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Sample records for breast tumours identifies

  1. Comprehensive molecular portraits of human breast tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    We analysed primary breast cancers by genomic DNA copy number arrays, DNA methylation, exome sequencing, messenger RNA arrays, microRNA sequencing and reverse-phase protein arrays. Our ability to integrate information across platforms provided key insights into previously defined gene expression subtypes and demonstrated the existence of four main breast cancer classes when combining data from five platforms, each of which shows significant molecular heterogeneity. Somatic mutations in only three genes (TP53, PIK3CA and GATA3) occurred at >10% incidence across all breast cancers; however, there were numerous subtype-associated and novel gene mutations including the enrichment of specific mutations in GATA3, PIK3CA and MAP3K1 with the luminal A subtype. We identified two novel protein-expression-defined subgroups, possibly produced by stromal/microenvironmental elements, and integrated analyses identified specific signalling pathways dominant in each molecular subtype including a HER2/phosphorylated HER2/EGFR/phosphorylated EGFR signature within the HER2-enriched expression subtype. Comparison of basal-like breast tumours with high-grade serous ovarian tumours showed many molecular commonalities, indicating a related aetiology and similar therapeutic opportunities. The biological finding of the four main breast cancer subtypes caused by different subsets of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities raises the hypothesis that much of the clinically observable plasticity and heterogeneity occurs within, and not across, these major biological subtypes of breast cancer.

  2. Breast tumour visualization using 3D quantitative ultrasound methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangeh, Mehrdad J.; Raheem, Abdul; Tadayyon, Hadi; Liu, Simon; Hadizad, Farnoosh; Czarnota, Gregory J.

    2016-04-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancer types accounting for 29% of all cancer cases. Early detection and treatment has a crucial impact on improving the survival of affected patients. Ultrasound (US) is non-ionizing, portable, inexpensive, and real-time imaging modality for screening and quantifying breast cancer. Due to these attractive attributes, the last decade has witnessed many studies on using quantitative ultrasound (QUS) methods in tissue characterization. However, these studies have mainly been limited to 2-D QUS methods using hand-held US (HHUS) scanners. With the availability of automated breast ultrasound (ABUS) technology, this study is the first to develop 3-D QUS methods for the ABUS visualization of breast tumours. Using an ABUS system, unlike the manual 2-D HHUS device, the whole patient's breast was scanned in an automated manner. The acquired frames were subsequently examined and a region of interest (ROI) was selected in each frame where tumour was identified. Standard 2-D QUS methods were used to compute spectral and backscatter coefficient (BSC) parametric maps on the selected ROIs. Next, the computed 2-D parameters were mapped to a Cartesian 3-D space, interpolated, and rendered to provide a transparent color-coded visualization of the entire breast tumour. Such 3-D visualization can potentially be used for further analysis of the breast tumours in terms of their size and extension. Moreover, the 3-D volumetric scans can be used for tissue characterization and the categorization of breast tumours as benign or malignant by quantifying the computed parametric maps over the whole tumour volume.

  3. Breast tumours of adolescents in an African population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umanah Ivy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tumours of the breast are uncommon in childhood and adolescence. Patients in this age group often require a different approach to diagnosis and treatment. The purpose of this study is to highlight the clinicopathologic features of breast tumours in adolescents in a Nigerian city. Materials and Methods: Eighty-four breast tumour materials from patients aged 10-19 years were analyzed over a 10-year period at the Department of Pathology, University of Benin Teaching Hospital (UBTH, Benin City, Edo State, Benin City, Nigeria. Results: A majority of the breast tumours were benign. Fibroadenoma was the most common tumour with 46 cases (54.8%, followed by fibrocystic changes with 15 cases (17%. Malignancy was extremely rare in this group, with only one case (1.2% of an invasive ductal carcinoma. Histologically, most tumours were indistinguishable from the adult types. Conclusion: Fibroadenoma is the most common breast tumour in adolescents in Benin City, Nigeria. Breast cancer and male breast tumours are rare in this age group. Routine complete physical examination of children and adolescents should include breast examination.

  4. Relevance of BCAR4 in tamoxifen resistance and tumour aggressiveness of human breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.F.E. Godinho (Marcia F.E.); A.M. Sieuwerts (Anieta); M.P. Look (Maxime); D.N. Meijer (Dies); J.A. Foekens (John); L.C.J. Dorssers (Lambert); T.L.A. van Agthoven (Thecla)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground:Breast cancer anti-oestrogen resistance 4 (BCAR4) was identified in a search for genes involved in anti-oestrogen resistance in breast cancer. We explored whether BCAR4 is predictive for tamoxifen resistance and prognostic for tumour aggressiveness, and studied its function.Me

  5. Interleukin 18 expression in the primary breast cancer tumour tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahida Srabović

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim To investigate the presence and expression levels of the IL-18 in the primary breast cancer tissue in relation to the unchangedbreast tissue in same patients and the breast tissue in patients withbenign breast disease, as well as the correlation between the IL-18 expression levels and pathohistological factors, including thecorrelation between IL-18 expression and the estrogens and progesterone receptor status. Methods This prospective randomized study was conducted at the Policlinic for Laboratory Diagnostics of the University Clinical Centre of Tuzla. 50 patients with invasive ductal breast cancer and 20 patients with benign breast diseases were included in the study. The tree-step immunohistochemical staining was used for testing the levels of IL-18 expression and hormone receptor status. Results IL-18 was present in the breast cancer tumour, in the surrounding unchanged tissue of the same patients and in the breast tissue of patients with benign breast tumour and other benign breast disease. The expression of this interleukin was signiicantly higher in breast cancer tumour tissue as compared to its expression in surrounding unchanged tissue of the same patients (p<0,05, whereas IL-18 expression was not signiicantly higher in breast cancer tumours compared to its expression in breast tissue of the patients with benign breast diseases (p=0,057. There was no signiicant correlation between IL-18 expression and the lymph node status, and between IL-18 expression and the pathohistological factors. Conclusion The results suggest possible involvement of IL-18 in complex mechanisms of breast carcinogenesis.

  6. Breast spindle cell tumours: about eight cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abd El All Howayda S

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast spindle cell tumours (BSCTs, although rare, represent a heterogeneous group with different treatment modalities. This work was undertaken to evaluate the utility of fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC, histopathology and immunohistochemistry (IHC in differentiating BSCTs. Methods FNAC of eight breast masses diagnosed cytologically as BSCTs was followed by wide excision biopsy. IHC using a panel of antibodies against vimentin, pan-cytokeratin, s100, desmin, smooth muscle actin, CD34, and CD10 was evaluated to define their nature. Results FNAC defined the tumors as benign (n = 4, suspicious (n = 2 and malignant (n = 3, based on the cytopathological criteria of malignancy. Following wide excision biopsy, the tumors were reclassified into benign (n = 5 and malignant (n = 3. In the benign group, the diagnosis was raised histologically and confirmed by IHC for 3 cases (one spindle cell lipoma, one myofibroblastoma and one leiomyoma. For the remaining two cases, the diagnosis was set up after IHC (one fibromatosis and one spindle cell variant of adenomyoepithelioma. In the malignant group, a leiomyosarcoma was diagnosed histologically, while IHC was crucial to set up the diagnosis of one case of spindle cell carcinoma and one malignant myoepithelioma. Conclusion FNAC in BSCTs is an insufficient tool and should be followed by wide excision biopsy. The latter technique differentiate benign from malignant BSCTs and is able in 50% of the cases to set up the definite diagnosis. IHC is of value to define the nature of different benign lesions and is mandatory in the malignant ones for optimal treatment. Awareness of the different types of BSCTs prevents unnecessary extensive therapeutic regimes.

  7. Assessment of breast cancer tumour size using six different methods

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    Meier-Meitinger, Martina; Uder, Michael; Schulz-Wendtland, Ruediger; Adamietz, Boris [Erlangen University Hospital, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Erlangen (Germany); Haeberle, Lothar; Fasching, Peter A.; Bani, Mayada R.; Heusinger, Katharina; Beckmann, Matthias W. [Erlangen University Hospital, University Breast Center, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Erlangen (Germany); Wachter, David [Erlangen University Hospital, Institute of Pathology, Erlangen (Germany)

    2011-06-15

    Tumour size estimates using mammography (MG), conventional ultrasound (US), compound imaging (CI) and real-time elastography (RTE) were compared with histopathological specimen sizes. The largest diameters of 97 malignant breast lesions were measured. Two US and CI measurements were made: US1/CI1 (hypoechoic nucleus only) and US2/CI2 (hypoechoic nucleus plus hyperechoic halo). Measurements were compared with histopathological tumour sizes using linear regression and Bland-Altman plots. Size prediction was best with ultrasound (US/CI/RTE: R{sup 2} 0.31-0.36); mammography was poorer (R{sup 2} = 0.19). The most accurate method was US2, while US1 and CI1 were poorest. Bland-Altman plots showed better size estimation with US2, CI2 and RTE, with low variation, while mammography showed greatest variability. Smaller tumours were better assessed than larger ones. CI2 and US2 performed best for ductal tumours and RTE for lobular cancers. Tumour size prediction accuracy did not correlate significantly with breast density, but on MG tumours were more difficult to detect in high-density tissue. The size of ductal tumours is best predicted with US2 and CI2, while for lobular cancers RTE is best. Hyperechoic tumour surroundings should be included in US and CI measurements and RTE used as an additional technique in the clinical staging process. (orig.)

  8. Cell-free circulating tumour DNA as a liquid biopsy in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Mattos-Arruda, Leticia; Caldas, Carlos

    2016-03-01

    Recent developments in massively parallel sequencing and digital genomic techniques support the clinical validity of cell-free circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) as a 'liquid biopsy' in human cancer. In breast cancer, ctDNA detected in plasma can be used to non-invasively scan tumour genomes and quantify tumour burden. The applications for ctDNA in plasma include identifying actionable genomic alterations, monitoring treatment responses, unravelling therapeutic resistance, and potentially detecting disease progression before clinical and radiological confirmation. ctDNA may be used to characterise tumour heterogeneity and metastasis-specific mutations providing information to adapt the therapeutic management of patients. In this article, we review the current status of ctDNA as a 'liquid biopsy' in breast cancer.

  9. Circulating tumour cells lacking cytokeratin in breast cancer: the importance of being mesenchymal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradilone, Angela; Raimondi, Cristina; Nicolazzo, Chiara; Petracca, Arianna; Gandini, Orietta; Vincenzi, Bruno; Naso, Giuseppe; Aglianò, Anna Maria; Cortesi, Enrico; Gazzaniga, Paola

    2011-05-01

    Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) are independent predictor of prognosis in metastatic breast cancer. Nevertheless, in one third of patients, circulating tumour cells are undetected by conventional methods. Aim of the study was to assess the prognostic value of circulating tumour cells expressing mesenchymal markers in metastatic breast cancer patients. We isolated CTC from blood of 55 metastatic breast cancer patients. CTC were characterized for cytokeratins and markers of epithelial mesenchymal transition. The gain of mesenchymal markers in CTC was correlated to prognosis of patients in a follow-up of 24 months. The presence of mesenchymal markers on CTC more accurately predicted worse prognosis than the expression of cytokeratins alone. Because of the frequent loss of epithelial antigens by CTC, assays targeting epithelial antigens may miss the most invasive cell population. Thus, there is an urgent need to improve detection methods to identify CTC which undergone epithelial mesenchymal transition program.

  10. Association of primary tumour FDG uptake with clinical, histopathological and molecular characteristics in breast cancer patients scheduled for neoadjuvant chemotherapy

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    Koolen, B.B.; Aukema, T.S. [Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Surgical Oncology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Vrancken Peeters, M.J.T.F.D.; Rutgers, E.J.T. [Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Surgical Oncology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Wesseling, J.; Lips, E.H. [Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Pathology and Experimental Therapy, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Vogel, W.V.; Valdes Olmos, R.A. [Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Werkhoven, E. van [Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Biometrics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Gilhuijs, K.G.A. [Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University Medical Centre Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Rodenhuis, S. [Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Medical Oncology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-12-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of primary tumour {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake with clinical, histopathological and molecular characteristics of breast cancer patients scheduled for neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Second, we wished to establish for which patients pretreatment positron emission tomography (PET)/CT could safely be omitted because of low FDG uptake. PET/CT was performed in 214 primary stage II or III breast cancer patients in the prone position with hanging breasts. Tumour FDG uptake was qualitatively evaluated to determine the possibility of response monitoring with PET/CT and was quantitatively assessed using maximum standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max}). FDG uptake was compared with age, TNM stage, histology, hormone and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 status, grade, Ki-67 and molecular subtype in univariable and multivariable analyses. In 203 tumours (95 %) FDG uptake was considered sufficient for response monitoring. No subgroup of patients with consistently low tumour FDG uptake could be identified. In a univariable analysis, SUV{sub max} was significantly higher in patients with distant metastases at staging examination, non-lobular carcinomas, tumours with negative hormone receptors, triple negative tumours, grade 3 tumours, and in tumours with a high proliferation index (Ki-67 expression). After multiple linear regression analysis, triple negative and grade 3 tumours were significantly associated with a higher SUV{sub max}. Primary tumour FDG uptake in breast cancer patients scheduled for neoadjuvant chemotherapy is significantly higher in tumours with prognostically unfavourable characteristics. Based on tumour characteristics associated with low tumour FDG uptake, this study was unable to identify a subgroup of patients unlikely to benefit from pretreatment PET/CT. (orig.)

  11. Phyllodes tumours of the breast: a consensus review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Benjamin Y; Acs, Geza; Apple, Sophia K; Badve, Sunil; Bleiweiss, Ira J; Brogi, Edi; Calvo, José P; Dabbs, David J; Ellis, Ian O; Eusebi, Vincenzo; Farshid, Gelareh; Fox, Stephen B; Ichihara, Shu; Lakhani, Sunil R; Rakha, Emad A; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Richardson, Andrea L; Sahin, Aysegul; Schmitt, Fernando C; Schnitt, Stuart J; Siziopikou, Kalliopi P; Soares, Fernando A; Tse, Gary M; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Tan, Puay Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Phyllodes tumours constitute an uncommon but complex group of mammary fibroepithelial lesions. Accurate and reproducible grading of these tumours has long been challenging, owing to the need to assess multiple stratified histological parameters, which may be weighted differently by individual pathologists. Distinction of benign phyllodes tumours from cellular fibroadenomas is fraught with difficulty, due to overlapping microscopic features. Similarly, separation of the malignant phyllodes tumour from spindle cell metaplastic carcinoma and primary breast sarcoma can be problematic. Phyllodes tumours are treated by surgical excision. However, there is no consensus on the definition of an appropriate surgical margin to ensure completeness of excision and reduction of recurrence risk. Interpretive subjectivity, overlapping histological diagnostic criteria, suboptimal correlation between histological classification and clinical behaviour and the lack of robust molecular predictors of outcome make further investigation of the pathogenesis of these fascinating tumours a matter of active research. This review consolidates the current understanding of their pathobiology and clinical behaviour, and includes proposals for a rational approach to the classification and management of phyllodes tumours. PMID:26768026

  12. Contrast kinetics of the malignant breast tumour - border versus centre enhancement on dynamic midfield MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marklund, M.; Torp-Pedersen, S.; Bentzon, N.;

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: To quantify the border versus centre enhancement of malignant breast tumours on dynamic magnetic resonance mammography. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fifty-two women diagnosed with primary breast cancer underwent dynamic magnetic resonance mammography (Omniscan 0.2 mmol/kg bodyweight...... receptor negative tumours. CONCLUSION: The border/centre enhancement difference in malignant breast tumours is easily visualized on midfield dynamic magnetic resonance mammography. The dynamic behaviour is significantly correlated to histological features and receptor status of the tumours Udgivelsesdato...

  13. Techniques of tumour bed boost irradiation in breast conserving therapy: Current evidence and suggested guidelines

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    Jalali, Rakesh; Singh, Suruchi; Budrukkar, Ashwini [Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India)

    2007-10-15

    Breast conservation surgery followed by external beam radiotherapy to breast has become the standard of care in management of early carcinoma breast. A boost to the tumour bed after whole breast radiotherapy is employed in view of the pattern of tumour bed recurrences in the index quadrant and was particularly considered in patients with some adverse histopathological characteristics such as positive margins, extensive intraductal carcinoma (EIC), lymphovascular invasion (LVI), etc. There is however, now, a conclusive evidence of improvement in local control rates after a boost radiotherapy dose in patients even without such factors and for all age groups. The maximum absolute reduction of local recurrences by the addition of boost is especially seen in young premenopausal patients. At the same time, the addition of boost is associated with increased risk of worsening of cosmesis and no clear cut survival advantage. Radiological modalities such as fluoroscopy, ultrasound and CT scan have aided in accurate delineation of tumour bed with increasing efficacy. A widespread application of these techniques might ultimately translate into improved local control with minimal cosmetic deficit. The present article discusses the role of radiotherapy boost and the means to delineate and deliver the same, identify the high risk group, optimal technique and the doses and fractionations to be used. It also discusses the extent of adverse cosmetic outcome after boost delivery, means to minimise it and relevance of tumour bed in present day scenario of advanced radiotherapy delivery techniques like (IMRT)

  14. Numerical modelling of biopotential field for detection of breast tumour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, E Y K; Ng, W K; Sim, L S J; Rajendra Acharya, U

    2007-08-01

    Breast cancer is a disease characterised by the uncontrolled growth of abnormal cells. These cancer cells can travel through the body by way of blood or lymph nodes. Previous studies have indicated that, changes in the electrical properties of abnormal breast are more significant compared to the breast normal tissues. In the present study, a simple 2D models of breast (close to realistic), with and without artificially inserted malignant cancer were simulated, based upon electrical activity within the breast. We developed an inhomogeneous female breast model, closer to the actual, by considering a breast as a hemisphere with various layers of unequal thickness in supine condition. In order to determine the potential distribution developed due to a dipole source, isotropic homogeneous conductivity was assigned to each of these compartments and the volume conductor problem was solved using finite element method. Significant changes in the potential distribution were recoded in the malignant and normal breast regions. The surface potential decreases about 0.5%, for the small malignant region of surface area 13 mm(2) (spherical diameter=2mm). And it (surface potential) decreases about 16.4% for large malignant surface area of 615 mm(2) (spherical diameter=14 mm). Hence, the results show that, the sizes of tumours result in the reduction of surface potential and follows a fourth order polynomial equation. Thus, biofield analysis yields promising results in the detection of the breast cancer of various sizes.

  15. Sox2 expression in breast tumours and activation in breast cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leis, O; Eguiara, A; Lopez-Arribillaga, E; Alberdi, M J; Hernandez-Garcia, S; Elorriaga, K; Pandiella, A; Rezola, R; Martin, A G

    2012-03-15

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) model does not imply that tumours are generated from transformed tissue stem cells. The target of transformation could be a tissue stem cell, a progenitor cell, or a differentiated cell that acquires self-renewal ability. The observation that induced pluripotency reprogramming and cancer are related has lead to the speculation that CSCs may arise through a reprogramming-like mechanism. Expression of pluripotency genes (Oct4, Nanog and Sox2) was tested in breast tumours by immunohistochemistry and it was found that Sox2 is expressed in early stage breast tumours. However, expression of Oct4 or Nanog was not found. Mammosphere formation in culture was used to reveal stem cell properties, where expression of Sox2, but not Oct4 or Nanog, was induced. Over-expression of Sox2 increased mammosphere formation, effect dependent on continuous Sox2 expression; furthermore, Sox2 knockdown prevented mammosphere formation and delayed tumour formation in xenograft tumour initiation models. Induction of Sox2 expression was achieved through activation of the distal enhancer of Sox2 promoter upon sphere formation, the same element that controls Sox2 transcription in pluripotent stem cells. These findings suggest that reactivation of Sox2 represents an early step in breast tumour initiation, explaining tumour heterogeneity by placing the tumour-initiating event in any cell along the axis of mammary differentiation.

  16. Parametric study of the biopotential equation for breast tumour identification using ANOVA and Taguchi method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Eddie Y K; Ng, W Kee

    2006-03-01

    Extensive literatures have shown significant trend of progressive electrical changes according to the proliferative characteristics of breast epithelial cells. Physiologists also further postulated that malignant transformation resulted from sustained depolarization and a failure of the cell to repolarize after cell division, making the area where cancer develops relatively depolarized when compared to their non-dividing or resting counterparts. In this paper, we present a new approach, the Biofield Diagnostic System (BDS), which might have the potential to augment the process of diagnosing breast cancer. This technique was based on the efficacy of analysing skin surface electrical potentials for the differential diagnosis of breast abnormalities. We developed a female breast model, which was close to the actual, by considering the breast as a hemisphere in supine condition with various layers of unequal thickness. Isotropic homogeneous conductivity was assigned to each of these compartments and the volume conductor problem was solved using finite element method to determine the potential distribution developed due to a dipole source. Furthermore, four important parameters were identified and analysis of variance (ANOVA, Yates' method) was performed using design (n = number of parameters, 4). The effect and importance of these parameters were analysed. The Taguchi method was further used to optimise the parameters in order to ensure that the signal from the tumour is maximum as compared to the noise from other factors. The Taguchi method used proved that probes' source strength, tumour size and location of tumours have great effect on the surface potential field. For best results on the breast surface, while having the biggest possible tumour size, low amplitudes of current should be applied nearest to the breast surface.

  17. Comprehensive molecular portraits of human breast tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koboldt, Daniel C.; Fulton, Robert S.; McLellan, Michael D.; Schmidt, Heather; Kalicki-Veizer, Joelle; McMichael, Joshua F.; Fulton, Lucinda L.; Dooling, David J.; Ding, Li; Mardis, Elaine R.; Wilson, Richard K.; Ally, Adrian; Balasundaram, Miruna; Butterfield, Yaron S. N.; Carlsen, Rebecca; Carter, Candace; Chu, Andy; Chuah, Eric; Chun, Hye-Jung E.; Coope, Robin J. N.; Dhalla, Noreen; Guin, Ranabir; Hirst, Carrie; Hirst, Martin; Holt, Robert A.; Lee, Darlene; Li, Haiyan I.; Mayo, Michael; Moore, Richard A.; Mungall, Andrew J.; Pleasance, Erin; Robertson, A. Gordon; Schein, Jacqueline E.; Shafiei, Arash; Sipahimalani, Payal; Slobodan, Jared R.; Stoll, Dominik; Tam, Angela; Thiessen, Nina; Varhol, Richard J.; Wye, Natasja; Zeng, Thomas; Zhao, Yongjun; Birol, Inanc; Jones, Steven J. M.; Marra, Marco A.; Cherniack, Andrew D.; Saksena, Gordon; Onofrio, Robert C.; Pho, Nam H.; Carter, Scott L.; Schumacher, Steven E.; Tabak, Barbara; Hernandez, Bryan; Gentry, Jeff; Nguyen, Huy; Crenshaw, Andrew; Ardlie, Kristin; Beroukhim, Rameen; Winckler, Wendy; Getz, Gad; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Meyerson, Matthew; Chin, Lynda; Park, Peter J.; Kucherlapati, Raju; Hoadley, Katherine A.; Auman, J. Todd; Fan, Cheng; Turman, Yidi J.; Shi, Yan; Li, Ling; Topal, Michael D.; He, Xiaping; Chao, Hann-Hsiang; Prat, Aleix; Silva, Grace O.; Iglesia, Michael D.; Zhao, Wei; Usary, Jerry; Berg, Jonathan S.; Adams, Michael; Booker, Jessica; Wu, Junyuan; Gulabani, Anisha; Bodenheimer, Tom; Hoyle, Alan P.; Simons, Janae V.; Soloway, Matthew G.; Mose, Lisle E.; Jefferys, Stuart R.; Balu, Saianand; Parker, Joel S.; Hayes, D. Neil; Perou, Charles M.; Malik, Simeen; Mahurkar, Swapna; Shen, Hui; Weisenberger, Daniel J.; Triche, Timothy; Lai, Phillip H.; Bootwalla, Moiz S.; Maglinte, Dennis T.; Berman, Benjamin P.; Van den Berg, David J.; Baylin, Stephen B.; Laird, Peter W.; Creighton, Chad J.; Donehower, Lawrence A.; Getz, Gad; Noble, Michael; Voet, Doug; Saksena, Gordon; Gehlenborg, Nils; DiCara, Daniel; Zhang, Juinhua; Zhang, Hailei; Wu, Chang-Jiun; Liu, Spring Yingchun; Lawrence, Michael S.; Zou, Lihua; Sivachenko, Andrey; Lin, Pei; Stojanov, Petar; Jing, Rui; Cho, Juok; Sinha, Raktim; Park, Richard W.; Nazaire, Marc-Danie; Robinson, Jim; Thorvaldsdottir, Helga; Mesirov, Jill; Park, Peter J.; Chin, Lynda; Reynolds, Sheila; Kreisberg, Richard B.; Bernard, Brady; Bressler, Ryan; Erkkila, Timo; Lin, Jake; Thorsson, Vesteinn; Zhang, Wei; Shmulevich, Ilya; Ciriello, Giovanni; Weinhold, Nils; Schultz, Nikolaus; Gao, Jianjiong; Cerami, Ethan; Gross, Benjamin; Jacobsen, Anders; Sinha, Rileen; Aksoy, B. Arman; Antipin, Yevgeniy; Reva, Boris; Shen, Ronglai; Taylor, Barry S.; Ladanyi, Marc; Sander, Chris; Anur, Pavana; Spellman, Paul T.; Lu, Yiling; Liu, Wenbin; Verhaak, Roel R. G.; Mills, Gordon B.; Akbani, Rehan; Zhang, Nianxiang; Broom, Bradley M.; Casasent, Tod D.; Wakefield, Chris; Unruh, Anna K.; Baggerly, Keith; Coombes, Kevin; Weinstein, John N.; Haussler, David; Benz, Christopher C.; Stuart, Joshua M.; Benz, Stephen C.; Zhu, Jingchun; Szeto, Christopher C.; Scott, Gary K.; Yau, Christina; Paul, Evan O.; Carlin, Daniel; Wong, Christopher; Sokolov, Artem; Thusberg, Janita; Mooney, Sean; Ng, Sam; Goldstein, Theodore C.; Ellrott, Kyle; Grifford, Mia; Wilks, Christopher; Ma, Singer; Craft, Brian; Yan, Chunhua; Hu, Ying; Meerzaman, Daoud; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Bowen, Jay; Ramirez, Nilsa C.; Black, Aaron D.; Pyatt, Robert E.; White, Peter; Zmuda, Erik J.; Frick, Jessica; Lichtenberg, Taram.; Brookens, Robin; George, Myra M.; Gerken, Mark A.; Harper, Hollie A.; Leraas, Kristen M.; Wise, Lisa J.; Tabler, Teresa R.; McAllister, Cynthia; Barr, Thomas; Hart-Kothari, Melissa; Tarvin, Katie; Saller, Charles; Sandusky, George; Mitchell, Colleen; Iacocca, Mary V.; Brown, Jennifer; Rabeno, Brenda; Czerwinski, Christine; Petrelli, Nicholas; Dolzhansky, Oleg; Abramov, Mikhail; Voronina, Olga; Potapova, Olga; Marks, Jeffrey R.; Suchorska, Wiktoria M.; Murawa, Dawid; Kycler, Witold; Ibbs, Matthew; Korski, Konstanty; Spychala, Arkadiusz; Murawa, Pawel; Brzezinski, Jacek J.; Perz, Hanna; Lazniak, Radoslaw; Teresiak, Marek; Tatka, Honorata; Leporowska, Ewa; Bogusz-Czerniewicz, Marta; Malicki, Julian; Mackiewicz, Andrzej; Wiznerowicz, Maciej; Van Le, Xuan; Kohl, Bernard; Viet Tien, Nguyen; Thorp, Richard; Van Bang, Nguyen; Sussman, Howard; Duc Phu, Bui; Hajek, Richard; Phi Hung, Nguyen; Viet The Phuong, Tran; Quyet Thang, Huynh; Khan, Khurram Zaki; Penny, Robert; Mallery, David; Curley, Erin; Shelton, Candace; Yena, Peggy; Ingle, James N.; Couch, Fergus J.; Lingle, Wilma L.; King, Tari A.; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana Maria; Mills, Gordon B.; Dyer, Mary D.; Liu, Shuying; Meng, Xiaolong; Patangan, Modesto; Waldman, Frederic; Stoeppler, Hubert; Rathmell, W. Kimryn; Thorne, Leigh; Huang, Mei; Boice, Lori; Hill, Ashley; Morrison, Carl; Gaudioso, Carmelo; Bshara, Wiam; Daily, Kelly; Egea, Sophie C.; Pegram, Mark D.; Gomez-Fernandez, Carmen; Dhir, Rajiv; Bhargava, Rohit; Brufsky, Adam; Shriver, Craig D.; Hooke, Jeffrey A.; Campbell, Jamie Leigh; Mural, Richard J.; Hu, Hai; Somiari, Stella; Larson, Caroline; Deyarmin, Brenda; Kvecher, Leonid; Kovatich, Albert J.; Ellis, Matthew J.; King, Tari A.; Hu, Hai; Couch, Fergus J.; Mural, Richard J.; Stricker, Thomas; White, Kevin; Olopade, Olufunmilayo; Ingle, James N.; Luo, Chunqing; Chen, Yaqin; Marks, Jeffrey R.; Waldman, Frederic; Wiznerowicz, Maciej; Bose, Ron; Chang, Li-Wei; Beck, Andrew H.; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana Maria; Pihl, Todd; Jensen, Mark; Sfeir, Robert; Kahn, Ari; Chu, Anna; Kothiyal, Prachi; Wang, Zhining; Snyder, Eric; Pontius, Joan; Ayala, Brenda; Backus, Mark; Walton, Jessica; Baboud, Julien; Berton, Dominique; Nicholls, Matthew; Srinivasan, Deepak; Raman, Rohini; Girshik, Stanley; Kigonya, Peter; Alonso, Shelley; Sanbhadti, Rashmi; Barletta, Sean; Pot, David; Sheth, Margi; Demchok, John A.; Shaw, Kenna R. Mills; Yang, Liming; Eley, Greg; Ferguson, Martin L.; Tarnuzzer, Roy W.; Zhang, Jiashan; Dillon, Laura A. L.; Buetow, Kenneth; Fielding, Peter; Ozenberger, Bradley A.; Guyer, Mark S.; Sofia, Heidi J.; Palchik, Jacqueline D.

    2012-01-01

    We analysed primary breast cancers by genomic DNA copy number arrays, DNA methylation, exome sequencing, messenger RNA arrays, microRNA sequencing and reverse-phase protein arrays. Our ability to integrate information across platforms provided key insights into previously defined gene expression sub

  18. Detection of Circulating Tumour Cells from Blood of Breast Cancer Patients via RT-qPCR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andergassen, Ulrich; Kölbl, Alexandra C.; Hutter, Stefan; Friese, Klaus; Jeschke, Udo, E-mail: udo.jeschke@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich, Munich, Maistrasse 11, D-80337 Munich (Germany)

    2013-09-25

    Breast cancer is still the most frequent cause of cancer-related death in women worldwide. Often death is not caused only by the primary tumour itself, but also by metastatic lesions. Today it is largely accepted, that these remote metastases arise out of cells, which detach from the primary tumour, enter circulation, settle down at secondary sites in the body and are called Circulating Tumour Cells (CTCs). The occurrence of such minimal residual diseases in the blood of breast cancer patients is mostly linked to a worse prognosis for therapy outcome and overall survival. Due to their very low frequency, the detection of CTCs is, still a technical challenge. RT-qPCR as a highly sensitive method could be an approach for CTC-detection from peripheral blood of breast cancer patients. This assumption is based on the fact that CTCs are of epithelial origin and therefore express a different gene panel than surrounding blood cells. For the technical approach it is necessary to identify appropriate marker genes and to correlate their gene expression levels to the number of tumour cells within a sample in an in vitro approach. After that, samples from adjuvant and metastatic patients can be analysed. This approach may lead to new concepts in diagnosis and treatment.

  19. CASE SERIES ON PHYLLODES TUMOUR OF THE BREAST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available : BACKGROUND: Phyllodes tumor of breast is one of the rare neoplasms comprising less than 1% of all breast tumours.aim of the study is to evaluate the clinical charecteristics, treatment regimens and complications of phyllodes tumor in our institution. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We have retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 2 years from 2013 to 2015 of patients who presented to our department, government general hospital, Kakinada. RESULTS: 342 patients presented with breast tumors of which 126 are malignant and 216 are benign. Phyllodes tumor constituted 8 cases of the total breastlump cases presented in our institution from 2013 to 2015. 3 out of 8 cases are recurrent. CONCLUSION: In benign cases wide local excision with clear margins is sufficient to prevent recurrence. In recurrent and malignant cases simple mastectomy has to be done.

  20. Adenomyoepithelial tumours and myoepithelial carcinomas of the breast – a spectrum of monophasic and biphasic tumours dominated by immature myoepithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herbst Hermann

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adenomyoepithelial tumours and myoepithelial carcinomas of the breast are primarily defined by the presence of neoplastic cells with a myoepithelial immunophenotype. Current classification schemes are based on purely descriptive features and an assessment of individual prognosis is still problematic. Methods A series of 27 adenomyoepithelial tumours of the breast was analysed immunohistochemically with antibodies directed against various cytokeratins, p63, smooth muscle alpha-actin (SMA and vimentin. Additionally, double immunofluorescence and comparative genomic hybridisation (CGH was performed. Results Immunohistochemically, all the tumours showed a constant expression of high molecular weight cytokeratins (Ck Ck5 and Ck14, p63, SMA and vimentin. With exception of one case diagnosed as myoepithelial carcinoma, all tested tumours expressed low molecular weight cytokeratin Ck18 in variable proportions of cells. Even in monophasic tumours lacking obvious glandular differentiation in conventional staining, a number of neoplastic cells still expressed those cytokeratins. Double immunofluorescence revealed tumour cells exclusively staining for Ck5/Ck14 in the presence of other cell populations that co-expressed high molecular weight Ck5/Ck14 as well as either low molecular weight Ck8/18 or SMA. Based on morphology, we assigned the series to three categories, benign, borderline and malignant. This classification was supported by a stepwise increase in cytogenetic alterations on CGH. Conclusion Adenomyoepithelial tumours comprise a spectrum of neoplasms consisting of an admixture of glandular and myoepithelial differentiation patterns. As a key component SMA-positive cells co-expressing cytokeratins could be identified. Although categorisation of adenomyoepithelial tumours in benign, borderline and malignant was supported by results of CGH, any assessment of prognosis requires to be firmly based on morphological grounds. At present

  1. Phase contrast imaging of breast tumours with synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olivo, A. [Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, University College London, Malet Place, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)], E-mail: aolivo@medphys.ucl.ac.uk; Rigon, L. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, Area Science Park, Padriciano 99, 34012 Trieste (Italy)], E-mail: rigon@ts.infn.it; Vinnicombe, S.J. [Department of Radiology, St. Bartholomews Hospital, Barts and the London NHS Trust, West Smithfield, London EC1A 7BE (United Kingdom)], E-mail: s.j.vinnicombe@qmul.ac.uk; Cheung, K.C. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Keckwick Lane, Warrington, Cheshire WA4 4AD (United Kingdom)], E-mail: k.c.cheung@dl.ac.uk; Ibison, M. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Oxford Street, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom)], E-mail: m.ibison@dl.ac.uk; Speller, R.D. [Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, University College London, Malet Place, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)], E-mail: rspeller@medphys.ucl.ac.uk

    2009-06-15

    Even though the potential of phase contrast (PC) imaging has been demonstrated in a number of biological tissue samples, the availability of free-space propagation phase contrast images of real breast tumours is still limited. The aim of this study was to obtain phase contrast images of two different pathological breast specimens containing tumours of differing morphological type at two synchrotron radiation (SR) facilities, and to assess any qualitative improvements in the evaluation and characterisation of the masses through the use of phase contrast imaging. A second aim was to assess the effects of parameters such as detector resolution, beam energy and sample-to-detector distance on image quality using the same breast specimens, as to date these effects have been modelled and discussed only for geometric phantoms. At each synchrotron radiation facility a range of images was acquired with different detectors and by varying the above parameters. Images of the same samples were also acquired with the absorption-based approach to allow a direct comparison and estimation of the advantages specifically ascribable to the PC technique.

  2. Impact of tumour epithelial subtype on circulating microRNAs in breast cancer patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peadar S Waters

    Full Text Available While a range of miRNAs have been shown to be dysregulated in the circulation of patients with breast cancer, little is known about the relationship between circulating levels and tumour characteristics. The aim of this study was to analyse alterations in circulating miRNA expression during tumour progression in a murine model of breast cancer, and to detemine the clinical relevance of identified miRNAs at both tissue and circulating level in patient samples. Athymic nude mice received a subcutaneous or mammary fat pad injection of MDA-MB-231 cells. Blood sampling was performed at weeks 1, 3 and 6 following tumour induction, and microRNA extracted. MicroRNA microArray analysis was performed comparing samples harvested at week 1 to those collected at week 6 from the same animals. Significantly altered miRNAs were validated across all murine samples by RQ-PCR (n = 45. Three miRNAs of interest were then quantified in the circulation(n = 166 and tissue (n = 100 of breast cancer patients and healthy control individuals. MicroArray-based analysis of murine blood samples revealed levels of 77 circulating microRNAs to be changed during disease progression, with 44 demonstrating changes >2-fold. Validation across all samples revealed miR-138 to be significantly elevated in the circulation of animals during disease development, with miR-191 and miR-106a levels significantly decreased. Analysis of patient tissue and blood samples revealed miR-138 to be significantly up-regulated in the circulation of patients with breast cancer, with no change observed in the tissue setting. While not significantly changed overall in breast cancer patients compared to controls, circulating miR-106a and miR-191 were significantly decreased in patients with basal breast cancer. In tissue, both miRNAs were significantly elevated in breast cancer compared to normal breast tissue. The data demonstrates an impact of tumour epithelial subtype on circulating levels of

  3. Analysis of the progression of fibroepithelial tumours of the breast by PCR-based clonality assay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijper, Arno; Buerger, H.; Simon, R.; Schaefer, K-L.; Croonen, A.; Boecker, W.; Wall, E. van der; Diest, P.J. van

    2002-01-01

    Fibroadenoma and phyllodes tumour of the breast are both fibroepithelial tumours. Although progression to epithelial malignancy has been described, the behaviour of most fibroadenomas is benign. Phyllodes tumours, on the other hand, can display locally destructive growth and can even metastasize. A

  4. Galectin-3 coats the membrane of breast cells and makes a signature of tumours

    KAUST Repository

    Simone, Giuseppina

    2014-01-01

    Galectin-3, β-galactoside-binding lectin, coats the membrane of most cancer cells and is involved in metastasis and endothelium recognition as well as in evading immune surveillance through killing of activated T cells. To flag galectin as a biomarker of tumours and metastasis, it is pivotal to understand the role of this protein in different tumours and at different stages. Breast tumours have an anomalous behaviour of the galectin-3 compared to other tumour cells. Herein, FACS sorting and galactoside based assays were used to investigate the role of galectin-3 in metastasis and metastatisation of breast cancer cells. Breast galectin fingerprint at the FACS displayed a higher amount in healthy cells, compared to metastatic cells. The microfluidic assay was able to isolate tumour and metastatic cells more than healthy breast cells. Investigation was performed on samples from patients with breast tumours at stage I and stage III whilst MCF7 and EPH-4 cells were used to perform preliminary investigations. The readout of the conditioned medium (from culturing of stage I cells) fingerprint by FACS evidenced high expression of free galectin. Analysis of the results established that the galectin coating the membrane, by galactoside recognition of the breast cells, and engaged by the cells to form protein-carbohydrate complexes inside the microfluidic assay, resembled the tumour signature of tumours in breast cells whilst the galectin free is independent of those mechanisms. © 2014 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  5. Applying machine learning approaches to improving the accuracy of breast-tumour diagnosis via fine needle aspiration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Qian-fei; CAI Cong-zhong; XIAO Han-guang; LIU Xing-hua

    2007-01-01

    Diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer have been improved during the last decade; however, breast cancer is still a leading cause of death among women in the whole world. Early detection and accurate diagnosis of this disease has been demonstrated an approach to long survival of the patients. As an attempt to develop a reliable diagnosing method for breast cancer, we integrated support vector machine (SVM), k-nearest neighbor and probabilistic neural network into a complex machine learning approach to detect malignant breast tumour through a set of indicators consisting of age and ten cellular features of fine-needle aspiration of breast which were ranked according to signal-to-noise ratio to identify determinants distinguishing benign breast tumours from malignant ones. The method turned out to significantly improve the diagnosis, with a sensitivity of 94.04%, a specificity of 97.37%, and an overall accuracy up to 96.24% when SVM was adopted with the sigmoid kernel function under 5-fold cross validation. The results suggest that SVM is a promising methodology to be further developed into a practical adjunct implement to help discerning benign and malignant breast tumours and thus reduce the incidence of misdiagnosis.

  6. Are ipsilateral breast tumour invasive recurrences in young (more aggressive than their primary tumours?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigal-Zafrani, B; Bollet, M A; Antoni, G; Savignoni, A; Vincent-Salomon, A; Pierga, J-Y; Salmon, R; Sastre-Garau, X; Fourquet, A

    2007-10-22

    The characteristics of ipsilateral breast tumour recurrences (IBTRs) relative to those of their primary tumours (PTs) remain scarcely studied. Of 70 young (grades or hormonal receptors were not significantly different in PTs and in IBTRs. The concordance between IBTRs and their PTs was good for histological types. IBTRs with conserved histological types tended to occur more locally, but not significantly sooner than others. These IBTRs had good concordance for hormone receptors. In discordant cases there were as many losses as appearances of the receptors. The concordance was weak for grades, with equivalent numbers of IBTRs graded lower as higher than their PTs. The 10-year overall survival rate was 70%. Neither the conservation of histological type, location, nor of the two combined were associated with deaths. Early (<2 years) IBTRs, tended to be associated with poorer survival (HR=2.24 (0.92-5.41); P=0.08). IBTRs did not display features of higher aggressiveness than PTs. Neither clinical nor histological definition of a true recurrence could be established other than the conservation of the histological type.

  7. DMP1β, a splice isoform of the tumour suppressor DMP1 locus, induces proliferation and progression of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglic, Dejan; Stovall, Daniel B; Cline, J Mark; Fry, Elizabeth A; Mallakin, Ali; Taneja, Pankaj; Caudell, David L; Willingham, Mark C; Sui, Guangchao; Inoue, Kazushi

    2015-05-01

    Our recent work has indicated that the DMP1 locus on 7q21, encoding a haplo-insufficient tumour suppressor, is hemizygously deleted at a high frequency in breast cancer. The locus encodes DMP1α protein, an activator of the p53 pathway leading to cell cycle arrest and senescence, and two other functionally undefined isoforms, DMP1β and DMP1γ. In this study, we show that the DMP1 locus is alternatively spliced in ∼30% of breast cancer cases with relatively decreased DMP1α and increased DMP1β expression. RNA-seq analyses of a publicly available database showed significantly increased DMP1β mRNA in 43-55% of human breast cancers, dependent on histological subtypes. Similarly, DMP1β protein was found to be overexpressed in ∼60% of tumours relative to their surrounding normal tissue. Importantly, alteration of DMP1 splicing and DMP1β overexpression were associated with poor clinical outcomes of the breast cancer patients, indicating that DMP1β may have a biological function. Indeed, DMP1β increased proliferation of non-tumourigenic mammary epithelial cells and knockdown of endogenous DMP1 inhibited breast cancer cell growth. To determine DMP1β's role in vivo, we established MMTV-DMP1β transgenic mouse lines. DMP1β overexpression was sufficient to induce mammary gland hyperplasia and multifocal tumour lesions in mice at 7-18 months of age. The tumours formed were adenosquamous carcinomas with evidence of transdifferentiation and keratinized deposits. Overall, we identify alternative splicing as a mechanism utilized by cancer cells to modulate the DMP1 locus through diminishing DMP1α tumour suppressor expression, while simultaneously up-regulating the tumour-promoting DMP1β isoform.

  8. Blood vessel hyperpermeability and pathophysiology in human tumour xenograft models of breast cancer: a comparison of ectopic and orthotopic tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Karyn S

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human tumour xenografts in immune compromised mice are widely used as cancer models because they are easy to reproduce and simple to use in a variety of pre-clinical assessments. Developments in nanomedicine have led to the use of tumour xenografts in testing nanoscale delivery devices, such as nanoparticles and polymer-drug conjugates, for targeting and efficacy via the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR effect. For these results to be meaningful, the hyperpermeable vasculature and reduced lymphatic drainage associated with tumour pathophysiology must be replicated in the model. In pre-clinical breast cancer xenograft models, cells are commonly introduced via injection either orthotopically (mammary fat pad, MFP or ectopically (subcutaneous, SC, and the organ environment experienced by the tumour cells has been shown to influence their behaviour. Methods To evaluate xenograft models of breast cancer in the context of EPR, both orthotopic MFP and ectopic SC injections of MDA-MB-231-H2N cells were given to NOD scid gamma (NSG mice. Animals with matched tumours in two size categories were tested by injection of a high molecular weight dextran as a model nanocarrier. Tumours were collected and sectioned to assess dextran accumulation compared to liver tissue as a positive control. To understand the cellular basis of these observations, tumour sections were also immunostained for endothelial cells, basement membranes, pericytes, and lymphatic vessels. Results SC tumours required longer development times to become size matched to MFP tumours, and also presented wide size variability and ulcerated skin lesions 6 weeks after cell injection. The 3 week MFP tumour model demonstrated greater dextran accumulation than the size matched 5 week SC tumour model (for P  Conclusions Dextran accumulation and immunostaining results suggest that small MFP tumours best replicate the vascular permeability required to observe the EPR effect

  9. Epstein-Barr virus, human papillomavirus and mouse mammary tumour virus as multiple viruses in breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy K Glenn

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The purpose of this investigation is to determine if Epstein Barr virus (EBV, high risk human papillomavirus (HPV, and mouse mammary tumour viruses (MMTV co-exist in some breast cancers. MATERIALS AND METHODS: All the specimens were from women residing in Australia. For investigations based on standard PCR, we used fresh frozen DNA extracts from 50 unselected invasive breast cancers. For normal breast specimens, we used DNA extracts from epithelial cells from milk donated by 40 lactating women. For investigations based on in situ PCR we used 27 unselected archival formalin fixed breast cancer specimens and 18 unselected archival formalin fixed normal breast specimens from women who had breast reduction surgery. Thirteen of these fixed breast cancer specimens were ductal carcinoma in situ (dcis and 14 were predominantly invasive ductal carcinomas (idc. RESULTS: EBV sequences were identified in 68%, high risk HPV sequences in 50%, and MMTV sequences in 78% of DNA extracted from 50 invasive breast cancer specimens. These same viruses were identified in selected normal and breast cancer specimens by in situ PCR. Sequences from more than one viral type were identified in 72% of the same breast cancer specimens. Normal controls showed these viruses were also present in epithelial cells in human milk - EBV (35%, HPV, 20% and MMTV (32% of 40 milk samples from normal lactating women, with multiple viruses being identified in 13% of the same milk samples. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that (i EBV, HPV and MMTV gene sequences are present and co-exist in many human breast cancers, (ii the presence of these viruses in breast cancer is associated with young age of diagnosis and possibly an increased grade of breast cancer.

  10. Deep tissue volume imaging of birefringence through fibre-optic needle probes for the delineation of breast tumour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villiger, Martin; Lorenser, Dirk; McLaughlin, Robert A.; Quirk, Bryden C.; Kirk, Rodney W.; Bouma, Brett E.; Sampson, David D.

    2016-07-01

    Identifying tumour margins during breast-conserving surgeries is a persistent challenge. We have previously developed miniature needle probes that could enable intraoperative volume imaging with optical coherence tomography. In many situations, however, scattering contrast alone is insufficient to clearly identify and delineate malignant regions. Additional polarization-sensitive measurements provide the means to assess birefringence, which is elevated in oriented collagen fibres and may offer an intrinsic biomarker to differentiate tumour from benign tissue. Here, we performed polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography through miniature imaging needles and developed an algorithm to efficiently reconstruct images of the depth-resolved tissue birefringence free of artefacts. First ex vivo imaging of breast tumour samples revealed excellent contrast between lowly birefringent malignant regions, and stromal tissue, which is rich in oriented collagen and exhibits higher birefringence, as confirmed with co-located histology. The ability to clearly differentiate between tumour and uninvolved stroma based on intrinsic contrast could prove decisive for the intraoperative assessment of tumour margins.

  11. miR-10b*, a master inhibitor of the cell cycle, is down-regulated in human breast tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagioni, Francesca; Bossel Ben-Moshe, Noa; Fontemaggi, Giulia; Canu, Valeria; Mori, Federica; Antoniani, Barbara; Di Benedetto, Anna; Santoro, Raffaela; Germoni, Sabrina; De Angelis, Fernanda; Cambria, Anna; Avraham, Roi; Grasso, Giuseppe; Strano, Sabrina; Muti, Paola; Mottolese, Marcella; Yarden, Yosef; Domany, Eytan; Blandino, Giovanni

    2012-11-01

    Deregulated proliferation is a hallmark of cancer cells. Here, we show that microRNA-10b* is a master regulator of breast cancer cell proliferation and is downregulated in tumoural samples versus matched peritumoural counterparts. Two canonical CpG islands (5 kb) upstream from the precursor sequence are hypermethylated in the analysed breast cancer tissues. Ectopic delivery of synthetic microRNA-10b* in breast cancer cell lines or into xenograft mouse breast tumours inhibits cell proliferation and impairs tumour growth in vivo, respectively. We identified and validated in vitro and in vivo three novel target mRNAs of miR-10b* (BUB1, PLK1 and CCNA2), which play a remarkable role in cell cycle regulation and whose high expression in breast cancer patients is associated with reduced disease-free survival, relapse-free survival and metastasis-free survival when compared to patients with low expression. This also suggests that restoration of microRNA-10b* expression might have therapeutic promise.

  12. miR-10b*, a master inhibitor of the cell cycle, is down-regulated in human breast tumours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagioni, Francesca; Bossel Ben-Moshe, Noa; Fontemaggi, Giulia; Canu, Valeria; Mori, Federica; Antoniani, Barbara; Di Benedetto, Anna; Santoro, Raffaela; Germoni, Sabrina; De Angelis, Fernanda; Cambria, Anna; Avraham, Roi; Grasso, Giuseppe; Strano, Sabrina; Muti, Paola; Mottolese, Marcella; Yarden, Yosef; Domany, Eytan; Blandino, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Deregulated proliferation is a hallmark of cancer cells. Here, we show that microRNA-10b* is a master regulator of breast cancer cell proliferation and is downregulated in tumoural samples versus matched peritumoural counterparts. Two canonical CpG islands (5 kb) upstream from the precursor sequence are hypermethylated in the analysed breast cancer tissues. Ectopic delivery of synthetic microRNA-10b* in breast cancer cell lines or into xenograft mouse breast tumours inhibits cell proliferation and impairs tumour growth in vivo, respectively. We identified and validated in vitro and in vivo three novel target mRNAs of miR-10b* (BUB1, PLK1 and CCNA2), which play a remarkable role in cell cycle regulation and whose high expression in breast cancer patients is associated with reduced disease-free survival, relapse-free survival and metastasis-free survival when compared to patients with low expression. This also suggests that restoration of microRNA-10b* expression might have therapeutic promise. PMID:23125021

  13. Tumour suppressor function of MDA-7/IL-24 in human breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patani Neill

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Melanoma differentiation associated gene-7 (MDA-7, also known as interleukin (IL-24, is a tumour suppressor gene associated with differentiation, growth and apoptosis. However, the mechanisms underlying its anti-neoplastic activity, tumour-specificity and efficacy across a spectrum of human cancers have yet to be fully elucidated. In this study, the biological impact of MDA-7 on the behavior of breast cancer (BC cells is evaluated. Furthermore, mRNA expression of MDA-7 is assessed in a cohort of women with BC and correlated with established pathological parameters and clinical outcome. Methods The human BC cell line MDA MB-231 was used to evaluate the in-vitro impact of recombinant human (rh-MDA-7 on cell growth and motility, using a growth assay, wounding assay and electric cell impedance sensing (ECIS. Localisation of MDA-7 in mammary tissues was assessed with standard immuno-histochemical methodology. BC tissues (n = 127 and normal tissues (n = 33 underwent RNA extraction and reverse transcription, MDA-7 transcript levels were determined using real-time quantitative PCR. Transcript levels were analyzed against tumour size, grade, oestrogen receptor (ER status, nodal involvement, TNM stage, Nottingham Prognostic Index (NPI and clinical outcome over a 10 year follow-up period. Results Exposure to rh-MDA-7 significantly reduced wound closure rates for human BC cells in-vitro. The ECIS model demonstrated a significantly reduced motility and migration following rh-MDA-7 treatment (p = 0.024. Exposure to rh-MDA-7 was only found to exert a marginal effect on growth. Immuno-histochemical staining of human breast tissues revealed substantially greater MDA-7 positivity in normal compared to cancer cells. Significantly lower MDA-7 transcript levels were identified in those predicted to have a poorer prognosis by the NPI (p = 0.049 and those with node positive tumours. Significantly lower expression was also noted in tumours from

  14. An imbalance in progenitor cell populations reflects tumour progression in breast cancer primary culture models

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Donatello, Simona

    2011-04-26

    Abstract Background Many factors influence breast cancer progression, including the ability of progenitor cells to sustain or increase net tumour cell numbers. Our aim was to define whether alterations in putative progenitor populations could predict clinicopathological factors of prognostic importance for cancer progression. Methods Primary cultures were established from human breast tumour and adjacent non-tumour tissue. Putative progenitor cell populations were isolated based on co-expression or concomitant absence of the epithelial and myoepithelial markers EPCAM and CALLA respectively. Results Significant reductions in cellular senescence were observed in tumour versus non-tumour cultures, accompanied by a stepwise increase in proliferation:senescence ratios. A novel correlation between tumour aggressiveness and an imbalance of putative progenitor subpopulations was also observed. Specifically, an increased double-negative (DN) to double-positive (DP) ratio distinguished aggressive tumours of high grade, estrogen receptor-negativity or HER2-positivity. The DN:DP ratio was also higher in malignant MDA-MB-231 cells relative to non-tumourogenic MCF-10A cells. Ultrastructural analysis of the DN subpopulation in an invasive tumour culture revealed enrichment in lipofuscin bodies, markers of ageing or senescent cells. Conclusions Our results suggest that an imbalance in tumour progenitor subpopulations imbalances the functional relationship between proliferation and senescence, creating a microenvironment favouring tumour progression.

  15. Cell Biological Markers in Breast Tumours: Applications in cyto- and histopathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Kuenen-Boumeester (Vibeke)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractBreast cancer is the most common malignant tumour among women in the western world, affecting 8-12 % of the female population. In the Netherlands, breast cancer occurs yearly in IOOO per IOO,OOO women with an absolute incidence of 9,000 new cases per year. The etiology is multifactorial.

  16. Solutions of Inverse Problems with Potential Application for Breast Tumour Detection Using Microwave Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. G. Senaratne

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents one-dimensional and two-dimensional microwave inverse computing methods to detect an internal object using measurements based on a signal applied from the surface of the host material. The modelling of our application system has been aimed towards the in vivo detection of a breast tumour, in particular, and to enable the calculation of the tumour size and its distance from the surface of the breast. However, our approach is also applicable for more general foreign object identification. Complex backscattered electromagnetic waves characterise the relations of the internal properties of the host material. Forward and backscattered signals are used to calculate the impedance and reflection coefficients as a function of the applied microwave frequency. In the study of one-dimensional modelling, we discuss the approach to identifying a foreign object hidden inside the host material and we present a method for computing the distance to the object from the surface of the host. Subsequently, a cylindrical coordinate system is used for two-dimensional modelling. A method to compute the size of the object (up to one millimetre in radius is discussed. Computation of unknown electrical and non-electrical parameters using front-end microwave application is challenging but it is feasible.

  17. Lymphoscintigraphy and SPECT/CT in multicentric and multifocal breast cancer: does each tumour have a separate drainage pattern? Results of a Dutch multicentre study (MULTISENT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brouwer, O.R. [Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Antoni van Leeuwenhoekhospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Vermeeren, L.; Valdes Olmos, R.A. [Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Ploeg, I.M.C. van der; Rutgers, E.J.T.; Oldenburg, H.S.A. [Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Surgery, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Loo, C.E. [Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Radiology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Pereira-Bouda, L.M.; Smit, F. [Rijnland Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leiderdorp (Netherlands); Neijenhuis, P. [Rijnland Hospital, Department of Surgery, Leiderdorp (Netherlands); Vrouenraets, B.C. [Sint Lucas Andreas Hospital, Department of Surgery, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Sivro-Prndelj, F. [Sint Lucas Andreas Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Jap-a-Joe, S.M.; Borgstein, P.J. [Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-07-15

    To investigate whether lymphoscintigraphy and SPECT/CT after intralesional injection of radiopharmaceutical into each tumour separately in patients with multiple malignancies in one breast yields additional sentinel nodes compared to intralesional injection of the largest tumour only. Patients were included prospectively at four centres in The Netherlands. Lymphatic flow was studied using planar lymphoscintigraphy and SPECT/CT until 4 h after administration of {sup 99m}Tc-nanocolloid in the largest tumour. Subsequently, the smaller tumour(s) was injected intratumorally followed by the same imaging sequence. Sentinel nodes were intraoperatively localized using a gamma ray detection probe and vital blue dye. Included in the study were 50 patients. Additional lymphatic drainage was depicted after the second and/or third injection in 32 patients (64 %). Comparison of planar images and SPECT/CT images after consecutive injections enabled visualization of the number and location of additional sentinel nodes (32 axillary, 11 internal mammary chain, 2 intramammary, and 1 interpectoral. A sentinel node contained metastases in 17 patients (34 %)). In five patients with a tumour-positive node in the axilla that was visualized after the first injection, an additional involved axillary node was found after the second injection. In two patients, isolated tumour cells were found in sentinel nodes that were only visualized after the second injection, whilst the sentinel nodes identified after the first injection were tumour-negative. Lymphoscintigraphy and SPECT/CT after consecutive intratumoral injections of tracer enable lymphatic mapping of each tumour separately in patients with multiple malignancies within one breast. The high incidence of additional sentinel nodes draining from tumours other than the largest one suggests that separate tumour-related tracer injections may be a more accurate approach to mapping and sampling of sentinel nodes in patients with multicentric or

  18. Myoepithelial and epithelial-myoepithelial, mesenchymal and fibroepithelial breast lesions: updates from the WHO Classification of Tumours of the Breast 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Puay Hoon; Ellis, Ian O

    2013-06-01

    In the 4th edition of the WHO Classification of Tumours of the Breast, myoepithelial lesions are retitled myoepithelial and epithelial-myoepithelial lesions in order to better reflect the dual participation of luminal and myoepithelial compartments in some key entities. Malignant myoepithelioma, described as a section within the chapter on myoepithelial lesions in the 3rd edition, is recognised in the 4th edition as part of metaplastic carcinoma. Adenomyoepithelioma with malignancy is categorised in terms of the cellular component undergoing malignant transformation. The list of antibodies that can be used for identifying myoepithelial cells is updated. Among mesenchymal lesions, new additions are nodular fasciitis and atypical vascular lesions, while the haemangiopericytoma is removed. The 3rd edition stated that pathological prediction of behaviour of phyllodes tumours is difficult in the individual case. In the 4th edition, some progress has been made in prioritisation and weighting of histological parameters that can potentially estimate probability of recurrence. The WHO Working Group advocates leaning towards a diagnosis of fibroadenoma in cases where there is histological uncertainty in distinction from a benign phyllodes tumour, or adopting the neutral term 'benign fibroepithelial neoplasm', as the clinical behaviour of fibroadenoma overlaps with that of benign phyllodes tumour. The 3rd edition terminology of 'periductal stromal sarcoma' is revised to 'periductal stromal tumour', akin to the widespread consensus to avoid the use of the term 'cystosarcoma' in the context of phyllodes tumours.

  19. Gene expression-based classifications of fibroadenomas and phyllodes tumours of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Maria; Peg, Vicente; Galván, Patricia; Tres, Alejandro; Cortés, Javier; Ramón y Cajal, Santiago; Rubio, Isabel T; Prat, Aleix

    2015-06-01

    Fibroepithelial tumors (FTs) of the breast are a heterogeneous group of lesions ranging from fibroadenomas (FAD) to phyllodes tumors (PT) (benign, borderline, malignant). Further understanding of their molecular features and classification might be of clinical value. In this study, we analysed the expression of 105 breast cancer-related genes, including the 50 genes of the PAM50 intrinsic subtype predictor and 12 genes of the Claudin-low subtype predictor, in a panel of 75 FTs (34 FADs, 5 juvenile FADs, 20 benign PTs, 5 borderline PTs and 11 malignant PTs) with clinical follow-up. In addition, we compared the expression profiles of FTs with those of 14 normal breast tissues and 49 primary invasive ductal carcinomas (IDCs). Our results revealed that the levels of expression of all breast cancer-related genes can discriminate the various groups of FTs, together with normal breast tissues and IDCs (False Discovery Rate expression of proliferation-related genes (e.g. CCNB1 and MKI67) and mesenchymal/epithelial-related (e.g. CLDN3 and EPCAM) genes were found to be most discriminative. As expected, FADs showed the highest and lowest expression of epithelial- and proliferation-related genes, respectively, whereas malignant PTs showed the opposite expression pattern. Interestingly, the overall profile of benign PTs was found more similar to FADs and normal breast tissues than the rest of tumours, including juvenile FADs. Within the dataset of IDCs and normal breast tissues, the vast majority of FADs, juvenile FADs, benign PTs and borderline PTs were identified as Normal-like by intrinsic breast cancer subtyping, whereas 7 (63.6%) and 3 (27.3%) malignant PTs were identified as Claudin-low and Basal-like, respectively. Finally, we observed that the previously described PAM50 risk of relapse prognostic score better predicted outcome in FTs than the morphological classification, even within PTs-only. Our results suggest that classification of FTs using gene expression

  20. The genomic and transcriptomic architecture of 2,000 breast tumours reveals novel subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Christina; Shah, Sohrab P; Chin, Suet-Feung; Turashvili, Gulisa; Rueda, Oscar M; Dunning, Mark J; Speed, Doug; Lynch, Andy G; Samarajiwa, Shamith; Yuan, Yinyin; Gräf, Stefan; Ha, Gavin; Haffari, Gholamreza; Bashashati, Ali; Russell, Roslin; McKinney, Steven; Langerød, Anita; Green, Andrew; Provenzano, Elena; Wishart, Gordon; Pinder, Sarah; Watson, Peter; Markowetz, Florian; Murphy, Leigh; Ellis, Ian; Purushotham, Arnie; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Brenton, James D; Tavaré, Simon; Caldas, Carlos; Aparicio, Samuel

    2012-04-18

    The elucidation of breast cancer subgroups and their molecular drivers requires integrated views of the genome and transcriptome from representative numbers of patients. We present an integrated analysis of copy number and gene expression in a discovery and validation set of 997 and 995 primary breast tumours, respectively, with long-term clinical follow-up. Inherited variants (copy number variants and single nucleotide polymorphisms) and acquired somatic copy number aberrations (CNAs) were associated with expression in ~40% of genes, with the landscape dominated by cis- and trans-acting CNAs. By delineating expression outlier genes driven in cis by CNAs, we identified putative cancer genes, including deletions in PPP2R2A, MTAP and MAP2K4. Unsupervised analysis of paired DNA–RNA profiles revealed novel subgroups with distinct clinical outcomes, which reproduced in the validation cohort. These include a high-risk, oestrogen-receptor-positive 11q13/14 cis-acting subgroup and a favourable prognosis subgroup devoid of CNAs. Trans-acting aberration hotspots were found to modulate subgroup-specific gene networks, including a TCR deletion-mediated adaptive immune response in the ‘CNA-devoid’ subgroup and a basal-specific chromosome 5 deletion-associated mitotic network. Our results provide a novel molecular stratification of the breast cancer population, derived from the impact of somatic CNAs on the transcriptome.

  1. Targeting Chromosomal Instability and Tumour Heterogeneity in HER2-Positive Breast Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burrell, Rebecca A.; Birkbak, Nicolai Juul; Johnston, Stephen R.;

    2010-01-01

    Chromosomal instability (CIN) is a common cause of tumour heterogeneity and poor prognosis in solid tumours and describes cell-cell variation in chromosome structure or number across a tumour population. In this article we consider evidence suggesting that CIN may be targeted and may influence...... response to distinct chemotherapy regimens, using HER2-positive breast cancer as an example. Pre-clinical models have indicated a role for HER2 signalling in initiating CIN and defective cell-cycle control, and evidence suggests that HER2-targeting may attenuate this process. Anthracyclines and platinum...... agents may target tumours with distinct patterns of karyotypic complexity, whereas taxanes may have preferential activity in tumours with relative chromosomal stability. A greater understanding of karyotypic complexity and identification of methods to directly examine and target CIN may support novel...

  2. Background parenchymal enhancement in breast MRI before and after neoadjuvant chemotherapy: correlation with tumour response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preibsch, H.; Wanner, L.; Bahrs, S.D.; Wietek, B.M.; Nikolaou, K.; Wiesinger, B. [University Hospital Tuebingen, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Siegmann-Luz, K.C. [Diagnostic Center for Breast Cancer and Screening Mammography Brandenburg Ost, Koenigs Wusterhausen (Germany); Oberlecher, E.; Hahn, M. [University Hospital Tuebingen, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Tuebingen (Germany); Staebler, A. [University Hospital Tuebingen, Institute of Pathology and Neuropathology, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    To correlate the decrease in background parenchymal enhancement (BPE) and tumour response measured with MRI in breast cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). One hundred and forty-six MRI examinations of 73 patients with 80 biopsy-proven breast cancers who underwent breast MRI before and after NAC were retrospectively analysed. All images were reviewed by two blinded readers, who classified BPE into categories (BEC; 1 = minimal, 2 = mild, 3 = moderate, 4 = marked) before and after NAC. Histopathological and morphological tumour responses were analysed and compared. The distribution of BEC 1/2/3/4 was 25/46/18/11 % before and 78/20/2/0 % after NAC. On average, BPE decreased by 0.87 BEC. Cohen's kappa showed substantial agreement (k = 0.73-0.77) before and moderate agreement (k = 0.43-0.60) after NAC and moderate agreement (k = 0.62-0.60) concerning the change in BEC. Correlating the change in BPE with tumour response, the average decrease in BEC was 1.3 in cases of complete remission, 0.83 in cases with partial response, 0.85 in cases with stable disease and 0.40 in cases with progressive disease. Correlation analysis showed a significant correlation between the decrease in BEC and tumour response (r = -0.24, p = 0.03). BPE decreased by, on average, 0.87 BEC following NAC for breast cancer. The degree of BPE reduction seemed to correlate with tumour response. (orig.)

  3. Co-expressed peptide receptors in breast cancer as a molecular basis for in vivo multireceptor tumour targeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reubi, Jean Claude; Gugger, Mathias; Waser, Beatrice [Division of Cell Biology and Experimental Cancer Research, Institute of Pathology, University of Berne (Switzerland)

    2002-07-01

    Breast cancers can express different types of peptide receptors such as somatostatin, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) and NPY(Y{sub 1}) receptors. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate which is the most appropriate peptide receptor or peptide receptor combination for in vivo diagnostic and therapeutic targeting of breast cancers. Seventy-seven primary breast cancers and 15 breast cancer lymph node metastases were investigated in vitro for their expression of somatostatin, VPAC{sub 1}, GRP and NPY(Y{sub 1}) receptors using in vitro receptor autoradiography on successive tissue sections with {sup 125}I-[Tyr{sup 3}]-octreotide, {sup 125}I-VIP, {sup 125}I-[Tyr{sup 4}]-bombesin and {sup 125}I-[Leu{sup 31},Pro{sup 34}]-PYY respectively. This study identified two groups of tumours: a group of 68 tumours (88%) with at least one receptor expressed at high density (>2,000 dpm/mg tissue) that may provide a strong predictive value for successful in vivo targeting, and a group of nine tumours (12%) with no receptors or only a low density of them (<2,000 dpm/mg tissue). In the group with high receptor density, 50 of the 68 tumours (74%) expressed GRP receptors, 45 (66%) expressed NPY(Y{sub 1}) receptors, 25 (37%) expressed VPAC{sub 1} receptors and 14 (21%) expressed somatostatin receptors. Mean density was 9,819{+-}530 dpm/mg tissue for GRP receptors, 9,135{+-}579 dpm/mg for NPY(Y{sub 1}) receptors, 4,337{+-}528 dpm/mg for somatostatin receptors and 3,437{+-}306 dpm/mg for VPAC{sub 1} receptors. It is of note that tumours expressing NPY(Y{sub 1}) or GRP receptors, or both, were found in 63/68 (93%) cases. Lymph node metastases showed a similar receptor profile to the corresponding primary tumour. This in vitro study strongly suggests that the combination of radiolabelled GRP and Y{sub 1} analogues should allow targeting of breast carcinomas and their lymph node metastases for in vivo peptide receptor scintigraphy and radiotherapy

  4. Intra-tumour signalling entropy determines clinical outcome in breast and lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher R S Banerji

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The cancer stem cell hypothesis, that a small population of tumour cells are responsible for tumorigenesis and cancer progression, is becoming widely accepted and recent evidence has suggested a prognostic and predictive role for such cells. Intra-tumour heterogeneity, the diversity of the cancer cell population within the tumour of an individual patient, is related to cancer stem cells and is also considered a potential prognostic indicator in oncology. The measurement of cancer stem cell abundance and intra-tumour heterogeneity in a clinically relevant manner however, currently presents a challenge. Here we propose signalling entropy, a measure of signalling pathway promiscuity derived from a sample's genome-wide gene expression profile, as an estimate of the stemness of a tumour sample. By considering over 500 mixtures of diverse cellular expression profiles, we reveal that signalling entropy also associates with intra-tumour heterogeneity. By analysing 3668 breast cancer and 1692 lung adenocarcinoma samples, we further demonstrate that signalling entropy correlates negatively with survival, outperforming leading clinical gene expression based prognostic tools. Signalling entropy is found to be a general prognostic measure, valid in different breast cancer clinical subgroups, as well as within stage I lung adenocarcinoma. We find that its prognostic power is driven by genes involved in cancer stem cells and treatment resistance. In summary, by approximating both stemness and intra-tumour heterogeneity, signalling entropy provides a powerful prognostic measure across different epithelial cancers.

  5. Annexin A1 influences in breast cancer: Controversies on contributions to tumour, host and immunoediting processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Yan; Johnstone, Cameron N; Stewart, Alastair G

    2017-02-14

    Annexin A1 is a multifunctional protein characterised by its actions in modulating the innate and adaptive immune response. Accumulating evidence of altered annexin A1 expression in many human tumours raises interest in its functional role in cancer biology. In breast cancer, altered annexin A1 expression levels suggest a potential influence on tumorigenic and metastatic processes. However, reports of conflicting results reveal a relationship that is much more complex than first conceptualised. In this review, we explore the diverse actions of annexin A1 on breast tumour cells and various host cell types, including stromal immune and structural cells, particularly in the context of cancer immunoediting.

  6. The Impact of Tumour Characteristics on Hereditary Breast Cancer Screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M.A. Tilanus-Linthorst (Madeleine)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractIn the Western world breast cancer is a fairly common disease in women, nearly one in ten is diagnosed with breast cancer during her life. Worldwide 1.200.000 women are diagnosed with breast cancer annually, in the Netherlands about 12.000, 25% of them before age 50 years 1. Worldwide th

  7. Up-regulated Proteins in the Fluid Bathing the Tumour Cell Microenvironment as Potential Serological Markers for Early Detection of Cancer of the Breast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gromov, Pavel; Gromova, Irina; Bunkenborg, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    -based proteomics in combination with mass spectrometry and immunohistochemistry (IHC) of the tumour interstitial fluids (TIF) and normal interstitial fluids (NIF) collected from 69 prospective breast cancer patients. The goal of this study was to identify abundant cancer up-regulated proteins that are externalised...

  8. Up-regulated proteins in the fluid bathing the tumour cell microenvironment as potential serological markers for early detection of cancer of the breast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gromov, Pavel; Gromova, Irina; Bunkenborg, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    -based proteomics in combination with mass spectrometry and immunohistochemistry (IHC) of the tumour interstitial fluids (TIF) and normal interstitial fluids (NIF) collected from 69 prospective breast cancer patients. The goal of this study was to identify abundant cancer up-regulated proteins that are externalised...

  9. The Role of CD10 Immunohistochemistry in the Grading of Phyllodes Tumour of The Breast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huzlinda Hussin,Jayalakshmi Pailoor

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the relationship between the degree of CD10 expression in the stromal cells of phyllodes tumour and tumour grading. Methods: A total of 61 cases of mammary phyllodes tumours over the past 11 years were searched from histopathology files, University Malaya Medical Centre. The paraffin blocks were retrieved and 4 μm thick slides were prepared and stained using an antibody against CD10 with the envision method. Fibroadenoma case was used as a control slide and breast myoepithelium as the internal control. Each stained slides was independantly and semiquantitatively analysed for the intensity and percentage of the stromal cells stained. The staining intensity was graded as negative (no staining, mild, moderate and strong if the staining was much weaker, slightly weaker and same intensity as that of the myoepithelium, respectively. The tumour was considered positive for CD10 if the staining intensity is moderate to strong in 20% or more of the stromal cells. Results: 21 (44.7% of 47 benign phyllodes tumour, 5 (83.3% of 6 borderline phyllodes tumour and all 8 cases (100% of malignant phyllodes tumour showed positive expression for CD10 immunostain. Conclusions: There was a significant increase in CD10 expression in the stromal cells as the lesions progressed from benign to borderline and malignant phyllodes tumour. [J Interdiscipl Histopathol 2013; 1(4.000: 195-203

  10. Targeting breast to brain metastatic tumours with death receptor ligand expressing therapeutic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagci-Onder, Tugba; Du, Wanlu; Figueiredo, Jose-Luiz; Martinez-Quintanilla, Jordi; Shah, Khalid

    2015-06-01

    Characterizing clinically relevant brain metastasis models and assessing the therapeutic efficacy in such models are fundamental for the development of novel therapies for metastatic brain cancers. In this study, we have developed an in vivo imageable breast-to-brain metastasis mouse model. Using real time in vivo imaging and subsequent composite fluorescence imaging, we show a widespread distribution of micro- and macro-metastasis in different stages of metastatic progression. We also show extravasation of tumour cells and the close association of tumour cells with blood vessels in the brain thus mimicking the multi-foci metastases observed in the clinics. Next, we explored the ability of engineered adult stem cells to track metastatic deposits in this model and show that engineered stem cells either implanted or injected via circulation efficiently home to metastatic tumour deposits in the brain. Based on the recent findings that metastatic tumour cells adopt unique mechanisms of evading apoptosis to successfully colonize in the brain, we reasoned that TNF receptor superfamily member 10A/10B apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) based pro-apoptotic therapies that induce death receptor signalling within the metastatic tumour cells might be a favourable therapeutic approach. We engineered stem cells to express a tumour selective, potent and secretable variant of a TRAIL, S-TRAIL, and show that these cells significantly suppressed metastatic tumour growth and prolonged the survival of mice bearing metastatic breast tumours. Furthermore, the incorporation of pro-drug converting enzyme, herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase, into therapeutic S-TRAIL secreting stem cells allowed their eradication post-tumour treatment. These studies are the first of their kind that provide insight into targeting brain metastasis with stem-cell mediated delivery of pro-apoptotic ligands and have important clinical implications.

  11. Metaplastic breast carcinoma; melanocytic variant, a very rare tumour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nzegwu, Martin A.; Sule, Emmanuel; Uzoigwe, Joseph; Achi, Franklyn

    2015-01-01

    Metaplastic breast carcinoma (MBC) is a rare heterogeneous malignancy, accounting for <1% of all invasive breast carcinomas, in which adenocarcinoma is found to coexist with an admixture of spindle, squamous, chondroid or bone-forming neoplastic cells. Melanocytic variant was first described by Ruffolo et al. in 1997. We report a case of MBC, melanocytic variant, in a 57-year-old Nigerian female who presented with a left breast mass 8 cm in diameter in the upper outer quadrant, hard and gradually increase in size to become painful. Breast examination showed gross asymmetry. Left breast was oedematous and shiny with extensive peau d'orange. No palpable axillary nodes were seen. Chest X-ray and abdominal ultrasound scan showed no involvement. Breast biopsy revealed an invasive metaplastic ductal carcinoma with melanocytic differentiation. PMID:25666364

  12. An imbalance in progenitor cell populations reflects tumour progression in breast cancer primary culture models.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Donatello, Simona

    2011-01-01

    Many factors influence breast cancer progression, including the ability of progenitor cells to sustain or increase net tumour cell numbers. Our aim was to define whether alterations in putative progenitor populations could predict clinicopathological factors of prognostic importance for cancer progression.

  13. {sup 18}F-FDG PET and biomarkers for tumour angiogenesis in early breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groves, Ashley M.; Shastry, Manu; Endozo, Raymondo; Ell, Peter J. [University College London, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Rodriguez-Justo, Manuel [University College London, Department of Histopathology, London (United Kingdom); Malhotra, Anmol; Davidson, Timothy; Kelleher, Tina; Keshtgar, Mohammed R. [Breast Unit, Royal Free Hospital, UCL, London (United Kingdom); Miles, Kenneth A. [Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals, Brighton (United Kingdom)

    2011-01-15

    Tumour angiogenesis is an independent and strong prognostic factor in early breast carcinoma. We performed this study to investigate the ability of {sup 18}F-FDG to detect angiogenesis in early breast carcinoma using PET/CT. Twenty consecutive patients with early (T1-T2) breast carcinoma were recruited prospectively for 18F-FDG PET/CT. The PET/CT data were used to calculate whole tumour maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) and mean standardized uptake value (SUV{sub mean}). All patients underwent subsequent surgery without prior chemotherapy or radiotherapy. The excised tumour underwent immunohistochemistry for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), CD105 and glucose transporter protein 1 (GLUT1). The SUV{sub max} showed the following correlation with tumour histology: CD105: r = 0.60, p = 0.005; GLUT1: r = 0.21, p = 0.373; VEGF: r = -0.16, p = 0.496. The SUV{sub mean} showed the following correlation with tumour histology: CD105: r = 0.65, p = 0.002; GLUT1: r = 0.34, p = 0.144; VEGF: r = -0.18, p = 0.443 {sup 18}F-FDG uptake is highly significantly associated with angiogenesis as measured by the immunohistochemistry with CD105 for new vessel formation. Given that tumour angiogenesis is an important prognostic indicator and a predictor of treatment response, {sup 18}F-FDG PET may have a role in the management of primary breast cancer patients even in early-stage disease. (orig.)

