WorldWideScience

Sample records for breathing improving health

  1. Sudarshan kriya yoga: Breathing for health

    OpenAIRE

    Sameer A Zope; Zope, Rakesh A

    2013-01-01

    Breathing techniques are regularly recommended for relaxation, stress management, control of psychophysiological states, and to improve organ function. Yogic breathing, defined as a manipulation of breath movement, has been shown to positively affect immune function, autonomic nervous system imbalances, and psychological or stress-related disorders. The aim of this study was to assess and provide a comprehensive review of the physiological mechanisms, the mind–body connection, and the benefit...

  2. Sudarshan kriya yoga: Breathing for health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer A Zope

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Breathing techniques are regularly recommended for relaxation, stress management, control of psychophysiological states, and to improve organ function. Yogic breathing, defined as a manipulation of breath movement, has been shown to positively affect immune function, autonomic nervous system imbalances, and psychological or stress-related disorders. The aim of this study was to assess and provide a comprehensive review of the physiological mechanisms, the mind-body connection, and the benefits of Sudarshan Kriya Yoga (SKY in a wide range of clinical conditions. Various online databases searched were Medline, Psychinfo, EMBASE, and Google Scholar. All the results were carefully screened and articles on SKY were selected. The references from these articles were checked to find any other potentially relevant articles. SKY, a unique yogic breathing practice, involves several types of cyclical breathing patterns, ranging from slow and calming to rapid and stimulating. There is mounting evidence to suggest that SKY can be a beneficial, low-risk, low-cost adjunct to the treatment of stress, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, stress-related medical illnesses, substance abuse, and rehabilitation of criminal offenders.

  3. Sudarshan kriya yoga: Breathing for health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zope, Sameer A; Zope, Rakesh A

    2013-01-01

    Breathing techniques are regularly recommended for relaxation, stress management, control of psychophysiological states, and to improve organ function. Yogic breathing, defined as a manipulation of breath movement, has been shown to positively affect immune function, autonomic nervous system imbalances, and psychological or stress-related disorders. The aim of this study was to assess and provide a comprehensive review of the physiological mechanisms, the mind-body connection, and the benefits of Sudarshan Kriya Yoga (SKY) in a wide range of clinical conditions. Various online databases searched were Medline, Psychinfo, EMBASE, and Google Scholar. All the results were carefully screened and articles on SKY were selected. The references from these articles were checked to find any other potentially relevant articles. SKY, a unique yogic breathing practice, involves several types of cyclical breathing patterns, ranging from slow and calming to rapid and stimulating. There is mounting evidence to suggest that SKY can be a beneficial, low-risk, low-cost adjunct to the treatment of stress, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, stress-related medical illnesses, substance abuse, and rehabilitation of criminal offenders. PMID:23440614

  4. Breath by breath analysis of breathing pattern in health and disease: a potential outcome measure for breathing retraining?

    OpenAIRE

    Lo, Wai

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of breathing pattern can quantify parameters of breathing such as rate, volume, timing and regularity/rhythmicity. This information can be useful to compare breathing patterns in those healthy and with disease, under different experiment conditions (such as rest versus activity) and to monitor changes over time. In this research, respiratory inductive plethysmography (RIP) was used to record breathing patterns in a group of healthy subjects and a group of severe asthma patients. ...

  5. Wearable sensors and feedback system to improve breathing technique

    OpenAIRE

    Coyle, Shirley; Mitchell, Edmond; Ward, Tomas; O'Connor, Noel E.; Diamond, Dermot

    2009-01-01

    Breathing is an important factor in our well-being as it oxygenates the body, revitalizes organs, cells and tissues. It is a unique physiological system in that it is both voluntary and involuntary. By breathing in a slow, deep and regular manner, the heartbeat become smooth and regular, blood pressure normalizes, stress hormones drop, and muscles relax. Breathing techniques are important for athletes to improve performance and reduce anxiety during competitions. Patients with respiratory ...

  6. Comprehensive yogic breathing program improves quality of life in patients with diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viveka P Jyotsna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the effect of a comprehensive yogic breathing program on glycemic control and quality of life (QOL in patients with diabetes. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective randomized controlled intervention trial. Patients having HbA1c between 6 and 9% for at least 3 months with lifestyle modification and oral antidiabetic medication were included. They were followed-up and randomized at 6 months into two groups: one group receiving standard treatment of diabetes and the other group receiving standard treatment of diabetes and taught and told to regularly practice the comprehensive yogic breathing program (Sudarshan Kriya Yoga and Pranayam. Change in fasting and post-prandial blood sugars, glycated hemoglobin and QOL as assessed by the World Health Organization QOL WHOQOL BREF questionnaire were assessed. Results: There was a trend toward improvement in glycemic control in the group practicing the comprehensive yogic breathing program compared with the group following standard treatment alone, although this was not significant. There was significant improvement in physical, psychological and social domains and total QOL post-intervention in the group practicing the comprehensive yogic breathing program as compared with the group following standard treatment alone. Conclusion: There was significant improvement in the QOL and a non-significant trend toward improvement in glycemic control in the group practicing the comprehensive yogic breathing program compared with the group that was following standard treatment alone.

  7. Take a Breath (A Cup of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-03-26

    Breathing is a natural bodily function that most take for granted. But for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD, inhaling and exhaling is a daily struggle. In this podcast, Dr. Anne Wheaton discusses health problems associated with COPD.  Created: 3/26/2015 by MMWR.   Date Released: 3/26/2015.

  8. Prediction values regarding Bio-Regenerative Environmental Treatment for Health (BREATHe)from Sybil's forwarded email

    OpenAIRE

    ALS-NSCORT,

    2003-01-01

    3 worksheets Provider Notes:Kim, I have attached an excel file that has predictions (very rough) regarding Bio-Regenerative Environmental Treatment for Health (BREATHe)effluent quality. There are 3 sheets included in the file, Bio-Regenerative Environmental Treatment for Health (BREATHe)I (B1) liquid composition, Bio-Regenerative Environmental Treatment for Health (BREATHe)1 gas composition, and BreatheII (B2) liquid composition.

  9. Improved breath alcohol analysis with use of carbon dioxide as the tracer gas

    OpenAIRE

    Kaisdotter Andersson, Annika

    2010-01-01

    State-of-the-art breath analysers require a prolonged expiration into a mouthpiece to obtain the accuracy required for evidential testing and screening of the alcohol concentration. This requirement is unsuitable for breath analysers used as alcolock owing to their frequent use and the fact that the majority of users are sober drivers; as well as for breath testing in uncooperative persons. This thesis presents a method by which breath alcohol analysis can be improved, using carbon dioxide (C...

  10. Health, social and economical consequences of sleep-disordered breathing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, Poul; Kjellberg, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    The objective direct and indirect costs of sleep-disordered breathing (snoring, sleep apnoea (SA) and obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS)) and the treatment are incompletely described.......The objective direct and indirect costs of sleep-disordered breathing (snoring, sleep apnoea (SA) and obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS)) and the treatment are incompletely described....

  11. Mouth breathing: adverse effects on facial growth, health, academics, and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferson, Yosh

    2010-01-01

    The vast majority of health care professionals are unaware of the negative impact of upper airway obstruction (mouth breathing) on normal facial growth and physiologic health. Children whose mouth breathing is untreated may develop long, narrow faces, narrow mouths, high palatal vaults, dental malocclusion, gummy smiles, and many other unattractive facial features, such as skeletal Class II or Class III facial profiles. These children do not sleep well at night due to obstructed airways; this lack of sleep can adversely affect their growth and academic performance. Many of these children are misdiagnosed with attention deficit disorder (ADD) and hyperactivity. It is important for the entire health care community (including general and pediatric dentists) to screen and diagnose for mouth breathing in adults and in children as young as 5 years of age. If mouth breathing is treated early, its negative effect on facial and dental development and the medical and social problems associated with it can be reduced or averted.

  12. Cardiac autonomic function in patients with diabetes improves with practice of comprehensive yogic breathing program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viveka P Jyotsna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to observe the effect comprehensive yogic breathing (Sudarshan Kriya Yoga [SKY] and Pranayam had on cardiac autonomic functions in patients with diabetes. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective randomized controlled intervention trial. Cardiac autonomic functions were assessed in 64 diabetics. Patients were randomized into two groups, one group receiving standard therapy for diabetes and the other group receiving standard therapy for diabetes and comprehensive yogic breathing program. Standard therapy included dietary advice, brisk walking for 45 min daily, and administration of oral antidiabetic drugs. Comprehensive yogic breathing program was introduced to the participants through a course of 12 h spread over 3 days. It was an interactive session in which SKY, a rhythmic cyclical breathing, preceded by Pranayam is taught under the guidance of a certified teacher. Cardiac autonomic function tests were done before and after 6 months of intervention. Results: In the intervention group, after practicing the breathing techniques for 6 months, the improvement in sympathetic functions was statistically significant (P 0.04. The change in sympathetic functions in the standard therapy group was not significant (P 0.75.Parasympathetic functions did not show any significant change in either group. When both parasympathetic and sympathetic cardiac autonomic functions were considered, there was a trend toward improvement in patients following comprehensive yogic breathing program (P 0.06. In the standard therapy group, no change in cardiac autonomic functions was noted (P 0.99. Conclusion: Cardiac autonomic functions improved in patients with diabetes on standard treatment who followed the comprehensive yogic breathing program compared to patients who were on standard therapy alone.

  13. Improvement of myocardial perfusion status in response to indian vedic breathing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Yoga is the buzz word all over the world today. Amidst their busy schedule, people tend to ignore their personal health. Management of various disorders, especially those involving interventions, surgical or radiological, is very expensive. The Indian Vedic Exercises, of which Pranaayaama is one, emphasize on prevention of the diseases in order to keep the individual in good health. It is equally applicable to those who have already suffered from various disorders and in whom both improvement and/or avoidance of further deterioration are required. However, no Objective assessment of the disease status in response to these exercises has been reported so far. Objectives: This pilot study has been undertaken on patients with reversible myocardial perfusion defects to Objectively monitor the improvements in the myocardial perfusion in response to a breathing exercise, Pranayama, a breathing technique prescribed in the Indian Vedic Sciences. Methods: Two patients who were found to have reversible myocardial perfusion defects were taken up in this study. These defects were diagnosed from the myocardial perfusion SPECT done in stressed (on Tread Mill) and resting states with 99m Technetium labeled MIBI.These patients were taught the pranayama technique which is done for about 30 minutes every day. At the end of four months from the commencement of this technique, the myocardial perfusion SPECT studies were repeated. Details of the exercise in the form of a CD are available on request. Results: Overall good improvements were observed in all the quantitative parameters in the TMT and SPECT studies in the studies done after the pranayama procedures in both the patients. Perfusion defects seen in the stress images of the initial studies have almost completely reversed in the stress images of the later study. Patients are asymptomatic and are leading a comfortable life. Conclusion: This is only a study of two cases to Objectively evaluate the effects of pranayama

  14. Synchronized moving aperture radiation therapy (SMART): improvement of breathing pattern reproducibility using respiratory coaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) we proposed a new treatment technique called synchronized moving aperture radiation therapy (SMART) to account for tumour motion during radiotherapy. The basic idea of SMART is to synchronize the moving radiation beam aperture formed by a dynamic multileaf collimator with the tumour motion induced by respiration. The two key requirements for being able to successfully use SMART in clinical practice are the precise and fast detection of tumour position during the simulation/treatment and the good reproducibility of the tumour motion pattern. To fulfil the first requirement, an integrated radiotherapy imaging system is currently being developed at MGH. The results of a previous study show that breath coaching techniques are required to make SMART an efficient technique in general. In this study, we investigate volunteer and patient respiratory coaching using a commercial respiratory gating system as a respiration coaching tool. Five healthy volunteers, observed during six sessions, and 33 lung cancer patients, observed during one session when undergoing 4D CT scans, were investigated with audio and visual promptings, with free breathing as a control. For all five volunteers, breath coaching was well tolerated and the intra- and inter-session reproducibility of the breathing pattern was greatly improved. Out of 33 patients, six exhibited a regular breathing pattern and needed no coaching, four could not be coached at all due to the patient's medical condition or had difficulty following the instructions, 13 could only be coached with audio instructions and 10 could follow the instructions of and benefit from audio-video coaching. We found that, for all volunteers and for those patients who could be properly coached, breath coaching improves the duty cycle of SMART treatment. However, about half of the patients could not follow both audio and video instructions simultaneously, suggesting that the current coaching

  15. Characteristics of breathing apparatus used in health physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present state of knowledge makes it possible to envisage the calculation of doses absorbed by various parts of the respiration apparatus following inhalation of radio-active dusts contained in aerosols. After recalling some anatomical and histological considerations, the author presents various curves showing the deposition of dusts in the three parts of the breathing apparatus: - the rhino-pharynx - the trachea and wind-pipe - the pulmonary parenchyma. The dusts can be classified in three groups of biological solubility according to which the rates of elimination of the particles from the organs are different. A synthesis of these data is given in elimination diagrams. In order to calculate the doses it is necessary furthermore to know certain anatomical and physiological characteristics of a standard man. (author)

  16. The use of counting beads to improve the classification of fast breathing in low-resource settings: a multi-country review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noordam, Aaltje Camielle; Barberá Laínez, Yolanda; Sadruddin, Salim; van Heck, Pabla Maria; Chono, Alex Opio; Acaye, Geoffrey Larry; Lara, Victor; Nanyonjo, Agnes; Ocan, Charles; Källander, Karin

    2015-07-01

    To decrease child mortality due to common but life-threatening illnesses, community health workers (CHWs) are trained to assess, classify and treat sick children. For pneumonia, CHWs are trained to count the respiratory rate of a child with cough and/or difficulty breathing, and determine whether the child has fast breathing or not based on how the child's breath count relates to age-specific respiratory rate cut-off points. International organizations training CHWs to classify fast breathing realized that many of them faced challenges counting and determining how the respiratory rate relates to age-specific cut-off points. Counting beads were designed to overcome these challenges. This article presents findings from different studies on the utility of these beads, in conjunction with a timer, as a tool to improve classification of fast breathing. Studies conducted by the International Rescue Committee and Save the Children among illiterate CHWs assessed the effectiveness of counting beads to improve both counting and classifying respiratory rate against age-specific cut-off points. These studies found that the use of counting beads enabled and improved the assessment and classification of fast breathing. However, a Malaria Consortium study found that the use of counting beads decreased the accuracy of counting breaths among literate CHWs. Qualitative findings from these studies and two additional studies by UNICEF suggest that the design of the beads is crucial: beads should move comfortably, and a separate bead string, with colour coding, is required for the age groups with different cut-off thresholds-eliminating more complicated calculations. Further research, using standardized protocols and gold standard comparisons, is needed to understand the accuracy of beads in comparison to other tools used for classifying pneumonia, which CHWs benefit most from each different tool (i.e. disaggregating data by levels of literacy and numeracy) and what the impact is on

  17. Free-breathing motion-corrected late-gadolinium-enhancement imaging improves image quality in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olivieri, Laura; O' Brien, Kendall J. [Children' s National Health System, Division of Cardiology, Washington, DC (United States); National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Cross, Russell [Children' s National Health System, Division of Cardiology, Washington, DC (United States); Xue, Hui; Kellman, Peter; Hansen, Michael S. [National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2016-06-15

    -enhancement imaging with motion-corrected averaging is feasible in children, robust at high heart rates and with variable R-R intervals, and can be performed without breath-holding with higher image quality ratings than standard breath-held techniques. Use of free-breathing single-shot motion-corrected technique does not compromise LGE image quality in children who can hold their breath, and it can significantly improve image quality in children who cannot hold their breath or who have significant arrhythmia. (orig.)

  18. Breathing difficulty

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... getting enough air Considerations There is no standard definition for difficulty breathing. Some people feel breathless with ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  19. Efficacy of paced breathing for insomnia: enhances vagal activity and improves sleep quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, H J; Kuo, Terry B J; Lee, Guo-She; Yang, Cheryl C H

    2015-03-01

    Fourteen self-reported insomniacs (SRI) and 14 good sleepers (GS) had their cardiac neuronal activity assessed by heart rate variability (HRV) under controlled respiration at a slow frequency rate of 0.1 Hz, and a forced rate of 0.2 Hz during daytime rest. Nighttime sleep was measured by polysomnography. The SRI showed depressed high frequency power of HRV compared to the GS. An increased total power of HRV was observed among the SRI during slow, paced breathing compared with spontaneous breathing and 0.2 Hz. Sleep onset latency, number of awakenings, and awakening time during sleep were decreased and sleep efficiency was increased if SRI practiced slow, paced breathing exercises for 20 min before going to sleep. Our results indicate that there is autonomic dysfunction among insomniacs, especially in relation to vagal activity; however, this decreased vagal activity can be facilitated by practicing slow, paced breathing, thereby improving sleep quality. PMID:25234581

  20. Breath tests sustainability in hospital settings: cost analysis and reimbursement in the Italian National Health System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, M; Scaldaferri, F; Ojetti, V; Poscia, A

    2013-01-01

    The high demand of Breath Tests (BT) in many gastroenterological conditions in time of limited resources for health care systems, generates increased interest in cost analysis from the point of view of the delivery of services to better understand how use the money to generate value. This study aims to measure the cost of C13 Urea and other most utilized breath tests in order to describe key aspects of costs and reimbursements looking at the economic sustainability for the hospital. A hospital based cost-analysis of the main breath tests commonly delivery in an ambulatory setting is performed. Mean salary for professional nurses and gastroenterologists, drugs/preparation used and disposable materials, purchase and depreciation of the instrument and the testing time was used to estimate the cost, while reimbursements are based on the 2013 Italian National Health System ambulatory pricelist. Variables that could influence the model are considered in the sensitivity analyses. The mean cost for C13--Urea, Lactulose and Lactose BT are, respectively, Euros 30,59; 45,20 and 30,29. National reimbursement often doesn't cover the cost of the analysis, especially considering the scenario with lower number of exam. On the contrary, in high performance scenario all the reimbursement could cover the cost, except for the C13 Urea BT that is high influenced by the drugs cost. However, consideration about the difference between Italian Regional Health System ambulatory pricelist are done. Our analysis shows that while national reimbursement rates cover the costs of H2 breath testing, they do not cover sufficiently C13 BT, particularly urea breath test. The real economic strength of these non invasive tests should be considered in the overall organization of inpatient and outpatient clinic, accounting for complete diagnostic pathway for each gastrointestinal disease. PMID:24443075

  1. Breathing exercises improve post-operative pulmonary function and quality of life in patients with lung cancer: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Pan, Ying-Li; Gao, Cai-Xiang; Shang, Zuo; Ning, Li-Juan; Liu, Xing

    2013-04-01

    Previous research has shown that breathing exercises may improve the prognosis and health status in patients with lung cancer by enhancing pulmonary function and quality of life (QOL). However, individually published results are inconclusive. The aim of the present meta-analysis was to evaluate the clinical value of breathing exercises on post-operative pulmonary function and QOL in patients with lung cancer. A literature search of Pubmed, Embase, the Web of Science and CBM databases was conducted from their inception through to October 2012. Crude standardized mean differences (SMDs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to assess the effect of breathing exercises. A total of eight clinical studies were ultimately included with 398 lung cancer patients. When all the eligible studies were pooled into the meta-analysis, there was a significant difference between the pre-intervention and post-intervention results of breathing exercises on post-operative pulmonary function; forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1): SMD, 3.37; 95% CI, 1.97-4.77; Pintervention with breathing exercises; there were significant differences between the pre-intervention and post-intervention results on the ability of self-care in daily life (SMD, -1.00; 95% CI, -1.467 to -0.52; P<0.001), social activities (SMD, -0.94; 95% CI, -1.73 to -0.15; P=0.02), symptoms of depression (SMD, -0.91; 95% CI, -1.25 to -0.57; P<0.001) and symptoms of anxiety (SMD, -0.91; 95% CI, -1.20 to -0.63; P<0.001). Results from the present meta-analysis suggest that breathing exercises may significantly improve post-operative pulmonary function and QOL in patients with lung cancer.

  2. The doctor, the breath and Thomas Bernhard: using novels in health psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaptein, Ad A; Lyons, Antonia C

    2009-03-01

    The use of literature in medical education has increased greatly in recent years, as attested to by growth in the medical humanities field. In this article we argue that literary texts may be beneficial for use in health psychology, illustrated by an analysis of patient-physician interaction in the novel Breath by Thomas Bernhard. Reading novels can impact on people's health-related behaviours. Using novels in our teaching and training can illustrate that there are alternative, useful ways of gaining health-related knowledge beyond objective, scientific rationality. Novels are able to show health, illness, disability and suffering in their full human, social and spiritual contexts, and therefore should be considered seriously in our health psychology endeavours. PMID:19237483

  3. Prospective randomized controlled intervention trial: Comprehensive Yogic Breathing Improves Cardiac autonomic functions and Quality of life in Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V P Jyotsna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: To assess the effect of Comprehensive Yogic Breathing Program on glycemic control, quality of life, and cardiac autonomic functions in diabetes. Material and Methods: This is a prospective randomized controlled intervention trial. Cardiac autonomic functions were assessed in 120 diabetics. Patients were randomized into two groups, one group receiving standard therapy for diabetes (n = 56 and the other group receiving standard therapy for diabetes and comprehensive yogic breathing program (n = 64. Standard therapy included advice on diet, walk, and oral antidiabetic drugs. Comprehensive yogic breathing program was an interactive session in which Sudarshan kriya yoga, a rhythmic cyclical breathing, preceded by Pranayam was taught under guidance of a certified teacher. Change in fasting, post prandial blood sugars, glycated hemoglobin, and quality of life were assessed. Cardiac autonomic function tests were done before and six months after intervention. Results: There was significant improvement in psychological (P = 0.006 and social domains (P = 0.04 and total quality of life (P = 0.02 in the group practicing comprehensive yogic breathing program as compared to the group following standard therapy alone. In the group following breathing program, the improvement in sympathetic cardiac autonomic functions was statistically significant (P = 0.01, while the change in the standard group was not significant (P = 0.17. When both parasympathetic and sympathetic cardiac autonomic functions were considered, there was a trend toward improvement in patients following comprehensive yogic breathing program (P = 0.07. In the standard therapy group, no change in cardiac autonomic functions was noted (P = 0.76. The parameters of glycemic control were comparable in both groups. Conclusion: There was significant improvement in quality of life and cardiac autonomic functions in the diabetes patients practicing comprehensive yogic breathing

  4. Chemical Analysis of Whale Breath Volatiles: A Case Study for Non-Invasive Field Health Diagnostics of Marine Mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Cumeras

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We explored the feasibility of collecting exhaled breath from a moribund gray whale (Eschrichtius robustus for potential non-invasive health monitoring of marine mammals. Biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC profiling is a relatively new field of research, in which the chemical composition of breath is used to non-invasively assess the health and physiological processes on-going within an animal or human. In this study, two telescopic sampling poles were designed and tested with the primary aim of collecting whale breath exhalations (WBEs. Once the WBEs were successfully collected, they were immediately transferred onto a stable matrix sorbent through a custom manifold system. A total of two large volume WBEs were successfully captured and pre-concentrated onto two Tenax®-TA traps (one exhalation per trap. The samples were then returned to the laboratory where they were analyzed using solid phase micro extraction (SPME and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS. A total of 70 chemicals were identified (58 positively identified in the whale breath samples. These chemicals were also matched against a database of VOCs found in humans, and 44% of chemicals found in the whale breath are also released by healthy humans. The exhaled gray whale breath showed a rich diversity of chemicals, indicating the analysis of whale breath exhalations is a promising new field of research.

  5. What Causes Bad Breath?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... I Help a Friend Who Cuts? What Causes Bad Breath? KidsHealth > For Teens > What Causes Bad Breath? Print A A A Text Size en español ¿Qué es lo que provoca el mal aliento? Bad breath, or halitosis , can be a major problem, especially ...

  6. Effect of slow rhythmic voluntary breathing pattern on isometric handgrip among health care students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajajeyakumar M, Janitha A, Madanmohan, Balachander J

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hand grip strength is a widely used test in experimental and epidemiologicalstudies. The measure of hand grip strength is influenced by several factors, including age; gender; different angle of the shoulder, elbow, forearm, and wrist; and posture.So we planned to study theeffect of slow voluntary breathing exercise (Savitri Pranayam onthe various strengths of isometric hand grip (IHG amongyoung health care students.Methods: The present study was conducted on 60 volunteers 17-20 yrs.The subjects were randomly assigned to Pranayam and control groups. They were divided into two groups: control (n=30, Savitri (n=30 Savitri group were practiced slow yogic breathing for three months, Paired’ test was done to compare the values within group and unpaired’ test was done to compare the values between male and female subjects.Results: In Savitri Pranayam group, the blood pressure responses to IHG were higher in males, as compared to females.The rate pressure product (RPP also decreased during IHG 60%. A decrease in SBP and DBP was observed at the end of the study period. Briefly, a gender difference in various parameters such as MAP, QTc existed in the control group at the beginning of the study and the differences persisted at the end of three months.Conclusion: Our study reported that slow Pranayam are known to enhance parasympathetic tone, produce a highly significant decrease in oxygen consumption and psychosomatic relaxation.

  7. Breathing difficulties - first aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... health conditions that may cause breathing problems are: Anemia (low red blood cell count) Asthma Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), sometimes called emphysema or chronic bronchitis Heart ...

  8. Spontaneous breathing during high-frequency oscillatory ventilation improves regional lung characteristics in experimental lung injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Heerde, M.; Roubik, K.; Kopelent, V.; Kneyber, M. C. J.; Markhorst, D. G.

    2010-01-01

    Background Maintenance of spontaneous breathing is advocated in mechanical ventilation. This study evaluates the effect of spontaneous breathing on regional lung characteristics during high-frequency oscillatory (HFO) ventilation in an animal model of mild lung injury. Methods Lung injury was induce

  9. Propofol Breath Monitoring as a Potential Tool to Improve the Prediction of Intraoperative Plasma Concentrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colin, Pieter; Eleveld, Douglas J; van den Berg, Johannes P; Vereecke, Hugo E M; Struys, Michel M R F; Schelling, Gustav; Apfel, Christian C; Hornuss, Cyrill

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Monitoring of drug concentrations in breathing gas is routinely being used to individualize drug dosing for the inhalation anesthetics. For intravenous anesthetics however, no decisive evidence in favor of breath concentration monitoring has been presented up until now. At the same tim

  10. Sleep board review questions: sleep disordered breathing that improves in REM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budhiraja R

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at end of question. Which of the following breathing disorders is usually less severe in rapid eye movement (REM sleep compared to non-rapid eye movement (NREM sleep?1.Sleep-related hypoxemia in COPD2.Obstructive Sleep Apnea3.Cheyne Stokes Breathing4.Hypoxemia in Pulmonary Hypertension

  11. Periodontitis and Sleep Disordered Breathing in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Anne E.; Essick, Greg K.; Beck, James D.; Cai, Jianwen; Beaver, Shirley; Finlayson, Tracy L.; Zee, Phyllis C.; Loredo, Jose S.; Ramos, Alberto R.; Singer, Richard H.; Jimenez, Monik C.; Barnhart, Janice M.; Redline, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: To investigate the association between sleep disordered breathing (SDB) and severe chronic periodontitis. Design: Cross-sectional data analysis from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos. Setting: Community-based setting with probability sampling from four urban US communities. Participants: 12,469 adults aged 18–74 y. Interventions: None. Measurements and Results: Severe chronic periodontitis was defined using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/American Academy of Periodontology case classification based on full-mouth periodontal assessments performed by calibrated dentists. SDB was evaluated in standardized home sleep tests, and defined as the number of apnea plus hypopnea events associated with ≥ 3% desaturation, per hour of estimated sleep. SDB was quantified using categories of the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI): 0.0 events (nonapneic); 0.1–4.9 (subclinical); 5.0–14.9 (mild); and ≥ 15 (moderate/severe). Covariates were demographic characteristics and established periodontitis risk factors. C-reactive protein was a potential explanatory variable. Using survey estimation, multivariable binary logistic regression estimated odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence limits (CL). Following adjustment for confounding, the SDB and periodontitis relationship remained statistically significant, but was attenuated in strength and no longer dose-response. Compared with the nonapneic referent, adjusted odds of severe periodontitis were 40% higher with subclinical SDB (OR = 1.4, 95% CL: 1.0, 1.9), 60% higher with mild SDB (OR = 1.6, 95% CL: 1.1, 2.2) and 50% higher with moderate/severe SDB (OR = 1.5, 95% CL: 1.0, 2.3) demonstrating an independent association between SDB and severe periodontitis. Conclusions: This study identifies a novel association between mild sleep disordered breathing and periodontitis that was most pronounced in young adults. Citation: Sanders AE, Essick GK, Beck JD, Cai J, Beaver S, Finlayson TL, Zee PC

  12. Multiple breath washout analysis in infants: quality assessment and recommendations for improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anagnostopoulou, Pinelopi; Egger, Barbara; Lurà, Marco; Usemann, Jakob; Schmidt, Anne; Gorlanova, Olga; Korten, Insa; Roos, Markus; Frey, Urs; Latzin, Philipp

    2016-03-01

    Infant multiple breath washout (MBW) testing serves as a primary outcome in clinical studies. However, it is still unknown whether current software algorithms allow between-centre comparisons. In this study of healthy infants, we quantified MBW measurement errors and tried to improve data quality by simply changing software settings. We analyzed best quality MBW measurements performed with an ultrasonic flowmeter in 24 infants from two centres in Switzerland with the current software settings. To challenge the robustness of these settings, we also used alternative analysis approaches. Using the current analysis software, the coefficient of variation (CV) for functional residual capacity (FRC) differed significantly between centres (mean  ±  SD (%): 9.8  ±  5.6 and 5.8  ±  2.9, respectively, p  =  0.039). In addition, FRC values calculated during the washout differed between  -25 and  +30% from those of the washin of the same tracing. Results were mainly influenced by analysis settings and temperature recordings. Changing few algorithms resulted in significantly more robust analysis. Non-systematic inter-centre differences can be reduced by using correctly recorded environmental data and simple changes in the software algorithms. We provide implications that greatly improve infant MBW outcomes' quality and can be applied when multicentre trials are conducted. PMID:26849570

  13. Improved pulmonary function in working divers breathing nitrox at shallow depths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Daniel T.; Conkin, Johnny

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: There is limited data about the long-term pulmonary effects of nitrox use in divers at shallow depths. This study examined changes in pulmonary function in a cohort of working divers breathing a 46% oxygen enriched mixture while diving at depths less than 12 m. METHODS: A total of 43 working divers from the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL), NASA-Johnson Space Center completed a questionnaire providing information on diving history prior to NBL employment, diving history outside the NBL since employment, and smoking history. Cumulative dive hours were obtained from the NBL dive-time database. Medical records were reviewed to obtain the diver's height, weight, and pulmonary function measurements from initial pre-dive, first year and third year annual medical examinations. RESULTS: The initial forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) were greater than predicted, 104% and 102%, respectively. After 3 yr of diving at the NBL, both the FVC and FEV1 showed a significant (p FEV1 at 1 and 3 yr. CONCLUSIONS: NBL divers initially belong to a select group with larger than predicted lung volumes. Regular diving with nitrox at shallow depths over a 3-yr period did not impair pulmonary function. Improvements in FVC and FEV1 were primarily due to a training effect.

  14. Improved pulmonary function in working divers breathing nitrox at shallow depths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Daniel T.; Conkin, Johnny

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: There is limited data about the long-term pulmonary effects of nitrox use in divers at shallow depths. This study examined changes in pulmonary function in a cohort of working divers breathing a 46% oxygen enriched mixture while diving at depths less than 12 m. METHODS: A total of 43 working divers from the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL), NASA-Johnson Space Center completed a questionnaire providing information on diving history prior to NBL employment, diving history outside the NBL since employment, and smoking history. Cumulative dive hours were obtained from the NBL dive-time database. Medical records were reviewed to obtain the diver's height, weight, and pulmonary function measurements from initial pre-dive, first year and third year annual medical examinations. RESULTS: The initial forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) were greater than predicted, 104% and 102%, respectively. After 3 yr of diving at the NBL, both the FVC and FEV1 showed a significant (p volumes. Regular diving with nitrox at shallow depths over a 3-yr period did not impair pulmonary function. Improvements in FVC and FEV1 were primarily due to a training effect.

  15. Breath odor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bad breath; Halitosis ... Some disorders will produce distinct breath odors. Bad breath related to poor oral hygiene is most common and caused by release of sulphur compounds by bacteria in the mouth. A fruity odor ...

  16. Effectiveness of a new toothbrush design versus a conventional tongue scraper in improving breath odor and reducing tongue microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Assirati Casemiro

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available For centuries, specific instruments or regular toothbrushes have routinely been used to remove tongue biofilm and improve breath odor. Toothbrushes with a tongue scraper on the back of their head have recently been introduced to the market. The present study compared the effectiveness of a manual toothbrush with this new design, i.e., possessing a tongue scraper, and a commercial tongue scraper in improving breath odor and reducing the aerobic and anaerobic microbiota of tongue surface. The evaluations occurred at 4 moments, when the participants (n=30 had their halitosis quantified with a halimeter and scored according to a 4-point scoring system corresponding to different levels of intensity. Saliva was collected for counts of aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms. Data were analyzed statistically by Friedman's test (p<0.05. When differences were detected, the Wilcoxon test adjusted for Bonferroni correction was used for multiple comparisons (group to group. The results confirmed the importance of mechanical cleaning of the tongue, since this procedure provided an improvement in halitosis and reduction of aerobe and anaerobe counts. Regarding the evaluated methods, the toothbrush's tongue scraper and conventional tongue scraper had a similar performance in terms of breath improvement and reduction of tongue microbiota, and may be indicated as effective methods for tongue cleaning.

  17. Breathing Difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Discuss with your respiratory therapist the benefits of breathing techniques to increase ventilation and decrease your work of breathing Discuss with your physician appropriate use of respiratory ...

  18. Noninvasive Mechanical Ventilation Improves Breathing-Swallowing Interaction of Ventilator Dependent Neuromuscular Patients: A Prospective Crossover Study

    OpenAIRE

    Marine Garguilo; Michèle Lejaille; Isabelle Vaugier; David Orlikowski; Nicolas Terzi; Frédéric Lofaso; Hélène Prigent

    2016-01-01

    Background Respiratory involvement in neuromuscular disorders may contribute to impaired breathing-swallowing interactions, swallowing disorders and malnutrition. We investigated whether the use of non-invasive ventilation (NIV) controlled by the patient could improve swallowing performances in a population of neuromuscular patients requiring daytime NIV. Methods Ten neuromuscular patients with severe respiratory failure requiring extensive NIV use were studied while swallowing without and wi...

  19. THE EFFECTS OF BREATHING EXERCISES TO INCREASE IMMUNITY IN ELDERLY HEALTH

    OpenAIRE

    Siswantoyo Siswantoyo

    2012-01-01

    Background: this study aimed to demonstrate influence of breathing exercise to increase immunity in elderly. It was an experimental study with Randomized Group Pre-Posttest design. The intervension was given in 21 meetings. Methods: The populations were elder participants of Satria Nusantara breathing exercise. Samples were 15 men aged over 45 years. each group. The unit of analysis was blood taken from cubital vein. Glucometer was to determine blood sugar levels. whereas beta-endorphin and l...

  20. Exhaled Breath Analysis for the Monitoring of Elderly COPD Patients Health-state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennazza, Giorgio; Scarlata, Simone; Santonico, Marco; Chiurco, Domenica; D'Amico, Arnaldo; Incalzi, Raffaele Antonelli

    2011-09-01

    This pilot study assesses how effectively a gas sensors array can follow the evolution of elderly patients with COPD, the most common chronic respiratory disease. In particular, reproducibility of breath analysis (calculated for each subject along three weekly measurements) resulted comparable to spirometry, except for a larger spread for breath analysis, whose patterns was significantly correlated with other heath status parameters (such as eosinophiles and Barthel index).

  1. Improved ROS defense in the swimbladder of a facultative air-breathing erythrinid fish, jeju, compared to a non-air-breathing close relative, traira.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelster, Bernd; Giacomin, Marina; Wood, Chris M; Val, Adalberto L

    2016-07-01

    The jeju Hoplerythrinus unitaeniatus and the traira Hoplias malabaricus are two closely related erythrinid fish, both possessing a two-chambered physostomous swimbladder. In the jeju the anterior section of the posterior bladder is highly vascularized and the swimbladder is used for aerial respiration; the traira, in turn, is a water-breather that uses the swimbladder as a buoyancy organ and not for aerial oxygen uptake. Observation of the breathing behavior under different levels of water oxygenation revealed that the traira started aquatic surface respiration only under severe hypoxic conditions and did not breathe air. In the jeju air-breathing behavior was observed under normoxic conditions, and the frequency of air-breathing was significantly increased under hypoxic conditions. Unexpectedly, even under hyperoxic conditions (30 mg O2 L(-1)) the jeju continued to take air breaths, and compared with normoxic conditions the frequency was not reduced. Because the frequently air-exposed swimbladder tissue faces higher oxygen partial pressures than normally experienced by other fish tissues, it was hypothesized that in the facultative air-breathing jeju, swimbladder tissue would have a higher antioxidative capacity than the swimbladder tissue of the water breathing traira. Measurement of total glutathione (GSSG/GSH) concentration in anterior and posterior swimbladder tissue revealed a higher concentration of this antioxidant in swimbladder tissue as compared to muscle tissue in the jeju. Furthermore, the GSSG/GSH concentration in jeju tissues was significantly higher than in traira tissues. Similarly, activities of enzymes involved in the breakdown of reactive oxygen species were significantly higher in the jeju swimbladder as compared to the traira swimbladder. The results show that the jeju, using the swimbladder as an additional breathing organ, has an enhanced antioxidative capacity in the swimbladder as compared to the traira, using the swimbladder only as a

  2. Strengthening public health research for improved health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Gea-Izquierdo

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Research in public health is a range that includes from fundamental research to research in clinical practice, including novel advances, evaluation of results and their spreading. Actually, public health research is considered multidisciplinary incorporating numerous factors in its development. Establishing as a mainstay the scientific method, deepens in basic research, clinical epidemiological research and health services. The premise of quality and relevance is reflected in international scientific research, and in the daily work and good biomedical practices that should be included in the research as a common task. Therefore, the research must take a proactive stance of inquiry, integrating a concern planned and ongoing development of knowledge. This requires improve international coordination, seeking a balance between basic and applied research as well as science and technology. Thus research cannot be considered without innovation, weighing up the people and society needs. Acting on knowledge of scientific production processes requires greater procedures thoroughness and the effective expression of the results. It is noted as essential to establish explicit principles in review and evaluation of the adjustments of actions, always within the standards of scientific conduct and fairness of the research process. In the biomedical scientific lines it have to be consider general assessments that occur related to the impact and quality of health research, mostly leading efforts to areas that require further attention. However, other subject areas that may be deficient or with lower incidence in the population should not be overlook. Health research as a source of new applications and development provides knowledge, improving well-being. However, it is understandable without considering the needs and social demands. Therefore, in public health research and to improve the health of the population, we must refine and optimize the prevention and

  3. SU-E-J-236: Audiovisual Biofeedback Improves Breath-Hold Lung Tumor Position Reproducibility Measured with 4D MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D; Pollock, S; Keall, P [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, NSW (Australia); Greer, P [School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, The University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology, Calvary Mater Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Lapuz, C; Ludbrook, J [Department of Radiation Oncology, Calvary Mater Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Kim, T [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, NSW (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Audiovisual biofeedback breath-hold (AVBH) was employed to reproduce tumor position on inhale and exhale breath-holds for 4D tumor information. We hypothesize that lung tumor position will be more consistent using AVBH compared with conventional breath-hold (CBH). Methods: Lung tumor positions were determined for seven lung cancer patients (age: 25 – 74) during to two separate 3T MRI sessions. A breathhold training session was performed prior to the MRI sessions to allow patients to become comfortable with AVBH and their exhale and inhale target positions. CBH and AVBH 4D image datasets were obtained in the first MRI session (pre-treatment) and the second MRI session (midtreatment) within six weeks of the first session. Audio-instruction (MRI: Siemens Skyra) in CBH and verbal-instruction (radiographer) in AVBH were used. A radiation oncologist contoured the lung tumor using Eclipse (Varian Medical Systems); tumor position was quantified as the centroid of the contoured tumor after rigid registration based on vertebral anatomy across two MRI sessions. CBH and AVBH were compared in terms of the reproducibility assessed via (1) the difference between the two exhale positions for the two sessions and the two inhale positions for the sessions. (2) The difference in amplitude (exhale to inhale) between the two sessions. Results: Compared to CBH, AVBH improved the reproducibility of two exhale (or inhale) lung tumor positions relative to each other by 33%, from 6.4±5.3 mm to 4.3±3.0 mm (p=0.005). Compared to CBH, AVBH improved the reproducibility of exhale and inhale amplitude by 66%, from 5.6±5.9 mm to 1.9±1.4 mm (p=0.005). Conclusions: This study demonstrated that audiovisual biofeedback can be utilized for improving the reproducibility of breath-hold lung tumor position. These results are advantageous towards achieving more accurate emerging radiation treatment planning methods, in addition to imaging and treatment modalities utilizing breath

  4. SU-E-J-236: Audiovisual Biofeedback Improves Breath-Hold Lung Tumor Position Reproducibility Measured with 4D MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Audiovisual biofeedback breath-hold (AVBH) was employed to reproduce tumor position on inhale and exhale breath-holds for 4D tumor information. We hypothesize that lung tumor position will be more consistent using AVBH compared with conventional breath-hold (CBH). Methods: Lung tumor positions were determined for seven lung cancer patients (age: 25 – 74) during to two separate 3T MRI sessions. A breathhold training session was performed prior to the MRI sessions to allow patients to become comfortable with AVBH and their exhale and inhale target positions. CBH and AVBH 4D image datasets were obtained in the first MRI session (pre-treatment) and the second MRI session (midtreatment) within six weeks of the first session. Audio-instruction (MRI: Siemens Skyra) in CBH and verbal-instruction (radiographer) in AVBH were used. A radiation oncologist contoured the lung tumor using Eclipse (Varian Medical Systems); tumor position was quantified as the centroid of the contoured tumor after rigid registration based on vertebral anatomy across two MRI sessions. CBH and AVBH were compared in terms of the reproducibility assessed via (1) the difference between the two exhale positions for the two sessions and the two inhale positions for the sessions. (2) The difference in amplitude (exhale to inhale) between the two sessions. Results: Compared to CBH, AVBH improved the reproducibility of two exhale (or inhale) lung tumor positions relative to each other by 33%, from 6.4±5.3 mm to 4.3±3.0 mm (p=0.005). Compared to CBH, AVBH improved the reproducibility of exhale and inhale amplitude by 66%, from 5.6±5.9 mm to 1.9±1.4 mm (p=0.005). Conclusions: This study demonstrated that audiovisual biofeedback can be utilized for improving the reproducibility of breath-hold lung tumor position. These results are advantageous towards achieving more accurate emerging radiation treatment planning methods, in addition to imaging and treatment modalities utilizing breath

  5. The Health Improvement Network (THIN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Health Improvement Network is a collaboration between Cegedim Strategic Data EPIC, an expert in the provision of UK primary care patient data that is used for medical research, and In Practice Systems (InPS), who continue to develop and supply the widely-used Vision general practice computer system.

  6. Cardiac autonomic function in patients with diabetes improves with practice of comprehensive yogic breathing program

    OpenAIRE

    Jyotsna, Viveka P.; Smita Ambekar; Rajiv Singla; Ansumali Joshi; Anju Dhawan; Neeta Kumar; Deepak, K. K.; Sreenivas, V.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to observe the effect comprehensive yogic breathing (Sudarshan Kriya Yoga [SKY] and Pranayam) had on cardiac autonomic functions in patients with diabetes. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective randomized controlled intervention trial. Cardiac autonomic functions were assessed in 64 diabetics. Patients were randomized into two groups, one group receiving standard therapy for diabetes and the other group receiving standard therapy for diabetes and c...

  7. Bad Breath

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that get stuck between your teeth. Lots of people have bad breath at some point. Don’t worry! There are steps you can take to keep your mouth fresh and healthy. Tips for preventing bad breath: Brush your teeth ( ...

  8. Breath odor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... distinct breath odors. Bad breath related to poor oral hygiene is most common and caused by release of ... supplements? Do you smoke? What home care and oral hygiene measures have you tried? How effective are they? ...

  9. A prediction model for COPD readmissions: catching up, catching our breath, and improving a national problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Fischman

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Frequent COPD exacerbations have a large impact on morbidity, mortality and health-care expenditures. By 2020, the World Health Organization expects COPD and COPD exacerbations to be the third leading cause of death world-wide. Furthermore, In 2005 it was estimated that COPD exacerbations cost the U.S. health-care system 38 billion dollars. Studies attempting to determine factors related to COPD readmissions are still very limited. Moreover, few have used a organized machine-learning, sensitivity analysis approach, such as a Random Forest (RF statistical model, to analyze this problem. This study utilized the RF machine learning algorithm to determine factors that predict risk for multiple COPD exacerbations in a single year.This was a retrospective study with a data set of 106 patients. These patients were divided randomly into training (80% and validating (20% data-sets, 100 times, using approximately sixty variables intially, which in prior studies had been found to be associated with patient readmission for COPD exacerbation. In an interactive manner, an RF model was created using the training set and validated on the testing dataset. Mean area-under-curve (AUC statistics, sensitivity, specificity, and negative/positive predictive values (NPV, PPV were calculated for the 100 runs. The following variables were found to be important predictors of patients having at least two COPD exacerbations within one year: employment, body mass index, number of previous surgeries, administration of azithromycin/ceftriaxone/moxifloxacin, and admission albumin level. The mean AUC was 0.72, sensitivity of 0.75, specificity of 0.56, PPV of 0.7 and NPV of 0.63. Histograms were used to confirm consistent accuracyThe RF design has consistently demonstrated encouraging results. We expect to validate our results on new patient groups and improve accuracy by increasing our training dataset. We hope that identifying patients at risk for frequent readmissions will

  10. Proceedings of the educational forum on the air children breathe : the effects on their health

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    This conference was organized by the Canadian Institute of Child Health and Pollution Probe to consider issues regarding indoor and outdoor air quality and how it affects the health of children. More than 120 experts and citizens attended. Existing policies, air quality standards and guidelines were reviewed, and the role of community groups in bringing about change were discussed. Discussion revolved around four main themes: (1) the status of children`s health, (2) children`s exposure and vulnerability, (3) determinants of outdoor air quality, and (4) determinants of indoor air quality. Specific topics addressed included asthma, molds, trace volatiles, pesticides, coal-fired power generating stations, swimming pools and arenas. Several recommendations were made as to how air quality can be improved. 19 figs., 8 appendices.

  11. Improved pre-concentration and detection methods for volatile sulphur breath constituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochalski, Paweł; Wzorek, Beata; Sliwka, Ireneusz; Amann, Anton

    2009-07-01

    Suitability of different types of pre-concentration (solid phase microextraction and sorbent trapping) and detection (flame photometric detector (FPD) and mass selective detector (MSD)) for gas chromatographic determination of sulphur-containing compounds (H2S, MeSH, EtSH, DMS, COS and CS2) in breath-gas was assessed in this study. Several factors like influence of humidity, influence of oxygen, or stability of target compounds in extraction vessels (SPME vials and sorbent tubes) were investigated. Despite poor stability of VSCs in SPME vials and matrix effects (unfavorable influence of humidity), SPME was found to be a fast and reliable enrichment method, which coupled with mass selective detector provided satisfactory LODs of target compounds at the ppt level (from 0.15 ppb for CS2 to 2.3 ppb for H2S). Application of sorbent trapping with two-bed sorbent tubes containing Tenax TA and Carboxen 1000 gave excellent LODs (0.03-0.3 ppb for 200 ml sample and MSD). Stability of investigated VSCs in sorbents was found to be very poor (30-40% losses after 2 h). FPD showed satisfactory sensitivity only when it was coupled with sorbent trapping. Breath samples were collected into Tedlar bags in a CO2-controlled manner. Humidity was removed during sampling (permeation dryer--Nafion) to avoid unfavorable water dependent effects during analysis.

  12. Can baroreflex measurements with spontaneous sequence analysis be improved by also measuring breathing and by standardization of filtering strategies?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) is known to be attenuated by inspiration and all the original BRS methodologies took this into account by measuring only in expiration. Spontaneous sequence analysis (SSA) is a non-invasive clinical tool widely used to estimate BRS in Man but does not take breathing into account. We have therefore modified it to test whether it too can detect inspiratory attenuation. Traditional SSA is also entangled with issues of distinguishing causal from random relationships between blood pressure and heart period and of the optimum choice of data filter settings. We have also tested whether the sequences our modified SSA rejects do behave as random relationships and show the limitations of the absence of filter standardization. SSA was performed on eupneic data from 1 h periods in 20 healthy subjects. Applying SSA traditionally produced a mean BRS of 23 ± 3 ms mmHg−1. After modification to measure breathing, SSA detected significant inspiratory attenuation (11 ± 1 ms mmHg−1), and the mean expiratory BRS was significantly higher (26 ± 5 ms mmHg−1). Traditional SSA therefore underestimates BRS by an amount (3 ms mmHg−1) as big as the major physiological and clinical factors known to alter BRS. We show that the sequences rejected by SSA do behave like random associations between pressure and period. We also show the minimal effect of the r2 filter and the biases that some pressure and heart period filters can introduce. We discuss whether SSA might be improved by standardization of filter settings and by also measuring breathing

  13. Improving Public Health in France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bourdelais, Patrice

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper is focused on the French improvement of life expectancy, especially during the 19th century. A precise analysis of an industrial town (Le Creusot gives some elements about the importance of the urban penalty in mortality and also on the factors able to compensate the new bad conditions linked to the sudden increase of the population in these cities. It also emphasise the importance of the municipal level in the public health field.For the Republican, after 1871, often non active catholic elite, the social justice in the attribution of relief was linked to transparency of procedures. That led to a reflection about the objectiveness of the criterion chosen to decide who will be relieved. The reason why the nuns were dismissed and left place to municipal employees and professionnalization. Introduced to compensate the uncertainty of workers revenues, the system was rapidly linked to health perspectives and medical cares, even to preventive medicine.

  14. Comparison of breath testing with fructose and high fructose corn syrups in health and IBS

    OpenAIRE

    Skoog, S. M.; Bharucha, A. E.; Zinsmeister, A R

    2008-01-01

    Although incomplete fructose absorption has been implicated to cause gastrointestinal symptoms, foods containing high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) contain glucose. Glucose increases fructose absorption in healthy subjects. Our hypothesis was that fructose intolerance is less prevalent after HFCS consumption compared to fructose alone in healthy subjects and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Breath hydrogen levels and gastrointestinal symptoms were assessed after 40 g of fructose (12% solution) pr...

  15. Improving musculoskeletal health: global issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mody, Girish M; Brooks, Peter M

    2012-04-01

    Musculoskeletal (MSK) disorders are among the leading reasons why patients consult a family or primary health practitioner, take time off work and become disabled. Many of the MSK disorders are more common in the elderly. Thus, as the proportion of the elderly increases all over the world, MSK disorders will make a greater contribution to the global burden of disease. Epidemiological studies have shown that the spectrum of MSK disorders in developing countries is similar to that seen in industrialised countries, but the burden of disease tends to be higher due to a delay in diagnosis or lack of access to adequate health-care facilities for effective treatment. Musculoskeletal pain is very common in the community while fibromyalgia is being recognised as part of a continuum of chronic widespread pain rather than a narrowly defined entity. This will allow research to improve our understanding of pain in a variety of diffuse pain syndromes. The availability of newer more effective therapies has resulted in efforts to initiate therapy at an earlier stage of diseases. The new criteria for rheumatoid arthritis, and the diagnosis of axial and peripheral involvement in spondyloarthritis, permit an earlier diagnosis without having to wait for radiological changes. One of the major health challenges is the global shortage of health workers, and based on current training of health workers and traditional models of care for service delivery, the global situation is unlikely to change in the near future. Thus, new models of care and strategies to train community health-care workers and primary health-care practitioners to detect and initiate the management of patients with MSK disorders at an earlier stage are required. There is also a need for prevention strategies with campaigns to educate and raise awareness among the entire population. Lifestyle interventions such as maintaining an ideal body weight to prevent obesity, regular exercises, avoidance of smoking and alcohol

  16. Long-Term Improvements in Sleep and Respiratory Parameters in Preschool Children Following Treatment of Sleep Disordered Breathing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Lisa M.; Biggs, Sarah N.; Nisbet, Lauren C.; Weichard, Aidan J.; Hollis, Samantha L.; Davey, Margot J.; Anderson, Vicki; Nixon, Gillian M.; Horne, Rosemary S.C.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Sleep disordered breathing (SDB) in preschool-aged children is common, but long-term outcomes have not been investigated. We aimed to compare sleep and respiratory parameters in preschool children to examine the effects of treatment or non-treatment after 3 years. Methods: Children (3–5 years) diagnosed with SDB (n = 45) and non-snoring controls (n = 30) returned for repeat overnight polysomnography (39% of original cohort), 3 years following baseline polysomnography. Children with SDB were grouped according to whether they had received treatment or not. SDB resolution was defined as an obstructive apnea hypopnea index (OAHI) ≤ 1 event/h, no snoring detected on polysomnography and habitual snoring not indicated by parents on questionnaire. Results: Fifty-one percent (n = 23) of the children with SDB were treated. Overall, SDB resolved in 49% (n = 22), either spontaneously (n = 8) or with treatment (n = 14). SDB remained unresolved in 39% (n = 9) of those treated and 64% (n = 14) of the children who were untreated. Two of the non-snoring controls developed SDB at follow-up. The treated group had significantly lower OAHI (p Anderson V, Nixon GM, Horne RS. Long-term improvements in sleep and respiratory parameters in preschool children following treatment of sleep disordered breathing. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(10):1143–1151. PMID:26094933

  17. Improved heart, lung and target dose with deep inspiration breath hold in a large clinical series of breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: This study aims at evaluating the effect of deep-inspiration breath hold (DIBH) on target coverage and dose to organs at risk in a large series of breast cancer patients. Materials and methods: Clinical dose plans for 319 breast cancer patients were evaluated: 144 left-sided patients treated with DIBH and 175 free-breathing (FB) patients (83 left-sided and 92 right-sided). All patients received whole breast irradiation with tangential fields, based on a forward-planned intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) technique. Dose to heart, ipsi-lateral lung and ipsi-lateral breast were assessed and median values compared between patient groups. Results: Comparing group median values, DIBH plans show large reductions of dose to the heart compared with left-sided FB plans; V20Gy (relative volume receiving ⩾20 Gy) for the heart is reduced from 7.8% to 2.3% (−70%, p < 0.0001), V40Gy from 3.4% to 0.3% (−91%, p < 0.0001) and mean dose from 5.2 to 2.7 Gy (−48%, p < 0.0001). Lung dose also shows a small reduction in V20Gy (p < 0.04), while median target coverage is slightly improved (p = 0.0002). Conclusions: In a large series of clinical patients we find that implementation of DIBH in daily clinical practice results in reduced irradiation of heart and lung, without compromising target coverage

  18. Immediate and Sustained Improvement in Behavior and Life Quality by Adenotonsillectomy in Children With Sleep-Disordered Breathing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Yung Jin; Song, Jae-Jin; Ahn, Jae-Cheul; Kong, Il Gyu; Kim, Jae-Won; Park, Gyeong-Hun; Won, Tae-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate longitudinal changes in behavior and quality-of-life (QoL) in children with sleep disordered breathing (SDB) after adenotonsillectomy (AT). Methods This study prospectively enrolled 148 children who underwent AT for SDB. Caregivers filled out Korean attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) rating scale (K-ARS) and Korean version of the obstructive sleep apnea-18 (KOSA-18) at preoperative 1 day, postoperative 1 month, and postoperative 6 months. Longitudinal changes in K-ARS and KOSA-18 were evaluated and compared among subgroups. Results Both K-ARS and KOSA-18 scores improved immediately at postoperative 1 month and were maintained at postoperative 6 months. The mean preoperative K-ARS scores of the non-ADHD, ADHD-trait, and overt-ADHD groups showed uniformly immediate and sustained improvements. Also, the mean preoperative KOSA-18 scores of the small, moderate, and large impact groups were significantly improved both at postoperative 1 month and 6 months. The changes in behavior and QoL showed no significant differences with regard to the aforementioned factors. Conclusion After AT, we may expect immediate and sustained improvements in behavior and QoL in children with SDB regardless of preoperative symptom severity. Moreover, by performing AT, improvements in behavior and QoL are expected regardless of sex, age, allergic trait, or concurrent coblation-assisted turbinoplasty. These findings may help our colleague physicians counselling pediatric SDB patients and their caregivers. PMID:27090276

  19. Mechanical indentation improves cerebral blood oxygenation signal quality of functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) during breath holding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, William C.; Romero, Edwin; LaConte, Stephen M.; Rylander, Christopher G.

