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Sample records for breast tumorigenesis revelation

  1. ODAM Expression Inhibits Human Breast Cancer Tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kestler, Daniel P.; Foster, James S.; Bruker, Charles T.; Prenshaw, John W.; Kennel, Stephen J.; Wall, Jonathan S.; Weiss, Deborah T.; Solomon, Alan

    2011-01-01

    We have posited that Odontogenic Ameloblast Associated Protein (ODAM) serves as a novel prognostic biomarker in breast cancer and now have investigated its potential role in regulating tumor growth and metastasis. Human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells were transfected with a recombinant ODAM plasmid construct (or, as a control, the plasmid vector alone). ODAM expression increased adhesion and apoptosis of the transfected MDA-MB-231 cells and suppressed their growth rate, migratory activity, and capability to invade extracellular matrix-coated membranes. Implantation of such cells into mouse mammary fat pads resulted in significantly smaller tumors than occurred in animals that received control cells; furthermore, ODAM-expressing cells, when injected intravenously into mice, failed to metastasize, whereas the control-transfected counterparts produced extensive lung lesions. Our finding that induction of ODAM expression in human breast cancer cells markedly inhibited their neoplastic properties provides further evidence for the regulatory role of this molecule in tumorigenesis and, consequently, is of potential clinical import. PMID:21603257

  2. ODAM Expression Inhibits Human Breast Cancer Tumorigenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Kestler, Daniel P; Foster, James S.; Bruker, Charles T.; Prenshaw, John W.; Kennel, Stephen J.; Wall, Jonathan S.; Weiss, Deborah T.; Alan Solomon

    2011-01-01

    We have posited that Odontogenic Ameloblast Associated Protein (ODAM) serves as a novel prognostic biomarker in breast cancer and now have investigated its potential role in regulating tumor growth and metastasis. Human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells were transfected with a recombinant ODAM plasmid construct (or, as a control, the plasmid vector alone). ODAM expression increased adhesion and apoptosis of the transfected MDA-MB-231 cells and suppressed their growth rate, migratory activity, an...

  3. LIF promotes tumorigenesis and metastasis of breast cancer through the AKT-mTOR pathway

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    Yu, Haiyang; Wu, Lihua; Zhao, Yuhan; Zhang, Cen; Yue, Xuetian; Liu, Zhen; Wu, Hao; Haffty, Bruce G.; Feng, Zhaohui; Hu, Wenwei

    2014-01-01

    Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) is a multi-functional cytokine protein. The role of LIF in tumorigenesis is not well-understood. Here, we found that LIF promotes tumorigenesis and metastasis of breast cancer. LIF promotes cell proliferation and anchorage-independent growth of breast cancer cells in vitro, and the growth of xenograft breast tumors in vivo. LIF also promotes invasion and migration of breast cancer cells in vitro and metastasis of breast cancer in vivo. We found that LIF activates the AKT-mTOR signaling pathway to promote tumorigenesis and metastasis of breast cancer. Inhibiting the AKT activity can largely block the activation of the mTOR pathway by LIF, suggesting that LIF activates the mTOR pathway through AKT. Inhibiting the AKT activity as well as inhibiting the mTOR activity largely block the promoting effect of LIF on tumorigenesis and metastasis. Furthermore, overexpression of LIF is significantly associated with a poorer relapse free survival in breast cancer patients. Taken together, our data strongly suggest that LIF plays an important role in the tumorigenesis and metastasis of breast cancer, and could be an important prognostic marker for breast cancer. PMID:24553191

  4. Multifaceted role of EZH2 in breast and prostate tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, Gauri; Thakur, Vijay S.; Gupta, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    Overexpression of EZH2 and other PRC2 subunits, such as SUZ12, is associated with tumor progression and poor prognosis in several human malignancies. Nevertheless, the underlying mechanisms driving aberrant EZH2 expression are poorly understood. This review provides molecular insights into the essential role of EZH2 in breast and prostate tumorigenesis. We addressed the current understanding on the oncogenic role of EZH2, with an emphasis on: (1) the less known PRC2-independent role of EZH2 in gene activation, in addition to its canonical role in transcriptional silencing as a histone methyltransferase catalyzing the trimethylation of histone H3 at lysine 27; (2) causes and consequences of its deregulation in tumor cells and; (3) collaboration of EZH2 with other epigenetic and hormone receptor-mediated oncogenic signaling pathways. We also summarize how EZH2 has emerged as a promising therapeutic target in hormone-refractory cancers and the prospects for integrating EZH2 blockade with available pharmacological inhibitors. PMID:23644490

  5. The Mre11 Complex Suppresses Oncogene-Driven Breast Tumorigenesis and Metastasis

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    Gupta, Gaorav P.; Vanness, Katelynd; Barlas, Afsar; Manova-Todorova, Katia O.; Wen, Yong H.; Petrini, John H.J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The DNA damage response (DDR) is activated by oncogenic stress, but the mechanisms by which this occurs, and the particular DDR functions that constitute barriers to tumorigenesis, remain unclear. We established a mouse model of sporadic onco-gene-driven breast tumorigenesis in a series of mutant mouse strains with specific DDR deficiencies to reveal a role for the Mre11 complex in the response to oncogene activation. We demonstrate that an Mre11-mediated DDR restrains mammary hyperplasia by effecting an oncogene-induced G2 arrest. Impairment of Mre11 complex functions promotes the progression of mammary hyperplasias into invasive and metastatic breast cancers, which are often associated with secondary inactivation of the Ink4a-Arf (CDKN2a) locus. These findings provide insight into the mechanism of DDR engagement by activated oncogenes and highlight genetic interactions between the DDR and Ink4a-Arf pathways in suppression of oncogene-driven tumorigenesis and metastasis. PMID:24120666

  6. Inhibition of Breast Cancer Cell Proliferation and In Vitro Tumorigenesis by a New Red Apple Cultivar.

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    Schiavano, Giuditta Fiorella; De Santi, Mauro; Brandi, Giorgio; Fanelli, Mirco; Bucchini, Anahi; Giamperi, Laura; Giomaro, Giovanna

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antiproliferative activity in breast cancer cells and the inhibition of tumorigenesis in pre-neoplastic cells of a new apple cultivar with reddish pulp, called the Pelingo apple. The antiproliferative activity was evaluated in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells. The inhibition of tumorigenesis was performed in JB6 promotion-sensitive (P+) cells. Results showed that Pelingo apple juice is characterized by a very high polyphenol content and strongly inhibited breast cancer cell proliferation. Its antiproliferative activity was found to be higher than the other five apple juices tested. Pelingo juice induced cell accumulation in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle and autophagy through overexpression of p21, inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) activity and an increase in lipidated microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain-3 beta (LC3B). Remarkably, Pelingo juice inhibited the 12-o-tetra-decanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced tumorigenesis of JB6 P+ cells, suppressing colony formation in semi-solid medium and TPA-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Our data indicate that the Pelingo apple is rich in food components that can markedly inhibit in vitro tumorigenesis and growth of human breast cancer cells and could provide natural bioactive non-nutrient compounds, with potential chemopreventive activity.

  7. Loss of Dickkopf 3 Promotes the Tumorigenesis of Basal Breast Cancer.

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    Eva Lorsy

    Full Text Available Dickkopf 3 (DKK3 has been associated with tumor suppression of various tumor entities including breast cancer. However, the functional impact of DKK3 on the tumorigenesis of distinct molecular breast cancer subtypes has not been considered so far. Therefore, we initiated a study analyzing the subtype-specific DKK3 expression pattern as well as its prognostic and functional impact with respect to breast cancer subtypes. Based on three independent tissue cohorts including one in silico dataset (n = 30, n = 463 and n = 791 we observed a clear down-regulation of DKK3 expression in breast cancer samples compared to healthy breast tissue controls on mRNA and protein level. Interestingly, most abundant reduction of DKK3 expression was detected in the highly aggressive basal breast cancer subtype. Analyzing a large in silico dataset comprising 3,554 cases showed that low DKK3 mRNA expression was significantly associated with reduced recurrence free survival (RFS of luminal and basal-like breast cancer cases. Functionally, DKK3 re-expression in human breast cancer cell lines led to suppression of cell growth possibly mediated by up-regulation of apoptosis in basal-like but not in luminal-like breast cancer cell lines. Moreover, ectopic DKK3 expression in mesenchymal basal breast cancer cells resulted in partial restoration of epithelial cell morphology which was molecularly supported by higher expression of epithelial markers like E-Cadherin and down-regulation of mesenchymal markers such as Snail 1. Hence, we provide evidence that down-regulation of DKK3 especially promotes tumorigenesis of the aggressive basal breast cancer subtype. Further studies decoding the underlying molecular mechanisms of DKK3-mediated effects may help to identify novel targeted therapies for this clinically highly relevant breast cancer subtype.

  8. Multifaceted role of EZH2 in breast and prostate tumorigenesis: Epigenetics and beyond

    OpenAIRE

    Deb, Gauri; Thakur, Vijay S; Gupta, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    Overexpression of EZH2 and other PRC2 subunits, such as SUZ12, is associated with tumor progression and poor prognosis in several human malignancies. Nevertheless, the underlying mechanisms driving aberrant EZH2 expression are poorly understood. This review provides molecular insights into the essential role of EZH2 in breast and prostate tumorigenesis. We addressed the current understanding on the oncogenic role of EZH2, with an emphasis on: (1) the less known PRC2-independent role of EZH2 i...

  9. Overexpression of Id1 in transgenic mice promotes mammary basal stem cell activity and breast tumorigenesis

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    Won, Hee-Young; Jang, Ki-Seok; Min, Kyueng-Whan; Jang, Si-Hyong; Woo, Jong-Kyu; Oh, Seung Hyun; Kong, Gu

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitor of differentiation/DNA binding (Id)1 is a crucial regulator of mammary development and breast cancer progression. However, its effect on stemness and tumorigenesis in mammary epithelial cells remains undefined. Herein, we demonstrate that Id1 induces mammary tumorigenesis by increasing normal and malignant mammary stem cell (MaSC) activities in transgenic mice. MaSC-enriched basal cell expansion and increased self-renewal and in vivo regenerative capacity of MaSCs are observed in the mammary glands of MMTV-Id1 transgenic mice. Furthermore, MMTV-Id1 mice develop ductal hyperplasia and mammary tumors with highly expressed basal markers. Id1 also increases breast cancer stem cell (CSC) population and activity in human breast cancer lines. Moreover, the effects of Id1 on normal and malignant stem cell activities are mediated by the Wnt/c-Myc pathway. Collectively, these findings provide in vivo genetic evidence of Id1 functions as an oncogene in breast cancer and indicate that Id1 regulates mammary basal stem cells by activating the Wnt/c-Myc pathway, thereby contributing to breast tumor development. PMID:25938540

  10. The Rab2A GTPase Promotes Breast Cancer Stem Cells and Tumorigenesis via Erk Signaling Activation

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    Man-Li Luo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Proline-directed phosphorylation is regulated by the prolyl isomerase Pin1, which plays a fundamental role in driving breast cancer stem-like cells (BCSCs. Rab2A is a small GTPase critical for vesicle trafficking. Here, we show that Pin1 increases Rab2A transcription to promote BCSC expansion and tumorigenesis in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistically, Rab2A directly interacts with and prevents dephosphorylation/inactivation of Erk1/2 by the MKP3 phosphatase, resulting in Zeb1 upregulation and β-catenin nuclear translocation. In cancer cells, Rab2A is activated via gene amplification, mutation or Pin1 overexpression. Rab2A overexpression or mutation endows BCSC traits to primary normal human breast epithelial cells, whereas silencing Rab2A potently inhibits the expansion and tumorigenesis of freshly isolated BCSCs. Finally, Rab2A overexpression correlates with poor clinical outcome in breast cancer patients. Thus, Pin1/Rab2A/Erk drives BCSC expansion and tumorigenicity, suggesting potential drug targets.

  11. Impaired PRC2 activity promotes transcriptional instability and favors breast tumorigenesis.

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    Wassef, Michel; Rodilla, Veronica; Teissandier, Aurélie; Zeitouni, Bruno; Gruel, Nadege; Sadacca, Benjamin; Irondelle, Marie; Charruel, Margaux; Ducos, Bertrand; Michaud, Audrey; Caron, Matthieu; Marangoni, Elisabetta; Chavrier, Philippe; Le Tourneau, Christophe; Kamal, Maud; Pasmant, Eric; Vidaud, Michel; Servant, Nicolas; Reyal, Fabien; Meseure, Dider; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Fre, Silvia; Margueron, Raphaël

    2015-12-15

    Alterations of chromatin modifiers are frequent in cancer, but their functional consequences often remain unclear. Focusing on the Polycomb protein EZH2 that deposits the H3K27me3 (trimethylation of Lys27 of histone H3) mark, we showed that its high expression in solid tumors is a consequence, not a cause, of tumorigenesis. In mouse and human models, EZH2 is dispensable for prostate cancer development and restrains breast tumorigenesis. High EZH2 expression in tumors results from a tight coupling to proliferation to ensure H3K27me3 homeostasis. However, this process malfunctions in breast cancer. Low EZH2 expression relative to proliferation and mutations in Polycomb genes actually indicate poor prognosis and occur in metastases. We show that while altered EZH2 activity consistently modulates a subset of its target genes, it promotes a wider transcriptional instability. Importantly, transcriptional changes that are consequences of EZH2 loss are predominantly irreversible. Our study provides an unexpected understanding of EZH2's contribution to solid tumors with important therapeutic implications. © 2015 Wassef et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  12. Breast cancer cells induce cancer-associated fibroblasts to secrete hepatocyte growth factor to enhance breast tumorigenesis.

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    Shiaw-Wei Tyan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been well documented that microenvironment consisting of stroma affects breast cancer progression. However, the mechanisms by which cancer cells and fibroblasts, the major cell type in stroma, interact with each other during tumor development remains to be elucidated. Here, we show that the human cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs had higher activity in enhancing breast tumorigenecity compared to the normal tissue-associated fibroblasts (NAFs isolated from the same patients. The expression level of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF in these fibroblasts was positively correlated with their ability to enhance breast tumorigenesis in mice. Deprivation of HGF using a neutralizing antibody reduced CAF-mediated colony formation of human breast cancer cells, indicating that CAFs enhanced cancer cell colony formation mainly through HGF secretion. Co-culture with human breast cancer MDA-MB-468 cells in a transwell system enhanced NAFs to secret HGF as well as promote tumorigenecity. The newly gained ability of these "educated" NAFs became irreversible after continuing this process till fourth passage. These results suggested that breast cancer cells could alter the nature of its surrounding fibroblasts to secrete HGF to support its own progression through paracrine signaling.

  13. Up-regulation of METCAM/MUC18 promotes motility, invasion, and tumorigenesis of human breast cancer cells

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    Cai Shao-xi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conflicting research has identified METCAM/MUC18, an integral membrane cell adhesion molecule (CAM in the Ig-like gene super-family, as both a tumor promoter and a tumor suppressor in the development of breast cancer. To resolve this, we have re-investigated the role of this CAM in the progression of human breast cancer cells. Methods Three breast cancer cell lines were used for the tests: one luminal-like breast cancer cell line, MCF7, which did not express any METCAM/MUC18, and two basal-like breast cancer cell lines, MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468, which expressed moderate levels of the protein. MCF7 cells were transfected with the human METCAM/MUC18 cDNA to obtain G418-resistant clones which expressed the protein and were used for testing effects of human METCAM/MUC18 expression on in vitro motility and invasiveness, and in vitro and in vivo tumorigenesis. Both MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 cells already expressed METCAM/MUC18. They were directly used for in vitro tests in the presence and absence of an anti-METCAM/MUC18 antibody. Results In MCF7 cells, enforced METCAM/MUC18 expression increased in vitro motility, invasiveness, anchorage-independent colony formation (in vitro tumorigenesis, and in vivo tumorigenesis. In both MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 cells, the anti-METCAM/MUC18 antibody inhibited both motility and invasiveness. Though both MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 cells established a disorganized growth in 3D basement membrane culture assay, the introduction of the anti-METCAM/MUC18 antibody completely destroyed their growth in the 3D culture. Conclusion These findings support the notion that human METCAM/MUC18 expression promotes the progression of human breast cancer cells by increasing their motility, invasiveness and tumorigenesis.

  14. Multifaceted role of EZH2 in breast and prostate tumorigenesis: epigenetics and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, Gauri; Thakur, Vijay S; Gupta, Sanjay

    2013-05-01

    Overexpression of EZH2 and other PRC2 subunits, such as SUZ12, is associated with tumor progression and poor prognosis in several human malignancies. Nevertheless, the underlying mechanisms driving aberrant EZH2 expression are poorly understood. This review provides molecular insights into the essential role of EZH2 in breast and prostate tumorigenesis. We addressed the current understanding on the oncogenic role of EZH2, with an emphasis on: (1) the less known PRC2-independent role of EZH2 in gene activation, in addition to its canonical role in transcriptional silencing as a histone methyltransferase catalyzing the trimethylation of histone H3 at lysine 27; (2) causes and consequences of its deregulation in tumor cells and; (3) collaboration of EZH2 with other epigenetic and hormone receptor-mediated oncogenic signaling pathways. We also summarize how EZH2 has emerged as a promising therapeutic target in hormone-refractory cancers and the prospects for integrating EZH2 blockade with available pharmacological inhibitors.

  15. Breast cancer cell behaviors on staged tumorigenesis-mimicking matrices derived from tumor cells at various malignant stages.

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    Hoshiba, Takashi; Tanaka, Masaru

    2013-09-20

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) has been focused to understand tumor progression in addition to the genetic mutation of cancer cells. Here, we prepared "staged tumorigenesis-mimicking matrices" which mimic in vivo ECM in tumor tissue at each malignant stage to understand the roles of ECM in tumor progression. Breast tumor cells, MDA-MB-231 (invasive), MCF-7 (non-invasive), and MCF-10A (benign) cells, were cultured to form their own ECM beneath the cells and formed ECM was prepared as staged tumorigenesis-mimicking matrices by decellularization treatment. Cells showed weak attachment on the matrices derived from MDA-MB-231 cancer cells. The proliferations of MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 was promoted on the matrices derived from MDA-MB-231 cancer cells whereas MCF-10A cell proliferation was not promoted. MCF-10A cell proliferation was promoted on the matrices derived from MCF-10A cells. Chemoresistance of MDA-MB-231 cells against 5-fluorouracil increased on only matrices derived from MDA-MB-231 cells. Our results showed that the cells showed different behaviors on staged tumorigenesis-mimicking matrices according to the malignancy of cell sources for ECM preparation. Therefore, staged tumorigenesis-mimicking matrices might be a useful in vitro ECM models to investigate the roles of ECM in tumor progression. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Inducing Polyclonal Eag1-Specific Antibodies by Vaccination with a Linear Epitope Immunogen and Its Relation to Breast Tumorigenesis.

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    Li, Zhandong; Zhu, Ketong; Gong, Xin; Vasilescu, Steven; Sun, Yu; Hong, Kaiqing; Li, Hao; Li, Lin; Shan, Yaming

    2017-10-01

    Ether à-go-go 1 (KCNH1, Kv10.1) (Eag1) is a voltage-gated potassium channel, which is commonly overexpressed in tested breast cancer patients. This occurrence makes it a potential molecular marker and a promising tool for breast cancer diagnosis and therapy. In order to explore protective or specific polyclonal antibodies for further research, potential linear epitopes from Eag1 were collected by sequence alignment. The sequence was synthesized and then coupled to the carrier protein keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) for animal immunization. Polyclonal antibodies against Eag1 were produced and purified from the rabbit antisera. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and western blot were performed to characterize their specificities. Immunohistochemical staining was carried out on normal and cancerous breast tissue sections using the purified polyclonal Eag1-specific antibodies. The results indicate that the overexpression of Eag1 might be associated with an increased risk of progression to breast cancer (Grade 1 tissue = 57.89%;Grade 2 tissue = 92.59%;Grade 3 tissue = 100%). These results also suggest that Eag1 gene is a putative growth-promoting gene that might be involved in breast tumorigenesis and development. Eag1 might further be represented as a potential target for some human diseases treatment.

  17. The Cell Surface Estrogen Receptor, G Protein- Coupled Receptor 30 (GPR30, is Markedly Down Regulated During Breast Tumorigenesis

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    Indira Poola

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: GPR30 is a cell surface estrogen receptor that has been shown to mediate a number of non-genomic rapid effects of estrogen and appear to balance the signaling of estrogen and growth factors. In addition, progestins appear to use GPR30 for their actions. Therefore, GPR30 could play a critical role in hormonal regulation of breast epithelial cell integrity. Deregulation of the events mediated by GPR30 could contribute to tumorigenesis.Methods: To understand the role of GPR30 in the deregulation of estrogen signaling processes during breast carcinogenesis, we have undertaken this study to investigate its expression at mRNA levels in tumor tissues and their matched normal tissues. We compared its expression at mRNA levels by RT quantitative real-time PCR relative to GAPDH in ERα”—positive (n = 54 and ERα”—negative (n = 45 breast cancer tissues to their matched normal tissues.Results: We report here, for the first time, that GPR30 mRNA levels were significantly down-regulated in cancer tissues in comparison with their matched normal tissues (p 0.0001 by two sided paired t-test. The GPR30 expression levels were significantly lower in tumor tissues from patients (n = 29 who had lymph node metastasis in comparison with tumors from patients (n = 53 who were negative for lymph node metastasis (two sample t-test, p 0.02, but no association was found with ERα, PR and other tumor characteristics.Conclusions: Down-regulation of GPR30 could contribute to breast tumorigenesis and lymph node metastasis.

  18. Does the correlation between EBNA-1 and p63 expression in breast carcinomas provide a clue to tumorigenesis in Epstein-Barr virus-related breast malignancies?

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    Ribeiro-Silva A.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Several investigators have identified Epstein-Barr virus (EBV particles in breast carcinomas, a fact that supports a role for EBV in mammary tumorigenesis. The possible mechanism involved in this process is not clear. The present study was carried out in an attempt to determine whether there is a relationship between latent infection with EBV and p53 and p63 expression in breast carcinomas. Immunohistochemistry developed with 3.3-diaminobenzidine tetrahydrochloride was performed in 85 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded breast carcinomas using anti-EBV EBNA-1, anti-p63, anti-p53, anti-estrogen receptor (ER and anti-progesterone receptor (PR antibodies. The cases were selected to represent each of the various histologic types: intraductal carcinoma (N = 12, grade I invasive ductal carcinoma (N = 15, grade II invasive ductal carcinoma (N = 15, grade III invasive ductal carcinoma (N = 15, tubular carcinoma (N = 8, lobular carcinoma (N = 10, and medullary carcinoma (N = 10. The ductal breast carcinomas were graded I, II and III based on the Scarff-Bloom and Richardson grading system modified by Elston and Ellis. One slide containing at least 1000 neoplastic cells was examined in each case. ER, PR, p63, p53 and EBNA-1 were positive in 60, 40, 11.8, 21.2 and 37.6% of carcinomas, respectively. There was a correlation between EBNA-1 and p63 expression (P < 0.001, but not between EBNA-1 and p53 (P = 0.10. These data suggest a possible role for p63 in the mammary tumorigenesis associated with Epstein-Barr virus infection.

  19. [Search for new genes involved in breast tumorigenesis by "Omics" analysis].

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    Bièche, I

    2010-11-01

    The high heterogeneity of clinical, histological, biological and genetic features in breast cancer is due in part to the extreme molecular complexity of these tumors. This review article presents the major technological advances of the past ten years, in particular the development of microarray approaches, which have enabled genome-wide ("Omics") analysis of these tumors. Numerous genetic and epigenetic alterations involving a small number of altered signalling pathways (PI3K, NK-κB, FGF, etc.) have been described. The next decade will be even more prolific in terms of discovery with the advent of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies that will provide fast and low cost constitutional and somatic genome sequences. The full catalogue of somatic genetic alterations will result in a completely new individual management for breast cancer patients.

  20. The Role of Crk Adaptor Proteins in Breast Tumorigenesis and Bone Metastasis

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    2012-09-01

    proteins affected proliferation , an Alamar Blue assay was performed. No significant differences in cell proliferation were observed (Figure 2b). In...migration and invasion, cell morphology and adhesion. Western blot of Crk proteins from whole cell lysates with actin as loading control (A). Alamar blue ...We have established a relationship between Crk protein expression and cell proliferation in basal breast cancer. Stable knockdown of Crk protein

  1. A Comparative Analysis of Genetic and Epigenetic Events of Breast and Ovarian Cancer Related to Tumorigenesis

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    Mckenna Longacre

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer persists as the most common cause of cancer death in women worldwide. Ovarian cancer is also a significant source of morbidity and mortality, as the fifth leading cause of cancer death among women. This reflects the continued need for further understanding and innovation in cancer treatment. Though breast and ovarian cancer usually present as distinct clinical entities, the recent explosion of large-scale -omics research has uncovered many overlaps, particularly with respect to genetic and epigenetic alterations. We compared genetic, microenvironmental, stromal, and epigenetic changes common between breast and ovarian cancer cells, as well as the clinical relevance of these changes. Some of the most striking commonalities include genetic alterations of BRCA1 and 2, TP53, RB1, NF1, FAT3, MYC, PTEN, and PIK3CA; down regulation of miRNAs 9, 100, 125a, 125b, and 214; and epigenetic alterations such as H3K27me3, H3K9me2, H3K9me3, H4K20me3, and H3K4me. These parallels suggest shared features of pathogenesis. Furthermore, preliminary evidence suggests a shared epigenetic mechanism of oncogenesis. These similarities, warrant further investigation in order to ultimately inform development of more effective chemotherapeutics, as well as strategies to circumvent drug resistance.

  2. Loss of Panx1 Impairs Mammary Gland Development at Lactation: Implications for Breast Tumorigenesis.

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    Michael K G Stewart

    Full Text Available Pannexin1 (Panx1 subunits oligomerize to form large-pore channels between the intracellular and extracellular milieu that have been shown to regulate proliferation, differentiation and cell death mechanisms. These key cellular responses are ultimately necessary for normal tissue development and function but the role of Panx1 in development, differentiation and function in many tissues remains unexplored, including that of the breast. Panx1 was identified to be expressed in the mammary gland through western blot and immunofluorescent analysis and is dynamically upregulated during pregnancy and lactation. In order to evaluate the role of Panx1 in the context of mammary gland development and function, Panx1-/- mice were evaluated in comparison to wild-type mice in the mammary glands of virgin, lactating and involuting mice. Our results revealed that Panx1 ablation did not affect virgin or involuting mammary glands following histological and whole mount analysis. Panx1 was necessary for timely alveolar development during early lactation based on a decreased number of alveolar lumen following histological analysis and reduced proliferation following Ki67 immunofluorescent labelling. Importantly, the loss of Panx1 in lactating mammary glands did not overtly affect epithelial or secretory differentiation of the mammary gland suggesting that Panx1 is not critical in normal mammary gland function. In addition, PANX1 mRNA expression was correlated with negative clinical outcomes in patients with breast cancer using in silico arrays. Together, our results suggest that Panx1 is necessary for timely alveolar development following the transition from pregnancy to lactation, which may have implications extending to patients with breast cancer.

  3. Efficacy of melatonin, IL-25 and siIL-17B in tumorigenesis-associated properties of breast cancer cell lines.

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    Gelaleti, Gabriela Bottaro; Borin, Thaiz Ferraz; Maschio-Signorini, Larissa Bazela; Moschetta, Marina Gobbe; Jardim-Perassi, Bruna Victorasso; Calvinho, Guilherme Berto; Facchini, Mariana Castilho; Viloria-Petit, Alicia M; de Campos Zuccari, Debora Aparecida Pires

    2017-08-15

    Mammary tumorigenesis can be modulated by melatonin, which has oncostatic action mediated by multiple mechanisms, including the inhibition of the activity of transcription factors such as NF-κB and modulation of interleukins (ILs) expression. IL-25 is an active cytokine that induces apoptosis in tumor cells due to differential expression of its receptor (IL-17RB). IL-17B competes with IL-25 for binding to IL-17RB in tumor cells, promoting tumorigenesis. This study purpose is to address the possibility of engaging IL-25/IL-17RB signaling to enhance the effect of melatonin on breast cancer cells. Breast cancer cell lines were cultured monolayers and 3D structures and treated with melatonin, IL-25, siIL-17B, each alone or in combination. Cell viability, gene and protein expression of caspase-3, cleaved caspase-3 and VEGF-A were performed by qPCR and immunofluorescence. In addition, an apoptosis membrane array was performed in metastatic cells. Treatments with melatonin and IL-25 significantly reduced tumor cells viability at 1mM and 1ng/mL, respectively, but did not alter cell viability of a non-tumorigenic epithelial cell line (MCF-10A). All treatments, alone and combined, significantly increased cleaved caspase-3 in tumor cells grown as monolayers and 3D structures (pmelatonin treatment. All treatments reduced VEGF-A protein expression in tumor cells (pmelatonin and IL-25-driven signaling in breast cancer cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Seduction, persecution, revelation.

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    Laplanche, J

    1995-08-01

    The author argues that seduction is not primarily a fantasy but a 'real' situation, which lies at the heart of the other two allegedly primal major scenarios: castration and the primal scene. This statement is not to be confused with an event-based realism, as, for this to be achieved, a third category of reality must be postulated. This reality, constantly misconstrued by authors as corresponding to material and psychological reality, is that of the message conveyed and, more specifically in the case of analysis, the enigmatic message. To establish his position the author re-examines Freud's presentation of the Schreber case. The sexual other and his intrusion are the essential points of Freud's analysis in the first part of his study. In the second part, however, desexualisation (in the name of love) and a return to the ego, as the centre of the whole process, both being evident in the 'primary' sentence from which Freud proposes to derive everything: 'I (a man) love him (a man)'. This leads us to a consideration of Fichte's concept of Bekanntmachung, the 'announcement' by the other and to an argument that the message stemming from the other is irreducible to a projection by the subject, within the three domains of primal seduction, paranoia and religious 'revelation'.

  5. Revelation and Innovation of Value

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saghaug, Kristin Margrethe

    Kristin F. Saghaug’s Phd thesis investigates the interaction of revelatory theology, artistic creativity and small business owners in a business model innovation context. This project challenges mainstream business management’s concept of value and adds to the understanding of the innovation...... of values that are innovated as they are “broken through” using Tillich’s notion of revelation in art and his anthropology. The project adds to the understanding of the innovation process as it focuses on the moment as a breakthrough, a fragmentary revelation that unites past, present and future. The form...

  6. Dietary administration of δ- and γ-tocopherol inhibits tumorigenesis in the animal model of estrogen receptor-positive, but not HER-2 breast cancer.

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    Smolarek, Amanda K; So, Jae Young; Burgess, Brenda; Kong, Ah-Ng Tony; Reuhl, Kenneth; Lin, Yong; Shih, Weichung Joe; Li, Guangxun; Lee, Mao-Jung; Chen, Yu-Kuo; Yang, Chung S; Suh, Nanjoo

    2012-11-01

    Tocopherol, a member of the vitamin E family, consists of four forms designated as α, β, γ, and δ. Several large cancer prevention studies with α-tocopherol have reported no beneficial results, but recent laboratory studies have suggested that δ- and γ-tocopherol may be more effective. In two different animal models of breast cancer, the chemopreventive activities of individual tocopherols were assessed using diets containing 0.3% of tocopherol (α-, δ-, or γ-) or 0.3% of a γ-tocopherol rich mixture (γ-TmT). Although administration of tocopherols did not prevent human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2/neu)-driven tumorigenesis, δ- and γ-tocopherols inhibited hormone-dependent mammary tumorigenesis in N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (NMU)-treated female Sprague-Dawley rats. NMU-treated rats showed an average tumor burden of 10.6 ± 0.8 g in the control group at 11 weeks, whereas dietary administration of δ- and γ-tocopherols significantly decreased tumor burden to 7.2 ± 0.8 g (P < 0.01) and 7.1 ± 0.7 g (P < 0.01), respectively. Tumor multiplicity was also reduced in δ- and γ-tocopherol treatment groups by 42% (P < 0.001) and 32% (P < 0.01), respectively. In contrast, α-tocopherol did not decrease tumor burden or multiplicity. In mammary tumors, the protein levels of proapoptotic markers (BAX, cleaved caspase-9, cleaved caspase-3, cleaved PARP) were increased, whereas antiapoptotic markers (Bcl-2, XIAP) were inhibited by δ-tocopherol, γ-tocopherol, and γ-TmT. Furthermore, markers of cell proliferation (PCNA, PKCα), survival (PPAR-γ, PTEN, phospho-Akt), and cell cycle (p53, p21) were affected by δ- and γ-tocopherols. Both δ- and γ-tocopherols, but not α-tocopherol, seem to be promising agents for the prevention of hormone-dependent breast cancer.

  7. Thymosin beta 10 is a key regulator of tumorigenesis and metastasis and a novel serum marker in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Ren, Dong; Guo, Ling; Wang, Lan; Wu, Shu; Lin, Chuyong; Ye, Liping; Zhu, Jinrong; Li, Jun; Song, Libing; Lin, Huanxin; He, Zhenyu

    2017-02-08

    Thymosin beta 10 (TMSB10) has been demonstrated to be involved in the malignant process of many cancers. The purpose of this study was to determine the biological roles and clinical significance of TMSB10 in breast cancer and to identify whether TMSB10 might be used as a serum marker for the diagnosis of breast cancer. TMSB10 expression was evaluated by immunohistochemical analysis (IHC) of 253 breast tumors and ELISA of serum from 80 patients with breast cancer. Statistical analysis was performed to explore the correlation between TMSB10 expression and clinicopathological features in breast cancer. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression analysis were performed to examine the association between TMSB10 expression and overall survival and metastatic status. In vitro and in vivo assays were performed to assess the biological roles of TMSB10 in breast cancer. Western blotting and luciferase assays were examined to identify the underlying pathway involved in the tumor-promoting role of TMSB10. We found TMSB10 was upregulated in breast cancer cells and tissues. Univariate and multivariate analysis demonstrated that high TMSB10 expression significantly correlated with clinicopathological features, poor prognosis and distant metastases in patients with breast cancer. Overexpression of TMSB10 promotes, while silencing of TMSB10 inhibits, proliferation, invasion and migration of breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Our results further reveal that TMSB10 promotes the proliferation, invasion and migration of breast cancer cells via AKT/FOXO signaling, which is antagonized by the AKT kinase inhibitor perifosine. Importantly, the expression of TMSB10 is significantly elevated in the serum of patients with breast cancer and is positively associated with clinical stages of breast cancer. TMSB10 may hold promise as a minimally invasive serum cancer biomarker for the diagnosis of breast cancer and a potential therapeutic target which will facilitate the development of a

  8. Does Skeletal Muscle Mass Influence Breast Cancer? Evaluating Mammary Tumorigenesis and Progression Genetically Hyper-Muscular Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-01

    the skeletal muscle-specific muscle growth inhibitor myostatin and mice expressing a dominant negative form of the myostatin receptor, Activin...and rates of breast cancer initiation and progression. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Breast cancer, skeletal muscle, myostatin , MPA, DMBA, Activin receptor 16...including interleukins, Insulin-like Growth Factor (IGF) isoforms, IGF-binding proteins and myostatin . To determine the effect of skeletal muscle mass

  9. The direct effect of Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK, dominant-negative FAK, FAK-CD and FAK siRNA on gene expression and human MCF-7 breast cancer cell tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Li

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Focal adhesion kinase (FAK is a non-receptor tyrosine kinase that plays an important role in survival signaling. FAK has been shown to be overexpressed in breast cancer tumors at early stages of tumorigenesis. Methods To study the direct effect of FAK on breast tumorigenesis, we developed Tet-ON (tetracycline-inducible system of MCF-7 breast cancer cells stably transfected with FAK or dominant-negative, C-terminal domain of FAK (FAK-CD, and also FAKsiRNA with silenced FAK MCF-7 stable cell line. Increased expression of FAK in isogenic Tet-inducible MCF-7 cells caused increased cell growth, adhesion and soft agar colony formation in vitro, while expression of dominant-negative FAK inhibitor caused inhibition of these cellular processes. To study the role of induced FAK and FAK-CD in vivo, we inoculated these Tet-inducible cells in nude mice to generate tumors in the presence or absence of doxycycline in the drinking water. FAKsiRNA-MCF-7 cells were also injected into nude mice to generate xenograft tumors. Results Induction of FAK resulted in significant increased tumorigenesis, while induced FAK-CD resulted in decreased tumorigenesis. Taq Man Low Density Array assay demonstrated specific induction of FAKmRNA in MCF-7-Tet-ON-FAK cells. DMP1, encoding cyclin D binding myb-like protein 1 was one of the genes specifically affected by Tet-inducible FAK or FAK-CD in breast xenograft tumors. In addition, silencing of FAK in MCF-7 cells with FAK siRNA caused increased cell rounding, decreased cell viability in vitro and inhibited tumorigenesis in vivo. Importantly, Affymetrix microarray gene profiling analysis using Human Genome U133A GeneChips revealed >4300 genes, known to be involved in apoptosis, cell cycle, and adhesion that were significantly down- or up-regulated (p Conclusion Thus, these data for the first time demonstrate the direct effect of FAK expression and function on MCF-7 breast cancer tumorigenesis in vivo and reveal

  10. LincRNA-ROR induces epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and contributes to breast cancer tumorigenesis and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, P; Zhao, Y; Li, Z; Yao, R; Ma, M; Gao, Y; Zhao, L; Zhang, Y; Huang, B; Lu, J

    2014-06-12

    LncRNAs have critical roles in various biological processes ranging from embryonic development to human diseases, including cancer progression, although their detailed mechanistic functions remain illusive. The lncRNA linc-ROR has been shown to contribute to the maintenance of induced pluripotent stem cells and embryonic stem cells. In this study, we discovered that linc-ROR was upregulated in breast tumor samples, and ectopic overexpression of linc-ROR in immortalized human mammary epithelial cells induced an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) program. Moreover, we showed that linc-ROR enhanced breast cancer cell migration and invasion, which was accompanied by generation of stem cell properties. Contrarily, silencing of linc-ROR repressed breast tumor growth and lung metastasis in vivo. Mechanistically, our data revealed that linc-ROR was associated with miRNPs and functioned as a competing endogenous RNA to mi-205. Specifically, linc-ROR prevented the degradation of mir-205 target genes, including the EMT inducer ZEB2. Thus our results indicate that linc-ROR functions as an important regulator of EMT and can promote breast cancer progression and metastasis through regulation of miRNAs. Potentially, the findings of this study implicate the relevance of linc-ROR as a possible therapeutic target for aggressive and metastatic breast cancers.

  11. Interaction of CDCP1 with HER2 Enhances HER2-Driven Tumorigenesis and Promotes Trastuzumab Resistance in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Alajati

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the molecular pathways that contribute to the aggressive behavior of HER2-positive breast cancers may aid in the development of novel therapeutic interventions. Here, we show that CDCP1 and HER2 are frequently co-overexpressed in metastatic breast tumors and associated with poor patient prognosis. HER2 and CDCP1 co-overexpression leads to increased transformation ability, cell migration, and tumor formation in vivo, and enhanced HER2 activation and downstream signaling in different breast cancer cell lines. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that CDCP1 binds to HER2 through its intracellular domain, thereby increasing HER2 interaction with the non-receptor tyrosine kinase c-SRC (SRC, leading to trastuzumab resistance. Taken together, our findings establish that CDCP1 is a modulator of HER2 signaling and a biomarker for the stratification of breast cancer patients with poor prognosis. Our results also provide a rationale for therapeutic targeting of CDCP1 in HER2-positive breast cancer patients.