  14. Parameter estimation of breast tumour using dynamic neural network from thermal pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Saniei

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a new approach for estimating the depth, size, and metabolic heat generation rate of a tumour. For this purpose, the surface temperature distribution of a breast thermal image and the dynamic neural network was used. The research consisted of two steps: forward and inverse. For the forward section, a finite element model was created. The Pennes bio-heat equation was solved to find surface and depth temperature distributions. Data from the analysis, then, were used to train the dynamic neural network model (DNN. Results from the DNN training/testing confirmed those of the finite element model. For the inverse section, the trained neural network was applied to estimate the depth temperature distribution (tumour position from the surface temperature profile, extracted from the thermal image. Finally, tumour parameters were obtained from the depth temperature distribution. Experimental findings (20 patients were promising in terms of the model’s potential for retrieving tumour parameters.

  15. Primary breast cancer tumours contain high amounts of IgA1 immunoglobulin: an immunohistochemical analysis of a possible carrier of the tumour-associated Tn antigen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Welinder

    Full Text Available The Tn antigen (GalNAc alpha-O-Ser/Thr as defined by the binding of the lectin, helix pomatia agglutinin (HPA or anti-Tn monoclonal antibodies, is known to be exposed in a majority of cancers, and it has also been shown to correlate positively with the metastatic capacity in breast carcinoma. The short O-glycan that forms the antigen is carried by a number of different proteins. One potential carrier of the Tn antigen is immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1, which we surprisingly found in tumour cells of the invasive parts of primary breast carcinoma. Conventional immunohistochemical analysis of paraffin-embedded sections from primary breast cancers showed IgA1 to be present in the cytoplasm and plasma membrane of 35 out of 36 individual primary tumours. The immunohistochemical staining of HPA and anti-Tn antibody (GOD3-2C4 did to some extent overlap with the presence of IgA1 in the tumours, but differences were seen in the percentage of stained cells and in the staining pattern in the different breast cancers analysed. Anti-Tn antibody and HPA were also shown to specifically bind to a number of possible constellations of the Tn antigen in the hinge region of IgA1. Both reagents could also detect the presence of Tn positive IgA in serum. On average 51% of the tumour cells in the individual breast cancer tumour sections showed staining for IgA1. The overall amount of staining in the invasive part of the tumour with the anti Tn antibody was 67%, and 93% with HPA. The intra-expression or uptake of IgA1 in breast cancer makes it a new potential carrier of the tumour associated and immunogenic Tn antigen.

  16. Modelling circulating tumour cells for personalised survival prediction in metastatic breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Ascolani

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Ductal carcinoma is one of the most common cancers among women, and the main cause of death is the formation of metastases. The development of metastases is caused by cancer cells that migrate from the primary tumour site (the mammary duct through the blood vessels and extravasating they initiate metastasis. Here, we propose a multi-compartment model which mimics the dynamics of tumoural cells in the mammary duct, in the circulatory system and in the bone. Through a branching process model, we describe the relation between the survival times and the four markers mainly involved in metastatic breast cancer (EPCAM, CD47, CD44 and MET. In particular, the model takes into account the gene expression profile of circulating tumour cells to predict personalised survival probability. We also include the administration of drugs as bisphosphonates, which reduce the formation of circulating tumour cells and their survival in the blood vessels, in order to analyse the dynamic changes induced by the therapy. We analyse the effects of circulating tumour cells on the progression of the disease providing a quantitative measure of the cell driver mutations needed for invading the bone tissue. Our model allows to design intervention scenarios that alter the patient-specific survival probability by modifying the populations of circulating tumour cells and it could be extended to other cancer metastasis dynamics.

  17. Targeting of breast metastases using a viral gene vector with tumour-selective transcription.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rajendran, Simon

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have significant potential as gene delivery vectors for cancer gene therapy. However, broad AAV2 tissue tropism results in nonspecific gene expression. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We investigated use of the C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) promoter to restrict AAV expression to tumour cells, in subcutaneous MCF-7 xenograft mouse models of breast cancer and in patient samples, using bioluminescent imaging and flow cytometric analysis. RESULTS: Higher transgene expression levels were observed in subcutaneous MCF-7 tumours relative to normal tissue (muscle) using the CXCR4 promoter, unlike a ubiquitously expressing Cytomegalovirus promoter construct, with preferential AAVCXCR4 expression in epithelial tumour and CXCR4-positive cells. Transgene expression following intravenously administered AAVCXCR4 in a model of liver metastasis was detected specifically in livers of tumour bearing mice. Ex vivo analysis using patient samples also demonstrated higher AAVCXCR4 expression in tumour compared with normal liver tissue. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates for the first time, the potential for systemic administration of AAV2 vector for tumour-selective gene therapy.

  18. Genomic profiling of papillary renal cell tumours identifies small regions of DNA alterations: a possible role of HNF1B in tumour development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szponar, A.; Yusenko, M.V.; Kuiper, R.P.; Geurts van Kessel, A.H.M.; Kovacs, G.

    2011-01-01

    AIMS: Papillary renal cell tumours (RCT) are characterized by specific trisomies. The aim of this study was to identify small regions of duplication marking putative tumour genes. METHODS AND RESULTS: Full-tiling path bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) array hybridization of 20 papillary RCTs con

  19. Early prognosis of metastasis risk in inflammatory breast cancer by texture analysis of tumour microscopic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolarevic, Daniela; Tomasevic, Zorica; Dzodic, Radan; Kanjer, Ksenija; Vukosavljevic, Dragica Nikolic; Radulovic, Marko

    2015-10-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is a rare and aggressive type of locally advanced breast cancer. The purpose of this study was to determine the value of microscopic tumour histomorphology texture for prognosis of local and systemic recurrence at the time of initial IBC diagnosis. This retrospective study included a group of 52 patients selected on the basis of non-metastatic IBC diagnosis, stage IIIB. Gray-Level-Co-Occurrence-Matrix (GLCM) texture analysis was performed on digital images of primary tumour tissue sections stained with haematoxylin/eosin. Obtained values were categorized by use of both data- and outcome-based methods. All five acquired GLCM texture features significantly associated with metastasis outcome. By accuracies of 69-81% and AUCs of 0.71-0.81, prognostic performance of GLCM parameters exceeded that of standard major IBC clinical prognosticators such as tumour grade and response to induction chemotherapy. Furthermore, a composite score consisting of tumour grade, contrast and correlation as independent features resulted in further enhancement of prognostic performance by accuracy of 89%, discrimination efficiency by AUC of 0.93 and an outstanding hazard ratio of 71.6 (95%CI, 41.7-148.4). Internal validation was successfully performed by bootstrap and split-sample cross-validation, suggesting that the model is generalizable. This study indicates for the first time the potential use of primary breast tumour histology texture as a highly accurate, simple and cost-effective prognostic indicator of metastasis risk in IBC. Clinical relevance of the obtained results rests on the role of prognosis in decisions on induction chemotherapy and the resulting impact on quality of life and survival.

  20. Monitoring different stages of breast cancer using tumour markers CA 15-3, CEA and TPA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sölétormos, G; Nielsen, D; Schiøler, V;

    2004-01-01

    % of the patients receiving first-line chemotherapy (cohort B). Trials are necessary to determine whether tumour marker-guided therapy has any prognostic impact. The data suggest that tumour marker information may be used to stop ineffective treatments and reduce unnecessary adverse effects.......-individual biological variation, and the rate of increase. Patient cohorts were as follows: (A) 90 stage II breast cancer patients who were monitored postoperatively, (B) 204 recurrent breast cancer patients who were monitored during first-line chemotherapy, and (C) 112 patients who were monitored during the time...... period after first-line chemotherapy. The sensitivity for progression was 44% (cohort A), 69% (cohort B), and 68% (cohort C) without any false progression signals. Marker lead-times exceeded 3 months in 20% (cohort A) and 27% (cohort C) of patients. Marker lead-times were 1-6 months among 33...

  1. Cell Biological Markers in Breast Tumours: Applications in cyto- and histopathology

    OpenAIRE

    Kuenen-Boumeester, Vibeke

    1998-01-01

    textabstractBreast cancer is the most common malignant tumour among women in the western world, affecting 8-12 % of the female population. In the Netherlands, breast cancer occurs yearly in IOOO per IOO,OOO women with an absolute incidence of 9,000 new cases per year. The etiology is multifactorial. Age is an important risk factor. The incidence climbs after age 30, followed by a slight dip at menopause and continues to ri se during postmenopausal years. Honnonal influences are weil documente...

  2. Gene expression profiling of tumours derived from rasV12/E1A-transformed mouse embryonic fibroblasts to identify genes required for tumour development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagorn Jean

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In cancer, cellular transformation is followed by tumour development. Knowledge on the mechanisms of transformation, involving activation of proto-oncogenes and inactivation of tumour-suppressor genes has considerably improved whereas tumour development remains poorly understood. An interesting way of gaining information on tumour progression mechanisms would be to identify genes whose expression is altered during tumour formation. We used the Affymetrix-based DNA microarray technology to analyze gene expression profiles of tumours derived from rasV12/E1A-transformed mouse embryo fibroblasts in order to identify the genes that could be involved in tumour development. Results Among the 12,000 genes analyzed in this study, only 489 showed altered expression during tumour development, 213 being up-regulated and 276 down-regulated. The genes differentially expressed are involved in a variety of cellular functions, including control of transcription, regulation of mRNA maturation and processing, regulation of protein translation, activation of interferon-induced genes, intracellular signalling, apoptosis, cell growth, angiogenesis, cytoskeleton, cell-to-cell interaction, extracellular matrix formation, metabolism and production of secretory factors. Conclusions Some of the genes identified in this work, whose expression is altered upon rasV12/E1A transformation of MEFs, could be new cancer therapeutic targets.

  3. Impact of tumour bed boost integration on acute and late toxicity in patients with breast cancer: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Daniel George; Bale, Rebecca; Jones, Claire; Fitzgerald, Emma; Khor, Richard; Knight, Kellie; Wasiak, Jason

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to summarise the evidence from studies investigating the integration of tumour bed boosts into whole breast irradiation for patients with Stage 0-III breast cancer, with a focus on its impact on acute and late toxicities. A comprehensive systematic electronic search through the Ovid MEDLINE, EMBASE and PubMed databases from January 2000 to January 2015 was conducted. Studies were considered eligible if they investigated the efficacy of hypo- or normofractionated whole breast irradiation with the inclusion of a daily concurrent boost. The primary outcomes of interest were the degree of observed acute and late toxicity following radiotherapy treatment. Methodological quality assessment was performed on all included studies using either the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale or a previously published investigator-derived quality instrument. The search identified 35 articles, of which 17 satisfied our eligibility criteria. Thirteen and eleven studies reported on acute and late toxicities respectively. Grade 3 acute skin toxicity ranged from 1 to 7% whilst moderate to severe fibrosis and telangiectasia were both limited to 9%. Reported toxicity profiles were comparable to historical data at similar time-points. Studies investigating the delivery of concurrent boosts with whole breast radiotherapy courses report safe short to medium-term toxicity profiles and cosmesis rates. Whilst the quality of evidence and length of follow-up supporting these findings is low, sufficient evidence has been generated to consider concurrent boost techniques as an alternative to conventional sequential techniques.

  4. Which factors influence MRI-pathology concordance of tumour size measurements in breast cancer?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rominger, M.; Frauenfelder, T. [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Berg, D. [Urbankrankenhaus Berlin, Anesthesiology, Berlin (Germany); Ramaswamy, A. [University Hospital Marburg, Pathology, Marburg (Germany); Timmesfeld, N. [Philipps University Marburg, Institute for Medical Biometry and Epidemiology, Marburg (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    To assess MRI-pathology concordance and factors influencing tumour size measurement in breast cancer. MRI tumour size (greatest diameter in anatomical planes (MRI-In-Plane) and greatest diameter along main tumour axis (MRI-MPR)) of 115 consecutive breast lesions (59 invasive lobular carcinoma, 46 invasive ductal carcinoma, and 10 ductal carcinoma in situ) was retrospectively compared to size measured at histopathology (pT size (Path-TNM) and greatest tumour diameter as relevant for excision (Path-Diameter; reference standard)). Histopathological tumour types, preoperative palpability, surgical management, additional high-risk lesions, and BI-RADS lesion type (mass versus non-mass enhancements) were assessed as possible influencing factors. Systematic errors were most pronounced between MRI-MPR and Path-TNM (7.1 mm, limits of agreement (LoA) [-21.7; 35.9]), and were lowest between MRI-In-Plane and Path-Diameter (0.2 mm, LoA [-19.7; 20.1]). Concordance rate of MRI-In-Plane with Path-Diameter was 86 % (97/113), overestimation 9 % (10/113) and underestimation 5 % (6/113); BI-RADS mass lesions were overestimated in 7 % (6/81) versus 41 % (13/32) for non-mass enhancements. On multivariate analysis only BI-RADS lesion type significantly influenced MRI-pathology concordance (p < 0.001). 2/59 (3 %) ILC did not enhance. Concordance rate varies according to the execution of MRI and histopathological measurements. Beyond this only non-mass enhancement significantly predicted discordance. (orig.)

  5. Role of CD10 Immunoexpression in Grading Phyllodes Tumour of the Breast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandeparkar, Siddhi Gaurish Sinai; Joshi, Avinash R; Kothikar, Vishakha; Nasare, Anuja; Patil, Sukhada; Niraspatil, Supriya; Dhande, Bhagyashree

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Fibroepithelial tumours are a heterogeneous group of biphasic neoplasms consisting of a proliferation of both epithelial and stromal components. Fibroadenoma (FA) and Phyllodes Tumour (PT) constitute the major entities. It is crucial to distinguish benign from borderline PT (low grade malignant PT), because the former do not metastasize, have a lesser risk of local recurrence and initial local recurrences are histologically benign in almost all instances. Multiple Immunohistochemical (IHC) markers are being studied to find their utility in grading the PT accurately for planning proper treatment. Aim To study, the IHC expression of CD10 in the stromal cells of a series of PTs and FA, with the aim of determining whether the degree of CD10 expression in the stromal cells is related to the grade of the tumour. Materials and Methods Records of 28 cases of PT and 35 cases of FA received in the Department of Pathology in a tertiary care hospital were obtained. Histopathology reports and slides of all the cases were reviewed and clinical data such as age and histomorphological features such as tumour cellularity, stromal overgrowth, mitotic count and nuclear atypia were noted. Representative block of the tumour with maximum cellularity was subjected to CD10 staining. For FA and benign PT a technique of tissue microarray was used. For borderline and malignant PT, representative section was used. Stromal cell staining was assessed, using cytoplasmic staining of the breast myoepithelium as internal control. Results Present study included 35 cases of FA, 20 cases of benign PT, five cases of borderline PT and three cases of malignant PT. The mean age of the patients increased with the increasing tumour grade of PT and this was also observed for FA and benign PT. The mean age increased with increase in tumour grade of PT and was statistically significant (p<0.05). The mean size did not increase with the increasing tumour grade of PT and was statistically

  6. ERCC1 and telomere status in breast tumours treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and their association with patient prognosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay‐Bellile, Mathilde; Romero, Pierre; Cayre, Anne; Véronèse, Lauren; Privat, Maud; Singh, Shalini; Combes, Patricia; Kwiatkowski, Fabrice; Abrial, Catherine; Bignon, Yves‐Jean; Vago, Philippe; Penault‐Llorca, Frédérique

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Dysfunctional telomeres and DNA damage repair (DDR) play important roles in cancer progression. Studies have reported correlations between these factors and tumour aggressiveness and clinical outcome in breast cancer. We studied the characteristics of telomeres and expression of ERCC1, a protein involved in a number of DNA repair pathways and in telomere homeostasis, to assess their prognostic value, alone or in combination, in 90 residual breast tumours after treatment with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT). ERCC1 status was investigated at different molecular levels (protein and gene expression and gene copy‐number variations) by immunohistochemistry, qRT‐PCR and quantitative multiplex fluorescent‐PCR (QMF‐PCR). A comprehensive analysis of telomere characteristics was performed using qPCR for telomere length and qRT‐PCR for telomerase (hTERT), tankyrase 1 (TNKS) and shelterin complex (TRF1, TRF2, POT1, TPP1, RAP1 and TIN2) gene expression. Short telomeres, high hTERT and TNKS expression and low ERCC1 protein expression were independently associated with worse survival outcome. Interestingly, ERCC1 gains and losses correlated with worse disease‐free (p = 0.026) and overall (p = 0.043) survival as compared to survival of patients with normal gene copy‐numbers. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of all ERCC1 and telomere parameters identified four subgroups with distinct prognosis. In particular, a cluster combining low ERCC1, ERCC1 gene alterations, dysfunctional telomeres and high hTERT and a cluster with high TNKS and shelterin expression correlated with poor disease‐free (HR= 5.41, p= 0.0044) and overall survival (HR= 6.01, p= 0.0023) irrespective of tumour stage and grade. This comprehensive study demonstrates that telomere dysfunction and DDR can contribute synergistically to tumour progression and chemoresistance. These parameters are predictors of clinical outcome in breast cancer patients treated with NCT and could be useful

  7. Breast cancer nodal metastasis correlates with tumour and lymph node methylation profiles of Caveolin-1 and CXCR4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alevizos, Leonidas; Kataki, Agapi; Derventzi, Anastasia; Gomatos, Ilias; Loutraris, Christos; Gloustianou, Georgia; Manouras, Andreas; Konstadoulakis, Manousos M; Zografos, George

    2014-06-01

    DNA methylation is the best characterised epigenetic change so far. However, its role in breast cancer metastasis has not as yet been elucidated. The aim of this study was to investigate the differences between the methylation profiles characterising primary tumours and their corresponding positive or negative for metastasis lymph nodes (LN) and correlate these with tumour metastatic potential. Methylation signatures of Caveolin-1, CXCR4, RAR-β, Cyclin D2 and Twist gene promoters were studied in 30 breast cancer primary lesions and their corresponding metastasis-free and tumour-infiltrated LN with Methylation-Specific PCR. CXCR4 and Caveolin-1 expression was further studied by immunohistochemistry. Tumours were typified by methylation of RAR-β and hypermethylation of Cyclin-D2 and Twist gene promoters. Tumour patterns were highly conserved in tumour-infiltrated LN. CXCR4 and Caveolin-1 promoter methylation patterns differentiated between node-negative and metastatic tumours. Nodal metastasis was associated with tumour and lymph node profiles of extended methylation of Caveolin-1 and lack of CXCR4 hypermethylation. Immunodetection studies verified CXCR4 and Caveolin-1 hypermethylation as gene silencing mechanism. Absence of Caveolin-1 expression in stromal cells associated with tumour aggressiveness while strong Caveolin-1 expression in tumour cells correlated with decreased 7-year disease-free survival. Methylation-mediated activation of CXCR4 and inactivation of Caveolin-1 was linked with nodal metastasis while intratumoral Caveolin-1 expression heterogeneity correlated with disease progression. This evidence contributes to the better understanding and, thereby, therapeutic management of breast cancer metastasis process.

  8. Primary breast cancer tumours contain high amounts of IgA1 immunoglobulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welinder, Charlotte; Baldetorp, Bo; Blixt, Klas Ola;

    2013-01-01

    The Tn antigen (GalNAc alpha-O-Ser/Thr) as defined by the binding of the lectin, helix pomatia agglutinin (HPA) or anti-Tn monoclonal antibodies, is known to be exposed in a majority of cancers, and it has also been shown to correlate positively with the metastatic capacity in breast carcinoma......-embedded sections from primary breast cancers showed IgA1 to be present in the cytoplasm and plasma membrane of 35 out of 36 individual primary tumours. The immunohistochemical staining of HPA and anti-Tn antibody (GOD3-2C4) did to some extent overlap with the presence of IgA1 in the tumours, but differences were...... seen in the percentage of stained cells and in the staining pattern in the different breast cancers analysed. Anti-Tn antibody and HPA were also shown to specifically bind to a number of possible constellations of the Tn antigen in the hinge region of IgA1. Both reagents could also detect the presence...

  9. Aberrant Promoter Methylation of the Tumour Suppressor RASSF10 and Its Growth Inhibitory Function in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antje M. Richter

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women, with 1.7 million new cases each year. As early diagnosis and prognosis are crucial factors in cancer treatment, we investigated potential DNA methylation biomarkers of the tumour suppressor family Ras-association domain family (RASSF. Promoter hypermethylation of tumour suppressors leads to their inactivation and thereby promotes cancer development and progression. In this study we analysed the tumour suppressors RASSF1A and RASSF10. Our study shows that RASSF10 is expressed in normal breast but inactivated by methylation in breast cancer. We observed a significant inactivating promoter methylation of RASSF10 in primary breast tumours. RASSF10 is inactivated in 63% of primary breast cancer samples but only 4% of normal control breast tissue is methylated (p < 0.005. RASSF1A also shows high promoter methylation levels in breast cancer of 56% vs. 8% of normal tissue (p < 0.005. Interestingly more than 80% of breast cancer samples harboured a hypermethylation of RASSF10 and/or RASSF1A promoter. Matching samples exhibited a strong tumour specific promoter methylation of RASSF10 in comparison to the normal control breast tissue. Demethylation treatment of breast cancer cell lines MCF7 and T47D reversed RASSF10 promoter hypermethylation and re-established RASSF10 expression. In addition, we could show the growth inhibitory potential of RASSF10 in breast cancer cell lines MCF7 and T47D upon exogenous expression of RASSF10 by colony formation. We could further show, that RASSF10 induced apoptotic changes in MCF7 and T47D cells, which was verified by a significant increase in the apoptotic sub G1 fraction by 50% using flow cytometry for MCF7 cells. In summary, our study shows the breast tumour specific inactivation of RASSF10 and RASSF1A due to DNA methylation of their CpG island promoters. Furthermore RASSF10 was characterised by the ability to block growth of breast cancer cell lines by apoptosis

  10. Tumour location and axillary lymph node involvement in breast cancer: a series of 3472 cases from Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manjer, J; Balldin, G; Garne, J P

    2004-01-01

    AIM: This study investigates the potential relation between breast cancer location and axillary lymph node involvement (ALNI). METHODS: Out of all cases with unilateral first-time diagnosis of invasive breast cancer in Malmö, Sweden, between 1961 and 1991, 3472 underwent axillary dissection. The .......19-2.18), and for central tumours 3.50 (2.32-5.28). CONCLUSIONS: Outer and central breast tumours are associated with a high risk of axillary lymph node involvement. Udgivelsesdato: 2004-Aug......AIM: This study investigates the potential relation between breast cancer location and axillary lymph node involvement (ALNI). METHODS: Out of all cases with unilateral first-time diagnosis of invasive breast cancer in Malmö, Sweden, between 1961 and 1991, 3472 underwent axillary dissection...

  11. Addition of vasopressin synthetic analogue [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP to standard chemotherapy enhances tumour growth inhibition and impairs metastatic spread in aggressive breast tumour models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garona, Juan; Pifano, Marina; Pastrian, Maria B; Gomez, Daniel E; Ripoll, Giselle V; Alonso, Daniel F

    2016-08-01

    [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP is a novel 2nd generation vasopressin analogue with robust antitumour activity against metastatic breast cancer. We recently reported that, by acting on vasopressin V2r membrane receptor present in tumour cells and microvascular endothelium, [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP inhibits angiogenesis and metastatic progression of the disease without overt toxicity. Despite chemotherapy remaining as a primary therapeutic option for aggressive breast cancer, its use is limited by low selectivity and associated adverse effects. In this regard, we evaluated potential combinational benefits by adding [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP to standard-of-care chemotherapy. In vitro, combination of [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP with sub-IC50 concentrations of paclitaxel or carmustine resulted in a cooperative inhibition of breast cancer cell growth in comparison to single-agent therapy. In vivo antitumour efficacy of [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP addition to chemotherapy was first evaluated using the triple-negative MDA-MB-231 breast cancer xenograft model. Tumour-bearing mice were treated with i.v. injections of [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP (0.3 μg/kg, thrice weekly) in combination with weekly cycles of paclitaxel (10 mg/kg i.p.). After 6 weeks of treatment, combination regimen resulted in greater tumour growth inhibition compared to monotherapy. [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP addition was also associated with reduction of local aggressiveness, and impairment of tumour invasion and infiltration of the skin. Benefits of combined therapy were confirmed in the hormone-independent and metastatic F3II breast cancer model by combining [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP with carmustine (25 mg/kg i.p.). Interestingly, [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP plus cytotoxic agents severely impaired colony forming ability of tumour cells and inhibited breast cancer metastasis to lung. The present study shows that [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP may complement conventional chemotherapy by modulating metastatic progression and early stages of microtumour establishment, and thus supports further preclinical testing of

  12. Tumour characteristics and survival in patients with invasive interval breast cancer classified according to mammographic findings at the latest screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vitak, B; Olsen, K E; Månson, J C;

    1999-01-01

    rate of patients with interval cancer and the interval between the latest screen and diagnosis, tumour characteristics and radiological category of the interval tumours. The study focused on comparison of patients with true interval and missed interval cancer. Women with mammographically occult tumours...... screen and diagnosis were not genuine predictors of the prognosis in patients with invasive interval breast cancer. No certain prognostic difference existed between true interval cancers and overlooked or misinterpreted interval breast cancers, despite higher proportions of grade-I tumours, ER positive......The aim of this study was to investigate whether different mammographic categories of interval cancer classified according to findings at the latest screening are associated with different distributions of prognostic factors or with different survival rates. The series consisted of all patients...

  13. Molecular profiling of low grade serous ovarian tumours identifies novel candidate driver genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Sally M; Anglesio, Michael S; Ryland, Georgina L; Sharma, Raghwa; Chiew, Yoke-Eng; Rowley, Simone M; Doyle, Maria A; Li, Jason; Gilks, C Blake; Moss, Phillip; Allan, Prue E; Stephens, Andrew N; Huntsman, David G; deFazio, Anna; Bowtell, David D; Gorringe, Kylie L; Campbell, Ian G

    2015-11-10

    Low grade serous ovarian tumours are a rare and under-characterised histological subtype of epithelial ovarian tumours, with little known of the molecular drivers and facilitators of tumorigenesis beyond classic oncogenic RAS/RAF mutations. With a move towards targeted therapies due to the chemoresistant nature of this subtype, it is pertinent to more fully characterise the genetic events driving this tumour type, some of which may influence response to therapy and/or development of drug resistance. We performed genome-wide high-resolution genomic copy number analysis (Affymetrix SNP6.0) and mutation hotspot screening (KRAS, BRAF, NRAS, HRAS, ERBB2 and TP53) to compare a large cohort of ovarian serous borderline tumours (SBTs, n = 57) with low grade serous carcinomas (LGSCs, n = 19). Whole exome sequencing was performed for 13 SBTs, nine LGSCs and one mixed low/high grade carcinoma. Copy number aberrations were detected in 61% (35/57) of SBTs, compared to 100% (19/19) of LGSCs. Oncogenic RAS/RAF/ERBB2 mutations were detected in 82.5% (47/57) of SBTs compared to 63% (12/19) of LGSCs, with NRAS mutations detected only in LGSC. Some copy number aberrations appeared to be enriched in LGSC, most significantly loss of 9p and homozygous deletions of the CDKN2A/2B locus. Exome sequencing identified BRAF, KRAS, NRAS, USP9X and EIF1AX as the most frequently mutated genes. We have identified markers of progression from borderline to LGSC and novel drivers of LGSC. USP9X and EIF1AX have both been linked to regulation of mTOR, suggesting that mTOR inhibitors may be a key companion treatment for targeted therapy trials of MEK and RAF inhibitors.

  14. In silico design and performance of peptide microarrays for breast cancer tumour-auto-antibody testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Weinhäusel

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The simplicity and potential of minimally invasive testing using sera from patients makes auto-antibody based biomarkers a very promising tool for use in cancer diagnostics. Protein microarrays have been used for the identification of such auto-antibody signatures. Because high throughput protein expression and purification is laborious, synthetic peptides might be a good alternative for microarray generation and multiplexed analyses. In this study, we designed 1185 antigenic peptides, deduced from proteins expressed by 642 cDNA expression clones found to be sero-reactive in both breast tumour patients and controls. The sero-reactive proteins and the corresponding peptides were used for the production of protein and peptide microarrays. Serum samples from females with benign and malignant breast tumours and healthy control sera (n=16 per group were then analysed. Correct classification of the serum samples on peptide microarrays were 78% for discrimination of ‘malignant versus healthy controls’, 72% for ‘benign versus malignant’ and 94% for ‘benign versus controls’. On protein arrays, correct classification for these contrasts was 69%, 59% and 59%, respectively. The over-representation analysis of the classifiers derived from class prediction showed enrichment of genes associated with ribosomes, spliceosomes, endocytosis and the pentose phosphate pathway. Sequence analyses of the peptides with the highest sero-reactivity demonstrated enrichment of the zinc-finger domain. Peptides’ sero-reactivities were found negatively correlated with hydrophobicity and positively correlated with positive charge, high inter-residue protein contact energies and a secondary structure propensity bias. This study hints at the possibility of using in silico designed antigenic peptide microarrays as an alternative to protein microarrays for the improvement of tumour auto-antibody based diagnostics.

  15. Identifying Genes Responsible for Tamoxifen Resistance in Breast Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Meijer (Daniëlle)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBreast cancer is one of the leading causes of death of women in western countries. It affects one out of eight females in the USA (1) and one out of nine females in The Netherlands (www.kankerregistratie.nl) during their lifetime. Many risk factors for breast cancer have been identified

  16. Serum tumour markers as a diagnostic and prognostic tool in Libyan breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfagieh, Mohamed; Abdalla, Fathi; Gliwan, Asma; Boder, Jamela; Nichols, Wafa; Buhmeida, Abdelbaset

    2012-12-01

    Results from studies on efficacy of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), carbohydrate antigen 15.3 (CA 15.3) and thymidine kinase (TK1) as diagnostic and prognostic tools for primary breast cancer (BC) have presented conflicting results, and usefulness of these markers for clinical use in BC remains unclear. The aim of this study is to evaluate potential of concentration of the sera CEA, CA15.3 and TK1 peptides' use as markers in the diagnosis and prognosis of breast lesions of Libyan patients. Serum tumour markers were studied in 20 healthy subjects, 30 patient with benign lesion diseases and 50 patients with histologically confirmed BC diagnosed at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), Misurata, Libya during the period 2005-2009. The concentrations of the BC patients' cutoff points used for diagnostic and prognostic sensitivity were 8.82 ng/ml, 35.57 U/ml and 32.57 U/mg/protein for CEA, CA15.3 and TK1, respectively. Increased CEA (>8.82 ng/ml), CA 15.3 (>35.57 U/ml) and TK1 (>32.57 U/mg/protein) concentrations were found in 62 %, 70 % and 78 % of the BC patients, respectively. For all three tumour markers, increased concentrations correlated increased tumour size and nodal involvement. Significantly higher serum TK1 levels were found in patients with advanced disease (p < 0.0001) and TK1 levels also correlated with disease-specific survival (DSS, p < 0.07). The combined data set of the three markers' data from three markers increased the diagnostic sensitivity to 90 %. The serum marker analysis for CEA, CA 15.3, and S-TK1 concentrations is shown to be a useful tool for identification of malignant cases in our BC population and for the prognostic evaluation of patients with primary BC. Increased concentrations of the markers were also observed to be higher in patients with advanced tumours and indicative of the development of distant metastasis.

  17. Targeted intraoperative radiotherapy tumour bed boost during breast-conserving surgery after neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolberg, Hans-Christian; Akpolat-Basci, Leyla; Stephanou, Miltiades [Marienhospital Bottrop gGmbH, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Bottrop (Germany); Loevey, Gyoergy [BORAD, Bottrop (Germany); Fasching, Peter A. [University of Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Untch, Michael [Helios Klinikum Berlin-Buch, Berlin (Germany); Liedtke, Cornelia [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein/Campus Luebeck, Luebeck (Germany); Bulsara, Max [University of Notre Dame, Fremantle (Australia); University College, London (United Kingdom); Vaidya, Jayant S. [University College, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-01-15

    The use of targeted intraoperative radiotherapy (TARGIT-IORT) as a tumour bed boost during breast-conserving surgery (BCS) for breast cancer has been reported since 1998. We present its use in patients undergoing breast conservation following neoadjuvant therapy (NACT). In this retrospective study involving 116 patients after NACT we compared outcomes of 61 patients who received a tumour bed boost with IORT during lumpectomy versus 55 patients treated in the previous 13 months with external (EBRT) boost. All patients received whole breast radiotherapy. Local recurrence-free survival (LRFS), disease-free survival (DFS), distant disease-free survival (DDFS), breast cancer mortality (BCM), non-breast cancer mortality (NBCM) and overall mortality (OS) were compared. Median follow up was 49 months. The differences in LRFS, DFS and BCM were not statistically significant. The 5-year Kaplan-Meier estimate of OS was significantly better by 15% with IORT: IORT 2 events (96.7%, 95%CI 87.5-99.2), EBRT 9 events (81.7%, 95%CI 67.6-90.1), hazard ratio (HR) 0.19 (0.04-0.87), log rank p = 0.016, mainly due to a reduction of 10.1% in NBCM: IORT 100%, EBRT 89.9% (77.3-95.7), HR (not calculable), log rank p = 0.015. The DDFS was as follows: IORT 3 events (95.1%, 85.5-98.4), EBRT 12 events (69.0%, 49.1-82.4), HR 0.23 (0.06-0.80), log rank p = 0.012. IORT during lumpectomy after neoadjuvant chemotherapy as a tumour bed boost appears to give results that are not worse than external beam radiotherapy boost. These data give further support to the inclusion of such patients in the TARGIT-B (boost) randomised trial that is testing whether IORT boost is superior to EBRT boost. (orig.) [German] Die intraoperative Radiotherapie (TARGIT-IORT) als vorgezogener Boost im Rahmen der brusterhaltenden Therapie (BET) ist seit 1998 Gegenstand der wissenschaftlichen Diskussion. Wir praesentieren Daten zum Einsatz der IORT bei der BET nach neoadjuvanter Therapie (NACT). In diese retrospektive Analyse

  18. Alterations of monocarboxylate transporter densities during hypoxia in brain and breast tumour cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheng, Chang; Edin, Nina F Jeppesen; Lauritzen, Knut H;

    2012-01-01

    Tumour cells are characterized by aerobic glycolysis, which provides biomass for tumour proliferation and leads to extracellular acidification through efflux of lactate via monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs). Deficient and spasm-prone tumour vasculature causes variable hypoxia, which favours...

  19. Is there a requirement for axillary lymph node dissection following identification of micro-metastasis or isolated tumour cells at sentinel node biopsy for breast cancer?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Joyce, D P

    2012-02-29

    INTRODUCTION: Recent decades have seen a significant shift towards conservative management of the axilla. Increasingly, immunohistochemical analysis of sentinel nodes leads to the detection of small tumour deposits, the significance of which remains uncertain. The aims of this study are to examine patients whose sentinel lymph nodes are positive for macro-metastasis, micro-metastasis or isolated tumour cells (ITCs) and to determine the rate of further nodal disease after axillary lymph node dissection (ALND). METHODS: A retrospective analysis of all patients undergoing a sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) between January 2007 and December 2010 in a tertiary referral breast unit was performed. Patients who underwent an axillary lymph node dissection for macro-metastasis, micro-metastasis or ITCs were identified. Demographics, histological data and the rate of further axillary disease were examined. RESULTS: In total, 664 breast cancer patients attended the symptomatic breast unit during the study period, 360 of whom underwent a SLNB. Seventy patients had a SLNB positive for macro-metastasis. All of these patients underwent ALND. A positive SLNB with either micro-metastasis or ITCs was identified in 58 patients. Only 41 of the 58 patients went on to have an ALND, due primarily to variations in surgeons\\' preferences. Nineteen patients with micro-metastasis underwent an ALND. Four patients had further axillary disease (21%). Twenty-two patients had ITCs identified, of whom only one had further disease (4.5%). No statistically significant difference was found between the two groups in terms of tumour size, grade, lymphovascular invasion or oestrogen receptor status. CONCLUSION: ALND should be considered in patients with micro-metastasis at SLNB. It should rarely be employed in the setting of SLNB positive for ITCs.

  20. Cooverexpression of EpCAM and c-myc genes in malignant breast tumours

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SAMIRA SADEGHI; ZOHREH HOJATI; HOSSEIN TABATABAEIAN

    2017-03-01

    The overexpression of epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), a proto-oncogene, affects progression, treatment, and diagnosis of many adenocarcinomas. C-myc has been shown to be a downstream target of EpCAM and is also one of the most important proto-oncogenes routinely overexpressed in breast cancer. However, cooverexpression of EpCAM and c-mycgenes has not been investigated in breast cancer tissues, particularly in Iranian population. The aim of this study was to assess the expression of EpCAM and c-myc genes in malignant breast cancer tissues using reverse transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) followed by analyses of the association between the outcomes. In this study, 122 fresh tissues, including 104 malignant and 18 benign samples, were disrupted by mortar and pestle, and then the RNA was isolated from the samples and converted to cDNA. The relative expression levels of EpCAM and c-myc genes were measured by2−ΔΔCt method using RT-qPCR. EpCAM protein level was also assessed in 66 cases using Western blot technique. UsingRT-qPCR method, our results showed that EpCAM was overexpressed in 48% of malignant and 11.1% of benign samples. Evaluating EpCAM protein overexpression in a portion of samples depicted the fully concordance rate between Western blot and RT-qPCR techniques. C-myc expression was first evaluated by RT-qPCR method, showing the overexpression rate of 39%and 28% in malignant and benign samples, respectively. These data were also quite concordant with the clinically available immunohistochemistry reports of the same samples studied in this study. Importantly, overexpression of EpCAM and c-myc was significantly associated and showed an agreement of 57.3%. This study demonstrated the cooverexpression of EpCAM and c-myc in breast tumours collected from breast cancer patients of the Iranian population. EpCAM and c-myc positive cases were significantly associated with reduced and enhanced risk of ER/PR positivity

  1. Screening of 1331 Danish breast and/or ovarian cancer families identified 40 novel BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas V O; Jønson, Lars; Steffensen, Ane Y;

    2011-01-01

    Germ-line mutations in the tumour suppressor genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 predispose to breast and ovarian cancer. Since 1999 we have performed mutational screening of breast and/or ovarian cancer patients in East Denmark. During this period we have identified 40 novel sequence variations in BRCA1...... and BRCA2 in high risk breast and/or ovarian cancer families. The mutations were detected via pre-screening using dHPLC or high-resolution melting and direct sequencing. We identified 16 variants in BRCA1, including 9 deleterious frame-shift mutations, 2 intronic variants, 4 missense mutations, and 1...... interpreted as pathogenic, 3 missense mutations were suggested to be pathogenic based on in silico analysis, 6 mutations were suggested to be benign since they were identified in patients together with a well-known disease-causing BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation, while 12 were variants of unknown significance....

  2. Screening of 1331 Danish breast and/or ovarian cancer families identified 40 novel BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas V O; Jønson, Lars; Steffensen, Ane Y;

    2011-01-01

    Germ-line mutations in the tumour suppressor genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 predispose to breast and ovarian cancer. Since 1999 we have performed mutational screening of breast and/or ovarian cancer patients in East Denmark. During this period we have identified 40 novel sequence variations in BRCA1...... and BRCA2 in high risk breast and/or ovarian cancer families. The mutations were detected via pre-screening using dHPLC or high-resolution melting and direct sequencing. We identified 16 variants in BRCA1, including 9 deleterious frame-shift mutations, 2 intronic variants, 4 missense mutations, and 1...... synonymous variant. The remaining 24 variants were identified in BRCA2, including 10 deleterious mutants (6 frame-shift and 4 nonsense), 2 intronic variants, 10 missense mutations and 2 synonymous variants. The frequency of the variants of unknown significance was examined in control individuals. Moreover...

  3. Giant desmoid tumour of the thorax following latissimus dorsi and implant breast reconstruction: case report and review of the literature

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Collins, AM

    2017-03-01

    The case of a giant thoracic desmoid tumour in a 44-year-old woman, who presented two years following a breast reconstruction with a latissimus dorsi (LD) flap and implant, is reported. Clinical findings included a rapidly growing, painless mass. Computed tomography (CT) suggested skin and intercostal soft tissue invasion. The tumour was resected en bloc with the LD muscle, implant capsule and underlying rib segments. The resultant thoracic and abdominal wall defects were reconstructed with Dualmesh® and polypropylene meshes respectively. There was no evidence of recurrence at thirty-six months follow-up.

  4. Diffusion-weighted imaging of breast tumours at 3 Tesla and 7 Tesla: a comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruber, S.; Minarikova, L.; Zaric, O.; Chmelik, M.; Strasser, B.; Trattnig, S.; Bogner, W. [Medical University Vienna, MRCE, Department of Biomedical imaging and Image-Guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Clinical Molecular MR Imaging, Vienna (Austria); Pinker, K.; Baltzer, P.; Helbich, T. [Medical University Vienna, Division of Molecular and Gender Imaging, Department of Biomedical imaging and Image-Guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria)

    2016-05-15

    To compare bilateral diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) at 3 T and 7 T in the same breast tumour patients. Twenty-eight patients were included in this IRB-approved study (mean age 56 ± 16 years). Before contrast-enhanced imaging, bilateral DWI with b = 0 and 850 s/mm{sup 2} was performed in 2:56 min (3 T) and 3:48 min (7 T), using readout-segmented echo planar imaging (rs-EPI) with a 1.4 x 1.4 mm{sup 2} (3 T)/0.9 x 0.9 mm{sup 2} (7 T) in-plane resolution. Apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC), signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) were assessed. Twenty-eight lesions were detected (18 malignant, 10 benign). CNR and SNR were comparable at both field strengths (p > 0.3). Mean ADC values at 7 T were 4-22 % lower than at 3 T (p ≤ 0.03). An ADC threshold of 1.275 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s resulted in a diagnostic specificity of 90 % at both field strengths. The sensitivity was 94 % and 100 % at 3 T and 7 T, respectively. 7-T DWI of the breast can be performed with 2.4-fold higher spatial resolution than 3 T, without significant differences in SNR if compared to 3 T. (orig.)

  5. Identification of six potential markers for the detection of circulating canine mammary tumour cells in the peripheral blood identified by microarray analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, A; Lenze, D; Hummel, M; Kohn, B; Gruber, A D; Klopfleisch, R

    2012-01-01

    The presence of circulating tumour cells (CTCs) in the peripheral blood is a prognostic factor for survival of human breast cancer patients. CTCs in the peripheral blood of dogs with mammary tumours have not been reported definitively. The present pilot study identifies mRNA markers for CTCs by comparing the transcriptome of canine mammary carcinoma cell lines CMM26 and CMM115 and peripheral blood leucocytes (PBLs). Genes with a 200-fold or higher mRNA expression in carcinoma cell lines were tested for specificity and sensitivity to detect CTCs using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Six mRNA markers, AGR2, ATP8B1, CRYAB, F3 IRX3 and SLC1A1 were expressed in cell lines, but not PBL. All PCRs were able to detect one carcinoma cell admixed in 10(6) or more PBLs. The six mRNA markers may be suitable for detection of canine mammary CTCs and allow the analysis of their spatiotemporal distribution in dogs with mammary tumours.

  6. NMD inhibition fails to identify tumour suppressor genes in microsatellite stable gastric cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ylstra Bauke

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gastric cancers frequently show chromosomal alterations which can cause activation of oncogenes, and/or inactivation of tumour suppressor genes. In gastric cancer several chromosomal regions are described to be frequently lost, but for most of the regions, no tumour suppressor genes have been identified yet. The present study aimed to identify tumour suppressor genes inactivated by nonsense mutation and deletion in gastric cancer by means of GINI (gene identification by nonsense mediated decay inhibition and whole genome copy number analysis. Methods Two non-commercial gastric cancer cell lines, GP202 and IPA220, were transfected with siRNA directed against UPF1, to specifically inhibit the nonsense mediated decay (NMD pathway, and with siRNA directed against non-specific siRNA duplexes (CVII as a control. Microarray expression experiments were performed in triplicate on 4 × 44 K Agilent arrays by hybridizing RNA from UPF1-transfected cells against non-specific CVII-transfected cells. In addition, array CGH of the two cell lines was performed on 4 × 44K agilent arrays to obtain the DNA copy number profiles. Mutation analysis of GINI candidates was performed by sequencing. Results UPF1 expression was reduced for >70% and >80% in the GP202 and IPA220 gastric cancer cell lines, respectively. Integration of array CGH and microarray expression data provided a list of 134 and 50 candidate genes inactivated by nonsense mutation and deletion for GP202 and IPA220, respectively. We selected 12 candidate genes for mutation analysis. Of these, sequence analysis was performed on 11 genes. One gene, PLA2G4A, showed a silent mutation, and in two genes, CTSA and PTPRJ, missense mutations were detected. No nonsense mutations were detected in any of the 11 genes tested. Conclusion Although UPF1 was substantially repressed, thus resulting in the inhibition of the NMD system, we did not find genes inactivated by nonsense mutations. Our results

  7. ApoA-I mimetic administration, but not increased apoA-I-containing HDL, inhibits tumour growth in a mouse model of inherited breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedó, Lídia; García-León, Annabel; Baila-Rueda, Lucía; Santos, David; Grijalva, Victor; Martínez-Cignoni, Melanie Raquel; Carbó, José M.; Metso, Jari; López-Vilaró, Laura; Zorzano, Antonio; Valledor, Annabel F.; Cenarro, Ana; Jauhiainen, Matti; Lerma, Enrique; Fogelman, Alan M.; Reddy, Srinivasa T.; Escolà-Gil, Joan Carles; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLc) have been associated with breast cancer risk, but several epidemiologic studies have reported contradictory results with regard to the relationship between apolipoprotein (apo) A-I and breast cancer. We aimed to determine the effects of human apoA-I overexpression and administration of specific apoA-I mimetic peptide (D-4F) on tumour progression by using mammary tumour virus-polyoma middle T-antigen transgenic (PyMT) mice as a model of inherited breast cancer. Expression of human apoA-I in the mice did not affect tumour onset and growth in PyMT transgenic mice, despite an increase in the HDLc level. In contrast, D-4F treatment significantly increased tumour latency and inhibited the development of tumours. The effects of D-4F on tumour development were independent of 27-hydroxycholesterol. However, D-4F treatment reduced the plasma oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) levels in mice and prevented oxLDL-mediated proliferative response in human breast adenocarcinoma MCF-7 cells. In conclusion, our study shows that D-4F, but not apoA-I-containing HDL, hinders tumour growth in mice with inherited breast cancer in association with a higher protection against LDL oxidative modification. PMID:27808249

  8. Occupation as a risk identifier for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, C H; Burnett, C A; Halperin, W E; Seligman, P J

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. Breast cancer mortality may be reduced if the disease is detected early through targeted screening programs. Current screening guidelines are based solely on a woman's age. Because working populations are accessible for intervention, occupational identification may be a way of helping to define and locate risk groups and target prevention. METHODS. We used a database consisting of 2.9 million occupationally coded death certificates collected from 23 states between 1979 and 1987 to calculate age-adjusted, race-specific proportionate mortality ratios for breast cancer according to occupation. We performed case-control analyses on occupational groups and on stratifications within the teaching profession. RESULTS. We found a number of significant associations between occupation and frequency of breast cancer. For example, white female professional, managerial, and clerical workers all had high proportions of breast cancer death. High rates of breast cancer in teachers were found in both proportionate mortality ratio and case-control analyses. CONCLUSIONS. These findings may serve as in an aid in the effective targeting of work-site health promotion programs. They suggest that occupationally coded mortality data can be a useful adjunct in the difficult task of identifying groups at risk of preventable disease. PMID:8363008

  9. Comparison of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and technetium-99m methoxyisobutylisonitrile scintimammography in the detection of breast tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmedo, H.; Bender, H.; Gruenwald, F.; Zamora, P.; Biersack, H.J. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Bonn (Germany); Mallmann, P.; Krebs, D. [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, University of Bonn (Germany)

    1997-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare, in breast cancer patients, the diagnostic accuracy of positron emission tomography (PET) using fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and scintimammography (SMM) using technetium-99m methoxyisobutylisonitrile (MIBI). A total of 20 patients (40 breasts with 22 lesions) were evaluated serially with MIBI and, on the following day, with FDG. For SMM, planar and single-photon emission tomography imaging in the prone position was performed starting at 10 min following the injection of MIBI (740 MBq). For PET, scans were acquired 45-60 min after the injection of FDG (370 MBq) and attentuation correction was performed following transmission scans. Results from SMM and PET were subsequently compared with the histopathology results. True-positive results were obtained in 12/13 primary breast cancers (mean diameter=29 mm, range 8-53 mm) with both FDG and MIBI. False-negative results were obtained in two local recurrences (diameter <9 mm) with both FDG and MIBI. In benign disease, FDG and MIBI did not localize three fibrocystic lesions, two fibroadenomas and one inflammatory lesion (true-negative), but both localized one fibroadenoma (false-positive). Collectively, the results demonstrate a sensitivity of 92%, and a specificity of 86%, for primary breast cancer regardless of whether FDG or MIBI was used. In contrast to MIBI scintigraphy, FDG PET scored the axillae correctly as either positive (metastatic disease) or negative (no axillary disease) in all 12 patients. The tumour/non-tumour ratio for MIBI was 1.97 (range 1.43-3.1). The mean standard uptake value (SUV) for FDG uptake was 2.57 (range 0.3-6.2). The diagnostic accuracy of SMM was equivalent to that of FDG PET for the detection of primary breast cancer. For the detection of in situ lymph node metastases of the axilla, FDG seems to be more sensitive than {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI. (orig.). With 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Liposomal Nanoparticles Carrying anti-IL6R Antibody to the Tumour Microenvironment Inhibit Metastasis in Two Molecular Subtypes of Breast Cancer Mouse Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chunlei; Chen, Yanan; Gao, Wenjuan; Chang, Antao; Ye, Yujie; Shen, Wenzhi; Luo, Yunping; Yang, Shengyong; Sun, Peiqing; Xiang, Rong; Li, Na

    2017-01-01

    Tumour microenvironment (TME) contributes significantly towards potentiating the stemness and metastasis properties of cancer cells. IL6-Stat3 is one of the important cell signaling pathways in mediating the communication between tumour and immune cells. Here, we have systematically developed a novel anti-CD44 antibody-mediated liposomal nanoparticle delivery system loaded with anti-IL6R antibody, which could specifically target the TME of CD44+ breast cancer cells in different mouse models for triple negative and luminal breast cancer. This nanoparticle had an enhanced and specific tumour targeting efficacy with dramatic anti-tumour metastasis effects in syngeneic BALB/c mice bearing 4T1 cells as was in the syngeneic MMTV-PyMT mice. It inhibited IL6R-Stat3 signaling and moderated the TME, characterized by the reduced expression of genes encoding Stat3, Sox2, VEGFA, MMP-9 and CD206 in the breast tissues. Furthermore, this nanoparticle reduced the subgroups of Sox2+ and CD206+ cells in the lung metastatic foci, demonstrating its inhibitory effect on the lung metastatic niche for breast cancer stem cells. Taken together, the CD44 targeted liposomal nanoparticles encapsulating anti-IL6R antibody achieved a significant effect to inhibit the metastasis of breast cancer in different molecular subtypes of breast cancer mouse models. Our results shed light on the application of nanoparticle mediated cancer immune-therapy through targeting TME. PMID:28255366

  11. Using tumour phylogenetics to identify the roots of metastasis in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naxerova, Kamila; Jain, Rakesh K

    2015-05-01

    In cancer, much uncertainty remains regarding the origins of metastatic disease. Models of metastatic progression offer competing views on when dissemination occurs (at an early or late stage of tumour development), whether metastases at different sites arise independently and directly from the primary tumour or give rise to each other, and whether dynamic cell exchange occurs between synchronously growing lesions. Although it is probable that many routes can lead to the establishment of systemic disease, clinical observations suggest that distinct modes of metastasis might prevail in different tumour types. Gaining a more-comprehensive understanding of the evolutionary processes that underlie metastasis is not only relevant from a basic biological perspective, but also has profound clinical implications. The 'tree of life' of metastatic cancer contains answers to many outstanding questions about the development of systemic disease, but has only been reconstructed in a limited number of patients. Here we review available data on the phylogenetic relationships between primary solid tumours and their metastases, and examine to what degree they support different models of metastatic progression. We provide a description of experimental methods for lineage tracing in human cancer, ranging from broad DNA-sequencing approaches to more-targeted techniques, and discuss their respective benefits and caveats. Finally, we propose future research questions in the area of cancer phylogenetics.

  12. Inhibition of Wnt signalling and breast tumour growth by the multi-purpose drug suramin through suppression of heterotrimeric G proteins and Wnt endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koval, Alexey; Ahmed, Kamal; Katanaev, Vladimir L

    2016-02-15

    Overactivation of the Wnt signalling pathway underlies oncogenic transformation and proliferation in many cancers, including the triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), the deadliest form of tumour in the breast, taking about a quarter of a million lives annually worldwide. No clinically approved targeted therapies attacking Wnt signalling currently exist. Repositioning of approved drugs is a promising approach in drug discovery. In the present study we show that a multi-purpose drug suramin inhibits Wnt signalling and proliferation of TNBC cells in vitro and in mouse models, inhibiting a component in the upper levels of the pathway. Through a set of investigations we identify heterotrimeric G proteins and regulation of Wnt endocytosis as the likely target of suramin in this pathway. G protein-dependent endocytosis of plasma membrane-located components of the Wnt pathway was previously shown to be important for amplification of the signal in this cascade. Our data identify endocytic regulation within Wnt signalling as a promising target for anti-Wnt and anti-cancer drug discovery. Suramin, as the first example of such drug or its analogues might pave the way for the appearance of first-in-class targeted therapies against TNBC and other Wnt-dependent cancers.

  13. Gallic acid indanone and mangiferin xanthone are strong determinants of immunosuppressive anti-tumour effects of Mangifera indica L. bark in MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Rivera, Dagmar; Delgado, René; Bougarne, Nadia; Haegeman, Guy; Berghe, Wim Vanden

    2011-06-01

    Vimang is a standardized extract derived from Mango bark (Mangifera Indica L.), commonly used as anti-inflammatory phytomedicine, which has recently been used to complement cancer therapies in cancer patients. We have further investigated potential anti-tumour effects of glucosylxanthone mangiferin and indanone gallic acid, which are both present in Vimang extract. We observed significant anti-tumour effects of both Vimang constituents in the highly aggressive and metastatic breast cancer cell type MDA-MB231. At the molecular level, mangiferin and gallic acid both inhibit classical NFκB activation by IKKα/β kinases, which results in impaired IκB degradation, NFκB translocation and NFκB/DNA binding. In contrast to the xanthone mangiferin, gallic acid further inhibits additional NFκB pathways involved in cancer cell survival and therapy resistance, such as MEK1, JNK1/2, MSK1, and p90RSK. This results in combinatorial inhibition of NFκB activity by gallic acid, which results in potent inhibition of NFκB target genes involved in inflammation, metastasis, anti-apoptosis and angiogenesis, such as IL-6, IL-8, COX2, CXCR4, XIAP, bcl2, VEGF. The cumulative NFκB inhibition by gallic acid, but not mangiferin, is also reflected at the level of cell survival, which reveals significant tumour cytotoxic effects in MDA-MB231 cells. Altogether, we identify gallic acid, besides mangiferin, as an essential anti-cancer component in Vimang extract, which demonstrates multifocal inhibition of NFκB activity in the cancer-inflammation network.

  14. Lack of TIMP-1 tumour cell immunoreactivity predicts effect of adjuvant anthracycline-based chemotherapy in patients (n=647) with primary breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willemoe, Gro L.; Hertel, Pernille Bræmer; Bartels, Annette;

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: A number of prospective studies have shown that adjuvant CEF significantly improves disease-free and overall survival as compared to CMF in breast cancer patients. Our aim was to determine whether the benefit of epirubicin versus methotrexate differs according to TIMP-1 tumour cell...

  15. Extended neoadjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced breast cancer combined with GM-CSF: effect on tumour-draining lymph node dendritic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pinedo, H.M.; Buter, J.; Luykx-de Bakker, S.A.; Pohlmann, P.R.; Hensbergen, Y. van; Heideman, D.A.M.; Diest, P.J. van; Gruijl, T.D. de; Wall, E. van der

    2003-01-01

    The effect of long-term administration of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) on dendritic cell (DC) activation and survival in patients with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) was studied. To this end, the number of activated DC (i.e. positive for the marker S100) in tumour

  16. An autopsy case of acute cor pulmonale and paradoxical systemic embolism due to tumour cell microemboli in a patient with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uga, Sayuri; Ikeda, Shuntaro; Matsukage, Sho-ichi; Hamada, Mareomi

    2012-09-30

    A 62-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of severe respiratory distress. Diagnostic imaging studies suggested the existence of inexplicable cor pulmonale. Although we immediately sought the aetiology of her severe condition, she died suddenly on the fourth day after admission. Postmortem autopsy revealed tumour cell microemboli in the small pulmonary arteries. In addition, tumour cell embolisation identical to that in primary breast cancer cells was also observed in microvessels in systemic multiple organs, such as the liver, brain, kidneys, spleen, uterus, bone marrow and adrenal glands-with simultaneous findings of peripheral infarction. Systemic tumour cell embolism mediated through the patent foramen ovale superimposed on pulmonary tumour cell emboli (PTCE) is considered to be the mechanism underlying inexplicable cor pulmonale. The rapid aggravation of her condition terminated in death.

  17. Using Breast Cancer Risk Associated Polymorphisms to Identify Women for Breast Cancer Chemoprevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziv, Elad; Tice, Jeffrey A.; Sprague, Brian; Vachon, Celine M.; Cummings, Steven R.; Kerlikowske, Karla

    2017-01-01

    Background Breast cancer can be prevented with selective estrogen receptor modifiers (SERMs) and aromatase inhibitors (AIs). The US Preventive Services Task Force recommends that women with a 5-year breast cancer risk ≥3% consider chemoprevention for breast cancer. More than 70 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been associated with breast cancer. We sought to determine how to best integrate risk information from SNPs with other risk factors to risk stratify women for chemoprevention. Methods We used the risk distribution among women ages 35–69 estimated by the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (BCSC) risk model. We modeled the effect of adding 70 SNPs to the BCSC model and examined how this would affect how many women are reclassified above and below the threshold for chemoprevention. Results We found that most of the benefit of SNP testing a population is achieved by testing a modest fraction of the population. For example, if women with a 5-year BCSC risk of >2.0% are tested (~21% of all women), ~75% of the benefit of testing all women (shifting women above or below 3% 5-year risk) would be derived. If women with a 5-year risk of >1.5% are tested (~36% of all women), ~90% of the benefit of testing all women would be derived. Conclusion SNP testing is effective for reclassification of women for chemoprevention, but is unlikely to reclassify women with <1.5% 5-year risk. These results can be used to implement an efficient two-step testing approach to identify high risk women who may benefit from chemoprevention. PMID:28107349

  18. Primary radiotherapy after tumour excision as an alternative to mastectomy for early breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Browde, S.; Nissenbaum, M.M. (University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa))

    1983-09-28

    A conservative approach to the management of breast cancer is gaining acceptance. The evidence from many retrospective and prospective studies indicates that breast-preserving surgery and radiation therapy give results equal to those of mastectomy. Relapse affecting the breast alone has been shown not to be detrimental to survival, while the psychological benefits to the patients have been gratifying. A prospective study of early breast cancer treated by conservative surgery and radiation was commenced at the Johannesburg Hospital in 1980. The results in 57 patients are reported. So far there have been 2 cases of local recurrence. In the majority of cases satisfactory cosmetic results were achieved. It is considered that lumpectomy with axillary dissection to establish nodal status followed by irradiation is the treatment of choice for stage l and ll carcinoma of the breast.

  19. Analysis of the effects of exposure to acute hypoxia on oxidative lesions and tumour progression in a transgenic mouse breast cancer model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lunt Sarah

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumour hypoxia is known to be a poor prognostic indicator, predictive of increased risk of metastatic disease and reduced survival. Genomic instability has been proposed as one of the potential mechanisms for hypoxic tumour progression. Both of these features are commonly found in many cancer types, but their relationship and association with tumour progression has not been examined in the same model. Methods To address this issue, we determined the effects of 6 week in vivo acute hypoxic exposure on the levels of mutagenic lipid peroxidation product, malondialdehyde, and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine DNA (8-oxo-dG lesions in the transgenic polyomavirus middle T (PyMT breast cancer mouse model. Results We observed significantly increased plasma lipid peroxidation and 8-oxo-dG lesion levels in the hypoxia-exposed mice. Consumption of malondialdehyde also induced a significant increase in the PyMT tumour DNA lesion levels, however, these increases did not translate into enhanced tumour progression. We further showed that the in vivo exposure to acute hypoxia induced accumulation of F4/80 positive tumour-associated macrophages (TAMs, demonstrating a relationship between hypoxia and macrophages in an experimental model. Conclusion These data suggest that although exposure to acute hypoxia causes an increase in 8-oxo-dG lesions and TAMs in the PyMT tumours, these increases do not translate into significant changes in tumour progression at the primary or metastatic levels in this strong viral oncogene-driven breast cancer model.

  20. Wide-field optical coherence elastography for intraoperative assessment of tumour margins in breast cancer (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Wes M.; Chin, Lixin; Sampson, David D.; Kennedy, Brendan F.

    2016-03-01

    Incomplete excision of tumour margins is a major issue in breast-conserving surgery. Currently 20 - 60% of cases require a second surgical procedure required as a result of cancer recurrence. A number of techniques have been proposed to assess margin status, including frozen section analysis and imprint cytology. However, the recurrence rate after using these techniques remains very high. Over the last several years, our group has been developing optical coherence elastography (OCE) as a tool for the intraoperative assessment of tumour margins in breast cancer. We have reported a feasibility study on 65 ex vivo samples from patients undergoing mastectomy or wide local excision demonstrates the potential of OCE in differentiating benign from malignant tissue. In this study, malignant tissue was readily distinguished from surrounding relative tissue by a distinctive heterogeneous pattern in micro-elastograms. To date the largest field of view for a micro-elastogram is 20 x 20mm, however, lumpectomy samples are typically ~50 x 50 x 30mm. For OCE to progress as a useful clinical tool, elastograms must be acquired over larger areas to allow a greater portion of the surface area of lumpectomies to be assessed. Here, we propose a wide-field OCE scanner that utilizes a piezoelectric transducer with an internal diameter of 65mm. In this approach partially overlapped elastograms are stitched together forming a mosaic with overall dimensions of 50 x 50mm in a total acquisition time of 15 - 30 minutes. We present results using this approach on both tissue-mimicking phantoms and tissue, and discuss prospects for shorter acquisitions times.

  1. Combining phenotypic and proteomic approaches to identify membrane targets in a ‘triple negative’ breast cancer cell type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rust Steven

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The continued discovery of therapeutic antibodies, which address unmet medical needs, requires the continued discovery of tractable antibody targets. Multiple protein-level target discovery approaches are available and these can be used in combination to extensively survey relevant cell membranomes. In this study, the MDA-MB-231 cell line was selected for membranome survey as it is a ‘triple negative’ breast cancer cell line, which represents a cancer subtype that is aggressive and has few treatment options. Methods The MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cell line was used to explore three membranome target discovery approaches, which were used in parallel to cross-validate the significance of identified antigens. A proteomic approach, which used membrane protein enrichment followed by protein identification by mass spectrometry, was used alongside two phenotypic antibody screening approaches. The first phenotypic screening approach was based on hybridoma technology and the second was based on phage display technology. Antibodies isolated by the phenotypic approaches were tested for cell specificity as well as internalisation and the targets identified were compared to each other as well as those identified by the proteomic approach. An anti-CD73 antibody derived from the phage display-based phenotypic approach was tested for binding to other ‘triple negative’ breast cancer cell lines and tested for tumour growth inhibitory activity in a MDA-MB-231 xenograft model. Results All of the approaches identified multiple cell surface markers, including integrins, CD44, EGFR, CD71, galectin-3, CD73 and BCAM, some of which had been previously confirmed as being tractable to antibody therapy. In total, 40 cell surface markers were identified for further study. In addition to cell surface marker identification, the phenotypic antibody screening approaches provided reagent antibodies for target validation studies. This is illustrated

  2. Minimal residual disease in breast cancer: an overview of circulating and disseminated tumour cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachtsidis, A; McInnes, L M; Jacobsen, N; Thompson, E W; Saunders, C M

    2016-08-01

    Within the field of cancer research, focus on the study of minimal residual disease (MRD) in the context of carcinoma has grown exponentially over the past several years. MRD encompasses circulating tumour cells (CTCs)-cancer cells on the move via the circulatory or lymphatic system, disseminated tumour cells (DTCs)-cancer cells which have escaped into a distant site (most studies have focused on bone marrow), and resistant cancer cells surviving therapy-be they local or distant, all of which may ultimately give rise to local relapse or overt metastasis. Initial studies simply recorded the presence and number of CTCs and DTCs; however recent advances are allowing assessment of the relationship between their persistence, patient prognosis and the biological properties of MRD, leading to a better understanding of the metastatic process. Technological developments for the isolation and analysis of circulating and disseminated tumour cells continue to emerge, creating new opportunities to monitor disease progression and perhaps alter disease outcome. This review outlines our knowledge to date on both measurement and categorisation of MRD in the form of CTCs and DTCs with respect to how this relates to cancer outcomes, and the hurdles and future of research into both CTCs and DTCs.

  3. Telomere fusion threshold identifies a poor prognostic subset of breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, K; Jones, R E; Grimstead, J W; Hills, R; Pepper, C; Baird, D M

    2015-06-01

    Telomere dysfunction and fusion can drive genomic instability and clonal evolution in human tumours, including breast cancer. Telomere length is a critical determinant of telomere function and has been evaluated as a prognostic marker in several tumour types, but it has yet to be used in the clinical setting. Here we show that high-resolution telomere length analysis, together with a specific telomere fusion threshold, is highly prognostic for overall survival in a cohort of patients diagnosed with invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast (n = 120). The telomere fusion threshold defined a small subset of patients with an extremely poor clinical outcome, with a median survival of less than 12 months (HR = 21.4 (7.9-57.6), P telomere length threshold was independent of ER, PGR, HER2 status, NPI, or grade and was the dominant variable in multivariate analysis. We conclude that the fusogenic telomere length threshold provides a powerful, independent prognostic marker with clinical utility in breast cancer. Larger prospective studies are now required to determine the optimal way to incorporate high-resolution telomere length analysis into multivariate prognostic algorithms for patients diagnosed with breast cancer.

  4. Bony metastases from breast cancer - a study of foetal antigen 2 as a blood tumour marker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iles Ray K

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Foetal antigen 2 (FA-2, first isolated in the amniotic fluid, was shown to be the circulating form of the aminopropeptide of the alpha 1 chain of procollagen type I. Serum concentrations of FA-2 appeared to be elevated in a number of disorders of bone metabolism. This paper is the first report of its role as a marker of bone metabolism in metastatic breast cancer. Methods Serum FA-2 concentrations were measured by radioimmunoassay in 153 women with different stages of breast cancer and in 34 normal controls. Results Serum FA-2 was significantly elevated in women with bony metastases (p Conclusions FA-2 is a promising blood marker of bone metabolism. Further studies to delineate its role in the diagnosis and management of bony metastases from breast cancer are required.

  5. The prognostic value of tumour-stroma ratio in triple-negative breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moorman, A.M.; Vink, R.; Heijmans, H.J.; Palen, van der J.A.M.; Kouwenhoven, E.A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Triple-negative cancer constitutes one of the most challenging groups of breast cancer given its aggressive clinical behaviour, poor outcome and lack of targeted therapy. Until now, profiling techniques have not been able to distinguish between patients with a good and poor outcome. Recen

  6. The sodium channel β1 subunit mediates outgrowth of neurite-like processes on breast cancer cells and promotes tumour growth and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Michaela; Millican-Slater, Rebecca; Forrest, Lorna C; Brackenbury, William J

    2014-11-15

    Voltage-gated Na(+) channels (VGSCs) are heteromeric proteins composed of pore-forming α subunits and smaller β subunits. The β subunits are multifunctional channel modulators and are members of the immunoglobulin superfamily of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs). β1, encoded by SCN1B, is best characterized in the central nervous system (CNS), where it plays a critical role in regulating electrical excitability, neurite outgrowth and migration during development. β1 is also expressed in breast cancer (BCa) cell lines, where it regulates adhesion and migration in vitro. In the present study, we found that SCN1B mRNA/β1 protein were up-regulated in BCa specimens, compared with normal breast tissue. β1 upregulation substantially increased tumour growth and metastasis in a xenograft model of BCa. β1 over-expression also increased vascularization and reduced apoptosis in the primary tumours, and β1 over-expressing tumour cells had an elongate morphology. In vitro, β1 potentiated outgrowth of processes from BCa cells co-cultured with fibroblasts, via trans-homophilic adhesion. β1-mediated process outgrowth in BCa cells required the presence and activity of fyn kinase, and Na(+) current, thus replicating the mechanism by which β1 regulates neurite outgrowth in CNS neurons. We conclude that when present in breast tumours, β1 enhances pathological growth and cellular dissemination. This study is the first demonstration of a functional role for β1 in tumour growth and metastasis in vivo. We propose that β1 warrants further study as a potential biomarker and targeting β1-mediated adhesion interactions may have value as a novel anti-cancer therapy.

  7. Ultrasound-guided diffuse optical tomography (DOT) of invasive breast carcinoma: Does tumour total haemoglobin concentration contribute to the prediction of axillary lymph node status?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Qingli, E-mail: qinglizhu@gmail.com [Department of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Shuaifuyuan 1, Dongcheng District, Beijing 100730 (China); Xiao, Mengsu, E-mail: xiaomengsu_2000@sina.com [Department of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Shuaifuyuan 1, Dongcheng District, Beijing 100730 (China); You, Shanshan, E-mail: shanshan_0531@sina.com [Department of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Shuaifuyuan 1, Dongcheng District, Beijing 100730 (China); Zhang, Jing, E-mail: zhang.jing1029@163.com [Department of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Shuaifuyuan 1, Dongcheng District, Beijing 100730 (China); Jiang, Yuxin, E-mail: yuxinjiangxh@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Shuaifuyuan 1, Dongcheng District, Beijing 100730 (China); Lai, Xingjian, E-mail: lxjpumch@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Shuaifuyuan 1, Dongcheng District, Beijing 100730 (China); Dai, Qing, E-mail: qingdai_2000@yahoo.com [Department of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Shuaifuyuan 1, Dongcheng District, Beijing 100730 (China)

    2012-11-15

    Objectives: To prospectively study the ultrasound-guided near-infrared diffuse optical tomography (DOT) findings of the total haemoglobin concentration (THC) detected in invasive breast carcinomas and its contribution to the prediction of axillary lymph node (LN) status. Methods: A total of 195 invasive breast carcinomas were prospectively studied with DOT before surgery. Lumpectomy or mastectomy with full axillary nodal dissection was performed. Tumour size and THC level were correlated with LN status by a logistic regression analysis. Results: One hundred twenty-four patients (63.59%) was LN(-) and 71 (36.41%) was LN(+). The average THC was significantly higher in the LN(+) group than in the LN(-) group (252.94 {+-} 69.19 {mu}mol/L versus 203.86 {+-} 83.13 {mu}mol/L, P = 0.01). A multivariate analysis showed an independent relationship between the probability of axillary metastasis, elevated THC level (P = 0.01), and tumour size (P = 0.001). The odds ratio with THC {>=} 140 {mu}mol/L was 13.651 (1.781-104.560), whereas that of tumour size with a 1 cm increment was only 1.777 (1.283-2.246). Conclusions: The THC level and the tumour size are independent and preoperative predictors of axillary nodal status; these variables may improve the diagnosis of patients with lymph node metastasis.

  8. Multi-stage genome-wide association study identifies new susceptibility locus for testicular germ cell tumour on chromosome 3q25

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Litchfield, Kevin; Sultana, Razvan; Renwick, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and subsequent meta-analyses have identified over 25 SNPs at 18 loci, together accounting for >15% of the genetic susceptibility to testicular germ cell tumour (TGCT). To identify further common SNPs associated with TGCT, here we report a three...

  9. p53 Expression Helps Identify High Risk Oral Tongue Pre- malignant Lesions and Correlates with Patterns of Invasive Tumour Front and Tumour Depth in Oral Tongue Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viveka, Thangaraj Soundara; Shyamsundar, Vidyarani; Krishnamurthy, Arvind; Ramani, Pratibha; Ramshankar, Vijayalakshmi

    2016-01-01

    Oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC) is the most common oral cancer subtype with a maximum propensity for regional spread. Our objective was to study if p53 expression might have any correlation with aggressive patterns of invasion within oral tongue cancers as well as with the histologically identified degree of oral tongue dysplasia. p53 immunoexpression was studied using immunohistochemistry in early staged OTSCCs (n=155), oral tongue dysplasias, (n=29) and oral tongue normal specimens (n=10) and evaluated for correlations with histological and clinicopathological parameters. Our study (n=194) showed a pattern of p53 expression increasing with different grades of tongue dysplasia to different grades of invasive OTSCC (p=0.000). Among the OTSCC tumours, positive p53 expression was seen in 43.2% (67/155) and a higher p53 labelling index was significantly associated with increased Bryne's grade of the tumour invasive front (p=0.039) and increased tumour depth (p=0.018). Among the OTSCC patients with tobacco habits, (n=91), a higher p53 labelling index was significantly associated with increased risk of local recurrence (p=0.025) and with lymphovascular space involvement (p=0.014). Evaluation of p53 through varying degrees of dysplasia to oral tongue cancer indicates that p53 expression is linked to aggressive features of oral tongue cancers and tongue precancers entailing a closer monitoring in positive cases. Among the OTSCCs, p53 expression is associated with tumour aggressiveness correlating with increased grading of invasive tumour front and tumour depth.

  10. Real-time RT-PCR systems for CTC detection from blood samples of breast cancer and gynaecological tumour patients (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andergassen, Ulrich; Kölbl, Alexandra C; Mahner, Sven; Jeschke, Udo

    2016-04-01

    Cells, which detach from a primary epithelial tumour and migrate through lymphatic vessels and blood stream are called 'circulating tumour cells'. These cells are considered to be the main root of remote metastasis and are correlated to a worse prognosis concerning progression-free and overall survival of the patients. Therefore, the detection of the minimal residual disease is of great importance regarding therapeutic decisions. Many different detection strategies are already available, but only one method, the CellSearch® system, reached FDA approval. The present review focusses on the detection of circulating tumour cells by means of real-time PCR, a highly sensitive method based on differences in gene expression between normal and malignant cells. Strategies for an enrichment of tumour cells are mentioned, as well as a large panel of potential marker genes. Drawbacks and advantages of the technique are elucidated, whereas, the greatest advantage might be, that by selection of appropriate marker genes, also tumour cells, which have already undergone epithelial to mesenchymal transition can be detected. Finally, the application of real-time PCR in different gynaecological malignancies is described, with breast cancer being the most studied cancer entity.

  11. Tumour Delineation using Statistical Properties of The Breast US Images and Vector Quantization based Clustering Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. B. Kekre

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is most common and leading cause of death among women. With improvement in the imaging modalities it is possible to diagnose the cancer at an early stage moreover treatment at an early stage reduces the mortality rate. B-mode ultrasound (US imaging is very illustrious and reliable technique in early detection of masses in the breast. Though it is complimentary to the mammography, dense breast tissues can be examined more efficiently and detects the small nodules that are usually not observed in mammography. Segmentation of US images gives the clear understanding of nature and growth of the tumor. But some inherent artifact of US images makes this process difficult and computationally inefficient. Many methods are discussed in the literature for US image segmentation, each method has its pros and cons. In this paper, initially region merging based watershed and marker-controlled watershed transforms are discussed and implemented. In the subsequent sections we proposed a method for segmentation, based on clustering. Proposed method consists of three stages, in first stage probability images and its equalized histogram images are obtained from the original US images without any preprocessing. In the next stage, we used VQ based clustering technique with LBG, KPE and KEVR codebook generation algorithm followed by sequential cluster merging. Last stage is the post processing, where we removed unwanted regions from the selected cluster image by labeling the connected components and moreover used morphological operation for closing the holes in the final segmented image. Finally, results by our method are compared with initially discussed methods.

  12. NIH scientists identify molecular link between metabolism and breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    A protein associated with conditions of metabolic imbalance, such as diabetes and obesity, may play a role in the development of aggressive forms of breast cancer, according to new findings by researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of th

  13. Genome-wide association analysis identifies three new breast cancer susceptibility loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghoussaini, Maya; Fletcher, Olivia; Michailidou, Kyriaki

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. To date, 22 common breast cancer susceptibility loci have been identified accounting for ∼8% of the heritability of the disease. We attempted to replicate 72 promising associations from two independent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in ...

  14. Genome-wide association analysis identifies three new breast cancer susceptibility loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghoussaini, M.; Fletcher, O.; Michailidou, K.; Turnbull, C.; Schmidt, M.K.; Dicks, E.; Dennis, J.; Wang, Q.; Humphreys, M.K.; Luccarini, C.; Baynes, C.; Conroy, D.; Maranian, M.; Ahmed, S.; Driver, K.; Johnson, N.; Orr, N.; dos Santos Silva, I.; Waisfisz, Q.; Meijers-Heijboer, H.; Uitterlinden, A.G.; Rivadeneira, F.; Hall, P.; Czene, K.; Irwanto, A.; Liu, J.; Nevanlinna, H.; Aittomaki, K.; Blomqvist, C.; Meindl, A.; Schmutzler, R.K.; Muller-Myhsok, B.; Lichtner, P.; Chang-Claude, J.; Hein, R.; Nickels, S.; Flesch-Janys, D.; Tsimiklis, H.; Makalic, E.; Schmidt, D.; Bui, M.; Hopper, J.L.; Apicella, C.; Park, D.J.; Southey, M.; Hunter, D.J.; Chanock, S.J.; Broeks, A.; Verhoef, S.; Hogervorst, F.B.; Fasching, P.A.; Lux, M.P.; Beckmann, M.W.; Ekici, A.B.; Sawyer, E.; Tomlinson, I.; Kerin, M.; Marme, F.; Schneeweiss, A.; Sohn, C.; Burwinkel, B.; Guenel, P.; Truong, T.; Cordina-Duverger, E.; Menegaux, F.; Bojesen, S.E.; Nordestgaard, B.G.; Nielsen, S.F.; Flyger, H.; Milne, R.L.; Alonso, M.R.; Gonzalez-Neira, A.; Benitez, J.; Anton-Culver, H.; Ziogas, A.; Bernstein, L.; Dur, C.C.; Brenner, H.; Muller, H.; Arndt, V.; Stegmaier, C.; Justenhoven, C.; Brauch, H.; Bruning, T.; Wang-Gohrke, S.; Eilber, U.; Dork, T.; Schurmann, P.; Bremer, M.; Hillemanns, P.; Bogdanova, N.V.; Antonenkova, N.N.; Rogov, Y.I.; Karstens, J.H.; Bermisheva, M.; Prokofieva, D.; Ligtenberg, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. To date, 22 common breast cancer susceptibility loci have been identified accounting for approximately 8% of the heritability of the disease. We attempted to replicate 72 promising associations from two independent genome-wide association studies

  15. Large-scale genotyping identifies 41 new loci associated with breast cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michailidou, Kyriaki; Hall, Per; Gonzalez-Neira, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. Common variants at 27 loci have been identified as associated with susceptibility to breast cancer, and these account for ∼9% of the familial risk of the disease. We report here a meta-analysis of 9 genome-wide association studies, including 10...

