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Sample records for breast-specific gamma camera

  1. Optimal configuration of a low-dose breast-specific gamma camera based on semiconductor CdZnTe pixelated detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genocchi, B.; Pickford Scienti, O.; Darambara, DG

    2017-05-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most frequent tumours in women. During the ‘90s, the introduction of screening programmes allowed the detection of cancer before the palpable stage, reducing its mortality up to 50%. About 50% of the women aged between 30 and 50 years present dense breast parenchyma. This percentage decreases to 30% for women between 50 to 80 years. In these women, mammography has a sensitivity of around 30%, and small tumours are covered by the dense parenchyma and missed in the mammogram. Interestingly, breast-specific gamma-cameras based on semiconductor CdZnTe detectors have shown to be of great interest to early diagnosis. Infact, due to the high energy, spatial resolution, and high sensitivity of CdZnTe, molecular breast imaging has been shown to have a sensitivity of about 90% independently of the breast parenchyma. The aim of this work is to determine the optimal combination of the detector pixel size, hole shape, and collimator material in a low dose dual head breast specific gamma camera based on a CdZnTe pixelated detector at 140 keV, in order to achieve high count rate, and the best possible image spatial resolution. The optimal combination has been studied by modeling the system using the Monte Carlo code GATE. Six different pixel sizes from 0.85 mm to 1.6 mm, two hole shapes, hexagonal and square, and two different collimator materials, lead and tungsten were considered. It was demonstrated that the camera achieved higher count rates, and better signal-to-noise ratio when equipped with square hole, and large pixels (> 1.3 mm). In these configurations, the spatial resolution was worse than using small pixel sizes (< 1.3 mm), but remained under 3.6 mm in all cases.

  2. Scintimammography (Breast Specific Gamma Imaging-BSGI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is scintimammography? Scintimammography, also known as nuclear medicine breast imaging, is an examination that may be used to ... as Breast Specific Gamma Imaging (BSGI) or Molecular Breast Imaging (MBI). Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical ...

  3. Occult Breast Cancer: Scintimammography with High-Resolution Breast-specific Gamma Camera in Women at High Risk for Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rachel F. Brem; Jocelyn A. Rapelyea; , Gilat Zisman; Kevin Mohtashemi; Joyce Raub; Christine B. Teal; Stan Majewski; Benjamin L. Welch

    2005-08-01

    To prospectively evaluate a high-resolution breast-specific gamma camera for depicting occult breast cancer in women at high risk for breast cancer but with normal mammographic and physical examination findings. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Institutional Review Board approval and informed consent were obtained. The study was HIPAA compliant. Ninety-four high-risk women (age range, 36-78 years; mean, 55 years) with normal mammographic (Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System [BI-RADS] 1 or 2) and physical examination findings were evaluated with scintimammography. After injection with 25-30 mCi (925-1110 MBq) of technetium 99m sestamibi, patients were imaged with a high-resolution small-field-of-view breast-specific gamma camera in craniocaudal and mediolateral oblique projections. Scintimammograms were prospectively classified according to focal radiotracer uptake as normal (score of 1), with no focal or diffuse uptake; benign (score of 2), with minimal patchy uptake; probably benign (score of 3), with scattered patchy uptake; probably abnormal (score of 4), with mild focal radiotracer uptake; and abnormal (score of 5), with marked focal radiotracer uptake. Mammographic breast density was categorized according to BI-RADS criteria. Patients with normal scintimammograms (scores of 1, 2, or 3) were followed up for 1 year with an annual mammogram, physical examination, and repeat scintimammography. Patients with abnormal scintimammograms (scores of 4 or 5) underwent ultrasonography (US), and those with focal hypoechoic lesions underwent biopsy. If no lesion was found during US, patients were followed up with scintimammography. Specific pathologic findings were compared with scintimammographic findings. RESULTS: Of 94 women, 78 (83%) had normal scintimammograms (score of 1, 2, or 3) at initial examination and 16 (17%) had abnormal scintimammograms (score of 4 or 5). Fourteen (88%) of the 16 patients had either benign findings at biopsy or no focal abnormality at US; in two

  4. Gamma ray camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Mendez, Victor

    1997-01-01

    A gamma ray camera for detecting rays emanating from a radiation source such as an isotope. The gamma ray camera includes a sensor array formed of a visible light crystal for converting incident gamma rays to a plurality of corresponding visible light photons, and a photosensor array responsive to the visible light photons in order to form an electronic image of the radiation therefrom. The photosensor array is adapted to record an integrated amount of charge proportional to the incident gamma rays closest to it, and includes a transparent metallic layer, photodiode consisting of a p-i-n structure formed on one side of the transparent metallic layer, and comprising an upper p-type layer, an intermediate layer and a lower n-type layer. In the preferred mode, the scintillator crystal is composed essentially of a cesium iodide (CsI) crystal preferably doped with a predetermined amount impurity, and the p-type upper intermediate layers and said n-type layer are essentially composed of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). The gamma ray camera further includes a collimator interposed between the radiation source and the sensor array, and a readout circuit formed on one side of the photosensor array.

  5. The DRAGO gamma camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorini, C; Gola, A; Peloso, R; Longoni, A; Lechner, P; Soltau, H; Strüder, L; Ottobrini, L; Martelli, C; Lui, R; Madaschi, L; Belloli, S

    2010-04-01

    In this work, we present the results of the experimental characterization of the DRAGO (DRift detector Array-based Gamma camera for Oncology), a detection system developed for high-spatial resolution gamma-ray imaging. This camera is based on a monolithic array of 77 silicon drift detectors (SDDs), with a total active area of 6.7 cm(2), coupled to a single 5-mm-thick CsI(Tl) scintillator crystal. The use of an array of SDDs provides a high quantum efficiency for the detection of the scintillation light together with a very low electronics noise. A very compact detection module based on the use of integrated readout circuits was developed. The performances achieved in gamma-ray imaging using this camera are reported here. When imaging a 0.2 mm collimated (57)Co source (122 keV) over different points of the active area, a spatial resolution ranging from 0.25 to 0.5 mm was measured. The depth-of-interaction capability of the detector, thanks to the use of a Maximum Likelihood reconstruction algorithm, was also investigated by imaging a collimated beam tilted to an angle of 45 degrees with respect to the scintillator surface. Finally, the imager was characterized with in vivo measurements on mice, in a real preclinical environment.

  6. Alternative screening for women with dense breasts: breast-specific gamma imaging (molecular breast imaging).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, Anna; Newel, Mary S

    2015-02-01

    OBJECTIVE. Given mammography's limitations in evaluating dense breasts, examination with breast-specific gamma imaging (BSGI)-also called molecular breast imaging (MBI)-has been proposed. We review the literature pertinent to the performance of BSGI in patients with dense breasts. CONCLUSION. Many studies have reported the sensitivity of BSGI in finding cancers even in dense breasts. However, BSGI has not yet been validated as an effective screening tool in large prospective studies. In addition, whole-body dose remains a significant concern.

  7. Gamma camera performance: technical assessment protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolster, A.A. [West Glasgow Hospitals NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Clinical Physics; Waddington, W.A. [University College London Hospitals NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom). Inst. of Nuclear Medicine

    1996-12-31

    This protocol addresses the performance assessment of single and dual headed gamma cameras. No attempt is made to assess the performance of any associated computing systems. Evaluations are usually performed on a gamma camera commercially available within the United Kingdom and recently installed at a clinical site. In consultation with the manufacturer, GCAT selects the site and liaises with local staff to arrange a mutually convenient time for assessment. The manufacturer is encouraged to have a representative present during the evaluation. Three to four days are typically required for the evaluation team to perform the necessary measurements. When access time is limited, the team will modify the protocol to test the camera as thoroughly as possible. Data are acquired on the camera`s computer system and are subsequently transferred to the independent GCAT computer system for analysis. This transfer from site computer to the independent system is effected via a hardware interface and Interfile data transfer. (author).

  8. [Analog gamma camera digitalization computer system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, G M; Quintana, J C; Jer, J; Astudillo, S; Arenas, L; Araya, H

    2004-01-01

    Digitalization of analogue gamma cameras systems, using special acquisition boards in microcomputers and appropriate software for acquisition and processing of nuclear medicine images is described in detail. Microcomputer integrated systems interconnected by means of a Local Area Network (LAN) and connected to several gamma cameras have been implemented using specialized acquisition boards. The PIP software (Portable Image Processing) was installed on each microcomputer to acquire and preprocess the nuclear medicine images. A specialized image processing software has been designed and developed for these purposes. This software allows processing of each nuclear medicine exam, in a semiautomatic procedure, and recording of the results on radiological films. . A stable, flexible and inexpensive system which makes it possible to digitize, visualize, process, and print nuclear medicine images obtained from analogue gamma cameras was implemented in the Nuclear Medicine Division. Such a system yields higher quality images than those obtained with analogue cameras while keeping operating costs considerably lower (filming: 24.6%, fixing 48.2% and developing 26%.) Analogue gamma camera systems can be digitalized economically. This system makes it possible to obtain optimal clinical quality nuclear medicine images, to increase the acquisition and processing efficiency, and to reduce the steps involved in each exam.

  9. GAMPIX: A new generation of gamma camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gmar, M.; Agelou, M.; Carrel, F.; Schoepff, V.

    2011-10-01

    Gamma imaging is a technique of great interest in several fields such as homeland security or decommissioning/dismantling of nuclear facilities in order to localize hot spots of radioactivity. In the nineties, previous works led by CEA LIST resulted in the development of a first generation of gamma camera called CARTOGAM, now commercialized by AREVA CANBERRA. Even if its performances can be adapted to many applications, its weight of 15 kg can be an issue. For several years, CEA LIST has been developing a new generation of gamma camera, called GAMPIX. This system is mainly based on the Medipix2 chip, hybridized to a 1 mm thick CdTe substrate. A coded mask replaces the pinhole collimator in order to increase the sensitivity of the gamma camera. Hence, we obtained a very compact device (global weight less than 1 kg without any shielding), which is easy to handle and to use. In this article, we present the main characteristics of GAMPIX and we expose the first experimental results illustrating the performances of this new generation of gamma camera.

  10. A novel fully integrated handheld gamma camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massari, R.; Ucci, A.; Campisi, C. [Biostructure and Bioimaging Institute (IBB), National Research Council of Italy (CNR), Rome (Italy); Scopinaro, F. [University of Rome “La Sapienza”, S. Andrea Hospital, Rome (Italy); Soluri, A., E-mail: alessandro.soluri@ibb.cnr.it [Biostructure and Bioimaging Institute (IBB), National Research Council of Italy (CNR), Rome (Italy)

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we present an innovative, fully integrated handheld gamma camera, namely designed to gather in the same device the gamma ray detector with the display and the embedded computing system. The low power consumption allows the prototype to be battery operated. To be useful in radioguided surgery, an intraoperative gamma camera must be very easy to handle since it must be moved to find a suitable view. Consequently, we have developed the first prototype of a fully integrated, compact and lightweight gamma camera for radiopharmaceuticals fast imaging. The device can operate without cables across the sterile field, so it may be easily used in the operating theater for radioguided surgery. The prototype proposed consists of a Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM) array coupled with a proprietary scintillation structure based on CsI(Tl) crystals. To read the SiPM output signals, we have developed a very low power readout electronics and a dedicated analog to digital conversion system. One of the most critical aspects we faced designing the prototype was the low power consumption, which is mandatory to develop a battery operated device. We have applied this detection device in the lymphoscintigraphy technique (sentinel lymph node mapping) comparing the results obtained with those of a commercial gamma camera (Philips SKYLight). The results obtained confirm a rapid response of the device and an adequate spatial resolution for the use in the scintigraphic imaging. This work confirms the feasibility of a small gamma camera with an integrated display. This device is designed for radioguided surgery and small organ imaging, but it could be easily combined into surgical navigation systems.

  11. Toward standardising gamma camera quality control procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhorayef, M. A.; Alnaaimi, M. A.; Alduaij, M. A.; Mohamed, M. O.; Ibahim, S. Y.; Alkandari, F. A.; Bradley, D. A.

    2015-11-01

    Attaining high standards of efficiency and reliability in the practice of nuclear medicine requires appropriate quality control (QC) programs. For instance, the regular evaluation and comparison of extrinsic and intrinsic flood-field uniformity enables the quick correction of many gamma camera problems. Whereas QC tests for uniformity are usually performed by exposing the gamma camera crystal to a uniform flux of gamma radiation from a source of known activity, such protocols can vary significantly. Thus, there is a need for optimization and standardization, in part to allow direct comparison between gamma cameras from different vendors. In the present study, intrinsic uniformity was examined as a function of source distance, source activity, source volume and number of counts. The extrinsic uniformity and spatial resolution were also examined. Proper standard QC procedures need to be implemented because of the continual development of nuclear medicine imaging technology and the rapid expansion and increasing complexity of hybrid imaging system data. The present work seeks to promote a set of standard testing procedures to contribute to the delivery of safe and effective nuclear medicine services.

  12. 21 CFR 892.1100 - Scintillation (gamma) camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Scintillation (gamma) camera. 892.1100 Section 892...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1100 Scintillation (gamma) camera. (a) Identification. A scintillation (gamma) camera is a device intended to image the distribution of radionuclides in...

  13. Quality control of gamma camera systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolster, Alison (ed.)

    2003-07-01

    This report has been prepared by the Radionuclide Special Interest Group of the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine. It replaces the Institute of Physical Sciences in Medicine Report 66. Since the publication of that report, there have been important advances, particularly with regard to wholebody imaging, single photon emission computed tomography, gamma camera positron emission tomography and gamma camera computer/software development. To reflect this, Chapters 1, 2 and 3 remain relatively unchanged from the previous version, while Chapters 4, 5, 6 and 7 have been added to cover the four topics mentioned above. These chapters include detailed quality control test procedures for each type of imaging. Recommendations on the frequency at which various performance parameters should be assessed are summarised in Chapter 8, and Chapter 9 deals briefly with the subject of specifying equipment. Requirement for Quality Control. There is often some confusion about the distinction between the terms 'quality assurance' and 'quality control'. Quality assurance (QA) is usually taken to refer to all aspects of a procedure which contribute to the quality of the results obtained. In nuclear medicine, this would include staff training, testing of radiopharmaceuticals, assessment of equipment performance and reporting of clinical studies. Quality control (QC) refers to the specification, assessment, optimisation and maintenance of a particular aspect, such as the performance of the imaging equipment. The specification of equipment for tendering purposes may include aspects of performance which are difficult for the purchaser to confirm. Acceptance testing may require access to specialised equipment and may be performed by the supplier's engineers. It is essential that the purchaser, or an appropriately experienced person acting on behalf of the purchaser, should be closely involved in the acceptance testing. However, for routine QC, it is

  14. Comparison of breast specific gamma imaging and molecular breast tomosynthesis in breast cancer detection: Evaluation in phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zongyi; Williams, Mark B

    2015-07-01

    Breast specific gamma imaging or molecular breast imaging (BSGI) obtains 2D images of (99m)Tc sestamibi distribution in the breast. Molecular breast tomosynthesis (MBT) maps the tracer distribution in 3D by acquiring multiple projections over a limited angular range. Here, the authors compare the performance of the two technologies in terms of spatial resolution, lesion contrast, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in phantom studies under conditions of clinically relevant sestamibi dose and imaging time. The systems tested were a Dilon 6800 and a MBT prototype developed at the University of Virginia. Both systems comprise a pixelated sodium iodide scintillator, an array of position sensitive photomultipliers, and a parallel hole collimator. The active areas and energy resolution of the systems are similar. System sensitivity, spatial resolution, lesion contrast, and CNR were measured using a Petri dish, a point source phantom, and a breast phantom containing simulated lesions at two depths, respectively. A single BSGI projection was acquired. Five MBT projections were acquired over ±20°. For both modalities, the total scan count density was comparable to that observed for each in typical 10 min human scans following injection of 22 mCi (814 MBq) of (99m)Tc-sestamibi. To assess the impact of reducing the tracer dose, the pixel counts of projection images were later binomially subsampled by a factor of 2 to give images corresponding to an injected activity of approximately 11 mCi (407 MBq). Both unprocessed (pixelated) BSGI projections and interpolated (smoothed) BSGI images displayed by default on the Dilon 6800 workstation were analyzed. Volumetric images were reconstructed from the MBT projections using a maximum likelihood expectation maximization algorithm and extracted slices were analyzed. Over a depth range of 1.5-7.5 cm, BSGI spatial resolution was 5.6-11.5 mm in unprocessed projections and 5.7-12.0 mm in interpolated images. Over the same range, the in

  15. A case of recurrence-mimicking charcoal granuloma in a breast cancer patient: Ultrasound,CT, PET/CT and breast-specific gamma imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Dae Woong; Park, Ji Yeon; Park, Noh Hyuck; Kim, Seon Jeong; Shin, Hyuck Jai; Lee, Jeong Ju [Myongji Hospital, Seonam University College of Medicine, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Seong Yoon [Div. of Hematology-Oncology, Dept. of Internal Medicine, Inje University Ilsan Paik Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    Charcoal remains stable without causing a foreign body reaction and it may be used for preoperative localization of a non-palpable breast mass. However, cases of post-charcoal-marking granuloma have only rarely been reported in the breast, and a charcoal granuloma can be misdiagnosed as malignancy. Herein, we report the ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/CT, and breast-specific gamma imaging findings of recurrence-mimicking charcoal granuloma after breast conserving surgery, following localization with charcoal in a breast cancer patient.

  16. The use of a portable gamma camera for preoperative lymphatic mapping: a comparison with a conventional gamma camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidal-Sicart, Sergi; Paredes, Pilar [Hospital Clinic Barcelona, Nuclear Medicine Department (CDIC), Barcelona (Spain); Institut d' Investigacio Biomedica Agusti Pi Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Barcelona (Spain); Vermeeren, Lenka; Valdes-Olmos, Renato A. [Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital (NKI-AVL), Nuclear Medicine Department, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Sola, Oriol [Hospital Clinic Barcelona, Nuclear Medicine Department (CDIC), Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-04-15

    Planar lymphoscintigraphy is routinely used for preoperative sentinel node visualization, but large gamma cameras are not always available. We evaluated the reproducibility of lymphatic mapping with a smaller and portable gamma camera. In two centres, 52 patients with breast cancer received preoperative lymphoscintigraphy with a conventional gamma camera with a field of view of 40 x 40 cm. Static anterior and lateral images were performed at 15 min, 2 h and 4 h after injection of the radiotracer ({sup 99m}Tc-nanocolloid). At 2 h after injection, anterior and oblique images were also performed with a portable gamma camera (Sentinella, Oncovision) positioned to obtain a field of view of 20 x 20 cm. Visualization of lymphatic drainage on conventional images and images with the portable device were compared for number of nodes depicted, their intensity and localization of sentinel nodes. The images performed with the conventional gamma camera depicted sentinel nodes in 94%, while the portable gamma camera showed drainage in 73%. There was however no significant difference in visualization between the two devices when a lead shield was used to mask the injection area in 43 patients (95 vs 88%, p = 0.25). Second-echelon nodes were visualized in 62% of the patients with the conventional gamma camera and in 29% of the cases with the portable gamma camera. Preoperative imaging with a portable gamma camera fitted with a pinhole collimator to obtain a field of view of 20 x 20 cm is able to depict sentinel nodes in 88% of the cases, if a lead shield is used to mask the injection site. This device may be useful in centres without the possibility to perform a preoperative image. (orig.)

  17. A Multimodality Hybrid Gamma-Optical Camera for Intraoperative Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, John E.; Bugby, Sarah L.; Alqahtani, Mohammed S.; Jambi, Layal K.; Dawood, Numan S.; McKnight, William R.; Ng, Aik H.; Perkins, Alan C.

    2017-01-01

    The development of low profile gamma-ray detectors has encouraged the production of small field of view (SFOV) hand-held imaging devices for use at the patient bedside and in operating theatres. Early development of these SFOV cameras was focussed on a single modality—gamma ray imaging. Recently, a hybrid system—gamma plus optical imaging—has been developed. This combination of optical and gamma cameras enables high spatial resolution multi-modal imaging, giving a superimposed scintigraphic and optical image. Hybrid imaging offers new possibilities for assisting clinicians and surgeons in localising the site of uptake in procedures such as sentinel node detection. The hybrid camera concept can be extended to a multimodal detector design which can offer stereoscopic images, depth estimation of gamma-emitting sources, and simultaneous gamma and fluorescence imaging. Recent improvements to the hybrid camera have been used to produce dual-modality images in both laboratory simulations and in the clinic. Hybrid imaging of a patient who underwent thyroid scintigraphy is reported. In addition, we present data which shows that the hybrid camera concept can be extended to estimate the position and depth of radionuclide distribution within an object and also report the first combined gamma and Near-Infrared (NIR) fluorescence images. PMID:28282957

  18. Breast Imaging Utilizing Dedicated Gamma Camera and (99m)Tc-MIBI: Experience at the Tel Aviv Medical Center and Review of the Literature Breast Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Even-Sapir, Einat; Golan, Orit; Menes, Tehillah; Weinstein, Yuliana; Lerman, Hedva

    2016-07-01

    The scope of the current article is the clinical role of gamma cameras dedicated for breast imaging and (99m)Tc-MIBI tumor-seeking tracer, as both a screening modality among a healthy population and as a diagnostic modality in patients with breast cancer. Such cameras are now commercially available. The technology utilizing a camera composed of a NaI (Tl) detector is termed breast-specific gamma imaging. The technology of dual-headed camera composed of semiconductor cadmium zinc telluride detectors that directly converts gamma-ray energy into electronic signals is termed molecular breast imaging. Molecular breast imaging system has been installed at the Department of Nuclear medicine at the Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv in 2009. The article reviews the literature well as our own experience. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Spectroscopic gamma camera for use in high dose environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Yuichiro; Takahashi, Isao; Ishitsu, Takafumi; Tadokoro, Takahiro; Okada, Koichi; Nagumo, Yasushi; Fujishima, Yasutake; Kometani, Yutaka; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Umegaki, Kikuo

    2016-06-01

    We developed a pinhole gamma camera to measure distributions of radioactive material contaminants and to identify radionuclides in extraordinarily high dose regions (1000 mSv/h). The developed gamma camera is characterized by: (1) tolerance for high dose rate environments; (2) high spatial and spectral resolution for identifying unknown contaminating sources; and (3) good usability for being carried on a robot and remotely controlled. These are achieved by using a compact pixelated detector module with CdTe semiconductors, efficient shielding, and a fine resolution pinhole collimator. The gamma camera weighs less than 100 kg, and its field of view is an 8 m square in the case of a distance of 10 m and its image is divided into 256 (16×16) pixels. From the laboratory test, we found the energy resolution at the 662 keV photopeak was 2.3% FWHM, which is enough to identify the radionuclides. We found that the count rate per background dose rate was 220 cps h/mSv and the maximum count rate was 300 kcps, so the maximum dose rate of the environment where the gamma camera can be operated was calculated as 1400 mSv/h. We investigated the reactor building of Unit 1 at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant using the gamma camera and could identify the unknown contaminating source in the dose rate environment that was as high as 659 mSv/h.

  20. Spectroscopic gamma camera for use in high dose environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, Yuichiro, E-mail: yuichiro.ueno.bv@hitachi.com [Research and Development Group, Hitachi, Ltd., Hitachi-shi, Ibaraki-ken 319-1221 (Japan); Takahashi, Isao; Ishitsu, Takafumi; Tadokoro, Takahiro; Okada, Koichi; Nagumo, Yasushi [Research and Development Group, Hitachi, Ltd., Hitachi-shi, Ibaraki-ken 319-1221 (Japan); Fujishima, Yasutake; Kometani, Yutaka [Hitachi Works, Hitachi-GE Nuclear Energy, Ltd., Hitachi-shi, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Suzuki, Yasuhiko [Measuring Systems Engineering Dept., Hitachi Aloka Medical, Ltd., Ome-shi, Tokyo (Japan); Umegaki, Kikuo [Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo-shi, Hokkaido (Japan)

    2016-06-21

    We developed a pinhole gamma camera to measure distributions of radioactive material contaminants and to identify radionuclides in extraordinarily high dose regions (1000 mSv/h). The developed gamma camera is characterized by: (1) tolerance for high dose rate environments; (2) high spatial and spectral resolution for identifying unknown contaminating sources; and (3) good usability for being carried on a robot and remotely controlled. These are achieved by using a compact pixelated detector module with CdTe semiconductors, efficient shielding, and a fine resolution pinhole collimator. The gamma camera weighs less than 100 kg, and its field of view is an 8 m square in the case of a distance of 10 m and its image is divided into 256 (16×16) pixels. From the laboratory test, we found the energy resolution at the 662 keV photopeak was 2.3% FWHM, which is enough to identify the radionuclides. We found that the count rate per background dose rate was 220 cps h/mSv and the maximum count rate was 300 kcps, so the maximum dose rate of the environment where the gamma camera can be operated was calculated as 1400 mSv/h. We investigated the reactor building of Unit 1 at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant using the gamma camera and could identify the unknown contaminating source in the dose rate environment that was as high as 659 mSv/h.

  1. Development and application of a small gamma camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Kenneth Lee, II

    This work investigates the design, construction, and application of a portable gamma camera based on a single position-sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT) rather than an array of conventional photomultiplier tubes as used in the majority of gamma cameras. The PSPMT is an innovation in phototube design which allows two-dimensional (2-D) position information to be obtained from a single phototube. PSPMT-based portable gamma cameras can have several distinct advantages over portable systems using conventional technology: lower weight, reduced electronics, and smaller size. These advantages imply that PSPMT imagers can be more portable and possibly less expensive than their conventional counterparts. Additionally, this design can be incorporated as modules in conjugate imaging, orthogonal view, or ring detector systems, or even in conventional large-area planar imagers. The PSPMT design is applicable for diagnostic clinical procedures and for basic biomedical research. Clinically, this system could be used for intraoperative imaging; bedside imaging of non-transportable patients, e.g., in an intensive care unit, nursing home, or burn unit; and imaging in outpatient settings. In research settings such as radiopharmaceutical development laboratories, the PSPMT camera is suitable for imaging of small animals. The University of Chicago Small Gamma Camera (SGC) is a PSPMT-based gamma camera. Two SGC systems have been designed and constructed. Computer simulations and physical measurements have been applied to the performance characterization of the SGC. A maximum-likelihood position estimation scheme has been implemented in the system in place of the Anger position estimation scheme used in the majority of conventional gamma cameras. The SGC has been evaluated for several nuclear medicine imaging applications as well as laboratory research imaging. The clinical applications include planar and tomographic imaging. Radiotracer imaging with the SGC has been applied to the

  2. Iterative reconstruction of the detector response for medical gamma cameras

    CERN Document Server

    Morozov, A; Alves, F; Domingos, V; Martins, R; Neves, F; Chepel, V

    2015-01-01

    Statistical event reconstruction techniques can give better results for gamma cameras than the traditional centroid method. However, implementation of such techniques requires detailed knowledge of the PMT light response functions. Here we describe an iterative technique which allows to obtain the response functions from flood irradiation data without imposing strict requirements on the spatial uniformity of the event distribution. A successful application of the technique for medical gamma cameras is demonstrated using both simulated and experimental data. We show that this technique can be used for monitoring of the photomultiplier gain variations. An implementation of the iterative reconstruction technique capable of operating in real-time is also presented.

  3. ISPA - a high accuracy X-ray and gamma camera Exhibition LEPFest 2000

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    ISPA offers ... Ten times better resolution than Anger cameras High efficiency single gamma counting Noise reduction by sensitivity to gamma energy ...for Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT)

  4. An ISPA-camera for gamma rays

    CERN Document Server

    Puertolas, D; Pani, R; Leutz, H; Gys, Thierry; De Notaristefani, F; D'Ambrosio, C

    1995-01-01

    With the recently developed ISPA (Imaging Silicon Pixel Array)-tube attached either to a planar YAlO3(Ce) (YAP) disc (1mm thick) or to a matrix of optically-separated YAP-crystals (5mm high, 0.6 x 0.6 mm2 cross-section) we achieved high spatial resolution of 57Co-122 keV photons. The vacuum-sealed ISPA-tube is only 4 cm long with 3.5 cm diameter and consists of a photocathode viewed at 3 cm distance by a silicon pixel chip, directly detecting the photoelectrons. The chip-anode consists of 1024 rectangular pixels with 75 µm x 500 µm edges, each bump-bonded to their individual front-end electronics. The total pixel array read-out time is 10 µs. The measured intrinsic spatial resolutions (FWHM) of this ISPA-camera are 700 µm (planar YAP) and 310 µm (YAP-matrix). Apart from its already demonstrated application for particle tracking with scintillating fibres, the ISPA-tube provides also an excellent tool in medicine, biology and chemistry.

  5. Background 99mTc-methoxyisobutylisonitrile uptake of breast-specific gamma imaging in relation to background parenchymal enhancement in magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hai-Jeon; Kim, Yemi; Lee, Jee Eun; Kim, Bom Sahn

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated factors that could affect background uptake of (99m)Tc- methoxyisobutylisonitrile (MIBI) on normal breast by breast-specific gamma imaging (BSGI). In addition, the impact of background (99m)Tc-MIBI uptake on the diagnostic performance of BSGI was further investigated. One hundred forty-five women with unilateral breast cancer who underwent BSGI, MRI, and mammography were retrospectively enrolled. Background uptake on BSGI was evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively. Patients were classified into non-dense and dense breast groups according to mammographic breast density. Background parenchymal enhancement (BPE) was rated according to BI-RADS classification. The relationship of age, menopausal status, mammographic breast density, and BPE with background (99m)Tc-MIBI uptake was analyzed. Heterogeneous texture and high background uptake ratio on BSGI were significantly correlated with younger age (p background MIBI uptake (p background MIBI uptake and BPE grade increased. BPE on MRI was the most important factor for background MIBI uptake on BSGI. High background MIBI uptake or marked BPE can diminish the diagnostic performance of BSGI. • Age, menopause, density, and background parenchymal enhancement affect background MIBI uptake. • BPE is an independent factor for background MIBI uptake on BSGI. • Marked BPE may impair BSGI interpretation.

  6. Evaluation of efficiency of a semiconductor gamma camera

    CERN Document Server

    Otake, H; Takeuchi, Y

    2002-01-01

    We evaluation basic characteristics of a compact type semiconductor gamma camera (eZ-SCOPE AN) of Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CdZnTe). This new compact gamma camera has 256 semiconductors representing the same number of pixels. Each semiconductor is 2 mm square and is located in 16 lines and rows on the surface of the detector. The specific performance characteristics were evaluated in the study referring to National Electrical Manufactures Association (NEMA) standards; intrinsic energy resolution, intrinsic count rate performance, integral uniformity, system planar sensitivity, system spatial resolution, and noise to the neighboring pixels. The intrinsic energy resolution measured 5.7% as full width half maximum (FWHM). The intrinsic count rate performance ranging from 17 kcps to 1,285 kcps was evaluated, but the highest intrinsic count rate was not observed. Twenty percents count loss was recognized at 1,021 kcps. The integral uniformity was 1.3% with high sensitivity collimator. The system planar sensitivity w...

  7. Gamma camera intrinsic uniformity in an unstable power supply environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejeh, John E; Adedapo, Kayode S; Akinlade, Bidemi I; Osifo, Bola O A

    2011-01-01

    The main objective of this work was to show that a gamma camera in a developing country could perform efficiently despite electricity outages using intrinsic flood uniformity tests as an index of performance. A total of 143 intrinsic uniformity test results for a new gamma camera in use in an environment with unstable power supply are presented. The integral uniformity for the central field of view (CFOV) was found to be between 3.43% and 1.49% (3.29% for acceptance test) while the integral uniformity for the useful field of view (UFOV) was between 4.51% and 1.9% (5.21% for acceptance test). The differential uniformity for the CFOV was between 1.99% and 1.04% (2.25% for acceptance test) while that of the UFOV was between 2.84% and 1.23% (2.63% for acceptance test). In conclusion, these results show that the uniformity of the gamma camera under this condition is within an acceptable range for both planar and SPET imaging.

  8. The intraoperative mini gamma camera in primary hyperparathyroidism surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrems, Paloma; Guallart, Fernando; Abreu, Pedro; Sopena, Pablo; Dalmau, José; Sopena, Ramón

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of primary hyperparathyroidism surgical treatment has been improved by the arrival of new techniques that allow for better parathyroid gland tracking. A mini gamma camera has recently been developed that makes it possible to take intraoperative parathyroid gammagraphies. The objective of this study was to evaluate the utility of this technique. We prospectively studied 29 patients with primary hyperparathyroidism, comparing the diagnostic effectiveness of the MGP with the results obtained with preoperative techniques (ultrasound scan plus Tc(99m)-sestamibi gammagraphy). The sensitivity and specificity of the mini gamma camera was superior to those of the preoperative techniques, applied to the lateral neck as well as to the face of the neck (lateral: 89.6% sensitivity and 96.15% specificity compared to 79.31% and 92.59% respectively; and neck face: sensitivity and specificity 83.33% and 90.91% against 48.39% and 72.73%). The portable mini gamma camera accurately tracks pathologic parathyroid glands. In that sense, it could be useful when considering a radio-guided surgery with minimal parathyroid invasion. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  9. Clinical usefulness of breast-specific gamma imaging as an adjunct modality to mammography for diagnosis of breast cancer: a systemic review and meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Yu.; Wei, Wei; Yang, Hua-Wei; Liu, Jian-Lun [Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Guangxi Medical University, Department of Breast Surgery of Guangxi Cancer Hospital, Nanning, Guangxi (China)

    2013-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic performance of breast-specific gamma imaging (BSGI) as an adjunct modality to mammography for detecting breast cancer. Comprehensive searches of MEDLINE (1984 to August 2012) and EMBASE (1994 to August 2012) were performed. A summary receiver operating characteristic curve (SROC) was constructed to summarize the overall test performance of BSGI. The sensitivities for detecting subcentimetre cancer and ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) were pooled. The potential of BSGI to complement mammography was also evaluated by identifying mammography-occult breast cancer. Analysis of the studies revealed that the overall validity estimates of BSGI in detecting breast cancer were as follows: sensitivity 95 % (95 % CI 93-96 %), specificity 80 % (95 % CI 78-82 %), positive likelihood ratio 4.63 (95 % CI 3.13-6.85), negative likelihood ratio 0.08 (95 % CI 0.05-0.14), and diagnostic odds ratio 56.67 (95 % CI 26.68-120.34). The area under the SROC was 0.9552 and the Q* point was 0.8977. The pooled sensitivities for detecting subcentimetre cancer and DCIS were 84 % (95 % CI 80-88 %) and 88 % (95 % CI 81-92 %), respectively. Among patients with normal mammography, 4 % were diagnosed with breast cancer by BSGI, and among those with mammography suggestive of malignancy or new biopsy-proven breast cancer, 6 % were diagnosed with additional cancers in the breast by BSGI. BSGI had a high diagnostic performance as an excellent adjunct modality to mammography for detecting breast cancer. The ability to identify subcentimetre cancer and DCIS was also high. (orig.)

  10. The diagnostic sensitivity of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and breast-specific gamma imaging in women with calcified and non-calcified DCIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Sil; Lee, Sang Min; Cha, Eun Suk

    2014-07-01

    Early detection of breast cancer reduces mortality. Therefore, diagnosis of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is important. To compare the sensitivities of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and breast-specific gamma imaging (BSGI) in pathologically proven calcified and non-calcified DCIS. Thirty-five patients with pathologically diagnosed DCIS from 1 June 2009 through 31 December 2011, underwent a protocol involving both breast MRI and BSGI. Each image was assessed by a separate dedicated breast radiologist. All lesions were divided into two groups; with or without microcalcifications on mammograms. In cases without microcalcifications, we recorded the mass, asymmetry, or negative findings on mammography. On MRI, the enhancement pattern was categorized as mass or non-mass-like enhancement. On BSGI, the uptake pattern was analyzed. The histopathological features of the lesions were obtained. Statistical analysis of the sensitivity of each modality was performed using McNemar's test. Thirty-five women with a mean age of 48 years (range, 26-69 years) were enrolled in the study. The total sensitivities of MRI and BSGI in the 35 cases were 91.4% (32 of 35 DCIS) and 68.6% (24 of 35 DCIS), respectively. Eighteen cases with DCIS displayed microcalcifications on mammography, while 17 cases did not. Of these 17 cases without microcalcifications on mammography, 88.2% (15 of 17 DCIS) were detected by MRI and 52.9% (9 of 17 DCIS) by BSGI. Of 18 cases with microcalcifications on mammography, 94.4% (17 of 18 DCIS) were detected by MRI and 83.3% (15 of 19 DCIS) by BSGI. MRI showed a higher sensitivity for the detection of calcified and non-calcified DCIS and is more helpful than BSGI in cases without microcalcifications on mammography. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  11. A fast algorithm for computer aided collimation gamma camera (CACAO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanguillaume, C.; Begot, S.; Quartuccio, M.; Douiri, A.; Franck, D.; Pihet, P.; Ballongue, P.

    2000-08-01

    The computer aided collimation gamma camera is aimed at breaking down the resolution sensitivity trade-off of the conventional parallel hole collimator. It uses larger and longer holes, having an added linear movement at the acquisition sequence. A dedicated algorithm including shift and sum, deconvolution, parabolic filtering and rotation is described. Examples of reconstruction are given. This work shows that a simple and fast algorithm, based on a diagonal dominant approximation of the problem can be derived. Its gives a practical solution to the CACAO reconstruction problem.

  12. Europe's space camera unmasks a cosmic gamma-ray machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-11-01

    The new-found neutron star is the visible counterpart of a pulsating radio source, Pulsar 1055-52. It is a mere 20 kilometres wide. Although the neutron star is very hot, at about a million degrees C, very little of its radiant energy takes the form of visible light. It emits mainly gamma-rays, an extremely energetic form of radiation. By examining it at visible wavelengths, astronomers hope to figure out why Pulsar 1055-52 is the most efficient generator of gamma-rays known so far, anywhere the Universe. The Faint Object Camera found Pulsar 1055-52 in near ultraviolet light at 3400 angstroms, a little shorter in wavelength than the violet light at the extremity of the human visual range. Roberto Mignani, Patrizia Caraveo and Giovanni Bignami of the Istituto di Fisica Cosmica in Milan, Italy, report its optical identification in a forthcoming issue of Astrophysical Journal Letters (1 January 1997). The formal name of the object is PSR 1055-52. Evading the glare of an adjacent star The Italian team had tried since 1988 to spot Pulsar 1055-52 with two of the most powerful ground-based optical telescopes in the Southern Hemisphere. These were the 3.6-metre Telescope and the 3.5-metre New Technology Telescope of the European Southern Observatory at La Silla, Chile. Unfortunately an ordinary star 100,000 times brighter lay in almost the same direction in the sky, separated from the neutron star by only a thousandth of a degree. The Earth's atmosphere defocused the star's light sufficiently to mask the glimmer from Pulsar 1055-52. The astronomers therefore needed an instrument in space. The Faint Object Camera offered the best precision and sensitivity to continue the hunt. Devised by European astronomers to complement the American wide field camera in the Hubble Space Telescope, the Faint Object Camera has a relatively narrow field of view. It intensifies the image of a faint object by repeatedly accelerating electrons from photo-electric films, so as to produce

  13. Diagnostic performance of breast specific gamma imaging (BSGI) for breast cancer: Usefulness of dual phase imaging with {sup 99m}Tc sestamibi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ji Sun; Lee, An Young; Jung, Kyung Pyo; Choi, Su Jung; Lee, Seok Mo; Bae, Sangn Kyun [Inje Univ., Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the usefulness of breast specific gamma imaging (BSGI) with dual phase imaging for increasing diagnostic performance and interpreter confidence. We studied 76 consecutive patients (mean age: 49.3 years, range: 33-61 years) who received 925MBq (25mCi) {sup 99m}Tc sestamibi intravenously. Craniocaudal and mediolateral oblique planar images were acquired for all patients. Delayed images were obtained from all patients 1h after tracer injection, except for patients with no definite abnormal uptake. All images were classified into four categories: group 1 (definite negative) = no definite abnormal uptake; group 2 (possible negative) = symmetrically diffuse and amorphous uptake; group 3 (possible positive) = asymmetrically mild and nodular uptake; group 4 (definite positive) = asymmetrically intense and nodular uptake. To evaluate diagnostic performance, the BSGI studies were classified as positive (group 3 or 4) or negative (group 1 or 2) for malignancy according to a visual analysis. The final diagnoses were derived from histopathological confirmation and/or imaging follow up after at least 6 months (range: 6-14 months) by both ultrasonography and mammography. The patients' ages ranged from 33 to 61 years, with an average of 49.3 years. Thirteen patients were diagnosed with malignancy, and 63 patients were diagnosed as negative for malignancy. Using early images, 43 patients were classified as group 1, 12 as group 2, 10 as group 3 and 11 as group 4. Based on early images, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) and accuracy of BSGI were 77%, 83%, 48%, 95% and 82%, respectively. Dual phase BSGI had a sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy of 69%, 95%, 75%, significantly higher with dual phase imaging than with single phase imaging (p=0.0078), but the sensitivity did not differ significantly (p=1.0). Based on dual phase imaging, the sensitivity, specificity

  14. Coded-aperture Compton camera for gamma-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farber, Aaron M.

    This dissertation describes the development of a novel gamma-ray imaging system concept and presents results from Monte Carlo simulations of the new design. Current designs for large field-of-view gamma cameras suitable for homeland security applications implement either a coded aperture or a Compton scattering geometry to image a gamma-ray source. Both of these systems require large, expensive position-sensitive detectors in order to work effectively. By combining characteristics of both of these systems, a new design can be implemented that does not require such expensive detectors and that can be scaled down to a portable size. This new system has significant promise in homeland security, astronomy, botany and other fields, while future iterations may prove useful in medical imaging, other biological sciences and other areas, such as non-destructive testing. A proof-of-principle study of the new gamma-ray imaging system has been performed by Monte Carlo simulation. Various reconstruction methods have been explored and compared. General-Purpose Graphics-Processor-Unit (GPGPU) computation has also been incorporated. The resulting code is a primary design tool for exploring variables such as detector spacing, material selection and thickness and pixel geometry. The advancement of the system from a simple 1-dimensional simulation to a full 3-dimensional model is described. Methods of image reconstruction are discussed and results of simulations consisting of both a 4 x 4 and a 16 x 16 object space mesh have been presented. A discussion of the limitations and potential areas of further study is also presented.

  15. High count rate gamma camera with independent modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massari, R.; Ucci, A.; Campisi, C.; Scopinaro, F.; Soluri, A.

    2015-11-01

    Advances in nuclear medical imaging are based on the improvements of the detector's performance. Generally the research is focussed on the spatial resolution improvement. However, another important parameter is the acquisition time that can significantly affect performance in some clinical investigation (e.g. first-pass cardiac studies). At present, there are several clinical imaging systems which are able to solve these diagnostic requirements, such as the D-SPECT Cardiac Imaging System (Spectrum Dynamics) or the Nucline Cardiodesk Medical Imaging System (Mediso). Actually, these solutions are organ-specific dedicated systems, while it would be preferable having general purpose planar detectors with high counting rate. Our group has recently introduced the use of scintillation matrices whose size is equal to the overall area of a position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT) in order to design a modular gamma camera. This study allowed optimising the overall pixel identification by improving and controlling the light collection efficiency of each PSPMT. Although we achieved a solution for the problems about the dead area at the junction of the PSPMTs when they are set side by side. In this paper, we propose a modular gamma camera design as the basis to build large area detectors. The modular detector design allows us to achieve better counting performance. In this approach, each module that is made of one or more PSPMTs, can actually acquire data independently and simultaneously, increasing the overall detection efficiency. To verify the improvement in count rate capability we have built two detectors with a field of view of 5 × 5cm2, by using four R8900-C12 PSPMTs (Hamamatsu Photonics K.K.). Each PSPMT was coupled to a dedicated discrete scintillation structure designed to obtain a good homogeneity, high imaging performance and high efficiency. One of the detectors was designed as a standard gamma camera, while the other was composed by four independent

  16. New gamma cameras in nuclear cardiology: D-SPECT; Les nouvelles gamma cameras en cardiologie nucleaire: D-Spect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rouzet, F.; Bechara, T.; Ben Ali, K.; Nassar, P.; Grellier, J.F.; Burg, S.; Hyafil, F.; Le Guludec, D. [Service de medecine nucleaire, groupe hospitalier Bichat-Claude-Bernard, AP-HP, 75 - Paris (France)

    2010-08-15

    Over the past few years, advances in nuclear medicine aimed at decreasing both the duration and dosimetry of exams, without decreasing image quality. In this setting, Spectrum Dynamics (D-Spect) is a new generation gamma camera dedicated to cardiac scintigraphy. Its technology includes solid-state detectors based on pixelated semiconductors, region-centric (cardiac area) scanning, high-sensitivity collimators and resolution recovery. An additional particularity is the patient position during scanning. Phantom studies showed an improvement of sensitivity compared to conventional cameras, at the price of a loss in geometric resolution, which is compensated by resolution recovery. Semiconductors detectors provide a better energy resolution than conventional detectors suited to double isotope acquisitions, and a high count rate allowing dynamic acquisitions. Only few clinical studies are available so far, they suggest performances similar to that of conventional cameras obtained with acquisitions duration reduced to few minutes. The next step is to establish a trade-off between acquisition duration and dosimetry reduction. (authors)

  17. Potential value of color-coded dynamic breast-specific gamma-imaging; comparing {sup 99m}Tc-(V)-DMSA, {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI, and {sup 99m}Tc-HDP in a mouse mammary tumor model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leeuwen, Fijs W.B. van, E-mail: fw.v.leeuwen@nki.n [Departments of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands); Buckle, Tessa; Batteau, Lukas; Pool, Bert; Sinaasappel, Michiel [Departments of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands); Jonkers, Jos [Department of Molecular Biology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands); Gilhuijs, Kenneth G.A. [Departments of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2010-12-15

    Using a mouse mammary tumor model based on orthotopic transplantation of luciferase-expressing mouse ILC cells (KEP1-Luc cells), we evaluated the diagnostic value of three clinically applied tracers: {sup 99m}Tc-(V)-DMSA, {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI, and {sup 99m}Tc-HDP. Uptake of the tracers is compared using static and dynamic imaging procedures. We found that dynamic imaging in combination with pixel-by-pixel color coding has an added value over (high resolution) static imaging procedures. Such dynamic imaging procedures could enhance the potential of breast-specific gamma-imaging.

  18. Optimizing a three-stage Compton camera for measuring prompt gamma rays emitted during proton radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, S W; Robertson, D; Polf, J

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the use of a three-stage Compton camera to measure secondary prompt gamma rays emitted from patients treated with proton beam radiotherapy. The purpose of this study was (1) to develop an optimal three-stage Compton camera specifically designed to measure prompt gamma rays emitted from tissue and (2) to determine the feasibility of using this optimized Compton camera design to measure and image prompt gamma rays emitted during proton beam irradiation. The three-stage Compton camera was modeled in Geant4 as three high-purity germanium detector stages arranged in parallel-plane geometry. Initially, an isotropic gamma source ranging from 0 to 15 MeV was used to determine lateral width and thickness of the detector stages that provided the optimal detection efficiency. Then, the gamma source was replaced by a proton beam irradiating a tissue phantom to calculate the overall efficiency of the optimized camera for detecting emitted prompt gammas. The overall calculated efficiencies varied from ~10−6 to 10−3 prompt gammas detected per proton incident on the tissue phantom for several variations of the optimal camera design studied. Based on the overall efficiency results, we believe it feasible that a three-stage Compton camera could detect a sufficient number of prompt gammas to allow measurement and imaging of prompt gamma emission during proton radiotherapy. PMID:21048295

  19. Thyroid dyshormonogenesis detected through a modified perchlorate discharge test using a gamma-camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sami U; Khan, Aakif U; Khan, Ayub; Khan, Kamran; Ullah, Hameed

    2009-07-01

    To find an easy tool to detect dyshormonogenesis. In this study, the standard perchlorate discharge test was modified by using a gamma-camera instead of a gamma-probe to detect this rare abnormality. By using this technique two cases of dyshormonogenesis were identified. The gamma-camera-based perchlorate discharge test is an easy, reliable, convenient, and feasible procedure where thyroid uptake probe is not available.

  20. Development of NEMA-based Software for Gamma Camera Quality Control

    OpenAIRE

    Rova, Andrew; Celler, Anna; Hamarneh, Ghassan

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a cross-platform software application that implements all of the basic standardized nuclear medicine scintillation camera quality control analyses, thus serving as an independent complement to camera manufacturers’ software. Our application allows direct comparison of data and statistics from different cameras through its ability to uniformly analyze a range of file types. The program has been tested using multiple gamma cameras, and its results agree with comparable analysi...

  1. The utility of intraoperative handheld gamma camera for detection of sentinel lymph nodes in melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozkan, Elgin; Eroglu, Aydan [Ankara University Medical School, Ankara (Turkmenistan)

    2015-12-15

    Accurate identification of the sentinel lymph node (SLN) is an important prognostic factor for melanoma. In a minority of cases drainage to interval nodal basins, such as the epitrochlear region, are possible. Intraoperative handheld gamma cameras have been used to detect SLNs which are located in different anatomical localizations. In this case we report the utility of an intraoperative handheld gamma camera in the localization of epitrochlear drainage of distal upper extremity melanoma and its impact on surgical procedure.

  2. A study on the performance evaluation of small gamma camera collimators using detective quantun efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Ho Sang

    2008-02-15

    The anger-type gamma camera and novel marker compound using Tc-99m were firstly introduced in 1963. The gamma camera systems have being improved and applied to various fields, for example, medical, industrial, and environmental fields. Gamma camera is mainly composed of collimator, detector, and signal processor. And the radiative source is namely the imaging object. The collimator is essential component of gamma camera system because the imaging performance of system is mainly dependent on the collimator. The performance evaluation of collimators can be done by using evaluating factors. In this study, the novel factors for gamma camera evaluation are suggested. The established evaluating factors by NEMA are FWHM, sensitivity, and uniformity. They have some limitations in spite of their usefulness. Firstly, performance evaluation by those factors give insensitive and indirect results only. Secondly, the evaluation of noise property is ambiguous. Thirdly, there is no synthetic evaluation of system performance. Simulation with Monte Carlo code and experiment with a small camera camera were simultaenuously performed to verify novel evaluating factors. For the evaluation of spatial resolution, MTF was applied instead of FWHM. The MTF values presents excellent linear relationship with FWHM values. The NNPS was applied instead of uniformity and sensitivity for the evaluation of noise fluctuation. The NNPS values also presents linear relationship with sensitivity and unifomity. Moreover, these novel factors give quantities as the function of spatial frequencies. Finally, the DQE values were given by calculations with MTF, NNPS, and input SNR. DQE effectively presents the synthetic evaluation of gamma camera performance. It is the conclusion that MTF, NNPS, and DQE can be novel evaluating factors for gamma camera systems and the new factor for synthetic evaluation is derived.

  3. A pinhole gamma camera with optical depth-of-interaction elimination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korevaar, M.A.N.; Heemskerk, J.W.T.; Beekman, F.J.

    2009-01-01

    The performance of pinhole single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) depends on the spatial resolution of the gamma-ray detectors used. Pinhole cameras suffer from strong resolution loss due to the varying depth-of-interaction (DOI) of gamma quanta that enter the detector material at an

  4. Quality controls for gamma cameras and PET cameras: development of a free open-source ImageJ program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlier, Thomas; Ferrer, Ludovic; Berruchon, Jean B.; Cuissard, Regis; Martineau, Adeline; Loonis, Pierre; Couturier, Olivier

    2005-04-01

    Acquisition data and treatments for quality controls of gamma cameras and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) cameras are commonly performed with dedicated program packages, which are running only on manufactured computers and differ from each other, depending on camera company and program versions. The aim of this work was to develop a free open-source program (written in JAVA language) to analyze data for quality control of gamma cameras and PET cameras. The program is based on the free application software ImageJ and can be easily loaded on any computer operating system (OS) and thus on any type of computer in every nuclear medicine department. Based on standard parameters of quality control, this program includes 1) for gamma camera: a rotation center control (extracted from the American Association of Physics in Medicine, AAPM, norms) and two uniformity controls (extracted from the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine, IPEM, and National Electronic Manufacturers Association, NEMA, norms). 2) For PET systems, three quality controls recently defined by the French Medical Physicist Society (SFPM), i.e. spatial resolution and uniformity in a reconstructed slice and scatter fraction, are included. The determination of spatial resolution (thanks to the Point Spread Function, PSF, acquisition) allows to compute the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) in both modalities of cameras. All the control functions are included in a tool box which is a free ImageJ plugin and could be soon downloaded from Internet. Besides, this program offers the possibility to save on HTML format the uniformity quality control results and a warning can be set to automatically inform users in case of abnormal results. The architecture of the program allows users to easily add any other specific quality control program. Finally, this toolkit is an easy and robust tool to perform quality control on gamma cameras and PET cameras based on standard computation parameters, is free, run on

  5. A portable gamma-camera for intraoperative detection of sentinel nodes in the head and neck region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeeren, Lenka; Valdés Olmos, Renato A; Klop, W Martin C; Balm, Alfons J M; van den Brekel, Michiel W M

    2010-05-01

    We introduced and evaluated a portable gamma-camera for intraoperative visualization of sentinel nodes in the head and neck region. Planar lymphoscintigraphy and SPECT/CT were performed after peritumoral injection of (99m)Tc-nanocolloid in 25 patients (head and neck melanoma or oral cavity carcinoma). Sentinel nodes were localized intraoperatively with a portable gamma-camera and a hand-held gamma-probe. The portable gamma-camera was used to determine the distribution of remaining radioactivity after excision of the sentinel nodes. The portable gamma-camera visualized all 70 preoperatively identified sentinel nodes. Sentinel nodes at difficult sites could be localized more efficiently, and in 6 patients, 9 additional nodes (1 tumor-positive) were identified with the portable gamma-camera after excision. Intraoperative identification of sentinel nodes in the head and neck region with a portable gamma-camera is feasible and might lead to detection of more sentinel nodes.

  6. 131I activity quantification of gamma camera planar images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barquero, Raquel; Garcia, Hugo P.; Incio, Monica G.; Minguez, Pablo; Cardenas, Alexander; Martínez, Daniel; Lassmann, Michael

    2017-02-01

    A procedure to estimate the activity in target tissues in patients during the therapeutic administration of 131I radiopharmaceutical treatment for thyroid conditions (hyperthyroidism and differentiated thyroid cancer) using a gamma camera (GC) with a high energy (HE) collimator, is proposed. Planar images are acquired for lesions of different sizes r, and at different distances d, in two HE GC systems. Defining a region of interest (ROI) on the image of size r, total counts n g are measured. Sensitivity S (cps MBq-1) in each acquisition is estimated as the product of the geometric G and the intrinsic efficiency η 0. The mean fluence of 364 keV photons arriving at the ROI per disintegration G, is calculated with the MCNPX code, simulating the entire GC and the HE collimator. Intrinsic efficiency η 0 is estimated from a calibration measurement of a plane reference source of 131I in air. Values of G and S for two GC systems—Philips Skylight and Siemens e-cam—are calculated. The total range of possible sensitivity values in thyroidal imaging in the e-cam and skylight GC measure from 7 cps MBq-1 to 35 cps MBq-1, and from 6 cps MBq-1 to 29 cps MBq-1, respectively. These sensitivity values have been verified with the SIMIND code, with good agreement between them. The results have been validated with experimental measurements in air, and in a medium with scatter and attenuation. The counts in the ROI can be produced by direct, scatter and penetration photons. The fluence value for direct photons is constant for any r and d values, but scatter and penetration photons show different values related to specific r and d values, resulting in the large sensitivity differences found. The sensitivity in thyroidal GC planar imaging is strongly dependent on uptake size, and distance from the GC. An individual value for the acquisition sensitivity of each lesion can significantly alleviate the level of uncertainty in the measurement of thyroid uptake activity for each patient.

  7. The x-/gamma-ray camera ECLAIRs for the gamma-ray burst mission SVOM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godet, O.; Nasser, G.; Atteia, J.-.; Cordier, B.; Mandrou, P.; Barret, D.; Triou, H.; Pons, R.; Amoros, C.; Bordon, S.; Gevin, O.; Gonzalez, F.; Götz, D.; Gros, A.; Houret, B.; Lachaud, C.; Lacombe, K.; Marty, W.; Mercier, K.; Rambaud, D.; Ramon, P.; Rouaix, G.; Schanne, S.; Waegebaert, V.

    2014-07-01

    We present ECLAIRs, the Gamma-ray burst (GRB) trigger camera to fly on-board the Chinese-French mission SVOM. ECLAIRs is a wide-field (~ 2 sr) coded mask camera with a mask transparency of 40% and a 1024 cm2 detection plane coupled to a data processing unit, so-called UGTS, which is in charge of locating GRBs in near real time thanks to image and rate triggers. We present the instrument science requirements and how the design of ECLAIRs has been optimized to increase its sensitivity to high-redshift GRBs and low-luminosity GRBs in the local Universe, by having a low-energy threshold of 4 keV. The total spectral coverage ranges from 4 to 150 keV. ECLAIRs is expected to detect ~ 200 GRBs of all types during the nominal 3 year mission lifetime. To reach a 4 keV low-energy threshold, the ECLAIRs detection plane is paved with 6400 4 × 4 mm2 and 1 mm-thick Schottky CdTe detectors. The detectors are grouped by 32, in 8×4 matrices read by a low-noise ASIC, forming elementary modules called XRDPIX. In this paper, we also present our current efforts to investigate the performance of these modules with their front-end electronics when illuminated by charged particles and/or photons using radioactive sources. All measurements are made in different instrument configurations in vacuum and with a nominal in-flight detector temperature of -20°C. This work will enable us to choose the in-flight configuration that will make the best compromise between the science performance and the in-flight operability of ECLAIRs. We will show some highlights of this work.

  8. A Compton camera prototype for prompt gamma medical imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thirolf P.G.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Compton camera prototype for a position-sensitive detection of prompt γ rays from proton-induced nuclear reactions is being developed in Garching. The detector system allows to track the Comptonscattered electrons. The camera consists of a monolithic LaBr3:Ce scintillation absorber crystal, read out by a multi-anode PMT, preceded by a stacked array of 6 double-sided silicon strip detectors acting as scatterers. The LaBr3:Ce crystal has been characterized with radioactive sources. Online commissioning measurements were performed with a pulsed deuteron beam at the Garching Tandem accelerator and with a clinical proton beam at the OncoRay facility in Dresden. The determination of the interaction point of the photons in the monolithic crystal was investigated.

  9. Gated tomographic radionuclide angiography using cadmium-zinc-telluride detector gamma camera; comparison to traditional gamma cameras

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Maria Maj; Schmidt, Ulla; Huang, Chenxi

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Estimation of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) with equilibrium 99MTc-HSA equilibrium radionuclide angiography (MUGA) is frequently used for assessing cardiac function. The purpose of this study was to compare intra- and interobserver variation between three different gamma...

  10. Monte Carlo Simulation and Experimental Characterization of a Dual Head Gamma Camera

    CERN Document Server

    Rodrigues, S; Abreu, M C; Santos, N; Rato-Mendes, P; Peralta, L

    2007-01-01

    The GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation and experimental characterization of the Siemens E.Cam Dual Head gamma camera hosted in the Particular Hospital of Algarve have been done. Imaging tests of thyroid and other phantoms have been made "in situ" and compared with the results obtained with the Monte Carlo simulation.

  11. Gamma camera imaging for studying intestinal absorption and whole-body distribution of selenomethionine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jan L.; Sjögreen-Gleisner, Katarina; Elema, Dennis Ringkjøbing

    2014-01-01

    ]SeMet was retained within the body after 7 d. In contrast, the measured excretion in urine and faeces for the 7 d period was 8•2 (SD 1•1)% of the activity. Time–activity curves were generated for the whole body, stomach, liver, abdomen (other than the stomach and the liver), brain and femoral muscles. Gamma camera...

  12. Portable gamma camera guidance in sentinel lymph node biopsy: prospective observational study of consecutive cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peral Rubio, F; de La Riva, P; Moreno-Ramírez, D; Ferrándiz-Pulido, L

    2015-06-01

    Sentinel lymph node biopsy is the most important tool available for node staging in patients with melanoma. To analyze sentinel lymph node detection and dissection with radio guidance from a portable gamma camera. To assess the number of complications attributable to this biopsy technique. Prospective observational study of a consecutive series of patients undergoing radioguided sentinel lymph node biopsy. We analyzed agreement between nodes detected by presurgical lymphography, those detected by the gamma camera, and those finally dissected. A total of 29 patients (17 women [62.5%] and 12 men [37.5%]) were enrolled. The mean age was 52.6 years (range, 26-82 years). The sentinel node was dissected from all patients; secondary nodes were dissected from some. In 16 cases (55.2%), there was agreement between the number of nodes detected by lymphography, those detected by the gamma camera, and those finally dissected. The only complications observed were seromas (3.64%). No cases of wound dehiscence, infection, hematoma, or hemorrhage were observed. Portable gamma-camera radio guidance may be of use in improving the detection and dissection of sentinel lymph nodes and may also reduce complications. These goals are essential in a procedure whose purpose is melanoma staging. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  13. A Rotating Phantom: Evaluation Of Hard And Software For Gated Gamma Camera Systems In Nuclear Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanregemorter, J.; Deconinck, F.; Bossuyt, A.

    1986-06-01

    In this paper we describe a rotating dynamic phantom which allows quality control of hardware and software for gated gamma camera systems in nuclear medicine. The phantom not only allows simulation of a gated heart study but also testing of the response of the whole system to time frequencies.

  14. A new intraoperative gamma camera for the sentinel lymph node procedure in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathelin, Carole; Salvador, Samuel; Bekaert, Virgile; Croce, Sabrina; Andriamisandratsoa, Norosoa; Liégeois, Philippe; Prados, Eric; Guyonnet, Jean-Louis; Grucker, Daniel; Brasse, David

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the performance of an intraoperative gamma camera, named CarolIReS, to detect axillary drainage and to assess the removal of sentinel lymph nodes (SLN) in breast surgery. SLN biopsy was performed on 25 patients and the CarolIReS camera was used preoperatively to localize SLNs. During surgery, individual removal of SLNs was performed using a gamma probe and their activity was measured with a gamma ray counter. At the end of surgery, the CarolIReS camera was used again to check the quality of surgery which was followed by surgical excision for remaining SLNs. The detection efficiency of the CarolIReS camera was 2.2 cps/kBq for 99"Tc activity in SLNs. In one case, it allowed the detection of a residual SLN with a low activity (0.5 kBq) which was massively metastatic. Intraoperative cameras could be used to improve the efficiency of the SLN procedure.

  15. Development and evaluation of a portable CZT coded aperture gamma-camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montemont, G.; Monnet, O.; Stanchina, S.; Maingault, L.; Verger, L. [CEA, LETI, Minatec Campus, Univ. Grenoble Alpes, 38054 Grenoble, (France); Carrel, F.; Lemaire, H.; Schoepff, V. [CEA, LIST, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette, (France); Ferrand, G.; Lalleman, A.-S. [CEA, DAM, DIF, 91297 Arpajon, (France)

    2015-07-01

    We present the design and the evaluation of a CdZnTe (CZT) based gamma camera using a coded aperture mask. This camera, based on a 8 cm{sup 3} detection module, is small enough to be portable and battery-powered (4 kg weight and 4 W power dissipation). As the detector has spectral capabilities, the gamma camera allows isotope identification and colored imaging, by affecting one color channel to each identified isotope. As all data processing is done at real time, the user can directly observe the outcome of an acquisition and can immediately react to what he sees. We first present the architecture of the system, how the detector works, and its performances. After, we focus on the imaging technique used and its strengths and limitations. Finally, results concerning sensitivity, spatial resolution, field of view and multi-isotope imaging are shown and discussed. (authors)

  16. A protocol for the calibration of gamma cameras to estimate internal contamination in emergency situations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dantas, B.M.; Lucena, E.A.; Dantas, A.L.A.; Araujo, F.; Melo, D. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria, CNEN, Av. Salvador Allende s/n, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Rebelo, A.M.O. [University Hospital, Nuclear Medicine Center, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Teran, M.; Paolino, A. [Facultad de Quimica, Montevideo (Uruguay); Hermida, J.C. [Hospital de Clinicas, Facultad de Medicina, Montevideo (Uruguay); Rojo, A.M. [Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Puerta, J.A.; Morales, J. [Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Medellin (Colombia); Bejerano, G.M.L. [Centro de Proteccion e Higiene de las Radiaciones, Ciudad de la Habana (Cuba); Alfaro, M.; Ruiz, M.A. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Ocoyoacac (Mexico); Videla, R.; Pinones, O. [Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear, Santiago (Chile); Gonzalez, S. [Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear, Lima (Peru); Navarro, T. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas, Madrid (Spain); Cruz-Suarez, R. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    2007-07-01

    The concern about accidents involving radioactive materials has led to the search of alternative methods to quickly identify and quantify radionuclides in workers and in the population. One of the options to face up an eventual demand for mass monitoring of internal contamination is the use of a nuclear medicine diagnostic equipment known as gamma camera, a device used to scan patients who have been administered specific amounts of radioactive materials for medical purposes. Although the gamma camera is used for image diagnosis, it can be calibrated with anthropomorphic phantoms or point sources for the quantification of radionuclide activities in the human body. This work presents a protocol for the calibration of gamma cameras for such application. In order to evaluate the suitability of this type of equipment, a gamma camera available in a public hospital located in Rio de Janeiro was calibrated for the in vivo measurement of {sup 131}I. The calibration includes the determination of detection efficiencies and minimum detectable activities for each radionuclide. The results show that the gamma camera presents enough sensitivity to detect activity levels corresponding to effective doses below 1 mSv. The protocol is the basis to establish a network of Nuclear Medicine Centres, located in public hospitals in eight countries of Latin America (Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Cuba, Chile, Mexico, Peru and Uruguay) and in Spain that could be requested to collaborate in remediation actions in the event of an accident involving incorporation of radioactive materials. This protocol is one of the most significant outputs of the IAEA-ARCAL Project (RLA/9/049-LXXVIII) aimed to the Harmonization of Internal Dosimetry Procedures. (authors)

  17. Event Processing for Modular Gamma Cameras with Tiled Multi-Anode Photomultiplier Tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salçın, Esen; Furenlid, Lars R

    2012-01-01

    Multi-anode photomultiplier tubes (MAPMTs) are good candidates as light sensors for a new generation of modular scintillation cameras for Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and Positron emission tomography (PET) applications. MAPMTs can provide improved intrinsic spatial resolution (interaction (DOI). However, the area of a single MAPMT module is small for a modular gamma camera, so we are designing read-out electronics that will allow multiple individual MAPMT modules to be optically coupled to a single monolithic scintillator crystal. In order to allow such flexibility, the read-out electronics, which we refer to as the event processor, must be compact and adaptable. In combining arrays of MAPMTs, which may each have 64 to 1024 anodes per unit, issues need to be overcome with amplifying, digitizing, and recording potentially very large numbers of channels per gamma-ray event. In this study, we have investigated different event-processor strategies for gamma cameras with multiple MAPMTs that will employ maximum-likelihood (ML) methods for estimation of 3D spatial location, deposited energy and time of occurrence of events. We simulated anode signals for hypothetical gamma-camera geometries based on models of the stochastic processes inherent in scintillation cameras. The comparison between different triggering and read-out schemes was carried out by quantifying the information content in the anode signals via the Fisher Information Matrix (FIM). We observed that a decline in spatial resolution at the edges of the individual MAPMTs could be improved by the inclusion of neighboring MAPMT anode signals for events near the tiling boundaries. Thus in order to maintain spatial resolution uniformity throughout the modular camera face, we propose dividing an MAPMT's array of anode signals into regions such to help determine when triggers from one MAPMT need to be passed to a neighboring MAPMT so that it can contribute anode information for events between

  18. Simulation of the functioning of a gamma camera using Monte Carlo method; Simulacion del funcionamiento de una camara gamma mediante metodo Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oramas Polo, I.

