WorldWideScience

Sample records for breastfeeding women content

  1. GPs' decision-making when prescribing medicines for breastfeeding women: Content analysis of a survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Lisa H

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many breastfeeding women seek medical care from general practitioners (GPs for various health problems and GPs may consider prescribing medicines in these consultations. Prescribing medicines to a breastfeeding mother may lead to untimely cessation of breastfeeding or a breastfeeding mother may be denied medicines due to the possible risk to her infant, both of which may lead to unwanted consequences. Information on factors governing GPs' decision-making and their views in such situations is limited. Methods GPs providing shared maternity care at the Royal Women's Hospital, Melbourne were surveyed using an anonymous postal survey to determine their knowledge, attitudes and practices on medicines and breastfeeding, in 2007/2008 (n = 640. Content analysis of their response to a question concerning decision-making about the use of medicine for a breastfeeding woman was conducted. A thematic network was constructed with basic, organising and global themes. Results 335 (52% GPs responded to the survey, and 253 (76% provided information on the last time they had to decide about the use of medicine for a breastfeeding woman. Conditions reported were mastitis (24%, other infections (24% and depressive disorders (21%. The global theme that emerged was "complexity of managing risk in prescribing for breastfeeding women". The organising themes were: certainty around decision-making; uncertainty around decision-making; need for drug information to be available, consistent and reliable; joint decision-making; the vulnerable "third party" and infant feeding decision. Decision-making is a spectrum from a straight forward decision, such as treatment of mastitis, to a complicated one requiring multiple inputs and consideration. GPs use more information seeking and collaboration in decision-making when they perceive the problem to be more complex, for example, in postnatal depression. Conclusion GPs feel that prescribing medicines for

  2. Legislation, women, and breastfeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, G

    1987-01-01

    Governmental policies and legislation aimed at validating the dual role of women as mothers and wage earners can significantly strengthen breastfeeding promotion efforts. Examples of such laws and policies are maternity leave, breastfeeding breaks at the workplace, allowances for pregnant women and new mothers, rooming-in at hospitals, child care at the worksite, flexible work schedules for new mothers, and a national marketing code for breastmilk substitutes. The International labor Organization (ILO) has played an important role in setting international standards to protect working mothers. The ILO defines minimal maternity protection as encompassing: a compulsory period of 6 weeks' leave after delivery; entitlement to a further 6 weeks of leave; the provision during maternity leave of benefits sufficient for the full and healthy maintenance of the child; medical care by a qualified midwife or physician; authorization to interrupt work for the purpose of breastfeeding; and protection from dismissal during maternity leave. In many countries there is a lack of public awareness of existing laws or policies; i.e., working women may not know they are entitled to maternity leave, or pediatricians may not know that the government has developed a marketing code for breastmilk substitutes. Overall, the enactment and enforcement of legislation can ensure the longterm effectiveness of breastfeeding promotion by raising the consciousness of individuals and institutions, putting breastfeeding activities in the wider context of support for women's rights, recognizing the dual roles of women, and institutionalizing and legitimating support for breastfeeding.

  3. Breastfeeding performance in Iranian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faridvand, Fatemeh; Mirghafourvand, Mojgan; Mohammad-Alizadeh-Charandabi, Sakineh; Malakouti, Jamileh

    2018-04-20

    Studies have shown that breastfeeding has both short-term and long-term useful effects on mother's and newborn's health. This study was conducted with the aim of determining predictors of breastfeeding performance in women who were referred to health centres in Tabriz City, Iran, in 2014 to 2015. This cross-sectional study cluster-sampled 220 breastfeeding women with infants aged 4 to 6 months. The Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale, the Iowa Infant Feeding Attitude Scale, the personal resource questionnaire-85, and a researcher-developed knowledge questionnaire were used to collect data. Multivariate linear regression model was used to determine predictors of breastfeeding performance. The results showed that participants' breastfeeding performance mean (SD) value was 3.6 (1.2) of 6. There were significant relationships between breastfeeding performance and breastfeeding self-efficacy (P = .033) but not between social support, knowledge, attitudes, and breastfeeding performance (P > .05). Breastfeeding self-efficacy, occupation, family income sufficiency, and living with the family were identified as predictors of breastfeeding performance. Given the relationship between breastfeeding self-efficacy and breastfeeding performance, strengthening mothers' self-efficacy should be considered, especially when compiling programs to promote breastfeeding. Increasing breastfeeding self-efficacy in women improves their breastfeeding performance: In developing programs to promote breastfeeding culture, women's self-efficacy should be considered. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  4. Breastfeeding information in pharmacology textbooks: a content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, Lisa H; Raval, Manjri; Hussainy, Safeera Y

    2013-07-01

    Women often need to take medicines while breastfeeding and pharmacists need to provide accurate information in order to avoid undue caution about the compatibility of medicines and breastfeeding. The objective of this study was to review information provided about breastfeeding in commonly used pharmacology textbooks. We asked 15 Australian universities teaching pharmacy courses to provide a list of recommended pharmacology textbooks in 2011. Ten universities responded, generating a list of 11 textbooks that we analysed for content relating to breastfeeding. Pharmacology textbooks outline the mechanisms of actions of medicines and their use: however, only a small emphasis is placed on the safety/compatibility of medicines for women during breastfeeding. Current pharmacology textbooks recommended by Australian universities have significant gaps in their coverage of medicine use in breastfeeding. Authors of textbooks should address this gap, so academic staff can recommend texts with the best lactation content.

  5. Facilitators for Empowering Women in Breastfeeding: a Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahnaz Kohan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background  Exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months and continued breastfeeding up to 2 years or more is a desirable approach for infant’s nutrition. A mother's breastfeeding empowerment is considered an important factor in promoting breastfeeding and identifying its facilitating factors can contribute to the development of effective policies and intervention. This study with a qualitative approach carried out aiming to exploring the facilitators for women’s empowerment in breastfeeding. Material and Methods This study conducted by content analysis method. Thirty-four semi-structured individual interviews with 20 mothers having breastfeeding experience, 4 key family members, and 10 personnel involved in breastfeeding services were carried out. Data analysis was simultaneously performed with data collection. Results Three main categories of "Health system factors", "Family and personal factors" and "Social and cultural factors" were extracted from the participants' explanations, indicating the dimensions of facilitators for empowering women in breastfeeding. Conclusion Participants regarded the acquisition of breastfeeding skills in hospitals and breastfeeding counseling in health centers as important factors in facilitating their empowerment to early initiation of breastfeeding and its continuity. Further analysis showed "a mother's decision to breastfeed" along with her understanding of "positive attitude and her husband and family's participation in breastfeeding" boosts the breastfeeding ability and the support of the community through "positive cultural belief in breastfeeding" and" public education and information" provides an appropriate ground for the continuity of breastfeeding. In order to improve breastfeeding, a comprehensive planning with regard to women's empowerment in breastfeeding should be considered.

  6. Opinions and attitudes of women towards breastfeeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Bień

    2017-08-01

    Conclusions. The most positive beliefs related to breastfeeding refer to the special relation between an infant and its mother, the belief that breastfeeding is an ideal solution for a baby and the appreciation of its economical aspect. Women are aware of the fact that breastfeeding is a challenge for them. Two main factors influence their opinion: the age of women and the number of births.

  7. Women's Decisions about Breastfeeding and Maternal Employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, Laura Duberstein

    1996-01-01

    Extends the concept of role incompatibility to examine potential incompatibilities between breastfeeding and maternal employment. Hypothesizes women may face both structural and attitudinal conflicts between these behaviors. Found significantly more women employed part-time are likely to breastfeed and for longer durations than women employed…

  8. Group A Streptococcus vulvovaginitis in breastfeeding women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahangdale, Lisa; Lacy, Judith; Hillard, Paula A

    2008-08-01

    Group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus-associated vulvovaginitis is uncommon in adult women. Clinicians should include group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus as a possible cause of vulvovaginal symptoms in breastfeeding women. Along with appropriate antibiotic therapy, vaginal estrogen therapy may be considered to diminish susceptibility to recurrent infection in women with vaginal atrophy.

  9. Enabling women to achieve their breastfeeding goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuebe, Alison M

    2014-03-01

    In mammalian physiology, lactation follows pregnancy, and disruption of this physiology is associated with adverse health outcomes for mother and child. Although lactation is the physiologic norm, cultural norms for infant feeding have changed dramatically over the past century. Breastfeeding initiation fell from 70% in the early 1900s to 22% in 1972. In the past 40 years, rates have risen substantially, to 77% in 2010. Although more mothers are initiating breastfeeding, many report that they do not continue as long as they desire. As reproductive health care experts, obstetricians are uniquely positioned to assist women to make an informed feeding decision, offer anticipatory guidance, support normal lactation physiology, and evaluate and treat breastfeeding complications. Integration of care among the obstetrician, pediatric provider, and lactation consultant may enable more women to achieve their breastfeeding goals, thereby improving health outcomes across two generations.

  10. How motivation influences breastfeeding duration among low-income women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racine, Elizabeth F; Frick, Kevin D; Strobino, Donna; Carpenter, Laura M; Milligan, Renee; Pugh, Linda C

    2009-05-01

    In-depth interviews were conducted with 44 low-income breastfeeding women to explore the incentives and disincentives to breastfeeding experienced within 6 months postpartum. Using an individual net benefit maximization (INBM) framework based on economic theory, we assessed women's motivations, incentives, and disincentives for breastfeeding. Based on the framework and their experience breastfeeding, women fell into 3 groups: intrinsically motivated, extrinsically motivated, and successfully experienced with both intrinsic and extrinsic motivation. Successfully experienced women were most likely to breastfeed to 6 months. Intrinsically motivated women valued breastfeeding but often required information and instruction to reach breastfeeding goals. Extrinsically motivated women were least likely to continue breastfeeding even with support and instruction. Providers can screen women to determine their experience and motivation then tailor interventions accordingly. Intrinsically motivated women may need support and instruction, extrinsically motivated women may benefit from motivational interviewing, and successfully experienced women may need only minimal breastfeeding counseling.

  11. Breastfeeding Duration and Primary Reasons for Breastfeeding Cessation among Women with Postpartum Depressive Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bascom, Erin McElderry; Napolitano, Melissa A

    2016-05-01

    Although postpartum depression is associated with lower breastfeeding initiation rates and shorter breastfeeding duration, the potential mechanisms through which this relationship functions are not well understood. This study examined the breastfeeding behaviors of women with postpartum depressive symptoms (PDS) to identify potential motivations for early breastfeeding cessation. An analysis of quantitative data from the Infant Feeding Practices Study II examined the relationship between PDS and breastfeeding behaviors, including breastfeeding duration and primary reasons for early breastfeeding cessation. Of the women in the sample, 30.9% met criteria for mild PDS. Women with PDS had shorter overall (18.4 vs 21.8 weeks, P = .001) and exclusive breastfeeding duration (3.6 vs 4.7 weeks, P = .012) than women without PDS. A larger proportion of women with PDS stopped breastfeeding before 6 months (68.7% vs 57.2%, P household duties" (OR = 1.90, P = .011) as a primary reason for breastfeeding cessation among women who stopped breastfeeding before 6 months. After controlling for these same covariates, women with PDS had, on average, 2.4 weeks shorter breastfeeding duration than women without PDS (P = .025). There is a high prevalence of depressive symptoms among new mothers, and most do not breastfeed for recommended time periods. Increased PDS screening during prenatal and postpartum visits and promotion of lactation support services may better address the high rates of PDS and suboptimal breastfeeding behavior. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. Antibiotics for mastitis in breastfeeding women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shayesteh Jahanfar

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Mastitis can be caused by ineffective positioning of the baby at the breast or restricted feeding. Infective mastitis is commonly caused by Staphylococcus aureus . The prevalence of mastitis in breastfeeding women may reach 33%. Effective milk removal, pain medication and antibiotic therapy have been the mainstays of treatment. OBJECTIVES: This review aims to examine the effectiveness of antibiotic therapies in relieving symptoms for breastfeeding women with mastitis with or without laboratory investigation. METHODS: Search methods: We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (30 September 2012, contacted investigators and other content experts known to us for unpublished trials and scanned the reference lists of retrieved articles. Selection criteria: We selected randomised controlled trials (RCTs and quasi-RCTs comparing the effectiveness of various types of antibiotic therapies or antibiotic therapy versus alternative therapies for the treatment of mastitis. Data collection and analysis: Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. When in dispute, we consulted a third author. MAIN RESULTS: Two trials met the inclusion criteria. One small trial (n = 25 compared amoxicillin with cephradine and found no significant difference between the two antibiotics in terms of symptom relief and abscess formation. Another, older study compared breast emptying alone as 'supportive therapy' versus antibiotic therapy plus supportive therapy, and no therapy. The findings of the latter study suggested faster clearance of symptoms for women using antibiotics, although the study design was problematic. AUTHORS CONCLUSIONS: There is insufficient evidence to confirm or refute the effectiveness of antibiotic therapy for the treatment of lactational mastitis. There is an urgent need to conduct high-quality, double-blinded RCTs to determine whether antibiotics should be used in this

  13. [Breastfeeding among children of women workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasileiro, Aline Alves; Ambrosano, Gláucia Maria Bovi; Marba, Sérgio Tadeu Martins; Possobon, Rosana de Fátima

    2012-08-01

    To analyze employment benefits and factors associated with the maintenance of breastfeeding indexes among working mothers. The sample was constituted by 200 formal women workers who returned to work before the child had reached six months of life, in the city of Piracicaba (Southeastern Brazil). Among the participants, 100 mother-infant dyads received guidance and support for the practice of breastfeeding within an oral health prevention program, and the other 100 dyads were addressed in a child vaccination campaign. Multiple logistic regression analysis was carried out to identify variables related to weaning in the fourth month of life. The majority of the participants were primiparous women who underwent cesarean section, initiated breastfeeding within four hours after birth and stayed with their child in the room. The following women had higher odds of stopping breastfeeding: mothers not participating in the incentive program (OR = 3.04 [95%CI: 1.35;6.85]), mothers who did not have a 30-minute break during the working hours (OR = 4.10 [95%CI: 1.81;9.26]), and mothers whose children used pacifiers (OR = 2.68 [95%CI: 1.23;5.83]) or bottles (OR = 14.47 [95%CI: 1.85;113.24]. The mothers who participated in the breastfeeding incentive group, who did not offer pacifiers and bottles to their babies and who had a break during the working hours stopped breastfeeding after the fourth month. Support and information on lactation management and on their rights guaranteed by law, together with the increase in the length of maternity leave, may play an important role in maintaining breastfeeding.

  14. It takes a mother to practise breastfeeding : Women's perceptions of breastfeeding during the period of intention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterhoff, Alberta; Hutter, Inge; Haisma, Hinke

    2014-01-01

    Background: In the Netherlands, 81% of mothers initiate breastfeeding. After one month the percentage of mothers still breastfeeding drops, despite positive intentions. Little is known about women's perceptions of breastfeeding during the period of intention. Aim: This qualitative study aimed to

  15. Iodine Status in Pregnant & Breastfeeding Women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Stine Linding

    Iodine is required for the synthesis of thyroid hormones, which are crucial regulator of early brain development. The source of iodine in the fetus and the breastfed infant is maternal iodine, and adequate iodine intake in pregnant and breastfeeding is of major concern. Severe iodine deficiency can...... cause irreversible brain damage, whereas the consequences of mild to moderate iodine deficiency are less clear. Denmark was previously iodine deficient with regional differences (mild iodine deficiency in East Denmark and moderate iodine deficiency in West Denmark), and also pregnant and breastfeeding...... women suffered from iodine deficiency. A mandatory iodine fortification of household salt and salt used for commercial production of bread was introduced in Denmark in the year 2000. The PhD thesis investigates intake of iodine supplements and urinary iodine status in Danish pregnant and breastfeeding...

  16. Knowledge and practice of exclusive breastfeeding among women ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Knowledge and practice of exclusive breastfeeding among women with children aged between 9 ... PROMOTING ACCESS TO AFRICAN RESEARCH ... Conclusion: Most mothers knew the benefits and definitions of exclusive breastfeeding.

  17. Factors That Influence Breastfeeding Initiation Among African American Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinson, Tyonne D; Skinner, Asheley Cockrell; Lich, Kristen Hassmiller; Spatz, Diane L

    2018-05-01

    To examine cultural and socioenvironmental factors that affect breastfeeding initiation among African American women. Qualitative descriptive design and conventional content analysis. A large, inner-city, primary care center affiliated with a 500-bed children's hospital within a large, Northeastern U.S. city. Participants were 34 U.S.-born African American mothers of healthy term infants 0 to 3 months of age. Six focus groups were conducted using a 16-question, scripted interview guide. A number of complex factors that influenced breastfeeding initiation included certain cultural beliefs about sexuality, the influence of family and peer networks, information sources, intentions, and a variety of other barriers and facilitators. Our findings suggest that the decision to initiate breastfeeding is not solely determined by the woman within the African American community. Because this decision is contingent on multiple factors external to the woman, it is important to recognize the role that partners, grandmothers, communities, information sources, and health care providers/organizations play in women's decisions. Implementation of multilevel strategies is critical to increase breastfeeding initiation among African American mothers. Copyright © 2018 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Initiating and sustaining breastfeeding in african american women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewallen, Lynne Porter; Street, Darlene J

    2010-01-01

    To explore issues related to initiating and sustaining breastfeeding in African American women. Qualitative design using focus groups, guided by Leininger's theory of culture care diversity and universality. Three different regions of a southeastern state in the United States. Fifteen self-identified African American women who had recently breastfed were recruited by lactation consultants and by word of mouth. Three focus groups were conducted with initial guiding questions. New ideas that emerged were fully explored in the group and included as a guiding question for the next group. Categories identified from the data were reasons to start and stop breastfeeding, advice about breastfeeding that was useful or not useful, and cultural issues related to breastfeeding that were perceived to be unique among African Americans. Three overall themes were identified that cut across categories: perceived lack of information about benefits and management of breastfeeding, difficulties breastfeeding in public, and lack of a support system for continued breastfeeding. Women need to be taught early in their pregnancies about the benefits of breastfeeding and offered continuing support and teaching once breastfeeding is established. Peer support groups for breastfeeding African American women should be established. © 2010 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  19. Identifying job characteristics related to employed women's breastfeeding behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzmueller, Christiane; Zhang, Jing; Thomas, Candice L; Wang, Zhuxi; Fisher, Gwenith G; Matthews, Russell A; Strathearn, Lane

    2018-05-14

    For employed mothers of infants, reconciliation of work demands and breastfeeding constitutes a significant challenge. The discontinuation of breastfeeding has the potential to result in negative outcomes for the mother (e.g., higher likelihood of obesity), her employer (e.g., increased absenteeism), and her infant (e.g., increased risk of infection). Given previous research findings identifying return to work as a major risk factor for breastfeeding cessation, we investigate what types of job characteristics relate to women's intentions to breastfeed shortly after giving birth and women's actual breastfeeding initiation and duration. Using job titles and job descriptors contained in a large Australian longitudinal cohort data set (N = 809), we coded job titles using the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL)'s Occupational Information Network (O*NET) database and extracted job characteristics. Hazardous working conditions and job autonomy were identified as significant determinants of women's breastfeeding intentions, their initiation of breastfeeding, and ultimately their breastfeeding continuation. Hence, we recommend that human resource professionals, managers, and public health initiatives provide breastfeeding-supportive resources to women who, based on their job characteristics, are at high risk to prematurely discontinue breastfeeding to ensure these mothers have equal opportunity to reap the benefits of breastfeeding. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. Breastfeeding: knowledge of the women about this practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Luiza de Jesus Trindade

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The milk is considered the best food for the baby, or the most skilled for the proper growth and development of children, keeping it away from infections and diseases larger. This study aims to identify the knowledge acquired by mothers visited by scholars of the Project Scope: "We will breastfeed, Mom?" About breast feeding. This is a documentary research, qualitative in nature. We analyzed 93 routes from home visits, for the year 2006. Information was submitted to the technical analysis of thematic content, from which emerged a category: "knowledge gained by the mothers about breast feeding", and eight subcategories. We conclude that the knowledge of the women on breastfeeding, are still scarce, which reinforces the importance of this project, since it allows greater knowledge about breastfeeding, thus providing, reduction in the rates of morbidity and mortality

  1. Treatments for breast abscesses in breastfeeding women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irusen, Hayley; Rohwer, Anke C; Steyn, D Wilhelm; Young, Taryn

    2015-08-17

    The benefits of breastfeeding are well known, and the World Health Organization recommends exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months of life and continuing breastfeeding to age two. However, many women stop breastfeeding due to lactational breast abscesses. A breast abscess is a localised accumulation of infected fluid in breast tissue. Abscesses are commonly treated with antibiotics, incision and drainage (I&D) or ultrasound-guided needle aspiration, but there is no consensus on the optimal treatment. To assess the effects of different treatments for the management of breast abscesses in breastfeeding women. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trial Register (27 February 2015). In addition we searched African Journals Online (27 February 2015), Google Scholar (27 February 2015), ProQuest Dissertations and Theses Databases (27 February 2015) and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) search portal (27 February 2015). We also checked reference lists of retrieved studies and contacted experts in the field as well as relevant pharmaceutical companies. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) investigating any intervention for treating lactational breast abscesses compared with any other intervention. Studies published in abstract form, quasi-RCTs and cluster-RCTs were not eligible for inclusion. Two review authors independently assessed studies for inclusion, assessed risk of bias and extracted data. Data were checked for accuracy. We included six studies. Overall, trials had an unclear risk of bias for most domains due to poor reporting. Two studies did not stratify data for lactational and non-lactational breast abscesses, and these studies do not contribute to the results. This review is based on data from four studies involving 325 women. Needle aspiration (with and without ultrasound guidance) versus incision and drainage (I&D) Mean time (days) to complete resolution of breast abscess (three studies) - there was

  2. Breastfeeding practices of ethnic Indian immigrant women in Melbourne, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharaj, Natasha; Bandyopadhyay, Mridula

    2013-12-18

    The health benefits of breastfeeding are well documented in public health and medical literature worldwide. Despite this, global rates of breastfeeding steadily decline during the first couple of months postpartum. Although immigrant women have higher initiation rates and a longer duration of breastfeeding overall, breastfeeding practices are compromised because of a myriad of socioeconomic and cultural factors, including the acculturation process. The objective of this study was to show how acculturation and cultural identity influenced breastfeeding practices among Indian immigrants in Melbourne, Australia. Twelve case studies were employed to gather narratives of women's lived experiences. Ethnographic field research methods were used to collect data, including participant observation, semi-structured interviews, case studies, and life histories. This provided in-depth information from women on various aspects of the immigrant experience of motherhood, including infant care and feeding. Participants were opportunistically recruited from Indian obstetricians and gynaecologists. Women identifying as ethnic Indian and in their third trimester of pregnancy were recruited. Interviews were conducted in women's homes in metropolitan Melbourne over a 12 month period between 2004 and 2005. Data were coded and analysed thematically. All women identified as ethnic Indian and initiated breastfeeding in accordance with their cultural identity. Social support and cultural connectivity impacted positively on duration of breastfeeding. However, acculturation (adopting Australian cultural values and gender norms, including returning to paid employment) negatively influenced breastfeeding duration. In addition, the high reliance of recent immigrants on the advice of healthcare professionals who gave inconsistent advice negatively affected exclusive breastfeeding. For ethnic Indian immigrant women breastfeeding practice is closely linked to acculturation and identity construction

  3. Pregnant women's attitudes toward influenza vaccination while breastfeeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica R. Gorman

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Pregnant women and postpartum women who are breastfeeding could benefit from receiving information and recommendations specific to vaccination from their healthcare providers, with a focus on discussing known risks and benefits to the baby's health.

  4. [The Continued Breastfeeding Experiences of Women Who Suffer From Breast Abscess].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu-Yan; Chen, Wei-Chih; Chen, Shu-Ling

    2016-04-01

    Up to 11% of women with mastitis develop a breast abscess, which obviously affects breastfeeding. Therefore, this is a potentially significant issue for women's health. Women with breast abscesses suffer from severe pain. Pain is the most significant factor causing the termination of breastfeeding. The experience of women with breast abscesses who continued to breastfeed may provide valuable insights/guidance to women who are currently in the same or similar situations. This study explores the continuous breastfeeding experience of women with breast abscesses. We collected qualitative data from 10 qualified female participants using 60-90 minute, in-depth interviews that were conducted between April 2012 and June 2012 in a central medical center. All interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Content analysis was used to analyze and categorize the major themes. Results were generalized into the following seven themes: (1) experiencing uncomfortable breast pain; (2) feeling helpless to manage the abnormal breast symptoms; (3) relying on the concept of motherhood to support continued breastfeeding; (4) feeling shocked about the process of diagnosis and treatment; (5) facing the doubts and difficulties regarding continuing to breastfeed; (6) experiencing the assistance of the support system for breastfeeding; (7) returning to a normal pattern of life. The findings provide nurses with a deeper understanding of the biological and psychological behaviors and social support system experiences of women with breast abscesses who continue to breastfeed. Study results may serve as a reference for nurses in providing mother-centered breastfeeding care.

  5. Factors affecting breastfeeding practices in working women of Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Soomro, Jamil Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background, rationale and aim of the study Breastfeeding is considered to be an important measure to secure child s optimal health and survival. In urban areas of Pakistan most of the women can t afford to live at home longer because they serve as an important contributor of their family income. A woman's return to work has frequently been found to be a main contributor to the early termination of breastfeeding. Most workplaces do not have the supportive environment for breastfeeding...

  6. Breastfeeding practices that support women with diabetes to breastfeed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallon, Anne; Dunne, Fidelma

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this literature review was to identify breastfeeding practices that support women with diabetes to breastfeed. A search was undertaken of CINAHL and Medline databases to identify studies that inform breastfeeding practice for women with diabetes. This resulted in 14 studies (19 records). Most studies focused on women with GDM and T1D with some consideration of T2D. The review has been organised using Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs, to enable a clear focus on the needs of women while identifying supportive practices. The key findings of this review are that breastfeeding as the first feed and exclusive breastfeeding are beneficial to meeting physiological needs. Preparations such as having food nearby and having someone to call on can help meet the woman's safety and security needs. A sense of love and belonging is supported by the practice of an early first breastfeed, but antenatal breast milk expression is currently not recommended. The woman's self-esteem can be enhanced through informed multidisciplinary support. Finally, self-actualisation or success with breastfeeding has been achieved by women with diabetes. Common breastfeeding concerns rather than diabetes have been identified as reasons for cessation of breastfeeding. Practices that support women deal with these concerns are recommended. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Factors affecting breastfeeding practices among working women in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soomro, J A; Shaikh, Z N; Bijarani, S A; Saheer, T B

    2017-02-01

    In urban areas of Pakistan, women's return to work after giving birth has frequently been found to be a main contributor to the early termination of breastfeeding. This study aimed to assess workplace breastfeeding support provided to working mothers in Pakistan. In a cross-sectional survey in 2014, mothers and employers from a representative sample of 297 workplaces were interviewed using a pre-tested questionnaire. Mothers from 36 (12.1%) sites reported receiving breastfeeding breaks, and 86% of the mothers had received 3 months paid maternity leave. Provision of a lighter job and information about breastfeeding options on return to work were reported from 15% and 5% of the workplaces, respectively. Only two sites had designated breastfeeding corners. Significantly different results were found between types of employer (government or private) and type of organization (national or multinational) with regard to breastfeeding breaks, breastfeeding corners, lighter jobs and paid maternity leave. Public and multinational companies were slightly better than private and national ones in providing breastfeeding facilities.

  8. Development, content validity, and piloting of an instrument designed to measure managers' attitude toward workplace breastfeeding support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Tan; Wolfe, Edward W; Olson, Beth H

    2012-07-01

    Manager attitude is influential in female employees' perceptions of workplace breastfeeding support. Currently, no instrument is available to assess manager attitude toward supporting women who wish to combine breastfeeding with work. We developed and piloted an instrument to measure manager attitudes toward workplace breastfeeding support entitled the "Managers' Attitude Toward Breastfeeding Support Questionnaire," an instrument that measures four constructs using 60 items that are rated agree/disagree on a 4-point Likert rating scale. We established the content validity of the Managers' Attitude Toward Breastfeeding Support Questionnaire measures through expert content review (n=22), expert assessment of item fit (n=11), and cognitive interviews (n=8). Data were collected from a purposive sample of 185 front-line managers who had experience supervising female employees, and responses were scaled using the Multidimensional Random Coefficients Multinomial Logit Model. Dimensionality analyses supported the proposed four-construct model. Reliability ranged from 0.75 to 0.86, and correlations between the constructs were moderately strong (0.47 to 0.71). Four items in two constructs exhibited model-to-data misfit and/or a low score-measure correlation. One item was revised and the other three items were retained in the Managers' Attitude Toward Breastfeeding Support Questionnaire. Findings of this study suggest that the Managers' Attitude Toward Breastfeeding Support Questionnaire measures are reliable and valid indicators of manager attitude toward workplace breastfeeding support, and future research should be conducted to establish external validity. The Managers' Attitude Toward Breastfeeding Support Questionnaire could be used to collect data in a standardized manner within and across companies to measure and compare manager attitudes toward supporting breastfeeding. Organizations can subsequently develop targeted strategies to improve support for breastfeeding

  9. Health & Nutrition Information for Pregnant & Breastfeeding Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Adults Moms/ Moms-to-Be Print Share Health & Nutrition Information When you are pregnant or breastfeeding, you ... Story Last Updated: Apr 27, 2018 RESOURCES FOR NUTRITION AND HEALTH MYPLATE What Is MyPlate? Fruits Vegetables ...

  10. Chinese women's experiences, emotions and expectations of breast-feeding in public: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ya; Ouyang, Yan-Qiong; Redding, Sharon R

    2018-06-01

    To explore Chinese mothers' experiences, emotions and expectations of breast-feeding in public places. Exploratory qualitative study. Purposive sampling was used to recruit participants and face-to-face interviews were conducted. Themes were identified by content analysis. Two different geographical communities in Wuhan, Hubei Province, central China, March-May 2016. A total of twenty-seven mothers aged 23-33 years, who had one child under 3 years of age and had experience of breast-feeding in public places. Seven themes emerged from the interviews: struggling to balance infant's needs and personal feelings; embarrassed or natural emotion regarding breast-feeding in public places; effect of cultural and social norms; internalized concerns going beyond actual social reaction; measures to make breast-feeding in public places easier; desire for more public facilities; and expecting emotional support from society members. More positive social support, favourable policies and necessary facilities were desired to enable mothers to breast-feed in an appropriate public location. Women expected increased public acceptance of breast-feeding practices and support from government health officials to ensure women's success in breast-feeding in public settings.

  11. "I Just Want to Do Everything Right:" Primiparous Women's Accounts of Early Breastfeeding via an App-Based Diary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirci, Jill; Caplan, Erin; Murray, Nora; Cohen, Susan

    Our objective was to describe the early breastfeeding experience of primiparous women. Healthy, primiparous women intending to exclusively breastfeed downloaded a commercial infant feeding mobile application (app) during their postpartum hospitalization. Women free-texted breastfeeding thoughts and experiences through 8 weeks postpartum in the app's diary. Diary content was qualitatively coded. Thirty-five participants completed diaries and were included in analyses. The overarching theme was Seeking sustainability and validation. Mothers felt overwhelmed, anxious, and frustrated with the intensity and unpredictability of breastfeeding and inconsistent professional breastfeeding support. The ability to exclusively breastfeed was seen as a bellwether of maternal competence. Breastfeeding progress was primarily measured through external feedback (e.g., weight checks) and managed through strict adherence to provider feeding plans. As breastfeeding problems and intensity abated, women exhibited optimism and assumed greater independence in feeding decisions. The primiparous breastfeeding experience is fraught with internally imposed and externally reinforced pressure to produce and persevere despite inadequate breastfeeding support infrastructure. Copyright © 2017 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Long-term breast-feeding in women with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stage, E; Nørgård, Hanne; Damm, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Breast-feeding may be more difficult in women with diabetes because of neonatal morbidity and fluctuating maternal blood glucose values. The frequency of long-term breast-feeding and the possible predictors for successful breast-feeding were investigated.......Breast-feeding may be more difficult in women with diabetes because of neonatal morbidity and fluctuating maternal blood glucose values. The frequency of long-term breast-feeding and the possible predictors for successful breast-feeding were investigated....

  13. Cultural beliefs that may discourage breastfeeding among Lebanese women: a qualitative analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wick Livia

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the health benefits of breastfeeding are well established, early introduction of formula remains a common practice. Cultural beliefs and practices can have an important impact on breastfeeding. This paper describes some common beliefs that may discourage breastfeeding in Lebanon. Methods Participants were healthy first-time mothers recruited from hospitals throughout Lebanon to participate in a study on usage patterns of a telephone hotline for postpartum support. The hotline was available to mothers for the first four months postpartum and patterns of usage, as well as questions asked were recorded. Thematic analysis of the content of questions which referred to cultural beliefs and practices related to breastfeeding was conducted. Results Twenty four percent of the 353 women enrolled in the study called the hotline, and 50% of the calls included questions about breastfeeding. Mothers expressed concern about having adequate amounts of breast milk or the quality of their breast milk. Concerns that the mother could potentially harm her infant though breastfeeding were rooted in a number of cultural beliefs. Having an inherited inability to produce milk, having "bad milk", and transmission of abdominal cramps to infants through breast milk were among the beliefs that were expressed. Although the researchers live and work in Lebanon, they were not aware of many of the beliefs that are reported in this study. Conclusion There are a number of cultural beliefs that could potentially discourage breastfeeding among Lebanese women. Understanding and addressing local beliefs and customs can help clinicians to provide more culturally appropriate counselling about breastfeeding.

  14. Effect of a Home-Based Lifestyle Intervention on Breastfeeding Initiation Among Socioeconomically Disadvantaged African American Women with Overweight or Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewkowitz, Adam K; López, Julia D; Stein, Richard I; Rhoades, Janine S; Schulz, Rosa C; Woolfolk, Candice L; Macones, George A; Haire-Joshu, Debra; Cahill, Alison G

    2018-06-18

    Socioeconomically disadvantaged (SED) African American women with overweight or obesity are less likely to breastfeed. To test whether a home-based lifestyle intervention impacts breastfeeding initiation rates in SED African American women with overweight or obesity. This was a secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial from October 2012 to March 2016 at a university-based hospital within the LIFE-Moms consortium. SED African American women with overweight or obesity and singleton gestations were randomized by 16 weeks to Parents as Teachers (PAT)-a home-based parenting support and child development educational intervention-or PAT+, PAT with additional content on breastfeeding. Participants completed a breastfeeding survey. Outcomes included breastfeeding initiation and reasons for not initiating or not continuing breastfeeding. One hundred eighteen women were included: 59 in PAT+; 59 in PAT. Breastfeeding initiation rates were similar in each group (78.00% in PAT+; 74.58% in PAT). On a one to four scale, with four denoting "very important," women in PAT+ and PAT were equally likely to rate their beliefs that formula was better than breast milk or breastfeeding would be too inconvenient as the most important reasons to not initiate breastfeeding. On the same scale, women similarly rated their difficulty latching or concern for low milk supply as the most important reasons for breastfeeding cessation. SED African American women with overweight or obesity who received a home-based educational intervention had higher breastfeeding rates than is reported nationally for black women (59%). However, the intervention with more breastfeeding content did not further increase breastfeeding rates or impact reasons for breastfeeding cessation. ClinicalTrials.gov : NCT01768793.

  15. The influence of culture on breast-feeding decisions by African American and white women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Darlene Joyner; Lewallen, Lynne Porter

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how culture influenced breast-feeding decisions in African American and white women, using the Theory of Culture Care Diversity and Universality as a framework. One hundred eighty-six participants responded to the following: The word culture means beliefs and traditions passed down by your family and friends. How has culture affected how you plan to feed your baby? Qualitative content analysis was used to analyze the data. Four categories of responses were identified: influences of family, known benefits of breast-feeding, influences of friends, and personal choice. The findings suggest that race alone may not be as influential in infant feeding decisions as other factors. Although some women acknowledged the effect of their cultural background and experiences, most women reported that their culture did not affect their infant feeding decision. In this population, breast-feeding decisions were based on the influences of family, friends, self, and the perceived knowledge of breast-feeding benefits. Although breast-feeding statistics are commonly reported by race, cultural influences on infant feeding decisions may transcend race and include the influence of family and friends, learned information from impersonal sources, and information that is shared and observed from other people.

  16. Breastfeeding knowledge among working pregnant women in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanci, Gülsah; Yenal, Kerziban

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the breastfeeding knowledge of pregnant working women and explore factors that affected their knowledge. This Turkish study included 260 healthy, working women in the last trimester of pregnancy. Two separate questionnaires developed by the researcher were used to collect data. The average knowledge score of pregnant women respondents for all questions were 6.03 ± 2.99 (range: 0 to 14). Pregnant women had the least knowledge about duration of expressing breast milk (21.9%) and safe storage conditions for breast milk (27.2%). They knew the most about methods to express breast milk (87.3%) and features of containers used to store expressed milk (80%). Study results indicated that working pregnant women need better prenatal education to continue safe breastfeeding after returning to work. Occupational health nurses should inform working pregnant women about expression and storage of breast milk during prenatal education. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. Breastfeeding Initiation and Continuation by Employment Status among Korean Women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kang, N.M.; Lee, J.E.; Bai, Y.; Achterberg, T. van; Hyun, T.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The objective of this study was to examine the factors associated with initiation and continuation of breastfeeding among Korean women in relation to their employment status. METHODS: Data were collected using a web-based self-administered questionnaire from 1,031 Korean mothers living in

  18. Risk factors for exclusive breastfeeding lasting less than two months-Identifying women in need of targeted breastfeeding support.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Cato

    Full Text Available Breastfeeding rates in Sweden are declining, and it is important to identify women at risk for early cessation of exclusive breastfeeding.The aim of this study was to investigate factors associated with exclusive breastfeeding lasting less than two months postpartum.A population-based longitudinal study was conducted at Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden. Six hundred and seventy-nine women were included in this sub-study. Questionnaires were sent at five days, six weeks and six months postpartum, including questions on breastfeeding initiation and duration as well as several other background variables. The main outcome measure was exclusive breastfeeding lasting less than two months postpartum. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used in order to calculate adjusted Odds Ratios (AOR and 95% Confidence Intervals (95% CI.Seventy-seven percent of the women reported exclusive breastfeeding at two months postpartum. The following variables in the multivariate regression analysis were independently associated with exclusive breastfeeding lasting less than two months postpartum: being a first time mother (AOR 2.15, 95% CI 1.32-3.49, reporting emotional distress during pregnancy (AOR 2.21, 95% CI 1.35-3.62 and giving birth by cesarean section (AOR 2.63, 95% CI 1.34-5.17.Factors associated with shorter exclusive breastfeeding duration were determined. Identification of women experiencing emotional distress during pregnancy, as well as scrutiny of caregiving routines on cesarean section need to be addressed, in order to give individual targeted breastfeeding support and promote longer breastfeeding duration.

  19. Low prevalence of long-term breastfeeding among women with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herskin, Camilla W; Stage, Edna; Barfred, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the prevalence of long-term breastfeeding among women with type 2 diabetes compared to women with type 1 diabetes and to identify predictors of long-term breastfeeding for women with pre-gestational diabetes. METHODS: In total, 149 women with diabetes were interviewed ab...

  20. Women's perceptions, knowledge and breastfeeding decision-making : Linking theory to qualitative empirical data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterhoff, Alberta Tonnise

    2015-01-01

    In the Netherlands, many women who start breastfeeding stop doing so in the first month after birth. Campaigns aiming to increase breastfeeding rates, focus on initiation as well as on continuation of breastfeeding, preferably until six months after birth. Little is known about women’s underlying

  1. Food Safety for Pregnant and Breastfeeding Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... contaminate. For example, after cutting meat, wash the knife before using it to cut vegetables. COOK: Cook ... Adults Men and Women Moms/ Moms-to-Be Making Healthy Choices in Each Food Group MyPlate Plan ...

  2. A Social Media Campaign to Promote Breastfeeding among Saudi Women: A Web-based Survey Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahkali, Salwa; Alkharjy, Nora; Alowairdy, Maryam; Househ, Mowafa; Da'ar, Omar; Alsurimi, Khaled

    2015-01-01

    Prolonged breastfeeding can prevent or limit the severity of a variety of diseases and conditions. Although evidence clearly shows that there are health benefits for breastfeeding, adherence to breastfeeding remains a key challenge facing maternal health providers in Saudi Arabia. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the impacts of a social media platform (Twitter) to promote breastfeeding in Saudi Arabia. Between February 10 and March 25, 2015, a web-based questionnaire was administered to evaluate the impacts of a Twitter based educational campaign on the awareness, knowledge, and adherence to breastfeeding behavior for women in Saudi Arabia. The overall response rate among mothers with a newborn child was 83% (n=484). The results showed an increase in the knowledge and awareness of breastfeeding practices and adherence among Twitter followers. The initiation rate of breastfeeding had slightly increased among women who never had previously breastfed. More women reported their willingness to continue exclusive breastfeeding and to stop bottle-feeding. Results also show that an integration of professional breastfeeding support, public health education programs through social media could be an effective tool in promoting breastfeeding in Saudi Arabia. There is a need for further research on designing and implementing a social media based educational outreach program to increase women's awareness, knowledge, and adherence to breastfeeding behavior in Saudi Arabia.

  3. Predictors of Breastfeeding Duration among Women in Kuwait: Results of a Prospective Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Dashti, Manal; Scott, Jane A.; Edwards, Christine A.; Al-Sughayer, Mona

    2014-01-01

    The purposes of this paper are to report the prevalence of breastfeeding to six months among women in Kuwait and to determine the factors that are associated with the duration of breastfeeding. A cohort of 373 women recruited from maternity wards in four hospitals in Kuwait city were followed from birth to 26 weeks postpartum. The association of any and full breastfeeding duration and predictor variables were explored using multivariate Cox’s proportional hazards models. At six months, 39% o...

  4. What Do Women Really Want? Lessons for Breastfeeding Promotion and Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Amy

    2016-04-01

    Promoting breastfeeding is a strategic priority, but breastfeeding rates remain low in the United Kingdom. Women value breastfeeding promotion and education, but a different strategy may be needed to continue to raise breastfeeding rates. New mothers, as the experts, are best placed to inform these changes. The current study explored new mothers' attitudes toward breastfeeding education and promotion, evaluating experiences and examining ideas for change. One thousand one hundred thirty mothers with a baby aged 0-2 years old who had planned to breastfeed at birth completed a questionnaire consisting of both closed and open-ended questions exploring their attitudes to breastfeeding promotion and support. Overall, the findings showed that mothers valued breastfeeding information, but believed that changes needed to be made to current messages. Key themes included a move away from the perception that breastfeeding is best (rather than normal), emphasis on wider values other than the health benefits of breastfeeding, and a message that every feed, rather than just 6 months exclusive breastfeeding, matters. Mothers also highlighted the need for promotion and education to target family members and wider society rather than simply mothers themselves, all of whom influenced both directly or indirectly maternal decision and ability to breastfeed. Mothers suggested ideas for promotional campaigns or how specific groups or methods could be used to increase support, including education for children, TV adverts, and using established online sources of breastfeeding information. The findings are important both for those supporting new mothers to breastfeed and those involved in breastfeeding policy and promotional messages.

  5. Integrative Review of Breastfeeding Duration and Influencing Factors Among Women Serving Active Duty in the U.S. Military.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farwell, Andrea L

    To determine what is known about breastfeeding duration among active-duty servicewomen and to identify factors related to military employment that facilitate or inhibit breastfeeding. Literature searches using CINAHL and MEDLINE were conducted with the keywords military and breastfeeding for articles published from January 2000 through May 2016. Abstracts and full-text research articles were retrieved and analyzed that met the inclusion criteria: English language, U.S. active-duty military personnel, peer-reviewed, and identified facilitators and/or barriers to breastfeeding. Eight studies were analyzed for quality and content; analysis was guided by Cooper's five stages of review synthesis processes. Findings indicated that although breastfeeding initiation rates are similar to those for civilians, military women may discontinue sooner. Perception of military work as a barrier is associated with shorter duration, and enlisted personnel were less likely to breastfeed to 12 months than commissioned officers. Military women experienced work-related barriers: lack of proper facilities for pumping, pressures and obligations related to rank, conflicts between mother/soldier demands, physical fitness/weight standards, concerns related to exposure to hazardous material, and prolonged separations from their infants. Most women in the military serve during their childbearing years when they may want to breastfeed. Strategies to promote breastfeeding include advocacy for policy changes, education of servicewomen and supervisors/commanders, and implementation of a breastfeeding class that addresses military-specific factors. Copyright © 2017 AWHONN, the Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Demands out of context: Tanzanian women combining exclusive breastfeeding with employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlay, Rose Shao; Keddy, Barbara; Stern, Phyllis Noerager

    2004-03-01

    This research, conducted in Tanzania, involved 6 women and their experiences as they combined exclusive breastfeeding with work outside their home. Additional data were collected at a conference in Tanzania and from women in North America. We found that while public health officials did a spectacular job of convincing the women of the advantages of exclusive breastfeeding in terms of their babies' health and their own, they then left the women to their own devises when it came to solving the practical problems of breastfeeding at the same time as holding down a full-time job. We found that the women had to deal with conditions such as no on-site child care, lack of expressing or breastfeeding rooms, and short maternity leave at most workplaces. In addition, the women suffered the embarrassment of dribbling breasts while working. It seems clear that while cultural norms persist, these women are victims who are taught the imperative of breastfeeding without being given societal and governmental support. Therefore, the obvious next step for health professionals is to work for sociopolitical action that will provide a context where breastfeeding can take its natural place in the growth and development of infants. While structural functionalists might insist that structures in place position breastfeeding as having no normal function in the workplace, the pressure of the World Health Organization, by the shear weight of its international influence, may force a change in structure of the workplace.

  7. Policy and Legal Protection for Breastfeeding and Incarcerated Women in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paynter, Martha Jane

    2018-05-01

    Most incarcerated women in Canada are mothers. Because women are the fastest growing population in carceral facilities, protecting the rights of incarcerated women to breastfeed their children is increasingly important. There is considerable evidence that incarcerated women in Canada experience poor physical and mental health, isolation, and barriers to care. Incarcerated women and their children could benefit significantly from breastfeeding. This Insight in Policy explores policy and legal protection for breastfeeding in Canada as it relates to carceral facilities, considers key cases regarding breastfeeding rights among incarcerated women, and presents recommendations for policy development and advocacy. The Canadian Constitution and human rights legislation across Canada prohibits discrimination on the basis of gender and includes pregnancy and the possibility of becoming pregnant as a characteristic of gender. Some provinces note that breastfeeding is a characteristic of gender. Women's Wellness Within, a nonprofit organization providing volunteer perinatal support to criminalized women in Nova Scotia, conducted a scan of all provincial and territorial correctional services acts and the federal Corrections and Conditional Release Act: none mention breastfeeding. Protocols for breastfeeding during arrest and lockup by police were not available in any jurisdiction across Canada. International law, including the Convention on the Rights of the Child, the Nelson Mandela Rules, and the Bangkok Rules, have application to the rights of incarcerated breastfeeding women. The Inglis v. British Columbia (Minister of Public Safety) (2013) and Hidalgo v. New Mexico Department of Corrections (2017) decisions are pivotal examples of successful litigation brought forward by incarcerated mothers to advance breastfeeding rights. Improved application and understanding of existent law could advance breastfeeding rights.

  8. Breastfeeding Practices in Relation to Country of Origin Among Women Living in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busck-Rasmussen, Marianne; Villadsen, Sarah Fredsted; Norsker, Filippa Nyboe

    2014-01-01

    , suggesting that acculturation did not favor breastfeeding. For all but the group of women who had migrated from Pakistan, adjustment for socio-demographic indicators (age, parity, education, attachment to labour market, and income) eliminated the increased risk of suboptimal breastfeeding...

  9. Breastfeeding support - the importance of self-efficacy for low-income women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entwistle, Francesca; Kendall, Sally; Mead, Marianne

    2010-07-01

    Breastfeeding is a key determinant in promoting public health and reducing health inequality. Low-income women have a significantly lower level of breastfeeding. Midwives in the UK have been encouraged to implement the World Health Organization/United Nations Children's Fund's Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding, but to date, there has been no evaluation of the impact of the training initiative on the breastfeeding behaviours of low-income women. As part of a wider study, this qualitative component was designed to answer the question - what are the views and experiences of low-income women (defined by Jarman scores) in relation to their breastfeeding support received in the post-natal period? A sample of seven women was interviewed. The in-depth interviews were analysed using a qualitative, thematic approach based on the self-efficacy theory. The four themes that emerged from the data were the following: breastfeeding related to the woman's self-confidence, the social environment in which the woman lived, knowledge of breastfeeding and the influence of maternity services on breastfeeding outcomes. These themes were interpreted in relation to the self-efficacy theory. The findings suggest that the components that inform self-efficacy are consistent with the themes from the data, suggesting that midwives and other health professionals should take the psychosocial aspects of breastfeeding support into account. As this important feature of breastfeeding support is not explicitly part of the current Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding, we suggest that further research and debate could inform expansion of these minimum standards to include the psychosocial aspects.

  10. Breastfeeding woman are at higher risk of vitamin D deficiency than non-breastfeeding women - insights from the German VitaMinFemin study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellert, Sandra; Ströhle, Alexander; Hahn, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Despite increased awareness of the adverse health effects of vitamin D deficiency, only a few studies have evaluated the vitamin D status (25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OHD)]) of breastfeeding women and up to now, no information exits for German breastfeeding women. Therefore, the aim of study was to determine the vitamin D status of breastfeeding women compared to non-pregnant and non-breastfeeding (NPNB) women. This cross-sectional study investigated 124 breastfeeding women and 124 age and season matched NPNB women from the German "Vitamin and mineral status among German women" study. The study participants were recruited from April 2013 to March 2015 and did not take vitamin D supplements. Serum 25(OH)D was analyzed by chemiluminescent immunoassay. Vitamin D deficiency (risk of vitamin D deficiency was higher in the winter and spring months (OR: 2.6, 95% CI 1.1, 6.3) and increased with lower longitude per one unit (OR 0.7, 95% CI 0.6, 0.9). Breastfeeding women in Germany had a higher risk of deficient vitamin D levels than NPNB women. In further studies, the optimal vitamin D status for breastfeeding women should be investigated and also the required vitamin D doses to ensure this vitamin D status. German Clinical Trial Register (identification number: DRKS00004789).

  11. Employment and breastfeeding outcomes in a sample of black women in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarter-Spaulding, Deborah; Lucas, Jennifer; Gore, Rebecca

    2011-12-01

    Black women have lower rates of breastfeeding initiation and duration than other racial groups have, but the effects of employment on breastfeeding, specifically for Black women, have not been studied extensively. The purpose of this research was to determine the influence of work or maternity leave on breastfeeding duration in a sample of Black women. Participants were recruited in the first postpartum week, and then followed monthly for six months or until complete weaning. The timing of returning to work significantly influenced the risk of weaning. Women who returned to work prior to 12 weeks were more likely to wean their babies than both those who returned to work after 12 weeks as well as those who remained at home. Policies that allow for at least 12 weeks' maternity leave would be likely to increase breastfeeding duration for employed Black women. Interdisciplinary research is needed to address health and economic issues of maternity leave and to eliminate racial disparities.

  12. At the edges of embodiment: determinants of breastfeeding for first nations women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eni, Rachel; Phillips-Beck, Wanda; Mehta, Punam

    2014-05-01

    In Canada, First Nations women are far less likely to breastfeed than other women. First Nations people have been subjected to massive health and social disparities and are at the lowest end of the scale on every measure of well-being. The purpose of this study is to understand the experiences, strengths, and challenges of breastfeeding for First Nations women. Central to the current research is the notion of an embodiment within indigenous women's health and, more specifically, breastfeeding perspectives. Guided by an indigenous feminist standpoint, our research study evolved through honest discussions and is informed by relevant public health literature on breastfeeding. We collected quantitative data through a survey on demographics and feeding practices, and we conducted focus groups in three Canadian provinces (British Columbia, Manitoba, and Ontario) over a period of 1 year (2010) from 65 women in seven First Nation communities. Three overarching themes are discussed: social factors, including perceptions of self; breastfeeding environments; and intimacy, including the contribution of fathers. The main findings are that breastfeeding is conducive to bed sharing, whereas a history of residential school attendance, physical and psychological trauma, evacuations for childbirth, and teen pregnancy are obstacles to breastfeeding. Also, fathers play a pivotal role in a woman's decision to breastfeed. Findings from this study contribute to informing public health by reconsidering simplistic health promotion and public health policies and, instead, educating First Nations communities about the complexity of factors associated with multiple breastfeeding environments.

  13. Do breastfeeding intentions of pregnant inner-city teens and adult women differ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Ashley; O'Riordan, Mary Ann; Furman, Lydia

    2010-12-01

    This study compared the breastfeeding intentions and attitudes of pregnant low-income inner-city teens (age ≤19 years) and non-teens (age ≥20) to determine if age is a significant determinant of intent to breastfeed in this population. We used structured interviews to examine the feeding intentions and attitudes of consecutive healthy pregnant women receiving obstetrical care at the Women's Health Center, MacDonald Women's Hospital, Cleveland, OH (June 1-July 31, 2007). The primary outcome measure was rate of intent to breastfeed among teen versus non-teen participants. Attitudes and self-assessed knowledge regarding breastfeeding were compared between teens and non-teens, and multiple logistic regression analysis was used to examine the effect of age on breastfeeding intent. We interviewed 176 pregnant women (95% African-American, 94% single marital status, median age 22 years [range, 15-41 years], 46 [26%] teens) at a median of 27 weeks of pregnancy. There were no significant differences between teens and non-teens in race, marital status, or timing of first prenatal visit or interview. Rate of intent to breastfeed and planned duration and exclusivity of breastfeeding, as well as most measured attitudes about breastfeeding including "back to work" plans, were not significantly different between groups. Significant determinants of feeding intent included primiparity, good self-assessed knowledge about breastfeeding, and having support from the father of the baby. In a population at high risk for choosing not to breastfeed, we found no significant explanatory effect of age on breastfeeding intention, implying that an inclusive targeted breastfeeding intervention program may be effective for both teens and non-teens in a low-income inner-city population. We also found that the support of the father of the baby significantly influenced breastfeeding intent among our participants, suggesting that paternal involvement will be integral to the success of

  14. Pregnant and breastfeeding women: A priority population for HIV viral load monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myer, Landon; Essajee, Shaffiq; Broyles, Laura N; Watts, D Heather; Lesosky, Maia; El-Sadr, Wafaa M; Abrams, Elaine J

    2017-08-01

    Landon Myer and colleagues discuss viral load monitoring for pregnant HIV-positive women and those breastfeeding; ART treatments can suppress viral load and are key to preventing transmission to the child.

  15. Promoting and Supporting Breastfeeding Among Active Duty Women: An Education Module for Health Professionals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Friedline, Donna

    2004-01-01

    .... While it is well known that full-time employment decreases the incidence and duration of breastfeeding, active duty women may face additional obstacles such as potential deployment, body weight...

  16. Enhancing Breastfeeding Rates Among African American Women: A Systematic Review of Current Psychosocial Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Angela; Kirk, Rosalind; Rosenblum, Katherine Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The goals of this article are to provide a review of key interventions and strategies that impact initiation and duration of breastfeeding with particular focus on low-income African American mothers' maternal psychological vulnerabilities during the early postpartum period using a social ecological perspective as a guiding framework. Although modest gains have been achieved in breastfeeding initiation rates in the United States, a projected gap remains between infant feeding practices and national Healthy People breastfeeding goals set for 2020, particularly among African Americans. These disparities raise concerns that socially disadvantaged mothers and babies may be at increased risk for poor postnatal outcomes because of poorer mental health and increased vulnerability to chronic health conditions. Breastfeeding can be a protective factor, strengthening the relationship between mother and baby and increasing infant health and resilience. Evidence suggests that no single intervention can sufficiently address the multiple breastfeeding barriers faced by mothers. Effective intervention strategies require a multilevel approach. A social ecological perspective highlights that individual knowledge, behavior, and attitudes are shaped by interactions between the individual woman, her friends and family, and her wider historical, social, political, economic, institutional, and community contexts, and therefore effective breastfeeding interventions must reflect all these aspects. Current breastfeeding interventions are disjointed and inadequately meet all African American women's social and psychological breastfeeding needs. Poor outcomes indicate a need for an integrative approach to address the complexity of interrelated breastfeeding barriers mothers' experience across layers of the social ecological system. PMID:25423601

  17. Predictors of breastfeeding duration among women in Kuwait: results of a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashti, Manal; Scott, Jane A; Edwards, Christine A; Al-Sughayer, Mona

    2014-02-20

    The purposes of this paper are to report the prevalence of breastfeeding to six months among women in Kuwait and to determine the factors that are associated with the duration of breastfeeding. A cohort of 373 women recruited from maternity wards in four hospitals in Kuwait city were followed from birth to 26 weeks postpartum. The association of any and full breastfeeding duration and predictor variables were explored using multivariate Cox's proportional hazards models. At six months, 39% of all infants were receiving some breast milk and only 2% of infants had been fully breastfed to 26 weeks. Women born in other Arab countries were less likely to discontinue breastfeeding than women born in Kuwait. Other factors positively associated with breastfeeding duration were level of maternal education, higher parity, infant being demand fed in hospital and a preference for breastfeeding on the part of the infant's father and maternal grandmother. The introduction of a pacifier before four weeks of age and the mother intending to return to work by six months were negatively associated with duration. These findings present a number of opportunities for prolonging breastfeeding duration in Kuwait.

  18. Predictors of Breastfeeding Duration among Women in Kuwait: Results of a Prospective Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manal Dashti

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The purposes of this paper are to report the prevalence of breastfeeding to six months among women in Kuwait and to determine the factors that are associated with the duration of breastfeeding. A cohort of 373 women recruited from maternity wards in four hospitals in Kuwait city were followed from birth to 26 weeks postpartum. The association of any and full breastfeeding duration and predictor variables were explored using multivariate Cox’s proportional hazards models. At six months, 39% of all infants were receiving some breast milk and only 2% of infants had been fully breastfed to 26 weeks. Women born in other Arab countries were less likely to discontinue breastfeeding than women born in Kuwait. Other factors positively associated with breastfeeding duration were level of maternal education, higher parity, infant being demand fed in hospital and a preference for breastfeeding on the part of the infant’s father and maternal grandmother. The introduction of a pacifier before four weeks of age and the mother intending to return to work by six months were negatively associated with duration. These findings present a number of opportunities for prolonging breastfeeding duration in Kuwait.

  19. Perceptions of breastfeeding and planned return to work or school among low-income pregnant women in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojjanasrirat, Wilaiporn; Sousa, Valmi D

    2010-07-01

    To describe the perceptions of breastfeeding in low-income pregnant women to understand their needs better as they plan to return to work or school. Maternal employment has a negative impact on breastfeeding duration. Yet there is insufficient research on challenges and facilitators regarding breastfeeding and employment issue among low-income women in the USA. Knowing the perceptions of breastfeeding among low-income pregnant women and their plan to return to work or school may have implications for nurses and midwives in providing quality care. Qualitative study using focus group interviews. The research setting consisted of three Women, Infants and Children clinics (WIC) in a midwestern city of the USA. Seventeen pregnant women (aged 19-35) participated in focus group interviews. Data were coded and analysed for themes and patterns using the QSR software - NVivo 6. Eleven participants were single. Ten women were primigravida, and seven were multipara. The following five themes were identified: (1) perceived benefits of breastfeeding; (2) general perceptions of breastfeeding; (3) maternal concerns; (4) having the right support; and (5) anticipated challenges of combining breastfeeding and work. Conclusions.  Low-income women anticipated substantial barriers for breastfeeding when they planned to combine breastfeeding and work or school. The results of this study have many implications for public health practice, research and policy. Educating employers and the public at large about the health and economic benefits derived from long-term breastfeeding could help promote breastfeeding awareness. Strategies supporting breastfeeding among low-income working women must be provided at multiple levels to help overcome the barriers they concern. Health care providers should help women gain confidence by minimising their uncertainties and fears about breastfeeding to prepare them to continue breastfeeding successfully after returning to work. © 2010 Blackwell

  20. Timing of return to work and women's breastfeeding practices in urban Malaysia: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, Zaharah; Liamputtong, Pranee; Amir, Lisa H

    2018-01-01

    Nearly half of the working population in Malaysia are women, and with only a short period of maternity leave, they may struggle to achieve the recommended 6 months of exclusive breastfeeding. The aim of this paper was to explore the relationship between the timing of return to work and beliefs and breastfeeding practices among women in urban Malaysia. A qualitative inquiry based on a phenomenological framework and multiple methods was used: face-to-face interview, participant diary and researcher field notes. Data collection took place in Penang and the Klang Valley, Malaysia, from March to September 2011. Eligible participants were purposely identified at randomly selected recruitment sites. A thematic analysis method was used to develop the typologies and categories of the findings. A total of 40 working women with a mean age of 32 years (SD 3.4) were interviewed and 15 participated in the diary writing. Most women (75%) returned to work between 2 and 3 months. Only 10% returned to work 4 months or later postpartum, and 15% had an early return to work (defined here as less than 2 months). The women fell into three groups: Passionate women with a strong determination to breastfeed, who exclusively breastfed for 6 months; Ambivalent women, who commenced breastfeeding but were unable to sustain this after returning to work; and Equivalent women, who perceived formula feeding as equally nutritious as breast milk. Although longer maternity leave was very important for Ambivalent women to maintain breastfeeding, it was not as important for the Equivalent or Passionate women. In conclusion, returning earlier was not an absolute barrier to continuing breastfeeding. Instead, a woman's beliefs and perceptions of breastfeeding were more important than the timing of her return to work in determining her ability to maintain breastfeeding or breast milk feeding. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Beliefs of Pregnant Women in Qom City about Exclusive Breastfeeding until 6 Months of Age, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahimi Tahereh

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Exclusive breastfeeding is the most effective way of feeding infants until 6 months of age. The present study aimed to determine the beliefs of pregnant women in Qom city about exclusive breastfeeding until 6 months of age based on constructs of theory of planned behavior. : In this descriptive cross-sectional study, after designing a questionnaire to measure the constructs of theory of planned behavior, including behavioral, normative, and control beliefs, and also determining its validity and reliability, 240 pregnant women in Qom were selected using cluster sampling and completed the questionnaires. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Results: More emotional relationship with infants was the most important positive behavioral belief, and belief in breast malformation and fatigue was negative behavioral beliefs about exclusive breastfeeding among the pregnant women. The opinion of physicians and health care providers about exclusive breastfeeding was reported as the most important normative belief, and urging of relatives, especially mother or mother-in-law to use sweet water or powdered milk was the most important control beliefs among the mothers, which made exclusive breastfeeding difficult. Conclusion: Promoting positive beliefs and correcting wrong beliefs about exclusive breastfeeding, along with consideration of the role of health care providers and husband would help pregnant mothers to accept the choice of exclusive breastfeeding until the end of 6 months of age.