  16. C-erbB-2 onco-protein expression in breast cancer: relationship to tumour characteristics and short-term survival in Universiti Kebansaan Malaysia Medical Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifah, N A; Lee, B R; Clarence-Ko, C H; Tan, G C; Shiran, M S; Naqiyah, I; Rohaizak, M; Fuad, I; Tamil, A M

    2008-01-01

    Breast cancer is the commonest cancer affecting females in Malaysia, contributing 31% of all newly diagnosed cases amongst Malaysian women. The present retrospective cohort study evaluated the relationship between cerbB- 2 onco-protein overexpression with various tumour characteristics and survival rate of breast cancer patients treated at the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre (UKMMC) between 1996-2000. CerbB- 2 oncoprotein overexpression was determined by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and tumors showing 2+ positivity were verified by Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH). One hundred and seventy two patients were eligible for the study with a short-term follow-up (median) of 5.1 years. C-erbB-2 oncoprotein overexpression correlated with lymph node positivity, oestrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) negativity. Univariate analyses showed shorter disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) in patients with cerbB- 2 oncoprotein overexpression, Malay ethnicity, higher tumour grade, lymph node positivity, ER and PR negativity. In a subgroup of patients with c-erbB-2 oncoprotein overexpression, a shorter OS was observed in those with lymph node positivity, ER and PR negativity. In multivariate prognostic analysis, lymph node status, ER status and tumour grading were the strongest independent prognostic factors for both OS and DFS. However, c-erbB-2 status was not a significantly independent prognostic factor, even in subsets with lymph node positive or negative group. C-erbB-2 oncoprotein overexpression correlated well with lymph node status, ER and PR. Shorter OS and DFS were significantly observed in patients with c-erbB-2 oncoprotein overexpression. Lymph node status, ER status and tumour grading were the only three independent prognostic factors for OS and DFS in this study. Although c-erbB-2 expression is obviously important from a biological standpoint, multivariate analysis showed that it is not an independent prognostic

  17. The effects of renal variation upon measurements of perfusion and leakage volume in breast tumours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahearn, T. S.; Staff, R. T.; Redpath, T. W.; Semple, S. I. K.

    2004-05-01

    Dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) and pharmacokinetic models have been used to measure tumour permeability (Ktrans) and leakage volume (ve) in numerous studies. The construction of pharmacokinetic models describing such tissue properties relies on defining the blood plasma concentration of contrast agent with respect to time (Cp(t)). When direct measurement is not possible a bi-exponential decay has been applied using data from healthy volunteers. This work investigates, by simulation, the magnitude of errors resulting from this definition with respect to normal variation in renal function and for cases with renal impairment. Errors up to 23% in ve and 28% in Ktrans were found for the normal simulations, and 67% in ve and 61% in Ktrans for the impaired simulations. If this bi-exponential curve is used as an input function to the generalized kinetic model and used in oncology, estimates of tissue permeability and leakage volume will possess large errors due to variation in Cp(t) curves between subjects.

  18. Integrated multi-omics analysis of oligodendroglial tumours identifies three subgroups of 1p/19q co-deleted gliomas

    OpenAIRE

    Kamoun, Aurélie; Idbaih, Ahmed; Dehais, Caroline; Elarouci, Nabila; Carpentier, Catherine; Letouzé, Eric; Colin, Carole; Mokhtari, Karima; Jouvet, Anne; Uro-Coste, Emmanuelle; Martin-Duverneuil, Nadine; Sanson, Marc; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; de Reyniès, Aurélien

    2016-01-01

    POLA Network; International audience; Oligodendroglial tumours (OT) are a heterogeneous group of gliomas. Three molecular subgroups are currently distinguished on the basis of the IDH mutation and 1p/19q co-deletion. Here we present an integrated analysis of the transcriptome, genome and methylome of 156 OT. Not only does our multi-omics classification match the current classification but also reveals three subgroups within 1p/19q co-deleted tumours, associated with specific expression patter...

  19. The novel desmopressin analogue [V4Q5]dDAVP inhibits angiogenesis, tumour growth and metastases in vasopressin type 2 receptor-expressing breast cancer models

    Science.gov (United States)

    GARONA, JUAN; PIFANO, MARINA; ORLANDO, ULISES D.; PASTRIAN, MARIA B.; IANNUCCI, NANCY B.; ORTEGA, HUGO H.; PODESTA, ERNESTO J.; GOMEZ, DANIEL E.; RIPOLL, GISELLE V.; ALONSO, DANIEL F.

    2015-01-01

    Desmopressin (dDAVP) is a safe haemostatic agent with previously reported antitumour activity. It acts as a selective agonist for the V2 vasopressin membrane receptor (V2r) present on tumour cells and microvasculature. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the novel peptide derivative [V4Q5]dDAVP in V2r-expressing preclinical mouse models of breast cancer. We assessed antitumour effects of [V4Q5]dDAVP using human MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cells, as well as the highly metastatic mouse F3II cell line. Effect on in vitro cancer cell growth was evaluated by cell proliferation and clonogenic assays. Cell cycle distribution was analysed by flow cytometry. In order to study the effect of intravenously administered [V4Q5]dDAVP on tumour growth and angiogenesis, breast cancer xenografts were generated in athymic mice. F3II cells were injected into syngeneic mice to evaluate the effect of [V4Q5]dDAVP on spontaneous and experimental metastatic spread. In vitro cytostatic effects of [V4Q5]dDAVP against breast cancer cells were greater than those of dDAVP, and associated with V2r-activated signal transduction and partial cell cycle arrest. In MDA-MB-231 xenografts, [V4Q5]dDAVP (0.3 μg/kg, thrice a week) reduced tumour growth and angiogenesis. Treatment of F3II mammary tumour-bearing immunocompetent mice resulted in complete inhibition of metastatic progression. [V4Q5]dDAVP also displayed greater antimetastatic efficacy than dDAVP on experimental lung colonisation by F3II cells. The novel analogue was well tolerated in preliminary acute toxicology studies, at doses ≥300-fold above that required for anti-angiogenic/antimetastatic effects. Our data establish the preclinical activity of [V4Q5]dDAVP in aggressive breast cancer, providing the rationale for further clinical trials. PMID:25846632

  20. Tumour 18 F-FDG Uptake on preoperative PET/CT may predict axillary lymph node metastasis in ER-positive/HER2-negative and HER2-positive breast cancer subtypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin You; Lee, Suck Hong; Kim, Suk [Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan National University School of Medicine and Medical Research Institute, Department of Radiology, Seo-gu, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Taewoo [Pusan National University Hospital, Busan Cancer Center, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Young Tae [Pusan National University Hospital, Department of Surgery, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the association between tumour FDG uptake on preoperative PET/CT and axillary lymph node metastasis (ALNM) according to breast cancer subtype. The records of 671 patients with invasive breast cancer who underwent {sup 18} F-FDG PET/CT and surgery were reviewed. Using immunohistochemistry, tumours were divided into three subtypes: oestrogen receptor (ER)-positive/human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative, HER2-positive, and triple-negative. Tumour FDG uptake, expressed as maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}), and clinicopathological variables were analysed. ALNM was present in 187 of 461 ER-positive/HER2-negative, 54 of 97 HER2-positive, and 38 of 113 triple-negative tumours. On multivariate analysis, high tumour SUV{sub max} (≥4.25) (P < 0.001), large tumour size (>2 cm) (P = 0.003) and presence of lymphovascular invasion (P < 0.001) were independent variables associated with ALNM. On subset analyses, tumour SUV{sub max} maintained independent significance for predicting ALNM in ER-positive/HER2-negative (adjusted odds ratio: 3.277, P < 0.001) and HER2-positive tumours (adjusted odds ratio: 14.637, P = 0.004). No association was found for triple-negative tumours (P = 0.161). Tumour SUV{sub max} may be an independent prognostic factor for ALNM in patients with invasive breast cancer, especially in ER-positive/HER2-negative and HER2-positive subtypes, but not in those with triple-negative subtype. (orig.)

  1. Does {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT add diagnostic accuracy in incidentally identified non-secreting adrenal tumours?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tessonnier, L.; Colavolpe, C.; Mundler, O.; Taieb, D. [Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de la Timone, Service Central de Biophysique et de Medecine Nucleaire, Marseille Cedex 5 (France); Sebag, F.; Palazzo, F.F.; Henry, J.F. [Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de la Timone, Service de Chirurgie Generale et Endocrinienne, Marseille Cedex 5 (France); Micco, C. de [Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de la Timone, Faculte de Medecine, Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale (U555), Marseille Cedex 5 (France); Mancini, J. [Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de la Timone, Service de Sante Publique et d' Information Medicale, Marseille Cedex 5 (France); Conte-Devolx, B. [Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de la Timone, Service d' Endocrinologie, Diabete et des Maladies Metaboliques, Marseille Cedex 5 (France)

    2008-11-15

    The widespread use of high-resolution cross-sectional imaging such as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the investigation of the abdomen is associated with an increasing detection of incidental adrenal masses. We evaluated the ability of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography to distinguish benign from malignant adrenal masses when CT or MRI results had been inconclusive. We included only patients with no evidence of hormonal hypersecretion and no personal history of cancer or in whom previously diagnosed cancer was in prolonged remission. PET/CT scans were acquired after 90 min (mean, range 60-140 min) after FDG injection. The visual interpretation, maximum standardised uptake values (SUVmax) and adrenal compared to liver uptake ratio were correlated with the final histological diagnosis or clinico-radiological follow-up when surgery had not been performed. Thirty-seven patients with 41 adrenal masses were prospectively evaluated. The final diagnosis was 12 malignant, 17 benign tumours, and 12 tumours classified as benign on follow-up. The visual interpretation was more accurate than SUVmax alone, tumour diameter or unenhanced density, with a sensitivity of 100% (12/12), a specificity of 86% (25/29) and a negative predictive value of 100% (25/25). The use of 1.8 as the threshold for tumour/liver SUVmax ratio, retrospectively established, demonstrated 100% sensitivity and specificity. FDG PET/CT accurately characterises adrenal tumours, with an excellent sensitivity and negative predictive values. Thus, a negative PET may predict a benign tumour that would potentially prevent the need for surgery of adrenal tumours with inconclusive conventional imaging. (orig.)

  2. Absence of transforming growth factor-beta type II receptor is associated with poorer prognosis in HER2-negative breast tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paiva, C E; Drigo, S A; Rosa, F E;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The clinical relevance of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta)-signalling pathway in breast carcinomas (BCs) remained elusive. This study aimed to evaluate the prognostic value of TGF-beta1 and transforming growth factor-beta type II receptor (TGF-betaRII) expression levels...... in tumour cells and their association with the established biomarkers in BC. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In 324 BC from patients with long-term follow-up, the TGF-beta1 and TGF-betaRII transcript and protein expression levels were assessed. RESULTS: TGF-beta1 and TGF-betaRII down-expression was significantly...... associated with BC. Negative TGF-beta1 and TGF-betaRII protein status was associated with the development of distant metastasis (P = 0.003 and P = 0.029, respectively). In multivariate analysis, TGF-beta1-positive tumours were associated with increased disease-free survival (DFS) [hazard ratio (HR) = 0...

  3. Volatile organic metabolites identify patients with breast cancer, cyclomastopathy, and mammary gland fibroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Changsong; Sun, Bo; Guo, Lei; Wang, Xiaoyang; Ke, Chaofu; Liu, Shanshan; Zhao, Wei; Luo, Suqi; Guo, Zhigang; Zhang, Yang; Xu, Guowang; Li, Enyou

    2014-06-20

    The association between cancer and volatile organic metabolites in exhaled breaths has attracted increasing attention from researchers. The present study reports on a systematic study of gas profiles of metabolites in human exhaled breath by pattern recognition methods. Exhaled breath was collected from 85 patients with histologically confirmed breast disease (including 39 individuals with infiltrating ductal carcinoma, 25 individuals with cyclomastopathy and from 21 individuals with mammary gland fibroma) and 45 healthy volunteers. Principal component analysis and partial least squares discriminant analysis were used to process the final data. The volatile organic metabolites exhibited significant differences between breast cancer and normal controls, breast cancer and cyclomastopathy, and breast cancer and mammary gland fibroma; 21, 6, and 8 characteristic metabolites played decisive roles in sample classification, respectively (P fibroma patients, and patients with cyclomastopathy (P < 0.05). The identified three volatile organic metabolites associated with breast cancer may serve as novel diagnostic biomarkers.

  4. Macrophage-tumour cell interactions: identification of MUC1 on breast cancer cells as a potential counter-receptor for the macrophage-restricted receptor, sialoadhesin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, D; Hartnell, A; Happerfield, L; Miles, D W; Burchell, J; Taylor-Papadimitriou, J; Crocker, P R

    1999-10-01

    In many carcinomas, infiltrating macrophages are commonly found closely associated with tumour cells but little is known concerning the nature or significance of adhesion molecules involved in these cellular interactions. Here we demonstrate in primary human breast cancers that sialoadhesin (Sn), a macrophage-restricted adhesion molecule, is frequently expressed on infiltrating cells that often make close contact with breast carcinoma cells. To determine whether Sn could act as a specific receptor for ligands on breast cancer cell lines, binding assays were performed with a recombinant form of the protein fused to the Fc portion of human immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) (Sn-Fc). Sn-Fc was found to bind specifically and in a sialic acid-dependent manner to the breast cancer cell lines MCF-7, T47.D and BT-20 both in solid- and solution-phase binding assays. To investigate the nature of the sialoglycoproteins recognized by Sn on breast cancer cells, MCF-7 cells were labelled with [6-3H]glucosamine. Following precipitation with Sn-Fc, a major band of approximately 240000 MW was revealed, which was shown in reprecipitation and Western blotting experiments to be the epithelial mucin, MUC1.

  5. Using ultrasound tomography to identify the distributions of density throughout the breast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sak, Mark; Duric, Neb; Littrup, Peter; Sherman, Mark E.; Gierach, Gretchen L.

    2016-04-01

    Women with high breast density are at increased risk of developing breast cancer. Breast density has usually been defined using mammography as the ratio of fibroglandular tissue to total breast area. Ultrasound tomography (UST) is an emerging modality that can also be used to measure breast density. UST creates tomographic sound speed images of the patient's breast which is useful as sound speed is directly proportional to tissue density. Furthermore, the volumetric and quantitative information contained in the sound speed images can be used to describe the distribution of breast density. The work presented here measures the UST sound speed density distributions of 165 women with negative screening mammography. Frequency distributions of the sound speed voxel information were examined for each patient. In a preliminary analysis, the UST sound speed distributions were averaged across patients and grouped by various patient and density-related factors (e.g., age, body mass index, menopausal status, average mammographic breast density). It was found that differences in the distribution of density could be easily visualized for different patient groupings. Furthermore, findings suggest that the shape of the distributions may be used to identify participants with varying amounts of dense and non-dense tissue.

  6. Genetic variations may help identify best candidates for preventive breast cancer drugs | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newly discovered genetic variations may help predict breast cancer risk in women who receive preventive breast cancer therapy with the selective estrogen receptor modulator drugs tamoxifen andraloxifene, a Mayo Clinic-led study has found. The study is published in the journal Cancer Discovery. "Our findings are important because we identified genetic factors that could eventually be used to select women who should be offered the drugs for prevention," said James Ingle, M.D., an oncologist at Mayo Clinic. |

  7. Positron emission tomography of tumour [{sup 18}F]fluoroestradiol uptake in patients with acquired hormone-resistant metastatic breast cancer prior to oestradiol therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruchten, Michel van; Schroeder, Carolien P.; Vries, Elisabeth G.E. de; Hospers, Geke A.P. [University of Groningen, Department of Medical Oncology, University Medical Centre Groningen (Netherlands); Glaudemans, Andor W.J.M.; Vries, Erik F.J. de [University of Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Centre Groningen (Netherlands)

    2015-10-15

    Whereas anti-oestrogen therapy is widely applied to treat oestrogen receptor (ER) positive breast cancer, paradoxically, oestrogens can also induce tumour regression. Up-regulation of ER expression is a marker for oestrogen hypersensitivity. We, therefore, performed an exploratory study to evaluate positron emission tomography (PET) with the tracer 16α-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-17β-oestradiol ({sup 18}F-FES) as potential marker to select breast cancer patients for oestradiol therapy. Eligible patients had acquired endocrine-resistant metastatic breast cancer that progressed after ≥2 lines of endocrine therapy. All patients had prior ER-positive histology. Treatment consisted of oestradiol 2 mg, three times daily, orally. Patients underwent {sup 18}F-FES-PET/CT imaging at baseline. Tumour {sup 18}F-FES-uptake was quantified for a maximum of 20 lesions and expressed as maximum standardised uptake value (SUV{sub max}). CT-scan was repeated every 3 months to evaluate treatment response. Clinical benefit was defined as time to radiologic or clinical progression ≥24 weeks. {sup 18}F-FES uptake, quantified for 255 lesions in 19 patients, varied greatly between lesions (median 2.8; range 0.6-24.3) and between patients (median 2.5; range 1.1-15.5). Seven (37 %) patients experienced clinical benefit of oestrogen therapy, eight progressed (PD), and four were non-evaluable due to side effects. The positive and negative predictive value (PPV/NPV) of {sup 18}F-FES-PET for response to treatment were 60 % (95 % CI: 31-83 %) and 80 % (95 % CI: 38-96 %), respectively, using SUV{sub max} >1.5. {sup 18}F-FES-PET may aid identification of patients with acquired antihormone resistant breast cancer that are unlikely to benefit from oestradiol therapy. (orig.)

  8. Cytosolic phospholipase A2-alpha expression in breast cancer is associated with EGFR expression and correlates with an adverse prognosis in luminal tumours.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Caiazza, F

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: The eicosanoid signalling pathway promotes the progression of malignancies through the production of proliferative prostaglandins (PGs). Cytosolic phospholipase A(2)alpha (cPLA(2)alpha) activity provides the substrate for cyclooxygenase-dependent PG release, and we have previously found that cPLA(2)alpha expression correlated with EGFR\\/HER2 over-expression in a small number of breast cancer cell lines. METHODS: The importance of differential cPLA(2)alpha activity in clinical breast cancer was established by relating the expression of cPLA(2)alpha in tissue samples from breast cancer patients, and two microarray-based gene expression datasets to different clinicopathological and therapeutic parameters. RESULTS: High cPLA(2)alpha mRNA expression correlated with clinical parameters of poor prognosis, which are characteristic of highly invasive tumours of the HER2-positive and basal-like subtype, including low oestrogen receptor expression and high EGFR expression. High cPLA(2)alpha expression decreased overall survival in patients with luminal cancers, and correlated with a reduced effect of tamoxifen treatment. The cPLA(2)alpha expression was an independent predictive parameter of poor response to endocrine therapy in the first 5 years of follow-up. CONCLUSION: This study shows a role of cPLA(2)alpha in luminal breast cancer progression, in which the enzyme could represent a novel therapeutic target and a predictive marker.

  9. Differences in radiological patterns, tumour characteristics and diagnostic precision between digital mammography and screen-film mammography in four breast cancer screening programmes in Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domingo, Laia; Sala, Maria [IMIM-Hospital del Mar, Department of Epidemiology and Evaluation, Barcelona (Spain); CIBER de Epidemiologia y Salud Publica (CIBERESP), Barcelona (Spain); Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (UAB), EHEA Doctoral Program in Public Health. Department of Pediatrics, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Barcelona (Spain); Romero, Anabel; Belvis, Francesc; Macia, Francesc; Castells, Xavier [IMIM-Hospital del Mar, Department of Epidemiology and Evaluation, Barcelona (Spain); CIBER de Epidemiologia y Salud Publica (CIBERESP), Barcelona (Spain); Sanchez, Mar [Government of Cantabria, General Directorate of Public Health, Department of Health, Santander (Spain); Ferrer, Joana [Radiology Unit. Hospital Santa Caterina, Girona (Spain); Salas, Dolores; Ibanez, Josefa [General Directorate Public Health and Centre for Public Health Research (CSISP), Valencia (Spain); Vega, Alfonso [Hospital Universitario Marques de Valdecilla, Radiology Unit, Santander (Spain); Ferrer, Francesc [Hospital del Mar, Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Service, Barcelona (Spain); Laso, M.S. [Breast Cancer Screening Unit Burjassot, Valencia (Spain)

    2011-09-15

    To compare tumour characteristics between cancers detected with screen-film mammography (SFM) and digital mammography (DM) and to evaluate changes in positive predictive values (PPVs) for further assessments, for invasive procedures and for distinct radiological patterns in recalled women. 242,838 screening mammograms (171,191 SFM and 71,647 DM) from 103,613 women aged 45-69 years, performed in four population-based breast cancer screening programmes in Spain, were included. The tumour characteristics and PPVs of each group were compared. Radiological patterns (masses, calcifications, distortions and asymmetries) among recalled women were described and PPVs were evaluated. The percentages of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) were higher in DM than in SFM both in the first [18.5% vs. 15.8%(p = 0.580)] and in successive screenings [23.2% vs. 15.7%(p = 0.115)]. PPVs for masses, asymmetries and calcifications were higher in DM, being statistically significant in masses (5.3% vs. 3.9%; proportion ratio: 1.37 95%CI: 1.08-1.72). Among cancers detected by calcifications, the percentage of DCIS was higher in DM (60.3% vs. 46.4%, p = 0.060). PPVs were higher when DM was used, both for further assessments and for invasive procedures, with similar cancer detection rates and no statistically significant differences in tumour characteristics. The greatest improvements in PPVs were found for masses. (orig.)

  10. PTEN/PIK3CA genes are frequently mutated in spontaneous and medroxyprogesterone acetate-accelerated 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene-induced mammary tumours of tree shrews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Hou-Jun; He, Bao-Li; Wang, Chun-Yan; Zhang, Hai-Lin; Ge, Guang-Zhe; Zhang, Yuan-Xu; Lv, Long-Bao; Jiao, Jian-Lin; Chen, Ceshi

    2014-12-01

    Tree shrew has increasingly become an attractive experimental animal model for human diseases, particularly for breast cancer due to spontaneous breast tumours and their close relationship to primates and by extension to humans. However, neither normal mammary glands nor breast tumours have been well characterised in the Chinese tree shrew (Tupaia belangeri chinensis). In this study, normal mammary glands from four different developmental stages and 18 spontaneous breast tumours were analysed. Haematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining and immunohistochemistry (IHC) showed that normal mammary gland morphology and structures of tree shrews were quite similar to those found in humans. Spontaneous breast tumours of tree shrews were identified as being intraductal papilloma, papillary carcinoma, and invasive ductal carcinoma with or without lung metastasis. To further analyse breast cancer tumours among tree shrews, 40 3-4 month-old female tree shrews were orally administrated 20 mg 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) or peanut oil thrice, and then, 15 of these DMBA administrated tree shrews were implanted with medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) pellets. DMBA was shown to induce breast tumours (12%) while the addition of MPA increased the tumour incidence (50%). Of these, three induced breast tumours were intraductal papillary carcinomas and one was invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). The PTEN/PIK3CA (phosphatase and tensin homologue/phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase catalytic subunit alpha), but not TP53 and GATA3, genes are frequently mutated in breast tumours, and the PTEN/PIK3CA gene mutation status correlated with the expression of pAKT in tree shrew breast tumours. These results suggest that tree shrews may be a promising animal model for a subset of human breast cancers with PTEN/PIK3CA gene mutations.

  11. Large-scale genotyping identifies 41 new loci associated with breast cancer risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michailidou, Kyriaki; Hall, Per; Gonzalez-Neira, Anna; Ghoussaini, Maya; Dennis, Joe; Milne, Roger L; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dicks, Ed; Lee, Andrew; Turnbull, Clare; Rahman, Nazneen; Fletcher, Olivia; Peto, Julian; Gibson, Lorna; Silva, Isabel dos Santos; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Czene, Kamila; Irwanto, Astrid; Liu, Jianjun; Waisfisz, Quinten; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Adank, Muriel; van der Luijt, Rob B; Hein, Rebecca; Dahmen, Norbert; Beckman, Lars; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Lichtner, Peter; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Makalic, Enes; Schmidt, Daniel F; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Hofman, Albert; Hunter, David J; Chanock, Stephen J; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, François; Tessier, Daniel C; Canisius, Sander; Wessels, Lodewyk F A; Haiman, Christopher A; Shah, Mitul; Luben, Robert; Brown, Judith; Luccarini, Craig; Schoof, Nils; Humphreys, Keith; Li, Jingmei; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Flyger, Henrik; Couch, Fergus J; Wang, Xianshu; Vachon, Celine; Stevens, Kristen N; Lambrechts, Diether; Moisse, Matthieu; Paridaens, Robert; Christiaens, Marie-Rose; Rudolph, Anja; Nickels, Stefan; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Johnson, Nichola; Aitken, Zoe; Aaltonen, Kirsimari; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Broeks, Annegien; Van’t Veer, Laura J; van der Schoot, C Ellen; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Menegaux, Florence; Marme, Frederik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Burwinkel, Barbara; Zamora, M Pilar; Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M Rosario; Cox, Angela; Brock, Ian W; Cross, Simon S; Reed, Malcolm W R; Sawyer, Elinor J; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J; Miller, Nicola; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Hooning, Maartje J; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; Jager, Agnes; Bui, Quang M; Stone, Jennifer; Dite, Gillian S; Apicella, Carmel; Tsimiklis, Helen; Giles, Graham G; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Fasching, Peter A; Haeberle, Lothar; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Brenner, Hermann; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nick; Jones, Michael; Figueroa, Jonine; Lissowska, Jolanta; Brinton, Louise; Goldberg, Mark S; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Brüning, Thomas; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Bonanni, Bernardo; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Seynaeve, Caroline; van Asperen, Christi J; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Antonenkova, Natalia N; Dörk, Thilo; Kristensen, Vessela N; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Slager, Susan; Toland, Amanda E; Edge, Stephen; Fostira, Florentia; Kang, Daehee; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong-Young; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Sueta, Aiko; Wu, Anna H; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Van Den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Hui; Teo, Soo Hwang; Yip, Cheng Har; Phuah, Sze Yee; Cornes, Belinda K; Hartman, Mikael; Miao, Hui; Lim, Wei Yen; Sng, Jen-Hwei; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Wu, Pei-Ei; Ding, Shian-Ling; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James; Blot, William J; Signorello, Lisa B; Cai, Qiuyin; Zheng, Wei; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Shrubsole, Martha; Long, Jirong; Simard, Jacques; Garcia-Closas, Montse; Pharoah, Paul D P; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Dunning, Alison M; Benitez, Javier; Easton, Douglas F

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. Common variants at 27 loci have been identified as associated with susceptibility to breast cancer, and these account for ~9% of the familial risk of the disease. We report here a meta-analysis of 9 genome-wide association studies, including 10,052 breast cancer cases and 12,575 controls of European ancestry, from which we selected 29,807 SNPs for further genotyping. These SNPs were genotyped in 45,290 cases and 41,880 controls of European ancestry from 41 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). The SNPs were genotyped as part of a collaborative genotyping experiment involving four consortia (Collaborative Oncological Gene-environment Study, COGS) and used a custom Illumina iSelect genotyping array, iCOGS, comprising more than 200,000 SNPs. We identified SNPs at 41 new breast cancer susceptibility loci at genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10−8). Further analyses suggest that more than 1,000 additional loci are involved in breast cancer susceptibility. PMID:23535729

  12. The p53 pathway in breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Gasco, Milena; Shami, Shukri; Crook, Tim

    2002-01-01

    p53 mutation remains the most common genetic change identified in human neoplasia. In breast cancer, p53 mutation is associated with more aggressive disease and worse overall survival. The frequency of mutation in p53 is, however, lower in breast cancer than in other solid tumours. Changes, both genetic and epigenetic, have been identified in regulators of p53 activity and in some downstream transcriptional targets of p53 in breast cancers that express wild-type p53. Molecular pathological an...

  13. Proteomic maps of breast cancer subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tyanova, Stefka; Albrechtsen, Reidar; Kronqvist, Pauliina

    2016-01-01

    oestrogen receptor positive (luminal), Her2 positive and triple negative breast tumours and reached a quantitative depth of >10,000 proteins. These proteomic profiles identified functional differences between breast cancer subtypes, related to energy metabolism, cell growth, mRNA translation and cell...

  14. Mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) identified proteomic biosignatures of breast cancer in proximal fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, Stephen A; He, Jianbo; Lu, Ming; Souda, Puneet; Saxton, Romaine E; Faull, Kym F; Whitelegge, Julian P; Chang, Helena R

    2012-10-05

    We have begun an early phase of biomarker discovery in three clinically important types of breast cancer using a panel of human cell lines: HER2 positive, hormone receptor positive and HER2 negative, and triple negative (HER2-, ER-, PR-). We identified and characterized the most abundant secreted, sloughed, or leaked proteins released into serum free media from these breast cancer cell lines using a combination of protein fractionation methods before LC-MS/MS mass spectrometry analysis. A total of 249 proteins were detected in the proximal fluid of 7 breast cancer cell lines. The expression of a selected group of high abundance and/or breast cancer-specific potential biomarkers including thromobospondin 1, galectin-3 binding protein, cathepsin D, vimentin, zinc-α2-glycoprotein, CD44, and EGFR from the breast cancer cell lines and in their culture media were further validated by Western blot analysis. Interestingly, mass spectrometry identified a cathepsin D protein single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) by alanine to valine replacement from the MCF-7 breast cancer cell line. Comparison of each cell line media proteome displayed unique and consistent biosignatures regardless of the individual group classifications, demonstrating the potential for stratification of breast cancer. On the basis of the cell line media proteome, predictive Tree software was able to categorize each cell line as HER2 positive, HER2 negative, and hormone receptor positive and triple negative based on only two proteins, muscle fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolase and keratin 19. In addition, the predictive Tree software clearly identified MCF-7 cell line overexpresing the HER2 receptor with the SNP cathepsin D biomarker.

  15. A target based approach identifies genomic predictors of breast cancer patient response to chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hallett Robin M

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The efficacy of chemotherapy regimens in breast cancer patients is variable and unpredictable. Whether individual patients either achieve long-term remission or suffer recurrence after therapy may be dictated by intrinsic properties of their breast tumors including genetic lesions and consequent aberrant transcriptional programs. Global gene expression profiling provides a powerful tool to identify such tumor-intrinsic transcriptional programs, whose analyses provide insight into the underlying biology of individual patient tumors. For example, multi-gene expression signatures have been identified that can predict the likelihood of disease reccurrence, and thus guide patient prognosis. Whereas such prognostic signatures are being introduced in the clinical setting, similar signatures that predict sensitivity or resistance to chemotherapy are not currently clinically available. Methods We used gene expression profiling to identify genes that were co-expressed with genes whose transcripts encode the protein targets of commonly used chemotherapeutic agents. Results Here, we present target based expression indices that predict breast tumor response to anthracycline and taxane based chemotherapy. Indeed, these signatures were independently predictive of chemotherapy response after adjusting for standard clinic-pathological variables such as age, grade, and estrogen receptor status in a cohort of 488 breast cancer patients treated with adriamycin and taxotere/taxol. Conclusions Importantly, our findings suggest the practicality of developing target based indices that predict response to therapeutics, as well as highlight the possibility of using gene signatures to guide the use of chemotherapy during treatment of breast cancer patients.

  16. CD3+, CD4+ & CD8+ tumour infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs are predictors of favourable survival outcome in infiltrating ductal carcinoma of breast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankita Singh Rathore

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Tumour infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs represent the host immune response against cancer cells associated with good or bad prognosis in different tumour types. This study was undertaken to evaluate the significance of CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ TILs in breast cancer tissues in relation to clinico-pathological variables and survival outcome. Methods: Immunohistochemistry (IHC was performed with antibodies against CD3, CD4 and CD8 antigens on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue sections of 150 breast cancer patients. Intratumoural and stromal TIL counting was performed semiquantitatively. Results: The higher CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ intratumoural and stromal counts showed independent and direct association with good prognosis. The prognostic predictor value of intratumoural counts was higher than stromal counts. The independent associations of intratumoural and stromal counts became more prominent when adjusted with stage and grade, respectively. Among intratumoural counts, the high (++/+++ CD4+ count (OR=3.85, 95% CI=3.28-16.71, P<0.001 showed the highest survival followed by CD3+ (OR=2.70, 95% CI=1.76-8.30, P=0.001 and CD8+ (OR=2.58, 95% CI=1.55-5.86, p0 =0.001 the least when compared to respective low (+ counts. In contrast, among stromal counts, the high CD8+ count (OR=3.13, 95% CI=2.20-9.57, p0 <0.001 showed the highest survival followed by CD4+ (OR=3.02, 95% CI=2.07-8.89, p0 <0.001 and CD3+ (OR=2.45, 95% CI=1.53-6.73, p0 =0.002 the least. Interpretation & conclusions: Our results suggest that intratumoural CD4+ and stromal CD8+ counts by immunohistochemistry may serve as an independent prognosticator for favourable outcome in breast cancer.

  17. A comparative study between mixed-type tumours from human salivary and canine mammary glands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cardoso Sérgio V

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In comparative pathology, canine mammary tumours have special interest because of their similarities with human breast cancer. Mixed tumours are uncommon lesions in the human breast, but they are found most frequently in the mammary gland of the female dogs and in the human salivary glands. The aim of the study was to compare clinical, morphological and immunohistochemical features of human salivary and canine mammary gland mixed tumours, in order to evaluate the latter as an experimental model for salivary gland tumours. Methods Ten examples of each mixed tumour type (human pleomorphic adenoma and carcinomas ex-pleomorphic adenomas and canine mixed tumour and metaplastic carcinoma were evaluated. First, clinical and morphologic aspects of benign and malignant variants were compared between the species. Then, streptavidin-biotin-peroxidase immunohistochemistry was performed to detect the expression of cytokeratins, vimentin, p63 protein, estrogen receptor, β-catenin, and E-cadherin. Results After standardization, similar age and site distributions were observed in human and canine tumours. Histological similarities were identified in the comparison of the benign lesions as well. Metaplastic carcinomas also resembled general aspects of carcinomas ex-pleomorphic adenomas in morphological evaluation. Additionally, immunohistochemical staining further presented similar antigenic expression between lesions. Conclusion There are many similar features between human salivary and canine mammary gland mixed tumours. This observation is of great relevance for those interested in the study and management of salivary gland tumours, since canine lesions may constitute useful comparative models for their investigations.

  18. Fine-mapping identifies two additional breast cancer susceptibility loci at 9q31.2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orr, Nick; Dudbridge, Frank; Dryden, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    We recently identified a novel susceptibility variant, rs865686, for estrogen-receptor positive breast cancer at 9q31.2. Here, we report a fine-mapping analysis of the 9q31.2 susceptibility locus using 43 160 cases and 42 600 controls of European ancestry ascertained from 52 studies and a further...

  19. Fine-mapping identifies two additional breast cancer susceptibility loci at 9q31.2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Orr (Nick); F. Dudbridge (Frank); N. Dryden (Nicola); S. Maguire (Sarah); D. Novo (Daniela); E. Perrakis (Eleni); N. Johnson (Nichola); M. Ghoussaini (Maya); J. Hopper (John); M.C. Southey (Melissa); C. Apicella (Carmel); J. Stone (Jennifer); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); A. Broeks (Annegien); L.J. van 't Veer (Laura); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); P.A. Fasching (Peter); L. Haeberle (Lothar); A.B. Ekici (Arif); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias W.); L.J. Gibson (Lorna); A. Aitken; H. Warren (Helen); E.J. Sawyer (Elinor); I.P. Tomlinson (Ian); M. Kerin (Michael); N. Miller (Nicola); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); F. Marme (Federick); A. Schneeweiss (Andreas); C. Sohn (Chistof); P. Guénel (Pascal); T. Truong (Thérèse); E. Cordina-Duverger (Emilie); M. Sanchez (Marie); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); B.G. Nordestgaard (Børge); S.F. Nielsen (Sune); H. Flyger (Henrik); J. Benítez (Javier); M.P. Zamora (Pilar); J.I.A. Perez (Jose Ignacio Arias); P. Menéndez (Primitiva); H. Anton-Culver (Hoda); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); H. Brenner (Hermann); A.K. Dieffenbach (Aida Karina); V. Arndt (Volker); C. Stegmaier (Christa); U. Hamann (Ute); H. Brauch (Hiltrud); C. Justenhoven (Christina); T. Brüning (Thomas); Y.-D. Ko (Yon-Dschun); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); C. Blomqvist (Carl); S. Khan (Sofia); N.V. Bogdanova (Natalia); T. Dörk (Thilo); A. Lindblom (Annika); S. Margolin (Sara); A. Mannermaa (Arto); V. Kataja (Vesa); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); J.M. Hartikainen (J.); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); J. Beesley (Jonathan); D. Lambrechts (Diether); M. Moisse (Matthieu); O.A.M. Floris; B. Beuselinck (B.); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); A. Rudolph (Anja); P. Seibold (Petra); D. Flesch-Janys (Dieter); P. Radice (Paolo); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); B. Peissel (Bernard); V. Pensotti (Valeria); F.J. Couch (Fergus); J.E. Olson (Janet); S. Slettedahl (Seth); C. Vachon (Celine); G.G. Giles (Graham G.); R.L. Milne (Roger L.); C.A. McLean (Catriona Ann); C.A. Haiman (Christopher); B.E. Henderson (Brian); F.R. Schumacher (Fredrick); L. Le Marchand (Loic); J. Simard (Jacques); M.S. Goldberg (Mark); F. Labrèche (France); M. Dumont (Martine); V. Kristensen (Vessela); G.G. Alnæs (Grethe Grenaker); S. Nord (Silje); A.-L. Borresen-Dale (Anne-Lise); W. Zheng (Wei); S.L. Deming-Halverson (Sandra); M. Shrubsole (Martha); J. Long (Jirong); R. Winqvist (Robert); K. Pykäs (Katri); A. Jukkola-Vuorinen (Arja); M. Grip (Mervi); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); J.A. Knight (Julia); G. Glendon (Gord); S. Tchatchou (Sandrine); P. Devilee (Peter); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Robertus A. E. M.); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); C.J. van Asperen (Christi); M. García-Closas (Montserrat); J.D. Figueroa (Jonine); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); J. Lissowska (Jolanta); K. Czene (Kamila); H. Darabi (Hatef); M. Eriksson (Mikael); D. Klevebring (Daniel); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); A. Hollestelle (Antoinette); C.H.M. van Deurzen (Carolien); M. Kriege (Mieke); P. Hall (Per); J. Li (Jingmei); J. Liu (Jianjun); M.K. Humphreys (Manjeet); A. Cox (Angela); S.S. Cross (Simon); M.W.R. Reed (Malcolm); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); A.M. Dunning (Alison); M. Shah (Mitul); B. Perkins (Barbara); A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); K. Jaworska-Bieniek (Katarzyna); K. Durda (Katarzyna); A. Ashworth (Alan); A.J. Swerdlow (Anthony ); M. Jones (Michael); M. Schoemaker (Minouk); A. Meindl (Alfons); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); C. Olswold (Curtis); S. Slager (Susan); A.E. Toland (Amanda); D. Yannoukakos (Drakoulis); K.R. Muir (K.); A. Lophatananon (Artitaya); S. Stewart-Brown (Sarah); P. Siriwanarangsan (Pornthep); K. Matsuo (Keitaro); H. Ito (Hidema); H. Iwata (Hisato); J. Ishiguro (Junko); A.H. Wu (Anna H.); C.-C. Tseng (Chiu-chen); D. Van Den Berg (David); D.O. Stram (Daniel O.); S.-H. Teo; C.H. Yip (Cheng Har); P. Kang (Peter); M.K. Ikram (Kamran); X.-O. Shu (Xiao-Ou); W. Lu (Wei); Y. Gao; H. Cai (Hui); D. Kang (Daehee); J.-Y. Choi (J.); S.K. Park (Sue); D-Y. Noh (Dong-Young); J.M. Hartman (Joost); X. Miao; W.-Y. Lim (Wei-Yen); S.C. Lee (Soo Chin); S. Sangrajrang (Suleeporn); V. Gaborieau (Valerie); P. Brennan (Paul); J.D. McKay (James); P.-E. Wu (Pei-Ei); M.-F. Hou (Ming-Feng); J-C. Yu (Jyh-Cherng); C-Y. Shen (Chen-Yang); W.J. Blot (William); Q. Cai (Qiuyin); L.B. Signorello (Lisa B.); C. Luccarini (Craig); C. Bayes (Caroline); S. Ahmed (Shahana); M. Maranian (Melanie); S. Healey (Sue); A. González-Neira (Anna); G. Pita (G.); M. Rosario Alonso; N. Álvarez (Nuria); D. Herrero (Daniel); D.C. Tessier (Daniel C.); D. Vincent (Daniel); F. Bacot (Francois); D. Hunter (David); S. Lindstrom (Stephen); J. Dennis (Joe); K. Michailidou (Kyriaki); M.K. Bolla (Manjeet); D.F. Easton (Douglas); I. dos Santos Silva (Isabel); O. Fletcher (Olivia); J. Peto (Julian)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractWe recently identified a novel susceptibility variant, rs865686, for estrogen-receptor positive breast cancer at 9q31.2. Here, we report a fine-mapping analysis of the 9q31.2 susceptibility locus using 43 160 cases and 42 600 controls of European ancestry ascertained from 52 studies and

  20. Breast MRI in clinically and mammographically occult breast cancer presenting with an axillary metastasis: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Bresser, J; De Vos, B.; van der Ent, F.; Hulsewé, K.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Axillary metastatic lymphadenopathy with no primary tumour identified in the breast on physical examination, mammography or ultrasound is referred to as occult breast cancer. The goal of this systematic review is to give an overview of the value and additional considerations of using breast MRI in occult breast cancer. Methods The databases of Pubmed, Embase, CINAHL and the Cochrane library were searched for studies addressing th...

  1. Transcriptional shift identifies a set of genes driving breast cancer chemoresistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Vera-Ramirez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Distant recurrences after antineoplastic treatment remain a serious problem for breast cancer clinical management, which threats patients' life. Systemic therapy is administered to eradicate cancer cells from the organism, both at the site of the primary tumor and at any other potential location. Despite this intervention, a significant proportion of breast cancer patients relapse even many years after their primary tumor has been successfully treated according to current clinical standards, evidencing the existence of a chemoresistant cell subpopulation originating from the primary tumor. METHODS/FINDINGS: To identify key molecules and signaling pathways which drive breast cancer chemoresistance we performed gene expression analysis before and after anthracycline and taxane-based chemotherapy and compared the results between different histopathological response groups (good-, mid- and bad-response, established according to the Miller & Payne grading system. Two cohorts of 33 and 73 breast cancer patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy were recruited for whole-genome expression analysis and validation assay, respectively. Identified genes were subjected to a bioinformatic analysis in order to ascertain the molecular function of the proteins they encode and the signaling in which they participate. High throughput technologies identified 65 gene sequences which were over-expressed in all groups (P ≤ 0·05 Bonferroni test. Notably we found that, after chemotherapy, a significant proportion of these genes were over-expressed in the good responders group, making their tumors indistinguishable from those of the bad responders in their expression profile (P ≤ 0.05 Benjamini-Hochgerg`s method. CONCLUSIONS: These data identify a set of key molecular pathways selectively up-regulated in post-chemotherapy cancer cells, which may become appropriate targets for the development of future directed therapies against breast cancer.

  2. Transcriptional Shift Identifies a Set of Genes Driving Breast Cancer Chemoresistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera-Ramirez, Laura; Sanchez-Rovira, Pedro; Ramirez-Tortosa, Cesar L.; Quiles, Jose L.; Ramirez-Tortosa, MCarmen; Lorente, Jose A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Distant recurrences after antineoplastic treatment remain a serious problem for breast cancer clinical management, which threats patients’ life. Systemic therapy is administered to eradicate cancer cells from the organism, both at the site of the primary tumor and at any other potential location. Despite this intervention, a significant proportion of breast cancer patients relapse even many years after their primary tumor has been successfully treated according to current clinical standards, evidencing the existence of a chemoresistant cell subpopulation originating from the primary tumor. Methods/Findings To identify key molecules and signaling pathways which drive breast cancer chemoresistance we performed gene expression analysis before and after anthracycline and taxane-based chemotherapy and compared the results between different histopathological response groups (good-, mid- and bad-response), established according to the Miller & Payne grading system. Two cohorts of 33 and 73 breast cancer patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy were recruited for whole-genome expression analysis and validation assay, respectively. Identified genes were subjected to a bioinformatic analysis in order to ascertain the molecular function of the proteins they encode and the signaling in which they participate. High throughput technologies identified 65 gene sequences which were over-expressed in all groups (P ≤ 0·05 Bonferroni test). Notably we found that, after chemotherapy, a significant proportion of these genes were over-expressed in the good responders group, making their tumors indistinguishable from those of the bad responders in their expression profile (P ≤ 0.05 Benjamini-Hochgerg`s method). Conclusions These data identify a set of key molecular pathways selectively up-regulated in post-chemotherapy cancer cells, which may become appropriate targets for the development of future directed therapies against breast cancer. PMID:23326553

  3. Reactivation of the tumour suppressor RASSF1A in breast cancer by simultaneous targeting of DNA and E2F1 methylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María F Montenegro

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tumour suppressor genes are often transcriptionally silenced by promoter hypermethylation, and recent research has implicated alterations in chromatin structure as the mechanistic basis for this repression. In addition to DNA methylation, other epigenetic post-translational modifications that modulate the stability and binding of specific transcription factors to gene promoters have emerged as important mechanisms for controlling gene expression. The aim of this study was to analyse the implications of these mechanisms and their molecular connections in the reactivation of RASSF1A in breast cancer. METHODS: Compounds that modulate the intracellular concentration of adenosine, such as dipyridamole (DIPY, greatly increase the antiproliferative effects of 3-O-(3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoyl-(--catechin (TMCG, a synthetic antifolate derived from the structure of tea catechins. Quantitative real-time PCR arrays and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry indicated that this combination (TMCG/DIPY induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells by modulating the methylation levels of DNA and proteins (such as E2F1, respectively. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assays were employed to confirm that this combination induced chromatin remodelling of the RASSF1A promoter and increased the occupancy of E2F1 at the promoter of this tumour suppressor gene. RESULTS: The TMCG/DIPY combination acted as an epigenetic treatment that reactivated RASSF1A expression and induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells. In addition to modulating DNA methylation and chromatin remodelling, this combination also induced demethylation of the E2F1 transcription factor. The ChIP assay showed enhancement of E2F1 occupancy at the unmethylated RASSF1A promoter after TMCG/DIPY treatment. Interestingly, inhibition of E2F1 demethylation using an irreversible inhibitor of lysine-specific demethylase 1 reduced both TMCG/DIPY-mediated RASSF1A expression and apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 cells, suggesting

  4. Incidental detection of breast cancer by {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC-PET/CT in women suffering from neuroendocrine tumours

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    Elgeti, F.; Denecke, T.; Steffen, I.; Stelter, L.; Ruf, J. [Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Berlin (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde; Amthauer, H. [Universitaetsklinikum Magdeburg (Germany). Klinik fuer Radilogie und Nuklearmedizin; Heuck, F. [Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Berlin (Germany). Medizinische Klinik m. S. Hepatologie und Gastroenterologie

    2008-07-01

    Aim: Somatostatin receptor (sstr) imaging using 68Ga- DOTATOC-PET/CT in neuroendocrine tumors (NET) is promising, suggesting a more sensitive detection of lesions with a low sstr-expression. This is also important for other sstr positive tumors, especially breast cancer whose incidence and age-range is similar to that of NET. Patients, methods: The PET/CT data of 33 consecutive women with NET (age: 33-78 years, mean 59) who underwent whole-body staging with {sup 6}8Ga-DOTATOC was retrospectively analyzed for breast lesions. The data was read separately, side-byside and as fused images. Focal tracer uptake in the breast was semiquantitatively analyzed by comparing the lesional SUV{sub max} to normal breast tissue using Wilcoxon's rank sum test. Breast cancer lesions were compared visually to concomitant NET- lesions. Results: In six of 33 patients (18%) breast lesions were observed on the CT-scans and classified in four patients (12%) as suspicious. The same lesions also showed a pathological tracer uptake on the corresponding PET-scan, visually and semiquantitatively (p<0.01). Histological reevaluation of the suspicious lesions revealed two patients with NET metastases. Two patients had primary breast cancer with lower tracer uptake than concomitant abdominal NET-lesions. Breast cancer diagnosis resulted in a change of the therapeutic regimen. Conclusion: {sup 68}Ga- DOTATOC-PET/CT not only improves the staging of NET-patients, but also increases the chance to detect sstr-positive breast cancer. Although these lesions may show a lower tracer uptake than NET, they must not be overlooked or misinterpreted as metastases. Further imaging and clarification by histopathology is warranted, as the confirmation of a secondary malignoma has great impact on further therapeutic proceedings. (orig.)

  5. Transcriptome and proteome analysis of tyrosine kinase inhibitor treated canine mast cell tumour cells identifies potentially kit signaling-dependent genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klopfleisch Robert

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Canine mast cell tumour proliferation depends to a large extent on the activity of KIT, a tyrosine kinase receptor. Inhibitors of the KIT tyrosine kinase have recently been introduced and successfully applied as a therapeutic agent for this tumour type. However, little is known on the downstream target genes of this signaling pathway and molecular changes after inhibition. Results Transcriptome analysis of the canine mast cell tumour cell line C2 treated for up to 72 hours with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor masitinib identified significant changes in the expression levels of approximately 3500 genes or 16% of the canine genome. Approximately 40% of these genes had increased mRNA expression levels including genes associated with the pro-proliferative pathways of B- and T-cell receptors, chemokine receptors, steroid hormone receptors and EPO-, RAS and MAP kinase signaling. Proteome analysis of C2 cells treated for 72 hours identified 24 proteins with changed expression levels, most of which being involved in gene transcription, e.g. EIA3, EIA4, TARDBP, protein folding, e.g. HSP90, UCHL3, PDIA3 and protection from oxidative stress, GSTT3, SELENBP1. Conclusions Transcriptome and proteome analysis of neoplastic canine mast cells treated with masitinib confirmed the strong important and complex role of KIT in these cells. Approximately 16% of the total canine genome and thus the majority of the active genes were significantly transcriptionally regulated. Most of these changes were associated with reduced proliferation and metabolism of treated cells. Interestingly, several pro-proliferative pathways were up-regulated, which may represent attempts of masitinib treated cells to activate alternative pro-proliferative pathways. These pathways may contain hypothetical targets for a combination therapy with masitinib to further improve its therapeutic effect.

  6. Loss of ATRX and DAXX expression identifies poor prognosis for smooth muscle tumours of uncertain malignant potential and early stage uterine leiomyosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slatter, Tania L; Hsia, Howard; Samaranayaka, Ari; Sykes, Peter; Clow, William Bill; Devenish, Celia J; Sutton, Tim; Royds, Janice A; Pc, Philip; Cheung, Annie N; Hung, Noelyn Anne

    2015-04-01

    Uterine smooth muscle tumours of uncertain malignant potential (STUMP) are diagnostically and clinically challenging. The alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) telomere maintenance mechanism is associated with poor survival in soft tissue leiomyosarcoma. Time to first recurrence and survival were known for 18 STUMP and 43 leiomyosarcomata (LMS). These were screened for ALT telomere maintenance by the presence of ALT-associated PML bodies (APBs) and for changes associated with the ALT phenotype, namely aberrant p53 expression, isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 mutation (R132H substitution) expression, mutant ATRX (αthalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked) expression and mutant DAXX (death-domain-associated protein) expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Overexpression of p16(INK4A) was examined immunohistologically in a subset of cases. Many of the tumours associated with death or recurrence demonstrated APBs commensurate with ALT telomere maintenance. However, all uterine STUMP (4/4), and vaginal STUMP (2/2) patients, and almost all LMS patients (88.4%, 23/26, including 90% (9/10) of stage 1 LMS cases), who had died of disease or who had recurrent disease, displayed loss of ATRX or DAXX expression. Loss of ATRX or DAXX expression identified poor prognosis (95% CI 2.1 to 40.8, p ATRX or DAXX expression in uterine smooth muscle tumours identifies a clinically aggressive molecular subtype of early stage LMS and when histopathological features are problematic such as in STUMP. As ATRX and DAXX IHC is readily performed in diagnostic laboratories these are potentially useful for routine histopathological classification and management.

  7. Genome-wide association study identifies novel breast cancer susceptibility loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easton, Douglas F.; Pooley, Karen A.; Dunning, Alison M.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Thompson, Deborah; Ballinger, Dennis G.; Struewing, Jeffery P.; Morrison, Jonathan; Field, Helen; Luben, Robert; Wareham, Nicholas; Ahmed, Shahana; Healey, Catherine S.; Bowman, Richard; Meyer, Kerstin B.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Kolonel, Laurence K.; Henderson, Brian E.; Marchand, Loic Le; Brennan, Paul; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Odefrey, Fabrice; Shen, Chen-Yang; Wu, Pei-Ei; Wang, Hui-Chun; Eccles, Diana; Evans, D. Gareth; Peto, Julian; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Seal, Sheila; Stratton, Michael R.; Rahman, Nazneen; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Axelsson, Christen K.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Brinton, Louise; Chanock, Stephen; Lissowska, Jolanta; Peplonska, Beata; Nevanlinna, Heli; Fagerholm, Rainer; Eerola, Hannaleena; Kang, Daehee; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong-Young; Ahn, Sei-Hyun; Hunter, David J.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Cox, David G.; Hall, Per; Wedren, Sara; Liu, Jianjun; Low, Yen-Ling; Bogdanova, Natalia; Schürmann, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Tollenaar, Rob A. E. M.; Jacobi, Catharina E.; Devilee, Peter; Klijn, Jan G. M.; Sigurdson, Alice J.; Doody, Michele M.; Alexander, Bruce H.; Zhang, Jinghui; Cox, Angela; Brock, Ian W.; MacPherson, Gordon; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Couch, Fergus J.; Goode, Ellen L.; Olson, Janet E.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; van den Ouweland, Ans; Uitterlinden, André; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Milne, Roger L.; Ribas, Gloria; Gonzalez-Neira, Anna; Benitez, Javier; Hopper, John L.; McCredie, Margaret; Southey, Melissa; Giles, Graham G.; Schroen, Chris; Justenhoven, Christina; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kataja, Vesa; Hartikainen, Jaana; Day, Nicholas E.; Cox, David R.; Ponder, Bruce A. J.; Luccarini, Craig; Conroy, Don; Shah, Mitul; Munday, Hannah; Jordan, Clare; Perkins, Barbara; West, Judy; Redman, Karen; Driver, Kristy; Aghmesheh, Morteza; Amor, David; Andrews, Lesley; Antill, Yoland; Armes, Jane; Armitage, Shane; Arnold, Leanne; Balleine, Rosemary; Begley, Glenn; Beilby, John; Bennett, Ian; Bennett, Barbara; Berry, Geoffrey; Blackburn, Anneke; Brennan, Meagan; Brown, Melissa; Buckley, Michael; Burke, Jo; Butow, Phyllis; Byron, Keith; Callen, David; Campbell, Ian; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Clarke, Christine; Colley, Alison; Cotton, Dick; Cui, Jisheng; Culling, Bronwyn; Cummings, Margaret; Dawson, Sarah-Jane; Dixon, Joanne; Dobrovic, Alexander; Dudding, Tracy; Edkins, Ted; Eisenbruch, Maurice; Farshid, Gelareh; Fawcett, Susan; Field, Michael; Firgaira, Frank; Fleming, Jean; Forbes, John; Friedlander, Michael; Gaff, Clara; Gardner, Mac; Gattas, Mike; George, Peter; Giles, Graham; Gill, Grantley; Goldblatt, Jack; Greening, Sian; Grist, Scott; Haan, Eric; Harris, Marion; Hart, Stewart; Hayward, Nick; Hopper, John; Humphrey, Evelyn; Jenkins, Mark; Jones, Alison; Kefford, Rick; Kirk, Judy; Kollias, James; Kovalenko, Sergey; Lakhani, Sunil; Leary, Jennifer; Lim, Jacqueline; Lindeman, Geoff; Lipton, Lara; Lobb, Liz; Maclurcan, Mariette; Mann, Graham; Marsh, Deborah; McCredie, Margaret; McKay, Michael; McLachlan, Sue Anne; Meiser, Bettina; Milne, Roger; Mitchell, Gillian; Newman, Beth; O'Loughlin, Imelda; Osborne, Richard; Peters, Lester; Phillips, Kelly; Price, Melanie; Reeve, Jeanne; Reeve, Tony; Richards, Robert; Rinehart, Gina; Robinson, Bridget; Rudzki, Barney; Salisbury, Elizabeth; Sambrook, Joe; Saunders, Christobel; Scott, Clare; Scott, Elizabeth; Scott, Rodney; Seshadri, Ram; Shelling, Andrew; Southey, Melissa; Spurdle, Amanda; Suthers, Graeme; Taylor, Donna; Tennant, Christopher; Thorne, Heather; Townshend, Sharron; Tucker, Kathy; Tyler, Janet; Venter, Deon; Visvader, Jane; Walpole, Ian; Ward, Robin; Waring, Paul; Warner, Bev; Warren, Graham; Watson, Elizabeth; Williams, Rachael; Wilson, Judy; Winship, Ingrid; Young, Mary Ann; Bowtell, David; Green, Adele; deFazio, Anna; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Gertig, Dorota; Webb, Penny

    2009-01-01

    Breast cancer exhibits familial aggregation, consistent with variation in genetic susceptibility to the disease. Known susceptibility genes account for less than 25% of the familial risk of breast cancer, and the residual genetic variance is likely to be due to variants conferring more moderate risks. To identify further susceptibility alleles, we conducted a two-stage genome-wide association study in 4,398 breast cancer cases and 4,316 controls, followed by a third stage in which 30 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were tested for confirmation in 21,860 cases and 22,578 controls from 22 studies. We used 227,876 SNPs that were estimated to correlate with 77% of known common SNPs in Europeans at r2>0.5. SNPs in five novel independent loci exhibited strong and consistent evidence of association with breast cancer (P<10−7). Four of these contain plausible causative genes (FGFR2, TNRC9, MAP3K1 and LSP1). At the second stage, 1,792 SNPs were significant at the P<0.05 level compared with an estimated 1,343 that would be expected by chance, indicating that many additional common susceptibility alleles may be identifiable by this approach. PMID:17529967

  8. BCIP: a gene-centered platform for identifying potential regulatory genes in breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiaqi; Hu, Shuofeng; Chen, Yaowen; Li, Zongcheng; Zhang, Jian; Yuan, Hanyu; Shi, Qiang; Shao, Ningsheng; Ying, Xiaomin

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is a disease with high heterogeneity. Many issues on tumorigenesis and progression are still elusive. It is critical to identify genes that play important roles in the progression of tumors, especially for tumors with poor prognosis such as basal-like breast cancer and tumors in very young women. To facilitate the identification of potential regulatory or driver genes, we present the Breast Cancer Integrative Platform (BCIP, http://omics.bmi.ac.cn/bcancer/). BCIP maintains multi-omics data selected with strict quality control and processed with uniform normalization methods, including gene expression profiles from 9,005 tumor and 376 normal tissue samples, copy number variation information from 3,035 tumor samples, microRNA-target interactions, co-expressed genes, KEGG pathways, and mammary tissue-specific gene functional networks. This platform provides a user-friendly interface integrating comprehensive and flexible analysis tools on differential gene expression, copy number variation, and survival analysis. The prominent characteristic of BCIP is that users can perform analysis by customizing subgroups with single or combined clinical features, including subtypes, histological grades, pathologic stages, metastasis status, lymph node status, ER/PR/HER2 status, TP53 mutation status, menopause status, age, tumor size, therapy responses, and prognosis. BCIP will help to identify regulatory or driver genes and candidate biomarkers for further research in breast cancer. PMID:28327601

  9. High-throughput protein expression analysis using tissue microarray technology of a large well-characterised series identifies biologically distinct classes of breast cancer confirming recent cDNA expression analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El-Rehim, Dalia M; Ball, Graham; Pinder, Sarah E; Rakha, Emad; Paish, Claire; Robertson, John F R; Macmillan, Douglas; Blamey, Roger W; Ellis, Ian O

    2005-09-01

    Recent studies on gene molecular profiling using cDNA microarray in a relatively small series of breast cancer have identified biologically distinct groups with apparent clinical and prognostic relevance. The validation of such new taxonomies should be confirmed on larger series of cases prior to acceptance in clinical practice. The development of tissue microarray (TMA) technology provides methodology for high-throughput concomitant analyses of multiple proteins on large numbers of archival tumour samples. In our study, we have used immunohistochemistry techniques applied to TMA preparations of 1,076 cases of invasive breast cancer to study the combined protein expression profiles of a large panel of well-characterized commercially available biomarkers related to epithelial cell lineage, differentiation, hormone and growth factor receptors and gene products known to be altered in some forms of breast cancer. Using hierarchical clustering methodology, 5 groups with distinct patterns of protein expression were identified. A sixth group of only 4 cases was also identified but deemed too small for further detailed assessment. Further analysis of these clusters was performed using multiple layer perceptron (MLP)-artificial neural network (ANN) with a back propagation algorithm to identify key biomarkers driving the membership of each group. We have identified 2 large groups by their expression of luminal epithelial cell phenotypic characteristics, hormone receptors positivity, absence of basal epithelial phenotype characteristics and lack of c-erbB-2 protein overexpression. Two additional groups were characterized by high c-erbB-2 positivity and negative or weak hormone receptors expression but showed differences in MUC1 and E-cadherin expression. The final group was characterized by strong basal epithelial characteristics, p53 positivity, absent hormone receptors and weak to low luminal epithelial cytokeratin expression. In addition, we have identified significant

  10. Down-Regulation of miR-92 in Breast Epithelial Cells and in Normal but Not Tumour Fibroblasts Contributes to Breast Carcinogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Smith

    Full Text Available MicroRNA (miR expression is commonly dysregulated in many cancers, including breast. MiR-92 is one of six miRs encoded by the miR-17-92 cluster, one of the best-characterised oncogenic miR clusters. We examined expression of miR-92 in the breast epithelium and stroma during breast cancer progression. We also investigated the role of miR-92 in fibroblasts in vitro and showed that down-regulation in normal fibroblasts enhances the invasion of breast cancer epithelial cells.We used laser microdissection (LMD to isolate epithelial cells from matched normal, DCIS and invasive tissue from 9 breast cancer patients and analysed miR-92 expression by qRT-PCR. Expression of ERβ1, a direct miR-92 target, was concurrently analysed for each case by immunohistochemistry. LMD was also used to isolate matched normal (NFs and cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs from 14 further cases. Effects of miR-92 inhibition in fibroblasts on epithelial cell invasion in vitro was examined using a Matrigel™ assay. miR-92 levels decreased in microdissected epithelial cells during breast cancer progression with highest levels in normal breast epithelium, decreasing in DCIS (p<0.01 and being lowest in invasive breast tissue (p<0.01. This was accompanied by a shift in cell localisation of ERβ1 from nuclear expression in normal breast epithelium to increased cytoplasmic expression during progression to DCIS (p = 0.0078 and invasive breast cancer (p = 0.031. ERβ1 immunoreactivity was also seen in stromal fibroblasts in tissues. Where miR-92 expression was low in microdissected NFs this increased in matched CAFs; a trend also seen in cultured primary fibroblasts. Down-regulation of miR-92 levels in NFs but not CAFs enhanced invasion of both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer epithelial cells.miR-92 is gradually lost in breast epithelial cells during cancer progression correlating with a shift in ERβ1 immunoreactivity from nuclei to the cytoplasm. Our data support a functional

  11. A randomized controlled trial comparing primary tumour resection plus systemic therapy with systemic therapy alone in metastatic breast cancer (PRIM-BC): Japan Clinical Oncology Group Study JCOG1017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shien, Tadahiko; Nakamura, Kenichi; Shibata, Taro; Kinoshita, Takayuki; Aogi, Kenjiro; Fujisawa, Tomomi; Masuda, Norikazu; Inoue, Kenichi; Fukuda, Haruhiko; Iwata, Hiroji

    2012-10-01

    This trial is being conducted to confirm the superiority, in terms of overall survival, of primary tumour resection plus systemic therapy to systemic therapy alone in patients with Stage IV breast cancer who are not refractory to primary systemic therapy. The inclusion criteria for the study are as follows: untreated patients with histologically confirmed invasive breast cancer with one or more measurable metastatic lesions diagnosed by radiological examination. All patients receive primary systemic therapy according to the estrogen receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor type-2 status of the primary breast cancer after the first registration. After 3 months, the patients without disease progression are randomized to the primary tumour resection plus systemic therapy arm or the systemic therapy alone arm. The primary endpoint is the overall survival, and the secondary endpoints are proportion of patients without tumour progression at the metastatic sites, yearly local recurrence-free survival, proportion of local ulcer/local bleeding, yearly primary tumour resection-free survival, adverse events of chemotherapy, operative morbidity and serious adverse events. The patient recruitment was commenced in May 2011. Enrolment of 410 patients for randomization is planned over a 5 year recruitment period. We hereby report the details of the study.

  12. Parametric optimization for tumour identification: bioheat equation using ANOVA and the Taguchi method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudharsan, N M; Ng, E Y

    2000-01-01

    Breast cancer is the number one killer disease among women. It is known that early detection of a tumour ensures better prognosis and higher survival rate. In this paper an intelligent, inexpensive and non-invasive diagnostic tool is developed for aiding breast cancer detection objectively. This tool is based on thermographic scanning of the breast surface in conjunction with numerical simulation of the breast using the bioheat equation. The medical applications of thermographic scanning make use of the skin temperature as an indication of an underlying pathological process. The thermal pattern over a breast tumour reflects the vascular reaction to the abnormality. Hence an abnormal temperature pattern may be an indicator of an underlying tumour. Seven important parameters are identified and analysis of variance (ANOVA) is performed using a 2n design (n = number of parameters, 7). The effect and importance of the various parameters are analysed. Based on the above 2(7) design, the Taguchi method is used to optimize the parameters in order to ensure the signal from the tumour maximized compared with the noise from the other factors. The model predicts that the ideal setting for capturing the signal from the tumour is when the patient is at basal metabolic activity with a correspondingly lower subcutaneous perfusion in a low temperature environment.

  13. Common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are associated with tumour subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mulligan, Anna Marie; Couch, Fergus J; Barrowdale, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    -negative breast cancer risk for both BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. In BRCA2 carriers, SNPs in FGFR2, TOX3, LSP1, SLC4A7/NEK10, 5p12, 2q35, and1p11.2 were significantly associated with ER-positive but not ER-negative disease. Similar results were observed when differentiating breast cancer cases by PR status...

  14. Which techniques for an additional irradiation of the tumour bed in a breast cancer?; Quelles techniques de complement d'irradiation du lit tumoral dans le cancer du sein?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chenna, H.; Iraqi, M.; Ahmedou, M.M.; Berhil, H.; El Kacemi, H.; Hassouni, K.; Kebdani, T.; Benjaafar, N.; El Gueddari, B.K. [Service de radiotherapie, Institut national d' oncologie, Rabat (Morocco)

    2010-10-15

    The authors report a comparison of different techniques for an additional irradiation of the tumour bed, in terms of local control and aesthetic result in the case of a breast cancer. This additional irradiation has been delivered by electron beam in five fractions, high dose rate curie-therapy in two fractions, photon beam in five or six fractions, and low dose rate curie-therapy. The dose increase in the tumour bed allows the local control rate to be increased without compromising aesthetic results. However, the comparison of the different boost techniques does not reveal significant differences. Short communication

  15. Co-expression of tenascin-C and vimentin in human breast cancer cells indicates phenotypic transdifferentiation during tumour progression: correlation with histopathological parameters, hormone receptors, and oncoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandachi, N; Hauser-Kronberger, C; Moré, E; Wiesener, B; Hacker, G W; Dietze, O; Wirl, G

    2001-02-01

    Loss of epithelial morphology and the acquisition of mesenchymal characteristics are typical for carcinoma cells in tumour progression. In human breast carcinomas, up-regulation of tenascin-C (TN-C) and vimentin (Vim) is frequently observed in cancer cells and correlates with increased malignancy. Thus, it is possible that TN-C is co-expressed with Vim, representing cancer cells that have undergone epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). This study examined 128 breast carcinomas using immunohistochemical techniques to demonstrate that mammary cancer cells are a prominent source of both TN-C and Vim. Statistical analysis revealed a significant association between TN-C and Vim expression in cancer cells. TN-C expression also correlated positively with overexpression of c-erbB-2 oncoprotein and down-regulation of oestrogen receptors (ERs). Eleven human mammary cancer cell lines and two 'normal' cell lines were examined by western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Co-expression of TN-C and Vim was detected in the carcinosarcoma cell line HS 578T, SK-BR-3 (B), fibroblast-like MDA-MB-231 cells, and the myoepithelial cell line HBL 100. These findings suggest that TN-C and Vim, when co-expressed in mammary carcinoma cells, represent regulator genes likely to be involved in EMT during mammary carcinogenesis.

  16. A comparison among HER2, TP53, PAI-1, angiogenesis, and proliferation activity as prognostic variables in tumours from 408 patients diagnosed with early breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Offersen, Birgitte Vrou; Alsner, Jan; Ege Olsen, Karen;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The prognostic potential of HER2, TP53 mutations, PAI-1 protein levels, angiogenesis and proliferation were investigated in tumours from 408 patients with early breast cancer followed >10 years. One hundred and sixty seven patients (41%) died from breast cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS...... receptor (p prognosis. In multivariate analysis, metastatic nodes (1-3 positive: RR 1.56 95% CI 1.02-2.38; >3 positive: RR 3.70 95% CI 2.54-5.38), HER2+ (RR 1.91, 95% CI 1.35-2.70), mutated TP53 (RR 1.70, 95% CI 1.21-2.38), PAI-1 (RR 1.04, 95% CI 1.......01-1.07) and grade 3 (RR 1.96, 95% CI 1.83-3.22) were independent markers of poor outcome. CONCLUSION: Compared to PAI-1 protein levels, Chalkley counts and MIB-1, HER2+ and mutations of TP53 were the strongest independent markers of poor prognosis irrespective of nodal status....

  17. Transposon mutagenesis identifies genes that cooperate with mutant Pten in breast cancer progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel, Roberto; Lee, Song-Choon; Hon-Kim Ban, Kenneth; Guzman-Rojas, Liliana; Mann, Michael B.; Newberg, Justin Y.; McNoe, Leslie A.; Selvanesan, Luxmanan; Ward, Jerrold M.; Rust, Alistair G.; Chin, Kuan-Yew; Black, Michael A.; Jenkins, Nancy A.; Copeland, Neal G.

    2016-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) has the worst prognosis of any breast cancer subtype. To better understand the genetic forces driving TNBC, we performed a transposon mutagenesis screen in a phosphatase and tensin homolog (Pten) mutant mice and identified 12 candidate trunk drivers and a much larger number of progression genes. Validation studies identified eight TNBC tumor suppressor genes, including the GATA-like transcriptional repressor TRPS1. Down-regulation of TRPS1 in TNBC cells promoted epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) by deregulating multiple EMT pathway genes, in addition to increasing the expression of SERPINE1 and SERPINB2 and the subsequent migration, invasion, and metastasis of tumor cells. Transposon mutagenesis has thus provided a better understanding of the genetic forces driving TNBC and discovered genes with potential clinical importance in TNBC. PMID:27849608

  18. Genome-wide association studies identify four ER negative–specific breast cancer risk loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Couch, Fergus J; Lindstrom, Sara; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Brook, Mark N; orr, Nick; Rhie, Suhn Kyong; Riboli, Elio; Feigelson, Heather s; Le Marchand, Loic; Buring, Julie E; Eccles, Diana; Miron, Penelope; Fasching, Peter A; Brauch, Hiltrud; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Carpenter, Jane; Godwin, Andrew K; Nevanlinna, Heli; Giles, Graham G; Cox, Angela; Hopper, John L; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Dicks, Ed; Howat, Will J; Schoof, Nils; Bojesen, Stig E; Lambrechts, Diether; Broeks, Annegien; Andrulis, Irene L; Guénel, Pascal; Burwinkel, Barbara; Sawyer, Elinor J; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Fletcher, Olivia; Winqvist, Robert; Brenner, Hermann; Mannermaa, Arto; Hamann, Ute; Meindl, Alfons; Lindblom, Annika; Zheng, Wei; Devillee, Peter; Goldberg, Mark S; Lubinski, Jan; Kristensen, Vessela; Swerdlow, Anthony; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Dörk, Thilo; Muir, Kenneth; Matsuo, Keitaro; Wu, Anna H; Radice, Paolo; Teo, Soo Hwang; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Blot, William; Kang, Daehee; Hartman, Mikael; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Shen, Chen-Yang; Southey, Melissa C; Park, Daniel J; Hammet, Fleur; Stone, Jennifer; Veer, Laura J Van’t; Rutgers, Emiel J; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Peto, Julian; Schrauder, Michael G; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Silva, Isabel dos Santos; Johnson, Nichola; Warren, Helen; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J; Miller, Nicola; Marme, Federick; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Truong, Therese; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Kerbrat, Pierre; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Flyger, Henrik; Milne, Roger L; Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias; Menéndez, Primitiva; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Lichtner, Peter; Lochmann, Magdalena; Justenhoven, Christina; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Muranen, Taru A; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Greco, Dario; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Yatabe, Yasushi; Antonenkova, Natalia N; Margolin, Sara; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Balleine, Rosemary; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Van Den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O; Neven, Patrick; Dieudonné, Anne-Sophie; Leunen, Karin; Rudolph, Anja; Nickels, Stefan; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peissel, Bernard; Bernard, Loris; Olson, Janet E; Wang, Xianshu; Stevens, Kristen; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Mclean, Catriona; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Feng, Ye; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Yip, Cheng Har; Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Shrubsole, Martha; Long, Jirong; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kauppila, Saila; knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Tollenaar, Robertus A E M; Seynaeve, Caroline M; Kriege, Mieke; Hooning, Maartje J; Van den Ouweland, Ans M W; Van Deurzen, Carolien H M; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Hui; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy P; Cross, Simon S; Reed, Malcolm W R; Signorello, Lisa; Cai, Qiuyin; Shah, Mitul; Miao, Hui; Chan, Ching Wan; Chia, Kee Seng; Jakubowska, Anna; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Wu, Pei-Ei; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Ashworth, Alan; Jones, Michael; Tessier, Daniel C; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M Rosario; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Ambrosone, Christine B; Bandera, Elisa V; John, Esther M; Chen, Gary K; Hu, Jennifer J; Rodriguez-gil, Jorge L; Bernstein, Leslie; Press, Michael F; Ziegler, Regina G; Millikan, Robert M; Deming-Halverson, Sandra L; Nyante, Sarah; Ingles, Sue A; Waisfisz, Quinten; Tsimiklis, Helen; Makalic, Enes; Schmidt, Daniel; Bui, Minh; Gibson, Lorna; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Schmutzler, Rita K; Hein, Rebecca; Dahmen, Norbert; Beckmann, Lars; Aaltonen, Kirsimari; Czene, Kamila; Irwanto, Astrid; Liu, Jianjun; Turnbull, Clare; Rahman, Nazneen; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Olswold, Curtis; Slager, Susan; Pilarski, Robert; Ademuyiwa, Foluso; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Martin, Nicholas G; Montgomery, Grant W; Slamon, Dennis J; Rauh, Claudia; Lux, Michael P; Jud, Sebastian M; Bruning, Thomas; Weaver, Joellen; Sharma, Priyanka; Pathak, Harsh; Tapper, Will; Gerty, Sue; Durcan, Lorraine; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Tumino, Rosario; Peeters, Petra H; Kaaks, Rudolf; Campa, Daniele; Canzian, Federico; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Johansson, Mattias; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Travis, Ruth; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Kolonel, Laurence N; Chen, Constance; Beck, Andy; Hankinson, Susan E; Berg, Christine D; Hoover, Robert N; Lissowska, Jolanta; Figueroa, Jonine D

    2013-01-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER)-negative tumors represent 20–30% of all breast cancers, with a higher proportion occurring in younger women and women of African ancestry1. The etiology2 and clinical behavior3 of ER-negative tumors are different from those of tumors expressing ER (ER positive), including differences in genetic predisposition4. To identify susceptibility loci specific to ER-negative disease, we combined in a meta-analysis 3 genome-wide association studies of 4,193 ER-negative breast cancer cases and 35,194 controls with a series of 40 follow-up studies (6,514 cases and 41,455 controls), genotyped using a custom Illumina array, iCOGS, developed by the Collaborative Oncological Gene-environment Study (COGS). SNPs at four loci, 1q32.1 (MDM4, P = 2.1 × 10−12 and LGR6, P = 1.4 × 10−8), 2p24.1 (P = 4.6 × 10−8) and 16q12.2 (FTO, P = 4.0 × 10−8), were associated with ER-negative but not ER-positive breast cancer (P > 0.05). These findings provide further evidence for distinct etiological pathways associated with invasive ER-positive and ER-negative breast cancers. PMID:23535733

  19. Expression of Erk5 in early stage breast cancer and association with disease free survival identifies this kinase as a potential therapeutic target.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Montero

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Breast cancer is the most common neoplasia in women. Even though advances in its treatment have improved disease outcome, some patients relapse. Therefore, attempts to better define the molecular determinants that drive breast cancer cell proliferation may help in defining potential therapeutic targets. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK play important roles in tumorigenesis. One of them, Erk5, has been linked to the proliferation of breast cancer cells in vitro. Here we have investigated the expression and prognostic value of Erk5 in human breast cancer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Animal and cellular models were used to study Erk5 expression and function in breast cancer. In 84 human breast tumours the expression of Erk5 was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Active Erk5 (pErk5 was studied by Western blotting. Correlation of Erk5 with clinicopathological parameters and with disease-free survival in early stage breast cancer patients was analyzed. Expression of Erk5 was detected in most patients, and overexpression was found in 20%. Active Erk5 was present in a substantial number of samples, as well as in tumours from an animal breast cancer model. Overexpression of Erk5 was associated with a decrease in disease-free survival time, which was independent of other clinicopathological parameters of prognosis. Transient transfection of a short hairpin RNA (shRNA targeting Erk5, and a stable cell line expressing a dominant negative form of Erk5 (Erk5(AEF, were used to investigate the influence of Erk5 on drugs used in the clinic to treat breast tumours. We found that inhibition of Erk5 decreased cancer cell proliferation and also sensitized these cells to the action of anti-HER2 therapies. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Overexpression of Erk5 is an independent predictor of disease-free survival in breast cancer, and may represent a future therapeutic target.