  12. Dietary administration of δ- and γ-tocopherol inhibits tumorigenesis in the animal model of estrogen-receptor positive, but not HER-2 breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolarek, Amanda K.; So, Jae Young; Burgess, Brenda; Kong, Ah-Ng Tony; Reuhl, Kenneth; Lin, Yong; Shih, Weichung Joe; Li, Guangxun; Lee, Mao-Jung; Chen, Yu-Kuo; Yang, Chung S.; Suh, Nanjoo

    2012-01-01

    Tocopherol, a member of the vitamin E family, consists of four forms designated as α, β, γ, and δ. Several large cancer prevention studies with α-tocopherol have reported no beneficial results, but recent laboratory studies have suggested that δ- and γ-tocopherol may be more effective. In two different animal models of breast cancer, the chemopreventive activities of individual tocopherols were assessed using diets containing 0.3% of tocopherol (α-, δ- or γ-) or 0.3% of a γ-tocopherol rich mixture (γ-TmT). While administration of tocopherols did not prevent human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2/neu)-driven tumorigenesis, δ- and γ-tocopherols inhibited hormone-dependent mammary tumorigenesis in N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (NMU)-treated female Sprague Dawley rats. NMU-treated rats showed an average tumor burden of 10.6 ± 0.8 g in the control group at 11 weeks, whereas dietary administration of δ- and γ-tocopherols significantly decreased tumor burden to 7.2 ± 0.8 g (p<0.01) and 7.1 ± 0.7 g (p<0.01), respectively. Tumor multiplicity was also reduced in δ- and γ-tocopherol treatment groups by 42% (p<0.001) and 32% (p<0.01), respectively. In contrast, α-tocopherol did not decrease tumor burden or multiplicity. In mammary tumors, the protein levels of pro-apoptotic markers (BAX, cleaved-caspase 9, cleaved-caspase 3, cleaved-PARP) were increased, while anti-apoptotic markers (Bcl2, XIAP) were inhibited by δ-tocopherol, γ-tocopherol and γ-TmT. Furthermore, markers of cell proliferation (PCNA, PKC α), survival (PPARγ, PTEN, phospho-Akt) and cell cycle (p53, p21) were affected by δ- and γ-tocopherols. Both δ- and γ-tocopherols, but not α-tocopherol, appear to be promising agents for the prevention of hormone-dependent breast cancer. PMID:22964476

  13. E-cadherin inactivation in lobular carcinoma in situ of the breast: an early event in tumorigenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, C. B.; Cleton-Jansen, A. M.; Berx, G.; de Leeuw, W. J.; ter Haar, N. T.; van Roy, F.; Cornelisse, C. J.; Peterse, J. L.; van de Vijver, M. J.

    1997-01-01

    In breast cancer, inactivating point mutations in the E-cadherin gene are frequently found in invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) but never in invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). Lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) adjacent to ILC has previously been shown to lack E-cadherin expression, but whether LCIS

  14. Role of HGF in obesity-associated tumorigenesis: C3(1)-TAg mice as a model for human basal-like breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaram, Sneha; Freemerman, Alex J.; Johnson, Amy R.; Milner, J. Justin; McNaughton, Kirk K.; Galanko, Joseph A.; Bendt, Katharine M.; Darr, David B.; Perou, Charles M.; Troester, Melissa A.; Makowski, Liza

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is associated with basal-like breast cancer (BBC), an aggressive breast cancer subtype. The objective of this study was to determine whether obesity promotes BBC onset in adulthood and to evaluate the role of stromal-epithelial interactions in obesity-associated tumorigenesis. We hypothesized that hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) plays a promoting role in BBC, which express the HGF receptor, c-Met. In C3(1)-Tag mice, a murine model of BBC, we demonstrated that obesity leads to a significant increase in HGF secretion and an associated decrease in tumor latency. By immunohistochemical analysis, normal mammary gland exhibited obesity-induced HGF, c-Met and phospho-c-Met, indicating that activation of the cascade was obesity-driven. HGF secretion was also increased from primary mammary fibroblasts isolated from normal mammary glands and tumors of obese mice compared to lean. These results demonstrate that obesity-induced elevation of HGF expression is a stable phenotype, maintained after several passages, and after removal of dietary stimulation. Conditioned media from primary tumor fibroblasts from obese mice drove tumor cell proliferation. In co-culture, neutralization of secreted HGF blunted tumor cell migration, further linking obesity-mediated HGF-dependent effects to in vitro measures of tumor aggressiveness. In sum, these results demonstrate that HGF/c-Met plays an important role in obesity-associated carcinogenesis. Understanding the effects of obesity on risk and progression is important given that epidemiologic studies imply a portion of BBC could be eliminated by reducing obesity. PMID:24218051

  15. Creative nonfiction: narrative and revelation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Curtis W

    2009-06-01

    Creative nonfiction and the illness narrative are recently identified approaches to literary expression. They are particularly well suited to the genre of memoir where psychological issues such as mourning and attachment and loss may be explored. The recent memoirs of Sue Erikson Bloland and Honor Moore fulfill the description of creative nonfiction. They offer their readers an opportunity to explore with them the theological and existential issues of revelation, reconciliation, and forgiveness. This paper was first presented for the Working Group on Psychoanalysis and the Arts of the Richardson Research Seminar in the History of Psychiatry at Weill Cornell Medical College.

  16. Complement Inhibitory Proteins and Their Role in Tumorigenesis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tomlinson, Stephen

    2001-01-01

    Complement is a major effector mechanism of the immune system. Membrane complement inhibitors on the surface of breast tumor cells, may play a crucial role in determining tumorigenesis and the outcome of antibody-mediated immunotherapy...

  17. Notch3 Maintains Luminal Phenotype and Suppresses Tumorigenesis and Metastasis of Breast Cancer via Trans-Activating Estrogen Receptor-α

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dou, Xiao-Wei; Liang, Yuan-Ke; Lin, Hao-Yu; Wei, Xiao-Long; Zhang, Yong-Qu; Bai, Jing-Wen; Chen, Chun-Fa; Chen, Min; Du, Cai-Wen; Li, Yao-Chen; Tian, Jie; Man, Kwan; Zhang, Guo-Jun

    2017-01-01

    The luminal A phenotype is the most common breast cancer subtype and is characterized by estrogen receptor α expression (ERα). Identification of the key regulator that governs the luminal phenotype of breast cancer will clarify the pathogenic mechanism and provide novel therapeutic strategies for

  18. Activation of Robo1 signaling of breast cancer cells by Slit2 from stromal fibroblast restrains tumorigenesis via blocking PI3K/Akt/β-catenin pathway

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chang, Po-Hao; Hwang-Verslues, Wendy W; Chang, Yi-Cheng; Chen, Chun-Chin; Hsiao, Michael; Jeng, Yung-Ming; Chang, King-Jen; Lee, Eva Y-H P; Shew, Jin-Yuh; Lee, Wen-Hwa

    2012-01-01

    .... The mechanisms that underlie this paradox remain unknown. Here, we report that the tumorigenic potential of breast cancer cells is determined by an interaction between the Robo1 receptor and its ligand Slit2, which is secreted by stromal fibroblasts...

  19. Ambient oxygen promotes tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Joong Sung

    Full Text Available Oxygen serves as an essential factor for oxidative stress, and it has been shown to be a mutagen in bacteria. While it is well established that ambient oxygen can also cause genomic instability in cultured mammalian cells, its effect on de novo tumorigenesis at the organismal level is unclear. Herein, by decreasing ambient oxygen exposure, we report a ∼50% increase in the median tumor-free survival time of p53-/- mice. In the thymus, reducing oxygen exposure decreased the levels of oxidative DNA damage and RAG recombinase, both of which are known to promote lymphomagenesis in p53-/- mice. Oxygen is further shown to be associated with genomic instability in two additional cancer models involving the APC tumor suppressor gene and chemical carcinogenesis. Together, these observations represent the first report directly testing the effect of ambient oxygen on de novo tumorigenesis and provide important physiologic evidence demonstrating its critical role in increasing genomic instability in vivo.

  20. Lipid Signaling in Tumorigenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Renyan; Huang, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Lipids are important cellular building blocks and components of signaling cascades. Deregulation of lipid metabolism or signaling is frequently linked to a variety of human diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer. It is widely believed that lipid molecules or their metabolic products are involved in tumorigenic inflammation and thus, lipids are implicated as significant contributors or even primary triggers of tumorigenesis. Lipids are believed to directly or indirectly...

  1. Activation of Robo1 signaling of breast cancer cells by Slit2 from stromal fibroblast restrains tumorigenesis via blocking PI3K/Akt/β-catenin pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Po-Hao; Hwang-Verslues, Wendy W; Chang, Yi-Cheng; Chen, Chun-Chin; Hsiao, Michael; Jeng, Yung-Ming; Chang, King-Jen; Lee, Eva Y-H P; Shew, Jin-Yuh; Lee, Wen-Hwa

    2012-09-15

    Tumor microenvironment plays a critical role in regulating tumor progression by secreting factors that mediate cancer cell growth. Stromal fibroblasts can promote tumor growth through paracrine factors; however, restraint of malignant carcinoma progression by the microenvironment also has been observed. The mechanisms that underlie this paradox remain unknown. Here, we report that the tumorigenic potential of breast cancer cells is determined by an interaction between the Robo1 receptor and its ligand Slit2, which is secreted by stromal fibroblasts. The presence of an active Slit2/Robo1 signal blocks the translocation of β-catenin into nucleus, leading to downregulation of c-myc and cyclin D1 via the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway. Clinically, high Robo1 expression in the breast cancer cells correlates with increased survival in patients with breast cancer, and low Slit2 expression in the stromal fibroblasts is associated with lymph node metastasis. Together, our findings explain how a specific tumor microenvironment can restrain a given type of cancer cell from progression and show that both stromal fibroblasts and tumor cell heterogeneity affect breast cancer outcomes.

  2. Role of EGE-related Growth Factor Cripto in Murine Mammary Tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-10-01

    which may confer association with the cell membrane [10, 11]. Despite their relatively low sequence conservation (about 30% amino acid identity...B. A. Beta- amyloid neurotoxicity requires fibril formation nod iu 1nhibe,1y homogenates for human PSI fragments. Transgene expression was also Congo...human breast tumorigenesis. To determine whether Cripto has a causal role in tumorigenesis, and whether it may be involved in normal breast development

  3. Activation of Robo1 signaling of breast cancer cells by Slit2 from stromal fibroblast restrains tumorigenesis via blocking PI3K/Akt/β-catenin pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Po-Hao; Hwang-Verslues, Wendy W.; Chang, Yi-Cheng; Chen, Chun-Chin; Hsiao, Michael; Jeng, Yung-Ming; Chang, King-Jen; Lee, Eva Y.-H. P.; Shew, Jin-Yuh; Lee, Wen-Hwa

    2012-01-01

    Tumor microenvironment plays a critical role in regulating tumor progression by secreting factors that mediate cancer cell growth. Stromal fibroblasts can promote tumor growth through paracrine factors; however, restraint of malignant carcinoma progression by the microenvironment also has been observed. The mechanisms that underlie this paradox remain unknown. Here, we report that the tumorigenic potential of breast cancer cells is determined by an interaction between the Robo1 receptor and i...

  4. The unfolding of God's revelation in Hebrews 1:1–2a

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-06-24

    Jun 24, 2016 ... revelation is progressive, that his revelation in his Son is superior, climactic and final, and that. God's final revelation in his Son can only be understood within the context of his Old Testament revelation, and vice versa. The unfolding of God's revelation in Hebrews 1:1–2a. Read online: Scan this QR.

  5. Kuidas kirjutatakse ajalugu? / Jacques Revel ; interv. Marek Tamm

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Revel, Jacques

    2007-01-01

    Prantsuse ajaloolase ja ajakirja Annales ühe peatoimetaja J. Revel'i erialasest tegevusest ja teostest. Varem. ilm.: Sündmused, jutustus ja analüüsiskaalad : intervjuu Jacques Reveliga // Revel, Jacques, Farge, Arlette. Mässu loogika : lasteröövlite afäär Pariisis 1750. - Tallinn, 2005. - Lk. 109-123

  6. Cosmology in the book of Revelation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gert J.C. Jordaan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The cosmology of the book of Revelation mainly involves God’s restored reign over the created universe (κόσμος. Throughout the book, the κόσμος is depicted according to its constituent parts, namelyheaven, sea and earth. At first sight, this threefold description seems to stem from the ancient Jewish and mythological three-storied cosmological view of ‘up-above’, ‘here-below’ and ‘down-under’. However, this correspondence proves to be only superficial. Heaven is used by John not as much in spatial sense as in temporal sense: as symbolic reference to a divine point above time and history. Heaven is also a qualitative reference to a situation of complete obedient worship to God. Earth in John’s visions is mostly used as metaphor for sinful mankind under the rule of Satan. Yet, the earth remains part of God’s creation under his divine authority, and even becomes a refuge for the church in this dispensation. The sea in Revelation, when not denoting a physical space, is often equated by scholars to the abyss or the underworld. However, in Revelation the sea is mostly used as metaphor for the basic evil from which the beast originates and of everything immoral and impure. The last chapters of Revelation reveal that in the eschaton heaven, sea and earth will all be part of the new creation − renewed to the point where God’s reign is restored and acknowledged above all doubt throughout the κόσμος.Kosmologie in die boek van Openbaring. Die kosmologie van Openbaring getuig van God se herstelde regering oor die geskape heelal (κόσμος. Regdeur die boek word die κόσμος volgens sy samestellende dele beskryf, naamlik hemel, see en aarde. Oppervlakkig beskou, lyk hierdie beskrywing na die antieke Joodse en mitologiese drie-verdieping-kosmologie van ‘daar bo’, ‘hier onder’ en ‘daar onder’. Hierdie ooreenkoms is egter slegs oppervlakkig. Hemel word deur Johannes nie soseer in ruimtelike sin

  7. The Revelation of God, East and West: Contrasting Special Revelation in Western Modernity with the Ancient Christian East

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobs Nathan A.

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The questions of whether God reveals himself; if so, how we can know a purported revelation is authentic; and how such revelations relate to the insights of reason are discussed by John Locke, Thomas Hobbes, René Descartes, G. W. Leibniz, and Immanuel Kant, to name a few. Yet, what these philosophers say with such consistency about revelation stands in stark contrast with the claims of the Christian East, which are equally consistent from the second century through the fourteenth century. In this essay, I will compare the modern discussion of special revelation from Thomas Hobbes through Johann Fichte with the Eastern Christian discussion from Irenaeus through Gregory Palamas. As we will see, there are noteworthy differences between the two trajectories, differences I will suggest merit careful consideration from philosophers of religion.

  8. Cutaneous metastasis reveling lung cancer | Elfatoiki | Pan African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pan African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 20, No 1 (2015) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Cutaneous metastasis reveling lung cancer. FZ Elfatoiki, F Hali. Abstract.

  9. Persecution in the book of Revelation | De Villiers | Acta Theologica

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this article attention will be given to scholarly interpretations of persecution in Revelation with special attention to their theoretical, hermeneutical and theological implications. After an introductory discussion of the traditional interpretation of a ";real"; persecution in a Domitianic setting, attention will be given to the recent ...

  10. The unfolding of God's revelation in Hebrews 1:1–2a | Coetsee ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the introduction to his sermon, the writer of Hebrews suggests that God's revelation unfolded from his so-called 'Old Testament' revelation to his 'New Testament' revelation in his Son (Heb. 1:1–2a). By doing a thorough exegesis of Hebrews 1:1–2a, the author's view of such an unfolding revelation is confirmed. From this ...

  11. Dietary supplementation with methylseleninic acid inhibits mammary tumorigenesis and metastasis in male MMTV-PyMT mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Male breast cancer, which makes up approximately 1% of all breast cancer, is an aggressive disease with poor prognosis. We investigated the effects of dietary supplementation with selenium in the form of methylseleninic acid (MSeA, 4.0 mg MSeA/kg) on mammary tumorigenesis in male MMTV-PyMT mice. ...

  12. "Guess What?": On Hidden-Camera Pranks' Revelation Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Javier Izquierdo-Martín

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Conceived as public communication objects, hidden-camera pranks (HCPs are a type of documentary on ordinary pranks. Defined versus classical Garfinkelian breaching experiments, HCPs also offer a natural form of ethnomethodological experimentation. Here I present some results of an analysis of a sample of forty-nine HCPs' revelation sequences (RSs. These little clips of five to fifty seconds long allow for the description of audio-visual details of the interactional work that actors, accomplices and victims of a HCP have to perform, in a finely coordinated manner in order "to put an end" to an artificially constructed social situation. My study focuses on a set of practical relevances of the work of revelation (offering and awakening (acceptation/rejection endogenously pointed at and topicalized by the agents enmeshed in the HCP situation. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0402126

  13. The effect of the feeling of resolution and recognition performance on the revelation effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Hiroshi; Itoh, Yuji

    2016-10-01

    The fact that engaging in a cognitive task before a recognition task increases the probability of "old" responses is known as the revelation effect. We used several cognitive tasks to examine whether the feeling of resolution, a key construct of the occurrence mechanism of the revelation effect, is related to the occurrence of the revelation effect. The results show that the revelation effect was not caused by a visual search task, which elicited the feeling of resolution, but caused by an unsolvable anagram task and an articulatory suppression task, which did not elicit the feeling of resolution. These results suggest that the revelation effect is not related to the feeling of resolution. Moreover, the revelation effect was likely to occur in participants who performed poorly on the recognition task. The result suggests that the revelation effect is inclined to occur when people depend more on familiarity than on recollection process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The interplay between autophagy and ROS in tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameera eKongara

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS at physiological levels are important cell signaling molecules. However, aberrantly high ROS are intimately associated with disease and commonly observed in cancer. Mitochondria are primary sources of intracellular ROS, and their maintenance is essential to cellular health. Autophagy, an evolutionarily conserved process whereby cytoplasmic components are delivered to lysosomes for degradation, is responsible for mitochondrial turnover and removal of damaged mitochondria. Impaired autophagy is implicated in many pathological conditions, including neurological disorders, inflammatory bowel disease, diabetes, aging and cancer. The first reports connecting autophagy to cancer showed that allelic loss of the essential autophagy gene BECLIN1 (BECN1 is prevalent in human breast, ovarian and prostate cancers and that Becn1+/- mice develop mammary gland hyperplasias, lymphomas, and lung and liver tumors. Subsequent studies demonstrated that Atg5-/- and Atg7-/- livers give rise to adenomas, Atg4-/- mice are susceptible to chemical carcinogenesis, and Bif1-/- mice are prone to spontaneous tumors, indicating that autophagy defects promote tumorigenesis. Due to defective mitophagy, autophagy-deficient cells accumulate damaged mitochondria and deregulated ROS levels, which likely contribute to their tumor-initiating capacity. However, the role of autophagy in tumorigenesis is complex, as more recent work also revealed tumor dependence on autophagy: autophagy-competent mutant-Ras-expressing cells form tumors more efficiently than their autophagy-deficient counterparts; similarly, FIP200 deficiency suppresses PyMT-driven mammary tumorigenesis. These latter findings are attributed to the fact that tumors driven by powerful oncogenes have high metabolic demands catered to by autophagy. In this review, we discuss the relationship between ROS and autophagy and summarize our current knowledge on their functional interactions in

  15. Tumorigenesis: cell defense against hypoxia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nafiseh Pakravan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Microenvironmental elements can directly contribute to the induction and the maintenance of tumor. Oxygen is the main element in the cell microenvironment and hypoxia can affect the process of tumorigenesis. In response to hypoxia, cells change their pattern and characteristics. These changes suggest that it is not just adaptation, but some sort of cell defense against hypoxia. If hypoxia is corrected, then cell defense mechanisms are interrupted. An examination of the process of tumorigenesis helps to design better therapeutic strategies.A systematic review of the English literature was conducted by searching PubMed, Google Scholar, and ISI Web databases for studies on changes that defend and help cells to live in a hypoxic microenvironment. Cells respond to hypoxia by de-differentiation and an increase in heat shock proteins. Angiogenesis and deviation of inflammatory response in favor of hypoxic cell survival also defend and save the oxygen-starved cells from death. Finally, anti-angiogenic therapies and more hypoxia enhance metastasis, as tumors with low oxygen concentration are more malignant than tumors with high oxygen concentration. All these enable cells to migrate away from low oxygen areas and seek a more conducive microenvironment. Therapies that make the microenvironment more hypoxic need to be revised. This has been done for antiangiogenic therapies, previously considered to be anti-tumor approaches. Effective therapies may be correcting therapies which direct the tumor microenvironment towards natural physical/chemical condition. Correcting therapies either bring back tumor cells to a normal form (correct tumor cells or help the immune system to eradicate tumor cells which can not be corrected.

  16. The REVEL Project: an Oceanographic Research Immersion Professional Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robigou, V.

    2004-12-01

    The REVEL Project (Research and Education: Volcanoes, Exploration and Life) is an NSF-funded, professional development program for middle and high school science teachers that are motivated to use deep-sea research and seafloor exploration as tools to implement inquiry-based science in their classrooms, schools, and districts, and to share their experiences with their communities. Initiated in 1996 as a regional program for Northwest science educators, REVEL evolved into a multi-institutional program inviting teachers to practice doing research on sea-going research expeditions. Today the project offers teachers throughout the U. S. an opportunity to participate and contribute to international, multidisciplinary, deep-sea research in the Northeast Pacific ocean to study the relationship between geological processes such as earthquakes and volcanism, fluid circulation and life on our planet. In addition, the program supports teachers to implement research-based, data-oriented activities in their classrooms, and prepares them to use curriculum that will enhance student learning through the research process. Evaluation for year 2003-2004 of the program reveals that the program is designed as a successful research immersion opportunity during which teachers learn content, process, culture and ethos of authentic research. Qualitative results indicate that teachers who have participated in the program assimilate the scientific process over several years and share their expertise in ways most beneficial for their communities for years to come.

  17. Anaplastic thyroid cancer, tumorigenesis and therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Neill, J P

    2010-03-01

    Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) is a fatal endocrine malignancy. Current therapy fails to significantly improve survival. Recent insights into thyroid tumorigenesis, post-malignant dedifferentiation and mode of metastatic activity offer new therapeutic strategies.

  18. Mutant p53 Amplifies Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Family Signaling to Promote Mammary Tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yallowitz, Alisha R; Li, Dun; Lobko, Anthony; Mott, Daniel; Nemajerova, Alice; Marchenko, Natalia

    2015-04-01

    The EGFR family (ErbB2/Her2 and EGFR/ErbB1/Her1) often modulates the transcriptional program involved in promoting mammary tumorigenesis. In humans, the majority of ErbB2-positive sporadic breast cancers harbor p53 mutations, which correlate with poor prognosis. Also, the extremely high incidence of ErbB2-positive breast cancer in women with p53 germline mutations (Li-Fraumeni syndrome) suggests a key role of mutant p53 specifically in ErbB2-mediated mammary tumorigenesis. To examine the role of mutant p53 during ErbB2-mediated mammary tumorigenesis, a mutant p53 allele (R172H) was introduced into the (MMTV)-ErbB2/Neu mouse model system. Interestingly, we show in heterozygous p53 mice that mutant p53 R172H is a more potent activator of ErbB2-mediated mammary tumorigenesis than simple loss of p53. The more aggressive disease in mutant p53 animals was reflected by earlier tumor onset, increased mammary tumor multiplicity, and shorter survival. These in vivo and in vitro data provide mechanistic evidence that mutant p53 amplifies ErbB2 and EGFR signaling to promote the expansion of mammary stem cells and induce cell proliferation. This study identifies mutant p53 as an essential player in ErbB2 and EGFR-mediated mammary tumorigenesis and indicates the potential translational importance of targeting mutant p53 in this subset of patients with breast cancer. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. BAG-1 haplo-insufficiency impairs lung tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camarero Guadalupe

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background BAG-1 is a multifunctional co-chaperone of heat shock proteins (Hsc70/Hsp70 that is expressed in most cells. It interacts with Bcl-2 and Raf indicating that it might connect protein folding with other signaling pathways. Evidence that BAG-1 expression is frequently altered in human cancers, in particular in breast cancer, relative to normal cells has been put forward but the notion that overexpression of BAG-1 contributes to poor prognosis in tumorigenesis remains controversial. Methods We have evaluated the effect of BAG-1 heterozygosity in mice in a model of non-small-cell lung tumorigenesis with histological and molecular methods. We have generated mice heterozygous for BAG-1, carrying a BAG-1 null allele, that in addition express oncogenic, constitutively active C-Raf kinase (SP-C C-Raf BxB in type II pneumocytes. SP-C C-Raf BxB mice develop multifocal adenomas early in adulthood. Results We show that BAG-1 heterozygosity in mice impairs C-Raf oncogene-induced lung adenoma growth. Lung tumor initiation was reduced by half in BAG-1 heterozygous SP-C C-Raf BxB mice compared to their littermates. Tumor area was reduced by 75% in 4 month lungs of BAG-1 haploinsufficient mice compared to mice with two BAG-1 copies. Whereas BAG-1 heterozygosity did not affect the rate of cell proliferation or signaling through the mitogenic cascade in adenoma cells, it increased the rate of apoptosis. Conclusion Reduced BAG-1 expression specifically targets tumor cells to apoptosis and impairs tumorigenesis. Our data implicate BAG-1 as a key player in oncogenic transformation by Raf and identify it as a potential molecular target for cancer treatment.

  20. the glory of the son of man in revelation 13. reflections on mysticism

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    THE GLORY OF THE SON OF MAN. IN REVELATION 13. REFLECTIONS. ON MYSTICISM IN THE NEW. TESTAMENT. ABSTRACT. This article focuses on the mystical nature of the Christophany in Revelation 13 in order to illuminate the present research on mysticism in the New Testament. It firstly introduces the relevant ...

  1. Neither Sola Scriptura, Nor Solus Spiritus: The revelation in the human dimension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdruschin Schaeffer Rocha

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This present article aims to discuss the revelation in the human dimension. In this sense, it presupposes that both in the historical Protestantism as in the Pentecostalism, such dimension and its derived contingencies were not properly considered, as both traditions make use of an alleged “guarantee of purity” from the revelation. In the historical protestantism such guarantee was sought in the Scriptures, in a way that by evoking the authority of the Scripture the Reformers believed they could ensure the integrity of the revelation, within a supposed "sanitized environment". In the pentecostalism, this supposed security was guaranteed by the Spirit, after all, it’s fueled by strong expectation of a personal meeting with God, and that such immediacy would ensure the purity of the revelation.   By assuming human limitations and subjectivity that are inherent in receiving a revelation, we propose, therefore, a revelation that is constituted within the limits of history; a revelation that is constituted within the limits of language; a revelation that is constituted within the limits of human vulnerability

  2. Skillful Revelation: Local Healers, Rationalists, and Their 'Trickery' in Chhattisgarh, Central India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, Helen M

    2015-01-01

    To understand the workings of medicine, healing, placebo, belief, and rationality, medical anthropologists need to pay attention to the complex relations of various forms of revelation, contemplation, and rejoining revelation that attach to illness and healing. In this article two performances of a healing technique located in the agricultural plain of Chhattisgarh, central India, are compared: one representing scientific rationality; the other 'blind' superstition. In both performances the practitioner's aim is to reveal: the local healer reveals witchcraft objects from the afflicted body; the local rationalist society reveals the healer's technique as a fraudulent trick. Each performance shares 'an aesthetics of revelation'-they rely on seeing or revealing to obtain their social effect. The interplay between forms of revelation, a reliance on aesthetics for the revelation, and the ways of seeing can indicate how distinctions are made (or not) between doctor and quack, expertise and gimmickry, and truth and falsehood.

  3. DNA Methylation in Thyroid Tumorigenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen, Josena K., E-mail: jstephe2@hfhs.org [Department of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); Chitale, Dhananjay [Department of Pathology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); Narra, Vinod [Essex Surgical Associates, PC, Beverly, MA 01915 (United States); Chen, Kang Mei; Sawhney, Raja; Worsham, Maria J. [Department of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States)

    2011-03-29

    Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine cancer with 1,690 deaths each year. There are four main types of which the papillary and follicular types together account for >90% followed by medullary cancers with 3% to 5% and anaplastic carcinomas making up <3%. Epigenetic events of DNA hypermethylation are emerging as promising molecular targets for cancer detection. Our immediate and long term goal is to identify DNA methylation markers for early detection of thyroid cancer. This pilot study comprised of 21 patients to include 11 papillary thyroid cancers (PTC), 2 follicular thyroid cancers (FTC), 5 normal thyroid cases, and 3 hyperthyroid cases. Aberrant promoter methylation was examined in 24 tumor suppressor genes using the methylation specific multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MS-MLPA) assay and in the NIS gene using methylation-specific PCR (MSP). The frequently methylated genes were CASP8 (17/21), RASSF1 (16/21) and NIS (9/21). In the normal samples, CASP8, RASSF1 and NIS were methylated in 5/5, 4/5 and 1/5 respectively. In the hyperthyroid samples, CASP8, RASSF1 and NIS were methylated in 3/3, 2/3 and 1/3 respectively. In the thyroid cancers, CASP8, RASSF1, and NIS were methylated in 9/13, 10/13, and 7/13 respectively. CASP8, RASSF1 and NIS were also methylated in concurrently present normal thyroid tissue in 3/11, 4/11 and 3/11 matched thyroid cancer cases (matched for presence of both normal thyroid tissue and thyroid cancer), respectively. Our data suggests that aberrant methylation of CASP8, RASSF1, and NIS maybe an early change in thyroid tumorigenesis regardless of cell type.

  4. Aluminium chloride promotes tumorigenesis and metastasis in normal murine mammary gland epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Mandriota, Stefano J.; Tenan, Mirna; Ferrari, Paolo; Sappino, Andr??Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Aluminium salts, present in many industrial products of frequent use like antiperspirants, anti?acid drugs, food additives and vaccines, have been incriminated in contributing to the rise in breast cancer incidence in Western societies. However, current experimental evidence supporting this hypothesis is limited. For example, no experimental evidence that aluminium promotes tumorigenesis in cultured mammary epithelial cells exists. We report here that long?term exposure to concentrations of a...

  5. LMW-E/CDK2 Deregulates Acinar Morphogenesis, Induces Tumorigenesis, and Associates with the Activated b-Raf-ERK1/2-mTOR Pathway in Breast Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, MyLinh T.; Akli, Said; Wei, Caimiao; Wingate, Hannah F.; Liu, Wenbin; Lu, Yiling; Yi, Min; Mills, Gordon B.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Keyomarsi, Khandan

    2012-01-01

    Elastase-mediated cleavage of cyclin E generates low molecular weight cyclin E (LMW-E) isoforms exhibiting enhanced CDK2–associated kinase activity and resistance to inhibition by CDK inhibitors p21 and p27. Approximately 27% of breast cancers express high LMW-E protein levels, which significantly correlates with poor survival. The objective of this study was to identify the signaling pathway(s) deregulated by LMW-E expression in breast cancer patients and to identify pharmaceutical agents to effectively target this pathway. Ectopic LMW-E expression in nontumorigenic human mammary epithelial cells (hMECs) was sufficient to generate xenografts with greater tumorigenic potential than full-length cyclin E, and the tumorigenicity was augmented by in vivo passaging. However, cyclin E mutants unable to interact with CDK2 protected hMECs from tumor development. When hMECs were cultured on Matrigel, LMW-E mediated aberrant acinar morphogenesis, including enlargement of acinar structures and formation of multi-acinar complexes, as denoted by reduced BIM and elevated Ki67 expression. Similarly, inducible expression of LMW-E in transgenic mice generated hyper-proliferative terminal end buds resulting in enhanced mammary tumor development. Reverse-phase protein array assay of 276 breast tumor patient samples and cells cultured on monolayer and in three-dimensional Matrigel demonstrated that, in terms of protein expression profile, hMECs cultured in Matrigel more closely resembled patient tissues than did cells cultured on monolayer. Additionally, the b-Raf-ERK1/2-mTOR pathway was activated in LMW-E–expressing patient samples, and activation of this pathway was associated with poor disease-specific survival. Combination treatment using roscovitine (CDK inhibitor) plus either rapamycin (mTOR inhibitor) or sorafenib (a pan kinase inhibitor targeting b-Raf) effectively prevented aberrant acinar formation in LMW-E–expressing cells by inducing G1/S cell cycle arrest. LMW

  6. REVEL: A model for Recent plate velocities from space geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sella, Giovanni F.; Dixon, Timothy H.; Mao, Ailin

    2002-04-01

    We present a new global model for Recent plate velocities, REVEL, describing the relative velocities of 19 plates and continental blocks. The model is derived from publicly available space geodetic (primarily GPS) data for the period 1993-2000. We include an independent and rigorous estimate for GPS velocity uncertainties to assess plate rigidity and propagate these uncertainties to the velocity estimates. The velocity fields for North America, Eurasia, and Antarctica clearly show the effects of glacial isostatic adjustment, and Australia appears to depart from rigid plate behavior in a manner consistent with the mapped intraplate stress field. Two thirds of tested plate pairs agree with the NUVEL-1A geologic (3 Myr average) velocities within uncertainties. Three plate pairs (Caribbean-North America, Caribbean-South America, and North America-Pacific) exhibit significant differences between the geodetic and geologic model that may reflect systematic errors in NUVEL-1A due to the use of seafloor magnetic rate data that do not reflect the full plate rate because of tectonic complexities. Most other differences probably reflect real velocity changes over the last few million years. Several plate pairs (Arabia-Eurasia, Arabia-Nubia, Eurasia-India) move more slowly than the 3 Myr NUVEL-1A average, perhaps reflecting long-term deceleration associated with continental collision. Several other plate pairs, including Nazca-Pacific, Nazca-South America and Nubia-South America, are experiencing slowing that began ~25 Ma, the beginning of the current phase of Andean crustal shortening.

  7. Multiple susceptibility loci for radiation-induced mammary tumorigenesis in F2[Dahl S x R]-intercross rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria L Herrera

    Full Text Available Although two major breast cancer susceptibility genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, have been identified accounting for 20% of breast cancer genetic risk, identification of other susceptibility genes accounting for 80% risk remains a challenge due to the complex, multi-factorial nature of breast cancer. Complexity derives from multiple genetic determinants, permutations of gene-environment interactions, along with presumptive low-penetrance of breast cancer predisposing genes, and genetic heterogeneity of human populations. As with other complex diseases, dissection of genetic determinants in animal models provides key insight since genetic heterogeneity and environmental factors can be experimentally controlled, thus facilitating the detection of quantitative trait loci (QTL. We therefore, performed the first genome-wide scan for loci contributing to radiation-induced mammary tumorigenesis in female F2-(Dahl S x R-intercross rats. Tumorigenesis was measured as tumor burden index (TBI after induction of rat mammary tumors at forty days of age via ¹²⁷Cs-radiation. We observed a spectrum of tumor latency, size-progression, and pathology from poorly differentiated ductal adenocarcinoma to fibroadenoma, indicating major effects of gene-environment interactions. We identified two mammary tumorigenesis susceptibility quantitative trait loci (Mts-QTLs with significant linkage: Mts-1 on chromosome-9 (LOD-2.98 and Mts-2 on chromosome-1 (LOD-2.61, as well as two Mts-QTLs with suggestive linkage: Mts-3 on chromosome-5 (LOD-1.93 and Mts-4 on chromosome-18 (LOD-1.54. Interestingly, Chr9-Mts-1, Chr5-Mts-3 and Chr18-Mts-4 QTLs are unique to irradiation-induced mammary tumorigenesis, while Chr1-Mts-2 QTL overlaps with a mammary cancer susceptibility QTL (Mcs 3 reported for 7,12-dimethylbenz-[α]antracene (DMBA-induced mammary tumorigenesis in F2[COP x Wistar-Furth]-intercross rats. Altogether, our results suggest at least three distinct susceptibility QTLs for

  8. BAG-1 haplo-insufficiency impairs lung tumorigenesis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Götz, Rudolf; Kramer, Boris W; Camarero, Guadalupe; Rapp, Ulf R

    2004-01-01

    ... contributes to poor prognosis in tumorigenesis remains controversial. We have evaluated the effect of BAG-1 heterozygosity in mice in a model of non-small-cell lung tumorigenesis with histological and molecular methods...

  9. The Mechanism by which Neurofibromin Suppresses Tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    NF1) syndrome . MPNSTs are highly aggressive,therapeutically resistant, and typically fatal. Using comparative transcriptome analysis, we identified...transiently promotes self-renewal but not tumorigenesis by neural crest stem cells. Cancer Cell 13, 129-140. Kijima, T., Maulik, G., Ma, P.C., Tibaldi, E.V

  10. Ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme complex Uev1A-Ubc13 promotes breast cancer metastasis through nuclear factor-кB mediated matrix metalloproteinase-1 gene regulation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wu, Zhaojia; Shen, Siqi; Zhang, Zhiling; Zhang, Weiwei; Xiao, Wei

    2014-01-01

    .... Previous reports have correlated the level of UEV1A expression with tumorigenesis; however, the detailed molecular events leading to tumors particularly breast cancer and metastasis are unclear...

  11. Ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme complex Uev1A-Ubc13 promotes breast cancer metastasis through nuclear factor-?B mediated matrix metalloproteinase-1 gene regulation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wu, Zhaojia; Shen, Siqi; Zhang, Zhiling; Zhang, Weiwei; Xiao, Wei

    2014-01-01

    .... Previous reports have correlated the level of UEV1A expression with tumorigenesis; however, the detailed molecular events leading to tumors particularly breast cancer and metastasis are unclear...

  12. Cdk2-Null Mice Are Resistant to ErbB-2-Induced Mammary Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipankar Ray

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The concept of targeting G1 cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs in breast cancer treatments is supported by the fact that the genetic ablation of Cdk4 had minimal impacts on normal cell proliferation in majority of cell types, resulting in near-normal mouse development, whereas such loss of Cdk4 completely abrogated ErbB-2/neu-induced mammary tumorigenesis in mice. In most human breast cancer tissues, another G1-regulatory CDK, CDK2, is also hyperactivated by various mechanisms and is believed to be an important therapeutic target. In this report, we provide genetic evidence that CDK2 is essential for proliferation and oncogenesis of murine mammary epithelial cells. We observed that 87% of Cdk2-null mice were protected from ErbB-2-induced mammary tumorigenesis. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts isolated from Cdk2-null mouse showed resistance to various oncogene-induced transformation. Previously, we have reported that hemizygous loss of Cdc25A, the major activator of CDK2, can also protect mice from ErbB-2-induced mammary tumorigenesis [Cancer Res (2007 67(14: 6605–11]. Thus, we propose that CDC25A-CDK2 pathway is critical for the oncogenic action of ErbB-2 in mammary epithelial cells, in a manner similar to Cyclin D1/CDK4 pathway.

  13. The glucose transporter GLUT1 is required for ErbB2-induced mammary tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellberg, Elizabeth A; Johnson, Stevi; Finlay-Schultz, Jessica; Lewis, Andrew S; Terrell, Kristina L; Sartorius, Carol A; Abel, E Dale; Muller, William J; Anderson, Steven M

    2016-12-20

    Altered tumor cell metabolism is an emerging hallmark of cancer; however, the precise role for glucose in tumor initiation is not known. GLUT1 (SLC2A1) is expressed in breast cancer cells and is likely responsible for avid glucose uptake observed in established tumors. We have shown that GLUT1 was necessary for xenograft tumor formation from primary mammary cells transformed with the polyomavirus middle-T antigen but that it was not necessary for growth after tumors had formed in vivo, suggesting a differential requirement for glucose depending on the stage of tumorigenesis. To determine whether GLUT1 is required early during mammary tumorigenesis, we crossed MMTV-NIC mice, which express activated HER2/NEU/ERBB2 and Cre recombinase, to Slc2a1 (Flox/Flox) (GLUT1(Flox/Flox)) mice to generate NIC-GLUT1(+/+), NIC-GLUT1(Flox/+), and NIC-GLUT1(Flox/Flox) mice. In addition, we evaluated effects of glucose restriction or GLUT1 inhibition on transformation in MCF10A-ERBB2 breast epithelial cells in three-dimensional culture. Finally, we utilized global gene expression profiling data of primary human breast tumors to determine the relationship between SLC2A1 and stage of tumorigenesis. All of the NIC-GLUT1(+/+) mice developed tumors in less than 200 days. In contrast, only 1 NIC-GLUT1(Flox/Flox) mouse and 1 NIC-GLUT1(Flox/+) mouse developed mammary tumors, even after 18 months. Mammary gland development was not disrupted in NIC mice lacking GLUT1; however, epithelial content of mature glands was reduced compared to NIC-GLUT1(Flox/+) mice. In MCF10A-ERBB2 cells, glucose restriction or GLUT1 inhibition blocked transformation induced by activated ERBB2 through reduced cell proliferation. In human breast cancers, SLC2A1 was higher in ductal carcinoma in situ compared to the normal breast, but lower in invasive versus in situ lesions, suggesting the requirement for GLUT1 decreases as tumors progress. This study demonstrates a strict requirement for GLUT1 in the early stages of

  14. Genetic mechanisms in Apc-mediated mammary tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Kuraguchi

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Many components of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway also play critical roles in mammary tumor development, yet the role of the tumor suppressor gene APC (adenomatous polyposis coli in breast oncongenesis is unclear. To better understand the role of Apc in mammary tumorigenesis, we introduced conditional Apc mutations specifically into two different mammary epithelial populations using K14-cre and WAP-cre transgenic mice that express Cre-recombinase in mammary progenitor cells and lactating luminal cells, respectively. Only the K14-cre-mediated Apc heterozygosity developed mammary adenocarcinomas demonstrating histological heterogeneity, suggesting the multilineage progenitor cell origin of these tumors. These tumors harbored truncation mutation in a defined region in the remaining wild-type allele of Apc that would retain some down-regulating activity of beta-catenin signaling. Activating mutations at codons 12 and 61 of either H-Ras or K-Ras were also found in a subset of these tumors. Expression profiles of acinar-type mammary tumors from K14-cre; Apc(CKO/+ mice showed luminal epithelial gene expression pattern, and clustering analysis demonstrated more correlation to MMTV-neu model than to MMTV-Wnt1. In contrast, neither WAP-cre-induced Apc heterozygous nor homozygous mutations resulted in predisposition to mammary tumorigenesis, although WAP-cre-mediated Apc deficiency resulted in severe squamous metaplasia of mammary glands. Collectively, our results suggest that not only the epithelial origin but also a certain Apc mutations are selected to achieve a specific level of beta-catenin signaling optimal for mammary tumor development and explain partially the colon- but not mammary-specific tumor development in patients that carry germline mutations in APC.