    2013-03-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is a well-known technique for non-invasively measuring cerebral blood oxygenation, and many studies have demonstrated that fNIRS signals can be related to cognitive function. However, the fNIRS signal is attenuated by the skin, while scalp blood content has been reported to influence cerebral oxygenation measurements. Mechanical indentation has been shown to increase light transmission through soft tissues by causing interstitial water and blood flow away from the compressed region. To study the effects of indentation on fNIRS, a commercial fNIRS system with 16 emitter/detector pairs was used to measure cerebral blood oxygenation at 2 Hz. This device used diffuse reflectance at 730 nm and 850 nm to calculate deoxy- and oxy-hemoglobin concentrations. A borosilicate glass hemisphere was epoxied over each sensor to function as both an indenter and a lens. After placing the indenter/sensor assembly on the forehead, a pair of plastic bands was placed on top of the fNIRS headband and strapped to the head to provide uniform pressure and tightened to approx. 15 N per strap. Cerebral blood oxygenation was recorded during a breath holding regime (15 second hold, 15 second rest, 6 cycles) in 4 human subjects both with and without the indenter array. Results showed that indentation increased raw signal intensity by 85 +/- 35%, and that indentation increased amplitude of hemoglobin changes during breath cycles by 313% +/- 105%. These results suggest that indentation improves sensing of cerebral blood oxygenation, and may potentially enable sensing of deeper brain tissues.

  20. Improved inhaled air quality at reduced ventilation rate by control of airflow interaction at the breathing zone with lobed jets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolashikov, Zhecho Dimitrov; Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Spilak, Michal;

    2014-01-01

    Inhaled air quality at a reduced supply of clean air was studied by controlling the airflow interaction at the breathing zone of a person using lobed jets as part of personalized ventilation (PV). Experiments were performed in a full-scale test room at 23°C (73.4°F) with a breathing thermal manik...

  1. The efficiency of active cycle of breathing techniques regarding the improvement the quality of life in cystic fibrosis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Almăjan-Guţă

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Physiotherapy is well known as one of the most important part of CF patient’s management. The right choice ofappropriate therapy schema will improve the life’s quality of the patients. The purpose of the study was to prove the efficiencyof Active cycle of breathing techniques at children with cystic fibrosis. The study was performed between September 2006-september 2007 and the lot of study consisted of 20 children (11 girls and 9 boys with an age range between 6 and 18 years(average 14,8 years from the records of the Cystic Fibrosis National Centre Timisoara. The results showed an improvement inall measured values: general well-being, coughing, physical signs, X-ray signs and CT, bacteriological exam, nutritional status,functional respiratory tests. The statistical briefing of data shows the fact that there are significant statistical difference (p<0,05, before and after treatment in all ventilator index. The conclusion of this study was that the chosen technique (ACTBproved to be very efficient, in improving of respiratory symptoms and ventilator parameters

  2. Breathe In, Breathe Out

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-11-01

    This podcast promotes healthy lifestyle messages through original music.  Created: 11/1/2007 by National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP), a joint program of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institutes of Health.   Date Released: 11/30/2007.

  3. Breath sounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Causes of abnormal breath sounds may include: Acute bronchitis Asthma Bronchiectasis Chronic bronchitis Congestive heart failure Emphysema Interstitial lung disease Foreign body obstruction of the airway Pneumonia Pulmonary edema Tracheobronchitis

  4. Bad Breath

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... garlic, onions, cheese, orange juice, and soda poor dental hygiene (say: HI-jeen), meaning not brushing and flossing regularly smoking and other tobacco use Poor oral hygiene leads to bad breath because when food particles ...

  5. Improving Health and Quality of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) Share Compartir Improving Health and Quality of Life On this Page Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) Support ... and improve their ability to function and their quality of life. Doctors may refer some of their CFS patients ...

  6. Improving African health research capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarus, Jeff; Wallace, Samantha A; Liljestrand, Jerker

    2010-01-01

    is the migration of health professionals to countries that offer more lucrative opportunities, like those in western Europe. To combat this ''brain drain'', already back in 1984, the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (Sida) created a training programme in which healthcare professionals from......The issue of strengthening local research capacity in Africa is again high on the health and development agenda. The latest initiative comes from the Wellcome Trust. But when it comes to capacity development, one of the chief obstacles that health sectors in the region must confront...... of beneficial research capacity in the countries of sub-Saharan Africa, this article suggests several recommendations to both donors and governments that have broad application for general health research issues in the region....

  7. Community Health Needs Assessment: Potential for Population Health Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennel, Cara L; McLeroy, Kenneth R; Burdine, James N; Matarrita-Cascante, David; Wang, Jia

    2016-06-01

    Derived from various health care policies and initiatives, the concept of population health has been newly adopted by health care and medicine. In particular, it has been suggested that the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act provision that requires nonprofit hospitals to conduct a community health needs assessment (CHNA) and implement strategies to address health priorities has the potential to improve population health. A mixed methods study design was used to examine the potential for population health improvements to occur through the Internal Revenue Service (IRS)-mandated nonprofit hospital CHNA and planning processes. Methods involved a 2-phased approach composed of (1) content analysis of 95 CHNA/implementation strategies reports and (2) interviews with key informants, consultants, and community stakeholders involved in CHNA and planning processes. Although this is a great opportunity for the nonprofit hospital assessment and planning processes to influence population health outcomes, the findings from the first 3-year assessment and planning cycle (2011-2013) suggest this is unlikely. As nonprofit hospitals begin the second 3-year assessment and planning cycle, this article offers recommendations to increase the potential for nonprofit hospitals to improve population health. These recommendations include clarifying the purpose of IRS CHNA regulations, engaging community stakeholders in collaborative assessment and planning, understanding disease etiology and identifying and addressing broader determinants of health, adopting a public health assessment and planning model, and emphasizing population health improvement. (Population Health Management 2016;19:178-186). PMID:26440370

  8. Improved workflow for quantification of left ventricular volumes and mass using free-breathing motion corrected cine imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Cross, Russell; Olivieri, Laura; O’Brien, Kendall; Kellman, Peter; Xue, Hui; Hansen, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background Traditional cine imaging for cardiac functional assessment requires breath-holding, which can be problematic in some situations. Free-breathing techniques have relied on multiple averages or real-time imaging, producing images that can be spatially and/or temporally blurred. To overcome this, methods have been developed to acquire real-time images over multiple cardiac cycles, which are subsequently motion corrected and reformatted to yield a single image series displaying one card...

  9. INCENTIVE SPIROMETRY AND BREATHING EXERCISES WERE NOT ABLE TO IMPROVE RESTRICTIVE PULMONARY CHARACTERISTICS INDUCED BY WATER IMMERSION IN HEALTHY SUBJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline A. Vepo,

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available pulmonary volumes and capacities which could be at least in part similar to that happen in healthy individuals during water immersion. Objectives: To investigate if respiratory effects of water immersion are partially due to enhanced return venous from legs and arms and if physiotherapeutic techniques incentive spirometry (IS and breathing exercises (BE are able to improve pulmonary volumes and capacities in healthy subjects during water immersion. Design: Randomised, within-participant experimental study. Participants: 18 healthy subjects. Intervention: Stage 1 was realized to investigate the cardiorespiratory effects of water immersion with and without a cuff-induced venous compression. Stage 2 was conducted to explain the effects of physiotherapeutic techniques IS and BE during water immersion. Main outcome measures: The pulmonary function (forced vital capacity - FVC, forced expiratory volume the first second - FEV1, ratio of FEV/FVC, peak expiratory flow rate - PEFR and forced expiratory flow of 25-75% FVC - FEF25-75% was evaluated. Results: Water immersion decreased FVC and FEV1 after 10 minutes of immersion. After a total compression of arms and legs the reduction on FVC and FEV1 was not observed, even with only partial compression of legs (P>0.05. Conclusions: Water immersion promotes pulmonary restrictive characteristics due to increased venous return mainly from legs. The application IS and BE did not normalize the spirometric values.

  10. How to breathe when you are short of breath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pursed lip breathing; COPD - pursed lip breathing; Emphysema - pursed lip breathing; Chronic bronchitis - pursed lip breathing; Pulmonary fibrosis - pursed lip breathing; Interstitial lung disease - pursed lip breathing; Hypoxia - pursed lip breathing; ...

  11. Improving Health Promotion Using Quality Improvement Techniques in Australian Indigenous Primary Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percival, Nikki; O'Donoghue, Lynette; Lin, Vivian; Tsey, Komla; Bailie, Ross Stewart

    2016-01-01

    Although some areas of clinical health care are becoming adept at implementing continuous quality improvement (CQI) projects, there has been limited experimentation of CQI in health promotion. In this study, we examined the impact of a CQI intervention on health promotion in four Australian Indigenous primary health care centers. Our study objectives were to (a) describe the scope and quality of health promotion activities, (b) describe the status of health center system support for health promotion activities, and (c) introduce a CQI intervention and examine the impact on health promotion activities and health centers systems over 2 years. Baseline assessments showed suboptimal health center systems support for health promotion and significant evidence-practice gaps. After two annual CQI cycles, there were improvements in staff understanding of health promotion and systems for planning and documenting health promotion activities had been introduced. Actions to improve best practice health promotion, such as community engagement and intersectoral partnerships, were inhibited by the way health center systems were organized, predominately to support clinical and curative services. These findings suggest that CQI can improve the delivery of evidence-based health promotion by engaging front line health practitioners in decision-making processes about the design/redesign of health center systems to support the delivery of best practice health promotion. However, further and sustained improvements in health promotion will require broader engagement of management, senior staff, and members of the local community to address organizational and policy level barriers. PMID:27066470

  12. Suction/inspiration against resistance or standardized Mueller maneuver: a new breathing technique to improve contrast density within the pulmonary artery: a pilot CT study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutzeit, Andreas [Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg, Department of Radiology, Salzburg (Austria); Hirslanden Hospital St. Anna, Institute of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Clinical Research Unit, Lucerne (Switzerland); Kantonsspital Winterthur, Department of Radiology, Winterthur (Switzerland); Froehlich, Johannes M.; Weymarn, Constantin von; Goyen, Matthias [Hirslanden Hospital St. Anna, Institute of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Clinical Research Unit, Lucerne (Switzerland); Waelti, Stephan [Cantonal Hospital St. Gallen, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, St. Gallen (Switzerland); Roos, Justus E. [Duke University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Durham, NC (United States); Meissnitzer, Matthias; Hergan, Klaus [Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg, Department of Radiology, Salzburg (Austria); Czell, David [Cantonal Hospital Winterthur, Department of Neurology, Winterthur (Switzerland); Reischauer, Carolin [Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg, Department of Radiology, Salzburg (Austria); Hirslanden Hospital St. Anna, Institute of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Clinical Research Unit, Lucerne (Switzerland)

    2015-11-15

    Our aim was to prospectively investigate whether the recently introduced suction/inspiration against resistance breathing method leads to higher computed tomography (CT) contrast density in the pulmonary artery compared to standard breathing. The present study was approved by the Medical Ethics committee and all subjects gave written informed consent. Fifteen patients, each without suspicious lung emboli, were randomly assigned to four different groups with different breathing maneuvers (suction against resistance, Valsalva, inspiration, expiration) during routine CT. Contrast enhancement in the central and peripheral sections of the pulmonary artery were measured and compared with one another. Peripheral enhancement during suction yielded increased mean densities of 138.14 Hounsfield units (HU) (p = 0.001), compared to Valsalva and a mean density of 67.97 HU superior to inspiration (p = 0.075). Finally, suction in comparison to expiration resulted in a mean increase of 30.51 HU (p = 0.42). Central parts of pulmonary arteries presented significantly increased enhancement values (95.74 HU) for suction versus the Valsalva technique (p = 0.020), while all other mean densities were in favour of suction (versus inspiration: p = 0.201; versus expiration: p = 0.790) without reaching significance. Suction/Inspiration against resistance is a promising technique to improve contrast density within pulmonary vessels, especially in the peripheral parts, in comparison to other breathing maneuvers. (orig.)

  13. Suction against resistance: a new breathing technique to significantly improve the blood flow ratio of the superior and inferior vena cava

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optimal contrast within the pulmonary artery is achieved by the maximum amount of contrast-enhanced blood flowing through the superior vena cava (SVC), while minimum amounts of non-contrasted blood should originate from the inferior vena cava (IVC). This study aims to clarify whether ''suction against resistance'' might optimise this ratio. Phase-contrast pulse sequences on a 1.5T MRI magnet were used for flow quantification mean flow (mL/s), stroke volume (Vol) in the SVC and IVC in volunteers. Different breathing manoeuvers were analysed repeatedly: free breathing; inspiration; expiration; suction against resistance, and Valsalva. To standardise breathing commands, volunteers performed suction and Valsalva manoeuvers with an MR-compatible manometer.??Suction against resistance was associated with a significant drop of the IVC/SVC flow quotient (1.63 [range 1.3-2.0] p 0.05).??Suction against resistance caused a significant drop in the IVC/SVC quotient. Theoretically, this breathing manoeuver might significantly improve the enhancement characteristics of CT angiography. (orig.)

  14. Suction/inspiration against resistance or standardized Mueller maneuver: a new breathing technique to improve contrast density within the pulmonary artery: a pilot CT study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our aim was to prospectively investigate whether the recently introduced suction/inspiration against resistance breathing method leads to higher computed tomography (CT) contrast density in the pulmonary artery compared to standard breathing. The present study was approved by the Medical Ethics committee and all subjects gave written informed consent. Fifteen patients, each without suspicious lung emboli, were randomly assigned to four different groups with different breathing maneuvers (suction against resistance, Valsalva, inspiration, expiration) during routine CT. Contrast enhancement in the central and peripheral sections of the pulmonary artery were measured and compared with one another. Peripheral enhancement during suction yielded increased mean densities of 138.14 Hounsfield units (HU) (p = 0.001), compared to Valsalva and a mean density of 67.97 HU superior to inspiration (p = 0.075). Finally, suction in comparison to expiration resulted in a mean increase of 30.51 HU (p = 0.42). Central parts of pulmonary arteries presented significantly increased enhancement values (95.74 HU) for suction versus the Valsalva technique (p = 0.020), while all other mean densities were in favour of suction (versus inspiration: p = 0.201; versus expiration: p = 0.790) without reaching significance. Suction/Inspiration against resistance is a promising technique to improve contrast density within pulmonary vessels, especially in the peripheral parts, in comparison to other breathing maneuvers. (orig.)

  15. Breathing Easier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolkin, Rachel

    2003-01-01

    Describes use of Environmental Protection Agency's Tools for Schools tool kit to improve indoor air quality aimed specifically at eliminating asthma triggers such as dust mites and mold. Includes several examples of school district efforts to reduce or eliminate student health problems associated with poor indoor air quality. (PKP)

  16. Improving the oral health of older people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Poul Erik; Yamamoto, Tatsuo

    2005-01-01

    changing burden of chronic diseases in old age. Chronic disease and most oral diseases share common risk factors. Globally, poor oral health amongst older people has been particularly evident in high levels of tooth loss, dental caries experience, and the prevalence rates of periodontal disease, xerostomia...... to translate knowledge into action programmes for the oral health of older people. The World Health Organization recommends that countries adopt certain strategies for improving the oral health of the elderly. National health authorities should develop policies and measurable goals and targets for oral health....... National public health programmes should incorporate oral health promotion and disease prevention based on the common risk factors approach. Control of oral disease and illness in older adults should be strengthened through organization of affordable oral health services, which meet their needs. The needs...

  17. Single breath-hold real-time cine MR imaging: improved temporal resolution using generalized autocalibrating partially parallel acquisition (GRAPPA) algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to test parallel imaging techniques for improvement of temporal resolution in multislice single breath-hold real-time cine steady-state free precession (SSFP) in comparison with standard segmented single-slice SSFP techniques. Eighteen subjects were examined on a 1.5-T scanner using a multislice real-time cine SSFP technique using the GRAPPA algorithm. Global left ventricular parameters (EDV, ESV, SV, EF) were evaluated and results compared with a standard segmented single-slice SSFP technique. Results for EDV (r=0.93), ESV (r=0.99), SV (r=0.83), and EF (r=0.99) of real-time multislice SSFP imaging showed a high correlation with results of segmented SSFP acquisitions. Systematic differences between both techniques were statistically non-significant. Single breath-hold multislice techniques using GRAPPA allow for improvement of temporal resolution and for accurate assessment of global left ventricular functional parameters. (orig.)

  18. Reducing Health Disparities and Improving Health Equity in Saint Lucia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kisha Holden

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available St. Lucia is an island nation in the Eastern Caribbean, with a population of 179,000 people, where chronic health conditions, such as hypertension and diabetes, are significant. The purpose of this pilot study is to create a model for community health education, tracking, and monitoring of these health conditions, research training, and policy interventions in St. Lucia, which may apply to other Caribbean populations, including those in the U.S. This paper reports on phase one of the study, which utilized a mixed method analytic approach. Adult clients at risk for, or diagnosed with, diabetes (n = 157, and health care providers/clinic administrators (n = 42, were recruited from five healthcare facilities in St. Lucia to assess their views on health status, health services, and improving health equity. Preliminary content analyses indicated that patients and providers acknowledge the relatively high prevalence of diabetes and other chronic illnesses, recognize the impact that socioeconomic status has on health outcomes, and desire improved access to healthcare and improvements to healthcare infrastructures. These findings could inform strategies, such as community education and workforce development, which may help improve health outcomes among St. Lucians with chronic health conditions, and inform similar efforts among other selected populations.

  19. Reducing Health Disparities and Improving Health Equity in Saint Lucia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Kisha; Charles, Lisa; King, Stephen; McGregor, Brian; Satcher, David; Belton, Allyson

    2015-01-01

    St. Lucia is an island nation in the Eastern Caribbean, with a population of 179,000 people, where chronic health conditions, such as hypertension and diabetes, are significant. The purpose of this pilot study is to create a model for community health education, tracking, and monitoring of these health conditions, research training, and policy interventions in St. Lucia, which may apply to other Caribbean populations, including those in the U.S. This paper reports on phase one of the study, which utilized a mixed method analytic approach. Adult clients at risk for, or diagnosed with, diabetes (n = 157), and health care providers/clinic administrators (n = 42), were recruited from five healthcare facilities in St. Lucia to assess their views on health status, health services, and improving health equity. Preliminary content analyses indicated that patients and providers acknowledge the relatively high prevalence of diabetes and other chronic illnesses, recognize the impact that socioeconomic status has on health outcomes, and desire improved access to healthcare and improvements to healthcare infrastructures. These findings could inform strategies, such as community education and workforce development, which may help improve health outcomes among St. Lucians with chronic health conditions, and inform similar efforts among other selected populations. PMID:26703647

  20. Learn More Breathe Better

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-11-16

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a serious lung disease that makes breathing very difficult and can affect your quality of life. Learn the causes of COPD and what you can do to prevent it.  Created: 11/16/2011 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Adult and Community Health (NCCDPHP, DACH).   Date Released: 11/16/2011.

  1. Breathing and Relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... related breathing difficulties. Learn some ways to control breathing and some techniques to help you reach a greater level of relaxation during your day: Diaphragmatic Breathing Minimizing Shortness of Breath Instant Relaxation Drill Meditation ...

  2. Markers of Sleep Disordered Breathing and Diabetes Mellitus in a Multiethnic Sample of US Adults: Results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2005–2008)

    OpenAIRE

    Charumathi Sabanayagam; Srinivas Teppala; Anoop Shankar

    2012-01-01

    We examined gender and ethnic differences in the association between sleep disordered breathing (SDB) and diabetes among 6,522 participants aged ≥20 years from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005–08. SDB severity was defined based on an additive summary score including sleep duration, snoring, snorting, and daytime sleepiness. We found that the summary SDB score was significantly associated with diabetes after adjusting for potential confounders in the whole population. ...

  3. m-Health- Can it Improve Indian Public Health System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev Davey, Anuradha Davey

    2013-01-01

    Materials and methods: A Systematic Review of related studies in literature published till 30th June 2013on role of Mobile-Applications in Public health (m-Health was done. Results: A wide variety of Mobile health applications are available in Mobile Phone Market with lack of proper Regulation from health care authorities and with variably good results. Conclusions: We must use these applications guardedly weighing its benefits and utility in Public Health as well as capitalize the good prospect and capability of m-health worldwide application in the field of Public Health Globally. This means that we can have a greater access to larger segments of a population in developing countries like India and this can improve the capacity of our India health system to provide quality healthcare, which is in great demand today.

  4. Even small interventions can improve oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Lina; Carberry, Frank J

    2013-01-01

    When resources are scarce, authors of articles appearing in health publications have questioned the effectiveness of traditional interventions as a means of improving oral health. The experience in Delicias, Honduras, indicates that the principles of BPOC (Basic Package of Oral Care) may provide quicker and better results. PMID:24027899

  5. Optimized projection binning for improved helical amplitude- and phase-based 4DCT reconstruction in the presence of breathing irregularity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, René; Hofmann, Christian; Gauer, Tobias

    2016-03-01

    Respiration-correlated CT (4DCT) forms the basis of clinical 4D radiotherapy workflows for patients with thoracic and abdominal lesions. 4DCT image data, however, often suffers from motion artifacts due to unfulfilled assumptions during reconstruction and image/projection data sorting. In this work and focusing on low-pitch helical scanning protocols, two questionable assumptions are addressed: (1) the need for regular breathing patterns and (2) a constant correlation between the external breathing signal acquired for image/projection sorting and internal motion patterns. To counteract (1), a patient-specific upper breathing signal amplitude threshold is introduced to avoid artifacts due to unusual deep inspiration (helpful for both amplitude- and phase-based reconstruction). In addition, a projection data binning algorithm based on a statistical analysis of the patient's breathing signal is proposed to stabilize phase-based sorting. To further alleviate the need for (2), an image artifact metric is incorporated into and minimized during the reconstruction process. The optimized reconstruction is evaluated using 30 clinical 4DCT data sets and demonstrated to significantly reduce motion artifacts.

  6. FMWC Radar for Breath Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suhr, Lau Frejstrup; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso; Vegas Olmos, Juan José

    We report on the experimental demonstration of an FMCW radar operating in the 25.7 - 26.6 GHz range with a repetition rate of 500 sweeps per second. The radar is able to track the breathing rate of an adult human from a distance of 1 meter. The experiments have utilized a 50 second recording window...... to accurately track the breathing rate. The radar utilizes a saw tooth modulation format and a low latency receiver. A breath tracking radar is useful both in medical scenarios, diagnosing disorders such as sleep apnea, and for home use where the user can monitor its health. Breathing is a central part of every...... radar chip which, through the use of a simple modulation scheme, is able to measure the breathing rate of an adult human from a distance. A high frequency output makes sure that the radar cannot penetrate solid obstacles which is a wanted feature in private homes where people therefore cannot measure...

  7. Regulation of Breathing under Different Pulmonary Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Rieger-Fackeldey, Esther

    2004-01-01

    The breathing pattern of preterm infants is immature and is associated with a variety of reflexes. In a patient on the ventilator these reflexes interfere with spontaneous breathing. A better understanding of the immature control of breathing could lead to further improvements in ventilatory techniques. This thesis concerns studies of pulmonary stretch receptor (PSR) and phrenic nerve activity as part of the regulation of breathing in an animal model. During assist/control ventilation with th...

  8. WHEN DOES IMPROVING HEALTH RAISE GDP?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Quamrul H; Lester, Ashley; Weil, David N

    2009-04-01

    We assess quantitatively the effect of exogenous health improvements on output per capita. Our simulation model allows for a direct effect of health on worker productivity, as well as indirect effects that run through schooling, the size and age-structure of the population, capital accumulation, and crowding of fixed natural resources. The model is parameterized using a combination of microeconomic estimates, data on demographics, disease burdens, and natural resource income in developing countries, and standard components of quantitative macroeconomic theory. We consider both changes in general health, proxied by improvements in life expectancy, and changes in the prevalence of two particular diseases: malaria and tuberculosis. We find that the effects of health improvements on income per capita are substantially lower than those that are often quoted by policy-makers, and may not emerge at all for three decades or more after the initial improvement in health. The results suggest that proponents of efforts to improve health in developing countries should rely on humanitarian rather than economic arguments.

  9. The impact of sleep-disordered breathing on body mass index (BMI: the sleep heart health study (SHHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins JA

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: It is well known that obesity is a risk factor for sleep-disordered breathing (SDB. However, whether SDB predicts increase in BMI is not well defined. Data from the Sleep Heart Health Study (SHHS were analyzed to determine whether SDB predicts longitudinal increase in BMI, adjusted for confounding factors.Methods: A full-montage unattended home polysomnogram (PSG and body anthropometric measurements were obtained approximately five years apart in 3001 participants. Apnea-hypopnea index (AHI was categorized using clinical thresholds: < 5 (normal, ≥ 5 to <15 (mild sleep apnea, and ³ 15 (moderate to severe sleep apnea. Linear regression was used to examine the association between the three AHI groups and increased BMI. The model included age, gender, race, baseline BMI, and change in AHI as covariates.Results: Mean (SD age was 62.2 years (10.14, 55.2% were female and 76.1% were Caucasian. Five-year increase in BMI was modest with a mean (SD change of 0.53 (2.62 kg/m2 (p=0.071. A multivariate regression model showed that subjects with a baseline AHI between 5-15 had a mean increase in BMI of 0.22 kg/m2 (p=0.055 and those with baseline AHI ≥ 15 had a BMI increase of 0.51 kg/m2 (p<0.001 compared to those with baseline AHI of <5.Conclusion: Our findings suggest that there is a positive association between severity of SDB and subsequent increased BMI over approximately 5 years. This observation may help explain why persons with SDB have difficulty losing weight.

  10. Climate services to improve public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jancloes, Michel; Thomson, Madeleine; Costa, María Mánez; Hewitt, Chris; Corvalan, Carlos; Dinku, Tufa; Lowe, Rachel; Hayden, Mary

    2014-04-25

    A high level expert panel discussed how climate and health services could best collaborate to improve public health. This was on the agenda of the recent Third International Climate Services Conference, held in Montego Bay, Jamaica, 4-6 December 2013. Issues and challenges concerning a demand led approach to serve the health sector needs, were identified and analysed. Important recommendations emerged to ensure that innovative collaboration between climate and health services assist decision-making processes and the management of climate-sensitive health risk. Key recommendations included: a move from risk assessment towards risk management; the engagement of the public health community with both the climate sector and development sectors, whose decisions impact on health, particularly the most vulnerable; to increase operational research on the use of policy-relevant climate information to manage climate- sensitive health risks; and to develop in-country capacities to improve local knowledge (including collection of epidemiological, climate and socio-economic data), along with institutional interaction with policy makers.

  11. A one-day "Helping Babies Breathe" course improves simulated performance but not clinical management of neonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ersdal, H L; Vossius, C; Bayo, E;

    2013-01-01

    "Helping Babies Breathe" (HBB) is a simulation-based one-day course developed to help reduce neonatal mortality globally. The study objectives were to (1) determine the effect on practical skills and management strategies among providers using simulations seven months after HBB training, and (2......) describe neonatal management in the delivery room during the corresponding time period before/after a one-day HBB training in a rural Tanzanian hospital....

  12. Improving public health by tackling climate change

    OpenAIRE

    Griffiths, Jenny

    2013-01-01

    Across the world, climate change is now responsible for substantial mortality and morbidity, through direct effects on health and also by threatening the determinants of health. This commentary argues that adaptation policies to enhance resilience to adverse climate events are important, but must be coupled with determined action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The prize is synergy: many such policies, for example concerning food, travel and community engagement, can simultaneously improv...

  13. Can life coaching improve health outcomes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ammentorp, Jette

    26. Ammentorp J, Uhrenfeldt L, Angel F, Ehrensvärd, Carlsen E, Kofoed P-E. Can life coaching improve health outcomes? – A systematic review of intervention studies. Poster presented at the International Conference on Communication in Healthcare, Montreal Canada, 30 Sept 2013.......26. Ammentorp J, Uhrenfeldt L, Angel F, Ehrensvärd, Carlsen E, Kofoed P-E. Can life coaching improve health outcomes? – A systematic review of intervention studies. Poster presented at the International Conference on Communication in Healthcare, Montreal Canada, 30 Sept 2013....

  14. Electronic health records improve clinical note quality

    OpenAIRE

    Burke, Harry B; SESSUMS, LAURA L; Hoang, Albert; Becher, Dorothy A; Fontelo, Paul; Liu, Fang; Stephens, Mark; Pangaro, Louis N; O'Malley, Patrick G; Baxi, Nancy S; Bunt, Christopher W; Capaldi, Vincent F; Chen, Julie M; Cooper, Barbara A; Djuric, David A

    2014-01-01

    Background and objective The clinical note documents the clinician's information collection, problem assessment, clinical management, and its used for administrative purposes. Electronic health records (EHRs) are being implemented in clinical practices throughout the USA yet it is not known whether they improve the quality of clinical notes. The goal in this study was to determine if EHRs improve the quality of outpatient clinical notes. Materials and methods A five and a half year longitudin...

  15. Acupressure Improves the Weaning Indices of Tidal Volumes and Rapid Shallow Breathing Index in Stable Coma Patients Receiving Mechanical Ventilation: Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suh-Hwa Maa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Acupressure has been shown to improve respiratory parameters. We investigated the effects of acupressure on weaning indices in stable coma patients receiving mechanical ventilation. Methods. Patients were randomly allocated to one of three treatments: standard care with adjunctive acupressure on one (n=32 or two days (n=31 and standard care (n=31. Acupressure in the form of 10 minutes of bilateral stimulation at five acupoints was administered per treatment session. Weaning indices were collected on two days before, right after, and at 0.5 hrs, 1 hr, 1.5 hrs, 2 hrs, 2.5 hrs, 3 hrs, 3.5 hrs, and 4 hrs after the start of treatment. Results. There were statistically significant improvements in tidal volumes and index of rapid shallow breathing in the one-day and two-day adjunctive acupressure study arms compared to the standard care arm immediately after acupressure and persisting until 0.5, 1 hr, and 2 hrs after adjustment for covariates. Conclusions. In the stable ventilated coma patient, adjunctive acupressure contributes to improvements in tidal volumes and the index of rapid shallow breathing, the two indices most critical for weaning patients from mechanical ventilation. These effects tend to be immediate and likely to be sustained for 1 to 2 hours.

  16. Point-of-care continuous 13C-methacetin breath test improves decision making in acute liver disease: Results of a pilot clinical trial

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gadi Lalazar; Tomer Adar; Yaron Ilan

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To assess the role of the 13C-methacetin breath test (MBT) in patients with acute liver disease. METHODS: Fifteen patients with severe acute liver disease from diverse etiologies were followed-up with 13C-MBT during the acute phase of their illnesses (range 3-116 d after treatment). Patients fasted for 8 h and ingested 75 mg of methacetin prior to the MBT. We compared results from standard clinical assessment, serum liver enzymes, synthetic function, and breath test scores. RESULTS: Thirteen patients recovered and two patients died. In patients that recovered, MBT parameters improved in parallel with improvements in lab results. Evidence of consistent improvement began on day 3 for MBT parameters and between days 7 and 9 for blood tests. Later convergence to normality occurred at an average of 9 d for MBT parameters and from 13 to 28 d for blood tests. In both patients that died, MBT parameters remained low despite fluctuating laboratory values. CONCLUSION: The 13C-MBT provides a rapid, noninvasive assessment of liver function in acute severe liver disease of diverse etiologies. The results of this pilot clinical trial suggest that the MBT may offer greater sensitivity than standard clinical tests for managing patients with severe acute liver disease.

  17. Improving mental health outcomes: achieving equity through quality improvement

    OpenAIRE

    Poots, Alan J; Green, Stuart A.; Honeybourne, Emmi; Green, John; Woodcock, Thomas; Barnes, Ruth; Bell, Derek

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate equity of patient outcomes in a psychological therapy service, following increased access achieved by a quality improvement (QI) initiative. Design Retrospective service evaluation of health outcomes; data analysed by ANOVA, chi-squared and Statistical Process Control. Setting A psychological therapy service in Westminster, London, UK. Participants People living in the Borough of Westminster, London, attending the service (from either healthcare professional or self-r...

  18. Breath alcohol test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcohol test - breath ... There are various brands of breath alcohol tests. Each one uses a different method to test the level of alcohol in the breath. The machine may be electronic or manual. One ...

  19. What Controls Your Breathing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... To a limited degree, you can change your breathing rate, such as by breathing faster or holding your ... oxygen levels in your blood and change your breathing rate as needed. Sensors in the airways detect lung ...

  20. Monitoring of thorium incorporation by thoron in breath measurement: Methodology improvements and determination of burdens of workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorium body burdens were determined from thoron (220Rn) in breath measurements: decay products of expired 220Rn were collected electrostatically and their progeny were subsequently measured by alpha-spectrometry. The volume of the 38.5 litre collection chamber was optimised with respect to the breathing rate, the decay constant of thoron, the electric field geometry and strength, and the humidity of air. Calibration was achieved by means of a calibrated 228Th source. A minimum detectable activity of 45 mBq 224Ra freely emanating 220Rn at the mouth (Ra equivalent) was achieved. Five Thorotrast patients were measured and data ranged from 40 up to 150 Bq Ra equivalent, indicating an exhalation factor of about 4.0 ± 1.9% of the total 220Rn produced in the body. Data from 53 workers showed burdens up to 23 Bq (mean 5.5 Bq) of thorium. Urine bioassays of samples from the same workers yielded corresponding results. In vivo measurements revealed no result above the detection limit of 25 Bq 208Tl. (author)

  1. Breathing difficulty - lying down

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea; PND; Difficulty breathing while lying down; Orthopnea ... does not directly cause difficulty breathing while lying down but often worsens other conditions that lead to ...

  2. Using surface imaging and visual coaching to improve the reproducibility and stability of deep-inspiration breath hold for left-breast-cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Late cardiac complications may arise after left-breast radiation therapy. Deep-inspiration breath hold (DIBH) allows reduction of the irradiated heart volume at the same time as it reduces tumor bed motion and increases lung sparing. In the present study, we have evaluated the improvement in reproducibility and stability of the DIBH for left-breast-cancer treatment when visual coaching is provided with the aid of 3D video surface imaging and video goggles. Five left-breast-cancer patients and fifteen healthy volunteers were asked to perform a series of DIBHs without and with visual coaching. Reproducibility and stability of DIBH were measured for each individual with and without visual coaching. The average reproducibility and stability changed from 2.1 mm and 1.5 mm, respectively, without visual feedback to 0.5 mm and 0.7 mm with visual feedback, showing a significant statistical difference (p 2 mm) in reproducibility and stability were observed in 35% and 15% of the subjects, respectively. The average chest wall excursion of the DIBH with respect to the free breathing preceding the DIBH was found to be 11.3 mm. The reproducibility and stability of the DIBH improve significantly from the visual coaching provided to the patient, especially in those patients with poor reproducibility and stability.

  3. Using surface imaging and visual coaching to improve the reproducibility and stability of deep-inspiration breath hold for left-breast-cancer radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerviño, Laura I.; Gupta, Sonia; Rose, Mary A.; Yashar, Catheryn; Jiang, Steve B.

    2009-11-01

    Late cardiac complications may arise after left-breast radiation therapy. Deep-inspiration breath hold (DIBH) allows reduction of the irradiated heart volume at the same time as it reduces tumor bed motion and increases lung sparing. In the present study, we have evaluated the improvement in reproducibility and stability of the DIBH for left-breast-cancer treatment when visual coaching is provided with the aid of 3D video surface imaging and video goggles. Five left-breast-cancer patients and fifteen healthy volunteers were asked to perform a series of DIBHs without and with visual coaching. Reproducibility and stability of DIBH were measured for each individual with and without visual coaching. The average reproducibility and stability changed from 2.1 mm and 1.5 mm, respectively, without visual feedback to 0.5 mm and 0.7 mm with visual feedback, showing a significant statistical difference (p 2 mm) in reproducibility and stability were observed in 35% and 15% of the subjects, respectively. The average chest wall excursion of the DIBH with respect to the free breathing preceding the DIBH was found to be 11.3 mm. The reproducibility and stability of the DIBH improve significantly from the visual coaching provided to the patient, especially in those patients with poor reproducibility and stability.

  4. Thoracic radiotherapy and breath control: current prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D CRT) is adversely affected by setup error and organ motion. In thoracic 3D CRT, breathing accounts for most of intra-fraction movements, thus impairing treatment quality. Breath control clearly exhibits dosimetric improvement compared to free breathing, leading to various techniques for gated treatments. We review benefits of different breath control methods -i.e. breath-holding or beam gating, with spirometric, isometric or X-ray respiration sensor- and argument the choice of expiration versus inspiration, with consideration to dosimetric concerns. All steps of 3D-CRT can be improved with breath control. Contouring of organs at risk (OAR) and target are easier and more accurate on breath controlled CT-scans. Inter- and intra-fraction target immobilisation allows smaller margins with better coverage. Lung outcome predictors (NTCP, Mean Dose, LV20, LV30) are improved with breath-control. In addition, inspiration breath control facilitates beam arrangement since it widens the distance between OAR and target, and leaves less lung normal tissue within the high dose region. Last, lung density, as of CT scan, is more accurate, improving dosimetry. Our institutions choice is to use spirometry driven, patient controlled high-inspiration breath-hold; this technique gives excellent immobilization results, with high reproducibility, yet it is easy to implement and costs little extra treatment time. Breath control, whatever technique is employed, proves superior to free breathing treatment when using 3D-CRT. Breath control should then be used whenever possible, and is probably mandatory for IMRT. (authors)

  5. Family welfare through improved health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solon, F

    1986-11-01

    Education is an integral part of any development effort, particularly in the developing countries. Many educational measures do not accomplish their objectives because many strategies used were neither appropriate nor adaptable to the actual needs of the target audience. Current education projects are more effective than traditional approaches for several reasons including: target audiences are reached through a combination of face-to-face communication and mass media information; development testing, evaluative research and message design based on audience response are inherent in the program; and nutrition education is used to support material inputs. The behavioral method of cummunication has gained recognition as a health education model. The Philippines has long been engaged in the practive of health education. Health education should work at integrating different health problems. A mobile and comprehensive system called the Nutri-bus was organized in 1978 to provide logistical, supervisory and communications support to the village nutrition worker. The Nutri-bus package of services includes: health and nutrition education through video showings and the distribution of print materials. In 1980, a series of educational materials was produced and distributed to over 30,000 schools nationwide for school teachers. The teacher's role in the health and nutrition effort was highlighted. The Teacher-Child-Parent (TCP) Approach was developed to improve the strategies used by school teachers. Developmental description pads containing illustrated food instructions recommending the amounts and kinds of food for the preschool child were designed. Mass media are used extensively. It is necessary to make health education specific so that activities can be evaluated. PMID:12314462

  6. Health care quality improvement publication trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Gordon H; MacEachern, Mark P; Perla, Rocco J; Gaines, Jean M; Davis, Matthew M; Shrank, William H

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the extent of academic interest in quality improvement (QI) initiatives in medical practice, annual publication trends for the most well-known QI methodologies being used in health care settings were analyzed. A total of 10 key medical- and business-oriented library databases were examined: PubMed, Ovid MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, ISI Web of Science, Scopus, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, ABI/INFORM, and Business Source Complete. A total of 13 057 articles were identified that discuss at least 1 of 10 well-known QI concepts used in health care contexts, 8645 (66.2%) of which were classified as original research. "Total quality management" was the only methodology to demonstrate a significant decline in publication over time. "Continuous quality improvement" was the most common topic of study across all publication years, whereas articles discussing Lean methodology demonstrated the largest growth in publication volume over the past 2 decades. Health care QI publication volume increased substantially beginning in 1991.

  7. Health innovation for patient safety improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renukha Sellappans

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Medication error has been identified as a major factor affecting patient safety. Many innovative efforts such as Computerised Physician Order Entry (CPOE, a Pharmacy Information System, automated dispensing machines and Point of Administration Systems have been carried out with the aim of improving medication safety. However, areas remain that require urgent attention. One main area will be the lack of continuity of care due to the breakdown of communication between multiple healthcare providers. Solutions may include consideration of “health smart cards” that carry vital patient medical information in the form of a “credit card” or use of the Malaysian identification card. However, costs and technical aspects associated with the implementation of this health smart card will be a significant barrier. Security and confidentiality, on the other hand, are expected to be of primary concern to patients. Challenges associated with the implementation of a health smart card might include physician buy-in for use in his or her everyday practice. Training and technical support should also be available to ensure the smooth implementation of this system. Despite these challenges, implementation of a health smart card moves us closer to seamless care in our country, thereby increasing the productivity and quality of healthcare.

  8. MELATONIN: POTENTIAL UTILITY FOR IMPROVING PUBLIC HEALTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russel J REITER; Fatih GULTEKIN; Luis J FLORES; Ma Pilar TERRON; Dun-Xian TAN

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes the beneficial actions of melatonin in various experimental conditions/diseases and identifies where the use of melatonin may be helpful in improving public health. The nightly use of melatonin supplements by humans often improves their sleep and helps correct the circadian dyssynchronization associated with “jet lag”. Additionally, melatonin has been found effective in curtailing the growth of a variety of experimental cancers. Mechanistically, this is achieved by melatonin’s ability to limit fatty acid uptake, especially linoleic acid, by tumor cells. Fatty acids are growth factors for many tumors. Additionally, melatonin inhibits the elevated telomerase activity of tumor cells thus making them more fragile and vulnerable to chemotherapies. Melatonin also may inhibit angiogenesis in tumors by suppressing endothelin-1 production and the indole interferes with the stimulatory action of steroids on hormone-responsive tumors. As an ubiquitously-acting antioxidant, melatonin reduces cardiac damage during ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury (heart attack and during I/R to the brain (stroke. Melatonin also limits the toxicity of amyloid  peptide and of neurofibrillary tangles, two of the cardinal signs of Alzheimer’s disease. Collectively, these data suggest supplementation with melatonin, whose endogenous levels decrease with age, may improve the quality of life in the aged and, as a consequence, be beneficial for public health generally. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2006; 5(2.000: 131-158

  9. Social networks in improvement of health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masic, Izet; Sivic, Suad; Toromanovic, Selim; Borojevic, Tea; Pandza, Haris

    2012-01-01

    , etc., which gives a special emphasis on public health aspects of information, especially in the field of medicine and health care. The authors of this paper discuss the role and practical importance of social networks in improving the health and solving of health problems without the physical entrance into the health care system. Social networks have their advantages and disadvantages, benefits and costs, especially when it comes to information which within the network set unprofessional people from unreliable sources, without an adequate selection. The ethical aspect of the norms in this segment is still not adequately regulated, so any sanctions for the unauthorized and malicious use of social networks in private and other purposes in order to obtain personal gain at the expense of individuals or groups (sick or healthy, owners of certain businesses and companies, health organizations and pharmaceutical manufacturers, etc.), for which there is still no global or European codes and standards of conduct. Cyber crime is now one of the mostly present types of crime in modern times, as evidenced by numerous scandals that are happening both globally and locally. PMID:23922516

  10. Technologies for Clinical Diagnosis Using Expired Human Breath Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Thalakkotur Lazar; Pownraj, Prabhahari; Abdulla, Sukhananazerin; Pullithadathil, Biji

    2015-01-01

    This review elucidates the technologies in the field of exhaled breath analysis. Exhaled breath gas analysis offers an inexpensive, noninvasive and rapid method for detecting a large number of compounds under various conditions for health and disease states. There are various techniques to analyze some exhaled breath gases, including spectrometry, gas chromatography and spectroscopy. This review places emphasis on some of the critical biomarkers present in exhaled human breath, and its related effects. Additionally, various medical monitoring techniques used for breath analysis have been discussed. It also includes the current scenario of breath analysis with nanotechnology-oriented techniques. PMID:26854142

  11. Technologies for Clinical Diagnosis Using Expired Human Breath Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thalakkotur Lazar Mathew

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This review elucidates the technologies in the field of exhaled breath analysis. Exhaled breath gas analysis offers an inexpensive, noninvasive and rapid method for detecting a large number of compounds under various conditions for health and disease states. There are various techniques to analyze some exhaled breath gases, including spectrometry, gas chromatography and spectroscopy. This review places emphasis on some of the critical biomarkers present in exhaled human breath, and its related effects. Additionally, various medical monitoring techniques used for breath analysis have been discussed. It also includes the current scenario of breath analysis with nanotechnology-oriented techniques

  12. Public health improvement and integrated planning in British Columbia

    OpenAIRE

    Parks, Amanda

    2007-01-01

    Experiences of staff involved in public health improvement in a health authority highlight several barriers and keys to success. Analyzing these experiences with the BC Core Functions Improvement Process and reviewing the literature of other recent initiatives leads to a summary of potential key areas to address public health improvement. This project will explore in detail the key area of integrated planning using information from interviews with public health staff, a public health leadersh...

  13. Finger dexterity and visual discrimination following two yoga breathing practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley Telles

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Practicing yoga has been shown to improve motor functions and attention. Though attention is required for fine motor and discrimination tasks, the effect of yoga breathing techniques on fine motor skills and visual discrimination has not been assessed. Aim: To study the effect of yoga breathing techniques on finger dexterity and visual discrimination. Materials and Methods: The present study consisted of one hundred and forty subjects who had enrolled for stress management. They were randomly divided into two groups, one group practiced high frequency yoga breathing while the other group practiced breath awareness. High frequency yoga breathing (kapalabhati, breath rate 1.0 Hz and breath awareness are two yoga practices which improve attention. The immediate effect of high frequency yoga breathing and breath awareness (i were assessed on the performance on the O′Connor finger dexterity task and (ii (in a shape and size discrimination task. Results: There was a significant improvement in the finger dexterity task by 19% after kapalabhati and 9% after breath awareness (P<0.001 in both cases, repeated measures ANOVA and post-hoc analyses. There was a significant reduction (P<0.001 in error (41% after kapalabhati and 21% after breath awareness as well as time taken to complete the shape and size discrimination test (15% after kapalabhati and 15% after breath awareness; P<0.001 was also observed. Conclusion: Both kapalabahati and breath awareness can improve fine motor skills and visual discrimination, with a greater magnitude of change after kapalabhati.

  14. Sustainable Improvement of Animal Production and Health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The world's poorest people, some one billion living mostly in Africa and Asia, depend on livestock for their day-to-day livelihood. To reduce poverty, fight hunger and ensure global food security, there is an urgent need to increase livestock production in sustainable ways. However, livestock production in developing countries is constrained by low genetic potential of the animals, poor nutrition and husbandry practices and infectious diseases. Nuclear techniques, when applied in conjunction with conventional methods, can identify constraints to livestock productivity as well as interventions that lead to their reduction or elimination in ways that are economically and socially acceptable. The challenge is how best to exploit these techniques for solving problems faced by livestock keepers within the many agricultural production systems that exist in developing countries and demonstrating their advantages to owners, local communities and government authorities. This publication is a compilation of the contributions emanating from an international Symposium on Sustainable Improvement of Animal Production and Health organised by the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture in cooperation with the Animal Production and Health Division of FAO. It provides invaluable information not only on how nuclear and related techniques can be used to support sustainable livestock production systems, but also about the constraints and opportunities for using these techniques in developing countries; it also attempts to identify specific research needs and gaps and new options for using these techniques for solving established and emerging problems. As such, it is hoped that the information presented and suggestions made will provide valuable guidance to scientists in both the public and private sectors as well as to government and institutional policy and decision makers. The Symposium comprised a plenary session and four thematic sessions, covering (i

  15. Effects of slow breathing exercise on cardiovascular functions, pulmonary functions & galvanic skin resistance in healthy human volunteers - a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Turankar, A.V.; Jain, S.; Patel, S.B.; Sinha, S.R.; A. D. Joshi; B N Vallish; Mane, P.R.; Turankar, S.A.

    2013-01-01

    Background & objectives: Regular practice of slow breathing has been shown to improve cardiovascular and respiratory functions and to decrease the effects of stress. This pilot study was planned to evaluate the short term effects of pranayama on cardiovascular functions, pulmonary functions and galvanic skin resistance (GSR) which mirrors sympathetic tone, and to evaluate the changes that appear within a short span of one week following slow breathing techniques. Methods: Eleven normal health...

  16. Metabolite content profiling of bottlenose dolphin exhaled breath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksenov, Alexander A; Yeates, Laura; Pasamontes, Alberto; Siebe, Craig; Zrodnikov, Yuriy; Simmons, Jason; McCartney, Mitchell M; Deplanque, Jean-Pierre; Wells, Randall S; Davis, Cristina E

    2014-11-01

    Changing ocean health and the potential impact on marine mammal health are gaining global attention. Direct health assessments of wild marine mammals, however, is inherently difficult. Breath analysis metabolomics is a very attractive assessment tool due to its noninvasive nature, but it is analytically challenging. It has never been attempted in cetaceans for comprehensive metabolite profiling. We have developed a method to reproducibly sample breath from small cetaceans, specifically Atlantic bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus). We describe the analysis workflow to profile exhaled breath metabolites and provide here a first library of volatile and nonvolatile compounds in cetacean exhaled breath. The described analytical methodology enabled us to document baseline compounds in exhaled breath of healthy animals and to study changes in metabolic content of dolphin breath with regard to a variety of factors. The method of breath analysis may provide a very valuable tool in future wildlife conservation efforts as well as deepen our understanding of marine mammals biology and physiology. PMID:25254551

  17. Communicating hope with one breath

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen D. Edwards

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The central thesis of this article was that the phenomenon of hope involves states and stages of consciousness development, which can be enhanced through breath control, meditation, prayer and related practices that have formed the essence of various spiritual healing traditions for millennia. In particular, it was argued that breath control can provide a vital foundation for consciousness transformation and the development of hope. Whilst breath control alone may lead to a state of pure, transcendent and/or cosmic consciousness, the practical theological implications are that its effect of enhancing states and stages of consciousness may be anchored and amplified. This process can take place through further contemplative and intercessory meditation, prayer and related behaviour and will differ between people, groups, contexts, religious and/or spiritual traditions. A particular method of breath control called One Breath, which is associated with pure consciousness and the experience of hope was described. Such an experience typically leads to further spiritual practice, healing and transformation. It was concluded that such ongoing spiritual practice is crucial for improving consciousness development, healing and hope for individuals, societies, planet Earth and the cosmos.

  18. Health literacy: applying current concepts to improve health services and reduce health inequalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batterham, R W; Hawkins, M; Collins, P A; Buchbinder, R; Osborne, R H

    2016-03-01

    The concept of 'health literacy' refers to the personal and relational factors that affect a person's ability to acquire, understand and use information about health and health services. For many years, efforts in the development of the concept of health literacy exceeded the development of measurement tools and interventions. Furthermore, the discourse about and development of health literacy in public health and in clinical settings were often substantially different. This paper provides an update about recently developed approaches to measurement that assess health literacy strengths and limitations of individuals and of groups across multiple aspects of health literacy. This advancement in measurement now allows diagnostic and problem-solving approaches to developing responses to identified strengths and limitations. In this paper, we consider how such an approach can be applied across the diverse range of settings in which health literacy has been applied. In particular, we consider some approaches to applying health literacy in the daily practice of health-service providers in many settings, and how new insights and tools--including approaches based on an understanding of diversity of health literacy needs in a target community--can contribute to improvements in practice. Finally, we present a model that attempts to integrate the concept of health literacy with concepts that are often considered to overlap with it. With careful consideration of the distinctions between prevailing concepts, health literacy can be used to complement many fields from individual patient care to community-level development, and from improving compliance to empowering individuals and communities. PMID:26872738

  19. Preinduction incentive spirometry versus deep breathing to improve apnea tolerance during induction of anesthesia in patients of abdominal sepsis: A randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Tripathi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Abdominal sepsis is associated with varied degree of hypoxemia and atelactasis in the lung and can enhance the onset of desaturation of arterial blood during apnea. Aims : This study looked at methods to improve safety margin of apnea during induction of anesthesia in these high-risk patients. Settings and Design: It was a randomized, single blind study on adult patients presenting for emergency laparotomy due to peritonitis in a university teaching hospital setting. Materials and Methods: In group 1 (IS (n = 32, three sessions of incentive spirometry (IS were performed within one hour before induction of anesthesia. In group 2 (DB (n = 34, patients were subjected to deep breathing sessions in a similar manner. All patients received preoxygenation (100% by mask for 3 min, followed by rapid-sequence induction of anesthesia using fentanyl, thiopental, and suxamethonium and endotracheal intubation. Patients were subjected to a period of apnea by keeping the end of the endotracheal tube open to air till they developed 95% hemoglobin saturation (SpO 2 by pulse oxymetry. Positive pressure ventilation was resumed at the end. We observed for hemodynamic changes, apnea time, and SpO 2 (100% recovery time on resuming ventilation. Arterial blood gas samples were taken before intervention, after IS or DB, after preoxygenation, and at the end of apnea. Statistical analysis used: One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA, X 2 test, Kaplan-Meier graph, and log-rank tests were applied to compare the two study groups. Results: Oxygenation level in group 1 (265 ± 76.7 mmHg patients was significantly (P < 0.001 higher than in group 2 (221 ± 61.8 mmHgat the end of preoxygenation. The apnea time (median: lower bound - upper bound Confidence Interval apnea time (272:240-279 s in group 1 (IS patients was significantly higher P < 0.05 than in group 2 (180:163-209 s patients. Saturation recovery time (35:34-46 s in group 1 (IS patients was also quicker than in

  20. Characteristics of breathing apparatus used in health physics; Caracteristiques de l'appareil respiratoire utilisables en radioprotection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perissin-Pirasset, F. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-07-01

    The present state of knowledge makes it possible to envisage the calculation of doses absorbed by various parts of the respiration apparatus following inhalation of radio-active dusts contained in aerosols. After recalling some anatomical and histological considerations, the author presents various curves showing the deposition of dusts in the three parts of the breathing apparatus: - the rhino-pharynx - the trachea and wind-pipe - the pulmonary parenchyma. The dusts can be classified in three groups of biological solubility according to which the rates of elimination of the particles from the organs are different. A synthesis of these data is given in elimination diagrams. In order to calculate the doses it is necessary furthermore to know certain anatomical and physiological characteristics of a standard man. (author) [French] L'etat actuel des connaissances permet d'envisager le calcul des doses recues par les differentes parties de l'arbre respiratoire, a la suite d'inhalation de poussieres radioactives contenues dans des aerosols. Apres un rappel de notions anatomiques et histologiques, nous presentons differentes courbes de depot des poussieres dans les trois etages respiratoires: - le rhino-pharynx - la trachee et les bronches - le parenchyme pulmonaire. Les poussieres peuvent etre classees en trois groupes de solubilite biologique selon lesquels les vitesses d'elimination des particules a partir des organes sont differentes. Ceci peut etre synthetise dans des schemas d'elimination. Pour permettre le calcul des doses, il faut en outre disposer des caracteristiques d'un homme standard, du point de vue anatomique et physiologique. (auteur)

  1. Rapid shallow breathing index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthika, Manjush; Al Enezi, Farhan A; Pillai, Lalitha V; Arabi, Yaseen M

    2016-01-01

    Predicting successful liberation of patients from mechanical ventilation has been a focus of interest to clinicians practicing in intensive care. Various weaning indices have been investigated to identify an optimal weaning window. Among them, the rapid shallow breathing index (RSBI) has gained wide use due to its simple technique and avoidance of calculation of complex pulmonary mechanics. Since its first description, several modifications have been suggested, such as the serial measurements and the rate of change of RSBI, to further improve its predictive value. The objective of this paper is to review the utility of RSBI in predicting weaning success. In addition, the use of RSBI in specific patient populations and the reported modifications of RSBI technique that attempt to improve the utility of RSBI are also reviewed. PMID:27512505

  2. Improving Coordination of Addiction Health Services Organizations with Mental Health and Public Health Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Erick G; Andrews, Christina; Harris, Lesley; Padwa, Howard; Kong, Yinfei; M S W, Karissa Fenwick

    2016-01-01

    In this mixed-method study, we examined coordination of mental health and public health services in addiction health services (AHS) in low-income racial and ethnic minority communities in 2011 and 2013. Data from surveys and semistructured interviews were used to evaluate the extent to which environmental and organizational characteristics influenced the likelihood of high coordination with mental health and public health providers among outpatient AHS programs. Coordination was defined and measured as the frequency of interorganizational contact among AHS programs and mental health and public health providers. The analytic sample consisted of 112 programs at time 1 (T1) and 122 programs at time 2 (T2), with 61 programs included in both periods of data collection. Forty-three percent of AHS programs reported high frequency of coordination with mental health providers at T1 compared to 66% at T2. Thirty-one percent of programs reported high frequency of coordination with public health services at T1 compared with 54% at T2. Programs with culturally responsive resources and community linkages were more likely to report high coordination with both services. Qualitative analysis highlighted the role of leadership in leveraging funding and developing creative solutions to deliver coordinated care. Overall, our findings suggest that AHS program funding, leadership, and cultural competence may be important drivers of program capacity to improve coordination with health service providers to serve minorities in an era of health care reform. PMID:26350114

  3. Improving Coordination of Addiction Health Services Organizations with Mental Health and Public Health Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Erick G; Andrews, Christina; Harris, Lesley; Padwa, Howard; Kong, Yinfei; M S W, Karissa Fenwick

    2016-01-01

    In this mixed-method study, we examined coordination of mental health and public health services in addiction health services (AHS) in low-income racial and ethnic minority communities in 2011 and 2013. Data from surveys and semistructured interviews were used to evaluate the extent to which environmental and organizational characteristics influenced the likelihood of high coordination with mental health and public health providers among outpatient AHS programs. Coordination was defined and measured as the frequency of interorganizational contact among AHS programs and mental health and public health providers. The analytic sample consisted of 112 programs at time 1 (T1) and 122 programs at time 2 (T2), with 61 programs included in both periods of data collection. Forty-three percent of AHS programs reported high frequency of coordination with mental health providers at T1 compared to 66% at T2. Thirty-one percent of programs reported high frequency of coordination with public health services at T1 compared with 54% at T2. Programs with culturally responsive resources and community linkages were more likely to report high coordination with both services. Qualitative analysis highlighted the role of leadership in leveraging funding and developing creative solutions to deliver coordinated care. Overall, our findings suggest that AHS program funding, leadership, and cultural competence may be important drivers of program capacity to improve coordination with health service providers to serve minorities in an era of health care reform.