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents the simulation of the gamma camera Park Isocam II by Monte Carlo code SIMIND. This simulation allows detailed assessment of the functioning of the gamma camera. The parameters evaluated by means of the simulation are: the intrinsic uniformity with different window amplitudes, the system uniformity, the extrinsic spatial resolution, the maximum rate of counts, the intrinsic sensitivity, the system sensitivity, the energy resolution and the pixel size. The results of the simulation are compared and evaluated against the specifications of the manufacturer of the gamma camera and taking into account the National Protocol for Quality Control of Nuclear Medicine Instruments of the Cuban Medical Equipment Control Center. The simulation reported here demonstrates the validity of the SIMIND Monte Carlo code to evaluate the performance of the gamma camera Park Isocam II and as result a computational model of the camera has been obtained. (Author)

  19. Cramer-Rao lower bound optimization of an EM-CCD-based scintillation gamma camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korevaar, Marc A N; Goorden, Marlies C; Beekman, Freek J

    2013-04-21

    Scintillation gamma cameras based on low-noise electron multiplication (EM-)CCDs can reach high spatial resolutions. For further improvement of these gamma cameras, more insight is needed into how various parameters that characterize these devices influence their performance. Here, we use the Cramer-Rao lower bound (CRLB) to investigate the sensitivity of the energy and spatial resolution of an EM-CCD-based gamma camera to several parameters. The gamma camera setup consists of a 3 mm thick CsI(Tl) scintillator optically coupled by a fiber optic plate to the E2V CCD97 EM-CCD. For this setup, the position and energy of incoming gamma photons are determined with a maximum-likelihood detection algorithm. To serve as the basis for the CRLB calculations, accurate models for the depth-dependent scintillation light distribution are derived and combined with a previously validated statistical response model for the EM-CCD. The sensitivity of the lower bounds for energy and spatial resolution to the EM gain and the depth-of-interaction (DOI) are calculated and compared to experimentally obtained values. Furthermore, calculations of the influence of the number of detected optical photons and noise sources in the image area on the energy and spatial resolution are presented. Trends predicted by CRLB calculations agree with experiments, although experimental values for spatial and energy resolution are typically a factor of 1.5 above the calculated lower bounds. Calculations and experiments both show that an intermediate EM gain setting results in the best possible spatial or energy resolution and that the spatial resolution of the gamma camera degrades rapidly as a function of the DOI. Furthermore, calculations suggest that a large improvement in gamma camera performance is achieved by an increase in the number of detected photons or a reduction of noise in the image area. A large noise reduction, as is possible with a new generation of EM-CCD electronics, may improve the

  20. A didactic experiment showing the Compton scattering by means of a clinical gamma camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Ernesto; Auditore, Lucrezia; Campennì, Alfredo; Minutoli, Fabio; Cucinotta, Mariapaola; Sindoni, Alessandro; Baldari, Sergio

    2017-06-01

    We describe a didactic approach aimed to explain the effect of Compton scattering in nuclear medicine imaging, exploiting the comparison of a didactic experiment with a gamma camera with the outcomes from a Monte Carlo simulation of the same experimental apparatus. We employed a 99mTc source emitting 140.5keV photons, collimated in the upper direction through two pinholes, shielded by 6mm of lead. An aluminium cylinder was placed on the source at 50mm of distance. The energy of the scattered photons was measured on the spectra acquired by the gamma camera. We observed that the gamma ray energy measured at each step of rotation gradually decreased from the characteristic energy of 140.5keV at 0° to 102.5keV at 120°. A comparison between the obtained data and the expected results from the Compton formula and from the Monte Carlo simulation revealed a full agreement within the experimental error (relative errors between -0.56% and 1.19%), given by the energy resolution of the gamma camera. Also the electron rest mass has been evaluated satisfactorily. The experiment was found useful in explaining nuclear medicine residents the phenomenology of the Compton scattering and its importance in the nuclear medicine imaging, and it can be profitably proposed during the training of medical physics residents as well. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Design of a Compton camera for 3D prompt-{gamma} imaging during ion beam therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roellinghoff, F., E-mail: roelling@ipnl.in2p3.fr [Universite de Lyon, F-69622 Lyon (France); Universite Lyon 1 and CNRS/IN2P3, UMR 5822, IPNL, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); INSA-Lyon Laboratory of Nondestructive Testing using Ionizing Radiation (CNDRI), F-69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Richard, M.-H., E-mail: mrichard@ipnl.in2p3.fr [Universite de Lyon, F-69622 Lyon (France); Universite Lyon 1 and CNRS/IN2P3, UMR 5822, IPNL, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); INSA-Lyon Laboratory of Nondestructive Testing using Ionizing Radiation (CNDRI), F-69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Chevallier, M.; Constanzo, J.; Dauvergne, D. [Universite de Lyon, F-69622 Lyon (France); Universite Lyon 1 and CNRS/IN2P3, UMR 5822, IPNL, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Freud, N. [INSA-Lyon Laboratory of Nondestructive Testing using Ionizing Radiation (CNDRI), F-69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Henriquet, P.; Le Foulher, F. [Universite de Lyon, F-69622 Lyon (France); Universite Lyon 1 and CNRS/IN2P3, UMR 5822, IPNL, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Letang, J.M. [INSA-Lyon Laboratory of Nondestructive Testing using Ionizing Radiation (CNDRI), F-69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Montarou, G. [LPC, CNRS/IN2P3, Clermont-F. University (France); Ray, C.; Testa, E.; Testa, M. [Universite de Lyon, F-69622 Lyon (France); Universite Lyon 1 and CNRS/IN2P3, UMR 5822, IPNL, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Walenta, A.H. [Uni-Siegen, FB Physik, Emmy-Noether Campus, D-57068 Siegen (Germany)

    2011-08-21

    We investigate, by means of Geant4 simulations, a real-time method to control the position of the Bragg peak during ion therapy, based on a Compton camera in combination with a beam tagging device (hodoscope) in order to detect the prompt gamma emitted during nuclear fragmentation. The proposed set-up consists of a stack of 2 mm thick silicon strip detectors and a LYSO absorber detector. The {gamma} emission points are reconstructed analytically by intersecting the ion trajectories given by the beam hodoscope and the Compton cones given by the camera. The camera response to a polychromatic point source in air is analyzed with regard to both spatial resolution and detection efficiency. Various geometrical configurations of the camera have been tested. In the proposed configuration, for a typical polychromatic photon point source, the spatial resolution of the camera is about 8.3 mm FWHM and the detection efficiency 2.5x10{sup -4} (reconstructable photons/emitted photons in 4{pi}). Finally, the clinical applicability of our system is considered and possible starting points for further developments of a prototype are discussed.

  2. [Evaluation of small semiconductor gamma camera--simulation of sentinel lymph node biopsy by using a trial product of clinical type gamma camera].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Takaaki; Hayama, Kazuhide; Tsuchimochi, Makoto

    2009-03-01

    This study was to verify the performance of three different collimators that were equipped to the clinical application type of small semiconductor gamma camera (SSGC) for radio-guided surgery. We also wanted to see if the clinical application type could be effective to detect sentinel nodes in simulation studies for sentinel lymph node biopsy. The camera head consisted of a pixelized CdTe module (32 x 32 individual elements, total of 1,024 pixels) (Acrorad Co. Ltd., Tokyo, Japan). The field of view was 44.8 mm x 44.8 mm. The clinical application type of this gamma camera had three exchangeable collimators; standard, high sensitivity and high resolution (ST, HS, HR). Energy resolution, full-width at half-maximum (FWHM), of the CdTe detector attached with the standard collimator was 6.9% at 141 keV (99mTc). The spatial resolution, represented by FWHM, had a mean value of 1.59 mm. The data was comparable to the results of the prototype SSGC. The simulation studies showed that HS could more sensitively detect the simulated nodes than ST and HR did, and HR could more reliably distinguish the simulated sentinel node that situated close to the injection site than other two collimators did. However the depiction was interfered by the higher background radiation levels. We suggest that this SSGC clinical application type may provide advantages over the standard system for isolating sentinel lymph nodes biopsy. We also believe that the SSGC may aid surgeons in identifying target tissues when performing radio-guided surgery.

  3. Radioguided occult lesion localisation in breast cancer using an intraoperative portable gamma camera: first results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, P; Vidal-Sicart, S; Zanón, G; Roé, N; Rubí, S; Lafuente, S; Pavía, J; Pons, F

    2008-02-01

    The role of the radioguided occult lesion localisation (ROLL) technique in breast cancer has been increasing in recent years. One of the important drawbacks of such a technique is radiotracer spillage within the mammary gland that makes the precise lesion resection difficult, and this requires the use of a hook-wire collocation to reach the lesion. The possibility of obtaining an intraoperative image of the specimen could help to confirm whether the lesion is correctly removed. Some types of portable gamma cameras have been designed, but up to now, intraoperative use has been confined to surgery of parathyroid adenomas and sentinel lymph node location. The aim of the study was to value the usefulness of an intraoperative gamma camera to assess the resection of non-palpable breast lesions. The study involved 42 women diagnosed with non-palpable early breast cancer. Lymphoscintigraphy was performed on the day before surgery by injection of (99m)Tc-labelled nanocolloid. During surgery a gamma probe was used to guide the surgeon, and afterwards images of the surgical bed and the tumoral specimen were acquired by means of a portable gamma camera, fitted with a pinhole collimator. A (99m)Tc pointer was used to draw an outline image around the specimen. On lymphoscintigraphy, radiotracer was concentrated in 31 cases. During surgery, all lesions were removed. In the images acquired by the portable gamma camera, the lesion was centred inside the surgical specimen in 23 of 42 cases, non-centred in 15 and in contact in 4 cases. Congruence of 60% was found between the intraoperative images and the histopathological results. The posterior margin was the most frequently involved. The whole acquisition time for the tumoral specimen with its margins was 5 min at most. The use of portable gamma cameras in theatre is in an early phase. The short period of time required during the surgical procedure will allow the surgical team to improve this technique until it can replace hand

  4. Radioguided occult lesion localisation in breast cancer using an intraoperative portable gamma camera: first results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paredes, P. [Hospital Sant Pau, Nuclear Medicine Department, Barcelona (Spain); Vidal-Sicart, S.; Pavia, J.; Pons, F. [University of Barcelona, Nuclear Medicine Department, Hospital Clinic, Barcelona (Spain); Institut d' Investigacions Biomediques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Barcelona (Spain); Zanon, G. [University of Barcelona, Obstetrics and Gynaecology Department, Hospital Clinic, Barcelona (Spain); Roe, N.; Rubi, S. [University of Barcelona, Nuclear Medicine Department, Hospital Clinic, Barcelona (Spain); Lafuente, S. [Hospital Joan XXIII, Nuclear Medicine Department, Tarragona (Spain)

    2008-02-15

    The role of the radioguided occult lesion localisation (ROLL) technique in breast cancer has been increasing in recent years. One of the important drawbacks of such a technique is radiotracer spillage within the mammary gland that makes the precise lesion resection difficult, and this requires the use of a hook-wire collocation to reach the lesion. The possibility of obtaining an intraoperative image of the specimen could help to confirm whether the lesion is correctly removed. Some types of portable gamma cameras have been designed, but up to now, intraoperative use has been confined to surgery of parathyroid adenomas and sentinel lymph node location. The aim of the study was to value the usefulness of an intraoperative gamma camera to assess the resection of non-palpable breast lesions. The study involved 42 women diagnosed with non-palpable early breast cancer. Lymphoscintigraphy was performed on the day before surgery by injection of {sup 99m}Tc-labelled nanocolloid. During surgery a gamma probe was used to guide the surgeon, and afterwards images of the surgical bed and the tumoral specimen were acquired by means of a portable gamma camera, fitted with a pinhole collimator. A {sup 99m}Tc pointer was used to draw an outline image around the specimen. On lymphoscintigraphy, radiotracer was concentrated in 31 cases. During surgery, all lesions were removed. In the images acquired by the portable gamma camera, the lesion was centred inside the surgical specimen in 23 of 42 cases, non-centred in 15 and in contact in 4 cases. Congruence of 60% was found between the intraoperative images and the histopathological results. The posterior margin was the most frequently involved. The whole acquisition time for the tumoral specimen with its margins was 5 min at most. The use of portable gamma cameras in theatre is in an early phase. The short period of time required during the surgical procedure will allow the surgical team to improve this technique until it can replace

  5. An innovative silicon photomultiplier digitizing camera for gamma-ray astronomy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Heller, M.; Schioppa, E.jr.; Porcelli, A.; Pujadas, I.T.; Zietara, K.; della Volpe, D.; Montaruli, T.; Cadoux, F.; Favre, Y.; Aguilar, J.A.; Christov, A.; Prandini, E.; Rajda, P.; Rameez, M.; Bilnik, W.; Blocki, J.; Bogacz, L.; Borkowski, J.; Bulik, T.; Frankowski, A.; Grudzinska, M.; Idzkowski, B.; Jamrozy, M.; Janiak, M.; Kasperek, J.; Lalik, K.; Lyard, E.; Mach, E.; Mandát, Dušan; Marszalek, A.; Medina Miranda, L. D.; Michałowski, J.; Moderski, R.; Neronov, A.; Niemiec, J.; Ostrowski, M.; Pasko, P.; Pech, Miroslav; Schovánek, Petr; Seweryn, K.; Sliusar, V.; Skowron, K.; Stawarz, L.; Stodulska, M.; Stodulski, M.; Walter, R.; Wiecek, M.; Zagdanski, A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 77, č. 1 (2017), s. 1-31, č. článku 47. ISSN 1434-6044 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LE13012; GA MŠk LG14019 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : silicon photomultiplier * digitizing camera * gamma-ray astronomy Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 5.331, year: 2016

  6. A photon counting CdTe gamma- and X-ray camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spartiotis, Konstantinos; Leppänen, Anssi; Pantsar, Tuomas; Pyyhtiä, Jouni; Laukka, Pasi; Muukkonen, Kari; Männistö, Olli; Kinnari, Jussi; Schulman, Tom

    2005-09-01

    A photon counting CdTe imaging camera suitable for gamma- and X-ray detection has been developed and tested. The current full active imaging area of the gamma/X-ray camera covers 44×44 mm 2. The camera is built of eight individual detector hybrids each consisting of a pixelated CdTe detector with dimensions of 22×11 mm 2 and solder bump-bonded to a photon counting custom-designed application specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The ASICs are realized in a mixed signal, 0.35 μm 4 metal 2 poly CMOS process. The effective pixel size (image pixel pitch) is 0.5 mm. To enable higher count rate imaging and to achieve better position resolution in X-ray CT scanning each pixel is divided both on the CdTe detector and on the ASIC into two sub-pixels with dimensions 0.25×0.5 mm 2. Every pixel circuit has two preamps each connected to one sub-pixel and feeding signal to a separate comparator. The digital pulses of the two distinct comparators are recorded by one common 8-bit counter. The amplifier offsets can be adjusted individually with 3-bit accuracy to compensate for process mismatch. A similar 3-bit gain tuning common to the two amplifiers in one pixel circuit is also implemented. A globally tuneable threshold voltage generated externally with high accuracy is used for energy discrimination. The camera can be operated both in the real time imaging mode with a maximum speed of 100 frames/s and in the accumulation mode with user adjustable counting time. Experimental data collected from a fully operational eight hybrid gamma/X-ray camera is presented and compared to simulated data. The camera exhibits excellent sensitivity and a dynamic range of 1:14,000,000. A sharp line spread function indicates the spatial resolution to be limited only by the pixel size (0.5 mm). A single pixel energy resolution of FWHM 4.7 keV at 122 keV (3.9%) was determined from measured 57Co spectra. The peak width of the spectrum combined from all pixels was somewhat larger due to calibration

  7. Development and calibration of a new gamma camera detector using large square Photomultiplier Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeraatkar, N.; Sajedi, S.; Teimourian Fard, B.; Kaviani, S.; Akbarzadeh, A.; Farahani, M. H.; Sarkar, S.; Ay, M. R.

    2017-09-01

    Large area scintillation detectors applied in gamma cameras as well as Single Photon Computed Tomography (SPECT) systems, have a major role in in-vivo functional imaging. Most of the gamma detectors utilize hexagonal arrangement of Photomultiplier Tubes (PMTs). In this work we applied large square-shaped PMTs with row/column arrangement and positioning. The Use of large square PMTs reduces dead zones in the detector surface. However, the conventional center of gravity method for positioning may not introduce an acceptable result. Hence, the digital correlated signal enhancement (CSE) algorithm was optimized to obtain better linearity and spatial resolution in the developed detector. The performance of the developed detector was evaluated based on NEMA-NU1-2007 standard. The acquired images using this method showed acceptable uniformity and linearity comparing to three commercial gamma cameras. Also the intrinsic and extrinsic spatial resolutions with low-energy high-resolution (LEHR) collimator at 10 cm from surface of the detector were 3.7 mm and 7.5 mm, respectively. The energy resolution of the camera was measured 9.5%. The performance evaluation demonstrated that the developed detector maintains image quality with a reduced number of used PMTs relative to the detection area.

  8. An operative gamma camera for sentinel lymph node procedure in case of breast cancer

    CERN Document Server

    Salvador, S; Mathelin, C; Guyonne, J; Huss, D

    2007-01-01

    Large field of view gamma cameras are widely used to perform lymphoscintigraphy in the sentinel lymph nodes (SLN) procedure in case of breast cancer. However, they are not specified for this application and their sizes do not enable their use in the operative room to control the excision of the all SLN. We present the results obtained with a prototype of a new mini gamma camera developed especially for the operative lymphoscintigraphy of the axillary area in case of breast cancer. This prototype is composed of 10 mm thick parallel lead collimator, a 2 mm thick GSO:Ce inorganic scintillating crystal from Hitachi and a Hamamatsu H8500 flat panel multianode (64 channels) photomultiplier tube (MAPMT) equipped with a dedicated electronics. Its actual field of view is 50 × 50mm2. The gamma interaction position in the GSO scintillating plate is obtained by calculating the center of gravity of the fired MAPMT channels. The measurements performed with this prototype demonstrate the usefulness of this mini gamma camer...

  9. Lymphoscintigraphic imaging study for quantitative evaluation of a small field of view (SFOV) gamma camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqahtani, M. S.; Lees, J. E.; Bugby, S. L.; Jambi, L. K.; Perkins, A. C.

    2015-07-01

    The Hybrid Compact Gamma Camera (HCGC) is a portable optical-gamma hybrid imager designed for intraoperative medical imaging, particularly for sentinel lymph node biopsy procedures. To investigate the capability of the HCGC in lymphatic system imaging, two lymphoscintigraphic phantoms have been designed and constructed. These phantoms allowed quantitative assessment and evaluation of the HCGC for lymphatic vessel (LV) and sentinel lymph node (SLN) detection. Fused optical and gamma images showed good alignment of the two modalities allowing localisation of activity within the LV and the SLN. At an imaging distance of 10 cm, the spatial resolution of the HCGC during the detection process of the simulated LV was not degraded at a separation of more than 1.5 cm (variation lymphatic vessel drainage imaging and SLN imaging in patients in different critical clinical situations such as interventional and surgical procedures.

  10. Prognostic value of primary tumor SUVmax on F-18 FDG PET/CT compared with semi-quantitative tumor uptake on Tc-99m sestamibi breast-specific gamma imaging in invasive ductal breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jang; Yoon, Hai-Jeon; Kim, Bom Sahn

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the prognostic value of F-18 FDG PET/CT in comparison with Tc-99m sestamibi breast-specific gamma imaging (BSGI) and previously established clinical prognostic parameters of invasive ductal breast carcinoma (IDC). We retrospectively included 157 female IDC patients (mean age 49.2 years, range 29.9-78.9) who underwent PET/CT and BSGI. The maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) and tumor to normal background ratios (TNRs) of their primary tumors were measured on PET/CT and BSGI, respectively. Univariate and multivariate survival analyses were performed to evaluate the prognostic value of the measured parameters and other clinical prognostic factors: age, menopausal status, breast density, pathologic tumor size (pTS), axillary nodal status (ANS), nuclear grade, histologic grade, hormone receptor status of estrogen (ER) and progesterone receptors (PR) and HER-2 expression. Among 157 patients, recurrences occurred in 22 patients (14.0 %). In univariate analyses, pTS (p < 0.0001), ANS (p < 0.0001), nuclear grade (p = 0.0046), histologic grade (p = 0.0001), ER status (p < 0.0001), PR status (p = 0.0037), HER-2 status (p = 0.0007), primary tumor SUVmax (p < 0.0001) and TNR (p = 0.0001) were significant predictors of recurrence. Among them, pTS (p = 0.0172), ANS (p = 0.0416), ER status (p = 0.0375) and primary tumor SUVmax (p = 0.0239) were independent prognostic factors in multivariate regression analysis. High primary tumor SUVmax of PET/CT and high TNR of BSGI were poor prognostic factors in IDC patients; in addition, primary tumor SUVmax was an independent prognostic factor along with pTS, ANS and ER status.

  11. Breast-specific gamma imaging with Tc-99m-sestamibi in the diagnosis of breast cancer and its semiquantitative index correlation with tumor biologic markers, subtypes, and clinicopathologic characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Hui; Zhang, Hongwei; Yang, Weige; Fu, Yipeng; Gu, Yusen; Du, Min; Cheng, Dengfeng; Shi, Hongcheng

    2016-08-01

    To determine the sensitivity of breast-specific gamma imaging (BSGI) in diagnosing breast cancer and assess the potential correlation between the semiquantitative index of BSGI and biologic markers, molecular subtypes, and clinicopathologic characteristics of breast cancer. The sensitivity of BSGI for breast cancer was retrospectively assessed in 102 female breast cancer patients who underwent BSGI before surgery and was compared with that of ultrasonography and mammography. BSGI was visually graded on the basis of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging guideline. Tracer uptake in the cancer as the lesion to nonlesion ratio (L/N) was calculated semiquantitatively and was subsequently correlated to tumor biologic markers, molecular subtypes, and clinicopathologic characteristics. The sensitivity of BSGI for breast cancer by visual analysis was 94.1% (96/102) in our cohort, which was 100% (47/47) in the subgroup of patients with a tumor size more than 2.0 cm and 89.1% (49/55) in the subgroup of patients with a size less than or equal to 2.0 cm. The sensitivity of BSGI was significantly higher than that of ultrasonography of 84.2% (85/101) (P=0.022) and mammography of 84.5% (60/71) (P=0.037). There was no significant correlation between the L/N and expressions of estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, and antigen Ki-67, and the subtypes or histologic grade of the cancer (P>0.05). However, the value of L/N was associated with infiltration degree (P=0.005), axillary lymph node status (P=0.029), and tumor size (P=0.002). Multivariate analysis further indicated that the value of L/N was correlated with infiltration degree (P=0.016) and tumor size (P=0.002). BSGI has a high sensitivity for detecting primary breast cancer. The value of L/N on BSGI was independently related to infiltration degree and tumor size of breast cancer, but not to expression of tumor receptor markers and histologic grade.

  12. Modeling of a slanted-hole collimator in a compact endo-cavity gamma camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamuda, Mark; Cui, Yonggang; Lall, Terry; Ionson, Jim; Camarda, Giuseppe S.; Hossain, Anwar; Yang, Ge; Roy, Utpal N.; James, Ralph B.

    2013-09-01

    Having the ability to take an accurate 3D image of a tumor greatly helps doctors diagnose it and then create a treatment plan for a patient. One way to accomplish molecular imaging is to inject a radioactive tracer into a patient and then measure the gamma rays emitted from regions with high-uptake of the tracer, viz., the cancerous tissues. In large, expensive PET- or SPECT-imaging systems, the 3D imaging easily is accomplished by rotating the gamma-ray detectors and then employing software to reconstruct the 3D images from the multiple 2D projections at different angles of view. However, this method is impractical in a very compact imaging system due to anatomical considerations, e.g., the transrectal gamma camera under development at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for detection of intra-prostatic tumors. The camera uses pixilated cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe or CZT) detectors with matched parallel-hole collimator. Our research investigated the possibility of using a collimator with slanted holes to create 3D pictures of a radioactive source. The underlying concept is to take 2D projection images at different angles of view by adjusting the slant angle of the collimator, then using the 2D projection images to reconstruct the 3D image. To do this, we first simulated the response of a pixilated CZT detector to radiation sources placed in the field of view of the camera. Then, we formulated an algorithm to use the simulation results as prior knowledge and estimate the distribution of a shaped source from its 2D projection images. From the results of the simulation, we measured the spatial resolution of the camera as ~7-mm at a depth of 13.85-mm when using a detector with 2.46-mm pixel pitch and a collimator with 60° slant angle.

  13. Realization and study of spectral properties of the ISGRI gamma-ray camera; Mise en oeuvre et etude des proprietes spectrales de la gamma-camera ISGRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Limousin, O

    2001-11-01

    This work evaluates spectroscopic and physical properties of CdTe detectors in view of assembling a large number on a new generation spectro-imager for space gamma-ray astronomy. Study, optimization, realization and calibration of modular detection units of the ISGRI camera are described. After a description of the experimental context of the INTEGRAL program and a review of the physical processes involved in gamma-ray photon detectors, we present an analysis of the properties of CdTe detectors attempting to be so exhaustive as possible. We propose the base point of a global model, which relates charge transport properties, spectral response and possible instabilities in the detectors. We propose a new formulation of the Hecht relation that describes charge loss as a function of the detector charge transport properties. We discuss at length the method of charge loss correction and its consequences on the associated integrated electronics definition. Finally, we illustrate our instrument capabilities using as an example the observation of titanium 44 lines in historical supernovae. (author)

  14. Use of a compact pixellated gamma camera for small animal pinhole SPECT imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeniya, Tsutomu; Watabe, Hiroshi; Aoi, Toshiyuki; Kim, Kyeong Min; Teramoto, Noboru; Takeno, Takeshi; Ohta, Yoichiro; Hayashi, Takuya; Mashino, Hiroyuki; Ota, Toshihiro; Yamamoto, Seiichi; Iida, Hidehiro

    2006-07-01

    Pinhole SPECT which permits in vivo high resolution 3D imaging of physiological functions in small animals facilitates objective assessment of pharmaceutical development and regenerative therapy in pre-clinical trials. For handiness and mobility, the miniature size of the SPECT system is useful. We developed a small animal SPECT system based on a compact high-resolution gamma camera fitted to a pinhole collimator and an object-rotating unit. This study was aimed at evaluating the basic performance of the detection system and the feasibility of small animal SPECT imaging. The gamma camera consists of a 22 x 22 pixellated scintillator array of 1.8 mm x 1.8 mm x 5 mm NaI(Tl crystals with 0.2-mm gap between the crystals coupled to a 2" flat panel position-sensitive photomultiplier tube (Hamamatsu H8500) with 64 channels. The active imaging region of the camera was 43.8 mm x 43.8 mm. Data acquisition is controlled by a personal computer (Microsoft Windows) through the camera controller. Projection data over 360 degrees for SPECT images are obtained by synchronizing with the rotating unit. The knife-edge pinhole collimators made of tungsten are attached on the camera and have 0.5-mm and 1.0-mm apertures. The basic performance of the detection system was evaluated with 99mTc and 201Tl solutions. Energy resolution, system spatial resolution and linearity of count rate were measured. Rat myocardial perfusion SPECT scans were sequentially performed following intravenous injection of 201TlCl. Projection data were reconstructed using a previously validated pinhole 3D-OSEM method. The energy resolution at 140 keV was 14.8% using a point source. The system spatial resolutions were 2.8-mm FWHM and 2.5-mm FWHM for 99mTc and 201Tl line sources, respectively, at 30-mm source distance (magnification factor of 1.3) using a 1.0-mm pinhole. The linearity between the activity and count rate was good up to 10 kcps. In a rat study, the left ventricular walls were clearly visible in all

  15. Observations of gamma-ray burst afterglows with the AEOS Burst Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flewelling, Heather Anne

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), are variable bursts of gamma-ray radiation, that lasts from milliseconds to hundreds of seconds. These bursts of gamma rays are detected in other wavelengths (optical, IR, radio, X-ray), because the afterglow lasts much longer, and this enables us to learn more about GRBs. The AEOS Burst Camera (ABC) is a 6'x6' field of view camera designed to observe the optical afterglows of GRBs, and is mounted on the 3.67m Advanced Electro- Optical System (AEOS) telescope, located at 10,000ft on Haleakala, Hawaii. There are 45 hours of Target of Opportunity (ToO) time to observe GRBs detected by Swift and other GRB satellites. Observations are started within minutes after a suitable GRB is detected, and continue for an hour or two. During this project, 21 GRBs were observed, and of those, 10 had detected afterglows, and 4 had interesting limits. About half of the bursts fit the fireball model, and half did not, which is similar to what ROTSE has found. Roughly half of the ABC bursts fall in the dark category, with b ox Akerlof Sr, Swan (2007) found, that roughly 70% of all GRBs brighter than 22nd mag at 1000s should be detectable.

  16. A pixellated gamma-camera based on CdTe detectors clinical interests and performances

    CERN Document Server

    Chambron, J; Eclancher, B; Scheiber, C; Siffert, P; Hage-Ali, M; Regal, R; Kazandjian, A; Prat, V; Thomas, S; Warren, S; Matz, R; Jahnke, A; Karman, M; Pszota, A; Németh, L

    2000-01-01

    A mobile gamma camera dedicated to nuclear cardiology, based on a 15 cmx15 cm detection matrix of 2304 CdTe detector elements, 2.83 mmx2.83 mmx2 mm, has been developed with a European Community support to academic and industrial research centres. The intrinsic properties of the semiconductor crystals - low-ionisation energy, high-energy resolution, high attenuation coefficient - are potentially attractive to improve the gamma-camera performances. But their use as gamma detectors for medical imaging at high resolution requires production of high-grade materials and large quantities of sophisticated read-out electronics. The decision was taken to use CdTe rather than CdZnTe, because the manufacturer (Eurorad, France) has a large experience for producing high-grade materials, with a good homogeneity and stability and whose transport properties, characterised by the mobility-lifetime product, are at least 5 times greater than that of CdZnTe. The detector matrix is divided in 9 square units, each unit is composed ...

  17. On-Line High Dose-Rate Gamma Ray Irradiation Test of the CCD/CMOS Cameras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jai Wan; Jeong, Kyung Min [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    In this paper, test results of gamma ray irradiation to CCD/CMOS cameras are described. From the CAMS (containment atmospheric monitoring system) data of Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant station, we found out that the gamma ray dose-rate when the hydrogen explosion occurred in nuclear reactors 1{approx}3 is about 160 Gy/h. If assumed that the emergency response robot for the management of severe accident of the nuclear power plant has been sent into the reactor area to grasp the inside situation of reactor building and to take precautionary measures against releasing radioactive materials, the CCD/CMOS cameras, which are loaded with the robot, serve as eye of the emergency response robot. In the case of the Japanese Quince robot system, which was sent to carry out investigating the unit 2 reactor building refueling floor situation, 7 CCD/CMOS cameras are used. 2 CCD cameras of Quince robot are used for the forward and backward monitoring of the surroundings during navigation. And 2 CCD (or CMOS) cameras are used for monitoring the status of front-end and back-end motion mechanics such as flippers and crawlers. A CCD camera with wide field of view optics is used for monitoring the status of the communication (VDSL) cable reel. And another 2 CCD cameras are assigned for reading the indication value of the radiation dosimeter and the instrument. In the preceding assumptions, a major problem which arises when dealing with CCD/CMOS cameras in the severe accident situations of the nuclear power plant is the presence of high dose-rate gamma irradiation fields. In the case of the DBA (design basis accident) situations of the nuclear power plant, in order to use a CCD/CMOS camera as an ad-hoc monitoring unit in the vicinity of high radioactivity structures and components of the nuclear reactor area, a robust survivability of this camera in such intense gamma-radiation fields therefore should be verified. The CCD/CMOS cameras of various types were gamma irradiated at a

  18. Gamma camera based method for 131I capsule counting: an alternate method to Uptake probe method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Biju K; Uday, Awasare S; Singh, Baghel N

    2017-11-10

    The main objective of this study was to check the validity of using gamma camera as an alternate method to thyroid uptake probe, for counting 25uCi (0.925 MBq) and 50uCi (1.85 MBq) 131I capsules before administration to thyroid patients. Methods: - 10 sets each of 25uCi (0.925 MBq) and 50uCi (1.85 MBq) 131I capsules received from Board Of Radiation and Isotope Technology, Department Of Atomic Energy, India (BRIT, DAE) have been counted individually using thyroid uptake probe for 10 seconds following institutional protocol and also by keeping individual capsule of a set with 8cm gap between each of them .These capsules were also scanned by Scintillation gamma camera for 100 seconds. Capsules having counts within the range of mean ±2 Standard Deviation (SD) were accepted for patient administration. After analysing both the data, correlation coefficient between these two methods has been evaluated. Results: Scanned images were analysed by drawing Identical ROI around each set of 25uCi (0.925 MBq) and 50uCi (1.85 MBq) 131I capsules. Capsules with counts within 2 Standard Deviation from mean were accepted for patient administration. Good correlation coefficient (r >0.95) was observed between these two counts set. Conclusion: Gamma camera based 131I -capsule counting method is an easy and time saving method compared to probe based capsule counting method as we can scan a set of capsules in a single acquisition. It can provide uniformity information for a batch of 131I -capsules and avoid the time consuming method of individual capsule counting with the thyroid uptake probe. Copyright © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  19. Modeling an Interwoven Collimator for A 3D Endocavity Gamma Camera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry Lall

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Positron emission tomography (PET and single-photon emission-computed tomography (SPECT are important nuclear-medical imaging tools in diagnosing cancers and creating effective treatment plans. Commercially imaging systems are operated externally and can create 3D images of the whole body or of specific organs by rotating the gamma-ray detectors, and then employing software to reconstruct the 3D images from the multiple 2D projections at different angles of view. However, their uses in intraoperative environments or for imaging specific small organs, e.g., the prostate, ovary, and cervix, are limited because of their bulky designs and the long working-distance, hence causing low efficiency and poor spatial-resolution. In such situations, compact imaging devices, e.g., the trans-rectal gamma camera developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL and Hybridyne Imaging Technologies, are preferable for detecting intra-prostatic tumors. The camera uses pixilated cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe detectors with a matched parallel-hole collimator. However, their lack of 3D imaging capability limits their use in clinics, because the acquired images cannot be interpreted easily due to missing depth information. Given the constraint on space in such operations, the traditional 3D-image acquisition methods are impractical. For this reason, we designed an interwoven collimator dedicated for 3D imaging using an endocavity probe. This novel collimator allows us to take two or multiple views of a specific organ or tissue without rotating the camera. At the first stage of design for the collimator, we carried out Monte-Carlo simulations to study the response of the collimator and the attached detectors to gamma rays, and then developed a maximum-likelihood-based algorithm for reconstructing 3D images. In this paper, we detail our modeling of the collimator on a cluster Linux computer, and discuss the imaging capability of this novel collimator.

  20. A clinical gamma camera-based pinhole collimated system for high resolution small animal SPECT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mejia, J.; Galvis-Alonso, O.Y., E-mail: mejia_famerp@yahoo.com.b [Faculdade de Medicina de Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Biologia Molecular; Castro, A.A. de; Simoes, M.V. [Faculdade de Medicina de Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Clinica Medica; Leite, J.P. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FMRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina. Dept. de Neurociencias e Ciencias do Comportamento; Braga, J. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Div. de Astrofisica

    2010-11-15

    The main objective of the present study was to upgrade a clinical gamma camera to obtain high resolution tomographic images of small animal organs. The system is based on a clinical gamma camera to which we have adapted a special-purpose pinhole collimator and a device for positioning and rotating the target based on a computer-controlled step motor. We developed a software tool to reconstruct the target's three-dimensional distribution of emission from a set of planar projections, based on the maximum likelihood algorithm. We present details on the hardware and software implementation. We imaged phantoms and heart and kidneys of rats. When using pinhole collimators, the spatial resolution and sensitivity of the imaging system depend on parameters such as the detector-to-collimator and detector-to-target distances and pinhole diameter. In this study, we reached an object voxel size of 0.6 mm and spatial resolution better than 2.4 and 1.7 mm full width at half maximum when 1.5- and 1.0-mm diameter pinholes were used, respectively. Appropriate sensitivity to study the target of interest was attained in both cases. Additionally, we show that as few as 12 projections are sufficient to attain good quality reconstructions, a result that implies a significant reduction of acquisition time and opens the possibility for radiotracer dynamic studies. In conclusion, a high resolution single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system was developed using a commercial clinical gamma camera, allowing the acquisition of detailed volumetric images of small animal organs. This type of system has important implications for research areas such as Cardiology, Neurology or Oncology. (author)

  1. Study of the feasibility of a compact gamma camera for real-time cancer assessment

    CERN Document Server

    Caballero Ontanaya, Luis

    2017-01-01

    Results from the simulations of a Compton gamma camera based on compact configuration of detectors consisting in two detection modules, each of them having two stages of high-resolution position- and energy sensitive radiation detectors operated in time-coincidence are presented. Monolithic scintillation crystals instead of pixelated crystals in order to reduce dead areas have been simulated. In order to study the system feasibility to produce real-time images, different setups are considered. Performance in terms of acquisition times have been calculated to determine the real-time capabilities and limitations of such a system.

  2. A machine learning method for fast and accurate characterization of depth-of-interaction gamma cameras

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedemonte, Stefano; Pierce, Larry; Van Leemput, Koen

    2017-01-01

    mixture model. The method is purely data-driven, not requiring simulations, and is applicable to a wide range of detector types. The proposed method was evaluated both in a simulation study and with data acquired using a monolithic gamma camera designed for PET (the cMiCE detector), demonstrating...... the accurate recovery of the DOI characteristics. The combination of the proposed calibration technique with maximum-a posteriori estimation of the coordinates of interaction provided a depth resolution of approximate to 1.14 mm for the simulated PET detector and approximate to 1.74 mm for the cMiCE detector...

  3. COMPACT CdZnTe-BASED GAMMA CAMERA FOR PROSTATE CANCER IMAGING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CUI, Y.; LALL, T.; TSUI, B.; YU, J.; MAHLER, G.; BOLOTNIKOV, A.; VASKA, P.; DeGERONIMO, G.; O' CONNOR, P.; MEINKEN, G.; JOYAL, J.; BARRETT, J.; CAMARDA, G.; HOSSAIN, A.; KIM, K.H.; YANG, G.; POMPER, M.; CHO, S.; WEISMAN, K.; SEO, Y.; BABICH, J.; LaFRANCE, N.; AND JAMES, R.B.

    2011-10-23

    In this paper, we discuss the design of a compact gamma camera for high-resolution prostate cancer imaging using Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CdZnTe or CZT) radiation detectors. Prostate cancer is a common disease in men. Nowadays, a blood test measuring the level of prostate specific antigen (PSA) is widely used for screening for the disease in males over 50, followed by (ultrasound) imaging-guided biopsy. However, PSA tests have a high false-positive rate and ultrasound-guided biopsy has a high likelihood of missing small cancerous tissues. Commercial methods of nuclear medical imaging, e.g. PET and SPECT, can functionally image the organs, and potentially find cancer tissues at early stages, but their applications in diagnosing prostate cancer has been limited by the smallness of the prostate gland and the long working distance between the organ and the detectors comprising these imaging systems. CZT is a semiconductor material with wide band-gap and relatively high electron mobility, and thus can operate at room temperature without additional cooling. CZT detectors are photon-electron direct-conversion devices, thus offering high energy-resolution in detecting gamma rays, enabling energy-resolved imaging, and reducing the background of Compton-scattering events. In addition, CZT material has high stopping power for gamma rays; for medical imaging, a few-mm-thick CZT material provides adequate detection efficiency for many SPECT radiotracers. Because of these advantages, CZT detectors are becoming popular for several SPECT medical-imaging applications. Most recently, we designed a compact gamma camera using CZT detectors coupled to an application-specific-integrated-circuit (ASIC). This camera functions as a trans-rectal probe to image the prostate gland from a distance of only 1-5 cm, thus offering higher detection efficiency and higher spatial resolution. Hence, it potentially can detect prostate cancers at their early stages. The performance tests of this camera

  4. Single photon emission computed tomography of the brain with a rotating gamma camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biersack, H.J.; Knopp, R.; Winkler, C.; Wappenschmidt, J.

    1981-08-01

    In 471 patients SPECT of the brain was performed in addition to conventional serial brain scintigraphy using a rotating gamma camera (GAMMATOME T 9000). 23 patients had tumorous lesions, 26 had vascular lesions, and 422 patients revealed normal brain findings. 5 of the 23 patients with tumorous lesion and 5 of the 12 patients with vascular lesion (anamnesis shorter than 4 weeks) showed positive SPECT results but false negative conventional brain scans. Specificity could be improved up to 98% (412 out of 422 patients) using SPECT and conventional scintigraphy.

  5. MO-AB-206-02: Testing Gamma Cameras Based On TG177 WG Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halama, J. [Loyola Univ. Medical Center (United States)

    2016-06-15

    This education session will cover the physics and operation principles of gamma cameras and PET scanners. The first talk will focus on PET imaging. An overview of the principles of PET imaging will be provided, including positron decay physics, and the transition from 2D to 3D imaging. More recent advances in hardware and software will be discussed, such as time-of-flight imaging, and improvements in reconstruction algorithms that provide for options such as depth-of-interaction corrections. Quantitative applications of PET will be discussed, as well as the requirements for doing accurate quantitation. Relevant performance tests will also be described. Learning Objectives: Be able to describe basic physics principles of PET and operation of PET scanners. Learn about recent advances in PET scanner hardware technology. Be able to describe advances in reconstruction techniques and improvements Be able to list relevant performance tests. The second talk will focus on gamma cameras. The Nuclear Medicine subcommittee has charged a task group (TG177) to develop a report on the current state of physics testing of gamma cameras, SPECT, and SPECT/CT systems. The report makes recommendations for performance tests to be done for routine quality assurance, annual physics testing, and acceptance tests, and identifies those needed satisfy the ACR accreditation program and The Joint Commission imaging standards. The report is also intended to be used as a manual with detailed instructions on how to perform tests under widely varying conditions. Learning Objectives: At the end of the presentation members of the audience will: Be familiar with the tests recommended for routine quality assurance, annual physics testing, and acceptance tests of gamma cameras for planar imaging. Be familiar with the tests recommended for routine quality assurance, annual physics testing, and acceptance tests of SPECT systems. Be familiar with the tests of a SPECT/CT system that include the CT images

  6. A 3D high-resolution gamma camera for radiopharmaceutical studies with small animals

    CERN Document Server

    Loudos, G K; Giokaris, N D; Styliaris, E; Archimandritis, S C; Varvarigou, A D; Papanicolas, C N; Majewski, S; Weisenberger, D; Pani, R; Scopinaro, F; Uzunoglu, N K; Maintas, D; Stefanis, K

    2003-01-01

    The results of studies conducted with a small field of view tomographic gamma camera based on a Position Sensitive Photomultiplier Tube are reported. The system has been used for the evaluation of radiopharmaceuticals in small animals. Phantom studies have shown a spatial resolution of 2 mm in planar and 2-3 mm in tomographic imaging. Imaging studies in mice have been carried out both in 2D and 3D. Conventional radiopharmaceuticals have been used and the results have been compared with images from a clinically used system.

  7. Development of a compact and high spatial resolution gamma camera system using LaBr 3(Ce)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Imaizumi, Masao; Shimosegawa, Eku; Hatazawa, Jun

    2010-10-01

    In small animal imaging using a single photon emitting radionuclide, a high spatial resolution gamma camera is required. However, its spatial resolution is limited by the light output of conventional scintillators such as NaI(Tl). We developed and tested a small field-of-view (FOV) gamma camera using a new scintillator, LaBr3(Ce). The LaBr3(Ce) gamma camera consists of a 2 mm thick LaBr3(Ce) scintillator, a 2 in. 8×8 multi-anode position sensitive photomultiplier tube (Hamamatsu H8500), and a personal computer-based data acquisition system. The LaBr3(Ce) scintillator was directly coupled to the PSPMT and was contained in a hermetically shielded and light tight aluminum case. The signals from the PSPMT were gain corrected, weighted summed, and digitized by 100 MHz free running A-D converters in the data acquisition system. The detector part of the gamma camera was encased in a tungsten gamma shield, and a tungsten pinhole collimator was mounted in front of the detector surface. The intrinsic spatial resolution that was measured using a tungsten slit mask was 0.75 mm FWHM, and the energy resolution was 8.9% FWHM for 122 keV gamma photons. We obtained transmission and emission images that demonstrated the high spatial resolution of the gamma camera system. Approximately two years after the fabrication of the detector, the flood image showed significant distortion due to the change in LaBr3(Ce) of its hygroscopic characteristic. These results confirm that the developed LaBr3(Ce) gamma camera is promising for small animal imaging using a low energy single photon emitting radionuclide if the hygroscopic problem of LaBr3(Ce) will be solved.

  8. Study of a new architecture of gamma cameras with Cd/ZnTe/CdTe semiconductors; Etude d'une nouvelle architecture de gamma camera a base de semi-conducteurs CdZnTe /CdTe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerin, L

    2007-11-15

    This thesis studies new semi conductors for gammas cameras in order to improve the quality of image in nuclear medicine. The chapter 1 reminds the general principle of the imaging gamma, by describing the radiotracers, the channel of detection and the types of Anger gamma cameras acquisition. The physiological, physical and technological limits of the camera are then highlighted, to better identify the needs of future gamma cameras. The chapter 2 is dedicated to a bibliographical study. At first, semi-conductors used in imaging gamma are presented, and more particularly semi-conductors CDTE and CdZnTe, by distinguishing planar detectors and monolithic pixelated detectors. Secondly, the classic collimators of the gamma cameras, used in clinical routine for the most part of between them, are described. Their geometry is presented, as well as their characteristics, their advantages and their inconveniences. The chapter 3 is dedicated to a state of art of the simulation codes dedicated to the medical imaging and the methods of reconstruction in imaging gamma. These states of art allow to introduce the software of simulation and the methods of reconstruction used within the framework of this thesis. The chapter 4 presents the new architecture of gamma camera proposed during this work of thesis. It is structured in three parts. The first part justifies the use of semiconducting detectors CdZnTe, in particular the monolithic pixelated detectors, by bringing to light their advantages with regard to the detection modules based on scintillator. The second part presents gamma cameras to base of detectors CdZnTe (prototypes or commercial products) and their associated collimators, as well as the interest of an association of detectors CdZnTe in the classic collimators. Finally, the third part presents in detail the HiSens architecture. The chapter 5 describes both software of simulation used within the framework of this thesis to estimate the performances of the Hi

  9. SiPM arrays and miniaturized readout electronics for compact gamma camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinu, N., E-mail: dinu@lal.in2p3.fr [Laboratory of Linear Accelerator, IN2P3, CNRS, Orsay (France); Imando, T. Ait; Nagai, A. [Laboratory of Linear Accelerator, IN2P3, CNRS, Orsay (France); Pinot, L. [Laboratory of Imaging and Modelisation in Neurobiology and Cancerology, IN2P3, CNRS, Orsay (France); Puill, V. [Laboratory of Linear Accelerator, IN2P3, CNRS, Orsay (France); Callier, S. [Omega Microelectronics Group, CNRS, Palaiseau (France); Janvier, B.; Esnault, C.; Verdier, M.-A. [Laboratory of Imaging and Modelisation in Neurobiology and Cancerology, IN2P3, CNRS, Orsay (France); Raux, L. [Omega Microelectronics Group, CNRS, Palaiseau (France); Vandenbussche, V.; Charon, Y.; Menard, L. [Laboratory of Imaging and Modelisation in Neurobiology and Cancerology, IN2P3, CNRS, Orsay (France)

    2015-07-01

    This article reports on the design and features of a very compact and light gamma camera based on SiPM arrays and miniaturized readout electronics dedicated to tumor localization during radio-guided cancer surgery. This gamma camera, called MAGICS, is composed of four (2×2) photo-detection elementary modules coupled to an inorganic scintillator. The 256 channels photo-detection system covers a sensitive area of 54×53 m{sup 2}. Each elementary module is based on four (2×2) SiPM monolithic arrays, each array consisting of 16 SiPM photo-sensors (4×4) with 3×3 mm{sup 2} sensitive area, coupled to a miniaturized readout electronics and a dedicated ASIC. The overall dimensions of the electronics fit the size of the detector, enabling to assemble side-by-side several elementary modules in a close-packed arrangement. The preliminary performances of the system are very encouraging, showing an energy resolution of 9.8% and a spatial resolution of less than 1 mm at 122 keV.

  10. Performance evaluation of a hand-held, semiconductor (CdZnTe)-based gamma camera

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, A; Lee, J; Oka, T; Shizukuishi, K; Kikuchi, T; Inoue, T; Jimbo, M; Ryuo, H; Bickel, C

    2003-01-01

    We have designed and developed a small field of view gamma camera, the eZ SCOPE, based on use of a CdZnTe semiconductor. This device utilises proprietary signal processing technology and an interface to a computer-based imaging system. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of the eZ scope in comparison with currently employed gamma camera technology. The detector is a single wafer of 5-mm-thick CdZnTe that is divided into a 16 x 16 array (256 pixels). The sensitive area of the detector is a square of dimension 3.2 cm. Two parallel-hole collimators are provided with the system and have a matching (256 hole) pattern to the CdZnTe detector array: a low-energy, high-resolution parallel-hole (LEHR) collimator fabricated of lead and a low-energy, high-sensitivity parallel-hole (LEHS) collimator fabricated of tungsten. Performance measurements and the data analysis were done according to the procedures of the NEMA standard. We also studied the long-term stability of the system with continuous use...

  11. A new design for a high resolution, high efficiency CZT gamma camera detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestais, C.; Baffert, N.; Bonnefoy, J. P.; Chapuis, A.; Koenig, A.; Monnet, O.; Ouvrier Buffet, P.; Rostaing, J. P.; Sauvage, F.; Verger, L.

    2001-02-01

    We have designed a CZT gamma camera detector that provides an array of CZT pixels and associated front-end electronics - including an ASIC - and permits gamma camera measurements using the method patented by CEA-LETI and reported by Verger et al. [1]. Electron response in each CZT pixel is registered by correcting pulse height for position of interaction based on fast rise-time information. This method brings advantages of high scatter rejection while allowing high detection efficiency. These techniques and the systems approach have been developed at CEA-LETI in an exclusive joint development with BICRON and CRISMATEC who in turn are commercializing the technology. The initial system is implemented in an array framework with 1920 pixels, approximately 180×215 mm 2 in dimension, but the system architecture expands readily to 4096 pixels, and these arrays can be ganged into groups of up to 8 for pixel planes totaling over 32 000 pixels without architecture changes. The overall system design is described and brain phantom images are presented that were obtained by scanning with a small number of pixels.

  12. Performance evaluation of a hand-held, semiconductor (CdZnTe)-based gamma camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Aya; Takahashi, Nobukazu; Lee, Jin; Oka, Takashi; Shizukuishi, Kazuya; Kikuchi, Tatsuya; Inoue, Tomio; Jimbo, Masao; Ryuo, Hideki; Bickel, Chris

    2003-06-01

    We have designed and developed a small field of view gamma camera, the eZ SCOPE, based on use of a CdZnTe semiconductor. This device utilises proprietary signal processing technology and an interface to a computer-based imaging system. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of the eZ scope in comparison with currently employed gamma camera technology. The detector is a single wafer of 5-mm-thick CdZnTe that is divided into a 16x16 array (256 pixels). The sensitive area of the detector is a square of dimension 3.2 cm. Two parallel-hole collimators are provided with the system and have a matching (256 hole) pattern to the CdZnTe detector array: a low-energy, high-resolution parallel-hole (LEHR) collimator fabricated of lead and a low-energy, high-sensitivity parallel-hole (LEHS) collimator fabricated of tungsten. Performance measurements and the data analysis were done according to the procedures of the NEMA standard. We also studied the long-term stability of the system with continuous use and variations in ambient temperature. Results were as follows. INTRINSIC ENERGY RESOLUTION: 8.6% FWHM at 141 keV.LINEARITY: There was excellent linearity between the observed photopeaks and the known gamma ray energies for the given isotopes. INTRINSIC SYSTEM UNIFORMITY: For the central field of view, the integral uniformity and the differential uniformity were, respectively, 1.6% and 1.3% with the LEHR collimator and 1.9% and 1.2% with the LEHS collimator. SYSTEM SPATIAL RESOLUTION: The FWHM measurements made at the surface of the collimator were 2.2 mm (LEHR) and 2.9 mm (LEHS).CONTRAST TEST: The average S/N ratios (i.e. counts in the irradiated pixel divided by counts in the surrounding pixels) for the inner ring pixels (8)/outer ring pixels (16) using the LEHS collimator and LEHR collimator were 3.2%/0.2% and 3.7%/0.3%, respectively. COUNT RATE CHARACTERISTICS: We could not determine the maximum count rate and the 20% loss count rate from these data because

  13. Performance of a single crystal digital gamma camera for first pass cardiac studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbeleir, A; Franken, P R; Ham, H R; Brihaye, C; Guillaume, M; Knapp, F F; Vandevivere, J

    1991-01-01

    First pass radionuclide angiocardiography (FPRNA) has gained increasing interest because of the development of new 99Tcm-labelled perfusion agents and of new 191Os/191Irm generator systems. The aim of the study was to evaluate the performance capacities of a small field of view single crystal digital gamma camera for 99Tcm and 191Irm at high count rates. The camera dead time for 99Tcm (window 30%) was well corrected up to 300 kcps in fast acquisition mode using the relative decrease of a small shielded reference source. Using the decaying activity method for 191Irm the non-linearity response of the gamma camera was corrected by an 191Os reference soruce up to 210 kcps at 70 keV, 75 kcps at 129 keV and 320 kcps including both peaks. Saturation count rates were respectively 270 kcps, 150 kcps and 420 kcps and high count rate resolution (FWHM) 9.0, 7.3 and 10.3 mm. Since the accuracy of first pass measurements is more sensitive to count rate than to spatial resolution the 50-150 keV window was chosen for clinical studies. In data obtained from 32 ECG gated FPRNA patient studies, the whole field of view count rate during the left ventricular phase ranged from 100 to 250 kcps with 80 to 120 mCi (2960-4400 MBq) of 191Irm and 100 to 180 kcps with 20 to 25 mCi (750-925 MBq) of 99Tcm red blood cells permitting for both tracers accurate non-linearity correction.

  14. Qualification model of the space ISGRI CdTe gamma-ray camera

    CERN Document Server

    Limousin, O; Bonnin, C; Cretolle, J; Goldwurm, A; Horeau, B; Laurent, P; Lebrun, F; Leray, J P

    2001-01-01

    A new generation of large area semiconductor based gamma-ray camera for astrophysics space application has been developed through the gamma-ray IBIS (Imager on Board INTEGRAL Satellite) telescope program, on board the ESA INTEGRAL satellite. This instrument features a coded-mask aperture imaging system, active and passive shields and two detector arrays. The first one (ISGRI : INTEGRAL Soft Gamma-Ray Imager) is made of 16384 CdTe detectors (4x4 mm large, 2 mm thick) operating at room temperature and will operate between 15 keV and 1 MeV. The second detector array (PICsIT : Pixelated CsI Telescope) is made of 4096 CsI scintillators (9.2x9.2 mm large, 30 mm high) coupled to silicon PIN photodiodes working between 150 keV and 10 MeV. IBIS combine broad band energy, spectroscopic capabilities and high spatial resolution imaging (12 arcmin) over a wide field of view (approx 20 deg. x 20 deg., 50% sensitivity). A 'flight-like' model of the detectors has been built, integrated and successfully tested. After a descri...

  15. First demonstration of real-time gamma imaging by using a handheld Compton camera for particle therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taya, T., E-mail: taka48138@ruri.waseda.jp [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Kataoka, J.; Kishimoto, A.; Iwamoto, Y.; Koide, A. [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Nishio, T. [Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Science, Hiroshima University, 1-2-3, Kasumi, Minami-ku, Hiroshima-shi, Hiroshima (Japan); Kabuki, S. [School of Medicine, Tokai University, 143 Shimokasuya, Isehara-shi, Kanagawa (Japan); Inaniwa, T. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba-shi, Chiba (Japan)

    2016-09-21

    The use of real-time gamma imaging for cancer treatment in particle therapy is expected to improve the accuracy of the treatment beam delivery. In this study, we demonstrated the imaging of gamma rays generated by the nuclear interactions during proton irradiation, using a handheld Compton camera (14 cm×15 cm×16 cm, 2.5 kg) based on scintillation detectors. The angular resolution of this Compton camera is ∼8° at full width at half maximum (FWHM) for a {sup 137}Cs source. We measured the energy spectra of the gamma rays using a LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) scintillator and photomultiplier tube, and using the handheld Compton camera, performed image reconstruction when using a 70 MeV proton beam to irradiate a water, Ca(OH){sub 2}, and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantom. In the energy spectra of all three phantoms, we found an obvious peak at 511 keV, which was derived from annihilation gamma rays, and in the energy spectrum of the PMMA phantom, we found another peak at 718 keV, which contains some of the prompt gamma rays produced from {sup 10}B. Therefore, we evaluated the peak positions of the projection from the reconstructed images of the PMMA phantom. The differences between the peak positions and the Bragg peak position calculated using simulation are 7 mm±2 mm and 3 mm±8 mm, respectively. Although we could quickly acquire online gamma imaging of both of the energy ranges during proton irradiation, we cannot arrive at a clear conclusion that prompt gamma rays sufficiently trace the Bragg peak from these results because of the uncertainty given by the spatial resolution of the Compton camera. We will develop a high-resolution Compton camera in the near future for further study. - Highlights: • Gamma imaging during proton irradiation by a handheld Compton camera is demonstrated. • We were able to acquire the online gamma-ray images quickly. • We are developing a high resolution Compton camera for range verification.

  16. Measurement of spleen size using gamma camera scintigraphy in essential thrombocythaemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Revesz, P. (Department of Medicine, Oestra Hospital, University of Goeteborg, Goeteborg (Sweden)); Carneskog, J.; Wadenvik, H.; Kutti, J. (Haematology Section, Department of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Hospital, University of Goeteborg, Goeteborg (Sweden)); Jarneborn, L. (Department of Clinical Physiology, Oestra Hospital, University of Goeteborg, Goeteborg (Sweden))

    1993-09-01

    By using gamma camera imaging the spleen size was determined in 33 consecutive patients with essential thrombocythaemia (ET) and in 33 consecutive patients with reactive thrombocytosis (RT). All ET patients were newly diagnosed and had not received myelosuppressive treatment prior to study; they all fulfilled the criteria for ET as established by the Polycythemia Vera Study Group. In both posterior and lateral projections, the spleen area in the group of ET patients was significantly larger than in the RT patients. The present study has shown that 39% of ET patients at diagnosis have splenic enlargement. Evaluation of Spleen size is therefore a useful diagnostic test in patients presenting with unexplained thrombocytosis. (au) (15 refs.).

  17. Maximum-likelihood scintillation detection for EM-CCD based gamma cameras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korevaar, Marc A N; Goorden, Marlies C; Heemskerk, Jan W T; Beekman, Freek J, E-mail: M.A.N.Korevaar@TUDelft.nl [Department of Radiation, Radionuclides and Reactors, Section of Radiation Detection and Medical Imaging, Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands)

    2011-08-07

    Gamma cameras based on charge-coupled devices (CCDs) coupled to continuous scintillation crystals can combine a good detection efficiency with high spatial resolutions with the aid of advanced scintillation detection algorithms. A previously developed analytical multi-scale algorithm (MSA) models the depth-dependent light distribution but does not take statistics into account. Here we present and validate a novel statistical maximum-likelihood algorithm (MLA) that combines a realistic light distribution model with an experimentally validated statistical model. The MLA was tested for an electron multiplying CCD optically coupled to CsI(Tl) scintillators of different thicknesses. For {sup 99m}Tc imaging, the spatial resolution (for perpendicular and oblique incidence), energy resolution and signal-to-background counts ratio (SBR) obtained with the MLA were compared with those of the MSA. Compared to the MSA, the MLA improves the energy resolution by more than a factor of 1.6 and the SBR is enhanced by more than a factor of 1.3. For oblique incidence (approximately 45{sup 0}), the depth-of-interaction corrected spatial resolution is improved by a factor of at least 1.1, while for perpendicular incidence the MLA resolution does not consistently differ significantly from the MSA result for all tested scintillator thicknesses. For the thickest scintillator (3 mm, interaction probability 66% at 141 keV) a spatial resolution (perpendicular incidence) of 147 {mu}m full width at half maximum (FWHM) was obtained with an energy resolution of 35.2% FWHM. These results of the MLA were achieved without prior calibration of scintillations as is needed for many statistical scintillation detection algorithms. We conclude that the MLA significantly improves the gamma camera performance compared to the MSA.

  18. FDG scan on an ordinary coincidence gamma camera (CDET) -preliminary data in pulmonary or colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montravers, F.; Grahek, D.; Ghazzar, N.; Younsi, N.; Kerrou, K.; Talbot, J.N. [Hopital Tenon, 75 - Paris (France). Services de Medecine Nucleaire; Wartski, M.; Zerbib, E. [Hopital Marie Lannelongue Le Plessis Robinson (France); Lumbroso, J. [Institut Gustave Roussy Villejuif (France)

    1997-12-31

    Full text. The purpose of this study to evaluate the impact of FDG scan performed on an ordinary CDET gamma camera on the therapeutic management of patients with pulmonary nodules or with suspicion of recurrent colorectal carcinoma. Methods: two tomoscintigrams (thorax and abdomen) were acquired, using a PICKER Prism XP 2000 coincidence gamma camera, 45 m after i.v. injection of 100-150 MBq of {sup 18} F-FDG in fasting patients. The 21 pts were explored in July or August 1997. Preliminary results: among 12 patients with pulmonary nodules, the planed surgery was replaced by chemotherapy after visualization of unknown metastases accumulating FDG in 3 patients. In another one, the high uptake of FDG by a lung nodule which has been known for 6 years, led to surgery and objectivation of an adenocarcinoma. In one case, the absence of FDG uptake corresponded to an abscess (true negative result). In the other 7 patients, the indication of surgery was confirmed but the procedure was modified in 2 cases. In case of suspicion of recurrent colorectal carcinoma (9 patients), the finding of a single focus of FDG uptake whereas CT scan was negative or inconclusive let do the decision of surgery in 3 patients. In one patient with pelvic pain without increase of tumor markers levels and with normal CT scan, a normal FDG scan confirmed the physician`s hypothesis of pain due to the previous therapy but do not recurrence. In one patient, the finding of 3 foci of uptake of FDG whereas CT scan was inconclusive confirmed the indication of chemotherapy. In 2 patients with FDG abdominal foci without morphologic abnormalities, the therapeutic strategy is not yet decided in 2 patients, no foci could be found. In conclusion, these preliminary results show that FDG scan has provided a help to the physician indecision-making for therapeutic strategy in 8 patients on 21 (38%) and a help to the surgeon in 2 more cases (48% as a whole)

  19. Heart imaging by cadmium telluride gamma camera European Program 'BIOMED' consortium

    CERN Document Server

    Scheiber, C; Chambron, J; Prat, V; Kazandjan, A; Jahnke, A; Matz, R; Thomas, S; Warren, S; Hage-Hali, M; Regal, R; Siffert, P; Karman, M

    1999-01-01

    Cadmium telluride semiconductor detectors (CdTe) operating at room temperature are attractive for medical imaging because of their good energy resolution providing excellent spatial and contrast resolution. The compactness of the detection system allows the building of small light camera heads which can be used for bedside imaging. A mobile pixellated gamma camera based on 2304 CdTe (pixel size: 3x3 mm, field of view: 15 cmx15 cm) has been designed for cardiac imaging. A dedicated 16-channel integrated circuit has also been designed. The acquisition hardware is fully programmable (DSP card, personal computer-based system). Analytical calculations have shown that a commercial parallel hole collimator will fit the efficiency/resolution requirements for cardiac applications. Monte-Carlo simulations predict that the Moire effect can be reduced by a 15 deg. tilt of the collimator with respect to the detector grid. A 16x16 CdTe module has been built for the preliminary physical tests. The energy resolution was 6.16...

  20. Acceptance of gamma camera Philips bright view based in the protocol nema 2001; Aceptacion de gammacamara philips brightview basada en el protocolo nema 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrer Gracia, C.; Luquero Llopis, N.; Plaza Aparicio, R.; Huerga Cabrerizo, C.; Corredoira Silva, E.; Serrada Hierro, A.

    2013-07-01

    Recently a new Philips Bright View X gamma camera installed in the Nuclear Medicine Service. It is one gamma camera of nuclear medicine of variable angle with double detector that can be configured for cardiac SPECT, SPECT not circular, body full, dynamic planar and several acquisitions with a single detector. (Author)

  1. A portable gamma-camera for intraoperative detection of sentinel nodes in the head and neck region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeeren, Lenka; Valdés Olmos, Renato A.; Klop, W. Martin C.; Balm, Alfons J. M.; van den Brekel, Michiel W. M.

    2010-01-01

    We introduced and evaluated a portable gamma-camera for intraoperative visualization of sentinel nodes in the head and neck region. METHODS: Planar lymphoscintigraphy and SPECT/CT were performed after peritumoral injection of (99m)Tc-nanocolloid in 25 patients (head and neck melanoma or oral cavity

  2. Small Field of View Scintimammography Gamma Camera Integrated to a Stereotactic Core Biopsy Digital X-ray System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrew Weisenberger; Fernando Barbosa; T. D. Green; R. Hoefer; Cynthia Keppel; Brian Kross; Stanislaw Majewski; Vladimir Popov; Randolph Wojcik

    2002-10-01

    A small field of view gamma camera has been developed for integration with a commercial stereotactic core biopsy system. The goal is to develop and implement a dual-modality imaging system utilizing scintimammography and digital radiography to evaluate the reliability of scintimammography in predicting the malignancy of suspected breast lesions from conventional X-ray mammography. The scintimammography gamma camera is a custom-built mini gamma camera with an active area of 5.3 cm /spl times/ 5.3 cm and is based on a 2 /spl times/ 2 array of Hamamatsu R7600-C8 position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes. The spatial resolution of the gamma camera at the collimator surface is < 4 mm full-width at half-maximum and a sensitivity of /spl sim/ 4000 Hz/mCi. The system is also capable of acquiring dynamic scintimammographic data to allow for dynamic uptake studies. Sample images of preliminary clinical results are presented to demonstrate the performance of the system.

  3. Nema tests in gamma-cameras. Independent implementation of manufacturer; Pruebas Nema en gammacamaras. Implementacion independiente del fabricante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos Pacho, J. A.; Montes Fuentes, C.; Verde Velasco, J. M.; Perez Alvarez, M. E.; Delgado Aparicio, J. M.; Cons Perez, N.; Gomez Gonzalez, N.; Garcia Repiso, S.; Saez Beltran, M.; Gomez Llorente, P. L.

    2013-07-01

    The analysis of test results of quality control in gamma cameras, as extrinsic planar uniformity and the spatial resolution is often limited by intrinsic equipment tools and procedures. With the objective of an independent assessment of such evidence and better management and monitoring of the data obtained are made two separate programs in Matlab. (Author)

  4. A machine learning method for fast and accurate characterization of depth-of-interaction gamma cameras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedemonte, Stefano; Pierce, Larry; Van Leemput, Koen

    2017-10-19

    Measuring the depth-of-interaction (DOI) of gamma photons enables increasing the resolution of emission imaging systems. Several design variants of DOI-sensitive detectors have been recently introduced to improve the performance of scanners for positron emission tomography (PET). However, the accurate characterization of the response of DOI detectors, necessary to accurately measure the DOI, remains an unsolved problem. Numerical simulations are, at the state of the art, imprecise, while measuring directly the characteristics of DOI detectors experimentally is hindered by the impossibility to impose the depth-of-interaction in an experimental set-up. In this article we introduce a machine learning approach for extracting accurate forward models of gamma imaging devices from simple pencil-beam measurements, using a nonlinear dimensionality reduction technique in combination with a finite mixture model. The method is purely data-driven, not requiring simulations, and is applicable to a wide range of detector types. The proposed method was evaluated both in a simulation study and with data acquired using a monolithic gamma camera designed for PET (the cMiCE detector), demonstrating the accurate recovery of the DOI characteristics. The combination of the proposed calibration technique with maximum- a posteriori estimation of the coordinates of interaction provided a depth resolution of  ≈1.14 mm for the simulated PET detector and  ≈1.74 mm for the cMiCE detector. The software and experimental data are made available at http://occiput.mgh.harvard.edu/depthembedding/.

  5. A machine learning method for fast and accurate characterization of depth-of-interaction gamma cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedemonte, Stefano; Pierce, Larry; Van Leemput, Koen

    2017-11-01

    Measuring the depth-of-interaction (DOI) of gamma photons enables increasing the resolution of emission imaging systems. Several design variants of DOI-sensitive detectors have been recently introduced to improve the performance of scanners for positron emission tomography (PET). However, the accurate characterization of the response of DOI detectors, necessary to accurately measure the DOI, remains an unsolved problem. Numerical simulations are, at the state of the art, imprecise, while measuring directly the characteristics of DOI detectors experimentally is hindered by the impossibility to impose the depth-of-interaction in an experimental set-up. In this article we introduce a machine learning approach for extracting accurate forward models of gamma imaging devices from simple pencil-beam measurements, using a nonlinear dimensionality reduction technique in combination with a finite mixture model. The method is purely data-driven, not requiring simulations, and is applicable to a wide range of detector types. The proposed method was evaluated both in a simulation study and with data acquired using a monolithic gamma camera designed for PET (the cMiCE detector), demonstrating the accurate recovery of the DOI characteristics. The combination of the proposed calibration technique with maximum- a posteriori estimation of the coordinates of interaction provided a depth resolution of  ≈1.14 mm for the simulated PET detector and  ≈1.74 mm for the cMiCE detector. The software and experimental data are made available at http://occiput.mgh.harvard.edu/depthembedding/.

