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Sample records for breathing adapted radiotherapy

  1. Practical recommendations for breathing-adapted radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, L.; Giraud, P.; Rosenwald, J.C.; Dumas, J.L.; Lorchel, F.; Marre, D.; Dupont, S.; Varmenot, N.; Ginestet, C.; Caron, J.; Marchesi, V.; Ferreira, I.; Garcia, R.

    2007-01-01

    Respiration-gated radiotherapy offers a significant potential for improvement in the irradiation of tumor sites affected by respiratory motion such as lung, breast and liver tumors. An increased conformality of irradiation fields leading to decreased complications rates of organs at risk (lung, heart) is expected. Respiratory gating is in line with the need for improved precision required by radiotherapy techniques such as 3D conformal radiotherapy or intensity modulated radiotherapy. Reduction of respiratory motion can be achieved by using either breath-hold techniques or respiration synchronized gating techniques. Breath-hold techniques can be achieved with active techniques, in which airflow of the patient is temporarily blocked by a valve, or passive techniques, in which the patient voluntarily holds his/her breath. Synchronized gating techniques use external devices to predict the phase of the respiration cycle while the patient breaths freely. This work summarizes the different experiences of the centers of the STIC 2003 project. It describes the different techniques, gives an overview of the literature and proposes a practice based on our experience. (authors)

  2. Breathing adapted radiotherapy for breast cancer: comparison of free breathing gating with the breath-hold technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korreman, Stine Sofia; Pedersen, Anders N; Nøttrup, Trine Jakobi

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Adjuvant radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery for breast cancer implies a risk of late cardiac and pulmonary toxicity. This is the first study to evaluate cardiopulmonary dose sparing of breathing adapted radiotherapy (BART) using free breathing gating......, and to compare this respiratory technique with voluntary breath-hold. PATIENTS AND METHODS: 17 patients were CT-scanned during non-coached breathing manoeuvre including free breathing (FB), end-inspiration gating (IG), end-expiration gating (EG), deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) and end-expiration breath......-hold (EBH). The Varian Real-time Position Management system (RPM) was used to monitor respiratory movement and to gate the scanner. For each breathing phase, a population based internal margin (IM) was estimated based on average chest wall excursion, and incorporated into an individually optimised three...

  3. Breathing adapted radiotherapy: final clinic results of the program for the support to costly innovating techniques (Stic) of 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giraud, P.; Giraud, P.; Morvan, E.; Djadi-Prat, J.; Rosenwald, J.C.; Carrere, M.O.

    2010-01-01

    The authors report the comparison, from a clinic point of view, between breathing adapted conformational radiotherapy (BART) and conventional conformational radiotherapy, in the case of lung and breast cancers. The assessment comprised a clinic examination, a thoracic radiography, breathing functional tests, a thoracic scanography at different moments (3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months), and dosimetric criteria for tumour target volumes and the different thoracic organs at risk. Data have been collected among more than six hundred patients. Breathing adapted techniques allow acute and late toxicity to be reduced, notably for the lung, heart and oesophagus during a lung irradiation. They are less interesting for mammary irradiation, but could be important for a radiotherapy of the left breast. Short communication

  4. Reduction of cardiac and pulmonary complication probabilities after breathing adapted radiotherapy for breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korreman, Stine S; Pedersen, Anders N; Aarup, Lasse Rye

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: Substantial reductions of cardio-pulmonary radiation doses can be achieved using voluntary deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) or free breathing inspiration gating (IG) in radiotherapy after conserving surgery for breast cancer. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the radiobiological...... implications of such dosimetric benefits. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Patients from previously reported studies were pooled for a total of 33 patients. All patients underwent DIBH and free breathing (FB) scans, and 17 patients underwent an additional IG scan. Tangential conformal treatment plans covering...... voluntary DIBH and free breathing IG to reduce the risk of both cardiac mortality and pneumonitis for the common technique of adjuvant tangential breast irradiation....

  5. Clinical Introduction of a Novel Liquid Fiducial Marker for Breathing Adapted Radiotherapy of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rydhog, Jonas Scherman

    .g. the heart and the lungs. Breathing adaptation and fiducial markers are tools which can increase precision in lung cancer radiotherapy. The primary aim of this thesis was to evaluate a novel liquid fiducial marker in both a pre-clinical and a clinical setting. The marker was tested rigorously for visibility......, possible dose perturbation and volumetric changes. We found that the liquid fiducial marker was an excellent alternative to solid fiducial markers. It showed small dose perturbations in proton therapy, was volumetrically stable during several weeks of radiotherapy and functioned well as a surrogate...... for the tumour position in lung cancer patients. Furthermore, we evaluated the potential benefit of a breathing adaptation technique, where patients hold their breath during treatment delivery. We found that this technique reduced both tumour motion and doses to risk organs. Finally, we investigated...

  6. Breathing adapted radiotherapy: a 4D gating software for lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaidi Habib

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose Physiological respiratory motion of tumors growing in the lung can be corrected with respiratory gating when treated with radiotherapy (RT. The optimal respiratory phase for beam-on may be assessed with a respiratory phase optimizer (RPO, a 4D image processing software developed with this purpose. Methods and Materials Fourteen patients with lung cancer were included in the study. Every patient underwent a 4D-CT providing ten datasets of ten phases of the respiratory cycle (0-100% of the cycle. We defined two morphological parameters for comparison of 4D-CT images in different respiratory phases: tumor-volume to lung-volume ratio and tumor-to-spinal cord distance. The RPO automatized the calculations (200 per patient of these parameters for each phase of the respiratory cycle allowing to determine the optimal interval for RT. Results Lower lobe lung tumors not attached to the diaphragm presented with the largest motion with breathing. Maximum inspiration was considered the optimal phase for treatment in 4 patients (28.6%. In 7 patients (50%, however, the RPO showed a most favorable volumetric and spatial configuration in phases other than maximum inspiration. In 2 cases (14.4% the RPO showed no benefit from gating. This tool was not conclusive in only one case. Conclusions The RPO software presented in this study can help to determine the optimal respiratory phase for gated RT based on a few simple morphological parameters. Easy to apply in daily routine, it may be a useful tool for selecting patients who might benefit from breathing adapted RT.

  7. Breathing adapted radiotherapy of breast cancer: reduction of cardiac and pulmonary doses using voluntary inspiration breath-hold

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders N; Korreman, Stine; Nyström, Håkan

    2004-01-01

    of a monitored voluntary breath-hold technique for right-sided as well as for left-sided tumours. PATIENTS AND METHODS: After breast-conserving surgery, 16 patients were CT-scanned in distinct respiratory phases using the varian real-time position management system for the monitoring of respiratory...... anterioposterior chest wall excursion. Each patient underwent three scans: during free breathing (FB), voluntary expiration breath-hold (EBH) and voluntary deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH). For each scan, an optimised treatment plan was designed with conformal tangential fields encompassing the clinical target...... volume (CTV) of the breast and ipsilateral internal mammary nodes, and an anterior supraclavicular field. RESULTS: Breath-hold was well accepted by the patients, with a median duration of 24 s for both EBH and DIBH. The mean anterioposterior chest wall excursions were 2.5, 2.6 and 4.1 mm during FB, EBH...

  8. Adaptation requirements due to anatomical changes in free-breathing and deep-inspiration breath-hold for standard and dose-escalated radiotherapy of lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibolt, Patrik; Ottosson, Wiviann; Sjöström, David; Larsen, Christina; Behrens, Claus F

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy of lung cancer patients is subject to uncertainties related to heterogeneities, anatomical changes and breathing motion. Use of deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) can reduce the treated volume, potentially enabling dose-escalated (DE) treatments. This study was designed to investigate the need for adaptation due to anatomical changes, for both standard (ST) and DE plans in free-breathing (FB) and DIBH. The effect of tumor shrinkage (TS), pleural effusion (PE) and atelectasis was investigated for patients and for a CIRS thorax phantom. Sixteen patients were computed tomography (CT) imaged both in FB and DIBH. Anatomical changes were simulated by CT information editing and re-calculations, of both ST and DE plans, in the treatment planning system. PE was systematically simulated by adding fluid in the dorsal region of the lung and TS by reduction of the tumor volume. Phantom simulations resulted in maximum deviations in mean dose to the GTV-T (GTV-T) of -1% for 3 cm PE and centrally located tumor, and + 3% for TS from 5 cm to 1 cm diameter for an anterior tumor location. For the majority of the patients, simulated PE resulted in a decreasing GTV-T with increasing amount of fluid and increasing GTV-T for decreasing tumor volume. Maximum change in GTV-T of -3% (3 cm PE in FB for both ST and DE plans) and + 10% (2 cm TS in FB for DE plan) was observed. Large atelectasis reduction increased the GTV-T with 2% for FB and had no effect for DIBH. Phantom simulations provided potential adaptation action levels for PE and TS. For the more complex patient geometry, individual assessment of the dosimetric impact is recommended for both ST and DE plans in DIBH as well as in FB. However, DIBH was found to be superior over FB for DE plans, regarding robustness of GTV-T to TS.

  9. Comparative study and clinical implementation of two breathing-adapted radiotherapy techniques: dosimetric benefits for lung cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, L.; Giraud, P.; Rosenwald, J.C.; Servois, V.

    2006-01-01

    Breathing can lead to organ motions up to several centimeters. For radiotherapy of lung, these motions are generally taken into account by adding a specific margin around the target. Thus, treated volumes are often too large to allow for the high-dose values requested for local control. To manage respiratory motion, deep-inspiration breath-hold technique (DIBH) and gated radiotherapy are starting being used clinically. DIBH consists in asking the patient to perform breath-hold during the treatment and the image acquisition, DIBH level being measured by a spirometer. Gated radiotherapy consists in treating the patient at a certain phase of the free breathing. Linac is synchronized with the motion of a marker' located on the patient chest. Planning images are obtained by a four-dimensional CT (4D-CT) using the same marker. We have assessed the value of these two methods. For lung treatment, compared to a standard treatment, toxicity reduction was mainly due to the lung total volume increase.; It is therefore more significant for breath-hold approach. It is also due to the reduction of safety margins, which is similar for both methods. These two techniques, which have specific advantages and drawbacks, are used routinely at Curie Institute for a large proportion of lung patients, but also for some breast, liver or even Hodgkin disease treatments. (author)

  10. Adaptation requirements due to anatomical changes in free-breathing and deep-inspiration breath-hold for standard and dose-escalated radiotherapy of lung cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sibolt, Patrik; Ottosson, Wiviann; Sjöström, David

    2015-01-01

    to investigate the need for adaptation due to anatomical changes, for both standard (ST) and DE plans in free-breathing (FB) and DIBH. Material and methods. The effect of tumor shrinkage (TS), pleural effusion (PE) and atelectasis was investigated for patients and for a CIRS thorax phantom. Sixteen patients were...... computed tomography (CT) imaged both in FB and DIBH. Anatomical changes were simulated by CT information editing and re-calculations, of both ST and DE plans, in the treatment planning system. PE was systematically simulated by adding fl uid in the dorsal region of the lung and TS by reduction of the tumor...... GTV-T with increasing amount of fluid and increasing GTV-T for decreasing tumor volume. Maximum change in GTV-T of -3% (3 cm PE in FB for both ST and DE plans) and + 10% (2 cm TS in FB for DE plan) was observed. Large atelectasis reduction increased the GTV-T with 2% for FB...

  11. Thoracic radiotherapy and breath control: current prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reboul, F.; Mineur, L.; Paoli, J.B.; Bodez, V.; Oozeer, R.; Garcia, R.

    2002-01-01

    Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D CRT) is adversely affected by setup error and organ motion. In thoracic 3D CRT, breathing accounts for most of intra-fraction movements, thus impairing treatment quality. Breath control clearly exhibits dosimetric improvement compared to free breathing, leading to various techniques for gated treatments. We review benefits of different breath control methods -i.e. breath-holding or beam gating, with spirometric, isometric or X-ray respiration sensor- and argument the choice of expiration versus inspiration, with consideration to dosimetric concerns. All steps of 3D-CRT can be improved with breath control. Contouring of organs at risk (OAR) and target are easier and more accurate on breath controlled CT-scans. Inter- and intra-fraction target immobilisation allows smaller margins with better coverage. Lung outcome predictors (NTCP, Mean Dose, LV20, LV30) are improved with breath-control. In addition, inspiration breath control facilitates beam arrangement since it widens the distance between OAR and target, and leaves less lung normal tissue within the high dose region. Last, lung density, as of CT scan, is more accurate, improving dosimetry. Our institutions choice is to use spirometry driven, patient controlled high-inspiration breath-hold; this technique gives excellent immobilization results, with high reproducibility, yet it is easy to implement and costs little extra treatment time. Breath control, whatever technique is employed, proves superior to free breathing treatment when using 3D-CRT. Breath control should then be used whenever possible, and is probably mandatory for IMRT. (authors)

  12. Adaptive Motion Compensation in Radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Murphy, Martin J

    2011-01-01

    External-beam radiotherapy has long been challenged by the simple fact that patients can (and do) move during the delivery of radiation. Recent advances in imaging and beam delivery technologies have made the solution--adapting delivery to natural movement--a practical reality. Adaptive Motion Compensation in Radiotherapy provides the first detailed treatment of online interventional techniques for motion compensation radiotherapy. This authoritative book discusses: Each of the contributing elements of a motion-adaptive system, including target detection and tracking, beam adaptation, and pati

  13. Kidney motion during free breathing and breath hold for MR-guided radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stam, Mette K.; van Vulpen, Marco; Barendrecht, Maurits M.; Zonnenberg, Bernard A.; Intven, Martijn; Crijns, Sjoerd P. M.; Lagendijk, Jan J. W.; Raaymakers, Bas W.

    2013-04-01

    Current treatments for renal cell carcinoma have a high complication rate due to the invasiveness of the treatment. With the MRI-linac it may be possible to treat renal tumours non-invasively with high-precision radiotherapy. This is expected to reduce complications. To deliver a static dose distribution, radiation gating will be used. In this study the reproducibility and efficiency of free breathing gating and a breath hold treatment of the kidney was investigated. For 15 patients with a renal lesion the kidney motion during 2 min of free breathing and 10 consecutive expiration breath holds was studied with 2D cine MRI. The variability in kidney expiration position and treatment efficiency for gating windows of 1 to 20 mm was measured for both breathing patterns. Additionally the time trend in free breathing and the variation in expiration breath hold kidney position with baseline shift correction was determined. In 80% of the patients the variation in expiration position during free breathing is smaller than 2 mm. No clinically relevant time trends were detected. The variation in expiration breath hold is for all patients larger than the free breathing expiration variation. Gating on free breathing is, for gating windows of 1 to 5 mm more efficient than breath hold without baseline correction. When applying a baseline correction to the breath hold it increases the treatment efficiency. The kidney position is more reproducible in expiration free breathing than non-guided expiration breath hold. For small gating windows it is also more time efficient. Since free breathing also seems more comfortable for the patients it is the preferred breathing pattern for MRI-Linac treatments of the kidney.

  14. Kidney motion during free breathing and breath hold for MR-guided radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stam, Mette K; Van Vulpen, Marco; Intven, Martijn; Crijns, Sjoerd P M; Lagendijk, Jan J W; Raaymakers, Bas W; Barendrecht, Maurits M; Zonnenberg, Bernard A

    2013-01-01

    Current treatments for renal cell carcinoma have a high complication rate due to the invasiveness of the treatment. With the MRI-linac it may be possible to treat renal tumours non-invasively with high-precision radiotherapy. This is expected to reduce complications. To deliver a static dose distribution, radiation gating will be used. In this study the reproducibility and efficiency of free breathing gating and a breath hold treatment of the kidney was investigated. For 15 patients with a renal lesion the kidney motion during 2 min of free breathing and 10 consecutive expiration breath holds was studied with 2D cine MRI. The variability in kidney expiration position and treatment efficiency for gating windows of 1 to 20 mm was measured for both breathing patterns. Additionally the time trend in free breathing and the variation in expiration breath hold kidney position with baseline shift correction was determined. In 80% of the patients the variation in expiration position during free breathing is smaller than 2 mm. No clinically relevant time trends were detected. The variation in expiration breath hold is for all patients larger than the free breathing expiration variation. Gating on free breathing is, for gating windows of 1 to 5 mm more efficient than breath hold without baseline correction. When applying a baseline correction to the breath hold it increases the treatment efficiency. The kidney position is more reproducible in expiration free breathing than non-guided expiration breath hold. For small gating windows it is also more time efficient. Since free breathing also seems more comfortable for the patients it is the preferred breathing pattern for MRI-Linac treatments of the kidney. (paper)

  15. Thoracic radiotherapy and breath control: current prospects; Radiotherapie thoracique et controle de la respiration: perspectives actuelles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reboul, F.; Mineur, L.; Paoli, J.B.; Bodez, V.; Oozeer, R.; Garcia, R. [Institut Sainte-Catherine, 84 - Avignon (France)

    2002-11-01

    Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D CRT) is adversely affected by setup error and organ motion. In thoracic 3D CRT, breathing accounts for most of intra-fraction movements, thus impairing treatment quality. Breath control clearly exhibits dosimetric improvement compared to free breathing, leading to various techniques for gated treatments. We review benefits of different breath control methods -i.e. breath-holding or beam gating, with spirometric, isometric or X-ray respiration sensor- and argument the choice of expiration versus inspiration, with consideration to dosimetric concerns. All steps of 3D-CRT can be improved with breath control. Contouring of organs at risk (OAR) and target are easier and more accurate on breath controlled CT-scans. Inter- and intra-fraction target immobilisation allows smaller margins with better coverage. Lung outcome predictors (NTCP, Mean Dose, LV20, LV30) are improved with breath-control. In addition, inspiration breath control facilitates beam arrangement since it widens the distance between OAR and target, and leaves less lung normal tissue within the high dose region. Last, lung density, as of CT scan, is more accurate, improving dosimetry. Our institutions choice is to use spirometry driven, patient controlled high-inspiration breath-hold; this technique gives excellent immobilization results, with high reproducibility, yet it is easy to implement and costs little extra treatment time. Breath control, whatever technique is employed, proves superior to free breathing treatment when using 3D-CRT. Breath control should then be used whenever possible, and is probably mandatory for IMRT. (authors)

  16. Adapting radiotherapy to hypoxic tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malinen, Eirik; Soevik, Aste; Hristov, Dimitre; Bruland, Oeyvind S; Olsen, Dag Rune

    2006-01-01

    In the current work, the concepts of biologically adapted radiotherapy of hypoxic tumours in a framework encompassing functional tumour imaging, tumour control predictions, inverse treatment planning and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) were presented. Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCEMRI) of a spontaneous sarcoma in the nasal region of a dog was employed. The tracer concentration in the tumour was assumed related to the oxygen tension and compared to Eppendorf histograph measurements. Based on the pO 2 -related images derived from the MR analysis, the tumour was divided into four compartments by a segmentation procedure. DICOM structure sets for IMRT planning could be derived thereof. In order to display the possible advantages of non-uniform tumour doses, dose redistribution among the four tumour compartments was introduced. The dose redistribution was constrained by keeping the average dose to the tumour equal to a conventional target dose. The compartmental doses yielding optimum tumour control probability (TCP) were used as input in an inverse planning system, where the planning basis was the pO 2 -related tumour images from the MR analysis. Uniform (conventional) and non-uniform IMRT plans were scored both physically and biologically. The consequences of random and systematic errors in the compartmental images were evaluated. The normalized frequency distributions of the tracer concentration and the pO 2 Eppendorf measurements were not significantly different. 28% of the tumour had, according to the MR analysis, pO 2 values of less than 5 mm Hg. The optimum TCP following a non-uniform dose prescription was about four times higher than that following a uniform dose prescription. The non-uniform IMRT dose distribution resulting from the inverse planning gave a three times higher TCP than that of the uniform distribution. The TCP and the dose-based plan quality depended on IMRT parameters defined in the inverse planning procedure

  17. Adapting radiotherapy to hypoxic tumours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinen, Eirik; Søvik, Åste; Hristov, Dimitre; Bruland, Øyvind S.; Rune Olsen, Dag

    2006-10-01

    In the current work, the concepts of biologically adapted radiotherapy of hypoxic tumours in a framework encompassing functional tumour imaging, tumour control predictions, inverse treatment planning and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) were presented. Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCEMRI) of a spontaneous sarcoma in the nasal region of a dog was employed. The tracer concentration in the tumour was assumed related to the oxygen tension and compared to Eppendorf histograph measurements. Based on the pO2-related images derived from the MR analysis, the tumour was divided into four compartments by a segmentation procedure. DICOM structure sets for IMRT planning could be derived thereof. In order to display the possible advantages of non-uniform tumour doses, dose redistribution among the four tumour compartments was introduced. The dose redistribution was constrained by keeping the average dose to the tumour equal to a conventional target dose. The compartmental doses yielding optimum tumour control probability (TCP) were used as input in an inverse planning system, where the planning basis was the pO2-related tumour images from the MR analysis. Uniform (conventional) and non-uniform IMRT plans were scored both physically and biologically. The consequences of random and systematic errors in the compartmental images were evaluated. The normalized frequency distributions of the tracer concentration and the pO2 Eppendorf measurements were not significantly different. 28% of the tumour had, according to the MR analysis, pO2 values of less than 5 mm Hg. The optimum TCP following a non-uniform dose prescription was about four times higher than that following a uniform dose prescription. The non-uniform IMRT dose distribution resulting from the inverse planning gave a three times higher TCP than that of the uniform distribution. The TCP and the dose-based plan quality depended on IMRT parameters defined in the inverse planning procedure (fields

  18. Intra- and interfraction breathing variations during curative radiotherapy for lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhler Nøttrup, Trine; Korreman, Stine Sofia; Pedersen, Anders Navrsted

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: This study aimed at quantifying the breathing variations among lung cancer patients over full courses of fractionated radiotherapy. The intention was to relate these variations to the margins assigned to lung tumours, to account for respiratory motion, in fractionated...... radiotherapy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eleven lung cancer patients were included in the study. The patients' chest wall motions were monitored as a surrogate measure for breathing motion during each fraction of radiotherapy by use of an external optical marker. The exhale level variations were evaluated...... with respect to exhale points and fraction-baseline, defined for intra- and interfraction variations respectively. The breathing amplitude was evaluated as breathing cycle amplitudes and fraction-max-amplitudes defined for intra- and interfraction breathing, respectively. RESULTS: The breathing variations over...

  19. Voluntary Breath-hold Technique for Reducing Heart Dose in Left Breast Radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Frederick R.; Colgan, Ruth M.; Donovan, Ellen M.; Carr, Karen; Landeg, Steven; Clements, Nicola; McNair, Helen A.; Locke, Imogen; Evans, Philip M.; Haviland, Joanne S.; Yarnold, John R.; Kirby, Anna M.

    2014-01-01

    Breath-holding techniques reduce the amount of radiation received by cardiac structures during tangential-field left breast radiotherapy. With these techniques, patients hold their breath while radiotherapy is delivered, pushing the heart down and away from the radiotherapy field. Despite clear dosimetric benefits, these techniques are not yet in widespread use. One reason for this is that commercially available solutions require specialist equipment, necessitating not only significant capital investment, but often also incurring ongoing costs such as a need for daily disposable mouthpieces. The voluntary breath-hold technique described here does not require any additional specialist equipment. All breath-holding techniques require a surrogate to monitor breath-hold consistency and whether breath-hold is maintained. Voluntary breath-hold uses the distance moved by the anterior and lateral reference marks (tattoos) away from the treatment room lasers in breath-hold to monitor consistency at CT-planning and treatment setup. Light fields are then used to monitor breath-hold consistency prior to and during radiotherapy delivery. PMID:25046661

  20. Feasibility of breathing-adapted PET/CT imaging for radiation therapy of Hodgkin lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aznar, M C; Andersen, Flemming; Berthelsen, A K

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Respiration can induce artifacts in positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) images leading to uncertainties in tumour volume, location and uptake quantification. Respiratory gating for PET images is now established but is not directly translatable to a radiotherapy setup....... in PET/CT images. These results suggest that advanced therapies (such as SUV-based dose painting) will likely require breathing-adapted PET images and that the relevant SUV thresholds are yet to be investigated....

  1. Feasibility of breathing-adapted PET/CT imaging for radiation therapy of Hodgkin lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aznar, M C; Andersen, Flemming; Berthelsen, A K

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Respiration can induce artifacts in positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) images leading to uncertainties in tumour volume, location and uptake quantification. Respiratory gating for PET images is now established but is not directly translatable to a radiotherapy setup....... uptake in PET/CT images. These results suggest that advanced therapies (such as SUV-based dose painting) will likely require breathing-adapted PET images and that the relevant SUV thresholds are yet to be investigated....

  2. Image-guided and adaptive radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louvel, G.; Chajon, E.; Henry, O.; Cazoulat, G.; Le Maitre, A.; Simon, A.; Bensadoun, R.J.; Crevoisier, R. de

    2012-01-01

    Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) aims to take into account anatomical variations occurring during irradiation by visualization of anatomical structures. It may consist of a rigid registration of the tumour by moving the patient, in case of prostatic irradiation for example. IGRT associated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is strongly recommended when high-dose is delivered in the prostate, where it seems to reduce rectal and bladder toxicity. In case of significant anatomical deformations, as in head and neck tumours (tumour shrinking and decrease in volume of the salivary glands), re-planning appears to be necessary, corresponding to the adaptive radiotherapy. This should ideally be 'monitored' and possibly triggered based on a calculation of cumulative dose, session after session, compared to the initial planning dose, corresponding to the concept of dose-guided adaptive radiotherapy. The creation of 'planning libraries' based on predictable organ positions (as in cervical cancer) is another way of adaptive radiotherapy. All of these strategies still appear very complex and expensive and therefore require stringent validation before being routinely applied. (authors)

  3. Mean heart dose variation over a course of breath-holding breast cancer radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunkerley, Nicolle; Bartlett, Frederick R; Kirby, Anna M; Evans, Philip M; Donovan, Ellen M

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of the work was to estimate the dose received by the heart throughout a course of breath-holding breast radiotherapy. 113 cone-beam CT (CBCT) scans were acquired for 20 patients treated within the HeartSpare 1A study, in which both an active breathing control (ABC) device and a voluntary breath-hold (VBH) method were used. Predicted mean heart doses were obtained from treatment plans. CBCT scans were imported into a treatment planning system, heart outlines defined, images registered to the CT planning scan and mean heart dose recorded. Two observers outlined two cases three times each to assess interobserver and intraobserver variation. There were no statistically significant differences between ABC and VBH heart dose data from CT planning scans, or in the CBCT-based estimates of heart dose, and no effect from the order of the breath-hold method. Variation in mean heart dose per fraction over the three imaged fractions was breath-holding radiotherapy and was well predicted by the planning system. Advances in knowledge: Mean heart dose was not adversely affected by fraction-to-fraction variations throughout a course of heart-sparing radiotherapy using two well-established breath-holding methods.

  4. Assessing and ensuring patient safety during breath-holding for radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkes, M J; Green, S; Stevens, A M; Clutton-Brock, T H

    2014-11-01

    While there is recent interest in using repeated deep inspiratory breath-holds, or prolonged single breath-holds, to improve radiotherapy delivery, breath-holding has risks. There are no published guidelines for monitoring patient safety, and there is little clinical awareness of the pronounced blood pressure rise and the potential for gradual asphyxia that occur during breath-holding. We describe the blood pressure rise during deep inspiratory breath-holding with air and test whether it can be abolished simply by pre-oxygenation and hypocapnia. We measured blood pressure, oxygen saturation (SpO2) and heart rate in 12 healthy, untrained subjects performing breath-holds. Even for deep inspiratory breath-holds with air, the blood pressure rose progressively (e.g. mean systolic pressure rose from 133 ± 5 to 175 ± 8 mmHg at breakpoint, p breath-hold duration and prevented the development of asphyxia but failed to abolish the pressure rise. The pressure rise was not a function of breath-hold duration and was not signalled by any fall in heart rate (remaining at resting levels of 72 ± 2 beats per minute). Colleagues should be aware of the progressive blood pressure rise during deep inspiratory breath-holding that so far is not easily prevented. In breast cancer patients scheduled for breath-holds, we recommend routine screening for heart, cardiovascular, renal and cerebrovascular disease, routine monitoring of patient blood pressure and SpO2 during breath-holding and requesting patients to stop if systolic pressure rises consistently >180 mmHg and or SpO2 falls breath-holds, or prolonged single breath-holding techniques, to improve radiotherapy delivery. But there appears to be no clinical awareness of the risks to patients from breath-holding. We demonstrate the progressive blood pressure rise during deep inspiratory breath-holds with air, which we show cannot be prevented by the simple expedient of pre-oxygenation and hypocapnia. We propose patient

  5. Intra- and interfraction breathing variations during curative radiotherapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juhler Nottrup, Trine; Korreman, Stine Sofia; Pedersen, Anders Navrsted; Aarup, Lasse Rye; Nystroem, Hakan; Olsen, Mikael; Specht, Lena

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: This study aimed at quantifying the breathing variations among lung cancer patients over full courses of fractionated radiotherapy. The intention was to relate these variations to the margins assigned to lung tumours, to account for respiratory motion, in fractionated radiotherapy. Materials and methods: Eleven lung cancer patients were included in the study. The patients' chest wall motions were monitored as a surrogate measure for breathing motion during each fraction of radiotherapy by use of an external optical marker. The exhale level variations were evaluated with respect to exhale points and fraction-baseline, defined for intra- and interfraction variations respectively. The breathing amplitude was evaluated as breathing cycle amplitudes and fraction-max-amplitudes defined for intra- and interfraction breathing, respectively. Results: The breathing variations over a full treatment course, including both intra- and interfraction variations, were 15.2 mm (median over the patient population), range 5.5-26.7 mm, with the variations in exhale level as the major contributing factor. The median interfraction span in exhale level was 14.8 mm, whereas the median fraction-max-amplitude was 6.1 mm (median of patient individual SD 1.4). The median intrafraction span in exhale level was 1.6 mm, and the median breathing cycle amplitude was 4.0 mm (median of patient individual SD 1.4). Conclusions: The variations in externally measured exhale levels are larger than variations in breathing amplitude. The interfraction variations in exhale level are in general are up to 10 times larger than intrafraction variations. Margins to account for respiratory motion cannot safely be based on one planning session, especially not if relying on measuring external marker motion. Margins for lung tumours should include interfraction variations in breathing

  6. Adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system for breath phase detection and breath cycle segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaniappan, Rajkumar; Sundaraj, Kenneth; Sundaraj, Sebastian

    2017-07-01

    The monitoring of the respiratory rate is vital in several medical conditions, including sleep apnea because patients with sleep apnea exhibit an irregular respiratory rate compared with controls. Therefore, monitoring the respiratory rate by detecting the different breath phases is crucial. This study aimed to segment the breath cycles from pulmonary acoustic signals using the newly developed adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) based on breath phase detection and to subsequently evaluate the performance of the system. The normalised averaged power spectral density for each segment was fuzzified, and a set of fuzzy rules was formulated. The ANFIS was developed to detect the breath phases and subsequently perform breath cycle segmentation. To evaluate the performance of the proposed method, the root mean square error (RMSE) and correlation coefficient values were calculated and analysed, and the proposed method was then validated using data collected at KIMS Hospital and the RALE standard dataset. The analysis of the correlation coefficient of the neuro-fuzzy model, which was performed to evaluate its performance, revealed a correlation strength of r = 0.9925, and the RMSE for the neuro-fuzzy model was found to equal 0.0069. The proposed neuro-fuzzy model performs better than the fuzzy inference system (FIS) in detecting the breath phases and segmenting the breath cycles and requires less rules than FIS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. [Benefits of breathing-adapted radiation therapy for breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vourch, S; Miglierini, P; Miranda, O; Malhaire, J-P; Boussion, N; Pradier, O; Schick, U

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare free-breathing radiotherapy, end-expiration gating and end-inspiration gating for left breast cancer, with respect to the target volume coverage and dose to organs at risk. Sixteen patients underwent 3D and 4D simulation CT. For each patient, five dosimetric plans were compared: free breathing, end-inspiration gating, end-expiration gating, and two optimised plans with a 3mm reduction of the posterior field edge to create optimised end-inspiration and end-expiration plans. Dose-volume parameters, including planning target volume coverage and dose to lung, heart and left anterior descending coronary artery were analysed. Planning target volume coverage was adequate and similar in the five dosimetric plans (P=0.49). Significant advantage was found for end-inspiration gating in sparing the ipsilateral lung, heart and left anterior descending coronary artery compared to free-breathing 3D radiotherapy. Optimised end-inspiration was even more favourable than end-inspiration gating (Pradiation therapy allowed for dose reduction to organs at risk (left lung, heart and left anterior descending coronary artery), while keeping the same planning target volume coverage. Therefore it can be considered as an interesting option for left breast cancer radiation treatment. Copyright © 2015 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Risk-adapted targeted intraoperative radiotherapy versus whole-breast radiotherapy for breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaidya, Jayant S; Wenz, Frederik; Bulsara, Max

    2014-01-01

    The TARGIT-A trial compared risk-adapted radiotherapy using single-dose targeted intraoperative radiotherapy (TARGIT) versus fractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for breast cancer. We report 5-year results for local recurrence and the first analysis of overall survival....

  9. Introduction of audio gating to further reduce organ motion in breathing synchronized radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, H. Dale; Wang Lili

    2002-01-01

    With breathing synchronized radiotherapy (BSRT), a voltage signal derived from an organ displacement detector is usually displayed on the vertical axis whereas the elapsed time is shown on the horizontal axis. The voltage gate window is set on the breathing voltage signal. Whenever the breathing signal falls between the two gate levels, a gate pulse is produced to enable the treatment machine. In this paper a new gating mechanism, audio (or time-sequence) gating, is introduced and is integrated into the existing voltage gating system. The audio gating takes advantage of the repetitive nature of the breathing signal when repetitive audio instruction is given to the patient. The audio gating is aimed at removing the regions of sharp rises and falls in the breathing signal that cannot be removed by the voltage gating. When the breathing signal falls between voltage gate levels as well as between audio-gate levels, the voltage- and audio-gated radiotherapy (ART) system will generate an AND gate pulse. When this gate pulse is received by a linear accelerator, the linear accelerator becomes 'enabled' for beam delivery and will deliver the beam when all other interlocks are removed. This paper describes a new gating mechanism and a method of recording beam-on signal, both of which are, configured into a laptop computer. The paper also presents evidence of some clinical advantages achieved with the ART system

  10. Radiotherapy of lung cancer: the inspiration breath hold with a spirometric monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, R.; Oozeer, R.; Le Thanh, H.; Chastel, D.; Doyen, J.C.; Chauvet, B.; Reboul, F.

    2002-01-01

    A CT acquisition during a free breathing examination generates images of poor quality. It creates an uncertainty on the reconstructed gross tumour volume and dose distribution. The aim of this study is to test the feasibility of a breath hold method applied in all preparation and treatment days. Five patients received a thoracic radiotherapy with the benefit of this procedure. The breathing of the patient was measured with a spirometer. The patient was coached to reproduce a constant level of breath-hold in a deep inspiration. Video glasses helped the patients to fix the breath-hold at the reference level. The patients followed the coaching during preparation and treatment, without any difficulty. The better quality of the CT reconstructed images resulted in an easier contouring. No movements of the gross tumour volume lead to a better coverage. The deep breath hold decreased the volume of irradiated lung. This method improves the reproducibility of the thoracic irradiation. The decrease of irradiated lung volume offers prospects in dose escalation and intensity modulation radiotherapy. (authors)

  11. Anatomic and Pathologic Variability During Radiotherapy for a Hybrid Active Breath-Hold Gating Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glide-Hurst, Carri K.; Gopan, Ellen; Hugo, Geoffrey D.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate intra- and interfraction variability of tumor and lung volume and position using a hybrid active breath-hold gating technique. Methods and Materials: A total of 159 repeat normal inspiration active breath-hold CTs were acquired weekly during radiotherapy for 9 lung cancer patients (12-21 scans per patient). A physician delineated the gross tumor volume (GTV), lungs, and spinal cord on the first breath-hold CT, and contours were propagated semiautomatically. Intra- and interfraction variability of tumor and lung position and volume were evaluated. Tumor centroid and border variability were quantified. Results: On average, intrafraction variability of lung and GTV centroid position was 0.1). Increases in free-breathing tidal volume were associated with increases in breath-hold ipsilateral lung volume (p < 0.05). Conclusions: The breath-hold technique was reproducible within 2 mm during each fraction. Interfraction variability of GTV position and shape was substantial because of tumor volume and breath-hold lung volume change during therapy. These results support the feasibility of a hybrid breath-hold gating technique and suggest that online image guidance would be beneficial.

  12. Dosimetric comparison of moderate deep inspiration breath-hold and free-breathing intensity-modulated radiotherapy for left-sided breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, F; Wu, S; Zhou, J; Li, F; Sun, J; Lin, Q; Lin, H; Guan, X; He, Z

    2015-05-01

    This study determined the dosimetric comparison of moderate deep inspiration breath-hold using active breathing control and free-breathing intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) after breast-conserving surgery for left-sided breast cancer. Thirty-one patients were enrolled. One free breathe and two moderate deep inspiration breath-hold images were obtained. A field-in-field-IMRT free-breathing plan and two field-in-field-IMRT moderate deep inspiration breath-holding plans were compared in the dosimetry to target volume coverage of the glandular breast tissue and organs at risks for each patient. The breath-holding time under moderate deep inspiration extended significantly after breathing training (Pinspiration breath-holding in the target volume coverage. The volume of the ipsilateral lung in the free-breathing technique were significantly smaller than the moderate deep inspiration breath-holding techniques (Pinspiration breath-holding plans. There were no significant differences in target volume coverage between the three plans for the field-in-field-IMRT (all P>0.05). The dose to ipsilateral lung, coronary artery and heart in the field-in-field-IMRT were significantly lower for the free-breathing plan than for the two moderate deep inspiration breath-holding plans (all Pinspiration breath-holding plans. The whole-breast field-in-field-IMRT under moderate deep inspiration breath-hold with active breathing control after breast-conserving surgery in left-sided breast cancer can reduce the irradiation volume and dose to organs at risks. There are no significant differences between various moderate deep inspiration breath-holding states in the dosimetry of irradiation to the field-in-field-IMRT target volume coverage and organs at risks. Copyright © 2015 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Safely prolonging single breath-holds to >5 min in patients with cancer; feasibility and applications for radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Stuart; Stevens, Andrea M; Parveen, Sophia; Stephens, Rebecca; Clutton-Brock, Thomas H

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Multiple, short and deep inspiratory breath-holds with air of approximately 20 s are now used in radiotherapy to reduce the influence of ventilatory motion and damage to healthy tissue. There may be further clinical advantages in delivering each treatment session in only one single, prolonged breath-hold. We have previously developed techniques enabling healthy subjects to breath-hold for 7 min. Here, we demonstrate their successful application in patients with cancer. Methods: 15 patients aged 37–74 years undergoing radiotherapy for breast cancer were trained to breath-hold safely with pre-oxygenation and mechanically induced hypocapnia under simulated radiotherapy treatment conditions. Results: The mean breath-hold duration was 5.3 ± 0.2 min. At breakpoint, all patients were normocapnic and normoxic [mean end-tidal partial pressure of carbon dioxide was 36 ± 1 standard error millimetre of mercury, (mmHg) and mean oxygen saturation was 100 ± 0 standard error %]. None were distressed, nor had gasping, dizziness or disturbed breathing in the post-breath-hold period. Mean blood pressure had risen significantly from 125 ± 3 to 166 ± 4 mmHg at breakpoint (without heart rate falling), but normalized within approximately 20 s of the breakpoint. During breath-holding, the mean linear anteroposterior displacement slope of the L breast marker was radiotherapy treatment conditions for longer than the typical beam-on time of a single fraction. We discuss the important applications of this technique for radiotherapy. Advances in knowledge: We demonstrate for the first time a technique enabling patients with cancer to deliver safely a single prolonged breath-hold of >5 min (10 times longer than currently used in radiotherapy practice), under simulated radiotherapy treatment conditions. PMID:27168468

  14. Voluntary breath-holding for breast cancer radiotherapy is consistent and stable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colgan, Ruth; James, Matthew; Bartlett, Frederick R; Kirby, Anna M; Donovan, Ellen M

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate breath-hold stability and constancy for a voluntary breath-hold (VBH) technique in a retrospective analysis. Movie loop sequences of electronic portal image data from multiple breath holds in a cohort of 19 patients were used to assess within and between breath-hold stability. In vivo dosimetry data based on electronic portal imaging (EPI) were analysed for 31 VBH patients plus a cohort of free-breathing (FB) patients to provide a reference. A phantom experiment simulated the impact on dose of FB, breath hold and unplanned release of breath hold. 165/174 (93%) movie loop data sets had no detectable displacement. For the remaining 12, median displacement = 1.5 mm and maximum displacement = 3 mm (one patient on one fraction). In vivo dosimetry data analysis showed a median dose difference measured to planned of -0.2% (VBH) and -0.1% (FB). Dose distribution evaluation (γ) pass rates were 84% (VBH) and 91% (FB) including the lung region; 93% and 96% with a lung override. Unplanned release of phantom breath-hold position changed median dose by ≤1% and degraded γ pass rates to 79-62%. Failing regions were mostly in the periphery of the treated volume. The data confirmed that multiple VBHs using visual monitoring are stable; in vivo dose verification via EPI was within expected and acceptable levels. These data provide further reassurance that VBH is a safe technique for cardiac sparing breast radiotherapy and support its rapid, widespread implementation.

  15. Online Adaptive Replanning Method for Prostate Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahunbay, Ergun E.; Peng Cheng; Holmes, Shannon; Godley, Andrew; Lawton, Colleen; Li, X. Allen

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To report the application of an adaptive replanning technique for prostate cancer radiotherapy (RT), consisting of two steps: (1) segment aperture morphing (SAM), and (2) segment weight optimization (SWO), to account for interfraction variations. Methods and Materials: The new 'SAM+SWO' scheme was retroactively applied to the daily CT images acquired for 10 prostate cancer patients on a linear accelerator and CT-on-Rails combination during the course of RT. Doses generated by the SAM+SWO scheme based on the daily CT images were compared with doses generated after patient repositioning using the current planning target volume (PTV) margin (5 mm, 3 mm toward rectum) and a reduced margin (2 mm), along with full reoptimization scans based on the daily CT images to evaluate dosimetry benefits. Results: For all cases studied, the online replanning method provided significantly better target coverage when compared with repositioning with reduced PTV (13% increase in minimum prostate dose) and improved organ sparing when compared with repositioning with regular PTV (13% decrease in the generalized equivalent uniform dose of rectum). The time required to complete the online replanning process was 6 ± 2 minutes. Conclusion: The proposed online replanning method can be used to account for interfraction variations for prostate RT with a practically acceptable time frame (5-10 min) and with significant dosimetric benefits. On the basis of this study, the developed online replanning scheme is being implemented in the clinic for prostate RT.

  16. Automated Image-Based Procedures for Adaptive Radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, Troels

    Fractionated radiotherapy for cancer treatment is a field of constant innovation. Developments in dose delivery techniques have made it possible to precisely direct ionizing radiation at complicated targets. In order to further increase tumour control probability (TCP) and decrease normal...... to encourage bone rigidity and local tissue volume change only in the gross tumour volume and the lungs. This is highly relevant in adaptive radiotherapy when modelling significant tumour volume changes. - It is described how cone beam CT reconstruction can be modelled as a deformation of a planning CT scan...... be employed for contour propagation in adaptive radiotherapy. - MRI-radiotherapy devices have the potential to offer near real-time intrafraction imaging without any additional ionising radiation. It is detailed how the use of multiple, orthogonal slices can form the basis for reliable 3D soft tissue tracking....

  17. The reproducibility of organ position using active breathing control (ABC) during liver radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, Laura A.; Brock, Kristy K.; Kazanjian, Sahira; Fitch, Dwight; McGinn, Cornelius J.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Haken, Randall K. ten; Balter, James

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the intrafraction and interfraction reproducibility of liver immobilization using active breathing control (ABC). Methods and Materials: Patients with unresectable intrahepatic tumors who could comfortably hold their breath for at least 20 s were treated with focal liver radiation using ABC for liver immobilization. Fluoroscopy was used to measure any potential motion during ABC breath holds. Preceding each radiotherapy fraction, with the patient setup in the nominal treatment position using ABC, orthogonal radiographs were taken using room-mounted diagnostic X-ray tubes and a digital imager. The radiographs were compared to reference images using a 2D alignment tool. The treatment table was moved to produce acceptable setup, and repeat orthogonal verification images were obtained. The positions of the diaphragm and the liver (assessed by localization of implanted radiopaque intra-arterial microcoils) relative to the skeleton were subsequently analyzed. The intrafraction reproducibility (from repeat radiographs obtained within the time period of one fraction before treatment) and interfraction reproducibility (from comparisons of the first radiograph for each treatment with a reference radiograph) of the diaphragm and the hepatic microcoil positions relative to the skeleton with repeat breath holds using ABC were then measured. Caudal-cranial (CC), anterior-posterior (AP), and medial-lateral (ML) reproducibility of the hepatic microcoils relative to the skeleton were also determined from three-dimensional alignment of repeat CT scans obtained in the treatment position. Results: A total of 262 fractions of radiation were delivered using ABC breath holds in 8 patients. No motion of the diaphragm or hepatic microcoils was observed on fluoroscopy during ABC breath holds. From analyses of 158 sets of positioning radiographs, the average intrafraction CC reproducibility (σ) of the diaphragm and hepatic microcoil position relative to the skeleton

  18. Reproducibility of organ position using voluntary breath-hold method with spirometer for extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Tomoki; Hirokawa, Yutaka; Murakami, Yuji; Tsujimura, Masatsugu; Nakashima, Tateo; Ohno, Yoshimi; Kenjo, Masahiro; Kaneyasu, Yuko; Wadasaki, Koichi; Ito, Katsuhide

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate in healthy volunteers the reproducibility of organ position using a voluntary breath-hold method with a spirometer and the feasibility of this method for extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy in a clinical setting. Methods and materials: For this study, 5 healthy volunteers were enrolled. After training sessions, they held their breath at the end-inspiration and the end-expiration phase under spirometer-based monitoring. Computed tomography (CT) scans were performed twice at each respiratory phase, with a 10-min interval, on 2 separate days. The total number of CT scans was four at each respiratory phase. After CT volume data were transferred to a three-dimensional treatment-planning system, digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) were calculated for anterior-posterior and left-right beams. Verification was performed with DRRs relative to the diaphragm position, bony landmarks, and the isocenter in each healthy volunteer at each respiratory phase. To evaluate intrafraction reproducibility, we measured the distance between diaphragm position and bony landmarks. To evaluate interfraction reproducibility, we measured the distance between diaphragm position and the isocenter. Reproducibility and setup error were defined as the average value of the differences between each DRR with regard to the first DRR. Results: Intrafraction reproducibility of the caudal-cranial direction was 4.0 ± 3.5 mm at the end-inspiration phase and 2.2 ± 2.0 mm at the end-expiration phase. Interfraction reproducibility of the caudal-cranial direction was 5.1 ± 4.8 mm at the end-inspiration phase and 2.1 ± 1.8 mm at the end-expiration phase. The end-expiration phase was more stable than the end-inspiration phase. Conclusions: The voluntary breath-hold method with a spirometer is feasible, with relatively good reproducibility. We are encouraged about the use of this technique clinically for extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy

  19. Monte Carlo calculations support organ sparing in Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold intensity-modulated radiotherapy for locally advanced lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosson, Wiviann; Sibolt, Patrik; Larsen, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose: Studies indicate that Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold (DIBH) is advantageous over Free-Breathing (FB) for locally advanced lung cancer radiotherapy. However, these studies were based on simplified dose calculation algorithms, potentially critical due to the heterogeneous nature...... than breathing technique. © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved....

  20. The Use of the Active Breathing Coordinator Throughout Radical Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brock, Juliet; McNair, Helen A.; Panakis, Niki; Symonds-Tayler, Richard; Evans, Phil M.; Brada, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To assess feasibility and reproducibility of an Active Breathing Coordinator (ABC) used throughout radical radiotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer, and compare lung dosimetric parameters between free-breathing and ABC plans. Methods and Materials: A total of 18 patients, recruited into an approved study, had free-breathing and ABC breath-hold treatment plans generated. Lung volume, the percentage volume of lung treated to a dose of ≥20 Gy (V 20 ), and mean lung dose (MLD) were compared. Treatment (64 Gy in 32 fractions, 5 days/week) was delivered in breath-hold. Repeat breath-hold computed tomography scans were used to assess change in gross tumor volume (GTV) size and position. Setup error was also measured and potential GTV-planning target volume (PTV) margins calculated. Results: Seventeen of 18 patients completed radiotherapy using ABC daily. Intrafraction tumor position was consistent, but interfraction variation had mean (range) values of 5.1 (0-25), 3.6 (0-9.7), and 3.5 (0-16.6) mm in the superoinferior (SI), right-left (RL), and anteroposterior (AP) directions, respectively. Tumor moved partially outside the PTV in 5 patients. Mean reduction in GTV from planning to end of treatment was 25% (p = 0.003). Potentially required PTV margins were 18.1, 11.9, and 11.9 mm in SI, RL, and AP directions. ABC reduced V 20 by 13% (p = 0.0001), V 13 by 12% (p = 0.001), and MLD by 13% (p < 0.001) compared with free-breathing; lung volume increased by 41% (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Clinically significant movements of GTV were seen during radiotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer using ABC. Image guidance is recommended with ABC. The use of ABC can reduce dose volume parameters determining lung toxicity, and might allow for equitoxic radiotherapy dose escalation.

  1. Comparison of intensity-modulated radiotherapy, adaptive radiotherapy, proton radiotherapy, and adaptive proton radiotherapy for treatment of locally advanced head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simone, Charles B.; Ly, David; Dan, Tu D.; Ondos, John; Ning, Holly; Belard, Arnaud; O’Connell, John; Miller, Robert W.; Simone, Nicole L.

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose: Various radiotherapy planning methods for locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) have been proposed to decrease normal tissue toxicity. We compare IMRT, adaptive IMRT, proton therapy (IMPT), and adaptive IMPT for SCCHN. Materials and methods: Initial and re-simulation CT images from 10 consecutive patients with SCCHN were used to quantify dosimetric differences between photon and proton therapy. Contouring was performed on both CTs, and plans (n = 40 plans) and dose–volume histograms were generated. Results: The mean GTV volume decreased 53.4% with re-simulation. All plans provided comparable PTV coverage. Compared with IMRT, adaptive IMRT significantly reduced the maximum dose to the mandible (p = 0.020) and mean doses to the contralateral parotid gland (p = 0.049) and larynx (p = 0.049). Compared with IMRT and adaptive IMRT, IMPT significantly lowered the maximum doses to the spinal cord (p < 0.002 for both) and brainstem (p < 0.002 for both) and mean doses to the larynx (p < 0.002 for both) and ipsilateral (p = 0.004 IMRT, p = 0.050 adaptive) and contralateral (p < 0.002 IMRT, p = 0.010 adaptive) parotid glands. Adaptive IMPT significantly reduced doses to all critical structures compared with IMRT and adaptive IMRT and several critical structures compared with non-adaptive IMPT. Conclusions: Although adaptive IMRT reduced dose to several normal structures compared with standard IMRT, non-adaptive proton therapy had a more favorable dosimetric profile than IMRT or adaptive IMRT and may obviate the need for adaptive planning. Protons allowed significant sparing of the spinal cord, parotid glands, larynx, and brainstem and should be considered for SCCHN to decrease normal tissue toxicity while still providing optimal tumor coverage.

  2. Adaptive radiotherapy for invasive bladder cancer: a feasibility study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pos, Floris J.; Hulshof, Maarten; Lebesque, Joos; Lotz, Heidi; van Tienhoven, Geertjan; Moonen, Luc; Remeijer, Peter

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of adaptive radiotherapy (ART) in combination with a partial bladder irradiation. Twenty-one patients with solitary T1-T4 N0M0 bladder cancer were treated to the bladder tumor + 2 cm margin planning target volume (PTV(CONV)). During the first treatment week, five daily

  3. Adaptive radiotherapy: what to do and to get from it

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive radiotherapy individualizes patient treatment by systematically including treatment image feedback in the treatment planning and dose delivering control process. Treatment image feedback can provide information of daily patient treatment position, volume and delivered dose in organs of interest, as well as dose-response-induced bio-activity in tumor and normal tissues. (Author)

  4. Development of a deep inspiration breath-hold system for radiotherapy utilizing a laser distance measurer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Christer Andre; Skottner, Nils; Frengen, Jomar; Lund, Jo-Åsmund

    2017-01-01

    Deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) is a technique for treating left-sided breast cancer (LSBC). In modern radiotherapy, one of the main aims is to exclude the heart from the beam aperture with an individualized beam design for LSBC. A deep inhalation will raise the chest wall while the volume of the lungs increase, this will again push the heart away from the breast to be treated. There are a few commercial DIBH systems, both invasive and noninvasive. We present an alternative noninvasive DIBH system based upon an industrial laser distance measurer. This system can be installed in a treatment room at a low cost; it is very easy to use and requires limited amount of training for the personnel and the patient. The system is capable of measuring the position of the chest wall with high frequency and precision in real time. The patient views its breathing curve through video glasses, and gets instructions during the treatment session. The system is well tolerated by test subjects due to its noninvasiveness. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  5. Cardiac motion during deep-inspiration breath-hold: implications for breast cancer radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaochun; Pan, Tinsu; Pinnix, Chelsea; Zhang, Sean X; Salehpour, Mohammad; Sun, Tzouh Liang; Gladish, Gregory; Strom, Eric A; Perkins, George H; Tereffe, Welela; Woodward, Wendy; Hoffman, Karen E; Buchholz, Thomas A; Yu, T Kuan

    2012-02-01

    Many patients with left-sided breast cancer receive adjuvant radiotherapy during deep-inspiration breath hold (DIBH) to minimize radiation exposure to the heart. We measured the displacement of the left anterior descending artery (LAD) and heart owing to cardiac motion during DIBH, relative to the standard tangential fields for left breast cancer radiotherapy. A total of 20 patients who had undergone computed tomography-based coronary angiography with retrospective electrocardiographic gating were randomly selected for the present study. The patients underwent scanning during DIBH to control the influence of respiration on cardiac motion. Standard medial and lateral tangential fields were placed, and the LADs were contoured on the systolic- and diastolic-phase computed tomography data sets by the clinicians. Displacement of the LAD during cardiac contractions was calculated in three directions: toward the posterior edge of the treatment fields, left-right, and anteroposterior. Displacement of the entire heart was measured on the maximal and minimal intensity projection computed tomography images. The mean displacement of the LAD from cardiac contraction without the influence of respiration for 20 patients was 2.3 mm (range, 0.7-3.8) toward the posterior edge of the treatment fields, 2.6 mm (range, 1.0-6.8) in the left-right direction, and 2.3 mm (range, 0.6-6.5) in the anteroposterior direction. At least 30% of the LAD volume was displaced >5 mm in any direction in 2 patients (10%), and 5 mm in 10 patients (50%). The extent of displacement of the heart periphery during cardiac motion was negligible near the treatment fields. Displacement of the heart periphery near the treatment fields was negligible during DIBH; however, displacement of the LAD from cardiac contraction varied substantially between and within patients. We recommend maintaining ≥ 5 mm of distance between the LAD and the field edge for patients undergoing breast cancer radiotherapy during DIBH

  6. A real-time respiration position based passive breath gating equipment for gated radiotherapy: a preclinical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Weigang; Xu, Anjie; Li, Guichao; Zhang, Zhen; Housley, Dave; Ye, Jinsong

    2012-03-01

    To develop a passive gating system incorporating with the real-time position management (RPM) system for the gated radiotherapy. Passive breath gating (PBG) equipment, which consists of a breath-hold valve, a controller mechanism, a mouthpiece kit, and a supporting frame, was designed. A commercial real-time positioning management system was implemented to synchronize the target motion and radiation delivery on a linear accelerator with the patient's breathing cycle. The respiratory related target motion was investigated by using the RPM system for correlating the external markers with the internal target motion while using PBG for passively blocking patient's breathing. Six patients were enrolled in the preclinical feasibility and efficiency study of the PBG system. PBG equipment was designed and fabricated. The PBG can be manually triggered or released to block or unblock patient's breathing. A clinical workflow was outlined to integrate the PBG with the RPM system. After implementing the RPM based PBG system, the breath-hold period can be prolonged to 15-25 s and the treatment delivery efficiency for each field can be improved by 200%-400%. The results from the six patients showed that the diaphragm motion caused by respiration was reduced to less than 3 mm and the position of the diaphragm was reproducible for difference gating periods. A RPM based PBG system was developed and implemented. With the new gating system, the patient's breath-hold time can be extended and a significant improvement in the treatment delivery efficiency can also be achieved.

  7. Target position uncertainty during visually guided deep-inspiration breath-hold radiotherapy in locally advanced lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rydhog, Jonas Scherman; de Blanck, Steen Riisgaard; Josipovic, Mirjana

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to estimate the uncertainty in voluntary deep-inspiration breath hold (DISH) radiotherapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients.Methods: Perpendicular fluoroscopic movies were acquired in free breathing (FB) and DIBH during a course...... of visually guided DIBH radiotherapy of nine patients with NSCLC. Patients had liquid markers injected in mediastinal lymph nodes and primary tumours. Excursion, systematic- and random errors, and inter-breath-hold position uncertainty were investigated using an image based tracking algorithm.Results: A mean...... (root-mean-square of the intra-BH SD) during DIBH were 0.5 and 0.3 mm (AP), 0.5 and 0.3 mm (LR), 0.8 and 0.4 mm (CC), respectively. The mean inter-breath-hold shifts were -0.3 mm (AP), -0.2 mm (LR), and -0.2 mm (CC).Conclusion: Intra- and inter-breath-hold uncertainty of tumours and lymph nodes were...

  8. Breathing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... smaller structures called bronchi. The process of breathing (respiration) is divided into two distinct phases, inspiration (inhalation) and expiration (exhalation). During inspiration, the diaphragm contracts and pulls downward while the muscles between the ribs contract and pull upward. This ...

  9. Impact of different breathing conditions on the dose to surrounding normal structures in tangential field breast radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabhakar, Ramachandran; Tharmar, Ganesh; Julka, Pramod K.; Rath, Goura K.; Joshi, Rakesh C.; Bansal, Anil K.; Bisht, R.K.; Gopishankar, N.; Pant, G.S.; Thulkar, S.

    2007-01-01

    Cardiac toxicity is an important concern in tangential field breast radiotherapy. In this study, the impact of three different breathing conditions on the dose to surrounding normal structures such as heart, ipsilateral lung, liver and contralateral breast has been assessed. Thirteen patients with early breast cancer who underwent conservative surgery (nine left-sided and four right-sided breast cancer patients) were selected in this study. Spiral CT scans were performed for all the three breathing conditions, viz., deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH), normal breathing phase (NB) and deep expiration breath-hold (DEBH). Conventional tangential fields were placed on the 3D-CT dataset, and the parameters such as V30 (volume covered by dose >30 Gy) for heart, V20 (volume covered by dose >20 Gy) for ipsilateral lung and V 50 (volume receiving >50% of the prescription dose) for heart and liver were studied. The average reduction in cardiac dose due to DIBH was 64% (range: 26.5-100%) and 74% (range: 37-100%) as compared to NB and DEBH respectively. For right breast cancer, DIBH resulted in excellent liver sparing. Our results indicate that in patients with breast cancer, delivering radiation in deep inspiration breath-hold condition can considerably reduce the dose to the surrounding normal structures, particularly heart and liver. (author)

  10. Prognostic value of the proliferation marker Ki-67 in laryngeal carcinoma : Results of the Accelerated Radiotherapy with Carbogen Breathing and Nicotinamide phase III randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rademakers, Saskia E.; Hoogsteen, Ilse J.; Rijken, Paul F.; Terhaard, Chris H.; Doornaert, Patricia A.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; van den Ende, Piet; van der Kogel, Albert J.; Bussink, Johan; Kaanders, Johannes H.

    BackgroundThe prognostic and predictive value of the proliferation marker Ki-67 was investigated in a randomized trial comparing accelerated radiotherapy with carbogen breathing and nicotinamide (ARCON) to accelerated radiotherapy in laryngeal carcinoma. MethodsLabeling index of Ki-67 (Li Ki-67) in

  11. Prognostic value of the proliferation marker Ki-67 in laryngeal carcinoma : Results of the Accelerated Radiotherapy with Carbogen Breathing and Nicotinamide phase III randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rademakers, Saskia E.; Hoogsteen, Ilse J.; Rijken, Paul F.; Terhaard, Chris H.; Doornaert, Patricia A.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Van Den Ende, Piet; Van Der Kogel, Albert J.; Bussink, Johan; Kaanders, Johannes H.

    2015-01-01

    Background The prognostic and predictive value of the proliferation marker Ki-67 was investigated in a randomized trial comparing accelerated radiotherapy with carbogen breathing and nicotinamide (ARCON) to accelerated radiotherapy in laryngeal carcinoma. Methods Labeling index of Ki-67 (Li Ki-67)

  12. Air breath control radiotherapy in severe insufficiency respiratory patients with N.S.C.L.: application for deformable registration method in thoracic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarrut, D.; Pommier, P.; Carrie, C.; Perol, D.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose. Using deformable registration methods from a phase two clinical study of air breath control during radiotherapy in patients suffering from severe respiratory insufficiency and non-small cell lung carcinoma. Patients and methods, Between April 2002 and November 2005, 22 patients with severe respiratory insufficiency were treated with curative intent by conformal therapy combined with active breathing control. Results. After a mean of follow-up of 22 months, the local control rate is 28% and the method is feasible despite the severe respiratory insufficiency. However the overall survival is still poor due to metastatic widespread. For the second part of the study, the clinical protocol was also used for two studies using deformable registration methods. In the first study, a deformable registration method has been developed in order to register several breath-hold 3D CT of the same patient acquired at several days of interval. It allowed quantifying the inter-fraction breath-hold reproducibility by analysing the resulting displacement field. For 6 patients, the breath-hold was effective, while for 2 patients, motion greater than 10 mm were detected. The second study aimed to simulate 4D images from 3D breath-hold images. Developing an ad-hoc methodology based on the interpolation of 3D dense deformation fields performed it. The approach has been validated with expert selected landmarks, with accuracy lower than 3 mm. Conclusion. ABC is feasible, even in case of severe insufficiency respiratory syndrome but metastatic widespread disease is still a major challenge even with an acceptable local control rate without serious side effects: regarding the deformable registration method. Such artificial 4D images could allow decreasing the dose need to acquire a full 4D image, to simulate irregular breathing pattern and to be used for 4D dosimetry planning. (author)

  13. Myosin heavy chain expression and muscle adaptation to chronic oral breathing in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelhaye, M; Martrette, J M; Legrand-Frossi, C; Trabalon, M

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish if early chronic oral breathing could induce an ultra-structural adaptation of the diaphragm and orofacial muscles related to oral or nasal breathing. Therefore, we performed a bilateral nasal obstruction at day 8 on rat pups and the myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition of the muscles was analyzed at day 21. Nasal obstruction and the related switch to chronic oral breathing were associated with impaired growth, atrophy of olfactory bulbs, hypertrophy of adrenal glands and reduced muscle growth for all muscles studied except the diaphragm. Furthermore, we detected a smaller decrease of MHC 2b compared to MHC 2a and 2x in levator nasolabialis, a muscle involved with nasal breathing. In masseter superficialis and anterior digastric involved with oral breathing, we observed a smaller decrease of MHC 2a compared to MHC 2b or 2x, respectively. No difference was detected in the diaphragm MHC expression of oral breathing animals. Since the relative expression of fatigue resistant MHC fiber types increased in muscles involved with oral breathing, orofacial muscles seem to present a profile in MHC adapted to the transition from nasal to oral breathing, facilitating respiration.

  14. Hypofraction radiotherapy of liver tumor using cone beam computed tomography guidance combined with active breath control by long breath-holding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Renming; Wang, Jin; Jiang, Xiaoqin; He, Yinbo; Zhang, Hong; Chen, Nianyong; Bai, Sen; Xu, Feng

    2012-09-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and validity of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and active breath control (ABC) by long breath-holding in hypofraction radiotherapy of liver tumor. Twenty-four patients received hypofraction radiotherapy of liver tumor with long breath-holding at end-inhale; four prescriptions were used: 6 Gy×7 (n=8), 10 Gy×4 (n=7), 5 Gy×9 (n=6), 4 Gy×10 (n=3). For each fraction, all patients received pre-correction CBCT scans with ABC, some patients received post-correction and post-treatment CBCT. The interfraction and intrafraction liver positioning errors on medial-lateral (ML), cranial-caudal (CC) and anterior-posterior (AP) directions were obtained. The theoretic margin from clinical target volume (CTV) to planning target volume (PTV) was calculated based on post-treatment error. The dosimetric parameters of PTV and normal tissue were compared between ABC and free breathing (FB). The interfraction error in liver positioning showed system errors (Σ) of 3.18 mm (ML), 6.80 mm (CC) and 3.05 mm (AP); random error (σ) of 3.03 mm (ML), 6.78 mm (CC) and 3.62 mm (AP). These errors were significantly reduced with CBCT guided online correction. The intrafraction systematic error was 0.72 mm (ML), 2.21 mm (CC), 1.49 mm (AP), and random error was 2.30 mm (ML), 3.58 mm (CC), 2.49 mm (AP). Dosimetric parameters such as PTV, the liver's volume included by 23, 30 Gy isodose curve (V23, V30), mean dose to normal liver (MDTNL) and mean dose to cord were significantly larger for FB (Pbreath-holding at end-inhale is an effective method to reduce liver motion, PTV and dose to normal tissue. Interfraction and intrafraction liver positioning errors were substantial. CBCT guided online correction of positioning error is recommended for liver radiotherapy with end-inhale ABC. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Multiple breath-hold CBCT for online image guided radiotherapy of lung tumors: Simulation with a dynamic phantom and first patient data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boda-Heggemann, Judit; Fleckenstein, Jens; Lohr, Frank; Wertz, Hansjoerg; Nachit, Mohammed; Blessing, Manuel; Stsepankou, Dzimitry; Loeb, Iris; Kuepper, Beate; Kavanagh, Anthony; Hansen, Vibeke N.; Brada, Michael; Wenz, Frederik; McNair, Helen

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Computer controlled breath-hold effectively reduces organ motion for image-guided precision radiotherapy of lung tumors. However, the acquisition time of 3D cone-beam-CT (CBCT) exceeds maximum breath-hold times. We have developed an approach enabling online verification using CBCT image acquisition with ABC (registered) -based breath-hold. Methods: Patient CBCT images were acquired with ABC (registered) -based repeat breath-hold. The clinical situation was also simulated with a Motion Phantom. Reconstruction of patient and phantom images with selection of free-breathing and breath-hold projections only was performed. Results: CBCT-imaging in repeat breath-hold resulted in a precisely spherical appearance of a tumor-mimicking structure in the phantom. A faint 'ghost' structure (free-breathing phases) can be clearly discriminated. Mean percentage of patient breath-hold time was 66%. Reconstruction based on free-breathing-only shows blurring of both tumor and diaphragm, reconstruction based on breath-hold projections only resulted in sharp contours of the same structures. From the phantom experiments, a maximal repositioning error of 1 mm in each direction can be estimated. Discussion and Conclusion: CBCT during repetitive breath hold provides reliable soft-tissue-based positioning. Fast 3D-imaging during one breath-hold is currently under development and has the potential to accelerate clinical linac-based volume imaging.

  16. Classifying geometric variability by dominant eigenmodes of deformation in regressing tumours during active breath-hold lung cancer radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawi, Ahmed M.; Weiss, Elisabeth; Sleeman, William C., IV; Hugo, Geoffrey D.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate a lung tumour interfraction geometric variability classification scheme as a means to guide adaptive radiotherapy and improve measurement of treatment response. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to generate statistical shape models of the gross tumour volume (GTV) for 12 patients with weekly breath hold CT scans. Each eigenmode of the PCA model was classified as ‘trending’ or ‘non-trending’ depending on whether its contribution to the overall GTV variability included a time trend over the treatment course. Trending eigenmodes were used to reconstruct the original semi-automatically delineated GTVs into a reduced model containing only time trends. Reduced models were compared to the original GTVs by analyzing the reconstruction error in the GTV and position. Both retrospective (all weekly images) and prospective (only the first four weekly images) were evaluated. The average volume difference from the original GTV was 4.3% ± 2.4% for the trending model. The positional variability of the GTV over the treatment course, as measured by the standard deviation of the GTV centroid, was 1.9 ± 1.4 mm for the original GTVs, which was reduced to 1.2 ± 0.6 mm for the trending-only model. In 3/13 cases, the dominant eigenmode changed class between the prospective and retrospective models. The trending-only model preserved GTV and shape relative to the original GTVs, while reducing spurious positional variability. The classification scheme appears feasible for separating types of geometric variability by time trend.