  20. TOX3 mutations in breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Owain Jones

    Full Text Available TOX3 maps to 16q12, a region commonly lost in breast cancers and recently implicated in the risk of developing breast cancer. However, not much is known of the role of TOX3 itself in breast cancer biology. This is the first study to determine the importance of TOX3 mutations in breast cancers. We screened TOX3 for mutations in 133 breast tumours and identified four mutations (three missense, one in-frame deletion of 30 base pairs in six primary tumours, corresponding to an overall mutation frequency of 4.5%. One potentially deleterious missense mutation in exon 3 (Leu129Phe was identified in one tumour (genomic DNA and cDNA. Whilst copy number changes of 16q12 are common in breast cancer, our data show that mutations of TOX3 are present at low frequency in tumours. Our results support that TOX3 should be further investigated to elucidate its role in breast cancer biology.

  1. Fine-scale mapping of the 4q24 locus identifies two independent loci associated with breast cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Xingyi; Long, Jirong; Zeng, Chenjie

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A recent association study identified a common variant (rs9790517) at 4q24 to be associated with breast cancer risk. Independent association signals and potential functional variants in this locus have not been explored. METHODS: We conducted a fine-mapping analysis in 55,540 breast...... was associated with level of expression of TET2 in breast normal and tumor tissue. CONCLUSION: Our study identified two independent association signals at 4q24 in relation to breast cancer risk and suggested that observed association in this locus may be mediated through the regulation of TET2. IMPACT: Fine...... cancer cases and 51,168 controls from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. RESULTS: Conditional analyses identified two independent association signals among women of European ancestry, represented by rs9790517 [conditional P = 2.51 × 10(-4); OR, 1.04; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.02-1.07] and rs...

  2. Fine-mapping identifies two additional breast cancer susceptibility loci at 9q31.2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Nick; Dudbridge, Frank; Dryden, Nicola; Maguire, Sarah; Novo, Daniela; Perrakis, Eleni; Johnson, Nichola; Ghoussaini, Maya; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Apicella, Carmel; Stone, Jennifer; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Broeks, Annegien; Van't Veer, Laura J; Hogervorst, Frans B; Fasching, Peter A; Haeberle, Lothar; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Gibson, Lorna; Aitken, Zoe; Warren, Helen; Sawyer, Elinor; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J; Miller, Nicola; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Chistof; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Sanchez, Marie; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Flyger, Henrik; Benitez, Javier; Zamora, Maria Pilar; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Menéndez, Primitiva; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Hamann, Ute; Brauch, Hiltrud; Justenhoven, Christina; Brüning, Thomas; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Khan, Sofia; Bogdanova, Natalia; Dörk, Thilo; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Beesley, Jonathan; Lambrechts, Diether; Moisse, Matthieu; Floris, Guiseppe; Beuselinck, Benoit; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peissel, Bernard; Pensotti, Valeria; Couch, Fergus J; Olson, Janet E; Slettedahl, Seth; Vachon, Celine; Giles, Graham G; Milne, Roger L; McLean, Catriona; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Simard, Jacques; Goldberg, Mark S; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Kristensen, Vessela; Alnæs, Grethe Grenaker; Nord, Silje; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Zheng, Wei; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Shrubsole, Martha; Long, Jirong; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robertus A E M; Seynaeve, Caroline M; Van Asperen, Christi J; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J; Lissowska, Jolanta; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Klevebring, Daniel; Hooning, Maartje J; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van Deurzen, Carolien H M; Kriege, Mieke; Hall, Per; Li, Jingmei; Liu, Jianjun; Humphreys, Keith; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Reed, Malcolm W R; Pharoah, Paul D P; Dunning, Alison M; Shah, Mitul; Perkins, Barbara J; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Ashworth, Alan; Swerdlow, Anthony; Jones, Michael; Schoemaker, Minouk J; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K; Olswold, Curtis; Slager, Susan; Toland, Amanda E; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidema; Iwata, Hiroji; Ishiguro, Junko; Wu, Anna H; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Van Den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O; Teo, Soo Hwang; Yip, Cheng Har; Kang, Peter; Ikram, Mohammad Kamran; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Hui; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Park, Sue K; Noh, Dong-Young; Hartman, Mikael; Miao, Hui; Lim, Wei Yen; Lee, Soo Chin; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Brennan, Paul; Mckay, James; Wu, Pei-Ei; Hou, Ming-Feng; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Shen, Chen-Yang; Blot, William; Cai, Qiuyin; Signorello, Lisa B; Luccarini, Craig; Bayes, Caroline; Ahmed, Shahana; Maranian, Mel; Healey, Catherine S; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M Rosario; Álvarez, Nuria; Herrero, Daniel; Tessier, Daniel C; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Hunter, David J; Lindstrom, Sara; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Bolla, Manjeet K; Easton, Douglas F; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Fletcher, Olivia; Peto, Julian

    2015-05-15

    We recently identified a novel susceptibility variant, rs865686, for estrogen-receptor positive breast cancer at 9q31.2. Here, we report a fine-mapping analysis of the 9q31.2 susceptibility locus using 43 160 cases and 42 600 controls of European ancestry ascertained from 52 studies and a further 5795 cases and 6624 controls of Asian ancestry from nine studies. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs676256 was most strongly associated with risk in Europeans (odds ratios [OR] = 0.90 [0.88-0.92]; P-value = 1.58 × 10(-25)). This SNP is one of a cluster of highly correlated variants, including rs865686, that spans ∼14.5 kb. We identified two additional independent association signals demarcated by SNPs rs10816625 (OR = 1.12 [1.08-1.17]; P-value = 7.89 × 10(-09)) and rs13294895 (OR = 1.09 [1.06-1.12]; P-value = 2.97 × 10(-11)). SNP rs10816625, but not rs13294895, was also associated with risk of breast cancer in Asian individuals (OR = 1.12 [1.06-1.18]; P-value = 2.77 × 10(-05)). Functional genomic annotation using data derived from breast cancer cell-line models indicates that these SNPs localise to putative enhancer elements that bind known drivers of hormone-dependent breast cancer, including ER-α, FOXA1 and GATA-3. In vitro analyses indicate that rs10816625 and rs13294895 have allele-specific effects on enhancer activity and suggest chromatin interactions with the KLF4 gene locus. These results demonstrate the power of dense genotyping in large studies to identify independent susceptibility variants. Analysis of associations using subjects with different ancestry, combined with bioinformatic and genomic characterisation, can provide strong evidence for the likely causative alleles and their functional basis.

  3. Genome-Wide Association Study in BRCA1 Mutation Carriers Identifies Novel Loci Associated with Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.J. Couch (Fergus); X. Wang (Xing); L. McGuffog (Lesley); A. Lee; C. Olswold (Curtis); K.B. Kuchenbaecker (Karoline); P. Soucy (Penny); Z. Fredericksen (Zachary); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); J. Dennis (Joe); M.M. Gaudet (Mia); E. Dicks (Ed); M. Kosel (Matthew); S. Healey (Sue); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); F. Bacot (Francois); D. Vincent (Daniel); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); S. Peock (Susan); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); A. Jakubowska (Anna); P. Radice (Paolo); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); S.M. Domchek (Susan); M. Piedmonte (Marion); C.F. Singer (Christian); E. Friedman (Eitan); M. Thomassen (Mads); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); C. Szabo (Csilla); I. Blanco (Ignacio); M.H. Greene (Mark); B. Karlan; J. Garber; C. Phelan (Catherine); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); M. Montagna (Marco); E. Olah; I.L. Andrulis (Irene); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); D. Yannoukakos (Drakoulis); D. Goldgar (David); T. Caldes (Trinidad); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); A. Osorio (Ana); M.-B. Terry (Mary-Beth); M.B. Daly (Mary); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); U. Hamann (Ute); S.J. Ramus (Susan); A. Ewart-Toland (Amanda); M.A. Caligo (Maria); O.I. Olopade (Olofunmilayo); N. Tung (Nadine); K. Claes (Kathleen); M.S. Beattie (Mary); M.C. Southey (Melissa); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); E.M. John (Esther); A. Kwong (Ava); O. Diez (Orland); J. Balmana (Judith); R.B. Barkardottir (Rosa); B.K. Arun (Banu); G. Rennert (Gad); S.-H. Teo; P.A. Ganz (Patricia); I. Campbell (Ian); A.H. van der Hout (Annemarie); C.H.M. van Deurzen (Carolien); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); E.B. Gómez García (Encarna); F.E. van Leeuwen (F.); H. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); J.J. Gille (Johan); M.G.E.M. Ausems (Margreet); M.J. Blok (Marinus); M.J. Ligtenberg (Marjolijn); M.A. Rookus (Matti); P. Devilee (Peter); S. Verhoef; T.A.M. van Os (Theo); J.T. Wijnen (Juul); D. Frost (Debra); S. Ellis (Steve); E. Fineberg (Elena); R. Platte (Radka); D.G. Evans (Gareth); L. Izatt (Louise); R. Eeles (Rosalind); J.W. Adlard (Julian); D. Eccles (Diana); J. Cook (Jackie); C. Brewer (C.); F. Douglas (Fiona); S.V. Hodgson (Shirley); P.J. Morrison (Patrick); L. Side (Lucy); A. Donaldson (Alan); C. Houghton (Catherine); M.T. Rogers (Mark); H. Dorkins (Huw); J. Eason (Jacqueline); H. Gregory (Helen); E. McCann (Emma); A. Murray (Alexandra); A. Calender (Alain); A. Hardouin (Agnès); P. Berthet (Pascaline); C.D. Delnatte (Capucine); C. Nogues (Catherine); C. Lasset (Christine); C. Houdayer (Claude); D. Leroux (Dominique); E. Rouleau (Etienne); F. Prieur (Fabienne); F. Damiola (Francesca); H. Sobol (Hagay); I. Coupier (Isabelle); L. Vénat-Bouvet (Laurence); L. Castera (Laurent); M. Gauthier-Villars (Marion); M. Léone (Mélanie); P. Pujol (Pascal); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); Y.-J. Bignon (Yves-Jean); E. Złowocka-Perłowska (Elzbieta); J. Gronwald (Jacek); J. Lubinski (Jan); K. Durda (Katarzyna); K. Jaworska (Katarzyna); T. Huzarski (Tomasz); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); A. Viel (Alessandra); B. Peissel (Bernard); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); G. Melloni (Giulia); L. Ottini (Laura); L. Papi (Laura); L. Varesco (Liliana); M.G. Tibiletti (Maria Grazia); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); S. Volorio (Sara); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); V. Pensotti (Valeria); N. Arnold (Norbert); C. Engel (Christoph); H. Deissler (Helmut); D. Gadzicki (Dorothea); P.A. Gehrig (Paola A.); K. Kast (Karin); K. Rhiem (Kerstin); A. Meindl (Alfons); D. Niederacher (Dieter); N. Ditsch (Nina); H. Plendl (Hansjoerg); S. Preisler-Adams (Sabine); S. Engert (Stefanie); C. Sutter (Christian); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); B.H.F. Weber (Bernhard); B. Arver (Brita Wasteson); M. Stenmark-Askmalm (M.); N. Loman (Niklas); R. Rosenquist (R.); Z. Einbeigi (Zakaria); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); S.V. Blank (Stephanie); D.E. Cohn (David); G.C. Rodriguez (Gustavo); L. Small (Laurie); M. Friedlander (Michael); V.L. Bae-Jump (Victoria L.); A. Fink-Retter (Anneliese); C. Rappaport (Christine); D. Gschwantler-Kaulich (Daphne); G. Pfeiler (Georg); M.-K. Tea; N.M. Lindor (Noralane); B. Kaufman (Bella); S. Shimon Paluch (Shani); Y. Laitman (Yael); A.-B. Skytte (Anne-Bine); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); I.S. Pedersen (Inge Sokilde); S.T. Moeller (Sanne Traasdahl); T.A. Kruse (Torben); U.B. Jensen; J. Vijai (Joseph); K. Sarrel (Kara); M. Robson (Mark); N. Kauff (Noah); A.M. Mulligan (Anna Marie); G. Glendon (Gord); H. Ozcelik (Hilmi); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); F.C. Nielsen (Finn); L. Jønson (Lars); M.K. Andersen (Mette); Y.C. Ding (Yuan); L. Steele (Linda); L. Foretova (Lenka); A. Teulé (A.); C. Lazaro (Conxi); J. Brunet (Joan); M.A. Pujana (Miguel); P.L. Mai (Phuong); J.T. Loud (Jennifer); C.S. Walsh (Christine); K.J. Lester (Kathryn); S. Orsulic (Sandra); S. Narod (Steven); J. Herzog (Josef); S.R. Sand (Sharon); S. Tognazzo (Silvia); S. Agata (Simona); T. Vaszko (Tibor); J. Weaver (JoEllen); A. Stavropoulou (Alexandra); S.S. Buys (Saundra); A. Romero (Alfonso); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); T.A. Muranen (Taru); M. Duran; W.K. Chung (Wendy); A. Lasa (Adriana); C.M. Dorfling (Cecelia); A. Miron (Alexander); J. Benítez (Javier); L. Senter (Leigha); D. Huo (Dezheng); S. Chan (Salina); A. Sokolenko (Anna); J. Chiquette (Jocelyne); L. Tihomirova (Laima); M.O.W. Friebel (Mark ); B.A. Agnarsson (Bjarni); K.H. Lu (Karen); F. Lejbkowicz (Flavio); P.A. James (Paul ); A.S. Hall (Alistair); A.M. Dunning (Alison); Y. Tessier (Yann); J. Cunningham (Jane); S. Slager (Susan); C. Wang (Chen); S. Hart (Stewart); K. Stevens (Kristen); J. Simard (Jacques); T. Pastinen (Tomi); V.S. Pankratz (Shane); K. Offit (Kenneth); D.F. Easton (Douglas); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis); H. Thorne (Heather); E. Niedermayr (Eveline); Å. Borg (Åke); H. Olsson; H. Jernström (H.); K. Henriksson (Karin); K. Harbst (Katja); M. Soller (Maria); U. Kristoffersson (Ulf); A. Öfverholm (Anna); M. Nordling (Margareta); P. Karlsson (Per); A. von Wachenfeldt (Anna); A. Liljegren (Annelie); A. Lindblom (Annika); G.B. Bustinza; J. Rantala (Johanna); B. Melin (Beatrice); C.E. Ardnor (Christina Edwinsdotter); M. Emanuelsson (Monica); H. Ehrencrona (Hans); M.H. Pigg (Maritta ); S. Liedgren (Sigrun); M.A. Rookus (M.); S. Verhoef (S.); F.E. van Leeuwen (F.); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); J.L. de Lange (J.); J.M. Collee (Margriet); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); C.J. van Asperen (Christi); J.T. Wijnen (Juul); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); P. Devilee (Peter); T.C.T.E.F. van Cronenburg; C.M. Kets; A.R. Mensenkamp (Arjen); R.B. van der Luijt (Rob); C.M. Aalfs (Cora); T.A.M. van Os (Theo); Q. Waisfisz (Quinten); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); E.B. Gomez Garcia (Encarna); J.C. Oosterwijk (Jan); M.J. Mourits; G.H. de Bock (Geertruida); S.D. Ellis (Steve); E. Fineberg (Elena); Z. Miedzybrodzka (Zosia); L. Jeffers (Lisa); T.J. Cole (Trevor); K.-R. Ong (Kai-Ren); J. Hoffman (Jonathan); M. James (Margaret); J. Paterson (Joan); A. Taylor (Amy); A. Murray (Anna); M.J. Kennedy (John); D.E. Barton (David); M.E. Porteous (Mary); S. Drummond (Sarah); C. Brewer (Carole); E. Kivuva (Emma); A. Searle (Anne); S. Goodman (Selina); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); V. Murday (Victoria); N. Bradshaw (Nicola); L. Snadden (Lesley); M. Longmuir (Mark); C. Watt (Catherine); S. Gibson (Sarah); E. Haque (Eshika); E. Tobias (Ed); A. Duncan (Alexis); L. Izatt (Louise); C. Jacobs (Chris); C. Langman (Caroline); A.F. Brady (Angela); S.A. Melville (Scott); K. Randhawa (Kashmir); J. Barwell (Julian); G. Serra-Feliu (Gemma); I.O. Ellis (Ian); F. Lalloo (Fiona); J. Taylor (James); A. Male (Alison); C. Berlin (Cheryl); R. Collier (Rebecca); F. Douglas (Fiona); O. Claber (Oonagh); I. Jobson (Irene); L.J. Walker (Lisa); D. McLeod (Diane); D. Halliday (Dorothy); S. Durell (Sarah); B. Stayner (Barbara); S. Shanley (Susan); N. Rahman (Nazneen); R. Houlston (Richard); A. Stormorken (Astrid); E. Bancroft (Elizabeth); E. Page (Elizabeth); A. Ardern-Jones (Audrey); K. Kohut (Kelly); J. Wiggins (Jennifer); E. Castro (Elena); S.R. Killick; S. Martin (Sue); D. Rea (Dan); A. Kulkarni (Anjana); O. Quarrell (Oliver); C. Bardsley (Cathryn); S. Goff (Sheila); G. Brice (Glen); L. Winchester (Lizzie); C. Eddy (Charlotte); V. Tripathi (Vishakha); V. Attard (Virginia); A. Lehmann (Anna); A. Lucassen (Anneke); G. Crawford (Gabe); D. McBride (Donna); S. Smalley (Sarah); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); F. Damiola (Francesca); L. Barjhoux (Laure); C. Verny-Pierre (Carole); S. Giraud (Sophie); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); B. Buecher (Bruno); V. Moncoutier (Virginie); M. Belotti (Muriel); C. Tirapo (Carole); A. de Pauw (Antoine); B. Bressac-de Paillerets (Brigitte); O. Caron (Olivier); Y.-J. Bignon (Yves-Jean); N. Uhrhammer (Nancy); V. Bonadona (Valérie); S. Handallou (Sandrine); A. hardouin (Agnès); H. Sobol (Hagay); V. Bourdon (Violaine); T. Noguchi (Tetsuro); A. Remenieras (Audrey); F. Eisinger (François); J.-P. Peyrat; J. Fournier (Joëlle); F. Révillion (Françoise); P. Vennin (Philippe); C. Adenis (Claude); R. Lidereau (Rosette); L. Demange (Liliane); D.W. Muller (Danièle); J.P. Fricker (Jean Pierre); E. Barouk-Simonet (Emmanuelle); F. Bonnet (Françoise); V. Bubien (Virginie); N. Sevenet (Nicolas); M. Longy (Michel); C. Toulas (Christine); R. Guimbaud (Rosine); L. Gladieff (Laurence); V. Feillel (Viviane); H. Dreyfus (Hélène); C. Rebischung (Christine); M. Peysselon (Magalie); F. Coron (Fanny); L. Faivre (Laurence); M. Lebrun (Marine); C. Kientz (Caroline); S.F. Ferrer; M. Frenay (Marc); I. Mortemousque (Isabelle); F. Coulet (Florence); C. Colas (Chrystelle); F. Soubrier; J. Sokolowska (Johanna); M. Bronner (Myriam); H. Lynch (Henry); C.L. Snyder (Carrie); M. Angelakos (Maggie); J. Maskiell (Judi); G.S. Dite (Gillian)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBRCA1-associated breast and ovarian cancer risks can be modified by common genetic variants. To identify further cancer risk-modifying loci, we performed a multi-stage GWAS of 11,705 BRCA1 carriers (of whom 5,920 were diagnosed with breast and 1,839 were diagnosed with ovarian cancer), w

  4. Genome-Wide Association Study in BRCA1 Mutation Carriers Identifies Novel Loci Associated with Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Couch, Fergus J.; Wang, Xianshu; McGuffog, Lesley; Lee, Andrew; Olswold, Curtis; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Soucy, Penny; Fredericksen, Zachary; Barrowdale, Daniel; Dennis, Joe; Gaudet, Mia M.; Dicks, Ed; Kosel, Matthew; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Lee, Adam; Bacot, Francois; Vincent, Daniel; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Peock, Susan; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Jakubowska, Anna; Radice, Paolo; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Domchek, Susan M.; Piedmonte, Marion; Singer, Christian F.; Friedman, Eitan; Thomassen, Mads; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Szabo, Csilla I.; Blanco, Ignacio; Greene, Mark H.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Garber, Judy; Phelan, Catherine M.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Montagna, Marco; Olah, Edith; Andrulis, Irene L.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Goldgar, David E.; Caldes, Trinidad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Osorio, Ana; Terry, Mary Beth; Daly, Mary B.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Hamann, Ute; Ramus, Susan J.; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Caligo, Maria A.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Tung, Nadine; Claes, Kathleen; Beattie, Mary S.; Southey, Melissa C.; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Tischkowitz, Marc; Janavicius, Ramunas; John, Esther M.; Kwong, Ava; Diez, Orland; Balmana, Judith; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Arun, Banu K.; Rennert, Gad; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Ganz, Patricia A.; Campbell, Ian; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; van Deurzen, Carolien H. M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Garcia, Encarna B. Gomez; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Gille, Johannes J. P.; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; Blok, Marinus J.; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J. L.; Rookus, Matti A.; Devilee, Peter; Verhoef, Senno; van Os, Theo A. M.; Wijnen, Juul T.; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve; Fineberg, Elena; Platte, Radka; Evans, D. Gareth; Izatt, Louise; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Adlard, Julian; Eccles, Diana M.; Cook, Jackie; Brewer, Carole; Douglas, Fiona; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J.; Side, Lucy E.; Donaldson, Alan; Houghton, Catherine; Rogers, Mark T.; Dorkins, Huw; Eason, Jacqueline; Gregory, Helen; McCann, Emma; Murray, Alex; Calender, Alain; Hardouin, Agnes; Berthet, Pascaline; Delnatte, Capucine; Nogues, Catherine; Lasset, Christine; Houdayer, Claude; Leroux, Dominique; Rouleau, Etienne; Prieur, Fabienne; Damiola, Francesca; Sobol, Hagay; Coupier, Isabelle; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Castera, Laurent; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Leone, Melanie; Pujol, Pascal; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Zlowocka-Perlowska, Elzbieta; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Huzarski, Tomasz; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Viel, Alessandra; Peissel, Bernard; Bonanni, Bernardo; Melloni, Giulia; Ottini, Laura; Papi, Laura; Varesco, Liliana; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Peterlongo, Paolo; Volorio, Sara; Manoukian, Siranoush; Pensotti, Valeria; Arnold, Norbert; Engel, Christoph; Deissler, Helmut; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Gehrig, Andrea; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Meindl, Alfons; Niederacher, Dieter; Ditsch, Nina; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Engert, Stefanie; Sutter, Christian; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Weber, Bernhard H. F.; Arver, Brita; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Loman, Niklas; Rosenquist, Richard; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Blank, Stephanie V.; Cohn, David E.; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Small, Laurie; Friedlander, Michael; Bae-Jump, Victoria L.; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Rappaport, Christine; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Lindor, Noralane M.; Kaufman, Bella; Paluch, Shani Shimon; Laitman, Yael; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Moeller, Sanne Traasdahl; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Vijai, Joseph; Sarrel, Kara; Robson, Mark; Kauff, Noah; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Ejlertsen, Bent; Nielsen, Finn C.; Jonson, Lars; Andersen, Mette K.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Steele, Linda; Foretova, Lenka; Teule, Alex; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Angel Pujana, Miquel; Mai, Phuong L.; Loud, Jennifer T.; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; Orsulic, Sandra; Narod, Steven A.; Herzog, Josef; Sand, Sharon R.; Tognazzo, Silvia; Agata, Simona; Vaszko, Tibor; Weaver, Joellen; Stavropoulou, Alexandra V.; Buys, Saundra S.; Romero, Atocha; de la Hoya, Miguel; Aittomaki, Kristiina; Muranen, Taru A.; Duran, Mercedes; Chung, Wendy K.; Lasa, Adriana; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; Miron, Alexander; Benitez, Javier; Senter, Leigha; Huo, Dezheng; Chan, Salina B.; Sokolenko, Anna P.; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Tihomirova, Laima; Friebel, Tara M.; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Lu, Karen H.; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; James, Paul A.; Hall, Per; Dunning, Alison M.

    2013-01-01

    BRCA1-associated breast and ovarian cancer risks can be modified by common genetic variants. To identify further cancer risk-modifying loci, we performed a multi-stage GWAS of 11,705 BRCA1 carriers (of whom 5,920 were diagnosed with breast and 1,839 were diagnosed with ovarian cancer), with a furthe

  5. An investigation of gene-environment interactions between 47 newly identified breast cancer susceptibility loci and environmental risk factors

    OpenAIRE

    Rudolph, Anja; Milne, Roger L; Truong, Thérèse; Knight, Julia A; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Behrens, Sabine; Eilber, Ursula; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Alison M Dunning; Shah, Mitul; Munday, Hannah R.; Darabi, Hatef

    2014-01-01

    A large genotyping project within the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) recently identified 41 associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and overall breast cancer (BC) risk. We investigated whether the effects of these 41 SNPs, as well as six SNPs associated with estrogen receptor (ER) negative BC risk are modified by 13 environmental risk factors for BC.

  6. Genetic mapping in mice identifies DMBT1 as a candidate modifier of mammary tumors and breast cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blackburn, Anneke C; Hill, Linda Z; Roberts, Amy L;

    2007-01-01

    Low-penetrance breast cancer susceptibility alleles seem to play a significant role in breast cancer risk but are difficult to identify in human cohorts. A genetic screen of 176 N2 backcross progeny of two Trp53(+/-) strains, BALB/c and C57BL/6, which differ in their susceptibility to mammary...

  7. Prognostic studies of canine and feline mammary tumours: the need for standardized procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, A J F; Baptista, C S; Gärtner, M F; Rutteman, G R

    2012-07-01

    For several years, veterinary oncologists have been struggling with the prognosis of mammary tumours in dogs and cats. Translation of tumour characteristics into prognostic information is an invaluable tool for the use of the most appropriate therapies, as well as for planning innovative therapeutic trials. Moreover, canine and feline spontaneous mammary gland tumours are good models for the study of human breast cancer. Collecting and interpreting information regarding the prognosis of canine and feline mammary tumours is difficult due to the fact that different methods have been applied to study various components and characteristics. This review identifies some of the challenges of prognostic studies of spontaneous canine and feline mammary tumours and suggests standardized procedures to overcome these challenges and facilitate reproducibility and assessment of results.

  8. [Commentary to the paper: immobilising malignant phyllodes tumour of the breast by E. Fritsche, U. Hug und D. Winterholer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horch, R E

    2015-04-01

    The size of a tumor should not be the limiting factor when it comes to the decision for surgical treatment of such entities. Due to modern plastic reconstructive techniques an R0 situaiton should always be attempted, and in the worst case an interdisciplinary palliative resection should be possible and recommendable. As the present case with a tumour that led to immobility clearly indicates, the gain in quality of life undoubtedly is a proof of the necessity and value of the surgical treatment of this entity.

  9. Regulators of genetic risk of breast cancer identified by integrative network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Mauro A A; de Santiago, Ines; Campbell, Thomas M; Vaughn, Courtney; Hickey, Theresa E; Ross, Edith; Tilley, Wayne D; Markowetz, Florian; Ponder, Bruce A J; Meyer, Kerstin B

    2016-01-01

    Genetic risk for breast cancer is conferred by a combination of multiple variants of small effect. To better understand how risk loci might combine, we examined whether risk-associated genes share regulatory mechanisms. We created a breast cancer gene regulatory network comprising transcription factors and groups of putative target genes (regulons) and asked whether specific regulons are enriched for genes associated with risk loci via expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs). We identified 36 overlapping regulons that were enriched for risk loci and formed a distinct cluster within the network, suggesting shared biology. The risk transcription factors driving these regulons are frequently mutated in cancer and lie in two opposing subgroups, which relate to estrogen receptor (ER)(+) luminal A or luminal B and ER(-) basal-like cancers and to different luminal epithelial cell populations in the adult mammary gland. Our network approach provides a foundation for determining the regulatory circuits governing breast cancer, to identify targets for intervention, and is transferable to other disease settings.

  10. Gene expression meta-analysis identifies metastatic pathways and transcription factors in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Mads; Tan, Qihua; Kruse, Torben

    2008-01-01

    tumors compared to non-metastasizing tumors. Meta-analysis has been used to determine overrepresentation of pathways and transcription factors targets, concordant deregulated in metastasizing breast tumors, in several data sets. RESULTS: The major findings are upregulation of cell cycle pathways...... system, angiogenesis, DNA repair and several signal transduction pathways are associated to metastasis. Finally several transcription factors e.g. E2F, NFY, and YY1 are identified as being involved in metastasis. CONCLUSIONS: By pathway meta-analysis many biological mechanisms beyond major...... studies. Besides classification of outcome, these global expression patterns may reflect biological mechanisms involved in metastasis of breast cancer. Our purpose has been to investigate pathways and transcription factors involved in metastasis by use of gene expression data sets. METHODS: We have...

  11. Molecular mechanisms for tumour resistance to chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Shu-Ting; Li, Zhi-Ling; He, Zhi-Xu; Qiu, Jia-Xuan; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2016-08-01

    Chemotherapy is one of the prevailing methods used to treat malignant tumours, but the outcome and prognosis of tumour patients are not optimistic. Cancer cells gradually generate resistance to almost all chemotherapeutic drugs via a variety of distinct mechanisms and pathways. Chemotherapeutic resistance, either intrinsic or acquired, is caused and sustained by reduced drug accumulation and increased drug export, alterations in drug targets and signalling transduction molecules, increased repair of drug-induced DNA damage, and evasion of apoptosis. In order to better understand the mechanisms of chemoresistance, this review highlights our current knowledge of the role of altered drug metabolism and transport and deregulation of apoptosis and autophagy in the development of tumour chemoresistance. Reduced intracellular activation of prodrugs (e.g. thiotepa and tegafur) or enhanced drug inactivation by Phase I and II enzymes contributes to the development of chemoresistance. Both primary and acquired resistance can be caused by alterations in the transport of anticancer drugs which is mediated by a variety of drug transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp), multidrug resistance associated proteins, and breast cancer resistance protein. Presently there is a line of evidence indicating that deregulation of programmed cell death including apoptosis and autophagy is also an important mechanism for tumour resistance to anticancer drugs. Reversal of chemoresistance is likely via pharmacological and biological approaches. Further studies are warranted to grasp the full picture of how each type of cancer cells develop resistance to anticancer drugs and to identify novel strategies to overcome it.

  12. CEF is superior to CMF for tumours with TOP2A aberrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunnarsdóttir, Katrín A; Jensen, Maj-Britt; Zahrieh, David;

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine TOP2A gene copy number changes as a means to identify groups of breast cancer patients with superior benefit from treatment with anthracyclines. Tumour tissue was retrospectively collected and successfully analysed for TOP2A in 773 of 980 Danish patients...

  13. A hypothesis-generating search for new genetic breast cancer syndromes - a national study in 803 Swedish families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    von Wachenfeldt Anna

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Among Swedish families with an inherited predisposition for breast cancer, less than one third segregate mutations in genes known to be associated with an increased risk of breast cancer in combination with other types of tumours. In a search for new putative familial breast cancer syndromes we studied Swedish families undergoing genetic counselling during 1992-2000. Four thousand families from counselling clinics in Sweden were eligible for study. Families with breast cancer only were excluded, as were families with mutations in genes already known to be associated with malignant diseases. We identified 803 families with two or more cases of breast cancer and at least one other type of cancer. The observed proportion of different types of non-breast cancer was compared with the percentage distribution of non-breast cancer tumours in Sweden in 1958 and 1999. We found tumours in the colon, ovary, endometrium, pancreas and liver, as well as leukaemia in a significantly larger proportion of the study population than in the general population in both years. These tumours were also seen among families where several members had one additional tumour, suggesting that malignancies at these sites, in combination with breast tumours, could constitute genetic syndromes. Endometrial carcinoma has not previously been described in the context of breast cancer syndromes and the excess of malignancies at this site could not be explained by secondary tumours. Thus, we suggest that endometrial carcinoma and breast cancer constitute a new breast cancer syndrome. Further investigation is warranted to categorize phenotypes of both breast and endometrial tumours in this subgroup.

  14. Multiplatform molecular profiling identifies potentially targetable biomarkers in malignant phyllodes tumors of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatalica, Zoran; Vranic, Semir; Ghazalpour, Anatole; Xiu, Joanne; Ocal, Idris Tolgay; McGill, John; Bender, Ryan P; Discianno, Erin; Schlum, Aaron; Sanati, Souzan; Palazzo, Juan; Reddy, Sandeep; Pockaj, Barbara

    2016-01-12

    Malignant phyllodes tumor is a rare breast malignancy with sarcomatous overgrowth and with limited effective treatment options for recurrent and metastatic cases. Recent clinical trials indicated a potential for anti-angiogenic, anti-EGFR and immunotherapeutic approaches for patients with sarcomas, which led us to investigate these and other targetable pathways in malignant phyllodes tumor of the breast. Thirty-six malignant phyllodes tumors (including 8 metastatic tumors with two cases having matched primary and metastatic tumors) were profiled using gene sequencing, gene copy number analysis, whole genome expression, and protein expression. Whole genome expression analysis demonstrated consistent over-expression of genes involved in angiogenesis including VEGFA, Angiopoietin-2, VCAM1, PDGFRA, and PTTG1. EGFR protein overexpression was observed in 26/27 (96%) of cases with amplification of the EGFR gene in 8/24 (33%) cases. Two EGFR mutations were identified including EGFRvIII and a presumed pathogenic V774M mutation, respectively. The most common pathogenic mutations included TP53 (50%) and PIK3CA (15%). Cases with matched primary and metastatic tumors harbored identical mutations in both sites (PIK3CA/KRAS and RB1 gene mutations, respectively). Tumor expression of PD-L1 immunoregulatory protein was observed in 3/22 (14%) of cases. Overexpression of molecular biomarkers of increased angiogenesis, EGFR and immune checkpoints provides novel targeted therapy options in malignant phyllodes tumors of the breast.

  15. Oncologic safety of breast conserving surgery after tumour downsizing by neoadjuvant therapy: a retrospective single centre cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzal, F; Riedl, O; Mittlböck, M; Dubsky, P; Bartsch, R; Steger, G; Jakesz, R; Gnant, M

    2011-05-01

    The objective of this study is to analyse local recurrence rates in patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy (nCT) comparing mastecomized (MX) patients with those undergoing breast conserving therapy (BCT). Patients undergoing breast cancer surgery after nCT (3xCMF or 3-6xED) between 1995 and 2007 at our department were retrospectively analysed. The median follow up was 60 months for 308 patients. Patients who were downsized from MX to BCT with partial or complete response (n = 104) had a similar local recurrence free survival (LRFS) compared to patients who did not experience successful downsizing (n = 67) and finally undergoing MX (LRFS MX-BCT 81% vs. MX-MX 91%; P = 0.79). Uni- and multivariate analyses demonstrated that BCT itself was not an independent prognostic factor for a worse LRFS (P = 0.07 and 0.14). After no pathologic change or progressive disease the risk of local recurrence was increased in patients undergoing BCT (MX-BCT; n = 6 LRFS 66%) compared with MX (n = 44; LRFS 90%; P = 0.04). Overall survival in general was better for the BCT group (n = 197) compared with MX group (n = 111) regardless of clinical response (92% vs. 72%; P downsizing by nCT in patients primarily scheduled for mastectomy. These patients, however, should not be treated with breast conservation in the absence of any proven response after nCT.

  16. Androgen receptors and serum testosterone levels identify different subsets of postmenopausal breast cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Secreto Giorgio

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Androgen receptors (AR are frequently expressed in breast cancers, but their implication in cancer growth is still controversial. In the present study, we further investigated the role of the androgen/AR pathway in breast cancer development. Methods AR expression was evaluated by immunochemistry in a cohort of 528 postmenopausal breast cancer patients previously examined for the association of serum testosterone levels with patient and tumor characteristics. AR expression was classified according to the percentage of stained cells: AR-absent (0% and AR-poorly (1%-30%, AR-moderately (>30%-60%, and AR-highly (>60% positive. Results Statistical analysis was performed in 451 patients who experienced natural menopause. AR-high expression was significantly related with low histologic grade and estrogen receptor (ER- and progesterone receptor (PR-positive status (P trendP=0.022, although a trend across the AR expression categories was not present. When women defined by ER status were analyzed separately, regression analysis in the ER-positive group showed a significant association of high testosterone levels with AR-highly-positive expression (OR 1.86; 95% CI, 1.10-3.16, but the association was essentially due to patients greater than or equal to 65 years (OR 2.42; 95% CI, 1.22-4.82. In ER-positive group, elevated testosterone levels appeared also associated with AR-absent expression, although the small number of patients in this category limited the appearance of significant effects (OR 1.92; 95% CI, 0.73–5.02: the association was present in both age groups ( Conclusions The findings in the present study confirm that testosterone levels are a marker of hormone-dependent breast cancer and suggest that the contemporary evaluation of ER status, AR expression, and circulating testosterone levels may identify different subsets of cancers whose growth may be influenced by androgens.

  17. Exome sequencing identifies rare deleterious mutations in DNA repair genes FANCC and BLM as potential breast cancer susceptibility alleles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ella R Thompson

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite intensive efforts using linkage and candidate gene approaches, the genetic etiology for the majority of families with a multi-generational breast cancer predisposition is unknown. In this study, we used whole-exome sequencing of thirty-three individuals from 15 breast cancer families to identify potential predisposing genes. Our analysis identified families with heterozygous, deleterious mutations in the DNA repair genes FANCC and BLM, which are responsible for the autosomal recessive disorders Fanconi Anemia and Bloom syndrome. In total, screening of all exons in these genes in 438 breast cancer families identified three with truncating mutations in FANCC and two with truncating mutations in BLM. Additional screening of FANCC mutation hotspot exons identified one pathogenic mutation among an additional 957 breast cancer families. Importantly, none of the deleterious mutations were identified among 464 healthy controls and are not reported in the 1,000 Genomes data. Given the rarity of Fanconi Anemia and Bloom syndrome disorders among Caucasian populations, the finding of multiple deleterious mutations in these critical DNA repair genes among high-risk breast cancer families is intriguing and suggestive of a predisposing role. Our data demonstrate the utility of intra-family exome-sequencing approaches to uncover cancer predisposition genes, but highlight the major challenge of definitively validating candidates where the incidence of sporadic disease is high, germline mutations are not fully penetrant, and individual predisposition genes may only account for a tiny proportion of breast cancer families.

  18. Fine-mapping identifies two additional breast cancer susceptibility loci at 9q31.2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Nick; Dudbridge, Frank; Dryden, Nicola; Maguire, Sarah; Novo, Daniela; Perrakis, Eleni; Johnson, Nichola; Ghoussaini, Maya; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Apicella, Carmel; Stone, Jennifer; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Van't Veer, Laura J.; Hogervorst, Frans B.; Fasching, Peter A.; Haeberle, Lothar; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Gibson, Lorna; Aitken, Zoe; Warren, Helen; Sawyer, Elinor; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J.; Miller, Nicola; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Chistof; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Sanchez, Marie; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Flyger, Henrik; Benitez, Javier; Zamora, Maria Pilar; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Menéndez, Primitiva; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Hamann, Ute; Brauch, Hiltrud; Justenhoven, Christina; Brüning, Thomas; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Khan, Sofia; Bogdanova, Natalia; Dörk, Thilo; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Beesley, Jonathan; Lambrechts, Diether; Moisse, Matthieu; Floris, Guiseppe; Beuselinck, Benoit; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peissel, Bernard; Pensotti, Valeria; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet E.; Slettedahl, Seth; Vachon, Celine; Giles, Graham G.; Milne, Roger L.; McLean, Catriona; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Simard, Jacques; Goldberg, Mark S.; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Kristensen, Vessela; Alnæs, Grethe Grenaker; Nord, Silje; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Zheng, Wei; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Shrubsole, Martha; Long, Jirong; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robertus A. E. M.; Seynaeve, Caroline M.; Van Asperen, Christi J.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Klevebring, Daniel; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van Deurzen, Carolien H. M.; Kriege, Mieke; Hall, Per; Li, Jingmei; Liu, Jianjun; Humphreys, Keith; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Dunning, Alison M.; Shah, Mitul; Perkins, Barbara J.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Ashworth, Alan; Swerdlow, Anthony; Jones, Michael; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Olswold, Curtis; Slager, Susan; Toland, Amanda E.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidema; Iwata, Hiroji; Ishiguro, Junko; Wu, Anna H.; Tseng, Chiu-chen; Van Den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O.; Teo, Soo Hwang; Yip, Cheng Har; Kang, Peter; Ikram, Mohammad Kamran; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Hui; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Park, Sue K.; Noh, Dong-Young; Hartman, Mikael; Miao, Hui; Lim, Wei Yen; Lee, Soo Chin; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Brennan, Paul; Mckay, James; Wu, Pei-Ei; Hou, Ming-Feng; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Shen, Chen-Yang; Blot, William; Cai, Qiuyin; Signorello, Lisa B.; Luccarini, Craig; Bayes, Caroline; Ahmed, Shahana; Maranian, Mel; Healey, Catherine S.; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M. Rosario; Álvarez, Nuria; Herrero, Daniel; Tessier, Daniel C.; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Hunter, David J.; Lindstrom, Sara; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Easton, Douglas F.; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Fletcher, Olivia; Peto, Julian

    2015-01-01

    We recently identified a novel susceptibility variant, rs865686, for estrogen-receptor positive breast cancer at 9q31.2. Here, we report a fine-mapping analysis of the 9q31.2 susceptibility locus using 43 160 cases and 42 600 controls of European ancestry ascertained from 52 studies and a further 5795 cases and 6624 controls of Asian ancestry from nine studies. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs676256 was most strongly associated with risk in Europeans (odds ratios [OR] = 0.90 [0.88–0.92]; P-value = 1.58 × 10−25). This SNP is one of a cluster of highly correlated variants, including rs865686, that spans ∼14.5 kb. We identified two additional independent association signals demarcated by SNPs rs10816625 (OR = 1.12 [1.08–1.17]; P-value = 7.89 × 10−09) and rs13294895 (OR = 1.09 [1.06–1.12]; P-value = 2.97 × 10−11). SNP rs10816625, but not rs13294895, was also associated with risk of breast cancer in Asian individuals (OR = 1.12 [1.06–1.18]; P-value = 2.77 × 10−05). Functional genomic annotation using data derived from breast cancer cell-line models indicates that these SNPs localise to putative enhancer elements that bind known drivers of hormone-dependent breast cancer, including ER-α, FOXA1 and GATA-3. In vitro analyses indicate that rs10816625 and rs13294895 have allele-specific effects on enhancer activity and suggest chromatin interactions with the KLF4 gene locus. These results demonstrate the power of dense genotyping in large studies to identify independent susceptibility variants. Analysis of associations using subjects with different ancestry, combined with bioinformatic and genomic characterisation, can provide strong evidence for the likely causative alleles and their functional basis. PMID:25652398

  19. Notch reporter activity in breast cancer cell lines identifies a subset of cells with stem cell activity

    OpenAIRE

    D’Angelo, Rosemarie C.; Ouzounova, Maria; Davis, April; Choi, Daejin; Tchuenkam, Stevie M.; Kim, Gwangil; Luther, Tahra; Quraishi, Ahmed A.; Senbabaoglu, Yasin; Conley, Sarah J; Shawn G Clouthier; Hassan, Khaled A.; Wicha, Max S; Korkaya, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Developmental pathways such as Notch play a pivotal role in tissue specific stem cell self-renewal as well as in tumor development. However, the role of Notch signaling in breast cancer stem cells (CSC) remains to be determined. We utilized a lentiviral Notch reporter system to identify a subset of cells with a higher Notch activity (Notch+) or reduced activity (Notch-) in multiple breast cancer cell lines. Using in vitro and mouse xenotransplantation assays we investigated the role of Notch ...

  20. Whole Genome Sequencing of High-Risk Families to Identify New Mutational Mechanisms of Breast Cancer Predisposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Families to Identify New Mutational Mechanisms of Breast Cancer Predisposition 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0336 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...An integrative approach to predicting the functional effects of non-coding and coding sequence variation. Bioinformatics. 31:1536-1543. 14 Fu Y...Breast Cancer Predisposition PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Mary-Claire King, PhD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of Washington Seattle, WA, 98195

  1. Genome-wide association study in east Asians identifies novel susceptibility loci for breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jirong Long

    Full Text Available Genetic factors play an important role in the etiology of both sporadic and familial breast cancer. We aimed to discover novel genetic susceptibility loci for breast cancer. We conducted a four-stage genome-wide association study (GWAS in 19,091 cases and 20,606 controls of East-Asian descent including Chinese, Korean, and Japanese women. After analyzing 690,947 SNPs in 2,918 cases and 2,324 controls, we evaluated 5,365 SNPs for replication in 3,972 cases and 3,852 controls. Ninety-four SNPs were further evaluated in 5,203 cases and 5,138 controls, and finally the top 22 SNPs were investigated in up to 17,423 additional subjects (7,489 cases and 9,934 controls. SNP rs9485372, near the TGF-β activated kinase (TAB2 gene in chromosome 6q25.1, showed a consistent association with breast cancer risk across all four stages, with a P-value of 3.8×10(-12 in the combined analysis of all samples. Adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence intervals were 0.89 (0.85-0.94 and 0.80 (0.75-0.86 for the A/G and A/A genotypes, respectively, compared with the genotype G/G. SNP rs9383951 (P = 1.9×10(-6 from the combined analysis of all samples, located in intron 5 of the ESR1 gene, and SNP rs7107217 (P = 4.6×10(-7, located at 11q24.3, also showed a consistent association in each of the four stages. This study provides strong evidence for a novel breast cancer susceptibility locus represented by rs9485372, near the TAB2 gene (6q25.1, and identifies two possible susceptibility loci located in the ESR1 gene and 11q24.3, respectively.

  2. Breast metastases from rectal carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jia; FANG Yu; LI Ang; LI Fei

    2011-01-01

    Metastases to the breast from extramammary neoplasms are very rare, constituting 2.7% of all malignant breast tumours. The most common primary tumor metastatic to the breast is primary breast cancer. Rectal cancer metastasizing to the breast is extremely rare. We report a case of aggressive rectal carcinoma with metastasis to the breast.

  3. Notch reporter activity in breast cancer cell lines identifies a subset of cells with stem cell activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, Rosemarie C; Ouzounova, Maria; Davis, April; Choi, Daejin; Tchuenkam, Stevie M; Kim, Gwangil; Luther, Tahra; Quraishi, Ahmed A; Senbabaoglu, Yasin; Conley, Sarah J; Clouthier, Shawn G; Hassan, Khaled A; Wicha, Max S; Korkaya, Hasan

    2015-03-01

    Developmental pathways such as Notch play a pivotal role in tissue-specific stem cell self-renewal as well as in tumor development. However, the role of Notch signaling in breast cancer stem cells (CSC) remains to be determined. We utilized a lentiviral Notch reporter system to identify a subset of cells with a higher Notch activity (Notch(+)) or reduced activity (Notch(-)) in multiple breast cancer cell lines. Using in vitro and mouse xenotransplantation assays, we investigated the role of the Notch pathway in breast CSC regulation. Breast cancer cells with increased Notch activity displayed increased sphere formation as well as expression of breast CSC markers. Interestingly Notch(+) cells displayed higher Notch4 expression in both basal and luminal breast cancer cell lines. Moreover, Notch(+) cells demonstrated tumor initiation capacity at serial dilutions in mouse xenografts, whereas Notch(-) cells failed to generate tumors. γ-Secretase inhibitor (GSI), a Notch blocker but not a chemotherapeutic agent, effectively targets these Notch(+) cells in vitro and in mouse xenografts. Furthermore, elevated Notch4 and Hey1 expression in primary patient samples correlated with poor patient survival. Our study revealed a molecular mechanism for the role of Notch-mediated regulation of breast CSCs and provided a compelling rationale for CSC-targeted therapeutics.

  4. Genome-wide association analysis of more than 120,000 individuals identifies 15 new susceptibility loci for breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michailidou, Kyriaki; Beesley, Jonathan; Lindstrom, Sara; Canisius, Sander; Dennis, Joe; Lush, Michael J.; Maranian, Mel J.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Shah, Mitul; Perkins, Barbara J.; Czene, Kamila; Eriksson, Mikael; Darabi, Hatef; Brand, Judith S.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Borge G.; Flyger, Henrik; Nielsen, Sune F.; Rahman, Nazneen; Turnbull, Clare; Fletcher, Olivia; Peto, Julian; Gibson, Lorna; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Rudolph, Anja; Eilber, Ursula; Behrens, Sabine; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A.; Aittomaki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Khan, Sofia; Aaltonen, Kirsimari; Ahsan, Habibul; Kibriya, Muhammad G.; Whittemore, Alice S.; John, Esther M.; Malone, Kathleen E.; Gammon, Marilie D.; Santella, Regina M.; Ursin, Giske; Makalic, Enes; Schmidt, Daniel F.; Casey, Graham; Hunter, David J.; Gapstur, Susan M.; Gaudet, Mia M.; Diver, W. Ryan; Haiman, Christopher A.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Henderson, Brian E.; Le Marchand, Loic; Berg, Christine D.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Figueroa, Jonine; Hoover, Robert N.; Lambrechts, Diether; Neven, Patrick; Wildiers, Hans; van Limbergen, Erik; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Verhoef, Senno; Cornelissen, Sten; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet E.; Hallberg, Emily; Vachon, Celine; Waisfisz, Quinten; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Adank, Muriel A.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Li, Jingmei; Liu, Jianjun; Humphreys, Keith; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Park, Sue K.; Yoo, Keun-Young; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Tajima, Kazuo; Guenel, Pascal; Truong, Therese; Mulot, Claire; Sanchez, Marie; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Surowy, Harald; Sohn, Christof; Wu, Anna H.; Tseng, Chiu-chen; Van den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O.; Gonzalez-Neira, Anna; Benitez, Javier; Zamora, M. Pilar; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Hui; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J.; Miller, Nicola; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Teo, Soo Hwang; Yip, Cheng Har; Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd; Tan, Gie-Hooi; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Martens, John W. M.; Collee, J. Margriet; Blot, William; Signorello, Lisa B.; Cai, Qiuyin; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Tsimiklis, Helen; Apicella, Carmel; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Wu, Pei-Ei; Hou, Ming-Feng; Kristensen, Vessela N.; Nord, Silje; Alnaes, Grethe I. Grenaker; Giles, Graham G.; Milne, Roger L.; McLean, Catriona; Canzian, Federico; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Peeters, Petra; Lund, Eiliv; Sund, Malin; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Gunter, Marc J.; Palli, Domenico; Mortensen, Lotte Maxild; Dossus, Laure; Huerta, Jose-Maria; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Sutter, Christian; Yang, Rongxi; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Hartman, Mikael; Miao, Hui; Chia, Kee Seng; Chan, Ching Wan; Fasching, Peter A.; Hein, Alexander; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Haeberle, Lothar; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nick; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Swerdlow, Anthony J.; Brinton, Louise; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Zheng, Wei; Halverson, Sandra L.; Shrubsole, Martha; Long, Jirong; Goldberg, Mark S.; Labreche, France; Dumont, Martine; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkas, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Bruening, Thomas; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Bernard, Loris; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Doerk, Thilo; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert A. E. M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Van Asperen, Christi J.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Huzarski, Tomasz; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Brennan, Paul; Mckay, James; Slager, Susan; Toland, Amanda E.; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Kabisch, Maria; Torres, Diana; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Luccarini, Craig; Baynes, Caroline; Ahmed, Shahana; Healey, Catherine S.; Tessier, Daniel C.; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Pita, Guillermo; Rosario Alonso, M.; Alvarez, Nuria; Herrero, Daniel; Simard, Jacques; Pharoah, Paul P. D. P.; Kraft, Peter; Dunning, Alison M.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and large-scale replication studies have identified common variants in 79 loci associated with breast cancer, explaining similar to 14% of the familial risk of the disease. To identify new susceptibility loci, we performed a meta-analysis of 11 GWAS, comprising

  5. Genome-wide association analysis of more than 120,000 individuals identifies 15 new susceptibility loci for breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Michailidou (Kyriaki); J. Beesley (Jonathan); S. Lindstrom (Stephen); S. Canisius (Sander); J. Dennis (Joe); M. Lush (Michael); M. Maranian (Melanie); M.K. Bolla (Manjeet); Q. Wang (Qing); M. Shah (Mitul); B. Perkins (Barbara); K. Czene (Kamila); M. Eriksson (Mikael); H. Darabi (Hatef); J.S. Brand (Judith S.); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); B.G. Nordestgaard (Børge); H. Flyger (Henrik); S.F. Nielsen (Sune); N. Rahman (Nazneen); C. Turnbull (Clare); O. Fletcher (Olivia); J. Peto (Julian); L.J. Gibson (Lorna); I. dos Santos Silva (Isabel); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); D. Flesch-Janys (Dieter); A. Rudolph (Anja); U. Eilber (Ursula); T.W. Behrens (Timothy); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); T.A. Muranen (Taru); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); C. Blomqvist (Carl); S. Khan (Sofia); K. Aaltonen (Kirsimari); H. Ahsan (Habibul); M.G. Kibriya (Muhammad); A.S. Whittemore (Alice S.); E.M. John (Esther M.); K.E. Malone (Kathleen E.); M.D. Gammon (Marilie); R.M. Santella (Regina M.); G. Ursin (Giske); E. Makalic (Enes); D.F. Schmidt (Daniel); G. Casey (Graham); D.J. Hunter (David J.); S.M. Gapstur (Susan M.); M.M. Gaudet (Mia); W.R. Diver (Ryan); C.A. Haiman (Christopher A.); F.R. Schumacher (Fredrick); B.E. Henderson (Brian); L. Le Marchand (Loic); C.D. Berg (Christine); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); J.D. Figueroa (Jonine); R.N. Hoover (Robert N.); D. Lambrechts (Diether); P. Neven (Patrick); H. Wildiers (Hans); E. van Limbergen (Erik); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); A. Broeks (Annegien); S. Verhoef; S. Cornelissen (Sten); F.J. Couch (Fergus); J.E. Olson (Janet); B. Hallberg (Boubou); C. Vachon (Celine); Q. Waisfisz (Quinten); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); M.A. Adank (Muriel); R.B. van der Luijt (Rob); J. Li (Jingmei); J. Liu (Jianjun); M.K. Humphreys (Manjeet); D. Kang (Daehee); J.-Y. Choi (Ji-Yeob); S.K. Park (Sue K.); K.Y. Yoo; K. Matsuo (Keitaro); H. Ito (Hidemi); H. Iwata (Hiroji); K. Tajima (Kazuo); P. Guénel (Pascal); T. Truong (Thérèse); C. Mulot (Claire); M. Sanchez (Marie); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); F. Marme (Federick); H. Surowy (Harald); C. Sohn (Christof); A.H. Wu (Anna H); C.-C. Tseng (Chiu-chen); D. Van Den Berg (David); D.O. Stram (Daniel O.); A. González-Neira (Anna); J. Benítez (Javier); M.P. Zamora (Pilar); J.I.A. Perez (Jose Ignacio Arias); X.-O. Shu (Xiao-Ou); W. Lu (Wei); Y. Gao; H. Cai (Hui); A. Cox (Angela); S.S. Cross (Simon); M.W.R. Reed (Malcolm); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); J.A. Knight (Julia); G. Glendon (Gord); A.-M. Mulligan (Anna-Marie); E.J. Sawyer (Elinor); I.P. Tomlinson (Ian); M. Kerin (Michael); N. Miller (Nicola); A. Lindblom (Annika); S. Margolin (Sara); S.H. Teo (Soo Hwang); C.H. Yip (Cheng Har); N.A.M. Taib (Nur Aishah Mohd); G.-H. Tan (Gie-Hooi); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); A. Hollestelle (Antoinette); J.W.M. Martens (John); J. Margriet Collée; W.J. Blot (William); L.B. Signorello (Lisa B.); Q. Cai (Qiuyin); J. Hopper (John); M.C. Southey (Melissa); H. Tsimiklis (Helen); C. Apicella (Carmel); C-Y. Shen (Chen-Yang); C.-N. Hsiung (Chia-Ni); P.-E. Wu (Pei-Ei); M.-F. Hou (Ming-Feng); V. Kristensen (Vessela); S. Nord (Silje); G.G. Alnæs (Grethe Grenaker); G.G. Giles (Graham G.); R.L. Milne (Roger); C.A. McLean (Catriona Ann); F. Canzian (Federico); D. Trichopoulos (Dimitrios); P.H.M. Peeters; E. Lund (Eiliv); R. Sund (Reijo); K.T. Khaw; M.J. Gunter (Marc J.); D. Palli (Domenico); L.M. Mortensen (Lotte Maxild); L. Dossus (Laure); J.-M. Huerta (Jose-Maria); A. Meindl (Alfons); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); C. Sutter (Christian); R. Yang (Rongxi); K. Muir (Kenneth); A. Lophatananon (Artitaya); S. Stewart-Brown (Sarah); P. Siriwanarangsan (Pornthep); J.M. Hartman (Joost); X. Miao; K.S. Chia (Kee Seng); C.W. Chan (Ching Wan); P.A. Fasching (Peter); R. Hein (Rebecca); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias W.); L. Haeberle (Lothar); H. Brenner (Hermann); A.K. Dieffenbach (Aida Karina); V. Arndt (Volker); C. Stegmaier (Christa); A. Ashworth (Alan); N. Orr (Nick); M. Schoemaker (Minouk); A.J. Swerdlow (Anthony ); L.A. Brinton (Louise); M. García-Closas (Montserrat); W. Zheng (Wei); S.L. Halverson (Sandra L.); M. Shrubsole (Martha); J. Long (Jirong); M.S. Goldberg (Mark); F. Labrèche (France); M. Dumont (Martine); R. Winqvist (Robert); K. Pykäs (Katri); A. Jukkola-Vuorinen (Arja); M. Grip (Mervi); H. Brauch (Hiltrud); U. Hamann (Ute); T. Brüning (Thomas); P. Radice (Paolo); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); L. Bernard (Loris); N.V. Bogdanova (Natalia); T. Dörk (Thilo); A. Mannermaa (Arto); V. Kataja (Vesa); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); J.M. Hartikainen (J.); P. Devilee (Peter); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); C.J. van Asperen (Christi); A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); K. Jaworska (Katarzyna); T. Huzarski (Tomasz); S. Sangrajrang (Suleeporn); V. Gaborieau (Valerie); P. Brennan (Paul); J.D. McKay (James); S. Slager (Susan); A.E. Toland (Amanda); C.B. Ambrosone (Christine B.); D. Yannoukakos (Drakoulis); M. Kabisch (Maria); D. Torres (Diana); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); H. Anton-Culver (Hoda); C. Luccarini (Craig); C. Baynes (Caroline); S. Ahmed (Shahana); S. Healey (Sue); D.C. Tessier (Daniel C.); D. Vincent (Daniel); F. Bacot (Francois); G. Pita (G.); M.R. Alonso (M Rosario); N. Álvarez (Nuria); D. Herrero (Daniel); J. Simard (Jacques); P.P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul P.D.P.); P. Kraft (Peter); A.M. Dunning (Alison); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); P. Hall (Per); D.F. Easton (Douglas)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractGenome-wide association studies (GWAS) and large-scale replication studies have identified common variants in 79 loci associated with breast cancer, explaining ∼14% of the familial risk of the disease. To identify new susceptibility loci, we performed a meta-analysis of 11 GWAS, comprisi

  6. Genome-wide association analysis of more than 120,000 individuals identifies 15 new susceptibility loci for breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michailidou, Kyriaki; Beesley, Jonathan; Lindstrom, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and large-scale replication studies have identified common variants in 79 loci associated with breast cancer, explaining ∼14% of the familial risk of the disease. To identify new susceptibility loci, we performed a meta-analysis of 11 GWAS, comprising 15,748...

  7. High-throughput screens identify microRNAs essential for HER2 positive breast cancer cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leivonen, Suvi-Katri; Sahlberg, Kristine Kleivi; Mäkelä, Rami; Due, Eldri Undlien; Kallioniemi, Olli; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Perälä, Merja

    2014-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding RNAs regulating gene expression post-transcriptionally. We have characterized the role of miRNAs in regulating the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-pathway in breast cancer. We performed miRNA gain-of-function assays by screening two HER2 amplified cell lines (KPL-4 and JIMT-1) with a miRNA mimic library consisting of 810 human miRNAs. The levels of HER2, phospho-AKT, phospho-ERK1/2, cell proliferation (Ki67) and apoptosis (cPARP) were analyzed with reverse-phase protein arrays. Rank product analyses identified 38 miRNAs (q breast tumors as compared to HER2-negative tumors from two cohorts of breast cancer patients (101 and 1302 cases). miR-342-5p specifically inhibited HER2-positive cell growth, as it had no effect on the growth of HER2-negative control cells in vitro. Furthermore, higher expression of miR-342-5p was associated with better survival in both breast cancer patient cohorts. In conclusion, we have identified miRNAs which are efficient negative regulators of the HER2 pathway that may play a role in vivo during breast cancer progression. These results give mechanistic insights in HER2 regulation which may open potential new strategies towards prevention and therapeutic inhibition of HER2-positive breast cancer.

  8. Integrated Bioinformatics, Environmental Epidemiologic and Genomic Approaches to Identify Environmental and Molecular Links between Endometriosis and Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deodutta Roy

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a combined environmental epidemiologic, genomic, and bioinformatics approach to identify: exposure of environmental chemicals with estrogenic activity; epidemiologic association between endocrine disrupting chemical (EDC and health effects, such as, breast cancer or endometriosis; and gene-EDC interactions and disease associations. Human exposure measurement and modeling confirmed estrogenic activity of three selected class of environmental chemicals, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs, bisphenols (BPs, and phthalates. Meta-analysis showed that PCBs exposure, not Bisphenol A (BPA and phthalates, increased the summary odds ratio for breast cancer and endometriosis. Bioinformatics analysis of gene-EDC interactions and disease associations identified several hundred genes that were altered by exposure to PCBs, phthalate or BPA. EDCs-modified genes in breast neoplasms and endometriosis are part of steroid hormone signaling and inflammation pathways. All three EDCs–PCB 153, phthalates, and BPA influenced five common genes—CYP19A1, EGFR, ESR2, FOS, and IGF1—in breast cancer as well as in endometriosis. These genes are environmentally and estrogen responsive, altered in human breast and uterine tumors and endometriosis lesions, and part of Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK signaling pathways in cancer. Our findings suggest that breast cancer and endometriosis share some common environmental and molecular risk factors.

  9. Epigenetic reprogramming of breast cancer cells with oocyte extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumari Rajendra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer is a disease characterised by both genetic and epigenetic alterations. Epigenetic silencing of tumour suppressor genes is an early event in breast carcinogenesis and reversion of gene silencing by epigenetic reprogramming can provide clues to the mechanisms responsible for tumour initiation and progression. In this study we apply the reprogramming capacity of oocytes to cancer cells in order to study breast oncogenesis. Results We show that breast cancer cells can be directly reprogrammed by amphibian oocyte extracts. The reprogramming effect, after six hours of treatment, in the absence of DNA replication, includes DNA demethylation and removal of repressive histone marks at the promoters of tumour suppressor genes; also, expression of the silenced genes is re-activated in response to treatment. This activity is specific to oocytes as it is not elicited by extracts from ovulated eggs, and is present at very limited levels in extracts from mouse embryonic stem cells. Epigenetic reprogramming in oocyte extracts results in reduction of cancer cell growth under anchorage independent conditions and a reduction in tumour growth in mouse xenografts. Conclusions This study presents a new method to investigate tumour reversion by epigenetic reprogramming. After testing extracts from different sources, we found that axolotl oocyte extracts possess superior reprogramming ability, which reverses epigenetic silencing of tumour suppressor genes and tumorigenicity of breast cancer cells in a mouse xenograft model. Therefore this system can be extremely valuable for dissecting the mechanisms involved in tumour suppressor gene silencing and identifying molecular activities capable of arresting tumour growth. These applications can ultimately shed light on the contribution of epigenetic alterations in breast cancer and advance the development of epigenetic therapies.

  10. The development of an integrated platform to identify breast cancer glycoproteome changes in human serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Zhi; Hincapie, Marina; Haab, Brian B; Hanash, Samir; Pitteri, Sharon J; Kluck, Steven; Hogan, Jason M; Kennedy, Jacob; Hancock, William S

    2010-05-07

    Protein glycosylation represents one of the major post-translational modifications and can have significant effects on protein function. Moreover, changes in the carbohydrate structure are increasingly being recognized as an important modification associated with cancer etiology. In this report, we describe the development of a proteomics approach to identify breast cancer related changes in either concentration and/or the carbohydrate structures of glycoprotein(s) present in blood samples. Diseased and healthy serum samples were processed by an optimized sample preparation protocol using multiple lectin affinity chromatography (M-LAC) that partitions serum proteins based on glycan characteristics. Subsequently, three separate procedures, 1D SDS-PAGE, isoelectric focusing and an antibody microarray, were applied to identify potential candidate markers for future study. The combination of these three platforms is illustrated in this report with the analysis of control and cancer glycoproteomic fractions. Firstly, a molecular weight based separation of glycoproteins by 1D SDS-PAGE was performed, followed by protein, glycoprotein staining, lectin blotting and LC-MS analysis. To refine or confirm the list of interesting glycoproteins, isoelectric focusing (targeting sialic acid changes) and an antibody microarray (used to detect neutral glycan shifts) were selected as the orthogonal methods. As a result, several glycoproteins including alpha-1B-glycoprotein, complement C3, alpha-1-antitrypsin and transferrin were identified as potential candidates for further study.

  11. Identifying breast cancer risk loci by global differential allele-specific expression (DASE analysis in mammary epithelial transcriptome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Chuan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The significant mortality associated with breast cancer (BCa suggests a need to improve current research strategies to identify new genes that predispose women to breast cancer. Differential allele-specific expression (DASE has been shown to contribute to phenotypic variables in humans and recently to the pathogenesis of cancer. We previously reported that nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD could lead to DASE of BRCA1/2, which is associated with elevated susceptibility to breast cancer. In addition to truncation mutations, multiple genetic and epigenetic factors can contribute to DASE, and we propose that DASE is a functional index for cis-acting regulatory variants and pathogenic mutations, and that global analysis of DASE in breast cancer precursor tissues can be used to identify novel causative alleles for breast cancer susceptibility. Results To test our hypothesis, we employed the Illumina® Omni1-Quad BeadChip in paired genomic DNA (gDNA and double-stranded cDNA (ds-cDNA samples prepared from eight BCa patient-derived normal mammary epithelial lines (HMEC. We filtered original array data according to heterozygous genotype calls and calculated DASE values using the Log ratio of cDNA allele intensity, which was normalized to the corresponding gDNA. We developed two statistical methods, SNP- and gene-based approaches, which allowed us to identify a list of 60 candidate DASE loci (DASE ≥ 2.00, P ≤ 0.01, FDR ≤ 0.05 by both methods. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis of DASE loci revealed one major breast cancer-relevant interaction network, which includes two known cancer causative genes, ZNF331 (DASE = 2.31, P = 0.0018, FDR = 0.040 and USP6 (DASE = 4.80, P = 0.0013, FDR = 0.013, and a breast cancer causative gene, DMBT1 (DASE=2.03, P = 0.0017, FDR = 0.014. Sequence analysis of a 5′ RACE product of DMBT1 demonstrated that rs2981745, a putative breast cancer risk locus, appears to be one of the causal variants leading to DASE

  12. Breast cancer epidemiology and risk factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broeders, M. J. M.; Verbeek, A. L. M. [Nijmegen, Univ. (Netherlands). Dept. of Epidemiology

    1997-09-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among women in the Western society. Over the past decades it has become apparent that breast cancer incidence rates are increasing steadily, whereas the mortality rates for breast cancer have remained relatively constant. Information through the media on this rising number of cases has increased breast health awareness but has also introduced anxiety in the female population. This combination of factors has made the need for prevention of breast cancer an urgent matter. Breast cancer does not seem to be a single disease entity. A specific etiologic factor may therefore have more influence on one form may therefore have more influence on one form of breast cancer than another. So far though, as shown in their summary of current knowledge on established and dubious risk factors, no risk factors have been identified that can explain a major part of the incidence. Efforts to identify other ways for primary prevention have also been discouraging, even though breast cancer is one of the most investigated tumours world-wide. Thus, at this point i time, the most important strategy to reduce breast cancer mortality is early detection through individual counselling and organised breast screening programs. The recent isolation of breast cancer susceptibility genes may introduce new ways to reduce the risk of breast cancer in a small subset of women.

  13. Comprehensive annotation of bidirectional promoters identifies co-regulation among breast and ovarian cancer genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Q Yang

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available A "bidirectional gene pair" comprises two adjacent genes whose transcription start sites are neighboring and directed away from each other. The intervening regulatory region is called a "bidirectional promoter." These promoters are often associated with genes that function in DNA repair, with the potential to participate in the development of cancer. No connection between these gene pairs and cancer has been previously investigated. Using the database of spliced-expressed sequence tags (ESTs, we identified the most complete collection of human transcripts under the control of bidirectional promoters. A rigorous screen of the spliced EST data identified new bidirectional promoters, many of which functioned as alternative promoters or regulated novel transcripts. Additionally, we show a highly significant enrichment of bidirectional promoters in genes implicated in somatic cancer, including a substantial number of genes implicated in breast and ovarian cancers. The repeated use of this promoter structure in the human genome suggests it could regulate co-expression patterns among groups of genes. Using microarray expression data from 79 human tissues, we verify regulatory networks among genes controlled by bidirectional promoters. Subsets of these promoters contain similar combinations of transcription factor binding sites, including evolutionarily conserved ETS factor binding sites in ERBB2, FANCD2, and BRCA2. Interpreting the regulation of genes involved in co-expression networks, especially those involved in cancer, will be an important step toward defining molecular events that may contribute to disease.

  14. Transposon insertional mutagenesis in mice identifies human breast cancer susceptibility genes and signatures for stratification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liming; Jenjaroenpun, Piroon; Pillai, Andrea Mun Ching; Ivshina, Anna V.; Ow, Ghim Siong; Efthimios, Motakis; Zhiqun, Tang; Lee, Song-Choon; Rogers, Keith; Ward, Jerrold M.; Mori, Seiichi; Adams, David J.; Jenkins, Nancy A.; Copeland, Neal G.; Ban, Kenneth Hon-Kim; Kuznetsov, Vladimir A.; Thiery, Jean Paul

    2017-01-01

    Robust prognostic gene signatures and therapeutic targets are difficult to derive from expression profiling because of the significant heterogeneity within breast cancer (BC) subtypes. Here, we performed forward genetic screening in mice using Sleeping Beauty transposon mutagenesis to identify candidate BC driver genes in an unbiased manner, using a stabilized N-terminal truncated β-catenin gene as a sensitizer. We identified 134 mouse susceptibility genes from 129 common insertion sites within 34 mammary tumors. Of these, 126 genes were orthologous to protein-coding genes in the human genome (hereafter, human BC susceptibility genes, hBCSGs), 70% of which are previously reported cancer-associated genes, and ∼16% are known BC suppressor genes. Network analysis revealed a gene hub consisting of E1A binding protein P300 (EP300), CD44 molecule (CD44), neurofibromin (NF1) and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), which are linked to a significant number of mutated hBCSGs. From our survival prediction analysis of the expression of human BC genes in 2,333 BC cases, we isolated a six-gene-pair classifier that stratifies BC patients with high confidence into prognostically distinct low-, moderate-, and high-risk subgroups. Furthermore, we proposed prognostic classifiers identifying three basal and three claudin-low tumor subgroups. Intriguingly, our hBCSGs are mostly unrelated to cell cycle/mitosis genes and are distinct from the prognostic signatures currently used for stratifying BC patients. Our findings illustrate the strength and validity of integrating functional mutagenesis screens in mice with human cancer transcriptomic data to identify highly prognostic BC subtyping biomarkers. PMID:28251929

  15. Genome-wide association study identifies multiple loci associated with both mammographic density and breast cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindström, Sara; Thompson, Deborah J; Paterson, Andrew D; Li, Jingmei; Gierach, Gretchen L; Scott, Christopher; Stone, Jennifer; Douglas, Julie A; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Fernandez-Navarro, Pablo; Verghase, Jajini; Smith, Paula; Brown, Judith; Luben, Robert; Wareham, Nicholas J; Loos, Ruth J F; Heit, John A; Pankratz, V Shane; Norman, Aaron; Goode, Ellen L; Cunningham, Julie M; deAndrade, Mariza; Vierkant, Robert A; Czene, Kamila; Fasching, Peter A; Baglietto, Laura; Southey, Melissa C; Giles, Graham G; Shah, Kaanan P; Chan, Heang-Ping; Helvie, Mark A; Beck, Andrew H; Knoblauch, Nicholas W; Hazra, Aditi; Hunter, David J; Kraft, Peter; Pollan, Marina; Figueroa, Jonine D; Couch, Fergus J; Hopper, John L; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F; Boyd, Norman F; Vachon, Celine M; Tamimi, Rulla M

    2014-10-24

    Mammographic density reflects the amount of stromal and epithelial tissues in relation to adipose tissue in the breast and is a strong risk factor for breast cancer. Here we report the results from meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of three mammographic density phenotypes: dense area, non-dense area and percent density in up to 7,916 women in stage 1 and an additional 10,379 women in stage 2. We identify genome-wide significant (P<5 × 10(-8)) loci for dense area (AREG, ESR1, ZNF365, LSP1/TNNT3, IGF1, TMEM184B and SGSM3/MKL1), non-dense area (8p11.23) and percent density (PRDM6, 8p11.23 and TMEM184B). Four of these regions are known breast cancer susceptibility loci, and four additional regions were found to be associated with breast cancer (P<0.05) in a large meta-analysis. These results provide further evidence of a shared genetic basis between mammographic density and breast cancer and illustrate the power of studying intermediate quantitative phenotypes to identify putative disease-susceptibility loci.