  6. Potential role of a new hand-held miniature gamma camera in performing minimally invasive parathyroidectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, Joaquin; Lledo, Salvador [University of Valencia, Clinic University Hospital, Department of Surgery, Valencia (Spain); Ferrer-Rebolleda, Jose [Clinic University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Valencia (Spain); Cassinello, Norberto [Clinic University Hospital, Unit of Endocrinologic and Bariatric Surgery, Valencia (Spain)

    2007-02-15

    Sestamibi scans have increased the use of minimally invasive parathyroidectomy (MIP) to treat primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) when caused by a parathyroid single adenoma. The greatest concern for surgeons remains the proper identification of pathological glands in a limited surgical field. We have studied the usefulness of a new hand-held miniature gamma camera (MGC) when used intraoperatively to locate parathyroid adenomas. To our knowledge this is the first report published on this subject in the scientific literature. Five patients with PHPT secondary to a single adenoma, positively diagnosed by preoperative sestamibi scans, underwent a MIP. A gamma probe for radioguided surgery and the new hand-held MGC were used consecutively to locate the pathological glands. This new MGC has a module composed of a high-resolution interchangeable collimator and a CsI(Na) scintillating crystal. It has dimensions of around 15 cm x 8 cm x 9 cm and weighs 1 kg. The intraoperative assay of PTH (ioPTH) was used to confirm the complete resection of pathological tissue. All cases were operated on successfully by a MIP. The ioPTH confirmed the excision of all pathological tissues. The MGC proved its usefulness in all patients, even in a difficult case in which the first attempt with the gamma probe failed. In all cases it offered real-time accurate intraoperative images. The hand-held MGC is a useful instrument in MIP for PHPT. It may be used to complement the standard tools used to date, or may even replace them, at least in selected cases of single adenomas. (orig.)

  7. Evaluation of a CdTe semiconductor based compact gamma camera for sentinel lymph node imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, Paolo; Curion, Assunta S.; Mettivier, Giovanni; Esposito, Michela; Aurilio, Michela; Caraco, Corradina; Aloj, Luigi; Lastoria, Secondo [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli Federico II, I-80126 Napoli (Italy) and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Napoli, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Medicina Nucleare, Istituto Nazionale per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori, Fondazione G. Pascale, I-80131 Napoli (Italy)

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: The authors assembled a prototype compact gamma-ray imaging probe (MediPROBE) for sentinel lymph node (SLN) localization. This probe is based on a semiconductor pixel detector. Its basic performance was assessed in the laboratory and clinically in comparison with a conventional gamma camera. Methods: The room-temperature CdTe pixel detector (1 mm thick) has 256x256 square pixels arranged with a 55 {mu}m pitch (sensitive area 14.08x14.08 mm{sup 2}), coupled pixel-by-pixel via bump-bonding to the Medipix2 photon-counting readout CMOS integrated circuit. The imaging probe is equipped with a set of three interchangeable knife-edge pinhole collimators (0.94, 1.2, or 2.1 mm effective diameter at 140 keV) and its focal distance can be regulated in order to set a given field of view (FOV). A typical FOV of 70 mm at 50 mm skin-to-collimator distance corresponds to a minification factor 1:5. The detector is operated at a single low-energy threshold of about 20 keV. Results: For {sup 99m}Tc, at 50 mm distance, a background-subtracted sensitivity of 6.5x10{sup -3} cps/kBq and a system spatial resolution of 5.5 mm FWHM were obtained for the 0.94 mm pinhole; corresponding values for the 2.1 mm pinhole were 3.3x10{sup -2} cps/kBq and 12.6 mm. The dark count rate was 0.71 cps. Clinical images in three patients with melanoma indicate detection of the SLNs with acquisition times between 60 and 410 s with an injected activity of 26 MBq {sup 99m}Tc and prior localization with standard gamma camera lymphoscintigraphy. Conclusions: The laboratory performance of this imaging probe is limited by the pinhole collimator performance and the necessity of working in minification due to the limited detector size. However, in clinical operative conditions, the CdTe imaging probe was effective in detecting SLNs with adequate resolution and an acceptable sensitivity. Sensitivity is expected to improve with the future availability of a larger CdTe detector permitting operation at shorter

  8. Iterative reconstruction of SiPM light response functions in a square-shaped compact gamma camera

    CERN Document Server

    Morozov, A; Marcos, J; Martins, R; Pereira, L; Solovov, V; Chepel, V

    2016-01-01

    Compact gamma cameras with a square-shaped monolithic scintillator crystal and an array of silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) are actively being developed for applications in areas such as small animal imaging, cancer diagnostics and radiotracer guided surgery. Statistical methods of position reconstruction, which are potentially superior to the traditional centroid method, require accurate knowledge of the spatial response of each photomultiplier. Using both Monte Carlo simulations and experimental data obtained with a camera prototype, we show that the spatial response of all photomultipliers (light response functions) can be parameterized with axially symmetric functions obtained iteratively from flood field irradiation data. The study was performed with a camera prototype equipped with a 30 x 30 x 2 mm3 LYSO crystal and an 8 x 8 array of SiPMs for 140 keV gamma rays. The simulations demonstrate that the images, reconstructed with the maximum likelihood method using the response obtained with the iterative a...

  9. Performance of the prototype LaBr{sub 3} spectrometer developed for the JET gamma-ray camera upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rigamonti, D., E-mail: davide.rigamonti@mib.infn.it; Nocente, M.; Gorini, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica “G. Occhialini,” Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “P. Caldirola,” CNR, Milano (Italy); Muraro, A.; Giacomelli, L.; Cippo, E. P.; Tardocchi, M. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “P. Caldirola,” CNR, Milano (Italy); Perseo, V. [Dipartimento di Fisica “G. Occhialini,” Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Boltruczyk, G.; Gosk, M.; Korolczuk, S.; Mianowski, S.; Zychor, I. [Narodowe Centrum Badań Jądrowych (NCBJ), 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Fernandes, A.; Pereira, R. C. [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa (Portugal); Figueiredo, J. [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa (Portugal); EUROfusion Programme Management Unit, Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB Abingdon (United Kingdom); Kiptily, V. [Culham Science Centre for Fusion Energy, Culham (United Kingdom); Murari, A. [EUROfusion Programme Management Unit, Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB Abingdon (United Kingdom); Consorzio RFX (CNR, ENEA, INFN, Universita’ di Padova, Acciaierie Venete SpA), Padova (Italy); Collaboration: EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-15

    In this work, we describe the solution developed by the gamma ray camera upgrade enhancement project to improve the spectroscopic properties of the existing JET γ-ray camera. Aim of the project is to enable gamma-ray spectroscopy in JET deuterium-tritium plasmas. A dedicated pilot spectrometer based on a LaBr{sub 3} crystal coupled to a silicon photo-multiplier has been developed. A proper pole zero cancellation network able to shorten the output signal to a length of 120 ns has been implemented allowing for spectroscopy at MHz count rates. The system has been characterized in the laboratory and shows an energy resolution of 5.5% at E{sub γ} = 0.662 MeV, which extrapolates favorably in the energy range of interest for gamma-ray emission from fast ions in fusion plasmas.

  10. Estimated GFR (eGFR by prediction equation in staging of chronic kidney disease compared to gamma camera GFR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Masum Alam

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Glomerular filtration rate is an effective tool for diagnosis and staging of chronic kidney disease. The effect ofrenal insufficiency by different method of this tool among patients with CKD is controversial.Objective: The objec­tive of this study was to evaluate the performance of eGFR in staging of CKD compared to gamma camera based GFR.Methods: This cross sectional analytical study was conducted in the Department of Biochemistry Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU with the collaboration with National Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Allied Sciences, BSMMU during the period of January 2011 to December 2012. Gama camera based GFR was estimated from DTP A reno gram and eGFR was estimated by three prediction equations. Comparison was done by Bland Altman agree­ment test to see the agreement on the measurement of GFR between three equation based eGFR method and gama camera based GFR method. Staging comparison was done by Kappa analysis to see the agreement between the stages identified by those different methods.Results: Bland-Altman agreement analysis between GFR measured by gamma camera, CG equation ,CG equation corrected by BSA and MDRD equation shows statistically significant. CKD stages determined by CG GFR, CG GFR corrected by BSA , MDRD GFR and gamma camera based GFR was compared by Kappa statistical analysis .The kappa value was 0.66, 0.77 and 0.79 respectively.Conclusions: This study findings suggest that GFR estimation by MDRD equation in CKD patients shows good agreement with gamma camera based GFR and for staging of CKD patients, eGFR by MDRD formula may be used as very effective tool in Bangladeshi population.

  11. Reading and comparative quantification of perfusion myocardium tomo-scintigraphy realised by gamma camera and semiconductors camera;Interpretation et quantification comparative de la tomoscintigraphie myocardique de perfusion realisee par gamma camera et camera a semi-conducteur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merlin, C.; Gauthe, M.; Bertrand, S.; Kelly, A.; Veyre, A.; Mestas, D.; Cachin, F. [CLCC Jean-Perrin, Service de medecine nucleaire, 63 - Clermont-Ferrand (France); Motreff, P. [CHRU Gabriel Montpied, Service de Cardiologie, 63 - Clermont-Ferrand (France)

    2010-05-15

    By offering high quality images, semiconductor cameras represent an undeniable technological progress. The interpretation of examinations, however, requires a learning phase. The optimization of quantification software should confirm the superiority of the D-SPECT for the measurement of kinetic parameters. (N.C.)

  12. Imaging of radiocesium uptake dynamics in a plant body using a newly developed high-resolution gamma camera for radiocesium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawachi, Naoki; Yin, Yong-Gen; Suzui, Nobuo; Ishii, Satomi; Fujimaki, Shu [Radiotracer Imaging Gr., Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Yoshihara, Toshihiro [Plant Molecular Biology, Laboratory of Environmental Science, Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI), 1646 Abiko, Chiba 270-1194 (Japan); Watabe, Hiroshi [Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center (CYRIC), Tohoku University, 6-3Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi, 980-8578 (Japan); Yamamoto, Seiichi [Department of Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1-20 Daiko-Minami, Higashi-ku, Nagoya 461-8673 (Japan)

    2014-07-01

    Vast agricultural and forest areas around the Tokyo Electric Power Company Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station in Japan were contaminated with radiocesium (Cs-134 and Cs-137) after the accident following the earthquake and tsunami in March 2011. A variety of agricultural studies, such as fertilizer management and plant breeding, have been undertaken intensively for reduction of radiocesium uptake in crops, or, enhancement of uptake in phyto-remediation. In this study, we newly developed a gamma camera specific for plant nutritional research, and performed quantitative analyses on uptake and partitioning of radiocesium in intact plant bodies. In general, gamma camera is a common technology in medical imaging, but it is not applicable to high-energy gamma rays such as emissions from Cs-137 (662 keV). Therefore, we designed our new gamma camera to prevent the penetration and scattering of the high-energy gamma rays. A single-crystal scintillator, Ce-doped Gd{sub 3}Al{sub 2}Ga{sub 3}O{sub 12} (Ce:GAGG), was employed, which has a relatively high density, a large light output, no natural radioactivity and no hygroscopicity. A 44 x 44 matrix of the Ce:GAGG pixels, with dimensions of 0.85 mm x 0.85 mm x 10 mm for each pixel, was coupled to a high-quantum efficiency position sensitive photomultiplier tube. This gamma detector unit was encased in a 20-mm-thick tungsten container with a tungsten pinhole collimator on the front. By using this gamma camera, soybean plants (Glycine max), grown in hydroponic solutions and fed with 1-2 MBq of Cs-137, were imaged for 6.5 days in maximum to investigate and visualize the uptake dynamics into/within the areal part. As a result, radiocesium gradually appeared in the shoot several hours after feeding of Cs-137, and then accumulated intensively in the maturing pods and seeds in a characteristic pattern. Our results also demonstrated that this gamma-camera method enables quantitative evaluation of plant ability to absorb, transport

  13. News in nuclear cardiology: A gamma camera with semiconductors dedicated to cardiac imaging;Nouveautes en cardiologie nucleaire: une gamma camera a semi-conducteurs dediee a l'imagerie cardiaque

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godbert, Y.; Bullier, E.; Riviere, A.L.; Laffon, E.; Guyot, M.; Bordenave, L.; Barat, J.L. [CHU de Bordeaux, Service de medecine nucleaire, hopital du Haut-Leveque, 33 - Pessac (France)

    2010-03-15

    During the last few years, cardiac imaging made important breakthroughs thanks to the development of various techniques allowing the risk stratification of patients with coronary artery disease. The well-established single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) as a myocardial imaging technique made an important progress with the recent improvement of high-speed volume acquisition, using dedicated semi-conductor gamma camera. These cameras bring significant improvement to the image quality and the image acquisition time, which is now seven times lower. New type of artefacts is expected because of the geometry of detection, thus studies are still needed to assess the exact performance of this revolutionary technology. (authors)

  14. Development of a Compton camera for prompt-gamma medical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldawood, S.; Thirolf, P. G.; Miani, A.; Böhmer, M.; Dedes, G.; Gernhäuser, R.; Lang, C.; Liprandi, S.; Maier, L.; Marinšek, T.; Mayerhofer, M.; Schaart, D. R.; Lozano, I. Valencia; Parodi, K.

    2017-11-01

    A Compton camera-based detector system for photon detection from nuclear reactions induced by proton (or heavier ion) beams is under development at LMU Munich, targeting the online range verification of the particle beam in hadron therapy via prompt-gamma imaging. The detector is designed to be capable to reconstruct the photon source origin not only from the Compton scattering kinematics of the primary photon, but also to allow for tracking of the secondary Compton-scattered electrons, thus enabling a γ-source reconstruction also from incompletely absorbed photon events. The Compton camera consists of a monolithic LaBr3:Ce scintillation crystal, read out by a multi-anode PMT acting as absorber, preceded by a stacked array of 6 double-sided silicon strip detectors as scatterers. The detector components have been characterized both under offline and online conditions. The LaBr3:Ce crystal exhibits an excellent time and energy resolution. Using intense collimated 137Cs and 60Co sources, the monolithic scintillator was scanned on a fine 2D grid to generate a reference library of light amplitude distributions that allows for reconstructing the photon interaction position using a k-Nearest Neighbour (k-NN) algorithm. Systematic studies were performed to investigate the performance of the reconstruction algorithm, revealing an improvement of the spatial resolution with increasing photon energy to an optimum value of 3.7(1)mm at 1.33 MeV, achieved with the Categorical Average Pattern (CAP) modification of the k-NN algorithm.

  15. Iterative reconstruction of SiPM light response functions in a square-shaped compact gamma camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, A.; Alves, F.; Marcos, J.; Martins, R.; Pereira, L.; Solovov, V.; Chepel, V.

    2017-05-01

    Compact gamma cameras with a square-shaped monolithic scintillator crystal and an array of silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) are actively being developed for applications in areas such as small animal imaging, cancer diagnostics and radiotracer guided surgery. Statistical methods of position reconstruction, which are potentially superior to the traditional centroid method, require accurate knowledge of the spatial response of each photomultiplier. Using both Monte Carlo simulations and experimental data obtained with a camera prototype, we show that the spatial response of all photomultipliers (light response functions) can be parameterized with axially symmetric functions obtained iteratively from flood field irradiation data. The study was performed with a camera prototype equipped with a 30  ×  30  ×  2 mm3 LYSO crystal and an 8  ×  8 array of SiPMs for 140 keV gamma rays. The simulations demonstrate that the images, reconstructed with the maximum likelihood method using the response obtained with the iterative approach, exhibit only minor distortions: the average difference between the reconstructed and the true positions in X and Y directions does not exceed 0.2 mm in the central area of 22  ×  22 mm2 and 0.4 mm at the periphery of the camera. A similar level of image distortions is shown experimentally with the camera prototype.

  16. Evaluation of the scattered radiation components produced in a gamma camera using Monte Carlo method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polo, Ivon Oramas, E-mail: ivonoramas67@gmail.com [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Technologies, Higher Institute of Applied Science and Technology (InSTEC), La Habana (Cuba)

    2014-07-01

    Introduction: this paper presents a simulation for evaluation of the scattered radiation components produced in a gamma camera PARK using Monte Carlo code SIMIND. It simulates a whole body study with MDP (Methylene Diphosphonate) radiopharmaceutical based on Zubal anthropomorphic phantom, with some spinal lesions. Methods: the simulation was done by comparing 3 configurations for the detected photons. The corresponding energy spectra were obtained using Low Energy High Resolution collimator. The parameters related with the interactions and the fraction of events in the energy window, the simulated events of the spectrum and scatter events were calculated. Results: the simulation confirmed that the images without influence of scattering events have a higher number of valid recorded events and it improved the statistical quality of them. A comparison among different collimators was made. The parameters and detector energy spectrum were calculated for each simulation configuration with these collimators using {sup 99m}Tc. Conclusion: the simulation corroborated that LEHS collimator has higher sensitivity and HEHR collimator has lower sensitivity when they are used with low energy photons. (author)

  17. The review of myocardial positron emission computed tomography and positron imaging by gamma camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohtake, Tohru [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1998-04-01

    To measure myocardial blood flow, Nitrogen-13 ammonia, Oxygen-15 water, Rubidium-82 and et al. are used. Each has merit and demerit. By measuring myocardial coronary flow reserve, the decrease of flow reserve during dipyridamole in patients with hypercholesterolemia or diabetes mellitus without significant coronary stenosis was observed. The possibility of early detection of atherosclerosis was showed. As to myocardial metabolism, glucose metabolism is measured by Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), and it is considered as useful for the evaluation of myocardial viability. We are using FDG to evaluate insulin resistance during insulin clamp in patients with diabetes mellitus by measuring glucose utilization rate of myocardium and skeletal muscle. FFA metabolism has been measured by {sup 11}C-palmitate, but absolute quantification has not been performed. Recently the method for absolute quantification was reported, and new radiopharmaceutical {sup 18}F-FTHA was reported. Oxygen metabolism has been estimated by {sup 11}C-acetate. Myocardial viability, cardiac efficiency was evaluated by oxygen metabolism. As to receptor or sympathetic nerve end, cardiac insufficiency or cardiac transplantation was evaluated. Imaging of positron emitting radiopharmaceutical by gamma camera has been performed. Collimator method is clinically useful for cardiac imaging of viability study. (author). 54 refs.

  18. Calculating Gamma Camera Uniformity Parameters: Beyond the Vendor-specific Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Anil Kumar; Sharma, Param Dev; Kumar, Jay Prakash; Saroha, Kartik; Patel, Chetan; Bal, Chandra Sekhar; Kumar, Rakesh

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and verify a personal computer-based software tool for calculating uniformity indices of gamma camera. The program was developed in MATLAB R2013b under Microsoft Windows operating system. Noise-less digital phantoms with known uniformity parameters were used to verify the accuracy of the program. Two hundred and forty-four Co-57 flood source images were acquired on Symbia T6 and Discovery nuclear medicine/computed tomography 670. The uniformity indices of these images were determined with their respective vendor's software and also by the tool developed. Bland-Altman plots were used for measuring the agreements between the developed program and the vendor's program for the calculation of uniformity indices. The tool for calculating uniformity indices was found to be accurate. Uniformity indices measured with the tool revealed a very good correlation with vendor's software based on Bland-Altman analysis, as almost all measurements were within the ±2 standard deviation range. The software tool for calculation of uniformity indices is accurate, and the uniformity indices calculated by it are in agreement with uniformity indices calculated by the vendor's software.

  19. Radioguided Parathyroidectomy with Portable Mini Gamma-Camera for the Treatment of Primary Hyperparathyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Casella

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. A proper localisation of pathological parathyroid glands is essential for a minimally invasive approach in the surgical treatment of primary hyperparathyroidism (PHP. The recent introduction of portable mini gamma-cameras (pMGCs enabled intraoperative scintigraphic scanning. The aim of our study is to evaluate the efficacy of this new method and compare it with the preoperative localisation surveys. Methods. 20 patients were studied; they were evaluated preoperatively by neck ultrasound and Tc-sestaMIBI-scintigraphy and intraoperatively with the pMGC IP Guardian 2. The results obtained from the three evaluations were compared. Results. The pMGC presented a sensitivity of 95%, a specificity of 98.89%, and a diagnostic accuracy of 98.18%, which were higher than those of preoperative ultrasound (sensitivity 55%; specificity 95%; diagnostic accuracy 87% and scintigraphy with Tc-sestaMIBI (sensitivity 73.68%; specificity 96.05%; diagnostic accuracy 91.58%. Conclusions. The pMGC can be used effectively as an intraoperative method to find the correct location of the pathological parathyroid glands. The pMGC is more reliable than the currently used preoperative and intraoperative localisation techniques.

  20. Optimization of a parallel hole collimator/CdZnTe gamma-camera architecture for scintimammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Charlotte; Montémont, Guillaume; Rebuffel, Véronique; Verger, Loïck; Buvat, Irène

    2011-04-01

    Small field-of-view CdZnTe (CZT) gamma cameras are increasingly studied for breast lesion detection to complement mammography or ultrasonographic findings. However, in classical collimation configurations, they remain limited by the trade-off between spatial resolution and sensitivity. The HiSens architecture was proposed to overcome these limitations. Using an accurate 3D localization of the interactions inside the detector, this architecture leads to a gain in sensitivity without loss in spatial resolution. In this article, the relevance of the HiSens architecture for planar scintimammography is studied. A detective quantum efficiency (DQE) computation method is developed and used to optimize the dimensioning of a parallel hole collimator dedicated to scintimammography. Based on the DQE curves, the impact of the collimator-to-detector distance is studied. Two algorithms are proposed to combine data acquired with different collimator-to-detector distances. It is shown that CZT detector virtual pixelization increases system sensitivity by 3.3 while preserving a standard LEHR spatial resolution. The introduction of a gap between the CZT detector and the collimator is useful to modulate the DQE curve shape. The combination of data acquired using different gaps in the image formation process leads to enhanced restoration of the frequency content of the images, resulting in image contrast and spatial resolution improvements. Acquisition duration or injected activity could be markedly reduced if the HiSens architecture with an appropriate collimator-detector gap were used.

  1. Optimization of a parallel hole collimator/CdZnTe gamma-camera architecture for scintimammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert, Charlotte; Montemont, Guillaume; Rebuffel, Veronique; Verger, Loieck; Buvat, Irene [CEA-LETI-MINATEC, F38054 Grenoble (France); IMNC-UMR 8165 CNRS, Universites Paris 7 et 11, Batiment 440, 91406 Orsay (France)

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: Small field-of-view CdZnTe (CZT) gamma cameras are increasingly studied for breast lesion detection to complement mammography or ultrasonographic findings. However, in classical collimation configurations, they remain limited by the trade-off between spatial resolution and sensitivity. The HiSens architecture was proposed to overcome these limitations. Using an accurate 3D localization of the interactions inside the detector, this architecture leads to a gain in sensitivity without loss in spatial resolution. In this article, the relevance of the HiSens architecture for planar scintimammography is studied. Methods: A detective quantum efficiency (DQE) computation method is developed and used to optimize the dimensioning of a parallel hole collimator dedicated to scintimammography. Based on the DQE curves, the impact of the collimator-to-detector distance is studied. Two algorithms are proposed to combine data acquired with different collimator-to-detector distances. Results: It is shown that CZT detector virtual pixelization increases system sensitivity by 3.3 while preserving a standard LEHR spatial resolution. The introduction of a gap between the CZT detector and the collimator is useful to modulate the DQE curve shape. The combination of data acquired using different gaps in the image formation process leads to enhanced restoration of the frequency content of the images, resulting in image contrast and spatial resolution improvements. Conclusions: Acquisition duration or injected activity could be markedly reduced if the HiSens architecture with an appropriate collimator-detector gap were used.

  2. Radiotracer study of wash load movement in a drum-type fabric washing machine using a gamma camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balt, A.P.; Brekel, L.D.M. van den; Vandecasteele, C.; Kolar, Z.

    1987-01-01

    A study was made of the movement of the wash loads in a drum-type washing machine. For this purpose a sup(99m)Tc source was attached to one or two separate textile pieces and the subsequent source positions were determined by means of a gamma-camera. The wash load movement pattern appears to depend on the type of textile material and its amount, as well as on the volume of water present in the washing machine.

  3. Correlation between glomerular filtration rate with gamma camera and estimated serum creatinine clearance from Cockcroft and Gault's formula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhushan, Shivanand; Kumar, Rajesh

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of the present study is to find out the correlation between the glomerular filtration rate (GFR by Gates gamma camera method) and serum creatinine clearance (SCrCl by Cockcroft and Gault's method) within ± 3 weeks' time difference. Study design retrospectively in 59 patients with serum creatinine value calculated for SCrCl with Cockcroft and Gault's formula as an index parameter for kidney function underwent the 99m-Technitium labeled Di-ethyl Triamine Penta Acetic Acid (99mTc-DTPA) renogram with ECIL planar gamma camera. All data of 59 patients has been divided into Group- I, II, and III based on the time difference of serum creatinine test from 99mTc-DTPA renal GFR tests performed on the same subjects. Serum Creatinine test was carried out within ± 3 days, between ± 4 days and ± 7 days, and between ± 8 days and ± 21 days from the DTPA GFR Test performed in the Group-I, II, and III respectively. Correlation coefficient of Group-I (n = 15) patients showed 0.8198 and P value formula could serve as an instant, easy, and reliable method for assessing kidney function. SCrCl with Cockcroft and Gault's formula is more useful for rapid estimation of global GFR for those patients who are not accessible to DTPA renogram with gamma camera. Correlation can be established further with the prospective study in various renal pathophysiological conditions.

  4. Development of an omnidirectional gamma-ray imaging Compton camera for low-radiation-level environmental monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takara; Enomoto, Ryoji; Muraishi, Hiroshi; Katagiri, Hideaki; Kagaya, Mika; Fukushi, Masahiro; Kano, Daisuke; Satoh, Wataru; Takeda, Tohoru; Tanaka, Manobu M.; Tanaka, Souichi; Uchida, Tomohisa; Wada, Kiyoto; Wakamatsu, Ryo

    2018-02-01

    We have developed an omnidirectional gamma-ray imaging Compton camera for environmental monitoring at low levels of radiation. The camera consisted of only six CsI(Tl) scintillator cubes of 3.5 cm, each of which was readout by super-bialkali photo-multiplier tubes (PMTs). Our camera enables the visualization of the position of gamma-ray sources in all directions (∼4π sr) over a wide energy range between 300 and 1400 keV. The angular resolution (σ) was found to be ∼11°, which was realized using an image-sharpening technique. A high detection efficiency of 18 cps/(µSv/h) for 511 keV (1.6 cps/MBq at 1 m) was achieved, indicating the capability of this camera to visualize hotspots in areas with low-radiation-level contamination from the order of µSv/h to natural background levels. Our proposed technique can be easily used as a low-radiation-level imaging monitor in radiation control areas, such as medical and accelerator facilities.

  5. Airflow distribution with manual hyperinflation as assessed through gamma camera imaging: a crossover randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Aswegen, H; van Aswegen, A; Raan, H Du; Toit, R Du; Spruyt, M; Nel, R; Maleka, M

    2013-06-01

    Manual hyperinflation (MHI) has been shown to improve lung compliance, reduce airway resistance, and enhance secretion removal and peak expiratory flow. The aims of this study were to investigate whether there is a difference in airflow distribution through patients' lungs when using the Laerdal and Mapleson-C circuits at a set level of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP), and to establish whether differences in lung compliance and haemodynamic status exist when patients are treated with both these MHI circuits. Crossover randomised controlled trial. Adult multidisciplinary intensive care unit (ICU) at an academic hospital. Fifteen adult patients were recruited and served as their own controls. In the Nuclear Medicine Department, MHI with PEEP 7.5 cmH(2)O was performed in the supine position (Day 1) with either Laerdal or Mapleson-C circuits, in a random order, while technetium-99m (Tc-99m) aerosol was administered and images were taken with a gamma camera. Changes in heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP) and dynamic lung compliance (C(D)) were documented at baseline, immediately after return to ICU, and 10, 20 and 30 minutes after return to ICU. The alternative circuit was used on Day 2. Tc-99m deposition was greater in the right lung field (62% and 63% for Laerdal and Mapleson-C circuits, respectively) than the left lung field (38% and 37%, respectively) for all patients, and least deposition occurred in the left lower segments (6% and 6%, respectively). No differences in Tc-99m deposition in the lungs, HR, MAP or C(D) were noted between the two MHI circuits. Airflow distribution through patients' lungs was similar when the Laerdal and Mapleson-C MHI circuits were compared using a set level of PEEP in the supine position. Copyright © 2012 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Monitoring system for isolated limb perfusion based on a portable gamma camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orero, A.; Muxi, A.; Rubi, S.; Duch, J. [Servei de Medicina Nuclear, Hospital Clinic, Barcelona (Spain); Vidal-Sicart, S.; Pons, F. [Servei de Medicina Nuclear, Hospital Clinic, Barcelona (Spain); Inst. d' Investigacions Biomediques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Barcelona (Spain); Red Tematica de Investigacion Cooperativa en Cancer (RTICC), Barcelona (Spain); Roe, N. [Servei de Medicina Nuclear, Hospital Clinic, Barcelona (Spain); CIBER de Bioingenieria, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN), Barcelona (Spain); Rull, R. [Servei de Cirurgia, Hospital Clinic, Barcelona (Spain); Pavon, N. [Inst. de Fisica Corpuscular, CSIC - UV, Valencia (Spain); Pavia, J. [Servei de Medicina Nuclear, Hospital Clinic, Barcelona (Spain); Inst. d' Investigacions Biomediques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Barcelona (Spain); CIBER de Bioingenieria, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN), Barcelona (Spain)

    2009-07-01

    Background: The treatment of malignant melanoma or sarcomas on a limb using extremity perfusion with tumour necrosis factor (TNF-{alpha}) and melphalan can result in a high degree of systemic toxicity if there is any leakage from the isolated blood territory of the limb into the systemic vascular territory. Leakage is currently controlled by using radiotracers and heavy external probes in a procedure that requires continuous manual calculations. The aim of this work was to develop a light, easily transportable system to monitor limb perfusion leakage by controlling systemic blood pool radioactivity with a portable gamma camera adapted for intraoperative use as an external probe, and to initiate its application in the treatment of MM patients. Methods: A special collimator was built for maximal sensitivity. Software for acquisition and data processing in real time was developed. After testing the adequacy of the system, it was used to monitor limb perfusion leakage in 16 patients with malignant melanoma to be treated with perfusion of TNF-{alpha} and melphalan. Results: The field of view of the detector system was 13.8 cm, which is appropriate for the monitoring, since the area to be controlled was the precordial zone. The sensitivity of the system was 257 cps/MBq. When the percentage of leakage reaches 10% the associated absolute error is {+-}1%. After a mean follow-up period of 12 months, no patients have shown any significant or lasting side-effects. Partial or complete remission of lesions was seen in 9 out of 16 patients (56%) after HILP with TNF-{alpha} and melphalan. Conclusion: The detector system together with specially developed software provides a suitable automatic continuous monitoring system of any leakage that may occur during limb perfusion. This technique has been successfully implemented in patients for whom perfusion with TNF-{alpha} and melphalan has been indicated. (orig.)

  7. A SPECT Scanner for Rodent Imaging Based on Small-Area Gamma Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lage, Eduardo; Villena, José L.; Tapias, Gustavo; Martinez, Naira P.; Soto-Montenegro, Maria L.; Abella, Mónica; Sisniega, Alejandro; Pino, Francisco; Ros, Domènec; Pavia, Javier; Desco, Manuel; Vaquero, Juan J.

    2010-10-01

    We developed a cost-effective SPECT scanner prototype (rSPECT) for in vivo imaging of rodents based on small-area gamma cameras. Each detector consists of a position-sensitive photomultiplier tube (PS-PMT) coupled to a 30 x 30 Nal(Tl) scintillator array and electronics attached to the PS-PMT sockets for adapting the detector signals to an in-house developed data acquisition system. The detector components are enclosed in a lead-shielded case with a receptacle to insert the collimators. System performance was assessed using 99mTc for a high-resolution parallel-hole collimator, and for a 0.75-mm pinhole collimator with a 60° aperture angle and a 42-mm collimator length. The energy resolution is about 10.7% of the photopeak energy. The overall system sensitivity is about 3 cps/μCi/detector and planar spatial resolution ranges from 2.4 mm at 1 cm source-to-collimator distance to 4.1 mm at 4.5 cm with parallel-hole collimators. With pinhole collimators planar spatial resolution ranges from 1.2 mm at 1 cm source-to-collimator distance to 2.4 mm at 4.5 cm; sensitivity at these distances ranges from 2.8 to 0.5 cps/μCi/detector. Tomographic hot-rod phantom images are presented together with images of bone, myocardium and brain of living rodents to demonstrate the feasibility of preclinical small-animal studies with the rSPECT.

  8. Gamma-camera 18F-FDG PET in diagnosis and staging of patients presenting with suspected lung cancer and comparison with dedicated PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oturai, Peter S; Mortensen, Jann; Enevoldsen, Henriette

    2004-01-01

    It is not clear whether high-quality coincidence gamma-PET (gPET) cameras can provide clinical data comparable with data obtained with dedicated PET (dPET) cameras in the primary diagnostic work-up of patients with suspected lung cancer. This study focuses on 2 main issues: direct comparison betw...

  9. Measurement of prompt gamma profiles in inhomogeneous targets with a knife-edge slit camera during proton irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priegnitz, M.; Helmbrecht, S.; Janssens, G.; Perali, I.; Smeets, J.; Vander Stappen, F.; Sterpin, E.; Fiedler, F.

    2015-06-01

    Proton and ion beam therapies become increasingly relevant in radiation therapy. To fully exploit the potential of this irradiation technique and to achieve maximum target volume conformality, the verification of particle ranges is highly desirable. Many research activities focus on the measurement of the spatial distributions of prompt gamma rays emitted during irradiation. A passively collimating knife-edge slit camera is a promising option to perform such measurements. In former publications, the feasibility of accurate detection of proton range shifts in homogeneous targets could be shown with such a camera. We present slit camera measurements of prompt gamma depth profiles in inhomogeneous targets. From real treatment plans and their underlying CTs, representative beam paths are selected and assembled as one-dimensional inhomogeneous targets built from tissue equivalent materials. These phantoms have been irradiated with monoenergetic proton pencil beams. The accuracy of range deviation estimation as well as the detectability of range shifts is investigated in different scenarios. In most cases, range deviations can be detected within less than 2 mm. In close vicinity to low-density regions, range detection is challenging. In particular, a minimum beam penetration depth of 7 mm beyond a cavity is required for reliable detection of a cavity filling with the present setup. Dedicated data post-processing methods may be capable of overcoming this limitation.

  10. Implementation of test for quality assurance in nuclear medicine gamma camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montoya Moreno, A.; Rodriguez Laguna, A.; Trujillo Zamudio, Flavio E [Department of Nuclear Medicine, National Cancer Institute San Fernando Avenue No.22, Col. Section XVI (Mexico)

    2012-10-23

    In nuclear medicine (NM) over 90% of procedures are performed for diagnostic purposes. To ensure adequate diagnostic quality of images and the optimization of the doses received by patients originated from the radioactive material is essential for regular monitoring and equipment performance through a quality assurance program (QAP). The QAP consists of 15 proposed performance tomographic and not tomographic gamma camera (GC) tests, and is based on recommendations of international organizations. We describe some results of the performance parameters of QAP applied to a GC model e.cam Siemens, of the Department of NM of the National Cancer Institute of Mexico (INCan). The results were: (1) The average intrinsic spatial resolution (R{sub in}) was 4.67 {+-} 0.25 mm at the limit of acceptance criterion of 4.4 mm. (2) The sensitivity extrinsic (S{sub ext}), with maximum variations of 1.8% (less than 2% which is the criterion of acceptance). (3) Rotational Uniformity (U{sub rot}), with values of integral uniformity (IU) in the useful field of view detector (UFOV), with maximum percentage change of 0.97% and monthly variations equal angles, ranging from 0.13 to 0.99% less than 1%. (4) The displacement of the center of rotation (DCOR), indicated a maximum deviation of 0.155 {+-} 0.039 mm less than 4.795 mm, an absolute deviation of less than 0.5 where pixel 0.085 pixel is suggested, the criteria are assigned to low-energy collimator high resolution. (5) In tomographic uniformity (U{sub tomo}), UI values (%) and percentage noise level (rms%) were 7.54 {+-} 1.53 and 4.18 {+-} 1.69 which are consistent with the limits of acceptance of 7.0-12.0% and 3.0-6.0% respectively. The smallest cold sphere has a diameter of 11.4 mm. The implementation of a QAP allows for high quality diagnostic images, optimization of the doses given to patients, a reduction of exposure to occupationally exposed workers (POE, by its Spanish acronym), and generally improves the productivity of the

  11. Dual-head gamma camera system for intraoperative localization of radioactive seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenali, B.; de Jong, H. W. A. M.; Viergever, M. A.; Dickerscheid, D. B. M.; Beijst, C.; Gilhuijs, K. G. A.

    2015-10-01

    Breast-conserving surgery is a standard option for the treatment of patients with early-stage breast cancer. This form of surgery may result in incomplete excision of the tumor. Iodine-125 labeled titanium seeds are currently used in clinical practice to reduce the number of incomplete excisions. It seems likely that the number of incomplete excisions can be reduced even further if intraoperative information about the location of the radioactive seed is combined with preoperative information about the extent of the tumor. This can be combined if the location of the radioactive seed is established in a world coordinate system that can be linked to the (preoperative) image coordinate system. With this in mind, we propose a radioactive seed localization system which is composed of two static ceiling-suspended gamma camera heads and two parallel-hole collimators. Physical experiments and computer simulations which mimic realistic clinical situations were performed to estimate the localization accuracy (defined as trueness and precision) of the proposed system with respect to collimator-source distance (ranging between 50 cm and 100 cm) and imaging time (ranging between 1 s and 10 s). The goal of the study was to determine whether or not a trueness of 5 mm can be achieved if a collimator-source distance of 50 cm and imaging time of 5 s are used (these specifications were defined by a group of dedicated breast cancer surgeons). The results from the experiments indicate that the location of the radioactive seed can be established with an accuracy of 1.6 mm  ±  0.6 mm if a collimator-source distance of 50 cm and imaging time of 5 s are used (these experiments were performed with a 4.5 cm thick block phantom). Furthermore, the results from the simulations indicate that a trueness of 3.2 mm or less can be achieved if a collimator-source distance of 50 cm and imaging time of 5 s are used (this trueness was achieved for all 14 breast phantoms which

  12. Implementation of test for quality assurance in nuclear medicine gamma camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, A. Montoya; Laguna, A. Rodríguez; Zamudio, Flavio E. Trujillo

    2012-10-01

    In nuclear medicine (NM) over 90% of procedures are performed for diagnostic purposes. To ensure adequate diagnostic quality of images and the optimization of the doses received by patients originated from the radioactive material is essential for regular monitoring and equipment performance through a quality assurance program (QAP). The QAP consists of 15 proposed performance tomographic and not tomographic gamma camera (GC) tests, and is based on recommendations of international organizations. We describe some results of the performance parameters of QAP applied to a GC model e.cam Siemens, of the Department of NM of the National Cancer Institute of Mexico (INCan). The results were: (1) The average intrinsic spatial resolution (Rin) was 4.67 ± 0.25 mm at the limit of acceptance criterion of 4.4 mm. (2) The sensitivity extrinsic (Sext), with maximum variations of 1.8% (less than 2% which is the criterion of acceptance). (3) Rotational Uniformity (Urot), with values of integral uniformity (IU) in the useful field of view detector (UFOV), with maximum percentage change of 0.97% and monthly variations equal angles, ranging from 0.13 to 0.99% less than 1%. (4) The displacement of the center of rotation (DCOR), indicated a maximum deviation of 0.155 ± 0.039 mm less than 4.795 mm, an absolute deviation of less than 0.5 where pixel 0.085 pixel is suggested, the criteria are assigned to low-energy collimator high resolution. (5) In tomographic uniformity (Utomo), UI values (%) and percentage noise level (rms%) were 7.54 ± 1.53 and 4.18 ± 1.69 which are consistent with the limits of acceptance of 7.0-12.0% and 3.0-6.0% respectively. The smallest cold sphere has a diameter of 11.4 mm. The implementation of a QAP allows for high quality diagnostic images, optimization of the doses given to patients, a reduction of exposure to occupationally exposed workers (POE, by its Spanish acronym), and generally improves the productivity of the service. This proposal can be used to

  13. How many x-ray photons can be scattered from a SPECT/CT room to an adjacent gamma camera?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zongjian

    2009-02-01

    The upper limit of the amount of x-rays that are scattered from a SPECT/CT room and are acquired by an adjacent gamma camera is estimated using physical principles and approximations. Methods: We first estimated the amount of xrays scattered from the patient to the ceiling of the SPECT/CT room, then the amount scattered from the ceiling through the gap between the ceiling and the top of lead walls to reach outside of the room, and finally the amount acquired by an adjacent gamma camera into the Tl-201 data. Results: The counts of scattered x-ray photons acquired in the Tl-201 energy window can reach 0.12% of the CT primary counts when the standard 2.13 m high lead walls are used for the SPECT/CT room. Due to the high CT counts, contamination to the Tl-201 data cannot be ignored. It is not effective to reduce the contamination by increase the lead height or change the floor plan because the scattered x-rays reduce moderately with increasing lead height or different floor plans. When the lead height increases from 2.13 m to 2.74 m, for example, the amount of scattered x-rays only decreases by 20%. With the same 2.13 m lead height, there is little difference in the amount of scattered x-rays for three different floor plans. Conclusions: The standard lead walls for a SPECT/CT room cannot prevent scattered x-rays from severe contamination to the Tl-201 data acquired by an adjacent gamma camera. Since dramatic increase of lead height is costly and often prohibitive due to the heavy load, we recommend that Tl-201 studies be stopped when an adjacent CT scanner is in operation.

  14. Sensitivity of a prompt-gamma slit-camera to detect range shifts for proton treatment verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenoff, Lena; Priegnitz, Marlen; Janssens, Guillaume; Petzoldt, Johannes; Wohlfahrt, Patrick; Trezza, Anna; Smeets, Julien; Pausch, Guntram; Richter, Christian

    2017-12-01

    A prompt-gamma imaging (PGI) slit-camera was recently applied successfully in clinical proton treatments using pencil beam scanning (PBS) and double scattering (DS). However, its full capability under clinical conditions has still to be systematically evaluated. Here, the performance of the slit-camera is systematically assessed in well-defined error scenarios using realistic treatment deliveries to an anthropomorphic head phantom. The sensitivity and accuracy to detect introduced global and local range shifts with the slit-camera was investigated in PBS and DS irradiations. For PBS, measured PGI information of shifted geometries were compared spot-wise with un-shifted PGI information derived from either a reference measurement or a treatment-plan-based simulation. Furthermore, for DS and PBS the integral PGI signal of the whole field was evaluated. Deviations from the treatment plan were detected with an accuracy better than 2 mm in PBS. The PGI simulation accuracy was well below 1 mm. Interfractional comparisons are more affected by measurement noise. The field-integral PGI sum signal allows the detection of global shifts in DS. Detection of global and local range shifts under close-to-clinical conditions is possible with the PGI slit-camera. Especially for PBS, high sensitivity and high accuracy in shift detection were found. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Calibration of gamma camera systems for a multicentre European {sup 123}I-FP-CIT SPECT normal database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tossici-Bolt, Livia [Southampton Univ. Hospitals NHS Trust, Dept. of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, Southampton (United Kingdom); Dickson, John C. [UCLH NHS Foundation Trust and Univ. College London, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Sera, Terez [Univ. of Szeged, Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Euromedic Szeged, Szeged (Hungary); Nijs, Robin de [Rigshospitalet and Univ. of Copenhagen, Neurobiology Research Unit, Copenhagen (Denmark); Bagnara, Maria Claudia [Az. Ospedaliera Universitaria S. Martino, Medical Physics Unit, Genoa (Italy); Jonsson, Cathrine [Karolinska Univ. Hospital, Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Medical Physics, Stockholm (Sweden); Scheepers, Egon [Univ. of Amsterdam, Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Zito, Felicia [Fondazione IRCCS Granda, Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Milan (Italy); Seese, Anita [Univ. of Leipzig, Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Koulibaly, Pierre Malick [Univ. of Nice-Sophia Antipolis, Nuclear Medicine Dept., Centre Antoine Lacassagne, Nice (France); Kapucu, Ozlem L. [Gazi Univ., Faculty of Medicine, Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Ankara (Turkey); Koole, Michel [Univ. Hospital and K.U. Leuven, Nuclear Medicine, Leuven (Belgium); Raith, Maria [Medical Univ. of Vienna, Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Vienna (Austria); George, Jean [Univ. Catholique Louvain, Nuclear Medicine Division, Mont-Godinne Medical Center, Mont-Godinne (Belgium); Lonsdale, Markus Nowak [Bispebjerg Univ. Hospital, Dept. of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Copenhagen (Denmark); Muenzing, Wolfgang [Univ. of Munich, Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Tatsch, Klaus [Univ. of Munich, Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Municipal Hospital of Karlsruhe Inc., Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Karlsruhe (Germany); Varrone, Andrea [Center for Psychiatric Research, Karolinska Inst., Dept. of Clinical Neuroscience, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2011-08-15

    A joint initiative of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) Neuroimaging Committee and EANM Research Ltd. aimed to generate a European database of [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scans of healthy controls. This study describes the characterization and harmonization of the imaging equipment of the institutions involved. {sup 123}I SPECT images of a striatal phantom filled with striatal to background ratios between 10:1 and 1:1 were acquired on all the gamma cameras with absolute ratios measured from aliquots. The images were reconstructed by a core lab using ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) without corrections (NC), with attenuation correction only (AC) and additional scatter and septal penetration correction (ACSC) using the triple energy window method. A quantitative parameter, the simulated specific binding ratio (sSBR), was measured using the ''Southampton'' methodology that accounts for the partial volume effect and compared against the actual values obtained from the aliquots. Camera-specific recovery coefficients were derived from linear regression and the error of the measurements was evaluated using the coefficient of variation (COV). The relationship between measured and actual sSBRs was linear across all systems. Variability was observed between different manufacturers and, to a lesser extent, between cameras of the same type. The NC and AC measurements were found to underestimate systematically the actual sSBRs, while the ACSC measurements resulted in recovery coefficients close to 100% for all cameras (AC range 69-89%, ACSC range 87-116%). The COV improved from 46% (NC) to 32% (AC) and to 14% (ACSC) (p < 0.001). A satisfactory linear response was observed across all cameras. Quantitative measurements depend upon the characteristics of the SPECT systems and their calibration is a necessary prerequisite for data pooling. Together with accounting for partial volume, the

  16. A Theoretical Model for Fast Evaluation of Position Linearity and Spatial Resolution in Gamma Cameras Based on Monolithic Scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galasso, Matteo; Fabbri, Andrea; Borrazzo, Cristian; Cencelli, Valentino Orsolini; Pani, Roberto

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we developed a model that is able to predict in a few seconds the response of a gamma camera based on continuous scintillator in terms of linearity and spatial resolution in the whole field of view (FoV). This model will be useful during the design phase of a SPECT or PET detector in order to predict and optimize gamma camera performance by varying the parameter values of its components (scintillator, light guides, and photodetector). Starting from a model of the scintillation light distribution on the photodetector sensitive surface, a theoretical analysis based on the estimation theory is carried out in order to find the analytical expressions of bias and FWHM related to four interaction position estimation methods: the classical Center of Gravity method (Anger Logic), an enhanced Center of Gravity method, a Mean Square Error fitting method, and the Maximum Likelihood Estimation method. Afterwards, spatial resolution as well as depth of interaction (DOI) distribution effects are evaluated by processing biases and FWHMs at different DOIs. The comparison between the model and GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations of four different detection systems has been carried out. Our model prediction errors of spatial resolution, in terms of percentage RMSDs with respect to the simulated spatial resolution, are lower than 13.2% in the whole FoV for three estimation methods. The computational time to calculate spatial resolutions with the model in the whole FoV is five order of magnitudes faster than an equivalent standard Monte Carlo simulation.

  17. Two-Level Multi-Pinhole Collimator for SPECT Imaging Using a Small-Field-of-View Gamma Camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Jaekeon; Bae, Seungbin; Lee, Soo-young; Lee, Kisung [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yongkwon; Joung, Jinhun [NuCare Inc., Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, MinHo; Kim, Kyeong Min [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    The aim of this study was to develop a high-throughput imaging method for single-photon emission computed tomography. We developed a target-oriented multi-pinhole collimator and limited angle method for scanning small organs such as the thyroid. To maximize the resolution and the sensitivity of the collimator, we designed a two-level multi-pinhole collimator whose levels were optimized for concave body contours. One level had a center hole whereas the other had surrounding holes. The limited-angle scanning method was employed to obtain tomographic images by using the collimator located near the body contour of the target, and a corresponding image reconstruction algorithm was implemented. A small-field-of-view gamma camera was used to achieve a smaller footprint. The design of the collimator also considered the dimensions of used gamma camera. Evaluation studies were conducted using the Geant4 application for tomographic emission. The results showed the resolution of the proposed collimator to be more than twice that of the previously designed multi-pinhole collimator while maintaining the same efficiency. Given that the designed collimator can be changed by simply replacing the center hole, the suggested imaging method is suitable for studying not only the thyroid but also any organ whose diameter is less than 90 mm.

  18. AIRWAY IDENTIFICATION WITHIN PLANAR GAMMA CAMERA IMAGES USING COMPUTER MODELS OF LUNG MORPHOLOGY

    Science.gov (United States)

    The quantification of inhaled aerosols could be improved if a more comprehensive assessment of their spatial distribution patterns among lung airways were obtained. A common technique for quantifying particle deposition in human lungs is with planar gamma scintigraphy. However, t...

  19. Tumor dosimetry for I-131 trastuzumab therapy in a Her2+ NCI N87 xenograft mouse model using the Siemens SYMBIA E gamma camera with a pinhole collimator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Sub; Kim, Jin Su; Deuk Cho, Kyung; Kang, Joo Hyun; Moo Lim, Sang

    2015-07-01

    We performed imaging and therapy using I-131 trastuzumab and a pinhole collimator attached to a conventional gamma camera for human use in a mouse model. The conventional clinical gamma camera with a 2-mm radius-sized pinhole collimator was used for monitoring the animal model after administration of I-131 trastuzumab The highest and lowest radiation-received organs were osteogenic cells (0.349 mSv/MBq) and skin (0.137 mSv/MBq), respectively. The mean coefficients of variation (%CV) of the effective dose equivalent and effective dose were 0.091 and 0.093 mSv/MBq respectively. We showed the feasibility of the pinholeattached conventional gamma camera for human use for the assessment of dosimetry. Mouse dosimetry and prediction of human dosimetry could be used to provide data for the safety and efficacy of newly developed therapeutic schemes.

  20. An innovative silicon photomultiplier digitizing camera for gamma-ray astronomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heller, M. [DPNC-Universite de Geneve, Geneva (Switzerland); Schioppa, E. Jr; Porcelli, A.; Pujadas, I.T.; Della Volpe, D.; Montaruli, T.; Cadoux, F.; Favre, Y.; Christov, A.; Rameez, M.; Miranda, L.D.M. [DPNC-Universite de Geneve, Geneva (Switzerland); Zietara, K.; Idzkowski, B.; Jamrozy, M.; Ostrowski, M.; Stawarz, L.; Zagdanski, A. [Jagellonian University, Astronomical Observatory, Krakow (Poland); Aguilar, J.A. [DPNC-Universite de Geneve, Geneva (Switzerland); Universite Libre Bruxelles, Faculte des Sciences, Brussels (Belgium); Prandini, E.; Lyard, E.; Neronov, A.; Walter, R. [Universite de Geneve, Department of Astronomy, Geneva (Switzerland); Rajda, P.; Bilnik, W.; Kasperek, J.; Lalik, K.; Wiecek, M. [AGH University of Science and Technology, Krakow (Poland); Blocki, J.; Mach, E.; Michalowski, J.; Niemiec, J.; Skowron, K.; Stodulski, M. [Instytut Fizyki Jadrowej im. H. Niewodniczanskiego Polskiej Akademii Nauk, Krakow (Poland); Bogacz, L. [Jagiellonian University, Department of Information Technologies, Krakow (Poland); Borkowski, J.; Frankowski, A.; Janiak, M.; Moderski, R. [Polish Academy of Science, Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Center, Warsaw (Poland); Bulik, T.; Grudzinska, M. [University of Warsaw, Astronomical Observatory, Warsaw (Poland); Mandat, D.; Pech, M.; Schovanek, P. [Institute of Physics of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague (Czech Republic); Marszalek, A.; Stodulska, M. [Instytut Fizyki Jadrowej im. H. Niewodniczanskiego Polskiej Akademii Nauk, Krakow (Poland); Jagellonian University, Astronomical Observatory, Krakow (Poland); Pasko, P.; Seweryn, K. [Centrum Badan Kosmicznych Polskiej Akademii Nauk, Warsaw (Poland); Sliusar, V. [Universite de Geneve, Department of Astronomy, Geneva (Switzerland); Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, Astronomical Observatory, Kyiv (Ukraine)

    2017-01-15

    The single-mirror small-size telescope (SST-1M) is one of the three proposed designs for the small-size telescopes (SSTs) of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) project. The SST-1M will be equipped with a 4 m-diameter segmented reflector dish and an innovative fully digital camera based on silicon photo-multipliers. Since the SST sub-array will consist of up to 70 telescopes, the challenge is not only to build telescopes with excellent performance, but also to design them so that their components can be commissioned, assembled and tested by industry. In this paper we review the basic steps that led to the design concepts for the SST-1M camera and the ongoing realization of the first prototype, with focus on the innovative solutions adopted for the photodetector plane and the readout and trigger parts of the camera. In addition, we report on results of laboratory measurements on real scale elements that validate the camera design and show that it is capable of matching the CTA requirements of operating up to high moonlight background conditions. (orig.)

  1. The HURRA filter: An easy method to eliminate collimator artifacts in high-energy gamma camera images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Garcia, H; Barquero, R

    The correct determination and delineation of tumor/organ size is crucial in 2-D imaging in 131I therapy. These images are usually obtained using a system composed of a Gamma camera and high-energy collimator, although the system can produce artifacts in the image. This article analyses these artifacts and describes a correction filter that can eliminate those collimator artifacts. Using free software, ImageJ, a central profile in the image is obtained and analyzed. Two components can be seen in the fluctuation of the profile: one associated with the stochastic nature of the radiation, plus electronic noise and the other periodically across the position in space due to the collimator. These frequencies are analytically obtained and compared with the frequencies in the Fourier transform of the profile. A specially developed filter removes the artifacts in the 2D Fourier transform of the DICOM image. This filter is tested using a 15-cm-diameter Petri dish with 131I radioactive water (big object size) image, a 131I clinical pill (small object size) image, and an image of the remainder of the lesion of two patients treated with 3.7GBq (100mCi), and 4.44GBq (120mCi) of 131I, respectively, after thyroidectomy. The artifact is due to the hexagonal periodic structure of the collimator. The use of the filter on large-sized images reduces the fluctuation by 5.8-3.5%. In small-sized images, the FWHM can be determined in the filtered image, while this is impossible in the unfiltered image. The definition of tumor boundary and the visualization of the activity distribution inside patient lesions improve drastically when the filter is applied to the corresponding images obtained with HE gamma camera. The HURRA filter removes the artifact of high-energy collimator artifacts in planar images obtained with a Gamma camera without reducing the image resolution. It can be applied in any study of patient quantification because the number of counts remains invariant. The filter makes

  2. Electronic discrimination of the effective thickness of proportional counters. [Gamma camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borkowski, C.J.; Kopp, M.K.

    1976-01-01

    A new method of electronic discrimination of the effective thickness of proportional counters was developed and tested and applied in a proportional counter camera to adjust its effective aperture, i.e., the combination of counter efficiency and spatial resolution, without changing the pinhole aperture, the collimator, or the distance between the subject and camera. The discriminator virtually divides the thickness of the electronic drift volume of the camera into two regions and separates the photons detected in each region. Thus, two sets of data are acquired and displayed simultaneously during an exposure: one with good spatial resolution (less than 2 mm fwhm) using photons detected in the drift volume close to the entrance window, and one with high detection efficiency (greater than 50 percent for 60-keV photons) but poorer resolution (approximately 5 mm fwhm) using all detected photons. Simultaneous acquisition of two sets of data with different apertures reduces the exposure time in applications, such as nuclear medicine, where a sequence of images often is required to select the optimum aperture for different portions of radioisotope distribution images.

  3. Evaluation of Compton gamma camera prototype based on pixelated CdTe detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón, Y; Chmeissani, M; Kolstein, M; De Lorenzo, G

    2014-06-01

    A proposed Compton camera prototype based on pixelated CdTe is simulated and evaluated in order to establish its feasibility and expected performance in real laboratory tests. The system is based on module units containing a 2×4 array of square CdTe detectors of 10×10 mm 2 area and 2 mm thickness. The detectors are pixelated and stacked forming a 3D detector with voxel sizes of 2 × 1 × 2 mm 3 . The camera performance is simulated with Geant4-based Architecture for Medicine-Oriented Simulations(GAMOS) and the Origin Ensemble(OE) algorithm is used for the image reconstruction. The simulation shows that the camera can operate with up to 10 4 Bq source activities with equal efficiency and is completely saturated at 10 9 Bq. The efficiency of the system is evaluated using a simulated 18 F point source phantom in the center of the Field-of-View (FOV) achieving an intrinsic efficiency of 0.4 counts per second per kilobecquerel. The spatial resolution measured from the point spread function (PSF) shows a FWHM of 1.5 mm along the direction perpendicular to the scatterer, making it possible to distinguish two points at 3 mm separation with a peak-to-valley ratio of 8.

  4. ORIS: the Oak Ridge Imaging System program listings. [Nuclear medicine imaging with rectilinear scanner and gamma camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, P. R.; Dougherty, J. M.

    1978-04-01

    The Oak Ridge Imaging System (ORIS) is a general purpose access, storage, processing and display system for nuclear medicine imaging with rectilinear scanner and gamma camera. This volume contains listings of the PDP-8/E version of ORIS Version 2. The system is designed to run under the Digital Equipment Corporation's OS/8 monitor in 16K or more words of core. System and image file mass storage is on RK8E disk; longer-time image file storage is provided on DECtape. Another version of this program exists for use with the RF08 disk, and a more limited version is for DECtape only. This latter version is intended for non-medical imaging.

  5. Results of optical Monte Carlo simulations of a compact {gamma} camera for the detection of sentinel lymph nodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowe, Dean; Truman, Andrew E-mail: atruman@bccancer.bc.ca; Kwok, Harry; Bergman, Alanah

    2001-07-11

    Breast cancer is most often treatable when detected in the early stages, before the primary disease spreads to sentinel lymph nodes in the axilla and supraclavicular region. A sentinel lymph node is the closest adjacent lymph node to receive lymphatic drainage from a primary breast tumour. It is from these nodes that cancer cells metastasise throughout the lymphatic system, spreading the disease. This work details the optical Monte Carlo modelling of an ultra compact, nuclear medicine {gamma} camera that will be used intra-operatively to detect malignant sentinel lymph nodes. This development will improve the identification and localisation of these sentinel nodes, thereby facilitating improved techniques for axillary lymph node dissection, and sentinel lymph node biopsy.

  6. Multiaxial tomography of heart chambers by gated blood-pool emission computed tomography using a rotating gamma camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamaki, N.; Mukai, T.; Ishii, Y.; Yonekura, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Kadota, K.; Kambara, H.; Kawai, C.; Torizuka, K.

    1983-05-01

    Fifteen patients and three volunteers underwent radionuclide blood-pool cardiac studies with electrocardiographic gating. Following conventional planar-gated imaging (anterior and left anterior oblique projections), emission computed tomography (ECT), using a rotating gamma camera, was performed.A series of transaxial tomograms of the cardiac chambers was obtained. The left ventricular short-axis plane, long-axis plane, and four-chamber-view plane were then reorganized; each chamber was visualized separately. Compared to gated planar imaging, this technique showed regional asynergy more clearly in patients with myocardial infarction and demonstrated dilatation of the atria and ventricles more accurately in patients with an atrial septal defect and valvular heart diseases. In addition, when a section of the heart is otained at any angle with gated blood pool ECT, three-dimensional assessment of cardiac chambers in motion is more precise; mutual superimposition becomes unnecessary.

  7. In vivo quantification of {sup 177}Lu with planar whole-body and SPECT/CT gamma camera imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, Dale L. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, NSW 2065 (Australia); Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, Cumberland, NSW (Australia); Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW (Australia); NETwork, Sydney Vital, St Leonards, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Hennessy, Thomas M.; Willowson, Kathy P.; Henry, E. Courtney [Institute of Medical Physics, University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW (Australia); Chan, David L.H. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, NSW 2065 (Australia); NETwork, Sydney Vital, St Leonards, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Aslani, Alireza [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, NSW 2065 (Australia); Roach, Paul J. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, NSW 2065 (Australia); Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW (Australia)

    2015-09-17

    Advances in gamma camera technology and the emergence of a number of new theranostic radiopharmaceutical pairings have re-awakened interest in in vivo quantification with single-photon-emitting radionuclides. We have implemented and validated methodology to provide quantitative imaging of {sup 177}Lu for 2D whole-body planar studies and for 3D tomographic imaging with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT. Whole-body planar scans were performed on subjects to whom a known amount of [{sup 177}Lu]-DOTA-octreotate had been administered for therapy. The total radioactivity estimated from the images was compared with the known amount of the radionuclide therapy administered. In separate studies, venous blood samples were withdrawn from subjects after administration of [{sup 177}Lu]-DOTA-octreotate while a SPECT acquisition was in progress and the concentration of the radionuclide in the venous blood sample compared with that estimated from large blood pool structures in the SPECT reconstruction. The total radioactivity contained within an internal SPECT calibration standard was also assessed. In the whole-body planar scans (n = 28), the estimated total body radioactivity was accurate to within +4.6 ± 5.9 % (range −17.1 to +11.2 %) of the correct value. In the SPECT reconstructions (n = 12), the radioactivity concentration in the cardiac blood pool was accurate to within −4.0 ± 7.8 % (range −16.1 to +7.5 %) of the true value and the internal standard measurements (n = 89) were within 2.0 ± 8.5 % (range −16.3 to +24.2 %) of the known amount of radioactivity contained. In our hands, state-of-the-art hybrid SPECT/CT gamma cameras were able to provide accurate estimates of in vivo radioactivity to better than, on average, ±10 % for use in biodistribution and radionuclide dosimetry calculations.

  8. Determination of Optimum Planar Imaging Parameters for Small Structures with Diameters Less Than the Resolution of the Gamma Camera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mpumelelo Nyathi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The limited spatial resolution of the gamma camera hinders the absolute quantification of planar images of small structures. The imaged structures are affected by partial volume effects (PVEs, which can spread activity and lead to underestimation of the regional distribution.  The use of optimum planar parameters reduces the impact of the limited spatial resolution of the gamma camera and the statistical noise inherent to low photon count, thus improving quantification. In this study, we aimed to determine the optimum planar imaging parameters for small structures. Materials and Methods: A thyroid protocol was used to acquire planar images of the spheres A, B, and C (16 mm, 12 mm, and 11 mm in diameter, respectively whilst filled with a targeted activity concentration of technetium-99m. One sphere was mounted at the centre of the Jaszczak Phantom and the other two adjacent to its walls using capillary stems fitted on the spheres. The phantom was filled with distilled water. The targeted activity concentrations used were 74 kBq/mL, 100 kBq/mL, 150 kBq/mL, and 300 kBq/mL. Images of the same count per pixel were acquired on 64  64, 128  128, 256  256, 512  512, and 1024  1024 pixels using a vertical detector mounted 5 cm above the phantom. All the images were quantified using ImageJ software, version 1.48a, Java 1.70_51 [64-bit]. Results: The optimum planar imaging parameters established were a matrix size of 128 128 pixels and technetium-99m solution of activity concentration of 300 kBq/ml. Conclusion: The use of optimal imaging parameters reduces the impact of PVEs, leading to improved quantitative accuracy.

  9. Imaging system for cardiac planar imaging using a dedicated dual-head gamma camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, Stanislaw [Morgantown, VA; Umeno, Marc M [Woodinville, WA

    2011-09-13

    A cardiac imaging system employing dual gamma imaging heads co-registered with one another to provide two dynamic simultaneous views of the heart sector of a patient torso. A first gamma imaging head is positioned in a first orientation with respect to the heart sector and a second gamma imaging head is positioned in a second orientation with respect to the heart sector. An adjustment arrangement is capable of adjusting the distance between the separate imaging heads and the angle between the heads. With the angle between the imaging heads set to 180 degrees and operating in a range of 140-159 keV and at a rate of up to 500kHz, the imaging heads are co-registered to produce simultaneous dynamic recording of two stereotactic views of the heart. The use of co-registered imaging heads maximizes the uniformity of detection sensitivity of blood flow in and around the heart over the whole heart volume and minimizes radiation absorption effects. A normalization/image fusion technique is implemented pixel-by-corresponding pixel to increase signal for any cardiac region viewed in two images obtained from the two opposed detector heads for the same time bin. The imaging system is capable of producing enhanced first pass studies, bloodpool studies including planar, gated and non-gated EKG studies, planar EKG perfusion studies, and planar hot spot imaging.

  10. Simulation-based evaluation and optimization of a new CdZnTe gamma-camera architecture (HiSens).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Charlotte; Montémont, Guillaume; Rebuffel, Véronique; Buvat, Irène; Guérin, Lucie; Verger, Loïck

    2010-05-07

    A new gamma-camera architecture named HiSens is presented and evaluated. It consists of a parallel hole collimator, a pixelated CdZnTe (CZT) detector associated with specific electronics for 3D localization and dedicated reconstruction algorithms. To gain in efficiency, a high aperture collimator is used. The spatial resolution is preserved thanks to accurate 3D localization of the interactions inside the detector based on a fine sampling of the CZT detector and on the depth of interaction information. The performance of this architecture is characterized using Monte Carlo simulations in both planar and tomographic modes. Detective quantum efficiency (DQE) computations are then used to optimize the collimator aperture. In planar mode, the simulations show that the fine CZT detector pixelization increases the system sensitivity by 2 compared to a standard Anger camera without loss in spatial resolution. These results are then validated against experimental data. In SPECT, Monte Carlo simulations confirm the merits of the HiSens architecture observed in planar imaging.

  11. Simulation-based evaluation and optimization of a new CdZnTe gamma-camera architecture (HiSens)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert, Charlotte; Montemont, Guillaume; Rebuffel, Veronique; Guerin, Lucie; Verger, Loick [CEA, LETI, MINATEC, F38054 Grenoble (France); Buvat, Irene [IMNC-UMR 8165 CNRS, Universites Paris 7 et Paris 11, Bat 104, 91406 Orsay (France)

    2010-05-07

    A new gamma-camera architecture named HiSens is presented and evaluated. It consists of a parallel hole collimator, a pixelated CdZnTe (CZT) detector associated with specific electronics for 3D localization and dedicated reconstruction algorithms. To gain in efficiency, a high aperture collimator is used. The spatial resolution is preserved thanks to accurate 3D localization of the interactions inside the detector based on a fine sampling of the CZT detector and on the depth of interaction information. The performance of this architecture is characterized using Monte Carlo simulations in both planar and tomographic modes. Detective quantum efficiency (DQE) computations are then used to optimize the collimator aperture. In planar mode, the simulations show that the fine CZT detector pixelization increases the system sensitivity by 2 compared to a standard Anger camera without loss in spatial resolution. These results are then validated against experimental data. In SPECT, Monte Carlo simulations confirm the merits of the HiSens architecture observed in planar imaging.

  12. Design and implementation of a quality assurance program for gamma cameras; Diseno e implementacion de un programa de aseguramiento de calidad para camaras gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montoya M, A.; Rodriguez L, A. [Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia, Departamento de Medicina Nuclear, Av. San Fernando No. 22, Col. Seccion XVI, 14080 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Trujillo Z, F. E., E-mail: montoya-moreno@hotmail.co [Hospital Regional de Alta Especialidad de Oaxaca, Area de Fisica Medica, Aldama s/n, Paraje El Tule, 71256 San Bartolo Coyotepec, Oaxaca (Mexico)

    2010-09-15

    In nuclear medicine more than 90% of the carried out procedures are diagnostic. To assure an appropriate diagnostic quality of the images and the doses optimization received by the patients originated in the radioactive material, it is indispensable the periodic surveillance of the operation and performance of the equipment s by means of quality assurance tests. This work presents a proposal of a quality assurance program for gamma cameras based on recommendations of the IAEA, the American Association of Medical Physics and the National Electrical Manufacturers Association. Some tests of the program were applied to an e.cam gamma camera (Siemens) of the Nuclear Medicine Department of the National Institute of Cancer. The intrinsic and extrinsic uniformity, the intrinsic spatial resolution and the extrinsic sensibility were verified. For intrinsic uniformity the average daily values of the integral uniformity and differential uniformity in the useful vision field were 2.61% and 1.58% respectively, the average monthly values of intrinsic uniformity for the integral and differential uniformity in the useful vision field were 4.10% and 1.66% respectively. The used acceptance criterions were respectively of 3.74% and 2.74%. The average values of extrinsic uniformity for the useful vision field were of 7.65% (intrinsic uniformity) and 2.69% (extrinsic uniformity), in this case the acceptance criterion is a value of 6.00%. The average value of intrinsic spatial resolution went 4.67 mm superior to 4.4. mm that is the acceptance limit. Finally, maximum variations of 1.8% were observed (minors than 2% that is the acceptance criterion) for the extrinsic sensibility measured in different regions of the detector. Significant variations of extrinsic sensibility were not observed among the monthly lectures. Of the realized measurements was concluded that the system requires of a maintenance service by part of the manufacturer, which one carries out later on to this work. The

  13. [Feasibility study of CdTe Semiconductor detector for gamma camera--evaluation of planar images].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, T; Nakamura, N; Motomura, N; Mori, I; Ozaki, T; Ohno, R

    2000-05-01

    To evaluate the performance of a semiconductor detector for use in a gammacamera system, we assembled a detector with a small field of view--1 inch x 1 inch and 1 inch x 2 inch--made from CdTe (Cadmium telluride). We then compared the planar images and energy resolution of the resulting detectors against those of a conventional gammacamera. Pixel pitch of the detector was 1.6 mm x 1.6 mm, and was manufactured by Acrorad Corporation. Average FWHM of the energy spectrum for the semiconductor detector was 5.11% (SD: 0.80%, Best: 3.26%, Worst: 6.68%). The planar images obtained were of a letter phantom made from pieces of lead and of an IMP brain phantom. Since the field of view of the semiconductor detector was small, the image of the IMP brain phantom was acquired by moving the semiconductor over the collimated detector module until the area of the entire phantom was covered. The images from the semiconductor assembly were compared with those from a conventional gammacamera using the same conditions, and it was found that visual image quality was superior to those of the conventional camera system.