  17. Adaptive radiotherapy based on contrast enhanced cone beam CT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soevik, Aaste; Skogmo, Hege K. (Dept. of Companion Animal Clinical Sciences, Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, Oslo (Norway)), E-mail: aste.sovik@nvh.no; Roedal, Jan (Dept. of Companion Animal Clinical Sciences, Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, Oslo (Norway)); Lervaag, Christoffer; Eilertsen, Karsten; Malinen, Eirik (Dept. of Medical Physics, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo Univ. Hospital, Oslo (Norway))

    2010-10-15

    Cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging has become an integral part of radiation therapy, with images typically used for offline or online patient setup corrections based on bony anatomy co-registration. Ideally, the co-registration should be based on tumor localization. However, soft tissue contrast in CBCT images may be limited. In the present work, contrast enhanced CBCT (CECBCT) images were used for tumor visualization and treatment adaptation. Material and methods. A spontaneous canine maxillary tumor was subjected to repeated cone beam CT imaging during fractionated radiotherapy (10 fractions in total). At five of the treatment fractions, CECBCT images, employing an iodinated contrast agent, were acquired, as well as pre-contrast CBCT images. The tumor was clearly visible in post-contrast minus pre-contrast subtraction images, and these contrast images were used to delineate gross tumor volumes. IMRT dose plans were subsequently generated. Four different strategies were explored: 1) fully adapted planning based on each CECBCT image series, 2) planning based on images acquired at the first treatment fraction and patient repositioning following bony anatomy co-registration, 3) as for 2), but with patient repositioning based on co-registering contrast images, and 4) a strategy with no patient repositioning or treatment adaptation. The equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and tumor control probability (TCP) calculations to estimate treatment outcome for each strategy. Results. Similar translation vectors were found when bony anatomy and contrast enhancement co-registration were compared. Strategy 1 gave EUDs closest to the prescription dose and the highest TCP. Strategies 2 and 3 gave EUDs and TCPs close to that of strategy 1, with strategy 3 being slightly better than strategy 2. Even greater benefits from strategies 1 and 3 are expected with increasing tumor movement or deformation during treatment. The non-adaptive strategy 4 was clearly inferior to all three adaptive strategies

  18. Adaptive radiotherapy based on contrast enhanced cone beam CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soevik, Aaste; Skogmo, Hege K.; Roedal, Jan; Lervaag, Christoffer; Eilertsen, Karsten; Malinen, Eirik

    2010-01-01

    Cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging has become an integral part of radiation therapy, with images typically used for offline or online patient setup corrections based on bony anatomy co-registration. Ideally, the co-registration should be based on tumor localization. However, soft tissue contrast in CBCT images may be limited. In the present work, contrast enhanced CBCT (CECBCT) images were used for tumor visualization and treatment adaptation. Material and methods. A spontaneous canine maxillary tumor was subjected to repeated cone beam CT imaging during fractionated radiotherapy (10 fractions in total). At five of the treatment fractions, CECBCT images, employing an iodinated contrast agent, were acquired, as well as pre-contrast CBCT images. The tumor was clearly visible in post-contrast minus pre-contrast subtraction images, and these contrast images were used to delineate gross tumor volumes. IMRT dose plans were subsequently generated. Four different strategies were explored: 1) fully adapted planning based on each CECBCT image series, 2) planning based on images acquired at the first treatment fraction and patient repositioning following bony anatomy co-registration, 3) as for 2), but with patient repositioning based on co-registering contrast images, and 4) a strategy with no patient repositioning or treatment adaptation. The equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and tumor control probability (TCP) calculations to estimate treatment outcome for each strategy. Results. Similar translation vectors were found when bony anatomy and contrast enhancement co-registration were compared. Strategy 1 gave EUDs closest to the prescription dose and the highest TCP. Strategies 2 and 3 gave EUDs and TCPs close to that of strategy 1, with strategy 3 being slightly better than strategy 2. Even greater benefits from strategies 1 and 3 are expected with increasing tumor movement or deformation during treatment. The non-adaptive strategy 4 was clearly inferior to all three adaptive strategies

  19. Navigator channel adaptation to reconstruct three dimensional heart volumes from two dimensional radiotherapy planning data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, Angela; Nguyen, Thao-Nguyen; Moseley, Joanne L; Hodgson, David C; Sharpe, Michael B; Brock, Kristy K

    2012-01-01

    Biologically-based models that utilize 3D radiation dosimetry data to estimate the risk of late cardiac effects could have significant utility for planning radiotherapy in young patients. A major challenge arises from having only 2D treatment planning data for patients with long-term follow-up. In this study, we evaluate the accuracy of an advanced deformable image registration (DIR) and navigator channels (NC) adaptation technique to reconstruct 3D heart volumes from 2D radiotherapy planning images for Hodgkin's Lymphoma (HL) patients. Planning CT images were obtained for 50 HL patients who underwent mediastinal radiotherapy. Twelve image sets (6 male, 6 female) were used to construct a male and a female population heart model, which was registered to 23 HL 'Reference' patients' CT images using a DIR algorithm, MORFEUS. This generated a series of population-to-Reference patient specific 3D deformation maps. The technique was independently tested on 15 additional 'Test' patients by reconstructing their 3D heart volumes using 2D digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRR). The technique involved: 1) identifying a matching Reference patient for each Test patient using thorax measurements, 2) placement of six NCs on matching Reference and Test patients' DRRs to capture differences in significant heart curvatures, 3) adapting the population-to-Reference patient-specific deformation maps to generate population-to-Test patient-specific deformation maps using linear and bilinear interpolation methods, 4) applying population-to-Test patient specific deformation to the population model to reconstruct Test-patient specific 3D heart models. The percentage volume overlap between the NC-adapted reconstruction and actual Test patient's true heart volume was calculated using the Dice coefficient. The average Dice coefficient expressed as a percentage between the NC-adapted and actual Test model was 89.4 ± 2.8%. The modified NC adaptation

  20. A real-time respiration position based passive breath gating equipment for gated radiotherapy: A preclinical evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Weigang; Xu Anjie; Li Guichao; Zhang Zhen; Housley, Dave; Ye Jinsong

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a passive gating system incorporating with the real-time position management (RPM) system for the gated radiotherapy. Methods: Passive breath gating (PBG) equipment, which consists of a breath-hold valve, a controller mechanism, a mouthpiece kit, and a supporting frame, was designed. A commercial real-time positioning management system was implemented to synchronize the target motion and radiation delivery on a linear accelerator with the patient's breathing cycle. The respiratory related target motion was investigated by using the RPM system for correlating the external markers with the internal target motion while using PBG for passively blocking patient's breathing. Six patients were enrolled in the preclinical feasibility and efficiency study of the PBG system. Results: PBG equipment was designed and fabricated. The PBG can be manually triggered or released to block or unblock patient's breathing. A clinical workflow was outlined to integrate the PBG with the RPM system. After implementing the RPM based PBG system, the breath-hold period can be prolonged to 15-25 s and the treatment delivery efficiency for each field can be improved by 200%-400%. The results from the six patients showed that the diaphragm motion caused by respiration was reduced to less than 3 mm and the position of the diaphragm was reproducible for difference gating periods. Conclusions: A RPM based PBG system was developed and implemented. With the new gating system, the patient's breath-hold time can be extended and a significant improvement in the treatment delivery efficiency can also be achieved.

  1. Hypofractionated radiotherapy for lung tumors with online cone beam CT guidance and active breathing control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background To study the set-up errors, PTV margin and toxicity of cone beam CT (CBCT) guided hypofractionated radiotherapy with active breathing control (ABC) for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) or metastatic tumors in lung. Methods 32 tumors in 20 patients were treated. Based on the location of tumor, dose per fraction given to tumor was divided into three groups: 12 Gy, 8 Gy and 6 Gy. ABC is applied for every patient. During each treatment, patients receive CBCT scan for online set-up correction. The pre- and post-correction setup errors between fractions, the interfractional and intrafractional, set-up errors, PTV margin as well as toxicity are analyzed. Results The pre-correction systematic and random errors in the left-right (LR), superior-inferior (SI), anterior-posterior (AP) directions were 3.7 mm and 5.3 mm, 3.1 mm and 2.1 mm, 3.7 mm and 2.8 mm, respectively, while the post-correction residual errors were 0.6 mm and 0.8 mm, 0.8 mm and 0.8 mm, 1.2 mm and 1.3 mm, respectively. There was an obvious intrafractional shift of tumor position. The pre-correction PTV margin was 9.5 mm in LR, 14.1 mm in SI and 8.2 mm in AP direction. After CBCT guided online correction, the PTV margin was markedly reduced in all three directions. The post-correction margins ranged 1.5 to 2.1 mm. The treatment was well tolerated by patients, of whom there were 4 (20%) grade1-2 acute pneumonitis, 3 (15%) grade1 acute esophagitis, 2 (10%) grade1 late pneumonitis and 1 (5%) grade 1 late esophagitis. Conclusion The positioning errors for lung SBRT using ABC were significant. Online correction with CBCT image guidance should be applied to reduce setup errors and PTV margin, which may reduce radiotherapy toxicity of tissues when ABC was used. PMID:20187962

  2. Hypofractionated radiotherapy for lung tumors with online cone beam CT guidance and active breathing control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Yali; Zhang, Hong; Wang, Jin; Zhong, Renming; Jiang, Xiaoqing; Xu, Qinfeng; Wang, Xin; Bai, Sen; Xu, Feng

    2010-01-01

    To study the set-up errors, PTV margin and toxicity of cone beam CT (CBCT) guided hypofractionated radiotherapy with active breathing control (ABC) for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) or metastatic tumors in lung. 32 tumors in 20 patients were treated. Based on the location of tumor, dose per fraction given to tumor was divided into three groups: 12 Gy, 8 Gy and 6 Gy. ABC is applied for every patient. During each treatment, patients receive CBCT scan for online set-up correction. The pre- and post-correction setup errors between fractions, the interfractional and intrafractional, set-up errors, PTV margin as well as toxicity are analyzed. The pre-correction systematic and random errors in the left-right (LR), superior-inferior (SI), anterior-posterior (AP) directions were 3.7 mm and 5.3 mm, 3.1 mm and 2.1 mm, 3.7 mm and 2.8 mm, respectively, while the post-correction residual errors were 0.6 mm and 0.8 mm, 0.8 mm and 0.8 mm, 1.2 mm and 1.3 mm, respectively. There was an obvious intrafractional shift of tumor position. The pre-correction PTV margin was 9.5 mm in LR, 14.1 mm in SI and 8.2 mm in AP direction. After CBCT guided online correction, the PTV margin was markedly reduced in all three directions. The post-correction margins ranged 1.5 to 2.1 mm. The treatment was well tolerated by patients, of whom there were 4 (20%) grade1-2 acute pneumonitis, 3 (15%) grade1 acute esophagitis, 2 (10%) grade1 late pneumonitis and 1 (5%) grade 1 late esophagitis. The positioning errors for lung SBRT using ABC were significant. Online correction with CBCT image guidance should be applied to reduce setup errors and PTV margin, which may reduce radiotherapy toxicity of tissues when ABC was used

  3. Hypofractionated radiotherapy for lung tumors with online cone beam CT guidance and active breathing control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xin

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To study the set-up errors, PTV margin and toxicity of cone beam CT (CBCT guided hypofractionated radiotherapy with active breathing control (ABC for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC or metastatic tumors in lung. Methods 32 tumors in 20 patients were treated. Based on the location of tumor, dose per fraction given to tumor was divided into three groups: 12 Gy, 8 Gy and 6 Gy. ABC is applied for every patient. During each treatment, patients receive CBCT scan for online set-up correction. The pre- and post-correction setup errors between fractions, the interfractional and intrafractional, set-up errors, PTV margin as well as toxicity are analyzed. Results The pre-correction systematic and random errors in the left-right (LR, superior-inferior (SI, anterior-posterior (AP directions were 3.7 mm and 5.3 mm, 3.1 mm and 2.1 mm, 3.7 mm and 2.8 mm, respectively, while the post-correction residual errors were 0.6 mm and 0.8 mm, 0.8 mm and 0.8 mm, 1.2 mm and 1.3 mm, respectively. There was an obvious intrafractional shift of tumor position. The pre-correction PTV margin was 9.5 mm in LR, 14.1 mm in SI and 8.2 mm in AP direction. After CBCT guided online correction, the PTV margin was markedly reduced in all three directions. The post-correction margins ranged 1.5 to 2.1 mm. The treatment was well tolerated by patients, of whom there were 4 (20% grade1-2 acute pneumonitis, 3 (15% grade1 acute esophagitis, 2 (10% grade1 late pneumonitis and 1 (5% grade 1 late esophagitis. Conclusion The positioning errors for lung SBRT using ABC were significant. Online correction with CBCT image guidance should be applied to reduce setup errors and PTV margin, which may reduce radiotherapy toxicity of tissues when ABC was used.

  4. Feasibility of the use of the Active Breathing Co ordinatorTM (ABC) in patients receiving radical radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNair, Helen A.; Brock, Juliet; Symonds-Tayler, J. Richard N.; Ashley, Sue; Eagle, Sally; Evans, Philip M.; Kavanagh, Anthony; Panakis, Niki; Brada, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: One method to overcome the problem of lung tumour movement in patients treated with radiotherapy is to restrict tumour motion with an active breathing control (ABC) device. This study evaluated the feasibility of using ABC in patients receiving radical radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer. Methods: Eighteen patients, median (range) age of 66 (44-82) years, consented to the study. A training session was conducted to establish the patient's breath hold level and breath hold time. Three planning scans were acquired using the ABC device. Reproducibility of breath hold was assessed by comparing lung volumes measured from the planning scans and the volume recorded by ABC. Patients were treated with a 3-field coplanar beam arrangement and treatment time (patient on and off the bed) and number of breath holds recorded. The tolerability of the device was assessed by weekly questionnaire. Quality assurance was performed on the two ABC devices used. Results: 17/18 patients completed 32 fractions of radiotherapy using ABC. All patients tolerated a maximum breath hold time >15 s. The mean (SD) patient training time was 13.8 (4.8) min and no patient found the ABC very uncomfortable. Six to thirteen breath holds of 10-14 s were required per session. The mean treatment time was 15.8 min (5.8 min). The breath hold volumes were reproducible during treatment and also between the two ABC devices. Conclusion: The use of ABC in patients receiving radical radiotherapy for NSCLC is feasible. It was not possible to predict a patient's ability to hold breath. A minimum tolerated breath hold time of 15 s is recommended prior to commencing treatment.

  5. Accuracy of daily image guidance for hypofractionated liver radiotherapy with active breathing control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, Laura A.; Eccles, Cynthia; Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre; Brock, Kristy K.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: A six-fraction, high-precision radiotherapy protocol for unresectable liver cancer has been developed in which active breathing control (ABC) is used to immobilize the liver and daily megavoltage (MV) imaging and repositioning is used to decrease geometric uncertainties. We report the accuracy of setup in the first 20 patients consecutively treated using this approach. Methods and materials: After setup using conventional skin marks and lasers, orthogonal MV images were acquired with the liver immobilized using ABC. The images were aligned to reference digitally reconstructed radiographs using the diaphragm for craniocaudal (CC) alignment and the vertebral bodies for anterior-posterior (AP) and mediolateral (ML) alignment. Adjustments were made for positioning errors >3 mm. Verification imaging was repeated after repositioning to assess for residual positioning error. Offline image matching was conducted to determine the setup accuracy using this approach compared with the initial setup error before repositioning. Real-time beam's-eye-view MV movies containing an air-diaphragm interface were also evaluated. Results: A total of 405 images were evaluated from 20 patients. Repositioning occurred in 109 of 120 fractions because of offsets >3 mm. Three to eight beam angles, with up to four segments per field, were used for each isocenter. Breath holds of up to 27 s were used for imaging and treatment. The average time from the initial verification image to the last treatment beam was 21 min. Image guidance and repositioning reduced the population random setup errors (σ) from 6.5 mm (CC), 4.2 mm (ML), and 4.7 mm (AP) to 2.5 mm (CC), 2.8 mm (ML), and 2.9 mm (AP). The average individual random setup errors (σ) were reduced from 4.5 mm (CC), 3.2 mm (AP), and 2.5 mm (ML) to 2.2 mm (CC), 2.0 mm (AP), and 2.0 mm (ML). The standard deviation of the distribution of systematic deviations (Σ) was also reduced from 5.1 mm (CC), 3.4 mm (ML), and 3.1 mm (AP) to 1.4 mm (CC

  6. Validation of an online replanning technique for prostate adaptive radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Cheng; Chen Guangpei; Ahunbay, Ergun; Wang Dian; Lawton, Colleen; Li, X Allen

    2011-01-01

    We have previously developed an online adaptive replanning technique to rapidly adapt the original plan according to daily CT. This paper reports the quality assurance (QA) developments in its clinical implementation for prostate cancer patients. A series of pre-clinical validation tests were carried out to verify the overall accuracy and consistency of the online replanning procedure. These tests include (a) phantom measurements of 22 individual patient adaptive plans to verify their accuracy and deliverability and (b) efficiency and applicability of the online replanning process. A four-step QA procedure was established to ensure the safe and accurate delivery of an adaptive plan, including (1) offline phantom measurement of the original plan, (2) online independent monitor unit (MU) calculation for a redundancy check, (3) online verification of plan-data transfer using an in-house software and (4) offline validation of actually delivered beam parameters. The pre-clinical validations demonstrate that the newly implemented online replanning technique is dosimetrically accurate and practically efficient. The four-step QA procedure is capable of identifying possible errors in the process of online adaptive radiotherapy and to ensure the safe and accurate delivery of the adaptive plans. Based on the success of this work, the online replanning technique has been used in the clinic to correct for interfractional changes during the prostate radiation therapy.

  7. Automated daily breath hold stability measurements by real-time imaging in radiotherapy of breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Boer, Hans C J; Van Den Bongard, Desirée J G; van Asselen, B

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Breath hold is increasingly used for cardiac sparing in left-sided breast cancer irradiation. We have developed a fast automated method to verify breath hold stability in each treatment fraction. Material and methods We evaluated 504 patients treated with breath hold. Moderate

  8. Dosimetric comparison of deep inspiration breath hold and free breathing technique in stereotactic body radiotherapy for localized lung tumor using Flattening Filter Free beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Karthick Raj; Bhuiyan, Md. Anisuzzaman; Alam, Md. Mahbub; Ahmed, Sharif; Sumon, Mostafa Aziz; Sengupta, Ashim Kumar; Rahman, Md. Shakilur; Azharul Islam, Md. S. M.

    2018-03-01

    Aim: To compare the dosimetric advantage of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for localized lung tumor between deep inspiration breath hold technique and free breathing technique. Materials and methods: We retrospectively included ten previously treated lung tumor patients in this dosimetric study. All the ten patients underwent CT simulation using 4D-CT free breathing (FB) and deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) techniques. Plans were created using three coplanar full modulated arc using 6 MV flattening filter free (FFF) bream with a dose rate of 1400 MU/min. Same dose constraints for the target and the critical structures for a particular patient were used during the plan optimization process in DIBH and FB datasets. We intend to deliver 50 Gy in 5 fractions for all the patients. For standardization, all the plans were normalized at target mean of the planning target volume (PTV). Doses to the critical structures and targets were recorded from the dose volume histogram for evaluation. Results: The mean right and left lung volumes were inflated by 1.55 and 1.60 times in DIBH scans compared to the FB scans. The mean internal target volume (ITV) increased in the FB datasets by 1.45 times compared to the DIBH data sets. The mean dose followed by standard deviation (x¯ ± σx¯) of ipsilateral lung for DIBH-SBRT and FB-SBRT plans were 7.48 ± 3.57 (Gy) and 10.23 ± 4.58 (Gy) respectively, with a mean reduction of 36.84% in DIBH-SBRT plans. Ipsilateral lung were reduced to 36.84% in DIBH plans compared to FB plans. Conclusion: Significant dose reduction in ipsilateral lung due to the lung inflation and target motion restriction in DIBH-SBRT plans were observed compare to FB-SBRT. DIBH-SBRT plans demonstrate superior dose reduction to the normal tissues and other critical structures.

  9. Free-Breathing Cardiac MR with a Fixed Navigator Efficiency Using Adaptive Gating Window Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghari, Mehdi H.; Chan, Raymond H.; Hong-Zohlman, Susie N.; Shaw, Jaime L.; Goepfert, Lois A.; Kissinger, Kraig V.; Goddu, Beth; Josephson, Mark E.; Manning, Warren J.; Nezafat, Reza

    2012-01-01

    A respiratory navigator with a fixed acceptance gating window is commonly used to reduce respiratory motion artifacts in cardiac MR. This approach prolongs the scan time and occasionally yields an incomplete dataset due to respiratory drifts. To address this issue, we propose an adaptive gating window approach in which the size and position of the gating window are changed adaptively during the acquisition based on the individual’s breathing pattern. The adaptive gating window tracks the breathing pattern of the subject throughout the scan and adapts the size and position of the gating window such that the gating efficiency is always fixed at a constant value. To investigate the image quality and acquisition time, free breathing cardiac MRI, including both targeted coronary MRI and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) imaging, was performed in 67 subjects using the proposed navigator technique. Targeted coronary MRI was acquired from eleven healthy adult subjects using both the conventional and proposed adaptive gating window techniques. Fifty-six patients referred for cardiac MRI were also imaged using LGE with the proposed adaptive gating window technique. Subjective and objective image assessments were used to evaluate the proposed method. The results demonstrate that the proposed technique allows free-breathing cardiac MRI in a relatively fixed time without compromising imaging quality due to respiratory motion artifacts. PMID:22367715

  10. 14C-lactose breath tests during pelvic radiotherapy: the effect of the amount of small bowel irradiated

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, R.G.; Stryker, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    Thirty patients who were undergoing pelvic radiotherapy had 14 C-lactose breath tests performed in the first and fifth weeks of treatment. In Group I (21 patients), a significant portion of the small intestine was irradiated, and in Group II (9 patients), only a small portion of the small intestine was irradiated. In Group I, the average reductions in the excretion of ingested 14 C between the first- and fifth-week tests were 41.5% at 1/2 hour postingestion (p 0.05). The data suggest that lactose malabsorption is a factor in the etiology of the nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea experienced by patients who are undergoing pelvic radiotherapy, and that the amount of bowel included in the treatment volume significantly influences the degree of malabsorption

  11. Prospective phase II trial of image-guided radiotherapy in Hodgkin lymphoma: benefit of deep inspiration breath-hold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Peter M; Aznar, Marianne C; Berthelsen, Anne K; Loft, Annika; Schut, Deborah A; Maraldo, Maja; Josipovic, Mirjana; Klausen, Thomas L; Andersen, Flemming L; Specht, Lena

    2015-01-01

    Long-term Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors have an increased risk of late cardiac morbidity and secondary lung cancer after chemotherapy and mediastinal radiotherapy. In this prospective study we investigate whether radiotherapy with deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) can reduce radiation doses to the lungs, heart, and cardiac structures without compromising the target dose. Twenty-two patients (14 female, 8 male), median age 30 years (18-65 years), with supra-diaphragmatic HL were enrolled and had a thoracic PET/CT with DIBH in addition to staging FDG-PET/CT in free breathing (FB) and a planning CT in both FB and DIBH. For each patient an involved-node radiotherapy plan was done for both DIBH and FB, and the doses to the lungs, heart, and female breasts were recorded prospectively. Mean doses to the heart valves and coronary arteries were recorded retrospectively. Patients were treated with the technique yielding the lowest doses to normal structures. Nineteen patients were treated with DIBH and three with FB. DIBH reduced the mean estimated lung dose by 2.0 Gy (median: 8.5 Gy vs. 7.2 Gy) (p < 0.01) and the mean heart dose by 1.4 Gy (6.0 Gy vs. 3.9 Gy) (p < 0.01) compared to FB. The lung and heart V20Gy were reduced with a median of 5.3% and 6.3%. Mean doses to the female breasts were equal with FB and DIBH. DIBH can significantly decrease the estimated mean doses to the heart and lungs without lowering the dose to the target in radiotherapy for patients with mediastinal HL.

  12. [Involved-node radiotherapy combined with deep-inspiration breath-hold technique in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paumier, A; Bakkour, M; Ghalibafian, M; Beaudre, A; Blanchard, P; Martinetti, F; Girinsky, T

    2012-04-01

    To assess the clinical outcome of the involved-node radiotherapy (INRT) concept with the use of deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique in patients with localized supra-diaphragmatic Hodgkin lymphoma. All were patients with stage I-II Hodgkin lymphoma and they were treated with chemotherapy prior to irradiation. Radiation treatments were delivered using the involved-node radiotherapy concept according to the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Guidelines and a spirometer dedicated to DIBH radiotherapy was used for every patient. Twenty-seven patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (26 patients with primary Hodgkin lymphoma, one with refractory disease), treated from November 2004 to October 2010, were retrospectively analysed. The median age was 27 years (range 16 to 54). Seventeen (63%) patients had stage I-IIA and 10 (37%) had stage I-IIB disease. All patients received two to six cycles of adriamycin, bleomycin, vinblastine and dacarbazine. The median radiation dose to patients was 30,6 Gy (range: 19,8-40). Protection of various organs at risk was satisfactory. Median follow-up, 3-year progression-free and 3-year overall survival were 38 months (range: 7-70), 96% (95%CI: 79-99%) and 95% (95%CI: 75-99%), respectively. Recurrence occurred in one patient (mediastinal in-field relapse). There was one grade 3 acute toxicity (transient pneumonitis). Our results suggest that patients with localized Hodgkin lymphoma can be safely and efficiently treated using deep-inspiration breath technique and the involved-node radiotherapy concept. Longer follow-up is needed to assess late toxicity, especially for the heart and the coronary arteries. Copyright © 2011 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Involved-node radiotherapy combined with deep-inspiration breath-hold technique in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paumier, A.; Bakkour, M.; Ghalibafian, M.; Blanchard, P.; Girinsky, T.; Beaudre, A.; Martinetti, F.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. - To assess the clinical outcome of the involved-node radiotherapy (INRT) concept with the use of deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique in patients with localized supra-diaphragmatic Hodgkin lymphoma. Patients and methods. - All were patients with stage I-II Hodgkin lymphoma and they were treated with chemotherapy prior to irradiation. Radiation treatments were delivered using the involved-node radiotherapy concept according to the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Guidelines and a spirometer dedicated to DIBH radiotherapy was used for every patient. Results. - Twenty-seven patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (26 patients with primary Hodgkin lymphoma, one with refractory disease), treated from November 2004 to October 2010, were retrospectively analysed. The median age was 27 years (range 16 to 54). Seventeen (63%) patients had stage I-IIA and 10 (37%) had stage I-IIB disease. All patients received two to six cycles of adriamycin, bleomycin, vinblastine and dacarbazine. The median radiation dose to patients was 30,6 Gy (range: 19,8-40). Protection of various organs at risk was satisfactory. Median follow-up, 3-year progression-free and 3-year overall survival were 38 months (range: 7-70), 96% (95% CI: 79-99%) and 95% (95% CI: 75-99%), respectively. Recurrence occurred in one patient (mediastinal in-field relapse). There was one grade 3 acute toxicity (transient pneumonitis). Conclusions. - Our results suggest that patients with localized Hodgkin lymphoma can be safely and efficiently treated using deep-inspiration breath technique and the involved-node radiotherapy concept. Longer follow-up is needed to assess late toxicity, especially for the heart and the coronary arteries. (authors)

  14. SU-E-J-206: Adaptive Radiotherapy for Gynecological Malignancies with MRIGuided Cobolt-60 Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamb, J; Kamrava, M; Agazaryan, N; Cao, M; Low, D; Thomas, D; Yang, Y [UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Even in the IMRT era, bowel toxicity and bone marrow irradiation remain concerns with pelvic irradiation. We examine the potential gain from an adaptive radiotherapy workflow for post-operative gynecological patients treated to pelvic targets including lymph nodes using MRI-guided Co-60 radiation therapy. Methods: An adaptive workflow was developed with the intent of minimizing time overhead of adaptive planning. A pilot study was performed using retrospectively analyzed images from one patient’s treatment. The patient’s treated plan was created using conventional PTV margins. Adaptive treatment was simulated on the patient’s first three fractions. The daily PTV was created by removing non-target tissue, including bone, muscle and bowel, from the initial PTV based on the daily MRI. The number of beams, beam angles, and optimization parameters were kept constant, and the plan was re-optimized. Normal tissue contours were not adjusted for the re-optimization, but were adjusted for evaluation of plan quality. Plan quality was evaluated based on PTV coverage and normal tissue DVH points per treatment protocol. Bowel was contoured as the entire bowel bag per protocol at our institution. Pelvic bone marrow was contoured per RTOG protocol 1203. Results: For the clinically treated plan, the volume of bowel receiving 45 Gy was 380 cc, 53% of the rectum received 30 Gy, 35% of the bladder received 45 Gy, and 28% of the pelvic bone marrow received 40 Gy. For the adaptive plans, the volume of bowel receiving 45 Gy was 175–201 cc, 55–62% of the rectum received 30 Gy, 21– 27% of the bladder received 45 Gy, and 13–17% of the pelvic bone marrow received 40 Gy. Conclusion: Adaptive planning led to a large reduction of bowel and bone marrow dose in this pilot study. Further study of on-line adaptive techniques for the radiotherapy of pelvic lymph nodes is warranted. Dr. Low is a member of the scientific advisory board of ViewRay, Inc.

  15. Adaptive treatment-length optimization in spatiobiologically integrated radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajdari, Ali; Ghate, Archis; Kim, Minsun

    2018-04-01

    Recent theoretical research on spatiobiologically integrated radiotherapy has focused on optimization models that adapt fluence-maps to the evolution of tumor state, for example, cell densities, as observed in quantitative functional images acquired over the treatment course. We propose an optimization model that adapts the length of the treatment course as well as the fluence-maps to such imaged tumor state. Specifically, after observing the tumor cell densities at the beginning of a session, the treatment planner solves a group of convex optimization problems to determine an optimal number of remaining treatment sessions, and a corresponding optimal fluence-map for each of these sessions. The objective is to minimize the total number of tumor cells remaining (TNTCR) at the end of this proposed treatment course, subject to upper limits on the biologically effective dose delivered to the organs-at-risk. This fluence-map is administered in future sessions until the next image is available, and then the number of sessions and the fluence-map are re-optimized based on the latest cell density information. We demonstrate via computer simulations on five head-and-neck test cases that such adaptive treatment-length and fluence-map planning reduces the TNTCR and increases the biological effect on the tumor while employing shorter treatment courses, as compared to only adapting fluence-maps and using a pre-determined treatment course length based on one-size-fits-all guidelines.

  16. SU-E-J-211: Design and Study of In-House Software Based Respiratory Motion Monitoring, Controlling and Breath-Hold Device for Gated Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shanmugam, Senthilkumar

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this present work was to fabricate an in-house software based respiratory monitoring, controlling and breath-hold device using computer software programme which guides the patient to have uniform breath hold in response to request during the gated radiotherapy. Methods: The respiratory controlling device consists of a computer, inhouse software, video goggles, a highly sensitive sensor for measurement of distance, mounting systems, a camera, a respiratory signal device, a speaker and a visual indicator. The computer is used to display the respiratory movements of the patient with digital as well as analogue respiration indicators during the respiration cycle, to control, breath-hold and analyze the respiratory movement using indigenously developed software. Results: Studies were conducted with anthropomophic phantoms by simulating the respiratory motion on phantoms and recording the respective movements using the respiratory monitoring device. The results show good agreement between the simulated and measured movements. Further studies were conducted for 60 cancer patients with several types of cancers in the thoracic region. The respiratory movement cycles for each fraction of radiotherapy treatment were recorded and compared. Alarm indications are provided in the system to indicate when the patient breathing movement exceeds the threshold level. This will help the patient to maintain uniform breath hold during the radiotherapy treatment. Our preliminary clinical test results indicate that our device is highly reliable and able to maintain the uniform respiratory motion and breathe hold during the entire course of gated radiotherapy treatment. Conclusion: An indigenous respiratory monitoring device to guide the patient to have uniform breath hold device was fabricated. The alarm feature and the visual waveform indicator in the system guide the patient to have normal respiration. The signal from the device can be connected to the radiation

  17. SU-F-T-644: Reproducibility of Target Position Using Moderate Voluntary Breath- Hold During Liver Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, G; Trakul, N; Chang, E; Shiu, A [University Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the reproducibility of target position using moderate voluntary breath-hold during liver stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR). Methods: Two patients who underwent liver SABR on a Varian TrueBeam STx linac were used for this study. Fiducial markers were placed in and around the target in the liver as surrogates for the target position and motion. GTVs were contoured by assessing tumor extent on contrast enhanced CT. The PTV was created from the GTV by adding 2 mm margins to account for the residual motion during breath-holds. A portable biofeedback system was used to facilitate the breath-hold to a reproducible position. The Varian RPM system was used for gating the linac. Proceeding each treatment, orthogonal kV pairs were taken, and alignment to nearby bony anatomy was performed. Then the breath-hold CBCT was acquired to align the fiducial markers. On-line fluoroscopy was used to fine-tune the breath-hold gating thresholds to correlate with the positions of the fiducial markers. The inter-fraction reproducibility of the target was evaluated by the offsets of the daily breath-hold CBCTs from the paired kV matches as a direct measure of the target position relative to the bony anatomy. The intra-fraction reproducibility of the target position was assessed by the gated window of the RPM marker block for each fraction. Results: The absolute mean offsets between the CBCT and paired kV matches in the vertical, longitudinal, and lateral directions were 0.06 cm, 0.10 cm, and 0.06 cm for patient 1, and 0.37 cm, 0.62 cm, and 0.09 cm for patient 2. The gated window of the RPM marker block for the breath-hold for each fraction was within 0.63 ± 0.16 cm and 0.59 ± 0.12 cm for patients 1 and 2, respectively. Conclusion: Moderate voluntary breath-hold showed good inter- and intra-fraction reproducibility of target position during liver SABR.

  18. Dosimetric investigation of breath-hold intensity-modulated radiotherapy for pancreatic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Kishimoto, Shun; Iwamura, Kohei; Shiinoki, Takehiro; Nakamura, Akira; Matsuo, Yukinori; Shibuya, Keiko; Hiraoka, Masahiro [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Department of Radiological Technology, Faculty of Medical Science, Kyoto College of Medical Science, Nantan, Kyoto 622-0041 (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: To experimentally investigate the effects of variations in respiratory motion during breath-holding (BH) at end-exhalation (EE) on intensity-modulated radiotherapy (BH-IMRT) dose distribution using a motor-driven base, films, and an ionization chamber. Methods: Measurements were performed on a linear accelerator, which has a 120-leaf independently moving multileaf collimator with 5-mm leaf width at the isocenter for the 20-cm central field. Polystyrene phantoms with dimensions of 40 x 40 x 10 cm were set on a motor-driven base. All gantry angles of seven IMRT plans (a total of 35 fields) were changed to zero, and doses were then delivered to a film placed at a depth of 4 cm and an ionization chamber at a depth of 5 cm in the phantom with a dose rate of 600 MU/min under the following conditions: pulsation from the abdominal aorta and baseline drift with speeds of 0.2 mm/s (BD{sub 0.2mm/s}) and 0.4 mm/s (BD{sub 0.4mm/s}). As a reference for comparison, doses were also delivered to the chamber and film under stationary conditions. Results: In chamber measurements, means {+-} standard deviations of the dose deviations between stationary and moving conditions were -0.52% {+-} 1.03% (range: -3.41-1.05%), -0.07% {+-} 1.21% (range: -1.88-4.31%), and 0.03% {+-} 1.70% (range: -2.70-6.41%) for pulsation, BD{sub 0.2mm/s}, and BD{sub 0.4mm/s}, respectively. The {gamma} passing rate ranged from 99.5% to 100.0%, even with the criterion of 2%/1 mm for pulsation pattern. In the case of BD{sub 0.4mm/s}, the {gamma} passing rate for four of 35 fields (11.4%) did not reach 90% with a criterion of 3%/3 mm. The differences in {gamma} passing rate between BD{sub 0.2mm/s} and BD{sub 0.4mm/s} were statistically significant for each criterion. Taking {gamma} passing rates of > 90% as acceptable with a criterion of 3%/3 mm, large differences were observed in the {gamma} passing rate between the baseline drift of {<=}5 mm and that of >5 mm (minimum {gamma} passing rate: 92.0% vs 82

  19. Feasibility and potential utility of multicomponent exhaled breath analysis for predicting development of radiation pneumonitis after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moré, Jayaji M; Eclov, Neville C W; Chung, Melody P; Wynne, Jacob F; Shorter, Joanne H; Nelson, David D; Hanlon, Alexandra L; Burmeister, Robert; Banos, Peter; Maxim, Peter G; Loo, Billy W; Diehn, Maximilian

    2014-07-01

    In this prospective pilot study, we evaluated the feasibility and potential utility of measuring multiple exhaled gases as biomarkers of radiation pneumonitis (RP) in patients receiving stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for lung tumors. Breath analysis was performed for 26 patients receiving SABR for lung tumors. Concentrations of exhaled nitric oxide (eNO), carbon monoxide (eCO), nitrous oxide (eN2O), and carbon dioxide (eCO2) were measured before and immediately after each fraction using real-time, infrared laser spectroscopy. RP development (CTCAE grade ≥2) was correlated with baseline gas concentrations, acute changes in gas concentrations after each SABR fraction, and dosimetric parameters. Exhaled breath analysis was successfully completed in 77% of patients. Five of 20 evaluable patients developed RP at a mean of 5.4 months after SABR. Acute changes in eNO and eCO concentrations, defined as percent changes between each pre-fraction and post-fraction measurement, were significantly smaller in RP versus non-RP cases (p = 0.022 and 0.015, respectively). In an exploratory analysis, a combined predictor of baseline eNO greater than 24 parts per billion and acute decrease in eCO less than 5.5% strongly correlated with RP incidence (p =0.0099). Neither eN2O nor eCO2 concentrations were significantly associated with RP development. Although generally higher in patients destined to develop RP, dosimetric parameters were not significantly associated with RP development. The majority of SABR patients in this pilot study were able to complete exhaled breath analysis. Baseline concentrations and acute changes in concentrations of exhaled breath components were associated with RP development after SABR. If our findings are validated, exhaled breath analysis may become a useful approach for noninvasive identification of patients at highest risk for developing RP after SABR.

  20. Less increase of CT-based calcium scores of the coronary arteries. Effect three years after breast-conserving radiotherapy using breath-hold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mast, M.E.; Kempen-Harteveld, M.L. van; Petoukhova, A.L.; Heijenbrok, M.W.; Scholten, A.N.; Wolterbeek, R.; Schreur, J.H.M.; Struikmans, H.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this prospective longitudinal study was to compare coronary artery calcium (CAC) scores determined before the start of whole breast irradiation with those determined 3 years afterwards. Changes in CAC scores were analysed in 99 breast cancer patients. Three groups were compared: patients receiving left- and right-sided radiotherapy, and those receiving left-sided radiotherapy with breath-hold. We analysed overall CAC scores and left anterior descending (LAD) and right coronary artery (RCA) CAC scores. Between the three groups, changes of the value of the LAD minus the RCA CAC scores of each individual patient were also compared. Three years after breath-hold-based whole breast irradiation, a less pronounced increase of CAC scores was noted. Furthermore, LAD minus RCA scores in patients treated for left-sided breast cancer without breath-hold were higher when compared to LAD minus RCA scores of patients with right-sided breast cancers and those with left-sided breast cancer treated with breath-hold. Breath-hold in breast-conserving radiotherapy leads to a less pronounced increase of CT-based CAC scores. Therefore, breath-hold probably prevents the development of radiation-induced coronary artery disease. However, the sample size of this study is limited and the follow-up period relatively short. (orig.) [de

  1. Adaptive radiotherapy for invasive bladder cancer: A feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pos, Floris J.; Hulshof, Maarten; Lebesque, Joos; Lotz, Heidi; Tienhoven, Geertjan van; Moonen, Luc; Remeijer, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of adaptive radiotherapy (ART) in combination with a partial bladder irradiation. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients with solitary T1-T4 N0M0 bladder cancer were treated to the bladder tumor + 2 cm margin planning target volume (PTV CONV ). During the first treatment week, five daily computed tomography (CT) scans were made immediately before or after treatment. In the second week, a volume was constructed encompassing the gross tumor volumes (GTVs) on the planning scan and the five CT scans (GTV ART ). The GTV ART was expanded with a 1 cm margin for the construction of a PTV ART . Starting in the third week, patients were treated to PTV ART . Repeat CT scans were used to evaluate treatment accuracy. Results: On 5 of 91 repeat CT scans (5%), the GTV was not adequately covered by the PTV ART . On treatment planning, there was only one scan in which the GTV was not adequately covered by the 95% isodose. On average, the treatment volumes were reduced by 40% when comparing PTV ART with PTV CONV (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: The adaptive strategy for bladder cancer is an effective way to deal with treatment errors caused by variations in bladder tumor position and leads to a substantial reduction in treatment volumes

  2. MRI assessment of cervical cancer for adaptive radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimopoulos, Johannes C.A.; Schirl, Gertrude; Baldinger, Anja; Poetter, Richard; Helbich, Thomas H.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the importance of the information obtained from MRI for adaptive cervix cancer radiotherapy. Patients and methods: 49 patients with cervix cancer, treated by external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and MRI-assisted high-dose-rate brachytherapy ± concomitant cisplatin, underwent MRI at diagnosis and at the time of brachytherapy fractions. 190 MRI examinations were performed. Pretreatment scans were correlated with clinical examination (CE) findings. Measurements in 3-D of the tumor extension and also of the distance from the tumor to the pelvic side wall were performed using both MRI and CE. The tumor volume regression induced initially by EBRT and the subsequent regression after each brachytherapy fraction were assessed. Results: MRI and CE showed 92% agreement in overall parametrial staging and 73% agreement in terms of vaginal involvement. There was, however, disagreement in parametrial side (right/left) classification in 25% of the parametria examined. These were patients with unilateral displacement of the cervix and contralateral invasion of the parametrium. The mean tumor volume on the pretreatment MRI scan (GTVD) was 61 cm 3 . At the time of the four brachytherapy fractions the mean was 16 cm 3 , 10 cm 3 , 9 cm 3 , and 8 cm 3 , defined as the GTVBT plus the gray zones in the parametria. Conclusion: CE and MRI findings agree well in terms of overall staging. The clinical assessment of side-specific parametrial invasion improved when having access to the additional knowledge obtained from MRI. The greatest decrease in tumor volume occurs during EBRT, whereas tumor regression between the first and subsequent brachytherapy fractions is minor. (orig.)

  3. A Novel Respiratory Motion Perturbation Model Adaptable to Patient Breathing Irregularities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Amy [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Wei, Jie [Department of Computer Science, City College of New York, New York, New York (United States); Gaebler, Carl P.; Huang, Hailiang; Olek, Devin [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Li, Guang, E-mail: lig2@mskcc.org [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Purpose: To develop a physical, adaptive motion perturbation model to predict tumor motion using feedback from dynamic measurement of breathing conditions to compensate for breathing irregularities. Methods and Materials: A novel respiratory motion perturbation (RMP) model was developed to predict tumor motion variations caused by breathing irregularities. This model contained 2 terms: the initial tumor motion trajectory, measured from 4-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) images, and motion perturbation, calculated from breathing variations in tidal volume (TV) and breathing pattern (BP). The motion perturbation was derived from the patient-specific anatomy, tumor-specific location, and time-dependent breathing variations. Ten patients were studied, and 2 amplitude-binned 4DCT images for each patient were acquired within 2 weeks. The motion trajectories of 40 corresponding bifurcation points in both 4DCT images of each patient were obtained using deformable image registration. An in-house 4D data processing toolbox was developed to calculate the TV and BP as functions of the breathing phase. The motion was predicted from the simulation 4DCT scan to the treatment 4DCT scan, and vice versa, resulting in 800 predictions. For comparison, noncorrected motion differences and the predictions from a published 5-dimensional model were used. Results: The average motion range in the superoinferior direction was 9.4 ± 4.4 mm, the average ΔTV ranged from 10 to 248 mm{sup 3} (−26% to 61%), and the ΔBP ranged from 0 to 0.2 (−71% to 333%) between the 2 4DCT scans. The mean noncorrected motion difference was 2.0 ± 2.8 mm between 2 4DCT motion trajectories. After applying the RMP model, the mean motion difference was reduced significantly to 1.2 ± 1.8 mm (P=.0018), a 40% improvement, similar to the 1.2 ± 1.8 mm (P=.72) predicted with the 5-dimensional model. Conclusions: A novel physical RMP model was developed with an average accuracy of 1.2 ± 1.8 mm for

  4. Reproducible deep-inspiration breath-hold irradiation with forward intensity-modulated radiotherapy for left-sided breast cancer significantly reduces cardiac radiation exposure compared to inverse intensity-modulated radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolukbasi, Yasemin; Saglam, Yucel; Selek, Ugur; Topkan, Erkan; Kataria, Anglina; Unal, Zeynep; Alpan, Vildan

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the objective utility of our clinical routine of reproducible deep-inspiration breath-hold irradiation for left-sided breast cancer patients on reducing cardiac exposure. Free-breathing and reproducible deep-inspiration breath-hold scans were evaluated for our 10 consecutive left-sided breast cancer patients treated with reproducible deep-inspiration breath-hold. The study was based on the adjuvant dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions of 2 Gy/fraction. Both inverse and forward intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans were generated for each computed tomography dataset. Reproducible deep-inspiration breath-hold plans with forward intensity-modulated radiotherapy significantly spared the heart and left anterior descending artery compared to generated free-breathing plans based on mean doses - free-breathing vs reproducible deep-inspiration breath-hold, left ventricle (296.1 vs 94.5 cGy, P = 0.005), right ventricle (158.3 vs 59.2 cGy, P = 0.005), left anterior descending artery (171.1 vs 78.1 cGy, P = 0.005), and whole heart (173.9 vs 66 cGy, P = 0.005), heart V20 (2.2% vs 0%, P = 0.007) and heart V10 (4.2% vs 0.3%, P = 0.007) - whereas they revealed no additional burden on the ipsilateral lung. Reproducible deep-inspiration breath-hold and free-breathing plans with inverse intensity-modulated radiotherapy provided similar organ at risk sparing by reducing the mean doses to the left ventricle, left anterior descending artery, heart, V10-V20 of the heart and right ventricle. However, forward intensity-modulated radiotherapy showed significant reduction in doses to the left ventricle, left anterior descending artery, heart, right ventricle, and contralateral breast (mean dose, 248.9 to 12.3 cGy, P = 0.005). The mean doses for free-breathing vs reproducible deep-inspiration breath-hold of the proximal left anterior descending artery were 1.78 vs 1.08 Gy and of the distal left anterior descending artery were 8.11 vs 3.89 Gy, whereas mean distances to the 50 Gy

  5. 14C-lactose breath tests during pelvic radiotherapy: the effect of the amount of small bowel irradiated

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, R.G.; Stryker, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    Thirty patients who were undergoing pelvic radiotherapy had 14 C-lactose breath tests performed in the first and fifth weeks of treatment. In Group I (21 patients), a significant portion of the small intestine was irradiated, and in Group II (9 patients), only a small portion of the small intestine was irradiated. In Group I, the average reductions in the excretion of ingested 14 C between the first- and fifth-week tests were 41.5% at 1/2 hour postingestion (p less than 0.05), and 21.8% at 1 hour postingestion (p less than 0.05). In Group II, the percentage reductions were 11.8% and 3.7% at 1/2 and 1 hour, respectively (p greater than 0.05). The data suggest that lactose malabsorption is a factor in the etiology of the nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea experienced by patients who are undergoing pelvic radiotherapy, and that the amount of bowel included in the treatment volume significantly influences the degree of malabsorption

  6. Heart position variability during voluntary moderate deep inspiration breath-hold radiotherapy for breast cancer determined by repeat CBCT scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Haaren, Paul; Claassen-Janssen, Fiere; van de Sande, Ingrid; Boersma, Liesbeth; van der Sangen, Maurice; Hurkmans, Coen

    2017-08-01

    Voluntary moderate deep inspiration breath hold (vmDIBH) in left-sided breast cancer radiotherapy reduces cardiac dose. The aim of this study was to investigate heart position variability in vmDIBH using CBCT and to compare this variability with differences in heart position between vmDIBH and free breathing (FB). For 50 patients initial heart position with respect to the field edge (HP-FE) was measured on a vmDIBH planning CT scan. Breath-hold was monitored using an in-house developed vertical plastic stick. On pre-treatment CBCT scans, heart position variability with respect to the field edge (Δ HP-FE ) was measured, reflecting heart position variability when using an offline correction protocol. After registering the CBCT scan to the planning CT, heart position variability with respect to the chest wall (Δ HP-CW ) was measured, reflecting heart position variability when using an online correction protocol. As a control group, vmDIBH and FB computed tomography (CT) scans were acquired for 30 patients and registering both scans on the chest wall. For 34 out of 50 patients, the average HP-FE and HP-CW increased over the treatment course in comparison to the planning CT. Averaged over all patients and all treatment fractions, the Δ HP-FE and the Δ HP-CW was 0.8±4.2mm (range -9.4-+10.6mm) and 1.0±4.4mm (range -8.3-+10.4mm) respectively. The average gain in heart to chest wall distance was 11.8±4.6mm when using vmDIBH instead of FB. In conclusion, substantial variability in heart position using vmDIBH was observed during the treatment course. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Geometric uncertainties in voluntary deep inspiration breath hold radiotherapy for locally advanced lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Josipovic, Mirjana; Persson, G F; Dueck, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) increases lung volume and can potentially reduce treatment-related toxicity in locally advanced lung cancer. We estimated geometric uncertainties in visually guided voluntary DIBH and derived the appropriate treatment margins for different...

  8. Assessment of voluntary deep inspiration breath-hold with CINE imaging for breast radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estoesta, Reuben Patrick; Attwood, Lani; Naehrig, Diana; Claridge-Mackonis, Elizabeth; Odgers, David; Martin, Darren; Pham, Melissa; Toohey, Joanne; Carroll, Susan

    2017-10-01

    Deep Inspiration Breath-Hold (DIBH) techniques for breast cancer radiation therapy (RT) have reduced cardiac dose compared to Free Breathing (FB). Recently, a voluntary deep inspiration breath-hold (vDIBH) technique was established using in-room lasers and skin tattoos to monitor breath-hold. An in-house quality assessment of positional reproducibility during RT delivery with vDIBH in patients with left-sided breast cancer was evaluated. The electronic portal imaging device (EPID) was used in cinematographic (CINE) mode to capture a sequence of images during beam delivery. Weekly CINE images were retrospectively assessed for 20 left-sided breast cancer patients receiving RT in vDIBH, and compared with CINE images of 20 patients treated in FB. The intra-beam motion was assessed and the distance from the beam central axis (CA) to the internal chest wall (ICW) was measured on each CINE image. These were then compared to the planned distance on digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR). The maximum intra-beam motion for any one patient measurement was 0.30 cm for vDIBH and 0.20 cm for FB. The mean difference between the distance from the CA to ICW on DRR and the equivalent distance on CINE imaging (as treated) was 0.28 cm (SD 0.17) for vDIBH patients and 0.25 cm (SD 0.14) for FB patients (P = 0.458). The measured values were comparable for patients undergoing RT in vDIBH, and for those in FB. This quality assessment showed that using in-room lasers and skin tattoos to independently monitor breath-hold in vDIBH as detected by 'on-treatment' CINE imaging is safe and effective. © 2017 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  9. Credentialing of radiotherapy centres for a clinical trial of adaptive radiotherapy for bladder cancer (TROG 10.01)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kron, Tomas; Pham, Daniel; Roxby, Paul; Rolfo, Aldo; Foroudi, Farshad

    2012-01-01

    Background: Daily variations in bladder filling make conformal treatment of bladder cancer challenging. On-line adaptive radiotherapy with a choice of plans has been demonstrated to reduce small bowel irradiation in single institution trials. In order to support a multicentre feasibility clinical trial on adaptive radiotherapy for bladder cancer (TROG 10.01) a credentialing programme was developed for centres wishing to participate. Methods: The credentialing programme entails three components: a facility questionnaire; a planning exercise which tests the ability of centres to create three adaptive plans based on a planning and five cone beam CTs; and a site visit during which image quality, imaging dose and image guidance procedures are assessed. Image quality and decision making were tested using customised inserts for a Perspex phantom (Modus QUASAR) that mimic different bladder sizes. Dose was assessed in the same phantom using thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD). Results: All 12 centres participating in the full credentialing programme were able to generate appropriate target volumes in the planning exercise and identify the correct target volume and position the bladder phantom in the phantom within 3 mm accuracy. None of the imaging doses exceeded the limit of 5 cGy with a CT on rails system having the lowest overall dose. Conclusion: A phantom mimicking the decision making process for adaptive radiotherapy was found to be well suited during site visits for credentialing of centres participating in a clinical trial of adaptive radiotherapy for bladder cancer. Combined with a planning exercise the site visit allowed testing the ability of centres to create adaptive treatment plans and make appropriate decisions based on the volumetric images acquired at treatment.

  10. Design of planning target volume margin using an active breathing control and Varian image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) system in unresectable liver tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue Jinbo; Yu Jinming; Liu Jing; Liu Tonghai; Yin Yong; Shi Xuetao; Song Jinlong

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To define the planning target volume(PTV) margin with an active breathing control (ABC) and the Varian image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) system. Methods: Thirteen patients with liver cancer were treated with radiotherapy from May 2006 to September 2006. Prior to radiotherapy, all patients had undergone transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) by infusing a mixture of iodized oil contrast medium and chemotherapeutic agents, kV fluoroscopy was used to measure the potential motion of lipiodol spot positions during ABC breath-holds. ABC was used for planning CT scan and radiation delivery, with the breath held at the same phase of the respiratory cycle (near end-exhalation). Cone beam CT (CBCT) was taken using Varian IGRT system, which was then compared online with planning CT using a 3 D-3 D matching tool. Analysis relied on lipiodol spots on planning CT and CBCT manually. The treatment table was moved to produce acceptable setup before treatment delivery. Repeated CBCT image and another analysis were obtained after irradiation. Results: No motion of the intrahepatic tumor was observed on fluoroscopy during ABC breath-holds. The estimated required PTV margins, calculated according to the Stroom formula, were 4.4 mm, 5.3 mm and 7.8 mm in the x, y and z axis directions before radiotherapy. The corresponding parameters were 2.5m, 2.6 mm and 3.9 mm after radiotherapy. Conclusions: We have adopted a PTV margin of 5 mm, 6 mm and 8 mm in the x, y and z axis directions with ABC, and 3,3 and 4 mm with ABC and on-line kilovoltage CBCT. (authors)

  11. SU-E-T-450: How Important Is a Reproducible Breath Hold for DIBH Breast Radiotherapy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, H; Wentworth, S; Sintay, B; Wiant, D [Cone Health Cancer Center, Greensboro, NC (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) for left-sided breast cancer has been shown to reduce heart dose. Surface imaging helps to ensure accurate breast positioning, but does not guarantee a reproducible breath hold (BH) at DIBH treatments. We examine the effects of variable BH positions for DIBH treatments. Methods: Twenty-Five patients with free breathing (FB) and DIBH scans were reviewed. Four plans were created for each patient: 1) FB, 2) DIBH, 3) FB-DIBH – the DIBH plans were copied to the FB images and recalculated (image registration was based on breast tissue), and 4) P-DIBH – a partial BH with the heart shifted midway between the FB and DIBH positions. The FB-DIBH plans give “worst case” scenarios for surface imaging DIBH, where the breast is aligned by surface imaging but the patient is not holding their breath. Students t-tests were used to compare dose metrics. Results: The DIBH plans gave lower heart dose and comparable breast coverage versus FB in all cases. The FB-DIBH plans showed no significant difference versus FB plans for breast coverage, mean heart dose, or maximum heart dose (p >= 0.10). The mean heart dose differed between FB-DIBH and FB by < 2 Gy for all cases, the maximum heart dose differed by < 2 Gy for 21 cases. The P-DIBH plans showed significantly lower mean heart dose than FB (p = 0.01). The mean heart doses for the P-DIBH plans were < FB for 22 cases, the maximum dose < FB for 18 cases. Conclusions: A DIBH plan delivered to a FB patient set-up with surface imaging will yield similar dosimetry to a plan created and delivered FB. A DIBH plan delivered with even a partial BH can give reduced heart dose compared to FB techniques when the breast tissue is well aligned.

  12. SU-E-T-450: How Important Is a Reproducible Breath Hold for DIBH Breast Radiotherapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, H; Wentworth, S; Sintay, B; Wiant, D

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) for left-sided breast cancer has been shown to reduce heart dose. Surface imaging helps to ensure accurate breast positioning, but does not guarantee a reproducible breath hold (BH) at DIBH treatments. We examine the effects of variable BH positions for DIBH treatments. Methods: Twenty-Five patients with free breathing (FB) and DIBH scans were reviewed. Four plans were created for each patient: 1) FB, 2) DIBH, 3) FB-DIBH – the DIBH plans were copied to the FB images and recalculated (image registration was based on breast tissue), and 4) P-DIBH – a partial BH with the heart shifted midway between the FB and DIBH positions. The FB-DIBH plans give “worst case” scenarios for surface imaging DIBH, where the breast is aligned by surface imaging but the patient is not holding their breath. Students t-tests were used to compare dose metrics. Results: The DIBH plans gave lower heart dose and comparable breast coverage versus FB in all cases. The FB-DIBH plans showed no significant difference versus FB plans for breast coverage, mean heart dose, or maximum heart dose (p >= 0.10). The mean heart dose differed between FB-DIBH and FB by < 2 Gy for all cases, the maximum heart dose differed by < 2 Gy for 21 cases. The P-DIBH plans showed significantly lower mean heart dose than FB (p = 0.01). The mean heart doses for the P-DIBH plans were < FB for 22 cases, the maximum dose < FB for 18 cases. Conclusions: A DIBH plan delivered to a FB patient set-up with surface imaging will yield similar dosimetry to a plan created and delivered FB. A DIBH plan delivered with even a partial BH can give reduced heart dose compared to FB techniques when the breast tissue is well aligned

  13. Evaluation of delivered dose for a clinical daily adaptive plan selection strategy for bladder cancer radiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lutkenhaus, Lotte J.; Visser, Jorrit; de Jong, Rianne; Hulshof, Maarten C. C. M.; Bel, Arjan

    2015-01-01

    To account for variable bladder size during bladder cancer radiotherapy, a daily plan selection strategy was implemented. The aim of this study was to calculate the actually delivered dose using an adaptive strategy, compared to a non-adaptive approach. Ten patients were treated to the bladder and

  14. Interfractional diaphragm changes during breath-holding in stereotactic body radiotherapy for liver cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, Daisuke; Ozawa, Shuichi; Nakashima, Takeo; Tsuda, Shintaro; Ochi, Yusuke; Okumura, Takuro; Masuda, Hirokazu; Hioki, Kazunari; Suzuki, Tathsuhiko; Ohno, Yoshimi; Kimura, Tomoki; Murakami, Yuji; Nagata, Yasushi

    2018-01-01

    IGRT based on bone matching may produce a large target positioning error in terms of the reproducibility of expiration breath-holding on SBRT for liver cancer. We evaluated the intrafractional and interfractional errors using the diaphragm position at the end of expiration by utilising Abches and analysed the factor of the interfractional error. Intrafractional and interfractional errors were measured using a couple of frontal kV images, planning computed tomography (pCT) and daily cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Moreover, max-min diaphragm position within daily CBCT image sets with respect to pCT and the maximum value of diaphragm position difference between CBCT and pCT were calculated. The mean ± SD (standard deviation) of the intra-fraction diaphragm position variation in the frontal kV images was 1.0 ± 0.7 mm in the C-C direction. The inter-fractional diaphragm changes were 0.4 ± 4.6 mm in the C-C direction, 1.4 ± 2.2 mm in the A-P direction, and -0.6 ± 1.8 mm in the L-R direction. There were no significant differences between the maximum value of the max-min diaphragm position within daily CBCT image sets with respect to pCT and the maximum value of diaphragm position difference between CBCT and pCT. Residual intrafractional variability of diaphragm position is minimal, but large interfractional diaphragm changes were observed. There was a small effect in the patient condition difference between pCT and CBCT. The impact of the difference in daily breath-holds on the interfractional diaphragm position was large or the difference in daily breath-holding heavily influenced the interfractional diaphragm change.

  15. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prosnitz, L.R.; Kapp, D.S.; Weissberg, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    This review highlights developments over the past decade in radiotherapy and attempts to summarize the state of the art in the management of the major diseases in which radiotherapy has a meaningful role. The equipment, radiobiology of radiotherapy and carcinoma of the lung, breast and intestines are highlighted

  16. Magnitude of shift of tumor position as a function of moderated deep inspiration breath-hold: An analysis of pooled data of lung patients with active breath control in image-guided radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muralidhar K

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reproducibility and magnitude of shift of tumor position by using active breathing control and iView-GT for patients with lung cancer with moderate deep-inspiration breath-hold (mDIBH technique. Eight patients with 10 lung tumors were studied. CT scans were performed in the breath-holding phase. Moderate deep-inspiration breath-hold under spirometer-based monitoring system was used. Few important bony anatomic details were delineated by the radiation oncologist. To evaluate the interbreath-hold reproducibility of the tumor position, we compared the digital reconstruction radiographs (DRRs from planning system with the DRRs from the iView-GT in the machine room. We measured the shift in x, y, and z directions. The reproducibility was defined as the difference between the bony landmarks from the DRR of the planning system and those from the DRR of the iView-GT. The maximum shift of the tumor position was 3.2 mm, 3.0 mm, and 2.9 mm in the longitudinal, lateral, and vertical directions. In conclusion, the moderated deep-inspiration breath-hold method using a spirometer is feasible, with relatively good reproducibility of the tumor position for image-guided radiotherapy in lung cancers.

  17. Efficiency of Stereotactic Conformal Radiotherapy in Lung Metastases with Active Breathing Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Yu. Anikeeva, PhD

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Twenty four patients with lung metastases underwent radiosurgery treatment between October 2010 and December 2012. Stereotactic conformal high-dose radiation therapy with Active Breathing Control (ABC was conducted using the volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT technique. The median overall follow-up was 18 months (range 6-24 months, overall survival was 75%, and local control rate was 92%. The median time to progression was 4 months (range 1-18 months.There have been no cases of leucopenia, radiation esophagitis, mediastinitis or severe acute radiation pneumonitis. The late radiation effects Grade 2, according to the LENT SOMA scales, was observed in one patient (4%. The results of this study indicate that the usage of the stereotactic high-dose radiation therapy with ABC is safe and effective in the treatment of lung metastases.

  18. Potential benefit and clinical implementation of adaptive radiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lutkenhaus, L.J.

    2016-01-01

    The success of radiotherapy is defined by how well we are able to treat the tumor, without overly damaging the healthy tissue. Over the entire treatment period, day-to-day anatomical variations will occur, which can be compensated for by using a different irradiation plan for each treatment day.

  19. MO-FG-BRA-09: Towards an Optimal Breath-Holding Procedure for Radiotherapy: Differences in Organ Motion During Inhalation and Exhalation Breath-Holds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lens, E; Gurney-Champion, O; Horst, A van der; Tekelenburg, D; Kesteren, Z van; Tienhoven, G van; Nederveen, A; Bel, A [Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, Noord-Holland (Netherlands); Parkes, M [University of Birmingham, Birmingham, West Midlands (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Breath-holding (BH) is often used to reduce organ motion during radiotherapy. The aim of this study was to determine the differences in pancreatic and diaphragmatic motion during BH between inhalation and exhalation BHs with variable lung volumes and to investigate whether motion increases/decreases during BH. Methods: Sixteen healthy volunteers were asked to perform four different 60-second BHs, from fully inflated to fully deflated lungs (i.e. lung volumes of: 100%, ∼70%, ∼30% and 0% of inspiratory capacity) three times (total of 192 BHs). During each BH, we obtained single-slice (coronal) magnetic-resonance scans with spatial resolution 0.93×0.93×8.0 mm3 and temporal resolution 0.6 s. We used 2-dimensional image correlation to obtain the motion of pancreatic head and diaphragm during BH. Motion magnitude in inferior-superior direction was obtained by determining the maximum displacement during BH. Results: Pancreatic and diaphragmatic drifts occurred during BH and were mostly in the superior direction. We observed significantly smaller pancreatic and diaphragmatic motion magnitudes in inferior-superior direction during exhalation BHs (BH{sub 30%} and BH{sub 0%}) compared to inhalation BHs (BH{sub 100%} and BH{sub 70%}). The mean motion magnitudes of the pancreatic head were 7.0, 6.5, 4.4 and 4.2 mm during BH{sub 100%}, BH{sub 70%}, BH{sub 30%} and BH{sub 0%}, respectively, and mean BH durations were 59.9, 59.1, 59.0 and 52.7 s. For the diaphragm, mean motion magnitudes were 9.8, 9.0, 5.6 and 4.3 mm, respectively. When considering 30-second BHs, as often used in the clinic, the motion was most pronounced during the first 10 s and excluding these from the analysis (yielding an effective BH period of 20 s) significantly reduced (P≤0.002) organ motion. Conclusion: Organ motion was significantly smaller during exhalation BHs compared to inhalation BHs. Also, motion was largest at the start of BH. Hence, waiting for 10 s may significantly decrease

  20. Less increase of CT-based calcium scores of the coronary arteries. Effect three years after breast-conserving radiotherapy using breath-hold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mast, M.E.; Kempen-Harteveld, M.L. van; Petoukhova, A.L. [Centre West, Radiotherapy, The Hague (Netherlands); Heijenbrok, M.W. [Medical Center Haaglanden, Department of Radiology, The Hague (Netherlands); Scholten, A.N. [Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Wolterbeek, R. [Leiden University Medical Centre, Department of Medical Statistics and Bioinformatics, Leiden (Netherlands); Schreur, J.H.M. [Medical Center Haaglanden, Department of Cardiology, The Hague (Netherlands); Struikmans, H. [Centre West, Radiotherapy, The Hague (Netherlands); Leiden University Medical Centre, Department of Clinical Oncology, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2016-10-15

    The aim of this prospective longitudinal study was to compare coronary artery calcium (CAC) scores determined before the start of whole breast irradiation with those determined 3 years afterwards. Changes in CAC scores were analysed in 99 breast cancer patients. Three groups were compared: patients receiving left- and right-sided radiotherapy, and those receiving left-sided radiotherapy with breath-hold. We analysed overall CAC scores and left anterior descending (LAD) and right coronary artery (RCA) CAC scores. Between the three groups, changes of the value of the LAD minus the RCA CAC scores of each individual patient were also compared. Three years after breath-hold-based whole breast irradiation, a less pronounced increase of CAC scores was noted. Furthermore, LAD minus RCA scores in patients treated for left-sided breast cancer without breath-hold were higher when compared to LAD minus RCA scores of patients with right-sided breast cancers and those with left-sided breast cancer treated with breath-hold. Breath-hold in breast-conserving radiotherapy leads to a less pronounced increase of CT-based CAC scores. Therefore, breath-hold probably prevents the development of radiation-induced coronary artery disease. However, the sample size of this study is limited and the follow-up period relatively short. (orig.) [German] Das Ziel dieser prospektiven Langzeitstudie war der Vergleich der Coronary-Artery-Calcium-(CAC-)Werte vor Beginn der Brustbestrahlung mit den Werten nach 3 Jahren. Aenderungen der CAC-Werte wurden bei 99 Brustkrebspatienten analysiert. Drei Gruppen wurden untersucht: Patienten nach links- und rechtsseitiger Strahlentherapie sowie mit Bestrahlung unter Atemanhalt. Wir analysierten die Gesamt-CAC-Werte sowie die CAC-Werte der vorderen linken absteigenden (''left anterior descending'', LAD) und der rechten Koronararterie (''right coronary artery'', RCA). Zwischen den drei Gruppen wurden auch die Veraenderungen

  1. Chronic adaptations of lung function in breath-hold diving fishermen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Diniz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to verify and analyze the existence of chronic adaptations of lung function in freediving fishermen whose occupation is artisanal fishing. Material and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study involving 11 breath-hold diving fishermen and 10 non-breath-hold diving fishermen (control from the village of Bitupitá in the municipality of Barroquinha (Ceará - Brazil. Anthropometric measurements, chest and abdominal circumferences as well as spirometric and respiratory muscle strength tests were conducted according to the specifications of the American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society (ATS/ERS. In order to compare the measured values versus the predicted values, Student t test was used in the case of parametric test and Wilcoxon test in the case of nonparametric test. To compare the inter-group means Student t test was used for parametric test and Mann-Whitney test for the nonparametric one. The level of significance was set at α = 5%. Results: The forced vital capacity (FVC (4.9±0.6 l vs. 4.3±0.4 l and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1 (4.0±0.5 l vs. 3.6±0.3 l were, respectively, higher in the group of divers compared to the control group (p ≤ 0.05. Furthermore, in the group of free divers, the measured FVC, FEV1 and FEV1/FVC ratios were significantly greater than the predicted ones. No differences were found between the measured respiratory pressures. Conclusions: These results indicate that breath-hold diving seems to produce chronic adaptations of the respiratory system, resulting in elevated lung volumes with no airway obstruction.

  2. Air-Breathing Hypersonic Vehicle Tracking Control Based on Adaptive Dynamic Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Chaoxu; Ni, Zhen; Sun, Changyin; He, Haibo

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a data-driven supplementary control approach with adaptive learning capability for air-breathing hypersonic vehicle tracking control based on action-dependent heuristic dynamic programming (ADHDP). The control action is generated by the combination of sliding mode control (SMC) and the ADHDP controller to track the desired velocity and the desired altitude. In particular, the ADHDP controller observes the differences between the actual velocity/altitude and the desired velocity/altitude, and then provides a supplementary control action accordingly. The ADHDP controller does not rely on the accurate mathematical model function and is data driven. Meanwhile, it is capable to adjust its parameters online over time under various working conditions, which is very suitable for hypersonic vehicle system with parameter uncertainties and disturbances. We verify the adaptive supplementary control approach versus the traditional SMC in the cruising flight, and provide three simulation studies to illustrate the improved performance with the proposed approach.

  3. Sliding mode disturbance observer-enhanced adaptive control for the air-breathing hypersonic flight vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Hao; Wang, Changhong; Fidan, Baris

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents a backstepping procedure to design an adaptive controller for the air-breathing hypersonic flight vehicle (AHFV) subject to external disturbances and actuator saturations. In each step, a sliding mode exact disturbance observer (SMEDO) is exploited to exactly estimate the lumped disturbance in finite time. Specific dynamics are introduced to handle the possible actuator saturations. Based on SMEDO and introduced dynamics, an adaptive control law is designed, along with the consideration on ;explosion of complexity; in backstepping design. The developed controller is equipped with fast disturbance rejection and great capability to accommodate the saturated actuators, which also lead to a wider application scope. A simulation study is provided to show the effectiveness and superiority of the proposed controller.

  4. SU-E-J-223: A BOLD Contrast Imaging Sequence to Evaluate Oxygenation Changes Due to Breath Holding for Breast Radiotherapy: A Pilot Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamson, J; Chang, Z; Cai, J; Palta, M; Horton, J; Yin, F; Blitzblau, R

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a robust MRI sequence to measure BOLD breath hold induced contrast in context of breast radiotherapy. Methods: Two sequences were selected from prior studies as candidates to measure BOLD contrast attributable to breath holding within the breast: (1) T2* based Gradient Echo EPI (TR/TE = 500/41ms, flip angle = 60°), and (2) T2 based Single Shot Fast Spin Echo (SSFSE) (TR/TE = 3000/60ms). We enrolled ten women post-lumpectomy for breast cancer who were undergoing treatment planning for whole breast radiotherapy. Each session utilized a 1.5T GE MRI and 4 channel breast coil with the subject immobilized prone on a custom board. For each sequence, 1–3 planes of the lumpectomy breast were imaged continuously during a background measurement (1min) and intermittent breath holds (20–40s per breath hold, 3–5 holds per sequence). BOLD contrast was quantified as correlation of changes in per-pixel intensity with the breath hold schedule convolved with a hemodynamic response function. Subtle motion was corrected using a deformable registration algorithm. Correlation with breath-holding was considered significant if p<0.001. Results: The percentage of the breast ROI with positive BOLD contrast measured by the two sequences were in agreement with a correlation coefficient of R=0.72 (p=0.02). While both sequences demonstrated areas with strong BOLD response, the response was more systematic throughout the breast for the SSFSE (T2) sequence (% breast with response in the same direction: 51.2%±0.7% for T2* vs. 68.1%±16% for T2). In addition, the T2 sequence was less prone to magnetic susceptibility artifacts, especially in presence of seroma, and provided a more robust image with little distortion or artifacts. Conclusion: A T2 SSFSE sequence shows promise for measuring BOLD contrast in the context of breast radiotherapy utilizing a breath hold technique. Further study in a larger patient cohort is warranted to better refine this novel technique

  5. SU-E-J-223: A BOLD Contrast Imaging Sequence to Evaluate Oxygenation Changes Due to Breath Holding for Breast Radiotherapy: A Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, J; Chang, Z; Cai, J; Palta, M; Horton, J; Yin, F; Blitzblau, R [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a robust MRI sequence to measure BOLD breath hold induced contrast in context of breast radiotherapy. Methods: Two sequences were selected from prior studies as candidates to measure BOLD contrast attributable to breath holding within the breast: (1) T2* based Gradient Echo EPI (TR/TE = 500/41ms, flip angle = 60°), and (2) T2 based Single Shot Fast Spin Echo (SSFSE) (TR/TE = 3000/60ms). We enrolled ten women post-lumpectomy for breast cancer who were undergoing treatment planning for whole breast radiotherapy. Each session utilized a 1.5T GE MRI and 4 channel breast coil with the subject immobilized prone on a custom board. For each sequence, 1–3 planes of the lumpectomy breast were imaged continuously during a background measurement (1min) and intermittent breath holds (20–40s per breath hold, 3–5 holds per sequence). BOLD contrast was quantified as correlation of changes in per-pixel intensity with the breath hold schedule convolved with a hemodynamic response function. Subtle motion was corrected using a deformable registration algorithm. Correlation with breath-holding was considered significant if p<0.001. Results: The percentage of the breast ROI with positive BOLD contrast measured by the two sequences were in agreement with a correlation coefficient of R=0.72 (p=0.02). While both sequences demonstrated areas with strong BOLD response, the response was more systematic throughout the breast for the SSFSE (T2) sequence (% breast with response in the same direction: 51.2%±0.7% for T2* vs. 68.1%±16% for T2). In addition, the T2 sequence was less prone to magnetic susceptibility artifacts, especially in presence of seroma, and provided a more robust image with little distortion or artifacts. Conclusion: A T2 SSFSE sequence shows promise for measuring BOLD contrast in the context of breast radiotherapy utilizing a breath hold technique. Further study in a larger patient cohort is warranted to better refine this novel technique.

  6. Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rema Jyothirmayi

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Conservative treatment in the form of limited surgery and post-operative radiotherapy is controversial in hand and foot sarcomas, both due to poor radiation tolerance of the palm and sole, and due to technical difficulties in achieving adequate margins.This paper describes the local control and survival of 41 patients with soft tissue sarcoma of the hand or foot treated with conservative surgery and radiotherapy. The acute and late toxicity of megavoltage radiotherapy to the hand and foot are described. The technical issues and details of treatment delivery are discussed. The factors influencing local control after radiotherapy are analysed.