  16. Do clinical, histological or immunohistochemical primary tumour characteristics translate into different {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT volumetric and heterogeneity features in stage II/III breast cancer?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groheux, David; Martineau, Antoine; Merlet, Pascal [Saint-Louis Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Paris (France); Majdoub, Mohamed; Hatt, Mathieu; Visvikis, Dimitris [INSERM, UMR 1101 LaTIM, Brest (France); Tixier, Florent; Le Rest, Catherine Cheze [Miletrie Hospital, DACTIM, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Poitiers (France); Espie, Marc [Saint-Louis Hospital, Breast Diseases Unit and Department of Medical Oncology, Paris (France); Roquancourt, Anne de [Saint-Louis Hospital, Department of Pathology, Paris (France); Hindie, Elif [University of Bordeaux, Department of Nuclear Medicine, CHU Bordeaux, Bordeaux (France)

    2015-10-15

    The aim of this retrospective study was to determine if some features of baseline {sup 18}F-FDG PET images, including volume and heterogeneity, reflect clinical, histological or immunohistochemical characteristics in patients with stage II or III breast cancer (BC). Included in the present retrospective analysis were 171 prospectively recruited patients with stage II/III BC treated consecutively at Saint-Louis hospital. Primary tumour volumes were semiautomatically delineated on pretreatment {sup 18}F-FDG PET images. The parameters extracted included SUV{sub max}, SUV{sub mean}, metabolically active tumour volume (MATV), total lesion glycolysis (TLG) and heterogeneity quantified using the area under the curve of the cumulative histogram and textural features. Associations between clinical/histopathological characteristics and {sup 18}F-FDG PET features were assessed using one-way analysis of variance. Areas under the ROC curves (AUC) were used to quantify the discriminative power of the features significantly associated with clinical/histopathological characteristics. T3 tumours (>5 cm) exhibited higher textural heterogeneity in {sup 18}F-FDG uptake than T2 tumours (AUC <0.75), whereas there were no significant differences in SUV{sub max} and SUV{sub mean}. Invasive ductal carcinoma showed higher SUV{sub max} values than invasive lobular carcinoma (p = 0.008) but MATV, TLG and textural features were not discriminative. Grade 3 tumours had higher FDG uptake (AUC 0.779 for SUV{sub max} and 0.694 for TLG), and exhibited slightly higher regional heterogeneity (AUC 0.624). Hormone receptor-negative tumours had higher SUV values than oestrogen receptor-positive (ER-positive) and progesterone receptor-positive tumours, while heterogeneity patterns showed only low-level variation according to hormone receptor expression. HER-2 status was not associated with any of the image features. Finally, SUV{sub max}, SUV{sub mean} and TLG significantly differed among the three

  17. Fine-scale mapping of the 4q24 locus identifies & pr two Independent loci associated with breast cancer risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    X. Guo (Xingyi); J. Long (Jirong); C. Zeng (Chenjie); K. Michailidou (Kyriaki); M. Ghoussaini (Maya); M.K. Bolla (Manjeet); Q. Wang (Qing); R.L. Milne (Roger L.); X.-O. Shu (Xiao-Ou); Q. Cai (Qiuyin); J. Beesley (Jonathan); S. Kar (Siddhartha); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); H. Anton-Culver (Hoda); V. Arndt (Volker); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias W.); A. Beeghly-Fadiel (Alicia); J. Benítez (Javier); W.J. Blot (William); N.V. Bogdanova (Natalia); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); H. Brauch (Hiltrud); H. Brenner (Hermann); L.A. Brinton (Louise); A. Broekss (Annegien); T. Brüning (Thomas); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); H. Cai (Hui); S. Canisius (Sander); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); J.-Y. Choi (J.); F.J. Couch (Fergus); A. Cox (Angela); S.S. Cross (Simon); K. Czene (Kamila); H. Darabi (Hatef); P. Devilee (Peter); A. Droit (Arnaud); T. Dörk (Thilo); P.A. Fasching (Peter); O. Fletcher (Olivia); H. Flyger (Henrik); F. Fostira (Florentia); V. Gaborieau (Valerie); M. García-Closas (Montserrat); G.G. Giles (Graham G.); M. Grip (Mervi); P. Guénel (Pascal); C.A. Haiman (Christopher A.); U. Hamann (Ute); J.M. Hartman (Joost); A. Hollestelle (Antoinette); J.L. Hopper (John L.); C.-N. Hsiung (Chia-Ni); H. Ito (Hidemi); A. Jakubowska (Anna); N. Johnson (Nichola); M. Kabisch (Maria); D. Kang (Daehee); S. Khan (Sofia); J.A. Knight (Julia); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); D. Lambrechts (Diether); L. Le Marchand (Loic); J. Li (Jingmei); A. Lindblom (Annika); A. Lophatananon (Artitaya); J. Lubinski (Jan); A. Mannermaa (Arto); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); S. Margolin (Sara); F. Marme (Federick); K. Matsuo (Keitaro); C.A. McLean (Catriona Ann); A. Meindl (Alfons); K. Muir (Kenneth); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); S. Nord (Silje); J.E. Olson (Janet); N. Orr (Nick); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); T.C. Putti (Thomas Choudary); A. Rudolph (Anja); S. Sangrajrang (Suleeporn); E.J. Sawyer (Elinor); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); C-Y. Shen (Chen-Yang); J. Shi (Jiajun); M. Shrubsole (Martha); M.C. Southey (Melissa); A.J. Swerdlow (Anthony ); S.H. Teo (Soo Hwang); B. Thienpont (Bernard); A.E. Toland (Amanda); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); I. Tomlinson (Ian); T. Truong (Thérèse); C.-C. Tseng (Chiu-chen); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); W. Wen (Wanqing); R. Winqvist (Robert); A. Wu (Anna); C.H. Yip (Cheng Har); M.P. Zamora (Pilar); Y. Zheng (Ying); P. Hall (Per); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); J. Simard (Jacques); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); A.M. Dunning (Alison); D.F. Easton (Douglas F.); W. Zheng (Wei); R. Eeles (Rosalind); A.A. Al Olama (Ali Amin); Z. Kote-Jarai; S. Benlloch (Sara); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis C.); L. McGuffog (Lesley); K. Offit (Kenneth); A. Lee (Andrew); E. Dicks (Ed); C. Luccarini (Craig); D.C. Tessier (Daniel C.); F. Bacot (Francois); D. Vincent (Daniel); S. La Boissière (Sylvie); F. Robidoux (Frederic); S.F. Nielsen (Sune); J.M. Cunningham (Julie); S.A. Windebank (Sharon A.); C.A. Hilker (Christopher A.); J. Meyer (Jeffrey); M. Angelakos (Maggie); J. Maskiell (Judi); E.J. Rutgers (Emiel J.); S. Verhoef; F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); P. Boonyawongviroj (Prat); P. Siriwanarungsan (Pornthep); A. Schrauder (André); M. Rübner (Matthias); S. Oeser (Sonja); S. Landrith (Silke); E. Williams (Eileen); E. Ryder-Mills (Elaine); K. Sargus (Kara); N. McInerney (Niall); G. Colleran (Gabrielle); A. Rowan (Andrew); A. Jones (Angela); C. Sohn (Christof); A. Schneeweiß (Andeas); P. Bugert (Peter); N. Álvarez (Nuria); L. Bernstein (Leslie); J. Lacey (James); S. Wang (Sophia); H. Ma (Huiyan); Y. Lu (Yani); J. Clague De Hart (Jessica); D. Deapen (Dennis); R. Pinder (Rich); E. Lee (Eunjung); F.R. Schumacher (Fredrick); P. Horn-Ross (Pam); P. Reynolds (Peggy); D. Nelson (David); H. Park (Hannah); H. Ziegler (Hartwig); S. Wolf (Sonja); V. Hermann (Volker); W.-Y. Lo (Wing-Yee); C. Justenhoven (Christina); Y.-D. Ko (Yon-Dschun); C. Baisch (Christian); H.-P. Fischer (Hans-Peter); B. Pesch (Beate); S. Rabstein (Sylvia); A. Lotz (Anne); V. Harth (Volker); T. Heikkinen (Tuomas); I. Erkkilä (Irja); K. Aaltonen (Kirsimari); K. von Smitten (Karl); N.N. Antonenkova (Natalia); P. Hillemanns (Peter); H. Christiansen (Hans); E. Myöhänen (Eija); H. Kemiläinen (Helena); H. Thorne (Heather); E. Niedermayr (Eveline); D. Bowtell; G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); A. De Fazio (Anna); D. Gertig; A. Green; P. Webb (Penny); A. Green; P. Parsons; N. Hayward; P.M. Webb (P.); D. Whiteman; A. Fung (Annie); J. Yashiki (June); G. Peuteman (Gilian); D. Smeets (Dominiek); T. Van Brussel (Thomas); K. Corthouts (Kathleen); N. Obi (Nadia); J. Heinz (Judith); T.W. Behrens (Timothy); U. Eilber (Ursula); M. Celik (Muhabbet); T. Olchers (Til); B. Peissel (Bernard); G. Scuvera (Giulietta); D. Zaffaroni (Daniela); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); I. Feroce (Irene); A. Maniscalco (Angela); A. Rossi (Alessandra); L. Bernard (Loris); M. Tranchant (Martine); M.-F. Valois (Marie-France); A. Turgeon (Annie); L. Heguy (Lea); P.S. Yee (Phuah Sze); P. Kang (Peter); K.I. Nee (Kang In); S. Mariapun (Shivaani); Y. Sook-Yee (Yoon); D.S.C. Lee (Daphne S.C.); T.Y. Ching (Teh Yew); N.A.M. Taib (Nur Aishah Mohd); M. Otsukka (Meeri); K. Mononen (Kari); T. Selander (Teresa); N. Weerasooriya (Nayana); E.M.M. Krol-Warmerdam (Elly); J. Molenaar; J. Blom; N. Szeszenia-Dabrowska (Neonilia); B. Peplonska (Beata); W. Zatonski (Witold); P. Chao (Pei); M. Stagner (Michael); P. Bos (Petra); J. Blom (Jannet); E. Crepin (Ellen); A. Nieuwlaat (Anja); A. Heemskerk (Annette); S. Higham (Sue); H.E. Cramp (Helen); D. Connley (Daniel); S. Balasubramanian (Sabapathy); I.W. Brock (Ian); M. Kerin (Michael); N. Miller (Nicola); P. Kerbrat (Pierre); P. Arveux (Patrick); R. Le Scodan (Romuald); Y. Raoul (Yves); P. Laurent-Puig (Pierre); C. Mulot (Claire); C. Stegmaier (Christa); K. Butterbach (Katja); J.H. Karstens (Johann); D. Flesch-Janys (Dieter); P. Seibold (Petra); A. Vrieling (Alina); S. Nickels (Stefan); P. Radice (Paolo); K. Pykäs (Katri); A. Jukkola-Vuorinen (Arja); S. Kauppila (Saila); D. Conroy (Don); C. Baynes (Caroline); K. Chua (Kimberley); R. Pilarski (Robert)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: A recent association study identified a common variant (rs9790517) at 4q24 to be associated with breast cancer risk. Independent association signals and potential functional variants in this locus have not been explored. Methods: We conducted a fine-mapping analysis in 55,540

  18. Mechanisms driving local breast cancer recurrence in a model of breast-conserving surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Smith, Myles J

    2012-02-03

    OBJECTIVE: We aimed to identify mechanisms driving local recurrence in a model of breast-conserving surgery (BCS) for breast cancer. BACKGROUND: Breast cancer recurrence after BCS remains a clinically significant, but poorly understood problem. We have previously reported that recurrent colorectal tumours demonstrate altered growth dynamics, increased metastatic burden and resistance to apoptosis, mediated by upregulation of phosphoinositide-3-kinase\\/Akt (PI3K\\/Akt). We investigated whether similar characteristics were evident in a model of locally recurrent breast cancer. METHODS: Tumours were generated by orthotopic inoculation of 4T1 cells in two groups of female Balb\\/c mice and cytoreductive surgery performed when mean tumour size was above 150 mm(3). Local recurrence was observed and gene expression was examined using Affymetrix GeneChips in primary and recurrent tumours. Differential expression was confirmed with quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Phosphorylation of Akt was assessed using Western immunoblotting. An ex vivo heat shock protein (HSP)-loaded dendritic cell vaccine was administered in the perioperative period. RESULTS: We observed a significant difference in the recurrent 4T1 tumour volume and growth rate (p < 0.05). Gene expression studies suggested roles for the PI3K\\/Akt system and local immunosuppression driving the altered growth kinetics. We demonstrated that perioperative vaccination with an ex vivo HSP-loaded dendritic cell vaccine abrogated recurrent tumour growth in vivo (p = 0.003 at day 15). CONCLUSION: Investigating therapies which target tumour survival pathways such as PI3K\\/Akt and boost immune surveillance in the perioperative period may be useful adjuncts to contemporary breast cancer treatment.

  19. LET-painting increases tumour control probability in hypoxic tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassler, Niels; Toftegaard, Jakob; Lühr, Armin; Sørensen, Brita Singers; Scifoni, Emanuele; Krämer, Michael; Jäkel, Oliver; Mortensen, Lise Saksø; Overgaard, Jens; Petersen, Jørgen B

    2014-01-01

    LET-painting was suggested as a method to overcome tumour hypoxia. In vitro experiments have demonstrated a well-established relationship between the oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) and linear energy transfer (LET), where OER approaches unity for high-LET values. However, high-LET radiation also increases the risk for side effects in normal tissue. LET-painting attempts to restrict high-LET radiation to compartments that are found to be hypoxic, while applying lower LET radiation to normoxic tissues. Methods. Carbon-12 and oxygen-16 ion treatment plans with four fields and with homogeneous dose in the target volume, are applied on an oropharyngeal cancer case with an identified hypoxic entity within the tumour. The target dose is optimised to achieve a tumour control probability (TCP) of 95% when assuming a fully normoxic tissue. Using the same primary particle energy fluence needed for this plan, TCP is recalculated for three cases assuming hypoxia: first, redistributing LET to match the hypoxic structure (LET-painting). Second, plans are recalculated for varying hypoxic tumour volume in order to investigate the threshold volume where TCP can be established. Finally, a slight dose boost (5-20%) is additionally allowed in the hypoxic subvolume to assess its impact on TCP. Results. LET-painting with carbon-12 ions can only achieve tumour control for hypoxic subvolumes smaller than 0.5 cm(3). Using oxygen-16 ions, tumour control can be achieved for tumours with hypoxic subvolumes of up to 1 or 2 cm(3). Tumour control can be achieved for tumours with even larger hypoxic subvolumes, if a slight dose boost is allowed in combination with LET-painting. Conclusion. Our findings clearly indicate that a substantial increase in tumour control can be achieved when applying the LET-painting concept using oxygen-16 ions on hypoxic tumours, ideally with a slight dose boost.

  20. Lectin chromatography/mass spectrometry discovery workflow identifies putative biomarkers of aggressive breast cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Penelope M; Schilling, Birgit; Niles, Richard K; Prakobphol, Akraporn; Li, Bensheng; Jung, Kwanyoung; Cho, Wonryeon; Braten, Miles; Inerowicz, Halina D; Williams, Katherine; Albertolle, Matthew; Held, Jason M; Iacovides, Demetris; Sorensen, Dylan J; Griffith, Obi L; Johansen, Eric; Zawadzka, Anna M; Cusack, Michael P; Allen, Simon; Gormley, Matthew; Hall, Steven C; Witkowska, H Ewa; Gray, Joe W; Regnier, Fred; Gibson, Bradford W; Fisher, Susan J

    2012-04-06

    We used a lectin chromatography/MS-based approach to screen conditioned medium from a panel of luminal (less aggressive) and triple negative (more aggressive) breast cancer cell lines (n=5/subtype). The samples were fractionated using the lectins Aleuria aurantia (AAL) and Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA), which recognize fucose and sialic acid, respectively. The bound fractions were enzymatically N-deglycosylated and analyzed by LC-MS/MS. In total, we identified 533 glycoproteins, ∼90% of which were components of the cell surface or extracellular matrix. We observed 1011 glycosites, 100 of which were solely detected in ≥3 triple negative lines. Statistical analyses suggested that a number of these glycosites were triple negative-specific and thus potential biomarkers for this tumor subtype. An analysis of RNaseq data revealed that approximately half of the mRNAs encoding the protein scaffolds that carried potential biomarker glycosites were up-regulated in triple negative vs luminal cell lines, and that a number of genes encoding fucosyl- or sialyltransferases were differentially expressed between the two subtypes, suggesting that alterations in glycosylation may also drive candidate identification. Notably, the glycoproteins from which these putative biomarker candidates were derived are involved in cancer-related processes. Thus, they may represent novel therapeutic targets for this aggressive tumor subtype.

  1. Clinical Significance of HER-2 Splice Variants in Breast Cancer Progression and Drug Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Jackson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Overexpression of human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER-2 occurs in 20–30% of breast cancers and confers survival and proliferative advantages on the tumour cells making HER-2 an ideal therapeutic target for drugs like Herceptin. Continued delineation of tumour biology has identified splice variants of HER-2, with contrasting roles in tumour cell biology. For example, the splice variant 16HER-2 (results from exon 16 skipping increases transformation of cancer cells and is associated with treatment resistance; conversely, Herstatin (results from intron 8 retention and p100 (results from intron 15 retention inhibit tumour cell proliferation. This review focuses on the potential clinical implications of the expression and coexistence of HER-2 splice variants in cancer cells in relation to breast cancer progression and drug resistance. “Individualised” strategies currently guide breast cancer management; in accordance, HER-2 splice variants may prove valuable as future prognostic and predictive factors, as well as potential therapeutic targets.

  2. Metastatic canine mammary carcinomas can be identified by a gene expression profile that partly overlaps with human breast cancer profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hummel Michael

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Similar to human breast cancer mammary tumors of the female dog are commonly associated with a fatal outcome due to the development of distant metastases. However, the molecular defects leading to metastasis are largely unknown and the value of canine mammary carcinoma as a model for human breast cancer is unclear. In this study, we analyzed the gene expression signatures associated with mammary tumor metastasis and asked for parallels with the human equivalent. Methods Messenger RNA expression profiles of twenty-seven lymph node metastasis positive or negative canine mammary carcinomas were established by microarray analysis. Differentially expressed genes were functionally characterized and associated with molecular pathways. The findings were also correlated with published data on human breast cancer. Results Metastatic canine mammary carcinomas had 1,011 significantly differentially expressed genes when compared to non-metastatic carcinomas. Metastatic carcinomas had a significant up-regulation of genes associated with cell cycle regulation, matrix modulation, protein folding and proteasomal degradation whereas cell differentiation genes, growth factor pathway genes and regulators of actin organization were significantly down-regulated. Interestingly, 265 of the 1,011 differentially expressed canine genes are also related to human breast cancer and, vice versa, parts of a human prognostic gene signature were identified in the expression profiles of the metastatic canine tumors. Conclusions Metastatic canine mammary carcinomas can be discriminated from non-metastatic carcinomas by their gene expression profiles. More than one third of the differentially expressed genes are also described of relevance for human breast cancer. Many of the differentially expressed genes are linked to functions and pathways which appear to be relevant for the induction and maintenance of metastatic progression and may represent new therapeutic

  3. Identifying Patients Who May Be Candidates for a Clinical Trial of Salvage Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation after Previous Whole Breast Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linna Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives. Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI has been proposed as an alternative to salvage mastectomy for patients with ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR after prior breast conservation. We studied factors that are associated with a more favorable local recurrence profile that could make certain patients eligible for APBI. Methods. Between 1980 and 2005, 157 Stage 0–II breast cancer patients had an IBTR treated by mastectomy. Clinical and pathological features were analyzed to identify factors associated with favorable IBTR defined as unifocal DCIS or T1 ≤ 2 cm, without skin involvement, and >2 year interval from initial treatment. Results. Median followup was 140 months and time to recurrence was 73 months. Clinical stage distribution at recurrence was DCIS in 32 pts (20%, T1 in 90 pts (57%, T2 in 14 pts (9%, T3 in 4 pts (3%, and T4 in 9 pts (6%. IBTR was classified as favorable in 71%. Clinical stage of IBTR predicted for pathologic stage –95% of patients with clinical T1 IBTR had pathologic T1 disease at salvage mastectomy . Conclusions. Clinical stage at presentation strongly correlated with pathologic stage at mastectomy. More than 70% of recurrences were favorable and may be appropriate candidates for salvage APBI trials.

  4. Canine Mammary Tumours Are Affected by Frequent Copy Number Aberrations, including Amplification of MYC and Loss of PTEN.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaja S Borge

    Full Text Available Copy number aberrations frequently occur during the development of many cancers. Such events affect dosage of involved genes and may cause further genomic instability and progression of cancer. In this survey, canine SNP microarrays were used to study 117 canine mammary tumours from 69 dogs.We found a high occurrence of copy number aberrations in canine mammary tumours, losses being more frequent than gains. Increased frequency of aberrations and loss of heterozygosity were positively correlated with increased malignancy in terms of histopathological diagnosis. One of the most highly recurrently amplified regions harbored the MYC gene. PTEN was located to a frequently lost region and also homozygously deleted in five tumours. Thus, deregulation of these genes due to copy number aberrations appears to be an important event in canine mammary tumour development. Other potential contributors to canine mammary tumour pathogenesis are COL9A3, INPP5A, CYP2E1 and RB1. The present study also shows that a more detailed analysis of chromosomal aberrations associated with histopathological parameters may aid in identifying specific genes associated with canine mammary tumour progression.The high frequency of copy number aberrations is a prominent feature of canine mammary tumours as seen in other canine and human cancers. Our findings share several features with corresponding studies in human breast tumours and strengthen the dog as a suitable model organism for this disease.

  5. The localisation and micro-mapping of copper and other trace elements in breast tumours using a synchrotron micro-XRF system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquharson, M J; Geraki, K; Falkenberg, G; Leek, R; Harris, A

    2007-02-01

    Trace elements have critical roles in cancer biology. The quantity and distribution of the elements Cl, Ca, K, P, S, Ti, Fe, Cu and Zn in samples of primary breast cancer have been assessed. The samples were formalin fixed tissue specimens formatted as microarrays of cores 1.0 mm diameter and 10 microm thick each. The data were obtained using a synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microprobe system. The spatial resolution of elemental maps was approximately 20 microm. Maps were compared with light transmission images of the samples and then the images were stained for cancer. The synchrotron system proved successful in producing data that could be mapped into high-resolution images where clear structure could be identified. Correlation of these distributions with the concentrations of cancer cells was achieved in some samples.

  6. Prognostic breast cancer signature identified from 3D culture model accurately predicts clinical outcome across independent datasets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Katherine J.; Patrick, Denis R.; Bissell, Mina J.; Fournier, Marcia V.

    2008-10-20

    One of the major tenets in breast cancer research is that early detection is vital for patient survival by increasing treatment options. To that end, we have previously used a novel unsupervised approach to identify a set of genes whose expression predicts prognosis of breast cancer patients. The predictive genes were selected in a well-defined three dimensional (3D) cell culture model of non-malignant human mammary epithelial cell morphogenesis as down-regulated during breast epithelial cell acinar formation and cell cycle arrest. Here we examine the ability of this gene signature (3D-signature) to predict prognosis in three independent breast cancer microarray datasets having 295, 286, and 118 samples, respectively. Our results show that the 3D-signature accurately predicts prognosis in three unrelated patient datasets. At 10 years, the probability of positive outcome was 52, 51, and 47 percent in the group with a poor-prognosis signature and 91, 75, and 71 percent in the group with a good-prognosis signature for the three datasets, respectively (Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, p<0.05). Hazard ratios for poor outcome were 5.5 (95% CI 3.0 to 12.2, p<0.0001), 2.4 (95% CI 1.6 to 3.6, p<0.0001) and 1.9 (95% CI 1.1 to 3.2, p = 0.016) and remained significant for the two larger datasets when corrected for estrogen receptor (ER) status. Hence the 3D-signature accurately predicts breast cancer outcome in both ER-positive and ER-negative tumors, though individual genes differed in their prognostic ability in the two subtypes. Genes that were prognostic in ER+ patients are AURKA, CEP55, RRM2, EPHA2, FGFBP1, and VRK1, while genes prognostic in ER patients include ACTB, FOXM1 and SERPINE2 (Kaplan-Meier p<0.05). Multivariable Cox regression analysis in the largest dataset showed that the 3D-signature was a strong independent factor in predicting breast cancer outcome. The 3D-signature accurately predicts breast cancer outcome across multiple datasets and holds prognostic

  7. Identifying gaps in the locoregional management of early breast cancer: highlights from the kyoto consensus conference.

    OpenAIRE

    Toi, Masakazu; Winer, Eric P.; INAMOTO, TAKASHI; BENSON, JOHN R.; Forbes, John F.; Mitsumori, Michihide; Robertson, John F. R.; Sasano, Hironobu; von Minckwitz, Gunter; Yamauchi, Akira; KLIMBERG, V. SUZANNE

    2011-01-01

    A consensus conference was held to investigate issues related to the local management of early breast cancer. Here, we highlight the major topics discussed at the conference and propose ideas for future studies. Regarding axillary management, we examined three major issues. First, we discussed whether the use of axillary reverse mapping could clarify the lymphatic system of breast and whether the ipsilateral arm might help avoid lymphedema. Second, the use of an indocyanine green fluorescent ...

  8. Loss of heterozygosity in bilateral breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollias, J; Man, S; Marafie, M; Carpenter, K; Pinder, S; Ellis, I O; Blamey, R W; Cross, G; Brook, J D

    2000-12-01

    Women who develop bilateral breast cancer at an early age are likely to harbour germline mutations in breast cancer susceptibility genes. The aim of this study was to test for concordant genetic changes in left and right breast cancer of young women (age < 50) with bilateral breast cancer that may suggest an inherited breast cancer predisposition. Microsatellite markers were used to test for loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in left and right tumours for 31 women with premenopausal bilateral breast cancer. Markers adjacent to or within candidate genes on 17p (p53), 17q (BRCA1), 13q (BRCA2), 11q (Ataxia Telangiectasia-ATM) and 3p (FHIT) were chosen. Mutational testing for BRCA1 and BRCA2 was performed for cases where blood was available. Concordant LOH in both left and right tumours was demonstrated for at least one of the markers tested in 16/31(54%) cases. Where allelic loss was demonstrated for both left and right breast cancer, the same allele was lost on each occasion. This may suggest a common mutational event. Four cases showed concordant loss of alleles in both left and right breast cancer at D17S791 (BRCA1). BRCA1 mutations were identified in two of these cases where blood was available. Four cases showed concordant LOH at D13S155 (BRCA2). Concordant LOH was further demonstrated in seven cases for D11S1778 (ATM) and four cases for D3S1300 (which maps to the FHIT gene), suggesting a possible role for these tumour suppressor genes in this subgroup of breast cancer patients. No concordant allelic loss was demonstrated for D17S786 suggesting that germline mutations in p53 are unlikely in such cases of bilateral breast cancer.

  9. Biopsy variability of lymphocytic infiltration in breast cancer subtypes and the ImmunoSkew score

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Adnan Mujahid; Yuan, Yinyin

    2016-11-01

    The number of tumour biopsies required for a good representation of tumours has been controversial. An important factor to consider is intra-tumour heterogeneity, which can vary among cancer types and subtypes. Immune cells in particular often display complex infiltrative patterns, however, there is a lack of quantitative understanding of the spatial heterogeneity of immune cells and how this fundamental biological nature of human tumours influences biopsy variability and treatment resistance. We systematically investigate biopsy variability for the lymphocytic infiltrate in 998 breast tumours using a novel virtual biopsy method. Across all breast cancers, we observe a nonlinear increase in concordance between the biopsy and whole-tumour score of lymphocytic infiltrate with increasing number of biopsies, yet little improvement is gained with more than four biopsies. Interestingly, biopsy variability of lymphocytic infiltrate differs considerably among breast cancer subtypes, with the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive (HER2+) subtype having the highest variability. We subsequently identify a quantitative measure of spatial variability that predicts disease-specific survival in HER2+ subtype independent of standard clinical variables (node status, tumour size and grade). Our study demonstrates how systematic methods provide new insights that can influence future study design based on a quantitative knowledge of tumour heterogeneity.

  10. Genome-wide association analysis of more than 120,000 individuals identifies 15 new susceptibility loci for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michailidou, Kyriaki; Beesley, Jonathan; Lindstrom, Sara; Canisius, Sander; Dennis, Joe; Lush, Michael J; Maranian, Mel J; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Shah, Mitul; Perkins, Barbara J; Czene, Kamila; Eriksson, Mikael; Darabi, Hatef; Brand, Judith S; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Flyger, Henrik; Nielsen, Sune F; Rahman, Nazneen; Turnbull, Clare; Fletcher, Olivia; Peto, Julian; Gibson, Lorna; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Rudolph, Anja; Eilber, Ursula; Behrens, Sabine; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Khan, Sofia; Aaltonen, Kirsimari; Ahsan, Habibul; Kibriya, Muhammad G; Whittemore, Alice S; John, Esther M; Malone, Kathleen E; Gammon, Marilie D; Santella, Regina M; Ursin, Giske; Makalic, Enes; Schmidt, Daniel F; Casey, Graham; Hunter, David J; Gapstur, Susan M; Gaudet, Mia M; Diver, W Ryan; Haiman, Christopher A; Schumacher, Fredrick; Henderson, Brian E; Le Marchand, Loic; Berg, Christine D; Chanock, Stephen J; Figueroa, Jonine; Hoover, Robert N; Lambrechts, Diether; Neven, Patrick; Wildiers, Hans; van Limbergen, Erik; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Broeks, Annegien; Verhoef, Senno; Cornelissen, Sten; Couch, Fergus J; Olson, Janet E; Hallberg, Emily; Vachon, Celine; Waisfisz, Quinten; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Adank, Muriel A; van der Luijt, Rob B; Li, Jingmei; Liu, Jianjun; Humphreys, Keith; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Park, Sue K; Yoo, Keun-Young; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Tajima, Kazuo; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Mulot, Claire; Sanchez, Marie; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Surowy, Harald; Sohn, Christof; Wu, Anna H; Tseng, Chiu-chen; Van Den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O; González-Neira, Anna; Benitez, Javier; Zamora, M Pilar; Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Hui; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Reed, Malcolm W R; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Sawyer, Elinor J; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J; Miller, Nicola; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Teo, Soo Hwang; Yip, Cheng Har; Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd; Tan, Gie-Hooi; Hooning, Maartje J; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Martens, John W M; Collée, J Margriet; Blot, William; Signorello, Lisa B; Cai, Qiuyin; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Tsimiklis, Helen; Apicella, Carmel; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Wu, Pei-Ei; Hou, Ming-Feng; Kristensen, Vessela N; Nord, Silje; Alnaes, Grethe I Grenaker; Giles, Graham G; Milne, Roger L; McLean, Catriona; Canzian, Federico; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Peeters, Petra; Lund, Eiliv; Sund, Malin; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Gunter, Marc J; Palli, Domenico; Mortensen, Lotte Maxild; Dossus, Laure; Huerta, Jose-Maria; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K; Sutter, Christian; Yang, Rongxi; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Hartman, Mikael; Miao, Hui; Chia, Kee Seng; Chan, Ching Wan; Fasching, Peter A; Hein, Alexander; Beckmann, Matthias W; Haeberle, Lothar; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nick; Schoemaker, Minouk J; Swerdlow, Anthony J; Brinton, Louise; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Zheng, Wei; Halverson, Sandra L; Shrubsole, Martha; Long, Jirong; Goldberg, Mark S; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Brüning, Thomas; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Bernard, Loris; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Dörk, Thilo; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert A E M; Seynaeve, Caroline; Van Asperen, Christi J; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Huzarski, Tomasz; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James; Slager, Susan; Toland, Amanda E; Ambrosone, Christine B; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Kabisch, Maria; Torres, Diana; Neuhausen, Susan L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Luccarini, Craig; Baynes, Caroline; Ahmed, Shahana; Healey, Catherine S; Tessier, Daniel C; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M Rosario; Álvarez, Nuria; Herrero, Daniel; Simard, Jacques; Pharoah, Paul P D P; Kraft, Peter; Dunning, Alison M; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F

    2015-04-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and large-scale replication studies have identified common variants in 79 loci associated with breast cancer, explaining ∼14% of the familial risk of the disease. To identify new susceptibility loci, we performed a meta-analysis of 11 GWAS, comprising 15,748 breast cancer cases and 18,084 controls together with 46,785 cases and 42,892 controls from 41 studies genotyped on a 211,155-marker custom array (iCOGS). Analyses were restricted to women of European ancestry. We generated genotypes for more than 11 million SNPs by imputation using the 1000 Genomes Project reference panel, and we identified 15 new loci associated with breast cancer at P < 5 × 10(-8). Combining association analysis with ChIP-seq chromatin binding data in mammary cell lines and ChIA-PET chromatin interaction data from ENCODE, we identified likely target genes in two regions: SETBP1 at 18q12.3 and RNF115 and PDZK1 at 1q21.1. One association appears to be driven by an amino acid substitution encoded in EXO1.

  11. Genome-wide association analysis of more than 120,000 individuals identifies 15 new susceptibility loci for breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michailidou, Kyriaki; Beesley, Jonathan; Lindstrom, Sara; Canisius, Sander; Dennis, Joe; Lush, Michael; Maranian, Mel J; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Shah, Mitul; Perkins, Barbara J; Czene, Kamila; Eriksson, Mikael; Darabi, Hatef; Brand, Judith S; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Flyger, Henrik; Nielsen, Sune F; Rahman, Nazneen; Turnbull, Clare; Fletcher, Olivia; Peto, Julian; Gibson, Lorna; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Rudolph, Anja; Eilber, Ursula; Behrens, Sabine; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Khan, Sofia; Aaltonen, Kirsimari; Ahsan, Habibul; Kibriya, Muhammad G; Whittemore, Alice S; John, Esther M; Malone, Kathleen E; Gammon, Marilie D; Santella, Regina M; Ursin, Giske; Makalic, Enes; Schmidt, Daniel F; Casey, Graham; Hunter, David J; Gapstur, Susan M; Gaudet, Mia M; Diver, W Ryan; Haiman, Christopher A; Schumacher, Fredrick; Henderson, Brian E; Le Marchand, Loic; Berg, Christine D; Chanock, Stephen; Figueroa, Jonine; Hoover, Robert N; Lambrechts, Diether; Neven, Patrick; Wildiers, Hans; van Limbergen, Erik; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Broeks, Annegien; Verhoef, Senno; Cornelissen, Sten; Couch, Fergus J; Olson, Janet E; Hallberg, Emily; Vachon, Celine; Waisfisz, Quinten; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Adank, Muriel A; van der Luijt, Rob B; Li, Jingmei; Liu, Jianjun; Humphreys, Keith; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Park, Sue K; Yoo, Keun-Young; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Tajima, Kazuo; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Mulot, Claire; Sanchez, Marie; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Surowy, Harald; Sohn, Christof; Wu, Anna H; Tseng, Chiu-chen; Van Den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O; González-Neira, Anna; Benitez, Javier; Zamora, M Pilar; Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Hui; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Reed, Malcolm WR; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Sawyer, Elinor J; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J; Miller, Nicola; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Teo, Soo Hwang; Yip, Cheng Har; Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd; TAN, Gie-Hooi; Hooning, Maartje J; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Martens, John WM; Collée, J Margriet; Blot, William; Signorello, Lisa B; Cai, Qiuyin; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Tsimiklis, Helen; Apicella, Carmel; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Wu, Pei-Ei; Hou, Ming-Feng; Kristensen, Vessela N; Nord, Silje; Alnaes, Grethe I Grenaker; Giles, Graham G; Milne, Roger L; McLean, Catriona; Canzian, Federico; Trichopoulos, Dmitrios; Peeters, Petra; Lund, Eiliv; Sund, Malin; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Gunter, Marc J; Palli, Domenico; Mortensen, Lotte Maxild; Dossus, Laure; Huerta, Jose-Maria; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K; Sutter, Christian; Yang, Rongxi; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Hartman, Mikael; Miao, Hui; Chia, Kee Seng; Chan, Ching Wan; Fasching, Peter A; Hein, Alexander; Beckmann, Matthias W; Haeberle, Lothar; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nick; Schoemaker, Minouk J; Swerdlow, Anthony J; Brinton, Louise; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Zheng, Wei; Halverson, Sandra L; Shrubsole, Martha; Long, Jirong; Goldberg, Mark S; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Brüning, Thomas; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Bernard, Loris; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Dörk, Thilo; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert AEM; Seynaeve, Caroline; Van Asperen, Christi J; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Huzarski, Tomasz; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James; Slager, Susan; Toland, Amanda E; Ambrosone, Christine B; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Kabisch, Maria; Torres, Diana; Neuhausen, Susan L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Luccarini, Craig; Baynes, Caroline; Ahmed, Shahana; Healey, Catherine S; Tessier, Daniel C; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M Rosario; Álvarez, Nuria; Herrero, Daniel; Simard, Jacques; Pharoah, Paul PDP; Kraft, Peter; Dunning, Alison M; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F

    2015-01-01

    Genome wide association studies (GWAS) and large scale replication studies have identified common variants in 79 loci associated with breast cancer, explaining ~14% of the familial risk of the disease. To identify new susceptibility loci, we performed a meta-analysis of 11 GWAS comprising of 15,748 breast cancer cases and 18,084 controls, and 46,785 cases and 42,892 controls from 41 studies genotyped on a 200K custom array (iCOGS). Analyses were restricted to women of European ancestry. Genotypes for more than 11M SNPs were generated by imputation using the 1000 Genomes Project reference panel. We identified 15 novel loci associated with breast cancer at P<5×10−8. Combining association analysis with ChIP-Seq data in mammary cell lines and ChIA-PET chromatin interaction data in ENCODE, we identified likely target genes in two regions: SETBP1 on 18q12.3 and RNF115 and PDZK1 on 1q21.1. One association appears to be driven by an amino-acid substitution in EXO1. PMID:25751625

  12. A mammary stem cell population identified and characterized in late embryogenesis reveals similarities to human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spike, Benjamin T; Engle, Dannielle D; Lin, Jennifer C; Cheung, Samantha K; La, Justin; Wahl, Geoffrey M

    2012-02-03

    Gene expression signatures relating mammary stem cell populations to breast cancers have focused on adult tissue. Here, we identify, isolate, and characterize the fetal mammary stem cell (fMaSC) state since the invasive and proliferative processes of mammogenesis resemble phases of cancer progression. fMaSC frequency peaks late in embryogenesis, enabling more extensive stem cell purification than achieved with adult tissue. fMaSCs are self-renewing, multipotent, and coexpress multiple mammary lineage markers. Gene expression, transplantation, and in vitro analyses reveal putative autocrine and paracrine regulatory mechanisms, including ErbB and FGF signaling pathways impinging on fMaSC growth. Expression profiles from fMaSCs and associated stroma exhibit significant similarities to basal-like and Her2+ intrinsic breast cancer subtypes. Our results reveal links between development and cancer and provide resources to identify new candidates for diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy.

  13. Cancer Stem Cells and Side Population Cells in Breast Cancer and Metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britton, Kelly M. [Institute of Genetic Medicine, Newcastle University, International Centre for Life, Central Parkway, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE1 3BZ (United Kingdom); Kirby, John A. [Institute of Cellular Medicine, Newcastle University, 3rd Floor William Leech Building, Framlington Place, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Lennard, Thomas W.J. [Faculty of Medical Sciences, Newcastle University, 3rd Floor William Leech Building, Framlington Place, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Meeson, Annette P., E-mail: annette.meeson@ncl.ac.uk [Institute of Genetic Medicine, Newcastle University, International Centre for Life, Central Parkway, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE1 3BZ (United Kingdom); North East England Stem Cell Institute, Bioscience Centre, International Centre for Life, Central Parkway, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE1 3BZ (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-19

    In breast cancer it is never the primary tumour that is fatal; instead it is the development of metastatic disease which is the major cause of cancer related mortality. There is accumulating evidence that suggests that Cancer Stem Cells (CSC) may play a role in breast cancer development and progression. Breast cancer stem cell populations, including side population cells (SP), have been shown to be primitive stem cell-like populations, being long-lived, self-renewing and highly proliferative. SP cells are identified using dual wavelength flow cytometry combined with Hoechst 33342 dye efflux, this ability is due to expression of one or more members of the ABC transporter family. They have increased resistance to chemotherapeutic agents and apoptotic stimuli and have increased migratory potential above that of the bulk tumour cells making them strong candidates for the metastatic spread of breast cancer. Treatment of nearly all cancers usually involves one first-line agent known to be a substrate of an ABC transporter thereby increasing the risk of developing drug resistant tumours. At present there is no marker available to identify SP cells using immunohistochemistry on breast cancer patient samples. If SP cells do play a role in breast cancer progression/Metastatic Breast Cancer (MBC), combining chemotherapy with ABC inhibitors may be able to destroy both the cells making up the bulk tumour and the cancer stem cell population thus preventing the risk of drug resistant disease, recurrence or metastasis.

  14. Gastric Calcifying Fibrous Tumour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Attila

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Intramucosal gastric tumours are most commonly found to be gastrointestinal stromal tumours or leiomyomas (smooth muscle tumours; however, a variety of other uncommon mesenchymal tumours can occur in the stomach wall. A rare benign calcifying fibrous tumour is reported and the endoscopic appearance, ultrasound findings and morphology are documented. A review of the literature found only two similar cases.

  15. Fine-scale mapping of 8q24 locus identifies multiple independent risk variants for breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Jiajun; Zhang, Yanfeng; Zheng, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Previous genome-wide association studies among women of European ancestry identified two independent breast cancer susceptibility loci represented by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs13281615 and rs11780156 at 8q24. A fine-mapping study across 2.06 Mb (chr8:127,561,724-129,624,067, hg19...... public resources implied that SNPs rs7815245 in Signal 3, and rs1121948 in Signal 5 (in linkage disequilibrium with rs11780156, r(2)  = 0.77), were putatively functional variants for two of the five independent association signals. The results highlighted multiple 8q24 variants associated with breast......) in 55,540 breast cancer cases and 51,168 controls within the Breast Cancer Association Consortium was conducted. Three additional independent association signals in women of European ancestry, represented by rs35961416 (OR = 0.95, 95% CI = 0.93-0.97, conditional p = 5.8 × 10(-6) ), rs7815245 (OR = 0...

  16. Fine-scale mapping of 8q24 locus identifies multiple independent risk variants for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jiajun; Zhang, Yanfeng; Zheng, Wei; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Ghoussaini, Maya; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Lush, Michael; Milne, Roger L; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Beesley, Jonathan; Kar, Siddhartha; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Beckmann, Matthias W; Zhao, Zhiguo; Guo, Xingyi; Benitez, Javier; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Blot, William; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Bojesen, Stig E; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Brinton, Louise; Broeks, Annegien; Brüning, Thomas; Burwinkel, Barbara; Cai, Hui; Canisius, Sander; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Couch, Fergus J; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Devilee, Peter; Droit, Arnaud; Dork, Thilo; Fasching, Peter A; Fletcher, Olivia; Flyger, Henrik; Fostira, Florentia; Gaborieau, Valerie; García-Closas, Montserrat; Giles, Graham G; Grip, Mervi; Guenel, Pascal; Haiman, Christopher A; Hamann, Ute; Hartman, Mikael; Miao, Hui; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Hopper, John L; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Ito, Hidemi; Jakubowska, Anna; Johnson, Nichola; Torres, Diana; Kabisch, Maria; Kang, Daehee; Khan, Sofia; Knight, Julia A; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Lambrechts, Diether; Li, Jingmei; Lindblom, Annika; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Lubinski, Jan; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Le Marchand, Loic; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Matsuo, Keitaro; McLean, Catriona; Meindl, Alfons; Muir, Kenneth; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nord, Silje; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Olson, Janet E; Orr, Nick; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; Peterlongo, Paolo; Choudary Putti, Thomas; Rudolph, Anja; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Schmutzler, Rita K; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hou, Ming-Feng; Shrubsole, Matha J; Southey, Melissa C; Swerdlow, Anthony; Hwang Teo, Soo; Thienpont, Bernard; Toland, Amanda E; Tollenaar, Robert A E M; Tomlinson, Ian; Truong, Therese; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Wen, Wanqing; Winqvist, Robert; Wu, Anna H; Har Yip, Cheng; Zamora, Pilar M; Zheng, Ying; Floris, Giuseppe; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Hooning, Maartje J; Martens, John W M; Seynaeve, Caroline; Kristensen, Vessela N; Hall, Per; Pharoah, Paul D P; Simard, Jacques; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Dunning, Alison M; Antoniou, Antonis C; Easton, Douglas F; Cai, Qiuyin; Long, Jirong

    2016-09-15

    Previous genome-wide association studies among women of European ancestry identified two independent breast cancer susceptibility loci represented by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs13281615 and rs11780156 at 8q24. A fine-mapping study across 2.06 Mb (chr8:127,561,724-129,624,067, hg19) in 55,540 breast cancer cases and 51,168 controls within the Breast Cancer Association Consortium was conducted. Three additional independent association signals in women of European ancestry, represented by rs35961416 (OR = 0.95, 95% CI = 0.93-0.97, conditional p = 5.8 × 10(-6) ), rs7815245 (OR = 0.94, 95% CI = 0.91-0.96, conditional p = 1.1 × 10(-6) ) and rs2033101 (OR = 1.05, 95% CI = 1.02-1.07, conditional p = 1.1 × 10(-4) ) were found. Integrative analysis using functional genomic data from the Roadmap Epigenomics, the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements project, the Cancer Genome Atlas and other public resources implied that SNPs rs7815245 in Signal 3, and rs1121948 in Signal 5 (in linkage disequilibrium with rs11780156, r(2)  = 0.77), were putatively functional variants for two of the five independent association signals. The results highlighted multiple 8q24 variants associated with breast cancer susceptibility in women of European ancestry.

  17. Common alleles at 6q25.1 and 1p11.2 are associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Sinilnikova, Olga M

    2011-01-01

    Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 6q25.1, near the ESR1 gene, have been implicated in the susceptibility to breast cancer for Asian (rs2046210) and European women (rs9397435). A genome-wide association study in Europeans identified two further breast cancer susceptibility variants: rs...... to a better understanding of the biology of tumour development in these women....

  18. Stratification and therapeutic potential of PML in metastatic breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Martín, Natalia; Piva, Marco; Urosevic, Jelena; Aldaz, Paula; Sutherland, James D.; Fernández-Ruiz, Sonia; Arreal, Leire; Torrano, Verónica; Cortazar, Ana R.; Planet, Evarist; Guiu, Marc; Radosevic-Robin, Nina; Garcia, Stephane; Macías, Iratxe; Salvador, Fernando; Domenici, Giacomo; Rueda, Oscar M.; Zabala-Letona, Amaia; Arruabarrena-Aristorena, Amaia; Zúñiga-García, Patricia; Caro-Maldonado, Alfredo; Valcárcel-Jiménez, Lorea; Sánchez-Mosquera, Pilar; Varela-Rey, Marta; Martínez-Chantar, Maria Luz; Anguita, Juan; Ibrahim, Yasir H.; Scaltriti, Maurizio; Lawrie, Charles H.; Aransay, Ana M.; Iovanna, Juan L.; Baselga, Jose; Caldas, Carlos; Barrio, Rosa; Serra, Violeta; dM Vivanco, Maria; Matheu, Ander; Gomis, Roger R.; Carracedo, Arkaitz

    2016-01-01

    Patient stratification has been instrumental for the success of targeted therapies in breast cancer. However, the molecular basis of metastatic breast cancer and its therapeutic vulnerabilities remain poorly understood. Here we show that PML is a novel target in aggressive breast cancer. The acquisition of aggressiveness and metastatic features in breast tumours is accompanied by the elevated PML expression and enhanced sensitivity to its inhibition. Interestingly, we find that STAT3 is responsible, at least in part, for the transcriptional upregulation of PML in breast cancer. Moreover, PML targeting hampers breast cancer initiation and metastatic seeding. Mechanistically, this biological activity relies on the regulation of the stem cell gene SOX9 through interaction of PML with its promoter region. Altogether, we identify a novel pathway sustaining breast cancer aggressiveness that can be therapeutically exploited in combination with PML-based stratification. PMID:27553708

  19. Genome-Wide Association Study in BRCA1 Mutation Carriers Identifies Novel Loci Associated with Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couch, Fergus J; Wang, Xianshu; McGuffog, Lesley;

    2013-01-01

    BRCA1-associated breast and ovarian cancer risks can be modified by common genetic variants. To identify further cancer risk-modifying loci, we performed a multi-stage GWAS of 11,705 BRCA1 carriers (of whom 5,920 were diagnosed with breast and 1,839 were diagnosed with ovarian cancer......), with a further replication in an additional sample of 2,646 BRCA1 carriers. We identified a novel breast cancer risk modifier locus at 1q32 for BRCA1 carriers (rs2290854, P = 2.7 × 10(-8), HR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.09-1.20). In addition, we identified two novel ovarian cancer risk modifier loci: 17q21.31 (rs17631303......, P = 1.4 × 10(-8), HR = 1.27, 95% CI: 1.17-1.38) and 4q32.3 (rs4691139, P = 3.4 × 10(-8), HR = 1.20, 95% CI: 1.17-1.38). The 4q32.3 locus was not associated with ovarian cancer risk in the general population or BRCA2 carriers, suggesting a BRCA1-specific association. The 17q21.31 locus was also...

  20. The future of breast cancer radiotherapy: From one size fits all to taylor-made treatment; L'avenir de la radiotherapie du cancer du sein: de la taille unique au sur-mesure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennequin, C. [Service de cancerologie-radiotherapie, hopital Saint-Louis, 1, avenue Claude-Vellefaux, 75475 Paris (France); Azria, D. [Departement de cancerologie radiotherapie, CRLC Val-d' Aurelle-Paul-Lamarque, rue Croix-Verte, 34298 Montpellier cedex 5 (France); Universite de Montpellier I, 5, boulevard Henri-IV, CS 19044, 34967 Montpellier cedex 2 (France); Inserm U896, institut de recherche en cancerologie de Montpellier, CRLC Val-d' Aurelle-Paul-Lamarque, rue Croix-Verte, 34298 Montpellier cedex 5 (France)

    2011-10-15

    Various subgroups of breast tumours have been identified during the last 10 years according to the risk of local relapse. Prognostic factors for local relapse are age, surgical margins, tumour size, Her2 expression and hormonal receptors status. For tumours with a high risk of local relapse, an increased in boost dose or the addition of new drugs (trastuzumab, anti-angiogenics, PARP inhibitors) could be considered. For low risk tumours, hypo-fractionated, accelerated partial breast and intraoperative radiotherapy are being evaluated. The classical schedule (45-50 Gy to the whole gland followed by a boost dose of 16 Gy) is no longer the universal rule. Treatment individualization, according to clinical and biological characteristics of the tumour and - possibly - to the radiobiological profile of the patient, is likely to be the future of breast cancer radiotherapy. (authors)

  1. Genome-Wide Association Study in BRCA1 Mutation Carriers Identifies Novel Loci Associated with Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xianshu; McGuffog, Lesley; Lee, Andrew; Olswold, Curtis; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Soucy, Penny; Fredericksen, Zachary; Barrowdale, Daniel; Dennis, Joe; Gaudet, Mia M.; Dicks, Ed; Kosel, Matthew; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Lee, Adam; Bacot, François; Vincent, Daniel; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Peock, Susan; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Jakubowska, Anna; Investigators, kConFab; Radice, Paolo; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Domchek, Susan M.; Piedmonte, Marion; Singer, Christian F.; Friedman, Eitan; Thomassen, Mads; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Szabo, Csilla I.; Blanco, Ignacio; Greene, Mark H.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Garber, Judy; Phelan, Catherine M.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Montagna, Marco; Olah, Edith; Andrulis, Irene L.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Goldgar, David E.; Caldes, Trinidad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Osorio, Ana; Terry, Mary Beth; Daly, Mary B.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Hamann, Ute; Ramus, Susan J.; Ewart Toland, Amanda; Caligo, Maria A.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Tung, Nadine; Claes, Kathleen; Beattie, Mary S.; Southey, Melissa C.; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Tischkowitz, Marc; Janavicius, Ramunas; John, Esther M.; Kwong, Ava; Diez, Orland; Balmaña, Judith; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Arun, Banu K.; Rennert, Gad; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Ganz, Patricia A.; Campbell, Ian; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; van Deurzen, Carolien H. M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Gille, Johannes J. P.; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; Blok, Marinus J.; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J. L.; Rookus, Matti A.; Devilee, Peter; Verhoef, Senno; van Os, Theo A. M.; Wijnen, Juul T.; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve; Fineberg, Elena; Platte, Radka; Evans, D. Gareth; Izatt, Louise; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Adlard, Julian; Eccles, Diana M.; Cook, Jackie; Brewer, Carole; Douglas, Fiona; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J.; Side, Lucy E.; Donaldson, Alan; Houghton, Catherine; Rogers, Mark T.; Dorkins, Huw; Eason, Jacqueline; Gregory, Helen; McCann, Emma; Murray, Alex; Calender, Alain; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Delnatte, Capucine; Nogues, Catherine; Lasset, Christine; Houdayer, Claude; Leroux, Dominique; Rouleau, Etienne; Prieur, Fabienne; Damiola, Francesca; Sobol, Hagay; Coupier, Isabelle; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Castera, Laurent; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Léoné, Mélanie; Pujol, Pascal; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Złowocka-Perłowska, Elżbieta; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Huzarski, Tomasz; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Viel, Alessandra; Peissel, Bernard; Bonanni, Bernardo; Melloni, Giulia; Ottini, Laura; Papi, Laura; Varesco, Liliana; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Peterlongo, Paolo; Volorio, Sara; Manoukian, Siranoush; Pensotti, Valeria; Arnold, Norbert; Engel, Christoph; Deissler, Helmut; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Gehrig, Andrea; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Meindl, Alfons; Niederacher, Dieter; Ditsch, Nina; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Engert, Stefanie; Sutter, Christian; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Weber, Bernhard H. F.; Arver, Brita; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Loman, Niklas; Rosenquist, Richard; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Blank, Stephanie V.; Cohn, David E.; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Small, Laurie; Friedlander, Michael; Bae-Jump, Victoria L.; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Rappaport, Christine; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Lindor, Noralane M.; Kaufman, Bella; Shimon Paluch, Shani; Laitman, Yael; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Moeller, Sanne Traasdahl; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Vijai, Joseph; Sarrel, Kara; Robson, Mark; Kauff, Noah; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Ejlertsen, Bent; Nielsen, Finn C.; Jønson, Lars; Andersen, Mette K.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Steele, Linda; Foretova, Lenka; Teulé, Alex; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Pujana, Miquel Angel; Mai, Phuong L.; Loud, Jennifer T.; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; Orsulic, Sandra; Narod, Steven A.; Herzog, Josef; Sand, Sharon R.; Tognazzo, Silvia; Agata, Simona; Vaszko, Tibor; Weaver, Joellen; Stavropoulou, Alexandra V.; Buys, Saundra S.; Romero, Atocha; de la Hoya, Miguel; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Muranen, Taru A.; Duran, Mercedes; Chung, Wendy K.; Lasa, Adriana; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; Miron, Alexander; Benitez, Javier; Senter, Leigha; Huo, Dezheng; Chan, Salina B.; Sokolenko, Anna P.; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Tihomirova, Laima; Friebel, Tara M.; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Lu, Karen H.; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; James, Paul A.; Hall, Per

    2013-01-01

    BRCA1-associated breast and ovarian cancer risks can be modified by common genetic variants. To identify further cancer risk-modifying loci, we performed a multi-stage GWAS of 11,705 BRCA1 carriers (of whom 5,920 were diagnosed with breast and 1,839 were diagnosed with ovarian cancer), with a further replication in an additional sample of 2,646 BRCA1 carriers. We identified a novel breast cancer risk modifier locus at 1q32 for BRCA1 carriers (rs2290854, P = 2.7×10−8, HR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.09–1.20). In addition, we identified two novel ovarian cancer risk modifier loci: 17q21.31 (rs17631303, P = 1.4×10−8, HR = 1.27, 95% CI: 1.17–1.38) and 4q32.3 (rs4691139, P = 3.4×10−8, HR = 1.20, 95% CI: 1.17–1.38). The 4q32.3 locus was not associated with ovarian cancer risk in the general population or BRCA2 carriers, suggesting a BRCA1-specific association. The 17q21.31 locus was also associated with ovarian cancer risk in 8,211 BRCA2 carriers (P = 2×10−4). These loci may lead to an improved understanding of the etiology of breast and ovarian tumors in BRCA1 carriers. Based on the joint distribution of the known BRCA1 breast cancer risk-modifying loci, we estimated that the breast cancer lifetime risks for the 5% of BRCA1 carriers at lowest risk are 28%–50% compared to 81%–100% for the 5% at highest risk. Similarly, based on the known ovarian cancer risk-modifying loci, the 5% of BRCA1 carriers at lowest risk have an estimated lifetime risk of developing ovarian cancer of 28% or lower, whereas the 5% at highest risk will have a risk of 63% or higher. Such differences in risk may have important implications for risk prediction and clinical management for BRCA1 carriers. PMID:23544013

  2. Genome-wide association study in BRCA1 mutation carriers identifies novel loci associated with breast and ovarian cancer risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fergus J Couch

    Full Text Available BRCA1-associated breast and ovarian cancer risks can be modified by common genetic variants. To identify further cancer risk-modifying loci, we performed a multi-stage GWAS of 11,705 BRCA1 carriers (of whom 5,920 were diagnosed with breast and 1,839 were diagnosed with ovarian cancer, with a further replication in an additional sample of 2,646 BRCA1 carriers. We identified a novel breast cancer risk modifier locus at 1q32 for BRCA1 carriers (rs2290854, P = 2.7 × 10(-8, HR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.09-1.20. In addition, we identified two novel ovarian cancer risk modifier loci: 17q21.31 (rs17631303, P = 1.4 × 10(-8, HR = 1.27, 95% CI: 1.17-1.38 and 4q32.3 (rs4691139, P = 3.4 × 10(-8, HR = 1.20, 95% CI: 1.17-1.38. The 4q32.3 locus was not associated with ovarian cancer risk in the general population or BRCA2 carriers, suggesting a BRCA1-specific association. The 17q21.31 locus was also associated with ovarian cancer risk in 8,211 BRCA2 carriers (P = 2×10(-4. These loci may lead to an improved understanding of the etiology of breast and ovarian tumors in BRCA1 carriers. Based on the joint distribution of the known BRCA1 breast cancer risk-modifying loci, we estimated that the breast cancer lifetime risks for the 5% of BRCA1 carriers at lowest risk are 28%-50% compared to 81%-100% for the 5% at highest risk. Similarly, based on the known ovarian cancer risk-modifying loci, the 5% of BRCA1 carriers at lowest risk have an estimated lifetime risk of developing ovarian cancer of 28% or lower, whereas the 5% at highest risk will have a risk of 63% or higher. Such differences in risk may have important implications for risk prediction and clinical management for BRCA1 carriers.

  3. Pre-diagnostic smoking behaviour and poorer prognosis in a German breast cancer patient cohort - Differential effects by tumour subtype, NAT2 status, BMI and alcohol intake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seibold, P.; Vrieling, A.; Heinz, J.; Obi, N.; Sinn, H.P.; Flesch-Janys, D.; Chang-Claude, J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Inconsistent associations of smoking and breast cancer-specific mortality might be explained by subgroups of patients with different susceptibility to harmful effects of smoking. METHODS: We used a prospective cohort of 3340 postmenopausal breast cancer patients aged 50-74 and diagnosed

  4. Microarray methods to identify factors determining breast cancer progression : Potentials, limitations, and challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vegt, B.; de Bock, G. H.; Hollema, H.; Wesseling, J.

    2009-01-01

    65-80% of the patients with breast cancer might not benefit from the adjuvant therapy they receive based on 'classical' markers used for the selection for adjuvant therapy. Therefore it is necessary to develop new markers that are able to tailor treatment for an individual patient. A number of micro

  5. Genome-wide association studies identify four ER negative-specific breast cancer risk loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Couch, Fergus J.; Lindstrom, Sara; Michailidouo, Kyriaki; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Brook, Mark N.; Orr, Nick; Rhie, Suhn Kyong; Riboli, Elio; Feigelson, Heather S.; Le Marchand, Loic; Buring, Julie E.; Eccles, Diana; Miron, Penelope; Fasching, Peter A.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Carpenter, Jane; Godwin, Andrew K.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Giles, Graham G.; Cox, Angela; Hopper, John L.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Dicks, Ed; Howat, Will J.; Schoof, Nils; Bojesen, Stig E.; Lambrechts, Diether; Broeks, Annegien; Andrulis, Irene L.; Guenel, Pascal; Burwinkel, Barbara; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Fletcher, Olivia; Winqvist, Robert; Brenner, Hermann; Mannermaa, Arto; Hamann, Ute; Meindl, Alfons; Lindblom, Annika; Zheng, Wei; Devillee, Peter; Goldberg, Mark S.; Lubinski, Jan; Kristensen, Vessela; Swerdlow, Anthony; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Doerk, Thilo; Muir, Kenneth; Matsuo, Keitaro; Wu, Anna H.; Radice, Paolo; Teo, Soo Hwang; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Blot, William; Kang, Daehee; Hartman, Mikael; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Shen, Chen-Yang; Southey, Melissa C.; Park, Daniel J.; Hammet, Fleur; Stone, Jennifer; Van't Veer, Laura J.; Rutgers, Emiel J.; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Peto, Julian; Schrauder, Michael G.; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Silva, Isabel dos Santos; Johnson, Nichola; Warren, Helen; Tomlins, Ian; Kerin, Michael J.; Miller, Nicola; Marme, Federick; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Truong, Therese; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Kerbrat, Pierre; Nordestgaard, Borge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Flyger, Henrik; Milne, Roger L.; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Menendez, Primitiva; Mueller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Lichtner, Peter; Lochmann, Magdalena; Justenhoven, Christina; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Muranen, Taru A.; Aittomaki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Greco, Dario; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Yatabe, Yasushi; Antonenkova, Natalia N.; Margolin, Sara; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Balleine, Rosemary; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Van den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O.; Neven, Patrick; Dieudonne, Anne-Sophie; Leunen, Karin; Rudolph, Anja; Nickels, Stefan; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peissel, Bernard; Bernard, Loris; Olson, Janet E.; Wang, Xianshu; Stevens, Kristen; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; McLean, Catriona; Coetzee, Gerhard A.; Feng, Ye; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Labreche, France; Dumont, Martine; Yip, Cheng Har; Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Shrubsole, Martha; Long, Jirong; Pylkas, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kauppila, Saila; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Tollenaar, Robertus A. E. M.; Seynaeve, Caroline M.; Kriege, Mieke; Hooning, Maartje J.; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; van Deurzen, Carolien H. M.; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Hui; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy P.; Cross, Simon S.; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Signorello, Lisa; Cai, Qiuyin; Shah, Mitul; Miao, Hui; Chan, Ching Wan; Chia, Kee Seng; Jakubowska, Anna; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Wu, Peiei; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Ashworth, Alan; Jones, Michael; Tessier, Daniel C.; Gonzalez-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M. Rosario; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Bandera, Elisa V.; John, Esther M.; Chen, Gary K.; Hu, Jennifer J.; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L.; Bernstein, Leslie; Press, Michael F.; Ziegler, Regina G.; Millikan, Robert M.; Deming-Halverson, Sandra L.; Nyante, Sarah; Ingles, Sue A.; Waisfisz, Quinten; Tsimiklis, Helen; Makalic, Enes; Schmidt, Daniel; Bui, Minh; Gibson, Lorna; Mueller-Myhsok, Bertram; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Hein, Rebecca; Dahmen, Norbert; Beckmann, Lars; Aaltonen, Kirsimari; Czene, Kamila; Irwanto, Astrid; Liu, Jianjun; Turnbull, Clare; Rahman, Nazneen; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Olswold, Curtis; Slager, Susan; Pilarski, Robert; Ademuyiwa, Foluso; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Martin, Nicholas G.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Slamon, Dennis J.; Rauh, Claudia; Lux, Michael P.; Jud, Sebastian M.; Bruning, Thomas; Weaver, JoEllen; Harma, Priyanka; Pathak, Harsh; Tapper, Will; Gerty, Sue; Durcan, Lorraine; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Tumino, Rosario; Peeters, Petra H.; Kaaks, Rudolf; Campa, Daniele; Canzian, Federico; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Johansson, Mattias; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Travis, Ruth; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Chen, Constance; Beck, Andy; Hankinson, Susan E.; Berg, Christine D.; Hoover, Robert N.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Gaudet, Mia M.; Diver, W. Ryan; Willett, Walter C.; Hunter, David J.; Simard, Jacques; Benitez, Javier; Dunning, Alison M.; Sherman, Mark E.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Chanock, Stephen J.; Hall, Per; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Vachon, Celine; Easton, Douglas F.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Kraft, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER)-negative tumors represent 20-30% of all breast cancers, with a higher proportion occurring in younger women and women of African ancestry. The etiology and clinical behavior of ER-negative tumors are different from those of tumors expressing ER (ER positive), including differe

  6. Genome-wide association studies identify four ER negative-specific breast cancer risk loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Couch, Fergus J; Lindstrom, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER)-negative tumors represent 20-30% of all breast cancers, with a higher proportion occurring in younger women and women of African ancestry. The etiology and clinical behavior of ER-negative tumors are different from those of tumors expressing ER (ER positive), including diff...

  7. A meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of breast cancer identifies two novel susceptibility loci at 6q14 and 20q11

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siddiq, Afshan; Couch, Fergus J.; Chen, Gary K.; Lindstrom, Sara; Eccles, Diana; Millikan, Robert C.; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Stram, Daniel O.; Beckmann, Lars; Rhie, Suhn Kyong; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Aittomaki, Kristiina; Amiano, Pilar; Apicella, Carmel; Baglietto, Laura; Bandera, Elisa V.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Berg, Christine D.; Bernstein, Leslie; Blomqvist, Carl; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brinton, Louise; Bui, Quang M.; Buring, Julie E.; Buys, Saundra S.; Campa, Daniele; Carpenter, Jane E.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chen, Constance; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Czene, Kamila; Deming, Sandra L.; Diasio, Robert B.; Diver, W. Ryan; Dunning, Alison M.; Durcan, Lorraine; Ekici, Arif B.; Fasching, Peter A.; Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Fejerman, Laura; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Fletcher, Olivia; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Gaudet, Mia M.; Gerty, Susan M.; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L.; Giles, Graham G.; van Gils, Carla H.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Graham, Nikki; Greco, Dario; Hall, Per; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hartmann, Arndt; Hein, Rebecca; Heinz, Judith; Hoover, Robert N.; Hopper, John L.; Hu, Jennifer J.; Huntsman, Scott; Ingles, Sue A.; Irwanto, Astrid; Isaacs, Claudine; Jacobs, Kevin B.; John, Esther M.; Justenhoven, Christina; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Coetzee, Gerhard A.; Lathrop, Mark; Le Marchand, Loic; Lee, Adam M.; Lee, I-Min; Lesnick, Timothy; Lichtner, Peter; Liu, Jianjun; Lund, Eiliv; Makalic, Enes; Martin, Nicholas G.; McLean, Catriona A.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Meindl, Alfons; Miron, Penelope; Monroe, Kristine R.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Mueller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nickels, Stefan; Nyante, Sarah J.; Olswold, Curtis; Overvad, Kim; Palli, Domenico; Park, Daniel J.; Palmer, Julie R.; Pathak, Harsh; Peto, Julian; Pharoah, Paul; Rahman, Nazneen; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Schmidt, Daniel F.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Slager, Susan; Southey, Melissa C.; Stevens, Kristen N.; Sinn, Hans-Peter; Press, Michael F.; Ross, Eric; Riboli, Elio; Ridker, Paul M.; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Severi, Gianluca; Silva, Isabel dos Santos; Stone, Jennifer; Sund, Malin; Tapper, William J.; Thun, Michael J.; Travis, Ruth C.; Turnbull, Clare; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Waisfisz, Quinten; Wang, Xianshu; Wang, Zhaoming; Weaver, JoEllen; Schulz-Wendtland, Ruediger; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Van Den Berg, David; Zheng, Wei; Ziegler, Regina G.; Ziv, Elad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Easton, Douglas F.; Hunter, David J.; Henderson, Brian E.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Kraft, Peter; Haiman, Christopher A.; Vachon, Celine M.

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of breast cancer defined by hormone receptor status have revealed loci contributing to susceptibility of estrogen receptor (ER)-negative subtypes. To identify additional genetic variants for ER-negative breast cancer, we conducted the largest meta-analysis of E

  8. Primary radiotherapy after tumour excision as an alternative to mastectomy for early breast cancer. Rationale and preliminary results of a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browde, S; Nissenbaum, M M

    1983-09-28

    A conservative approach to the management of breast cancer is gaining acceptance. The evidence from many retrospective and prospective studies indicates that breast-preserving surgery and radiation therapy give results equal to those of mastectomy. Relapse affecting the breast alone has been shown not to be detrimental to survival, while the psychological benefits to the patients have been gratifying. A prospective study of early breast cancer treated by conservative surgery and radiation was commenced at the Johannesburg Hospital in 1980. The results in 57 patients are reported. So far there have been 2 cases of local recurrence. In the majority of cases satisfactory cosmetic results were achieved. It is considered that lumpectomy with axillary dissection to establish nodal status followed by irradiation is the treatment of choice for stage I and II carcinoma of the breast.

  9. A novel de novo BRCA2 mutation of paternal origin identified in a Spanish woman with early onset bilateral breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez, Orland; Gutiérrez-Enríquez, Sara; Mediano, Carmen; Masas, Miriam; Saura, Cristina; Gadea, Neus; Balmaña, Judith

    2010-05-01

    Germ line mutations in either of the two major breast cancer predisposition genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, account for a significant proportion of hereditary breast/ovarian cancer. Identification of breast cancer patients carrying mutations in any of these genes is primarily based on a positive family history of breast/ovarian cancer or early onset of the disease. In the course of mutation screening of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in a hospital based series of patients with risk factors for hereditary breast/ovarian cancer, we identified a novel germ line mutation in the BRCA2 gene (c.51dupA) in a patient with early onset bilateral breast cancer and no family history of the disease. None of her parents carried the mutation, and paternity was confirmed. Subsequent molecular analysis demonstrated that the mutation was a novel de novo germ line mutation located in the paternal allele of the BRCA2 gene.

  10. A modulated empirical Bayes model for identifying topological and temporal estrogen receptor α regulatory networks in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Yuming

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Estrogens regulate diverse physiological processes in various tissues through genomic and non-genomic mechanisms that result in activation or repression of gene expression. Transcription regulation upon estrogen stimulation is a critical biological process underlying the onset and progress of the majority of breast cancer. Dynamic gene expression changes have been shown to characterize the breast cancer cell response to estrogens, the every molecular mechanism of which is still not well understood. Results We developed a modulated empirical Bayes model, and constructed a novel topological and temporal transcription factor (TF regulatory network in MCF7 breast cancer cell line upon stimulation by 17β-estradiol stimulation. In the network, significant TF genomic hubs were identified including ER-alpha and AP-1; significant non-genomic hubs include ZFP161, TFDP1, NRF1, TFAP2A, EGR1, E2F1, and PITX2. Although the early and late networks were distinct ( Conclusions We identified a number of estrogen regulated target genes and established estrogen-regulated network that distinguishes the genomic and non-genomic actions of estrogen receptor. Many gene targets of this network were not active anymore in anti-estrogen resistant cell lines, possibly because their DNA methylation and histone acetylation patterns have changed.

  11. Investigation of gene-environment interactions between 47 newly identified breast cancer susceptibility loci and environmental risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, Anja; Milne, Roger L; Truong, Thérèse; Knight, Julia A; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Behrens, Sabine; Eilber, Ursula; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Dunning, Alison M; Shah, Mitul; Munday, Hannah R; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Brand, Judith S; Olson, Janet; Vachon, Celine M; Hallberg, Emily; Castelao, J Esteban; Carracedo, Angel; Torres, Maria; Li, Jingmei; Humphreys, Keith; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Menegaux, Florence; Flyger, Henrik; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Yesilyurt, Betul T; Floris, Giuseppe; Leunen, Karin; Engelhardt, Ellen G; Broeks, Annegien; Rutgers, Emiel J; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Cross, Simon; Reed, Malcolm; Gonzalez-Neira, Anna; Arias Perez, José Ignacio; Provenzano, Elena; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C; Spurdle, Amanda; Häberle, Lothar; Beckmann, Matthias W; Ekici, Arif B; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; McLean, Catriona; Baglietto, Laura; Chanock, Stephen J; Lissowska, Jolanta; Sherman, Mark E; Brüning, Thomas; Hamann, Ute; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Orr, Nick; Schoemaker, Minouk; Ashworth, Alan; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kataja, Vesa; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Mannermaa, Arto; Swerdlow, Anthony; Giles, Graham G; Brenner, Hermann; Fasching, Peter A; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Hopper, John; Benítez, Javier; Cox, Angela; Andrulis, Irene L; Lambrechts, Diether; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Couch, Fergus; Czene, Kamila; Bojesen, Stig E; Easton, Doug F; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Guénel, Pascal; Hall, Per; Pharoah, Paul D P; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Chang-Claude, Jenny

    2015-03-15

    A large genotyping project within the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) recently identified 41 associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and overall breast cancer (BC) risk. We investigated whether the effects of these 41 SNPs, as well as six SNPs associated with estrogen receptor (ER) negative BC risk are modified by 13 environmental risk factors for BC. Data from 22 studies participating in BCAC were pooled, comprising up to 26,633 cases and 30,119 controls. Interactions between SNPs and environmental factors were evaluated using an empirical Bayes-type shrinkage estimator. Six SNPs showed interactions with associated p-values (pint ) factors and the observed potential interactions require confirmation in independent studies.

  12. Identifying gaps and relative opportunities for discovering membrane proteomic biomarkers of triple-negative breast cancer as a translational priority

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhooma Venkatraman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC remains a significant clinical and scientific challenge. The classification of TNBC is based on the lack of expression of the human epidermal growth factor 2, the estrogen receptor, and the progesterone receptor. TNBC accounts for more than 20% of all breast cancers (BCs, has a poorer prognosis compared to other BC subtypes, and has no targeted therapeutics. Primarily, this review focuses on the heterogeneity of BC and the importance of molecular subtyping for the accurate classification of TNBC. Further, it seeks to identify the molecular "omic" gaps in subtyping TNBC and the role of membrane protein biomarkers that could potentially advance clinical and translational research in BC.

  13. Integrative Functional Genomics Analysis of Sustained Polyploidy Phenotypes in Breast Cancer Cells Identifies an Oncogenic Profile for GINS2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juha K. Rantala

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Aneuploidy is among the most obvious differences between normal and cancer cells. However, mechanisms contributing to development and maintenance of aneuploid cell growth are diverse and incompletely understood. Functional genomics analyses have shown that aneuploidy in cancer cells is correlated with diffuse gene expression signatures and aneuploidy can arise by a variety of mechanisms, including cytokinesis failures, DNA endoreplication, and possibly through polyploid intermediate states. To identify molecular processes contributing to development of aneuploidy, we used a cell spot microarray technique to identify genes inducing polyploidy and/or allowing maintenance of polyploid cell growth in breast cancer cells. Of 5760 human genes screened, 177 were found to induce severe DNA content alterations on prolonged transient silencing. Association with response to DNA damage stimulus and DNA repair was found to be the most enriched cellular processes among the candidate genes. Functional validation analysis of these genes highlighted GINS2 as the highest ranking candidate inducing polyploidy, accumulation of endogenous DNA damage, and impairing cell proliferation on inhibition. The cell growth inhibition and induction of polyploidy by suppression of GINS2 was verified in a panel of breast cancer cell lines. Bioinformatic analysis of published gene expression and DNA copy number studies of clinical breast tumors suggested GINS2 to be associated with the aggressive characteristics of a subgroup of breast cancers in vivo. In addition, nuclear GINS2 protein levels distinguished actively proliferating cancer cells suggesting potential use of GINS2 staining as a biomarker of cell proliferation as well as a potential therapeutic target.

  14. Can the microRNA expression profile help to identify novel targets for zoledronic acid in breast cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insalaco, Lavinia; Incorvaia, Lorena; Barraco, Nadia; Castiglia, Marta; Rizzo, Sergio; Santini, Daniele; Giordano, Antonio; Castorina, Sergio; Russo, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Zoledronic acid (ZOL), belonging to third generation bisphosphonate family, is a potent inhibitor of osteoclast-mediated bone resorption, widely used to effectively prevent osteolysis in breast cancer patients who develop bone metastases. Low doses of ZOL have been shown to exhibit a direct anticancer role, by inhibiting cell adhesion, invasion, cytoskeleton remodelling and proliferation in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. In order to identify the molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways underlying the anticancer activity exerted by ZOL, we analyzed for the first time the microRNA expression profile in breast cancer cells. A large-scale microarray analysis of 377 miRNAs was performed on MCF7 cells treated with 10 μM ZOL for 24 h compared to untreated cells. Furthermore, the expression of specific ZOL-induced miRNAs was analyzed in MCF-7 and SkBr3 cells through Real-time PCR. Low-dose treatment with ZOL significantly altered expression of 54 miRNAs. Nine upregulated and twelve downregulated miRNAs have been identified after 24 h of treatment. Also, ZOL induced expression of 11 specific miRNAs and silenced expression of 22 miRNAs. MiRNA data analysis revealed the involvement of differentially expressed miRNAs in PI3K/Akt, MAPK, Wnt, TGF-β, Jak-STAT and mTOR signaling pathways, and regulation of actin cytoskeleton. Our results have been shown to be perfectly coherent with the recent findings reported in literature concerning changes in expression of some miRNAs involved in bone metastasis formation, progression, therapy resistance in breast cancer. In conclusion, this data supports the hypothesis that ZOL-induced modification of the miRNA expression profile contributes to the anticancer efficacy of this agent. PMID:27081088

  15. AGR3 in breast cancer: prognostic impact and suitable serum-based biomarker for early cancer detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garczyk, Stefan; von Stillfried, Saskia; Antonopoulos, Wiebke; Hartmann, Arndt; Schrauder, Michael G; Fasching, Peter A; Anzeneder, Tobias; Tannapfel, Andrea; Ergönenc, Yavuz; Knüchel, Ruth; Rose, Michael; Dahl, Edgar

    2015-01-01

    Blood-based early detection of breast cancer has recently gained novel momentum, as liquid biopsy diagnostics is a fast emerging field. In this study, we aimed to identify secreted proteins which are up-regulated both in tumour tissue and serum samples of breast cancer patients compared to normal tissue and sera. Based on two independent tissue cohorts (n = 75 and n = 229) and one serum cohort (n = 80) of human breast cancer and healthy serum samples, we characterised AGR3 as a novel potential biomarker both for breast cancer prognosis and early breast cancer detection from blood. AGR3 expression in breast tumours is significantly associated with oestrogen receptor α (Pbreast tumours (multivariate hazard ratio: 2.186, 95% CI: 1.008-4.740, Pbreast cancer patients (n = 40, mainly low stage tumours) compared to healthy controls (n = 40). To develop a suitable biomarker panel for early breast cancer detection, we measured AGR2 protein in human serum samples in parallel. The combined AGR3/AGR2 biomarker panel achieved a sensitivity of 64.5% and a specificity of 89.5% as shown by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve statistics. Thus our data clearly show the potential usability of AGR3 and AGR2 as biomarkers for blood-based early detection of human breast cancer.

  16. Sixteen-kinase gene expression identifies luminal breast cancers with poor prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finetti, Pascal; Cervera, Nathalie; Charafe-Jauffret, Emmanuelle; Chabannon, Christian; Charpin, Colette; Chaffanet, Max; Jacquemier, Jocelyne; Viens, Patrice; Birnbaum, Daniel; Bertucci, François

    2008-02-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease made of various molecular subtypes with different prognosis. However, evolution remains difficult to predict within some subtypes, such as luminal A, and treatment is not as adapted as it should be. Refinement of prognostic classification and identification of new therapeutic targets are needed. Using oligonucleotide microarrays, we profiled 227 breast cancers. We focused our analysis on two major breast cancer subtypes with opposite prognosis, luminal A (n = 80) and basal (n = 58), and on genes encoding protein kinases. Whole-kinome expression separated luminal A and basal tumors. The expression (measured by a kinase score) of 16 genes encoding serine/threonine kinases involved in mitosis distinguished two subgroups of luminal A tumors: Aa, of good prognosis and Ab, of poor prognosis. This classification and its prognostic effect were validated in 276 luminal A cases from three independent series profiled across different microarray platforms. The classification outperformed the current prognostic factors in univariate and multivariate analyses in both training and validation sets. The luminal Ab subgroup, characterized by high mitotic activity compared with luminal Aa tumors, displayed clinical characteristics and a kinase score intermediate between the luminal Aa subgroup and the luminal B subtype, suggesting a continuum in luminal tumors. Some of the mitotic kinases of the signature represent therapeutic targets under investigation. The identification of luminal A cases of poor prognosis should help select appropriate treatment, whereas the identification of a relevant kinase set provides potential targets.

  17. Identifying gaps in the locoregional management of early breast cancer: highlights from the Kyoto Consensus Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toi, Masakazu; Winer, Eric P; Inamoto, Takashi; Benson, John R; Forbes, John F; Mitsumori, Michihide; Robertson, John F R; Sasano, Hironobu; von Minckwitz, Gunter; Yamauchi, Akira; Klimberg, V Suzanne

    2011-10-01

    A consensus conference was held to investigate issues related to the local management of early breast cancer. Here, we highlight the major topics discussed at the conference and propose ideas for future studies. Regarding axillary management, we examined three major issues. First, we discussed whether the use of axillary reverse mapping could clarify the lymphatic system of breast and whether the ipsilateral arm might help avoid lymphedema. Second, the use of an indocyanine green fluorescent navigation system was discussed for intraoperative lymphatic mapping. These new issues should be examined further in practice. Finally, some agreement was reached on the importance of "four-node diagnosis" to aid in the diagnostic accuracy of sentinel nodes. Regarding breast treatment, there was general agreement that the clinical value of surgical margins in predicting local failure was dependent on the tumor's intrinsic biology and subtypes. For patients treated with preoperative chemotherapy, less extensive excision may be feasible in those who respond to systemic therapy in an acceptable manner. Most trials of preoperative chemotherapy lack outcome data on local recurrence. Therefore, there is a need for such data for overview analysis. We also agreed that radiation after mastectomy may be beneficial in node-positive cases where more than four nodes are involved. Throughout the discussions for both invasive and noninvasive disease, the investigation of nomograms was justified for major issues in the decision-making process, such as the presence or absence of microinvasion and the involvement of nonsentinel nodes in sentinel node-positive patients.