  14. The ISGRI CdTe gamma-ray camera: first steps

    CERN Document Server

    Limousin, O; Cretolle, J; Dzitko, H; Laurent, P; Lebrun, F; Leray, J P; Arques, M; Baffert, N; Mathy, F; Noca, A; Trystram, P; Villard, P; Baron, P; Delagnes, E; Rouger, M

    2000-01-01

    The gamma-ray telescope IBIS, on board the INTEGRAL satellite, features a coded-mask aperture, active and passive shields and two detector arrays. The first one (ISGRI) is an assembly of 16384 CdTe detectors (4x4 mm large, 2 mm thick) operating at room temperature. ISGRI covers the lower part (15 keV-1 MeV) of the IBIS energy range (15 keV-10 MeV). Detectors are arranged on polycells, each including 16 crystals, connected to their front-end electronics (ASICs). Each of the eight independent ISGRI modules are made of 128 polycells. The ASICs contain a low noise charge-sensitive preamplifier and feature pulse rise-time measurement in addition to the standard pulse height measurement. This permits to compute a charge loss correction based on the charge drift time. After application of this correction, a spectral resolution around 7.5% at 122 keV is obtained with the ASICs. Today, 16 polycells have been mounted on the first representative ISGRI module. This module has been interfaced with the entire ISGRI data-pr...

  15. Performance of cardiac cadmium-zinc-telluride gamma camera imaging in coronary artery disease: a review from the cardiovascular committee of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agostini, Denis [CHU Caen and Normandy University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Caen (France); Normandy University, Caen (France); Marie, Pierre-Yves [University of Lorraine, Faculty of Medicine, Nancyclotep Experimental Imaging Platform, Nancy (France); University of Lorraine, Faculty of Medicine, CHU Nancy, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nancy (France); University of Lorraine, Faculty of Medicine, Nancy (France); Ben-Haim, Simona [University College London, University College Hospital, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ramat Gan (Israel); Rouzet, Francois [University Hospital of Paris-Bichat, UMR 1148, Inserm et Paris Diderot-Paris 7 University Paris, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Paris (France); UMR 1148, Inserm and Paris Diderot-Paris 7 University Paris, Paris (France); Songy, Bernard [Centre Cardiologique du Nord, Saint-Denis (France); Giordano, Alessandro [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Catholic University of Sacred Heart, Largo A. Gemelli, Department of Bioimages and Radiological Sciences, Rome (Italy); Gimelli, Alessia [Fondazione Toscana Gabriele Monasterio, Pisa (Italy); Hyafil, Fabien [Bichat University Hospital, Assistance Publique - Hopitaux de Paris, UMR 1148, Inserm and Paris Diderot-Paris 7 University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Paris (France); Sciagra, Roberto [University of Florence, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Department of Experimental and Clinical Biomedical Sciences, Florence (Italy); Bucerius, Jan [Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical Center, Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht (CARIM), Maastricht (Netherlands); University Hospital RWTH Aachen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Verberne, Hein J. [Academic Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Slart, Riemer H.J.A. [University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Groningen (Netherlands); University of Twente, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Biomedical Photonic Imaging, Enschede (Netherlands); Lindner, Oliver [Institute of Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Heart and Diabetes Center NRW, Bad Oeynhausen (Germany); Collaboration: Cardiovascular Committee of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM)

    2016-12-15

    The trade-off between resolution and count sensitivity dominates the performance of standard gamma cameras and dictates the need for relatively high doses of radioactivity of the used radiopharmaceuticals in order to limit image acquisition duration. The introduction of cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT)-based cameras may overcome some of the limitations against conventional gamma cameras. CZT cameras used for the evaluation of myocardial perfusion have been shown to have a higher count sensitivity compared to conventional single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) techniques. CZT image quality is further improved by the development of a dedicated three-dimensional iterative reconstruction algorithm, based on maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM), which corrects for the loss in spatial resolution due to line response function of the collimator. All these innovations significantly reduce imaging time and result in a lower patient's radiation exposure compared with standard SPECT. To guide current and possible future users of the CZT technique for myocardial perfusion imaging, the Cardiovascular Committee of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine, starting from the experience of its members, has decided to examine the current literature regarding procedures and clinical data on CZT cameras. The committee hereby aims (1) to identify the main acquisitions protocols; (2) to evaluate the diagnostic and prognostic value of CZT derived myocardial perfusion, and finally (3) to determine the impact of CZT on radiation exposure. (orig.)

  16. The influence of electron multiplication and internal X-ray fluorescence on the performance of a scintillator-based gamma camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, David J., E-mail: d.j.hall@open.ac.uk [e2v centre for electronic imaging, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Holland, Andrew; Soman, Matthew [e2v centre for electronic imaging, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom)

    2012-06-21

    When considering the 'standard' gamma-camera, one might picture an array of photo-multiplier tubes or a similar array of small-area detectors. This array of imaging detectors would be attached to a corresponding array of scintillator modules (or a solid layer of scintillator) in order to give a high detection efficiency in the energy region of interest, usually 8-140 keV. Over recent years, developments of gamma-cameras capable of achieving much higher spatial resolutions have led to a new range of systems based on Charge-Coupled Devices with some form of signal multiplication between the scintillator and the CCD in order for one to distinguish the light output from the scintillator above the CCD noise. The use of an Electron-Multiplying Charge-Coupled Device (EM-CCD) incorporates the gain process within the CCD through a form of 'impact ionisation', however, the gain process introduces an 'excess noise factor' due to the probabilistic nature of impact ionisation and this additional noise consequently has an impact on the spatial and spectral resolution of the detector. Internal fluorescence in the scintillator, producing K-shell X-ray fluorescence photons that can be detected alongside the incident gamma-rays, also has a major impact on the imaging capabilities of gamma-cameras. This impact varies dramatically from the low spatial resolution to high spatial resolution camera system. Through a process of simulation and experimental testing focussed on the high spatial resolution (EM-CCD based) variant, the factors affecting the performance of gamma-camera systems are discussed and the results lead to important conclusions to be considered for the development of future systems. This paper presents a study into the influence of the EM-CCD gain process and the internal X-ray fluorescence in the scintillator on the performance of scintillator-based gamma cameras (CCD-based or otherwise), making use of Monte Carlo simulations to demonstrate

  17. Assessment of spleen size using gamma camera scintigraphy in newly diagnosed patients with essential thrombocythaemia and polycythaemia vera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carneskog, J.; Wadenvik, H.; Kutti, J. [Univ. of Goeteborg, Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital, Dept. of Medicine, Haematology Section, Goeteborg (Sweden); Fjaeelling, M. [Univ. of Goeteborg, Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital, Dept. of Clinical Physiology, Section of Nuclear Med., Goeteborg (Sweden)

    1996-03-01

    By using gamma camera imaging the spleen size was assessed in 18 consecutive patients with essential thrombocythaemia (ET) and in 18 consecutive patients with polycythaemia vera (PV). All ET and PV patients were newly diagnosed and had not received any myelosuppressive therapy prior to study. The spleen areas in both posterior and left lateral projections were determined. Eighteen consecutive patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) served as a control group since by definition they do not present with splenic enlargement; in these latter subjects the mean posterior and left lateral splenic areas were almost identical (48 {+-} 15 and 47 {+-} 17 cm{sup 2}, respectively). In comparison with this control group patients with ET an dPV had significantly larger spleens. In both ET and in PV patients the left lateral spleen scan area exceeded the posterior one. Patients with PV had larger splenic areas in both projections than did patients with ET, but the differences were not statistically significant. Compared to the ITP patients it was found that at least 50% of the ET patients and at least 61% of the PV patients at diagnosis presented with splenomegaly. (au) 35 refs.

  18. Evaluation of a gamma camera system for the RITS-6 accelerator using the self-magnetic pinch diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Timothy J.; Kiefer, Mark L.; Gignac, Raymond; Baker, Stuart A.

    2015-08-01

    The self-magnetic pinch (SMP) diode is an intense radiographic source fielded on the Radiographic Integrated Test Stand (RITS-6) accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, NM. The accelerator is an inductive voltage adder (IVA) that can operate from 2-10 MV with currents up to 160 kA (at 7 MV). The SMP diode consists of an annular cathode separated from a flat anode, holding the bremsstrahlung conversion target, by a vacuum gap. Until recently the primary imaging diagnostic utilized image plates (storage phosphors) which has generally low DQE at these photon energies along with other problems. The benefits of using image plates include a high-dynamic range, good spatial resolution, and ease of use. A scintillator-based X-ray imaging system or "gamma camera" has been fielded in front of RITS and the SMP diode which has been able to provide vastly superior images in terms of signal-to-noise with similar resolution and acceptable dynamic range.

  19. Intraoperative Scintigraphy Using a Large Field-of-View Portable Gamma Camera for Primary Hyperparathyroidism: Initial Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan C. Hall

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We investigated a novel technique, intraoperative 99 mTc-Sestamibi (MIBI imaging (neck and excised specimen (ES, using a large field-of-view portable gamma camera (LFOVGC, for expediting confirmation of MIBI-avid parathyroid adenoma removal. Methods. Twenty patients with MIBI-avid parathyroid adenomas were preoperatively administered MIBI and intraoperatively imaged prior to incision (neck and immediately following resection (neck and/or ES. Preoperative and intraoperative serum parathyroid hormone monitoring (IOPTH and pathology (path were also performed. Results. MIBI neck activity was absent and specimen activity was present in 13/20 with imaging after initial ES removal. In the remaining 7/20 cases, residual neck activity and/or absent ES activity prompted excision of additional tissue, ultimately leading to complete hyperfunctioning tissue excision. Postexcision LFOVGC ES imaging confirmed parathyroid adenoma resection 100% when postresection imaging qualitatively had activity (ES and/or no activity (neck. The mean ± SEM time saving using intraoperative LFOVGC data to confirm resection versus first IOPTH or path result would have been 22.0 ± 2 minutes (specimen imaging and 26.0 ± 3 minutes (neck imaging. Conclusion. Utilization of a novel real-time intraoperative LFOVGC imaging approach can provide confirmation of MIBI-avid parathyroid adenoma removal appreciably faster than IOPTH and/or path and may provide a valuable adjunct to parathyroid surgery.

  20. [Evaluation of the efficacy of sentinel node detection in breast cancer: chronological course and influence of the incorporation of an intra-operative portable gamma camera].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goñi Gironés, E; Vicente García, F; Serra Arbeloa, P; Estébanez Estébanez, C; Calvo Benito, A; Rodrigo Rincón, I; Camarero Salazar, A; Martínez Lozano, M E

    2013-01-01

    To define the sentinel node identification rate in breast cancer, the chronological evolution of this parameter and the influence of the introduction of a portable gamma camera. A retrospective study was conducted using a prospective database of 754 patients who had undergone a sentinel lymph node biopsy between January 2003 and December 2011. The technique was mixed in the starting period and subsequently was performed with radiotracer intra-peritumorally administered the day before of the surgery. Until October 2009, excision of the sentinel node was guided by a probe. After that date, a portable gamma camera was introduced for intrasurgical detection. The SN was biopsied in 725 out of the 754 patients studied. The resulting technique global effectiveness was 96.2%. In accordance with the year of the surgical intervention, the identification percentage was 93.5% in 2003, 88.7% in 2004, 94.3% in 2005, 95.7% in 2006, 93.3% in 2007, 98.8% in 2008, 97.1% in 2009 and 99.1% in 2010 and 2011. There was a significant difference in the proportion of identification before and after the incorporation of the portable gamma camera of 4.6% (95% CI of the difference 2-7.2%, P = 0.0037). The percentage of global identification exceeds the recommended level following the current guidelines. Chronologically, the improvement for this parameter during the study period has been observed. These data suggest that the incorporation of a portable gamma camera had an important role. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  1. Monte Carlo simulation of the basic features of the GE Millennium MG single photon emission computed tomography gamma camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, L; Vaz, T F; Costa, D C; Almeida, P

    2014-01-01

    To describe and validate the simulation of the basic features of GE Millennium MG gamma camera using the GATE Monte Carlo platform. Crystal size and thickness, parallel-hole collimation and a realistic energy acquisition window were simulated in the GATE platform. GATE results were compared to experimental data in the following imaging conditions: a point source of (99m)Tc at different positions during static imaging and tomographic acquisitions using two different energy windows. The accuracy between the events expected and detected by simulation was obtained with the Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon test. Comparisons were made regarding the measurement of sensitivity and spatial resolution, static and tomographic. Simulated and experimental spatial resolutions for tomographic data were compared with the Kruskal-Wallis test to assess simulation accuracy for this parameter. There was good agreement between simulated and experimental data. The number of decays expected when compared with the number of decays registered, showed small deviation (≤ 0.007%). The sensitivity comparisons between static acquisitions for different distances from source to collimator (1, 5, 10, 20, 30 cm) with energy windows of 126-154 keV and 130-158 keV showed differences of 4.4%, 5.5%, 4.2%, 5.5%, 4.5% and 5.4%, 6.3%, 6.3%, 5.8%, 5.3%, respectively. For the tomographic acquisitions, the mean differences were 7.5% and 9.8% for the energy window 126-154 keV and 130-158 keV. Comparison of simulated and experimental spatial resolutions for tomographic data showed no statistically significant differences with 95% confidence interval. Adequate simulation of the system basic features using GATE Monte Carlo simulation platform was achieved and validated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  2. Nuclear myocardial perfusion imaging with a cadmium-telluride semiconductor detector gamma camera in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Yoshimitsu; Kumita, Shin-ichiro; Kawaguchi, Tsuneaki; Maruyama, Takatoshi; Kawasaki, Yoshiyuki; Shinkai, Yasuhiro

    2014-08-01

    Since myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) with conventional sodium iodine (NaI) device has low spatial resolution, there have been some cases in which small structures such as non-transmural myocardial infarction could not be properly detected. The purpose of this study was to evaluate potential usefulness of cadmium-telluride (CdTe) semiconductor detector-based high spatial resolution gamma cameras in detecting myocardial infarction sites, especially non-transmural infarction. A total of 38 patients (mean age ± SD: 64 ± 21 year) who were clinically diagnosed with acute myocardial infarction were included. Twenty-eight cases of them were with ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and 10 cases with non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI). In all patients, myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography images were acquired with Infinia (NaI device) and R1-M (CdTe device), and the images were compared concerning the detectability of acute myocardial infarction sites. The detection rates of the myocardial infarction site in cases with STEMI were 100% both by NaI and CdTe images. In cases with NSTEMI, detection rate by NaI images was 50%, while that of CdTe images was 100% (p = 0.033). The summed rest score (SRS) value derived from CdTe images was significantly higher than that from NaI images in cases with STEMI [NaI images: 12 (7-18) versus CdTe images: 14 (9-20)] (p cases with NSTEMI [NaI images: 2 (0-5) versus CdTe images: 6 (6-8)] (p = 0.006). These results indicate that MPI using CdTe-semiconductor device will provide a much more accurate assessment of acute myocardial infarction in comparison to current methods.

  3. New readout and data-acquisition system in an electron-tracking Compton camera for MeV gamma-ray astronomy (SMILE-II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizumoto, T., E-mail: mizumoto@cr.scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, 606-8502 Kyoto (Japan); Matsuoka, Y. [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, 606-8502 Kyoto (Japan); Mizumura, Y. [Unit of Synergetic Studies for Space, Kyoto University, 606-8502 Kyoto (Japan); Department of Physics, Kyoto University, 606-8502 Kyoto (Japan); Tanimori, T. [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, 606-8502 Kyoto (Japan); Unit of Synergetic Studies for Space, Kyoto University, 606-8502 Kyoto (Japan); Kubo, H.; Takada, A.; Iwaki, S.; Sawano, T.; Nakamura, K.; Komura, S.; Nakamura, S.; Kishimoto, T.; Oda, M.; Miyamoto, S.; Takemura, T.; Parker, J.D.; Tomono, D.; Sonoda, S. [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, 606-8502 Kyoto (Japan); Miuchi, K. [Department of Physics, Kobe University, 658-8501 Kobe (Japan); Kurosawa, S. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 980-8577 Sendai (Japan)

    2015-11-11

    For MeV gamma-ray astronomy, we have developed an electron-tracking Compton camera (ETCC) as a MeV gamma-ray telescope capable of rejecting the radiation background and attaining the high sensitivity of near 1 mCrab in space. Our ETCC comprises a gaseous time-projection chamber (TPC) with a micro pattern gas detector for tracking recoil electrons and a position-sensitive scintillation camera for detecting scattered gamma rays. After the success of a first balloon experiment in 2006 with a small ETCC (using a 10×10×15 cm{sup 3} TPC) for measuring diffuse cosmic and atmospheric sub-MeV gamma rays (Sub-MeV gamma-ray Imaging Loaded-on-balloon Experiment I; SMILE-I), a (30 cm){sup 3} medium-sized ETCC was developed to measure MeV gamma-ray spectra from celestial sources, such as the Crab Nebula, with single-day balloon flights (SMILE-II). To achieve this goal, a 100-times-larger detection area compared with that of SMILE-I is required without changing the weight or power consumption of the detector system. In addition, the event rate is also expected to dramatically increase during observation. Here, we describe both the concept and the performance of the new data-acquisition system with this (30 cm){sup 3} ETCC to manage 100 times more data while satisfying the severe restrictions regarding the weight and power consumption imposed by a balloon-borne observation. In particular, to improve the detection efficiency of the fine tracks in the TPC from ~10% to ~100%, we introduce a new data-handling algorithm in the TPC. Therefore, for efficient management of such large amounts of data, we developed a data-acquisition system with parallel data flow.

  4. Detecting near-the-injection-site sentinel nodes in head and neck melanomas with a high-resolution portable gamma camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellingman, Daan; de Wit-van der Veen, Linda J; Klop, W Martin C; Olmos, Renato A Valdés

    2015-01-01

    In head/neck melanomas, near-the-injection-site sentinel nodes (NIS-SNs) may be missed on planar lymphoscintigraphy and/or SPECT/CT. The aim of the present study is to establish the performance of a portable gamma camera (PGC) to detect NIS-SNs in a simulation phantom set-up, and subsequently in head/neck melanoma patients scheduled for a SN procedure. Five plastic Eppendorf tubes filled with technetium-99m-albumin nanocolloid were used to simulate 4 radiotracer deposit sites, as traditionally injected in melanoma patients, and 1 NIS-SN. A PGC was used with 2 pinhole collimators (2.5 and 4.0 mm). Image acquisition time was 1 minute with the camera positioned at various distances (range 1.5-15.5 cm). Results were compared with conventional lymphoscintigraphy and SPECT/CT acquired with a dual-head gamma camera as well with a gamma probe. Additionally, the same PGC setting was used in a case series of 3 patients with head/neck melanomas. The simulated NIS-SN was differentiated from the injection site at a distance of 3 mm with the 2.5-mm pinhole and at 5 mm with the 4-mm pinhole when the PGC was positioned at 1.5 cm distance. Planar lymphoscintigraphy, SPECT/CT, and the gamma probe depicted the NIS-SN separated from the injection site at distances of 7, 10, and 22 mm, respectively. In all 3 patients, 6 NIS-SNs were depicted with the PGC. A high-resolution PGC, positioned close to the skin, is able to detect SNs at distances of at least 3 mm from the injection site. A further clinical evaluation of this device to establish its added value in reducing false-negative procedures and potential recurrences is necessary.

  5. Easy method to measure radioactive waste with a gamma-camera detector; Methode simple d'evaluation de l'activite volumique d'effluents radioactifs au moyen d'une camera a scintillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murat, C. [Centre Hospitalier d' Avignon, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, 84 - Avignon (France); Barrau, C. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Nimes, Service de Medecine Nucleaire et de Biophysique Medicale, 30 - Nimes (France)

    2007-01-15

    The aim of this technical note is to evaluate an easy method to measure {sup 99m}Tc samples with an activity of 1000, 100 and 10 Bq/L. This study is performed with a gamma camera detector in two departments of nuclear medicine in Avignon and in Nimes. We develop a procedure to measure{sup 99m}Tc radioactive waste at the two hospitals output in accordance with the D.G.S./D.H.O.S. no. 2001/323 circular requests of the Ministry for Employment and Solidarity. (authors)

  6. Simulation study on a stationary data acquisition SPECT system with multi-pinhole collimators attached to a triple-head gamma camera system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Koichi; Ichimura, Yuta

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the study was to develop a new SPECT system that makes it possible to acquire projection data stationary using a triple-head gamma camera system. We evaluated several data acquisition geometry with multi-pinhole collimators attached to a triple-head gamma camera system. The number of pinholes for each camera was three to twelve, and we located these holes on collimator plates adequately. These collimator holes were tilted by predefined angles to efficiently cover the field of view of the data acquisition system. Acquired data were reconstructed with the OS-EM method. In the simulations, we used a three-dimensional point source phantom, brain phantom, and myocardial phantom. Attenuation correction was conducted with the x-ray CT image of the corresponding slice. Reconstructed images of the point source phantom showed that the spatial resolution could be improved with the small number of pinholes. On the other hand, reconstructed images of the brain phantom showed that the large number of pinholes yielded images with less artifact. The results of the simulations with the myocardial phantom showed that more than eight pinholes could yield an accurate distribution of activity when the source was distributed only in the myocardium. The results of the simulations confirmed that more than eight pinholes for each detector were required to reconstruct an artifact free image in the triple-head SPECT system for imaging of brain and myocardium.

  7. The added value of a portable gamma camera for intraoperative detection of sentinel lymph node in squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayoral, M; Paredes, P; Sieira, R; Vidal-Sicart, S; Marti, C; Pons, F

    2014-01-01

    The use of sentinel lymph node biopsy in squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity is still subject to debate although some studies have reported its feasibility. The main reason for this debate is probably due to the high false-negative rate for floor-of-mouth tumors per se. We report the case of a 54-year-old man with a T1N0 floor-of-mouth squamous cell carcinoma who underwent the sentinel lymph node procedure. Lymphoscintigraphy and SPECT/CT imaging were performed for lymphatic mapping with a conventional gamma camera. Sentinel lymph nodes were identified at right Ib, left IIa and Ia levels. However, these sentinel lymph nodes were difficult to detect intraoperatively with a gamma probe owing to the activity originating from the injection site. The use of a portable gamma camera made it possible to localize and excise all the sentinel lymph nodes. This case demonstrates the usefulness of this tool to improve sentinel lymph node detecting in floor-of-mouth tumors, especially those close to the injection area. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  8. Non-invasive assessment of blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability using a gamma camera to detect 99technetium-gluceptate extravasation in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, P; Jacobson, S; Connolly, R; Gheorghe, D; Theoharides, T C

    2001-10-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a complex structure of endothelial cells, astroglia, pericytes, and perivascular macrophages enclosed by basal lamina. The BBB regulates the entry of blood-borne molecules and cells into the brain, but it is disrupted in various inflammatory conditions of the central nervous system (CNS). We previously showed that 30 min of immobilization stress increased 99technetium-gluceptate (99Tc) extravasation, measured by a gamma counter, in brain regions containing mast cells, an effect blocked by the mast cell stabilizer disodium cromoglycate [Brain Res. 888 (2001) 117]. Here we report the use of a gamma camera to assess BBB permeability by assessing 99Tc extravasation in the rat brain, during and following acute stress, without having to sacrifice the experimental animals. This method also allows for repeated experimentation on the same animal, since the half-life of 99Tc is only 6 h, and permits testing of potential inhibitors of BBB permeability.

  9. Hydra phantom applicability for carrying out tests of field uniformity in gamma cameras; Aplicabilidade do fantoma hydra para realizacao dos testes de uniformidade de campo em gama camaras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aragao Filho, Geraldo L., E-mail: geraldo_lemos10@hotmail.com [Centro de Medicina Nuclear de Pernambuco (CEMUPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Oliveira, Alex C.H., E-mail: oliveira_ach@yahoo.com [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (DEN/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear; Lopes Filho, Ferdinand J.; Vieira, Jose W., E-mail: ferdinand.lopes@oi.com.br, E-mail: jose-wilson59@live.com [Instituto Federal de Pernambuco (IFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    Nuclear Medicine is a medical modality that makes use of radioactive material 'in vivo' in humans, making them a temporary radioactive source. The radiation emitted by the patient's body is detected by a specific equipment, called a gamma camera, creates an image showing the spatial and temporal biodistribution of radioactive material administered to the patient. Therefore, it's of fundamental importance a number of specific measures to make sure that procedure be satisfactory, called quality control. To Nuclear Medicine, quality control of gamma camera has the purpose of ensuring accurate scintillographic imaging, truthful and reliable for the diagnosis, guaranteeing visibility and clarity of details of structures, and also to determine the frequency and the need for preventive maintenance of equipment. To ensure the quality control of the gamma camera it's necessary to use some simulators, called phantom, used in Nuclear Medicine to evaluate system performance, system calibration and simulation of injuries. The goal of this study was to validate a new simulator for nuclear medicine, the Hydra phantom. The phantom was initially built for construction of calibration curves used in radiotherapy planning and quality control in CT. It has similar characteristics to specific phantoms in nuclear medicine, containing inserts and water area. Those inserts are regionally sourced materials, many of them are already used in the literature and based on information about density and interaction of radiation with matter. To verify its efficiency in quality control in Nuclear Medicine, was performed a test for uniformity field, one of the main tests performed daily, so we can verify the ability of the gamma camera to reproduce a uniform distribution of the administered activity in the phantom, been analysed qualitatively, through the image, and quantitatively, through values established for Central Field Of View (CFOV) and Useful Field Of View (UFOV

  10. Development of the set of corrections for a gamma camera dedicated to research; Desarrollo del conjunto de correcciones para una gammacamara dedicada a investigacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gimenez Insua, M.; Ambroa Rey, E. M.; Vazquez Vazquez, R.; Sanchez Garcia, M.; Luna Vega, V.; Mosquera Sueiro, J.; Otero Martinez, C.; Lobato Busto, R.; Pombar Camean, M.

    2013-07-01

    As part of a project for animal research, replaced electronics one of the gamma-cameras (GC) of the service that was out of use, with the aim of using it for SPECT. The implementation is therefore required of the corrections that allow image quality enough for SPECT from raw data supplied by the team. This has been developed software that enables to perform correction of power, uniform and linearity on the acquired data. For validation, change in several parameters indicative of the image quality has been evaluated. (Author)

  11. Use of calibration methodology of gamma cameras for the workers surveillance using a thyroid simulator; Uso de una metodologia de calibracion de camaras gamma para la vigilancia de trabajadores usando un simulador de tiroides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfaro, M.; Molina, G.; Vazquez, R.; Garcia, O., E-mail: mercedes.alfaro@inin.gob.m [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2010-09-15

    In Mexico there are a significant number of nuclear medicine centers in operation. For what the accidents risk related to the transport and manipulation of open sources used in nuclear medicine can exist. The National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) has as objective to establish a simple and feasible methodology for the workers surveillance related with the field of the nuclear medicine. This radiological surveillance can also be applied to the public in the event of a radiological accident. To achieve this it intends to use the available equipment s in the nuclear medicine centers, together with the neck-thyroid simulators elaborated by the ININ to calibrate the gamma cameras. The gamma cameras have among their component elements that conform spectrometric systems like the employees in the evaluation of the internal incorporation for direct measurements, reason why, besides their use for diagnostic for image, they can be calibrated with anthropomorphic simulators and also with punctual sources for the quantification of the radionuclides activity distributed homogeneously in the human body, or located in specific organs. Inside the project IAEA-ARCAL-RLA/9/049-LXXVIII -Procedures harmonization of internal dosimetry- where 9 countries intervened (Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Cuba, Chile, Mexico, Peru, Uruguay and Spain). It was developed a protocol of cameras gamma calibration for the determination in vivo of radionuclides. The protocol is the base to establish and integrated network in Latin America to attend in response to emergencies, using nuclear medicine centers of public hospitals of the region. The objective is to achieve the appropriate radiological protection of the workers, essential for the sure and acceptable radiation use, the radioactive materials and the nuclear energy. (Author)

  12. The effect of energy and source location on gamma camera intrinsic and extrinsic spatial resolution: an experimental and Monte Carlo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holstensson, Maria; Partridge, Mike; Buckley, Susan E; Flux, Glenn D

    2010-03-21

    Quantification of nuclear medicine image data is a prerequisite for personalized absorbed dose calculations and quantitative biodistribution studies. The spatial response of a detector is a governing factor affecting the accuracy of image quantification, and the aim of this work was to model this impact. To simulate spatial response, a value for the intrinsic spatial resolution (R(intrinsic)) of the gamma camera is needed. R(intrinsic) for (99m)Tc was measured over the field of view (FOV) and an experimental setup was designed to measure R(intrinsic) for radioisotopes with higher photon energies. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, using the codes SIMIND and GATE, were used to investigate the extrinsic effect of R(intrinsic) as a function of energy and its variation across the FOV. A method was developed to calculate energy-dependent blurring values for input to MC simulations, by separate consideration of the Compton scatter and photoelectric effect in the crystal and statistical variation in the signal. Inclusion of energy-specific blurring values in simulations showed excellent agreement with experimental measurements. The maximum pixel count rate can change by up to 18% when imaged at two different points in the FOV, and errors in the maximum pixel count rate of up to 11% were shown if a blurring value for (99m)Tc was used for simulations of (131)I. We demonstrate that the accuracy of MC simulations of gamma cameras can be significantly improved by accounting for the effect of energy on intrinsic spatial resolution.

  13. A compact, discrete CsI(Tl) scintillator/Si photodiode gamma camera for breast cancer imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruber, Gregory J. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Recent clinical evaluations of scintimammography (radionuclide breast imaging) are promising and suggest that this modality may prove a valuable complement to X-ray mammography and traditional breast cancer detection and diagnosis techniques. Scintimammography, however, typically has difficulty revealing tumors that are less than 1 cm in diameter, are located in the medial part of the breast, or are located in the axillary nodes. These shortcomings may in part be due to the use of large, conventional Anger cameras not optimized for breast imaging. In this thesis I present compact single photon camera technology designed specifically for scintimammography which strives to alleviate some of these limitations by allowing better and closer access to sites of possible breast tumors. Specific applications are outlined. The design is modular, thus a camera of the desired size and geometry can be constructed from an array (or arrays) of individual modules and a parallel hole lead collimator for directional information. Each module consists of: (1) an array of 64 discrete, optically-isolated CsI(Tl) scintillator crystals 3 x 3 x 5 mm3 in size, (2) an array of 64 low-noise Si PIN photodiodes matched 1-to-1 to the scintillator crystals, (3) an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) that amplifies the 64 photodiode signals and selects the signal with the largest amplitude, and (4) connectors and hardware for interfacing the module with a motherboard, thereby allowing straightforward computer control of all individual modules within a camera.

  14. Fluorine 18 FDG coincidence positron emission tomography using dual-head gamma camera in the follow-up of patient with head and neck cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pai, M. S.; Park, C. H.; Koh, J. H.; Suh, J. H.; Joh, C. W.; Yoon, S. N.; Kim, S.; Hwang, K. H. [College of Medicine, Ajou Univ., Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-07-01

    Metabolic imaging with F-18-FDG has diagnostic potential to detect residual malignancy as well as the involvement of lymph node after or during the treatment, but it is not widely available because of high cost of PET operation. The alternative method to use F-18-FDG has been developed the coincident PET (CoDe PET) using gamma camera. Purpose is to evaluate the clinical usefulness of the F-18-FDG CoDe PET using gamma camera in differentiating residual/recurrent disease from post-therapy changes in patients with head and neck cancer. 55 cases F-18-FDG CoDe PET studies in 32 patients (Age : 25-79, mean : 50 13, M/F : 23/9) after therapy with various head and neck cancers were performed (11 undifferentiated carcinoma, 10 squamous cell carcinoma, 9 malignant lymphoma, 1 adenoid cystic cancer, 1 Ewing sarcoma). All patients were in the fasting stage for 6-12 hours and injected 3-10mCi of F-18-FDG 1 hour before the imaging. Images were obtained for 30 min (3 min per one rotation) with 20% photopeak window and 20% compton scatter window and reconstructed after filtered with METS filter. Attenuation correction was not done. Any visually detectable FDG uptake in the head and neck except the physiologic uptake were considered positive. All findings were validated either by biopsy or by clinical follow-up and compared with corresponding CT/MRI findings. Ten of eleven cases with residual disease and 41 of 44 cases which remained relapse free were correctly identified by CoDe PET. CoDe PET assessed nine more relapse free cases, in which CT/MRI were specificity (93%). FDG CoDe PET was especially helpful in patients with residual abnormalities noted on radiological imaging. F-18-FDG CoDe PET is a useful method for follow-up after the initial therapy in patients with head and neck cancers.

  15. SPECT-CT and intraoperative portable gamma-camera detection protocol for sentinel lymph node biopsy in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieira-Gil, Ramón; Paredes, Pilar; Martí-Pagés, Carles; Ferrer-Fuertes, Ada; García-Díez, Eloy; Cho-Lee, Gui Youn; Tapias, Andres; Mayoral, Maria; Vidal-Sicart, Sergi

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a multimodality approach to sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) detection with lymphoscintigraphy and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/computed tomography (CT). When combined with intraoperative imaging by a portable gamma camera (PGC), improved SLNB accuracy and detection rate may result. A total of 42 patients selected for SLNB in node-negative T1 and T2 oral squamous cell carcinoma were retrospectively analyzed. The detection protocol consisted of preoperative lymphoscintigraphy and SPECT/CT performed the day before surgery. Intraoperative sentinel lymph node (SLN) detection was done with the aid of a PGC in association with hand-held gamma probe. All SLN detected in the preoperative study could be harvested except for one case. A total of 131 SLN were resected. This number was higher than the SLN depicted on lymphoscintigraphy (119 SLNs) and SPECT/CT (123 SLNs). Sublingual SLNs were observed in two cases (4.76%). These SLNs were detected by SPECT/CT but not by lymphoscintigraphy. Five (3.8%) additional SLNs not previously visualized on lymphoscintigraphy or on SPECT/CT were detected intraoperatively with the aid of the PGC. Positive SLNs were detected in eight cases (19%). Micrometastases were detected in five cases (62%) and macrometastases in three cases (38%). The SLNB detection protocol described contributes to more accurate study and detection.

  16. Imaging Polarimeter for a Sub-MeV Gamma-Ray All-sky Survey Using an Electron-tracking Compton Camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komura, S.; Takada, A.; Mizumura, Y.; Miyamoto, S.; Takemura, T.; Kishimoto, T.; Kubo, H.; Matsuoka, Y.; Mizumoto, T.; Nakamasu, Y.; Nakamura, K.; Oda, M.; Parker, J. D.; Sonoda, S.; Tanimori, T.; Tomono, D.; Yoshikawa, K. [Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Kurosawa, S. [New Industry Creation Hatchery Center (NICHe), Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi, 980-8579 (Japan); Miuchi, K. [Department of Physics, Kobe University, Kobe, Hyogo, 658-8501 (Japan); Sawano, T., E-mail: komura@cr.scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp [College of Science and Engineering, School of Mathematics and Physics, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Ishikawa, 920-1192 (Japan)

    2017-04-10

    X-ray and gamma-ray polarimetry is a promising tool to study the geometry and the magnetic configuration of various celestial objects, such as binary black holes or gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). However, statistically significant polarizations have been detected in few of the brightest objects. Even though future polarimeters using X-ray telescopes are expected to observe weak persistent sources, there are no effective approaches to survey transient and serendipitous sources with a wide field of view (FoV). Here we present an electron-tracking Compton camera (ETCC) as a highly sensitive gamma-ray imaging polarimeter. The ETCC provides powerful background rejection and a high modulation factor over an FoV of up to 2 π sr thanks to its excellent imaging based on a well-defined point-spread function. Importantly, we demonstrated for the first time the stability of the modulation factor under realistic conditions of off-axis incidence and huge backgrounds using the SPring-8 polarized X-ray beam. The measured modulation factor of the ETCC was 0.65 ± 0.01 at 150 keV for an off-axis incidence with an oblique angle of 30° and was not degraded compared to the 0.58 ± 0.02 at 130 keV for on-axis incidence. These measured results are consistent with the simulation results. Consequently, we found that the satellite-ETCC proposed in Tanimori et al. would provide all-sky surveys of weak persistent sources of 13 mCrab with 10% polarization for a 10{sup 7} s exposure and over 20 GRBs down to a 6 × 10{sup −6} erg cm{sup −2} fluence and 10% polarization during a one-year observation.

  17. High-resolution mini gamma camera for diagnosis and radio-guided surgery in diabetic foot infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scopinaro, F. [Department of Radiological Sciences, University ' La Sapienza' Rome (Italy); Capriotti, G. [Department of Radiological Sciences, University ' La Sapienza' Rome (Italy); Di Santo, G. [Department of Radiological Sciences, University ' La Sapienza' Rome (Italy); Capotondi, C. [Unit of Radiology, S. Andrea Hospital, Rome (Italy); Micarelli, A. [Nuclear Medicine, Sulmona Hospital, Sulmona (AQ) (Italy); Massari, R. [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, ISIB-CNR, Rome-Li-tech srl, Lauzacco Pavia di Udine (UD) (Italy); Trotta, C. [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, ISIB-CNR, Rome-Li-tech srl, Lauzacco Pavia di Udine (UD) (Italy); Soluri, A. [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, ISIB-CNR, Rome-Li-tech srl, Lauzacco Pavia di Udine (UD) (Italy)]. E-mail: soluri@isib.cnr.it

    2006-12-20

    The diagnosis of diabetic foot osteomyelitis is often difficult. {sup 99m}Tc-WBC (White Blood Cell) scintigraphy plays a key role in the diagnosis of bone infections. Spatial resolution of Anger camera is not always able to differentiate soft tissue from bone infection. Aim of present study is to verify if HRD (High-Resolution Detector) is able to improve diagnosis and to help surgery. Patients were studied by HRD showing 25.7x25.7 mm{sup 2} FOV, 2 mm spatial resolution and 18% energy resolution. The patients were underwent to surgery and, when necessary, bone biopsy, both guided by HRD. Four patients were positive at Anger camera without specific signs of osteomyelitis. HRS (High-Resolution Scintigraphy) showed hot spots in the same patients. In two of them the hot spot was bar-shaped and it was localized in correspondence of the small phalanx. The presence of bone infection was confirmed at surgery, which was successfully guided by HRS. {sup 99m}Tc-WBC HRS was able to diagnose pedal infection and to guide the surgery of diabetic foot, opening a new way in the treatment of infected diabetic foot.

  18. High-resolution mini gamma camera for diagnosis and radio-guided surgery in diabetic foot infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scopinaro, F.; Capriotti, G.; Di Santo, G.; Capotondi, C.; Micarelli, A.; Massari, R.; Trotta, C.; Soluri, A.

    2006-12-01

    The diagnosis of diabetic foot osteomyelitis is often difficult. 99mTc-WBC (White Blood Cell) scintigraphy plays a key role in the diagnosis of bone infections. Spatial resolution of Anger camera is not always able to differentiate soft tissue from bone infection. Aim of present study is to verify if HRD (High-Resolution Detector) is able to improve diagnosis and to help surgery. Patients were studied by HRD showing 25.7×25.7 mm 2 FOV, 2 mm spatial resolution and 18% energy resolution. The patients were underwent to surgery and, when necessary, bone biopsy, both guided by HRD. Four patients were positive at Anger camera without specific signs of osteomyelitis. HRS (High-Resolution Scintigraphy) showed hot spots in the same patients. In two of them the hot spot was bar-shaped and it was localized in correspondence of the small phalanx. The presence of bone infection was confirmed at surgery, which was successfully guided by HRS. 99mTc-WBC HRS was able to diagnose pedal infection and to guide the surgery of diabetic foot, opening a new way in the treatment of infected diabetic foot.

  19. SPECT/CT and a portable gamma-camera for image-guided laparoscopic sentinel node biopsy in testicular cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwer, Oscar R; Valdés Olmos, Renato A; Vermeeren, Lenka; Hoefnagel, Cornelis A; Nieweg, Omgo E; Horenblas, Simon

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of SPECT/CT and real-time intraoperative imaging with a portable γ-camera for laparoscopic sentinel node (SN) localization in stage I testicular cancer. Ten patients with clinical stage I testicular cancer were studied between November 2006 and November 2010. Their mean age was 37 y (range, 25-50 y). The primary tumors were situated on the right side in 5 patients and on the left side in 5. After a funicular block with 2% lidocaine, an average dose of 80 MBq (range, 59-98 MBq) of (99m)Tc-nanocolloid in a volume of 0.2 mL was injected into the testicular parenchyma. Shortly after injection, a 10-min dynamic study was performed, followed by the acquisition of static planar images at 15 min and 2 h. SPECT/CT was performed at 2 h. After image fusion, SNs were visualized, and their exact anatomic location was determined. The SPECT/CT images were displayed in the operation room to guide SN detection using a laparoscopic γ-ray probe and a portable γ-camera. Lymphatic drainage to the retroperitoneum was seen in all patients. SPECT/CT identified interaortocaval or paracaval SNs in the 5 patients with right-sided tumors, one of whom had an additional SN adjacent to the testicular vessels. In all 5 patients with left-sided tumors, paraaortic SNs were visualized; a node along the testicular vessels was visualized in 2 of these 5. Twenty-six SNs were laparoscopically removed (range, 1-4 per patient). An SN contained metastases in 1 case. No recurrences developed in the 9 patients with a tumor-free SN during a median follow-up of 21 mo (range, 2-50 mo). SPECT/CT enables accurate anatomic localization of retroperitoneal SNs in patients with testicular cancer, facilitating their laparoscopic retrieval. Real-time image guidance by a portable γ-camera improves intraoperative SN detection and appears to identify (20%) additional SNs.

  20. Development of a Compton Camera for Online Range Monitoring of Laser-Accelerated Proton Beams via Prompt-Gamma Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thirolf P.G.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Presently large efforts are conducted in Munich towards the development of proton beams for bio-medical applications, generated via the technique of particle acceleration from high-power, short-pulse lasers. While so far mostly offline diagnostics tools are used in this context, we aim at developing a reliable and accurate online range monitoring technique, based on the position-sensitive detection of prompt γ rays emitted from nuclear reactions between the proton beam and the biological sample. For this purpose, we develop a Compton camera, designed to be able to track not only the Compton scattering of the primary photon, but also to detect the secondary Compton electron, thus reducing the Compton cone to an arc segment and by this increasing the source reconstruction efficiency. Design specifications and the status of the protype system are discussed.

  1. Application of Two Phase (Liquid/Gas) Xenon Gamma-Camera for the Detection of Special Nuclear Material and PET Medical Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKinsey, Daniel Nicholas [Yale University

    2013-08-27

    The McKinsey group at Yale has been awarded a grant from DTRA for the building of a Liquid Xenon Gamma Ray Color Camera (LXe-GRCC), which combines state-of-the-art detection of LXe scintillation light and time projection chamber (TPC) charge readout. The DTRA application requires a movable detector and hence only a single phase (liquid) xenon detector can be considered in this case. We propose to extend the DTRA project to applications that allow a two phase (liquid/gas) xenon TPC. This entails additional (yet minimal) hardware and extension of the research effort funded by DTRA. The two phase detector will have better energy and angular resolution. Such detectors will be useful for PET medical imaging and detection of special nuclear material in stationary applications (e.g. port of entry). The expertise of the UConn group in gas phase TPCs will enhance the capabilities of the Yale group and the synergy between the two groups will be very beneficial for this research project as well as the education and research projects of the two universities. The LXe technology to be used in this project has matured rapidly over the past few years, developed for use in detectors for nuclear physics and astrophysics. This technology may now be applied in a straightforward way to the imaging of gamma rays. According to detailed Monte Carlo simulations recently performed at Yale University, energy resolution of 1% and angular resolution of 3 degrees may be obtained for 1.0 MeV gamma rays, using existing technology. With further research and development, energy resolution of 0.5% and angular resolution of 1.3 degrees will be possible at 1.0 MeV. Because liquid xenon is a high density, high Z material, it is highly efficient for scattering and capturing gamma rays. In addition, this technology scales elegantly to large detector areas, with several square meter apertures possible. The Yale research group is highly experienced in the development and use of noble liquid detectors for

  2. Viability after myocardial infarction: can it be assessed within five minutes by low-dose dynamic iodine-123-iodophenylpentadecanoic acid imaging with a multicrystal gamma camera?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, G L; Schad, N; Bush, A J

    1997-04-01

    Although positron emission tomography (PET) assesses myocardial viability (V) accurately, a rapid, inexpensive substitute is needed. Therefore, the authors developed a low-dose (1 mCi) Iodine-123-Iodophenylpentadecanoic Acid (IPPA) myocardial viability scan requiring analysis of only the first three minutes of data acquired at rest with a standard multicrystal gamma camera. Twenty-one patients > 2 weeks after myocardial infarction (MI) (24 MIs, 10 anterior, 14 inferoposterior, 21 akinetic or dyskinetic) had cardiac catheterization and resting IPPA imaging. V was determined by either transmural myocardial biopsy during coronary bypass surgery (12 patients, 14 MIs) or reinjection tomographic thallium scan (9 patients, 10 MIs), and 50% of MIs were viable. The IPPA variables analyzed were: time to initial left ventricular (LV) uptake in the region of interest (ROI), the ratio of three-minute uptake in the ROI to three-minute LV uptake, three-minute clearing (counts/pixel) in the ROI (decrease in IPPA after initial uptake), and three-minute accumulation (increase in IPPA after initial uptake) in the ROI. Rules for detecting V were generated and applied to 10 healthy volunteers to determine normalcy. While three-minute uptake in nonviable MIs was only 67% of volunteers (P IPPA clearing, however, was > or = 13.5 counts/pixel in 10/12 (83%) of viable MIs, and IPPA accumulation > or = 6.75 counts/pixel identified one more viable MI, for a sensitivity for V of 11/12 (92%), with a specificity of 11/12 (92%), and a 100% normalcy rate. The authors conclude low-dose IPPA (five-minute acquisition with analysis of the first three minutes of data) has potential for providing rapid, inexpensive V data after MI. Since newer multicrystal cameras are mobile, IPPA scans can be done in emergency rooms or coronary care units generating information that might be useful in decisions regarding thrombolysis, angioplasty, or bypass surgery.

  3. Development of a 32-detector CdTe matrix for the SVOM ECLAIRs x/gamma camera: tests results of first flight models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacombe, K.; Dezalay, J.-P.; Houret, B.; Amoros, C.; Atteia, J.-L.; Aubaret, K.; Billot, M.; Bordon, S.; Cordier, B.; Delaigue, S.; Galliano, M.; Gevin, O.; Godet, O.; Gonzalez, F.; Guillemot, Ph.; Limousin, O.; Mercier, K.; Nasser, G.; Pons, R.; Rambaud, D.; Ramon, P.; Waegebaert, V.

    2016-07-01

    ECLAIRs, a 2-D coded-mask imaging camera on-board the Sino-French SVOM space mission, will detect and locate gamma-ray bursts in near real time in the 4 - 150 keV energy band in a large field of view. The design of ECLAIRs has been driven by the objective to reach an unprecedented low-energy threshold of 4 keV. The detection plane is an assembly of 6400 Schottky CdTe detectors of size 4x4x1 mm3, biased from -200V to -500V and operated at -20°C. The low-energy threshold is achieved thanks to an innovative hybrid module composed of a thick film ceramic holding 32 CdTe detectors ("Detectors Ceramics"), associated to an HTCC ceramic housing a low-noise 32-channel ASIC ("ASIC Ceramics"). We manage the coupling between Detectors Ceramics and ASIC Ceramics in order to achieve the best performance and ensure the uniformity of the detection plane. In this paper, we describe the complete hybrid XRDPIX, of which 50 flight models have been manufactured by the SAGEM company. Afterwards, we show test results obtained on Detectors Ceramics, on ASIC Ceramics and on the modules once assembled. Then, we compare and confront detectors leakage currents and ASIC ENC with the energy threshold values and FWHM measured on XRDPIX modules at the temperature of -20°C by using a calibrated radioactive source of 241Am. Finally, we study the homogeneity of the spectral properties of the 32-detector hybrid matrices and we conclude on general performance of more than 1000 detection channels which may reach the lowenergy threshold of 4 keV required for the future ECLAIRs space camera.

  4. Development of a 32-detector CdTe matrix for the SVOM ECLAIRs X/Gamma camera: Preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacombe, K.; Nasser, G.; Amoros, C.; Atteia, J.-L.; Barret, D.; Billot, M.; Cordier, B.; Gevin, O.; Godet, O.; Gonzalez, F.; Houret, B.; Landé, J.; Lugiez, F.; Mandrou, P.; Martin, J.-A.; Marty, W.; Mercier, K.; Pons, R.; Rambaud, D.; Ramon, P.; Rouaix, G.; Waegebaert, V.

    2013-12-01

    ECLAIRs, a 2D coded-mask imaging telescope on the Sino-French SVOM space mission, will detect and locate gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) between 4 and 150 keV. The detector array is an assembly of 6400 Schottky CdTe detectors of size 4×4×1 mm3, biased from -100 V to -600 V and operated at -20 °C to minimize the leakage current and maximize the polarization time. The remarkable low-energy threshold is achieved through various steps: an extensive detectors selection, a low-noise 32 channels ASIC study, and the design of an innovative detection module called XRDPIX formed by a thick film ceramic holding 32 detectors, a high voltage grid and an HTCC substrate housing the ASIC within a hermetic cavity. In this paper, we describe the XRDPIX module and explain the results of first tests to measure the linearity and compare the sources of noise, such as leakage currents and the Equivalent Noise Charge (ENC) measured on ASIC Ceramics. We confront these values with the energy threshold and spectral resolution made with dedicated test benches. Finally, we present the superposition of 32 calibrated spectra of one XRDPIX module, showing the excellent homogeneity of the 32 detectors and the achievement of a detection threshold at 4 keV over the entire module.

  5. In vivo dynamic distribution of {sup 131}I-glucagon-like peptide-1 (7-36) amide in the rat studied by gamma camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, Moustapha E-mail: hassan@algonet.se; Eskilsson, Anja; Nilsson, Christina; Jonsson, Cathrine; Jacobsson, Hans; Refai, Essam; Larsson, Stig; Efendic, Suad

    1999-05-01

    The in vivo distribution of glucagon-like peptide-1 (7-36) amide (GLP-1) was studied in a rat model using radiolabeled GLP-1 ({sup 131}I-GLP-1) depicted by a gamma-camera. The dynamic scan showed a rapid clearance from the blood circulation after an intravenous (IV) injection of {sup 131}I-GLP-1. After 10 min, the major part of the radioactivity was accumulated in the kidneys, whereas about 9% (of the blood value) was found in the brain. The pharmacokinetic study using {sup 125}I-GLP-1 demonstrated a rapid elimination from plasma, with a half-life of 3.3{+-}0.6 min, a clearance of 117{+-}15 mL/min, and a distribution volume of 557{+-}61 mL. The elimination half-lives for the intact {sup 125}I-GLP-1 in lungs and kidneys were determined to 3.7 and 3.9 min, respectively. The metabolite GLP-1 (9-36) amide was followed in blood, lung, and kidney. All other organs assumed to contain low molecular weight fragments of GLP-1. The present study suggest that GLP-1 and/or its labeled metabolites cross the blood-brain barrier. Also the kidney plays an essential role in GLP-1 elimination after an IV administration, which can be of clinical interest especially in patients with kidney insufficiency who are treated with GLP-1.

  6. Use of a portable gamma camera for guiding surgical treatment in locally advanced breast cancer in a post-neoadjuvant therapy setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelista, Laura; Cervino, Anna Rita; Sanco, Riccardo; Bignotto, Michele; Saibene, Tania; Michieletto, Silvia; Ghiotto, Cristina; Bozza, Fernando; Paiusco, Marta; Saladini, Giorgio

    2014-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the feasibility of a portable gamma camera (PGC) for guiding surgical treatment in locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) after neoadjuvant therapy (NT). Since January 2012, a PGC (Sentinella 102, ONCOVISION) has been available in our center. We planned to perform a feasibility monocentric prospective study involving 15-20 patients with LABC for assessing the diagnostic performance of this PGC after NT (Breast Cancer Surgery-S102). Before the surgical treatment and at the end of NT an injection of 99mTc-Sestamibi (100-150 MBq) was made. Conventional scintimmamography (SMM) and Sentinella 102 images were obtained from 18 patients. 10 (55.5 %) patients showed a focal uptake of tracer in the breast or lymph nodes before or after the surgical excision (on histological specimen), while 8 did not. The histological specimen concluded for a complete response to NT in 4 (22.2 %) patients and for a partial or no response to treatment in the remnant 14 subjects. The specificity and false-negative rate of the Sentinella 102 compared to SMM were 100 % for both and 38 % vs. 60 %, respectively. The global diagnostic accuracy of Sentinella 102 was: 66.7 % (95 % confidence interval: 44.88-88.44 %). The present feasibility study shows how a new nuclear imaging device can be useful in the operating theatre for guiding a radical surgery approach in patients with LABC after NT.

  7. Metabolic cardiac imaging in severe coronary disease: assessment of viability with iodine-123-iodophenylpentadecanoic acid and multicrystal gamma camera, and correlation with biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, G; Schad, N; Ladd, W; Allie, D; vander Zwagg, R; Avet, P; Rockett, J

    1992-07-01

    Fifteen patients with coronary disease and resting left ventricular ejection fractions of less than or equal to 0.35 underwent resting metabolic cardiac imaging utilizing 1 mCi [123I]iodophenylpentadecanoic acid (IPPA) intravenously and a multicrystal gamma camera. Parametric images of regional rates of IPPA clearance and accumulation were generated. Forty-two vascular territories (22 infarcted) were evaluated by metabolic imaging as well as transmural myocardial biopsy. Despite resting akinesis or dyskinesis in 20/22 (91%) infarcted territories, 16/22 (73%) of these territories were metabolically viable. Transmural myocardial biopsies in all patients (43 sites, 42 vascular territories) during coronary bypass surgery confirmed IPPA results in 39/43 patients (91%). When compared to biopsy, scan sensitivity for viability was 33/36 (92%) with a specificity of 6/7 (86%). Eighty percent of bypassed, infarcted but IPPA viable segments demonstrated improved regional systolic wall motion postoperatively as assessed by exercise radionuclide angiography. We conclude resting IPPA imaging identifies viable myocardium, thereby providing a safe, cost-effective technique for myocardial viability assessment.

  8. Comparison of uteroplacental blood flow in normal and pre-eclamptic patients measurement with technetium-99m and a computer-linked gamma camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, S.H.; Moon, H.; Kim, D.S.; Cho, S.S.

    1985-05-01

    Uteroplacental blood flow studies in preeclampsia are of special interest since the vascular changes reported in this disease might constitute a structural basis for a reduction of blood flow. Evidence has also been given for a decreased uteroplacental blood flow in preeclampsia. Among the various methods to estimate the maternal placental blood flow, the one most frequently reported in the literature during the last years has been the time activity analysis of short lived radiotracer such as technetium-99m or indium-113m injected intravenously. Only few studies with the above mentioned technique comparing normal and preeclampsia cases have been undertaken. In clinical practice we frequently experience difficuly in finding the optimal time to get the delivery in preeclampsia patients. The aim of this study was first to measure uteroplacental blood flow in preeclamptic pregnancies using a computer-linked gamma camera method for the time-activity analysis of technetium-99m and second to discuss the possibility of clinical application of these measurements for determination of fetal well-being and the timing of the delivery in these patients. Uteroplacental blood flow was measured from 13 preeclamptic patients and 19 pregnancies without any complication after 35 completed weeks of gestation from Jan. 1983 to Sep. 1983 at Obstetrics department of Hanyang University Hospital. (Author).

  9. Monitoring of the internal contamination of occupationally exposure personnel in services of nuclear medicine through the use of gamma cameras; Monitoreo de la contaminacion interna de personal ocupacionalmente expuesto en servicios de medicina nuclear mediante el uso de gamma camaras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teran, M.; Paolino, A.; Savio, E. [Catedra de Radioquimica, Facultad de Quimica, Montevideo (Uruguay); Hermida, J.C. [Centro de Medicina Nuclear, Hospital de Clinicas, Facultad de Medicina, Montevideo (Uruguay); Dantas, B.M. [Laboratorio de Medidas In vivo, Instituto da Radioprotecao e Dosimetria, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2006-07-01

    The radionuclides incorporation can happen as a result of diverse activities; these include the work associated with the different stadiums of the nuclear fuel cycle, the use of radioactive sources in medicine, the scientific research, the agriculture and the industry. In Uruguay the main activities linked to the manipulation of open sources correspond those of Nuclear Medicine and from 2004, in the mark of the Project Arcal RLA 049 and being based on the Safety Guides of the IAEA it is implementing a program of internal monitoring in combined form the Nuclear Medicine Center of the Hospital of and the Radiochemistry class of the Faculty of Chemistry. In accordance with the publication of the ICRP 75 the emphasis of any monitoring program should be in the formal study of the doses in the workers to who are considered commendable of to receive in routine form an outstanding fraction of the dose limits or who work in areas where the exposures can be significant in the accident event. From April 2004, to the date has started a pilot plan by means of in that were established appropriate conditions of procedures and of safety in a reduced group of workers of the Nuclear Medicine area. In that period the first work limits, equipment adjustment, calibrations and registration systems were determined. The monitoring system implemented until the moment is carried out with a thyroid caption equipment. However these measurements are carried out in the university hospital embracing 40% of the involved workers of our country, with the purpose of reaching the covering of the biggest quantity of occupationally exposed personnel of private clinics. Also it was developed a new work proposal that allows to have an alternative measure method, in the event of not having the equipment habitually used. Among the conclusions of this work are that for the before exposed are considered the measure conditions but appropriate the following ones: Gamma Camera without collimator; Measurement

  10. Testing and Performance Validation of a Sensitive Gamma Ray Camera Designed for Radiation Detection and Decommissioning Measurements in Nuclear Facilities-13044

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mason, John A.; Looman, Marc R.; Poundall, Adam J.; Towner, Antony C.N. [ANTECH, A. N. Technology Ltd., Unit 6, Thames Park, Wallingford, Oxfordshire, OX10 9TA (United Kingdom); Creed, Richard; Pancake, Daniel [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    This paper describes the measurements, testing and performance validation of a sensitive gamma ray camera designed for radiation detection and quantification in the environment and decommissioning and hold-up measurements in nuclear facilities. The instrument, which is known as RadSearch, combines a sensitive and highly collimated LaBr{sub 3} scintillation detector with an optical (video) camera with controllable zoom and focus and a laser range finder in one detector head. The LaBr{sub 3} detector has a typical energy resolution of between 2.5% and 3% at the 662 keV energy of Cs-137 compared to that of NaI detectors with a resolution of typically 7% to 8% at the same energy. At this energy the tungsten shielding of the detector provides a shielding ratio of greater than 900:1 in the forward direction and 100:1 on the sides and from the rear. The detector head is mounted on a pan/tile mechanism with a range of motion of ±180 degrees (pan) and ±90 degrees (tilt) equivalent to 4 π steradians. The detector head with pan/tilt is normally mounted on a tripod or wheeled cart. It can also be mounted on vehicles or a mobile robot for access to high dose-rate areas and areas with high levels of contamination. Ethernet connects RadSearch to a ruggedized notebook computer from which it is operated and controlled. Power can be supplied either as 24-volts DC from a battery or as 50 volts DC supplied by a small mains (110 or 230 VAC) power supply unit that is co-located with the controlling notebook computer. In this latter case both power and Ethernet are supplied through a single cable that can be up to 80 metres in length. If a local battery supplies power, the unit can be controlled through wireless Ethernet. Both manual operation and automatic scanning of surfaces and objects is available through the software interface on the notebook computer. For each scan element making up a part of an overall scanned area, the unit measures a gamma ray spectrum. Multiple

  11. Conjugate view gamma camera method for measuring activity in 131{sup I} treatments; Metodo de la imagen conjugada para la cuantificacion de la actividad en tratamientos de 131{sup I}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barquero Sanz, R.; Placios, A. M.; Perez, D. M.; Tortosa Oliver, R.; Michel, R.

    2012-07-01

    A quantification method is developed to determine 131{sup I} activity and its associated uncertainty using regions of interest from gamma camera images. Inside a neck phantom, a known activity source is introduced to simulate thyroid remainders in thyroid differentiated cancer. The three parameters that define the accuracy of the method are: net count rates in ROI, the air calibration factor of the gamma camera and the attenuation correction factor. In order to obtain net count rates, four methods for background subtraction are tested. The best procedure to follow is based in two energy windows acquisitions, which gives an activity result of 47 {+-} 5 {mu}Ci Bq, in good agreement with the real activity value for the source, 46 {+-} 5 {mu}Ci. (Author) 12 refs.

  12. Use of /sup 131/I labelling to study distribution and migration of spermatozoa in the genital tract of female sheep, following artifical insemination. 1. Gamma camera studies into migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brueckner, G.; Kaempfer, I.; Rummer, H.J.; Menger, H.; Schneider, G. (Karl-Marx-Universitaet, Leipzig (German Democratic Republic). Sektion Tierproduktion und Veterinaermedizin; Karl-Marx-Universitaet, Leipzig (German Democratic Republic). Medizinische Fakultaet)

    1982-03-01

    Ram sperma, which had been sucessfully labelled with Na/sup 131/I was followed up by means of a gamma camera up to 150 minutes from insemination while migrating through the genital tract of female sheep. The study had been undertaken primarily for the purpose of testing the method and the suitability of this radionuclide for sperm labelling without major impairment of spermatic motility. Also included in the study were comparisons between oestrus induction by means of fluorogestonacetate vaginal sponges plus pregnant mare serum gonadotrophin treatment and spontaneous oestrus or between fresh and liquid-preserved ram sperma for migration capacity as well as observation of passive migration of sperma in the genital tract of sheep. Rompun anesthesia was applied to sheep for sedation for gamma camera observation.

  13. Traffic camera system development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Toshi

    1997-04-01

    The intelligent transportation system has generated a strong need for the development of intelligent camera systems to meet the requirements of sophisticated applications, such as electronic toll collection (ETC), traffic violation detection and automatic parking lot control. In order to achieve the highest levels of accuracy in detection, these cameras must have high speed electronic shutters, high resolution, high frame rate, and communication capabilities. A progressive scan interline transfer CCD camera, with its high speed electronic shutter and resolution capabilities, provides the basic functions to meet the requirements of a traffic camera system. Unlike most industrial video imaging applications, traffic cameras must deal with harsh environmental conditions and an extremely wide range of light. Optical character recognition is a critical function of a modern traffic camera system, with detection and accuracy heavily dependent on the camera function. In order to operate under demanding conditions, communication and functional optimization is implemented to control cameras from a roadside computer. The camera operates with a shutter speed faster than 1/2000 sec. to capture highway traffic both day and night. Consequently camera gain, pedestal level, shutter speed and gamma functions are controlled by a look-up table containing various parameters based on environmental conditions, particularly lighting. Lighting conditions are studied carefully, to focus only on the critical license plate surface. A unique light sensor permits accurate reading under a variety of conditions, such as a sunny day, evening, twilight, storms, etc. These camera systems are being deployed successfully in major ETC projects throughout the world.

  14. Imaging of prompt gamma rays emitted during delivery of clinical proton beams with a Compton camera: feasibility studies for range verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polf, Jerimy C; Avery, Stephen; Mackin, Dennis S; Beddar, Sam

    2015-09-21

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the ability of a prototype Compton camera (CC) to measure prompt gamma rays (PG) emitted during delivery of clinical proton pencil beams for prompt gamma imaging (PGI) as a means of providing in vivo verification of the delivered proton radiotherapy beams. A water phantom was irradiated with clinical 114 MeV and 150 MeV proton pencil beams. Up to 500 cGy of dose was delivered per irradiation using clinical beam currents. The prototype CC was placed 15 cm from the beam central axis and PGs from 0.2 MeV up to 6.5 MeV were measured during irradiation. From the measured data (2D) images of the PG emission were reconstructed. (1D) profiles were extracted from the PG images and compared to measured depth dose curves of the delivered proton pencil beams. The CC was able to measure PG emission during delivery of both 114 MeV and 150 MeV proton beams at clinical beam currents. 2D images of the PG emission were reconstructed for single 150 MeV proton pencil beams as well as for a 5   ×   5 cm mono-energetic layer of 114 MeV pencil beams. Shifts in the Bragg peak (BP) range were detectable on the 2D images. 1D profiles extracted from the PG images show that the distal falloff of the PG emission profile lined up well with the distal BP falloff. Shifts as small as 3 mm in the beam range could be detected from the 1D PG profiles with an accuracy of 1.5 mm or better. However, with the current CC prototype, a dose of 400 cGy was required to acquire adequate PG signal for 2D PG image reconstruction. It was possible to measure PG interactions with our prototype CC during delivery of proton pencil beams at clinical dose rates. Images of the PG emission could be reconstructed and shifts in the BP range were detectable. Therefore PGI with a CC for in vivo range verification during proton treatment delivery is feasible. However, improvements in the prototype CC detection efficiency and reconstruction algorithms are necessary

  15. Analysis of stress-only imaging, comparing upright and supine CZT camera acquisition to conventional gamma camera images with and without attenuation correction, with coronary angiography as a reference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jameria, Zenith A; Abdallah, Mouhamad; Fernandez-Ulloa, Mariano; O'Donnell, Robert; Dwivedi, Alok K; Washburn, Erica; Khan, Naseer; Khaleghi, Mahyar; Kalakota, Nischelle; Gerson, Myron C

    2017-01-20

    Diagnostic performance of stress-only imaging using a Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT) camera has not been directly compared in the same patients to stress-only attenuation-corrected conventional Anger camera images. 112 subjects with correlative coronary angiographic data and 40 subjects with camera and uncorrected upright and supine stress images on a CZT camera. Two readers provided independent, blinded interpretations of stress-only images. Upright and supine stress-only CZT images and attenuation-corrected Anger camera images provided similar positive (reader 1/reader 2, 50.0%/44.1% vs 46.4%/51.9%) and negative (66.7%/64.0% vs 67.9%/67.7%) predictive values (all P = NS) for obstructive coronary artery disease; however, the sensitivity was higher (81.3% vs 58.3%, P = .05), specificity lower (29.7% vs 50.0%, P = .005), and normalcy rate lower (87.5% vs 100%, P = .025) with attenuation-corrected Anger camera images for the first reader with no significant differences between cameras for the second reader. Stress-only upright and supine CZT imaging was non-inferior statistically to attenuation-corrected stress-only Anger camera imaging. Nevertheless, stress-only CZT imaging may be associated with reduced diagnostic sensitivity for some readers compared to attenuation-corrected Anger camera images, which may be less acceptable clinically compared to stress plus rest images.

  16. PET with a coincidence gamma camera: results in selected oncological questions; PET mit einer Koinzidenz-Gammakamera: Resultate bei ausgewaehlten onkologischen Fragestellungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauer, I.; Haase, A; Adam, S.; Prueter, I.; Richter, E.; Baehre, M. [Universitaetsklinikum Luebeck (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Nuklearmedizin

    2001-11-01

    Since early 1997, about 1660 investigations with coincidence gamma camera PET (CGC-PET) have been performed in our department, mostly undertaken for oncological questions. Based on these data, several retrospective and prospective studies were performed. In the following, the results in CUP (cancer of unknown primary) syndrome, melanoma and malignant lymphoma are presented. Methods: CGC-PET was performed after application of 250-350 MBq [{sup 18}F]FDG using a coincidence double head gamma camera with 19 mm Nal cristal. CUP-Syndrome: After completing conventional diagnostic procedures, 32 patients have been examined in a prospective study, including 25 patients with recently detected CUP and 7 patients undergoing restaging after therapy. Localization of the primary tumor was successful in 12 (38%) cases. Melanoma: We evaluated 50 studies in 41 patients suffering from melanoma, retrospectively. CGC-PET showed a sensitivity of 76%, and a specificity of 94%. In comparison to conventional diagnostic methods, CGC-PET delineated important additional information in 16%. CGC-PET was superior to morphological diagnostic tools in the differentiation between residual scar tissue and active tumor following immunochemotherapy. Malignant lymphoma: 29 CGC-PET in 29 patients were performed for staging of malignant lymphoma, sensitivity was 86% versus 88% for CT. Overall CGC-PET showed additional information to conventional diagnostic methods, but revealed problems in detecting small infiltrations of organs. In restaging malignant melanoma (26 patients, 33 studies), specificity of CGC-PET was superior to conventional diagnostics (92% versus 35%). (orig.) [German] Seit Einfuehrung der Koinzidenzgammakamera-PET (KGK-PET) an der Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Nuklearmedizin des Universitaetsklinikums Luebeck im Jahre 1997 wurden etwa 1660 Patientenuntersuchungen - die ueberwiegende Zahl unter onkologischer Fragestellung - durchgefuehrt. Mithilfe dieser Untersuchungsdaten erfolgten

  17. [Dynamics of food transit in gastrectomized patients with and without dumping syndrome studied with the gamma camera and a marked meal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palermo, F; Boccaletto, F; Allegri, F; Tommaseo, T; Chiara, G

    1988-01-01

    Scintigraphy was performed on a group of patients following the administration of a solid radiolabelled meal. As a tracer, human albumin microspheres were used with 99mTc, mixed with fresh scrambled eggs, eaten as a sandwich in two slices of white bread. The analysis of transit and emptying-rate of the radiolabelled meal in the gastric or derivative loop areas was performed by means of a medium field (300 mm) gamma camera interfaced with a digital computer; the data were collected at 15" frames for 90'-120'. Twenty-nine patients were examined who had undergone sub-total gastrectomy: 11 of them were "dumpers" and 18 "non-dumpers"; moreover, 9 volunteers without any history of gastrointestinal diseases and 11 patients with different gastric disorders were checked. In the first group of gastrectomized patients the half-emptying time (T50) was significantly shorter than in the 11 people being checked (Md = 27.5 +/- 10.8 versus 69.6 +/- 19 minutes); in "non-dumpers" T50 was even shorter (Md = 24.2 +/- 13 min). There was no significant statistical difference between the two classes of gastroresected patients in both T50 and emptying-rate of the radioactive solid food, which excludes the accelerated transit as a factor in the functional post-prandial symptoms of the dumping syndrome. On the contrary, the dynamic selective analysis of the radiolabelled food transit through derivative afferent and efferent loops showed different patterns in the two groups of gastroresected patients: the progression of the propulsive wave was very irregular and constantly hyperperistaltic only in the dumpers.