  2. Low breastfeeding rates and body mass index in Danish children of women with gestational diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenger-Grøn, Jesper; Fenger-Grøn, Morten; Blunck, Charlotte Holst

    2015-01-01

    on breastfeeding rates, growth patterns and their associations are important to optimize future strategies among offspring from women with GDM managed by diet. Methods Based on 10.730 births, a cohort of 131 singletons of Danish women with GDM managed by diet was defined. Data on feeding patterns, offspring length...... feeding was introduced earlier than recommended among 11 %. At the age of five weeks and at five months, children had grown longer and had lower BMI than expected from Danish and World Health Organization references. In the study periods, breastfeeding was significantly associated with lower BMI....... Conclusion Despite lower breastfeeding rates than normally reported in Denmark, offspring BMI at the age of five months were low. Still new initiatives to promote breastfeeding among Danish women with GDM should be considered....

  3. Incorporating breastfeeding education into prenatal care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, Adrienne; Faucher, Mary Ann; Spencer, Rebecca

    2015-03-01

    Prenatal breastfeeding education increases breastfeeding initiation, exclusivity, and duration. Current research regarding antenatal breastfeeding education suggests that recurrent, individual, and technology-based education programs are effective in providing women with evidence-based breastfeeding information and guidance. This project was implemented at an obstetrical practice in the northeast United States. Pregnant women between 32 weeks of gestation and birth, receiving care from certified nurse-midwives, were the targeted population. Three breastfeeding modules were created and offered to women at the 32-, 34-, and 36-week prenatal visit via computer tablets. Women answered questionnaires at the end of each module, serving as a measure for participation and content learning. Women also completed a questionnaire at the 6-week postpartum visit to assess summative perceptions. Twenty-three women participated, and 21 women completed questionnaires at 6 weeks postpartum. All women answered the content questions at the end of the modules correctly. Sixty-seven percent reported prior breastfeeding experience, 95% initiated breastfeeding, 86% were exclusively breastfeeding at 6 weeks postpartum, and 71% of the women planned to exclusively breastfeed for 6 months. Sixty-seven percent reported the modules promoted or affirmed their decision to breastfeed, whereas 5% would have preferred group-based education. Providers documented breastfeeding education 52% of the time. The results of this project indicate that women successfully learned breastfeeding content via the tablet methodology. The results confirm that prenatal breastfeeding education, in the office setting, is well accepted by women. In order to assess the impact of the program on breastfeeding success, further study is needed.

  4. Differences in Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome by Breastfeeding Experience of Women in Their 30s and 40s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye-Jin Kim, MSN, RN

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: This study found that postpartum breastfeeding may play a significant role in reducing the risk of metabolic syndrome and also that childbearing is associated with a higher incidence of metabolic syndrome among women in their 30s. For women in their 40s, the risk of metabolic syndrome did not significantly differ depending on the breastfeeding experience. This study indicated that breastfeeding can be a way to reduce metabolic health burdens in women in their 30s.

  5. Barriers and facilitators for breastfeeding among working women in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Marina L; Esposito, Noreen

    2007-01-01

    To review the literature and describe the barriers and facilitators to the continuation of breastfeeding for at least 6 months by working women in the United States. A search of PubMed, CINAHL, Sociological Abstracts, ISI, PsychInfo, and ProQuest. Twenty studies based on the inclusion criteria and published between January 1, 1995, and January 2006. An ecologic framework, which includes the individual (microsystem), social support and relationships (mesosystem), and the workplace environment (exosystem). When working mothers possess certain personal characteristics and develop a strategic plan, breastfeeding is promoted. When social support is available and when support groups are utilized, lactation is also facilitated. Part-time work, lack of long mother-infant separations, supportive work environments and facilities, and child care options facilitate breastfeeding. Health care providers can use the findings of this review to promote breastfeeding among working women by using tactics geared toward the mother, her social network, and the entire community.

  6. Exclusive breastfeeding plan of pregnant Southeast Asian women: what encourages them?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, Nikmah Salamia; Sastroasmoro, Sudigdo; Hidayati, Fatimah; Sapriani, Irma; Suradi, Rulina; Grobbee, Diederick E; Uiterwaal, Cuno S P M

    2013-06-01

    This study investigated factors involved in breastfeeding planning of pregnant Asian women. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 207 pregnant women visiting the Budi Kemuliaan Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia, between June and August 2011. The planned breastfeeding duration and determinants were sought using a standardized self-reported questionnaire. Most subjects had low income (84.1%) and education (79.7%). Women who had been informed about breastfeeding had a higher likelihood to plan longer (≥6 months) breastfeeding (odds ratio [OR] 1.97; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.04-3.75; p=0.04), whereas women who had breastfed previous children over a shorter period had a lower likelihood (OR 0.26; 95% CI 0.11-0.59; p=0.001). Age, low education level, first pregnancy, and low income had no association with breastfeeding plans. Working mothers who had to return to work before 6 months and worked for >8 hours/day were less likely to plan longer breastfeeding (OR 0.14; 95% CI 0.02-0.83; p=0.03 vs. OR 0.53; 95% CI 0.17-1.63; p=0.27), whereas those intending to express their milk were more likely to breastfeed longer (OR 16.85; 95% CI 4.21-67.48; pwork, who had previously breastfed for a short period, and who are not well informed about breastfeeding tend to plan shorter breastfeeding. Among mothers who work, it is the length of maternal leave and required working hours that determine the plans.

  7. The experiences of urban, professional women when combining breastfeeding with paid employment in Karachi, Pakistan: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirani, Shela Akbar Ali; Karmaliani, Rozina

    2013-06-01

    Pakistan has the second highest child mortality rate in South Asia. Breastfeeding can promote infant health, prevent infection and possibly mortality. However, a gradual decline in breastfeeding is reported for Pakistan; especially among urban, educated, employed women. Little research exists regarding the experiences of professional women in Pakistan who are breastfeeding and employed. To describe the experiences of urban, professional women who breastfeed and are employed, as related to facilitators and barriers of breastfeeding. Using a qualitative descriptive design, nine full-time employed women were recruited through purposive sampling from a private tertiary care health setting in Karachi, Pakistan. A pre-tested, semi-structured interview guide was used for an in-depth interview of 40-45min with each participant. Most women spoke about the challenges of combining breastfeeding with employment, which resulted in early cessation of breastfeeding. The study indicated that positive maternal attributes such as knowledge about breastfeeding, planning, self-commitment, and open communication, as well as availability of social and workplace support is essential to enable urban, professional women in Pakistan to continue breastfeeding while employed. Pakistan has high infant and child mortality rate and decreasing prevalence of breastfeeding, especially among employed professional women. Our findings indicate an urgent need for lactation support programs that include integrated interventions for lactating women that offer informational support, social support, and formal workplace support. Copyright © 2012 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Breast-feeding intentions among low-income pregnant and lactating women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Gina Jarman; Arnett, Dennis B; Mauk, Eileen

    2008-01-01

    Provide a better understanding of the process used by low-income pregnant/postpartum women when deciding whether to breast-feed or not. Pregnant/postpartum women admitted to an obstetrics floor completed a survey to determine breast-feeding intention (n=88). Subjects were primarily Hispanic and African American women. Beliefs and referent other were related positively to attitude and subjective norm, respectively. Subjective norm was related positively to intention to breast-feed. Breast-feeding knowledge was low. Others' opinions clearly influence feeding intentions among this population of low-income women. Inclusion of these significant others, family, and friends within the breast-feeding education process is warranted.

  9. Community based participatory research of breastfeeding disparities in African American women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulka, Tamar Ringel; Jensen, Elizabeth; McLaurin, Sue; Woods, Elizabeth; Kotch, Jonathan; Labbok, Miriam; Bowling, Mike; Dardess, Pamela; Baker, Sharon

    2011-08-01

    OBJECTIVE: Lack of support for breastfeeding mothers has been consistently identified in the literature as a barrier for breastfeeding across racial and ethnic groups. Using a community-based participatory approach, academic and community-based partners conducted an iterative process to assess barriers, facilitators and potential mediating interventions for breastfeeding in the African-American community in Durham, North Carolina. METHODS: Eight focus groups were conducted with African-American mothers, fathers and grandmothers. Researchers transcribed and coded each focus group and analyzed using Atlas ti. 5.2. Patterns and themes that emerged informed the development of community stakeholder interviews; 41 interviews were conducted with community representatives. These findings informed the development of a support group pilot intervention. The pilot support groups were evaluated for increase in knowledge of attendees. RESULTS: Focus group and community interviews indicate that African Americans may disproportionately experience inadequate support for breastfeeding. This lack of support was reported in the home, the workplace, among peers, and from healthcare providers. The pilot support groups resulted in increased knowledge of breastfeeding among group participants OR=3.6 (95% CI: 2.5, 5.2). CONCLUSIONS: The findings from this research underscore the importance of a multi-level approach to breastfeeding support for African American women to address breastfeeding disparities.

  10. Awareness and Attitude towards Breastfeeding among Two Generations of Indian Women: A Comparative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Deeksha; Sardana, Parnita; Saxena, Aashish; Dogra, Luvdeep; Coondoo, Ambika; Kamath, Asha

    2015-01-01

    Present study was aimed to analyze the impact of education, employment and financial independence in breastfeeding practices among Indian women. Present explorative questionnaire based survey included 256 women (128 pairs) in the final analysis. A pair means--a) pregnant lady (in her third trimester) representing younger generation and b) her mother/mother in law representing the elder generation. We found that the overall awareness regarding 'breast milk' being the best food for baby was excellent (overall 97.3%; younger generation: 96.9%; elder generation: 97.7%). Overall knowledge regarding the correct technique (28.9% younger generation and 21.9% elder generation) and frequency of breastfeeding (20.3% of younger generation and 34.4% of elder generation) was very poor. Less than 60% (younger generation: 57.8%; elder generation: 58.6%) were aware that the only major contraindication for breastfeeding is a mother infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). On comparing responses obtained from the two generations of women, difference was not statistically significant among most of the issues related to breastfeeding. With regards to the attitude, despite better awareness, only 94.5% women in younger generation and 89.1% women in elder generation were planning to give mother's milk as the first feed to the newborn. Similarly, less than 75% of women were ready to breast-feed the newborn immediately after birth. This was contradictory to the fact that 86% of pregnant women were aware that the baby should be breast-fed within an hour of birth. Awareness with regards to breastfeeding issues had not changed significantly with the educational progress of Indian women. Despite the good level of awareness in the society regarding breastfeeding, attitude to practice the same is lacking.

  11. Interventions in the workplace to support breastfeeding for women in employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulwadud, Omar A; Snow, Mary Elizabeth

    2012-10-17

    In recent years there has been a rise in the participation rate of women in employment. Some may become pregnant while in employment and subsequently deliver their babies. Most may decide to return early to work after giving birth for various reasons. Unless these mothers get support from their employers and fellow employees, they might give up breastfeeding when they return to work. As a result, the duration and exclusivity of breastfeeding to the recommended age of the babies would be affected.Workplace environment can play a positive role to promote breastfeeding. For women going back to work, various types of workplace support interventions are available and this should not be ignored by employers. Notably, promoting breastfeeding in a workplace may have benefits for the women, the baby and also the employer. To assess the effectiveness of workplace interventions to support and promote breastfeeding among women returning to paid work after the birth of their children, and its impact on process outcomes pertinent to employees and employers. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (2 August 2012). Two authors independently assessed all identified studies for randomised controlled trials and quasi-randomised controlled trials that compared workplace interventions with no intervention or two or more workplace interventions against each other. Two authors planned to evaluate the methodological quality of the eligible trials and extract data. There were no randomised controlled trials or quasi-randomised controlled trials identified. No trials have evaluated the effectiveness of workplace interventions in promoting breastfeeding among women returning to paid work after the birth of their child. The impact of such intervention on process outcomes is also unknown. Randomised controlled trials are required to establish the benefits of various types of workplace interventions to support, encourage and promote breastfeeding among working

  12. Alcohol use and self-perceived mental health status among pregnant and breastfeeding women in Canada: a secondary data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, S; Quere, M; Shield, K; Rehm, J; Popova, S

    2016-05-01

    To estimate the prevalence of alcohol consumption during pregnancy and while breastfeeding in Canada from 2003 to 2010, and to test the relation between self-perceived mental health status and alcohol consumption during pregnancy and while breastfeeding. Secondary analysis of four cycles of the Canadian Community Health Survey, a population-based cross-sectional survey. Canada. A total of 18 612 pregnant and 15 836 breastfeeding women. The prevalence of alcohol consumption during pregnancy and while breastfeeding and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated by province and territory, and cycle. The relation between self-perceived mental health status and alcohol consumption during pregnancy and while breastfeeding was explored using quasi-Poisson regression models. Alcohol consumption during pregnancy and while breastfeeding, and self-perceived mental health status. In Canada, between 2003 and 2010, approximately one in every ten pregnant women (9.9%; 95%CI 9.2-10.5%) and two in every ten breastfeeding women (20.3%; 95%CI 19.4-21.2%) women consumed alcohol. Women with a lower self-perceived mental health status (i.e. 'good') were 1.40 (95%CI 1.18-1.67, P women with an 'excellent' self-perceived mental health. There were no notable differences between the categories of mental health status in regard to alcohol consumption while breastfeeding. Despite public health efforts in Canada, a significant proportion of pregnant and breastfeeding women consume alcohol. It is imperative that a standard screening protocol be initiated among pregnant and breastfeeding women, especially in high-risk populations (e.g. women utilising substance abuse treatment programs). In Canada in 2003-2010, approximately 10% of pregnant and 20% of breastfeeding women consumed alcohol. © 2015 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  13. Military milk: breastfeeding rates among Australian Defence Force women who return to military service following maternity leave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Kelley

    2015-02-01

    The breastfeeding behaviors among Australian Defence Force women have not previously been examined. Studies have shown that breastfeeding prevalence and duration are affected by maternity leave entitlements and returning to work. This study aimed to benchmark breastfeeding initiation, prevalence, and duration among a cohort of Australian Defence Force women and to compare these findings against Australian population norms. A cross-sectional survey was conducted via email in 2008 for Australian Defence Force women who had taken maternity leave in the Australian financial year of 2006/2007. Analysis of breastfeeding indicators was undertaken. Ninety-eight percent of Australian Defence Force women in this cohort initiated breastfeeding and breastfed for a median duration of 8 months, returning to work when the mean age of the child was 8.4 months. Breastfeeding prevalence did not meet 2003 Australian National Health and Medical Research Council targets by 6 months postpartum but compared favorably to the Australian population norms. Sixty-six percent of the respondents returned to work full-time, with a median breastfeeding duration of 7 months. Women who returned to work part-time had a longer median duration of 10 months. Breastfeeding rates among this cohort of Australian Defence Force women compare favorably with the general Australian population until 9 months, coinciding with returning to work after a period of maternity leave. The results support recent Australian population studies on breastfeeding and employment. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. [The impact of breastfeeding promotion in women with formal employment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasileiro, Aline Alves; Possobon, Rosana de Fátima; Carrascoza, Karina Camilo; Ambrosano, Gláucia Maria Bovi; Moraes, Antônio Bento Alves de

    2010-09-01

    This study focused on programs to promote breastfeeding in order to prevent early weaning of working mothers' infant children. A non-randomized intervention study was conducted using a survey of mothers who had returned to work after childbirth, including both participants and non-participants in a program to promote breastfeeding. The sample consisted of 200 mothers of infants ranging from 6 to 10 months of age. Factors associated with early weaning were analyzed with the chi-square and Fisher's exact tests and multiple logistic regression (α = 0.05). The results showed statistical differences between the groups in relation to exclusive breastfeeding (p work. There was no difference between the end of maternity leave and weaning time. Mothers that were unable to nurse their infants during the work shift showed 4.98 times higher odds (95%CI: 1.27-19.61) of weaning them before the fourth month of age.

  15. Postpartum sexual abstinence, breastfeeding, and childspacing, among Yoruba women in urban Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feyisetan, B J

    1990-01-01

    This paper examines the extent to which the traditional practice of sexual abstinence during lactation has broken down among Yoruba women residents in urban areas. The first major finding is that there is a gradual erosion of the tradition, and the dominant factors of modernization are education of the woman and the use of contraception. The second major finding is that the breakdown of postpartum sexual taboos has statistically significant negative consequences on duration of lactation, although the negative impact of woman's education is greater. The third major finding is that duration of breastfeeding reduces birth interval significantly only when it is less than 15 months, and that both durations of breastfeeding and birth intervals have declined over time. The first two findings suggest further reductions in the proportion of women who abstain from sexual relations during lactation and in durations of breastfeeding as more women become more educated. Significant declines in birth intervals may follow soon after.

  16. Reducing Postpartum Weight Retention and Improving Breastfeeding Outcomes in Overweight Women: A Pilot Randomised Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Martin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Overweight and obesity is prevalent among women of reproductive age (42% BMI > 25 kg/m2 and parity is associated with risk of weight gain. Weight gain greater than that recommended by the Institute of Medicine (IOM is also associated with lower rates of breastfeeding initiation and duration in women. The aim of this pilot randomised controlled trial is to examine the feasibility of recruiting and maintaining a cohort of pregnant women with the view of reducing postpartum weight retention and improving breastfeeding outcomes. Women (BMI of 25–35 kg/m2 (n = 36 were recruited from the John Hunter Hospital antenatal clinic in New South Wales, Australia. Participants were stratified by BMI and randomised to one of three groups with follow-up to six months postpartum. Women received a dietary intervention with or without breastfeeding support from a lactation consultant, or were assigned to a wait-list control group where the dietary intervention was issued at three months postpartum. Feasibility and acceptability was assessed by participation rates and questionnaire. Analysis of variance and covariance was conducted to determine any differences between groups. Sixty-nine per cent of the participants were still enrolled at six months postpartum. This pilot demonstrated some difficulties in recruiting women from antenatal clinics and retaining them in the trial. Although underpowered; the results on weight; biomarkers and breastfeeding outcomes indicated improved metabolic health.

  17. Intention to Breastfeed as a Predictor of Initiation of Exclusive Breastfeeding in Hispanic Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Ana M; Rayens, Mary K; Gomez, Maria L; Gokun, Yevgeniya; Dignan, Mark B

    2015-08-01

    Exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) is the most efficacious form of infant feeding and nutrition. Hispanic mothers in the US are more likely than mothers of other racial/ethnic groups to supplement with formula in the first 2 days of life. The purpose of this study was to explore infant feeding intentions during the prenatal period as a predictor of EBF at postpartum discharge in a sample of Hispanic women (n = 99). At discharge, 51 % of the women were EBF, 44 % were breastfeeding and supplementing with formula, and 5 % were feeding only formula. Intention to breastfeed was found to be a strong and potentially modifiable predictor of breastfeeding behavior, showing a significant association with EBF upon discharge from the hospital after birth when linked with acceptance of pregnancy and method of delivery. Prenatal care offers a unique opportunity to enhance intentions to breastfeed that may lead to improved EBF in this health vulnerable population.

  18. Breastfeeding: What are the Barriers? Why Women Struggle to Achieve Their Goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriraman, Natasha K; Kellams, Ann

    2016-07-01

    Despite recognized health benefits for both mothers and infants, significant disparities still exist in the rates of breastfeeding in the United States. Major organizations representing the health of women and children (including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC], American Academy of Pediatrics [AAP], American Congress of Obstetrics and Gynecology [ACOG], American Academy of Family Physicians [AAFP], United Nations International Children's Emergency Fund (UNICEF), the World Health Organization [WHO], and the United States Public Health Service [PHS]) recommend exclusive breastfeeding, but statistics show that although many women initiate breastfeeding, few meet the recommended goals for duration and exclusivity. This article reviews the evidence related to barriers (prenatal, medical, societal, hospital, and sociocultural) that many mothers face, and explore the known barriers and the impact they have on a woman's ability to breastfeed her infant. Strategies will be discussed to address (and potentially overcome) some of the most common barriers women face along with a list of resources that can be useful in this effort. Gaps in care and areas that need further research will be noted. This article is targeted toward physicians and other healthcare providers who work with women and who can assist with and advocate for the removal of barriers and thereby improve the health of women and children by increasing the rates of breastfeeding initiation, duration, and exclusivity in the United States.

  19. Breastfeeding in Samoa: A Study to Explore Women's Knowledge and the Factors which Influence Infant Feeding Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Lucy E; Dunne, Thomas F; Lock, Lauren J; Price, Lucy A; Ahmed, Zubair

    2017-01-01

    A decline in breastfeeding rates in Samoa has been reported over the last century. To assess the length of time women breastfeed, their knowledge of both the advantages of and recommendations for breastfeeding, and the factors that influence their decisions to continue or discontinue breastfeeding, a questionnaire was distributed at Tupua Tamasese Meaole Hospital. One hundred and twenty-one eligible participants were included aged 18-50 years (mean age 28.2). Ninety percent of participants initiated breastfeeding, and the majority (78%) of babies were exclusively breastfed for at least the recommended 6 months. Many mothers introduced complementary (solid) foods later than World Health Organization (WHO) and United Nation's International Children's Fund (UNICEF) recommendations of 6 months. Awareness of the advantages of breastfeeding was mixed. The most widely known advantage was "the development of an emotional bond between mother and baby" (67%). Other advantages were less widely known. Only a small minority were aware that breastfeeding reduces risk of maternal diabetes and aids weight loss post partum. Doctors and healthcare workers were listed as the top factors encouraging breastfeeding. Participants' comments revealed a generally positive attitude towards breastfeeding, a very encouraging finding. Participants identified that the number of breastfeeding breaks available at work and the length of their maternity leave were factors discouraging breastfeeding. Future studies are necessary to determine if problems identified in this study are applicable on a national level. These could be important to determine measures to improve breastfeeding practices in Samoa.

  20. The risk of postpartum maternal hyperglycaemia in women with gestational diabetes is reduced by breastfeeding

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Reilly, MW

    2011-09-01

    Background and aims: Gestational diabetes (GDM) is associated with adverse fetal and maternal outcomes. It identifies women at risk of pre-diabetes, type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and cardiovascular risk in later life. Recent studies have suggested that breastfeeding may confer a beneficial effect on postpartum maternal glucose tolerance in both women with GDM and normal glucose tolerance (NGT) in pregnancy.\\r\

  1. The portrayal of infant feeding in British women's magazines: a qualitative and quantitative content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, E; Myles, P; Pritchard, C

    2017-06-01

    Exclusive breastfeeding is the best start an infant can receive. However, in many high-income countries breastfeeding rates are low and this may be a reflection of social norms which in turn may be influenced by the media. This study therefore explored the portrayal of infant feeding in women's general interest magazines. The five top selling women's weekly magazines in Britain and Ireland for 2013 over a 4-month period were included. A quantitative and qualitative content analysis was conducted for both written and visual content. In 58 magazines, there were 90 references to infant feeding with an average of 1.5 (range: 0-5) per magazine. Breastfeeding and formula feeding references were present in equal number and both were predominantly portrayed positively. There was only 1 visual representation of breast feeding compared with 11 of bottle feeding. Potential drivers for breastfeeding included its role in post-pregnancy weight loss and celebrity endorsement while family routine, the role of males in the house and concerns about adverse health effects were identified as barriers to breastfeeding. An improvement in visual representations of breast feeding and factual information in women's weekly magazines may be helpful in re-defining social norms regarding infant feeding. Keywords: food and nutrition, health promotion, public health. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. The extended Theory of Planned Behavior in explaining exclusive breastfeeding intention and behavior among women in Kelantan, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tengku Ismail, Tengku Alina; Wan Muda, Wan Abdul Manan; Bakar, Mohd Isa

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to utilize an extended Theory of Planned Behavior in identifying predictors of exclusive breastfeeding intention and behavior among women in Kelantan, Malaysia. A prospective cohort study was conducted, recruiting pregnant womenthrough two-stage cluster sampling. Their exclusive breastfeeding intention, attitude, perceived norm, perceived behavioral control and past behavior were obtained at baseline through interviewer-guided questionnaire. At one month after delivery, another interview was conducted to determine the two additional variables in the extended theory, which were their postpartum support and breastfeeding difficulty. The behavior, which was the actual duration of exclusive breastfeeding, was obtained from the second follow-up at six months. Pearson correlation and two hierarchical regression analyses were conducted. A total of 200 women completed the study follow-up. Their median intended exclusive breastfeeding duration was 4.0 (IQR 5) months, and the median actual duration was 1.0 (IQR 4) month. The Theory of Planned Behavior explained 51.0% of the variance in intention, with perceived behavioral control and attitude were the significant predictors. It also explained 10.0% of the variance in behavior, but the addition of postpartum support and breastfeeding difficulty increased the amount of explained variance in behavior by 6.0%. The significant predictors of exclusive breastfeeding behavior were intention, postpartum support and breastfeeding difficulty. The extended Theory of Planned Behaviorhad a good predictive ability in explaining exclusive breastfeedingintention and behavior. The women's intention to practice exclusive breastfeeding may be improved by improving their perceived behavioral control and attitude. Providing correct postpartum support and skills to handle breastfeeding difficulties after delivery will improve their exclusive breastfeeding behavior.

  3. Feeding by numbers: an ethnographic study of how breastfeeding women understand their babies' weight charts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dykes Fiona

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Weighing breastfed babies has been the subject of some controversy as the previous international growth chart was largely based on data from infants fed infant formula. The concern that professionals may be misled by the charts into suggesting to mothers that they supplement unnecessarily was a major impetus for the World Health Organization's investment in a new growth chart. Evidence of interpretation in practice has been scant. Methods An ethnographic study was conducted in a town in the Northwest of England to investigate this issue. In the first phase, women and health visitors were observed in the well-child clinic during clinic sessions and breastfeeding group meetings. In the second phase, longitudinal interviews with 14 women were conducted. Each woman was interviewed up to three times in the first six months after the birth of her baby, with a total of 35 interviews. Results Mothers and health visitors focussed on weight gain with frequent weighing and attention to even minor fluctuations of the plotted line being evident. Women felt it important to ensure their baby's weight followed a centile, and preferred for this to be the fiftieth centile. Interventions included giving infant formula and solids as well as changing what the mother ate and drank. Women also described how they worried about their baby's weight. Little effective support by health professionals with breastfeeding technique was observed. Conclusion Babies were weighed more often than officially recommended, with weighing and plotting being at the core of each clinic visit. The plotted weight chart exerted a powerful influence on both women's and health visitors' understanding of the adequacy of breastfeeding. They appeared to rate the regular progression of weight gains along the chart centiles more highly than continued or exclusive breastfeeding. Thus weighing and visual charting of weight constituted a form of surveillance under the medical gaze

  4. Rabies Vaccine Hesitancy and Deaths Among Pregnant and Breastfeeding Women - Vietnam, 2015-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Huong T T; Tran, Cuc H; Dang, Anh D; Tran, Huong G T; Vu, Thiem D; Pham, Thach N; Nguyen, Hoang V; Nguyen, Anh N K; Pieracci, Emily G; Tran, Duong N

    2018-03-02

    Human rabies deaths are preventable through prompt administration of postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) with rabies immune globulin and rabies vaccine after exposure to a rabid animal (1); there are no known contraindications to receiving PEP (1,2). Despite widespread availability of PEP in Vietnam, in 2015 the Ministry of Health (MoH) received reports of pregnant and breastfeeding women with clinically diagnosed rabies. MoH investigated factors associated with these rabies cases. MoH found that, during 2015-2016, among 169 cases reported in Vietnam, two probable cases of rabies were reported in breastfeeding mothers and four in pregnant women, all of whom had been bitten by dogs. All six patients died. Three of the four pregnant women had cesarean deliveries. One of the three newborns died from complications believed to be unrelated to rabies; the fourth pregnant woman contracted rabies too early in pregnancy for the fetus to be viable. Two of the patients sought care from a medical provider or traditional healer; however, none sought PEP after being bitten. In each case, families reported the patient's fear of risk to the fetus or breastfed child as the primary barrier to receiving PEP. These findings highlight the need for public health messaging about the safety and effectiveness of PEP in preventing rabies among all persons with exposures, including pregnant and breastfeeding women.

  5. Effects of menthol essence and breast milk on the improvement of nipple fissures in breastfeeding women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedigheh Amir Ali Akbari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nipple fissure is a common disorder during breastfeeding. With high prevalence of nipple fissures and its impacts on breastfeeding, as well as the existence of evidence in favor of the application of peppermint as an antiinflammatory and antiinfection herb, the purpose of this study is to determine the effect of Menthol essence on improving nipple fissures in the primiparous breastfeeding women. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted using a clinical trial method. Samples were divided randomly into two groups of 55 women. The women in the peppermint group applied four drops of Menthol essence on their nipple and areola after each feeding. The control group applied four drops of their own milk on the nipple and areola after each feeding. Then, the two groups were studied on days 10 and 14 postpartum. For intensity of pain, the visual analog scale (0-10 cm and to measure the severity of damage, Amir scale (1-10 cm were applied and the existence or lack of nipple discharge was also recorded. The data were analyzed using SPSS 17 software. Results: The mean intensity of pain and nipple fissure before treatment (8.55 ± 1.74 and day 10 after delivery (4.26 ± 1.57 and before treatment and day 14 after delivery in the case group (1.32 ± 1.02 had a significant difference (P < 0.001. Nipple discharge between the two groups, before treatment (%75.2 and day 10 after delivery (%31.6 and before treatment and day 14 after delivery (%15.7, the case group had a significant difference (P < 0.001. Conclusion: Menthol essence can improve nipple fissures in the primiparous breastfeeding women.

  6. Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Catheter Drainage of Large Breast Abscesses in Lactating Women: How to Preserve Breastfeeding Safely.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falco, Giuseppe; Foroni, Monica; Castagnetti, Fabio; Marano, Luigi; Bordoni, Daniele; Rocco, Nicola; Marchesi, Vanessa; Iotti, Valentina; Vacondio, Rita; Ferrari, Guglielmo

    2016-12-01

    Management of breast abscess in lactating women remains controversial. During pregnancy, women may develop different kinds of benign breast lesions that could require a surgical incision performed under general anesthesia with consequent breastfeeding interruption. The purpose of this study was to prospectively evaluate the management of large breast abscesses with ultrasound-assisted drainage aiming at breastfeeding preservation. 34 lactating women with a diagnosis of unilateral breast abscess have been treated with an ultrasound (US)-assisted drainage of the abscess. A pigtail catheter was inserted into the fluid collection using the Seldinger technique under US guide and connected to a three stop way to allow drainage and irrigation of the cavity until its resolution. All procedures have been found safe and well tolerated. No recurrence was observed and breastfeeding was never interrupted. The described technique allows to avoid surgery and to preserve breastfeeding in well-selected patients with a safe, well-tolerated and cost-effective procedure.

  7. Rapid Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation for Women in an HIV-1 Prevention Clinical Trial Experiencing Primary HIV-1 Infection during Pregnancy or Breastfeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Susan; John-Stewart, Grace; Egessa, John J; Mubezi, Sezi; Kusemererwa, Sylvia; Bii, Dennis K; Bulya, Nulu; Mugume, Francis; Campbell, James D; Wangisi, Jonathan; Bukusi, Elizabeth A; Celum, Connie; Baeten, Jared M

    2015-01-01

    During an HIV-1 prevention clinical trial in East Africa, we observed 16 cases of primary HIV-1 infection in women coincident with pregnancy or breastfeeding. Nine of eleven pregnant women initiated rapid combination antiretroviral therapy (ART), despite having CD4 counts exceeding national criteria for ART initiation; breastfeeding women initiated ART or replacement feeding. Rapid ART initiation during primary HIV-1 infection during pregnancy and breastfeeding is feasible in this setting.

  8. Rapid Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation for Women in an HIV-1 Prevention Clinical Trial Experiencing Primary HIV-1 Infection during Pregnancy or Breastfeeding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Morrison

    Full Text Available During an HIV-1 prevention clinical trial in East Africa, we observed 16 cases of primary HIV-1 infection in women coincident with pregnancy or breastfeeding. Nine of eleven pregnant women initiated rapid combination antiretroviral therapy (ART, despite having CD4 counts exceeding national criteria for ART initiation; breastfeeding women initiated ART or replacement feeding. Rapid ART initiation during primary HIV-1 infection during pregnancy and breastfeeding is feasible in this setting.

  9. A qualitative study of Western Australian women's perceptions of using a Snoezelen room for breastfeeding during their postpartum hospital stay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauck, Yvonne L; Summers, Lisa; White, Ellie; Jones, Cheryl

    2008-08-13

    There is limited evidence on the use of the Snoezelen concept for maternity clients. Snoezelen, a Dutch concept, initiated in the 1970s as a leisure activity for severely disabled people, involves creating an indoor environment using controllable stimuli to enhance comfort and relaxation. These specially designed rooms expose the user to multiple sensory stimulations combining vision, touch, sounds and aromas. The aim of this study was to provide insight into breastfeeding women's experience of using a Snoezelen room during hospitalisation. A qualitative exploratory design was chosen to reveal women's perceptions of using the Snoezelen room. Osborne Park Hospital, the study setting is the second largest public provider of obstetric services in Western Australia. A purposive sample was drawn from breastfeeding women who used the Snoezelen room during their postpartum stay from March 2006 to March 2007. Saturation was achieved after eleven breastfeeding women were interviewed six weeks post discharge. Data analysis involved the constant comparison method. Participants entered the room feeling tired and emotional with an unsettled baby and breastfeeding issues aggravated by maternal stress and anxiety. All women indicated they were able to achieve relaxation while in the room and would recommend its use to other breastfeeding mothers. Two key themes revealed how the Snoezelen room facilitated maternal relaxation, which ultimately enhanced the breastfeeding experience. The first theme, "Finding Relaxation for the Breastfeeding Mother" incorporates three subthemes: 'Time out' for mother; Control in own personal space; and a Quiet/calm environment with homelike atmosphere. The second theme, "Enabling Focus on Breastfeeding", occurred after relaxation was achieved and involved four subthemes: Able to get one-on-one attention; Not physically exposed to others; Away from prying, judgemental eyes and Able to safely attempt breastfeeding alone knowing help is nearby. Insight

  10. A qualitative study of Western Australian women's perceptions of using a Snoezelen room for breastfeeding during their postpartum hospital stay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    White Ellie

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is limited evidence on the use of the Snoezelen concept for maternity clients. Snoezelen, a Dutch concept, initiated in the 1970s as a leisure activity for severely disabled people, involves creating an indoor environment using controllable stimuli to enhance comfort and relaxation. These specially designed rooms expose the user to multiple sensory stimulations combining vision, touch, sounds and aromas. The aim of this study was to provide insight into breastfeeding women's experience of using a Snoezelen room during hospitalisation. Methods A qualitative exploratory design was chosen to reveal women's perceptions of using the Snoezelen room. Osborne Park Hospital, the study setting is the second largest public provider of obstetric services in Western Australia. A purposive sample was drawn from breastfeeding women who used the Snoezelen room during their postpartum stay from March 2006 to March 2007. Saturation was achieved after eleven breastfeeding women were interviewed six weeks post discharge. Data analysis involved the constant comparison method. Results Participants entered the room feeling tired and emotional with an unsettled baby and breastfeeding issues aggravated by maternal stress and anxiety. All women indicated they were able to achieve relaxation while in the room and would recommend its use to other breastfeeding mothers. Two key themes revealed how the Snoezelen room facilitated maternal relaxation, which ultimately enhanced the breastfeeding experience. The first theme, "Finding Relaxation for the Breastfeeding Mother" incorporates three subthemes: 'Time out' for mother; Control in own personal space; and a Quiet/calm environment with homelike atmosphere. The second theme, "Enabling Focus on Breastfeeding", occurred after relaxation was achieved and involved four subthemes: Able to get one-on-one attention; Not physically exposed to others; Away from prying, judgemental eyes and Able to safely

  11. Hormonal Contraception, Pregnancy, Breastfeeding, and Risk of HIV Disease Progression Among Zambian Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Kristin M; Kilembe, William; Haddad, Lisa; Vwalika, Bellington; Lakhi, Shabir; Khu, Naw Htee; Brill, Ilene; Chomba, Elwyn; Mulenga, Joseph; Tichacek, Amanda; Allen, Susan

    2016-03-01

    Some studies suggest that hormonal contraception, pregnancy, and/or breastfeeding may influence rates of HIV disease progression. From 1994 to 2012, HIV discordant couples recruited at couples' voluntary HIV counseling and testing centers in Lusaka were followed 3-monthly. Multivariate survival analyses explored associations between time-varying contraception, pregnancy, and breastfeeding and 2 outcomes among HIV-positive women: (1) time to death and (2) time to antiretroviral treatment (ART) initiation. Among 1656 female seropositive, male seronegative couples followed for 3359 person-years (PY), 224 women died [6.7/100 PY; 95% confidence interval (CI): 5.8 to 7.6]. After 2003, 290 women initiated ART (14.5/100 PY; 95% CI: 12.9 to 16.2). In a multivariate model of time to death, hormonal implant [adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) = 0.30; 95% CI: 0.10 to 0.98] and injectable (aHR = 0.59; 95% CI: 0.36 to 0.97) were significantly protective relative to nonhormonal method use, whereas oral contraceptive pill (OCP) use was not (aHR = 1.08; 95% CI: 0.74 to 1.57) controlling for baseline HIV disease stage, time-varying pregnancy, time-varying breastfeeding, and year of enrollment. In a multivariate model of time-to-ART initiation, implant was significantly protective (aHR = 0.54; 95% CI: 0.31 to 0.95), whereas OCP (aHR = 0.70; 95% CI: 0.44 to 1.10) and injectable (aHR = 0.85; 95% CI: 0.55 to 1.32) were not relative to nonhormonal method use controlling for variables above, woman's age, and literacy. Pregnancy was not significantly associated with death (aHR = 1.07; 95% CI: 0.68 to 1.66) or ART initiation (aHR = 1.24; 95% CI: 0.83 to 1.86), whereas breastfeeding was protective for death (aHR = 0.34; 95% CI: 0.19 to 0.62) and ART initiation (aHR = 0.49; 95% CI: 0.29 to 0.85). Hormonal implants and injectables significantly predicted lower mortality; implants were protective for ART initiation. OCPs and pregnancy were not associated with death or ART initiation, whereas

  12. Mental health predictors of breastfeeding initiation and continuation among HIV infected and uninfected women in a South African birth cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Eileen; Kuo, Caroline; Cohen, Sophie; Hoare, Jacqueline; Koen, Natassja; Barnett, Whitney; Zar, Heather J; Stein, Dan J

    2017-09-01

    Breastfeeding is a cost-effective, yet underutilized strategy to promote maternal and infant health in low and middle income countries (LMICs). Breastfeeding remains challenging for mothers living with HIV in LMICs, yet few studies have examined mental health predictors of breastfeeding initiation and continuation. We investigated breastfeeding among mothers by HIV status in South Africa, evaluating predictors of breastfeeding initiation and continuation to identify intervention-targets. Breastfeeding patterns were investigated in a subsample of 899 breastfeeding mothers from the Drakenstein Child Health Study; a prospective birth cohort of 1225 pregnant women, between March 2012 and March 2015 in a peri-urban area. Breastfeeding was assessed at 5 time-points between 6weeks and 24months' infant age. Cox proportional hazard models evaluated breastfeeding initiation and duration. Logistic regression models with breastfeeding non-initiation as the outcome parameter were performed to determine associations with maternal sociodemographic, psychosocial factors and gestational outcomes. More HIV-uninfected mothers initiated breastfeeding (n=685, 97%) than HIV-infected mothers (n=87, 45%). Median duration of exclusive breastfeeding was short (2months), but HIV-infected mothers engaged in exclusive breastfeeding for longer duration than uninfected mothers (3 vs 2months). Despite concerning high rates, mental disorders were not significant predictors of breastfeeding behaviour. Employment and HIV diagnosis during pregnancy predicted a lower likelihood of breastfeeding initiation among HIV-infected mothers, while employment was associated with earlier breastfeeding-discontinuation in HIV-uninfected mothers. Findings indicate that future interventions should target sub-populations such as HIV-infected women because of distinct needs. Workplace interventions appear particularly key for mothers in our study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Breastfeeding mothers returning to work: experiences of women at one university in Victoria, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmour, Carole; Monk, Hilary; Hall, Helen

    2013-07-01

    Working women need to juggle work, child care and family to continue to breastfeed. This qualitative study's aim was to explore women's experiences of returning to work following the birth of their baby. Focus groups were held with women within one multi-campus university, who had commenced breastfeeding at birth and had returned to work or study within 12 months. In addition, educators working with babies in childcare centres on two of the campuses were interviewed. Thematic analysis was employed used Rogoff's (2003) three planes of analysis, the individual, the interpersonal and the cultural-institutional. Three themes, proximity, flexibility, and communication, were identified relating to the factors impacting on women and their choices to breastfeed or wean on returning to work. From a socio-cultural perspective these themes can be understood as situated within the interrelated contexts of workplace, child care and family. Limitations of the study include the small number of participants and recruitment from one university.

  14. Breastfeeding works: the role of employers in supporting women who wish to breastfeed and work in four organizations in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmala-Anderson, Joanna; Wallace, Louise M

    2006-09-01

    An important factor influencing duration of breastfeeding is mother's employment status. The main aim of this study was to determine the experience and views of employees (n = 46) in four large public sector organizations concerning breastfeeding support at work. Participants were recruited if they were employed by one of four public service employers and if they were planning to go on maternity leave in the next 6 months, on maternity leave or within 6 months of return from maternity leave. They completed a questionnaire anonymously. Almost 80% of women wanted to continue breastfeeding after returning to work. However, 90% of all respondents were not aware of any employer policy nor offered any information concerning support to enable breastfeeding after returning to work, despite two organizations having a range of maternity- and breastfeeding-related policies in development and some facilities in place. Almost 90% of respondents stated the employers should do more to support breastfeeding. This should include providing pregnant staff with information about breastfeeding support that they should expect and could therefore plan to use, including access to facilities to express and to store breast milk, to enable them to work flexible hours and to take rest breaks during working hours. Recommendations are made for employers.

  15. Gender and personal breastfeeding experience of rural GP registrars in Australia--a qualitative study of their effect on breastfeeding attitudes and knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodribb, W E; Jackson, C; Fallon, A B; Hegney, D

    2007-01-01

    While most doctors believe they have a major role to play in breastfeeding promotion, and consider it worthwhile taking time to assist women to continue to breastfeed, it appears that gender and personal breastfeeding experience affect their attitude and confidence concerning breastfeeding issues. As doctors practicing in rural and regional areas may be expected to provide a greater degree of assistance and support for breastfeeding women, their views on these topics are of particular interest. This article reports the results of qualitative interviews with eight GP registrars from rural and regional Australia, and their views about the influence gender and personal experience have on their ability to assist breastfeeding women. The study is part of a larger project investigating the breastfeeding skills and knowledge of GP registrars as a basis for designing a tailored educational breastfeeding resource. This project uses mixed methods and triangulation of data. Semi-structured, one-on-one interviews were conducted with eight GP registrars from southern Queensland, Australia. The participants were chosen so that there were eight unique combinations of age ( or =34), gender (male or female) and breastfeeding experience (self or spouse had breastfed/had not breastfed) to ensure diversity of responses and increase the transferability of results. Demographics were collected from each participant, as well as information about: their attitudes to breastfeeding and to counselling breastfeeding women; their perception of breastfeeding knowledge needs and their confidence assisting breastfeeding women; and prior training about breastfeeding. Transcripts of the recorded interviews were returned to the participants for verification before analysis. Emergent themes were identified both within and between interviews following content analysis. Four male and four female registrars with a mean age of 35 years (range 28-43 years) were recruited. Two participants of each gender

  16. Exclusive Breastfeeding among Women in Rural Suburbs of Federal Capital Territory, Abuja, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egenti NB

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The feeding of an infant with breast milk only, to the exclusion of all other feeds - liquids or solids, including water - except prescribed medications; within the first half year of life is referred to as exclusive breastfeeding (EBF. Despite its numerous benefits, not many mothers practiced it because of one barrier or the other. This study estimated the prevalence of EBF established the major barriers thereof and determined the link between socio-demographic characteristics and the practice of EBF among women living in the rural suburbs of Federal Capital Territory, Abuja, Nigeria. Methodology: This study was descriptive cross-sectional in design. Results: Among the 370 subjects, 49% practiced EBF. None of the respondents made PNC visit specifically for the purpose of learning or asking questions about breastfeeding. Nonetheless, 18.5% received breastfeeding education during PNC visit. A large proportion of the subjects did not practice EBF because they were not aware (21.1% of it. Medical reasons, which included HIV positive mothers and those with breast disease constituted the least barriers (1.3%. EBF was prominently linked with maternal education, type of work, delivery place, skilled attendance at birth, husband’s education, and occupation (p<0.05. Conclusion: Capacity building for healthcare personnel on breast feeding, establishment of facilities as close to the communities as possible with their active participation in the planning, implementation and monitoring of EBF practice is recommended. Emphasis should be laid on the need for breastfeeding during antenatal period and then postnatal just before discharge.

  17. Impact of a breastfeeding-friendly workplace on an employed mother's intention to continue breastfeeding after returning to work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Su-Ying

    2013-04-01

    Ever-increasing populations of women in their childbearing years are choosing to become employed. Breastfeeding provides unique health advantages to both the infant and mother. A breastfeeding-friendly workplace might be an important factor for predicting breastfeeding rates among working women. To explore the impact of breastfeeding-friendly support on the intention of working mothers to continue breastfeeding, we conducted a survey at a female labor-intensive electronics manufacturer in Taiwan. A structured questionnaire survey was administered to 715 working mothers employed in an electronics manufacturing plant in Tainan Science Park in Southern Taiwan. Questionnaire content included female employee demographics, employment characteristics, continued breastfeeding behavior after returning to work, access to lactation rooms, and employee perception of the breastfeeding policy and support when raising their most recently born child. A higher education level (odds ratio [OR]=2.66), lower work load (8 work hours/day) (OR=2.66), lactation room with dedicated space (OR=2.38), use of breast pumping breaks (OR=61.6), and encouragement from colleagues (OR=2.78) and supervisors (OR=2.44) to use breast pumping breaks were significant predictors of continued breastfeeding for more than 6 months after returning to work. The findings of the present study suggest that to encourage and increase the rate of continued breastfeeding, workplaces should establish dedicated breastfeeding rooms and maintain a comfortable and clean environment. Furthermore, employers should provide encouragement and support for working mothers to continue breastfeeding after returning to work.

  18. Effect of Theory of Planned Behavior-based Educational Intervention on Breastfeeding Behavior in Pregnant Women in Fasa City, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyedeh Marjan Arshad

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Breastfeeding is a matter of significant importance. Given the role of such factors as attitude and subjective norms on the behavior of mothers and the low level of exclusive breastfeeding, the present study aimed to determine the effect of educational program based on the theory of planned behavior on breastfeeding behavior among the pregnant women in Fasa, Iran. Materials and Methods: This quasi-experimental study was conducted on 100 pregnant women with the gestational age of 30-35 weeks who referred to the health care centers of Fasa, Iran, in 2017. The study population was selected using random sampling technique, and then assigned into two groups of control (n=50 and intervention (n=50. The data were collected using a demographic form, components of the theory of planned behavior questionnaire, and a breastfeeding checklist. The intervention group received three 55-to-60-minute training sessions. The mothers' breastfeeding behavior was evaluated before the training sessions and 40 days post-delivery in both groups. The data were analyzed in SPSS software, version 22, using Chi-square test, independent t-test, and paired sample t-test. Results: According to the results, there was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of the components of the theory of planned behavior before the educational intervention (P=0.208. However, after the training sessions, the intervention group showed a significant improvement in all components of the theory of planned behavior, including intention and breastfeeding behavior, compared to the control group (P=0.001. Conclusion: Based on the findings of this study, appropriate training programs, social network support, and suitable conditions for breastfeeding in the community are among the effective factors that can change the mothers’ attitudes towards lactation and result in successful breastfeeding in the first three months after childbirth.

  19. Effects of lactation on bone mineral content in healthy postpartum women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayslip, C.C.; Klein, T.A.; Wray, H.L.; Duncan, W.E.

    1989-01-01

    Bone mineral contents were estimated by dual photon absorptiometry of the lumbar spine (L2-L4) and single photon absorptiometry of the mid- and distal radius in 19 healthy women on their second postpartum day and at 6 months postpartum. All bone mineral measurements were performed by one technician, and the single and dual photon absorptiometry results were read by one observer. Daily oral calcium intakes were estimated from dietary histories obtained by a dietitian. Twelve women who breast-fed exclusively throughout the first 6 months postpartum were compared with seven formula-feeding women who did not breast-feed or who breast-fed for less than 3 months postpartum. No differences were found in age, parity, height, weight, or daily calcium intake between the breast- and formula-feeding women. Breast-feeding women had a significant decrease (averaging 6.5%) in bone mineral of the lumbar spine at 6 months postpartum as compared with 2 days postpartum (1.14 +/- 0.03 versus 1.22 +/- 0.03 g/cm2, mean +/- SEM; P less than .001), whereas no significant change occurred in the formula-feeding women at 6 months (1.24 +/- 0.03 versus 1.26 +/- 0.04 g/cm2). At 6 months postpartum, the breast-feeding women had a significantly lower mean bone mineral content of the lumbar spine than did formula-feeding women (P less than .05). No significant changes were noted in bone mineral content of the mid- or distal radius in either group of women during the period of evaluation. We conclude that during the first 6 months postpartum, breast-feeding is associated with bone mineral loss from the lumbar spine, but not from the mid- or distal radius

  20. Lactation mastitis: occurrence and medical management among 946 breastfeeding women in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foxman, Betsy; D'Arcy, Hannah; Gillespie, Brenda; Bobo, Janet Kay; Schwartz, Kendra

    2002-01-15

    In 1994-1998, the authors followed 946 breastfeeding women from Michigan and Nebraska for the first 3 months postpartum or until they stopped breastfeeding to describe mastitis incidence, mastitis treatment, and any associations between mastitis occurrence and hypothesized host characteristics and behaviors. Participants were interviewed by telephone at 3, 6, 9, and 12 weeks postpartum or until they ceased breastfeeding. A total of 9.5% reported provider-diagnosed lactation mastitis at least once during the 12-week period, with 64% diagnosed via telephone. After adjustment in a logistic regression model, history of mastitis with a previous child (odds ratio (OR) = 4.0, 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.64, 6.11), cracks and nipple sores in the same week as mastitis (OR = 3.4, 95% CI: 2.04, 5.51), using an antifungal nipple cream (presumably for nipple thrush) in the same 3-week interval as mastitis (OR = 3.4, 95% CI: 1.37, 8.54), and (for women with no prior mastitis history) using a manual breast pump (OR = 3.3, 95% CI: 1.92, 5.62) strongly predicted mastitis. Feeding fewer than 10 times per day was protective regardless of whether or not feeding frequency in the same week or the week before mastitis was included in the model (for the same week: 7-9 times: OR = 0.6, 95% CI: 0.41, 1.01; < or =6 times: OR = 0.4, 95% CI: 0.19, 0.82). Duration of feeding was not associated with mastitis risk.

  1. Postpartum weight retention and breastfeeding among obese women from the randomized controlled Lifestyle in Pregnancy (LiP) trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinter, Christina Anne; Jensen, Dorte Møller; Ovesen, Per Glud

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study the effects of lifestyle intervention in pregnancy on weight retention 6 months postpartum among obese women from the "Lifestyle in Pregnancy" (LiP) study, and to determine associations between breastfeeding with postpartum maternal weight. DESIGN: Six months postpartum follow...... routine pregnancy care. Both groups received standard postnatal care. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Gestational weight gain, postpartum weight retention and breastfeeding. RESULTS: Follow up was completed in 238 women of whom 46% in the intervention group and 57% in the control group had retained weight 6 months...

  2. [I want to breastfeed my baby: Unvealing the experiences of women who lived process difficulties in their breastfeeding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucchini Raies, Camila; Márquez Doren, Francisca; Rivera Martínez, María Soledad

    2017-01-01

    Breastfeeding is the most beneficial feeding practice for infants. However, it is not always the first choice for mothers and their encouragement and support from health professionals is variable. To understand the experience of mothers who had difficulties with their breastfeeding process. A phenomenological study was conducted in a University Health center. Twelve breastfeeding women were included. Data collection technique was in depth interviews, taped recorded with participants’ consent. Phenomenological analysis of data followed Streubert´s method. The rigor of the study was guarded by criteria for qualitative research and the research process. Ethical aspects were sheltered through the informed consent process, confidentiality and methodological rigor. The experience of living difficulties in the breastfeeding process is revealed in five comprehensive categories: recognizing the difficulties with breastfeeding; emotional impact when unable to breastfeed; motivation to overcome the difficulty and ask for help; support for breastfeeding recovery; and transition process from stress and anxiety to peace, gratification and empowerment. The understanding of this experience is qualitative evidence that contributes to a comprehensive understanding of the situation of each mother and child, allowing to improve support care interventions in health.

  3. Effective promotion of breastfeeding among Latin American women newly immigrated to the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denman-Vitale, S; Murillo, E K

    1999-07-01

    Across the United States, advance practice nurses (APNs) are increasingly encountering recently immigrated Latin American populations. This article provides an overview of the situation of Latin Americans in the United States and discusses aspects of Latin American culture such as, respeto (respect), confianza (confidence), the importance of family, and the value of a personal connection. Strategies that will assist practitioners to incorporate culturally holistic principles in the promotion of breastfeeding among Latin American women who are new arrivals in the United States are described. If practitioners are to respond to the increasing numbers of Latin American women who need health care services, and also provide thorough, holistic health care then health care activities must be integrated with cultural competence.

  4. Adherence to medical treatment in relation to pregnancy, birth outcome & breastfeeding behavior among women with Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julsgaard, Mette

    2016-07-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is common among women of fertile age, and it often requires maintenance medical treatment. Adherence to medical treatment among women with CD prior to, during, and after pregnancy has, however, never been examined. Although CD women have increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes, little is known about predictors for these outcomes in women with CD. In addition, the impact of breastfeeding on disease activity remains controversial. The aims of this PhD thesis were to determine adherence to treatment and to investigate predictors for and prevalence rates of non-adherence to maintenance medical treatment among women with CD prior to, during, and after pregnancy; to assess pregnancy outcomes among women with CD, taking medical treatment, smoking status, and disease activity into account; to assess breastfeeding rates and the impact of breastfeeding on the risk of relapse. We conducted a population-based prevalence study including 154 women with CD who had given birth within a six-year period. We combined questionnaire data, data from medical records, and medical register data. Among 105 (80%) respondents, more than half reported taking medication with an overall high adherence rate of 69.8%. Counselling, previous pregnancy, and planned pregnancy seemed to decrease the likelihood of non-adherence, whereas smoking seemed to predict non-adherence prior to pregnancy, although our sample size prevented any firm conclusions. During pregnancy, the vast majority (95%) of CD women were in remission. The children's birth weight did not differ in relation to maternal medical treatment, but mean birth weight in children of smokers in medical treatment was 274 g lower than that of children of non-smokers in medical treatment. In our relatively small study CD women in medical treatment were not at increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes compared with untreated women with CD. In total, 87.6% of CD women were breastfeeding, and rates did not vary by

  5. Maternal bodies and medicines: a commentary on risk and decision-making of pregnant and breastfeeding women and health professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McDonald Karalyn

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The perceived risk/benefit balance of prescribed and over-the-counter (OTC medicine, as well as complementary therapies, will significantly impact on an individual’s decision-making to use medicine. For women who are pregnant or breastfeeding, this weighing of risks and benefits becomes immensely more complex because they are considering the effect on two bodies rather than one. Indeed the balance may lie in opposite directions for the mother and baby/fetus. The aim of this paper is to generate a discussion that focuses on the complexity around risk, responsibility and decision-making of medicine use by pregnant and breastfeeding women. We will also consider the competing discourses that pregnant and breastfeeding women encounter when making decisions about medicine. Discussion Women rely not only on biomedical information and the expert knowledge of their health care professionals but on their own experiences and cultural understandings as well. When making decisions about medicines, pregnant and breastfeeding women are influenced by their families, partners and their cultural societal norms and expectations. Pregnant and breastfeeding women are influenced by a number of competing discourses. “Good” mothers should manage and avoid any risks, thereby protecting their babies from harm and put their children’s needs before their own – they should not allow toxins to enter the body. On the other hand, “responsible” women take and act on medical advice – they should take the medicine as directed by their health professional. This is the inherent conflict in medicine use for maternal bodies. Summary The increased complexity involved when one body’s actions impact the body of another – as in the pregnant and lactating body – has received little acknowledgment. We consider possibilities for future research and methodologies. We argue that considering the complexity of issues for maternal bodies can improve our

  6. Influence of Islamic Traditions on Breastfeeding Beliefs and Practices Among African American Muslims in West Philadelphia: A Mixed-Methods Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamoun, Camilia; Spatz, Diane

    2018-02-01

    Little is known regarding the influence of religion on breastfeeding in African American communities. In particular, whether Islamic traditions influence breastfeeding beliefs and practices among African American Muslims has not been studied. Research aim: This study sought to gain understanding of breastfeeding attitudes, rates, and education among African American Muslims in West Philadelphia and to examine if engaging Islamic teachings in breastfeeding education can positively influence breastfeeding attitudes. Open-ended, in-person, digitally recorded qualitative interviews were conducted with 10 community leaders and analyzed by conventional content analysis. A study tool distributed to a convenience sample of 44 community members and 11 leaders was used to gather information about education received from community leaders, breastfeeding attitudes and practices, and the potential for Islamic teachings to positively affect breastfeeding attitudes and practices. To obtain further data on this last topic, preliminary data analysis guided the creation of an education pamphlet, about which feedback was gathered through another study tool. Education surrounding Islamic perspectives on breastfeeding was not prevalent. African American Muslims in West Philadelphia view breastfeeding favorably and have higher rates of breastfeeding than African Americans as a whole. Community education about breastfeeding that engaged Islamic teachings improved respondents' breastfeeding attitudes. Increasing education among providers and African American Muslims about Islamic perspectives on breastfeeding may improve breastfeeding exclusivity and duration. Healthcare providers who care for Muslim women should be aware of Islam's tradition of positive attitudes toward breastfeeding and partner with Muslim leaders to improve breastfeeding rates and duration among such women.

  7. Breastfeeding initiation: An in-depth qualitative analysis of the perspectives of women and midwives using Social Cognitive Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, M E; Jepson, R G; McInnes, R J

    2018-02-01

    to explore women's and midwives' expectations, knowledge and experiences of breastfeeding initiation using Social Cognitive Theory. a qualitative study using focus group discussions and individual interviews. Breastfeeding initiation was defined for this study as a process within the first 48hours after birth. Data were analysed using qualitative inductive analysis then further deductive analysis using Social Cognitive Theory (SCT). a purposefully selected sample of primigravid antenatal and postnatal women (n=18) and practising midwives (n=18) from one Health Board area in Scotland. attachment of the baby to the breast at birth was hindered by sleepy babies and the busy unfamiliar hospital environment. These resulted in mothers struggling to maintain their motivation to breastfeed and to develop low self-efficacy. Instinctive attachment was rare. Midwives who considered it was normal for babies to be sleepy and unable to attach or feed at birth did not facilitate instinctive baby behaviour. Midwives sometimes experienced lack of autonomy and environmental circumstances that made women centred care difficult. Furthermore caring for high numbers of women, dependent on their help, resulted in reduced self-efficacy for providing effective breastfeeding support. interviewing both women and midwives specifically about initiation of breastfeeding has allowed for deeper insights into this critical period and enabled a comparison between the data obtained from mothers and midwives. The findings suggest that instinctive attachment is not an expectation of either mothers or midwives and results in a loss of breastfeeding confidence in both. to facilitate initiation there is a need for more research to develop appropriate maternal and midwifery skills, and make changes to the cultural environment in hospitals. Social Cognitive Theory could be used as a framework in both the antenatal and immediate postnatal period to develop strategies and materials to increase women's and

  8. Group cell phones are feasible and acceptable for promoting optimal breastfeeding practices in a women's microcredit program in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flax, Valerie L; Ibrahim, Alawiyatu Usman; Negerie, Mekebeb; Yakubu, Danjuma; Leatherman, Sheila; Bentley, Margaret E

    2017-01-01

    As part of a breastfeeding promotion intervention trial in Nigeria, we provided one cell phone per group of 5-7 microcredit clients and instructed the group's cell phone recipient to share weekly breastfeeding voice and text messages with group members. We measured the feasibility and acceptability of using group cell phones by conducting semi-structured exit interviews with 195 microcredit clients whose babies were born during the intervention (target group), in-depth interviews with eight phone recipients and nine non-phone recipients, and 16 focus group discussions with other microcredit clients. Women in the target group said the group phone worked well or very well (64%). They were motivated to try the recommended practices because they trusted the information (58%) and had support from others (35%). Approximately 44% of target women reported that their groups met and shared messages at least once a week. Women in groups that met at least weekly had higher odds of exclusive breastfeeding up to 6 months (OR 5.6, 95% CI 1.6, 19.7) than women in groups that never met. In-depth interviews and focus group discussions indicated that non-phone recipients had positive feelings towards phone recipients, the group phone met participants' needs, and messages were often shared outside the group. In conclusion, group cell phone messaging to promote breastfeeding among microcredit clients is feasible and acceptable and can be part of an effective behaviour change package. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Sexual Function in Breastfeeding Women in Family Health Centers of Tabriz, Iran, 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamileh Malakoti

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:There are conflicting evidences about the effects of breastfeeding on postpartum maternal sexual functioning. With regard to the methodological weaknesses of previous studies and cultural differences affecting their issue, the present study aims to evaluate sexual functions of lactating women and its components. Methods:This is a descriptive study in which 200 eligible postpartum women were selected from eight health centers of Tabriz (25 from each center. The eligible women were called and invited to attend the health center. The evaluation was performed using the Persian version of normalized questionnaire of the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI. The participants’ sexual function scores above 28 were considered desirable (regarding the cut-off point mentioned in the Persian version of the questionnaire. Results:Almost all of the lactating women suffered from sexual dysfunctions. Regarding the sexual performance’s components the lowest scores were for libido and sexual arousal. Conclusion:According to the findings of the studies, in order to prevent the effects of sexual dysfunction on lactating women and their family members it is necessary to develop sexual health programs in health centers.