  15. Role of CDK4 in Breast Development and Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reddy, Haritha

    2008-01-01

    .... Our studies to determine the role of Cdk4 in Neu Wnt-1 and Ras-induced breast tumorigenesis indicated that the absence of Cdk4 impairs Neu and Ras-induced mammary tumorigenesis but not that induced by Wnt-1...

  16. Reproduction and Breast Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanf, Volker; Hanf, Dorothea

    2014-01-01

    Summary Reproduction is doubtlessly one of the main biological meanings of life. It is therefore not surprising that various aspects of reproduction impact on breast cancer risk. Various developmental levels may become targets of breast tumorigenesis. This review follows the chronologic sequence of events in the life of a female at risk, starting with the intrauterine development. Furthermore, the influence of both contraceptive measures and fertility treatment on breast cancer development is dealt with, as well as various pregnancy-associated factors, events, and perinatal outcomes. Finally, the contribution of breast feeding to a reduced breast cancer risk is discussed. PMID:25759622

  17. High-fat diet enhances mammary tumorigenesis and pulmonary metastasis and alters inflammatory and angiogenic profiles in MMTV-PyMT mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    The MMTV-PyMT transgenic mouse model is commonly used to study luminal B breast cancer, which has a lower prevalence but a worse prognosis. The objective of the present study was to determine whether an obesogenic, high-fat diet enhances primary tumorigenesis and pulmonary metastasis in female MMTV...

  18. The general revelation of God and creational gifts as a source for bioethics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakobus M. Vorster

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to provide a Christian-ethical foundation for the development of moral codes for bio- and ecoethics. The central theoretical argument of this contribution is that, due to the general revelation of God in nature, the Spirit of God bestows all humans with creational gifts. Seen as such the concept of natural law can be regarded, with certain conditions, as a credible and useful tool in the reformed paradigm. This article examines the concept of natural law as this idea is defined by Calvin and developed in the recent reformed tradition. Attention is paid to the criticism of Karl Barth and the view of Michael Welker and a way forward is proposed in view of the idea of God’s revelation in creation, the written Word and the incarnate Word of God, and the creational gifts bestowed by God upon all humans. The article concludes that natural knowledge, based on God’s revelation in creation as it is revealed by the natural sciences, provides Christian ethics with opportunities and the means to formulate applicable and relevant moral codes that can be utilised in a secular society. However, the ethical codes provided by natural sciences may not contradict the knowledge gained by God’s revelation in Scripture and the moral implications of God’s revelation in the Word that became flesh. Christian moral conduct can thus draw on creational gifts and biblical revelation but must in the end answer to the distinct values of Christ. The ethics flowing from the incarnate Word is the final yardstick for bio- and ecoethics and on this foundation Christian ethics can contribute to the current debates in the development of suitable bio- and ecoethical concepts.

  19. Reconsidering prepositions and Case assignment in the text of Revelation 4 and 5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.J.P.K. Riekert

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to describe the government by prepositions in the book of Revelation in terms of the Government and Binding Theory, it is imperative that the sub-theory of Case assignment be considered. With the latter as point of departure one may describe, i the shifts from autothematic and structural Case to oblique Case, ii the use of prepositions with oblique Case instead of the structural genitive Case, and( iii the peculiarities of the Case and case assignment of the preposition [foreign font omitted], as found in Revelation 4 and 5.

  20. The Functional Analysis of Histone Acetyltransferase MOF in Tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jiaming; Wang, Fei; Cai, Yong; Jin, Jingji

    2016-01-14

    Changes in chromatin structure and heritably regulating the gene expression by epigenetic mechanisms, such as histone post-translational modification, are involved in most cellular biological processes. Thus, abnormal regulation of epigenetics is implicated in the occurrence of various diseases, including cancer. Human MOF (males absent on the first) is a member of the MYST (Moz-Ybf2/Sas3-Sas2-Tip60) family of histone acetyltransferases (HATs). As a catalytic subunit, MOF can form at least two distinct multiprotein complexes (MSL and NSL) in human cells. Both complexes can acetylate histone H4 at lysine 16 (H4K16); however, the NSL complex possesses broader substrate specificity and can also acetylate histone H4 at lysines 5 and 8 (H4K5 and H4K8), suggesting the complexity of the intracellular functions of MOF. Silencing of MOF in cells leads to genomic instability, inactivation of gene transcription, defective DNA damage repair and early embryonic lethality. Unbalanced MOF expression and its corresponding acetylation of H4K16 have been found in certain primary cancer tissues, including breast cancer, medulloblastoma, ovarian cancer, renal cell carcinoma, colorectal carcinoma, gastric cancer, as well as non-small cell lung cancer. In this review, we provide a brief overview of MOF and its corresponding histone acetylation, introduce recent research findings that link MOF functions to tumorigenesis and speculate on the potential role that may be relevant to tumorigenic pathways.

  1. The Functional Analysis of Histone Acetyltransferase MOF in Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaming Su

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Changes in chromatin structure and heritably regulating the gene expression by epigenetic mechanisms, such as histone post-translational modification, are involved in most cellular biological processes. Thus, abnormal regulation of epigenetics is implicated in the occurrence of various diseases, including cancer. Human MOF (males absent on the first is a member of the MYST (Moz-Ybf2/Sas3-Sas2-Tip60 family of histone acetyltransferases (HATs. As a catalytic subunit, MOF can form at least two distinct multiprotein complexes (MSL and NSL in human cells. Both complexes can acetylate histone H4 at lysine 16 (H4K16; however, the NSL complex possesses broader substrate specificity and can also acetylate histone H4 at lysines 5 and 8 (H4K5 and H4K8, suggesting the complexity of the intracellular functions of MOF. Silencing of MOF in cells leads to genomic instability, inactivation of gene transcription, defective DNA damage repair and early embryonic lethality. Unbalanced MOF expression and its corresponding acetylation of H4K16 have been found in certain primary cancer tissues, including breast cancer, medulloblastoma, ovarian cancer, renal cell carcinoma, colorectal carcinoma, gastric cancer, as well as non-small cell lung cancer. In this review, we provide a brief overview of MOF and its corresponding histone acetylation, introduce recent research findings that link MOF functions to tumorigenesis and speculate on the potential role that may be relevant to tumorigenic pathways.

  2. Stem-Like Cells in Bone Sarcomas: Implications for Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Parker Gibbs

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Bone sarcomas are a clinically and molecularly heterogeneous group of malignancies characterized by varying degrees of mesenchymal differentiation. Despite advances in medical and surgical management, survival rates for high-grade tumors have remained static at 50% to 70%. Tumor stem cells have been recently implicated in the pathogenesis of other heterogeneous, highly malignant tumors. We demonstrate here the existence of a small subpopulation of self-renewing bone sarcoma cells that are capable of forming suspended spherical, clonal colonies, also called “sarcospheres,” in anchorage-independent, serum-starved conditions. These bone sarcoma cells as well as tissue specimens express activated STAT3 and the marker genes of pluripotent embryonic stem (ES cells, Oct 3/4 and Nanog. Expression levels of Oct 3/4 and Nanog are greater in sarcospheres than in adherent cultures. A subset of bone sarcoma cells displays several surface markers of mesenchymal stem cells (Stro-1, CD105, and CD44 as well as attributes of mesodermal, ectodermal, and endodermal differentiation. Although previously documented in brain and breast tumors, our results support the extension of the cancer stem cell hypothesis to include tumors of mesenchymal lineage. Furthermore, they suggest the participation of ES cell homeobox proteins in non-germ cell tumorigenesis.

  3. The Role of Polymerase Gamma Mutations in Breast Tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Chau GY, Wu YT, Li SH, Lui WY, et al. Alteration of the copy number and deletion of mitochondrial DNA in human hepatocellular carcinoma. Br. J...481–484. [PubMed: 16020738] 47. Alonso A, Martin P, Albarran C, Aquilera B, Garcia O, Guzman A, et al. Detection of somatic mutations in the

  4. Role of Polymerase Gamma Mutations in Breast Tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    HC, Chau GY, Wu YT, Li SH, Lui WY, et al. Alteration of the copy number and deletion of mitochondrial DNA in human hepatocellular carcinoma. Br. J...2005;309:481–484. [PubMed: 16020738] 47. Alonso A, Martin P, Albarran C, Aquilera B, Garcia O, Guzman A, et al. Detection of somatic mutations in the

  5. [Epigenetics in tumorigenesis: advances and clinical implications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xian huo; Zhao, Xiu juan; Qiu, Li hua; Wang, Hua qing; Wang, Xi

    2012-10-18

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide and the total number of cases globally keeps increasing. For many years, cancer has been thought to be caused by a series of DNA sequence alterations and thus is thought to be a "genetic" disease. However, studies in the last decade, including the large-scale cancer genomics projects, have highlighted the rising importance of epigenetic regulation in cancer. Here, we review recent advances in understanding how chromatin-based epigenetic regulation participates in tumorigenesis and discuss the growing implications of these advances for developing novel strategies to prevent, diagnose, as well as treat cancer.

  6. NF-kappaB in Lung Tumorigenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Zhenjian [Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Department of Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, 462 First Avenue, NBV 7N24, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Tchou-Wong, Kam-Meng; Rom, William N., E-mail: william.rom@nyumc.org [Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Department of Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, 462 First Avenue, NBV 7N24, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, 57 Old Forge Road, Tuxedo, NY 10987 (United States)

    2011-12-14

    The development of lung cancer in humans can be divided into three steps initiation, promotion and progression. This process is driven by alterations in related signal transduction pathways. These pathways signal the aberrant activation of NF-kappaB, a transcription factor that regulates the expression of genes important for lung tumorigenesis. Our current knowledge about the role of the NF-kappaB signaling pathway in the development of lung cancer has been bolstered by animal models demonstrating the connection between K-ras and tobacco induced lung transformation with NF-kappaB. Activation of downstream genes leads to cell proliferation, inhibition of apoptosis, angiogenesis, inflammation, invasion, and metastasis.

  7. A partial preterist understanding of Revelation 12-13 within an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There are two lines of thought in exegetical circles concerning the interpretation of partial preterism, applied to Rev. 12-13: (1) the consistent partial preterism, according to which the whole book of Revelation is God's judgement directed toward the apostate Jews in AD 70; (2) the transitional partial preterism which argues ...

  8. THE SIXTH SEAL IN REVELATION 6:12-17 1. INTRODUCTION

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1997. A postmodern Revelation. Signs of astrology and the Apocalypse. Toronto: Uni- versity of Toronto Press. COLLINS A Y. 1984. Crisis and catharsis. The power of the Apocalypse. Philadelphia: Westminster. CULLMANN O. 1953. Early Christian worship. London: SCM. Studies in Biblical Theology. DE VILLIERS P G R.

  9. Ghrelin is a prognostic marker and a potential therapeutic target in breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Gr?nberg, Malin; Ahlin, Cecilia; Naeser, Ylva; Janson, Eva Tiensuu; Holmberg, Lars; Fj?llskog, Marie-Louise

    2017-01-01

    Ghrelin and obestatin are gastrointestinal peptides, encoded by the same preproghrelin gene. Both are expressed in breast cancer tissue and ghrelin has been implicated in breast cancer tumorigenesis. Despite recent advances in breast cancer management the need for new prognostic markers and potential therapeutic targets in breast cancer remains high. We studied the prognostic impact of ghrelin and obestatin in women with node negative breast cancer. Within a cohort of women with breast cancer...

  10. Elevated NIBP/TRAPPC9 mediates tumorigenesis of cancer cells through NFκB signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yonggang; Liu, Shu; Wang, Hong; Yang, Wensheng; Li, Fang; Yang, Fan; Yu, Daohai; Ramsey, Frederick V; Tuszyski, George P; Hu, Wenhui

    2015-03-20

    Regulatory mechanisms underlying constitutive and inducible NFκB activation in cancer remain largely unknown. Here we investigated whether a novel NIK- and IKK2-binding protein (NIBP) is required for maintaining malignancy of cancer cells in an NFκB-dependent manner. Real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis of a human cancer survey tissue-scan cDNA array, immunostaining of a human frozen tumor tissue array and immunoblotting of a high-density reverse-phase cancer protein lysate array showed that NIBP is extensively expressed in most tumor tissues, particularly in breast and colon cancer. Lentivirus-mediated NIBP shRNA knockdown significantly inhibited the growth/proliferation, invasion/migration, colony formation and xenograft tumorigenesis of breast (MDA-MB-231) or colon (HCT116) cancer cells. NIBP overexpression in HCT116 cells promoted cell proliferation, migration and colony formation. Mechanistically, NIBP knockdown in cancer cells inhibited cytokine-induced activation of NFκB luciferase reporter, thus sensitizing the cells to TNFα-induced apoptosis. Endogenous NIBP bound specifically to the phosphorylated IKK2 in a TNFα-dependent manner. NIBP knockdown transiently attenuated TNFα-stimulated phosphorylation of IKK2/p65 and degradation of IκBα. In contrast, NIBP overexpression enhanced TNFα-induced NFκB activation, thus inhibiting constitutive and TNFα-induced apoptosis. Collectively, our data identified important roles of NIBP in promoting tumorigenesis via NFκΒ signaling, spotlighting NIBP as a promising target in cancer therapeutic intervention.

  11. Protein Kinase C beta in the tumor microenvironment promotes mammary tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie A Wallace

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Protein kinase C beta (PKCβ expression in breast cancer is associated with a more aggressive tumor phenotype, yet the mechanism for how PKCβ is pro-tumorigenic in this disease is still unclear. Interestingly, while it is known that PKCβ mediates angiogenesis, immunity, fibroblast function and adipogenesis, all components of the mammary tumor microenvironment (TME, no study to date has investigated whether stromal PKCβ is functionally relevant in breast cancer. Herein, we evaluate mouse mammary tumor virus-polyoma middle T-antigen (MMTV-PyMT induced mammary tumorigenesis in the presence and absence of PKCβ. We utilize two model systems: one where PKCβ is deleted in both the epithelial and stromal compartments to test the global requirement for PKCβ on tumor formation, and second, where PKCβ is deleted only in the stromal compartment to test its role in the TME. MMTV-PyMT mice globally lacking PKCβ live longer and develop smaller tumors with decreased proliferation and decreased macrophage infiltration. Similarly, when PKCβ is null exclusively in the stroma, PyMT-driven B6 cells form smaller tumors. These experiments reveal for the first time a tumor promoting role for stromal PKCβ in MMTV-PyMT tumorigenesis. In corroboration with these results, PKCβ mRNA (Prkcb is increased in fibroblasts isolated from MMTV-PyMT tumors. These data were confirmed in a breast cancer patient cohort. Combined these data suggest the continued investigation of PKCβ in the mammary TME is necessary to elucidate how to effectively target this signaling pathway in breast cancer.

  12. Protein kinase C Beta in the tumor microenvironment promotes mammary tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Julie A; Pitarresi, Jason R; Sharma, Nandini; Palettas, Marilly; Cuitiño, Maria C; Sizemore, Steven T; Yu, Lianbo; Sanderlin, Allen; Rosol, Thomas J; Mehta, Kamal D; Sizemore, Gina M; Ostrowski, Michael C

    2014-01-01

    Protein kinase C beta (PKCβ) expression in breast cancer is associated with a more aggressive tumor phenotype, yet the mechanism for how PKCβ is pro-tumorigenic in this disease is still unclear. Interestingly, while it is known that PKCβ mediates angiogenesis, immunity, fibroblast function and adipogenesis, all components of the mammary tumor microenvironment (TME), no study to date has investigated whether stromal PKCβ is functionally relevant in breast cancer. Herein, we evaluate mouse mammary tumor virus-polyoma middle T-antigen (MMTV-PyMT) induced mammary tumorigenesis in the presence and absence of PKCβ. We utilize two model systems: one where PKCβ is deleted in both the epithelial and stromal compartments to test the global requirement for PKCβ on tumor formation, and second, where PKCβ is deleted only in the stromal compartment to test its role in the TME. MMTV-PyMT mice globally lacking PKCβ live longer and develop smaller tumors with decreased proliferation and decreased macrophage infiltration. Similarly, when PKCβ is null exclusively in the stroma, PyMT-driven B6 cells form smaller tumors with diminished collagen deposition. These experiments reveal for the first time a tumor promoting role for stromal PKCβ in MMTV-PyMT tumorigenesis. In corroboration with these results, PKCβ mRNA (Prkcb) is increased in fibroblasts isolated from MMTV-PyMT tumors. These data were confirmed in a breast cancer patient cohort. Combined these data suggest the continued investigation of PKCβ in the mammary TME is necessary to elucidate how to effectively target this signaling pathway in breast cancer.

  13. The role of menin in parathyroid tumorigenesis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Davenport, Colin

    2009-01-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism is a common disorder that involves the pathological enlargement of one or more parathyroid glands resulting in excessive production of parathyroid hormone (PTH). The exact pathogenesis of this disease remains to be fully understood. In recent years interest has focussed on the interaction between menin protein and the transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta\\/Smad signalling pathway. In vitro experimentation has demonstrated that the presence of menin is required for TGF-beta to effectively inhibit parathyroid cell proliferation and PTH production. This observation correlates with the almost universal occurrence of parathyroid tumors accompanying the inactivation of menin in multiple endocrine neoplasia Type 1 (MEN1) syndrome and the high rate of somatic menin gene mutations seen in sporadic parathyroid adenomas. This chapter aims to review the role of menin in primary hyperparathyroidism and parathyroid hormone-regulation, including the influences of MEN1 gene mutations on parathyroid cell proliferation, differentiation and tumorigenesis.

  14. Histone deacetylase 8 in neuroblastoma tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehme, Ina; Deubzer, Hedwig E; Wegener, Dennis; Pickert, Diana; Linke, Jan-Peter; Hero, Barbara; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Westermann, Frank; Ulrich, Scott M; von Deimling, Andreas; Fischer, Matthias; Witt, Olaf

    2009-01-01

    The effects of pan-histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors on cancer cells have shown that HDACs are involved in fundamental tumor biological processes such as cell cycle control, differentiation, and apoptosis. However, because of the unselective nature of these compounds, little is known about the contribution of individual HDAC family members to tumorigenesis and progression. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of individual HDACs in neuroblastoma tumorigenesis. We have investigated the mRNA expression of all HDAC1-11 family members in a large cohort of primary neuroblastoma samples covering the full spectrum of the disease. HDACs associated with disease stage and survival were subsequently functionally evaluated in cell culture models. Only HDAC8 expression was significantly correlated with advanced disease and metastasis and down-regulated in stage 4S neuroblastoma associated with spontaneous regression. High HDAC8 expression was associated with poor prognostic markers and poor overall and event-free survival. The knockdown of HDAC8 resulted in the inhibition of proliferation, reduced clonogenic growth, cell cycle arrest, and differentiation in cultured neuroblastoma cells. The treatment of neuroblastoma cell lines as well as short-term-culture neuroblastoma cells with an HDAC8-selective small-molecule inhibitor inhibited cell proliferation and clone formation, induced differentiation, and thus reproduced the HDAC8 knockdown phenotype. Global histone 4 acetylation was not affected by HDAC8 knockdown or by selective inhibitor treatment. Our data point toward an important role of HDAC8 in neuroblastoma pathogenesis and identify this HDAC family member as a specific drug target for the differentiation therapy of neuroblastoma.

  15. Defining the situation in Revelation: John’s intention and action-lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Theunissen

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available This article argues that the purpose of Revelation is to strengthen the group identity of the church and not to encourage a persecuted church. This view is proposed by a symbolic-interactionistic analysis of Revelation. Symbolic interaction focuses on the construction of situations through symbols, the interaction between symbols and the grouping of symbols. Through the analysis and the corresponding action lines certain conclusions pertaining to the problems in the church and the author's intention (the writing being a reflection of his mind process are possible. The overall problem seems to be the fading boundaries of identity between the church and society. John’s intention is to bring about the necessary alterations. He thus exhorts the church through warnings, calls to repent and even threats. This is achiebed by defining the situation to the church through symbolic scenes.

  16. Carcinogen inducibility in vivo and down-regulation of DMBT1 during breast carcinogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollenhauer, Jan; Helmke, Burkhard; Medina, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    of the carcinogen 7,12-dimethybenz(alpha)anthracene prior to the onset of tumorigenesis or other histopathological changes. DMBT1 displayed significant up-regulation in human tumor-flanking tissues compared to in normal breast tissues (P

  17. Oncogenic pathways in hereditary and sporadic breast cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kenemans, P.; Verstraeten, R.A.; Verheijen, R.H.M.

    2004-01-01

    Cancer is a genetic disease. Breast cancer tumorigenesis can be described as a multi-step process in which each step is thought to correlate with one or more distinct mutations in major regulatory genes. The question addressed is how far a multi-step progression model for sporadic breast cancer

  18. Sox2 Suppresses Gastric Tumorigenesis in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abby Sarkar

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Sox2 expression marks gastric stem and progenitor cells, raising important questions regarding the genes regulated by Sox2 and the role of Sox2 itself during stomach homeostasis and disease. By using ChIP-seq analysis, we have found that the majority of Sox2 targets in gastric epithelial cells are tissue specific and related to functions such as endoderm development, Wnt signaling, and gastric cancer. Unexpectedly, we found that Sox2 itself is dispensable for gastric stem cell and epithelial self-renewal, yet Sox2+ cells are highly susceptible to tumorigenesis in an Apc/Wnt-driven mouse model. Moreover, Sox2 loss enhances, rather than impairs, tumor formation in Apc-deficient gastric cells in vivo and in vitro by inducing Tcf/Lef-dependent transcription and upregulating intestinal metaplasia-associated genes, providing a mechanistic basis for the observed phenotype. Together, these data identify Sox2 as a context-dependent tumor suppressor protein that is dispensable for normal tissue regeneration but restrains stomach adenoma formation through modulation of Wnt-responsive and intestinal genes.

  19. miR-100 induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition but suppresses tumorigenesis, migration and invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahu Chen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Whether epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT is always linked to increased tumorigenicity is controversial. Through microRNA (miRNA expression profiling of mammary epithelial cells overexpressing Twist, Snail or ZEB1, we identified miR-100 as a novel EMT inducer. Surprisingly, miR-100 inhibits the tumorigenicity, motility and invasiveness of mammary tumor cells, and is commonly downregulated in human breast cancer due to hypermethylation of its host gene MIR100HG. The EMT-inducing and tumor-suppressing effects of miR-100 are mediated by distinct targets. While miR-100 downregulates E-cadherin by targeting SMARCA5, a regulator of CDH1 promoter methylation, this miRNA suppresses tumorigenesis, cell movement and invasion in vitro and in vivo through direct targeting of HOXA1, a gene that is both oncogenic and pro-invasive, leading to repression of multiple HOXA1 downstream targets involved in oncogenesis and invasiveness. These findings provide a proof-of-principle that EMT and tumorigenicity are not always associated and that certain EMT inducers can inhibit tumorigenesis, migration and invasion.

  20. ARD1 Stabilization of TSC2 Suppresses Tumorigenesis Through the mTOR Signaling Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Hsu-Ping; Lee, Dung-Fang; Chen, Chun-Te; Liu, Mo; Chou, Chao-Kai; Lee, Hong-Jen; Du, Yi; Xie, Xiaoming; Wei, Yongkun; Xia, Weiya; Weihua, Zhang; Yang, Jer-Yen; Yen, Chia-Jui; Huang, Tzu-Hsuan; Tan, Minjia; Xing, Gang; Zhao, Yingming; Lin, Chien-Hsing; Tsai, Shih-Feng; Fidler, Isaiah J.; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2010-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) regulates various cellular functions, including tumorigenesis, and is inhibited by the tuberous sclerosis 1 (TSC1)–TSC2 complex. Here, we demonstrate that arrest-defective protein 1 (ARD1) physically interacts with, acetylates, and stabilizes TSC2, thereby repressing mTOR activity. The inhibition of mTOR by ARD1 inhibits cell proliferation and increases autophagy, thereby inhibiting tumorigenicity. Correlation between ARD1 and TSC2 abundance was apparent in multiple tumor types. Moreover, evaluation of loss of heterozygosity at Xq28 revealed allelic loss in 31% of tested breast cancer cell lines and tumor samples. Together, our findings suggest that ARD1 functions as an inhibitor of the mTOR pathway and that dysregulation of the ARD1-TSC2-mTOR axis may contribute to cancer development. PMID:20145209

  1. A Confession as Clear as Mud? Making Sense of Lance Armstrong’s Revelations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gleaves, John; Christiansen, Ask Vest

    2013-01-01

    Rabobank riders, e.g. Michael Rasmussen, doping scandals in American collegiate sport, a whole cluster of revelations from Australian elite sport and testimonies from the Operacion Puerto trial have added new information about closed doping practices. Moreover, it seems that the complex love......-hate relationship between sporting organizations and their anti-doping programs has pointed towards previously underexplored conflicts of interest. So while the past few months would leave any hungry doctoral student salivating over the wealth of new material, it is important to separate out what has become clearer...

  2. The Gut Microbiota, Tumorigenesis, and Liver Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guishuai Lv

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, diseases concerning the gut microbiota have presented some of the most serious public health problems worldwide. The human host’s physiological status is influenced by the intestinal microbiome, thus integrating external factors, such as diet, with genetic and immune signals. The notion that chronic inflammation drives carcinogenesis has been widely established for various tissues. It is surprising that the role of the microbiota in tumorigenesis has only recently been recognized, given that the presence of bacteria at tumor sites was first described more than a century ago. Extensive epidemiological studies have revealed that there is a strong link between the gut microbiota and some common cancers. However, the exact molecular mechanisms linking the gut microbiota and cancer are not yet fully understood. Changes to the gut microbiota are instrumental in determining the occurrence and progression of hepatocarcinoma, chronic liver diseases related to alcohol, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD, and cirrhosis. To be specific, the gut milieu may play an important role in systemic inflammation, endotoxemia, and vasodilation, which leads to complications such as spontaneous bacterial peritonitis and hepatic encephalopathy. Relevant animal studies involving gut microbiota manipulations, combined with observational studies on patients with NAFLD, have provided ample evidence pointing to the contribution of dysbiosis to the pathogenesis of NAFLD. Given the poor prognosis of these clinical events, their prevention and early management are essential. Studies of the composition and function of the gut microbiota could shed some light on understanding the prognosis because the microbiota serves as an essential component of the gut milieu that can impact the aforementioned clinical events. As far as disease management is concerned, probiotics may provide a novel direction for therapeutics for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC and NAFLD

  3. Aluminium chloride promotes tumorigenesis and metastasis in normal murine mammary gland epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandriota, Stefano J; Tenan, Mirna; Ferrari, Paolo; Sappino, André-Pascal

    2016-12-15

    Aluminium salts, present in many industrial products of frequent use like antiperspirants, anti-acid drugs, food additives and vaccines, have been incriminated in contributing to the rise in breast cancer incidence in Western societies. However, current experimental evidence supporting this hypothesis is limited. For example, no experimental evidence that aluminium promotes tumorigenesis in cultured mammary epithelial cells exists. We report here that long-term exposure to concentrations of aluminium-in the form of aluminium chloride (AlCl3 )-in the range of those measured in the human breast, transform normal murine mammary gland (NMuMG) epithelial cells in vitro as revealed by the soft agar assay. Subcutaneous injections into three different mouse strains with decreasing immunodeficiency, namely, NOD SCID gamma (NSG), NOD SCID or nude mice, revealed that untreated NMuMG cells form tumors and metastasize, to a limited extent, in the highly immunodeficient and natural killer (NK) cell deficient NSG strain, but not in the less permissive and NK cell competent NOD SCID or nude strains. In contrast, NMuMG cells transformed in vitro by AlCl3 form large tumors and metastasize in all three mouse models. These effects correlate with a mutagenic activity of AlCl3 . Our findings demonstrate for the first time that concentrations of aluminium in the range of those measured in the human breast fully transform cultured mammary epithelial cells, thus enabling them to form tumors and metastasize in well-established mouse cancer models. Our observations provide experimental evidence that aluminium salts could be environmental breast carcinogens. © 2016 The Authors International Journal of Cancer published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of UICC.

  4. The Role of Myoepithelium in Mammary Development and Tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-09-01

    mediators of the susceptibility of the gland to tumorigenesis and potential targets of therapeutic or protective strategies. Figura 1 Fuchs-Young, Robin g B I...Prostate Cancer, Jordan, V.C. and Furr, B., eds., Humana Press Inc., Totowa, NJ. (In press). Presentations/Abstracts: Young, R.F., Harrison, R.W., and

  5. Centrosomal Nlp is an oncogenic protein that is gene-amplified in human tumors and causes spontaneous tumorigenesis in transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Shujuan; Liu, Rong; Wang, Yang; Song, Yongmei; Zuo, Lihui; Xue, Liyan; Lu, Ning; Hou, Ning; Wang, Mingrong; Yang, Xiao; Zhan, Qimin

    2010-02-01

    Disruption of mitotic events contributes greatly to genomic instability and results in mutator phenotypes. Indeed, abnormalities of mitotic components are closely associated with malignant transformation and tumorigenesis. Here we show that ninein-like protein (Nlp), a recently identified BRCA1-associated centrosomal protein involved in microtubule nucleation and spindle formation, is an oncogenic protein. Nlp was found to be overexpressed in approximately 80% of human breast and lung carcinomas analyzed. In human lung cancers, this deregulated expression was associated with NLP gene amplification. Further analysis revealed that Nlp exhibited strong oncogenic properties; for example, it conferred to NIH3T3 rodent fibroblasts the capacity for anchorage-independent growth in vitro and tumor formation in nude mice. Consistent with these data, transgenic mice overexpressing Nlp displayed spontaneous tumorigenesis in the breast, ovary, and testicle within 60 weeks. In addition, Nlp overexpression induced more rapid onset of radiation-induced lymphoma. Furthermore, mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) derived from Nlp transgenic mice showed centrosome amplification, suggesting that Nlp overexpression mimics BRCA1 loss. These findings demonstrate that Nlp abnormalities may contribute to genomic instability and tumorigenesis and suggest that Nlp might serve as a potential biomarker for clinical diagnosis and therapeutic target.

  6. Prophecy, patriarchy, and violence in the early modern household: the revelations of Anne Wentworth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Warren

    2009-10-01

    In 1676 the apostate Baptist prophet Anne Wentworth (1629/30-1693?) published "A True Account of Anne Wentworths Being Cruelly, Unjustly, and Unchristianly Dealt with by Some of Those People called Anabaptists," the first in a series of pamphlets that would continue to the end of the decade. Orignially a member of a London Baptist church, Wentworth left the congregation and eventually her own home after her husband used physical force to stop her writing and prophesying. Yet Wentworth persisted in her "revelations." These prophecies increasingly focused on her response to those who were trying to stop her efforts, especially within her own household. This article examines Wentworth's writings as an effort by an early modern woman, using arguments of spiritual agency, to assert ideas about proper gender roles and household responsibilities to denounce her husband and rebut those who criticized and attempted to suppress her.

  7. Finding revelation in anthropology: Alexander Winchell, William Robertson Smith and the heretical imperative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingstone, David N

    2015-09-01

    Anthropological inquiry has often been considered an agent of intellectual secularization. Not least is this so in the sphere of religion, where anthropological accounts have often been taken to represent the triumph of naturalism. This metanarrative, however, fails to recognize that naturalistic explanations could sometimes be espoused for religious purposes and in defence of confessional creeds. This essay examines two late nineteenth-century figures--Alexander Winchell in the United States and William Robertson Smith in Britain--who found in anthropological analysis resources to bolster rather than undermine faith. In both cases these individuals found themselves on the receiving end of ecclesiastical censure and were dismissed from their positions at church-governed institutions. But their motivation was to vindicate divine revelation, in Winchell's case from the physical anthropology of human origins and in Smith's from the cultural anthropology of Semitic ritual.

  8. A new global plate velocity model using space geodetic data, REVEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sella, G. F.; Dixon, T. H.; Mao, A.; Stein, S.

    2001-12-01

    Our model describes the relative velocities of 19 plates and continental blocks, and is derived from publicly available space geodetic (primarily GPS) data for the period 1993-2000. We include an independent and rigorous estimate for GPS velocity uncertainties in order to assess plate rigidity, and propagate these uncertainties to the velocity predictions. By excluding sites that may be influenced by seismic cycle effects within the plate boundary zone as well sites affected by glacial isostatic adjustment, we believe the plate velocity model is representative of geologically Recent motions (last ~10,000 years) and have termed it REVEL, for Recent velocity. Departures from short term rigid plate behaviour due to glacial isostatic adjustment are clearly observed for North America and Eurasia. Australia shows possible differences from rigid plate behavior in a manner consistent with its mapped intraplate stress field. We see statistically significant differences between the velocity predictions of REVEL-2000 and those of the NUVEL-1A geologic model for about one third of tested plate pairs. Pacific-North America motion and motion of the Caribbean plate with respect to North and South America are significantly faster than NUVEL-1A, presumably reflecting systematic errors in the geological model because the relevant rate data do not reflect the full plate rate. Many other differences between the geodetic and geological models appear to reflect real velocity changes over the last few million years. Nubia-Arabia and Arabia-Eurasia appear to be slowing, perhaps related to the collision of Arabia with Eurasia and consequent increased resistance to Arabia's northward motion Several other plate pairs, including Nazca-Pacific, Nazca-South America and Nubia-South America, are experiencing gradual slowing that dates back to about 25 Ma. This is the time of the initiation of the modern Andes mountains, and we speculate that associated crustal thickening on the leading edge of

  9. Genetic variation in mitotic regulatory pathway genes is associated with breast tumor grade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Purrington, Kristen S; Slettedahl, Seth; Bolla, Manjeet K

    2014-01-01

    Mitotic index is an important component of histologic grade and has an etiologic role in breast tumorigenesis. Several small candidate gene studies have reported associations between variation in mitotic genes and breast cancer risk. We measured associations between 2156 single nucleotide polymor...

  10. Mammary tumorigenesis by radiation and its prevention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onoda, Makoto; Suzuki, Keiko; Inano, Hiroshi [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    1999-06-01

    Since the breast cancer in women emerged as an important risk associated with exposure to ionizing radiation, we have investigated to clarify the relationship between the induction of mammary tumors by irradiation and the developmental stage of the mammary glands that regulated by the action of endocrine hormones. Besides the radiation, epidemiological studies showed that the process of biosynthesis/metabolism of steroid hormones and hyperlipidemia may be associated with an increased risk of mammary carcinogenesis. In this context, we have undertaken investigations to evaluate the anti-carcinogenic activities of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), a major secretory steroid of the adrenal glands, bezafibrate (BEZF), an anti-hyperlipidemic drug derived from clofibrate, and simvastatin (SIMV), a prodrug of a specific inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, against diethylstilbestrol (DES)-dependent promotion/progression of rat mammary tumors initiated by {gamma}-rays. Pregnant Wistar-MS rats received whole-body irradiation with 2.6 Gy of {gamma}-rays from a {sup 60}Co source at day-20 of pregnancy. The mother rats were fed a diet containing either 0.6% DHEA, 0.15% BEZF or 0.03% SIMV beginning immediately after weaning. They were then implanted subcutaneously with a pellet of DES (3 mg/pellet) in the interscapular area 30 days after termination of nursing and were observed for 1 year for detection of palpable mammary tumors starting from the time of pellet implantation. The administration of dietary DHEA, BEZF or SIMV together with DES implantation in rats irradiated in late pregnancy significantly decreased the total incidence of mammary tumors to 35%, 27% and 36%, respectively, for the 1 year period, while higher tumor incidence (96%, 90% and 88%) was observed in rats fed controldiet. However, neither the number of mammary tumors per tumor-bearing rat nor the latency period in the drug treated groups was different from that observed in the control group

  11. Zygapophysial joint blocks in chronic low back pain: a test of Revel's model as a screening test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aprill Charles N

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Only controlled blocks are capable of confirming the zygapophysial joints (ZJ as the pain generator in LBP patients. However, previous workers have found that a cluster of clinical signs ("Revel's criteria", may be valuable in predicting the results of an initial screening ZJ block. It was suggested that these clinical findings are unsuitable for diagnosis, but may be of value in selecting patients for diagnostic blocks of the lumbar ZJ's. To constitute evidence in favour of a clinical management strategy, these results need confirmation. This study evaluates the utility of 'Revel's criteria' as a screening tool for selection of chronic low back pain patients for controlled ZJ diagnostic blocks. Methods This study utilized a prospective blinded concurrent reference standard related validity design. Consecutive chronic LBP patients completed pain drawings, psychosocial distress and disability questionnaires, received a clinical examination and lumbar zygapophysial blocks. Two reference standards were evaluated simultaneously: 1. 75% reduction of pain on a visual analogue scale (replication of previous work, and 2. abolition of the dominant or primary pain. Using "Revel's criteria" as predictors, logistic regression analyses were used to test the model. Estimates of sensitivity, specificity, predictive values and likelihood ratios for selected variables were calculated for the two proposed clinical strategies. Results Earlier results were not replicated. Sensitivity of "Revel's criteria" was low sensitivity ( Conclusions "Revel's criteria" are unsuitable as a clinical screening test to select chronic LBP patients for initial ZJ blocks. However, the criteria may have use in identifying a small subset (11% of patients likely to respond to the initial block (specificity 93%.

  12. Mixed tocopherols prevent mammary tumorigenesis by inhibiting estrogen action and activating PPAR-γ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hong Jin; Ju, Jihyeung; Paul, Shiby; So, Jae-Young; DeCastro, Andrew; Smolarek, Amanda; Lee, Mao-Jung; Yang, Chung S.; Newmark, Harold L.; Suh, Nanjoo

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Tocopherols are lipophilic antioxidants present in vegetable oils. Although the antioxidant and anticancer activities of α-tocopherol (vitamin E) have been studied for decades, recent intervention studies with α-tocopherol have been negative for protection from cancer in humans. The tocopherols consist of 4 isoforms, α, β, γ, and δ variants, and recent attention is being made to other isoforms. In the present study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of a tocopherol mixture rich in γ- and δ-tocopherols against mammary tumorigenesis. Experimental Design Female Sprague Dawley rats were treated with N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (NMU), and then fed diets containing 0.1%, 0.3%, or 0.5% mixed tocopherols rich in γ- and δ-tocopherols for 9 weeks. Tumor burden and multiplicity were determined, and the levels of markers of inflammation, proliferation and apoptosis were evaluated in the serum and in mammary tumors. The regulation of nuclear receptor signaling by tocopherols was studied in mammary tumors and in breast cancer cells. Results Dietary administration of 0.1%, 0.3%, or 0.5% mixed tocopherols suppressed mammary tumor growth by 38%, 50%, or 80%, respectively. Tumor multiplicity was also significantly reduced in all three mixed tocopherol groups. Mixed tocopherols increased the expression of p21, p27, caspase-3 and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ), and inhibited AKT and estrogen signaling in mammary tumors. Our mechanistic study found that γ- and δ-tocopherols, but not α-tocopherol, activated PPAR-γ and antagonized estrogen action in breast cancer. Conclusion The results suggest that γ- and δ-tocopherols may be effective agents for the prevention of breast cancer. PMID:19509159

  13. Mixed tocopherols prevent mammary tumorigenesis by inhibiting estrogen action and activating PPAR-gamma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hong Jin; Ju, Jihyeung; Paul, Shiby; So, Jae-Young; DeCastro, Andrew; Smolarek, Amanda; Lee, Mao-Jung; Yang, Chung S; Newmark, Harold L; Suh, Nanjoo

    2009-06-15

    Tocopherols are lipophilic antioxidants present in vegetable oils. Although the antioxidant and anticancer activities of alpha-tocopherol (vitamin E) have been studied for decades, recent intervention studies with alpha-tocopherol have been negative for protection from cancer in humans. The tocopherols consist of four isoforms, which are the alpha, beta, gamma, and delta variants, and recent attention is being given to other isoforms. In the present study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of a tocopherol mixture rich in gamma- and delta-tocopherols against mammary tumorigenesis. Female Sprague Dawley rats were treated with N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (NMU), and then fed diets containing 0.1%, 0.3%, or 0.5% mixed tocopherols rich in gamma- and delta-tocopherols for 9 weeks. Tumor burden and multiplicity were determined, and the levels of markers of inflammation, proliferation, and apoptosis were evaluated in the serum and in mammary tumors. The regulation of nuclear receptor signaling by tocopherols was studied in mammary tumors and in breast cancer cells. Dietary administration of 0.1%, 0.3%, or 0.5% mixed tocopherols suppressed mammary tumor growth by 38%, 50%, or 80%, respectively. Tumor multiplicity was also significantly reduced in all three mixed tocopherol groups. Mixed tocopherols increased the expression of p21, p27, caspase-3, and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-gamma, and inhibited AKT and estrogen signaling in mammary tumors. Our mechanistic study found that gamma- and delta-tocopherols, but not alpha-tocopherol, activated peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-gamma and antagonized estrogen action in breast cancer. The results suggest that gamma- and delta-tocopherols may be effective agents for the prevention of breast cancer.