  18. Changes in left ventricular function as determined by the multi-wire gamma camera at near presyncopal levels of lower body negative pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintner, R.; Fortney, S.; Mulvagh, S.; Lacy, J.

    1992-01-01

    At presyncopal levels of lower body negative pressure (LBNP), we have frequently observed electrocardiographic responses that may be due to changes in cardiac position and/or shape, but could be indicative of altered myocardial function. To further investigate this, we evaluated cardiac function using a nuclear imaging technique in 21 healthy subjects (17 men and 4 women) after 30 minutes of supine rest and near the end of a presyncopal-limited LBNP exposure (LBNP averaged 65 plus or minus 3 mmHg at injection). Cardiac first pass images were obtained with a Multi-Wire Gamma Camera following an intravenous bolus injection of 30-50 millicurries of Tantalum-178. Manual blood pressures and electrocardiograms were obtained throughout the 3 minute graded LBNP protocol. Between rest and injection during LBNP, heart rate increased (P less than 0.01) from 67 plus or minus 3 beats per minute to 99 plus or minus beats per minute, systolic blood pressure decreased (P less than 0.01) from 110 plus or minus 3 mmHg to 107 plus or minus 3 mmHg and left ventricular ejection fraction (EF) decreased (P less than 0.01) from 0.57 plus or minus 0.02 to 0.48 plus or minus 0.02. During LBNP, ST segment depression of at least 0.5 mm occurred in 7 subjects. Subjects with ST depression had greater reductions (P = 0.05) in EF than subjects without ST depression (0.15 plus or minus 0.07 versus 0.005 plus or minus 0.03), but also tolerated greater levels (P less than 0.05) of negative pressure (88 plus or minus mmHg versus 69 plus or minus 5 mmHg). There was a significant relationship between presyncopal LBNP level and EF (R(exp 2) = 0.50, P less than 0.05). Our findings suggest there may be a decrease in systolic myocardial function at high levels of LBNP.

  19. Method of conjugate gamma camera image to determine tumor uptake in other thyroid treatments with I-131; Metodo de la imagen conjugada en Gammacamara para determinar la captacion en resto tumoral tiroideo en tratamientos con I-131

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barquero, R.; Sainz, A.; Tortosa, R.; Mari, A.

    2011-07-01

    The efficacy of ablation of thyroid remnants with 1-131 in the treatment of CDT depends on the activity captured in these remains, the optimal method for quantifying this activity is based on the gamma camera imaging with in the course of treatment. However, due to saturation of the image with high activities and time-cost optimization of machine, not usually get those images, except in a post-treatment scan. In our service MN tracking each patient is between 6 and 9 after administration. A method of quantification of the activity captured in other thyroid screening using this image.

  20. Monitoring the distribution of prompt gamma rays in boron neutron capture therapy using a multiple-scattering Compton camera: A Monte Carlo simulation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Taewoong; Lee, Hyounggun; Lee, Wonho, E-mail: wonhol@korea.ac.kr

    2015-10-21

    This study evaluated the use of Compton imaging technology to monitor prompt gamma rays emitted by {sup 10}B in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) applied to a computerized human phantom. The Monte Carlo method, including particle-tracking techniques, was used for simulation. The distribution of prompt gamma rays emitted by the phantom during irradiation with neutron beams is closely associated with the distribution of the boron in the phantom. Maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) method was applied to the information obtained from the detected prompt gamma rays to reconstruct the distribution of the tumor including the boron uptake regions (BURs). The reconstructed Compton images of the prompt gamma rays were combined with the cross-sectional images of the human phantom. Quantitative analysis of the intensity curves showed that all combined images matched the predetermined conditions of the simulation. The tumors including the BURs were distinguishable if they were more than 2 cm apart.

  1. Neutron cameras for ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, L.C.; Barnes, C.W.; Batistoni, P. [ITER San Diego Joint Work Site, La Jolla, CA (United States)] [and others

    1998-12-31

    Neutron cameras with horizontal and vertical views have been designed for ITER, based on systems used on JET and TFTR. The cameras consist of fan-shaped arrays of collimated flight tubes, with suitably chosen detectors situated outside the biological shield. The sight lines view the ITER plasma through slots in the shield blanket and penetrate the vacuum vessel, cryostat, and biological shield through stainless steel windows. This paper analyzes the expected performance of several neutron camera arrangements for ITER. In addition to the reference designs, the authors examine proposed compact cameras, in which neutron fluxes are inferred from {sup 16}N decay gammas in dedicated flowing water loops, and conventional cameras with fewer sight lines and more limited fields of view than in the reference designs. It is shown that the spatial sampling provided by the reference designs is sufficient to satisfy target measurement requirements and that some reduction in field of view may be permissible. The accuracy of measurements with {sup 16}N-based compact cameras is not yet established, and they fail to satisfy requirements for parameter range and time resolution by large margins.

  2. Time-resolved imaging of prompt-gamma rays for proton range verification using a knife-edge slit camera based on digital photon counters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cambraia Lopes, P.; Clementel, E.; Crespo, P.; Henrotin, S.; Huizenga, J.; Janssens, G.; Parodi, K.; Prieels, D.; Roellinghoff, F.; Smeets, J.; Stichelbaut, F.; Schaart, D.R.

    2015-01-01

    Proton range monitoring may facilitate online adaptive proton therapy and improve treatment outcomes. Imaging of proton-induced prompt gamma (PG) rays using a knife-edge slit collimator is currently under investigation as a potential tool for real-time proton range monitoring. A major challenge in

  3. The test of intrinsic uniformity is one of the basic tests to check the status of the detectors of gamma cameras, and as such is contained in RD 1 841/1997 Quality Control in Nuclear Medicine; Protocolo NEMA para el calculo de la uniformidad intrinsica en gamma-camaras: aplicacion y comparacion con el software del fabricante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez Soto, X. L.; Gonzalez Ruiz, C.; Lopez-Boto, M. A.; Polo Cezon, R.

    2015-07-01

    Spanish Protocol Quality Control Instrumentation in Nuclear Medicine provides guidelines for conducting this test, similar to those established in the NEMA protocol NEMA Protocol for the calculation of the uniformity intrinsic in GAMMA cameras: application and comparison with the SQFTWARE of the manufacturer. it is advisable to conduct a study to ensure that the results for the test of intrinsic uniformity of the software provided by the equipment manufacturer are equivalent to those obtained by applying the protocol recommended by the SEFM before using this software for performing quality control. (Author)

  4. SPEIR: A Ge Compton Camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihailescu, L; Vetter, K M; Burks, M T; Hull, E L; Craig, W W

    2004-02-11

    The SPEctroscopic Imager for {gamma}-Rays (SPEIR) is a new concept of a compact {gamma}-ray imaging system of high efficiency and spectroscopic resolution with a 4-{pi} field-of-view. The system behind this concept employs double-sided segmented planar Ge detectors accompanied by the use of list-mode photon reconstruction methods to create a sensitive, compact Compton scatter camera.

  5. Value of coincidence gamma camera PET in tumors of the thorax and abdomen and assessment of myocardial viability; Stellenwert der Koinzidenz-Gammakamera-PET bei Tumoren des Thorax und Abdomens sowie Wertigkeit in der Vitalitaetsdiagnostik des Herzens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenberger, J.; Eilles, C. [Regensburg Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2001-11-01

    In this paper we report our experience of the usefulness of FDG scanning using a gamma camera equipped with coincidence detection for staging lung cancer and in the follow-up of patients with colorectal cancer. We also tested the diagnostic accuracy of cardiac FDG imaging. Our results demonstrate that, although a coincidence camera is technically inferior to a dedicated PET scanner, it may provide clinically useful results in situations were a lesion of sufficient size and FDG-uptake is to be expected. In patients with chronic ischemic cardiomyopathy coincidence PET can be introduced into clinical practice for the assessment of myocardial viability. (orig.) [German] In dieser Arbeit stellen wir die Ergebnisse des Einsatzes einer Koinzidenz-Gammakamera beim Staging des Bronchialkarzinoms dar sowie in der Nachsorge des kolorektalen Karzinoms. Zusaetzlich stellen wir die Zuverlaessigkeit bei der Frage der Myokardvitalitaet mit FDG vergleichend zum PET-Scanner dar. Zusammenfassend laesst sich dabei festhalten, dass, obwohl die KGK technisch den dedizierten PET-Scannern unterlegen ist, klinisch relevante Ergebnisse erzielt werden koennen, vor allem bei ausreichender Herdgroesse sowie hohem Glukosestoffwechsel. Bei der Frage der Myokardvitalitaet sehen wir eine uneingeschraenkte Einsatzfaehigkeit eines solchen Systems. (orig.)

  6. Gamma camera based Positron Emission Tomography: a study of the viability on quantification; Tomografia por emissao de positrons com sistemas PET/SPECT: um estudo da viabilidade de quantifizacao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pozzo, Lorena

    2005-07-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a Nuclear Medicine imaging modality for diagnostic purposes. Pharmaceuticals labeled with positron emitters are used and images which represent the in vivo biochemical process within tissues can be obtained. The positron/electron annihilation photons are detected in coincidence and this information is used for object reconstruction. Presently, there are two types of systems available for this imaging modality: the dedicated systems and those based on gamma camera technology. In this work, we utilized PET/SPECT systems, which also allows for the traditional Nuclear Medicine studies based on single photon emitters. There are inherent difficulties which affect quantification of activity and other indices. They are related to the Poisson nature of radioactivity, to radiation interactions with patient body and detector, noise due to statistical nature of these interactions and to all the detection processes, as well as the patient acquisition protocols. Corrections are described in the literature and not all of them are implemented by the manufacturers: scatter, attenuation, random, decay, dead time, spatial resolution, and others related to the properties of each equipment. The goal of this work was to assess these methods adopted by two manufacturers, as well as the influence of some technical characteristics of PET/SPECT systems on the estimation of SUV. Data from a set of phantoms were collected in 3D mode by one camera and 2D, by the other. We concluded that quantification is viable in PET/SPECT systems, including the estimation of SUVs. This is only possible if, apart from the above mentioned corrections, the camera is well tuned and coefficients for sensitivity normalization and partial volume corrections are applied. We also verified that the shapes of the sources used for obtaining these factors play a role on the final results and should be delt with carefully in clinical quantification. Finally, the choice of the region

  7. Myocardial blood flow rate and capillary permeability for 99mTc-DTPA in patients with angiographically normal coronary arteries. Evaluation of the single-injection, residue detection method with intracoronary indicator bolus injection and the use of a mobile gamma camera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, J H; Kelbaek, H; Efsen, Fritz

    1994-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to quantitate myocardial perfusion and capillary permeability in the human heart by means of the single-injection, residue detection method using a mobile gamma camera. With this method, the intravascular mean transit time and the capillary extraction fraction (E...

  8. Pre-chemotherapy values for left and right ventricular volumes and ejection fraction by gated tomographic radionuclide angiography using a cadmium-zinc-telluride detector gamma camera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haarmark, Christian; Haase, Christine; Jensen, Maria Maj

    2016-01-01

    age and both left and right ventricular volumes in women (r = -0.4, P right end systolic ventricular volume in men (r = -0.3, P = .001). CONCLUSION: A set of reference values for cardiac evaluation prior to chemotherapy in cancer patients without other known cardiopulmonary......BACKGROUND: Estimation of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) using equilibrium radionuclide angiography is an established method for assessment of left ventricular function. The purpose of this study was to establish normative data on left and right ventricular volumes and ejection fraction......, using cadmium-zinc-telluride SPECT camera. METHODS AND RESULTS: From routine assessments of left ventricular function in 1172 patients, we included 463 subjects (194 men and 269 women) without diabetes, previous potentially cardiotoxic chemotherapy, known cardiovascular or pulmonary disease. The lower...

  9. Whole body retention of Se-75-homotaurocholic acid (SeBCAT) using a Gamma Camera: A new test in chronic diarrhea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaral, H.; Palma, R.; Pfau, J.; Coudeu, I.; Bauer, K.

    1985-05-01

    Bile acid malabsorption has been recognized as an important cause of chronic diarrhea. Se-75HCAT, a bile acid, is absorbed in the terminal ileum. Therefore, measurement of its body retention indicate ileal function not requiring fecal collections. The authors studied 8 normal volunteers presenting with chronic recurrent diarrhea for more than 2 years. Each received orally a 10 ..mu..Ci capsule of SeHCAT (Amersham Intl.) and 3 hours later anterior and posterior whole body activity was measured using a digital camera without collimator. Measurements were repeated daily for 7 days and expressed as % of retention. Three patients had normal retention (1 celiac disease, 1 inactive Crohn disease and 1 functional diarrhea), another was borderline (an immunodeficiency) and 4 patients presented abnormal bile acid absorption (2 had vagotomy, 1 Crohn disease and 1 idiopathic diarrhea). This last group was treated with cholestyramine showing improvement of the diarrhea, and relapse on drug withdrawal. These findings demonstrate that this technique can identify bile acid malabsorption as the cause of chronic diarrhea by external counting.

  10. Infrared Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    A sensitive infrared camera that observes the blazing plumes from the Space Shuttle or expendable rocket lift-offs is capable of scanning for fires, monitoring the environment and providing medical imaging. The hand-held camera uses highly sensitive arrays in infrared photodetectors known as quantum well infrared photo detectors (QWIPS). QWIPS were developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Center for Space Microelectronics Technology in partnership with Amber, a Raytheon company. In October 1996, QWIP detectors pointed out hot spots of the destructive fires speeding through Malibu, California. Night vision, early warning systems, navigation, flight control systems, weather monitoring, security and surveillance are among the duties for which the camera is suited. Medical applications are also expected.

  11. An array of virtual Frisch-grid CdZnTe detectors and a front-end application-specific integrated circuit for large-area position-sensitive gamma-ray cameras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolotnikov, A E; Ackley, K; Camarda, G S; Cherches, C; Cui, Y; De Geronimo, G; Fried, J; Hodges, D; Hossain, A; Lee, W; Mahler, G; Maritato, M; Petryk, M; Roy, U; Salwen, C; Vernon, E; Yang, G; James, R B

    2015-07-01

    We developed a robust and low-cost array of virtual Frisch-grid CdZnTe detectors coupled to a front-end readout application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) for spectroscopy and imaging of gamma rays. The array operates as a self-reliant detector module. It is comprised of 36 close-packed 6 × 6 × 15 mm(3) detectors grouped into 3 × 3 sub-arrays of 2 × 2 detectors with the common cathodes. The front-end analog ASIC accommodates up to 36 anode and 9 cathode inputs. Several detector modules can be integrated into a single- or multi-layer unit operating as a Compton or a coded-aperture camera. We present the results from testing two fully assembled modules and readout electronics. The further enhancement of the arrays' performance and reduction of their cost are possible by using position-sensitive virtual Frisch-grid detectors, which allow for accurate corrections of the response of material non-uniformities caused by crystal defects.

  12. An array of virtual Frisch-grid CdZnTe detectors and a front-end application-specific integrated circuit for large-area position-sensitive gamma-ray cameras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolotnikov, A. E., E-mail: bolotnik@bnl.gov; Ackley, K.; Camarda, G. S.; Cherches, C.; Cui, Y.; De Geronimo, G.; Fried, J.; Hossain, A.; Mahler, G.; Maritato, M.; Roy, U.; Salwen, C.; Vernon, E.; Yang, G.; James, R. B. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11793 (United States); Hodges, D. [University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, Texas 79968 (United States); Lee, W. [Korea University, Seoul 136-855 (Korea, Republic of); Petryk, M. [SUNY Binghamton, Vestal, New York 13902 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    We developed a robust and low-cost array of virtual Frisch-grid CdZnTe detectors coupled to a front-end readout application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) for spectroscopy and imaging of gamma rays. The array operates as a self-reliant detector module. It is comprised of 36 close-packed 6 × 6 × 15 mm{sup 3} detectors grouped into 3 × 3 sub-arrays of 2 × 2 detectors with the common cathodes. The front-end analog ASIC accommodates up to 36 anode and 9 cathode inputs. Several detector modules can be integrated into a single- or multi-layer unit operating as a Compton or a coded-aperture camera. We present the results from testing two fully assembled modules and readout electronics. The further enhancement of the arrays’ performance and reduction of their cost are possible by using position-sensitive virtual Frisch-grid detectors, which allow for accurate corrections of the response of material non-uniformities caused by crystal defects.

  13. CCD Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Roger R.

    1983-01-01

    A CCD camera capable of observing a moving object which has varying intensities of radiation eminating therefrom and which may move at varying speeds is shown wherein there is substantially no overlapping of successive images and wherein the exposure times and scan times may be varied independently of each other.

  14. [F18]-FDG imaging of experimental animal tumours using a hybrid gamma-camera; Imagerie au [18F]-FDG des tumeurs experimentales du petit animal de laboratoire a l'aide d'une gamma-camera hybride optimisee pour la scintigraphie chez l'homme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lausson, S. [Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale (INSERM U349) - Hopital Lariboisiere, 75 - Paris (France); Maurel, G.; Kerrou, K.; Montravers, F.; Petegnief, Y.; Talbot, J.N. [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Dept. de Biophysique, Faculte de Medecine St Antoine, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Hopital Tenon, AP-HP, 75 - Paris (France); Fredelizi, D. [Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale (INSERM U477) - Hopital Cochin, 75 - Paris (France)

    2001-07-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has been widely used in clinical studies. This technology permits detection of compounds labelled with positron emitting radionuclides and in particular, [F18]-fluorodeoxyglucose ([F18]-FDG).[F18]-FDG uptake and accumulation is generally related to malignancy; some recent works have suggested the usefulness of PET camera dedicated to small laboratory animals (micro-PET). Our study dealt with the feasibility of [F18]-FDG imaging of malignant tumours in animal models by means of an hybrid camera dedicated for human scintigraphy. We evaluated the ability of coincidence detection emission tomography (CDET) using this hybrid camera to visualize in vivo subcutaneous tumours grafted to mice or rats. P815 murine mastocytoma grafted in syngeneic DBA/2 mice resulted with foci of very high FDG uptake. Tumours with a diameter of only 3 mm were clearly visualized. Medullary thyroid cancer provoked by rMTC 6/23 and CA77 lines in syngeneic Wag/Rij rat was also detected. The differentiated CA77 tumours exhibited avidity for [F18]-FDG and a tumour, which was just palpable (diameter lower than 2 mm), was identified. In conclusion, CDET-FDG is a non-invasive imaging tool which can be used to follow grafted tumours in the small laboratory animal, even when their size is smaller than 1 cm. It has the potential to evaluate experimental anticancer treatments in small series of animals by individual follow-up. It offers the opportunity to develop experimental PET research within a nuclear medicine or biophysics department, the shift to a dedicated micro-PET device being subsequently necessary. It is indeed compulsory to strictly follow the rules for non contamination and disinfection of the hybrid camera. (authors)

  15. A compact gamma camera for biological imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, E L; Cella, J; Majewski, S; Popov, V; Qian, Jianguo; Saha, M S; Smith, M F; Weisenberger, A G; Welsh, R E

    2006-02-01

    A compact detector, sized particularly for imaging a mouse, is described. The active area of the detector is approximately 46 mm; spl times/ 96 mm. Two flat-panel Hamamatsu H8500 position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PSPMTs) are coupled to a pixellated NaI(Tl) scintillator which views the animal through a copper-beryllium (CuBe) parallel-hole collimator specially designed for {sup 125}I. Although the PSPMTs have insensitive areas at their edges and there is a physical gap, corrections for scintillation light collection at the junction between the two tubes results in a uniform response across the entire rectangular area of the detector. The system described has been developed to optimize both sensitivity and resolution for in-vivo imaging of small animals injected with iodinated compounds. We demonstrate an in-vivo application of this detector, particularly to SPECT, by imaging mice injected with approximately 10-15; spl mu/Ci of {sup 125}I.

  16. Calibration of the cameras of the H.E.S.S. {gamma}-ray astronomy experiment and observations of the Galactic Centre above 100 GeV; Etalonnage des cameras de l'experience d'astronomie {gamma} H.E.S.S. et observations du centre galactique au-dela de 100 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rolland, L

    2005-05-15

    The H.E.S.S. experiment (High Energy Stereoscopic System) consists of four imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes to study the southern astrophysical sources above 100 GeV. This thesis presents the detector as well as the analysis chain. The calibration methods are described in details and the systematic errors on the image amplitude are derived. Then, an analysis based on a semi-analytical model of the electromagnetic shower development in the atmosphere is presented. Tools to reconstruct the energy spectrum and the morphology of the very high energy {gamma}-ray sources are presented and applied to the Crab Nebula. Systematic errors associated to the spectrum analysis are estimated. All these techniques were applied to study the Galactic Centre emission above 100 GeV. The nature of the source detected in 2003 and 2004 observations is still unknown and its spectrum, variability and morphology are studied. Various candidates are proposed, among them the supermassive black hole Sgr A* located at the dynamical centre of the Milky Way, the supernova remnant Sgr A Est or interactions of accelerated particles with the dense medium of this region. In this thesis, the signal was interpreted in terms of dark matter annihilation (neutralinos or Kaluza-Klein bosons) in a dense halo located at the Galactic Centre. This analysis showed that, in the framework of these models, dark matter annihilation alone can not explain the H.E.S.S. signal. The main component would thus come from astrophysical sources. (author)

  17. Myocardial blood flow rate and capillary permeability for 99mTc-DTPA in patients with angiographically normal coronary arteries. Evaluation of the single-injection, residue detection method with intracoronary indicator bolus injection and the use of a mobile gamma camera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup; Kelbaek, H; Efsen, F

    1994-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to quantitate myocardial perfusion and capillary permeability in the human heart by means of the single-injection, residue detection method using a mobile gamma camera. With this method, the intravascular mean transit time and the capillary extraction fraction (E......) can be determined in one experiment and in the same myocardial region. Eighteen patients with a history of chest pain episodes and angiographically normal coronary arteries were studied after intracoronary bolus injections of 99mTc-DTPA during elective coronary angiography. Two measurements were...

  18. Gamma gamma technology group

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This report briefly describes the results presented at this conference on work to develop the technology required to build the proposed gamma gamma option, also known as the photon linear collider (PLC) [1]. Before describing the work presented at this conference I would like to put it in context. At the International ...

  19. Color reproduction software for a digital still camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bong S.; Park, Du-Sik; Nam, Byung D.

    1998-04-01

    We have developed a color reproduction software for a digital still camera. The image taken by the camera was colorimetrically reproduced on the monitor after characterizing the camera and the monitor, and color matching between two devices. The reproduction was performed at three levels; level processing, gamma correction, and color transformation. The image contrast was increased after the level processing adjusting the level of dark and bright portions of the image. The relationship between the level processed digital values and the measured luminance values of test gray samples was calculated, and the gamma of the camera was obtained. The method for getting the unknown monitor gamma was proposed. As a result, the level processed values were adjusted by the look-up table created by the camera and the monitor gamma correction. For a color transformation matrix for the camera, 3 by 3 or 3 by 4 matrix was used, which was calculated by the regression between the gamma corrected values and the measured tristimulus values of each test color samples the various reproduced images were displayed on the dialogue box implemented in our software, which were generated according to four illuminations for the camera and three color temperatures for the monitor. An user can easily choose he best reproduced image comparing each others.

  20. Development of SED Camera for Quasars in Early Universe (SQUEAN)

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Sanghyuk; Jeon, Yiseul; Lee, Hye-In; Park, Woojin; Ji, Tae-Geun; Hyun, Minhee; Choi, Changsu; Im, Myungshin; Pak, Soojong

    2016-01-01

    We describe the characteristics and performance of a camera system, Spectral energy distribution Camera for Quasars in Early Universe (SQUEAN). It was developed to measure SEDs of high redshift quasar candidates (z $\\gtrsim$ 5) and other targets, e.g., young stellar objects, supernovae, and gamma-ray bursts, and to trace the time variability of SEDs of objects such as active galactic nuclei (AGNs). SQUEAN consists of an on-axis focal plane camera module, an auto-guiding system, and mechanical...

  1. Making Ceramic Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squibb, Matt

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how to make a clay camera. This idea of creating functional cameras from clay allows students to experience ceramics, photography, and painting all in one unit. (Contains 1 resource and 3 online resources.)

  2. Adapting Virtual Camera Behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burelli, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    In a three-dimensional virtual environment aspects such as narrative and interaction completely depend on the camera since the camera defines the player’s point of view. Most research works in automatic camera control aim to take the control of this aspect from the player to automatically gen...

  3. Digital Pinhole Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancor, Rachael; Lancor, Brian

    2014-01-01

    In this article we describe how the classic pinhole camera demonstration can be adapted for use with digital cameras. Students can easily explore the effects of the size of the pinhole and its distance from the sensor on exposure time, magnification, and image quality. Instructions for constructing a digital pinhole camera and our method for…

  4. Calibration of a Stereo Radiation Detection Camera Using Planar Homography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Hae Baek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a calibration technique of a stereo gamma detection camera. Calibration of the internal and external parameters of a stereo vision camera is a well-known research problem in the computer vision society. However, few or no stereo calibration has been investigated in the radiation measurement research. Since no visual information can be obtained from a stereo radiation camera, it is impossible to use a general stereo calibration algorithm directly. In this paper, we develop a hybrid-type stereo system which is equipped with both radiation and vision cameras. To calibrate the stereo radiation cameras, stereo images of a calibration pattern captured from the vision cameras are transformed in the view of the radiation cameras. The homography transformation is calibrated based on the geometric relationship between visual and radiation camera coordinates. The accuracy of the stereo parameters of the radiation camera is analyzed by distance measurements to both visual light and gamma sources. The experimental results show that the measurement error is about 3%.

  5. Camera Development for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncada, Roberto Jose

    2017-01-01

    With the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), the very-high-energy gamma-ray universe, between 30 GeV and 300 TeV, will be probed at an unprecedented resolution, allowing deeper studies of known gamma-ray emitters and the possible discovery of new ones. This exciting project could also confirm the particle nature of dark matter by looking for the gamma rays produced by self-annihilating weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). The telescopes will use the imaging atmospheric Cherenkov technique (IACT) to record Cherenkov photons that are produced by the gamma-ray induced extensive air shower. One telescope design features dual-mirror Schwarzschild-Couder (SC) optics that allows the light to be finely focused on the high-resolution silicon photomultipliers of the camera modules starting from a 9.5-meter primary mirror. Each camera module will consist of a focal plane module and front-end electronics, and will have four TeV Array Readout with GSa/s Sampling and Event Trigger (TARGET) chips, giving them 64 parallel input channels. The TARGET chip has a self-trigger functionality for readout that can be used in higher logic across camera modules as well as across individual telescopes, which will each have 177 camera modules. There will be two sites, one in the northern and the other in the southern hemisphere, for full sky coverage, each spanning at least one square kilometer. A prototype SC telescope is currently under construction at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory in Arizona. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation's REU program through NSF award AST-1560016.

  6. Diffractive Photon Production in $\\gamma p$ and $\\gamma \\gamma$ Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Evanson, N G; Forshaw, J R

    1999-01-01

    We study the diffractive production of photons in gamma-p and gamma-gamma collisions. We specifically compute the rates for gamma*-p -> gamma-X and for gamma*-gamma* -> gamma-gamma, where X denotes the proton dissociation. We focus on the rates at large momentum transfers, -t >> Lambda^2, where we are most confident in the use of QCD perturbation theory. However, our calculations do allow us to study the -t -> 0 behaviour of the gamma*-gamma*-> gamma-gamma process in the region where the inco...

  7. The VISTA infrared camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, G. B.; Caldwell, M.; Ward, A. K.; Whalley, M. S.; Woodhouse, G.; Edeson, R. L.; Clark, P.; Beard, S. M.; Gallie, A. M.; Todd, S. P.; Strachan, J. M. D.; Bezawada, N. N.; Sutherland, W. J.; Emerson, J. P.

    2006-06-01

    We describe the integration and test phase of the construction of the VISTA Infrared Camera, a 64 Megapixel, 1.65 degree field of view 0.9-2.4 micron camera which will soon be operating at the cassegrain focus of the 4m VISTA telescope. The camera incorporates sixteen IR detectors and six CCD detectors which are used to provide autoguiding and wavefront sensing information to the VISTA telescope control system.

  8. Streak camera meeting summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolan, Daniel H. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bliss, David E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Streak cameras are important for high-speed data acquisition in single event experiments, where the total recorded information (I) is shared between the number of measurements (M) and the number of samples (S). Topics of this meeting included: streak camera use at the national laboratories; current streak camera production; new tube developments and alternative technologies; and future planning. Each topic is summarized in the following sections.

  9. Solid state video cameras

    CERN Document Server

    Cristol, Y

    2013-01-01

    Solid State Video Cameras reviews the state of the art in the field of solid-state television cameras as compiled from patent literature. Organized into 10 chapters, the book begins with the basic array types of solid-state imagers and appropriate read-out circuits and methods. Documents relating to improvement of picture quality, such as spurious signal suppression, uniformity correction, or resolution enhancement, are also cited. The last part considerssolid-state color cameras.

  10. Airborne Network Camera Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Optical Systems Group Document 466-15 AIRBORNE NETWORK CAMERA STANDARD DISTRIBUTION A: APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE...Airborne Network Camera Standard 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER...without the focus of standardization for interoperable command and control, storage, and data streaming has been the airborne network camera systems used

  11. Thermal Cameras and Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gade, Rikke; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2014-01-01

    Thermal cameras are passive sensors that capture the infrared radiation emitted by all objects with a temperature above absolute zero. This type of camera was originally developed as a surveillance and night vision tool for the military, but recently the price has dropped, significantly opening up...

  12. Camera for QUasars in EArly uNiverse (CQUEAN)

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Won-Kee; Pak, Soojong; Im, Myungshin; Choi, Changsu; Jeon, Yiseul; Chang, Seunghyuk; Jeong, Hyeonju; Lim, Juhee; Kim, Eunbin

    2012-01-01

    We describe the overall characteristics and the performance of an optical CCD camera system, Camera for QUasars in EArly uNiverse (CQUEAN), which is being used at the 2.1 m Otto Struve Telescope of the McDonald Observatory since 2010 August. CQUEAN was developed for follow-up imaging observations of red sources such as high redshift quasar candidates (z >= 5), Gamma Ray Bursts, brown dwarfs, and young stellar objects. For efficient observations of the red objects, CQUEAN has a science camera ...

  13. Kitt Peak speckle camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breckinridge, J B; McAlister, H A; Robinson, W G

    1979-04-01

    The speckle camera in regular use at Kitt Peak National Observatory since 1974 is described in detail. The design of the atmospheric dispersion compensation prisms, the use of film as a recording medium, the accuracy of double star measurements, and the next generation speckle camera are discussed. Photographs of double star speckle patterns with separations from 1.4 sec of arc to 4.7 sec of arc are shown to illustrate the quality of image formation with this camera, the effects of seeing on the patterns, and to illustrate the isoplanatic patch of the atmosphere.

  14. Mars Observer Camera

    OpenAIRE

    Malin, M. C.; Danielson, G. E.; Ingersoll, A. P.; Masursky, H.; J. Veverka(Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, U.S.A.); Ravine, M. A.; Soulanille, T.A.

    1992-01-01

    The Mars Observer camera (MOC) is a three-component system (one narrow-angle and two wide-angle cameras) designed to take high spatial resolution pictures of the surface of Mars and to obtain lower spatial resolution, synoptic coverage of the planet's surface and atmosphere. The cameras are based on the “push broom” technique; that is, they do not take “frames” but rather build pictures, one line at a time, as the spacecraft moves around the planet in its orbit. MOC is primarily a telescope f...

  15. Camera as Cultural Critique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suhr, Christian

    2015-01-01

    What does the use of cameras entail for the production of cultural critique in anthropology? Visual anthropological analysis and cultural critique starts at the very moment a camera is brought into the field or existing visual images are engaged. The framing, distances, and interactions between...... researchers, cameras, and filmed subjects already inherently comprise analytical decisions. It is these ethnographic qualities inherent in audiovisual and photographic imagery that make it of particular value to a participatory anthropological enterprise that seeks to resist analytic closure and seeks instead...

  16. Advanced CCD camera developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Condor, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    Two charge coupled device (CCD) camera systems are introduced and discussed, describing briefly the hardware involved, and the data obtained in their various applications. The Advanced Development Group Defense Sciences Engineering Division has been actively designing, manufacturing, fielding state-of-the-art CCD camera systems for over a decade. These systems were originally developed for the nuclear test program to record data from underground nuclear tests. Today, new and interesting application for these systems have surfaced and development is continuing in the area of advanced CCD camera systems, with the new CCD camera that will allow experimenters to replace film for x-ray imaging at the JANUS, USP, and NOVA laser facilities.

  17. TARGETLESS CAMERA CALIBRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Barazzetti

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In photogrammetry a camera is considered calibrated if its interior orientation parameters are known. These encompass the principal distance, the principal point position and some Additional Parameters used to model possible systematic errors. The current state of the art for automated camera calibration relies on the use of coded targets to accurately determine the image correspondences. This paper presents a new methodology for the efficient and rigorous photogrammetric calibration of digital cameras which does not require any longer the use of targets. A set of images depicting a scene with a good texture are sufficient for the extraction of natural corresponding image points. These are automatically matched with feature-based approaches and robust estimation techniques. The successive photogrammetric bundle adjustment retrieves the unknown camera parameters and their theoretical accuracies. Examples, considerations and comparisons with real data and different case studies are illustrated to show the potentialities of the proposed methodology.

  18. Camera for Quasars in Early Universe (CQUEAN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Won-Kee; Pak, Soojong; Im, Myungshin; Choi, Changsu; Jeon, Yiseul; Chang, Seunghyuk; Jeong, Hyeonju; Lim, Juhee; Kim, Eunbin

    2012-08-01

    We describe the overall characteristics and the performance of an optical CCD camera system, Camera for Quasars in Early Universe (CQUEAN), which has been used at the 2.1 m Otto Struve Telescope of the McDonald Observatory since 2010 August. CQUEAN was developed for follow-up imaging observations of red sources such as high-redshift quasar candidates (z ≳ 5), gamma-ray bursts, brown dwarfs, and young stellar objects. For efficient observations of the red objects, CQUEAN has a science camera with a deep-depletion CCD chip, which boasts a higher quantum efficiency at 0.7-1.1 μm than conventional CCD chips. The camera was developed in a short timescale () and has been working reliably. By employing an autoguiding system and a focal reducer to enhance the field of view on the classical Cassegrain focus, we achieve a stable guiding in 20 minute exposures, an imaging quality with FWHM≥0.6‧‧ over the whole field (4.8‧ × 4.8‧), and a limiting magnitude of z = 23.4 AB mag at 5-σ with 1 hr total integration time. This article includes data taken at the McDonald Observatory of The University of Texas at Austin.

  19. The VISTA IR camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Gavin B.; Caldwell, Martin; Ward, Kim; Whalley, Martin S.; Burke, Kevin; Lucas, John M.; Richards, Tony; Ferlet, Marc; Edeson, Ruben L.; Tye, Daniel; Shaughnessy, Bryan M.; Strachan, Mel; Atad-Ettedgui, Eli; Leclerc, Melanie R.; Gallie, Angus; Bezawada, Nagaraja N.; Clark, Paul; Bissonauth, Nirmal; Luke, Peter; Dipper, Nigel A.; Berry, Paul; Sutherland, Will; Emerson, Jim

    2004-09-01

    The VISTA IR Camera has now completed its detailed design phase and is on schedule for delivery to ESO"s Cerro Paranal Observatory in 2006. The camera consists of 16 Raytheon VIRGO 2048x2048 HgCdTe arrays in a sparse focal plane sampling a 1.65 degree field of view. A 1.4m diameter filter wheel provides slots for 7 distinct science filters, each comprising 16 individual filter panes. The camera also provides autoguiding and curvature sensing information for the VISTA telescope, and relies on tight tolerancing to meet the demanding requirements of the f/1 telescope design. The VISTA IR camera is unusual in that it contains no cold pupil-stop, but rather relies on a series of nested cold baffles to constrain the light reaching the focal plane to the science beam. In this paper we present a complete overview of the status of the final IR Camera design, its interaction with the VISTA telescope, and a summary of the predicted performance of the system.

  20. Commercialization of radiation tolerant camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yong Bum; Choi, Young Soo; Kim, Sun Ku; Lee, Jong Min; Cha, Bung Hun; Lee, Nam Ho; Byun, Eiy Gyo; Yoo, Seun Wook; Choi, Bum Ki; Yoon, Sung Up; Kim, Hyun Gun; Sin, Jeong Hun; So, Suk Il

    1999-12-01

    In this project, radiation tolerant camera which tolerates 10{sup 6} - 10{sup 8} rad total dose is developed. In order to develop radiation tolerant camera, radiation effect of camera components was examined and evaluated, and camera configuration was studied. By the result of evaluation, the components were decided and design was performed. Vidicon tube was selected to use by image sensor and non-browning optics and camera driving circuit were applied. The controller needed for CCTV camera system, lens, light, pan/tilt controller, was designed by the concept of remote control. And two type of radiation tolerant camera were fabricated consider to use in underwater environment or normal environment. (author)

  1. Gamma Knife

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tested on a regular basis to ensure the safety of patients and medical staff. top of page This page ... Brain Tumor Treatment Introduction to Cancer Therapy (Radiation Oncology) Cerebral ... to Gamma Knife Sponsored by Please ...

  2. Gamma Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    coupling two Gamma processes so that the marginal processes will have negative serial correlations. It is actually easier to implement this scheme...to analyze a long sequence of wind speeds. This sequence is very non-stationary, containing yearly cycles. The model actually used is v(n)G n , where P...1967). "Some Problems of Statistical Inference Relating to Double-Gamma Distribution," Trabajos de Estadistica , 18, 67-87. Hugus, D. K. (1982

  3. HIGH SPEED CAMERA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, B.T. Jr.; Davis, W.C.

    1957-12-17

    This patent relates to high speed cameras having resolution times of less than one-tenth microseconds suitable for filming distinct sequences of a very fast event such as an explosion. This camera consists of a rotating mirror with reflecting surfaces on both sides, a narrow mirror acting as a slit in a focal plane shutter, various other mirror and lens systems as well as an innage recording surface. The combination of the rotating mirrors and the slit mirror causes discrete, narrow, separate pictures to fall upon the film plane, thereby forming a moving image increment of the photographed event. Placing a reflecting surface on each side of the rotating mirror cancels the image velocity that one side of the rotating mirror would impart, so as a camera having this short a resolution time is thereby possible.

  4. Implications of a nonvanishing $Z \\gamma \\gamma$ vertex on the $H\\to \\gamma \\gamma \\gamma$ decay

    OpenAIRE

    Cordero-Cid, A.; López-Osorio, M. A.; Martínez-Pascual, E.; Toscano, J. J.

    2014-01-01

    The $Z\\to \\gamma \\gamma$ and $H\\to \\gamma \\gamma \\gamma$ decays are strictly forbidden in the Standard Model, but they can be induced by theories that violate Lorentz symmetry or the CPT theorem. By assuming that a nonvanishing $Z\\gamma \\gamma$ vertex is induced in some context of new physics, and by analyzing the reaction $H\\to \\gamma Z^*\\to \\gamma \\gamma \\gamma$ in the $Z$ resonance, we obtain an estimation for the branching ratio of the $H\\to \\gamma \\gamma \\gamma$ decay. Specifically, it i...

  5. Wide angle pinhole camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    Hemispherical refracting element gives pinhole camera 180 degree field-of-view without compromising its simplicity and depth-of-field. Refracting element, located just behind pinhole, bends light coming in from sides so that it falls within image area of film. In contrast to earlier pinhole cameras that used water or other transparent fluids to widen field, this model is not subject to leakage and is easily loaded and unloaded with film. Moreover, by selecting glass with different indices of refraction, field at film plane can be widened or reduced.

  6. Working safely in gamma radiography. A training manual for industrial radiographers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGuire, S.A.; Peabody, C.A.

    1982-09-01

    This manual is designed for classroom training in working safely in industrial radiography using gamma sources. The purpose is to train radiographers' assistants to work safely as a qualified gamma radiographer. The contents cover the essentials of radiation, radiation protection, emergency procedures, gamma cameras, and biological effects of radiation. (ACR)

  7. Automatic Camera Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burelli, Paolo; Preuss, Mike

    2014-01-01

    camera. We approach this problem by modelling it as a dynamic multi-objective optimisation problem and show how this metaphor allows a much richer expressiveness than a classical single objective approach. Finally, we showcase the application of a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm to generate a shot...

  8. Make a Pinhole Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Diane K.; Novati, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    On Earth, using ordinary visible light, one can create a single image of light recorded over time. Of course a movie or video is light recorded over time, but it is a series of instantaneous snapshots, rather than light and time both recorded on the same medium. A pinhole camera, which is simple to make out of ordinary materials and using ordinary…

  9. The canopy camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harry E. Brown

    1962-01-01

    The canopy camera is a device of new design that takes wide-angle, overhead photographs of vegetation canopies, cloud cover, topographic horizons, and similar subjects. Since the entire hemisphere is photographed in a single exposure, the resulting photograph is circular, with the horizon forming the perimeter and the zenith the center. Photographs of this type provide...

  10. Image responses to x-ray radiation in ICCD camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jiming; Duan, Baojun; Song, Yan; Song, Guzhou; Han, Changcai; Zhou, Ming; Du, Jiye; Wang, Qunshu; Zhang, Jianqi

    2013-08-01

    When used in digital radiography, ICCD camera will be inevitably irradiated by x-ray and the output image will degrade. In this research, we separated ICCD camera into two optical-electric parts, CCD camera and MCP image intensifier, and irradiated them respectively on Co-60 gamma ray source and pulsed x-ray source. By changing time association between radiation and the shutter of CCD camera, the state of power supply of MCP image intensifier, significant differences have been observed in output images. A further analysis has revealed the influence of the CCD chip, readout circuit in CCD camera, and the photocathode, microchannel plate and fluorescent screen in MCP image intensifier on image quality of an irradiated ICCD camera. The study demonstrated that compared with other parts, irradiation response of readout circuit is very slight and in most cases negligible. The interaction of x-ray with CCD chip usually behaves as bright spots or rough background in output images, which depends on x-ray doses. As to the MCP image intensifier, photocathode and microchannel plate are the two main steps that degrade output images. When being irradiated by x-ray, microchannel plate in MCP image intensifier tends to contribute a bright background in output images. Background caused by the photocathode looks more bright and fluctuant. Image responses of fluorescent screen in MCP image intensifier in ICCD camera and that of a coupling fiber bundle are also evaluated in this presentation.

  11. Breast-Specific γ-Imaging for the Detection of Mammographically Occult Breast Cancer in Women at Increased Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brem, Rachel F; Ruda, Rachel C; Yang, Jialu L; Coffey, Caitrín M; Rapelyea, Jocelyn A

    2016-05-01

    Breast-specific γ-imaging (BSGI) is a physiologic imaging modality that can detect subcentimeter and mammographically occult breast cancer, with a sensitivity and specificity comparable to MRI. The purpose of this study was to determine the incremental increase in breast cancer detection when BSGI is used as an adjunct to mammography in women at increased risk for breast cancer. All patients undergoing BSGI from April 2010 through January 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. Eligible patients were identified as women at increased risk for breast cancer and whose most recent mammogram was benign. Examinations exhibiting focally increased radiotracer uptake were considered positive. Incremental increase in cancer detection was calculated as the percentage of mammographically occult BSGI-detected breast cancer and the number of mammographically occult breast cancers detected per 1,000 women screened. Included in this study were 849 patients in whom 14 BSGI examinations detected mammographically occult breast cancer. Patients ranged in age from 26 to 83 y, with a mean age of 57 y. Eleven of 14 cancers were detected in women with dense breasts. The addition of BSGI to the annual breast screen of asymptomatic women at increased risk for breast cancer yields 16.5 cancers per 1,000 women screened. When high-risk lesions and cancers were combined, BSGI detected 33.0 high-risk lesions and cancers per 1,000 women screened. BSGI is a reliable adjunct modality to screening mammography that increases breast cancer detection by 1.7% (14/849) in women at increased risk for breast cancer, comparable to results reported for breast MRI. BSGI is beneficial in breast cancer detection in women at increased risk, particularly in those with dense breasts. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  12. MISR radiometric camera-by-camera Cloud Mask V004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This file contains the Radiometric camera-by-camera Cloud Mask dataset. It is used to determine whether a scene is classified as clear or cloudy. A new parameter has...

  13. Goniometer to calibrate system cameras or amateur cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakkarainen, J.

    An accurate and rapid horizontal goniometer was developed to determine the optical properties of film cameras. Radial and decentering distortion, color defects, optical resolution, and small object transmission factors are measured according to light wavelengths and symmetry. The goniometer can be used to calibrate cameras for photogrammetry, to determine the effects of remoteness on image geometry, distortion symmetry, efficiency of lens lighting film systems, to develop quality criteria for lenses, and to test camera lens and camera defects after an incident.

  14. Color camera pyrometry for high explosive detonations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Densmore, John; Biss, Matthew; Homan, Barrie; McNesby, Kevin

    2011-06-01

    Temperature measurements of high-explosive and combustion processes are difficult because of the speed and environment of the events. We have characterized and calibrated a digital high-speed color camera that may be used as an optical pyrometer to overcome these challenges. The camera provides both high temporal and spatial resolution. The color filter array of the sensor uses three color filters to measure the spectral distribution of the imaged light. A two-color ratio method is used to calculate a temperature using the color filter array raw image data and a gray-body assumption. If the raw image data is not available, temperatures may be calculated from processed images or movies depending on proper analysis of the digital color imaging pipeline. We analyze three transformations within the pipeline (demosaicing, white balance, and gamma-correction) to determine their effect on the calculated temperature. Using this technique with a Vision Research Phantom color camera, we have measured the temperature of exploded C-4 charges. The surface temperature of the resulting fireball rapidly increases after detonation and then decayed to a constant value of approximately 1980 K. Processed images indicates that the temperature remains constant until the light intensity decreased below the background value.

  15. Dual cameras acquisition and display system of retina-like sensor camera and rectangular sensor camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Nan; Cao, Fengmei; Lin, Yabin; Bai, Tingzhu; Song, Shengyu

    2015-04-01

    For a new kind of retina-like senor camera and a traditional rectangular sensor camera, dual cameras acquisition and display system need to be built. We introduce the principle and the development of retina-like senor. Image coordinates transformation and interpolation based on sub-pixel interpolation need to be realized for our retina-like sensor's special pixels distribution. The hardware platform is composed of retina-like senor camera, rectangular sensor camera, image grabber and PC. Combined the MIL and OpenCV library, the software program is composed in VC++ on VS 2010. Experience results show that the system can realizes two cameras' acquisition and display.

  16. Body worn camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aishwariya, A.; Pallavi Sudhir, Gulavani; Garg, Nemesa; Karthikeyan, B.

    2017-11-01

    A body worn camera is small video camera worn on the body, typically used by police officers to record arrests, evidence from crime scenes. It helps preventing and resolving complaints brought by members of the public; and strengthening police transparency, performance, and accountability. The main constants of this type of the system are video format, resolution, frames rate, and audio quality. This system records the video in .mp4 format with 1080p resolution and 30 frames per second. One more important aspect to while designing this system is amount of power the system requires as battery management becomes very critical. The main design challenges are Size of the Video, Audio for the video. Combining both audio and video and saving it in .mp4 format, Battery, size that is required for 8 hours of continuous recording, Security. For prototyping this system is implemented using Raspberry Pi model B.

  17. The NEAT Camera Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jr., Ray L. Newburn

    1995-01-01

    The NEAT (Near Earth Asteroid Tracking) camera system consists of a camera head with a 6.3 cm square 4096 x 4096 pixel CCD, fast electronics, and a Sun Sparc 20 data and control computer with dual CPUs, 256 Mbytes of memory, and 36 Gbytes of hard disk. The system was designed for optimum use with an Air Force GEODSS (Ground-based Electro-Optical Deep Space Surveillance) telescope. The GEODSS telescopes have 1 m f/2.15 objectives of the Ritchey-Chretian type, designed originally for satellite tracking. Installation of NEAT began July 25 at the Air Force Facility on Haleakala, a 3000 m peak on Maui in Hawaii.

  18. Streak camera techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avara, R.

    1977-06-01

    An introduction to streak camera geometry, experimental techniques, and limitations are presented. Equations, graphs and charts are included to provide useful data for optimizing the associated optics to suit each experiment. A simulated analysis is performed on simultaneity and velocity measurements. An error analysis is also performed for these measurements utilizing the Monte Carlo method to simulate the distribution of uncertainties associated with simultaneity-time measurements.

  19. Visual odometry from omnidirectional camera

    OpenAIRE

    Jiří DIVIŠ

    2012-01-01

    We present a system that estimates the motion of a robot relying solely on images from onboard omnidirectional camera (visual odometry). Compared to other visual odometry hardware, ours is unusual in utilizing high resolution, low frame-rate (1 to 3 Hz) omnidirectional camera mounted on a robot that is propelled using continuous tracks. We focus on high precision estimates in scenes, where objects are far away from the camera. This is achieved by utilizing omnidirectional camera that is able ...

  20. Gamma watermarking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Muriel Y.; Wood, Lowell L.; Lougheed, Ronald W.; Moody, Kenton J.; Wang, Tzu-Fang

    2004-05-25

    A covert, gamma-ray "signature" is used as a "watermark" for property identification. This new watermarking technology is based on a unique steganographic or "hidden writing" digital signature, implemented in tiny quantities of gamma-ray-emitting radioisotopic material combinations, generally covertly emplaced on or within an object. This digital signature may be readily recovered at distant future times, by placing a sensitive, high energy-resolution gamma-ray detecting instrument reasonably precisely over the location of the watermark, which location may be known only to the object's owner; however, the signature is concealed from all ordinary detection means because its exceedingly low level of activity is obscured by the natural radiation background (including the gamma radiation naturally emanating from the object itself, from cosmic radiation and material surroundings, from human bodies, etc.). The "watermark" is used in object-tagging for establishing object identity, history or ownership. It thus may serve as an aid to law enforcement officials in identifying stolen property and prosecuting theft thereof. Highly effective, potentially very low cost identification-on demand of items of most all types is thus made possible.

  1. Hemispherical Laue camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, James C. M.; Chu, Sungnee G.

    1980-01-01

    A hemispherical Laue camera comprises a crystal sample mount for positioning a sample to be analyzed at the center of sphere of a hemispherical, X-radiation sensitive film cassette, a collimator, a stationary or rotating sample mount and a set of standard spherical projection spheres. X-radiation generated from an external source is directed through the collimator to impinge onto the single crystal sample on the stationary mount. The diffracted beam is recorded on the hemispherical X-radiation sensitive film mounted inside the hemispherical film cassette in either transmission or back-reflection geometry. The distances travelled by X-radiation diffracted from the crystal to the hemispherical film are the same for all crystal planes which satisfy Bragg's Law. The recorded diffraction spots or Laue spots on the film thereby preserve both the symmetry information of the crystal structure and the relative intensities which are directly related to the relative structure factors of the crystal orientations. The diffraction pattern on the exposed film is compared with the known diffraction pattern on one of the standard spherical projection spheres for a specific crystal structure to determine the orientation of the crystal sample. By replacing the stationary sample support with a rotating sample mount, the hemispherical Laue camera can be used for crystal structure determination in a manner previously provided in conventional Debye-Scherrer cameras.

  2. Optimisation of a dual head semiconductor Compton camera using Geant4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harkness, L.J. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Oliver Lodge Laboratory, Liverpool L697ZE (United Kingdom)], E-mail: ljh@ns.ph.liv.ac.uk; Boston, A.J.; Boston, H.C.; Cooper, R.J.; Cresswell, J.R.; Grint, A.N.; Nolan, P.J.; Oxley, D.C.; Scraggs, D.P. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Oliver Lodge Laboratory, Liverpool L697ZE (United Kingdom); Beveridge, T.; Gillam, J. [School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Monash University, Melbourne (Australia); Lazarus, I. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington, Cheshire (United Kingdom)

    2009-06-01

    Conventional medical gamma-ray camera systems utilise mechanical collimation to provide information on the position of an incident gamma-ray photon. Systems that use electronic collimation utilising Compton image reconstruction techniques have the potential to offer huge improvements in sensitivity. Position sensitive high purity germanium (HPGe) detector systems are being evaluated as part of a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) Compton camera system. Data have been acquired from the orthogonally segmented planar SmartPET detectors, operated in Compton camera mode. The minimum gamma-ray energy which can be imaged by the current system in Compton camera configuration is 244 keV due to the 20 mm thickness of the first scatter detector which causes large gamma-ray absorption. A simulation package for the optimisation of a new semiconductor Compton camera has been developed using the Geant4 toolkit. This paper will show results of preliminary analysis of the validated Geant4 simulation for gamma-ray energies of SPECT, 141 keV.

  3. Evaluation of exposure to ionizing radiation among gamma camera operators

    OpenAIRE

    Agnieszka Anna Domańska; Małgorzata Bieńkiewicz; Jerzy Olszewski

    2013-01-01

    Background: Protection of nuclear medicine unit employees from hazards of the ionizing radiation is a crucial issue of radiation protection services. We aimed to assess the severity of the occupational radiation exposure of technicians performing scintigraphic examinations at the Nuclear Medicine Department, Central Teaching Hospital of Medical University in Łódź, where thousands of different diagnostic procedures are performed yearly. Materials and Methods: In 2013 the studied diagnostic uni...

  4. Evaluation of exposure to ionizing radiation among gamma camera operators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Anna Domańska

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Protection of nuclear medicine unit employees from hazards of the ionizing radiation is a crucial issue of radiation protection services. We aimed to assess the severity of the occupational radiation exposure of technicians performing scintigraphic examinations at the Nuclear Medicine Department, Central Teaching Hospital of Medical University in Łódź, where thousands of different diagnostic procedures are performed yearly. Materials and Methods: In 2013 the studied diagnostic unit has employed 10 technicians, whose exposure is permanently monitored by individual dosimetry. We analyzed retrospective data of quarterly doses in terms of Hp(10 dose equivalents over the years 2001-2010. Also annual and five-year doses were determined to relate the results to current regulations. Moreover, for a selected period of one year, we collected data on the total activity of radiopharmaceuticals used for diagnostics, to analyze potential relationship with doses recorded in technicians performing the examinations. Results: In a 10-year period under study, the highest annual dose recorded in a technician was 2 mSv, which represented 10% of the annual dose limit of 20 mSv. The highest total dose for a 5-year period was 7.1 mSv, less than 10% of a 5-year dose limit for occupational exposure. Positive linear correlation was observed between total activity of radiopharmaceuticals used for diagnostics in the period of three months and respective quarterly doses received by technicians performing examinations. Conclusions: Doses received by nuclear medicine technicians performing diagnostic procedures in compliance with principles of radiation protection are low, which is confirmed by recognizing the technicians of this unit as B category employees. Med Pr 2013;64(4:503–506

  5. [Evaluation of exposure to ionizing radiation among gamma camera operators].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domańska, Agnieszka Anna; Bieńkiewicz, Malgorzata; Olszewski, Jerzy

    2013-01-01

    Protection of nuclear medicine unit employees from hazards of the ionizing radiation is a crucial issue of radiation protection services. We aimed to assess the severity of the occupational radiation exposure of technicians performing scintigraphic examinations at the Nuclear Medicine Department, Central Teaching Hospital of Medical University in Lódz, where thousands of different diagnostic procedures are performed yearly. In 2013 the studied diagnostic unit has employed 10 technicians, whose exposure is permanently monitored by individual dosimetry. We analyzed retrospective data of quarterly doses in terms of Hp(10) dose equivalents over the years 2001-2010. Also annual and five-year doses were determined to relate the results to current regulations. Moreover, for a selected period of one year, we collected data on the total activity of radiopharmaceuticals used for diagnostics, to analyze potential relationship with doses recorded in technicians performing the examinations. In a 10-year period under study, the highest annual dose recorded in a technician was 2 mSv, which represented 10% of the annual dose limit of 20 mSv. The highest total dose for a 5-year period was 7.1 mSv, less than 10% of a 5-year dose limit for occupational exposure. Positive linear correlation was observed between total activity of radiopharmaceuticals used for diagnostics in the period of three months and respective quarterly doses received by technicians performing examinations. Doses received by nuclear medicine technicians performing diagnostic procedures in compliance with principles of radiation protection are low, which is confirmed by recognizing the technicians of this unit as B category employees.

  6. High-resolution EM-CCD scintillation gamma cameras

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korevaar, M.A.N.

    2013-01-01

    The development of medical imaging techniques has dramatically changed clinical practice and biomedical science in the 20th century. Nuclear Medicine imaging techniques reveal the function of organs and tissues in vivo with the aid of radioactively labeled tracer molecules. These techniques, such as

  7. Upgraded cameras for the HESS imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giavitto, Gianluca; Ashton, Terry; Balzer, Arnim; Berge, David; Brun, Francois; Chaminade, Thomas; Delagnes, Eric; Fontaine, Gérard; Füßling, Matthias; Giebels, Berrie; Glicenstein, Jean-François; Gräber, Tobias; Hinton, James; Jahnke, Albert; Klepser, Stefan; Kossatz, Marko; Kretzschmann, Axel; Lefranc, Valentin; Leich, Holger; Lüdecke, Hartmut; Lypova, Iryna; Manigot, Pascal; Marandon, Vincent; Moulin, Emmanuel; de Naurois, Mathieu; Nayman, Patrick; Penno, Marek; Ross, Duncan; Salek, David; Schade, Markus; Schwab, Thomas; Simoni, Rachel; Stegmann, Christian; Steppa, Constantin; Thornhill, Julian; Toussnel, François

    2016-08-01

    The High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) is an array of five imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes, sensitive to cosmic gamma rays of energies between 30 GeV and several tens of TeV. Four of them started operations in 2003 and their photomultiplier tube (PMT) cameras are currently undergoing a major upgrade, with the goals of improving the overall performance of the array and reducing the failure rate of the ageing systems. With the exception of the 960 PMTs, all components inside the camera have been replaced: these include the readout and trigger electronics, the power, ventilation and pneumatic systems and the control and data acquisition software. New designs and technical solutions have been introduced: the readout makes use of the NECTAr analog memory chip, which samples and stores the PMT signals and was developed for the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). The control of all hardware subsystems is carried out by an FPGA coupled to an embedded ARM computer, a modular design which has proven to be very fast and reliable. The new camera software is based on modern C++ libraries such as Apache Thrift, ØMQ and Protocol buffers, offering very good performance, robustness, flexibility and ease of development. The first camera was upgraded in 2015, the other three cameras are foreseen to follow in fall 2016. We describe the design, the performance, the results of the tests and the lessons learned from the first upgraded H.E.S.S. camera.

  8. Three-dimensional camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bothe, Thorsten; Gesierich, Achim; Legarda-Saenz, Ricardo; Jueptner, Werner P. O.

    2003-05-01

    Industrial- and multimedia applications need cost effective, compact and flexible 3D profiling instruments. In the talk we will show the principle of, applications for and results from a new miniaturized 3-D profiling system for macroscopic scenes. The system uses a compact housing and is usable like a camera with minimum stabilization like a tripod. The system is based on common fringe projection technique. Camera and projector are assembled with parallel optical axes having coplanar projection and imaging plane. Their axes distance is comparable to the human eyes distance altogether giving a complete system of 21x20x11 cm size and allowing to measure high gradient objects like the interior of tubes. The fringe projector uses a LCD which enables fast and flexible pattern projection. Camera and projector have a short focal length and a high system aperture as well as a large depth of focus. Thus, objects can be measured from a shorter distance compared to common systems (e.g. 1 m sized objects in 80 cm distance). Actually, objects with diameters up to 4 m can be profiled because the set-up allows working with completely opened aperture combined with bright lamps giving a big amount of available light and a high Signal to Noise Ratio. Normally a small basis has the disadvantage of reduced sensitivity. We investigated in methods to compensate the reduced sensitivity via setup and enhanced evaluation methods. For measurement we use synthetic wavelengths. The developed algorithms are completely adaptable concerning the users needs of speed and accuracy. The 3D camera is built from low cost components, robust, nearly handheld and delivers insights also into difficult technical objects like tubes and inside volumes. Besides the realized high resolution phase measurement the system calibration is an important task for usability. While calibrating with common photogrammetric models (which are typically used for actual fringe projection systems) problems were found that

  9. Digital camera in ophthalmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Mitra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ophthalmology is an expensive field and imaging is an indispensable modality in ophthalmology; and in developing countries including India, it is not possible for every ophthalmologist to afford slit-lamp photography unit. We here present our experience of slit-lamp photography using digital camera. Good quality pictures of anterior and posterior segment disorders were captured using readily available devices. It can be a used as a good teaching tool for residents learning ophthalmology and can also be a method to document lesions which at many times is necessary for medicolegal purposes. It's a technique which is simple, inexpensive, and has a short learning curve.

  10. NFC - Narrow Field Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koukal, J.; Srba, J.; Gorková, S.

    2015-01-01

    We have been introducing a low-cost CCTV video system for faint meteor monitoring and here we describe the first results from 5 months of two-station operations. Our system called NFC (Narrow Field Camera) with a meteor limiting magnitude around +6.5mag allows research on trajectories of less massive meteoroids within individual parent meteor showers and the sporadic background. At present 4 stations (2 pairs with coordinated fields of view) of NFC system are operated in the frame of CEMeNt (Central European Meteor Network). The heart of each NFC station is a sensitive CCTV camera Watec 902 H2 and a fast cinematographic lens Meopta Meostigmat 1/50 - 52.5 mm (50 mm focal length and fixed aperture f/1.0). In this paper we present the first results based on 1595 individual meteors, 368 of which were recorded from two stations simultaneously. This data set allows the first empirical verification of theoretical assumptions for NFC system capabilities (stellar and meteor magnitude limit, meteor apparent brightness distribution and accuracy of single station measurements) and the first low mass meteoroid trajectory calculations. Our experimental data clearly showed the capabilities of the proposed system for low mass meteor registration and for calculations based on NFC data to lead to a significant refinement in the orbital elements for low mass meteoroids.

  11. Compact 3D camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bothe, Thorsten; Osten, Wolfgang; Gesierich, Achim; Jueptner, Werner P. O.

    2002-06-01

    A new, miniaturized fringe projection system is presented which has a size and handling that approximates to common 2D cameras. The system is based on the fringe projection technique. A miniaturized fringe projector and camera are assembled into a housing of 21x20x11 cm size with a triangulation basis of 10 cm. The advantage of the small triangulation basis is the possibility to measure difficult objects with high gradients. Normally a small basis has the disadvantage of reduced sensitivity. We investigated in methods to compensate the reduced sensitivity via setup and enhanced evaluation methods. Special hardware issues are a high quality, bright light source (and components to handle the high luminous flux) as well as adapted optics to gain a large aperture angle and a focus scan unit to increase the usable measurement volume. Adaptable synthetic wavelengths and integration times were used to increase the measurement quality and allow robust measurements that are adaptable to the desired speed and accuracy. Algorithms were developed to generate automatic focus positions to completely cover extended measurement volumes. Principles, setup, measurement examples and applications are shown.

  12. Mars Science Laboratory Engineering Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, Justin N.; Thiessen, David L.; Pourangi, Ali M.; Kobzeff, Peter A.; Lee, Steven W.; Dingizian, Arsham; Schwochert, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Rover, which launched to Mars in 2011, is equipped with a set of 12 engineering cameras. These cameras are build-to-print copies of the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) cameras, which were sent to Mars in 2003. The engineering cameras weigh less than 300 grams each and use less than 3 W of power. Images returned from the engineering cameras are used to navigate the rover on the Martian surface, deploy the rover robotic arm, and ingest samples into the rover sample processing system. The navigation cameras (Navcams) are mounted to a pan/tilt mast and have a 45-degree square field of view (FOV) with a pixel scale of 0.82 mrad/pixel. The hazard avoidance cameras (Haz - cams) are body-mounted to the rover chassis in the front and rear of the vehicle and have a 124-degree square FOV with a pixel scale of 2.1 mrad/pixel. All of the cameras utilize a frame-transfer CCD (charge-coupled device) with a 1024x1024 imaging region and red/near IR bandpass filters centered at 650 nm. The MSL engineering cameras are grouped into two sets of six: one set of cameras is connected to rover computer A and the other set is connected to rover computer B. The MSL rover carries 8 Hazcams and 4 Navcams.

  13. ACCURACY EVALUATION OF STEREO CAMERA SYSTEMS WITH GENERIC CAMERA MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Rueß

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades the consumer and industrial market for non-projective cameras has been growing notably. This has led to the development of camera description models other than the pinhole model and their employment in mostly homogeneous camera systems. Heterogeneous camera systems (for instance, combine Fisheye and Catadioptric cameras can also be easily thought of for real applications. However, it has not been quite clear, how accurate stereo vision with these cameras and models can be. In this paper, different accuracy aspects are addressed by analytical inspection, numerical simulation as well as real image data evaluation. This analysis is generic, for any camera projection model, although only polynomial and rational projection models are used for distortion free, Catadioptric and Fisheye lenses. Note that this is different to polynomial and rational radial distortion models which have been addressed extensively in literature. For single camera analysis it turns out that point features towards the image sensor borders are significantly more accurate than in center regions of the sensor. For heterogeneous two camera systems it turns out, that reconstruction accuracy decreases significantly towards image borders as different projective distortions occur.

  14. Noise evaluation of Compton camera imaging for proton therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Ortega, P G; Cerutti, F; Ferrari, A; Gillam, J E; Lacasta, C; Llosá, G; Oliver, J F; Sala, P R; Solevi, P; Rafecas, M

    2015-01-01

    Compton Cameras emerged as an alternative for real-time dose monitoring techniques for Particle Therapy (PT), based on the detection of prompt-gammas. As a consequence of the Compton scattering process, the gamma origin point can be restricted onto the surface of a cone (Compton cone). Through image reconstruction techniques, the distribution of the gamma emitters can be estimated, using cone-surfaces backprojections of the Compton cones through the image space, along with more sophisticated statistical methods to improve the image quality. To calculate the Compton cone required for image reconstruction, either two interactions, the last being photoelectric absorption, or three scatter interactions are needed. Because of the high energy of the photons in PT the first option might not be adequate, as the photon is not absorbed in general. However, the second option is less efficient. That is the reason to resort to spectral reconstructions, where the incoming γ energy is considered as a variable in the recons...

  15. Transmission electron microscope CCD camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, Kenneth H.

    1999-01-01

    In order to improve the performance of a CCD camera on a high voltage electron microscope, an electron decelerator is inserted between the microscope column and the CCD. This arrangement optimizes the interaction of the electron beam with the scintillator of the CCD camera while retaining optimization of the microscope optics and of the interaction of the beam with the specimen. Changing the electron beam energy between the specimen and camera allows both to be optimized.

  16. Junocam: Juno's Outreach Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, C. J.; Caplinger, M. A.; Ingersoll, A.; Ravine, M. A.; Jensen, E.; Bolton, S.; Orton, G.

    2017-11-01

    Junocam is a wide-angle camera designed to capture the unique polar perspective of Jupiter offered by Juno's polar orbit. Junocam's four-color images include the best spatial resolution ever acquired of Jupiter's cloudtops. Junocam will look for convective clouds and lightning in thunderstorms and derive the heights of the clouds. Junocam will support Juno's radiometer experiment by identifying any unusual atmospheric conditions such as hotspots. Junocam is on the spacecraft explicitly to reach out to the public and share the excitement of space exploration. The public is an essential part of our virtual team: amateur astronomers will supply ground-based images for use in planning, the public will weigh in on which images to acquire, and the amateur image processing community will help process the data.

  17. Stereotactic radiosurgery - Gamma Knife

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gamma Knife; Gamma Knife radiosurgery; Non-invasive neurosugery; Epilepsy - Gamma Knife ... problems ( arteriovenous malformation , arteriovenous fistula ) Some types of epilepsy Trigeminal neuralgia (severe nerve pain of the face) ...