  4. Improving physical health international students enrolled in a technical college in Baikal region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolokoltsev M.M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : to improve the physical health of foreign students enrolled in a technical college Baikal region using an extended motor mode. Material : in the experiment participated 57 students attending the training of South-East Asia, 74 - from Central Asia and 455 - Slavs, natives of the Irkutsk region. Results : it was found poor fitness and low functional performance among foreign students. For this purpose they had used advanced motoring. It included, besides training curriculum additional group activities in the form of sports, participating in sports events and guided independent study physical education. Conclusion : the end of follow foreign students involved in the extended motor mode, significantly outperform their peers engaged on normal functional parameters (heart rate, a test with 20 squats, the recovery time after exercise, dynamometry hands, breath tests, adaptive capacity as well as motor qualities.

  5. Nursing education to improve global health

    OpenAIRE

    Hülya Kaya

    2010-01-01

    In the final decades of the twentieth century world went through a complex process in political, technological, economic, social and health areas. In the process  often referred to as globalization, many  health problems including global spread have seen and  many have still being seen. This situation obliges nurses who are the largest groups of health care providers, to be  aware of health problems that result from globalization  and to explore solutions these health problems requires them t...

  6. Improved abdominal MRI in non-breath-holding children using a radial k-space sampling technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radial k-space sampling techniques have been shown to reduce motion artifacts in adult abdominal MRI. To compare a T2-weighted radial k-space sampling MRI pulse sequence (BLADE) with standard respiratory-triggered T2-weighted turbo spin echo (TSE) in pediatric abdominal imaging. Axial BLADE and respiratory-triggered turbo spin echo sequences were performed without fat suppression in 32 abdominal MR examinations in children. We retrospectively assessed overall image quality, the presence of respiratory, peristaltic and radial artifact, and lesion conspicuity. We evaluated signal uniformity of each sequence. BLADE showed improved overall image quality (3.35 ± 0.85 vs. 2.59 ± 0.59, P < 0.001), reduced respiratory motion artifact (0.51 ± 0.56 vs. 1.89 ± 0.68, P < 0.001), and improved lesion conspicuity (3.54 ± 0.88 vs. 2.92 ± 0.77, P = 0.006) compared to respiratory triggering turbo spin-echo (TSE) sequences. The bowel motion artifact scores were similar for both sequences (1.65 ± 0.77 vs. 1.79 ± 0.74, P = 0.691). BLADE introduced a radial artifact that was not observed on the respiratory triggering-TSE images (1.10 ± 0.85 vs. 0, P < 0.001). BLADE was associated with diminished signal variation compared with respiratory triggering-TSE in the liver, spleen and air (P < 0.001). The radial k-space sampling technique improved the quality and reduced respiratory motion artifacts in young children compared with conventional respiratory-triggered turbo spin-echo sequences. (orig.)

  7. Improved abdominal MRI in non-breath-holding children using a radial k-space sampling technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Hyuk; Choi, Young Hun; Cheon, Jung Eun; Lee, So Mi; Cho, Hyun Hae; Kim, Woo Sun; Kim, In One [Seoul National University Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Su Mi [SMG-SNU Boramae Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Radial k-space sampling techniques have been shown to reduce motion artifacts in adult abdominal MRI. To compare a T2-weighted radial k-space sampling MRI pulse sequence (BLADE) with standard respiratory-triggered T2-weighted turbo spin echo (TSE) in pediatric abdominal imaging. Axial BLADE and respiratory-triggered turbo spin echo sequences were performed without fat suppression in 32 abdominal MR examinations in children. We retrospectively assessed overall image quality, the presence of respiratory, peristaltic and radial artifact, and lesion conspicuity. We evaluated signal uniformity of each sequence. BLADE showed improved overall image quality (3.35 ± 0.85 vs. 2.59 ± 0.59, P < 0.001), reduced respiratory motion artifact (0.51 ± 0.56 vs. 1.89 ± 0.68, P < 0.001), and improved lesion conspicuity (3.54 ± 0.88 vs. 2.92 ± 0.77, P = 0.006) compared to respiratory triggering turbo spin-echo (TSE) sequences. The bowel motion artifact scores were similar for both sequences (1.65 ± 0.77 vs. 1.79 ± 0.74, P = 0.691). BLADE introduced a radial artifact that was not observed on the respiratory triggering-TSE images (1.10 ± 0.85 vs. 0, P < 0.001). BLADE was associated with diminished signal variation compared with respiratory triggering-TSE in the liver, spleen and air (P < 0.001). The radial k-space sampling technique improved the quality and reduced respiratory motion artifacts in young children compared with conventional respiratory-triggered turbo spin-echo sequences. (orig.)

  8. The effectiveness of M-health technologies for improving health and health services: a systematic review protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Patel Vikram; Galli Leandro; Felix Lambert; Phillips Gemma; Free Caroline; Edwards Philip

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The application of mobile computing and communication technology is rapidly expanding in the fields of health care and public health. This systematic review will summarise the evidence for the effectiveness of mobile technology interventions for improving health and health service outcomes (M-health) around the world. Findings To be included in the review interventions must aim to improve or promote health or health service use and quality, employing any mobile computing a...

  9. Exploring the Promise of Population Health Management Programs to Improve Health.

    OpenAIRE

    Suzanne Felt-Lisk; Tricia Higgins

    2011-01-01

    Population health management programs—programs targeted to a defined population that use a variety of individual, organizational, and societal interventions to improve health outcomes—are increasingly being looked on by large employers as a promising practice for improving health and outcomes and "bending" the health care cost curve. Given the national focus on the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services' administrator Donald Berwick's "triple aim" of improving population health and care ...

  10. Decolonisation: a critical step for improving Aboriginal health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Juanita; Edwards, Tahnia

    2006-09-01

    Aboriginal health continues to be in crisis in Australia although expenditure has increased in service provision, strategic planning, research and policy development over the last thirty years. This paper recommends that a shift must occur to make Aboriginal health improvement a reality. This shift requires the decolonising of Aboriginal health so that the experts in Aboriginal health, namely Aboriginal people, can voice and action initiatives that address their health issues. This shift is from the current western dominant approach that continues to manage Aboriginal health in its linear spectrum of illness and disease. Aboriginal people view health differently; their contexts for health issues are also diverse requiring a more holistic and informed response.

  11. Improved general physical fitness of young swimmers by applying in the training process of endogenous hypoxic breathing techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Furman Y.M.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : to examine the effect of general physical preparedness of young swimmers in the body artificially created state hypercapnic normobaric hypoxia. Material : the study involved 21 swimmer aged 13-14 years with sports qualifications at third and second sports categories. Results : the original method of working with young swimmers. Studies were conducted for 16 weeks a year preparatory period macrocycle. The average value of the index on the results of general endurance races 800m improved by 2.80 %. 8.24 % increased speed- strength endurance and 18.77 % increased dynamic strength endurance. During the period of formative experiment performance speed, agility, static endurance, flexibility and explosive strength athletes first experimental group was not significantly changed. Conclusions : it was found that the use of the proposed technique provides statistically significant increase in overall endurance, speed strength endurance and dynamic strength endurance.

  12. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of a health claim related to zinc and “the prevention of bad breath by neutralising of volatile sulphur compounds in the mouth and oral cavity” pursuant to Article 13(5) of Regulation (EC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    claim related to zinc and “the prevention of bad breath by neutralising of volatile sulphur compounds in the mouth and oral cavity”. The scope of the application was proposed to fall under a health claim based on newly developed scientific evidence. The claimed effect is “prevents bad breath...

  13. Improving primary health care through technological innovation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenewegen, P.P.; Hutten, J.B.F.

    1989-01-01

    As a result of policy changes and developments on the demand side, the importance of technology in primary health care will grow fast. An approach to the implementation of new technologies in primary health care is presented in this article. First we describe the main problems in Dutch primary healt

  14. Improving Health Outcomes for Low Health Literacy Heart Failure Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friel, Catherine J

    2016-09-01

    According to the National Assessment of Adult Literacy (2003), only 12% of U.S. adults have a proficient level of health literacy, with adults 65 years and older more likely to have a below basic or a basic health literacy level. An estimated 5.8 million individuals in the United States have heart failure (HF) and it is one of the most common reasons for those aged 65 and over to be hospitalized. Many patients with HF are at risk for poor health outcomes due to low health literacy. This article reviews the literature with regard to the effectiveness of methods used to address low health literacy among HF patients and describes a pilot study implemented by a home care agency in the northeast to address high HF readmission rates. PMID:27580282

  15. Markers of Sleep Disordered Breathing and Diabetes Mellitus in a Multiethnic Sample of US Adults: Results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2005–2008)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabanayagam, Charumathi; Teppala, Srinivas; Shankar, Anoop

    2012-01-01

    We examined gender and ethnic differences in the association between sleep disordered breathing (SDB) and diabetes among 6,522 participants aged ≥20 years from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005–08. SDB severity was defined based on an additive summary score including sleep duration, snoring, snorting, and daytime sleepiness. We found that the summary SDB score was significantly associated with diabetes after adjusting for potential confounders in the whole population. Compared to those without any sleep disturbance, the multivariable odds ratio (OR) (95% confidence interval (CI)) of diabetes among those with ≥3 sleep disturbances was 2.04 (1.46–2.87). In sex-specific analyses, this association was significant only in women (OR (95% CI) = 3.68 (2.01–6.72)) but not in men (1.10 (0.59–2.04)), P-interaction = 0.01. However, there were no ethnic differences in this association, P-interaction = 0.7. In a nationally representative sample of US adults, SDB was independently associated with diabetes only in women, but not in men. PMID:22518133

  16. Markers of Sleep Disordered Breathing and Diabetes Mellitus in a Multiethnic Sample of US Adults: Results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2005–2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charumathi Sabanayagam

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined gender and ethnic differences in the association between sleep disordered breathing (SDB and diabetes among 6,522 participants aged ≥20 years from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005–08. SDB severity was defined based on an additive summary score including sleep duration, snoring, snorting, and daytime sleepiness. We found that the summary SDB score was significantly associated with diabetes after adjusting for potential confounders in the whole population. Compared to those without any sleep disturbance, the multivariable odds ratio (OR (95% confidence interval (CI of diabetes among those with ≥3 sleep disturbances was 2.04 (1.46–2.87. In sex-specific analyses, this association was significant only in women (OR (95% CI = 3.68 (2.01–6.72 but not in men (1.10 (0.59–2.04, P-interaction =0.01. However, there were no ethnic differences in this association, P-interaction =0.7. In a nationally representative sample of US adults, SDB was independently associated with diabetes only in women, but not in men.

  17. Application of end-expired breath sampling to estimate carboxyhemoglobin levels in community air pollution exposure assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, William E.; Colome, Steven D.; Wojciechowski, Sandra L.

    Measurement of carbon monoxide (CO) in end-expired air after breath-holding permits the estimation of blood carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) levels. Some literature suggests that the precision of the method decreases at low COHb levels. As part of a community exposure and health study, the end-expired breath method was applied to estimate COHb levels in 28 men with ischemic heart disease. Paired samples of blood and breath were collected at the beginning and end of the 24-h CO monitoring periods. The aggregate regression of all subjects' COHb on breath CO displayed high variability. However, the variability was substantially reduced for any particular subject, promoting the use of individualized blood-breath standard curves to improve the precision of COHb estimates made from breath CO. The ultimate accuracy of the blood-breath relationship could not be resolved by our data. Two major sources of error are identified. The observed person-to-person variability may be caused by physiologic factors or differences in ability to deliver an end-expired breath sample representative of alveolar air. This variation may also be due to instrumentation factors, specifically the accuracy of the IL282 CO-Oximeter at 0-3% levels. Further research into the sources of variability in the end-expired breath method is recommended. Epidemiologists using similar end-expired breath measurements to predict COHb levels should be cognizant of the magnitude and probable direction of the error in COHb estimates. This non-invasive method should continue to allow evaluation of the success of personal monitoring efforts and pharmacokinetic modeling of CO uptake in community exposure research.

  18. Can public health registry data improve Emergency Medical Dispatch?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, M S; Christensen, E F; Jepsen, S B;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Emergency Medical Dispatchers make decisions based on limited information. We aimed to investigate if adding demographic and hospitalization history information to the dispatch process improved precision. METHODS: This 30-day follow-up study evaluated time-critical emergencies...... in contact with the emergency phone number 112 in Denmark during 18 months. 'Time-critical' was defined as suspected First Hour Quintet (FHQ) (cardiac arrest, chest pain, stroke, difficulty breathing, trauma). The association of age, sex, and hospitalization history with adverse outcomes was examined using...... (adjusted OR 2.02 [1.57-2.59]) was associated with a higher risk of death. For trauma patients, the discriminative ability of the model showed an AUC of 0.74 for death on day 1. CONCLUSION: Increasing age, male sex, and hospitalization history was associated with increased risk of death on day 1 for FHQ 112...

  19. Diffusion of a quality improvement programme among allied health professionals.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluijs, E.M.; Dekker, J.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To assess the diffusion of a quality improvement (QI) programme among allied health professions in The Netherlands. Design: Descriptive study, based on a questionnaire distributed to allied health professionals; response rate, 63%. Settings and participants: All subsectors in health care

  20. Improving psychosocial health in hemodialysis patients after a disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Sheila; Kutner, Nancy G; Bowles, Tess; Johnstone, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    Twenty-two social workers implemented a cognitive-behavioral intervention with 69 patients in 22 dialysis units in Louisiana to improve psychosocial health following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. Pre- and post-intervention questionnaires measured psychosocial status domains (general health status, social functioning, burden of kidney disease, depressed mood, anxiety, and mastery). Participants rated their general health status (p disease [p = .05]).

  1. Working with women to improve child and community eye health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopa Kothari

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In the slums and rural areas of India, visual impairment, blindness, and childhood blindness are usually more prevalent.In order to improve the eye health of children and the community in these areas, it is important to understand the influence women and mothers have over children’s eye health and the eye health of the community as a whole.

  2. Evaluation of two communication strategies to improve udder health management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, J.; Renes, R.J.; Lam, T.J.G.M.

    2010-01-01

    Worldwide, programs to improve udder health are implemented using communication tools and methods that inform and persuade dairy farmers. This study evaluated 2 communication strategies used in a mastitis control program in the Netherlands. To improve farmers’ udder health management, tools such as

  3. Bifidobacterium activation in technologies of health-improving mayonnaise

    OpenAIRE

    Маковська, Тетяна Валентинівна; Ткаченко, Наталія Андріївна

    2015-01-01

    One of the key areas of oil and fat industry today is to develop a range of fat emulsion products that provide good health. Emulsion fat mayonnaise type products deserve special attention among the products of oil and fat industry with the health-improving properties.Guidelines for the production of health-improving mayonnaise enriched with bifidobacteria, in the scientific literature aren’t available. Mayonnaise is an unfavorable environment for the development and preservation of bacteria o...

  4. Adopting feminist strategies to improve women's health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, T

    The new public health movement offers community nurses a context in which to address the continuing inequalities faced by women in society. This paper explores the use of feminism as a tool for this. It considers some of the constraints on feminist nursing practice and offers some ways forward.

  5. Improving cattle health: knowledge transfer and motivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lam, T.J.G.M.; Jansen, J.; Veersen, van J.; Steuten, C.D.M.

    2009-01-01

    In an ever changing market, ruminant milk and meat production must continually develop cost-effective ways to promote animal health, performance and product safety. Food safety and traceability, as well as animal welfare are beginning to play key roles in consumer decisions. However, these deliverab

  6. Rx for OTC Users: Improved Health Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shands, Virginia P.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    A survey of college students' perceptions and understanding of the directions and warnings on the labels of over-the-counter medicines was conducted at the University of Southern Mississippi at Hattiesburg. The results point to the need for increased emphasis in health education at all levels concerning self-medication. (Author/PP)

  7. A systematic review of eHealth interventions to improve health literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Robin J; Lou, Jennie Q; Ownby, Raymond L; Caballero, Joshua

    2016-06-01

    Implementation of eHealth is now considered an effective way to address concerns about the health status of health care consumers. The purpose of this study was to review empirically based eHealth intervention strategies designed to improve health literacy among consumers in a variety of settings. A computerized search of 16 databases of abstracts (e.g. Biomedical Reference Collection, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Computers & Applied Sciences Complete, Health Technology Assessments, MEDLINE) were explored in a systematic fashion to assess the presence of eHealth applications targeting health literacy. Compared to control interventions, the interventions using technology reported significant outcomes or showed promise for future positive outcomes regarding health literacy in a variety of settings, for different diseases, and with diverse samples. This review has indicated that it is feasible to deliver eHealth interventions specifically designed to improve health literacy skills for people with different health conditions, risk factors, and socioeconomic backgrounds. PMID:24916567

  8. From breathing to respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitting, Jean-William

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of breathing remained an enigma for a long time. The Hippocratic school described breathing patterns but did not associate breathing with the lungs. Empedocles and Plato postulated that breathing was linked to the passage of air through pores of the skin. This was refuted by Aristotle who believed that the role of breathing was to cool the heart. In Alexandria, breakthroughs were accomplished in the anatomy and physiology of the respiratory system. Later, Galen proposed an accurate description of the respiratory muscles and the mechanics of breathing. However, his heart-lung model was hampered by the traditional view of two non-communicating vascular systems - veins and arteries. After a period of stagnation in the Middle Ages, knowledge progressed with the discovery of pulmonary circulation. The comprehension of the purpose of breathing progressed by steps thanks to Boyle and Mayow among others, and culminated with the contribution of Priestley and the discovery of oxygen by Lavoisier. Only then was breathing recognized as fulfilling the purpose of respiration, or gas exchange. A century later, a controversy emerged concerning the active or passive transfer of oxygen from alveoli to the blood. August and Marie Krogh settled the dispute, showing that passive diffusion was sufficient to meet the oxygen needs. PMID:25532022

  9. Can life coaching improve health outcomes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ammentorp, Jette; Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth; Angel, Flemming;

    2013-01-01

    for an overview of the evidence regarding coaching interventions used in patient care, the effect of the interventions, and the quality of the studies published. However, in order to provide a clear definition of the coaching interventions selected for this review, we have found it necessary to distinguish...... between health coaching and life coaching. In this review, we will only focus on the latter method and on that basis assess the health related outcomes of life coaching. METHODS Intervention studies using quantitative or qualitative methods to evaluate the outcome of the life coach interventions were...... suggest that the description and categorisation of the coaching methods are described more comprehensively, and that research into this area is supplemented by a more qualitative approach....

  10. Improvements in well-being and vagal tone following a yogic breathing-based life skills workshop in young adults: Two open-trial pilot studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R Goldstein

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: These findings suggest that a life skills workshop integrating yogic breathing techniques may provide self-empowering tools for enhancing well-being in young adults. Future research is indicated to further explore these effects, particularly in regards to vagal tone and other aspects of stress physiology.

  11. Optimal Blood Suppression inversion time based on breathing rates and heart rates to improve renal artery visibility in spatial labeling with multiple inversion pulses: A preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pei, Yi Gang; Li, Fang; Long, Xue Ying; Liu, Hui; Wang, Xiao Yi; Liu, Jin Kang; Li, Wen Zheng [Dept. of Radiology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha (China); Shen, Hao [GE Healthcare, Waukesha (United States)

    2016-02-15

    To determine whether an optimal blood suppression inversion time (BSP TI) can boost arterial visibility and whether the optimal BSP TI is related to breathing rate (BR) and heart rate (HR) for hypertension subjects in spatial labeling with multiple inversion pulses (SLEEK). This prospective study included 10 volunteers and 93 consecutive hypertension patients who had undergone SLEEK at 1.5T MRI system. Firstly, suitable BSP TIs for displaying clearly renal artery were determined in 10 volunteers. Secondly, non-contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography with the suitable BSP TIs were performed on those hypertension patients. Then, renal artery was evaluated and an optimal BSP TI to increase arterial visibility was determined for each patient. Patients' BRs and HRs were recorded and their relationships with the optimal BSP TI were analyzed. The optimal BSP TI was negatively correlated with BR (r1 = -0.536, P1 < 0.001; and r2 = -0.535, P2 < 0.001) and HR (r1 = -0.432, P1 = 0.001; and r2 = -0.419, P2 = 0.001) for 2 readers (κ = 0.93). For improving renal arterial visibility, BSP TI = 800 ms could be applied as the optimal BSP TI when the 95% confidence interval were 17-19/min (BR1) and 74-82 bpm (HR1) for reader#1 and 17-19/min (BR2) and 74-83 bpm (HR2) for reader#2; BSP TI = 1100 ms while 14-15/min (BR1, 2) and 71-76 bpm (HR1, 2) for both readers; and BSP TI = 1400 ms when 13-16/min (BR1) and 63-68 bpm (HR1) for reader#1 and 14-15/min (BR2) and 64-70 bpm (HR2) for reader#2. In SLEEK, BSP TI is affected by patients' BRs and HRs. Adopting the optimal BSP TI based on BR and HR can improve the renal arterial visibility and consequently the working efficiency.

  12. Monitoring Breathing via Signal Strength in Wireless Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Patwari, Neal; R., Sai Ananthanarayanan P; Kasera, Sneha K; Westenskow, Dwayne

    2011-01-01

    This paper shows experimentally that standard wireless networks which measure received signal strength (RSS) can be used to reliably detect human breathing and estimate the breathing rate, an application we call "BreathTaking". We show that although an individual link cannot reliably detect breathing, the collective spectral content of a network of devices reliably indicates the presence and rate of breathing. We present a maximum likelihood estimator (MLE) of breathing rate, amplitude, and phase, which uses the RSS data from many links simultaneously. We show experimental results which demonstrate that reliable detection and frequency estimation is possible with 30 seconds of data, within 0.3 breaths per minute (bpm) RMS error. Use of directional antennas is shown to improve robustness to motion near the network.

  13. [e-Health interventions and improvement in treatment adherence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieben, Angelien; Bredie, S J H Bas; van Laarhoven, C J H M Kees; Schoonhoven, Lisette; Burger, David M; van Onzenoort, Hein A W

    2014-01-01

    Poor adherence to medication is one of the most important determinants in the treatment of patients with chronic disorders. e-Health-based interventions may be able to improve treatment adherence. This article gives an overview of the available e-Health interventions and the extent to which they can improve adherence. We searched in the PubMed, Cinahl, PsycInfo, and Embase databases for e-Health interventions that aimed at improving adherence to treatment. Of the 16 included studies, 15 used a website and one used an app. Ten studies showed a significant improvement in treatment adherence by using the intervention. e-Health interventions were generally complex. Simple interventions were the most successful in improving treatment adherence.

  14. Improving physical health monitoring for patients with chronic mental health problems who receive antipsychotic medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Nihad; Conn, Rory; Latif Marini, Abdel

    2016-01-01

    Physical health monitoring is an integral part of caring for patients with mental health problems. It is proven that serious physical health problems are more common among patients with severe mental health illness (SMI), this monitoring can be challenging and there is a need for improvement. The project aimed at improving the physical health monitoring among patients with SMI who are receiving antipsychotic medications. The improvement process focused on ensuring there is a good communication with general practitioners (GPs) as well as patient's education and education of care home staff. GP letters requesting physical health monitoring were updated; care home staff and patients were given more information about the value of regular physical health monitoring. There was an improvement in patients' engagement with the monitoring and the monitoring done by GPs was more adherent to local and national guidelines and was communicated with the mental health service.

  15. Improving physical health monitoring for patients with chronic mental health problems who receive antipsychotic medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Nihad; Conn, Rory; Latif Marini, Abdel

    2016-01-01

    Physical health monitoring is an integral part of caring for patients with mental health problems. It is proven that serious physical health problems are more common among patients with severe mental health illness (SMI), this monitoring can be challenging and there is a need for improvement. The project aimed at improving the physical health monitoring among patients with SMI who are receiving antipsychotic medications. The improvement process focused on ensuring there is a good communication with general practitioners (GPs) as well as patient's education and education of care home staff. GP letters requesting physical health monitoring were updated; care home staff and patients were given more information about the value of regular physical health monitoring. There was an improvement in patients' engagement with the monitoring and the monitoring done by GPs was more adherent to local and national guidelines and was communicated with the mental health service. PMID:27559474

  16. The isotope breathe test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The foundations of the breath diagnostic test, based on application of the carbon compounds, labeled with the stable (13C) or radioactive isotope are presented. The methodology for conducting the breath isotope test and the apparatuses, making it possible to determine under clinical conditions the isotope composition of the carbon, contained in the expired air, depending on the introduced tracer type, is briefly described. The safety of the method and prospects of its application are discussed. The examples of the breath isotope test practical application are presented

  17. Meeting the challenge: using policy to improve children's health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brush, Charles Adam; Kelly, Maggie M; Green, Denise; Gaffney, Marcus; Kattwinkel, John; French, Molly

    2005-11-01

    We reflect on the proceedings of a symposium at a conference of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities. We present examples of bridging the gap between science and policy to achieve improvements in children's health through case studies in early hearing detection and intervention, folic acid fortification to prevent birth defects, sleep positioning recommendations to reduce infant mortality, and workplace lactation support programs. We discuss case studies that present different policy strategies (public health law and voluntary practices) for improving public health. These case studies demonstrate both the power of policy as a tool for improving children's health and the challenges of communicating public health research to policy decisionmakers.

  18. Improving Sanitation and Health in Rural Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubenheim, David L.

    2013-01-01

    In rural Alaskan communities personal health is threatened by energy costs and limited access to clean water, wastewater management, and adequate nutrition. Fuel-­-based energy systems are significant factors in determining local accessibility to clean water, sanitation and food. Increasing fuel costs induce a scarcity of access and impact residents' health. The University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) School of Natural Resources and Agricultural Sciences (SNRAS), NASA's Ames Research Center, and USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) have joined forces to develop high-efficiency, low­-energy consuming techniques for water treatment and food production in rural circumpolar communities. Methods intended for exploration of space and establishment of settlements on the Moon or Mars will ultimately benefit Earth's communities in the circumpolar north. The initial phase of collaboration is completed. Researchers from NASA Ames Research Center and SNRAS, funded by the USDA­-ARS, tested a simple, reliable, low-energy sewage treatment system to recycle wastewater for use in food production and other reuse options in communities. The system extracted up to 70% of the water from sewage and rejected up to 92% of ions in the sewage with no carryover of toxic effects. Biological testing showed that plant growth using recovered water in the nutrient solution was equivalent to that using high-purity distilled water. With successful demonstration that the low energy consuming wastewater treatment system can provide safe water for communities and food production, the team is ready to move forward to a full-scale production testbed. The SNRAS/NASA team (including Alaska students) will design a prototype to match water processing rates and food production to meet rural community sanitation needs and nutritional preferences. This system would be operated in Fairbanks at the University of Alaska through SNRAS. Long­-term performance will be validated and operational needs of the

  19. Challenging oneself intermittently to improve health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattson, Mark P

    2014-12-01

    Humans and their predecessors evolved in environments where they were challenged intermittently with: 1) food scarcity; 2) the need for aerobic fitness to catch/kill prey and avoid or repel attackers; and 3) exposure to biological toxins present in foodstuffs. Accordingly, cells and organ systems acquired and retained molecular signaling and metabolic pathways through which the environmental challenges enhanced the functionality and resilience of the cells and organisms. Within the past 60 years there has been a precipitous diminution of such challenges in modern societies because of the development of technologies that provide a continuous supply of energy-dense processed foods and that largely eliminate the need for physical exertion. As a consequence of the modern 'couch potato' lifestyle, signaling pathways that mediate beneficial effects of environmental challenges on health and disease resistance are disengaged, thereby rendering people vulnerable to obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, cancers and neurodegenerative disorders. Reversal of the epidemic of diseases caused by unchallenging lifestyles will require a society-wide effort to re-introduce intermittent fasting, exercise and consumption of plants containing hormetic phytochemicals into daily and weekly routines. PMID:25552960

  20. Improving Performance through Knowledge Translation in the Veterans Health Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Joseph; Perlin, Jonathan B.

    2006-01-01

    The Veterans Health Administration (VA) provides a case study for linking performance measurement, information technology, and aligned research efforts to facilitate quality improvement in a large, complex health system. Dialogue between clinical researchers and VA leaders occurs through structured activities (e.g., the Quality Enhancement…

  1. Continuing Medical Education via Telemedicine and Sustainable Improvements to Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Background. This research aims to investigate the quantitative relationship between telemedicine and online continuing medical education (CME) and to find the optimal CME lectures to be delivered via telemedicine to improve the population's health status. Objective. This study examines the following: (1) What factors foster learning processes in CME via telemedicine? (2) What is the possible role of online CME in health improvement? And (3) How optimal learning processes can be integrated with various health services? Methods. By applying telemedicine experiences in Taiwan over the period 1995–2004, this study uses panel data and the method of ordinary least squares to embed an adequate set of phenomena affecting the provision of online CME lectures versus health status. Results. Analytical results find that a nonlinear online CME-health nexus exists. Increases in the provision of online CME lectures are associated with health improvements. However, after the optimum has been reached, greater provision of online CME lectures may be associated with decreasing population health. Conclusion. Health attainment could be partially viewed as being determined by the achievement of the appropriately providing online CME lectures. This study has evaluated the population's health outcomes and responded to the currently inadequate provision of online CME lectures via telemedicine.

  2. Towards a unified taxonomy of health indicators: academic health centers and communities working together to improve population health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Gaxiola, Sergio; Ahmed, Syed; Franco, Zeno; Kissack, Anne; Gabriel, Davera; Hurd, Thelma; Ziegahn, Linda; Bates, Nancy J; Calhoun, Karen; Carter-Edwards, Lori; Corbie-Smith, Giselle; Eder, Milton Mickey; Ferrans, Carol; Hacker, Karen; Rumala, Bernice B; Strelnick, A Hal; Wallerstein, Nina

    2014-04-01

    The Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSA) program represents a significant public investment. To realize its major goal of improving the public's health and reducing health disparities, the CTSA Consortium's Community Engagement Key Function Committee has undertaken the challenge of developing a taxonomy of community health indicators. The objective is to initiate a unified approach for monitoring progress in improving population health outcomes. Such outcomes include, importantly, the interests and priorities of community stakeholders, plus the multiple, overlapping interests of universities and of the public health and health care professions involved in the development and use of local health care indicators.The emerging taxonomy of community health indicators that the authors propose supports alignment of CTSA activities and facilitates comparative effectiveness research across CTSAs, thereby improving the health of communities and reducing health disparities. The proposed taxonomy starts at the broadest level, determinants of health; subsequently moves to more finite categories of community health indicators; and, finally, addresses specific quantifiable measures. To illustrate the taxonomy's application, the authors have synthesized 21 health indicator projects from the literature and categorized them into international, national, or local/special jurisdictions. They furthered categorized the projects within the taxonomy by ranking indicators with the greatest representation among projects and by ranking the frequency of specific measures. They intend for the taxonomy to provide common metrics for measuring changes to population health and, thus, extend the utility of the CTSA Community Engagement Logic Model. The input of community partners will ultimately improve population health.

  3. Shortness-of-Breath

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can lead to shortness of breath include anxiety, panic attacks, anemia and even constipation. The experience of shortness ... are used to treat patients with anxiety or panic attacks. Other commonly used drugs include bronchodilators to widen ...

  4. Take a Deep Breath

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Everyone involved in Beijing’s Olympic Games held their breath last week, not because of the city’s famously polluted air , but in anticipation of the results of an experiment that could help to clean it up.

  5. Physical Activity: A Tool for Improving Health (Part 2-Mental Health Benefits)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallaway, Patrick J.; Hongu, Nobuko

    2016-01-01

    By promoting physical activities and incorporating them into their community-based programs, Extension professionals are improving the health of individuals, particularly those with limited resources. This article is the second in a three-part series describing the benefits of physical activity for human health: (1) biological health benefits of…

  6. Physical Activity: A Tool for Improving Health (Part 1--Biological Health Benefits)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallaway, Patrick J.; Hongu, Nobuko

    2015-01-01

    Extension educators have been promoting and incorporating physical activities into their community-based programs and improving the health of individuals, particularly those with limited resources. This article is the first of a three-part series describing the benefits of physical activity for human health: 1) biological health benefits of…

  7. Improving health and safety through greater cooperation: A labor perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Main, J.A.

    1996-12-31

    There has been considerable effort in the coal mining industry to improve the future of mining operations and the health and safety conditions through improved labor and management relations. The United Mine Workers of America has been a major part of that effort.

  8. Why Economic Analysis of Health System Improvement Interventions Matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broughton, Edward Ivor; Marquez, Lani

    2016-01-01

    There is little evidence to direct health systems toward providing efficient interventions to address medical errors, defined as an unintended act of omission or commission or one not executed as intended that may or may not cause harm to the patient but does not achieve its intended outcome. We believe that lack of guidance on what is the most efficient way to reduce medical errors and improve the quality of health-care limits the scale-up of health system improvement interventions. Challenges to economic evaluation of these interventions include defining and implementing improvement interventions in different settings with high fidelity, capturing all of the positive and negative effects of the intervention, using process measures of effectiveness rather than health outcomes, and determining the full cost of the intervention and all economic consequences of its effects. However, health system improvement interventions should be treated similarly to individual medical interventions and undergo rigorous economic evaluation to provide actionable evidence to guide policy-makers in decisions of resource allocation for improvement activities among other competing demands for health-care resources.

  9. Family physicians improve patient health care quality and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Marjorie A; Neale, Anne Victoria

    2013-01-01

    This issue exemplifies family physicians' ability to provide great care and to continuously improve. For example, beyond other specialty care, the care provided by family physicians is associated with improved melanoma diagnosis and outcomes and improved preventive services for those with a history of breast cancer. Electronic health records are providing new avenues to both assess outcomes and influence care. However, to truly reward quality care, simplistic and readily measurable items such as laboratory results or assessment of the provision of preventive services must be adjusted for risk. Health insurance influences classic preventive care services more than personal health behaviors. The care provided at federally qualified health centers throughout the nation is highly appreciated by the people they serve and is not plagued by the types of disparities in other settings.

  10. For debate: a new wave in public health improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Sally C; Winpenny, Eleanor; Ball, Sarah; Fowler, Tom; Rubin, Jennifer; Nolte, Ellen

    2014-11-22

    The rising burden of chronic disease poses a challenge for all public health systems and requires innovative approaches to effectively improve population health. Persisting inequalities in health are of particular concern. Disadvantage because of education, income, or social position is associated with a larger burden of disease and, in particular, multimorbidity. Although much has been achieved to enhance population health, challenges remain, and approaches need to be revisited. In this paper, we join the debate about how a new wave of public health improvement might look. We start from the premise that population health improvement is conditional on a health-promoting societal context. It is characterised by a culture in which healthy behaviours are the norm, and in which the institutional, social, and physical environment support this mindset. Achievement of this ambition will require a positive, holistic, eclectic, and collaborative effort, involving a broad range of stakeholders. We emphasise three mechanisms: maximisation of the value of health and incentives for healthy behaviour; promotion of healthy choices as default; and minimisation of factors that create a culture and environment which promote unhealthy behaviour. We give examples of how these mechanisms might be achieved.

  11. Health Care Improvement and Continuing Interprofessional Education: Continuing Interprofessional Development to Improve Patient Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcock, Peter M.; Janes, Gillian; Chambers, Alison

    2009-01-01

    Health care improvement and continuing professional education must be better understood if we are to promote continuous service improvement through interprofessional learning in the workplace. We propose that situating interprofessional working, interprofessional learning, work-based learning, and service improvement within a framework of social…

  12. Big data in global health: improving health in low- and middle-income countries

    OpenAIRE

    Wyber, Rosemary; Vaillancourt, Samuel; Perry, William; Mannava, Priya; Folaranmi, Temitope; Celi, Leo Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Over the last decade, a massive increase in data collection and analysis has occurred in many fields. In the health sector, however, there has been relatively little progress in data analysis and application despite a rapid rise in data production. Given adequate governance, improvements in the quality, quantity, storage and analysis of health data could lead to substantial improvements in many health outcomes. In low- and middle-income countries in particular, the creation of an inf...

  13. Breath-based biomarkers for tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolk, Arend H. J.; van Berkel, Joep J. B. N.; Claassens, Mareli M.; Walters, Elisabeth; Kuijper, Sjoukje; Dallinga, Jan W.; van Schooten, Fredrik-Jan

    2012-06-01

    We investigated the potential of breath analysis by gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to discriminate between samples collected prospectively from patients with suspected tuberculosis (TB). Samples were obtained in a TB endemic setting in South Africa where 28% of the culture proven TB patients had a Ziehl-Neelsen (ZN) negative sputum smear. A training set of breath samples from 50 sputum culture proven TB patients and 50 culture negative non-TB patients was analyzed by GC-MS. A classification model with 7 compounds resulted in a training set with a sensitivity of 72%, specificity of 86% and accuracy of 79% compared with culture. The classification model was validated with an independent set of breath samples from 21 TB and 50 non-TB patients. A sensitivity of 62%, specificity of 84% and accuracy of 77% was found. We conclude that the 7 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that discriminate breath samples from TB and non-TB patients in our study population are probably host-response related VOCs and are not derived from the VOCs secreted by M. tuberculosis. It is concluded that at present GC-MS breath analysis is able to differentiate between TB and non-TB breath samples even among patients with a negative ZN sputum smear but a positive culture for M. tuberculosis. Further research is required to improve the sensitivity and specificity before this method can be used in routine laboratories.

  14. Improving the financial viability of primary care health centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkler, S A; Knickman, J R; Hanson, K L

    1994-01-01

    This article presents findings from a national demonstration program to improve the long-term financial viability of small not-for-profit primary care health centers. The program initiatives and their implementation are described in some detail. A standard pre/post study design was used to measure the impact of the initiatives on general outcome measures, financial ratios, and the utilization of management techniques. Overall, demonstration centers showed improvement over the study period. Notable short-term improvements included significant growth in the volume of patient visits and increased profit. Observed changes also revealed an increased use of sophisticated management techniques, expected to positively affect longer-term financial health. The findings suggest that improving the financial viability of health centers need not be expensive.

  15. The indoor air we breathe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, L C; Shackleton, B W

    1998-01-01

    Increasingly recognized as a potential public health problem since the outbreak of Legionnaire's disease in Philadelphia in 1976, polluted indoor air has been associated with health problems that include asthma, sick building syndrome, multiple chemical sensitivity, and hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Symptoms are often nonspecific and include headache, eye and throat irritation, chest tightness and shortness of breath, and fatigue. Air-borne contaminants include commonly used chemicals, vehicular exhaust, microbial organisms, fibrous glass particles, and dust. Identified causes include defective building design and construction, aging of buildings and their ventilation systems, poor climate control, inattention to building maintenance. A major contributory factor is the explosion in the use of chemicals in building construction and furnishing materials over the past four decades. Organizational issues and psychological variables often contribute to the problem and hinder its resolution. This article describes the health problems related to poor indoor air quality and offers solutions.

  16. Volatile Biomarkers in Breath Associated With Liver Cirrhosis — Comparisons of Pre- and Post-liver Transplant Breath Samples

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández del Río, R.; M.E. O'Hara; Holt, A.; Pemberton, P; Shah, T; T. Whitehouse; Mayhew, C. A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The burden of liver disease in the UK has risen dramatically and there is a need for improved diagnostics. Aims: To determine which breath volatiles are associated with the cirrhotic liver and hence diagnostically useful. Methods: A two-stage biomarker discovery procedure was used. Alveolar breath samples of 31 patients with cirrhosis and 30 healthy controls were mass spectrometrically analysed and compared (stage 1). 12 of these patients had their breath analysed after live...

  17. Metabolite Content Profiling of Bottlenose Dolphin Exhaled Breath

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander A Aksenov; Yeates, Laura; Pasamontes, Alberto; Siebe, Craig; Zrodnikov, Yuriy; Simmons, Jason; McCartney, Mitchell M.; Deplanque, Jean-Pierre; Wells, Randall S; Davis, Cristina E.

    2014-01-01

    Changing ocean health and the potential impact on marine mammal health are gaining global attention. Direct health assessments of wild marine mammals, however, is inherently difficult. Breath analysis metabolomics is a very attractive assessment tool due to its noninvasive nature, but it is analytically challenging. It has never been attempted in cetaceans for comprehensive metabolite profiling. We have developed a method to reproducibly sample breath from small cetaceans, specifically Atlant...

  18. Improving shift workers' health and tolerance to shiftwork: recent advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogi, K

    1996-02-01

    Recent developments in research in relation to health and tolerance to shiftwork offer useful guidance for improving conditions of shiftwork. These developments were discussed by the papers of this special issue, presented at the Mini-symposium on improving shift workers' health and tolerance to shiftwork in the 24th International Congress on Occupational Health in Nice, France, in 1993. While there is evidence that shiftwork is regarded as a risk factor with respect to the health of shift workers, many shift workers are engaged in shift systems for years while coping with associated burdens in their working life. In order to improve shift workers' health and tolerance, recent research points to the importance of multifaceted measures addressing both the effects of disruptions in circadian rhythms, and the actual interferences with daily routines at work and in family and social life. Increasing attention is paid to changed working hours and shift systems, including more flexible shiftwork systems, as well as to supporting effective coping activities and occupational health services. As shown by the new ILO Convention on night work, a consensus is being built internationally that multifaceted actions are necessary for improving shiftworking conditions and that such actions should be based on participatory planning and implementation.

  19. A Qualitative Study Exploring Facilitators for Improved Health Behaviors and Health Behavior Programs: Mental Health Service Users’ Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Candida Graham

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Mental health service users experience high rates of cardiometabolic disorders and have a 20–25% shorter life expectancy than the general population from such disorders. Clinician-led health behavior programs have shown moderate improvements, for mental health service users, in managing aspects of cardiometabolic disorders. This study sought to potentially enhance health initiatives by exploring (1 facilitators that help mental health service users engage in better health behaviors and (2 the types of health programs mental health service users want to develop. Methods. A qualitative study utilizing focus groups was conducted with 37 mental health service users attending a psychosocial rehabilitation center, in Northern British Columbia, Canada. Results. Four major facilitator themes were identified: (1 factors of empowerment, self-value, and personal growth; (2 the need for social support; (3 pragmatic aspects of motivation and planning; and (4 access. Participants believed that engaging with programs of physical activity, nutrition, creativity, and illness support would motivate them to live more healthily. Conclusions and Implications for Practice. Being able to contribute to health behavior programs, feeling valued and able to experience personal growth are vital factors to engage mental health service users in health programs. Clinicians and health care policy makers need to account for these considerations to improve success of health improvement initiatives for this population.

  20. Linking public health agencies and hospitals for improved emergency preparedness: North Carolina's public health epidemiologist program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markiewicz Milissa

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2003, 11 public health epidemiologists were placed in North Carolina's largest hospitals to enhance communication between public health agencies and healthcare systems for improved emergency preparedness. We describe the specific services public health epidemiologists provide to local health departments, the North Carolina Division of Public Health, and the hospitals in which they are based, and assess the value of these services to stakeholders. Methods We surveyed and/or interviewed public health epidemiologists, communicable disease nurses based at local health departments, North Carolina Division of Public Health staff, and public health epidemiologists' hospital supervisors to 1 elicit the services provided by public health epidemiologists in daily practice and during emergencies and 2 examine the value of these services. Interviews were transcribed and imported into ATLAS.ti for coding and analysis. Descriptive analyses were performed on quantitative survey data. Results Public health epidemiologists conduct syndromic surveillance of community-acquired infections and potential bioterrorism events, assist local health departments and the North Carolina Division of Public Health with public health investigations, educate clinicians on diseases of public health importance, and enhance communication between hospitals and public health agencies. Stakeholders place on a high value on the unique services provided by public health epidemiologists. Conclusions Public health epidemiologists effectively link public health agencies and hospitals to enhance syndromic surveillance, communicable disease management, and public health emergency preparedness and response. This comprehensive description of the program and its value to stakeholders, both in routine daily practice and in responding to a major public health emergency, can inform other states that may wish to establish a similar program as part of their larger public

  1. On the Function of Proper Breathing Ways in Improving Competing Ability of 400-meter Racers%合理呼吸方法对提高400米运动员竞技能力的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭真

    2016-01-01

    In 400-meter race training , it is of same importance for runners to improve their technical movements and special quality and ability as well as to grasp correct breathing ways .Through analyzing 400-meter racers ’ breathing characteristics and their needs in the process of running , the paper finds out problems existing in everyday training and makes solutions to bring physical function into full play , improve training results and achieve the goal of improving performance .%400米跑训练中不但要注意改进技术动作、提高专项素质能力,还应该掌握正确的呼吸方法。通过分析400米跑运动员跑动过程中呼吸特点及需要,找出日常训练中存在的问题并制定解决办法,以充分发挥人体机能能力并提高训练效果,进而达到提高成绩的目的。

  2. Can audio coached 4D CT emulate free breathing during the treatment course?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. The image quality of 4DCT depends on breathing regularity. Respiratory audio coaching may improve regularity and reduce motion artefacts. We question the safety of coached planning 4DCT without coaching during treatment. We investigated the possibility of coaching to a more stable breathing without changing the breathing amplitude. The interfraction variation of the breathing cycle amplitude in free and coached breathing was studied as well as the possible impact of fatigue on longer coaching sessions. Methods. Thirteen volunteers completed respiratory audio coaching on 3 days within a 2 week period. An external marker system monitoring the motion of the thoraco-abdominal wall was used to track the respiration. On all days, free breathing and two coached breathing curves were recorded. We assumed that free versus coached breathing from day 1 (reference session) simulated breathing during an uncoached versus coached planning 4DCT, respectively, and compared the mean breathing cycle amplitude to the free versus coached breathing from day 2 and 3 simulating free versus coached breathing during treatment. Results. For most volunteers it was impossible to apply coaching without changes in breathing cycle amplitude. No significant decrease in standard deviation of breathing cycle amplitude distribution was seen. Generally it was not possible to predict the breathing cycle amplitude and its variation the following days based on the breathing in the reference session irrespective of coaching or free breathing. We found a significant tendency towards an increased breathing cycle amplitude variation with the duration of the coaching session. Conclusion. These results suggest that large interfraction variation is present in breathing amplitude irrespective of coaching, leading to the suggestion of daily image guidance for verification of respiratory pattern and tumour related motion. Until further investigated it is not recommendable to use coached 4DCT for

  3. Towards Automatic Improvement of Patient Queries in Health Retrieval Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesrine KSENTINI

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available With the adoption of health information technology for clinical health, e-health is becoming usual practice today. Users of this technology find it difficult to seek information relevant to their needs due to the increasing amount of the clinical and medical data on the web, and the lack of knowledge of medical jargon. In this regards, a method is described to improve user's needs by automatically adding new related terms to their queries which appear in the same context of the original query in order to improve final search results. This method is based on the assessment of semantic relationships defined by a proposed statistical method between a set of terms or keywords. Experiments were performed on CLEF-eHealth-2015 database and the obtained results show the effectiveness of our proposed method.

  4. Improving health outcomes with better patient understanding and education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Robert John

    2010-01-01

    A central plank of health care reform is an expanded role for educated consumers interacting with responsive health care teams. However, for individuals to realize the benefits of health education also requires a high level of engagement. Population studies have documented a gap between expectations and the actual performance of behaviours related to participation in health care and prevention. Interventions to improve self-care have shown improvements in self-efficacy, patient satisfaction, coping skills, and perceptions of social support. Significant clinical benefits have been seen from trials of self-management or lifestyle interventions across conditions such as diabetes, coronary heart disease, heart failure and rheumatoid arthritis. However, the focus of many studies has been on short-term outcomes rather that long term effects. There is also some evidence that participation in patient education programs is not spread evenly across socio economic groups. This review considers three other issues that may be important in increasing the public health impact of patient education. The first is health literacy, which is the capacity to seek, understand and act on health information. Although health literacy involves an individual's competencies, the health system has a primary responsibility in setting the parameters of the health interaction and the style, content and mode of information. Secondly, much patient education work has focused on factors such as attitudes and beliefs. That small changes in physical environments can have large effects on behavior and can be utilized in self-management and chronic disease research. Choice architecture involves reconfiguring the context or physical environment in a way that makes it more likely that people will choose certain behaviours. Thirdly, better means of evaluating the impact of programs on public health is needed. The Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation and Maintenance (RE-AIM) framework has been

  5. Enabling healthy choices: is ICT the highway to health improvement?

    OpenAIRE

    Lindsay, Sally; Bellaby, Paul; Smith, Simon; Baker, Rose

    2008-01-01

    Abstract The White Paper Choosing health acknowledges that there is no lack of information in the system about healthy lifestyles, but the manner of communication of risk and the level of support for lifestyle change need improvement. Action also has to be taken to address inequalities in health and to focus on securing better access to healthier choices for people in disadvantaged groups or areas. Accordingly, this randomized controlled trial examined whether access to a purpose-b...

  6. Animal-Assisted Therapy for Improving Human Health

    OpenAIRE

    Sibel Cevizci; Ethem Erginoz; Zuhal Baltas

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT Animal Assisted Therapy (AAT) or Pet Therapy is an adjunctive therapy by taking advantage of human and animal interaction, activate the physiological and psychological mechanisms, initiate positive changes improving health in metabolism. In recent years, this interaction are in use to treat psychological and psychiatric disorders such as stress, depression, loneliness, pervasive developmental disorders affect negatively to human health. Furthermore, AAT has been increasingly used to ...

  7. How can developing countries harness biotechnology to improve health?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Persad Deepa L

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The benefits of genomics and biotechnology are concentrated primarily in the industrialized world, while their potential to combat neglected diseases in the developing world has been largely untapped. Without building developing world biotechnology capacity to address local health needs, this disparity will only intensify. To assess the potential of genomics to address health needs in the developing world, the McLaughlin-Rotman Centre for Global Health, along with local partners, organized five courses on Genomics and Public Health Policy in the developing world. The overall objective of the courses was to collectively explore how to best harness genomics to improve health in each region. This article presents and analyzes the recommendations from all five courses. Discussion In this paper we analyze recommendations from 232 developing world experts from 58 countries who sought to answer how best to harness biotechnology to improve health in their regions. We divide their recommendations into four categories: science; finance; ethics, society and culture; and politics. Summary The Courses' recommendations can be summarized across the four categories listed above: Science - Collaborate through national, regional, and international networks - Survey and build capacity based on proven models through education, training, and needs assessments Finance - Develop regulatory and intellectual property frameworks for commercialization of biotechnology - Enhance funding and affordability of biotechnology - Improve the academic-industry interface and the role of small and medium enterprise Ethics, Society, Culture - Develop public engagement strategies to inform and educate the public about developments in genomics and biotechnology - Develop capacity to address ethical, social and cultural issues - Improve accessibility and equity Politics - Strengthen understanding, leadership and support at the political level for biotechnology

  8. The business case for health-care quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swensen, Stephen J; Dilling, James A; Mc Carty, Patrick M; Bolton, Jeffrey W; Harper, Charles M

    2013-03-01

    The business case for health-care quality improvement is presented. We contend that investment in process improvement is aligned with patients' interests, the organization's reputation, and the engagement of their workforce. Four groups benefit directly from quality improvement: patients, providers, insurers, and employers. There is ample opportunity, even in today's predominantly pay-for-volume (that is, evolving toward value-based purchasing) insurance system, for providers to deliver care that is in the best interest of the patient while improving their financial performance.