  7. Technical Note: DIRART- A software suite for deformable image registration and adaptive radiotherapy research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Deshan; Brame, Scott; El Naqa, Issam; Aditya, Apte; Wu Yu; Murty Goddu, S.; Mutic, Sasa; Deasy, Joseph O.; Low, Daniel A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Recent years have witnessed tremendous progress in image guide radiotherapy technology and a growing interest in the possibilities for adapting treatment planning and delivery over the course of treatment. One obstacle faced by the research community has been the lack of a comprehensive open-source software toolkit dedicated for adaptive radiotherapy (ART). To address this need, the authors have developed a software suite called the Deformable Image Registration and Adaptive Radiotherapy Toolkit (DIRART). Methods: DIRART is an open-source toolkit developed in MATLAB. It is designed in an object-oriented style with focus on user-friendliness, features, and flexibility. It contains four classes of DIR algorithms, including the newer inverse consistency algorithms to provide consistent displacement vector field in both directions. It also contains common ART functions, an integrated graphical user interface, a variety of visualization and image-processing features, dose metric analysis functions, and interface routines. These interface routines make DIRART a powerful complement to the Computational Environment for Radiotherapy Research (CERR) and popular image-processing toolkits such as ITK. Results: DIRART provides a set of image processing/registration algorithms and postprocessing functions to facilitate the development and testing of DIR algorithms. It also offers a good amount of options for DIR results visualization, evaluation, and validation. Conclusions: By exchanging data with treatment planning systems via DICOM-RT files and CERR, and by bringing image registration algorithms closer to radiotherapy applications, DIRART is potentially a convenient and flexible platform that may facilitate ART and DIR research.

  8. Effect of different breathing patterns in the same patient on stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy dosimetry for primary renal cell carcinoma: A case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham, Daniel; Kron, Tomas; Foroudi, Farshad; Siva, Shankar

    2013-01-01

    Stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) for primary renal cell carcinoma (RCC) targets requires motion management strategies to verify dose delivery. This case study highlights the effect of a change in patient breathing amplitude on the dosimetry to organs at risk and target structures. A 73-year-old male patient was planned for receiving 26 Gy of radiation in 1 fraction of SABR for a left primary RCC. The patient was simulated with four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) and the tumor internal target volume (ITV) was delineated using the 4DCT maximum intensity projection. However, the initially planned treatment was abandoned at the radiation oncologist's discretion after pretreatment cone-beam CT (CBCT) motion verification identified a greater than 50% reduction in superior to inferior diaphragm motion as compared with the planning 4DCT. This patient was resimulated with respiratory coaching instructions. To assess the effect of the change in breathing on the dosimetry to the target, each plan was recalculated on the data set representing the change in breathing condition. A change from smaller to larger breathing showed a 46% loss in planning target volume (PTV) coverage, whereas a change from larger breathing to smaller breathing resulted in an 8% decrease in PTV coverage. ITV coverage was similarly reduced by 8% in both scenarios. This case study highlights the importance of tools to verify breathing motion prior to treatment delivery. 4D image guided radiation therapy verification strategies should focus on not only verifying ITV margin coverage but also the effect on the surrounding organs at risk

  9. Risk of behavioral and adaptive functioning difficulties in youth with previous and current sleep disordered breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfect, Michelle M; Archbold, Kristen; Goodwin, James L; Levine-Donnerstein, Deborah; Quan, Stuart F

    2013-04-01

    To examine the rates of behavioral and adaptive functioning difficulties among youth who never had sleep disordered breathing (SDB), had remitted SDB, had incident SDB, or had persistent SDB; and to determine if there were increased odds of behavioral difficulties among youth with varying SDB histories relative to those who never had SDB. 263 youth had valid polysomnography and neurobehavioral data at two time points approximately 5 years apart from the prospective Tucson Children's Assessment of Sleep Apnea study. Primary outcomes were the behavior assessment scale for children-2(nd) Edition parent report form (BASC-PRF) and Self-Report of Personality (SRP), and the Adaptive Behavior Assessment System-2(nd) Edition (ABAS-2). Compared to those who never had SDB, individuals with persistent SDB had significant odds and met more cutoff scores on the BASC-2-PRF externalizing problems composite (odds ratio [OR] 3.29; 8.92% vs. 35.3%), behavioral symptoms index (OR 6.82; 7.4% vs. 35.3%) and Hyperactivity subscale (OR 6.82; 11.1% vs. 41.2%). Similarly, greater difficulties was seen for the group with persistent SDB (relative to never) on the ABAS-2 social domain (OR 3.39; 22% vs. 50%), and Communication (OR 4.26; 15% vs. 42.9%) and Self-Care subscales (OR = 2.97; 25.2% vs. 50%). Relative to youth who never had SDB, youth who developed SDB at Time 2 had compromised adaptive skills as evidenced by the BASC-2 PRF adaptive behavior composite (OR 3.34; 15.6% vs. 38.1%) and the ABAS-2 general adaptive composite (OR 2.83; 20.5% vs. 42.1%). Youth with current SDB exhibited hyperactivity, attention problems, aggressivity, lower social competency, poorer communication, and/or diminished adaptive skills.

  10. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zedgenidze, G.A.; Kulikov, V.A.; Mardynskij, Yu.S.

    1984-01-01

    The technique for roentgenotopometric and medicamentous preparation of patients for radiotherapy has been reported in detail. The features of planning and performing of remote, intracavitary and combined therapy in urinary bladder cancer are considered. The more effective methods of radiotherapy have been proposed taking into account own experience as well as literature data. The comparative evaluation of treatment results and prognosis are given. Radiation pathomorphism of tumors and tissues of urinary bladder is considered in detail. The problems of diagnosis, prophylaxis and treatment of complications following radiodiagnosis and radiotherapy in patients with urinary bladder cancer are illustrated widely

  11. Novel adaptive neural control of flexible air-breathing hypersonic vehicles based on sliding mode differentiator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bu Xiangwei

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A novel adaptive neural control strategy is exploited for the longitudinal dynamics of a generic flexible air-breathing hypersonic vehicle (FAHV. By utilizing functional decomposition method, the dynamics of FAHV is decomposed into the velocity subsystem and the altitude subsystem. For each subsystem, only one neural network is employed for the unknown function approximation. To further reduce the computational burden, minimal-learning parameter (MLP technology is used to estimate the norm of ideal weight vectors rather than their elements. By introducing sliding mode differentiator (SMD to estimate the newly defined variables, there is no need for the strict-feedback form and virtual controller. Hence the developed control law is considerably simpler than the ones derived from back-stepping scheme. Finally, simulation studies are made to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed control approach in spite of the flexible effects, system uncertainties and varying disturbances.

  12. Adaptive Neural Back-Stepping Control with Constrains for a Flexible Air-Breathing Hypersonic Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengfei Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The design of an adaptive neural back-stepping control for a flexible air-breathing hypersonic vehicle (AHV in the presence of input constraint and aerodynamic uncertainty is discussed. Based on functional decomposition, the dynamics can be decomposed into the velocity subsystem and the altitude subsystem. To guarantee the exploited controller’s robustness with respect to parametric uncertainties, neural network (NN is applied to approximate the lumped uncertainty of each subsystem of AHV model. The exceptional contribution is that novel auxiliary systems are introduced to compensate both the tracking errors and desired control laws, based on which the explored controller can still provide effective tracking of velocity and altitude commands when the actuators are saturated. Finally, simulation studies are made to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed control approach in spite of the flexible effects, system uncertainties, and varying disturbances.

  13. Effects of interportal error on dose distribution in patients undergoing breath-holding intensity-modulated radiotherapy for pancreatic cancer: evaluation of a new treatment planning method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takakura, Toru; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Shibuya, Keiko; Nakata, Manabu; Nakamura, Akira; Matsuo, Yukinori; Shiinoki, Takehiro; Higashimura, Kyoji; Teshima, Teruki; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2013-09-06

    In patients with pancreatic cancer, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) under breath holding facilitates concentration of the radiation dose in the tumor, while sparing the neighboring organs at risk and minimizing interplay effects between movement of the multileaf collimator and motion of the internal structures. Although the breath-holding technique provides high interportal reproducibility of target position, dosimetric errors caused by interportal breath-holding positional error have not been reported. Here, we investigated the effects of interportal breath-holding positional errors on IMRT dose distribution by incorporating interportal positional error into the original treatment plan, using random numbers in ten patients treated for pancreatic cancer. We also developed a treatment planning technique that shortens breath-holding time without increasing dosimetric quality assurance workload. The key feature of our proposed method is performance of dose calculation using the same optimized fluence map as the original plan, after dose per fraction in the original plan was cut in half and the number of fractions was doubled. Results confirmed that interportal error had a negligible effect on dose distribution over multiple fractions. Variations in the homogeneity index and the dose delivered to 98%, 2%, and 50% of the volume for the planning target volume, and the dose delivered to 1 cc of the volume for the duodenum and stomach were ±1%, on average, in comparison with the original plan. The new treatment planning method decreased breath-holding time by 33%, and differences in dose-volume metrics between the original and the new treatment plans were within ± 1%. An additional advantage of our proposed method is that interportal errors can be better averaged out; thus, dose distribution in the proposed method may be closer to the planned dose distribution than with the original plans.

  14. SU-F-P-14: Oxygen Inhalation Should Be the Conventional Approach in the Treatment of Thoracic and Abdominal Cancer by Radiotherapy with Active Breathing Control (ABC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, G; Guo, Y; Yin, Y [Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Jinan, Shandong (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility and potential benefit of oxygen inhalation (OI) during radiotherapy applying an active breathing control (ABC) device, by analyzing the blood oxygen saturation (SpO2) and the instantaneous heart rate (IHR) variation in breath holding with OI and oxygen non-inhalation (ONI). Methods: The 27 healthy volunteers (16 males, 11 females) who were involved in this trial were all required to hold their breath for 10 times, non-inhaling and inhaling oxygen successively. The breath-holding time (BHT), rest time (RT), SpO2 and IHR under different oxygen status were recorded and compared. Results: The volunteers were divided into two groups according to SpO2 variations in breath-holding: group A (12 cases), with less than2% decline of SpO2; group B (15 cases), with a decline that surpassed 2%, and which could reach 3–6%. The BHT of group A, without inhaling oxygen, was significantly longer than that of group B (mean 33.77s Vs 30.51s, p<0.05); and was extended by 26.6% and 27.85%, after inhaling oxygen, in groups A and B, respectively. The SpO2 decreased in all volunteers during RT with ONI, to an extent that could reach up to 6%. The IHR of all volunteers showed the fast-slow-fast variation rule, and the oxygen had little effect. More than 70% of the volunteers stated that oxygen made them feel more comfortable and were more cooperative when ABC was used. Conclusion: The SpO2 declines during breath holding and RT could not be ignored while applying ABC, oxygen inhalation should become a conventional method with lengthening BHT and shortening RT, which yielded the benefit of improving the stability and reproducibility.

  15. SU-F-P-14: Oxygen Inhalation Should Be the Conventional Approach in the Treatment of Thoracic and Abdominal Cancer by Radiotherapy with Active Breathing Control (ABC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, G; Guo, Y; Yin, Y

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility and potential benefit of oxygen inhalation (OI) during radiotherapy applying an active breathing control (ABC) device, by analyzing the blood oxygen saturation (SpO2) and the instantaneous heart rate (IHR) variation in breath holding with OI and oxygen non-inhalation (ONI). Methods: The 27 healthy volunteers (16 males, 11 females) who were involved in this trial were all required to hold their breath for 10 times, non-inhaling and inhaling oxygen successively. The breath-holding time (BHT), rest time (RT), SpO2 and IHR under different oxygen status were recorded and compared. Results: The volunteers were divided into two groups according to SpO2 variations in breath-holding: group A (12 cases), with less than2% decline of SpO2; group B (15 cases), with a decline that surpassed 2%, and which could reach 3–6%. The BHT of group A, without inhaling oxygen, was significantly longer than that of group B (mean 33.77s Vs 30.51s, p<0.05); and was extended by 26.6% and 27.85%, after inhaling oxygen, in groups A and B, respectively. The SpO2 decreased in all volunteers during RT with ONI, to an extent that could reach up to 6%. The IHR of all volunteers showed the fast-slow-fast variation rule, and the oxygen had little effect. More than 70% of the volunteers stated that oxygen made them feel more comfortable and were more cooperative when ABC was used. Conclusion: The SpO2 declines during breath holding and RT could not be ignored while applying ABC, oxygen inhalation should become a conventional method with lengthening BHT and shortening RT, which yielded the benefit of improving the stability and reproducibility.

  16. Dosimetric evaluation of inspiration and expiration breath-hold for intensity-modulated radiotherapy planning of non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, Bilal A; Bragg, Christopher M; Lawless, Sarah E; Hatton, Matthew Q F; Ireland, Rob H

    2010-04-21

    The purpose of this study was to compare target coverage and lung tissue sparing between inspiration and expiration breath-hold intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In a prospective study, seven NSCLC patients gave written consent to undergo both moderate deep inspiration and end-expiration breath-hold computed tomography (CT), which were used to generate five-field IMRT plans. Dose was calculated with a scatter and an inhomogeneity correction algorithm. The percentage of the planning target volume (PTV) receiving 90% of the prescription dose (PTV(90)), the volume of total lung receiving >or=10 Gy (V(10)) and >or=20 Gy (V(20)) and the mean lung dose (MLD) were compared by the Student's paired t-test. Compared with the expiration plans, the mean +/- SD reductions for V(10), V(20) and MLD on the inspiration plans were 4.0 +/- 3.7% (p = 0.031), 2.5 +/- 2.3% (p = 0.028) and 1.1 +/- 0.7 Gy (p = 0.007), respectively. Conversely, a mean difference of 1.1 +/- 1.1% (p = 0.044) in PTV(90) was demonstrated in favour of expiration. When using IMRT, inspiration breath-hold can reduce the dose to normal lung tissue while expiration breath-hold can improve the target coverage. The improved lung sparing at inspiration may outweigh the modest improvements in target coverage at expiration.

  17. NOTE: Dosimetric evaluation of inspiration and expiration breath-hold for intensity-modulated radiotherapy planning of non-small cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, Bilal A.; Bragg, Christopher M.; Lawless, Sarah E.; Hatton, Matthew Q. F.; Ireland, Rob H.

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare target coverage and lung tissue sparing between inspiration and expiration breath-hold intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In a prospective study, seven NSCLC patients gave written consent to undergo both moderate deep inspiration and end-expiration breath-hold computed tomography (CT), which were used to generate five-field IMRT plans. Dose was calculated with a scatter and an inhomogeneity correction algorithm. The percentage of the planning target volume (PTV) receiving 90% of the prescription dose (PTV90), the volume of total lung receiving >= 10 Gy (V10) and >= 20 Gy (V20) and the mean lung dose (MLD) were compared by the Student's paired t-test. Compared with the expiration plans, the mean ± SD reductions for V10, V20 and MLD on the inspiration plans were 4.0 ± 3.7% (p = 0.031), 2.5 ± 2.3% (p = 0.028) and 1.1 ± 0.7 Gy (p = 0.007), respectively. Conversely, a mean difference of 1.1 ± 1.1% (p = 0.044) in PTV90 was demonstrated in favour of expiration. When using IMRT, inspiration breath-hold can reduce the dose to normal lung tissue while expiration breath-hold can improve the target coverage. The improved lung sparing at inspiration may outweigh the modest improvements in target coverage at expiration.

  18. On using an adaptive neural network to predict lung tumor motion during respiration for radiotherapy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaksson, Marcus; Jalden, Joakim; Murphy, Martin J.

    2005-01-01

    In this study we address the problem of predicting the position of a moving lung tumor during respiration on the basis of external breathing signals--a technique used for beam gating, tracking, and other dynamic motion management techniques in radiation therapy. We demonstrate the use of neural network filters to correlate tumor position with external surrogate markers while simultaneously predicting the motion ahead in time, for situations in which neither the breathing pattern nor the correlation between moving anatomical elements is constant in time. One pancreatic cancer patient and two lung cancer patients with mid/upper lobe tumors were fluoroscopically imaged to observe tumor motion synchronously with the movement of external chest markers during free breathing. The external marker position was provided as input to a feed-forward neural network that correlated the marker and tumor movement to predict the tumor position up to 800 ms in advance. The predicted tumor position was compared to its observed position to establish the accuracy with which the filter could dynamically track tumor motion under nonstationary conditions. These results were compared to simplified linear versions of the filter. The two lung cancer patients exhibited complex respiratory behavior in which the correlation between surrogate marker and tumor position changed with each cycle of breathing. By automatically and continuously adjusting its parameters to the observations, the neural network achieved better tracking accuracy than the fixed and adaptive linear filters. Variability and instability in human respiration complicate the task of predicting tumor position from surrogate breathing signals. Our results show that adaptive signal-processing filters can provide more accurate tumor position estimates than simpler stationary filters when presented with nonstationary breathing motion

  19. Robust adaptive multivariable higher-order sliding mode flight control for air-breathing hypersonic vehicle with actuator failures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes an adaptive multivariable higher-order sliding mode control for the longitudinal model of an air-breathing vehicle under system uncertainties and actuator failures. Firstly, a fast finite-time control law is designed for a chain of integrators. Secondly, based on the input/output feedback linearization technique, the system uncertainty and external disturbances are modeled as additive certainty and the actuator failures are modeled as multiplicative uncertainty. By using the proposed fast finite-time control law, a robust multivariable higher-order sliding mode control is designed for the air-breathing hypersonic vehicle with actuator failures. Finally, adaptive laws are proposed for the adaptation of the parameters in the robust multivariable higher-order sliding mode control. Thus, the bounds of the uncertainties are not needed in the control system design. Simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed robust adaptive multivariable higher-order sliding mode control.

  20. Deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) radiotherapy in left-sided breast cancer: Dosimetrical comparison and clinical feasibility in 20 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepp, Rodrigo; Ammerpohl, Mark; Morgenstern, Christina; Nielinger, Lisa; Erichsen, Patricia; Abdallah, Abdallah; Galalae, Razvan

    2015-09-01

    Adjuvant radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) for breast cancer (BC) is a well-established indication. The risk of ischaemic heart disease after radiotherapy for BC increases linearly with the heart mean dose with no apparent threshold. Radiotherapy to the left breast in deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) reduces the dose to the heart. A new linac system with an integrated surface scanner (SS) for DIBH treatments was recently installed in our department. We tested it for potential benefits, safety, patients' acceptance/compliance and associated additional workload. Twenty consecutive patients following BCS for breast carcinoma of the left side were enrolled in our institutional DIBH protocol. We compared dose to the heart and ipsilateral lung (IL) between plans in DIBH and free breathing (FB) using standard defined parameters: mean dose, maximal dose to a volume of 2 cm(3) (D2 cm (3)), volume receiving ≥ 5 Gy (V5), 10 Gy (V10), 15 Gy (V15) and 20 Gy (V20). Comparison of median calculated dose values was performed using a two-tailed Wilcoxon signed rank test. DIBH was associated with a statistically significant reduction (p < 0.001) in all studied parameters for the heart and the IL. In 16 of 20 patients the heart D2 cm (3) was less than 42 Gy in DIBH. In FB the heart D2 cm (3) was ≥ 42 Gy in 17 of 20 patients. The median daily treatment time was 9 min. Radiotherapy of the left breast in DIBH using a SS could easily be incorporated into daily routine and is associated with significant dose reduction to the heart and IL.

  1. Molecular PET imaging for biology-guided adaptive radiotherapy of head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeben, Bianca A W; Bussink, Johan; Troost, Esther G C; Oyen, Wim J G; Kaanders, Johannes H A M

    2013-10-01

    Integration of molecular imaging PET techniques into therapy selection strategies and radiation treatment planning for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) can serve several purposes. First, pre-treatment assessments can steer decisions about radiotherapy modifications or combinations with other modalities. Second, biology-based objective functions can be introduced to the radiation treatment planning process by co-registration of molecular imaging with planning computed tomography (CT) scans. Thus, customized heterogeneous dose distributions can be generated with escalated doses to tumor areas where radiotherapy resistance mechanisms are most prevalent. Third, monitoring of temporal and spatial variations in these radiotherapy resistance mechanisms early during the course of treatment can discriminate responders from non-responders. With such information available shortly after the start of treatment, modifications can be implemented or the radiation treatment plan can be adapted tailing the biological response pattern. Currently, these strategies are in various phases of clinical testing, mostly in single-center studies. Further validation in multicenter set-up is needed. Ultimately, this should result in availability for routine clinical practice requiring stable production and accessibility of tracers, reproducibility and standardization of imaging and analysis methods, as well as general availability of knowledge and expertise. Small studies employing adaptive radiotherapy based on functional dynamics and early response mechanisms demonstrate promising results. In this context, we focus this review on the widely used PET tracer (18)F-FDG and PET tracers depicting hypoxia and proliferation; two well-known radiation resistance mechanisms.

  2. Modelling and Bayesian adaptive prediction of individual patients’ tumour volume change during radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tariq, Imran; Chen, Tao; Kirkby, Norman F; Jena, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a mathematical modelling method that can predict individual patients’ response to radiotherapy, in terms of tumour volume change during the treatment. The main concept is to start from a population-average model, which is subsequently updated from an individual’s tumour volume measurement. The model becomes increasingly personalised and so too does the prediction it produces. This idea of adaptive prediction was realised by using a Bayesian approach for updating the model parameters. The feasibility of the developed method was demonstrated on the data from 25 non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with helical tomotherapy, during which tumour volume was measured from daily imaging as part of the image-guided radiotherapy. The method could provide useful information for adaptive treatment planning and dose scheduling based on the patient’s personalised response. (paper)

  3. Impact of physiological breathing motion for breast cancer radiotherapy with proton beam scanning - An in silico study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flejmer, Anna M; Chehrazi, Behnaz; Josefsson, Dan; Toma-Dasu, Iuliana; Dasu, Alexandru

    2017-07-01

    This study investigates the impact of breathing motion on proton breast treatment plans. Twelve patients with CT datasets acquired during breath-hold-at-inhalation (BHI), breath-hold-at-exhalation (BHE) and in free-breathing (FB) were included in the study. Proton plans were designed for the left breast for BHI and subsequently recalculated for BHE or designed for FB and recalculated for the extreme breath-hold phases. The plans were compared from the point of view of their target coverage and doses to organs-at-risk. The median amplitude of breathing motion determined from the positions of the sternum was 4.7mm (range 0.5-14.6mm). Breathing motion led to a degradation of the dose coverage of the target (heterogeneity index increased from 4-7% to 8-11%), but the degraded values of the dosimetric parameters of interest fulfilled the clinical criteria for plan acceptance. Exhalation decreased the lung burden [average dose 3.1-4.5Gy (RBE)], while inhalation increased it [average dose 5.8-6.8Gy (RBE)]. The individual values depended on the field arrangement. Smaller differences were seen for the heart [average dose 0.1-0.2Gy (RBE)] and the LAD [1.9-4.6Gy (RBE)]. Weak correlations were generally found between changes in dosimetric parameters and respiratory motion. The differences between dosimetric parameters for various breathing phases were small and their expected clinical impact is consequently quite small. The results indicated that the dosimetric parameters of the plans corresponding to the extreme breathing phases are little affected by breathing motion, thus suggesting that this motion might have little impact for the chosen beam orientations with scanned proton beams. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The influence of breathing motion on intensity modulated radiotherapy in the step-and-shoot technique: phantom measurements for irradiation of superficial target volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thilmann, Christoph [Klinische Kooperationseinheit Radioonkologie des Deutschen Krebsforschungszentrums, INF 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Haering, Peter [Medizinische Physik des Deutschen Krebsforschungszentrums, INF 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Thilmann, Lennart [Klinische Kooperationseinheit Radioonkologie des Deutschen Krebsforschungszentrums, INF 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Unkelbach, Jan [Medizinische Physik des Deutschen Krebsforschungszentrums, INF 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Rhein, Bernhard [Medizinische Physik des Deutschen Krebsforschungszentrums, INF 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Nill, Simeon [Medizinische Physik des Deutschen Krebsforschungszentrums, INF 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Huber, Peter [Klinische Kooperationseinheit Radioonkologie des Deutschen Krebsforschungszentrums, INF 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Janisch, Elisabeth [Medizinische Physik des Deutschen Krebsforschungszentrums, INF 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Thieke, Christian [Klinische Kooperationseinheit Radioonkologie des Deutschen Krebsforschungszentrums, INF 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Debus, Juergen [Klinische Radiologie des Universitaetsklinikums Heidelberg, INF 400, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2006-03-21

    For intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) of deep-seated tumours, dosimetric variations of the original static dose profiles due to breathing motion can be primarily considered as blurring effects known from conventional radiotherapy. The purpose of this dosimetric study was to clarify whether these results are transferable to superficial targets and to quantify the additional effect of fractionation. A solid polystyrene phantom and an anthropomorphic phantom were used for film and ion chamber dose measurements. The phantoms were installed on an electric driven device and moved with a frequency of 6 or 12 cycles per minute and an amplitude of 4 mm or 10 mm. A split beam geometry of two adjacent asymmetric fields and an IMRT treatment plan with 12 fields for irradiation of the breast were investigated. For the split beam geometry the dose modifications due to unintended superposition of partial fields were reduced by fractionation and completely smoothed out after 20 fractions. IMRT applied to the moving phantom led to a more homogeneous dose distribution compared to the static phantom. The standard deviation of the target dose which is a measure of the dose homogeneity was 10.3 cGy for the static phantom and 7.7 cGy for a 10 mm amplitude. The absolute dose values, measured with ionization chambers, remained unaffected. Irradiation of superficial targets by IMRT in the step-and-shoot technique did not result in unexpected dose perturbations due to breathing motion. We conclude that regular breathing motion does not jeopardize IMRT of superficial target volumes. (note)

  5. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pistenma, D.A.

    1980-01-01

    The need for radiotherapy research is exemplified by the 100,000 cancer patients who will fail treatment locally and/or regionally annually for the next several years but who would benefit from better local treatment modalities. Theoretically, all of the areas of investigation discussed in this projection paper have the potential to significantly improve local-regional treatment of cancer by radiotherapy alone or in combination with other modalities. In many of the areas of investigation discussed in this paper encouraging results have been obtained in cellular and animal tumor studies and in limited studies in humans as well. In the not too distant future the number of patients who would benefit from better local control may increase by tens of thousands if developments in chemotherapy and/or immunotherapy provide a means to eradicate disseminated microscopic foci of cancer. Thus the efforts to improve local-regional control take on even greater significance

  6. SU-D-BRB-05: Quantum Learning for Knowledge-Based Response-Adaptive Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Naqa, I; Ten, R [Haken University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: There is tremendous excitement in radiotherapy about applying data-driven methods to develop personalized clinical decisions for real-time response-based adaptation. However, classical statistical learning methods lack in terms of efficiency and ability to predict outcomes under conditions of uncertainty and incomplete information. Therefore, we are investigating physics-inspired machine learning approaches by utilizing quantum principles for developing a robust framework to dynamically adapt treatments to individual patient’s characteristics and optimize outcomes. Methods: We studied 88 liver SBRT patients with 35 on non-adaptive and 53 on adaptive protocols. Adaptation was based on liver function using a split-course of 3+2 fractions with a month break. The radiotherapy environment was modeled as a Markov decision process (MDP) of baseline and one month into treatment states. The patient environment was modeled by a 5-variable state represented by patient’s clinical and dosimetric covariates. For comparison of classical and quantum learning methods, decision-making to adapt at one month was considered. The MDP objective was defined by the complication-free tumor control (P{sup +}=TCPx(1-NTCP)). A simple regression model represented state-action mapping. Single bit in classical MDP and a qubit of 2-superimposed states in quantum MDP represented the decision actions. Classical decision selection was done using reinforcement Q-learning and quantum searching was performed using Grover’s algorithm, which applies uniform superposition over possible states and yields quadratic speed-up. Results: Classical/quantum MDPs suggested adaptation (probability amplitude ≥0.5) 79% of the time for splitcourses and 100% for continuous-courses. However, the classical MDP had an average adaptation probability of 0.5±0.22 while the quantum algorithm reached 0.76±0.28. In cases where adaptation failed, classical MDP yielded 0.31±0.26 average amplitude while the

  7. SU-D-BRB-05: Quantum Learning for Knowledge-Based Response-Adaptive Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Naqa, I; Ten, R

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: There is tremendous excitement in radiotherapy about applying data-driven methods to develop personalized clinical decisions for real-time response-based adaptation. However, classical statistical learning methods lack in terms of efficiency and ability to predict outcomes under conditions of uncertainty and incomplete information. Therefore, we are investigating physics-inspired machine learning approaches by utilizing quantum principles for developing a robust framework to dynamically adapt treatments to individual patient’s characteristics and optimize outcomes. Methods: We studied 88 liver SBRT patients with 35 on non-adaptive and 53 on adaptive protocols. Adaptation was based on liver function using a split-course of 3+2 fractions with a month break. The radiotherapy environment was modeled as a Markov decision process (MDP) of baseline and one month into treatment states. The patient environment was modeled by a 5-variable state represented by patient’s clinical and dosimetric covariates. For comparison of classical and quantum learning methods, decision-making to adapt at one month was considered. The MDP objective was defined by the complication-free tumor control (P + =TCPx(1-NTCP)). A simple regression model represented state-action mapping. Single bit in classical MDP and a qubit of 2-superimposed states in quantum MDP represented the decision actions. Classical decision selection was done using reinforcement Q-learning and quantum searching was performed using Grover’s algorithm, which applies uniform superposition over possible states and yields quadratic speed-up. Results: Classical/quantum MDPs suggested adaptation (probability amplitude ≥0.5) 79% of the time for splitcourses and 100% for continuous-courses. However, the classical MDP had an average adaptation probability of 0.5±0.22 while the quantum algorithm reached 0.76±0.28. In cases where adaptation failed, classical MDP yielded 0.31±0.26 average amplitude while the quantum

  8. Dosimetric evaluation of inspiration and expiration breath-hold for intensity-modulated radiotherapy planning of non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahir, Bilal A; Bragg, Christopher M; Lawless, Sarah E; Hatton, Matthew Q F; Ireland, Rob H

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare target coverage and lung tissue sparing between inspiration and expiration breath-hold intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In a prospective study, seven NSCLC patients gave written consent to undergo both moderate deep inspiration and end-expiration breath-hold computed tomography (CT), which were used to generate five-field IMRT plans. Dose was calculated with a scatter and an inhomogeneity correction algorithm. The percentage of the planning target volume (PTV) receiving 90% of the prescription dose (PTV 90 ), the volume of total lung receiving ≥ 10 Gy (V 10 ) and ≥ 20 Gy (V 20 ) and the mean lung dose (MLD) were compared by the Student's paired t-test. Compared with the expiration plans, the mean ± SD reductions for V 10 , V 20 and MLD on the inspiration plans were 4.0 ± 3.7% (p = 0.031), 2.5 ± 2.3% (p = 0.028) and 1.1 ± 0.7 Gy (p = 0.007), respectively. Conversely, a mean difference of 1.1 ± 1.1% (p = 0.044) in PTV 90 was demonstrated in favour of expiration. When using IMRT, inspiration breath-hold can reduce the dose to normal lung tissue while expiration breath-hold can improve the target coverage. The improved lung sparing at inspiration may outweigh the modest improvements in target coverage at expiration. (note)

  9. Knowledge-light adaptation approaches in case-based reasoning for radiotherapy treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovic, Sanja; Khussainova, Gulmira; Jagannathan, Rupa

    2016-03-01

    Radiotherapy treatment planning aims at delivering a sufficient radiation dose to cancerous tumour cells while sparing healthy organs in the tumour-surrounding area. It is a time-consuming trial-and-error process that requires the expertise of a group of medical experts including oncologists and medical physicists and can take from 2 to 3h to a few days. Our objective is to improve the performance of our previously built case-based reasoning (CBR) system for brain tumour radiotherapy treatment planning. In this system, a treatment plan for a new patient is retrieved from a case base containing patient cases treated in the past and their treatment plans. However, this system does not perform any adaptation, which is needed to account for any difference between the new and retrieved cases. Generally, the adaptation phase is considered to be intrinsically knowledge-intensive and domain-dependent. Therefore, an adaptation often requires a large amount of domain-specific knowledge, which can be difficult to acquire and often is not readily available. In this study, we investigate approaches to adaptation that do not require much domain knowledge, referred to as knowledge-light adaptation. We developed two adaptation approaches: adaptation based on machine-learning tools and adaptation-guided retrieval. They were used to adapt the beam number and beam angles suggested in the retrieved case. Two machine-learning tools, neural networks and naive Bayes classifier, were used in the adaptation to learn how the difference in attribute values between the retrieved and new cases affects the output of these two cases. The adaptation-guided retrieval takes into consideration not only the similarity between the new and retrieved cases, but also how to adapt the retrieved case. The research was carried out in collaboration with medical physicists at the Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, City Hospital Campus, UK. All experiments were performed using real-world brain cancer

  10. MO-FG-CAMPUS-JeP3-05: Evaluation of 4D CT-On-Rails Target Localization Methods for Free Breathing Liver Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, J; Lin, T; Jin, L; Chen, L; Veltchev, I; Wang, L; Eldib, A; Chibani, O; Wang, B; Price, R; Ma, C; Xu, Q

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Liver SBRT patients unable to tolerate breath-hold for radiotherapy are treated free-breathing with image guidance. Target localization using 3D CBCT requires extra margins to accommodate the respiratory motion. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the accuracy and reproducibility of 4D CT-on-rails in target localization for free-breathing liver SBRT. Methods: A Siemens SOMATOM CT-on-Rails 4D with Anzai Pressure Belt system was used both as the simulation and the localization CT. Fiducial marker was placed close to the center of the target prior to the simulation. Amplitude based sorting was used in the scan. Eight or sixteen phases of reconstructed CT sets (depends on breathing pattern) can be sent to Velocity to create the maximum intensity projection (MIP) image set. Target ITV and fiducial ITV were drawn based on the MIP image. In patient localization, a 4D scan was taken with the same settings as the sim scan. Images were registered to match fiducial ITVs. Results: Ten liver cancer patients treated for 50Gy over 5 fractions, with amplitudes of breathing motion ranging from 4.3–14.5 mm, were analyzed in this study. Results show that the Intra & inter fraction variability in liver motion amplitude significantly less than the baseline inter-fraction shifts in liver position. 90% of amplitude change is less than 3 mm. The differences in the D99 and D95 GTV dose coverage between the 4D CT-on-Rails and the CBCT plan were small (within 5%) for all the selected cases. However, the average PTV volume by using the 4D CT-on-Rails is 37% less than the CBCT PTV volume. Conclusion: Simulation and Registration using 4D CT-on-Rails provides accurate target localization and is unaffected by larger breathing amplitudes as seen with 3D CBCT image registration. Localization with 4D CT-on-Rails can significantly reduce the PTV volume with sufficient tumor

  11. MO-FG-CAMPUS-JeP3-05: Evaluation of 4D CT-On-Rails Target Localization Methods for Free Breathing Liver Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, J; Lin, T; Jin, L; Chen, L; Veltchev, I; Wang, L; Eldib, A; Chibani, O; Wang, B; Price, R; Ma, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Xu, Q [MD Anderson Cancer Center at Cooper Mt Laurel, NJ (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Liver SBRT patients unable to tolerate breath-hold for radiotherapy are treated free-breathing with image guidance. Target localization using 3D CBCT requires extra margins to accommodate the respiratory motion. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the accuracy and reproducibility of 4D CT-on-rails in target localization for free-breathing liver SBRT. Methods: A Siemens SOMATOM CT-on-Rails 4D with Anzai Pressure Belt system was used both as the simulation and the localization CT. Fiducial marker was placed close to the center of the target prior to the simulation. Amplitude based sorting was used in the scan. Eight or sixteen phases of reconstructed CT sets (depends on breathing pattern) can be sent to Velocity to create the maximum intensity projection (MIP) image set. Target ITV and fiducial ITV were drawn based on the MIP image. In patient localization, a 4D scan was taken with the same settings as the sim scan. Images were registered to match fiducial ITVs. Results: Ten liver cancer patients treated for 50Gy over 5 fractions, with amplitudes of breathing motion ranging from 4.3–14.5 mm, were analyzed in this study. Results show that the Intra & inter fraction variability in liver motion amplitude significantly less than the baseline inter-fraction shifts in liver position. 90% of amplitude change is less than 3 mm. The differences in the D99 and D95 GTV dose coverage between the 4D CT-on-Rails and the CBCT plan were small (within 5%) for all the selected cases. However, the average PTV volume by using the 4D CT-on-Rails is 37% less than the CBCT PTV volume. Conclusion: Simulation and Registration using 4D CT-on-Rails provides accurate target localization and is unaffected by larger breathing amplitudes as seen with 3D CBCT image registration. Localization with 4D CT-on-Rails can significantly reduce the PTV volume with sufficient tumor.

  12. A case study evaluating deep inspiration breath-hold and intensity-modulated radiotherapy to minimise long-term toxicity in a young patient with bulky mediastinal Hodgkin lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaszewski, Jonathan M; Crook, Sarah; Wan, Kenneth; Scott, Lucille; Foroudi, Farshad

    2017-03-01

    Radiotherapy plays an important role in the treatment of early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma, but late toxicities such as cardiovascular disease and second malignancy are a major concern. Our aim was to evaluate the potential of deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) to reduce cardiac dose from mediastinal radiotherapy. A 24 year-old male with early-stage bulky mediastinal Hodgkin lymphoma received involved-site radiotherapy as part of a combined modality programme. Simulation was performed in free breathing (FB) and DIBH. The target and organs at risk were contoured on both datasets. Free breathing-3D conformal (FB-3DCRT), DIBH-3DCRT, FB-IMRT and DIBH-IMRT were compared with respect to target coverage and doses to organs at risk. A 'butterfly' IMRT technique was used to minimise the low-dose bath. In our patient, both DIBH (regardless of mode of delivery) and IMRT (in both FB and DIBH) achieved reductions in mean heart dose. DIBH improved all lung parameters. IMRT reduced high dose (V20), but increased low dose (V5) to lung. DIBH-IMRT was chosen for treatment delivery. Advanced radiotherapy techniques have the potential to further optimise the therapeutic ratio in patients with mediastinal lymphoma. Benefits should be assessed on an individualised basis. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Medical Radiation Sciences published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Australian Society of Medical Imaging and Radiation Therapy and New Zealand Institute of Medical Radiation Technology.

  13. Plan of the day selection for online image-guided adaptive post-prostatectomy radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Suki; Pham, Daniel; Dang, Kim; Bressel, Mathias; Kron, Tomas; Siva, Shankar; Tran, Phillip K; Tai, Keen Hun; Foroudi, Farshad

    2013-05-01

    To compare the cone-beam CT (CBCT) soft tissue localization disparity between radiation oncologists (RO) and radiation therapy technologists (RTT) in a novel online protocol of image-guided adaptive radiotherapy to the postoperative prostate bed. Using the planning CT and pre-treatment CBCTs from the first week of radiotherapy, four adaptive plans of different sizes were derived for each of eight post-prostatectomy patients. Four ROs collectively defined the reference answer, i.e. the plan of the day and isocentre correction for 40 CBCTs taken in weeks 2-6 of treatment for each patient. RTTs were randomly assigned five of these CBCTs; and asked to record their plan of the day selection and isocentre correction. RTT selection and reference answers were compared. The distance between the RTT selection and the reference answer was calculated. A total of 33 RTTs took part in this study. The average difference in CTV volume (reference answer-RTT selection) was 1.32 cm(3) (SD 29 cm(3)) overall. The average difference between reference answer and RTT isocentre coordinates was SI 1mm (SD 4.8mm), LR 1.1mm (SD 4.0mm) and AP -0.2mm (SD 3.9 mm). Distance of superior 8mm, inferior 6mm, left 4mm, right 2mm, anterior 6mm and posterior 6mm covered 100% of the CTV in 90% of fractions. The difference between RTT and RO selection of adaptive volumes is small and can be accounted for in a clinically acceptable CTV to PTV margin. Adaptive post-prostatectomy radiotherapy is feasible, in the setting of an academic center although at the moment, we have insufficient evidence to suggest that margins can yet be reduced with IGART with the current protocol. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Hybrid adaptive radiotherapy with on-line MRI in cervix cancer IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Seungjong; Stewart, James; Moseley, Joanne; Kelly, Valerie; Lim, Karen; Xie, Jason; Fyles, Anthony; Brock, Kristy K.; Lundin, Anna; Rehbinder, Henrik; Milosevic, Michael; Jaffray, David

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Substantial organ motion and tumor shrinkage occur during radiotherapy for cervix cancer. IMRT planning studies have shown that the quality of radiation delivery is influenced by these anatomical changes, therefore the adaptation of treatment plans may be warranted. Image guidance with off-line replanning, i.e. hybrid-adaptation, is recognized as one of the most practical adaptation strategies. In this study, we investigated the effects of soft tissue image guidance using on-line MR while varying the frequency of off-line replanning on the adaptation of cervix IMRT. Materials and method: 33 cervical cancer patients underwent planning and weekly pelvic MRI scans during radiotherapy. 5 patients of 33 were identified in a previous retrospective adaptive planning study, in which the coverage of gross tumor volume/clinical target volume (GTV/CTV) was not acceptable given single off-line IMRT replan using a 3 mm PTV margin with bone matching. These 5 patients and a randomly selected 10 patients from the remaining 28 patients, a total of 15 patients of 33, were considered in this study. Two matching methods for image guidance (bone to bone and soft tissue to dose matrix) and three frequencies of off-line replanning (none, single, and weekly) were simulated and compared with respect to target coverage (cervix, GTV, lower uterus, parametrium, upper vagina, tumor related CTV and elective lymph node CTV) and OAR sparing (bladder, bowel, rectum, and sigmoid). Cost (total process time) and benefit (target coverage) were analyzed for comparison. Results: Hybrid adaptation (image guidance with off-line replanning) significantly enhanced target coverage for both 5 difficult and 10 standard cases. Concerning image guidance, bone matching was short of delivering enough doses for 5 difficult cases even with a weekly off-line replan. Soft tissue image guidance proved successful for all cases except one when single or more frequent replans were utilized in the difficult cases

  15. Deep inspiration breath-hold radiotherapy for lung cancer: impact on image quality and registration uncertainty in cone beam CT image guidance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Josipovic, Mirjana; Persson, Gitte F; Bangsgaard, Jens Peter

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We investigated the impact of deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) and tumour baseline shifts on image quality and registration uncertainty in image-guided DIBH radiotherapy (RT) for locally advanced lung cancer. METHODS: Patients treated with daily cone beam CT (CBCT)-guided free...... and visualization of tumour and anatomical structures. We examined the impact of tumour baseline shift between consecutive DIBHs on CBCT image quality. RESULTS: CBCT scans from 15 patients were analysed. Intraobserver image registration uncertainty was approximately 2 mm in both FB and DIBH, except...... for the craniocaudal direction in FB, where it was >3 mm. On the 31st fraction, the intraobserver uncertainty increased compared with the second fraction. This increase was more pronounced in FB. Image quality scores improved in DIBH compared with FB for all parameters in all patients. Simulated tumour baseline shifts...

  16. Optimization of the 'involved-node radiotherapy' by using intensity modulation in free breathing in the case of a supra-diaphragmatic hodgkinian lymphoma; Optimisation de l''involved-node radiotherapy' par l'utilisation de la modulation d'intensite en respiration libre dans le lymphome hodgkinien supradiaphragmatique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paumier, A.; Khodari, W.; Beaudre, A.; Galibafian, M.; Blanchard, P.; Bhari, M.; Lefkopoulos, D.; Girinsky, T. [Institut de cancerologie Gustave-Roussy, Villejuif (France); Almokhles, H. [hopital Henri-Mondor, Creteil (France)

    2011-10-15

    The authors report the assessment of the optimization of the 'involved-node radiotherapy' concept by intensity-modulated conformational radiotherapy (IMRT) in free breathing conditions in the case of a localized supra-diaphragmatic Hodgkin disease. 47 patients have been treated by chemotherapy followed by an 'involved-node' IMRT. Results are discussed in terms of age, disease stage, relapse, dose, survival, toxicity occurrence. Results are promising. Short communication

  17. Adaptive fuzzy tracking control for a constrained flexible air-breathing hypersonic vehicle based on actuator compensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Fei Wang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The design of an adaptive fuzzy tracking control for a flexible air-breathing hypersonic vehicle with actuator constraints is discussed. Based on functional decomposition methodology, velocity and altitude controllers are designed. Fuzzy logic systems are applied to approximate the lumped uncertainty of each subsystem of air-breathing hypersonic vehicle model. Every controllers contain only one adaptive parameter that needs to be updated online with a minimal-learning-parameter scheme. The back-stepping design is not demanded by converting the altitude subsystem into the normal output-feedback formulation, which predigests the design of a controller. The special contribution is that novel auxiliary systems are developed to compensate both the tracking errors and desired control laws, based on which the explored controller can still provide effective tracking of velocity and altitude commands when the inputs are saturated. Finally, reference trajectory tracking simulation shows the effectiveness of the proposed method in its application to air-breathing hypersonic vehicle control.

  18. SU-C-BRF-01: Correlation of DIBH Breath Hold Amplitude with Dosimetric Sparing of Heart and Left Anterior Descending Artery in Left Breast Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Taeho; Reardon, Kelli; Sukovich, Kaitlyn; Crandley, Edwin; Read, Paul; Krishni, Wijesooriya

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: A 7.4% increase in major coronary events per 1 Gy increase in mean heart dose has been reported from the population-based analysis of radiation-induced cardiac toxicity following treatment of left sided breast cancer. Deep inhalation breath-hold (DIBH) is clinically utilized to reduce radiation dose to heart and left anterior descending artery (LAD). We investigated the correlation of dose sparing in heart and LAD with internal DIBH amplitude to develop a quantitative predictive model for expected dose to heart and LAD based on internal breath hold amplitude. Methods: A treatment planning study (Prescription Dose = 50 Gy) was performed on 50 left breast cancer patients underwent DIBH whole breast radiotherapy. Two CT datasets, free breathing (FB) and DIBH, were utilized for treatment planning and for determination of the internal anatomy DIBH amplitude (difference between sternum position at FB and DIBH). The heart and LAD dose between FB and DIBH plans was compared and dose to the heart and LAD as a function of breath hold amplitude was determined. Results: Average DIBH amplitude using internal anatomy was 13.9±4.2 mm. The DIBH amplitude-mean dose reduction correlation is 20%/5mm (0.3 Gy/5mm) for the heart and 18%/5mm (1.1 Gy/5mm) for LAD. The correlation with max dose reduction is 12%/5mm (3.8 Gy/5mm) for the heart and 16%/5mm (3.2 Gy/5mm) for LAD. We found that average dose reductions to LAD from 6.0±6.5 Gy to 2.0±1.6 Gy with DIBH (4.0 Gy reduction: -67%, p < 0.001) and average dose reduction to the heart from 1.3±0.7 Gy to 0.7±0.2 Gy with DIBH (0.6 Gy reduction: -46%, p < 0.001). That suggests using DIBH may reduce the risk of the major coronary event for left sided breast cancer patients. Conclusion: The correlation between breath hold amplitude and dosimetric sparing suggests that dose sparing linearly increases with internal DIBH amplitude

  19. The study of target delineation and target movement of whole breast assisted by active breathing control in intensity modulated radiotherapy after breast conservative surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jianbing; Yu Jinming; Ma Zhifang; Lu Jie; Sun Tao; Guo Shoufang; Wang Jingguo

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To explore the influence of different delineators and different delineating time on target determination of the whole breast and to explore intrafraction and interfraction target displacements of the breast on moderate deep inspiration breathing hold (mDIBH) assisted by active breathing control (ABC) alter breast conservative surgery. Methods: Twenty patients received primary CT-simulation assisted by ABC to get five sets of CT image on the three breathing condition which included one set from free breath (FB), two sets from mDIBH and two sets from deep expiration breathing control (DEBH). After radiotherapy with ten to fifteen fractions, the repeat CT-simulation was carried out to get the same five sets of CT image as the primary CT- simulation. The whole breast target were delineated at different time by the same delineator and delineated respectively by five delineators on the first set of CT images got with mDIBH from the primary CT-simulation, and to compare the influence of delineator and delineating time on the whole breast target. The total silver clips in the cavity were marked respectively on the two sets of CT images got with mDIBH from the primary CT-simulation, and to compare the intrafraction displacement of geometric body structured by the total of silver clips. The two ribs near the isocentric plane of the breast target were delineated respectively on two sets of the mDIBH CT image from the primary CT-simulation and on one set of the mDIBH CT image from the repeat CT-simulation, and comparing the movement of the point of interest (POI) of the ribs delineated to get the value of intrafraction and interfraction thoracic expansion. Results: There was not statistically significant between the four volumes of whole breast targets delineated by the same delineator at different time, but with statistics significant between the volumes of whole breast target delineated by the different delineators ( F=19.681, P=0.000). There was not statistically

  20. SU-C-BRF-01: Correlation of DIBH Breath Hold Amplitude with Dosimetric Sparing of Heart and Left Anterior Descending Artery in Left Breast Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Taeho; Reardon, Kelli; Sukovich, Kaitlyn; Crandley, Edwin; Read, Paul; Krishni, Wijesooriya [Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: A 7.4% increase in major coronary events per 1 Gy increase in mean heart dose has been reported from the population-based analysis of radiation-induced cardiac toxicity following treatment of left sided breast cancer. Deep inhalation breath-hold (DIBH) is clinically utilized to reduce radiation dose to heart and left anterior descending artery (LAD). We investigated the correlation of dose sparing in heart and LAD with internal DIBH amplitude to develop a quantitative predictive model for expected dose to heart and LAD based on internal breath hold amplitude. Methods: A treatment planning study (Prescription Dose = 50 Gy) was performed on 50 left breast cancer patients underwent DIBH whole breast radiotherapy. Two CT datasets, free breathing (FB) and DIBH, were utilized for treatment planning and for determination of the internal anatomy DIBH amplitude (difference between sternum position at FB and DIBH). The heart and LAD dose between FB and DIBH plans was compared and dose to the heart and LAD as a function of breath hold amplitude was determined. Results: Average DIBH amplitude using internal anatomy was 13.9±4.2 mm. The DIBH amplitude-mean dose reduction correlation is 20%/5mm (0.3 Gy/5mm) for the heart and 18%/5mm (1.1 Gy/5mm) for LAD. The correlation with max dose reduction is 12%/5mm (3.8 Gy/5mm) for the heart and 16%/5mm (3.2 Gy/5mm) for LAD. We found that average dose reductions to LAD from 6.0±6.5 Gy to 2.0±1.6 Gy with DIBH (4.0 Gy reduction: -67%, p < 0.001) and average dose reduction to the heart from 1.3±0.7 Gy to 0.7±0.2 Gy with DIBH (0.6 Gy reduction: -46%, p < 0.001). That suggests using DIBH may reduce the risk of the major coronary event for left sided breast cancer patients. Conclusion: The correlation between breath hold amplitude and dosimetric sparing suggests that dose sparing linearly increases with internal DIBH amplitude.

  1. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubert, D.

    2009-01-01

    Context: the descendants of persons treated for a childhood cancer could have an increased risk of genetic disease because of mutagenic anti cancerous treatments received by their parents. 3963 survivors of cancer in childhood ( born between 12950 and 1984) have been identified from the Danish register of cancer, constituting the 'survivors' cohort. 5657 of their brothers and sisters constituting the 'siblings' cohort have been identified from the Danish central register of the population. All of the live-born children born from these two cohorts have been identified from this register, allowing to include 1715 descendants from the 'survivors' cohort and 6009 descendants from the 'siblings' cohort. The congenital malformations have been found out from the national hospital register. The irradiation doses to the gonads and uterus have been defined by using the usual radiotherapy protocols. Conclusion: This study shows that the anti cancerous treatments for children do not seem increase the risk of congenital malformations in their progeny. (N.C.)

  2. Radiation-induced second malignancies after involved-node radiotherapy with deep-inspiration breath-hold technique for early stage Hodgkin Lymphoma: a dosimetric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Uwe; Sumila, Marcin; Robotka, Judith; Weber, Damien; Gruber, Günther

    2014-02-18

    To estimate the risk of radiation induced second cancers after radiotherapy using deep-inspiration breath-hold (DI) technique with three-dimensional conformal (3DCRT) and volumetric arc therapy (VMAT) for patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL). Early-stage HL with mediastinal and supraclavicular involvement was studied using an Alderson phantom. A whole body CT was performed and all tissues were delineated. The clinical target volumes and planning target volumes (PTV) were determined according to the German Hodgkin study group guidelines. Free-breathing (FB) technique and DI technique were simulated by different safety margins for the PTV definition. In both cases, 30 Gy in 15 fractions was prescribed. Second cancer risk was estimated for various tissues with a second cancer model including fractionation. When compared with FB-3DCRT, estimated relative life time attributable risk (LAR) of cancer induction after DI-3DCRT was 0.86, 0.76, 0.94 and 0.92 for breast, lung, esophagus and stomach, respectively. With DI-VMAT, the corresponding values were 2.05, 1.29, 1.01, 0.93, respectively. For breast cancer, the LAR observed with DI-VMAT was not substantially distinguishable from the LAR computed for mantle RT with an administered dose of 40 Gy. This study suggests that DI may reduce the LAR of secondary cancers of all OARs and may be a valuable technique when using 3DCRT. Conversely, VMAT may increase substantially the LAR and should be cautiously implemented in clinical practice.

  3. Comparison of cardiac and lung doses for breast cancer patients with free breathing and deep inspiration breath hold technique in 3 dimensional conformal radiotherapy - a dosimetric study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj Mani, Karthick; Poudel, Suresh; Maria Das, K. J.

    2017-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate the cardio-pulmonary doses between Deep Inspiration Breath Hold (DIBH) and Free Breathing (FB) technique in left sided breast irradiation. Materials & Methods: DIBH CT and FB CT were acquired for 10 left sided breast patients who underwent whole breast irradiation with or without nodal irradiation. Three fields single isocenter technique were used for patients with node positive patients along with two tangential conformal fields whereas only two tangential fields were used in node negative patients. All the critical structures like lungs, heart, esophagus, thyroid, etc., were delineated in both DIBH and FB scan. Both DIBH and FB scans were fused with the Dicom origin as they were acquired with the same Dicom coordinates. Plans were created in the DIBH scan for a dose range between 50 Gy in 25 fractions. Critical structures doses were recorded from the Dose Volume Histogram for both the DIBH and FB data set for evaluation. Results: The average mean heart dose in DIBH vs FB was 13.18 Gy vs 6.97 Gy, (p = 0.0063) significantly with DIBH as compared to FB technique. The relative reduction in average mean heart dose was 47.12%. The relative V5 reduced by 14.70% (i.e. 34.42% vs 19.72%, p = 0.0080), V10 reduced by 13.83% (i.e. 27.79 % vs 13.96%, p = 0.0073). V20 reduced by 13.19% (i.e. 24.54 % vs 11.35%, p = 0.0069), V30 reduced by 12.38% (i.e. 22.27 % vs 9.89 %, p = 0.0073) significantly with DIBH as compared to FB. The average mean left lung dose reduced marginally by 1.43 Gy (13.73 Gy vs 12.30 Gy, p = 0.4599) but insignificantly with DIBH as compared to FB. Other left lung parameters (V5, V10, V20 and V30) shows marginal decreases in DIBH plans compare to FB plans. Conclusion: DIBH shows a substantial reduction of cardiac doses but slight and insignificant reduction of pulmonary doses as compared with FB technique. Using the simple DIBH technique, we can effectively reduce the cardiac morbidity and at the same time radiation induced lung

  4. Evaluation of delivered dose for a clinical daily adaptive plan selection strategy for bladder cancer radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutkenhaus, Lotte J; Visser, Jorrit; de Jong, Rianne; Hulshof, Maarten C C M; Bel, Arjan

    2015-07-01

    To account for variable bladder size during bladder cancer radiotherapy, a daily plan selection strategy was implemented. The aim of this study was to calculate the actually delivered dose using an adaptive strategy, compared to a non-adaptive approach. Ten patients were treated to the bladder and lymph nodes with an adaptive full bladder strategy. Interpolated delineations of bladder and tumor on a full and empty bladder CT scan resulted in five PTVs for which VMAT plans were created. Daily cone beam CT (CBCT) scans were used for plan selection. Bowel, rectum and target volumes were delineated on these CBCTs, and delivered dose for these was calculated using both the adaptive plan, and a non-adaptive plan. Target coverage for lymph nodes improved using an adaptive strategy. The full bladder strategy spared the healthy part of the bladder from a high dose. Average bowel cavity V30Gy and V40Gy significantly reduced with 60 and 69ml, respectively (pstrategy yielded similar bladder coverage and improved coverage for lymph nodes, with a significant reduction in bowel cavity V30Gy and V40Gy only, while other sparing was limited. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Optimization of 'involved-node' radiotherapy with the help of the deep-inspiration breath-hold technique in supra-diaphragmatic Hodgkin disease; Optimisation de la radiotherapie 'involved-node' grace a l'inspiration profonde bloquee dans la maladie de Hodgkin supradiaphragmatique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paumier, A.; Galibafian, M.; Gilmore, J.; Hanna, C.; Raphael, J.; Ferme, C.; Ribrag, V.; Girinsky, T. [Institut de cancerologie Gustave-Roussy, Villejuif (France)

    2011-10-15

    The authors report a retrospective study aimed at the assessment of conformational radiotherapy optimized with deep-inspiration-breath-hold in an 'involved-node' irradiation of a localized supra-diaphragmatic Hodgkin disease. All patients of different ages and suffering from the Hodgkin disease at different stages had chemotherapy before radiotherapy. The treated volumes have been determined according to the 'involved-node' radiotherapy concept. Prescribed doses, doses received by the heart, coronaries and lungs, survival probability over three years are discussed. The concept appears to be efficient and not much toxic. Short communication

  6. MO-FG-BRA-05: Dosimetric and Radiobiological Validation of Respiratory Gating in Conventional and Hypofractionated Radiotherapy of the Lung: Effect of Dose, Dose Rate, Gating Window and Breathing Pattern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cervino, L; Soultan, D; Pettersson, N; Yock, A; Cornell, M; Aguilera, J; Murphy, J; Advani, S; Moiseenko, V [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Gill, B [British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: to evaluate the dosimetric and radiobiological consequences from having different gating windows, dose rates, and breathing patterns in gated VMAT lung radiotherapy. Methods: A novel 3D-printed moving phantom with central high and peripheral low tracer uptake regions was 4D FDG-PET/CT-scanned using ideal, patient-specific regular, and irregular breathing patterns. A scan of the stationary phantom was obtained as a reference. Target volumes corresponding to different uptake regions were delineated. Simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) 6 MV VMAT plans were produced for conventional and hypofractionated radiotherapy, using 30–70 and 100% cycle gating scenarios. Prescribed doses were 200 cGy with SIB to 240 cGy to high uptake volume for conventional, and 800 with SIB to 900 cGy for hypofractionated plans. Dose rates of 600 MU/min (conventional and hypofractionated) and flattening filter free 1400 MU/min (hypofractionated) were used. Ion chamber measurements were performed to verify delivered doses. Vials with A549 cells placed in locations matching ion chamber measurements were irradiated using the same plans to measure clonogenic survival. Differences in survival for the different doses, dose rates, gating windows, and breathing patterns were analyzed. Results: Ion chamber measurements agreed within 3% of the planned dose, for all locations, breathing patterns and gating windows. Cell survival depended on dose alone, and not on gating window, breathing pattern, MU rate, or delivery time. The surviving fraction varied from approximately 40% at 2Gy to 1% for 9 Gy and was within statistical uncertainty relative to that observed for the stationary phantom. Conclusions: Use of gated VMAT in PET-driven SIB radiotherapy was validated using ion chamber measurements and cell survival assays for conventional and hypofractionated radiotherapy.

  7. Contribution to adaptive radiotherapy by systematic analysis of the entrance fluence and exit patient dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celi, Sofia

    2016-01-01

    Modern radiation therapy combines complex techniques and personalized treatments, with the risk that certain evolutions and errors occurring during the course of the treatment might go unnoticed. These fluctuations may cause great damage to the health of the patient. In this perspective, we worked on the potential of a transit in vivo dosimetry system for continuous monitoring of the patient and, hereafter, adaptive radiotherapy. Our clinical experience and feasibility testing determined the main lines of work: automation and simplification of the results analysis method. The developments included the creation of a golden data library and a series of root cause analyzes, allowing us to strengthen the accuracy of the system, to enhance the automation of the setup and to identify tracks for an efficient analysis of the results and for the creation of additional analytical tools to facilitate the monitoring and adaptation of the treatments in clinical routine [fr

  8. A review of plan library approaches in adaptive radiotherapy of bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Shane D; Leech, Michelle M

    2018-05-01

    Large variations in the shape and size of the bladder volume are commonly observed in bladder cancer radiotherapy (RT). The clinical target volume (CTV) is therefore frequently inadequately treated and large isotropic margins are inappropriate in terms of dose to organs at risk (OAR); thereby making adaptive radiotherapy (ART) attractive for this tumour site. There are various methods of ART delivery, however, for bladder cancer, plan libraries are frequently used. A review of published studies on plan libraries for bladder cancer using four databases (Pubmed, Science Direct, Embase and Cochrane Library) was conducted. The endpoints selected were accuracy and feasibility of initiation of a plan library strategy into a RT department. Twenty-four articles were included in this review. The majority of studies reported improvement in accuracy with 10 studies showing an improvement in planning target volume (PTV) and CTV coverage with plan libraries, some by up to 24%. Seventeen studies showed a dose reduction to OARs, particularly the small bowel V45Gy, V40Gy, V30Gy and V10Gy, and the rectal V30Gy. However, the occurrence of no suitable plan was reported in six studies, with three studies showing no significant difference between adaptive and non-adaptive strategies in terms of target coverage. In addition, inter-observer variability in plan selection appears to remain problematic. The additional resources, education and technology required for the initiation of plan library selection for bladder cancer may hinder its routine clinical implementation, with eight studies illustrating increased treatment time required. While there is a growing body of evidence in support of plan libraries for bladder RT, many studies differed in their delivery approach. The advent of the clinical use of the MRI-linear accelerator will provide RT departments with the opportunity to consider daily online adaption for bladder cancer as an alternate to plan library approaches.

  9. Feasibility of breathing-adapted PET/CT imaging for radiation therapy of Hodgkin lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aznar, M C; Andersen, Flemming; Berthelsen, A K

    2011-01-01

    . We investigate the feasibility of introducing a deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) strategy in PET/CT imaging of Hodgkin lymphoma patients and its impact on image quantification parameters.  Methods: Three patients with suspicion of large mediastinal tumour burden were selected for this study...

  10. Feasibility of breathing-adapted PET/CT imaging for radiation therapy of Hodgkin lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aznar, M C; Andersen, Flemming; Berthelsen, A K

    2011-01-01

    . We investigate the feasibility of introducing a deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) strategy in PET/CT imaging of Hodgkin lymphoma patients and its impact on image quantification parameters. Methods: Three patients with suspicion of large mediastinal tumour burden were selected for this study...

  11. A new strategy for online adaptive prostate radiotherapy based on cone-beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boggula, Ramesh; Lorenz, Friedlieb; Lohr, Frank; Wolff, Dirk; Boda-Heggemann, Judit; Hesser, Juergen; Wenz, Frederik; Wertz, Hansjoerg

    2009-01-01

    Interfractional organ motion and patient positioning errors during prostate radiotherapy can have deleterious clinical consequences. It has become clinical practice to re-position the patient with image-guided translational position correction before each treatment to compensate for those errors. However, tilt errors can only be corrected with table corrections in six degrees of freedom or ''full'' adaptive treatment planning strategies. Organ shape deformations can only be corrected by ''full'' plan adaptation. This study evaluates the potential of instant treatment plan adaptation (fast isodose line adaptation with real-time dose manipulating tools) based on cone-beam CT (CBCT) to further improve treatment quality. Using in-house software, CBCTs were modified to approximate a correct density calibration. To evaluate the dosimetric accuracy, dose distributions based on CBCTs were compared with dose distributions calculated on conventional planning CTs (PCT) for four datasets (one inhomogeneous phantom, three patient datasets). To determine the potential dosimetric benefit of a ''full'' plan adaptation over translational position correction, dose distributions were re-optimized using graphical ''online'' dose modification tools for three additional patients' CT-datasets with a substantially distended rectum while the original plans have been created with an empty rectum (single treatment fraction estimates). Absolute dose deviations of up to 51% in comparison to the PCT were observed when uncorrected CBCTs were used for replanning. After density calibration of the CBCTs, 97% of the dose deviations were ≤3% (gamma index: 3%/3 mm). Translational position correction restored the PTV dose (D 95 ) to 73% of the corresponding dose of the reference plan. After plan adaptation, larger improvements of dose restoration to 95% were observed. Additionally, the rectal dose (D 30 ) was further decreased by 42 percentage points (mean of three patient datasets). An accurate dose

  12. The evaluation of composite dose using deformable image registration in adaptive radiotherapy for head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Chul Hwan; Ko, Seong Jin; Kim, Chang Soo; Kim, Jung Hoon; Kim, Dong Hyun; Choi, Seok Yoon; Ye, Soo Young; Kang, Se Sik [Dept. of Radiological Science, College of Health Sciences, Catholic University of Pusan, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15

    In adaptive radiotherapy(ART), generated composite dose of surrounding normal tissue on overall treatment course which is using deformable image registration from multistage images. Also, compared with doses summed by each treatment plan and clinical significance is considered. From the first of May, 2011 to the last of July, 2012. Patients who were given treatment and had the head and neck cancer with 3-dimension conformal radiotherapy or intensity modulated radiotherapy, those who were carried out adaptive radiotherapy cause of tumor shrinkage and weight loss. Generated composite dose of surrounding normal tissue using deformable image registration was been possible, statistically significant difference was showed to mandible(48.95±3.89 vs 49.10±3.55 Gy), oral cavity(36.93±4.03 vs 38.97±5.08 Gy), parotid gland(35.71±6.22 vs 36.12±6.70 Gy) and temporomandibular joint(18.41±9.60 vs 20.13±10.42 Gy) compared with doses summed by each treatment plan. The results of this study show significant difference between composite dose by deformable image registration and doses summed by each treatment plan, composite dose by deformable image registration may generate more exact evaluation to surrounding normal tissue in adaptive radiotherapy.

  13. Precise and real-time measurement of 3D tumor motion in lung due to breathing and heartbeat, measured during radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seppenwoolde, Yvette; Shirato, Hiroki; Kitamura, Kei; Shimizu, Shinichi; Herk, Marcel van; Lebesque, Joos V.; Miyasaka, Kazuo

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: In this work, three-dimensional (3D) motion of lung tumors during radiotherapy in real time was investigated. Understanding the behavior of tumor motion in lung tissue to model tumor movement is necessary for accurate (gated or breath-hold) radiotherapy or CT scanning. Methods: Twenty patients were included in this study. Before treatment, a 2-mm gold marker was implanted in or near the tumor. A real-time tumor tracking system using two fluoroscopy image processor units was installed in the treatment room. The 3D position of the implanted gold marker was determined by using real-time pattern recognition and a calibrated projection geometry. The linear accelerator was triggered to irradiate the tumor only when the gold marker was located within a certain volume. The system provided the coordinates of the gold marker during beam-on and beam-off time in all directions simultaneously, at a sample rate of 30 images per second. The recorded tumor motion was analyzed in terms of the amplitude and curvature of the tumor motion in three directions, the differences in breathing level during treatment, hysteresis (the difference between the inhalation and exhalation trajectory of the tumor), and the amplitude of tumor motion induced by cardiac motion. Results: The average amplitude of the tumor motion was greatest (12±2 mm [SD]) in the cranial-caudal direction for tumors situated in the lower lobes and not attached to rigid structures such as the chest wall or vertebrae. For the lateral and anterior-posterior directions, tumor motion was small both for upper- and lower-lobe tumors (2±1 mm). The time-averaged tumor position was closer to the exhale position, because the tumor spent more time in the exhalation than in the inhalation phase. The tumor motion was modeled as a sinusoidal movement with varying asymmetry. The tumor position in the exhale phase was more stable than the tumor position in the inhale phase during individual treatment fields. However, in many

  14. MRI-based treatment plan simulation and adaptation for ion radiotherapy using a classification-based approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rank, Christopher M; Tremmel, Christoph; Hünemohr, Nora; Nagel, Armin M; Jäkel, Oliver; Greilich, Steffen

    2013-01-01

    In order to benefit from the highly conformal irradiation of tumors in ion radiotherapy, sophisticated treatment planning and simulation are required. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential of MRI for ion radiotherapy treatment plan simulation and adaptation using a classification-based approach. Firstly, a voxelwise tissue classification was applied to derive pseudo CT numbers from MR images using up to 8 contrasts. Appropriate MR sequences and parameters were evaluated in cross-validation studies of three phantoms. Secondly, ion radiotherapy treatment plans were optimized using both MRI-based pseudo CT and reference CT and recalculated on reference CT. Finally, a target shift was simulated and a treatment plan adapted to the shift was optimized on a pseudo CT and compared to reference CT optimizations without plan adaptation. The derivation of pseudo CT values led to mean absolute errors in the range of 81 - 95 HU. Most significant deviations appeared at borders between air and different tissue classes and originated from partial volume effects. Simulations of ion radiotherapy treatment plans using pseudo CT for optimization revealed only small underdosages in distal regions of a target volume with deviations of the mean dose of PTV between 1.4 - 3.1% compared to reference CT optimizations. A plan adapted to the target volume shift and optimized on the pseudo CT exhibited a comparable target dose coverage as a non-adapted plan optimized on a reference CT. We were able to show that a MRI-based derivation of pseudo CT values using a purely statistical classification approach is feasible although no physical relationship exists. Large errors appeared at compact bone classes and came from an imperfect distinction of bones and other tissue types in MRI. In simulations of treatment plans, it was demonstrated that these deviations are comparable to uncertainties of a target volume shift of 2 mm in two directions indicating that especially

  15. Monitoring deep inspiration breath hold for left-sided localized breast cancer radiotherapy with an in-house developed laser distance meter system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Christer A; Abramova, Tatiana; Frengen, Jomar; Lund, Jo-Åsmund

    2017-09-01

    Deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) in left-sided breast cancer radiotherapy is a technique to reduce cardiac and pulmonary doses while maintaining target coverage. This study aims at evaluating an in-house developed DIBH system. Free-breathing (FB) and DIBH plans were generated for 22 left-sided localized breast cancer patients who had radiation therapy (RT) after breast-conserving surgery. All patients were treated utilizing an in-house laser distance measuring system. 50 Gy was prescribed, and parameters of interest were target coverage, left anterior descending coronary artery, (LAD) and heart doses. Portal images were acquired and the reproducibility and stability of DIBH treatment were compared to FB. The comparing result shows there is a significant reduction in all LAD and heart dose statistics for DIBH compared to FB plans without compromising the target coverage. The maximum LAD dose was reduced from 43.7 Gy to 29.0 Gy and the volume of the heart receiving >25 Gy was reduced from 3.3% to 1.0% using the in-house system, both statistically significant. The in-house system gave a reproducible and stable DIBH treatment where the systematic error ∑, and random error σ, were less than 2.2 mm in all directions, but were not significantly better than at FB. The system was well tolerated and all patients completed their treatment sessions with DIBH. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  16. Dosimetric benefits of intensity-modulated radiotherapy combined with the deep-inspiration breath-hold technique in patients with mediastinal Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paumier, Amaury; Ghalibafian, Mithra; Gilmore, Jennifer; Beaudre, Anne; Blanchard, Pierre; el Nemr, Mohammed; Azoury, Farez; al Hamokles, Hweej; Lefkopoulos, Dimitri; Girinsky, Theodore

    2012-03-15

    To assess the additional benefits of using the deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in terms of the protection of organs at risk for patients with mediastinal Hodgkin's disease. Patients with early-stage Hodgkin's lymphoma with mediastinal involvement were entered into the study. Two simulation computed tomography scans were performed for each patient: one using the free-breathing (FB) technique and the other using the DIBH technique with a dedicated spirometer. The clinical target volume, planning target volume (PTV), and organs at risk were determined on both computed tomography scans according to the guidelines of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer. In both cases, 30 Gy in 15 fractions was prescribed. The dosimetric parameters retrieved for the statistical analysis were PTV coverage, mean heart dose, mean coronary artery dose, mean lung dose, and lung V20. There were no significant differences in PTV coverage between the two techniques (FB vs. DIBH). The mean doses delivered to the coronary arteries, heart, and lungs were significantly reduced by 15% to 20% using DIBH compared with FB, and the lung V20 was reduced by almost one third. The dose reduction to organs at risk was greater for masses in the upper part of the mediastinum. IMRT with DIBH was partially implemented in 1 patient. This combination will be extended to other patients in the near future. Radiation exposure of the coronary arteries, heart, and lungs in patients with mediastinal Hodgkin's lymphoma was greatly reduced using DIBH with IMRT. The greatest benefit was obtained for tumors in the upper part of the mediastinum. The possibility of a wider use in clinical practice is currently under investigation in our department. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Dosimetric Benefits of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Combined With the Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold Technique in Patients With Mediastinal Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paumier, Amaury, E-mail: amaury.paumier@igr.fr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Ghalibafian, Mithra; Gilmore, Jennifer [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Beaudre, Anne [Physics Unit, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Blanchard, Pierre; El Nemr, Mohammed; Azoury, Farez; Al Hamokles, Hweej [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Lefkopoulos, Dimitri [Physics Unit, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Girinsky, Theodore [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the additional benefits of using the deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in terms of the protection of organs at risk for patients with mediastinal Hodgkin's disease. Methods and Materials: Patients with early-stage Hodgkin's lymphoma with mediastinal involvement were entered into the study. Two simulation computed tomography scans were performed for each patient: one using the free-breathing (FB) technique and the other using the DIBH technique with a dedicated spirometer. The clinical target volume, planning target volume (PTV), and organs at risk were determined on both computed tomography scans according to the guidelines of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer. In both cases, 30 Gy in 15 fractions was prescribed. The dosimetric parameters retrieved for the statistical analysis were PTV coverage, mean heart dose, mean coronary artery dose, mean lung dose, and lung V20. Results: There were no significant differences in PTV coverage between the two techniques (FB vs. DIBH). The mean doses delivered to the coronary arteries, heart, and lungs were significantly reduced by 15% to 20% using DIBH compared with FB, and the lung V20 was reduced by almost one third. The dose reduction to organs at risk was greater for masses in the upper part of the mediastinum. IMRT with DIBH was partially implemented in 1 patient. This combination will be extended to other patients in the near future. Conclusions: Radiation exposure of the coronary arteries, heart, and lungs in patients with mediastinal Hodgkin's lymphoma was greatly reduced using DIBH with IMRT. The greatest benefit was obtained for tumors in the upper part of the mediastinum. The possibility of a wider use in clinical practice is currently under investigation in our department.