  18. Neutron and Gamma-ray Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasilnikov, Anatoly V.; Sasao, Mamiko; Kaschuck, Yuri A.; Kiptily, Vasily G.; Nishitani, Takeo; Popovichev, Sergey V.; Bertalot, Luciano

    2008-03-01

    Due to high neutron and gamma-ray yields and large size plasmas many future fusion reactor plasma parameters such as fusion power, fusion power density, ion temperature, fuel mixture, fast ion energy and spatial distributions can be well measured by various fusion product diagnostics. Neutron diagnostics provide information on fusion reaction rate, which indicates how close is the plasma to the ultimate goal of nuclear fusion and fusion power distribution in the plasma core, which is crucial for optimization of plasma breakeven and burn. Depending on the plasma conditions neutron and gamma-ray diagnostics can provide important information, namely about dynamics of fast ion energy and spatial distributions during neutral beam injection, ion cyclotron heating and generated by fast ions MHD instabilities. The influence of the fast particle population on the 2-D neutron source profile was clearly demonstrated in JET experiments. 2-D neutron and gamma-ray source measurements could be important for driven plasma heating profile optimization in fusion reactors. To meat the measurement requirements in ITER the planned set of neutron and gamma ray diagnostics includes radial and vertical neutron and gamma cameras, neutron flux monitors, neutron activation systems and neutron spectrometers. The necessity of using massive radiation shielding strongly influences the diagnostic designs in fusion reactor, determines angular fields of view of neutron and gamma-ray cameras and spectrometers and gives rise to unavoidable difficulties in the absolute calibration. The development, testing in existing tokomaks and a possible engineering integration of neuron and gamma-ray diagnostic systems into ITER are presented.

  19. gamma-gamma Interactions from Real to Virtual Photons

    OpenAIRE

    Sjöstrand, Torbjörn

    2000-01-01

    A `complete' framework for gamma-gamma / gamma*-gamma / gamma*-gamma* interactions is presented. The emphasis is on providing a model for gamma-gamma physics at all photon virtualities, including the difficult transition region around the rho meson mass.

  20. Development of SED Camera for Quasars in Early Universe (SQUEAN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sanghyuk; Jeon, Yiseul; Lee, Hye-In; Park, Woojin; Ji, Tae-Geun; Hyun, Minhee; Choi, Changsu; Im, Myungshin; Pak, Soojong

    2016-11-01

    We describe the characteristics and performance of a camera system, Spectral energy distribution Camera for Quasars in Early Universe (SQUEAN). It was developed to measure SEDs of high-redshift quasar candidates (z ≳ 5) and other targets, e.g., young stellar objects, supernovae, and gamma-ray bursts, and to trace the time variability of SEDs of objects such as active galactic nuclei (AGNs). SQUEAN consists of an on-axis focal plane camera module, an autoguiding system, and mechanical supporting structures. The science camera module is composed of a focal reducer, a customizable filter wheel, and a CCD camera on the focal plane. The filter wheel uses filter cartridges that can house filters with different shapes and sizes, enabling the filter wheel to hold 20 filters of 50 mm × 50 mm size, 10 filters of 86 mm × 86 mm size, or many other combinations. The initial filter mask was applied to calibrate the filter wheel with high accuracy, and we verified that the filter position is repeatable at much less than one pixel accuracy. We installed and tested 50 nm medium bandwidth filters of 600-1050 nm and other filters at the commissioning observation in 2015 February. We found that SQUEAN can reach limiting magnitudes of 23.3-25.3 AB mag at 5σ in a one-hour total integration time.

  1. CCD camera for an autoguider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schempp, William V.

    1991-06-01

    The requirements of a charge coupled device (CCD) autoguider camera and the specifications of a camera that we propose to build to meet those requirements will be discussed. The design goals of both the package and the electronics will be considered.

  2. Digital camera self-calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Clive S.

    Over the 25 years since the introduction of analytical camera self-calibration there has been a revolution in close-range photogrammetric image acquisition systems. High-resolution, large-area 'digital' CCD sensors have all but replaced film cameras. Throughout the period of this transition, self-calibration models have remained essentially unchanged. This paper reviews the application of analytical self-calibration to digital cameras. Computer vision perspectives are touched upon, the quality of self-calibration is discussed, and an overview is given of each of the four main sources of departures from collinearity in CCD cameras. Practical issues are also addressed and experimental results are used to highlight important characteristics of digital camera self-calibration.

  3. Gamma-ray imaging with position-sensitive HPGe detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vetter, K. E-mail: kvetter@lbl.gov; Burks, M.; Mihailescu, L

    2004-06-01

    Due to advances in manufacturing large and highly segmented HPGe detectors along with the availability of fast and high-precision digital electronics, it is now possible to build efficient and high-resolution Compton cameras. Two-dimensionally segmented semi-conductor detectors along with pulse-shape analysis allow to obtain three-dimensional positions and energies of individual gamma-ray interactions. By employing gamma-ray tracking procedures it is possible to determine the scattering sequence in the detector and ultimately to deduce the incident direction of gamma rays without the use of a attenuating collimator. These advanced gamma-ray tracking-based Compton cameras are able not only to image gamma-ray sources with higher sensitivity than collimator-based systems but can increase the sensitivity in finding gamma-ray sources over non-imaging detectors, particularly in complex radiation fields. We have implemented a Compton camera built of a single double-sided strip HPGe detector with a strip pitch size of 2 mm. A three-dimensional position resolution of 0.5 mm at 122 keV by using simple pulse-shape analysis is achieved. We have implemented image reconstruction procedures for search scenarios, which are of interest for national security applications. In addition, we have developed reconstruction procedures to optimize image quality which potentially finds applications in other areas as well.

  4. Silicon detector for a Compton Camera in Nuclear Medical Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Meier, D; Jalocha, P; Sowicki, B; Kowal, M; Dulinski, W; Maehlum, G; Nygård, E; Yoshioka, K; Fuster, J A; Lacasta, C; Mikuz, M; Roe, S; Weilhammer, Peter; Hua, C H; Park, S J; Wilderman, S J; Zhang, L; Clinthorne, N H; Rogers, W L

    2001-01-01

    Electronically collimated gamma ca\\-me\\-ras based on Com\\-pton scattering in silicon pad sensors may improve imaging in nuclear medicine and bio-medical research. The work described here concentrates on the silicon pad detector developed for a prototype Compton camera. The silicon pad sensors are read out using low noise VLSI CMOS chips and novel fast triggering chips. Depending on the application a light weight and dense packaging of sensors and its readout electronics on a hybrid is required. We describe the silicon pad sensor and their readout with the newly designed hybrid. %The silicon detector of a Compton camera %may contain up to $10^5$~analogue channels requiring %a fast and low cost data acquisition system. We also describe a modular and low-cost data acquisition system (CCDAQ) based on a digital signal processor which is interfaced to the EPP port of personal computers. Using the CCDAQ and the hybrids energy spectra of gamma-ray photons from technetium ($^{\\rm 99m}_{43}$Tc) and americium ($^{241}_{...

  5. Gamma ray generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firestone, Richard B; Reijonen, Jani

    2014-05-27

    An embodiment of a gamma ray generator includes a neutron generator and a moderator. The moderator is coupled to the neutron generator. The moderator includes a neutron capture material. In operation, the neutron generator produces neutrons and the neutron capture material captures at least some of the neutrons to produces gamma rays. An application of the gamma ray generator is as a source of gamma rays for calibration of gamma ray detectors.

  6. The search for optical counterparts to BATSE GRBs with the Explosive Transient Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderspek, Roland; Ricker, George R.

    1992-01-01

    The Explosive Transient Camera (ETC), an automatic wide-field sky monitor sensitive to short-timescale optical transients, has been operating in conjunction with BATSE since the launch of GRO. In this paper, we discuss the probability and implications of the ETC monitoring a part of the sky in which BATSE detects a gamma-ray burst.

  7. New generation of meteorology cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janout, Petr; Blažek, Martin; Páta, Petr

    2017-12-01

    A new generation of the WILLIAM (WIde-field aLL-sky Image Analyzing Monitoring system) camera includes new features such as monitoring of rain and storm clouds during the day observation. Development of the new generation of weather monitoring cameras responds to the demand for monitoring of sudden weather changes. However, new WILLIAM cameras are ready to process acquired image data immediately, release warning against sudden torrential rains, and send it to user's cell phone and email. Actual weather conditions are determined from image data, and results of image processing are complemented by data from sensors of temperature, humidity, and atmospheric pressure. In this paper, we present the architecture, image data processing algorithms of mentioned monitoring camera and spatially-variant model of imaging system aberrations based on Zernike polynomials.

  8. An Inexpensive Digital Infrared Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Allan

    2012-01-01

    Details are given for the conversion of an inexpensive webcam to a camera specifically sensitive to the near infrared (700-1000 nm). Some experiments and practical applications are suggested and illustrated. (Contains 9 figures.)

  9. Scanning laser video camera/ microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C. P.; Bow, R. T.

    1984-10-01

    A laser scanning system capable of scanning at standard video rate has been developed. The scanning mirrors, circuit design and system performance, as well as its applications to video cameras and ultra-violet microscopes, are discussed.

  10. INT prime focus mosaic camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ives, Derek J.; Tulloch, Simon; Churchill, John

    1996-03-01

    The INT Prime Focus Mosaic Camera (INT PFC) is designed to provide a large field survey and supernovae search capability for the prime focus of the 2.5 m Isaac Newton Telescope (INT). It is a joint collaboration between the Royal Greenwich Observatory (UK), Kapteyn Sterrenwacht Werkgroep (Netherlands), and the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories (USA). The INT PFC consists of a 4 chip mosaic utilizing thinned and anti-reflection coated CCDs. These are LORAL devices of the LICK3 design. They will be operated cryogenically in a purpose built camera assembly. A fifth CCD, of the same type, is co-mounted with the science array in the cryostat to provide autoguider functions. This cryostat then mounts to the main camera assembly at the prime focus. This assembly will include standard filters and a novel shutter wheel which has been specifically designed for this application. The camera will have an unvignetted field of 40 arcminutes and a focal ratio of f/3.3. This results in a very tight mechanical specification for co-planarity and flatness of the array of CCDs and also quite stringent flexure tolerance of the camera assembly. A method of characterizing the co- planarity and flatness of the array will be described. The overall system architecture will also be described. One of the main requirements is to read the whole array out within 100s, with less than 10e rms. noise and very low CCD cross talk.

  11. The Clementine longwave infrared camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Priest, R.E.; Lewis, I.T.; Sewall, N.R.; Park, H.S.; Shannon, M.J.; Ledebuhr, A.G.; Pleasance, L.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Massie, M.A. [Pacific Advanced Technology, Solvang, CA (United States); Metschuleit, K. [Amber/A Raytheon Co., Goleta, CA (United States)

    1995-04-01

    The Clementine mission provided the first ever complete, systematic surface mapping of the moon from the ultra-violet to the near-infrared regions. More than 1.7 million images of the moon, earth and space were returned from this mission. The longwave-infrared (LWIR) camera supplemented the UV/Visible and near-infrared mapping cameras providing limited strip coverage of the moon, giving insight to the thermal properties of the soils. This camera provided {approximately}100 m spatial resolution at 400 km periselene, and a 7 km across-track swath. This 2.1 kg camera using a 128 x 128 Mercury-Cadmium-Telluride (MCT) FPA viewed thermal emission of the lunar surface and lunar horizon in the 8.0 to 9.5 {micro}m wavelength region. A description of this light-weight, low power LWIR camera along with a summary of lessons learned is presented. Design goals and preliminary on-orbit performance estimates are addressed in terms of meeting the mission`s primary objective for flight qualifying the sensors for future Department of Defense flights.

  12. Camera Movement in Narrative Cinema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jakob Isak

    2007-01-01

    Just like art historians have focused on e.g. composition or lighting, this dissertation takes a single stylistic parameter as its object of study: camera movement. Within film studies this localized avenue of middle-level research has become increasingly viable under the aegis of a perspective......, and that a given camera movement may activate one or more of the proposed functions at any given moment. Six main functions are proposed and defined: 1) Orientation: orienting the viewer spatially. 2) Pacing: contributing to the cinematic rhythm of the film. 3) Inflection: inflecting shots in a suggestive...... to illustrate how the functions may mesh in individual camera movements six concrete examples are analyzed. The analyses illustrate how the taxonomy presented can substantiate analysis and interpretation of film style. More generally, the dissertation - and particularly these in-depth analyses - illustrates how...

  13. Perceptual Color Characterization of Cameras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Vazquez-Corral

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Color camera characterization, mapping outputs from the camera sensors to an independent color space, such as \\(XYZ\\, is an important step in the camera processing pipeline. Until now, this procedure has been primarily solved by using a \\(3 \\times 3\\ matrix obtained via a least-squares optimization. In this paper, we propose to use the spherical sampling method, recently published by Finlayson al., to perform a perceptual color characterization. In particular, we search for the \\(3 \\times 3\\ matrix that minimizes three different perceptual errors, one pixel based and two spatially based. For the pixel-based case, we minimize the CIE \\(\\Delta E\\ error, while for the spatial-based case, we minimize both the S-CIELAB error and the CID error measure. Our results demonstrate an improvement of approximately 3for the \\(\\Delta E\\ error, 7& for the S-CIELAB error and 13% for the CID error measures.

  14. Dark Energy Camera for Blanco

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binder, Gary A.; /Caltech /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    In order to make accurate measurements of dark energy, a system is needed to monitor the focus and alignment of the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) to be located on the Blanco 4m Telescope for the upcoming Dark Energy Survey. One new approach under development is to fit out-of-focus star images to a point spread function from which information about the focus and tilt of the camera can be obtained. As a first test of a new algorithm using this idea, simulated star images produced from a model of DECam in the optics software Zemax were fitted. Then, real images from the Mosaic II imager currently installed on the Blanco telescope were used to investigate the algorithm's capabilities. A number of problems with the algorithm were found, and more work is needed to understand its limitations and improve its capabilities so it can reliably predict camera alignment and focus.

  15. Radiation-Tolerant High-Speed Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Radiation -Tolerant High-Speed Camera Esko Mikkola, Andrew Levy, Matt Engelman Alphacore, Inc. Tempe, AZ 85281 Abstract: As part of an... radiation -hardened CMOS image sensor and camera system. Radiation -hardened cameras with frame rates as high as 10 kfps and resolution of 1Mpixel are not...camera solution that is under development with a similar architecture. It also includes a brief description of the radiation -hardened camera that

  16. Gamma-ray bursts

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gehrels, Neil; Mészáros, Péter

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bright flashes of gamma rays coming from the cosmos. They occur roughly once per day, typically last for tens of seconds, and are the most luminous events in the universe...

  17. Compton camera study for high efficiency SPECT and benchmark with Anger system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, M.; Dauvergne, D.; Létang, J. M.; Ley, J.-L.; Testa, É.

    2017-12-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is at present one of the major techniques for non-invasive diagnostics in nuclear medicine. The clinical routine is mostly based on collimated cameras, originally proposed by Hal Anger. Due to the presence of mechanical collimation, detection efficiency and energy acceptance are limited and fixed by the system’s geometrical features. In order to overcome these limitations, the application of Compton cameras for SPECT has been investigated for several years. In this study we compare a commercial SPECT-Anger device, the General Electric HealthCare Infinia system with a High Energy General Purpose (HEGP) collimator, and the Compton camera prototype under development by the French collaboration CLaRyS, through Monte Carlo simulations (GATE—GEANT4 Application for Tomographic Emission—version 7.1 and GEANT4 version 9.6, respectively). Given the possible introduction of new radio-emitters at higher energies intrinsically allowed by the Compton camera detection principle, the two detectors are exposed to point-like sources at increasing primary gamma energies, from actual isotopes already suggested for nuclear medicine applications. The Compton camera prototype is first characterized for SPECT application by studying the main parameters affecting its imaging performance: detector energy resolution and random coincidence rate. The two detector performances are then compared in terms of radial event distribution, detection efficiency and final image, obtained by gamma transmission analysis for the Anger system, and with an iterative List Mode-Maximum Likelihood Expectation Maximization (LM-MLEM) algorithm for the Compton reconstruction. The results show for the Compton camera a detection efficiency increased by a factor larger than an order of magnitude with respect to the Anger camera, associated with an enhanced spatial resolution for energies beyond 500 keV. We discuss the advantages of Compton camera application

  18. Directing Performers for the Cameras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, George P., Jr.

    An excellent way for an undergraduate, novice director of television and film to pick up background experience in directing performers for cameras is by participating in nonbroadcast-film activities, such as theatre, dance, and variety acts, both as performer and as director. This document describes the varieties of activities, including creative,…

  19. The Camera Comes to Court.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floren, Leola

    After the Lindbergh kidnapping trial in 1935, the American Bar Association sought to eliminate electronic equipment from courtroom proceedings. Eventually, all but two states adopted regulations applying that ban to some extent, and a 1965 Supreme Court decision encouraged the banning of television cameras at trials as well. Currently, some states…

  20. SPEIR: A Ge Compton camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihailescu, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore (United States)]. E-mail: mihailescu1@llnl.gov; Vetter, K.M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore (United States); Burks, M.T. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore (United States); Hull, E.L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore (United States); Craig, W.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore (United States)

    2007-01-01

    The SPEctroscopic Imager for{gamma}-Rays (SPEIR) is a Compton scatter {gamma}-ray imaging system of high efficiency and spectroscopic resolution with a 4-{pi} field-of-view. The imaging system consists of double-sided segmented (DSSD) planar Ge detectors, an acquisition system instrumenting the detectors, and a set of data analysis methods. The analysis methods employ event reconstruction algorithms that increase the intrinsic position resolution and granularity of the detectors, and provide photon scattering information relevant for Compton imaging.

  1. Gamma-ray Astronomy

    OpenAIRE

    Pohl, Martin

    2007-01-01

    This paper summarizes recents results in gamma-ray astronomy, most of which were derived with data from ground-based gamma-ray detectors. Many of the contributions presented at this conference involve multiwavelength studies which combine ground-based gamma-ray measurements with optical data or space-based X-ray and gamma-ray measurements. Besides measurements of the diffuse emission from the Galaxy, observations of blazars, gamma-ray bursts, and supernova remnants this paper also covers theo...

  2. Digital Low Frequency Radio Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullekrug, M.; Mezentsev, A.; Soula, S.; van der Velde, O.; Poupeney, J.; Sudre, C.; Gaffet, S.; Pincon, J.

    2012-04-01

    This contribution reports the design, realization and operation of a novel digital low frequency radio camera towards an exploration of the Earth's electromagnetic environment with particular emphasis on lightning discharges and subsequent atmospheric effects such as transient luminous events. The design of the digital low frequency radio camera is based on the idea of radio interferometry with a network of radio receivers which are separated by spatial baselines comparable to the wavelength of the observed radio waves, i.e., ~1-100 km which corresponds to a frequency range from ~3-300 kHz. The key parameter towards the realization of the radio interferometer is the frequency dependent slowness of the radio waves within the Earth's atmosphere with respect to the speed of light in vacuum. This slowness is measured with the radio interferometer by using well documented radio transmitters. The digital low frequency radio camera can be operated in different modes. In the imaging mode, still photographs show maps of the low frequency radio sky. In the video mode, movies show the dynamics of the low frequency radio sky. The exposure time of the photograhps, the frame rate of the video, and the radio frequency of interest can be adjusted by the observer. Alternatively, the digital radio camera can be used in the monitoring mode, where a particular area of the sky is observed continuously. The first application of the digital low frequency radio camera is to characterize the electromagnetic energy emanating from sprite producing lightning discharges, but it is expected that it can also be used to identify and investigate numerous other radio sources of the Earth's electromagnetic environment.

  3. GammaWorkshops Proceedings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strålberg, Elisabeth; Klemola, Seppo; Nielsen, Sven Poul

    Due to a sparse interaction during the last years between practioners in gamma ray spectrometry in the Nordic countries, a NKS activity was started in 2009. This GammaSem was focused on seminars relevant to gamma spectrometry. A follow up seminar was held in 2010. As an outcome of these activities...... it was suggested that the 2011 meeting should be focused on practical issues, e.g. different corrections needed in gamma spectrometric measurements. This three day’s meeting, GammaWorkshops, was held in September at Risø-DTU. Experts on different topics relevant for gamma spectrometric measurements were invited...... to the GammaWorkshops. The topics included efficiency transfer, true coincidence summing corrections, self-attenuation corrections, measurement of natural radionuclides (natural decay series), combined measurement uncertainty calculations, and detection limits. These topics covered both lectures and practical...

  4. Dynamic Camera Positioning and Reconfiguration for Multi-Camera Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Konda, Krishna Reddy

    2015-01-01

    The large availability of different types of cameras and lenses, together with the reduction in price of video sensors, has contributed to a widespread use of video surveillance systems, which have become a widely adopted tool to enforce security and safety, in detecting and preventing crimes and dangerous events. The possibility for personalization of such systems is generally very high, letting the user customize the sensing infrastructure, and deploying ad-hoc solutions based on the curren...

  5. D-SPECT, a semiconductor camera: Technical aspects and clinical applications;La camera a semi-conducteur D-Spect: aspects techniques et applications cliniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merlin, C.; Bertrand, S.; Kelly, A.; Veyre, A.; Mestas, D.; Cachin, F. [CLCC Jean-Perrin, Service de medecine nucleaire, 63 - Clermont-Ferrand (France); Motreff, P.; Levesque, S. [CHU Gabriel-Montpied, Service de cardiologie, 63 - Clermont-Ferrand (France); Cachin, F. [Universite d' Auvergne, UMR 990 Inserm, 63 - Clermont-Ferrand (France); Askienazy, S. [Cyclopharma, biopole Clermont-Limagne, 63 -Saint-Beauzire (France)

    2010-03-15

    Clinical practice in nuclear medicine has largely changed in the last decade, particularly with the arrival of PET/CT and SPECT/CT. New semiconductor cameras could represent the next evolution in our nuclear medicine practice. Due to the resolution and sensitivity improvement, this technology authorizes fast speed acquisitions, high contrast and resolution images performed with low activity injection. The dedicated cardiology D-SPECT camera (Spectrum Dynamics, Israel) is based on semiconductor technology and provides an original system for collimation and images reconstruction. We describe here our clinical experience in using the D-SPECT with a preliminary study comparing D-D.P.E.C.T. and conventional gamma camera. (authors)

  6. Development of gamma-photon/Cerenkov-light hybrid system for simultaneous imaging of I-131 radionuclide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Suzuki, Mayumi; Kato, Katsuhiko [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Watabe, Tadashi; Ikeda, Hayato; Kanai, Yasukazu [Department of Molecular Imaging in Medicine, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Ogata, Yoshimune [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Hatazawa, Jun [Department of Molecular Imaging in Medicine, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan)

    2016-09-11

    Although iodine 131 (I-131) is used for radionuclide therapy, high resolution images are difficult to obtain with conventional gamma cameras because of the high energy of I-131 gamma photons (364 keV). Cerenkov-light imaging is a possible method for beta emitting radionuclides, and I-131 (606 MeV maximum beta energy) is a candidate to obtain high resolution images. We developed a high energy gamma camera system for I-131 radionuclide and combined it with a Cerenkov-light imaging system to form a gamma-photon/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging system to compare the simultaneously measured images of these two modalities. The high energy gamma imaging detector used 0.85-mm×0.85-mm×10-mm thick GAGG scintillator pixels arranged in a 44×44 matrix with a 0.1-mm thick reflector and optical coupled to a Hamamatsu 2 in. square position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT: H12700 MOD). The gamma imaging detector was encased in a 2 cm thick tungsten shield, and a pinhole collimator was mounted on its top to form a gamma camera system. The Cerenkov-light imaging system was made of a high sensitivity cooled CCD camera. The Cerenkov-light imaging system was combined with the gamma camera using optical mirrors to image the same area of the subject. With this configuration, we simultaneously imaged the gamma photons and the Cerenkov-light from I-131 in the subjects. The spatial resolution and sensitivity of the gamma camera system for I-131 were respectively ~3 mm FWHM and ~10 cps/MBq for the high sensitivity collimator at 10 cm from the collimator surface. The spatial resolution of the Cerenkov-light imaging system was 0.64 mm FWHM at 10 cm from the system surface. Thyroid phantom and rat images were successfully obtained with the developed gamma-photon/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging system, allowing direct comparison of these two modalities. Our developed gamma-photon/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging system will be useful to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of these two

  7. An optical metasurface planar camera

    CERN Document Server

    Arbabi, Amir; Kamali, Seyedeh Mahsa; Horie, Yu; Han, Seunghoon; Faraon, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    Optical metasurfaces are 2D arrays of nano-scatterers that modify optical wavefronts at subwavelength spatial resolution. They are poised to revolutionize optical design by enabling complex low cost systems where multiple metasurfaces are lithographically stacked on top of each other and are integrated with electronics. For imaging applications, metasurface stacks can perform sophisticated image corrections and can be directly integrated with image sensors. Here, we demonstrate this concept with a miniature flat camera integrating a monolithic metasurface lens doublet corrected for monochromatic aberrations, and an image sensor. The doublet lens, which acts as a fisheye photographic objective, has an f-number of 0.9, an angle-of-view larger than 60$^\\circ$$\\times$60$^\\circ$, and operates at 850 nm wavelength with large transmission. The camera exhibits high image quality, which indicates the potential of this technology to produce a paradigm shift in future designs of imaging systems for microscopy, photograp...

  8. GRAVITY acquisition camera: characterization results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anugu, Narsireddy; Garcia, Paulo; Amorim, Antonio; Wiezorrek, Erich; Wieprecht, Ekkehard; Eisenhauer, Frank; Ott, Thomas; Pfuhl, Oliver; Gordo, Paulo; Perrin, Guy; Brandner, Wolfgang; Straubmeier, Christian; Perraut, Karine

    2016-08-01

    GRAVITY acquisition camera implements four optical functions to track multiple beams of Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI): a) pupil tracker: a 2×2 lenslet images four pupil reference lasers mounted on the spiders of telescope secondary mirror; b) field tracker: images science object; c) pupil imager: reimages telescope pupil; d) aberration tracker: images a Shack-Hartmann. The estimation of beam stabilization parameters from the acquisition camera detector image is carried out, for every 0.7 s, with a dedicated data reduction software. The measured parameters are used in: a) alignment of GRAVITY with the VLTI; b) active pupil and field stabilization; c) defocus correction and engineering purposes. The instrument is now successfully operational on-sky in closed loop. The relevant data reduction and on-sky characterization results are reported.

  9. Graphic design of pinhole cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, H. B.; Chu, W. P.

    1979-01-01

    The paper describes a graphic technique for the analysis and optimization of pinhole size and focal length. The technique is based on the use of the transfer function of optical elements described by Scott (1959) to construct the transfer function of a circular pinhole camera. This transfer function is the response of a component or system to a pattern of lines having a sinusoidally varying radiance at varying spatial frequencies. Some specific examples of graphic design are presented.

  10. Coordinated Sensing in Intelligent Camera Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Ding, Chong

    2013-01-01

    The cost and size of video sensors has led to camera networks becoming pervasive in our lives. However, the ability to analyze these images efficiently is very much a function of the quality of the acquired images. Human control of pan-tilt-zoom (PTZ) cameras is impractical and unreliable when high quality images are needed of multiple events distributed over a large area. This dissertation considers the problem of automatically controlling the fields of view of individual cameras in a camera...

  11. Optimising Camera Traps for Monitoring Small Mammals

    OpenAIRE

    Glen, Alistair S.; Stuart Cockburn; Margaret Nichols; Jagath Ekanayake; Bruce Warburton

    2013-01-01

    Practical techniques are required to monitor invasive animals, which are often cryptic and occur at low density. Camera traps have potential for this purpose, but may have problems detecting and identifying small species. A further challenge is how to standardise the size of each camera?s field of view so capture rates are comparable between different places and times. We investigated the optimal specifications for a low-cost camera trap for small mammals. The factors tested were 1) trigger s...

  12. Stereo Pinhole Camera: Assembly and experimental activities

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Gilmário Barbosa; Departamento de Ciência da Computação, Universidade do Estado de Santa Catarina, Joinville; Cunha, Sidney Pinto; Centro de Tecnologia da Informação Renato Archer, Campinas

    2015-01-01

    This work describes the assembling of a stereo pinhole camera for capturing stereo-pairs of images and proposes experimental activities with it. A pinhole camera can be as sophisticated as you want, or so simple that it could be handcrafted with practically recyclable materials. This paper describes the practical use of the pinhole camera throughout history and currently. Aspects of optics and geometry involved in the building of the stereo pinhole camera are presented with illustrations. Fur...

  13. Toward a miniaturized fundus camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gliss, Christine; Parel, Jean-Marie; Flynn, John T; Pratisto, Hans; Niederer, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) describes a pathological development of the retina in prematurely born children. In order to prevent severe permanent damage to the eye and enable timely treatment, the fundus of the eye in such children has to be examined according to established procedures. For these examinations, our miniaturized fundus camera is intended to allow the acquisition of wide-angle digital pictures of the fundus for on-line or off-line diagnosis and documentation. We designed two prototypes of a miniaturized fundus camera, one with graded refractive index (GRIN)-based optics, the other with conventional optics. Two different modes of illumination were compared: transscleral and transpupillary. In both systems, the size and weight of the camera were minimized. The prototypes were tested on young rabbits. The experiments led to the conclusion that the combination of conventional optics with transpupillary illumination yields the best results in terms of overall image quality. (c) 2004 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers.

  14. Gamma-ray triangles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibarra, Alejandro; Lopez-Gehler, Sergio; Molinaro, Emiliano

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a new type of gamma-ray spectral feature, which we denominate gamma-ray triangle. This spectral feature arises in scenarios where dark matter self-annihilates via a chiral interaction into two Dirac fermions, which subsequently decay in flight into another fermion and a photon....... The resulting photon spectrum resembles a sharp triangle and can be readily searched for in the gamma-ray sky. Using data from the Fermi-LAT and H.E.S.S. instruments, we find no evidence for such a spectral feature and, therefore, set strong upper bounds on the corresponding annihilation cross section....... A concrete realization of a scenario yielding gamma-ray triangles consists of an asymmetric dark matter model where the dark matter particle carries lepton number. We show explicitly that this class of models can lead to intense gamma-ray spectral features, potentially at the reach of upcoming gamma...

  15. Gamma Splines and Wavelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannu Olkkonen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work we introduce a new family of splines termed as gamma splines for continuous signal approximation and multiresolution analysis. The gamma splines are born by -times convolution of the exponential by itself. We study the properties of the discrete gamma splines in signal interpolation and approximation. We prove that the gamma splines obey the two-scale equation based on the polyphase decomposition. to introduce the shift invariant gamma spline wavelet transform for tree structured subscale analysis of asymmetric signal waveforms and for systems with asymmetric impulse response. Especially we consider the applications in biomedical signal analysis (EEG, ECG, and EMG. Finally, we discuss the suitability of the gamma spline signal processing in embedded VLSI environment.

  16. 16 CFR 501.1 - Camera film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Camera film. 501.1 Section 501.1 Commercial... 500 § 501.1 Camera film. Camera film packaged and labeled for retail sale is exempt from the net... should be expressed, provided: (a) The net quantity of contents on packages of movie film and bulk still...

  17. An Open Standard for Camera Trap Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forrester, Tavis; O'Brien, Tim; Fegraus, Eric; Jansen, P.A.; Palmer, Jonathan; Kays, Roland; Ahumada, Jorge; Stern, Beth; McShea, William

    2016-01-01

    Camera traps that capture photos of animals are a valuable tool for monitoring biodiversity. The use of camera traps is rapidly increasing and there is an urgent need for standardization to facilitate data management, reporting and data sharing. Here we offer the Camera Trap Metadata Standard as an

  18. Demonstration of a Far Infrared Streak Camera.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drabbels, M.M.J.E.; Lankhuijzen, G.M.; Noordam, L.D.

    1998-01-01

    An atomic infrared (IR) streak camera is demonstrated that operates in the mid- and far-infrared (λ = 5-85 μm), well beyond the long wavelength cutoff of conventional streak cameras. The temporal and spectral characteristics of the streak camera are determined using the FELIX free-electron laser as

  19. 21 CFR 892.1110 - Positron camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Positron camera. 892.1110 Section 892.1110 Food... DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1110 Positron camera. (a) Identification. A positron camera is a device intended to image the distribution of positron-emitting radionuclides in the body...

  20. 21 CFR 886.1120 - Opthalmic camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Opthalmic camera. 886.1120 Section 886.1120 Food... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1120 Opthalmic camera. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic camera is an AC-powered device intended to take photographs of the eye and the surrounding area...

  1. Radiation Dose-Rate Extraction from the Camera Image of Quince 2 Robot System using Optical Character Recognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jai Wan; Jeong, Kyung Min [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    In the case of the Japanese Quince 2 robot system, 7 CCD/CMOS cameras were used. 2 CCD cameras of Quince robot are used for the forward and backward monitoring of the surroundings during navigation. And 2 CCD (or CMOS) cameras are used for monitoring the status of front-end and back-end motion mechanics such as flippers and crawlers. A CCD camera with wide field of view optics is used for monitoring the status of the communication (VDSL) cable reel. And another 2 CCD cameras are assigned for reading the indication value of the radiation dosimeter and the instrument. The Quince 2 robot measured radiation in the unit 2 reactor building refueling floor of the Fukushima nuclear power plant. The CCD camera with wide field-of-view (fisheye) lens reads indicator of the dosimeter loaded on the Quince 2 robot, which was sent to carry out investigating the unit 2 reactor building refueling floor situation. The camera image with gamma ray dose-rate information is transmitted to the remote control site via VDSL communication line. At the remote control site, the radiation information in the unit 2 reactor building refueling floor can be perceived by monitoring the camera image. To make up the radiation profile in the surveyed refueling floor, the gamma ray dose-rate information in the image should be converted to numerical value. In this paper, we extract the gamma ray dose-rate value in the unit 2 reactor building refueling floor using optical character recognition method

  2. Beta and Gamma Gradients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løvborg, Leif; Gaffney, C. F.; Clark, P. A.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental and/or theoretical estimates are presented concerning, (i) attenuation within the sample of beta and gamma radiation from the soil, (ii) the gamma dose within the sample due to its own radioactivity, and (iii) the soil gamma dose in the proximity of boundaries between regions...... of differing radioactivity. It is confirmed that removal of the outer 2 mm of sample is adequate to remove influence from soil beta dose and estimates are made of the error introduced by non-removal. Other evaluations include variation of the soil gamma dose near the ground surface and it appears...

  3. RPC gamma sensitivity simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Altieri, S; Bruno, G; Gianini, G; Merlo, M; Ratti, S P; Riccardi, C; Torre, P; Viola, L; Vitulo, P; Abbrescia, M; Colaleo, A; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Loddo, F; Maggi, M; Marangelli, B; Natali, S; Nuzzo, S; Pugliese, G; Ranieri, A; Romano, F; Salvemini, A

    2000-01-01

    A method to simulate resistive plate chambers (RPCs) gamma sensitivity has been developed using a Monte Carlo code. The sensitivity has been evaluated as a function of the gamma energy in the range 0.1-100 MeV and for different spectra. To evaluate the response of the detector in a Large Hadron Collider (LHC) background environment the gamma energy spectrum expected in the CMS muon barrel has been taken into account and the RPC gamma sensitivity evaluated as a function of the detector size. (3 refs).

  4. Relative camera localisation in non-overlapping camera networks using multiple trajectories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    John, V.; Englebienne, G.; Kröse, B.J.A.

    2012-01-01

    In this article we present an automatic camera calibration algorithm using multiple trajectories in a multiple camera network with non-overlapping field-of-views (FOV). Visible trajectories within a camera FOV are assumed to be measured with respect to the camera local co-ordinate system.

  5. MicroCameras and Photometers (MCP) on board TARANIS satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farges, Thomas; Blanc, Elisabeth; Hébert, Philippe; Le Mer-Dachard, Fanny; Ravel, Karen; Gaillac, Stéphanie

    2017-04-01

    TARANIS (Tool for the Analysis of Radiations from lightNings and Sprites) is a CNES micro satellite. Its main objective is to study impulsive transfers of energy between the Earth atmosphere and the space environment. It will be sun-synchronous at an altitude of 700 km. It will be launched from end-2018 for at least 2 years. Its payload is composed of several electromagnetic instruments in different wavelengths (from gamma-rays to radio waves including optical). TARANIS instruments are currently in calibration and qualification phase. The purpose of this poster is to present the MicroCameras and Photometers (MCP) scientific objectives and the sensor design, to show the performances of this instrument using the recent characterization, and at last to promote its products. The MicroCameras, developed by Sodern, are dedicated to the spatial description of TLEs and their parent lightning. They are able to differentiate sprite and lightning thanks to two narrow bands ([757-767 nm] and [772-782 nm]) that provide simultaneous pairs of images of an Event. Simulation results of the differentiation method will be shown. After calibration and tests, the MicroCameras are now delivered to CNES for integration on the payload. The Photometers, developed by Bertin Technologies, will provide temporal measurements and spectral characteristics of TLEs and lightning. There are key instrument because of their capability to detect on-board TLEs and then switch all the instruments of the scientific payload in their high resolution acquisition mode. Photometers use four spectral bands in the [170-260 nm], [332-342 nm], [757-767 nm] and [600-900 nm] and have the same field of view as cameras. The on-board TLE detection algorithm remote-controlled parameters have been tuned before launch using the electronic board and simulated or real events waveforms. The Photometers are now in the calibration and test phase. They will be delivered for integration in mid-2017.

  6. Characterization of the Series 1000 Camera System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimbrough, J; Moody, J; Bell, P; Landen, O

    2004-04-07

    The National Ignition Facility requires a compact network addressable scientific grade CCD camera for use in diagnostics ranging from streak cameras to gated x-ray imaging cameras. Due to the limited space inside the diagnostic, an analog and digital input/output option in the camera controller permits control of both the camera and the diagnostic by a single Ethernet link. The system consists of a Spectral Instruments Series 1000 camera, a PC104+ controller, and power supply. The 4k by 4k CCD camera has a dynamic range of 70 dB with less than 14 electron read noise at a 1MHz readout rate. The PC104+ controller includes 16 analog inputs, 4 analog outputs and 16 digital input/output lines for interfacing to diagnostic instrumentation. A description of the system and performance characterization is reported.

  7. A Positron CT Camera System Using Multiwire Proportional Chambers as Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-18

    Beijing) Abstract This article reports on a positron computerized tomography camera syste:. using 7ultiwire proportional chambers ( MWPC ) as detectors...This system is composed of two high-density MWPC gamma-ray detectors, an electronic readout system and a computer foi data piocessing. Three...proportional chamber ( MWPC ) PECT is directly used in the field of solid body investigation in physics to measure Fermi surfaces as well as to determine Lhe

  8. Robot Tracer with Visual Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbar Lubis, Abdul; Dwi Lestari, Yuyun; Dafitri, Haida; Azanuddin

    2017-12-01

    Robot is a versatile tool that can function replace human work function. The robot is a device that can be reprogrammed according to user needs. The use of wireless networks for remote monitoring needs can be utilized to build a robot that can be monitored movement and can be monitored using blueprints and he can track the path chosen robot. This process is sent using a wireless network. For visual robot using high resolution cameras to facilitate the operator to control the robot and see the surrounding circumstances.

  9. Directional gamma detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeVert, Francis E.; Cox, Samson A.

    1981-01-01

    An improved directional gamma radiation detector has a collector sandwiched etween two layers of insulation of varying thicknesses. The collector and insulation layers are contained within an evacuated casing, or emitter, which releases electrons upon exposure to gamma radiation. Delayed electrons and electrons entering the collector at oblique angles are attenuated as they pass through the insulation layers on route to the collector.

  10. SHOK—The First Russian Wide-Field Optical Camera in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipunov, V. M.; Gorbovskoy, E. S.; Kornilov, V. G.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Amelushkin, A. M.; Petrov, V. L.; Yashin, I. V.; Svertilov, S. I.; Vedenkin, N. N.

    2018-02-01

    Onboard the spacecraft Lomonosov is established two fast, fixed, very wide-field cameras SHOK. The main goal of this experiment is the observation of GRB optical emission before, synchronously, and after the gamma-ray emission. The field of view of each of the cameras is placed in the gamma-ray burst detection area of other devices located onboard the "Lomonosov" spacecraft. SHOK provides measurements of optical emissions with a magnitude limit of ˜ 9-10m on a single frame with an exposure of 0.2 seconds. The device is designed for continuous sky monitoring at optical wavelengths in the very wide field of view (1000 square degrees each camera), detection and localization of fast time-varying (transient) optical sources on the celestial sphere, including provisional and synchronous time recording of optical emissions from the gamma-ray burst error boxes, detected by the BDRG device and implemented by a control signal (alert trigger) from the BDRG. The Lomonosov spacecraft has two identical devices, SHOK1 and SHOK2. The core of each SHOK device is a fast-speed 11-Megapixel CCD. Each of the SHOK devices represents a monoblock, consisting of a node observations of optical emission, the electronics node, elements of the mechanical construction, and the body.

  11. Resolved photon and multi-component model for $\\gamma^*$p and $\\gamma^* \\gamma^*$ total cross section

    OpenAIRE

    Szczurek, A.; Pietrycki, T.

    2005-01-01

    We generalize our previous model for $\\gamma^* p$ scattering to $\\gamma \\gamma$ scattering. Performing a new simultaneous fit to $\\gamma^* p$ and $\\gamma \\gamma$ total cross section we find an optimal set of parameters to describe both processes. We propose new measures of factorization breaking for $\\gamma^* \\gamma^*$ collisions and present results for our new model.

  12. Optical gamma thermometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, Glen Peter; Xia, Hua; Lee, Boon Kwee

    2013-08-06

    An optical gamma thermometer includes a metal mass having a temperature proportional to a gamma flux within a core of a nuclear reactor, and an optical fiber cable for measuring the temperature of the heated metal mass. The temperature of the heated mass may be measured by using one or more fiber grating structures and/or by using scattering techniques, such as Raman, Brillouin, and the like. The optical gamma thermometer may be used in conjunction with a conventional reactor heat balance to calibrate the local power range monitors over their useful in-service life. The optical gamma thermometer occupies much less space within the in-core instrument tube and costs much less than the conventional gamma thermometer.

  13. Performance evaluation of a new gamma imager for small animal SPECT applications

    OpenAIRE

    Lage, Eduardo; Vaquero, Juan José; Villena, José L.; Carlos, Álvaro de; Tapias, Gustavo; Sisniega, Alejandro; Desco, Manuel

    2007-01-01

    Proceeding of: 2007 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium Conference Record (NSS '07), Honolulu, Hawaii, USA, Oct. 27 - Nov. 3, 2007 Abstract–In this work we characterized a recently developed gamma imager for small animal SPECT applications. The Hamamatsu C9177 is a mini-gamma camera that integrates the detector and all the electronics, including the acquisition system, in a compact and portable housing. The detector is based on a high resolution parallel hole collimator, a CsI(NaI) crystal a...

  14. The image camera of the 17 m diameter air Cherenkov telescope MAGIC

    CERN Document Server

    Ostankov, A P

    2001-01-01

    The image camera of the 17 m diameter MAGIC telescope, an air Cherenkov telescope currently under construction to be installed at the Canary island La Palma, is described. The main goal of the experiment is to cover the unexplored energy window from approx 10 to approx 300 GeV in gamma-ray astrophysics. In its first phase with a classical PMT camera the MAGIC telescope is expected to reach an energy threshold of approx 30 GeV. The operational conditions, the special characteristics of the developed PMTs and their use with light concentrators, the fast signal transfer scheme using analog optical links, the trigger and DAQ organization as well as image reconstruction strategy are described. The different paths being explored towards future camera improvements, in particular the constraints in using silicon avalanche photodiodes and GaAsP hybrid photodetectors in air Cherenkov telescopes are discussed.

  15. Human tracking over camera networks: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Li; Wan, Wanggen; Hwang, Jenq-Neng; Muhammad, Rizwan; Yang, Mingyang; Han, Kang

    2017-12-01

    In recent years, automated human tracking over camera networks is getting essential for video surveillance. The tasks of tracking human over camera networks are not only inherently challenging due to changing human appearance, but also have enormous potentials for a wide range of practical applications, ranging from security surveillance to retail and health care. This review paper surveys the most widely used techniques and recent advances for human tracking over camera networks. Two important functional modules for the human tracking over camera networks are addressed, including human tracking within a camera and human tracking across non-overlapping cameras. The core techniques of human tracking within a camera are discussed based on two aspects, i.e., generative trackers and discriminative trackers. The core techniques of human tracking across non-overlapping cameras are then discussed based on the aspects of human re-identification, camera-link model-based tracking and graph model-based tracking. Our survey aims to address existing problems, challenges, and future research directions based on the analyses of the current progress made toward human tracking techniques over camera networks.

  16. Using DSLR cameras in digital holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hincapié-Zuluaga, Diego; Herrera-Ramírez, Jorge; García-Sucerquia, Jorge

    2017-08-01

    In Digital Holography (DH), the size of the bidimensional image sensor to record the digital hologram, plays a key role on the performance of this imaging technique; the larger the size of the camera sensor, the better the quality of the final reconstructed image. Scientific cameras with large formats are offered in the market, but their cost and availability limit their use as a first option when implementing DH. Nowadays, DSLR cameras provide an easy-access alternative that is worthwhile to be explored. The DSLR cameras are a wide, commercial, and available option that in comparison with traditional scientific cameras, offer a much lower cost per effective pixel over a large sensing area. However, in the DSLR cameras, with their RGB pixel distribution, the sampling of information is different to the sampling in monochrome cameras usually employed in DH. This fact has implications in their performance. In this work, we discuss why DSLR cameras are not extensively used for DH, taking into account the problem reported by different authors of object replication. Simulations of DH using monochromatic and DSLR cameras are presented and a theoretical deduction for the replication problem using the Fourier theory is also shown. Experimental results of DH implementation using a DSLR camera show the replication problem.

  17. Optimising camera traps for monitoring small mammals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alistair S Glen

    Full Text Available Practical techniques are required to monitor invasive animals, which are often cryptic and occur at low density. Camera traps have potential for this purpose, but may have problems detecting and identifying small species. A further challenge is how to standardise the size of each camera's field of view so capture rates are comparable between different places and times. We investigated the optimal specifications for a low-cost camera trap for small mammals. The factors tested were 1 trigger speed, 2 passive infrared vs. microwave sensor, 3 white vs. infrared flash, and 4 still photographs vs. video. We also tested a new approach to standardise each camera's field of view. We compared the success rates of four camera trap designs in detecting and taking recognisable photographs of captive stoats (Mustelaerminea, feral cats (Felis catus and hedgehogs (Erinaceuseuropaeus. Trigger speeds of 0.2-2.1 s captured photographs of all three target species unless the animal was running at high speed. The camera with a microwave sensor was prone to false triggers, and often failed to trigger when an animal moved in front of it. A white flash produced photographs that were more readily identified to species than those obtained under infrared light. However, a white flash may be more likely to frighten target animals, potentially affecting detection probabilities. Video footage achieved similar success rates to still cameras but required more processing time and computer memory. Placing two camera traps side by side achieved a higher success rate than using a single camera. Camera traps show considerable promise for monitoring invasive mammal control operations. Further research should address how best to standardise the size of each camera's field of view, maximise the probability that an animal encountering a camera trap will be detected, and eliminate visible or audible cues emitted by camera traps.

  18. Gamma Ray Burst Optical Counterpart Search Experiment (GROCSE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, H. S.; Ables, E.; Bionta, R. M.; Ott, L.; Parker, E.; Akerlof, C.; Lee, B.; Wallace, S.; Barthelmy, S.; Butterworth, P.

    1995-01-01

    GROCSE (Gamma-Ray Optical Counterpart Search Experiments) is a system of automated telescopes that search for simultaneous optical activity associated with gamma ray bursts in response to real-time burst notifications provided by the BATSE/BACODINE network. The first generation system, GROCSE 1, is sensitive down to Mv (approximately) 8.5 and requires an average of 12 seconds to obtain the first images of the gamma ray burst error box defined by the BACODINE trigger. The collaboration is now constructing a second generation system which has a 4 second slewing time and can reach Mv (approximately) 14 with a 5 second exposure. GROCSE 2 consists of 4 cameras on a single mount. Each camera views the night sky through a commercial Canon lens (f/1.8, focal length 200 mm) and utilizes a 2K x 2K Loral CCD. Light weight and low noise custom readout electronics were designed and fabricated for these CCDs. The total field of view of the 4 cameras is 17.6 x 17.6 (degree). GROCSE 2 will be operated by the end of 1995. In this paper, the authors present an overview of the GROCSE system and the results of measurements with a GROCSE 2 prototype unit.

  19. Recent advances in BazookaSPECT: Real-time data processing and the development of a gamma-ray microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Brian W; Barrett, Harrison H; Furenlid, Lars R; Barber, H Bradford; Hunter, Robert J

    2008-06-11

    Recent advances have been made with the BazookaSPECT detector, a high-resolution CCD-based gamma camera which utilizes an MCP-based image intensifier for upfront optical gain. Operating the gamma camera at high frame rates leads to a massive amount of data throughput, thereby inducing the need for real-time processing. We have developed and implemented a list-mode algorithm which allows for real-time data acquisition and processing at high frame rates. This is accomplished with a graphics processing unit (GPU), which provides processing capabilities in addition to the CPU. We have also developed a gamma-ray microscope based on the BazookaSPECT detector and micro-coded apertures. Experimental phantom images show the gamma-ray microscope having an estimated reconstruction resolution of ~30 μm, an unprecedented resolution in gamma-ray imaging.

  20. GammaWorkshops Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramebaeck, H. (ed.) (Swedish Defence Research Agency (Sweden)); Straalberg, E. (Institute for Energy Technology, Kjeller (Norway)); Klemola, S. (Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, STUK (Finland)); Nielsen, Sven P. (Technical Univ. of Denmark. Risoe National Lab. for Sustainable Energy, Roskilde (Denmark)); Palsson, S.E. (Icelandic Radiation Safety Authority (Iceland))

    2012-01-15

    Due to a sparse interaction during the last years between practioners in gamma ray spectrometry in the Nordic countries, a NKS activity was started in 2009. This GammaSem was focused on seminars relevant to gamma spectrometry. A follow up seminar was held in 2010. As an outcome of these activities it was suggested that the 2011 meeting should be focused on practical issues, e.g. different corrections needed in gamma spectrometric measurements. This three day's meeting, GammaWorkshops, was held in September at Risoe-DTU. Experts on different topics relevant for gamma spectrometric measurements were invited to the GammaWorkshops. The topics included efficiency transfer, true coincidence summing corrections, self-attenuation corrections, measurement of natural radionuclides (natural decay series), combined measurement uncertainty calculations, and detection limits. These topics covered both lectures and practical sessions. The practical sessions included demonstrations of tools for e.g. corrections and calculations of the above meantioned topics. (Author)

  1. High Speed Digital Camera Technology Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, Sandra D.

    2009-01-01

    A High Speed Digital Camera Technology Review (HSD Review) is being conducted to evaluate the state-of-the-shelf in this rapidly progressing industry. Five HSD cameras supplied by four camera manufacturers participated in a Field Test during the Space Shuttle Discovery STS-128 launch. Each camera was also subjected to Bench Tests in the ASRC Imaging Development Laboratory. Evaluation of the data from the Field and Bench Tests is underway. Representatives from the imaging communities at NASA / KSC and the Optical Systems Group are participating as reviewers. A High Speed Digital Video Camera Draft Specification was updated to address Shuttle engineering imagery requirements based on findings from this HSD Review. This draft specification will serve as the template for a High Speed Digital Video Camera Specification to be developed for the wider OSG imaging community under OSG Task OS-33.

  2. Computational imaging for miniature cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salahieh, Basel

    Miniature cameras play a key role in numerous imaging applications ranging from endoscopy and metrology inspection devices to smartphones and head-mount acquisition systems. However, due to the physical constraints, the imaging conditions, and the low quality of small optics, their imaging capabilities are limited in terms of the delivered resolution, the acquired depth of field, and the captured dynamic range. Computational imaging jointly addresses the imaging system and the reconstructing algorithms to bypass the traditional limits of optical systems and deliver better restorations for various applications. The scene is encoded into a set of efficient measurements which could then be computationally decoded to output a richer estimate of the scene as compared with the raw images captured by conventional imagers. In this dissertation, three task-based computational imaging techniques are developed to make low-quality miniature cameras capable of delivering realistic high-resolution reconstructions, providing full-focus imaging, and acquiring depth information for high dynamic range objects. For the superresolution task, a non-regularized direct superresolution algorithm is developed to achieve realistic restorations without being penalized by improper assumptions (e.g., optimizers, priors, and regularizers) made in the inverse problem. An adaptive frequency-based filtering scheme is introduced to upper bound the reconstruction errors while still producing more fine details as compared with previous methods under realistic imaging conditions. For the full-focus imaging task, a computational depth-based deconvolution technique is proposed to bring a scene captured by an ordinary fixed-focus camera to a full-focus based on a depth-variant point spread function prior. The ringing artifacts are suppressed on three levels: block tiling to eliminate boundary artifacts, adaptive reference maps to reduce ringing initiated by sharp edges, and block-wise deconvolution or

  3. The Mars Science Laboratory Engineering Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, J.; Thiessen, D.; Pourangi, A.; Kobzeff, P.; Litwin, T.; Scherr, L.; Elliott, S.; Dingizian, A.; Maimone, M.

    2012-09-01

    NASA's Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Rover is equipped with a set of 12 engineering cameras. These cameras are build-to-print copies of the Mars Exploration Rover cameras described in Maki et al. (J. Geophys. Res. 108(E12): 8071, 2003). Images returned from the engineering cameras will be used to navigate the rover on the Martian surface, deploy the rover robotic arm, and ingest samples into the rover sample processing system. The Navigation cameras (Navcams) are mounted to a pan/tilt mast and have a 45-degree square field of view (FOV) with a pixel scale of 0.82 mrad/pixel. The Hazard Avoidance Cameras (Hazcams) are body-mounted to the rover chassis in the front and rear of the vehicle and have a 124-degree square FOV with a pixel scale of 2.1 mrad/pixel. All of the cameras utilize a 1024×1024 pixel detector and red/near IR bandpass filters centered at 650 nm. The MSL engineering cameras are grouped into two sets of six: one set of cameras is connected to rover computer "A" and the other set is connected to rover computer "B". The Navcams and Front Hazcams each provide similar views from either computer. The Rear Hazcams provide different views from the two computers due to the different mounting locations of the "A" and "B" Rear Hazcams. This paper provides a brief description of the engineering camera properties, the locations of the cameras on the vehicle, and camera usage for surface operations.

  4. Movement-based Interaction in Camera Spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Eva; Riisgaard Hansen, Thomas; Lykke-Olesen, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we present three concepts that address movement-based interaction using camera tracking. Based on our work with several movement-based projects we present four selected applications, and use these applications to leverage our discussion, and to describe our three main concepts space......, relations, and feedback. We see these as central for describing and analysing movement-based systems using camera tracking and we show how these three concepts can be used to analyse other camera tracking applications....

  5. Development of biostereometric experiments. [stereometric camera system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herron, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    The stereometric camera was designed for close-range techniques in biostereometrics. The camera focusing distance of 360 mm to infinity covers a broad field of close-range photogrammetry. The design provides for a separate unit for the lens system and interchangeable backs on the camera for the use of single frame film exposure, roll-type film cassettes, or glass plates. The system incorporates the use of a surface contrast optical projector.

  6. Omnidirectional Underwater Camera Design and Calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep Bosch

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the development of an underwater omnidirectional multi-camera system (OMS based on a commercially available six-camera system, originally designed for land applications. A full calibration method is presented for the estimation of both the intrinsic and extrinsic parameters, which is able to cope with wide-angle lenses and non-overlapping cameras simultaneously. This method is valid for any OMS in both land or water applications. For underwater use, a customized housing is required, which often leads to strong image distortion due to refraction among the different media. This phenomena makes the basic pinhole camera model invalid for underwater cameras, especially when using wide-angle lenses, and requires the explicit modeling of the individual optical rays. To address this problem, a ray tracing approach has been adopted to create a field-of-view (FOV simulator for underwater cameras. The simulator allows for the testing of different housing geometries and optics for the cameras to ensure a complete hemisphere coverage in underwater operation. This paper describes the design and testing of a compact custom housing for a commercial off-the-shelf OMS camera (Ladybug 3 and presents the first results of its use. A proposed three-stage calibration process allows for the estimation of all of the relevant camera parameters. Experimental results are presented, which illustrate the performance of the calibration method and validate the approach.

  7. Omnidirectional Underwater Camera Design and Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Josep; Gracias, Nuno; Ridao, Pere; Ribas, David

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the development of an underwater omnidirectional multi-camera system (OMS) based on a commercially available six-camera system, originally designed for land applications. A full calibration method is presented for the estimation of both the intrinsic and extrinsic parameters, which is able to cope with wide-angle lenses and non-overlapping cameras simultaneously. This method is valid for any OMS in both land or water applications. For underwater use, a customized housing is required, which often leads to strong image distortion due to refraction among the different media. This phenomena makes the basic pinhole camera model invalid for underwater cameras, especially when using wide-angle lenses, and requires the explicit modeling of the individual optical rays. To address this problem, a ray tracing approach has been adopted to create a field-of-view (FOV) simulator for underwater cameras. The simulator allows for the testing of different housing geometries and optics for the cameras to ensure a complete hemisphere coverage in underwater operation. This paper describes the design and testing of a compact custom housing for a commercial off-the-shelf OMS camera (Ladybug 3) and presents the first results of its use. A proposed three-stage calibration process allows for the estimation of all of the relevant camera parameters. Experimental results are presented, which illustrate the performance of the calibration method and validate the approach. PMID:25774707

  8. Low Noise Camera for Suborbital Science Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, David; Robertson, Bryan; Holloway, Todd

    2015-01-01

    Low-cost, commercial-off-the-shelf- (COTS-) based science cameras are intended for lab use only and are not suitable for flight deployment as they are difficult to ruggedize and repackage into instruments. Also, COTS implementation may not be suitable since mission science objectives are tied to specific measurement requirements, and often require performance beyond that required by the commercial market. Custom camera development for each application is cost prohibitive for the International Space Station (ISS) or midrange science payloads due to nonrecurring expenses ($2,000 K) for ground-up camera electronics design. While each new science mission has a different suite of requirements for camera performance (detector noise, speed of image acquisition, charge-coupled device (CCD) size, operation temperature, packaging, etc.), the analog-to-digital conversion, power supply, and communications can be standardized to accommodate many different applications. The low noise camera for suborbital applications is a rugged standard camera platform that can accommodate a range of detector types and science requirements for use in inexpensive to mid range payloads supporting Earth science, solar physics, robotic vision, or astronomy experiments. Cameras developed on this platform have demonstrated the performance found in custom flight cameras at a price per camera more than an order of magnitude lower.

  9. (abstract) Applications of Long-wavelength 256x256 GaAs/Al&subx;Ga&sub1-x;As Quantum Well Infrared Photodetector Hand-held Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunapala, S. D.; Bandara, S. V.; Liu, J. K.; Sundaram, M.; Hong, W.; Shott, C. A.; Hoelter, T.; Laband, S.; James, J. B.

    1997-01-01

    A 9 (micro)m 256x256 hand-held quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP) camera has been demonstrated. Excellent imagery, with a noise equivalent differential temperature (NE(gamma)) of 26 mK has been achieved. In this presentation, we discuss the development of this very sensitive long wavelength infrared (LWIR) camera based on a GaAs/AlGaAs QWIP focal plane array, its performance in quantum efficience, NA(gamma), minimum resolvable temperature (MRTD), uniformity, operability, and its applications.

  10. Basics of Gamma Ray Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stinnett, Jacob [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Venkataraman, Ram [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-09-13

    The objective of this training is to explain the origin of x-rays and gamma rays, gamma ray interactions with matter, detectors and electronics used in gamma ray-spectrometry, and features of a gamma-ray spectrum for nuclear material that is safeguarded.

  11. Charge sharing on monolithic CdZnTe gamma-ray detectors: A simulation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gros d' Aillon, Eric [LETI - CEA Recherche technologique, CEA Grenoble, 17 rue des Martyrs, F 38054 Grenoble, Cedex 9 (France); Tabary, Joachim [LETI - CEA Recherche technologique, CEA Grenoble, 17 rue des Martyrs, F 38054 Grenoble, Cedex 9 (France); Gliere, Alain [LETI - CEA Recherche technologique, CEA Grenoble, 17 rue des Martyrs, F 38054 Grenoble, Cedex 9 (France); Verger, Loick [LETI - CEA Recherche technologique, CEA Grenoble, 17 rue des Martyrs, F 38054 Grenoble, Cedex 9 (France)]. E-mail: loick.verger@cea.fr

    2006-07-01

    Monolithic CdZnTe gamma-ray detectors are used to build gamma cameras for nuclear medicine imaging but their energy resolution is currently limited by charge sharing between adjacent anodes. For this work, charge sharing is simulated using Ulysse, a numerical model that takes into account the physical processes of charge creation by ionizing radiation and charge transport within the semiconductor detector. The charge carrier cloud size, following the gamma-ray photon interaction, is computed by the Monte Carlo method. Electron cloud diffusion and charge induction on the electrodes are computed by the finite element method. This study shows that the electron diffusion strongly influences the final electron cloud diameter.

  12. Rapid optical variability of the gamma-ray burst grb 080319b and its central engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beskin, G.; Karpov, S.; Bondar, S.; Guarnieri, A.; Bartolini, C.; Greco, D.; Piccioni, A.

    2010-07-01

    The results of observations of the optical emission that accompanied the gamma-ray burst GRB 080319B are reported. Observations were made using the TORTORA fast wide-field camera mounted on the REM robotic telescope in Chile. The behavior of the light curve before, during, and after the gamma-ray burst is described. The light curve consists of four, possibly periodic, 5-7 s long peaks 8-9 s apart. The behavior of the burst in the gamma and optical energy ranges are compared and the results of the theoretical interpretation of this comparison are reported.

  13. EXIST OIRT Camera and Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutyrev, Alexander; Moseley, S. H.; Golisano, C.; Gong, Q.; Allen, B.; Grindlay, J.; Hong, J.; Woodgate, B.; EXIST Team

    2009-01-01

    The EXIST mission includes a 1.1m infrared and visible telescope which provides the capability to locate, identify, and obtain spectra of GRB afterglows at redshifts up to z 20. To allow rapid identification and spectroscopic follow up, the instruments will provide wide band imaging, covering the full error circle of the Gamma Ray Telescope (GRT), low spectral resolution slitless spectroscopy, and high resolution integral field spectroscopy. The integral field unit will have a small field of view of 2" x 2" to study diffuse objects, e.g. GRB host galaxies. The instrumentation capabilities will allow this telescope quickly identify the afterglow, measure its brightness curves, redshift, measure spectral characteristics of the GRBs, and measure absorption spectra of the intervening intergalactic medium. With this instrument, high redshift GRBs become important tools for observing the processes through which the universe is ionized.

  14. Dynamic gamma knife radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luan Shuang; Swanson, Nathan; Chen Zhe [Department of Computer Science, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Ma Lijun [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143 (United States)], E-mail: sluan@cs.unm.edu, E-mail: nate@cs.unm.edu, E-mail: zchen@cs.unm.edu, E-mail: lijunma@radonc.ucsf.edu

    2009-03-21

    Gamma knife has been the treatment of choice for various brain tumors and functional disorders. Current gamma knife radiosurgery is planned in a 'ball-packing' approach and delivered in a 'step-and-shoot' manner, i.e. it aims to 'pack' the different sized spherical high-dose volumes (called 'shots') into a tumor volume. We have developed a dynamic scheme for gamma knife radiosurgery based on the concept of 'dose-painting' to take advantage of the new robotic patient positioning system on the latest Gamma Knife C(TM) and Perfexion(TM) units. In our scheme, the spherical high dose volume created by the gamma knife unit will be viewed as a 3D spherical 'paintbrush', and treatment planning reduces to finding the best route of this 'paintbrush' to 'paint' a 3D tumor volume. Under our dose-painting concept, gamma knife radiosurgery becomes dynamic, where the patient moves continuously under the robotic positioning system. We have implemented a fully automatic dynamic gamma knife radiosurgery treatment planning system, where the inverse planning problem is solved as a traveling salesman problem combined with constrained least-square optimizations. We have also carried out experimental studies of dynamic gamma knife radiosurgery and showed the following. (1) Dynamic gamma knife radiosurgery is ideally suited for fully automatic inverse planning, where high quality radiosurgery plans can be obtained in minutes of computation. (2) Dynamic radiosurgery plans are more conformal than step-and-shoot plans and can maintain a steep dose gradient (around 13% per mm) between the target tumor volume and the surrounding critical structures. (3) It is possible to prescribe multiple isodose lines with dynamic gamma knife radiosurgery, so that the treatment can cover the periphery of the target volume while escalating the dose for high tumor burden regions. (4) With dynamic gamma knife radiosurgery, one can

  15. Performance of a new electron-tracking Compton camera under intense radiations from a water target irradiated with a proton beam

    OpenAIRE

    Matsuoka, Yoshihiro; Tanimori, T.; Kubo, H.; Takada, A.; Parker, J D; Mizumoto, T.; Mizumura, Y.; Iwaki, S.; Sawano, T.; Komura, S.; Kishimoto, T.; Oda, M; T. Takemura; Miyamoto, S; Sonoda, S.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed an electron-tracking Compton camera (ETCC) for use in next-generation MeV gamma ray telescopes. An ETCC consists of a gaseous time projection chamber (TPC) and pixel scintillator arrays (PSAs). Since the TPC measures the three dimensional tracks of Compton-recoil electrons, the ETCC can completely reconstruct the incident gamma rays. Moreover, the ETCC demonstrates efficient background rejection power in Compton-kinematics tests, identifies particle from the energy deposit r...

  16. Camera self-calibration from translation by referring to a known camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bin; Hu, Zhaozheng

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a novel linear method for camera self-calibration by referring to a known (or calibrated) camera. The method requires at least three images, with two images generated by the uncalibrated camera from pure translation and one image generated by the known reference camera. We first propose a method to compute the infinite homography from scene depths. Based on this, we use two images generated by translating the uncalibrated camera to recover scene depths, which are further utilized to linearly compute the infinite homography between an arbitrary uncalibrated image, and the image from the known camera. With the known camera as reference, the computed infinite homography is readily decomposed for camera calibration. The proposed self-calibration method has been tested with simulation and real image data. Experimental results demonstrate that the method is practical and accurate. This paper proposes using a "known reference camera" for camera calibration. The pure translation, as required in the method, is much more maneuverable, compared with some strict motions in the literature, such as pure rotation. The proposed self-calibration method has good potential for solving online camera calibration problems, which has important applications, especially for multicamera and zooming camera systems.

  17. Improving Situational Awareness in camera surveillance by combining top-view maps with camera images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooi, F.L.; Zeeders, R.

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the experiment described is to improve today's camera surveillance in public spaces. Three designs with the camera images combined on a top-view map were compared to each other and to the current situation in camera surveillance. The goal was to test which design makes spatial

  18. Development of compact Compton camera for 3D image reconstruction of radioactive contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Y.; Terasaka, Y.; Ozawa, S.; Nakamura Miyamura, H.; Kaburagi, M.; Tanifuji, Y.; Kawabata, K.; Torii, T.

    2017-11-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (FDNPS), operated by Tokyo Electric Power Company Holdings, Inc., went into meltdown after the large tsunami caused by the Great East Japan Earthquake of March 11, 2011. Very large amounts of radionuclides were released from the damaged plant. Radiation distribution measurements inside FDNPS buildings are indispensable to execute decommissioning tasks in the reactor buildings. We have developed a compact Compton camera to measure the distribution of radioactive contamination inside the FDNPS buildings three-dimensionally (3D). The total weight of the Compton camera is lower than 1.0 kg. The gamma-ray sensor of the Compton camera employs Ce-doped GAGG (Gd3Al2Ga3O12) scintillators coupled with a multi-pixel photon counter. Angular correction of the detection efficiency of the Compton camera was conducted. Moreover, we developed a 3D back-projection method using the multi-angle data measured with the Compton camera. We successfully observed 3D radiation images resulting from the two 137Cs radioactive sources, and the image of the 9.2 MBq source appeared stronger than that of the 2.7 MBq source.

  19. Securing Embedded Smart Cameras with Trusted Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winkler Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Camera systems are used in many applications including video surveillance for crime prevention and investigation, traffic monitoring on highways or building monitoring and automation. With the shift from analog towards digital systems, the capabilities of cameras are constantly increasing. Today's smart camera systems come with considerable computing power, large memory, and wired or wireless communication interfaces. With onboard image processing and analysis capabilities, cameras not only open new possibilities but also raise new challenges. Often overlooked are potential security issues of the camera system. The increasing amount of software running on the cameras turns them into attractive targets for attackers. Therefore, the protection of camera devices and delivered data is of critical importance. In this work we present an embedded camera prototype that uses Trusted Computing to provide security guarantees for streamed videos. With a hardware-based security solution, we ensure integrity, authenticity, and confidentiality of videos. Furthermore, we incorporate image timestamping, detection of platform reboots, and reporting of the system status. This work is not limited to theoretical considerations but also describes the implementation of a prototype system. Extensive evaluation results illustrate the practical feasibility of the approach.