  10. The Effect of Message-Framing on Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Among Nulliparous Women in Shushtar, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merdasi, Fatemeh; Araban, Marzieh; Saki, Malehi Amal

    2017-01-01

    Exclusive breastfeeding for 6 months and continuing it for 2 years, along with complementary feeding, are the primary objectives of public health plans and nutrition around the world. Self-efficacy is a theoretical framework that could be a strong predictive for breastfeeding. This study aimed to determine the effect of message-framing on self-efficacy of breastfeeding in nulliparous women in Shushtar. This quasi-experimental study was conducted in 2015 on 210 nulliparous women in Shushtar (Iran). The participants were randomly allocated into intervention and control groups. The study tool was the short form of breastfeeding self-efficacy scale that was completed on arrival of the study (days 3-5), at the end of week four and at the end of week eight. Data were analyzed by SPSS 19, using Chi-square, ANOVA, and repeated measurements. Mean age of participants was 24.52 years old with standard deviation of 95.4. Mean score of breastfeeding self-efficacy in gain-framed group at days 3-5, week four and week eight was 47.94, 57.43 and 52.8 respectively; in loss-framed group it was 47.76, 56.11 and 52.64 respectively; and in control group it was 45.16, 48.68 and 45.31 respectively. No significant difference was observed between the score of average self-efficacy of days 3-5 and week eight in control group (p=0.93). However, in gain-framed group (p=0.001) and loss-framed group (p=0.004), a significant difference was observed. Results of this study showed that message-framing promotes breastfeeding self-efficacy in nulliparous women and in this regard, there is no difference between gain-framed and loss-framed messages.

  11. Maternity care practices and breastfeeding experiences of women in different racial and ethnic groups: Pregnancy Risk Assessment and Monitoring System (PRAMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahluwalia, Indu B; Morrow, Brian; D'Angelo, Denise; Li, Ruowei

    2012-11-01

    Research shows that maternity care practices are important to promoting breastfeeding in the early post partum period; however, little is known about the association between maternity care practices and breastfeeding among different racial and ethnic groups. We examined the association between maternity care practices and breastfeeding duration to ≥10 weeks overall and among various racial and ethnic groups using data from the Pregnancy Risk Assessment and Monitoring System (PRAMS). PRAMS is a state, population-based surveillance system that collects information on maternal behaviors. We used maternity care practices data from 11 states and New York City with response rates ≥70% from 2004 to 2006. Multiple maternity care practices were examined and the analysis adjusted for demographic characteristics, participation in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC), lifestyle, and infant variables. The outcome variable for multivariable analysis was breastfeeding duration to ethnic groups. One practice, that of giving newborns breast milk only, was positively associated with breastfeeding duration of ≥10 weeks across all three groups. Maternity care practices associated with breastfeeding continuation to ≥10 weeks varied by race/ethnicity. For example: breastfeeding within the first hour, baby given a pacifier, and assistance from hospital staff, were significantly associated with breastfeeding duration among black and white women and not Hispanics. The practice of breastfeeding on demand was significantly associated with breastfeeding to ≥10 weeks for black and Hispanic women and not for whites. Hospitals may want to examine the implementation of specific practices in relation to the cultural backgrounds of women to promote breastfeeding.

  12. Energy Drinks: Implications for the Breastfeeding Mother.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorlton, Janet; Ahmed, Azza; Colby, David A

    2016-01-01

    Breastfeeding women may experience disrupted sleep schedules and be tempted to turn to popular energy drinks to reduce fatigue and enhance alertness, prompting the question: What are the maternal and child health implications for breastfeeding mothers consuming energy drinks? Caffeine and vitamin-rich energy drinks contain a variety of herbal ingredients and vitamins; however, ingredient amounts may not be clearly disclosed on product labels. Interactions between herbal ingredients and caffeine are understudied and not well defined in the literature. Some infants can be sensitive to caffeine and display increased irritability and sleep disturbances when exposed to caffeine from breastmilk. Breastfeeding women who consume energy drinks may be ingesting herbal ingredients that have not undergone scientific evaluation, and if taking prenatal vitamins, may unknowingly exceed the recommended daily intake. Caffeinated products are marketed in newer ways, fueling concerns about health consequences of caffeine exposure. We present implications associated with consumption of caffeine and vitamin-rich energy drinks among breastfeeding women. Product safety, labeling, common ingredients, potential interactions, and clinical implications are discussed. Healthcare providers should encourage breastfeeding women to read product labels for ingredients, carbohydrate content, serving size, and to discourage consumption of energy drinks when breastfeeding and/or taking prenatal vitamins, to avoid potential vitamin toxicity.

  13. Discontinuity of Breastfeeding Care: "There's No Captain of the Ship".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Christine D; Ratcliff, Stephannie L; Thornburg, Loralei L; Wethington, Elaine; Howard, Cynthia R; Rasmussen, Kathleen M

    2016-01-01

    Breastfeeding rates in the United States are suboptimal. Health professionals (HPs) have a unique opportunity to support breastfeeding because of the frequency and timing of their visits with mothers and infants as well as their call by professional organizations to do so. The objective of this study was to understand HPs' perceived roles and experiences with providing breastfeeding-related care. In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with 34 HPs (obstetricians, midwives, pediatricians, nurses, and lactation consultants) who care for pregnant or lactating women. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and verified for accuracy; content analysis was used to identify themes using a grounded theory approach. The overarching theme was discontinuity in breastfeeding care across the continuum. Most HPs relied on other HPs to provide breastfeeding care, which resulted from and contributed to problematic gaps in care that were reported. A minority of HPs attempted to bridge gaps in breastfeeding care or improve continuity. Contributing to the discontinuity were a lack of time, lack of skills, inconsistent messages, and low communication across stages of care. HPs were unsure whether their help was effective and whether required follow-up was completed. Despite HPs' recognition of breastfeeding as the best choice for infant feeding, breastfeeding care may be disjointed and a barrier to achieving breastfeeding recommendations. These problems should be investigated and systemically addressed in future research so that maternal-infant dyad breastfeeding care can be improved.

  14. Associations Between Peer Counseling and Breastfeeding Initiation and Duration: An Analysis of Minnesota Participants in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Marcia Burton; Geppert, Joni; Dech, Linda; Richardson, Michaela

    2018-01-01

    Background Peer counseling (PC) has been associated with increased breastfeeding initiation and duration, but few analyses have examined the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) model for peer counseling or the continuation of breastfeeding from birth through 12 months postpartum. Objectives Identify associations between Minnesota WIC Peer Breastfeeding Support Program services and breastfeeding initiation and continuation. Methods Retrospective analysis of observational data from the Minnesota WIC program's administrative database of women who gave birth in 2012 and accepted a PC program referral prenatally (n = 2219). Multivariate logistic regression and Cox regression models examined associations between peer services and breastfeeding initiation and continuation of any breastfeeding. Results Among women who accepted referral into a PC program, odds of initiation were significantly higher among those who received peer services (Odds Ratio (OR): 1.66; 95% CI 1.19-2.32), after adjusting for confounders. Women who received peer services had a significantly lower hazard of breastfeeding discontinuation from birth through 12 months postpartum than women who did not receive services. (Hazard Ratio (HR) month one: 0.45; 95% CI 0.33-0.61; months two through twelve: 0.33; 95% CI 0.18-0.60). The effect of peer counseling did not differ significantly by race and ethnicity, taking into account mother's country of origin. Conclusion for practice Receipt of peer services was positively associated with breastfeeding initiation and continued breastfeeding from birth through 12 months postpartum. Making peer services available to more women, especially in communities with low initiation and duration, could improve maternal and child health in Minnesota.

  15. Parity and breastfeeding among African-American women: differential effects on breast cancer risk by estrogen receptor status in the Women's Circle of Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosone, Christine B; Zirpoli, Gary; Ruszczyk, Melanie; Shankar, Jyoti; Hong, Chi-Chen; McIlwain, Demetra; Roberts, Michelle; Yao, Song; McCann, Susan E; Ciupak, Gregory; Hwang, Helena; Khoury, Thaer; Jandorf, Lina; Bovbjerg, Dana H; Pawlish, Karen; Bandera, Elisa V

    2014-02-01

    It has long been held that parity reduces risk of breast cancer. However, accumulating evidence indicates that the effects of parity, as well as breastfeeding, may vary according to estrogen receptor (ER) status. We evaluated these associations in a case-control study among African-American women in New York City and New Jersey. In the Women's Circle of Health Study, including 786 African-American women with breast cancer and 1,015 controls, data on reproductive histories were collected from in-person interviews, with tumor characteristics abstracted from pathology reports. We calculated number of live births and months breastfeeding for each child, and examined each in relation to breast cancer by ER status, and for triple-negative (TN) breast cancer. Although associations were not statistically significant, having children was associated with reduced risk of ER+ breast cancer [odds ratio (OR) 0.82, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.58-1.16], but increased risk of ER- tumors, with associations most pronounced for TN breast cancer (OR 1.81, 95 % CI 0.93-3.51). Breastfeeding gave no additional benefit for ER+ cancer, but reduced the risk of ER- disease associated with parity. Accumulating data from a number of studies, as well as our own in African-American women, indicate that the effects of parity and breastfeeding differ by ER status. African-American women are more likely to have children and not to breastfeed, and to have ER- and TN breast cancer. It is possible that breastfeeding in this population could reduce risk of more aggressive breast cancers.

  16. Integrating group counseling, cell phone messaging, and participant-generated songs and dramas into a microcredit program increases Nigerian women's adherence to international breastfeeding recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flax, Valerie L; Negerie, Mekebeb; Ibrahim, Alawiyatu Usman; Leatherman, Sheila; Daza, Eric J; Bentley, Margaret E

    2014-07-01

    In northern Nigeria, interventions are urgently needed to narrow the large gap between international breastfeeding recommendations and actual breastfeeding practices. Studies of integrated microcredit and community health interventions documented success in modifying health behaviors but typically had uncontrolled designs. We conducted a cluster-randomized controlled trial in Bauchi State, Nigeria, with the aim of increasing early breastfeeding initiation and exclusive breastfeeding among female microcredit clients. The intervention had 3 components. Trained credit officers led monthly breastfeeding learning sessions during regularly scheduled microcredit meetings for 10 mo. Text and voice messages were sent out weekly to a cell phone provided to small groups of microcredit clients (5-7 women). The small groups prepared songs or dramas about the messages and presented them at the monthly microcredit meetings. The control arm continued with the regular microcredit program. Randomization occurred at the level of the monthly meeting groups. Pregnant clients were recruited at baseline and interviewed again when their infants were aged ≥6 mo. Logistic regression models accounting for clustering were used to estimate the odds of performing recommended behaviors. Among the clients who completed the final survey (n = 390), the odds of exclusive breastfeeding to 6 mo (OR: 2.4; 95% CI: 1.4, 4.0) and timely breastfeeding initiation (OR: 2.6; 95% CI: 1.6, 4.1) were increased in the intervention vs. control arm. Delayed introduction of water explained most of the increase in exclusive breastfeeding among clients receiving the intervention. In conclusion, a breastfeeding promotion intervention integrated into microcredit increased the likelihood that women adopted recommended breastfeeding practices. This intervention could be scaled up in Nigeria, where local organizations provide microcredit to >500,000 clients. Furthermore, the intervention could be adopted more widely

  17. Advice given to women in Argentina about breast-feeding and the use of alcohol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepino, M. Yanina; Mennella, Julie A.

    2006-01-01

    Objective To explore the types of advice that women in Argentina received from health professionals, family members, and friends about drinking alcoholic beverages and about alcohol usage during pregnancy and lactation. Methods In December 2001 and December 2002, structured interviews were conducted with a total of 167 women who were then breast-feeding or who had recently breast-fed their infant. Mothers were asked about the type of advice, if any, that they had received about the use of alcohol from health professionals and from family members and friends. Also included were questions related to the usage of the traditional Argentine beverage “mate” (an infusion widely consumed in South America that is prepared from the leaves of the Ilex paraguayensis plant) and the types of advice the women had received about breast-feeding and neonatal care in general. Results Of the 167 women studied, 96.4% of them reported that their physician had advised them to breast-feed their infant. In addition, 93.4% of the women said they had treated their infant’s umbilical cord stump with alcohol. Fewer than half of the women (46.7%) reported that their physician had advised them about drinking alcoholic beverages during pregnancy, and even fewer (25.7%) received such advice during lactation. Family and friends were about equally likely to give advice about the consumption of alcoholic beverages during pregnancy (42.6%) and during lactation (47.9%). However, the type of advice changed, with the family and friends being significantly more likely to encourage drinking when the women were lactating than when they were pregnant (P embarazo y la lactancia. Métodos En diciembre de 2001 y diciembre de 2002 se llevaron a cabo entrevistas estructuradas con un total de 167 mujeres que estaban amamantando o que habían amamantado recientemente. A las madres se les preguntó qué tipo de consejos, en caso de haberlos, les dieron los profesionales de la salud y sus parientes y amistades

  18. Experiences and Perspectives About Breastfeeding in "Public": A Qualitative Exploration Among Normal-Weight and Obese Mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Shanice A; Rasmussen, Kathleen M; Garner, Christine D

    2018-01-01

    Women face societal and cultural barriers to breastfeeding. These challenges have been investigated in international studies and U.S. public opinion polls; however, mothers' experiences with breastfeeding in public in the United States remain unexplored. Research aim: The aim of this study was to describe the experiences of obese and normal-weight women with breastfeeding in public in central New York. Pregnant women ( N = 26) in central New York who intended to breastfeed and were either normal weight or obese were enrolled during their third trimester. A longitudinal, qualitative study was conducted to obtain information about women's experiences from birth through 3 to 6 months postpartum. Interviews were audio recorded, transcribed, and verified for accuracy. Transcripts were analyzed iteratively using conventional content analysis. The concept of "public" was situational rather than a set of physical places; women experienced challenges while breastfeeding around others in private locations that were indistinguishable from those they encountered in places typically considered public. Women experienced social and physical awkwardness including perceived lack of acceptability, fear of confrontation, exposure, and positioning difficulties. They used strategies to reduce awkwardness, for example, being "discreet" and minimizing breastfeeding around other people. Obese women experienced similar challenges but to a greater degree than normal-weight women. "Breastfeeding around others" described mother's experiences more accurately than "breastfeeding in public" and was experienced as awkward both socially and physically, particularly by obese women. Strategies are needed to normalize breastfeeding in the United States and to prepare mothers for the challenges of breastfeeding around others.

  19. Simultaneous Breast Expression in Breastfeeding Women Is More Efficacious Than Sequential Breast Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbin, Catherine P.; Hartmann, Peter E.; Kent, Jacqueline C.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Simultaneous (SIM) breast expression saves mothers time compared with sequential (SEQ) expression, but it remains unclear whether the two methods differ in milk output efficiency and efficacy. Subjects and Methods The Showmilk device (Medela AG, Baar, Switzerland) was used to measure milk output and milk ejection during breast expression (electric pump) in 31 Australian breastfeeding mothers of term infants (median age, 19 weeks [interquartile range, 10–33 weeks]). The order of expression type (SIM/SEQ) and breast (left/right) was randomized. Results SIM expression yielded more milk ejections (p≤0.001) and greater amounts of milk at 2, 5, and 10 minutes (p≤0.01) and removed a greater total amount of milk (p≤0.01) and percentage of available milk (p<0.05) than SEQ expression. After SIM expression the cream content of both the overall (8.3% [p≤0.05]) and postexpression (12.6% [p≤0.001]) milk were greater. During SEQ expression, the breast expressed first had a shorter time to 50% and 80% of the total amount of milk than the breast expressed second (p≤0.05), but, overall, a similar percentage of available milk was removed from both breasts. Conclusions SIM expression stimulated more milk ejections and was a more efficient and efficacious method of expression, yielding milk with a higher energy content. PMID:23039397

  20. Breastfeeding practice and knowledge among women attending primary health-care centers in Riyadh 2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norah Faleh Al-Mutairi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Breast milk is the best natural essential nutrition to newborns and infants. However, the practice of breastfeeding (BF has declined in Saudi Arabia. Objective: The objective of this study was to assess the knowledge and practice of BF with their determinants among mothers in Riyadh. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 252 mothers attending the well-baby clinics in Riyadh from March 2016 to May 2017 were selected randomly with their consent and studied by a standardized questionnaire. Results: Of the 252 women, 69.4% were 25–35 years of age and 56.7% with a bachelor degree or higher education. Nearly 75% mothers had education on BF before our study. Mixed feeding was the most preferred method (51.6% followed by artificial milk (29.4%. The most reported reason for discontinuing BF was breast milk insufficiency (37.3% and of breastfeed continuation was their perceived benefit (36.6%. Excellent knowledge was observed among 12.7%, good knowledge in 57.1%, and unsatisfactory level in 30.2% mothers. The regression model shows that high school education improved the knowledge by 10.9 points (P = 0.024 and undergraduate by 18.7 points (P value = 0.001 when compared to women who were literate. Women with parity> 5 improved knowledge score by 17.3 points (P < 0.001. Conclusion: We observed that majority (57.1% of Saudi mothers had a moderate level of knowledge on BF benefits and 19% had practiced exclusive BF. There is a need for better educational programs to increase awareness on its benefits for the health situation in the country on the long term.

  1. Breastfeeding : Gender and Socio-Economic Dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogi Pasca Pratama

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to examine breastfeeding behavior from a gender perspective and socio-economic dimension. The legal basis and internal and external factors of breastfeeding behavior are the main issues. Breastfeeding views are also studied in terms of working women, in response to the increasingly expensive economic needs of women to help the family economy by entering the labor market, while women also have an obligation to engage in breastfeeding activities. This study uses literature method, by collecting all the literature related to the breastfeeding process, the legal basis that supports, and the factors that can inhibit and the way to succeed exclusive breastfeeding issues. This study found the fact that there is a misconception of society about breastfeeding that the breastfeeding process is not optimal, the modernization also makes women who should breastfeed to make new choices instead of breastfeeding obligations for their children.   Keywords: breastfeeding, gender, socio-economic JEL Classification: I15, Z10

  2. Use of antimigraine medications and information needs during pregnancy and breastfeeding: a cross-sectional study among 401 Norwegian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amundsen, Siri; Øvrebø, Torunn G; Amble, Netta Marie S; Poole, Anne Christine; Nordeng, Hedvig

    2016-12-01

    Migraine is highly prevalent among women of fertile age. The main objectives of this study were to describe the prevalence and patterns of use of antimigraine medications during pregnancy and breastfeeding and to identify maternal and migraine-related factors associated with medication use during pregnancy. The study is a cross-sectional internet-based survey among pregnant women and new mothers with migraine conducted in Norway from October 1, 2013 to February 1, 2014. Descriptive statistics were used to explore patterns of medication use, and logistic regression analysis was performed to examine the association between maternal socio-demographic and migraine-related factors and use of antimigraine medications during pregnancy. Of the total 401 respondents, 34.9 % were pregnant and 65.1 % had delivered within the last 18 months. The majority reported use of antimigraine medications during pregnancy (73.3 %) and postpartum (64.8 %), yet less than a third considered their migraine to be optimally treated during pregnancy (31.7 %) and the breastfeeding period (27.2 %). The patterns of medication use markedly changed during pregnancy and postpartum. Women with moderate or severe migraine were more likely to use antimigraine medications during pregnancy compared to women with mild migraine. Despite the fact that antimigraine medications were commonly used, the majority of the women felt that their migraine was suboptimally treated during pregnancy and postpartum. There was a decline in the use of medicines in pregnancy and postpartum, and the patterns of use markedly changed. Efforts to improve treatment of women with migraine during pregnancy and breastfeeding should be undertaken.

  3. Pressure and judgement within a dichotomous landscape of infant feeding: a grounded theory study to explore why breastfeeding women do not access peer support provision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Louise; Thomson, Gill

    2017-04-01

    Lack of support is reported as a key reason for early breastfeeding cessation. While breastfeeding peer support (BPS) is a recommended intervention to increase breastfeeding rates, a number of studies identify that engagement with BPS is problematic. Due to paucity of research in this area, this study explores why breastfeeding women do not access BPS in South-West England. Utilising a constructionist grounded theory approach, 33 participants (women (n = 13), health professionals (n = 6) and peer supporters (n = 14)) participated in a semi-structured interview (n = 22) or focus group (n = 11). Analysis involved open coding, constant comparisons and focussed coding. One core category and three main themes explicating non-access were identified. The core category concerns women's experiences of pressure and judgement around their feeding decisions within a dichotomous landscape of infant feeding language and support. Theme one, 'place and space of support', describes the contrast between perceived pressure to breastfeed and a lack of adequate and appropriate support. Theme two, 'one way or no way', outlines the rules-based approach to breastfeeding adopted by some health professionals and how women avoided BPS due to anticipating a similar approach. Theme three, 'it must be me', concerns how lack of embodied insights could lead to 'breastfeeding failure' identities. A background of dichotomised language, pressure and moral judgement, combined with the organisation of post-natal care and the model of breastfeeding adopted by health professionals, may inhibit women's access to BPS. A socio-cultural model of breastfeeding support providing clear messages regarding the value and purpose of BPS should be adopted. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Modeling the Influence of Early Skin-to-Skin Contact on Exclusive Breastfeeding in a Sample of Hispanic Immigrant Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Ana M; Wambach, Karen; Rayens, Mary K; Wiggins, Amanda; Coleman, Elizabeth; Dignan, Mark B

    2017-10-01

    Using data from a longitudinal study of breastfeeding in Hispanics, this study evaluated the influence of early skin-to-skin contact (SSC) on initiation and sustained exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) at 1 month postpartum. Two-thirds of the women in the sample participated in early SSC. At discharge, over half of the women were EBF; this proportion decreased to one-third at 1 month postpartum. Controlling for demographic and clinical variables in the model, participation in early SSC was associated with a greater than sevenfold increase in the odds of EBF at discharge (p = .005) but was not predictive of EBF at 1 month post-discharge (p = .7). Younger maternal age and increased prenatal infant feeding intention were associated with an increased likelihood of EBF across both timepoints. Promoting early SSC may help with initiation of EBF, while further breastfeeding support may be needed to maintain EBF following discharge for this vulnerable population.

  5. Breastfeeding peer support: are there additional benefits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Deborah; Haining, Shona; Day, Ann

    2009-12-01

    Anecdotal discussion among breastfeeding peer supporters and the infant-feeding co-ordinator suggested that breastfeeding peer support provided by breastfeeding peer supporters may offer benefits to breastfeeding women and their families other than increasing breastfeeding initiation and sustainability. The aim of this research was to determine whether there was evidence to support this. The research team used focus groups to obtain information from 16 local women who had received breastfeeding peer support from breastfeeding peer supporters. The key themes that emerged were--improved mental health, increased self-esteem or confidence, parenting skills, improved family diet, breastfeeding sustainability and poor hospital experience.The findings suggest that breastfeeding peer supporters supporting mothers to breastfeed, with the intention of increasing both breastfeeding rates and sustainability, may have additional benefits in several aspects of families' lives. Breastfeeding peer support may play an important role in helping to attain targets such as reducing obesity and postnatal depression.

  6. Factors affecting exclusive breastfeeding of healthy babies aged zero to four months: a community-based study of Turkish women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaçam, Zekiye

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the factors that affect exclusive breastfeeding of healthy babies aged 0-4 months. Both the World Health Organization (WHO) and UNICEF recommend feeding babies of 0-6 months exclusively with breast milk and starting complementary foods after the sixth month. In Turkey, however, a vast majority of babies 1-5 months of age (89.4%) are given complementary foods. This cross-sectional study was conducted in central Ankara province, with a sampling of 514 individuals who were selected using the convenience sampling method. Of the 514 mothers who participated in my research, 260 (50.6%) were found to be feeding their babies exclusively with breast milk; 77 (15.0%), with breast milk + water; 87 (16.9%), with breast milk + baby formula; 70 (13.6%), with breast milk + baby formula + other foods; and 20 (3.9%), baby formula + other foods. Based on multivariate logistic regression analysis results, the mother's employment [odds ratio (OR) = 0.488; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.288-0.827) considerably reduced the incidence of complementary foods, while frequent crying of the baby (OR = 1.687; 95% CI = 1.125-2.530) significantly increased the use of supplementary foods in infant nutrition. This study concluded that frequent crying of the baby increases the likelihood of giving the baby complementary foods. Midwives and nurses can encourage exclusive breastfeeding behaviour by providing individual education and counselling to women whose babies cry frequently. Exclusive breastfeeding of babies aged 0-6 months is crucial for the development and growth of the baby and instrumental in reducing infant morbidities and mortalities. One factor that increases the likelihood of provision of complementary foods is frequent crying of the baby. Midwives and nurses can encourage exclusive breastfeeding behaviour by providing individual education and counselling to women whose babies cry frequently.

  7. "#discrimination": The Online Response to a Case of a Breastfeeding Mother Being Ejected from a UK Retail Premises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Aimee

    2016-02-01

    Stigma is a significant barrier to breastfeeding. Internationally, mothers have reported stigma surrounding public breastfeeding. In the United Kingdom, the Equality Act 2010 gives women the right to breastfeed in public, including within private businesses. In April 2014, a woman who was breastfeeding in a UK sports shop was asked to leave, resulting in a localized protest by breastfeeding mothers. This resulted in the issue of public breastfeeding being highlighted in local, national, and social media. To examine online opinion regarding breastfeeding in public and protesting about the right to breastfeed in public within the context of a single case. Online user-generated content relating to the case of Wioletta Komar was downloaded from Twitter and the comments section of a UK online news source, Mail Online. Data comprised 884 comments and 1210 tweets, collected within 24 hours of the incident. Semiotic and thematic analysis was facilitated by NVivo 10. Comments from Twitter were supportive (76%) or neutral (22%) regarding the protesting women and public breastfeeding. Conversely, Mail Online comments were mostly negative (85%). Mail Online posters questioned the legality of public breastfeeding, while Twitter comments acknowledged and supported women's legal right to breastfeed publicly. Many Mail Online commenters stated that they found it uncomfortable to watch breastfeeding or thought it was unnecessary to breastfeed in public. If the UK government is serious about increasing breastfeeding, interventions to promote public support for public breastfeeding are urgently required. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Early breastfeeding problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feenstra, Maria Monberg; Kirkeby, Mette Jørgine; Thygesen, Marianne

    2018-01-01

    Objectives Breastfeeding problems are common and associated with early cessation. Stilllength of postpartum hospital stay has been reduced. This leaves new mothers to establish breastfeeding at home with less support from health care professionals. The objective was to explore mothers’ perspectives...... on when breastfeeding problems were the most challenging and prominent early postnatal. The aim was also toidentify possible factors associated with the breastfeeding problems. Methods In a cross-sectional study, a mixed method approach was used to analyse postal survey data from 1437 mothers with full...... term singleton infants. Content analysis was used to analyse mothers’ open text descriptions of their most challenging breastfeeding problem. Multiple logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios for early breastfeeding problems according to sociodemographic- and psychosocial factors. Results...

  9. Good breastfeeding policies -- good breastfeeding rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    In Norway, where breast-feeding policies protecting breast-feeding women's needs have been in place since the 1970s, approximately 97% of women breast feed when leaving the hospital, 80% are breast feeding at 3 months, and 20% beyond 12 months. Government family policies play an important role in enabling women to achieve good breast-feeding rates. In Norway: maternity leave is 42 weeks with full pay or 52 weeks with 80% of salary; flexible part-time is available for women from 2 months after giving birth with income supplemented from maternity benefits; after returning to work, women are entitled to 1- to 1.5-hour breaks to return home to breast feed, or to have the child brought to work. "Breast feeding is so normal," writes Hege Jacobson Lepri, "it's more embarrassing to bring out the feeding bottle in public." full text

  10. Prevalence and Demographics of Exclusive Breastfeeding in Turkish Women in Ankara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neslihan Erkuran

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Exclusive breastfeeding (EBF is strongly recommended by the World Health Organization during the first six months of life. Breastfeeding should continue up to two years or more for optimal growth, development and health while it is suggested to start supplementary foods beginning from seventh month. The study aimed to determine frequency and examine the affecting factors of EBF in infants who were admitted to a pediatric outpatient clinic in Ankara, Turkey.Method: A cross-sectional study was conducted in six months period among 603 breastfeeding mothers, with infants aged 6–24 months, who attended to the well-baby clinic. Mothers’ perceptions about breastfeeding, complementary feeding practices and demographic characteristics were collected by interviewing with mothers.Results: Six months EBF rate was 38%. Median week of EBF was 16 weeks (1-40 weeks. Mothers giving birth at younger (≤19 or older (≥35 ages, and mothers having chronic diseases had shorter median week of EBF (p<0.05. Median duration of breastfeeding was 9 months (0-24 months. When mothers who interrupted EBF were asked why they had introduced supplementary foods early, the most frequent reason was mother’s perceptions of having inadequate breast milk (42.5%.Conclusions: The study indicates that frequency of 6 month EBF (38% and median duration of breastfeeding (16 weeks are low in our region, in Ankara. We must develop a local strategy to overcome mothers’ negative perceptions about EBF.

  11. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... content U.S. Department of Health & Human Services En Español Search Call the OWH HELPLINE: 1-800-994- ... breastfeeding My breastfeeding story Partner resources Search En Español Call the OWH HELPLINE: 1-800-994-9662 ...

  12. Intersectionality family, generation and breastfeeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Araújo Moreira

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Breastfeeding, sociocultural complex and multifaceted process, allows women of the same or of different generations within a group, parental experience and/or develop multiple meanings that can be modified or not depending on the social time in which they lived. Therefore, breastfeeding contributes to the interaction between family members, especially grandmothers, daughters and granddaughters when new generations appreciate lessons learned from the wisdom of a more experienced group. Therefore, it is a qualitative study, descriptive, exploratory-type literature review that had timeless selection for books, dissertations and theses, as series of articles from 1998 to 2008. The objective was to discuss the interface between family, generation and breastfeeding, underscoring the importance of aging and experience of older generations in the process of teaching and learning about breastfeeding to new generations. The literature review was done in the databases SciELO, LILACS and MEDLINE plus books, dissertations and theses, with the keywords: breastfeeding, family and generation. We identified 20 articles, 14 books, dissertations 4, 6 and 2 academic papers theses that were submitted to content analysis. In the analysis, it was noticed that the generations have a close relationship with each other, revealing that aging and maturity of the first generations contribute to greater acquisition of knowledge to be transmitted to younger generations of mothers who breastfeed. We conclude, believing that this study will look amplified, not only of health and related fields, but for those who want to analyze the possibilities of breastfeeding from intergenerational understanding it from the perspective of policymaker’s agents.

  13. Does cultural context make a difference to women?s experiences of maternity care? A qualitative study comparing the perspectives of breast?feeding women of Bangladeshi origin and health practitioners

    OpenAIRE

    McFadden, Alison; Renfrew, Mary J; Atkin, Karl

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background? Maternity services struggle to provide culturally appropriate care that meets the needs of women from diverse populations. Problems include simplistic understandings of ethnicity and the role of culture in women?s lives, and stereotypes held by health practitioners. Objective? To explore the extent to which cultural context makes a difference to experiences of breast?feeding support for women of Bangladeshi origin and to consider the implications for the provision of cult...

  14. The association between psychological factors and breastfeeding behaviour in women with a body mass index (BMI) ≥30 kg m-2 : a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, S; Currie, S; Peters, S; Lavender, T; Smith, D M

    2018-03-24

    Breastfeeding can play a key role in the reduction of obesity, but initiation and maintenance rates in women with a body mass index (BMI) of ≥30 kg m -2 are low. Psychological factors influence breastfeeding behaviours in the general population, but their role is not yet understood in women with a BMI ≥30 kg m -2 . Therefore, this review aimed to systematically search and synthesize the literature, which has investigated the association between any psychological factor and breastfeeding behaviour in women with a BMI ≥30 kg m -2 . The search identified 20 eligible papers, reporting 16 psychological factors. Five psychological factors were associated with breastfeeding behaviours: intentions to breastfeed, belief in breast milk's nutritional adequacy and sufficiency, belief about other's infant feeding preferences, body image and social knowledge. It is therefore recommended that current care should encourage women to plan to breastfeed, provide corrective information for particular beliefs and address their body image and social knowledge. Recommendations for future research include further exploration of several psychological factors (i.e. expecting that breastfeeding will enhance weight loss, depression, anxiety and stress) and evidence and theory-based intervention development. © 2018 The Authors. Obesity Reviews published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of World Obesity Federation.

  15. Is being resolute better than being pragmatic when it comes to breastfeeding? Longitudinal qualitative study investigating experiences of women intending to breastfeed using the Theoretical Domains Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardine, E E; McLellan, J; Dombrowski, S U

    2017-09-01

    In the UK, initiating then discontinuing breastfeeding before two weeks post-partum is common. The aim of this longitudinal qualitative study was to explore which psychosocial factors may influence discontinuation. A sample of 10 pregnant women intending to breastfeed were recruited. A longitudinal qualitative design was used to capture views prior to and two weeks following birth. Semi-structured interviews were conducted underpinned by the Theoretical Domains Framework to explore a comprehensive list of psychosocial factors. Four women discontinued breastfeeding at the time of the second interview. Pre-partum differences were identified between maintainers and discontinuers; discontinuers appeared to have stronger intentions to breastfeed based on their self-determination, self-confidence and perception of fewer barriers to breastfeeding. Post-partum, discontinuers highlighted how they felt physically unable to carry on; their feeding experiences elicited negative emotions and pain. Negative emotions appeared to be exacerbated by original breastfeeding beliefs and advice given by healthcare professionals. The women in this study who discontinued breastfeeding showed less cognitive flexibility, which appeared to exacerbate post-partum emotional distress, when they encountered difficulties. Women with strong intentions and self-determination might benefit from support in anticipating potential barriers and identifying ways of overcoming them. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Retention in care under universal antiretroviral therapy for HIV-infected pregnant and breastfeeding women ('Option B+') in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenthani, Lyson; Haas, Andreas D; Tweya, Hannock; Jahn, Andreas; van Oosterhout, Joep J; Chimbwandira, Frank; Chirwa, Zengani; Ng'ambi, Wingston; Bakali, Alan; Phiri, Sam; Myer, Landon; Valeri, Fabio; Zwahlen, Marcel; Wandeler, Gilles; Keiser, Olivia

    2014-02-20

    To explore the levels and determinants of loss to follow-up (LTF) under universal lifelong antiretroviral therapy (ART) for pregnant and breastfeeding women ('Option B+') in Malawi. We examined retention in care, from the date of ART initiation up to 6 months, for women in the Option B+ program. We analysed nationwide facility-level data on women who started ART at 540 facilities (n = 21,939), as well as individual-level data on patients who started ART at 19 large facilities (n = 11,534). Of the women who started ART under Option B+ (n = 21,939), 17% appeared to be lost to follow-up 6 months after ART initiation. Most losses occurred in the first 3 months of therapy. Option B+ patients who started therapy during pregnancy were five times more likely than women who started ART in WHO stage 3/4 or with a CD4 cell count 350 cells/μl or less, to never return after their initial clinic visit [odds ratio (OR) 5.0, 95% confidence interval (CI) 4.2-6.1]. Option B+ patients who started therapy while breastfeeding were twice as likely to miss their first follow-up visit (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.8-2.8). LTF was highest in pregnant Option B+ patients who began ART at large clinics on the day they were diagnosed with HIV. LTF varied considerably between facilities, ranging from 0 to 58%. Decreasing LTF will improve the effectiveness of the Option B+ approach. Tailored interventions, like community or family-based models of care could improve its effectiveness.

  17. Interactive weekly mobile phone text messaging plus motivational interviewing in promotion of breastfeeding among women living with HIV in South Africa: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zunza, Moleen; Cotton, Mark F; Mbuagbaw, Lawrence; Lester, Richard; Thabane, Lehana

    2017-07-17

    South Africa recently phased out access to free formula milk in the public sector in support of breastfeeding for women living with HIV. Few women living with HIV in South Africa choose breastfeeding and among those who do, many stop breastfeeding early. We sought to explore the feasibility of using mobile phone text messaging coupled with motivational interviewing to enhance adherence to breastfeeding practices. A randomized, parallel group, single-center pilot trial. Electronic sequence generation and random allocation will be done centrally. Women of low socioeconomic status, from Cape Town, South Africa will be randomly assigned within 24 h of giving birth at a primary healthcare clinic to a structured weekly text message plus motivational interviewing and usual standard of care, using a permutation of different block sizes. Criteria for feasibility success will include: five participants recruited per week (over 12 weeks), about 75% of all eligible participants consent for study participation, complete evaluation of outcomes in at least 70% of all recruited participants, breastfeeding adherence rates of at least 70% in the intervention group, six months after delivery. Participants will be evaluated soon after giving birth and post-delivery at weeks 2, 6, 10, and 24. Primary analysis will follow the "intention-to-treat" principle. Sub-group analysis will be used to assess sub-group effects. This pilot trial will evaluate the feasibility of conducting a larger trial on communication and support approaches to improve adherence to breastfeeding by HIV-infected women. Text messaging and motivational interviewing are simple interventions which may allow participants to access personalized adherence advice and support. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02949713 . Registered on 26 October 2016; Pan African Clinical Trial Registry PACTR201611001855404 . Registered on 8 November 2016.

  18. Trio of terror (pregnancy, menstruation, and breastfeeding): an existential function of literal self-objectification among women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Kasey Lynn; Goldenberg, Jamie L; Heflick, Nathan A

    2014-07-01

    Research and theorizing suggest that objectification entails perceiving a person not as a human being but, quite literally, as an object. However, the motive to regard the self as an object is not well understood. The current research tested the hypothesis that literal self-objectification can serve a terror management function. From this perspective, the female body poses a unique existential threat on account of its role in reproduction, and regarding the self as an object is posited to shield women from this threat because objects, in contrast to humans, are not mortal. Across 5 studies, 3 operationalizations of literal self-objectification were employed (a denial of essentially human traits to the self, overlap in the explicit assignment of traits to the self and objects, and implicit associations between self and objects using an implicit association test) in response to 3 aspects of women's bodies involved in reproduction (pregnancy, menstruation, and breastfeeding). In each study, priming mortality led women (but not men, included in Studies 1, 3, 4, and 5) to literally self-objectify in conditions where women's reproductive features were salient. In addition, literal self-objectification was found to mediate subsequent responsiveness to death-related stimuli (Study 4). Together, these findings are the first to demonstrate a direct link between mortality salience, women's role in reproduction, and their self-objectification, supporting an existential function of self-objectification in women.

  19. Online Continuing Education for Expanding Clinicians' Roles in Breastfeeding Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Roger A; Colchamiro, Rachel; Tolan, Ellen; Browne, Susan; Foley, Mary; Jenkins, Lucia; Mainello, Kristen; Vallu, Rohith; Hanley, Lauren E; Boisvert, Mary Ellen; Forgit, Julie; Ghiringhelli, Kara; Nordstrom, Christina

    2015-11-01

    Lack of health professional support is an important variable affecting mothers' achievement of breastfeeding goals. Online continuing education is a recognized pathway for disseminating content for improving clinicians' knowledge and supporting efforts to change practices. At the time we developed our project, free, accredited continuing education for physicians related to breastfeeding management that could be easily accessed using portable devices (via tablets/smartphones) was not available. Such resources were in demand, especially for facilities pursuing designation through the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative. We assembled a government, academic, health care provider, and professional society partnership to create such a tutorial that would address the diverse content needed for supporting breastfeeding mothers postdischarge in the United States. Our 1.5-hour-long continuing medical and nursing education was completed by 1606 clinicians (1172 nurses [73%] and 434 physicians [27%]) within 1 year. More than 90% of nurses and over 98% of physicians said the tutorial achieved its 7 learning objectives related to breastfeeding physiology, broader factors in infant feeding decisions and practices, the American Academy of Pediatrics' policy statement, and breastfeeding management/troubleshooting. Feedback received from the tutorial led to the creation of a second tutorial consisting of another 1.5 hours of continuing medical and nursing education related to breast examination and assessment prior to delivery, provision of anticipatory guidance to pregnant women interested in breastfeeding, maternity care practices that influence breastfeeding outcomes, breastfeeding preterm infants, breastfeeding's role in helping address disparities, and dispelling common myths. The tutorials contribute to achievement of 8 Healthy People 2020 Maternal, Infant and Child Health objectives. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. The prevalence and determinants of breast-feeding initiation and duration in a sample of women in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tarrant, R C

    2010-06-01

    To assess breast-feeding initiation and prevalence from birth to 6 months in a sample of mothers in Dublin, and to determine the factors associated with breast-feeding initiation and \\'any\\' breast-feeding at 6 weeks in a sample of Irish-national mothers.

  1. Inducing Lactation: Breastfeeding for Adoptive Moms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Dynamics > Adoption & Foster Care > Inducing Lactation: Breastfeeding for Adoptive Moms Family Life Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Inducing Lactation: Breastfeeding for Adoptive Moms Page Content Article Body A growing number ...

  2. Education and training of healthcare staff in the knowledge, attitudes and skills needed to work effectively with breastfeeding women: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavine, Anna; MacGillivray, Steve; Renfrew, Mary J; Siebelt, Lindsay; Haggi, Haggi; McFadden, Alison

    2016-01-01

    Current evidence suggests that women need effective support to breastfeed, but many healthcare staff lack the necessary knowledge, attitudes and skills. There is therefore a need for breastfeeding education and training for healthcare staff. The primary aim of this review is to determine whether education and training programs for healthcare staff have an effect on their knowledge and attitudes about supporting breastfeeding women. The secondary aim of this review was to identify whether any differences in type of training or discipline of staff mattered. A systematic search of the literature was conducted using the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's trial register. Randomised controlled trials comparing breastfeeding education and training for healthcare staff with no or usual training and education were included if they measured the impact on staff knowledge, attitudes or compliance with the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI). From the 1192 reports identified, four distinct studies were included. Three studies were two-arm cluster-randomised trials and one was a two-arm individual randomised trial. Of these, three contributed quantitative data from a total of 250 participants. Due to heterogeneity of outcome measures meta-analysis was not possible. Knowledge was included as an outcome in two studies and demonstrated small but significant positive effects. Attitudes towards breastfeeding was included as an outcome in two studies, however, results were inconsistent both in terms of how they were measured and the intervention effects. One study reported a small but significant positive effect on BFHI compliance. Study quality was generally deemed low with the majority of domains being judged as high or unclear risk of bias. This review identified a lack of good evidence on breastfeeding education and training for healthcare staff. There is therefore a critical need for research to address breastfeeding education and training needs of multidisciplinary

  3. Breastfeeding reduces postpartum weight retention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Jennifer Lyn; Gamborg, Michael; Heitmann, Berit L

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Weight gained during pregnancy and not lost postpartum may contribute to obesity in women of childbearing age. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to determine whether breastfeeding reduces postpartum weight retention (PPWR) in a population among which full breastfeeding is common and breastfeeding...... duration is long. DESIGN: We selected women from the Danish National Birth Cohort who ever breastfed (>98%), and we conducted the interviews at 6 (n = 36 030) and 18 (n = 26 846) mo postpartum. We used regression analyses to investigate whether breastfeeding (scored to account for duration and intensity......) reduced PPWR at 6 and 18 mo after adjustment for maternal prepregnancy body mass index (BMI) and gestational weight gain (GWG). RESULTS: GWG was positively (P postpartum. Breastfeeding was negatively associated with PPWR in all women but those...

  4. Working & breastfeeding: a contemporary workplace dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, J

    1999-12-01

    The benefits of breastfeeding are well known and widely documented. What we are only beginning to understand is the significant impact of returning to work on the experience of breastfeeding. This article describes workplace issues, discusses current literature and examines the range of influences that impact on women's decisions about working and breastfeeding.

  5. Possibilidades e limitações da amamentação entre mulheres trabalhadoras formais Possibilities and limitations of breast-feeding among women in formal employment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Ferreira Rea

    1997-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: Pesquisas sobre a amamentação e a questão do trabalho da mulher são de difícil comparabilidade. A prática de amamentar entre mulheres com um emprego formal no Brasil tem sido pouco estudada, em que pesem as mudanças havidas como a extensão da licença maternidade para 120 dias. Decidiu-se realizar estudo com o objetivo de descrever o padrão de amamentação de mulheres empregadas em empresas, as limitações que elas enfrentam e que fatores contribuem para que elas possam conciliar trabalho e amamentação. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Estudo exploratório realizado em 13 indústrias de São Paulo em 1994, onde todas as mulheres no terceiro trimestre da gestação (76 foram entrevistadas e reentrevistadas (69 na volta ao trabalho (em torno de 5,4 meses pós-parto. RESULTADOS: Iniciaram a amamentação 97% das mulheres, apresentando uma duração mediana de 150 dias; quanto ao Aleitamento Materno Exclusivo, a duração mediana foi de 10 dias, e à Amamentação Predominante, a mediana foi de 70 dias. As mulheres de melhor nível socioeconômico e as que tinham creche no local de trabalho ou sala de coleta e estocagem de leite materno, foram as que amamentaram por mais tempo. A possibilidade de flexibilizar seu horário e não trabalhar na linha de produção também mostraram ser fatores significantes que levam as mulheres dessas indústrias a amamentar mais. CONCLUSÕES: A licença-maternidade tem sido útil e usada pela maioria das trabalhadoras para amamentar, mas há outros fatores que são fundamentais para que a manutenção da lactação seja facilitada, tais como aqueles que permitem a proximidade mãe-criança e/ou a retirada periódica de leite materno durante a jornada de trabalho.INTRODUCTION: Studies carried out on breastfeeding and working women are difficult to compare. Breastfeeding practices among formally employed women in Brazil have not been much studied, despite important changes in public policies such as the

  6. Using Videoconferencing Technology to Provide Breastfeeding Support to Low-Income Women: Connecting Hospital-Based Lactation Consultants with Clients Receiving Care at a Community Health Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Carol A; Hormuth, Laura J; Petersen, Devan; Babbitt, Tina

    2015-11-01

    The Tele-Lactation Pilot Project (TLPP), 1 of 13 community-based breastfeeding projects implemented in Indiana in 2013 using Centers for Disease Control and Prevention grant funds, explored the feasibility of using videoconferencing technology to provide breastfeeding education and support to low-income women by a centrally located International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC). The IBCLC was housed at the Breastfeeding Center at the hospital where the women would deliver; the women receiving the education and support were located at an inner-city community health center (CHC) where they received their primary care. The videoconferencing sessions were juxtaposed with the women's regularly scheduled prenatal and postnatal visits at the CHC. After delivery, the lactation consultant visited the mother and infant in person at the hospital to offer additional support. Overall, 35 mothers were served by the TLPP during the 9-month project period. A total of 134 visits (30-45 minutes each) were conducted (3.8 sessions per woman). At the conclusion of the project, interviews with key participants indicated that the tele-lactation videoconferencing sessions were easy to implement, allowed the IBCLC to reach a wider client base, and allowed the women to receive expert support that they might not have otherwise received. Comments indicated that, in addition to providing education and increasing the women's confidence, the tele-lactation sessions appeared to have decreased the mothers' anxiety about the birthing process and the hospital experience. The TLPP demonstrated that incorporating videoconferencing technology into routine care can help foster collaboration among health care providers and provide mothers with continuous, easily accessible breastfeeding education and support. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. The theory of agency and breastfeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Kath; Team, Victoria; Alexander, Jo

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we apply psychological agency theory to women's interviews of their breastfeeding experiences to understand the role of agency in relation to breastfeeding initiation, maintenance and duration. Qualitative, video interviews were collected from 49 women in the UK from a wide range of ethnic, religious, educational and employment backgrounds about their breastfeeding experiences. We undertook secondary analysis of the data focusing on their accounts of vulnerability and agency. Women's agency was impacted by a variety of factors including their own vulnerability, knowledge, expectations and experience, the feeding environment and the support of health professionals in sharing decision-making and dealing with uncertainty. Health professionals as co-agents with women are well positioned to maintain, enhance or restore women's sense of agency. Breastfeeding goals should be included in women's birth plans. Training related to agency, continuity of care, and staffing and workload management supported by national breastfeeding policies could improve breastfeeding rates and experiences.

  8. Workplace Breastfeeding Support Varies by Employment Type: The Service Workplace Disadvantage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Kailey; Hansen, Kelli; Brown, Sara; Portratz, Amy; White, Kate; Dinkel, Danae

    The majority of women are returning to work full-time after childbirth, and support within their place of employment may influence intention and duration for breastfeeding, but more research is needed. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to explore the influence of employment type on breastfeeding duration upon return to work by examining informal (i.e., verbal encouragement) and direct (i.e., lactation space, flexible time) factors of support. This was a retrospective survey of women's returning-to-work experiences while breastfeeding. Survey contents included respondent demographics as well as questions surrounding perceptions of employer support, work environment, and goal/satisfaction regarding breastfeeding. Data were analyzed via crosstabs and chi-square goodness of fit tests. A total of 1,002 women completed the survey. Significant differences were seen across different employment types. Women within the professional/management industry were most likely to receive informal and direct support for breastfeeding upon return to work. Women within the service industry and production/transportation industry reported receiving the lowest levels of informal and direct support. Workplace support varies by employment type and women in the service and production/transportation industry appear to be at a disadvantage compared with other employment types. There is a need for more breastfeeding support programs to be developed that target specific workplace characteristics.

  9. Stavudine concentrations in women receiving postpartum antiretroviral treatment and their breastfeeding infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Jessica M; Taha, Taha E; Sun, Jin; Hoover, Donald R; Parsons, Teresa L; Kumwenda, Johnstone J; Mofenson, Lynne M; Fowler, Mary Glenn; Hendrix, Craig W; Kumwenda, Newton I; Eshleman, Susan H; Mirochnick, Mark

    2012-08-15

    First-line antiretroviral treatment regimens in resource-limited settings used in breastfeeding mothers often include stavudine (d4T). Limited data describing d4T concentrations in breast milk are available. We analyzed d4T concentrations in 52 mother-infant pairs using ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (lower limit of quantification: 5 ng/mL in plasma, 20 ng/mL in breast milk). Median (interquartile range) d4T concentrations were 86 (36-191) ng/mL in maternal plasma, 151 (48-259) ng/mL in whole milk, 190 (58-296) ng/mL in skim milk, and <5 (<5 to <5) ng/mL in infant plasma. Although d4T is concentrated in breast milk relative to maternal plasma, the infant d4T dose received from breast milk is very small and not clinically significant.

  10. Statement on the safety of synthetic L-ergothioneine as a novel food – supplementary dietary exposure and safety assessment for infants and young children, pregnant and breastfeeding women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjödin, Anders Mikael

    2017-01-01

    as established in the original assessment also pertains to pregnant and breastfeeding women as well as to young children (i.e. toddlers) and infants. The corresponding margins of exposure (i.e. the ratio between the NOAEL and the maximum anticipated daily intakes) are 284 for infants, 236 for young children...... and 610 for pregnant and breastfeeding women. These margins of exposure are considered sufficient. The Panel concludes that the novel food, synthetic L-ergothioneine, is safe under the proposed uses and use levels for infants, young children (i.e. toddlers) and pregnant and breastfeeding women....... in the original application, i.e. infants and young children (i.e. toddlers), pregnant and breastfeeding women. Thus, intake estimates were calculated for these population groups and the following maximum anticipated daily intakes of L-ergothioneine from the NF, in addition to the background diet, were calculated...

  11. Which Benefits and Harms of Using Fenugreek as a Galactogogue Need to Be Discussed during Clinical Consultations? A Delphi Study among Breastfeeding Women, Gynecologists, Pediatricians, Family Physicians, Lactation Consultants, and Pharmacists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiblawi, Sara; Ghanayem, Haifa

    2018-01-01

    Background Breastfeeding women with hypogalactia are commonly recommended to use fenugreek as a galactogogue. This study aimed to achieve formal consensus among breastfeeding women and healthcare providers on which potential harms and benefits of using fenugreek need to be communicated and discussed during clinical consultations. Methods A two-iterative round Delphi technique was used in two separate panels of breastfeeding women (n = 65) and healthcare providers (n = 56) to achieve formal consensus on a list of 24 and 16 items related to potential harms and benefits of fenugreek. Results About 70% of the healthcare providers recommended quite often herbal remedies for breastfeeding women and about 68% of the women had been recommended to use herbal remedies many times by their healthcare providers. Consensus was achieved on 21 potential harms and 14 potential benefits of using fenugreek to enhance human milk supply that need to be discussed with breastfeeding women during consultations. Conclusion Probably, potential harms and benefits of recommending fenugreek as herbal galactogogue for breastfeeding women seeking recommendations to increase their human milk supply need to be discussed during clinical consultations. Further observational studies are needed to assess what is being discussed in daily consultations when herbal remedies are recommended. PMID:29849697

  12. Selected abstracts from the Breastfeeding and Feminism International Conference 2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa H. Amir

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Table of contents A1. Infant feeding and poverty: a public health perspective in a global context Lisa H. Amir A2. Mothers’ experiences with galactagogues for lactation: an exploratory cross sectional study Alessandra Bazzano, Shelley Thibeau, Katherine P. Theall A3. The motherhood journey and breastfeeding: from self-efficacy to resilience and social stigma Anna Blair, Karin Cadwell A4. Breastfeeding as an evolutionary adaptive behavior Emily A. Bronson A5. Conflict-of-interest in public health policy: as real as that logo on your website Elizabeth C. Brooks A6. Co-opting sisterhood and motherhood: behind the scenes of Similac’s aggressive social media campaigns Jodine Chase A7. The exclusion of women from the definition of exclusive breastfeeding Ellen Chetwynd, Rebecca Costello, Kathryn Wouk A8. Healthy maternity policies in the workplace: a state health department’s experience with the “Bring Your Infant to Work” program Lindsey Dermid-Gray A9. Implications for a paradigm shift: factors related to breastfeeding among African American women Stephanie Devane-Johnson, Cheryl Woods Giscombe, Miriam Labbok A10. Social experiences of breastfeeding: building bridges between research and policy: an ESRC-funded seminar series in the UK Sally Dowling A11. Manager’s perspectives of lactation breaks Melanie Fraser A12. The challenging second night: a dialogue from two perspectives Jane Grassley, Deborah McCarter-Spaulding, Becky Spencer A13. The role of lactation consultants in two council breastfeeding services in Melbourne, Australia – some preliminary impressions Jennifer Hocking, Pranee Liamputtong A14. Integrating social marketing and community engagement concepts in community breastfeeding programs Sheree H. Keitt, Harumi Reis-Reilly A15. What happens before and after the maternity stay? Creating a community-wide Ten Steps approach Miriam Labbok A16. #RVABREASTFEEDS: cultivating a breastfeeding-friendly community Leslie Lytle A17

  13. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Planning ahead Breastfeeding and baby basics Making breastfeeding work for you Addressing breastfeeding myths Overcoming challenges Finding support Fitting breastfeeding into your life Partner resources Subscribe To receive Breastfeeding email updates ...

  14. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... It's Only Natural Planning ahead Breastfeeding and baby basics Making breastfeeding work for you Addressing breastfeeding myths Overcoming challenges Finding support Fitting breastfeeding into your life Partner resources Subscribe To receive Breastfeeding email updates ...

  15. Effect of prenatal education on breastfeeding initiation and exclusive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The prevalence of breastfeeding initiation and exclusive breastfeeding is low globally in both developing and developed countries despite the promotion interventions on breastfeeding rates in early infancy. In Ethiopia, the proportion of women who practiced early breastfeeding initiation (EBI) and exclusive ...

  16. Cultural Norms in Conflict: Breastfeeding Among Hispanic Immigrants in Rural Washington State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohl, Sarah; Thompson, Beti; Escareño, Monica; Duggan, Catherine

    2016-07-01

    Objectives To examine perceptions, experiences, and attitudes towards breastfeeding among Hispanic women living in rural Washington State. Methods Twenty parous Hispanic women of low acculturation, aged 25-48 years and residents in rural Washington State participated in an exploratory, face-to-face interview. Interviews were audio-recorded, translated and transcribed, and analyzed using a thematic content analysis approach. Results Nine emergent themes were grouped into three overarching categories: (1) Breast is best; (2) Hispanic cultural and familial expectations to breastfeed; and (3) Adapting to life in the United States: cultural norms in conflict. Women said they were motivated to breastfeed because of their knowledge and observations of its health benefits for mother and child. They said breastfeeding is ingrained in their Hispanic cultural heritage, and infant feeding choices of female family members were particularly influential in women's own decision to breastfeed. Women said they experienced embarrassment about breastfeeding in the United States and as a result, often chose to initiate formula feeding as a complement so as to avoid feelings of shame. Additionally, they faced economic pressure to work, key barriers for continued breastfeeding among Hispanics in the United States. Conclusions for Practice Knowledge of the benefits of breastfeeding for mother and child and longstanding cultural practices of breastfeeding are not enough to encourage exclusive breastfeeding to 6 months among this rural Hispanic population. Continued support through family-level interventions as well as work place policies that encourage breastfeeding are needed for rural Hispanics to reach optimal breastfeeding rates.