  18. Dosimetric Benefits of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Combined With the Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold Technique in Patients With Mediastinal Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paumier, Amaury; Ghalibafian, Mithra; Gilmore, Jennifer; Beaudre, Anne; Blanchard, Pierre; El Nemr, Mohammed; Azoury, Farez; Al Hamokles, Hweej; Lefkopoulos, Dimitri; Girinsky, Theodore

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the additional benefits of using the deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in terms of the protection of organs at risk for patients with mediastinal Hodgkin’s disease. Methods and Materials: Patients with early-stage Hodgkin’s lymphoma with mediastinal involvement were entered into the study. Two simulation computed tomography scans were performed for each patient: one using the free-breathing (FB) technique and the other using the DIBH technique with a dedicated spirometer. The clinical target volume, planning target volume (PTV), and organs at risk were determined on both computed tomography scans according to the guidelines of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer. In both cases, 30 Gy in 15 fractions was prescribed. The dosimetric parameters retrieved for the statistical analysis were PTV coverage, mean heart dose, mean coronary artery dose, mean lung dose, and lung V20. Results: There were no significant differences in PTV coverage between the two techniques (FB vs. DIBH). The mean doses delivered to the coronary arteries, heart, and lungs were significantly reduced by 15% to 20% using DIBH compared with FB, and the lung V20 was reduced by almost one third. The dose reduction to organs at risk was greater for masses in the upper part of the mediastinum. IMRT with DIBH was partially implemented in 1 patient. This combination will be extended to other patients in the near future. Conclusions: Radiation exposure of the coronary arteries, heart, and lungs in patients with mediastinal Hodgkin’s lymphoma was greatly reduced using DIBH with IMRT. The greatest benefit was obtained for tumors in the upper part of the mediastinum. The possibility of a wider use in clinical practice is currently under investigation in our department.

  19. Predicting the need for adaptive radiotherapy in head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Elizabeth; Owen, Rebecca; Harden, Fiona; Mengersen, Kerrie; Oestreich, Kimberley; Houghton, Whitney; Poulsen, Michael; Harris, Selina; Lin, Charles; Porceddu, Sandro

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose: Adaptive radiotherapy (ART) can account for the dosimetric impact of anatomical change in head and neck cancer patients; however it can be resource intensive. Consequently, it is imperative that patients likely to require ART are identified. The purpose of this study was to find predictive factors that identify oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPC) and nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients more likely to need ART. Materials and methods: One hundred and ten patients with OPC or NPC were analysed. Patient demographics and tumour characteristics were compared between patients who were replanned and those that were not. Factors found to be significant were included in logistic regression models. Risk profiles were developed from these models. A dosimetric analysis was performed. Results: Nodal disease stage, pre-treatment largest involved node size, diagnosis and initial weight (categorised in 2 groups) were identified as significant for inclusion in the model. Two models were found to be significant (p = 0.001), correctly classifying 98.2% and 96.1% of patients respectively. Three ART risk profiles were developed. Conclusion: Predictive factors identifying OPC or NPC patients more likely to require ART were reported. A risk profile approach could facilitate the effective implementation of ART into radiotherapy departments through forward planning and appropriate resource allocation

  20. Adaptive radiotherapy for bladder cancer using deformable image registration of empty and full bladder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juneja, Prabhjot; Caine, H.; Hunt, P.

    2015-01-01

    A common objective of various adaptive radiotherapy (ART) strategies for bladder cancer is to reduce irradiation of normal tissue, thereby reduce the risk of radiation induced toxicity, and maintain or improve the target coverage. Bladder radiotherapy, typically involves generous margins (up to 20...... bladder cancer patients and a total of 100 fractions. It was found that the smaller a-PTV, a-PTV4 and a-PTV3, were appropriate in 87% of the fractions, while a-PTV2 and a-PTV1 were required in 12% of the fractions respectively. The use of the a-PTVs reduced the PTV volume by 32% (28-36%) as compared...... to conv-PTV. In conclusion, the results of this pilot study indicate that the use of a-PTVs could result in substantial decrease in the course averaged planning target volume. This reduction in the PTV is likely to decrease the radiation related toxicity and benefit bladder cancer patients. Currently...

  1. Validation of 3D surface imaging in breath-hold radiotherapy for breast cancer: one central camera unit versus three camera units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderliesten, Tanja; Betgen, Anja; van Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine; Remeijer, Peter

    2013-03-01

    In this work we investigated the benefit of the use of two lateral camera units additional to a central camera unit for 3D surface imaging for image guidance in deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) radiotherapy by comparison with cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Ten patients who received DIBH radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery were included. The performance of surface imaging using one and three camera units was compared to using CBCT for setup verification. Breast-surface registrations were performed for CBCT as well as for 3D surfaces, captured concurrently with CBCT, to planning CT. The resulting setup errors were compared with linear regression analysis. For the differences between setup errors an assessment of the group mean, systematic error, random error, and 95% limits of agreement was made. Correlations between derived surface-imaging [one camera unit;three camera units] and CBCT setup errors were: R2=[0.67;0.75], [0.76;0.87], [0.88;0.91] in left-right, cranio-caudal, and anterior-posterior direction, respectively. Group mean, systematic and random errors were slightly smaller (sub-millimeter differences) and the limits of agreement were 0.10 to 0.25cm tighter when using three camera units compared with one. For the majority of the data, the use of three camera units compared with one resulted in setup errors more similar to the CBCT derived setup errors for the craniocaudal and anterior-posterior directions (p<0.01, Wilcoxon-signed-ranks test). This study shows a better correlation and agreement between 3D surface imaging and CBCT when three camera units are used instead of one and further outlines the conditions under which the benefit of using three camera units is significant.

  2. Interactive adaptation of a volumetric imaging radiotherapy treatment: development and validation of tools for its implementation in clinical routine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huger, Sandrine

    2013-01-01

    Changing anatomy during radiotherapy can lead to significant dosimetric consequences for organs at risk (OARs) and/or target volumes. Adaptive radiotherapy can compensate for these variations however its deployment for clinical work is hampered by the increased workload for the medical staff and there is still no commercialized software available for clinical use. We developed a simple in vivo dosimetric alert tool allowing rapid identification of patients who might benefit from an adaptive radiotherapy. Dosimetric evaluation of delivered treatment has been conducted onto 3D on board imaging (CBCT) whose dose calculation accuracy has been evaluated. The tool does not require a new volume of interest delineation. Tool alert is based on objectives and quantifiable criteria defined by the exceeding volumes of interest dose thresholds. Tool precision and detectability have been validated and applied in a retrospective study on 10 head and neck patients. The tool allows detecting patients where an adaptive treatment could have been considered. In its clinical implementation, adaptive radiotherapy process requires deformable matching algorithms to follow patient local's deformations occurring during treatment. Nevertheless, their use has not been validated. We conducted an evaluation of the Block Matching deformable algorithm, suitable for multimodality imaging (CT/CBCT), in comparison to rigid algorithm. A study has been conducted for 10 head and neck patients based on volume of interest contours comparison for 76 CBCT. Similarity parameters used consisted on Dice Similarity Index, Robust Hausdorff Distance (in mm) and the absolute volume difference (in cc). (author)

  3. Intra-fractional bladder motion and margins in adaptive radiotherapy for urinary bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønborg, Caroline; Vestergaard, Anne; Høyer, Morten

    2015-01-01

    and to estimate population-based and patient-specific intra-fractional margins, also relevant for a future re-optimisation strategy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Nine patients treated in a clinical phase II ART trial of daily plan selection for bladder cancer were included. In the library plans, 5 mm isotropic margins......BACKGROUND: The bladder is a tumour site well suited for adaptive radiotherapy (ART) due to large inter-fractional changes, but it also displays considerable intra-fractional motion. The aim of this study was to assess target coverage with a clinically applied method for plan selection ART...... were added to account for intra-fractional changes. Pre-treatment and weekly repeat magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) series were acquired in which a full three-dimensional (3D) volume was scanned every second min for 10 min (a total of 366 scans in 61 series). Initially, the bladder clinical target...

  4. Adaptive radiotherapy for head and neck cancer—Dosimetric results from a prospective clinical trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, David L.; Garden, Adam S.; Shah, Shalin J.; Chronowski, Gregory; Sejpal, Samir; Rosenthal, David I.; Chen, Yipei; Zhang, Yongbin; Zhang, Lifei; Wong, Pei-Fong; Garcia, John A.; Kian Ang, K.; Dong, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To conduct a clinical trial evaluating adaptive head and neck radiotherapy (ART). Methods: Patients with locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer were prospectively enrolled. Daily CT-guided setup and deformable image registration permitted mapping of dose to avoidance structures and CTVs. We compared four planning scenarios: (1) original IMRT plan aligned daily to marked isocenter (BB); (2) original plan aligned daily to bone (IGRT); (3) IGRT with one adaptive replan (ART1); and (4) actual treatment received by each study patient (IGRT with one or two adaptive replans, ART2). Results: All 22 study patients underwent one replan (ART1); eight patients had two replans (ART2). ART1 reduced mean dose to contralateral parotid by 0.6 Gy or 2.8% (paired t-test; p = 0.003) and ipsilateral parotid by 1.3 Gy (3.9%) (p = 0.002) over the IGRT alone. ART2 further reduced the mean contralateral parotid dose by 0.8 Gy or 3.8% (p = 0.026) and ipsilateral parotid by 4.1 Gy or 9% (p = 0.001). ART significantly reduced integral body dose. Conclusions: This pilot trial suggests that head and neck ART dosimetrically outperforms IMRT. IGRT that leverages conventional PTV margins does not improve dosimetry. One properly timed replan delivers the majority of achievable dosimetric improvement. The clinical impact of ART must be confirmed by future trials

  5. Dosimetric benefit of adaptive re-planning in pancreatic cancer stereotactic body radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yongbao [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Key Laboratory of Particle & Radiation Imaging (Tsinghua University), Ministry of Education, Beijing (China); Center for Advanced Radiotherapy Technologies University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Hoisak, Jeremy D.P.; Li, Nan; Jiang, Carrie [Center for Advanced Radiotherapy Technologies University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Tian, Zhen [Center for Advanced Radiotherapy Technologies University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Gautier, Quentin; Zarepisheh, Masoud [Center for Advanced Radiotherapy Technologies University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Wu, Zhaoxia; Liu, Yaqiang [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Key Laboratory of Particle & Radiation Imaging (Tsinghua University), Ministry of Education, Beijing (China); Jia, Xun [Center for Advanced Radiotherapy Technologies University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); and others

    2015-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) shows promise in unresectable pancreatic cancer, though this treatment modality has high rates of normal tissue toxicity. This study explores the dosimetric utility of daily adaptive re-planning with pancreas SBRT. We used a previously developed supercomputing online re-planning environment (SCORE) to re-plan 10 patients with pancreas SBRT. Tumor and normal tissue contours were deformed from treatment planning computed tomographies (CTs) and transferred to daily cone-beam CT (CBCT) scans before re-optimizing each daily treatment plan. We compared the intended radiation dose, the actual radiation dose, and the optimized radiation dose for the pancreas tumor planning target volume (PTV) and the duodenum. Treatment re-optimization improved coverage of the PTV and reduced dose to the duodenum. Within the PTV, the actual hot spot (volume receiving 110% of the prescription dose) decreased from 4.5% to 0.5% after daily adaptive re-planning. Within the duodenum, the volume receiving the prescription dose decreased from 0.9% to 0.3% after re-planning. It is noteworthy that variation in the amount of air within a patient's stomach substantially changed dose to the PTV. Adaptive re-planning with pancreas SBRT has the ability to improve dose to the tumor and decrease dose to the nearby duodenum, thereby reducing the risk of toxicity.

  6. Comparison of doses and NTCP to risk organs with enhanced inspiration gating and free breathing for left-sided breast cancer radiotherapy using the AAA algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edvardsson, Anneli; Nilsson, Martin P; Amptoulach, Sousana; Ceberg, Sofie

    2015-04-10

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential dose reduction to the heart, left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery and the ipsilateral lung for patients treated with tangential and locoregional radiotherapy for left-sided breast cancer with enhanced inspiration gating (EIG) compared to free breathing (FB) using the AAA algorithm. The radiobiological implication of such dose sparing was also investigated. Thirty-two patients, who received tangential or locoregional adjuvant radiotherapy with EIG for left-sided breast cancer, were retrospectively enrolled in this study. Each patient was CT-scanned during FB and EIG. Similar treatment plans, with comparable target coverage, were created in the two CT-sets using the AAA algorithm. Further, the probability of radiation induced cardiac mortality and pneumonitis were calculated using NTCP models. For tangential treatment, the median V25Gy for the heart and LAD was decreased for EIG from 2.2% to 0.2% and 40.2% to 0.1% (p < 0.001), respectively, whereas there was no significant difference in V20Gy for the ipsilateral lung (p = 0.109). For locoregional treatment, the median V25Gy for the heart and LAD was decreased for EIG from 3.3% to 0.2% and 51.4% to 5.1% (p < 0.001), respectively, and the median ipsilateral lung V20Gy decreased from 27.0% for FB to 21.5% (p = 0.020) for EIG. The median excess cardiac mortality probability decreased from 0.49% for FB to 0.02% for EIG (p < 0.001) for tangential treatment and from 0.75% to 0.02% (p < 0.001) for locoregional treatment. There was no significant difference in risk of radiation pneumonitis for tangential treatment (p = 0.179) whereas it decreased for locoregional treatment from 6.82% for FB to 3.17% for EIG (p = 0.004). In this study the AAA algorithm was used for dose calculation to the heart, LAD and left lung when comparing the EIG and FB techniques for tangential and locoregional radiotherapy of breast cancer patients. The results support the dose and

  7. Dosimetric evaluation of a three-phase adaptive radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma using helical tomotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fung, Winky Wing Ki, E-mail: winky.fung@gmail.com [Department of Radiotherapy, Hong Kong Sanatorium and Hospital (Hong Kong); Wu, Vincent Wing Cheung [Department of Health Technology and Informatics, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Teo, Peter Man Lung [Central Comprehensive Cancer Centre, Central (Hong Kong)

    2012-04-01

    Adaptive radiotherapy (ART) has been introduced to correct the radiation-induced anatomic changes in head and neck cases during a treatment course. This study evaluated the potential dosimetric benefits of applying a 3-phase adaptive radiotherapy protocol in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients compared with the nonadaptive single-phase treatment protocol. Ten NPC patients previously treated with this 3-phase radiation protocol using Hi-Art Tomotherapy were recruited. Two new plans, PII-ART and PIII-ART, were generated based on the up-to-date computed tomography (CT) images and contours and were used for treatment in phase two (PII; after 25th fraction) and phase three (PIII; after 35th fraction), respectively. To simulate the situation of no replanning, 2 hybrid plans denoted as PII-NART and PIII-NART were generated using the original contours pasted on the PII- and PIII-CT sets by CT-CT fusion. Dosimetric comparisons were made between the NART plans and the corresponding ART plans. In both PII- and PIII-NART plans, the doses to 95% of all the target volumes (D{sub 95}) were increased with better dose uniformity, whereas the organs at risk (OARs) received higher doses compared with the corresponding ART plans. Without replanning, the total dose to 1% of brainstem and spinal cord (D{sub 1}) significantly increased 7.87 {+-} 7.26% and 10.69 {+-} 6.72%, respectively (P = 0.011 and 0.001, respectively), in which 3 patients would have these structures overdosed when compared with those with two replannings. The total maximum doses to the optic chiasm and pituitary gland and the mean doses to the left and right parotid glands were increased by 10.50 {+-} 10.51%, 8.59 {+-} 6.10%, 3.03 {+-} 4.48%, and 2.24 {+-} 3.11%, respectively (P = 0.014, 0.003, 0.053, and 0.046, respectively). The 3-phase radiotherapy protocol showed improved dosimetric results to the critical structures while keeping satisfactory target dose coverage, which demonstrated the advantages of ART in

  8. SU-E-J-33: Cardiac Movement in Deep Inspiration Breath-Hold for Left-Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, M; Lee, S; Suh, T

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The present study was designed to investigate the displacement of heart using Deep Inspiration Breath Hold (DIBH) CT data compared to free-breathing (FB) CT data and radiation exposure to heart. Methods: Treatment planning was performed on the computed tomography (CT) datasets of 20 patients who had received lumpectomy treatments. Heart, lung and both breasts were outlined. The prescribed dose was 50 Gy divided into 28 fractions. The dose distributions in all the plans were required to fulfill the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurement specifications that include 100% coverage of the CTV with ≥ 95% of the prescribed dose and that the volume inside the CTV receiving > 107% of the prescribed dose should be minimized. Displacement of heart was measured by calculating the distance between center of heart and left breast. For the evaluation of radiation dose to heart, minimum, maximum and mean dose to heart were calculated. Results: The maximum and minimum left-right (LR) displacements of heart were 8.9 mm and 3 mm, respectively. The heart moved > 4 mm in the LR direction in 17 of the 20 patients. The distances between the heart and left breast ranged from 8.02–17.68 mm (mean, 12.23 mm) and 7.85–12.98 mm (mean, 8.97 mm) with DIBH CT and FB CT, respectively. The maximum doses to the heart were 3115 cGy and 4652 cGy for the DIBH and FB CT dataset, respectively. Conclusion: The present study has demonstrated that the DIBH technique could help to reduce the risk of radiation dose-induced cardiac toxicity by using movement of cardiac; away from radiation field. The DIBH technique could be used in an actual treatment room for a few minutes and could effectively reduce the cardiac dose when used with a sub-device or image acquisition standard to maintain consistent respiratory motion

  9. Can air-breathing fish be adapted to higher than present temperatures?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bayley, Mark

    hypophthalmus inhabits the Mekong river system covering two climate zones during its life cycle and migrating more than 2000 km from hatching in northern Laos to its adult life in the southern delta region. It is a facultative air-breather with well-developed gills and air-breathing organ and an unusual...... circulatory bauplan. Here we examine the question of its optimal temperature through aspects of its cardio respiratory physiology including temperature effects on blood oxygen binding, ventilation and blood gasses, stereological measures of cardiorespiratory system, metabolic rate and growth. Comparing...

  10. Using dual-energy x-ray imaging to enhance automated lung tumor tracking during real-time adaptive radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menten, Martin J.; Fast, Martin F.; Nill, Simeon; Oelfke, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Real-time, markerless localization of lung tumors with kV imaging is often inhibited by ribs obscuring the tumor and poor soft-tissue contrast. This study investigates the use of dual-energy imaging, which can generate radiographs with reduced bone visibility, to enhance automated lung tumor tracking for real-time adaptive radiotherapy. Methods: kV images of an anthropomorphic breathing chest phantom were experimentally acquired and radiographs of actual lung cancer patients were Monte-Carlo-simulated at three imaging settings: low-energy (70 kVp, 1.5 mAs), high-energy (140 kVp, 2.5 mAs, 1 mm additional tin filtration), and clinical (120 kVp, 0.25 mAs). Regular dual-energy images were calculated by weighted logarithmic subtraction of high- and low-energy images and filter-free dual-energy images were generated from clinical and low-energy radiographs. The weighting factor to calculate the dual-energy images was determined by means of a novel objective score. The usefulness of dual-energy imaging for real-time tracking with an automated template matching algorithm was investigated. Results: Regular dual-energy imaging was able to increase tracking accuracy in left–right images of the anthropomorphic phantom as well as in 7 out of 24 investigated patient cases. Tracking accuracy remained comparable in three cases and decreased in five cases. Filter-free dual-energy imaging was only able to increase accuracy in 2 out of 24 cases. In four cases no change in accuracy was observed and tracking accuracy worsened in nine cases. In 9 out of 24 cases, it was not possible to define a tracking template due to poor soft-tissue contrast regardless of input images. The mean localization errors using clinical, regular dual-energy, and filter-free dual-energy radiographs were 3.85, 3.32, and 5.24 mm, respectively. Tracking success was dependent on tumor position, tumor size, imaging beam angle, and patient size. Conclusions: This study has highlighted the influence of

  11. Using dual-energy x-ray imaging to enhance automated lung tumor tracking during real-time adaptive radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menten, Martin J; Fast, Martin F; Nill, Simeon; Oelfke, Uwe

    2015-12-01

    Real-time, markerless localization of lung tumors with kV imaging is often inhibited by ribs obscuring the tumor and poor soft-tissue contrast. This study investigates the use of dual-energy imaging, which can generate radiographs with reduced bone visibility, to enhance automated lung tumor tracking for real-time adaptive radiotherapy. kV images of an anthropomorphic breathing chest phantom were experimentally acquired and radiographs of actual lung cancer patients were Monte-Carlo-simulated at three imaging settings: low-energy (70 kVp, 1.5 mAs), high-energy (140 kVp, 2.5 mAs, 1 mm additional tin filtration), and clinical (120 kVp, 0.25 mAs). Regular dual-energy images were calculated by weighted logarithmic subtraction of high- and low-energy images and filter-free dual-energy images were generated from clinical and low-energy radiographs. The weighting factor to calculate the dual-energy images was determined by means of a novel objective score. The usefulness of dual-energy imaging for real-time tracking with an automated template matching algorithm was investigated. Regular dual-energy imaging was able to increase tracking accuracy in left-right images of the anthropomorphic phantom as well as in 7 out of 24 investigated patient cases. Tracking accuracy remained comparable in three cases and decreased in five cases. Filter-free dual-energy imaging was only able to increase accuracy in 2 out of 24 cases. In four cases no change in accuracy was observed and tracking accuracy worsened in nine cases. In 9 out of 24 cases, it was not possible to define a tracking template due to poor soft-tissue contrast regardless of input images. The mean localization errors using clinical, regular dual-energy, and filter-free dual-energy radiographs were 3.85, 3.32, and 5.24 mm, respectively. Tracking success was dependent on tumor position, tumor size, imaging beam angle, and patient size. This study has highlighted the influence of patient anatomy on the success rate of real

  12. Using dual-energy x-ray imaging to enhance automated lung tumor tracking during real-time adaptive radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menten, Martin J., E-mail: martin.menten@icr.ac.uk; Fast, Martin F.; Nill, Simeon; Oelfke, Uwe, E-mail: uwe.oelfke@icr.ac.uk [Joint Department of Physics at The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London SM2 5NG (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: Real-time, markerless localization of lung tumors with kV imaging is often inhibited by ribs obscuring the tumor and poor soft-tissue contrast. This study investigates the use of dual-energy imaging, which can generate radiographs with reduced bone visibility, to enhance automated lung tumor tracking for real-time adaptive radiotherapy. Methods: kV images of an anthropomorphic breathing chest phantom were experimentally acquired and radiographs of actual lung cancer patients were Monte-Carlo-simulated at three imaging settings: low-energy (70 kVp, 1.5 mAs), high-energy (140 kVp, 2.5 mAs, 1 mm additional tin filtration), and clinical (120 kVp, 0.25 mAs). Regular dual-energy images were calculated by weighted logarithmic subtraction of high- and low-energy images and filter-free dual-energy images were generated from clinical and low-energy radiographs. The weighting factor to calculate the dual-energy images was determined by means of a novel objective score. The usefulness of dual-energy imaging for real-time tracking with an automated template matching algorithm was investigated. Results: Regular dual-energy imaging was able to increase tracking accuracy in left–right images of the anthropomorphic phantom as well as in 7 out of 24 investigated patient cases. Tracking accuracy remained comparable in three cases and decreased in five cases. Filter-free dual-energy imaging was only able to increase accuracy in 2 out of 24 cases. In four cases no change in accuracy was observed and tracking accuracy worsened in nine cases. In 9 out of 24 cases, it was not possible to define a tracking template due to poor soft-tissue contrast regardless of input images. The mean localization errors using clinical, regular dual-energy, and filter-free dual-energy radiographs were 3.85, 3.32, and 5.24 mm, respectively. Tracking success was dependent on tumor position, tumor size, imaging beam angle, and patient size. Conclusions: This study has highlighted the influence of

  13. It takes a mouth to eat and a nose to breathe: abnormal oral respiration affects neonates' oral competence and systemic adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trabalon, Marie; Schaal, Benoist

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian, including human, neonates are considered to be obligate nose breathers. When constrained to breathe through their mouth in response to obstructed or closed nasal passages, the effects are pervasive and profound, and sometimes last into adulthood. The present paper briefly surveys neonates' and infants' responses to this atypical mobilisation of the mouth for breathing and focuses on comparisons between human newborns and infants and the neonatal rat model. We present the effects of forced oral breathing on neonatal rats induced by experimental nasal obstruction. We assessed the multilevel consequences on physiological, structural, and behavioural variables, both during and after the obstruction episode. The effects of the compensatory mobilisation of oral resources for breathing are discussed in the light of the adaptive development of oromotor functions.

  14. A 4D ultrasound real-time tracking system for external beam radiotherapy of upper abdominal lesions under breath-hold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sihono, Dwi Seno Kuncoro; Vogel, Lena; Thoelking, Johannes; Wenz, Frederik; Boda-Heggemann, Judit; Wertz, Hansjoerg [University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Weiss, Christel [University of Heidelberg, Department of Biomathematics and Medical Statistics, University Medical Center Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Lohr, Frank [University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Az. Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Modena, Struttura Complessa di Radioterapia, Dipartimento di Oncologia, Modena (Italy)

    2017-03-15

    To evaluate a novel four-dimensional (4D) ultrasound (US) tracking system for external beam radiotherapy of upper abdominal lesions under computer-controlled deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH). The tracking accuracy of the research 4D US system was evaluated using two motion phantoms programmed with sinusoidal and breathing patterns to simulate free breathing and DIBH. Clinical performance was evaluated with five healthy volunteers. US datasets were acquired in computer-controlled DIBH with varying angular scanning angles. Tracked structures were renal pelvis (spherical structure) and portal/liver vein branches (non-spherical structure). An external marker was attached to the surface of both phantoms and volunteers as a secondary object to be tracked by an infrared camera for comparison. Phantom measurements showed increased accuracy of US tracking with decreasing scanning range/increasing scanning frequency. The probability of lost tracking was higher for small scanning ranges (43.09% for 10 and 13.54% for 20 ).The tracking success rates in healthy volunteers during DIBH were 93.24 and 89.86% for renal pelvis and portal vein branches, respectively. There was a strong correlation between marker motion and US tracking for the majority of analyzed breath-holds: 84.06 and 88.41% of renal pelvis target results and 82.26 and 91.94% of liver vein target results in anteroposterior and superoinferior directions, respectively; Pearson's correlation coefficient was between 0.71 and 0.99. The US system showed a good tracking performance in 4D motion phantoms. The tracking capability of surrogate structures for upper abdominal lesions in DIBH fulfills clinical requirements. Further investigation in a larger cohort of patients is underway. (orig.) [German] Evaluation eines neuen vierdimensionalen (4D) Ultraschall(US)-Tracking-Systems fuer die externe Strahlentherapie von Oberbauchlaesionen unter computergesteuertem tiefem Atemanhalt (DIBH). Die Tracking-Genauigkeit des 4D

  15. Process-based quality management for clinical implementation of adaptive radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noel, Camille E.; Santanam, Lakshmi; Parikh, Parag J.; Mutic, Sasa

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated adaptive radiotherapy (ART) has been the focus of considerable research and developmental work due to its potential therapeutic benefits. However, in light of its unique quality assurance (QA) challenges, no one has described a robust framework for its clinical implementation. In fact, recent position papers by ASTRO and AAPM have firmly endorsed pretreatment patient-specific IMRT QA, which limits the feasibility of online ART. The authors aim to address these obstacles by applying failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) to identify high-priority errors and appropriate risk-mitigation strategies for clinical implementation of intensity-modulated ART. Methods: An experienced team of two clinical medical physicists, one clinical engineer, and one radiation oncologist was assembled to perform a standard FMEA for intensity-modulated ART. A set of 216 potential radiotherapy failures composed by the forthcoming AAPM task group 100 (TG-100) was used as the basis. Of the 216 failures, 127 were identified as most relevant to an ART scheme. Using the associated TG-100 FMEA values as a baseline, the team considered how the likeliness of occurrence (O), outcome severity (S), and likeliness of failure being undetected (D) would change for ART. New risk priority numbers (RPN) were calculated. Failures characterized by RPN ≥ 200 were identified as potentially critical. Results: FMEA revealed that ART RPN increased for 38% (n = 48/127) of potential failures, with 75% (n = 36/48) attributed to failures in the segmentation and treatment planning processes. Forty-three of 127 failures were identified as potentially critical. Risk-mitigation strategies include implementing a suite of quality control and decision support software, specialty QA software/hardware tools, and an increase in specially trained personnel. Conclusions: Results of the FMEA-based risk assessment demonstrate that intensity-modulated ART introduces different (but not necessarily

  16. Tumor Volume-Adapted Dosing in Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy of Lung Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trakul, Nicholas; Chang, Christine N.; Harris, Jeremy [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Chapman, Christopher [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Rao, Aarti [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); University of California, Davis, School of Medicine, Davis, CA (United States); Shen, John [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); University of California, Irvine, School of Medicine, Irvine, CA (United States); Quinlan-Davidson, Sean [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, McMaster University, Juravinski Cancer Centre, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Filion, Edith J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Departement de Medecine, Service de Radio-Oncologie, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Wakelee, Heather A.; Colevas, A. Dimitrios [Department of Medicine, Division of Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Whyte, Richard I. [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Division of General Thoracic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); and others

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Current stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) protocols for lung tumors prescribe a uniform dose regimen irrespective of tumor size. We report the outcomes of a lung tumor volume-adapted SABR dosing strategy. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes in 111 patients with a total of 138 primary or metastatic lung tumors treated by SABR, including local control, regional control, distant metastasis, overall survival, and treatment toxicity. We also performed subset analysis on 83 patients with 97 tumors treated with a volume-adapted dosing strategy in which small tumors (gross tumor volume <12 mL) received single-fraction regimens with biologically effective doses (BED) <100 Gy (total dose, 18-25 Gy) (Group 1), and larger tumors (gross tumor volume {>=}12 mL) received multifraction regimens with BED {>=}100 Gy (total dose, 50-60 Gy in three to four fractions) (Group 2). Results: The median follow-up time was 13.5 months. Local control for Groups 1 and 2 was 91.4% and 92.5%, respectively (p = 0.24) at 12 months. For primary lung tumors only (excluding metastases), local control was 92.6% and 91.7%, respectively (p = 0.58). Regional control, freedom from distant metastasis, and overall survival did not differ significantly between Groups 1 and 2. Rates of radiation pneumonitis, chest wall toxicity, and esophagitis were low in both groups, but all Grade 3 toxicities developed in Group 2 (p = 0.02). Conclusion: A volume-adapted dosing approach for SABR of lung tumors seems to provide excellent local control for both small- and large-volume tumors and may reduce toxicity.

  17. Tumor Volume-Adapted Dosing in Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy of Lung Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trakul, Nicholas; Chang, Christine N.; Harris, Jeremy; Chapman, Christopher; Rao, Aarti; Shen, John; Quinlan-Davidson, Sean; Filion, Edith J.; Wakelee, Heather A.; Colevas, A. Dimitrios; Whyte, Richard I.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Current stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) protocols for lung tumors prescribe a uniform dose regimen irrespective of tumor size. We report the outcomes of a lung tumor volume-adapted SABR dosing strategy. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes in 111 patients with a total of 138 primary or metastatic lung tumors treated by SABR, including local control, regional control, distant metastasis, overall survival, and treatment toxicity. We also performed subset analysis on 83 patients with 97 tumors treated with a volume-adapted dosing strategy in which small tumors (gross tumor volume <12 mL) received single-fraction regimens with biologically effective doses (BED) <100 Gy (total dose, 18–25 Gy) (Group 1), and larger tumors (gross tumor volume ≥12 mL) received multifraction regimens with BED ≥100 Gy (total dose, 50–60 Gy in three to four fractions) (Group 2). Results: The median follow-up time was 13.5 months. Local control for Groups 1 and 2 was 91.4% and 92.5%, respectively (p = 0.24) at 12 months. For primary lung tumors only (excluding metastases), local control was 92.6% and 91.7%, respectively (p = 0.58). Regional control, freedom from distant metastasis, and overall survival did not differ significantly between Groups 1 and 2. Rates of radiation pneumonitis, chest wall toxicity, and esophagitis were low in both groups, but all Grade 3 toxicities developed in Group 2 (p = 0.02). Conclusion: A volume-adapted dosing approach for SABR of lung tumors seems to provide excellent local control for both small- and large-volume tumors and may reduce toxicity.

  18. Variations in CT determination of target volume with active breath co-ordinate in radiotherapy for post-operative gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gui-Chao; Zhang, Zhen; Ma, Xue-Jun; Yu, Xiao-Li; Hu, Wei-Gang; Wang, Jia-Zhou; Li, Qi-Wen; Liang, Li-Ping; Shen, Li-Jun; Zhang, Hui; Fan, Ming

    2016-01-01

    To investigate interobserver and inter-CT variations in using the active breath co-ordinate technique in the determination of clinical tumour volume (CTV) and normal organs in post-operative gastric cancer radiotherapy. Ten gastric cancer patients were enrolled in our study, and four radiation oncologists independently determined the CTVs and organs at risk based on the CT simulation data. To determine interobserver and inter-CT variation, we evaluated the maximum dimensions, derived volume and distance between the centres of mass (CMs) of the CTVs. We assessed the reliability in CTV determination among the observers by conformity index (CI). The average volumes ± standard deviation (cm(3)) of the CTV, liver, left kidney and right kidney were 674 ± 138 (range, 332-969), 1000 ± 138 (range, 714-1320), 149 ± 13 (range, 104-183) and 141 ± 21 (range, 110-186) cm(3), respectively. The average inter-CT distances between the CMs of the CTV, liver, left kidney and right kidney were 0.40, 0.56, 0.65 and 0.6 cm, respectively; the interobserver values were 0.98, 0.53, 0.16 and 0.15 cm, respectively. In the volume size of CTV for post-operative gastric cancer, there were significant variations among multiple observers, whereas there was no variation between different CTs. The slices in which variations more likely occur were the slices of the lower verge of the hilum of the spleen and porta hepatis, then the paraoesophageal lymph nodes region and abdominal aorta, and the inferior vena cava, and the variation in the craniocaudal orientation from the interobserver was more predominant than that from inter-CT. First, this is the first study to evaluate the interobserver and inter-CT variations in the determination of the CTV and normal organs in gastric cancer with the use of the active breath co-ordinate technique. Second, we analysed the region where variations most likely occur. Third, we investigated the influence of interobserver variation on

  19. Evolution of motion uncertainty in rectal cancer: implications for adaptive radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleijnen, Jean-Paul J. E.; van Asselen, Bram; Burbach, Johannes P. M.; Intven, Martijn; Philippens, Marielle E. P.; Reerink, Onne; Lagendijk, Jan J. W.; Raaymakers, Bas W.

    2016-01-01

    Reduction of motion uncertainty by applying adaptive radiotherapy strategies depends largely on the temporal behavior of this motion. To fully optimize adaptive strategies, insight into target motion is needed. The purpose of this study was to analyze stability and evolution in time of motion uncertainty of both the gross tumor volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) for patients with rectal cancer. We scanned 16 patients daily during one week, on a 1.5 T MRI scanner in treatment position, prior to each radiotherapy fraction. Single slice sagittal cine MRIs were made at the beginning, middle, and end of each scan session, for one minute at 2 Hz temporal resolution. GTV and CTV motion were determined by registering a delineated reference frame to time-points later in time. The 95th percentile of observed motion (dist95%) was taken as a measure of motion. The stability of motion in time was evaluated within each cine-MRI separately. The evolution of motion was investigated between the reference frame and the cine-MRIs of a single scan session and between the reference frame and the cine-MRIs of several days later in the course of treatment. This observed motion was then converted into a PTV-margin estimate. Within a one minute cine-MRI scan, motion was found to be stable and small. Independent of the time-point within the scan session, the average dist95% remains below 3.6 mm and 2.3 mm for CTV and GTV, respectively 90% of the time. We found similar motion over time intervals from 18 min to 4 days. When reducing the time interval from 18 min to 1 min, a large reduction in motion uncertainty is observed. A reduction in motion uncertainty, and thus the PTV-margin estimate, of 71% and 75% for CTV and tumor was observed, respectively. Time intervals of 15 and 30 s yield no further reduction in motion uncertainty compared to a 1 min time interval.

  20. Evolution of motion uncertainty in rectal cancer: implications for adaptive radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleijnen, Jean-Paul J E; van Asselen, Bram; Burbach, Johannes P M; Intven, Martijn; Philippens, Marielle E P; Reerink, Onne; Lagendijk, Jan J W; Raaymakers, Bas W

    2016-01-07

    Reduction of motion uncertainty by applying adaptive radiotherapy strategies depends largely on the temporal behavior of this motion. To fully optimize adaptive strategies, insight into target motion is needed. The purpose of this study was to analyze stability and evolution in time of motion uncertainty of both the gross tumor volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) for patients with rectal cancer. We scanned 16 patients daily during one week, on a 1.5 T MRI scanner in treatment position, prior to each radiotherapy fraction. Single slice sagittal cine MRIs were made at the beginning, middle, and end of each scan session, for one minute at 2 Hz temporal resolution. GTV and CTV motion were determined by registering a delineated reference frame to time-points later in time. The 95th percentile of observed motion (dist95%) was taken as a measure of motion. The stability of motion in time was evaluated within each cine-MRI separately. The evolution of motion was investigated between the reference frame and the cine-MRIs of a single scan session and between the reference frame and the cine-MRIs of several days later in the course of treatment. This observed motion was then converted into a PTV-margin estimate. Within a one minute cine-MRI scan, motion was found to be stable and small. Independent of the time-point within the scan session, the average dist95% remains below 3.6 mm and 2.3 mm for CTV and GTV, respectively 90% of the time. We found similar motion over time intervals from 18 min to 4 days. When reducing the time interval from 18 min to 1 min, a large reduction in motion uncertainty is observed. A reduction in motion uncertainty, and thus the PTV-margin estimate, of 71% and 75% for CTV and tumor was observed, respectively. Time intervals of 15 and 30 s yield no further reduction in motion uncertainty compared to a 1 min time interval.

  1. Dosimetric and geometric evaluation of a hybrid strategy of offline adaptive planning and online image guidance for prostate cancer radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Han; Wu, Qiuwen

    2011-01-01

    For prostate cancer patients, online image-guided (IG) radiotherapy has been widely used in clinic to correct the translational inter-fractional motion at each treatment fraction. For uncertainties that cannot be corrected online, such as rotation and deformation of the target volume, margins are still required to be added to the clinical target volume (CTV) for the treatment planning. Offline adaptive radiotherapy has been implemented to optimize the treatment for each individual patient based on the measurements at early stages of treatment process. It has been shown that offline adaptive radiotherapy can effectively reduce the required margin. Recently a hybrid strategy of offline adaptive replanning and online IG was proposed and the geometric evaluation was performed. It was found that the planning margins can be further reduced by 1–2 mm compared to online IG only strategy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the dosimetric benefits of such hybrid strategy on the target and organs at risk (OARs). A total of 420 repeated helical computed tomography (HCT) scans from 28 patients were included in the study. Both low-risk patients (LRP, CTV = prostate) and intermediate-risk patients (IRP, CTV = prostate + seminal vesicles, SV) were included in the simulation. Two registration methods, based on center-of-mass (COM) shift of prostate only and prostate plus SV, were performed for IRP. The intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) was used in the simulation. Criteria on both cumulative dose and fractional doses were evaluated. Furthermore, the geometric evaluation was extended to investigate the optimal number of fractions necessary to construct the internal target volume (ITV) for the hybrid strategy. The dosimetric margin improvement was smaller than its geometric counterpart and was in the range of 0 mm to 1 mm. The optimal number of fractions necessary for the ITV construction is 2 for LRP and 3–4 for IRP in a hypofractionation protocol. A new

  2. Adaptive radiotherapy for soft tissue changes during helical tomotherapy for head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duma, M.N.; Kampfer, S.; Winkler, C.; Geinitz, H. [Universitaetsklinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Schuster, T. [Universitaetsklinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany). Inst. of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology

    2012-03-15

    The goal of the present study was to assess the frequency and impact of replanning triggered solely by soft tissue changes observed on the daily setup mega-voltage CT (MVCT) in head and neck cancer (H and N) helical tomotherapy (HT). A total of 11 patients underwent adaptive radiotherapy (ART) using MVCT. Preconditions were a soft tissue change > 0.5 cm and a tight mask. The dose-volume histograms (DVHs) derived from the initial planning kVCT (inPlan), the recalculated DVHs of the fraction (fx) when replanning was decided (actSit) and the DVHs of the new plan (adaptPlan) were compared. Assessed were the following: maximum dose (D{sub max}), minimum dose (D{sub min}), and mean dose (D{sub mean}) to the planning target volume (PTV) normalized to the prescribed dose; the D{sub mean}/fx to the parotid glands (PG), oral cavity (OC), and larynx (Lx); and the D{sub max}/fx to the spinal cord (SC) in Gy/fx. No patient had palpable soft tissue changes. The median weight loss at the moment of replanning was 2.3 kg. The median PTV D{sub mean} was 100% for inPlan, 103% for actSit, and 100% for adaptPlan. The PTV was always covered by the prescribed dose. A statistically significant increase was noted for all organs at risk (OAR) in the actSit. The D{sub mean} to the Lx, the D{sub mean} to the OC and the D{sub max} to the SC were statistically better in the adaptPlan. No statistically significant improvement was achieved by ART for the PGs. No significant correlations between weight and volume loss or between the volume changes of the organs to each other were observed, except a strong positive correlation of the shrinkage of the PGs ({rho} = + 0.77, p = 0.005). Soft tissue shrinkage without clinical palpable changes will not affect the coverage of the PTV, but translates into a higher delivered dose to the PTV itself and the normal tissue outside the PTV. The gain by ART in individual patients - especially in patients who receive doses close to the tolerance doses of the OAR

  3. An enhanced block matching algorithm for fast elastic registration in adaptive radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malsch, U; Thieke, C; Huber, P E; Bendl, R

    2006-10-07

    Image registration has many medical applications in diagnosis, therapy planning and therapy. Especially for time-adaptive radiotherapy, an efficient and accurate elastic registration of images acquired for treatment planning, and at the time of the actual treatment, is highly desirable. Therefore, we developed a fully automatic and fast block matching algorithm which identifies a set of anatomical landmarks in a 3D CT dataset and relocates them in another CT dataset by maximization of local correlation coefficients in the frequency domain. To transform the complete dataset, a smooth interpolation between the landmarks is calculated by modified thin-plate splines with local impact. The concept of the algorithm allows separate processing of image discontinuities like temporally changing air cavities in the intestinal track or rectum. The result is a fully transformed 3D planning dataset (planning CT as well as delineations of tumour and organs at risk) to a verification CT, allowing evaluation and, if necessary, changes of the treatment plan based on the current patient anatomy without time-consuming manual re-contouring. Typically the total calculation time is less than 5 min, which allows the use of the registration tool between acquiring the verification images and delivering the dose fraction for online corrections. We present verifications of the algorithm for five different patient datasets with different tumour locations (prostate, paraspinal and head-and-neck) by comparing the results with manually selected landmarks, visual assessment and consistency testing. It turns out that the mean error of the registration is better than the voxel resolution (2 x 2 x 3 mm(3)). In conclusion, we present an algorithm for fully automatic elastic image registration that is precise and fast enough for online corrections in an adaptive fractionated radiation treatment course.

  4. Investigation of the climatic extremes influence on the humane adaptive capacity by mass spectrometric analysis of exhaled breath condensate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryabokon, Anna; Larina, Irina; Kononikhin, Alexey; Starodubtceva, Nataliia; Popov, Igor; Nikolaev, Eugene; Varfolomeev, Sergey

    Global climate change, which causes abnormal fluctuations in temperature and rainfall, has adverse effects on human health. Particularly people suffer with cardiovascular and respiratory system disease. Our research was concentrated on the changes in the regulation and adaptation systems of human organism related to hyperthermia and polluted air influence. Healthy individuals with the age from 22 to 45 years were isolated during 30 days in the ground based experimental facility located at Institute of medico-biological problems RAS (Moscow, Russia). In the ground based facility artificially climatic conditions of August, 2010 in Moscow were created. Exhaled breath condensate was collected before and after isolation by R-Tube collector, freeze dried, treated by trypsin and analyzed by nanoflow LC-MS/MS with a 7-Tesla LTQ-FT Ultra mass spectrometer (Thermo Electron, Bremen, Germany). Database search was performed using Mascot Server 2.2 software (Matrix Science, London, UK). Investigation of exhaled breath condensate (EBC) collected from participants of the 30 days isolation with hyper thermic and polluted air climate conditions was performed. After isolation reduction of the protein number was observed. Loss endothelial C receptor precursor - the main physiological anticoagulant - correlate with the clinical data of physicians to increase the propensity to thrombosis. Also COP9 signalosome protein, positive regulator of ubiquitin was identified in all EBC samples before isolation and was not detected for more than a half of donors after isolation. This phenomena may be due to violation of ubiquitin protection system of the cells from harmful proteins. During isolation the air was cleared from microdisperse particles.

  5. Breath-hold monitoring and visual feedback for radiotherapy using a charge-coupled device camera and a head-mounted display. System development and feasibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshitake, Tadamasa; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to present the technical aspects of the breath-hold technique with respiratory monitoring and visual feedback and to evaluate the feasibility of this system in healthy volunteers. To monitor respiration, the vertical position of the fiducial marker placed on the patient's abdomen was tracked by a machine vision system with a charge-coupled device camera. A monocular head-mounted display was used to provide the patient with visual feedback about the breathing trace. Five healthy male volunteers were enrolled in this study. They held their breath at the end-inspiration and the end-expiration phases. They performed five repetitions of the same type of 15-s breath-holds with and without a head-mounted display, respectively. A standard deviation of five mean positions of the fiducial marker during a 15-s breath-hold in each breath-hold type was used as the reproducibility value of breath-hold. All five volunteers well tolerated the breath-hold maneuver. For the inspiration breath-hold, the standard deviations with and without visual feedback were 1.74 mm and 0.84 mm, respectively (P=0.20). For the expiration breath-hold, the standard deviations with and without visual feedback were 0.63 mm and 0.96 mm, respectively (P=0.025). Our newly developed system might help the patient achieve improved breath-hold reproducibility. (author)

  6. Deformable image registration for geometrical evaluation of DIBH radiotherapy treatment of lung cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosson, Wiviann; Lykkegaard Andersen, J. A.; Borrisova, S.

    2014-01-01

    Respiration and anatomical variation during radiotherapy (RT) of lung cancer yield dosimetric uncertainties of the delivered dose, possibly affecting the clinical outcome if not corrected for. Adaptive radiotherapy (ART), based on deformable image registration (DIR) and Deep-Inspiration-Breath-Hold...... (DIBH) gating can potentially improve the accuracy of RT. Purpose: The objective was to investigate the performance of contour propagation on repeated CT and Cone Beam CT (CBCT) images in DIBH compared to images acquired in free breathing (FB), using a recently released DIR software. Method: Three...

  7. A modified VMAT adaptive radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal cancer patients based on CT-CT image fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Xiance; Han, Ce; Zhou, Yongqiang; Yi, Jinling; Yan, Huawei; Xie, Congying

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the feasibility and benefits of a modified adaptive radiotherapy (ART) by replanning in the initial CT (iCT) with new contours from a repeat CT (rCT) based on CT-CT image fusion for nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) patients underwent volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT). Nine NPC patients underwent VMAT treatment with a rCT at 23rd fraction were enrolled in this study. Dosimetric differences for replanning VMAT plans in the iCT and in the rCT were compared. Volumetric and dosimetric changes of gross tumor volume (GTV) and organs at risk (OARs) of this modified ART were also investigated. No dosimetric differences between replanning in the iCT and in the rCT were observed. The average volume of GTV decreased from 78.83 ± 38.42 cm 3 in the iCT to 71.44 ± 37.46 cm 3 in the rCT, but with no significant difference (p = 0.42).The average volume of the left and right parotid decreased from 19.91 ± 4.89 cm 3 and 21.58 ± 6.16 cm 3 in the iCT to 11.80 ± 2.79 cm 3 and 13.29 ± 4.17 cm 3 in the rCT (both p < 0.01), respectively. The volume of other OARs did not shrink very much. No significant differences on PTV GTV and PTV CTV coverage were observed for replanning with this modified ART. Compared to the initial plans, the average mean dose of the left and right parotid after re-optimization were decreased by 62.5 cGy (p = 0.05) and 67.3 cGy (p = 0.02), respectively, and the V5 (the volume receiving 5 Gy) of the left and right parotids were decreased by 7.8% (p = 0.01) and 11.2% (p = 0.001), respectively. There was no significant difference on the dose delivered to other OARs. Patients with NPC undergoing VMAT have significant anatomic and dosimetric changes to parotids. Repeat CT as an anatomic changes reference and re-optimization in the iCT based on CT-CT image fusion was accurate enough to identify the volume changes and to ensure safe dose to parotids

  8. Robust Adaptive Flight Control Design of Air-breathing Hypersonic Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-07

    Xu et al., 2012] with the application of neural network to control the longitudinal winged-cone hypersonic model. Another longitudinal hypersonic...square, non-affine nonlinear systems. IET Control Theory & Applications, 1(6):1650–1661, 2007. Wang Qian and Liu Jiaxue. A neural network adaptive...nonlinear control of a hypersonic aircraft . Journal of Guidance, Control , and Dynamics, 23(4):577–585, 2000. Bin Xu and Yu Zhang. Neural discrete back

  9. TH-AB-202-04: Auto-Adaptive Margin Generation for MLC-Tracked Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glitzner, M; Lagendijk, J; Raaymakers, B; Crijns, S; Fast, M; Nill, S; Oelfke, U; Denis de Senneville, B

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop an auto-adaptive margin generator for MLC tracking. The generator is able to estimate errors arising in image guided radiotherapy, particularly on an MR-Linac, which depend on the latencies of machine and image processing, as well as on patient motion characteristics. From the estimated error distribution, a segment margin is generated, able to compensate errors up to a user-defined confidence. Method: In every tracking control cycle (TCC, 40ms), the desired aperture D(t) is compared to the actual aperture A(t), a delayed and imperfect representation of D(t). Thus an error e(t)=A(T)-D(T) is measured every TCC. Applying kernel-density-estimation (KDE), the cumulative distribution (CDF) of e(t) is estimated. With CDF-confidence limits, upper and lower error limits are extracted for motion axes along and perpendicular leaf-travel direction and applied as margins. To test the dosimetric impact, two representative motion traces were extracted from fast liver-MRI (10Hz). The traces were applied onto a 4D-motion platform and continuously tracked by an Elekta Agility 160 MLC using an artificially imposed tracking delay. Gafchromic film was used to detect dose exposition for static, tracked, and error-compensated tracking cases. The margin generator was parameterized to cover 90% of all tracking errors. Dosimetric impact was rated by calculating the ratio between underexposed points (>5% underdosage) to the total number of points inside FWHM of static exposure. Results: Without imposing adaptive margins, tracking experiments showed a ratio of underexposed points of 17.5% and 14.3% for two motion cases with imaging delays of 200ms and 300ms, respectively. Activating the margin generated yielded total suppression (<1%) of underdosed points. Conclusion: We showed that auto-adaptive error compensation using machine error statistics is possible for MLC tracking. The error compensation margins are calculated on-line, without the need of assuming motion or

  10. A DVH-guided IMRT optimization algorithm for automatic treatment planning and adaptive radiotherapy replanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarepisheh, Masoud; Li, Nan; Long, Troy; Romeijn, H. Edwin; Tian, Zhen; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a novel algorithm that incorporates prior treatment knowledge into intensity modulated radiation therapy optimization to facilitate automatic treatment planning and adaptive radiotherapy (ART) replanning. Methods: The algorithm automatically creates a treatment plan guided by the DVH curves of a reference plan that contains information on the clinician-approved dose-volume trade-offs among different targets/organs and among different portions of a DVH curve for an organ. In ART, the reference plan is the initial plan for the same patient, while for automatic treatment planning the reference plan is selected from a library of clinically approved and delivered plans of previously treated patients with similar medical conditions and geometry. The proposed algorithm employs a voxel-based optimization model and navigates the large voxel-based Pareto surface. The voxel weights are iteratively adjusted to approach a plan that is similar to the reference plan in terms of the DVHs. If the reference plan is feasible but not Pareto optimal, the algorithm generates a Pareto optimal plan with the DVHs better than the reference ones. If the reference plan is too restricting for the new geometry, the algorithm generates a Pareto plan with DVHs close to the reference ones. In both cases, the new plans have similar DVH trade-offs as the reference plans. Results: The algorithm was tested using three patient cases and found to be able to automatically adjust the voxel-weighting factors in order to generate a Pareto plan with similar DVH trade-offs as the reference plan. The algorithm has also been implemented on a GPU for high efficiency. Conclusions: A novel prior-knowledge-based optimization algorithm has been developed that automatically adjust the voxel weights and generate a clinical optimal plan at high efficiency. It is found that the new algorithm can significantly improve the plan quality and planning efficiency in ART replanning and automatic treatment

  11. Decision Trees Predicting Tumor Shrinkage for Head and Neck Cancer: Implications for Adaptive Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surucu, Murat; Shah, Karan K; Mescioglu, Ibrahim; Roeske, John C; Small, William; Choi, Mehee; Emami, Bahman

    2016-02-01

    To develop decision trees predicting for tumor volume reduction in patients with head and neck (H&N) cancer using pretreatment clinical and pathological parameters. Forty-eight patients treated with definitive concurrent chemoradiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the nasopharynx, oropharynx, oral cavity, or hypopharynx were retrospectively analyzed. These patients were rescanned at a median dose of 37.8 Gy and replanned to account for anatomical changes. The percentages of gross tumor volume (GTV) change from initial to rescan computed tomography (CT; %GTVΔ) were calculated. Two decision trees were generated to correlate %GTVΔ in primary and nodal volumes with 14 characteristics including age, gender, Karnofsky performance status (KPS), site, human papilloma virus (HPV) status, tumor grade, primary tumor growth pattern (endophytic/exophytic), tumor/nodal/group stages, chemotherapy regimen, and primary, nodal, and total GTV volumes in the initial CT scan. The C4.5 Decision Tree induction algorithm was implemented. The median %GTVΔ for primary, nodal, and total GTVs was 26.8%, 43.0%, and 31.2%, respectively. Type of chemotherapy, age, primary tumor growth pattern, site, KPS, and HPV status were the most predictive parameters for primary %GTVΔ decision tree, whereas for nodal %GTVΔ, KPS, site, age, primary tumor growth pattern, initial primary GTV, and total GTV volumes were predictive. Both decision trees had an accuracy of 88%. There can be significant changes in primary and nodal tumor volumes during the course of H&N chemoradiotherapy. Considering the proposed decision trees, radiation oncologists can select patients predicted to have high %GTVΔ, who would theoretically gain the most benefit from adaptive radiotherapy, in order to better use limited clinical resources. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. A deformable head and neck phantom with in-vivo dosimetry for adaptive radiotherapy quality assurance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graves, Yan Jiang [Center for Advanced Radiotherapy Technologies and Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92037-0843 and Department of Physics, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Smith, Arthur-Allen; Mcilvena, David; Manilay, Zherrina; Lai, Yuet Kong [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Rice, Roger; Mell, Loren; Cerviño, Laura, E-mail: lcervino@ucsd.edu, E-mail: steve.jiang@utsouthwestern.edu [Center for Advanced Radiotherapy Technologies and Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92037-0843 (United States); Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B., E-mail: lcervino@ucsd.edu, E-mail: steve.jiang@utsouthwestern.edu [Center for Advanced Radiotherapy Technologies and Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92037-0843 and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75235 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Patients’ interfractional anatomic changes can compromise the initial treatment plan quality. To overcome this issue, adaptive radiotherapy (ART) has been introduced. Deformable image registration (DIR) is an important tool for ART and several deformable phantoms have been built to evaluate the algorithms’ accuracy. However, there is a lack of deformable phantoms that can also provide dosimetric information to verify the accuracy of the whole ART process. The goal of this work is to design and construct a deformable head and neck (HN) ART quality assurance (QA) phantom with in vivo dosimetry. Methods: An axial slice of a HN patient is taken as a model for the phantom construction. Six anatomic materials are considered, with HU numbers similar to a real patient. A filled balloon inside the phantom tissue is inserted to simulate tumor. Deflation of the balloon simulates tumor shrinkage. Nonradiopaque surface markers, which do not influence DIR algorithms, provide the deformation ground truth. Fixed and movable holders are built in the phantom to hold a diode for dosimetric measurements. Results: The measured deformations at the surface marker positions can be compared with deformations calculated by a DIR algorithm to evaluate its accuracy. In this study, the authors selected a Demons algorithm as a DIR algorithm example for demonstration purposes. The average error magnitude is 2.1 mm. The point dose measurements from the in vivo diode dosimeters show a good agreement with the calculated doses from the treatment planning system with a maximum difference of 3.1% of prescription dose, when the treatment plans are delivered to the phantom with original or deformed geometry. Conclusions: In this study, the authors have presented the functionality of this deformable HN phantom for testing the accuracy of DIR algorithms and verifying the ART dosimetric accuracy. The authors’ experiments demonstrate the feasibility of this phantom serving as an end

  13. A hybrid strategy of offline adaptive planning and online image guidance for prostate cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei Yu; Wu Qiuwen

    2010-01-01

    Offline adaptive radiotherapy (ART) has been used to effectively correct and compensate for prostate motion and reduce the required margin. The efficacy depends on the characteristics of the patient setup error and interfraction motion through the whole treatment; specifically, systematic errors are corrected and random errors are compensated for through the margins. In online image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) of prostate cancer, the translational setup error and inter-fractional prostate motion are corrected through pre-treatment imaging and couch correction at each fraction. However, the rotation and deformation of the target are not corrected and only accounted for with margins in treatment planning. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the offline ART strategy is necessary for an online IGRT protocol and to evaluate the benefit of the hybrid strategy. First, to investigate the rationale of the hybrid strategy, 592 cone-beam-computed tomography (CBCT) images taken before and after each fraction for an online IGRT protocol from 16 patients were analyzed. Specifically, the characteristics of prostate rotation were analyzed. It was found that there exist systematic inter-fractional prostate rotations, and they are patient specific. These rotations, if not corrected, are persistent through the treatment fraction, and rotations detected in early fractions are representative of those in later fractions. These findings suggest that the offline adaptive replanning strategy is beneficial to the online IGRT protocol with further margin reductions. Second, to quantitatively evaluate the benefit of the hybrid strategy, 412 repeated helical CT scans from 25 patients during the course of treatment were included in the replanning study. Both low-risk patients (LRP, clinical target volume, CTV = prostate) and intermediate-risk patients (IRP, CTV = prostate + seminal vesicles) were included in the simulation. The contours of prostate and seminal vesicles were

  14. Molecular PET imaging for biology-guided adaptive radiotherapy of head and neck cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeben, B.A.W.; Bussink, J.; Troost, E.G.C.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Integration of molecular imaging PET techniques into therapy selection strategies and radiation treatment planning for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) can serve several purposes. First, pre-treatment assessments can steer decisions about radiotherapy modifications or

  15. Nonrigid registration method to assess reproducibility of breath-holding with ABC in lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarrut, David; Boldea, Vlad; Ayadi, Myriam; Badel, Jean-Noel; Ginestet, Chantal; Clippe, Sebastien; Carrie, Christian

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To study the interfraction reproducibility of breath-holding using active breath control (ABC), and to develop computerized tools to evaluate three-dimensional (3D) intrathoracic motion in each patient. Methods and materials: Since June 2002, 11 patients with non-small-cell lung cancer enrolled in a Phase II trial have undergone four CT scans: one during free-breathing (reference) and three using ABC. Patients left the room between breath-hold scans. The patient's breath was held at the same predefined phase of the breathing cycle (about 70% of the vital capacity) using the ABC device, then patients received 3D-conformal radiotherapy. Automated computerized tools for breath-hold CT scans were developed to analyze lung and tumor interfraction residual motions with 3D nonrigid registration. Results: All patients but one were safely treated with ABC for 7 weeks. For 6 patients, the lung volume differences were 300 cm 3 and displacements >10 mm, probably owing to atelectasia and emphysema. One patient was excluded, and two others had incomplete data sets. Conclusion: Breath-holding with ABC was effective in 6 patients, and discrepancies were clinically accountable in 2. The proposed 3D nonrigid registration method allows for personalized evaluation of breath-holding reproducibility with ABC. It will be used to adapt the patient-specific internal margins

  16. The advantage of deep-inspiration breath-hold and cone-beam CT based soft-tissue registration for locally advanced lung cancer radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosson, Wiviann; Rahma, Fatma; Sjöström, David

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose: Three cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) registration strategies combined with deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) and free-breathing (FB) were explored, in terms of obtaining the smallest planning target volume (PTV). Material and methods: CBCT images were acquired pre...

  17. Intra-patient semi-automated segmentation of the cervix-uterus in CT-images for adaptive radiotherapy of cervical cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Bondar (Luiza); M.S. Hoogeman (Mischa); W. Schillemans; B.J.M. Heijmen (Ben)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractFor online adaptive radiotherapy of cervical cancer, fast and accurate image segmentation is required to facilitate daily treatment adaptation. Our aim was twofold: (1) to test and compare three intra-patient automated segmentation methods for the cervix-uterus structure in CT-images and

  18. Breathing difficulty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortness of breath; Breathlessness; Difficulty breathing; Dyspnea ... There is no standard definition for difficulty breathing. Some people ... even though they don't have a medical condition. Others may ...

  19. Automatic Delineation of On-Line Head-And-Neck Computed Tomography Images: Toward On-Line Adaptive Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Tiezhi; Chi Yuwei; Meldolesi, Elisa; Yan Di

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and validate a fully automatic region-of-interest (ROI) delineation method for on-line adaptive radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: On-line adaptive radiotherapy requires a robust and automatic image segmentation method to delineate ROIs in on-line volumetric images. We have implemented an atlas-based image segmentation method to automatically delineate ROIs of head-and-neck helical computed tomography images. A total of 32 daily computed tomography images from 7 head-and-neck patients were delineated using this automatic image segmentation method. Manually drawn contours on the daily images were used as references in the evaluation of automatically delineated ROIs. Two methods were used in quantitative validation: (1) the dice similarity coefficient index, which indicates the overlapping ratio between the manually and automatically delineated ROIs; and (2) the distance transformation, which yields the distances between the manually and automatically delineated ROI surfaces. Results: Automatic segmentation showed agreement with manual contouring. For most ROIs, the dice similarity coefficient indexes were approximately 0.8. Similarly, the distance transformation evaluation results showed that the distances between the manually and automatically delineated ROI surfaces were mostly within 3 mm. The distances between two surfaces had a mean of 1 mm and standard deviation of <2 mm in most ROIs. Conclusion: With atlas-based image segmentation, it is feasible to automatically delineate ROIs on the head-and-neck helical computed tomography images in on-line adaptive treatments

  20. Patient positioning and immobilization in static and dynamic adaptive radiotherapy: an integral part of IGRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oinam, Arun S.

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy treatment deals with different varieties of treatment procedures depending on type and stages of tumors. These treatments are grossly classified into palliative curative treatment. Immobilizations used in this treatment are designed with respect to this classification as well as the techniques. With the improvements in imaging technology used in Radiotherapy, patient position set up margin can be reduced as compared to the conventional radiotherapy. Still immobilization in patient position setup has been an integral part of Image Guided Radiotherapy (lGRT) and Stereotactic Radio Surgery (SRS) and Radiotherapy (SRT). Immobilization used in this technique should produce a minimum attenuation of radiation beam as well as positioning comfort and this will enhance the reproducibility for the daily position setup and immobilize the patient during the treatment. Advanced dose delivery technique like Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) and Volumetric Modulated Arc Radiotherapy (VMAT) can do differential dose sculpting around and inside the irregular shape different target volumes while minimizing the dose to the surrounding organs at risk. A small positional error may produce the mistreatment of target and exposure of organs at risk beyond the acceptable dose limits. Such a potential positional error can be reduced if different varieties of good immobilizing devices are properly utilized. The immobilization used in the treatment of Head and Neck and Cranial tumor can produce better immobilization as compared to abdominal and pelvic tumors which are forced to move by the inability to control movements of lung and heart as well as the very large flabby tissues which are attached skeleton bones

  1. Development of a deformable dosimetric phantom to verify dose accumulation algorithms for adaptive radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hualiang Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive radiotherapy may improve treatment outcomes for lung cancer patients. Because of the lack of an effective tool for quality assurance, this therapeutic modality is not yet accepted in clinic. The purpose of this study is to develop a deformable physical phantom for validation of dose accumulation algorithms in regions with heterogeneous mass. A three-dimensional (3D deformable phantom was developed containing a tissue-equivalent tumor and heterogeneous sponge inserts. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs were placed at multiple locations in the phantom each time before dose measurement. Doses were measured with the phantom in both the static and deformed cases. The deformation of the phantom was actuated by a motor driven piston. 4D computed tomography images were acquired to calculate 3D doses at each phase using Pinnacle and EGSnrc/DOSXYZnrc. These images were registered using two registration software packages: VelocityAI and Elastix. With the resultant displacement vector fields (DVFs, the calculated 3D doses were accumulated using a mass-and energy congruent mapping method and compared to those measured by the TLDs at four typical locations. In the static case, TLD measurements agreed with all the algorithms by 1.8% at the center of the tumor volume and by 4.0% in the penumbra. In the deformable case, the phantom's deformation was reproduced within 1.1 mm. For the 3D dose calculated by Pinnacle, the total dose accumulated with the Elastix DVF agreed well to the TLD measurements with their differences <2.5% at four measured locations. When the VelocityAI DVF was used, their difference increased up to 11.8%. For the 3D dose calculated by EGSnrc/DOSXYZnrc, the total doses accumulated with the two DVFs were within 5.7% of the TLD measurements which are slightly over the rate of 5% for clinical acceptance. The detector-embedded deformable phantom allows radiation dose to be measured in a dynamic environment, similar to deforming lung

  2. Adaptive servoventilation improves cardiac dysfunction and prognosis in heart failure patients with sleep-disordered breathing: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xu; Fu, Cuiping; Zhang, Shuqi; Liu, Zilong; Li, Shanqun; Jiang, Liyan

    2017-09-01

    Adaptive servoventilation (ASV) is a new therapeutic modality to treat sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) especially for central sleep apnoea associated with Cheyne-Stokes respiration, whereas the role of ASV in SDB patients with heart failure (HF) is controversial. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of ASV on these patients through a meta-analysis of published data. A comprehensive literature search was performed to identify studies focused on ASV through databases, including PubMed, Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library and Web of science from 1950 to 2014. Parallel randomised controlled trials which compared ASV to other controls in HF and SDB patients with extractable data were meet our inclusion criteria. Random effects meta-analysis models were applied using RevMan 5.2. Seven studies involving 301 patients were recruited in the meta-analysis. The weighted mean difference in apnoea hyponea index (-17.73 events/h, 95% CI, -21.85 to -2.94) and left ventricular ejection fraction (MD: 4.68, 95% CI, 2.74-6.63) both favored ASV compared to control conditions. The urinary noradrenaline level (MD: -32.18, 95%CI: -44.07 to -20.09) was decreased, while the exercise capacity measured by 6-min walk distance (MD: 41.26, 95% CI, 17.06-65.45) was improved after ASV treatment. Whereas neither left ventricular end-diastolic diameter (LVEDD) nor Epworth sleepiness-scale score (ESS) significantly changed after ASV therapy. ASV is superior to other therapy, as it can result in good consequences for patients with SDB and improve their prognosis in cardiac function. Further studies will still be needed to assess the benefit of it. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Adaptive-Predictive Organ Localization Using Cone-Beam Computed Tomography for Improved Accuracy in External Beam Radiotherapy for Bladder Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalondrelle, Susan; Huddart, Robert; Warren-Oseni, Karole; Hansen, Vibeke Nordmark; McNair, Helen; Thomas, Karen; Dearnaley, David; Horwich, Alan; Khoo, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To examine patterns of bladder wall motion during high-dose hypofractionated bladder radiotherapy and to validate a novel adaptive planning method, A-POLO, to prevent subsequent geographic miss. Methods and Materials: Patterns of individual bladder filling were obtained with repeat computed tomography planning scans at 0, 15, and 30 minutes after voiding. A series of patient-specific plans corresponding to these time-displacement points was created. Pretreatment cone-beam computed tomography was performed before each fraction and assessed retrospectively for adaptive intervention. In fractions that would have required intervention, the most appropriate plan was chosen from the patient's 'library,' and the resulting target coverage was reassessed with repeat cone-beam computed tomography. Results: A large variation in patterns of bladder filling and interfraction displacement was seen. During radiotherapy, predominant translations occurred cranially (maximum 2.5 cm) and anteriorly (maximum 1.75 cm). No apparent explanation was found for this variation using pretreatment patient factors. A need for adaptive planning was demonstrated by 51% of fractions, and 73% of fractions would have been delivered correctly using A-POLO. The adaptive strategy improved target coverage and was able to account for intrafraction motion also. Conclusions: Bladder volume variation will result in geographic miss in a high proportion of delivered bladder radiotherapy treatments. The A-POLO strategy can be used to correct for this and can be implemented from the first fraction of radiotherapy; thus, it is particularly suited to hypofractionated bladder radiotherapy regimens.