  9. The business case for health-care quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swensen, Stephen J; Dilling, James A; Mc Carty, Patrick M; Bolton, Jeffrey W; Harper, Charles M

    2013-03-01

    The business case for health-care quality improvement is presented. We contend that investment in process improvement is aligned with patients' interests, the organization's reputation, and the engagement of their workforce. Four groups benefit directly from quality improvement: patients, providers, insurers, and employers. There is ample opportunity, even in today's predominantly pay-for-volume (that is, evolving toward value-based purchasing) insurance system, for providers to deliver care that is in the best interest of the patient while improving their financial performance. PMID:23429226

  10. Measuring and improving patient safety through health information technology: The Health IT Safety Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Hardeep; Sittig, Dean F

    2016-04-01

    Health information technology (health IT) has potential to improve patient safety but its implementation and use has led to unintended consequences and new safety concerns. A key challenge to improving safety in health IT-enabled healthcare systems is to develop valid, feasible strategies to measure safety concerns at the intersection of health IT and patient safety. In response to the fundamental conceptual and methodological gaps related to both defining and measuring health IT-related patient safety, we propose a new framework, the Health IT Safety (HITS) measurement framework, to provide a conceptual foundation for health IT-related patient safety measurement, monitoring, and improvement. The HITS framework follows both Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) and sociotechnical approaches and calls for new measures and measurement activities to address safety concerns in three related domains: 1) concerns that are unique and specific to technology (e.g., to address unsafe health IT related to unavailable or malfunctioning hardware or software); 2) concerns created by the failure to use health IT appropriately or by misuse of health IT (e.g. to reduce nuisance alerts in the electronic health record (EHR)), and 3) the use of health IT to monitor risks, health care processes and outcomes and identify potential safety concerns before they can harm patients (e.g. use EHR-based algorithms to identify patients at risk for medication errors or care delays). The framework proposes to integrate both retrospective and prospective measurement of HIT safety with an organization's existing clinical risk management and safety programs. It aims to facilitate organizational learning, comprehensive 360 degree assessment of HIT safety that includes vendor involvement, refinement of measurement tools and strategies, and shared responsibility to identify problems and implement solutions. A long term framework goal is to enable rigorous measurement that helps achieve the safety

  11. Measuring and improving patient safety through health information technology: The Health IT Safety Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Hardeep; Sittig, Dean F

    2016-04-01

    Health information technology (health IT) has potential to improve patient safety but its implementation and use has led to unintended consequences and new safety concerns. A key challenge to improving safety in health IT-enabled healthcare systems is to develop valid, feasible strategies to measure safety concerns at the intersection of health IT and patient safety. In response to the fundamental conceptual and methodological gaps related to both defining and measuring health IT-related patient safety, we propose a new framework, the Health IT Safety (HITS) measurement framework, to provide a conceptual foundation for health IT-related patient safety measurement, monitoring, and improvement. The HITS framework follows both Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) and sociotechnical approaches and calls for new measures and measurement activities to address safety concerns in three related domains: 1) concerns that are unique and specific to technology (e.g., to address unsafe health IT related to unavailable or malfunctioning hardware or software); 2) concerns created by the failure to use health IT appropriately or by misuse of health IT (e.g. to reduce nuisance alerts in the electronic health record (EHR)), and 3) the use of health IT to monitor risks, health care processes and outcomes and identify potential safety concerns before they can harm patients (e.g. use EHR-based algorithms to identify patients at risk for medication errors or care delays). The framework proposes to integrate both retrospective and prospective measurement of HIT safety with an organization's existing clinical risk management and safety programs. It aims to facilitate organizational learning, comprehensive 360 degree assessment of HIT safety that includes vendor involvement, refinement of measurement tools and strategies, and shared responsibility to identify problems and implement solutions. A long term framework goal is to enable rigorous measurement that helps achieve the safety

  12. Improving Oral Health Status of Children in Tabuk, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziad D. Baghdadi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This comprehensive community health intervention aimed to improve the oral health and reduce the incidence of dental caries in Tabuk schoolchildren. The program supports the public health pyramid that provides a framework to improve health and included creating and evaluating a school oral health surveillance system, applying fluoride varnish and dental sealants on high- and medium-caries risk children, and providing treatment for existing diseases. In a pilot phase, 48 children (26 males 22 females; mean age 6.42; dmft 9.33, Decayed, Missing, or Filled Primary and Permanent Teeth (DMFT 3.27 received the dental services, both treatment and prevention. Three hundred seventy-eight composite resin or resin-modified light-cured glass ionomer restorations were placed. One-hundred and eighteen teeth received pulp therapy (pulpotomy or pulpectomy, ten of which received stainless steel crowns. A total of 72 teeth were extracted due to caries. To understand the effects of dental disease on children, as perceived by parents, an oral health-related quality of life survey was completed and analyzed. Results found an underestimation of the role the teeth play, particularly primary teeth, in the general health and wellbeing of the child. The program’s main evaluation effort focused on the process and outcome objectives, including the number of children received care, number of teeth received restorations and sealants, and number of children received fluoride varnish, etc. Analyzing the effect of the program on oral hygiene revealed an improvement in oral health, as a direct result of oral health educational sessions and one-to-one counseling. There is an urgent need to expand the program to include all primary schools.

  13. World Health Organization global policy for improvement of oral health--World Health Assembly 2007

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Poul Erik

    2008-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) Global Oral Health Programme has worked hard over the past five years to increase the awareness of oral health worldwide as an important component of general health and quality of life. Meanwhile, oral disease is still a major public health problem in high income...

  14. Sustainable Development Goals for Monitoring Action to Improve Global Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesario, Sandra K

    2016-01-01

    Women and children compose the largest segment of the more than 1 billion people worldwide who are unable to access needed health care services. To address this and other global health issues, the United Nations brought together world leaders to address growing health inequities, first by establishing the Millennium Development Goals in 2000 and more recently establishing Sustainable Development Goals, which are an intergovernmental set of 17 goals consisting of 169 targets with 304 indicators to measure compliance; they were designed to be applicable to all countries. Goal number 3, "Good Health and Well-Being: Ensure Heathy Lives and Promote Well-Being for All at All Ages," includes targets to improve the health of women and newborns.

  15. Sustainable Development Goals for Monitoring Action to Improve Global Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesario, Sandra K

    2016-01-01

    Women and children compose the largest segment of the more than 1 billion people worldwide who are unable to access needed health care services. To address this and other global health issues, the United Nations brought together world leaders to address growing health inequities, first by establishing the Millennium Development Goals in 2000 and more recently establishing Sustainable Development Goals, which are an intergovernmental set of 17 goals consisting of 169 targets with 304 indicators to measure compliance; they were designed to be applicable to all countries. Goal number 3, "Good Health and Well-Being: Ensure Heathy Lives and Promote Well-Being for All at All Ages," includes targets to improve the health of women and newborns. PMID:27520607

  16. Improving the physical health in long-term psychiatric inpatients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Peter; Davidsen, A.S.; Killian, R.;

    2014-01-01

    programme to improve physical health is effective. Methods: An extension of the European Network for Promoting the Health of Residents in Psychiatric and Social Care Institutions (HELPS) project further developed as a 12-month controlled cluster-randomized intervention study in the Danish centre. Waist......, but not significant, reduction in waist circumference, while participants in the control group showed a significant increase in waist circumference. Conclusions: The intervention had a positive effect on the physical health of the patients measured by a reduction in the increase of waist circumference. © The Royal...... Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2014....

  17. Sleep and Breathing at High Altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickramasinghe, Himanshu; Anholm, James D.

    1999-01-01

    Sleep at high altitude is characterized by poor subjective quality, increased awakenings, frequent brief arousals, marked nocturnal hypoxemia, and periodic breathing. A change in sleep architecture with an increase in light sleep and decreasing slow-wave and REM sleep have been demonstrated. Periodic breathing with central apnea is almost universally seen amongst sojourners to high altitude, although it is far less common in long-standing high altitude dwellers. Hypobaric hypoxia in concert with periodic breathing appears to be the principal cause of sleep disruption at altitude. Increased sleep fragmentation accounts for the poor sleep quality and may account for some of the worsened daytime performance at high altitude. Hypoxic sleep disruption contributes to the symptoms of acute mountain sickness. Hypoxemia at high altitude is most severe during sleep. Acetazolamide improves sleep, AMS symptoms, and hypoxemia at high altitude. Low doses of a short acting benzodiazepine (temazepam) may also be useful in improving sleep in high altitude. PMID:11898114

  18. Breathing exercises as adjuvant in the management of COPD : An overview

    OpenAIRE

    Kant S; Singh G.

    2006-01-01

    COPD is the most common chronic lung disease. It is a major cause of chronic morbidity, mortality and health care used throughout the world and resulting in an economic and social burden that is both substantial and increasing also in our country. Pharmacotherapy alone does not optimize and have limited role in im-proving dyspnea, exercise limitation and quality of life which are characteristic and troublesome features of COPD. Breathing exercises are popular among patients, physician and p...

  19. Children’s Oral Health: The Opportunity for Improvement Using the WHO Health Promoting School Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. Macnab

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The health and quality of life of a large proportion of the world’s children are compromised by dental caries and periodontal disease. Those in developing countries and from disadvantaged populations suffer disproportionately from these forms of poor oral health; however, much of the primary disease and secondary pathology is preventable by simple and inexpensive measures that children can readily learn. WHO health promoting schools (HPS are an established model for addressing public health issues through education of children in a manner that achieves acquisition of knowledge and health practices that promote behaviours that positively impact determinants of health. HPS programs that address poor oral health have achieved improvement in oral health practices and reduction in caries rates among disadvantaged populations of children. WHO has called for more programs to address the “epidemic” of poor oral health worldwide, and the WHO HPS model appears to be a relevant and applicable way forward. Health care professionals and educators who want to improve the health and quality of life of children related to caries and periodontal disease now have an opportunity to collaborate to initiate, deliver, and evaluate community-based HPS interventions using proven concepts, content, and process.

  20. Improving the quality of health care: what's taking so long?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassin, Mark R

    2013-10-01

    Nearly fourteen years ago the Institute of Medicine's report, To Err Is Human: Building a Safer Health System, triggered a national movement to improve patient safety. Despite the substantial and concentrated efforts that followed, quality and safety problems in health care continue to routinely result in harm to patients. Desired progress will not be achieved unless substantial changes are made to the way in which quality improvement is conducted. Alongside important efforts to eliminate preventable complications of care, there must also be an effort to seriously address the widespread overuse of health services. That overuse, which places patients at risk of harm and wastes resources at the same time, has been almost entirely left out of recent quality improvement endeavors. Newer and much more effective strategies and tools are needed to address the complex quality challenges confronting health care. Tools such as Lean, Six Sigma, and change management are proving highly effective in tackling problems as difficult as hand-off communication failures and patient falls. Finally, the organizational culture of most American hospitals and other health care organizations must change. To create a culture of safety, leaders must eliminate intimidating behaviors that suppress the reporting of errors and unsafe conditions. Leaders must also hold everyone accountable for adherence to safe practices. PMID:24101066

  1. Iron supplementation reduces the frequency and severity of breath-holding attacks in non-anaemic children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Zehetner

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Iron supplementation reduces the frequency and severity of breath-holding attacks (BHAs, particularly in children with iron deficiency. The issue of iron supplementation is less clear for Westernized children with BHAs who present to an outpatient community clinic and are not iron-deficient. This is the first reported case series of iron-replete children with frequent and disabling breath-holding attacks who have responded to a course of oral iron supplementation. This intervention is safe, improves quality of life for both child and carer, and is significantly cost-effective in terms of health resource utilization.

  2. Taking Her Breath Away: The Rise of COPD in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disparities Taking Her Breath Away: The Rise of COPD in Women Disparities in Lung Health Series More ... the U.S. live with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema. Millions more ...

  3. Improved health outcomes in urban slums through infrastructure upgrading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butala, Neel M; VanRooyen, Michael J; Patel, Ronak Bhailal

    2010-09-01

    The world is rapidly urbanizing with over half the population now living in urban areas. As the urban population grows, so does the proportion of these persons living in slums where conditions are deplorable. These conditions concentrate health hazards leading to higher rates of morbidity and mortality. This growing problem creates a unique challenge for policymakers and public health practitioners. While the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) aim to address these conditions and standards for water and sanitation as well as pertinent health outcomes, little evidence on interventions exists to guide policymakers. Upgrades in slum household water and sanitation systems have not yet been rigorously evaluated to demonstrate whether there is a direct link to improved health outcomes. This study aims to show that slum upgrading as carried out in Ahmedabad, India, led to a significant decline in waterborne illness incidence. We employ a quasi-experimental regression model using health insurance claims (for 2001-2008) as a proxy for passive surveillance of disease incidence. We found that slum upgrading reduced a claimant's likelihood of claiming for waterborne illness from 32% to 14% and from 25% to 10% excluding mosquito-related illnesses. This study shows that upgrades in slum household infrastructure can lead to improved health outcomes and help achieve the MDGs. It also provides guidance on how upgrading in this context using microfinance and a public-private partnership can provide an avenue to affect positive change. PMID:20599311

  4. Improvement of health and management of village poultry in Mozambique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Characteristics of the village poultry production are discussed, including constraints such as inadequate health care associated with Newcastle disease (ND) outbreaks as well as low productivity and inadequate housing. Once ND has been controlled, it will be essential to improve housing, nutrition and general management. (author)

  5. Scientists Improve Health & Welfare of Organic Laying Hens

    OpenAIRE

    Hinrichsen, Lena Karina; Sørensen, Jan Tind

    2012-01-01

    The mortality rate among organic laying hens is twice as high as for layers from enriched cages. In an international research collaboration scientists from Aarhus University will be investigating why this is so with the hope of improving the health and welfare of laying hens and this unsatisfactory statistic.

  6. Scientists improve health and welfare of organic laying hens

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, Janne

    2012-01-01

    The mortality rate among organic laying hens is twice as high as for layers from enriched cages. In an international research collaboration scientists from Aarhus University will be investigating why this is so with the hope of improving the health and welfare of laying hens and this dissatisfactory statistic.

  7. Submarines, spacecraft and exhaled breath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleil, Joachim D; Hansel, Armin

    2012-03-01

    Foreword The International Association of Breath Research (IABR) meetings are an eclectic gathering of researchers in the medical, environmental and instrumentation fields; our focus is on human health as assessed by the measurement and interpretation of trace chemicals in human exhaled breath. What may have escaped our notice is a complementary field of research that explores the creation and maintenance of artificial atmospheres practised by the submarine air monitoring and air purification (SAMAP) community. SAMAP is comprised of manufacturers, researchers and medical professionals dealing with the engineering and instrumentation to support human life in submarines and spacecraft (including shuttlecraft and manned rockets, high-altitude aircraft, and the International Space Station (ISS)). Here, the immediate concerns are short-term survival and long-term health in fairly confined environments where one cannot simply 'open the window' for fresh air. As such, one of the main concerns is air monitoring and the main sources of contamination are CO(2) and other constituents of human exhaled breath. Since the inaugural meeting in 1994 in Adelaide, Australia, SAMAP meetings have been held every two or three years alternating between the North American and European continents. The meetings are organized by Dr Wally Mazurek (a member of IABR) of the Defense Systems Technology Organization (DSTO) of Australia, and individual meetings are co-hosted by the navies of the countries in which they are held. An overriding focus at SAMAP is life support (oxygen availability and carbon dioxide removal). Certainly, other air constituents are also important; for example, the closed environment of a submarine or the ISS can build up contaminants from consumer products, cooking, refrigeration, accidental fires, propulsion and atmosphere maintenance. However, the most immediate concern is sustaining human metabolism: removing exhaled CO(2) and replacing metabolized O(2). Another

  8. Oronasal breathing during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saibene, F; Mognoni, P; Lafortuna, C L; Mostardi, R

    1978-12-15

    The shift from nasal to oronasal breathing (ONBS) has been observed on 73 subjects with two independent methods. A first group of 63 subjects exercising on a bicycle ergometer at increasing work load (98--196 W) has been observed. On 35 subjects the highest value of ventilation attained with nasal breathing was 40.2 +/- 9.41 . min-1 S.D. Ten subjects breathed through the mouth at all loads, while 5 never opened the mouth. On 13 subjects it was not possible to make reliable measurements. On a second group of 10 subjects utilizing a different techniques which did not need a face mask, the ventilation at which one changes the pattern of breathing was found to be 44.2 +/- 13.51 . min-1 S.D. On the same subjects nasal resistance did not show any correlation with ONBS. It is concluded that ONBS is not solely determined by nasal resistance, though an indirect effect due to hypoventilation and hence to changes in alveolar air composition cannot be ruled out. It is likely that ONBS is also influenced by psychological factors. PMID:569826

  9. The Breath of Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Josephsen, Jens

    The present preliminary text is a short thematic presentation in biological inorganic chemistry meant to illustrate general and inorganic (especially coordination) chemistry in biochemistry. The emphasis is on molecular models to explain features of the complicated mechanisms essential to breathing...

  10. International research needs for improving sleep and health of workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogi, Kazutaka

    2005-01-01

    Research needs in identifying preventive measures dealing with working time arrangements and associated sleep problems are reviewed. These needs are based on the recognition of a range of risk factors for health involving disturbed circadian rhythms leading to various levels of sleep deficits. The review takes account of recent joint change approaches that address both working time arrangements and various relevant intervening factors. As examples of such approaches, voluntary industry-based guidelines for improving shift work are examined. Also reviewed is evidence indicating the effects of improved working time arrangements and sleep hygiene on the tolerance of workers working irregular shifts. Trends in action-oriented risk assessment are further discussed as the effects on health and sleep of these workers may be modified by complex aspects related to working situations, family and social conditions, personal characteristics and social support. Generally relevant are not only the relationships between sleep-affecting factors and health, but also advances in taking the various support measures. The effective use of participatory steps is found important in dealing with working time arrangements and associated health and sleep problems together. It is thus considered important to study (a) the efficacy of joint change approaches addressing complex sleep and health factors, (b) effective procedures for action-oriented health risk assessment in various work life situations, and (c) the relevance of innovative participatory steps to improving health and tolerance of workers. Future research topics mentioned by the participants of the international symposium on night and shift work held in Santos in 2003 are presented, and international efforts to promote research into these aspects in field conditions are discussed. Interactive research involving local people appears crucial.

  11. International research needs for improving sleep and health of workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogi, Kazutaka

    2005-01-01

    Research needs in identifying preventive measures dealing with working time arrangements and associated sleep problems are reviewed. These needs are based on the recognition of a range of risk factors for health involving disturbed circadian rhythms leading to various levels of sleep deficits. The review takes account of recent joint change approaches that address both working time arrangements and various relevant intervening factors. As examples of such approaches, voluntary industry-based guidelines for improving shift work are examined. Also reviewed is evidence indicating the effects of improved working time arrangements and sleep hygiene on the tolerance of workers working irregular shifts. Trends in action-oriented risk assessment are further discussed as the effects on health and sleep of these workers may be modified by complex aspects related to working situations, family and social conditions, personal characteristics and social support. Generally relevant are not only the relationships between sleep-affecting factors and health, but also advances in taking the various support measures. The effective use of participatory steps is found important in dealing with working time arrangements and associated health and sleep problems together. It is thus considered important to study (a) the efficacy of joint change approaches addressing complex sleep and health factors, (b) effective procedures for action-oriented health risk assessment in various work life situations, and (c) the relevance of innovative participatory steps to improving health and tolerance of workers. Future research topics mentioned by the participants of the international symposium on night and shift work held in Santos in 2003 are presented, and international efforts to promote research into these aspects in field conditions are discussed. Interactive research involving local people appears crucial. PMID:15732307

  12. Translating evidence into population health improvement: strategies and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolf, Steven H; Purnell, Jason Q; Simon, Sarah M; Zimmerman, Emily B; Camberos, Gabriela J; Haley, Amber; Fields, Robert P

    2015-03-18

    Among the challenges facing research translation-the effort to move evidence into policy and practice-is that key questions chosen by investigators and funders may not always align with the information priorities of decision makers, nor are the findings always presented in a form that is useful for or relevant to the decisions at hand. This disconnect is a problem particularly for population health, where the change agents who can make the biggest difference in improving health behaviors and social and environmental conditions are generally nonscientists outside of the health professions. To persuade an audience that does not read scientific journals, strong science may not be enough to elicit change. Achieving influence in population health often requires four ingredients for success: research that is responsive to user needs, an understanding of the decision-making environment, effective stakeholder engagement, and strategic communication. This article reviews the principles and provides examples from a national and local initiative.

  13. Probiotics: can they be used to improve oral health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gungor, O E; Kirzioglu, Z; Kivanc, M

    2015-01-01

    The role of probiotic bacteria in improving human health has been an attractive subject for researchers since the beginning of the 20(th) century. They have been used to control gastro-intestinal infections, to promote immunity and to prevent various diseases (allergies, urogenital infections, etc.). However, the use of beneficial bacteria in the field of dentistry has only recently gained interest. Investigation of the effects of probiotic bacteria on oral health has become an important research subject. These studies are still in the early stages, however results show that probiotic bacteria are effective against tooth caries, periodontal disease, oral mucosal lesions and oral malodour. This review provides information on the effects of probiotics--well-known for their effects on general health, and therefore more widely used in healthcare--on oral and dental health, in order to promote their use/prescription by physicians and patients.

  14. Animal-Assisted Therapy for Improving Human Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibel Cevizci

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Animal Assisted Therapy (AAT or Pet Therapy is an adjunctive therapy by taking advantage of human and animal interaction, activate the physiological and psychological mechanisms, initiate positive changes improving health in metabolism. In recent years, this interaction are in use to treat psychological and psychiatric disorders such as stress, depression, loneliness, pervasive developmental disorders affect negatively to human health. Furthermore, AAT has been increasingly used to improve quality of life, hypertension, cardiovascular diseases, chronic illnesses such as cancer and AIDS. The aim of this paper is to identify AAT by reviewing human and animal interaction, evaluate how AAT has a scientific background from past to now. Also, we aim to give some information about the risks, institutional applications, some factors referring AAT’s mechanism of action and chronic diseases, psychological and physical improvements provided with animal assisted therapies. The therapy results will be evaluated more advisable providing AAT is being applied with public health specialist, veterinarian, physician, psychologist, psychiatrist and veterinary public health experts who are monitor applications. Especially, the psychosomatic effects result from physical, emotional and play mechanism of action of HDT can be used for improving quality of life in individuals with chronic diseases. In Turkey, there is no any investigation which have been performed in this scientific field. It is quitely important to evaluate the benefits of this therapy accurately and to select various methods proper to diseases. Consequently, it is obvious that AAT will be considered by the healthcare services as a supportive therapy process for improving human health in Turkey and needs further studies. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2009; 8(3.000: 263-272

  15. Dispute, dissent and the place of health promotion in a "disrupted tradition" of health improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Peter

    2004-04-01

    Dispute over the nature and purpose of health promotion has characterized the development of this field of activity in recent times. This paper explores such disputes and offers an explanation for them. I argue that health promotion and related fields (such as public health and health education) share in a "disrupted tradition." I assert that "health promotion" can be seen as the term presently favored by some to represent an extensive "tradition of protecting and improving the health of the public." Its relative favor and currency can be ascribed to a degree of power shift between competing groups operating with separate conceptions of health, away from biomedicine and towards more socially rooted understanding. Relative degrees of power and influence possessed by these groups at different historical times have contributed to the "disruption" of the tradition. Understanding this disruption helps explain a number of historiographical and theoretical problems besetting the field. PMID:15323061

  16. Improving intra-fractional target position accuracy using a 3D surface surrogate for left breast irradiation using the respiratory-gated deep-inspiration breath-hold technique.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Rong

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the use of 3D optical surface imaging as a surrogate for respiratory gated deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH for left breast irradiation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patients with left-sided breast cancer treated with lumpectomy or mastectomy were selected as candidates for DIBH treatment for their external beam radiation therapy. Treatment plans were created on both free breathing (FB and DIBH computed tomography (CT simulation scans to determine dosimetric benefits from DIBH. The Real-time Position Management (RPM system was used to acquire patient's breathing trace during DIBH CT acquisition and treatment delivery. The reference 3D surface models from FB and DIBH CT scans were generated and transferred to the "AlignRT" system for patient positioning and real-time treatment monitoring. MV Cine images were acquired during treatment for each beam as quality assurance for intra-fractional position verification. The chest wall excursions measured on these images were used to define the actual target position during treatment, and to investigate the accuracy and reproducibility of RPM and AlignRT. RESULTS: Reduction in heart dose can be achieved using DIBH for left breast/chest wall radiation. RPM was shown to have inferior correlation with the actual target position, as determined by the MV Cine imaging. Therefore, RPM alone may not be an adequate surrogate in defining the breath-hold level. Alternatively, the AlignRT surface imaging demonstrated a superior correlation with the actual target positioning during DIBH. Both the vertical and magnitude real-time deltas (RTDs reported by AlignRT can be used as the gating parameter, with a recommended threshold of ±3 mm and 5 mm, respectively. CONCLUSION: The RPM system alone may not be sufficient for the required level of accuracy in left-sided breast/CW DIBH treatments. The 3D surface imaging can be used to ensure patient setup and monitor inter- and intra- fractional motions

  17. Breathing Rate Prediction Using Finger-tip Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Rahmanian, Holakou

    2015-01-01

    Personalized health-care is trending and individuals tend to wear sensors in order to record their own health data. As a part of this trend, any redundancy in the data captured by wearable sensors must be exploited to reduce the number of devices one may wear. In this thesis, we work with a device which senses breathing and pulse through pressure tube and pulse oximetry, respectively. Extracting the dependency between these two measurements, we approximately predict the breathing rate by firs...

  18. Productivity improvement and job satisfaction among public health nutritionists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeersch, J A; Feeney, M J; Wesner, K M; Dahl, T

    1979-12-01

    A workshop for public health nutritionists which scrutinized ways to improve productivity and job satisfaction is reported. Participants believed that productivity could be improved most by improving the execution of tasks, followed by better planning of programs, office management, and skills in group education, and by delegation of non-professional activities to lesser-trained personnel. Job satisfaction of public health nutritionists could be increased by reducing stress and discomfort and promoting feelings of personal effectiveness and efficiency through role clarification and by management training. There is a large potential for greater productivity in the profession. Realization of this potential will contribute measurably to the cost-effectiveness of nutritional services. PMID:117042

  19. Medication effects on sleep and breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seda, Gilbert; Tsai, Sheila; Lee-Chiong, Teofilo

    2014-09-01

    Sleep respiration is regulated by circadian, endocrine, mechanical and chemical factors, and characterized by diminished ventilatory drive and changes in Pao2 and Paco2 thresholds. Hypoxemia and hypercapnia are more pronounced during rapid eye movement. Breathing is influenced by sleep stage and airway muscle tone. Patient factors include medical comorbidities and body habitus. Medications partially improve obstructive sleep apnea and stabilize periodic breathing at altitude. Potential adverse consequences of medications include precipitation or worsening of disorders. Risk factors for adverse medication effects include aging, medical disorders, and use of multiple medications that affect respiration.

  20. Recommendations for evaluation of health care improvement initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Gareth J; Carson-Stevens, Andrew; Luff, Donna F; McPherson, Marianne E; Goldmann, Donald A

    2013-01-01

    Intensive efforts are underway across the world to improve the quality of health care. It is important to use evaluation methods to identify improvement efforts that work well before they are replicated across a broad range of contexts. Evaluation methods need to provide an understanding of why an improvement initiative has or has not worked and how it can be improved in the future. However, improvement initiatives are complex, and evaluation is not always well aligned with the intent and maturity of the intervention, thus limiting the applicability of the results. We describe how initiatives can be grouped into 1 of 3 improvement phases-innovation, testing, and scale-up and spread-depending on the degree of belief in the associated interventions. We describe how many evaluation approaches often lead to a finding of no effect, consistent with what has been termed Rossi's Iron Law of Evaluation. Alternatively, we recommend that the guiding question of evaluation in health care improvement be, "How and in what contexts does a new model work or can be amended to work?" To answer this, we argue for the adoption of formative, theory-driven evaluation. Specifically, evaluations start by identifying a program theory that comprises execution and content theories. These theories should be revised as the initiative develops by applying a rapid-cycle evaluation approach, in which evaluation findings are fed back to the initiative leaders on a regular basis. We describe such evaluation strategies, accounting for the phase of improvement as well as the context and setting in which the improvement concept is being deployed. Finally, we challenge the improvement and evaluation communities to come together to refine the specific methods required so as to avoid the trap of Rossi's Iron Law. PMID:24268081

  1. Big data in global health: improving health in low- and middle-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyber, Rosemary; Vaillancourt, Samuel; Perry, William; Mannava, Priya; Folaranmi, Temitope; Celi, Leo Anthony

    2015-03-01

    Over the last decade, a massive increase in data collection and analysis has occurred in many fields. In the health sector, however, there has been relatively little progress in data analysis and application despite a rapid rise in data production. Given adequate governance, improvements in the quality, quantity, storage and analysis of health data could lead to substantial improvements in many health outcomes. In low- and middle-income countries in particular, the creation of an information feedback mechanism can move health-care delivery towards results-based practice and improve the effective use of scarce resources. We review the evolving definition of big data and the possible advantages of - and problems in - using such data to improve health-care delivery in low- and middle-income countries. The collection of big data as mobile-phone based services improve may mean that development phases required elsewhere can be skipped. However, poor infrastructure may prevent interoperability and the safe use of patient data. An appropriate governance framework must be developed and enforced to protect individuals and ensure that health-care delivery is tailored to the characteristics and values of the target communities. PMID:25767300

  2. Big data in global health: improving health in low- and middle-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyber, Rosemary; Vaillancourt, Samuel; Perry, William; Mannava, Priya; Folaranmi, Temitope; Celi, Leo Anthony

    2015-03-01

    Over the last decade, a massive increase in data collection and analysis has occurred in many fields. In the health sector, however, there has been relatively little progress in data analysis and application despite a rapid rise in data production. Given adequate governance, improvements in the quality, quantity, storage and analysis of health data could lead to substantial improvements in many health outcomes. In low- and middle-income countries in particular, the creation of an information feedback mechanism can move health-care delivery towards results-based practice and improve the effective use of scarce resources. We review the evolving definition of big data and the possible advantages of - and problems in - using such data to improve health-care delivery in low- and middle-income countries. The collection of big data as mobile-phone based services improve may mean that development phases required elsewhere can be skipped. However, poor infrastructure may prevent interoperability and the safe use of patient data. An appropriate governance framework must be developed and enforced to protect individuals and ensure that health-care delivery is tailored to the characteristics and values of the target communities.

  3. Cardiovascular and Respiratory Effect of Yogic Slow Breathing in the Yoga Beginner: What Is the Best Approach?

    OpenAIRE

    Heather Mason; Matteo Vandoni; Giacomo deBarbieri; Erwan Codrons; Veena Ugargol; Luciano Bernardi

    2013-01-01

    Slow breathing increases cardiac-vagal baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), improves oxygen saturation, lowers blood pressure, and reduces anxiety. Within the yoga tradition slow breathing is often paired with a contraction of the glottis muscles. This resistance breath “ujjayi” is performed at various rates and ratios of inspiration/expiration. To test whether ujjayi had additional positive effects to slow breathing, we compared BRS and ventilatory control under different breathing patterns (equal/...

  4. StaR Child Health: improving global standards for child health research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offringa, Martin; Needham, Allison C; Chan, Winnie W Y

    2013-11-01

    Standards for Research (StaR) in Child Health, founded in 2009, addresses the current scarcity of and deficiencies in pediatric clinical trials. StaR Child Health brings together leading international experts devoted to developing practical, evidence-based standards to enrich the reliability and relevance of pediatric clinical research. Through a systematic "knowledge to action" plan, StaR Child Health creates opportunities to improve the evidence base for child health across the world. To date, six standards have been published and four more are under development. It is now time to use these standards. Improving the design, conduct and reporting of pediatric clinical trials will ultimately advance the quality of health care provided to children across the globe.

  5. Psychology and health: contributions of psychology to the improvement of health and health care

    OpenAIRE

    Holtzman, W. H.; Evans, R. I.; Kennedy, S.; Iscoe, I.

    1987-01-01

    Psychology as both a science and a profession has been closely identified with other disciplines in the broad field of health since the turn of the present century. Recent advances in health care have reinforced the growing belief that the promotion of health and the prevention and treatment of illness can be greatly enhanced by incorporating the scientific findings and modern techniques of psychology into everyday practices. This review outlines the contributions of psychology to health care...

  6. The effectiveness of M-health technologies for improving health and health services: a systematic review protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Vikram

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The application of mobile computing and communication technology is rapidly expanding in the fields of health care and public health. This systematic review will summarise the evidence for the effectiveness of mobile technology interventions for improving health and health service outcomes (M-health around the world. Findings To be included in the review interventions must aim to improve or promote health or health service use and quality, employing any mobile computing and communication technology. This includes: (1 interventions designed to improve diagnosis, investigation, treatment, monitoring and management of disease; (2 interventions to deliver treatment or disease management programmes to patients, health promotion interventions, and interventions designed to improve treatment compliance; and (3 interventions to improve health care processes e.g. appointment attendance, result notification, vaccination reminders. A comprehensive, electronic search strategy will be used to identify controlled studies, published since 1990, and indexed in MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Global Health, Web of Science, the Cochrane Library, or the UK NHS Health Technology Assessment database. The search strategy will include terms (and synonyms for the following mobile electronic devices (MEDs and a range of compatible media: mobile phone; personal digital assistant (PDA; handheld computer (e.g. tablet PC; PDA phone (e.g. BlackBerry, Palm Pilot; Smartphone; enterprise digital assistant; portable media player (i.e. MP3 or MP4 player; handheld video game console. No terms for health or health service outcomes will be included, to ensure that all applications of mobile technology in public health and health services are identified. Bibliographies of primary studies and review articles meeting the inclusion criteria will be searched manually to identify further eligible studies. Data on objective and self-reported outcomes and study quality will

  7. Physical health nurse consultant role to improve physical health in mental health services: A carer's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happell, Brenda; Wilson, Karen; Platania-Phung, Chris; Stanton, Robert

    2016-06-01

    The physical health of people diagnosed with a mental illness is significantly poorer in comparison with the general population. Awareness of this health disparity is increasing; however, strategies to address the problem are limited. Carers play an important role in the physical health care of people with mental illness, particularly in facilitating navigation of and advocating in the health care system. A specialist physical health nurse consultant position has been suggested as a way to address the physical health care disparity and limited research available suggests that positive outcomes are possible. In the present study, a qualitative exploratory research project was undertaken, involving in-depth interviews with people identifying as mental health carers. Two focus groups and one individual interview were conducted involving a total of 13 carers. The resulting data were analyzed thematically. Views and opinions about the proposed physical health nurse consultant (PHNC) position were sought during these interviews and are reported in this paper. Two main sub-themes were evident relating to characteristics of this role: reliability and consistency; and communication and support. Essentially carers expressed a need for support for themselves and consumers in addressing physical health concerns. Successful implementation of this position would require a consistent and reliable approach. Carers are significant stakeholders in the physical health of consumers of mental health services and their active involvement in identifying and tailoring services, including development of the physical health nurse consultant must be seen as a priority. PMID:26876094

  8. Nature-Based Strategies for Improving Urban Health and Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Michelle C; South, Eugenia C; Branas, Charles C

    2015-10-01

    Place-based programs are being noticed as key opportunities to prevent disease and promote public health and safety for populations at-large. As one key type of place-based intervention, nature-based and green space strategies can play an especially large role in improving health and safety for dwellers in urban environments such as US legacy cities that lack nature and greenery. In this paper, we describe the current understanding of place-based influences on public health and safety. We focus on nonchemical environmental factors, many of which are related to urban abandonment and blight. We then review findings from studies of nature-based interventions regarding impacts on health, perceptions of safety, and crime. Based on our findings, we suggest that further research in this area will require (1) refined measures of green space, nature, and health and safety for cities, (2) interdisciplinary science and cross-sector policy collaboration, (3) observational studies as well as randomized controlled experiments and natural experiments using appropriate spatial counterfactuals and mixed methods, and (4) return-on-investment calculations of potential economic, social, and health costs and benefits of urban greening initiatives.

  9. Physical improvement and its impact on the health of students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konova L.A.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The directions of physical improvement in personal and individual approach and its impact on the health of students. The definitions of the concept of physical perfection and its main components: strength, speed, endurance, agility, flexibility. Special attention is paid to the importance of physical perfection as part of positive self-identity. Outlines the theory of the acquisition of physical improvement in the availability of a clear human motivation. It is noted that physical perfection is in need of motivation on the part of the student, the proper selection of a complex exercise and may be based only on a personal and individual approach based on the physical abilities of each student. Show the direction of their own physical fitness improvement during the self-study. It is shown that promoting the harmonious development of all-round, avoiding harmful habits, improve mental and physical performance and confidence in their own ability to significantly change the person's self esteem.

  10. Evidence for Health I: Producing evidence for improving health and reducing inequities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andermann, Anne; Pang, Tikki; Newton, John N; Davis, Adrian; Panisset, Ulysses

    2016-01-01

    In an ideal world, researchers and decision-makers would be involved from the outset in co-producing evidence, with local health needs assessments informing the research agenda and research evidence informing the actions taken to improve health. The first step in improving the health of individuals and populations is therefore gaining a better understanding of what the main health problems are, and of these, which are the most urgent priorities by using both quantitative data to develop a health portrait and qualitative data to better understand why the local population thinks that addressing certain health challenges should be prioritized in their context. Understanding the causes of these health problems often involves analytical research, such as case-control and cohort studies, or qualitative studies to better understand how more complex exposures lead to specific health problems (e.g. by interviewing local teenagers discovering that watching teachers smoke in the school yard, peer pressure, and media influence smoking initiation among youth). Such research helps to develop a logic model to better map out the proximal and distal causes of poor health and to determine potential pathways for intervening and impacting health outcomes. Rarely is there a single 'cure' or stand-alone intervention, but rather, a continuum of strategies are needed from diagnosis and treatment of patients already affected, to disease prevention, health promotion and addressing the upstream social determinants of health. Research for developing and testing more upstream interventions must often go beyond randomized controlled trials, which are expensive, less amenable to more complex interventions, and can be associated with certain ethical challenges. Indeed, a much neglected area of the research cycle is implementation and evaluation research, which often involves quasi-experimental research study designs as well as qualitative research, to better understand how to derive the greatest

  11. Primary health care contribution to improve health outcomes in Bogota-Colombia: a longitudinal ecological analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosquera Paola A

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colombia has a highly segmented and fragmented national health system that contributes to inequitable health outcomes. In 2004 the district government of Bogota initiated a Primary Health Care (PHC strategy to improve health care access and population health status. This study aims to analyse the contribution of the PHC strategy to the improvement of health outcomes controlling for socioeconomic variables. Methods A longitudinal ecological analysis using data from secondary sources was carried out. The analysis used data from 2003 and 2007 (one year before and 3 years after the PHC implementation. A Primary Health Care Index (PHCI of coverage intensity was constructed. According to the PHCI, localities were classified into two groups: high and low coverage. A multivariate analysis using a Poisson regression model for each year separately and a Panel Poisson regression model to assess changes between the groups over the years was developed. Dependent variables were infant mortality rate, under-5 mortality rate, infant mortality rate due to acute diarrheal disease and pneumonia, prevalence of acute malnutrition, vaccination coverage for diphtheria, pertussis, tetanus (DPT and prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding. The independent variable was the PHCI. Control variables were sewerage coverage, health system insurance coverage and quality of life index. Results The high PHCI localities as compared with the low PHCI localities showed significant risk reductions of under-5 mortality (13.8% and infant mortality due to pneumonia (37.5% between 2003 and 2007. The probability of being vaccinated for DPT also showed a significant increase of 4.9%. The risk of infant mortality and of acute malnutrition in children under-5 years was lesser in the high coverage group than in the low one; however relative changes were not statistically significant. Conclusions Despite the adverse contextual conditions and the limitations imposed by the

  12. Improvement of teamwork in health care through interprofessional education

    OpenAIRE

    Simin Dragana; Milutinović Dragana; Brestovački Branislava; Andrijević Ilija; Cigić Tomislav

    2010-01-01

    Introduction. Collaboration, within and between healthcare teams, facilitates effective healthcare. Internationally, the development of interprofessional education, as a means to facilitate more effective teamwork in health care, has been recognized for over forty years. Objective. The aim of this paper is to evaluate students' attitudes toward the influence of interprofessional education on improvement of collaboration and teamwork. Methods. The research was conducted by interviewing student...

  13. Is walking to school associated with improved metabolic health?

    OpenAIRE

    Pizarro Andreia Nogueira; Ribeiro José Carlos; Marques Elisa Amélia; Mota Jorge; Santos Maria Paula

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Active commuting to/from school is an important source of physical activity that has been declining over the past years. Although it is an affordable and simple way of increasing physical activity levels it is still unclear whether it has enough potential to improve health. Therefore, the aim of this cross sectional study was to examine the relationship between active commuting to/from school and metabolic risk factors in 10 to 12 year old children. Methods Participants we...

  14. Health education improves effectively therapy of inpatients with hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang Gu; Chunzhi Shi; Yibai Feng; Xianggui Wang; Hongbin Nie; Yongming Zhou; Yeqiang Liu; Xiangdong Xu

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Low rate of medication usage and blood pressure (BP) control, bad lifestyle, poor cognition to hypertension, have been obstacles in prevention from hypertensive disease and complication in Chinese cohort. Health education appears to be an impendent measure to improve this situation. To study the effect of health education on the rate of medication usage and BP control, the lifestyle, and the incidence of complication among patients with hypertension. Methods: 284 hypertensive inpatients were divided randomly into two groups: the control group was intervened with routine medication; the education group was intervened with routine medication in combination with intensive health education according to the investigation on the risk factors of cardiocerebrovascular diseases and cognitive levels of hypertensivedisease. During 12.16 ± 1.95 months of following up,the status of lifestyle, the rate of medication usage and BP control, and incidence of complications between two groups were analyzed. Results: In education group, the rate of smoking, alcohol intake, lower-salt ingesting, exercise, medication usage and BP control were improved after intervention and significantly different from those before intervention (P < 0.01). After intervention,the incidence of complications in education group and control group was 10.9% and 30.5% respectively (P < 0.01 ). Conclusion:Intensive health education is an important measure in preventing from hypertension.

  15. Health benefits of improving air quality in Taiyuan, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Deliang; Wang, Cuicui; Nie, Jiesheng; Chen, Renjie; Niu, Qiao; Kan, Haidong; Chen, Bingheng; Perera, Frederica

    2014-12-01

    Since 2000, the government in Shanxi province has mounted several initiatives and mandated factory shutdowns with the goal of reducing coal burning emissions and the environmental impacts of industrialization. We estimated the health benefits associated with air quality improvement from 2001 to 2010 in Taiyuan, Shanxi Province, using disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) and monetized the health benefits using value of statistical life (VOSL). Data were collected on annual average concentrations of particulate matter less than 10 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM10) and relevant health outcomes in Taiyuan from 2001 to 2010. Selected exposure-response functions were used to calculate the cases of death or disease attributable to PM10 annually over a 10-year period. These were summed to calculate the DALYs lost and their monetary value associated with PM10 each year between 2001 and 2010. Air quality improvement from 2001 to 2010 was estimated to have prevented 2810 premature deaths, 951 new cases of chronic bronchitis, 141,457 cases of outpatient visits, 969 cases of emergency-room visits and 31,810 cases of hospital admissions. The DALYs (VOSL) decreased by 56.92% (52.68%) from 52,937 (7274 million Yuan) in 2001 to 22,807 (3442 million Yuan) in 2010. Premature deaths accounted for almost 95% of the total DALYs. Our analysis demonstrates that air pollution abatement during the last decade in Taiyuan has generated substantial health benefits. PMID:25168129

  16. Taking a deep breath

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Renato Zacharias

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available While 2012 is going away, IJHDR prepares the celebration of its 5th anniversary! This is thus a time for reflection, to ponder on the good and bad experiences, to (rethink the next steps to improve our service to readers, authors and the scientific community at large. Along these hard, but rewarding first five years, IJHDR reached many readers and was supported by many authors all over the world, it achieved recognition by important scientific databases and societies. This success is the result of the joint work of the Editorial Board members and with GIRI, our hosting scientific society. IJHDR provided the homeopathic community an open, free, multimedia and electronic venue to share high-quality information. Focused on research articles, and open to the entire field of High Dilution research, including homeopathy and hormesis, IJHDR came to occupy a special place within the scientific map. Nevertheless, the goals achieved are not enough, but further improvement is needed for IJHDR keep on growing. Our aim for the next years is to maintain the original editorial vision and mission, while increasing even more the quality of publication. IJHDR will start 2013 by revising its Board of Consultants. Five years ago, when IJHDR was an unknown journal that still had to prove its quality, friends, idealists, and invited experts kindly contributed with their expertise to make peer review a mandatory step in the evaluation of articles. However, not only IJHDR grew, but also the editorial work did! The time arrives to include new experts in our Board of Consultant,, not only to share in the work, but to have cover a broader scope of knowledge, as HD research is a cross-disciplinary and emergent field. Also the structure of the articles will be revised. Improvement in the layout will be discussed to stimulate the use of multimedia resources like video and audio files, simulations, supplementary materials, links, and color images. Special attention will

  17. Diagnosing and improving functioning in interdisciplinary health care teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmore, Gail; Persaud, D David

    2012-01-01

    Interdisciplinary teams play a key role in the delivery of health care. Team functioning can positively or negatively impact the effective and efficient delivery of health care services as well as the personal well-being of group members. Additionally, teams must be able and willing to work together to achieve team goals within a climate that reflects commitment to team goals, accountability, respect, and trust. Not surprisingly, dysfunctional team functioning can limit the success of interdisciplinary health care teams. The first step in improving dysfunctional team function is to conduct an analysis based on criteria necessary for team success, and this article provides meaningful criteria for doing such an analysis. These are the following: a common team goal, the ability and willingness to work together to achieve team goals, decision making, communication, and team member relationships. High-functioning interdisciplinary teams must exhibit features of good team function in all key domains. If a team functions well in some domains and needs to improve in others, targeted strategies are described that can be used to improve team functioning.

  18. Integrating health promotion with quality improvement in a Swedish hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astnell, Sandra; von Thiele Schwarz, Ulrica; Hasson, Henna; Augustsson, Hanna; Stenfors-Hayes, Terese

    2016-09-01

    Integration of workplace employee health promotion (HP) and occupational health and safety (OHS) work into organizational quality improvement systems is suggested as a way to strengthen HP and OHS activities in an organization. The aim of this article was to study what consequences integration of HP, OHS and a quality improvement system called kaizen has on the frequency and type of HP and OHS activities. A quasi-experimental study design was used where an integration of the three systems for HP, OHS respectively kaizen, was performed at six intervention units at a Swedish hospital. The remaining six units served as controls. Document analysis of all employees' written improvement suggestions (kaizen notes) during 2013 was conducted. The findings show that the intervention group had more suggestions concerning HP and OHS (n = 114) when compared with the control group (n = 78) and a greater variety of HP and OHS suggestions. In addition, only the intervention group had included HP aspects. In both groups, most kaizen notes with health consideration had a preventive focus rather than rehabilitative. The intervention, i.e. the integration of HP, OHS and kaizen work, had a favourable effect on HP and OHS work when compared with the controls. The results of the study support that this system can work in practice at hospitals.

  19. African American caregiving grandmothers: results of an intervention to improve health indicators and health promotion behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Susan J; Whitley, Deborah M; Campos, Peter E

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the efficacy of an intervention to improve the health of grandmothers raising grandchildren. A pre- and post-test design was employed with 504 African American grandmother participants. The intervention included monthly home-based visitation by registered nurses (RNs) and social workers, participation in support groups and parenting classes, referrals for legal services, and early intervention services for children with special needs. The Health Risk Appraisal was used to assess health indicators and health promotion behaviors. A comparison of pre- and post-test scores indicated significant (p life satisfaction. No improvements were observed in the proportion of participants who were obese or overweight. PMID:23007422

  20. A fully integrated standalone portable cavity ringdown breath acetone analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Meixiu; Jiang, Chenyu; Gong, Zhiyong; Zhao, Xiaomeng; Chen, Zhuying; Wang, Zhennan; Kang, Meiling; Li, Yingxin; Wang, Chuji

    2015-09-01

    Breath analysis is a promising new technique for nonintrusive disease diagnosis and metabolic status monitoring. One challenging issue in using a breath biomarker for potential particular disease screening is to find a quantitative relationship between the concentration of the breath biomarker and clinical diagnostic parameters of the specific disease. In order to address this issue, we need a new instrument that is capable of conducting real-time, online breath analysis with high data throughput, so that a large scale of clinical test (more subjects) can be achieved in a short period of time. In this work, we report a fully integrated, standalone, portable analyzer based on the cavity ringdown spectroscopy technique for near-real time, online breath acetone measurements. The performance of the portable analyzer in measurements of breath acetone was interrogated and validated by using the certificated gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The results show that this new analyzer is useful for reliable online (online introduction of a breath sample without pre-treatment) breath acetone analysis with high sensitivity (57 ppb) and high data throughput (one data per second). Subsequently, the validated breath analyzer was employed for acetone measurements in 119 human subjects under various situations. The instrument design, packaging, specifications, and future improvements were also described. From an optical ringdown cavity operated by the lab-set electronics reported previously to this fully integrated standalone new instrument, we have enabled a new scientific tool suited for large scales of breath acetone analysis and created an instrument platform that can even be adopted for study of other breath biomarkers by using different lasers and ringdown mirrors covering corresponding spectral fingerprints.

  1. Reducing Food Loss And Waste While Improving The Public's Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neff, Roni A; Kanter, Rebecca; Vandevijvere, Stefanie

    2015-11-01

    An estimated 30 percent of the global food supply is lost or wasted, as is about 40 percent of the US food supply. There are valuable synergies between efforts to reduce food loss and waste and those promoting public health. To demonstrate the potential impact of building upon these synergies, we present an analysis of policies and interventions addressing food loss and waste, food security, food safety, and nutrition. We characterize as opportunities the policies and interventions that promote synergistic relationships between goals in the fields of food loss and waste and of public health. We characterize as challenges the policies and interventions that may reduce food loss and waste but compromise public health, or improve public health but increase food loss and waste. Some interventions are both opportunities and challenges. With deliberate planning and action, challenges can often be addressed and turned into opportunities. In other cases, it may be necessary to strike a balance between potential benefit in one area and risk of harm in the other. To help policy makers make the best use of the opportunities while tackling the challenges, it is essential to consider public health in efforts to reduce food loss and waste.

  2. Reducing Food Loss And Waste While Improving The Public's Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neff, Roni A; Kanter, Rebecca; Vandevijvere, Stefanie

    2015-11-01

    An estimated 30 percent of the global food supply is lost or wasted, as is about 40 percent of the US food supply. There are valuable synergies between efforts to reduce food loss and waste and those promoting public health. To demonstrate the potential impact of building upon these synergies, we present an analysis of policies and interventions addressing food loss and waste, food security, food safety, and nutrition. We characterize as opportunities the policies and interventions that promote synergistic relationships between goals in the fields of food loss and waste and of public health. We characterize as challenges the policies and interventions that may reduce food loss and waste but compromise public health, or improve public health but increase food loss and waste. Some interventions are both opportunities and challenges. With deliberate planning and action, challenges can often be addressed and turned into opportunities. In other cases, it may be necessary to strike a balance between potential benefit in one area and risk of harm in the other. To help policy makers make the best use of the opportunities while tackling the challenges, it is essential to consider public health in efforts to reduce food loss and waste. PMID:26526239

  3. Access and Use: Improving Digital Multimedia Consumer Health Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Alex

    2016-01-01

    This project enabled novel organisational insight into the comparative utility of a portfolio of consumer health information content, by measuring patterns of attrition (abandonment) in content use. The project used as a case study the event activity log of a fully automated digital information kiosk, located in a community health facility. Direct measurements of the duration of content use were derived from the user interface activity recorded in the kiosk log, thus avoiding issues in using other approaches to collecting this type of data, such as sampling and observer bias. The distribution patterns of 1,383 durations of observed abandonments of use for twenty-eight discrete modules of health information content were visualised using Kaplan-Meir survival plots. Clear patterns of abandonment of content use were exhibited. The method of analysis is cost-effective, scalable and provides deep insight into the utility of health promotion content. The impact on the content producers, platform operators and service users is to improve organisational learning and thus increase the confidence in stakeholders that the service is continuously delivering high quality health and wellbeing benefits. PMID:27440299

  4. Population health improvement: a community health business model that engages partners in all sectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindig, David A; Isham, George

    2014-01-01

    Because population health improvement requires action on multiple determinants--including medical care, health behaviors, and the social and physical environments--no single entity can be held accountable for achieving improved outcomes. Medical organizations, government, schools, businesses, and community organizations all need to make substantial changes in how they approach health and how they allocate resources. To this end, we suggest the development of multisectoral community health business partnership models. Such collaborative efforts are needed by sectors and actors not accustomed to working together. Healthcare executives can play important leadership roles in fostering or supporting such partnerships in local and national arenas where they have influence. In this article, we develop the following components of this argument: defining a community health business model; defining population health and the Triple Aim concept; reaching beyond core mission to help create the model; discussing the shift for care delivery beyond healthcare organizations to other community sectors; examining who should lead in developing the community business model; discussing where the resources for a community business model might come from; identifying that better evidence is needed to inform where to make cost-effective investments; and proposing some next steps. The approach we have outlined is a departure from much current policy and management practice. But new models are needed as a road map to drive action--not just thinking--to address the enormous challenge of improving population health. While we applaud continuing calls to improve health and reduce disparities, progress will require more robust incentives, strategies, and action than have been in practice to date. Our hope is that ideas presented here will help to catalyze a collective, multisectoral response to this critical social and economic challenge.

  5. Improving health services for African migrants in China: A health diplomacy perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Megan M; Lee, Margaret C; Hall, Brian J; Bulterys, Marc; Ling, Li; Tucker, Joseph D

    2014-01-01

    Global health has become an increasingly prominent component of foreign policy in the last decade. The term health diplomacy has been used to describe this growing interface between foreign policy and global health, and it encompasses both the concept of using health to further foreign policy objectives as well as the idea that diplomatic tools can be helpful for attaining public health goals. The Chinese presence in Africa has grown in the last 15 years, generating increased interest in Sino-African relations. While much has been written in recent years about the Chinese presence in Africa, the growing numbers of Africans in China have attracted considerably less attention. Many are small-scale traders and might be expected to face many of the health challenges common among foreign migrants, but their health needs have been largely unrecognised. In this paper, we consider how a health diplomacy approach could be applied to African migrants in China, and the potential advantages and limitations of this strategy. We identify areas of overlap between public health, trade and foreign policy goals that can be emphasised to generate support for improved services for African migrants in China and to engage partners from a diversity of sectors. PMID:24807820

  6. Improving Population Health by Incorporating Chronic Disease and Injury Prevention Into Value-Based Care Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Ruth; Rushing, Jill; Nelson, Sharon; Rhyne, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Today's health system transformation provides a prime opportunity to leverage the capacity of public health to reduce the burden of chronic disease and injury, improve population health, and contain health care costs. Health care settings and organizations should support public health capacity as a key investment in population health. PMID:27422946

  7. Improving Quality of Emergency Care Through Integration of Mental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okafor, Martha; Wrenn, Glenda; Ede, Victor; Wilson, Nana; Custer, William; Risby, Emile; Claeys, Michael; Shelp, Frank E; Atallah, Hany; Mattox, Gail; Satcher, David

    2016-04-01

    The goal of this study was to better integrate emergency medical and psychiatric care at a large urban public hospital, identify impact on quality improvement metrics, and reduce healthcare cost. A psychiatric fast track service was implemented as a quality improvement initiative. Data on disposition from the emergency department from January 2011 to May 2012 for patients impacted by the pilot were analyzed. 4329 patients from January 2011 to August 2011 (pre-intervention) were compared with 4867 patients from September 2011 to May 2012 (intervention). There was a trend of decline on overall quality metrics of time to triage and time from disposition to discharge. The trend analysis of the psychiatric length of stay and use of restraints showed significant reductions. Integrated emergency care models are evidence-based approach to ensuring that patients with mental health needs receive proper and efficient treatment. Results suggest that this may also improve overall emergency department's throughput.

  8. Development and Evaluation of Algorithms for Breath Alcohol Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljungblad, Jonas; Hök, Bertil; Ekström, Mikael

    2016-01-01

    Breath alcohol screening is important for traffic safety, access control and other areas of health promotion. A family of sensor devices useful for these purposes is being developed and evaluated. This paper is focusing on algorithms for the determination of breath alcohol concentration in diluted breath samples using carbon dioxide to compensate for the dilution. The examined algorithms make use of signal averaging, weighting and personalization to reduce estimation errors. Evaluation has been performed by using data from a previously conducted human study. It is concluded that these features in combination will significantly reduce the random error compared to the signal averaging algorithm taken alone. PMID:27043576

  9. Commentary: improving the health of neglected populations in Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones Danielle

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Neglected diseases encompass a group of pathologies that disproportionally affect resource-constrained areas of the world. In tropical and subtropical areas in Latin America, the vicious cycle of poverty, disease and underdevelopment is widespread. The burden of disease associated to neglected diseases in this region is mainly expressed through diseases such as malaria, dengue, intestinal parasitic infections, Chagas' disease, and many others. These maladies have burdened Latin America throughout centuries and have directly influenced their ability to develop and become competitive societies in the current climate of globalization. Therefore, the need for a new paradigm that integrates various public health policies, programs, and a strategy with the collaboration of all responsible sectors is long overdue. In this regard, innovative approaches are required to ensure the availability of low-cost, simple, sustainable, and locally acceptable strategies to improve the health of neglected populations to prevent, control, and potentially eliminate neglected diseases. Improving the health of these forgotten populations will place them in an environment more conducive to development and will likely contribute significantly to the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals in this area of the globe.