  14. The role of antimicrobial peptides in skin tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Marcinkiewicz

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs, known as “natural antibiotics”, are the first line of defense in humans as effector molecules of the innate immune system of the skin. They present activity against a broad spectrum of bacteria, fungi, parasites and enveloped viruses. An increasing number of studies report altered expression of AMPs in human cancers. Antimicrobial peptides such as human β defensins, human cathelicidin, ribonuclease 7 and psoriasin, a member of S100 proteins, are suggested to play a role in tumor progression and tumor suppression in pre-malignant skin lesions and malignancies. Noticeable changes in AMPs expression in skin tumorigenesis suggest a correlation between peptides and cutaneous cancers, though it is still a matter of discussion. In this article we review recent studies on the relationship between antimicrobial peptides and skin tumorigenesis.

  15. Non-metabolic functions of glycolytic enzymes in tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, X; Li, S

    2017-05-11

    Cancer cells reprogram their metabolism to meet the requirement for survival and rapid growth. One hallmark of cancer metabolism is elevated aerobic glycolysis and reduced oxidative phosphorylation. Emerging evidence showed that most glycolytic enzymes are deregulated in cancer cells and play important roles in tumorigenesis. Recent studies revealed that all essential glycolytic enzymes can be translocated into nucleus where they participate in tumor progression independent of their canonical metabolic roles. These noncanonical functions include anti-apoptosis, regulation of epigenetic modifications, modulation of transcription factors and co-factors, extracellular cytokine, protein kinase activity and mTORC1 signaling pathway, suggesting that these multifaceted glycolytic enzymes not only function in canonical metabolism but also directly link metabolism to epigenetic and transcription programs implicated in tumorigenesis. These findings underscore our understanding about how tumor cells adapt to nutrient and fuel availability in the environment and most importantly, provide insights into development of cancer therapy.

  16. The Pathology of EMT in Mouse Mammary Tumorigenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Cardiff, Robert Darrell

    2010-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal-transition (EMT) tumorigenesis in the mouse was first described over 100?years ago using various terms such as carcinosarcoma and without any comprehension of the underlying mechanisms. Such tumors have been considered artifacts of transplantation and of tissue culture. Recently, EMT tumors have been recognized in mammary glands of genetically engineered mice. This review provides a historical perspective leading to the current status in the context of some of the key m...

  17. Exploring the gain of function contribution of AKT to mammary tumorigenesis in mouse models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Blanco-Aparicio

    Full Text Available Elevated expression of AKT has been noted in a significant percentage of primary human breast cancers, mainly as a consequence of the PTEN/PI3K pathway deregulation. To investigate the mechanistic basis of the AKT gain of function-dependent mechanisms of breast tumorigenesis, we explored the phenotype induced by activated AKT transgenes in a quantitative manner. We generated several transgenic mice lines expressing different levels of constitutively active AKT in the mammary gland. We thoroughly analyzed the preneoplastic and neoplastic mammary lesions of these mice and correlated the process of tumorigenesis to AKT levels. Finally, we analyzed the impact that a possible senescent checkpoint might have in the tumor promotion inhibition observed, crossing these lines to mammary specific p53(R172H mutant expression, and to p27 knock-out mice. We analyzed the benign, premalignant and malignant lesions extensively by pathology and at molecular level analysing the expression of proteins involved in the PI3K/AKT pathway and in cellular senescence. Our findings revealed an increased preneoplastic phenotype depending upon AKT signaling which was not altered by p27 or p53 loss. However, p53 inactivation by R172H point mutation combined with myrAKT transgenic expression significantly increased the percentage and size of mammary carcinoma observed, but was not sufficient to promote full penetrance of the tumorigenic phenotype. Molecular analysis suggest that tumors from double myrAKT;p53(R172H mice result from acceleration of initiated p53(R172H tumors and not from bypass of AKT-induced oncogenic senescence. Our work suggests that tumors are not the consequence of the bypass of senescence in MIN. We also show that AKT-induced oncogenic senescence is dependent of pRb but not of p53. Finally, our work also suggests that the cooperation observed between mutant p53 and activated AKT is due to AKT-induced acceleration of mutant p53-induced tumors. Finally, our

  18. Ukrainian thinkers on philosophical and religious ideas of revelation and transfiguration: metodological prinsiples

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    Z. I. Timenyk

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The article has been based on legacy of Ukrainian thinkers of 1840s-1960s. The author has highlighted how the discussed ideas function in close proximity to analogous ideas. For instance, the idea of God has been reviewed from the viewpoint of human and world structure, with the idea of interaction between good-evil, light-darkness. While interpreting the topic of the article, the reasonable interdependence of principles, ratios and other constructs has been justified by researcher. A complex of such processes creates a so-called “cascade” in which elements of (interreligious communications and multidisciplinary space become a reality through harmonized temporhythmics from various dimensions. At the same time, essential features of the revelation of nature and God on the borderline of paganism and Christianity have been distinguished in a systemic manner. Under the above-mentioned circumstances, “religious logics” demonstrates its possibilities. It is indispensable during the analysis of given ideas. When we think about the regularity of stage-by-stage transformation of the very concepts “revelation”, “transfiguration” comes to the said borderline. Big attention has been paid by the researcher to manifestations of partiality or wholeness of these notions from the standpoint of their harmony. Real functioning of “religious logics” gave ground to the introduction of such new notions as “inter-religious consciousness”, “revelation studies”. Not only their expediency have been justified. They are also used directly to elicit philosophical and religious ideas. One of the arguments in favor of these ideas is the necessity to expand terminological lexis, which is insufficient in modern studies. The introduction of new terms with the terms which were had not been used for a long time, has been combined by the author. This is, namely, the aforementioned “religious logics” as well as “divine dialectics”. Due to this

  19. The effects of Fhit on tumorigenesis after multi-exposure to low-dose radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaoyan; Lu, Lin; Wen, Siyuan; Wang, Ya

    2009-01-01

    Low-dose (≤ 0.1 Gy) radiation could reduce high-dose induced damage including tumorigenesis. However, it remains unclear whether multi-exposure to low-dose radiation at a high dose rate has any risk for increasing tumorigenesis, and whether Fhit plays any role in the process. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of multi-exposure to low-dose radiation at a high dose rate on tumorigenesis, and the role of Fhit in it. We irradiated Fhit+/+ and Fhit-/- mice with 1 Gy/1 or 0.1 Gy × 10 exposures at a dose rate of 1 Gy/min, sacrificed the mice at 1.5 years after radiation and observed multi-organ tumorigenesis. The results showed that although the spontaneous tumorigenesis in these mice was relatively high, 1 Gy/1-exposure dramatically increased the tumorigenesis including lung and liver tumor. Fhit-/- mice showed more tumorigenesis than Fhit+/+ mice after 1 Gy/1-exposure. However, 0.1 Gy × 10 exposures did not increase tumorigenesis, and there was no statistical difference in tumorigenesis between Fhit+/+ mice and Fhit-/- mice following 0.1 Gy × 10 exposures. Our results suggest that 0.1 Gy, even after multiple exposures, does not increase tumorigenesis, and Fhit could prevent high-dose radiation-induced tumors but has no effect in a low-dose environment. PMID:20057978

  20. Stromal Effects on Mammary Gland Development and Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiseman, Bryony S.; Werb, Zena

    2002-05-01

    Breast cancer manifests itself in the mammary epithelium, yet there is a growing recognition that mammary stromal cells also play an important role in tumorigenesis. During its developmental cycle, the mammary gland displays many of the properties associated with breast cancer, and many of the stromal factors necessary for mammary development also promote or protect against breast cancer. Here we review our present knowledge of the specific factors and cell types that contribute to epithelial-stromal crosstalk during mammary development. To find cures for diseases like breast cancer that rely on epithelial-stromal crosstalk, we must understand how these different cell types communicate with each other.

  1. Sustained expression of miR-26a promotes chromosomal instability and tumorigenesis through regulation of CHFR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellano, Leandro; Dabrowska, Aleksandra; Pellegrino, Loredana; Ottaviani, Silvia; Cathcart, Paul; Frampton, Adam E; Krell, Jonathan; Stebbing, Justin

    2017-05-05

    MicroRNA 26a (miR-26a) reduces cell viability in several cancers, indicating that miR-26a could be used as a therapeutic option in patients. We demonstrate that miR-26a not only inhibits G1-S cell cycle transition and promotes apoptosis, as previously described, but also regulates multiple cell cycle checkpoints. We show that sustained miR-26a over-expression in both breast cancer (BC) cell lines and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) induces oversized cells containing either a single-large nucleus or two nuclei, indicating defects in mitosis and cytokinesis. Additionally, we demonstrate that miR-26a induces aneuploidy and centrosome defects and enhances tumorigenesis. Mechanistically, it acts by targeting G1-S transition genes as well as genes involved in mitosis and cytokinesis such as CHFR, LARP1 and YWHAE. Importantly, we show that only the re-expression of CHFR in miR-26a over-expressing cells partially rescues normal mitosis and impairs the tumorigenesis exerted by miR-26a, indicating that CHFR represents an important miR-26a target in the regulation of such phenotypes. We propose that miR-26a delivery might not be a viable therapeutic strategy due to the potential deleterious oncogenic activity of this miRNA. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  2. God’s immanency in Abraham’s response to revelation: from providence to omnipresence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciocan Tudor Cosmin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available My assertion is that God’s biblical image may not reflect entirely His existence in itself as well as His revealed image. Even if God in Himself is both transcendent and immanent at the same time, and He is revealing accordingly in the history of humankind, still the image of God constructed in the writings of the Old Testament is merely the perspective made upon God by His followers to whom the He has revealed. That could be the reason why for centuries God’s biblical image seems to emphasize more His immanence, starting with Pentateuch, where God cohabites with Adam on Earth, then He reveals Himself to Abraham and Moses and so on. Somewhere, after the Babylonian exile, the image suffers slightly differences tilting towards God’s transcendence. In a path already created and grounded by Israel’s ancestors, even this new color of transcendence bears the nuances of immanence. How can this be possible? Let’s take a look on the revelation received by Abraham from God and see how this can fit the profile. Instead of the transcendence of God regarded by others in the differentness of Yahweh appointed by Abraham in his walking out of Mesopotamia, I will prove otherwise, that Abraham is on the contrary proving God’s immanency in this very differentness of His in relation with other gods by providence and omnipresence, indwelling His creation.

  3. Right bundle branch block with revelation of changing axis deviation at the end of atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patanè, Salvatore; Marte, Filippo; Sturiale, Mauro

    2009-11-12

    Changing axis deviation has been reported also during atrial fibrillation or atrial flutter. Changing axis deviation has been also reported during acute myocardial infarction associated with atrial fibrillation too or at the end of atrial fibrillation during acute myocardial infarction. Left bundle branch block is usually associated with normal or left axis deviation. Rarely the ECG shows a left bundle branch block with changing QRS morphology and changing axis deviation. There are several possible explanations for the intermittent shift in the QRS axis in the presence of complete left bundle branch block. The most plausible explanation is the coexistence of left posterior hemiblock and predivisional left bundle branch block. Intermittent right axis deviation has been rarely reported in the presence of left bundle branch block also during atrial fibrillation and with acute myocardial infarction too. Isolated left posterior hemiblock is a very rare finding and transient right axis deviation associated with a left posterior hemiblock pattern has been also rarely described associated with acute myocardial infarction. Changing axis deviation with changing bundle branch block and new-onset of atrial fibrillation during acute myocardial infarction has been also reported. Changing axis deviation with intermittent right bundle branch block in a patient admitted with acute myocardial infarction has been also described. We present a case of a right bundle branch block with revelation of changing axis deviation at the end of atrial fibrillation in a 68-year-old Italian man.

  4. Hypoxic conditions induce a cancer-like phenotype in human breast epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaapil, Marica; Helczynska, Karolina; Villadsen, René

    2012-01-01

    Solid tumors are less oxygenated than their tissue of origin. Low intra-tumor oxygen levels are associated with worse outcome, increased metastatic potential and immature phenotype in breast cancer. We have reported that tumor hypoxia correlates to low differentiation status in breast cancer. Less...... is known about effects of hypoxia on non-malignant cells. Here we address whether hypoxia influences the differentiation stage of non-malignant breast epithelial cells and potentially have bearing on early stages of tumorigenesis....

  5. ASK1 and ASK2 differentially regulate the counteracting roles of apoptosis and inflammation in tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iriyama, Takayuki; Takeda, Kohsuke; Nakamura, Hiromi; Morimoto, Yoshifumi; Kuroiwa, Takumi; Mizukami, Junya; Umeda, Tsuyoshi; Noguchi, Takuya; Naguro, Isao; Nishitoh, Hideki; Saegusa, Kaoru; Tobiume, Kei; Homma, Toshiki; Shimada, Yutaka; Tsuda, Hitoshi; Aiko, Satoshi; Imoto, Issei; Inazawa, Johji; Chida, Kazuhiro; Kamei, Yoshimasa; Kozuma, Shiro; Taketani, Yuji; Matsuzawa, Atsushi; Ichijo, Hidenori

    2009-04-08

    Apoptosis and inflammation generally exert opposite effects on tumorigenesis: apoptosis serves as a barrier to tumour initiation, whereas inflammation promotes tumorigenesis. Although both events are induced by various common stressors, relatively little is known about the stress-induced signalling pathways regulating these events in tumorigenesis. Here, we show that stress-activated MAP3Ks, ASK1 and ASK2, which are involved in cellular responses to various stressors such as reactive oxygen species, differentially regulate the initiation and promotion of tumorigenesis. ASK2 in cooperation with ASK1 functioned as a tumour suppressor by exerting proapoptotic activity in epithelial cells, which was consistent with the reduction in ASK2 expression in human cancer cells and tissues. In contrast, ASK1-dependent cytokine production in inflammatory cells promoted tumorigenesis. Our findings suggest that ASK1 and ASK2 are critically involved in tumorigenesis by differentially regulating apoptosis and inflammation.

  6. Overexpression of SAMD9 suppresses tumorigenesis and progression during non small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Qing; Yu, Tao; Ren, Yao-Yao; Gong, Ting; Zhong, Dian-Sheng, E-mail: zhongdsyx@126.com

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • SAMD9 is down-regulated in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). • Knockdown of SAMD9 expression is increased the invasion, migration and proliferation in H1299 cells in vitro. • Overexpression of SAMD9 suppressed proliferation and invasion in A549 cells in vitro. • Depletion of SAMD9 increases tumor formation in vivo. - Abstract: The Sterile Alpha Motif Domain-containing 9 (SAMD9) gene has been recently emphasized during the discovery that it is expressed at a lower level in aggressive fibromatosis and some cases of breast and colon cancer, however, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we found that SAMD9 is down-regulated in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Furthermore, knockdown of SAMD9 expression is increased the invasion, migration and proliferation in H1299 cells in vitro and overexpression of SAMD9 suppressed proliferation and invasion in A549 cells. Finally, depletion of SAMD9 increases tumor formation in vivo. Our results may provide a strategy for blocking NSCLC tumorigenesis and progression.

  7. Targeting tumorigenesis: development and use of mTOR inhibitors in cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kay Andrea

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR is an intracellular serine/threonine protein kinase positioned at a central point in a variety of cellular signaling cascades. The established involvement of mTOR activity in the cellular processes that contribute to the development and progression of cancer has identified mTOR as a major link in tumorigenesis. Consequently, inhibitors of mTOR, including temsirolimus, everolimus, and ridaforolimus (formerly deforolimus have been developed and assessed for their safety and efficacy in patients with cancer. Temsirolimus is an intravenously administered agent approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA and the European Medicines Agency (EMEA for the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC. Everolimus is an oral agent that has recently obtained US FDA and EMEA approval for the treatment of advanced RCC after failure of treatment with sunitinib or sorafenib. Ridaforolimus is not yet approved for any indication. The use of mTOR inhibitors, either alone or in combination with other anticancer agents, has the potential to provide anticancer activity in numerous tumor types. Cancer types in which these agents are under evaluation include neuroendocrine tumors, breast cancer, leukemia, lymphoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, gastric cancer, pancreatic cancer, sarcoma, endometrial cancer, and non-small-cell lung cancer. The results of ongoing clinical trials with mTOR inhibitors, as single agents and in combination regimens, will better define their activity in cancer.

  8. Expression Pattern of a Homeotic Gene, HOXA5, in Normal Breast and in Breast Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory S. Henderson

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Homeotic (HOX gene products are now known to be functionally associated with breast cancer biogenesis. Recent evidence has indicated that HOXA5 regulates both p53 and progesterone receptor expression levels in breast cancer cells. In addition, HOXA5 has been shown to interact and regulate the activity of another protein referred to as Twist. As homeotic genes play a pivotal role in development, we sought to decipher the expression pattern in both normal breast tissues and in breast carcinomas. Methods: RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry were performed, to assay the levels of HOXA5 expression, on a panel of normal breast tissue and its corresponding primary breast tumors. Results and Conclusions: We show that HOXA5 expression was maintained at stable levels at different reproductive stages of a woman's life, except during lactation. This evidence indicates that HOXA5 may play a role in maintaining the differentiated state within the breast epithelium. However, nearly 70% of all breast carcinomas had decreased HOXA5 protein levels as compared to normal breast tissues. In addition, we demonstrate that HOXA5 protein expression levels in breast carcinomas inversely co-relates with Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR expression. Furthermore, we found that the survival rate amongst the different low levels of HOXA5 expressing breast tumors was not significant, indicative of an early tumorigenesis process in the absence of innate levels of HOXA5 in normal breast cells.

  9. Mammary cells with active Wnt signaling resist ErbB2-induced tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Bu

    Full Text Available Aberrant activation of Wnt signaling is frequent in human malignancies. In normal epithelial tissues, including the breast, Wnt signaling is active only in a subset of cells, but it is unknown whether this subset of Wnt signaling-active cells is at increased risk of carcinogenesis. We created transgenic mice (TOP-tva in which the synthetic Wnt-responsive promoter TOP controlled the gene encoding TVA, which confers susceptibility to infection by the retroviral vector RCAS. Thus, only cells in which Wnt signaling is active will express tva and be targeted by RCAS. Surprisingly, we found that RCAS-mediated delivery of cDNA encoding a constitutively activated version of ErbB2 (HER2/Neu into the small number of TVA+ mammary epithelial cells in TOP-tva mice failed to induce tumor, while the same virus readily induced mammary tumors after it was delivered into a comparable number of cells in our previously reported mouse line MMTV-tva, whose tva is broadly expressed in mammary epithelium. Furthermore, we could not even detect any early lesions or infected cells in TOP-tva mice at the time of necropsy. Therefore, we conclude that the Wnt pathway-active cell subset in the normal mammary epithelium does not evolve into tumors following ErbB2 activation-rather, they apparently die due to apoptosis, an anticancer "barrier" that we have reported to be erected in some mammary cells followed ErbB2 activation. In accord with these mouse model data, we found that unlike the basal subtype, ErbB2+ human breast cancers rarely involve aberrant activation of Wnt signaling. This is the first report of a defined sub-population of mammalian cells that is "protected" from tumorigenesis by a potent oncogene, and provides direct in vivo evidence that mammary epithelial cells are not equal in their response to oncogene-initiated transformation.

  10. Metformin prevents tobacco carcinogen-induced lung tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memmott, Regan M.; Mercado, Jose R.; Maier, Colleen R.; Kawabata, Shigeru; Fox, Stephen D.; Dennis, Phillip A.

    2011-01-01

    Activation of the mTOR pathway is an important and early event in tobacco carcinogen-induced lung tumorigenesis, and therapies that target mTOR could be effective in the prevention or treatment of lung cancer. The biguanide metformin, which is widely prescribed for the treatment of type II diabetes, might be a good candidate for lung cancer chemoprevention because it activates AMPK, which can inhibit the mTOR pathway. To test this, A/J mice were treated with oral metformin after exposure to the tobacco carcinogen NNK. Metformin reduced lung tumor burden by up to 53% at steady-state plasma concentrations that are achievable in humans. mTOR was inhibited in lung tumors but only modestly. To test whether intraperitoneal administration of metformin might improve mTOR inhibition, we injected mice and assessed biomarkers in liver and lung tissues. Plasma levels of metformin were significantly higher after injection than oral administration. In liver tissue, metformin activated AMPK and inhibited mTOR. In lung tissue, metformin did not activate AMPK but inhibited phosphorylation of IGF-IR/IR, Akt, ERK, and mTOR. This suggested that metformin indirectly inhibited mTOR in lung tissue by decreasing activation of IGF-1R/IR and Akt upstream of mTOR. Based on these data, we repeated the NNK-induced lung tumorigenesis study using intraperitoneal administration of metformin. Metformin decreased tumor burden by 72%, which correlated with decreased cellular proliferation and marked inhibition of mTOR in tumors. These studies show that metformin prevents tobacco carcinogen-induced lung tumorigenesis, and support clinical testing of metformin as a chemopreventive agent. PMID:20810672

  11. The antitumor action of cannabinoids on glioma tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zogopoulos, Panagiotis; Korkolopoulou, Penelope; Patsouris, Efstratios; Theocharis, Stamatios

    2015-06-01

    Cannabinoids are a class of chemical compounds with a wide spectrum of pharmacological effects, mediated by two specific plasma membrane receptors (CB1 and CB2). Recently, CB1 and CB2 expression levels have been detected in human tumors, including those of brain. Cannabinoids-endocannabinoids exert anti-inflammatory, anti-proliferative, anti-invasive, anti-metastatic and pro-apoptotic effects in different cancer types, both in vitro and in vivo in animal models, after local or systemic administration. We present the available experimental and clinical data, to date, regarding the antitumor action of cannabinoids on the tumorigenesis of gliomas.

  12. Aberrantly methylated DNA as a biomarker in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Søren; Jørgensen, Lars Mønster; Guldberg, Per

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant DNA hypermethylation at gene promoters is a frequent event in human breast cancer. Recent genome-wide studies have identified hundreds of genes that exhibit differential methylation between breast cancer cells and normal breast tissue. Due to the tumor-specific nature of DNA...... hypermethylation events, their use as tumor biomarkers is usually not hampered by analytical signals from normal cells, which is a general problem for existing protein tumor markers used for clinical assessment of breast cancer. There is accumulating evidence that DNA-methylation changes in breast cancer patients...... occur early during tumorigenesis. This may open up for effective screening, and analysis of blood or nipple aspirate may later help in diagnosing breast cancer. As a more detailed molecular characterization of different types of breast cancer becomes available, the ability to divide patients...

  13. The concept of revelation in terms of the evolution of consciousness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Nürnberger

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Following Paul’s injunction in 1 Corinthians 9:19–23 we have to ‘become scientists’ to a scientifically informed audience. While theology cannot agree with the naturalist denial of transcendence, it can adopt the experiential-realist approach typical for the sciences in its description of the Christian faith as an immanent part of cosmic evolution, albeit at a higher level of emergence. The article begins with my understanding of evolutionary theory (big bang cosmology, entropy, emergence, neural networks as infrastructure of consciousness, evolution and differentiation, sequences of past, present and future, contingency etc. It then describes God consciousness as the intuition, perception or conceptualisation of the transcendent Source and Destiny of experienced reality and locates God consciousness in the evolutionary process. Biblical God consciousness displays two distinct characteristics: God’s creative power is experienced in reality, while God’s benevolent intentionality is proclaimed on the basis of a religious tradition. The evolutionary trajectory of biblical God consciousness, culminating in the Christ-event, is sketched and the God consciousness of Jesus is deduced from its religious embeddedness, its social-environmental relationships and its religious impact. Implications of an experiential-realist approach are (1 a dynamic, rather than ontological Christology and (2 the cosmic significance of the sacrifice of God in Christ. On this basis revelation is described first in experiential-realist and then in theological terms. The tension between the experience of God’s creative power and the proclamation of God’s benevolence leads to a dynamic, rather than ontological rendering of the Trinity. Finally, traditional eschatological assumptions are reconceptualised as God’s dynamic vision of comprehensive well-being operating like a horizon that moves on as we approach it and displays ever new vistas, challenges and

  14. The concept of revelation in terms of the evolution of consciousness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Nürnberger

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Following Paul’s injunction in 1 Corinthians 9:19–23 we have to ‘become scientists’ to a scientifically informed audience. While theology cannot agree with the naturalist denial of transcendence, it can adopt the experiential-realist approach typical for the sciences in its description of the Christian faith as an immanent part of cosmic evolution, albeit at a higher level of emergence. The article begins with my understanding of evolutionary theory (big bang cosmology, entropy, emergence, neural networks as infrastructure of consciousness, evolution and differentiation, sequences of past, present and future, contingency etc. It then describes God consciousness as the intuition, perception or conceptualisation of the transcendent Source and Destiny of experienced reality and locates God consciousness in the evolutionary process. Biblical God consciousness displays two distinct characteristics: God’s creative power is experienced in reality, while God’s benevolent intentionality is proclaimed on the basis of a religious tradition. The evolutionary trajectory of biblical God consciousness, culminating in the Christ-event, is sketched and the God consciousness of Jesus is deduced from its religious embeddedness, its social-environmental relationships and its religious impact. Implications of an experiential-realist approach are (1 a dynamic, rather than ontological Christology and (2 the cosmic significance of the sacrifice of God in Christ. On this basis revelation is described first in experiential-realist and then in theological terms. The tension between the experience of God’s creative power and the proclamation of God’s benevolence leads to a dynamic, rather than ontological rendering of the Trinity. Finally, traditional eschatological assumptions are reconceptualised as God’s dynamic vision of comprehensive well-being operating like a horizon that moves on as we approach it and displays ever new vistas, challenges and

  15. Breast lump

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... removed with surgery. Breast infections are treated with antibiotics. If you are diagnosed with breast cancer , you will discuss your options carefully and thoroughly with your provider. Alternative Names Breast mass Images Female breast Breast lumps ...

  16. Breast lift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastopexy; Breast lift with reduction; Breast lift with augmentation ... enlargement with implants) when they have a breast lift. ... it for medical reasons. Women usually have breast lifts to lift sagging, loose breasts. Pregnancy, breastfeeding, and ...

  17. Trianthema portulacastrum Linn. exerts chemoprevention of 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene-induced mammary tumorigenesis in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishayee, Anupam, E-mail: abishayee@auhs.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, American University of Health Sciences, Signal Hill, CA 90755 (United States); Mandal, Animesh [Cancer Therapeutics and Chemoprevention Group, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Northeast Ohio Medical University, Rootstown, OH 44272 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Dietary administration of an ethanolic extract of aerial parts of T. portulacastrum (TPE) exhibits a striking chemopreventive effect in an experimentally induced classical animal model of breast cancer. • The mammary tumor-inhibitory effect of TPE could be achieved, at least in part, though intervention of key hallmark capabilities of tumor cells, such as abnormal cell proliferation and evasion of apoptosis. • TPE is capable of diminishing activated canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling to exhibit antiproliferative, proapoptotic and oncostatic effects during this early-stage mammary carcinoma. • These results coupled with a safety profile of T. portulacastrum may encourage further studies to understand the full potential of this dietary plant for chemoprevention of breast cancer. - Abstract: Due to limited treatment options for advanced-stage metastatic breast cancer, a high priority should be given to develop non-toxic chemopreventive drugs. The value of various natural and dietary agents to reduce the risk of developing breast cancer is well established. Trianthema portulacastrum Linn. (Aizoaceae), a dietary and medicinal plant, has been found to exert antihepatotoxic and antihepatocarcinogenic properties in rodents. This study was initiated to investigate mechanism-based chemopreventive potential of an ethanolic extract of T. portulacastrum (TPE) against 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-initiated rat mammary gland carcinogenesis, an experimental tumor model that closely resembles human breast cancer. Rats had access to a basal diet supplemented with TPE to yield three dietary doses of the extract, i.e., 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg body weight. Following two weeks of TPE treatment, mammary tumorigenesis was initiated by oral administration of DMBA (50 mg/kg body weight). At the end of the study (16 weeks after DMBA exposure), TPE exhibited a striking reduction of DMBA-induced mammary tumor incidence, total tumor burden and average tumor weight

  18. [NF-kappaB tumorigenesis and drug developement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei-Feng; Yu, Shan-Shan; Li, Yue-Zhong

    2005-01-01

    NF-kappaB, a collective name of dimeric transcription factors, is composed of members of the Rel family proteins that recognize and bind a specific DNA sequence. It is normally sequestered in the cytoplasm of non-stimulated cells by associating with a family of inhibitor proteins called IkappaBs. Exposure of cells to a variety of extra-and intra-cellular stimuli leads to the rapid proteolytic degradation of IkappaBs, which frees NF-kappaBs allowing them to translocate to the nucleus where it regulates gene transcription. NF-kappaB is involved in a lot of physiological processes such as immunity, inflammation, cell proliferation, apoptosis and even tumorigenesis by regulating the transcription of a larger number of genes. This review introduces the various mechanisms of NF-kappaB activation including a recently reported alternative activation pathway mediated by lymphotoxin alpha/beta, B cell activating factor and CD40 ligand. The signal transduction pathway leading to NF-kappaB activation via IKK in response to proinflammatory factors like TNF-alpha and IL-1 is addressed in more detail concerning the regulation of IKK activity, mechanism of IkappaB degradation and regulation of transactivation activity of NF-kappaB on different levels. Considering the important role of NF-kappaB in cell proliferation and regulation of various genes participating in apoptosis, the involvement of NF-kappaB in tumorigenesis and drug screening is also discussed.

  19. The Role of Genetic and Epigenetic Changes in Pituitary Tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    FUKUOKA, Hidenori; TAKAHASHI, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas are one of the most common intracranial tumors. Despite their benign nature, dys-regulation of hormone secretion causes systemic metabolic deterioration, resulting in high mortality and an impaired quality of life. Tumorigenic pathogenesis of pituitary adenomas is mainly investigated by performing genetic analyses of somatic mutations in the tumor or germline mutations in patients. Genetically modified mouse models, which develop pituitary adenomas, are also used. Genetic analysis in rare familial pituitary adenomas, including multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 and type 4, Carney complex, familial isolated pituitary adenomas, and succinate dehydrogenases (SDHs)-mediated paraganglioma syndrome, revealed several causal germline mutations and sporadic somatic mutations in these genes. The analysis of genetically modified mouse models exhibiting pituitary adenomas has revealed the underlying mechanisms, where cell cycle regulatory molecules, tumor suppressors, and growth factor signaling are involved in pituitary tumorigenesis. Furthermore, accumulating evidence suggests that epigenetic changes, including deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) methylation, histone modification, micro ribonucleic acids (RNAs), and long noncoding RNAs play a pivotal role. The elucidation of precise mechanisms of pituitary tumori-genesis can contribute to the development of novel targeted therapy for pituitary adenomas. PMID:25446387

  20. Lysyl oxidase activity regulates oncogenic stress response and tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiel, C; Augert, A; Vincent, D F; Gitenay, D; Vindrieux, D; Le Calvé, B; Arfi, V; Lallet-Daher, H; Reynaud, C; Treilleux, I; Bartholin, L; Lelievre, E; Bernard, D

    2013-10-10

    Cellular senescence, a stable proliferation arrest, is induced in response to various stresses. Oncogenic stress-induced senescence (OIS) results in blocked proliferation and constitutes a fail-safe program counteracting tumorigenesis. The events that enable a tumor in a benign senescent state to escape from OIS and become malignant are largely unknown. We show that lysyl oxidase activity contributes to the decision to maintain senescence. Indeed, in human epithelial cell the constitutive expression of the LOX or LOXL2 protein favored OIS escape, whereas inhibition of lysyl oxidase activity was found to stabilize OIS. The relevance of these in vitro observations is supported by in vivo findings: in a transgenic mouse model of aggressive pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), increasing lysyl oxidase activity accelerates senescence escape, whereas inhibition of lysyl oxidase activity was found to stabilize senescence, delay tumorigenesis, and increase survival. Mechanistically, we show that lysyl oxidase activity favors the escape of senescence by regulating the focal-adhesion kinase. Altogether, our results demonstrate that lysyl oxidase activity participates in primary tumor growth by directly impacting the senescence stability.

  1. Loss of Pin1 Suppresses Hedgehog-Driven Medulloblastoma Tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tao; Zhang, Honglai; Park, Sung-Soo; Venneti, Sriram; Kuick, Rork; Ha, Kimberly; Michael, Lowell Evan; Santi, Mariarita; Uchida, Chiyoko; Uchida, Takafumi; Srinivasan, Ashok; Olson, James M; Dlugosz, Andrzej A; Camelo-Piragua, Sandra; Rual, Jean-François

    2017-03-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor in children. Therapeutic approaches to medulloblastoma (combination of surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy) have led to significant improvements, but these are achieved at a high cost to quality of life. Alternative therapeutic approaches are needed. Genetic mutations leading to the activation of the Hedgehog pathway drive tumorigenesis in ~30% of medulloblastoma. In a yeast two-hybrid proteomic screen, we discovered a novel interaction between GLI1, a key transcription factor for the mediation of Hedgehog signals, and PIN1, a peptidylprolyl cis/trans isomerase that regulates the postphosphorylation fate of its targets. The GLI1/PIN1 interaction was validated by reciprocal pulldowns using epitope-tagged proteins in HEK293T cells as well as by co-immunoprecipiations of the endogenous proteins in a medulloblastoma cell line. Our results support a molecular model in which PIN1 promotes GLI1 protein abundance, thus contributing to the positive regulation of Hedgehog signals. Most importantly, in vivo functional analyses of Pin1 in the GFAP-tTA;TRE-SmoA1 mouse model of Hedgehog-driven medulloblastoma demonstrate that the loss of Pin1 impairs tumor development and dramatically increases survival. In summary, the discovery of the GLI1/PIN1 interaction uncovers PIN1 as a novel therapeutic target in Hedgehog-driven medulloblastoma tumorigenesis. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Breast Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... result in the development of breast cysts. Breast trauma, prior breast surgery or other factors localized to the breast can lead to breast pain. Breast pain may also start outside the breast — in the chest wall, muscles, joints or heart, for example — and ...

  3. Anticancer and Cancer Prevention Effects of Piperine-Free Piper nigrum Extract on N-nitrosomethylurea-Induced Mammary Tumorigenesis in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriwiriyajan, Somchai; Tedasen, Aman; Lailerd, Narissara; Boonyaphiphat, Pleumjit; Nitiruangjarat, Anupong; Deng, Yan; Graidist, Potchanapond

    2016-01-01

    Piper nigrum (P. nigrum) is commonly used in traditional medicine. This current study aimed to investigate the anticancer and cancer preventive activity of a piperine-free P. nigrum extract (PFPE) against breast cancer cells and N-nitrosomethylurea (NMU)-induced mammary tumorigenesis in rats. The cytotoxic effects and the mechanism of action were investigated in breast cancer cells using the MTT assay and Western blot analysis, respectively. An acute toxicity study was conducted according to the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development guideline. Female Sprague-Dawley rats with NMU-induced mammary tumors were used in preventive and anticancer studies. The results showed that PFPE inhibited the growth of luminal-like breast cancer cells more so than the basal-like ones by induction of apoptosis. In addition, PFPE exhibited greater selectivity against breast cancer cells than colorectal cancer, lung cancer, and neuroblastoma cells. In an acute toxicity study, a single oral administration of PFPE at a dose of 5,000 mg/kg body weight resulted in no mortality and morbidity during a 14-day observation period. For the cancer preventive study, the incidence of tumor-bearing rats was 10% to 20% in rats treated with PFPE. For the anticancer activity study, the growth rate of tumors in the presence of PFPE-treated groups was much slower when compared with the control and vehicle groups. The extract itself caused no changes to the biochemical and hematologic parameters when compared with the control and vehicle groups. In conclusion, PFPE had a low toxicity and a potent antitumor effect on mammary tumorigenesis in rats. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. Oral administration of a Gemini vitamin D analog, a synthetic triterpenoid and the combination prevents mammary tumorigenesis driven by ErbB2 overexpression

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Jae Young; Wahler, Joseph E.; Yoon, Taesook; Smolarek, Amanda K.; Lin, Yong; Shih, Weichung Joe; Maehr, Hubert; Uskokovic, Milan; Liby, Karen T.; Sporn, Michael B.; Suh, Nanjoo

    2013-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 or ErbB2), a member of ErbB receptor tyrosine kinases, is overexpressed in approximately 20 % of human breast cancer, and the ErbB2 signaling pathway is a critical therapeutic target for ErbB2-overexpressing breast cancer. We investigated the inhibitory effects of the Gemini vitamin D analog BXL0124, the synthetic triterpenoid CDDO-Im and the combination on the tumorigenesis of ErbB2-overexpressing breast cancer. MMTV-ErbB2/neu transgenic mice were treated with BXL0124, CDDO-Im or the combination from 3 months of age until the end of the experiment. Formation and growth of MMTV-ErbB2/neu mammary tumors were monitored every week, and all three treatments delayed the development of mammary tumors without significant toxicity. Decreased activation of ErbB2 as well as other ErbB receptors, ErbB1 and ErbB3, in MMTV-ErbB2/neu mammary tumors was shown by all treatments. Protein levels of downstream targets of the ErbB2 signaling pathway, including activated-Erk1/2, activated-Akt, c-Myc, CycD1 and Bcl2, were repressed by all three treatments, with the combination treatment exhibiting the strongest effects. To investigate therapeutic efficacy, the combination of BXL0124 and CDDO-Im was given to MMTV-ErbB2/neu mice after mammary tumors were established between 23-30 weeks of age. Short-term treatment with the combination did not show effects on tumor growth nor the ErbB2 signaling pathway. The present study demonstrates BXL0124, CDDO-Im and the combination as potential agents for prevention, but not treatment, against the tumorigenesis of ErbB2-overexpressing breast cancer. PMID:23856074

  5. Oral administration of a gemini vitamin D analog, a synthetic triterpenoid and the combination prevents mammary tumorigenesis driven by ErbB2 overexpression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Jae Young; Wahler, Joseph E; Yoon, Taesook; Smolarek, Amanda K; Lin, Yong; Shih, Weichung Joe; Maehr, Hubert; Uskokovic, Milan; Liby, Karen T; Sporn, Michael B; Suh, Nanjoo

    2013-09-01

    HER2 (or ErbB2), a member of ErbB receptor tyrosine kinases, is overexpressed in approximately 20% of human breast cancer, and the ErbB2 signaling pathway is a critical therapeutic target for ErbB2-overexpressing breast cancer. We investigated the inhibitory effects of the Gemini vitamin D analog BXL0124, the synthetic triterpenoid CDDO-Im and the combination on the tumorigenesis of ErbB2-overexpressing breast cancer. MMTV-ErbB2/neu transgenic mice were treated with BXL0124, CDDO-Im, or the combination from three months of age until the end of the experiment. Formation and growth of MMTV-ErbB2/neu mammary tumors were monitored every week, and all three treatments delayed the development of mammary tumors without significant toxicity. Decreased activation of ErbB2 as well as other ErbB receptors, ErbB1 and ErbB3, in MMTV-ErbB2/neu mammary tumors was shown by all treatments. Protein levels of downstream targets of the ErbB2 signaling pathway, including activated-Erk1/2, activated-Akt, c-Myc, CycD1, and Bcl2, were repressed by all three treatments, with the combination treatment exhibiting the strongest effects. To investigate therapeutic efficacy, the combination of BXL0124 and CDDO-Im was given to MMTV-ErbB2/neu mice after mammary tumors were established between 23 and 30 weeks of age. Short-term treatment with the combination did not show effects on tumor growth nor the ErbB2 signaling pathway. The present study shows BXL0124, CDDO-Im, and the combination as potential agents for prevention, but not treatment, against the tumorigenesis of ErbB2-overexpressing breast cancer.