  17. Aleitamento materno exclusivo entre trabalhadoras com creche no local de trabalho Exclusive breastfeeding among working women with free daycare available at workplace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria José Duarte Osis

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Investigar os fatores relacionados à decisão das mulheres em amamentar e a duração planejada e, de fato observada, do aleitamento exclusivo entre trabalhadoras que dispõem de creche na empresa. MÉTODOS: Estudo qualitativo no qual se comparou um grupo de 15 trabalhadoras cujos bebês estavam sendo alimentados apenas com leite materno quando começaram a freqüentar a creche da empresa com outro similar que incluía mulheres cujos bebês que, ao ingressar, já estavam recebendo, além do leite materno, outros alimentos. Foram realizadas entrevistas semi-estruturadas e grupos focais. RESULTADOS: Evidenciaram-se como fatores relacionados à decisão de iniciar a amamentação e mantê-la ao retornar ao trabalho: o desejo de amamentar, embasado no valor que as mulheres dos dois grupos atribuíam ao aleitamento materno, bem como seus maridos e outras pessoas significativas (por exemplo: mãe, irmã, amigas. A duração do aleitamento exclusivo relacionou-se principalmente à orientação do pediatra que cuidava do bebê, que foi distinta em cada um dos grupos estudados. CONCLUSÃO: A existência da creche no local de trabalho aparece como elemento relevante para a manutenção do aleitamento após a licença de maternidade, especialmente o materno exclusivo. A decisão sobre quanto tempo amamentar de forma exclusiva esteve relacionada às informações recebidas acerca do assunto antes e durante a gestação, e no pós-parto. A diferença entre os dois grupos estudados foi que as mulheres que mantiveram o aleitamento exclusivo por quase seis meses acreditavam que quanto mais tempo dessem somente o leite materno, mais benefícios o bebê teria, enquanto as mulheres do outro grupo acreditavam que três meses de aleitamento exclusivo eram suficientes.OBJECTIVE: To investigate factors related to the decision of exclusive breastfeeding, and the planned and the actual duration among working women with free daycare available at workplace

  18. Does cultural context make a difference to women's experiences of maternity care? A qualitative study comparing the perspectives of breast-feeding women of Bangladeshi origin and health practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFadden, Alison; Renfrew, Mary J; Atkin, Karl

    2013-12-01

    Maternity services struggle to provide culturally appropriate care that meets the needs of women from diverse populations. Problems include simplistic understandings of ethnicity and the role of culture in women's lives, and stereotypes held by health practitioners. To explore the extent to which cultural context makes a difference to experiences of breast-feeding support for women of Bangladeshi origin and to consider the implications for the provision of culturally appropriate care. The study comprised individual interviews with 23 women of Bangladeshi origin and four health service managers, and focus group discussions with 28 health practitioners between February and December 2008. Participants were recruited from four localities in northern England. Women's rich descriptions of various facets of their identities were in contrast to practitioners' representations of women of Bangladeshi origin as homogenous. Practitioners did not recognize when the needs of women of Bangladeshi origin were similar to those of the majority white population, or where cultural context made a difference to their experiences of breast-feeding and breast-feeding support. Some practitioners used cultural stereotypes which, combined with organizational constraints, resulted in services not meeting many of the women's needs. Implications for education, policy and practice include the need for training of health practitioners to work with diverse populations, implementing evidence-based practice and providing an organizational context which supports practitioners to respond to diversity without using cultural stereotypes. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Facilitating working mothers' ability to breastfeed: global trends in guaranteeing breastfeeding breaks at work, 1995-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atabay, Efe; Moreno, Gonzalo; Nandi, Arijit; Kranz, Gabriella; Vincent, Ilona; Assi, Tina-Marie; Winfrey, Elise Marie Vaughan; Earle, Alison; Raub, Amy; Heymann, S Jody

    2015-02-01

    Mothers who work away from home tend to stop breastfeeding earlier than their nonworking counterparts due to workplace barriers. Barriers to breastfeeding discriminate against women and may lead to inequities in children's health outcomes. Guaranteeing paid breastfeeding breaks at work is 1 mechanism that can improve mothers' opportunity to breastfeed in the workplace. This study aimed to assess the trends in the share of countries guaranteeing breastfeeding breaks in the workplace and paid maternal leave that lasts until the infant is 6 months old (the World Health Organization recommended duration for exclusive breastfeeding), between 1995 and 2014. Legislation and secondary source data were collected and reviewed for 193 United Nations member states. Legislation was analyzed for content on breastfeeding breaks and maternal leave guarantees. Fifty-one countries (26.7%) in 2014 did not guarantee breastfeeding breaks in any form and 4 countries provided only unpaid breaks or breaks that did not cover the first 6 months of life; since 1995, around 15 countries (10.2%) legislated for such a policy. In 2014, out of 55 countries that did not guarantee paid breastfeeding breaks for the first 6 months after birth, 7 countries guaranteed paid maternal leave for the same duration; 48 countries (25.1%) provided neither paid maternal leave nor paid breastfeeding breaks. Progress in the number of countries guaranteeing breastfeeding breaks at work is modest. Adopting measures to facilitate breastfeeding at work can be a critical opportunity for countries to increase breastfeeding rates among the growing number of women in the labor force. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. Influence of number of deliveries and total breast-feeding time on bone mineral density in premenopausal and young postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsvetov, Gloria; Levy, Sigal; Benbassat, Carlos; Shraga-Slutzky, Ilana; Hirsch, Dania

    2014-03-01

    Pregnancy and lactation have been associated with decline in bone mineral density (BMD). It is not clear if there is a full recovery of BMD to baseline. This study sought to determine if pregnancy or breast-feeding or both have a cumulative effect on BMD in premenopausal and early postmenopausal women. We performed single-center cohort analysis. Five hundred women aged 35-55 years underwent routine BMD screening from February to July 2011 at a tertiary medical center. Patients were questioned about number of total full-term deliveries and duration of breast-feeding and completed a background questionnaire on menarche and menopause, smoking, dairy product consumption, and weekly physical exercise. Weight and height were measured. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry was used to measure spinal, dual femoral neck, and total hip BMD. Associations between background characteristics and BMD values were analyzed. Sixty percent of the women were premenopausal. Mean number of deliveries was 2.5 and mean duration of breast-feeding was 9.12 months. On univariate analysis, BMD values were negatively correlated with patient age (p=0.006) and number of births (p=0.013), and positively correlated with body mass index (posteoporosis later in life. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Use of human milk in the assessment of toxic metal exposure and essential element status in breastfeeding women and their infants in coastal Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzunov Letinić, Judita; Matek Sarić, Marijana; Piasek, Martina; Jurasović, Jasna; Varnai, Veda Marija; Sulimanec Grgec, Antonija; Orct, Tatjana

    2016-12-01

    Pregnant and lactating women and infants are vulnerable population groups for adverse effects of toxic metals due to their high nutritional needs and the resultant increased gastrointestinal absorption of both, essential and toxic elements. Although breastfeeding is recommended for infants worldwide, as human milk is the best source of nutrients and other required bioactive factors, it is also a pathway of maternal excretion of toxic substances including toxic metals and thus a source of infant exposure. The aim of this research was to assess health risks in breastfeeding women in the coastal area of the Republic of Croatia and their infants (N=107) due to maternal exposure to Cd and Pb via cigarette smoking, and Hg via seafood and dental amalgam fillings, and their interaction with essential elements. Biological markers of exposure were the concentrations of main toxic metals Pb, Cd and Hg in maternal blood and three types of breast milk throughout lactation stages. Biological markers of effects were the levels of essential elements Ca, Fe, Cu, Zn and Se in maternal serum and breast milk. With regard to cigarette smoking as a source of exposure to Cd and Pb, there were effects of smoking on Cd concentration in blood and correlations between the smoking index and Cd concentrations in maternal blood (ρ=0.593; Pexposure in both breastfeeding women and their infants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Travel Characteristics and Pretravel Health Care Among Pregnant or Breastfeeding U.S. Women Preparing for International Travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagmann, Stefan H F; Rao, Sowmya R; LaRocque, Regina C; Erskine, Stefanie; Jentes, Emily S; Walker, Allison T; Barnett, Elizabeth D; Chen, Lin H; Hamer, Davidson H; Ryan, Edward T

    2017-12-01

    To study characteristics and preventive interventions of adult pregnant and breastfeeding travelers seeking pretravel health care in the United States. This cross-sectional study analyzed data (2009-2014) of pregnant and breastfeeding travelers seen at U.S. travel clinics participating in Global TravEpiNet. Nonpregnant, nonbreastfeeding adult female travelers of childbearing age were used for comparison. We evaluated the prescription of malaria chemoprophylaxis and antibiotics for this population as well as the administration of three travel-related vaccines: hepatitis A, typhoid, and yellow fever. We also evaluated use of tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid, and acellular pertussis and influenza vaccines, because these are widely recommended in pregnancy. Of 21,138 female travelers of childbearing age in Global TravEpiNet, 170 (0.8%) were pregnant and 139 (0.7%) were breastfeeding. Many traveled to destinations endemic for mosquito-borne illnesses, including malaria (pregnant: 95%; breastfeeding: 94%), dengue (pregnant: 87%; breastfeeding: 81%), or yellow fever (pregnant: 35%; breastfeeding: 50%). Compared with nonpregnant, nonbreastfeeding adult female travelers, eligible pregnant travelers were less likely to be vaccinated against hepatitis A (28% compared with 51%, Ptravelers did not receive influenza vaccination. Yellow fever vaccine was occasionally provided to pregnant and breastfeeding travelers traveling to countries entirely endemic for yellow fever (6 [20%] of 30 pregnant travelers and 18 [46%] of 39 breastfeeding travelers). Half of pregnant travelers and two thirds of breastfeeding travelers preparing to travel to malaria-holoendemic countries received a prescription for malaria prophylaxis. Most pregnant and breastfeeding travelers seen for pretravel health consultations traveled to destinations with high risk for vector-borne or other travel-related diseases. Destination-specific preventive interventions were frequently underused.

  3. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... information Breastfeeding Pregnancy Resources Your Guide to Breastfeeding Support for Nursing Moms in the Workplace: Employer Solutions Blog topics Breastfeeding: Natural Doesn’t ...

  4. Marketing pharmaceutical drugs to women in magazines: a content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokol, Jennifer; Wackowski, Olivia; Lewis, M J

    2010-01-01

    To examine the prevalence and content of pharmaceutical ads in demographically different women's magazines. A content analysis was conducted using one year's worth of 5 different women's magazines of varying age demographics. Magazines differed in the proportion of drug ads for different health conditions (eg, cardiovascular) and target audience by age demographic. Use of persuasive elements (types of appeals, evidence) varied by condition promoted (eg, mental-health drug ads more frequently used emotional appeals). Ads placed greater emphasis on direction to industry information resources than on physician discussions. Prevalence of pharmaceutical advertising in women's magazines is high; continued surveillance is recommended.

  5. Cannabis and Breastfeeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélia Garry

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cannabis is a drug derived from hemp plant, Cannabis sativa, used both as a recreational drug or as medicine. It is a widespread illegal substance, generally smoked for its hallucinogenic properties. Little is known about the adverse effects of postnatal cannabis exposure throw breastfeeding because of a lack of studies in lactating women. The active substance of cannabis is the delta 9 TetraHydroCannabinol (THC. Some studies conclude that it could decrease motor development of the child at one year of age. Therefore, cannabis use and abuse of other drugs like alcohol, tobacco, or cocaine must be contraindicated during breastfeeding. Mothers who use cannabis must stop breastfeeding, or ask for medical assistance to stop cannabis use in order to provide her baby with all the benefits of human milk.

  6. A descriptive study of Swedish women with symptoms of breast inflammation during lactation and their perceptions of the quality of care given at a breastfeeding clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hall- Lord Marie

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Women's perceptions of quality of care during episodes of breast inflammation have been scantily explored. It was the objective of the present study to describe a cohort of breastfeeding women with inflammatory symptoms of the breast during lactation regarding demographical variables, illness history and symptoms at first contact with a breastfeeding clinic and to explore their physical health status, psychological well-being and perceptions of quality of care received, at a six-week postal follow-up. Methods This is a descriptive study set at a midwife-led breastfeeding clinic in Sweden, which included a cohort of women with 210 episodes of breast inflammation. The women had taken part in a RCT of acupuncture and care interventions and were recruited between 2002 and 2004. Of the total cohort, 176 (84 % responded to a postal questionnaire, six weeks after recovery. Results Of the 154 women for whom body temperature was recorded at the first visit, 80 (52% had fever ranging from 38.1°C to 40.7°C. There was no significant difference between those with favourable outcomes (5 or less contact days and those with less favourable outcomes (6 or more contact days for having fever or no fever at first contact. Thirty-six percent of women had damaged nipples. Significantly more women with a less favourable outcome (6 or more contact days had damaged nipples. Most women recovered well from the episode of breast inflammation and 96% considered their physical health and 97% their psychological well-being, to be good, six weeks after the episode. Those whose illness lasted 6 days or more showed less confidence in the midwives and in the care given to them. Twenty-one (12% women contacted health care services because of recurring symptoms and eight of the 176 responders (4.5% were prescribed antibiotics for these recurring symptoms. A further 46 women (26% of the responders reported recurring symptoms that they managed without recourse

  7. Dad's Role in Breastfeeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share Dad's Role in Breastfeeding Page Content Article Body Let’s say you and mom have talked about it and ... is the medical term for the way the body makes room for incoming food by ... that your baby poops every time she nurses. Step in to handle this ...

  8. Mothers' Concerns for Personal Safety and Privacy While Breastfeeding: An Unexplored Phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen-Carole, Casey; Allen, Katherine; Fagnano, Maria; Dozier, Ann; Halterman, Jill

    2018-04-01

    Preliminary qualitative research in upstate NY shows new mothers are worried about safety while breastfeeding. Little is known regarding prevalence of these concerns and their effect on breastfeeding outcomes. (1) Determine frequency of breastfeeding safety and privacy concerns; (2) Explore their association with breastfeeding outcomes. Mothers were surveyed immediately and 1-month postpartum about breastfeeding goals; both surveys addressed privacy and safety concerns at home, work, and in public. Outcome data included breastfeeding intent, exclusivity, and duration. Breastfeeding/non-breastfeeding mothers were compared using Chi-square and multivariate analyses. A total of 279 women enrolled. Of these 82.8% initiated breastfeeding; at 1-month 72% provided any breast milk, and 44% were exclusively breastfeeding. About 99% felt safe breastfeeding at home; 25% reported privacy concerns; and 5% felt "vulnerable or unsafe" while breastfeeding. At 1-month, 49% agreed there was a safe place to breastfeed/express milk at work (20% unsure). Non-breastfeeding mothers expressed more safety concerns outside home/at work: 18% breastfeeding versus 28% non-breastfeeding outside home; 27% breastfeeding versus 40% non-breastfeeding at work. Nearly 54% who reported feeling vulnerable/unsafe with breastfeeding initiated breastfeeding, compared with 86% not reporting this concern (p = 0.008). Fewer women initiating breastfeeding reported vulnerability/safety (3% breastfeeding versus 14% non-breastfeeding, p = 0.008) or privacy (22% breastfeeding versus 40% non-breastfeeding, p = 0.19) concerns. Associations held after controlling for age, race, parity, insurance, geography, and marital-status. Significant associations between initiation, privacy, and safety concerns did not extend to duration or exclusivity. Many breastfeeding women reported safety and privacy concerns, especially outside the home and at work, which may influence breastfeeding initiation. Further study

  9. The Sharjah Baby-Friendly Campaign: A Community-Based Model for Breastfeeding Promotion, Protection, and Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Ghazal, Hessa; Rashid, Shehnaz; Ruf, Evelyne

    2015-11-01

    Breastfeeding promotion, protection, and support are one of the most cost-effective public health interventions to advance maternal and child health. The World Health Organization, the United Nations International Children's Emergency Fund, and numerous health organizations have recommended exclusive breastfeeding for the first 6 months of life, which is a key indicator of breastfeeding promotion programs worldwide. Despite the recommendations and various initiatives to promote breastfeeding, most women do not reach the exclusive breastfeeding target in both developed and developing countries. Such has been the case in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Therefore, based on the decree for breastfeeding promotion, protection, and support by the ruler of the Emirate of Sharjah, UAE, H.H. Sheikh Doctor Sultan Al Qasimi, a multisectorial, multidirectional breastfeeding campaign--the Sharjah Baby-Friendly Campaign--was launched in March 2012 by H.E. Sheikha Bodour Al Qasimi, under her patronage. It consisted of four initiatives-namely, Baby-Friendly Health Facility, Mother-Friendly Workplace, Breastfeeding-Friendly Nursery, and Mother-Baby Friendly Public Place. Once an organization met the criteria for any of these initiatives, it was awarded the designation or accreditation of that initiative. The campaign initiatives worked through capacity building of healthcare workers, provided professional support and facilitation for the accreditation process, developed breastfeeding education content and resources, and organized and conducted breastfeeding promotion seminars in health facilities and community, as well as community outreach through social media and an innovative mobile mother' room. The positive impact of the campaign on breastfeeding promotion, protection, and support is evident by the increased exclusive breastfeeding rate at 6 months and decreased bottle feeding rates at both 4 and 6 months.

  10. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you Addressing breastfeeding myths Breastfeeding myths in the African-American community Incredible facts about babies, breastmilk, and ... to get your family on board with breastfeeding African-American celebrity moms who breastfeed Fitting breastfeeding into ...

  11. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... breastfeeding Overcoming challenges Common questions about breastfeeding and pain Breastfeeding checklist: How to get a good latch Finding ... and Shareables Browse by health topic Autoimmune Diseases Breastfeeding Cancer ... Pregnancy Reproductive Health Sexual Health Sexually Transmitted Infections ...

  12. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... menu It's Only Natural Planning ahead Breastfeeding and baby basics Making breastfeeding work for you Addressing breastfeeding ... in the African-American community Incredible facts about babies, breastmilk, and breastfeeding Overcoming challenges Common questions about ...

  13. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... we are What we do Programs and activities Work with us Contact Us Blog Popular topics Vision ... Planning ahead Breastfeeding and baby basics Making breastfeeding work for you Addressing breastfeeding myths Breastfeeding myths in ...

  14. Increasing loyalty to breastfeeding: investigating a product development strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Joy; Russell-Bennett, Rebekah; Previte, Josephine

    2012-01-01

    This article demonstrates how social marketing insights were used to influence women's loyalty to breastfeeding. The article reports on a social marketing campaign undertaken by the Australian Breastfeeding Association and a government health department, which used a product development strategy in order to increase breastfeeding loyalty. Seeking new approaches to support breastfeeding behaviors is critical and timely, because while initiation rates of breastfeeding are high in developed countries such as the United Kingdom, Australia, Canada, and the United States, duration rates are significantly lower. Results indicate that a product- focused strategy influences pregnant women's loyalty to exclusively breastfeeding.

  15. Young mothers, first time parenthood and exclusive breastfeeding in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naanyu, Violet

    2008-12-01

    Breastfeeding behaviour is explored in Kenya using data collected in the town of Eldoret, Kenya. This paper specifically examines duration of exclusive breastfeeding among young mothers below 20 years of age as compared to older cohorts. Additionally, focus is laid on the effect of first time motherhood and breastfeeding difficulties on exclusive breastfeeding. Results show that Eldoret mothers are aware of benefits of breastfeeding; nevertheless, the mean duration for exclusive breastfeeding in this sample is 2.4 months. Higher durations of exclusive breastfeeding are associated with increasing age and first time motherhood. Predictably, breastfeeding difficulties bear a negative association with exclusive breastfeeding. While HIV is transmissible through breastfeeding, breast milk remains a vital source of nourishment for infants in Sub-Saharan Africa. More research on mothering should examine the changing socio-economic milieu and its influence on women's infant feeding decisions

  16. Breastfeeding promotion and support strategies based on Paulo Freire's epistemological categories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisca Márcia Pereira Linhares

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study identified strategies for promoting breastfeeding involving pregnant women, breastfeeding women and actors of the social support network for the breastfeeding process. METHODS: This qualitative study was guided by action research and the focal group technique to collect data. Focal Group 1 consisted of four pregnant and six breastfeeding women; Focal Group 2 consisted of six family members; and Focal Group 3 consisted of thirteen health professionals. The focal groups were guided by the following questions: What breastfeeding promotion and support actions should be done? How should they be performed? Who should perform them? The conversation sunder went thematic content analysis and were interpreted in the light of Paulo Freire's theoretical constructs: dialogue, ethics and problematization. RESULTS: Four themes were emerged from the conversations: dialogue-based educational actions involving the social support network during the vital cycle; educational actions in schools; educational actions in the media; ongoing counseling at Family Health Units. CONCLUSION: The constructed strategies were centered on dialogue and active listening. Both should be present during the entire vital cycle and in the Family Health Strategy, and involve all actors of the social support network. These strategies may disrupt the unidirectional transmission of the educational practices that promote breastfeeding.

  17. Alcohol and Breastfeeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haastrup, Maija Bruun; Pottegård, Anton; Damkier, Per

    2014-01-01

    While the harmful effects of alcohol during pregnancy are well-established, the consequences of alcohol intake during lactation have been far less examined. We reviewed available data on the prevalence of alcohol intake during lactation, the influence of alcohol on breastfeeding......, the pharmacokinetics of alcohol in lactating women and nursing infants and the effects of alcohol intake on nursing infants. A systematic search was performed in PubMed from origin to May 2013, and 41 publications were included in the review. Approximately half of all lactating women in Western countries consume...... alcohol while breastfeeding. Alcohol intake inhibits the milk ejection reflex, causing a temporary decrease in milk yield. The alcohol concentrations in breast milk closely resemble those in maternal blood. The amount of alcohol presented to nursing infants through breast milk is approximately 5...

  18. Breastfeeding and abstinence among the Yoruba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dow, T E

    1977-08-01

    Contemporary patterns of breastfeeding and postpartum abstinence among the Yoruba of Nigera are examined. Quite extensive periods of postpartum abstinence are still observed by most rural and poorer urban women to prolong breastfeeding and increase child survivorship. Differentials in duration of breastfeeding and abstinence relate to both socioeconomic factors and age, suggesting the likelihood of large future reductions. Implications for family planning prospects and policies are noted.

  19. A Content Analysis of Women's Career Choices in Film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Tonya R.

    2010-01-01

    A feminist content analysis of 81 films was conducted as a means to assist mental health practitioners in guiding the career choices of young women and to explore the possibilities for change through this medium. The review of the 117 lead female characters revealed themes including: the idea that relationships should be secondary to careers in…

  20. Participation of pregnant women in a community-based nutrition program in Mumbai's informal settlements: Effect on exclusive breastfeeding practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanani, Sheila; Waingankar, Anagha; Shah More, Neena; Pantvaidya, Shanti; Fernandez, Armida; Jayaraman, Anuja

    2018-01-01

    In urban Maharashtra, India, approximately half of mothers exclusively breastfeed. For children residing in informal settlements of Mumbai, this study examines factors associated with exclusive breastfeeding, and whether exclusive breastfeeding, in a community-based nutrition program to prevent and treat wasting among children under age three, is associated with enrolment during the mother's pregnancy. The nutrition program conducted a cross-sectional endline survey (October-December 2015) of caregivers in intervention areas. Factors associated with exclusive breastfeeding for infants under six months of age were explored using multi-level logistic regressions. Additionally, program surveillance data collected during home-based counselling visits documented breastfeeding practices for children under six months of age. Using the surveillance data (January 2014-March 2016), exclusive breastfeeding status was regressed adjusting for child, maternal and socioeconomic characteristics, and whether the child was enrolled in the program in utero or after birth. The community-based endline survey included 888 mothers of infants. Mothers who received the nutrition program home visits or attended group counselling sessions were more likely to exclusively breastfeed (adjusted odds ratio 1.67, 95% CI 1.16, 2.41). Having a normal weight-for-height z-score (adjusted odds ratio 1.57, 95% CI 1.00, 2.45) was associated positively with exclusive breastfeeding. As expected, being an older infant aged three to five months (adjusted odds ratio 0.34, 95% CI 0.25, 0.48) and receiving a prelacteal feed after birth (adjusted odds ratio 0.57, 95% CI 0.41, 0.80) were associated with lower odds of exclusively breastfeeding. Surveillance data (N = 3420) indicate that infants enrolled in utero have significantly higher odds of being exclusively breastfed (adjusted odds ratio 1.55, 95% CI 1.30, 1.84) than infants enrolled after birth. Prenatal enrolment in community-based programs working on

  1. Acceptability of lifelong treatment among HIV-positive pregnant and breastfeeding women (Option B+) in selected health facilities in Zimbabwe: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadambuka, Addmore; Katirayi, Leila; Muchedzi, Auxilia; Tumbare, Esther; Musarandega, Reuben; Mahomva, Agnes I; Woelk, Godfrey

    2017-07-25

    Zimbabwe's Ministry of Health and Child Care (MOHCC) adopted 2013 World Health Organization (WHO) prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission (PMTCT) guidelines recommending initiation of HIV-positive pregnant and breastfeeding women (PPBW) on lifelong antiretroviral treatment (ART) irrespective of clinical stage (Option B+). Option B+ was officially launched in Zimbabwe in November 2013; however the acceptability of life-long ART and its potential uptake among women was not known. A qualitative study was conducted at selected sites in Harare (urban) and Zvimba (rural) to explore Option B+ acceptability; barriers, and facilitators to ART adherence and service uptake. In-depth interviews (IDIs), focus group discussions (FGDs) and key informant interviews (KIIs) were conducted with PPBW, healthcare providers, and community members. All interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and translated; data were coded and analyzed in MaxQDA v10. Forty-three IDIs, 22 FGDs, and five KIIs were conducted. The majority of women accepted lifelong ART. There was however, a fear of commitment to taking lifelong medication because they were afraid of defaulting, especially after cessation of breastfeeding. There was confusion around dosage; and fear of side effects, not having enough food to take drugs, and the lack of opportunities to ask questions in counseling. Participants reported the need for strengthening community sensitization for Option B+. Facilitators included receiving a simplified pill regimen; ability to continue breastfeeding beyond 6 months like HIV-negative women; and partner, community and health worker support. Barriers included distance of health facility, non-disclosure of HIV status, poor male partner support and knowing someone who had negative experience on ART. This study found that Option B+ is generally accepted among PPBW as a means to strengthen their health and protect their babies. Consistent with previous literature, this study demonstrated the

  2. Cannabis and Breastfeeding

    OpenAIRE

    Garry, Aurélia; Rigourd, Virginie; Amirouche, Ammar; Fauroux, Valérie; Aubry, Sylvie; Serreau, Raphaël

    2009-01-01

    Cannabis is a drug derived from hemp plant, Cannabis sativa, used both as a recreational drug or as medicine. It is a widespread illegal substance, generally smoked for its hallucinogenic properties. Little is known about the adverse effects of postnatal cannabis exposure throw breastfeeding because of a lack of studies in lactating women. The active substance of cannabis is the delta 9 TetraHydroCannabinol (THC). Some studies conclude that it could decrease motor development of the child at ...

  3. Fathers' experiences of supporting breastfeeding: challenges for breastfeeding promotion and education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Amy; Davies, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    Increasing breastfeeding rates is a strategic priority in the UK and understanding the factors that promote and encourage breastfeeding is critical to achieving this. It is established that women who have strong social support from their partner are more likely to initiate and continue breastfeeding. However, little research has explored the fathers' role in breastfeeding support and more importantly, the information and guidance he may need. In the current study, 117 men whose partner had given birth in the previous 2 years and initiated breastfeeding at birth completed an open-ended questionnaire exploring their experiences of breastfeeding, the information and support they received and their ideas for future breastfeeding education and promotion aimed at fathers and families. Overall, the findings showed that fathers were encouraging of breastfeeding and wanted to be able to support their partner. However, they often felt left out of the breastfeeding relationships and helpless to support their partner at this time. Many reported being excluded from antenatal breastfeeding education or being considered unimportant in post-natal support. Men wanted more information about breastfeeding to be directed towards them alongside ideas about how they could practically support their partner. The importance of support mechanisms for themselves during this time was also raised. The results highlight the need for health professionals to direct support and information towards fathers as well as the mother–infant dyad and to recognise their importance in promoting and enabling breastfeeding. PMID:24720518

  4. In-hospital Breastfeeding and Intention to Return to Work Influence Mothers' Breastfeeding Intentions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas-Jackson, Shera C; Bentley, Gail E; Keyton, Kristina; Reifman, Alan; Boylan, Mallory; Hart, Sybil L

    2016-11-01

    Research continues to demonstrate that formula feeding is associated with numerous long-term negative outcomes for a mother and her infant. However, many women cease breastfeeding sooner than intended and recommended. Breastfeeding has been found to be related to demographics, maternal mood, and returning to work outside the home. This study aimed to shed light on the woman's perception of the effect of working on intended breastfeeding duration. This study used intentions to return to work and in-hospital breastfeeding to predict breastfeeding intentions. Women (N = 160) were surveyed during the first 48 hours postdelivery of healthy, full-term infants. Survey instruments included demographics (socioeconomic status, maternal age, education, and marital status), depression, fetal attachment, current exclusive breastfeeding status, as well as breastfeeding and return-to-work intentions for the next year. A path analysis was used to explore relationships and predictors of breastfeeding intentions. The model had a good fit and breastfeeding intentions were predicted by exclusive breastfeeding in the hospital (β = 0.21, P work (β = -0.18, P work influence how long a mother intends to breastfeed. Attention to these areas can be provided immediately postpartum to support exclusive breastfeeding and provide informational support on continuing to breastfeed/express milk upon return to work if the mother intends to return to work.

  5. Navigating Return to Work and Breastfeeding in a Hospital with a Comprehensive Employee Lactation Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froh, Elizabeth B; Spatz, Diane L

    2016-11-01

    The Surgeon General's Call to Action to Support Breastfeeding details the need for comprehensive employer lactation support programs. Our institution has an extensive employee lactation program, and our breastfeeding initiation and continuation rates are statistically significantly higher than state and national data, with more than 20% of our employees breastfeeding for more than 1 year. The objective of this research was complete secondary data analysis of qualitative data collected as part of a larger study on breastfeeding outcomes. In the larger study, 545 women who returned to work full or part time completed an online survey with the ability to provide free text qualitative data and feedback regarding their experiences with breastfeeding after return to work. Qualitative data were pulled from the online survey platform. The responses to these questions were analyzed using conventional content analysis by the research team (2 PhD-prepared nurse researchers trained and experienced in qualitative methodologies and 1 research assistant) in order to complete a thematic analysis of the survey data. Analysis of the data yielded 5 major themes: (1) positive reflections, (2) nonsupportive environment/work culture, (3) supportive environment/work culture, (4) accessibility of resources, and (5) internal barriers. The themes that emerged from this research clearly indicate that even in a hospital with an extensive employee lactation program, women have varied experiences-some more positive than others. Returning to work while breastfeeding requires time and commitment of the mother, and a supportive employee lactation program may ease that transition of return to work.

  6. Acceptability of lifelong treatment among HIV-positive pregnant and breastfeeding women (Option B+ in selected health facilities in Zimbabwe: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Addmore Chadambuka

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Zimbabwe’s Ministry of Health and Child Care (MOHCC adopted 2013 World Health Organization (WHO prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission (PMTCT guidelines recommending initiation of HIV-positive pregnant and breastfeeding women (PPBW on lifelong antiretroviral treatment (ART irrespective of clinical stage (Option B+. Option B+ was officially launched in Zimbabwe in November 2013; however the acceptability of life-long ART and its potential uptake among women was not known. Methods A qualitative study was conducted at selected sites in Harare (urban and Zvimba (rural to explore Option B+ acceptability; barriers, and facilitators to ART adherence and service uptake. In-depth interviews (IDIs, focus group discussions (FGDs and key informant interviews (KIIs were conducted with PPBW, healthcare providers, and community members. All interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and translated; data were coded and analyzed in MaxQDA v10. Results Forty-three IDIs, 22 FGDs, and five KIIs were conducted. The majority of women accepted lifelong ART. There was however, a fear of commitment to taking lifelong medication because they were afraid of defaulting, especially after cessation of breastfeeding. There was confusion around dosage; and fear of side effects, not having enough food to take drugs, and the lack of opportunities to ask questions in counseling. Participants reported the need for strengthening community sensitization for Option B+. Facilitators included receiving a simplified pill regimen; ability to continue breastfeeding beyond 6 months like HIV-negative women; and partner, community and health worker support. Barriers included distance of health facility, non-disclosure of HIV status, poor male partner support and knowing someone who had negative experience on ART. Conclusions This study found that Option B+ is generally accepted among PPBW as a means to strengthen their health and protect their babies

  7. Intervening to promote early initiation of breastfeeding in the LDR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komara, Carol; Simpson, Diana; Teasdale, Carla; Whalen, Gaye; Bell, Shay; Giovanetto, Laurie

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of an interventional protocol for the early initiation of breastfeeding that would remove barriers in the labor, delivery, recovery (LDR) unit. Descriptive design using 100 postpartum mothers who were interviewed before discharge at a large university hospital in the south-central United States. Descriptive statistics were used for analysis. The protocol was effective for initiating breastfeeding, and breastfeeding increased from 53% to 66%. When barriers to breastfeeding are reduced in the LDR setting, women will breastfeed. It is possible that reducing hospital barriers to breastfeeding in the LDR can also set the stage for sustained breastfeeding during hospitalization and for less supplementation with formula.

  8. Relationship between breastfeeding factors and breast cancer in women referred to Seyed Al-Shohada Hospital in Isfahan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farahnaz Jafari-Mehdiabad

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: The results showed that there was no relationship between breast cancer and reproductive factors and breastfeeding pattern. Due to the difference between the findings of this research and other researches, genetic, epigenetic, and cultural differences must be considered in the evaluation of risk factors for breast cancer.

  9. Workplace breastfeeding support for hospital employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodgson, Joan E; Chee, Yuet-Oi; Yap, Tian Sew

    2004-07-01

    Breastfeeding initiation rates have been steadily rising in Hong Kong, but most employed women wean prior to returning to work. While health care providers promote breastfeeding, women receive little support from employers. A few health care facilities offer some workplace breastfeeding support, but little is known about the specific types and amount of support that are offered. This paper reports a study whose aim was to describe workplace supports available to breastfeeding women employed by hospitals that provide maternity services in Hong Kong, and to determine if differences in workplace supports exist based on the hospitals' numbers of employees or funding source. In late 2001, a cross-sectional survey was completed by nurse managers or lactation consultants most knowledgeable about supports to breastfeeding employees in 19 hospitals. The number of workplace breastfeeding supports or Breastfeeding Support Score (M = 7.47; sd = 3.37) varied considerably. Mean Breastfeeding Support Score for government-funded hospitals was significantly higher (t = 2.31; P = 0.03) than for private hospitals. Of the 14 hospitals that had a designated space for using a breast pump, only five (26.3%) had a private room with a door that locked. Only two hospitals (11.1%) allowed employees to take breaks as needed to use a pump; employees in 10 (55.6%) had to use their meal and regular break times. Hospitals having a hospital-wide committee that addressed workplace breastfeeding issues had a more supportive environment for breastfeeding employees. Although all surveyed hospitals returned the questionnaire, the sample size was small. It was difficult to ensure accuracy and to differentiate subtle variations in the services provided using a self-report survey. Facilitating continued breastfeeding after employees' return to work requires that employers understand the needs of breastfeeding employees. Policy at the level of the employer and government is an essential component of

  10. Pre-exposure Prophylaxis Use by Breastfeeding HIV-Uninfected Women: A Prospective Short-Term Study of Antiretroviral Excretion in Breast Milk and Infant Absorption.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth K Mugwanya

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available As pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP becomes more widely used in heterosexual populations, an important consideration is its safety in infants who are breastfed by women taking PrEP. We investigated whether tenofovir and emtricitabine are excreted into breast milk and then absorbed by the breastfeeding infant in clinically significant concentrations when used as PrEP by lactating women.We conducted a prospective short-term, open-label study of daily oral emtricitabine-tenofovir disoproxil fumarate PrEP among 50 HIV-uninfected breastfeeding African mother-infant pairs between 1-24 wk postpartum (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02776748. The primary goal was to quantify the steady-state concentrations of tenofovir and emtricitabine in infant plasma ingested via breastfeeding. PrEP was administered to women through daily directly observed therapy (DOT for ten consecutive days and then discontinued thereafter. Non-fasting peak and trough samples of maternal plasma and breast milk were obtained at drug concentration steady states on days 7 and 10, and a single infant plasma sample was obtained on day 7. Peak blood and breast milk samples were obtained 1-2 h after the maternal DOT PrEP dose, while maternal trough samples were obtained at the end of the PrEP dosing interval (i.e., 23 to 24 h after maternal DOT PrEP dose. Tenofovir and emtricitabine concentrations were quantified using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS assays. Of the 50 mother-infant pairs enrolled, 48% were ≤12 wk and 52% were 13-24 wk postpartum, and median maternal age was 25 y (interquartile range [IQR] 22-28. During study follow-up, the median (IQR daily reported frequency of infant breastfeeding was 15 times (12 to 18 overall, 16 (14 to 19 for the ≤12 weeks, and 14 (12 to 17 for the 13-24 wk infant age groups. Overall, median (IQR time-averaged peak concentrations in breast milk were 3.2 ng/mL (2.3 to 4.7 for tenofovir and 212.5 ng/mL (140.0 to 405.0 for

  11. Investing in breastfeeding - the world breastfeeding costing initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holla-Bhar, Radha; Iellamo, Alessandro; Gupta, Arun; Smith, Julie P; Dadhich, Jai Prakash

    2015-01-01

    Despite scientific evidence substantiating the importance of breastfeeding in child survival and development and its economic benefits, assessments show gaps in many countries' implementation of the 2003 WHO and UNICEF Global Strategy for Infant and Young Child Feeding (Global Strategy). Optimal breastfeeding is a particular example: initiation of breastfeeding within the first hour of birth, exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months; and continued breastfeeding for two years or more, together with safe, adequate, appropriate, responsive complementary feeding starting in the sixth month. While the understanding of "optimal" may vary among countries, there is a need for governments to facilitate an enabling environment for women to achieve optimal breastfeeding. Lack of financial resources for key programs is a major impediment, making economic perspectives important for implementation. Globally, while achieving optimal breastfeeding could prevent more than 800,000 under five deaths annually, in 2013, US$58 billion was spent on commercial baby food including milk formula. Support for improved breastfeeding is inadequately prioritized by policy and practice internationally. The World Breastfeeding Costing Initiative (WBCi) launched in 2013, attempts to determine the financial investment that is necessary to implement the Global Strategy, and to introduce a tool to estimate the costs for individual countries. The article presents detailed cost estimates for implementing the Global Strategy, and outlines the WBCi Financial Planning Tool. Estimates use demographic data from UNICEF's State of the World's Children 2013. The WBCi takes a programmatic approach to scaling up interventions, including policy and planning, health and nutrition care systems, community services and mother support, media promotion, maternity protection, WHO International Code of Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes implementation, monitoring and research, for optimal breastfeeding practices

  12. Depression, sleep quality, and maternal well-being in postpartum women with a history of sexual assault: a comparison of breastfeeding, mixed-feeding, and formula-feeding mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall-Tackett, Kathleen; Cong, Zhen; Hale, Thomas W

    2013-02-01

    Women with a history of sexual assault are at increased risk for sleep difficulties and depression in their first year of motherhood. Breastfeeding improves sleep parameters and lowers risk of depression for women in general. However, it is unknown whether breastfeeding is related to maternal depression, sleep quality, and maternal well-being in sexual assault survivors. We examined the association between sexual assault and several indices of sleep, depression, and maternal well-being in a large sample of sexual assault survivors in the first year postpartum. We also explored whether feeding method was related to our outcome variables for both sexually assaulted and non-assaulted women. A sample of 6,410 mothers of infants 0-12 months old participated in the online Survey of Mothers' Sleep and Fatigue; 994 women had a history of sexual assault. As predicted, women with a history of sexual assault had a number of sleep difficulties, increased risk of depression, and overall poorer subjective well-being than their non-assaulted counterparts. However, sexual assault survivors who were breastfeeding were at lower risk on all of the sleep and depression parameters than sexual assault survivors who were mixed or formula feeding. Sexual assault has a pervasive negative effect on new mothers' sleep quality and risk of depression. However, these negative effects were less severe for the breastfeeding mothers than they were for the mixed- or formula-feeding mothers.

  13. First time mothers' experiences of breastfeeding their newborns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronborg, Hanne; Harder, Ingegerd; Hall, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Objective Despite efforts to improve continued breastfeeding, the percentages of exclusively breastfeeding remain low. To help the breastfeeding mother and reshape professional practice, we need more knowledge of maternal experiences of breastfeeding in the first months. The objective...... was to explore mothers' early breastfeeding experiences. Method Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse data from 108 Danish first time mothers who had answered an open-ended question 6 months after birth. Results All the mothers started breastfeeding. We identified three overlapping phases presented...... as dominant themes: (1) on shaky ground, characterised by breastfeeding interwoven with mothering, painful breastfeeding, and conflicting advice, (2) searching for a foothold, characterised by reading the baby's cues, concerns about milk production, for or against breastfeeding, and looking for professional...

  14. Paid Maternity Leave and Breastfeeding Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirkovic, Kelsey R; Perrine, Cria G; Scanlon, Kelley S

    2016-09-01

    Despite the benefits of breastfeeding, rates in the United States are low. Shorter maternity leave is associated with lower initiation and shorter durations of breastfeeding; however, little is known about how paid maternity leave may influence breastfeeding rates. We used data from the 2006-2010 U.S. National Survey of Family Growth on the most recent birth to employed women who delivered a child within the previous 5 years. Separate multivariable logistic regression models were used to describe the associations between paid leave duration (0, 1-5, 6-11, ≥ 12 weeks, maternity leave not taken) and three outcomes: 1) breastfeeding initiation, 2) 6-month duration, and 3) 6-month duration among initiators. Twenty-eight percent of prenatally employed women received no paid leave. Women who received 12 or more weeks of paid leave were more likely to initiate breastfeeding compared to women with no paid leave (87.3% vs 66.7%, adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 2.83 [95% confidence interval {CI} 1.23-6.48]). Similarly, women with 12 or more weeks of paid leave were more likely to breastfeed at 6 months, compared to women with no paid leave (24.9% vs 50.1%, aOR 2.26 [95% CI 1.20-4.26]). Among women who initiated breastfeeding, having received 12 or more weeks' paid leave increased the odds of breastfeeding for 6 or more months; however, the association was not statistically significant in the adjusted model (aOR 1.81 [95% CI 0.93-3.52]). Employed women who received 12 or more weeks of paid maternity leave were more likely to initiate breastfeeding and be breastfeeding their child at 6 months than those without paid leave. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  15. Factors Influencing Breastfeeding Duration in a Military Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics ( AAP ) recommends breastfeeding for at least 12 months, and as long as mother and child mutually desire thereafter...of the superiority of breastmilk, many women choose to bottle-feed or to cease breastfeeding earlier than recommended by the AAP . The national average...34 Breastfeeding and the Use", 1997). Benefits of breastfeeding are multifaceted and extend beyond mother and baby into society. In spite of evidence

  16. Barriers to Exclusive Breastfeeding among Urban Mothers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazina Sharmin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Breastfeeding is the unique source of nutrition and it plays an important role in the growth, development and survival of the infants. The initiation of breastfeeding within one hour and continuation of only breast milk up to six months ensure maximum benefits. The prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding in Bangladesh is 56% which is low. We designed this study to find out the factors influencing the duration of breastfeeding in Bangladeshi population. Objective: To study the factors influencing noncompliance to exclusive breastfeeding. Materials and Methods: This cross sectional study was conducted in Dhaka Shishu Hospital during the period January to June 2011. It includes 125 infant (1–12 months-mother pairs randomly selected from the inpatient and outpatient departments of Dhaka Shishu Hospital. Mother-infant pairs were divided into two groups based on continuation of only breastfeeding up to six months. Outcomes were compared between two groups. Results: In this study exclusive breastfeeding was found in 27.2% and nonexclusive breastfeeding was in 72.8% cases. It was found that in most cases (40% termination of breastfeeding was at 3--4 months. The study revealed that insufficient milk production due to poor position and attachment, social factors such as influence of husband and other family members, joining to service etc act as barrier to exclusive breastfeeding. Mass media and advice from health professionals had a higher influence on lower rate of exclusive breastfeeding. Women who were multiparous, housewives were more likely to maintain optimal breastfeeding. Conclusion: The present study reveals some important factors contributing to low rate of exclusive breastfeeding in Bangladesh.

  17. Relationship of breastfeeding self-efficacy with quality of life in Iranian breastfeeding mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirghafourvand, Mojgan; Kamalifard, Mahin; Ranjbar, Fatemeh; Gordani, Nasrin

    2017-07-20

    Due to the importance of breastfeeding, we decided to conduct a study to examine the relationship between breastfeeding self-efficacy and quality of life. This study was a cross-sectional study, which was carried out on 547 breastfeeding mothers that had 2-6 months old infants. The participants were selected randomly, and the sociodemographic characteristics questionnaire, Dennis' breastfeeding self-efficacy scale, and WHO's Quality of Life (WHOQOL) questionnaire were completed through interview. The multivariate linear regression model was used for data analysis. The means (standard deviations) of breastfeeding self-efficacy score and quality of life score were 134.5 (13.3) and 67.7 (13.7), respectively. Quality of life and all of its dimensions were directly and significantly related to breastfeeding self-efficacy. According to the results of multivariate linear regression analysis, there was a relationship between breastfeeding self-efficacy and the following variables: environmental dimension of quality of life, education, spouse's age, spouse's job, average duration of previous breastfeeding period and receiving breastfeeding training. Findings showed that there is direct and significant relationship between breastfeeding self-efficacy and quality of life. Moreover, it seems that the development of appropriate training programs is necessary for improving the quality of life of pregnant women, as it consequently enhances breastfeeding self-efficacy.

  18. Health professionals' advice for breastfeeding problems: not good enough!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, Lisa H; Ingram, Jennifer

    2008-09-11

    Jane Scott and colleagues have recently published a paper in the International Breastfeeding Journal showing that health professionals are still giving harmful advice to women with mastitis. We see the management of mastitis as an illustration of health professionals' management of wider breastfeeding issues. If health professionals don't know how to manage this common problem, how can they be expected to manage less common conditions such as a breast abscess or nipple/breast candidiasis? There is an urgent need for more clinical research into breastfeeding problems and to improve the education of health professionals to enable them to promote breastfeeding and support breastfeeding women.

  19. Health professionals' advice for breastfeeding problems: Not good enough!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Lisa H

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Jane Scott and colleagues have recently published a paper in the International Breastfeeding Journal showing that health professionals are still giving harmful advice to women with mastitis. We see the management of mastitis as an illustration of health professionals' management of wider breastfeeding issues. If health professionals don't know how to manage this common problem, how can they be expected to manage less common conditions such as a breast abscess or nipple/breast candidiasis? There is an urgent need for more clinical research into breastfeeding problems and to improve the education of health professionals to enable them to promote breastfeeding and support breastfeeding women.

  20. A systematic review of structured versus non-structured breastfeeding programmes to support the initiation and duration of exclusive breastfeeding in acute and primary healthcare settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beake, Sarah; Pellowe, Carol; Dykes, Fiona; Schmied, Virginia; Bick, Debra

    2011-01-01

    Joanna Briggs Institute. Two independent reviewers conducted critical appraisal and data extraction. Twenty-six articles were included; one randomised controlled trial, two non randomised trials, one cross-sectional study, five systematic reviews, 15 cohort studies and two descriptive studies. Due to the poor quality of evidence presented and clinical and methodological heterogeneity of study designs, including definitions of breastfeeding and duration of follow-up, it was not possible to combine studies or individual outcomes in meta-analyses, therefore findings are presented in a narrative form.In most studies the structured programme of interest reflected some or all of the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative 'Ten Steps'. Most studies found a statistically significant improvement in initiation of breastfeeding following introduction of a structured breastfeeding programme, although effect sizes varied widely.The impact of introducing a structured programme on the duration of exclusive breastfeeding and duration of any breastfeeding was also evident, although not all studies found statistically significant differences. At hospital discharge or within the first week post-birth, implementation of a structured programme appeared to increase duration of exclusive breastfeeding and the duration of any breastfeeding compared with usual care. After hospital discharge and up to six months post-birth, use of structured programmes also appeared to support continued duration of exclusive and any breastfeeding although differences in outcomes were not reported across all included studies. At six months, three of five studies which included data on longer-term outcomes showed women were statistically significantly more likely to be exclusively breastfeeding. Only one of these studies compared outcomes following implementation of BFHI. Despite the poor overall quality of studies, structured programmes, regardless of content, compared with standard care appear to influence the uptake

  1. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Disease and Stroke HIV and AIDS Mental Health Pain Pregnancy Reproductive Health Sexual Health Sexually Transmitted Infections ... breastfeeding Overcoming challenges Common questions about breastfeeding and pain Breastfeeding checklist: How to get a good latch ...

  2. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Moms explain why breastfeeding was such a natural choice. Secrets to breastfeeding success YouTube embed video: breastfeeding. Learn more about the foods you should eat. Previous Page Next Page It's ...

  3. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and mission Leadership Programs and activities In your community Funding opportunities Internships and jobs View all pages ... breastfeeding myths Breastfeeding myths in the African-American community Incredible facts about babies, breastmilk, and breastfeeding Overcoming ...

  4. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... section About Us Who we are What we do Programs and activities Work with us Contact Us ... Laws that support breastfeeding 10 things moms can do while breastfeeding My breastfeeding story Partner resources Search ...

  5. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Planning ahead Breastfeeding and baby basics Making breastfeeding work for you Addressing ... decisions. But if you haven’t already thought about breastfeeding, now is a great time. Before your baby is here is the ...

  6. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Find out what worked for other breastfeeding moms. What breastfeeding means to me YouTube embed video: < ... you strong while breastfeeding. Learn more about the foods you should eat. Previous Page Next Page It's ...

  7. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Page It's Only Natural resources Related information Breastfeeding Pregnancy Resources Your Guide to Breastfeeding Support for Nursing Moms in the Workplace: Employer Solutions Blog topics Breastfeeding: Natural Doesn’t ...

  8. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... public Laws that support breastfeeding 10 things moms can do while breastfeeding My breastfeeding story Partner resources ... a> Learn the unique ways that breastmilk can improve your child’s health and lower the risk ...

  9. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... facts about babies, breastmilk, and breastfeeding Overcoming challenges Common questions about breastfeeding and pain Breastfeeding checklist: How to get a good latch Finding support It takes a village: Building ...

  10. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... public Laws that support breastfeeding 10 things moms can do while breastfeeding My breastfeeding story Partner resources ... Folic acid Heart-healthy eating Iron-deficiency anemia ...

  11. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and jobs View all pages in this section Home It's Only Natural Planning ahead It's Only Natural Planning ahead Breastfeeding and baby basics Making breastfeeding work for you Addressing breastfeeding myths Overcoming challenges Finding ...

  12. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Fitting breastfeeding into your life Breastfeeding in daily life: At home and in public Laws that support breastfeeding 10 things ... Folic acid Heart-healthy eating Iron-deficiency anemia ...

  13. Maternal and infant health is protected by antiretroviral drug strategies that preserve breastfeeding by HIV-positive women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Kuhn

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The South African Department of Health is justified in withdrawing support for free infant formula. By so doing, it recognises that any intervention that might detract from breast feeding poses a serious threat to infant survival. Since evidence is now strong that antiretroviral drugs used during lactation prevent transmission of infection from a seropositive mother, strategies that promote breastfeeding can now be recommended for enhancing the health of mothers and infants.

  14. Breastfeeding: patterns, correlates, and fertility effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, A K; Bongaarts, J

    1981-03-01

    Paper based on data generated by the World Fertility Survey in 8 countries: Bangladesh, Indonesia, Sri Lanka, Jordan, Peru, Guyana, Colombia, and Panama. The authors address the following issues, among others: the prevalence and duration of breastfeeding; variations in the duration of breastfeeding among different subgroups, classified by age, parity, woman's education, etc,; the key determinants of breastfeeding; and the effect of breastfeeding on fertility. The large majority of women in all the countries breastfed their last 2 children, the number who did not ranging from 2 to 18%. Duration ranged from 9 months (Panama) to 29 months (Bangladesh). Key determinants were women's education, place of residence, husband's occupation, and survival status of the child--consistent for all 8 countries. Women with more education and those living in urban areas breastfeed for shorter periods. Sex of child, age and parity of mother, and mother's work experience showed no independent effect on duration of breastfeeding. Although breastfeeding is not used for family limitation, the possibility that it is used to prolong birth intervals cannot be ruled out. Average length of last closed birth interval increased with prolonged breastfeeding in all 8 countries. 1 month of breastfeeding adds an average of 0.4 months to the birth interval, although there was considerable variation among the countries. To what extent these variations may be due to differences in reporting errors or to other factors could not be determined.

  15. Breastfeeding Counseling, Barriers and Facilitators of Lactation in the Military Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-05-01

    recommended exclusive breastfeeding for the first four to six months of an infant s life ( AAP , 1978; ADA, 1993). Breastfeeding offers advantages to both...women. Nurse practitioners should be familiar with the recommended breastfeeding practices set forth by the AAP (see Appendix C). Nurse practitioners... BREASTFEEDING COUNSELING, BARRIERS AND FACILITATORS OF LACTATION IN THE MILITARY COMMUNITY Captain Bernadette Ann Harlow APPROVED

  16. Breastfeeding Patterns in the Rural Community of Hilo, Hawai‘i: An Exploration of Existing Data Sets

    OpenAIRE

    Flood, Jeanie L

    2013-01-01

    Before any breastfeeding promotion effort, an understanding of the existing breastfeeding patterns is essential. Hawai‘i County is a rural, ethnically diverse, medically underserved community. The purpose of this study was to describe the breastfeeding patterns of women living in Hilo, Hawai‘i. Data from several existing national, state, and local data sets were accessed to identify and describe the breastfeeding patterns of women in this community. Available breastfeeding data about women in...

  17. System analysis of the quality of life self-assessments from the SF-36 questionnaire in breast-feeding or milk formula feeding women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. G. Ivanko

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective. A system analysis of the self-assessments of quality of life (QOL and the possible rational correction of psychological dysadaptation of nursing women. Materials and Methods. A survey among 134 healthy women aged 21 to 40, married and having children aged 1 to 12 months at the time of the survey. The first group consisted of women with breast-fed children (1 to 6 months old and “exclusively breastfed” or 6 to 12 months old and receiving “rational breast feeding”; the second group consisted of women with formula-fed children. The non-specific SF-36 questionnaire has been used for the survey. Statistica 6.0 licensed software has been used for statistical processing of gathered scores. Results. The breast-feeding women (Group 1 showed higher total results in self-assessment of the quality of life compared to the women forced to feed their children with breast milk substitutes (Group 2. The difference affects all 8 scales of the questionnaire, thus varying from the a priori values of the “null hypothesis” (χ2=5.33, df=1 with statistical error probability of p=0.02. The most significant differences of the SF-36 questionnaire assessment indicator scores between the two groups have been identified on BP (intensity and frequency of pain and MH (mental health scales. Conclusions. Our observations have shown significant differences of self-assessments of QOL by women feeding their children in different ways. Breast feeding leads to positive changes in the system of self-assessment of QOL, the lives of nursing women are characterized by greater social support and role activity; they are more socially adapted, not prone to depression and unreasonable mood swings.

  18. Breast-Feeding Twins: Making Feedings Manageable

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Department of Health and Human Services Office on Women's Health. http://www.womenshealth.gov/publications/our-publications/breastfeeding-guide. Accessed March 11, 2015. Shelov SP, et al. Feeding your ...

  19. Alternative hospital gift bags and breastfeeding exclusivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yeon; Wunderlich, Shahla M; Kashdan, Rickie

    2013-01-01

    The type of gift bags given to new mothers at the time of discharge from the hospital can influence their confidence in breastfeeding. Most hospitals in the US continue to distribute commercial gift bags containing formula samples despite the reported negative influence of commercial bags on the duration of breastfeeding. This study compared breastfeeding outcomes in women receiving three different kinds of gift bags at discharge. A prospective intervention study was conducted during 2009-2010 in New Jersey. Three breastfeeding cohorts were recruited and assigned to three groups: COMMERCIAL received discharge bags containing formula samples, BF-INFO received breastfeeding information and supplies, and PUMP received breastfeeding information/supplies plus a manual breast pump. Follow-up contacts were at 2, 4, and 12 postpartum weeks to determine breastfeeding outcome. The mean durations of exclusive (EBF) and partial breastfeeding were compared between groups using ANOVA. A total of 386 participants completed the study. The mean EBF duration (weeks) in the PUMP (n = 138, 8.28 ± 4.86) and BF-INFO (n = 121, 7.87 ± 4.63) were significantly longer (P < 0.01) than COMMERCIAL (n = 127, 6.12 ± 4.49). The rate of EBF through 12 weeks in PUMP was most consistent. The mean duration of partial breastfeeding showed similar results: significantly longer in PUMP and BF-INFO than COMMERCIAL (P < 0.01).

  20. Impacto do incentivo ao aleitamento materno entre mulheres trabalhadoras formais The impact of breastfeeding promotion in women with formal employment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Alves Brasileiro

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Investigar se programas de incentivo ao aleitamento materno ajudam a prevenir o desmame precoce entre filhos de mães trabalhadoras. Foi realizado um estudo de intervenção não randomizado, por meio de inquérito entre mães que voltaram a trabalhar após o parto, participantes e não-participantes de um programa de incentivo ao aleitamento. A amostra consistiu de 200 mães de filhos com idades entre 6 e 10 meses. Para avaliar fatores associados ao desmame precoce, os resultados foram analisados por meio dos testes estatísticos de qui-quadrado, exato de Fisher e análise de regressão logística múltipla (α = 0,05. Os resultados mostraram que houve diferença estatística nas taxas de aleitamento materno exclusivo (p This study focused on programs to promote breastfeeding in order to prevent early weaning of working mothers' infant children. A non-randomized intervention study was conducted using a survey of mothers who had returned to work after childbirth, including both participants and non-participants in a program to promote breastfeeding. The sample consisted of 200 mothers of infants ranging from 6 to 10 months of age. Factors associated with early weaning were analyzed with the chi-square and Fisher's exact tests and multiple logistic regression (α = 0.05. The results showed statistical differences between the groups in relation to exclusive breastfeeding (p < 0.0001 and breastfeeding (p < 0.0001. There was a statistically significant difference (p = 0.0056 between the groups in relation to time between childbirth and return to work. There was no difference between the end of maternity leave and weaning time. Mothers that were unable to nurse their infants during the work shift showed 4.98 times higher odds (95%CI: 1.27-19.61 of weaning them before the fourth month of age.

  1. Deseos, aptitudes y conocimientos sobre lactancia materna de gestantes en su tercer trimestre Desires, aptitudes and knowledge about breastfeeding in women at their third trimester of pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remigio Rafael Gorrita Pérez

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: la lactancia materna es la única forma natural de alimentar al bebé, y una forma inigualable de facilitar el alimento ideal para su crecimiento y desarrollo. Métodos: se realizó un estudio descriptivo, transversal, para evaluar deseos, aptitudes y conocimientos sobre lactancia materna en el tercer trimestre de 114 gestantes del Policlínico "Mártires del 9 de Abril", de San José de las Lajas. Entre marzo de 2010 y de 2011 se valoraron sus historias de salud individual y familiar, y se aplicó a tal efecto un cuestionario con 22 preguntas. Resultados: la información se incorporó a una base de datos y se utilizó para el análisis el estadígrafo chi cuadrado, que se consideró significativo con pIntroduction: breastfeeding is the only natural way of feeding the baby and an unparallel form of providing him with the ideal food for adequate growth and development. Methods: a cross-sectional and descriptive study was conducted to evaluate the desires, the aptitudes and the knowledge about breastfeeding of 114 women in their third trimester of pregnancy from "Martires del 9 de Abril" polyclinics in San José de las Lajas. From March 2010 to March 2011, their individual and family health histories were assessed through a 22-interrogation questionnaire. Results: data were introduced in a database and chi square statistic was used for statistical analysis, the level of significance was p< 0,05. All the participants expressed their desire to breastfeed their offspring. Two thirds were considered prepared or well-prepared to do so, with the required knowledge to attain this objective; but just over one fifth did prove that they had it. Most of the future mothers aged 20 to 35 years; the schooling was mostly technician or high school education (60 for 52.6 %; the marital status of 45.6 % was cohabitation, 40.3 % were married and 13.2 % (15 were singles. These are aspects that undoubtedly influence the results. Conclusions: in addition

  2. HIV testing uptake and retention in care of HIV-infected pregnant and breastfeeding women initiated on 'Option B+' in rural Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzangare, Janet; Takarinda, Kudakwashe C; Harries, Anthony D; Tayler-Smith, Katie; Mhangara, Mutsa; Apollo, Tsitsi Mutasa; Mushavi, Angela; Chimwaza, Anesu; Sithole, Ngwarai; Magure, Tapiwa; Mpofu, Amon; Dube, Freeman; Mugurungi, Owen

    2016-02-01

    Zimbabwe has started to scale up Option B+ for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV, but there is little published information about uptake or retention in care. This study determined the number and proportion of pregnant and lactating women in rural districts diagnosed with HIV infection and started on Option B+ along with six-month antiretroviral treatment (ART) outcomes. This was a retrospective record review of women presenting to antenatal care or maternal and child health services at 34 health facilities in Chikomba and Gutu rural districts, Zimbabwe, between January and March 2014. A total of 2728 women presented to care of whom 2598 were eligible for HIV testing: 76% presented to antenatal care, 20% during labour and delivery and 4% while breastfeeding. Of 2097 (81%) HIV-tested women, 7% were HIV positive. Lower HIV testing uptake was found with increasing parity, late presentation to antenatal care, health centre attendance and in women tested during labour. Ninety-one per cent of the HIV-positive women were started on Option B+. Six-month ART retention in care, including transfers, was 83%. Loss to follow-up was the main cause of attrition. Increasing age and gravida status ≥2 were associated with higher six-month attrition. The uptake of HIV testing and Option B+ is high in women attending antenatal and post-natal clinics in rural Zimbabwe, suggesting that the strategy is feasible for national scale-up in the country. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Breastfeeding (Un)Covered: Narratives of Public Breastfeeding on Romanian Discussion Forums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tăut, Diana

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the construction of breastfeeding in public, as depicted in the stories and the opinions of women participating in discussions on public forums. There were 8 discussion forums selected, from which 769 messages were subjected to a narrative analysis further informed by recurrent themes identified in the literature and across messages. The emerging narratives were grouped based on their valence, and three broader categories of themes were formed, highlighting the predominant tone towards breastfeeding in public. The three broader themes, 'public restraint of breast(feeding) as acknowledgement of the cultural status-quo', 'permission within boundaries' and 'breast(feeding) as a human right', depict various meanings and experiences associated with public breastfeeding. People seeing breasts as mainly a cultural symbol of sexuality were more against public breastfeeding and more in favour of covering up or striving to discretion. Those arguing that breastfeeding is no more than exercising a fundamental right and pleading for breast as a primary maternal symbol were more in favour of breastfeeding in public. Aiming to understand personal and social perspectives on public breastfeeding is informative for understanding cultural differences in breastfeeding rates but also for designing effective interventions to promote it.

  4. Breastfeeding motivation and Self-Determination Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kestler-Peleg, Miri; Shamir-Dardikman, Merav; Hermoni, Doron; Ginzburg, Karni

    2015-11-01

    In the current social climate, breastfeeding is regarded as the "gold standard" of babies' nutrition and optimal mothering. It is not surprising, therefore, that the vast majority of contemporary women begin breastfeeding after they give birth. This paper presents two separate quantitative studies conducted in Israel which examined breastfeeding motivation and its association with maternal well-being as derived from Self-Determination Theory (SDT). In Study I, a new breastfeeding motivation scale reflecting the various SDT-informed motivations was developed. Study II sought to validate the structure of the scale and to examine the hypotheses derived from SDT. In Study I, which took place in 2007, 130 mothers of at least one child under the age of eight years old filled out the Breastfeeding Motivation Scale. In Study II, which took place during the years 2008-2010, a different sample of 236 women were followed at three different time points: during the third trimester of pregnancy, at eight weeks postnatal, and at five months postnatal. The participants completed the Breastfeeding Motivation Scale and maternal well-being, maternal self-efficacy and maternal attachment questionnaires. The findings supported the structure of the Breastfeeding Motivation Scale according to SDT. As predicted, autonomous motivation was positively correlated with maternal well-being and self-efficacy, while controlled motivations were positively associated with distress and inversely correlated with self-efficacy. Anxious attachment predicted both controlled and autonomous breastfeeding motivations. The findings support the validity of the SDT for breastfeeding motivations, and highlight the role of these motivations as differentiating between positive and negative subjective well-being, among breastfeeding women. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... breastfeeding was such a natural choice. Secrets to breastfeeding success YouTube embed video: breastfeeding. The benefits of breastfeeding YouTube embed video: Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... celebrity moms who breastfeed Fitting breastfeeding into your life Breastfeeding in daily life: At home and in public Laws that support ... Overcoming challenges Finding support Fitting breastfeeding into your life Partner resources Subscribe To receive Breastfeeding email updates ...