  18. Carbohydrate Microarrays Identify Blood Group Precursor Cryptic Epitopes as Potential Immunological Targets of Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denong Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Using carbohydrate microarrays, we explored potential natural ligands of antitumor monoclonal antibody HAE3. This antibody was raised against a murine mammary tumor antigen but was found to cross-react with a number of human epithelial tumors in tissues. Our carbohydrate microarray analysis reveals that HAE3 is specific for an O-glycan cryptic epitope that is normally hidden in the cores of blood group substances. Using HAE3 to screen tumor cell surface markers by flow cytometry, we found that the HAE3 glycoepitope, gpHAE3, was highly expressed by a number of human breast cancer cell lines, including some triple-negative cancers that lack the estrogen, progesterone, and Her2/neu receptors. Taken together, we demonstrate that HAE3 recognizes a conserved cryptic glycoepitope of blood group precursors, which is nevertheless selectively expressed and surface-exposed in certain breast tumor cells. The potential of this class of O-glycan cryptic antigens in breast cancer subtyping and targeted immunotherapy warrants further investigation.

  19. Application of a drug-induced apoptosis assay to identify treatment strategies in recurrent or metastatic breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Bosserman

    Full Text Available A drug-induced apoptosis assay has been developed to determine which chemotherapy drugs or regimens can produce higher cell killing in vitro. This study was done to determine if this assay could be performed in patients with recurrent or metastatic breast cancer patients, to characterize the patterns of drug-induced apoptosis, and to evaluate the clinical utility of the assay. A secondary goal was to correlate assay use with clinical outcomes.In a prospective, non-blinded, multi institutional controlled trial, 30 evaluable patients with recurrent or metastatic breast cancer who were treated with chemotherapy had tumor samples submitted for the MiCK drug-induced apoptosis assay. After receiving results within 72 hours after biopsy, physicians could use the test to determine therapy (users, or elect to not use the test (non-users.The assay was able to characterize drug-induced apoptosis in tumor specimens from breast cancer patients and identified which drugs or combinations gave highest levels of apoptosis. Patterns of drug activity were also analyzed in triple negative breast cancer. Different drugs from a single class of agents often produced significantly different amounts of apoptosis. Physician frequently (73% used the assay to help select chemotherapy treatments in patients, Patients whose physicians were users had a higher response (CR+PR rate compared to non-users (38.1% vs 0%, p = 0.04 and a higher disease control (CR+PR+Stable rate (81% vs 25%, p<0.01. Time to relapse was longer in users 7.4 mo compared to non-users 2.2 mo (p<0.01.The MiCK assay can be performed in breast cancer specimens, and results are often used by physicians in breast cancer patients with recurrent or metastatic disease. These results from a good laboratory phase II study can be the basis for a future larger prospective multicenter study to more definitively establish the value of the assay.Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00901264.

  20. Application of a Drug-Induced Apoptosis Assay to Identify Treatment Strategies in Recurrent or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosserman, Linda; Rogers, Karl; Willis, Carl; Davidson, Dirk; Whitworth, Pat; Karimi, Misagh; Upadhyaya, Gargi; Rutledge, James; Hallquist, Allan; Perree, Mathieu; Presant, Cary A.

    2015-01-01

    Background A drug-induced apoptosis assay has been developed to determine which chemotherapy drugs or regimens can produce higher cell killing in vitro. This study was done to determine if this assay could be performed in patients with recurrent or metastatic breast cancer patients, to characterize the patterns of drug-induced apoptosis, and to evaluate the clinical utility of the assay. A secondary goal was to correlate assay use with clinical outcomes. Methods In a prospective, non-blinded, multi institutional controlled trial, 30 evaluable patients with recurrent or metastatic breast cancer who were treated with chemotherapy had tumor samples submitted for the MiCK drug-induced apoptosis assay. After receiving results within 72 hours after biopsy, physicians could use the test to determine therapy (users), or elect to not use the test (non-users). Results The assay was able to characterize drug-induced apoptosis in tumor specimens from breast cancer patients and identified which drugs or combinations gave highest levels of apoptosis. Patterns of drug activity were also analyzed in triple negative breast cancer. Different drugs from a single class of agents often produced significantly different amounts of apoptosis. Physician frequently (73%) used the assay to help select chemotherapy treatments in patients, Patients whose physicians were users had a higher response (CR+PR) rate compared to non-users (38.1% vs 0%, p = 0.04) and a higher disease control (CR+PR+Stable) rate (81% vs 25%, p<0.01). Time to relapse was longer in users 7.4 mo compared to non-users 2.2 mo (p<0.01). Conclusions The MiCK assay can be performed in breast cancer specimens, and results are often used by physicians in breast cancer patients with recurrent or metastatic disease. These results from a good laboratory phase II study can be the basis for a future larger prospective multicenter study to more definitively establish the value of the assay. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT

  1. Using patients’ experiences to identify priorities for quality improvement in breast cancer care: patient narratives, surveys or both?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsianakas Vicki

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients’ experiences have become central to assessing the performance of healthcare systems worldwide and are increasingly being used to inform quality improvement processes. This paper explores the relative value of surveys and detailed patient narratives in identifying priorities for improving breast cancer services as part of a quality improvement process. Methods One dataset was collected using a narrative interview approach, (n = 13 and the other using a postal survey (n = 82. Datasets were analyzed separately and then compared to determine whether similar priorities for improving patient experiences were identified. Results There were both similarities and differences in the improvement priorities arising from each approach. Day surgery was specifically identified as a priority in the narrative dataset but included in the survey recommendations only as part of a broader priority around improving inpatient experience. Both datasets identified appointment systems, patients spending enough time with staff, information about treatment and side effects and more information at the end of treatment as priorities. The specific priorities identified by the narrative interviews commonly related to ‘relational’ aspects of patient experience. Those identified by the survey typically related to more ‘functional’ aspects and were not always sufficiently detailed to identify specific improvement actions. Conclusions Our analysis suggests that whilst local survey data may act as a screening tool to identify potential problems within the breast cancer service, they do not always provide sufficient detail of what to do to improve that service. These findings may have wider applicability in other services. We recommend using an initial preliminary survey, with better use of survey open comments, followed by an in-depth qualitative analysis to help deliver improvements to relational and functional aspects of patient

  2. Identifying metastatic breast tumors using textural kinetic features of a contrast based habitat in DCE-MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhury, Baishali; Zhou, Mu; Goldgof, Dmitry B.; Hall, Lawrence O.; Gatenby, Robert A.; Gillies, Robert J.; Drukteinis, Jennifer S.

    2015-03-01

    The ability to identify aggressive tumors from indolent tumors using quantitative analysis on dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) would dramatically change the breast cancer treatment paradigm. With this prognostic information, patients with aggressive tumors that have the ability to spread to distant sites outside of the breast could be selected for more aggressive treatment and surveillance regimens. Conversely, patients with tumors that do not have the propensity to metastasize could be treated less aggressively, avoiding some of the morbidity associated with surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. We propose a computer aided detection framework to determine which breast cancers will metastasize to the loco-regional lymph nodes as well as which tumors will eventually go on to develop distant metastses using quantitative image analysis and radiomics. We defined a new contrast based tumor habitat and analyzed textural kinetic features from this habitat for classification purposes. The proposed tumor habitat, which we call combined-habitat, is derived from the intersection of two individual tumor sub-regions: one that exhibits rapid initial contrast uptake and the other that exhibits rapid delayed contrast washout. Hence the combined-habitat represents the tumor sub-region within which the pixels undergo both rapid initial uptake and rapid delayed washout. We analyzed a dataset of twenty-seven representative two dimensional (2D) images from volumetric DCE-MRI of breast tumors, for classification of tumors with no lymph nodes from tumors with positive number of axillary lymph nodes. For this classification an accuracy of 88.9% was achieved. Twenty of the twenty-seven patients were analyzed for classification of distant metastatic tumors from indolent cancers (tumors with no lymph nodes), for which the accuracy was 84.3%.

  3. Kinome-wide functional screen identifies role of PLK1 in hormone-independent, ER-positive breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhola, Neil E; Jansen, Valerie M; Bafna, Sangeeta; Giltnane, Jennifer M; Balko, Justin M; Estrada, Mónica V; Meszoely, Ingrid; Mayer, Ingrid; Abramson, Vandana; Ye, Fei; Sanders, Melinda; Dugger, Teresa C; Allen, Eliezer V; Arteaga, Carlos L

    2015-01-15

    Estrogen receptor (ER) α-positive breast cancers initially respond to antiestrogens but eventually become estrogen independent and recur. ER(+) breast cancer cells resistant to long-term estrogen deprivation (LTED) exhibit hormone-independent ER transcriptional activity and growth. A kinome-wide siRNA screen using a library targeting 720 kinases identified Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) as one of the top genes whose downregulation resulted in inhibition of estrogen-independent ER transcriptional activity and growth of LTED cells. High PLK1 mRNA and protein correlated with a high Ki-67 score in primary ER(+) breast cancers after treatment with the aromatase inhibitor letrozole. RNAi-mediated knockdown of PLK1 inhibited ER expression, estrogen-independent growth, and ER transcription in MCF7 and HCC1428 LTED cells. Pharmacologic inhibition of PLK1 with volasertib, a small-molecule ATP-competitive PLK1 inhibitor, decreased LTED cell growth, ER transcriptional activity, and ER expression. Volasertib in combination with the ER antagonist, fulvestrant, decreased MCF7 xenograft growth in ovariectomized mice more potently than each drug alone. JUNB, a component of the AP-1 complex, was expressed 16-fold higher in MCF7/LTED compared with parental MCF7 cells. Furthermore, JUNB and BCL2L1 (which encodes antiapoptotic BCL-xL) mRNA levels were markedly reduced upon volasertib treatment in MCF7/LTED cells, while they were increased in parental MCF7 cells. Finally, JUNB knockdown decreased ER expression and transcriptional activity in MCF7/LTED cells, suggesting that PLK1 drives ER expression and estrogen-independent growth via JUNB. These data support a critical role of PLK1 in acquired hormone-independent growth of ER(+) human breast cancer and is therefore a promising target in tumors that have escaped estrogen deprivation therapy.

  4. Diagnostic performance of core needle biopsy in identifying breast phyllodes tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhi-Rui; Wang, Chen-Chen; Sun, Xiang-Jie; Yang, Zhao-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Background A retrospective analysis of diagnoses was performed in patients with phyllodes tumors of the breast (PTB) who received preoperative core needle biopsy (CNB) and had breast surgery at Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center from January 1, 2002 to April 1, 2013. The resulting data allowed us to compare the accordance between CNB and excision diagnoses of PTB patients and evaluate the accuracy of CNB in preoperative diagnosis. Methods Data from 128 patients with PTB who had undergone preoperative CNB and breast surgery were retrospectively analyzed. We reviewed the medical history, clinical follow-up data, and CNB diagnostic data. A diagnostic test was used to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of CNB in diagnosing benign, borderline, and malignant phyllodes tumors. Results The accuracy of CNB for diagnosing PTB was 13.3% (17/128). Of the remaining patients, 98 (75.5% of the PTB patients) were diagnosed with fibroadenoma or fibroepithelial lesions. The sensitivity of CNB at diagnosing benign, borderline, and malignant phyllodes tumors were 4.9% (2/41), 4.2% (3/71), and 25.0% (4/16), respectively, whereas the corresponding specificity were 92.0%, 98.2%, and 100%, respectively. Some clinical features, such as large tumor size, rapid growth, or surgical history of fibroadenomas, were indicative of an increased possibility of PTB. Conclusions CNB provides a pathological basis for the preoperative diagnosis of PTB, but it has a poor accuracy and offers limited guidance for surgical decisions. Considering CNB along with multiple histologic features may improve the ability to accurately diagnose PTB. An integrated assessment using CNBs in combination with clinical data and imaging features is suggested as a reliable strategy to assist PTB diagnosis. PMID:28066593

  5. Identifying predictive motor factors for falls in post-menopausal breast cancer survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, Marek; Biskup, Malgorzata; Macek, Pawel; Krol, Halina; Krupnik, Szymon; Opuchlik, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Objective Breast cancer treatment, including radical surgery, is also pursued as late as the 7th - 8th decade of women’s lives. Standard physical rehabilitation procedures offered to those women are predominantly focused on attenuating specific functional deficits of the upper limb and trunk. Seldom do they entail any regimens specifically aimed at recovering overall functionality, and reducing exposure to falls-risk. The study aimed to assess potential interrelationships between the self-reported falls, individual functional capabilities and appreciably reducing exposure to falls-risk in a group of post-menopausal, post-surgical breast cancer survivors. Methods The study recruited 102 women (aged 65–79; mean age 70.2), post-surgical breast cancer survivors. The subjects were stratified by age into three groups: Group 1 (65–69 years); Group 2 (70–74 years), and Group 3 (75–79 years). Individual functional capabilities were assessed with Eight-foot up & go test (8UG), chair stand test (CST), and 2-minute step test (2ST). Tinetti POMA test was applied to assess gait and balance disorders. Self-reported falls in the past year were ascertained through a questionnaire. Results Assessment of individual aerobic endurance (2ST) also demonstrated a clear deficit in the mean scores category in all respective age sub-groups, as compared against the reference values. The deficits ranged from 4.86 to 15.90 steps less than the normative values; the oldest subjects demonstrating the largest deficit. The aerobic endurance tests results significantly impacted the ultimate assessment of an individual falls-risk in the oldest group. The analysis of the number of falls sustained within the recent year indicated that 43.67% of the subjects fell victim of such incidents. Conclusion An individual exposure to falls-risk was found to be appreciably more dependent upon individual aerobic endurance rather than overall strength of the lower part of the body in the breast cancer

  6. Exome sequencing identifies highly recurrent MED12 somatic mutations in breast fibroadenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Weng Khong; Ong, Choon Kiat; Tan, Jing; Thike, Aye Aye; Ng, Cedric Chuan Young; Rajasegaran, Vikneswari; Myint, Swe Swe; Nagarajan, Sanjanaa; Nasir, Nur Diyana Md; McPherson, John R; Cutcutache, Ioana; Poore, Gregory; Tay, Su Ting; Ooi, Wei Siong; Tan, Veronique Kiak Mien; Hartman, Mikael; Ong, Kong Wee; Tan, Benita K T; Rozen, Steven G; Tan, Puay Hoon; Tan, Patrick; Teh, Bin Tean

    2014-08-01

    Fibroadenomas are the most common breast tumors in women under 30 (refs. 1,2). Exome sequencing of eight fibroadenomas with matching whole-blood samples revealed recurrent somatic mutations solely in MED12, which encodes a Mediator complex subunit. Targeted sequencing of an additional 90 fibroadenomas confirmed highly frequent MED12 exon 2 mutations (58/98, 59%) that are probably somatic, with 71% of mutations occurring in codon 44. Using laser capture microdissection, we show that MED12 fibroadenoma mutations are present in stromal but not epithelial mammary cells. Expression profiling of MED12-mutated and wild-type fibroadenomas revealed that MED12 mutations are associated with dysregulated estrogen signaling and extracellular matrix organization. The fibroadenoma MED12 mutation spectrum is nearly identical to that of previously reported MED12 lesions in uterine leiomyoma but not those of other tumors. Benign tumors of the breast and uterus, both of which are key target tissues of estrogen, may thus share a common genetic basis underpinned by highly frequent and specific MED12 mutations.

  7. Hypoxic enhancement of exosome release by breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    King Hamish W

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exosomes are nanovesicles secreted by tumour cells which have roles in paracrine signalling during tumour progression, including tumour-stromal interactions, activation of proliferative pathways and bestowing immunosuppression. Hypoxia is an important feature of solid tumours which promotes tumour progression, angiogenesis and metastasis, potentially through exosome-mediated signalling. Methods Breast cancer cell lines were cultured under either moderate (1% O2 or severe (0.1% O2 hypoxia. Exosomes were isolated from conditioned media and quantitated by nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA and immunoblotting for the exosomal protein CD63 in order to assess the impact of hypoxia on exosome release. Hypoxic exosome fractions were assayed for miR-210 by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and normalised to exogenous and endogenous control genes. Statistical significance was determined using the Student T test with a P value of  Results Exposure of three different breast cancer cell lines to moderate (1% O2 and severe (0.1% O2 hypoxia resulted in significant increases in the number of exosomes present in the conditioned media as determined by NTA and CD63 immunoblotting. Activation of hypoxic signalling by dimethyloxalylglycine, a hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF hydroxylase inhibitor, resulted in significant increase in exosome release. Transfection of cells with HIF-1α siRNA prior to hypoxic exposure prevented the enhancement of exosome release by hypoxia. The hypoxically regulated miR-210 was identified to be present at elevated levels in hypoxic exosome fractions. Conclusions These data provide evidence that hypoxia promotes the release of exosomes by breast cancer cells, and that this hypoxic response may be mediated by HIF-1α. Given an emerging role for tumour cell-derived exosomes in tumour progression, this has significant implications for understanding the hypoxic tumour phenotype, whereby hypoxic

  8. Tumour suppressor genes in sporadic epithelial ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Ying; Ganesan, Trivadi S

    2002-01-01

    of the evolution of tumour progression. A major focus of research has been to identify tumour suppressor genes implicated in sporadic ovarian cancer over the past decade. Several tumour suppressor genes have been identified by strategies such as positional cloning and differential expression display. Further...

  9. New breast cancer prognostic factors identified by computer-aided image analysis of HE stained histopathology images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jia-Mei; Qu, Ai-Ping; Wang, Lin-Wei; Yuan, Jing-Ping; Yang, Fang; Xiang, Qing-Ming; Maskey, Ninu; Yang, Gui-Fang; Liu, Juan; Li, Yan

    2015-05-29

    Computer-aided image analysis (CAI) can help objectively quantify morphologic features of hematoxylin-eosin (HE) histopathology images and provide potentially useful prognostic information on breast cancer. We performed a CAI workflow on 1,150 HE images from 230 patients with invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) of the breast. We used a pixel-wise support vector machine classifier for tumor nests (TNs)-stroma segmentation, and a marker-controlled watershed algorithm for nuclei segmentation. 730 morphologic parameters were extracted after segmentation, and 12 parameters identified by Kaplan-Meier analysis were significantly associated with 8-year disease free survival (P < 0.05 for all). Moreover, four image features including TNs feature (HR 1.327, 95%CI [1.001-1.759], P = 0.049), TNs cell nuclei feature (HR 0.729, 95%CI [0.537-0.989], P = 0.042), TNs cell density (HR 1.625, 95%CI [1.177-2.244], P = 0.003), and stromal cell structure feature (HR 1.596, 95%CI [1.142-2.229], P = 0.006) were identified by multivariate Cox proportional hazards model to be new independent prognostic factors. The results indicated that CAI can assist the pathologist in extracting prognostic information from HE histopathology images for IDC. The TNs feature, TNs cell nuclei feature, TNs cell density, and stromal cell structure feature could be new prognostic factors.

  10. Breast Cancer Awareness and Prevention Behavior Among Women of Delhi, India: Identifying Barriers to Early Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Subhojit; Sharma, Surabhi; Mishra, Arti; Krishnan, Suneeta; Govil, Jyotsna; Dhillon, Preet K.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Globally, breast cancer (BC) has become the leading cause of mortality in women. Awareness and early detection can curb the growing burden of BC and are the first step in the battle against BC. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore the awareness and perceived barriers concerning the early detection of BC. METHODS A total of 20 focus group discussions (FGDs) were conducted during May 2013–March 2014. Pre-existing themes were used to conduct FGDs; each FGD group consisted of an average of ~10 women (aged ≥18–70 years) who came to participate in a BC awareness workshop. All FGDs were audio taped and transcribed verbatim. The transcripts were inductively analyzed using ATLAS.ti. Based on emerged codes and categories, thematic analysis was done, and theory was developed using the grounded theory approach. RESULTS Data were analyzed in three major themes: i) knowledge and perception about BC; ii) barriers faced by women in the early presentation of BC; and iii) healthcare-seeking behavior. The findings revealed that shyness, fear, and posteriority were the major behavioral barriers in the early presentation of BC. Erroneously, pain was considered as an initial symptom of BC by most women. Financial constraint was also mentioned as a cause for delay in accessing treatment. Social stigma that breast problems reflect bad character of women also contributed in hiding BC symptoms. CONCLUSIONS Lack of BC awareness was prevalent, especially in low socioeconomic class. Women’s ambivalence in prioritizing their own health and social and behavioral hurdles should be addressed by BC awareness campaigns appropriately suited for various levels of social class.

  11. Profiling of microRNAs in tumor interstitial fluid of breast tumors – a novel resource to identify biomarkers for prognostic classification and detection of cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halvorsen, Ann Rita; Helland, Åslaug; Gromov, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    and to elucidate the cross-talk that exists among cells in a tumor microenvironment. Matched tumor interstitial fluid samples (TIF, n = 60), normal interstitial fluid samples (NIF, n = 51), corresponding tumor tissue specimens (n = 54), and serum samples (n = 27) were collected from patients with breast cancer......, and detectable microRNAs were analyzed and compared. In addition, serum data from 32 patients with breast cancer and 22 healthy controls were obtained for a validation study. To identify potential serum biomarkers of breast cancer, first the microRNA profiles of TIF and NIF samples were compared. A total of 266...

  12. Profiling of microRNAs in tumor interstitial fluid of breast tumors – a novel resource to identify biomarkers for prognostic classification and detection of cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halvorsen, Ann Rita; Helland, Åslaug; Gromov, Pavel;

    2016-01-01

    and to elucidate the cross-talk that exists among cells in a tumor microenvironment. Matched tumor interstitial fluid samples (TIF, n = 60), normal interstitial fluid samples (NIF, n = 51), corresponding tumor tissue specimens (n = 54), and serum samples (n = 27) were collected from patients with breast cancer......, and detectable microRNAs were analyzed and compared. In addition, serum data from 32 patients with breast cancer and 22 healthy controls were obtained for a validation study. To identify potential serum biomarkers of breast cancer, first the microRNA profiles of TIF and NIF samples were compared. A total of 266...

  13. Effect of Prior Bilateral Oophorectomy on the Presentation of Breast Cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metcalfe Kelly A

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To compare the presentation of invasive breast cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers with and without prior bilateral oophorectomy. Patients and methods Women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation with the diagnosis of invasive breast cancer were identified from ten cancer genetics clinics. The medical history, medical treatment records and pathology reports for the breast cancers were reviewed. Information was abstracted from medical charts, including history (and date of oophorectomy, date of breast cancer diagnosis, stage of disease, and pathologic characteristics of the breast cancer. Women with prior bilateral oophorectomy were matched by age, year of diagnosis, and mutation with one or more women who had two intact ovaries at the time of breast cancer diagnosis. Characteristics of the breast tumours were compared between the two groups. Results Women with prior bilateral oophorectomy presented with smaller tumours on average compared to women without prior oophorectomy (mean size 1.50 cm vs. 1.95 cm; p = 0.01. Additionally, although not statistically significant, women with intact ovaries were more likely to have high-grade tumour (70% vs. 54%: p = 0.10 and to have positive lymph nodes (34% vs. 18%; p = 0.11 compared to women with prior bilateral oophorectomy. Conclusions Bilateral oophorectomy prior to breast cancer appears to favourably influence the biological presentation of breast cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

  14. A statistically inferred microRNA network identifies breast cancer target miR-940 as an actin cytoskeleton regulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhajun, Ricky; Guyon, Laurent; Pitaval, Amandine; Sulpice, Eric; Combe, Stéphanie; Obeid, Patricia; Haguet, Vincent; Ghorbel, Itebeddine; Lajaunie, Christian; Gidrol, Xavier

    2015-02-01

    MiRNAs are key regulators of gene expression. By binding to many genes, they create a complex network of gene co-regulation. Here, using a network-based approach, we identified miRNA hub groups by their close connections and common targets. In one cluster containing three miRNAs, miR-612, miR-661 and miR-940, the annotated functions of the co-regulated genes suggested a role in small GTPase signalling. Although the three members of this cluster targeted the same subset of predicted genes, we showed that their overexpression impacted cell fates differently. miR-661 demonstrated enhanced phosphorylation of myosin II and an increase in cell invasion, indicating a possible oncogenic miRNA. On the contrary, miR-612 and miR-940 inhibit phosphorylation of myosin II and cell invasion. Finally, expression profiling in human breast tissues showed that miR-940 was consistently downregulated in breast cancer tissues

  15. HPLC-based metabolomics to identify cytotoxic compounds from Plectranthus amboinicus (Lour.) Spreng against human breast cancer MCF-7Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yulianto, Wahid; Andarwulan, Nuri; Giriwono, Puspo Edi; Pamungkas, Joko

    2016-12-15

    The objective of this study was to identify the active compounds in Plectranthus amboinicus (Lour.) Spreng which play a role to inhibit viability of breast cancer MCF-7 cells using HPLC-based metabolomics approach. Five fractions of the plant extract were observed including ethanol, hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate and water fraction. There were 45 HPLC chromatograms resulted from 5 fractions with 3 replications and 3 wavelengths detection. The chromatograms were compared to the data of IC50 from MTT assay of each fraction against human breast cancer MCF-7 cells using metabolomics. The OPLS analysis result promptly pointed towards a chloroform fraction at retention time of 40.16-41.28min that has the greatest contribution to the cytotoxic activity. The data of mass spectra indicated that an abietane diterpene namely 7-acetoxy-6-hydroxyroyleanone was the main compound that contributed to the cytotoxic activity. This metabolomics application method can be used as a quick preliminary guideline to uncover the most dominant compound related to the bioactivity.

  16. Cytosolic phospholipase A2-α expression in breast cancer is associated with EGFR expression and correlates with an adverse prognosis in luminal tumours.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Caiazza, F

    2011-01-18

    The eicosanoid signalling pathway promotes the progression of malignancies through the production of proliferative prostaglandins (PGs). Cytosolic phospholipase A(2)α (cPLA(2)α) activity provides the substrate for cyclooxygenase-dependent PG release, and we have previously found that cPLA(2)α expression correlated with EGFR\\/HER2 over-expression in a small number of breast cancer cell lines.

  17. Targeting tumour Cell Plasticity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elizabeth D. WILLIAMS

    2009-01-01

    @@ Her research is focused on understanding the mechanisms of tumour progression and metastasis, particularly in uro-logical carcinomas (bladder and prostate). Tumour cell plasticity, including epithelial-mesenchymal transition, is a cen-tral theme in Dr Williams' work.

  18. The Efficacy of Trastuzumab in Animal Models of Breast Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiarong Chen

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most frequent cancers and is the second leading cause of cancer death among women. Trastuzumab is an effective treatment, the first monoclonal antibody directed against the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2. To inform the development of other effective treatments we report summary estimates of efficacy of trastuzumab on survival and tumour volume in animal models of breast cancer.We searched PubMed and EMBASE systematically to identify publications testing trastuzumab in animal models of breast cancer. Data describing tumour volume, median survival and animal features were extracted and we assessed quality using a 12-item checklist. We analysed the impact of study design and quality and evidence for publication bias.We included data from 83 studies reporting 169 experiments using 2076 mice. Trastuzumab treatment caused a substantial reduction in tumour growth, with tumours in treated animals growing to 32.6% of the volume of tumours in control animals (95%CI 27.8%-38.2%. Median survival was prolonged by a factor of 1.45 (1.30-1.62. Many study design and quality features accounted for between-study heterogeneity and we found evidence suggesting publication bias.We have found trastuzumab to be effective in animal breast cancer models across a range of experimental circumstances. However the presence of publication bias and a low prevalence of measures to reduce bias provide a focus for future improvements in preclinical breast cancer research.

  19. Personalised pathway analysis reveals association between DNA repair pathway dysregulation and chromosomal instability in sporadic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao; Srihari, Sriganesh; Lal, Samir; Gautier, Benoît; Simpson, Peter T; Khanna, Kum Kum; Ragan, Mark A; Lê Cao, Kim-Anh

    2016-01-01

    The Homologous Recombination (HR) pathway is crucial for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) generated during DNA replication. Defects in HR repair have been linked to the initiation and development of a wide variety of human malignancies, and exploited in chemical, radiological and targeted therapies. In this study, we performed a personalised pathway analysis independently for four large sporadic breast cancer cohorts to investigate the status of HR pathway dysregulation in individual sporadic breast tumours, its association with HR repair deficiency and its impact on tumour characteristics. Specifically, we first manually curated a list of HR genes according to our recent review on this pathway (Liu et al., 2014), and then applied a personalised pathway analysis method named Pathifier (Drier et al., 2013) on the expression levels of the curated genes to obtain an HR score quantifying HR pathway dysregulation in individual tumours. Based on the score, we observed a great diversity in HR dysregulation between and within gene expression-based breast cancer subtypes, and by using two published HR-defect signatures, we found HR pathway dysregulation reflects HR repair deficiency. Furthermore, we identified a novel association between HR pathway dysregulation and chromosomal instability (CIN) in sporadic breast cancer. Although CIN has long been considered as a hallmark of most solid tumours, with recent extensive studies highlighting its importance in tumour evolution and drug resistance, the molecular basis of CIN in sporadic cancers remains poorly understood. Our results imply that HR pathway dysregulation might contribute to CIN in sporadic breast cancer.

  20. Proteomic maps of breast cancer subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tyanova, Stefka; Albrechtsen, Reidar; Kronqvist, Pauliina;

    2016-01-01

    Systems-wide profiling of breast cancer has almost always entailed RNA and DNA analysis by microarray and sequencing techniques. Marked developments in proteomic technologies now enable very deep profiling of clinical samples, with high identification and quantification accuracy. We analysed 40...... oestrogen receptor positive (luminal), Her2 positive and triple negative breast tumours and reached a quantitative depth of >10,000 proteins. These proteomic profiles identified functional differences between breast cancer subtypes, related to energy metabolism, cell growth, mRNA translation and cell......-cell communication. Furthermore, we derived a signature of 19 proteins, which differ between the breast cancer subtypes, through support vector machine (SVM)-based classification and feature selection. Remarkably, only three proteins of the signature were associated with gene copy number variations and eleven were...

  1. RT-PCR for mammaglobin genes, MGB1 and MGB2, identifies breast cancer micrometastases in sentinel lymph nodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouellette, Rodney J; Richard, Dominique; Maïcas, Emmanuel

    2004-05-01

    In the present study, we examined the expression of the mammaglobin genes, MGB1 and MGB2, in the sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) of patients with breast cancer and compared our results with the histologic status of the same SLNs. Compared with immunohistochemical staining for cytokeratin 8, which detected metastases in 17 of 42 patients, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for MGB1 or MGB2 genes was positive in 22 patients. The concordance between the expression of any mammaglobin and histologic status was 79% (33/42), with a sensitivity of 88% and specificity of 72%. The detection of patients with metastases was more sensitive when testing for both MGB1 and MGB2 (P MGB2 (P < .0005) or MGB1 (P < .05) alone. The increased detection rate relative to histologic examination suggests that using RT-PCR for the mammaglobin genes might identify patients at higher risk compared with patients with negative RT-PCR results.

  2. Metastasis-related plasma membrane proteins of human breast cancer cells identified by comparative quantitative mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth-Larsen, Rikke; Lund, Rikke; Hansen, Helle V

    2009-01-01

    The spread of cancer cells from a primary tumor to form metastasis at distant sites is a complex multi-step process. The cancer cell proteins, and plasma membrane proteins in particular, involved in this process are poorly defined and a study of the very early events of the metastatic process using...... clinical samples or in vitro assays is not feasible. We have used a unique model system consisting of two isogenic human breast cancer cell lines that are equally tumorigenic in mice, but while one gives rise to metastasis, the other disseminates single cells that remain dormant at distant organs. Membrane...... by the two cell lines. The study demonstrates a quantitative and comparative proteomic strategy to identify clinically-relevant key molecules in the early events of metastasis, some of which may prove to be potential targets for cancer therapy....

  3. An investigation of gene-environment interactions between 47 newly identified breast cancer susceptibility loci and environmental risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, Anja; Milne, Roger L.; Truong, Thérèse; Knight, Julia A.; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Behrens, Sabine; Eilber, Ursula; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Dunning, Alison M.; Shah, Mitul; Munday, Hannah R.; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Brand, Judith S.; Olson, Janet; Vachon, Celine M.; Hallberg, Emily; Castelao, J. Esteban; Carracedo, Angel; Torres, Maria; Li, Jingmei; Humphreys, Keith; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Menegaux, Florence; Flyger, Henrik; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Yesilyurt, Betul T.; Floris, Giuseppe; Leunen, Karin; Engelhardt, Ellen G.; Broeks, Annegien; Rutgers, Emiel J.; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Cross, Simon; Reed, Malcolm; Gonzalez-Neira, Anna; Perez, José Ignacio Arias; Provenzano, Elena; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C.; Spurdle, Amanda; Investigators, kConFab; Group, AOCS; Häberle, Lothar; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Ekici, Arif B.; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; McLean, Catriona; Baglietto, Laura; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Sherman, Mark E.; Brüning, Thomas; Hamann, Ute; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Orr, Nick; Schoemaker, Minouk; Ashworth, Alan; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kataja, Vesa; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Mannermaa, Arto; Swerdlow, Anthony; Giles, Graham G.; Brenner, Hermann; Fasching, Peter A.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Hopper, John; Benítez, Javier; Cox, Angela; Andrulis, Irene L.; Lambrechts, Diether; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Couch, Fergus; Czene, Kamila; Bojesen, Stig E.; Easton, Doug F.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Guénel, Pascal; Hall, Per; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Chang-Claude, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    A large genotyping project within the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) recently identified 41 associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and overall breast cancer (BC) risk. We investigated whether the effects of these 41 SNPs, as well as six SNPs associated with estrogen receptor (ER) negative BC risk are modified by 13 environmental risk factors for BC. Data from 22 studies participating in BCAC were pooled, comprising up to 26,633 cases and 30,119 controls. Interactions between SNPs and environmental factors were evaluated using an empirical Bayes-type shrinkage estimator. Six SNPs showed interactions with associated p-values (pint) <1.1×10−3. None of the observed interactions was significant after accounting for multiple testing. The Bayesian False Discovery Probability was used to rank the findings, which indicated three interactions as being noteworthy at 1% prior probability of interaction. SNP rs6828523 was associated with increased ER-negative BC risk in women ≥170cm (OR=1.22, p=0.017), but inversely associated with ER-negative BC risk in women <160cm (OR=0.83, p=0.039, pint=1.9×10−4). The inverse association between rs4808801 and overall BC risk was stronger for women who had had four or more pregnancies (OR=0.85, p=2.0×10−4), and absent in women who had had just one (OR=0.96, p=0.19, pint = 6.1×10−4). SNP rs11242675 was inversely associated with overall BC risk in never/former smokers (OR=0.93, p=2.8×10−5), but no association was observed in current smokers (OR=1.07, p=0.14, pint = 3.4×10−4). In conclusion, recently identified breast cancer susceptibility loci are not strongly modified by established risk factors and the observed potential interactions require confirmation in independent studies. PMID:25227710

  4. Tradeoffs of Using Administrative Claims and Medical Records to Identify the Use of Personalized Medicine for Patients with Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Su-Ying; Phillips, Kathryn A.; Wang, Grace; Keohane, Carol; Armstrong, Joanne; Morris, William M.; Haas, Jennifer S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Administrative claims and medical records are important data sources to examine healthcare utilization and outcomes. Little is known about identifying personalized medicine technologies in these sources. Objectives To describe agreement, sensitivity, and specificity of administrative claims compared to medical records for two pairs of targeted tests and treatments for breast cancer. Research Design Retrospective analysis of medical records linked to administrative claims from a large health plan. We examined whether agreement varied by factors that facilitate tracking in claims (coding and cost) and that enhance medical record completeness (records from multiple providers). Subjects Women (35 – 65 years) with incident breast cancer diagnosed in 2006–2007 (n=775). Measures Use of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and gene expression profiling (GEP) testing, trastuzumab and adjuvant chemotherapy in claims and medical records. Results Agreement between claims and records was substantial for GEP, trastuzumab, and chemotherapy, and lowest for HER2 tests. GEP, an expensive test with unique billing codes, had higher agreement (91.6% vs. 75.2%), sensitivity (94.9% vs. 76.7%), and specificity (90.1% vs. 29.2%) than HER2, a test without unique billing codes. Trastuzumab, a treatment with unique billing codes, had slightly higher agreement (95.1% vs. 90%) and sensitivity (98.1% vs. 87.9%) than adjuvant chemotherapy. Conclusions Higher agreement and specificity were associated with services that had unique billing codes and high cost. Administrative claims may be sufficient for examining services with unique billing codes. Medical records provide better data for identifying tests lacking specific codes and for research requiring detailed clinical information. PMID:21422962

  5. Candidate luminal B breast cancer genes identified by genome, gene expression and DNA methylation profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Cornen

    Full Text Available Breast cancers (BCs of the luminal B subtype are estrogen receptor-positive (ER+, highly proliferative, resistant to standard therapies and have a poor prognosis. To better understand this subtype we compared DNA copy number aberrations (CNAs, DNA promoter methylation, gene expression profiles, and somatic mutations in nine selected genes, in 32 luminal B tumors with those observed in 156 BCs of the other molecular subtypes. Frequent CNAs included 8p11-p12 and 11q13.1-q13.2 amplifications, 7q11.22-q34, 8q21.12-q24.23, 12p12.3-p13.1, 12q13.11-q24.11, 14q21.1-q23.1, 17q11.1-q25.1, 20q11.23-q13.33 gains and 6q14.1-q24.2, 9p21.3-p24,3, 9q21.2, 18p11.31-p11.32 losses. A total of 237 and 101 luminal B-specific candidate oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes (TSGs presented a deregulated expression in relation with their CNAs, including 11 genes previously reported associated with endocrine resistance. Interestingly, 88% of the potential TSGs are located within chromosome arm 6q, and seven candidate oncogenes are potential therapeutic targets. A total of 100 candidate oncogenes were validated in a public series of 5,765 BCs and the overexpression of 67 of these was associated with poor survival in luminal tumors. Twenty-four genes presented a deregulated expression in relation with a high DNA methylation level. FOXO3, PIK3CA and TP53 were the most frequent mutated genes among the nine tested. In a meta-analysis of next-generation sequencing data in 875 BCs, KCNB2 mutations were associated with luminal B cases while candidate TSGs MDN1 (6q15 and UTRN (6q24, were mutated in this subtype. In conclusion, we have reported luminal B candidate genes that may play a role in the development and/or hormone resistance of this aggressive subtype.

  6. Candidate luminal B breast cancer genes identified by genome, gene expression and DNA methylation profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornen, Stéphanie; Guille, Arnaud; Adélaïde, José; Addou-Klouche, Lynda; Finetti, Pascal; Saade, Marie-Rose; Manai, Marwa; Carbuccia, Nadine; Bekhouche, Ismahane; Letessier, Anne; Raynaud, Stéphane; Charafe-Jauffret, Emmanuelle; Jacquemier, Jocelyne; Spicuglia, Salvatore; de The, Hugues; Viens, Patrice; Bertucci, François; Birnbaum, Daniel; Chaffanet, Max

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancers (BCs) of the luminal B subtype are estrogen receptor-positive (ER+), highly proliferative, resistant to standard therapies and have a poor prognosis. To better understand this subtype we compared DNA copy number aberrations (CNAs), DNA promoter methylation, gene expression profiles, and somatic mutations in nine selected genes, in 32 luminal B tumors with those observed in 156 BCs of the other molecular subtypes. Frequent CNAs included 8p11-p12 and 11q13.1-q13.2 amplifications, 7q11.22-q34, 8q21.12-q24.23, 12p12.3-p13.1, 12q13.11-q24.11, 14q21.1-q23.1, 17q11.1-q25.1, 20q11.23-q13.33 gains and 6q14.1-q24.2, 9p21.3-p24,3, 9q21.2, 18p11.31-p11.32 losses. A total of 237 and 101 luminal B-specific candidate oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) presented a deregulated expression in relation with their CNAs, including 11 genes previously reported associated with endocrine resistance. Interestingly, 88% of the potential TSGs are located within chromosome arm 6q, and seven candidate oncogenes are potential therapeutic targets. A total of 100 candidate oncogenes were validated in a public series of 5,765 BCs and the overexpression of 67 of these was associated with poor survival in luminal tumors. Twenty-four genes presented a deregulated expression in relation with a high DNA methylation level. FOXO3, PIK3CA and TP53 were the most frequent mutated genes among the nine tested. In a meta-analysis of next-generation sequencing data in 875 BCs, KCNB2 mutations were associated with luminal B cases while candidate TSGs MDN1 (6q15) and UTRN (6q24), were mutated in this subtype. In conclusion, we have reported luminal B candidate genes that may play a role in the development and/or hormone resistance of this aggressive subtype.

  7. Proline-hydroxylated hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α upregulation in human tumours.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron E Snell

    Full Text Available The stabilisation of HIF-α is central to the transcriptional response of animals to hypoxia, regulating the expression of hundreds of genes including those involved in angiogenesis, metabolism and metastasis. HIF-α is degraded under normoxic conditions by proline hydroxylation, which allows for recognition and ubiquitination by the von-Hippel-Lindau (VHL E3 ligase complex. The aim of our study was to investigate the posttranslational modification of HIF-1α in tumours, to assess whether there are additional mechanisms besides reduced hydroxylation leading to stability. To this end we optimised antibodies against the proline-hydroxylated forms of HIF-1α for use in formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE immunohistochemistry to assess effects in tumour cells in vivo. We found that HIF-1α proline-hydroxylated at both VHL binding sites (Pro402 and Pro564, was present in hypoxic regions of a wide range of tumours, tumour xenografts and in moderately hypoxic cells in vitro. Staining for hydroxylated HIF-1α can identify a subset of breast cancer patients with poorer prognosis and may be a better marker than total HIF-1α levels. The expression of unhydroxylated HIF-1α positively correlates with VHL in breast cancer suggesting that VHL may be rate-limiting for HIF degradation. Our conclusions are that the degradation of proline-hydroxylated HIF-1α may be rate-limited in tumours and therefore provides new insights into mechanisms of HIF upregulation. Persistence of proline-hydroxylated HIF-1α in perinecrotic areas suggests there is adequate oxygen to support prolyl hydroxylase domain (PHD activity and proline-hydroxylated HIF-1α may be the predominant form associated with the poorer prognosis that higher levels of HIF-1α confer.

  8. Genomewide high-density SNP linkage analysis of non-BRCA1/2 breast cancer families identifies various candidate regions and has greater power than microsatellite studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalez-Neira Anna

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recent development of new high-throughput technologies for SNP genotyping has opened the possibility of taking a genome-wide linkage approach to the search for new candidate genes involved in heredity diseases. The two major breast cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 are involved in 30% of hereditary breast cancer cases, but the discovery of additional breast cancer predisposition genes for the non-BRCA1/2 breast cancer families has so far been unsuccessful. Results In order to evaluate the power improvement provided by using SNP markers in a real situation, we have performed a whole genome screen of 19 non-BRCA1/2 breast cancer families using 4720 genomewide SNPs with Illumina technology (Illumina's Linkage III Panel, with an average distance of 615 Kb/SNP. We identified six regions on chromosomes 2, 3, 4, 7, 11 and 14 as candidates to contain genes involved in breast cancer susceptibility, and additional fine mapping genotyping using microsatellite markers around linkage peaks confirmed five of them, excluding the region on chromosome 3. These results were consistent in analyses that excluded SNPs in high linkage disequilibrium. The results were compared with those obtained previously using a 10 cM microsatellite scan (STR-GWS and we found lower or not significant linkage signals with STR-GWS data compared to SNP data in all cases. Conclusion Our results show the power increase that SNPs can supply in linkage studies.

  9. DNA repair variants and breast cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundy, Anne; Richardson, Harriet; Schuetz, Johanna M; Burstyn, Igor; Spinelli, John J; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Aronson, Kristan J

    2016-05-01

    A functional DNA repair system has been identified as important in the prevention of tumour development. Previous studies have hypothesized that common polymorphisms in DNA repair genes could play a role in breast cancer risk and also identified the potential for interactions between these polymorphisms and established breast cancer risk factors such as physical activity. Associations with breast cancer risk for 99 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from genes in ten DNA repair pathways were examined in a case-control study including both Europeans (644 cases, 809 controls) and East Asians (299 cases, 160 controls). Odds ratios in both additive and dominant genetic models were calculated separately for participants of European and East Asian ancestry using multivariate logistic regression. The impact of multiple comparisons was assessed by correcting for the false discovery rate within each DNA repair pathway. Interactions between several breast cancer risk factors and DNA repair SNPs were also evaluated. One SNP (rs3213282) in the gene XRCC1 was associated with an increased risk of breast cancer in the dominant model of inheritance following adjustment for the false discovery rate (P breast cancer risk or their modification by breast cancer risk factors were observed.

  10. Functional and molecular characterisation of EO771.LMB tumours, a new C57BL/6-mouse-derived model of spontaneously metastatic mammary cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Cameron N; Smith, Yvonne E; Cao, Yuan; Burrows, Allan D; Cross, Ryan S N; Ling, Xiawei; Redvers, Richard P; Doherty, Judy P; Eckhardt, Bedrich L; Natoli, Anthony L; Restall, Christina M; Lucas, Erin; Pearson, Helen B; Deb, Siddhartha; Britt, Kara L; Rizzitelli, Alexandra; Li, Jason; Harmey, Judith H; Pouliot, Normand; Anderson, Robin L

    2015-03-01

    The translation of basic research into improved therapies for breast cancer patients requires relevant preclinical models that incorporate spontaneous metastasis. We have completed a functional and molecular characterisation of a new isogenic C57BL/6 mouse model of breast cancer metastasis, comparing and contrasting it with the established BALB/c 4T1 model. Metastatic EO771.LMB tumours were derived from poorly metastatic parental EO771 mammary tumours. Functional differences were evaluated using both in vitro assays and spontaneous metastasis assays in mice. Results were compared to non-metastatic 67NR and metastatic 4T1.2 tumours of the 4T1 model. Protein and transcript levels of markers of human breast cancer molecular subtypes were measured in the four tumour lines, as well as p53 (Tp53) tumour-suppressor gene status and responses to tamoxifen in vivo and in vitro. Array-based expression profiling of whole tumours identified genes and pathways that were deregulated in metastatic tumours. EO771.LMB cells metastasised spontaneously to lung in C57BL/6 mice and displayed increased invasive capacity compared with parental EO771. By immunohistochemical assessment, EO771 and EO771.LMB were basal-like, as was the 4T1.2 tumour, whereas 67NR had a luminal phenotype. Primary tumours from all lines were negative for progesterone receptor, Erb-b2/Neu and cytokeratin 5/6, but positive for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Only 67NR displayed nuclear estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) positivity. EO771 and EO771.LMB expressed mutant p53, whereas 67NR and 4T1.2 were p53-null. Integrated molecular analysis of both the EO771/EO771.LMB and 67NR/4T1.2 pairs indicated that upregulation of matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3), parathyroid hormone-like hormone (Pthlh) and S100 calcium binding protein A8 (S100a8) and downregulation of the thrombospondin receptor (Cd36) might be causally involved in metastatic dissemination of breast cancer.

  11. Functional and molecular characterisation of EO771.LMB tumours, a new C57BL/6-mouse-derived model of spontaneously metastatic mammary cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron N. Johnstone

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The translation of basic research into improved therapies for breast cancer patients requires relevant preclinical models that incorporate spontaneous metastasis. We have completed a functional and molecular characterisation of a new isogenic C57BL/6 mouse model of breast cancer metastasis, comparing and contrasting it with the established BALB/c 4T1 model. Metastatic EO771.LMB tumours were derived from poorly metastatic parental EO771 mammary tumours. Functional differences were evaluated using both in vitro assays and spontaneous metastasis assays in mice. Results were compared to non-metastatic 67NR and metastatic 4T1.2 tumours of the 4T1 model. Protein and transcript levels of markers of human breast cancer molecular subtypes were measured in the four tumour lines, as well as p53 (Tp53 tumour-suppressor gene status and responses to tamoxifen in vivo and in vitro. Array-based expression profiling of whole tumours identified genes and pathways that were deregulated in metastatic tumours. EO771.LMB cells metastasised spontaneously to lung in C57BL/6 mice and displayed increased invasive capacity compared with parental EO771. By immunohistochemical assessment, EO771 and EO771.LMB were basal-like, as was the 4T1.2 tumour, whereas 67NR had a luminal phenotype. Primary tumours from all lines were negative for progesterone receptor, Erb-b2/Neu and cytokeratin 5/6, but positive for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR. Only 67NR displayed nuclear estrogen receptor alpha (ERα positivity. EO771 and EO771.LMB expressed mutant p53, whereas 67NR and 4T1.2 were p53-null. Integrated molecular analysis of both the EO771/EO771.LMB and 67NR/4T1.2 pairs indicated that upregulation of matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3, parathyroid hormone-like hormone (Pthlh and S100 calcium binding protein A8 (S100a8 and downregulation of the thrombospondin receptor (Cd36 might be causally involved in metastatic dissemination of breast cancer.

  12. High-throughput RNAi screening for novel modulators of vimentin expression identifies MTHFD2 as a regulator of breast cancer cell migration and invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtinen, Laura; Ketola, Kirsi; Mäkelä, Rami; Mpindi, John-Patrick; Viitala, Miro; Kallioniemi, Olli; Iljin, Kristiina

    2013-01-01

    Vimentin is an intermediate filament protein, with a key role in the epithelial to mesenchymal transition as well as cell invasion, and it is often upregulated during cancer progression. However, relatively little is known about its regulation in cancer cells. Here, we performed an RNA interference screen followed by protein lysate microarray analysis in bone metastatic MDA-MB-231(SA) breast cancer cells to identify novel regulators of vimentin expression. Out of the 596 genes investigated, three novel vimentin regulators EPHB4, WIPF2 and MTHFD2 were identified. The reduced vimentin expression in response to EPHB4, WIPF2 and MTHFD2 silencing was observed at mRNA and protein levels. Bioinformatic analysis of gene expression data across cancers indicated overexpression of EPHB4 and MTHFD2 in breast cancer and high expression associated with poor clinical characteristics. Analysis of 96 cDNA samples derived from both normal and malignant human tissues suggested putative association with metastatic disease. MTHFD2 knockdown resulted in impaired cell migration and invasion into extracellular matrix as well as decreased the fraction of cells with a high CD44 expression, a marker of cancer stem cells. Furthermore, MTHFD2 expression was induced in response to TGF-β stimulation in breast cancer cells. Our results show that MTHFD2 is overexpressed in breast cancer, associates with poor clinical characteristics and promotes cellular features connected with metastatic disease, thus implicating MTHFD2 as a potential drug target to block breast cancer cell migration and invasion.

  13. p53 mutant breast cancer patients expressing p53γ have as good a prognosis as wild-type p53 breast cancer patients.

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    International audience; INTRODUCTION: Normal function of the p53 network is lost in most cancers, often through p53 mutation. The clinical impact of p53 mutations in breast cancer remains uncertain, especially where p53 isoforms may modify the effects of these p53 mutations. METHODS: Expression of p53β and p53γ isoforms, the isoforms identified in normal breast tissue, was detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction from a cohort of 127 primary breast tumours. Expression of p5...

  14. KiSS-1 expression in human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Tracey A; Watkins, Gareth; Jiang, Wen G

    2005-01-01

    The KiSS-1 gene encodes a 145 amino acid residue peptide that is further processed to a final peptide, metastin, a ligand to a G-coupled orphan receptor (OT7T175/AXOR12). KiSS-1 has been identified as a putative human metastasis suppressor gene in melanomas and in breast cancer cell lines. This study aimed to determine the expression and distribution of KiSS-1 and its receptor in human breast cancer tissues and to identify a possible link between expression levels and patient prognosis. Frozen sections from breast cancer primary tumours (matched tumour 124 and background 33) were immuno-stained with KiSS-1 antibody. RNA was reverse transcribed and analyzed by Q-PCR (standardized using beta-actin, and normalized with cytokeratin-19 levels). Levels of expression of KiSS-1 were higher in tumour compared to background tissues (3,124+/-1,262 vs 2,397+/-1,181) and significantly increased in node positive tumours compared to node negative (3,637+/-1,719 vs 2,653+/-1,994, P = 0.02). KiSS-1 expression was also increased with increasing grade and TNM status. There were no such trends with the KiSS-1 receptor. Expression of KiSS-1 was higher in patients who had died from breast cancer than those who had remained healthy (4,631+/-3,024 vs 2,280+/-1,403) whereas expression of the receptor was reduced (480+/-162 vs 195+/-134). Immunohistochemical staining showed increased expression of KiSS-1 in tumour sections. Insertion of the KiSS-1 gene into the human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231, resulted in cells that were significantly more motile and invasive in behaviour, with reduced adhesion to matrix, using respective assays. In conclusion, KiSS-1 expression is increased in human breast cancer, particularly in patients with aggressive tumours and with mortality. Over-expression of KiSS-1 in breast cancer cells result in more aggressive phenotype. Together, it suggests that KiSS-1 plays a role beyond the initial metastasis repressor in this cancer type.

  15. Molecular-based tumour subtypes of canine mammary carcinomas assessed by immunohistochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarli Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human breast cancer is classified by gene expression profile into subtypes consisting of two hormone (oestrogen and/or progesterone receptor-positive types (luminal-like A and luminal-like B and three hormone receptor-negative types [human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-expressing, basal-like, and unclassified ("normal-like"]. Immunohistochemical surrogate panels are also proposed to potentially identify the molecular-based groups. The present study aimed to apply an immunohistochemical panel (anti-ER, -PR, -ERB-B2, -CK 5/6 and -CK14 in a series of canine malignant mammary tumours to verify the molecular-based classification, its correlation with invasion and grade, and its use as a prognostic aid in veterinary practice. Results Thirty-five tumours with luminal pattern (ER+ and PR+ were subgrouped into 13 A type and 22 B type, if ERB-B2 positive or negative. Most luminal-like A and basal-like tumours were grade 1 carcinomas, while the percentage of luminal B tumours was higher in grades 2 and 3 (Pearson Chi-square P = 0.009. No difference in the percentage of molecular subtypes was found between simple and complex/mixed carcinomas (Pearson Chi-square P = 0.47. No significant results were obtained by survival analysis, even if basal-like tumours had a more favourable prognosis than luminal-like lesions. Conclusion The panel of antibodies identified only three tumour groups (luminal-like A and B, and basal-like in the dog. Even though canine mammary tumours may be a model of human breast cancer, the existence of the same carcinoma molecular subtypes in women awaits confirmation. Canine mammary carcinomas show high molecular heterogeneity, which would benefit from a classification based on molecular differences. Stage and grade showed independent associations with survival in the multivariate regression, while molecular subtype grouping and histological type did not show associations. This suggests that caution should be

  16. Imaging of sacral tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, S.; Ollivier, L.; Brisse, H.; Neuenschwander, S. [Institut Curie, Department of Radiology, Paris (France); Leclere, J. [Institut Gustave Roussy, Department of Radiology, Villejuif (France); Vanel, D. [The Rizzoli Institute, Department of Radiology, Bologna (Italy); Missenard, G. [Institut Gustave Roussy, Comite de pathologie tumorale de l' appareil locomoteur, Villejuif (France); Pinieux, G. de [CHRU de Tours, Department of Pathology, Hopital Trousseau, Tours (France)

    2008-04-15

    All components of the sacrum (bone, cartilage, bone marrow, meninges, nerves, notochord remnants, etc.) can give rise to benign or malignant tumours. Bone metastases and intraosseous sites of haematological malignancies, lymphoma and multiple myeloma are the most frequent aetiologies, while primary bone tumours and meningeal or nerve tumours are less common. Some histological types have a predilection for the sacrum, especially chordoma and giant cell tumour. Clinical signs are usually minor, and sacral tumours are often discovered in the context of nerve root or pelvic organ compression. The roles of conventional radiology, CT and MRI are described and compared with the histological features of the main tumours. The impact of imaging on treatment decisions and follow-up is also reviewed. (orig.)

  17. De novo sequencing of circulating miRNAs identifies novel markers predicting clinical outcome of locally advanced breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Xiwei

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs have been recently detected in the circulation of cancer patients, where they are associated with clinical parameters. Discovery profiling of circulating small RNAs has not been reported in breast cancer (BC, and was carried out in this study to identify blood-based small RNA markers of BC clinical outcome. Methods The pre-treatment sera of 42 stage II-III locally advanced and inflammatory BC patients who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT followed by surgical tumor resection were analyzed for marker identification by deep sequencing all circulating small RNAs. An independent validation cohort of 26 stage II-III BC patients was used to assess the power of identified miRNA markers. Results More than 800 miRNA species were detected in the circulation, and observed patterns showed association with histopathological profiles of BC. Groups of circulating miRNAs differentially associated with ER/PR/HER2 status and inflammatory BC were identified. The relative levels of selected miRNAs measured by PCR showed consistency with their abundance determined by deep sequencing. Two circulating miRNAs, miR-375 and miR-122, exhibited strong correlations with clinical outcomes, including NCT response and relapse with metastatic disease. In the validation cohort, higher levels of circulating miR-122 specifically predicted metastatic recurrence in stage II-III BC patients. Conclusions Our study indicates that certain miRNAs can serve as potential blood-based biomarkers for NCT response, and that miR-122 prevalence in the circulation predicts BC metastasis in early-stage patients. These results may allow optimized chemotherapy treatments and preventive anti-metastasis interventions in future clinical applications.

  18. Profiling of microRNAs in tumor interstitial fluid of breast tumors – a novel resource to identify biomarkers for prognostic classification and detection of cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Halvorsen, Ann Rita; Helland, Åslaug; Gromov, Pavel; Wielenga, Vera Timmermans; Talman, Maj-Lis Møller; Brünner, Nils; Sandhu, Vandana; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Gromova, Irina; Haakensen, Vilde D

    2017-01-01

    It has been hypothesized based on accumulated data that a class of small noncoding RNAs, termed microRNAs, are key factors in intercellular communication. Here, microRNAs present in interstitial breast tumor fluids have been analyzed to identify relevant markers for a diagnosis of breast cancer and to elucidate the cross-talk that exists among cells in a tumor microenvironment. Matched tumor interstitial fluid samples (TIF, n = 60), normal interstitial fluid samples (NIF, n = 51), correspondi...

  19. Activation of tumour cell ECM degradation by thrombin-activated platelet membranes: potentially a P-selectin and GPIIb/IIIa-dependent process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, J H; Coupland, L A; Freeman, C; Chong, B H; Parish, Christopher R

    2015-06-01

    The promotion of tumour metastasis by platelets may occur through several mechanisms including the induction of a more metastatic phenotype in tumour cells and assisted extravasation of circulating tumour cells. Whilst the mechanisms underlying platelet-assisted extravasation have been extensively studied, much less attention has been paid to the mechanisms underlying platelet promotion of an aggressive phenotype within a tumour cell population. Herein, we demonstrate in vitro that MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cells incubated with washed thrombin-activated platelet membranes adopt a Matrigel-degrading phenotype in a dose- and contact time-dependent manner. The same phenotypic change was observed with three other human tumour cell lines of diverse anatomical origin. Moreover, tumour cell lines that had been cultured with washed thrombin-activated platelet membranes had a greater metastatic capacity when injected into mice. This in vivo effect was reliant upon a co-incubation period of >2 h implying a mechanism involving more than platelet membrane binding that occurred within 5 min. Upon further investigation it was found that simultaneous blocking of the platelet-membrane proteins P-selectin and GPIIb/IIIa prevented interactions between platelet membranes and MDA-MB-231 cells but also significantly reduced the ability of tumour cells to degrade Matrigel. These results confirm that platelets induce a more aggressive phenotype in tumour cells but also identify the platelet proteins involved in this effect. P-selectin and GPIIb/IIIa also play a role in assisting tumour cell extravasation and, thus, are ideal targets for the therapeutic intervention of both stages of platelet-assisted metastasis.

  20. A Mouse Mammary Gland Involution mRNA Signature Identifies Biological Pathways Potentially Associated with Breast Cancer Metastasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Stein; N. Salomonis; D.S.A. Nuyten; M.J. van de Vijver; B.A. Gusterson

    2009-01-01

    Mouse mammary gland involution resembles a wound healing response with suppressed inflammation. Wound healing and inflammation are also associated with tumour development, and a 'wound-healing' gene expression signature can predict metastasis formation and survival. Recent studies have shown that an

  1. Antibody responses to NY-ESO-1 in primary breast cancer identify a subtype target for immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaï, Ahmed; Duperrier-Amouriaux, Karine; Pignon, Pascale; Raimbaud, Isabelle; Memeo, Lorenzo; Colarossi, Cristina; Canzonieri, Vincenzo; Perin, Tiziana; Classe, Jean-Marc; Campone, Mario; Jézéquel, Pascal; Campion, Loïc; Ayyoub, Maha; Valmori, Danila

    2011-01-01

    The highly immunogenic human tumor antigen NY-ESO-1 (ESO) is a target of choice for anti-cancer immune therapy. In this study, we assessed spontaneous antibody (Ab) responses to ESO in a large cohort of patients with primary breast cancer (BC) and addressed the correlation between the presence of anti-ESO Ab, the expression of ESO in the tumors and their characteristics. We found detectable Ab responses to ESO in 1% of the patients. Tumors from patients with circulating Ab to ESO exhibited common characteristics, being mainly hormone receptor (HR)⁻ invasive ductal carcinomas of high grade, including both HER2⁻ and HER2⁺ tumors. In line with these results, we detected ESO expression in 20% of primary HR⁻ BC, including both ESO Ab⁺ and Ab⁻ patients, but not in HR⁺ BC. Interestingly, whereas expression levels in ESO⁺ BC were not significantly different between ESO Ab⁺ and Ab⁻ patients, the former had, in average, significantly higher numbers of tumor-infiltrated lymph nodes, indicating that lymph node invasion may be required for the development of spontaneous anti-tumor immune responses. Thus, the presence of ESO Ab identifies a tumor subtype of HR⁻ (HER2⁻ or HER2⁺) primary BC with frequent ESO expression and, together with the assessment of antigen expression in the tumor, may be instrumental for the selection of patients for whom ESO-based immunotherapy may complement standard therapy.

  2. High-throughput screen identifies disulfiram as a potential therapeutic for triple-negative breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Tyler JW; Pai, Melody; Liu, Jeff C; Vizeacoumar, Frederick; Sun, Thomas; Egan, Sean E; Datti, Alessandro; Huang, Jing; Zacksenhaus, Eldad

    2013-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) represents an aggressive subtype, for which radiation and chemotherapy are the only options. Here we describe the identification of disulfiram, an FDA-approved drug used to treat alcoholism, as well as the related compound thiram, as the most potent growth inhibitors following high-throughput screens of 3185 compounds against multiple TNBC cell lines. The average IC50 for disulfiram was ~300 nM. Drug affinity responsive target stability (DARTS) analysis identified IQ motif-containing factors IQGAP1 and MYH9 as direct binding targets of disulfiram. Indeed, knockdown of these factors reduced, though did not completely abolish, cell growth. Combination treatment with 4 different drugs commonly used to treat TNBC revealed that disulfiram synergizes most effectively with doxorubicin to inhibit cell growth of TNBC cells. Disulfiram and doxorubicin cooperated to induce cell death as well as cellular senescence, and targeted the ESA+/CD24-/low/CD44+ cancer stem cell population. Our results suggest that disulfiram may be repurposed to treat TNBC in combination with doxorubicin. PMID:23974104

  3. Computational Analysis of mRNA Expression Profiles Identifies the ITG Family and PIK3R3 as Crucial Genes for Regulating Triple Negative Breast Cancer Cell Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhontip Klahan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC is an aggressive type of breast cancer that does not express estrogen receptor (ER, progesterone receptor (PR, and human epidermal growth factor receptor (Her2/neu. TNBC has worse clinical outcomes than other breast cancer subtypes. However, the key molecules and mechanisms of TNBC migration remain unclear. In this study, we compared two normalized microarray datasets from GEO database between Asian (GSE33926 and non-Asian populations (GSE46581 to determine the molecules and common pathways in TNBC migration. We demonstrated that 16 genes in non-Asian samples and 9 genes in Asian samples are related to TNBC migration. In addition, our analytic results showed that 4 genes, PIK3R3, ITGB1, ITGAL, and ITGA6, were involved in the regulation of actin cytoskeleton. Our results indicated potential genes that link to TNBC migration. This study may help identify novel therapeutic targets for drug development in cancer therapy.

  4. Integrated MicroRNA–mRNA Profiling Identifies Oncostatin M as a Marker of Mesenchymal-Like ER-Negative/HER2-Negative Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottai, Giulia; Diao, Lixia; Baggerly, Keith A.; Paladini, Laura; Győrffy, Balázs; Raschioni, Carlotta; Pusztai, Lajos; Calin, George A.; Santarpia, Libero

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) simultaneously modulate different oncogenic networks, establishing a dynamic system of gene expression and pathway regulation. In this study, we analyzed global miRNA and messenger RNA (mRNA) expression profiles of 17 cell lines representing different molecular breast cancer subtypes. Spearman’s rank correlation test was used to evaluate the correlation between miRNA and mRNA expression. Hierarchical clustering and pathway analysis were also performed. Publicly available gene expression profiles (n = 699) and tumor tissues (n = 80) were analyzed to assess the relevance of key miRNA-regulated pathways in human breast cancer. We identified 39 significantly deregulated miRNAs, and the integration between miRNA and mRNA data revealed the importance of immune-related pathways, particularly the Oncostatin M (OSM) signaling, associated with mesenchymal-like breast cancer cells. OSM levels correlated with genes involved in the inflammatory response, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and epidermal growth factor (EGF) signaling in human estrogen receptor (ER)-negative/human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative breast cancer. Our results suggest that the deregulation of specific miRNAs may cooperatively impair immune and EMT pathways. The identification of the OSM inflammatory pathway as an important mediator of EMT in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) may provide a novel potential opportunity to improve therapeutic strategies. PMID:28106823

  5. A deep learning based strategy for identifying and associating mitotic activity with gene expression derived risk categories in estrogen receptor positive breast cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romo-Bucheli, David; Janowczyk, Andrew; Gilmore, Hannah; Romero, Eduardo; Madabhushi, Anant

    2017-02-13

    The treatment and management of early stage estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer is hindered by the difficulty in identifying patients who require adjuvant chemotherapy in contrast to those that will respond to hormonal therapy. To distinguish between the more and less aggressive breast tumors, which is a fundamental criterion for the selection of an appropriate treatment plan, Oncotype DX (ODX) and other gene expression tests are typically employed. While informative, these gene expression tests are expensive, tissue destructive, and require specialized facilities. Bloom-Richardson (BR) grade, the common scheme employed in breast cancer grading, has been shown to be correlated with the Oncotype DX risk score. Unfortunately, studies have also shown that the BR grade determined experiences notable inter-observer variability. One of the constituent categories in BR grading is the mitotic index. The goal of this study was to develop a deep learning (DL) classifier to identify mitotic figures from whole slides images of ER+ breast cancer, the hypothesis being that the number of mitoses identified by the DL classifier would correlate with the corresponding Oncotype DX risk categories. The mitosis detector yielded an average F-score of 0.556 in the AMIDA mitosis dataset using a 6-fold validation setup. For a cohort of 174 whole slide images with early stage ER+ breast cancer for which the corresponding Oncotype DX score was available, the distributions of the number of mitoses identified by the DL classifier was found to be significantly different between the high vs low Oncotype DX risk groups (P < 0.01). Comparisons of other risk groups, using both ODX score and histological grade, were also found to present significantly different automated mitoses distributions. Additionally, a support vector machine classifier trained to separate low/high Oncotype DX risk categories using the mitotic count determined by the DL classifier yielded a 83.19% classification

  6. Identifying putative breast cancer-associated long intergenic non-coding RNA loci by high density SNP array analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengyu eJiang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent high-throughput transcript discoveries have yielded a growing recognition of long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs, a class of arbitrarily defined transcripts (>200 nt that are primarily produced from the intergenic space. LincRNAs have been increasingly acknowledged for their expressional dynamics and likely functional associations with cancers. However, differential gene dosage of lincRNA genes between cancer genomes is less studied. By using the high-density Human Omni5-Quad BeadChips (Illumina, we investigated genomic copy number aberrations in a set of seven tumor-normal paired primary human mammary epithelial cells (HMECs established from patients with invasive ductal carcinoma. This Beadchip platform includes a total of 2,435,915 SNP loci dispersed at an average interval of ~700 nt throughout the intergenic region of the human genome. We mapped annotated or putative lincRNA genes to a subset of 332,539 SNP loci, which were included in our analysis for lincRNA-associated copy number variations (CNV. We have identified 122 lincRNAs, which were affected by somatic CNV with overlapped aberrations ranging from 0.14% to 100% in length. LincRNA-associated aberrations were detected predominantly with copy number losses and preferential clustering to the ends of chromosomes. Interestingly, lincRNA genes appear to be much less susceptible to CNV in comparison to both protein-coding and intergenic regions (CNV affected segments in percentage: 1.8%, 37.5% and 60.6%, respectively. In summary, our study established a novel approach utilizing high-resolution SNP array to identify lincRNA candidates, which could functionally link to tumorigenesis, and provide new strategies for the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer.

  7. Prognostic factors affecting disease-free survival rate following surgical resection of primary breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Horita

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to identify the prognostic factors that significantly influence the disease-free survival rate after surgical resection of primary breast cancers, we determined tumour and lymph node grades, and immunohistochemical staining for estrogen and progesterone receptors (ER and PR, c-erbB-2, p53, bcl-2, bax and PCNA in 76 patients. Univariate analysis showed that increased grade of tumour and lymph nodes, negative immunostaining for ER, positive immunostaining for c-erbB-2, and a high PCNA index (³30% negatively influenced the disease- free survival rate, but PR, p53, bcl-2 and bax had no predictive value. Although p53 was not an independent prognostic factor by itself, the combination of p53, bcl-2, and bax proved to correlate with the disease-free survival, with the best prognosis noted in tumours negative for p53 and positive for both bcl-2 and bax, intermediate prognosis in tumours negative for p53 and positive for either bcl- 2 or bax and worst prognosis in tumors negative for p53 as well as bcl-2 and bax. Tumour grade correlated positively with PCNA index, while positive staining for ER correlated negatively with tumour grade as well as with PCNA index, although this was statistically insignificant. Immunostaining of breast cancers for Bcl-2 correlated negatively with tumour grade and PCNA index. Immunostaining for c-erbB-2 correlated positively with PCNA but not with tumour grade. Immunostaining for p53 tended to correlate positively with PCNA, but not with tumour grade. Immunostaining for PR and bax did not correlate with tumour grade and PCNA index. These results suggest that in addition to tumour size and lymph node involvement, immunostaining for ER, c-erbB-2, and a high PCNA index are important prognostic factors in human breast cancer. Wild-type p53 with preserved bcl-2 and bax gene products is also a favorable prognostic factor indicating breast cancer at an early stage of cancer progression.

  8. Influencia del sitio de inoculación sobre el crecimiento, morfología y metástasis espontáneas del cáncer de mama en un modelo murino (Effect of tumour host microenvironment on growth, morphology and spontaneous metastases in a breast cancer mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuentes-Morales, Dasha

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available ResumenEl cáncer de mama constituye la principal neoplasia que se presenta en la mujer. Para el estudio de esta enfermedad se emplean frecuentemente modelos murinos, sin embargo el microambiente tisular del sitio de inoculación del tumor juega un papel fundamental en el posterior desarrollo de la neoformación y por tanto en los resultadosexperimentales. En este trabajo nos propusimos como objetivo determinar la influencia del sitio de inoculación sobre la morfología, crecimiento y metástasis espontáneas en un modelo murino de cáncer de mama. Para desarrollar nuestra investigación se utilizaron ratones BALB/c hembras jóvenes a las cuales se les inocularon células de F3II por vía subcutánea (ectópico y directamente en la glándula mamaria (ortotópico. Transcurridos 35 días se practicó la eutanasia y se estudiaron las características morfológicas y metástasis espontáneas de los tumores inoculados en su tejido de origen respecto a los que se implantaron en elsubcutis. Los resultados obtenidos evidenciaron semejanzas en la morfohistología y metástasis espontáneas cuando las células son inoculadas en la glándula mamaria o en el tejido celular subcutáneo, sin embargo se encontró una mayor velocidad de crecimiento en las células inoculadas por vía ortotópica respecto a los tumores inoculados en el subcutis. Los hallazgos realizados sugieren que la inyección del carcinoma F3II tanto por la vía ortotópica como por la subcutánea en ratones BALB/c permite obtener un modelo útil para el estudio del cáncer de mama.SummaryBreast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in women. Mousemodels of mammary cancer permit experimental evaluation of thebehavior and biology of disease, although tumour host icroenvironmentplays an important role in tumour development and therefore inexperimental results. In this study, we aimed to examine the influence of tumour host environment on tumour development and pathophysiology in

  9. In situ identification of CD44+/CD24- cancer cells in primary human breast carcinomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Perrone

    Full Text Available Breast cancer cells with the CD44+/CD24- phenotype have been reported to be tumourigenic due to their enhanced capacity for cancer development and their self-renewal potential. The identification of human tumourigenic breast cancer cells in surgical samples has recently received increased attention due to the implications for prognosis and treatment, although limitations exist in the interpretation of these studies. To better identify the CD44+/CD24- cells in routine surgical specimens, 56 primary breast carcinoma cases were analysed by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy, and the results were compared using flow cytometry analysis to correlate the amount and distribution of the CD44+/CD24- population with clinicopathological features. Using these methods, we showed that the breast carcinoma cells displayed four distinct sub-populations based on the expression pattern of CD44 and CD24. The CD44+/CD24- cells were found in 91% of breast tumours and constituted an average of 6.12% (range, 0.11%-21.23% of the tumour. A strong correlation was found between the percentage of CD44+/CD24- cells in primary tumours and distant metastasis development (p = 0.0001; in addition, there was an inverse significant association with ER and PGR status (p = 0.002 and p = 0.001, respectively. No relationship was evident with tumour size (T and regional lymph node (N status, differentiation grade, proliferative index or HER2 status. In a multivariate analysis, the percentage of CD44+/CD24- cancer cells was an independent factor related to metastasis development (p = 0.004. Our results indicate that confocal analysis of fluorescence-labelled breast cancer samples obtained at surgery is a reliable method to identify the CD44+/CD24- tumourigenic cell population, allowing for the stratification of breast cancer patients into two groups with substantially different relapse rates on the basis of CD44+/CD24- cell percentage.

  10. Differences in oestrogen receptors in malignant and normal breast tissue as identified by the binding of a new synthetic progestogen.

    OpenAIRE

    Iqbal, M J; Colletta, A. A.; Houmayoun-Valyani, S. D.; Baum, M.

    1986-01-01

    Oestrogen receptor protein (ER) was detected in 9 of 11 samples of malignant breast tissue and 8 of 9 samples of normal breast tissue. Levels of cytosolic ER (ERc) in malignant breast were 21-1102 fmol mg-1 soluble protein (Kd 1.8 X 10(-9)-3.1 X 10(-8) mol l-1) and those of nucleosolic ER (ERn), 13-526 fmol mg-1 soluble protein (Kd 2.1 X 10(-9)-1.4 X 10(-8) mol l-1). In normal breast tissue ERc levels were 33-640 fmol mg-1 soluble protein (Kd 1.3 X 10(-10)-3.2 X 10(-9) mol l-1), ERn was detec...

  11. FGFR2 protein expression in breast cancer: nuclear localisation and correlation with patient genotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thompson Alastair M

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs in intron 2 of the Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor Type 2 (FGFR2 gene, including rs2981582, contribute to multifactorial breast cancer susceptibility. The high risk polymorphism haplotype in the FGFR2 gene has been associated with increased mRNA transcription and altered transcription factor binding but the effect on FGFR2 protein expression is unknown. 40 breast tumours were identified from individuals with known rs2981582 genotype. Tumour sections were stained for FGFR2 protein expression, and scored for nuclear and cytoplasmic staining in tumour and surrounding normal tissue. Findings FGFR2 immunohistochemistry demonstrated variable nuclear staining in normal tissue and tumour tissue, as well as consistent cytoplasmic staining. We did not find an association between nuclear staining for FGFR2 and genotype, and there was no association between FGFR2 staining and estrogen or progestogen receptor status. There was an association between presence of nuclear staining for FGFR2 in normal tissue and presence of nuclear staining in the adjacent tumour (Fishers exact test, p = 0.002. Conclusions Variable nuclear staining for FGFR2 in breast cancer, but an absence of correlation with rs2981582 genotype suggests that the mechanism of action of polymorphisms at the FGFR2 locus may be more complex than a direct effect on mRNA expression levels in the final cancer. The effect may relate to FGFR2 function or localisation during breast development or tumourigenesis. Nuclear localisation of FGFR2 suggests an important additional role for this protein in breast development and breast cancer, in addition to its function as a classical cell surface receptor.

  12. Biochemistry of neuroendocrine tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Herder, Wouter W

    2007-03-01

    Several circulating or urinary tumour markers can be used for the diagnosis and follow-up of functioning and clinically non-functioning neuroendocrine tumours of the pancreatic islet cells and intestinal tract. Among the specific tumour markers are serotonin and its metabolites--e.g. 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA)--in carcinoid tumours and the carcinoid syndrome, insulin and its precursors or breakdown products in insulinoma, and gastrin in gastrinoma. Plasma vasointestinal polypeptide (VIP) determinations have been used in the diagnosis of VIPoma, plasma glucagon for glucagonoma, and serum somatostatin for somatostatinoma. Among the tumour-non-specific markers are: chromogranins, neuron-specific enolase (NSE), alpha-subunits of the glycoprotein hormones, catecholamines, pancreatic polypeptide (PP), ghrelin and adrenomedullin.