  4. WE-G-BRD-08: Motion Analysis for Rectal Cancer: Implications for Adaptive Radiotherapy On the MR-Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleijnen, J; Asselen, B van; Burbach, M; Intven, M; Philippens, M; Reerink, O; Lagendijk, J; Raaymakers, B [University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Purpose of this study is to find the optimal trade-off between adaptation interval and margin reduction and to define the implications of motion for rectal cancer boost radiotherapy on a MR-linac. Methods: Daily MRI scans were acquired of 16 patients, diagnosed with rectal cancer, prior to each radiotherapy fraction in one week (N=76). Each scan session consisted of T2-weighted and three 2D sagittal cine-MRI, at begin (t=0 min), middle (t=9:30 min) and end (t=18:00 min) of scan session, for 1 minute at 2 Hz temporal resolution. Tumor and clinical target volume (CTV) were delineated on each T2-weighted scan and transferred to each cine-MRI. The start frame of the begin scan was used as reference and registered to frames at time-points 15, 30 and 60 seconds, 9:30 and 18:00 minutes and 1, 2, 3 and 4 days later. Per time-point, motion of delineated voxels was evaluated using the deformation vector fields of the registrations and the 95th percentile distance (dist95%) was calculated as measure of motion. Per time-point, the distance that includes 90% of all cases was taken as estimate of required planning target volume (PTV)-margin. Results: Highest motion reduction is observed going from 9:30 minutes to 60 seconds. We observe a reduction in margin estimates from 10.6 to 2.7 mm and 16.1 to 4.6 mm for tumor and CTV, respectively, when adapting every 60 seconds compared to not adapting treatment. A 75% and 71% reduction, respectively. Further reduction in adaptation time-interval yields only marginal motion reduction. For adaptation intervals longer than 18:00 minutes only small motion reductions are observed. Conclusion: The optimal adaptation interval for adaptive rectal cancer (boost) treatments on a MR-linac is 60 seconds. This results in substantial smaller PTV-margin estimates. Adaptation intervals of 18:00 minutes and higher, show little improvement in motion reduction.

  5. Breath-hold technique in conventional APPA or intensity-modulated radiotherapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma. Comparison of ILROG IS-RT and the GHSG IF-RT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kriz, Jan; Spickermann, Max; Lehrich, Philipp; Reinartz, Gabriele; Eich, Hans; Haverkamp, Uwe [University of Muenster, Department of Radiation Oncology, Muenster (Germany); Schmidberger, Heinz [University Mainz, Department of Radiation Oncology, Mainz (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    The present study addresses the role of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in contrast to standard RT (APPA) for patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) with a focus on deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique and a comparison between the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG) Involved Site Radiotherapy (IS-RT) versus the German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG) Involved Field Radiotherapy (IF-RT). APPA treatment and 2 IMRT plans were compared for 11 patients with HL. Furthermore, treatment with DIBH versus free breathing (FB) and two different treatment volumes, i.e. IF-RT versus IS-RT, were compared. IMRT was planned as a sliding-window technique with 5 and 7 beam angles. For each patient 12 different treatment plans were calculated (132 plans). Following organs at risk (OAR) were analysed: lung, heart, spinal cord, oesophagus, female breast and skin. Comparisons of the different values with regard to dose-volume histograms (DVH), conformity and homogeneity indices were made. IS-RT reduces treatment volumes. With respect to the planning target volume (PTV), IMRT achieves better conformity but the same homogeneity. Regarding the D{sub mean} for the lung, IMRT shows increased doses, while RT in DIBH reduces doses. The IMRT shows improved values for D{sub max} concerning the spinal cord, whereas the APPA shows an improved D{sub mean} of the lung and the female breast. IS-RT reduces treatment volumes. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy shows advantages in the conformity. Treatment in DIBH also reduces the dose applied to the lungs and the heart. (orig.) [German] Ziel dieser Auswertung ist es, die konventionelle APPA-Feldanordnung mit der Intensitaetsmodulierten Radiotherapie (IMRT) bei Patienten mit Hodgkin-Lymphom (HL) zu vergleichen. Ein besonderer Fokus liegt hierbei auf der Bestrahlung in tiefer Inspiration und Atemanhaltetechnik (DIBH). Des Weiteren wurde die ''Involved-site''-Radiotherapie (IS-RT) der International

  6. SU-F-BRB-07: A Plan Comparison Tool to Ensure Robustness and Deliverability in Online-Adaptive Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, P; Labby, Z; Bayliss, R A; Geurts, M; Bayouth, J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a plan comparison tool that will ensure robustness and deliverability through analysis of baseline and online-adaptive radiotherapy plans using similarity metrics. Methods: The ViewRay MRIdian treatment planning system allows export of a plan file that contains plan and delivery information. A software tool was developed to read and compare two plans, providing information and metrics to assess their similarity. In addition to performing direct comparisons (e.g. demographics, ROI volumes, number of segments, total beam-on time), the tool computes and presents histograms of derived metrics (e.g. step-and-shoot segment field sizes, segment average leaf gaps). Such metrics were investigated for their ability to predict that an online-adapted plan reasonably similar to a baseline plan where deliverability has already been established. Results: In the realm of online-adaptive planning, comparing ROI volumes offers a sanity check to verify observations found during contouring. Beyond ROI analysis, it has been found that simply editing contours and re-optimizing to adapt treatment can produce a delivery that is substantially different than the baseline plan (e.g. number of segments increased by 31%), with no changes in optimization parameters and only minor changes in anatomy. Currently the tool can quickly identify large omissions or deviations from baseline expectations. As our online-adaptive patient population increases, we will continue to develop and refine quantitative acceptance criteria for adapted plans and relate them historical delivery QA measurements. Conclusion: The plan comparison tool is in clinical use and reports a wide range of comparison metrics, illustrating key differences between two plans. This independent check is accomplished in seconds and can be performed in parallel to other tasks in the online-adaptive workflow. Current use prevents large planning or delivery errors from occurring, and ongoing refinements will lead to

  7. Expected treatment dose construction and adaptive inverse planning optimization: Implementation for offline head and neck cancer adaptive radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan Di; Liang Jian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, Michigan 48073 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: To construct expected treatment dose for adaptive inverse planning optimization, and evaluate it on head and neck (h and n) cancer adaptive treatment modification. Methods: Adaptive inverse planning engine was developed and integrated in our in-house adaptive treatment control system. The adaptive inverse planning engine includes an expected treatment dose constructed using the daily cone beam (CB) CT images in its objective and constrains. Feasibility of the adaptive inverse planning optimization was evaluated retrospectively using daily CBCT images obtained from the image guided IMRT treatment of 19 h and n cancer patients. Adaptive treatment modification strategies with respect to the time and the number of adaptive inverse planning optimization during the treatment course were evaluated using the cumulative treatment dose in organs of interest constructed using all daily CBCT images. Results: Expected treatment dose was constructed to include both the delivered dose, to date, and the estimated dose for the remaining treatment during the adaptive treatment course. It was used in treatment evaluation, as well as in constructing the objective and constraints for adaptive inverse planning optimization. The optimization engine is feasible to perform planning optimization based on preassigned treatment modification schedule. Compared to the conventional IMRT, the adaptive treatment for h and n cancer illustrated clear dose-volume improvement for all critical normal organs. The dose-volume reductions of right and left parotid glands, spine cord, brain stem and mandible were (17 {+-} 6)%, (14 {+-} 6)%, (11 {+-} 6)%, (12 {+-} 8)%, and (5 {+-} 3)% respectively with the single adaptive modification performed after the second treatment week; (24 {+-} 6)%, (22 {+-} 8)%, (21 {+-} 5)%, (19 {+-} 8)%, and (10 {+-} 6)% with three weekly modifications; and (28 {+-} 5)%, (25 {+-} 9)%, (26 {+-} 5)%, (24 {+-} 8)%, and (15 {+-} 9)% with five weekly modifications. Conclusions

  8. Impact of dose escalation and adaptive radiotherapy for cervical cancers on tumour shrinkage—a modelling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Røthe Arnesen, Marius; Paulsen Hellebust, Taran; Malinen, Eirik

    2017-03-01

    Tumour shrinkage occurs during fractionated radiotherapy and is regulated by radiation induced cellular damage, repopulation of viable cells and clearance of dead cells. In some cases additional tumour shrinkage during external beam therapy may be beneficial, particularly for locally advanced cervical cancer where a small tumour volume may simplify and improve brachytherapy. In the current work, a mathematical tumour model is utilized to investigate how local dose escalation affects tumour shrinkage, focusing on implications for brachytherapy. The iterative two-compartment model is based upon linear-quadratic radiation response, a doubling time for viable cells and a half-time for clearance of dead cells. The model was individually fitted to clinical tumour volume data from fractionated radiotherapy of 25 cervical cancer patients. Three different fractionation patterns for dose escalation, all with an additional dose of 12.2 Gy, were simulated and compared to standard fractionation in terms of tumour shrinkage. An adaptive strategy where dose escalation was initiated after one week of treatment was also considered. For 22 out of 25 patients, a good model fit was achieved to the observed tumour shrinkage. A large degree of inter-patient variation was seen in predicted volume reduction following dose escalation. For the 10 best responding patients, a mean tumour volume reduction of 34  ±  3% (relative to standard treatment) was estimated at the time of brachytherapy. Timing of initiating dose escalation had a larger impact than the number of fractions applied. In conclusion, the model was found useful in evaluating the impact from dose escalation on tumour shrinkage. The results indicate that dose escalation could be conducted from the start of external beam radiotherapy in order to obtain additional tumour shrinkage before brachytherapy.

  9. Validation of 3'-deoxy-3'-fluorine-18-fluorothymidine positron emission tomography for image-guidance in biologically adaptive radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axente, Marian

    Accelerated tumor cell repopulation during radiation therapy is one of the leading causes for low survival rates of head-and-neck cancer patients. The therapeutic effectiveness of radiotherapy could be improved by selectively targeting proliferating tumor subvolumes with higher doses of radiation. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with 3'-deoxy-3 '-18F-fluorothymidine (FLT) has shown great potential as a non-invasive approach to characterizing the proliferation status of tumors. This thesis focuses on histopathological validation of FLT PET imaging specifically for image-guidance applications in biologically adaptive radiotherapy. The lack of experimental data supporting the use of FLT PET imaging for radiotherapy guidance is addressed by developing a novel methodology for histopathological validation of PET imaging. Using this new approach, the spatial concordance between the intratumoral pattern of FLT uptake and the spatial distribution of cell proliferation is demonstrated in animal tumors. First, a two-dimensional analysis is conducted comparing the microscopic FLT uptake as imaged with autoradiography and the distribution of active cell proliferation markers imaged with immunofluorescent microscopy. It was observed that when tumors present a pattern of cell proliferation that is highly dispersed throughout the tumor, even high-resolution imaging modalities such as autoradiography could not accurately determine the extent and spatial distribution of proliferative tumor subvolumes. While microscopic spatial coincidence between high FLT uptake regions and actively proliferative subvolumes was demonstrated in tumors with highly compartmentalized/aggregated features of cell proliferation, there were no conclusive results across the entire set of utilized tumor specimens. This emphasized the need for addressing the limited resolution of FLT PET when imaging microscopic patterns of cell proliferation. This issue was emphasized in the second part of the

  10. Lung anatomy and histology of the extant coelacanth shed light on the loss of air-breathing during deep-water adaptation in actinistians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cupello, Camila; Meunier, François J; Herbin, Marc; Clément, Gaël; Brito, Paulo M

    2017-03-01

    Lungs are specialized organs originated from the posterior pharyngeal cavity and considered as plesiomorphic for osteichthyans, as they are found in extant basal actinopterygians (i.e. Polypterus ) and in all major groups of extant sarcopterygians. The presence of a vestigial lung in adult stages of the extant coelacanth Latimeria chalumnae is the result of allometric growth during ontogeny, in relation with long-time adaptation to deep water. Here, we present the first detailed histological and anatomical description of the lung of Latimeria chalumnae , providing new insights into its arrested differentiation in an air-breathing complex, mainly represented by the absence of pneumocytes and of compartmentalization in the latest ontogenetic stages.

  11. A multi-institution evaluation of deformable image registration algorithms for automatic organ delineation in adaptive head and neck radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardcastle Nicholas

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adaptive Radiotherapy aims to identify anatomical deviations during a radiotherapy course and modify the treatment plan to maintain treatment objectives. This requires regions of interest (ROIs to be defined using the most recent imaging data. This study investigates the clinical utility of using deformable image registration (DIR to automatically propagate ROIs. Methods Target (GTV and organ-at-risk (OAR ROIs were non-rigidly propagated from a planning CT scan to a per-treatment CT scan for 22 patients. Propagated ROIs were quantitatively compared with expert physician-drawn ROIs on the per-treatment scan using Dice scores and mean slicewise Hausdorff distances, and center of mass distances for GTVs. The propagated ROIs were qualitatively examined by experts and scored based on their clinical utility. Results Good agreement between the DIR-propagated ROIs and expert-drawn ROIs was observed based on the metrics used. 94% of all ROIs generated using DIR were scored as being clinically useful, requiring minimal or no edits. However, 27% (12/44 of the GTVs required major edits. Conclusion DIR was successfully used on 22 patients to propagate target and OAR structures for ART with good anatomical agreement for OARs. It is recommended that propagated target structures be thoroughly reviewed by the treating physician.

  12. A multi-institution evaluation of deformable image registration algorithms for automatic organ delineation in adaptive head and neck radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardcastle, Nicholas; Kumar, Prashant; Oechsner, Markus; Richter, Anne; Song, Shiyu; Myers, Michael; Polat, Bülent; Bzdusek, Karl; Tomé, Wolfgang A; Cannon, Donald M; Brouwer, Charlotte L; Wittendorp, Paul WH; Dogan, Nesrin; Guckenberger, Matthias; Allaire, Stéphane; Mallya, Yogish

    2012-01-01

    Adaptive Radiotherapy aims to identify anatomical deviations during a radiotherapy course and modify the treatment plan to maintain treatment objectives. This requires regions of interest (ROIs) to be defined using the most recent imaging data. This study investigates the clinical utility of using deformable image registration (DIR) to automatically propagate ROIs. Target (GTV) and organ-at-risk (OAR) ROIs were non-rigidly propagated from a planning CT scan to a per-treatment CT scan for 22 patients. Propagated ROIs were quantitatively compared with expert physician-drawn ROIs on the per-treatment scan using Dice scores and mean slicewise Hausdorff distances, and center of mass distances for GTVs. The propagated ROIs were qualitatively examined by experts and scored based on their clinical utility. Good agreement between the DIR-propagated ROIs and expert-drawn ROIs was observed based on the metrics used. 94% of all ROIs generated using DIR were scored as being clinically useful, requiring minimal or no edits. However, 27% (12/44) of the GTVs required major edits. DIR was successfully used on 22 patients to propagate target and OAR structures for ART with good anatomical agreement for OARs. It is recommended that propagated target structures be thoroughly reviewed by the treating physician

  13. Breathing Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... getting enough air. Sometimes you can have mild breathing problems because of a stuffy nose or intense ... panic attacks Allergies If you often have trouble breathing, it is important to find out the cause.

  14. The potential of MRI-guided online adaptive re-optimisation in radiotherapy of urinary bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Anne; Hafeez, Shaista; Muren, Ludvig

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose: Adaptive radiotherapy (ART) using plan selection is being introduced clinically for bladder cancer, but the challenge of how to compensate for intra-fractional motion remains. The purpose of this study was to assess target coverage with respect to intra-fractional motion...... and the potential for normal tissue sparing in MRI-guided ART (MRIGART) using isotropic (MRIGARTiso), an-isotropic (MRIGARTanIso) and population-based margins (MRIGARTpop). Materials and methods: Nine bladder cancer patients treated in a phase II trial of plan selection underwent 6-7 weekly repeat MRI series, each......: Online re-optimised ART has a considerable normal tissue sparing potential. MRIGART with online corrections for target shift during a treatment fraction should be considered in ART for bladder cancer....

  15. Method for automatic re contouring straight adaptive radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Vila, B.; Garcia Vicente, F.; Aguilera, E. J.

    2011-01-01

    Outline of quickly and accurately the rectal wall is important in Image Guided Radiotherapy (IGRT in the acronym) as an organ of greatest influence in limiting the dose in the planning of radiation therapy in prostate cancer. Deformabies registration methods based on image intensity can not create a correct spatial transformation if there is no correspondence between the image and image planning session. The rectal content variation creates a non-correspondence in the image intensity becomes a major obstacle to the deformable registration based on image intensity.

  16. Adaptive radiotherapy with an average anatomy model: Evaluation and quantification of residual deformations in head and neck cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kranen, Simon van; Mencarelli, Angelo; Beek, Suzanne van; Rasch, Coen; Herk, Marcel van; Sonke, Jan-Jakob

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: To develop and validate an adaptive intervention strategy for radiotherapy of head-and-neck cancer that accounts for systematic deformations by modifying the planning-CT (pCT) to the average misalignments in daily cone beam CT (CBCT) measured with deformable registration (DR). Methods and materials: Daily CBCT scans (808 scans) for 25 patients were retrospectively registered to the pCT with B-spline DR. The average deformation vector field ( ) was used to deform the pCT for adaptive intervention. Two strategies were simulated: single intervention after 10 fractions and weekly intervention with an from the previous week. The model was geometrically validated with the residual misalignment of anatomical landmarks both on bony-anatomy (BA; automatically generated) and soft-tissue (ST; manually identified). Results: Systematic deformations were 2.5/3.4 mm vector length (BA/ST). Single intervention reduced deformations to 1.5/2.7 mm (BA/ST). Weekly intervention resulted in 1.0/2.2 mm (BA/ST) and accounted better for progressive changes. 15 patients had average systematic deformations >2 mm (BA): reductions were 1.1/1.9 mm (single/weekly BA). ST improvements were underestimated due to observer and registration variability. Conclusions: Adaptive intervention with a pCT modified to the average anatomy during treatment successfully reduces systematic deformations. The improved accuracy could possibly be exploited in margin reduction and/or dose escalation

  17. Prostatic fiducial markers implantation by transrectal ultrasound for adaptive image guided radiotherapy in localized cancer: 7-years experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vito Lacetera

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: we present our 7-years’ experience with fiducial gold markers inserted before Image-Guided Radiotherapy (IGRT focusing on our echo-guided technique reporting early and late complications. Material and methods: 78 prostate cancer (PCA patients who underwent fiducial markers placement for adaptive IGRT (period 2007-2014 were selected. Mean patient age was 75 years (range 60-81, mean PSA 7.8 ng/ml (range 3.1-10, clinical stage < T3, mean Gleason Score 6.4 (range 6-7. We recorded early and late complications. Maximum distance between the Clinical Target Volume (CTV and Planning Target Volume (PTV was assessed for each direction and the mean PTV reduction was estimated. Results: we describe in details our echo-guided technique of intraprostatic gold fiducial markers insertion prior to adaptative IGRT. We report rare early toxicity (5-7% grade 1-2, a mean PTV reduction of 37% and a very low late toxicity (only 3.4% bladder G3 and 8% rectal G2 side effects. Conclusion: Our technique of fiducial gold markers implantation for adaptative IGRT is safe and well-tolerated and it resulted helpful to reduce CTV-PTV margin in all cases; the effects on clinical practice seem significant in terms of late toxicity but further investigations are needed with longer follow-up.

  18. The first clinical implementation of real-time image-guided adaptive radiotherapy using a standard linear accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keall, Paul J; Nguyen, Doan Trang; O'Brien, Ricky; Caillet, Vincent; Hewson, Emily; Poulsen, Per Rugaard; Bromley, Regina; Bell, Linda; Eade, Thomas; Kneebone, Andrew; Martin, Jarad; Booth, Jeremy T

    2018-02-07

    Until now, real-time image guided adaptive radiation therapy (IGART) has been the domain of dedicated cancer radiotherapy systems. The purpose of this study was to clinically implement and investigate real-time IGART using a standard linear accelerator. We developed and implemented two real-time technologies for standard linear accelerators: (1) Kilovoltage Intrafraction Monitoring (KIM) that finds the target and (2) multileaf collimator (MLC) tracking that aligns the radiation beam to the target. Eight prostate SABR patients were treated with this real-time IGART technology. The feasibility, geometric accuracy and the dosimetric fidelity were measured. Thirty-nine out of forty fractions with real-time IGART were successful (95% confidence interval 87-100%). The geometric accuracy of the KIM system was -0.1 ± 0.4, 0.2 ± 0.2 and -0.1 ± 0.6 mm in the LR, SI and AP directions, respectively. The dose reconstruction showed that real-time IGART more closely reproduced the planned dose than that without IGART. For the largest motion fraction, with real-time IGART 100% of the CTV received the prescribed dose; without real-time IGART only 95% of the CTV would have received the prescribed dose. The clinical implementation of real-time image-guided adaptive radiotherapy on a standard linear accelerator using KIM and MLC tracking is feasible. This achievement paves the way for real-time IGART to be a mainstream treatment option. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. An effective deep-inspiration breath-hold radiotherapy technique for left-breast cancer: impact of post-mastectomy treatment, nodal coverage, and dose schedule on organs at risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rice L

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Lynsey Rice,1,2 Christy Goldsmith,1,2 Melanie ML Green,2 Susan Cleator,1,2 Patricia M Price1,2 1Department of Radiation Oncology, The Harley Street Clinic, 2Department of Surgery and Cancer, Imperial College London, London, UK Background: We developed, applied, and prospectively evaluated a novel deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH screening and delivery technique to optimize cardiac sparing in left-breast radiotherapy (RT at our clinic. The impact of set-up and dose variables upon organs at risk (OAR dose in DIBH RT was investigated.Methods and materials: All patients with left-breast cancer referred between 2011 and 2014 – of all disease stages, set-up variations, and dose prescriptions – were included. Radiographers used simple screening criteria at CT simulation, to systematically assess patients for obvious DIBH benefit and capability. Selected patients received forward-planned intensity-modulated RT (IMRT based on a DIBH CT scan. A 3D-surface monitoring system with visual feedback assured reproducible DIBH positioning during gated radiation delivery. Patient, target set-up, and OAR dose information were collected at treatment.Results: Of 272 patients who were screened, 4 withdrew, 56 showed no obvious advantage, and 56 showed benefit but had suitability issues; 156 patients were selected and successfully completed DIBH treatment. The technique was compatible with complex set-up and optimal target coverage was maintained. Comparison of free-breathing (FB and DIBH treatment plans in the first five patients enrolled confirmed DIBH reduced heart radiation by ~80% (p = 0.032. Low OAR doses were achieved overall: the mean (95% confidence interval [CI] heart dose was 1.17 (1.12–1.22 Gy, and the mean ipsilateral lung dose was 5.26 (5.01–5.52 Gy. Patients who underwent a standard radiation schedule (40 Gy/15# after breast-conserving surgery had the lowest OAR doses: post-mastectomy treatment, simultaneous supraclavicular (SCV node

  20. Normal tissue sparing in a phase II trial on daily adaptive plan selection in radiotherapy for urinary bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vestergaard, Anne; Muren, Ludvig P; Lindberg, Henriette; Jakobsen, Kirsten L; Petersen, Jørgen B B; Elstrøm, Ulrik V; Agerbæk, Mads; Høyer, Morten

    2014-08-01

    Background: Patients with urinary bladder cancer often display large changes in the shape and size of their bladder target during a course of radiotherapy (RT), making adaptive RT (ART) appealing for this tumour site. We are conducting a clinical phase II trial of daily plan selection-based ART for bladder cancer and here report dose-volume data from the first 20 patients treated in the trial. All patients received 60 Gy in 30 fractions to the bladder; in 13 of the patients the pelvic lymph nodes were simultaneously treated to 48 Gy. Daily patient set-up was by use of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) guidance. The first 5 fractions were delivered with large, population-based (non-adaptive) margins. The bladder contours from the CBCTs acquired in the first 4 fractions were used to create a patient-specific library of three plans, corresponding to a small, medium and large size bladder. From fraction 6, daily online plan selection was performed, where the smallest plan covering the bladder was selected prior to each treatment delivery. A total of 600 treatment fractions in the 20 patients were evaluated. Small, medium and large size plans were used almost equally often, with an average of 10, 9 and 11 fractions, respectively. The median volume ratio of the course-averaged PTV (PTV-ART) relative to the non-adaptive PTV was 0.70 (range: 0.46-0.89). A linear regression analysis showed a 183 cm(3) (CI 143-223 cm(3)) reduction in PTV-ART compared to the non-adaptive PTV (R(2) = 0.94). Daily adaptive plan selection in RT of bladder cancer results in a considerable normal tissue sparing, of a magnitude that we expect will translate into a clinically significant reduction of the treatment-related morbidity.

  1. The outcome of a multi-centre feasibility study of online adaptive radiotherapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer TROG 10.01 BOLART

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foroudi, Farshad; Pham, Daniel; Rolfo, Aldo; Bressel, Mathias; Tang, Colin I.; Tan, Alex; Turner, Sandra; Hruby, George; Williams, Stephen; Hayne, Dickon; Lehman, Margot; Skala, Marketa; Jose, Chakiath C.; Gogna, Kumar; Kron, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To assess whether online adaptive radiotherapy for bladder cancer is feasible across multiple Radiation Oncology departments using different imaging, delivery and recording technology. Materials and methods: A multi-centre feasibility study of online adaptive radiotherapy, using a choice of three “plan of the day”, was conducted at 12 departments. Patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer were included. Departments were activated if part of the pilot study or after a site-credentialing visit. There was real time review of the first two cases from each department. Results: 54 patients were recruited, with 50 proceeding to radiotherapy. There were 43 males and 7 females with a mean age of 78 years. The tumour stages treated included T1 (1 patient), T2 (35), T3 (10) and T4 (4). One patient died of an unrelated cause during radiotherapy. The three adaptive plans were created before the 10th fraction in all cases. In 8 (16%) of the patients, a conventional plan using a ‘standard’ CTV to PTV margin of 1.5 cm was used for one or more fractions where the pre-treatment bladder CTV was larger than any of the three adaptive plans. The bladder CTV extended beyond the PTV on post treatment imaging in 9 (18%) of the 49 patients. Conclusions: From a technical perspective an online adaptive radiotherapy technique can be instituted in a multi-centre setting. However, without further bladder filling control or imaging, a CTV to PTV margin of 7 mm is insufficient

  2. Evidence for adaptive response and implication in pulse-simulated low-dose-rate radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raaphorst, G.P.; Ng, C.E.; Smith, D.; Niedbala, M.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: Pulsed-dose-rate (PDR) brachytherapy as a substitute for continuous low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy has a number of clinical advantages. However, early results show that some cells can exhibit an adaptive response to radiation and in PDR where many pulses are given such an adaptive response may play an important role in the outcome. Methods and Materials: Nine human cell lines (two normal fibroblast and seven tumor) were evaluated for an adaptive response. Cells were given either a single adapting dose before a challenge dose or given PDR sequences for which the average dose rate matched the LDR dose rate. Response was assessed using the colony survival assay. Results: Five of the nine cell lines showed an adapting response to single small doses of radiation. Three of these cell lines were further investigated for adapting response to PDR and two of the three lines (one ovarian carcinoma and one glioma) showed an adaptive response which was dependent on pulse size and interval. Conclusion: The data show that an adaptive response can occur in human cells and that it can vary among cell lines. In addition, PDR sequences also produced an adaptive response which could have an affect on PDR therapy if such a response is found in tissues

  3. BrAD-seq: Breath Adapter Directional sequencing: a streamlined, ultra-simple and fast library preparation protocol for strand specific mRNA library construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsley, Brad T.; Covington, Michael F.; Ichihashi, Yasunori; Zumstein, Kristina; Sinha, Neelima R.

    2015-01-01

    Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) is driving rapid advancement in biological understanding and RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) has become an indispensable tool for biology and medicine. There is a growing need for access to these technologies although preparation of NGS libraries remains a bottleneck to wider adoption. Here we report a novel method for the production of strand specific RNA-seq libraries utilizing the terminal breathing of double-stranded cDNA to capture and incorporate a sequencing adapter. Breath Adapter Directional sequencing (BrAD-seq) reduces sample handling and requires far fewer enzymatic steps than most available methods to produce high quality strand-specific RNA-seq libraries. The method we present is optimized for 3-prime Digital Gene Expression (DGE) libraries and can easily extend to full transcript coverage shotgun (SHO) type strand-specific libraries and is modularized to accommodate a diversity of RNA and DNA input materials. BrAD-seq offers a highly streamlined and inexpensive option for RNA-seq libraries. PMID:26052336

  4. Introduction of online adaptive radiotherapy for bladder cancer through a multicentre clinical trial (Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group 10.01: Lessons learned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Pham

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Online adaptive radiotherapy for bladder cancer is a novel radiotherapy technique that was found feasible in a pilot study at a single academic institution. In September 2010 this technique was opened as a multicenter study through the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG 10.01 bladder online adaptive radiotherapy treatment. Twelve centers across Australia and New-Zealand registered interest into the trial. A multidisciplinary team of radiation oncologists, radiation therapists and medical physicists represented the trial credentialing and technical support team. To provide timely activation and proper implementation of the adaptive technique the following key areas were addressed at each site: Staff education/training; Practical image guided radiotherapy assessment; provision of help desk and feedback. The trial credentialing process involved face-to-face training and technical problem solving via full day site visits. A dedicated "help-desk" team was developed to provide support for the clinical trial. 26% of the workload occurred at the credentialing period while the remaining 74% came post-center activation. The workload was made up of the following key areas; protocol clarification (36%, technical problems (46% while staff training was less than 10%. Clinical trial credentialing is important to minimizing trial deviations. It should not only focus on site activation quality assurance but also provide ongoing education and technical support.

  5. Introduction of online adaptive radiotherapy for bladder cancer through a multicentre clinical trial (Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group 10.01): lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham, Daniel; Roxby, Paul; Kron, Tomas; Rolfo, Aldo; Foroudi, Farshad

    2013-01-01

    Online adaptive radiotherapy for bladder cancer is a novel radiotherapy technique that was found feasible in a pilot study at a single academic institution. In September 2010 this technique was opened as a multicenter study through the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG 10.01 bladder online adaptive radiotherapy treatment). Twelve centers across Australia and New-Zealand registered interest into the trial. A multidisciplinary team of radiation oncologists, radiation therapists and medical physicists represented the trial credentialing and technical support team. To provide timely activation and proper implementation of the adaptive technique the following key areas were addressed at each site: Staff education/training; Practical image guided radiotherapy assessment; provision of help desk and feedback. The trial credentialing process involved face-to-face training and technical problem solving via full day site visits. A dedicated 'help-desk' team was developed to provide support for the clinical trial. 26% of the workload occurred at the credentialing period while the remaining 74% came post-center activation. The workload was made up of the following key areas; protocol clarification (36%), technical problems (46%) while staff training was less than 10%. Clinical trial credentialing is important to minimizing trial deviations. It should not only focus on site activation quality assurance but also provide ongoing education and technical support. (author)

  6. Adaptive fractionated stereotactic Gamma Knife radiotherapy of meningioma using integrated stereotactic cone-beam-CT and adaptive re-planning (a-gkFSRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stieler, F.; Wenz, F.; Abo-Madyan, Y.; Schweizer, B.; Polednik, M.; Herskind, C.; Giordano, F.A.; Mai, S.

    2016-01-01

    The Gamma Knife Icon (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) allows frameless stereotactic treatment using a combination of cone beam computer tomography (CBCT), a thermoplastic mask system, and an infrared-based high-definition motion management (HDMM) camera system for patient tracking during treatment. We report on the first patient with meningioma at the left petrous bone treated with adaptive fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (a-gkFSRT). The first patient treated with Gamma Knife Icon at our institute received MR imaging for preplanning before treatment. For each treatment fraction, a daily CBCT was performed to verify the actual scull/tumor position. The system automatically adapted the planned shot positions to the daily position and recalculated the dose distribution (online adaptive planning). During treatment, the HDMM system recorded the intrafractional patient motion. Furthermore, the required times were recorded to define a clinical treatment slot. Total treatment time was around 20 min. Patient positioning needed 0.8 min, CBCT positioning plus acquisition 1.65 min, CT data processing and adaptive planning 2.66 min, and treatment 15.6 min. The differences for the five daily CBCTs compared to the reference are for rotation: -0.59 ± 0.49 /0.18 ± 0.20 /0.05 ± 0.36 and for translation: 0.94 ± 0.52 mm/-0.08 ± 0.08 mm/-1.13 ± 0.89 mm. Over all fractions, an intrafractional movement of 0.13 ± 0.04 mm was observed. The Gamma Knife Icon allows combining the accuracy of the stereotactic Gamma Knife system with the flexibility of fractionated treatment with the mask system and CBCT. Furthermore, the Icon system introduces a new online patient tracking system to the clinical routine. The interfractional accuracy of patient positioning was controlled with a thermoplastic mask and CBCT. (orig.) [de

  7. National arrangements for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    After a presentation of several letters exchanged between the French health ministry and public agencies in charge of public health or nuclear safety after a radiotherapy accident in Epinal, this report comments the evolution of needs in cancerology care and the place given to radiotherapy. It outlines the technological and organisational evolution of radiotherapy and presents the distribution of radiotherapy equipment, of radio-therapists and other radiotherapy professionals in France. Within the context of radiotherapy accidents which occurred in 2007, it presents the regulatory arrangements which aimed at improving the safety, short term and middle term arrangements which are needed to support and structure radiotherapy practice quality. It stresses the fact that the system will deeply evolve by implementing a radiotherapy vigilance arrangement and a permanent follow-on and adaptation plan based on surveys and the creation of a national committee

  8. Adaptive fractionated stereotactic Gamma Knife radiotherapy of meningioma using integrated stereotactic cone-beam-CT and adaptive re-planning (a-gkFSRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stieler, F.; Wenz, F.; Abo-Madyan, Y.; Schweizer, B.; Polednik, M.; Herskind, C.; Giordano, F.A.; Mai, S. [University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    The Gamma Knife Icon (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) allows frameless stereotactic treatment using a combination of cone beam computer tomography (CBCT), a thermoplastic mask system, and an infrared-based high-definition motion management (HDMM) camera system for patient tracking during treatment. We report on the first patient with meningioma at the left petrous bone treated with adaptive fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (a-gkFSRT). The first patient treated with Gamma Knife Icon at our institute received MR imaging for preplanning before treatment. For each treatment fraction, a daily CBCT was performed to verify the actual scull/tumor position. The system automatically adapted the planned shot positions to the daily position and recalculated the dose distribution (online adaptive planning). During treatment, the HDMM system recorded the intrafractional patient motion. Furthermore, the required times were recorded to define a clinical treatment slot. Total treatment time was around 20 min. Patient positioning needed 0.8 min, CBCT positioning plus acquisition 1.65 min, CT data processing and adaptive planning 2.66 min, and treatment 15.6 min. The differences for the five daily CBCTs compared to the reference are for rotation: -0.59 ± 0.49 /0.18 ± 0.20 /0.05 ± 0.36 and for translation: 0.94 ± 0.52 mm/-0.08 ± 0.08 mm/-1.13 ± 0.89 mm. Over all fractions, an intrafractional movement of 0.13 ± 0.04 mm was observed. The Gamma Knife Icon allows combining the accuracy of the stereotactic Gamma Knife system with the flexibility of fractionated treatment with the mask system and CBCT. Furthermore, the Icon system introduces a new online patient tracking system to the clinical routine. The interfractional accuracy of patient positioning was controlled with a thermoplastic mask and CBCT. (orig.) [German] Das Gamma Knife Icon (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Schweden) ermoeglicht die stereotaktische Behandlung von Patienten mittels Cone-beam-Computertomographie (CBCT

  9. Exhaled breath condensate methods adapted from human studies using longitudinal metabolomics for predicting early health alterations in dolphins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borras, Eva; Aksenov, Alexander A; Baird, Mark; Novick, Brittany; Schivo, Michael; Zamuruyev, Konstantin O; Pasamontes, Alberto; Parry, Celeste; Foutouhi, Soraya; Venn-Watson, Stephanie; Weimer, Bart C; Davis, Cristina E

    2017-11-01

    Monitoring health conditions is essential to detect early asymptomatic stages of a disease. To achieve this, blood, urine and breath samples are commonly used as a routine clinical diagnostic. These samples offer the opportunity to detect specific metabolites related to diseases and provide a better understanding of their development. Although blood samples are commonly used routinely to monitor health, the implementation of a relatively noninvasive technique, such as exhaled breath condensate (EBC) analysis, may further benefit the well-being of both humans and other animals. EBC analysis can be used to track possible physical or biochemical alterations caused by common diseases of the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus), such as infections or inflammatory-mediated processes. We have used an untargeted metabolomic method with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of EBC samples to determine biomarkers related to disease development. In this study, five dolphins under human care were followed up for 1 year. We collected paired blood, physical examination information, and EBC samples. We then statistically correlated this information to predict specific health alterations. Three dolphins provided promising case study information about biomarkers related to cutaneous infections, respiratory infections, dental disease, or hormonal changes (pregnancy). The use of complementary liquid chromatography platforms, with hydrophilic interaction chromatography and reverse-phased columns, allowed us to detect a wide spectrum of EBC biomarker compounds that could be related to these health alterations. Moreover, these two analytical techniques not only provided complementary metabolite information but in both cases they also provided promising diagnostic information for these health conditions. Graphical abstract Collection of the exhaled condensed breath from a bottlenose dolphin from U.S. Navy Marine Mammal Program (MMP).

  10. SU-G-BRC-13: Model Based Classification for Optimal Position Selection for Left-Sided Breast Radiotherapy: Free Breathing, DIBH, Or Prone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, H; Liu, T; Xu, X [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States); Shi, C [Saint Vincent Medical Center, Bridgeport, CT (United States); Petillion, S; Kindts, I [University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Vlaams-Brabant (Belgium); Tang, X [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, West Harrison, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: There are clinical decision challenges to select optimal treatment positions for left-sided breast cancer patients—supine free breathing (FB), supine Deep Inspiration Breath Hold (DIBH) and prone free breathing (prone). Physicians often make the decision based on experiences and trials, which might not always result optimal OAR doses. We herein propose a mathematical model to predict the lowest OAR doses among these three positions, providing a quantitative tool for corresponding clinical decision. Methods: Patients were scanned in FB, DIBH, and prone positions under an IRB approved protocol. Tangential beam plans were generated for each position, and OAR doses were calculated. The position with least OAR doses is defined as the optimal position. The following features were extracted from each scan to build the model: heart, ipsilateral lung, breast volume, in-field heart, ipsilateral lung volume, distance between heart and target, laterality of heart, and dose to heart and ipsilateral lung. Principal Components Analysis (PCA) was applied to remove the co-linearity of the input data and also to lower the data dimensionality. Feature selection, another method to reduce dimensionality, was applied as a comparison. Support Vector Machine (SVM) was then used for classification. Thirtyseven patient data were acquired; up to now, five patient plans were available. K-fold cross validation was used to validate the accuracy of the classifier model with small training size. Results: The classification results and K-fold cross validation demonstrated the model is capable of predicting the optimal position for patients. The accuracy of K-fold cross validations has reached 80%. Compared to PCA, feature selection allows causal features of dose to be determined. This provides more clinical insights. Conclusion: The proposed classification system appeared to be feasible. We are generating plans for the rest of the 37 patient images, and more statistically significant

  11. Dose-adapted salvage radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy based on an erMRI target definition model: toxicity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilli, Thomas; Jorcano, Sandra; Peguret, Nicolas; Caparrotti, Francesca; Hidalgo, Alberto; Khan, Haleem G; Vees, Hansjorg; Weber, Damien C; Miralbell, Raymond

    2014-01-01

    To assess treatment tolerance by patients treated with a dose-adapted salvage radiotherapy (SRT) protocol based on an multiparametric endorectal magnetic resonance imaging (erMRI) failure definition model after radical prostatectomy (RP). A total of 171 prostate cancer patients recurring after RP undergoing erMRI before SRT were analyzed. A median dose of 64 Gy was delivered to the prostatic bed (PB) with, in addition, a boost of 10 Gy to the suspected relapse as visualized on erMRI in 131 patients (76.6%). Genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities were scored using the RTOG scale. Grade ≥ 3 GU and GI acute toxicity were observed in three and zero patients, respectively. The four-year grade ≥ 2 and ≥ 3 late GU and GI toxicity-free survival rates (109 patients with at least two years of follow-up) were 83.9 ± 4.7% and 87.1 ± 4.2%, and 92.1 ± 3.6% and 97.5 ± 1.7%, respectively. Boost (p = 0.048) and grade ≥ 2 acute GU toxicity (p = 0.008) were independently correlated with grade ≥ 2 late GU toxicity on multivariate analysis. A dose-adapted, erMRI-based SRT approach treating the PB with a boost to the suspected local recurrence may potentially improve the therapeutic ratio by selecting patients that are most likely expected to benefit from SRT doses above 70 Gy as well as by reducing the size of the highest-dose target volume. Further prospective trials are needed to investigate the use of erMRI in SRT as well as the role of dose-adapted protocols and the best fractionation schedule.

  12. SU-E-J-208: Fast and Accurate Auto-Segmentation of Abdominal Organs at Risk for Online Adaptive Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, V; Wang, Y; Romero, A; Heijmen, B; Hoogeman, M; Myronenko, A; Jordan, P

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Various studies have demonstrated that online adaptive radiotherapy by real-time re-optimization of the treatment plan can improve organs-at-risk (OARs) sparing in the abdominal region. Its clinical implementation, however, requires fast and accurate auto-segmentation of OARs in CT scans acquired just before each treatment fraction. Autosegmentation is particularly challenging in the abdominal region due to the frequently observed large deformations. We present a clinical validation of a new auto-segmentation method that uses fully automated non-rigid registration for propagating abdominal OAR contours from planning to daily treatment CT scans. Methods: OARs were manually contoured by an expert panel to obtain ground truth contours for repeat CT scans (3 per patient) of 10 patients. For the non-rigid alignment, we used a new non-rigid registration method that estimates the deformation field by optimizing local normalized correlation coefficient with smoothness regularization. This field was used to propagate planning contours to repeat CTs. To quantify the performance of the auto-segmentation, we compared the propagated and ground truth contours using two widely used metrics- Dice coefficient (Dc) and Hausdorff distance (Hd). The proposed method was benchmarked against translation and rigid alignment based auto-segmentation. Results: For all organs, the auto-segmentation performed better than the baseline (translation) with an average processing time of 15 s per fraction CT. The overall improvements ranged from 2% (heart) to 32% (pancreas) in Dc, and 27% (heart) to 62% (spinal cord) in Hd. For liver, kidneys, gall bladder, stomach, spinal cord and heart, Dc above 0.85 was achieved. Duodenum and pancreas were the most challenging organs with both showing relatively larger spreads and medians of 0.79 and 2.1 mm for Dc and Hd, respectively. Conclusion: Based on the achieved accuracy and computational time we conclude that the investigated auto

  13. SU-E-J-208: Fast and Accurate Auto-Segmentation of Abdominal Organs at Risk for Online Adaptive Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, V; Wang, Y; Romero, A; Heijmen, B; Hoogeman, M [Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Myronenko, A; Jordan, P [Accuray Incorporated, Sunnyvale, United States. (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Various studies have demonstrated that online adaptive radiotherapy by real-time re-optimization of the treatment plan can improve organs-at-risk (OARs) sparing in the abdominal region. Its clinical implementation, however, requires fast and accurate auto-segmentation of OARs in CT scans acquired just before each treatment fraction. Autosegmentation is particularly challenging in the abdominal region due to the frequently observed large deformations. We present a clinical validation of a new auto-segmentation method that uses fully automated non-rigid registration for propagating abdominal OAR contours from planning to daily treatment CT scans. Methods: OARs were manually contoured by an expert panel to obtain ground truth contours for repeat CT scans (3 per patient) of 10 patients. For the non-rigid alignment, we used a new non-rigid registration method that estimates the deformation field by optimizing local normalized correlation coefficient with smoothness regularization. This field was used to propagate planning contours to repeat CTs. To quantify the performance of the auto-segmentation, we compared the propagated and ground truth contours using two widely used metrics- Dice coefficient (Dc) and Hausdorff distance (Hd). The proposed method was benchmarked against translation and rigid alignment based auto-segmentation. Results: For all organs, the auto-segmentation performed better than the baseline (translation) with an average processing time of 15 s per fraction CT. The overall improvements ranged from 2% (heart) to 32% (pancreas) in Dc, and 27% (heart) to 62% (spinal cord) in Hd. For liver, kidneys, gall bladder, stomach, spinal cord and heart, Dc above 0.85 was achieved. Duodenum and pancreas were the most challenging organs with both showing relatively larger spreads and medians of 0.79 and 2.1 mm for Dc and Hd, respectively. Conclusion: Based on the achieved accuracy and computational time we conclude that the investigated auto

  14. Using surface imaging and visual coaching to improve the reproducibility and stability of deep-inspiration breath hold for left-breast-cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cervino, Laura I; Gupta, Sonia; Rose, Mary A; Yashar, Catheryn; Jiang, Steve B

    2009-01-01

    Late cardiac complications may arise after left-breast radiation therapy. Deep-inspiration breath hold (DIBH) allows reduction of the irradiated heart volume at the same time as it reduces tumor bed motion and increases lung sparing. In the present study, we have evaluated the improvement in reproducibility and stability of the DIBH for left-breast-cancer treatment when visual coaching is provided with the aid of 3D video surface imaging and video goggles. Five left-breast-cancer patients and fifteen healthy volunteers were asked to perform a series of DIBHs without and with visual coaching. Reproducibility and stability of DIBH were measured for each individual with and without visual coaching. The average reproducibility and stability changed from 2.1 mm and 1.5 mm, respectively, without visual feedback to 0.5 mm and 0.7 mm with visual feedback, showing a significant statistical difference (p 2 mm) in reproducibility and stability were observed in 35% and 15% of the subjects, respectively. The average chest wall excursion of the DIBH with respect to the free breathing preceding the DIBH was found to be 11.3 mm. The reproducibility and stability of the DIBH improve significantly from the visual coaching provided to the patient, especially in those patients with poor reproducibility and stability.

  15. Using surface imaging and visual coaching to improve the reproducibility and stability of deep-inspiration breath hold for left-breast-cancer radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerviño, Laura I.; Gupta, Sonia; Rose, Mary A.; Yashar, Catheryn; Jiang, Steve B.

    2009-11-01

    Late cardiac complications may arise after left-breast radiation therapy. Deep-inspiration breath hold (DIBH) allows reduction of the irradiated heart volume at the same time as it reduces tumor bed motion and increases lung sparing. In the present study, we have evaluated the improvement in reproducibility and stability of the DIBH for left-breast-cancer treatment when visual coaching is provided with the aid of 3D video surface imaging and video goggles. Five left-breast-cancer patients and fifteen healthy volunteers were asked to perform a series of DIBHs without and with visual coaching. Reproducibility and stability of DIBH were measured for each individual with and without visual coaching. The average reproducibility and stability changed from 2.1 mm and 1.5 mm, respectively, without visual feedback to 0.5 mm and 0.7 mm with visual feedback, showing a significant statistical difference (p 2 mm) in reproducibility and stability were observed in 35% and 15% of the subjects, respectively. The average chest wall excursion of the DIBH with respect to the free breathing preceding the DIBH was found to be 11.3 mm. The reproducibility and stability of the DIBH improve significantly from the visual coaching provided to the patient, especially in those patients with poor reproducibility and stability.

  16. MO-E-BRC-00: Online Adaptive Radiotherapy - Considerations for Practical Clinical Implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-06-15

    Online adaptive radiation therapy has the potential to ensure delivery of optimal treatment to the patient by accounting for anatomical and potentially functional changes that occur from one fraction to the next and over the course of treatment. While on-line adaptive RT (ART) has been a topic of many publications, discussions, and research, it has until very recently remained largely a concept and not a practical implementation. However, recent advances in on-table imaging, use of deformable image registration for contour generation and dose tracking, faster and more efficient plan optimization, as well as fast quality assurance method has enabled the implementation of ART in the clinic in the past couple of years. The introduction of these tools into routine clinical use requires many considerations and progressive knowledge to understand how processes that have historically taken hours/days to complete can now be done in less than 30 minutes. This session will discuss considerations to perform real time contouring, planning and patient specific QA, as well as a practical workflow and the required resources. Learning Objectives: To understand the difficulties, challenges and available technologies for online adaptive RT. To understand how to implement online adaptive therapy in a clinical environment and to understand the workflow and resources required. To understand the limitations and sources of uncertainty in the online adaptive process I have research funding from ViewRay Inc. and Philips Medical Systems.; R. Kashani, I have research funding from ViewRay Inc. and Philips Medical Systems.; X. Li, Research supported by Elekta Inc.

  17. MO-E-BRC-00: Online Adaptive Radiotherapy - Considerations for Practical Clinical Implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    Online adaptive radiation therapy has the potential to ensure delivery of optimal treatment to the patient by accounting for anatomical and potentially functional changes that occur from one fraction to the next and over the course of treatment. While on-line adaptive RT (ART) has been a topic of many publications, discussions, and research, it has until very recently remained largely a concept and not a practical implementation. However, recent advances in on-table imaging, use of deformable image registration for contour generation and dose tracking, faster and more efficient plan optimization, as well as fast quality assurance method has enabled the implementation of ART in the clinic in the past couple of years. The introduction of these tools into routine clinical use requires many considerations and progressive knowledge to understand how processes that have historically taken hours/days to complete can now be done in less than 30 minutes. This session will discuss considerations to perform real time contouring, planning and patient specific QA, as well as a practical workflow and the required resources. Learning Objectives: To understand the difficulties, challenges and available technologies for online adaptive RT. To understand how to implement online adaptive therapy in a clinical environment and to understand the workflow and resources required. To understand the limitations and sources of uncertainty in the online adaptive process I have research funding from ViewRay Inc. and Philips Medical Systems.; R. Kashani, I have research funding from ViewRay Inc. and Philips Medical Systems.; X. Li, Research supported by Elekta Inc.

  18. SU-E-J-20: Adaptive Aperture Morphing for Online Correction for Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandhu, R; Qin, A; Yan, D

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Online adaptive aperture morphing is desirable over translational couch shifts to accommodate not only the target position variation but also anatomic changes (rotation, deformation, and relation of target to organ-atrisks). We proposed quick and reliable method for adapting segment aperture leaves for IMRT treatment of prostate. Methods: The proposed method consists of following steps: (1) delineate the contours of prostate, SV, bladder and rectum on kV-CBCT; (2) determine prostate displacement from the rigid body registration of the contoured prostate manifested on the reference CT and the CBCT; (3) adapt the MLC segment apertures obtained from the pre-treatment IMRT planning to accommodate the shifts as well as anatomic changes. The MLC aperture adaptive algorithm involves two steps; first move the whole aperture according to prostate translational/rotational shifts, and secondly fine-tune the aperture shape to maintain the spatial relationship between the planning target contour and the MLC aperture to the daily target contour. Feasibility of this method was evaluated retrospectively on a seven-field IMRT treatment of prostate cancer patient by comparing dose volume histograms of the original plan and the aperture-adjusted plan, with/without additional segments weight optimization (SWO), on two daily treatment CBCTs selected with relative large motion and rotation. Results: For first daily treatment, the prostate rotation was significant (12degree around lateral-axis). With apertureadjusted plan, the D95 to the target was improved 25% and rectum dose (D30, D40) was reduced 20% relative to original plan on daily volumes. For second treatment-fraction, (lateral shift = 6.7mm), after adjustment target D95 improved by 3% and bladder dose (D30, maximum dose) was reduced by 1%. For both cases, extra SWO did not provide significant improvement. Conclusion: The proposed method of adapting segment apertures is promising in treatment position correction

  19. SU-E-J-20: Adaptive Aperture Morphing for Online Correction for Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandhu, R; Qin, A; Yan, D [William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Online adaptive aperture morphing is desirable over translational couch shifts to accommodate not only the target position variation but also anatomic changes (rotation, deformation, and relation of target to organ-atrisks). We proposed quick and reliable method for adapting segment aperture leaves for IMRT treatment of prostate. Methods: The proposed method consists of following steps: (1) delineate the contours of prostate, SV, bladder and rectum on kV-CBCT; (2) determine prostate displacement from the rigid body registration of the contoured prostate manifested on the reference CT and the CBCT; (3) adapt the MLC segment apertures obtained from the pre-treatment IMRT planning to accommodate the shifts as well as anatomic changes. The MLC aperture adaptive algorithm involves two steps; first move the whole aperture according to prostate translational/rotational shifts, and secondly fine-tune the aperture shape to maintain the spatial relationship between the planning target contour and the MLC aperture to the daily target contour. Feasibility of this method was evaluated retrospectively on a seven-field IMRT treatment of prostate cancer patient by comparing dose volume histograms of the original plan and the aperture-adjusted plan, with/without additional segments weight optimization (SWO), on two daily treatment CBCTs selected with relative large motion and rotation. Results: For first daily treatment, the prostate rotation was significant (12degree around lateral-axis). With apertureadjusted plan, the D95 to the target was improved 25% and rectum dose (D30, D40) was reduced 20% relative to original plan on daily volumes. For second treatment-fraction, (lateral shift = 6.7mm), after adjustment target D95 improved by 3% and bladder dose (D30, maximum dose) was reduced by 1%. For both cases, extra SWO did not provide significant improvement. Conclusion: The proposed method of adapting segment apertures is promising in treatment position correction

  20. Adaptive radiotherapy strategies for pelvic tumors - a systematic review of clinical implementations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thörnqvist, Sara; Hysing, Liv B; Tuomikoski, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Med. For each tumor site, the identified papers were screened independently by two researches for selection of studies describing all processes of an ART workflow: treatment monitoring and evaluation, decision and execution of adaptations. Both brachytherapy and external beam studies were eligible for review......, but increases workload and thereby challenges clinical implementation. This paper reviews strategies and workflows for clinical and in silico implemented ART for prostate, bladder, gynecological (gyne) and ano-rectal cancers. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Initial identification of papers was based on searches in Pub....... RESULTS: The review consisted of 43 clinical studies and 51 in silico studies. For prostate, 1219 patients were treated with offline re-planning, mainly to adapt prostate motion relative to bony anatomy. For gyne 1155 patients were treated with online brachytherapy re-planning while 25 ano-rectal cancer...

  1. High-order tracking differentiator based adaptive neural control of a flexible air-breathing hypersonic vehicle subject to actuators constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Xiangwei; Wu, Xiaoyan; Tian, Mingyan; Huang, Jiaqi; Zhang, Rui; Ma, Zhen

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, an adaptive neural controller is exploited for a constrained flexible air-breathing hypersonic vehicle (FAHV) based on high-order tracking differentiator (HTD). By utilizing functional decomposition methodology, the dynamic model is reasonably decomposed into the respective velocity subsystem and altitude subsystem. For the velocity subsystem, a dynamic inversion based neural controller is constructed. By introducing the HTD to adaptively estimate the newly defined states generated in the process of model transformation, a novel neural based altitude controller that is quite simpler than the ones derived from back-stepping is addressed based on the normal output-feedback form instead of the strict-feedback formulation. Based on minimal-learning parameter scheme, only two neural networks with two adaptive parameters are needed for neural approximation. Especially, a novel auxiliary system is explored to deal with the problem of control inputs constraints. Finally, simulation results are presented to test the effectiveness of the proposed control strategy in the presence of system uncertainties and actuators constraints. Copyright © 2015 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Real-time monitoring and control on deep inspiration breath-hold for lung cancer radiotherapy--combination of ABC and external marker tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Victy Y W; Tung, Stewart Y; Ng, Alice W Y; Li, Francis A S; Leung, Joyce O Y

    2010-09-01

    In this article, the breath-hold and gating concepts were combined for application of lung cancer radiation treatment. The tumor movement was immobilized based on deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH), in which the breath-hold consistency and stability were monitored by infrared (IR) tracking and controlled by gating with a predefined threshold. The authors' goal is to derive the benefits from both techniques, namely, the minimized treatment margin and the known advantages of deep inspiration. The efficacy of the technique in terms of tumor immobility and treatment setup accuracy was evaluated in the study. Fourteen patients who were diagnosed with non small cell lung cancer were included in this study. The control of tumor immobility was investigated interfractionally and intrafractionally. The intrabreath-hold tumor motion was devised based on the external marker movement, in which the tumor-marker correlation was studied. The margin of the planning target volume (PTV) was evaluated based on two factors: (1) The treatment setup error accounts for the patient setup and interbreath-hold variations and (2) the intrabreath-hold tumor motion in which the residual tumor motion during irradiation was studied. As the result of the study, the group systematic error and group random error of treatment setup measured at the isocenter were 0.2(R) +/- 1.6, 1.0(A) +/- 2.0, and 0.3(S) +/- 1.5 mm in the left-right (LR), anterior-posterior (AP), and caudal-cranial (CC) directions, respectively. The Pearson correlation coefficient were 0.81 (LR), 0.76 (AP), and 0.85 (CC) mm and suggest tendency in linear correlation of tumor and marker movement. The intrabreath-hold tumor was small in all directions. The group PTV margins of 3.8 (LR), 4.6 (AP), and 4.8 (CC) mm were evaluated to account for both setup errors and residual tumor motion during irradiation. The study applies the DIBH technique in conjunction with IR positional tracking for tumor immobilization and treatment setup

  3. SU-E-J-55: End-To-End Effectiveness Analysis of 3D Surface Image Guided Voluntary Breath-Holding Radiotherapy for Left Breast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, M; Feigenberg, S [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose To evaluate the effectiveness of using 3D-surface-image to guide breath-holding (BH) left-side breast treatment. Methods Two 3D surface image guided BH procedures were implemented and evaluated: normal-BH, taking BH at a comfortable level, and deep-inspiration-breath-holding (DIBH). A total of 20 patients (10 Normal-BH and 10 DIBH) were recruited. Patients received a BH evaluation using a commercialized 3D-surface- tracking-system (VisionRT, London, UK) to quantify the reproducibility of BH positions prior to CT scan. Tangential 3D/IMRT plans were conducted. Patients were initially setup under free-breathing (FB) condition using the FB surface obtained from the untaged CT to ensure a correct patient position. Patients were then guided to reach the planned BH position using the BH surface obtained from the BH CT. Action-levels were set at each phase of treatment process based on the information provided by the 3D-surface-tracking-system for proper interventions (eliminate/re-setup/ re-coaching). We reviewed the frequency of interventions to evaluate its effectiveness. The FB-CBCT and port-film were utilized to evaluate the accuracy of 3D-surface-guided setups. Results 25% of BH candidates with BH positioning uncertainty > 2mm are eliminated prior to CT scan. For >90% of fractions, based on the setup deltas from3D-surface-trackingsystem, adjustments of patient setup are needed after the initial-setup using laser. 3D-surface-guided-setup accuracy is comparable as CBCT. For the BH guidance, frequency of interventions (a re-coaching/re-setup) is 40%(Normal-BH)/91%(DIBH) of treatments for the first 5-fractions and then drops to 16%(Normal-BH)/46%(DIBH). The necessity of re-setup is highly patient-specific for Normal-BH but highly random among patients for DIBH. Overall, a −0.8±2.4 mm accuracy of the anterior pericardial shadow position was achieved. Conclusion 3D-surface-image technology provides effective intervention to the treatment process and ensures

  4. Investigation of the robustness of adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system for tracking moving tumors in external radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torshabi, Ahmad Esmaili

    2014-12-01

    In external radiotherapy of dynamic targets such as lung and breast cancers, accurate correlation models are utilized to extract real time tumor position by means of external surrogates in correlation with the internal motion of tumors. In this study, a correlation method based on the neuro-fuzzy model is proposed to correlate the input external motion data with internal tumor motion estimation in real-time mode, due to its robustness in motion tracking. An initial test of the performance of this model was reported in our previous studies. In this work by implementing some modifications it is resulted that ANFIS is still robust to track tumor motion more reliably by reducing the motion estimation error remarkably. After configuring new version of our ANFIS model, its performance was retrospectively tested over ten patients treated with Synchrony Cyberknife system. In order to assess the performance of our model, the predicted tumor motion as model output was compared with respect to the state of the art model. Final analyzed results show that our adaptive neuro-fuzzy model can reduce tumor tracking errors more significantly, as compared with ground truth database and even tumor tracking methods presented in our previous works.

  5. Cardiac dose reduction with deep inspiration breath hold for left-sided breast cancer radiotherapy patients with and without regional nodal irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Rosanna; Conroy, Leigh; Long, Karen; Walrath, Daphne; Li, Haocheng; Smith, Wendy; Hudson, Alana; Phan, Tien

    2015-09-22

    Deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) reduces heart and left anterior descending artery (LAD) dose during left-sided breast radiation therapy (RT); however there is limited information about which patients derive the most benefit from DIBH. The primary objective of this study was to determine which patients benefit the most from DIBH by comparing percent reduction in mean cardiac dose conferred by DIBH for patients treated with whole breast RT ± boost (WBRT) versus those receiving breast/chest wall plus regional nodal irradiation, including internal mammary chain (IMC) nodes (B/CWRT + RNI) using a modified wide tangent technique. A secondary objective was to determine if DIBH was required to meet a proposed heart dose constraint of Dmean irradiation.

  6. SU-E-J-254: Utility of Pinnacle Dynamic Planning Module Utilizing Deformable Image Registration in Adaptive Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jani, S

    2014-01-01

    Purpose For certain highly conformal treatment techniques, changes in patient anatomy due to weight loss and/or tumor shrinkage can result in significant changes in dose distribution. Recently, the Pinnacle treatment planning system added a Dynamic Planning module utilizing Deformable Image Registration (DIR). The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of this software in adapting to altered anatomy and adjusting treatment plans to account for it. Methods We simulated significant tumor response by changing patient thickness and altered chin positions using a commercially-available head and neck (H and N) phantom. In addition, we studied 23 CT image sets of fifteen (15) patients with H and N tumors and eight (8) patients with prostate cancer. In each case, we applied deformable image registration through Dynamic Planning module of our Pinnacle Treatment Planning System. The dose distribution of the original CT image set was compared to the newly computed dose without altering any treatment parameter. Result was a dose if we did not adjust the plan to reflect anatomical changes. Results For the H and N phantom, a tumor response of up to 3.5 cm was correctly deformed by the Pinnacle Dynamic module. Recomputed isodose contours on new anatomies were within 1 mm of the expected distribution. The Pinnacle system configuration allowed dose computations resulting from original plans on new anatomies without leaving the planning system. Original and new doses were available side-by-side with both CT image sets. Based on DIR, about 75% of H and N patients (11/15) required a re-plan using new anatomy. Among prostate patients, the DIR predicted near-correct bladder volume in 62% of the patients (5/8). Conclusions The Dynamic Planning module of the Pinnacle system proved to be an accurate and useful tool in our ability to adapt to changes in patient anatomy during a course of radiotherapy

  7. Results of Dose-adapted Salvage Radiotherapy After Radical Prostatectomy Based on an Endorectal MRI Target Definition Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilli, Thomas; Jorcano, Sandra; Peguret, Nicolas; Caparrotti, Francesca; Hidalgo, Alberto; Khan, Haleem G; Vees, Hansjörg; Miralbell, Raymond

    2017-04-01

    To assess the outcome of patients treated with a dose-adapted salvage radiotherapy (SRT) protocol based on an endorectal magnetic resonance imaging (erMRI) failure definition model after radical prostatectomy (RP). We report on 171 relapsing patients after RP who had undergone an erMRI before SRT. 64 Gy were prescribed to the prostatic bed with, in addition, a boost of 10 Gy to the suspected local relapse as detected on erMRI in 131 patients (76.6%). The 3-year biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS), local relapse-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, cancer-specific survival, and overall survival were 64.2±4.3%, 100%, 85.2±3.2%, 100%, and 99.1±0.9%, respectively. A PSA value >1 ng/mL before salvage (P=0.006) and an absence of biochemical progression during RT (P=0.001) were both independently correlated with bRFS on multivariate analysis. No significant difference in 3-year bRFS was observed between the boost and no-boost groups (68.4±4.6% vs. 49.7±10%, P=0.251). A PSA value >1 ng/mL before salvage and a biochemical progression during RT were both independently correlated with worse bRFS after SRT. By using erMRI to select patients who are most likely expected to benefit from dose-escalated SRT protocols, this dose-adapted SRT approach was associated with good biochemical control and outcome, serving as a hypothesis-generating basis for further prospective trials aimed at improving the therapeutic ratio in the salvage setting.

  8. Accelerated gradient-based free form deformable registration for online adaptive radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Gang; Yang, Guanyu; Shu, Huazhong; Li, Baosheng; Liang, Yueqiang; Yin, Yong; Li, Dengwang

    2015-01-01

    The registration of planning fan-beam computed tomography (FBCT) and daily cone-beam CT (CBCT) is a crucial step in adaptive radiation therapy. The current intensity-based registration algorithms, such as Demons, may fail when they are used to register FBCT and CBCT, because the CT numbers in CBCT cannot exactly correspond to the electron densities. In this paper, we investigated the effects of CBCT intensity inaccuracy on the registration accuracy and developed an accurate gradient-based free form deformation algorithm (GFFD). GFFD distinguishes itself from other free form deformable registration algorithms by (a) measuring the similarity using the 3D gradient vector fields to avoid the effect of inconsistent intensities between the two modalities; (b) accommodating image sampling anisotropy using the local polynomial approximation-intersection of confidence intervals (LPA-ICI) algorithm to ensure a smooth and continuous displacement field; and (c) introducing a ‘bi-directional’ force along with an adaptive force strength adjustment to accelerate the convergence process. It is expected that such a strategy can decrease the effect of the inconsistent intensities between the two modalities, thus improving the registration accuracy and robustness. Moreover, for clinical application, the algorithm was implemented by graphics processing units (GPU) through OpenCL framework. The registration time of the GFFD algorithm for each set of CT data ranges from 8 to 13 s. The applications of on-line adaptive image-guided radiation therapy, including auto-propagation of contours, aperture-optimization and dose volume histogram (DVH) in the course of radiation therapy were also studied by in-house-developed software. (paper)

  9. Image-guided adaptive radiotherapy for prostate and head-and-neck cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Daniel, Jennifer C.