  6. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... activities In your community Funding opportunities Internships and jobs View all pages in this section Back to section menu It's Only Natural Planning ahead Breastfeeding and baby basics Making breastfeeding work for you Addressing breastfeeding myths Breastfeeding myths in ...

  7. Representational contents of domestic violence against women among nursing students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Daiane Silva

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to analyze the representational contents of domestic violence against women among nursing students. This is a qualitative research, based on the Theory of Social Representations. We collected the data from August to November/2014 by semi-structured interviews, analyzed by software. Thirty-three students participated, 16 from the initial grades and 17 from the final grades. We identified two categories: representational content acquired in the pre-university and university years. The initial grades listed high school, cases with family members and colleagues. Among the final grades, knowledge was acquired during academic weeks, research groups, practical activities, and internships. The knowledge of common sense is constant, especially between the students of initial grades and the reified, between the final series. The actions of the future professional life can base on personal experiences, reified common sense knowledge, and practical knowledge generated during graduation. It highlights the impact on training to provide assistance to women/persons in situations of violence.

  8. Shorter duration of breastfeeding at elevated exposures to perfluoroalkyl substances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timmermann, Clara Amalie Gade; Budtz-Jørgensen, Esben; Petersen, Maria Skaalum

    2017-01-01

    . Duration of breastfeeding was assessed by questionnaire and clinical interview. In adjusted linear regression models, a doubling of maternal serum PFASs was associated with a reduction in duration of both total and exclusive breastfeeding, most pronounced for perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) where...... a doubling was associated with a reduction in total breastfeeding of 1.4 (95% CI: 0.6; 2.1) months and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) where a doubling was associated with a reduction in exclusive breastfeeding of 0.5 (0.3; 0.7) months. The associations were evident among both primiparous and multiparous women......, and thus cannot be explained by confounding from previous breastfeeding....

  9. Stavudine (d4T) concentrations in women receiving post-partum antiretroviral treatment and their breastfeeding infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Jessica M.; Taha, Taha E.; Sun, Jin; Hoover, Donald R.; Parsons, Teresa L.; Kumwenda, Johnstone J.; Mofenson, Lynne M.; Fowler, Mary Glenn; Hendrix, Craig W.; Kumwenda, Newton I.; Eshleman, Susan H.; Mirochnick, Mark

    2012-01-01

    First-line antiretroviral treatment regimens in resource-limited settings used in breastfeeding mothers often include stavudine (d4T). Limited data describing d4T concentrations in breast milk are available. We analyzed d4T concentrations in 52 mother-infant pairs using ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (lower limit of quantification: 5 ng/ml in plasma, 20 ng/ml in breast milk). Median (interquartile range) d4T concentrations were 86 (36–191) ng/ml in maternal plasma, 151 (48–259) ng/ml in whole milk, 190 (58–296) ng/ml in skim milk, and <5 (<5-<5) ng/ml in infant plasma. While d4T is concentrated in breast milk relative to maternal plasma, the infant d4T dose received from breast milk is very small and not clinically significant. PMID:22614899

  10. Game-based online antenatal breastfeeding education: A pilot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassley, Jane S; Connor, Kelley C; Bond, Laura

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the Healthy Moms intervention on antenatal breastfeeding self-efficacy and intention and to determine the feasibility of using an online game-based learning platform to deliver antenatal breastfeeding education. The Internet has potential for improving breastfeeding rates through improving women's access to antenatal breastfeeding education. Twelve computer-based breastfeeding education modules were developed using an online learning platform. Changes in participants' breastfeeding self-efficacy and intention pre- and post-intervention were measured using descriptive statistics and a one-way ANOVA. Of the 25 women submitting the pretest, four completed zero quests; seven, orientation only; eight, one to six breastfeeding quests; and six, 10 to 12 breastfeeding quests. No significant differences in breastfeeding self-efficacy and intention were found among the groups. Online antenatal breastfeeding education is feasible; however, further research is warranted to determine if it can affect breastfeeding outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of Cesarean Delivery on Breastfeeding Practices and Duration: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cheng; Yan, Yan; Gao, Xiao; Xiang, Shiting; He, Qiong; Zeng, Guangyu; Liu, Shiping; Sha, Tingting; Li, Ling

    2018-01-01

    Mothers are encouraged to exclusively breastfeed for the first 6 months. However, cesarean delivery rates have increased worldwide, which may affect breastfeeding. Research aim: This study aimed to determine the potential effects of cesarean delivery on breastfeeding practices and breastfeeding duration. This was a 6-month cohort study extracted from a 24-month prospective cohort study of mother-infant pairs in three communities in Hunan, China. Data about participants' characteristics, delivery methods, breastfeeding initiation, use of formula in the hospital, exclusive breastfeeding, and any breastfeeding were collected at 1, 3, and 6 months following each infant's birth. The chi-square test, logistic regression model, and Cox proportional hazard regression model were used to examine the relationship between breastfeeding practices and cesarean delivery. The number of women who had a cesarean delivery was 387 (40.6%), and 567 (59.4%) women had a vaginal delivery. The exclusive breastfeeding rates at 1, 3, and 6 months were 80.2%, 67.4%, and 21.5%, respectively. Women who had a cesarean delivery showed a lower rate of exclusive breastfeeding and any breastfeeding than those who had a vaginal delivery ( p cesarean delivery was related with using formula in the hospital and delayed breastfeeding initiation. Cesarean delivery also shortened the breastfeeding duration (hazard ratio = 1.40, 95% confidence interval [1.06, 1.84]). Healthcare professionals should provide more breastfeeding skills to women who have a cesarean delivery and warn mothers about the dangers of elective cesarean section for breastfeeding practices.

  12. Drug use during breastfeeding. A survey from the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schirm, Eric; Schwagermann, M.P.; Tobi, H; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje Theodora Wilhelmina

    Objective: To survey drug use by breastfeeding women, and to compare this with nonbreastfeeding women. In addition, we were interested whether drug use was of influence on the decision to give breastfeeding, and the other way around. Design and setting: During a 6-week period in 2002, a

  13. Impact of multi parity on iron content in multiparous women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farooq, A.; Rauf, S.; Hassan, U.; Sadiq, N.

    2011-01-01

    The effect of multiple pregnancies, a very common pattern in reproductive lifestyle of Pakistani women, needs to be addressed to see if it affects the iron content and hence cause iron deficiency. Recognising this deficiency prior to development of anaemia can prevent disastrous consequences that can complicate the life of the mother and foetus especially in developing countries. The objective of this study was to assess the effect that the stress of multiple pregnancies has on the iron status of the body. Methods: This comparative study was conducted in a focus group of female population. Two hundred subjects were selected by convenient sampling and grouped depending on their parity status. Data regarding diet, and socioeconomic history was collected on pre-designed questionnaire. Serum Ferritin was used to assess iron deficiency using the Electro chemiluminescence Immunoassay (ECLIA). Data was statistically analysed using SPSS-17. Results: Mean value of serum Ferritin in the nulliparous group was 76.52 +- 4.92 eta g/mL with 16% of nulliparous subjects showing lower than normal values. Thirty-six percent of uniparous subjects showed low serum Ferritin values, mean value being 45.74 +- 4.51 eta g/mL. Seventy-two percent of the multiparous subjects showed iron deficiency with Ferritin levels of <20 eta g/mL. Mean serum Ferritin in this group was 25.21+- 2.75 g/mL. The differences between the Ferritin levels of the study groups were highly significant (p<0.01). Conclusions: Multiparous women had lower serum Ferritin levels than the control group suggesting that the stress of multiple pregnancies takes its toll on the iron content of the body. (author)

  14. Breastfeeding as an environment preserving facto

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Amaral Martins

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: to determine the knowledge on breastfeeding acquired by women during the pregnant and puerperal period and to check if the breastfeeding benefits for the environment preservation were referred by the mothers. METHODS: this is a documental, descriptive and quantitative by nature research, with secondary data, collected from records of “Vamos amamentar, mamãe?” ("Let's breastfeed, mom?" extension project, resultant from the mothers monitoring during the 2008 year, with a total of 116 mothers. RESULTS: most mothers are in the age group from 14 to 18 years (31.89%; 57.75% have only primary level; 62.06% have stable relationship/married; 92.24% report having received information about breastfeeding during prenatal care, among which the highlights were: exclusive breastfeeding until 6 months (45.68%; pregnant women feeding (47.41%; breasts care 28 (24.13%, while: milking, myths’ clarification and non-use of bottles and pacifiers each submitted, only (0.86%, noting also that breastfeeding as an environment preservation factor was not mentioned. CONCLUSION: the mothers hold a reasonable knowledge of breastfeeding. Health professionals have an important role in stimulating and implementing new works focused on a practice that considers this subject from a multidimensional perspective, considering the complex bio-psycho-socio-cultural-environmental-emotional factors involving breastfeeding.

  15. Effectiveness of Topical Curcumin for Treatment of Mastitis in Breastfeeding Women: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raha Afshariani

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the efficacy of topical curcumin in reducing breast inflammation in women suffering from lactational mastitis. Methods: A randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled study including 63 breastfeeding women with lactational mastitis were randomly assigned to receive curcumin topical cream, one pump every 8 hours for 3 days (n=32 or topical moisturizer as placebo (n=31. Using an index for severity of breast inflammation, all of the patients had moderate breast inflammation before entering the study. The outcome of treatment was evaluated using the same index at 24, 48 and 72 hours of starting the treatment. Results: There was no significant difference between two study groups regarding the baseline characteristics such as age (p=0.361 and duration of lactation (p=0.551. After 72-hour of therapy, patients in curcumin groups had significantly lower rate of moderate (p=0.019 and mild (p=0.002 mastitis. Patients in curcumin group had significantly lower scores for tension (p<0.001, erythema (p<0.001 and pain (p<0.001, after 72-hour of treatment. Conclusion: The results of the current study indicate that topical preparation of curcumin successfully decrease the markers of lactational mastitis such as pain, breast tension and erythema within 72 hours of administration without side effects. Thus, topical preparation of curcumin could be safely administered for those suffering from lactational mastitis after excluding infectious etiologies.

  16. Surveying Lactation Professionals Regarding Marijuana Use and Breastfeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeria, Cecilia L; Heil, Sarah H

    2015-09-01

    Breastfeeding is associated with substantial benefits for both the child and mother. Most guidelines state that women who use illicit drugs should not breastfeed. Although this recommendation has traditionally included marijuana, this drug's changing legal status and the limited scientific research regarding marijuana's effect on breastfeeding and the nursing child may lead to varying recommendations made by lactation professionals to clients who use marijuana. Additionally, to our knowledge, there are no data estimating the prevalence of marijuana use among breastfeeding women, making it unclear how common it is. This study assessed recommendations around breastfeeding and marijuana use and estimated the prevalence of marijuana use among breastfeeding women. A convenience sample of lactation professionals who practice throughout New England and were attending the 2014 Vermont Lactation Consultant Association conference was offered the opportunity to complete a five-item survey. Of 120 conference attendees, 74 completed the survey. Forty-four percent reported their recommendations around breastfeeding and marijuana use depended on factors like the severity of maternal use. Another 41% reported recommending continued breastfeeding because the benefits outweigh the harms. The remaining 15% reported recommending that a woman should stop breastfeeding if she cannot stop using marijuana. Survey completers estimated that 15% (1,203/7,843) of their breastfeeding clients in the past year used marijuana. Lactation professionals vary widely in their recommendations to breastfeeding clients who use marijuana. The estimate of prevalence also suggests this is a relatively common issue. More research is needed to assess the generalizability of these findings.

  17. Exclusive Breastfeeding Determinants in Breastfeeding Mother

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ika Mustika

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Exclusive breastfeeding until 6 month is very important for baby. The proportion of mothers who exclusively breastfeed their babies up to 6 months remains low. Factors influencing the exclusive breastfeeding namely sociodemograph factors , factors pre / post delivery , and psychosocial factors. This aims of this study to identify determinant factors of exclusive breastfeeding on mother. This research method is a systematic review , by analyzing the various studies on exclusive breastfeeding. There are 17 studies. The results obtained occupational factors most studied with significant results ( median OR = 1.265 . Psychosocial factors that have significant relationship is support of her husband (average OR = 4.716 and family support ( average OR = 1.770 . Conclusions : factors influencing the exclusive breastfeeding is occupational factor. Socialization and support from people nearby, health workers, and all parties is needed for exclusive breastfeeding for six months can be achieved.

  18. A Maternity different: Breastfeeding and Phytotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Dolores Hernández Benítez

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The use of complementary health therapies has grown progressively since the 1950s. This article presents a bibliographical review on galactogogues. The main objective is to identify scientific evidence of plants used traditionally as galactogogues in our environment, and its efficacy and safety. We carried out a literature review in order to find the scientific evidence available on the Cochrane Library databases, CINAHL, MEDLINE, and Cuidatge CUIDEN. The keywords used were: phytotherapy, breastfeeding galactogogues, herbal agents, herbal products, breastfeeding and galactogogues. To conclusion although the use of natural remedies, improve breastfeeding should provide accurate and updated health information and women transmit security capabilities.

  19. Overcoming Workplace Barriers: A Focus Group Study Exploring African American Mothers' Needs for Workplace Breastfeeding Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Angela Marie; Kirk, Rosalind; Muzik, Maria

    2015-08-01

    Persistent racial disparities in breastfeeding show that African American women breastfeed at the lowest rates. Return to work is a critical breastfeeding barrier for African American women who return to work sooner than other ethnic groups and more often encounter unsupportive work environments. They also face psychosocial burdens that make breastfeeding at work uniquely challenging. Participants share personal struggles with combining paid employment and breastfeeding and suggest workplace and personal support strategies that they believe will help continue breastfeeding after a return to work. To explore current perspectives on ways to support African American mothers' workplace breastfeeding behavior. Pregnant African American women (n = 8), African American mothers of infants (n = 21), and lactation support providers (n = 9) participated in 1 of 6 focus groups in the Greater Detroit area. Each focus group audiotape was transcribed verbatim. Thematic analysis was used to inductively analyze focus group transcripts and field notes. Focus groups explored thoughts, perceptions, and behavior on interventions to support African American women's breastfeeding. Participants indicate that they generally believed breastfeeding was a healthy option for the baby; however, paid employment is a critical barrier to successful breastfeeding for which mothers receive little help. Participants felt breastfeeding interventions that support working African American mothers should include education and training for health care professionals, regulation and enforcement of workplace breastfeeding support policies, and support from peers who act as breastfeeding role models. Culturally appropriate interventions are needed to support breastfeeding among working African American women. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. The impact of prenatal employment on breastfeeding intentions and breastfeeding status at 1 week postpartum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attanasio, Laura; Kozhimannil, Katy B; McGovern, Patricia; Gjerdingen, Dwenda; Johnson, Pamela Jo

    2013-11-01

    Postpartum employment is associated with non-initiation and early cessation of breastfeeding, but less is known about the relationship between prenatal employment and breastfeeding intentions and behaviors. This study aimed to estimate the relationship between prenatal employment status, a strong predictor of postpartum return to work, and breastfeeding intentions and behaviors. Using data from the Listening to Mothers II national survey (N = 1573), we used propensity score matching methods to account for non-random selection into employment patterns and to measure the impact of prenatal employment status on breastfeeding intentions and behaviors. We also examined whether hospital practices consistent with the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI), assessed based on maternal perception, were differentially associated with breastfeeding by employment status. Women who were employed (vs unemployed) during pregnancy were older, were more educated, were less likely to have had a previous cesarean delivery, and had fewer children. After matching, these differences were eliminated. Although breastfeeding intention did not differ by employment, full-time employment (vs no employment) during pregnancy was associated with decreased odds of exclusive breastfeeding 1 week postpartum (adjusted odds ratio = 0.48; 95% confidence interval, 0.25-0.92; P = .028). Higher BFHI scores were associated with higher odds of breastfeeding at 1 week but did not differentially impact women by employment status. Women employed full-time during pregnancy were less likely to fulfill their intention to exclusively breastfeed, compared to women who were not employed during pregnancy. Clinicians should be aware that employment circumstances may impact women's breastfeeding decisions; this may help guide discussions during clinical encounters.

  2. Social representations about support for breastfeeding in a group of breastfeeding women Las representaciones sociales de un grupo de mujeres/amamantadoras sobre el apoyo a la lactancia materna Representações sociais de um grupo de mulheres/nutrizes sobre o apoio à amamentação

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Swain Müller

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to get to know the social representations about support for breastfeeding in a group of breastfeeding women, as well as to identify the actions in their social environment these women perceive as supportive in their breastfeeding processes. Data were collected through a qualitative approach, using recorded semistructured interviews, organized in accordance with the Collective Subject Discourse and analyzed under the premises of Social Representations Theory. Results showed that the representations of women in this study about support for breastfeeding consist of actions available in the hospital, family and work contexts. In these women's perspective, support is a broad phenomenon that involves aspects of encouragement, promotion and protection to breastfeeding.Este estudio tuvo como objetivo conocer las representaciones sociales de un grupo de amamantadoras sobre el apoyo para amamantar y, también, identificar las acciones del entorno social que son percibidas por esas mujeres, como apoyo en sus procesos de amamantar. Los datos fueron recolectados por medio de un abordaje cualitativo, en entrevista semiestructurada grabada, y organizados conforme la propuesta del Discurso del Sujeto Colectivo y analizados según las concepciones de la Teoría de las Representaciones Sociales. Los resultados mostraron que las representaciones de las mujeres de este estudio, sobre el apoyo para amamantar, son constituidas por las acciones disponibles en el contexto hospitalario, familiar y de trabajo. Bajo la óptica de la mujer, el apoyo es un fenómeno de gran amplitud que engloba aspectos de incentivo, de promoción y de protección al amamantamiento.Este estudo teve como objetivo conhecer as representações sociais de um grupo de nutrizes sobre o apoio para amamentar e, também, identificar as ações do entorno social que são percebidas por essas mulheres, como apoio em seus processos de amamentação. Os dados foram coletados por meio de

  3. A amamentação entre filhos de mulheres trabalhadoras El amamantamiento entre hijos de mujeres trabajadoras Breastfeeding among children of women workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Alves Brasileiro

    2012-08-01

    el municipio de Piracicaba, SP. Entre las participantes, 100 dúos madre-lactante recibieron orientaciones y apoyo para la práctica de la lactancia en un programa de prevención en salud bucal y los otros 100 dúos fueron abordados en una campaña de vacunación infantil. Se realizó análisis de regresión logística múltiple para identificar variables relacionadas al destete al cuarto mes de vida. RESULTADOS: La mayor parte de las participantes era primípara, pasó por cesárea, inició el amamantamiento en menos de cuatro horas posterior al parto y permaneció con su hijo en alojamiento conjunto. Tuvieron mayor probabilidad de parar el amamantamiento: madres no participantes del programa de incentivo (OR= 3,04 [IC95% 1,35;6,85], madres que no tenían intervalo de 30 minutos durante la jornada laboral (OR= 4,10 [IC95% 1,81;9,26] y madres cuyos hijos utilizaban chupete (OR= 2,68 [IC95% 1,23;5,83] o tetero (OR= 14,47 [IC95% 1,85;113,24]. CONCLUSIONES: Las madres que participaron en el grupo de incentivo de la lactancia, no ofrecieron chupete y tetero a los hijos y tenían intervalo durante el trabajo pararon el amamantamiento posterior al cuarto mes. Apoyo, informaciones sobre el manejo de la lactancia y sobre sus derechos garantizados por ley, en conjunto con la ampliación del tiempo de licencia maternidad, podrán tener un papel importante en el mantenimiento de la práctica de la lactancia materna.OBJECTIVE: To analyze employment benefits and factors associated with the maintenance of breastfeeding indexes among working mothers. METHODS: The sample was constituted by 200 formal women workers who returned to work before the child had reached six months of life, in the city of Piracicaba (Southeastern Brazil. Among the participants, 100 mother-infant dyads received guidance and support for the practice of breastfeeding within an oral health prevention program, and the other 100 dyads were addressed in a child vaccination campaign. Multiple logistic regression

  4. Breastfeeding on prime-time in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castello Branco, H

    1990-01-01

    An example of the potential power of mass media in helping implement health programs, Brazil conducted a highly successful advertising campaign aimed at increasing the prevalence and duration of breastfeeding. The advertising campaign formed part of the 1981-84 breastfeeding program, which included -- among other things -- implementing maternity laws, establishing support groups for breastfeeding mothers, and disseminating information to policymakers. While several methods to inform parents had been tried, all had encountered resistance. An intensive mass media campaign changed all that. In 1982, 100 television channels began airing frequent, prime- time commercials -- an effort supplemented by radio sports, posters, and print advertisements. The airing of commercials followed extensive research and pretesting of the material, and were intended to help break down social barrier to breastfeeding, which included: women's fears that their breast size made then incapable of breastfeeding; employers' lack of support for working mothers; the lack of unity among doctors that breastfeeding is right for every child; and "machismo" -- men's attitude that the breast is only a sexual object. In order to establish a common goal, all spots ended with the slogan: "Breastfeeding -- 6 months that build up a life." And to establish credibility, the commercials featured well-known Brazilian celebrities. A spot aimed at facilitating the act for other women showed a popular actress breastfeeding her own child; another commercial showed a well- known singer and male role model asking fathers to support breastfeeding. An evaluation conducted in 1987 indicated significant positive changes due to the advertising campaign, demonstrating the potential of mass media in raising public awareness.

  5. Breastfeeding policies and breastfeeding support programs in the mother's workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettinelli, Maria Enrica

    2012-10-01

    Women should never be forced to make a choice between mother-work and other work. Many women mistakenly think they cannot breastfeed if they plan to return to work, and thus they may not talk with their employers about their intention to breastfeed or how breastfeeding might be supported at their workplace. All breastfeeding policies and strategies underline the importance of providing support for lactating mothers and highlight the need to promote specific interventions in the workplace. Possible strategies for working mothers include having the mother keep the baby with her while she works, allowing the mother to go to the baby to breastfeed during the workday, telecommuting, offering flexible work schedules, maintaining part-time work schedules, and using on-site or nearby child care centres.

  6. Breastfeeding: The Illusion of Choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinour, Lauren M; Bai, Yeon K

    2016-01-01

    Breastfeeding is frequently described as a woman's decision, yet this choice is often illusionary owing to suboptimal social and structural supports. Despite passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (2010) that requires all qualifying employers to provide mothers "reasonable" break time and a private, non-bathroom space to express breast milk, the majority of women in the United States still do not have access to both accommodations. At least three issues may be influencing this suboptimal implementation at workplaces: 1) federal law does not address lactation space functionality and accessibility, 2) federal law only protects a subset of employees, and 3) enforcement of the federal law requires women to file a complaint with the United States Department of Labor. To address each of these issues, we recommend the following modifications to current law: 1) additional requirements surrounding lactation space and functionality, 2) mandated coverage of exempt employees, and 3) requirement that employers develop company-specific lactation policies. If the goal is to give women a real choice of whether to continue breastfeeding after returning to work, we must provide the proper social and structural supports that will allow for a truly personal decision. No mother should have to choose between breastfeeding her child and earning a paycheck. Copyright © 2016 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Shareables Autoimmune Diseases Breastfeeding Cancer Fitness and Nutrition Heart Disease and Stroke HIV and AIDS Mental ... health topic Autoimmune Diseases Breastfeeding Cancer Fitness and Nutrition Heart Disease and Stroke HIV and AIDS Mental ...

  8. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... some nursing know-how? These steps and strategies will help soon-to-be-moms make an informed, smooth transition into breastfeeding. The benefits of breastfeeding YouTube embed video:

  9. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... topics Printables and Shareables Autoimmune Diseases Breastfeeding Cancer Fitness and Nutrition Heart Disease and Stroke HIV and ... Browse by health topic Autoimmune Diseases Breastfeeding Cancer Fitness and Nutrition Heart Disease and Stroke HIV and ...

  10. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... your breastfeeding support network How to get your family on board with breastfeeding African-American celebrity moms ... health care Get health insurance Get help with family planning Get help with mental health Find girls' ...

  11. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... A-Z health topics Reproductive Health Breastfeeding Menopause Menstrual Cycle Pregnancy Popular topics Bacterial vaginosis Birth control ... A-Z health topics Reproductive Health Breastfeeding Menopause Menstrual Cycle Pregnancy Popular topics Bacterial vaginosis Birth control ...

  12. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... health topics Find Help Get breastfeeding help Get health care Get health insurance Get help with family planning ... health topics Find Help Get breastfeeding help Get health care Get health insurance Get help with family planning ...

  13. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to Breastfeeding Support for Nursing Moms in the Workplace: Employer Solutions Blog topics Breastfeeding: Natural Doesn’t ... OWH updates enter email address Submit HHS Non-Discrimination Notice Language Assistance Available Accessibility Privacy Policy Disclaimers ...

  14. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Breastfeeding Carpal tunnel syndrome Depression HIV and AIDS Menstruation Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) Pregnancy Thyroid disease All ... Breastfeeding Carpal tunnel syndrome Depression HIV and AIDS Menstruation Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) Pregnancy Thyroid disease All ...

  15. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you strong while breastfeeding. Learn more about the foods you should eat. Previous Page Next Page It's Only Natural resources Related information Breastfeeding Pregnancy Resources Your Guide ...

  16. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Page Next Page It's Only Natural resources Related information Breastfeeding Pregnancy Resources Your Guide to Breastfeeding Support ... Our vision and mission Programs and Activities Health Information Gateway It's Only Natural Make the Call, Don' ...

  17. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Easy An Interview About Breastfeeding: Lauren Sogor Taking Care of Your Health — and Your Baby's Subscribe ... topics Find Help Get breastfeeding help Get health care Get health insurance Get help with family planning ...

  18. Breastfeeding vs. Formula Feeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Educators Search English Español Breastfeeding vs. Formula Feeding KidsHealth / For Parents / Breastfeeding vs. Formula Feeding What's ... work with a lactation specialist. All About Formula Feeding Commercially prepared infant formulas are a nutritious alternative ...

  19. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... All A-Z health topics Reproductive Health Breastfeeding Menopause Menstrual Cycle Pregnancy Popular topics Bacterial vaginosis Birth ... All A-Z health topics Reproductive Health Breastfeeding Menopause Menstrual Cycle Pregnancy Popular topics Bacterial vaginosis Birth ...

  20. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Breastfeeding in daily life: At home and in public Laws that support breastfeeding 10 things moms can do while ... Policy Disclaimers Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) USA.gov ...

  1. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Z health topics Reproductive Health Breastfeeding Menopause Menstrual Cycle Pregnancy Popular topics Bacterial vaginosis Birth control methods ... Z health topics Reproductive Health Breastfeeding Menopause Menstrual Cycle Pregnancy Popular topics Bacterial vaginosis Birth control methods ...

  2. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... into your life Breastfeeding in daily life: At home and in public Laws that support breastfeeding 10 ... and jobs View all pages in this section Home It's Only Natural Planning ahead It's Only Natural ...

  3. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Previous Page Next Page It's Only Natural resources Related information Breastfeeding Pregnancy Resources Your Guide to Breastfeeding ... About Us Who we are What we do Work with us Our vision and mission Programs and ...

  4. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Help Get breastfeeding help Get health care Get health insurance Get help with family planning Get help with ... Help Get breastfeeding help Get health care Get health insurance Get help with family planning Get help with ...

  5. Trends in ART Initiation among Men and Non-Pregnant/Non-Breastfeeding Women before and after Option B+ in Southern Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dovel, Kathryn; Yeatman, Sara; van Oosterhout, Joep J; Chan, Adrienne; Mantengeni, Alfred; Landes, Megan; Bedell, Richard; Kawalazira, Gift; Sodhi, Sumeet

    2016-01-01

    Option B+ is promoted as a key component to eliminating vertical transmission of HIV; however, little is known about the policy's impact on non-targeted populations, such as men and non-pregnant/non-breastfeeding women. We compare ART uptake among non-targeted populations during pre/post Option B+ periods in Zomba District, Malawi. Individual-level ART registry data from 27 health facilities were digitized and new ART initiates were disaggregated by sex and type of initiate (Option B+ or not). Data were analyzed over the pre- (January 2009-June 2011) and post- (July 2011- December 2013) Option B+ periods. After the implementation of Option B+, the total number of new female initiates increased significantly (quarterly median: 547 vs. 816; P = 0.001) and their median age decreased from 34 to 31 years (P = Option B+ clients. Post-policy, Option B+ clients represented 48% of all new female initiates while the number of females who initiated through CD4 or WHO staging criteria significantly decreased (quarterly median: 547 vs. 419; P = 0.005). The number and age of male initiates remained stable; however, the proportion of men among new initiates decreased (36% vs. 31%; P = Option B+ shifted the profile of first-time initiates towards younger and fertile women. Declines among non-Option B+ women most likely reflect earlier initiation during pregnancies before deteriorations in health. The decreased proportion of men among first-time initiates represents a growing gender disparity in HIV services that deserves immediate attention.

  6. What Do Mothers Think about Concurrent Breastfeeding and Smoking?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogen, Debra L.; Davies, Erin D.; Barnhart, Wesley C.; Lucero, Cynthia A.; Moss, Deborah R.

    2008-01-01

    Background According to newer AAP policies, smoking is not contraindicated with breastfeeding, yet smokers initiate and maintain breastfeeding less than non-smokers. Objectives 1) Describe maternal knowledge and 2) attitudes regarding concurrent breastfeeding and smoking or nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) and 3) evaluate the association between maternal smoking and infant feeding practices. Methods Mothers bringing children breastfeeding and smoking/NRT. Results Among 204 survey completers, 63% were African American, 52% had never breastfed and 54% had never smoked. Knowledge: Regardless of smoking status, 19% were aware of the recommendation to smoke after breastfeeding; most did not know that nicotine gum (42%) or patch (40%) transfers less or about the same amount of nicotine into breast milk than smoking a pack per day. Attitudes: Most mothers (80%) believe that women should not smoke any cigarettes if breastfeeding; current smokers (25%) were more likely than former (10%) or never smokers (11%) to find it acceptable to smoke one or more cigarettes per day (p=.03). Only 2% found it acceptable to use NRT while breastfeeding. Practice: Among ever breastfeeders, 10% stopped breastfeeding because of smoking. Over half of recent or current smokers reported that smoking impacted their infant feeding decision. Conclusions Mothers in this sample believe that women who smoke or take NRT should not breastfeed. Smoking status impacted women’s infant feeding practices. Correction of misinformation could increase breastfeeding rates. PMID:18501868

  7. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... already thought about breastfeeding, now is a great time. Before your baby is here is the best time to learn about the benefits of breastfeeding and ... breastfeeding. Learn more about the foods you should eat. Previous Page Next Page It's Only Natural resources ...

  8. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... your life Partner resources Subscribe To receive Breastfeeding email updates Enter email Submit Planning ahead From choosing the crib to ... Breastfeeding: The #First31 Days Subscribe To receive Breastfeeding email updates Enter email Submit All material contained on ...

  9. Breastfeeding Self-efficacy: A Critical Review of Available Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuthill, Emily L.; McGrath, Jacqueline M.; Graber, Melanie; Cusson, Regina M.; Young, Sera L.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing breastfeeding rates in the United States is a national priority. Yet, initiation and duration of breastfeeding remains below national targets. Breastfeeding self-efficacy has been shown to be a strong predictor of both breastfeeding initiation and duration and is therefore an important characteristic to be able to measure. However, there is currently a myriad of instruments for measuring breastfeeding self-efficacy, which makes selection of an appropriate instrument difficult. Thus, our aim was to identify, compare, and critically review available breastfeeding self-efficacy instruments. In a systematic review, 6 breastfeeding self-efficacy instruments were identified. The instruments’ purposes, theoretical framework, final scale development, and application in 5 most recent settings were analyzed. The 6 breastfeeding self-efficacy instruments apply a number of theoretical and conceptual frameworks in their development, with Bandura’s social cognitive theory being most common. Content, construct, and predictive validity were strong for most scales. Some, but not all, have been successfully adapted to novel settings. In sum, there are several measurements of breastfeeding self-efficacy that can and should be employed to better understand reasons for suboptimal breastfeeding rates and the effects of interventions on breastfeeding self-efficacy. Instrument selection should be based on domains of primary interest, time available, peripartum timing, and assessment of previous adaptations. Failure to apply appropriate measures in research may garner results that are inconclusive, inaccurate, or nonrepresentative of true study effects. PMID:26319113

  10. A questionnaire for assessing breastfeeding intentions and practices in Nigeria: validity, reliability and translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmanuel, Andy; Clow, Sheila E

    2017-06-07

    Validating a questionnaire/instrument (whether developed or adapted) before proceeding to the field for data collection is important. This article presents the modification of an Irish questionnaire for a Nigerian setting. The validation process and reliability testing of this questionnaire (which was used in assessing previous breastfeeding practices and breastfeeding intentions of pregnant women in English and Hausa languages) were also presented. Five experts in the field of breastfeeding and infant feeding voluntarily and independently evaluated the instrument. The experts evaluated the various items of the questionnaire based on relevance, clarity, simplicity and ambiguity on a Likert scale of 4. The analysis was performed to determine the content validity index (CVI).Two language experts performed the translation and back-translation. Ten pregnant women completed questionnaires which were evaluated for internal consistency. Two other pregnant women completed the questionnaire twice at an interval of two weeks to test the reliability. SPSS version 21 was used to calculate the coefficient of reliability. The content validity index was high (0.94 for relevance, clarity and ambiguity and 0.96 for simplicity). The analysis suggested that four of the seventy one items should be removed. Cronbach's Alpha was 0.81, while the reliability coefficient was 0.76. The emerged validated questionnaire was translated from English to Hausa, then, back-translated into English and compared for accuracy. The final instrument is reliable and valid for data collection on breastfeeding in Nigeria among English and Hausa speakers. Therefore, the instrument is recommended for use in assessing breastfeeding intention and practices in Nigeria.

  11. Epilepsy and recommendations for breastfeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiby, Gyri; Bjørk, Marte; Engelsen, Bernt A; Gilhus, Nils Erik

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this paper is to provide a synopsis of benefits and potential harmful effects of exposure to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) via breastmilk, and present recommendations for breastfeeding in women with epilepsy. The article is based on a discretionary selection of English language articles retrieved by a literature search in the PubMed database, the LactMed database, and the authors' clinical experience. Breastfeeding is associated with benefits for the infant, including nutrition, protection against infectious and immunological disease, and promotion of development and psychological attachment. Exposure to AEDs via breastmilk could potentially produce side effects or negatively affect development. Most studies on AED transfer through breastmilk report infant serum levels well below the limit of an expected pharmacological effect. Some drugs have the potential to reach significant serum levels in breastfed infants, such as barbiturates, benzodiazepines, lamotrigine, and ethosuximide. Thus, breastfed infants should be monitored for side effects. Still, adverse symptoms are rarely reported in breastfed infants of mothers taking AEDs, and prospective studies have failed to demonstrate any negative developmental effects in children that have been exposed to AEDs via breastmilk. The nursing infant's degree of drug exposure can be minimized by breastfeeding when drug concentrations in the milk are low, reducing maternal AED dosage to prepregnancy levels, and administering mixed nutrition. Most AEDs are considered safe or moderately safe during breastfeeding. Mothers with epilepsy should be encouraged to breastfeed, provided careful monitoring of the infant. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Managing breastfeeding and work: a Foucauldian secondary analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Deborah; Nicholls, David A

    2010-08-01

    This paper is a report of a secondary analysis of the experiences of employed breastfeeding mothers. Health promotion policies exhort mothers to feed their infants breastmilk exclusively for the first 6 months and partially until the age of 2 years. More mothers are returning to paid employment less than a year after having a baby. Combining breastfeeding and paid work is an issue for nursing and midwifery as predominantly female professions caring for women and their children. Foucauldian discourse analysis was used for a secondary analysis of interviews performed in 2005 with 20 women who continued to breastfeed on their return to work. The discursive positions and disciplinary practices were identified and analysed. Combining breastfeeding and paid work required negotiating the positions of good mother and good worker. Being a good mother conferred health benefits on infants. Being a good worker required the mothers to constrain their breastfeeding practices. The practices performed by the mothers involved stockpiling breastmilk, maintaining milk supply, preparing the baby ready for absence, making sacrifices and remaining silent and invisible as a breastfeeding worker. Breastfeeding workers have the potential to threaten the focus of the workplace. They discipline themselves to minimize their disruptive potential. Such strategies serve to maintain the marginalization of breastfeeding in the workplace and to keep women's efforts to continue breastfeeding invisible. The work of breastfeeding workers needs to be better recognized and supported.

  13. Outcomes of Video-Assisted Teaching for Latching in Postpartum Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sroiwatana, Suttikamon; Puapornpong, Pawin

    2018-04-25

    Latching is an important process of breastfeeding and should be taught and practiced by the postpartum mother. The objective is to compare latching outcomes between video-assisted and routine teaching methods among postpartum women. A randomized controlled trial was conducted. Postpartum women who had deliveries without complications were randomized into two groups: 14 cases in the video-assisted teaching group and 14 cases in a routine teaching group. In the first group, the mothers were taught breastfeeding benefits, latching methods, and breastfeeding positions and practiced breastfeeding in a controlled setting for a 30-minute period and watched a 6-minute video with consistent content. In the second group, the mothers were taught a normal 30-minute period and then practiced breastfeeding. In both groups, Latching on, Audible swallowing, the Type of nipples, Comfort, and Help (LATCH) scores were assessed at 24-32 and 48-56 hours after the breastfeeding teaching modals. Demographic data and LATCH scores were collected and analyzed. There were no statistically significant differences in the mothers' ages, occupations, marital status, religion, education, income, infants' gestational age, body mass index, nipple length, route of delivery, and time to first latching between the video-assisted and routine breastfeeding teaching groups. First and second LATCH score assessments had shown no significant differences between both breastfeeding teaching groups. The video-assisted breastfeeding teaching did not improve latching outcomes when it was compared with routine teaching.

  14. Breastfeeding and postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, Julia P; Wimalawansa, Sunil J

    2003-06-01

    Bone loss associated with osteoporosis occurs with high frequency among the elderly and often results in debilitating fractures. A combination of lifestyle behaviors, genetic predisposition, and disease processes contributes to bone metabolism. Therefore, any discussion regarding bone health must address these factors. The impact of menopause on bone turnover has been generally well studied and characterized. Breastfeeding places significant stress on calcium metabolism and, as a consequence, directly influences bone metabolism. The most significant factors affecting bone mineral density (BMD) and bone metabolism are the duration and frequency of lactation, the return of menses, and pre-pregnancy weight. Although transient, lactation is associated with bone loss. As clinical guidelines and public health policies are being formulated, there is a compelling need for further investigation into the relationship of lactation, BMD, and subsequent risk of osteoporosis. Better understanding of this relationship will provide new opportunities for early intervention and ultimately help in the prevention of bone loss in postmenopausal women.

  15. Breastfeeding social marketing: lessons learned from USDA's "Loving Support" campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Escamilla, Rafael

    2012-10-01

    Social marketing involves the application of commercial marketing principles to advance the public good. Social marketing calls for much more than health communications campaigns. It involves four interrelated tasks: audience benefit, target behavior, essence (brand, relevance, positioning), and developing the "4Ps" (product, price, place, promotion) marketing mix. The ongoing U.S. Department of Agriculture "Loving Support Makes Breastfeeding Work" campaign was launched in 1997 based on social marketing principles to increase breastfeeding initiation rates and breastfeeding duration among Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) participants. Since then there have been improvements in breastfeeding duration in the country, and the majority of WIC women now initiate breastfeeding. Breastfeeding in public places is still not well accepted by society at large, and any and exclusive breastfeeding durations remain exceedingly low. Lessons learned from "Loving Support" and other campaigns indicate that it is important to design social marketing campaigns to target the influential societal forces (e.g., family and friends, healthcare providers, employers, formula industry, legislators) that affect women's decision and ability to breastfeed for the recommended amount of time. This will require formative research that applies the social-ecological model to different population segments, taking and identifying the right incentives to nudge more women to breastfeed for longer. Any new breastfeeding campaign needs to understand and take into account the information acquisition preferences of the target audiences. The vast majority of WIC women have mobile devices and are accessing social media. The Brazilian experience indicates that making breastfeeding the social norm can be done with a solid social marketing strategy. This is consistent with the recently released "Six Steps to Achieve Breastfeeding Goals for WIC Clinics," which identifies

  16. Graduate Social Work Faculty's Support for Educational Content on Women and on Sexism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Dana S; Woodford, Michael R; Gutiérrez, Lorraine M; Luke, Katherine P

    2015-10-01

    Social work faculty play an important role in preparing students to address sexism and engage in culturally competent practice with women. This study examines the nature of U.S. and Anglo-Canadian graduate social work faculty's support for content on women and on sexism. Although support appears high for both content areas, results suggest that faculty endorsement for content on women is significantly greater than that for sexism. Further, bivariate and multivariate analyses indicate that the nature of support differs for each content area. Implications for social work education are discussed.

  17. A Functional Assessment of the Impact of Advantages and Disadvantages on Breastfeeding Attitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Acker, Frederik; Bakker, Esther

    2012-01-01

    Although health and other benefits of breastfeeding for mother and child have been repeatedly shown, there is still a large proportion of women who do not initiate or continue breastfeeding. The aim of the current study is to analyze the contribution of the presentation of advantages and disadvantages of breastfeeding in developing an attitude…

  18. Barriers to postnatal care and exclusive breastfeeding among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: Poor knowledge and inaccessibility to health facilities were the main obstacles to postnatal care while the practice of exclusive breastfeeding was limited by the stress and mothers refusal. Keywords: Exclusive breastfeeding, postnatal care, southeastern Nigeria, urban women. Nigerian Medical Journal | Vol.

  19. Content Analysis of the Construction of Self and Others in Women with Bulimia Nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Dada, Gloria; Izu, Sheila; Montebruno, Claudia; Grau, Antoni; Feixas, Guillem

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the content of personal constructs in people diagnosed with bulimia nervosa (BN). We expected to find differences in the predominant content of the construct systems between women with and without BN. We analyzed the constructs elicited using the repertory grid technique from 120 women aged between 18 to 45 years, divided into two groups: a clinical group of women diagnosed with bulimia (n = 62) and a control group of university students (n = 58). The ...

  20. Strategically Positioned: Breastfeeding, Advocacy, and the Hands-On Nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gathron, Erika L

    2017-08-01

    Breastfeeding, a health behavior that provides well-known benefits for mothers, infants, and children, is an essential strategy to improve public health. Breastfeeding can reduce the incidence of infant illness and death and provides both short- and longterm physiological benefits to mothers. National and international government agencies and grassroots organizations supporting breastfeeding include the World Health Organization, the United Nations International Children's Emergency Fund, the World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the La Leche League. In the United States, breastfeeding of infants was the norm until the late 1890s when the Progressive Era's emphasis on science and modernity led to the transition of childbirth from residential in-home births to community-based hospital births and the aggressive rise of the baby formula industry. By 1966, only 18% of mothers were exclusively breastfeeding their infants at hospital discharge. This drastic decrease in breastfeeding reduced the percentage of mothers and grandmothers who could share their breastfeeding knowledge and experience. Nurses who provide care for women and infants are essential stakeholders in bridging the breastfeeding knowledge gap by offering education on the short- and long-term health benefits of breastfeeding to both mother and baby and timely encouragement to mothers during the most significant time for establishing lactation.

  1. Antenatal breastfeeding education for increasing breastfeeding duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumbiganon, Pisake; Martis, Ruth; Laopaiboon, Malinee; Festin, Mario R; Ho, Jacqueline J; Hakimi, Mohammad

    2016-12-06

    Breast milk is well recognised as the best food source for infants. The impact of antenatal breastfeeding (BF) education on the duration of BF has not been evaluated. To assess the effectiveness of antenatal breastfeeding (BF) education for increasing BF initiation and duration. We searched Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth's Trials Register on 1 March 2016, CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library, 2016, Issue 3), MEDLINE (1966 to 1 March 2016) and Scopus (January 1985 to 1 March 2016). We contacted experts and searched reference lists of retrieved articles. All identified published, unpublished and ongoing randomised controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effect of formal antenatal BF education or comparing two different methods of formal antenatal BF education, on the duration of BF. We included RCTs that only included antenatal interventions and excluded those that combined antenatal and intrapartum or postpartum BF education components. Cluster-randomised trials were included in this review. Quasi-randomised trials were not eligible for inclusion. We assessed all potential studies identified as a result of the search strategy. Two review authors extracted data from each included study using the agreed form and assessed risk of bias. We resolved discrepancies through discussion. We assessed the quality of the evidence using the GRADE approach. This review update includes 24 studies (10,056 women). Twenty studies (9789 women) contribute data to analyses. Most studies took place in high-income countries such as the USA, UK, Canada and Australia. In the first five comparisons, we display the included trials according to type of intervention without pooling data. For the 'Summary of findings' we pooled data for a summary effect.Five included studies were cluster-randomised trials: all of these adjusted data and reported adjustments as odds ratios (OR). We have analysed the data using the generic inverse variance method and presented results as odds ratios, because we were

  2. A vivência de amamentar para trabalhadoras e estudantes de uma universidade pública La experiencia de la amamantación para mujeres trabajadoras y estudiantes de una universidad pública Breast-feeding experience for women workers and students from a public university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isilia Aparecida Silva

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo qualitativo teve como objetivo conhecer os principais elementos interferentes no processo de amamentação vivenciado por trabalhadoras e estudantes de uma universidade pública do Estado de São Paulo, no qual participaram 65 mulheres trabalhadoras e alunas, cujas entrevistas foram analisadas segundo os pressupostos de Taylor e Bogdan e do Interacionismo Simbólico. Os resultados demonstram que o processo de amamentar, para essas mulheres, mostrou-se delineado pelas condições seus ambientes doméstico, do trabalho ou de estudo. O ambiente físico, as relações entre seus familiares, superiores e seus pares exercem forte influência em sua determinação de manter a amamentação.Este estudio cualitativo tuvo como objetivo conocer los principales elementos de interferencia en el proceso de amamantamiento vivenciado por trabajadoras y estudiantes de una universidad pública, cuyos sujetos son las mujeres trabajadoras y alumnas de una universidad pública del Estado de São Paulo. Los datos se coletaron a través de entrevista, que se analizaron según los presupuestos de Taylor e Bogdan y bajo la óptica del Interaccionismo Simbólico. Los resultados apuntan que el proceso de amamantamiento para esas mujeres se mostró condicionado y delineado por las situaciones que surgen en su ambiente doméstico, de trabajo o estudio y las relaciones entre sus familiares, superiores y sus similares, ejercen fuerte influencia en la determinación de mantener la amamantacion.This qualitative research aimed to know the main interfering elements in the breast-feeding process as experienced by professional women and by students, that was carried out with 65 professional women and students from a public university in São Paulo state. The data collection was proceeded by interviews which contents were analyzed according to Taylor and Bogdan and Symbolic Interactionism approaches. Results indicated that the breast-feeding process for these women

  3. Breastfeeding and employment: an assessment of employer attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libbus, M Kay; Bullock, Linda F C

    2002-08-01

    Both research and anecdotal reports suggest that maternal employment is associated with failure to initiate breastfeeding and early breastfeeding attrition. The objective of this study was to describe the experience with and attitudes toward breastfeeding of a sample of employers in a small Midwestern city in the United States. Based on an analysis of 85 mail-out questionnaires, we found that less than half of the employers had personal experience with breastfeeding. A large percentage of the sample, however, indicated that they would be willing to facilitate women who wished to breastfeed or express milk in the workplace. However, these employers also stated that they saw little value to their business of supporting breastfeeding in the work environment. Thus, enhancement of breastfeeding opportunity in the work environment may come as a result of public and employer education but, more likely, will require some type of directive from official sources.

  4. Conhecimentos maternos sobre amamentação entre puérperas inscritas em programa de pré-natal Breastfeeding knowledge among post-partum women previously enrolled in a prenatal program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilza Sandre-Pereira

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi conhecer o nível de informação sobre amamentação entre as mulheres que participam do programa de pré-natal na Maternidade-Escola da Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro. A amostra totalizou 135 puérperas que responderam a questionário estruturado, contendo perguntas objetivas sobre aspectos práticos e teóricos do aleitamento materno. Os resultados mostraram que as mulheres iniciaram o pré-natal, em média, com 16 semanas de gravidez e realizaram cerca de oito consultas. Dentre elas, 53,3% afirmaram ter recebido informações sobre aleitamento materno durante o acompanhamento pré-natal e a informação mais lembrada por 22,2% foi a de amamentar até os seis meses de vida do bebê. Quanto ao momento ideal para a primeira mamada, 50,4% consideraram ser logo após o parto e 47,4% apontaram o leite materno como benéfico para proteger o bebê contra doenças. Embora as mães tenham conhecimentos básicos sobre aleitamento materno, questões como o momento ideal para a primeira mamada, a importância do colostro e aspectos nutricionais relacionados à nutriz ainda precisam ser melhor esclarecidos durante o pré-natal e no período pós-parto imediato.The purpose of this study was to evaluate knowledge of breastfeeding issues among post-partum women who had participated in a prenatal program at the Rio de Janeiro Federal University (UFRJ Maternity Teaching Hospital. The sample totaled 135 post-partum women who answered a structured questionnaire with objective questions about practical and theoretical aspects of breastfeeding. The women had begun prenatal care at the 16th week of gestation on average, with an average of 8 medical consultations. Some 53.3% stated having received information about breastfeeding during prenatal care, and 22.2% stated that the information they remembered the best was that they should breastfeed for the first 6 months. Regarding the best moment for the first feeding, 50

  5. Women's social space and the reference for breastfeeding practice El espacio social de mujeres y su referencia para el cuidado en la práctica de la lactancia O espaço social das mulheres e a referência para o cuidado na prática da amamentação

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Márcia Spanó Nakano

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to identify agents or institutions taken as reference by women when breastfeeding. A qualitative study was carried out on 20 primiparous who were assisted, for reasons not related to breastfeeding, in the five health services selected by this study. Data were collected by semi-structured interviews carried out in the participants' households and were analyzed by content analysis in the thematic mode. We identified that health professionals play a standardize role of breastfeeding based on scientific knowledge. In the daily breastfeeding routine, the family is the first reference for women, transmitting beliefs, habits and behaviors. We believe in the valorization of the family context by the health professional, in which actions and interactions in the breastfeeding issue are developed in order to constitute the foundations for a new care model in breastfeeding. This model should, therefore, consider the practice diversity, adapting actions to the multiple roles of being mother/fortress/wife/worker in the social context.Este estudio tuvo como objetivo identificar los agentes o instituciones consideradas como referencia por las madres lactantes en la práctica de amamatación. Investigación cualitativa con 20 puérperas quienes buscaron por razones ajenas a la lactancia una de las 5 unidades básicas de salud seleccionadas en este estudio. Los datos fueron recolectados a través de entrevistas semi-estructuradas realizadas en su domicilio; su análisis se apoyó en el análisis de contenido, modalidad temática. Fue identificado que el profesional de salud asume un rol normativo en este proceso, apoyándose en conocimientos científicos. Dentro del proceso de amamantar, la familia ocupa el primer lugar de referencia para las mujeres, transmitiendo creencias, hábitos y conductas. Se cree que la valorización del contexto familiar por el profesional de salud, al desarrollar acciones e interacciones durante la lactancia, se

  6. Scintigraphic examinations during pregnancy and in breast-feeding women: a survey of Belgian nuclear medicine physician's attitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tondeur, M.; Ham, H.; Sand, A.

    2003-01-01

    Radiation protection is of major importance in pregnant and breast feeding women. This work was undertaken to assess the practices of Belgian nuclear medicine physicians towards performing diagnostic tests during pregnancy and in breast feeding women. A questionnaire was sent to 201 Belgian nuclear medicine physicians; 82 answers (41 %) were received. 51 % of the responding physicians agree to perform lung perfusion scan during pregnancy provided a reduced dose is administered, 33% refuse to perform it during first three months and 24% refuse to perform it for pregnancies older than three months. For the Tc-99m ventilation scan 79% and 66% refuse to perform it before and after first three months. Better agreement was observed for other Tc-99m scintigraphies or tests using other radionuclides. In breast feeding women 89% agree to perform Tc-99m tests provided a breast feeding break; however, the duration of this break appears variable. The need for obtaining a written informed consent appears controversial. Given the variability of the attitudes of nuclear medicine physicians, official guidelines for nuclear medicine diagnostic tests during pregnancy is needed. (authors)

  7. Bone Mineral Density in Gravida: Effect of Pregnancies and Breast-Feeding in Women of Differing Ages and Parity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehud Lebel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Changes of bone during pregnancy and during lactation evaluated by bone mineral density (BMD may have implications for risk of osteoporosis and fractures. We studied BMD in women of differing ages, parity, and lactation histories immediately postpartum for BMD, T-scores, and Z-scores. Institutional Review Board approval was received. All women while still in hospital postpartum were asked to participate. BMD was performed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA machine at femoral neck (FN and lumbar spine (LS by a single technician. Of 132 participants, 73 (55.3% were ≤30 years; 27 (20.5% were primiparous; 36 (27.3% were grand multiparous; 35 (26.5% never breast fed. Mean FN T-scores and Z-scores were higher than respective mean LS scores, but all means were within the normal limits. Mean LS T-scores and Z-scores were highest in the grand multiparas. There were only 2 (1.5% outliers with low Z-scores. We conclude that, in a large cohort of Israeli women with BMD parameters assessed by DXA within two days postpartum, mean T-scores and Z-scores at both the LS and FN were within normal limits regardless of age (20–46 years, parity (1–13 viable births, and history of either no or prolonged months of lactation (up to 11.25 years.

  8. Outcomes in a cohort of women who discontinued maternal triple-antiretroviral regimens initially used to prevent mother-to-child transmission during pregnancy and breastfeeding--Kenya, 2003-2009.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy D Minniear

    Full Text Available In 2012, the World Health Organization (WHO amended their 2010 guidelines for women receiving limited duration, triple-antiretroviral drug regimens during pregnancy and breastfeeding for prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (tARV-PMTCT (Option B to include the option to continue lifelong combination antiretroviral therapy (cART (Option B+. We evaluated clinical and CD4 outcomes in women who had received antiretrovirals for prevention of mother-to-child transmission and then discontinued antiretrovirals 6-months postpartum.The Kisumu Breastfeeding Study, 2003-2009, was a prospective, non-randomized, open-label clinical trial of tARV-PMTCT in ARV-naïve, Kenyan women. Women received tARV-PMTCT from 34 weeks' gestation until 6-months postpartum when women were instructed to discontinue breastfeeding. Women with CD4 count (CD4 <250cells/mm3 or WHO stage III/IV prior to 6-months postpartum continued cART indefinitely. We estimated the change in CD4 after discontinuing tARV-PMTCT and the adjusted relative risk [aRR] for factors associated with declines in maternal CD4. We compared maternal and infant outcomes following weaning-when tARV-PMTCT discontinued-by maternal ARV status through 24-months postpartum. Compared with women who continued cART, discontinuing antiretrovirals was associated with infant HIV transmission and death (10.1% vs. 2.4%; P = 0.03. Among women who discontinued antiretrovirals, CD4<500 cells/mm3 at either initiation (21.8% vs. 1.5%; P = 0.002; aRR: 9.8; 95%-confidence interval [CI]: 2.4-40.6 or discontinuation (36.9% vs. 8.3%; P<0.0001; aRR: 4.4; 95%-CI: 1.9-5.0 were each associated with increased risk of women requiring cART for their own health within 6 months after discontinuing.Considering the serious health risks to the woman's infant and the brief reprieve from cART gained by stopping, every country should evaluate the need for and feasibility to implement WHO Option B+ for PMTCT. Evaluating CD4 at

  9. Why are breastfeeding rates low in Lebanon? A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabulsi, Mona

    2011-08-30

    Breastfeeding is a cost-effective public health intervention that reduces infant morbidity and mortality in developing countries. In Lebanon, breastfeeding exclusivity and continuation rates are disappointingly low. This qualitative study aims at identifying barriers and promoters of breastfeeding in the Lebanese context by exploring mothers' perceptions and experiences in breastfeeding over a one year period. We conducted focus group discussions in three hospitals in Beirut, Lebanon, and followed up 36 breastfeeding mothers with serial in-depth interviews for one year post-partum or until breastfeeding discontinuation. Themes generated from baseline interviews revealed several positive and negative perceptions of breastfeeding. Longitudinal follow up identified insufficient milk, fear of weight gain or breast sagging, pain, sleep deprivation, exhaustion, or maternal employment, as reasons for early breastfeeding discontinuation. Women who continued breastfeeding for one year were more determined to succeed and overcome any barrier, relying mostly on family support and proper time management. Increasing awareness of future mothers about breast feeding difficulties, its benefits to children, mothers, and society at large may further promote breastfeeding, and improve exclusivity and continuation rates in Lebanon. A national strategy for early intervention during school years to increase young women's awareness may improve their self-confidence and determination to succeed in breastfeeding later. Moreover, prolonging maternity leave, having day-care facilities at work, creation of lactation peer support groups and hotlines, and training of doctors and nurses in proper lactation support may positively impact breastfeeding exclusivity and continuation rates. Further research is needed to assess the effectiveness of proposed interventions in the Lebanese context.

  10. Why are breastfeeding rates low in Lebanon? a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabulsi Mona

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breastfeeding is a cost-effective public health intervention that reduces infant morbidity and mortality in developing countries. In Lebanon, breastfeeding exclusivity and continuation rates are disappointingly low. This qualitative study aims at identifying barriers and promoters of breastfeeding in the Lebanese context by exploring mothers' perceptions and experiences in breastfeeding over a one year period. Methods We conducted focus group discussions in three hospitals in Beirut, Lebanon, and followed up 36 breastfeeding mothers with serial in-depth interviews for one year post-partum or until breastfeeding discontinuation. Results Themes generated from baseline interviews revealed several positive and negative perceptions of breastfeeding. Longitudinal follow up identified insufficient milk, fear of weight gain or breast sagging, pain, sleep deprivation, exhaustion, or maternal employment, as reasons for early breastfeeding discontinuation. Women who continued breastfeeding for one year were more determined to succeed and overcome any barrier, relying mostly on family support and proper time management. Conclusions Increasing awareness of future mothers about breast feeding difficulties, its benefits to children, mothers, and society at large may further promote breastfeeding, and improve exclusivity and continuation rates in Lebanon. A national strategy for early intervention during school years to increase young women's awareness may improve their self-confidence and determination to succeed in breastfeeding later. Moreover, prolonging maternity leave, having day-care facilities at work, creation of lactation peer support groups and hotlines, and training of doctors and nurses in proper lactation support may positively impact breastfeeding exclusivity and continuation rates. Further research is needed to assess the effectiveness of proposed interventions in the Lebanese context.

  11. Markets, breastfeeding and trade in mothers' milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Julie P

    2015-01-01

    This introduction to a special issue on the economics of breastfeeding draws attention to the lack of economic justice for women. Human milk is being bought and sold. Commodifying and marketing human milk and breastfeeding risk reinforcing social and gender economic inequities. Yet there are potential benefits for breastfeeding, and some of the world's poorest women might profit. How can we improve on the present situation where everyone except the woman who donates her milk benefits? Breastfeeding is a global food production system with unsurpassed capacity to promote children's food security and maternal and child health, but it is side-lined by trade negotiators who seek instead to expand world markets for cow's milk-based formula. Regulators focus on potential risks of feeding donated human milk, rather than on health risks of exposing infants and young children to highly processed bovine milk. Similarly, policymakers aspire to provide universal health care access that may be unaffordable when two thirds of the world's children are not optimally nourished in infancy, resulting in a global double burden of infectious and chronic disease. Universal breastfeeding requires greater commitment of resources, but such investment remains lacking despite the cost effectiveness of breastfeeding protection, support and promotion in and beyond health services. Women invest substantially in breastfeeding but current policy - epitomised by the G20 approach to the 'gender gap' - fails to acknowledge the economic value of this unpaid care work. Economic incentives for mothers to optimally breastfeed are dwarfed by health system and commercial incentives promoting formula feeding and by government fiscal policies which ignore the resulting economic costs. 'The market' fails to protect breastfeeding, because market prices give the wrong signals. An economic approach to the problem of premature weaning from optimal breastfeeding may help prioritise global maternity protection as

  12. Factores que influyen en el abandono temprano de la lactancia por mujeres trabajadoras Factors associated with short duration of breast-feeding in Mexican working women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Navarro-Estrella

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Identificar los factores maternos, laborales y de los servicios de salud que influyen en el abandono temprano de la lactancia materna en madres trabajadoras. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Entre noviembre de 1998 y marzo de 1999 se efectuó un estudio transversal comparativo con madres derechohabientes del Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social de Ensenada, Baja California, México. A 265 madres se les aplicó un cuestionario entre los tres y nueve meses posparto. Se distribuyeron en: grupo I: madres con abandono temprano de la lactancia materna; grupo II: madres que prolongaron la lactancia materna por más de tres meses. Para identificar los factores asociados con el abandono temprano de la lactancia materna, se utilizó regresión logística. RESULTADOS: El 42.3% (112 de las madres abandonaron temprano la lactancia materna. Los factores de riesgo fueron: tener conocimientos malos sobre lactancia materna, OR 5.97 (IC 95% 1.67-20.67, la ausencia del antecedente de haberla practicado en un hijo previo OR 2.98 (IC 95% 1.66-5.36, tener un plan de duración de la misma de 0 a 3 meses, OR 16.24 (IC 95% 5.37-49.12, y la falta de facilidades en el trabajo para efectuarla, OR 1.99 (IC 95% 1.12-3.56. CONCLUSIONES: Los principales factores asociados con el abandono temprano de la lactancia materna fueron maternos. El único factor laboral fue la ausencia de facilidades para amamantar. Es probable que la calidad de los conocimientos, la experiencia previa con ella y tener facilidades laborales influyan en la decisión de prolongarla.OBJECTIVE:To identify the maternal, work, and health services factors associated with a short duration of breast-feeding in working mothers. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A cross-sectional study was carried out between November 1998 and March 1999, among 265 mothers medically insured by (Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, IMSS Mexican Institute of Social Security, who completed a questionnaire when their babies were 3 to 9 months old

  13. Juggling work and breastfeeding: effects of maternity leave and occupational characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guendelman, Sylvia; Kosa, Jessica Lang; Pearl, Michelle; Graham, Steve; Goodman, Julia; Kharrazi, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Juggling breastfeeding and paid work can challenge breastfeeding success. We examined the relationship between breastfeeding and maternity leave before and after delivery among working mothers in Southern California. California is 1 of only 5 states in the United States providing paid pregnancy leave that can be extended for infant bonding. Drawing from a case-control study of preterm birth and low birth weight, 770 full-time working mothers were compared on whether they established breastfeeding in the first month. For those who established breastfeeding, we examined duration. Eligible women participated in California's Prenatal Screening Program; delivered live births between July 2002 and December 2003; were > or =18 years old; had a singleton birth without congenital anomalies; and had a US mailing address. We assessed whether maternity leave and other occupational characteristics predicted breastfeeding cessation and used multivariate regression models weighted for probability of sampling to calculate odds ratios for breastfeeding establishment and hazards ratios for breastfeeding cessation. A maternity leave of leave on breastfeeding cessation was stronger among nonmanagers, women with inflexible jobs, and with high psychosocial distress. Antenatal leave in the last month of pregnancy was not associated with breastfeeding establishment or duration. Postpartum maternity leave may have a positive effect on breastfeeding among full-time workers, particularly those who hold nonmanagerial positions, lack job flexibility, or experience psychosocial distress. Pediatricians should encourage patients to take maternity leave and advocate for extending paid postpartum leave and flexibility in working conditions for breastfeeding women.