  6. The role of composition in the interpretation of the Rider on the white horse and the seven seals in Revelation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieter G.R. de Villiers

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The article investigates the way in which the author of Revelation composed the seven seals: Formal elements group the seals in smaller patterns. It then explains how this reading of the composition contributes to the process of interpretation by analysing the Rider on the white horse as first seal. Other aspects of the author’s compositional skills are brought into discussion in a last part of the article where the meaning of the Rider on the white horse and the ambiguity of the symbols are discussed.

  7. Fibroadenoma - breast

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fibroadenoma; Breast lump - noncancerous; Breast lump - benign References Hacker NF, Friedlander ML. Breast disease: a gynecologic perspective. In: Hacker NF, Gambone JC, Hobel CJ, eds. Hacker and ...

  8. Measuring the role for Met endosomal signaling in tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, Rachel; Joffre, Carine; Ménard, Ludovic; Kermorgant, Stéphanie

    2014-01-01

    Met is a receptor tyrosine kinase, often overexpressed or mutated in human cancer. Upon activation by its ligand, the hepatocyte growth factor, Met controls several cell functions such as proliferation, migration, and survival through the activation of multiple pathways. Upon ligand binding, Met rapidly internalizes and continues to signal from endosomal compartments prior to its degradation. Importantly, this "endosomal signaling" has recently been shown to be involved in tumorigenesis and experimental metastasis. Consequently, interfering with Met endosomal signaling may provide a novel therapeutic approach in cancer treatment. However, there is a need for additional studies in various experimental models to confirm this and find the most specific ways of achieving it. Thus, outlined in this review are the techniques and tools we have been using to study Met endocytosis and Met endosomal signaling. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Wnt signaling and colon tumorigenesis - A view from the periphery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgess, Antony W., E-mail: burgess@ludwig.edu.au [Parkville Branch, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Melbourne, 3050 (Australia); Faux, Maree C. [Parkville Branch, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Melbourne, 3050 (Australia); Layton, Meredith J. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Monash University, Melbourne, 3800 (Australia); Ramsay, Robert G. [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, 3002 (Australia); Pathology Department, the University of Melbourne, Parkville, 3050 (Australia)

    2011-11-15

    In this brief overview we discuss the association between Wnt signaling and colon cell biology and tumorigenesis. Our current understanding of the role of Apc in the {beta}-catenin destruction complex is compared with potential roles for Apc in cell adhesion and migration. The requirement for phosphorylation in the proteasomal-mediated degradation of {beta}-catenin is contrasted with roles for phospho-{beta}-catenin in the activation of transcription, cell adhesion and migration. The synergy between Myb and {beta}-catenin regulation of transcription in crypt stem cells during Wnt signaling is discussed. Finally, potential effects of growth factor regulatory systems, Apc or truncated-Apc on crypt morphogenesis, stem cell localization and crypt fission are considered.

  10. SOX-mediated molecular crosstalk during the progression of tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ya-Ru; Yang, Wan-Xi

    2017-03-01

    SOX family transcription factor has emerged as a double-edged sword relating to tumorigenesis and metastasis. Multiple studies have revealed different expression patterns and contradictory roles of SOX factors in the tumor initiation and progression. The aberrant expression of SOX factors is regulated by copy number alteration, methylation modulation, microRNAs, transcription factors and post-translational modification. This review summarizes the role of SOX factors in molecular interactions and signaling pathways during different steps of carcinogenesis, such as CSCs stemness maintenance, EMT occurrence, cell invasion, cell proliferation and apoptosis. The Wnt signaling pathway is also shown to provide vital intermediate signaling transduction. We believe that SOX family proteins may be used as prognostic markers for human clinical therapy, and novel therapy strategies targeting SOX factors should be explored in future clinical applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Telomere Replication Stress Induced by POT1 Inactivation Accelerates Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra M. Pinzaru

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Genome sequencing studies have revealed a number of cancer-associated mutations in the telomere-binding factor POT1. Here, we show that when combined with p53 deficiency, depletion of murine POT1a in common lymphoid progenitor cells fosters genetic instability, accelerates the onset, and increases the severity of T cell lymphomas. In parallel, we examined human and mouse cells carrying POT1 mutations found in cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL patients. Inhibition of POT1 activates ATR-dependent DNA damage signaling and induces telomere fragility, replication fork stalling, and telomere elongation. Our data suggest that these phenotypes are linked to impaired CST (CTC1-STN1-TEN1 function at telomeres. Lastly, we show that proliferation of cancer cells lacking POT1 is enabled by the attenuation of the ATR kinase pathway. These results uncover a role for defective telomere replication during tumorigenesis.

  12. Period 2 Mutation Accelerates ApcMin/+ Tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Patricia A.; Yang, Xiaoming; Taber, Andrew; Oh, Eun-Young; Ansell, Christine; Ayers, Stacy E.; Al-Assaad, Ziad; Carnevale, Kevin; Berger, Franklin G.; Peña, Maria Marjorette O.; Hrushesky, William J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer risk is increased in shift workers with presumed circadian disruption. Intestinal epithelial cell proliferation is gated throughout each day by the circadian clock. Period 2 (Per2) is a key circadian clock gene. Per2 mutant (Per2m/m) mice show an increase in lymphomas and deregulated expression of cyclin D and c-Myc genes that are key to proliferation control. We asked whether Per2 clock gene inactivation would accelerate intestinal and colonic tumorigenesis. The effects of PER2 on cell proliferation and β-catenin were studied in colon cancer cell lines by its down-regulation following RNA interference. The effects of Per2 inactivation in vivo on β-catenin and on intestinal and colonic polyp formation were studied in mice with Per2 mutation alone and in combination with an Apc mutation using polyp-prone ApcMin/+ mice. Down-regulation of PER2 in colon cell lines (HCT116 and SW480) increases β-catenin, cyclin D, and cell proliferation. Down-regulation of β-catenin along with Per2 blocks the increase in cyclin D and cell proliferation. Per2m/m mice develop colonic polyps and show an increase in small intestinal mucosa β-catenin and cyclin D protein levels compared with wild-type mice. ApcMin/+Per2m/m mice develop twice the number of small intestinal and colonic polyps, with more severe anemia and splenomegaly, compared with ApcMin/+ mice. These data suggest that Per2 gene product suppresses tumorigenesis in the small intestine and colon by down-regulation of β-catenin and β-catenin target genes, and this circadian core clock gene may represent a novel target for colorectal cancer prevention and control. PMID:19010825

  13. New and emerging factors in tumorigenesis: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim S

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Suwon Kim1,2 1Department of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Arizona College of Medicine-Phoenix, 2Cancer and Cell Biology Division, Translational Genomics Research Institute, Phoenix, AZ, USA Abstract: This article provides an overview of the genes and cellular processes that have emerged recently as new key factors in tumorigenesis. We review these in the context of three broad categories. First, genome-scale sequencing studies have revealed a set of frequently mutated genes in cancer. Genes that are mutated in >5% of all cancers across tissue types are discussed, with a highlighted focus on the two most frequently mutated genes, TP53 and PIK3CA. Second, the mechanisms of resistance to targeted therapy are reviewed. These include acquired resistance under targeted therapy selection owing to mutations and amplification of genes in the same or parallel signaling pathways. Importantly, sequencing of primary tumors has revealed that therapy-resistant clones already exist prior to targeted therapy, demonstrating that tumor heterogeneity in primary tumors confers a mechanism for inherent therapy resistance. Third, “metastasis-specific genes”, or rather lack thereof, are discussed. While many genes have been shown to be capable of promoting metastasis in experimental systems, no common genetic alterations have been identified specific to metastatic lesions. Rather, the same gene mutations frequently found in primary tumors are also found prevalent in metastases, suggesting that the genes that drive tumorigenesis may also drive metastasis. In this light, an emerging view of metastatic progression is discussed. Collectively, these recent advances in cancer research have refined our knowledge on cancer etiology and progression but also present challenges that will require innovative new approaches to treat and manage cancer. Keywords: cancer, genomics, gene mutations, targeted therapy resistance, tumor heterogeneity, metastasis

  14. Fetal alcohol exposure and mammary tumorigenesis in offspring: role of the estrogen and insulin-like growth factor systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohick, Wendie S; Crismale-Gann, Catina; Stires, Hillary; Katz, Tiffany A

    2015-01-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders affect a significant number of live births each year, indicating that alcohol consumption during pregnancy is an important public health issue. Environmental exposures and lifestyle choices during pregnancy may affect the offspring's risk of disease in adulthood, leading to the idea that a woman's risk of breast cancer may be pre-programmed prior to birth. Exposure of pregnant rats to alcohol increases tumorigenesis in the adult offspring in response to mammary carcinogens. The estrogen and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) axes occupy central roles in normal mammary gland development and breast cancer. 17-β estradiol (E2) and IGF-I synergize to regulate formation of terminal end buds and ductal elongation during pubertal development. The intracellular signaling pathways mediated by the estrogen and IGF-I receptors cross-talk at multiple levels through both genomic and non-genomic mechanisms. Several components of the E2 and IGF-I systems are altered in early development in rat offspring exposed to alcohol in utero, therefore, these changes may play a role in the enhanced susceptibility to mammary carcinogens observed in adulthood. Alcohol exposure in utero induces a number of epigenetic alterations in non-mammary tissues in the offspring and other adverse in utero exposures induce epigenetic modifications in the mammary gland. Future studies will determine if fetal alcohol exposure can induce epigenetic modifications in genes that regulate E2/IGF action at key phases of mammary development, ultimately leading to changes in susceptibility to carcinogens.

  15. A targeted constitutive mutation in the APC tumor suppressor gene underlies mammary but not intestinal tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Gaspar

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Germline mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC gene are responsible for familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP, an autosomal dominant hereditary predisposition to the development of multiple colorectal adenomas and of a broad spectrum of extra-intestinal tumors. Moreover, somatic APC mutations play a rate-limiting and initiating role in the majority of sporadic colorectal cancers. Notwithstanding its multifunctional nature, the main tumor suppressing activity of the APC gene resides in its ability to regulate Wnt/beta-catenin signaling. Notably, genotype-phenotype correlations have been established at the APC gene between the length and stability of the truncated proteins encoded by different mutant alleles, the corresponding levels of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling activity they encode for, and the incidence and distribution of intestinal and extra-intestinal tumors. Here, we report a novel mouse model, Apc1572T, obtained by targeting a truncated mutation at codon 1572 in the endogenous Apc gene. This hypomorphic mutant allele results in intermediate levels of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling activation when compared with other Apc mutations associated with multifocal intestinal tumors. Notwithstanding the constitutive nature of the mutation, Apc(+/1572T mice have no predisposition to intestinal cancer but develop multifocal mammary adenocarcinomas and subsequent pulmonary metastases in both genders. The histology of the Apc1572T primary mammary tumours is highly heterogeneous with luminal, myoepithelial, and squamous lineages and is reminiscent of metaplastic carcinoma of the breast in humans. The striking phenotype of Apc(+/1572T mice suggests that specific dosages of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling activity differentially affect tissue homeostasis and initiate tumorigenesis in an organ-specific fashion.

  16. In vivo fluorescence imaging reveals the promotion of mammary tumorigenesis by mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Chih Ke

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are multipotent adult stem cells which are recruited to the tumor microenvironment (TME and influence tumor progression through multiple mechanisms. In this study, we examined the effects of MSCs on the tunmorigenic capacity of 4T1 murine mammary cancer cells. It was found that MSC-conditioned medium increased the proliferation, migration, and efficiency of mammosphere formation of 4T1 cells in vitro. When co-injected with MSCs into the mouse mammary fat pad, 4T1 cells showed enhanced tumor growth and generated increased spontaneous lung metastasis. Using in vivo fluorescence color-coded imaging, the interaction between GFP-expressing MSCs and RFP-expressing 4T1 cells was monitored. As few as five 4T1 cells could give rise to tumor formation when co-injected with MSCs into the mouse mammary fat pad, but no tumor was formed when five or ten 4T1 cells were implanted alone. The elevation of tumorigenic potential was further supported by gene expression analysis, which showed that when 4T1 cells were in contact with MSCs, several oncogenes, cancer markers, and tumor promoters were upregulated. Moreover, in vivo longitudinal fluorescence imaging of tumorigenesis revealed that MSCs created a vascularized environment which enhances the ability of 4T1 cells to colonize and proliferate. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that the promotion of mammary cancer progression by MSCs was achieved through the generation of a cancer-enhancing microenvironment to increase tumorigenic potential. These findings also suggest the potential risk of enhancing tumor progression in clinical cell therapy using MSCs. Attention has to be paid to patients with high risk of breast cancer when considering cell therapy with MSCs.

  17. [The expression and clinical significance of Wnt-1 induced secreted protein-1 in breast carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Rui; Tian, Chao; Meng, Wen-jian; Zhang, Jian-hui; Li, Lui; Zhang, Pu-rong; Long, Qi-ming; Tao, Ping

    2010-03-01

    To investigate the expression of Wnt-1 induced secreted protein-1 (WISP-1) between breast cancer and paired normal breast tissues and to explore the significance of WISP-1 in breast cancer tumorigenesis. The mRNA and protein expressions of WISP-1 in human breast cancer were measured by Quantitative Real-Time RT-PCR and immunohistochemical staining and further analyzed the relationship between WISP-1 expression and clinic pathologic characters. WISP-1 expression in breast cancer was higher than that in normal breast tissue (P = 0.001). The mRNA expression level of WISP-1 was correlated with tumor size, staging, lymph node status, differentiated degree and HER-2 status (P WISP-1 protein expression level was correlated with lymph node status, differentiated degree and HER-2 status (P WISP-1 expression in human breast cancer increases significantly and may play a key role in the invasion and metastasis of human breast cancer.

  18. Manipulating Protein Acetylation in Breast Cancer: A Promising Approach in Combination with Hormonal Therapies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélien Linares

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Estrogens play an essential role in the normal physiology of the breast as well as in mammary tumorigenesis. Their effects are mediated by two nuclear estrogen receptors, ERα and β, which regulate transcription of specific genes by interacting with multiprotein complexes, including histone deacetylases (HDACs. During the past few years, HDACs have raised great interest as therapeutic targets in the field of cancer therapy. In breast cancer, several experimental arguments suggest that HDACs are involved at multiple levels in mammary tumorigenesis: their expression is deregulated in breast tumors; they interfere with ER signaling in intricate ways, restoring hormone sensitivity in models of estrogen resistance, and they clinically represent new potential targets for HDACs inhibitors (HDIs in combination with hormonal therapies. In this paper, we will describe these different aspects and underline the clinical interest of HDIs in the context of breast cancer resistance to hormone therapies (HTs.

  19. [Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lax, S F

    2017-05-01

    Hereditary breast and ovarian carcinomas are frequently caused by germline mutations of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes (BRCA1/2 syndromes) and are often less associated with other hereditary syndromes such as Li-Fraumeni and Peutz-Jeghers. The BRCA1/2 proteins have a special role in DNA repair. Therefore, loss of function due to mutation causes an accumulation of mutations in other genes and subsequent tumorigenesis at an early age. BRCA1/2 mutations are irregularly distributed over the length of the genes without hot spots, although special mutations are known. Breast and ovarian cancer occur far more frequently in women with BRCA1/2 germline mutations compared with the general population. Breast cancer occurs increasingly from the age of 30, ovarian cancer in BRCA1 syndrome from the age of 40 and BRCA2 from the age of 50. Suspicion of a BRCA syndrome should be prompted in the case of clustering of breast cancer in 1st degree relatives, in particular at a young age, if breast and ovarian cancer have occurred, and if cases of male breast cancer are known. Breast carcinomas with medullary differentiation seem to predominate in BRCA syndromes, but other carcinoma types may also occur. BRCA germline mutations seem to occur frequently in triple-negative breast carcinomas, whereas an association with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is rare. Ovarian carcinomas in BRCA syndromes are usually high-grade serous, mucinous carcinomas and borderline tumors are unusual. Pathology plays a special role within the multidisciplinary team in the recognition of patients with hereditary cancer syndromes.

  20. Identification and treatment of patients with BRCA1 or BRCA2-defective breast and ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, P.C.

    2017-01-01

    Inactivating mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 confer a large lifetime risk of breast and ovarian cancer. These genes are involved in high-fidelity repair of DNA double strand breaks. Although defects in BRCA1 and BRCA2 are contributing to tumorigenesis, they may also form therapeutic targets. We

  1. Enhancer-Mediated Oncogenic Function of the Menin Tumor Suppressor in Breast Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dreijerink, Koen M A; Groner, Anna C.; Vos, Erica S M; Font-Tello, Alba; Gu, Lei; Chi, David; Reyes, Jaime; Cook, Jennifer; Lim, Elgene; Lin, Charles Y.; de Laat, Wouter; Rao, Prakash K.; Long, Henry W.; Brown, Myles

    2017-01-01

    While the multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) gene functions as a tumor suppressor in a variety of cancer types, we explored its oncogenic role in breast tumorigenesis. The MEN1 gene product menin is involved in H3K4 trimethylation and co-activates transcription. We integrated ChIP-seq and

  2. Harderian Gland Tumorigenesis: Low-Dose and LET Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Polly Y. [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States). Biosciences Div.; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Life Sciences Div.; Cucinotta, Francis A. [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States). Dept. of Health Physics and Diagnostic Sciences; Bjornstad, Kathleen A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Life Sciences Div.; Bakke, James [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States). Biosciences Div.; Rosen, Chris J. [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States). Biosciences Div.; Du, Nicholas [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Life Sciences Div.; Fairchild, David G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Life Sciences Div.; Cacao, Eliedonna [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States). Dept. of Health Physics and Diagnostic Sciences; Blakely, Eleanor A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Life Sciences Div.

    2016-04-19

    Increased cancer risk remains a primary concern for travel into deep space and may preclude manned missions to Mars due to large uncertainties that currently exist in estimating cancer risk from the spectrum of radiations found in space with the very limited available human epidemiological radiation-induced cancer data. Existing data on human risk of cancer from X-ray and gamma-ray exposure must be scaled to the many types and fluences of radiations found in space using radiation quality factors and dose-rate modification factors, and assuming linearity of response since the shapes of the dose responses at low doses below 100 mSv are unknown. The goal of this work was to reduce uncertainties in the relative biological effect (RBE) and linear energy transfer (LET) relationship for space-relevant doses of charged-particle radiation-induced carcinogenesis. The historical data from the studies of Fry et al. and Alpen et al. for Harderian gland (HG) tumors in the female CB6F1 strain of mouse represent the most complete set of experimental observations, including dose dependence, available on a specific radiation-induced tumor in an experimental animal using heavy ion beams that are found in the cosmic radiation spectrum. However, these data lack complete information on low-dose responses below 0.1 Gy, and for chronic low-dose-rate exposures, and there are gaps in the LET region between 25 and 190 keV/μm. In this study, we used the historical HG tumorigenesis data as reference, and obtained HG tumor data for 260 MeV/u silicon (LET ~70 keV/μm) and 1,000 MeV/u titanium (LET ~100 keV/μm) to fill existing gaps of data in this LET range to improve our understanding of the dose-response curve at low doses, to test for deviations from linearity and to provide RBE estimates. Animals were also exposed to five daily fractions of 0.026 or 0.052 Gy of 1,000 MeV/u titanium ions to simulate chronic exposure, and HG tumorigenesis from this fractionated study were compared to the

  3. Breast and ovarian cancers: a survey and possible roles for the cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoneda, Atsuko; Lendorf, Maria E; Couchman, John R

    2012-01-01

    of breast cancer may also develop ovarian cancer. Here, the authors review the different tumor markers of breast and ovarian carcinoma and discuss the expression, mutations, and possible roles of cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans during tumorigenesis of these carcinomas. The focus is on two groups...... of proteoglycans, the transmembrane syndecans and the lipid-anchored glypicans. Both families of proteoglycans have been implicated in cellular responses to growth factors and morphogens, including many now associated with tumor progression....

  4. The Role of Phosphatidylinositol 3' -OH Kinase Signaling in Mammary Tumorigenesis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hutchinson, John

    2001-01-01

    ...) and its downstream targets such as the Akt kinase in the induction of mammary tumors. To assess the role of Akt in mammary development and tumorigenesis, we have generated transgenic mice that express an activated Akt (Akt-DD...

  5. The Role of Phosphatidylinositol 3' -OH Kinase Signaling in Mammary Tumorigenesis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hutchinson, John

    2002-01-01

    ...) and its downstream target Akt kinase in the induction of mammary tumors. To assess the role of Akt in mammary development and tumorigenesis, we generated transgenic mice that express an activated Akt (Akt-DD...

  6. Alternative RNA Structure-Coupled Gene Regulations in Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Chi Chen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Alternative RNA structures (ARSs, or alternative transcript isoforms, are critical for regulating cellular phenotypes in humans. In addition to generating functionally diverse protein isoforms from a single gene, ARS can alter the sequence contents of 5'/3' untranslated regions (UTRs and intronic regions, thus also affecting the regulatory effects of these regions. ARS may introduce premature stop codon(s into a transcript, and render the transcript susceptible to nonsense-mediated decay, which in turn can influence the overall gene expression level. Meanwhile, ARS can regulate the presence/absence of upstream open reading frames and microRNA targeting sites in 5'UTRs and 3'UTRs, respectively, thus affecting translational efficiencies and protein expression levels. Furthermore, since ARS may alter exon-intron structures, it can influence the biogenesis of intronic microRNAs and indirectly affect the expression of the target genes of these microRNAs. The connections between ARS and multiple regulatory mechanisms underline the importance of ARS in determining cell fate. Accumulating evidence indicates that ARS-coupled regulations play important roles in tumorigenesis. Here I will review our current knowledge in this field, and discuss potential future directions.

  7. Control of glioblastoma tumorigenesis by feed-forward cytokine signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahani-Asl, Arezu; Yin, Hang; Soleimani, Vahab D; Haque, Takrima; Luchman, H Artee; Chang, Natasha C; Sincennes, Marie-Claude; Puram, Sidharth V; Scott, Andrew M; Lorimer, Ian A J; Perkins, Theodore J; Ligon, Keith L; Weiss, Samuel; Rudnicki, Michael A; Bonni, Azad

    2016-06-01

    EGFRvIII-STAT3 signaling is important in glioblastoma pathogenesis. Here, we identified the cytokine receptor OSMR as a direct target gene of the transcription factor STAT3 in mouse astrocytes and human brain tumor stem cells (BTSCs). We found that OSMR functioned as an essential co-receptor for EGFRvIII. OSMR formed a physical complex with EGFRvIII, and depletion of OSMR impaired EGFRvIII-STAT3 signaling. Conversely, pharmacological inhibition of EGFRvIII phosphorylation inhibited the EGFRvIII-OSMR interaction and activation of STAT3. EGFRvIII-OSMR signaling in tumors operated constitutively, whereas EGFR-OSMR signaling in nontumor cells was synergistically activated by the ligands EGF and OSM. Finally, knockdown of OSMR strongly suppressed cell proliferation and tumor growth of mouse glioblastoma cells and human BTSC xenografts in mice, and prolonged the lifespan of these mice. Our findings identify OSMR as a critical regulator of glioblastoma tumor growth that orchestrates a feed-forward signaling mechanism with EGFRvIII and STAT3 to drive tumorigenesis.

  8. MicroRNA-429 Modulates Hepatocellular Carcinoma Prognosis and Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Ying Huang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNA-429 (miR-429 may modify the development and progression of cancers; however, the role of this microRNA in the hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC has not been well elaborated. Here, we tested miR-429 expression in 138 pathology-diagnosed HCC cases and SMMC-7721 cells. We found that miR-429 was upregulated in HCC tumor tissues and that the high expression of miR-429 was significantly correlated with larger tumor size (odd ratio (OR, 2.70; 95% confidence interval (CI, 1.28–5.56 and higher aflatoxin B1-DNA adducts (OR = 3.13, 95% CI = 1.47–6.67. Furthermore, this microRNA overexpression modified the recurrence-free survival and overall survival of HCC patients. Functionally, miR-429 overexpression progressed tumor cells proliferation and inhibited cell apoptosis. These results indicate for the first time that miR-429 may modify HCC prognosis and tumorigenesis and may be a potential tumor therapeutic target.

  9. Intricacies of hedgehog signaling pathways: A perspective in tumorigenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kar, Swayamsiddha; Deb, Moonmoon; Sengupta, Dipta; Shilpi, Arunima; Bhutia, Sujit Kumar [Epigenetics and Cancer Research Laboratory, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Group, Department of Life Science, National Institute of Technology, Rourkela, Odisha 769008 (India); Patra, Samir Kumar, E-mail: samirp@nitrkl.ac.in [Epigenetics and Cancer Research Laboratory, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Group, Department of Life Science, National Institute of Technology, Rourkela, Odisha 769008 (India)

    2012-10-01

    The hedgehog (HH) signaling pathway is a crucial negotiator of developmental proceedings in the embryo governing a diverse array of processes including cell proliferation, differentiation, and tissue patterning. The overall activity of the pathway is significantly curtailed after embryogenesis as well as in adults, yet it retains many of its functional capacities. However, aberration in HH signaling mediates the initiation, proliferation and continued sustenance of malignancy in different tissues to varying degrees through different mechanisms. In this review, we provide an overview of the role of constitutively active aberrant HH signaling pathway in different types of human cancer and the underlying molecular and genetic mechanisms that drive tumorigenesis in that particular tissue. An insight into the various modes of anomalous HH signaling in different organs will provide a comprehensive knowledge of the pathway in these tissues and open a window for individually tailored, tissue-specific therapeutic interventions. The synergistic cross talking of HH pathway with many other regulatory molecules and developmentally inclined signaling pathways may offer many avenues for pharmacological advances. Understanding the molecular basis of abnormal HH signaling in cancer will provide an opportunity to inhibit the deregulated pathway in many aggressive and therapeutically challenging cancers where promising options are not available.

  10. Embodied Revelation: A Classic Grounded Theory of Heart Failure Patient Decision Making Surrounding Primary Prevention Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Barton-Caro Ph.D.,

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this classic grounded theory study was to explain the complex decision making process of heart failure (HF patients considering primary prevention implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD therapy. Sudden cardiac death (SCD is the leading cause of death for people with HF as well as the primary cause of death in the United States (US. ICDs represent the standard of care as the only effective therapy for primary prevention of SCD. However, a significant proportion of qualifying HF patients declines this invasive, yet life-saving device. The grounded theory is of Embodied revelation. The threat of SCD for ICD candidates consists of four stages: living in conscious denial, heightening of awareness, sanctioning ICD therapy, and living in new assurance. The first stage ends abruptly with the critical juncture of grasping the threat of SCD. This grounded theory has implications for research, nursing and medical practice, as well as bioethical considerations.

  11. Research on the management and endorsement of nuclear safety standards in the United States and its revelation for China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ting; Tian, Yu; Yang, Lili; Gao, Siyi; Song, Dahu

    2018-01-01

    This paper introduces the American standard system, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)’s responsibility, NRC nuclear safety regulations and standards system, studies on NRC’s standards management and endorsement mode, analyzes the characteristics of NRC standards endorsement management, and points out its disadvantages. This paper draws revelation from the standard management and endorsement model of NRC and points suggestion to China’s nuclear and radiation safety standards management.The issue of the “Nuclear Safety Law”plays an important role in China’s nuclear and radiation safety supervision. Nuclear and radiation safety regulations and standards are strong grips on the implementation of “Nuclear Safety Law”. This paper refers on the experience of international advanced countriy, will effectively promote the improvement of the endorsed management of China’s nuclear and radiation safety standards.

  12. The Role of the Low Molecular Weight (LMW) Isoforms of Cyclin E in Breast Cancer Tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-01

    C., Connell-Crowley, L., Swindell , E., Fox, M. P., and Wei, N. (1995) Mol. Biol. Cell 6, 387-400 cancer, without harming normal proliferating cells in...Nishomoto, T., Morgan, D. 0., Franza, R., and Roberts , J. M. (1992) Science hibitors could then help control the progression through the 257, 1689-169432...2. Sherr, C. J. (1996) Science 274, 1672-1677 Firpo, E. J., Doling, J. R., and Roberts , J. M. (1997) Nat. Med. 3, 222-225 3. Sherr, C. J. (1993) Cell

  13. Oncogene-Induced Changes in Mammary Cell Fate and EMT in Breast Tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Snail shRNA (n=125) b. Serial dilution injection into NOD SCID mammary glands with weekly palpation This task is to test the in-vivo tumor initiating...Subaim1a d. Serial dilution injection into NOD SCID mammary glands with weekly palpation As stated above, the HMEC cells are ready and testing has begun...experimental techniques . These optimization experiments are all outlined below. As demonstrated in Aim 1b, we have successfully cloned CD8IGF1R into

  14. The Effects of IGFBP3 Induction by TFG-B in Breast Tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-09-01

    dpp, response and early death. Proc. Natil. Acad, Sci. USA 90:770-774. a gene required for decapentaplegic function in Drosophila melanogaster . 27...identified in genetic screens for TGF-P can be targeted to specific promoter sequences through their effectors in Drosophila (49) and Caenorhabditis...Schutte, M., R. H. Hruban, L. Hedrick, K. R. Cho, G. M. Nadasdy, C. L. sophila Mad binds to DNA and directly mediate activation of vestigial by

  15. The Physiological Role of Progesterone Receptors in Breast Development and Tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-09-01

    Cellular and Molecular Biology of Mammary Cancer., D. Medina, G. Kidwell , G. Heppner and E. Anderson, Eds. (Plenum Press, New York, 1987), p. 163. 12 22...proliferation also express cyclin D1, ER and 23. Zwijsen RM, Wientjens E, Klompmaker R, van der Sman J, Bernards R, Michalides RJAM 1997 Cdk-independent

  16. The Role of SIRT1 In Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    tumorigenesis and 18 resistance to chemotherapy in hepatocellular carcinoma and its expression predicts poor prognosis. Ann Surg Oncol. 2012;19:2011-9...results. Furthermore, specifically knock down SIRT1 expression with SIRT1 small inhibitor RNA significantly reduced SOX-2 protein and slightly...SJ, et al. Expression of DBC1 and SIRT1 is associated with poor prognosis for breast carcinoma . Hum Pathol 2011;42:204-13. 26. Chen X, Sun K, Jiao S

  17. Conserved mechanisms of tumorigenesis in the Drosophila adult midgut.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Òscar Martorell

    Full Text Available Whereas the series of genetic events leading to colorectal cancer (CRC have been well established, the precise functions that these alterations play in tumor progression and how they disrupt intestinal homeostasis remain poorly characterized. Activation of the Wnt/Wg signaling pathway by a mutation in the gene APC is the most common trigger for CRC, inducing benign lesions that progress to carcinomas due to the accumulation of other genetic alterations. Among those, Ras mutations drive tumour progression in CRC, as well as in most epithelial cancers. As mammalian and Drosophila's intestines share many similarities, we decided to explore the alterations induced in the Drosophila midgut by the combined activation of the Wnt signaling pathway with gain of function of Ras signaling in the intestinal stem cells. Here we show that compound Apc-Ras clones, but not clones bearing the individual mutations, expand as aggressive intestinal tumor-like outgrowths. These lesions reproduce many of the human CRC hallmarks such as increased proliferation, blockade of cell differentiation and cell polarity and disrupted organ architecture. This process is followed by expression of tumoral markers present in human lesions. Finally, a metabolic behavioral assay shows that these flies suffer a progressive deterioration in intestinal homeostasis, providing a simple readout that could be used in screens for tumor modifiers or therapeutic compounds. Taken together, our results illustrate the conservation of the mechanisms of CRC tumorigenesis in Drosophila, providing an excellent model system to unravel the events that, upon mutation in Apc and Ras, lead to CRC initiation and progression.

  18. Autophagy regulates UBC9 levels during viral-mediated tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Mattoscio

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available UBC9, the sole E2-conjugating enzyme required for SUMOylation, is a key regulator of essential cellular functions and, as such, is frequently altered in cancers. Along these lines, we recently reported that its expression gradually increases during early stages of human papillomavirus (HPV-mediated cervical lesions transformation. However, a better understanding of how UBC9 is exploited by transforming viral oncoproteins is still needed. In the present study, we show that in human samples HPV drives UBC9 up-regulation also in very early steps of head and neck tumorigenesis, pointing to the important role for UBC9 in the HPV-mediated carcinogenic program. Moreover, using HPV-infected pre-cancerous tissues and primary human keratinocytes as the natural host of the virus, we investigate the pathological meaning and the cellular mechanisms responsible for UBC9 de-regulation in an oncoviral context. Our results show that UBC9 overexpression is promoted by transforming viral proteins to increase host cells' resistance to apoptosis. In addition, ultrastuctural, pharmacological and genetic approaches crucially unveil that UBC9 is physiologically targeted by autophagy in human cells. However, the presence of HPV E6/E7 oncoproteins negatively impacts the autophagic process through selective inhibition of autophagosome-lysosome fusion, finally leading to p53 dependent UBC9 accumulation during viral-induced cellular transformation. Therefore, our study elucidates how UBC9 is manipulated by HPV oncoproteins, details the physiological mechanism by which UBC9 is degraded in cells, and identifies how HPV E6/E7 impact on autophagy. These findings point to UBC9 and autophagy as novel hallmarks of HPV oncogenesis, and open innovative avenues towards the treatment of HPV-related malignancies.

  19. Autophagy regulates UBC9 levels during viral-mediated tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattoscio, Domenico; Casadio, Chiara; Miccolo, Claudia; Maffini, Fausto; Raimondi, Andrea; Tacchetti, Carlo; Gheit, Tarik; Tagliabue, Marta; Galimberti, Viviana E; De Lorenzi, Francesca; Pawlita, Michael; Chiesa, Fausto; Ansarin, Mohssen; Tommasino, Massimo; Chiocca, Susanna

    2017-03-01

    UBC9, the sole E2-conjugating enzyme required for SUMOylation, is a key regulator of essential cellular functions and, as such, is frequently altered in cancers. Along these lines, we recently reported that its expression gradually increases during early stages of human papillomavirus (HPV)-mediated cervical lesions transformation. However, a better understanding of how UBC9 is exploited by transforming viral oncoproteins is still needed. In the present study, we show that in human samples HPV drives UBC9 up-regulation also in very early steps of head and neck tumorigenesis, pointing to the important role for UBC9 in the HPV-mediated carcinogenic program. Moreover, using HPV-infected pre-cancerous tissues and primary human keratinocytes as the natural host of the virus, we investigate the pathological meaning and the cellular mechanisms responsible for UBC9 de-regulation in an oncoviral context. Our results show that UBC9 overexpression is promoted by transforming viral proteins to increase host cells' resistance to apoptosis. In addition, ultrastuctural, pharmacological and genetic approaches crucially unveil that UBC9 is physiologically targeted by autophagy in human cells. However, the presence of HPV E6/E7 oncoproteins negatively impacts the autophagic process through selective inhibition of autophagosome-lysosome fusion, finally leading to p53 dependent UBC9 accumulation during viral-induced cellular transformation. Therefore, our study elucidates how UBC9 is manipulated by HPV oncoproteins, details the physiological mechanism by which UBC9 is degraded in cells, and identifies how HPV E6/E7 impact on autophagy. These findings point to UBC9 and autophagy as novel hallmarks of HPV oncogenesis, and open innovative avenues towards the treatment of HPV-related malignancies.

  20. Molecular mechanisms of thyroid tumorigenesis; Molekulare Mechanismen der Schilddruesentumorgenese

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, K.; Fuehrer, D. [Universitaetsklinikum Leipzig (Germany). Abt. fuer Endokrinolgoie, Diabetologie und Nephrologie

    2008-09-15

    Thyroid nodules are the most frequent endocrine disorder and occur in approximately 30% of the German population. Thyroid nodular disease constitutes a very heterogeneous entity. A striking diversity of possible functional and morphological features of a thyroid tumour derived from the same thyroid ancestor cell, is a hallmark of thyroid tumorigenesis and is due to specific genetic alterations. Defects in known candidate genes can be found in up to 70% of differentiated thyroid carcinomas and determine the respective cancer phenotype. Papillary thyroid cancers (PTC) harbour BRAF (or much less frequently RAS) mutations in sporadically occurring tumours, while radiation-induced PTC display chromosomal rearrangements such as RET, TRK, APR9 / BRAF. These genetic events results in constitutive MAPKinase activation. Follicular thyroid cancers (FTC) harbour RAS mutations or PAX8/ PPAR{gamma} rearrangements, both of which, however have also been identified in follicular adenoma. In addition, recent studies show, that activation of PI3K/AKT signalling occurs with high frequency in follicular thyroid tumours. Undifferentiated (anaplastic) thyroid cancers (ATC) display genetic features of FTC or PTC, in addition to aberant activation of multiple tyrosinkinase pathways (overexpression or mutations in PI3K and MAPK pathways). This underscores the concept of a sequential evolution of ATC from differentiated thyroid cancer, a process widely conceived to be triggered by p53 inactivation. In contrast, the molecular pathogenesis of benign thyroid tumours, in particular cold thyroid nodules is less known, except for toxic thyroid nodules, which arise from constitutive activation of cAMP signalling, predominantly through TSHR mutations. (orig.)

  1. Interaction of tomato lycopene and ketosamine against rat prostate tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossine, Valeri V; Chopra, Pankaj; Mawhinney, Thomas P

    2008-06-01

    Prior investigations on the beneficial effect of dietary processed tomato products and lycopene on prostate cancer risk suggested that lycopene may require the presence of other constituents to exert its chemopreventive potential. We investigated whether ketosamines, a group of carbohydrate derivatives present in dehydrated tomato products, may interact with lycopene against prostate tumorigenesis. One ketosamine, FruHis, strongly synergized with lycopene against proliferation of the highly metastatic rat prostate adenocarcinoma MAT-LyLu cell line in vitro. The FruHis/lycopene combination significantly inhibited in vivo tumor formation by MAT-LyLu cells in syngeneic Copenhagen rats. Energy-balanced diets, supplemented with tomato paste, tomato powder, or tomato paste plus FruHis, were fed to Wistar-Unilever rats (n = 20 per group) treated with N-nitroso-N-methylurea and testosterone to induce prostate carcinogenesis. Survival from carcinogenesis was lowest in the control group (median survival time, 40 weeks) and highest in the group fed the tomato paste/FruHis diet (51 weeks; P = 0.004, versus control). The proportions of dying rats with macroscopic prostate tumors in the control, tomato paste, tomato powder, and tomato paste/FruHis groups were 63% (12 of 19), 39% (5 of 13), 43% (6 of 14), and 18% (2 of 11), respectively. FruHis completely blocked DNA oxidative degradation at >250 micromol/L in vitro, whereas neither ascorbate nor phenolic antioxidants from tomato were effective protectors in this assay. FruHis, therefore, may exert tumor-preventive effect through its antioxidant activity and interaction with lycopene.