  20. Using a Robotic Camera in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groom, Frank M.; Bellaver, Richard

    1997-01-01

    Describes how two professors used a robotic camera to tape their classes and improve their teaching style. The camera was found to be unobtrusive and useful in providing feedback; both professors adjusted their materials and delivery approach as a result. Tapes were used in later classes and for students who missed classes. (AEF)

  1. Rosetta Star Tracker and Navigation Camera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Gøsta

    1998-01-01

    Proposal in response to the Invitation to Tender (ITT) issued by Matra Marconi Space (MSS) for the procurement of the ROSETTA Star Tracker and Navigation Camera.......Proposal in response to the Invitation to Tender (ITT) issued by Matra Marconi Space (MSS) for the procurement of the ROSETTA Star Tracker and Navigation Camera....

  2. An Open Standard for Camera Trap Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tavis Forrester

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Camera traps that capture photos of animals are a valuable tool for monitoring biodiversity. The use of camera traps is rapidly increasing and there is an urgent need for standardization to facilitate data management, reporting and data sharing. Here we offer the Camera Trap Metadata Standard as an open data standard for storing and sharing camera trap data, developed by experts from a variety of organizations. The standard captures information necessary to share data between projects and offers a foundation for collecting the more detailed data needed for advanced analysis. The data standard captures information about study design, the type of camera used, and the location and species names for all detections in a standardized way. This information is critical for accurately assessing results from individual camera trapping projects and for combining data from multiple studies for meta-analysis. This data standard is an important step in aligning camera trapping surveys with best practices in data-intensive science. Ecology is moving rapidly into the realm of big data, and central data repositories are becoming a critical tool and are emerging for camera trap data. This data standard will help researchers standardize data terms, align past data to new repositories, and provide a framework for utilizing data across repositories and research projects to advance animal ecology and conservation.

  3. Solid State Replacement of Rotating Mirror Cameras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, A M; Bartolick, J M

    2006-08-25

    Rotating mirror cameras have been the mainstay of mega-frame per second imaging for decades. There is still no electronic camera that can match a film based rotary mirror camera for the combination of frame count, speed, resolution and dynamic range. The rotary mirror cameras are predominantly used in the range of 0.1 to 100 micro-seconds per frame, for 25 to more than a hundred frames. Electron tube gated cameras dominate the sub microsecond regime but are frame count limited. Video cameras are pushing into the microsecond regime but are resolution limited by the high data rates. An all solid state architecture, dubbed ''In-situ Storage Image Sensor'' or ''ISIS'', by Prof. Goji Etoh, has made its first appearance into the market and its evaluation is discussed. Recent work at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has concentrated both on evaluation of the presently available technologies and exploring the capabilities of the ISIS architecture. It is clear though there is presently no single chip camera that can simultaneously match the rotary mirror cameras, the ISIS architecture has the potential to approach their performance.

  4. Digital airborne camera introduction and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Sandau, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    The last decade has seen great innovations on the airborne camera. This book is the first ever written on the topic and describes all components of a digital airborne camera ranging from the object to be imaged to the mass memory device.

  5. Active spectral imaging nondestructive evaluation (SINDE) camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simova, E.; Rochefort, P.A., E-mail: eli.simova@cnl.ca [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    A proof-of-concept video camera for active spectral imaging nondestructive evaluation has been demonstrated. An active multispectral imaging technique has been implemented in the visible and near infrared by using light emitting diodes with wavelengths spanning from 400 to 970 nm. This shows how the camera can be used in nondestructive evaluation to inspect surfaces and spectrally identify materials and corrosion. (author)

  6. Controlled Impact Demonstration (CID) tail camera video

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    The Controlled Impact Demonstration (CID) was a joint research project by NASA and the FAA to test a survivable aircraft impact using a remotely piloted Boeing 720 aircraft. The tail camera movie is one shot running 27 seconds. It shows the impact from the perspective of a camera mounted high on the vertical stabilizer, looking forward over the fuselage and wings.

  7. A Benchmark for Virtual Camera Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burelli, Paolo; Yannakakis, Georgios N.

    2015-01-01

    Automatically animating and placing the virtual camera in a dynamic environment is a challenging task. The camera is expected to maximise and maintain a set of properties — i.e. visual composition — while smoothly moving through the environment and avoiding obstacles. A large number of different ...

  8. Driving with head-slaved camera system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oving, A.B.; Erp, J.B.F. van

    2001-01-01

    In a field experiment, we tested the effectiveness of a head-slaved camera system for driving an armoured vehicle under armour. This system consists of a helmet-mounted display (HMD), a headtracker, and a motion platform with two cameras. Subjects performed several driving tasks on paved and in

  9. Laser Dazzling of Focal Plane Array Cameras

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schleijpen, H.M.A.; Dimmeler, A.; Eberle, B; Heuvel, J.C. van den; Mieremet, A.L.; Bekman, H.H.P.T.; Mellier, B.

    2007-01-01

    Laser countermeasures against infrared focal plane array cameras aim to saturate the full camera image. In this paper we will discuss the results of dazzling experiments performed with MWIR lasers. In the “low energy” pulse regime we observe an increasing saturated area with increasing power. The

  10. Creating and Using a Camera Obscura

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinnell, Justin

    2012-01-01

    The camera obscura (Latin for "darkened room") is the earliest optical device and goes back over 2500 years. The small pinhole or lens at the front of the room allows light to enter and this is then "projected" onto a screen inside the room. This differs from a camera, which projects its image onto light-sensitive material.…

  11. Fazendo 3d com uma camera so

    CERN Document Server

    Lunazzi, J J

    2010-01-01

    A simple system to make stereo photography or videos based in just two mirrors was made in 1989 and recently adapted to a digital camera setup. Um sistema simples para fazer fotografia ou videos em estereo baseado em dois espelhos que dividem o campo da imagem foi criado no ano 1989, e recentemente adaptado para camera digital.

  12. Cameras Monitor Spacecraft Integrity to Prevent Failures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory contracted Malin Space Science Systems Inc. to outfit Curiosity with four of its cameras using the latest commercial imaging technology. The company parlayed the knowledge gained under working with NASA to develop an off-the-shelf line of cameras, along with a digital video recorder, designed to help troubleshoot problems that may arise on satellites in space.

  13. Characterizations of {\\Gamma}-AG^{**}-groupoids by their {\\Gamma}-ideals

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Madad; Ahmad, Naveed

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we have discusses {\\Gamma}-left, {\\Gamma}-right, {\\Gamma}-bi-, {\\Gamma}-quasi-, {\\Gamma}-interior and {\\Gamma}-ideals in {\\Gamma}-AG^{**}-groupoids and regular {\\Gamma}-AG^{**}-groupoids. Moreover we have proved that the set of {\\Gamma}-ideals in a regular {\\Gamma}-AG^{**}-groupoid form a semilattice structure. Also we have characterized a regular {\\Gamma}-AG^{**}-groupoid in terms of left ideals.

  14. Incremental activity modeling in multiple disjoint cameras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loy, Chen Change; Xiang, Tao; Gong, Shaogang

    2012-09-01

    Activity modeling and unusual event detection in a network of cameras is challenging, particularly when the camera views are not overlapped. We show that it is possible to detect unusual events in multiple disjoint cameras as context-incoherent patterns through incremental learning of time delayed dependencies between distributed local activities observed within and across camera views. Specifically, we model multicamera activities using a Time Delayed Probabilistic Graphical Model (TD-PGM) with different nodes representing activities in different decomposed regions from different views and the directed links between nodes encoding their time delayed dependencies. To deal with visual context changes, we formulate a novel incremental learning method for modeling time delayed dependencies that change over time. We validate the effectiveness of the proposed approach using a synthetic data set and videos captured from a camera network installed at a busy underground station.

  15. Dust on Mars from MSL Engineering Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen-Chen, Hao; Sanchez-Lavega, A.; Perez-Hoyos, Santiago

    2017-10-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) EngineeringCameras were designed for supporting the rover surface operations. Thenavigation camera has a field of view of 45 square degrees, while the hazardavoidance camera, located at the front and rear of the rover and pointingdownwards, counts with a 124 square degrees field of view. Their imagedatabase and sky coverage provides useful information for characterising thedust aerosol physical properties at Gale Crater, complementing the dataretrieved from scientific cameras. In this work, we have reviewed andcalibrated the images from the MSL engineering cameras. The atmosphereextinction values database has been extended. Observations at low scatteringangle have been used to reproduce the dust forward scattering peak and thedust size distribution has been inferred from the sky brightness measurementsusing a discrete ordinates radiative transfer code.

  16. Stereo Cameras for Clouds (STEREOCAM) Instrument Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romps, David [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Oktem, Rusen [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-10-31

    The three pairs of stereo camera setups aim to provide synchronized and stereo calibrated time series of images that can be used for 3D cloud mask reconstruction. Each camera pair is positioned at approximately 120 degrees from the other pair, with a 17o-19o pitch angle from the ground, and at 5-6 km distance from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Central Facility at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Southern Great Plains (SGP) observatory to cover the region from northeast, northwest, and southern views. Images from both cameras of the same stereo setup can be paired together to obtain 3D reconstruction by triangulation. 3D reconstructions from the ring of three stereo pairs can be combined together to generate a 3D mask from surrounding views. This handbook delivers all stereo reconstruction parameters of the cameras necessary to make 3D reconstructions from the stereo camera images.

  17. Lessons Learned from Crime Caught on Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernasco, Wim

    2018-01-01

    Objectives: The widespread use of camera surveillance in public places offers criminologists the opportunity to systematically and unobtrusively observe crime, their main subject matter. The purpose of this essay is to inform the reader of current developments in research on crimes caught on camera. Methods: We address the importance of direct observation of behavior and review criminological studies that used observational methods, with and without cameras, including the ones published in this issue. We also discuss the uses of camera recordings in other social sciences and in biology. Results: We formulate six key insights that emerge from the literature and make recommendations for future research. Conclusions: Camera recordings of real-life crime are likely to become part of the criminological tool kit that will help us better understand the situational and interactional elements of crime. Like any source, it has limitations that are best addressed by triangulation with other sources. PMID:29472728

  18. Diagnosing ICF gamma-ray physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmann, Hans W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kim, Y H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mc Evoy, A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Young, C S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mack, J M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hoffman, N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wilson, D C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Langenbrunner, J R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Evans, S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sedillo, T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Batha, S H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dauffy, L [LLNL; Stoeffl, W [LLNL; Malone, R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kaufman, M I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cox, B C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tunnel, T W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Miller, E K [NSTEC/SB; Ali, Z A [NSREC/LIVERMORE; Horsfield, C J [AWE; Rubery, M [AWE

    2010-01-01

    , dynamic range, cost, and NIF-specific logistics, requirements and extreme radiation environment. Implementation will occur in two phases: (1) four PMT-based channels mounted to the outside of the target chamber at {approx}6m from TCC (GRH-6m) for the 3e13-3e16 DT neutron yield range expected during the early ignition-tuning campaigns; and (2) several channels located just inside the target bay shield wall at 15 m from TCC (GRH-15m) with optical paths leading through the cement shield wall to well-shielded streak cameras and PMTs for the 1e16-1e20 yield range expected during the DT ignition campaign. Multiple channels at each phase will allow for increased redundancy, reliability, accuracy and flexibility. This suite of diagnostics will make possible exploration of interesting {gamma}-ray physics well beyond the ignition campaign.

  19. VLSI-distributed architectures for smart cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Wayne H.

    2001-03-01

    Smart cameras use video/image processing algorithms to capture images as objects, not as pixels. This paper describes architectures for smart cameras that take advantage of VLSI to improve the capabilities and performance of smart camera systems. Advances in VLSI technology aid in the development of smart cameras in two ways. First, VLSI allows us to integrate large amounts of processing power and memory along with image sensors. CMOS sensors are rapidly improving in performance, allowing us to integrate sensors, logic, and memory on the same chip. As we become able to build chips with hundreds of millions of transistors, we will be able to include powerful multiprocessors on the same chip as the image sensors. We call these image sensor/multiprocessor systems image processors. Second, VLSI allows us to put a large number of these powerful sensor/processor systems on a single scene. VLSI factories will produce large quantities of these image processors, making it cost-effective to use a large number of them in a single location. Image processors will be networked into distributed cameras that use many sensors as well as the full computational resources of all the available multiprocessors. Multiple cameras make a number of image recognition tasks easier: we can select the best view of an object, eliminate occlusions, and use 3D information to improve the accuracy of object recognition. This paper outlines approaches to distributed camera design: architectures for image processors and distributed cameras; algorithms to run on distributed smart cameras, and applications of which VLSI distributed camera systems.

  20. Optimising Camera Traps for Monitoring Small Mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glen, Alistair S.; Cockburn, Stuart; Nichols, Margaret; Ekanayake, Jagath; Warburton, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Practical techniques are required to monitor invasive animals, which are often cryptic and occur at low density. Camera traps have potential for this purpose, but may have problems detecting and identifying small species. A further challenge is how to standardise the size of each camera’s field of view so capture rates are comparable between different places and times. We investigated the optimal specifications for a low-cost camera trap for small mammals. The factors tested were 1) trigger speed, 2) passive infrared vs. microwave sensor, 3) white vs. infrared flash, and 4) still photographs vs. video. We also tested a new approach to standardise each camera’s field of view. We compared the success rates of four camera trap designs in detecting and taking recognisable photographs of captive stoats (Mustelaerminea), feral cats (Felis catus) and hedgehogs (Erinaceuseuropaeus). Trigger speeds of 0.2–2.1 s captured photographs of all three target species unless the animal was running at high speed. The camera with a microwave sensor was prone to false triggers, and often failed to trigger when an animal moved in front of it. A white flash produced photographs that were more readily identified to species than those obtained under infrared light. However, a white flash may be more likely to frighten target animals, potentially affecting detection probabilities. Video footage achieved similar success rates to still cameras but required more processing time and computer memory. Placing two camera traps side by side achieved a higher success rate than using a single camera. Camera traps show considerable promise for monitoring invasive mammal control operations. Further research should address how best to standardise the size of each camera’s field of view, maximise the probability that an animal encountering a camera trap will be detected, and eliminate visible or audible cues emitted by camera traps. PMID:23840790

  1. NIR Camera/spectrograph: TEQUILA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, E.; Sohn, E.; Cruz-Gonzalez, I.; Salas, L.; Parraga, A.; Torres, R.; Perez, M.; Cobos, F.; Tejada, C.; Iriarte, A.

    1998-11-01

    We describe the configuration and operation modes of the IR camera/spectrograph called TEQUILA, based on a 1024X1024 HgCdTe FPA (HAWAII). The optical system will allow three possible modes of operation: direct imaging, low and medium resolution spectroscopy and polarimetry. The basic system is being designed to consist of the following: 1) A LN$_2$ dewar that allocates the FPA together with the preamplifiers and a 24 filter position cylinder. 2) Control and readout electronics based on DSP modules linked to a workstation through fiber optics. 3) An optomechanical assembly cooled to -30oC that provides an efficient operation of the instrument in its various modes. 4) A control module for the moving parts of the instrument. The opto-mechanical assembly will have the necessary provisions to install a scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer and an adaptive optics correction system. The final image acquisition and control of the whole instrument is carried out in a workstation to provide the observer with a friendly environment. The system will operate at the 2.1 m telescope at the Observatorio Astronomico Nacional in San Pedro Martir, B.C. (Mexico), and is intended to be a first-light instrument for the new 7.8 m Mexican Infrared-Optical Telescope (TIM).

  2. Positron imaging with multiwire proportional chamber-gamma converter hybrid detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, D.Y.H.

    1976-09-01

    A large area positron camera was developed using multiwire proportional chambers as detectors and electromagnetic delay lines for coordinate readout. Honeycomb structured gamma converters made of lead are coupled to the chambers for efficient gamma detection and good spatial resolution. Two opposing detectors, each having a sensitive area of 48 cm x 48 cm, are operated in coincidence for the detection of annihilation gammas (511 keV) from positron emitters. Detection efficiency of 4.2 percent per detector and spatial resolution of 6 to 7 mm FWHM at the mid-plane were achieved. The present camera operates at a maximum count rate of 24 K counts/min, limited by accidental coincidence. The theory for the gamma converter is presented along with a review of the operation of the multiwire proportional chamber and delay line readout. Calculated gamma converter efficiencies are compared with the measured results using a prototype test chamber. The characteristics of the positron camera system is evaluated, and the performance is shown to be consistent with calculation.

  3. Gamma ray optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jentschel, M.; Günther, M. M.; Habs, D.; Thirolf, P. G.

    2012-07-01

    Via refractive or diffractive scattering one can shape γ ray beams in terms of beam divergence, spot size and monochromaticity. These concepts might be particular important in combination with future highly brilliant gamma ray sources and might push the sensibility of planned experiments by several orders of magnitude. We will demonstrate the experimental feasibility of gamma ray monochromatization on a ppm level and the creation of a gamma ray beam with nanoradian divergence. The results are obtained using the inpile target position of the High Flux Reactor of the ILL Grenoble and the crystal spectrometer GAMS. Since the refractive index is believed to vanish to zero with 1/E2, the concept of refractive optics has never been considered for gamma rays. The combination of refractive optics with monochromator crystals is proposed to be a promising design. Using the crystal spectrometer GAMS, we have measured for the first time the refractive index at energies in the energy range of 180 - 2000 keV. The results indicate a deviation from simple 1/E2 extrapolation of X-ray results towards higher energies. A first interpretation of these new results will be presented. We will discuss the consequences of these results on the construction of refractive optics such as lenses or refracting prisms for gamma rays and their combination with single crystal monochromators.

  4. Gamma Ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S. T.

    2000-01-01

    The project has progressed successfully during this period of performance. The highlights of the Gamma Ray Astronomy teams efforts are: (1) Support daily BATSE data operations, including receipt, archival and dissemination of data, quick-look science analysis, rapid gamma-ray burst and transient monitoring and response efforts, instrument state-of-health monitoring, and instrument commanding and configuration; (2) On-going scientific analysis, including production and maintenance of gamma-ray burst, pulsed source and occultation source catalogs, gamma-ray burst spectroscopy, studies of the properties of pulsars and black holes, and long-term monitoring of hard x-ray sources; (3) Maintenance and continuous improvement of BATSE instrument response and calibration data bases; (4) Investigation of the use of solid state detectors for eventual application and instrument to perform all sky monitoring of X-Ray and Gamma sources with high sensitivity; and (5) Support of BATSE outreach activities, including seminars, colloquia and World Wide Web pages. The highlights of this efforts can be summarized in the publications and presentation list.

  5. Keck Autoguider and Camera Server Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupton, W. F.

    On the Keck telescope, autoguiders are not tightly integrated into the telescope control system; an autoguider is just an instrument which happens to have been asked to send guide star positions to the telescope. A standard message interface has been defined, and any source of guide star positions which adheres to this interface can play the role of the autoguider. This means that it would be easy for science instruments with fast readout rates (this of course includes all thermal infra-red instruments) to provide guide star positions. Much of an autoguider's user interface and control logic is independent of the actual source of the guide star positions. Accordingly the Keck telescope has defined an internal ``camera server'' protocol which is used by camera-independent high-level autoguider software to control physical cameras. As yet this protocol is only supported by one type of camera (the Photometrics camera which is used for all Keck autoguiders). Support for other types of camera, for example an infra-red camera, is planned. The poster display will illustrate the Keck approach to autoguiding, will show some of the advantages and disadvantages of the Keck approach, and will discuss future plans.

  6. Uav Cameras: Overview and Geometric Calibration Benchmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, M.; Przybilla, H.-J.; Zurhorst, A.

    2017-08-01

    Different UAV platforms and sensors are used in mapping already, many of them equipped with (sometimes) modified cameras as known from the consumer market. Even though these systems normally fulfil their requested mapping accuracy, the question arises, which system performs best? This asks for a benchmark, to check selected UAV based camera systems in well-defined, reproducible environments. Such benchmark is tried within this work here. Nine different cameras used on UAV platforms, representing typical camera classes, are considered. The focus is laid on the geometry here, which is tightly linked to the process of geometrical calibration of the system. In most applications the calibration is performed in-situ, i.e. calibration parameters are obtained as part of the project data itself. This is often motivated because consumer cameras do not keep constant geometry, thus, cannot be seen as metric cameras. Still, some of the commercial systems are quite stable over time, as it was proven from repeated (terrestrial) calibrations runs. Already (pre-)calibrated systems may offer advantages, especially when the block geometry of the project does not allow for a stable and sufficient in-situ calibration. Especially for such scenario close to metric UAV cameras may have advantages. Empirical airborne test flights in a calibration field have shown how block geometry influences the estimated calibration parameters and how consistent the parameters from lab calibration can be reproduced.

  7. Towards next generation 3D cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Mohit

    2017-03-01

    We are in the midst of a 3D revolution. Robots enabled by 3D cameras are beginning to autonomously drive cars, perform surgeries, and manage factories. However, when deployed in the real-world, these cameras face several challenges that prevent them from measuring 3D shape reliably. These challenges include large lighting variations (bright sunlight to dark night), presence of scattering media (fog, body tissue), and optically complex materials (metal, plastic). Due to these factors, 3D imaging is often the bottleneck in widespread adoption of several key robotics technologies. I will talk about our work on developing 3D cameras based on time-of-flight and active triangulation that addresses these long-standing problems. This includes designing `all-weather' cameras that can perform high-speed 3D scanning in harsh outdoor environments, as well as cameras that recover shape of objects with challenging material properties. These cameras are, for the first time, capable of measuring detailed (<100 microns resolution) scans in extremely demanding scenarios with low-cost components. Several of these cameras are making a practical impact in industrial automation, being adopted in robotic inspection and assembly systems.

  8. First results from the TOPSAT camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenway, Paul; Tosh, Ian; Morris, Nigel; Burton, Gary; Cawley, Steve

    2017-11-01

    The TopSat camera is a low cost remote sensing imager capable of producing 2.5 metre resolution panchromatic imagery, funded by the British National Space Centre's Mosaic programme. The instrument was designed and assembled at the Space Science & Technology Department of the CCLRC's Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in the UK, and was launched on the 27th October 2005 from Plesetsk Cosmodrome in Northern Russia on a Kosmos-3M. The camera utilises an off-axis three mirror system, which has the advantages of excellent image quality over a wide field of view, combined with a compactness that makes its overall dimensions smaller than its focal length. Keeping the costs to a minimum has been a major design driver in the development of this camera. The camera is part of the TopSat mission, which is a collaboration between four UK organisations; QinetiQ, Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd (SSTL), RAL and Infoterra. Its objective is to demonstrate provision of rapid response high resolution imagery to fixed and mobile ground stations using a low cost minisatellite. The paper "Development of the TopSat Camera" presented by RAL at the 5th ICSO in 2004 described the opto-mechanical design, assembly, alignment and environmental test methods implemented. Now that the spacecraft is in orbit and successfully acquiring images, this paper presents the first results from the camera and makes an initial assessment of the camera's in-orbit performance.

  9. Proprioceptive evoked gamma oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnfred, S.M.; Hansen, Lars Kai; Parnas, J.

    2007-01-01

    A proprioceptive stimulus consisting of a weight change of a handheld load has recently been shown to elicit an evoked potential. Previously, somatosensory gamma oscillations have only been evoked by electrical stimuli. We conjectured that a natural proprioceptive stimulus also would be able...... to evoke gamma oscillations. EEG was recorded using 64 channels in 14 healthy subjects. In each of three runs a stimulus of 100 g load increment in each hand was presented in 120 trials. Data were wavelet transformed and runs collapsed. Inter-trial phase coherence (ITPC) was computed as the best measure...... contralateral to stimulus side and additionally an unexpected 20 Hz activity was observed slightly lateralized in the frontal central region. The gamma phase locking may be a manifestation of early somatosensory feature integration. The analyses suggest that the high frequency activity consists of two distinct...

  10. Adapting virtual camera behaviour through player modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burelli, Paolo; Yannakakis, Georgios N.

    2015-01-01

    a novel approach to virtual camera control, which builds upon camera control and player modelling to provide the user with an adaptive point-of-view. To achieve this goal, we propose a methodology to model the player’s preferences on virtual camera movements and we employ the resulting models to tailor...... the viewpoint movements to the player type and her game-play style. Ultimately, the methodology is applied to a 3D platform game and is evaluated through a controlled experiment; the results suggest that the resulting adaptive cinematographic experience is favoured by some player types and it can generate...

  11. Lessons Learned from Crime Caught on Camera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Marie Rosenkrantz; Bernasco, Wim

    2018-01-01

    Objectives: The widespread use of camera surveillance in public places offers criminologists the opportunity to systematically and unobtrusively observe crime, their main subject matter. The purpose of this essay is to inform the reader of current developments in research on crimes caught on camera...... formulate six key insights that emerge from the literature and make recommendations for future research. Conclusions: Camera recordings of real-life crime are likely to become part of the criminological tool kit that will help us better understand the situational and interactional elements of crime. Like...

  12. Modelling Virtual Camera Behaviour Through Player Gaze

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Picardi, Andrea; Burelli, Paolo; Yannakakis, Georgios N.

    2012-01-01

    industry and game AI research focus on the devel- opment of increasingly sophisticated systems to automate the control of the virtual camera integrating artificial intel- ligence algorithms within physical simulations. However, in both industry and academia little research has been carried out...... on the relationship between virtual camera, game-play and player behaviour. We run a game user experiment to shed some light on this relationship and identify relevant dif- ferences between camera behaviours through different game sessions, playing behaviours and player gaze patterns. Re- sults show that users can...

  13. A Dataset for Camera Independent Color Constancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aytekin, Caglar; Nikkanen, Jarno; Gabbouj, Moncef

    2017-10-17

    In this paper, we provide a novel dataset designed for camera independent color constancy research. Camera independence corresponds to the robustness of an algorithm's performance when run on images of the same scene taken by different cameras. Accordingly, the images in our database correspond to several lab and field scenes each of which is captured by three different cameras with minimal registration errors. The lab scenes are also captured under five different illuminations. The spectral responses of cameras and the spectral power distributions of the lab light sources are also provided, as they may prove beneficial for training future algorithms to achieve color constancy. For a fair evaluation of future methods, we provide guidelines for supervised methods with indicated training, validation and testing partitions. Accordingly, we evaluate two recently proposed convolutional neural network based color constancy algorithms as baselines for future research. As a side contribution, this dataset also includes images taken by a mobile camera with color shading corrected and uncorrected results. This allows research on the effect of color shading as well.In this paper, we provide a novel dataset designed for camera independent color constancy research. Camera independence corresponds to the robustness of an algorithm's performance when run on images of the same scene taken by different cameras. Accordingly, the images in our database correspond to several lab and field scenes each of which is captured by three different cameras with minimal registration errors. The lab scenes are also captured under five different illuminations. The spectral responses of cameras and the spectral power distributions of the lab light sources are also provided, as they may prove beneficial for training future algorithms to achieve color constancy. For a fair evaluation of future methods, we provide guidelines for supervised methods with indicated training, validation and testing

  14. A Monte Carlo study of a high resolution $\\gamma$-detector for small organ imaging in Nuclear Medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Ortigão, C

    2004-01-01

    A reliable Monte Carlo simulation study is of significance importance to evaluate the performance of a gamma-ray detector and the search for compromises between spatial resolution, sensitivity and energy resolution. The development of a simulation package for a new compact gamma camera based on GEANT3 is described in this report. This simulation takes into account the interaction of gamma-rays in the crystal, the production and transport of scintillation photons and allows an accurate radiation transport description of photon attenuation in high-Z collimators, for SPECT applications. In order to achieve the best setup configuration different detector arrangements were explored, namely different scintillation crystals, coatings, reflector properties and polishing types. The conventional detector system, based on PMT light readout, was compared with an HPD system. Different collimators were studied for high resolution applications with compact gamma-cameras.

  15. Measurement of the gamma gamma* --> eta and gamma gamma* --> eta' transition form factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    del Amo Sanchez et al, P.

    2011-02-07

    We study the reactions e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -} {eta}{sup (/)} in the single-tag mode and measure the {gamma}{gamma}* {yields} {eta}{sup (/)} transition form factors in the momentum transfer range from 4 to 40 GeV{sup 2}. The analysis is based on 469 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected at PEP-II with the BABAR detector at e{sup +}e{sup -} center-of-mass energies near 10.6 GeV.

  16. Gamma-ray bursts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil; Mészáros, Péter

    2012-08-24

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bright flashes of gamma rays coming from the cosmos. They occur roughly once per day, typically last for tens of seconds, and are the most luminous events in the universe. More than three decades after their discovery, and after pioneering advances from space and ground experiments, they still remain mysterious. The launch of the Swift and Fermi satellites in 2004 and 2008 brought in a trove of qualitatively new data. In this Review, we survey the interplay between these recent observations and the theoretical models of the prompt GRB emission and the subsequent afterglow.

  17. Gamma measurements at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Cheung, Faye

    2016-01-01

    Recent measurements of the CKM angle g from charged and neutral B$\\rightarrow$ DK(*) decays, with a variety of D final states, are presented. The measurements are performed using proton-proton collision data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb$^{-1}$ collected at the LHCb experiment during Run I of the LHC. The results of a combination of LHCb g measurements are discussed. The combined value of $\\gamma$ is $(70.9^{+7.1}_{-8.5})^{\\circ}$ and is the most precise measurement of $\\gamma$ from a single experiment.

  18. CKM angle $\\gamma$ from LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Smith, Jackson

    2015-01-01

    Results of the latest $\\gamma$ combination from LHCb are presented, along with the six LHCb measurements used as inputs. In addition, the anticipated precision attainable for measuring $\\gamma$ after the LHCb Upgrade is outlined

  19. Interferon Gamma-1b Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interferon gamma-1b injection is used to reduce the frequency and severity of serious infections in people with chronic ... severe, malignant osteopetrosis (an inherited bone disease). Interferon gamma-1b is in a class of medications called ...

  20. A compact gamma ray imager for oncology

    CERN Document Server

    Pani, R; Del Guerra, A; Festinesi, A; Garibaldi, F; Gigliotti, T; Pellegrini, R; Scafe, R; Scopinaro, F; Soluri, A; Tati, A

    2002-01-01

    A variety of new techniques based on radiopharmaceuticals are showing a valid support for cancer detection and interventional procedures. Axillary lymph nodes status is the most important prognostic factor for determining breast cancer prognosis. The use of dedicated gamma cameras characterized by low costs and weight, could be easily transferred to detection for bioptical procedures. To this aim this paper presents a new detection system having two heads with 4 and 25 cm sup 2 Field of View (FOV) and 0.8 and 3.6 kg weight, respectively. This novel scintillation camera is based upon a compact Position Sensitive Photo Multiplier Tube (PSPMT) Hamamatsu R5900-C8 as individual or array assembled. The Hamamatsu R5900-C8 is a metal channel dynode PMT with a crossed wire anode. The overall dimensions are 28x28 mm sup 2 and 20 mm height. It was coupled to a CsI(Tl) array of individual 3x3x3 mm sup 3 crystals. The measured intrinsic spatial resolution proved much better than the pixel size. A clinical image obtained f...

  1. Gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamma-GT; GGTP; GGT; Gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase ... Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase (GGTP, gamma-glutamyltransferase) - blood. In: Chernecky CC, Berger BJ, eds. Laboratory Tests and Diagnostic Procedures . 6th ed. St Louis, ...

  2. Camera Based Navigation System with Augmented Reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Marcu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays smart mobile devices have enough processing power, memory, storage and always connected wireless communication bandwidth that makes them available for any type of application. Augmented reality (AR proposes a new type of applications that tries to enhance the real world by superimposing or combining virtual objects or computer generated information with it. In this paper we present a camera based navigation system with augmented reality integration. The proposed system aims to the following: the user points the camera of the smartphone towards a point of interest, like a building or any other place, and the application searches for relevant information about that specific place and superimposes the data over the video feed on the display. When the user moves the camera away, changing its orientation, the data changes as well, in real-time, with the proper information about the place that is now in the camera view.

  3. CALIBRATION PROCEDURES ON OBLIQUE CAMERA SETUPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Kemper

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Beside the creation of virtual animated 3D City models, analysis for homeland security and city planning, the accurately determination of geometric features out of oblique imagery is an important task today. Due to the huge number of single images the reduction of control points force to make use of direct referencing devices. This causes a precise camera-calibration and additional adjustment procedures. This paper aims to show the workflow of the various calibration steps and will present examples of the calibration flight with the final 3D City model. In difference to most other software, the oblique cameras are used not as co-registered sensors in relation to the nadir one, all camera images enter the AT process as single pre-oriented data. This enables a better post calibration in order to detect variations in the single camera calibration and other mechanical effects. The shown sensor (Oblique Imager is based o 5 Phase One cameras were the nadir one has 80 MPIX equipped with a 50 mm lens while the oblique ones capture images with 50 MPix using 80 mm lenses. The cameras are mounted robust inside a housing to protect this against physical and thermal deformations. The sensor head hosts also an IMU which is connected to a POS AV GNSS Receiver. The sensor is stabilized by a gyro-mount which creates floating Antenna –IMU lever arms. They had to be registered together with the Raw GNSS-IMU Data. The camera calibration procedure was performed based on a special calibration flight with 351 shoots of all 5 cameras and registered the GPS/IMU data. This specific mission was designed in two different altitudes with additional cross lines on each flying heights. The five images from each exposure positions have no overlaps but in the block there are many overlaps resulting in up to 200 measurements per points. On each photo there were in average 110 well distributed measured points which is a satisfying number for the camera calibration. In a first

  4. Calibration Procedures on Oblique Camera Setups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, G.; Melykuti, B.; Yu, C.

    2016-06-01

    Beside the creation of virtual animated 3D City models, analysis for homeland security and city planning, the accurately determination of geometric features out of oblique imagery is an important task today. Due to the huge number of single images the reduction of control points force to make use of direct referencing devices. This causes a precise camera-calibration and additional adjustment procedures. This paper aims to show the workflow of the various calibration steps and will present examples of the calibration flight with the final 3D City model. In difference to most other software, the oblique cameras are used not as co-registered sensors in relation to the nadir one, all camera images enter the AT process as single pre-oriented data. This enables a better post calibration in order to detect variations in the single camera calibration and other mechanical effects. The shown sensor (Oblique Imager) is based o 5 Phase One cameras were the nadir one has 80 MPIX equipped with a 50 mm lens while the oblique ones capture images with 50 MPix using 80 mm lenses. The cameras are mounted robust inside a housing to protect this against physical and thermal deformations. The sensor head hosts also an IMU which is connected to a POS AV GNSS Receiver. The sensor is stabilized by a gyro-mount which creates floating Antenna -IMU lever arms. They had to be registered together with the Raw GNSS-IMU Data. The camera calibration procedure was performed based on a special calibration flight with 351 shoots of all 5 cameras and registered the GPS/IMU data. This specific mission was designed in two different altitudes with additional cross lines on each flying heights. The five images from each exposure positions have no overlaps but in the block there are many overlaps resulting in up to 200 measurements per points. On each photo there were in average 110 well distributed measured points which is a satisfying number for the camera calibration. In a first step with the help of

  5. POLICE BODY CAMERAS: SEEING MAY BE BELIEVING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noel Otu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available While the concept of body-mounted cameras (BMC worn by police officers is a controversial issue, it is not new. Since in the early-2000s, police departments across the United States, England, Brazil, and Australia have been implementing wearable cameras. Like all devices used in policing, body-mounted cameras can create a sense of increased power, but also additional responsibilities for both the agencies and individual officers. This paper examines the public debate regarding body-mounted cameras. The conclusions drawn show that while these devices can provide information about incidents relating to police–citizen encounters, and can deter citizen and police misbehavior, these devices can also violate a citizen’s privacy rights. This paper outlines several ramifications for practice as well as implications for policy.

  6. Ge Quantum Dot Infrared Imaging Camera Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Luna Innovations Incorporated proposes to develop a high performance Ge quantum dots-based infrared (IR) imaging camera on Si substrate. The high sensitivity, large...

  7. Camera vibration measurement using blinking light-emitting diode array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Kazuki; Matsuda, Yuichi

    2017-01-23

    We present a new method for measuring camera vibrations such as camera shake and shutter shock. This method successfully detects the vibration trajectory and transient waveforms from the camera image itself. We employ a time-varying pattern as the camera test chart over the conventional static pattern. This pattern is implemented using a specially developed blinking light-emitting-diode array. We describe the theoretical framework and pattern analysis of the camera image for measuring camera vibrations. Our verification experiments show that our method has a detection accuracy and sensitivity of 0.1 pixels, and is robust against image distortion. Measurement results of camera vibrations in commercial cameras are also demonstrated.

  8. A stereoscopic lens for digital cinema cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipton, Lenny; Rupkalvis, John

    2015-03-01

    Live-action stereoscopic feature films are, for the most part, produced using a costly post-production process to convert planar cinematography into stereo-pair images and are only occasionally shot stereoscopically using bulky dual-cameras that are adaptations of the Ramsdell rig. The stereoscopic lens design described here might very well encourage more live-action image capture because it uses standard digital cinema cameras and workflow to save time and money.

  9. MCP gated x-ray framing camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Houzhi; Liu, Jinyuan; Niu, Lihong; Liao, Hua; Zhou, Junlan

    2009-11-01

    A four-frame gated microchannel plate (MCP) camera is described in this article. Each frame photocathode coated with gold on the MCP is part of a transmission line with open circuit end driven by the gating electrical pulse. The gating pulse is 230 ps in width and 2.5 kV in amplitude. The camera is tested by illuminating its photocathode with ultraviolet laser pulses, 266 nm in wavelength, which shows exposure time as short as 80 ps.

  10. Face identification in videos from mobile cameras

    OpenAIRE

    Mu, Meiru; Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.

    2014-01-01

    It is still challenging to recognize faces reliably in videos from mobile camera, although mature automatic face recognition technology for still images has been available for quite some time. Suppose we want to be alerted when suspects appear in the recording of a police Body-Cam, even a good face matcher on still images would give many false alarms due to the uncontrolled conditions. This paper presents an approach to identify faces in videos from mobile cameras. A commercial face matcher F...

  11. Proprioceptive evoked gamma oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnfred, Sidse M; Hansen, Lars Kai; Parnas, Josef

    2007-01-01

    to evoke gamma oscillations. EEG was recorded using 64 channels in 14 healthy subjects. In each of three runs a stimulus of 100 g load increment in each hand was presented in 120 trials. Data were wavelet transformed and runs collapsed. Inter-trial phase coherence (ITPC) was computed as the best measure...

  12. Gamma rays from Galactic Pulsars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calore, F.; di Mauro, M.; Donato, F.

    2015-01-01

    Gamma rays from young pulsars and milli-second pulsars are expected to contribute to the diuse gamma-ray emission measured by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) at high latitudes. We derive the contribution of the pulsars undetected counterpart by using information from radio to gamma rays and we

  13. The Use of Camera Traps in Wildlife

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasin Uçarlı

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Camera traps are increasingly used in the abundance and density estimates of wildlife species. Camera traps are very good alternative for direct observation in case, particularly, steep terrain, dense vegetation covered areas or nocturnal species. The main reason for the use of camera traps is eliminated that the economic, personnel and time loss in a continuous manner at the same time in different points. Camera traps, motion and heat sensitive, can take a photo or video according to the models. Crossover points and feeding or mating areas of the focal species are addressed as a priority camera trap set locations. The population size can be finding out by the images combined with Capture-Recapture methods. The population density came out the population size divided to effective sampling area size. Mating and breeding season, habitat choice, group structures and survival rates of the focal species can be achieved from the images. Camera traps are very useful to obtain the necessary data about the particularly mysterious species with economically in planning and conservation efforts.

  14. Minimum Requirements for Taxicab Security Cameras*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Shengke; Amandus, Harlan E.; Amendola, Alfred A.; Newbraugh, Bradley H.; Cantis, Douglas M.; Weaver, Darlene

    2015-01-01

    Problem The homicide rate of taxicab-industry is 20 times greater than that of all workers. A NIOSH study showed that cities with taxicab-security cameras experienced significant reduction in taxicab driver homicides. Methods Minimum technical requirements and a standard test protocol for taxicab-security cameras for effective taxicab-facial identification were determined. The study took more than 10,000 photographs of human-face charts in a simulated-taxicab with various photographic resolutions, dynamic ranges, lens-distortions, and motion-blurs in various light and cab-seat conditions. Thirteen volunteer photograph-evaluators evaluated these face photographs and voted for the minimum technical requirements for taxicab-security cameras. Results Five worst-case scenario photographic image quality thresholds were suggested: the resolution of XGA-format, highlight-dynamic-range of 1 EV, twilight-dynamic-range of 3.3 EV, lens-distortion of 30%, and shutter-speed of 1/30 second. Practical Applications These minimum requirements will help taxicab regulators and fleets to identify effective taxicab-security cameras, and help taxicab-security camera manufacturers to improve the camera facial identification capability. PMID:26823992

  15. Low light performance of digital still cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wueller, Dietmar

    2013-03-01

    The major difference between a dSLR camera, a consumer camera, and a camera in a mobile device is the sensor size. The sensor size is also related to the over all system size including the lens. With the sensors getting smaller the individual light sensitive areas are also getting smaller leaving less light falling onto each of the pixels. This effect requires higher signal amplification that leads to higher noise levels or other problems that may occur due to denoising algorithms. These Problems become more visible at low light conditions because of the lower signal levels. The fact that the sensitivity of cameras decreases makes customers ask for a standardized way to measure low light performance of cameras. The CEA (Consumer Electronics Association) together with ANSI has addressed this for camcorders in the CEA-639 [1] standard. The ISO technical committee 42 (photography) is currently also thinking about a potential standard on this topic for still picture cameras. This paper is part of the preparation work for this standardization activity and addresses the differences compared to camcorders and also potential additional problems with noise reduction that have occurred over the past few years. The result of this paper is a proposed test procedure with a few open questions that have to be answered in future work.

  16. Multi-Angle Snowflake Camera Instrument Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuefer, Martin [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States); Bailey, J. [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States)

    2016-07-01

    The Multi-Angle Snowflake Camera (MASC) takes 9- to 37-micron resolution stereographic photographs of free-falling hydrometers from three angles, while simultaneously measuring their fall speed. Information about hydrometeor size, shape orientation, and aspect ratio is derived from MASC photographs. The instrument consists of three commercial cameras separated by angles of 36º. Each camera field of view is aligned to have a common single focus point about 10 cm distant from the cameras. Two near-infrared emitter pairs are aligned with the camera’s field of view within a 10-angular ring and detect hydrometeor passage, with the lower emitters configured to trigger the MASC cameras. The sensitive IR motion sensors are designed to filter out slow variations in ambient light. Fall speed is derived from successive triggers along the fall path. The camera exposure times are extremely short, in the range of 1/25,000th of a second, enabling the MASC to capture snowflake sizes ranging from 30 micrometers to 3 cm.

  17. Measurement of {\\eta} meson production in {\\gamma}{\\gamma} interactions and {\\Gamma}({\\eta}-->{\\gamma}{\\gamma}) with the KLOE detector

    CERN Document Server

    :,; Badoni, D; Balwierz-Pytko, I; Bencivenni, G; Bini, C; Bloise, C; Bossi, F; Branchini, P; Budano, A; Balkestaahl, L Caldeira; Capon, G; Ceradini, F; Ciambrone, P; Czerwinski, E; Dane, E; De Lucia, E; De Robertis, G; De Santis, A; Di Domenico, A; Di Donato, C; Di Salvo, R; Domenici, D; Erriquez, O; Fanizzi, G; Fantini, A; Felici, G; Fiore, S; Franzini, P; Gauzzi, P; Giardina, G; Giovannella, S; Gonnella, F; Graziani, E; Happacher, F; Heijkenskj, L; Hoistad, B; Iafolla, L; Jacewicz, M; Johansson, T; Kupsc, A; Lee-Franzini, J; Leverington, B; Loddo, F; Loffredo, S; Mandaglio, G; Martemianov, M; Martini, M; Mascolo, M; Messi, R; Miscetti, S; Morello, G; Moricciani, D; Moskal, P; Nguyen, F; Passeri, A; Patera, V; Longhi, I Prado; Ranieri, A; Redmer, C F; Santangelo, P; Sarra, I; Schioppa, M; Sciascia, B; Silarski, M; Taccini, C; Tortora, L; Venanzoni, G; Wislicki, W; Wolke, M; Zdebik, J

    2012-01-01

    We present a measurement of {\\eta} meson production in photon-photon interactions produced by electron-positron beams colliding with \\sqrt{s}=1 GeV. The measurement is done with the KLOE detector at the \\phi-factory DA{\\Phi}NE with an integrated luminosity of 0.24 fb^{-1}. The e^+e^- --> e^+e^-{\\eta} cross section is measured without detecting the outgoing electron and positron, selecting the decays {\\eta}-->{\\pi}^+{\\pi}^-{\\pi}^0 and {\\eta}-->{\\pi}^0{\\pi}^0{\\pi}^0. The most relevant background is due to e^+e^- --> {\\eta}{\\gamma} when the monochromatic photon escapes detection. The cross section for this process is measured as {\\sigma}(e^+e^- -->{\\eta}{\\gamma}) = (856 \\pm 8_{stat} \\pm 16_{syst}) pb. The combined result for the e^+e^- -->e^+e^-{\\eta} cross section is {\\sigma}(e^+e^- -->e^+e^-{\\eta}) = (32.72 \\pm 1.27_{stat} \\pm 0.70_{syst}) pb. From this we derive the partial width {\\Gamma}({\\eta}-->{\\gamma}{\\gamma}) = (520 \\pm 20_{stat} \\pm 13_{syst}) eV. This is in agreement with the world average and is the ...

  18. A Major Upgrade of the H.E.S.S. Cherenkov Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lypova, Iryna; Giavitto, Gianluca; Ashton, Terry; Balzer, Arnim; Berge, David; Brun, Francois; Chaminade, Thomas; Delagnes, Eric; Fontaine, Gerard; Füßling, Matthias; Giebels, Berrie; Glicenstein, Jean-Francois; Gräber, Tobias; Hinton, Jim; Jahnke, Albert; Klepser, Stefan; Kossatz, Marko; Kretzschmann, Axel; Lefranc, Valentin; Leich, Holger; Lüdecke, Hartmut; Manigot, Pascal; Marandon, Vincent; Moulin, Emmanuel; de Naurois, Mathieu; Nayman, Patrick; Ohm, Stefan; Penno, Marek; Ross, Duncan; Salek, David; Schade, Markus; Schwab, Thomas; Simoni, Rachel; Stegmann, Christian; Steppa, Constantin; Thornhill, Julian; Toussnel, Francois

    2017-03-01

    The High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) is an array of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs) located in Namibia. It was built to detect Very High Energy (VHE, >100 GeV) cosmic gamma rays, and consists of four 12 m diameter Cherenkov telescopes (CT1-4), built in 2003, and a larger 28 m telescope (CT5), built in 2012. The larger mirror surface of CT5 permits to lower the energy threshold of the array down to 30 GeV. The cameras of CT1-4 are currently undergoing an extensive upgrade, with the goals of reducing their failure rate, reducing their readout dead time and improving the overall performance of the array. The entire camera electronics has been renewed from ground-up, as well as the power, ventilation and pneumatics systems, and the control and data acquisition software. Technical solutions forseen for the next-generation Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) observatory have been introduced, most notably the readout is based on the NECTAr analog memory chip. The camera control subsystems and the control software framework also pursue an innovative design, increasing the camera performance, robustness and flexibility. The CT1 camera has been upgraded in July 2015 and is currently taking data; CT2-4 will upgraded in Fall 2016. Together they will assure continuous operation of H.E.S.S at its full sensitivity until and possibly beyond the advent of CTA. This contribution describes the design, the testing and the in-lab and on-site performance of all components of the newly upgraded H.E.S.S. camera.

  19. A Major Upgrade of the H.E.S.S. Cherenkov Cameras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lypova Iryna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S. is an array of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs located in Namibia. It was built to detect Very High Energy (VHE, >100 GeV cosmic gamma rays, and consists of four 12 m diameter Cherenkov telescopes (CT1-4, built in 2003, and a larger 28 m telescope (CT5, built in 2012. The larger mirror surface of CT5 permits to lower the energy threshold of the array down to 30 GeV. The cameras of CT1-4 are currently undergoing an extensive upgrade, with the goals of reducing their failure rate, reducing their readout dead time and improving the overall performance of the array. The entire camera electronics has been renewed from ground-up, as well as the power, ventilation and pneumatics systems, and the control and data acquisition software. Technical solutions forseen for the next-generation Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA observatory have been introduced, most notably the readout is based on the NECTAr analog memory chip. The camera control subsystems and the control software framework also pursue an innovative design, increasing the camera performance, robustness and flexibility. The CT1 camera has been upgraded in July 2015 and is currently taking data; CT2-4 will upgraded in Fall 2016. Together they will assure continuous operation of H.E.S.S at its full sensitivity until and possibly beyond the advent of CTA. This contribution describes the design, the testing and the in-lab and on-site performance of all components of the newly upgraded H.E.S.S. camera.

  20. Characterizations of intra-regular gamma AG-groupoids by the properties of their gamma ideals

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Madad; Amjid, Venus; Faisal

    2010-01-01

    We have characterized an intra-regular {\\Gamma}-AG^{**}-groupoids by using the properties of {\\Gamma}-ideals (left, right, two-sided ), {\\Gamma}-interior, {\\Gamma}-quasi, {\\Gamma}-bi and {\\Gamma}-generalized bi and {\\Gamma}-(1,2)). We have prove that all the {\\Gamma}-ideals coincides in an intra-regular {\\Gamma}-AG^{**}-groupoids. It has been examined that all the {\\Gamma}-ideals of an intra-regular {\\Gamma}-AG^{**}-groupoids are {\\Gamma}-idempotent. In this paper we define all {\\Gamma}-ideal...

  1. Development of a compact scintillator-based high-resolution Compton camera for molecular imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishimoto, A., E-mail: daphne3h-aya@ruri.waseda.jp [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Ohkubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan); Kataoka, J.; Koide, A.; Sueoka, K.; Iwamoto, Y.; Taya, T. [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Ohkubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan); Ohsuka, S. [Central Research Laboratory, Hamamatsu Photonics K.K., 5000 Hirakuchi, Hamakita-ku, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka (Japan)

    2017-02-11

    The Compton camera, which shows gamma-ray distribution utilizing the kinematics of Compton scattering, is a promising detector capable of imaging across a wide range of energy. In this study, we aim to construct a small-animal molecular imaging system in a wide energy range by using the Compton camera. We developed a compact medical Compton camera based on a Ce-doped Gd{sub 3}Al{sub 2}Ga{sub 3}O{sub 12} (Ce:GAGG) scintillator and multi-pixel photon counter (MPPC). A basic performance confirmed that for 662 keV, the typical energy resolution was 7.4 % (FWHM) and the angular resolution was 4.5° (FWHM). We then used the medical Compton camera to conduct imaging experiments based on a 3-D imaging reconstruction algorithm using the multi-angle data acquisition method. The result confirmed that for a {sup 137}Cs point source at a distance of 4 cm, the image had a spatial resolution of 3.1 mm (FWHM). Furthermore, we succeeded in producing 3-D multi-color image of different simultaneous energy sources ({sup 22}Na [511 keV], {sup 137}Cs [662 keV], and {sup 54}Mn [834 keV]).

  2. 640x512 InGaAs focal plane array camera for visible and SWIR imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Tara; Brubaker, Robert; Dixon, Peter; Gagliardi, Mari-Anne; Sudol, Tom

    2005-05-01

    We report on our 640x512 pixel InGaAs/InP focal plane array camera for visible and short-wavelength infrared imaging. For this camera, we have fabricated a 640x512 element substrate-removed backside-illuminated InGaAs/InP photodiode array (PDA) with a 25 mm pixel pitch. The PDA is indium bump bonded to a silicon read out integrated circuit. Removing the InP substrate from the focal plane array allows visible wavelengths, which would otherwise be absorbed by the InP substrate due to its 920 nm wavelength cut-off, to reach the pixels' active region. The quantum efficiency is approximately 15% at 500 nm, 70% at 850 nm, 85% at 1310 nm, and 80% at 1550 nm. Features incorporated into this video-rate, 14-bit output camera include external triggering, windowing, individual pixel correction, 8 operational settings of gain and exposure time, and gamma correction. The readout circuit uses a gate-modulated pixel for high sensitivity imaging over a wide illumination range. This camera is useable for visible imaging as well as imaging eye-safe lasers and is of particular interest seeing laser designators and night vision as well as hyperspectral imaging.

  3. Fog camera to visualize ionizing charged particles; Camara de niebla para visualizar particulas cargadas ionizantes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trujillo A, L.; Rodriguez R, N. I.; Vega C, H. R., E-mail: ingtrujilloa@hotmail.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    The human being can not perceive the different types of ionizing radiation, natural or artificial, present in the nature, for what appropriate detection systems have been developed according to the sensibility to certain radiation type and certain energy type. The objective of this work was to build a fog camera to visualize the traces, and to identify the trajectories, produced by charged particles with high energy, coming mainly of the cosmic rays. The origin of the cosmic rays comes from the solar radiation generated by solar eruptions where the protons compose most of this radiation. It also comes, of the galactic radiation which is composed mainly of charged particles and gamma rays that comes from outside of the solar system. These radiation types have energy time millions higher that those detected in the earth surface, being more important as the height on the sea level increases. These particles in their interaction produce secondary particles that are detectable by means of this cameras type. The camera operates by means of a saturated atmosphere of alcohol vapor. In the moment in that a charged particle crosses the cold area of the atmosphere, the medium is ionized and the particle acts like a condensation nucleus of the alcohol vapor, leaving a visible trace of its trajectory. The built camera was very stable, allowing the detection in continuous form and the observation of diverse events. (Author)

  4. CALIBRATION PROCEDURES IN MID FORMAT CAMERA SETUPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Pivnicka

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available A growing number of mid-format cameras are used for aerial surveying projects. To achieve a reliable and geometrically precise result also in the photogrammetric workflow, awareness on the sensitive parts is important. The use of direct referencing systems (GPS/IMU, the mounting on a stabilizing camera platform and the specific values of the mid format camera make a professional setup with various calibration and misalignment operations necessary. An important part is to have a proper camera calibration. Using aerial images over a well designed test field with 3D structures and/or different flight altitudes enable the determination of calibration values in Bingo software. It will be demonstrated how such a calibration can be performed. The direct referencing device must be mounted in a solid and reliable way to the camera. Beside the mechanical work especially in mounting the camera beside the IMU, 2 lever arms have to be measured in mm accuracy. Important are the lever arms from the GPS Antenna to the IMU's calibrated centre and also the lever arm from the IMU centre to the Camera projection centre. In fact, the measurement with a total station is not a difficult task but the definition of the right centres and the need for using rotation matrices can cause serious accuracy problems. The benefit of small and medium format cameras is that also smaller aircrafts can be used. Like that, a gyro bases stabilized platform is recommended. This causes, that the IMU must be mounted beside the camera on the stabilizer. The advantage is, that the IMU can be used to control the platform, the problematic thing is, that the IMU to GPS antenna lever arm is floating. In fact we have to deal with an additional data stream, the values of the movement of the stabiliser to correct the floating lever arm distances. If the post-processing of the GPS-IMU data by taking the floating levers into account, delivers an expected result, the lever arms between IMU and

  5. Temporal Imaging CeBr3 Compton Camera: A New Concept for Nuclear Decommissioning and Nuclear Waste Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iltis, A.; Snoussi, H.; Magalhaes, L. Rodrigues de; Hmissi, M. Z.; Zafiarifety, C. Tata; Tadonkeng, G. Zeufack; Morel, C.

    2018-01-01

    During nuclear decommissioning or waste management operations, a camera that could make an image of the contamination field and identify and quantify the contaminants would be a great progress. Compton cameras have been proposed, but their limited efficiency for high energy gamma rays and their cost have severely limited their application. Our objective is to promote a Compton camera for the energy range (200 keV - 2 MeV) that uses fast scintillating crystals and a new concept for locating scintillation event: Temporal Imaging. Temporal Imaging uses monolithic plates of fast scintillators and measures photons time of arrival distribution in order to locate each gamma ray with a high precision in space (X,Y,Z), time (T) and energy (E). This provides a native estimation of the depth of interaction (Z) of every detected gamma ray. This also allows a time correction for the propagation time of scintillation photons inside the crystal, therefore resulting in excellent time resolution. The high temporal resolution of the system makes it possible to veto quite efficiently background by using narrow time coincidence (< 300 ps). It is also possible to reconstruct the direction of propagation of the photons inside the detector using timing constraints. The sensitivity of our system is better than 1 nSv/h in a 60 s acquisition with a 22Na source. The project TEMPORAL is funded by the ANDRA/PAI under the grant No. RTSCNADAA160019.

  6. PET camera performance design evaluation for BGO and BaF2 scintillators (non-time-of-flight).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, W H

    1988-03-01

    Bismuth germanate (BGO) and barium fluoride (BaF2) scintillators are presently used in positron emission tomegraphy (PET) cameras. This study evaluates the important PET performance parameters of image resolution, true sensitivity, scatter background, accidental background, and realistic maximum radioactivity in the field of view for both BGO and BaF2 in an identical non-time-of-flight, whole-body camera configuration. These performance parameters are evaluated for three phantoms simulating (a) the head, (b) whole-body cross-section and (c) heart/kidney. This study finds that the high stopping power of BGO yields higher sensitivity, higher resolution, less vignetting, better immunity from scattered gamma, and lower accident/true ratio at any dose level. The faster BaF2 timing acceptance window is traded off by its vulnerability to noncoincidental scatter-gamma which increases accidental coincidences. The BGO is found to be a better choice for non-time-of-flight systems especially with large objects which produce a lot of noncoincidental scatter-gammas. This study also found that the practical diminishing return maximum activity within the field-of-view is approximately 20-25 mCi for existing conventional cameras.

  7. New developments to improve SO2 cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luebcke, P.; Bobrowski, N.; Hoermann, C.; Kern, C.; Klein, A.; Kuhn, J.; Vogel, L.; Platt, U.

    2012-12-01

    The SO2 camera is a remote sensing instrument that measures the two-dimensional distribution of SO2 (column densities) in volcanic plumes using scattered solar radiation as a light source. From these data SO2-fluxes can be derived. The high time resolution of the order of 1 Hz allows correlating SO2 flux measurements with other traditional volcanological measurement techniques, i.e., seismology. In the last years the application of SO2 cameras has increased, however, there is still potential to improve the instrumentation. First of all, the influence of aerosols and ash in the volcanic plume can lead to large errors in the calculated SO2 flux, if not accounted for. We present two different concepts to deal with the influence of ash and aerosols. The first approach uses a co-axial DOAS system that was added to a two filter SO2 camera. The camera used Filter A (peak transmission centred around 315 nm) to measures the optical density of SO2 and Filter B (centred around 330 nm) to correct for the influence of ash and aerosol. The DOAS system simultaneously performs spectroscopic measurements in a small area of the camera's field of view and gives additional information to correct for these effects. Comparing the optical densities for the two filters with the SO2 column density from the DOAS allows not only a much more precise calibration, but also to draw conclusions about the influence from ash and aerosol scattering. Measurement examples from Popocatépetl, Mexico in 2011 are shown and interpreted. Another approach combines the SO2 camera measurement principle with the extremely narrow and periodic transmission of a Fabry-Pérot interferometer. The narrow transmission window allows to select individual SO2 absorption bands (or series of bands) as a substitute for Filter A. Measurements are therefore more selective to SO2. Instead of Filter B, as in classical SO2 cameras, the correction for aerosol can be performed by shifting the transmission window of the Fabry

  8. Embedded image enhancement for high-throughput cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geerts, Stan J. C.; Cornelissen, Dion; de With, Peter H. N.

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents image enhancement for a novel Ultra-High-Definition (UHD) video camera offering 4K images and higher. Conventional image enhancement techniques need to be reconsidered for the high-resolution images and the low-light sensitivity of the new sensor. We study two image enhancement functions and evaluate and optimize the algorithms for embedded implementation in programmable logic (FPGA). The enhancement study involves high-quality Auto White Balancing (AWB) and Local Contrast Enhancement (LCE). We have compared multiple algorithms from literature, both with objective and subjective metrics. In order to objectively compare Local Contrast (LC), an existing LC metric is modified for LC measurement in UHD images. For AWB, we have found that color histogram stretching offers a subjective high image quality and it is among the algorithms with the lowest complexity, while giving only a small balancing error. We impose a color-to-color gain constraint, which improves robustness of low-light images. For local contrast enhancement, a combination of contrast preserving gamma and single-scale Retinex is selected. A modified bilateral filter is designed to prevent halo artifacts, while significantly reducing the complexity and simultaneously preserving quality. We show that by cascading contrast preserving gamma and single-scale Retinex, the visibility of details is improved towards the level appropriate for high-quality surveillance applications. The user is offered control over the amount of enhancement. Also, we discuss the mapping of those functions on a heterogeneous platform to come to an effective implementation while preserving quality and robustness.

  9. Precise measurement of {gamma}(K{yields}e {nu}({gamma}))/{gamma}(K{yields}{mu} {nu}({gamma})) and study of K{yields}e {nu} {gamma}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambrosino, F.; Massarotti, P.; Meola, S.; Napolitano, M. [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche dell' Universita ' ' Federico II' ' , Napoli (Italy); INFN Sezione di Napoli, Napoli (Italy); Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Bloise, C.; Bossi, F.; Capon, G.; Capussela, T.; Ciambrone, P.; De Lucia, E.; De Simone, P.; Dreucci, M.; Felici, G.; Gatti, C.; Giovannella, S.; Jacewicz, M.; Lanfranchi, G.; Miscetti, S.; Moulson, M.; Murtas, F.; Palutan, M.; Santangelo, P.; Sciascia, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Spadaro, T.; Venanzoni, G. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy); Archilli, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Rome (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma Tor Vergata, Rome (Italy); Beltrame, P.; Denig, A.; Mueller, S. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Mainz (Germany); Bini, C.; De Santis, A.; De Zorzi, G.; Di Domenico, A.; Fiore, S.; Franzini, P.; Gauzzi, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita ' ' La Sapienza' ' , Rome (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy); Bocchetta, S.; Ceradini, F.; Di Micco, B.; Nguyen, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita ' ' Roma Tre' ' , Rome (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma Tre, Rome (Italy); Branchini, P.; Graziani, E.; Passeri, A.; Tortora, L. [INFN Sezione di Roma Tre, Rome (Italy); Capriotti, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita ' ' Roma Tre' ' , Rome (Italy); Di Donato, C. [INFN Sezione di Napoli, Napoli (Italy); Kulikov, V. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Lee-Franzini, J. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy); State University of New York, Physics Department, Stony Brook (United States); Martini, M.; Patera, V.; Versaci, R. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy); Dipartimento di Energetica dell' Universita ' ' La Sapienza' ' , Rome (Italy); Valente, P. [INFN Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy)

    2009-12-15

    We present a precise measurement of the ratio R{sub K}={gamma}(K{yields}e{nu}({gamma}))/{gamma}(K{yields}{mu}{nu}({gamma})) and a study of the radiative process K{yields}e{nu}{gamma}, performed with the KLOE detector. The results are based on data collected at the Frascati e{sup +}e{sup -} collider DA {phi}NE for an integrated luminosity of 2.2 fb{sup -1}. We find R{sub K}=(2.493{+-}0.025{sub stat}{+-}0.019{sub syst}) x 10{sup -5}, in agreement with the Standard Model expectation. This result is used to improve constraints on parameters of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model with lepton flavor violation. We also measured the differential decay rate d {gamma}(K{yields}e{nu}{gamma})/dE{sub {gamma}} for photon energies 10gamma}}<250 MeV. Results are compared with predictions from theory. (orig.)

  10. Development of a Compton camera for medical applications based on silicon strip and scintillation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krimmer, J., E-mail: j.krimmer@ipnl.in2p3.fr [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3 UMR 5822, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Ley, J.-L. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3 UMR 5822, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Abellan, C.; Cachemiche, J.-P. [Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS/IN2P3, CPPM UMR 7346, 13288 Marseille (France); Caponetto, L.; Chen, X.; Dahoumane, M.; Dauvergne, D. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3 UMR 5822, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Freud, N. [Université de Lyon, CREATIS, CNRS UMR5220, Inserm U1044, INSA - Lyon, Université Lyon 1, Centre Léon Bérard (France); Joly, B.; Lambert, D.; Lestand, L. [Clermont Université, Université Blaise Pascal, CNRS/IN2P3, Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, BP 10448, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France); Létang, J.M. [Université de Lyon, CREATIS, CNRS UMR5220, Inserm U1044, INSA - Lyon, Université Lyon 1, Centre Léon Bérard (France); Magne, M. [Clermont Université, Université Blaise Pascal, CNRS/IN2P3, Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, BP 10448, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France); and others

    2015-07-01

    A Compton camera is being developed for the purpose of ion-range monitoring during hadrontherapy via the detection of prompt-gamma rays. The system consists of a scintillating fiber beam tagging hodoscope, a stack of double sided silicon strip detectors (90×90×2 mm{sup 3}, 2×64 strips) as scatter detectors, as well as bismuth germanate (BGO) scintillation detectors (38×35×30 mm{sup 3}, 100 blocks) as absorbers. The individual components will be described, together with the status of their characterization.

  11. The High-Speed and Wide-Field TORTORA Camera: description & results .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, G.; Beskin, G.; Karpov, S.; Guarnieri, A.; Bartolini, C.; Bondar, S.; Piccioni, A.; Molinari, E.

    We present the description and the most significant results of the wide-field and ultra-fast TORTORA camera devoted to the investigation of rapid changes in light intensity in a phenomenon occurring within an extremely short period of time and randomly distributed over the sky. In particular, the ground-based TORTORA observations synchronized with the gamma -ray BAT telescope on board of the Swift satellite has permitted to trace the optical burst time-structure of the Naked-Eye GRB 080319B with an unprecedented level of accuracy.

  12. Dental shade matching using a digital camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, W K; Lee, H J

    2012-12-01

    Digital cameras could be substitutes for contact-type instruments in shade selection and overcome their drawbacks. The images taken show morphology and color texture of teeth. A new method was proposed to compare the color of shade tabs taken by a digital camera using appropriate color features. Vita 3D-MASTER shade guide and Canon EOS 1100D digital camera were employed. Shade tab images were compared in two reference strategies. The color of tooth surface was presented by a content manually cropped out of the image. The content was divided into 10 × 2 blocks to encode the color distribution. Color features from commonly used color spaces were evaluated. The top n matches were selected when the least n shade distances between the shade tabs were attained. Using Sa*b* features, the top one accuracy was 0.87, where the feature S is defined in HSV color space, a* and b* features are defined in L*a*b* color space. This rate was higher than previous reports using contact-type instruments. The top three matching accuracy was 0.94. Sa*b* were suitable features for shade matching using a digital cameras in this study. Both the color and texture of the tooth surface could be presented by the proposed content-based descriptor. Clinical use of digital cameras in shade matching became possible. This in vitro study proposed a method for shade matching using digital cameras through the comparisons of the color patterns on the shade tab surfaces. The method overcame some drawbacks from the devices such as colorimeters or spectrophotometers. The results supported the use of digital cameras in shade matching. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Development of a SiPM Camera for a Schwarzschild-Couder Cherenkov Telescope for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    CERN Document Server

    Otte, A N; Dickinson, H.; Funk, S.; Jogler, T.; Johnson, C.A.; Karn, P.; Meagher, K.; Naoya, H.; Nguyen, T.; Okumura, A.; Santander, M.; Sapozhnikov, L.; Stier, A.; Tajima, H.; Tibaldo, L.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Wakely, S.; Weinstein, A.; Williams, D.A.

    2015-01-01

    We present the development of a novel 11328 pixel silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) camera for use with a ground-based Cherenkov telescope with Schwarzschild-Couder optics as a possible medium-sized telescope for the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). The finely pixelated camera samples air-shower images with more than twice the optical resolution of cameras that are used in current Cherenkov telescopes. Advantages of the higher resolution will be a better event reconstruction yielding improved background suppression and angular resolution of the reconstructed gamma-ray events, which is crucial in morphology studies of, for example, Galactic particle accelerators and the search for gamma-ray halos around extragalactic sources. Packing such a large number of pixels into an area of only half a square meter and having a fast readout directly attached to the back of the sensors is a challenging task. For the prototype camera development, SiPMs from Hamamatsu with through silicon via (TSV) technology are used. We give ...