  14. An Institutional Ethnography of Nurses' Support of Breastfeeding on the Night Shift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassley, Jane S; Clark, Manda; Schleis, Joyce

    2015-01-01

    To describe nurses' support of breastfeeding on the night shift and to identify the interpersonal interactions and institutional structures that affect this support. Institutional ethnography. The mother/baby unit of a tertiary care hospital with 4200 births per year. Registered nurses (N = 16) who provided care on the night shift to mother/infant dyads in the immediate postpartum period. Data were collected using focus groups, individual and group interviews, and mother/baby unit observations. The focus groups were held before the night shift and had five participants. The nine individual and group interviews were conducted between 0100 and 0230 on the mother/baby unit. Three unit observations were conducted. Interviews were recorded, professionally transcribed, and analyzed using a content analysis method. Data analysis yielded three themes that described these nurses' support of breastfeeding on the night shift: competing priorities, incongruent expectations, and influential institutional structures. The need of visitors to see their new family members competed with the needs of mothers to rest and breastfeed their newborns. Helping breastfeeding dyads who experienced difficulties competed with providing care to other patients. Parents' expectations regarding newborn behavior were incongruent with the reality of newborn feeding and sleeping patterns. Institutional structures that affected the provision of breastfeeding support by nurses included hospital breastfeeding practices, staffing, and policies. Nurses' support of breastfeeding on the night shift encompasses a complex interplay of interpersonal interactions with new families and visitors regarding priorities and expectations and negotiating institutional structures such as feeding policies and staffing. © 2015 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  15. Relation between household food insecurity and breastfeeding in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Sarah K; Dachner, Naomi; Frank, Lesley; Tarasuk, Valerie

    2018-03-19

    Qualitative studies have suggested that food insecurity adversely affects infant feeding practices. We aimed to determine how household food insecurity relates to breastfeeding initiation, duration of exclusive breastfeeding and vitamin D supplementation of breastfed infants in Canada. We studied 10 450 women who had completed the Maternal Experiences - Breastfeeding Module and the Household Food Security Survey Module of the Canadian Community Health Survey (2005-2014) and who had given birth in the year of or year before their interview. We used multivariable Cox proportional hazards models and logistic regression to examine the relation between food insecurity and infant feeding practices, adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics, maternal mood disorders and diabetes mellitus. Overall, 17% of the women reported household food insecurity, of whom 8.6% had moderate food insecurity and 2.9% had severe food insecurity (weighted percentages). After adjustment for sociodemographic factors, women with food insecurity were no less likely than others to initiate breastfeeding or provide vitamin D supplementation to their infants. Half of the women with food insecurity ceased exclusive breastfeeding by 2 months, whereas most of those with food security persisted with breastfeeding for 4 months or more. Relative to women with food security, those with marginal, moderate and severe food insecurity had significantly lower odds of exclusive breastfeeding to 4 months, but only women with moderate food insecurity had lower odds of exclusive breastfeeding to 6 months, independent of sociodemographic characteristics (odds ratio 0.60, 95% confidence interval 0.39-0.92). Adjustment for maternal mood disorder or diabetes slightly attenuated these relationships. Mothers caring for infants in food-insecure households attempted to follow infant feeding recommendations, but were less able than women with food security to sustain exclusive breastfeeding. Our findings highlight the

  16. Association between parity and breastfeeding with maternal high blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupton, Samantha J; Chiu, Christine L; Lujic, Sanja; Hennessy, Annemarie; Lind, Joanne M

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine how parity and breastfeeding were associated with maternal high blood pressure, and how age modifies this association. Baseline data for 74,785 women were sourced from the 45 and Up Study, Australia. These women were 45 years of age or older, had an intact uterus, and had not been diagnosed with high blood pressure before pregnancy. Odds ratios (ORs) and 99% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association between giving birth, breastfeeding, lifetime breastfeeding duration, and average breastfeeding per child with high blood pressure were estimated using logistic regression. The combination of parity and breastfeeding was associated with lower odds of having high blood pressure (adjusted OR, 0.89; 99% CI, 0.82-0.97; P high blood pressure when compared with parous women who never breastfed. The odds were lower with longer breastfeeding durations and were no longer significant in the majority of women over the age of 64 years. Women should be encouraged to breastfeed for as long as possible and a woman's breastfeeding history should be taken into account when assessing her likelihood of high blood pressure in later life. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Autoimmune Diseases Breastfeeding Cancer Fitness and Nutrition Heart Disease and Stroke HIV and AIDS Mental Health Pain Pregnancy Reproductive Health Sexual Health Sexually ...

  18. Antenatal breastfeeding education for increasing breastfeeding duration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumbiganon, Pisake; Martis, Ruth; Laopaiboon, Malinee; Festin, Mario R; Ho, Jacqueline J; Hakimi, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background Breastfeeding (BF) is well recognised as the best food for infants. The impact of antenatal BF education on the duration of BF has not been evaluated. Objectives To evaluate the effectiveness of antenatal BF education for increasing BF initiation and duration. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (21 April 2010), CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2010, Issue 2), MEDLINE (1966 to April 2010) and SCOPUS (January 1985 to April 2010). We contacted experts and searched reference lists of retrieved articles. We updated the search of the Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register on 28 September 2011 and added the results to the awaiting classification section of the review. Selection criteria All identified published, unpublished and ongoing randomised controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effect of formal antenatal BF education or comparing two different methods of formal antenatal BF education, on duration of BF. We excluded RCTs that also included intrapartum or postpartum BF education. Data collection and analysis We assessed all potential studies identified as a result of the search strategy. Two review authors extracted data from each included study using the agreed form and assessed risk of bias. We resolved discrepancies through discussion. Main results We included 17 studies with 7131 women in the review and 14 studies involving 6932 women contributed data to the analyses. We did not do any meta-analysis because there was only one study for each comparison. Five studies compared a single method of BF education with routine care. Peer counselling significantly increased BF initiation. Three studies compared one form of BF education versus another. No intervention was significantly more effective than another intervention in increasing initiation or duration of BF. Seven studies compared multiple methods versus a single method of BF education. Combined BF educational interventions were not

  19. Female employees' perceptions of organisational support for breastfeeding at work: findings from an Australian health service workplace

    OpenAIRE

    Weber, Danielle; Janson, Anneka; Nolan, Michelle; Wen, Li Ming; Rissel, Chris

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Women's return to work can be a significant barrier to continued breastfeeding. Workplace policies and practices to promote and support continued, and longer duration of, breastfeeding are important. In the context of the introduction of a new breastfeeding policy for Area Health Services in New South Wales, Australia, a baseline survey was conducted to describe current practices and examine women's reports of perceived organisational support on breastfeeding intention and...

  20. Women's preferences regarding infant or maternal antiretroviral prophylaxis for prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV during breastfeeding and their views on Option B+ in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngarina, Matilda; Tarimo, Edith A M; Naburi, Helga; Kilewo, Charles; Mwanyika-Sando, Mary; Chalamilla, Guerino; Biberfeld, Gunnel; Ekstrom, Anna Mia

    2014-01-01

    The WHO 2010 guidelines for prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) of HIV recommended prophylactic antiretroviral treatment (ART) either for infants (Option A) or mothers (Option B) during breastfeeding for pregnant women with a CD4 count of >350 cell/µL in low-income countries. In 2012, WHO proposed that all HIV-infected pregnant women should receive triple ART for life (B+) irrespective of CD4 count. Tanzania has recently switched from Option A to B+, with a few centers practicing B. However, more information on the real-life feasibility of these options is needed. This qualitative study explored women's preferences for Option A vs B and their views on Option B+ in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. We conducted four focus group discussions with a total of 27 pregnant women with unknown HIV status, attending reproductive and child health clinics, and 31 in-depth interviews among HIV-infected pregnant and post-delivery women, 17 of whom were also asked about B+. Most participants were in favor of Option B compared to A. The main reasons for choosing Option B were: HIV-associated stigma, fear of drug side-effects on infants and difficult logistics for postnatal drug adherence. Some of the women asked about B+ favored it as they agreed that they would eventually need ART for their own survival. Some were against B+ anticipating loss of motivation after protecting the child, fearing drug side-effects and not feeling ready to embark on lifelong medication. Some were undecided. Option B was preferred. Since Tanzania has recently adopted Option B+, women with CD4 counts of >350 cell/µL should be counseled about the possibility to "opt-out" from ART after cessation of breastfeeding. Drug safety and benefits, economic concerns and available resources for laboratory monitoring and evaluation should be addressed during B+ implementation to enhance long-term feasibility and effectiveness.

  1. Women's preferences regarding infant or maternal antiretroviral prophylaxis for prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV during breastfeeding and their views on Option B+ in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matilda Ngarina

    Full Text Available The WHO 2010 guidelines for prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT of HIV recommended prophylactic antiretroviral treatment (ART either for infants (Option A or mothers (Option B during breastfeeding for pregnant women with a CD4 count of >350 cell/µL in low-income countries. In 2012, WHO proposed that all HIV-infected pregnant women should receive triple ART for life (B+ irrespective of CD4 count. Tanzania has recently switched from Option A to B+, with a few centers practicing B. However, more information on the real-life feasibility of these options is needed. This qualitative study explored women's preferences for Option A vs B and their views on Option B+ in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.We conducted four focus group discussions with a total of 27 pregnant women with unknown HIV status, attending reproductive and child health clinics, and 31 in-depth interviews among HIV-infected pregnant and post-delivery women, 17 of whom were also asked about B+.Most participants were in favor of Option B compared to A. The main reasons for choosing Option B were: HIV-associated stigma, fear of drug side-effects on infants and difficult logistics for postnatal drug adherence. Some of the women asked about B+ favored it as they agreed that they would eventually need ART for their own survival. Some were against B+ anticipating loss of motivation after protecting the child, fearing drug side-effects and not feeling ready to embark on lifelong medication. Some were undecided.Option B was preferred. Since Tanzania has recently adopted Option B+, women with CD4 counts of >350 cell/µL should be counseled about the possibility to "opt-out" from ART after cessation of breastfeeding. Drug safety and benefits, economic concerns and available resources for laboratory monitoring and evaluation should be addressed during B+ implementation to enhance long-term feasibility and effectiveness.

  2. Determinants of Breastfeeding Practices and Success in a Multi-Ethnic Asian Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Wei Wei; Aris, Izzuddin M; Fok, Doris; Soh, Shu-E; Chua, Mei Chien; Lim, Sok Bee; Saw, Seang-Mei; Kwek, Kenneth; Gluckman, Peter D; Godfrey, Keith M; van Dam, Rob M; Kramer, Michael S; Chong, Yap-Seng

    2016-03-01

    Many countries in Asia report low breastfeeding rates and the risk factors for early weaning are not well studied. We assessed the prevalence, duration, and mode of breastfeeding (direct or expressed) among mothers of three Asian ethnic groups. Participants were 1,030 Singaporean women recruited during early pregnancy. Data collected included early breastfeeding experiences, breastfeeding duration, and mode of breastfeeding. Full breastfeeding was defined as the intake of breast milk, with or without water. Cox regression models were used to identify factors associated with discontinuation of any and full breastfeeding. Logistic regression analyses assessed the association of ethnicity with mode of breastfeeding. At 6 months postpartum, the prevalence of any breastfeeding was 46 percent for Chinese mothers, 22 percent for Malay mothers, and 41 percent for Indian mothers; prevalence of full breastfeeding was 11, 2, and 5 percent, respectively. More Chinese mothers fed their infants expressed breast milk, instead of directly breastfeeding them, compared with the other two ethnic groups. Duration of any and full breastfeeding were positively associated with breastfeeding a few hours after birth, higher maternal age and education, and negatively associated with irregular breastfeeding frequency and being shown how to breastfeed. Adjusting for maternal education, breastfeeding duration was similar in the three ethnic groups, but ethnicity remained a significant predictor of mode of breastfeeding. The low rates and duration of breastfeeding in this population may be improved with breastfeeding education and support, especially in mothers with lower education. Further work is needed to understand the cultural differences in mode of feeding and its implications for maternal and infant health. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Health Education to Strengthen Breastfeeding Actions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raul Rodrigues Cipriano Sousa

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Breast milk is, without a doubt, the food that provides all the nutrients essential for the healthy growth and development of children. Through effective breastfeeding practices, it is possible to prevent several chronic noncommunicable diseases in childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. Objective: To investigate the relevance of using an educational strategy in breastfeeding promotion. Methods: It was a descriptive study with uncontrolled analytical approach conducted with 36 mothers of children under 2 years of age about breastfeeding, through an educational intervention using the booklet “Breastfeeding: an act of love”. Data collection took place in two moments (pre-test and post-test. Ethics Committee approved the project under protocol No. 058657. Results: Data analysis revealed that 41.6% of the interviewees stated that they did not receive guidance about breast problems from any professional during prenatal care, and 22% reported having presented nipple fissures. Regarding the initiation of breastfeeding, 11.1% of the women interviewed did not knowthe importance of colostrum, and 30.6% did not know its benefits. Assessment of the mothers’ knowledge before and after the intervention obtained a percentage of correctness of 50.7% and 70%, respectively. Conclusion: The educational activity to encourage breastfeeding was able to increase the mothers’ knowledge about breastfeeding and its health benefits for women and children. It is imperative to carry out activities such as the one proposed in this study, which enables the prevention of several problems that directly affect the health of families, acting effectively to promote a solid knowledge for the population. Keywords: Breast Feeding. Child Health. Health Education. Infant Nutrition. Food and Nutrition Education.

  4. Does body image influence the relationship between body weight and breastfeeding maintenance in new mothers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Vivien; Keely, Alice; Denison, Fiona C

    2017-09-01

    Obese women have lower breastfeeding initiation and maintenance rates than healthy weight women. Research generally focuses on biomedical explanations for this. Psychosocial factors including body image and well-being after childbirth are less well understood as predictors of breastfeeding. In obese and healthy weight women, we investigated changes in body image between 72 hrs post-delivery and 6-8 weeks post-natal, studying how women's body image related to breastfeeding initiation and maintenance. We also investigated how psychological distress was related to body image. Longitudinal semi-structured questionnaire survey. Body image and psychological distress were assessed within 72 hrs of birth and by postal questionnaire at 6-8 weeks, for 70 obese and 70 healthy weight women initiating exclusive (breastmilk only) breastfeeding or mixed feeding (with formula milk) in hospital. Breastfeeding was re-assessed at 6-8 weeks. Obese women were less likely to exclusively breastfeed in hospital and maintain breastfeeding to 6-8 weeks. Better body image was related to maintaining breastfeeding and to lower post-natal psychological distress for all women, but education level was the most significant predictor of maintenance in multivariate regression including body image and weight status. Body image mediated, but did not moderate the relationship between weight and breastfeeding maintenance. Body image was lower overall in obese women, but all women had low body image satisfaction around childbirth, reducing further at 6-8 weeks. Health professionals should consider women's body image when discussing breastfeeding. A focus on breast function over form may support breastfeeding for all women. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject? Obesity can negatively affect breastfeeding initiation and maintenance, but there is little information about how psychosocial factors affect this relationship. Body image may be an important factor, but has not

  5. Impact of birth complications on breastfeeding duration: an internet survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Amy; Jordan, Sue

    2013-04-01

    To explore reasons underlying cessation of breastfeeding in mothers with uncomplicated vaginal deliveries and those experiencing complications during childbirth. Interventions during labour and childbirth can have a negative impact on breastfeeding. Explanations include adverse reactions to medication, delayed breastfeeding initiation, and disruption of the normal endocrinology of childbirth. However, reasons for breastfeeding cessation linked to birth experience have not been fully examined. Increasing breastfeeding duration and, consequently, improving infant and maternal health in the UK depend on understanding why women stop breastfeeding. An exploratory cross-sectional survey. Between January-May 2009, 284 mothers attending community groups in Swansea, Wales, and mothers participating in online parenting forums, who initiated breastfeeding but discontinued before 6 months postpartum, reported their birth experience, including complications and reasons for breastfeeding cessation in an internet survey. Mothers who experienced birth complications breastfed for a significantly shorter duration than those who did not. Specifically, caesarean deliveries, foetal distress, failure to progress, and postpartum haemorrhage were each associated with a shorter breastfeeding duration. Mothers who experienced complications were more likely to discontinue breastfeeding for reasons of pain and difficulty than mothers who did not experience complications, yet no difference was seen between groups for social reasons such as embarrassment or a lack of support. Certain complications during labour may increase risk of specific physical difficulties with breastfeeding, possibly due to their association with medications received. Maternity health professionals should be alert to this possibility to offer enhanced attention and care to overcome these issues and prolong breastfeeding duration. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Cultural factors and social support related to breastfeeding among immigrant mothers in Taipei City, Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tzu-Ling; Tai, Chen-Jei; Chu, Yu-Roo; Han, Kuo-Chiang; Lin, Kuan-Chia; Chien, Li-Yin

    2011-02-01

    The objectives of this study were to identify cultural factors (including acculturation and breastfeeding cultures in subjects' native countries and those in mainstream Taiwanese society) and social support related to breastfeeding among immigrant mothers in Taiwan. This study was a cross-sectional survey performed from October 2007 through January 2008. The study participants were 210 immigrant mothers living in Taipei City. The prevalence of exclusive and partial breastfeeding at 3 months postpartum was 59.0% and 14.3%, respectively. Logistic regression analysis revealed that breastfeeding experience among mothers-in-law and the perceived level of acceptance of breastfeeding in Taiwan were positively associated with breastfeeding at 3 months postpartum. Immigrant women with a higher level of household activity support were less likely to breastfeed. Immigrant mothers in Taiwan usually come from cultures with a higher acceptance level for breastfeeding; however, their breastfeeding practices are more likely to be influenced by the mainstream culture in Taiwan.

  7. In which regions is breast-feeding safer from the impact of toxic elements from the environment?

    OpenAIRE

    Cinar, Nursan; Ozdemir, Sami; Yucel, Oya; Ucar, Fatma

    2011-01-01

    Owing to its unique nutritional and immunological characteristics, breast milk is the most important food source for infants. But, children are at greater risk for exposure to environmental toxicants from breast milk. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of environmental pollution on essential and toxic element contents of breast milk and determine the risky locations in our population. This study was conducted on women who were breastfeeding (n=90). Milk samples were collected...

  8. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of-a-kind bond that breastfeeding brings. Staying healthy and eating well YouTube embed video: https://www.youtube-nocookie. ... https://www.youtube-nocookie.com/embed/kYQhoQ4umgg Healthy eating can keep you strong while breastfeeding. Learn more ...

  9. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... health topics Printables and Shareables Autoimmune Diseases Breastfeeding Cancer Fitness and Nutrition Heart Disease and Stroke HIV and AIDS Mental ... Shareables Browse by health topic Autoimmune Diseases Breastfeeding Cancer Fitness and Nutrition Heart Disease and Stroke HIV and AIDS Mental ...

  10. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is the best time to learn about the benefits of breastfeeding and make plans to give your baby a healthy start in life. Expand the sections below to watch videos about breastfeeding and ... href="https://www.youtube-nocookie.com/embed/ge-2Cn-LRAE">https://www.youtube- ...

  11. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a.m. — 6 p.m. ET, Monday — Friday Search Menu En Español Search Menu CHANGE Top Menu Health and Wellness Getting ... do while breastfeeding My breastfeeding story Partner resources Search En Español Call the OWH HELPLINE: 800-994- ...

  12. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Find out what worked for other breastfeeding moms. What breastfeeding means to me YouTube embed video: < ... EMOCGmf3UVk</a> Moms share what’s behind the one-of-a-kind bond that ...

  13. Common Breastfeeding Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or duplicated without permission of the Office on Women’s Health in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Citation of the source is appreciated. Page last updated: March 02, 2018. Common breastfeeding challenges Breastfeeding can be ...

  14. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Popular Topics Autoimmune diseases Breastfeeding Carpal tunnel syndrome Depression HIV and AIDS Menstruation Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) Pregnancy Thyroid disease All A-Z health topics Find Help Get breastfeeding help Get health care Get health insurance Get help with family planning ...

  15. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... kind bond that breastfeeding brings. Staying healthy and eating well YouTube embed video: https://www.youtube-nocookie. ... www.youtube-nocookie.com/embed/kYQhoQ4umgg Healthy eating can keep you strong while breastfeeding. Learn more ...

  16. Buddhism and breastfeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segawa, Masashi

    2008-06-01

    Buddhism is an ancient religion that began in India and spread throughout Asia. It is prevalent in modern Japan. Breastfeeding has been a strong practice for centuries with the custom being to continue until the child is 6 or 7 years of age. The Edo period was very influential in establishing breastfeeding customs that continue today.

  17. Employer-Based Programs to Support Breastfeeding Among Working Mothers: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinour, Lauren M; Szaro, Jacalyn M

    2017-04-01

    Many mothers experience barriers to maintaining a breastfeeding relationship with their infants upon returning to work and, consequently, terminate breastfeeding earlier than recommended or intended. As such, employers are in a unique position to help further increase breastfeeding rates, durations, and exclusivity. The purpose of this review is to examine the literature regarding employer-based programs, policies, and interventions to support breastfeeding among working mothers. A systematic literature search was conducted for peer-reviewed articles published before April 2016. Studies were included if they focused on workplace-based lactation/breastfeeding support programs, policies, or interventions to promote breastfeeding among employees. For inclusion, articles must have measured at least one outcome, such as breastfeeding duration, breastfeeding exclusivity, or employee satisfaction. Twenty-two articles were included, representing 10 different countries and both public- and private-sector employers, including governmental offices, schools, hospitals, manufacturing/industrial companies, and financial settings, among others. Providing a lactation space was the most common employer-based support accommodation studied, followed by breastfeeding breaks and comprehensive lactation support programs. The majority of studies analyzing these three support types found at least one positive breastfeeding and/or nonbreastfeeding outcome. This review suggests that maintaining breastfeeding while working is not only possible but also more likely when employers provide the supports that women need to do so. Although some employers may have more extensive breastfeeding support policies and practices than others, all employers can implement a breastfeeding support program that fits their company's budget and resources.

  18. Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice of Breastfeeding Among Working Mothers in South Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altamimi, Eyad; Al Nsour, Reem; Al Dalaen, Duaa; Almajali, Neyaf

    2017-05-01

    Breast milk is the ideal food for human infants, with benefits to mothers and babies. However, working mothers are more likely to choose not to breastfeed or to interrupt breastfeeding prematurely. This study assessed breastfeeding knowledge and attitudes among working mothers in South Jordan. Four hundred cross-sectional, self-administered Arabic surveys were distributed to working mothers at their workplaces. In addition to measuring mothers' knowledge of and attitudes toward breastfeeding, barriers that prevented continuing breastfeeding beyond 6 months were also explored. Three hundred forty-four (80%) completed questionnaires were returned. The breastfeeding initiation rate was 72.4%, but only 20.9% were exclusively breastfeeding by 6 months. The participants showed satisfactory knowledge about breastfeeding and had positive attitudes toward breastfeeding. Most of the women who initiated breastfeeding reported ending breastfeeding prematurely. Approximately 30% of the mothers attributed premature cessation of breastfeeding to work. The results of this study could be useful for health care providers and policy makers when planning effective breastfeeding promotion programs and creating breastfeeding-friendly workplaces.

  19. The Impact of the Professional Qualifications of the Prenatal Care Provider on Breastfeeding Duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallenborn, Jordyn T; Lu, Juan; Perera, Robert A; Wheeler, David C; Masho, Saba W

    2018-03-01

    A prenatal commitment to breastfeed is a strong predictor for breastfeeding success. Prenatal care providers have the opportunity to educate and promote breastfeeding. However, differences in education and training between healthcare providers such as physicians and midwives may result in differing breastfeeding outcomes. This study explores whether breastfeeding initiation and duration differ by prenatal care provider. Longitudinal data from the Infant Feeding Practices Survey II were analyzed (N = 2,832 women). Prenatal care providers were categorized as obstetrician, family/other physician, and midwife/nurse-midwife. Breastfeeding initiation was dichotomized (yes; no). Breastfeeding duration and exclusive breastfeeding duration were reported in weeks. Logistic regression was used to investigate the relationship between prenatal care provider and breastfeeding initiation. Cox proportional hazard models provided crude and adjusted hazard ratios and 95% confidence limits to determine the relationship between type of prenatal care provider and breastfeeding duration. After adjusting for confounders, women who received care from a midwife were 68% less likely to never breastfed than women whose prenatal care was provided by an obstetrician. Women whose prenatal care was provided by a midwife had 14% lower risk of discontinuing breastfeeding and 23% lower risk of discontinuing exclusive breastfeeding. No significant association was found between women whose prenatal care was provided by a family physician or other type of physician and breastfeeding initiation and duration. Findings highlight the importance of prenatal care providers on breastfeeding duration. Future studies should examine factors (i.e., training, patient-provider interaction) that contribute to differences in breastfeeding outcomes by type of prenatal care provider.

  20. Cultural Parallax and Content Analysis: Images of Black Women in High School History Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woyshner, Christine; Schocker, Jessica B.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the representation of Black women in high school history textbooks. To examine the extent to which Black women are represented visually and to explore how they are portrayed, the authors use a mixed-methods approach that draws on analytical techniques in content analysis and from visual culture studies. Their findings…

  1. A Content Analytic Technique for Measuring the Sexiness of Women's Business Attire in Media Presentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Sylvia E.

    1995-01-01

    Describes development of an objective content analytic category scheme for measuring the sexiness of women's business attire in media presentations. Finds women's business attire in television soap operas significantly more provocative than real-world attire. Finds a significant positive correlation between the degree of sexiness as measured by…

  2. Reliability and Validity of a Turkish version of the Prenatal Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Ayse; Pasinlioglu, Turkan

    2018-05-18

    This study aims to conduct reliability and validity study of the Turkish version of the "Prenatal Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale", which determines pregnant women's perception of breastfeeding self-efficacy in the prenatal period. This methodological research was carried out between December 2014 and May 2016 in maternity clinics of the Erzurum Nene Hatun Maternity Hospital and Atatürk University Research Hospital. The study population consisted of pregnant women, admitted to the specified clinics for prenatal controls. The study was carried out with 326 pregnant women, who met the inclusion criteria and agreed to participate in the research without any sample selection. "Personal Information Form" and "Prenatal Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale - Turkish Form" were used for data collection. The data were collected by the face-to-face interview method, and analyzed by SPSS 18 software. In the validity-reliability analysis of the scale, language and content validity, explanatory factor analysis, Cronbach's Alpha coefficient, item-total score correlation, and testretest methods were used. Linguistic validity was verified by the translation-backtranslation of the Prenatal Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale, then the necessary corrections were made according to the recommendations of the expert opinions, to ensure the content validity. As a result of the explanatory factor analysis, performed to determine the construct validity of the scale, a single factor structure was found, having factor loadings in the appropriate range (0.30-0.76). In the internal consistency analysis of the scale, Cronbach's Alpha was 0.86, and the item-total score correlations were between 0.23 and 0.65, and no item was removed from the scale. In order to test the time-invariance of the scale, the test-retest correlation value was found to be 0.94. The relationship between the two applications were determined to be statistically significant (p valid and reliable measurement instrument

  3. Bone mineral content of the forearm in healthy Dutch women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barentsen, R.; Raymakers, J.A.; Landman, J.O.; Duursma, S.A.

    1988-01-01

    Single energy photon absorptiometry is a reliable technique for assessing the bone mineral content (BMC) of cortical bone in the forearm. It can also be used for BMC measurement in the ultradistal part of the forearm, where there is a considerable proportion of trabecular bone. The results of a BMC

  4. Interventions for promoting the initiation of breastfeeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Dyson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite the widely documented health advantages of breastfeeding over formula feeding, initiation rates remain relatively low in many high-income countries, particularly among women in lower income groups. OBJECTIVE : To evaluate the effectiveness of interventions which aim to encourage women to breastfeed in terms of changes in the number of women who start to breastfeed. METHODS : Search methods: We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (July 2007, handsearched the Journal of Human Lactation, Health Promotion International and Health Education Quarterly from inception to 15 August 2007, and scanned reference lists of all articles obtained. Selection criteria: Randomized controlled trials, with or without blinding, of any breastfeeding promotion intervention in any population group except women and infants with a specific health problem. Data collection and analysis: One review author independently extracted data and assessed trial quality, checked by a second author. We contacted investigators to obtain missing information. MAIN RESULTS: Main results: Eleven trials were included. Statistical analyses were conducted on data from eight trials (1553 women. Five studies (582 women on low incomes in the USA with typically low breastfeeding rates showed breastfeeding education had a significant effect on increasing initiation rates compared to standard care (risk ratio (RR 1.57, 95% confidence interval (CI 1.15 to 2.15, P = 0.005. Subgroup analyses showed that one-to-one, needs-based, informal repeat education sessions and generic, formal antenatal education sessions are effective in terms of an increase in breastfeeding rates among women on low incomes regardless of ethnicity and feeding intention. Needs-based, informal peer support in the antenatal and postnatal periods was also shown to be effective in one study conducted among Latina women who were considering breastfeeding in the USA (RR 4.02, 95% CI

  5. Development and evaluation of a self care program on breastfeeding in Japan: A quasi-experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awano Masayo

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the importance of breastfeeding is well known in Japan, in recent years less than 50% of mothers were fully breastfeeding at one month after birth. The purpose of this study was to develop a self-care program for breastfeeding aimed at increasing mothers' breastfeeding confidence and to evaluate its effectiveness. Methods A quasi-experimental pretest-posttest design was conducted in Japan. The intervention, a breastfeeding self-care program, was created to improve mothers' self-efficacy for breastfeeding. This Breastfeeding Self-Care Program included: information on the advantages and basics of breastfeeding, a breastfeeding checklist to evaluate breastfeeding by mothers and midwives, and a pamphlet and audiovisual materials on breastfeeding. Mothers received this program during their postpartum hospital stay. A convenience sample of 117 primiparous women was recruited at two clinical sites from October 2007 to March 2008. The intervention group (n = 55, who gave birth in three odd-numbered months, received standard care and the Breastfeeding Self-Care Program while the control group (n = 62 gave birth in three even numbered months and received standard breastfeeding care. To evaluate the effectiveness of the Breastfeeding Self-Care Program, breastfeeding self-efficacy and breastfeeding rate were measured early postpartum, before the intervention, and after the intervention at one month postpartum. The study used the Japanese version of The Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale Short Form (BSES-SF to measure self-efficacy. Results The BSES-SF score of the intervention group rose significantly from 34.8 at early postpartum to 49.9 at one month after birth (p Conclusion Results indicate that the Breastfeeding Self-Care Program increased mothers' self-efficacy for breastfeeding and had a positive effect on the continuation of breastfeeding. Trial Registration Number UMIN000003517

  6. Teenage pregnancy and exclusive breastfeeding rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puapompong, Pawin; Raungrongmorakot, Kasem; Manolerdtewan, Wichian; Ketsuwan, Sukwadee; Wongin, Sinutchanan

    2014-09-01

    Teenage pregnancy is an important health issue globally and in Thailand Younger age mothers decide on the breastfeeding practices ofthe first 6-month. To find the rates of 6-month exclusive breastfeeding practices of teenage mothers and compare them with the rates of 6-month exclusive breastfeeding practices in mothers who are 20 years of age or more. Three thousand five hundred sixty three normal, postpartum women, who delivered without complications at the HRH Princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn Medical Center in the Nakhon Nayok Province between 2010 and2013 were included in this study. At the second daypostpartum, the data of latch scores and the data of the practice of exclusive breastfeeding were collected Telephone follow-ups on the seventh, fourteenth, and forty-fifth postpartum days and at the second, fourth, and sixth month postpartum month were collected and used for exclusive breastfeeding data following discharge. Demographic data included the maternal age, parity, gestational age, marital status, occupation, religion, route ofdelivery, estimated blood loss, body mass index, nipple length, and the childs birth weight. The collected data was analyzed by the t-test, Chi-square, and odds ratio with 95% confidence interval. The percentage of teenage pregnancies was at 14.8% (527 cases). On postpartum day 2, the percentage of latch scores of 8 or less was 66.4%. At the seventh, fourteenth, and forty-fifth day and at the second, fourth, and sixth months postpartum, the exclusive breastfeeding rates were 88.5, 78.5, 57.6, 43.1, 32.9, and27.0%, respectively. Comparison of the 6-month exclusive breastfeeding rates between teenage mothers and mothers 20 years ofage or older were not statistically significant (pteenage mothers was at 27.0% and had no significant differences from the rates of mothers 20 years of age or more.

  7. Determinants of breastfeeding initiation and cessation among employed mothers: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagher, Rada K; McGovern, Patricia M; Schold, Jesse D; Randall, Xian J

    2016-07-29

    The U.S. continues to have one of the lowest breastfeeding rates in the industrialized world. Studies have shown that full-time employment and early return to work decreased breastfeeding duration, but little is known about the relationship between leave policies and breastfeeding initiation and cessation. This study aimed to identify workplace-related barriers and facilitators associated with breastfeeding initiation and cessation in the first 6 months postpartum. A prospective cohort study design was utilized to recruit 817 Minnesota women aged 18 and older while hospitalized for childbirth. Selection criteria included English-speaking, employed mothers with a healthy, singleton birth. These women were followed up using telephone interviews at 6 weeks, 12 weeks, and 6 months after childbirth. The main study outcomes were breastfeeding initiation, measured during hospital enrollment, and breastfeeding cessation by 6 months postpartum. Women were 30 years old; 86 % were White, and 73 % were married. Breastfeeding rates were 81 % at childbirth, 67 % at 6 weeks, 49 % at 12 weeks, and 33 % at 6 months postpartum. Logistic regression revealed the odds of breastfeeding initiation were higher for women who: held professional jobs, were primiparae, had graduate degree, did not smoke prenatally, had no breastfeeding problems, and had family or friends who breastfeed. Survival analyses showed the hazard for breastfeeding cessation by 6 months was: higher for women who returned to work at any time during the 6 months postpartum versus those who did not return, lower for professional workers, higher among single than married women, higher for every educational category compared to graduate school, and higher for those with no family or friends who breastfeed. While employer paid leave policy did not affect breastfeeding initiation or cessation, women who took shorter leaves were more likely to stop breastfeeding in the first 6 months postpartum. Future research should examine

  8. Strengthening the human rights framework to protect breastfeeding: a focus on CEDAW

    OpenAIRE

    Galtry, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Background There have been recent calls for increased recognition of breastfeeding as a human right. The United Nations Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women, 1979 (CEDAW) is the core human rights treaty on women. CEDAW?s approach to breastfeeding is considered from an historical perspective. A comparison is drawn with breastfeeding protection previously outlined in the International Labour Organization?s Maternity Protection Convention, 1919 (ILO C3), and...

  9. From bioactive substances to research on breast-feeding promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, A L; Guerrero, M L

    2001-01-01

    Despite known health benefits, exclusive breast-feeding for at least 4 months is uncommon in many countries. In Mexico, most mothers initiate breast-feeding but few breast-feed exclusively. The objective was to examine the effectiveness of home visits by lay peer counselors to increase exclusive breast-feeding among mothers in a periurban area of Mexico. An ethnographic assessment conducted in 1994 that identified key maternal beliefs, practices, and needs was used to guide educational strategies. Lay counselors were recruited from the same community and trained by La Leche League. From March 1995 through September 1996, pregnant women were identified by community census and invited to participate. Women were enrolled into a randomized, controlled study of 3 groups: no intervention (control), 3 visits, and 6 visits during pregnancy and early postpartum. Data collection was performed by a social worker apart from the counselors. Exclusive breast-feeding was defined by WHO criteria. The study enrolled 130 women; 52 were in the 3-visit group, 44 in the 6-visit group, and 34 in the control group. Study groups did not differ in the maternal characteristics or initiation of breast-feeding (96%). At 3 months postpartum, exclusive breast-feeding was practiced by only 12% of controls vs. 52% in the 3-visit group and 67% in the 6-visit group (P exclusive breast-feeding and a significant reduction in infant illness in an urban community through well-designed maternal support including early intervention and repeated contact.

  10. Breastfeeding: an emotional instinct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz Meneses, Gonzalo

    2013-04-01

    The proposed objective of this research is twofold: (1) it examines the significance of emotions to the breastfeeding experience in relation to cognition, and (2) it analyzes the extent to which emotions and cognition are connected to breastfeeding. An empirical research work has been carried out based on a questionnaire that was administered in a maternity hospital in the autumn of 2008, in order to gather information regarding cognitive and emotional aspects of breastfeeding behavior. The final sample comprised 311 breastfeeding mothers, and the sampling error was 5.55%. The research shows that breastfeeding is not only more of an emotional reaction than a rational decision, but also demonstrates that the emotional development of breastfeeding is independent from the cognitive process. A new approach in the literature of breastfeeding is put forward in which the predominant cognitive techniques and theories are complemented by highlighting the importance of understanding the target group and implementing suitable and affective actions. Specific practical implications are provided for social marketing campaigns as well as future lines of research.

  11. Breastfeeding considerations of opioid dependent mothers and infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Tara C

    2012-01-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has a long-standing recommendation against breastfeeding if the maternal methadone dose is above 20 mg/day. In 2001, the AAP lifted the dose restriction of maternal methadone allowing methadone-maintained mothers to breastfeed. The allowance of breastfeeding among mothers taking methadone has been met with opposition due to the uncertainty that exists related to methadone exposure of the suckling infant. Methadone-maintained mothers are at higher risk for abuse, concomitant psychiatric disorders, limited access to healthcare, and financial hardship. Breastfeeding rates among methadone-maintained women tend to be low compared to the national average. This manuscript will discuss the implications for healthcare practitioners caring for methadone-maintained mothers and infants and associated risks and benefits of breastfeeding. This population of mothers and infants stands to obtain particular benefits from the various well-known advantages of breastfeeding.

  12. Breastfeeding: guidance received in prenatal care, delivery and postpartum care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayara Caroline Barbieri

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to analyze the guidelines considering breastfeeding given by health professionals to women during prenatal care, delivery and postpartum care. Quantitative and descriptive work developed at Regional Pinheiros, Maringá-PR, from the registry in SisPreNatal, from May to August 2009. Data were collected through interviews conducted with parents at home, using a structured instrument. Participants were 36 mothers, most of whom received counseling for breastfeeding during prenatal (58.3%, maternity (87.6% and in nursing visits to newborn (84.6%. The prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding was 37.5%, even with the end of maternity leave. The rate is still below the recommended by the World Health Organization for exclusive breastfeeding. The present results may contribute to the monitoring of health actions and development of new strategies in the maintenance of exclusive breastfeeding.

  13. Can a text message a week improve breastfeeding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, Danielle; Russell-Bennett, Rebekah; Previte, Josephine; Parkinson, Joy

    2014-11-06

    Breastfeeding is recognised as the optimal method for feeding infants with health gains made by reducing infectious diseases in infancy; and chronic diseases, including obesity, in childhood, adolescence and adulthood. Despite this, exclusivity and duration in developed countries remains resistant to improvement. The objectives of this research were to test if an automated mobile phone text messaging intervention, delivering one text message a week, could increase "any" breastfeeding rates and improve breastfeeding self-efficacy and coping. Women were eligible to participate if they were: over eighteen years; had an infant less than three months old; were currently breastfeeding; no diagnosed mental illness; and used a mobile phone. Women in the intervention group received MumBubConnect, a text messaging service with automated responses delivered once a week for 8 weeks. Women in the comparison group received their usual care and were sampled two years after the intervention group. Data collection included online surveys at two time points, week zero and week nine, to measure breastfeeding exclusivity and duration, coping, emotions, accountability and self-efficacy. A range of statistical analyses were used to test for differences between groups. Hierarchical regression was used to investigate change in breastfeeding outcome, between groups, adjusting for co-variates. The intervention group had 120 participants at commencement and 114 at completion, the comparison group had 114 participants at commencement and 86 at completion. MumBubConnect had a positive impact on the primary outcome of breastfeeding behaviors with women receiving the intervention more likely to continue exclusive breastfeeding; with a 6% decrease in exclusive breastfeeding in the intervention group, compared to a 14% decrease in the comparison group (p issues. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12614001091695.

  14. Breastfeeding, Childhood Asthma, and Allergic Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oddy, Wendy H

    2017-01-01

    The worldwide prevalence of childhood asthma has been increasing considerably, and the protection afforded by breastfeeding in its development has been the subject of controversy for more than 80 years. Previous systematic reviews have generally found a protective effect of breastfeeding on allergic outcomes, although many studies have methodological limitations. Although breastfeeding is protective against lower respiratory tract infection during infancy, such protection has not been demonstrated for asthma in all studies. Breastfeeding has health benefits for the mother and child. Exclusive breastfeeding for the first 6 months of an infant's life, with continued breastfeeding for up to 2 years or longer, is recognized as the "gold" standard for infant feeding because human milk is uniquely suited to the human infant, and its nutritional content and bioactivity promote a healthy development. There is increasing concern that the practice of delaying complementary foods until 6 months may exacerbate the risk of allergic disease. Breast milk contains immunological components that protect against infections and allergic disease in infancy. The composition of human breast milk is complex, containing factors that interact with the infant immune system and intestinal milieu including allergens, cytokines, immunoglobulins, polyunsaturated fatty acids, and chemokines. Transforming growth factor β is a cytokine in human milk involved in maintaining intestinal homeostasis, inflammation regulation, and oral tolerance development. Modern day society, with increased standards of hygiene, has changed the gut flora of Western infants, potentially impacting the risk of developing immune-mediated diseases including allergic disease and asthma. Microbial diversity is intrinsic to healthy immune maturation and function. Compared to breastfed infants, formula-fed infants had lower bacterial diversity and an altered intestinal microbiota in the first few weeks of life associated with

  15. Body Shape and Weight Loss as Motivators for Breastfeeding Initiation and Continuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalla, Sophie C; Witcomb, Gemma L; Haycraft, Emma

    2017-07-11

    Breastfeeding rates in the UK are low. Efforts to promote breastfeeding typically include the known health benefits for mother and child, many of which are not immediate. Gaining immediate benefits can be effective motivators of behaviour. Body-related changes resulting from breastfeeding could be an immediate benefit. This study explored breastfeeding mothers' reports of body-related changes as benefits of breastfeeding. Mothers (N = 182) who currently, or had recently, breastfed an infant completed a survey detailing their infant feeding choices and the perceived benefits of breastfeeding on their bodies. Half of the mothers felt that breastfeeding had a positive effect on their body. Benefits were grouped into five themes: (1) Returning to pre-pregnancy body shape; (2) Health benefits; (3) Physical benefits; (4) Eating benefits; (5) Psychological benefits. These themes highlight the numerous body-related benefits that mothers identified as resulting from breastfeeding and suggest that immediate, personal, and appearance-related gains of breastfeeding are highly valued. These findings indicate that interventions would likely benefit from emphasising the more immediate physical and psychological benefits of breastfeeding, alongside the health and bonding benefits, as a way to promote breastfeeding initiation and continuation in more women. This may be particularly effective for groups such as young mothers, where breastfeeding rates are low and whose emphasis on body image may be greater.

  16. Body Shape and Weight Loss as Motivators for Breastfeeding Initiation and Continuation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie C. Schalla

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Breastfeeding rates in the UK are low. Efforts to promote breastfeeding typically include the known health benefits for mother and child, many of which are not immediate. Gaining immediate benefits can be effective motivators of behaviour. Body-related changes resulting from breastfeeding could be an immediate benefit. This study explored breastfeeding mothers’ reports of body-related changes as benefits of breastfeeding. Mothers (N = 182 who currently, or had recently, breastfed an infant completed a survey detailing their infant feeding choices and the perceived benefits of breastfeeding on their bodies. Half of the mothers felt that breastfeeding had a positive effect on their body. Benefits were grouped into five themes: (1 Returning to pre-pregnancy body shape; (2 Health benefits; (3 Physical benefits; (4 Eating benefits; (5 Psychological benefits. These themes highlight the numerous body-related benefits that mothers identified as resulting from breastfeeding and suggest that immediate, personal, and appearance-related gains of breastfeeding are highly valued. These findings indicate that interventions would likely benefit from emphasising the more immediate physical and psychological benefits of breastfeeding, alongside the health and bonding benefits, as a way to promote breastfeeding initiation and continuation in more women. This may be particularly effective for groups such as young mothers, where breastfeeding rates are low and whose emphasis on body image may be greater.

  17. Breastfeeding trends and updated national health objectives for exclusive breastfeeding--United States, birth years 2000-2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-03

    Breastfeeding is associated with decreased risk for many early-life diseases and conditions, including otitis media, respiratory tract infections, atopic dermatitis, gastroenteritis, type 2 diabetes, sudden infant death syndrome, and obesity. Breastfeeding also is associated with health benefits to women, including decreased risk for type 2 diabetes, ovarian cancer, and breast cancer. Exclusive breastfeeding is defined as an infant receiving only breast milk and no other liquids or solids except for drops or syrups consisting of vitamins, minerals, or medicines. In 2007, Healthy People 2010 (HP2010) objectives for breastfeeding initiation and duration were updated to include two new objectives on exclusive breastfeeding (i.e., to increase the proportion of mothers who exclusively breastfeed their infants through age 3 months to 60% and through age 6 months to 25% [objectives 16-19d and 16-19e]). To monitor progress toward achieving HP2010 breastfeeding objectives, CDC analyzed data from the National Immunization Survey (NIS). This report describes the results of that analysis, which indicated that rates for breastfeeding initiation and duration increased among infants born during 2000-2004. Rates for exclusive breastfeeding through ages 3 months and 6 months among infants born in 2004 were 30.5% and 11.3%, respectively, below targets set by HP2010. Rates of exclusive breastfeeding were significantly lower among black infants (compared with white infants) and infants born to unmarried mothers (compared with married mothers). Additionally, older age, urban residence, higher education, and higher income of mothers all were positively associated with exclusive breastfeeding. Further research is needed to identify successful programs and policies to support exclusive breastfeeding, especially among subgroups with the lowest rates.

  18. The impact of immigration on the breastfeeding practices of Mainland Chinese immigrants in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lok, Kris Yuet Wan; Bai, Dorothy Li; Chan, Noel P T; Wong, Janet Y H; Tarrant, Marie

    2018-03-01

    Researchers have found breastfeeding disparities between immigrant and native-born women in many countries. However, most studies on immigration and breastfeeding practices have been in Western countries. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of length of time since immigration on the breastfeeding practices of Mainland Chinese immigrants living in Hong Kong. We recruited 2704 mother-infant pairs from the postnatal wards of four public hospitals in Hong Kong. We examined the effect of migration status on the duration of any and exclusive breastfeeding. Breastfeeding duration was progressively shorter as the time since immigration increased. When compared with mothers who had lived in Hong Kong for Hong Kong-born participants had a 30% higher risk of stopping any breastfeeding (hazard ratio [HR] 1.34 [95% confidence interval {CI} 1.10-1.63]) and exclusive breastfeeding (HR 1.33 [95% CI 1.11-1.58]). In both Hong Kong-born and immigrant participants, breastfeeding cessation was associated with return to work postpartum and the husband's preference for infant formula or mixed feeding. Intention to exclusively breastfeed and to breastfeed for >6 months, and previous breastfeeding experience substantially reduced the risk of breastfeeding cessation for both Hong Kong-born and immigrant participants. Health care professionals should consider immigration history in their assessment of pregnant women and provide culturally adapted breastfeeding support and encouragement to this population. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Female employees' perceptions of organisational support for breastfeeding at work: findings from an Australian health service workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Danielle; Janson, Anneka; Nolan, Michelle; Wen, Li Ming; Rissel, Chris

    2011-11-30

    Women's return to work can be a significant barrier to continued breastfeeding. Workplace policies and practices to promote and support continued, and longer duration of, breastfeeding are important. In the context of the introduction of a new breastfeeding policy for Area Health Services in New South Wales, Australia, a baseline survey was conducted to describe current practices and examine women's reports of perceived organisational support on breastfeeding intention and practice. A cross sectional survey of female employees of the Sydney South West Area Health Service was conducted in late 2009. A mailed questionnaire was sent to 998 eligible participants who had taken maternity leave over the 20-month period from January 2008 to August 2009. The questionnaire collected items assessing breastfeeding intentions, awareness of workplace policies, and the level of organisational and social support available. For those women who had returned to work, further questions were asked to assess the perceptions and practices of breastfeeding in the work environment, as well as barriers and enabling factors to combining breastfeeding and work. Returning to work was one of the main reasons women ceased breastfeeding, with 60 percent of women intending to breastfeed when they returned to work, but only 40 percent doing so. Support to combine breastfeeding and work came mainly from family and partners (74% and 83% respectively), with little perceived support from the organisation (13%) and human resources (6%). Most women (92%) had received no information from their managers about their breastfeeding options upon their return to work, and few had access to a room specially designated for breastfeeding (19%). Flexible work options and lactation breaks, as well as access to a private room, were identified as the main factors that facilitate breastfeeding at work. Enabling women to continue breastfeeding at work has benefits for the infant, employee and organisation. However, this

  20. Female employees' perceptions of organisational support for breastfeeding at work: findings from an Australian health service workplace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weber Danielle

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Women's return to work can be a significant barrier to continued breastfeeding. Workplace policies and practices to promote and support continued, and longer duration of, breastfeeding are important. In the context of the introduction of a new breastfeeding policy for Area Health Services in New South Wales, Australia, a baseline survey was conducted to describe current practices and examine women's reports of perceived organisational support on breastfeeding intention and practice. Methods A cross sectional survey of female employees of the Sydney South West Area Health Service was conducted in late 2009. A mailed questionnaire was sent to 998 eligible participants who had taken maternity leave over the 20-month period from January 2008 to August 2009. The questionnaire collected items assessing breastfeeding intentions, awareness of workplace policies, and the level of organisational and social support available. For those women who had returned to work, further questions were asked to assess the perceptions and practices of breastfeeding in the work environment, as well as barriers and enabling factors to combining breastfeeding and work. Results Returning to work was one of the main reasons women ceased breastfeeding, with 60 percent of women intending to breastfeed when they returned to work, but only 40 percent doing so. Support to combine breastfeeding and work came mainly from family and partners (74% and 83% respectively, with little perceived support from the organisation (13% and human resources (6%. Most women (92% had received no information from their managers about their breastfeeding options upon their return to work, and few had access to a room specially designated for breastfeeding (19%. Flexible work options and lactation breaks, as well as access to a private room, were identified as the main factors that facilitate breastfeeding at work. Conclusions Enabling women to continue breastfeeding at work has

  1. Access to Workplace Accommodations to Support Breastfeeding after Passage of the Affordable Care Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozhimannil, Katy B; Jou, Judy; Gjerdingen, Dwenda K; McGovern, Patricia M

    2016-01-01

    This study examines access to workplace accommodations for breastfeeding, as mandated by the Affordable Care Act, and its associations with breastfeeding initiation and duration. We hypothesize that women with access to reasonable break time and private space to express breast milk would be more likely to breastfeed exclusively at 6 months and to continue breastfeeding for a longer duration. Data are from Listening to Mothers III, a national survey of women ages 18 to 45 who gave birth in 2011 and 2012. The study population included women who were employed full or part time at the time of survey. Using two-way tabulation, logistic regression, and survival analysis, we characterized women with access to breastfeeding accommodations and assessed the associations between these accommodations and breastfeeding outcomes. Only 40% of women had access to both break time and private space. Women with both adequate break time and private space were 2.3 times (95% CI, 1.03-4.95) as likely to be breastfeeding exclusively at 6 months and 1.5 times (95% CI, 1.08-2.06) as likely to continue breastfeeding exclusively with each passing month compared with women without access to these accommodations. Employed women face unique barriers to breastfeeding and have lower rates of breastfeeding initiation and shorter durations, despite compelling evidence of associated health benefits. Expanded access to workplace accommodations for breastfeeding will likely entail collaborative efforts between public health agencies, employers, insurers, and clinicians to ensure effective workplace policies and improved breastfeeding outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. When Breast Milk Alone Is Not Enough: Barriers to Breastfeeding Continuation among Overweight and Obese Mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kair, Laura R; Colaizy, Tarah T

    2016-05-01

    Maternal overweight and obesity are associated with decreased breastfeeding duration. This study aimed to identify barriers to breastfeeding continuation among overweight and obese mothers. A retrospective cohort study examining breastfeeding continuation barriers was conducted using results of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System survey from Illinois, Maine, and Vermont from 2004 to 2008. SAS Complex Survey version 9.3 was used for analysis. Of 19,145 mothers surveyed, 3717 (19%) were obese and 4367 (23%) were overweight. Overall, 14,731 women initiated breastfeeding, and 6467 discontinued breastfeeding prior to survey completion, around 4 months postpartum. The most common reasons that mothers reported for discontinuing breastfeeding were insufficient milk supply, infant not satisfied with breast milk alone, and breastfeeding difficulty. Overweight and obese women, compared with women of normal weight, had higher odds of discontinuing breastfeeding because their babies were not satisfied by breast milk alone (overweight: odds ratio [OR] = 1.39, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.16-1.68; obese: OR = 1.26, 95% CI, 1.03-1.54). Obese mothers, compared with normal weight mothers, had lower odds of discontinuing breastfeeding because it felt like the right time (OR = 0.64, 95% CI, 0.47-0.88) and higher odds of discontinuing due to breastfeeding difficulties (OR = 1.29, 95% CI, 1.05-1.58) and infant jaundice (OR = 1.81, 95% CI, 1.26-2.60). Obese and overweight mothers were significantly more likely to discontinue breastfeeding due to infant dissatisfaction with breast milk alone. Obese mothers had higher odds than normal weight mothers of discontinuing breastfeeding due to breastfeeding difficulties and infant jaundice. Breastfeeding education and support should be enhanced for this at-risk population. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Benefits of breastfeeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Breast cancer or other cancer Breast infection or breast abscess Poor milk supply (uncommon) Previous surgery or radiation treatment Breastfeeding is not recommended for mothers who have: Active ... tuberculosis Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection ...

  4. Initial management of breastfeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinusas, K; Gagliardi, A

    2001-09-15

    Breast milk is widely accepted as the ideal source of nutrition for infants. In order to ensure success in breastfeeding, it is important that it be initiated as early as possible during the neonatal period. This is facilitated by skin-to-skin contact between the mother and infant immediately following birth. When possible, the infant should be allowed to root and latch on spontaneously within the first hour of life. Many common nursery routines such as weighing the infant, administration of vitamin K and application of ocular antibiotics can be safely delayed until after the initial breastfeeding. Postpartum care practices that improve breastfeeding rates include rooming-in, anticipatory guidance about breastfeeding problems and the avoidance of formula supplementation and pacifiers.

  5. Overcoming breastfeeding problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MF, eds. Creasy and Resnik's Maternal-Fetal Medicine: Principles and Practice . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 9. Newton ER. Lactation and breastfeeding. In: Gabbe SG, Niebyl ...

  6. Breastfeeding vs. Formula Feeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MF, eds. Creasy and Resnik's Maternal-Fetal Medicine: Principles and Practice . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 9. Newton ER. Lactation and breastfeeding. In: Gabbe SG, Niebyl ...

  7. Breastfeeding - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PDF Health Information Translations Pumping and Storing Breast Milk - العربية (Arabic) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Bosnian (bosanski) Expand Section Breastfeeding Basics - ...

  8. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the unique ways that breastmilk can improve your child’s health and lower the risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), asthma, obesity, and other health problems. Breastfeeding 411 YouTube embed ...

  9. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the unique ways that breastmilk can improve your child’s health and lower the risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), asthma, obesity, and other health problems. Breastfeeding ...

  10. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... health topics Reproductive Health Breastfeeding Menopause Menstrual Cycle Pregnancy Popular topics Bacterial vaginosis Birth control methods Human ... and Stroke HIV and AIDS Mental Health Pain Pregnancy Reproductive Health Sexual Health Sexually Transmitted Infections Other ...

  11. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... www.youtube-nocookie.com/embed/kYQhoQ4umgg Healthy eating can keep you strong while breastfeeding. Learn more about the foods you should eat. Previous Page Next Page It's ...

  12. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Autoimmune Diseases Breastfeeding Cancer Fitness and Nutrition Heart Disease and Stroke HIV and AIDS Mental Health Pain Pregnancy Reproductive Health Sexual Health Sexually Transmitted Infections Other A-Z Health ...

  13. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in daily life: At home and in public Laws that support breastfeeding 10 things moms can do ... material contained on these pages are free of copyright restrictions and may be copied, reproduced, or duplicated ...

  14. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... syndrome Depression Irritable bowel syndrome Migraine Thyroid disease Urinary tract infections All A-Z health topics Reproductive Health Breastfeeding Menopause Menstrual Cycle Pregnancy Popular topics Bacterial vaginosis Birth control methods Human ...

  15. Breastfeeding assessment tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bizouerne, Cécile; Kerac, Marko; Macgrath, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Full text: Breastfeeding plays a major role in reducing the global burden of child mortality and under-nutrition. Whilst many programmes aim to support breastfeeding and prevent feeding problems occurring, interventions are also needed once they have developed. In this situation, accurate assessment of a problem is critical to inform prognosis and enables tailored, appropriate treatment. The presentation will present a review, which aims to identify breastfeeding assessment tools/checklists for use in assessing malnourished infants in poor resource settings. The literature review identified 24 breastfeeding assessment tools, and 41 validation studies. Evidence underpinning most of the tools was mainly low quality, and conducted in high-income countries and hospital settings. The presentation will describe the main findings of the literature review and propose recommendations for improving existing tools in order to appropriately assess malnourished infants and enable early, appropriate intervention and treatment of malnutrition. (author)

  16. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Shareables Autoimmune Diseases Breastfeeding Cancer Fitness and Nutrition Heart Disease and Stroke HIV and AIDS Mental Health Pain Pregnancy Reproductive Health Sexual Health Sexually Transmitted Infections Other ...

  17. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Need some nursing know-how? These steps and strategies will help soon-to-be-moms make an ... gt; There are many great resources, people, and places to turn to for breastfeeding support and information. ...

  18. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Pregnancy Thyroid disease All A-Z health topics Find Help Get breastfeeding help Get health care Get ... with family planning Get help with mental health Find girls' health information Stay Connected Blog Contact us ...

  19. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... foods you should eat. Previous Page Next Page It's Only Natural resources Related information Breastfeeding Pregnancy Resources ... and mission Programs and Activities Health Information Gateway It's Only Natural Make the Call, Don't Miss ...

  20. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... To receive Breastfeeding email updates Enter email Submit Planning ahead From choosing the crib to finding a ... care Get health insurance Get help with family planning Get help with mental health Find girls' health ...

  1. Breastfeeding practices and growth

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-08-10

    Aug 10, 2015 ... Federal Medical Centre Asaba. Nigeria. ( ) ... selling and health promotion. Conclusion: ... among children in West African sub region could be averted if ... breastfeeding within one hour of life are more likely to have longer ...

  2. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... All A-Z health topics Diseases and Conditions Cancer Heart Disease and Stroke HIV and AIDS Lupus ... health topics Printables and Shareables Autoimmune Diseases Breastfeeding Cancer Fitness and Nutrition Heart Disease and Stroke HIV ...

  3. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the unique ways that breastmilk can improve your child’s health and lower the risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), asthma, obesity, and other health problems. Breastfeeding 411 YouTube ...

  4. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... A-Z health topics Diseases and Conditions Cancer Heart Disease and Stroke HIV and AIDS Lupus Popular topics ... Shareables Autoimmune Diseases Breastfeeding Cancer Fitness and Nutrition Heart Disease and Stroke HIV and AIDS Mental Health Pain ...