  2. Diverse Functions of Plasma PAF-AH in Tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafforini, Diana M

    2015-01-01

    This chapter is focused on the role of the plasma form of platelet-activating factor-acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH), heretofore referred to as PAF-AH, in tumorigenic responses. Biochemical and other properties of this enzyme were discussed in detail in chapter "Plasma PAF-AH (PLA2G7): Biochemical Properties, Association with LDLs and HDLs, and Regulation of Expression" by Stafforini and in other chapters. Although phospholipases tend not to be drivers of tumorigenesis themselves, these enzymes and the lipid mediators whose levels they regulate interact with a variety of oncogenes and tumor suppressors [1]. Like other phospholipases, the functions of PAF-AH in cancer likely are related to its ability to regulate the levels of lipid mediators that participate in cellular processes related to initial tumorigenic events (e.g., proliferation, growth, inflammation) and/or spreading of the disease (e.g., matrix metalloproteinase secretion, actin cytoskeleton reorganization, migration, and angiogenesis) [1]. The importance of substrates and products of PAF-AH on key cellular functions has been evaluated in cell-based analyses which revealed that these metabolites can have pro- and antitumorigenic functions. Studies in genetically engineered mice lacking PAF-AH expression and genetic manipulation of PAF-AH levels in cancer cells demonstrated diverse functions of the protein in models of melanoma, prostate cancer, colon cancer, and others. The following sections highlight lessons learned from studies in cell lines and in mouse models regarding the diversity of functions of PAF-AH in cancer, and the potential of PAFAH transcripts, protein, and/or activity levels to become cancer biomarkers and therapeutic targets. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of combined phytochemicals on skin tumorigenesis in SENCAR mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    KOWALCZYK, MAGDALENA C.; JUNCO, JACOB J.; KOWALCZYK, PIOTR; TOLSTYKH, OLGA; HANAUSEK, MARGARET; SLAGA, THOMAS J.; WALASZEK, ZBIGNIEW

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to determine the effect of the combined action of phytochemicals on the early stages of skin tumorigenesis, i.e. initiation and promotion. We tested calcium D-glucarate (CG) given in the diet, while resveratrol (RES) and ursolic acid (UA) were applied topically. The 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-initiated, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-promoted multistage skin carcinogenesis model in SENCAR mice was used. Mice received one topical dose of DMBA, then after one month, two weekly doses of TPA for 14 weeks until sacrifice. RES or UA were applied 20 min prior to DMBA or TPA treatment and 2% dietary CG was given from 2 weeks prior to 2 weeks after the DMBA dose or continually beginning 2 weeks prior to the first dose of TPA. UA applied alone and in combination with CG during the promotion stage was the only inhibitor of tumor multiplicity and tumor incidence. A number of combinations reduced epidermal proliferation, but only UA and the combination UA+CG applied during promotion significantly reduced epidermal hyperplasia. DMBA/TPA application resulted in significant increases in c-jun and p50, which were reversed by a number of different treatments. DMBA/TPA treatment also strongly increased mRNA levels of inflammation markers COX-2 and IL-6. All anti-promotion treatments caused a marked decrease in COX-2 and IL-6 expression compared to the DMBA/TPA control. These results show that UA is a potent inhibitor of skin tumor promotion and inflammatory signaling and it may be useful in the prevention of skin cancer and other epithelial cancers in humans. PMID:23835587

  4. Intestinal-specific activatable Myb initiates colon tumorigenesis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaterre, J; Pereira, L; Putoczki, T; Millen, R; Paquet-Fifield, S; Germann, M; Liu, J; Cheasley, D; Sampurno, S; Stacker, S A; Achen, M G; Ward, R L; Waring, P; Mantamadiotis, T; Ernst, M; Ramsay, R G

    2016-05-12

    Transcription factor Myb is overexpressed in most colorectal cancers (CRC). Patients with CRC expressing the highest Myb are more likely to relapse. We previously showed that mono-allelic loss of Myb in an Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC)-driven CRC mouse model (Apc(Min/+)) significantly improves survival. Here we directly investigated the association of Myb with poor prognosis and how Myb co-operates with tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) (Apc) and cell cycle regulator, p27. Here we generated the first intestinal-specific, inducible transgenic model; a MybER transgene encoding a tamoxifen-inducible fusion protein between Myb and the estrogen receptor-α ligand-binding domain driven by the intestinal-specific promoter, Gpa33. This was to mimic human CRC with constitutive Myb activity in a highly tractable mouse model. We confirmed that the transgene was faithfully expressed and inducible in intestinal stem cells (ISCs) before embarking on carcinogenesis studies. Activation of the MybER did not change colon homeostasis unless one p27 allele was lost. We then established that MybER activation during CRC initiation using a pro-carcinogen treatment, azoxymethane (AOM), augmented most measured aspects of ISC gene expression and function and accelerated tumorigenesis in mice. CRC-associated symptoms of patients including intestinal bleeding and anaemia were faithfully mimicked in AOM-treated MybER transgenic mice and implicated hypoxia and vessel leakage identifying an additional pathogenic role for Myb. Collectively, the results suggest that Myb expands the ISC pool within which CRC is initiated while co-operating with TSG loss. Myb further exacerbates CRC pathology partly explaining why high MYB is a predictor of worse patient outcome.

  5. Implication of Heat Shock Factors in Tumorigenesis: Therapeutical Potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thonel, Aurelie de [INSERM U866, Dijon (France); Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy, University of Burgundy, 21033 Dijon (France); Mezger, Valerie, E-mail: valerie.mezger@univ-paris-diderot.fr [CNRS, UMR7216 Epigenetics and Cell Fate, Paris (France); University Paris Diderot, 75013 Paris (France); Garrido, Carmen, E-mail: valerie.mezger@univ-paris-diderot.fr [INSERM U866, Dijon (France); Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy, University of Burgundy, 21033 Dijon (France); CHU, Dijon BP1542, Dijon (France)

    2011-03-07

    Heat Shock Factors (HSF) form a family of transcription factors (four in mammals) which were named according to the discovery of their activation by a heat shock. HSFs trigger the expression of genes encoding Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs) that function as molecular chaperones, contributing to establish a cytoprotective state to various proteotoxic stresses and in pathological conditions. Increasing evidence indicates that this ancient transcriptional protective program acts genome-widely and performs unexpected functions in the absence of experimentally defined stress. Indeed, HSFs are able to re-shape cellular pathways controlling longevity, growth, metabolism and development. The most well studied HSF, HSF1, has been found at elevated levels in tumors with high metastatic potential and is associated with poor prognosis. This is partly explained by the above-mentioned cytoprotective (HSP-dependent) function that may enable cancer cells to adapt to the initial oncogenic stress and to support malignant transformation. Nevertheless, HSF1 operates as major multifaceted enhancers of tumorigenesis through, not only the induction of classical heat shock genes, but also of “non-classical” targets. Indeed, in cancer cells, HSF1 regulates genes involved in core cellular functions including proliferation, survival, migration, protein synthesis, signal transduction, and glucose metabolism, making HSF1 a very attractive target in cancer therapy. In this review, we describe the different physiological roles of HSFs as well as the recent discoveries in term of non-cogenic potential of these HSFs, more specifically associated to the activation of “non-classical” HSF target genes. We also present an update on the compounds with potent HSF1-modulating activity of potential interest as anti-cancer therapeutic agents.

  6. Biomarkers in Tumorigenesis Using Cancer Cell Lines: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju K, Lizbeth; Augustine, Dominic; Rao, Roopa S; S V, Sowmya; Haragannavar, Vanishri C; Nambiar, Shwetha; Prasad, Kavitha; Awan, Kamran Habib; Patil, Shankargouda

    2017-09-27

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide. Despite many research advancements in the field, the genetic changes regulating the transformation of normal oral cells into malignant cells have not been fully elucidated. Several studies have evaluated carcinogenesis at the molecular level. Cancer cell lines are commonly used in biomedical research because they provide an unlimited source of cells and represent various stages of initiation and progression of carcinogenesis in vitro. Aims: The objective of the study was to review original research articles using cancer cell lines as a tool to understand carcinogenesis and to identify the genes involved in tumor development. Additionally, we also examined the application of the genes as predictive biomarkers. Methods and Materials: Several databases, including PubMed, Google Scholar, Ebsco, and Science Direct, were searched from 1985 to December 2016 using various combinations of the following key words: “mouth neoplasm”, “cell lines”, and “tumorigenesis”. Original experimental studies published in English were included. We excluded letters to the editor, historic reviews, and unpublished data from the analysis. Results: There were 17 studies (in vitro) included in the analysis. There were 14 genes and 4 miRNAs involved in malignant transformation of oral keratinocytes into cancer cells. The most commonly studied genes were p53, cyclin D1, and hTERT. Conclusion: Additional reviews and studies are needed to identify a panel of genes specific to various potentially malignant disorders and to aid in the early detection of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) because tumorigenesis involves the mutation of multiple genes. Furthermore, improving advanced cost-effective diagnostic methods may benefit the public health sector. Creative Commons Attribution License

  7. Implication of Heat Shock Factors in Tumorigenesis: Therapeutical Potential

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    Aurelie de Thonel

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Heat Shock Factors (HSF form a family of transcription factors (four in mammals which were named according to the discovery of their activation by a heat shock. HSFs trigger the expression of genes encoding Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs that function as molecular chaperones, contributing to establish a cytoprotective state to various proteotoxic stresses and in pathological conditions. Increasing evidence indicates that this ancient transcriptional protective program acts genome-widely and performs unexpected functions in the absence of experimentally defined stress. Indeed, HSFs are able to re-shape cellular pathways controlling longevity, growth, metabolism and development. The most well studied HSF, HSF1, has been found at elevated levels in tumors with high metastatic potential and is associated with poor prognosis. This is partly explained by the above-mentioned cytoprotective (HSP-dependent function that may enable cancer cells to adapt to the initial oncogenic stress and to support malignant transformation. Nevertheless, HSF1 operates as major multifaceted enhancers of tumorigenesis through, not only the induction of classical heat shock genes, but also of “non-classical” targets. Indeed, in cancer cells, HSF1 regulates genes involved in core cellular functions including proliferation, survival, migration, protein synthesis, signal transduction, and glucose metabolism, making HSF1 a very attractive target in cancer therapy. In this review, we describe the different physiological roles of HSFs as well as the recent discoveries in term of non-cogenic potential of these HSFs, more specifically associated to the activation of “non-classical” HSF target genes. We also present an update on the compounds with potent HSF1-modulating activity of potential interest as anti-cancer therapeutic agents.

  8. Breast Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most women experience breast changes at some time. Your age, hormone levels, and medicines you take may cause lumps, bumps, and discharges (fluids that are not breast milk). If you have a breast lump, pain, ...

  9. The landscape of candidate driver genes differs between male and female breast cancer.

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    Ida Johansson

    Full Text Available The rapidly growing collection of diverse genome-scale data from multiple tumor types sheds light on various aspects of the underlying tumor biology. With the objective to identify genes of importance for breast tumorigenesis in men and to enable comparisons with genes important for breast cancer development in women, we applied the computational framework COpy Number and EXpression In Cancer (CONEXIC to detect candidate driver genes among all altered passenger genes. Unique to this approach is that each driver gene is associated with several gene modules that are believed to be altered by the driver. Thirty candidate drivers were found in the male breast cancers and 67 in the female breast cancers. We identified many known drivers of breast cancer and other types of cancer, in the female dataset (e.g. GATA3, CCNE1, GRB7, CDK4. In contrast, only three known cancer genes were found among male breast cancers; MAP2K4, LHP, and ZNF217. Many of the candidate drivers identified are known to be involved in processes associated with tumorigenesis, including proliferation, invasion and differentiation. One of the modules identified in male breast cancer was regulated by THY1, a gene involved in invasion and related to epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Furthermore, men with THY1 positive breast cancers had significantly inferior survival. THY1 may thus be a promising novel prognostic marker for male breast cancer. Another module identified among male breast cancers, regulated by SPAG5, was closely associated with proliferation. Our data indicate that male and female breast cancers display highly different landscapes of candidate driver genes, as only a few genes were found in common between the two. Consequently, the pathobiology of male breast cancer may differ from that of female breast cancer and can be associated with differences in prognosis; men diagnosed with breast cancer may consequently require different management and treatment strategies than

  10. Importance of Ezh2 polycomb protein in tumorigenesis process interfering with the pathway of growth suppressive key elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonini, Tiziana; D'Andrilli, Giuseppina; Fucito, Alfredo; Gaspa, Leonardo; Bagella, Luigi

    2008-02-01

    An understanding of the mechanisms that uncover the dynamic changes in the distribution of the chromatin modifying enzymes and regulatory proteins on their target loci could provide further insight into the phenomenon of malignant transformation. Based on the current available data, it seems more and more clear that an abnormal expression of Ezh2, a member of the Polycomb group (PcG) protein, may be involved in the tumorigenesis process, in addition, different studies identify Ezh2 as a potential marker that distinguish aggressive prostate and breast cancer from indolent one. Recent investigation show that ectopic expression of Ezh2 provides proliferative advantage to primary cells through interaction with the pathways of key elements that control cell growth arrest and differentiation, like members of the retinoblastoma (Rb) family. Here, we outline how these pathways converge and we review the recent advances on the molecular mechanisms that promote cell cycle progression through deregulation of Ezh2 protein level, providing novel links between cancer progression and chromatin remodeling machineries. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. The effect of dietary zinc - and polyphenols intake on DMBA-induced mammary tumorigenesis in rats

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    Bobrowska-Korczak Barbara

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of dietary supplementation with zinc and polyphenol compounds, i.e. resveratrol and genistein, on the effectiveness of chemically induced mammary cancer and the changes in the content of selected elements (Zn, Cu, Mg, Fe, Ca in tumors as compared with normal tissue of the mammary gland. Methods Female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into study groups which, apart from the standard diet and DMBA (7,12-dimethyl-1,2- benz[a]anthracene, were treated with zinc ions (Zn or zinc ions + resveratrol (Zn + resveratrol or zinc ions + genistein (Zn + genistein via gavage for a period from 40 days until 20 weeks of age. The ICP-OES (inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry technique was used to analyze the following elements: magnesium, iron, zinc and calcium. Copper content in samples was estimated in an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Results Regardless of the diet (standard; Zn; Zn + resveratrol; Zn + genistein, DMBA-induced breast carcinogenesis was not inhibited. On the contrary, in the Zn + resveratrol supplemented group, tumorigenesis developed at a considerably faster rate. On the basis of quantitative analysis of selected elements we found - irrespectively of the diet applied - great accumulation of copper and iron, which are strongly prooxidative, with a simultaneous considerable decrease of the magnesium content in DMBA-induced mammary tumors. The combination of zinc supplementation with resveratrol resulted in particularly large differences in the amount of the investigated elements in tumors as compared with their content in normal tissue. Conclusions Diet supplementation with zinc and polyphenol compounds, i.e. resveratrol and genistein had no effect on the decreased copper level in tumor tissue and inhibited mammary carcinogenesis in the rat. Irrespectively of the applied diet, the development of the neoplastic process in rats resulted in changes of

  12. Pubertally Initiated High-Fat Diet Promotes Mammary Tumorigenesis in Obesity-Prone FVB Mice Similarly to Obesity-Resistant BALB/c Mice

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    Yirong Zhu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Premenopausal breast cancer is associated with increased animal fat consumption among normal-weight but not overweight women. Our previous findings in obesity-resistant BALB/c mice showed that a diet high in saturated animal fat (HFD promotes mammary tumorigenesis in both DMBA carcinogenesis and Trp53-null transplant models. Having made these observations in BALB/c mice, which have very modest HFD weight gain, we determined the effects of HFD in FVB mice, which gain significant weight on HFD. Three-week-old FVB mice fed a low-fat diet or HFD were subjected to 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-induced carcinogenesis. Like BALB/c mice, HFD promoted mammary tumorigenesis. Development of tumors largely occurred prior to mice becoming obese, indicating the role of animal-derived HFD rather than resulting obesity in tumor promotion. Also similar to BALB/c mice, early-occurring adenosquamous mammary tumors were abundant among HFD-fed FVB mice. Tumors from HFD mice also had increased intra-tumor M2 macrophages. Prior to tumor development, HFD accelerated normal mammary gland development and increased mammary M2 macrophages, similarly to BALB/c mice. The promotional effects of puberty-initiated HFD on carcinogen-induced mammary cancer are thus largely weight gain-independent. Like BALB/c mice, HFD promoted adenosquamous tumors, suggesting a role for early age HFD in promoting this subtype of triple negative mammary cancer. M2 macrophage recruitment was common to both mouse strains. We speculate that a similar effect of HFD on immune function may contribute to epidemiological findings of increased breast cancer risk in young, premenopausal, normal-weight women who consume a diet high in saturated animal fat.

  13. Reduced HRAS G12V-Driven Tumorigenesis of Cell Lines Expressing KRAS C118S.

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    Lu Huang

    Full Text Available In many different human cancers, one of the HRAS, NRAS, or KRAS genes in the RAS family of small GTPases acquires an oncogenic mutation that renders the encoded protein constitutively GTP-bound and thereby active, which is well established to promote tumorigenesis. In addition to oncogenic mutations, accumulating evidence suggests that the wild-type isoforms may also be activated and contribute to oncogenic RAS-driven tumorigenesis. In this regard, redox-dependent reactions with cysteine 118 (C118 have been found to promote activation of wild-type HRAS and NRAS. We sought to determine if this residue is also important for the activation of wild-type KRAS and promotion of tumorigenesis. Thus, we mutated C118 to serine (C118S in wild-type KRAS to block redox-dependent reactions at this site. We now report that this mutation reduced the level of GTP-bound KRAS and impaired RAS signaling stimulated by the growth factor EGF. With regards to tumorigenesis, we also report that oncogenic HRAS-transformed human cells in which endogenous KRAS was knocked down and replaced with KRASC118S exhibited reduced xenograft tumor growth, as did oncogenic HRAS-transformed KrasC118S/C118S murine cells in which the C118S mutation was knocked into the endogenous Kras gene. Taken together, these data suggest a role for redox-dependent activation of wild-type KRAS through C118 in oncogenic HRAS-driven tumorigenesis.

  14. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) promotes inflammation-induced tumorigenesis by enhancing epithelial cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeppsson, Sabrina; Srinivasan, Shanthi; Chandrasekharan, Bindu

    2017-02-01

    We have demonstrated that neuropeptide Y (NPY), abundantly produced by enteric neurons, is an important regulator of intestinal inflammation. However, the role of NPY in the progression of chronic inflammation to tumorigenesis is unknown. We investigated whether NPY could modulate epithelial cell proliferation and apoptosis, and thus regulate tumorigenesis. Repeated cycles of dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) were used to model inflammation-induced tumorigenesis in wild-type (WT) and NPY knockout (NPY -/- ) mice. Intestinal epithelial cell lines (T84) were used to assess the effects of NPY (0.1 µM) on epithelial proliferation and apoptosis in vitro. DSS-WT mice exhibited enhanced intestinal inflammation, polyp size, and polyp number (7.5 ± 0.8) compared with DSS-NPY -/- mice (4 ± 0.5, P inflammation-induced tumorigenesis by NPY-epithelial cross talk as mediated by activation of PI3-K signaling and downregulation of miR-375. Our work exemplifies a novel role of neuropeptide Y (NPY) in regulating inflammation-induced tumorigenesis via two modalities: first by enhanced proliferation (PI3-K/pAkt), and second by downregulation of microRNA-375 (miR-375)-dependent apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells. Our data establish the existence of a microRNA-mediated cross talk between enteric neurons producing NPY and intestinal epithelial cells, and the potential of neuropeptide-regulated miRNAs as potential therapeutic molecules for the management of inflammation-associated tumors in the gut.

  15. E-cadherin promotor methylation and mutation are inversely related to motility capacity of breast cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horssen, R. van; Hollestelle, A.; Rens, J.A.; Eggermont, A.M.; Schutte, M.; Ten Hagen, T.L.

    2012-01-01

    Inactivation of the tumor suppressor E-cadherin is an important event during breast tumorigenesis, as its decreased expression is linked to aggressiveness and metastasis. However, the relationship between the different modes of E-cadherin inactivation (mutation versus promotor hypermethylation) and

  16. Revelation 1:7 − A roadmap of God’s τέλοςfor his creation

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    Kobus de Smidt

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Revelation 1:7 points to an anticipated final appearance of Jesus at the consummation. This κηρύσσω developed from the late Jewish apocalyptic eschatology. This apocalyptic end time dawned with Jesus. The present time is thus simultaneously the end time, though the consummation is still in the future. As Jesus appeared on earth with his resurrection, so will he appear at the consummation − his resurrection appearance is a simile of his appearance at the consummation. He will appear in a corporeal form. The writer encourages the second-generation marginalised Christians. The Roman emperor is not the victor − Jesus is the axis mundi of God’s final purpose for his creation. The final appearance of Jesus will bring redemption for the believers and mourning for the unbelievers. The κηρύσσω of Revelation 1:7 is diametrically the opposite of the chiliasts. The country of Israel and her present inhabitants have no eschatological role to fulfil at the consummation. Openbaring 1:7 dui op ’n geantisipeerde finale verskyning van Jesus met die voleinding. Hierdie κηρύσσω het uit die Joodse laat-apokaliptiese eskatologie ontwikkel. Die apokaliptiese eindtyd het met Jesus se opstanding plaasgevind en die Nuwe-Testamentiese hede is dus alreeds die eindtyd. Die voleinding is egter nog in die toekoms. Jesus se verskyning met sy opstanding is ’n metafoor vir sy koms by die voleinding. Hy sal liggaamlik verskyn. Die skrywer bemoedig die gemarginaliseerde tweede generasie Christene. Die Romeinse keiser is nie die oorwinnaar nie − Jesus is die axis mundi van God se finale plan vir sy skepping. Die finale verskyning van Jesus sal vir die gelowiges ewige verlossing bewerk, maar die ongelowiges sal in rou gedompel word. Die κηρύσσω van Openbaring 1:7 is die teenoorgestelde van die standpunt van die chiliasme. Die land en huidige volk van Israel vervul geen eskatologiese rol by die voleinding nie.

  17. The Yin-Yang of DNA Damage Response: Roles in Tumorigenesis and Cellular Senescence

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    Sang Soo Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Senescent cells are relatively stable, lacking proliferation capacity yet retaining metabolic activity. In contrast, cancer cells are rather invasive and devastating, with uncontrolled proliferative capacity and resistance to cell death signals. Although tumorigenesis and cellular senescence are seemingly opposite pathological events, they are actually driven by a unified mechanism: DNA damage. Integrity of the DNA damage response (DDR network can impose a tumorigenesis barrier by navigating abnormal cells to cellular senescence. Compromise of DDR, possibly due to the inactivation of DDR components, may prevent cellular senescence but at the expense of tumor formation. Here we provide an overview of the fundamental role of DDR in tumorigenesis and cellular senescence, under the light of the Yin-Yang concept of Chinese philosophy. Emphasis is placed on discussing DDR outcome in the light of in vivo models. This information is critical as it can help make better decisions for clinical treatments of cancer patients.

  18. Characterization of long noncoding RNA and messenger RNA signatures in melanoma tumorigenesis and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Siqi; Fan, Wenliang; Wan, Bing; Tu, Mengqi; Jin, Feng; Liu, Fang; Xu, Haibo; Han, Ping

    2017-01-01

    The incidence of melanoma, the most aggressive and life-threatening form of skin cancer, has significantly risen over recent decades. Therefore, it is essential to identify the mechanisms that underlie melanoma tumorigenesis and metastasis and to explore novel and effective melanoma treatment strategies. Accumulating evidence s uggests that aberrantly expressed long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have vital functions in multiple cancers. However, lncRNA functions in melanoma tumorigenesis and metastasis remain unclear. In this study, we investigated lncRNA and messenger RNA (mRNA) expression profiles in primary melanomas, metastatic melanomas and normal skin samples from the Gene Expression Omnibus database. We used GSE15605 as the training set (n = 74) and GSE7553 as the validation set (n = 58). In three comparisons (primary melanoma versus normal skin, metastatic melanoma versus normal skin, and metastatic melanoma versus primary melanoma), 178, 295 and 48 lncRNAs and 847, 1758, and 295 mRNAs were aberrantly expressed, respectively. We performed Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analyses to examine the differentially expressed mRNAs, and potential core lncRNAs were predicted by lncRNA-mRNA co-expression networks. Based on our results, 15 lncRNAs and 144 mRNAs were significantly associated with melanoma tumorigenesis and metastasis. A subsequent analysis suggested a critical role for a five-lncRNA signature during melanoma tumorigenesis and metastasis. Low expression of U47924.27 was significantly associated with decreased survival of patients with melanoma. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to explore the expression patterns of lncRNAs and mRNAs during melanoma tumorigenesis and metastasis by re-annotating microarray data from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) microarray dataset. These findings reveal potential roles for lncRNAs during melanoma tumorigenesis and metastasis and provide a rich candidate reservoir for

  19. A central role for Foxp3+ regulatory T cells in K-Ras-driven lung tumorigenesis.

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    Courtney A Granville

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: K-Ras mutations are characteristic of human lung adenocarcinomas and occur almost exclusively in smokers. In preclinical models, K-Ras mutations are necessary for tobacco carcinogen-driven lung tumorigenesis and are sufficient to cause lung adenocarcinomas in transgenic mice. Because these mutations confer resistance to commonly used cytotoxic chemotherapies and targeted agents, effective therapies that target K-Ras are needed. Inhibitors of mTOR such as rapamycin can prevent K-Ras-driven lung tumorigenesis and alter the proportion of cytotoxic and Foxp3+ regulatory T cells, suggesting that lung-associated T cells might be important for tumorigenesis. METHODS: Lung tumorigenesis was studied in three murine models that depend on mutant K-Ras; a tobacco carcinogen-driven model, a syngeneic inoculation model, and a transgenic model. Splenic and lung-associated T cells were studied using flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Foxp3+ cells were depleted using rapamycin, an antibody, or genetic ablation. RESULTS: Exposure of A/J mice to a tobacco carcinogen tripled lung-associated Foxp3+ cells prior to tumor development. At clinically relevant concentrations, rapamycin prevented this induction and reduced lung tumors by 90%. In A/J mice inoculated with lung adenocarcinoma cells resistant to rapamycin, antibody-mediated depletion of Foxp3+ cells reduced lung tumorigenesis by 80%. Likewise, mutant K-Ras transgenic mice lacking Foxp3+ cells developed 75% fewer lung tumors than littermates with Foxp3+ cells. CONCLUSIONS: Foxp3+ regulatory T cells are required for K-Ras-mediated lung tumorigenesis in mice. These studies support clinical testing of rapamycin or other agents that target Treg in K-Ras driven human lung cancer.

  20. Breast pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the level of of hormones during menstruation or pregnancy often cause breast pain. Some swelling and tenderness just before your period is normal. Some women who have pain in one or both breasts may fear breast cancer . However, breast pain is not a common symptom ...

  1. The conqueror motif in chapters 12-13: a heavenly and an earthly perspective in the Book of Revelation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EC Shin

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The theme of the conqueror motif in the book of Revelation is one of the prominent themes. The theme of the conqueror motif provides various symbolical messages from an exegetical and theological perspective. An alternative symbolic perspective provides a heavenly perspective and the symbolic transformation. Various images such as salvation for the conquerors and judgment of the evil ones, or victory of the Lamb and defeat of Satan, transform our earthly perspective into the heavenly perspective, and give us a new understanding as to how the conquerors should see the world. To provide the conquerors with a new understanding is to give them a reversed effect as a marginalized group and to reveal deep spiritual conflict between God and Satan. Who� is in control in history? With the result of the heavenly war between Michael and the dragon in 12:7-9, John proclaims the victory of God, who is the real conqueror, and provides the heavenly perspective that God is in control of the cosmos, as well as of history.

  2. Reason vs Revelation: Feminism, Malthus, and the New Poor Law in Narratives by Harriet Martineau and Charlotte Elizabeth Tonna

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    Ella Dzelzainis

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available My article examines the profoundly influential presence of eighteenth-century stadial or ‘four stages' theory in industrial fiction of the early Victorian period. Axiomatic within this Enlightenment theory was the assumption that the treatment of women was a reliable index to the civilized status of any society. The two women writers studied here, Harriet Martineau (1802-76 and Charlotte Elizabeth Tonna (1790-1846, took opposing sides in the debate over Malthusian political economy and interpreted stadial theory in correspondingly different ways. Martineau's enthusiastic Malthusianism in the 'Illustrations of Political Economy '(1832-4 foresaw a feminist future brought about by illimitable progress and the spread of reason. With the deliberate aim of countering Martineau's views, the pre-Millenarian Evangelical Tonna asserted the truth of revelation in 'The Wrongs of Woman' (1843-4 and positioned women's domestic subordination as integral to England's continued pre-eminence as a commercial nation. This essay examines the religious, social and political grounds on which these two adversaries staked their arguments, and does so through an analysis of their fictional accounts of the status, role, and treatment of working women in an industrializing society.

  3. How DNA barcoding can be more effective in microalgae identification: a case of cryptic diversity revelation in Scenedesmus (Chlorophyceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Shanmei; Fei, Cong; Wang, Chun; Gao, Zhan; Bao, Yachao; He, Meilin; Wang, Changhai

    2016-01-01

    Microalgae identification is extremely difficult. The efficiency of DNA barcoding in microalgae identification involves ideal gene markers and approaches employed, which however, is still under the way. Although Scenedesmus has obtained much research in producing lipids its identification is difficult. Here we present a comprehensive coalescent, distance and character-based DNA barcoding for 118 Scenedesmus strains based on rbcL, tufA, ITS and 16S. The four genes, and their combined data rbcL + tufA + ITS + 16S, rbcL + tufA and ITS + 16S were analyzed by all of GMYC, P ID, PTP, ABGD, and character-based barcoding respectively. It was apparent that the three combined gene data showed a higher proportion of resolution success than the single gene. In comparison, the GMYC and PTP analysis produced more taxonomic lineages. The ABGD generated various resolution in discrimination among the single and combined data. The character-based barcoding was proved to be the most effective approach for species discrimination in both single and combined data which produced consistent species identification. All the integrated results recovered 11 species, five out of which were revealed as potential cryptic species. We suggest that the character-based DNA barcoding together with other approaches based on multiple genes and their combined data could be more effective in microalgae diversity revelation. PMID:27827440

  4. College quality and hourly wages: evidence from the self-revelation model, sibling models and instrumental variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgen, Nicolai T

    2014-11-01

    This paper addresses the recent discussion on confounding in the returns to college quality literature using the Norwegian case. The main advantage of studying Norway is the quality of the data. Norwegian administrative data provide information on college applications, family relations and a rich set of control variables for all Norwegian citizens applying to college between 1997 and 2004 (N = 141,319) and their succeeding wages between 2003 and 2010 (676,079 person-year observations). With these data, this paper uses a subset of the models that have rendered mixed findings in the literature in order to investigate to what extent confounding biases the returns to college quality. I compare estimates obtained using standard regression models to estimates obtained using the self-revelation model of Dale and Krueger (2002), a sibling fixed effects model and the instrumental variable model used by Long (2008). Using these methods, I consistently find increasing returns to college quality over the course of students' work careers, with positive returns only later in students' work careers. I conclude that the standard regression estimate provides a reasonable estimate of the returns to college quality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Mechanisms of Mycotoxin-induced Dermal Toxicity and Tumorigenesis Through Oxidative Stress-related Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Kunio; Uetsuka, Koji

    2014-04-01

    Among the many mycotoxins, T-2 toxin, citrinin (CTN), patulin (PAT), aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) and ochratoxin A (OTA) are known to have the potential to induce dermal toxicity and/or tumorigenesis in rodent models. T-2 toxin, CTN, PAT and OTA induce apoptosis in mouse or rat skin. PAT, AFB1 and OTA have tumor initiating properties, and OTA is also a tumor promoter in mouse skin. This paper reviews the molecular mechanisms of dermal toxicity and tumorigenesis induced in rodent models by these mycotoxins especially from the viewpoint of oxidative stress-mediated pathways.

  6. Mechanisms of Mycotoxin-induced Dermal Toxicity and Tumorigenesis Through Oxidative Stress-related Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Doi, Kunio; Uetsuka, Koji

    2014-01-01

    Among the many mycotoxins, T-2 toxin, citrinin (CTN), patulin (PAT), aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) and ochratoxin A (OTA) are known to have the potential to induce dermal toxicity and/or tumorigenesis in rodent models. T-2 toxin, CTN, PAT and OTA induce apoptosis in mouse or rat skin. PAT, AFB1 and OTA have tumor initiating properties, and OTA is also a tumor promoter in mouse skin. This paper reviews the molecular mechanisms of dermal toxicity and tumorigenesis induced in rodent models by these mycoto...

  7. Inflammation and breast cancer. Metalloproteinases as common effectors of inflammation and extracellular matrix breakdown in breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojilla, Carlo V; Wood, Geoffrey A; Khokha, Rama

    2008-01-01

    Two rapidly evolving fields are converging to impact breast cancer: one has identified novel substrates of metalloproteinases that alter immune cell function, and the other has revealed a role for inflammation in human cancers. Evidence now shows that the mechanisms underlying these two fields interact in the context of breast cancer, providing new opportunities to understand this disease and uncover novel therapeutic strategies. The metalloproteinase class of enzymes is well studied in mammary gland development and physiology, but mostly in the context of extracellular matrix modification. Aberrant metalloproteinase expression has also been implicated in breast cancer progression, where these genes act as tumor modifiers. Here, we review how the metalloproteinase axis impacts mammary physiology and tumorigenesis and is associated with inflammatory cell influx in human breast cancer, and evaluate its potential as a regulator of inflammation in the mammary gland. PMID:18394187

  8. Combinatorial epigenetic mechanisms and efficacy of early breast cancer inhibition by nutritive botanicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanyuan; Buckhaults, Phillip; Cui, Xiangqin; Tollefsbol, Trygve O

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Aberrant epigenetic events are important contributors to the pathogenesis of different types of cancers and dietary botanicals with epigenetic properties can influence early cancer development leading to cancer prevention effects. We sought to investigate potential combinatorial effects of bioactive dietary components including green tea polyphenols (GTPs) and broccoli sprouts (BSp) on neutralizing epigenetic aberrations during breast tumorigenesis. Materials & methods: The combinatorial effects were evaluated in a breast cancer transformation cellular system and breast cancer mouse xenografts. Results & conclusion: Combined treatment with epigallocatechin-3-gallate in GTPs and sulforaphane in BSp resulted in a synergistic inhibition of breast cancer cellular growth. Further studies revealed this combination led to genome-wide epigenetic alterations. Combinatorial diets significantly inhibited tumor growth in breast cancer mouse xenografts. Collectively, these studies indicate that combined GTPs and BSp are highly effective in inhibiting early breast cancer development by, at least in part, regulating epigenetic mechanisms. PMID:27478970

  9. The potential of Beclin 1 as a therapeutic target for the treatment of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yoon Yang; Lee, Yu Kyung; Koo, Ja Seung

    2016-01-01

    Beclin 1 plays a crucial role in autophagy via the Beclin 1 interactome, and is involved in various biological processes such as protein sorting, chemokinesis, and cell death. Via these biologic functions, Beclin 1 contributes to both tumor suppression and tumor progression. Beclin 1 plays a key biologic function on cell homeostasis and affects tumorigenesis. In this review, detailing up-to-date knowledge on the tumorigenic role of Beclin 1, its implication in breast cancer, and its utility as a breast cancer-specific drug target is discussed. Because Beclin 1 is expressed in breast cancer cells, Beclin 1 could be a unique, effective drug target for the prevention and treatment of breast cancer. However, the expression of Beclin 1 varies according to cancer molecular subtypes, and Beclin 1 is involved in both breast cancer suppression and tumor progression; therefore, the decision of using a Beclin 1 inducer or inhibitor should be made based on breast cancer stage and subtype.

  10. Epigenetic mechanisms of breast cancer: an update of the current knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsli-Ceppioglu, Seher; Dagdemir, Aslihan; Judes, Gaëlle; Ngollo, Marjolaine; Penault-Llorca, Frédérique; Pajon, Amaury; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Bernard-Gallon, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic alterations are heritable changes in gene expression that occur without causing any change in DNA sequence. They are important key factors for cancer development and prognosis. Breast cancer is induced by the accumulation of altered gene regulation. Besides genetic mutations, epigenetics mechanisms have an important role in breast cancer tumorigenesis. Investigations related with aberrant epigenetic regulations in breast cancer focus on initiating molecular mechanisms in cancer development, identification of new biomarkers to predict breast cancer aggressiveness and the potential of epigenetic therapy. In this review, we will summarize the recent knowledge about the role of epigenetic alterations related with DNA methylation and histone modification in breast cancer. In addition, altered regulation of breast cancer specific genes and the potential of epigenetic therapy will be discussed according to epigenetic mechanisms.

  11. Combinatorial epigenetic mechanisms and efficacy of early breast cancer inhibition by nutritive botanicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanyuan; Buckhaults, Phillip; Cui, Xiangqin; Tollefsbol, Trygve O

    2016-08-01

    Aberrant epigenetic events are important contributors to the pathogenesis of different types of cancers and dietary botanicals with epigenetic properties can influence early cancer development leading to cancer prevention effects. We sought to investigate potential combinatorial effects of bioactive dietary components including green tea polyphenols (GTPs) and broccoli sprouts (BSp) on neutralizing epigenetic aberrations during breast tumorigenesis. The combinatorial effects were evaluated in a breast cancer transformation cellular system and breast cancer mouse xenografts. Combined treatment with epigallocatechin-3-gallate in GTPs and sulforaphane in BSp resulted in a synergistic inhibition of breast cancer cellular growth. Further studies revealed this combination led to genome-wide epigenetic alterations. Combinatorial diets significantly inhibited tumor growth in breast cancer mouse xenografts. Collectively, these studies indicate that combined GTPs and BSp are highly effective in inhibiting early breast cancer development by, at least in part, regulating epigenetic mechanisms.

  12. Whole transcriptome RNA-seq analysis: tumorigenesis and metastasis of melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hua; Li, Yongjun; Wang, Shaobin; Yang, Yadong; Wang, Junyun; Ruan, Xiuyan; Yang, Yaran; Cai, Kan; Zhang, Bing; Cui, Peng; Yan, Jiangwei; Zhao, Yongliang; Wakeland, Edward K; Li, Quanzhen; Hu, Songnian; Fang, Xiangdong

    2014-09-15

    Melanoma is the most malignant cutaneous cancer and causes over 9000 deaths annually. Because fatality rates from malignant melanoma (MM) increase dramatically upon metastasis, we investigated tumorigenesis and metastasis of MM in transcriptome analyses of three distinct cell lines that correspond with the stages of MM pathogenesis: the normal stage (HEMn-LP), the onset of MM (A375), and the metastasis stage (A2058). Using next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology, we detected asymmetrical expression of genes among the three cell lines, notably on chromosomes 9, 11, 12, and 14, suggesting their involvement in tumorigenesis and metastasis of MM. These genes were clustered into 41 categories based on their expression patterns, and their biological functions were analyzed using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. In the top cancer-associated category, HIF1A, IL8, TERT, ONECUT1, and FOXA1 directly interacted with either transcription factors or cytokines that are known to be involved in the tumorigenesis or metastasis of other malignant tumors. The present data suggest that cytokine regulatory pathways in macrophages predominate over other pathways during the pathogenesis of MM. This study provides new targets for the downstream mechanistic studies of the tumorigenesis and metastasis of MM and demonstrates a new strategy for studies of the progression of other malignant cancers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Ribosome heterogeneity in tumorigenesis: the rRNA point of view

    OpenAIRE

    Marcel, Virginie; Catez, Fr?d?ric; Diaz, Jean-Jacques

    2015-01-01

    The "specialized ribosome" concept proposes that ribosome variants are produced and differentially regulate translation. Examples supporting this notion demonstrated heterogeneity of ribosomal protein composition. However, ribosome translational activity is carried out by rRNA. We, and others, recently showed that rRNA heterogeneity regulates translation to generate distinct translatomes promoting tumorigenesis.

  14. The role of p53.S389 phosphorylation in DNA damage response pathways and tumorigenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruins, Wendy

    2007-01-01

    The results presented in this thesis provide new information on the role of the p53.S389A point mutation in chemical-induced tumorigenesis. After DNA damage, p53 protein levels increase due to several post-translational activation processes. Phosphorylation of p53.S389 seems to be partly required

  15. NOD2 Suppresses Colorectal Tumorigenesis via Downregulation of the TLR Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M. Nashir Udden

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Although NOD2 is the major inflammatory bowel disease susceptibility gene, its role in colorectal tumorigenesis is poorly defined. Here, we show that Nod2-deficient mice are highly susceptible to experimental colorectal tumorigenesis independent of gut microbial dysbiosis. Interestingly, the expression of inflammatory genes and the activation of inflammatory pathways, including NF-κB, ERK, and STAT3 are significantly higher in Nod2−/− mouse colons during colitis and colorectal tumorigenesis, but not at homeostasis. Consistent with higher inflammation, there is greater proliferation of epithelial cells in hyperplastic regions of Nod2−/− colons. In vitro studies demonstrate that, while NOD2 activates the NF-κB and MAPK pathways in response to MDP, it inhibits TLR-mediated activation of NF-κB and MAPK. Notably, NOD2-mediated downregulation of NF-κB and MAPK is associated with the induction of IRF4. Taken together, NOD2 plays a critical role in the suppression of inflammation and tumorigenesis in the colon via downregulation of the TLR signaling pathways.