  14. Field Deployable Gamma Radiation Detectors for DHS Use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanjoy Mukhopadhyay

    2007-08-01

    Recently, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has integrated all nuclear detection research, development, testing, evaluation, acquisition, and operational support into a single office: the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO). The DNDO has specific requirements set for all commercial off-the-shelf and government off-the-shelf radiation detection equipment and data acquisition systems. This article would investigate several recent developments in field deployable gamma radiation detectors that are attempting to meet the DNDO specifications. Commercially available, transportable, handheld radio isotope identification devices (RIID) are inadequate for DHS requirements in terms of sensitivity, resolution, response time, and reach-back capability. The leading commercial vendor manufacturing handheld gamma spectrometer in the United States is Thermo Electron Corporation. Thermo Electron's identiFINDER{trademark}, which primarily uses sodium iodide crystals (3.18 x 2.54cm cylinders) as gamma detectors, has a Full-Width-at-Half-Maximum energy resolution of 7 percent at 662 keV. Thermo Electron has just recently come up with a reach-back capability patented as RadReachBack{trademark} that enables emergency personnel to obtain real-time technical analysis of radiation samples they find in the field. The current project has the goal to build a prototype handheld gamma spectrometer, equipped with a digital camera and an embedded cell phone to be used as an RIID with higher sensitivity, better resolution, and faster response time (able to detect the presence of gamma-emitting radio isotopes within 5 seconds of approach), which will make it useful as a field deployable tool. The handheld equipment continuously monitors the ambient gamma radiation, and, if it comes across any radiation anomalies with higher than normal gamma gross counts, it sets an alarm condition. When a substantial alarm level is reached, the system automatically triggers the saving of relevant

  15. SAPPHiRE: a Small Gamma-Gamma Higgs Factory

    CERN Document Server

    Bogacz, S A; Lusito, L; Schulte, D; Takahashi, T; Velasco, M; Zanetti, M; Zimmermann, F

    2012-01-01

    A new particle with mass ~ 125 GeV that resembles the Higgs boson has recently been discovered by ATLAS and CMS. We propose a low-energy gamma-gamma collider as a cost- and time-efficient option for a Higgs factory capable of studying this particle in detail. In the past, this option has been suggested as a possible application of the CLIC two-beam accelerator technology (the CLIC Higgs Experiment, CLICHE) or as an option for the ILC. Here we propose a design based on a pair of \\sim 10 GeV recirculating Linacs (Small Accelerator for Photon-Photon Higgs production using Recirculating Electrons, SAPPHiRE) similar in design to those proposed for the LHeC. We present parameters for the e- beams and sketch a laser backscattering system capable of producing a gamma-gamma peak luminosity of 0.36 \\times 10^34/cm2/s with E_CM (gamma-gamma) \\sim 125 GeV. A gamma-gamma collider with such a luminosity could be used to measure accurately the mass, bbar, WW\\ast, and gamma-gamma decays of the Higgs boson. We also comment on...

  16. Establishment of Imaging Spectroscopy of Nuclear Gamma-Rays based on Geometrical Optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimori, Toru; Mizumura, Yoshitaka; Takada, Atsushi; Miyamoto, Shohei; Takemura, Taito; Kishimoto, Tetsuro; Komura, Shotaro; Kubo, Hidetoshi; Kurosawa, Shunsuke; Matsuoka, Yoshihiro; Miuchi, Kentaro; Mizumoto, Tetsuya; Nakamasu, Yuma; Nakamura, Kiseki; Parker, Joseph D; Sawano, Tatsuya; Sonoda, Shinya; Tomono, Dai; Yoshikawa, Kei

    2017-02-03

    Since the discovery of nuclear gamma-rays, its imaging has been limited to pseudo imaging, such as Compton Camera (CC) and coded mask. Pseudo imaging does not keep physical information (intensity, or brightness in Optics) along a ray, and thus is capable of no more than qualitative imaging of bright objects. To attain quantitative imaging, cameras that realize geometrical optics is essential, which would be, for nuclear MeV gammas, only possible via complete reconstruction of the Compton process. Recently we have revealed that "Electron Tracking Compton Camera" (ETCC) provides a well-defined Point Spread Function (PSF). The information of an incoming gamma is kept along a ray with the PSF and that is equivalent to geometrical optics. Here we present an imaging-spectroscopic measurement with the ETCC. Our results highlight the intrinsic difficulty with CCs in performing accurate imaging, and show that the ETCC surmounts this problem. The imaging capability also helps the ETCC suppress the noise level dramatically by ~3 orders of magnitude without a shielding structure. Furthermore, full reconstruction of Compton process with the ETCC provides spectra free of Compton edges. These results mark the first proper imaging of nuclear gammas based on the genuine geometrical optics.

  17. The study of error for analysis in dynamic image from the error of count rates in Nal (Tl) scintillation camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Joo Young; Kang, Chun Goo; Kim, Jung Yul; Oh, Ki Baek; Kim, Jae Sam [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hoon Hee [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Shingu college, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    This study is aimed to evaluate the effect of T{sub 1/2} upon count rates in the analysis of dynamic scan using NaI (Tl) scintillation camera, and suggest a new quality control method with this effects. We producted a point source with '9{sup 9m}TcO{sub 4}- of 18.5 to 185 MBq in the 2 mL syringes, and acquired 30 frames of dynamic images with 10 to 60 seconds each using Infinia gamma camera (GE, USA). In the second experiment, 90 frames of dynamic images were acquired from 74 MBq point source by 5 gamma cameras (Infinia 2, Forte 2, Argus 1). There were not significant differences in average count rates of the sources with 18.5 to 92.5 MBq in the analysis of 10 to 60 seconds/frame with 10 seconds interval in the first experiment (p>0.05). But there were significantly low average count rates with the sources over 111 MBq activity at 60 seconds/frame (p<0.01). According to the second analysis results of linear regression by count rates of 5 gamma cameras those were acquired during 90 minutes, counting efficiency of fourth gamma camera was most low as 0.0064%, and gradient and coefficient of variation was high as 0.0042 and 0.229 each. We could not find abnormal fluctuation in χ{sup 2} test with count rates (p>0.02), and we could find the homogeneity of variance in Levene's F-test among the gamma cameras (p>0.05). At the correlation analysis, there was only correlation between counting efficiency and gradient as significant negative correlation (r=-0.90, p<0.05). Lastly, according to the results of calculation of T{sub 1/2} error from change of gradient with -0.25% to +0.25%, if T{sub 1/2} is relatively long, or gradient is high, the error increase relationally. When estimate the value of 4th camera which has highest gradient from the above mentioned result, we could not see T{sub 1/2} error within 60 minutes at that value. In conclusion, it is necessary for the scintillation gamma camera in medical field to manage hard for the quality of radiation

  18. Gamma spectroscopy and optoelectronic imaging with hybrid photon detector

    CERN Document Server

    D'Ambrosio, C; Piedigrossi, D; Rosso, E; Cenceelli, V; De Notaristefani, F; Masini, Gérald; Puertolas, D; Cindolo, F; Mares, J A; Nikl, M; Abreu, M; Rato-Mendes, P; Sousa, P

    2003-01-01

    Hybrid Photon Detectors (HPD) detect light via photocathodes and accelerate the emitted photoelectrons by an electric field towards silicon PIN-anodes, where they are absorbed and generate electronic signals. We have developed two specific types of HPDs: (1) Hybrid photomultiplier tubes for photon counting and gamma spectroscopy; (2) Imaging silicon pixel array tubes for optoelectronic cameras. This paper will illustrate the main achievements, which we obtained in the last years, and will describe and discuss our present main R&D efforts, in particular, in the biomedical imaging field. (27 refs).

  19. How to Build Your Own Document Camera for around $100

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Orden, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Document cameras can have great utility in second language classrooms. However, entry-level consumer document cameras start at around $350. This article describes how the author built three document cameras and offers suggestions for how teachers can successfully build their own quality document camera using a webcam for around $100.

  20. 16 CFR 1025.45 - In camera materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false In camera materials. 1025.45 Section 1025.45... PROCEEDINGS Hearings § 1025.45 In camera materials. (a) Definition. In camera materials are documents... excluded from the public record. (b) In camera treatment of documents and testimony. The Presiding Officer...

  1. Model based scattering correction in time-of-flight cameras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Henrik; Lenzen, Frank; Garbe, Christoph S

    2014-12-01

    In-camera light scattering is a systematic error of Time-of-Flight depth cameras that significantly reduces the accuracy of the systems. A completely new model is presented, based on raw data calibration and only one additional intrinsic camera parameter. It is shown that the approach effectively removes the errors of in-camera light scattering.

  2. Gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Wijers, Ralph A M J; Woosley, Stan

    2012-01-01

    Cosmic gamma ray bursts (GRBs) have fascinated scientists and the public alike since their discovery in the late 1960s. Their story is told here by some of the scientists who participated in their discovery and, after many decades of false starts, solved the problem of their origin. Fourteen chapters by active researchers in the field present a detailed history of the discovery, a comprehensive theoretical description of GRB central engine and emission models, a discussion of GRB host galaxies and a guide to how GRBs can be used as cosmological tools. Observations are grouped into three sets from the satellites CGRO, BeppoSAX and Swift, and followed by a discussion of multi-wavelength observations. This is the first edited volume on GRB astrophysics that presents a fully comprehensive review of the subject. Utilizing the latest research, Gamma-ray Bursts is an essential desktop companion for graduate students and researchers in astrophysics.

  3. Calibration of action cameras for photogrammetric purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balletti, Caterina; Guerra, Francesco; Tsioukas, Vassilios; Vernier, Paolo

    2014-09-18

    The use of action cameras for photogrammetry purposes is not widespread due to the fact that until recently the images provided by the sensors, using either still or video capture mode, were not big enough to perform and provide the appropriate analysis with the necessary photogrammetric accuracy. However, several manufacturers have recently produced and released new lightweight devices which are: (a) easy to handle, (b) capable of performing under extreme conditions and more importantly (c) able to provide both still images and video sequences of high resolution. In order to be able to use the sensor of action cameras we must apply a careful and reliable self-calibration prior to the use of any photogrammetric procedure, a relatively difficult scenario because of the short focal length of the camera and its wide angle lens that is used to obtain the maximum possible resolution of images. Special software, using functions of the OpenCV library, has been created to perform both the calibration and the production of undistorted scenes for each one of the still and video image capturing mode of a novel action camera, the GoPro Hero 3 camera that can provide still images up to 12 Mp and video up 8 Mp resolution.

  4. Calibration of Action Cameras for Photogrammetric Purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterina Balletti

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of action cameras for photogrammetry purposes is not widespread due to the fact that until recently the images provided by the sensors, using either still or video capture mode, were not big enough to perform and provide the appropriate analysis with the necessary photogrammetric accuracy. However, several manufacturers have recently produced and released new lightweight devices which are: (a easy to handle, (b capable of performing under extreme conditions and more importantly (c able to provide both still images and video sequences of high resolution. In order to be able to use the sensor of action cameras we must apply a careful and reliable self-calibration prior to the use of any photogrammetric procedure, a relatively difficult scenario because of the short focal length of the camera and its wide angle lens that is used to obtain the maximum possible resolution of images. Special software, using functions of the OpenCV library, has been created to perform both the calibration and the production of undistorted scenes for each one of the still and video image capturing mode of a novel action camera, the GoPro Hero 3 camera that can provide still images up to 12 Mp and video up 8 Mp resolution.

  5. Wired and Wireless Camera Triggering with Arduino

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauhanen, H.; Rönnholm, P.

    2017-10-01

    Synchronous triggering is an important task that allows simultaneous data capture from multiple cameras. Accurate synchronization enables 3D measurements of moving objects or from a moving platform. In this paper, we describe one wired and four wireless variations of Arduino-based low-cost remote trigger systems designed to provide a synchronous trigger signal for industrial cameras. Our wireless systems utilize 315 MHz or 434 MHz frequencies with noise filtering capacitors. In order to validate the synchronization accuracy, we developed a prototype of a rotating trigger detection system (named RoTriDeS). This system is suitable to detect the triggering accuracy of global shutter cameras. As a result, the wired system indicated an 8.91 μs mean triggering time difference between two cameras. Corresponding mean values for the four wireless triggering systems varied between 7.92 and 9.42 μs. Presented values include both camera-based and trigger-based desynchronization. Arduino-based triggering systems appeared to be feasible, and they have the potential to be extended to more complicated triggering systems.

  6. Designing Camera Networks by Convex Quadratic Programming

    KAUST Repository

    Ghanem, Bernard

    2015-05-04

    ​In this paper, we study the problem of automatic camera placement for computer graphics and computer vision applications. We extend the problem formulations of previous work by proposing a novel way to incorporate visibility constraints and camera-to-camera relationships. For example, the placement solution can be encouraged to have cameras that image the same important locations from different viewing directions, which can enable reconstruction and surveillance tasks to perform better. We show that the general camera placement problem can be formulated mathematically as a convex binary quadratic program (BQP) under linear constraints. Moreover, we propose an optimization strategy with a favorable trade-off between speed and solution quality. Our solution is almost as fast as a greedy treatment of the problem, but the quality is significantly higher, so much so that it is comparable to exact solutions that take orders of magnitude more computation time. Because it is computationally attractive, our method also allows users to explore the space of solutions for variations in input parameters. To evaluate its effectiveness, we show a range of 3D results on real-world floorplans (garage, hotel, mall, and airport). ​

  7. Ophthalmic photography using a digital camera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fogla Rajesh

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report the application of a digital camera for ophthalmic photography in routine clinical use. Methods: A digital camera (Nikon Coolpix 995 was used both for external macrophotography of the eye and ocular adnexa, and slitlamp photography of the anterior segment of the eye. Results: We were able to take external macrophotographs under high magnification of the eye and ocular adnexa. Slitlamp photography could be performed under diffuse, slit beam, and retroillumination. The structures of the angle, the optic disc and surrounding retina could be photographed using appropriate lenses. The attachment to the operating microscope allowed intra-operative photography. It could also be attached to the laboratory microscope to capture images of various histopathology and microbiology slides. Conclusions: A digital camera is a versatile instrument for ophthalmic photography. It is easy to use in routine clinical practice and provides good quality photographs.

  8. Experiments with synchronized sCMOS cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Iain A.; Jermak, Helen; Copperwheat, Chris M.; Smith, Robert J.; Poshyachinda, Saran; Soonthorntham, Boonrucksar

    2016-07-01

    Scientific-CMOS (sCMOS) cameras can combine low noise with high readout speeds and do not suffer the charge multiplication noise that effectively reduces the quantum efficiency of electron multiplying CCDs by a factor 2. As such they have strong potential in fast photometry and polarimetry instrumentation. In this paper we describe the results of laboratory experiments using a pair of commercial off the shelf sCMOS cameras based around a 4 transistor per pixel architecture. In particular using a both stable and a pulsed light sources we evaluate the timing precision that may be obtained when the cameras readouts are synchronized either in software or electronically. We find that software synchronization can introduce an error of 200-msec. With electronic synchronization any error is below the limit ( 50-msec) of our simple measurement technique.

  9. HIGH SPEED KERR CELL FRAMING CAMERA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goss, W.C.; Gilley, L.F.

    1964-01-01

    The present invention relates to a high speed camera utilizing a Kerr cell shutter and a novel optical delay system having no moving parts. The camera can selectively photograph at least 6 frames within 9 x 10/sup -8/ seconds during any such time interval of an occurring event. The invention utilizes particularly an optical system which views and transmits 6 images of an event to a multi-channeled optical delay relay system. The delay relay system has optical paths of successively increased length in whole multiples of the first channel optical path length, into which optical paths the 6 images are transmitted. The successively delayed images are accepted from the exit of the delay relay system by an optical image focusing means, which in turn directs the images into a Kerr cell shutter disposed to intercept the image paths. A camera is disposed to simultaneously view and record the 6 images during a single exposure of the Kerr cell shutter. (AEC)

  10. Modifications in infrared intraoperative neuromonitoring camera and supports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Emily Klerekoper

    2008-09-01

    At my request, modifications were made to the visual oculography (VOG) camera described in the March 2008 article in this journal: "Use of an Infrared Camera to Improve the Outcome of Facial Nerve Monitoring," Am J Electroneurodiagnostic Technol 48.:38-47. The camera now has a wider and a more distant range and a clamp onto a rod. The company (Micromedical Technologies, Inc.) has named the camera the KlereView Camera in honor of my father, Fred Klerekoper.

  11. Vasomotor assessment by camera-based photoplethysmography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trumpp Alexander

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Camera-based photoplethysmography (cbPPG is a novel technique that allows the contactless acquisition of cardio-respiratory signals. Previous works on cbPPG most often focused on heart rate extraction. This contribution is directed at the assessment of vasomotor activity by means of cameras. In an experimental study, we show that vasodilation and vasoconstriction both lead to significant changes in cbPPG signals. Our findings underline the potential of cbPPG to monitor vasomotor functions in real-life applications.

  12. Structural optimization of some space camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jing; Wu, Mengyuan; Hu, Bin; Li, Xuyang

    2017-03-01

    Based on some space camera structure as the research subject, the statics analysis and modal analysis were studied using HyperMesh software. With the first order natural frequency being as constraint object, the topology optimization design of the original structure was made using OptiStruct software, which made the static deformation decrease by 42.4%; the fundamental frequency increase by 12.1%, effectively resolving the problem of the vibration of the circuit board components. Some further studies are necessary for the structure design of space camera.

  13. Digital Camera as Gloss Measurement Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihálik A.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays digital cameras with both high resolution and the high dynamic range (HDR can be considered as parallel multiple sensors producing multiple measurements at once. In this paper we describe a technique for processing the captured HDR data and than fit them to theoretical surface reflection models in the form of bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF. Finally, the tabular BRDF can be used to calculate the gloss reflection of the surface. We compare the captured glossiness by digital camera with gloss measured with the industry device and conclude that the results fit well in our experiments.

  14. Camera-enabled techniques for organic synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingham, Richard J; O’Brien, Matthew; Browne, Duncan L

    2013-01-01

    Summary A great deal of time is spent within synthetic chemistry laboratories on non-value-adding activities such as sample preparation and work-up operations, and labour intensive activities such as extended periods of continued data collection. Using digital cameras connected to computer vision algorithms, camera-enabled apparatus can perform some of these processes in an automated fashion, allowing skilled chemists to spend their time more productively. In this review we describe recent advances in this field of chemical synthesis and discuss how they will lead to advanced synthesis laboratories of the future. PMID:23766820

  15. Analysis of Brown camera distortion model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowakowski, Artur; Skarbek, Władysław

    2013-10-01

    Contemporary image acquisition devices introduce optical distortion into image. It results in pixel displacement and therefore needs to be compensated for many computer vision applications. The distortion is usually modeled by the Brown distortion model, which parameters can be included in camera calibration task. In this paper we describe original model, its dependencies and analyze orthogonality with regard to radius for its decentering distortion component. We also report experiments with camera calibration algorithm included in OpenCV library, especially a stability of distortion parameters estimation is evaluated.

  16. Use of gamma probe in {sup 131}I thyroid uptake studies; Utilizacao da sonda a cintilacao na captacao de {sup 131}I pela tireoide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarmento, Andrea Gondim Leitao

    2002-11-01

    Evaluation of thyroid uptake by administration of radioactive iodine is a well-defined procedure to assess patient thyroid function. In general, nuclear medicine institutions use gamma cameras coupled to pinhole collimators to perform uptake studies. With the growing use of intraoperative gamma probes in the radioguided surgical techniques, several institutions are purchasing this new and portable equipment, which can technically be also employed to assess patient's thyroid function, permitting further other applications of gamma cameras. The aim of the study was to compare thyroid uptake trails carried out with both gamma camera and intraoperative gamma probe, in order to evaluate the possible use of gamma probe for this purpose. At first a preliminary study of feasibility was carried out using a neck phantom to verify equipment efficiency with known activities of {sup 131} I. Henceforth, work data from 12 patients undergone studies of thyroid uptakes were evaluated, 24 hours after oral administration of 370 kBq of {sup 131} I. The maximum difference observed between the values obtained with both equipment was 60%, which demonstrated the feasibility of the proposed protocol and made clear that gamma probe can be useful for thyroid uptake studies. (author)

  17. Measurement of the $e^+ e^- \\to \\gamma\\gamma (\\gamma)$ cross section at the LEP energies

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Adye, T; Adzic, P; Alekseev, G D; Alemany, R; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Amaldi, Ugo; Amato, S; Andersson, P; Andreazza, A; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Bambade, P; Barão, F; Barbier, R; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G; Baroncelli, A; Bärring, O; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Belous, K S; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Bérat, C; Berggren, M; Bertini, D; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Bianchi, F; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Bizouard, M A; Bloch, D; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Boonekamp, M; Booth, P S L; Borgland, A W; Borisov, G; Bosio, C; Botner, O; Boudinov, E; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Boyko, I; Bozovic, I; Bozzo, M; Branchini, P; Brenke, T; Brenner, R A; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Burgsmüller, T; Buschmann, P; Cabrera, S; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camacho-Rozas, A J; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Canepa, M; Carena, F; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F R; Cerruti, C; Chabaud, V; Chapkin, M M; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chen, M; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P V; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Chudoba, J; Collins, P; Colomer, M; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Cowell, J H; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; D'Almagne, B; Damgaard, G; Davenport, Martyn; Da Silva, W; Deghorain, A; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Brabandere, S; De Clercq, C; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; Dijkstra, H; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Diodato, A; Djannati, A; Dolbeau, J; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Drees, K A; Dris, M; Duperrin, A; Durand, J D; Ehret, R; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, Gösta; Ellert, M; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Erzen, B; Espirito-Santo, M C; Falk, E; Fanourakis, G K; Fassouliotis, D; Fayot, J; Feindt, Michael; Fenyuk, A; Ferrari, P; Ferrer, A; Fichet, S; Firestone, A; Fischer, P A; Flagmeyer, U; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Franek, B J; Frodesen, A G; Frühwirth, R; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gandelman, M; García, C; García, J; Gaspar, C; Gaspar, M; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Gerber, J P; Ghodbane, N; Gil, I; Glege, F; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gonçalves, P; González-Caballero, I; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Górski, M; Guz, Yu; Gracco, Valerio; Grahl, J; Graziani, E; Green, C; Grefrath, A; Gris, P; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Günther, M; Guy, J; Hahn, F; Hahn, S; Haider, S; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Harris, F J; Hedberg, V; Heising, S; Henriques, R P; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Heuser, J M; Higón, E; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Holthuizen, D J; Hoorelbeke, S; Houlden, M A; Hrubec, Josef; Huet, K; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, C; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Johansson, E K; Jönsson, L B; Jönsson, P E; Joram, C; Juillot, P; Kapusta, F; Karafasoulis, K; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; King, B J; Kjaer, N J; Klapp, O; Klein, H; Kluit, P M; Knoblauch, D; Kokkinias, P; Konoplyannikov, A K; Koratzinos, M; Kostyukhin, V; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Krammer, Manfred; Kreuter, C; Kronkvist, I J; Krstic, J; Krumshtein, Z; Kubinec, P; Kucewicz, W; Kurvinen, K L; Lamsa, J; Lanceri, L; Lane, D W; Langefeld, P; Lapin, V; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Leder, Gerhard; Ledroit, F; Lefébure, V; Leinonen, L; Leisos, A; Leitner, R; Lemonne, J; Lenzen, Georg; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Lethuillier, M; Libby, J; Liko, D; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lörstad, B; Loken, J G; Lopes, J H; López, J M; López-Fernandez, R; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J N; Mahon, J R; Maio, A; Malek, A; Malmgren, T G M; Malychev, V; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R P; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Martí i García, S; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Mazzucato, F; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, R; McNulty, R; McPherson, G; Meroni, C; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mitaroff, Winfried A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Møller, R; Mönig, K; Monge, M R; Moreau, X; Morettini, P; Morton, G A; Münich, K; Mulders, M; Mulet-Marquis, C; Mundim, L M; Murray, W J; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Myklebust, T; Naraghi, F; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Navas, S; Nawrocki, K; Negri, P; Némécek, S; Neufeld, N; Neumann, W; Neumeister, N; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Nieuwenhuizen, M; Nikolaenko, V; Nikolenko, M; Normand, Ainsley; Nygren, A; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Orazi, G; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Paganini, P; Paganoni, M; Paiano, S; Pain, R; Paiva, R; Palacios, J; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Papageorgiou, K; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Parzefall, U; Passeri, A; Pegoraro, M; Peralta, L; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Phillips, H T; Piana, G; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Piotto, E; Podobnik, T; Podobrin, O; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Rakoczy, D; Rames, J; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Regler, Meinhard; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Rídky, J; Rinaudo, G; Røhne, O M; Romero, A; Ronchese, P; Rosenberg, E I; Rosinsky, P; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sajot, G; Salt, J; Sampsonidis, D; Sannino, M; Schneider, H; Schwemling, P; Schwickerath, U; Schyns, M A E; Scuri, F; Seager, P; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Sekulin, R L; Shellard, R C; Sheridan, A; Silvestre, R; Simard, L C; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Skaali, T B; Smadja, G; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Sopczak, André; Sosnowski, R; Spassoff, Tz; Spiriti, E; Sponholz, P; Squarcia, S; Stampfer, D; Stanescu, C; Stanic, S; Stapnes, Steinar; Stevenson, K; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tegenfeldt, F; Terranova, F; Thomas, J; Tilquin, A; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Todorov, T; Todorova, S; Toet, D Z; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortora, L; Tranströmer, G; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Trombini, A; Troncon, C; Tsirou, A L; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tzamarias, S; Überschär, B; Ullaland, O; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; van Apeldoorn, G W; van Dam, P; Van Doninck, W K; Van Eldik, J; Van Lysebetten, A; Van Vulpen, I B; Vassilopoulos, N; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Verzi, V; Vilanova, D; Vitale, L; Vlasov, E; Vodopyanov, A S; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Walck, C; Weiser, C; Wetherell, Alan M; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wilkinson, G R; Winter, M; Witek, M; Wlodek, T; Wolf, G; Yi, J; Yushchenko, O P; Zaitsev, A; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zimin, N I; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G

    1998-01-01

    The total and the differential cross-sections for the reaction $e^+e^-\\rightarrow \\gamma\\gamma(\\gamma)$ have been measured with the DELPHI detector at LEP % with at centre-of-mass energies from 1 30 %, 136, 161, 172 and to 183 GeV for an integrated luminosity of 78.19.~pb$^{-1}$. %CR An agreement with the QED predictions was found and consequently The results agree with the QED prediction s. The lower limits (obtained including previously published results at the $\\Zzero$ energies) on the QED cutoff parameters are $\\Lambda_{+} > 253$~GeV and $\\Lambda_{-} > 225$~GeV and the lower bo und on the mass of an excited electron with an effective coupling constant $\\lambda_{\\gamma} = 1$ is 231~GeV/$c^2$. %Upper limits on the branching ratios for the decays ${\\rm Z}^0\\rightarrow %\\gam ma\\gamma$, ${\\rm Z}^0\\rightarrow \\pi^0\\gamma$, % ${\\rm Z}^0\\rightarrow \\eta\\gamma$ %and ${\\rm Z}^0\\rightarrow \\gamma\\gamma\\gamma$ have been determined to be 2.5 % $\\times$ $10^{-5}$, 2.5 $\\times$ $ 10^{-5}$, % 4.0 $\\times$ $10^{-5}$, %and...

  18. Accurate Monte Carlo modelling of the back compartments of SPECT cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rault, E.; Staelens, S.; Van Holen, R.; De Beenhouwer, J.; Vandenberghe, S.

    2011-01-01

    Today, new single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) reconstruction techniques rely on accurate Monte Carlo (MC) simulations to optimize reconstructed images. However, existing MC scintillation camera models which usually include an accurate description of the collimator and crystal, lack correct implementation of the gamma camera's back compartments. In the case of dual isotope simultaneous acquisition (DISA), where backscattered photons from the highest energy isotope are detected in the imaging energy window of the second isotope, this approximation may induce simulation errors. Here, we investigate the influence of backscatter compartment modelling on the simulation accuracy of high-energy isotopes. Three models of a scintillation camera were simulated: a simple model (SM), composed only of a collimator and a NaI(Tl) crystal; an intermediate model (IM), adding a simplified description of the backscatter compartments to the previous model and a complete model (CM), accurately simulating the materials and geometries of the camera. The camera models were evaluated with point sources (67Ga, 99mTc, 111In, 123I, 131I and 18F) in air without a collimator, in air with a collimator and in water with a collimator. In the latter case, sensitivities and point-spread functions (PSFs) simulated in the photopeak window with the IM and CM are close to the measured values (error below 10.5%). In the backscatter energy window, however, the IM and CM overestimate the FWHM of the detected PSF by 52% and 23%, respectively, while the SM underestimates it by 34%. The backscatter peak fluence is also overestimated by 20% and 10% with the IM and CM, respectively, whereas it is underestimated by 60% with the SM. The results show that an accurate description of the backscatter compartments is required for SPECT simulations of high-energy isotopes (above 300 keV) when the backscatter energy window is of interest.

  19. Dual-head gamma camera system for intraoperative localization of radioactive seeds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arsenali, B.; De Jong, H. W A M; Viergever, M. A.; Dickerscheid, D. B M; Beijst, C.; Gilhuijs, K. G A

    2015-01-01

    Breast-conserving surgery is a standard option for the treatment of patients with early-stage breast cancer. This form of surgery may result in incomplete excision of the tumor. Iodine-125 labeled titanium seeds are currently used in clinical practice to reduce the number of incomplete excisions. It

  20. Pre-clinical and Clinical Evaluation of High Resolution, Mobile Gamma Camera and Positron Imaging Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    Downloaded on February 20,2010 at 10:55:59 EST from IEEE Xplore . Restrictions apply. STUDENSKI et al.: ACQUISITION AND PROCESSING METHODS FOR A BEDSIDE...February 20,2010 at 10:55:59 EST from IEEE Xplore . Restrictions apply. 208 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NUCLEAR SCIENCE, VOL. 57, NO. 1, FEBRUARY 2010 from the...59 EST from IEEE Xplore . Restrictions apply. STUDENSKI et al.: ACQUISITION AND PROCESSING METHODS FOR A BEDSIDE CARDIAC SPECT IMAGING SYSTEM 209

  1. Investigation of Technetium Redox Cycling in FRC Background Sediments using EXAFS and Gamma Camera Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lloyd, J.R.; McBeth, J.M.; Lear, G.; Morris, K.; Burke, I.T.; Livens, F.R.; Ellis, B.; Lawson, R.

    2006-04-05

    Technetium-99 is a priority pollutant at numerous DOE sites, due to its long half-life (2.1 x 105 years), high mobility as Tc(VII) in oxic waters, and bioavailability as a sulfate analogue. {sup 99}Tc is far less mobile under anaerobic conditions, forming insoluble Tc(IV) precipitates. As anaerobic microorganisms can reduce soluble Tc(VII) to insoluble Tc(IV), microbial metabolism may have the potential to treat sediments and waters contaminated with Tc. Baseline studies of fundamental mechanisms of Tc(VII) bioreduction and precipitation (reviewed by Lloyd et al., 2005, in press) have generally used pure cultures of metal-reducing bacteria, in order to develop conceptual models for the biogeochemical cycling of {sup 99}Tc. There is, however, comparatively little known about interactions of metal-reducing bacteria with environmentally relevant trace concentrations of {sup 99}Tc, against a more complex biogeochemical background provided by mixed microbial communities in aquifer sediments. The objective of this project is to probe the site specific biogeochemical conditions that control the mobility of {sup 99}Tc at the US DOE Field Research Center Site (FRC; Oak Ridge, Tennessee). This information is required for the rational design of in situ bioremediation strategies for technetium-contaminated subsurface environments. We are using a combination of geochemical, mineralogical, microbiological and spectroscopic techniques to determine the solubility and phase associations of {sup 99}Tc in FRC sediments, and characterize the underpinning biogeochemical controls.

  2. Pre-Clinical and Clinical Evaluation of High Resolution, Mobile Gamma Camera and Positron Imaging Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-01

    acrylic plate. Light sharing between the detector modules is achieved by the use of the light-guide resulting in the “dead” regions between PSPMTs...1. Pregnant women 2. Subjects with serum creatinine 1.5 md/dl 3. Subjects who have known allergy or sensitivity to iodine contrast media 4

  3. A new phantom for fast determination of the scatter response of a gamma camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beekman, F.J.; Frey, E.C.; Kamphuis, C.; Tsui, B.M.W.; Viergever, M.A. (Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States))

    1994-08-01

    A triangular phantom is proposed which enables the determination and parameterization of the depth dependent scatter response function (SRF) in uniformly attenuating objects for Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) by means of a single line source measurement. This approach replaces a tedious measurement series with line sources at various depths in slab phantoms. The method is evaluated for [sup 99m]Tc. Monte Carlo simulations of SRFs and scatter-to-primary ratios (SPRs) of the triangular phantom are compared with those of slabs. It is found that both the SPRs and the shapes of the SRFs from the slab and triangular phantoms are in excellent agreement. In addition, the data obtained from a single measurement using the triangular phantom can be used in the parameterization of the slab phantom SRF and can be described by an analytical expression of the line source response function. This information can be combined with knowledge of the geometric detector response and the shape of the object to compute the full scatter response function in convex shaped objects. This method for estimating scatter can serve as the basis for accurate scatter compensation in SPECT.

  4. Intelligent Decision Support System for Medical Radioisotope Diagnostics with Gamma-camera

    OpenAIRE

    A.S. Dovbysh; V.V. Moskalenko; A.S. Rizhova; O.V. Dyomin

    2015-01-01

    The results of parameters optimization of decision rules using the particle swarm algorithm are analyzed. The results of the automatic segmentation of scintigraphic data intended to highlight regions of interests, result of automatic classification of renogram curves intended to make-diagnosis are shown.

  5. Upper Limits on TeV Gamma-Ray Emission from Active Galactic Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerrick, A. D.; Carter-Lewis, D. A.; Akerlof, C. W.; Biller, S.; Buckley, J.; Chantell, M.; Cawley, M. F.; Connaughton, V.; Fegan, D. J.; Fennell, S.

    1995-01-01

    The results of a search for TeV gamma-ray emission from 35 active galactic nuclei (AGNS) using the Whipple Observatory High Resolution Atmospheric Cerenkov Camera are reported. Fifteen of these objects have been detected at GeV energies by the EGRET experiment on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. None of the 35 objects gave a signal at the 3 sigma level; Mrk 421 remains the only AGN detected at TeV energies. The absence of a TeV signal may imply a change in the primary source spectrum and/or the effect of absorption by pair production on intergalactic infrared photons.

  6. Applied gamma-ray spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Dams, R; Crouthamel, Carl E

    1970-01-01

    Applied Gamma-Ray Spectrometry covers real life application of the gamma-ray and the devices used in their experimental studies. This book is organized into 9 chapters, and starts with discussions of the various decay processes, the possible interaction mechanisms of gamma radiation with matter, and the intrinsic and extrinsic variables, which affect the observed gamma-ray and X-ray spectra. The subsequent chapters deal with the properties and fabrication of scintillation detectors, semiconductor detectors, and proportional gas counters. These chapters present some of the most widely utilized

  7. Increased Automation in Stereo Camera Calibration Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandi House

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Robotic vision has become a very popular field in recent years due to the numerous promising applications it may enhance. However, errors within the cameras and in their perception of their environment can cause applications in robotics to fail. To help correct these internal and external imperfections, stereo camera calibrations are performed. There are currently many accurate methods of camera calibration available; however, most or all of them are time consuming and labor intensive. This research seeks to automate the most labor intensive aspects of a popular calibration technique developed by Jean-Yves Bouguet. His process requires manual selection of the extreme corners of a checkerboard pattern. The modified process uses embedded LEDs in the checkerboard pattern to act as active fiducials. Images are captured of the checkerboard with the LEDs on and off in rapid succession. The difference of the two images automatically highlights the location of the four extreme corners, and these corner locations take the place of the manual selections. With this modification to the calibration routine, upwards of eighty mouse clicks are eliminated per stereo calibration. Preliminary test results indicate that accuracy is not substantially affected by the modified procedure. Improved automation to camera calibration procedures may finally penetrate the barriers to the use of calibration in practice.

  8. Case on Camera--An Audience Verdict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wober, J. M.

    In July 1984, British Channel 4 began televising Case on Camera, a series based on genuine arbitration of civil cases carried out by a retired judge, recorded as it happened, and edited into half hour programs. Because of the Independent Broadcasting Authority's concern for the rights to privacy, a systematic study of public reaction to the series…

  9. Face identification in videos from mobile cameras

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mu, Meiru; Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.

    2014-01-01

    It is still challenging to recognize faces reliably in videos from mobile camera, although mature automatic face recognition technology for still images has been available for quite some time. Suppose we want to be alerted when suspects appear in the recording of a police Body-Cam, even a good face

  10. Teaching Camera Calibration by a Constructivist Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samper, D.; Santolaria, J.; Pastor, J. J.; Aguilar, J. J.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the Metrovisionlab simulation software and practical sessions designed to teach the most important machine vision camera calibration aspects in courses for senior undergraduate students. By following a constructivist methodology, having received introductory theoretical classes, students use the Metrovisionlab application to…

  11. Phase camera experiment for Advanced Virgo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agatsuma, Kazuhiro; Van Beuzekom, Martin; Van Der Schaaf, Laura; Van Den Brand, Jo

    2016-01-01

    We report on a study of the phase camera, which is a frequency selective wave-front sensor of a laser beam. This sensor is utilized for monitoring sidebands produced by phase modulations in a gravitational wave (GW) detector. Regarding the operation of the GW detectors, the laser

  12. Lights, Camera, Read! Arizona Reading Program Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arizona State Dept. of Library, Archives and Public Records, Phoenix.

    This document is the manual for the Arizona Reading Program (ARP) 2003 entitled "Lights, Camera, Read!" This theme spotlights books that were made into movies, and allows readers to appreciate favorite novels and stories that have progressed to the movie screen. The manual consists of eight sections. The Introduction includes welcome…

  13. Digital Camera Control for Faster Inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Katharine; Siekierski, James D.; Mangieri, Mark L.; Dekome, Kent; Cobarruvias, John; Piplani, Perry J.; Busa, Joel

    2009-01-01

    Digital Camera Control Software (DCCS) is a computer program for controlling a boom and a boom-mounted camera used to inspect the external surface of a space shuttle in orbit around the Earth. Running in a laptop computer in the space-shuttle crew cabin, DCCS commands integrated displays and controls. By means of a simple one-button command, a crewmember can view low- resolution images to quickly spot problem areas and can then cause a rapid transition to high- resolution images. The crewmember can command that camera settings apply to a specific small area of interest within the field of view of the camera so as to maximize image quality within that area. DCCS also provides critical high-resolution images to a ground screening team, which analyzes the images to assess damage (if any); in so doing, DCCS enables the team to clear initially suspect areas more quickly than would otherwise be possible and further saves time by minimizing the probability of re-imaging of areas already inspected. On the basis of experience with a previous version (2.0) of the software, the present version (3.0) incorporates a number of advanced imaging features that optimize crewmember capability and efficiency.

  14. Determination of the $e^+ e^- \\to \\gamma \\gamma (\\gamma)$ cross-section at LEP 2

    CERN Document Server

    Abdallah, J; Adam, W; Adzic, P; Albrecht, T; Alderweireld, T; Alemany-Fernandez, R; Allmendinger, T; Allport, P P; Amaldi, Ugo; Amapane, N; Amato, S; Anashkin, E; Andreazza, A; Andringa, S; Anjos, N; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Ask, S; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Ballestrero, A; Bambade, P; Barbier, R; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G J; Baroncelli, A; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Behrmann, A; Ben-Haim, E; Benekos, N C; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Bérat, C; Berggren, M; Berntzon, L; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Besson, N; Bloch, D; Blom, M; Bluj, M; Bonesini, M; Boonekamp, M; Booth, P S L; Borisov, G; Botner, O; Bouquet, B; Bowcock, T J V; Boyko, I; Bracko, M; Brenner, R; Brodet, E; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buschmann, P; Calvi, M; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Carena, F; Castro, N; Cavallo, F R; Chapkin, M M; Charpentier, P; Checchia, P; Chierici, R; Shlyapnikov, P; Chudoba, J; Chung, S U; Cieslik, K; Collins, P; Contri, R; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Costa, M J; Crennell, D J; Cuevas-Maestro, J; D'Hondt, J; Dalmau, J; Da Silva, T; Da Silva, W; Della Ricca, G; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Clercq, C; De Lotto, B; De Maria, N; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; Di Ciaccio, L; Di Simone, A; Doroba, K; Drees, J; Dris, M; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ellert, M; Elsing, M; Espirito-Santo, M C; Fanourakis, G K; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, M; Fernández, J; Ferrer, A; Ferro, F; Flagmeyer, U; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Gandelman, M; García, C; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gómez-Ceballos, G; Gonçalves, P; Graziani, E; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Guy, J; Haag, C; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hamilton, K; Haug, S; Hauler, F; Hedberg, V; Hennecke, M; Herr, H; Hoffman, J; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Houlden, M A; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jeans, D; Johansson, E K; Johansson, P D; Jonsson, P; Joram, C; Jungermann, L; Kapusta, F; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Kernel, G; Kersevan, B P; Kerzel, U; Kiiskinen, A P; King, B T; Kjaer, N J; Kluit, P; Kokkinias, P; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Krumshtein, Z; Kucharczyk, M; Lamsa, J; Leder, G; Ledroit, F; Leinonen, L; Leitner, R; Lemonne, J; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Liebig, W; Liko, D; Lipniacka, A; Lopes, J H; López, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J; Malek, A; Maltezos, S; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Masik, J; Mastroyiannopoulos, N; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Mazzucato, F; Mazzucato, M; McNulty, R; Meroni, C; Migliore, E; Mitaroff, W A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Moch, M; Mönig, K; Monge, R; Montenegro, J; Moraes, D; Moreno, S; Morettini, P; Müller, U; Münich, K; Mulders, M; Mundim, L; Murray, W; Muryn, B; Myatt, G; Myklebust, T; Nassiakou, M; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Nawrocki, K; Nicolaidou, R; Nikolenko, M; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, R; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Oyanguren, A; Paganoni, M; Paiano, S; Palacios, J P; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Parzefall, U; Passeri, A; Passon, O; Peralta, L; Perepelitsa, V F; Perrotta, A; Petrolini, A; Piedra, J; Pieri, L; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Piotto, E; Podobnik, T; Poireau, V; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Pozdnyakov, V; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Rames, J; Read, A; Rebecchi, P; Rehn, J; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P B; Richard, F; Rídky, J; Rivero, M; Rodríguez, D; Romero, A; Ronchese, P; Roudeau, P; Rovelli, T; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ryabtchikov, D; Sadovskii, A; Salmi, L; Salt, J; Sander, C; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schwickerath, U; Segar, A; Sekulin, R L; Siebel, M; Sissakian, A N; Smadja, G; Smirnova, O G; Sokolov, A; Sopczak, A; Sosnowski, R; Spassoff, Tz; Stanitzki, M; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Szumlak, T; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Taffard, A C; Tegenfeldt, F; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Tobin, M; Todorovova, S; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortosa, P; Travnicek, P; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Trochimczuk, M; Troncon, C; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyapkin, P; Tzamarias, S; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; van Dam, P; Van Eldik, J; Van Lysebetten, A; Van Remortel, N; Van Vulpen, I; Vegni, G; Veloso, F; Venus, W A; Verdier, P; Verzi, V; Vilanova, D; Vitale, L; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Washbrook, A J; Weiser, C; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wilkinson, G; Winter, M; Witek, M; Yushchenko, O P; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, P; Zavrtanik, D; Zhuravlov, V; Zimin, N I; Zintchenko, A; Zupan, M

    2004-01-01

    A test of the benchmark QED process e+e- -> gamma gamma (gamma) is reported, using the data collected with the DELPHI detector at LEP 2. The data analysed were recorded at centre-of-mass energies ranging from 161 GeV to 208 GeV and correspond to a total integrated luminosity of 656.4 pb^{-1}. The Born cross-section for the process e+e- -> gamma gamma (gamma) was determined, confirming the validity of QED at the highest energies ever attained in electron-positron collisions. Lower limits on the parameters of a number of possible deviations from QED, predicted within theoretical frameworks expressing physics beyond the Standard Model, were derived.

  15. Predictions for $B \\to K \\gamma \\gamma$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Hiller, G; Hiller, Gudrun

    2005-01-01

    We present a phenomenological study of the rare double radiative decay $B\\to K \\gamma\\gamma$ in the Standard Model (SM) and beyond. Using the operator product expansion (OPE) technique, we estimate the short-distance (SD) contribution to the decay amplitude in a region of the phase space which is around the point where all decay products have energy $\\sim m_b/3$ in the rest frame of the $B$-meson. At lowest order in 1/Q, where $Q$ is of order $m_b$, the $B\\to K \\gamma\\gamma$ matrix element is then expressed in terms of the usual $B\\to K$ form factors known from semileptonic rare decays. The integrated SD branching ratio in the SM in the OPE region turns out to be $\\Delta {\\cal{B}}(B \\to K \\gamma \\gamma)_{SM}^{OPE} \\simeq 1 \\times 10^{-9}$. We work out the di-photon invariant mass distribution with and without the resonant background through $B\\to K \\{\\eta_c,\\chi_{c0}\\}\\to K\\gamma \\gamma$. In the SM, the resonance contribution is dominant in the region of phase space where the OPE is valid. The present experim...

  16. X-ray imaging using digital cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winch, Nicola M.; Edgar, Andrew

    2012-03-01

    The possibility of using the combination of a computed radiography (storage phosphor) cassette and a semiprofessional grade digital camera for medical or dental radiography is investigated. We compare the performance of (i) a Canon 5D Mk II single lens reflex camera with f1.4 lens and full-frame CMOS array sensor and (ii) a cooled CCD-based camera with a 1/3 frame sensor and the same lens system. Both systems are tested with 240 x 180 mm cassettes which are based on either powdered europium-doped barium fluoride bromide or needle structure europium-doped cesium bromide. The modulation transfer function for both systems has been determined and falls to a value of 0.2 at around 2 lp/mm, and is limited by light scattering of the emitted light from the storage phosphor rather than the optics or sensor pixelation. The modulation transfer function for the CsBr:Eu2+ plate is bimodal, with a high frequency wing which is attributed to the light-guiding behaviour of the needle structure. The detective quantum efficiency has been determined using a radioisotope source and is comparatively low at 0.017 for the CMOS camera and 0.006 for the CCD camera, attributed to the poor light harvesting by the lens. The primary advantages of the method are portability, robustness, digital imaging and low cost; the limitations are the low detective quantum efficiency and hence signal-to-noise ratio for medical doses, and restricted range of plate sizes. Representative images taken with medical doses are shown and illustrate the potential use for portable basic radiography.

  17. Modulated CMOS camera for fluorescence lifetime microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongtao; Holst, Gerhard; Gratton, Enrico

    2015-12-01

    Widefield frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FD-FLIM) is a fast and accurate method to measure the fluorescence lifetime of entire images. However, the complexity and high costs involved in construction of such a system limit the extensive use of this technique. PCO AG recently released the first luminescence lifetime imaging camera based on a high frequency modulated CMOS image sensor, QMFLIM2. Here we tested and provide operational procedures to calibrate the camera and to improve the accuracy using corrections necessary for image analysis. With its flexible input/output options, we are able to use a modulated laser diode or a 20 MHz pulsed white supercontinuum laser as the light source. The output of the camera consists of a stack of modulated images that can be analyzed by the SimFCS software using the phasor approach. The nonuniform system response across the image sensor must be calibrated at the pixel level. This pixel calibration is crucial and needed for every camera settings, e.g. modulation frequency and exposure time. A significant dependency of the modulation signal on the intensity was also observed and hence an additional calibration is needed for each pixel depending on the pixel intensity level. These corrections are important not only for the fundamental frequency, but also for the higher harmonics when using the pulsed supercontinuum laser. With these post data acquisition corrections, the PCO CMOS-FLIM camera can be used for various biomedical applications requiring a large frame and high speed acquisition. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. A Precision Analysis of Camera Distortion Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhongwei; Grompone von Gioi, Rafael; Monasse, Pascal; Morel, Jean-Michel

    2017-06-01

    This paper addresses the question of identifying the right camera direct or inverse distortion model, permitting a high subpixel precision to fit to real camera distortion. Five classic camera distortion models are reviewed and their precision is compared for direct or inverse distortion. By definition, the three radially symmetric models can only model a distortion radially symmetric around some distortion center. They can be extended to deal with non-radially symmetric distortions by adding tangential distortion components, but still may be too simple for very accurate modeling of real cameras. The polynomial and the rational models instead miss a physical or optical interpretation, but can cope equally with radially and non-radially symmetric distortions. Indeed, they do not require the evaluation of a distortion center. When requiring high precisions, we found that the distortion modeling must also be evaluated primarily as a numerical problem. Indeed, all models except the polynomial involve a non-linear minimization, which increases the numerical risk. The estimation of a polynomial distortion model leads instead to a linear problem, which is secure and much faster. We concluded by extensive numerical experiments that, although high degree polynomials were required to reach a high precision of 1/100 pixels, such polynomials were easily estimated and produced a precise distortion modeling without overfitting. Our conclusion is validated by three independent experimental setups: the models were compared first on the lens distortion database of the Lensfun library by their distortion simulation and inversion power; second by fitting real camera distortions estimated by a non parametric algorithm; and finally by the absolute correction measurement provided by the photographs of tightly stretched strings, warranting a high straightness.

  19. Physics at a gamma gamma, e gamma and e-e- Option for a Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    de Roeck, A

    2003-01-01

    This report presents a review of the studies made in the working group on gamma gamma and e gamma physics" of the ECFA/DESY workshop on linear collider physics. It reports on several new physics studies, in particular s-channel Higgs production. A summary of R&D activities for the interaction region is presented. The merits of e-e- collisions are briefly recalled.

  20. Search for C-parity violation in J/psi -> gamma gamma and gamma phi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ai, X. C.; Albayrak, O.; Albrecht, M.; Ambrose, D. J.; Amoroso, A.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; Ferroli, R. Baldini; Ban, Y.; Bennett, D. W.; Bennett, J. V.; Bertani, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bian, J. M.; Bianchi, F.; Boger, E.; Bondarenko, O.; Boyko, I.; Braun, S.; Briere, R. A.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X.; Chen, X. R.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, X. K.; Chu, Y. P.; Cibinetto, G.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; De Mori, F.; Ding, Y.; Dong, C.; Dong, J.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Du, S. X.; Fan, J. Z.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fang, Y.; Fava, L.; Feldbauer, F.; Felici, G.; Feng, C. Q.; Fioravanti, E.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, Q.; Gao, Y.; Garzia, I.; Geng, C.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, T.; Guo, Y. P.; Haddadi, Z.; Han, S.; Han, Y. L.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; He, Z. Y.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Huang, G. M.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, H. P.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, Y.; Hussain, T.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q. P.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, L. L.; Jiang, L. W.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Johansson, T.; Julin, A.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kang, X. L.; Kang, X. S.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Ke, B. C.; Kloss, B.; Kolcu, O. B.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kuehn, W.; Kupsc, A.; Lai, W.; Lange, J. S.; Lara, M.; Larin, P.; Leyhe, M.; Li, Cheng; Li, Cui; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, J. C.; Li, Jin; Li, K.; Li, K.; Li, Q. J.; Li, T.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. H.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Lin, D. X.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. L.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, X. X.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Lou, X. C.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, R. Q.; Lu, Y.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Lv, M.; Lyu, X. R.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, S.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. Y.; Maas, F. E.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q. A.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Marcello, S.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Min, J.; Min, T. J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Mo, Y. J.; Moeini, H.; Morales, C. Morales; Moriya, K.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Muramatsu, H.; Nefedov, Y.; Nerling, F.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Nisar, S.; Niu, S. L.; Niu, X. Y.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H. P.; Peters, K.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Pu, Y. N.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, L. Q.; Qin, N.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Y.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Redmer, C. F.; Ren, H. L.; Ripka, M.; Rong, G.; Ruan, X. D.; Santoro, V.; Sarantsev, A.; Savrie, M.; Schoenning, K.; Schumann, S.; Shan, W.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Shepherd, M. R.; Song, W. M.; Song, X. Y.; Sosio, S.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Thorndike, E. H.; Tiemens, M.; Toth, D.; Ullrich, M.; Uman, I.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B.; Wang, B. L.; Wang, D.; Wang, D. Y.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, Q. J.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, W.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. H.; Wang, Z. Y.; Wei, D. H.; Wei, J. B.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, S. P.; Werner, M.; Wiedner, U.; Wolke, M.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L. G.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xiu, Q. L.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, L.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, Q. N.; Xu, X. P.; Xue, Z.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, W. C.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, L.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, H.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, H. W.; Yu, J. S.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, W. L.; Yuan, Y.; Yuncu, A.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zang, S. L.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J. J.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, S. H.; Zhang, X. J.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Z. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, J. Z.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, Li; Zhou, X.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhou, X. Y.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.

    2014-01-01

    Using 1.06 x 10(8) psi(3686) events recorded in e(+)e(-) collisions at root s = 3.686 GeV with the BESIII at the BEPCII collider, we present searches for C-parity violation in J/psi -> gamma gamma and gamma phi decays via psi(3686) -> J/psi pi(+)pi(-). No significant signals are observed in either

  1. Control of the movement of a ROV camera; Controle de posicionamento da camera de um ROV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Alexandre S. de; Dutra, Max Suell [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE); Reis, Ney Robinson S. dos [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas; Santos, Auderi V. dos [Pontificia Univ. Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    The ROV's (Remotely Operated Vehicles) are used for installation and maintenance of underwater exploration systems in the oil industry. These systems are operated in distant areas thus being of essential importance the use of a cameras for the visualization of the work area. The synchronization necessary in the accomplishment of the tasks when operating the manipulator and the movement of the camera for the operator is a complex task. For the accomplishment of this synchronization is presented in this work the analysis of the interconnection of the systems. The concatenation of the systems is made through the interconnection of the electric signals of the proportional valves of the actuators of the manipulator with the signals of the proportional valves of the actuators of the camera. With this interconnection the approach accompaniment of the movement of the manipulator for the camera, keeping the object of the visualization of the field of vision of the operator is obtained. (author)

  2. Analysis of gamma ray intensity on the S/C vent pipes area in the unit 2 reactor building of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jai Wan; Choi, Young Soo; Jeong, Kyung Min [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The robot is equipped with cameras, a dosimeter, and 2 DOF (degree of freedom) manipulation arms. It loads a small vehicle equipped with a camera that can access and inspect narrow areas. TEPCO is using the four-legged walking robot to inspect the suppression chamber (S/C) area of the unit 2 reactor building basement in the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. The robot carried out 6 missions for about four months, from 11 December, 2012 to 15 March, 2013, where it examined an evidence of a leakage of radioactivity contaminated water in the S/C area of unit 2 reactor building. When a camera's signal processing unit, which is consist of ASIC and FPGA devices manufactured by a CMOS fabrication process, is exposed to a higher dose rate gamma ray, the speckle distribution in the camera image increase more. From the inspection videos, released by TEPCO, of the underground 8 vent pipes in the unit 2 reactor building, we analyzed the speckle distribution from the high dose-rate gamma rays. Based on the distribution of the speckle, we attempted to characterize the vent pipe with much radioactivity contaminated materials among the eight vent pipes connected to the PCV. The numbers of speckles viewed in the image of a CCD (or CMOS) camera are related to an intensity of the gamma ray energy emitted by a nuclear fission reaction from radioactivity materials. The numbers of speckles generated by gamma ray irradiation in the camera image are calculated by an image processing technique. Therefore, calculating the speckles counts, we can determine the vent pipe with relatively most radioactivity-contaminated materials among the other vent pipes. From the comparison of speckles counts calculated in the inspection image of the vent pipe with the speckles counts extracted by gamma ray irradiation experiment of the same small vehicle camera model loaded with the four-legged walking robot, we can qualitatively estimate the gamma ray dose-rate in the S/C vent pipe area of the

  3. Gamma-hadron families and scaling violation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaisser, T. K.; Stanev, T.; Wrotniak, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    For three different interaction models we have simulated gamma-hadron families, including the detector (Pamir emulsion chamber) response. Rates of gamma families, hadrons, and hadron-gamma ratios were compared with experiments.

  4. GGT (Gamma-Glutamyl Transferase) Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Links Patient Resources For Health Professionals Subscribe Search Gamma-Glutamyl Transferase (GGT) Send Us Your Feedback Choose ... Content Related Images View Sources Also Known As Gamma-Glutamyl Transpeptidase GGTP Gamma-GT GTP Formal Name ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: mucolipidosis III gamma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions Mucolipidosis III gamma Mucolipidosis III gamma Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Mucolipidosis III gamma is a slowly progressive disorder that affects many ...

  6. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovgaard, Jens

    A new method - Noise Adjusted Singular Value Decomposition, NASVD - for processing gamma-ray spectra has been developed as part of a Ph.D. project. By using this technique one is able to decompose a large set of data - for example from airborne gamma-ray surveys - into a few spectral components...

  7. The x-ray camera of the EXIST/SXI telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uslenghi, Michela; Fiorini, Mauro; Mereghetti, Sandro; Villa, Gabriele E.; Bazzano, Angela; Caraveo, Patrizia A.; Fiorini, Carlo E.; Grindlay, Jonathan E.; Natalucci, Lorenzo; Pareschi, Giovanni; Tagliaferri, Gianpiero; Ubertini, Pietro

    2010-07-01

    The Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope (EXIST) mission, submitted to the Decadal Survey, is a multiwavelength observatory mainly devoted to the study of Super Massive Black Holes, Gamma Ray Bursts and other transient sources. The set of instruments foreseen for EXIST includes a soft x-ray telescope (SXI), proposed as a contribution of the Italian Space Agency (ASI). We present the baseline design of the X-Ray camera for SXI telescope, that we have finalized under ASI contract. The camera is based on a focal plane detector consisting of a 450 μm thick silicon pixel sensor sensitive, with high QE, in the full SXI range (0.1-10 KeV), and capable of high energy resolution when operated in photon counting mode (E/dE ~ 47 at 6 keV), frame rate ~ 100-200 frames/s (enabling timing in the ms range), and spatial resolution matching the optical characteristics of the mirror module. We provide an overview of the mechanical, thermal and electrical concept of the camera.

  8. NATIONAL GUIDELINES FOR DIGITAL CAMERA SYSTEMS CERTIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Yaron

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Digital camera systems are a key component in the production of reliable, geometrically accurate, high-resolution geospatial products. These systems have replaced film imaging in photogrammetric data capturing. Today, we see a proliferation of imaging sensors collecting photographs in different ground resolutions, spectral bands, swath sizes, radiometric characteristics, accuracies and carried on different mobile platforms. In addition, these imaging sensors are combined with navigational tools (such as GPS and IMU, active sensors such as laser scanning and powerful processing tools to obtain high quality geospatial products. The quality (accuracy, completeness, consistency, etc. of these geospatial products is based on the use of calibrated, high-quality digital camera systems. The new survey regulations of the state of Israel specify the quality requirements for each geospatial product including: maps at different scales and for different purposes, elevation models, orthophotographs, three-dimensional models at different levels of details (LOD and more. In addition, the regulations require that digital camera systems used for mapping purposes should be certified using a rigorous mapping systems certification and validation process which is specified in the Director General Instructions. The Director General Instructions for digital camera systems certification specify a two-step process as follows: 1. Theoretical analysis of system components that includes: study of the accuracy of each component and an integrative error propagation evaluation, examination of the radiometric and spectral response curves for the imaging sensors, the calibration requirements, and the working procedures. 2. Empirical study of the digital mapping system that examines a typical project (product scale, flight height, number and configuration of ground control points and process. The study examine all the aspects of the final product including; its accuracy, the

  9. National Guidelines for Digital Camera Systems Certification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaron, Yaron; Keinan, Eran; Benhamu, Moshe; Regev, Ronen; Zalmanzon, Garry

    2016-06-01

    Digital camera systems are a key component in the production of reliable, geometrically accurate, high-resolution geospatial products. These systems have replaced film imaging in photogrammetric data capturing. Today, we see a proliferation of imaging sensors collecting photographs in different ground resolutions, spectral bands, swath sizes, radiometric characteristics, accuracies and carried on different mobile platforms. In addition, these imaging sensors are combined with navigational tools (such as GPS and IMU), active sensors such as laser scanning and powerful processing tools to obtain high quality geospatial products. The quality (accuracy, completeness, consistency, etc.) of these geospatial products is based on the use of calibrated, high-quality digital camera systems. The new survey regulations of the state of Israel specify the quality requirements for each geospatial product including: maps at different scales and for different purposes, elevation models, orthophotographs, three-dimensional models at different levels of details (LOD) and more. In addition, the regulations require that digital camera systems used for mapping purposes should be certified using a rigorous mapping systems certification and validation process which is specified in the Director General Instructions. The Director General Instructions for digital camera systems certification specify a two-step process as follows: 1. Theoretical analysis of system components that includes: study of the accuracy of each component and an integrative error propagation evaluation, examination of the radiometric and spectral response curves for the imaging sensors, the calibration requirements, and the working procedures. 2. Empirical study of the digital mapping system that examines a typical project (product scale, flight height, number and configuration of ground control points and process). The study examine all the aspects of the final product including; its accuracy, the product pixels size

  10. World's fastest and most sensitive astronomical camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    The next generation of instruments for ground-based telescopes took a leap forward with the development of a new ultra-fast camera that can take 1500 finely exposed images per second even when observing extremely faint objects. The first 240x240 pixel images with the world's fastest high precision faint light camera were obtained through a collaborative effort between ESO and three French laboratories from the French Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique/Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers (CNRS/INSU). Cameras such as this are key components of the next generation of adaptive optics instruments of Europe's ground-based astronomy flagship facility, the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT). ESO PR Photo 22a/09 The CCD220 detector ESO PR Photo 22b/09 The OCam camera ESO PR Video 22a/09 OCam images "The performance of this breakthrough camera is without an equivalent anywhere in the world. The camera will enable great leaps forward in many areas of the study of the Universe," says Norbert Hubin, head of the Adaptive Optics department at ESO. OCam will be part of the second-generation VLT instrument SPHERE. To be installed in 2011, SPHERE will take images of giant exoplanets orbiting nearby stars. A fast camera such as this is needed as an essential component for the modern adaptive optics instruments used on the largest ground-based telescopes. Telescopes on the ground suffer from the blurring effect induced by atmospheric turbulence. This turbulence causes the stars to twinkle in a way that delights poets, but frustrates astronomers, since it blurs the finest details of the images. Adaptive optics techniques overcome this major drawback, so that ground-based telescopes can produce images that are as sharp as if taken from space. Adaptive optics is based on real-time corrections computed from images obtained by a special camera working at very high speeds. Nowadays, this means many hundreds of times each second. The new generation instruments require these

  11. GPM GROUND VALIDATION DC-8 CAMERA NADIR GCPEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation DC-8 Camera Nadir GCPEx dataset contains geo-located visible-wavelength imagery of the ground obtained from the nadir camera aboard the...

  12. GPM GROUND VALIDATION DC-8 CAMERA NADIR GCPEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation DC-8 Camera Nadir GCPEx dataset contains geo-located, visible-wavelength imagery of the ground obtained from the nadir camera aboard the...

  13. Advanced EVA Suit Camera System Development Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mock, Kyla

    2016-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) is developing a new extra-vehicular activity (EVA) suit known as the Advanced EVA Z2 Suit. All of the improvements to the EVA Suit provide the opportunity to update the technology of the video imagery. My summer internship project involved improving the video streaming capabilities of the cameras that will be used on the Z2 Suit for data acquisition. To accomplish this, I familiarized myself with the architecture of the camera that is currently being tested to be able to make improvements on the design. Because there is a lot of benefit to saving space, power, and weight on the EVA suit, my job was to use Altium Design to start designing a much smaller and simplified interface board for the camera's microprocessor and external components. This involved checking datasheets of various components and checking signal connections to ensure that this architecture could be used for both the Z2 suit and potentially other future projects. The Orion spacecraft is a specific project that may benefit from this condensed camera interface design. The camera's physical placement on the suit also needed to be determined and tested so that image resolution can be maximized. Many of the options of the camera placement may be tested along with other future suit testing. There are multiple teams that work on different parts of the suit, so the camera's placement could directly affect their research or design. For this reason, a big part of my project was initiating contact with other branches and setting up multiple meetings to learn more about the pros and cons of the potential camera placements we are analyzing. Collaboration with the multiple teams working on the Advanced EVA Z2 Suit is absolutely necessary and these comparisons will be used as further progress is made for the overall suit design. This prototype will not be finished in time for the scheduled Z2 Suit testing, so my time was

  14. Declarative camera control for automatic cinematography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christianson, D.B.; Anderson, S.E.; Li-wei He [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Animations generated by interactive 3D computer graphics applications are typically portrayed either from a particular character`s point of view or from a small set of strategically-placed viewpoints. By ignoring camera placement, such applications fail to realize important storytelling capabilities that have been explored by cinematographers for many years. In this paper, we describe several of the principles of cinematography and show how they can be formalized into a declarative language, called the Declarative Camera Control Language (DCCL). We describe the application of DCCL within the context of a simple interactive video game and argue that DCCL represents cinematic knowledge at the same level of abstraction as expert directors by encoding 16 idioms from a film textbook. These idioms produce compelling animations, as demonstrated on the accompanying videotape.

  15. Relating vanishing points to catadioptric camera calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Wenting; Zhang, Hui; Allinson, Nigel M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the analysis and derivation of the geometric relation between vanishing points and camera parameters of central catadioptric camera systems. These vanishing points correspond to the three mutually orthogonal directions of 3D real world coordinate system (i.e. X, Y and Z axes). Compared to vanishing points (VPs) in the perspective projection, the advantages of VPs under central catadioptric projection are that there are normally two vanishing points for each set of parallel lines, since lines are projected to conics in the catadioptric image plane. Also, their vanishing points are usually located inside the image frame. We show that knowledge of the VPs corresponding to XYZ axes from a single image can lead to simple derivation of both intrinsic and extrinsic parameters of the central catadioptric system. This derived novel theory is demonstrated and tested on both synthetic and real data with respect to noise sensitivity.

  16. Cervical SPECT Camera for Parathyroid Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2012-08-31

    Primary hyperparathyroidism characterized by one or more enlarged parathyroid glands has become one of the most common endocrine diseases in the world affecting about 1 per 1000 in the United States. Standard treatment is highly invasive exploratory neck surgery called Parathyroidectomy. The surgery has a notable mortality rate because of the close proximity to vital structures. The move to minimally invasive parathyroidectomy is hampered by the lack of high resolution pre-surgical imaging techniques that can accurately localize the parathyroid with respect to surrounding structures. We propose to develop a dedicated ultra-high resolution (~ 1 mm) and high sensitivity (10x conventional camera) cervical scintigraphic imaging device. It will be based on a multiple pinhole-camera SPECT system comprising a novel solid state CZT detector that offers the required performance. The overall system will be configured to fit around the neck and comfortably image a patient.

  17. Infrared camera based on a curved retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Delphine; Fendler, Manuel; Berger, Frédéric; Cloix, Baptiste; Pornin, Cyrille; Baier, Nicolas; Druart, Guillaume; Primot, Jérôme; le Coarer, Etienne

    2012-02-15

    Design of miniature and light cameras requires an optical design breakthrough to achieve good optical performance. Solutions inspired by animals' eyes are the most promising. The curvature of the retina offers several advantages, such as uniform intensity and no field curvature, but this feature is not used. The work presented here is a solution to spherically bend monolithic IR detectors. Compared to state-of-the-art methods, a higher fill factor is obtained and the device fabrication process is not modified. We made an IR eye camera with a single lens and a curved IR bolometer. Images captured are well resolved and have good contrast, and the modulation transfer function shows better quality when comparing with planar systems.

  18. Time-of-Flight Microwave Camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charvat, Gregory; Temme, Andrew; Feigin, Micha; Raskar, Ramesh

    2015-10-05

    Microwaves can penetrate many obstructions that are opaque at visible wavelengths, however microwave imaging is challenging due to resolution limits associated with relatively small apertures and unrecoverable "stealth" regions due to the specularity of most objects at microwave frequencies. We demonstrate a multispectral time-of-flight microwave imaging system which overcomes these challenges with a large passive aperture to improve lateral resolution, multiple illumination points with a data fusion method to reduce stealth regions, and a frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) receiver to achieve depth resolution. The camera captures images with a resolution of 1.5 degrees, multispectral images across the X frequency band (8 GHz-12 GHz), and a time resolution of 200 ps (6 cm optical path in free space). Images are taken of objects in free space as well as behind drywall and plywood. This architecture allows "camera-like" behavior from a microwave imaging system and is practical for imaging everyday objects in the microwave spectrum.

  19. Interferon Gamma in Leishmaniasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kima, Peter E.; Soong, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a complex disease that is caused by parasites of the Leishmania genus. Leishmania are further classified into several complexes, each of which can engage in distinct interactions with mammalian hosts resulting in differing disease presentations. It is therefore not unexpected that host immune responses to Leishmania are variable. The induction of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) and response to it in these infections has received considerable attention. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of some of the host responses during Leishmania infections that are regulated by IFN-γ. In addition, studies that explore the nature of parasite-derived molecular mediators that might affect the host response to IFN-γ are also discussed. PMID:23801993

  20. Multiple-camera tracking: UK government requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosmer, Paul

    2007-10-01

    The Imagery Library for Intelligent Detection Systems (i-LIDS) is the UK government's new standard for Video Based Detection Systems (VBDS). The standard was launched in November 2006 and evaluations against it began in July 2007. With the first four i-LIDS scenarios completed, the Home Office Scientific development Branch (HOSDB) are looking toward the future of intelligent vision in the security surveillance market by adding a fifth scenario to the standard. The fifth i-LIDS scenario will concentrate on the development, testing and evaluation of systems for the tracking of people across multiple cameras. HOSDB and the Centre for the Protection of National Infrastructure (CPNI) identified a requirement to track targets across a network of CCTV cameras using both live and post event imagery. The Detection and Vision Systems group at HOSDB were asked to determine the current state of the market and develop an in-depth Operational Requirement (OR) based on government end user requirements. Using this OR the i-LIDS team will develop a full i-LIDS scenario to aid the machine vision community in its development of multi-camera tracking systems. By defining a requirement for multi-camera tracking and building this into the i-LIDS standard the UK government will provide a widely available tool that developers can use to help them turn theory and conceptual demonstrators into front line application. This paper will briefly describe the i-LIDS project and then detail the work conducted in building the new tracking aspect of the standard.