    In the current practice of radiation therapy, daily patient alignments have been based on external skin marks or on bone. However, internal organ variation (both motion and volumetric changes) between treatment fractions can displace the treatment target, causing target underdosage and normal tissue overdosage. In order to deliver the radiation treatment as planned, more accurate knowledge of the daily internal anatomy was needed. Additionally, treatments needed to adapt to these variations by either shifting the patient to account for the daily target position or by altering the treatment plan. In this dissertation, the question of whether inter-fractional variations in internal patient anatomy combined with external set-up uncertainties produced measurable differences between planned and delivered doses for prostate and head-and-neck cancer patients was investigated. Image-guided adaptive treatment strategies to improve tumor coverage and/or reduce normal tissue dose were examined. Treatment deliveries utilizing various alignment procedures for ten prostate cancer patients and eleven head-and-neck cancer patients, each of whom received multiple CT scans over the course of treatment, were simulated. The largest prostate dose losses between planning and delivery were correlated with anterior/posterior and superior/inferior prostate displacement. Daily bone alignment sufficiently maintained target coverage for 70% of patients, ultrasound for 90%, and CT for 100%. A no-action-level correction protocol, which corrected the daily bone alignment for the systematic internal displacement of the prostate based on a pre-determined number of CT image sets, successfully improved the prostate and seminal vesicle dosimetric coverage. Three CT image sets were sufficient to accurately correct the bone alignment scheme for the prostate internal systematic shifts. For head-and-neck cancer patient treatment, setup uncertainties and internal organ variations did not greatly affect

  10. Reducing scan angle using adaptive prior knowledge for a limited-angle intrafraction verification (LIVE) system for conformal arc radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yawei; Yin, Fang-Fang; Zhang, You; Ren, Lei

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop an adaptive prior knowledge guided image estimation technique to reduce the scan angle needed in the limited-angle intrafraction verification (LIVE) system for 4D-CBCT reconstruction. The LIVE system has been previously developed to reconstruct 4D volumetric images on-the-fly during arc treatment for intrafraction target verification and dose calculation. In this study, we developed an adaptive constrained free-form deformation reconstruction technique in LIVE to further reduce the scanning angle needed to reconstruct the 4D-CBCT images for faster intrafraction verification. This technique uses free form deformation with energy minimization to deform prior images to estimate 4D-CBCT based on kV-MV projections acquired in extremely limited angle (orthogonal 3°) during the treatment. Note that the prior images are adaptively updated using the latest CBCT images reconstructed by LIVE during treatment to utilize the continuity of the respiratory motion. The 4D digital extended-cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantom and a CIRS 008A dynamic thoracic phantom were used to evaluate the effectiveness of this technique. The reconstruction accuracy of the technique was evaluated by calculating both the center-of-mass-shift (COMS) and 3D volume-percentage-difference (VPD) of the tumor in reconstructed images and the true on-board images. The performance of the technique was also assessed with varied breathing signals against scanning angle, lesion size, lesion location, projection sampling interval, and scanning direction. In the XCAT study, using orthogonal-view of 3° kV and portal MV projections, this technique achieved an average tumor COMS/VPD of 0.4  ±  0.1 mm/5.5  ±  2.2%, 0.6  ±  0.3 mm/7.2  ±  2.8%, 0.5  ±  0.2 mm/7.1  ±  2.6%, 0.6  ±  0.2 mm/8.3  ±  2.4%, for baseline drift, amplitude variation, phase shift, and patient breathing signal variation

  11. SU-E-J-68: Adaptive Radiotherapy of Head and Neck Cancer: Re-Planning Based On Prior Dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dogan, N; Padgett, K [University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States); Evans, J; Sleeman, W; Song, S [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Fatyga, M [Mayo Clinic Arizona, Phoenix, AZ (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Adaptive Radiotherapy (ART) with frequent CT imaging has been used to improve dosimetric accuracy by accounting for anatomical variations, such as primary tumor shrinkage and/or body weight loss, in Head and Neck (H&N) patients. In most ART strategies, the difference between the planned and the delivered dose is estimated by generating new plans on repeated CT scans using dose-volume constraints used with the initial planning CT without considering already delivered dose. The aim of this study was to assess the dosimetric gains achieved by re-planning based on prior dose by comparing them to re-planning not based-on prior dose for H&N patients. Methods: Ten locally-advanced H&N cancer patients were selected for this study. For each patient, six weekly CT imaging were acquired during the course of radiotherapy. PTVs, parotids, cord, brainstem, and esophagus were contoured on both planning and six weekly CT images. ART with weekly re-plans were done by two strategies: 1) Generating a new optimized IMRT plan without including prior dose from previous fractions (NoPriorDose) and 2) Generating a new optimized IMRT plan based on the prior dose given from previous fractions (PriorDose). Deformable image registration was used to accumulate the dose distributions between planning and six weekly CT scans. The differences in accumulated doses for both strategies were evaluated using the DVH constraints for all structures. Results: On average, the differences in accumulated doses for PTV1, PTV2 and PTV3 for NoPriorDose and PriorDose strategies were <2%. The differences in Dmean to the cord and brainstem were within 3%. The esophagus Dmean was reduced by 2% using PriorDose. PriorDose strategy, however, reduced the left parotid D50 and Dmean by 15% and 14% respectively. Conclusion: This study demonstrated significant parotid sparing, potentially reducing xerostomia, by using ART with IMRT optimization based on prior dose for weekly re-planning of H&N cancer patients.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging for assessment of parametrial tumour spread and regression patterns in adaptive cervix cancer radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, Maximilian P.; Fidarova, Elena [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical Univ. of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)], e-mail: maximilian.schmid@akhwien.at; Poetter, Richard [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical Univ. of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Lab. for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical Univ. of Vienna (Austria)] [and others

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-morphologic differences in parametrial infiltration on tumour response during primary radio chemotherapy in cervical cancer. Material and methods: Eighty-five consecutive cervical cancer patients with FIGO stages IIB (n = 59) and IIIB (n = 26), treated by external beam radiotherapy ({+-}chemotherapy) and image-guided adaptive brachytherapy, underwent T2-weighted MRI at the time of diagnosis and at the time of brachytherapy. MRI patterns of parametrial tumour infiltration at the time of diagnosis were assessed with regard to predominant morphology and maximum extent of parametrial tumour infiltration and were stratified into five tumour groups (TG): 1) expansive with spiculae; 2) expansive with spiculae and infiltrating parts; 3) infiltrative into the inner third of the parametrial space (PM); 4) infiltrative into the middle third of the PM; and 5) infiltrative into the outer third of the PM. MRI at the time of brachytherapy was used for identifying presence (residual vs. no residual disease) and signal intensity (high vs. intermediate) of residual disease within the PM. Left and right PM of each patient were evaluated separately at both time points. The impact of the TG on tumour remission status within the PM was analysed using {chi}2-test and logistic regression analysis. Results: In total, 170 PM were analysed. The TG 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 were present in 12%, 11%, 35%, 25% and 12% of the cases, respectively. Five percent of the PM were tumour-free. Residual tumour in the PM was identified in 19%, 68%, 88%, 90% and 85% of the PM for the TG 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5, respectively. The TG 3 - 5 had significantly higher rates of residual tumour in the PM in comparison to TG 1 + 2 (88% vs. 43%, p < 0.01). Conclusion: MRI-morphologic features of PM infiltration appear to allow for prediction of tumour response during external beam radiotherapy and chemotherapy. A predominantly infiltrative tumour spread at the

  13. WE-G-BRF-01: Adaptation to Intrafraction Tumor Deformation During Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy: First Proof-Of-Principle Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ge, Y; OBrien, R; Shieh, C; Booth, J; Keall, P [Radiation Physics Laboratory, University of Sydney (Australia)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Intrafraction tumor deformation limits targeting accuracy in radiotherapy and cannot be adapted to by current motion management techniques. This study simulated intrafractional treatment adaptation to tumor deformations using a dynamic Multi-Leaf Collimator (DMLC) tracking system during Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment for the first time. Methods: The DMLC tracking system was developed to adapt to the intrafraction tumor deformation by warping the planned beam aperture guided by the calculated deformation vector field (DVF) obtained from deformable image registration (DIR) at the time of treatment delivery. Seven single phantom deformation images up to 10.4 mm deformation and eight tumor system phantom deformation images up to 21.5 mm deformation were acquired and used in tracking simulation. The intrafraction adaptation was simulated at the DMLC tracking software platform, which was able to communicate with the image registration software, reshape the instantaneous IMRT field aperture and log the delivered MLC fields.The deformation adaptation accuracy was evaluated by a geometric target coverage metric defined as the sum of the area incorrectly outside and inside the reference aperture. The incremental deformations were arbitrarily determined to take place equally over the delivery interval. The geometric target coverage of delivery with deformation adaptation was compared against the delivery without adaptation. Results: Intrafraction deformation adaptation during dynamic IMRT plan delivery was simulated for single and system deformable phantoms. For the two particular delivery situations, over the treatment course, deformation adaptation improved the target coverage by 89% for single target deformation and 79% for tumor system deformation compared with no-tracking delivery. Conclusion: This work demonstrated the principle of real-time tumor deformation tracking using a DMLC. This is the first step towards the development of an

  14. Evaluation of radiotherapy methods for adaptative head and neck treatment with RapidArc®

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazaro, Sarah J.; Vasconcellos, Herminiane L.; Silva, Laura E. da; Bastos, Fernanda M.; Silva, Leonardo P. da; Alvaro S; Migoviski, Igor

    2015-01-01

    Head and neck cancer is considered a public health problem worldwide. The intensity-modulated techniques have shown benefit in the treatment of these sites, particularly with respect to reduction of deterministic effects of risk, such as parotid. Anatomical variations in cases of head and neck are very frequent and may lead, for example, to an overdose in the parotid. This can be mitigated if making use of adaptive radiation therapy. The work aims to analyze a methodology to redo the planning of treatments, through 02 acquisitions of TC. The results showed that, due to a reduction in the volumes of the parotid, the doses delivered to these organs are underestimated, which is relevant to readapt the treatment, with the addition of only a second scan without the need of the third. (author)

  15. Cardiac dose reduction with deep inspiration breath hold for left-sided breast cancer radiotherapy patients with and without regional nodal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeung, Rosanna; Conroy, Leigh; Long, Karen; Walrath, Daphne; Li, Haocheng; Smith, Wendy; Hudson, Alana; Phan, Tien

    2015-01-01

    Deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) reduces heart and left anterior descending artery (LAD) dose during left-sided breast radiation therapy (RT); however there is limited information about which patients derive the most benefit from DIBH. The primary objective of this study was to determine which patients benefit the most from DIBH by comparing percent reduction in mean cardiac dose conferred by DIBH for patients treated with whole breast RT ± boost (WBRT) versus those receiving breast/chest wall plus regional nodal irradiation, including internal mammary chain (IMC) nodes (B/CWRT + RNI) using a modified wide tangent technique. A secondary objective was to determine if DIBH was required to meet a proposed heart dose constraint of D mean < 4 Gy in these two cohorts. Twenty consecutive patients underwent CT simulation both free breathing (FB) and DIBH. Patients were grouped into two cohorts: WBRT (n = 11) and B/CWRT + RNI (n = 9). 3D-conformal plans were developed and FB was compared to DIBH for each cohort using Wilcoxon signed-rank tests for continuous variables and McNemar’s test for discrete variables. The percent relative reduction conferred by DIBH in mean heart and LAD dose, as well as lung V 20 were compared between the two cohorts using Wilcox rank-sum testing. The significance level was set at 0.05 with Bonferroni correction for multiple testing. All patients had comparable target coverage on DIBH and FB. DIBH statistically significantly reduced mean heart and LAD dose for both cohorts. Percent reduction in mean heart and LAD dose with DIBH was significantly larger in the B/CWRT + RNI cohort compared to WBRT group (relative reduction in mean heart and LAD dose: 55.9 % and 72.1 % versus 29.2 % and 43.5 %, p < 0.02). All patients in the WBRT group and five patients (56 %) in the B/CWBRT + RNI group met heart D mean <4 Gy with FB. All patients met this constraint with DIBH. All patients receiving WBRT met D mean Heart < 4 Gy on FB, while only slightly over

  16. Adaptive Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer Does Not Underdose the Microscopic Disease and has the Potential to Increase Tumor Control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guckenberger, Matthias; Richter, Anne; Wilbert, Juergen; Flentje, Michael; Partridge, Mike

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate doses to the microscopic disease (MD) in adaptive radiotherapy (ART) for locally advanced non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and to model tumor control probability (TCP). Methods and Materials: In a retrospective planning study, three-dimensional conformal treatment plans for 13 patients with locally advanced NSCLC were adapted to shape and volume changes of the gross tumor volume (GTV) once or twice during conventionally fractionated radiotherapy with total doses of 66 Gy; doses in the ART plans were escalated using an iso-mean lung dose (MLD) approach compared to non-adapted treatment. Dose distributions to the volumes of suspect MD were simulated for a scenario with synchronous shrinkage of the MD and GTV and for a scenario of a stationary MD despite GTV shrinkage; simulations were performed using deformable image registration. TCP calculations considering doses to the GTV and MD were performed using three different models. Results: Coverage of the MD at 50 Gy was not compromised by ART. Coverage at 60 Gy in the scenario of a stationary MD was significantly reduced from 92% ± 10% to 73% ± 19% using ART; however, the coverage was restored by iso-MLD dose escalation. Dose distributions in the MD were sufficient to achieve a TCP >80% on average in all simulation experiments, with the clonogenic cell density the major factor influencing TCP. The combined TCP for the GTV and MD was 19.9% averaged over all patients and TCP models in non-adaptive treatment with 66 Gy. Iso-MLD dose escalation achieved by ART increased the overall TCP by absolute 6% (adapting plan once) and by 8.7% (adapting plan twice) on average. Absolute TCP values were significantly different between the TCP models; however, all TCP models suggested very similar TCP increase by using ART. Conclusions: Adaptation of radiotherapy to the shrinking GTV did not compromise dose coverage of volumes of suspect microscopic disease and has the potential to increase TCP by >40% compared

  17. BrAD-seq: Breath Adapter Directional sequencing: a streamlined, ultra-simple and fast library preparation protocol for strand specific mRNA library construction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad Thomas Townsley

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Next Generation Sequencing (NGS is driving rapid advancement in biological understanding and RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq has become an indispensable tool for biology and medicine. There is a growing need for access to these technologies although preparation of NGS libraries remains a bottleneck to wider adoption. Here we report a novel method for the production of strand specific RNA-seq libraries utilizing inherent properties of double-stranded cDNA to capture and incorporate a sequencing adapter. Breath Adapter Directional sequencing (BrAD-seq reduces sample handling and requires far fewer enzymatic steps than most available methods to produce high quality strand-specific RNA-seq libraries. The method we present is optimized for 3-prime Digital Gene Expression (DGE libraries and can easily extend to full transcript coverage shotgun (SHO type strand-specific libraries and is modularized to accommodate a diversity of RNA and DNA input materials. BrAD-seq offers a highly streamlined and inexpensive option for RNA-seq libraries.

  18. Automatic treatment plan re-optimization for adaptive radiotherapy guided with the initial plan DVHs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nan; Zarepisheh, Masoud; Uribe-Sanchez, Andres; Moore, Kevin; Tian, Zhen; Zhen, Xin; Graves, Yan Jiang; Gautier, Quentin; Mell, Loren; Zhou, Linghong; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve

    2013-12-21

    Adaptive radiation therapy (ART) can reduce normal tissue toxicity and/or improve tumor control through treatment adaptations based on the current patient anatomy. Developing an efficient and effective re-planning algorithm is an important step toward the clinical realization of ART. For the re-planning process, manual trial-and-error approach to fine-tune planning parameters is time-consuming and is usually considered unpractical, especially for online ART. It is desirable to automate this step to yield a plan of acceptable quality with minimal interventions. In ART, prior information in the original plan is available, such as dose-volume histogram (DVH), which can be employed to facilitate the automatic re-planning process. The goal of this work is to develop an automatic re-planning algorithm to generate a plan with similar, or possibly better, DVH curves compared with the clinically delivered original plan. Specifically, our algorithm iterates the following two loops. An inner loop is the traditional fluence map optimization, in which we optimize a quadratic objective function penalizing the deviation of the dose received by each voxel from its prescribed or threshold dose with a set of fixed voxel weighting factors. In outer loop, the voxel weighting factors in the objective function are adjusted according to the deviation of the current DVH curves from those in the original plan. The process is repeated until the DVH curves are acceptable or maximum iteration step is reached. The whole algorithm is implemented on GPU for high efficiency. The feasibility of our algorithm has been demonstrated with three head-and-neck cancer IMRT cases, each having an initial planning CT scan and another treatment CT scan acquired in the middle of treatment course. Compared with the DVH curves in the original plan, the DVH curves in the resulting plan using our algorithm with 30 iterations are better for almost all structures. The re-optimization process takes about 30 s using

  19. Automatic treatment plan re-optimization for adaptive radiotherapy guided with the initial plan DVHs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nan; Zarepisheh, Masoud; Uribe-Sanchez, Andres; Moore, Kevin; Tian, Zhen; Zhen, Xin; Jiang Graves, Yan; Gautier, Quentin; Mell, Loren; Zhou, Linghong; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve

    2013-12-01

    Adaptive radiation therapy (ART) can reduce normal tissue toxicity and/or improve tumor control through treatment adaptations based on the current patient anatomy. Developing an efficient and effective re-planning algorithm is an important step toward the clinical realization of ART. For the re-planning process, manual trial-and-error approach to fine-tune planning parameters is time-consuming and is usually considered unpractical, especially for online ART. It is desirable to automate this step to yield a plan of acceptable quality with minimal interventions. In ART, prior information in the original plan is available, such as dose-volume histogram (DVH), which can be employed to facilitate the automatic re-planning process. The goal of this work is to develop an automatic re-planning algorithm to generate a plan with similar, or possibly better, DVH curves compared with the clinically delivered original plan. Specifically, our algorithm iterates the following two loops. An inner loop is the traditional fluence map optimization, in which we optimize a quadratic objective function penalizing the deviation of the dose received by each voxel from its prescribed or threshold dose with a set of fixed voxel weighting factors. In outer loop, the voxel weighting factors in the objective function are adjusted according to the deviation of the current DVH curves from those in the original plan. The process is repeated until the DVH curves are acceptable or maximum iteration step is reached. The whole algorithm is implemented on GPU for high efficiency. The feasibility of our algorithm has been demonstrated with three head-and-neck cancer IMRT cases, each having an initial planning CT scan and another treatment CT scan acquired in the middle of treatment course. Compared with the DVH curves in the original plan, the DVH curves in the resulting plan using our algorithm with 30 iterations are better for almost all structures. The re-optimization process takes about 30 s using

  20. Automatic treatment plan re-optimization for adaptive radiotherapy guided with the initial plan DVHs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Nan; Zarepisheh, Masoud; Uribe-Sanchez, Andres; Moore, Kevin; Tian, Zhen; Zhen, Xin; Graves, Yan Jiang; Gautier, Quentin; Mell, Loren; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve; Zhou, Linghong

    2013-01-01

    Adaptive radiation therapy (ART) can reduce normal tissue toxicity and/or improve tumor control through treatment adaptations based on the current patient anatomy. Developing an efficient and effective re-planning algorithm is an important step toward the clinical realization of ART. For the re-planning process, manual trial-and-error approach to fine-tune planning parameters is time-consuming and is usually considered unpractical, especially for online ART. It is desirable to automate this step to yield a plan of acceptable quality with minimal interventions. In ART, prior information in the original plan is available, such as dose–volume histogram (DVH), which can be employed to facilitate the automatic re-planning process. The goal of this work is to develop an automatic re-planning algorithm to generate a plan with similar, or possibly better, DVH curves compared with the clinically delivered original plan. Specifically, our algorithm iterates the following two loops. An inner loop is the traditional fluence map optimization, in which we optimize a quadratic objective function penalizing the deviation of the dose received by each voxel from its prescribed or threshold dose with a set of fixed voxel weighting factors. In outer loop, the voxel weighting factors in the objective function are adjusted according to the deviation of the current DVH curves from those in the original plan. The process is repeated until the DVH curves are acceptable or maximum iteration step is reached. The whole algorithm is implemented on GPU for high efficiency. The feasibility of our algorithm has been demonstrated with three head-and-neck cancer IMRT cases, each having an initial planning CT scan and another treatment CT scan acquired in the middle of treatment course. Compared with the DVH curves in the original plan, the DVH curves in the resulting plan using our algorithm with 30 iterations are better for almost all structures. The re-optimization process takes about 30

  1. Breathing Difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... symptoms. Symptoms associated with weak respiratory muscles: Air “hunger” (gasping, labored breathing) with an without activity Fatigue ... Start your own fundraising event & help create a world without ALS Start an Event Site Map | Press ...

  2. Breath sounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... described as moist, dry, fine, and coarse. Rhonchi. Sounds that resemble snoring. They occur when air is blocked or air flow becomes rough through the large airways. Stridor. Wheeze-like sound heard when a person breathes. Usually it is ...

  3. WE-G-BRCD-01: A Procedure for Efficient Large-Scale Retrospective Clinical Studies for Online Adaptive Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrecht, M; Graves, Y; Gautier, Q; Tian, Z; Kim, G; Uribe-Sanchez, A; Jia, X; Jiang, S

    2012-06-01

    Online adaptive radiotherapy (ART) is promising for handling inter-fraction variations of patient's geometry. Before a clinical implementation of this advanced technology, it is necessary to study its potential clinical gains and optimal frequencies to be used for various tumor sites. The goal of this work is to establish and examine a procedure for efficient large-scale retrospective clinical studies for online ART using a GPU-based re-planning platform. The proposed procedure utilizes an in-house developed GPU-based replanning software called SCORE. SCORE starts by applying deformable registration from CT to CBCT and correcting CBCT artifacts and intensities. However, the CBCT image may not cover the whole treatment region due to the limited field of view. In that case, we use deformed CT for replanning and dose calculation. The final optimized fractional dose is calculated using the optimized fluence maps and a finite size pencil beam model. We also use the deformed CT to calculate the delivered fractional dose using the fluence maps from the original plan. The delivered fractional dose is compared to the optimized fractional dose to estimate the daily gain of replanning. To compare accumulated optimized dose and delivered dose, the delivered and optimized doses are mapped back to the original CT geometry using the deformation vector fields. We tested this procedure using prostate cancer IMRT cases and found that the re-optimized and delivered DVHs and dose distributions can be generated in a couple of minutes. We have developed a procedure using a GPU-based replanning software to retrospectively study the clinical gains of online ART in an efficient and large scale manner. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  4. SU-E-J-140: Availability of Using Diaphragm Matching in Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) at the Time in Breath-Holding SBRT for Liver Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawahara, D; Tsuda, S. [Course of Medical and Dental Sciences, Graduate School of Biomedical ' Health Sciences, Hiroshima University (Japan); Section of Radiation Therapy, Department of Clinical Support, Hiroshima University Hospital Health (Japan); Ozawa, S; Ohno, Y.; Kimura, T.; Nagata, Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institute of Biomedical ' Health Science, Hiroshima University (Japan); Nakashima, T.; Aita, M.; Ochi, Y.; Okumura, T.; Masuda, H. [Section of Radiation Therapy, Department of Clinical Support, Hiroshima University Hospital Health (Japan)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: IGRT based on the bone matching may produce a larger target positioning error in terms of the reproducibility of the expiration breath hold. Therefore, the feasibility of the 3D image matching between planning CT image and pretreatment CBCT image based on the diaphragm matching was investigated. Methods: In fifteen-nine liver SBRT cases, Lipiodol, uptake after TACE was outlined as the marker of the tumor. The relative coordinate of the isocenter obtained by the contrast matching was defined as the reference coordinate. The target positioning difference between diaphragm matching and bone matching were evaluated by the relative coordinate of the isocenter from the reference coordinate obtained by each matching technique. In addition, we evaluated PTV margins by van Herk setup margin formula. Results: The target positioning error by the diaphragm matching and the bone matching was 1.31±0.83 and 3.10±2.80 mm in the cranial-caudal(C-C) direction, 1.04±0.95 and 1.62±1.02 mm in the anterior-posterior(A-P) direction, 0.93±1.19 and 1.12±0.94 mm in the left-right(L-R) direction, respectively. The positioning error by the diaphragm matching was significantly smaller than the bone matching in the C-C direction (p<0.05). The setup margin of diaphragm matching and bone matching that we had calculated based on van Herk margin formula was 4.5mm and 6.2mm(C-C), and 3.6mm and 6.3mm(A-P), and 2.6mm and 4.5mm(L-R), respectively. Conclusion: IGRT based on a diaphragm matching could be one alternative image matching technique for the positioning of the patients with liver tumor.

  5. Anatomical imaging for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, Philip M

    2008-01-01

    The goal of radiation therapy is to achieve maximal therapeutic benefit expressed in terms of a high probability of local control of disease with minimal side effects. Physically this often equates to the delivery of a high dose of radiation to the tumour or target region whilst maintaining an acceptably low dose to other tissues, particularly those adjacent to the target. Techniques such as intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), stereotactic radiosurgery and computer planned brachytherapy provide the means to calculate the radiation dose delivery to achieve the desired dose distribution. Imaging is an essential tool in all state of the art planning and delivery techniques: (i) to enable planning of the desired treatment, (ii) to verify the treatment is delivered as planned and (iii) to follow-up treatment outcome to monitor that the treatment has had the desired effect. Clinical imaging techniques can be loosely classified into anatomic methods which measure the basic physical characteristics of tissue such as their density and biological imaging techniques which measure functional characteristics such as metabolism. In this review we consider anatomical imaging techniques. Biological imaging is considered in another article. Anatomical imaging is generally used for goals (i) and (ii) above. Computed tomography (CT) has been the mainstay of anatomical treatment planning for many years, enabling some delineation of soft tissue as well as radiation attenuation estimation for dose prediction. Magnetic resonance imaging is fast becoming widespread alongside CT, enabling superior soft-tissue visualization. Traditionally scanning for treatment planning has relied on the use of a single snapshot scan. Recent years have seen the development of techniques such as 4D CT and adaptive radiotherapy (ART). In 4D CT raw data are encoded with phase information and reconstructed to yield a set of scans detailing motion through the breathing, or cardiac, cycle. In ART a set of

  6. Intra-patient semi-automated segmentation of the cervix–uterus in CT-images for adaptive radiotherapy of cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondar, M Luiza; Hoogeman, Mischa; Schillemans, Wilco; Heijmen, Ben

    2013-01-01

    For online adaptive radiotherapy of cervical cancer, fast and accurate image segmentation is required to facilitate daily treatment adaptation. Our aim was twofold: (1) to test and compare three intra-patient automated segmentation methods for the cervix–uterus structure in CT-images and (2) to improve the segmentation accuracy by including prior knowledge on the daily bladder volume or on the daily coordinates of implanted fiducial markers. The tested methods were: shape deformation (SD) and atlas-based segmentation (ABAS) using two non-rigid registration methods: demons and a hierarchical algorithm. Tests on 102 CT-scans of 13 patients demonstrated that the segmentation accuracy significantly increased by including the bladder volume predicted with a simple 1D model based on a manually defined bladder top. Moreover, manually identified implanted fiducial markers significantly improved the accuracy of the SD method. For patients with large cervix–uterus volume regression, the use of CT-data acquired toward the end of the treatment was required to improve segmentation accuracy. Including prior knowledge, the segmentation results of SD (Dice similarity coefficient 85 ± 6%, error margin 2.2 ± 2.3 mm, average time around 1 min) and of ABAS using hierarchical non-rigid registration (Dice 82 ± 10%, error margin 3.1 ± 2.3 mm, average time around 30 s) support their use for image guided online adaptive radiotherapy of cervical cancer. (paper)

  7. Intra-patient semi-automated segmentation of the cervix-uterus in CT-images for adaptive radiotherapy of cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luiza Bondar, M.; Hoogeman, Mischa; Schillemans, Wilco; Heijmen, Ben

    2013-08-01

    For online adaptive radiotherapy of cervical cancer, fast and accurate image segmentation is required to facilitate daily treatment adaptation. Our aim was twofold: (1) to test and compare three intra-patient automated segmentation methods for the cervix-uterus structure in CT-images and (2) to improve the segmentation accuracy by including prior knowledge on the daily bladder volume or on the daily coordinates of implanted fiducial markers. The tested methods were: shape deformation (SD) and atlas-based segmentation (ABAS) using two non-rigid registration methods: demons and a hierarchical algorithm. Tests on 102 CT-scans of 13 patients demonstrated that the segmentation accuracy significantly increased by including the bladder volume predicted with a simple 1D model based on a manually defined bladder top. Moreover, manually identified implanted fiducial markers significantly improved the accuracy of the SD method. For patients with large cervix-uterus volume regression, the use of CT-data acquired toward the end of the treatment was required to improve segmentation accuracy. Including prior knowledge, the segmentation results of SD (Dice similarity coefficient 85 ± 6%, error margin 2.2 ± 2.3 mm, average time around 1 min) and of ABAS using hierarchical non-rigid registration (Dice 82 ± 10%, error margin 3.1 ± 2.3 mm, average time around 30 s) support their use for image guided online adaptive radiotherapy of cervical cancer.

  8. TU-AB-BRA-12: Quality Assurance of An Integrated Magnetic Resonance Image Guided Adaptive Radiotherapy Machine Using Cherenkov Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreozzi, J; Bruza, P; Saunders, S; Pogue, B [Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States); Mooney, K; Curcuru, A; Green, O [Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO (United States); Gladstone, D [Dartmouth-Hitchcock Med. Ctr., Lebanon, NH (Lebanon)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the viability of using Cherenkov imaging as a fast and robust method for quality assurance tests in the presence of a magnetic field, where other instruments can be limited. Methods: Water tank measurements were acquired from a clinically utilized adaptive magnetic resonance image guided radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) machine with three multileaf-collimator equipped 60Co sources. Cherenkov imaging used an intensified charge coupled device (ICCD) camera placed 3.5m from the treatment isocenter, looking down the bore of the 0.35T MRI into a water tank. Images were post-processed to make quantitative comparison between Cherenkov light intensity with both film and treatment planning system predictions, in terms of percent depth dose curves as well as lateral beam profile measurements. A TG-119 commissioning test plan (C4: C-Shape) was imaged in real-time at 6.33 frames per second to investigate the temporal and spatial resolution of the Cherenkov imaging technique. Results: A .33mm/pixel Cherenkov image resolution was achieved across 1024×1024 pixels in this setup. Analysis of the Cherenkov image of a 10.5×10.5cm treatment beam in the water tank successfully measured the beam width at the depth of maximum dose within 1.2% of the film measurement at the same point. The percent depth dose curve for the same beam was on average within 2% of ionization chamber measurements for corresponding depths between 3–100mm. Cherenkov video of the TG-119 test plan provided qualitative agreement with the treatment planning system dose predictions, and a novel temporal verification of the treatment. Conclusions: Cherenkov imaging was successfully used to make QA measurements of percent depth dose curves and cross beam profiles of MRI-IGRT radiotherapy machines after only several seconds of beam-on time and data capture; both curves were extracted from the same data set. Video-rate imaging of a dynamic treatment plan provided new information regarding temporal

  9. Evolution of surface-based deformable image registration for adaptive radiotherapy of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richter Anne

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate the performance of surface-based deformable image registration (DR for adaptive radiotherapy of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Methods Based on 13 patients with locally advanced NSCLC, CT images acquired at treatment planning, midway and the end of the radio- (n = 1 or radiochemotherapy (n = 12 course were used for evaluation of DR. All CT images were manually [gross tumor volume (GTV] and automatically [organs-at-risk (OAR lung, spinal cord, vertebral spine, trachea, aorta, outline] segmented. Contours were transformed into 3D meshes using the Pinnacle treatment planning system and corresponding mesh points defined control points for DR with interpolation within the structures. Using these deformation maps, follow-up CT images were transformed into the planning images and compared with the original planning CT images. Results A progressive tumor shrinkage was observed with median GTV volumes of 170 cm3 (range 42 cm3 - 353 cm3, 124 cm3 (19 cm3 - 325 cm3 and 100 cm3 (10 cm3 - 270 cm3 at treatment planning, mid-way and at the end of treatment. Without DR, correlation coefficients (CC were 0.76 ± 0.11 and 0.74 ± 0.10 for comparison of the planning CT and the CT images acquired mid-way and at the end of treatment, respectively; DR significantly improved the CC to 0.88 ± 0.03 and 0.86 ± 0.05 (p = 0.001, respectively. With manual landmark registration as reference, DR reduced uncertainties on the GTV surface from 11.8 mm ± 5.1 mm to 2.9 mm ± 1.2 mm. Regarding the carina and intrapulmonary vessel bifurcations, DR reduced uncertainties by about 40% with residual errors of 4 mm to 6 mm on average. Severe deformation artefacts were observed in patients with resolving atelectasis and pleural effusion, in one patient, where the tumor was located around large bronchi and separate segmentation of the GTV and OARs was not possible, and in one patient, where no clear shrinkage but more a decay of the tumor was observed

  10. Cardiac and pulmonary complication probabilities for breast cancer patients after routine end-inspiration gated radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korreman, Stine S; Pedersen, Anders N; Josipovic, Mirjana

    2006-01-01

    tangentials and a supraclavicular field was employed. NTCPs were calculated using the relative seriality model for the heart, and the model proposed by Burman et al. for the lung. The observed values were compared to those predicted from two previous CT-studies for a deep inspiration breath-hold technique......PURPOSE: Substantial reductions of radiation doses to heart and lung can be achieved using breathing adaptation of adjuvant radiotherapy following conservative surgery for breast cancer. The purpose of this study was to estimate the radiobiological implications after routine use of an end...... with gating in the end-inspiration phase of audio-coached enhanced free breathing. The target intended to encompass the remaining breast, ipsilateral internal mammary and periclavicular nodes, and the prescription dose was 48Gy in 24 fractions. A three-field mono-isocentric conformal technique using deep...

  11. Bad Breath

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fresh and healthy. Tips for preventing bad breath: Brush your teeth (and tongue!) for at least two minutes twice ... and drinks. This helps prevent damage to your teeth and is great for your overall health. Brush after sweets. If you eat or drink sugary ...

  12. SU-F-J-133: Adaptive Radiation Therapy with a Four-Dimensional Dose Calculation Algorithm That Optimizes Dose Distribution Considering Breathing Motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, I; Algan, O; Ahmad, S [University of Oklahoma Health Sciences, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Alsbou, N [University of Central Oklahoma, Edmond, OK (United States)

    2016-06-15

    techniques such as beam-gating or breath-holding and has potential applications in adaptive radiation therapy.

  13. Development of a Synthetic Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Prediction Model for Tumor Motion Tracking in External Radiotherapy by Evaluating Various Data Clustering Algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbanzadeh, Leila; Torshabi, Ahmad Esmaili; Nabipour, Jamshid Soltani; Arbatan, Moslem Ahmadi

    2016-04-01

    In image guided radiotherapy, in order to reach a prescribed uniform dose in dynamic tumors at thorax region while minimizing the amount of additional dose received by the surrounding healthy tissues, tumor motion must be tracked in real-time. Several correlation models have been proposed in recent years to provide tumor position information as a function of time in radiotherapy with external surrogates. However, developing an accurate correlation model is still a challenge. In this study, we proposed an adaptive neuro-fuzzy based correlation model that employs several data clustering algorithms for antecedent parameters construction to avoid over-fitting and to achieve an appropriate performance in tumor motion tracking compared with the conventional models. To begin, a comparative assessment is done between seven nuero-fuzzy correlation models each constructed using a unique data clustering algorithm. Then, each of the constructed models are combined within an adaptive sevenfold synthetic model since our tumor motion database has high degrees of variability and that each model has its intrinsic properties at motion tracking. In the proposed sevenfold synthetic model, best model is selected adaptively at pre-treatment. The model also updates the steps for each patient using an automatic model selectivity subroutine. We tested the efficacy of the proposed synthetic model on twenty patients (divided equally into two control and worst groups) treated with CyberKnife synchrony system. Compared to Cyberknife model, the proposed synthetic model resulted in 61.2% and 49.3% reduction in tumor tracking error in worst and control group, respectively. These results suggest that the proposed model selection program in our synthetic neuro-fuzzy model can significantly reduce tumor tracking errors. Numerical assessments confirmed that the proposed synthetic model is able to track tumor motion in real time with high accuracy during treatment. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. [TMJ, eating and breathing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheynet, F

    2016-09-01

    The study of the relationship between temporomandibular joints (TMJ), mastication and ventilation and the involvement of these two functions in the genesis of primary Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) and in some dentofacial deformities, was initiated in France, more than 30years, by Professor Raymond Gola. Once criticized the weakness of the scientific literature in this domain, the originality of the TMJ within the masticatory system is recalled with its huge adaptation potential to very different biomechanical constraints according to the age and masticatory activities during the day. But the biomechanics of the masticatory system does not stop at night and the positions of the mandible and head during sleep should be studied carefully. In case of nocturnal mouth breathing with open mouth, the predominant sleeping position (generating small but long-term strengths) may be deleterious to the condyle-disc complex, to the surrounding muscles and the occlusal relationships. Some condyle-disc displacements and asymmetric malocclusions occur in this long portion of life what sleep, especially as oral breathing leads to a lot of dysfunctions (low position of the tongue, labio-lingual dysfunctions, exacerbation of bruxism sleep…). The aim of this work was to share our multidisciplinary experience of the biomechanical consequences of the nocturnal mouth breathing on the face involving orthodontists, maxillofacial surgeons, ENT, allergists, speech therapists, physiotherapists and radiologists. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Postmastectomy radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shikama, Naoto; Koguchi, Masahiko; Sasaki, Shigeru; Kaneko, Tomoki; Shinoda, Atsunori; Nishikawa, Atsushi [Shinshu Univ., Matsumoto, Nagano (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-10-01

    Since there have been few reports on postmastectomy radiotherapy having a high evidence level in Japan, the significance of postoperative radiotherapy and the irradiation techniques were reviewed based on reports from Western countries. Authors focused on the indications for postoperative irradiation, irradiation methods (irradiation sites, irradiation techniques; prosthetics, methods of irradiating the chest wall and lymph nodes, timing of irradiation), and complications, and discuss them. The factors thought to be adaptable to postmastectomy radiotherapy have been listed. Axillary lymph node metastasis and the size of the primary focus are thought to be important factors in locoregional recurrence. The chest wall and the supraclavicular lymph nodes are the usual sites of irradiation after mastectomy. The irradiation method consists of tangential irradiation of the chest wall and single-field irradiation of the supraclavicular lymph nodes, with 46-50 Gy in fractional doses of 1.8-2 Gy x 5/w is administered for 4.5-5.5 weeks. The timing of irradiation in the West is generally after chemotherapy. Adverse radiation effects include ischemic heart disease, pneumonitis, arm edema, rib fractures, and brachial plexus paralysis. The frequency of these complications is increased by the combined use of chemotherapy or surgery. The breast cancer cure rate in Japan is generally better than in the West. It remains to be determined whether the clinical data from Europe and America are applicable to the treatment of breast cancer in Japan. To address this issue, a clinical investigation should be performed in Japan with close cooperation between surgeons, physicians, pathologists, and radiotherapists. (K.H.)

  16. A comparison between radiation therapists and medical specialists in the use of kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography scans for potential lung cancer radiotherapy target verification and adaptation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watt, Sandie Carolyn; Vinod, Shalini K.; Dimigen, Marion; Descallar, Joseph; Zogovic, Branimere; Atyeo, John; Wallis, Sian; Holloway, Lois C.

    2016-01-01

    Target volume matching using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is the preferred treatment verification method for lung cancer in many centers. However, radiation therapists (RTs) are trained in bony matching and not soft tissue matching. The purpose of this study was to determine whether RTs were equivalent to radiation oncologists (ROs) and radiologists (RDs) in alignment of the treatment CBCT with the gross tumor volume (GTV) defined at planning and in delineating the GTV on the treatment CBCT, as may be necessary for adaptive radiotherapy. In this study, 10 RTs, 1 RO, and 1 RD performed a manual tumor alignment and correction of the planning GTV to a treatment CBCT to generate an isocenter correction distance for 15 patient data sets. Participants also contoured the GTV on the same data sets. The isocenter correction distance and the contoured GTVs from the RTs were compared with the RD and RO. The mean difference in isocenter correction distances was 0.40 cm between the RO and RD, 0.51 cm between the RTs, and RO and 0.42 cm between the RTs and RD. The 95% CIs were smaller than the equivalence limit of 0.5 cm, indicating that the RTs were equivalent to the RO and RD. For GTV delineation comparisons, the RTs were not found to be equivalent to the RD or RO. The alignment of the planning defined GTV and treatment CBCT using soft tissue matching by the RTs has been shown to be equivalent to those by the RO and RD. However, tumor delineation by the RTs on the treatment CBCT was not equivalent to that of the RO and RD. Thus, it may be appropriate for RTs to undertake soft tissue alignment based on CBCT; however, further investigation may be necessary before RTs undertake delineation for adaptive radiotherapy purposes.

  17. A comparison between radiation therapists and medical specialists in the use of kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography scans for potential lung cancer radiotherapy target verification and adaptation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watt, Sandie Carolyn, E-mail: sandie.watt@sswahs.gov.au [Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, NSW (Australia); University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); Vinod, Shalini K. [Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, NSW (Australia); Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); South Western Sydney Clinical School, The University of New South Wales, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology, Prince of Wales Hospital, NSW (Australia); Dimigen, Marion [Department of Radiology, Liverpool Hospital, NSW (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology, Prince of Wales Hospital, NSW (Australia); Descallar, Joseph [Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); South Western Sydney Clinical School, The University of New South Wales, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); Zogovic, Branimere [Department of Radiation Oncology, Prince of Wales Hospital, NSW (Australia); Atyeo, John [University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Wallis, Sian [University of Western Sydney, NSW (Australia); Holloway, Lois C. [Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, NSW (Australia); University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Institute of Medical Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW, Australia. (Australia); Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool, NSW (Australia)

    2016-04-01

    Target volume matching using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is the preferred treatment verification method for lung cancer in many centers. However, radiation therapists (RTs) are trained in bony matching and not soft tissue matching. The purpose of this study was to determine whether RTs were equivalent to radiation oncologists (ROs) and radiologists (RDs) in alignment of the treatment CBCT with the gross tumor volume (GTV) defined at planning and in delineating the GTV on the treatment CBCT, as may be necessary for adaptive radiotherapy. In this study, 10 RTs, 1 RO, and 1 RD performed a manual tumor alignment and correction of the planning GTV to a treatment CBCT to generate an isocenter correction distance for 15 patient data sets. Participants also contoured the GTV on the same data sets. The isocenter correction distance and the contoured GTVs from the RTs were compared with the RD and RO. The mean difference in isocenter correction distances was 0.40 cm between the RO and RD, 0.51 cm between the RTs, and RO and 0.42 cm between the RTs and RD. The 95% CIs were smaller than the equivalence limit of 0.5 cm, indicating that the RTs were equivalent to the RO and RD. For GTV delineation comparisons, the RTs were not found to be equivalent to the RD or RO. The alignment of the planning defined GTV and treatment CBCT using soft tissue matching by the RTs has been shown to be equivalent to those by the RO and RD. However, tumor delineation by the RTs on the treatment CBCT was not equivalent to that of the RO and RD. Thus, it may be appropriate for RTs to undertake soft tissue alignment based on CBCT; however, further investigation may be necessary before RTs undertake delineation for adaptive radiotherapy purposes.

  18. Breath holding spell

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000967.htm Breath holding spell To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Some children have breath holding spells. This is an involuntary stop in breathing ...

  19. Deep breathing after surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000440.htm Deep breathing after surgery To use the sharing features on ... way to do so is by doing deep breathing exercises. Deep breathing keeps your lungs well-inflated ...

  20. Breathing difficulty - lying down

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... short of breath; Paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea; PND; Difficulty breathing while lying down; Orthopnea; Heart failure - orthopnea ... Heart failure Obesity (does not directly cause difficulty breathing while lying down but often worsens other conditions ...

  1. Apolo Ohno: Breathing Easier

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Breathing Easier Apolo Ohno: Breathing Easier Past Issues / Fall 2013 Table of Contents ... training, I started experiencing decreased exercise endurance, trouble breathing, and coughing. These symptoms affected my ability to ...

  2. Rapid shallow breathing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachypnea; Breathing - rapid and shallow; Fast shallow breathing; Respiratory rate - rapid and shallow ... Shallow, rapid breathing has many possible medical causes, including: Asthma Blood clot in an artery in the lung Choking Chronic obstructive ...

  3. Breathing and Relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Insights Stress & Relaxation Breathing and Relaxation Breathing and Relaxation Make an Appointment Ask a Question ... level is often dependent on his or her breathing pattern. Therefore, people with chronic lung conditions may ...

  4. Breathing difficulties - first aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Difficulty breathing - first aid; Dyspnea - first aid; Shortness of breath - first aid ... Breathing difficulty is almost always a medical emergency. An exception is feeling slightly winded from normal activity, ...

  5. Traveling with breathing problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000066.htm Traveling with breathing problems To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. If you have breathing problems and you: Are short of breath most ...

  6. Breathing - slowed or stopped

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bradypnea. Labored or difficult breathing is known as dyspnea. ... Premature birth Seizures Common causes of breathing trouble (dyspnea) in adults include: Allergic reaction that causes tongue, ...

  7. First clinical release of an online, adaptive, aperture-based image-guided radiotherapy strategy in intensity-modulated radiotherapy to correct for inter- and intrafractional rotations of the prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutschmann, Heinz; Kametriser, Gerhard; Steininger, Philipp; Scherer, Philipp; Schöller, Helmut; Gaisberger, Christoph; Mooslechner, Michaela; Mitterlechner, Bernhard; Weichenberger, Harald; Fastner, Gert; Wurstbauer, Karl; Jeschke, Stephan; Forstner, Rosemarie; Sedlmayer, Felix

    2012-08-01

    We developed and evaluated a correction strategy for prostate rotations using direct adaptation of segments in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Implanted fiducials (four gold markers) were used to determine interfractional translations, rotations, and dilations of the prostate. We used hybrid imaging: The markers were automatically detected in two pretreatment planar X-ray projections; their actual position in three-dimensional space was reconstructed from these images at first. The structure set comprising prostate, seminal vesicles, and adjacent rectum wall was transformed accordingly in 6 degrees of freedom. Shapes of IMRT segments were geometrically adapted in a class solution forward-planning approach, derived within seconds on-site and treated immediately. Intrafractional movements were followed in MV electronic portal images captured on the fly. In 31 of 39 patients, for 833 of 1013 fractions (supine, flat couch, knee support, comfortably full bladder, empty rectum, no intraprostatic marker migrations >2 mm of more than one marker), the online aperture adaptation allowed safe reduction of margins clinical target volume-planning target volume (prostate) down to 5 mm when only interfractional corrections were applied: Dominant L-R rotations were found to be 5.3° (mean of means), standard deviation of means ±4.9°, maximum at 30.7°. Three-dimensional vector translations relative to skin markings were 9.3 ± 4.4 mm (maximum, 23.6 mm). Intrafractional movements in 7.7 ± 1.5 min (maximum, 15.1 min) between kV imaging and last beam's electronic portal images showed further L-R rotations of 2.5° ± 2.3° (maximum, 26.9°), and three-dimensional vector translations of 3.0 ±3.7 mm (maximum, 10.2 mm). Addressing intrafractional errors could further reduce margins to 3 mm. We demonstrated the clinical feasibility of an online adaptive image-guided, intensity-modulated prostate protocol on a standard linear accelerator to correct 6 degrees of freedom of

  8. First Clinical Release of an Online, Adaptive, Aperture-Based Image-Guided Radiotherapy Strategy in Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy to Correct for Inter- and Intrafractional Rotations of the Prostate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deutschmann, Heinz, E-mail: h.deutschmann@salk.at [University Clinic for Radiotherapy and Radio-Oncology, Salzburg (Austria); radART Institute for Research and Development of Advanced Radiation Technologies, Paracelsus Medical University, Salzburg (Austria); Kametriser, Gerhard [University Clinic for Radiotherapy and Radio-Oncology, Salzburg (Austria); Steininger, Philipp [radART Institute for Research and Development of Advanced Radiation Technologies, Paracelsus Medical University, Salzburg (Austria); Scherer, Philipp; Schoeller, Helmut [University Clinic for Radiotherapy and Radio-Oncology, Salzburg (Austria); Gaisberger, Christoph [University Clinic for Radiotherapy and Radio-Oncology, Salzburg (Austria); radART Institute for Research and Development of Advanced Radiation Technologies, Paracelsus Medical University, Salzburg (Austria); Mooslechner, Michaela [radART Institute for Research and Development of Advanced Radiation Technologies, Paracelsus Medical University, Salzburg (Austria); Mitterlechner, Bernhard; Weichenberger, Harald [University Clinic for Radiotherapy and Radio-Oncology, Salzburg (Austria); radART Institute for Research and Development of Advanced Radiation Technologies, Paracelsus Medical University, Salzburg (Austria); Fastner, Gert; Wurstbauer, Karl [University Clinic for Radiotherapy and Radio-Oncology, Salzburg (Austria); Jeschke, Stephan [University Clinic for Urology and Andrology, Salzburg (Austria); Forstner, Rosemarie [University Clinic for Radiology, Salzburg (Austria); Sedlmayer, Felix [University Clinic for Radiotherapy and Radio-Oncology, Salzburg (Austria); radART Institute for Research and Development of Advanced Radiation Technologies, Paracelsus Medical University, Salzburg (Austria)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: We developed and evaluated a correction strategy for prostate rotations using direct adaptation of segments in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Method and Materials: Implanted fiducials (four gold markers) were used to determine interfractional translations, rotations, and dilations of the prostate. We used hybrid imaging: The markers were automatically detected in two pretreatment planar X-ray projections; their actual position in three-dimensional space was reconstructed from these images at first. The structure set comprising prostate, seminal vesicles, and adjacent rectum wall was transformed accordingly in 6 degrees of freedom. Shapes of IMRT segments were geometrically adapted in a class solution forward-planning approach, derived within seconds on-site and treated immediately. Intrafractional movements were followed in MV electronic portal images captured on the fly. Results: In 31 of 39 patients, for 833 of 1013 fractions (supine, flat couch, knee support, comfortably full bladder, empty rectum, no intraprostatic marker migrations >2 mm of more than one marker), the online aperture adaptation allowed safe reduction of margins clinical target volume-planning target volume (prostate) down to 5 mm when only interfractional corrections were applied: Dominant L-R rotations were found to be 5.3 Degree-Sign (mean of means), standard deviation of means {+-}4.9 Degree-Sign , maximum at 30.7 Degree-Sign . Three-dimensional vector translations relative to skin markings were 9.3 {+-} 4.4 mm (maximum, 23.6 mm). Intrafractional movements in 7.7 {+-} 1.5 min (maximum, 15.1 min) between kV imaging and last beam's electronic portal images showed further L-R rotations of 2.5 Degree-Sign {+-} 2.3 Degree-Sign (maximum, 26.9 Degree-Sign ), and three-dimensional vector translations of 3.0 {+-}3.7 mm (maximum, 10.2 mm). Addressing intrafractional errors could further reduce margins to 3 mm. Conclusion: We demonstrated the clinical feasibility of an online

  9. SU-F-J-145: MRI-Guided Interventional Boost Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer: Investigating the Feasibility of Adapting the Anatomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleijnen, J J E; Couwenberg, A M; Asselen, B van; Lagendijk, J J W; Intven, M; Raaymakers, B W [University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The recent development of an MRI-linac allows adaptation of treatments to the anatomy of the moment. This anatomy, in turn, could be altered into a more favorable situation for radiotherapy purposes. The purpose of this study is to investigate the potential dosimetric benefits of manipulating rectal anatomy in MRI-guided interventional external-beam radiotherapy for rectal cancer. Methods: For this retrospective analysis, four patients (1M/3F) diagnosed with rectal cancer were included. These underwent MR-imaging using sonography transmission gel as endorectal contrast at time of diagnosis and standard, non-contrast, MR-imaging prior to radiotherapy planning. In the contrast scan, the rectum is inflated by the inserted contrast gel, thereby potentially increasing the distance between tumor and the organs-at-risk (OAR). Both anatomies were delineated and 7- beam IMRT-plans were calculated for both situations (RT-standard and RT-inflated), using in-house developed treatment planning software. Each plan was aimed to deliver 15Gy to the planning target volume (PTV; tumor+3mm margin) with a D99>95% and Dmax<120% of the planned dose. The D2cc dose to the OAR were then compared for both situations. Results: At equal (or better) target coverage, we found a mean reduction in D2cc of 4.1Gy/237% [range 2.6Gy–6.3Gy/70%–621%] for the bladder and of 2.0Gy/145% [range −0.7Gy–7.9Gy/−73%–442%] for the small-bowel, for the RT-inflated compared to the RT-standard plans. For the three female patients, a reduction in D2cc of 5.2Gy/191% [range 3.2Gy–9.2Gy/44%–475%] for the gynecological organs was found. We found all D2cc doses to be better for the RT-inflated plans, except for one patient for whom the bladder D2cc dose was slightly increased. Conclusion: Reduction of OAR dose by manipulation of anatomy is feasible. Inflation of the rectum results in more distance between OAR and PTV. This leads to a substantial reduction in dose to OAR at equal or better target

  10. Radiotherapy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, G.T.Y.; Collier, J.M.; Lyman, J.T.; Pitluck, S.

    1982-01-01

    The Radiotherapy Physics Group works on the physical and biophysical aspects of charged particle radiotherapy. Our activities include the development of isosurvival beams (beams of uniform biological effect), computerized treatment planning development for charged particle radiotherapy, design of compensation to shape dose distributions, and development of dosimetry techniques to verify planned irradiations in both phantoms and patients

  11. SU-E-J-74: Dosimetric Advantages of Adaptive Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer Are Confirmed with Weekly CBCT Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shang, Q; Li, Z; Qu, H; Ward, M; Greskovich, J; Koyfman, S; Xia, P [The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Our previous study showed that weekly dose monitoring using cone-beam CT (CBCT) images can guide the timing and need for adaptive re-planning during the treatment of head and neck (HN) cancer. Here we aim to confirm the dosimetric improvement of adaptive radiotherapy (ART) using weekly CBCTs. Methods: We randomly selected seven HN patients treated with ART due to noticeable anatomic changes. Twenty weekly images acquired during the second treatment course were included. These CBCTs were aligned with both the initial and re-planning simulation CTs according to the clinical shifts. Daily doses were re-calculated for both the initial and adaptive plans. Contours of the tumor and organs-at-risk (OARs) were manually delineated by a physician on the re-planning CT and then were transferred to the CBCTs for plan evaluation. Contour modifications were made based on the daily anatomic changes observed on CBCTs. All patients were treated with 70Gy to the primary tumor and 56Gy to the elective lymph nodes. Results: Volumetric changes of the tumor (range — 43.9%∼+15.9%) were observed. The average D99 to the primary tumor was (70.1±2.0)Gy (range 62.2∼72.5Gy) for the adaptive plan and (66.0±5.5)Gy (range 50.9∼70.7Gy) for the initial plan(p<<0.01). The average D99 to the elective neck was (56.3±1.3)Gy (range 52.8∼59.2Gy) for the adaptive plan and (52.4±7.0)Gy (range 37.7∼58.6Gy) for the initial plan(p=0.01). The parotid decreased in volume during the treatment course (range 7.3%∼42.2%). The average D-mean to the spared parotid decreased by 15.3% (p=0.002) for the adaptive plan when compared to the original. With ART, 4 out of 7 patients experienced better sparing of the spinal cord (D-max reduced by 2.5%∼10.2%) and the oral cavity (D-mean reduced by 3.5%∼20.1%). Conclusion: Weekly CBCT dosimetry confirms that ART is an effective method to accommodate on-treatment anatomic changes. In select patients, tumor coverage and OAR sparing may be improved

  12. Quantifying the Reproducibility of Heart Position During Treatment and Corresponding Delivered Heart Dose in Voluntary Deep Inhalation Breath Hold for Left Breast Cancer Patients Treated With External Beam Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIntosh, Alyson; Shoushtari, Asal N.; Benedict, Stanley H.; Read, Paul W.; Wijesooriya, Krishni

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Voluntary deep inhalation breath hold (VDIBH) reduces heart dose during left breast irradiation. We present results of the first study performed to quantify reproducibility of breath hold using bony anatomy, heart position, and heart dose for VDIBH patients at treatment table. Methods and Materials: Data from 10 left breast cancer patients undergoing VDIBH whole-breast irradiation were analyzed. Two computed tomography (CT) scans, free breathing (FB) and VDIBH, were acquired to compare dose to critical structures. Pretreatment weekly kV orthogonal images and tangential ports were acquired. The displacement difference from spinal cord to sternum across the isocenter between coregistered planning Digitally Reconstructed Radiographs (DRRs) and kV imaging of bony thorax is a measure of breath hold reproducibility. The difference between bony coregistration and heart coregistration was the measured heart shift if the patient is aligned to bony anatomy. Results: Percentage of dose reductions from FB to VDIBH: mean heart dose (48%, SD 19%, p = 0.002), mean LAD dose (43%, SD 19%, p = 0.008), and maximum left anterior descending (LAD) dose (60%, SD 22%, p = 0.008). Average breath hold reproducibility using bony anatomy across the isocenter along the anteroposterior (AP) plane from planning to treatment is 1 (range, 0–3; SD, 1) mm. Average heart shifts with respect to bony anatomy between different breath holds are 2 ± 3 mm inferior, 1 ± 2 mm right, and 1 ± 3 mm posterior. Percentage dose changes from planning to delivery: mean heart dose (7%, SD 6%); mean LAD dose, ((9%, SD 7%)S, and maximum LAD dose, (11%, SD 11%) SD 11%, p = 0.008). Conclusion: We observed excellent three-dimensional bony registration between planning and pretreatment imaging. Reduced delivered dose to heart and LAD is maintained throughout VDIBH treatment.

  13. Prospective phase II trial of image-guided radiotherapy in Hodgkin lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Peter M; Aznar, Marianne C; Berthelsen, Anne K

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Long-term Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors have an increased risk of late cardiac morbidity and secondary lung cancer after chemotherapy and mediastinal radiotherapy. In this prospective study we investigate whether radiotherapy with deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) can reduce...... in radiotherapy for patients with mediastinal HL....

  14. SU-E-J-67: Evaluation of Adaptive MLC Morphing for Online Correction of Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandhu, R; Qin, A; Yan, D [William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Online adaptive MLC morphing is desirable over translational couch shifts to accommodate target position as well as anatomic changes. A reliable method of adaptive MLC segment to target during prostate cancer IMRT treatment is proposed and evaluated by comparison with daily online-image guidance (IGRT) correction and online-IMRT planning. Methods: The MLC adaptive algorithm involves following steps; move the MLC segments according to target translational shifts, and then morph the segment shape to maintain the spatial relationship between the planning-target contour and MLC segment. Efficacy of this method was evaluated retrospectively using daily-CBCT images on seven prostate patients treated with seven-beam IMRT treatment to deliver 64Gy in 20 fractions. Daily modification was simulated with three approaches; daily-IGRT correction based on implanted radio-markers, adaptive MLC morphing, and online-IMRT planning, with no-residual variation. The selected dosimetric endpoints and nEUD (normalized equivalent uniform dose to online-IMRT planning) of each organ of interest were determined for evaluation and comparison. Results: For target(prostate), bladder and rectal-wall, the mean±sd of nEUD were 97.6%+3.2%, 103.9%±4.9% and 97.4%±1.1% for daily-IGRT correction; and 100.2%+0.2%, 108.9%±5.1% and 99.8%±1.2% for adaptive MLC morphing, respectively. For daily-IGRT correction, adaptive MLC morphing and online-IMRT planning, target D99 was <95% of the prescription dose in 30%, 0% and 0% of 140 fractions, respectively. For the rectal-wall, D5 exceeded 105% of the planned-D5 in 2.8%, 11.4% and 0% of 140 fractions, respectively. For the bladder, Dmax exceeded 105% of the planned-D5 in 2.8%, 5.6% and 0% of 140 fractions, respectively. D30 of bladder and rectal-wall were well within the planned-D30 for all three approaches. Conclusion: The proposed method of adaptive MLC morphing can be beneficial for the prostate patient population with large deformation and

  15. SU-E-J-67: Evaluation of Adaptive MLC Morphing for Online Correction of Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandhu, R; Qin, A; Yan, D

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Online adaptive MLC morphing is desirable over translational couch shifts to accommodate target position as well as anatomic changes. A reliable method of adaptive MLC segment to target during prostate cancer IMRT treatment is proposed and evaluated by comparison with daily online-image guidance (IGRT) correction and online-IMRT planning. Methods: The MLC adaptive algorithm involves following steps; move the MLC segments according to target translational shifts, and then morph the segment shape to maintain the spatial relationship between the planning-target contour and MLC segment. Efficacy of this method was evaluated retrospectively using daily-CBCT images on seven prostate patients treated with seven-beam IMRT treatment to deliver 64Gy in 20 fractions. Daily modification was simulated with three approaches; daily-IGRT correction based on implanted radio-markers, adaptive MLC morphing, and online-IMRT planning, with no-residual variation. The selected dosimetric endpoints and nEUD (normalized equivalent uniform dose to online-IMRT planning) of each organ of interest were determined for evaluation and comparison. Results: For target(prostate), bladder and rectal-wall, the mean±sd of nEUD were 97.6%+3.2%, 103.9%±4.9% and 97.4%±1.1% for daily-IGRT correction; and 100.2%+0.2%, 108.9%±5.1% and 99.8%±1.2% for adaptive MLC morphing, respectively. For daily-IGRT correction, adaptive MLC morphing and online-IMRT planning, target D99 was <95% of the prescription dose in 30%, 0% and 0% of 140 fractions, respectively. For the rectal-wall, D5 exceeded 105% of the planned-D5 in 2.8%, 11.4% and 0% of 140 fractions, respectively. For the bladder, Dmax exceeded 105% of the planned-D5 in 2.8%, 5.6% and 0% of 140 fractions, respectively. D30 of bladder and rectal-wall were well within the planned-D30 for all three approaches. Conclusion: The proposed method of adaptive MLC morphing can be beneficial for the prostate patient population with large deformation and

  16. MO-E-BRC-02: MRI-Guided Online Adaptive Radiotherapy: The UCLA Approach to Quality Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamb, J. [University of California, Los Angeles (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Online adaptive radiation therapy has the potential to ensure delivery of optimal treatment to the patient by accounting for anatomical and potentially functional changes that occur from one fraction to the next and over the course of treatment. While on-line adaptive RT (ART) has been a topic of many publications, discussions, and research, it has until very recently remained largely a concept and not a practical implementation. However, recent advances in on-table imaging, use of deformable image registration for contour generation and dose tracking, faster and more efficient plan optimization, as well as fast quality assurance method has enabled the implementation of ART in the clinic in the past couple of years. The introduction of these tools into routine clinical use requires many considerations and progressive knowledge to understand how processes that have historically taken hours/days to complete can now be done in less than 30 minutes. This session will discuss considerations to perform real time contouring, planning and patient specific QA, as well as a practical workflow and the required resources. Learning Objectives: To understand the difficulties, challenges and available technologies for online adaptive RT. To understand how to implement online adaptive therapy in a clinical environment and to understand the workflow and resources required. To understand the limitations and sources of uncertainty in the online adaptive process I have research funding from ViewRay Inc. and Philips Medical Systems.; R. Kashani, I have research funding from ViewRay Inc. and Philips Medical Systems.; X. Li, Research supported by Elekta Inc.

  17. Individualized Nonadaptive and Online-Adaptive Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Treatment Strategies for Cervical Cancer Patients Based on Pretreatment Acquired Variable Bladder Filling Computed Tomography Scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondar, M.L.; Hoogeman, M.S.; Mens, J.W.; Quint, S.; Ahmad, R.; Dhawtal, G.; Heijmen, B.J.

    2012-01-01

    bladder and rectum inside the PTV (0% to 10% and −1% to 9%; p < 0.004) and the CTV-to-PTV volume (4–96 ml). Conclusions: Compared with population-based margins, an individualized PTV results in better organ-at-risk sparing. Online-adaptive radiotherapy further improves organ-at-risk sparing.

  18. Evaluation of deformable image registration for contour propagation between CT and cone-beam CT images in adaptive head and neck radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X; Zhang, Y Y; Shi, Y H; Zhou, L H; Zhen, X

    2016-04-29

    Deformable image registration (DIR) is a critical technic in adaptive radiotherapy (ART) to propagate contours between planning computerized tomography (CT) images and treatment CT/Cone-beam CT (CBCT) image to account for organ deformation for treatment re-planning. To validate the ability and accuracy of DIR algorithms in organ at risk (OAR) contours mapping, seven intensity-based DIR strategies are tested on the planning CT and weekly CBCT images from six Head & Neck cancer patients who underwent a 6 ∼ 7 weeks intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Three similarity metrics, i.e. the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), the percentage error (PE) and the Hausdorff distance (HD), are employed to measure the agreement between the propagated contours and the physician delineated ground truths. It is found that the performance of all the evaluated DIR algorithms declines as the treatment proceeds. No statistically significant performance difference is observed between different DIR algorithms (p> 0.05), except for the double force demons (DFD) which yields the worst result in terms of DSC and PE. For the metric HD, all the DIR algorithms behaved unsatisfactorily with no statistically significant performance difference (p= 0.273). These findings suggested that special care should be taken when utilizing the intensity-based DIR algorithms involved in this study to deform OAR contours between CT and CBCT, especially for those organs with low contrast.

  19. Motion compensation for MRI-guided radiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glitzner, M.

    2017-01-01

    Radiotherapy aims to deliver a lethal radiation dose to cancer cells immersed in the body using a high energetic photon beam. Due to physiologic motion of the human anatomy (e.g. caused by filling of internal organs or breathing), the target volume is under permanent motion during irradiation,

  20. What Causes Bad Breath?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español What Causes Bad Breath? KidsHealth / For Teens / What Causes Bad Breath? Print en español ¿Qué es lo ... through your mouth. Smoking is also a major cause of bad breath. There are lots of myths ...

  1. Breath-Holding Spells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Breath-Holding Spells KidsHealth / For Parents / Breath-Holding Spells What's in ... Spells Print en español Espasmos de sollozo About Breath-Holding Spells Many of us have heard stories about stubborn ...

  2. Considerable pancreatic tumor motion during breath-holding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lens, Eelco; van der Horst, Astrid; Versteijne, Eva; Bel, Arjan; van Tienhoven, Geertjan

    2016-01-01

    Breath-holding (BH) is often used to reduce abdominal organ motion during radiotherapy. However, for inhale BH, abdominal tumor motion during BH has not yet been investigated. The aim of this study was to quantify tumor motion during inhale BH and tumor position variations between consecutive inhale

  3. Impact of head and neck cancer adaptive radiotherapy to spare the parotid glands and decrease the risk of xerostomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelli, Joel; Simon, Antoine; Louvel, Guillaume; Henry, Olivier; Chajon, Enrique; Nassef, Mohamed; Haigron, Pascal; Cazoulat, Guillaume; Ospina, Juan David; Jegoux, Franck; Benezery, Karen; de Crevoisier, Renaud

    2015-01-09

    Large anatomical variations occur during the course of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for locally advanced head and neck cancer (LAHNC). The risks are therefore a parotid glands (PG) overdose and a xerostomia increase. The purposes of the study were to estimate: - the PG overdose and the xerostomia risk increase during a "standard" IMRT (IMRTstd); - the benefits of an adaptive IMRT (ART) with weekly replanning to spare the PGs and limit the risk of xerostomia. Fifteen patients received radical IMRT (70 Gy) for LAHNC. Weekly CTs were used to estimate the dose distributions delivered during the treatment, corresponding either to the initial planning (IMRTstd) or to weekly replanning (ART). PGs dose were recalculated at the fraction, from the weekly CTs. PG cumulated doses were then estimated using deformable image registration. The following PG doses were compared: pre-treatment planned dose, per-treatment IMRTstd and ART. The corresponding estimated risks of xerostomia were also compared. Correlations between anatomical markers and dose differences were searched. Compared to the initial planning, a PG overdose was observed during IMRTstd for 59% of the PGs, with an average increase of 3.7 Gy (10.0 Gy maximum) for the mean dose, and of 8.2% (23.9% maximum) for the risk of xerostomia. Compared to the initial planning, weekly replanning reduced the PG mean dose for all the patients (pxerostomia by 11% (pxerostomia risk.

  4. Adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broom, Donald M

    2006-01-01

    The term adaptation is used in biology in three different ways. It may refer to changes which occur at the cell and organ level, or at the individual level, or at the level of gene action and evolutionary processes. Adaptation by cells, especially nerve cells helps in: communication within the body, the distinguishing of stimuli, the avoidance of overload and the conservation of energy. The time course and complexity of these mechanisms varies. Adaptive characters of organisms, including adaptive behaviours, increase fitness so this adaptation is evolutionary. The major part of this paper concerns adaptation by individuals and its relationships to welfare. In complex animals, feed forward control is widely used. Individuals predict problems and adapt by acting before the environmental effect is substantial. Much of adaptation involves brain control and animals have a set of needs, located in the brain and acting largely via motivational mechanisms, to regulate life. Needs may be for resources but are also for actions and stimuli which are part of the mechanism which has evolved to obtain the resources. Hence pigs do not just need food but need to be able to carry out actions like rooting in earth or manipulating materials which are part of foraging behaviour. The welfare of an individual is its state as regards its attempts to cope with its environment. This state includes various adaptive mechanisms including feelings and those which cope with disease. The part of welfare which is concerned with coping with pathology is health. Disease, which implies some significant effect of pathology, always results in poor welfare. Welfare varies over a range from very good, when adaptation is effective and there are feelings of pleasure or contentment, to very poor. A key point concerning the concept of individual adaptation in relation to welfare is that welfare may be good or poor while adaptation is occurring. Some adaptation is very easy and energetically cheap and

  5. Impact of head and neck cancer adaptive radiotherapy to spare the parotid glands and decrease the risk of xerostomia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castelli, Joel; Simon, Antoine; Louvel, Guillaume; Henry, Olivier; Chajon, Enrique; Nassef, Mohamed; Haigron, Pascal; Cazoulat, Guillaume; Ospina, Juan David; Jegoux, Franck; Benezery, Karen; Crevoisier, Renaud de

    2015-01-01

    Large anatomical variations occur during the course of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for locally advanced head and neck cancer (LAHNC). The risks are therefore a parotid glands (PG) overdose and a xerostomia increase. The purposes of the study were to estimate: - the PG overdose and the xerostomia risk increase during a “standard” IMRT (IMRT std ); - the benefits of an adaptive IMRT (ART) with weekly replanning to spare the PGs and limit the risk of xerostomia. Fifteen patients received radical IMRT (70 Gy) for LAHNC. Weekly CTs were used to estimate the dose distributions delivered during the treatment, corresponding either to the initial planning (IMRT std ) or to weekly replanning (ART). PGs dose were recalculated at the fraction, from the weekly CTs. PG cumulated doses were then estimated using deformable image registration. The following PG doses were compared: pre-treatment planned dose, per-treatment IMRT std and ART. The corresponding estimated risks of xerostomia were also compared. Correlations between anatomical markers and dose differences were searched. Compared to the initial planning, a PG overdose was observed during IMRT std for 59% of the PGs, with an average increase of 3.7 Gy (10.0 Gy maximum) for the mean dose, and of 8.2% (23.9% maximum) for the risk of xerostomia. Compared to the initial planning, weekly replanning reduced the PG mean dose for all the patients (p < 0.05). In the overirradiated PG group, weekly replanning reduced the mean dose by 5.1 Gy (12.2 Gy maximum) and the absolute risk of xerostomia by 11% (p < 0.01) (30% maximum). The PG overdose and the dosimetric benefit of replanning increased with the tumor shrinkage and the neck thickness reduction (p < 0.001). During the course of LAHNC IMRT, around 60% of the PGs are overdosed of 4 Gy. Weekly replanning decreased the PG mean dose by 5 Gy, and therefore by 11% the xerostomia risk

  6. Comprehensive evaluation of ten deformable image registration algorithms for contour propagation between CT and cone-beam CT images in adaptive head & neck radiotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Li

    Full Text Available Deformable image registration (DIR is a critical technic in adaptive radiotherapy (ART for propagating contours between planning computerized tomography (CT images and treatment CT/cone-beam CT (CBCT images to account for organ deformation for treatment re-planning. To validate the ability and accuracy of DIR algorithms in organ at risk (OAR contour mapping, ten intensity-based DIR strategies, which were classified into four categories-optical flow-based, demons-based, level-set-based and spline-based-were tested on planning CT and fractional CBCT images acquired from twenty-one head & neck (H&N cancer patients who underwent 6~7-week intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT. Three similarity metrics, i.e., the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC, the percentage error (PE and the Hausdorff distance (HD, were employed to measure the agreement between the propagated contours and the physician-delineated ground truths of four OARs, including the vertebra (VTB, the vertebral foramen (VF, the parotid gland (PG and the submandibular gland (SMG. It was found that the evaluated DIRs in this work did not necessarily outperform rigid registration. DIR performed better for bony structures than soft-tissue organs, and the DIR performance tended to vary for different ROIs with different degrees of deformation as the treatment proceeded. Generally, the optical flow-based DIR performed best, while the demons-based DIR usually ranked last except for a modified demons-based DISC used for CT-CBCT DIR. These experimental results suggest that the choice of a specific DIR algorithm depends on the image modality, anatomic site, magnitude of deformation and application. Therefore, careful examinations and modifications are required before accepting the auto-propagated contours, especially for automatic re-planning ART systems.

  7. Comprehensive evaluation of ten deformable image registration algorithms for contour propagation between CT and cone-beam CT images in adaptive head & neck radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Zhang, Yuyu; Shi, Yinghua; Wu, Shuyu; Xiao, Yang; Gu, Xuejun; Zhen, Xin; Zhou, Linghong

    2017-01-01

    Deformable image registration (DIR) is a critical technic in adaptive radiotherapy (ART) for propagating contours between planning computerized tomography (CT) images and treatment CT/cone-beam CT (CBCT) images to account for organ deformation for treatment re-planning. To validate the ability and accuracy of DIR algorithms in organ at risk (OAR) contour mapping, ten intensity-based DIR strategies, which were classified into four categories-optical flow-based, demons-based, level-set-based and spline-based-were tested on planning CT and fractional CBCT images acquired from twenty-one head & neck (H&N) cancer patients who underwent 6~7-week intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Three similarity metrics, i.e., the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), the percentage error (PE) and the Hausdorff distance (HD), were employed to measure the agreement between the propagated contours and the physician-delineated ground truths of four OARs, including the vertebra (VTB), the vertebral foramen (VF), the parotid gland (PG) and the submandibular gland (SMG). It was found that the evaluated DIRs in this work did not necessarily outperform rigid registration. DIR performed better for bony structures than soft-tissue organs, and the DIR performance tended to vary for different ROIs with different degrees of deformation as the treatment proceeded. Generally, the optical flow-based DIR performed best, while the demons-based DIR usually ranked last except for a modified demons-based DISC used for CT-CBCT DIR. These experimental results suggest that the choice of a specific DIR algorithm depends on the image modality, anatomic site, magnitude of deformation and application. Therefore, careful examinations and modifications are required before accepting the auto-propagated contours, especially for automatic re-planning ART systems.

  8. SU-F-T-592: A Delivery QA-Free Approach for Adaptive Therapy of Prostate Cancer with Static Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, T; Dooley, J; Zhu, T; Woods, R; Mavroidis, P; Lian, J [University North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Clinical implementations of adaptive radiotherapy (ART) are limited mainly by the requirement of delivery QA (DQA) prior to the treatment. Small segment size and small segment MU are two dominant factors causing failures of DQA. The aim of this project is to explore the feasibility of ART treatment without DQA by using a partial optimization approach. Methods: A retrospective simulation study was performed on two prostate cancer patients treated with SMLC-IMRT. The prescription was 180cGx25 fractions with daily CT-on-rail imaging for target alignment. For each patient, seven daily CTs were selected randomly across treatment course. The contours were deformablely transferred from the simulation CT onto the daily CTs and modified appropriately. For each selected treatment, dose distributions from original beams were calculated on the daily treatment CTs (DCT plan). An ART plan was also created by optimizing the segmental MU only, while the segment shapes were preserved and the minimum MU constraint was respected. The overlaps, between PTV and the rectum, between PTV and the bladder, were normalized by the PTV volume. This ratio was used to characterize the difficulty of organs-at-risk (OAR) sparing. Results: Comparing to the original plan, PTV coverage was compromised significantly in DCT plans (82% ± 7%) while all ART plans preserved PTV coverage. ART plans showed similar OAR sparing as the original plan, such as V40Gy=11.2cc (ART) vs 11.4cc (original) for the rectum and D10cc=4580cGy vs 4605cGy for the bladder. The sparing of the rectum/bladder depends on overlap ratios. The sparing in ART was either similar or improved when overlap ratios in treatment CTs were smaller than those in original plan. Conclusion: A partial optimization method is developed that may make the real-time ART feasible on selected patients. Future research is warranted to quantify the applicability of the proposed method.

  9. MO-C-17A-13: Uncertainty Evaluation of CT Image Deformable Registration for H and N Cancer Adaptive Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, A; Yan, D [William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate uncertainties of organ specific Deformable Image Registration (DIR) for H and N cancer Adaptive Radiation Therapy (ART). Methods: A commercial DIR evaluation tool, which includes a digital phantom library of 8 patients, and the corresponding “Ground truth Deformable Vector Field” (GT-DVF), was used in the study. Each patient in the phantom library includes the GT-DVF created from a pair of CT images acquired prior to and at the end of the treatment course. Five DIR tools, including 2 commercial tools (CMT1, CMT2), 2 in-house (IH-FFD1, IH-FFD2), and a classic DEMON algorithms, were applied on the patient images. The resulting DVF was compared to the GT-DVF voxel by voxel. Organ specific DVF uncertainty was calculated for 10 ROIs: Whole Body, Brain, Brain Stem, Cord, Lips, Mandible, Parotid, Esophagus and Submandibular Gland. Registration error-volume histogram was constructed for comparison. Results: The uncertainty is relatively small for brain stem, cord and lips, while large in parotid and submandibular gland. CMT1 achieved best overall accuracy (on whole body, mean vector error of 8 patients: 0.98±0.29 mm). For brain, mandible, parotid right, parotid left and submandibular glad, the classic Demon algorithm got the lowest uncertainty (0.49±0.09, 0.51±0.16, 0.46±0.11, 0.50±0.11 and 0.69±0.47 mm respectively). For brain stem, cord and lips, the DVF from CMT1 has the best accuracy (0.28±0.07, 0.22±0.08 and 0.27±0.12 mm respectively). All algorithms have largest right parotid uncertainty on patient #7, which has image artifact caused by tooth implantation. Conclusion: Uncertainty of deformable CT image registration highly depends on the registration algorithm, and organ specific. Large uncertainty most likely appears at the location of soft-tissue organs far from the bony structures. Among all 5 DIR methods, the classic DEMON and CMT1 seem to be the best to limit the uncertainty within 2mm for all OARs. Partially supported by

  10. A margin-of-the-day online adaptive intensity-modulated radiotherapy strategy for cervical cancer provides superior treatment accuracy compared to clinically recommended margins: a dosimetric evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Rozilawati; Bondar, Luiza; Voet, Peter; Mens, Jan-Willem; Quint, Sandra; Dhawtal, Glenn; Heijmen, Ben; Hoogeman, Mischa

    2013-10-01

    To dosimetrically evaluate a margin-of-the-day (MoD) online adaptive intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) strategy for cervical cancer patients. The strategy is based on a single planning computed tomography (CT) scan and a pretreatment constructed IMRT plan library with incremental clinical target volumes (CTV)-to-planning target volumes (PTV) margins. For 14 patients, 9-10 variable bladder filling CT scans acquired at pretreatment and after 40 Gy were available. Bladder volume variability during the treatment course was recorded by twice-weekly US bladder-volume measurements. A MoD strategy that selects the best IMRT plan of the day from a library of plans with incremental margins in steps of 5 mm was compared with a clinically recommended population-based margin (15 mm). To compare the strategies, for each fraction that had a recorded US bladder-volume measurement, the CT scan with the nearest bladder volume was selected from the pretreatment CT series and from the CT series acquired after 40 Gy. A frequency-weighted average of the dose-volume histograms (DVH) parameters calculated for the two selected CT scans was used to estimate the DVH parameters of the fraction of interest. The 15-mm recommended margin resulted in cervix-uterus underdosage in six of 14 patients. Compared with the 15-mm margin, the MoD strategy resulted in significantly better cervix-uterus coverage (p = 0.008) without a significant difference in the sparing of rectum, bladder, and small bowel. For each patient, 3-8 (median 5) plans were needed in the library of plans for the MoD strategy. The required range of the MoD was 5-45 mm (median 15 mm). Twenty-five percent of all fractions could be treated with a MoD of 5 mm and 81% of all fractions could be treated with a MoD up to 25 mm. Compared with a clinically recommended margin, a simple online adaptive strategy resulted in better cervix-uterus coverage without compromising organs at risk sparing.