  16. Crosstalk between epithelial and mesenchymal tissues in tumorigenesis and imaginal disc development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herranz, Héctor; Weng, Ruifen; Cohen, Stephen M

    2014-07-07

    Cancers develop in a complex mutational landscape. Interaction of genetically abnormal cancer cells with normal stromal cells can modify the local microenvironment to promote disease progression for some tumor types. Genetic models of tumorigenesis provide the opportunity to explore how combinations of cancer driver mutations confer distinct properties on tumors. Previous Drosophila models of EGFR-driven cancer have focused on epithelial neoplasia. Here, we report a Drosophila genetic model of EGFR-driven tumorigenesis in which the neoplastic transformation depends on interaction between epithelial and mesenchymal cells. We provide evidence that the secreted proteoglycan Perlecan can act as a context-dependent oncogene cooperating with EGFR to promote tumorigenesis. Coexpression of Perlecan in the EGFR-expressing epithelial cells potentiates endogenous Wg/Wnt and Dpp/BMP signals from the epithelial cells to support expansion of a mesenchymal compartment. Wg activity is required in the epithelial compartment, whereas Dpp activity is required in the mesenchymal compartment. This genetically normal mesenchymal compartment is required to support growth and neoplastic transformation of the genetically modified epithelial population. We report a genetic model of tumor formation that depends on crosstalk between a genetically modified epithelial cell population and normal host mesenchymal cells. Tumorigenesis in this model co-opts a regulatory mechanism that is normally involved in controlling growth of the imaginal disc during development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The Role of Retinal Determination Gene Network (RDGN) in Hormone Signaling Transduction and Prostate Tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    lung cancer in smokers and never-smokers. Cell. 2012; 150(6):1121-34. 23. Coletta RD, Christensen KL, Micalizzi DS, Jedlicka P, Varella- Garcia M...402. 62. Rojas A, Liu G, Coleman I, Nelson PS, Zhang M, Dash R, Fisher PB, Plymate SR, Wu JD. IL-6 promotes prostate tumorigenesis and progression

  18. Ubiquitin C-Terminal Hydrolase L1 in Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Hurst-Kennedy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1, aka PGP9.5 is an abundant, neuronal deubiquitinating enzyme that has also been suggested to possess E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase activity and/or stabilize ubiquitin monomers in vivo. Recent evidence implicates dysregulation of UCH-L1 in the pathogenesis and progression of human cancers. Although typically only expressed in neurons, high levels of UCH-L1 have been found in many nonneuronal tumors, including breast, colorectal, and pancreatic carcinomas. UCH-L1 has also been implicated in the regulation of metastasis and cell growth during the progression of nonsmall cell lung carcinoma, colorectal cancer, and lymphoma. Together these studies suggest UCH-L1 has a potent oncogenic role and drives tumor development. Conversely, others have observed promoter methylation-mediated silencing of UCH-L1 in certain tumor subtypes, suggesting a potential tumor suppressor role for UCH-L1. In this paper, we provide an overview of the evidence supporting the involvement of UCH-L1 in tumor development and discuss the potential mechanisms of action of UCH-L1 in oncogenesis.

  19. Merlin knockdown in human Schwann cells: clues to vestibular schwannoma tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Zana; Brown, Carrie Maiorana; Patel, Andrew K; Ryan, Allen F; Ongkeko, Rutherford; Doherty, Joni K

    2010-04-01

    To investigate the early events in molecular progression toward schwannoma tumorigenesis, we developed an in vitro model of human Schwann cell tumorigenesis by merlin knockdown. Neurofibromatosis 2 (NF2)-related and sporadic vestibular schwannoma (VS) exhibit loss of functional merlin (schwannomin). After loss of merlin expression in the Schwann cell, the initial steps toward VS tumorigenesis are unknown. Merlin, a putative tumor suppressor protein, interacts with many cellular proteins, regulating their function. Among these are receptor tyrosine kinases, including the epidermal growth factor receptor family B (ErbB) family receptors epidermal growth factor receptor and ErbB2. Functional merlin interacts with and internalizes these growth factor receptors, silencing their proliferation and survival signaling. Deregulation of CD44, the cell adhesion/signaling molecule and cancer stem cell marker, has also been implicated in VS tumorigenesis. Merlin knockdown was performed using small interfering RNA transfection into human Schwann cell primary cultures. Knockdown was confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR, immunofluorescence, and Western analysis. Expression profiles of ErbB, merlin, and the stem cell markers nestin and CD44 were examined in knockdowns. Proliferation rate was assessed with bromodeoxyuridine incorporation, and radiation sensitivity was assessed using the Annexin assay in knockdowns versus controls. Merlin knockdowns demonstrated increased proliferation rate, upregulation of epidermal growth factor receptor, ErbB2, and ErbB3, CD44, and nestin. Short-term merlin depletion had no effect on gamma irradiation sensitivity compared with controls. Merlin depletion results in deregulation of ErbB receptor signaling, promotes a dedifferentiated state, and increases Schwann cell proliferation, suggesting critical steps toward schwannoma tumorigenesis.

  20. Breast Gangrene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husasin Irfan

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast gangrene is rare in surgical practice. Gangrene of breast can be idiopathic or secondary to some causative factor. Antibiotics and debridement are used for management. Acute inflammatory infiltrate, severe necrosis of breast tissue, necrotizing arteritis, and venous thrombosis is observed on histopathology. The aim of was to study patients who had breast gangrene. Methods A prospective study of 10 patients who had breast gangrene over a period of 6 years were analyzed Results All the patients in the study group were female. Total of 10 patients were encountered who had breast gangrene. Six patients presented with breast gangrene on the right breast whereas four had on left breast. Out of 10 patients, three had breast abscess after teeth bite followed by gangrene, one had iatrogenic trauma by needle aspiration of erythematous area of breast under septic conditions. Four had history of application of belladonna on cutaneous breast abscess and had then gangrene. All were lactating female. Amongst the rest two were elderly, one of which was a diabetic who had gangrene of breast and had no application of belladonna. All except one had debridement under cover of broad spectrum antibiotics. Three patients had grafting to cover the raw area. Conclusion Breast gangrene occurs rarely. Etiology is variable and mutifactorial. Teeth bite while lactation and the iatrogenic trauma by needle aspiration of breast abscess under unsterlised conditions could be causative. Uncontrolled diabetes can be one more causative factor for the breast gangrene. Belladonna application as a topical agent could be inciting factor. Sometimes gangrene of breast can be idiopathic. Treatment is antibiotics and debridement.

  1. Breast Tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancers when they are most curable and breast-conservation therapies are available. See the Mammography page for ... special platform and gradually compressed with a clear plastic paddle. Breast compression is necessary during tomosynthesis imaging ...

  2. Breast Exam

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 210:314. Mac Bride MB, et al. The evolution of the breast self-examination to breast awareness. ... of these materials may be reprinted for noncommercial personal use only. "Mayo," "Mayo Clinic," "MayoClinic.org," "Mayo ...

  3. Breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... help you not feel alone. Outlook (Prognosis) New, improved treatments are helping people with breast cancer live ... carcinoma in situ Patient Instructions Breast radiation - discharge Chemotherapy - what to ask your doctor Lymphedema - self-care ...

  4. The Involvement of RhoA and Wnt-5a in the Tumorigenesis and Progression of Ovarian Epithelial Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuo Chen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ras homolog gene family member A (RhoA is involved in Wnt-5a–induced migration of gastric and breast cancer cells. We investigated the roles of RhoA and Wnt-5a in ovarian carcinoma. Methods: RhoA and Wnt-5a mRNA and protein expression in normal fallopian tube epithelium, benign tumors, primary ovarian carcinomas, and metastatic omentum were quantified. RhoA or Wnt-5a was knocked down in OVCAR3 ovarian carcinoma cells using siRNAs and cell phenotype and expression of relevant molecules were assayed. Results: RhoA and Wnt-5a mRNA and protein expression were found to be significantly higher in metastatic omentum than in ovarian carcinomas, benign tumors, and normal fallopian tube epithelium (p < 0.05, and positively associated with differentiation and FIGO staging (stage I/II vs. stage III/IV in ovarian carcinoma (p < 0.05. RhoA and Wnt-5a expression were positively correlated in ovarian carcinoma (p = 0.001, R2 = 0.1669. RhoA or Wnt-5a knockdown downregulated RhoA and Wnt-5a expression; reduced cell proliferation; promoted G1 arrest and apoptosis; suppressed lamellipodia formation, cell migration, and invasion; and reduced PI3K, Akt, p70S6k, Bcl-xL, survivin, and VEGF mRNA or protein expression. Conclusions: This is the first demonstration that RhoA and Wnt-5a are associated with ovarian carcinogenesis and apoptosis inhibition; there might be positive correlation between RhoA and Wnt-5a expression. RhoA is a potential tumorigenesis, differentiation, and progression biomarker in ovarian carcinoma.

  5. Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breast cancer affects one in eight women during their lives. No one knows why some women get breast cancer, but there are many risk factors. Risks that ... who have family members with breast or ovarian cancer may wish to be tested for the genes. ...

  6. Ghrelin is a prognostic marker and a potential therapeutic target in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grönberg, Malin; Ahlin, Cecilia; Naeser, Ylva; Janson, Eva Tiensuu; Holmberg, Lars; Fjällskog, Marie-Louise

    2017-01-01

    Ghrelin and obestatin are gastrointestinal peptides, encoded by the same preproghrelin gene. Both are expressed in breast cancer tissue and ghrelin has been implicated in breast cancer tumorigenesis. Despite recent advances in breast cancer management the need for new prognostic markers and potential therapeutic targets in breast cancer remains high. We studied the prognostic impact of ghrelin and obestatin in women with node negative breast cancer. Within a cohort of women with breast cancer with tumor size ≤ 50 mm, no lymph node metastases and no initiation of adjuvant chemotherapy, 190 women were identified who died from breast cancer and randomly selected 190 women alive at the corresponding time as controls. Tumor tissues were immunostained with antibodies versus the peptides. Ghrelin expression was associated with better breast cancer specific survival in univariate analyses (OR 0.55, 95% CI 0.36-0.84) and in multivariate models, adjusted for endocrine treatment and age (OR 0.57, 95% CI 0.36-0.89). Obestatin expression was non-informative (OR 1.2, 95% CI 0.60-2.46). Ghrelin expression is independent prognostic factor for breast cancer death in node negative patients-halving the risk for dying of breast cancer. Our data implies that ghrelin could be a potential therapeutic target in breast cancer treatment.

  7. Ghrelin is a prognostic marker and a potential therapeutic target in breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malin Grönberg

    Full Text Available Ghrelin and obestatin are gastrointestinal peptides, encoded by the same preproghrelin gene. Both are expressed in breast cancer tissue and ghrelin has been implicated in breast cancer tumorigenesis. Despite recent advances in breast cancer management the need for new prognostic markers and potential therapeutic targets in breast cancer remains high. We studied the prognostic impact of ghrelin and obestatin in women with node negative breast cancer. Within a cohort of women with breast cancer with tumor size ≤ 50 mm, no lymph node metastases and no initiation of adjuvant chemotherapy, 190 women were identified who died from breast cancer and randomly selected 190 women alive at the corresponding time as controls. Tumor tissues were immunostained with antibodies versus the peptides. Ghrelin expression was associated with better breast cancer specific survival in univariate analyses (OR 0.55, 95% CI 0.36-0.84 and in multivariate models, adjusted for endocrine treatment and age (OR 0.57, 95% CI 0.36-0.89. Obestatin expression was non-informative (OR 1.2, 95% CI 0.60-2.46. Ghrelin expression is independent prognostic factor for breast cancer death in node negative patients-halving the risk for dying of breast cancer. Our data implies that ghrelin could be a potential therapeutic target in breast cancer treatment.

  8. HMGA1 drives stem cell, inflammatory pathway, and cell cycle progression genes during lymphoid tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schuldenfrei Andrew

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the high mobility group A1 (HMGA1 gene is widely overexpressed in diverse cancers and portends a poor prognosis in some tumors, the molecular mechanisms that mediate its role in transformation have remained elusive. HMGA1 functions as a potent oncogene in cultured cells and induces aggressive lymphoid tumors in transgenic mice. Because HMGA1 chromatin remodeling proteins regulate transcription, HMGA1 is thought to drive malignant transformation by modulating expression of specific genes. Genome-wide studies to define HMGA1 transcriptional networks during tumorigenesis, however, are lacking. To define the HMGA1 transcriptome, we analyzed gene expression profiles in lymphoid cells from HMGA1a transgenic mice at different stages in tumorigenesis. Results RNA from lymphoid samples at 2 months (before tumors develop and 12 months (after tumors are well-established was screened for differential expression of > 20,000 unique genes by microarray analysis (Affymetrix using a parametric and nonparametric approach. Differential expression was confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR in a subset of genes. Differentially expressed genes were analyzed for cellular pathways and functions using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Early in tumorigenesis, HMGA1 induced inflammatory pathways with NFkappaB identified as a major node. In established tumors, HMGA1 induced pathways involved in cell cycle progression, cell-mediated immune response, and cancer. At both stages in tumorigenesis, HMGA1 induced pathways involved in cellular development, hematopoiesis, and hematologic development. Gene set enrichment analysis showed that stem cell and immature T cell genes are enriched in the established tumors. To determine if these results are relevant to human tumors, we knocked-down HMGA1 in human T-cell leukemia cells and identified a subset of genes dysregulated in both the transgenic and human lymphoid tumors. Conclusions We found that HMGA1 induces

  9. Genetic variation in the immunosuppression pathway genes and breast cancer susceptibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lei, Jieping; Rudolph, Anja; Moysich, Kirsten B

    2016-01-01

    Immunosuppression plays a pivotal role in assisting tumors to evade immune destruction and promoting tumor development. We hypothesized that genetic variation in the immunosuppression pathway genes may be implicated in breast cancer tumorigenesis. We included 42,510 female breast cancer cases and.......5 × 10(-4) and 0.63, respectively). Our data provide evidence that the immunosuppression pathway genes STAT3, IL5, and GM-CSF may be novel susceptibility loci for breast cancer in women of European ancestry....... and 40,577 controls of European ancestry from 37 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (2015) with available genotype data for 3595 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 133 candidate genes. Associations between genotyped SNPs and overall breast cancer risk, and secondarily according...

  10. Comparative genomic hybridization detects novel amplifications in fibroadenomas of the breast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ojopi, E P; Rogatto, S R; Caldeira, J R

    2001-01-01

    Comparative genomic hybridization analysis was performed for identification of chromosomal imbalances in 23 samples of fibroadenomas of the breast. Chromosomal gains rather than losses were a feature of these lesions. Only two cases with a familial and/or previous history of breast lesions had gain...... of 1q or 16q as the sole abnormality. The most frequently overrepresented segments were 5p14 (10/23 cases), 5q34-qter (6/23 cases), 13q32-qter (6/23 cases), 10q25-qter (5/23 cases), and 18q22 (4/23 cases). Some of these regions have previously been associated with breast carcinoma, but this study...... indicates that gain of these regions can also occur in benign breast lesions. Our findings may provide a basis for conducting further investigations to locate and identify genes associated with proliferation that may be involved in the early steps of tumorigenesis of the breast....

  11. p53 alteration in morphologically normal/benign breast luminal cells in BRCA carriers with or without history of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xi; El-Halaby, Amber A; Zhang, Hengwei; Yang, Qi; Laughlin, Todd S; Rothberg, Paul G; Skinner, Kristin; Hicks, David G

    2017-10-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA genes have been shown to predispose patients to breast cancer. Studies have suggested that p53 alteration is a necessary step in tumorigenesis in BRCA carriers. Our previous study showed p53 alteration in morphologically normal/benign breast luminal cells in sporadic breast cancer patients, the so-called breast p53 signature. Here, we studied p53 status in 66 BRCA1/2 carriers' breasts: 29 patients with breast carcinoma (2 patients with bilateral breast carcinomas) and 37 without. Seven of the 12 (58%) triple-negative breast carcinomas in BRCA carriers were positive for p53 alteration (immunohistochemical stain and/or sequencing), the same frequency as in sporadic triple-negative breast carcinomas. Focal p53 positivity in adjacent normal/benign luminal cells was identified in 4 of the 7 cases with p53-positive carcinomas but not in breasts with p53-negative carcinomas, indicating that p53 positivity in normal/benign breast luminal cells is not a random event. Furthermore, in BRCA carriers' prophylactic mastectomies, 12 of the 94 (12.77%) breasts had focal p53 positivity in normal/benign luminal cells, with 2 cases in bilateral breasts, significantly higher than in previously studied mammoplasty specimens (0%). Our study suggests that germline BRCA gene mutations could result in genomic instability and an elevated gene mutation rate (such as the p53 gene) in breast luminal cells compared with the general population, predisposing BRCA carriers to develop p53-positive/triple-negative breast carcinomas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Chemokine CXCL16 Expression Suppresses Migration and Invasiveness and Induces Apoptosis in Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeying Fang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Increasing evidence argues that soluble CXCL16 promotes proliferation, migration, and invasion of cancer cells in vitro. However, the role of transmembrane or cellular CXCL16 in cancer remains relatively unknown. In this study, we determine the function of cellular CXCL16 as tumor suppressor in breast cancer cells. Methods. Expression of cellular CXCL16 in breast cancer cell lines was determined at both RNA and protein levels. In vitro and in vivo studies that overexpressed or downregulated CXCL16 were conducted in breast cancer cells. Results. We report differential expression of cellular CXCL16 in breast cancer cell lines that was negatively correlated with cell invasiveness and migration. Overexpression of CXCL16 in MDA-MB-231 cells led to a decrease in cell invasion and migration and induced apoptosis of the cells; downregulation of CXCL16 in MCF-7 cells increased cell migration and invasiveness. Consistent with the in vitro data, CXCL16 overexpression inhibited tumorigenesis in vivo. Conclusions. Cellular CXCL16 suppresses invasion and metastasis of breast cancer cells in vitro and inhibits tumorigenesis in vivo. Targeting of cellular CXCL16 expression is a potential therapeutic strategy for breast cancer.

  13. Down-regulation of the zinc-finger homeobox protein TSHZ2 releases GLI1 from the nuclear repressor complex to restore its transcriptional activity during mammary tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riku, Miho; Inaguma, Shingo; Ito, Hideaki; Tsunoda, Takumi; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Kasai, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Although breast cancer is one of the most common malignancies, the molecular mechanisms underlying its development and progression are not fully understood. To identify key molecules involved, we screened publicly available microarray datasets for genes differentially expressed between breast cancers and normal mammary glands. We found that three of the genes predicted in this analysis were differentially expressed among human mammary tissues and cell lines. Of these genes, we focused on the role of the zinc-finger homeobox protein TSHZ2, which is down-regulated in breast cancer cells. We found that TSHZ2 is a nuclear protein harboring a bipartite nuclear localization signal, and we confirmed its function as a C-terminal binding protein (CtBP)-dependent transcriptional repressor. Through comprehensive screening, we identified TSHZ2-suppressing genes such as AEBP1 and CXCR4, which are conversely up-regulated by GLI1, the downstream transcription factor of Hedgehog signaling. We found that GLI1 forms a ternary complex with CtBP2 in the presence of TSHZ2 and that the transcriptional activity of GLI1 is suppressed by TSHZ2 in a CtBP-dependent manner. Indeed, knockdown of TSHZ2 increases the expression of AEBP1 and CXCR4 in TSHZ2-expressing immortalized mammary duct epithelium. Concordantly, immunohistochemical staining of mammary glands revealed that normal duct cells expresses GLI1 in the nucleus along with TSHZ2 and CtBP2, whereas invasive ductal carcinoma cells, which does not express TSHZ2, show the increase in the expression of AEBP1 and CXCR4 and in the cytoplasmic localization of GLI1. Thus, we propose that down-regulation of TSHZ2 is crucial for mammary tumorigenesis via the activation of GLI1. PMID:26744317

  14. Exercise-Induced Catecholamines Activate the Hippo Tumor Suppressor Pathway to Reduce Risks of Breast Cancer Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dethlefsen, Christine; Hansen, Louise S; Lillelund, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Strong epidemiologic evidence documents the protective effect of physical activity on breast cancer risk, recurrence, and mortality, but the underlying mechanisms remain to be identified. Using human exercise-conditioned serum for breast cancer cell incubation studies and murine exercise...... interventions, we aimed to identify exercise factors and signaling pathways involved in the exercise-dependent suppression of breast cancer. Exercise-conditioned serum from both women with breast cancer (n = 20) and healthy women (n = 7) decreased MCF-7 (hormone-sensitive) and MDA-MB-231 (hormone......-insensitive) breast cancer cell viability in vitro by 11% to 19% and reduced tumorigenesis by 50% when preincubated MCF-7 breast cancer cells were inoculated into NMRI-Foxn1(nu) mice. This exercise-mediated suppression of cell viability and tumor formation was completely blunted by blockade of β-adrenergic signaling...

  15. Epigenetic silencing of the tumor suppressor klotho in human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinek, Tami; Shulman, Michal; Israeli, Shira; Bose, Shikha; Avraham, Ayelet; Zundelevich, Adi; Evron, Ella; Gal-Yam, Einav Nili; Kaufman, Bella; Wolf, Ido

    2012-06-01

    Klotho is a single pass transmembrane protein, associated with premature aging. We identified tumor suppressor activities for klotho, associated with reduced expression in breast cancer. We now aimed to analyze klotho expression in early stages of breast tumorigenesis and elucidate mechanisms leading to klotho silencing in breast tumors. We studied klotho expression, using immunohistochemistry, and found high klotho expression in all normal and mild hyperplasia samples, whereas reduced expression was associated with moderate and atypical ductal hyperplasia. Promoter methylation and histone deacetylation were studied as possible mechanisms for klotho silencing. Using bisulfite sequencing, and methylation-specific PCR, we identified KLOTHO promoter methylation in five breast cancer cell lines and in hyperplastic MCF-12A cells, but not in the non-tumorous mammary cell line HB2. Importantly, methylation status inversely correlated with klotho mRNA levels, and treatment of breast caner cells with 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine elevated klotho expression by up to 150-fold. KLOTHO promoter methylation was detected in 8/23 of breast cancer samples but not in normal breast samples. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that in HB2 KLOTHO promoter was enriched with AcH3K9; however, in breast cancer cells, H3K9 was deacetylated, and treatment with the histone deacetylase inhibitor suberoylanilide bishydroxamide (SAHA) restored H3K9 acetylation. Taken together, these data indicate loss of klotho expression as an early event in breast cancer development, and suggest a role for DNA methylation and histone deacetylation in klotho silencing. Klotho expression and methylation may, therefore, serve as early markers for breast tumorigenesis.

  16. Twist1 suppresses senescence programs and thereby accelerates and maintains mutant Kras-induced lung tumorigenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tran, Phuoc T; Shroff, Emelyn H; Burns, Timothy F

    2012-01-01

    overexpressed in primary human lung tumors. The suppression of TWIST1 in human lung cancer cells also induced cellular senescence. Hence, TWIST1 is a critical regulator of cellular senescence programs, and the suppression of TWIST1 in human tumors may be an effective example of pro-senescence therapy....... mouse model and in human lung tumors that the inhibition of Twist1 restores a senescence program inducing the loss of a neoplastic phenotype. The Twist1 gene encodes for a transcription factor that is essential during embryogenesis. Twist1 has been suggested to play an important role during tumor...... progression. However, there is no in vivo evidence that Twist1 plays a role in autochthonous tumorigenesis. Through two novel transgenic mouse models, we show that Twist1 cooperates with Kras(G12D) to markedly accelerate lung tumorigenesis by abrogating cellular senescence programs and promoting...

  17. Long Telomeres Bypass the Requirement for Telomere Maintenance in Human Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A.S. Taboski

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite the importance of telomere maintenance in cancer cell survival via the elongation of telomeres by telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT or alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT, it had not been tested directly whether telomere maintenance is dispensable for human tumorigenesis. We engineered human tumor cells containing loxP-flanked hTERT to enable extensive telomere elongation prior to complete hTERT excision. Despite unabated telomere erosion, hTERT-excised cells formed tumors in mice and proliferated in vitro for up to 1 year. Telomerase reactivation or ALT was not observed, and the eventual loss of telomeric signal coincided with loss of tumorigenic potential and cell viability. Crisis was averted via the reintroduction of active but not inactive hTERT. Thus, telomere maintenance is dispensable for human tumorigenesis when telomere reserves are long. Yet, despite telomere instability and the presence of oncogenic RAS, human tumors remain susceptible to crisis induced by critically short telomeres.

  18. The role of the Akt/mTOR pathway in tobacco-carcinogen induced lung tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memmott, Regan M.; Dennis, Phillip A.

    2009-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States, and 85–90% of lung cancer cases are associated with tobacco use. Tobacco components promote lung tumorigenesis through genotoxic effects, as well as through biochemical modulation of signaling pathways such as the Akt/mTOR pathway that regulate cell proliferation and survival. This review will describe cell surface receptors and other upstream components required for tobacco-carcinogen induced activation of Akt and mTOR. Preclinical studies demonstrate that inhibitors of the Akt/mTOR pathway inhibit tumor formation in mouse models of carcinogen-induced lung tumorigenesis. Some of these inhibitors will be highlighted, and their clinical potential for the treatment and prevention of lung cancer will be discussed. PMID:20028747

  19. A Role for PPARβ/δ in Tumor Stroma and Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf Müller

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-β/δ (PPARβ/δ is a transcription factor that is activated by endogenous fatty acid ligands and by synthetic agonists. Its role in the regulation of skeletal muscle fatty acid catabolism, glucose homeostasis, and cellular differentiation has been established in multiple studies. On the contrary, a role for PPARβ/δ in tumorigenesis is less clear because there are contradictory reports in the literature. However, the majority of these studies have not examined the role of PPARβ/δ in the tumor stroma. Recent evidence suggests that stromal PPARβ/δ regulates tumor endothelial cell proliferation and promotes differentiation leading to the properly orchestrated events required for tumor blood vessel formation. This review briefly summarizes the significance of these studies that may provide clues to help explain the reported discrepancies in the literature regarding the role of PPARβ/δ in tumorigenesis.

  20. HMGA2 induces pituitary tumorigenesis by enhancing E2F1 activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fedele, Monica; Visone, Rosa; De Martino, Ivana

    2006-01-01

    show that HMGA2 interacts with pRB and induces E2F1 activity in mouse pituitary adenomas by displacing HDAC1 from the pRB/E2F1 complex-a process that results in E2F1 acetylation. We found that loss of E2F1 function (obtained by mating HMGA2 and E2F1(-/-) mice) suppressed pituitary tumorigenesis in HMGA......HMGA2 gene amplification and overexpression in human prolactinomas and the development of pituitary adenomas in HMGA2 transgenic mice showed that HMGA2 plays a crucial role in pituitary tumorigenesis. We have explored the pRB/E2F1 pathway to investigate the mechanism by which HMGA2 acts. Here we...

  1. Up a gear? The significance of an elevated mutation rate in tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Karen M.

    2007-06-01

    Mutations involved in many cancers have been identified, but with some cancers requiring six or more mutations to take on their fully metastatic forms, the question remains whether all of these mutations can be acquired via a process of successive mutation, at a normal rate, and clonal expansion or whether heightened mutation rates are required. This issue has been debated for decades. Recently there has been much interest in forms of genomic instability such as chromosomal instability and microsatellite instability. It remains to definitively show whether or not these instabilities are very early causal events in tumorigenesis. This article reviews the evidence for and against genomic instability being an early causal event in tumorigenesis and surveys the mathematical modelling literature in this area. The focus is on chromosomal instability and microsatellite instability in colorectal cancer.

  2. STAT1 and STAT3 in tumorigenesis: A matter of balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avalle, Lidia; Pensa, Sara; Regis, Gabriella; Novelli, Francesco; Poli, Valeria

    2012-04-01

    The transcription factors STAT1 and STAT3 appear to play opposite roles in tumorigenesis. While STAT3 promotes cell survival/proliferation, motility and immune tolerance and is considered as an oncogene, STAT1 mostly triggers anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic responses while enhancing anti-tumor immunity. Despite being activated downstream of common cytokine and growth factor receptors, their activation is reciprocally regulated and perturbation in their balanced expression or phosphorylation levels may re-direct cytokine/growth factor signals from proliferative to apoptotic, or from inflammatory to anti-inflammatory. Here we review the functional canonical and non-canonical effects of STAT1 and STAT3 activation in tumorigenesis and their potential cross-regulation mechanisms.

  3. The role of lipolysis stimulated lipoprotein receptor in breast cancer and directing breast cancer cell behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise K Reaves

    Full Text Available The claudin-low molecular subtype of breast cancer is of particular interest for clinically the majority of these tumors are poor prognosis, triple negative, invasive ductal carcinomas. Claudin-low tumors are characterized by cancer stem cell-like features and low expression of cell junction and adhesion proteins. Herein, we sought to define the role of lipolysis stimulated lipoprotein receptor (LSR in breast cancer and cancer cell behavior as LSR was recently correlated with tumor-initiating features. We show that LSR was expressed in epithelium, endothelium, and stromal cells within the healthy breast tissue, as well as in tumor epithelium. In primary breast tumor bioposies, LSR expression was significantly correlated with invasive ductal carcinomas compared to invasive lobular carcinomas, as well as ERα positive tumors and breast cancer cell lines. LSR levels were significantly reduced in claudin-low breast cancer cell lines and functional studies illustrated that re-introduction of LSR into a claudin-low cell line suppressed the EMT phenotype and reduced individual cell migration. However, our data suggest that LSR may promote collective cell migration. Re-introduction of LSR in claudin-low breast cancer cell lines reestablished tight junction protein expression and correlated with transepithelial electrical resistance, thereby reverting claudin-low lines to other intrinsic molecular subtypes. Moreover, overexpression of LSR altered gene expression of pathways involved in transformation and tumorigenesis as well as enhanced proliferation and survival in anchorage independent conditions, highlighting that reestablishment of LSR signaling promotes aggressive/tumor initiating cell behaviors. Collectively, these data highlight a direct role for LSR in driving aggressive breast cancer behavior.

  4. Prepubertal exposure to cow's milk reduces susceptibility to carcinogen-induced mammary tumorigenesis in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Tina Skau; Khan, Galam; Davis, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    whole milk or tap water to drink from postnatal day (PND) 14 to PND 35, and thereafter normal tap water. Mammary tumorigenesis was induced by administering 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene on PND 50. Milk exposure increased circulating E2 levels on PND 25 by 10-fold (p ... glands of the milk-exposed rats had significantly less terminal end buds (TEBs) than the tap water-exposed controls (p water (p

  5. Harnessing impaired energy metabolism in cancer cell: small molecule- mediated ways to regulate tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govardhan, K Shroff; Ramyasri, Kuna; Kethora, Dirsipam; Ravishekar, Yalagala; Prasenjit, Mitra

    2011-03-01

    Altered cellular metabolism is a hallmark of tumorigenesis. Described first in 1924 by Otto Warburg, a cancer cell undergoes complete metabolic reprogramming to attain nutrient self-sufficiency for proliferation and survival. Interplay between diverse signalling cascades confers this metabolic advantage. In this review we focus on signalling molecules that regulate this altered metabolic paradigm in a cancer cell with emphasis on small molecule mediated intervention for attenuation of growth and progression of tumor.

  6. Targeted p16Ink4a epimutation causes tumorigenesis and reduces survival in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Da-Hai; Waterland, Robert A.; Zhang, Pumin; Schady, Deborah; Chen, Miao-Hsueh; Guan, Yongtao; Gadkari, Manasi; Shen, Lanlan

    2014-01-01

    Cancer has long been viewed as a genetic disease; however, epigenetic silencing as the result of aberrant promoter DNA methylation is frequently associated with cancer development, suggesting an epigenetic component to the disease. Nonetheless, it has remained unclear whether an epimutation (an aberrant change in epigenetic regulation) can induce tumorigenesis. Here, we exploited a functionally validated cis-acting regulatory element and devised a strategy to induce developmentally regulated ...

  7. Ras-Related Tumorigenesis Is Suppressed by BNIP3-Mediated Autophagy through Inhibition of Cell Proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan-Ying Wu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy plays diverse roles in Ras-related tumorigenesis. H-rasval12 induces autophagy through multiple signaling pathways including Raf-1/ERK pathway, and various ERK downstream molecules of autophagy have been reported. In this study, Bcl-2/adenovirus E1B 19-kDa–interacting protein 3 (BNIP3 is identified as a downstream transducer of the Ras/Raf/ERK signaling pathway to induce autophagy. BNIP3 was upregulated by H-rasval12 at the transcriptional level to compete with Beclin 1 for binding with Bcl-2. H-rasval12–induced autophagy suppresses cell proliferation demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo by expression of ectopic BNIP3, Atg5, or interference RNA of BNIP3 (siBNIP3 and Atg5 (shAtg5 using mouse NIH3T3 and embryo fibroblast cells. H-rasval12 induces different autophagic responses depending on the duration of Ras overexpression. After a short time (48 hours of Ras overexpression, autophagy inhibits cell proliferation. In contrast, a longer time (2 weeks of Ras overexpression, cell proliferation was enhanced by autophagy. Furthermore, overexpression of mutant Ras, BNIP3, and LC3-II was detected in bladder cancer T24 cells and the tumor parts of 75% of bladder cancer specimens indicating a positive correlation between autophagy and tumorigenesis. Taken together, our mouse model demonstrates a balance between BNIP3-mediated autophagy and H-rasval12–induced tumor formation and reveals that H-rasval12 induces autophagy in a BNIP3-dependent manner, and the threshold of autophagy plays a decisive role in H-rasval12–induced tumorigenesis. Our findings combined with others’ reports suggest a new therapeutic strategy against Ras-related tumorigenesis by negative or positive regulation of autophagic activity, which is determined by the level of autophagy and tumor progression stages.

  8. Role of SnoN in Normal Epithelial Function and Tumorigenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Jahchan, Nadine S

    2010-01-01

    The transforming growth factor-ß (TGF-ß) superfamily of cytokines regulates many cellular processes such as cell growth, cell survival, differentiation, and extracellular matrix deposition. TGF-ß is an important regulator of tissue homeostasis and is implicated in the development of human cancers and other diseases. During cancer development, TGF-ß acts as a tumor suppressor in the early stages of tumorigenesis and as a promoter of tumor invasiveness and metastasis in the later stages of canc...

  9. Functional aspects of primary cilia in signaling, cell cycle and tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Dysfunctional cilia underlie a broad range of cellular and tissue phenotypes and can eventually result in the development of ciliopathies: pathologically diverse diseases that range from clinically mild to highly complex and severe multi-organ failure syndromes incompatible with neonatal life. Given that virtually all cells of the human body have the capacity to generate cilia, it is likely that clinical manifestations attributed to ciliary dysfunction will increase in the years to come. Disputed but nevertheless enigmatic is the notion that at least a subset of tumor phenotypes fit within the ciliopathy disease spectrum and that cilia loss may be required for tumor progression. Contending for the centrosome renders ciliation and cell division mutually exclusive; a regulated tipping of balance promotes either process. The mechanisms involved, however, are complex. If the hypothesis that tumorigenesis results from dysfunctional cilia is true, then why do the classic ciliopathies only show limited hyperplasia at best? Although disassembly of the cilium is a prerequisite for cell proliferation, it does not intrinsically drive tumorigenesis per se. Alternatively, we will explore the emerging evidence suggesting that some tumors depend on ciliary signaling. After reviewing the structure, genesis and signaling of cilia, the various ciliopathy syndromes and their genetics, we discuss the current debate of tumorigenesis as a ciliopathy spectrum defect, and describe recent advances in this fascinating field. PMID:23628112

  10. Transmembrane voltage potential of somatic cells controls oncogene-mediated tumorigenesis at long-range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernet, Brook T.; Levin, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The microenvironment is increasingly recognized as a crucial aspect of cancer. In contrast and complement to the field's focus on biochemical factors and extracellular matrix, we characterize a novel aspect of host:tumor interaction – endogenous bioelectric signals among non-excitable somatic cells. Extending prior work focused on the bioelectric state of cancer cells themselves, we show for the first time that the resting potentials of distant cells are critical for oncogene-dependent tumorigenesis. In the Xenopus laevis tadpole model, we used human oncogenes such as mutant KRAS to drive formation of tumor-like structures that exhibited overproliferation, increased nuclear size, hypoxia, acidity, and leukocyte attraction. Remarkably, misexpression of hyperpolarizing ion channels at distant sites within the tadpole significantly reduced the incidence of these tumors. The suppression of tumorigenesis could also be achieved by hyperpolarization using native CLIC1 chloride channels, suggesting a treatment modality not requiring gene therapy. Using a dominant negative approach, we implicate HDAC1 as the mechanism by which resting potential changes affect downstream cell behaviors. Based on published data on the voltage-mediated changes of butyrate flux through the SLC5A8 transporter, we present a model linking resting potentials of host cells to the ability of oncogenes to initiate tumorigenesis. Antibiotic data suggest that the relevant butyrate is generated by a native bacterial species, identifying a novel link between the microbiome and cancer that is mediated by alterations in bioelectric signaling. PMID:24830454

  11. Mechanisms of increased risk of tumorigenesis in Atm and Brca1 double heterozygosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Jufang

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both epidemiological and experimental studies suggest that heterozygosity for a single gene is linked with tumorigenesis and heterozygosity for two genes increases the risk of tumor incidence. Our previous work has demonstrated that Atm/Brca1 double heterozygosity leads to higher cell transformation rate than single heterozygosity. However, the underlying mechanisms have not been fully understood yet. In the present study, a series of pathways were investigated to clarify the possible mechanisms of increased risk of tumorigenesis in Atm and Brca1 heterozygosity. Methods Wild type cells, Atm or Brca1 single heterozygous cells, and Atm/Brca1 double heterozygous cells were used to investigate DNA damage and repair, cell cycle, micronuclei, and cell transformation after photon irradiation. Results Remarkable high transformation frequency was confirmed in Atm/Brca1 double heterozygous cells compared to wild type cells. It was observed that delayed DNA damage recognition, disturbed cell cycle checkpoint, incomplete DNA repair, and increased genomic instability were involved in the biological networks. Haploinsufficiency of either ATM or BRCA1 negatively impacts these pathways. Conclusions The quantity of critical proteins such as ATM and BRCA1 plays an important role in determination of the fate of cells exposed to ionizing radiation and double heterozygosity increases the risk of tumorigenesis. These findings also benefit understanding of the individual susceptibility to tumor initiation.

  12. Gene methylation of human ovarian carcinoma stromal progenitor cells promotes tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Chih-Ming; Shih, Daniel Tzu-Bi; Hsiao, Chih-Chiang; Huang, Shih-Hung; Chang, Shwu-Fen; Cheng, Wen-Fang

    2015-11-23

    This study aimed to investigate whether the DNA methylation of human ovarian carcinoma stromal progenitor cells (OCSPCs) could promote the tumorigenesis of ovarian carcinoma. OCSPCs were first isolated from fresh tumor tissues and ascites of ovarian cancer patients. In vivo and in vitro experiments on the effect of the OCSPCs on tumorigenesis and the effects of DNA demethylation on the OCSPCs were then performed. The OCSPCs possessed self-renewal and multipotent differentiation capacity with elevated expressions of OCT4, NANOG, BMP2, BMP4, Rex-1, AC133 and TGF-β. The OCSPCs, when combined with tumor cells in vivo could promote tumor growth. The methylation profiles of tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) were significantly higher in the OCSPCs than in ovarian cancer cells (p cells. The expression levels of TSGs were re-expressed by 5-aza-2-dC to inhibit the self-renewal and growth of OCSPCs. OCSPCs with decreased TSG expressions in the ovarian tumor microenvironment were able to promote tumorigenesis which could be reversed by DNA demethylation. DNA demethylation reversing the expression of TSGs in OCSPCs may represent a potential therapeutic target for ovarian cancer.

  13. Breast Reconstruction After Mastectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Reconstruction After Mastectomy On This Page What is breast reconstruction? How ... are some new developments in breast reconstruction after mastectomy? What is breast reconstruction? Many women who have ...

  14. Breast reconstruction - implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breast implants surgery; Mastectomy - breast reconstruction with implants; Breast cancer - breast reconstruction with implants ... to make reconstruction easier. If you will have breast reconstruction later, your surgeon will remove enough skin ...