  10. Manipulation of Carotenoid Content in Plants to Improve Human Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alós, Enriqueta; Rodrigo, Maria Jesús; Zacarias, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids are essential components for human nutrition and health, mainly due to their antioxidant and pro-vitamin A activity. Foods with enhanced carotenoid content and composition are essential to ensure carotenoid feasibility in malnourished population of many countries around the world, which is critical to alleviate vitamin A deficiency and other health-related disorders. The pathway of carotenoid biosynthesis is currently well understood, key steps of the pathways in different plant species have been characterized and the corresponding genes identified, as well as other regulatory elements. This enables the manipulation and improvement of carotenoid content and composition in order to control the nutritional value of a number of agronomical important staple crops. Biotechnological and genetic engineering-based strategies to manipulate carotenoid metabolism have been successfully implemented in many crops, with Golden rice as the most relevant example of β-carotene improvement in one of the more widely consumed foods. Conventional breeding strategies have been also adopted in the bio-fortification of carotenoid in staple foods that are highly consumed in developing countries, including maize, cassava and sweet potatoes, to alleviate nutrition-related problems. The objective of the chapter is to summarize major breakthroughs and advances in the enhancement of carotenoid content and composition in agronomical and nutritional important crops, with special emphasis to their potential impact and benefits in human nutrition and health. PMID:27485228

  11. Approaches in Health Human Resource Forecasting: A Roadmap for Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiei, Sima; Mohebbifar, Rafat; Hashemi, Fariba; Ezzatabadi, Mohammad Ranjbar; Farzianpour, Fereshteh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Forecasting the demand and supply of health manpower in an accurate manner makes appropriate planning possible. The aim of this paper was to review approaches and methods for health manpower forecasting and consequently propose the features that improve the effectiveness of this important process of health manpower planning. Methods A literature review was conducted for studies published in English from 1990–2014 using Pub Med, Science Direct, Pro Quest, and Google Scholar databases. Review articles, qualitative studies, retrospective and prospective studies describing or applying various types of forecasting approaches and methods in health manpower forecasting were included in the review. The authors designed an extraction data sheet based on study questions to collect data on studies’ references, designs, and types of forecasting approaches, whether discussed or applied, with their strengths and weaknesses Results Forty studies were included in the review. As a result, two main categories of approaches (conceptual and analytical) for health manpower forecasting were identified. Each approach had several strengths and weaknesses. As a whole, most of them were faced with some challenges, such as being static and unable to capture dynamic variables in manpower forecasting and causal relationships. They also lacked the capacity to benefit from scenario making to assist policy makers in effective decision making. Conclusions An effective forecasting approach is supposed to resolve all the deficits that exist in current approaches and meet the key features found in the literature in order to develop an open system and a dynamic and comprehensive method necessary for today complex health care systems.

  12. Community health workers can improve male involvement in maternal health: evidence from rural Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Furaha August

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Male involvement in maternal health is recommended as one of the interventions to improve maternal and newborn health. There have been challenges in realising this action, partly due to the position of men in society and partly due to health system challenges in accommodating men. The aim of this study was therefore to evaluate the effect of Home Based Life Saving Skills training by community health workers on improving male involvement in maternal health in terms of knowledge of danger signs, joint decision-making, birth preparedness, and escorting wives to antenatal and delivery care in a rural community in Tanzania. Design: A community-based intervention consisting of educating the community in Home Based Life Saving Skills by community health workers was implemented using one district as the intervention district and another as comparison district. A pre-/post-intervention using quasi-experimental design was used to evaluate the effect of Home Based Life Saving Skills training on male involvement and place of delivery for their partners. The effect of the intervention was determined using difference in differences analysis between the intervention and comparison data at baseline and end line. Results: The results show there was improvement in male involvement (39.2% vs. 80.9% with a net intervention effect of 41.1% (confidence interval [CI]: 28.5–53.8; p <0.0001. There was improvement in the knowledge of danger signs during pregnancy, childbirth, and postpartum periods. The proportion of men accompanying their wives to antenatal and delivery also improved. Shared decision-making for place of delivery improved markedly (46.8% vs. 86.7%, showing a net effect of 38.5% (CI: 28.0–49.1; p <0.0001. Although facility delivery for spouses of the participants improved in the intervention district, this did not show statistical significance when compared to the comparison district with a net intervention effect of 12.2% (95% CI: −2.8

  13. The experimental modification of sonorous breathing.

    OpenAIRE

    Josephson, S C; Rosen, R C

    1980-01-01

    Loud snoring is a noxious habit and potential personal health risk. We are reporting the first experimental study of simple behavioral techniques for the modification of chronic snoring. Twenty-four volunteers participated in a repeated measures, randomized group design over 2 weeks of intervention and one-month follow-up. Treatment groups included a contingent-awakening and breathing retraining (self-control) condition. Both treatment groups were compared to a no-treatment control. Despite c...

  14. Breathing adapted radiotherapy for breast cancer: comparison of free breathing gating with the breath-hold technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korreman, Stine Sofia; Pedersen, Anders N; Nøttrup, Trine Jakobi;

    2005-01-01

    , and to compare this respiratory technique with voluntary breath-hold. PATIENTS AND METHODS: 17 patients were CT-scanned during non-coached breathing manoeuvre including free breathing (FB), end-inspiration gating (IG), end-expiration gating (EG), deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) and end-expiration breath...

  15. Intervention studies for improving global health and health care: An important arena for epidemiologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunnar Kvåle

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Marginalised populations in many low- and middle-income countries experience an increasing burden of disease, in sub-Saharan Africa to a large extent due to faltering health systems and serious HIV epidemics. Also other poverty related diseases (PRDs are prevalent, especially respiratory and diarrhoeal diseases in children, malnutrition, maternal and perinatal health problems, tuberculosis and malaria. Daily, nearly 30,000 children under the age of 5 die, most from preventable causes, and 8,000 people die from HIV infections. In spite of the availability of powerful preventive and therapeutic tools for combating these PRDs, their implementation, especially in terms of equitable delivery, leaves much to be desired. The research community must address this tragic gap between knowledge and implementation. Epidemiologists have a very important role to play in conducting studies on diseases that account for the largest share of the global disease burden. A shift of focus of epidemiologic research towards intervention studies addressing health problems of major public health importance for disadvantaged population groups is needed. There is a need to generate an evidence-base for interventions that can be implemented on a large scale; this can result in increased funding of health promotion programs as well as enable rational prioritization and integration between different health interventions. This will require close and synergetic teamwork between epidemiologists and other professions across disciplines and sectors. In this way epidemiologists can contribute significantly to improve health and optimise health care delivery for marginalized populations.

  16. Forensic mental health assessment in France: recommendations for quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combalbert, Nicolas; Andronikof, Anne; Armand, Marine; Robin, Cécile; Bazex, Hélène

    2014-01-01

    The quality of forensic mental health assessment has been a growing concern in various countries on both sides of the Atlantic, but the legal systems are not always comparable and some aspects of forensic assessment are specific to a given country. This paper describes the legal context of forensic psychological assessment in France (i.e. pre-trial investigation phase entrusted to a judge, with mental health assessment performed by preselected professionals called "experts" in French), its advantages and its pitfalls. Forensic psychiatric or psychological assessment is often an essential and decisive element in criminal cases, but since a judiciary scandal which was made public in 2005 (the Outreau case) there has been increasing criticism from the public and the legal profession regarding the reliability of clinical conclusions. Several academic studies and a parliamentary report have highlighted various faulty aspects in both the judiciary process and the mental health assessments. The heterogeneity of expert practices in France appears to be mainly related to a lack of consensus on several core notions such as mental health diagnosis or assessment methods, poor working conditions, lack of specialized training, and insufficient familiarity with the Code of Ethics. In this article we describe and analyze the French practice of forensic psychologists and psychiatrists in criminal cases and propose steps that could be taken to improve its quality, such as setting up specialized training courses, enforcing the Code of Ethics for psychologists, and calling for consensus on diagnostic and assessment methods.

  17. Biological control of vaginosis to improve reproductive health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastromarino, P; Hemalatha, R; Barbonetti, A; Cinque, B; Cifone, M G; Tammaro, F; Francavilla, F

    2014-11-01

    The human vaginal microbiota plays an important role in the maintenance of a woman's health, as well as of her partner's and newborns'. When this predominantly Lactobacillus community is disrupted, decreased in abundance and replaced by different anaerobes, bacterial vaginosis (BV) may occur. BV is associated with ascending infections and obstetrical complications, such as chorioamnionitis and preterm delivery, as well as with urinary tract infections and sexually transmitted infections. In BV the overgrowth of anaerobes produces noxious substances like polyamines and other compounds that trigger the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1 β and IL-8. BV can profoundly affect, with different mechanisms, all the phases of a woman's life in relation to reproduction, before pregnancy, during fertilization, through and at the end of pregnancy. BV can directly affect fertility, since an ascending dissemination of the involved species may lead to tubal factor infertility. Moreover, the increased risk of acquiring sexually transmitted diseases contributes to damage to reproductive health. Exogenous strains of lactobacilli have been suggested as a means of re-establishing a normal healthy vaginal flora. Carefully selected probiotic strains can eliminate BV and also exert an antiviral effect, thus reducing viral load and preventing foetal and neonatal infection. The administration of beneficial microorganisms (probiotics) can aid recovery from infection and restore and maintain a healthy vaginal ecosystem, thus improving female health also in relation to reproductive health. PMID:25673551

  18. Health-Promoting Schools: Evidence for a Holistic Approach to Promoting Health and Improving Health Literacy

    OpenAIRE

    Albert Lee

    2009-01-01

    Chronic diseases are now the major causes of death and disability worldwide, and non-communicable diseases (NCD) account for the majority of the global health burden. About half of premature deaths are related to health-risking behaviours that are often established during youth and extend to adulthood. While these diseases might not be curable, they are preventable. Prevention is possible when sustained actions are directed at individuals and families, as well as at the broader social, econom...

  19. An Effective Model for Improving Global Health Nursing Competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sun-Joo

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposed an effective model for improving global health nursing competence among undergraduate students. A descriptive case study was conducted by evaluation of four implemented programs by the author. All programs were conducted with students majoring in nursing and healthcare, where the researcher was a program director, professor, or facilitator. These programs were analyzed in terms of students' needs assessment, program design, and implementation and evaluation factors. The concept and composition of global nursing competence, identified within previous studies, were deemed appropriate in all of our programs. Program composition varied from curricular to extracurricular domains. During the implementation phase, some of the programs included non-Korean students to improve cultural diversity and overcome language barriers. Qualitative and quantitative surveys were conducted to assess program efficacy. Data triangulation from students' reflective journals was examined. Additionally, students' awareness regarding changes within global health nursing, improved critical thinking, cultural understanding, and global leadership skills were investigated pre- and post-program implementation. The importance of identifying students' needs regarding global nursing competence when developing appropriate curricula is discussed.

  20. An Effective Model for Improving Global Health Nursing Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sun-Joo

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposed an effective model for improving global health nursing competence among undergraduate students. A descriptive case study was conducted by evaluation of four implemented programs by the author. All programs were conducted with students majoring in nursing and healthcare, where the researcher was a program director, professor, or facilitator. These programs were analyzed in terms of students’ needs assessment, program design, and implementation and evaluation factors. The concept and composition of global nursing competence, identified within previous studies, were deemed appropriate in all of our programs. Program composition varied from curricular to extracurricular domains. During the implementation phase, some of the programs included non-Korean students to improve cultural diversity and overcome language barriers. Qualitative and quantitative surveys were conducted to assess program efficacy. Data triangulation from students’ reflective journals was examined. Additionally, students’ awareness regarding changes within global health nursing, improved critical thinking, cultural understanding, and global leadership skills were investigated pre- and post-program implementation. The importance of identifying students’ needs regarding global nursing competence when developing appropriate curricula is discussed. PMID:27679793

  1. An Effective Model for Improving Global Health Nursing Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sun-Joo

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposed an effective model for improving global health nursing competence among undergraduate students. A descriptive case study was conducted by evaluation of four implemented programs by the author. All programs were conducted with students majoring in nursing and healthcare, where the researcher was a program director, professor, or facilitator. These programs were analyzed in terms of students’ needs assessment, program design, and implementation and evaluation factors. The concept and composition of global nursing competence, identified within previous studies, were deemed appropriate in all of our programs. Program composition varied from curricular to extracurricular domains. During the implementation phase, some of the programs included non-Korean students to improve cultural diversity and overcome language barriers. Qualitative and quantitative surveys were conducted to assess program efficacy. Data triangulation from students’ reflective journals was examined. Additionally, students’ awareness regarding changes within global health nursing, improved critical thinking, cultural understanding, and global leadership skills were investigated pre- and post-program implementation. The importance of identifying students’ needs regarding global nursing competence when developing appropriate curricula is discussed.

  2. An Effective Model for Improving Global Health Nursing Competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sun-Joo

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposed an effective model for improving global health nursing competence among undergraduate students. A descriptive case study was conducted by evaluation of four implemented programs by the author. All programs were conducted with students majoring in nursing and healthcare, where the researcher was a program director, professor, or facilitator. These programs were analyzed in terms of students' needs assessment, program design, and implementation and evaluation factors. The concept and composition of global nursing competence, identified within previous studies, were deemed appropriate in all of our programs. Program composition varied from curricular to extracurricular domains. During the implementation phase, some of the programs included non-Korean students to improve cultural diversity and overcome language barriers. Qualitative and quantitative surveys were conducted to assess program efficacy. Data triangulation from students' reflective journals was examined. Additionally, students' awareness regarding changes within global health nursing, improved critical thinking, cultural understanding, and global leadership skills were investigated pre- and post-program implementation. The importance of identifying students' needs regarding global nursing competence when developing appropriate curricula is discussed. PMID:27679793

  3. Land Use Practices for Sustainable and Healthy Communities: Linking Environmental, Health and Social Sciences to Improve Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land has figured prominently in the history of environmental protection in the United States and in the history of the U.S. EPA. In 1970, the EPA was founded “to protect human health and the environment. . .by safeguarding the air we breathe, water we drink, and land on which we ...

  4. Submarines, spacecraft and exhaled breath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleil, Joachim D; Hansel, Armin

    2012-03-01

    Foreword The International Association of Breath Research (IABR) meetings are an eclectic gathering of researchers in the medical, environmental and instrumentation fields; our focus is on human health as assessed by the measurement and interpretation of trace chemicals in human exhaled breath. What may have escaped our notice is a complementary field of research that explores the creation and maintenance of artificial atmospheres practised by the submarine air monitoring and air purification (SAMAP) community. SAMAP is comprised of manufacturers, researchers and medical professionals dealing with the engineering and instrumentation to support human life in submarines and spacecraft (including shuttlecraft and manned rockets, high-altitude aircraft, and the International Space Station (ISS)). Here, the immediate concerns are short-term survival and long-term health in fairly confined environments where one cannot simply 'open the window' for fresh air. As such, one of the main concerns is air monitoring and the main sources of contamination are CO(2) and other constituents of human exhaled breath. Since the inaugural meeting in 1994 in Adelaide, Australia, SAMAP meetings have been held every two or three years alternating between the North American and European continents. The meetings are organized by Dr Wally Mazurek (a member of IABR) of the Defense Systems Technology Organization (DSTO) of Australia, and individual meetings are co-hosted by the navies of the countries in which they are held. An overriding focus at SAMAP is life support (oxygen availability and carbon dioxide removal). Certainly, other air constituents are also important; for example, the closed environment of a submarine or the ISS can build up contaminants from consumer products, cooking, refrigeration, accidental fires, propulsion and atmosphere maintenance. However, the most immediate concern is sustaining human metabolism: removing exhaled CO(2) and replacing metabolized O(2). Another

  5. Improving oral health through understanding the meaning of health and disease in a Chinese culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K L; Schwarz, E; Mak, K Y

    1993-02-01

    Advances in modern technology have undoubtedly been of benefit to dentistry in its preventive and curative activities for populations worldwide. Studies, mainly from Western societies, show nonetheless that utilisation of services or adoption of preventive methods are not taken up at satisfactory levels. The focus of this paper is on the special problems in a Chinese society where major differences exist between the traditional lay health concepts and the modernised professional ones. Traditional Chinese health concepts comprise the balance between and interaction of 'Yin' and 'Yang', the vital forces in both the universe and in man's body, as the basis for maintaining health. To restore a disturbed equilibrium of vital forces, which will manifest itself as disease, a range of dietary products are available in Hong Kong, for example cooling herb tea to reduce fire from the stomach producing gum disease. Seeking dental treatment from dentists could be delayed or made 'unnecessary' due to reliance on home remedies. This could reduce the effectiveness of any planned health education activities and dental services available for improving the oral health status of the community according to prevailing Western concepts. An understanding of the cultural meaning of dental disease is fundamental to changing beliefs and attitudes of people in order to improve the oral health of the community. PMID:8478125

  6. Women's health groups to improve perinatal care in rural Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manandhar Dharma

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neonatal mortality rates are high in rural Nepal where more than 90% of deliveries are in the home. Evidence suggests that death rates can be reduced by interventions at community level. We describe an intervention which aimed to harness the power of community planning and decision making to improve maternal and newborn care in rural Nepal. Methods The development of 111 women's groups in a population of 86 704 in Makwanpur district, Nepal is described. The groups, facilitated by local women, were the intervention component of a randomized controlled trial to reduce perinatal and neonatal mortality rates. Through participant observation and analysis of reports, we describe the implementation of this intervention: the community entry process, the facilitation of monthly meetings through a participatory action cycle of problem identification, community planning, and implementation and evaluation of strategies to tackle the identified problems. Results In response to the needs of the group, participatory health education was added to the intervention and the women's groups developed varied strategies to tackle problems of maternal and newborn care: establishing mother and child health funds, producing clean home delivery kits and operating stretcher schemes. Close linkages with community leaders and community health workers improved strategy implementation. There were also indications of positive effects on group members and health services, and most groups remained active after 30 months. Conclusion A large scale and potentially sustainable participatory intervention with women's groups, which focused on pregnancy, childbirth and the newborn period, resulted in innovative strategies identified by local communities to tackle perinatal care problems.

  7. Nudge: a new and better way to improve health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallgårda, Signild

    2012-02-01

    Nudging, or libertarian paternalism, is presented as a new and ethically justified way of improving people's health. It has proved influential and is currently taken up by the governments in the US, the UK and France. One may question the claim that the approach is new, in any case it has many similarities with the idea of "making healthy choices easier". Whether the approach is better from an ethical perspective depends on the ethical principles one holds. From a paternalistic perspective there could be no objections, but from a libertarian, there are several. Contrary to what the authors state, libertarian paternalism is an oxymoron.

  8. Improving the Health Industry with Stock Management Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Henrique Machado Cequeira

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Considering that the health industry has changed radically along the years, the efficient professional management of entities connected to this segment is fundamental. Modern techniques, such as demand forecast and stock management, contribute to a better management of scarce and critical resources which might put human lives at risk. The present study describes the use of quantitative techniques for supply forecast and stock management of a blood bank from a given hospital. The demonstration of the viability of these techniques broke paradigms. Furthermore, it has fomented new studies with emphasis on improving procedures and rationalization. It has also brought an improvement in terms of the institution operations, increasing the level of efficiency.

  9. Quality and quality improvement in forensic mental health evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wettstein, Robert M

    2005-01-01

    Despite the growing attention to quality and quality improvement in health care in the United States, forensic psychiatry has yet to incorporate relevant developments and information and make quality an important item on the agenda. This article reviews the empirical research regarding the perceived quality of forensic evaluations, which has primarily examined criminal rather than civil forensic evaluations. Beyond the available research, many important policy and empirical questions must be addressed, including the definition of a quality forensic evaluation, the process used to access quality, the indicators and measures used, the methods that provide incentives for performing quality evaluations, the role of forensic psychiatry training programs, and the role of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law (AAPL) or other professional organizations in the quality improvement enterprise.

  10. Breath-by-breath measurement of particle deposition in the lung of spontaneously breathing rats

    OpenAIRE

    S. Karrasch; Eder, G.; Bolle, I.; Tsuda, A.; Schulz, H

    2009-01-01

    A number of deposition models for humans, as well as experimental animals, have been described. However, no breath-by-breath deposition measurement in rats has been reported to date. The objective of this study is to determine lung deposition of micrometer-sized particles as a function of breathing parameters in the adult rat lung. A new aerosol photometry system was designed to measure deposition of nonhygroscopic, 2-μm sebacate particles in anesthetized, intubated, and spontaneously breathi...

  11. Xylitol improves compliance of patients to 13C- urea breath test%木糖醇改善13C-尿素呼气试验患者的依从性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李园; 吴本俨

    2011-01-01

    Objective To observe the effect of xylitol on the texture of reagents used in 13C- urea breath test and the value of DOB test. Methods One hundred and twenty patients were randomly divided into 0.05g or 0.10g xylitol group and non xylitol group. Texture of reagents used in 13C-urea breath test was assessed by the patients themselves in the xylitol group. DOB value was detected twice by paired test. Results The acceptable texture was significantly higher in 0.05g and 0.11g xylitol group than in non xylitol group(43.3% and 66.7% vs 20.0% and 33.3%, P<0.05) and in patients receiving 0.10g xylitol than in those receiving 0.05g xylitol(P<0.05). However, no difference was observed in DOB value between patients receiving 0.05g or 0.l0g xylitol(P>0.05). Conclusion Adding an appropriate amount of xylitol can improve the texture and compliance of patients to 13C-urea breath test. The best result can be achieved by adding 0.10g xylitol with no effect on the DOB value in 13C-urea breath test.%目的 观察木糖醇对13C-尿素呼气试验检测试剂的口感及DOB检测值的影响.方法 120例病人同时进行不添加和添加木糖醇0.05g和0.10g组,自评检测的试剂口感,并配对检验两次检测的DOB值变化.结果 木糖醇0.05g组和0.10g组,口感可接受百分比分别为43.3%和66.7%,显著高于未添加木糖醇时检测(分别为20.0%和33.3%,P<0.05),添加木糖醇0.10g口感可耐受百分比显著高于添加0.05g组(P<0.05).两种剂量木糖醇对DOB检测值均无显著性影响(P>0.05).结论 在13C-尿素呼气试验检查试剂中加入适量木糖醇可改善口感、提高病人依从性、其中添加0.10g木糖醇效果最优,对13C-尿素呼气试验的DOB值无影响.

  12. Improving personal health records for patient-centered care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Henry J; Ross, Stephen E; Safran, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Objective To assess the patient-centeredness of personal health records (PHR) and offer recommendations for best practice guidelines. Design Semi-structured interviews were conducted in seven large early PHR adopter organizations in 2007. Organizations were purposively selected to represent a variety of US settings, including medium and large hospitals, ambulatory care facilities, insurers and health plans, government departments, and commercial sectors. Measurements Patient-centeredness was assessed against a framework of care that includes: (1) respect for patient values, preferences, and expressed needs; (2) information and education; (3) access to care; (4) emotional support to relieve fear and anxiety; (5) involvement of family and friends; (6) continuity and secure transition between healthcare providers; (7) physical comfort; (8) coordination of care. Within this framework we used evidence for patient preferences (where it exists) to compare existing PHR policies, and propose a best practice model. Results Most organizations enable many patient-centered functions such as data access for proxies and minors. No organization allows patient views of clinical progress notes, and turnaround times for PHR reporting of normal laboratory results can be up to 7 days. Conclusion Findings suggest patient-centeredness for personal health records can be improved, and recommendations are made for best practice guidelines. PMID:20190063

  13. Re: Mental health rehabilitation in therapeutic jurisprudence: Theoretical improvements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrazzi, Priscilla; Krupa, Terry

    2016-01-01

    Legal scholarship relevant to criminal court mental health initiatives that divert people with mental illness from prosecution to treatment has created the concept of therapeutic jurisprudence (TJ), an approach that seeks to maximize the law's potential for therapeutic outcomes. Despite recognition that TJ includes a rehabilitative response as a key animating principle and that it advocates for interdisciplinary synthesis, TJ has developed mainly from within the practice and discipline of law and without reference to the discipline of rehabilitation science, in which approaches to mental health rehabilitation (MHR) have witnessed significant developments in recent decades. In particular, concepts of MHR have shifted from a biomedical focus to a psychosocial approach, such as the recovery model, that incorporates values of self-determination, independence, and empowerment. It is argued that greater consideration of MHR will improve the theoretical validity of TJ by 1) helping define what 'therapeutic' means; 2) constructing a normative framework; and 3) broadening the scope of TJ as an interdisciplinary approach. More research is needed to ensure concepts from MHR rehabilitation science are considered in TJ legal scholarship and criminal court mental health initiatives. PMID:27107821

  14. Integrated yoga therapy for improving mental health in managers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tikhe Sham Ganpat

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Managers′ lives have become a never-ending race against time, technology, and targets. This race creates tension, which leads to dissatisfaction and frustration and eventually manifests itself as psychological and physiological stress with mental and emotional drain. This modern lifestyle intensifies the stress leading to "Excessive Tension" and consequent deterioration in "Executive Efficiency." Objective: To assess mental health in managers undergoing yoga-based Self-Management of Excessive Tension (SMET program. Materials and Methods: 72 managers with 48.75±3.86 years of mean age were participated in this study of single group pre-post design. The General Health Questionnaire data were taken on the first and sixth day of 5 days SMET program. Results: The data analysis showed 68.25% decrease (P<0.001 in somatic symptoms, 66.29% decrease (P<0.001 in anxiety and insomnia, 65.00% decrease (P<0.001 in social dysfunction, 87.08% decrease (P<0.001 in severe depression, and 71.47% decrease (P<0.001 in all medical complaints. Conclusion: These results suggest that participation in a SMET program was associated with improvement in mental health and may have implications for "Executive Efficiency."

  15. Repository on maternal child health: Health portal to improve access to information on maternal child health in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khanna Rajesh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quality and essential health information is considered one of the most cost-effective interventions to improve health for a developing country. Healthcare portals have revolutionalized access to health information and knowledge using the Internet and related technologies, but their usage is far from satisfactory in India. This article describes a health portal developed in India aimed at providing one-stop access to efficiently search, organize and share maternal child health information relevant from public health perspective in the country. Methods The portal ‘Repository on Maternal Child Health’ was developed using an open source content management system and standardized processes were followed for collection, selection, categorization and presentation of resource materials. Its usage is evaluated using key performance indicators obtained from Google Analytics, and quality assessed using a standardized checklist of knowledge management. The results are discussed in relation to improving quality and access to health information. Results The portal was launched in July 2010 and provides free access to full-text of 900 resource materials categorized under specific topics and themes. During the subsequent 18 months, 52,798 visits were registered from 174 countries across the world, and more than three-fourth visits were from India alone. Nearly 44,000 unique visitors visited the website and spent an average time of 4 minutes 26 seconds. The overall bounce rate was 27.6%. An increase in the number of unique visitors was found to be significantly associated with an increase in the average time on site (p-value 0.01, increase in the web traffic through search engines (p-value 0.00, and decrease in the bounce rate (p-value 0.03. There was a high degree of agreement between the two experts regarding quality assessment carried out under the three domains of knowledge access, knowledge creation and knowledge transfer (Kappa

  16. Ultrasensitive laser spectroscopy for breath analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtas, J.; Bielecki, Z.; Stacewicz, T.; Mikołajczyk, J.; Nowakowski, M.

    2012-03-01

    At present there are many reasons for seeking new methods and technologies that aim to develop new and more perfect sensors for different chemical compounds. However, the main reasons are safety ensuring and health care. In the paper, recent advances in the human breath analysis by the use of different techniques are presented. We have selected non-invasive ones ensuring detection of pathogenic changes at a molecular level. The presence of certain molecules in the human breath is used as an indicator of a specific disease. Thus, the analysis of the human breath is very useful for health monitoring. We have shown some examples of diseases' biomarkers and various methods capable of detecting them. Described methods have been divided into non-optical and optical methods. The former ones are the following: gas chromatography, flame ionization detection, mass spectrometry, ion mobility spectrometry, proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry, selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry. In recent twenty years, the optical methods have become more popular, especially the laser techniques. They have a great potential for detection and monitoring of the components in the gas phase. These methods are characterized by high sensitivity and good selectivity. The spectroscopic sensors provide the opportunity to detect specific gases and to measure their concentration either in a sampling place or a remote one. Multipass spectroscopy, cavity ring-down spectroscopy, and photo-acoustic spectroscopy were characterised in the paper as well.

  17. Physiotherapy improves patient reported shoulder function and health status in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storgaard, Filip Holst; Pedersen, Christina Gravgaard; Jensen, Majbritt Lykke;

    Physiotherapy improves patient reported shoulder function and health status in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome.......Physiotherapy improves patient reported shoulder function and health status in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome....

  18. Microstructured optical fiber interferometric breathing sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favero, Fernando C.; Villatoro, Joel; Pruneri, Valerio

    2012-03-01

    In this paper a simple photonic crystal fiber (PCF) interferometric breathing sensor is introduced. The interferometer consists of a section of PCF fusion spliced at the distal end of a standard telecommunications optical fiber. Two collapsed regions in the PCF caused by the splicing process allow the excitation and recombination of a core and a cladding PCF mode. As a result, the reflection spectrum of the device exhibits a sinusoidal interference pattern that instantly shifts when water molecules, present in exhaled air, are adsorbed on or desorbed from the PCF surface. The device can be used to monitor a person's breathing whatever the respiration rate. The device here proposed could be particularly important in applications where electronic sensors fail or are not recommended. It may also be useful in the evaluation of a person's health and even in the diagnosis and study of the progression of serious illnesses such as sleep apnea syndrome.

  19. Improvement of teamwork in health care through interprofessional education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simin Dragana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Collaboration, within and between healthcare teams, facilitates effective healthcare. Internationally, the development of interprofessional education, as a means to facilitate more effective teamwork in health care, has been recognized for over forty years. Objective. The aim of this paper is to evaluate students' attitudes toward the influence of interprofessional education on improvement of collaboration and teamwork. Methods. The research was conducted by interviewing students at the Medical Faculty in Novi Sad in the form of cross-sectional study. The study sample included students from two undergraduate programmes: School of Nursing (n=52 and Integrated Studies of Medicine (n=53. Students admitted to the research had to be exposed to clinical experience. The instrument used in this study was the Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale (RIPLS. Results. As many as 93.3% of students indicated that basics of teamwork skills should be obtained prior to graduation, whereas 96.2% considered that interprofessional education would enable them to improve mutual trust and respect. The majority of interviewees indicated that patients would ultimately benefit if healthcare students worked together to solve patient problems. Multivariate procedures MANOVA p<0.05 and discriminative analysis p<0.05 of students' attitudes toward teamwork and collaboration showed significant differences between the students of medicine and nursing. Conclusion. The students of the Integrated Studies of Medicine and School of Nursing had a positive attitude toward the influence of interprofessional education on the improvement of collaboration and teamwork.

  20. Do multiple micronutrient interventions improve child health, growth, and development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Usha; Goldenberg, Tamar; Allen, Lindsay H

    2011-11-01

    Micronutrient deficiencies are common and often co-occur in many developing countries. Several studies have examined the benefits of providing multiple micronutrient (MMN) interventions during pregnancy and childhood, but the implications for programs remain unclear. The key objective of this review is to summarize what is known about the efficacy of MMN interventions during early childhood on functional outcomes, namely, child health, survival, growth, and development, to guide policy and identify gaps for future research. We identified review articles including meta-analyses and intervention studies that evaluated the benefits of MMN interventions (3 or more micronutrients) in children (child morbidity, anemia, and growth. Two studies found no effects on child mortality. The findings for respiratory illness and diarrhea are mixed, although suggestive of benefit when provided as fortified foods. There is evidence from several controlled trials (>25) and 2 meta-analyses that MMN interventions improve hemoglobin concentrations and reduce anemia, but the effects were small compared to providing only iron or iron with folic acid. Two recent meta-analyses and several intervention trials also indicated that MMN interventions improve linear growth compared to providing a placebo or single nutrients. Much less is known about the effects on MMN interventions during early childhood on motor and mental development. In summary, MMN interventions may result in improved outcomes for children in settings where micronutrient deficiencies are widespread.

  1. Seven year changes in health status and priorities for improvement of health in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Heiberg, T; Finset, A; Uhlig, T; Kvien, T

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To examine possible changes in priorities for improvement in health and health status from 1994 to 2001 within the setting of the Oslo Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Register, which provides representative data for the entire RA population in the county.

  2. Finger dexterity and visual discrimination following two yoga breathing practices

    OpenAIRE

    Shirley Telles; Nilkamal Singh; Acharya Balkrishna

    2012-01-01

    Background: Practicing yoga has been shown to improve motor functions and attention. Though attention is required for fine motor and discrimination tasks, the effect of yoga breathing techniques on fine motor skills and visual discrimination has not been assessed. Aim: To study the effect of yoga breathing techniques on finger dexterity and visual discrimination. Materials and Methods: The present study consisted of one hundred and forty subjects who had enrolled for stress management...

  3. [Health improvement in children with ecological dysadaptation syndrome treated at a health resort].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvedunova, L N; Khodova, T V; Polozkov, I M

    2010-01-01

    A method for the spa-and-resort treatment of children residing under conditions of ecological discomfort has been developed. It includes drinking weakly mineralized hydrocarbonate-sodium sulfate-sodium-calcium carbon dioxide water from the Slavyanovsk spring and slightly carbonaceous mineral baths in combination with magnetotherapy. This treatment is shown to improve characteristics of somatic and neurological status, activate metabolic processes, accelerate lymphokinesis and blood circulation. Collectively, these effects enhanced the children's health potential. PMID:21086602

  4. Demystifying and improving organizational culture in health-care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrin, Karen L; Currey, Hal S

    2011-01-01

    Organizational culture is defined as the shared values and beliefs that guide behavior within each organization, and it matters because it is related to performance. While culture is generally considered important, it is mysterious and intangible to most leaders. The first step toward understanding organizational culture is to measure it properly. This chapter describes methods for measuring culture in health-care organizations and how these methods were implemented in a large academic medical center. Because of the consistent empirical link between the dimension of communication, other culture dimensions, and employee satisfaction, special attention is focused in this area. Specifically, a case study of successful communication behaviors during a major "change management" initiative at a large academic medical center is described. In summary, the purpose of this chapter is to demystify the concept of culture and demonstrate how to improve it.

  5. Breathe easy in Seattle : addressing asthma disparities through healthier housing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krieger, J.W.; Rabkin, J.C. [Seattle and King County, Seattle Public Health, Seattle, WA (United States); Takaro, T.K. [Simon Fraser Univ., Burnaby, BC (Canada). Faculty of Health Sciences

    2008-07-01

    The prevalence of mortality associated with asthma in children in the United States has significantly increased over the past two decades and remains high. This paper described three home intervention projects that spanned the spectrum from individual behaviour change to improving housing quality. It described 2 healthy homes projects and 1 project known as Breathe Easy Homes. The first healthy home project involved randomly assigning 274 low-income asthmatic children to a high or low intensity group. Community health workers (CHWs) visited all homes to assess exposures, develop an action plan, and provide bedding encasements. The high intensity group received cleaning equipment and an average of 7 additional visits over a year while the low group received only the initial visit. In the second healthy home project, 309 low-income asthmatic children were randomly assigned to a CHW intervention group or usual care group. All participants received clinic based asthma education from a nurse. The breathe easy homes project involved using a pre-post design to examine the benefits of a new home designed to reduce asthma trigger on outcomes among 35 low-income children with asthma. All homes received a detailed inspection by a remediation coordinator who identified conditions associated with exposure to asthma triggers, such as moisture and mould, dust, pets, tobacco smoke and wood smoke. Mitigative actions included the use of proper ventilation, vacuuming with a high efficiency particulate filter and avoiding the use of fireplaces and wood stoves. It was concluded that home visits increased asthma control behaviours, reduced urgent health services, improved caregiver quality-of-life and decreased asthma symptoms. 93 refs., 3 tabs., 1 fig.

  6. Trend analysis of rapid shallow breathing indices during spontaneous breathing trial may improve predictive accuracy of extubation success%自主呼吸浅快指数趋势分析对拔管成功预测准确性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    穆玉; 刘阳; 彭民; 苏艳超; 吴荷宁; 王一峰; 王志强

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the respiratory indices capable of improving predictive accuracy of extubation success through serial measurements of during spontaneous breathing trial (SBT) in automatic tube compensation (ATC) pattern of mechanical ventilation.Methods For this prospective observational study,patients ventilated over 48 hours were enrolled according to the weaning criterion and underwent a 60 minutes spontaneous breathing trial (SBT) in ATC pattern (ATC =100%,FiO2 =0.4,PEEP =0 cm H2O,PS =0 cm H2O).During SBT,heart rate (HR) and mean artery pressure (MAP) were monitored continuously and minute volume (VE),respiratory rate (RR),tidal volume of spontaneous breath (VT),rapid shallow breathing index (RSBI),change and rate of change (△RSBI60_ 1 and △RSBI60_1/RSBI1,etc.) were recorded or calculated at the first,30th and 60th minute of SBT.Patients tolerating the trial were extubated immediately.Clinical data and respiratory indices during SBT were compared between patients in extubation success group and those in extubation failure group.Predictive accuracy of extubation success was assessed by area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) for each index.Results The duration of mechanical ventilation was longer in patients of extubation failure group than that of extubation success group (10.75 ± 2.73:7.47 ± 5.11,P =0.035) and extubation failure rate was 17.14%.During SBT,RSBI increased initially and then decreased in patients of extubation success group,but increased continuously in patients of extubation failure group.There were significant difference of △RSBI60_1 and △RSBI60_1/RSBII in patients between extubation success and failure groups (-11.5±16.6:12.1 ±38.9,P =0.001 and-17 ±26:13 ±39,P =0.028).AUCs of RSBI60,△RSBI60_1 and △RSBI60_1/RSBI1 were 0.75,0.73 and 0.72 and the sensitivity,specificity and diagnostic accuracy 81.0%,66.7% and 78.5% respectively.Conclusion It is important to observe change of various

  7. Genomics to benefit livestock production: improving animal health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Stuart Plastow

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The primary principle underlying the application of genomics is that it has the most value for difficult and expensive to measure traits. These traits will differ between species and probably also between markets. Maintenance of health will be one of the biggest challenges for efficient livestock production in the next few decades. This challenge will only increase in the face of demand for animal protein, resistance to existing drugs, and the pressure to reduce the use of antibiotics in agriculture. There is probably genetic variation in susceptibility for all diseases but little has been done to make use of this variation to date. In part this is because it is very difficult as well as expensive to measure this variation. This suggests that genomics should provide one of the ways of tackling the challenge of improving animal health. This paper will discuss the concepts of resistance, variation in susceptibility, and resilience; provide examples and present some recent results in cattle and pigs; and briefly discuss the application of gene editing in relation to disease resistance.

  8. How a Population Health Approach Improves Health and Reduces Disparities: The Case of Head Start

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M. Teutsch, MD, MPH

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Good health is a life-long process. Many of the most critical behaviors are established in early childhood and need reinforcing at each life stage. To encourage physical activity, for example, young children should engage in fun, active play daily; schools should ensure that physical activity is a normal part of daily life; parents should participate in physical activity at work, home, or both and include their children; and elders should be encouraged to stretch, move, and improve their strength. Children who understand and demonstrate healthful behaviors will bring those messages home to parents. They can advocate for healthful food (and perhaps not pester parents for unhealthful foods!, encourage parents to stop smoking for their children’s sake, and seek fun active activities rather than more screen time. Thus, the family unit with young children can become an important force for sustaining more healthful living. Amplifying the positive impacts of parents as a child’s first teacher can set a child on a healthful trajectory for life.

  9. Control of the Free Convection Flow within the Breathing Zone by Confluent Jets for Improved Performance of Personalized Ventilation: Part 1 – Thermal influence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagano, H.; Bolashikov, Zhecho Dimitrov; Melikov, Arsen Krikor;

    2009-01-01

    A new method for improvement the performance of personalized ventilation (PV) by control of the free convection flow based of confluent plane jets was studied. The confluent upward plane jets were generated close to the front of human body by openings at the front edge of a desk. The inner jet...

  10. Acupressure Improves the Weaning Indices of Tidal Volumes and Rapid Shallow Breathing Index in Stable Coma Patients Receiving Mechanical Ventilation: Randomized Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Suh-Hwa Maa; Chiu-Hua Wang; Kuang-Hung Hsu; Horng-Chyuan Lin; Brian Yee; Karen MacDonald; Ivo Abraham

    2013-01-01

    Background. Acupressure has been shown to improve respiratory parameters. We investigated the effects of acupressure on weaning indices in stable coma patients receiving mechanical ventilation. Methods. Patients were randomly allocated to one of three treatments: standard care with adjunctive acupressure on one (n = 32) or two days (n = 31) and standard care (n = 31). Acupressure in the form of 10 minutes of bilateral stimulation at five acupoints was administered per treatment session. Weani...

  11. Preinduction incentive spirometry versus deep breathing to improve apnea tolerance during induction of anesthesia in patients of abdominal sepsis: A randomized trial

    OpenAIRE

    Tripathi, M; A. Subedi; A Raimajhi; K Pokharel; Pandey, M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Abdominal sepsis is associated with varied degree of hypoxemia and atelactasis in the lung and can enhance the onset of desaturation of arterial blood during apnea. Aims : This study looked at methods to improve safety margin of apnea during induction of anesthesia in these high-risk patients. Settings and Design: It was a randomized, single blind study on adult patients presenting for emergency laparotomy due to peritonitis in a university teaching hospital setting. Materials and...

  12. Thoracic radiotherapy and breath control: current prospects; Radiotherapie thoracique et controle de la respiration: perspectives actuelles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reboul, F.; Mineur, L.; Paoli, J.B.; Bodez, V.; Oozeer, R.; Garcia, R. [Institut Sainte-Catherine, 84 - Avignon (France)

    2002-11-01

    Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D CRT) is adversely affected by setup error and organ motion. In thoracic 3D CRT, breathing accounts for most of intra-fraction movements, thus impairing treatment quality. Breath control clearly exhibits dosimetric improvement compared to free breathing, leading to various techniques for gated treatments. We review benefits of different breath control methods -i.e. breath-holding or beam gating, with spirometric, isometric or X-ray respiration sensor- and argument the choice of expiration versus inspiration, with consideration to dosimetric concerns. All steps of 3D-CRT can be improved with breath control. Contouring of organs at risk (OAR) and target are easier and more accurate on breath controlled CT-scans. Inter- and intra-fraction target immobilisation allows smaller margins with better coverage. Lung outcome predictors (NTCP, Mean Dose, LV20, LV30) are improved with breath-control. In addition, inspiration breath control facilitates beam arrangement since it widens the distance between OAR and target, and leaves less lung normal tissue within the high dose region. Last, lung density, as of CT scan, is more accurate, improving dosimetry. Our institutions choice is to use spirometry driven, patient controlled high-inspiration breath-hold; this technique gives excellent immobilization results, with high reproducibility, yet it is easy to implement and costs little extra treatment time. Breath control, whatever technique is employed, proves superior to free breathing treatment when using 3D-CRT. Breath control should then be used whenever possible, and is probably mandatory for IMRT. (authors)

  13. Applying Lean principles and Kaizen rapid improvement events in public health practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Gene; Poteat-Godwin, Annah; Harrison, Lisa Macon; Randolph, Greg D

    2012-01-01

    This case study describes a local home health and hospice agency's effort to implement Lean principles and Kaizen methodology as a rapid improvement approach to quality improvement. The agency created a cross-functional team, followed Lean Kaizen methodology, and made significant improvements in scheduling time for home health nurses that resulted in reduced operational costs, improved working conditions, and multiple organizational efficiencies.

  14. Is walking to school associated with improved metabolic health?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pizarro Andreia Nogueira

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Active commuting to/from school is an important source of physical activity that has been declining over the past years. Although it is an affordable and simple way of increasing physical activity levels it is still unclear whether it has enough potential to improve health. Therefore, the aim of this cross sectional study was to examine the relationship between active commuting to/from school and metabolic risk factors in 10 to 12 year old children. Methods Participants were 229 adolescents, selected through consecutive sampling, (121 girls with mean age of 11.65 (±0.73 years old from Porto, Portugal. Means of transport to/from school was accessed by asking: ”How do you usually travel to school?” and “How do you usually travel from school?”. Active commuting was considered if children reported at least one of the trips (to or from school by active means. Total physical activity was obtained with Actigraph accelerometer for 7 consecutive days. Lipid profile measurements were conducted with Cholestech LDX® analyser. Waist circumference and blood pressure were measured by standard methods. The criteria for metabolic syndrome defined by International Diabetes Federation for children and adolescents were used. Results Adjusted binary logistic regression analysis suggested that walkers have higher odds to have a better waist circumference (OR = 2.64, 95% CI = 1.63-6.01 and better high density lipoprotein cholesterol (OR = 2.14, 95% CI = 1.01-4.52 profiles than non-active commuters, independent of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. No associations were found for other metabolic risk factors. Conclusions Exertions to increase and maintain walking to school may be particularly relevant as it is likely to have a positive impact on children’s health and eventually decrease metabolic and cardiovascular diseases.

  15. Using Digital Crumbs from an Electronic Health Record to Identify, Study and Improve Health Care Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, James E; Feldman, Henry; Reti, Shane; Markson, Larry; Lu, Xiaoning; Davis, Roger B.; Safran, Charles A

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a novel approach, the Digital Crumb Investigator, for using data collected as a byproduct of Electonic Health Record (EHR) use to help define care teams and care processes. We are developing tools and methods to utilize these routinely collected data to visualize and quantify care networks across acute care and ambulatory settings We have chosen a clinical care domain where clinicians use EHRs in their offices, on the maternity wards and in the neonatal intensive care units as a test paradigm for this technology. The tools and methods we deliver should readily translate to other health care settings that collect behind-the-scenes electronic metadata such as audit trails. We believe that by applying the methods of social networking to define clinical relationships around a patient’s care we will enable new areas of research into the usage of EHRs to promote patient safety and other improvements in care. PMID:22195103

  16. Using reality mining to improve public health and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pentland, Alex; Lazer, David; Brewer, Devon; Heibeck, Tracy

    2009-01-01

    both to individuals and communities. With the aid of data-mining algorithms, these data could shed light on individual patterns of behavior and even on the well-being of communities, creating new ways to improve public health and medicine. To illustrate, consider two examples of how reality mining may benefit individual health care. By taking advantage of special sensors in mobile phones, such as the microphone or the accelerometers built into newer devices such as Apple's iPhone, important diagnostic data can be captured. Clinical pilot data demonstrate that it may be possible to diagnose depression from the way a person talks--a depressed person tends to speak more slowly, a change that speech analysis software on a phone might recognize more readily than friends or family do. Similarly, monitoring a phone's motion sensors can also reveal small changes in gait, which could be an early indicator of ailments such as Parkinson's disease. Within the next few years reality mining will become more common, thanks in part to the proliferation and increasing sophistication of mobile phones. Many handheld devices now have the processing power of low-end desktop computers, and they can also collect more varied data, due to components such as GPS chips that track location. The Chief Technology Officer of EMC, a large digital storage company, estimates that this sort of personal sensor data will balloon from 10% of all stored information to 90% within the next decade. While the promise of reality mining is great, the idea of collecting so much personal information naturally raises many questions about privacy. It is crucial that behavior-logging technology not be forced on anyone. But legal statutes are lagging behind data collection capabilities, making it particularly important to begin discussing how the technology will and should be used. Therefore, an additional focus of this chapter will be the development of a legal and ethical framework concerning the data used by reality

  17. Combating healthcare corruption and fraud with improved global health governance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Tim K; Liang, Bryan A

    2012-10-22

    Corruption is a serious threat to global health outcomes, leading to financial waste and adverse health consequences. Yet, forms of corruption impacting global health are endemic worldwide in public and private sectors, and in developed and resource-poor settings alike. Allegations of misuse of funds and fraud in global health initiatives also threaten future investment. Current domestic and sectorial-level responses are fragmented and have been criticized as ineffective. In order to address this issue, we propose a global health governance framework calling for international recognition of "global health corruption" and development of a treaty protocol to combat this crucial issue.

  18. Combating healthcare corruption and fraud with improved global health governance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mackey Tim K

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Corruption is a serious threat to global health outcomes, leading to financial waste and adverse health consequences. Yet, forms of corruption impacting global health are endemic worldwide in public and private sectors, and in developed and resource-poor settings alike. Allegations of misuse of funds and fraud in global health initiatives also threaten future investment. Current domestic and sectorial-level responses are fragmented and have been criticized as ineffective. In order to address this issue, we propose a global health governance framework calling for international recognition of “global health corruption” and development of a treaty protocol to combat this crucial issue.

  19. Physical Activity: A Tool for Improving Health (Part 3--Recommended Amounts of Physical Activity for Optimal Health)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallaway, Patrick J.; Hongu, Nobuko

    2016-01-01

    By promoting physical activities and incorporating them into their community-based programs, Extension professionals are improving the health of individuals, particularly those with limited resources. This article is the third in a three-part series describing the benefits of physical activity for human health: (1) biological health benefits of…

  20. One Health - Transdisciplinary Opportunities for SETAC Leadership in Integrating and Improving the Health of People, Animals, and the Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    One Health is a collaborative, transdisciplinary effort working locally, nationally, and globally to improve health for people,animals, plants, and the environment. The term is relatively new (from ?2003), and it is increasingly common to see One Health included by name in interi...

  1. Health services quality improvement in Guaymate, Dominican Republic, as the framework for US global health education: a case study

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. Minesh Shah, MD MPH; Andrew Dykens, MD MPH; Amy Huang, MD; Shannon Galvin, MD; Juliet Sorensen, JD

    2014-01-01

    Background: We explored the feasibility of a partnership approach between the community, the US Peace Corps, and the University of Illinois to improve the quality of local primary health-care services in Guaymate, Dominican Republic. The aim was to do community-based participatory research (CBPR) as a framework for responsible global health education for US trainees. Methods: We used mixed methods to characterise the partnership, assess the health service effect of a quality improvement pr...

  2. Do patients choose hospitals that improve their health?

    OpenAIRE

    Nils Gutacker; Luigi Siciliani; Giuseppe Moscelli; Hugh Gravelle

    2015-01-01

    Many health care systems collect and disseminate information on provider quality in order to facilitate patient choice and induce competitive behaviour amongst providers. The Department of Health in England has recently mandated the collection of patient-reported health outcome measures (PROMs) for the purpose of performance assessment and consumer information. This is the first attempt to routinely measure the gain in health that patients experience as the result of care and thus offer a mor...

  3. 睡眠呼吸紊乱成人患者健康相关危险因素调查%Research of health-related dangerous factors in adult patients of sleep breath disorder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李学忠; 刘洪英; 李心沁; 蔡晓岚

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate health-related behavior and its affecting factors in adult patients with sleep breath disorder( SBD) and provide dangerous evidence for health management services.Methods 2 596 patients aged above 18 years in clinic were invited to our research from May 20011 to Dec 2013.Questionnaire included height, body weight, diet, physical exercise and health-related behavior factors.Multivariate stepwise logistic regression was used for statistics analysis.Results The effective responding rate was 86.5%.In adult patients with sleep breath disorder, the incidence of lack of physical exercise, obesity, smoking, drinking and diet high in salt and fat was in high proportion. In multivariate Logistic regression analysis, risk factors in lack of physical exercise were smoking and diet high in salt and fat, its protective factors were female, age and higher educational level (P<0.05).Risk factors of obesity were male, age, alcohol drinking and over-intake of salt and fat, and its protective factor was higher educational level ( P<0.05).Risk factors of cigarette smoking were male, age, alcohol drinking, lack of physical exercise and over-intake of salt and fat, and its protective factors was higher educational level (P<0.05).Risk factors of alcohol drinking were male, age, overweight and obesity, smoking, and diet high of salt and fat (P<0.05).Risk factors of over-intake of salt and fat were obesity, smoking, drinking and lack of physical exercise, and its protective factor was higher educa-tional level (P<0.05).Conclusion Health education and behavioral intervention should be offered to adult patients with sleep breath disorder.%目的:探讨成人睡眠呼吸紊乱( sleep breathing disorder, SBD)患者健康相关危险因素,为此类患者的健康管理提供科学依据。方法对3000例18岁以上SDB患者进行问卷调查,收集身高、体质量及饮食运动等信息,采用多元逐步Logistic回归分析,探讨该类人群中

  4. The Coronary Health Improvement Projects Impact on Lowering Eating, Sleep, Stress, and Depressive Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Ray M.; Aldana, Stephen G.; Greenlaw, Roger L.; Diehl, Hans A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The Coronary Health Improvement Project (CHIP) is designed to lower cardiovascular risk factors among a group of generally healthy individuals through health education. Purpose: This study will evaluate the efficacy of the CHIP intervention at improving eating, sleep, stress, and depressive disorders. Methods: A health education…

  5. Breathing detection with a portable impedance measurement system: first measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordes, Axel; Foussier, Jerome; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2009-01-01

    For monitoring the health status of individuals, detection of breathing and heart activity is important. From an electrical point of view, it is known that breathing and heart activity change the electrical impedance distribution in the human body over the time due to ventilation (high impedance) and blood shifts (low impedance). Thus, it is possible to detect both important vital parameters by measuring the impedance of the thorax or the region around lung and heart. For some measurement scenarios it is also essential to detect these parameters contactless. For instance, monitoring bus drivers health could help to limit accidents, but directly connected systems limit the drivers free moving space. One measurement technology for measuring the impedance changes in the chest without cables is the magnetic impedance tomography (MIT). This article describes a portable measurement system we developed for this scenario that allows to measure breathing contactless. Furthermore, first measurements with five volunteers were performed and analyzed.

  6. Hygiene improvement: essential to improving child health in remote Aboriginal communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Elizabeth; Bailie, Ross

    2010-09-01

    It is generally recognised that poor living conditions and poor hygiene underlie the high burden of infection experienced by Indigenous (Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander) children living in remote communities. There has been little research on this topic. Taking an ecological approach, our study aimed to identify the key factors contributing to poor hygiene in one remote Aboriginal community and to determine appropriate approaches for improving hygiene and reducing the burden of infection among children. Key findings include that multifaceted interventions are required to ensure that household water and sanitation technology are functional, hygiene behaviour change is achieved and environments that enable good hygiene behaviour are created. Many of the factors contributing to the problem of poor living conditions and poor hygiene in these communities are outside the control of the health system. Intersectoral collaboration and action is required to identify acceptable, effective and sustainable solutions. PMID:20854319

  7. Sleep-disordered breathing and mortality: a prospective cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naresh M Punjabi

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sleep-disordered breathing is a common condition associated with adverse health outcomes including hypertension and cardiovascular disease. The overall objective of this study was to determine whether sleep-disordered breathing and its sequelae of intermittent hypoxemia and recurrent arousals are associated with mortality in a community sample of adults aged 40 years or older. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We prospectively examined whether sleep-disordered breathing was associated with an increased risk of death from any cause in 6,441 men and women participating in the Sleep Heart Health Study. Sleep-disordered breathing was assessed with the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI based on an in-home polysomnogram. Survival analysis and proportional hazards regression models were used to calculate hazard ratios for mortality after adjusting for age, sex, race, smoking status, body mass index, and prevalent medical conditions. The average follow-up period for the cohort was 8.2 y during which 1,047 participants (587 men and 460 women died. Compared to those without sleep-disordered breathing (AHI: or=30.0 events/h sleep-disordered breathing were 0.93 (95% CI: 0.80-1.08, 1.17 (95% CI: 0.97-1.42, and 1.46 (95% CI: 1.14-1.86, respectively. Stratified analyses by sex and age showed that the increased risk of death associated with severe sleep-disordered breathing was statistically significant in men aged 40-70 y (hazard ratio: 2.09; 95% CI: 1.31-3.33. Measures of sleep-related intermittent hypoxemia, but not sleep fragmentation, were independently associated with all-cause mortality. Coronary artery disease-related mortality associated with sleep-disordered breathing showed a pattern of association similar to all-cause mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Sleep-disordered breathing is associated with all-cause mortality and specifically that due to coronary artery disease, particularly in men aged 40-70 y with severe sleep-disordered breathing. Please see later in the

  8. 21 CFR 868.5965 - Positive end expiratory pressure breathing attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... attachment. 868.5965 Section 868.5965 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... Positive end expiratory pressure breathing attachment. (a) Identification. A positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) breathing attachment is a device attached to a ventilator that is used to elevate...