  11. Differences in the definition of internal target volumes using slow CT alone or in combination with thin-slice CT under breath-holding conditions during the planning of stereotactic radiotherapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Satoshi; Kunieda, Etsuo; Takeda, Atsuya; Nagaoka, Tomoaki; Deloar, Hossain M.; Kawase, Takatsugu; Fukada, Junichi; Kawaguchi, Osamu; Uematsu, Minoru; Kubo, Atsushi

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate how the delineations of the internal target volume (ITV) made from 'slow' CT alter with reference to 'thin-slice' CT. Materials and methods: Thin-slice CT images taken under breath-holding conditions and slow CT images taken under shallow-breathing conditions (8 s/image) of 11 lung cancers were used for this study. Five radiation oncologists delineated ITV of the 11 lesions using slow CT images (ITV1), and then redefined them with reference to thin-slice CT images (ITV2). SD-images (standard deviation image) were created for all patients from ITV images in order to visualize the regional variation of the ITVs. Results: The mean value of ITV2 was smaller than that initially defined by ITV1. There was no significant change in ITV1 and ITV2 between operators with regard to standard deviation in volume. There was a significant difference in the distribution of the ratio of ITV1 to ITV2 obtained on thin-slice CTs between cases with and without ground glass opacity. In cases without ground glass opacity there was a tendency for ITV2 to have a smaller volume than ITV1. Conclusions: Combined use of slow CT and thin-slice CT in delineation of ITV contours appeared to be useful in making adjustments for obscured tumor images caused by respiratory movement

  12. Chemical sensors for breath gas analysis: the latest developments at the Breath Analysis Summit 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisch, Ulrike; Haick, Hossam

    2014-06-01

    Profiling the body chemistry by means of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the breath opens exciting new avenues in medical diagnostics. Gas sensors could provide ideal platforms for realizing portable, hand-held breath testing devices in the near future. This review summarizes the latest developments and applications in the field of chemical sensors for diagnostic breath testing that were presented at the Breath Analysis Summit 2013 in Wallerfangen, Germany. Considerable progress has been made towards clinically applicable breath testing devices, especially by utilizing chemo-sensitive nanomaterials. Examples of several specialized breath testing applications are presented that are either based on stand-alone nanomaterial-based sensors being highly sensitive and specific to individual breath compounds over others, or on combinations of several highly specific sensors, or on experimental nanomaterial-based sensors arrays. Other interesting approaches include the adaption of a commercially available MOx-based sensor array to indirect breath testing applications, using a sample pre-concentration method, and the development of compact integrated GC-sensor systems. The recent trend towards device integration has led to the development of fully integrated prototypes of point-of-care devices. We describe and compare the performance of several prototypes that are based on different sensing technologies and evaluate their potential as low-cost and readily available next-generation medical devices.

  13. Adaptation

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    . Dar es Salaam. Durban. Bloemfontein. Antananarivo. Cape Town. Ifrane ... program strategy. A number of CCAA-supported projects have relevance to other important adaptation-related themes such as disaster preparedness and climate.

  14. Treatment of acromegaly patients with risk-adapted single or fractionated stereotactic high-precision radiotherapy. High local control and low toxicity in a pooled series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bostroem, Jan Patrick [Mediclin Robert Janker Clinic and MediClin MVZ Bonn, Department of Radiosurgery and Stereotactic Radiotherapy, Bonn (Germany); University Hospital of Bonn, Department of Neurosurgery, Bonn (Germany); Kinfe, Thomas; Pintea, Bogdan [University Hospital of Bonn, Department of Neurosurgery, Bonn (Germany); Meyer, Almuth [HELIOS Klinikum Erfurt, Department of Endocrinology, Erfurt (Germany); Gerlach, Ruediger [HELIOS Klinikum Erfurt, Department of Neurosurgery, Erfurt (Germany); Surber, Gunnar; Hamm, Klaus [HELIOS Klinikum Erfurt, Department of Radiosurgery, Erfurt (Germany); Lammering, Guido [Mediclin Robert Janker Clinic and MediClin MVZ Bonn, Department of Radiosurgery and Stereotactic Radiotherapy, Bonn (Germany); Heinrich-Heine-University of Duesseldorf, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2015-01-10

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate a prospectively initiated two-center protocol of risk-adapted stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) or stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) in patients with acromegaly. In total 35 patients (16 men/19 women, mean age 54 years) were prospectively included in a treatment protocol of SRS [planning target volume (PTV) < 4 ccm, > 2 mm to optic pathways = low risk] or SRT (PTV ≥ 4 ccm, ≤ 2 mm to optic pathways = high risk). The mean tumor volume was 3.71 ccm (range: 0.11-22.10 ccm). Based on the protocol guidelines, 21 patients were treated with SRS and 12 patients with SRT, 2 patients received both consecutively. The median follow-up (FU) reached 8 years with a 5-year overall survival (OS) of 87.3 % [confidence interval (CI): 70.8-95.6 %] and 5-year local control rate of 97.1 % (CI: 83.4-99.8 %). Almost 80 % (28/35) presented tumor shrinkage during FU. Endocrinological cure was achieved in 23 % and IGF-1 normalization with reduced medication was achieved in 40 % of all patients. An endocrinological response was generally achieved within the first 3 years, but endocrinological cure can require more than 8 years. A new adrenocorticotropic hypopituitarism occurred in 13 patients (46.4 %). A new visual field disorder and a new oculomotor palsy occurred in 1 patient, respectively. Patients with occurrence of visual/neurological impairments had a longer FU (p = 0.049). Our SRS/SRT protocol proved to be safe and successful in terms of tumor control and protection of the visual system. The timing and rate of endocrine improvements are difficult to predict. One has to accept an unavoidable rate of additional adrenocorticotropic hypopituitarism in the long term. (orig.) [German] Zielsetzung dieser Arbeit ist die Evaluation eines prospektiv angelegten Behandlungsprotokolls einer risikoadaptierten stereotaktischen Radiochirurgie (SRS) oder stereotaktischen Radiotherapie (SRT) von Patienten mit Akromegalie aus 2 Zentren. Insgesamt 35 Patienten (16

  15. Risk-adapted single or fractionated stereotactic high-precision radiotherapy in a pooled series of nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas. High local control and low toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bostroem, Jan Patrick [MediClin Robert Janker Clinic and MediClin MVZ Bonn, Department of Radiosurgery and Stereotactic Radiotherapy, Bonn (Germany); University Hospital of Bonn, Department of Neurosurgery, Bonn (Germany); Meyer, Almuth [HELIOS Klinikum Erfurt, Department of Endocrinology, Erfurt (Germany); Pintea, Bogdan [University Hospital of Bonn, Department of Neurosurgery, Bonn (Germany); Gerlach, Ruediger [HELIOS Klinikum Erfurt, Department of Neurosurgery, Erfurt (Germany); Surber, Gunnar; Hamm, Klaus [HELIOS Klinikum Erfurt, Department of Radiosurgery, Erfurt (Germany); Lammering, Guido [MediClin Robert Janker Clinic and MediClin MVZ Bonn, Department of Radiosurgery and Stereotactic Radiotherapy, Bonn (Germany); Heinrich-Heine-University of Duesseldorf, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate a prospectively initiated two-center protocol of risk-adapted single-fraction (SRS) or fractionated radiotherapy (SRT) in patients with nonsecretory pituitary adenomas (NSA). A total of 73 NSA patients (39 men/34 women) with a median age of 62 years were prospectively included in a treatment protocol of SRS [planning target volume (PTV) < 4 ccm, > 2 mm to optic pathways = low risk] or SRT (PTV ≥ 4 ccm, ≤ 2 mm to optic pathways = high risk) in two Novalis registered centers. Mean tumor volume was 7.02 ccm (range 0.58-57.29 ccm). Based on the protocol guidelines, 5 patients were treated with SRS and 68 patients with SRT. Median follow-up (FU) reached 5 years with 5-year overall survival (OS) of 90.4 % (CI 80.2-95 %) and 5-year local control and progression-free survival rates of 100 % (CI 93.3-100 %) and 90.4 % (CI 80.2-95 %), respectively. A post-SRS/SRT new visual disorder occurred in 2 patients (2.7 %), a new oculomotor nerve palsy in one pre-irradiated patient, in 3 patients (4.1 %) a pre-existing visual disorder improved. New complete hypopituitarism occurred in 4 patients (13.8 %) and in 3 patients (25 %) with pre-existing partial hypopituitarism. Pituitary function in 26 % of patients retained normal. Patients with tumor shrinkage (65.75 %) had a significantly longer FU (p = 0.0093). Multivariate analysis confirmed correlation of new hypopituitarism with duration of FU (p = 0.008) and correlation of new hypopituitarism and tumor volume (p = 0.023). No significant influence factors for occurrence of visual disorders were found. Our SRS/SRT protocol proved to be safe and successful in terms of tumor control and protection of the visual system, especially for large tumors located close to optic pathways. (orig.) [German] Evaluation eines prospektiv angelegten Behandlungsprotokolls einer risikoadaptierten Radiochirurgie (SRS) oder stereotaktischen Radiotherapie (SRT) von Patienten mit hormoninaktiven Hypophysenadenomen

  16. Training logbook for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, Robin D.; Maciejewski, Boguslaw; Leer, Jan Willem; Kinay, Munir; Heeren, Germaine

    2004-01-01

    Aim: To develop a structured logbook for trainees in the medical speciality of radiotherapy with Europe that records the increasing experience throughout their training period. Material and methods: A working party appointed by the European Board of Radiotherapy developed a draft version of a European logbook for trainees in radiotherapy. For development, the update European Core Curriculum for Radiotherapists (Radiation Oncologists) was taken into consideration. The logbook is composed of six sections: (1) biodata of the trainee, (2) scientific training documentation, (3) clinical training documentation, (4) record of formal presentations by the trainee, (5) publications, (6) training courses. Decisions were made to suggest that the clinical section of the logbook should: (a) only collect data that was essential for the purposes of appraisal, assessment and regulation, (b) be as user friendly as possible, (c) concentrate on quality of the data and not volume. The logbook was tested by trainees in several European training departments and adapted according to their suggestions. A final draft of the logbook was circulated among the national and professional societies for radiotherapy in Europe for review before a European consensus conference took place in Brussels in December 2002. Results: The European training logbook for radiotherapy was endorsed by representatives of 35 European nations during the Brussels consensus conference on December 14, 2002. Conclusion: Keeping a training logbook is an essential feature of the record of training for all EU trainees who wish to retain an opportunity to spend part of their training time in another country of the Union, important for someone who seeks an appointment as a specialist in another country within a few years of achieving specialist accreditation, and good professional practice for all other trainees. The European training logbook for radiotherapy is a robust instrument that allows the systematic collection of the

  17. Translation and cross-cultural adaptation into Brazilian Portuguese of the Vanderbilt Head and Neck Symptom Survey version 2.0 (VHNSS 2.0 for the assessment of oral symptoms in head and neck cancer patients submitted to radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Marçon Barroso

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Patients submitted to radiotherapy for the treatment of head and neck cancer have several symptoms, predominantly oral. The Vanderbilt Head and Neck Symptom Survey version 2.0 is an American tool developed to evaluate oral symptoms in head and neck cancer patients submitted to radiotherapy. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to translate the Vanderbilt Head and Neck Symptom Survey version 2.0 into Brazilian Portuguese and cross-culturally adapt this tool for subsequent validation and application in Brazil. METHODS: A method used for the translation and cultural adaptation of tools, which included independent translations, synthesis of the translations, back-translations, expert committee, and pre-test, was used. The pre-test was performed with 37 head and neck cancer patients, who were divided into four groups, to assess the relevance and understanding of the assessed items. Data were submitted to descriptive statistical analysis. RESULTS: The overall mean of the content validity index was 0.79 for semantic and idiomatic equivalence, and it was higher than 0.8 for cultural and conceptual equivalence. The cognitive interview showed that patients were able to paraphrase the items, and considered them relevant and easily understood. CONCLUSION: The tool was translated and cross-culturally adapted to be used in Brazil. The authors believe this translation is suited for validation.

  18. Translation and cross-cultural adaptation into Brazilian Portuguese of the Vanderbilt Head and Neck Symptom Survey version 2.0 (VHNSS 2.0) for the assessment of oral symptoms in head and neck cancer patients submitted to radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroso, Eliane Marçon; Carvalho, André Lopes; Paiva, Carlos Eduardo; Nunes, João Soares; Paiva, Bianca Sakamoto Ribeiro

    2015-01-01

    Patients submitted to radiotherapy for the treatment of head and neck cancer have several symptoms, predominantly oral. The Vanderbilt Head and Neck Symptom Survey version 2.0 is an American tool developed to evaluate oral symptoms in head and neck cancer patients submitted to radiotherapy. The aim of the present study was to translate the Vanderbilt Head and Neck Symptom Survey version 2.0 into Brazilian Portuguese and cross-culturally adapt this tool for subsequent validation and application in Brazil. A method used for the translation and cultural adaptation of tools, which included independent translations, synthesis of the translations, back-translations, expert committee, and pre-test, was used. The pre-test was performed with 37 head and neck cancer patients, who were divided into four groups, to assess the relevance and understanding of the assessed items. Data were submitted to descriptive statistical analysis. The overall mean of the content validity index was 0.79 for semantic and idiomatic equivalence, and it was higher than 0.8 for cultural and conceptual equivalence. The cognitive interview showed that patients were able to paraphrase the items, and considered them relevant and easily understood. The tool was translated and cross-culturally adapted to be used in Brazil. The authors believe this translation is suited for validation. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  19. Dose-volume analysis of predictors for chronic rectal toxicity after treatment of prostate cancer with adaptive image-guided radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas, Carlos; Martinez, Alvaro; Kestin, Larry L.; Yan Di; Grills, Inga; Brabbins, Donald S.; Lockman, David M.; Liang Jian; Gustafson, Gary S.; Chen, Peter Y.; Vicini, Frank A.; Wong, John W.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose We analyzed our experience treating localized prostate cancer with image-guided off-line correction with adaptive high-dose radiotherapy (ART) in our Phase II dose escalation study to identify factors predictive of chronic rectal toxicity. Materials and Methods From 1999-2002, 331 patients with clinical stage T1-T3N0M0 prostate cancer were prospectively treated in our Phase II 3D conformal dose escalation ART study to a median dose of 75.6 Gy (range, 63.0-79.2 Gy), minimum dose to confidence limited-planning target volume (cl-PTV) in 1.8 Gy fractions (median isocenter dose = 79.7 Gy). Seventy-four patients (22%) also received neoadjuvant/adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy. A patient-specific cl-PTV was constructed using 5 computed tomography scans and 4 sets of electronic portal images by applying an adaptive process to assure target accuracy and minimize PTV margin. For each case, the rectum (rectal solid) was contoured from the sacroiliac joints or rectosigmoid junction (whichever was higher) to the anal verge or ischial tuberosities (whichever was lower), with a median volume of 81.2 cc. The rectal wall was defined using the rectal solid with an individualized 3-mm wall thickness (median volume = 29.8 cc). Rectal wall dose-volume histogram was used to determine the prescribed dose. Toxicity was quantified using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria 2.0. Multiple dose-volume endpoints were evaluated for their association with chronic rectal toxicity. Results Median follow-up was 1.6 years. Thirty-four patients (crude rate 10.3%) experienced Grade 2 chronic rectal toxicity at a median interval of 1.1 years. Nine patients (crude rate = 2.7%) experienced Grade ≥3 chronic rectal toxicity (1 was Grade 4) at a median interval of 1.2 years. The 3-year rates of Grade ≥2 and Grade ≥3 chronic rectal toxicity were 20% and 4%, respectively. Acute toxicity predicted for chronic: Acute Grade 2-3 rectal toxicity (p 40% respectively. The volume

  20. Adapt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargatze, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    Active Data Archive Product Tracking (ADAPT) is a collection of software routines that permits one to generate XML metadata files to describe and register data products in support of the NASA Heliophysics Virtual Observatory VxO effort. ADAPT is also a philosophy. The ADAPT concept is to use any and all available metadata associated with scientific data to produce XML metadata descriptions in a consistent, uniform, and organized fashion to provide blanket access to the full complement of data stored on a targeted data server. In this poster, we present an application of ADAPT to describe all of the data products that are stored by using the Common Data File (CDF) format served out by the CDAWEB and SPDF data servers hosted at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. These data servers are the primary repositories for NASA Heliophysics data. For this purpose, the ADAPT routines have been used to generate data resource descriptions by using an XML schema named Space Physics Archive, Search, and Extract (SPASE). SPASE is the designated standard for documenting Heliophysics data products, as adopted by the Heliophysics Data and Model Consortium. The set of SPASE XML resource descriptions produced by ADAPT includes high-level descriptions of numerical data products, display data products, or catalogs and also includes low-level "Granule" descriptions. A SPASE Granule is effectively a universal access metadata resource; a Granule associates an individual data file (e.g. a CDF file) with a "parent" high-level data resource description, assigns a resource identifier to the file, and lists the corresponding assess URL(s). The CDAWEB and SPDF file systems were queried to provide the input required by the ADAPT software to create an initial set of SPASE metadata resource descriptions. Then, the CDAWEB and SPDF data repositories were queried subsequently on a nightly basis and the CDF file lists were checked for any changes such as the occurrence of new, modified, or deleted

  1. Involved-Node Radiotherapy and Modern Radiation Treatment Techniques in Patients With Hodgkin Lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paumier, Amaury; Ghalibafian, Mithra; Beaudre, Anne; Ferreira, Ivaldo; Pichenot, Charlotte; Messai, Taha; Lessard, Nathalie Athalie; Lefkopoulos, Dimitri; Girinsky, Theodore

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the clinical outcome of the involved-node radiotherapy (INRT) concept using modern radiation treatments (intensity-modulated radiotherapy [IMRT] or deep-inspiration breath-hold radiotherapy [DIBH) in patients with localized supradiaphragmatic Hodgkin lymphoma. Methods and Materials: All but 2 patients had early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma, and they were treated with chemotherapy prior to irradiation. Radiation treatments were delivered using the INRT concept according to European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer guidelines. IMRT was performed with the patient free-breathing. For the adapted breath-hold technique, a spirometer dedicated to DIBH radiotherapy was used. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy was performed with those patients. Results: Fifty patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (48 patients with primary Hodgkin lymphoma, 1 patient with recurrent disease, and 1 patient with refractory disease) entered the study from January 2003 to August 2008. Thirty-two patients were treated with IMRT, and 18 patients were treated with the DIBH technique. The median age was 28 years (range, 17-62 years). Thirty-four (68%) patients had stage I - (I-IIA) IIA disease, and 16 (32%) patients had stage I - (I-IIB) IIB disease. All but 3 patients received three to six cycles of adriamycin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine (ABVD). The median radiation doses to patients treated with IMRT and DIBH were, respectively, 40 Gy (range, 21.6-40 Gy) and 30.6 Gy (range, 19.8-40 Gy). Protection of various organs at risk was satisfactory. Median follow-up was 53.4 months (range, 19.1-93 months). The 5-year progression-free and overall survival rates for the whole population were 92% (95% confidence interval [CI], 80%-97%) and 94% (95% CI, 75%-98%), respectively. Recurrences occurred in 4 patients: 2 patients had in-field relapses, and 2 patients had visceral recurrences. Grade 3 acute lung toxicity (transient pneumonitis) occurred in 1 case. Conclusions

  2. How to breathe when you are short of breath

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000053.htm How to breathe when you are short of breath ... Watch TV Use your computer Read a newspaper How to do Pursed lip Breathing The steps to ...

  3. A clinical evaluation of visual feedback-guided breath-hold reproducibility of tumor location

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshitake, Tadamasa; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Ohga, Saiji; Nonoshita, Takeshi; Ohnishi, Kayoko; Terashima, Kotaro; Honda, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Arimura, Hidetaka; Hirata, Hideki

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reproducibility of visual feedback-guided breath-hold using a machine vision system with a charge-coupled device camera and a monocular head-mounted display. Sixteen patients with lung tumors who were treated with stereotactic radiotherapy were enrolled. A machine vision system with a charge-coupled device camera was used for monitoring respiration. A monocular head-mounted display was used to provide the patient with visual feedback about the breathing trace. The patients could control their breathing so that the breathing waveform would fall between the upper and lower threshold lines. Planning and treatment were performed under visual feedback-guided expiratory breath-hold. Electronic portal images were obtained during treatment. The range of cranial-caudal motion of the tumor location during each single breath-hold was calculated as the intra-breath-hold (intra-BH) variability. The maximum displacement between the two to five averaged tumor locations of each single breath-hold was calculated as the inter-breath-hold (inter-BH) variability. All 16 patients tolerated the visual feedback-guided breath-hold maneuvers well. The intra- and inter-BH variability of all patients was 1.5 ± 0.6 mm and 1.2 ± 0.5 mm, respectively. A visual feedback-guided breath-hold technique using the machine vision system is feasible with good breath-hold reproducibility.

  4. SU-E-J-220: Evaluation of Atlas-Based Auto-Segmentation (ABAS) in Head-And-Neck Adaptive Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Q; Yan, D [William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Evaluate the accuracy of atlas-based auto segmentation of organs at risk (OARs) on both helical CT (HCT) and cone beam CT (CBCT) images in head and neck (HN) cancer adaptive radiotherapy (ART). Methods: Six HN patients treated in the ART process were included in this study. For each patient, three images were selected: pretreatment planning CT (PreTx-HCT), in treatment CT for replanning (InTx-HCT) and a CBCT acquired in the same day of the InTx-HCT. Three clinical procedures of auto segmentation and deformable registration performed in the ART process were evaluated: a) auto segmentation on PreTx-HCT using multi-subject atlases, b) intra-patient propagation of OARs from PreTx-HCT to InTx-HCT using deformable HCT-to-HCT image registration, and c) intra-patient propagation of OARs from PreTx-HCT to CBCT using deformable CBCT-to-HCT image registration. Seven OARs (brainstem, cord, L/R parotid, L/R submandibular gland and mandible) were manually contoured on PreTx-HCT and InTx-HCT for comparison. In addition, manual contours on InTx-CT were copied on the same day CBCT, and a local region rigid body registration was performed accordingly for each individual OAR. For procedures a) and b), auto contours were compared to manual contours, and for c) auto contours were compared to those rigidly transferred contours on CBCT. Dice similarity coefficients (DSC) and mean surface distances of agreement (MSDA) were calculated for evaluation. Results: For procedure a), the mean DSC/MSDA of most OARs are >80%/±2mm. For intra-patient HCT-to-HCT propagation, the Resultimproved to >85%/±1.5mm. Compared to HCT-to-HCT, the mean DSC for HCT-to-CBCT propagation drops ∼2–3% and MSDA increases ∼0.2mm. This Resultindicates that the inferior imaging quality of CBCT seems only degrade auto propagation performance slightly. Conclusion: Auto segmentation and deformable propagation can generate OAR structures on HCT and CBCT images with clinically acceptable accuracy. Therefore

  5. SU-E-J-220: Evaluation of Atlas-Based Auto-Segmentation (ABAS) in Head-And-Neck Adaptive Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Q; Yan, D

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Evaluate the accuracy of atlas-based auto segmentation of organs at risk (OARs) on both helical CT (HCT) and cone beam CT (CBCT) images in head and neck (HN) cancer adaptive radiotherapy (ART). Methods: Six HN patients treated in the ART process were included in this study. For each patient, three images were selected: pretreatment planning CT (PreTx-HCT), in treatment CT for replanning (InTx-HCT) and a CBCT acquired in the same day of the InTx-HCT. Three clinical procedures of auto segmentation and deformable registration performed in the ART process were evaluated: a) auto segmentation on PreTx-HCT using multi-subject atlases, b) intra-patient propagation of OARs from PreTx-HCT to InTx-HCT using deformable HCT-to-HCT image registration, and c) intra-patient propagation of OARs from PreTx-HCT to CBCT using deformable CBCT-to-HCT image registration. Seven OARs (brainstem, cord, L/R parotid, L/R submandibular gland and mandible) were manually contoured on PreTx-HCT and InTx-HCT for comparison. In addition, manual contours on InTx-CT were copied on the same day CBCT, and a local region rigid body registration was performed accordingly for each individual OAR. For procedures a) and b), auto contours were compared to manual contours, and for c) auto contours were compared to those rigidly transferred contours on CBCT. Dice similarity coefficients (DSC) and mean surface distances of agreement (MSDA) were calculated for evaluation. Results: For procedure a), the mean DSC/MSDA of most OARs are >80%/±2mm. For intra-patient HCT-to-HCT propagation, the Resultimproved to >85%/±1.5mm. Compared to HCT-to-HCT, the mean DSC for HCT-to-CBCT propagation drops ∼2–3% and MSDA increases ∼0.2mm. This Resultindicates that the inferior imaging quality of CBCT seems only degrade auto propagation performance slightly. Conclusion: Auto segmentation and deformable propagation can generate OAR structures on HCT and CBCT images with clinically acceptable accuracy. Therefore

  6. SU-D-206-05: A Critical Look at CBCT-Based Dose Calculation Accuracy as It Is Applied to Adaptive Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bejarano Buele, A; Sperling, N; Parsai, E [University of Toledo Medical Center, Toledo, OH (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Cone-beam CTs (CBCT) obtained from On-Board Imaging Devices (OBI) are increasingly being used for dose calculation purposes in adaptive radiotherapy. Patient and target morphology are monitored and the treatment plan is updated using CBCT. Due to the difference in image acquisition parameters, dose calculated in a CBCT can differ from planned dose. We evaluate the difference between dose calculation in kV CBCT and simulation CT, and the effect of HU-density tables in dose discrepancies Methods: HU values for various materials were obtained using a Catphan 504 phantom for a simulator CT (CTSIM) and two different OBI systems using three imaging protocols: Head, Thorax and Pelvis. HU-density tables were created in the TPS for each OBI image protocol. Treatment plans were made on each Catphan 504 dataset and on the head, thorax and pelvis sections of an anthropomorphic phantom, with and without the respective HU-density table. DVH information was compared among OBI systems and planning CT. Results: Dose calculations carried on the Catphan 504 CBCTs, with and without the respective CT-density table, had a maximum difference of −0.65% from the values on the planning CT. The use of the respective HU-density table decreased the percent differences from planned values by half in most of the protocols. For the anthropomorphic phantom datasets, the use of the correct HU-density table reduced differences by 0.89% on OBI1 and 0.59% on OBI2 for the head, 0.49% on OBI1 for the thorax, and 0.25% on OBI2 for the pelvis. Differences from planned values without HU-density correction ranged from 3.13% (OBI1, thorax) to 0.30% (OBI2, thorax). Conclusion: CT-density tables in the TPS yield acceptable differences when used in partly homogeneous medium. Further corrections are needed when the medium contains pronounced density differences for accurate CBCT calculation. Current difference range (1–3%) can be clinically acceptable.

  7. SU-D-202-04: Validation of Deformable Image Registration Algorithms for Head and Neck Adaptive Radiotherapy in Routine Clinical Setting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, L; Pi, Y; Chen, Z; Xu, X [University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui (China); Wang, Z [University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui (China); The First Affiliated Hospital of Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui (China); Shi, C [Saint Vincent Medical Center, Bridgeport, CT (United States); Long, T; Luo, W; Wang, F [The First Affiliated Hospital of Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the ROI contours and accumulated dose difference using different deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms for head and neck (H&N) adaptive radiotherapy. Methods: Eight H&N cancer patients were randomly selected from the affiliated hospital. During the treatment, patients were rescanned every week with ROIs well delineated by radiation oncologist on each weekly CT. New weekly treatment plans were also re-designed with consistent dose prescription on the rescanned CT and executed for one week on Siemens CT-on-rails accelerator. At the end, we got six weekly CT scans from CT1 to CT6 including six weekly treatment plans for each patient. The primary CT1 was set as the reference CT for DIR proceeding with the left five weekly CTs using ANACONDA and MORFEUS algorithms separately in RayStation and the external skin ROI was set to be the controlling ROI both. The entire calculated weekly dose were deformed and accumulated on corresponding reference CT1 according to the deformation vector field (DVFs) generated by the two different DIR algorithms respectively. Thus we got both the ANACONDA-based and MORFEUS-based accumulated total dose on CT1 for each patient. At the same time, we mapped the ROIs on CT1 to generate the corresponding ROIs on CT6 using ANACONDA and MORFEUS DIR algorithms. DICE coefficients between the DIR deformed and radiation oncologist delineated ROIs on CT6 were calculated. Results: For DIR accumulated dose, PTV D95 and Left-Eyeball Dmax show significant differences with 67.13 cGy and 109.29 cGy respectively (Table1). For DIR mapped ROIs, PTV, Spinal cord and Left-Optic nerve show difference with −0.025, −0.127 and −0.124 (Table2). Conclusion: Even two excellent DIR algorithms can give divergent results for ROI deformation and dose accumulation. As more and more TPS get DIR module integrated, there is an urgent need to realize the potential risk using DIR in clinical.

  8. Adaptation

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Nairobi, Kenya. 28 Adapting Fishing Policy to Climate Change with the Aid of Scientific and Endogenous Knowledge. Cap Verde, Gambia,. Guinea, Guinea Bissau,. Mauritania and Senegal. Environment and Development in the Third World. (ENDA-TM). Dakar, Senegal. 29 Integrating Indigenous Knowledge in Climate Risk ...

  9. Eldercare at Home: Breathing Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Join our e-newsletter! Resources Eldercare at Home: Breathing Problems Caregiving How Tos Understanding the Problem As ... However, aging sometimes brings on other more serious breathing problems including incapacitating shortness of breath, chest discomfort, ...

  10. From breathing to respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitting, Jean-William

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of breathing remained an enigma for a long time. The Hippocratic school described breathing patterns but did not associate breathing with the lungs. Empedocles and Plato postulated that breathing was linked to the passage of air through pores of the skin. This was refuted by Aristotle who believed that the role of breathing was to cool the heart. In Alexandria, breakthroughs were accomplished in the anatomy and physiology of the respiratory system. Later, Galen proposed an accurate description of the respiratory muscles and the mechanics of breathing. However, his heart-lung model was hampered by the traditional view of two non-communicating vascular systems - veins and arteries. After a period of stagnation in the Middle Ages, knowledge progressed with the discovery of pulmonary circulation. The comprehension of the purpose of breathing progressed by steps thanks to Boyle and Mayow among others, and culminated with the contribution of Priestley and the discovery of oxygen by Lavoisier. Only then was breathing recognized as fulfilling the purpose of respiration, or gas exchange. A century later, a controversy emerged concerning the active or passive transfer of oxygen from alveoli to the blood. August and Marie Krogh settled the dispute, showing that passive diffusion was sufficient to meet the oxygen needs. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Breath alcohol test (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The breath alcohol test measures the amount of alcohol in the blood by testing exhaled air. The test is performed by blowing ... breath machine 15 minutes after alcohol consumption. The test determines how much alcohol it takes to raise the blood-alcohol level ...

  12. Minimizing Shortness of Breath

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is also placed on proper use of the abdominal muscles to better control episodes of shortness of breath, limit overuse of the accessory muscles and manage respiratory symptoms. Monitor Breathing During an activity, it is important to pause frequently to check ...

  13. TOPICAL REVIEW: Anatomical imaging for radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Philip M.

    2008-06-01

    The goal of radiation therapy is to achieve maximal therapeutic benefit expressed in terms of a high probability of local control of disease with minimal side effects. Physically this often equates to the delivery of a high dose of radiation to the tumour or target region whilst maintaining an acceptably low dose to other tissues, particularly those adjacent to the target. Techniques such as intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), stereotactic radiosurgery and computer planned brachytherapy provide the means to calculate the radiation dose delivery to achieve the desired dose distribution. Imaging is an essential tool in all state of the art planning and delivery techniques: (i) to enable planning of the desired treatment, (ii) to verify the treatment is delivered as planned and (iii) to follow-up treatment outcome to monitor that the treatment has had the desired effect. Clinical imaging techniques can be loosely classified into anatomic methods which measure the basic physical characteristics of tissue such as their density and biological imaging techniques which measure functional characteristics such as metabolism. In this review we consider anatomical imaging techniques. Biological imaging is considered in another article. Anatomical imaging is generally used for goals (i) and (ii) above. Computed tomography (CT) has been the mainstay of anatomical treatment planning for many years, enabling some delineation of soft tissue as well as radiation attenuation estimation for dose prediction. Magnetic resonance imaging is fast becoming widespread alongside CT, enabling superior soft-tissue visualization. Traditionally scanning for treatment planning has relied on the use of a single snapshot scan. Recent years have seen the development of techniques such as 4D CT and adaptive radiotherapy (ART). In 4D CT raw data are encoded with phase information and reconstructed to yield a set of scans detailing motion through the breathing, or cardiac, cycle. In ART a set of

  14. Cardiac Side-effects From Breast Cancer Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, C W; Kirby, A M

    2015-11-01

    Breast cancer radiotherapy reduces the risk of cancer recurrence and death. However, it usually involves some radiation exposure of the heart and analyses of randomised trials have shown that it can increase the risk of heart disease. Estimates of the absolute risks of radiation-related heart disease are needed to help oncologists plan each individual woman's treatment. The risk for an individual woman varies according to her estimated cardiac radiation dose and her background risk of ischaemic heart disease in the absence of radiotherapy. When it is known, this risk can then be compared with the absolute benefit of the radiotherapy. At present, many UK cancer centres are already giving radiotherapy with mean heart doses of less than 3 Gy and for most women the benefits of the radiotherapy will probably far outweigh the risks. Technical approaches to minimising heart dose in breast cancer radiotherapy include optimisation of beam angles, use of multileaf collimator shielding, intensity-modulated radiotherapy, treatment in a prone position, treatment in deep inspiration (including the use of breath-hold and gating techniques), proton therapy and partial breast irradiation. The multileaf collimator is suitable for many women with upper pole left breast cancers, but for women with central or lower pole cancers, breath-holding techniques are now recommended in national UK guidelines. Ongoing work aims to identify ways of irradiating pan-regional lymph nodes that are effective, involve minimal exposure of organs at risk and are feasible to plan, deliver and verify. These will probably include wide tangent-based field-in-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy or arc radiotherapy techniques in combination with deep inspiratory breath-hold, and proton beam irradiation for women who have a high predicted heart dose from intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Copyright © 2015 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Differential risk assessments from five hypoxia specific assays: The basis for biologically adapted individualized radiotherapy in advanced head and neck cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordsmark, Marianne; Eriksen, Jesper Grau; Gebski, Val

    2007-01-01

    osteopontin measured by ELISA, tumour oxygenation status using pO(2) needle electrodes and tumour osteopontin, hypoxia inducible factor 1alpha (HIF-1alpha) and carboxyanhydrase 9 (CA9) by immunohistochemistry. The primary treatment was radiotherapy and the hypoxic radiosensitizer nimorazole. Loco...

  16. Successful treatment of a 67-year-old woman with urethral adenocarcinoma with the use of external beam radiotherapy and image guided adaptive interstitial brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mujkanovic, Jasmin; Tanderup, Kari; Agerbæk, Mads

    2016-01-01

    Primary urethral cancer (PUC) is a very rare disease. This case report illustrates a successful treatment approach of a 67-year-old woman with a urethral adenocarcinoma selected for an organ preserving treatment with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and interstitial brachytherapy (BT) boost, using...

  17. Respiratory gated radiotherapy: current techniques and potential benefits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giraud, P.; Campana, F.; Rosenwald, J.C.; Cosset, J.M.; Reboul, F.; Garcia, R.; Clippe, S.; Carrie, C.; Dubray, B.

    2003-01-01

    Respiration-gated radiotherapy offers a significant potential for improvement in the irradiation of tumor sites affected by respiratory motion such as lung, breast and liver tumors. An increased conformality of irradiation fields leading to decreased complications rates of organs at risk (lung, heart...) is expected. Respiratory gating is in line with the need for improved precision required by radiotherapy techniques such as 3D conformal radiotherapy or intensity modulated radiotherapy. Reduction of respiratory motion can be achieved by using either breath hold techniques or respiration synchronized gating techniques. Breath-hold techniques can be achieved with active, in which airflow of the patient is temporarily blocked by a valve, or passive techniques, in which the patient voluntarily breath-hold. Synchronized gating techniques use external devices to predict the phase of the respiration cycle while the patient breaths freely. These techniques presently investigated in several medical centers worldwide. Although promising, the first results obtained in lung and liver cancer patients require confirmation. Physical, technical and physiological questions still remain to be answered. This paper describes the most frequently used gated techniques and the main published clinical reports on the use of respiration-gated radiotherapy in order to evaluate the impact of these techniques. (author)

  18. Radiotherapy Accidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckenzie, Alan

    A major benefit of a Quality Assurance system in a radiotherapy centre is that it reduces the likelihood of an accident. For over 20 years I have been the interface in the UK between the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine and the media — newspapers, radio and TV — and so I have learned about radiotherapy accidents from personal experience. In some cases, these accidents did not become public and so the hospital cannot be identified. Nevertheless, lessons are still being learned.

  19. Radiotherapy apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, P.M.; Webb, H.P.J.

    1985-01-01

    This invention relates to apparatus for applying intracavitary radiotherapy. In previously-known systems radioactive material is conveyed to a desired location within a patient by transporting a chain of balls pneumatically to and from an appropriately inserted applicator. According to this invention a ball chain for such a purpose comprises several radioactive balls separated by non-radioactive tracer balls of radiographically transparent material of lower density and surface hardness than the radioactive balls. The invention also extends to radiotherapy treatment apparatus comprising a storage, sorting and assembly system

  20. A method for the reconstruction of four-dimensional synchronized CT scans acquired during free breathing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low, Daniel A.; Nystrom, Michelle; Kalinin, Eugene; Parikh, Parag; Dempsey, James F.; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Mutic, Sasa; Wahab, Sasha H.; Islam, Tareque; Christensen, Gary; Politte, David G.; Whiting, Bruce R.

    2003-01-01

    Breathing motion is a significant source of error in radiotherapy treatment planning for the thorax and upper abdomen. Accounting for breathing motion has a profound effect on the size of conformal radiation portals employed in these sites. Breathing motion also causes artifacts and distortions in treatment planning computed tomography (CT) scans acquired during free breathing and also causes a breakdown of the assumption of the superposition of radiation portals in intensity-modulated radiation therapy, possibly leading to significant dose delivery errors. Proposed voluntary and involuntary breath-hold techniques have the potential for reducing or eliminating the effects of breathing motion, however, they are limited in practice, by the fact that many lung cancer patients cannot tolerate holding their breath. We present an alternative solution to accounting for breathing motion in radiotherapy treatment planning, where multislice CT scans are collected simultaneously with digital spirometry over many free breathing cycles to create a four-dimensional (4-D) image set, where tidal lung volume is the additional dimension. An analysis of this 4-D data leads to methods for digital-spirometry, based elimination or accounting of breathing motion artifacts in radiotherapy treatment planning for free breathing patients. The 4-D image set is generated by sorting free-breathing multislice CT scans according to user-defined tidal-volume bins. A multislice CT scanner is operated in the cine mode, acquiring 15 scans per couch position, while the patient undergoes simultaneous digital-spirometry measurements. The spirometry is used to retrospectively sort the CT scans by their correlated tidal lung volume within the patient's normal breathing cycle. This method has been prototyped using data from three lung cancer patients. The actual tidal lung volumes agreed with the specified bin volumes within standard deviations ranging between 22 and 33 cm 3 . An analysis of sagittal and

  1. A comparison of the physiological responses to underwater arm cranking and breath holding between synchronized swimmers and breath holding untrained women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alentejano, Teresa C; Bell, Gordon J; Marshall, Dru

    2012-05-01

    Exercise and breath holding in the water such as that performed in the sport of synchronized swimming may evoke the physiological consequences of the diving response. The purpose of this study was to investigate the physiological responses of breath holding during underwater arm cranking in synchronized swimmers who are trained in breath holding and compare these responses to untrained women. Each participant performed 6 breath holding periods in the water (2 × 10s, 2 × 20s and 2 × 25s) with 2 minutes of normal breathing in between, in either an ascending or descending order while performing arm crank exercise. The intensity of arm crank exercise was set below the individual ventilatory threshold. Both synchronized swimmers and controls were matched on sitting height and then randomly divided into 2 groups: one group started breath holding with the longest (25s) breath holding periods while the other group began breath holding with the shortest (10s) breath holding periods. The synchronized swimmers experienced a significant decrease in heart rate while breath holding for 20 and 25s but the changes in heart rate for the control group was not consistent between subgroups. Full recovery from breath holding was identified for minute ventilation after 25s of recovery from breath holding for all groups. Results suggest synchronized swimmers exhibited a better adaptation to breath holding while exercising underwater.

  2. SU-F-J-22: Lung VolumeVariability Assessed by Bh-CBCT in 3D Surface Image Guided Deep InspirationBreath Hold (DIBH) Radiotherapy for Left-Sided Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez, A; Stanley, D; Papanikolaou, N; Crownover, R [University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: With the increasing use of DIBH techniques for left-sided breast cancer, 3D surface-image guided DIBH techniques have improved patient setup and facilitated DIBH radiation delivery. However, quantification of the daily separation between the heart and left breast still presents a challenge. One method of assuring separation is to ensure consistent left lung filling. With this in mind, the aim of this study is to retrospectively quantify left lung volume from weekly breath hold-CBCTs (bh-CBCT) of left-sided breast patients treated using a 3D surface imaging system. Methods: Ten patients (n=10) previously treated to the left breast using the C-Rad CatalystHD system (C-RAD AG, Uppsala Sweden) were evaluated. Patients were positioned with CatalystHD and with bh-CBCT. bh-CBCTs were acquired at the validation date, first day of treatment and at subsequent weekly intervals. Total treatment courses spanned from 3 to 5 weeks. bh-CBCT images were exported to VelocityAI and the left lung volume was segmented. Volumes were recorded and analyzed. Results: A total of 41 bh-CBCTs were contoured in VelocityAI for the 10 patients. The mean left lung volume for all patients was 1657±295cc based on validation bh-CBCT. With the subsequent lung volumes normalized to the validation lung volume, the mean relative ratios for all patients were 1.02±0.11, 0.97±0.14, 0.98±0.11, 1.02±0.01, and 0.96±0.02 for week 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5, respectively. Overall, the mean left lung volume change was ≤4.0% over a 5-week course; however left lung volume variations of up to 28% were noted in a select patient. Conclusion: With the use of the C-RAD CatalystHD system, the mean lung volume variability over a 5-week course of DIBH treatments was ≤4.0%. By minimizing left lung volume variability, heart to left breast separation maybe more consistently maintained. AN Gutierrez has a research grant from C-RAD AG.

  3. Shortness of Breath

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... enough air. Shortness of breath — known medically as dyspnea — is often described as an intense tightening in ... properly. Schwartzstein RM. Approach to the patient with dyspnea. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Feb. 4, ...

  4. Mapleson's Breathing Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Kaul, Tej K; Mittal, Geeta

    2013-01-01

    Mapleson breathing systems are used for delivering oxygen and anaesthetic agents and to eliminate carbon dioxide during anaesthesia. They consist of different components: Fresh gas flow, reservoir bag, breathing tubes, expiratory valve, and patient connection. There are five basic types of Mapleson system: A, B, C, D and E depending upon the different arrangements of these components. Mapleson F was added later. For adults, Mapleson A is the circuit of choice for spontaneous respiration where...

  5. SU-E-T-326: The Oxygen Saturation (SO2) and Breath-Holding Time Variation Applied Active Breathing Control (ABC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, G; Yin, Y [Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan, Shandong (China)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To study the oxygen saturation (SO2) and breath-holding time variation applied active breathing control (ABC) in radiotherapy of tumor. Methods: 24 volunteers were involved in our trials, and they all did breath-holding motion assisted by ELEKTA Active Breathing Coordinator 2.0 for 10 times respectively. And the patient monitor was used to observe the oxygen saturation (SO2) variation. The variation of SO2, and length of breath-holding time and the time for recovering to the initial value of SO2 were recorded and analyzed. Results: (1) The volunteers were divided into two groups according to the SO2 variation in breath-holding: A group, 14 cases whose SO2 reduction were more than 2% (initial value was 97% to 99%, while termination value was 91% to 96%); B group, 10 cases were less than 2% in breath-holding without inhaling oxygen. (2) The interfraction breath holding time varied from 8 to 20s for A group compared to the first breath-holding time, and for B group varied from 4 to 14s. (3) The breathing holding time of B group prolonged mean 8s, compared to A group. (4) The time for restoring to the initial value of SO2 was from 10s to 30s. And the breath-holding time shortened obviously for patients whose SO2 did not recover to normal. Conclusion: It is very obvious that the SO2 reduction in breath-holding associated with ABC for partial people. It is necessary to check the SO2 variation in breath training, and enough time should be given to recover SO2.

  6. Imposed Work of Breathing and Breathing Comfort of Nonintubated Volunteers Breathing with Three Portable Ventilators and a Critical Care Ventilator

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Austin, Paul

    2001-01-01

    .... The purpose of this study was to assess the imposed inspiratory work of breathing and breathing comfort of nonintubated healthy volunteers breathing spontaneously through three portable ventilators...

  7. Palliative Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salinas, J.

    2003-01-01

    Palliative care does not attempt to prolong survival but to the achieve the highest quality of life both for the patient and their family covering their physical, psychological, social and spiritual needs. Radiotherapy (RT), one of the most important therapeutic modalities, has a great significance in palliative medicine for cancer since it attempts to reduce as much as possible the acute reaction associated with the treatment for the patient. (Author)

  8. Method for automatic re contouring straight adaptive radiotherapy for prostate cancer; Metodo para el recontorneo automatico del recto en radioterapia adaptativa en cancer de prostata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez Vila, B.; Garcia Vicente, F.; Aguilera, E. J.

    2011-07-01

    Outline of quickly and accurately the rectal wall is important in Image Guided Radiotherapy (IGRT in the acronym) as an organ of greatest influence in limiting the dose in the planning of radiation therapy in prostate cancer. Deformabies registration methods based on image intensity can not create a correct spatial transformation if there is no correspondence between the image and image planning session. The rectal content variation creates a non-correspondence in the image intensity becomes a major obstacle to the deformable registration based on image intensity.

  9. Does breathing type influence electromyographic activity of obligatory and accessory respiratory muscles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, M F; Valenzuela, S; Miralles, R; Portus, C; Santander, H; Fuentes, A D; Celhay, I

    2014-11-01

    Craniomandibular electromyographic (EMG) studies frequently include several parameters, e.g. resting, chewing and tooth-clenching. EMG activity during these parameters has been recorded in the elevator muscles, but little is known about the respiratory muscles. The aim of this study was to compare EMG activity in obligatory and accessory respiratory muscles between subjects with different breathing types. Forty male subjects were classified according to their breathing type into two groups of 20 each: costo-diaphragmatic breathing type and upper costal breathing type. Bipolar surface electrodes were placed on the sternocleidomastoid, diaphragm, external intercostal and latissimus dorsi muscles. EMG activity was recorded during the following tasks: (i) normal quiet breathing, (ii) maximal voluntary clenching in intercuspal position, (iii) natural rate chewing until swallowing threshold, (iv) short-time chewing. Diaphragm EMG activity was significantly higher in the upper costal breathing type than in the costo-diaphragmatic breathing type in all tasks (P breathing type than in the costo-diaphragmatic breathing type in tasks 3 and 4 (P breathing types in the tasks studied (P > 0·05). The significantly higher EMG activity observed in subjects with upper costal breathing than in the costo-diaphragmatic breathing type suggests that there could be differences in motor unit recruitment strategies depending on the breathing type. This may be an expression of the adaptive capability of muscle chains in subjects who clinically have a different thoraco-abdominal expansion during inspiration at rest. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Physiology of static breath holding in elite apneists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Anthony R; Drvis, Ivan; Dujic, Zeljko; MacLeod, David B; Ainslie, Philip N

    2018-03-07

    What is the topic of this review? This review provides an up-to-date assessment of the physiology involved with extreme static dry-land breath holding in trained apneists. What advances does it highlight? We specifically highlight the recent findings involved with the cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and metabolic function during a maximal breath hold in elite apneists. Breath hold related activities have been performed for centuries, but only recently within the last ∼30 years has it emerged as an increasingly popular competitive sport. In apnea sport, people compete in disciplines relating to underwater distances or simply maximal breath hold duration - with the current (oxygen un-supplemented) static breath hold record at 11:35 min. Remarkably, many ultra-elite apneists are able to supress respiratory urges to the point where consciousness fundamentally limits a breath hold duration. Here, arterial oxygen saturations as low as ∼50% have been reported. In such cases, oxygen conservation to maintain cerebral functioning is critical, where responses ascribed to the mammalian dive reflex - e.g., sympathetically mediated peripheral vaconstriction, and vagally mediated bradycardia - are central. In defence of maintaining global cerebral oxygen delivery during prolonged breath holds, the cerebral blood flow may increase by ∼100% from resting values. Interestingly, near the termination of prolonged dry static breath holds, recent studies also indicate that reductions in the cerebral oxidative metabolism can occur, likely attributable to the extreme hypercapnia and irrespective of the hypoxemia. In this review we highlight and discuss the recent data on the cardiovascular, metabolic and particularly cerebrovascular function in competitive apneists performing maximal static breath holds. The physiological adaptation and maladaptation with regular breath hold training are also summarized, and future research areas in this unique physiological field are highlighted

  11. [Radiotherapy promises: focus on lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouin, Anaïs; Durand-Labrunie, Jérôme; Leroy, Thomas; Pannier, Diane; Wagner, Antoine; Rault, Erwan; Lartigau, Eric

    2013-06-01

    Radiotherapy is a key cancer treatment, which greatly modified its practice in recent years thanks to medical imaging and technical improvements. The systematic use of computed tomography (CT) for treatment planning, the imaging fusion/co-registration between CT/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or CT/positron emission tomography (PET) improve target identification/selection and delineation. New irradiation techniques such as image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT), stereotactic radiotherapy or hadron therapy offer a more diverse therapeutic armamentarium to patients together with lower toxicity. Radiotherapy, as well as medical oncology, tends to offer a personalized treatment to patients thanks to the IGRT, which takes into account the inter- or intra-fraction anatomic variations. IGRT leads to adaptive radiotherapy (ART) with a new planification in the treatment course in order to decrease toxicity and improve tumor control. The use of systemic therapies with radiations needs to be studied in order to improve efficiency without increasing toxicities from these multimodal approaches. Finally, radiotherapy advances were impacted by radiotherapy accidents like Epinal. They led to an increased quality control with the intensification of identity control, the emergence of in vivo dosimetry or the experience feedback committee in radiotherapy. We will illustrate through the example of lung cancer.

  12. Breathing Like a Fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsioloudis, Petros J.

    2010-01-01

    Being able to dive and breathe underwater has been a challenge for thousands of years. In 1980, Fuji Systems of Tokyo developed a series of prototype gills for divers as a way of demonstrating just how good its membranes are. Even though gill technology has not yet reached the point where recipients can efficiently use implants to dive underwater,…

  13. Breathing, feeding, and neuroprotection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Homma, Ikuo; Shioda, S

    2006-01-01

    ... of knowledge of brain functions and morphology. Akiyoshi Hosoyamada, M.D., Ph.D. President Showa University, Tokyo 142-8555, Japan December 2005Preface Brain research is on the march, with several advanced technical developments and new findings uncovered almost daily. Within the brain-research fields, we focus on breathing, neuroprotection, an...

  14. The Breath of Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Josephsen, Jens

    The present preliminary text is a short thematic presentation in biological inorganic chemistry meant to illustrate general and inorganic (especially coordination) chemistry in biochemistry. The emphasis is on molecular models to explain features of the complicated mechanisms essential to breathing...

  15. Improved Correlation of the Neuropathologic Classification According to Adapted World Health Organization Classification and Outcome After Radiotherapy in Patients With Atypical and Anaplastic Meningiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combs, Stephanie E.; Schulz-Ertner, Daniela; Debus, Jürgen; Deimling, Andreas von; Hartmann, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the correlation between the 1993 and 2000/2007 World Health Organization (WHO) classification with the outcome in patients with high-grade meningiomas. Patients and Methods: Between 1985 and 2004, 73 patients diagnosed with atypical or anaplastic meningiomas were treated with radiotherapy. Sections from the paraffin-embedded tumor material from 66 patients (90%) from 13 different pathology departments were re-evaluated according to the first revised WHO classification from 1993 and the revised classifications from 2000/2007. In 4 cases, the initial diagnosis meningioma was not reproducible (5%). Therefore, 62 patients with meningiomas were analyzed. Results: All 62 tumors were reclassified according to the 1993 and 2000/2007 WHO classification systems. Using the 1993 system, 7 patients were diagnosed with WHO grade I meningioma (11%), 23 with WHO grade II (37%), and 32 with WHO grade III meningioma (52%). After scoring using the 2000/2007 system, we found 17 WHO grade I meningiomas (27%), 32 WHO grade II meningiomas (52%), and 13 WHO grade III meningiomas (21%). According to the 1993 classification, the difference in overall survival was not statistically significant among the histologic subgroups (p = .96). Using the 2000/2007 WHO classifications, the difference in overall survival became significant (p = .02). Of the 62 reclassified patients 29 developed tumor progression (47%). No difference in progression-free survival was observed among the histologic subgroups (p = .44). After grading according to the 2000/2007 WHO classifications, significant differences in progression-free survival were observed among the three histologic groups (p = .005). Conclusion: The new 2000/2007 WHO classification for meningiomas showed an improved correlation between the histologic grade and outcome. This classification therefore provides a useful basis to determine the postoperative indication for radiotherapy. According to our results, a comparison of the

  16. Improved Correlation of the Neuropathologic Classification According to Adapted World Health Organization Classification and Outcome After Radiotherapy in Patients With Atypical and Anaplastic Meningiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Combs, Stephanie E., E-mail: Stephanie.Combs@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Schulz-Ertner, Daniela [Radiologisches Institut, Markuskrankenhaus Frankfurt, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Debus, Juergen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Deimling, Andreas von; Hartmann, Christian [Department of Neuropathology, Institute for Pathology, University Hospital of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Clinical Cooperation Unit Neuropathology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the correlation between the 1993 and 2000/2007 World Health Organization (WHO) classification with the outcome in patients with high-grade meningiomas. Patients and Methods: Between 1985 and 2004, 73 patients diagnosed with atypical or anaplastic meningiomas were treated with radiotherapy. Sections from the paraffin-embedded tumor material from 66 patients (90%) from 13 different pathology departments were re-evaluated according to the first revised WHO classification from 1993 and the revised classifications from 2000/2007. In 4 cases, the initial diagnosis meningioma was not reproducible (5%). Therefore, 62 patients with meningiomas were analyzed. Results: All 62 tumors were reclassified according to the 1993 and 2000/2007 WHO classification systems. Using the 1993 system, 7 patients were diagnosed with WHO grade I meningioma (11%), 23 with WHO grade II (37%), and 32 with WHO grade III meningioma (52%). After scoring using the 2000/2007 system, we found 17 WHO grade I meningiomas (27%), 32 WHO grade II meningiomas (52%), and 13 WHO grade III meningiomas (21%). According to the 1993 classification, the difference in overall survival was not statistically significant among the histologic subgroups (p = .96). Using the 2000/2007 WHO classifications, the difference in overall survival became significant (p = .02). Of the 62 reclassified patients 29 developed tumor progression (47%). No difference in progression-free survival was observed among the histologic subgroups (p = .44). After grading according to the 2000/2007 WHO classifications, significant differences in progression-free survival were observed among the three histologic groups (p = .005). Conclusion: The new 2000/2007 WHO classification for meningiomas showed an improved correlation between the histologic grade and outcome. This classification therefore provides a useful basis to determine the postoperative indication for radiotherapy. According to our results, a comparison of the

  17. Radon-in-breath measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leach, V.A.

    1981-01-01

    A review of literature on the area of radon breath measurements has shown that respiratory factors have been largely ignored. The history of breathing room-air radon concentrations and the variations in respiratory parameters for each individual have been the major contributing factors for poor reproducibility in radon breath measurements performed by past researchers

  18. [Dosimetric impact of breath-hold in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma by conformal radiation therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubas, A; Chapet, O; Merle, P; Lorchel, F; d'Hombres, A; Mornex, F

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the dosimetric impact of breath-hold during radiotherapy of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and to determinate the optimal respiratory phase for treatment (exhale or inhale). Two CT scans were performed in inhale and in exhale in 20 patients with HCC. The GTV was delineated slice by slice on the inspiration breath hold acquisition (GTV(insp)) and on the expiration breath hold acquisition (GTV(exp)). The superposition of two GTV allowed to obtain the global GTV (free respiration). PTV was defined by adding a margin of 1cm around each GTV. The liver, the duodenum, the two kidneys, the stomach and the spinal cord were delineated on each acquisition as organs at risk (OAR). Three dosimetric plans were created on inspiration, expiration and on global PTV. The mean reduction in the volume of PTV with conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) in the hold-breath group compared to the free respiration group was of 33.5+/-11.9%. The average difference of V50%, V20, V30, V40 and V50 were around 4% in favor of the breath hold. The average value of NTCP was 8.9% in free respiration, 4.5% in expiration and 3.2% in inspiration. Further improvement in the OARs dosimetric parameters for the breath hold was observed. Compared to the conformal radiotherapy with free respiration, the breath-hold allows reducing the volume of the PTV and the doses to the healthy liver and organs at risk. The use of this modality during different radiotherapy techniques (3D-CRT, IMRT and stereotactic) may be recommended. No difference in dosimetric value has been observed between the breath hold in expiratory and inspiratory phases.

  19. Radiotherapy in bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozan, R.

    1992-01-01

    In 1992, the problem of the vesical radiotherapy is not resolved. The author presents the situation and the different techniques of radiotherapy in bladder cancers: external radiotherapy, only and associated with surgery, interstitial curietherapy and non-classical techniques as per operative radiotherapy, neutron therapy and concurrent radiotherapy with chemotherapy. In order to compare their efficiency, the five-year survival are given in all cases.(10 tabs)

  20. Cardiac and pulmonary complication probabilities for breast cancer patients after routine end-inspiration gated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korreman, Stine S.; Pedersen, Anders N.; Josipovic, Mirjana; Aarup, Lasse Rye; Juhler-Nottrup, Trine; Specht, Lena; Nystroem, Hakan

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Substantial reductions of radiation doses to heart and lung can be achieved using breathing adaptation of adjuvant radiotherapy following conservative surgery for breast cancer. The purpose of this study was to estimate the radiobiological implications after routine use of an end-inspiration gated treatment, and to compare the results with predictions based on pre-clinical CT-studies. Patients and methods: Nineteen consecutive patients with axillary lymph node-positive left-sided breast cancer were referred for adjuvant radiotherapy after breast conserving surgery. Treatment was performed with gating in the end-inspiration phase of audio-coached enhanced free breathing. The target intended to encompass the remaining breast, ipsilateral internal mammary and periclavicular nodes, and the prescription dose was 48 Gy in 24 fractions. A three-field mono-isocentric conformal technique using deep tangentials and a supraclavicular field was employed. NTCPs were calculated using the relative seriality model for the heart, and the model proposed by Burman et al. for the lung. The observed values were compared to those predicted from two previous CT-studies for a deep inspiration breath-hold technique and an uncoached end-inspiration gating technique. Results: The ipsilateral lung V 5 (relative volume receiving more than 50% of the prescription dose) had a median value of 23.7% (range 10.8-35.1%) over the patient population. The corresponding median lung pneumonitis probability was 1.1% (range 0-14%). The median heart V 5 was 0.8% (range 0-19.1%) with a corresponding median cardiac mortality NTCP of 0.1% (range 0-5.7%). These results compare well with the predictions of our previous CT-studies. There is a significant reduction in dose to the left anterior descending coronary artery for the enhanced end-inspiration gating technique compared to the uncoached end-inspiration technique employed in the CT-studies. Conclusions: In a routine clinical practice involving

  1. Functional changes motorics of breathing in pregnant women and their influence by the Physiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Chytrá, Markéta

    2013-01-01

    During pregnancy there are many changes in the mother organism that influence each other. This bachelor's thesis summarizes the information about these significant changes. The thesis is focused on breathing mechanics and breathing patterns changes and considers ways how to influence and adapt breathing during physiologic pregnancy. One chapter points to psychosomatics of pregnant woman associated with the changes of organ systems and growth of foetus. The main part discusses possibilities of...

  2. Mapleson's Breathing Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Tej K; Mittal, Geeta

    2013-09-01

    Mapleson breathing systems are used for delivering oxygen and anaesthetic agents and to eliminate carbon dioxide during anaesthesia. They consist of different components: Fresh gas flow, reservoir bag, breathing tubes, expiratory valve, and patient connection. There are five basic types of Mapleson system: A, B, C, D and E depending upon the different arrangements of these components. Mapleson F was added later. For adults, Mapleson A is the circuit of choice for spontaneous respiration where as Mapleson D and its Bains modifications are best available circuits for controlled ventilation. For neonates and paediatric patients Mapleson E and F (Jackson Rees modification) are the best circuits. In this review article, we will discuss the structure of the circuits and functional analysis of various types of Mapleson systems and their advantages and disadvantages.

  3. The utility of e-Learning to support training for a multicentre bladder online adaptive radiotherapy trial (TROG 10.01-BOLART)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foroudi, Farshad; Pham, Daniel; Bressel, Mathias; Tongs, David; Rolfo, Aldo; Styles, Colin; Gill, Suki; Kron, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: An e-Learning programme appeared useful for providing training and information regarding a multi-centre image guided radiotherapy trial. The aim of this study is to demonstrate the utility of this e-Learning programme. Materials and methods: Modules were created on relevant pelvic anatomy, Cone Beam CT soft tissue recognition and trial details. Radiation therapist participants’ knowledge and confidence were evaluated before, at the end of, and after at least 6 weeks of e-Learning (long term). Results: One hundred and eighty-five participants were recruited from 12 centres, with 118 in the first, and 67 in the second cohort. One hundred and forty-six participants had two tests (pre and post e-Learning) and 39 of these had three tests (pre, post, and long term). There was an increase confidence after completion of modules (p < 0.001). The first cohort pre scores increased from 67 ± 11 to 79 ± 8 (p < 0.001) post. The long term same question score was 73 ± 14 (p = 0.025, comparing to pre-test), and different questions’ score was 77 ± 13 (p = 0.014). In the second cohort, pre-test scores were 64 ± 10, post-test same question score 78 ± 9 (p < 0.001) and different questions’ score 81 ± 11 (p < 0.001). Conclusions: e-Learning for a multi-centre clinical trial was feasible and improved confidence and knowledge

  4. The utility of e-Learning to support training for a multicentre bladder online adaptive radiotherapy trial (TROG 10.01-BOLART).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroudi, Farshad; Pham, Daniel; Bressel, Mathias; Tongs, David; Rolfo, Aldo; Styles, Colin; Gill, Suki; Kron, Tomas

    2013-10-01

    An e-Learning programme appeared useful for providing training and information regarding a multi-centre image guided radiotherapy trial. The aim of this study is to demonstrate the utility of this e-Learning programme. Modules were created on relevant pelvic anatomy, Cone Beam CT soft tissue recognition and trial details. Radiation therapist participants' knowledge and confidence were evaluated before, at the end of, and after at least 6 weeks of e-Learning (long term). One hundred and eighty-five participants were recruited from 12 centres, with 118 in the first, and 67 in the second cohort. One hundred and forty-six participants had two tests (pre and post e-Learning) and 39 of these had three tests (pre, post, and long term). There was an increase confidence after completion of modules (pLearning for a multi-centre clinical trial was feasible and improved confidence and knowledge. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Radiotherapy of bronchogenic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heilmann, H.P.

    1982-01-01

    Radiotherapy of branchogenic carcinoma comprises; palliative treatment, postoperative or pre-operative radiotherapy, radiotherapy as part of a combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy of small cell carcinoma and curative radiotherapy of non-operable non-small cell carcinoma. Atelectasis and obstruction are indications for palliative radiotherapy. Postoperative radiotherapy is given only in cases of incomplete resection or mediastinal metastases. In the treatment of small cell carcinoma by combined irradiation and chemotherapy the mediastinum and primary tumour are irradiated, generally after chemotherapy, and the C.N.S. receives prophylactic radiotherapy. Curative radiotherapy is indicated in cases of non-operable small cell carcinoma. Irradiation with doses of 60-70 Gy produced 5-years-survival rates of 10-14% in cases classified as T 1 -T 2 N 0 M 0 . (orig.) [de

  6. Learn More Breathe Better

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-11-16

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a serious lung disease that makes breathing very difficult and can affect your quality of life. Learn the causes of COPD and what you can do to prevent it.  Created: 11/16/2011 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Adult and Community Health (NCCDPHP, DACH).   Date Released: 11/16/2011.

  7. [Radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maingon, P; Blanchard, P; Bidault, F; Calmels, L

    2016-09-01

    Nasapharyngeal carcinoma is a rare disease. Oftenly, the diagnostic is made for advanced disease. Localized tumors, T1 or T2 NO observed a good prognosis and are locally controlled in more than 90 % of the cases by radiotherapy alone. The standard treatment of locally advanced disease is combined chemoradiation. A special vigilance of fast decrease of the volume of the pathological lymph nodes, sometimes associated to loss of weight might indicate an adaptive dosimetric revision. The treatment of recurrent disease is of great importance. Surgical indications are limited but should be discussed in multidisciplinary tumor board when possible. Surgical nodal sampling has to be proposed for nodal recurrence as well as reirradiation, which could be indicated according to the technical issues. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  8. Submarines, spacecraft and exhaled breath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleil, Joachim D; Hansel, Armin

    2012-03-01

    -term plans for their analytical tools, in this case to take breath analysis away from the large complex instruments in the laboratory to the outpatient clinic and eventually to the home care market. Similarly, for environmental and public health research, it is always desirable to have easily operated and deployable instruments that can be taken to the field, rather than bringing numerous subjects to a central laboratory. Bio-monitoring. Although the SAMAP community is much more focused on air rather than breath measurement, this is changing because of the realization that longer deployment times (on submarines and spacecraft) will affect more than just acute health. To monitor longer-term health outcomes, there is a great deal of commonality between our respective research communities. Any instrument that monitors for contaminants in environmental air could certainly be adapted to breath analysis for assessing exposures and health state. Instruments that simultaneously provide rapid response and high specificity to a broad range of analytes, such as those based on optical spectroscopy and mass spectrometry, are particularly valued. The path forward We found the SAMAP meeting to be a worthwhile experience, largely from the discovery that another high-tech community exists with similar needs as the IABR community. Some collaboration could be fruitful for us; we suggest that the IABR community stay in contact with SAMAP in the future and attempt to attend each other's meetings if possible. SAMAP meetings tend to run on a two year cycle and so the next one has not yet been announced. We will let the IABR community know when the next meeting is scheduled, and will certainly make the SAMAP people aware of IABR meetings and the Journal of Breath Research. This article has been subjected to EPA Agency review and approved for publication. Statements do not necessarily reflect official Agency policy.

  9. The deep inspiration breath hold technique using Abches reduces cardiac dose in patients undergoing left-sided breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ha Yoon; Chang, Jee Suk; Lee, Ik Jae; Park, Kwang Woo; Kim, Yong Bae; Suh, Chang Ok; Kim, Jun Won; Keum, Ki Chang

    2013-01-01

    We explored whether the deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) technique using Abches during left-sided breast irradiation was effective for minimizing the amount of radiation to the heart and lung compared to free breathing (FB). Between February and July 2012, a total of 25 patients with left-sided breast cancer underwent two computed tomography scans each with the DIBH using Abches and using FB after breast-conserving surgery. The scans were retrospectively replanned using standardized criteria for the purpose of this study. The DIBH plans for each patient were compared with FB plans using dosimetric parameters. All patients were successfully treated with the DIBH technique using Abches. Significant differences were found between the DIBH and FB plans for mean heart dose (2.52 vs. 4.53 Gy), heart V30 (16.48 vs. 45.13 cm 3 ), V20 (21.35 vs. 54.55 cm 3 ), mean left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) dose (16.01 vs. 26.26 Gy, all p 3 of the LAD (41.65 vs. 47.27 Gy, p = 0.017). The mean left lung dose (7.53 vs. 8.03 Gy, p = 0.073) and lung V20 (14.63% vs. 15.72%, p 0.060) of DIBH using Abches were not different significantly compared with FB. We report that the use of a DIBH technique using Abches in breathing adapted radiotherapy for left-sided breast cancer is easily feasible in daily practice and significantly reduces the radiation doses to the heart and LAD, therefore potentially reducing cardiac risk.

  10. Metabolic and thyroidal response in air-breathing perch (Anabus testudineus) to water-borne kerosene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peter, V.S.; Joshua, E.K.; Wendelaar Bonga, S.E.; Peter, M.C.S.

    2007-01-01

    To address the physiological compensatory adaptations in air-breathing fish to a toxicant, we studied the metabolite pattern, serum and liver enzymes and thyroidal response in a tropical air-breathing perch, Anabas testudineus (kept at 30 _C in a 12-h L:D cycle) after exposing the fish for 48 h to

  11. Preliminary report on a breathing coaching and assessment system for use by patients at home

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, C.D.; Kron, T.; Winton, J.R.S.; Rothwell, R.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Respiratory-gated radiotherapy requires consistent breathing. Therefore, we developed a system that will assess breathing consistency and allow patients to train themselves at home. Real-time feedback is to be provided visually to patients against a reference breathing track derived from their own breathing pattern. The system would need to generate the reference track and to use this reference track for coaching. The system should be simple, robust and affordable, without complex setup. Results The system uses a net book with a USB connected data acquisition module (DAQ). The patient's breathing is sampled by the DAQ, measuring intra-nasal pressure through nasal prongs. Software was written in collaboration with the Victorian eResearch Strategic Initiative (YERSi). The system is used to collect a patient reference breathing track. This track is processed to generate a 'golden breathing cycle' (GBC), normalised in both amplitude and duration, containing the shape of the breathing cycle. After training, the patient takes the system home for a number of sessions of coaching and assessment. In coaching mode the patient is asked to maintain a graphic representation of their current state of breathing in close correlation to the golden breathing cycle as it moves across the screen. Displayed GBC amplitude and duration respond dynamically to the patient's breathing rhythm. Statistics are collected measuring the patient's ability to conform to the GBC and may be used to decide suitability for gated therapy. Conclusion The DAQ hardware is completed, and software is approaching completion. Sample data has been collected from volunteers.