  5. Antibiotics and Breastfeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sá Del Fiol, Fernando; Barberato-Filho, Silvio; de Cássia Bergamaschi, Cristiane; Lopes, Luciane Cruz; Gauthier, Timothy P

    2016-01-01

    During the breastfeeding period, bacterial infections can occur in the nursing mother, requiring the use of antibiotics. A lack of accurate information may lead health care professionals and mothers to suspend breastfeeding, which may be unnecessary. This article provides information on the main antibiotics that are appropriate for clinical use and the interference of these antibiotics with the infant to support medical decisions regarding the discontinuation of breastfeeding. We aim to provide information on the pharmacokinetic factors that interfere with the passage of antibiotics into breast milk and the toxicological implications of absorption by the infant. Publications related to the 20 most frequently employed antibiotics and their transfer into breast milk were evaluated. The results demonstrate that most antibiotics in clinical use are considered suitable during breastfeeding; however, the pharmacokinetic profile of each drug must be observed to ensure the resolution of the maternal infection and the safety of the infant. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and pain Breastfeeding checklist: How to get a good latch Finding support It takes a village: Building ... Mental Health Relationships and Safety Popular topics Caregiver stress Folic acid Heart-healthy eating Iron-deficiency anemia ...

  7. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... t already thought about breastfeeding, now is a great time. Before your baby is here is the ... embed/qHVNTBLZnYo There are many great resources, people, and places to turn to for ...

  8. Breastfeeding in China: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binns Colin W

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This review aims to describe changes in breastfeeding and summarise the breastfeeding rates, duration and reasons of discontinuing 'any breastfeeding' or 'exclusive breastfeeding' in P.R. China. Breastfeeding rates in China fell during the 1970s when the use of breast milk substitutes became widespread, and reached the lowest point in the 1980s. As a result many efforts were introduced to promote breastfeeding. The breastfeeding rate in China started to increase in the 1990s, and since the mid-1990s 'any breastfeeding' rates in the majority of cities and provinces, including minority areas, have been above 80% at four months. But most cities and provinces did not reach the national target of 'exclusive breastfeeding' of 80%. The 'exclusive breastfeeding' rates in minority areas were relatively lower than comparable inland provinces. The mean duration of 'any breastfeeding' in the majority of cities or provinces was between seven and nine months. The common reasons for ceasing breastfeeding, or introducing water or other infant food before four months, were perceived breast milk insufficiency, mother going to work, maternal and child illness and breast problems. Incorrect traditional perceptions have a strong adverse influence on 'exclusive breastfeeding' in less developed areas or rural areas. China is a huge country, geographically and in population size, and there is considerable ethnic diversity. Therefore breastfeeding rates in different parts of China can vary considerably.

  9. Gendered perceptions on infant feeding in Eastern Uganda: continued need for exclusive breastfeeding support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karamagi Charles A

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In resource-poor settings, HIV positive mothers are recommended to choose between 'Exclusive breastfeeding' (EBF or 'Exclusive replacement feeding' (ERF. Acceptability, Feasibility, Affordability, Sustainability and Safety (AFASS has been the World Health Organization (WHO's a priori criteria for ERF the last ten years. 'AFASS' has become a mere acronym among many workers in the field of prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV, PMTCT. Thereby, non-breastfeeding has been suggested irrespective of social norms. EBF for the first half of infancy is associated with huge health benefits for children in areas where infant mortality is high. But, even if EBF has been recommended for a decade, few mothers are practicing it. We set out to understand fathers' and mothers' infant feeding perceptions and the degree to which EBF and ERF were 'AFASS.' Methods Eight focus groups with 81 informants provided information for inductive content analysis. Four groups were held by men among men and four groups by women among women in Mbale District, Eastern Uganda. Results Two study questions emerged: How are the different feeding options understood and accepted? And, what are men's and women's responsibilities related to infant feeding? A mother's commitment to breastfeed and the husband's commitment to provide for the family came out strongly. Not breastfeeding a newborn was seen as dangerous and as unacceptable, except in cases of maternal illness. Men argued that not breastfeeding could entail sanctions by kin or in court. But, in general, both men and women regarded EBF as 'not enough' or even 'harmful.' Among men, not giving supplements to breast milk was associated with poverty and men's failure as providers. Women emphasised lack of time, exhaustion, poverty and hunger as factors for limited breast milk production. Although women had attended antenatal teaching they expressed a need to know more. Most men felt left out from

  10. AWARENESS OF THE BENEFITS OF BREASTFEEDING AMONG ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FOBUR

    The aim of this study therefore was to determine awareness of breastfeeding benefits ... benefits of breastfeeding are important factors for breastfeeding practices. Awareness .... practicing Exclusive Breastfeeding in the first six months of ...

  11. Evaluation of breastfeeding Web sites for patient education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornan, Barbara A; Oermann, Marilyn H

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the quality of Web sites on breastfeeding for patient education. Descriptive study of 30 Web sites on breastfeeding for patient education, evaluated based on the Health Information Technology Institute (HITI) criteria, readability, and eight content criteria from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) policy statement on breastfeeding. The mean Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level for readability of the 30 sites was 9.2. Seven of the sites included all eight of the content criteria from the AAP, and three sites did not include any of the information recommended by the AAP content criteria. Nurses should be able to recommend best patient education materials for their patients. The five best Web sites for breastfeeding education are identified for patient teaching, and the HITI criteria are explained for nurses to learn how to evaluate Web sites for themselves and their patients.

  12. Development of the breastfeeding quality improvement in hospitals learning collaborative in New York state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Eileen; Dennison, Barbara A; Welge, Sara Bonam; Hisgen, Stephanie; Boyce, Patricia Simino; Waniewski, Patricia A

    2013-06-01

    Exclusive breastfeeding is a public health priority. A strong body of evidence links maternity care practices, based on the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding, to increased breastfeeding initiation, duration and exclusivity. Despite having written breastfeeding policies, New York (NY) hospitals vary widely in reported maternity care practices and in prevalence rates of breastfeeding, especially exclusive breastfeeding, during the birth hospitalization. To improve hospital maternity care practices, breastfeeding support, and the percentage of infants exclusively breastfeeding, the NY State Department of Health developed the Breastfeeding Quality Improvement in Hospitals (BQIH) Learning Collaborative. The BQIH Learning Collaborative was the first to use the Institute for Health Care Improvement's Breakthrough Series methodology to specifically focus on increasing hospital breastfeeding support. The evidence-based maternity care practices from the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding provided the basis for the Change Package and Data Measurement Plan. The present article describes the development of the BQIH Learning Collaborative. The engagement of breastfeeding experts, partners, and stakeholders in refining the Learning Collaborative design and content, in defining the strategies and interventions (Change Package) that drive hospital systems change, and in developing the Data Measurement Plan to assess progress in meeting the Learning Collaborative goals and hospital aims is illustrated. The BQIH Learning Collaborative is a model program that was implemented in a group of NY hospitals with plans to spread to additional hospitals in NY and across the country.

  13. Let's Talk About Breastfeeding: The Importance of Delivering a Message in a Home Visiting Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinnis, Sandra; Lee, Eunju; Kirkland, Kristen; Miranda-Julian, Claudia; Greene, Rose

    2018-05-01

    To examine the potential impact of paraprofessional home visitors in promoting breastfeeding initiation and continuation among a high-risk population. A secondary analysis of program data from a statewide home visitation program. Thirty-six Healthy Families New York sites across New York State. A total of 3521 pregnant mothers at risk of poor child health and developmental outcomes. Home visitors deliver a multifaceted intervention that includes educating high-risk mothers on benefits of breastfeeding, encouraging them to breastfeed and supporting their efforts during prenatal and postnatal periods. Home visitor-reported content and frequency of home visits, participant-reported breastfeeding initiation and duration, and covariates (Kempe Family Stress Index, race and ethnicity, region, nativity, marital status, age, and education). Logistic regression. Breastfeeding initiation increased by 1.5% for each 1-point increase in the percentage of prenatal home visits that included breastfeeding discussions. Breastfeeding continuation during the first 6 months also increased with the percentage of earlier home visits that included breastfeeding discussions. Additionally, if a participant receives 1 more home visit during the third month, her likelihood of breastfeeding at 6 months increases by 11%. Effect sizes varied by months postpartum. Delivering a breastfeeding message consistently during regular home visits is important for increasing breastfeeding rates. Given that home visiting programs target new mothers least likely to breastfeed, a more consistent focus on breastfeeding in this supportive context may reduce breastfeeding disparities.

  14. The status of a breastfeeding woman in labour law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabovanović Dragana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The legal status of an employed woman who is breastfeeding is regulated by the special Occupational Safety and Health Act. This Act implies a number of specific measures developed to ensure that breastfeeding women and their children, as a particularly vulnerable group, are provided with a fuller support and protection. Thus, a breastfeeding woman is guaranteed the right to take one or more daily breaks to breastfeed her child, or the right to work shorter working hours on the daily basis, provided that she returns to work within a period of one year from the birth of her child. Moreover, a breastfeeding woman shall not be obliged to perform work which has been assessed as significantly risky to her health or to the health of her child. However, a complete occupational safety and health protection of a breastfeeding woman also implies protection from discrimination on the grounds of family responsibilities, as well as creating work environment where every employee can effectively exercise the right to fair working conditions, taking into consideration the risk of discrimination that the breastfeeding woman is exposed to and the difficulties she faces while exercising certain employment rights. This paper analyses the status of employed breastfeeding women in labour legislation in order to discuss and underscore the legal protection goals and to indicate the risks which endanger their dignity and wellbeing.

  15. Facilitators and Barriers for Successful Breastfeeding Among Migrant Chuukese Mothers on Guam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn M. Wood PhD, RNC-OB

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to identify factors that serve as facilitators and barriers for breastfeeding among Chuukese immigrant women living in Guam. Traditionally, Chuukese women exclusively breastfeed their babies; however, it is reported that breastfeeding decreases among these women when they migrate to Guam. Little is known about why this happens. A qualitative approach that included key informant interviews and focus groups of Chuukese women ( N  = 24 who had migrated to Guam and delivered a baby on Guam within the past 5 years was completed. The project interview or discussion guides were guided by the Theory of Reasoned Action and explored facilitators and barriers for successful breastfeeding among these Chuukese immigrant women. Among this population, key facilitators for breastfeeding included high levels of self-confidence, family support, knowledge about breastfeeding, and the existence of strong traditional Chuukese cultural values. Key barriers included experiences of cultural conflict or social change, lack of support from their local community, family and health-care staff, as well as limited self-knowledge about how to manage common breastfeeding problems. Where more facilitators were reported, breastfeeding was more often practiced, and where more barriers were reported, formula feeding was more likely. Social factors, health system policies, and proactive nursing support are important influencing factors for breastfeeding among the Chuukese immigrant population on Guam. Nursing can play key roles in policy, professional leadership and practice, and social advocacy to support breastfeeding promotion and maintenance on Guam.

  16. Representações sociais de mulheres sobre a amamentação: teste de associação livre de idéias acerca da interrupção precoce do aleitamento materno exclusivo Representaciones Sociales de Mujeres Sobre el Amamantamiento: Prueba de Asociación Libre de Ideas Acerca de la Interrupción Precoz del Amamantamiento Materno Exclusivo Social Representations of Women on Breastfeeding: Free Association of Ideas Test About the Early Interruption of the Exclusive Maternal Breastfeeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cácia Mônica Osório

    2007-06-01

    reconocimiento de la importancia del amamantar materno y de la leche humana. "Salud del bebé" tuvo mayor expresividad en el grupo NTr, sugerido que esas mujeres anclaron el amamantar en el proceso salud-enfermedad. Concluyese que las mujeres reconocen la importancia de amamantar, pero no de su exclusivismo hasta el sexto mes de vida.The early interruption of exclusive breastfeeding (EB constitutes a problem with biological, psychological and sociocultural characteristics. This paper aims to describe the social representations of women who have early weaned EB. We have interviewed 30 women (15 were housewives HM, 15 were working mothers WM in mixed assited nursering in the Family Health Program in the city of Resende (RJ. From August to September 2005, we have collected data through a Free Association of Ideas test, aiming to emerge associations related to the words exploited at the level of social stereotypes, which was followed by the Bardin's content analyses. The data have shown high frequency of the category "pleasure, love and affection", showing the recognition of the importance of breastfeeding and of human milk. "Baby's health" has been more expressive in the HM group, suggesting that these women anchored breastfeeding in the health-sickness process. In conclusion, our women recognize the importance of breastfeeding but not its exclusiveness up to the sixth month of age.

  17. Conduct of breastfeeding among young Tunisian Mothers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miniaoui, Rim; Zediri, Manel; Mankai, Amani; Aouidet, Abdallah; Hamoudia, Faouzia

    2014-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: Breastfeeding is a natural phenomenon that reflects reality and occupies an important space in the life of all human beings. It is the reference for infant feeding since it is the food better tailored to his needs as its capabilities. The decision to make this practice is the responsibility of each parent. However, it is found that although mothers in particular young age properly begin the practice of breastfeeding, they end, for various reasons by early introduction of other foods or even stop breastfeeding few weeks after the delivery. Objectives: We aim from this study to examine the behavior of young mothers in breastfeeding, determine the impact of attitudes of mothers on the nutritional status of infants and encourage policymakers health to establish a line of action to initiate future and young mothers to breastfeed. Methods: This is a prospective study of 50 young mothers coming to consult or to vaccinate their children aged 2 to 23 months at the center of maternal and child of El Zouhour. Results: The analysis of our results showed that 76% of surveyed mothers have a high level of education, half primiparous and 64% are housewives. Concerning the practice of breastfeeding, we found that 42% of surveyed mothers have weaned their children and only 26% of them believe breastfeeding or breast-feed their infants exclusively for the first six months. Moreover, we noted That among children suffering from obesity 2nd degree be 16% of the total population , 87.5% of them were not (or are not) exclusively breastfed for the first six month of life. However, this relationship is not statistically significant. Conclusion: The evolution of knowledge of young mothers has not influenced their practices in breastfeeding. This requires the establishment of a line of action to promote breastfeeding based on the evaluation of implemented national programs in recent years, the update of their content and the improvement of training of personnel of

  18. Breast-feeding success among infants with phenylketonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banta-Wright, Sandra A; Shelton, Kathleen C; Lowe, Nancy D; Knafl, Kathleen A; Houck, Gail M

    2012-08-01

    Breast milk is the nutrition of choice for human infants (American Academy of Pediatrics, 2005; American Association of Family Physicians, 2008; Association of Women's Health Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses, 2005; Canadian Paediatric Society, 2005; U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, 2008; World Health Organization, 2009). In comparison to standard commercial formula, human breast milk has a lower concentration of protein and a lower content of the amino acid phenylalanine (Phe). For infants with phenylketonuria (PKU), these attributes of human breast milk make it ideal as a base source of nutrition. The purpose of this study was to compare the incidence and duration of breast-feeding and corresponding Phe levels of breast-fed and formula-fed infants with PKU in the caseload of a pediatric metabolic clinic at an urban tertiary-care medical center. Charts were reviewed for infants diagnosed with PKU beginning with 2005 and ending with 1980, the year no further breast-feeding cases were identified in the PKU population. During the first year of life, most of the infants, whether breast-fed or formula-fed, had similar mean Phe levels. However, the frequency distributions revealed that more breast-fed infants with PKU had Phe levels within the normal range (120-360 μmol/L) and were less likely to have low Phe levels (<120 μmol/L) than formula-fed infants with PKU. Further research is needed to understand how mothers manage breast-feeding in the context of PKU. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Assessment of Mycotoxin Exposure in Breastfeeding Mothers with Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Valitutti

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the risk of mycotoxin exposure (aflatoxin M1, ochratoxin A, and zearalenone in celiac disease (CD breastfeeding mothers and healthy control mothers, as well as in their offspring, by quantifying these contaminants in breast milk. Study design: Thirty-five breastfeeding women with CD on a gluten-free diet and 30 healthy breastfeeding controls were recruited. Milk sampling was performed three times per day for three consecutive days. Mycotoxin content was investigated by an analytical method using immunoaffinity column clean-up and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC with fluorometric detection. Results: Aflatoxin M1 (AFM1 was detected in 37% of CD group samples (mean ± SD = 0.012 ± 0.011 ng/mL; range = 0.003–0.340 ng/mL. The control group showed lower mean AFM1 concentration levels in 24% of the analyzed samples (0.009 ± 0.007 ng/mL; range = 0.003–0.067 ng/mL, ANOVA on ranks, p-value < 0.01. Ochratoxin A and zearalenone did not differ in both groups. Conclusion: Breast milk AFM1 contamination for both groups is lower than the European safety threshold. However, the estimated exposures of infants from CD mothers and control mothers was much higher (≃15 times and ≃11 times, respectively than the threshold set by the joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA. Since incongruities exist between JECFA and the European Union standard, a novel regulatory review of the available data on this topic is desirable. Protecting babies from a neglected risk of high AFM1 exposure requires prompt regulatory and food-control policies.

  20. Understanding women's interpretations of infant formula advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Kathleen; Taylor, Emily; Hall-Dardess, Pam; Walker, Marsha; Labbok, Miriam

    2013-06-01

    Exclusive breastfeeding for 6 months and continued breastfeeding for at least 1 year is recommended by all major health organizations. Whereas 74.6 percent of mothers initiate breastfeeding at birth, exclusivity and duration remain significantly lower than national goals. Empirical evidence suggests that exposure to infant formula marketing contributes to supplementation and premature cessation. The objective of this study was to explore how women interpret infant formula advertising to aid in an understanding of this association. Four focus groups were structured to include women with similar childbearing experience divided according to reproductive status: preconceptional, pregnant, exclusive breastfeeders, and formula feeders. Facilitators used a prepared protocol to guide discussion of infant formula advertisements. Authors conducted a thematic content analysis with special attention to women's statements about what they believed the advertisements said about how the products related to human milk (superior, inferior, similar) and how they reported reacting to these interpretations. Participants reported that the advertisements conveyed an expectation of failure with breastfeeding, and that formula is a solution to fussiness, spitting up, and other normal infant behaviors. Participants reported that the advertisements were confusing in terms of how formula-feeding is superior, inferior or the same as breastfeeding. This confusion was exacerbated by an awareness of distribution by health care practitioners and institutions, suggesting provider endorsement of infant formula. Formula marketing appears to decrease mothers' confidence in their ability to breastfeed, especially when provided by health care practitioners and institutions. Therefore, to be supportive of breastfeeding, perinatal educators and practitioners could be more effective if they did not offer infant formula advertising to mothers. © 2013, Copyright the Authors, Journal compilation © 2013

  1. Breastfeeding Support in the Workplace: The Relationships Among Breastfeeding Support, Work-Life Balance, and Job Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jantzer, Amanda M; Anderson, Jenn; Kuehl, Rebecca A

    2018-05-01

    Women are increasingly faced with decisions about how to combine breastfeeding with work, but few researchers have directly measured how breastfeeding relates to the work-life interface. Research aim: The authors examined how perceptions of work enhancement of personal life and work interference with personal life were influenced by workplace breastfeeding support, including organizational, manager, and coworker support, as well as adequate time to express human milk. Then, we examined how workplace breastfeeding support predicted work-life variables and job satisfaction. Using a self-report, survey design, the authors analyzed online surveys from 87 women in a rural, community sample who indicated that they had pumped at work or anticipated needing to pump in the future. According to regression results, provision of workplace breastfeeding support, particularly providing adequate time for human milk expression, predicted work enhancement of personal life. Conversely, we found that as workplace support diminished, employees perceived greater work interference with personal life. Results of path analysis further suggested that providing time for expressing milk improved job satisfaction via a partially mediated relationship where work enhancement of personal life acted as a mediator. These results suggest that employers can enhance the lives of their breastfeeding employees both at work and at home by providing workplace breastfeeding support, especially through providing time for expressing human milk in the workplace.

  2. Surveying Lactation Professionals Regarding Marijuana Use and Breastfeeding

    OpenAIRE

    Bergeria, Cecilia L.; Heil, Sarah H.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Breastfeeding is associated with substantial benefits for both the child and mother. Most guidelines state that women who use illicit drugs should not breastfeed. Although this recommendation has traditionally included marijuana, this drug's changing legal status and the limited scientific research regarding marijuana's effect on breastfeeding and the nursing child may lead to varying recommendations made by lactation professionals to clients who use marijuana. Additionally, to ou...

  3. Reasons given by mothers for discontinuing breastfeeding in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olang Beheshteh

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have previously shown that in Iran, only 28% of infants were exclusively breastfed at six months, despite a high prevalence of breastfeeding at two years of age. The primary aim of this study was to investigate the reasons women discontinued exclusive breastfeeding. Method This retrospective study was based on questionnaires and interviews with 63,071 mothers of infants up to 24 months of age, divided into two populations: infants younger than six months and six months or older. The data were collected in 2005–2006 from all 30 provinces of Iran. Results Only 5.3% of infants less than six months of age stopped breastfeeding (mean age of 3.2 months; more commonly in urban than rural areas. The most frequently cited reasons mothers gave for discontinuing exclusive breastfeeding were physicians’ recommendation (54% and insufficient breast milk (self-perceived or true, 28%. Breastfeeding was common after six months of age: only 11% of infants discontinued breastfeeding, at a mean of 13.8 months. The most common reason for discontinuation at this age was insufficient breast milk (self-perceived or true, 45%. Maternal illness or medication (10%, infant illness (6%, and return to work (3% were uncommon causes. Use of a pacifier was correlated with breastfeeding discontinuation. Maternal age and education was not associated with duration of breastfeeding. Multivariate analysis showed that using a pacifier and formula or other bottle feeding increased the risk of early cessation of breastfeeding. Conclusions Physicians and other health professionals have an important role to play in encouraging and supporting mothers to maintain breastfeeding.

  4. Influence of Skeletal Muscle Carnosine Content on Fatigue during Repeated Resistance Exercise in Recreationally Active Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varanoske, Alyssa N.; Hoffman, Jay R.; Church, David D.; Baker, Kayla M.; Dodd, Sarah J.; Coker, Nicholas A.; Oliveira, Leonardo P.; Dawson, Virgil L.; Stout, Jeffrey R.

    2017-01-01

    Carnosine is a naturally occurring intramuscular dipeptide that is thought to attenuate fatigue during high-intensity exercise. Carnosine content is influenced by various factors, including gender and diet. Despite research reporting that carnosine content is lower in women compared to men and lower in vegetarians compared to omnivores, no investigations have examined carnosine content in women based on dietary protein intake and its effect on muscle fatigue. Twenty recreationally active women were assigned to either a high (HI; n = 5), moderate (MOD; n = 10), or low (LO; n = 5) group based upon intramuscular carnosine content of the vastus lateralis. Each participant underwent two unilateral maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVIC) of the knee extensors separated by an isokinetic exercise protocol consisting of five sets of 50 repeated maximal unilateral contractions. Magnitude-based inferences were used to analyze group differences. Percent decline in rate of force development and peak torque (PT) during the MVICs and changes in PT and mean torque during the muscle-fatiguing protocol were lower in HI compared to both MOD and LO. Additionally, absolute and relative dietary protein intake were greater in HI compared to MOD or LO. Results indicated that greater intramuscular carnosine content was reflective of greater dietary protein intake and that individuals with higher carnosine content displayed a greater attenuation of fatigue compared to those with lower carnosine. PMID:28880219

  5. Reason for termination of breastfeeding and the length of breastfeeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, M S; Sodemann, Morten; Mølbak, Kare

    1996-01-01

    In third world countries the length of breastfeeding often has a major influence on child mortality, morbidity and nutritional status. When evaluating the impact of length of breastfeeding the reason why a mother terminates breastfeeding is usually not taken into consideration....

  6. The bonding circle of breastfeeding

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Murch, Ken

    1991-01-01

    This is a promotional video made to encourage breastfeeding among Native people. Breastfeeding is presented as a positive experience which includes not only the mother and child, but also the whole family...

  7. It's more than just luck: A qualitative exploration of breastfeeding in rural Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKellar, Lois; Fleet, Julie; Dove, Shona

    2017-09-21

    It's more than just luck: A qualitative exploration of breastfeeding in rural Australia PROBLEM: Despite significant public health benefits, breastfeeding for six months continues to be challenging for women. In the Mid North of South Australia, healthcare professionals were concerned that breastfeeding rates were lower than the national average and that a collaborative approach was needed to promote breastfeeding. To explore the experiences of women and health professional in the Mid North, to inform interventions to improve breastfeeding longevity. Two focus groups were conducted to examine breastfeeding experience in the region. Focus group one included nine mothers who had breastfed more than six months and focus group two consisted of ten health professionals from the Mid North. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the data. Two overarching themes were identified; 'breastfeeding: It's more than just luck' represented the voices of the mothers and 'breastfeeding: It's everybody's business' captured the discussion between the health professionals. Women described themselves as lucky while acknowledging that their own persistence, as well as positive support was vital. Health professionals identified education and support as key foci, and a need for a holistic approach to improve breastfeeding rates. Breastfeeding should be understood as a relationship, in which broadly applied solutions do not necessarily influence longevity, particularly in rural communities. Strategies should also reflect a realistic picture of breastfeeding and safeguard against idealistic expectation of the experience. A holistic approach to improve breastfeeding rates is imperative. One of the most promising antidotes to the breastfeeding dilemma is the provision of midwifery continuity of care. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Explaining Women's Success: Technological Change and the Skill Content of Women's Work

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra E. Black; Alexandra Spitz-Oener

    2010-01-01

    The closing of the gender wage gap is an ongoing phenomenon in industrialized countries. However, research has been limited in its ability to understand the causes of these changes, due in part to an inability to directly compare the work of women to that of men. In this study, we use a new approach for analyzing changes in the gender pay gap that uses direct measures of job tasks and gives a comprehensive characterization of how work for men and women has changed in recent decades. Using dat...

  9. ABFAB. Attachment to the breast and family attitudes to breastfeeding. The effect of breastfeeding education in the middle of pregnancy on the initiation and duration of breastfeeding: a randomised controlled trial [ISRCTN21556494

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldenström Ulla

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has proven difficult to reach World Health Organization (WHO recommendations that infants be exclusively breastfed from birth to six months of age 12, yet there is limited knowledge about interventions that are effective in increasing breastfeeding initiation and duration. Particularly lacking is evidence about how to maintain breastfeeding rates in countries which already have a high initiation of breastfeeding. This study aims to determine whether mid-pregnancy breastfeeding education, with a focus on either attitudes to breastfeeding or on technical aspects of breastfeeding, has an effect on rates of breastfeeding initiation and duration. Secondary aims of the study are to: explore what factors might affect the duration of breastfeeding and evaluate the interventions from the participant and childbirth facilitator perspectives. Methods/Design A randomised controlled trial (RCT design will be used. Women having their first baby, and planning to give birth as public patients at the Royal Women's Hospital (RWH, Melbourne, will be approached at 18–20 weeks of pregnancy and invited to participate in the study. Participants will be randomly allocated to a control group or one of two group interventions: a previously designed and trialled tool to teach practical aspects of breastfeeding or an exploration of family attitudes to breastfeeding. The latter was developed and piloted by the investigators in conjunction with the group facilitators, prior to trial commencement. The interventions are planned to take place at 20–25 weeks. Data will be collected by questionnaire at recruitment, at interview in hospital after the birth and by telephone interview six months later. Medical/obstetric outcomes will be obtained from the medical record. The sample size (972 was calculated to identify an increase in breastfeeding initiation from 75 to 85% and an increase from 40 to 50% in breastfeeding at six months.

  10. Hospital discharge bags and breastfeeding at 6 months: data from the infant feeding practices study II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadacharan, Radha; Grossman, Xena; Matlak, Stephanie; Merewood, Anne

    2014-02-01

    Distribution of industry-sponsored formula sample packs to new mothers undermines breastfeeding. Using data from the Infant Feeding Practices Study II (IFPS II), we aimed to determine whether receipt of 4 different types of bags was associated with exclusive breastfeeding during the first 6 months of life. We extracted data from IFPS II questionnaires. Type of discharge bag received was categorized as "formula bag," "coupon bag," "breastfeeding supplies bag," or "no bag". We examined exclusive breastfeeding status at 10 weeks (post hoc) and at 6 months using univariate descriptive analyses and multivariate logistic regression models, controlling for sociodemographic and attitudinal variables. Overall, 1868 (81.4%) of women received formula bags, 96 (4.2%) received coupon bags, 46 (2.0%) received breastfeeding supplies bags, and 284 (12.4%) received no bag. By 10 weeks, recipients of breastfeeding supplies bags or no bag were significantly more likely to be exclusively breastfeeding than formula bag recipients. In the adjusted model, compared to formula bag/coupon bag recipients, recipients of breastfeeding supplies bag/no bag were significantly more likely to breastfeed exclusively for 6 months (odds ratio = 1.58; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-2.36). The vast majority of new mothers received formula sample packs at discharge, and this was associated with reduced exclusive breastfeeding at 10 weeks and 6 months. Bags containing breastfeeding supplies or no bag at all were positively associated with exclusive breastfeeding at 10 weeks and 6 months.

  11. Radiological contrast media in the breastfeeding woman: a position paper of the Italian Society of Radiology (SIRM), the Italian Society of Paediatrics (SIP), the Italian Society of Neonatology (SIN) and the Task Force on Breastfeeding, Ministry of Health, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cova, Maria Assunta; Stacul, Fulvio; Quaranta, Roberto; Guastalla, Pierpaolo; Salvatori, Guglielmo; Banderali, Giuseppe; Fonda, Claudio; David, Vincenzo; Gregori, Massimo; Zuppa, Antonio Alberto; Davanzo, Riccardo

    2014-08-01

    Breastfeeding is a well-recognised investment in the health of the mother-infant dyad. Nevertheless, many professionals still advise breastfeeding mothers to temporarily discontinue breastfeeding after contrast media imaging. Therefore, we performed this review to provide health professionals with basic knowledge and skills for appropriate use of contrast media. A joint working group of the Italian Society of Radiology (SIRM), Italian Society of Paediatrics (SIP), Italian Society of Neonatology (SIN) and Task Force on Breastfeeding, Ministry of Health, Italy prepared a review of the relevant medical literature on the safety profile of contrast media for the nursing infant/child. Breastfeeding is safe for the nursing infant of any post-conceptional age after administration of the majority of radiological contrast media to the mother; only gadolinium-based agents considered at high risk of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (gadopentetate dimeglumine, gadodiamide, gadoversetamide) should be avoided in the breastfeeding woman as a precaution; there is no need to temporarily discontinue breastfeeding or to express and discard breast milk following the administration of contrast media assessed as compatible with breastfeeding. Breastfeeding women should receive unambiguous professional advice and clear encouragement to continue breastfeeding after imaging with the compatible contrast media. • Breastfeeding is a well-known investment in the health of the mother-infant dyad. • Breastfeeding is safe after administration of contrast media to the mother. • There is no need to temporarily discontinue breastfeeding following administration of contrast media.

  12. Knowledge, attitude and practice of breastfeeding in the north of Jordan: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amarin Zouhair

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Jordan, as in neighboring countries in the Middle East, higher education and higher employment rates in recent years among women have had an impact on traditionally based infant feeding. The objective of this study was to evaluate practice, knowledge and attitude to breastfeeding and to assess factors associated with breastfeeding among women in the north of Jordan. Methods A cross sectional study was carried out between 15 July 2003 and 15 August 2003. A total of 344 women with children aged between 6 months and 3 years from five different villages in the north of Jordan were randomly selected and interviewed. Information regarding participants' demographics, infant feeding in first six months of life, knowledge and attitude towards breastfeeding was collected. Results Full breastfeeding was reported by 58.3%, mixed feeding was reported by 30.3% and infant formula feeding was reported by 11.4%. Almost one third of the full breastfeeding group did so for 6–12 months, and almost two thirds did continue breastfeeding for more than one year. Employed women were more likely not to practice full breastfeeding compared to unemployed women (odds ratio 3.34, 95% CI 1.60, 6.98, and women who had caesarian delivery were more likely not to practice full breastfeeding compared to those who had vaginal delivery (odds ratio 2.36, 95% CI 1.17, 4.78. Jordanian women had a positive attitude but work place and short maternity leaves had a negative impact on breastfeeding. Conclusion This study showed that a high proportion of Jordanian women did breastfeed for more than one year. However, working women and those who deliver by caesarean section were less likely to breastfeed. It is speculated that adopting facilitatory measures at hospitals and work place could increase the rate of full breastfeeding.

  13. The Impact of Having a Baby on the Level and Content of Women's Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffenaar, Peter Johannes; van Balen, Frank; Hermanns, Jo

    2010-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to more fully understand the impact of having a baby on women's well-being by attending to both the level and the content of well-being. To cover the judgemental and affective aspects of well-being we included global measures of life satisfaction and well-being and affective experience measures derived from…

  14. Content Analysis of the Construction of Self and Others in Women with Bulimia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dada, Gloria; Izu, Sheila; Montebruno, Claudia; Grau, Antoni; Feixas, Guillem

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the content of personal constructs in people diagnosed with bulimia nervosa (BN). We expected to find differences in the predominant content of the construct systems between women with and without BN. We analyzed the constructs elicited using the repertory grid technique from 120 women aged between 18 to 45 years, divided into two groups: a clinical group of women diagnosed with bulimia ( n = 62) and a control group of university students ( n = 58). The constructs were categorized using the Classification System for Personal Constructs (CSPC), composed of six themes which are broken down into 45 categories. For this study, a new area called "Physical" was included, and it consists of three categories. The results indicated that women diagnosed with bulimia used significantly more constructs related to the body, while the control group used more constructs from the personal area. In addition, the congruent constructs from the clinical sample were predominantly moral, or related to values and interests, while discrepant constructs were personal and physical. The findings provide evidence for the clinical use of the CSPC as an instrument for exploring the content of personal meaning systems. Understanding the patient's personal constructions about herself and others is useful for treatment. Moreover, it is important for clinicians to explore the content of constructs related to symptomatic areas, which could be hindering change, and focus on them to facilitate improvement.

  15. Effect of a prenatal nutritional intervention program on initiation and duration of breastfeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léger-Leblanc, Gisèle; Rioux, France M

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate initiation and duration of breastfeeding of infants born to mothers who participated in the Early Childhood Initiative (ECI) program. Factors affecting the initiation and the early cessation of breastfeeding were also explored. Twenty-five pregnant women participating in the ECI program completed this prospective study. At 36 weeks' gestation, a questionnaire was administered to assess socioeconomic status, intention to breastfeed and breastfeeding experience. When the infants were three and six months of age, feeding practices were assessed with a questionnaire. The breastfeeding initiation rate was 62.5%. At one and three months postpartum, exclusive breastfeeding rates were 39% and 4%, respectively. At six months, none of the women was exclusively breastfeeding. Primiparity, prenatal classes, having been breastfed and intention to breastfeed at 36 weeks' gestation were positively associated with breastfeeding initiation. Father's education, intention to breastfeed at 36 weeks' gestation, no water or formula given to the infant during hospitalization and higher maternal hemoglobin level at 36 weeks' gestation were positively associated with the duration of breastfeeding. The rate of initiation and duration of breastfeeding for ECI participants were low. To achieve successful interventions, it is important to target modifiable factors known to influence the initiation and duration of breastfeeding within this population.

  16. Maternal and health care workers' perceptions of the effects of exclusive breastfeeding by HIV positive mothers on maternal and infant health in Blantyre, Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafulafula, Ursula K; Hutchinson, Mary K; Gennaro, Susan; Guttmacher, Sally

    2014-07-25

    HIV-positive mothers are likely to exclusively breastfeed if they perceive exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) beneficial to them and their infants. Nevertheless, very little is known in Malawi about HIV-positive mothers' perceptions regarding EBF. In order to effectively promote EBF among these mothers, it is important to first understand their perceptions on benefits of exclusive breastfeeding. This study therefore, explored maternal and health care workers' perceptions of the effects of exclusive breastfeeding on HIV-positive mothers' health and that of their infants. This was a qualitative study within a larger project. Face-to-face in-depth interviews and focus group discussions using a semi- structured interview and focus group guide were conducted. Sixteen HIV-positive breastfeeding mothers, between 18 and 35 years old, were interviewed and data saturation was achieved. Two focus group discussions (FGDs) comprising of five and six adult women of unknown HIV status who were personal assistants to maternity patients, and one FGD with five nurse-midwives working in the maternity wards of Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital in Blantyre, Malawi, were also conducted. Thematic content data analysis was utilized. The study revealed more positive than negative perceived effects of exclusive breastfeeding. However, the fear of transmitting HIV to infants through breast milk featured strongly in the study participants' reports including those of the nurse-midwives. Only one nurse-midwife and a few HIV-positive mothers believed that EBF prevents mother-to-child transmission of HIV. Furthermore, participants, especially the HIV-positive mothers felt that exclusive breastfeeding leads to maternal ill- health and would accelerate their progression to full blown AIDS. While most participants considered exclusive breastfeeding as an important component of the wellbeing of their infants' health, they did not share the worldwide acknowledged benefits of exclusive breastfeeding in the

  17. Factors influencing initiation of breast-feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekwo, E E; Dusdieker, L B; Booth, B M

    1983-04-01

    We used the critical incidence method to study factors motivating 33 primigravidas and 39 multigravidas to initiate breast-feeding of their infants. Women chose breast-feeding because they believed that it would provide protection to the infant against infection, establish maternal-infant bonding, was convenient, provided better nutrition than cow's milk formula, was emotionally satisfying, and was the natural way to feed infants. The decision to breast-feed was made well in advance of pregnancy by primigravidas and shortly before pregnancy by multigravidas. Friends who had successfully nursed infants were as influential as immediate family members in influencing our study subjects in their decision to breast-feed. Prenatal counseling, though important, may not be the optimal period for motivating women to breast-feed.

  18. Breastfeeding knowledge among health workers in rural South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Sonal; Rollins, Nigel C; Bland, Ruth

    2005-02-01

    The aim of the study was to conduct a rapid assessment of breastfeeding knowledge amongst health workers in an area of high HIV prevalence. A cross-sectional survey using semi-structured questionnaires and problem-based scenarios was carried out. Responses were compared to those recommended in the World Health Organization (WHO) Breastfeeding Counselling Course. The setting was a rural area of KwaZulu Natal, with a population of 220 000 people. At the time of the study approximately 36 per cent of pregnant women were HIV-infected and no programme to prevent mother-to-child transmission was in place. A convenient sample of 71 healthcare workers (14 doctors, 25 professional nurses, 16 staff nurses, and 16 community health workers) were included in the study. Over 50% of respondents had given breastfeeding advice to clients over the previous month. However, there were significant discrepancies in breastfeeding knowledge compared to WHO recommendations. Ninety-three per cent (n = 13) of doctors knew that breastfeeding should be initiated within 30 min of delivery, but 71 per cent (n = 10) would recommend water, and 50 per cent (n = 7) solids to breastfed infants under 6 months of age. Fifty-seven per cent (n = 8) considered glucose water necessary for neonatal jaundice, constipation, and for infants immediately after delivery. Only 44 per cent (n = 7) of staff nurses and 56 per cent (n = 14) of professional nurses knew that breastfeeding should be on demand. The majority would recommend water, formula milk, and solids to breastfed infants under 6 months of age, and glucose water for neonatal jaundice and immediately after delivery. Knowledge of community health workers differed most from WHO recommendations: only 37 per cent (n = 6) knew that breastfeeding should be initiated within 30 min of delivery, 68 per cent (n = 11) thought breastfeeding should be on schedule and not on demand, and the majority would recommend supplements to infants under 6 months of age. Few

  19. Maternal Perceptions and Views About Breastfeeding Practices Among Emirati Mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radwan, Hadia; Sapsford, Roger

    2016-03-01

    Understanding women's breastfeeding perceptions and experiences is increasingly recognized as a vital tool to provide effective support that would encourage the extension of the breastfeeding period. To identify and explore the perceptions and views that influence the feeding and weaning decisions of Emirati mother. A qualitative study using indepth interviews was undertaken with a convenience sample of 45 Emirati mothers who had infants aged between 6 months and 2 years. Participants were interviewed in the health centers in 3 cities in United Arab Emirates. Data were recorded through field notes and analyzed thematically using grounded theory analysis. The following themes emerged: influences of others on the decisions to breastfeed, sources of information, infants' behavior and participants' views and decisions about when to introduce supplementary feeding, knowledge of and attitudes toward current World Health Organization recommendations, and mothers' perception of the benefits of breastfeeding. Grandmothers in this study played an important role in the breastfeeding practices of Emirati mothers. They supported breastfeeding, however, some encouraged giving the infants prelacteal feeds for a variety of reasons: colic, hunger, promoting growth, and hydration. Fathers, according to the mothers, either supported or ignored breastfeeding practices. Health promotions and health care facilities failed to deliver the message of exclusive breastfeeding. Mothers in our study were resorting to the expertise of the grandmothers and receiving information and advice about child feeding from them. The findings highlight the need for successful intervention programs to be implemented for mothers and grandmothers through health care providers. © The Author(s) 2016.

  20. Prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding in the healthy newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazo-Tomé, Pedro Luis Del; Suárez-Rodríguez, Marta

    2018-01-01

    The best nourishment for infants during the first 6 months of life is exclusive breastfeeding. It is recommended along with other food to complement the diet until the child is 2 years old, as long as the mother and the child are willing to continue with it. The objectives of this study were to determine he exclusive breastfeeding rate in full term newborns at hospital discharge and 15 days later and to analyze the factors that positively affect the exclusive breastfeeding. A prospective study was conducted in which a sample of postpartum women with full term newborns was recruited during hospital admission. Different variables were compiled and two interviews were made to determine the kind of feeding they were giving their children and if it was maintained at 15 days of birth. Exclusive breastfeeding rate at hospital discharge is much lower than recommended. It significantly decreases at 15 days of birth, increasing artificial feeding. It seems that having a vaginal birth, no complications giving birth, providing early breastfeeding and skin-to-skin contact in the delivery room are predisposing factors necessary to establish a good breastfeeding at hospital discharge. Despite the efforts of professionals, the percentage of newborns with exclusive breastfeeding at birth is not enough for the current recommendations. Copyright: © 2018 Permanyer.

  1. Newborn ankyloglossia and breastfeeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zlata Felc

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tongue-tie (ankyloglossia is a relatively common finding in the newborn population and represents a significant proportion of breastfeeding problems. Ankyloglossia may result in difficulty with suckling and can lead to poor weight gain, sore nipples, low milk supply, maternal fatigue and frustration.Conclusions: By recognizing ankyloglossia early, the health care team is able to treat breastfeeding problems promptly and proactively. The pediatrician, oral-maxillofacial surgeon, and parents should work together as a team from the time of birth to determine a coordinated plan of treatment. Careful assessment of lingual function is important in selecting the correct treatment. Frenulotomy is indicated in newborns with a short and/or thick frenulum and limited lingual mobility. In newborn infants with ankyloglossia this minimal surgical procedure is an effective therapy for breastfeeding difficulties.

  2. Epidural analgesia, neonatal care and breastfeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuppa, Antonio Alberto; Alighieri, Giovanni; Riccardi, Riccardo; Cavani, Maria; Iafisco, Alma; Cota, Francesco; Romagnoli, Costantino

    2014-11-29

    The objective of our study is to evaluate the correlation between epidural analgesia during labor, start of breastfeeding and type of maternal-neonatal care.Two different assistance models were considered: Partial and Full Rooming-in.In this cohort study, 2480 healthy infants were enrolled, 1519 in the Partial Rooming-in group and 1321 in the Full Rooming-in group; 1223 were born to women subjected to epidural analgesia in labor.In case of Partial Rooming-in the rate of exclusive or prevailing breastfeeding is significant more frequent in newborns born to mothers who didn't receive analgesia. Instead, in case of Full Rooming-in the rate of exclusive or prevailing breastfeeding is almost the same and there's no correlation between the use or not of epidural analgesia.The good start of lactation and the success of breastfeeding seems to be guaranteed by the type of care offered to the couple mother-infant, that reverses any possible adverse effects of the use of epidural analgesia in labor.

  3. Breastfeeding in Iran: prevalence, duration and current recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strandvik Birgitta

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The need to promote breastfeeding is unquestionable for the health and development of infants. The aim of this study was to investigate prevalence, duration and promotion of breastfeeding status in Iran with respect to the Baby Friendly Hospital, government actions and activities by the Breastfeeding Promotion Society including comparison with European countries. Methods This retrospective study is based on data from 63,071 infants less than 24 months of age in all the 30 urban and rural provinces of Iran. The data of breastfeeding rates were collected in 2005–2006 by trained health workers in the Integrated Monitoring Evaluation System in the Family Health Office of the Ministry of Health to evaluate its subordinate offices. A translated version of a questionnaire, used to assess the current breastfeeding situation in Europe, was used. Results At a national level, 90% and 57% of infants were breastfed at one and two-years of age, respectively. Exclusive breastfeeding rates at 4 and 6 months of age at national level averaged 56.8% and 27.7%. Exclusive breastfeeding rates at 4 and 6 months of age in rural areas were 58% and 29%, and in urban areas 56% and 27%, respectively. The policy questionnaire showed that out of the 566 hospitals across the country 466 hospitals were accredited as Baby Friendly Hospitals, covering more than 80% of the births in 2006. A national board set standards and certified pre-service education at the Ministry of Health. Iran officially adopted the WHO International Code of Marketing of Breast Milk Substitutes in 1991. The legislation for working mothers met the International Labour Organization standards that cover women with formal employment. The Ministry of Health and Breastfeeding Promotion Society were responsible for producing booklets, pamphlets, breastfeeding journal, CD, workshops and websites. Monitoring of breastfeeding rates was performed every four years and funded by the Ministry of

  4. Do Breast Implants Influence Breastfeeding? A Meta-Analysis of Comparative Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Fengrui; Dai, Shuiping; Wang, Chiyi; Zeng, Shaoxue; Chen, Junjie; Cen, Ying

    2018-06-01

    Aesthetic breast implant augmentation surgery is the most popular plastic surgery worldwide. Many women choose to receive breast implants during their reproductive ages, although the long-term effects are still controversial. Research aim: We conducted a meta-analysis to assess the influence of aesthetic breast augmentation on breastfeeding. We also compared the exclusive breastfeeding rates of periareolar versus inframammary incision. A systematic search for comparative studies about breast implants and breastfeeding was performed in PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, ScienceDirect, Scopus, and Web of Science through May 2018. Meta-analysis was conducted with a random-effects model (or fixed effects, if heterogeneity was absent). Four cohorts and one cross-sectional study were included. There was a significant reduction in the exclusive breastfeeding rate for women with breast implants compared with women without implants, pooled relative risk = 0.63, 95% confidence interval [0.46, 0.86], as well as the breastfeeding rate, pooled relative risk = 0.88, 95% confidence interval [0.81, 0.95]. There was no evidence that periareolar incision was associated with a reduction in the exclusive breastfeeding rate, pooled relative risk = 0.84, 95% confidence interval [0.45, 1.58]. Participants with breast implants are less likely to establish breastfeeding, especially exclusive breastfeeding. Periareolar incision does not appear to reduce the exclusive breastfeeding rate.

  5. Why does the need for medication become a barrier to breastfeeding? A narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClatchey, Alyson K; Shield, Alison; Cheong, Lynn H; Ferguson, Sally L; Cooper, Gabrielle M; Kyle, Gregory J

    2017-12-16

    The need for medication during lactation can contribute to the early cessation of breastfeeding. Breastfeeding women may require medication for acute or chronic health conditions. For some women this need for medication can become a barrier to breastfeeding; this is despite the fact that the majority of medications are considered to be compatible with lactation. This narrative review aims to investigate factors relating to medicines safety that could contribute to medication unnecessarily becoming a barrier to breastfeeding. A selective literature search using PubMed, Scopus and Google Scholar was conducted over a 6-month period using the search terms "breastfeeding", "lactation", "medication" and "information". Articles were assessed to identify whether they addressed the impact of medication use on the decision to breastfeed. Fifty six articles were identified as having appropriate discussion about decision making for the safe use of medication during lactation. Themes identified included variable and conflicting safety advice for medicines; difficulty interpreting risks associated with medicine use; societal pressures faced by the breastfeeding woman; and the varied knowledge and training of health professionals involved in the care of breastfeeding women. Poor quality of information about medicine safety during lactation can contribute to confusion in giving recommendations. This confusion can result in early cessation of breastfeeding or insufficient health care for the breastfeeding woman. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. The Associations of Maternal Weight Change with Breastfeeding, Diet and Physical Activity During the Postpartum Period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Olmedo, Nancy; Hernández-Cordero, Sonia; Neufeld, Lynnette M; García-Guerra, Armando; Mejía-Rodríguez, Fabiola; Méndez Gómez-Humarán, Ignacio

    2016-02-01

    To determine the association between breastfeeding practices, diet and physical activity and maternal postpartum weight. This was a secondary data analysis of a randomized community trial on beneficiaries of the Programa de Desarrollo Humano Oportunidades, recently renamed Prospera (n = 314 pregnant women), without any diseases that could affect body weight. Generalized estimating equations were used to determine the association between postpartum weight change and changes in diet, physical activity and type of breastfeeding. The mean postpartum weight change from the first to the third month was 0.6 ± 2.2 kg. Women who breastfed exclusively for 3 months had a 4.1 (SE = 1.9) kg weight reduction in comparison with women who did not provide exclusive breastfeeding or who discontinued breastfeeding before 3 months (p = 0.04). There was no association between postpartum weight change and physical activity (p = 0.24) or energy intake (p = 0.06). Exclusive breastfeeding was associated with maternal postpartum weight reduction. These results reinforce the World Health Organization recommendation of exclusive breastfeeding during the first 6 months of life in order to reduce the risk of weight retention or weight gain in postpartum women. It has been well established that exclusive breastfeeding is beneficial for both infants and mothers, but promoting breastfeeding as a strategy to promote postpartum weight loss is of paramount importance, especially in countries like Mexico where excessive weight in women of reproductive age is a public health problem.

  7. Weighing women down: messages on weight loss and body shaping in editorial content in popular women's health and fitness magazines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Laura E; Knobloch-Westerwick, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to idealized body images has been shown to lower women's body satisfaction. Yet some studies found the opposite, possibly because real-life media (as opposed to image-only stimuli) often embed such imagery in messages that suggest thinness is attainable. Drawing on social cognitive theory, the current content analysis investigated editorial body-shaping and weight-loss messages in popular women's health and fitness magazines. About five thousand magazine pages published in top-selling U.S. women's health and fitness magazines in 2010 were examined. The findings suggest that body shaping and weight loss are a major topic in these magazines, contributing to roughly one-fifth of all editorial content. Assessing standards of motivation and conduct, as well as behaviors promoted by the messages, the findings reflect overemphasis on appearance over health and on exercise-related behaviors over caloric reduction behaviors and the combination of both behaviors. These accentuations are at odds with public health recommendations.

  8. Strengthening the human rights framework to protect breastfeeding: a focus on CEDAW.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galtry, Judith

    2015-01-01

    There have been recent calls for increased recognition of breastfeeding as a human right. The United Nations Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women, 1979 (CEDAW) is the core human rights treaty on women. CEDAW's approach to breastfeeding is considered from an historical perspective. A comparison is drawn with breastfeeding protection previously outlined in the International Labour Organization's Maternity Protection Convention, 1919 (ILO C3), and its 1952 revision (ILO C103), and subsequently, in the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, 1989 (CRC). Despite breastfeeding's sex-specific significance to an international human rights treaty on women and CEDAW's emphasis on facilitating women's employment, CEDAW is, in reality, a relatively weak instrument for breastfeeding protection. In both its text and subsequent interpretations explicit recognition of breastfeeding is minimal or nonexistent. Explanations for this are proposed and contextualised in relation to various political, social and economic forces, especially those influencing notions of gender equality. During the mid to late 1970s -when CEDAW was formulated - breastfeeding posed a strategic challenge for key feminist goals, particularly those of equal employment opportunity, gender neutral childrearing policy and reproductive rights. Protective legislation aimed at working women had been rejected as outdated and oppressive. Moreover, the right of women to breastfeed was generally assumed, with choice over infant feeding practices often perceived as the right NOT to breastfeed. There was also little awareness or analysis of the various structural obstacles to breastfeeding's practice, such as lack of workplace support, that undermine 'choice'. Subsequent interpretations of CEDAW show that despite significant advances in scientific and epidemiological knowledge about breastfeeding's importance for short-term and long-term maternal health, breastfeeding

  9. Portrayal of tobacco smoking in popular women's magazines: a content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasujee, Naseera; Britton, John; Cranwell, Jo; Lyons, Ailsa; Bains, Manpreet

    2017-09-01

    Whilst many countries have introduced legislation prohibiting tobacco advertising and sponsorship, references to tobacco continue to appear in the media. This study quantified and characterized tobacco smoking content in popular women's magazines. The 10 top weekly and 5 monthly women's magazines most popular among 15-34 year olds in Britain published over a 3-month period were included. A content analysis was conducted for both written and visual content. In 146 magazines, there were 310 instances of tobacco content, the majority of which were positive towards smoking. Instances of celebrities smoking were most common (171, 55%), often in holiday or party settings that could be perceived to be luxurious, glamorous or fun. In all, 55 (18%) tobacco references related to fashion, which generally created an impression of smoking as a norm within the industry; and 34 (11%) text and image references to tobacco in TV and film. There were 50 (16%) reader-initiated mentions of smoking, typically in real-life stories or readers writing in to seek advice about smoking. Anti-smoking references including the hazards of smoking were infrequent (49; 16%). Although tobacco advertising is prohibited in Britain, women's magazines still appear to be promoting positive messages about tobacco and smoking. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. A Test of Kangaroo Care on Preterm Infant Breastfeeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tully, Kristin P.; Holditch-Davis, Diane; White-Traut, Rosemary C.; David, Richard; O’Shea, T. Michael; Geraldo, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Objective To test the effects of kangaroo care (KC) on breastfeeding outcomes in preterm infants compared to two control groups and to explore whether maternal-infant characteristics and the mother’s choice to use KC were related to breastfeeding measures. Design Secondary analysis of a multisite, stratified, and randomized 3-arm trial. The treatment groups used KC, auditory-tactile-visual-vestibular (ATVV) intervention, or preterm infant care information. Setting Neonatal intensive care units from 4 hospitals in the United States from 2006–2011. Participants Racially diverse mothers (N=231) and their preterm infants born weighing breastfeeding, and breastfeeding exclusivity after hospital discharge did not differ statistically among the treatment groups. Regardless of group assignment, married, older, and more educated women were more likely to feed at the breast during hospitalization. Mothers who practiced KC, regardless of randomly allocated group, were more likely to provide their milk than those who did not practice KC. Breastfeeding duration was greatest among more educated women. Conclusion As implemented in this study, assignment to KC did not appear to influence the measured breastfeeding outcomes. PMID:26815798

  11. Support for healthy breastfeeding mothers with healthy term babies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renfrew, Mary J; McCormick, Felicia M; Wade, Angela; Quinn, Beverley; Dowswell, Therese

    2014-01-01

    Background There is extensive evidence of important health risks for infants and mothers related to not breastfeeding. In 2003, the World Health Organization recommended infants be exclusively breastfed until six months of age, with breastfeeding continuing as an important part of the infant’s diet till at least two years of age. However, breastfeeding rates in many countries currently do not reflect this recommendation. Objectives To assess the effectiveness of support for breastfeeding mothers. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (3 October 2011). Selection criteria Randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing extra support for healthy breastfeeding mothers of healthy term babies with usual maternity care. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. Main results Of the 67 studies that we assessed as eligible for inclusion, 52 contributed outcome data to the review (56,451 mother-infant pairs) from 21 countries. All forms of extra support analysed together showed an increase in duration of ‘any breastfeeding’ (includes partial and exclusive breastfeeding) (risk ratio (RR) for stopping any breastfeeding before six months 0.91, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.88 to 0.96). All forms of extra support together also had a positive effect on duration of exclusive breastfeeding (RR at six months 0.86, 95% CI 0.82 to 0.91; RR at four to six weeks 0.74, 95% CI 0.61 to 0.89). Extra support by both lay and professionals had a positive impact on breastfeeding outcomes. Maternal satisfaction was poorly reported. Authors’ conclusions All women should be offered support to breastfeed their babies to increase the duration and exclusivity of breastfeeding. Support is likely to be more effective in settings with high initiation rates, so efforts to increase the uptake of breastfeeding should be in place. Support may be offered either by

  12. Community Rates of Breastfeeding Initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubesic, Tony H; Durbin, Kelly M

    2016-11-01

    Breastfeeding initiation rates vary considerably across racial and ethnic groups, maternal age, and education level, yet there are limited data concerning the influence of geography on community rates of breastfeeding initiation. This study aimed to describe how community rates of breastfeeding initiation vary in geographic space, highlighting "hot spots" and "cool spots" of initiation and exploring the potential connections between race, socioeconomic status, and urbanization levels on these patterns. Birth certificate data from the Kentucky Department of Health for 2004-2010 were combined with county-level geographic base files, Census 2010 demographic and socioeconomic data, and Rural-Urban Continuum Codes to conduct a spatial statistical analysis of community rates of breastfeeding initiation. Between 2004 and 2010, the average rate of breastfeeding initiation for Kentucky increased from 43.84% to 49.22%. Simultaneously, the number of counties identified as breastfeeding initiation hot spots also increased, displaying a systematic geographic pattern in doing so. Cool spots of breastfeeding initiation persisted in rural, Appalachian Kentucky. Spatial regression results suggested that unemployment, income, race, education, location, and the availability of International Board Certified Lactation Consultants are connected to breastfeeding initiation. Not only do spatial analytics facilitate the identification of breastfeeding initiation hot spots and cool spots, but they can be used to better understand the landscape of breastfeeding initiation and help target breastfeeding education and/or support efforts.

  13. [Infant feeding practices and deterioration of breastfeeding in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González de Cosío, Teresita; Escobar-Zaragoza, Leticia; González-Castell, Luz Dinorah; Rivera-Dommarco, Juan Ángel

    2013-01-01

    To present data on infant and young child feeding practices (IYCFP) in Mexico from the 2012 National Health and Nutrition Survey (ENSANUT 2012) to support the development of public policy. Women 12-49y and children <2y. Indicators of IYCFP suggested by WHO were analyzed by geographic, socioeconomic, participation in food programs and health insurance variables. Median duration of breast-feeding: 10.2mo and 14.4% with exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) <6m. Breastfeeding deteriorated in most vulnerable groups. Decline in EBF<6m 2006-2012 was explained by increases in consumption of formula and other milks (4%) and water (4%). Three-quarters (74%) of 6-11mo infants had minimum food diversity, and it was lower in the most vulnerable. Complementary feeding improved but breastfeeding declined in Mexico. Promotion actions must be integral, coordinated, financed and evaluated, with Federal government leadership and should include the participation of various stakeholders.

  14. Maternal Sexuality and Breastfeeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Alison

    2005-01-01

    In this paper I consider the ways in which lactation has been discussed as a form of maternal sexuality, and the implications this carries for our understanding of breastfeeding practices and sexuality. Drawing on knowledge constructed in the western world during the last half of the twentieth century, the paper identifies a shift between the…

  15. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... breastfeeding story Partner resources Search En Español Call the OWH HELPLINE: 1-800-994-9662 9 a.m. — 6 p.m. ET, Monday — Friday Health and Wellness Getting Active Healthy Eating Healthy Weight Mental Health Relationships and Safety Popular topics Caregiver stress Folic acid Heart-healthy ...

  16. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... embed/DpVp07lgDsI Learn the unique ways that breastmilk can improve your child’s health and ... a> Moms share what’s behind the one-of-a-kind bond that breastfeeding brings. Staying ...

  17. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... embed/ge-2Cn-LRAE YouTube embed video: breastfeeding success YouTube embed video: Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to Breastfeeding Support for Nursing Moms in the Workplace: Employer Solutions ... restrictions and may be copied, reproduced, or duplicated without permission of the Office on Women’s Health in the U.S. Department of Health and ...

  18. Breastfeeding and allergic disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Odijk, J; Kull, I; Borres, M P

    2003-01-01

    concluded that breastfeeding seems to protect from the development of atopic disease. The effect appears even stronger in children with atopic heredity. If breast milk is unavailable or insufficient, extensively hydrolysed formulas are preferable to unhydrolysed or partially hydrolysed formulas in terms...

  19. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Support for Nursing Moms in the Workplace: Employer Solutions Blog topics Breastfeeding: Natural Doesn’t Mean Easy ... Ayisyen Français Polski Português Italiano Deutsch 日本語 فارسی English A federal government website managed by the Office ...

  1. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you strong while breastfeeding. Learn more about the foods you should eat. Previous Page ... of the Office on Women’s Health in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Citation of the source is appreciated. Page last ...