  13. Prognostic relevance at 5 years of the early monitoring of neoadjuvant chemotherapy using {sup 18}F-FDG PET in luminal HER2-negative breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humbert, Olivier; Brunotte, Francois [Centre GF Leclerc, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Dijon (France); CHU Le Bocage, Imaging Department, Dijon (France); Universite de Bourgogne, UMR CNRS 5158, Dijon (France); Berriolo-Riedinger, Alina; Toubeau, Michel; Dygai-Cochet, Inna [Centre GF Leclerc, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Dijon (France); Cochet, Alexandre [Centre GF Leclerc, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Dijon (France); Universite de Bourgogne, UMR CNRS 5158, Dijon (France); Gauthier, Melanie [Centre GF Leclerc, Biostatistics and Quality of Life Unit, EA 4184, Dijon (France); Charon-Barra, Celine [Centre GF Leclerc, Department of Pathology, Dijon (France); Guiu, Severine; Desmoulins, Isabelle; Fumoleau, Pierre [Centre GF Leclerc, Department of Medical Oncology, Dijon (France); Coutant, Charles [Centre GF Leclerc, Department of Surgery, Dijon (France)

    2014-03-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate, in the luminal human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative breast cancer subtype, the prognostic value of tumour glucose metabolism at baseline and of its early changes during neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). This prospective study included 61 women with hormone-sensitive HER2-negative breast cancer treated with NAC. {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) was performed at baseline. Hepatic activity was used as a reference to distinguish between low metabolic and hypermetabolic tumours. In hypermetabolic tumours, a PET exam was repeated after the first course of NAC. The relative change in the maximum standardized uptake value of the tumour (∇SUV) was calculated. Nineteen women had low metabolic luminal breast cancers at baseline, correlated with low proliferation indexes. Forty-two women had hypermetabolic tumours, corresponding to more proliferative breast cancers with higher Ki-67 expression (p = 0.017) and higher grade (p = 0.04). The median follow-up period was 64.2 months (range 11.5-93.2). Thirteen women developed recurrent disease, nine of whom died. Worse overall survival was associated with larger tumour size [>5 cm, hazard ratio (HR) = 6.52, p = 0.009] and with hypermetabolic tumours achieving a low metabolic response after one cycle of NAC (ΔSUV < 16 %, HR = 10.63, p = 0.004). Five-year overall survival in these poor responder patients was 49.2 %. Overall survival in women with low metabolic tumours or hypermetabolic/good response tumours was 100 and 96.15 %, respectively. In luminal HER2-negative breast tumours, tumour metabolism at baseline and changes after the first course of NAC are early surrogate markers of patients' survival. A subgroup of women with hypermetabolic/poorly responding tumours, correlated with poor prognosis at 5 years, can be identified early. These results may guide future studies by tailoring the NAC regimen to the metabolic response

  14. Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) to characterize MRI-detected additional lesions unidentified at targeted ultrasound in newly diagnosed breast cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariscotti, Giovanna; Durando, Manuela; Regini, Elisa; Fornari, Alberto; Fonio, Paolo; Gandini, Giovanni [Breast Imaging Service, Radiology - University of Turin, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiotherapy, A.O.U. Citta della Salute e della Scienza, Torino (Italy); Houssami, Nehmat [University of Sydney, Screening and Test Evaluation Program, School of Public Health, Sydney Medical School, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Campanino, Pier Paolo [Ospedale Koelliker, Breast Imaging Service, Torino (Italy); Bussone, Riccardo [A.O.U. Citta della Salute e della Scienza of Turin, SSCVD Breast Surgery. Department of Surgery, Torino (Italy); Castellano, Isabella; Sapino, Anna [University of Turin, Department of Biomedical Sciences and Human Oncology, A.O.U. Citta della Salute e della Scienza, Torino (Italy)

    2015-09-15

    Preoperative breast magnetic resonance (MR) often generates additional suspicious findings needing further investigations. Targeted breast ultrasound (US) is the standard tool to characterize MR additional lesions. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the potential role of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) to characterize MR detected additional findings, unidentified at targeted breast US. This prospective study included women who a) had biopsy-proven, newly diagnosed breast cancers detected at conventional 2D mammography and/or US, referred to breast MR for tumour staging; and b) had DBT if additional MR findings were not detected at targeted ('second look') US. In 520 patients, MR identified 164 (in 114 women, 22 %) additional enhancing lesions. Targeted US identified 114/164 (69.5 %) of these, whereas 50/164 (30.5 %) remained unidentified. DBT identified 32/50 of these cases, increasing the overall characterization of MR detected additional findings to 89.0 % (146/164). Using DBT the identified lesions were significantly more likely to be malignant than benign MR-detected additional lesions (p = 0.04). DBT improves the characterization of additional MR findings not identified at targeted breast US in preoperative breast cancer staging. (orig.)

  15. Skeletal muscle metastases: primary tumours, prevalence, and radiological features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surov, Alexey; Spielmann, Rolf Peter; Behrmann, Curd [Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Radiology, Halle (Germany); Hainz, Michael; Holzhausen, Hans-Juergen [Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Pathology, Halle (Germany); Arnold, Dirk [Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Haematology/Oncology, Halle (Germany); Katzer, Michaela [Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Urology, Halle (Germany); Schmidt, Joerg [Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Medical Statistics and Controlling, Halle (Germany)

    2010-03-15

    Although skeletal muscles comprise nearly 50% of the total human body mass and are well vascularised, metastases in the musculature are rare. The reported prevalence of skeletal muscle metastases from post-mortem studies of patients with cancer is inconstant and ranges from 0.03 to 17.5%. Of 5,170 patients with metastasised cancer examined and treated at our institution during the period from January 2000 to December 2007, 61 patients with muscle metastases (80 lesions) were identified on computed tomography (CT). Genital tumours (24.6%) were the most frequent malignancies metastasising into the skeletal musculature, followed by gastrointestinal tumours (21.3%), urological tumours (16.4%), and malignant melanoma (13.1%). Other primary malignancies were rarer, including bronchial carcinoma (8.2%), thyroid gland carcinoma (4.9%), and breast carcinoma (3.3%). In 8.2%, carcinoma of unknown primary was diagnosed. Skeletal muscle metastases (SMM) were located in the iliopsoas muscle (27.5%), paravertebral muscles (25%), gluteal muscles (16.3%), lower extremity muscles (12.5%), abdominal wall muscles (10%), thoracic wall muscles (5%), and upper extremity muscles (3.8%). Most (76.3%) of the 80 SMM were diagnosed incidentally during routine staging CT examinations, while 23.7% were symptomatic. Radiologically, SMM presented with five different types of lesions: focal intramuscular masses (type I, 52.5% of SMM), abscess-like intramuscular lesions (type II, 32.5%), diffuse metastatic muscle infiltration (type III, 8.8%), multifocal intramuscular calcification (type IV, 3.7%) and intramuscular bleeding (type V, 2.5%). (orig.)

  16. Tumour screening by means of tomography methods; Tumorscreening mit Schnittbildverfahren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diederich, S. [Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Marien-Hospital Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    Tomography methods such as computer tomography (CT), magnetic resonance tomography (MRT), and sonography/ultrasound examinations make it possible to detect small asymptomatic tumours, thus potentially preventing their manifestation at an advanced stage and improving survival prospects for the patients concerned. There are data available on various common tumours which show that modern tomography methods are capable of detecting not only small asymptomatic tumours but also their benign precursors (e.g. polyps of the large intestine). This has been demonstrated for lung cancer, colon cancer and breast cancer. However, it has not been possible to date to show for any tomography method or any type of tumour that the systematic use of such diagnostic procedures does anything to lower the mortality rate for that tumour. For other types of tumour (pancreatic cancer, kidney cancer, ovary cancer) the above named methods are either not sufficiently sensitive or the body of data that has accumulated on their respective use is too small to judge the benefit of tomography screenings. Current technical developments make it appear probable that for many types of cancer the reliability with which small tumours can be detected will improve in future. Studies aimed at clarifying the potential of screenings for reducing mortality rates are already underway for lung cancer and would be worthwhile performing for other tumour types.

  17. Gene Expression Meta-Analysis identifies Cytokine Pathways and 5q Aberrations involved in Metastasis of ERBB2 Amplified and Basal Breast Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Mads; Tan, Qihua; Burton, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Background: Breast tumors have been described by molecular subtypes characterized by pervasively different gene expression profiles. The subtypes are associated with different clinical parameters and origin of precursor cells. However, the biological pathways and chromosomal aberrations that differ...... the subgroups impact metastasis. Results: We have scrutinized publicly available gene expression datasets and identified molecular subtypes in 1,394 breast tumors with outcome data. By analysis of chromosomal regions and pathways using “Gene set enrichment analysis” followed by a meta-analysis, we identified...... show that high expression of 5q14 genes and low levels of TNFR2 pathway genes were associated with poor survival in basal-like cancers. Furthermore, low expression of 5q33 genes and interleukin-12 pathway genes were associated with poor outcome exclusively in ERBB2-like tumors. Conclusion...

  18. ATM kinase sustains HER2 tumorigenicity in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagni, Venturina; Manni, Isabella; Oropallo, Veronica; Mottolese, Marcella; Di Benedetto, Anna; Piaggio, Giulia; Falcioni, Rita; Giaccari, Danilo; Di Carlo, Selene; Sperati, Francesca; Cencioni, Maria Teresa; Barilà, Daniela

    2015-04-16

    ATM kinase preserves genomic stability by acting as a tumour suppressor. However, its identification as a component of several signalling networks suggests a dualism for ATM in cancer. Here we report that ATM expression and activity promotes HER2-dependent tumorigenicity in vitro and in vivo. We reveal a correlation between ATM activation and the reduced time to recurrence in patients diagnosed with invasive HER2-positive breast cancer. Furthermore, we identify ATM as a novel modulator of HER2 protein stability that acts by promoting a complex of HER2 with the chaperone HSP90, therefore preventing HER2 ubiquitination and degradation. As a consequence, ATM sustains AKT activation downstream of HER2 and may modulate the response to therapeutic approaches, suggesting that the status of ATM activity may be informative for the treatment and prognosis of HER2-positive tumours. Our findings provide evidence for ATM's tumorigenic potential revising the canonical role of ATM as a pure tumour suppressor.

  19. Improved visualization of breast cancer features in multifocal carcinoma using phase-contrast and dark-field mammography: an ex vivo study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grandl, Susanne; Sztrokay-Gaul, Aniko; Auweter, Sigrid D.; Hellerhoff, Karin [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Institute of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Scherer, Kai; Birnbacher, Lorenz; Willer, Konstantin; Chabior, Michael; Herzen, Julia; Pfeiffer, Franz [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Physics and Institute of Medical Engineering, Garching (Germany); Mayr, Doris [Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Institute of Pathology, Munich (Germany); Bamberg, Fabian [University Hospital Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    Conventional X-ray attenuation-based contrast is inherently low for the soft-tissue components of the female breast. To overcome this limitation, we investigate the diagnostic merits arising from dark-field mammography by means of certain tumour structures enclosed within freshly dissected mastectomy samples. We performed grating-based absorption, absolute phase and dark-field mammography of three freshly dissected mastectomy samples containing bi- and multifocal carcinoma using a compact, laboratory Talbot-Lau interferometer. Preoperative in vivo imaging (digital mammography, ultrasound, MRI), postoperative histopathological analysis and ex vivo digital mammograms of all samples were acquired for the diagnostic verification of our results. In the diagnosis of multifocal tumour growth, dark-field mammography seems superior to standard breast imaging modalities, providing a better resolution of small, calcified tumour nodules, demarcation of tumour boundaries with desmoplastic stromal response and spiculated soft-tissue strands extending from an invasive ductal breast cancer. On the basis of selected cases, we demonstrate that dark-field mammography is capable of outperforming conventional mammographic imaging of tumour features in both calcified and non-calcified tumours. Presuming dose optimization, our results encourage further studies on larger patient cohorts to identify those patients that will benefit the most from this promising additional imaging modality. (orig.)

  20. Functional analysis of non-hotspot AKT1 mutants found in human breast cancers identifies novel driver mutations: implications for personalized medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Yi, Kyung H.; Axtmayer, Jossette; Gustin, John P.; Rajpurohit, Anandita; Lauring, Josh

    2012-01-01

    The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase)-Akt-mTOR pathway is mutated at high frequency in human breast cancer, and this pathway is the focus of active drug discovery and clinical investigation. Trials of personalized cancer therapy seek to leverage knowledge of cancer gene mutations by using mutations to guide the choice of targeted therapies. At the same time, cancer genome sequencing studies are identifying low frequency variants of unknown significance in known cancer genes, as well ...

  1. Isolation and identification of marine fish tumour (odontoma) associated bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ramalingam Vijayakumar; Kuzhanthaivel Raja; Vijayapoopathi Singaravel; Ayyaru Gopalakrishnan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify fish tumour associated bacteria. Methods: The marine fish Sphyraena jello with odontoma was collected from in Tamil Nadu (Southeast India), and tumour associated bacteria were isolated. Then the isolated bacteria were identified based on molecular characters. Results: A total of 4 different bacterial species were isolated from tumour tissue. The bacterial species were Bacillus sp., Pontibacter sp., Burkholderia sp. and Macrococcus sp., and the sequences were submitted in DNA Data Bank of Japan with accession numbers of AB859240, AB859241, AB859242 and AB859243 respectively. Conclusions: Four different bacterial species were isolated from Sphyraena jello, but the role of bacteria within tumour needs to be further investigated.

  2. Genome-wide association study identifies a common variant in RAD51B associated with male breast cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orr, Nick; Lemnrau, Alina; Cooke, Rosie

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a genome-wide association study of male breast cancer comprising 823 cases and 2,795 controls of European ancestry, with validation in independent sample sets totaling 438 cases and 474 controls. A SNP in RAD51B at 14q24.1 was significantly associated with male breast cancer risk (P...... = 3.02 × 10(-13); odds ratio (OR) = 1.57). We also refine association at 16q12.1 to a SNP within TOX3 (P = 3.87 × 10(-15); OR = 1.50)....

  3. HPV status, cancer stem cell marker expression, hypoxia gene signatures and tumour volume identify good prognosis subgroups in patients with HNSCC after primary radiochemotherapy: A multicentre retrospective study of the German Cancer Consortium Radiation Oncology Group (DKTK-ROG)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linge, Annett; Lohaus, Fabian; Löck, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the impact of the tumour volume, HPV status, cancer stem cell (CSC) marker expression and hypoxia gene signatures, as potential markers of radiobiological mechanisms of radioresistance, in a contemporary cohort of patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell...... carcinoma (HNSCC), who received primary radiochemotherapy (RCTx). MATERIALS AND METHODS: For 158 patients with locally advanced HNSCC of the oral cavity, oropharynx or hypopharynx who were treated at six DKTK partner sites, the impact of tumour volume, HPV DNA, p16 overexpression, p53 expression, CSC marker...

  4. An integrative transcriptomics approach identifies miR-503 as a candidate master regulator of the estrogen response in MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purvis, Jeremy E.

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen receptor α (ERα) is an important biomarker of breast cancer severity and a common therapeutic target. In response to estrogen, ERα stimulates a dynamic transcriptional program including both coding and noncoding RNAs. We generate a fine-scale map of expression dynamics by performing a temporal profiling of both messenger RNAs (mRNAs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) in MCF-7 cells (an ER+ model cell line for breast cancer) in response to estrogen stimulation. We identified three primary expression trends—transient, induced, and repressed—that were each enriched for genes with distinct cellular functions. Integrative analysis of mRNA and miRNA temporal expression profiles identified miR-503 as the strongest candidate master regulator of the estrogen response, in part through suppression of ZNF217—an oncogene that is frequently amplified in cancer. We confirmed experimentally that miR-503 directly targets ZNF217 and that overexpression of miR-503 suppresses MCF-7 cell proliferation. Moreover, the levels of ZNF217 and miR-503 are associated with opposite outcomes in breast cancer patient cohorts, with high expression of ZNF217 associated with poor survival and high expression of miR-503 associated with improved survival. Overall, these data indicate that miR-503 acts as a potent estrogen-induced candidate tumor suppressor miRNA that opposes cellular proliferation and has promise as a novel therapeutic for breast cancer. More generally, our work provides a systems-level framework for identifying functional interactions that shape the temporal dynamics of gene expression. PMID:27539783

  5. Transformation of MCF-10A cells by random mutagenesis with frameshift mutagen ICR191: A model for identifying candidate breast-tumor suppressors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsui Sei-Ichi

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Widely accepted somatic mutation theory of carcinogenesis states that mutations in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in genomes of somatic cells is the cause of neoplastic transformation. Identifying frequent mutations in cancer cells suggests the involvement of mutant genes in carcinogenesis. Results To develop an in vitro model for the analysis of genetic alterations associated with breast carcinogenesis, we used random mutagenesis and selection of human non-tumorigenic immortalized breast epithelial cells MCF-10A in tissue-culture conditions that mimic tumor environment. Random mutations were generated in MCF-10A cells by cultivating them in a tissue-culture medium containing the frameshift-inducing agent ICR191. The first selective condition we used to transform MCF1-10A cells was cultivation in a medium containing mutagen at a concentration that allowed cell replication despite p53 protein accumulation induced by mutagen treatment. The second step of selection was either cell cultivation in a medium with reduced growth-factor supply or in a medium that mimics a hypoxia condition or growing in soft agar. Using mutagenesis and selection, we have generated several independently derived cultures with various degrees of transformation. Gene Identification by Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay Inhibition (GINI analysis has identified the ICR191-induced frameshift mutations in the TP53, smoothelin, Ras association (RalGDS/AF-6 domain family 6 (RASSF6 and other genes in the transformed MCF-10A cells. The TP53 gene mutations resulting in the loss of protein expression had been found in all independently transformed MCF-10A cultures, which form large progressively growing tumors with sustained angiogenesis in nude mice. Conclusion Identifying genes containing bi-allelic ICR191-induced frameshift mutations in the transformed MCF-10A cells generated by random mutagenesis and selection indicates putative breast-tumor suppressors. This

  6. Fluvastatin mediated breast cancer cell death: a proteomic approach to identify differentially regulated proteins in MDA-MB-231 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anantha Koteswararao Kanugula

    Full Text Available Statins are increasingly being recognized as anti-cancer agents against various cancers including breast cancer. To understand the molecular pathways targeted by fluvastatin and its differential sensitivity against metastatic breast cancer cells, we analyzed protein alterations in MDA-MB-231 cells treated with fluvastatin using 2-DE in combination with LC-MS/MS. Results revealed dys-regulation of 39 protein spots corresponding to 35 different proteins. To determine the relevance of altered protein profiles with breast cancer cell death, we mapped these proteins to major pathways involved in the regulation of cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, cell cycle, Rho GDI and proteasomal pathways using IPA analysis. Highly interconnected sub networks showed that vimentin and ERK1/2 proteins play a central role in controlling the expression of altered proteins. Fluvastatin treatment caused proteolysis of vimentin, a marker of epithelial to mesenchymal transition. This effect of fluvastatin was reversed in the presence of mevalonate, a downstream product of HMG-CoA and caspase-3 inhibitor. Interestingly, fluvastatin neither caused an appreciable cell death nor did modulate vimentin expression in normal mammary epithelial cells. In conclusion, fluvastatin alters levels of cytoskeletal proteins, primarily targeting vimentin through increased caspase-3- mediated proteolysis, thereby suggesting a role for vimentin in statin-induced breast cancer cell death.

  7. Fluvastatin mediated breast cancer cell death: a proteomic approach to identify differentially regulated proteins in MDA-MB-231 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanugula, Anantha Koteswararao; Dhople, Vishnu M; Völker, Uwe; Ummanni, Ramesh; Kotamraju, Srigiridhar

    2014-01-01

    Statins are increasingly being recognized as anti-cancer agents against various cancers including breast cancer. To understand the molecular pathways targeted by fluvastatin and its differential sensitivity against metastatic breast cancer cells, we analyzed protein alterations in MDA-MB-231 cells treated with fluvastatin using 2-DE in combination with LC-MS/MS. Results revealed dys-regulation of 39 protein spots corresponding to 35 different proteins. To determine the relevance of altered protein profiles with breast cancer cell death, we mapped these proteins to major pathways involved in the regulation of cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, cell cycle, Rho GDI and proteasomal pathways using IPA analysis. Highly interconnected sub networks showed that vimentin and ERK1/2 proteins play a central role in controlling the expression of altered proteins. Fluvastatin treatment caused proteolysis of vimentin, a marker of epithelial to mesenchymal transition. This effect of fluvastatin was reversed in the presence of mevalonate, a downstream product of HMG-CoA and caspase-3 inhibitor. Interestingly, fluvastatin neither caused an appreciable cell death nor did modulate vimentin expression in normal mammary epithelial cells. In conclusion, fluvastatin alters levels of cytoskeletal proteins, primarily targeting vimentin through increased caspase-3- mediated proteolysis, thereby suggesting a role for vimentin in statin-induced breast cancer cell death.

  8. Bilateral Malignant Brenner Tumour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasser D Choudhary, S.Manzoor Kadri, Ruby Reshi, S. Besina, Mansoor A. Laharwal, Reyaz tasleem, Qurrat A. Chowdhary

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Bilateral malignant Brenner tumour ofovary is extremely rate. A case ofmalignant Brenner tumourinvolving both the ovaries with mctastasis to mesentery in a 48 year femalc is presented. Grosslyo'arian masses were firm with soft areas, encapsulated and having bosselated external surfaces.Cut sections showed yellowish white surface with peripheral cysts (in both tumours. Microscopyrevealed transitional cell carcinoma with squamoid differentiation at places. Metastatic deposits werefound in the mesentery. Endometrium showed cystic glandular hyperplasia.

  9. Multiple lineages of human breast cancer stem/progenitor cells identified by profiling with stem cell markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy W Hwang-Verslues

    Full Text Available Heterogeneity of cancer stem/progenitor cells that give rise to different forms of cancer has been well demonstrated for leukemia. However, this fundamental concept has yet to be established for solid tumors including breast cancer. In this communication, we analyzed solid tumor cancer stem cell markers in human breast cancer cell lines and primary specimens using flow cytometry. The stem/progenitor cell properties of different marker expressing-cell populations were further assessed by in vitro soft agar colony formation assay and the ability to form tumors in NOD/SCID mice. We found that the expression of stem cell markers varied greatly among breast cancer cell lines. In MDA-MB-231 cells, PROCR and ESA, instead of the widely used breast cancer stem cell markers CD44(+/CD24(-/low and ALDH, could be used to highly enrich cancer stem/progenitor cell populations which exhibited the ability to self renew and divide asymmetrically. Furthermore, the PROCR(+/ESA(+ cells expressed epithelial-mesenchymal transition markers. PROCR could also be used to enrich cells with colony forming ability from MB-361 cells. Moreover, consistent with the marker profiling using cell lines, the expression of stem cell markers differed greatly among primary tumors. There was an association between metastasis status and a high prevalence of certain markers including CD44(+/CD24(-/low, ESA(+, CD133(+, CXCR4(+ and PROCR(+ in primary tumor cells. Taken together, these results suggest that similar to leukemia, several stem/progenitor cell-like subpopulations can exist in breast cancer.

  10. Common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are associated with tumour subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Mulligan (Anna Marie); F.J. Couch (Fergus); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); S.M. Domchek (Susan); D. Eccles (Diana); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); S.J. Ramus (Susan); M. Robson (Mark); M.E. Sherman (Mark); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); A. Lee (Andrew); L. McGuffog (Lesley); S. Healey (Sue); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); F.C. Nielsen (Finn); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); A. Osorio (Ana); I. Muñoz-Repeto (Iván); M. Durán (Mercedes); J. Godino (Javier); M. Pertesi (Maroulio); J. Benítez (Javier); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); B. Peissel (Bernard); D. Zaffaroni (D.); E. Cattaneo (Elisa); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); A. Viel (Alessandra); B. Pasini (Barbara); L. Papi (Laura); L. Ottini (Laura); A. Savarese (Antonella); L. Bernard (Loris); P. Radice (Paolo); U. Hamann (Ute); M. Verheus (Martijn); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); J.T. Wijnen (Juul); E.B. Gómez García (Encarna); M.R. Nelen (Marcel); C.M. Kets; C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); M.M.A. Tilanus-Linthorst (Madeleine); R.B. van der Luijt (Rob); T.V. Os (Theo); M.A. Rookus (Matti); D. Frost (Debra); J.L. Jones (J Louise); D.G. Evans (Gareth); F. Lalloo (Fiona); R. Eeles (Rosalind); L. Izatt (Louise); J.W. Adlard (Julian); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); J. Cook (Jackie); A. Donaldson (Alan); H. Dorkins (Huw); H. Gregory (Helen); J. Eason (Jacqueline); C. Houghton (Catherine); J. Barwell (Julian); L. Side (Lucy); E. McCann (Emma); A. Murray (Alexandra); S. Peock (Susan); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); K. Rhiem (Kerstin); C. Engel (Christoph); A. Meindl (Alfons); I. Ruehl (Ina); N. Arnold (Norbert); D. Niederacher (Dieter); C. Sutter (Christian); H. Deissler (Helmut); D. Gadzicki (Dorothea); K. Kast (Karin); S. Preisler-Adams (Sabine); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); I. Schoenbuchner (Ines); B. Fiebig (Britta); W. Heinritz (Wolfram); D. Schäfer; H. Gevensleben (Heidrun); V. Caux-Moncoutier (Virginie); M. Fassy-Colcombet (Marion); F. Cornelis (Franco̧is); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); M. Léone (Mélanie); N. Boutry-Kryza (N.); A. Hardouin (Agnès); P. Berthet (Pascaline); D.W. Muller (Danièle); J.P. Fricker (Jean Pierre); I. Mortemousque (Isabelle); P. Pujol (Pascal); I. Coupier (Isabelle); M. Lebrun (Marine); C. Kientz (Caroline); M. Longy (Michel); N. Sevenet (Nicolas); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); C. Isaacs (Claudine); T. Caldes (Trinidad); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); T. Heikinen (Tuomas); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); I. Blanco (Ignacio); C. Lazaro (Conxi); R.B. Barkardottir (Rosa); P. Soucy (Penny); M. Dumont (Martine); J. Simard (Jacques); M. Montagna (Marco); S. Tognazzo (Silvia); E. D'Andrea (Emma); S.B. Fox (Stephen); M. Yan (Max); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); O.I. Olopade (Olofunmilayo); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); H. Lynch (Henry); P.A. Ganz (Patricia); G. Tomlinson (Gail); X. Wang (Xing); Z. Fredericksen (Zachary); V.S. Pankratz (Shane); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); C. Szabo (Csilla); K. Offit (Kenneth); R. Sakr (Rita); M.M. Gaudet (Mia); K.P. Bhatia (Kailash); N. Kauff (Noah); C.F. Singer (Christian); M.-K. Tea; D. Gschwantler-Kaulich (Daphne); A. Fink-Retter (Anneliese); P.L. Mai (Phuong); M.H. Greene (Mark); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); F.P. O'Malley (Frances); H. Ozcelik (Hilmi); G. Glendon (Gord); A.E. Toland (Amanda); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); M. Thomassen (Mads); T.A. Kruse (Torben); U.B. Jensen; A.-B. Skytte (Anne-Bine); M.A. Caligo (Maria); M. Soller (Maria); K. Henriksson (Karin); A. von Wachenfeldt (Anna); B. Arver (Brita Wasteson); M. Stenmark-Askmalm (M.); P. Karlsson (Per); Y.C. Ding (Yuan); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); M.S. Beattie (Mary); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); K.B. Moysich (Kirsten); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); B. Karlan; J. Gross (Jenny); E.M. John (Esther); M.B. Daly (Mary); S.S. Buys (Saundra); M.C. Southey (Melissa); J.L. Hopper (John); M.-B. Terry (Mary-Beth); W. Chung (Wendy); A. Miron (Alexander); D. Goldgar (David); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); D.F. Easton (Douglas); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: Previous studies have demonstrated that common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are differentially associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers. It is currently unknown how these alleles are associated with different breast cancer subtypes

  11. Common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are associated with tumour subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers : results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulligan, Anna Marie; Couch, Fergus J.; Barrowdale, Daniel; Domchek, Susan M.; Eccles, Diana; Nevanlinna, Heli; Ramus, Susan J.; Robson, Mark; Sherman, Mark; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Lee, Andrew; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Nielsen, Finn C.; Ejlertsen, Bent; Osorio, Ana; Munoz-Repeto, Ivan; Duran, Mercedes; Godino, Javier; Pertesi, Maroulio; Benitez, Javier; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Cattaneo, Elisa; Bonanni, Bernardo; Viel, Alessandra; Pasini, Barbara; Papi, Laura; Ottini, Laura; Savarese, Antonella; Bernard, Loris; Radice, Paolo; Hamann, Ute; Verheus, Martijn; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Wijnen, Juul; Garcia, Encarna B. Gomez; Nelen, Marcel R.; Kets, C. Marleen; Seynaeve, Caroline; Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine M. A.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; van Os, Theo; Rookus, Matti; Frost, Debra; Jones, J. Louise; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Cook, Jackie; Donaldson, Alan; Dorkins, Huw; Gregory, Helen; Eason, Jacqueline; Houghton, Catherine; Barwell, Julian; Side, Lucy E.; McCann, Emma; Murray, Alex; Peock, Susan; Godwin, Andrew K.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Rhiem, Kerstin; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ruehl, Ina; Arnold, Norbert; Niederacher, Dieter; Sutter, Christian; Deissler, Helmut; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Kast, Karin; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Schoenbuchner, Ines; Fiebig, Britta; Heinritz, Wolfram; Schaefer, Dieter; Gevensleben, Heidrun; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; Fassy-Colcombet, Marion; Cornelis, Francois; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Leone, Melanie; Boutry-Kryza, Nadia; Hardouin, Agnes; Berthet, Pascaline; Muller, Daniele; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Mortemousque, Isabelle; Pujol, Pascal; Coupier, Isabelle; Lebrun, Marine; Kientz, Caroline; Longy, Michel; Sevenet, Nicolas; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Isaacs, Claudine; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Aittomaki, Kristiina; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Soucy, Penny; Dumont, Martine; Simard, Jacques; Montagna, Marco; Tognazzo, Silvia; D'Andrea, Emma; Fox, Stephen; Yan, Max; Rebbeck, Tim; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Lynch, Henry T.; Ganz, Patricia A.; Tomlinson, Gail E.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Szabo, Csilla; Offit, Kenneth; Sakr, Rita; Gaudet, Mia; Bhatia, Jasmine; Kauff, Noah; Singer, Christian F.; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Mai, Phuong L.; Greene, Mark H.; Imyanitov, Evgeny; O'Malley, Frances P.; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Glendon, Gordon; Toland, Amanda E.; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Thomassen, Mads; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Caligo, Maria A.; Soller, Maria; Henriksson, Karin; Wachenfeldt, von Anna; Arver, Brita; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Karlsson, Per; Ding, Yuan Chun; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Beattie, Mary; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Gross, Jenny; John, Esther M.; Daly, Mary B.; Buys, Saundra M.; Southey, Melissa C.; Hopper, John L.; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy; Miron, Alexander F.; Goldgar, David; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Antoniou, Antonis C.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Previous studies have demonstrated that common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are differentially associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers. It is currently unknown how these alleles are associated with different breast cancer subtypes in BRCA1 an

  12. Staging Investigations in Breast Cancer: Collective Opinion of UK Breast Surgeons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Chand

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Certain clinicopathological factors are associated with a higher likelihood of distant metastases in primary breast cancer. However, there remains inconsistency in which patients undergo formal staging for distant metastasis and the most appropriate investigation(s. Aims. To identify UK surgeon preferences and practice with regard to staging investigations for distant metastases. Methods. A survey was disseminated to members of the Association of Breast Surgery by e-mail regarding surgeon/breast unit demographics, use of staging investigations, and local policy on pre/postoperative staging investigations. Several patient scenarios were also presented. Results. 123 of 474 (25.9% recipients completed the survey. Investigations routinely employed for patients diagnosed with early breast cancer included serological/haematological tests (72% respondents, axillary ultrasound (67%, liver ultrasound (2%, chest radiograph (36%, and computed tomography (CT (1%. Three areas contributed to decisions to undertake staging by CT scan: tumour size, axillary nodal status, and plan for chemotherapy. There was widespread variation as to criteria for CT staging based on tumour size and nodal status, as well as the choice of staging investigation for the clinical scenarios presented. Conclusions. There remains variation in the use of staging investigations for distant disease in early breastcancer despite available guidelines.

  13. Staging Investigations in Breast Cancer: Collective Opinion of UK Breast Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chand, N; Cutress, R I; Oeppen, R S; Agrawal, A

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Certain clinicopathological factors are associated with a higher likelihood of distant metastases in primary breast cancer. However, there remains inconsistency in which patients undergo formal staging for distant metastasis and the most appropriate investigation(s). Aims. To identify UK surgeon preferences and practice with regard to staging investigations for distant metastases. Methods. A survey was disseminated to members of the Association of Breast Surgery by e-mail regarding surgeon/breast unit demographics, use of staging investigations, and local policy on pre/postoperative staging investigations. Several patient scenarios were also presented. Results. 123 of 474 (25.9%) recipients completed the survey. Investigations routinely employed for patients diagnosed with early breast cancer included serological/haematological tests (72% respondents), axillary ultrasound (67%), liver ultrasound (2%), chest radiograph (36%), and computed tomography (CT) (1%). Three areas contributed to decisions to undertake staging by CT scan: tumour size, axillary nodal status, and plan for chemotherapy. There was widespread variation as to criteria for CT staging based on tumour size and nodal status, as well as the choice of staging investigation for the clinical scenarios presented. Conclusions. There remains variation in the use of staging investigations for distant disease in early breastcancer despite available guidelines.

  14. Consensus on biomarkers for neuroendocrine tumour disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberg, Kjell; Modlin, Irvin M; De Herder, Wouter; Pavel, Marianne; Klimstra, David; Frilling, Andrea; Metz, David C; Heaney, Anthony; Kwekkeboom, Dik; Strosberg, Jonathan; Meyer, Timothy; Moss, Steven F; Washington, Kay; Wolin, Edward; Liu, Eric; Goldenring, James

    2016-01-01

    Management of neuroendocrine neoplasia represents a clinical challenge because of its late presentation, lack of treatment options, and limitations in present imaging modalities and biomarkers to guide management. Monoanalyte biomarkers have poor sensitivity, specificity, and predictive ability. A National Cancer Institute summit, held in 2007, on neuroendocrine tumours noted biomarker limitations to be a crucial unmet need in the management of neuroendocrine tumours. A multinational consensus meeting of multidisciplinary experts in neuroendocrine tumours assessed the use of current biomarkers and defined the perquisites for novel biomarkers via the Delphi method. Consensus (at >75%) was achieved for 88 (82%) of 107 assessment questions. The panel concluded that circulating multianalyte biomarkers provide the highest sensitivity and specificity necessary for minimum disease detection and that this type of biomarker had sufficient information to predict treatment effectiveness and prognosis. The panel also concluded that no monoanalyte biomarker of neuroendocrine tumours has yet fulfilled these criteria and there is insufficient information to support the clinical use of miRNA or circulating tumour cells as useful prognostic markers for this disease. The panel considered that trials measuring multianalytes (eg, neuroendocrine gene transcripts) should also identify how such information can optimise the management of patients with neuroendocrine tumours. PMID:26370353

  15. Myeloid cells in tumour-immune interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kareva, Irina; Berezovskaya, Faina; Castillo-Chavez, Carlos

    2010-07-01

    Despite highly developed specific immune responses, tumour cells often manage to escape recognition by the immune system, continuing to grow uncontrollably. Experimental work suggests that mature myeloid cells may be central to the activation of the specific immune response. Recognition and subsequent control of tumour growth by the cells of the specific immune response depend on the balance between immature (ImC) and mature (MmC) myeloid cells in the body. However, tumour cells produce cytokines that inhibit ImC maturation, altering the balance between ImC and MmC. Hence, the focus of this manuscript is on the study of the potential role of this inhibiting mechanism on tumour growth dynamics. A conceptual predator-prey type model that incorporates the dynamics and interactions of tumour cells, CD8(+) T cells, ImC and MmC is proposed in order to address the role of this mechanism. The prey (tumour) has a defence mechanism (blocking the maturation of ImC) that prevents the predator (immune system) from recognizing it. The model, a four-dimensional nonlinear system of ordinary differential equations, is reduced to a two-dimensional system using time-scale arguments that are tied to the maturation rate of ImC. Analysis shows that the model is capable of supporting biologically reasonable patterns of behaviour depending on the initial conditions. A range of parameters, where healing without external influences can occur, is identified both qualitatively and quantitatively.

  16. A novel method to identify and characterise peptide mimotopes of heat shock protein 70-associated antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaiz, Blanca; Madrigal-Estebas, Laura; Todryk, Stephen; James, Tharappel C; Doherty, Derek G; Bond, Ursula

    2006-04-08

    The heat shock protein, Hsp70, has been shown to play an important role in tumour immunity. Vaccination with Hsp70-peptide complexes (Hsp70-PCs), isolated from autologous tumour cells, can induce protective immune responses. We have developed a novel method to identify synthetic mimic peptides of Hsp70-PCs and to test their ability to activate T-cells. Peptides (referred to as "recognisers") that bind to Hsp70-PCs from the human breast carcinoma cell line, MDA-MB-231, were identified by bio-panning a random peptide M13 phage display library. Synthetic recogniser peptides were subsequently used as bait in a reverse bio-panning experiment to identify potential Hsp70-PC mimic peptides. The ability of the recogniser and mimic peptides to prime human lymphocyte responses against tumour cell antigens was tested by stimulating lymphocytes with autologous peptide-loaded monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs). Priming and subsequent stimulation with either the recogniser or mimic peptide resulted in interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) secretion by the lymphocytes. Furthermore, DCs loaded with Hsp70, Hsp70-PC or the recogniser or the mimic peptide primed the lymphocytes to respond to soluble extracts from breast cells. These results highlight the potential application of synthetic peptide-mimics of Hsp70-PCs, as modulators of the immune response against tumours.

  17. Identification of 5 novel genes methylated in breast and other epithelial cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ward Robyn L

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are several high throughput approaches to identify methylated genes in cancer. We utilized one such recently developed approach, MIRA (methylated-CpG island recovery assay combined with CpG island arrays to identify novel genes that are epigenetically inactivated in breast cancer. Results Using this approach we identified numerous CpG islands that demonstrated aberrant DNA methylation in breast cancer cell lines. Using a combination of COBRA and sequencing of bisulphite modified DNA, we confirmed 5 novel genes frequently methylated in breast tumours; EMILIN2, SALL1, DBC1, FBLN2 and CIDE-A. Methylation frequencies ranged from between 25% and 63% in primary breast tumours, whilst matched normal breast tissue DNA was either unmethylated or demonstrated a much lower frequency of methylation compared to malignant breast tissue DNA. Furthermore expression of the above 5 genes was shown to be restored following treatment with a demethylating agent in methylated breast cancer cell lines. We have expanded this analysis across three other common epithelial cancers (lung, colorectal, prostate. We demonstrate that the above genes show varying levels of methylation in these cancers. Lastly and most importantly methylation of EMILIN2 was associated with poorer clinical outcome in breast cancer and was strongly associated with estrogen receptor as well as progesterone receptor positive breast cancers. Conclusion The combination of the MIRA assay with CpG island arrays is a very useful technique for identifying epigenetically inactivated genes in cancer genomes and can provide molecular markers for early cancer diagnosis, prognosis and epigenetic therapy.

  18. Tumour biology: Herceptin acts as an anti-angiogenic cocktail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Yotaro; Xu, Lei; di Tomaso, Emmanuelle; Fukumura, Dai; Jain, Rakesh K.

    2002-03-01

    Malignant tumours secrete factors that enable them to commandeer their own blood supply (angiogenesis), and blocking the action of these factors can inhibit tumour growth. But because tumours may become resistant to treatments that target individual angiogenic factors by switching over to other angiogenic molecules, a cocktail of multiple anti-angiogenic agents should be more effective. Here we show that herceptin, a monoclonal antibody against the cell-surface receptor HER2 (for human epidermal growth factor receptor-2; ref. 4), induces normalization and regression of the vasculature in an experimental human breast tumour that overexpresses HER2 in mice, and that it works by modulating the effects of different pro- and anti-angiogenic factors. As a single agent that acts against multiple targets, herceptin, or drugs like it, may offer a simple alternative to combination anti-angiogenic treatments.

  19. A novel gene expression signature for bone metastasis in breast carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savci-Heijink, C Dilara; Halfwerk, Hans; Koster, Jan; van de Vijver, Marc J

    2016-04-01

    Metastatic cancer remains the leading cause of death for patients with breast cancer. To understand the mechanisms underlying the development of distant metastases to specific sites is therefore important and of potential clinical value. From 157 primary breast tumours of the patients with known metastatic disease, gene expression profiling data were generated and correlated to metastatic behaviour including site-specific metastasis, metastasis pattern and survival outcomes. We analysed gene expression signatures specifically associated with the development of bone metastases. As a validation cohort, we used a published dataset of 376 breast carcinomas for which gene expression data and site-specific metastasis information were available. 80.5 % of luminal-type tumours developed bone metastasis as opposed to 41.7 % of basal and 55.6 % of HER2-like tumours. A novel 15-gene signature identified 82.4 % of the tumours with bone metastasis, 85.2 % of the tumours which had bone metastasis as first site of metastasis and 100 % of the ones with bone metastasis only (p 9.99e-09), in the training set. In the independent dataset, 81.2 % of the positive tested tumours had known metastatic disease to the bone (p 4.28e-10). This 15-gene signature showed much better correlation with the development of bone metastases than previously identified signatures and was predictive in both ER-positive as well as in ER-negative tumours. Multivariate analyses revealed that together with the molecular subtype, our 15-gene expression signature was significantly correlated to bone metastasis status (p genes, APOPEC3B, ATL2, BBS1, C6orf61, C6orf167, MMS22L, KCNS1, MFAP3L, NIP7, NUP155, PALM2, PH-4, PGD5, SFT2D2 and STEAP3, encoded mainly membrane-bound molecules with molecular function of protein binding. The expression levels of the up-regulated genes (NAT1, BBS1 and PH-4) were also found to be correlated to epithelial to mesenchymal transition status of the tumour. We have identified a

  20. Factors influencing sentinel lymph node identification failure in breast cancer surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Straalman, K.; Kristoffersen, U.S.; Galatius, H.;

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate potential risk factors for failed sentinel lymph node identification in breast cancer surgery. Patient characteristics, tumour characteristics, surgeon experience and detection success/failure were registered at 748 sentinel lymph node biopsy procedures...... at our inpatient clinic. Data were analysed with backward stepwise multiple logistic regression with a cut-off point of psentinel lymph node detection rate....... Tumour size, palpability and biopsy method were not significantly associated with the sentinel lymph node detection rate. In conclusion, it is possible to identify patients with a higher risk of sentinel lymph node identification failure and we recommend that these patients are operated by experienced...

  1. [Sentinel lymph node biopsy in breast cancer. Experience of the Rome Breast Cancer Study Group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortunato, Lucio; Drago, Stefano; Vitelli, Carlo Eugenio; Santoni, Marcello; Gucciardo, Giacomo; Cabassi, Alessandro; Farina, Massimo; La Pinta, Massimo; Remedi, Massimiliano; Pagano, Giovanni; Silipod, Teresa; Terribile, Daniela; Stagnitto, Daniela; Grassi, Giovanni Battista

    2006-01-01

    We report our multicentric experience with sentinel lymph node biopsy for breast cancer patients. Patients with breast cancer operated on from January 1999 to March 2005 in 6 different institutions in the Rome area were retrospectively reviewed. All patients gave written informed consent. 1440 consecutive patients were analysed, with a median age of 59 years (range: 33-81) and a median tumour diameter of 1.3 cm (range: 0.1-5). Patients underwent lymphatic mapping with Tc99 nanocolloid (N = 701; 49%), with Evans Blue (N = 70; 5%), or with a combined injection (N = 669, 46%). The majority of patients were mapped with an intradermal or subdermal injection (N = 1193; 84%), while an intraparenchymal or peritumoral injection was used in 41 (3%) and 206 patients (13%), respectively. Sentinel lymph nodes were identified in 1374/1440 cases (95.4%), and 2075 sentinel lymph nodes were analysed (average 1.5/patient). A total of 9305 additional non-sentinel lymph-nodes were removed (median 6/patient). Correlations between sentinel lymph nodes and final lymph node status were found in 1355/1374 cases (98.6%). There were 19 false-negative cases (5%). Lymph node metastases were diagnosed in 325 patients (24%). In this group, micrometastases (< 2 mm in diameter) were diagnosed in 103 cases (7.6%). Additionally, isolated tumour cells were reported in 61 patients (4,5%). In positive cases, additional metastases in non-sentinel lymph-nodes were identified in 117/325 cases after axillary dissection (36%). Axillary dissection was avoided in 745/1440 patients (52%). At a median follow-up of 36 months, only 1 axillary recurrence has been reported. Sentinel lymph node biopsy improves staging in women with breast cancer because it is accurate and reproducible, and allows detection of micrometastases and isolated tumour cells that would otherwise be missed. Our multicentric study confirms that this is the preferred axillary staging procedure in women with breast cancer.

  2. Breast cancer in neurofibromatosis type 1: overrepresentation of unfavourable prognostic factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uusitalo, Elina; Kallionpää, Roope A; Kurki, Samu; Rantanen, Matti; Pitkäniemi, Janne; Kronqvist, Pauliina; Härkönen, Pirkko; Huovinen, Riikka; Carpen, Olli; Pöyhönen, Minna; Peltonen, Sirkku; Peltonen, Juha

    2017-01-01

    Background: An increased breast cancer incidence and poor survival have been reported for women with neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1). To explain the poor survival, we aimed to link the histopathology and clinical characteristics of NF1-associated breast cancers. Methods: The Finnish Cancer Registry and the Finnish NF Registry were cross-referenced to identify the NF1 patients with breast cancer. Archival NF1 breast cancer specimens were retrieved for histopathological typing and compared with matched controls. Results: A total of 32 breast cancers were diagnosed in 1404 NF1 patients during the follow-up. Women with NF1 had an estimated lifetime risk of 18.0% for breast cancer, and this is nearly two-fold compared with that of the general Finnish female population (9.74%). The 26 successfully retrieved archival NF1 breast tumours were more often associated with unfavourable prognostic factors, such as oestrogen and progesterone receptor negativity and HER2 amplification. However, survival was worse in the NF1 group (P=0.053) even when compared with the control group matched for age, diagnosis year, gender and oestrogen receptor status. Scrutiny of The Cancer Genome Atlas data set showed that NF1 mutations and deletions were associated with similar characteristics in the breast cancers of the general population. Conclusions: These results emphasise the role of the NF1 gene in the pathogenesis of breast cancer and a need for active follow-up for breast cancer in women with NF1. PMID:27931045

  3. Aurora-A identifies early recurrence and poor prognosis and promises a potential therapeutic target in triple negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jie; Wu, Xing; Zhou, Wei-hua; Liu, An-wen; Wu, Jian-bing; Deng, Jin-yun; Yue, Cai-feng; Yang, Shao-bing; Wang, Jing; Yuan, Zhong-yu; Liu, Quentin

    2013-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) acquires an unfavorable prognosis, emerging as a major challenge for the treatment of breast cancer. In the present study, 122 TNBC patients were subjected to analysis of Aurora-A (Aur-A) expression and survival prognosis. We found that Aur-A high expression was positively associated with initial clinical stage (P = 0.025), the proliferation marker Ki-67 (P = 0.001), and the recurrence rate of TNBC patients (Pprognosis compared with low expression of both Aur-A and Ki-67. Importantly, we further found that Aur-A was overexpressed in TNBC cells, and inhibition of this kinase inhibited cell proliferation and prevented cell migration in TNBC. Our findings demonstrated that Aur-A was a potential therapeutic target for TNBC and inhibition of Aur-A kinase was a promising regimen for TNBC cancer therapy.

  4. Ex-vivo HRMAS of adult brain tumours: metabolite quantification and assignment of tumour biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson M

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS NMR spectroscopy allows detailed metabolic analysis of whole biopsy samples for investigating tumour biology and tumour classification. Accurate biochemical assignment of small molecule metabolites that are "NMR visible" will improve our interpretation of HRMAS data and the translation of NMR tumour biomarkers to in-vivo studies. Results 1D and 2D 1H HRMAS NMR was used to determine that 29 small molecule metabolites, along with 8 macromolecule signals, account for the majority of the HRMAS spectrum of the main types of brain tumour (astrocytoma grade II, grade III gliomas, glioblastomas, metastases, meningiomas and also lymphomas. Differences in concentration of 20 of these metabolites were statistically significant between these brain tumour types. During the course of an extended 2D data acquisition the HRMAS technique itself affects sample analysis: glycine, glutathione and glycerophosphocholine all showed small concentration changes; analysis of the sample after HRMAS indicated structural damage that may affect subsequent histopathological analysis. Conclusions A number of small molecule metabolites have been identified as potential biomarkers of tumour type that may enable development of more selective in-vivo 1H NMR acquisition methods for diagnosis and prognosis of brain tumours.

  5. Glycogen-rich clear cell carcinoma of the breast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Paulsen, S M

    1987-01-01

    The light microscopic, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural features of a clear cell carcinoma of the breast have been studied. Both intraductal and invasive components were found. Histochemistry showed large amounts of intracytoplasmic glycogen and sparse neutral mucin in the tumour. The tumour...... was classified as a mucin-containing variant of glycogen-rich, clear cell carcinoma of the breast....

  6. A genetic screen identifies BRCA2 and PALB2 as key regulators of G2 checkpoint maintenance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menzel, Tobias; Nähse-Kumpf, Viola; Kousholt, Arne Nedergaard;

    2011-01-01

    To identify key connections between DNA-damage repair and checkpoint pathways, we performed RNA interference screens for regulators of the ionizing radiation-induced G2 checkpoint, and we identified the breast cancer gene BRCA2. The checkpoint was also abrogated following depletion of PALB2......, an interaction partner of BRCA2. BRCA2 and PALB2 depletion led to premature checkpoint abrogation and earlier activation of the AURORA A-PLK1 checkpoint-recovery pathway. These results indicate that the breast cancer tumour suppressors and homologous recombination repair proteins BRCA2 and PALB2 are main...

  7. Reverse phase protein array based tumor profiling identifies a biomarker signature for risk classification of hormone receptor-positive breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Sonntag

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A robust subclassification of luminal breast cancer, the most common molecular subtype of human breast cancer, is crucial for therapy decisions. While a part of patients is at higher risk of recurrence and requires chemo-endocrine treatment, the other part is at lower risk and also poorly responds to chemotherapeutic regimens. To approximate the risk of cancer recurrence, clinical guidelines recommend determining histologic grading and abundance of a cell proliferation marker in tumor specimens. However, this approach assigns an intermediate risk to a substantial number of patients and in addition suffers from a high interobserver variability. Therefore, the aim of our study was to identify a quantitative protein biomarker signature to facilitate risk classification. Reverse phase protein arrays (RPPA were used to obtain quantitative expression data for 128 breast cancer relevant proteins in a set of hormone receptor-positive tumors (n = 109. Proteomic data for the subset of histologic G1 (n = 14 and G3 (n = 22 samples were used for biomarker discovery serving as surrogates of low and high recurrence risk, respectively. A novel biomarker selection workflow based on combining three different classification methods identified caveolin-1, NDKA, RPS6, and Ki-67 as top candidates. NDKA, RPS6, and Ki-67 were expressed at elevated levels in high risk tumors whereas caveolin-1 was observed as downregulated. The identified biomarker signature was subsequently analyzed using an independent test set (AUC = 0.78. Further evaluation of the identified biomarker panel by Western blot and mRNA profiling confirmed the proteomic signature obtained by RPPA. In conclusion, the biomarker signature introduced supports RPPA as a tool for cancer biomarker discovery.

  8. Measurement of paraben concentrations in human breast tissue at serial locations across the breast from axilla to sternum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, L; Metaxas, G; Harbach, C A J; Savoy, L A; Darbre, P D

    2012-03-01

    The concentrations of five esters of p-hydroxybenzoic acid (parabens) were measured using HPLC-MS/MS at four serial locations across the human breast from axilla to sternum using human breast tissue collected from 40 mastectomies for primary breast cancer in England between 2005 and 2008. One or more paraben esters were quantifiable in 158/160 (99%) of the tissue samples and in 96/160 (60%) all five esters were measured. Variation was notable with respect to individual paraben esters, location within one breast and similar locations in different breasts. Overall median values in nanograms per gram tissue for the 160 tissue samples were highest for n-propylparaben [16.8 (range 0-2052.7)] and methylparaben [16.6 (range 0-5102.9)]; levels were lower for n-butylparaben [5.8 (range 0-95.4)], ethylparaben [3.4 (range 0-499.7)] and isobutylparaben 2.1 (range 0-802.9). The overall median value for total paraben was 85.5 ng g(-1) tissue (range 0-5134.5). The source of the paraben cannot be identified, but paraben was measured in the 7/40 patients who reported never having used underarm cosmetics in their lifetime. No correlations were found between paraben concentrations and age of patient (37-91 years), length of breast feeding (0-23 months), tumour location or tumour oestrogen receptor content. In view of the disproportionate incidence of breast cancer in the upper outer quadrant, paraben concentrations were compared across the four regions of the breast: n-propylparaben was found at significantly higher levels in the axilla than mid (P = 0.004 Wilcoxon matched pairs) or medial (P = 0.021 Wilcoxon matched pairs) regions (P = 0.010 Friedman ANOVA).

  9. Genome-wide Meta-analyses of Breast, Ovarian and Prostate Cancer Association Studies Identify Multiple New Susceptibility Loci Shared by At Least Two Cancer Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Siddhartha P.; Beesley, Jonathan; Al Olama, Ali Amin; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Tyrer, Jonathan; Kote-Jarai, ZSofia; Lawrenson, Kate; Lindstrom, Sara; Ramus, Susan J.; Thompson, Deborah J.; Kibel, Adam S.; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Michael, Agnieszka; Dieffenbach, Aida K.; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Whittemore, Alice S.; Wolk, Alicja; Monteiro, Alvaro; Peixoto, Ana; Kierzek, Andrzej; Cox, Angela; Rudolph, Anja; Gonzalez-Neira, Anna; Wu, Anna H.; Lindblom, Annika; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ziogas, Argyrios; Ekici, Arif B.; Burwinkel, Barbara; Karlan, Beth Y.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Blomqvist, Carl; Phelan, Catherine; McLean, Catriona; Pearce, Celeste Leigh; Vachon, Celine; Cybulski, Cezary; Slavov, Chavdar; Stegmaier, Christa; Maier, Christiane; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Høgdall, Claus K.; Teerlink, Craig C.; Kang, Daehee; Tessier, Daniel C.; Schaid, Daniel J.; Stram, Daniel O.; Cramer, Daniel W.; Neal, David E.; Eccles, Diana; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Velez Edwards, Digna R.; Wokozorczyk, Dominika; Levine, Douglas A.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Bandera, Elisa V.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Goode, Ellen L.; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Høgdall, Estrid; Song, Fengju; Bruinsma, Fiona; Heitz, Florian; Modugno, Francesmary; Hamdy, Freddie C.; Wiklund, Fredrik; Giles, Graham G.; Olsson, Håkan; Wildiers, Hans; Ulmer, Hans-Ulrich; Pandha, Hardev; Risch, Harvey A.; Darabi, Hatef; Salvesen, Helga B.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Gronberg, Henrik; Brenner, Hermann; Brauch, Hiltrud; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Song, Honglin; Lim, Hui-Yi; McNeish, Iain; Campbell, Ian; Vergote, Ignace; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubiński, Jan; Stanford, Janet L.; Benítez, Javier; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Permuth, Jennifer B.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Donovan, Jenny L.; Dennis, Joe; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Schleutker, Johanna; Hopper, John L.; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Park, Jong Y.; Figueroa, Jonine; Clements, Judith A.; Knight, Julia A.; Peto, Julian; Cunningham, Julie M.; Pow-Sang, Julio; Batra, Jyotsna; Czene, Kamila; Lu, Karen H.; Herkommer, Kathleen; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Matsuo, Keitaro; Muir, Kenneth; Offitt, Kenneth; Chen, Kexin; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Odunsi, Kunle; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Massuger, Leon F.A.G.; Fitzgerald, Liesel M.; Cook, Linda S.; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Hooning, Maartje J.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Luedeke, Manuel; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Goodman, Marc T.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Riggan, Marjorie; Aly, Markus; Rossing, Mary Anne; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Moisse, Matthieu; Sanderson, Maureen; Southey, Melissa C.; Jones, Michael; Lush, Michael; Hildebrandt, Michelle A. T.; Hou, Ming-Feng; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Bogdanova, Natalia; Rahman, Nazneen; Le, Nhu D.; Orr, Nick; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Pashayan, Nora; Peterlongo, Paolo; Guénel, Pascal; Brennan, Paul; Paulo, Paula; Webb, Penelope M.; Broberg, Per; Fasching, Peter A.; Devilee, Peter; Wang, Qin; Cai, Qiuyin; Li, Qiyuan; Kaneva, Radka; Butzow, Ralf; Kopperud, Reidun Kristin; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Stephenson, Robert A.; MacInnis, Robert J.; Hoover, Robert N.; Winqvist, Robert; Ness, Roberta; Milne, Roger L.; Travis, Ruth C.; Benlloch, Sara; Olson, Sara H.; McDonnell, Shannon K.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Maia, Sofia; Berndt, Sonja; Lee, Soo Chin; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Gapstur, Susan M.; Kjær, Susanne Krüger; Pejovic, Tanja; Tammela, Teuvo L.J.; Dörk, Thilo; Brüning, Thomas; Wahlfors, Tiina; Key, Tim J.; Edwards, Todd L.; Menon, Usha; Hamann, Ute; Mitev, Vanio; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Setiawan, Veronica Wendy; Kristensen, Vessela; Arndt, Volker; Vogel, Walther; Zheng, Wei; Sieh, Weiva; Blot, William J.; Kluzniak, Wojciech; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Gao, Yu-Tang; Schumacher, Fredrick; Freedman, Matthew L.; Berchuck, Andrew; Dunning, Alison M.; Simard, Jacques; Haiman, Christopher A.; Spurdle, Amanda; Sellers, Thomas A.; Hunter, David J.; Henderson, Brian E.; Kraft, Peter; Chanock, Stephen J.; Couch, Fergus J.; Hall, Per; Gayther, Simon A.; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Eeles, Rosalind; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Lambrechts, Diether

    2016-01-01

    Breast, ovarian, and prostate cancers are hormone-related and may have a shared genetic basis but this has not been investigated systematically by genome-wide association (GWA) studies. Meta-analyses combining the largest GWA meta-analysis data sets for these cancers totaling 112,349 cases and 116,421 controls of European ancestry, all together and in pairs, identified at P < 10−8 seven new cross-cancer loci: three associated with susceptibility to all three cancers (rs17041869/2q13/BCL2L11; rs7937840/11q12/INCENP; rs1469713/19p13/GATAD2A), two breast and ovarian cancer risk loci (rs200182588/9q31/SMC2; rs8037137/15q26/RCCD1), and two breast and prostate cancer risk loci (rs5013329/1p34/NSUN4; rs9375701/6q23/L3MBTL3). Index variants in five additional regions previously associated with only one cancer also showed clear association with a second cancer type. Cell-type specific expression quantitative trait locus and enhancer-gene interaction annotations suggested target genes with potential cross-cancer roles at the new loci. Pathway analysis revealed significant enrichment of death receptor signaling genes near loci with P < 10−5 in the three-cancer meta-analysis. PMID:27432226

  10. Tumour and tumour-like lesions of the patella - a multicentre experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, J.; James, S.L.; Davies, A.M. [The Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Department of Radiology, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Kroon, H.M. [Leiden University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, C-2-S, P. O Box 9600, Leiden (Netherlands); Woertler, K. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Radiology, Munich (Germany); Anderson, S.E. [Knochentumor- Referenzzentrum der Schweizerischen Gesellschaft fuer Pathologie, Basel (Switzerland)

    2009-03-15

    Fifty-nine cases of lesions presenting in the patella were identified after review of the databases of four European bone tumour registries. Of the 59 cases, 46% were non neoplastic, 39% were benign and 15% were malignant. The commonest benign neoplasm was giant cell tumour (GCT) (11 cases). Younger patients were more likely to have a benign neoplasm. Lesions in patients less than 40 years of age included giant cell tumour, chondroblastoma, aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC), osteomyelitis, osteoid osteoma and solitary bone cyst. In patients older than 40 years, the following were common lesions: intra-osseous gout, metastasis and intra-osseous ganglion. Expansion of the patella with thinning of cortex was seen more commonly in GCT and brown tumour in hyperparathyroidism. There was associated soft tissue extension in gout and malignant lesions. (orig.)

  11. Downregulation of a newly identified laminin, laminin-3B11, in vascular basement membranes of invasive human breast cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Taizo; Kariya, Yoshinobu; Komiya, Eriko; Higashi, Shouichi; Miyagi, Yohei; Sekiguchi, Kiyotoshi; Miyazaki, Kaoru

    2011-05-01

    Laminins present in the basement membranes (BM) of blood vessels are involved in angiogenesis and other vascular functions that are critical for tumor growth and metastasis. Two major vascular laminins, the α4 (laminin-411/421) and α5 (laminin-511/521) types, have been well characterized. We recently found a third type of vascular laminin, laminin-3B11, consisting of the α3B, β1 and γ1 chains, and revealed its biological activity. Laminin-3B11 potently stimulates vascular endothelial cells to extend lamellipodial protrusions. To understand the roles of laminin-3B11 in blood vessel functions and tumor growth, we examined localization of the laminin α3B chain in normal mammary glands and breast cancers, in comparison with the α4 and α5 laminins. In the immunohistochemical analysis, the α3B laminin was co-localized with the α4 and α5 laminins in the BM of venules and capillaries of normal breast tissues, but α3B was scarcely detected in vessels near invasive breast carcinoma cells. In contrast, the α4 laminin was overexpressed in capillaries of invasive carcinomas, where a large number of macrophages were found. The α5 laminin appeared to be weakly downregulated in cancer tissues, especially in capillary vessels. Furthermore, our in vitro analysis indicated that TNF-α significantly suppressed the laminin α3B expression in vascular endothelial cells, while it, as well as IL-1β and TGF-α, upregulated the α4 expression. These results suggest that Lm3B11/3B21 may be required for normal mature vessels and interfere with tumor angiogenesis.

  12. Antibody Responses to NY-ESO-1 in Primary Breast Cancer Identify a Subtype Target for Immunotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The highly immunogenic human tumor antigen NY-ESO-1 (ESO) is a target of choice for anti-cancer immune therapy. In this study, we assessed spontaneous antibody (Ab) responses to ESO in a large cohort of patients with primary breast cancer (BC) and addressed the correlation between the presence of anti-ESO Ab, the expression of ESO in the tumors and their characteristics. We found detectable Ab responses to ESO in 1% of the patients. Tumors from patients with circulating Ab to ESO exhibited co...

  13. RNF43 is a tumour suppressor gene mutated in mucinous tumours of the ovary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryland, Georgina L; Hunter, Sally M; Doyle, Maria A; Rowley, Simone M; Christie, Michael; Allan, Prue E; Bowtell, David D L; Gorringe, Kylie L; Campbell, Ian G

    2013-02-01

    Mucinous carcinomas represent a distinct morphological subtype which can arise from several organ sites, including the ovary, and their genetic characteristics are largely under-described. Exome sequencing of 12 primary mucinous ovarian tumours identified RNF43 as the most frequently somatically mutated novel gene, secondary to KRAS and mutated at a frequency equal to that of TP53 and BRAF. Further screening of RNF43 in a larger cohort of ovarian tumours identified additional mutations, with a total frequency of 2/22 (9%) in mucinous ovarian borderline tumours and 6/29 (21%) in mucinous ovarian carcinomas. Seven mutations were predicted to truncate the protein and one missense mutation was predicted to be deleterious by in silico analysis. Six tumours had allelic imbalance at the RNF43 locus, with loss of the wild-type allele. The mutation spectrum strongly suggests that RNF43 is an important tumour suppressor gene in mucinous ovarian tumours, similar to its reported role in mucinous pancreatic precancerous cysts.

  14. The immunomodulator PSK induces in vitro cytotoxic activity in tumour cell lines via arrest of cell cycle and induction of apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garrido Federico

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-bound polysaccharide (PSK is derived from the CM-101 strain of the fungus Coriolus versicolor and has shown anticancer activity in vitro and in in vivo experimental models and human cancers. Several randomized clinical trials have demonstrated that PSK has great potential in adjuvant cancer therapy, with positive results in the adjuvant treatment of gastric, esophageal, colorectal, breast and lung cancers. These studies have suggested the efficacy of PSK as an immunomodulator of biological responses. The precise molecular mechanisms responsible for its biological activity have yet to be fully elucidated. Methods The in vitro cytotoxic anti-tumour activity of PSK has been evaluated in various tumour cell lines derived from leukaemias, melanomas, fibrosarcomas and cervix, lung, pancreas and gastric cancers. Tumour cell proliferation in vitro was measured by BrdU incorporation and viable cell count. Effect of PSK on human peripheral blood lymphocyte (PBL proliferation in vitro was also analyzed. Studies of cell cycle and apoptosis were performed in PSK-treated cells. Results PSK showed in vitro inhibition of tumour cell proliferation as measured by BrdU incorporation and viable cell count. The inhibition ranged from 22 to 84%. Inhibition mechanisms were identified as cell cycle arrest, with cell accumulation in G0/G1 phase and increase in apoptosis and caspase-3 expression. These results indicate that PSK has a direct cytotoxic activity in vitro, inhibiting tumour cell proliferation. In contrast, PSK shows a synergistic effect with IL-2 that increases PBL proliferation. Conclusion These results indicate that PSK has cytotoxic activity in vitro on tumour cell lines. This new cytotoxic activity of PSK on tumour cells is independent of its previously described immunomodulatory activity on NK cells.

  15. Stage IV breast cancer: a population-based study about prognostic factors according to HER2 and HR status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertaut, A; Mounier, M; Desmoulins, I; Guiu, S; Beltjens, F; Darut-Jouve, A; Ponnelle, T; Arnould, L; Arveux, P

    2015-11-01

    We aim to describe trends in net survival (NS) and to assess the prognostic factors among women with de novo metastatic breast cancer (MBC) according to human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and hormone receptor (HR) status. Data on women suffering from de novo MBC and diagnosed from 1998 to 2009 were provided by the Côte-d'Or breast cancer registry. NS was described using the Pohar Perme estimator and prognostic factors were investigated in a generalised linear model. We identified 232 patients (mean age = 64.7). Median NS was 29.2 months, 1- and 5-year NS were 76% and 26% respectively. The survival trend in patients with HER2-positive tumours who did not receive trastuzumab was similar to that in women with triple-negative tumours. A higher relative excess risk of death by cancer was observed for high-grade tumours [RER, relative excess rates = 1.76 (95% CI, confidence intervals: 1.17-2.62) for Scarff Bloom Richardson grade 3 vs. 1 + 2], while a lower risk was observed for luminal tumours [RER = 0.49 (95% CI: 0.27-0.89)] and HER2-positive tumours treated with trastuzumab [RER = 0.28 (95% CI: 0.14-0.59)], both compared with triple-negative tumours. Surgery of the primary tumour was associated with better survival [RER = 0.43 (95% CI: 0.28-0.68)]. With half of the women dead before 29 months, stage IV breast cancer still has a bleak outlook. Progress should continue with new target therapies for both HR and HER2 receptors.

  16. Parallel evolution of tumour subclones mimics diversity between tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Pierre; Birkbak, Nicolai Juul; Gerlinger, Marco; McGranahan, Nicholas; Burrell, Rebecca A; Rowan, Andrew J; Joshi, Tejal; Fisher, Rosalie; Larkin, James; Szallasi, Zoltan; Swanton, Charles

    2013-08-01

    Intratumour heterogeneity (ITH) may foster tumour adaptation and compromise the efficacy of personalized medicine approaches. The scale of heterogeneity within a tumour (intratumour heterogeneity) relative to genetic differences between tumours (intertumour heterogeneity) is unknown. To address this, we obtained 48 biopsies from eight stage III and IV clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCCs) and used DNA copy-number analyses to compare biopsies from the same tumour with 440 single tumour biopsies from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of TCGA and multi-region ccRCC samples revealed segregation of samples from the same tumour into unrelated clusters; 25% of multi-region samples appeared more similar to unrelated samples than to any other sample originating from the same tumour. We found that the majority of recurrent DNA copy number driver aberrations in single biopsies were not present ubiquitously in late-stage ccRCCs and were likely to represent subclonal events acquired during tumour progression. Such heterogeneous subclonal genetic alterations within individual tumours may impair the identification of robust ccRCC molecular subtypes classified by distinct copy number alterations and clinical outcomes. The co-existence of distinct subclonal copy number events in different regions of individual tumours reflects the diversification of individual ccRCCs through multiple evolutionary routes and may contribute to tumour sampling bias and impact upon tumour progression and clinical outcome.

  17. Aurora-A identifies early recurrence and poor prognosis and promises a potential therapeutic target in triple negative breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Xu

    Full Text Available Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC acquires an unfavorable prognosis, emerging as a major challenge for the treatment of breast cancer. In the present study, 122 TNBC patients were subjected to analysis of Aurora-A (Aur-A expression and survival prognosis. We found that Aur-A high expression was positively associated with initial clinical stage (P = 0.025, the proliferation marker Ki-67 (P = 0.001, and the recurrence rate of TNBC patients (P<0.001. In TNBC patients with Aur-A high expression, the risk of distant recurrence peaked at the first 3 years and declined rapidly thereafter, whereas patients with Aur-A low expression showed a relatively constant risk of recurrence during the entire follow-up period. Univariate and multivariate analysis showed that overexpression of Aur-A predicted poor overall survival (P = 0.002 and progression-free survival (P = 0.012 in TNBC. Furthermore, overexpression of Aur-A, associated with high Ki-67, predicted an inferior prognosis compared with low expression of both Aur-A and Ki-67. Importantly, we further found that Aur-A was overexpressed in TNBC cells, and inhibition of this kinase inhibited cell proliferation and prevented cell migration in TNBC. Our findings demonstrated that Aur-A was a potential therapeutic target for TNBC and inhibition of Aur-A kinase was a promising regimen for TNBC cancer therapy.

  18. Neutrophil-induced transmigration of tumour cells treated with tumour-conditioned medium is facilitated by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wu, Q D

    2012-02-03

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of different cytokines that are present in tumour-conditioned medium on human neutrophil (PMN)-induced tumour cell transmigration. DESIGN: Laboratory study. SETTING: University hospital, Ireland. MATERIAL: Isolated human PMN and cultured human breast tumour cell line, MDA-MB-231. Interventions: Human PMN treated with either tumour-conditioned medium or different media neutralised with monoclonal antibodies (MoAb), and MDA-MB-231 cells were plated on macrovascular and microvascular endothelial monolayers in collagen-coated transwells to assess migration of tumour cells. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Cytokines present in tumour-conditioned medium, PMN cytocidal function and receptor expression, and tumour cell transmigration. RESULTS: tumour-conditioned medium contained high concentrations of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and interleukin 8 (IL-8), but not granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and interleukin 3 (IL-3). Anti-GM-CSF MoAb significantly reduced PMN-induced transmigration of tumour cells treated with tumour-conditioned medium (p < 0.05), whereas anti-VEGF and anti-IL-8 MoAbs did not affect their migration. In addition, anti-GM-CSF MoAb, but not anti-VEGF or anti-IL-8 MoAb, reduced PMN CD11b and CD18 overexpression induced by tumour-conditioned medium (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: These results indicate that the GM-CSF that is present in tumour-conditioned medium may be involved, at least in part, in alterations in PMN function mediated by the medium and subsequently PMN-induced transmigration of tumour cells.

  19. Percutaneous renal tumour biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delahunt, Brett; Samaratunga, Hemamali; Martignoni, Guido; Srigley, John R; Evans, Andrew J; Brunelli, Matteo

    2014-09-01

    The use of percutaneous renal tumour biopsy (RTB) as a diagnostic tool for the histological characterization of renal masses has increased dramatically within the last 30 years. This increased utilization has paralleled advances in imaging techniques and an evolving knowledge of the clinical value of nephron sparing surgery. Improved biopsy techniques using image guidance, coupled with the use of smaller gauge needles has led to a decrease in complication rates. Reports from series containing a large number of cases have shown the non-diagnostic rate of RTB to range from 4% to 21%. Re-biopsy has been shown to reduce this rate, while the use of molecular markers further improves diagnostic sensitivity. In parallel with refinements of the biopsy procedure, there has been a rapid expansion in our understanding of the complexity of renal cell neoplasia. The 2013 Vancouver Classification is the current classification for renal tumours, and contains five additional entities recognized as novel forms of renal malignancy. The diagnosis of tumour morphotype on RTB is usually achievable on routine histology; however, immunohistochemical studies may be of assistance in difficult cases. The morphology of the main tumour subtypes, based upon the Vancouver Classification, is described and differentiating features are discussed.

  20. Candidate tumour suppressor Fau regulates apoptosis in human cells: an essential role for Bcl-G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickard, Mark R; Mourtada-Maarabouni, Mirna; Williams, Gwyn T

    2011-09-01

    FAU, which encodes a ubiquitin-like protein (termed FUBI) with ribosomal protein S30 as a carboxy-terminal extension, has recently been identified as a pro-apoptotic regulatory gene. This activity may be mediated by Bcl-G (a pro-apoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family) which can be covalently modified by FUBI. FAU gene expression has been shown to be down-regulated in human breast, prostate and ovarian tumours, and this down-regulation is strongly associated with poor prognosis in breast cancer. We demonstrate here that ectopic FAU expression increases basal apoptosis in human T-cell lines and 293T/17 cells, whereas it has only a transient stimulatory effect on ultraviolet-C (UVC)-induced apoptosis. Conversely, siRNA-mediated silencing of FAU gene expression has no effect on basal apoptosis, but attenuates UV-induced apoptosis. Importantly, prior knockdown of Bcl-G expression ablates the stimulation of basal apoptosis by FAU, consistent with an essential downstream role for Bcl-G, itself a candidate tumour suppressor, in mediating the apoptosis regulatory role of FAU. In 293T/17 cells, Bcl-G knockdown also attenuates UV-induced apoptosis, so that Bcl-G may constitute a common factor in the pathways by which both FAU and UV-irradiation induce apoptosis. UV irradiation increases Bcl-G mRNA levels, providing an explanation for the transient nature of the effect of ectopic FAU expression on UV-induced apoptosis. Since failure of apoptosis is fundamental to the development of many cancers, the pro-apoptotic activity of the Fau/Bcl-G pathway offers an attractive explanation for the putative tumour suppressor role of FAU.

  1. Multicenter matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI MSI) identifies proteomic differences in breast-cancer-associated stroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, Tim J A; Balluff, Benjamin D; Jones, Emrys A; Schöne, Cédrik D; Schmitt, Manfred; Aubele, Michaela; Kroep, Judith R; Smit, Vincent T H B M; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Mesker, Wilma E; Walch, Axel; McDonnell, Liam A

    2014-11-07

    MALDI mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) has rapidly established itself as a powerful biomarker discovery tool. To date, no formal investigation has assessed the center-to-center comparability of MALDI MSI experiments, an essential step for it to develop into a new diagnostic method. To test such capabilities, we have performed a multicenter study focused on biomarkers of stromal activation in breast cancer. MALDI MSI experiments were performed in two centers using independent tissue banks, infrastructure, methods, and practitioners. One of the data sets was used for discovery and the other for validation. Areas of intra- and extratumoral stroma were selected, and their protein signals were compared. Four protein signals were found to be significantly associated with tumor-associated stroma in the discovery data set measured in Munich. Three of these peaks were also detected in the independent validation data set measured in Leiden, all of which were also significantly associated with intratumoral stroma. Hierarchical clustering displayed 100% accuracy in the Munich MSI data set and 80.9% accuracy in the Leiden MSI data set. The association of one of the identified mass signals (PA28) with stromal activation was confirmed with immunohistochemistry performed on 20 breast tumors. Independent and international MALDI MSI investigations could identify validated biomarkers of stromal activation.

  2. Androgen receptor driven transcription in molecular apocrine breast cancer is mediated by FoxA1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Jessica L L; Macarthur, Stewart; Ross-Innes, Caryn S; Tilley, Wayne D; Neal, David E; Mills, Ian G; Carroll, Jason S

    2011-06-24

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease and several distinct subtypes exist based on differential gene expression patterns. Molecular apocrine tumours were recently identified as an additional subgroup, characterised as oestrogen receptor negative and androgen receptor positive (ER- AR+), but with an expression profile resembling ER+ luminal breast cancer. One possible explanation for the apparent incongruity is that ER gene expression programmes could be recapitulated by AR. Using a cell line model of ER- AR+ molecular apocrine tumours (termed MDA-MB-453 cells), we map global AR binding events and find a binding profile that is similar to ER binding in breast cancer cells. We find that AR binding is a near-perfect subset of FoxA1 binding regions, a level of concordance never previously seen with a nuclear receptor. AR functionality is dependent on FoxA1, since silencing of FoxA1 inhibits AR binding, expression of the majority of the molecular apocrine gene signature and growth cell growth. These findings show that AR binds and regulates ER cis-regulatory elements in molecular apocrine tumours, resulting in a transcriptional programme reminiscent of ER-mediated transcription in luminal breast cancers.

  3. MLLT1 YEATS domain mutations in clinically distinctive Favourable Histology Wilms tumours | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilms tumour is an embryonal tumour of childhood that closely resembles the developing kidney. Genomic changes responsible for the development of the majority of Wilms tumours remain largely unknown. Here we identify recurrent mutations within Wilms tumours that involve the highly conserved YEATS domain of MLLT1 (ENL), a gene known to be involved in transcriptional elongation during early development. The mutant MLLT1 protein shows altered binding to acetylated histone tails.

  4. Aluminium in human breast tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exley, Christopher; Charles, Lisa M; Barr, Lester; Martin, Claire; Polwart, Anthony; Darbre, Philippa D

    2007-09-01

    Aluminium is omnipresent in everyday life and increased exposure is resulting in a burgeoning body burden of this non-essential metal. Personal care products are potential contributors to the body burden of aluminium and recent evidence has linked breast cancer with aluminium-based antiperspirants. We have used graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) to measure the aluminium content in breast biopsies obtained following mastectomies. The aluminium content of breast tissue and breast tissue fat were in the range 4-437 nmol/g dry wt. and 3-192 nmol/g oil, respectively. The aluminium content of breast tissue in the outer regions (axilla and lateral) was significantly higher (P=0.033) than the inner regions (middle and medial) of the breast. Whether differences in the regional distribution of aluminium in the breast are related to the known higher incidence of tumours in the outer upper quadrant of the breast remains to be ascertained.