  12. Changes in breathing while listening to read speech: the effect of reader and speech mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochet-Capellan, Amélie; Fuchs, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    The current paper extends previous work on breathing during speech perception and provides supplementary material regarding the hypothesis that adaptation of breathing during perception “could be a basis for understanding and imitating actions performed by other people” (Paccalin and Jeannerod, 2000). The experiments were designed to test how the differences in reader breathing due to speaker-specific characteristics, or differences induced by changes in loudness level or speech rate influence the listener breathing. Two readers (a male and a female) were pre-recorded while reading short texts with normal and then loud speech (both readers) or slow speech (female only). These recordings were then played back to 48 female listeners. The movements of the rib cage and abdomen were analyzed for both the readers and the listeners. Breathing profiles were characterized by the movement expansion due to inhalation and the duration of the breathing cycle. We found that both loudness and speech rate affected each reader’s breathing in different ways. Listener breathing was different when listening to the male or the female reader and to the different speech modes. However, differences in listener breathing were not systematically in the same direction as reader differences. The breathing of listeners was strongly sensitive to the order of presentation of speech mode and displayed some adaptation in the time course of the experiment in some conditions. In contrast to specific alignments of breathing previously observed in face-to-face dialog, no clear evidence for a listener–reader alignment in breathing was found in this purely auditory speech perception task. The results and methods are relevant to the question of the involvement of physiological adaptations in speech perception and to the basic mechanisms of listener–speaker coupling. PMID:24367344

  13. 42 CFR 84.81 - Compressed breathing gas and liquefied breathing gas containers; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compressed breathing gas and liquefied breathing... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.81 Compressed breathing gas and liquefied breathing gas containers; minimum requirements. (a) Compressed breathing gas and...

  14. A Study on Stereoscopic X-ray Imaging Data Set on the Accuracy of Real-Time Tumor Tracking in External Beam Radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbanzadeh, Leila

    2016-01-01

    At external beam radiotherapy, stereoscopic X-ray imaging system is responsible as tumor motion information provider. This system takes X-ray images intermittently from tumor position (1) at pretreatment step to provide training data set for model construction and (2) during treatment to control the accuracy of correlation model performance. In this work, we investigated the effect of imaging data points provided by this system on treatment quality. Because some information is still lacking about (1) the number of imaging data points, (2) shooting time for capturing each data point, and also (3) additional imaging dose delivered by this system. These 3 issues were comprehensively assessed at (1) pretreatment step while training data set is gathered for prediction model construction and (2) during treatment while model is tested and reconstructed using new arrival data points. A group of real patients treated with CyberKnife Synchrony module was chosen in this work, and an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system was considered as consistent correlation model. Results show that a proper model can be constructed while the number of imaging data points is highly enough to represent a good pattern of breathing cycles. Moreover, a trade-off between the number of imaging data points and additional imaging dose is considered in this study. Since breathing phenomena are highly variable at different patients, the time for taking some of imaging data points is very important, while their absence at that critical time may yield wrong tumor tracking. In contrast, the sensitivity of another category of imaging data points is not high, while breathing is normal and in the control range. Therefore, an adaptive supervision on the implementation of stereoscopic X-ray imaging is proposed to intelligently accomplish shooting process, based on breathing motion variations. PMID:27037300

  15. Implantable oxygen microelectrode suitable for medium-term investigations of post-surgical tissue hypoxia and changes in tumor tissue oxygenation produced by radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, T.R.; Johnson, R.J.; Krishnamsetty, C.B.; Sako, K.; Karakousis, C.; Wojtas, F.

    1980-01-01

    Teflon-covered platinum oxygen probes were used to monitor tissue oxygen levels in post-surgical cancer patients and those treated with radiotherapy. Progressive wound healing was usually accompanied by a decrease in tissue pO2. Radiotherapy produced a slight increase in pO2 while hyperthermia effected a significant increase in the oxygen level during 100% oxygen breathing

  16. SU-E-J-102: Performance Variations Among Clinically Available Deformable Image Registration Tools in Adaptive Radiotherapy: How Should We Evaluate and Interpret the Result?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nie, K; Pouliot, J; Smith, E; Chuang, C

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance variations in commercial deformable image registration (DIR) tools for adaptive radiation therapy. Methods: Representative plans from three different anatomical sites, prostate, head-and-neck (HN) and cranial spinal irradiation (CSI) with L-spine boost, were included. Computerized deformed CT images were first generated using virtual DIR QA software (ImSimQA) for each case. The corresponding transformations served as the “reference”. Three commercial software packages MIMVista v5.5 and MIMMaestro v6.0, VelocityAI v2.6.2, and OnQ rts v2.1.15 were tested. The warped contours and doses were compared with the “reference” and among each other. Results: The performance in transferring contours was comparable among all three tools with an average DICE coefficient of 0.81 for all the organs. However, the performance of dose warping accuracy appeared to rely on the evaluation end points. Volume based DVH comparisons were not sensitive enough to illustrate all the detailed variations while isodose assessment on a slice-by-slice basis could be tedious. Point-based evaluation was over-sensitive by having up to 30% hot/cold-spot differences. If adapting the 3mm/3% gamma analysis into the evaluation of dose warping, all three algorithms presented a reasonable level of equivalency. One algorithm had over 10% of the voxels not meeting this criterion for the HN case while another showed disagreement for the CSI case. Conclusion: Overall, our results demonstrated that evaluation based only on the performance of contour transformation could not guarantee the accuracy in dose warping. However, the performance of dose warping accuracy relied on the evaluation methodologies. Nevertheless, as more DIR tools are available for clinical use, the performance could vary at certain degrees. A standard quality assurance criterion with clinical meaning should be established for DIR QA, similar to the gamma index concept, in the near future

  17. On-line MRI guidance for Radiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crijns, S.P.M.

    2013-01-01

    Image-guided radiotherapy has the potential to increase success of treatment by decreasing uncertainties concerning tumour position and shape. MRI is the modality of choice when it comes to imaging for tumour delineation and characterisation, set-up correction, treatment plan adaptation, response

  18. Radiotherapy for Hodgkin lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Specht, Lena [Rigshospitalet Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). Depts. of Oncology and Haematology; Yahalom, Joachim (eds.) [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer, New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2011-07-01

    This book deals in detail with all aspects of the best practice in modern radiotherapy for Hodgkin lymphoma. It provides the background and rationale for the inclusion of radiotherapy in today's combined-modality approach, including special clinical situations such as Hodgkin lymphoma in children, in the pregnant patient, and in the elderly. Radiotherapy planning using state-of-the-art imaging, target definition, planning software, and treatment equipment is expounded in detail. Acute and long-term side effects of radiotherapy are analyzed, and the implications for modern radiotherapy approaches in Hodgkin lymphomas are explained. (orig.)

  19. Radiotherapy for Hodgkin lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Specht, Lena; Yahalom, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    This book deals in detail with all aspects of the best practice in modern radiotherapy for Hodgkin lymphoma. It provides the background and rationale for the inclusion of radiotherapy in today's combined-modality approach, including special clinical situations such as Hodgkin lymphoma in children, in the pregnant patient, and in the elderly. Radiotherapy planning using state-of-the-art imaging, target definition, planning software, and treatment equipment is expounded in detail. Acute and long-term side effects of radiotherapy are analyzed, and the implications for modern radiotherapy approaches in Hodgkin lymphomas are explained. (orig.)

  20. MO-FG-BRA-02: A Feasibility Study of Integrating Breathing Audio Signal with Surface Surrogates for Respiratory Motion Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei, Y; Zhu, X; Zheng, D; Li, S; Ma, R; Zhang, M; Fan, Q; Wang, X; Verma, V; Zhou, S; Tang, X

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Tracking the surrogate placed on patient skin surface sometimes leads to problematic signals for certain patients, such as shallow breathers. This in turn impairs the 4D CT image quality and dosimetric accuracy. In this pilot study, we explored the feasibility of monitoring human breathing motion by integrating breathing sound signal with surface surrogates. Methods: The breathing sound signals were acquired though a microphone attached adjacently to volunteer’s nostrils, and breathing curve were analyzed using a low pass filter. Simultaneously, the Real-time Position Management™ (RPM) system from Varian were employed on a volunteer to monitor respiratory motion including both shallow and deep breath modes. The similar experiment was performed by using Calypso system, and three beacons taped on volunteer abdominal region to capture breath motion. The period of each breathing curves were calculated with autocorrelation functions. The coherence and consistency between breathing signals using different acquisition methods were examined. Results: Clear breathing patterns were revealed by the sound signal which was coherent with the signal obtained from both the RPM system and Calypso system. For shallow breathing, the periods of breathing cycle were 3.00±0.19 sec (sound) and 3.00±0.21 sec (RPM); For deep breathing, the periods were 3.49± 0.11 sec (sound) and 3.49±0.12 sec (RPM). Compared with 4.54±0.66 sec period recorded by the calypso system, the sound measured 4.64±0.54 sec. The additional signal from sound could be supplement to the surface monitoring, and provide new parameters to model the hysteresis lung motion. Conclusion: Our preliminary study shows that the breathing sound signal can provide a comparable way as the RPM system to evaluate the respiratory motion. It’s instantaneous and robust characteristics facilitate it possibly to be a either independently or as auxiliary methods to manage respiratory motion in radiotherapy.

  1. FMWC Radar for Breath Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suhr, Lau Frejstrup; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso; Vegas Olmos, Juan José

    breathing through walls. Other remote breath tracking systems has been presented that are based on the Ultra-wideband radar technique. However, these systems have two drawbacks. Firstly, they penetrate walls. It is therefore harder to contain the emitted radiation and they could be used for unsolicited...

  2. Patient's breath controls comfort devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, M.; Carpenter, B.; Nichols, C. D.

    1972-01-01

    Patient assist system for totally disabled persons was developed which permits a person, so paralyzed as to be unable to move, to activate by breathing, a call system to summon assistance, turn the page of a book, ajust his bed, or do any one of a number of other things. System consists of patient assist control and breath actuated switch.

  3. Investigation into breath meditation: Phenomenological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This integral heuristic phenomenological investigation records participants' experiences of a single session of breath meditation with special reference to psychotherapy and sport psychology. There were 8 participants, 4 men and 4 women, with mean age of 45 years and age range from 31 to 62 years. Various breathing ...

  4. Usefulness of Guided Breathing for Dose Rate-Regulated Tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han-Oh, Sarah; Yi, Byong Yong; Berman, Barry L.; Lerma, Fritz; Yu, Cedric

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the usefulness of guided breathing for dose rate-regulated tracking (DRRT), a new technique to compensate for intrafraction tumor motion. Methods and Materials: DRRT uses a preprogrammed multileaf collimator sequence that tracks the tumor motion derived from four-dimensional computed tomography and the corresponding breathing signals measured before treatment. Because the multileaf collimator speed can be controlled by adjusting the dose rate, the multileaf collimator positions are adjusted in real time during treatment by dose rate regulation, thereby maintaining synchrony with the tumor motion. DRRT treatment was simulated with free, audio-guided, and audiovisual-guided breathing signals acquired from 23 lung cancer patients. The tracking error and duty cycle for each patient were determined as a function of the system time delay (range, 0-1.0 s). Results: The tracking error and duty cycle averaged for all 23 patients was 1.9 ± 0.8 mm and 92% ± 5%, 1.9 ± 1.0 mm and 93% ± 6%, and 1.8 ± 0.7 mm and 92% ± 6% for the free, audio-guided, and audiovisual-guided breathing, respectively, for a time delay of 0.35 s. The small differences in both the tracking error and the duty cycle with guided breathing were not statistically significant. Conclusion: DRRT by its nature adapts well to variations in breathing frequency, which is also the motivation for guided-breathing techniques. Because of this redundancy, guided breathing does not result in significant improvements for either the tracking error or the duty cycle when DRRT is used for real-time tumor tracking

  5. Proton minibeam radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girst, Stefanie

    2016-03-08

    The risk of developing adverse side effects in the normal tissue after radiotherapy is often limiting for the dose that can be applied to the tumor. Proton minibeam radiotherapy, a spatially fractionated radiotherapy method using sub-millimeter proton beams, similar to grid therapy or microbeam radiation radiotherapy (MRT) using X-rays, has recently been invented at the ion microprobe SNAKE in Munich. The aim of this new concept is to minimize normal tissue injuries in the entrance channel and especially in the skin by irradiating only a small percentage of the cells in the total irradiation field, while maintaining tumor control via a homogeneous dose in the tumor, just like in conventional broad beam radiotherapy. This can be achieved by optimizing minibeam sizes and distances according to the prevailing tumor size and depth such that after widening of the minibeams due to proton interactions in the tissue, the overlapping minibeams produce a homogeneous dose distribution throughout the tumor. The aim of this work was to elucidate the prospects of minibeam radiation therapy compared to conventional homogeneous broad beam radiotherapy in theory and in experimental studies at the ion microprobe SNAKE. Treatment plans for model tumors of different sizes and depths were created using the planning software LAPCERR, to elaborate suitable minibeam sizes and distances for the individual tumors. Radiotherapy-relevant inter-beam distances required to obtain a homogeneous dose in the target volume were found to be in the millimeter range. First experiments using proton minibeams of only 10 μm and 50 μm size (termed microchannels in the corresponding publication Zlobinskaya et al. 2013) and therapy-conform larger dimensions of 100 μm and 180 μm were performed in the artificial human in-vitro skin model EpiDermFT trademark (MatTek). The corresponding inter-beam distances were 500 μm, 1mm and 1.8 mm, respectively, leading to irradiation of only a few percent of the cells

  6. Lung volume reproducibility under ABC control and self-sustained breath-holding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaza, Evangelia; Dunlop, Alex; Panek, Rafal; Collins, David J; Orton, Matthew; Symonds-Tayler, Richard; McQuaid, Dualta; Scurr, Erica; Hansen, Vibeke; Leach, Martin O

    2017-03-01

    An Active Breathing Coordinator (ABC) can be employed to induce breath-holds during CT imaging and radiotherapy of lung, breast and liver cancer, and recently during lung cancer MRI. The apparatus measures and controls respiratory volume, hence subject lung volume reproducibility is its principal measure of effectiveness. To assess ABC control quality, the intra-session reproducibility of ABC-induced lung volumes was evaluated and compared with that reached by applying the clinical standard of operator-guided self-sustained breath-holds on healthy volunteers during MRI. Inter-session reproducibility was investigated by repeating ABC-controlled breath-holds on a second visit. Additionally, lung volume agreement with ABC devices used with different imaging modalities in the same institution (MR, CT), or for a breast trial treatment, was assessed. Lung volumes were derived from three-dimensional (3D) T1-weighted MRI datasets by three observers employing semiautomatic lung delineation on a radiotherapy treatment planning system. Inter-observer variability was less than 6% of the delineated lung volumes. Lung volume agreement between the different conditions over all subjects was investigated using descriptive statistics. The ABC equipment dedicated for MR application exhibited good intra-session and inter-session lung volume reproducibility (1.8% and 3% lung volume variability on average, respectively). MR-assessed lung volumes were similar using different ABC equipment dedicated to MR, CT, or breast radiotherapy. Overall, lung volumes controlled by the same or different ABC devices agreed better than with self-controlled breath-holds, as suggested by the average ABC variation of 1.8% of the measured lung volumes (99 mL), compared to the 4.1% (226 mL) variability observed on average with self-sustained breath-holding. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in

  7. The feasibility of utilizing pseudo CT-data for online MRI based treatment plan adaptation for a stereotactic radiotherapy treatment of spinal bone metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoogcarspel, Stan J; Van der Velden, Joanne M; Lagendijk, Jan J W; Van Vulpen, Marco; Raaymakers, Bas W

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate what pseudo-CT (pCT) strategy is sufficient for online MRI based treatment plan adaptation of a stereotactic treatment for spinal bone metastases. For this purpose, the dosimetric accuracy of five increasingly complex pCT strategies was evaluated using the planning CT data of 20 patients suffering from spinal metastases. For each pCT, a treatment plan was developed and simulated on both the pCT and the original CT data of the patient. The two resulting dose distributions were compared using gamma analysis of 2%/2 mm. In this paper, a Gamma Pass Rate (GPR) of ⩾95% within the Target Volume (TV) was considered clinically acceptable. We additionally demonstrated in this paper the automatic generation of each investigated pCT strategy with the use of dedicated MRI data complemented with pre-treatment CT data of a patient in treatment position. The dosimetric accuracy of a pCT increases when additional bulk densities are utilized for a pCT. However, the dosimetric accuracy of even the most complex ‘bulk density’ pCT strategy used in this study had an average GPR of only 78% within the TV. However, if information on the heterogeneous electron density distribution within the affected vertebral body was available, a clinically acceptable 99% mean GPR was observed. All pCTs could successfully be generated using the MRI data in combination with the CT data of a patient in treatment position. The results presented in this study show that a simple ‘bulk density’ pseudo-CT strategy is not feasible for online MRI based treatment plan adaptation for spinal bone metastases. However, a clinically acceptable result is generated if the information on the heterogeneous electron density (ED) distribution within the affected vertebral bone is available. Therefore, any pCT strategy for this tumor site should include a method which can estimate the heterogeneous ED of the affected vertebral bone. (paper)

  8. Breath of hospitality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Škof, Lenart

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we outline the possibilities of an ethic of care based on our self-affection and subjectivity in the ethical spaces between-two. In this we first refer to three Irigarayan concepts - breath, silence and listening from the third phase of her philosophy, and discuss them within the methodological framework of an ethics of intersubjectivity and interiority. Together with attentiveness, we analyse them as four categories of our ethical becoming. Furthermore, we argue that self-affection is based on our inchoate receptivity for the needs of the other(s) and is thus dialectical in its character. In this we critically confront some epistemological views of our ethical becoming. We wind up this paper with a proposal for an ethics towards two autonomous subjects, based on care and our shared ethical becoming - both as signs of our deepest hospitality towards the other.

  9. SU-F-T-449: Dosimetric Comparison of Acuros XB, Adaptive Convolve in Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uehara, R [National Cancer Center Hospital East, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan); Tachibana, H [National Cancer Center, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: There have been several publications focusing on dose calculation in lung for a new dose calculation algorithm of Acuros XB (AXB). AXB could contribute to dose calculation for high-density media for bone and dental prosthesis rather than in lung. We compared the dosimetric performance of AXB, Adaptive Convolve (AC) in head and neck IMRT plans. Methods: In a phantom study, the difference in depth profile between AXB and AC was evaluated using Kodak EDR2 film sandwiched with tough water phantoms. 6 MV x-ray using the TrueBeam was irradiated. In a patient study, 20 head and neck IMRT plans had been clinically approved in Pinnacle3 and were transferred to Eclipse. Dose distribution was recalculated using AXB in Eclipse while maintaining AC-calculated monitor units and MLC sequence planned in Pinnacle. Subsequently, both the dose-volumetric data obtained using the two different calculation algorithms were compared. Results: The results in the phantom evaluation for the shallow area ahead of the build-up region shows over-dose for AXB and under-dose for AC, respectively. In the patient plans, AXB shows more hot spots especially around the high-density media than AC in terms of PTV (Max difference: 4.0%) and OAR (Max. difference: 1.9%). Compared to AC, there were larger dose deviations in steep dose gradient region and higher skin-dose. Conclusion: In head and neck IMRT plans, AXB and AC show different dosimetric performance for the regions inside the target volume around high-density media, steep dose gradient regions and skin-surface. There are limitations in skin-dose and complex anatomic condition using even inhomogeneous anthropomorphic phantom Thus, there is the potential for an increase of hot-spot in AXB, and an underestimation of dose in substance boundaries and skin regions in AC.

  10. Exhaled breath condensate collection for nitrite dosage: a safe and low cost adaptation Coleta do condensado do ar exalado pulmonar para a dosagem de nitrito: Uma adaptação segura e barata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graziela Saraiva Reis

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Standardization of a simple and low cost technique of exhaled breath condensate (EBC collection to measure nitrite. METHODS: Two devices were mounted in polystyrene boxes filled either with crushed ice/salt crystals or dry ice/crushed ice. Blood samples were stored at -70º C for posterior nitrite dosages by chemiluminescence and the Griess reaction. RESULTS: a The use of crushed ice/dry ice or salt revealed sufficient EBC room air collection, but was not efficient for patients under ventilation support; b the method using crushed ice/salt collected greater EBC volumes, but the nitrite concentrations were not proportional to the volume collected; c The EBC nitrite values were higher in the surgical group using both methods; d In the surgical group the nasal clip use diminished the EBC nitrite concentrations in both methods. CONCLUSIONS: The exhaled breath condensate (EBC methodology collection was efficient on room air breathing. Either cooling methods provided successful EBC collections showing that it is possible to diminish costs, and, amongst the two used methods, the one using crushed ice/salt crystals revealed better efficiency compared to the dry ice method.OBJETIVO: Padronizar técnica simples e barata de coleta do condensado do ar exalado pulmonar (CEP para medir nitrito. MÉTODOS: Dois dispositivos foram montados em caixas de isopor e preenchidos com gelo picado/sal grosso ou gelo picado/gelo seco. Amostras de sangue foram armazenadas a -70º C para dosagem de nitrito por quimiluminescência e pela reação de Griess. RESULTADOS: a a utilização de gelo picado/gelo seco ou sal foi eficiente para a coleta em respiração espontânea, mas ineficiente durante ventilação mecânica; b o método gelo picado/sal coletou volumes maiores, sem aumento proporcional do nitrito; c os valores do nitrito foram mais elevados no grupo cirúrgico utilizando os dois métodos; d no grupo cirúrgico com clipe nasal ocorreu diminuição do

  11. Australian survey on current practices for breast radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dundas, Kylie L; Pogson, Elise M; Batumalai, Vikneswary; Boxer, Miriam M; Yap, Mei Ling; Delaney, Geoff P; Metcalfe, Peter; Holloway, Lois

    2015-12-01

    Detailed, published surveys specific to Australian breast radiotherapy practice were last conducted in 2002. More recent international surveys specific to breast radiotherapy practice include a European survey conducted in 2008/2009 and a Spanish survey conducted in 2009. Radiotherapy techniques continue to evolve, and the utilisation of new techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), is increasing. This survey aimed to determine current breast radiotherapy practices across Australia. An online survey was completed by 50 of the 69 Australian radiation therapy treatment centres. Supine tangential beam whole breast irradiation remains the standard of care for breast radiotherapy in Australia. A growing number of institutions are exploring prone positioning and IMRT utilisation. This survey demonstrated a wide variation in the benchmarks used to limit and report organ at risk doses, prescribed dose regimen, and post-mastectomy bolus practices. This survey also indicated, when compared with international literature, that there may be less interest in or uptake of external beam partial breast irradiation, prone positioning, simultaneous integrated boost and breath hold techniques. These are areas where further review and research may be warranted to ensure Australian patients are receiving the best care possible based on the best evidence available. This survey provides insight into the current radiotherapy practice for breast cancer in Australia. © 2015 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  12. Australian survey on current practices for breast radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dundas, Kylie L.; Pogson, Elise M.; Metcalfe, Peter; Batumalai, Vikneswary; Boxer, Mirian M.; Yap, Mei LIng; Delaney, Geoff P.; Holloway, Lois

    2015-01-01

    Detailed, published surveys specific to Australian breast radiotherapy practice were last conducted in 2002. More recent international surveys specific to breast radiotherapy practice include a European survey conducted in 2008/2009 and a Spanish survey conducted in 2009. Radiotherapy techniques continue to evolve, and the utilisation of new techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), is increasing. This survey aimed to determine current breast radiotherapy practices across Australia. An online survey was completed by 50 of the 69 Australian radiation therapy treatment centres. Supine tangential beam whole breast irradiation remains the standard of care for breast radiotherapy in Australia. A growing number of institutions are exploring prone positioning and IMRT utilisation. This survey demonstrated a wide variation in the benchmarks used to limit and report organ at risk doses, prescribed dose regimen, and post-mastectomy bolus practices. This survey also indicated, when compared with international literature, that there may be less interest in or uptake of external beam partial breast irradiation, prone positioning, simultaneous integrated boost and breath hold techniques. These are areas where further review and research may be warranted to ensure Australian patients are receiving the best care possible based on the best evidence available. This survey provides insight into the current radiotherapy practice for breast cancer in Australia.

  13. Cardiac dose sparing and avoidance techniques in breast cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Chirag; Badiyan, Shahed; Berry, Sameer; Khan, Atif J.; Goyal, Sharad; Schulte, Kevin; Nanavati, Anish; Lynch, Melanie; Vicini, Frank A.

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer radiotherapy represents an essential component in the overall management of both early stage and locally advanced breast cancer. As the number of breast cancer survivors has increased, chronic sequelae of breast cancer radiotherapy become more important. While recently published data suggest a potential for an increase in cardiac events with radiotherapy, these studies do not consider the impact of newer radiotherapy techniques commonly utilized. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to evaluate cardiac dose sparing techniques in breast cancer radiotherapy. Current options for cardiac protection/avoidance include (1) maneuvers that displace the heart from the field such as coordinating the breathing cycle or through prone patient positioning, (2) technological advances such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or proton beam therapy (PBT), and (3) techniques that treat a smaller volume around the lumpectomy cavity such as accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI), or intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT). While these techniques have shown promise dosimetrically, limited data on late cardiac events exist due to the difficulties of long-term follow up. Future studies are required to validate the efficacy of cardiac dose sparing techniques and may use surrogates for cardiac events such as biomarkers or perfusion imaging

  14. Comparison between audio-only and audiovisual biofeedback for regulating patients' respiration during four-dimensional radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jesang; Choi, Ji Hoon; Ma, Sun Young; Jeung, Tae Sig; Lim, Sangwook

    2015-09-01

    To compare audio-only biofeedback to conventional audiovisual biofeedback for regulating patients' respiration during four-dimensional radiotherapy, limiting damage to healthy surrounding tissues caused by organ movement. Six healthy volunteers were assisted by audiovisual or audio-only biofeedback systems to regulate their respirations. Volunteers breathed through a mask developed for this study by following computer-generated guiding curves displayed on a screen, combined with instructional sounds. They then performed breathing following instructional sounds only. The guiding signals and the volunteers' respiratory signals were logged at 20 samples per second. The standard deviations between the guiding and respiratory curves for the audiovisual and audio-only biofeedback systems were 21.55% and 23.19%, respectively; the average correlation coefficients were 0.9778 and 0.9756, respectively. The regularities between audiovisual and audio-only biofeedback for six volunteers' respirations were same statistically from the paired t-test. The difference between the audiovisual and audio-only biofeedback methods was not significant. Audio-only biofeedback has many advantages, as patients do not require a mask and can quickly adapt to this method in the clinic.

  15. Practice It: Deep Conscious Breathing Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    No time to sit and breathe? No problem; take your breathing practice with you! Deep conscious breathing can also be done with the eyes open wherever you happen to be—simply pause and take two to three full deep breaths (inhale deeply and exhale completely).

  16. Quality Assurance in Radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckenzie, Alan

    A common feature of the Radiotherapy Centres where there have been major accidents involving incorrect radiotherapy treatment is that they did not operate good Quality Assurance systems. A Quality Assurance system is sometimes called a Quality Management system, and it is designed to give assurance that quality standards are being met. One of the "spin offs" from operating a Quality Management system is that it reduces the likelihood of a radiotherapy accident. A detailed account of how to set up a quality system in radiotherapy has been given in an ESTRO booklet.2

  17. Radiotherapy in small countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Michael B; Zubizarreta, Eduardo H; Polo Rubio, J Alfredo

    2017-10-01

    To examine the availability of radiotherapy in small countries. A small country was defined as a country with a population less than one million persons. The economic status of each country was defined using the World Bank Classification. The number of cancers in each country was obtained from GLOBOCAN 2012. The number of cancer cases with an indication or radiotherapy was calculated using the CCORE model. There were 41 countries with a population of under 1 million; 15 were classified as High Income, 15 Upper Middle Income, 10 Lower Middle Income and one Low Income. 28 countries were islands. Populations ranged from 799 (Holy See) to 886450 (Fiji) and the total number of cancer cases occurring in small countries was 21,043 (range by country from 4 to 2476). Overall the total number of radiotherapy cases in small countries was 10982 (range by country from 2 to 1239). Radiotherapy was available in all HIC islands with 80 or more new cases of cancer in 2012 but was not available in any LMIC island. Fiji was the only LMIC island with a large radiotherapy caseload. Similar caseloads in non-island LMIC all had radiotherapy services. Most non-island HIC did not have radiotherapy services presumably because of the easy access to radiotherapy in neighbouring countries. There are no radiotherapy services in any LMIC islands. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Visualizing Breath using Digital Holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobson, P. R.; Reid, I. D.; Wilton, J. B.

    2013-02-01

    Artist Jayne Wilton and physicists Peter Hobson and Ivan Reid of Brunel University are collaborating at Brunel University on a project which aims to use a range of techniques to make visible the normally invisible dynamics of the breath and the verbal and non-verbal communication it facilitates. The breath is a source of a wide range of chemical, auditory and physical exchanges with the direct environment. Digital Holography is being investigated to enable a visually stimulating articulation of the physical trajectory of the breath as it leaves the mouth. Initial findings of this research are presented. Real time digital hologram replay allows the audience to move through holographs of breath-born particles.

  19. Blue breath holding is benign.

    OpenAIRE

    Stephenson, J B

    1991-01-01

    In their recent publication in this journal, Southall et al described typical cyanotic breath holding spells, both in otherwise healthy children and in those with brainstem lesions and other malformations. Their suggestions regarding possible autonomic disturbances may require further study, but they have adduced no scientific evidence to contradict the accepted view that in the intact child blue breath holding spells are benign. Those families in which an infant suffers an 'apparently life t...

  20. Automatization in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schraub, S.; Dutou, L.; Bernard, D.; Koechlin, M.; Beer-Gabel, J.

    1978-01-01

    Data-processing in external radiotherapy has to be adapted to each local situation, taking into account the patients to be treated, the irradiation equipment, the data-processing centers available locally, regionally, and nationally, and the rentability of the data-processing system required. It should be recalled that most dosimetric methods used today can be treated manually, and the question of rentability has to be kept in mind when deciding to buy a data-processing system. The radiotherapist should, therefore, prepare a list of costs for each situation, and verify the validity of each programme proposed by the supplier. It is difficult to make a definite choice between the presently available systems. The radiotherapist has to choose in relation to his activity, his availability and the systems available to him. It can sometimes be more advantageous to have a terminal linked to a large computer, rather than to readapt a series of programmes for a data-processing system available locally: many such solutions, though original, cannot be 'exported'. It should be recalled that a large number of dosimetries can be obtained manually, and on the rare occasions when the aid of a computer is essential, the assistance of better equipped neighbouring centers can be obtained. The decision as to whether a data-processing system needs to be acquired has to take all these imperatives into account [fr

  1. Towards fast online intrafraction replanning for free-breathing stereotactic body radiation therapy with the MR-linac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontaxis, C.; Bol, G. H.; Stemkens, B.; Glitzner, M.; Prins, F. M.; Kerkmeijer, L. G. W.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; Raaymakers, B. W.

    2017-09-01

    The hybrid MRI-radiotherapy machines, like the MR-linac (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) installed at the UMC Utrecht (Utrecht, The Netherlands), will be able to provide real-time patient imaging during treatment. In order to take advantage of the system’s capabilities and enable online adaptive treatments, a new generation of software should be developed, ranging from motion estimation to treatment plan adaptation. In this work we present a proof of principle adaptive pipeline designed for high precision stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) suitable for sites affected by respiratory motion, like renal cell carcinoma (RCC). We utilized our research MRL treatment planning system (MRLTP) to simulate a single fraction 25 Gy free-breathing SBRT treatment for RCC by performing inter-beam replanning for two patients and one volunteer. The simulated pipeline included a combination of (pre-beam) 4D-MRI and (online) 2D cine-MR acquisitions. The 4DMRI was used to generate the mid-position reference volume, while the cine-MRI, via an in-house motion model, provided three-dimensional (3D) deformable vector fields (DVFs) describing the anatomical changes during treatment. During the treatment fraction, at an inter-beam interval, the mid-position volume of the patient was updated and the delivered dose was accurately reconstructed on the underlying motion calculated by the model. Fast online replanning, targeting the latest anatomy and incorporating the previously delivered dose was then simulated with MRLTP. The adaptive treatment was compared to a conventional mid-position SBRT plan with a 3 mm planning target volume margin reconstructed on the same motion trace. We demonstrate that our system produced tighter dose distributions and thus spared the healthy tissue, while delivering more dose to the target. The pipeline was able to account for baseline variations/drifts that occurred during treatment ensuring target coverage at the end of the treatment fraction.

  2. Improved radiotherapy for locally advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma (NSCLC) patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosson, Wiviann

    be reduced by the DIBH method for the lung cancer patients. The overall aim of the clinical part of this thesis was to clarify the potential benefit of offering DIBH gating, compared to free-breathing (FB), for lung cancer patients. Particularly, the benefits for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer......Lung cancer is worldwide one of the most common cancer diseases with a high mortality rate. There is thus an urgent need for improving radiotherapy for these patients. Radiotherapy for lung cancer patients is challenging because the tumor and organs at risk (OARs) move with the breathing motion....... Deep-Inspiration-Breath-Hold (DIBH) is a technique that potentially can improve the treatment for these patients. DIBH is frequently and routinely used for breast cancer treatments. However, it is still an experimental method for lung cancer patients e.g. due to preconceptions about their incapability...

  3. Standardization of exhaled breath condensate (EBC) collection using a feedback regulated breathing pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collection of exhaled breath condensate (EBC) fluid by cooling of expired breath is a potentially valuable approach for the detection of biomarkers associated with disease or exposure to xenobiotics. EBC is generally collected using unregulated breathing patterns, perceived to el...

  4. Parotid gland sparing radiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braam, P.M.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Radiotherapy is a common form of treatment for head-and-neck malignancies. One of the most prominent complaints after radiotherapy is a dry mouth, which is caused by irradiation of the salivary glands. The main contributors of saliva during stimulation are the parotid glands, which are

  5. PLANNING NATIONAL RADIOTHERAPY SERVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo eRosenblatt

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Countries, states and island nations often need forward planning of their radiotherapy services driven by different motives. Countries without radiotherapy services sponsor patients to receive radiotherapy abroad. They often engage professionals for a feasibility study in order to establish whether it would be more cost-beneficial to establish a radiotherapy facility. Countries where radiotherapy services have developed without any central planning, find themselves in situations where many of the available centres are private and thus inaccessible for a majority of patients with limited resources. Government may decide to plan ahead when a significant exodus of cancer patients travel to another country for treatment, thus exposing the failure of the country to provide this medical service for its citizens. In developed countries the trigger has been the existence of highly visible waiting lists for radiotherapy revealing a shortage of radiotherapy equipment.This paper suggests that there should be a systematic and comprehensive process of long-term planning of radiotherapy services at the national level, taking into account the regulatory infrastructure for radiation protection, planning of centres, equipment, staff, education pr

  6. Breathing and Singing: Objective Characterization of Breathing Patterns in Classical Singers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sauro Salomoni

    Full Text Available Singing involves distinct respiratory kinematics (i.e. movements of rib cage and abdomen to quiet breathing because of different demands on the respiratory system. Professional classical singers often advocate for the advantages of an active control of the abdomen on singing performance. This is presumed to prevent shortening of the diaphragm, elevate the rib cage, and thus promote efficient generation of subglottal pressure during phonation. However, few studies have investigated these patterns quantitatively and inter-subject variability has hindered the identification of stereotypical patterns of respiratory kinematics. Here, seven professional classical singers and four untrained individuals were assessed during quiet breathing, and when singing both a standard song and a piece of choice. Several parameters were extracted from respiratory kinematics and airflow, and principal component analysis was used to identify typical patterns of respiratory kinematics. No group differences were observed during quiet breathing. During singing, both groups adapted to rhythmical constraints with decreased time of inspiration and increased peak airflow. In contrast to untrained individuals, classical singers used greater percentage of abdominal contribution to lung volume during singing and greater asynchrony between movements of rib cage and abdomen. Classical singers substantially altered the coordination of rib cage and abdomen during singing from that used for quiet breathing. Despite variations between participants, principal component analysis revealed consistent pre-phonatory inward movements of the abdominal wall during singing. This contrasted with untrained individuals, who demonstrated synchronous respiratory movements during all tasks. The inward abdominal movements observed in classical singers elevates intra-abdominal pressure and may increase the length and the pressure-generating capacity of rib cage expiratory muscles for potential

  7. To understand radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Dealing with the use of radiotherapy for adults, this guide indicates when a radiotherapy is suggested, how it acts, how the treatment is chosen, which are the professionals involved. It describes how an external radiotherapy takes place and its various techniques, the different types of side effects (general, specific to the treated zone, late effects). It indicates which organs can be treated by curie-therapy, the different curie-therapy treatment modalities, how a curie-therapy takes place and which are its side effects. It outlines how to better cope with radiotherapy (how to be supported, the important role of relatives, everyday life questions, rights). It indicates and comments the different measures adopted for the safety and quality of radiotherapy

  8. Biomarkers of Tumour Radiosensitivity and Predicting Benefit from Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forker, L J; Choudhury, A; Kiltie, A E

    2015-10-01

    Radiotherapy is an essential component of treatment for more than half of newly diagnosed cancer patients. The response to radiotherapy varies widely between individuals and although advances in technology have allowed the adaptation of radiotherapy fields to tumour anatomy, it is still not possible to tailor radiotherapy based on tumour biology. A biomarker of intrinsic radiosensitivity would be extremely valuable for individual dosing, aiding decision making between radical treatment options and avoiding toxicity of neoadjuvant or adjuvant radiotherapy in those unlikely to benefit. This systematic review summarises the current evidence for biomarkers under investigation as predictors of radiotherapy benefit. Only 10 biomarkers were identified as having been evaluated for their radiotherapy-specific predictive value in over 100 patients in a clinical setting, highlighting that despite a rich literature there were few high-quality studies for inclusion. The most extensively studied radiotherapy predictive biomarkers were the radiosensitivity index and MRE11; however, neither has been evaluated in a randomised controlled trial. Although these biomarkers show promise, there is not enough evidence to justify their use in routine practice. Further validation is needed before biomarkers can fulfil their potential and predict treatment outcomes for large numbers of patients. Copyright © 2015 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Synchronized moving aperture radiation therapy (SMART): improvement of breathing pattern reproducibility using respiratory coaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neicu, Toni; Berbeco, Ross; Wolfgang, John; Jiang, Steve B

    2006-01-01

    Recently, at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) we proposed a new treatment technique called synchronized moving aperture radiation therapy (SMART) to account for tumour motion during radiotherapy. The basic idea of SMART is to synchronize the moving radiation beam aperture formed by a dynamic multileaf collimator with the tumour motion induced by respiration. The two key requirements for being able to successfully use SMART in clinical practice are the precise and fast detection of tumour position during the simulation/treatment and the good reproducibility of the tumour motion pattern. To fulfil the first requirement, an integrated radiotherapy imaging system is currently being developed at MGH. The results of a previous study show that breath coaching techniques are required to make SMART an efficient technique in general. In this study, we investigate volunteer and patient respiratory coaching using a commercial respiratory gating system as a respiration coaching tool. Five healthy volunteers, observed during six sessions, and 33 lung cancer patients, observed during one session when undergoing 4D CT scans, were investigated with audio and visual promptings, with free breathing as a control. For all five volunteers, breath coaching was well tolerated and the intra- and inter-session reproducibility of the breathing pattern was greatly improved. Out of 33 patients, six exhibited a regular breathing pattern and needed no coaching, four could not be coached at all due to the patient's medical condition or had difficulty following the instructions, 13 could only be coached with audio instructions and 10 could follow the instructions of and benefit from audio-video coaching. We found that, for all volunteers and for those patients who could be properly coached, breath coaching improves the duty cycle of SMART treatment. However, about half of the patients could not follow both audio and video instructions simultaneously, suggesting that the current coaching

  10. External respiratory motion for abdominal radiotherapy patients: implications for patient alignment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kearvell, Rachel; Ebert, Martin A.

    2003-01-01

    Conformal external beam radiotherapy relies on accurate spatial positioning of the tumor and normal tissues during treatment. For abdominal patients, this is complicated by the motion of internal organs and the external patient contour due to respiration. As external motion influences the degree of accuracy achievable in patient setup, this motion was studied to provide indication of motions occurring during treatment, as well as to assess the technique of breath-holding at exhale (B-HEX). The motion of external abdominal points (anterior and right lateral) of a series of volunteers was tracked in real-time using an infrared tracking system, with the volunteers in treatment position. The resulting motion data was assessed to evaluate (1) the change in position of each point per breath/breath-hold, (2) the change in position between breaths/breath-holds, and (3) the change in position across the whole recording time. Analysis shows that, for the anterior abdominal point, there is little difference in the variation of position with time for free-breathing as opposed to the B-HEX technique. For the lateral point however, the B-HEX technique reduces the motion during each treatment cycle (i.e., during the breath-hold) and over an extended period (i.e., during a series of breath-holds). The B-HEX technique thus provides greater accuracy for setup to lateral markers and provides the opportunity to reduce systematic and random localization errors

  11. Respiratory Motion of The Heart and Positional Reproducibility Under Active Breathing Control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagsi, Reshma; Moran, Jean M.; Kessler, Marc L.; Marsh, Robin B. C; Balter, James M.; Pierce, Lori J.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce cardiotoxicity from breast radiotherapy (RT), innovative techniques are under investigation. Information about cardiac motion with respiration and positional reproducibility under active breathing control (ABC) is necessary to evaluate these techniques. Methods and Materials: Patients requiring loco-regional RT for breast cancer were scanned by computed tomography using an ABC device at various breath-hold states, before and during treatment. Ten patients were studied. For each patient, 12 datasets were analyzed. Mutual information-based regional rigid alignment was used to determine the magnitude and reproducibility of cardiac motion as a function of breathing state. For each scan session, motion was quantified by evaluating the displacement of a point along the left anterior descending artery (LAD) with respect to its position at end expiration. Long-term positional reproducibility was also assessed. Results: Displacement of the LAD was greatest in the inferior direction, moderate in the anterior direction, and lowest in the left-right direction. At shallow breathing states, the average displacement of LAD position was up to 6 mm in the inferior direction. The maximum displacement in any patient was 2.8 cm in the inferior direction, between expiration and deep-inspiration breath hold. At end expiration, the long-term reproducibility (SD) of the LAD position was 3 mm in the A-P, 6 mm in the S-I, and 4 mm in the L-R directions. At deep-inspiration breath hold, long-term reproducibility was 3 mm in the A-P, 7 mm in the S-I, and 3 mm in the L-R directions. Conclusions: These data demonstrate the extent of LAD displacement that occurs with shallow breathing and with deep-inspiration breath hold. This information may guide optimization studies considering the effects of respiratory motion and reproducibility of cardiac position on cardiac dose, both with and without ABC

  12. Breathing guidance in radiation oncology and radiology: A systematic review of patient and healthy volunteer studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Sean; Keall, Robyn; Keall, Paul

    2015-09-01

    The advent of image-guided radiation therapy has led to dramatic improvements in the accuracy of treatment delivery in radiotherapy. Such advancements have highlighted the deleterious impact tumor motion can have on both image quality and radiation treatment delivery. One approach to reducing tumor motion irregularities is the use of breathing guidance systems during imaging and treatment. These systems aim to facilitate regular respiratory motion which in turn improves image quality and radiation treatment accuracy. A review of such research has yet to be performed; it was therefore their aim to perform a systematic review of breathing guidance interventions within the fields of radiation oncology and radiology. From August 1-14, 2014, the following online databases were searched: Medline, Embase, PubMed, and Web of Science. Results of these searches were filtered in accordance to a set of eligibility criteria. The search, filtration, and analysis of articles were conducted in accordance with preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Reference lists of included articles, and repeat authors of included articles, were hand-searched. The systematic search yielded a total of 480 articles, which were filtered down to 27 relevant articles in accordance to the eligibility criteria. These 27 articles detailed the intervention of breathing guidance strategies in controlled studies assessing its impact on such outcomes as breathing regularity, image quality, target coverage, and treatment margins, recruiting either healthy adult volunteers or patients with thoracic or abdominal lesions. In 21/27 studies, significant (p breathing guidance were observed. There is a trend toward the number of breathing guidance studies increasing with time, indicating a growing clinical interest. The results found here indicate that further clinical studies are warranted that quantify the clinical impact of breathing guidance, along with the health technology

  13. Radiological incidents in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobzova, L.; Novotny, J.

    2008-01-01

    In many countries a reporting system of radiological incidents to national regulatory body exists and providers of radiotherapy treatment are obliged to report all major and/or in some countries all incidents occurring in institution. State Office for Nuclear Safety (SONS) is providing a systematic guidance for radiotherapy departments from 1997 by requiring inclusion of radiation safety problems into Quality assurance manual, which is the basic document for obtaining a license of SONS for handling with sources of ionizing radiation. For that purpose SONS also issued the recommendation 'Introduction of QA system for important sources in radiotherapy-radiological incidents' in which the radiological incidents are defined and the basic guidance for their classification (category A, B, C, D), investigation and reporting are given. At regular periods the SONS in co-operation with radiotherapy centers is making a survey of all radiological incidents occurring in institutions and it is presenting obtained information in synoptic communication (2003 Motolske dny, 2005 Novy Jicin). This presentation is another summary report of radiological incidents that occurred in our radiotherapy institutions during last 3 years. Emphasis is given not only to survey and statistics, but also to analysis of reasons of the radiological incidents and to their detection and prevention. Analyses of incidents in radiotherapy have led to a much broader understanding of incident causation. Information about the error should be shared as early as possible during or after investigation by all radiotherapy centers. Learning from incidents, errors and near misses should be a part of improvement of the QA system in institutions. Generally, it is recommended that all radiotherapy facilities should participate in the reporting, analyzing and learning system to facilitate the dissemination of knowledge throughout the whole country to prevent errors in radiotherapy.(authors)

  14. Blue breath holding is benign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, J B

    1991-01-01

    In their recent publication in this journal, Southall et al described typical cyanotic breath holding spells, both in otherwise healthy children and in those with brainstem lesions and other malformations. Their suggestions regarding possible autonomic disturbances may require further study, but they have adduced no scientific evidence to contradict the accepted view that in the intact child blue breath holding spells are benign. Those families in which an infant suffers an 'apparently life threatening event' deserve immense understanding and help, and it behoves investigators to exercise extreme care and self criticism in the presentation of new knowledge which may bear upon their management and their morale. PMID:2001115

  15. Radiotherapy: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikrant Kasat

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiotherapy is the art of using ionizing radiation to destroy malignant cells while minimizing damage to normal tissue. Radiotherapy has become a standard treatment option for a wide range of malignancies. Several new imaging techniques, both anatomical and functional are currently being evaluated as well as practiced for treatment planning of cancer. These recent developments have allowed radiation oncologists to escalate the dose of radiation delivered to tumors while minimizing the dose delivered to surrounding normal tissue. In this update, we attempt to pen down important aspects of radiotherapy.

  16. Radiotherapy indications - rectum cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-05-01

    This document is addressed to oncologists radiotherapists and to any health professional concerned by rectum cancer treatment. Rectum cancer therapy is based on various technical procedures including surgery, radiotherapy and systemic treatments defined for each patient according to his clinical situation. This document precises the specific situations where radiotherapy can be employed. However, the radiotherapy decision must be taken with respect to other therapeutic alternatives. Such a decision must be validated and must be the object of a discussion in the framework of a pluri-disciplinary consultation. (J.S.)

  17. On-line MR imaging for dose validation of abdominal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glitzner, M; Crijns, S P M; De Senneville, B Denis; Kontaxis, C; Prins, F M; Lagendijk, J J W; Raaymakers, B W

    2015-01-01

    For quality assurance and adaptive radiotherapy, validation of the actual delivered dose is crucial.Intrafractional anatomy changes cannot be captured satisfactorily during treatment with hitherto available imaging modalitites. Consequently, dose calculations are based on the assumption of static anatomy throughout the treatment. However, intra- and interfraction anatomy is dynamic and changes can be significant.In this paper, we investigate the use of an MR-linac as a dose tracking modality for the validation of treatments in abdominal targets where both respiratory and long-term peristaltic and drift motion occur.The on-line MR imaging capability of the modality provides the means to perform respiratory gating of both delivery and acquisition yielding a model-free respiratory motion management under free breathing conditions.In parallel to the treatment, the volumetric patient anatomy was captured and used to calculate the applied dose. Subsequently, the individual doses were warped back to the planning grid to obtain the actual dose accumulated over the entire treatment duration. Ultimately, the planned dose was validated by comparison with the accumulated dose.Representative for a site subject to breathing modulation, two kidney cases (25 Gy target dose) demonstrated the working principle on volunteer data and simulated delivery. The proposed workflow successfully showed its ability to track local dosimetric changes. Integration of the on-line anatomy information could reveal local dose variations  −2.3–1.5 Gy in the target volume of a volunteer dataset. In the adjacent organs at risk, high local dose errors ranging from  −2.5 to 1.9 Gy could be traced back. (paper)

  18. Oral breathing and speech disorders in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia F. Hitos

    2013-07-01

    Conclusion: Mouth breathing can affect speech development, socialization, and school performance. Early detection of mouth breathing is essential to prevent and minimize its negative effects on the overall development of individuals.

  19. Volatile sulphur compounds in morning breath of human volunteers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snel, Johannes; Burgering, Maurits; Smit, Bart; Noordman, Wouter; Tangerman, Albert; Winkel, Edwin G.; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    Objective: Morning breath contains elevated concentrations of volatile sulphur components (VSCs). Therefore, morning breath is recognised as a surrogate target for interventions on breath quality. Nevertheless, factors influencing morning breath are poorly understood. Our aim was to evaluate

  20. Volatile sulphur compounds in morning breath of human volunteers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snel, J.; Burgering, M.; Smit, B.; Noordman, W.; Tangerman, A.; Winkel, E.G.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: morning breath contains elevated concentrations of volatile sulphur components (VSCs). Therefore, morning breath is recognised as a surrogate target for interventions on breath quality. Nevertheless, factors influencing morning breath are poorly understood. Our aim was to evaluate

  1. 14CO2 in breath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabinowitz, J.L.; Lopez-Majano, V.

    1981-01-01

    The diagnosis of metabolic disorders can be made by detecting 14 CO 2 in the breath. This is possible because 14 CO 2 can label any organic compound without any deteriorations in the nature of the compound. This type of analysis is dependable, noninvasive and simple to perform with a scintillation counter. (orig.)

  2. Submarines, Spacecraft, and Exhaled Breath

    Science.gov (United States)

    The International Association of Breath Research (IABR) meetings are an eclectic gathering of researchers in the medical, environmental and instrumentation fields; our focus is on human health as assessed by the measurement and interpretation of trace chemicals in human exhaled b...

  3. Breathing retraining: a rational placebo?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garssen, B.; de Ruiter, C.; van Dyck, R.

    1992-01-01

    Breathing retraining of patients with Hyperventilation Syndrome (HVS) and/or panic disorder is discussed to evaluate its clinical effectiveness and to examine the mechanism that mediates its effect. In relation to this theoretical question, the validity of HVS as a scientific model is discussed and

  4. Radiotherapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boljesikova, E.; Ligacova, A.

    2012-01-01

    Radiotherapy plays an important role in the treatment of breast carcinoma, reduces local recurrences about 20% (after breast conserving surgery or mastectomy), reduces 15 y mortality for cancer about 5%. The irradiation volumes can cover whole breast ± boost, partial breast, chest wall and regional lymph nodes. In contribution are analysed indications of radiotherapy, radiation techniques with focus on new trends, altered fractionation, partial breast irradiation and toxicity. (author)

  5. Functional Analysis and Intervention for Breath Holding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Lee; And Others

    1995-01-01

    A functional analysis of breath-holding episodes in a 7-year-old girl with severe mental retardation and Cornelia-de-Lange syndrome indicated that breath holding served an operant function, primarily to gain access to attention. Use of extinction, scheduled attention, and a picture card communication system decreased breath holding. (Author/SW)

  6. 21 CFR 868.5620 - Breathing mouthpiece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Breathing mouthpiece. 868.5620 Section 868.5620...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5620 Breathing mouthpiece. (a) Identification. A breathing mouthpiece is a rigid device that is inserted into a patient's mouth and that...

  7. Relationships between breath ratios, spirituality and health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this retrospective, quantitative study was to investigate relationships between breath ratios, spirituality perceptions and health perceptions, with special reference to breath ratios that best predict optimal health and spirituality. Significant negative correlations were found between breath ratios and spirituality ...

  8. Breath psychotherapy | Edwards | Inkanyiso: Journal of Humanities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Breath psychotherapy is an approach that makes direct use of the breath in healing. There are many forms of breathbased healing: basic breathing and relaxation methods, with or without the practice of psychological skills such as imagery, centring and concentration; expressive physical and emotional techniques; ...

  9. Moderate risk-adapted dose escalation with 3D-conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer from 70 to 74 Gy : long-term morbidity and survival from a prospective phase II trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bombosch, V. B.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract English Background and Purpose: Evaluation of late side-effects and survival more than 60 months after 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy with moderate, risk adapted dose escalation from 70 to 74 Gy in patients with localized prostate cancer within a prospective Austrian-German phase II multicenter trial. Material and Methods: Between 03/1999 and 07/2002 486 patients were registered in the prospective Austrian-German multicenter phase II trial. 441 (90.7%) patients were evaluated. Patients in the low and intermediate risk group were treated with 70Gy, patients in the high risk group received 74Gy. Additional hormonal-therapy was recommended for intermediate- and high-risk group patients. Gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) late toxicity according to EORTC/RTOG criteria, initial appearance, prevalence and duration of grade >=2 side-effects were investigated. Furthermore bNED (Phoenix/Nadir + 2), overall and disease specific survival were prospectively assessed. Results: Median follow-up was 90 (2-158) months in all 441 patients and 99 (18-158) months in living patients. 154 patients (35%) had a follow-up of longer or equal 120 months. Distribution among risk groups was 26% (low), 51% (intermediate) and 23% (high). HT was administered in 86% of patients prior to RT. Late gastrointestinal side-effects at 5- and 10 years were 29%/32% (70/74Gy) and 30%/35% (70/74Gy) as actuarial rates; p=0.67. Late genitourinary side-effects at 5- and 10 years were 17%/26% (70/74Gy) and 27%/34% (70/74Gy); p=0.12. No more than 15% (GI) and 15% (GU) of patients suffered from side-effects >=2 at any time after the end of therapy (prevalence). The proportion of patients suffering from severe toxicity was low (Grade 3 GI: 2%, GU: 10%). 10 year actuarial bNED rate was 65%, 70% and 58% in the low-, intermediate- and high risk group according to Phoenix (Nadir +2) criteria. Overall and disease specific survival were 67% and 91% in all patients. Conclusion: Dose escalation

  10. Irregular breathing during 4DCT scanning of lung cancer patients: is the midventilation approach robust?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aznar, Marianne C; Persson, Gitte F; Kofoed, Inger M; Nygaard, Ditte E; Korreman, Stine S

    2014-02-01

    With 4DCT the risk of introducing positional systematic errors in lung cancer radiotherapy can be minimised. A common approach is to plan on the phase bin of the 4DCT best representing the tumour's time-weighted mean position also called the midventilation scan. However breathing irregularities can introduce uncertainties and potentially misrepresent both the tumour trajectory and the determination of the midventilation phase. In this study we evaluated the robustness of the midventilation approach in the presence of irregular breathing patterns. A LEGO Mindstorms(®) phantom with compact balls simulating lung tumours was constructed. The breathing curves loaded in the phantom were either acquired from a human volunteer or constructed with various magnitudes (ranging from 12 to 29 mm) as well as various irregularities of motion pattern. Repeated 4DCT scans were performed while tumour trajectories were recorded with two motion tracking systems. The time-weighted mean tumour position is accurately represented in 4DCT scans, even for irregular breathing patterns: the position presentation in the midventilation scan was always within in one standard deviation of the global position presentation (3 mm and 2 mm for regular and irregular breathing patterns, respectively). The displacement representation tended to be underestimated in 4DCT scans. The midventilation approach is robust even in the presence of breathing irregularity. The representation of the tumour trajectory in 4DCT scans is affected by breathing irregularity and the extent of tumour motion can be underestimated, which will affect the calculation of patient-individualised margins based on the 4DCT scan. Copyright © 2013 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. [Quality criteria of thoracic radiotherapy. Application to clinical research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, N; Mornex, F

    2007-10-01

    Lung cancer is a suitable model for studying the quality criteria of radiotherapy, as irradiation of the intra-thoracic organs is complex. The recent availability of conformational techniques allows the analysis of these difficulties, as treated volumes are adapted to the target volume in a three-dimensional setting. Radiotherapy has then become a major therapeutic option of the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. Radiation protection and technical quality criteria for radiotherapy have been integrated for a long time into the global control programs for civil use of ionizing radiation. Clinical quality criteria were defined more recently both from radio-biological data available in the literature and by the analysis of historical radiation accidents and risk management. Good clinical practice in radiotherapy is part of the global quality requirements for cancer treatment, and remains the key to maintaining quality in an increasingly technological area of medicine.

  12. Intra-fraction motion of larynx radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durmus, Ismail Faruk; Tas, Bora

    2018-02-01

    In early stage laryngeal radiotherapy, movement is an important factor. Thyroid cartilage can move from swallowing, breathing, sound and reflexes. The effects of this motion on the target volume (PTV) during treatment were examined. In our study, the target volume movement during the treatment for this purpose was examined. Thus, setup margins are re-evaluated and patient-based PTV margins are determined. Intrafraction CBCT was scanned in 246 fractions for 14 patients. During the treatment, the amount of deviation which could be lateral, vertical and longitudinal axis was determined. ≤ ± 0.1cm deviation; 237 fractions in the lateral direction, 202 fractions in the longitudinal direction, 185 fractions in the vertical direction. The maximum deviation values were found in the longitudinal direction. Intrafraction guide in laryngeal radiotherapy; we are sure of the correctness of the treatment, the target volume is to adjust the margin and dose more precisely, we control the maximum deviation of the target volume for each fraction. Although the image quality of intrafraction-CBCT scans was lower than the image quality of planning CT, they showed sufficient contrast for this work.

  13. Analysis of Exhaled Breath for Disease Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amann, Anton; Miekisch, Wolfram; Schubert, Jochen; Buszewski, Bogusław; Ligor, Tomasz; Jezierski, Tadeusz; Pleil, Joachim; Risby, Terence

    2014-06-01

    Breath analysis is a young field of research with great clinical potential. As a result of this interest, researchers have developed new analytical techniques that permit real-time analysis of exhaled breath with breath-to-breath resolution in addition to the conventional central laboratory methods using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Breath tests are based on endogenously produced volatiles, metabolites of ingested precursors, metabolites produced by bacteria in the gut or the airways, or volatiles appearing after environmental exposure. The composition of exhaled breath may contain valuable information for patients presenting with asthma, renal and liver diseases, lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, inflammatory lung disease, or metabolic disorders. In addition, oxidative stress status may be monitored via volatile products of lipid peroxidation. Measurement of enzyme activity provides phenotypic information important in personalized medicine, whereas breath measurements provide insight into perturbations of the human exposome and can be interpreted as preclinical signals of adverse outcome pathways.

  14. The effectiveness of breath-holding to stabilize lung and pancreas tumors during radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, Martin J.; Martin, David; Whyte, Richard; Hai, Jenny; Ozhasoglu, Cihat; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of breath-holding on the short-term reproducibility and long-term variability of tumor position during image-guided radiosurgery. Method: Thirteen patients have undergone single-fraction radiosurgery treatments during which the tumor was repeatedly imaged radiographically to observe its position. The imaging data were used to monitor the efficacy of breath-holding and to periodically readjust the alignment of the treatment beam with the tumor. These measurements have allowed the effects of breathing, heartbeat, patient movement, and instrumental uncertainties to be separately identified in the record of tumor position. Results: During inspiration breath-holding, the lung tumor position was reproducible to within 1 mm, on average, in the direction of maximum displacement during regular breathing, and to within 1.8 mm in three dimensions overall. The pancreas tumor position in three dimensions was reproducible to within 2.5 mm on average. Some patients showed a slow, steady drift of tumor position during the extended sequence of breath-holds, which was compensated by periodic retargeting of the treatment beam. Conclusion: Breath-holding can allow the reduction of tumor motion dosimetry margins to 2 mm or less for lung cancer treatments, provided that the treatment system can detect and adapt to long-term variations in the mean tumor position during a lengthy treatment fraction

  15. Life years lost attributable to late effects after radiotherapy for early stage Hodgkin lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rechner, Laura Ann; Maraldo, Maja Vestmø; Vogelius, Ivan Richter

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Due to the long life expectancy after treatment, the risk of late effects after radiotherapy (RT) is of particular importance for patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). Both deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) and proton therapy have been shown to reduce the dose to normal...... tissues for mediastinal HL, but the impact of these techniques in combination is unknown. The purpose of this study was to compare the life years lost (LYL) attributable to late effects after RT for mediastinal HL using intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in free breathing (FB) and DIBH...

  16. Mapleson′s breathing systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tej K Kaul

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mapleson breathing systems are used for delivering oxygen and anaesthetic agents and to eliminate carbon dioxide during anaesthesia. They consist of different components: Fresh gas flow, reservoir bag, breathing tubes, expiratory valve, and patient connection. There are five basic types of Mapleson system: A, B, C, D and E depending upon the different arrangements of these components. Mapleson F was added later. For adults, Mapleson A is the circuit of choice for spontaneous respiration where as Mapleson D and its Bains modifications are best available circuits for controlled ventilation. For neonates and paediatric patients Mapleson E and F (Jackson Rees modification are the best circuits. In this review article, we will discuss the structure of the circuits and functional analysis of various types of Mapleson systems and their advantages and disadvantages.

  17. [Stahl, Leibniz, Hoffmann and breathing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvallo, Sarah

    2006-01-01

    At the beginning of the XVIII th century, Wilhelm Gottfried Leibniz and Friedrich Hoffmann criticize Georg Ernst Stahl's medical theory. They differenciate between unsound and true reasonings. Namely, they validate Stahl's definition of breath but extracting it from its animist basis and placing it in an epistemology obeying to the principle of sufficient reason and to the mechanical model. The stahlian discovery consists in understanding breath as a calorific ventilation against the ancient conception; the iatromechanists recognize its accuracy, but they try then to transpose it to a mechanical model of ventilation. Using it in a different epistemological context implies that they analyze the idea of discovery "true" in its contents, but "wrong" in its hypothesis. It impels to examine the epistemology of medical knowledge, as science and therapeutics, and in its links with the other scientific theories. Thus, if Leibniz as philosopher and Hoffmann as doctor consider Stahl's animism so important, it is because its discoveries question the fundamental principles of medicine.

  18. Advice concerning radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    Dutch National cancer incidence figures were calculated by using the reliable data on cancer incidence in the Eindhoven area and population forecasts and information obtained from the Central Bureau of Statistics. Several radiotherapy departments suffer from under capacity (a lack of resources and understaffing). Data have also shown that 35% of cancer patients receive radiotherapy, instead of 50%. Calculations have been made by the committee on the present and future needs with regard to equipment and staff. In 1983, the number of megavoltage therapy units amounted to 38, but should have been 65. It should be 80 in 1990 and 90 in 2000. Since building and installing such equipment is a lengthy process a considerable effort is needed to make up for the arrears. The committee advocates the extension of the system of regional cooperation in cancer care (comprehensive cancer centres), in which radiotherapy departments play a crucial role. Working parties from the committee provided a comprehensive description of current radiotherapy practice with reference to physical, technical, clinical and management aspects. Another working party assessed the results of cancer treatment with regard to many different tumour sites. Recent and expected developments were analysed or indicated. The Radiotherapy Committee commissioned an external team to conduct a project to achieve a picture of future developments using methods different to those of the committee's. An interim advice has been added on this subject. (Auth.)

  19. TR-BREATH: Time-Reversal Breathing Rate Estimation and Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chen; Han, Yi; Chen, Yan; Lai, Hung-Quoc; Zhang, Feng; Wang, Beibei; Liu, K J Ray

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, we introduce TR-BREATH, a time-reversal (TR)-based contact-free breathing monitoring system. It is capable of breathing detection and multiperson breathing rate estimation within a short period of time using off-the-shelf WiFi devices. The proposed system exploits the channel state information (CSI) to capture the miniature variations in the environment caused by breathing. To magnify the CSI variations, TR-BREATH projects CSIs into the TR resonating strength (TRRS) feature space and analyzes the TRRS by the Root-MUSIC and affinity propagation algorithms. Extensive experiment results indoor demonstrate a perfect detection rate of breathing. With only 10 s of measurement, a mean accuracy of can be obtained for single-person breathing rate estimation under the non-line-of-sight (NLOS) scenario. Furthermore, it achieves a mean accuracy of in breathing rate estimation for a dozen people under the line-of-sight scenario and a mean accuracy of in breathing rate estimation of nine people under the NLOS scenario, both with 63 s of measurement. Moreover, TR-BREATH can estimate the number of people with an error around 1. We also demonstrate that TR-BREATH is robust against packet loss and motions. With the prevailing of WiFi, TR-BREATH can be applied for in-home and real-time breathing monitoring.

  20. EF5 PET of Tumor Hypoxia: A Predictive Imaging Biomarker of Response to Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) for Early Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-01

    Figure 1 shows the tumor hypoxic fraction on EF5- PET imaging at baseline and after carbogen breathing. Figure 1: Effect of carbogen breathing...tumors (hypoxia) can compromise the effectiveness of radiation therapy, yet there is currently no clinically practical way to measure it. PET imaging...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0236 TITLE: EF5 PET of Tumor Hypoxia: A Predictive Imaging Biomarker of Response to Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy

  1. The role of radiotherapy for the induction of antitumor immune responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multhoff, G.; Helmholtz-Zentrum Muenchen; Gaipl, U.S.; Niedermann, G.

    2012-01-01

    Effective radiotherapy is aimed to control the growth of the primary carcinoma and to induce a long-term specific antitumor immune response against the primary tumor, recurrence and metastases. The contribution covers the following issues: T cells and tumor specific immune responses, dendritic cells (DCs) start adaptive immune responses, NK (natural killer) cells for HLA independent tumor control, abscopal effects of radiotherapy, combination of radiotherapy and immune therapy, radiotherapy contribution to the induction of immunogenic cell death, combinability of radiotherapy and DC activation, combinability of radiotherapy and NK cell therapy. It turns out that the combination of radio-chemotherapy and immune therapy can change the microenvironment initiating antitumor immune reactions that inhibit the recurrence risk and the development of metastases.

  2. Brain responses to emotional stimuli during breath holding and hypoxia: an approach based on the independent component analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menicucci, Danilo; Artoni, Fiorenzo; Bedini, Remo; Pingitore, Alessandro; Passera, Mirko; Landi, Alberto; L'Abbate, Antonio; Sebastiani, Laura; Gemignani, Angelo

    2014-11-01

    Voluntary breath holding represents a physiological model of hypoxia. It consists of two phases of oxygen saturation dynamics: an initial slow decrease (normoxic phase) followed by a rapid drop (hypoxic phase) during which transitory neurological symptoms as well as slight impairment of integrated cerebral functions, such as emotional processing, can occur. This study investigated how breath holding affects emotional processing. To this aim we characterized the modulation of event-related potentials (ERPs) evoked by emotional-laden pictures as a function of breath holding time course. We recorded ERPs during free breathing and breath holding performed in air by elite apnea divers. We modeled brain responses during free breathing with four independent components distributed over different brain areas derived by an approach based on the independent component analysis (ICASSO). We described ERP changes during breath holding by estimating amplitude scaling and time shifting of the same components (component adaptation analysis). Component 1 included the main EEG features of emotional processing, had a posterior localization and did not change during breath holding; component 2, localized over temporo-frontal regions, was present only in unpleasant stimuli responses and decreased during breath holding, with no differences between breath holding phases; component 3, localized on the fronto-central midline regions, showed phase-independent breath holding decreases; component 4, quite widespread but with frontal prevalence, decreased in parallel with the hypoxic trend. The spatial localization of these components was compatible with a set of processing modules that affects the automatic and intentional controls of attention. The reduction of unpleasant-related ERP components suggests that the evaluation of aversive and/or possibly dangerous situations might be altered during breath holding.

  3. Nanoparticle-guided radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method and nano-sized particles for image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) of a target tissue. More specifically, the invention relates to nano-sized particles comprising X-ray-imaging contrast agents in solid form with the ability to block x-rays, allowing for simult......The present invention relates to a method and nano-sized particles for image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) of a target tissue. More specifically, the invention relates to nano-sized particles comprising X-ray-imaging contrast agents in solid form with the ability to block x-rays, allowing...... for simultaneous or integrated external beam radiotherapy and imaging, e.g., using computed tomography (CT)....

  4. Radiotherapy of pineal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danoff, B.; Sheline, G.E.

    1984-01-01

    Radiotherapy has universally been used in the treatment of pineal tumors and suprasellar germinomas. Recently however, major technical advances related to the use of the operating microscope and development of microsurgical techniques have prompted a renewed interest in the direct surgical approach for biopsy and/or excision. This interest has resulted in a controversy regarding the role of surgery prior to radiotherapy. Because of the heterogeneity of tumors occurring in the pineal region (i.e., germ cell tumors, pineal parenchymal tumors, glial tumors, and cysts) and their differing biological behavior, controversy also surrounds aspects of radiotherapy such as: the optimal radiation dose, the volume to be irradiated, and indications for prophylactic spinal irradiation. A review of the available data is presented in an attempt to answer these questions

  5. Cancer research and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuzawa, Taiju

    1978-01-01

    An actual condition of cancer, and the basis and a future view of radiotherapy were described by adding generally established biological and biochemical knowledge to the author's research. It was described that the relapse of cancer after irradiation was induced from outside of cancerous mass, and the nature of relapsed cancerous cells group was also stated. The histological structure of cancer from a view of cell movement and radioresistant cancerous cells group were described. The differentiation of cancerous cells were described, and a study of inhibition of cancer by redifferentiation was considered. It is important to grasp characteristics and a limit of radiotherapy for cancer, to systematize and materialize reasonable therapy which uses drug and immunotherapy together with surgery, and to use radiotherapy reasonably together with redifferentiation therapy of cancerous cells by extracting characteristics and a limit of radiationtherapy from an actual condition of cancer. (Serizawa, K.)

  6. Reduction of breathing irregularity-related motion artifacts in low-pitch spiral 4D CT by optimized projection binning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, René; Hofmann, Christian; Mücke, Eike; Gauer, Tobias

    2017-06-19

    Respiration-correlated CT (4D CT) is the basis of radiotherapy treatment planning of thoracic and abdominal tumors. Current clinical 4D CT images suffer, however, from artifacts due to unfulfilled assumptions concerning breathing pattern regularity. We propose and evaluate modifications to existing low-pitch spiral 4D CT reconstruction protocols to counteract respective artifacts. The proposed advanced reconstruction (AR) approach consists of two steps that build on each other: (1) statistical analysis of the breathing signal recorded during CT data acquisition and extraction of a patient-specific reference breathing cycle for projection binning; (2) incorporation of an artifact measure into the reconstruction. 4D CT data of 30 patients were reconstructed by standard phase- and local amplitude-based reconstruction (PB, LAB) and compared with images obtained by AR. The number of artifacts was evaluated and artifact statistics correlated to breathing curve characteristics. AR reduced the number of 4D CT artifacts by 31% and 27% compared to PB and LAB; the reduction was most pronounced for irregular breathing curves. We described a two-step optimization of low-pitch spiral 4D CT reconstruction to reduce artifacts in the presence of breathing irregularity and illustrated that the modifications to existing reconstruction solutions are effective in terms of artifact reduction.

  7. SU-F-T-514: Evaluation of the Accuracy of Free-Breathing and Deep Inspiration Breath-Hold Gated Beam Delivery Using An Elekta Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jermoumi, M; Cao, D; Housley, D; Shepard, D; Xie, R

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, we evaluated the performance of an Elekta linac in the delivery of gated radiotherapy. We examined whether the use of either a short gating window or a long beam hold impacts the accuracy of the delivery Methods: The performance of an Elekta linac in the delivery of gated radiotherapy was assessed using a 20cmX 20cm open field with the radiation delivered using a range of beam-on and beam-off time periods. Two SBRT plans were used to examine the accuracy of gated beam delivery for clinical treatment plans. For the SBRT cases, tests were performed for both free-breathing based gating and for gated delivery with a simulated breath-hold. A MatriXX 2D ion chamber array was used for dat