  2. Theory and social practice of agency in combining breastfeeding and employment: A qualitative study among health workers in New Delhi, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omer-Salim, Amal; Suri, Shobha; Dadhich, Jai Prakash; Faridi, Mohammad Moonis Akbar; Olsson, Pia

    2014-12-01

    Women's agency, or intentional actions, in combining breastfeeding and employment is significant for health and labour productivity. Previous research in India showed that mothers use various collaborative strategies to ensure a "good enough" combination of breastfeeding and employment. Bandura's theoretical agency constructs previously applied in various realms could facilitate the exploration of agency in an Indian context. To explore manifestations of agency in combining breastfeeding and employment amongst Indian health workers using Bandura's theoretical constructs of agency and women's experiences. Qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted with ten women employees within the governmental health sector in New Delhi, India. Both deductive and inductive qualitative content analyses were used. Bandura's features and modes of agency revealed that intentionality is underpinned by knowledge, forethought means being prepared, self-reactiveness includes collaboration and that self-reflectiveness gives perspective. Women's interviews revealed four approaches to agency entitled: 'All within my stride or the knowledgeable navigator'; 'Much harder than expected, but ok overall'; This is a very lonely job'; and 'Out of my control'. Agency features and their elements are complex, dynamic and involve family members. Bandura's theoretical agency constructs are partially useful in this context, but additional social practice constructs of family structure and relationship quality are needed for better correspondence with women's experiences of agency. The variation in individual approaches to agency has implications for supportive health and workplace services. Copyright © 2014 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of an educational technology on self-efficacy for breastfeeding and practice of exclusive breastfeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javorski, Marly; Rodrigues, Andreyna Javorski; Dodt, Regina Cláudia Melo; Almeida, Paulo César de; Leal, Luciana Pedrosa; Ximenes, Lorena Barbosa

    2018-06-11

    To evaluate the effects of using a flipchart (serial album) on maternal self-efficacy in breastfeeding and its effects on exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) in children's first two months of life. Clinical trial in Recife, Northeastern Brazil, with 112 women in the third trimester of gestation, randomly distributed in intervention group (IG) and control group (CG). The intervention was the use of the flipchart in IG. Data collection was performed through interviews in the prenatal period, and telephone contact at second, fourth and eighth weeks postpartum. The Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale-Short-Form (BSES-SF) was used to measure self-efficacy scores. In the analysis, was used descriptive, bivariate statistics through tests of comparisons of proportions and means, and relative risk assessment. There was a statistically significant difference in mean values of self-efficacy scores between women in the IG and CG (peducational tool had positive effects on self-efficacy scores for breastfeeding and in maintenance of EBF in the IG. Brazilian Registry of Clinical Trials: RBR-5N7K99.

  4. [Development And Validation Of A Breastfeeding Knowledge And Skills Questionnaire].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Fernández-Vegue, M; Menéndez Orenga, M

    2015-12-01

    Pediatricians play a key role in the onset and duration of breastfeeding. Although it is known that they lack formal education on this subject, there are currently no validated tools available to assess pediatrician knowledge regarding breastfeeding. To develop and validate a Breastfeeding Knowledge and Skills Questionnaire for Pediatricians. Once the knowledge areas were defined, a representative sample of pediatricians was chosen to carry out the survey. After pilot testing, non-discriminating questions were removed. Content validity was assessed by 14 breastfeeding experts, who examined the test, yielding 22 scorable items (maximum score: 26 points). To approach criterion validity, it was hypothesized that a group of pediatricians with a special interest in breastfeeding (1) would obtain better results than pediatricians from a hospital without a maternity ward (2), and the latter would obtain a higher score than the medical residents of Pediatrics training in the same hospital (3). The questionnaire was also evaluated before and after a basic course in breastfeeding. Breastfeeding experts have an index of agreement of >.90 for each item. The 3 groups (n=82) were compared, finding significant differences between group (1) and the rest. Moreover, an improvement was observed in the participants who attended the breastfeeding course (n=31), especially among those with less initial knowledge. Regarding reliability, internal consistency (KR-20=.87), interobserver agreement, and temporal stability were examined, with satisfactory results. A practical and self-administered tool is presented to assess pediatrician knowledge regarding breastfeeding, with a documented validity and reliability. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. An evidence-based approach to breastfeeding neonates at risk for hypoglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csont, Georgia Lowmaster; Groth, Susan; Hopkins, Patrick; Guillet, Ronnie

    2014-01-01

    The revised standard of care for breastfeeding infants at risk of developing hypoglycemia during transitioning to extrauterine life was developed using the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) 2011 hypoglycemia guidelines, the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine protocol, and staff input. A pre/postimplementation chart audit indicated support of infant safety by glucose stabilization, breastfeeding within the first hour of life, and breastfeeding frequency without an increase in blood sampling, formula use, or admissions to the special care nursery. © 2014 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  6. Bone and mineral metabolism in primiparous women and its relationship with breastfeeding: a longitudinal study Metabolismo óseo y mineral en mujeres primíparas y su relación con la lactancia: un estudio longitudinal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariela Glerean

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the changes in bone metabolism in breastfeeding women (BF. We selected 30 primiparous women and compared them to 31 nulliparous women. We assessed bone mineral density (BMD in the lumbar spine (LS, femoral neck (FN and trochanter (TROC, biochemical parameters of bone turnover and hormone and cytokine levels at the puerperium, 6 months and 12 months after delivery. A trend to lower BMD of LS was seen at initial evaluation in BF. BMD in LS, FN, and TROC were increased 12 months after delivery. Baseline body mass index was higher in puerperal women (p = 0.02 and correlated with an increased FN and TROC BMD one year post delivery (p = 0.001 and p = 0.003. An increase in bone remodeling markers, and lower urinary calcium was observed; after 12 months these values normalized. Prolactin, parathormone related peptide (PTHrP and IL-6 were enhanced during the first six months of breastfeeding. We conclude that calcium for breastfeeding was obtained by transient mobilization of calcium deposits from the trabecular bone, and urinary calcium sparing induced by calciotrophic hormones and cytokines. Body weigth is an important factor in proximal femur BMD.El objetivo de este estudio fue evaluar los cambios que suceden en el metabolismo óseo de mujeres que amamantan. Se seleccionaron 30 mujeres primíparas y se compararon con 30 mujeres nulíparas como grupo control. Se evaluó la densidad mineral ósea (DMO del raquis lumbar (RL, cuello femoral (CF y trocánter (TROC, parámetros del remodelado óseo, hormonas y citoquinas. Estos parámetros se midieron en el puerperio inmediato, y a los 6 y 12 meses post-parto. La DMO del RL de la mujeres primíparas evidenciaron una tendencia a menores valores al comienzo de la lactancia comparadas con las mujeres controles, y se observó un incremento significativo de la DMO a los 12 meses, alcanzando valores similares al grupo control. La DMO en CF y del TROC aument

  7. Factors associated with exclusive breastfeeding among infants under six months of age in peninsular malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Kok

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breastfeeding is accepted as the natural form of infant feeding. For mothers to be able to breastfeed exclusively to the recommended six months, it is important to understand the factors that influence exclusive breastfeeding. The aim of the study was to identify factors associated with exclusive breastfeeding in Peninsular Malaysia. Methods This was a cross-sectional study involving 682 mother-infant pairs with infants up to six months attending maternal and child health section of the government health clinics in Klang, Malaysia. Data were collected by face-to-face interviews using a pre-tested structured questionnaire over 4 months in 2006. Data on breastfeeding were based on practice in the previous one month period. Logistic regression was used to assess the independent association between the independent variables and exclusive breastfeeding adjusting for infant age. Results The prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding among mothers with infants aged between one and six months was 43.1% (95% CI: 39.4, 46.8. In the multivariate model exclusive breastfeeding was positively associated with rural residence, Malay mothers, non-working and non-smoking mothers, multiparous mothers, term infants, mothers with husbands who support breastfeeding and mothers who practice bed-sharing. Conclusions Interventions that seek to increase exclusive breastfeeding should focus on women who are at risk of early discontinuation of breastfeeding.

  8. In practice, the theory is different: a processual analysis of breastfeeding in northeast Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scavenius, Michael; van Hulsel, Lonneke; Meijer, Julia; Wendte, Hans; Gurgel, Ricardo

    2007-02-01

    'Na prática, a teoria è outra' (in practice, the theory is different) is an old Brazilian saying. This phrase summarizes well the general practice of breastfeeding in Brazil: 'Breast is best' is central in the pregnant women's future oriented 'theory' of how their infant should be fed. In the subsequent weeks after delivery, however, in the daily practicalities of feeding their infant, this theory is, to a large extent, abandoned. The present study is based on a sample of 300 mothers in the city of Aracaju in the Northeast of Brazil. Through interviews, the differences and similarities between knowledge and practice with respect to infant feeding were established. An explanation of these differences is developed on the basis of a processual analysis of the qualitative and quantitative results of the interview data. Nearly all mothers were knowledgeable of the need to breastfeed, and nearly all mothers had initiated breastfeeding. However, only a minority was exclusively breastfeeding at the time of the interview. A distinction is made between a breastfeeding process and a de-breastfeeding process. The data suggest that mothers, in general, start the de-breastfeeding process with the positive intention of ameliorating the infant's situation without realizing the negative processual consequences that most likely ends in a cessation of breastfeeding. The study supports the view that health policy should underline the processual character of both breastfeeding and de-breastfeeding when promoting the importance of exclusive breastfeeding.

  9. [How Italian midwives contribute to breastfeeding promotion: a national experience of "cascade" training].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giusti, Angela; Conti, Stefania; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppina; Donati, Serena; Perra, Alberto; Grandolfo, Michele

    2006-01-01

    Social changes of the last century have increasingly transformed maternity and newborn care into a medical act and have greatly reduced the number of breastfeeding women. In Italy, the explicit aim of the Ministry of Health concerning mother and child health (Progetto-Obiettivo Materno-Infantile) is to bring this process back to a more natural activity. The prevalence of women who breastfed after the third month of life has been set as an indicator of the effectiveness of mother and child health services. However, the percentage of fully breastfeeding women at the fourth month of the newborn varies greatly among Italian regions, from 18 to 56%. As in many other Countries in the European Union, in Italy the initial education of the mother and child caregivers often lacks a specific formal training on breastfeeding promotion, as do academic midwife-training courses. In 2004 the Italian Federation of the Colleges of Midwives implemented a cascade training project in collaboration with the Istituto Superiore di Sanita, to train trainer-midwives who in turn would train midwives, either already working (Continuing Medical Education) or during their formal academic education. Contents, techniques and methods have been the same as those adopted for the World Health Organization's 40+40 hours course "Breastfeeding: counselling: a training course" for trainers. A total of 39 training coordinators and teachers of academic midwifery courses have participated, in two separate groups. In their turn, the trainers have trained 74 working midwives, from almost every Italian region. Throughout the training program, the trainers were supervised by two tutors who assessed their learning-teaching performance and provided a final certificate. The program allowed the trainers and the other participants to reach a standard level of knowledge on the issue, regardless of their initial knowledge. Moreover, it helped to build and share a common language and attitude on the protection

  10. Community attitudes toward breastfeeding in public places among Western Australia Adults, 1995-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xingqiong; Daly, Alison; Pollard, Christina Mary; Binns, Colin William

    2013-05-01

    Community attitudes toward breastfeeding in public influence how comfortable women feel about continuing breastfeeding. Knowledge of the social context helps target breastfeeding-promoting interventions. To examine trends in Western Australian adult attitudes toward breastfeeding in public places. As part of 5 cross-sectional surveys from the Western Australian Nutrition Monitor Survey Series conducted between 1995 and 2009, 5496 adults aged 18 to 64 years were asked whether it was acceptable for mothers to breastfeed their babies in public places, including shopping centers, workplaces, and restaurants, and on public transport. Descriptive statistics and multinomial regressions were used to describe factors associated with attitudes toward publicly breastfeeding. There was no change in the acceptance of breastfeeding in shopping centers, restaurants, and workplaces and on public transport over time, but in 2009, significantly fewer people said that it was unacceptable to breastfeed in public compared with 1995. Women, people older than 44 years, those born outside Australia, and the less educated were those most likely to say that breastfeeding in public was unacceptable. In the years that the question was asked, more than 97% of respondents said that breastfeeding was acceptable if a separate room was provided. Making breastfeeding acceptable and pleasant for mothers in public spaces is a key policy recommendation. Women, people older than 44 years, and those born outside Australia were most likely to respond that breastfeeding in public was unacceptable unless a room was provided. Given that, on average, 70% of the population said that breastfeeding in public was acceptable, investigation into why some women do not think so is warranted.

  11. "Less Than A Wife": A Study of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Content in Teen and Women's Digital Magazines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Ninive; Jones, Hillary

    2016-06-02

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a major public health problem that affects women's physical and mental health. According to the US National Institutes of Health Office of Disease Prevention, there is a need to improve public awareness of the syndrome among health care providers and the public. Women's magazines are a type of "edutainment" that publish health content in addition to beauty, fashion, and entertainment content. These media have the potential to expose primarily female readers to content on PCOS and influence readers' beliefs and attitudes about women with PCOS. The objective of this study was to explore how digital (online) teen and women's magazines portray women with PCOS. We used data from the Alliance for Audited Media to identify popular digital teen and women's magazines with circulation rates ≥1,000,001. We also included magazines with circulation rates 100,001-1,000,000 directed toward racial and ethnic minority readers. A search of magazine websites over a 1-month period in 2015 yielded 21 magazines (eg, Glamour, Cosmopolitan en Español, Essence, and O, The Oprah Magazine) and 170 articles containing "PCOS" and "polycystic ovary syndrome." Textual analysis using a grounded theory approach was used to identify themes. Articles depicted PCOS symptoms as a hindrance to women's social roles as wives and mothers and largely placed personal responsibility on women to improve their health. To a lesser extent, women were depicted as using their personal experience with PCOS to advocate for women's health. Experiences of Latina and African American women and adolescents with PCOS were absent from women's magazine articles. The findings can inform health education programs that teach women to be critical consumers of PCOS-related content in digital women's magazines. Future research on PCOS content in digital teen and women's magazines can help researchers, patients, and consumer groups engage with the media to increase public awareness of PCOS.

  12. [Results of a health education intervention in the continuity of breastfeeding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinero Diaz, Patricia; Burgos Rodríguez, María José; Mejía Ramírez de Arellano, Mercedes

    2015-01-01

    evaluate the efficacy of a nursing intervention based on active observation and resolution of the problems of breastfeeding in the period 24-48h post-partum as regards stopping breastfeeding in mothers who gave birth in Hospital General Universitario, Ciudad Real. A clinical trial was conducted on 100 healthy women who had given birth to a healthy baby in the maternity unit of the Hospital General Universitario Ciudad Real. The results showed that 39.8% of women have problems, and 72% need help to initiate the breastfeeding. Approximately 79.9% continue with breastfeeding after hospital discharge as a result of our intervention. Breastfeeding was stopped by 31.1% of the control group, and by 10.9% in the experimental group (nursing intervention), with significant differences being observed in both groups, with RR 1.29 and 95% CI; 1.04-1.61. Hypogalactia (low milk production) was the most frequent reason for stopping, with no differences in both groups. At 3 months, 16.9% had stopped breastfeeding in the control group, and 9% in the experimental group. At 6 months, 19.3% of the control group did not continue with breastfeeding versus 15.9% in the experimental group. Action, and not only intervention, protocols in the period 48h pospartum when there were problems with breastfeeding were effective for initiation breastfeeding at hospital discharge. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Information Act (FOIA) USA.gov Use Our Content Language Assistance Available Español 繁體中文 Tiếng Việt 한국어 Tagalog Русский العربية Kreyòl Ayisyen Français Polski Português Italiano Deutsch 日本語 فارسی English A federal government website managed by the Office on Women's Health in ...

  14. Breastfeeding in the context of domestic violence-a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnbogadóttir, Hafrún; Thies-Lagergren, Li

    2017-12-01

    To determine the differences in breastfeeding among women who did and did not experience domestic violence during pregnancy and postpartum in a Swedish context. In addition, to identify possible differences regarding breastfeeding between groups with or without a history of violence. Further, determine the relationship between exclusive breastfeeding and symptoms of depression. History of violence may increase the risk of depression and a decrease in, or cessation of, breastfeeding. The study has a cross-sectional design. Data were collected prospectively from March 2012 - May 2015. A cohort of 731 mothers answered a questionnaire from a larger project (1.5 years postpartum). Breastfeeding was reported by 93.7% of participants. Women exposed to domestic violence during pregnancy and/or postpartum (4.5%) were just as likely to breastfeed as women who had not reported exposure to domestic violence. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups with or without a history of violence regarding exclusive breastfeeding. Women reporting several symptoms of depression breastfed exclusively to a lesser extent compared with women who had a few symptoms of depression. Domestic violence did not influence breastfeeding prevalence or duration. Breastfeeding did not differ in women with or without a history of violence. Symptoms of depression influenced duration of exclusive breastfeeding. Beyond recognizing women who are exposed to violence, it is important to identify and to support pregnant women and new mothers with symptoms of depression as their health and the health of their infants depends on the mothers' mental well-being. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Mobile Phone Short Messages to Improve Exclusive Breastfeeding and Reduce Adverse Infant Feeding Practices: Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial in Yangon, Myanmar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hmone, Myat Pan; Li, Mu; Alam, Ashraful; Dibley, Michael J

    2017-06-28

    Myanmar has a high burden of mortality for children aged younger than 5 years in which undernutrition plays a major role. Despite current efforts, the exclusive breastfeeding rate for children under 6 months is only 24%. To date there have been no interventions using mobile phones to improve breastfeeding and other feeding practices in Myanmar. This study aims to implement a breastfeeding promotion intervention using mobile phone text messages in Yangon, Myanmar, and evaluate its impact on breastfeeding practices. M528 is a 2-group parallel-arm randomized controlled trial with 9 months follow-up from recruitment until 6 months post-delivery. A total of 353 pregnant women between 28 and 34 weeks' gestation who had access to a mobile phone and were able to read and write have been recruited from the Central Women's Hospital, Yangon, and allocated randomly to an intervention or control group in a 1:1 ratio. The intervention group received breastfeeding promotional SMS messages 3 times a week while the control group received maternal and child health care messages (excluding breastfeeding-related messages) once a week. The SMS messages were tailored for the women's stage of gestation or the child's age. A formative qualitative study was conducted prior to the trial to inform the study design and text message content. We hypothesize that the exclusive breastfeeding rate in the intervention group will be double that in the control group. The primary outcome is exclusive breastfeeding from birth to 6 months and secondary outcomes are median durations of exclusive breastfeeding and other infant feeding practices. Both primary and secondary outcomes were assessed by monthly phone calls at 1 to 6 months postdelivery in both groups. Participants' delivery status was tracked through text messages, phone calls, and hospital records, and delivery characteristics were assessed 1 month after delivery. Child morbidity and breastfeeding self-efficacy scores were assessed at 1, 3

  16. Maternal and Hospital Factors Associated with First-Time Mothers' Breastfeeding Practice: A Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Tzu-I; Huang, Shu-Her; Lee, Shoou-Yih D

    2015-01-01

    Continuity of breastfeeding is infrequent and indeterminate. Evidence is lacking regarding factors associated with breastfeeding at different postpartum time points. This prospective study investigated the change in, and correlates of, breastfeeding practices after delivery at a hospital and at 1, 3, and 6 months postpartum among first-time mothers. We followed a cohort of 300 primiparous mothers of Taiwan who gave birth at two hospitals during 2010-2011. Logistic and Cox regression analyses were performed to determine factors that were correlated with breastfeeding practices. In the study sample, the rate of exclusive breastfeeding during the hospital stay was 66%; it declined to 37.5% at 1 month and 30.2% at 3 months postpartum. Only 17.1% of women reported continuing breastfeeding at 6 months. Early initiation of breastfeeding, rooming-in practice, and self-efficacy were significantly related to exclusive breastfeeding during the hospital stay. After discharge, health literacy, knowledge, intention, and self-efficacy were positively and significantly associated with breastfeeding exclusivity. Later initiation (hazard ratio=1.53; 95% confidence interval, 1.05, 1.97), shorter intention (hazard ratio=1.42; 95% confidence interval, 1.13, 1.68), and self-efficacy (hazard ratio=0.98; 95% confidence interval, 0.96, 0.99) were important predictors of breastfeeding cessation within 6 months of delivery. Continuous breastfeeding practice for 6 months is challenging and difficult for new mothers. Results showed that factors related to breastfeeding varied over time after delivery. Interventions seeking to sustain breastfeeding should consider new mothers' needs and barriers at different times.

  17. [Malama project in the Region of Murcia (Spain): environment and breastfeeding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega García, J A; Pastor Torres, E; Martínez Lorente, I; Bosch Giménez, V; Quesada López, J J; Hernández Ramón, F; Alcaráz Quiñonero, M; Llamas del Castillo, M M; Torres Cantero, A M; García de León González, R; Sánchez Solís de Querol, M

    2008-05-01

    To identify protective factors and risk factors for the initiation and length of breastfeeding and full breastfeeding, in the Region of Murcia (Spain). The Malama study (Medio Ambiente y Lactancia Materna) is a follow up study from birth up to years of 1,000 mother-child pairs. A description of breastfeeding practices are presented here, the survival curve of breastfeeding and a Cox regression model of the pilot study that includes 101 mother-child pairs and 6 months of follow-up. After six months the prevalence of breastfeeding was 35 %. The mean duration of full breastfeeding was 63 days (median 45 days) with six months prevalence of 8 %. Hazard ratios (HR) for full breastfeeding were, to be a smoker (1.89; 95 % CI: 1.18-3.02), older than 35 years of age (2.04; 95 % CI: 1.22-3.42), caesarean birth (1.63; 95 % CI: 1.00-2.66). As well as those previously mentioned risks for breastfeeding, there were also hazard ratios for primary school education or less (1.63; 95 % CI: 0.98-2.82); to have breastfed an earlier child for at least 16 weeks (0.33; 95 % CI: 0.13-0.79), and to be the first birth (0.50; 95 % CI: 0.27-0.95). The length of both breastfeeding and full breastfeeding increased with the length of the maternal leave (0.96; 95 % CI: 0.94-0.99). Pregestational occupational exposure to endocrine disruptors did not seem to interfere with the duration of breastfeeding. In order to improve quality and duration of breastfeeding programmes, paediatric research and training on breastfeeding practice should be encouraged, to reduce unnecessary caesarean sections, promote tobacco cessation, focus human and economic resources to women with less education, and include legal mechanisms to ensure longer maternal leave.

  18. Breastfeeding knowledge, attitudes, and practices among providers in a medical home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szucs, Kinga A; Miracle, Donna J; Rosenman, Marc B

    2009-03-01

    Breastfeeding offers numerous health advantages to children, mothers, and society. From obstetrics to pediatrics, breastfeeding dyads come in contact with a wide range of healthcare providers. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) calls for pediatricians to support breastfeeding enthusiastically and for all children to have a medical home. We studied an inner-city healthcare system with a Dyson Community Pediatrics Training Initiative Model Medical Home clinic, to explore how a breastfeeding/baby-friendly medical home might be built upon this framework. We describe breastfeeding knowledge, attitudes, and practices among a full range of providers and healthcare system-level barriers to effective and coordinated breastfeeding services. We conducted eight focus groups using semistructured interviews: (1) pediatricians; (2) obstetricians; (3) pediatric nurses and allied health professionals; (4) obstetric nurses and allied health professionals; (5) 24-hour telephone triage answering service nurses; (6) public health nurses; (7) Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) personnel; and (8) lactation consultants and peer counselors. We identified gaps in providers' breastfeeding knowledge, counseling skills, and professional education and training. Providers' cultures and attitudes affect breastfeeding promotion and support. Providers used their own breastfeeding experiences to replace evidence-based knowledge and AAP policy statement recommendations for breastfeeding dyads. There were communication disconnects between provider groups. Providers underestimated their own, and overestimated others', influence on breastfeeding. The system lacked a coordinated breastfeeding mission. This study illuminated key disconnectedness challenges (and, hence, opportunities) for a model medical home in fostering continuous, comprehensive, coordinated, culturally effective, and evidence-based breastfeeding promotion and support.

  19. Determinants of breastfeeding pattern among nursing mothers in Anambra State, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukegbu, A U; Ebenebe, E U; Ukegbu, P O; Onyeonoro, U U

    2011-09-01

    The practice of optimal breastfeeding including exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months of life is still rare among nursing mothers despite numerous benefits of breastfeeding. This study was aimed at identifying the factors influencing breastfeeding pattern among nursing mothers in Anambra State, Nigeria. A cross sectional study was carried out in three comprehensive health centres of Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital (NAUTH) located at Neni, Ukpo and Nnewi communities of Anambra State. A semi structured questionnaire was interviewer administered on 228 nursing mothers consecutively selected by a systematic random sampling method as they visited the maternal and child welfare clinics. In addition, four sessions of focus group discussions (one in each centre) involving 8-10 nursing mothers were held. Most mothers 190 (83.3%) were aged between 20 and 34 years. About 152 (66.6%) had attended or completed secondary education and were mainly traders 86 (37.7%) and full time house wives 66 (29.0%). Majority 208 (91.2%) had at least good knowledge of breastfeeding. Their main source of breastfeeding education was government health facilities (80.85%). Only 85 (37.3%) breastfed exclusively. Exclusively breastfeeding was significantly associated with maternal older age, parity, delivery at government facility, positive family attitude towards exclusive breastfeeding and breastfeeding education from government health facility (p < 0.05). Focus group discussion showed that mothers believed that adequate nutrition, physical, financial and emotional support to them would increase exclusive breastfeeding practice. Exclusive breastfeeding rate was low among the mothers and the factors identified to influence its practice have important implications to breastfeeding intervention programmes. Activities to promote exclusive breastfeeding should be focused on the group of women and location in which it was poorly practiced. In addition, support to the mothers would

  20. Got Milk? Breastfeeding and Milk Analysis of a Mother on Chronic Hemodialysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balzer, Michael S.; Gross, Mechthild M.; Lichtinghagen, Ralf; Haller, Hermann; Schmitt, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Women on dialysis rarely become pregnant. However, the overall rate of successful pregnancies is increasing in this patient population and breastfeeding becomes an option for mothers on dialysis. In this study we performed a systematic breast milk composition analysis of a mother on chronic hemodialysis (HD). Methods Specimens of breast milk and blood were collected in regular intervals before and after HD from a 39-year old woman starting on day 10 postpartum. Samples were analyzed for electrolytes, retention solutes, nutrients and other laboratory measurements. Breast milk samples from low-risk mothers matched for postpartum age were used as controls. Results Significantly higher levels of creatinine and urea were found in pre-HD breast milk when compared to post-HD. A similar post-dialytic decrease was only found for uric acid but not for any other investigated parameter. Conversely, sodium and chloride were significantly increased in post-HD samples. Compared to controls creatinine and urea were significantly higher in pre-HD samples while the difference remained only significant for post-HD creatinine. Phosphate was significantly lower in pre- and post-HD breast milk when compared to controls, whereas calcium showed no significant differences. In terms of nutrient components glucose levels showed a strong trend for a decrease, whereas protein, triglycerides and cholesterol did not differ. Similarly, no significant differences were found in iron, potassium and magnesium content. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge this is the first report on a breastfeeding mother on chronic dialysis. Although we found differences in creatinine, urea, sodium, chloride and phosphate, our general analysis showed high similarity of our patient’s breast milk to samples from low-risk control mothers. Significant variations in breast milk composition between pre- and post-HD samples suggest that breastfeeding might be preferably performed after dialysis treatment. In

  1. Evidence of estrogen modulation on memory processes for emotional content in healthy young women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompili, Assunta; Arnone, Benedetto; D'Amico, Mario; Federico, Paolo; Gasbarri, Antonella

    2016-03-01

    It is well accepted that emotional content can affect memory, interacting with the encoding and consolidation processes. The aim of the present study was to verify the effects of estrogens in the interplay of cognition and emotion. Images from the International Affective Pictures System, based on valence (pleasant, unpleasant and neutral), maintaining arousal constant, were viewed passively by two groups of young women in different cycle phases: a periovulatory group (PO), characterized by high level of estrogens and low level of progesterone, and an early follicular group (EF), characterized by low levels of both estrogens and progesterone. The electrophysiological responses to images were measured, and P300 peak was considered. One week later, long-term memory was tested by means of free recall. Intra-group analysis displayed that PO woman had significantly better memory for positive images, while EF women showed significantly better memory for negative images. The comparison between groups revealed that women in the PO phase had better memory performance for positive pictures than women in the EF phase, while no significant differences were found for negative and neutral pictures. According to the free recall results, the subjects in the PO group showed greater P300 amplitude, and shorter latency, for pleasant images compared with women in the EF group. Our results showed that the physiological hormonal fluctuation of estrogens during the menstrual cycle can influence memory, at the time of encoding, during the processing of emotional information. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Breastfeeding Patterns in the Rural Community of Hilo, Hawai‘i: An Exploration of Existing Data Sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Before any breastfeeding promotion effort, an understanding of the existing breastfeeding patterns is essential. Hawai‘i County is a rural, ethnically diverse, medically underserved community. The purpose of this study was to describe the breastfeeding patterns of women living in Hilo, Hawai‘i. Data from several existing national, state, and local data sets were accessed to identify and describe the breastfeeding patterns of women in this community. Available breastfeeding data about women in Hilo was obtained from the Hawai‘i WIC program and includes initiation, duration, exclusivity of breastfeeding, and reasons for not breastfeeding. These data were compared to data from published reports available at the county, state, and national level. The State of Hawai‘i and Hilo exceed national targets for breastfeeding initiation; however, rates soon drop following delivery, and mixed feedings of infants is common. The highest percentage of mothers weaned their infants within the first four weeks postpartum. The reasons the majority of the mothers gave for weaning were tied to breastfeeding situations that are amenable to skilled lactation support (eg, milk supply issues and latch or sucking problems). While available data sets offer valuable information on the breastfeeding patterns in this rural community, there are limitations to their usefulness, primarily due to the inconsistent operational definitions of infant feeding variables used in the surveys, and the lack of availability of community level data. PMID:23520565

  3. Breastfeeding patterns in the rural community of Hilo, Hawai'i: an exploration of existing data sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flood, Jeanie L

    2013-03-01

    Before any breastfeeding promotion effort, an understanding of the existing breastfeeding patterns is essential. Hawai'i County is a rural, ethnically diverse, medically underserved community. The purpose of this study was to describe the breastfeeding patterns of women living in Hilo, Hawai'i. Data from several existing national, state, and local data sets were accessed to identify and describe the breastfeeding patterns of women in this community. Available breastfeeding data about women in Hilo was obtained from the Hawai'i WIC program and includes initiation, duration, exclusivity of breastfeeding, and reasons for not breastfeeding. These data were compared to data from published reports available at the county, state, and national level. The State of Hawai'i and Hilo exceed national targets for breastfeeding initiation; however, rates soon drop following delivery, and mixed feedings of infants is common. The highest percentage of mothers weaned their infants within the first four weeks postpartum. The reasons the majority of the mothers gave for weaning were tied to breastfeeding situations that are amenable to skilled lactation support (eg, milk supply issues and latch or sucking problems). While available data sets offer valuable information on the breastfeeding patterns in this rural community, there are limitations to their usefulness, primarily due to the inconsistent operational definitions of infant feeding variables used in the surveys, and the lack of availability of community level data.

  4. Breastfeeding, baby friendliness and birth in transition in North Western Russia: a study of women's perceptions of the care they receive when giving birth in six maternity homes in the cities of Archangelsk and Murmansk, 1999.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helsing, E; Chalmers, B E; Dinekina, T J; Kondakova, N I

    2002-01-01

    Women's own views on the quality of the birthing care they received were recorded in a small study in the cities of Archangelsk and Murmansk in February 1999. Six maternity wards took part; one hospital had already been designated as a Baby Friendly Hospital (BFH) according to the strict global criteria of the WHO/UNICEF-recommended Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI). Two of the hospitals had made profound changes in feeding routines and were by their own reckoning close to achieving this distinction, and were included in the BFH group. Three maternity wards were far from being in compliance with the BFHI approach and were grouped as the Non-Baby-Friendly Hospitals (NBFH). A total of 180 newly delivered mothers answered a 60-item questionnaire about their birthing and breastfeeding experiences. The questions were chosen from an existing protocol, the WEB (Women's Experiences of Birth) developed by one of the authors (BC). The study was part of an informal evaluation of five years of BFHI activities in the Barents Region, supported by Norway, and also aimed at recording any positive carry-over effect of the BFHI into obstetric routines as a whole. It was found that the project definitely had had an impact; feeding practices at the BFH were markedly closer to the international BFHI recommendations than at the NBFH. BFH mothers, however, reported suffering from breastfeeding problems just as often or more so than NBFH mothers. Possible explanations are discussed; it is concluded that this cross-sectional study may depict a transitory situation in the BFH. At the two hospitals not yet assessed, although staff felt that they had made profound changes, they may not yet have grasped the full extent and stringency of the changes required. The study shows that, despite good will, some practical details had not yet been worked out, resulting in a mixed outcome for the mothers. There was no noticeable carry-over of the attitudes and basic ideas of the project into

  5. Content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    secondary levels. In subject matter didactics, the question of content is more developed, but it is still mostly confined to teaching on lower levels. As for higher education didactics, discussions on selection of content are almost non-existent on the programmatic level. Nevertheless, teachers are forced...... curriculum, in higher education, and to generate analytical categories and criteria for selection of content, which can be used for systematic didactical reflection. The larger project also concerns reflection on and clarification of the concept of content, including the relation between content at the level......Aim, content and methods are fundamental categories of both theoretical and practical general didactics. A quick glance in recent pedagogical literature on higher education, however, reveals a strong preoccupation with methods, i.e. how teaching should be organized socially (Biggs & Tang, 2007...

  6. Anaemia in HIV-infected pregnant women receiving triple antiretroviral combination therapy for prevention of mother-to-child transmission: a secondary analysis of the Kisumu breastfeeding study (KiBS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odhiambo, Collins; Zeh, Clement; Angira, Frank; Opollo, Valarie; Akinyi, Brenda; Masaba, Rose; Williamson, John M; Otieno, Juliana; Mills, Lisa A; Lecher, Shirley Lee; Thomas, Timothy K

    2016-03-01

    The prevalence of anaemia during pregnancy is estimated to be 35-75% in sub-Saharan Africa and is associated with an increased risk of maternal mortality. We evaluated the frequency and factors associated with anaemia in HIV-infected women undergoing antiretroviral (ARV) therapy for prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) enrolled in The Kisumu Breastfeeding Study 2003-2009. Maternal haematological parameters were monitored from 32 to 34 weeks of gestation to 2 years post-delivery among 522 enrolled women. Clinical and laboratory assessments for causes of anaemia were performed, and appropriate management was initiated. Anaemia was graded using the National Institutes of Health Division of AIDS 1994 Adult Toxicity Tables. Data were analysed using SAS software, v 9.2. The Wilcoxon two-sample rank test was used to compare groups. A logistic regression model was fitted to describe the trend in anaemia over time. At enrolment, the prevalence of any grade anaemia (Hb anaemia (Hb anaemia events occurred around delivery (48.8%; n = 20). Anaemia (Hb ≥ 7 and anaemia at delivery (OR 5.87; 95% CI: 4.48, 7.68, P anaemia coincided with clinical malaria (24.4%; n = 10) and helminth (7.3%; n = 3) infections. Resolution of anaemia among most participants during study follow-up was likely related to receipt of ARV therapy. Efforts should be geared towards addressing common causes of anaemia in HIV-infected pregnant women, prioritising initiation of ARV therapy and management of peripartum blood loss. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Necessidades de saúde de mulheres em processo de amamentação Necesidades de salud de mujeres en el proceso de lactancia Health needs of women in the process of breastfeeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glicéria Tochika Shimoda

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Nosso objetivo foi identificar as necessidades de saúde de mulheres no processo de amamentação. Entrevistamos 238 mulheres, organizamos os dados segundo proposta do Discurso do Sujeito Coletivo. Utilizando taxonomia de Matsumoto, encontramos: Necessidade de boas condições de vida (ter boa alimentação; trabalhar/estudar; ter tempo para si; sono e repouso adequados; boa saúde mental; boas condições para amamentar seu filho; Necessidade de ter acesso a todas as tecnologias de saúde que contribuam para melhorar e prolongar a vida (lidar com intercorrências da amamentação, ter acesso aos serviços de saúde; Necessidade de ter vínculo com um profissional/equipe de saúde; Necessidade de autonomia e autocuidado na escolha do modo de "andar a vida" (ter orientação quanto à amamentação; receber apoio do profissional; sentir-se segura para amamentar.Nuestro objetivo fue identificar las necesidades de salud de la mujer en el proceso de la lactancia materna. Fueron participantes 238 mujeres y los datos fueron organizados de acuerdo a la propuesta del Discurso del Sujeto Colectivo. De acuerdo con la taxonomía de Matsumoto tuvimos: Necesidad de buenas condiciones de vida (tener una buena alimentación, trabajar o estudiar, tener tiempo para sí, sueño y resto adecuados; buena salud mental, buenas condiciones para la lactancia de su hijo; Necesidad de tener acceso a todas las tecnologías de salud que se contribuyen para mejorar y ampliar la vida (para tratar de las complicaciones de la lactancia materna, tener el acceso a los servicios de salud; Necesidad de vincular con un profesional o equipo de salud, Necesidad de cuidado de sí mismo y autonomía en la opción en el camino "para andar la vida" (tener orientación sobre la lactancia, recibir apoyo del profesional; sentirse seguro de sí mismo con respecto a la lactancia materna.Our objective was to identify the health needs of women in their breastfeeding process. We interviewed 238

  8. Breastfeeding and maternal and infant iodine nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, Fereidoun; Smyth, Peter

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this review is to explore information available regarding iodine secretion in milk, both mothers and infants iodine nutrition during breastfeeding and to make recommendations for appropriate iodine supplementation during lactation. MEDLINE was queried for studies between 1960 and 2007 that included lactation and breastfeeding with iodine and iodine deficiency. Studies were selected if they studied (i) Secretion of iodine in breast milk; (ii) breastfeeding and iodine nutrition; (iii) factors affecting maternal iodine metabolism and (iv) recommendations for iodine supplementation during breastfeeding. Thirty-six articles met the selection criteria. The iodine content of breast milk varies with dietary iodine intake, being lowest in areas of iodine deficiency with high prevalence of goitre. Milk iodine levels are correspondingly higher when programs of iodine prophylaxis such as salt iodization or administration of iodized oil have been introduced. The small iodine pool of the neonatal thyroid turns over very rapidly and is highly sensitive to variations in dietary iodine intake. Expression of the sodium iodide symporter is up-regulated in the lactating mammary gland which results in preferential uptake of iodide. In areas of iodine sufficiency breast milk iodine concentration should be in the range of 100-150 microg/dl. Studies from France, Germany, Belgium, Sweden, Spain, Italy, Denmark, Thailand and Zaire have shown breast milk concentrations of nutrition. The current WHO/ICCIDD/UNICEF recommendation for daily iodine intake (250 microg for lactating mothers) has been selected to ensure that iodine deficiency dose not occur in the postpartum period and that the iodine content of the milk is sufficient for the infant's iodine requirement.

  9. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a Beat National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day National Women's Health Week Supporting Nursing Moms ... a Beat National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day National Women's Health Week Supporting Nursing Moms ...

  10. Health disparities and advertising content of women's magazines: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victorio Maria

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Disparities in health status among ethnic groups favor the Caucasian population in the United States on almost all major indicators. Disparities in exposure to health-related mass media messages may be among the environmental factors contributing to the racial and ethnic imbalance in health outcomes. This study evaluated whether variations exist in health-related advertisements and health promotion cues among lay magazines catering to Hispanic, African American and Caucasian women. Methods Relative and absolute assessments of all health-related advertising in 12 women's magazines over a three-month period were compared. The four highest circulating, general interest magazines oriented to Black women and to Hispanic women were compared to the four highest-circulating magazines aimed at a mainstream, predominantly White readership. Data were collected and analyzed in 2002 and 2003. Results Compared to readers of mainstream magazines, readers of African American and Hispanic magazines were exposed to proportionally fewer health-promoting advertisements and more health-diminishing advertisements. Photographs of African American role models were more often used to advertise products with negative health impact than positive health impact, while the reverse was true of Caucasian role models in the mainstream magazines. Conclusion To the extent that individual levels of health education and awareness can be influenced by advertising, variations in the quantity and content of health-related information among magazines read by different ethnic groups may contribute to racial disparities in health behaviors and health status.

  11. Discovery of the content of rumination thoughts among women with marital conflicts: Qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahimeh Namdarpour

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Rumination is the predisposing and continuing factor of depression. Since women are prone to rumination, the purpose of this study was to discover the content of rumination thoughts among women with marital conflicts. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted on a qualitative method basis, and target society was composed of women with marital conflicts and rumination. The sample was selected from among those referring to Isfahan counseling centers and was statured with 15 persons through purposeful sampling method. Information was collected through semi-structured interviews and data analysis was performed based on thematic analysis. Results: Five main categories were obtained from data analysis: root cause analysis, feeling incompetence, remembrance of bitter memories, negative emotions, and hesitation in continuation of couple relationship. Conclusion: The findings indicate that when women with marital conflicts become ruminant, the course of rumination is so that it could harm continuation of their couple relationship. Therefore, to reduce this damage, interventions are required to intervene effectively in this process.

  12. 'This little piranha': a qualitative analysis of the language used by health professionals and mothers to describe infant behaviour during breastfeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Elaine; Fenwick, Jenny; Sheehan, Athena; Schmied, Virginia

    2016-01-01

    Exclusive breastfeeding for the first 6 months of life offers the recommended best start in the life for a newborn baby. Yet, in Australia only a small number of babies receive breast milk exclusively for the first 6 months. Reasons for the introduction of formula milk are multi-factorial including access to appropriate support and the woman's experience of breastfeeding. The language and practices of health professionals can impact upon how a woman feels about breastfeeding and her breastfeeding body. One aspect of breastfeeding support that has had scarce attention in the literature is the language used by health professionals to describe the behaviour of the breastfeeding infant during the early establishment phase of breastfeeding. This paper reveals some of the ways in which midwives, lactation consultants and breastfeeding women describe the newborn baby during the first week after birth. The study was conducted at two maternity units in New South Wales. Interactions between midwives and breastfeeding women were observed and audio recorded on the post-natal ward and in women's homes, in the first week after birth. The transcribed data were analysed using discourse analysis searching for recurring words, themes and metaphors used in descriptions of the breastfeeding baby. Repeated negative references to infant personality and unfavourable interpretations of infant behaviour influenced how women perceived their infant. The findings revealed that positive language and interpretations of infant breastfeeding behaviour emerged from more relationship-based communication. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Coping mechanism against high levels of daily stress by working breastfeeding mothers in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sousan Valizadeh

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: Findings suggest that women need support from family members and family-friendly policies at the workplace. Breastfeeding mothers may benefit from educational programmes that focus on effective coping strategies.

  14. A Content Analysis of the Roles Portrayed by Women in Commercials: 1973 - 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Rosa Acevedo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The principal objective of this paper was to examine female roles portrayed in advertising. More specifically, the question that stimulated this research project was: What message has been signaled to society through advertisements about women? Have these portrayals altered throughout the past decades? The study consisted of a systematic content analysis of Brazilian commercials between 1973 and 2008. A probabilistic sample procedure was adopted. 95 pieces of material were selected. Our results have revealed that certain specific images have changed over the years; however, they continue to be stereotyped and idealized. DOI: 10.5585/remark.v9i3.2201

  15. Breastfeeding attitudes of Finnish parents during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laanterä, Sari; Pölkki, Tarja; Ekström, Anette; Pietilä, Anna-Maija

    2010-12-02

    Breastfeeding attitudes are known to influence infant feeding but little information exists on the prenatal breastfeeding attitudes of parents. The purpose of this study was to describe Finnish parents' prenatal breastfeeding attitudes and their relationships with demographic characteristics. The electronic Breastfeeding Knowledge, Attitude and Confidence scale was developed and 172 people (123 mothers, 49 fathers) completed the study. The data were analysed using factor analysis and nonparametric methods. Breastfeeding was regarded as important, but 54% of the respondents wanted both parents to feed the newborn. The mean rank values of breastfeeding attitudes differed significantly when parity, gender, education, age, breastfeeding history and level of breastfeeding knowledge were considered. The respondents who were expecting their first child, were 18-26 years old or had vocational qualifications or moderate breastfeeding knowledge had more negative feelings and were more worried about breastfeeding than respondents who had at least one child, had a higher vocational diploma or academic degree or had high levels of breastfeeding knowledge. Respondents with high levels of breastfeeding knowledge did not appear concerned about equality in feeding. Both mothers and fathers found breastfeeding important. A father's eagerness to participate in their newborn's life should be included in prenatal breastfeeding counselling and ways in which to support breastfeeding discussed. Relevant information about breastfeeding should focus on the parents who are expecting their first child, those who are young, those with low levels of education or those who have gaps in breastfeeding knowledge, so that fears and negative views can be resolved.

  16. Assessing the validity of measures of an instrument designed to measure employees' perceptions of workplace breastfeeding support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Sally W; Wolfe, Edward W; Olson, Beth H

    2008-09-01

    Breastfeeding rates among working mothers are lower than among mothers who are not employed. An ecological framework suggests that health behaviors, such as breastfeeding, are influenced by intrapersonal and environmental factors. There is no existing instrument to measure women's perception of the workplace environment in providing breastfeeding support. The objective of this study was to pilot an instrument measuring perceptions of the work climate for breastfeeding support among working women. Data were collected from self-administered mailed questionnaires filled out by 104 pregnant women or women who had recently given birth and were employed and breastfeeding. Dimensionally analyses supported the two-dimensional model suggested by the literature. Internal consistency reliability coefficients were high (near 0.90), and the correlation between the subscales was moderately strong (0.68). Only a single item exhibited misfit to the scaling model, and that item was revised after review.

  17. Session 1: Public health nutrition. Breast-feeding practices in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tarrant, R C

    2008-11-01

    Breast-feeding is the superior infant feeding method from birth, with research consistently demonstrating its numerous short- and long-term health benefits for both mother and infant. As a global recommendation the WHO advises that mothers should exclusively breast-feed for the first 6-months of life, thus delaying the introduction of solids during this time. Historically, Irish breast-feeding initiation rates have remained strikingly low in comparison with international data and there has been little improvement in breast-feeding duration rates. There is wide geographical variation in terms of breast-feeding initiation both internationally and in Ireland. Some of these differences in breast-feeding rates may be associated with differing socio-economic characteristics. A recent cross-sectional prospective study of 561 pregnant women attending a Dublin hospital and followed from the antenatal period to 6 months post partum has found that 47% of the Irish-national mothers initiated breast-feeding, while only 24% were still offering \\'any\\' breast milk to their infants at 6 weeks. Mothers\\' positive antenatal feeding intention to breast-feed is indicated as one of the most important independent determinants of initiation and \\'any\\' breast-feeding at 6 weeks, suggesting that the antenatal period should be targeted as an effective time to influence and affect mothers\\' attitudes and beliefs pertaining to breast-feeding. These results suggest that the \\'cultural\\' barrier towards breast-feeding appears to still prevail in Ireland and consequently an environment that enables women to breast-feed is far from being achieved. Undoubtedly, a shift towards a more positive and accepting breast-feeding culture is required if national breast-feeding rates are to improve.

  18. EFFECT OF BEHAVIOUR CHANGE COMMUNICATION ON BREASTFEEDING PRACTICES IN PERIURBAN AREA OF ALIGARH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd. Haroon Khan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: 1.To assess the behavior of pregnant women regarding breastfeeding practices. 2. Assessing impact of Behavior Change Communication Package among pregnant women regarding breastfeeding practices. Study design: A community based intervention study Setting: Field practice areas of Urban Health Training Center, Department of Community Medicine, JNMCH, AMU, Aligarh. Participants: 200 pregnant women (100 pregnant women from each intervention and non-intervention group Sampling: Purposive sampling method. Statistical Analysis: Data analysed with Epi Info version 3.5.1. Percentages, Relative Risk and Chi Square Test used. Results: Due to implementation of BCC Package in intervention, good practices like giving colostrum were increased two times. Initiation of breastfeeding within 1 hour was increased 4.7 times, exclusive breastfeeding was gone up 3.8 times for first seven days of delivery. There was significant difference (P–value <0.05 between the two groups regarding breastfeeding on 7th day of delivery. The differences were significant (P–value-<0.05 on 7th and 28th days of delivery. Conclusion: Good practices of breastfeeding within one hour, using colostrum, exclusive breastfeeding were improved significantly after implementation of behavior change communication package.

  19. Breastfeeding Initiation and Duration in First-Time Mothers: Exploring the Impact of Father Involvement in the Early Post-Partum Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa Hunter

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The early post-partum period is a crucial time for breastfeeding support. Mothers who have physical and emotional support during this period are more likely to be successful in breastfeeding. This study examined the relationship between father involvement and support for breast feeding initiation and duration in first-time mothers. Methods: Overall, 146 women who attended a childbirth education class or breastfeeding course at BABS were asked to fill out the Childbirth Experiences Survey, which explored key topics such as (1 breastfeeding initiation, (2 early post-partum breastfeeding, (3 breastfeeding plan, (4 post-partum breastfeeding support and (5 breast feeding duration. This was a voluntary self-reported questionnaire. The surveys were completed by the mothers during the post-partum period. Results: 45.9% (n=67 of mothers received helped from their husband or partner with breastfeeding while in the hospital, while 54.1% (n=79 of mothers did not receive support from their partners. Mothers who received early post-partum breastfeeding support were more likely to continue breastfeeding after leaving the hospital. Conclusion: First-time mothers who identified as having breastfeeding support from their partners, the infant’s father, during the early post-partum period were more likely to initiate breastfeeding and had longer breastfeeding durations.

  20. The impact on breastfeeding of labour market policy and practice in Ireland, Sweden, and the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galtry, Judith

    2003-07-01

    In recent decades there has been a marked rise in the labour market participation of women with infants in many countries. Partly in response to this trend, there are calls for greater emphasis on infant and child health in research and policy development on parental leave and other work-family balancing measures. Yet achieving high rates of breastfeeding as a health objective has thus far received relatively little attention in this context. Biomedical literature outlines the important health benefits conferred by breastfeeding, including upon infants and young children among middle class populations in developed countries. International recommendations now advise exclusive breastfeeding for 6 months. However, research indicates that the timing of the mother's resumption of employment is a key factor influencing the duration of exclusive breastfeeding. There would thus appear to be considerable potential for labour policy and practice, particularly maternity/parental leave provisions, to positively influence breastfeeding practice. Taking the case studies of Ireland, Sweden, and the United States, this paper explores the implications of labour market and early childhood policy for breastfeeding practice. The equity tensions posed by the breastfeeding-maternal employment intersection are also examined. The paper concludes that both socio-cultural support and labour market/health/early childhood policy are important if high rates of both breastfeeding and women's employment are to be achieved in industrialised countries.

  1. The practice of exclusive breastfeeding among mothers attending a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine reported infant feeding practice with reference to exclusive breastfeeding, exclusive formula feeding and mixed feeding at six weeks postpartum among women attending a postnatal clinic in the Tswaing subdistrict of North West province, and the strength of the association ...

  2. HIV TRANSMISSION BREAST-FEEDING AND HIV: AN UPDATE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    2004-11-02

    Nov 2, 2004 ... (RCT) of breast-feeding versus formula; however, the study had a serious limitation in ... that any groups in the future will attempt an RCT of feeding practices, as the ... (BHITS) Group2 therefore conducted an individual patient .... Counselling and empowering women to make an informed choice on infant ...

  3. Short term effect of breastfeeding on postpartum maternal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Pregnancy related weight gain and retention of gained weight during the postpartum period has remained a challenge to African women. Studies have revealed that breastfeeding has various benefits on both mother and child, however studies on the ability to cause reduction in postpartum maternal weight ...

  4. The practice of exclusive breastfeeding among mothers attending a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-08-08

    Aug 8, 2012 ... Original Research: The practice of exclusive breastfeeding among mothers ... programme for the PMTCT of HIV, which aims to reduce ... Setting and subjects: This study was conducted among women over the age of 18 years attending their first six weeks ..... publications/2009/9789241598873_eng.pdf. 3.

  5. Deaf Mothers and Breastfeeding: Do Unique Features of Deaf Culture and Language Support Breastfeeding Success?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Nancy P.; Cuculick, Jess; Starr, Matthew; Panko, Tiffany; Widanka, Holly; Dozier, Ann

    2014-01-01

    Background Deaf mothers who use American Sign Language (ASL) consider themselves a linguistic minority group, with specific cultural practices. Rarely has this group been engaged in infant-feeding research. Objectives To understand how ASL-using Deaf mothers learn about infant feeding and to identify their breastfeeding challenges. Methods Using a community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach we conducted four focus groups with Deaf mothers who had at least one child 0–5 years. A script was developed using a social ecological model (SEM) to capture multiple levels of influence. All groups were conducted in ASL, filmed, and transcribed into English. Deaf and hearing researchers analyzed data by coding themes within each SEM level. Results Fifteen mothers participated. All had initiated breastfeeding with their most recent child. Breastfeeding duration for eight of the mothers was three weeks to 12 months. Seven of the mothers were still breastfeeding, the longest for 19 months. Those mothers who breastfed longer described a supportive social environment and the ability to surmount challenges. Participants described characteristics of Deaf culture such as direct communication, sharing information, use of technologies, language access through interpreters and ASL-using providers, and strong self-advocacy skills. Finally, mothers used the sign ‘struggle’ to describe their breastfeeding experience. The sign implies a sustained effort over time which leads to success. Conclusions In a setting with a large population of Deaf women and ASL-using providers, we identified several aspects of Deaf culture and language which support BF mothers across institutional, community, and interpersonal levels of the SEM. PMID:23492762

  6. The Interactions between Breastfeeding Mothers and Their Babies during the Breastfeeding Session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Karen

    1993-01-01

    Videotaped 12 breastfeeding mothers and their babies during breastfeeding sessions to investigate maternal-infant interactions occurring during breastfeeding sessions. Presents four case studies to examine differences in breastfeeding interactions, as well as benefits and disadvantages that breastfeeding provided different mother-child pairs. (MM)

  7. Associations Between Postpartum Depression, Breastfeeding, and Oxytocin Levels in Latina Mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara-Cinisomo, Sandraluz; McKenney, Kathryn; Di Florio, Arianna; Meltzer-Brody, Samantha

    2017-09-01

    Postpartum depression (PPD), often comorbid with anxiety, is the leading medical complication among new mothers. Latinas have elevated risk of PPD, which has been associated with early breastfeeding cessation. Lower plasma oxytocin (OT) levels have also been associated with PPD in non-Latinas. This pilot study explores associations between PPD, anxiety, breastfeeding, and OT in Latinas. Thirty-four Latinas were enrolled during their third trimester of pregnancy and followed through 8 weeks postpartum. Demographic data were collected at enrollment. Depression was assessed using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) at each time point (third trimester of pregnancy, 4 and 8 weeks postpartum). The Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) was administered postpartum and EPDS anxiety subscale was used to assess anxiety at each time point. Breastfeeding status was assessed at 4 and 8 weeks postpartum. At 8 weeks, OT was collected before, during, and after a 10-minute breast/bottle feeding session from 28 women who completed the procedures. Descriptive statistics are provided and comparisons by mood and breastfeeding status were conducted. Analyses of variance were used to explore associations between PPD, anxiety, breastfeeding status, and OT. Just under one-third of women were depressed at enrollment. Prenatal depression, PPD, and anxiety were significantly associated with early breastfeeding cessation (i.e., stopped breastfeeding before 2 months) (p < 0.05). There was a significant interaction between early breastfeeding cessation and depression status on OT at 8 weeks postpartum (p < 0.05). Lower levels of OT were observed in women who had PPD at 8 weeks and who had stopped breastfeeding their infant by 8 weeks postpartum. Future studies should investigate the short- and long-term effects of lower OT levels and early breastfeeding cessation on maternal and child well-being.

  8. Breastfeeding and Opiate Substitution Therapy: Starting to Understand Infant Feeding Choices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa E. Graves

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Despite research demonstrating the safety and benefit of breastfeeding in opioid substitution therapy, few women in treatment breastfeed. Understanding the factors contributing to the choices women on opioid substitution therapy make about infant feeding is important. Objectives The aim of this study was to better understand and support infant feeding choices and breastfeeding experiences in women on opioid substitution therapy. Methods A systematic review was conducted on five databases: (1 Ovid MEDLINE(R without revisions, (2 Ovid MEDLINE(R In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, (3 EMBASE, (4 CINAHL, and (5 FRANCIS. From 1081 articles, 46 articles were reviewed. Results The literature supports breastfeeding as an appropriate and safe option for women on opioid substitution treatment. Breastfeeding and rooming-in reduce neonatal abstinence. Women face barriers to breastfeeding due to societal stigma and the lack of patient and health-care provider education. Conclusions Efforts are needed to increase the knowledge that women and health-care professionals have about the safety and benefits of breastfeeding.

  9. Explaining nutritional habits and behaviors of low socioeconomic status women in Sanandaj: a qualitative content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdi, Nasrin; Sadeghi, Roya; Zamani-Alavijeh, Fereshteh; Taghdisi, Mohammad Hossein; Shojaeezadeh, Davoud

    2016-01-01

    Health and behavior are closely related subjects because disease is typically rooted in individuals' unhealthy behaviors and habits. This study aims to identify women's nutritional habits and behaviors in order to design interventions to promote nutritional literacy. This qualitative research is part of a mixed method (quantitative-qualitative) study, conducted based on content analysis. Data were collected using semistructured interviews, group discussions, and in-depth interviews with married women, aged 18-50 years, who were referred to four health care centers in Sanandaj in 2013-2014. Nutritional habits and behaviors of participants were classified into two categories: representation of nutritional behavior based on consumption pattern and representation of nutritional behavior based on consumption method. For the former, eight consumption pattern subcategories were formed: meat, dairy, fast food, local foods, fruits and vegetables, soft drinks, and oils. The latter (representation of nutritional behavior based on consumption method), included two subcategories: consumption method in line with health and consumption method inconsistent with health. Results of this qualitative study provide a solid foundation for development and designing interventions to nutritional literacy promotion based on needs. The designed intervention to healthy nutritional behavior should be based on empowering women and providing facilitator factors of a healthy diet. While designing this study, with a holistic perspective, individual and social aspects of a healthy diet should be taken into account.

  10. Working mothers of the World Health Organization Western Pacific offices: lessons and experiences to protect, promote, and support breastfeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iellamo, Alessandro; Sobel, Howard; Engelhardt, Katrin

    2015-02-01

    Optimal breastfeeding saves lives. However, suboptimal breastfeeding is prevalent, primarily resulting from inappropriate promotion of infant formula and challenges of working mothers to continue breastfeeding. The article aims to determine the extent to which World Health Organization (WHO) policies protect, promote, and support breastfeeding women working at the WHO, Western Pacific Region. An online survey targeted all female WHO and contractual staff in all country and regional offices, who delivered a baby between July 24, 2008 and July 24, 2013. Respondents advised on how the worksite could better support breastfeeding. Thirty-two female staff from 11 of the 12 WHO offices within the Western Pacific Region responded. "Returning to work" (44%) and "not having enough milk" (17%) were the most commonly reported reasons for not breastfeeding. Eighteen (56%) reported using infant formula and 8 (44%) reported that the product was prescribed. Among the suggestions given to better support breastfeeding, 10 (32%) recommended having a private room with a chair, table, electric outlet, and refrigerator. The findings show that women working at the WHO face similar challenges to mothers outside the WHO. Based on the findings, we recommend the following: (1) provide prenatal/postpartum breastfeeding counseling services for employees; (2) establish breastfeeding rooms in country offices and regularly orient staff on agency policies to protect, promote, and support breastfeeding; (3) annually celebrate World Breastfeeding Week with employees; (4) encourage other public and private institutions to conduct online surveys and elicit recommendations from mothers on how their workplace can support breastfeeding; and (5) conduct a larger survey among UN agencies on how to better protect, promote, and support breastfeeding. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. A complex breastfeeding promotion and support intervention in a developing country: study protocol for a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabulsi, Mona; Hamadeh, Haya; Tamim, Hani; Kabakian, Tamar; Charafeddine, Lama; Yehya, Nadine; Sinno, Durriyah; Sidani, Saadieh

    2014-01-15

    Breastfeeding has countless benefits to mothers, children and community at large, especially in developing countries. Studies from Lebanon report disappointingly low breastfeeding exclusivity and continuation rates. Evidence reveals that antenatal breastfeeding education, professional lactation support, and peer lay support are individually effective at increasing breastfeeding duration and exclusivity, particularly in low-income settings. Given the complex nature of the breastfeeding ecosystem and its barriers in Lebanon, we hypothesize that a complex breastfeeding support intervention, which is centered on the three components mentioned above, would significantly increase breastfeeding rates. A multi-center randomized controlled trial. 443 healthy pregnant women in their first trimester will be randomized to control or intervention group. A "prenatal/postnatal" professional and peer breastfeeding support package continuing till 6 months postpartum, guided by the Social Network and Social Support Theory. Control group will receive standard prenatal and postnatal care. Mothers will be followed up from early pregnancy till five years after delivery. Total and exclusive breastfeeding rates, quality of life at 1, 3 and 6 months postpartum, maternal breastfeeding knowledge and attitudes at 6 months postpartum, maternal exclusive breastfeeding rates of future infants up to five years from baseline, cost-benefit and cost-effectiveness analyses of the intervention. Descriptive and regression analysis will be conducted under the intention to treat basis using the most recent version of SPSS. Exclusive breastfeeding is a cost-effective public health measure that has a significant impact on infant morbidity and mortality. In a country with limited healthcare resources like Lebanon, developing an effective breastfeeding promotion and support intervention that is easily replicated across various settings becomes a priority. If positive, the results of this study would provide

  12. Mother’s Views about Efficacy of Prenatal Educational Classes to Prepare for Normal Vaginal Delivery, Postpartum and Breastfeeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ّSomayeh Bahrami

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Prenatal educations focusing on physical, emotional and mental preparation for delivery, health promotion and improving lifestyle behaviors in families during the reproductive years. In this education, parents achieve data about physical, emotional and mental changes during pregnancy delivery and postpartum and overcome skills. Aim of this study was to determine Comments mothers about efficacy prenatal education classes to prepare for normal vaginal delivery, postpartum and breastfeeding in women referring to Dezful health Centers, 2015Materials and Methods: The descriptive study using quota sampling was performed. A total of 250 women consented to participant at study. A questionnaire was provided by content validity. It is reliability was confirmed by Test re-test. A questionnaire was used in 4 Part: demographics, knowledge toward mode of delivery and Comments mothers about efficacy prenatal education classes to prepare for normal vaginal delivery, postpartum and breastfeeding