  5. CEF is superior to CMF for tumours with TOP2A aberrations: a Subpopulation Treatment Effect Pattern Plot (STEPP) analysis on Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group Study 89D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunnarsdóttir, Katrín A; Jensen, Maj-Britt; Zahrieh, David

    2010-01-01

    47:725-734, 2008) demonstrated that superiority of CEF over CMF is limited to patients with TOP2A aberrations, defined as patients whose tumours have TOP2A ratio below 0.8 or above 2.0. The Subpopulation Treatment Effect Pattern Plot (STEPP) technique was applied to these data to explore the pattern...

  6. Characterization of TRPS1 and ERAS as oncogenes implicated in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez Gonzalez, L.

    2015-07-01

    New high throughput technologies have made possible to identify putative oncogenes in breast cancer. In this project we aim to relate and characterise two novel putative oncogenes, ERAS and TRPS1, in their role in human breast cancer. TRPS1, an atypical GATA factor, modulates cell proliferation and controls cell cycle progression through repression of GATA-regulated genes, therefore acting as a tumour suppressor gene. Conversely, TRPS1 expression has been shown to be significantly elevated in luminal and in a lesser extent in basal breast cancer cells, presenting roles both as an oncogene and as a tumour suppressor gene in breast cancer development. The aim of this project is therefore to determine the characteristics of TRPS1 either as a putative novel human oncogene or as a tumour suppressor gene in breast cancer cells. To this aim, we have cloned a novel isoform of TRPS1 and introduced it into several breast cancer cell lines. Our results show that overexpression of this isoform of TRPS1 results in variations in motility in non-carcinogenic cell lines, as well as in a series of EMT-like changes such as the down-regulation of the EMT marker E-cadherin, both of which can be associated to an increase in malignancy, suggesting an oncogenic behaviour for TRPS1. Furthermore, our results suggest that constitutively active members of the RAS protein family induce the expression of TRPS1, establishing a relationship between both genes. We can conclude that the effects of TRPS1 overexpression are moderate, inducing some changes but not fully transforming the cells. Therefore we cannot confirm that TRPS1 is a putative oncogene in breast cancer. (Author)

  7. AMP-guided tumour-specific nanoparticle delivery via adenosine A1 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Tongcheng; Li, Na; Han, Fajun; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Yuanxing; Liu, Qin

    2016-03-01

    Active targeting-ligands have been increasingly used to functionalize nanoparticles for tumour-specific clinical applications. Here we utilize nucleotide adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) as a novel ligand to functionalize polymer-based fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) for tumour-targeted imaging. We demonstrate that AMP-conjugated NPs (NPs-AMP) efficiently bind to and are following internalized into colon cancer cell CW-2 and breast cancer cell MDA-MB-468 in vitro. RNA interference and inhibitor assays reveal that the targeting effects mainly rely on the specific binding of AMP to adenosine A1 receptor (A1R), which is greatly up-regulated in cancer cells than in matched normal cells. More importantly, NPs-AMP specifically accumulate in the tumour site of colon and breast tumour xenografts and are further internalized into the tumour cells in vivo via tail vein injection, confirming that the high in vitro specificity of AMP can be successfully translated into the in vivo efficacy. Furthermore, NPs-AMP exhibit an active tumour-targeting behaviour in various colon and breast cancer cells, which is positively related to the up-regulation level of A1R in cancer cells, suggesting that AMP potentially suits for more extensive A1R-overexpressing cancer models. This work establishes AMP to be a novel tumour-targeting ligand and provides a promising strategy for future diagnostic or therapeutic applications.

  8. Gene Expression Signature TOPFOX Reflecting Chromosomal Instability Refines Prediction of Prognosis in Grade 2 Breast Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szasz, A.; Li, Qiyuan; Sztupinszki, Z.

    2011-01-01

    were diagnosed between 1999–2002 at the Budai MA´ V Hospital. 187 formalinfixed, paraffin-embedded breast cancer samples were included in the qPCR-based measurement of expression of AURKA, FOXM1, TOP2A and TPX2 genes. The expression of the genes were correlated to recurrencefree survival (RFS......Purpose: To assess the ability of genes selected from those reflecting chromosomal instability to identify good and poor prognostic subsets of Grade 2 breast carcinomas. Methods: We selected genes for splitting grade 2 tumours into low and high grade type groups by using public databases. Patients...

  9. Basal-like Breast cancer DNA copy number losses identify genes involved in genomic instability, response to therapy, and patient survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigman, Victor J; Chao, Hann-Hsiang; Shabalin, Andrey A; He, Xiaping; Parker, Joel S; Nordgard, Silje H; Grushko, Tatyana; Huo, Dezheng; Nwachukwu, Chika; Nobel, Andrew; Kristensen, Vessela N; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Perou, Charles M

    2012-06-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease with known expression-defined tumor subtypes. DNA copy number studies have suggested that tumors within gene expression subtypes share similar DNA Copy number aberrations (CNA) and that CNA can be used to further sub-divide expression classes. To gain further insights into the etiologies of the intrinsic subtypes, we classified tumors according to gene expression subtype and next identified subtype-associated CNA using a novel method called SWITCHdna, using a training set of 180 tumors and a validation set of 359 tumors. Fisher's exact tests, Chi-square approximations, and Wilcoxon rank-sum tests were performed to evaluate differences in CNA by subtype. To assess the functional significance of loss of a specific chromosomal region, individual genes were knocked down by shRNA and drug sensitivity, and DNA repair foci assays performed. Most tumor subtypes exhibited specific CNA. The Basal-like subtype was the most distinct with common losses of the regions containing RB1, BRCA1, INPP4B, and the greatest overall genomic instability. One Basal-like subtype-associated CNA was loss of 5q11-35, which contains at least three genes important for BRCA1-dependent DNA repair (RAD17, RAD50, and RAP80); these genes were predominantly lost as a pair, or all three simultaneously. Loss of two or three of these genes was associated with significantly increased genomic instability and poor patient survival. RNAi knockdown of RAD17, or RAD17/RAD50, in immortalized human mammary epithelial cell lines caused increased sensitivity to a PARP inhibitor and carboplatin, and inhibited BRCA1 foci formation in response to DNA damage. These data suggest a possible genetic cause for genomic instability in Basal-like breast cancers and a biological rationale for the use of DNA repair inhibitor related therapeutics in this breast cancer subtype.

  10. Diagnostic and prognostic correlates of preoperative FDG PET for breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinh-Hung, Vincent [University of Geneva, Department of Imaging and Medical Information Sciences, University Hospitals of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland); University of Geneva, Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland); Everaert, Hendrik [Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Department of Nuclear Medicine, UZ Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Lamote, Jan; Vanhoeij, Marian; Verfaillie, Guy [Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Department of Surgery, UZ Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Voordeckers, Mia; Parijs, Hilde van; Ridder, Mark de [Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Department of Radiotherapy, UZ Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Fontaine, Christel [Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Department of Medical Oncology UZ Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Vees, Hansjoerg; Ratib, Osman [University of Geneva, Department of Imaging and Medical Information Sciences, University Hospitals of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland); Vlastos, Georges [University of Geneva, Department of Surgical Senology, University Hospitals of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2012-10-15

    To explore the preoperative utility of FDG PET for the diagnosis and prognosis in a retrospective breast cancer case series. In this retrospective study, 104 patients who had undergone a preoperative FDG PET scan for primary breast cancer at the UZ Brussel during the period 2002-2008 were identified. Selection criteria were: histological confirmation, FDG PET performed prior to therapy, and breast surgery integrated into the primary therapy plan. Patterns of increased metabolism were recorded according to the involved locations: breast, ipsilateral axillary region, internal mammary chain, or distant organs. The end-point for the survival analysis using Cox proportional hazards was disease-free survival. The contribution of prognostic factors was evaluated using the Akaike information criterion and the Nagelkerke index. PET positivity was associated with age, gender, tumour location, tumour size >2 cm, lymphovascular invasion, oestrogen and progesterone receptor status. Among 63 patients with a negative axillary PET status, 56 (88.9 %) had three or fewer involved nodes, whereas among 41 patients with a positive axillary PET status, 25 (61.0 %) had more than three positive nodes (P < 0.0001). In the survival analysis of preoperative characteristics, PET axillary node positivity was the foremost statistically significant factor associated with decreased disease-free survival (hazard ratio 2.81, 95% CI 1.17-6.74). Preoperative PET axillary node positivity identified patients with a higher burden of nodal involvement, which might be important for treatment decisions in breast cancer patients. (orig.)

  11. Cdx2 polymorphism affects the activities of vitamin D receptor in human breast cancer cell lines and human breast carcinomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Pulito

    Full Text Available Vitamin D plays a role in cancer development and acts through the vitamin D receptor (VDR. It regulates the action of hormone responsive genes and is involved in cell cycle regulation, differentiation and apoptosis. VDR is a critical component of the vitamin D pathway and different common single nucleotide polymorphisms have been identified. Cdx2 VDR polymorphism can play an important role in breast cancer, modulating the activity of VDR. The objective of this study is to assess the relationship between the Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and the activities of VDR in human breast cancer cell lines and carcinomas breast patients. Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and antiproliferative effects of vitamin D treatment were investigated in a panel of estrogen receptor-positive (MCF7 and T-47D and estrogen receptor-negative (MDA-MB-231, SUM 159PT, SK-BR-3, BT549, MDA-MB-468, HCC1143, BT20 and HCC1954 human breast cancer cell lines. Furthermore, the potential relationship among Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and a number of biomarkers used in clinical management of breast cancer was assessed in an ad hoc set of breast cancer cases. Vitamin D treatment efficacy was found to be strongly dependent on the Cdx2 VDR status in ER-negative breast cancer cell lines tested. In our series of breast cancer cases, the results indicated that patients with variant homozygote AA were associated with bio-pathological characteristics typical of more aggressive tumours, such as ER negative, HER2 positive and G3. Our results may suggest a potential effect of Cdx2 VDR polymorphism on the efficacy of vitamin D treatment in aggressive breast cancer cells (estrogen receptor negative. These results suggest that Cdx2 polymorphism may be a potential biomarker for vitamin D treatment in breast cancer, independently of the VDR receptor expression.

  12. Cdx2 polymorphism affects the activities of vitamin D receptor in human breast cancer cell lines and human breast carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulito, Claudio; Terrenato, Irene; Di Benedetto, Anna; Korita, Etleva; Goeman, Frauke; Sacconi, Andrea; Biagioni, Francesca; Blandino, Giovanni; Strano, Sabrina; Muti, Paola; Mottolese, Marcella; Falvo, Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D plays a role in cancer development and acts through the vitamin D receptor (VDR). It regulates the action of hormone responsive genes and is involved in cell cycle regulation, differentiation and apoptosis. VDR is a critical component of the vitamin D pathway and different common single nucleotide polymorphisms have been identified. Cdx2 VDR polymorphism can play an important role in breast cancer, modulating the activity of VDR. The objective of this study is to assess the relationship between the Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and the activities of VDR in human breast cancer cell lines and carcinomas breast patients. Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and antiproliferative effects of vitamin D treatment were investigated in a panel of estrogen receptor-positive (MCF7 and T-47D) and estrogen receptor-negative (MDA-MB-231, SUM 159PT, SK-BR-3, BT549, MDA-MB-468, HCC1143, BT20 and HCC1954) human breast cancer cell lines. Furthermore, the potential relationship among Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and a number of biomarkers used in clinical management of breast cancer was assessed in an ad hoc set of breast cancer cases. Vitamin D treatment efficacy was found to be strongly dependent on the Cdx2 VDR status in ER-negative breast cancer cell lines tested. In our series of breast cancer cases, the results indicated that patients with variant homozygote AA were associated with bio-pathological characteristics typical of more aggressive tumours, such as ER negative, HER2 positive and G3. Our results may suggest a potential effect of Cdx2 VDR polymorphism on the efficacy of vitamin D treatment in aggressive breast cancer cells (estrogen receptor negative). These results suggest that Cdx2 polymorphism may be a potential biomarker for vitamin D treatment in breast cancer, independently of the VDR receptor expression.

  13. Cdx2 Polymorphism Affects the Activities of Vitamin D Receptor in Human Breast Cancer Cell Lines and Human Breast Carcinomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Benedetto, Anna; Korita, Etleva; Goeman, Frauke; Sacconi, Andrea; Biagioni, Francesca; Blandino, Giovanni; Strano, Sabrina; Muti, Paola; Mottolese, Marcella; Falvo, Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D plays a role in cancer development and acts through the vitamin D receptor (VDR). It regulates the action of hormone responsive genes and is involved in cell cycle regulation, differentiation and apoptosis. VDR is a critical component of the vitamin D pathway and different common single nucleotide polymorphisms have been identified. Cdx2 VDR polymorphism can play an important role in breast cancer, modulating the activity of VDR. The objective of this study is to assess the relationship between the Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and the activities of VDR in human breast cancer cell lines and carcinomas breast patients. Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and antiproliferative effects of vitamin D treatment were investigated in a panel of estrogen receptor-positive (MCF7 and T-47D) and estrogen receptor-negative (MDA-MB-231, SUM 159PT, SK-BR-3, BT549, MDA-MB-468, HCC1143, BT20 and HCC1954) human breast cancer cell lines. Furthermore, the potential relationship among Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and a number of biomarkers used in clinical management of breast cancer was assessed in an ad hoc set of breast cancer cases. Vitamin D treatment efficacy was found to be strongly dependent on the Cdx2 VDR status in ER-negative breast cancer cell lines tested. In our series of breast cancer cases, the results indicated that patients with variant homozygote AA were associated with bio-pathological characteristics typical of more aggressive tumours, such as ER negative, HER2 positive and G3. Our results may suggest a potential effect of Cdx2 VDR polymorphism on the efficacy of vitamin D treatment in aggressive breast cancer cells (estrogen receptor negative). These results suggest that Cdx2 polymorphism may be a potential biomarker for vitamin D treatment in breast cancer, independently of the VDR receptor expression. PMID:25849303

  14. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use and breast cancer risk: a Danish cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Søren; Thomassen, Lars; Sørensen, Henrik T

    2008-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies investigating the effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on breast cancer have yielded conflicting results. We examined the association between use of aspirin and nonaspirin NSAIDs and breast cancer risk among 28 695 women in the Danish Diet, Cancer...... and Health cohort. Information on NSAID and paracetamol use was obtained from a self-administered questionnaire completed at baseline (1993-1997) and updated through 2003 using a nationwide prescription database. Detailed information on breast cancer incidence and tumour characteristics was obtained from...... nationwide health registers. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to compute incidence rate ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). We identified 847 breast cancer cases over an average follow-up period of 7.5 years. Any NSAID use at baseline was associated with an increased incidence...

  15. Malignant salivary gland tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, S.H. (University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa). Dept. of Oral Pathology)

    1982-08-01

    The most frequent malignant salivary gland tumours are the mucoepidermoid tumour, adenoid cystic carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. The major salivary glands and the minor glands of the mouth and upper respiratory tract may potentially develop any of these malignant lesions. Malignant lesions most frequently present as a palpable mass and tend to enlarge more rapidly than benign neoplasms. Pain, paresthesia, muscle paralysis and fixation to surrounding tissue are all ominous signs and symptoms. The only reliable means of differential diagnosis of these lesions is biopsy and histologic analysis. Therapy involves surgery or a combination of surgery and radiation therapy. The ultimate prognosis is governed by the intrinsic biologic behaviour of the neoplasms, the extent of disease and adequate clinical therapy.

  16. Skull base tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Alexandra [Instituto Portugues de Oncologia Francisco Gentil, Servico de Radiologia, Rua Professor Lima Basto, 1093 Lisboa Codex (Portugal)], E-mail: borgesalexandra@clix.pt

    2008-06-15

    With the advances of cross-sectional imaging radiologists gained an increasing responsibility in the management of patients with skull base pathology. As this anatomic area is hidden to clinical exam, surgeons and radiation oncologists have to rely on imaging studies to plan the most adequate treatment. To fulfil these endeavour radiologists need to be knowledgeable about skull base anatomy, about the main treatment options available, their indications and contra-indications and needs to be aware of the wide gamut of pathologies seen in this anatomic region. This article will provide a radiologists' friendly approach to the central skull base and will review the most common central skull base tumours and tumours intrinsic to the bony skull base.

  17. Exploring circulating micro-RNA in the neoadjuvant treatment of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Máire-Caitlín; Sweeney, Karl J; Brown, James Andrew Lawrence; Kerin, Michael J

    2016-07-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed malignancy amongst females worldwide. In recent years the management of this disease has transformed considerably, including the administration of chemotherapy in the neoadjuvant setting. Aside from increasing rates of breast conserving surgery and enabling surgery via tumour burden reduction, use of chemotherapy in the neoadjuvant setting allows monitoring of in vivo tumour response to chemotherapeutics. Currently, there is no effective means of identifying chemotherapeutic responders from non-responders. Whilst some patients achieve complete pathological response (pCR) to chemotherapy, a good prognostic index, a proportion of patients derive little or no benefit, being exposed to the deleterious effects of systemic treatment without any knowledge of whether they will receive benefit. The identification of predictive and prognostic biomarkers could confer multiple benefits in this setting, specifically the individualization of breast cancer management and more effective administration of chemotherapeutics. In addition, biomarkers could potentially expedite the identification of novel chemotherapeutic agents or increase their efficacy. Micro-RNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNA molecules. With their tissue-specific expression, correlation with clinicopathological prognostic indices and known dysregulation in breast cancer, miRNAs have quickly become an important avenue in the search for novel breast cancer biomarkers. We provide a brief history of breast cancer chemotherapeutics and explore the emerging field of circulating (blood-borne) miRNAs as breast cancer biomarkers for the neoadjuvant treatment of breast cancer. Established molecular markers of breast cancer are outlined, while the potential role of circulating miRNAs as chemotherapeutic response predictors, prognosticators or potential therapeutic targets is discussed.

  18. Residential Radon and Brain Tumour Incidence in a Danish Cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bräuner, Elvira V.; Andersen, Zorana J.; Andersen, Claus Erik;

    2013-01-01

    (CI) for the risk of primary brain tumours associated with residential radon exposure with adjustment for age, sex, occupation, fruit and vegetable consumption and traffic-related air pollution. Effect modification by air pollution was assessed. Results: Median estimated radon was 40.5 Bq/m3......Background: Increased brain tumour incidence over recent decades may reflect improved diagnostic methods and clinical practice, but remain unexplained. Although estimated doses are low a relationship between radon and brain tumours may exist. Objective: To investigate the long-term effect...... of exposure to residential radon on the risk of primary brain tumour in a prospective Danish cohort. Methods: During 1993–1997 we recruited 57,053 persons. We followed each cohort member for cancer occurrence from enrolment until 31 December 2009, identifying 121 primary brain tumour cases. We traced...

  19. Axillary fine needle aspiration cytology for pre-operative staging of patients with screen-detected invasive breast carcinoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hayes, Brian D

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) of radiologically abnormal axillary lymph nodes in patients with breast cancer can identify patients suitable for primary axillary clearance (AC) rather than sentinel node biopsy, enabling surgical axillary staging by a single operation. This study assessed the accuracy of FNAC in predicting positive axillary lymph nodes. METHODS: 161 patients with screen-detected invasive carcinoma and who had pre-operative FNAC of a radiologically abnormal axillary lymph node were identified from two screening units, The axillary FNAC reports were correlated with sentinel node biopsy and AC reports, and sensitivity, specificity, positive (PPV) and negative (NPV) predictive values were calculated. RESULTS: FNAC had a moderate sensitivity (66.3%) and NPV (71.8%), and a high specificity (98.7%) and PPV (98.3%). Most patients (86%) had a single axillary operation. The sensitivity was highest in grade 3 (81.8%) and ductal type (77.8%) tumours. The sensitivity was lower in tumours of special type (34.8%), grade 1 tumours (50%) and those without lymphovascular invasion (LVI) (55.9%). The NPV was highest in pT1 (86.7%) and in grade 1 (84.5%) tumours, and lowest (44%) in tumours with LVI. The PPV was 100% in grade 1 and 3 tumours, stage pT2 and pT3 tumours and those without LVI, and was high (>96%) in all other groups. In lymph-node-positive patients, the mean number of lymph nodes involved was higher in the case of a positive (6.4) than negative FNAC (4.4). CONCLUSIONS: FNAC of ultrasonically abnormal axillary lymph nodes achieved surgical staging by a single operation in most patients with screen-detected invasive breast carcinoma, with moderate sensitivity and high specificity.

  20. Genomic and Immunological Tumor Profiling Identifies Targetable Pathways and Extensive CD8+/PDL1+ Immune Infiltration in Inflammatory Breast Cancer Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Christopher A; Moran, Diarmuid; Rao, Kakuturu; Trusk, Patricia B; Pry, Karen; Sausen, Mark; Jones, Siân; Velculescu, Victor E; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Bacus, Sarah

    2016-07-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is a rare and aggressive form of breast cancer that remains poorly understood at the molecular level. Comprehensive tumor profiling was performed to understand clinically actionable alterations in IBC. Targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) and IHC were performed to identify activated pathways in IBC tumor tissues. siRNA studies examined the impact of IBC genomic variants in cellular models. IBC tumor tissues were further characterized for immune infiltration and immune checkpoint expression by IHC. Genomic analysis identified recurrent alterations in core biologic pathways, including activating and targetable variants in HER/PI3K/mTOR signaling. High rates of activating HER3 point mutations were discovered in IBC tumors. Cell line studies confirmed a role for mutant HER3 in IBC cell proliferation. Immunologic analysis revealed a subset of IBC tumors associated with high CD8(+)/PD-L1(+) lymphocyte infiltration. Immune infiltration positively correlated with an NGS-based estimate of neoantigen exposure derived from the somatic mutation rate and mutant allele frequency, iScore. Additionally, DNA mismatch repair alterations, which may contribute to higher iScores, occurred at greater frequency in tumors with higher immune infiltration. Our study identifies genomic alterations that mechanistically contribute to oncogenic signaling in IBC and provides a genetic basis for the selection of clinically relevant targeted and combination therapeutic strategies. Furthermore, an NGS-based estimate of neoantigen exposure developed in this study (iScore) may be a useful biomarker to predict immune infiltration in IBC and other cancers. The iScore may be associated with greater levels of response to immunotherapies, such as PD-L1/PD-1-targeted therapies. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(7); 1746-56. ©2016 AACR.

  1. Breast Conservation Surgery: State of the Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan White

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast conservation surgery is available to the vast majority of women with breast cancer. The combination of neoadjuvant therapies and oncoplastic surgical techniques allows even large tumours to be managed with a breast-conserving approach. The relationship between breast size and the volume of tissue to be excised determines the need for volume displacement or replacement. Such an approach can also be used in the management of carefully selected cases of multifocal or multicentric breast cancer. The role of novel techniques, such as endoscopic breast surgery and radiofrequency ablation, is yet to be precisely defined.

  2. Zinc isotopic compositions of breast cancer tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larner, Fiona; Woodley, Laura N; Shousha, Sami; Moyes, Ashley; Humphreys-Williams, Emma; Strekopytov, Stanislav; Halliday, Alex N; Rehkämper, Mark; Coombes, R Charles

    2015-01-01

    An early diagnostic biomarker for breast cancer is essential to improve outcome. High precision isotopic analysis, originating in Earth sciences, can detect very small shifts in metal pathways. For the first time, the natural intrinsic Zn isotopic compositions of various tissues in breast cancer patients and controls were determined. Breast cancer tumours were found to have a significantly lighter Zn isotopic composition than the blood, serum and healthy breast tissue in both groups. The Zn isotopic lightness in tumours suggests that sulphur rich metallothionein dominates the isotopic selectivity of a breast tissue cell, rather than Zn-specific proteins. This reveals a possible mechanism of Zn delivery to Zn-sequestering vesicles by metallothionein, and is supported by a similar signature observed in the copper isotopic compositions of one breast cancer patient. This change in intrinsic isotopic compositions due to cancer has the potential to provide a novel early biomarker for breast cancer.

  3. An update on the biology of cancer stem cells in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Bueno, José María; Ocaña, Alberto; Castro-García, Paola; Gil Gas, Carmen; Sánchez-Sánchez, Francisco; Poblet, Enrique; Serrano, Rosario; Calero, Raúl; Ramírez-Castillejo, Carmen

    2008-12-01

    Breast cancer stem cells are defined as cancer cells with self-renewal capacity. These cells represent a small subpopulation endowed with the ability to form new tumours when injected in nude mice. Markers of differentiation have been used to identify these cancer cells. In the case of breast cancer, CD44+/CD24- select a population with stem cell properties. The fact that these cells have self-renewal ability has suggested that this population could be responsible for new tumour formation and cancer relapse. These cells have been shown to be more resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy than normal cancer cells. The identification of the molecular druggable alterations responsible for the initiation and maintenance of cancer stem cells is an important goal. In this article we will review all these points with special emphasis on the possible role of new drugs designed to interact with molecular pathways of cancer stem cells.

  4. Primary Breast Burkitt’s Lymphoma in an HIV-Infected Woman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bangaly Traoré

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 30-year-old HIV positive woman presented with a multifocal mass tumour associated with axillary and lateral-cervical lymphadenopathy in the right breast. Laboratory examination of the biopsy confirmed a case of mammary Burkitt’s lymphoma with a nodular infiltration of the breast. Antiretroviral treatment and chemotherapy were effective to control the tumour. Although Burkitt’s lymphoma rarely involves the breasts, it should be considered during routine breast examination of African woman.

  5. [Breast self-examination as main technique for breast cancer prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero Mercedes, Rocío; Llamas Muñoz, M Carmen

    2013-04-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women. Breast self-examination stands out as the main preventive measure, since almost 95% of breast tumours are detected by the woman herself through this technique. Nursing is the group most closely related to health education appropriate guidelines to perform the technique correctly: monthly technical realization, recognition of abnormalities in the breast, go to the doctor for possible doubt about changes in them, etc.

  6. Delayed breast reconstruction with implants after invasive breast cancer does not impair prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hölmich, Lisbet Rosenkrantz; Düring, Maria; Henriksen, Trine Foged;

    2008-01-01

    We investigated if delayed breast implant reconstruction after breast cancer impairs prognosis. Using data from the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group register, we identified all women......We investigated if delayed breast implant reconstruction after breast cancer impairs prognosis. Using data from the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group register, we identified all women...

  7. A systematic SNP selection approach to identify mechanisms underlying disease aetiology: linking height to post-menopausal breast and colorectal cancer risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elands, Rachel J. J.; Simons, Colinda C. J. M.; Riemenschneider, Mona; Isaacs, Aaron; Schouten, Leo J.; Verhage, Bas A.; Van Steen, Kristel; Godschalk, Roger W. L.; van den Brandt, Piet A.; Stoll, Monika; Weijenberg, Matty P.

    2017-01-01

    Data from GWAS suggest that SNPs associated with complex diseases or traits tend to co-segregate in regions of low recombination, harbouring functionally linked gene clusters. This phenomenon allows for selecting a limited number of SNPs from GWAS repositories for large-scale studies investigating shared mechanisms between diseases. For example, we were interested in shared mechanisms between adult-attained height and post-menopausal breast cancer (BC) and colorectal cancer (CRC) risk, because height is a risk factor for these cancers, though likely not a causal factor. Using SNPs from public GWAS repositories at p-values cancer site-specific pathways. This systematic approach identified a limited number of clustered SNPs, which pinpoint potential shared mechanisms linking together the complex phenotypes height, post-menopausal BC and CRC. PMID:28117334

  8. An original phylogenetic approach identified mitochondrial haplogroup T1a1 as inversely associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blein, Sophie; Bardel, Claire; Danjean, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    or unaffected individuals. RESULTS: We discovered that subclade T1a1 was depleted in affected BRCA2 mutation carriers compared with the rest of clade T (hazard ratio (HR) = 0.55; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.34 to 0.88; P = 0.01). Compared with the most frequent haplogroup in the general population (that is......, H and T clades), the T1a1 haplogroup has a HR of 0.62 (95% CI, 0.40 to 0.95; P = 0.03). We also identified three potential susceptibility loci, including G13708A/rs28359178, which has demonstrated an inverse association with familial breast cancer risk. CONCLUSIONS: This study illustrates how...

  9. A dynamic model for tumour growth and metastasis formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haustein, Volker; Schumacher, Udo

    2012-07-05

    A simple and fast computational model to describe the dynamics of tumour growth and metastasis formation is presented. The model is based on the calculation of successive generations of tumour cells and enables one to describe biologically important entities like tumour volume, time point of 1st metastatic growth or number of metastatic colonies at a given time. The model entirely relies on the chronology of these successive events of the metastatic cascade. The simulation calculations were performed for two embedded growth models to describe the Gompertzian like growth behaviour of tumours. The initial training of the models was carried out using an analytical solution for the size distribution of metastases of a hepatocellular carcinoma. We then show the applicability of our models to clinical data from the Munich Cancer Registry. Growth and dissemination characteristics of metastatic cells originating from cells in the primary breast cancer can be modelled thus showing its ability to perform systematic analyses relevant for clinical breast cancer research and treatment. In particular, our calculations show that generally metastases formation has already been initiated before the primary can be detected clinically.

  10. DNA methylation profile of triple negative breast cancer-specific genes comparing lymph node positive patients to lymph node negative patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathe, Andrea; Wong-Brown, Michelle; Locke, Warwick J; Stirzaker, Clare; Braye, Stephen G; Forbes, John F; Clark, Susan J; Avery-Kiejda, Kelly A; Scott, Rodney J

    2016-09-27

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is the most aggressive breast cancer subtype with no targeted treatment available. Our previous study identified 38 TNBC-specific genes with altered expression comparing tumour to normal samples. This study aimed to establish whether DNA methylation contributed to these expression changes in the same cohort as well as disease progression from primary breast tumour to lymph node metastasis associated with changes in the epigenome. We obtained DNA from 23 primary TNBC samples, 12 matched lymph node metastases, and 11 matched normal adjacent tissues and assayed for differential methylation profiles using Illumina HumanMethylation450 BeadChips. The results were validated in an independent cohort of 70 primary TNBC samples. The expression of 16/38 TNBC-specific genes was associated with alteration in DNA methylation. Novel methylation changes between primary tumours and lymph node metastases, as well as those associated with survival were identified. Altered methylation of 18 genes associated with lymph node metastasis were identified and validated. This study reveals the important role DNA methylation plays in altered gene expression of TNBC-specific genes and lymph node metastases. The novel insights into progression of TNBC to secondary disease may provide potential prognostic indicators for this hard-to-treat breast cancer subtype.

  11. Sequence analysis of mutations and translocations across breast cancer subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerji, Shantanu; Cibulskis, Kristian; Rangel-Escareno, Claudia; Brown, Kristin K.; Carter, Scott L.; Frederick, Abbie M.; Lawrence, Michael S.; Sivachenko, Andrey Y.; Sougnez, Carrie; Zou, Lihua; Cortes, Maria L.; Fernandez-Lopez, Juan C.; Peng, Shouyong; Ardlie, Kristin G.; Auclair, Daniel; Bautista-Piña, Veronica; Duke, Fujiko; Francis, Joshua; Jung, Joonil; Maffuz-Aziz, Antonio; Onofrio, Robert C.; Parkin, Melissa; Pho, Nam H.; Quintanar-Jurado, Valeria; Ramos, Alex H.; Rebollar-Vega, Rosa; Rodriguez-Cuevas, Sergio; Romero-Cordoba, Sandra L.; Schumacher, Steven E.; Stransky, Nicolas; Thompson, Kristin M.; Uribe-Figueroa, Laura; Baselga, Jose; Beroukhim, Rameen; Polyak, Kornelia; Sgroi, Dennis C.; Richardson, Andrea L.; Jimenez-Sanchez, Gerardo; Lander, Eric S.; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Garraway, Levi A.; Golub, Todd R.; Melendez-Zajgla, Jorge; Toker, Alex; Getz, Gad; Hidalgo-Miranda, Alfredo; Meyerson, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Breast carcinoma is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in women worldwide with an estimated 1.38 million new cases and 458,000 deaths in 2008 alone1. This malignancy represents a heterogeneous group of tumours with characteristic molecular features, prognosis, and responses to available therapy2–4. Recurrent somatic alterations in breast cancer have been described including mutations and copy number alterations, notably ERBB2 amplifications, the first successful therapy target defined by a genomic aberration5. Prior DNA sequencing studies of breast cancer genomes have revealed additional candidate mutations and gene rearrangements 6–10. Here we report the whole-exome sequences of DNA from 103 human breast cancers of diverse subtypes from patients in Mexico and Vietnam compared to matched-normal DNA, together with whole-genome sequences of 22 breast cancer/normal pairs. Beyond confirming recurrent somatic mutations in PIK3CA11, TP536, AKT112, GATA313, and MAP3K110, we discovered recurrent mutations in the CBFB transcription factor gene and deletions of its partner RUNX1. Furthermore, we have identified a recurrent MAGI3-AKT3 fusion enriched in triple-negative breast cancer lacking estrogen and progesterone receptors and ERBB2 expression. The Magi3-Akt3 fusion leads to constitutive activation of Akt kinase, which is abolished by treatment with an ATP-competitive Akt small-molecule inhibitor. PMID:22722202

  12. Genome-wide functional genetic screen with the anticancer agent AMPI-109 identifies PRL-3 as an oncogenic driver in triple-negative breast cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gari, Hamid H; Gearheart, Christy M; Fosmire, Susan; DeGala, Gregory D; Fan, Zeying; Torkko, Kathleen C; Edgerton, Susan M; Lucia, M Scott; Ray, Rahul; Thor, Ann D; Porter, Christopher C; Lambert, James R

    2016-03-29

    Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC) are among the most aggressive and heterogeneous cancers with a high propensity to invade, metastasize and relapse. Here, we demonstrate that the anticancer compound, AMPI-109, is selectively efficacious in inhibiting proliferation and inducing apoptosis of multiple TNBC subtype cell lines as assessed by activation of pro-apoptotic caspases-3 and 7, PARP cleavage and nucleosomal DNA fragmentation. AMPI-109 had little to no effect on growth in the majority of non-TNBC cell lines examined. We therefore utilized AMPI-109 in a genome-wide shRNA screen in the TNBC cell line, BT-20, to investigate the utility of AMPI-109 as a tool in helping to identify molecular alterations unique to TNBC. Our screen identified the oncogenic phosphatase, PRL-3, as a potentially important driver of TNBC growth, migration and invasion. Through stable lentiviral knock downs and transfection with catalytically impaired PRL-3 in TNBC cells, loss of PRL-3 expression, or functionality, led to substantial growth inhibition. Moreover, AMPI-109 treatment, downregulation of PRL-3 expression or impairment of PRL-3 activity reduced TNBC cell migration and invasion. Histological evaluation of human breast cancers revealed PRL-3 was significantly, though not exclusively, associated with the TNBC subtype and correlated positively with regional and distant metastases, as well as 1 and 3 year relapse free survival. Collectively, our study is proof-of-concept that AMPI-109, a selectively active agent against TNBC cell lines, can be used as a molecular tool to uncover unique drivers of disease progression, such as PRL-3, which we show promotes oncogenic phenotypes in TNBC cells.

  13. Identifying Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Using Background Parenchymal Enhancement Heterogeneity on Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI: A Pilot Radiomics Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff Wang

    Full Text Available To determine the added discriminative value of detailed quantitative characterization of background parenchymal enhancement in addition to the tumor itself on dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE MRI at 3.0 Tesla in identifying "triple-negative" breast cancers.In this Institutional Review Board-approved retrospective study, DCE-MRI of 84 women presenting 88 invasive carcinomas were evaluated by a radiologist and analyzed using quantitative computer-aided techniques. Each tumor and its surrounding parenchyma were segmented semi-automatically in 3-D. A total of 85 imaging features were extracted from the two regions, including morphologic, densitometric, and statistical texture measures of enhancement. A small subset of optimal features was selected using an efficient sequential forward floating search algorithm. To distinguish triple-negative cancers from other subtypes, we built predictive models based on support vector machines. Their classification performance was assessed with the area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC using cross-validation.Imaging features based on the tumor region achieved an AUC of 0.782 in differentiating triple-negative cancers from others, in line with the current state of the art. When background parenchymal enhancement features were included, the AUC increased significantly to 0.878 (p<0.01. Similar improvements were seen in nearly all subtype classification tasks undertaken. Notably, amongst the most discriminating features for predicting triple-negative cancers were textures of background parenchymal enhancement.Considering the tumor as well as its surrounding parenchyma on DCE-MRI for radiomic image phenotyping provides useful information for identifying triple-negative breast cancers. Heterogeneity of background parenchymal enhancement, characterized by quantitative texture features on DCE-MRI, adds value to such differentiation models as they are strongly associated with the triple-negative subtype

  14. Vaginal haemangioendothelioma: an unusual tumour.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mohan, H

    2012-02-01

    Vaginal tumours are uncommon and this is a particularly rare case of a vaginal haemangioendothelioma in a 38-year-old woman. Initial presentation consisted of symptoms similar to uterovaginal prolapse with "something coming down". Examination under anaesthesia demonstrated a necrotic anterior vaginal wall tumour. Histology of the lesion revealed a haemangioendothelioma which had some features of haemangiopericytoma. While the natural history of vaginal haemangioendothelioma is uncertain, as a group, they have a propensity for local recurrence. To our knowledge this is the third reported case of a vaginal haemangioendothelioma. Management of this tumour is challenging given the paucity of literature on this tumour. There is a need to add rare tumours to our "knowledge bank" to guide management of these unusual tumours.

  15. Primary angiosarcoma of the breast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonal TRIPATHI

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is increasing and is the most common cancer among females in Brunei Darussalam. Mostare ductal carcinoma. We report a case of a 40-year-old woman who was diagnosed with primary angiosarcomaof the right breast, a rare condition. To the best of our knowledge this is the only reportedcase in Brunei Darussalam. She underwent lumpectomy followed by mastectomy as the resection marginswere not clear. No adjuvant therapy was given because the size of tumour was small, there wasno residual tumour in mastectomy specimen and she had no distant metastasis.

  16. Primary bone tumours in infants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozlowski, K.; Beluffi, G.; Cohen, D.H.; Padovani, J.; Tamaela, L.; Azouz, M.; Bale, P.; Martin, H.C.; Nayanar, V.V.; Arico, M.

    1985-09-01

    Ten cases of primary bone tumours in infants (1 osteosarcoma, 3 Ewing's sarcoma, 1 chondroblastoma and 5 angiomastosis) are reported. All cases of angiomatosis showed characteristic radiographic findings. In all the other tumours the X-ray appearances were different from those usually seen in older children and adolescents. In the auhtors' opinion the precise diagnosis of malignant bone tumours in infancy is very difficult as no characteristic X-ray features are present in this age period.

  17. Gasdermin B expression predicts poor clinical outcome in HER2-positive breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hergueta-Redondo, Marta; Sarrio, David; Molina-Crespo, Ángela; Vicario, Rocío; Bernadó-Morales, Cristina; Martínez, Lidia; Rojo-Sebastián, Alejandro; Serra-Musach, Jordi; Mota, Alba; Martínez-Ramírez, Ángel; Castilla, Maria Ángeles; González-Martin, Antonio; Pernas, Sonia; Cano, Amparo; Cortes, Javier; Nuciforo, Paolo G.; Peg, Vicente; Palacios, José; Pujana, Miguel Ángel; Arribas, Joaquín; Moreno-Bueno, Gema

    2016-01-01

    Around, 30–40% of HER2-positive breast cancers do not show substantial clinical benefit from the targeted therapy and, thus, the mechanisms underlying resistance remain partially unknown. Interestingly, ERBB2 is frequently co-amplified and co-expressed with neighbour genes that may play a relevant role in this cancer subtype. Here, using an in silico analysis of data from 2,096 breast tumours, we reveal a significant correlation between Gasdermin B (GSDMB) gene (located 175 kilo bases distal from ERBB2) expression and the pathological and clinical parameters of poor prognosis in HER2-positive breast cancer. Next, the analysis of three independent cohorts (totalizing 286 tumours) showed that approximately 65% of the HER2-positive cases have GSDMB gene amplification and protein over-expression. Moreover, GSDMB expression was also linked to poor therapeutic responses in terms of lower relapse free survival and pathologic complete response as well as positive lymph node status and the development of distant metastasis under neoadjuvant and adjuvant treatment settings, respectively. Importantly, GSDMB expression promotes survival to trastuzumab in different HER2-positive breast carcinoma cells, and is associated with trastuzumab resistance phenotype in vivo in Patient Derived Xenografts. In summary, our data identifies the ERBB2 co-amplified and co-expressed gene GSDMB as a critical determinant of poor prognosis and therapeutic response in HER2-positive breast cancer. PMID:27462779

  18. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation (MALDI) TOF analysis identifies serum angiotensin II concentrations as a strong predictor of all-cause and breast cancer (BCa)-specific mortality following breast surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccardo, Francesco; Rubagotti, Alessandra; Nuzzo, Pier Vitale; Argellati, Francesca; Savarino, Grazia; Romano, Paolo; Damonte, Gianluca; Rocco, Mattia; Profumo, Aldo

    2015-11-15

    MALDI-TOF MS was used to recognise serum peptidome profiles predictive of mortality in women affected by early BCa. Mortality was analysed based on signal profiling, and appropriate statistics were used. The results indicate that four signals were increased in deceased patients compared with living patients. Three of the four signals were individually associated with all-cause mortality, but only one having mass/charge ratio (m/z) 1,046.49 was associated with BCa-specific mortality and was the only peak to maintain an independent prognostic role after multivariate analysis. Two groups exhibiting different mortality probabilities were identified after clustering patients based on the expression of the four peptides, but m/z 1,046.49 was exclusively expressed in the cluster exhibiting the worst mortality outcome, thus confirming the crucial value of this peptide. The specific role of this peak was confirmed by competing risk analysis. MS findings were validated by ELISA analysis after demonstrating that m/z 1,046.49 structurally corresponded to Angiotensin II (ATII). In fact, mortality results obtained after arbitrarily dividing patients according to an ATII serum value of 255 pg/ml (which corresponds to the 66(th) percentile value) were approximately comparable to those previously demonstrated when the same patients were analysed according to the expression of signal m/z 1,046.49. Similarly, ATII levels were specifically correlated with BCa-related deaths after competing risk analysis. In conclusion, ATII levels were increased in women who exhibited worse mortality outcomes, reinforcing the evidence that this peptide potentially significantly affects the natural history of early BCa. Our findings also confirm that MALDI-TOF MS is an efficient screening tool to identify novel tumour markers and that MS findings can be rapidly validated through less complex techniques, such as ELISA.

  19. [Rol of pituitary tumour-transforming gene (PTTG) in the pituitary adenomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Ortiga, Ruth; Sánchez Tejada, Laura; Peiró Cabrera, Gloria; Moreno-Pérez, Oscar; Arias Mendoza, Nieves; Aranda López, F Ignacio; Picó Alfonso, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    The pathogenesis of pituitary tumours is far to be understood. Pituitary transforming tumour gene (PTTG), a gen that induces aneuploidy, genetic instability, cellular proliferation and to stimulate angiogenesis, has been involved in neoplasic transformation and shown overexpressed in many neoplasm as lung, breast, endometrium, thyroid and colon malignant tumours. On the other hand, PTTG has been inconsistently studied in pituitary tumours. The majority of studies have been performed in animals and there is a great variability in the methods used in its determination. The goal of this review is to resume the role of PTTG in tumourogenesis and critically to revise the studies published in humans in order to advance in the knowledge of the pathogenesis of pituitary adenomas and to find clinical useful predictors of the behavior of these tumours.

  20. Oral Squamomelanocytic Tumour in a Dog: a Unique Biphasic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscatello, L V; Avallone, G; Benazzi, C; Sarli, G; Porcellato, I; Brachelente, C; Brunetti, B

    2016-01-01

    In human medicine, squamomelanocytic tumour is a malignant cutaneous neoplasm composed of closely intermingled neoplastic squamous cells and melanocytes. A multinodular gingival tumour in a 16-year-old, mixed breed neutered female dog was examined microscopically. Two populations of neoplastic cells, melanocytic and squamous epithelial cells were intermingled. The melanocytic cells were melan-A positive and cytokeratin AE1-AE3 negative and the squamous component was cytokeratin AE1-AE3 positive and melan-A negative. Bovine papillomavirus was not identified by immunohistochemistry or polymerase chain reaction. A diagnosis of squamomelanocytic tumour was made.

  1. HER2 Amplification Has no Prognostic Value in Sporadic and Hereditary Ovarian Tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brożek Izabela

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Whereas HER2 amplification is a well-known phenomenon in breast tumours, its frequency and clinical importance in ovarian cancer have not been established. The aim of the study was to compare the frequency of HER2 amplification in hereditary (BRCA-positive and sporadic (BRCA-negative ovarian tumours and to estimate the association of this gene alteration on clinical outcome in ovarian cancer patients. We analysed HER2 amplification in 53 ovarian tumours: 20 from mutation carriers (18 in BRCA1 and 2 in BRCA2 gene and 33 from non-carriers. Fluorescence in situ hybridization for HER2 was performed on 'touch' slides from frozen tumour samples or formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue. Our results indicate that high amplification (HER2: centromere ratio>5 is an infrequent phenomenon in ovarian tumours (6/53 cases. It occurs in both hereditary (4/20 and sporadic (2/33 tumours and no difference in the frequency of HER2 amplification exists between these groups. There is no significant difference in the clinical outcome of patients with HER2 amplified and non-amplified tumours (p = 0.3. Our results suggest a different biological role of HER2 amplification in ovarian and breast cancer.

  2. Integrative analysis of deep sequencing data identifies estrogen receptor early response genes and links ATAD3B to poor survival in breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian Ovaska

    Full Text Available Identification of responsive genes to an extra-cellular cue enables characterization of pathophysiologically crucial biological processes. Deep sequencing technologies provide a powerful means to identify responsive genes, which creates a need for computational methods able to analyze dynamic and multi-level deep sequencing data. To answer this need we introduce here a data-driven algorithm, SPINLONG, which is designed to search for genes that match the user-defined hypotheses or models. SPINLONG is applicable to various experimental setups measuring several molecular markers in parallel. To demonstrate the SPINLONG approach, we analyzed ChIP-seq data reporting PolII, estrogen receptor α (ERα, H3K4me3 and H2A.Z occupancy at five time points in the MCF-7 breast cancer cell line after estradiol stimulus. We obtained 777 ERa early responsive genes and compared the biological functions of the genes having ERα binding within 20 kb of the transcription start site (TSS to genes without such binding site. Our results show that the non-genomic action of ERα via the MAPK pathway, instead of direct ERa binding, may be responsible for early cell responses to ERα activation. Our results also indicate that the ERα responsive genes triggered by the genomic pathway are transcribed faster than those without ERα binding sites. The survival analysis of the 777 ERα responsive genes with 150 primary breast cancer tumors and in two independent validation cohorts indicated the ATAD3B gene, which does not have ERα binding site within 20 kb of its TSS, to be significantly associated with poor patient survival.

  3. Isolation and identification of marine fish tumour (odontoma associated bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramalingam Vijayakumar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify fish tumour associated bacteria. Methods: The marine fish Sphyraena jello with odontoma was collected from in Tamil Nadu (Southeast India, and tumour associated bacteria were isolated. Then the isolated bacteria were identified based on molecular characters. Results: A total of 4 different bacterial species were isolated from tumour tissue. The bacterial species were Bacillus sp., Pontibacter sp., Burkholderia sp. and Macrococcus sp., and the sequences were submitted in DNA Data Bank of Japan with accession numbers of AB859240, AB859241, AB859242 and AB859243 respectively. Conclusions: Four different bacterial species were isolated from Sphyraena jello, but the role of bacteria within tumour needs to be further investigated.

  4. Ductal Carcinoma in Situ of the Breast: Evaluating the Role of Radiation Therapy in the Management and Attempts to Identify Low-Risk Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Shah,Chirag; Vicini, Frank A.; Berry, Sameer; Julian, Thomas B.; Ben Wilkinson, J.; Shaitelman, Simona F.; Khan, Atif; Finkelstein, Steven E.; Goldstein, Neal

    2015-01-01

    Ductal carcinoma in-situ (DCIS) of the breast has rapidly increased in incidence over the past several decades secondary to an increased use of screening mammography. Local treatment options for women diagnosed with DCIS include mastectomy or breast-conserving therapy (BCT). While several randomized trials have confirmed a greater than 50% reduction in the risk of local recurrence with the administration of radiation therapy (RT) compared to breast-conserving surgery (BCS) alone, controversy ...

  5. A software tool based on the Surface Evolver for precise location of tumours as a preoperative procedure to partial mastectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias Fabris, Antonio; Zanchetta do Nascimento, Marcelo; Ramos Batista, Valério

    2015-09-01

    We present a fast and reliable program that gives precise location of breast tumours for a partial mastectomy. Our program is fully implemented in the Surface Evolver, which is a general-purpose simulator of physical experiments. By starting from the mammograms that show a tumour one takes its 2D coordinates in each view (CC and MLO). These coordinates, together with some measurements of the patient's breast, are given as input to our simulator. From this point on the simulator reproduces all main steps of taking mammography with a virtual transparent breast that matches the patient's. The virtual mammography procedure is graphically displayed on the computer screen, so that users can track the virtual tumour inside the breast. As output we have the coordinates of the tumour position when the woman lies on the operating table for the surgery. With these coordinates the surgeon can make a small incision into the breast and reach the tumour for its removal. The whole structure of the breast is preserved after a simple plastic correction.

  6. Association of Genome-Wide Association Study (GWAS) Identified SNPs and Risk of Breast Cancer in an Indian Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagrani, Rajini; Mhatre, Sharayu; Rajaraman, Preetha; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Akbari, Mohammad R.; Boffetta, Paolo; Brennan, Paul; Badwe, Rajendra; Gupta, Sudeep; Dikshit, Rajesh

    2017-01-01

    To date, no studies have investigated the association of the GWAS-identified SNPs with BC risk in Indian population. We investigated the association of 30 previously reported and replicated BC susceptibility SNPs in 1,204 cases and 1,212 controls from a hospital based case-control study conducted at the Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai. As a measure of total susceptibility burden, the polygenic risk score (PRS) for each individual was defined by the weighted sum of genotypes from 21 independent SNPs with weights derived from previously published estimates of association odds-ratios. Logistic regression models were used to assess risk associated with individual SNPs and overall PRS, and stratified by menopausal and receptor status. A total of 11 SNPs from eight genomic regions (FGFR2, 9q31.2, MAP3K, CCND1, ZM1Z1, RAD51L11, ESR1 and UST) showed statistically significant (p-value ≤ 0.05) evidence of association, either overall or when stratified by menopausal status or hormone receptor status. BC SNPs previously identified in Caucasian population showed evidence of replication in the Indian population mainly with respect to risk of postmenopausal and hormone receptor positive BC. PMID:28098224

  7. Tumours in the Small Bowel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Kurniawan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Small bowel tumours are rare and originate from a wide variety of benign and malignant entities. Adenocarcinomas are the most frequent primary malignant small bowel tumours. Submucosal tumours like gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST or neuroendocrine tumours (NET may show a central umbilication, pathologic vessels, bridging folds or an ulceration of the overlying mucosa. These signs help to differentiate them from harmless bulges caused by impression from outside, e.g. from other intestinal loops. Sarcomas of the small bowel are rare neoplasias with mesenchymal origin, sometimes presenting as protruding masses. Benign tumours like lipoma, fibrolipoma, fibroma, myoma, and heterotopias typically present as submucosal masses. They cannot be differentiated endoscopically from those with malignant potential as GIST or NET. Neuroendocrine carcinomas may present with diffuse infiltration, which may resemble other malignant tumours. The endoscopic appearance of small bowel lymphomas has a great variation from mass lesions to diffuse infiltrative changes. Melanoma metastases are the most frequent metastases to the small bowel. They may be hard to distinguish from other tumours when originating from an amelanotic melanoma.

  8. Novel Nonsense Variants c.58C>T (p.Q20X) and c.256G>T (p.E85X) in the CHEK2 Gene Identified dentified in Breast Cancer Patients from Balochistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baloch, Abdul Hameed; Khosa, Ahmad Nawaz; Bangulzai, Nasrullah; Shuja, Jamila; Naseeb, Hafiz Khush; Jan, Mohammad; Marghazani, Illahi Bakhsh; Kakar, Masood-Ul-Haq; Baloch, Dost Mohammad; Cheema, Abdul Majeed; Ahmad, Jamil

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most commonly occurring and leading cause of cancer deaths among women globally. Hereditary cases account 5-10% of all the cases and CHEK2 is considered as a moderate penetrance breast cancer risk gene. CHEK2 plays a crucial role in response to DNA damage to promote cell cycle arrest and repair DNA damage or induce apoptosis. Our objective in the current study was to analyze mutations in the CHEK2 gene related to breast cancer in Balochistan. A total of 271 individuals including breast cancer patients and normal subjects were enrolled. All 14 exons of CHEK2 were amplified and sequenced. The majority of the patients (>95%) had invasive ductal carcinomas (IDCs), 52.1% were diagnosed with tumor grade III and 56.1% and 27.5% were diagnosed with advance stages III and IV. Two novel nonsense variants i.e. c.58C>T (P.Q20X) and c.256G>T (p.E85X) at exon 1 and 2 in two breast cancer patients were identified in the current study. Both the variants identified were novel and have not been reported elsewhere.

  9. Intraspinal tumours in the Kenya African.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruberti, R F; Carmagnani, A L

    1976-06-01

    Thirty-one cases of intraspinal tumours in the African have been described, with age, sex incidence, frequency, site and histopathology shown. Intraspinal tumours in this series are compared with the larger series. Extradural and intramedullary tumours together with cervical spine tumours appear to be more frequent in this series. There is a high incidence of dumbell tumours in the neurinomas. Sarcomas are the most common type of tumours and mainly affect the thoracic spine.

  10. Unusual tumours of the lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, E S; Pike, E; Couves, C M

    1983-09-01

    Unusual lung tumors are not simply pathological curiosities. They demonstrate features of major significance in diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis. Six of these tumours are discussed: (1) Carcinosarcoma is rarely found in the lung. The histogenis of the lesion is unclear and the prognosis is poor. (2) Only three cases of pleomorphic adenoma have previously been described. Differentiation from other "mixed tumours" of the lung is essential. (3) A rare case of bronchial adenoma producing ectopic ACTH is described. Early recognition of these polypeptide hormone-secreting tumours is stressed. (4) Oat cell carcinoma with the myasthenic (Eaton-Lambert) syndrome shows the clinical features which should permit early tumour diagnosis. The hazards of muscle relaxants must be recognized. (5) Prostatic carcinoma with endobronchial metastases is is discussed. The importance of localization of the primary tumour is emphasized. (6) An example of double primary carcinoma is presented. The rarity of this finding may be related to the poor prognosis of patients with bronchogenesis carcinoma.

  11. Primary osteosarcoma of the breast: case report

    OpenAIRE

    Saber, Boutayeb; Nawal, Ahbeddou; Mohamed, Fetohi; Hassan, Errihani

    2008-01-01

    Mammary sarcomas are very uncommon and make up less than 1% of all primary breast malignancies. Primary osteosarcoma of the breast is extremely rare and represents 12.5% of mammary sarcomas. A secondary lesion from a primary osteosarcoma of the bone should be considered in the differential diagnosis. In addition, the absence of a direct connection between the tumour and the underlying skeleton is mandatory for the diagnosis. We report a case of primary osteosarcoma of the breast occurring in ...

  12. MLLT1 YEATS domain mutations in clinically distinctive Favourable Histology Wilms tumours

    KAUST Repository

    Perlman, Elizabeth J.

    2015-12-04

    Wilms tumour is an embryonal tumour of childhood that closely resembles the developing kidney. Genomic changes responsible for the development of the majority of Wilms tumours remain largely unknown. Here we identify recurrent mutations within Wilms tumours that involve the highly conserved YEATS domain of MLLT1 (ENL), a gene known to be involved in transcriptional elongation during early development. The mutant MLLT1 protein shows altered binding to acetylated histone tails. Moreover, MLLT1-mutant tumours show an increase in MYC gene expression and HOX dysregulation. Patients with MLLT1-mutant tumours present at a younger age and have a high prevalence of precursor intralobar nephrogenic rests. These data support a model whereby activating MLLT1 mutations early in renal development result in the development of Wilms tumour.

  13. Non-cell-autonomous driving of tumour growth supports sub-clonal heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marusyk, Andriy; Tabassum, Doris P; Altrock, Philipp M; Almendro, Vanessa; Michor, Franziska; Polyak, Kornelia

    2014-10-02

    Cancers arise through a process of somatic evolution that can result in substantial sub-clonal heterogeneity within tumours. The mechanisms responsible for the coexistence of distinct sub-clones and the biological consequences of this coexistence remain poorly understood. Here we used a mouse xenograft model to investigate the impact of sub-clonal heterogeneity on tumour phenotypes and the competitive expansion of individual clones. We found that tumour growth can be driven by a minor cell subpopulation, which enhances the proliferation of all cells within a tumour by overcoming environmental constraints and yet can be outcompeted by faster proliferating competitors, resulting in tumour collapse. We developed a mathematical modelling framework to identify the rules underlying the generation of intra-tumour clonal heterogeneity. We found that non-cell-autonomous driving of tumour growth, together with clonal interference, stabilizes sub-clonal heterogeneity, thereby enabling inter-clonal interactions that can lead to new phenotypic traits.

  14. In Situ Identification of CD44+/CD24− Cancer Cells in Primary Human Breast Carcinomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, Giuseppe; Gaeta, Laura Maria; Zagami, Mariagiovanna; Nasorri, Francesca; Coppola, Roberto; Borzomati, Domenico; Bartolozzi, Francesco; Altomare, Vittorio; Trodella, Lucio; Tonini, Giuseppe; Santini, Daniele; Cavani, Andrea; Muda, Andrea Onetti

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer cells with the CD44+/CD24− phenotype have been reported to be tumourigenic due to their enhanced capacity for cancer development and their self-renewal potential. The identification of human tumourigenic breast cancer cells in surgical samples has recently received increased attention due to the implications for prognosis and treatment, although limitations exist in the interpretation of these studies. To better identify the CD44+/CD24− cells in routine surgical specimens, 56 primary breast carcinoma cases were analysed by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy, and the results were compared using flow cytometry analysis to correlate the amount and distribution of the CD44+/CD24− population with clinicopathological features. Using these methods, we showed that the breast carcinoma cells displayed four distinct sub-populations based on the expression pattern of CD44 and CD24. The CD44+/CD24− cells were found in 91% of breast tumours and constituted an average of 6.12% (range, 0.11%–21.23%) of the tumour. A strong correlation was found between the percentage of CD44+/CD24− cells in primary tumours and distant metastasis development (p = 0.0001); in addition, there was an inverse significant association with ER and PGR status (p = 0.002 and p = 0.001, respectively). No relationship was evident with tumour size (T) and regional lymph node (N) status, differentiation grade, proliferative index or HER2 status. In a multivariate analysis, the percentage of CD44+/CD24− cancer cells was an independent factor related to metastasis development (p = 0.004). Our results indicate that confocal analysis of fluorescence-labelled breast cancer samples obtained at surgery is a reliable method to identify the CD44+/CD24− tumourigenic cell population, allowing for the stratification of breast cancer patients into two groups with substantially different relapse rates on the basis of CD44+/CD24− cell percentage. PMID:23028444

  15. An integrated genomic approach identifies that the PI3K/AKT/FOXO pathway is involved in breast cancer tumor initiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Linda; Berns, Katrien; Spence, Katherine; Ryder, W David; Zeps, Nik; Madiredjo, Mandy; Beijersbergen, Roderick; Bernards, René; Clarke, Robert B

    2015-01-01

    Therapy resistance is one of the major impediments to successful cancer treatment. In breast cancer, a small subpopulation of cells with stem cell features, named breast cancer stem cells (BCSC), is responsible for metastasis and recurrence of the tumor. BCSC have the unique ability to grow under no

  16. Breast Imaging Artifacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odle, Teresa G

    2015-01-01

    Artifacts appear on breast images for a number of reasons. Radiologic technologists play an important role in identifying artifacts that can help or hinder breast cancer diagnosis and in minimizing artifacts that degrade image quality. This article describes various artifacts that occur in breast imaging, along with their causes. The article focuses on artifacts in mammography, with a heavy emphasis on digital mammography, and on magnetic resonance imaging of the breast. Artifacts in ultrasonography of the breast, digital breast tomosynthesis, and positron emission mammography also are discussed.

  17. Messenger RNA (mRNA) nanoparticle tumour vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phua, Kyle K. L.; Nair, Smita K.; Leong, Kam W.

    2014-06-01

    Use of mRNA-based vaccines for tumour immunotherapy has gained increasing attention in recent years. A growing number of studies applying nanomedicine concepts to mRNA tumour vaccination show that the mRNA delivered in nanoparticle format can generate a more robust immune response. Advances in the past decade have deepened our understanding of gene delivery barriers, mRNA's biological stability and immunological properties, and support the notion for engineering innovations tailored towards a more efficient mRNA nanoparticle vaccine delivery system. In this review we will first examine the suitability of mRNA for engineering manipulations, followed by discussion of a model framework that highlights the barriers to a robust anti-tumour immunity mediated by mRNA encapsulated in nanoparticles. Finally, by consolidating existing literature on mRNA nanoparticle tumour vaccination within the context of this framework, we aim to identify bottlenecks that can be addressed by future nanoengineering research.

  18. Residential Radon and Brain Tumour Incidence in a Danish Cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bräuner, Elvira V.; Andersen, Zorana J.; Andersen, Claus Erik;

    2013-01-01

    Background: Increased brain tumour incidence over recent decades may reflect improved diagnostic methods and clinical practice, but remain unexplained. Although estimated doses are low a relationship between radon and brain tumours may exist. Objective: To investigate the long-term effect...... of exposure to residential radon on the risk of primary brain tumour in a prospective Danish cohort. Methods: During 1993–1997 we recruited 57,053 persons. We followed each cohort member for cancer occurrence from enrolment until 31 December 2009, identifying 121 primary brain tumour cases. We traced...... residential addresses from 1 January 1971 until 31 December 2009 and calculated radon concentrations at each address using information from central databases regarding geology and house construction. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate incidence rate-ratios (IRR) and 95% confidence intervals...

  19. Mystery of bilateral breast masses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nausheen Khan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Leiomyosarcoma (LMS is an uncommon malignant tumour of smooth muscle origin. It arises in the gastro intestinal tract, retroperitoneum, urinary bladder, uterus and soft tissue. Peritoneal leiomyosarcomatosis (PL is defined as a peritoneal dissemination of a primary sarcoma. We present a case of leiomyosarcomatosis with wide spread dissemination including involvement of both breasts.

  20. High-throughput screen identifies disulfiram as a potential therapeutic for triple-negative breast cancer cells: interaction with IQ motif-containing factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Tyler J W; Pai, Melody; Liu, Jeff C; Vizeacoumar, Frederick; Sun, Thomas; Egan, Sean E; Datti, Alessandro; Huang, Jing; Zacksenhaus, Eldad

    2013-09-15

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) represents an aggressive subtype, for which radiation and chemotherapy are the only options. Here we describe the identification of disulfiram, an FDA-approved drug used to treat alcoholism, as well as the related compound thiram, as the most potent growth inhibitors following high-throughput screens of 3185 compounds against multiple TNBC cell lines. The average IC50 for disulfiram was ~300 nM. Drug affinity responsive target stability (DARTS) analysis identified IQ motif-containing factors IQGAP1 and MYH9 as direct binding targets of disulfiram. Indeed, knockdown of these factors reduced, though did not completely abolish, cell growth. Combination treatment with 4 different drugs commonly used to treat TNBC revealed that disulfiram synergizes most effectively with doxorubicin to inhibit cell growth of TNBC cells. Disulfiram and doxorubicin cooperated to induce cell death as well as cellular senescence, and targeted the ESA(+)/CD24(-/low)/CD44(+) cancer stem cell population. Our results suggest that disulfiram may be repurposed to treat TNBC in combination with doxorubicin.

  1. Malignant eccrine breast spiradenoma. A case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra de Andrés Gómez

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Eccrine spiradenomas are rare adnexal tumours of the skin. Intraparenquimatous breast location is especially infrequent. Diagnosis is based on histopathological examination. MES metastasizes (40%, so a close follow up is recommended.

  2. Primary vertebral tumours in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozlowski, K.; Beluffi, G.; Masel, J.; Diard, F.; Ferrari-Ciboldi, F.; Le Dosseur, P.; Labatut, J.

    1984-03-01

    20 cases of primary benign and malignant bone tumours in children were reported. The most common tumours were Ewing's sarcoma, aneurismal bone cyst, benign osteoblastoma and osteoid osteoma. Some rare primary bone tumours in children (osteochondroma, chondroblastoma 6F, primary lymphoma of bone and neurofibromatosis with unusual cervical spinal changes) were also reported. The authors believe that radiographic findings together with clinical history and clinical examination may yield a high percentage of accurate diagnoses. Although microscopy is essential in the final diagnosis, the microscopic report should be also accepted with caution.

  3. Novel Nonsense Variants c.58C>T (p.Q20X) and c.256G>T (p.E85X) in the CHEK2 Gene Identified in Breast Cancer Patients from Balochistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baloch, Abdul Hameed; Khosa, Ahmad Nawaz; Bangulzai, Nasrullah; Shuja, Jamila; Naseeb, Hafiz Khush; Jan, Mohammad; Marghazani, Illahi Bakhsh; Kakar, MasoodulHaq; Baloch, Dost Mohammad; Cheema, Abdul Majeed; Ahmad, Jamil

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is very common and the leading cause of cancer deaths among women globally. Hereditary cases account for 510% of the total burden and CHEK2, which plays crucial role in response to DNA damage to promote cell cycle arrest and repair or induce apoptosis, is considered as a moderate penetrance breast cancer risk gene. Our objective in the current study was to analyze mutations in related to breast cancer. A total of 271 individuals including breast cancer patients and normal subjects were enrolled and all 14 exons of CHEK2 were amplified and sequenced. The majority of the patients (>95%) were affected with invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC), 52.1% were diagnosed with grade III tumors and 56.2% and 27.5% with advanced stages III and IV. Two novel nonsense variants i.e. c.58C>T (P.Q20X) and c.256G>T (p.E85X) at exon 1 and 2 in two breast cancer patients were identified, both novel and not reported elsewhere.

  4. BRCA1 transcriptionally regulates genes associated with the basal-like phenotype in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorski, Julia J; James, Colin R; Quinn, Jennifer E; Stewart, Gail E; Staunton, Kieran Crosbie; Buckley, Niamh E; McDyer, Fionnuala A; Kennedy, Richard D; Wilson, Richard H; Mullan, Paul B; Harkin, D Paul

    2010-08-01

    Expression profiling of BRCA1-deficient tumours has identified a pattern of gene expression similar to basal-like breast tumours. In this study, we examine whether a BRCA1-dependent transcriptional mechanism may underpin the link between BRCA1 and basal-like phenotype. In methods section, the mRNA and protein were harvested from a number of BRCA1 mutant and wild-type breast cancer cell lines and from matched isogenic controls. Microarray-based expression profiling was used to identify potential BRCA1-regulated transcripts. These gene targets were then validated (by in silico analysis of tumour samples) by real-time PCR and Western blot analysis. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays were used to confirm recruitment of BRCA1 to specific promoters. In results, we demonstrate that functional BRCA1 represses the expression of cytokeratins 5(KRT5) and 17(KRT17) and p-Cadherin (CDH3) in HCC1937 and T47D breast cancer cell lines at both mRNA and protein level. ChIP assays demonstrate that BRCA1 is recruited to the promoters of KRT5, KRT17 and CDH3, and re-ChIP assays confirm that BRCA1 is recruited independently to form c-Myc and Sp1 complexes on the CDH3 promoter. We show that siRNA-mediated inhibition of endogenous c-Myc (and not Sp1) results in a marked increase in CDH3 expression analogous to that observed following the inhibition of endogenous BRCA1. The data provided suggest a model whereby BRCA1 and c-Myc form a repressor complex on the promoters of specific basal genes and represent a potential mechanism to explain the observed overexpression of key basal markers in BRCA1-deficient tumours.

  5. Transcriptomic Analysis Identifies Candidate Genes Related to Intramuscular Fat Deposition and Fatty Acid Composition in the Breast Muscle of Squabs (Columba).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Manhong; Zhou, Bin; Wei, Shanshan; Ding, MengMeng; Lu, Xinghui; Shi, Xuehao; Ding, Jiatong; Yang, Shengmei; Wei, Wanhong

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that squab is consumed throughout the world because of its high nutritional value and appreciated sensory attributes, aspects related to its characterization, and in particular genetic issues, have rarely been studied. In this study, meat traits in terms of pH, water-holding capacity, intramuscular fat content, and fatty acid profile of the breast muscle of squabs from two meat pigeon breeds were determined. Breed-specific differences were detected in fat-related traits of intramuscular fat content and fatty acid composition. RNA-Sequencing was applied to compare the transcriptomes of muscle and liver tissues between squabs of two breeds to identify candidate genes associated with the differences in the capacity of fat deposition. A total of 27 differentially expressed genes assigned to pathways of lipid metabolism were identified, of which, six genes belonged to the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor signaling pathway along with four other genes. Our results confirmed in part previous reports in livestock and provided also a number of genes which had not been related to fat deposition so far. These genes can serve as a basis for further investigations to screen markers closely associated with intramuscular fat content and fatty acid composition in squabs. The data from this study were deposited in the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI)'s Sequence Read Archive under the accession numbers SRX1680021 and SRX1680022. This is the first transcriptome analysis of the muscle and liver tissue in Columba using next generation sequencing technology. Data provided here are of potential value to dissect functional genes influencing fat deposition in squabs.

  6. Differential Proteome Analysis Identifies TGF-β-Related Pro-Metastatic Proteins in a 4T1 Murine Breast Cancer Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misako Sato

    Full Text Available Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β has a dual role in tumorigenesis, acting as either a tumor suppressor or as a pro-oncogenic factor in a context-dependent manner. Although TGF-β antagonists have been proposed as anti-metastatic therapies for patients with advanced stage cancer, how TGF-β mediates metastasis-promoting effects is poorly understood. Establishment of TGF-β-related protein expression signatures at the metastatic site could provide new mechanistic information and potentially allow identification of novel biomarkers for clinical intervention to discriminate TGF-β oncogenic effects from tumor suppressive effects. In the present study, we found that systemic administration of the TGF-β receptor kinase inhibitor, SB-431542, significantly inhibited lung metastasis from transplanted 4T1 mammary tumors in Balb/c mice. The differentially expressed proteins in the comparison of lung metastases from SB-431542 treated and control vehicle-treated groups were analyzed by a quantitative LTQ Orbitrap Velos system coupled with stable isotope dimethyl labeling. A total of 36,239 peptides from 6,694 proteins were identified, out of which 4,531 proteins were characterized as differentially expressed. A subset of upregulated proteins in the control group was validated by western blotting and immunohistochemistry. The eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF family members constituted the most enriched protein pathway in vehicle-treated compared with SB-43512-treated lung metastases, suggesting that increased protein expression of specific eIF family members, especially eIF4A1 and eEF2, is related to the metastatic phenotype of advanced breast cancer and can be down-regulated by TGF-β pathway inhibitors. Thus our proteomic approach identified eIF pathway proteins as novel potential mediators of TGF-β tumor-promoting activity.

  7. Transcriptomic Analysis Identifies Candidate Genes Related to Intramuscular Fat Deposition and Fatty Acid Composition in the Breast Muscle of Squabs (Columba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manhong Ye

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite the fact that squab is consumed throughout the world because of its high nutritional value and appreciated sensory attributes, aspects related to its characterization, and in particular genetic issues, have rarely been studied. In this study, meat traits in terms of pH, water-holding capacity, intramuscular fat content, and fatty acid profile of the breast muscle of squabs from two meat pigeon breeds were determined. Breed-specific differences were detected in fat-related traits of intramuscular fat content and fatty acid composition. RNA-Sequencing was applied to compare the transcriptomes of muscle and liver tissues between squabs of two breeds to identify candidate genes associated with the differences in the capacity of fat deposition. A total of 27 differentially expressed genes assigned to pathways of lipid metabolism were identified, of which, six genes belonged to the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor signaling pathway along with four other genes. Our results confirmed in part previous reports in livestock and provided also a number of genes which had not been related to fat deposition so far. These genes can serve as a basis for further investigations to screen markers closely associated with intramuscular fat content and fatty acid composition in squabs. The data from this study were deposited in the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI’s Sequence Read Archive under the accession numbers SRX1680021 and SRX1680022. This is the first transcriptome analysis of the muscle and liver tissue in Columba using next generation sequencing technology. Data provided here are of potential value to dissect functional genes influencing fat deposition in squabs.

  8. Annexin A3 is a mammary marker and a potential neoplastic breast cell therapeutic target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeidan, Bashar; Jackson, Thomas R; Larkin, Samantha E T; Cutress, Ramsey I; Coulton, Gary R; Ashton-Key, Margaret; Murray, Nick; Packham, Graham; Gorgoulis, Vassilis; Garbis, Spiros D; Townsend, Paul A

    2015-08-28

    Breast cancers are the most common cancer-affecting women; critically the identification of novel biomarkers for improving early detection, stratification and differentiation from benign tumours is important for the reduction of morbidity and mortality.To identify and functionally characterise potential biomarkers, we used mass spectrometry (MS) to analyse serum samples representing control, benign breast disease (BBD) and invasive breast cancer (IDC) patients. Complementary and multidimensional proteomic approaches were used to identify and validate novel serum markers.Annexin A3 (ANX A3) was found to be differentially expressed amongst different breast pathologies. The diagnostic value of serum ANX A3 was subsequently validated by ELISA in an independent serum set representing the three groups. Here, ANX A3 was significantly upregulated in the benign disease group sera compared with other groups (P A3 was abundantly expressed in benign and to a lesser extent malignant neoplastic epithelium. Finally, we illustrated ANX A3 expression in cell culture lysates and conditioned media from neoplastic breast cell lines, and its role in neoplastic breast cell migration in vitro.This study confirms the novel role of ANX A3 as a mammary biomarker, regulator and therapeutic target.

  9. Biodistribution and SPECT imaging of {sup 125/131}I-crotoxin on mice bearing Ehrlich solid tumour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Marcella Araugio; Santos, Raquel Gouvea dos [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)], e-mail: marcellaaraugio@yahoo.com.br, e-mail: santosr@cdtn.br; Silveira, Marina B.; Simal, Carlos [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina; Dias, Consuelo L. Fortes [Fundacao Ezequiel Dias (FUNED), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The search of specific radiopharmaceuticals to be used in breast tumour diagnosis is relevant to complement the techniques applied in conventional medicine. Crotalus durissus terrificus venom (CV) and its main polypeptide, Crotoxin (Crtx), are natural source of several bioactive substances with therapeutical potential. The aim of this work was to evaluate the binding of Crtx with tumour targets in vivo, as well as, evaluate its applicability for breast tumours diagnosis. Crtx was labelled with {sup 125/131}I using lactoperoxidase method and radiochemical analysis was performed by chromatography. {sup 125}I-Crtx was used for biodistribution and pharmacokinetics studies on swiss mice bearing Ehrlich solid tumour, while {sup 131}I-Crtx was used for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging. Crtx presented specific binding sites on Ehrlich tumour cells and had a rapid blood clearance (T{sub 1/2}= 201.1 min.). Intratumoral administration increased significantly the activity delivered into the tumour site (128-fold higher) and reduced the kidney burden (7.2-fold lower). {sup 131}I-Crxt demonstrated to interact with tumour cells for until 72 hours allowing good quality images of tumour. Our results indicate the biotechnological potential of Crtx as template for radiopharmaceutical design for cancer diagnosis. (author)

  10. The Heidelberg classification of renal cell tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kovacs, G; Akhtar, M; Beckwith, BJ; Bugert, P; Cooper, CS; Delahunt, B; Eble, JN; Fleming, S; Ljungberg, B; Medeiros, LJ; Moch, H; Reuter, VE; Ritz, E; Roos, G; Schmidt, D; Srigley, [No Value; Storkel, S; VandenBerg, E; Zbar, B

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents the conclusions of a workshop entitled 'Impact of Molecular Genetics on the Classification of Renal Cell Tumours', which was held in Heidelberg in October 1996, The focus on 'renal cell tumours' excludes any discussion of Wilms' tumour and its variants, or of tumours metastatic t

  11. Validation of cytoplasmic-to-nuclear ratio of survivin as an indicator of improved prognosis in breast cancer

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rexhepaj, Elton

    2010-11-23

    Abstract Background Conflicting data exist regarding the prognostic and predictive impact of survivin (BIRC5) in breast cancer. We previously reported survivin cytoplasmic-to-nuclear ratio (CNR) as an independent prognostic indicator in breast cancer. Here, we validate survivin CNR in a separate and extended cohort. Furthermore, we present new data suggesting that a low CNR may predict outcome in tamoxifen-treated patients. Methods Survin expression was assessed using immunhistochemistry on a breast cancer tissue microarray (TMA) containing 512 tumours. Whole slide digital images were captured using an Aperio XT scanner. Automated image analysis was used to identify tumour from stroma and then to quantify tumour-specific nuclear and cytoplasmic survivin. A decision tree model selected using a 10-fold cross-validation approach was used to identify prognostic subgroups based on nuclear and cytoplasmic survivin expression. Results Following optimisation of the staining procedure, it was possible to evaluate survivin protein expression in 70.1% (n = 359) of the 512 tumours represented on the TMA. Decision tree analysis predicted that nuclear, as opposed to cytoplasmic, survivin was the most important determinant of overall survival (OS) and breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS). The decision tree model confirmed CNR of 5 as the optimum threshold for survival analysis. Univariate analysis demonstrated an association between a high CNR (>5) and a prolonged BCSS (HR 0.49, 95% CI 0.29-0.81, p = 0.006). Multivariate analysis revealed a high CNR (>5) was an independent predictor of BCSS (HR 0.47, 95% CI 0.27-0.82, p = 0.008). An increased CNR was associated with ER positive (p = 0.045), low grade (p = 0.007), Ki-67 (p = 0.001) and Her2 (p = 0.026) negative tumours. Finally, a high CNR was an independent predictor of OS in tamoxifen-treated ER-positive patients (HR 0.44, 95% CI 0.23-0.87, p = 0.018). Conclusion Using the same threshold as our previous study, we have

  12. Validation of cytoplasmic-to-nuclear ratio of survivin as an indicator of improved prognosis in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duffy Michael J

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conflicting data exist regarding the prognostic and predictive impact of survivin (BIRC5 in breast cancer. We previously reported survivin cytoplasmic-to-nuclear ratio (CNR as an independent prognostic indicator in breast cancer. Here, we validate survivin CNR in a separate and extended cohort. Furthermore, we present new data suggesting that a low CNR may predict outcome in tamoxifen-treated patients. Methods Survin expression was assessed using immunhistochemistry on a breast cancer tissue microarray (TMA containing 512