  9. "Working Together, Unlimited Things Can Happen": CDC, Tribes, Colleges Strive to Improve Native Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selden, Ron

    2004-01-01

    The article focuses on the overall health of American Indians. Native people living on reservations and in urban areas face a broad array of health problems. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta is committed to improving the health of Native Americans. CDC is one of the agencies within the U.S. Department of Health and Human…

  10. Classification of Asthma Based on Nonlinear Analysis of Breathing Pattern.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Raoufy

    Full Text Available Normal human breathing exhibits complex variability in both respiratory rhythm and volume. Analyzing such nonlinear fluctuations may provide clinically relevant information in patients with complex illnesses such as asthma. We compared the cycle-by-cycle fluctuations of inter-breath interval (IBI and lung volume (LV among healthy volunteers and patients with various types of asthma. Continuous respiratory datasets were collected from forty age-matched men including 10 healthy volunteers, 10 patients with controlled atopic asthma, 10 patients with uncontrolled atopic asthma, and 10 patients with uncontrolled non-atopic asthma during 60 min spontaneous breathing. Complexity of breathing pattern was quantified by calculating detrended fluctuation analysis, largest Lyapunov exponents, sample entropy, and cross-sample entropy. The IBI as well as LV fluctuations showed decreased long-range correlation, increased regularity and reduced sensitivity to initial conditions in patients with asthma, particularly in uncontrolled state. Our results also showed a strong synchronization between the IBI and LV in patients with uncontrolled asthma. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve analysis showed that nonlinear analysis of breathing pattern has a diagnostic value in asthma and can be used in differentiating uncontrolled from controlled and non-atopic from atopic asthma. We suggest that complexity analysis of breathing dynamics may represent a novel physiologic marker to facilitate diagnosis and management of patients with asthma. However, future studies are needed to increase the validity of the study and to improve these novel methods for better patient management.

  11. Health sector employment growth calls for improvements in labor productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmarcher, Maria M; Festl, Eva; Bishop-Tarver, Leslie

    2016-08-01

    While rising costs of healthcare have put increased fiscal pressure on public finance, job growth in the health sector has had a stabilizing force on overall employment levels - not least in times of economic crises. In 2014 EU-15 countries employed 21 million people in the health and social care sector. Between 2000 and 2014 the share of employed persons in this sector rose from 9.5% to 12.5% of the total labor force in EU-15 countries. Over time labor input growth has shifted towards residential care activities and social work while labor in human health activities including hospitals and ambulatory care still comprises the major share. About half of the human health labor force works in hospital. Variation of health and social care employment is large even in countries with generally comparable institutional structures. While standard measures of productivity in health and social care are not yet comparable across countries, we argue that labor productivity of a growing health work force needs more attention. The long-term stability of the health system will require care delivery models that better utilize a growing health work force in concert with smart investments in digital infrastructure to support this transition. In light of this, more research is needed to explain variations in health and social care labor endowments, to identify effective policy measures of labor productivity enhancement including enhanced efforts to develop comparable productivity indicators in these areas. PMID:27370916

  12. Learning and applying new quality improvement methods to the school health setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elik, Laurel L

    2013-11-01

    A school health registered nurse identified medication administration documentation errors by unlicensed assistive personnel (UAP) in a system of school health clinics in an urban setting. This nurse applied the Lean Six Sigma Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, Control process of improvement methodology to effectively improve the process. The UAP of medication administration documentation error rate improved from 68% to 35%. This methodology may be used by school nurses to collaboratively look at ways to improve processes at the point of care.

  13. Improving Dental Health in Underserved Communities | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... please turn Javascript on. Feature: Oral Health Improving Dental Health in Underserved Communities Past Issues / Summer 2012 ... Colorado pediatrician Dr. Patty Braun. "Brown or missing teeth don't help kids—or adults—one bit." ...

  14. Improving patient flow at a family health clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bard, Jonathan F; Shu, Zhichao; Morrice, Douglas J; Wang, Dongyang Ester; Poursani, Ramin; Leykum, Luci

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents an analysis of a residency primary care clinic whose majority of patients are underserved. The clinic is operated by the health system for Bexar County and staffed primarily with physicians in a three-year Family Medicine residency program at The University of Texas School of Medicine in San Antonio. The objective of the study was to obtain a better understanding of patient flow through the clinic and to investigate changes to current scheduling rules and operating procedures. Discrete event simulation was used to establish a baseline and to evaluate a variety of scenarios associated with appointment scheduling and managing early and late arrivals. The first steps in developing the model were to map the administrative and diagnostic processes and to collect time-stamped data and fit probability distributions to each. In conjunction with the initialization and validation steps, various regressions were performed to determine if any relationships existed between individual providers and patient types, length of stay, and the difference between discharge time and appointment time. The latter two statistics along with resource utilization and closing time were the primary metrics used to evaluate system performance.The results showed that up to an 8.5 % reduction in patient length of stay is achievable without noticeably affecting the other metrics by carefully adjusting appointment times. Reducing the no-show rate from its current value of 21.8 % or overbooking, however, is likely to overwhelm the system's resources and lead to excessive congestion and overtime. Another major finding was that the providers are the limiting factor in improving patient flow. With an average utilization rate above 90 % there is little prospect in shortening the total patient time in the clinic without reducing the providers' average assessment time. Finally, several suggestions are offered to ensure fairness when dealing with out-of-order arrivals. PMID:25155098

  15. Improving health service delivery organisational performance in health systems: a taxonomy of strategy areas and conceptual framework for strategy selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallas, Sarah W; Curry, Leslie; Bashyal, Chhitij; Berman, Peter; Bradley, Elizabeth H

    2012-03-01

    Health systems strengthening (HSS) is a priority for global health funders, policy-makers and practitioners. Although many HSS efforts have focused on policy levers such as financing approaches, payment schemes or regulatory reforms, less attention has been directed to targeting the organisations that deliver health services such as hospitals, health centres and clinics. Evidence suggests that the impact of organisation-level interventions varies by context; however, we lack a general framework for integrating organisational context into performance improvement strategies for health service delivery organisations. Drawing on open systems theories from organisational behaviour and management as well as a review of 181 empirical studies of health service delivery organisations in low- and middle-income countries, we propose a taxonomy of seven strategy areas for improving organisational performance as well as a multistage conceptual framework for selecting among them. We propose that the choice of strategy for improving health service delivery organisational performance should be informed by: (i) the root cause of the organisation's performance gap; (ii) the environmental conditions facing the organisation; and (iii) the implementation capability of the organisation. We also highlight conditions under which different strategy areas may be expected to be optimally effective. The approaches presented in this paper offer a way for health system decision-makers and researchers to systematically assess and incorporate organisational context in the process of developing strategies to improve the performance of health service delivery organisations and, ultimately, of health systems.

  16. Using TQM to improve management of home health aides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dansky, K H; Brannon, D

    1996-12-01

    Home health aides are at the front line of the home health industry, raising quality of care issues and human resource (HR) management challenges. Total quality management (TQM) provides a framework to help meet those challenges. The authors investigated the relationship between TQM and HR effectiveness in home health agencies. Results suggest that TQM practices are related to HR effectiveness. Suggestions are offered to make human resource management consistent with a TQM culture.

  17. Study protocol: national research partnership to improve primary health care performance and outcomes for Indigenous peoples

    OpenAIRE

    McDermott Robyn; Thompson Sandra; Weeramanthri Tarun; Connors Christine; Anderson Ian; Nagel Tricia; Scrimgeour David J; Rowley Kevin; Semmens James; Shannon Cindy; Si Damin; Bailie Ross; Burke Hugh; Moore Elizabeth; Leon Dallas

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Strengthening primary health care is critical to reducing health inequity between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians. The Audit and Best practice for Chronic Disease Extension (ABCDE) project has facilitated the implementation of modern Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) approaches in Indigenous community health care centres across Australia. The project demonstrated improvements in health centre systems, delivery of primary care services and in patient intermedia...

  18. Health-improving possibilities of usage of aerobics in the senior classes of comprehensive school.

    OpenAIRE

    Kravchuk T.N.; Shahov Р.V.; Gubina I.J.; Guslyaeva E.J.; Ryadinskaya I.A.

    2010-01-01

    In the article is opened health-improving possibilities of use of aerobics at physical training lessons in the senior classes. The technique of carrying out of lessons of physical training in the senior classes with use of different kinds of aerobics is proved and developed, and also their influence on indicators of health of senior pupils is investigated. It is shown that employment by aerobics promotes considerable improvement of health of senior pupils, increase of mood, state of health an...

  19. Health IT for Patient Safety and Improving the Safety of Health IT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrabi, Farah; Ong, Mei-Sing; Coiera, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Alongside their benefits health IT applications can pose new risks to patient safety. Problems with IT have been linked to many different types of clinical errors including prescribing and administration of medications; as well as wrong-patient, wrong-site errors, and delays in procedures. There is also growing concern about the risks of data breach and cyber-security. IT-related clinical errors have their origins in processes undertaken to design, build, implement and use software systems in a broader sociotechnical context. Safety can be improved with greater standardization of clinical software and by improving the quality of processes at different points in the technology life cycle, spanning design, build, implementation and use in clinical settings. Oversight processes can be set up at a regional or national level to ensure that clinical software systems meet specific standards. Certification and regulation are two mechanisms to improve oversight. In the absence of clear standards, guidelines are useful to promote safe design and implementation practices. Processes to identify and mitigate hazards can be formalised via a safety management system. Minimizing new patient safety risks is critical to realizing the benefits of IT. PMID:27198089

  20. Health IT for Patient Safety and Improving the Safety of Health IT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrabi, Farah; Ong, Mei-Sing; Coiera, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Alongside their benefits health IT applications can pose new risks to patient safety. Problems with IT have been linked to many different types of clinical errors including prescribing and administration of medications; as well as wrong-patient, wrong-site errors, and delays in procedures. There is also growing concern about the risks of data breach and cyber-security. IT-related clinical errors have their origins in processes undertaken to design, build, implement and use software systems in a broader sociotechnical context. Safety can be improved with greater standardization of clinical software and by improving the quality of processes at different points in the technology life cycle, spanning design, build, implementation and use in clinical settings. Oversight processes can be set up at a regional or national level to ensure that clinical software systems meet specific standards. Certification and regulation are two mechanisms to improve oversight. In the absence of clear standards, guidelines are useful to promote safe design and implementation practices. Processes to identify and mitigate hazards can be formalised via a safety management system. Minimizing new patient safety risks is critical to realizing the benefits of IT.

  1. Improving health insurance coverage in Ghana : a case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kotoh, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Ghana is one of the first sub-Saharan African countries to introduce national health insurance to ensure more equity in access to health care. The response of the population has been disappointing, however. This study describes and examines an experiment with so called 'problem-solving groups' that

  2. Improving somatic health of outpatients with severe mental illness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Hasselt, Fenneke M.; Oud, Marian J. T.; Krabbe, Paul F. M.; Postma, Maarten J.; Loonen, A.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Patients with severe mental illness (SMI) experience a 13-to 30-year reduction in life expectancy compared with the general population. The majority of these deaths can be attributed to somatic health problems. The risk on somatic health problems is partly increased due to a reduced abil

  3. Physician and provider education for improving health and eliminating disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rust, George; Pattillo, Roland A; Matthews, Roland; Dubois, Anne M

    2007-01-01

    The Sixth Annual Primary Care and Prevention Conference and the Eleventh Annual HeLa Women's Health Conference was held on September 11-13, 2006 in Atlanta, Georgia. The reports in this supplement of Ethnicity & Disease provide a sample of the presentations made during the primary care and women's health sessions.

  4. "Lifetime Fitness for Health" Course Assessment: Implications for Curriculum Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinal, Bradley J.; Cardinal, Marita K.; Burger, Molly E.

    2005-01-01

    Every other year, comprehensive school health education programs and policies are assessed nationally using the School Health Education Profile (SHEP) survey (Grunbaum et al., 1998). The data are collected in modules that are completed by different stakeholders within the school system. As part of a cooperative agreement with the Centers for…

  5. Improving World Health: A Least Cost Strategy. Worldwatch Paper 59.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, William U.

    Least-cost health strategies designed to attack the world's leading causes of unnecessary death are explored. Section 1 emphasizes the value of primary health-care procedures--midwifery, maternal education on breastfeeding and weaning, vaccinations, oral rehydration of victims of diarrhea, and antibiotics against respiratory infections--in…

  6. Measuring and improving the societal impact of health care research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hansen, J.; Muscat, N.A.; Keskimäki, I.; Lindahl, A.K.; Pfaff, H.; Wismar, M.; Groenewegen, P.P.; et al, [No Value

    2013-01-01

    Health care research is increasingly being evaluated in terms of its contribution to new market products and services, among other factors, in the European Union’s new Framework Programme for Research and Innovation, Horizon 2020. However, discoveries in health care research often are not marketable

  7. Realizing the promise of social psychology in improving public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, William M P; Shepperd, James A; Suls, Jerry; Rothman, Alexander J; Croyle, Robert T

    2015-02-01

    The theories, phenomena, empirical findings, and methodological approaches that characterize contemporary social psychology hold much promise for addressing enduring problems in public health. Indeed, social psychologists played a major role in the development of the discipline of health psychology during the 1970s and 1980s. The health domain allows for the testing, refinement, and application of many interesting and important research questions in social psychology, and offers the discipline a chance to enhance its reach and visibility. Nevertheless, in a review of recent articles in two major social-psychological journals (Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin and Journal of Personality and Social Psychology), we found that only 3.2% of 467 studies explored health-related topics. In this article, we identify opportunities for research at the interface of social psychology and health, delineate barriers, and offer strategies that can address these barriers as the discipline continues to evolve.

  8. 21 CFR 862.3050 - Breath-alcohol test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Breath-alcohol test system. 862.3050 Section 862.3050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... diagnosis of alcohol intoxication. (b) Classification. Class I....

  9. Ask Your Dental Hygienist about Understanding and Eliminating Bad Breath

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... overall health, dental hygienists educate patients about proper oral hygiene and treat and in turn help prevent can cause more harm than good. periodontal disease bad breath. Carefully Use ... to clear away istered dental hygienist (RDH) or visit the ADHA website, at ...

  10. Delivering On Accountable Care: Lessons From A Behavioral Health Program To Improve Access And Outcomes.

    OpenAIRE

    Clarke, RM; Jeffrey, J; Grossman, M.; Strouse, T; Gitlin, M.; Skootsky, SA

    2016-01-01

    Patients with behavioral health disorders often have worse health outcomes and have higher health care utilization than patients with medical diseases alone. As such, people with behavioral health conditions are important populations for accountable care organizations (ACOs) seeking to improve the efficiency of their delivery systems. However, ACOs have historically faced numerous barriers in implementing behavioral health population-based programs, including acquiring reimbursement, recruiti...

  11. Nutrition and Health Disparities: The Role of Dairy in Improving Minority Health Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown-Riggs, Constance

    2016-01-01

    Consuming a balanced diet, such as the food groups represented on MyPlate, is key to improving health disparities. Despite the best of intentions, however, the dietary guidelines can be culturally challenging, particularly when it comes to dairy consumption. Many African and Hispanic Americans avoid milk and dairy products-key contributors of three shortfall nutrients (calcium, potassium and vitamin D)-because many people in these populations believe they are lactose intolerant. However, avoiding dairy can have significant health effects. An emerging body of evidence suggests that yogurt and other dairy products may help support reduced risk of heart disease, hypertension, obesity, and type 2 diabetes-conditions that disproportionately impact people of color. For this reason, the National Medical Association and the National Hispanic Medical Association issued a joint consensus statement recommending African Americans consume three to four servings of low-fat dairy every day. Cultured dairy products could play an important role in addressing these recommendations. Because of the presence of lactase-producing cultures, yogurt is often a more easily digestible alternative to milk, and thus more palatable to people who experience symptoms of lactose intolerance. This was a key factor cited in the final rule to include yogurt in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children. PMID:26703668

  12. Nutrition and Health Disparities: The Role of Dairy in Improving Minority Health Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constance Brown-Riggs

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Consuming a balanced diet, such as the food groups represented on MyPlate, is key to improving health disparities. Despite the best of intentions, however, the dietary guidelines can be culturally challenging, particularly when it comes to dairy consumption. Many African and Hispanic Americans avoid milk and dairy products—key contributors of three shortfall nutrients (calcium, potassium and vitamin D—because many people in these populations believe they are lactose intolerant. However, avoiding dairy can have significant health effects. An emerging body of evidence suggests that yogurt and other dairy products may help support reduced risk of heart disease, hypertension, obesity, and type 2 diabetes—conditions that disproportionately impact people of color. For this reason, the National Medical Association and the National Hispanic Medical Association issued a joint consensus statement recommending African Americans consume three to four servings of low-fat dairy every day. Cultured dairy products could play an important role in addressing these recommendations. Because of the presence of lactase-producing cultures, yogurt is often a more easily digestible alternative to milk, and thus more palatable to people who experience symptoms of lactose intolerance. This was a key factor cited in the final rule to include yogurt in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children.

  13. Human resource leadership: the key to improved results in health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neil, Mary L

    2008-01-01

    This article is the lead article in the Human Resources for Health journal's first quarterly feature. The series of seven articles has been contributed by Management Sciences for Health (MSH) under the theme of leadership and management in public health and will be published article by article over the next few weeks. The journal has invited Dr Manuel M. Dayrit, Director of the WHO Department of Human Resources for Health and former Minister of Health for the Philippines to launch the feature with an opening editorial to be found in the journal's blog. This opening article describes the human resource challenges that managers around the world report and analyses why solutions often fail to be implemented. Despite rising attention to the acute shortage of health care workers, solutions to the human resource (HR) crisis are difficult to achieve, especially in the poorest countries. Although we are aware of the issues and have developed HR strategies, the problem is that some old systems of leading and managing human resources for health do not work in today's context. The Leadership Development Program (LDP) is grounded on the belief that good leadership and management can be learned and practiced at all levels. The case studies in this issue were chosen to illustrate results from using the LDP at different levels of the health sector. The LDP makes a profound difference in health managers' attitudes towards their work. Rather than feeling defeated by a workplace climate that lacks motivation, hope, and commitment to change, people report that they are mobilized to take action to change the status quo. The lesson is that without this capacity at all levels, global policy and national HR strategies will fail to make a difference.

  14. Human resource leadership: the key to improved results in health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Neil Mary L

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This article is the lead article in the Human Resources for Health journal's first quarterly feature. The series of seven articles has been contributed by Management Sciences for Health (MSH under the theme of leadership and management in public health and will be published article by article over the next few weeks. The journal has invited Dr Manuel M. Dayrit, Director of the WHO Department of Human Resources for Health and former Minister of Health for the Philippines to launch the feature with an opening editorial to be found in the journal's blog. This opening article describes the human resource challenges that managers around the world report and analyses why solutions often fail to be implemented. Despite rising attention to the acute shortage of health care workers, solutions to the human resource (HR crisis are difficult to achieve, especially in the poorest countries. Although we are aware of the issues and have developed HR strategies, the problem is that some old systems of leading and managing human resources for health do not work in today's context. The Leadership Development Program (LDP is grounded on the belief that good leadership and management can be learned and practiced at all levels. The case studies in this issue were chosen to illustrate results from using the LDP at different levels of the health sector. The LDP makes a profound difference in health managers' attitudes towards their work. Rather than feeling defeated by a workplace climate that lacks motivation, hope, and commitment to change, people report that they are mobilized to take action to change the status quo. The lesson is that without this capacity at all levels, global policy and national HR strategies will fail to make a difference.

  15. [Investigation of the structure breathing pattern in competitive exercises have athletes kettlebell Lifters].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhonov, V F; Agafonkina, T V

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the research is to determine the breathing pattern characteristics of kettlebell athletes. The main indicators were identified: breathing frequency (f), tidal volume (VT), minute ventilation (VE). We also searched for the dependence of these parameters using the weight of kettlebells and skill of the athletes.We used the spirograph SMP-21/01-"R-D" for qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the miain indicators of kettlebell athletes breathing patterns. Athletes who achieved Masters of Sports (MS) and candidate masters of sport (CMS), their changes in breathing during exercise occurs mainly on two parameters--the frequeincy of breathing and tidal yolume. We found out while the weight of the kettlebell increases the breathing frequen- cy increases and tidal volume decreases. Athletes who achieved International Masters of Sports (MSIC), they dominated the change of one parameter of breathing--on the tidalivolume, which increases from 0.7 +/- 0.11 to 1.2 +/- 0.11 (p Kettlebell sport. In our opinion high performance level of athletes is related to undergoing breathing regulation, trying constantly to keep same level of gas composition in functional residual capacity (FRC) at a time ofperforming competition exercises. This research highlights the importance of improving breathing patterns for Kettlebell athletes if they want to improve performance. PMID:25702464

  16. Applying Lean principles and Kaizen rapid improvement events in public health practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Gene; Poteat-Godwin, Annah; Harrison, Lisa Macon; Randolph, Greg D

    2012-01-01

    This case study describes a local home health and hospice agency's effort to implement Lean principles and Kaizen methodology as a rapid improvement approach to quality improvement. The agency created a cross-functional team, followed Lean Kaizen methodology, and made significant improvements in scheduling time for home health nurses that resulted in reduced operational costs, improved working conditions, and multiple organizational efficiencies. PMID:22139310

  17. Improving diabetes management with electronic health records and patients' health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benhamou, P-Y

    2011-12-01

    The lack of patient engagement and clinical inertia both contribute to suboptimal diabetes care. However, both obstacles are amenable to informatics- and Internet-based interventions. The use of electronic medical records (EMRs) is now established as being useful for improving diabetes care. Intelligent records that integrate computerized decision-support systems are now able to recommend care protocols tailored to risk levels. Web-based personal health record (PHR) systems, shared with healthcare providers, could also provide added value by promoting self-management of the behaviours related to diabetes. These Web-based programmes include patients' access to EMRs, uploading of glucose monitoring results, a glucose diary, secure e-mail with providers, manual or automated feedback on blood glucose readings and other risk factors, an educational website, and an online diary for entering personal information on exercise, diet and medication. The integration of Web-based patients' systems into the EMR used by physicians is the next frontier. In addition, the input from "smartphones" that are able to provide real-time support to patients could contribute to the reorganization of diabetes care. Convincing data on HbA(1c) improvements with such systems are available for type 2 diabetes, but are still equivocal for type 1 diabetes. Obstacles include patients' compliance with the technology, their ergonomic design and the need to reimburse providers for their care. Designing appropriate electronic tools and tailoring them to the conditions in France merits our attention. PMID:22208711

  18. Accountable Care Organizations and Clinical Commissioning Groups face an uncertain challenge for improving public health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas J. Noble

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Accountable Care Organizations (ACO in the United States of America (USA and Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCG in the United Kingdom (UK are new proposed organizations in health services both tasked with a role which includes improving public health.  Although there are very significant differences between the UK and USA health systems there appears to be a similar confusion as to how ACO and CCG will regard and address public or population health.  The role of ACO in improving population health and evaluating the health needs of their registered and insured patients remains ill-defined and poorly explored.  Likewise, in the current UK National Health Service (NHS reorganisation, control and commissioning of appropriate local health services are passing from Primary Care Trusts (PCT to new cross-organizational structures (CCG.  CCG groups aim to be, like ACO, physician led.  They will also assume a role for public or population health, but this role, like that of the newly-forming ACO, is currently unclear.  Lessons learned from the USA and UK experience of new organizations tasked with a role in improving public health may inform mechanisms for physician led organizations in the UK and the USA to assess health needs, monitor population health information and improve population health outcomes.

  19. Improving health literacy among elderly : The impact of low health literacy on health and well-being of older individuals

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Khadro

    2015-01-01

    Health Literacy is defined as the ability to understand, obtain and appraise health information in order to make appropriate decisions that can promote health. Low health literacy means lacking the ability to understand, obtain and appraise health information successfully and making decisions become difficult. The aim of the study was to address how low health literacy can have negative impact on health of older individual and also to suggest ways to deliver and create more accessible ...

  20. The development of the serious mental illness physical Health Improvement Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, J; Gray, R; Jones, M

    2009-06-01

    WHITE J., GRAY R. & JONES M. (2009) Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing16, 493-498 The development of the serious mental illness physical Health Improvement ProfilePeople with serious mental illness (SMI), such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, are more likely to suffer from a range of long-term physical conditions including diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Consequently they will die 10-15 years earlier than the general population. Health services have failed to address this major health inequality because of a lack of consensus about the type and frequency of monitoring people with SMI require and a lack of knowledge and skills in the mental health workforce. We developed the SMI physical Health Improvement Profile to help mental health nurses profile the physical health of the SMI patients they work with and direct them towards the evidence base interventions available to address identified health problems. PMID:19538607

  1. Antenatal care strengthening for improved health behaviours in Jimma, Ethiopia, 2009-2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, Sarah Fredsted; Negussie, Dereje; GebreMariam, Abebe;

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: health systems in low-income settings are not sufficiently reaching the poor, and global disparities in reproductive health persist. The frequency and quality of health education during antenatal care is often low. Further studies are needed on how to improve the performance of health...... systems in low income settings to improve maternal and child health. OBJECTIVES: to assess the effectiveness of a participatory antenatal care intervention on health behaviours and to illuminate how the different socioeconomic groups responded to the intervention in Jimma, Ethiopia. SETTING, INTERVENTION...... given birth within the previous 12 months. The effect of the intervention was assessed by comparing the change in health behaviours (number of antenatal visits, health facility delivery, breast feeding, preventive infant health check, and infant immunisation) from before to after the intervention period...

  2. Breathing Valley Fever

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-02-04

    Dr. Duc Vugia, chief of the Infectious Diseases Branch in the California Department of Public Health, discusses Valley Fever.  Created: 2/4/2014 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 2/5/2014.

  3. Sensors for breath testing: from nanomaterials to comprehensive disease detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konvalina, Gady; Haick, Hossam

    2014-01-21

    steps, each of which has several possible technological alternatives with advantages and drawbacks that might affect the performance of the nanomaterial-based sensors in a breath-testing system. With this in mind, we discuss how to choose nanomaterial-based sensors, considering the profile of the targeted breath markers and the possible limitations of the approach, and how to design the surrounding breath-testing setup. We also discuss how to tailor the dynamic range and selectivity of the applied sensors to detect the disease-related volatile organic compounds of interest. Finally, we describe approaches to overcome other obstacles by improving the sensing elements and the supporting techniques such as preconcentration and dehumidification. PMID:23926883

  4. Improving Health and Safety in the Workplace. Teenage Health Teaching Modules. Field Test Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Education Development Center, Inc., Newton, MA.

    The Teenage Health Teaching Modules (THTM) program is a health education curriculum for adolescents. Each THTM module frames an adolescent health task emphasizing development of self-assessment, communication, decision making, health advocacy, and self-management. The goals of this module are to acquaint secondary students with the problems of…

  5. Quality Improvement Initiative in School-Based Health Centers across New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booker, John M.; Schluter, Janette A.; Carrillo, Kris; McGrath, Jane

    2011-01-01

    Background: Quality improvement principles have been applied extensively to health care organizations, but implementation of quality improvement methods in school-based health centers (SBHCs) remains in a developmental stage with demonstration projects under way in individual states and nationally. Rural areas, such as New Mexico, benefit from the…

  6. Promoting health and advancing development through improved housing in low-income settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haines, A.; Bruce, N.; Cairncross, S.; Davies, M.; Greenland, K.; Hiscox, A.F.; Lindsay, S.; Lindsay, T.; Satterthwaite, D.; Wilkinson, P.

    2013-01-01

    There is major untapped potential to improve health in low-income communities through improved housing design, fittings, materials and construction. Adverse effects on health from inadequate housing can occur through a range of mechanisms, both direct and indirect, including as a result of extreme w

  7. Improving maternal health in Kenya: Challenges and strategies for low resource nations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagia, Jean

    2013-05-01

    In order to improve maternal health in low-resource countries, a multifaceted, culturally and religiously sensitive approach is needed. This approach includes working for political stability, increasing women's level of education, economic empowerment, strengthening existing health management systems, and wisely allocating human and material resources. Critically important material resources such as access to and production of food and clean water must be a top priority. In Kenya, our constitution respects life from conception as an individual's right. This means that there is need to set up strategies that improve maternal health and by extension improve the health of the unborn baby.

  8. Practice makes perfect, even for breathing

    OpenAIRE

    Feldman, Jack L.; Kam, Kaiwen; Janczewski, Wiktor A.

    2009-01-01

    Breathing relies on a respiratory rhythm generator. A study characterizes an early emerging oscillatory group of Phox2b-expressing parafacial cells that entrain and couple with the preBötzinger Complex at the onset of fetal breathing.

  9. Ethical analysis to improve decision-making on health technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saarni, Samuli I; Hofmann, Bjørn; Lampe, Kristian;

    2008-01-01

    beyond effectiveness and costs to also considering the social, organizational and ethical implications of technologies. However, a commonly accepted method for analysing the ethical aspects of health technologies is lacking. This paper describes a model for ethical analysis of health technology...... that is easy and flexible to use in different organizational settings and cultures. The model is part of the EUnetHTA project, which focuses on the transferability of HTAs between countries. The EUnetHTA ethics model is based on the insight that the whole HTA process is value laden. It is not sufficient...... to only analyse the ethical consequences of a technology, but also the ethical issues of the whole HTA process must be considered. Selection of assessment topics, methods and outcomes is essentially a value-laden decision. Health technologies may challenge moral or cultural values and beliefs...

  10. Utilizing health information technology to improve vaccine communication and coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockwell, Melissa S; Fiks, Alexander G

    2013-08-01

    Vaccination coverage is still below the Healthy People 2010 and 2020 goals. Technology use in the US is widespread by patients and providers including text message, email, internet, social media and electronic health records. Health information technology (IT) interventions can facilitate the rapid or real-time identification of children in need of vaccination and provide the foundation for vaccine-oriented parental communication or clinical alerts in a flexible and tailored manner. There has been a small but burgeoning field of work integrating IT into vaccination interventions including reminder/recall using non-traditional methods, clinical decision support for providers in the electronic health record, use of technology to affect work-flow and the use of social media. The aim of this review is to introduce and present current data regarding the effectiveness of a range of technology tools to promote vaccination, describe gaps in the literature and offer insights into future directions for research and intervention. PMID:23807361

  11. Integrating Literacy, Culture, and Language to Improve Health Care Quality for Diverse Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrulis, Dennis P.; Brach, Cindy

    2016-01-01

    Objective To understand the interrelationship of literacy, culture, and language and the importance of addressing their intersection. Methods Health literacy, cultural competence, and linguistic competence strategies to quality improvement were analyzed. Results Strategies to improve health literacy for low-literate individuals are distinct from strategies for culturally diverse and individuals with limited English proficiency (LEP). The lack of integration results in health care that is unresponsive to some vulnerable groups’ needs. A vision for integrated care is presented. Conclusion Clinicians, the health care team, and health care organizations have important roles to play in addressing challenges related to literacy, culture, and language. PMID:17931131

  12. Health care quality improvement in the emergency department: a reengineering approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaming, J S; Gulati, A

    1998-05-01

    Most health care organization processes can be compared with those in typical engineering, manufacturing, and service businesses, and improvement can be achieved in health care by means of many of the tools that are commonly found in non-health care industries. In fact, it may prove beneficial for health care organizations to consider obtaining help from professionals outside health care because such individuals probably will not have preconceived ideas about process improvement in such organizations. The article provides a success story in a health care process improvement effort that was undertaken by engineers in a large Los Angeles regional hospital in 1993. It discusses specific steps that were taken to obtain and synthesize data, achieve employee and management buy-in, analyze processes for strengths and improvement opportunities, assess customer satisfaction, implement changes, and measure results. PMID:10179278

  13. Cardiovascular and Respiratory Effect of Yogic Slow Breathing in the Yoga Beginner: What Is the Best Approach?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Mason

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Slow breathing increases cardiac-vagal baroreflex sensitivity (BRS, improves oxygen saturation, lowers blood pressure, and reduces anxiety. Within the yoga tradition slow breathing is often paired with a contraction of the glottis muscles. This resistance breath “ujjayi” is performed at various rates and ratios of inspiration/expiration. To test whether ujjayi had additional positive effects to slow breathing, we compared BRS and ventilatory control under different breathing patterns (equal/unequal inspiration/expiration at 6 breath/min, with/without ujjayi, in 17 yoga-naive young healthy participants. BRS increased with slow breathing techniques with or without expiratory ujjayi ( or higher except with inspiratory + expiratory ujjayi. The maximal increase in BRS and decrease in blood pressure were found in slow breathing with equal inspiration and expiration. This corresponded with a significant improvement in oxygen saturation without increase in heart rate and ventilation. Ujjayi showed similar increase in oxygen saturation but slightly lesser improvement in baroreflex sensitivity with no change in blood pressure. The slow breathing with equal inspiration and expiration seems the best technique for improving baroreflex sensitivity in yoga-naive subjects. The effects of ujjayi seems dependent on increased intrathoracic pressure that requires greater effort than normal slow breathing.

  14. Medical Student Mental Health 3.0: Improving Student Wellness Through Curricular Changes

    OpenAIRE

    Slavin, Stuart J.; Schindler, Debra L.; Chibnall, John T.

    2014-01-01

    Medical education can have significant negative effects on the well-being of medical students. To date, efforts to improve student mental health have focused largely on improving access to mental health providers, reducing the stigma and other barriers to mental health treatment, and implementing ancillary wellness programs. Still, new and innovative models that build on these efforts by directly addressing the root causes of stress that lie within the curriculum itself are needed to properly...

  15. Improving Health Outcomes for Patients with Depression: A Population Health Imperative. Report on an Expert Panel Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Janice L; Skoufalos, Alexis; Medalia, Alice; Fendrick, A Mark

    2016-09-01

    Improving Health Outcomes for Patients with Depression: A Population Health Imperative. Report on an Expert Panel Meeting Janice L. Clarke, RN, Alexis Skoufalos, EdD, Alice Medalia, PhD, and A. Mark Fendrick, MD Editorial: A Call to Action : David B. Nash, MD, MBA   S-2 OVERVIEW: Depression and the Population Health Imperative    S-3 Promoting Awareness of the Issues and Opportunities for Improvement    S-5 Cognitive Dysfunction in Affective Disorders    S-5 Critical Role of Employers in Improving Health Outcomes for Employees with Depression    S-6 Closing the Behavioral Health Professional and Process Gaps    S-6 Achieving the Triple Aim for Patients with Depressive Disorders    S-6 Improving the Experience of Care for Patients with Depression    S-6 Improving Quality of Care and Health Outcomes for Patients with Depression    S-7 Changing the Cost of Care Discussion from How Much to How Well    S-8 Panel Insights and Recommendations    S-9 Conclusion    S-10. PMID:27636743

  16. Applying Selective Breeding And Vaccination To Improve Fish Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infectious disease causes substantial economic loss in aquaculture. In an effort to reduce loss, selective breeding of animals with superior disease resistance is being increasingly utilized as a component within fish health management plans. Selective breeding is especially applicable to salmonid ...

  17. How to Improve the Health of American Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Laurence

    2015-11-01

    The major threats to the health of American teenagers are behavioral-risky and reckless things adolescents do that threaten their well-being and that of others. The primary approach to preventing adolescent risk taking has been classroom-based health education. Yet, most systematic research indicates that even the best programs are successful mainly at changing adolescents' knowledge but not in altering their behavior. Research on adolescent brain development has revolutionized our understanding of this stage of life, but our approach to deterring adolescent risk taking remains grounded in old, antiquated, and erroneous views of the period. Classroom-based health education is an uphill battle against evolution and endocrinology, and it is not a fight we are likely to win. Instead of trying to change teenagers into something they are not, we should try to reduce the risks they are exposed to. We should spend less money and effort trying to influence how adolescents think, and focus more on limiting opportunities for their inherently immature judgment to hurt themselves or others. Although there is evidence that some programs aimed at strengthening adolescents' self-regulation may also deter risky behavior, our public health policies should emphasize changing the context in which adolescents live, rather than solely attempting to change adolescents themselves.

  18. Improving Health by Reducing Stress: An Experiential Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Largo-Wight, Erin; Moore, Michele J.; Barr, Elissa M.

    2011-01-01

    Stress is a leading health issue among college students. Managing stress involves enhancing resources necessary to cope with life's demands. Relaxation techniques are especially critical coping strategies when stress is chronic and coping resources are overused and fatigued. Methods: This article describes a research-based relaxation technique…

  19. How to Improve the Health of American Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Laurence

    2015-11-01

    The major threats to the health of American teenagers are behavioral-risky and reckless things adolescents do that threaten their well-being and that of others. The primary approach to preventing adolescent risk taking has been classroom-based health education. Yet, most systematic research indicates that even the best programs are successful mainly at changing adolescents' knowledge but not in altering their behavior. Research on adolescent brain development has revolutionized our understanding of this stage of life, but our approach to deterring adolescent risk taking remains grounded in old, antiquated, and erroneous views of the period. Classroom-based health education is an uphill battle against evolution and endocrinology, and it is not a fight we are likely to win. Instead of trying to change teenagers into something they are not, we should try to reduce the risks they are exposed to. We should spend less money and effort trying to influence how adolescents think, and focus more on limiting opportunities for their inherently immature judgment to hurt themselves or others. Although there is evidence that some programs aimed at strengthening adolescents' self-regulation may also deter risky behavior, our public health policies should emphasize changing the context in which adolescents live, rather than solely attempting to change adolescents themselves. PMID:26581723

  20. Can Bonus Payments Improve the Quality of Health Care?

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2011-01-01

    The goal was to see whether linking bonus payments to performance had a positive effect. Rwanda, which was forced to rebuild its institutions after the 1994 civil war and genocide, began piloting programs in 2001 to give health clinics cash bonuses for meeting certain healthcare objectives, such as immunizing children, and for encouraging people to utilize medical services, such as having ...

  1. Commentary to Adam Oliver's 'Incentivising improvements in health care delivery'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vrangbaek, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    The commentary discusses key issues for assessment of performance management within health care. It supports the ambition to develop more realistic understandings of performance management based on insights from behavioral economics as suggested by Adam Oliver. However, it also points to several...

  2. Health informatics to improve the health of homeless and marginalised populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima Wurie

    2016-01-01

    the use of health informatics approaches, like VOT to improve the health of homeless and marginalised populations. METHODS & RESULTS: In a previous VOT pilot in London (July 2012 to March 2013 to explore VOT as a flexible alternative to DOT in clinically and/or socially complex TB cases, findings from 17 patients show that 80% of patients returned their video clips and 86% of scheduled VOT doses were observed to have been taken. Semi-structured interviews with patients with multi-drug resistant tuberculosis receiving VOT in London (Oct 2013 to March 2014: Patients reported very high levels of satisfaction as illustrated by the following quotes: “I was getting tired of DOT. I thought I would be a lot freer to continue with my daily life—all that time and effort you’ve saved me—I didn’t need much convincing. With the DOT, it felt like...there was some kind of stigma and for that reason they are monitoring you. It felt like being a criminal.” “I wouldn't have felt comfortable just meeting a person online—I would have been like, ‘who's that person, I don't even know him?’ But I'm really pleased you came all the way to my house, to make me comfortable and show me what to do...and I took it from there and it was really good." Mixed methods research approaches to explore patient acceptability of VOT intervention: Building upon previous pilot work current mixed methods research explores patient attitudes and acceptability of VOT will involve administration of the EQ5D survey instrument (at 2 and 6 months into treatment to capture impact of the VOT intervention on quality of life, patient satisfaction (using Likert scale; views on being asked to have treatment observed; to understand how VOT fits into patients’ lives and the effect of DOT/VOT on family, work and social life; to explore patient’s views on the levels of support available to them; identify technical difficulties with recording and submitting VOT clips. Semi-structured interviews and focus

  3. Breath hydrogen test and sucrase isomaltase deficiency.

    OpenAIRE

    Ford, R P; Barnes, G L

    1983-01-01

    Sucrose breath hydrogen tests were performed on 7 children with proved sucrase isomaltase deficiency. All children had raised breath hydrogen excretion. The amount of hydrogen produced and symptoms experienced increased with increasing sucrose loads. The sucrose breath hydrogen test appears to be a reliable indicator of sucrose malabsorption in sucrase isomaltase deficiency.

  4. Improving Your Health: Tips for African American Men and Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ways to be physically active, or have limited time and money. Start by talking to your doctor about ways to improve your eating, drinking, and physical activity habits. Consuming healthier foods and beverages and getting regular physical activity ...

  5. Neural mechanisms underlying breathing complexity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agathe Hess

    Full Text Available Breathing is maintained and controlled by a network of automatic neurons in the brainstem that generate respiratory rhythm and receive regulatory inputs. Breathing complexity therefore arises from respiratory central pattern generators modulated by peripheral and supra-spinal inputs. Very little is known on the brainstem neural substrates underlying breathing complexity in humans. We used both experimental and theoretical approaches to decipher these mechanisms in healthy humans and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. COPD is the most frequent chronic lung disease in the general population mainly due to tobacco smoke. In patients, airflow obstruction associated with hyperinflation and respiratory muscles weakness are key factors contributing to load-capacity imbalance and hence increased respiratory drive. Unexpectedly, we found that the patients breathed with a higher level of complexity during inspiration and expiration than controls. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI, we scanned the brain of the participants to analyze the activity of two small regions involved in respiratory rhythmogenesis, the rostral ventro-lateral (VL medulla (pre-Bötzinger complex and the caudal VL pons (parafacial group. fMRI revealed in controls higher activity of the VL medulla suggesting active inspiration, while in patients higher activity of the VL pons suggesting active expiration. COPD patients reactivate the parafacial to sustain ventilation. These findings may be involved in the onset of respiratory failure when the neural network becomes overwhelmed by respiratory overload We show that central neural activity correlates with airflow complexity in healthy subjects and COPD patients, at rest and during inspiratory loading. We finally used a theoretical approach of respiratory rhythmogenesis that reproduces the kernel activity of neurons involved in the automatic breathing. The model reveals how a chaotic activity in

  6. IS TOTAL QUALITY MANAGEMENT/ CONTINOUS QUALITY IMPROVEMENT OR QUALITY ASSURANCE APPLICABLE IN HEALTH SERVICES?

    OpenAIRE

    Sidin, Andi Indahwaty

    2015-01-01

    In modern society, people are likely to be consumerism. They tend to be concerned about the quality of goods or services. In the same way, health care had to pay attention as the patients seem to be familiarized with health services quality. Health care has tried to adapt TQM/Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) as well as Quality Assurance (QA) which is also adapted from manufacturing. However, some characteristics in the health industry are dissimilar to manufacturing. It can be explained ...

  7. Opportunities for improving the nation's health through collaboration with the mass media.

    OpenAIRE

    Arkin, E B

    1990-01-01

    Understanding the mass media is a prerequisite to gaining the cooperation of those who control access to media time and space to improve the coverage of health issues about which the public needs, and often wants, to know. To address the complexities of the mass media and how they influence the public's health, a group of Public Health Service agencies, foundations, and research institutions collaborated to review recent changes in the mass media and public health sectors and to recommend ste...

  8. Using Degraded Music Quality to Encourage a Health Improving Walking Pace: BeatClearWalker

    OpenAIRE

    Andreas Komninos; Mark Dunlop; David Rowe; Allan Hewitt; Steven Coull

    2015-01-01

    Meeting the target of 8000 steps/day, as recommended by many national governments and health authorities, can provide considerable physical and mental health benefits and is seen as a key target for reducing obesity levels and improving public health. However, to optimize the health benefits, walking should be performed at a “moderate” intensity. While there are numerous mobile fitness applications that monitor distance walked, none directly support walking at this cadence nor has there been ...

  9. Do primary care providers who speak Chinese improve access to mental health care of Chinese immigrants?

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Alice W.; Kazanjian, Arminée

    2009-01-01

    Background The utilization of health care providers who share the language and culture of their patients has been advocated as a strategy to improve access to the mental health care of immigrants. This study examines the relationship between patients receiving primary care from health care providers who speak Chinese and the rate of mental health diagnosis and consultation among Chinese immigrants in British Columbia (BC), Canada. Methods The study analyzed 3 linked administrative databases: ...

  10. A case study of population health improvement at a Midwest regional hospital employer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, D Adam; Sheehan, Paula

    2010-06-01

    This article reviews the population health improvement initiative of a Midwest regional hospital employer. Services included health risk assessments, health education, and motivational health coaching conducted telephonically. Outcomes categories for this program evaluation comprised participation rates, participant satisfaction, health status and behavior change, productivity change, health care claims savings, and return on investment. Participation rates varied widely with incentive structure, although retention of participants in coaching programs averaged 89%. The participant satisfaction rate for the last 14 months of interventions was 96%. Four years of population health status and behavior trending showed significant improvements in smoking status, dietary fat and fiber intake, exercise, mental health (ie, stress, effects depressive symptoms in the past year, life satisfaction), readiness to change (ie, diet, exercise, stress, smoking, body weight), perceptions of overall health, an index of good health habits, sum of lifestyle health risks, and sum of risks and chronic conditions. Body mass index showed nonsignificant improvements during the years of greatest participation (years 2 to 4). Indicators of productivity demonstrated improvements as well. These gains were noted for employees across all health risk statuses, which suggests population health improvement strategies can influence productivity even for healthy employees. Program year 3 was evaluated for health care claims savings using a 2-stage multivariate regression approach. Stage 1 was a computation of propensity-to-participate scores. Stage 2 was an estimation of per member per month (PMPM) claims savings for participant cohorts using a propensity score-weighted linear regression analysis. Participants averaged $40.65 PMPM savings over the control population. Program return on investment, including incentive costs and vendor fees, was 2.87:1. PMID:20521905

  11. Improving the Health Industry with Stock Management Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Luiz Henrique Machado Cequeira; Edson José Dalto; Pailo Sérgio de Souza Coelho

    2006-01-01

    Considering that the health industry has changed radically along the years, the efficient professional management of entities connected to this segment is fundamental. Modern techniques, such as demand forecast and stock management, contribute to a better management of scarce and critical resources which might put human lives at risk. The present study describes the use of quantitative techniques for supply forecast and stock management of a blood bank from a given hospital. The demonstration...

  12. Coordination in networks for improved mental health service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Hansson

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Well-organised clinical cooperation between health and social services has been difficult to achieve in Sweden as in other countries.Purpose: This paper presents an empirical study of a mental health coordination network in one area in Stockholm. The aim was to describe the development and nature of coordination within a mental health and social care consortium and to assess the impact on care processes and client outcomes.Method: Data was gathered through interviews with coordina­tors from three rehabilitation units. The interviews focused on coordination activities aimed at supporting the clients’ needs and investigated how the coordinators acted according to the consortium's holistic approach. Data on The Camberwell Assess­ment of Need (CAN-S showing clients’ satisfaction was used to assess on set of outcomes. Findings: The findings revealed different coordination activities and factors both helping and hindering the network coordination activities. One factor helping was the history of local and personal informal cooperation and shared responsibilities evident. Unclear roles and routines hindered cooperationPractical value: The contribution is an empirical example and a model for organisations establishing structures for network coordination. One lesson for current policy about integrated health care is to adapt and implement ”pair coordinators” where full structural integration is not possible. Another lesson, based on the idea of patient quality by coordinated care, is specific to adapt the work of the local psychiatric addictive team – an independent special team in the psychiatric outpatient care serving psychotic clients with complex addictive problems.

  13. Coordination in networks for improved mental health service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Hansson

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Well-organised clinical cooperation between health and social services has been difficult to achieve in Sweden as in other countries. Purpose: This paper presents an empirical study of a mental health coordination network in one area in Stockholm. The aim was to describe the development and nature of coordination within a mental health and social care consortium and to assess the impact on care processes and client outcomes. Method: Data was gathered through interviews with coordina­tors from three rehabilitation units. The interviews focused on coordination activities aimed at supporting the clients’ needs and investigated how the coordinators acted according to the consortium's holistic approach. Data on The Camberwell Assess­ment of Need (CAN-S showing clients’ satisfaction was used to assess on set of outcomes. Findings: The findings revealed different coordination activities and factors both helping and hindering the network coordination activities. One factor helping was the history of local and personal informal cooperation and shared responsibilities evident. Unclear roles and routines hindered cooperation Practical value: The contribution is an empirical example and a model for organisations establishing structures for network coordination. One lesson for current policy about integrated health care is to adapt and implement ”pair coordinators” where full structural integration is not possible. Another lesson, based on the idea of patient quality by coordinated care, is specific to adapt the work of the local psychiatric addictive team – an independent special team in the psychiatric outpatient care serving psychotic clients with complex addictive problems.

  14. Integrated yoga therapy for improving mental health in managers

    OpenAIRE

    Ganpat, Tikhe Sham; Nagendra, H R

    2011-01-01

    Background: Managers’ lives have become a never-ending race against time, technology, and targets. This race creates tension, which leads to dissatisfaction and frustration and eventually manifests itself as psychological and physiological stress with mental and emotional drain. This modern lifestyle intensifies the stress leading to “Excessive Tension” and consequent deterioration in “Executive Efficiency.” Objective: To assess mental health in managers undergoing yoga-based Self-Management ...

  15. Improving health care communication for persons with mental retardation.

    OpenAIRE

    Harper, D C; Wadsworth, J S

    1992-01-01

    There has been little effort directed at training health care professionals in behaviors and attitudes that are effective in communicating with persons with mental retardation. Such training would be beneficial not only to assist those with congenital cognitive deficits but for those with acquired central nervous system conditions as well, for example, dementia. Persons with mental retardation are living in community settings in greater numbers and increasingly participating in vocational, re...

  16. Is livestock research unproductive? Separating health maintenance from improvement research

    OpenAIRE

    Townsend, Robert; Thirtle, Colin

    2001-01-01

    Studies of the rates of return to research have usually been based on the implicit assumption that if there were no research, then there would be neither growth nor decline in output or productivity. In the case of livestock, particularly in southern Africa, which has a sub-tropical disease ecology and a long history of disastrous losses due to disease, the assumption is especially unreasonable. It ignores the losses that would have occurred in the absence of livestock health research, result...

  17. Edible Mushrooms: Improving Human Health and Promoting Quality Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Elena Valverde

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mushrooms have been consumed since earliest history; ancient Greeks believed that mushrooms provided strength for warriors in battle, and the Romans perceived them as the “Food of the Gods.” For centuries, the Chinese culture has treasured mushrooms as a health food, an “elixir of life.” They have been part of the human culture for thousands of years and have considerable interest in the most important civilizations in history because of their sensory characteristics; they have been recognized for their attractive culinary attributes. Nowadays, mushrooms are popular valuable foods because they are low in calories, carbohydrates, fat, and sodium: also, they are cholesterol-free. Besides, mushrooms provide important nutrients, including selenium, potassium, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin D, proteins, and fiber. All together with a long history as food source, mushrooms are important for their healing capacities and properties in traditional medicine. It has reported beneficial effects for health and treatment of some diseases. Many nutraceutical properties are described in mushrooms, such as prevention or treatment of Parkinson, Alzheimer, hypertension, and high risk of stroke. They are also utilized to reduce the likelihood of cancer invasion and metastasis due to antitumoral attributes. Mushrooms act as antibacterial, immune system enhancer and cholesterol lowering agents; additionally, they are important sources of bioactive compounds. As a result of these properties, some mushroom extracts are used to promote human health and are found as dietary supplements.

  18. Effect of slow breathing training on heart rate, spontaneous respiratory rate and pattern of breathing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritu Adhana

    2016-04-01

    Results: After three months of practicing slow breathing there was statistically significant reduction in heart rate and spontaneous respiratory rate. Shifting of pattern of breathing from thoracic pattern to abdominal pattern of breathing was also very highly significant. Conclusions: The study showed that slow breathing technique causes comprehensive change in body physiology by controlling autonomic nervous system. It regularizes rate and pattern of breathing. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(4.000: 1027-1030

  19. Effect of slow breathing training on heart rate, spontaneous respiratory rate and pattern of breathing

    OpenAIRE

    Ritu Adhana; Moneet Agarwal; Rani Gupta; Jyoti Dvivedi

    2016-01-01

    Background: The study was performed to see the effect of slow breathing (6 breaths/minute) training on spontaneous respiratory rate, heart rate and pattern of breathing. Methods: Sixty subjects between the ages 20-50 years were included in the study. After the rest of 10-15 minutes in a comfortable sitting posture their baseline heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR) and pattern of breathing were recorded on digital polygraph. Then they were guided to do slow breathing maintaining rate of...

  20. Partnerships among community development, public health, and health care could improve the well-being of low-income people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, David; Andrews, Nancy

    2011-11-01

    Safe, vibrant neighborhoods are vital to health. The community development "industry"-a network of nonprofit service providers, real estate developers, financial institutions, foundations, and government-draws on public subsidies and other financing to transform impoverished neighborhoods into better-functioning communities. Although such activity positively affects the "upstream" causes of poor health, the community development industry rarely collaborates with the health sector or even considers health effects in its work. Examples of initiatives-such as the creation of affordable housing that avoids nursing home placement-suggest a strong potential for cross-sector collaborations to reduce health disparities and slow the growth of health care spending, while at the same time improving economic and social well-being in America's most disadvantaged communities. We propose a four-point plan to help ensure that these collaborations achieve positive outcomes and sustainable progress for residents and investors alike. PMID:22068396

  1. Slow breathing and cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Chaddha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women worldwide. Much emphasis has been placed on the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. While depression and anxiety increase the risk of developing cardiovascular disease, cardiovascular disease also increases the risk of developing anxiety and depression. Thus, promoting optimal mental health may be important for both primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. Like lowering blood pressure, lipids, and body weight, lowering anger and hostility and improving depression and anxiety may also be an important intervention in preventive cardiology. As we strive to further improve cardiovascular outcomes, the next bridge to cross may be one of offering patients nonpharmacologic means for combating daily mental stress and promoting mental health, such as yoga and pranayama. Indeed, the best preventive cardiovascular medicine may be a blend of both Western and Eastern medicine.

  2. Slow breathing and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaddha, Ashish

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women worldwide. Much emphasis has been placed on the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. While depression and anxiety increase the risk of developing cardiovascular disease, cardiovascular disease also increases the risk of developing anxiety and depression. Thus, promoting optimal mental health may be important for both primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. Like lowering blood pressure, lipids, and body weight, lowering anger and hostility and improving depression and anxiety may also be an important intervention in preventive cardiology. As we strive to further improve cardiovascular outcomes, the next bridge to cross may be one of offering patients nonpharmacologic means for combating daily mental stress and promoting mental health, such as yoga and pranayama. Indeed, the best preventive cardiovascular medicine may be a blend of both Western and Eastern medicine. PMID:26170595

  3. The Impact Of Medicare ACOs On Improving Integration And Coordination Of Physical And Behavioral Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullerton, Catherine A; Henke, Rachel M; Crable, Erica; Hohlbauch, Andriana; Cummings, Nicholas

    2016-07-01

    The accountable care organization (ACO) model holds the promise of reducing costs and improving the quality of care by realigning payment incentives to focus on health outcomes instead of service volume. One key to managing the total cost of care is improving care coordination for and treatment of people with behavioral health disorders. We examined qualitative data from ninety organizations participating in Medicare ACO demonstration programs from 2012 through 2015 to determine whether and how they focused on behavioral health care. These ACOs had mixed degrees of engagement in improving behavioral health care for their populations. The biggest challenges included a lack of behavioral health care providers, data availability, and sustainable financing models. Nonetheless, we found substantial interest in integrating behavioral health care into primary care across a majority of the ACOs. PMID:27385242

  4. Improving Health Outcomes for Patients with Depression: A Population Health Imperative. Report on an Expert Panel Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoufalos, Alexis; Medalia, Alice; Fendrick, A. Mark

    2016-01-01

    Improving Health Outcomes for Patients with Depression: A Population Health Imperative. Report on an Expert Panel Meeting Janice L. Clarke, RN, Alexis Skoufalos, EdD, Alice Medalia, PhD, and A. Mark Fendrick, MD Editorial: A Call to Action: David B. Nash, MD, MBA   S-2 Overview: Depression and the Population Health Imperative   S-3 Promoting Awareness of the Issues and Opportunities for Improvement   S-5 Cognitive Dysfunction in Affective Disorders   S-5 Critical Role of Employers in Improving Health Outcomes for Employees with Depression   S-6 Closing the Behavioral Health Professional and Process Gaps   S-6 Achieving the Triple Aim for Patients with Depressive Disorders   S-6 Improving the Experience of Care for Patients with Depression   S-6 Improving Quality of Care and Health Outcomes for Patients with Depression   S-7 Changing the Cost of Care Discussion from How Much to How Well   S-8 Panel Insights and Recommendations   S-9 Conclusion   S-10 PMID:27636743

  5. 自主呼吸试验联合B型脑钠肽浓度预测撤机成功率的价值%B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Improve Weaning Outcome Predicted by Spontaneous Breathing Trial

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨田军; 张德文; 吕世进; 王锦全; 刘宝

    2011-01-01

    目的 评价自主呼吸试验联合试验前后B型脑钠肽(BNP)变化情况是否能提高撤机成功率.方法 前瞻性队列研究,收集2008年7月至2010年12月安徽省立医院83例ICU住院需机械通气患者自主呼吸试验前30 min及90 min自主呼吸试验结束时血浆BNP数据.依撤机结局将患者分为成功组和失败组.正态分布数据采用t检验,非正态分布数据采用非参数独立样本及配对检验.用受试者工作特征(ROC)曲线评价自主呼吸试验前后BNP差值预测撤机成功率的价值.结果 83例患者中,撤机失败13例(15.7%).6例自主呼吸试验成功而撤机失败(占入选患者的7.2%,占撤机失败患者的46.2%).自主呼吸试验结束时BNP水平显著高于试验前.撤机成功组自主呼吸试验结束时BNP水平及上升幅度均明显小于撤机失败组(P <0.001).自主呼吸试验前后BNP差值预测撤机失败的ROC曲线下面积为0.94±0.03(P <0.001),以BNP上升123 pg/mL为拐点,预测撤机成功的敏感性为92.3%,特异性为91.4%.结论 自主试验前后BNP的变化可作为撤机结局的一种预测指标,联合自主呼吸试验能提高撤机的成功率.%Objective To determine whether B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels combined with spontaneous breathing trial ( SBT) could improve the weaning outcome. Methods Eighty-three patients who were ready to undergo a 90-minute weaning trial (low-pressure support level) were enrolled . Weaning was considered to be successful if the patient passed the trial and sustained spontaneous breathing for more than 48 h after extubation. Plasma BNP was measured just before and at the end of the trial. All patients were divided into a weaning success group and a weaning failure group according to the outcomes of weaning. Categorical variables,expressed as percentages,were analyzed with a chi-square test or a Fisher's exact test. Continuous variables were expressed as median (25' -75" percentile) and were

  6. Noninvasive detection of lung cancer by analysis of exhaled breath

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denz Hubert

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lung cancer is one of the leading causes of death in Europe and the western world. At present, diagnosis of lung cancer very often happens late in the course of the disease since inexpensive, non-invasive and sufficiently sensitive and specific screening methods are not available. Even though the CT diagnostic methods are good, it must be assured that "screening benefit outweighs risk, across all individuals screened, not only those with lung cancer". An early non-invasive diagnosis of lung cancer would improve prognosis and enlarge treatment options. Analysis of exhaled breath would be an ideal diagnostic method, since it is non-invasive and totally painless. Methods Exhaled breath and inhaled room air samples were analyzed using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS and solid phase microextraction with subsequent gas chromatography mass spectrometry (SPME-GCMS. For the PTR-MS measurements, 220 lung cancer patients and 441 healthy volunteers were recruited. For the GCMS measurements, we collected samples from 65 lung cancer patients and 31 healthy volunteers. Lung cancer patients were in different disease stages and under treatment with different regimes. Mixed expiratory and indoor air samples were collected in Tedlar bags, and either analyzed directly by PTR-MS or transferred to glass vials and analyzed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS. Only those measurements of compounds were considered, which showed at least a 15% higher concentration in exhaled breath than in indoor air. Compounds related to smoking behavior such as acetonitrile and benzene were not used to differentiate between lung cancer patients and healthy volunteers. Results Isoprene, acetone and methanol are compounds appearing in everybody's exhaled breath. These three main compounds of exhaled breath show slightly lower concentrations in lung cancer patients as compared to healthy volunteers (p Conclusion GCMS-SPME is a relatively

  7. On Management Matters: Why We Must Improve Public Health Management Through Action: Comment on "Management Matters: A Leverage Point for Health Systems Strengthening in Global Health".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willacy, Erika; Bratton, Shelly

    2016-01-01

    Public health management is a pillar of public health practice. Only through effective management can research, theory, and scientific innovation be translated into successful public health action. With this in mind, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has developed an innovative program called Improving Public Health Management for Action (IMPACT) which aims to address this critical need by building an effective cadre of public health managers to work alongside scientists to prepare for and respond to disease threats and to effectively implement public health programs. IMPACT is a 2-year, experiential learning program that provides fellows with the management tools and opportunities to apply their new knowledge in the field, all while continuing to serve the Ministry of Health (MoH). IMPACT will launch in 2016 in 2 countries with the intent of expanding to additional countries in future years resulting in a well-trained cadre of public health managers around the world.

  8. Improving chronic disease management with mobile health platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Do-Youn; Bae, Sungchul; Song, Joon Hyun; Yi, Byoung-Kee; Kim, Il Kon

    2013-01-01

    In modern society, aging and chronic disease is becoming common phenomenon due to the increasing numbers of elderly patients. To best treat this growing segment of the population, medical care should be based on constant vital sign monitoring. In this study, we propose a mobile vital sign measurement and data collection system for chronic disease management.. And we implemented a middle ware using Multi-Agent platform in SOS (Self-Organizing System) platform that transmits patient clinical data for services. We also implemented a HL7 messaging interface for interoperability of clinical data exchange. We propose health services on a self-organized software platform.

  9. Improving health care costing with resource consumption accounting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozyapici, Hasan; Tanis, Veyis Naci

    2016-07-11

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to explore the differences between a traditional costing system (TCS) and resource consumption accounting (RCA) based on a case study carried out in a hospital. Design/methodology/approach - A descriptive case study was first carried out to identify the current costing system of the case hospital. An exploratory case study was then conducted to reveal how implementing RCA within the case hospital assigns costs differently to gallbladder surgeries than the current costing system (i.e. a TCS). Findings - The study showed that, in contrast to a TCS, RCA considers the unused capacity, which is the difference between the work that can be performed based on current resources and the work that is actually being performed. Therefore, it assigns lower total costs to open and laparoscopic gallbladder surgeries. The study also showed that by separating costs into fixed and variable RCA allows managers to benefit from a pricing strategy based on the difference between the service's selling price and variable costs incurred in providing that service. Research limitations/implications - The limitation of this study is that, because of time constraints, the implementation was performed in the general surgery department only. However, since RCA is an advanced system that has the same application procedures for any department inside in a hospital, managers need only time gaps to implement this system to all parts of the hospital. Practical implications - This study concluded that RCA is better than a TCS for use in health care settings that have high overhead costs because it accurately assigns overhead costs to services by considering unused capacities incurred by a hospital. Consequently, this study provides insight into both measuring and managing unused capacities within the health care sector. This study also concluded that RCA helps health care administrators increase their competitive advantage by allowing them to determine the lowest

  10. Improving health care costing with resource consumption accounting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozyapici, Hasan; Tanis, Veyis Naci

    2016-07-11

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to explore the differences between a traditional costing system (TCS) and resource consumption accounting (RCA) based on a case study carried out in a hospital. Design/methodology/approach - A descriptive case study was first carried out to identify the current costing system of the case hospital. An exploratory case study was then conducted to reveal how implementing RCA within the case hospital assigns costs differently to gallbladder surgeries than the current costing system (i.e. a TCS). Findings - The study showed that, in contrast to a TCS, RCA considers the unused capacity, which is the difference between the work that can be performed based on current resources and the work that is actually being performed. Therefore, it assigns lower total costs to open and laparoscopic gallbladder surgeries. The study also showed that by separating costs into fixed and variable RCA allows managers to benefit from a pricing strategy based on the difference between the service's selling price and variable costs incurred in providing that service. Research limitations/implications - The limitation of this study is that, because of time constraints, the implementation was performed in the general surgery department only. However, since RCA is an advanced system that has the same application procedures for any department inside in a hospital, managers need only time gaps to implement this system to all parts of the hospital. Practical implications - This study concluded that RCA is better than a TCS for use in health care settings that have high overhead costs because it accurately assigns overhead costs to services by considering unused capacities incurred by a hospital. Consequently, this study provides insight into both measuring and managing unused capacities within the health care sector. This study also concluded that RCA helps health care administrators increase their competitive advantage by allowing them to determine the lowest

  11. Health-improving possibilities of usage of aerobics in the senior classes of comprehensive school.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kravchuk T.N.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In the article is opened health-improving possibilities of use of aerobics at physical training lessons in the senior classes. The technique of carrying out of lessons of physical training in the senior classes with use of different kinds of aerobics is proved and developed, and also their influence on indicators of health of senior pupils is investigated. It is shown that employment by aerobics promotes considerable improvement of health of senior pupils, increase of mood, state of health and activity.

  12. Organisational learning and continuous improvement of health and safety in certified manufacturers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granerud, Lise; Rocha, Robson Sø

    2011-01-01

    and raise goals within health and safety on a continuous basis. The article examines how certified occupational and health management systems influence this process to evaluate how far they hinder or support learning. It presents a model with which it is possible to identify and analyse improvement...... that certified health and safety management does not obstruct learning, and can support advanced learning. Improvement practices with regard to health and safety are mainly dependent upon the firm’s overall organisational processes and do not automatically arise from the standard alone....

  13. Improving Olympic health services: what are the common health care planning issues?

    OpenAIRE

    Kononovas, K.; Black, G.; Taylor, J; Raine, R

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Due to their scale, the Olympic and Paralympic Games have the potential to place significant strain on local health services. The Sydney 2000, Athens 2004, Beijing 2008, Vancouver 2010, and London 2012 Olympic host cities shared their experiences by publishing reports describing health care arrangements. HYPOTHESIS: Olympic planning reports were compared to highlight best practices, to understand whether and which lessons are transferable, and to identify recurring health care p...

  14. Feeding Health: Michael Pollan on Improving Public Health through the Food Systems

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-08-19

    In this podcast, author Michael Pollan discusses his March 2009 visit to CDC and offers his thoughts on the intersection between the government, the food systems, and public health.  Created: 8/19/2009 by National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH), National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), Office of Sustainability.   Date Released: 4/15/2010.

  15. Efficient use of health care resources: the interaction between improved health and reduced health related income loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoel, Michael

    2002-11-01

    Cost effectiveness is a criterion that is often recommended for prioritizing between different types of health care. A modified use of this criterion can be justified as the outcome of a choice that is made "behind a veil of ignorance." Reduced health will in many cases also gives an income loss that is shared between the patient and society ar large. In the special case where the marginal utilities of health status (measured by QALYs) and income are independent of the health state, an efficient allocation of health resources is characterized by net marginal costs per QALY being equalized across different types of health care. Net marginal costs are equal to gross marginal costs minus the reduction in health related income losses due to treatment. In the general case where marginal utilities depend on the health state this rule must be modified.

  16. Improvement in Health State Utility after Sacroiliac Joint Fusion: Comparison to Normal Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cher, Daniel J; Polly, David W

    2016-03-01

    Study Design Prospective cohort study. Objective The sacroiliac joint (SIJ) is an important cause of lower back pain. The degree to which minimally invasive surgical fusion of the SIJ improves health state utility has not been previously documented. Methods Health state utility values were calculated using the EuroQOL-5D (EQ-5D) and Short Form-36 (SF-36) at baseline and 6 and 12 months after SIJ fusion surgery in subjects participating in a prospective, multicenter clinical trial (n = 172). Values were compared with individuals who participated in a nationally representative cross-sectional survey (National Health Measurement Study [NHMS], n = 3,844). Health utility values in the SIJ cohort were compared with those of the NMHS participants using both weighted linear regression and calculation of "health quantile" (i.e., percentile of health normalized to the NHMS cohort adjusted for age and gender). Results Baseline health state utility was significantly depressed in SIJ patients compared with normal subjects (SF-6D 0.509 versus 0.789, SF-36 physical component summary 31.7 versus 49.2, SF-36 mental component summary 8.5 versus 53.8, EQ-5D 0.433 versus 0.868; all p < 0.0001 after adjustment for age and gender). In the SIJ cohort, all the measures improved by 6 months postoperatively, and improvements were sustained at 12 months. Baseline health quantile was low (fifth percentile) in the SIJ cohort and improved significantly at follow-up. Conclusions Quality of life is markedly impaired in patients with SIJ pain compared with age- and gender-matched cohorts. SIJ fusion in this cohort resulted in a substantial improvement in health state utility, bringing the population back toward the expected levels of overall health. The quantile approach helps to explain the degree to which health is improved compared with age- and gender-matched cohorts. PMID:26933610

  17. The use of modern quality improvement approaches to strengthen African health systems: a 5-year agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiby, James

    2014-04-01

    There is a growing international consensus that African health systems need to improve, but no agreement on how to accomplish this. From the perspective of modern quality improvement (QI), a central issue for low performance in these health systems is the relative neglect of health-care processes. Both health system leaders and international donors have focused their efforts elsewhere, producing noteworthy health gains. But these gains are at risk if health systems do not develop the capacity to study and improve care processes. Substantial experience with QI in Africa shows impressive potential for broad-based process improvement. But this experience also highlights the need for modifying these growing programs to incorporate a more rigorous learning component to address challenges that have emerged recently. The addition of a region-wide knowledge management program could increase the efficiency of each country's QI program by learning from the experiences of other programs. With a coordinated donor initiative, it is reasonable to project that within 5 years, evidence-based improvement will become a norm in health services, and African health systems will approach the model of a learning organization. PMID:24481053

  18. Improving a mother to child HIV transmission programme through health system redesign: quality improvement, protocol adjustment and resource addition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele S Youngleson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Health systems that deliver prevention of mother to child transmission (PMTCT services in low and middle income countries continue to underperform, resulting in thousands of unnecessary HIV infections of newborns each year. We used a combination of approaches to health systems strengthening to reduce transmission of HIV from mother to infant in a multi-facility public health system in South Africa. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: All primary care sites and specialized birthing centers in a resource constrained sub-district of Cape Metro District, South Africa, were enrolled in a quality improvement (QI programme. All pregnant women receiving antenatal, intrapartum and postnatal infant care in the sub-district between January 2006 and March 2009 were included in the intervention that had a prototype-innovation phase and a rapid spread phase. System changes were introduced to help frontline healthcare workers to identify and improve performance gaps at each step of the PMTCT pathway. Improvement was facilitated and spread through the use of a Breakthrough Series Collaborative that accelerated learning and the spread of successful changes. Protocol changes and additional resources were introduced by provincial and municipal government. The proportion of HIV-exposed infants testing positive declined from 7.6% to 5%. Key intermediate PMTCT processes improved (antenatal AZT increased from 74% to 86%, PMTCT clients on HAART at the time of labour increased from 10% to 25%, intrapartum AZT increased from 43% to 84%, and postnatal HIV testing from 79% to 95% compared to baseline. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: System improvement methods, protocol changes and addition/reallocation of resources contributed to improved PMTCT processes and outcomes in a resource constrained setting. The intervention requires a clear design, leadership buy-in, building local capacity to use systems improvement methods, and a reliable data system. A systems improvement

  19. Community, service, and policy strategies to improve health care access in the changing urban environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrulis, D P

    2000-06-01

    Urban communities continue to face formidable historic challenges to improving public health. However, reinvestment initiatives, changing demographics, and growth in urban areas are creating changes that offer new opportunities for improving health while requiring that health systems be adapted to residents' health needs. This commentary suggests that health care improvement in metropolitan areas will require setting local, state, and national agendas around 3 priorities. First, health care must reorient around powerful population dynamics, in particular, cultural diversity, growing numbers of elderly, those in welfare-workplace transition, and those unable to negotiate an increasingly complex health system. Second, communities and governments must assess the consequences of health professional shortages, safety net provider closures and conversions, and new marketplace pressures in terms of their effects on access to care for vulnerable urban populations; they must also weigh the potential value of emerging models for improving those populations' care. Finally, governments at all levels should use their influence through accreditation, standards, tobacco settlements, and other financing streams to educate and guide urban providers in directions that respond to urban communities' health care needs.

  20. Community, service, and policy strategies to improve health care access in the changing urban environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrulis, D P

    2000-06-01

    Urban communities continue to face formidable historic challenges to improving public health. However, reinvestment initiatives, changing demographics, and growth in urban areas are creating changes that offer new opportunities for improving health while requiring that health systems be adapted to residents' health needs. This commentary suggests that health care improvement in metropolitan areas will require setting local, state, and national agendas around 3 priorities. First, health care must reorient around powerful population dynamics, in particular, cultural diversity, growing numbers of elderly, those in welfare-workplace transition, and those unable to negotiate an increasingly complex health system. Second, communities and governments must assess the consequences of health professional shortages, safety net provider closures and conversions, and new marketplace pressures in terms of their effects on access to care for vulnerable urban populations; they must also weigh the potential value of emerging models for improving those populations' care. Finally, governments at all levels should use their influence through accreditation, standards, tobacco settlements, and other financing streams to educate and guide urban providers in directions that respond to urban communities' health care needs. PMID:10846501

  1. Improving Public Health with Radiation Medicine and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Non-communicable diseases such as cancer and cardiovascular disorders are becoming increasingly common throughout the world, including in low and middle income countries. The growth in the number of people with such conditions is putting an enormous strain on developing countries, which often lack the resources to diagnose and treat these conditions effectively. Many people die of diseases which would be treatable if they lived in countries with advanced health care systems. This is a great human tragedy. This edition of the IAEA Bulletin provides an insight into what the IAEA is doing to help. As far as cancer is concerned, we help countries to establish or upgrade oncology and radiotherapy centres, and to build capacity in nuclear medicine for diagnosis

  2. Implantable cardioverter defibrillator specific rehabilitation improves health cost outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Selina Kikkenborg; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Koch, Mette Bjerrum;

    2015-01-01

    ) were randomized (1:1) to comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation or usual care. Outcomes were measured by implantable cardioverter defibrillator therapy history from patient records and national register follow-up on mortality, hospital admissions and costs. RESULTS: No significant differences were found...... was -6,789 USD/-5,593 Euro in favour of rehabilitation. CONCLUSION: No long-term health outcome benefits were found for the rehabilitation programme. However, the rehabilitation programme resulted in a reduction in total attributable direct costs.......OBJECTIVE: The Copenhagen Outpatient ProgrammE - implantable cardioverter defibrillator (COPE-ICD) trial included patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators in a randomized controlled trial of rehabilitation. After 6-12 months significant differences were found in favour...

  3. The chemical neuroanatomy of breathing

    OpenAIRE

    Alheid, George F.; McCrimmon, Donald R.

    2008-01-01

    The chemical neuroanatomy of breathing must ultimately encompass all the various neuronal elements physiologically identified in brainstem respiratory circuits and their apparent aggregation into “compartments” within the medulla and pons. These functionally defined respiratory compartments in the brainstem provide the major source of input to cranial motoneurons controlling the airways, and to spinal motoneurons activating inspiratory and expiratory pump muscles. This review provides an over...

  4. Breathing Modes in Dusty Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓钢; 王爽; 潘秋惠; 刘悦; 贺明峰

    2003-01-01

    Acoustic breathing modes of dusty plasmas have been investigated in a cylindricalsystem with an axial symmetry. The linear wave solution and a "dispersion" relation were derived.It was found that in an infinite area, the mode is reduced to a "classical" dust acoustic wave inthe region away from the center. If the dusty plasma is confined in a finite region, however, thebreathing (or heart-beating) behavior would be found as observed in many experiments.

  5. Improved cost, health, and satisfaction with a health home benefit plan for self-insured employers and small physician practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Jerry; Kapp, Brian

    2013-01-01

    We compared the impacts on total costs, health, and satisfaction among 615 adults enrolled 2 years in an employer's health home benefit plan to their baseline year in a standard preferred provider organization plan. The new plan combined strong continuity care incentives with nurse coaching support. After 24 months, total medical costs were 23% lower than the baseline year, biometric measures improved for more than 85% of members, and patient satisfaction exceeded 85%. Emergency department visits decreased by 16% and hospital days decreased by 48%. Health home benefit plans engaging small primary care physician practices and members in coordinated continuity care can deliver high value. PMID:23448916

  6. Promoting and Protecting Mental Health as Flourishing: A Complementary Strategy for Improving National Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, Corey L. M.

    2007-01-01

    This article summarizes the conception and diagnosis of the mental health continuum, the findings supporting the two continua model of mental health and illness, and the benefits of flourishing to individuals and society. Completely mentally healthy adults--individuals free of a 12-month mental disorder and flourishing--reported the fewest missed…

  7. Health Literacy: An Opportunity to Improve Individual, Community, and Global Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleasant, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Over the past decade, the field of health literacy has advanced from providing limited tools for simplifying language into the basis for a viable theory of the complex relationship between knowledge, attitudes, behavior, and health outcomes, ranging from the individual to the societal level. While roughly a decade passed between what seem to be…

  8. Evidence-Based Health Promotion in Nursing Homes: A Pilot Intervention to Improve Oral Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadet, Tamara J.; Berrett-Abebe, Julie; Burke, Shanna L.; Bakk, Louanne; Kalenderian, Elsbeth; Maramaldi, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Nursing home residents over the age of 65 years are at high risk for poor oral health and related complications such as pneumonia and adverse diabetes outcomes. A preliminary study found that Massachusetts' nursing homes generally lack the training and resources needed to provide adequate oral health care to residents. In this study, an…

  9. Running and Breathing in Mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramble, Dennis M.; Carrier, David R.

    1983-01-01

    Mechanical constraints appear to require that locomotion and breathing be synchronized in running mammals. Phase locking of limb and respiratory frequency has now been recorded during treadmill running in jackrabbits and during locomotion on solid ground in dogs, horses, and humans. Quadrupedal species normally synchronize the locomotor and respiratory cycles at a constant ratio of 1:1 (strides per breath) in both the trot and gallop. Human runners differ from quadrupeds in that while running they employ several phase-locked patterns (4:1, 3:1, 2:1, 1:1, 5:2, and 3:2), although a 2:1 coupling ratio appears to be favored. Even though the evolution of bipedal gait has reduced the mechanical constraints on respiration in man, thereby permitting greater flexibility in breathing pattern, it has seemingly not eliminated the need for the synchronization of respiration and body motion during sustained running. Flying birds have independently achieved phase-locked locomotor and respiratory cycles. This hints that strict locomotor-respiratory coupling may be a vital factor in the sustained aerobic exercise of endothermic vertebrates, especially those in which the stresses of locomotion tend to deform the thoracic complex.

  10. Are patient surveys valuable as a service-improvement tool in health services? An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patwardhan A

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Anjali Patwardhan,1 Charles H Spencer21Nationwide Children’s Hospital Columbus, 2Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USAAbstract: Improving the quality of care in international health services was made a high priority in 1977. The World Health Assembly passed a resolution to greatly improveHealth for all” by the year 2000. Since 1977, the use of patient surveys for quality improvement has become a common practice in the health-care industry. The use of surveys reflects the concept that patient satisfaction is closely linked with that of organizational performance, which is in turn closely linked with organizational culture. This article is a review of the role of patient surveys as a quality-improvement tool in health care. The article explores the characteristics, types, merits, and pitfalls of various patient surveys, as well as the impact of their wide-ranging application in dissimilar scenarios to identify gaps in service provision. It is demonstrated that the conducting of patient surveys and using the results to improve the quality of care are two different processes. The value of patient surveys depends on the interplay between these two processes and several other factors that can influence the final outcome. The article also discusses the business aspect of the patient surveys in detail. Finally, the authors make future recommendations on how the patient survey tool can be best used to improve the quality of care in the health-care sector.Keywords: patient surveys, quality improvement, service gaps 

  11. Multilevel Interventions To Address Health Disparities Show Promise In Improving Population Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paskett, Electra; Thompson, Beti; Ammerman, Alice S; Ortega, Alexander N; Marsteller, Jill; Richardson, DeJuran

    2016-08-01

    Multilevel interventions are those that affect at least two levels of influence-for example, the patient and the health care provider. They can be experimental designs or natural experiments caused by changes in policy, such as the implementation of the Affordable Care Act or local policies. Measuring the effects of multilevel interventions is challenging, because they allow for interaction among levels, and the impact of each intervention must be assessed and translated into practice. We discuss how two projects from the National Institutes of Health's Centers for Population Health and Health Disparities used multilevel interventions to reduce health disparities. The interventions, which focused on the uptake of the human papillomavirus vaccine and community-level dietary change, had mixed results. The design and implementation of multilevel interventions are facilitated by input from the community, and more advanced methods and measures are needed to evaluate the impact of the various levels and components of such interventions. PMID:27503968

  12. Continuous improvement and TQM in health care: an emerging operational paradigm becomes a strategic imperative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinehart, K; Green, R F

    1995-01-01

    Argues that US health care is in a state of crisis. Escalating costs account for 13 per cent of GNP, making health care the third largest industry in the USA, and spending is expected to increase. Claims health-care providers need to control rising costs, improve productivity and flexibility, adopt appropriate technologies, and maintain competitive levels of quality and value. States that TQM may provide an environment that will focus on quality of patient care and continuous quality improvement at all levels of the organization including the governing body, the administrative, managerial, and clinical areas. Any new national or state health-care plan will force providers to be more efficient while maintaining quality standards. Concludes that it will be strategically imperative that health-care providers ranging from family physicians to major medical centres and suppliers ranging from laboratories to pharmaceutical firms establish methods for making rapid continuous improvement and total quality management the cornerstone of the strategic planning process.

  13. Exercise and nutritional interventions for improving aging muscle health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Scott C; Little, Jonathan P; Candow, Darren G

    2012-08-01

    Skeletal muscle mass declines with age (i.e., sarcopenia) resulting in muscle weakness and functional limitations. Sarcopenia has been associated with physiological changes in muscle morphology, protein and hormonal kinetics, insulin resistance, inflammation, and oxidative stress. The purpose of this review is to highlight how exercise and nutritional intervention strategies may benefit aging muscle. It is well known that resistance exercise training increases muscle strength and size and evidence also suggests that resistance training can increase mitochondrial content and decrease oxidative stress in older adults. Recent findings suggest that fast-velocity resistance exercise may be an effective intervention for older adults to enhance muscle power and functional capacity. Aerobic exercise training may also benefit aging skeletal muscle by enhancing mitochondrial bioenergetics, improving insulin sensitivity, and/or decreasing oxidative stress. In addition to exercise, creatine monohydrate, milk-based proteins, and essential fatty acids all have biological effects which could enhance some of the physiological adaptations from exercise training in older adults. Additional research is needed to determine whether skeletal muscle adaptations to increased activity in older adults are further enhanced with effective nutritional interventions and whether this is due to enhanced muscle protein synthesis, improved mitochondrial function, and/or a reduced inflammatory response. PMID:22527891

  14. Kaizen: a process improvement model for the business of health care and perioperative nursing professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetteh, Hassan A

    2012-01-01

    Kaizen is a proven management technique that has a practical application for health care in the context of health care reform and the 2010 Institute of Medicine landmark report on the future of nursing. Compounded productivity is the unique benefit of kaizen, and its principles are change, efficiency, performance of key essential steps, and the elimination of waste through small and continuous process improvements. The kaizen model offers specific instruction for perioperative nurses to achieve process improvement in a five-step framework that includes teamwork, personal discipline, improved morale, quality circles, and suggestions for improvement. PMID:22201574

  15. Kaizen: a process improvement model for the business of health care and perioperative nursing professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetteh, Hassan A

    2012-01-01

    Kaizen is a proven management technique that has a practical application for health care in the context of health care reform and the 2010 Institute of Medicine landmark report on the future of nursing. Compounded productivity is the unique benefit of kaizen, and its principles are change, efficiency, performance of key essential steps, and the elimination of waste through small and continuous process improvements. The kaizen model offers specific instruction for perioperative nurses to achieve process improvement in a five-step framework that includes teamwork, personal discipline, improved morale, quality circles, and suggestions for improvement.

  16. Improving Dental Health in Underserved Communities | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... She is passionate about improving children's oral health. "Tooth decay is the number one chronic infectious disease in ... oral disease in pregnant women, infants, and toddlers. "Tooth decay is preventable but it can progress rapidly when ...

  17. Obesity prevention strategies: could food or soda taxes improve health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Encarnação, R; Lloyd-Williams, F; Bromley, H; Capewell, S

    2016-03-01

    Evidence shows that one of the main causes for rising obesity rates is excessive consumption of sugar, which is due in large part to the high sugar content of most soda and juice drinks and junk foods. Worryingly, UK and global populations are consuming increasing amounts of sugary drinks and junk foods (high in salt, sugar and saturated fats). However, there is raised public awareness, and parents in particular want something to be done to curb the alarming rise in childhood obesity. Population-wide policies (i.e. taxation, regulation, legislation, reformulation) consistently achieve greater public health gains than interventions and strategies targeted at individuals. Junk food and soda taxes are supported by increasing evidence from empirical and modelling studies. The strongest evidence base is for a tax on sugar sweetened beverages, but in order to effectively reduce consumption, that taxation needs to be at least 20%. Empirical data from a number of countries which have implemented a duty on sugar or sugary drinks shows rapid, substantial benefits. In the UK, increasing evidence from recent scientific reports consistently support substantial reductions in sugar consumption through comprehensive strategies which include a tax. Furthermore, there is increasing public support for such measures. A sugar sweetened beverages tax will happen in the UK so the question is not 'If?' but 'When?' this tax will be implemented. And, crucially, which nation will get there first? England, Ireland, Scotland or Wales?

  18. Obesity prevention strategies: could food or soda taxes improve health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Encarnação, R; Lloyd-Williams, F; Bromley, H; Capewell, S

    2016-03-01

    Evidence shows that one of the main causes for rising obesity rates is excessive consumption of sugar, which is due in large part to the high sugar content of most soda and juice drinks and junk foods. Worryingly, UK and global populations are consuming increasing amounts of sugary drinks and junk foods (high in salt, sugar and saturated fats). However, there is raised public awareness, and parents in particular want something to be done to curb the alarming rise in childhood obesity. Population-wide policies (i.e. taxation, regulation, legislation, reformulation) consistently achieve greater public health gains than interventions and strategies targeted at individuals. Junk food and soda taxes are supported by increasing evidence from empirical and modelling studies. The strongest evidence base is for a tax on sugar sweetened beverages, but in order to effectively reduce consumption, that taxation needs to be at least 20%. Empirical data from a number of countries which have implemented a duty on sugar or sugary drinks shows rapid, substantial benefits. In the UK, increasing evidence from recent scientific reports consistently support substantial reductions in sugar consumption through comprehensive strategies which include a tax. Furthermore, there is increasing public support for such measures. A sugar sweetened beverages tax will happen in the UK so the question is not 'If?' but 'When?' this tax will be implemented. And, crucially, which nation will get there first? England, Ireland, Scotland or Wales? PMID:27092368

  19. Iraqi health system in kurdistan region: medical professionals' perspectives on challenges and priorities for improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleh Abubakir M

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The views of medical professionals on efficiency of health system and needs for any changes are very critical and constitute a cornerstone for any health system improvement. This is particularly relevant to Iraqi Kurdistan case as the events of the last few decades have significantly devastated the national Iraqi health system while the necessity for adopting a new health care system is increasingly recognized since 2004. This study aims to examine the regional health system in Iraqi Kurdistan from medical professionals' perspectives and try to define its problems and priorities for improvement. Methods A survey questionnaire was developed and administered to a convenience sample of 250 medical professionals in Erbil governorate. The questionnaire included four items; rating of the quality of services and availability of resources in the health institutions, view on different aspects of the health system, the perceived priority needs for health system improvement and gender and professional characteristics of the respondents. Results The response rate to the survey was 83.6%. A high proportion of respondents rated the different aspects of services and resources in the health institutions as weak or very weak including the availability of the required quantity and quality of medicines (68.7%, the availability of sufficient medical equipment and investigation tools (68.7%, and the quality of offered services (65.3%. Around 72% of respondents had a rather negative view on the overall health system. The weak role of medical research, the weak role of professional associations in controlling the system and the inefficient health education were identified as important problems in the current health system (87.9%, 87.1% and 84.9%, respectively. The priority needs of health system improvement included adoption of social insurance for medical care of the poor (82%, enhancing the role of family medicine (77.2%, adopting health

  20. Improving district level health planning and priority setting in Tanzania through implementing accountability for reasonableness framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maluka, Stephen; Kamuzora, Peter; Sebastián, Miguel San;

    2010-01-01

    In 2006, researchers and decision-makers launched a five-year project - Response to Accountable Priority Setting for Trust in Health Systems (REACT) - to improve planning and priority-setting through implementing the Accountability for Reasonableness framework in Mbarali District, Tanzania....... The objective of this paper is to explore the acceptability of Accountability for Reasonableness from the perspectives of the Council Health Management Team, local government officials, health workforce and members of user boards and committees....

  1. Combating Obesity at Community Health Centers (COACH): A Quality Improvement Collaborative for Weight Management Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Wilkes, Abigail E.; John, Priya M.; Vable, Anusha M.; Campbell, Amanda; Heuer, Loretta; Schaefer, Cynthia; Vinci, Lisa; Drum, Melinda L.; Chin, Marshall H; Quinn, Michael T; Burnet, Deborah L.

    2013-01-01

    Community health centers (CHCs) seek effective strategies to address obesity. MidWest Clinicians’ Network partnered with [an academic medical center] to test feasibility of a weight management quality improvement (QI) collaborative. MidWest Clinicians’ Network members expressed interest in an obesity QI program. This pilot study aimed to determine whether the QI model can be feasibly implemented with limited resources at CHCs to improve weight management programs. Five health centers with wei...

  2. Improving occupational health and safety in a petrochemical environment through culture change / R.A. Farmer

    OpenAIRE

    Farmer, Ruan Alexander

    2010-01-01

    In spite of the vast technological progress and improvement in the standard of management systems within hazardous industries around the world, occupational health and safety incidents and fatalities continue to devastate thousands of lives each year. Throughout the last decade, significant improvement has been achieved in the reduction of health and safety incident rates across the South African petrochemical environment. However, a persistent roller-coaster fatality rate s...

  3. Focus Points for School Health Promotion Improvements in Dutch Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leurs, Mariken T. W.; Bessems, Kathelijne; Schaalma, Herman P.; de Vries, Hein

    2007-01-01

    To enable improvements in school health promotion, this paper examines associations between the number of health-promotion issues addressed by primary school teachers in the Netherlands and factors thought to influence this behavior. The main factors studied are context characteristics and constructs of attitude, social influence, self-efficacy…

  4. What Have We Learned from Collaborative Partnerships to Concomitantly Improve Both Education and Health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolbe, Lloyd J.; Allensworth, Diane D.; Potts-Datema, William; White, Douglas R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Collaborative partnerships are an essential means to concomitantly improve both education outcomes and health outcomes among K-12 students. Methods: We describe examples of contemporaneous, interactive, and evolving partnerships that have been implemented, respectively, by a national governmental health organization, national…

  5. Does Registration of Professionals Improve the Quality of Travelers' Health Advice?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.R. Ruis; G.G.C. van Rijckevorsel; A. van den Hoek; S.C. Koeman; G.J.B. Sonder

    2009-01-01

    Background The objectives of the Dutch National Coordination Center for Travelers' Health Advice (LCR) are to improve the uniformity of travelers' health advice in the Netherlands and to enhance its quality. The LCR offers national guidelines and quality criteria, as well as a telephone consultation

  6. Benefits of Spontaneous Breathing : Compared with Mechanical Ventilation

    OpenAIRE

    Vimláti, László

    2012-01-01

    When spontaneous breathing (SB) is allowed during mechanical ventilation (MV), atelectatic lung areas are recruited and oxygenation improves thereby. Whether unsupported SB at its natural pattern (without PEEP and at low pressure/small tidal volume) equally recruits and improves oxygenation, and if so by which mechanism, has not been studied. A porcine lung collapse model was designed to study this question. The cardiac output dependency of the pulmonary shunt was investigated with healthy lu...

  7. Exploring the role of community engagement in improving the health of disadvantaged populations: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Cyril

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although community engagement (CE is widely used in health promotion, components of CE models associated with improved health are poorly understood. This study aimed to examine the magnitude of the impact of CE on health and health inequalities among disadvantaged populations, which methodological approaches maximise the effectiveness of CE, and components of CE that are acceptable, feasible, and effective when used among disadvantaged populations. Design: The systematic review followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. We carried out methodological assessments of the included studies using rating scales. The analysis focussed on model synthesis to identify the key CE components linked to positive study outcomes and comparative analysis between positive study outcomes, processes, and quality indicators of CE. Results: Out of 24 studies that met our inclusion criteria, 21 (87.5% had positively impacted health behaviours, public health planning, health service access, health literacy, and a range of health outcomes. More than half of the studies (58% were of good quality, whereas 71% and 42% of studies showed good community involvement in research and achieved high levels of CE, respectively. Key CE components that affected health outcomes included real power-sharing, collaborative partnerships, bidirectional learning, incorporating the voice and agency of beneficiary communities in research protocol, and using bicultural health workers for intervention delivery. Conclusions: The findings suggest that CE models can lead to improved health and health behaviours among disadvantaged populations if designed properly and implemented through effective community consultation and participation. We also found several gaps in the current measurement of CE in health intervention studies, which suggests the importance of developing innovative approaches to measure CE impact on health outcomes in a

  8. Challenges to improving maternal health in rural Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, S

    1996-05-01

    In the remote village of Martadi, in Bajura district of western Nepal, the total fertility rate is 7. 20% of newborns die before they reach age 1. Temporary migration, mainly to India, is common due to the inability of the rugged and rocky terrain to supply enough food. The existence of temporary migration and a high frequency of remarriage suggest a high rate of sexually transmitted diseases. The relatively new hospital is very much under used (e.g., only 35 patients in 1995). The office in Kolti that supplies vaccines to Martadi has gone at least six months without receiving any new child immunization drugs, despite the presence of an air service. During and after delivery, no one, not even family members or traditional birth attendants, can touch a woman, who is confined to a cow-shed to deliver and care for her child and herself alone. Yet sick animals receive care. A new mother also is required to bathe herself, often requiring a walk of many hours. Women often identify access to water as their top priority. Pregnant or postpartum women are forbidden from eating green vegetables because of the belief that they cause diarrhea. Sanitation is better now in Martadi than in the past. Diarrhea and vomiting were once very prevalent. The international organization, CARE, along with the Ministry of Local Development operate the Remote Area Basic Needs Project, which revolves around community organization, agroforestry, rural infrastructure, and primary health care. The project has helped villagers construct low-cost toilets. It provides training in basic hygiene. Households have kitchen-gardens. Many families are now eating green vegetables regularly. Fruit trees are being introduced. Villagers recognize the value of child immunization. Some small-scale drinking water systems are operating. Villagers are trained in repair and management of these systems. About 33% of women aged 15-49 want no more children. A first-ever outreach program for female sterilization services

  9. Improving communication skills in the Southeast Asian health care context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claramita, Mora; Susilo, Astrid Pratidina

    2014-12-01

    The aim of these two PhD thesis are to develop a guideline on doctor-patient communication skills based on cultural characteristics of Southeast Asian context and to develop communication skills training for nurses to enhance their contribution to the informed consent and shared decision making process, in the same context. These studies started with qualitative methods; including grounded theory methodology, by exploring doctors', patients', medical students' and nurses' perceptions on the current and desired communication skills in which influenced by culture. Based on the results, we design communication skills training and evaluate the training with quantitative methods, using pre and post test studies. Southeast Asian desired ideal partnership style in communicating with their doctors. More emphasize on basic skills such as listening to subtle non-verbal cues are needed for doctors and nurses. A guideline on doctor-patient communication tailored to local culture was developed as well as training for nurses using 4CID design to enhance their contribution to the shared decision making process. To promote two-way interaction between doctors and patients and between health professionals require mastering basic skills in communicating with people, such as explorations on the unspoken concern. In a culturally hierarchical context of Indonesia, this two-way interaction is quite a challenge. To generalize our studies to other culture, more studies with rigorous methods should follow. To promote the use of basic skills in communicating with patients to approach the desired partnership communication style in Southeast Asian context, we need to use local evidences.

  10. Improving Medical Decision Making and Health Promotion through Culture-Sensitive Health Communication: An Agenda for Science and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betsch, Cornelia; Böhm, Robert; Airhihenbuwa, Collins O; Butler, Robb; Chapman, Gretchen B; Haase, Niels; Herrmann, Benedikt; Igarashi, Tasuku; Kitayama, Shinobu; Korn, Lars; Nurm, Ülla-Karin; Rohrmann, Bernd; Rothman, Alexander J; Shavitt, Sharon; Updegraff, John A; Uskul, Ayse K

    2016-10-01

    This review introduces the concept of culture-sensitive health communication. The basic premise is that congruency between the recipient's cultural characteristics and the respective message will increase the communication's effectiveness. Culture-sensitive health communication is therefore defined as the deliberate and evidence-informed adaptation of health communication to the recipients' cultural background in order to increase knowledge and improve preparation for medical decision making and to enhance the persuasiveness of messages in health promotion. To achieve effective health communication in varying cultural contexts, an empirically and theoretically based understanding of culture will be indispensable. We therefore define culture, discuss which evolutionary and structural factors contribute to the development of cultural diversity, and examine how differences are conceptualized as scientific constructs in current models of cultural differences. In addition, we will explicate the implications of cultural differences for psychological theorizing, because common constructs of health behavior theories and decision making, such as attitudes or risk perception, are subject to cultural variation. In terms of communication, we will review both communication strategies and channels that are used to disseminate health messages, and we will discuss the implications of cultural differences for their effectiveness. Finally, we propose an agenda both for science and for practice to advance and apply the evidence base for culture-sensitive health communication. This calls for more interdisciplinary research between science and practice but also between scientific disciplines and between basic and applied research. PMID:26296619

  11. Optimal flexibility as new goal for general health : Making health improvement tangible

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartingsveldt, W. van

    2013-01-01

    TNO has developed a new approach to demonstrate health effects of nutritional interventions. This approach combines a ‘challenge’ to force the body to reveal its metabolic flexibility with state-of-the-art analyses and bioinformatics.

  12. Paradigmatic obstacles to improving the health of populations: implications for health policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McKinlay John B.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available While there are promising developments in public health, most interventions (both at the individual and community levels remain focused on "downstream" tertiary treatments or one-on-one interventions. These efforts have their origins in the biomedical paradigm and risk factor epidemiology and the behavioral science research methods that serve as their handmaidens. This paper argues for a more appropriate balance of "downstream" efforts with a more appropriate whole population public health approach to health policy -what may be termed a social policy approach to healthy lifestyles rather than the current lifestyle approach to health policy. New, more appropriate research methods must be developed and applied to match these emerging levels of whole population intervention. We must avoid any disjunction between new upstream policy level interventions and the methods used to measure their effect -appropriate unto the intervention level must be the evaluation method thereof.

  13. New Sports Nutritious Food for Health Improvement and Antioxidant Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhilei Zheng

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The research aimed to explore the influence of new sports nutritious food (Hydrogen Water on exercise-induced oxidative stress injury and athletic ability of power organic skeletal muscle that is susceptible to oxidation attacks and in vivo basis and possible mechanism of hydrogen water in the process of selective oxidation. This study randomly divided 80 healthy male SD rats into 8 groups of quiet control group (EC, group A, exercise control group (EE, group B, hydrogen water injection before exercise group (EH, group C and joint hydrogen water injections before and after exercise group (EM, group D, with 10 rats in each group. The rest groups conducted adaptive low intensive treadmill running for 1 time every day before a week of the experiment except EC (group A. EH (group C conducted intraperitoneal injection of hydrogen water with 10 mL/kg before 1 min of exercise before formal experiment. EM (group D conducted intraperitoneal injection of hydrogen water immediately in 1 min before and after exercise. EE (group B conducted intraperitoneal injection with same volume normal saline. EE, EH and EM group conducted a one-time heavy intensive exhausted treadmill running by using Marra project. Group B, C, D conducted quantitative treadmill running, detected 3-NT, 8-OHdG value of skeletal muscle after 3 h of exercise in group A, B, C, D using Elisa method and measured MDA, SOD, GSH, T-AOC and level of O2-, H2O2 and •OH using chemical colorimetry. The results showed that hydrogen water can significantly prolong the duration of exercise to exhaustion of rats, which had significant anti-fatigue effect; and can significantly inhibit the aggravation of motility of O2-, H2O2 and •OH, remove in vivo cytotoxic substances •OH effectively, improve SOD and GSH, enhance T-AOC, improve minicirculation and reduce the damage of cells; joint hydrogen water injections before and after exercise had synergistic effect for the prevention and control of exercise

  14. Etiopathogenetic Mechanisms of Pulmonary Hypertension in Sleep-Related Breathing Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayodeji Adegunsoye

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is a common disorder with significant health consequences and is on the rise in consonance with the obesity pandemic. In view of the association between sleep-disordered breathing and pulmonary hypertension as depicted by multiple studies, current clinical practice guidelines categorize obstructive sleep apnea as a risk factor for pulmonary hypertension and recommend an assessment for sleep disordered breathing in evaluating patients with pulmonary hypertension. The dysregulatory mechanisms associated with hypoxemic episodes observed in sleep related breathing disorders contribute to the onset of pulmonary hypertension and identification of these potentially treatable factors might help in the reduction of overall cardiovascular mortality.

  15. SU-E-J-185: A Systematic Review of Breathing Guidance in Radiation Oncology and Radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollock, S; Keall, P [University of Sydney, Sydney (Australia); Keall, R [Hammond Care Palliative and Supportive Care Service, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The advent of image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) has led to dramatic improvements in the accuracy of treatment delivery in radiotherapy. Such advancements have highlighted the deleterious impact tumor motion can have on both image quality and radiation treatment delivery. One approach to reducing tumor motion is the use of breathing guidance systems during imaging and treatment. A review of such research had not yet been performed, it was therefore our aim to perform a systematic review of breathing guidance interventions within the fields of radiation oncology and radiology. Methods: Results of online database searches were filtered in accordance to a set of eligibility criteria. The search, filtration, and analysis of articles were conducted in accordance with the PRISMAStatement reporting standard (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses) utilizing the PICOS approach (Participants, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome, Study design). Participants: Cancer patients, healthy volunteers. Intervention: Biofeedback breathing guidance systems. Comparison: No breathing guidance of the same breathing type. Outcome: Regularity of breathing signal and anatomic/tumor motion, medical image quality, radiation treatment margins and coverage, medical imaging and radiation treatment times. Study design: Quantitative and controlled prospective or retrospective trials. Results: The systematic search yielded a total of 479 articles, which were filtered down to 27 relevant articles in accordance to the eligibility criteria. The vast majority of investigated outcomes were significantly positively impacted by the use of breathing guidance; however, this was dependent upon the nature of the breathing guidance system and study design. In 25/27 studies significant improvements from the use of breathing guidance were observed. Conclusion: The results found here indicate that further clinical studies are warranted which quantify more comprehensively the

  16. SU-E-J-185: A Systematic Review of Breathing Guidance in Radiation Oncology and Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The advent of image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) has led to dramatic improvements in the accuracy of treatment delivery in radiotherapy. Such advancements have highlighted the deleterious impact tumor motion can have on both image quality and radiation treatment delivery. One approach to reducing tumor motion is the use of breathing guidance systems during imaging and treatment. A review of such research had not yet been performed, it was therefore our aim to perform a systematic review of breathing guidance interventions within the fields of radiation oncology and radiology. Methods: Results of online database searches were filtered in accordance to a set of eligibility criteria. The search, filtration, and analysis of articles were conducted in accordance with the PRISMAStatement reporting standard (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses) utilizing the PICOS approach (Participants, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome, Study design). Participants: Cancer patients, healthy volunteers. Intervention: Biofeedback breathing guidance systems. Comparison: No breathing guidance of the same breathing type. Outcome: Regularity of breathing signal and anatomic/tumor motion, medical image quality, radiation treatment margins and coverage, medical imaging and radiation treatment times. Study design: Quantitative and controlled prospective or retrospective trials. Results: The systematic search yielded a total of 479 articles, which were filtered down to 27 relevant articles in accordance to the eligibility criteria. The vast majority of investigated outcomes were significantly positively impacted by the use of breathing guidance; however, this was dependent upon the nature of the breathing guidance system and study design. In 25/27 studies significant improvements from the use of breathing guidance were observed. Conclusion: The results found here indicate that further clinical studies are warranted which quantify more comprehensively the

  17. Identification of breathing cracks in a beam structure with entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimarshana, Buddhi; Wu, Nan; Wu, Christine

    2016-04-01

    A cantilever beam with a breathing crack is studied to detect and evaluate the crack using entropy measures. Closed cracks in engineering structures lead to proportional complexities to their vibration responses due to weak bi-linearity imposed by the crack breathing phenomenon. Entropy is a measure of system complexity and has the potential in quantifying the complexity. The weak bi-linearity in vibration signals can be amplified using wavelet transformation to increase the sensitivity of the measurements. A mathematical model of harmonically excited unit length steel cantilever beam with a breathing crack located near the fixed end is established, and an iterative numerical method is applied to generate accurate time domain dynamic responses. The bi-linearity in time domain signals due to the crack breathing are amplified by wavelet transformation first, and then the complexities due to bi-linearity is quantified using sample entropy to detect the possible crack and estimate the crack depth. It is observed that the method is capable of identifying crack depths even at very early stages of 3% with the increase in the entropy values more than 10% compared with the healthy beam. The current study extends the entropy based damage detection of rotary machines to structural analysis and takes a step further in high-sensitivity structural health monitoring by combining wavelet transformation with entropy calculations. The proposed technique can also be applied to other types of structures, such as plates and shells.

  18. Development of a collaborative model to improve school health promotion in The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leurs, Mariken T W; Schaalma, Herman P; Jansen, Maria W J; Mur-Veeman, Ingrid M; St Leger, Lawrence H; de Vries, Nanne

    2005-09-01

    In recent decades, school health promotion programs have been developing into whole-school health approaches. This has been accompanied by a greater understanding among health promoters of the core-business of schools, namely education, and how health promotion objectives can be integrated into this task. Evidence of the positive impact of school health promotion on health risk behavior of students is increasing. This article focuses on the processes and initial results of developing a collaborative model tailored for whole-school health in the Netherlands, named schoolBeat. The Dutch situation is characterized by fragmentation, a variety of health and welfare groups supporting schools, and a lack of sound integrated youth policies. A literature review, observations, and stakeholder consultation provided a clear picture of the current situation in school health promotion, and factors limiting a comprehensive and needs-based approach to school health. This revealed that a health promotion team within a school is fundamental to an effective approach to tailored school health promotion. A respected member of school staff should chair this team. To strengthen the link with the school care team, the school care coordinator should be a member of both teams. To provide coordinated support to all schools in a region, participating organizations decided to share advisory tasks. These tasks are included in the regular health promotion work of their staff. This means working with one advisor representing all school-health organizations per school, and using a comprehensive overview of possible support and projects promoting health. Empowering schools in needs assessments and comprehensive school health promotion is an important element of the developed approach. This article concludes with an examination of emerging issues in evaluating collaborative school health support during the first 18 months of development, and implementation and future perspectives regarding

  19. Benchmarking: a method for continuous quality improvement in health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettorchi-Tardy, Amina; Levif, Marie; Michel, Philippe

    2012-05-01

    Benchmarking, a management approach for implementing best practices at best cost, is a recent concept in the healthcare system. The objectives of this paper are to better understand the concept and its evolution in the healthcare sector, to propose an operational definition, and to describe some French and international experiences of benchmarking in the healthcare sector. To this end, we reviewed the literature on this approach's emergence in the industrial sector, its evolution, its fields of application and examples of how it has been used in the healthcare sector. Benchmarking is often thought to consist simply of comparing indicators and is not perceived in its entirety, that is, as a tool based on voluntary and active collaboration among several organizations to create a spirit of competition and to apply best practices. The key feature of benchmarking is its integration within a comprehensive and participatory policy of continuous quality improvement (CQI). Conditions for successful benchmarking focus essentially on careful preparation of the process, monitoring of the relevant indicators, staff involvement and inter-organizational visits. Compared to methods previously implemented in France (CQI and collaborative projects), benchmarking has specific features that set it apart as a healthcare innovation. This is especially true for healthcare or medical-social organizations, as the principle of inter-organizational visiting is not part of their culture. Thus, this approach will need to be assessed for feasibility and acceptability before it is more widely promoted. PMID:23634166

  20. Water-Food-Nutrition-Health Nexus: Linking Water to Improving Food, Nutrition and Health in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabhaudhi, Tafadzwanashe; Chibarabada, Tendai; Modi, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Whereas sub-Saharan Africa's (SSA) water scarcity, food, nutrition and health challenges are well-documented, efforts to address them have often been disconnected. Given that the region continues to be affected by poverty and food and nutrition insecurity at national and household levels, there is a need for a paradigm shift in order to effectively deliver on the twin challenges of food and nutrition security under conditions of water scarcity. There is a need to link water use in agriculture to achieve food and nutrition security outcomes for improved human health and well-being. Currently, there are no explicit linkages between water, agriculture, nutrition and health owing to uncoordinated efforts between agricultural and nutrition scientists. There is also a need to develop and promote the use of metrics that capture aspects of water, agriculture, food and nutrition. This review identified nutritional water productivity as a suitable index for measuring the impact of a water-food-nutrition-health nexus. Socio-economic factors are also considered as they influence food choices in rural communities. An argument for the need to utilise the region's agrobiodiversity for addressing dietary quality and diversity was established. It is concluded that a model for improving nutrition and health of poor rural communities based on the water-food-nutrition-health nexus is possible. PMID:26751464

  1. Water-Food-Nutrition-Health Nexus: Linking Water to Improving Food, Nutrition and Health in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabhaudhi, Tafadzwanashe; Chibarabada, Tendai; Modi, Albert

    2016-01-06

    Whereas sub-Saharan Africa's (SSA) water scarcity, food, nutrition and health challenges are well-documented, efforts to address them have often been disconnected. Given that the region continues to be affected by poverty and food and nutrition insecurity at national and household levels, there is a need for a paradigm shift in order to effectively deliver on the twin challenges of food and nutrition security under conditions of water scarcity. There is a need to link water use in agriculture to achieve food and nutrition security outcomes for improved human health and well-being. Currently, there are no explicit linkages between water, agriculture, nutrition and health owing to uncoordinated efforts between agricultural and nutrition scientists. There is also a need to develop and promote the use of metrics that capture aspects of water, agriculture, food and nutrition. This review identified nutritional water productivity as a suitable index for measuring the impact of a water-food-nutrition-health nexus. Socio-economic factors are also considered as they influence food choices in rural communities. An argument for the need to utilise the region's agrobiodiversity for addressing dietary quality and diversity was established. It is concluded that a model for improving nutrition and health of poor rural communities based on the water-food-nutrition-health nexus is possible.

  2. Water-Food-Nutrition-Health Nexus: Linking Water to Improving Food, Nutrition and Health in Sub-Saharan Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tafadzwanashe Mabhaudhi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Whereas sub-Saharan Africa’s (SSA water scarcity, food, nutrition and health challenges are well-documented, efforts to address them have often been disconnected. Given that the region continues to be affected by poverty and food and nutrition insecurity at national and household levels, there is a need for a paradigm shift in order to effectively deliver on the twin challenges of food and nutrition security under conditions of water scarcity. There is a need to link water use in agriculture to achieve food and nutrition security outcomes for improved human health and well-being. Currently, there are no explicit linkages between water, agriculture, nutrition and health owing to uncoordinated efforts between agricultural and nutrition scientists. There is also a need to develop and promote the use of metrics that capture aspects of water, agriculture, food and nutrition. This review identified nutritional water productivity as a suitable index for measuring the impact of a water-food-nutrition-health nexus. Socio-economic factors are also considered as they influence food choices in rural communities. An argument for the need to utilise the region’s agrobiodiversity for addressing dietary quality and diversity was established. It is concluded that a model for improving nutrition and health of poor rural communities based on the water-food-nutrition-health nexus is possible.

  3. Getting the product right: how competition policy can improve health care markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sage, William M

    2014-06-01

    As hospital, physician, and health insurance markets consolidate and change in response to health care reform, some commentators have called for vigorous enforcement of the federal antitrust laws to prevent the acquisition and exercise of market power. In health care, however, stricter antitrust enforcement will benefit consumers only if it accounts for the competitive distortions caused by the sector's long history of government regulation. This article directs policy makers to a neglected dimension of health care competition that has been altered by regulation: the product. Competition may have failed to significantly lower costs, increase access, or improve quality in health care because we have been buying and selling the wrong things. Competition policy makers-meaning both antitrust enforcers and regulators-should force the health care industry to define and market products that can be assembled and warranted to consumers while keeping emerging sectors such as mHealth free from overregulation, wasteful subsidy, and appropriation by established insurer and provider interests.

  4. Study protocol: national research partnership to improve primary health care performance and outcomes for Indigenous peoples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McDermott Robyn

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Strengthening primary health care is critical to reducing health inequity between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians. The Audit and Best practice for Chronic Disease Extension (ABCDE project has facilitated the implementation of modern Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI approaches in Indigenous community health care centres across Australia. The project demonstrated improvements in health centre systems, delivery of primary care services and in patient intermediate outcomes. It has also highlighted substantial variation in quality of care. Through a partnership between academic researchers, service providers and policy makers, we are now implementing a study which aims to 1 explore the factors associated with variation in clinical performance; 2 examine specific strategies that have been effective in improving primary care clinical performance; and 3 work with health service staff, management and policy makers to enhance the effective implementation of successful strategies. Methods/Design The study will be conducted in Indigenous community health centres from at least six States/Territories (Northern Territory, Western Australia, New South Wales, South Australia, Queensland and Victoria over a five year period. A research hub will be established in each region to support collection and reporting of quantitative and qualitative clinical and health centre system performance data, to investigate factors affecting variation in quality of care and to facilitate effective translation of research evidence into policy and practice. The project is supported by a web-based information system, providing automated analysis and reporting of clinical care performance to health centre staff and management. Discussion By linking researchers directly to users of research (service providers, managers and policy makers, the partnership is well placed to generate new knowledge on effective strategies for improving the quality of primary

  5. Kidney motion during free breathing and breath hold for MR-guided radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current treatments for renal cell carcinoma have a high complication rate due to the invasiveness of the treatment. With the MRI-linac it may be possible to treat renal tumours non-invasively with high-precision radiotherapy. This is expected to reduce complications. To deliver a static dose distribution, radiation gating will be used. In this study the reproducibility and efficiency of free breathing gating and a breath hold treatment of the kidney was investigated. For 15 patients with a renal lesion the kidney motion during 2 min of free breathing and 10 consecutive expiration breath holds was studied with 2D cine MRI. The variability in kidney expiration position and treatment efficiency for gating windows of 1 to 20 mm was measured for both breathing patterns. Additionally the time trend in free breathing and the variation in expiration breath hold kidney position with baseline shift correction was determined. In 80% of the patients the variation in expiration position during free breathing is smaller than 2 mm. No clinically relevant time trends were detected. The variation in expiration breath hold is for all patients larger than the free breathing expiration variation. Gating on free breathing is, for gating windows of 1 to 5 mm more efficient than breath hold without baseline correction. When applying a baseline correction to the breath hold it increases the treatment efficiency. The kidney position is more reproducible in expiration free breathing than non-guided expiration breath hold. For small gating windows it is also more time efficient. Since free breathing also seems more comfortable for the patients it is the preferred breathing pattern for MRI-Linac treatments of the kidney. (paper)

  6. Kidney motion during free breathing and breath hold for MR-guided radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stam, Mette K.; van Vulpen, Marco; Barendrecht, Maurits M.; Zonnenberg, Bernard A.; Intven, Martijn; Crijns, Sjoerd P. M.; Lagendijk, Jan J. W.; Raaymakers, Bas W.

    2013-04-01

    Current treatments for renal cell carcinoma have a high complication rate due to the invasiveness of the treatment. With the MRI-linac it may be possible to treat renal tumours non-invasively with high-precision radiotherapy. This is expected to reduce complications. To deliver a static dose distribution, radiation gating will be used. In this study the reproducibility and efficiency of free breathing gating and a breath hold treatment of the kidney was investigated. For 15 patients with a renal lesion the kidney motion during 2 min of free breathing and 10 consecutive expiration breath holds was studied with 2D cine MRI. The variability in kidney expiration position and treatment efficiency for gating windows of 1 to 20 mm was measured for both breathing patterns. Additionally the time trend in free breathing and the variation in expiration breath hold kidney position with baseline shift correction was determined. In 80% of the patients the variation in expiration position during free breathing is smaller than 2 mm. No clinically relevant time trends were detected. The variation in expiration breath hold is for all patients larger than the free breathing expiration variation. Gating on free breathing is, for gating windows of 1 to 5 mm more efficient than breath hold without baseline correction. When applying a baseline correction to the breath hold it increases the treatment efficiency. The kidney position is more reproducible in expiration free breathing than non-guided expiration breath hold. For small gating windows it is also more time efficient. Since free breathing also seems more comfortable for the patients it is the preferred breathing pattern for MRI-Linac treatments of the kidney.

  7. Shoulder and hip roll differences between breathing and non-breathing conditions in front crawl swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psycharakis, Stelios G; McCabe, Carla

    2011-06-01

    The effects of breathing on body roll have been previously investigated for the roll of the whole trunk only. The purposes of this study were: to calculate separately the shoulder roll (SR) and hip roll (HR) of swimmers during front crawl for non-breathing and preferred-side breathing conditions; to assess the differences in the magnitude and temporal characteristics of these variables between non-breathing and preferred-side breathing conditions; and to examine their association with swimming performance (indicated by swimming speed). Twelve male swimmers who competed at national and international level performed two maximum 25 m front crawl trials: one non-breathing and one with breathing to their preferred side. Performance was recorded with four below and two above water synchronised cameras. SR and HR in both trials were calculated for the breathing and non-breathing sides. The timings of SR and HR peaks to each side and at the positions of neutral roll were also calculated. Swimming speed was significantly slower in the breathing trial (p rolled their shoulders and hips to the breathing side significantly more in the breathing than in the non-breathing trial (SR: p side (p < 0.01) but HR was not significantly different (p = 0.07). There was no evidence to suggest that temporal characteristics of SR or HR were associated with swimming performance.

  8. Let's Talk About Sex! - Improving sexual health for patients in stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Meiqi; Bosnyak, Stephanie; Bontempo, Tiziana; Enns, Amie; Fourie, Candice; Ismail, Farooq; Lo, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Sexual health contributes greatly to quality of life. Research shows that stroke survivors want to learn and talk about sexual health, but are not given information. In keeping with the Canadian Best Practice Recommendations for Stroke Care, this project aimed to provide all stroke rehabilitation inpatients with the opportunity to discuss sexual health concerns with healthcare providers at West Park Healthcare Centre, a rehabilitation and complex continuing care centre in Toronto. Gap analysis conducted via staff member interviews and retrospective chart reviews showed that close to no patients were given the opportunity to discuss sexual health concerns at baseline. Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) methodology was used as the project framework. The changes implemented included a reminder system, standardization of care processes for sexual health, patient-centred time points for the delivery of sexual health discussions, and the development of a sexual health supported conversation tool for patients with aphasia. By the end of the ten month project period and after three PDSA cycles, the percentage of patients provided with the opportunity to discuss sexual health during inpatient rehabilitation increased to 80%. This quality improvement project successfully implemented the Canadian Best Practice Recommendations for Stroke Care with respect to sexual health. Lessons learned included the importance of early baseline data collection and advance planning for tools used in QI projects. Future projects may focus on improving the discussion of sexual health concerns during outpatient stroke rehabilitation.

  9. Patient safety culture in hospital settings : Measurements, health care staff perceptions and suggestions for improvement

    OpenAIRE

    Nordin, Anna

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to psychometrically test the S-HSOPSC and HSOPSC, investigate health care staff’s perceptions of patient safety culture and their suggestions for improvement. Methods: A three-time cross-sectional study with data from health care staff (N= 3721) in a Swedish county council was conducted in 2009 (N = 1,023), 2011 (N = 1,228) and 2013 (N =1,470) using the S-HSOPSC (I, II, III). Health care staff’s suggestions for improvement were analyzed in a qualitative content analysis study (IV)...

  10. Cancer control in developing countries: using health data and health services research to measure and improve access, quality and efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kangolle Alfred CT

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer is a rapidly increasing problem in developing countries. Access, quality and efficiency of cancer services in developing countries must be understood to advance effective cancer control programs. Health services research can provide insights into these areas. Discussion This article provides an overview of oncology health services in developing countries. We use selected examples from peer-reviewed literature in health services research and relevant publicly available documents. In spite of significant limitations in the available data, it is clear there are substantial barriers to access to cancer control in developing countries. This includes prevention, early detection, diagnosis/treatment and palliation. There are also substantial limitations in the quality of cancer control and a great need to improve economic efficiency. We describe how the application of health data may assist in optimizing (1 Structure: strengthening planning, collaboration, transparency, research development, education and capacity building. (2 Process: enabling follow-up, knowledge translation, patient safety and quality assurance. (3 Outcome: facilitating evaluation, monitoring and improvement of national cancer control efforts. There is currently limited data and capacity to use this data in developing countries for these purposes. Summary There is an urgent need to improve health services for cancer control in developing countries. Current resources and much-needed investments must be optimally managed. To achieve this, we would recommend investment in four key priorities: (1 Capacity building in oncology health services research, policy and planning relevant to developing countries. (2 Development of high-quality health data sources. (3 More oncology-related economic evaluations in developing countries. (4 Exploration of high-quality models of cancer control in developing countries. Meeting these needs will require national, regional and

  11. IMPROVEMENT OF SYSTEM OF MATERIAL STIMULATION AND MATERIAL ENCOURAGEMENT OF WORK OF HEALTH WORKERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Vladimirovna Deryabina

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In article are considered possibilities of a solution of the problem of quality of medical services by improvement of system of material stimulation and encouragement of health workers. Are developed the methodical recommendations about material stimulation and encouragement of work of medical personnel directed on increase of individual and collective productivity, improvement of quality of medical services.

  12. A Measurement Feedback System (MFS) Is Necessary to Improve Mental Health Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickman, Leonard

    2008-01-01

    The importance of measurement feedback system (MFS) for the improvement of mental health services for youths is discussed. As feedback obtained from clients and families is subject to distortions, a standardized MFS including clinical processes, contexts, outcomes, and feedback to clinicians and supervisors is necessary for improvement in quality…

  13. Health and social care regulation in Wales: an integrated system of political, corporate and professional governance for improving public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewell, Tony; Wilkinson, Jane

    2008-11-01

    Wales is developing a unique integrated system of governance to improve public health, which is diverging from some recent developments in the rest of the UK but shares many common features. There is a focus on strengthening collaborative working and co-ordination between bodies inspecting, regulating and auditing health and social care. Systems are being developed that are proportionate to the level of risk, eliminate unnecessary burdens of external review and support the improvement of services for patients, service users and carers. This is consistent with the Assembly Government's aim to improve the way that public services are delivered in Wales, including strengthening input from the public in the planning, delivery and reporting of regulation and inspection work. The test in the future will be how far we can demonstrate quantitatively and qualitatively the added value from our uniquely Welsh approach, built as it is on devolution and the aspirations for small-country governance. PMID:19058471

  14. Health and social care regulation in Wales: an integrated system of political, corporate and professional governance for improving public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewell, Tony; Wilkinson, Jane

    2008-11-01

    Wales is developing a unique integrated system of governance to improve public health, which is diverging from some recent developments in the rest of the UK but shares many common features. There is a focus on strengthening collaborative working and co-ordination between bodies inspecting, regulating and auditing health and social care. Systems are being developed that are proportionate to the level of risk, eliminate unnecessary burdens of external review and support the improvement of services for patients, service users and carers. This is consistent with the Assembly Government's aim to improve the way that public services are delivered in Wales, including strengthening input from the public in the planning, delivery and reporting of regulation and inspection work. The test in the future will be how far we can demonstrate quantitatively and qualitatively the added value from our uniquely Welsh approach, built as it is on devolution and the aspirations for small-country governance.

  15. Sport Mass Media Influence on Promoting Sports in Order to Improve Public Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majdy Ahmed Shawqi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Mass media could be one of the tools used to promote a physically active lifestyle. It is a direct and potentially effective tool for reaching public with means, knowledge and information and helping them to understand the importance of a physically active lifestyle. The main purpose of the study was to discover the influence of mass media in promoting sports activities in order to improve health in Sultanate of Oman, and attempt to determine the effect of the mass media in promoting sports activities to improve health. The study sample consisted of 470 participants divide to five age groups (15-20, 21-25, 26-30, 31-35, 36-40, and over 40 years, respectively. The study used a mass mediasurvey to answer the main questions of the study. The results showed a weakness of mass media to encourage sports culture and exercise within different segments of society in order to improve health. Furthermore, it was a good signal that highlights the importance of mass media in promoting exercise in sport in order to improve health. In addition, the results of the study provide professionals in sports an adequate informationas to what mass media should be done to promote sports in order to improve health of the people of Oman. It recommend that mass media should embrace national projects to promote and encourage sport for health.

  16. Surgical correction of pectus carinatum improves perceived body image, mental health and self-esteem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Marie Veje; Grosen, Kasper; Pilegaard, Hans K.;

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of surgical correction of pectus carinatum on health- related quality of life and self-esteem. METHODS: Between May 2012 and May 2013, a prospective observational single-center cohort study was conduct- ed on consecutive patients...... undergoing surgical correction of pectus carinatum at our institution. Patients filled in questionnaires on health-related quality of life and self-esteem before and six months after surgery. RESULTS: Disease-specific health-related quality of life was improved by 33% (95% CI: 23; 44%) according to responses...... to the Nuss Questionnaire modified for Adults. The improvement for generic mental health-related quality of life was 7% (95% CI: 3; 12%) in responses to the Short Form-36 Questionnaire. The improvement in self-esteem was 9% (95% CI: 2; 17%) as assessed with the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. A Single Step...

  17. From theory to practice: improving the impact of health services research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levine Robert

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While significant strides have been made in health research, the incorporation of research evidence into healthcare decision-making has been marginal. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of how the utility of health services research can be improved through the use of theory. Integrating theory into health services research can improve research methodology and encourage stronger collaboration with decision-makers. Discussion Recognizing the importance of theory calls for new expectations in the practice of health services research. These include: the formation of interdisciplinary research teams; broadening the training for those who will practice health services research; and supportive organizational conditions that promote collaboration between researchers and decision makers. Further, funding bodies can provide a significant role in guiding and supporting the use of theory in the practice of health services research. Summary Institutions and researchers should incorporate the use of theory if health services research is to fulfill its potential for improving the delivery of health care.

  18. Discriminating between Nasal and Mouth Breathing

    OpenAIRE

    Curran, Kevin; Yuan, Peng; Coyle, Damian

    2010-01-01

    The recommendation to change breathing patterns from the mouth to the nose can have a significantly positive impact upon the general well being of the individual. We classify nasal and mouth breathing by using an acoustic sensor and intelligent signal processing techniques. The overall purpose is to investigate the possibility of identifying the differences in patterns between nasal and mouth breathing in order to integrate this information into a decision support system which will form the b...

  19. Health benefits from improved outdoor air quality and intervention in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shanshan; Williams, Gail; Guo, Yuming

    2016-07-01

    China is at its most critical stage of outdoor air quality management. In order to prevent further deterioration of air quality and to protect human health, the Chinese government has made a series of attempts to reduce ambient air pollution. Unlike previous literature reviews on the widespread hazards of air pollution on health, this review article firstly summarized the existing evidence of human health benefits from intermittently improved outdoor air quality and intervention in China. Contents of this paper provide concrete and direct clue that improvement in outdoor air quality generates various health benefits in China, and confirm from a new perspective that it is worthwhile for China to shift its development strategy from economic growth to environmental economic sustainability. Greater emphasis on sustainable environment design, consistently strict regulatory enforcement, and specific monitoring actions should be regarded in China to decrease the health risks and to avoid long-term environmental threats.

  20. Health benefits from improved outdoor air quality and intervention in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shanshan; Williams, Gail; Guo, Yuming

    2016-07-01

    China is at its most critical stage of outdoor air quality management. In order to prevent further deterioration of air quality and to protect human health, the Chinese government has made a series of attempts to reduce ambient air pollution. Unlike previous literature reviews on the widespread hazards of air pollution on health, this review article firstly summarized the existing evidence of human health benefits from intermittently improved outdoor air quality and intervention in China. Contents of this paper provide concrete and direct clue that improvement in outdoor air quality generates various health benefits in China, and confirm from a new perspective that it is worthwhile for China to shift its development strategy from economic growth to environmental economic sustainability. Greater emphasis on sustainable environment design, consistently strict regulatory enforcement, and specific monitoring actions should be regarded in China to decrease the health risks and to avoid long-term environmental threats. PMID:27061471

  1. Vagal-dependent nonlinear variability in the respiratory pattern of anesthetized, spontaneously breathing rats

    OpenAIRE

    Dhingra, R. R.; Jacono, F. J.; Fishman, M; Loparo, K. A.; Rybak, I. A.; Dick, T E

    2011-01-01

    Physiological rhythms, including respiration, exhibit endogenous variability associated with health, and deviations from this are associated with disease. Specific changes in the linear and nonlinear sources of breathing variability have not been investigated. In this study, we used information theory-based techniques, combined with surrogate data testing, to quantify and characterize the vagal-dependent nonlinear pattern variability in urethane-anesthetized, spontaneously breathing adult rat...

  2. Infant breathing rate counter based on variable resistor for pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakti, Novi Angga; Hardiyanto, Ardy Dwi; La Febry Andira R., C.; Camelya, Kesa; Widiyanti, Prihartini

    2016-03-01

    Pneumonia is one of the leading causes of death in new born baby in Indonesia. According to WHO in 2002, breathing rate is very important index to be the symptom of pneumonia. In the Community Health Center, the nurses count with a stopwatch for exactly one minute. Miscalculation in Community Health Center occurs because of long time concentration and focus on two object at once. This calculation errors can cause the baby who should be admitted to the hospital only be attended at home. Therefore, an accurate breathing rate counter at Community Health Center level is necessary. In this work, resistance change of variable resistor is made to be breathing rate counter. Resistance change in voltage divider can produce voltage change. If the variable resistance moves periodically, the voltage will change periodically too. The voltage change counted by software in the microcontroller. For the every mm shift at the variable resistor produce average 0.96 voltage change. The software can count the number of wave generated by shifting resistor.

  3. Nutrition training improves health workers’ nutrition knowledge and competence to manage child undernutrition: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno F Sunguya

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medical and nursing education lack adequate practical nutrition training to fit the clinical reality that health workers face in their practices. Such a deficit creates health workers with poor nutrition knowledge and child undernutrition management practices. In-service nutrition training can help to fill this gap. However, no systematic review has examined its collective effectiveness. We thus conducted this study to examine the effectiveness of in-service nutrition training on health workers’ nutrition knowledge, counseling skills, and child undernutrition management practices. Methods: We conducted a literature search on nutrition interventions from PubMed/MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, ISI Web of Knowledge, and WHO regional databases. The outcome variables were nutrition knowledge, nutrition counseling skills, and undernutrition management practices of health workers. Due to heterogeneity, we conducted only descriptive analyses. Results: Out of 3910 retrieved articles, 25 were selected as eligible for the final analysis. A total of 18 studies evaluated health workers’ nutrition knowledge and showed improvement after training. A total of 12 studies with nutrition counseling as the outcome variable also showed improvement among the trained health workers. Sixteen studies evaluated health workers’ child undernutrition management practices. In all such studies, child undernutrition management practices and competence of health workers improved after the nutrition training intervention.Conclusion: In-service nutrition training improves quality of health workers by rendering them more knowledge and competence to manage nutrition-related conditions, especially child undernutrition. In-service nutrition training interventions can help to fill the gap created by the lack of adequate nutrition training in the existing medical and nursing education system. In this way, steps can be taken towards improving the overall nutritional status of

  4. Oral breathing: new early treatment protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Denotti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral breathing is a respiratory dysfunction that affects approximately 10-15% of child population. It is responsable of local effects and systemic effects, both immediate and long-term. They affect the growth of the subject and his physical health in many ways: pediatric, psycho-behavioral and cognitive. The etiology is multifactorial. It’s important the establishment of a vicious circle involving more areas and it is essential to stop it as soon as possible. In order to correct this anomaly, the pediatric dentist must be able to make a correct diagnosis to treat early the disfunction and to avoid the onset of cascade mechanisms. Who plays a central role is the pediatrician who first and frequently come into contact with little patients. He can identify the anomalies, and therefore collaborate with other specialists, including the dentist. The key aspect that guides us in the diagnosis, and allows us to identify the oral respirator, is the “adenoid facies”. The purpose of the study is to highlight the importance and benefits of an early and multidisciplinary intervention (pediatric, orthopedic-orthodontic-functional. A sample of 20 patients was selected with the following inclusion criteria: mouth breathing, transverse discrepancy > 4 mm, early mixed dentition, central and lateral permenent incisors, overjet increased, lip and nasal incompetence, snoring and/or sleep apnea episodes. The protocol of intervention includes the use of the following devices and procedures: a maxillary rapid expander (to correct the transverse discrepancy, to increase the amplitude of the upper respiratory airway and to reduce nasal resistances tract in association with myo-functional devices (nasal stimulator and oral obturator. They allow the reconstruction of a physiological balance between the perioral musculature and tongue, the acquisition of nasal and lips competence and the reduction of overjet. This protocol speeds up and stabilizes the results. The

  5. Policy directions in urban health in developing countries--the slum improvement approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpham, T; Stephens, C

    1992-07-01

    The urban development, or housing, sector has a longer experience of addressing the problems of the urban poor in developing countries than the health sector. In recent years the policy of 'slum improvement', which involves both sectors, has attracted the support of international donors. This article documents the development of the slum improvement approach and addresses key issues of the approach which have implications for health planning: covering the poorest dwellers; relocation; land tenure; gentrification; debt burdens and the impact on women. Questions about the approach which still need answering are defined and a summary of the constraints in slum improvement and potential solutions is presented. PMID:1509300

  6. Bilateral subthalamic nucleus stimulation improves health-related quality of life in Parkinsonian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erola, Tuomo; Karinen, Petri; Heikkinen, Esa; Tuominen, Juho; Haapaniemi, Tarja; Koivukangas, John; Myllylä, Vilho

    2005-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common neurological disorder. Recently, bilateral deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) has become an option in the treatment of severe PD. We measured the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of 27 parkinsonian patients, who underwent a bilateral STN-operation. The instruments used for the evaluation of the HRQoL were the Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-39) and the Finnish version of the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP). We found that the quality of life significantly improved when measured with both HRQoL scales. Clinical improvement and improvement in HRQoL were positively correlated. PMID:15734666

  7. Sleep disordered breathing in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilgay Izci Balserak

    2015-12-01

    Sleep disordered breathing (SDB is very common during pregnancy, and is most likely explained by hormonal, physiological and physical changes. Maternal obesity, one of the major risk factors for SDB, together with physiological changes in pregnancy may predispose women to develop SDB. SDB has been associated with poor maternal and fetal outcomes. Thus, early identification, diagnosis and treatment of SDB are important in pregnancy. This article reviews the pregnancy-related changes affecting the severity of SDB, the epidemiology and the risk factors of SDB in pregnancy, the association of SDB with adverse pregnancy outcomes, and screening and management options specific for this population.

  8. Breathe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Taylor Swift; 侯茂荣

    2010-01-01

    @@ I see your face in my mind as I drive away Cause none of us thought tt was gonna end that way People are people, and sometimes we change our minds But it's killing me to see you go after all this time

  9. A socially situated approach to inform ways to improve health and wellbeing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horrocks, Christine; Johnson, Sally

    2014-02-01

    Mainstream health psychology supports neoliberal notions of health promotion in which self-management is central. The emphasis is on models that explain behaviour as individually driven and cognitively motivated, with health beliefs framed as the favoured mechanisms to target in order to bring about change to improve health. Utilising understandings exemplified in critical health psychology, we take a more socially situated approach, focusing on practicing health, the rhetoric of modernisation in UK health care and moves toward democratisation. While recognising that within these new ways of working there are opportunities for empowerment and user-led health care, there are other implications. How these changes link to simplistic cognitive behavioural ideologies of health promotion and rational decision-making is explored. Utilising two different empirical studies, this article highlights how self-management and expected compliance with governmental authority in relation to health practices position not only communities that experience multiple disadvantage but also more seemingly privileged social actors. The article presents a challenge to self-management and informed choice, in which the importance of navigational networks is evident. Because health care can become remote and inaccessible to certain sections of the community, yet pervasive and deterministic for others, we need multiple levels of analysis and different forms of action. PMID:24443920

  10. The community-based Health Extension Program significantly improved contraceptive utilization in West Gojjam Zone, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yitayal M

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Mezgebu Yitayal,1 Yemane Berhane,2 Alemayehu Worku,3 Yigzaw Kebede11University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia; 2Addis Continental Institute of Public Health, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia; 3Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, EthiopiaBackground: Ethiopia has implemented a nationwide primary health program at grassroots level (known as the Health Extension Program since 2003 to increase public access to basic health services. This study was conducted to assess whether households that fully implemented the Health Extension Program have improved current contraceptive use.Methods: A cross-sectional community-based survey was conducted to collect data from 1,320 mothers using a structured questionnaire. A multivariate logistic regression was used to identify the predictors of current contraceptive utilization. A propensity score analysis was used to determine the contribution of the Health Extension Program “model households” on current contraceptive utilization.Result: Mothers from households which fully benefited from the Health Extension Program (“model households” were 3.97 (adjusted odds ratio, 3.97; 95% confidence interval, 3.01–5.23 times more likely to use contraceptives compared with mothers from non-model households. Model household status contributed to 29.3% (t=7.08 of the increase in current contraceptive utilization.Conclusion: The Health Extension Program when implemented fully could help to increase the utilization of contraceptives in the rural community and improve family planning.Keywords: Health Extension Program, current contraceptive utilization

  11. Breathing exercises: influence on breathing patterns and thoracoabdominal motion in healthy subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Danielle S. R. Vieira; Mendes, Liliane P. S.; Nathália S. Elmiro; Marcelo Velloso; Raquel R. Britto; Verônica F. Parreira

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The mechanisms underlying breathing exercises have not been fully elucidated. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the impact of four on breathing exercises (diaphragmatic breathing, inspiratory sighs, sustained maximal inspiration and intercostal exercise) the on breathing pattern and thoracoabdominal motion in healthy subjects. METHOD: Fifteen subjects of both sexes, aged 23±1.5 years old and with normal pulmonary function tests, participated in the study. The subjects were evaluated using t...

  12. Improving the Health of Our Nation (A Cup of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-11-06

    Life expectancy in the U.S. has reached an all-time high, thanks to advances in medical treatments and prevention strategies. However, certain behaviors continue to compromise our health. In this podcast, Dr. Kathleen Ethier discusses ways to live a longer, healthier life.  Created: 11/6/2014 by MMWR.   Date Released: 11/6/2014.

  13. Improving the Health of Our Nation (A Minute of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-11-06

    While life expectancy in the U.S. has reached an all-time high, certain behaviors continue to compromise our health. This podcast discusses how to live longer, healthier lives.  Created: 11/6/2014 by MMWR.   Date Released: 11/6/2014.

  14. Prevalence of sleep-disordered breathing in the general population: the HypnoLaus study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinzer, R; Vat, S; Marques-Vidal, P; Marti-Soler, H; Andries, D; Tobback, N; Mooser, V; Preisig, M; Malhotra, A; Waeber, G; Vollenweider, P; Tafti, M; Haba-Rubio, J

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Sleep-disordered breathing is associated with major morbidity and mortality. However, its prevalence has mainly been selectively studied in populations at risk for sleep-disordered breathing or cardiovascular diseases. Taking into account improvements in recording techniques and new criteria used to define respiratory events, we aimed to assess the prevalence of sleep-disordered breathing and associated clinical features in a large population-based sample. Methods Between Sept 1, 2009, and June 30, 2013, we did a population-based study (HypnoLaus) in Lausanne, Switzerland. We invited a cohort of 3043 consecutive participants of the CoLaus/PsyCoLaus study to take part. Polysomnography data from 2121 people were included in the final analysis. 1024 (48%) participants were men, with a median age of 57 years (IQR 49–68, range 40–85) and mean body-mass index (BMI) of 25·6 kg/m2 (SD 4·1). Participants underwent complete polysomnographic recordings at home and had extensive phenotyping for diabetes, hypertension, metabolic syndrome, and depression. The primary outcome was prevalence of sleep-disordered breathing, assessed by the apnoea-hypopnoea index. Findings The median apnoea-hypopnoea index was 6·9 events per h (IQR 2·7–14·1) in women and 14·9 per h (7·2–27·1) in men. The prevalence of moderate-to-severe sleep-disordered breathing (≥15 events per h) was 23·4% (95% CI 20·9–26·0) in women and 49·7% (46·6–52·8) in men. After multivariable adjustment, the upper quartile for the apnoea-hypopnoea index (>20·6 events per h) was associated independently with the presence of hypertension (odds ratio 1·60, 95% CI 1·14–2·26; p=0·0292 for trend across severity quartiles), diabetes (2·00, 1·05–3·99; p=0·0467), metabolic syndrome (2·80, 1·86–4·29; p<0·0001), and depression (1·92, 1·01–3·64; p=0·0292). Interpretation The high prevalence of sleep-disordered breathing recorded in our population-based sample might

  15. Outreach services to improve access to health care in South Africa: lessons from three community health worker programmes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nonhlanhla Nxumalo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In South Africa, there are renewed efforts to strengthen primary health care and community health worker (CHW programmes. This article examines three South African CHW programmes, a small local non-governmental organisation (NGO, a local satellite of a national NGO, and a government-initiated service, that provide a range of services from home-based care, childcare, and health promotion to assist clients in overcoming poverty-related barriers to health care. Methods: The comparative case studies, located in Eastern Cape and Gauteng, were investigated using qualitative methods. Thematic analysis was used to identify factors that constrain and enable outreach services to improve access to care. Results: The local satellite (of a national NGO, successful in addressing multi-dimensional barriers to care, provided CHWs with continuous training focused on the social determinants of ill-health, regular context-related supervision, and resources such as travel and cell-phone allowances. These workers engaged with, and linked their clients to, agencies in a wide range of sectors. Relationships with participatory structures at community level stimulated coordinated responses from service providers. In contrast, an absence of these elements curtailed the ability of CHWs in the small NGO and government-initiated service to provide effective outreach services or to improve access to care. Conclusion: Significant investment in resources, training, and support can enable CHWs to address barriers to care by negotiating with poorly functioning government services and community participation structures.

  16. Mental Health in Sport (MHS): Improving the Early Intervention Knowledge and Confidence of Elite Sport Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebbens, Joshua; Hassmén, Peter; Crisp, Dimity; Wensley, Kate

    2016-01-01

    Mental illnesses are as prevalent among elite athletes as in the general population. Despite this, there is little research examining how to enhance mental health literacy or helping behaviors in elite sport environments. A Mental Health in Sport (MHS) workshop was therefore developed and its effects on mental health literacy and confidence studied in 166 coaches and support staff working with elite athletes and teams in Australia. Results indicated that participants increased their knowledge of the signs and symptoms of common mental illnesses and were more confident in helping someone who may be experiencing a mental health problem. We conclude that even a very brief intervention can be effective in improving the mental health literacy and confidence of key persons in elite sport environments, and may promote early intervention and timely referral of elite athletes with mental health concerns to appropriate professionals. PMID:27445887

  17. Mental Health in Sport (MHS): Improving the Early Intervention Knowledge and Confidence of Elite Sport Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebbens, Joshua; Hassmén, Peter; Crisp, Dimity; Wensley, Kate

    2016-01-01

    Mental illnesses are as prevalent among elite athletes as in the general population. Despite this, there is little research examining how to enhance mental health literacy or helping behaviors in elite sport environments. A Mental Health in Sport (MHS) workshop was therefore developed and its effects on mental health literacy and confidence studied in 166 coaches and support staff working with elite athletes and teams in Australia. Results indicated that participants increased their knowledge of the signs and symptoms of common mental illnesses and were more confident in helping someone who may be experiencing a mental health problem. We conclude that even a very brief intervention can be effective in improving the mental health literacy and confidence of key persons in elite sport environments, and may promote early intervention and timely referral of elite athletes with mental health concerns to appropriate professionals.

  18. Health System Quality Improvement: Impact of Prompt Nutrition Care on Patient Outcomes and Health Care Costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, Anita; Loose, Claire; Bell, Jvawnna; Partridge, Jamie; Nelson, Jeffrey; Goates, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Among hospitalized patients, malnutrition is prevalent yet often overlooked and undertreated. We implemented a quality improvement program that positioned early nutritional care into the nursing workflow. Nurses screened for malnutrition risk at patient admission and then immediately ordered oral nutritional supplements for those at risk. Supplements were given as regular medications, guided and monitored by medication administration records. Post-quality improvement program, pressure ulcer incidence, length of stay, 30-day readmissions, and costs of care were reduced. PMID:26910129

  19. Observations Illustrating the Use of Health Informatics to Link Public Health Immunization Registries and Pharmacies to Increase Adult Immunization Rates and Improve Population Health Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovich, Michael; Altstadter, Brandy; Popovich, Lara Hargraves

    2016-01-01

    The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act encourages health information exchange between clinical care and public health through Meaningful Use measures. Meaningful Use specifically identifies objectives to support a number of public health programs including immunizations, cancer registries, syndromic surveillance, and disease case reports. The objective is to improve public and population health. Stage 2 of Meaningful Use focused on compliance to sending of information to public health. The next phase focuses on bi-directional information exchange to support immunization intelligence and to empower providers, pharmacists, and the consumer. The HITECH Act Stage 2 initiative provided incentive and motivation for healthcare providers to encourage their Electronic Medical Record (EMR) vendors to implement data exchanges with public health, with the expected result being timely awareness of health risks. The empowerment nugget in the HITECH Act is not in the compliance reporting to public health. The nugget is the ability for a provider to receive relevant information on the patient or consumer currently in front of them or to those they will connect to through their outreach efforts. The ability for public health to retain current immunization records of individuals from a variety of providers supports their program goals to increase immunization rates and mitigate the risk of vaccine-preventable disease (VPD). The ability for providers to receive at the point of service more complete immunization histories integrated with decision support enhances their delivery of care, thereby reducing the risk of VPD to their patients. Indirectly payers benefit through healthcare cost savings and when the focus is expanded from a health model to a business model, there are significant return on investment (ROI) opportunities that exponentially increase the value of a bi-directional immunization data exchange. This paper will provide

  20. Aligning health information technologies with effective service delivery models to improve chronic disease care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Amy M.; Thielke, Stephen M.; Katon, Wayne; Unützer, Jürgen; Areán, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Objective Healthcare reforms in the United States, including the Affordable Care and HITECH Acts, and the NCQA criteria for the Patient Centered Medical Home have promoted health information technology (HIT) and the integration of general medical and mental health services. These developments, which aim to improve chronic disease care have largely occurred in parallel, with little attention to the need for coordination. In this article, the fundamental connections between HIT and improvements in chronic disease management are explored. We use the evidence-based collaborative care model as an example, with attention to health literacy improvement for supporting patient engagement in care. Method A review of the literature was conducted to identify how HIT and collaborative care, an evidence-based model of chronic disease care, support each other. Results Five key principles of effective collaborative care are outlined: care is patient-centered, evidence-based, measurement-based, population-based, and accountable. The potential role of HIT in implementing each principle is discussed. Key features of the mobile health paradigm are described, including how they can extend evidence-based treatment beyond traditional clinical settings. Conclusion HIT, and particularly mobile health, can enhance collaborative care interventions, and thus improve the health of individuals and populations when deployed in integrated delivery systems. PMID:24963895

  1. Effectiveness of motivational interviewing at improving oral health: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreia Morales Cascaes

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE : To analyze the effectiveness of motivational interviewing (MI at improving oral health behaviors (oral hygiene habits, sugar consumption, dental services utilization or use of fluoride and dental clinical outcomes (dental plaque, dental caries and periodontal status. METHODS : A systematic search of PubMed, LILACS, SciELO, PsyINFO, Cochrane and Google Scholar bibliographic databases was conducted looking for intervention studies that investigated MI as the main approach to improving the oral health outcomes investigated. RESULTS : Of the 78 articles found, ten met the inclusion criteria, all based on randomized controlled trials. Most studies (n = 8 assessed multiple outcomes. Five interventions assessed the impact of MI on oral health behaviors and nine on clinical outcomes (three on dental caries, six on dental plaque, four on gingivitis and three on periodontal pockets. Better quality of evidence was provided by studies that investigated dental caries, which also had the largest population samples. The evidence of the effect of MI on improving oral health outcomes is conflicting. Four studies reported positive effects of MI on oral health outcomes whereas another four showed null effect. In two interventions, the actual difference between groups was not reported or able to be recalculated. CONCLUSIONS : We found inconclusive effectiveness for most oral health outcomes. We need more and better designed and reported interventions to fully assess the impact of MI on oral health and understand the appropriate dosage for the counseling interventions.

  2. Point-of-Care Diagnostics for Improving Maternal Health in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashamba-Thompson, Tivani P; Sartorius, Benn; Drain, Paul K

    2016-01-01

    Improving maternal health is a global priority, particularly in high HIV-endemic, resource-limited settings. Failure to use health care facilities due to poor access is one of the main causes of maternal deaths in South Africa. "Point-of-care" (POC) diagnostics are an innovative healthcare approach to improve healthcare access and health outcomes in remote and resource-limited settings. In this review, POC testing is defined as a diagnostic test that is carried out near patients and leads to rapid clinical decisions. We review the current and emerging POC diagnostics for maternal health, with a specific focus on the World Health Organization (WHO) quality-ASSURED (Affordability, Sensitivity, Specificity, User friendly, Rapid and robust, Equipment free and Delivered) criteria for an ideal point-of-care test in resource-limited settings. The performance of POC diagnostics, barriers and challenges related to implementing POC diagnostics for maternal health in rural and resource-limited settings are reviewed. Innovative strategies for overcoming these barriers are recommended to achieve substantial progress on improving maternal health outcomes in these settings. PMID:27589808

  3. Improving metabolic and cardiovascular health at an Early Psychosis Intervention program in Vancouver, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane H. Fredrikson

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Psychotic disorders most commonly appear during the late teenage years and early adulthood. A focused and rapid clinical response by an integrated health team can help to improve the quality of life of the patient, leading to a better long-term prognosis. The Vancouver Coastal Health Early Psychosis Intervention program covers a catchment area of approximately 800,000 people in the cities of Vancouver and Richmond, Canada. The program provides a multidisciplinary approach to supporting patients under the age of 30 who have recently experienced first-break psychosis. The program addresses the needs of the treatment environment, medication and psychological therapies. A critical part of this support includes a program to specifically improve patients’ physical health. Physical health needs are addressed through a two-pronged, parallel approach. Patients receive routine metabolic health assessments during their first year in the program where standard metabolic parameters are recorded. Based on the results of clinical interviews and laboratory tests, specific actionable interventions are recommended. The second key strategy is a program that promotes healthy lifestyle goal development. Patients work closely with occupational therapists to develop goals to improve cardiometabolic health. These programs are supported by an active research environment where patients are able to engage in studies with a focus on improving their physical health. These studies include a longitudinal evaluation of the effects of integrated health coaching on maintaining cardiometabolic health in patients recently admitted to the program, as well as a clinical study which evaluates the effects of low versus higher metabolic risk antipsychotic drugs on central adiposity. An additional pharmacogenomic study is helping to identify genetic variants that may predict cardiometabolic changes following treatment with antipsychotic drugs.

  4. [Stahl, Leibniz, Hoffmann and breathing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvallo, Sarah

    2006-01-01

    At the beginning of the XVIII th century, Wilhelm Gottfried Leibniz and Friedrich Hoffmann criticize Georg Ernst Stahl's medical theory. They differenciate between unsound and true reasonings. Namely, they validate Stahl's definition of breath but extracting it from its animist basis and placing it in an epistemology obeying to the principle of sufficient reason and to the mechanical model. The stahlian discovery consists in understanding breath as a calorific ventilation against the ancient conception; the iatromechanists recognize its accuracy, but they try then to transpose it to a mechanical model of ventilation. Using it in a different epistemological context implies that they analyze the idea of discovery "true" in its contents, but "wrong" in its hypothesis. It impels to examine the epistemology of medical knowledge, as science and therapeutics, and in its links with the other scientific theories. Thus, if Leibniz as philosopher and Hoffmann as doctor consider Stahl's animism so important, it is because its discoveries question the fundamental principles of medicine. PMID:17153053

  5. Non-communicable diseases and global health governance: enhancing global processes to improve health development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, Roger S

    2007-01-01

    This paper assesses progress in the development of a global framework for responding to non-communicable diseases, as reflected in the policies and initiatives of the World Health Organization (WHO), World Bank and the UN: the institutions most capable of shaping a coherent global policy. Responding to the global burden of chronic disease requires a strategic assessment of the global processes that are likely to be most effective in generating commitment to policy change at country level, and in influencing industry behaviour. WHO has adopted a legal process with tobacco (the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control), but a non-legal, advocacy-based approach with diet and physical activity (the Global Strategy on Diet, Physical Activity and Health). The paper assesses the merits of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and the FCTC as distinct global processes for advancing health development, before considering what lessons might be learned for enhancing the implementation of the Global Strategy on Diet. While global partnerships, economic incentives, and international legal instruments could each contribute to a more effective global response to chronic diseases, the paper makes a special case for the development of international legal standards in select areas of diet and nutrition, as a strategy for ensuring that the health of future generations does not become dependent on corporate charity and voluntary commitments. A broader frame of reference for lifestyle-related chronic diseases is needed: one that draws together WHO's work in tobacco, nutrition and physical activity, and that envisages selective use of international legal obligations, non-binding recommendations, advocacy and policy advice as tools of choice for promoting different elements of the strategy. PMID:17519005

  6. Non-communicable diseases and global health governance: enhancing global processes to improve health development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnusson Roger S

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper assesses progress in the development of a global framework for responding to non-communicable diseases, as reflected in the policies and initiatives of the World Health Organization (WHO, World Bank and the UN: the institutions most capable of shaping a coherent global policy. Responding to the global burden of chronic disease requires a strategic assessment of the global processes that are likely to be most effective in generating commitment to policy change at country level, and in influencing industry behaviour. WHO has adopted a legal process with tobacco (the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, but a non-legal, advocacy-based approach with diet and physical activity (the Global Strategy on Diet, Physical Activity and Health. The paper assesses the merits of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs and the FCTC as distinct global processes for advancing health development, before considering what lessons might be learned for enhancing the implementation of the Global Strategy on Diet. While global partnerships, economic incentives, and international legal instruments could each contribute to a more effective global response to chronic diseases, the paper makes a special case for the development of international legal standards in select areas of diet and nutrition, as a strategy for ensuring that the health of future generations does not become dependent on corporate charity and voluntary commitments. A broader frame of reference for lifestyle-related chronic diseases is needed: one that draws together WHO's work in tobacco, nutrition and physical activity, and that envisages selective use of international legal obligations, non-binding recommendations, advocacy and policy advice as tools of choice for promoting different elements of the strategy.

  7. Breath Tests in Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine: From Research to Practice in Current Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attapon Cheepsattayakorn

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Today, exhaled nitric oxide has been studied the most, and most researches have now focusd on asthma. More than a thousand different volatile organic compounds have been observed in low concentrations in normal human breath. Alkanes and methylalkanes, the majority of breath volatile organic compounds, have been increasingly used by physicians as a novel method to diagnose many diseases without discomforts of invasive procedures. None of the individual exhaled volatile organic compound alone is specific for disease. Exhaled breath analysis techniques may be available to diagnose and monitor the diseases in home setting when their sensitivity and specificity are improved in the future.

  8. Tunable fiber laser based photoacoustic spectrometer for breath ammonia analysis during hemodialysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J. W.; Xie, H.; Liang, L. R.; Zhang, W.; Peng, W.; Yu, Q. X.

    2011-11-01

    A photoacoustic (PA) spectrometer based on a near-IR tunable fiber laser is developed and used for breath ammonia analysis. We successfully measured the breath ammonia level variation of six patients with end-stage renal disease while they were undergoing hemodialysis in the hospital. The measurement results showed that the initial concentration level of the breath ammonia were from 1600 to 2200 ppb before dialysis treatment, the levels decreased to 200-600 ppb in the end stage of dialysis, which close to the levels of healthy persons. Further improvement and applications of this PA spectrometer are discussed.

  9. Improving health care quality and safety: the role of collective learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singer SJ

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Sara J Singer,1–4 Justin K Benzer,4–6 Sami U Hamdan4,6 1Department of Health Policy and Management, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA; 2Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; 3Mongan Institute for Health Policy, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA; 4Center for Healthcare Organization and Implementation Research, VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA, USA; 5VISN 17 Center of Excellence for Research on Returning War Veterans, Waco, TX, USA; 6Department of Health Policy and Management, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: Despite decades of effort to improve quality and safety in health care, this goal feels increasingly elusive. Successful examples of improvement are infrequently replicated. This scoping review synthesizes 76 empirical or conceptual studies (out of 1208 originally screened addressing learning in quality or safety improvement, that were published in selected health care and management journals between January 2000 and December 2014 to deepen understanding of the role that collective learning plays in quality and safety improvement. We categorize learning activities using a theoretical model that shows how leadership and environmental factors support collective learning processes and practices, and in turn team and organizational improvement outcomes. By focusing on quality and safety improvement, our review elaborates the premise of learning theory that leadership, environment, and processes combine to create conditions that promote learning. Specifically, we found that learning for quality and safety improvement includes experimentation (including deliberate experimentation, improvisation, learning from failures, exploration, and exploitation, internal and external knowledge acquisition, performance monitoring and comparison, and training. Supportive learning environments are characterized by team characteristics like psychological

  10. Why isn't evidence based practice improving health care for minorities in the United States?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Haeok; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J; Baik, Sung-Yi

    2013-11-01

    Achieving health equity by improving the health care of all racial/ethnic groups is one of the key goals of Healthy People 2020. The implementation of evidence based practice (EBP) has been a major recommendation to achieve health equity in hopes of eliminating the subjectivity of clinical decision making. However, health disparities among racial/ethnic minorities are persistent in spite of the adoption of standardized care based on evidence. The EBP with racial and ethnic minorities is often seen as a possible cause of health and health care disparities. Three potential issues of using EBP to reduce health disparities have been identified: (1) a lack of data for EBP with ethnic/racial minority populations; (2) limited research on the generalizability of the evidence based on a European-American middle-class; and (3) sociocultural considerations in the context of EBP. Using EBP to reduce disparities in health care and health outcomes requires that nurse professionals should know how to use relevant evidence in a particular situation as well as to generate knowledge and theory which is relevant to racial/ethnic minorities. In addition, EBP implementation should be contextualized within the sociocultural environments in which patients are treated rather than solely focusing on the health problems. PMID:23928122

  11. Reforms in Pakistan: decisive times for improving maternal and child health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazhar, Arslan; Shaikh, Babar Tasneem

    2012-08-01

    Pakistan is a struggling economy with poor maternal and child health indicators that have affected attainment of the United Nations Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5 (under-five child and maternal mortality). Recent health reforms have abolished the federal Ministry of Health and devolved administrative and financial powers to the provinces. Ideally, devolution tends to simplify a healthcare system's management structure and ensure more efficient delivery of health services to underserved populations, in this case women and children. In this time of transition, it is appropriate to outline prerequisites for the efficient management of maternal and child health (MCH) services. This paper examines the six building blocks of health systems in order to improve the utilization of MCH services in rural Pakistan. The targeted outcomes of recent reforms are devolved participatory decision-making regarding distribution of MCH-related services, improved deployment of the healthcare workforce, prioritization of pro-poor strategies for health financing and integration of various health information systems. Given this window of opportunity, the provinces need to guarantee fairness and equity through their stewardship of the healthcare system so as to protect vulnerable mothers and their children, especially in rural, remote and disadvantaged areas of Pakistan. PMID:23968601

  12. Through Their Eyes: Lessons Learned Using Participatory Methods in Health Care Quality Improvement Projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbale, Salva N; Locatelli, Sara M; LaVela, Sherri L

    2016-08-01

    In this methodological article, we examine participatory methods in depth to demonstrate how these methods can be adopted for quality improvement (QI) projects in health care. We draw on existing literature and our QI initiatives in the Department of Veterans Affairs to discuss the application of photovoice and guided tours in QI efforts. We highlight lessons learned and several benefits of using participatory methods in this area. Using participatory methods, evaluators can engage patients, providers, and other stakeholders as partners to enhance care. Participant involvement helps yield actionable data that can be translated into improved care practices. Use of these methods also helps generate key insights to inform improvements that truly resonate with stakeholders. Using participatory methods is a valuable strategy to harness participant engagement and drive improvements that address individual needs. In applying these innovative methodologies, evaluators can transcend traditional approaches to uniquely support evaluations and improvements in health care. PMID:26667882

  13. Rehabilitational Effects of Improved Pursed-lip Breathing Training for Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in Stable Period%改良缩唇呼吸训练在COPD稳定期患者康复治疗中的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈云

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨改良缩唇呼吸训练在慢性阻塞性肺疾病稳定期患者康复治疗中的作用。方法:选择笔者所在医院呼吸科COPD稳定期的出院患者为研究对象,随机分为空白对照组(A组)和改良缩唇呼吸训练组(B组)。分别检测两组患者出院时、出院8周后的呼吸频率、动脉血气分析(SaO2、PaO2、PaCO2)、肺功能(FEV1)、呼吸困难评分(MMRC)、日常生活活动能力评分(ADL)等指标。结果:出院8周后,B组的治疗效果明显优于空白对照组,两组呼吸频率、动脉血气分析、呼吸困难评分、日常生活活动能力评分指标比较的差异均有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论:慢性阻塞性肺疾病稳定期进行改良缩唇呼吸训练能有效地改善患者的呼吸功能,提高氧分压及COPD患者的生活质量,它是一种既简单又实用的呼吸训练方法。%Objective:To explore the effects of improved pursed-lip breathing training for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease(COPD) in stable period.Method:The cases with COPD were selected and randomly divided into two groups.The A group was without pursed-lip breathing,the B group was with improved pursed-lip breathing training.The indices including the respiratory rate,arterial blood gas analysis(SaO2,PaO2,PaCO2),pulmonary function(FEV1),modified medical research council dyspnea scale(MMRC) and activities of daily living(ADL) of the two groups were examined on discharge and at 8 weeks after discharge respectively.Result:The B group was better than the A group,there were statistical significance on the respiratory rate,arterial blood gas analysis,MMRC and ADL between the two groups 8 weeks after discharge(P<0.05).Conclusion:The improved pursed-lip breathing training can effectually improve the respiratory function,partial pressure of oxygen and quality life of the patients with stable COPD.It is a simple and pragmatic breathing training method.

  14. Improving motivation among primary health care workers in Tanzania: a health worker perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manongi, Rachel N; Marchant, Tanya C; Bygbjerg, Ib Christian

    2006-01-01

    shortages, a desire for more structured and supportive supervision from managers, and improved transparency in career development opportunities. Further, suggestions were made for inter-facility exchanges, particularly on commonly referred cases.The discussion highlights the context of some of the problems...

  15. Forest Cover Associated with Improved Child Health and Nutrition: Evidence from the Malawi Demographic and Health Survey and Satellite Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kiersten B.; Jacob, Anila; Brown, Molly Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Healthy forests provide human communities with a host of important ecosystem services, including the provision of food, clean water, fuel, and natural medicines. Yet globally, about 13 million hectares of forests are lost every year, with the biggest losses in Africa and South America. As biodiversity loss and ecosystem degradation due to deforestation continue at unprecedented rates, with concomitant loss of ecosystem services, impacts on human health remain poorly understood. Here, we use data from the 2010 Malawi Demographic and Health Survey, linked with satellite remote sensing data on forest cover, to explore and better understand this relationship. Our analysis finds that forest cover is associated with improved health and nutrition outcomes among children in Malawi. Children living in areas with net forest cover loss between 2000 and 2010 were 19% less likely to have a diverse diet and 29% less likely to consume vitamin A-rich foods than children living in areas with no net change in forest cover. Conversely, children living in communities with higher percentages of forest cover were more likely to consume vitamin A-rich foods and less likely to experience diarrhea. Net gain in forest cover over the 10-year period was associated with a 34% decrease in the odds of children experiencing diarrhea (P5.002). Given that our analysis relied on observational data and that there were potential unknown factors for which we could not account, these preliminary findings demonstrate only associations, not causal relationships, between forest cover and child health and nutrition outcomes. However, the findings raise concerns about the potential short- and long-term impacts of ongoing deforestation and ecosystem degradation on community health in Malawi, and they suggest that preventing forest loss and maintaining the ecosystems services of forests are important factors in improving human health and nutrition outcomes.

  16. COPD: When You Learn More, You'll Breathe Better

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are treatments that do help people breathe easier." Spirometry: A Simple Breathing Test Everyone at risk for ... tested for COPD with a simple breathing test. Spirometry is one of the best and most common ...

  17. [Short time counseling in medical practice for improving health behaviour: problems and solutions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuner-Jehle, Stefan; Schmid, Margareta; Grüninger, Ueli

    2014-02-26

    Health related behaviour is a main determinant of chronic disease. Family physicians have an important role in the support of patients to improve their health behaviour, but relevant barriers should be addressed. In the new "Health Coaching KHM" program, patients and physicians are working as a team in four steps (sensitize - create motivation - plan - act). In this process, physicians' communication skills (which are trained within the program) are of utmost importance. In a pilot study with 20 family physicians and 1045 patients acceptance and feasibility were excellent: Every second participant improved her or his behaviour in the area of choice by at least one (of two possible) categories. For dissemination improving framework is crucial.

  18. Decreased Consumption of Branched-Chain Amino Acids Improves Metabolic Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Fontana

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Protein-restricted (PR, high-carbohydrate diets improve metabolic health in rodents, yet the precise dietary components that are responsible for these effects have not been identified. Furthermore, the applicability of these studies to humans is unclear. Here, we demonstrate in a randomized controlled trial that a moderate PR diet also improves markers of metabolic health in humans. Intriguingly, we find that feeding mice a diet specifically reduced in branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs is sufficient to improve glucose tolerance and body composition equivalently to a PR diet via metabolically distinct pathways. Our results highlight a critical role for dietary quality at the level of amino acids in the maintenance of metabolic health and suggest that diets specifically reduced in BCAAs, or pharmacological interventions in this pathway, may offer a translatable way to achieve many of the metabolic benefits of a PR diet.

  19. Development of new solvent-free microextraction techniques for the analysis of volatile organic compounds: application to the use of breath analysis as a toxicological tool for explosure analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Alonso Roura, Mònica

    2012-01-01

    Hippocrates predicted many years ago that breath could tell something related with our health. On his treaties, he indicated that when the body starts moving after sleeping, and breathe with more frequency, something hot and acid is expelled with air. It is possible to predict a disease from breath, but it has not been until recent years that last developments in breath analysis has allowed to detect compounds precisely and to associate the presence of these compounds to certain diseases. The...

  20. Health Blief Model-based intervention to improve nutritional behavior among elderly women

    OpenAIRE

    Iranagh, Jamileh Amirzadeh; Rahman, Hejar Abdul; Motalebi, Seyedeh Ameneh

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Nutrition is a determinant factor of health in elderly people. Independent living in elderly people can be maintained or enhanced by improvement of nutritional behavior. Hence, the present study was conducted to determine the impact of Health Belief Model (HBM)-based intervention on the nutritional behavior of elderly women. SUBJECTS/METHODS Cluster-random sampling was used to assess the sample of this clinical trial study. The participants of this study attended a 12-we...