  15. Breast Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  16. Stages of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  17. Breast Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is prevention? Go ... from starting. Risk-reducing surgery . General Information About Breast Cancer Key Points Breast cancer is a disease in ...

  18. Breast cancer screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammogram - breast cancer screening; Breast exam - breast cancer screening; MRI - breast cancer screening ... is performed to screen women to detect early breast cancer when it is more likely to be cured. ...

  19. Apoptotic ratios and mitotic abnormalities in 17-β-estradiol-transformed human breast epithelial MCF-10F cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LMS Cruz

    Full Text Available Treatment of human breast epithelial cells MCF-10F with 17-β-estradiol has been reported to result in E2-transformed cells which have given rise to highly invasive C5 cells that in turn generate tumors in SCID mice. From these tumors, various cell lines, among which C5-A6-T6 and C5-A8-T8, were obtained. Although different phases of the tumorigenesis process in this model have been studied in molecular biology and image analysis assays, no cytological data on apoptotic ratios and mitotic abnormalities have been established to accompany the various steps leading to 17-β-estradiol-treated MCF-10F cells to tumorigenesis. Here we detected that the apoptotic ratio decreases with the transformation and tumorigenesis progress, except for the tumor cell line C5-A8-T8, probably on account of its more intense proliferation rate and a more rapid culture medium consumption. Increased frequency of mitotic abnormalities contributed by triple- and tetrapolar metaphases, and by lagging chromosomes and chromosome bridges observed at the anaphase found by transformation and tumorigenesis progress. However, no difference was found under these terms when the C5-A6-T6 and C5-A8-T8 tumor cell lines were compared to each other. Present findings are in agreement with the nuclear instability and enrichment of dysregulated genes in the apoptotic process promoted by transformation and tumorigenesis in 17-β-estradiol-treated MCF-10F cells.

  20. “The Voice as the Sound of Many Waters” in the Book of Revelation in Light of Old Testament Semantics: A Threatening Message or One of Beauty?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Nowińska

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The sentence ἡ φωνὴ αὐτοῦ ὡς φωνὴ ὑδάτων πολλῶν isn’t very commonly found in the Bible, despite the fact that the subject of God’s voice is one of the main motifs not only in the Old Testament. It’s used twice in Ezekiel and three times in the Book of Revelation. Both connect this motive with God to describe His Identity and deeds. The “many waters” do not only mean force, danger and terrible rule in the Bible. They are also a metaphor for abun-dance, which a good condition for progress, because water gives life. So “the voice as the sound of many waters” is the message of power, liveliness, beauty, and care. It’s so strong a voice that nobody and nothing is capable of overcoming it. Everybody who wants can hear it. It’s like the voice embraced from all sides. The Book of Revelation describes Jesus’ voice (Rev 1 : 15 and the voice from heaven (Rev 14 : 2 in such a way. Also for John, the mystery of internal experience (Rev 19 : 6 avoids any categorization. But for God, it’s the preferred way to communicate with human beings.

  1. p53 and survival in early onset breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gentile, M; Bergman Jungeström, M; Olsen, K E

    1999-01-01

    The p53 protein has proven to be central in tumorigenesis by its cell cycle regulatory properties and both gene mutations and protein accumulation have been associated with poor prognosis in breast cancer. The present study was undertaken to investigate the prognostic significance of gene mutations......, p53 protein accumulation and of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at the TP53 locus in young (age ... (46%). Log rank analysis revealed no significant association between survival and TP53 mutations (in general), p53 protein accumulation or LOH. However, missense mutations localised to the zinc binding domain were significantly (P = 0.0007) associated with poorer prognosis. As indicated...

  2. Lansoprazole induces apoptosis of breast cancer cells through inhibition of intracellular proton extrusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Shangrong; Wang, Yifan; Li, Shu Jie, E-mail: shujieli@nankai.edu.cn

    2014-06-13

    Highlights: • Lansoprazole (LPZ) induces cell apoptosis in breast cancer cells. • LPZ markedly inhibits intracellular proton extrusion. • LPZ induces an increase in intracellular ATP level, lysosomal alkalinization and ROS accumulation. - Abstract: The increased glycolysis and proton secretion in tumors is proposed to contribute to the proliferation and invasion of cancer cells during the process of tumorigenesis and metastasis. Here, treatment of human breast cancer cells with proton pump inhibitor (PPI) lansoprazole (LPZ) induces cell apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. In the implantation of the MDA-MB-231 xenografts in nude mice, administration of LPZ significantly inhibits tumorigenesis and induces large-scale apopotosis of tumor cells. LPZ markedly inhibits intracellular proton extrusion, induces an increase in intracellular ATP level, lysosomal alkalinization and accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in breast cancer cells. The ROS scavenger N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) and diphenyleneiodonium (DPI), a specific pharmacological inhibitor of NADPH oxidases (NOX), significantly abolish LPZ-induced ROS accumulation in breast cancer cells. Our results suggested that LPZ may be used as a new therapeutic drug for breast tumor.

  3. Metallothionein-3 Increases Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Cell Invasiveness via Induction of Metalloproteinase Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicja M Kmiecik

    Full Text Available It has been recently found that metallothionein-3 (MT3 enhances the invasiveness and tumorigenesis of prostate cancer cells. This finding is in contrast to those of earlier studies, which indicated that overexpression of MT3 in breast cancer and prostate cancer cell lines inhibits their growth in vitro. Therefore, to clarify the role of MT3 in breast cancer progression, we analyzed the effect of MT3-overexpression on proliferation, invasiveness, migration, and tumorigenesis of breast cancer MDA-MB-231/BO2 cells. It was found that MDA-MB-231/BO2 cells overexpressing MT3 were characterized by increased invasiveness in vitro, compared to the control cells. Interestingly, this increased invasiveness correlated with a highly increased concentration of MMP3 in the culture supernatants (p<0.0001. Our data suggest that MT3 may regulate breast cancer cell invasiveness by modulating the expression of MMP3. These experimental results, obtained using triple-negative MDA-MB-231/BO2 cells, were further supported by clinical data. It was found that, in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC, nuclear MT3 immunoreactivity in cancer cells tended to be associated with patients' shorter disease-specific survival, suggesting that nuclear MT3 expression may be a potential marker of poor prognosis of triple-negative TNBC cases.

  4. Metallothionein-3 Increases Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Cell Invasiveness via Induction of Metalloproteinase Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kmiecik, Alicja M; Pula, Bartosz; Suchanski, Jaroslaw; Olbromski, Mateusz; Gomulkiewicz, Agnieszka; Owczarek, Tomasz; Kruczak, Anna; Ambicka, Aleksandra; Rys, Janusz; Ugorski, Maciej; Podhorska-Okolow, Marzena; Dziegiel, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    It has been recently found that metallothionein-3 (MT3) enhances the invasiveness and tumorigenesis of prostate cancer cells. This finding is in contrast to those of earlier studies, which indicated that overexpression of MT3 in breast cancer and prostate cancer cell lines inhibits their growth in vitro. Therefore, to clarify the role of MT3 in breast cancer progression, we analyzed the effect of MT3-overexpression on proliferation, invasiveness, migration, and tumorigenesis of breast cancer MDA-MB-231/BO2 cells. It was found that MDA-MB-231/BO2 cells overexpressing MT3 were characterized by increased invasiveness in vitro, compared to the control cells. Interestingly, this increased invasiveness correlated with a highly increased concentration of MMP3 in the culture supernatants (p<0.0001). Our data suggest that MT3 may regulate breast cancer cell invasiveness by modulating the expression of MMP3. These experimental results, obtained using triple-negative MDA-MB-231/BO2 cells, were further supported by clinical data. It was found that, in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), nuclear MT3 immunoreactivity in cancer cells tended to be associated with patients' shorter disease-specific survival, suggesting that nuclear MT3 expression may be a potential marker of poor prognosis of triple-negative TNBC cases.

  5. Up-regulation of human arrest-defective 1 protein is correlated with metastatic phenotype and poor prognosis in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ze-Hua; Gong, Jun-Li; Yu, M; Yang, H; Lai, J H; Ma, M X; Wu, H; Li, L; Tan, D Y

    2011-01-01

    Human arrest defective 1 protein (ARD1), as a N-terminal acetyltransferase, has been reported to play a crucial role in tumorigenesis, but the results are somewhat controversial. To explore the clinical and pathological significance of ARD1 in breast tumorigenesis, we analyzed ARD1 status in multiple types of breast disease. The expression of ARD1 protein was assessed by immunohistochemistry in 356 cases including 82 invasive ductal carcinomas (IDC), 159 fibroadenomas, 66 hyperplasia of mammary glands, 19 inflammatory breast disease, 30 breast cysts, and in 29 postoperative treatment patients. We assessed the relationship of ARD1 protein with clinical and pathological characteristics using χ2 test. ARD1 protein was observed at 61.0% (50/82), 54.7% (87/159), 37.9% (25/66), 36.8% (7/19) in IDC, fibroadenoma, hyperplasia, and inflammation, respectively, and less than 30.0% for breast cyst. Thus, high ARD1 expression correlated with breast cancer (relative risk = 1.32, P breast cancer patients after postoperative therapy. These results suggest that ARD1 expression may be as a potential target for exploring the mechanism of breast cancer metastasic to lymph nodes and hormone-responsive regulation.

  6. Notch signaling as a therapeutic target for breast cancer treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jianxun; Hendzel, Michael J; Allalunis-Turner, Joan

    2011-05-31

    Aberrant Notch signaling can induce mammary gland carcinoma in transgenic mice, and high expressions of Notch receptors and ligands have been linked to poor clinical outcomes in human patients with breast cancer. This suggests that inhibition of Notch signaling may be beneficial for breast cancer treatment. In this review, we critically evaluate the evidence that supports or challenges the hypothesis that inhibition of Notch signaling would be advantageous in breast cancer management. We find that there are many remaining uncertainties that must be addressed experimentally if we are to exploit inhibition of Notch signaling as a treatment approach in breast cancer. Nonetheless, Notch inhibition, in combination with other therapies, is a promising avenue for future management of breast cancer. Furthermore, since aberrant Notch4 activity can induce mammary gland carcinoma in the absence of RBPjκ, a better understanding of the components of RBPjκ-independent oncogenic Notch signaling pathways and their contribution to Notch-induced tumorigenesis would facilitate the deployment of Notch inhibition strategies for effective treatment of breast cancer.

  7. Breast Feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Children's Centre, Paris (France).

    This set of documents consists of English, French, and Spanish translations of four pamphlets on breast-feeding. The pamphlets provide information designed for lay persons, academics and professionals, health personnel and educators, and policy-makers. The contents cover health-related differences between breast and bottle milk; patterns of…

  8. Breast lymphoma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    outside the breast. Histological diagnoses of the so-called primary breast lymphomas included 1 case of Hodgkin's disease and 6 of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (inclUding 2 with T-cell phenotypes). ... adequate specimens; (iI) mammary tissue and lymphomatous infiltrate ... All the patients were female. Their ages ranged from ...

  9. Breast asymmetry and predisposition to breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Scutt, D; Lancaster, GA; Manning, JT

    2006-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: It has been shown in our previous work that breast asymmetry is related to several of the known risk factors for breast cancer, and that patients with diagnosed breast cancer have more breast volume asymmetry, as measured from mammograms, than age-matched healthy women. METHODS: In the present study, we compared the breast asymmetry of women who were free of breast disease at time of mammography, but who had subsequently developed breast cancer, with that of age-matched healthy ...

  10. Epigenetics of breast cancer: Modifying role of environmental and bioactive food compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romagnolo, Donato F; Daniels, Kevin D; Grunwald, Jonathan T; Ramos, Stephan A; Propper, Catherine R; Selmin, Ornella I

    2016-06-01

    Reduced expression of tumor suppressor genes (TSG) increases the susceptibility to breast cancer. However, only a small percentage of breast tumors is related to family history and mutational inactivation of TSG. Epigenetics refers to non-mutational events that alter gene expression. Endocrine disruptors found in foods and drinking water may disrupt epigenetically hormonal regulation and increase breast cancer risk. This review centers on the working hypothesis that agonists of the aromatic hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), bisphenol A (BPA), and arsenic compounds, induce in TSG epigenetic signatures that mirror those often seen in sporadic breast tumors. Conversely, it is hypothesized that bioactive food components that target epigenetic mechanisms protect against sporadic breast cancer induced by these disruptors. This review highlights (i) overlaps between epigenetic signatures placed in TSG by AHR-ligands, BPA, and arsenic with epigenetic alterations associated with sporadic breast tumorigenesis; and (ii) potential opportunities for the prevention of sporadic breast cancer with food components that target the epigenetic machinery. Characterizing the overlap between epigenetic signatures elicited in TSG by endocrine disruptors with those observed in sporadic breast tumors may afford new strategies for breast cancer prevention with specific bioactive food components or diet. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Twisted Gastrulation as a BMP Modulator during Mammary Gland Development and Tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Humoral bone morphogenetic protein 2 is sufficient for inducing breast cancer microcalcification . Mol Imaging. 2008; 7:175–86. [PubMed: 19123988...Twsg1 is expressed in mammary glands from wild type (WT) mice at 3, 6 and 8 weeks of life, and is differentially expressed in breast cancer , yet its...role in MG development and breast cancer pathogenesis is unknown. This study is designed to determine how TWSG1 regulates the invasion of normal MG

  12. An inducible krasV12 transgenic zebrafish model for liver tumorigenesis and chemical drug screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anh Tuan Nguyen

    2012-01-01

    Because Ras signaling is frequently activated by major hepatocellular carcinoma etiological factors, a transgenic zebrafish constitutively expressing the krasV12 oncogene in the liver was previously generated by our laboratory. Although this model depicted and uncovered the conservation between zebrafish and human liver tumorigenesis, the low tumor incidence and early mortality limit its use for further studies of tumor progression and inhibition. Here, we employed a mifepristone-inducible transgenic system to achieve inducible krasV12 expression in the liver. The system consisted of two transgenic lines: the liver-driver line had a liver-specific fabp10 promoter to produce the LexPR chimeric transactivator, and the Ras-effector line contained a LexA-binding site to control EGFP-krasV12 expression. In double-transgenic zebrafish (driver-effector embryos and adults, we demonstrated mifepristone-inducible EGFP-krasV12 expression in the liver. Robust and homogeneous liver tumors developed in 100% of double-transgenic fish after 1 month of induction and the tumors progressed from hyperplasia by 1 week post-treatment (wpt to carcinoma by 4 wpt. Strikingly, liver tumorigenesis was found to be ‘addicted’ to Ras signaling for tumor maintenance, because mifepristone withdrawal led to tumor regression via cell death in transgenic fish. We further demonstrated the potential use of the transparent EGFP-krasV12 larvae in inhibitor treatments to suppress Ras-driven liver tumorigenesis by targeting its downstream effectors, including the Raf-MEK-ERK and PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathways. Collectively, this mifepristone-inducible and reversible krasV12 transgenic system offers a novel model for understanding hepatocarcinogenesis and a high-throughput screening platform for anti-cancer drugs.

  13. Progesterone-induced stimulation of mammary tumorigenesis is due to the progesterone metabolite, 5α-dihydroprogesterone (5αP) and can be suppressed by the 5α-reductase inhibitor, finasteride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiebe, John P; Rivas, Martin A; Mercogliano, Maria F; Elizalde, Patricia V; Schillaci, Roxana

    2015-05-01

    Progesterone has long been linked to breast cancer but its actual role as a cancer promoter has remained in dispute. Previous in vitro studies have shown that progesterone is converted to 5α-dihydroprogesterone (5αP) in breast tissue and human breast cell lines by the action of 5α-reductase, and that 5αP acts as a cancer-promoter hormone. Also studies with human breast cell lines in which the conversion of progesterone to 5αP is blocked by a 5α-reductase inhibitor, have shown that the in vitro stimulation in cell proliferation with progesterone treatments are not due to progesterone itself but to the metabolite 5αP. No similar in vivo study has been previously reported. The objective of the current studies was to determine in an in vivo mouse model if the presumptive progesterone-induced mammary tumorigenesis is due to the progesterone metabolite, 5αP. BALB/c mice were challenged with C4HD murine mammary cells, which have been shown to form tumors when treated with progesterone or the progestin, medroxyprogesterone acetate. Cells and mice were treated with various doses and combinations of progesterone, 5αP and/or the 5α-reductase inhibitor, finasteride, and the effects on cell proliferation and induction and growth of tumors were monitored. Hormone levels in serum and tumors were measured by specific RIA and ELISA tests. Proliferation of C4HD cells and induction and growth of tumors was stimulated by treatment with either progesterone or 5αP. The progesterone-induced stimulation was blocked by finasteride and reinstated by concomitant treatment with 5αP. The 5αP-induced tumors expressed high levels of ER, PR and ErbB-2. Hormone measurements showed significantly higher levels of 5αP in serum from mice with tumors than from mice without tumors, regardless of treatments, and 5αP levels were significantly higher (about 4-fold) in tumors than in respective sera, while progesterone levels did not differ between the compartments. The results indicate that

  14. “The Voice as the Sound of Many Waters” in the Book of Revelation in Light of Old Testament Semantics: A Threatening Message or One of Beauty?

    OpenAIRE

    Joanna Nowińska

    2017-01-01

    The sentence ἡ φωνὴ αὐτοῦ ὡς φωνὴ ὑδάτων πολλῶν isn’t very commonly found in the Bible, despite the fact that the subject of God’s voice is one of the main motifs not only in the Old Testament. It’s used twice in Ezekiel and three times in the Book of Revelation. Both connect this motive with God to describe His Identity and deeds. The “many waters” do not only mean force, danger and terrible rule in the Bible. They are also a metaphor for abun-dance, which a good condition for progress, beca...

  15. Breast MRI scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    MRI - breast; Magnetic resonance imaging - breast; Breast cancer - MRI; Breast cancer screening - MRI ... radiologist) see some areas more clearly. During the MRI, the person who operates the machine will watch ...

  16. MRI of the Breast

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Breast Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the breast ... limitations of MRI of the Breast? What is MRI of the Breast? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  17. Premenstrual breast changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premenstrual tenderness and swelling of the breasts; Breast tenderness - premenstrual; Breast swelling - premenstrual ... Symptoms of premenstrual breast tenderness may range from mild to ... most severe just before each menstrual period Improve during ...

  18. Breast reconstruction - natural tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... muscle flap; TRAM; Latissimus muscle flap with a breast implant; DIEP flap; DIEAP flap; Gluteal free flap; Transverse upper gracilis flap; TUG; Mastectomy - breast reconstruction with natural tissue; Breast cancer - breast reconstruction ...

  19. Breast Cancer: Treatment Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Breast Cancer > Breast Cancer: Treatment Options Request Permissions Breast Cancer: Treatment Options Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial ... as possible. Learn more about palliative care . Recurrent breast cancer If the cancer does return after treatment for ...

  20. Breast pain (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... breast pain is from hormonal fluctuations from menstruation, pregnancy, puberty, menopause, and breastfeeding. Breast pain can also be associated with fibrocystic breast disease, but it is a very unusual symptom of breast cancer.

  1. Slit2/Robo1 signaling promotes intestinal tumorigenesis through Src-mediated activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian-Qian; Zhou, Da-Lei; Lei, Yan; Zheng, Li; Chen, Sheng-Xia; Gou, Hong-Ju; Gu, Qu-Liang; He, Xiao-Dong; Lan, Tian; Qi, Cui-Ling; Li, Jiang-Chao; Ding, Yan-Qing; Qiao, Liang; Wang, Li-Jing

    2015-02-20

    Slit2 is often overexpressed in cancers. Slit2 is a secreted protein that binds to Roundabout (Robo) receptors to regulate cell growth and migration. Here, we employed several complementary mouse models of intestinal cancers, including the Slit2 transgenic mice, the ApcMin/+ spontaneous intestinal adenoma mouse model, and the DMH/DSS-induced colorectal carcinoma model to clarify function of Slit2/Robo1 signaling in intestinal tumorigenesis. We showed that Slit2 and Robo1 are overexpressed in intestinal tumors and may contribute to tumor generation. The Slit2/Robo1 signaling can induce precancerous lesions of the intestine and tumor progression. Ectopic expression of Slit2 activated Slit2/Robo1 signaling and promoted tumorigenesis and tumor growth. This was mediated in part through activation of the Src signaling, which then down-regulated E-cadherin, thereby activating Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Thus, Slit2/Robo1 signaling is oncogenic in intestinal tumorigenesis.

  2. Focal Adhesion Kinase Is Required for Intestinal Regeneration and Tumorigenesis Downstream of Wnt/c-Myc Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Gabrielle H.; Morton, Jennifer P.; Myant, Kevin; Phesse, Toby J.; Ridgway, Rachel A.; Marsh, Victoria; Wilkins, Julie A.; Athineos, Dimitris; Muncan, Vanesa; Kemp, Richard; Neufeld, Kristi; Clevers, Hans; Brunton, Valerie; Winton, Douglas J.; Wang, Xiaoyan; Sears, Rosalie C.; Clarke, Alan R.; Frame, Margaret C.; Sansom, Owen J.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The intestinal epithelium has a remarkable capacity to regenerate after injury and DNA damage. Here, we show that the integrin effector protein Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) is dispensable for normal intestinal homeostasis and DNA damage signaling, but is essential for intestinal regeneration following DNA damage. Given Wnt/c-Myc signaling is activated following intestinal regeneration, we investigated the functional importance of FAK following deletion of the Apc tumor suppressor protein within the intestinal epithelium. Following Apc loss, FAK expression increased in a c-Myc-dependent manner. Codeletion of Apc and Fak strongly reduced proliferation normally induced following Apc loss, and this was associated with reduced levels of phospho-Akt and suppression of intestinal tumorigenesis in Apc heterozygous mice. Thus, FAK is required downstream of Wnt Signaling, for Akt/mTOR activation, intestinal regeneration, and tumorigenesis. Importantly, this work suggests that FAK inhibitors may suppress tumorigenesis in patients at high risk of developing colorectal cancer. PMID:20708588

  3. How moderate changes in Akt T-loop phosphorylation impact on tumorigenesis and insulin resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Wullschleger

    2011-01-01

    The Akt signalling pathway plays vital roles in controlling cellular responses to insulin as well as in proliferation and survival. Inhibition of Akt signalling leads to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, whereas hyperactivation of Akt promotes tumorigenesis. In this study, we investigate how modest changes in the activity of the Akt signalling pathway, to an extent that might be achieved by drug treatment, would impact on insulin resistance and tumorigenesis. Using insulin-resistant PDK1K465E/K465E PH domain knock-in mice, we found that introducing the PTEN+/− mutation to slightly stimulate Akt restored normal insulin sensitivity. Introducing the PDK1K465E/K465E PH domain knock-in mutation into cancer-prone PTEN+/− mice, lowered Akt activity only by about 50%, but led to a delay in tumour onset of ∼4 months in a broad range of tumours. This was also accompanied by slower growth of B cell follicular lymphomas, as monitored by magnetic resonance imaging. Our findings imply that signal transduction inhibitors that lead to a modest reduction in Akt activity would not only delay onset of tumours possessing elevated phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathway activity but would also reduce the growth rate of developed tumours.

  4. Diverse roles of C-terminal Hsp70-interacting protein (CHIP) in tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chao; Li, Hai-Long; Shi, Mei-Lin; Liu, Qing-Hua; Bai, Jin; Zheng, Jun-Nian

    2014-02-01

    The carboxyl terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein (CHIP) is a member of E3 ubiquitin ligase, functioning as a link between the chaperone (heat shock protein 70/90) and proteasome systems, playing a vital role in maintaining the protein homeostasis in the cytoplasm. CHIP has been demonstrated to be involved in tumorigenesis, proliferation and invasion in several malignancies, regulating a number of oncogenic proteins. However, CHIP has also been implicated in the modulation of tumor suppressor proteins. The pathogenic mechanism of CHIP expression in human malignancy is not yet clear, and a number of studies have suggested that CHIP may have opposing roles in different cancers. Therefore, many studies have focused on the relationship between CHIP and carcinoma. A literature search focusing on regulation network, biological function and clinical significance of CHIP in connection with its role in cancer development was performed on the MEDLINE databases. CHIP may be a potential diagnostic biomarker and therapeutic target for human cancer, and may play different roles in different human cancers. This inconsistence might be induced by the diversity of CHIP downstream targeting proteins. Therefore, the phenotypes determined by CHIP should be dependent on the function of its specific targets in a specific type of cancer cells. Whether CHIP contributes to tumor progression or suppression in various human cancers remains unclear, suggesting the necessity of further extensive investigation of its role in tumorigenesis.

  5. Pokemon proto-oncogene in oral cancer: potential role in the early phase of tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartini, D; Lo Muzio, L; Morganti, S; Pozzi, V; Di Ruscio, G; Rocchetti, R; Rubini, C; Santarelli, A; Emanuelli, M

    2015-05-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) represents about 90% of all oral neoplasms with a poor clinical prognosis. To improve survival of OSCC patients, it is fundamental to understand the basic molecular mechanisms characterizing oral carcinogenesis. Dysregulation of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes seems to play a central role in tumorigenesis, including malignant transformation of the oral cavity. We analyzed the expression levels of the pro-oncogenic transcription factor Pokemon through real-time PCR, Western blot and immunohistochemistry in tumor, and normal oral tissue samples obtained from 22 patients with OSCC. The relationship between tumor characteristics and the level of Pokemon intratumor expression was also analyzed. Pokemon was significantly downregulated in OSCC. In particular, both mRNA and protein levels (tumor vs normal tissue) inversely correlated with histological grading, suggesting its potential role as a prognostic factor for OSCC. Moreover, a significant inverse correlation was found between Pokemon protein expression levels (OSCC vs normal oral mucosa) and tumor size, supporting the hypothesis that Pokemon could play an important role in the early phase of tumor expansion. This work shows that reduced expression of Pokemon is a peculiar feature of OSCC. Additional studies may establish the effective role of Pokemon in oral tumorigenesis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Nisin, an apoptogenic bacteriocin and food preservative, attenuates HNSCC tumorigenesis via CHAC1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Nam E; Ritchie, Kathryn; Kamarajan, Pachiyappan; Miao, Di; Kapila, Yvonne L

    2012-12-01

    Nisin, a bacteriocin and commonly used food preservative, may serve as a novel potential therapeutic for treating head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), as it induces preferential apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, and reduces cell proliferation in HNSCC cells, compared with primary keratinocytes. Nisin also reduces HNSCC tumorigenesis in vivo. Mechanistically, nisin exerts these effects on HNSCC, in part, through CHAC1, a proapoptotic cation transport regulator, and through a concomitant CHAC1-independent influx of extracellular calcium. In addition, although CHAC1 is known as an apoptotic mediator, its effects on cancer cell apoptosis have not been examined. Our studies are the first to report CHAC1's new role in promoting cancer cell apoptosis under nisin treatment. These data support the concept that nisin decreases HNSCC tumorigenesis in vitro and in vivo by inducing increased cell apoptosis and decreased cell proliferation; effects that are mediated by activation of CHAC1, increased calcium influxes, and induction of cell cycle arrest. These findings support the use of nisin as a potentially novel therapeutic for HNSCC, and as nisin is safe for human consumption and currently used in food preservation, its translation into a clinical setting may be facilitated.

  7. Expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and microvessel density in oral tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astekar, Madhusudan; Joshi, Asha; Ramesh, Gayathri; Metgud, Rashmi

    2012-01-01

    Significant increase in vascularity occurs during the transition from normal oral mucosa, through differing degrees of dysplasia, to invasive squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). To evaluate microvessel density (MVD) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in oral tumorigenesis and correlate it with the clinicopathological characteristics. VEGF expression and MVD were quantified immunohistochemically using anti-VEGF and anti-CD34 antibody. For this study we used a total of 60 archival specimens, including 10 normal oral mucosa (NOM), 7 mild epithelial dysplasia (Mild ED), 8 moderate epithelial dysplasia (Mod ED), 5 severe epithelial dysplasia (SED), 14 well-differentiated SCC, 11 moderately-differentiated SCC, and 5 poorly-differentiated SCC. VEGF expression was assessed in relation to the localization, intensity, and area of the immunohistochemically stained cells. MVD was evaluated using the Image-Pro(®) Plus software. One-way ANOVA (F test) was carried out for comparing the parameters for multiple groups such as different histopathological grades of dysplasia and carcinoma. Comparison between groups was carried out using the Student's 't' test. Correlations between VEGF score and MVD were estimated using the Karl Pearson coefficient of correlation. VEGF and MVD appeared to increase with disease progression and were statistically higher in oral SCC than in epithelial dysplasia and normal buccal mucosa. There was significant correlation between VEGF expression and MVD. These findings indicate that VEGF expression is upregulated during head and neck tumorigenesis.

  8. Wip1 and p53 contribute to HTLV-1 Tax-induced tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zane, Linda; Yasunaga, Junichiro; Mitagami, Yu; Yedavalli, Venkat; Tang, Sai-Wen; Chen, Chia-Yen; Ratner, Lee; Lu, Xiongbin; Jeang, Kuan-Teh

    2012-12-21

    Human T-cell Leukemia Virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infects 20 million individuals world-wide and causes Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma (ATLL), a highly aggressive T-cell cancer. ATLL is refractory to treatment with conventional chemotherapy and fewer than 10% of afflicted individuals survive more than 5 years after diagnosis. HTLV-1 encodes a viral oncoprotein, Tax, that functions in transforming virus-infected T-cells into leukemic cells. All ATLL cases are believed to have reduced p53 activity although only a minority of ATLLs have genetic mutations in their p53 gene. It has been suggested that p53 function is inactivated by the Tax protein. Using genetically altered mice, we report here that Tax expression does not achieve a functional equivalence of p53 inactivation as that seen with genetic mutation of p53 (i.e. a p53 -/- genotype). Thus, we find statistically significant differences in tumorigenesis between Tax+p53 +/+ versus Tax+p53 -/- mice. We also find a role contributed by the cellular Wip1 phosphatase protein in tumor formation in Tax transgenic mice. Notably, Tax+Wip1 -/- mice show statistically significant reduced prevalence of tumorigenesis compared to Tax+Wip1 +/+ counterparts. Our findings provide new insights into contributions by p53 and Wip1 in the in vivo oncogenesis of Tax-induced tumors in mice.

  9. Wip1 and p53 contribute to HTLV-1 Tax-induced tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zane Linda

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human T-cell Leukemia Virus type 1 (HTLV-1 infects 20 million individuals world-wide and causes Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma (ATLL, a highly aggressive T-cell cancer. ATLL is refractory to treatment with conventional chemotherapy and fewer than 10% of afflicted individuals survive more than 5 years after diagnosis. HTLV-1 encodes a viral oncoprotein, Tax, that functions in transforming virus-infected T-cells into leukemic cells. All ATLL cases are believed to have reduced p53 activity although only a minority of ATLLs have genetic mutations in their p53 gene. It has been suggested that p53 function is inactivated by the Tax protein. Results Using genetically altered mice, we report here that Tax expression does not achieve a functional equivalence of p53 inactivation as that seen with genetic mutation of p53 (i.e. a p53−/− genotype. Thus, we find statistically significant differences in tumorigenesis between Tax+p53+/+versus Tax+p53−/− mice. We also find a role contributed by the cellular Wip1 phosphatase protein in tumor formation in Tax transgenic mice. Notably, Tax+Wip1−/− mice show statistically significant reduced prevalence of tumorigenesis compared to Tax+Wip1+/+ counterparts. Conclusions Our findings provide new insights into contributions by p53 and Wip1 in the in vivo oncogenesis of Tax-induced tumors in mice.

  10. Twist1 suppresses senescence programs and thereby accelerates and maintains mutant Kras-induced lung tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phuoc T Tran

    Full Text Available KRAS mutant lung cancers are generally refractory to chemotherapy as well targeted agents. To date, the identification of drugs to therapeutically inhibit K-RAS have been unsuccessful, suggesting that other approaches are required. We demonstrate in both a novel transgenic mutant Kras lung cancer mouse model and in human lung tumors that the inhibition of Twist1 restores a senescence program inducing the loss of a neoplastic phenotype. The Twist1 gene encodes for a transcription factor that is essential during embryogenesis. Twist1 has been suggested to play an important role during tumor progression. However, there is no in vivo evidence that Twist1 plays a role in autochthonous tumorigenesis. Through two novel transgenic mouse models, we show that Twist1 cooperates with Kras(G12D to markedly accelerate lung tumorigenesis by abrogating cellular senescence programs and promoting the progression from benign adenomas to adenocarcinomas. Moreover, the suppression of Twist1 to physiological levels is sufficient to cause Kras mutant lung tumors to undergo senescence and lose their neoplastic features. Finally, we analyzed more than 500 human tumors to demonstrate that TWIST1 is frequently overexpressed in primary human lung tumors. The suppression of TWIST1 in human lung cancer cells also induced cellular senescence. Hence, TWIST1 is a critical regulator of cellular senescence programs, and the suppression of TWIST1 in human tumors may be an effective example of pro-senescence therapy.

  11. PAF-mediated MAPK signaling hyperactivation via LAMTOR3 induces pancreatic tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Sohee; Lee, Sunhye; Kim, Han-Cheon; Ng, Christopher; Schneider, Andrea M; Ji, Hong; Ying, Haoqiang; Wang, Huamin; DePinho, Ronald A; Park, Jae-Il

    2013-10-31

    Deregulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling leads to development of pancreatic cancer. Although Ras-mutation-driven pancreatic tumorigenesis is well understood, the underlying mechanism of Ras-independent MAPK hyperactivation remains elusive. Here, we have identified a distinct function of PCNA-associated factor (PAF) in modulating MAPK signaling. PAF is overexpressed in pancreatic cancer and required for pancreatic cancer cell proliferation. In mouse models, PAF expression induced pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia with expression of pancreatic cancer stem cell markers. PAF-induced ductal epithelial cell hyperproliferation was accompanied by extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation independently of Ras or Raf mutations. Intriguingly, PAF transcriptionally activated the expression of late endosomal/lysosomal adaptor, MAPK and mTOR activator 3 (LAMTOR3), which hyperphosphorylates MEK and ERK and is necessary for pancreatic cancer cell proliferation. Our results reveal an unsuspected mechanism of mitogenic signaling activation via LAMTOR3 and suggest that PAF-induced MAPK hyperactivation contributes to pancreatic tumorigenesis.

  12. PAF-Mediated MAPK Signaling Hyperactivation via LAMTOR3 Induces Pancreatic Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohee Jun

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Deregulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling leads to development of pancreatic cancer. Although Ras-mutation-driven pancreatic tumorigenesis is well understood, the underlying mechanism of Ras-independent MAPK hyperactivation remains elusive. Here, we have identified a distinct function of PCNA-associated factor (PAF in modulating MAPK signaling. PAF is overexpressed in pancreatic cancer and required for pancreatic cancer cell proliferation. In mouse models, PAF expression induced pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia with expression of pancreatic cancer stem cell markers. PAF-induced ductal epithelial cell hyperproliferation was accompanied by extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK phosphorylation independently of Ras or Raf mutations. Intriguingly, PAF transcriptionally activated the expression of late endosomal/lysosomal adaptor, MAPK and mTOR activator 3 (LAMTOR3, which hyperphosphorylates MEK and ERK and is necessary for pancreatic cancer cell proliferation. Our results reveal an unsuspected mechanism of mitogenic signaling activation via LAMTOR3 and suggest that PAF-induced MAPK hyperactivation contributes to pancreatic tumorigenesis.

  13. Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) function is essential for cell cycle progression, senescence and tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kümper, Sandra; Mardakheh, Faraz K; McCarthy, Afshan; Yeo, Maggie; Stamp, Gordon W; Paul, Angela; Worboys, Jonathan; Sadok, Amine; Jørgensen, Claus; Guichard, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    Rho-associated kinases 1 and 2 (ROCK1/2) are Rho-GTPase effectors that control key aspects of the actin cytoskeleton, but their role in proliferation and cancer initiation or progression is not known. Here, we provide evidence that ROCK1 and ROCK2 act redundantly to maintain actomyosin contractility and cell proliferation and that their loss leads to cell-cycle arrest and cellular senescence. This phenotype arises from down-regulation of the essential cell-cycle proteins CyclinA, CKS1 and CDK1. Accordingly, while the loss of either Rock1 or Rock2 had no negative impact on tumorigenesis in mouse models of non-small cell lung cancer and melanoma, loss of both blocked tumor formation, as no tumors arise in which both Rock1 and Rock2 have been genetically deleted. Our results reveal an indispensable role for ROCK, yet redundant role for isoforms 1 and 2, in cell cycle progression and tumorigenesis, possibly through the maintenance of cellular contractility. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12203.001 PMID:26765561

  14. miR-92a family and their target genes in tumorigenesis and metastasis

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    Li, Molin, E-mail: molin_li@hotmail.com [Department of Pathophysiology, Basic Medical Science of Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116044 (China); Institute of Cancer Stem Cell, Dalian Medical University Cancer Center, Dalian 116044 (China); Guan, Xingfang; Sun, Yuqiang [Department of Pathophysiology, Basic Medical Science of Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116044 (China); Mi, Jun [Institute of Cancer Stem Cell, Dalian Medical University Cancer Center, Dalian 116044 (China); Shu, Xiaohong [College of Pharmacy, Dalian Medical University Cancer Center, Dalian 116044 (China); Liu, Fang [Department of Surgery, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116027 (China); Li, Chuangang, E-mail: li_chuangang@sina.com [Department of Surgery, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116027 (China)

    2014-04-15

    The miR-92a family, including miR-25, miR-92a-1, miR-92a-2 and miR-363, arises from three different paralog clusters miR-17-92, miR-106a-363, and miR-106b-25 that are highly conservative in the process of evolution, and it was thought as a group of microRNAs (miRNAs) correlated with endothelial cells. Aberrant expression of miR-92a family was detected in multiple cancers, and the disturbance of miR-92a family was related with tumorigenesis and tumor development. In this review, the progress on the relationship between miR-92a family and their target genes and malignant tumors will be summarized. - Highlights: • Aberrant expression of miR-92a, miR-25 and miR-363 can be observed in many kinds of malignant tumors. • The expression of miR-92a family is regulated by LOH, epigenetic alteration, transcriptional factors such as SP1, MYC, E2F, wild-type p53 etc. • Roles of miR-92a family in tumorigenesis and development: promoting cell proliferation, invasion and metastasis, inhibiting cell apoptosis.

  15. Loss of p53 Ser18 and Atm results in embryonic lethality without cooperation in tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather L Armata

    Full Text Available Phosphorylation at murine Serine 18 (human Serine 15 is a critical regulatory process for the tumor suppressor function of p53. p53Ser18 residue is a substrate for ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM and ATM-related (ATR protein kinases. Studies of mice with a germ-line mutation that replaces Ser18 with Ala (p53(S18A mice have demonstrated that loss of phosphorylation of p53Ser18 leads to the development of tumors, including lymphomas, fibrosarcomas, leukemia and leiomyosarcomas. The predominant lymphoma is B-cell lymphoma, which is in contrast to the lymphomas observed in Atm(-/- animals. This observation and the fact that multiple kinases phosphorylate p53Ser18 suggest Atm-independent tumor suppressive functions of p53Ser18. Therefore, in order to examine p53Ser18 function in relationship to ATM, we analyzed the lifespan and tumorigenesis of mice with combined mutations in p53Ser18 and Atm. Surprisingly, we observed no cooperation in survival and tumorigenesis in compound p53(S18A and Atm(-/- animals. However, we observed embryonic lethality in the compound mutant animals. In addition, the homozygous p53Ser18 mutant allele impacted the weight of Atm(-/- animals. These studies examine the genetic interaction of p53Ser18 and Atm in vivo. Furthermore, these studies demonstrate a role of p53Ser18 in regulating embryonic survival and motor coordination.

  16. Mechanisms by Which Interleukin-6 Attenuates Cell Invasion and Tumorigenesis in Human Bladder Carcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke-Hung Tsui

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin-6, a multifunctional cytokine, contributes to tumor cell proliferation and differentiation. However, the biological mechanisms that are affected by the expression of interleukin-6 in bladder cancer cells remain unclear. We evaluated the effects of interleukin-6 expression in human bladder carcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo. The results of interleukin-6-knockdown experiments in T24 cells and interleukin-6-overexpression experiments in HT1376 cells revealed that interleukin-6 reduced cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in vitro. Xenograft animal studies indicated that the overexpression of interleukin-6 downregulated tumorigenesis of bladder cells and that interleukin-6 knockdown reversed this effect. The results of RT-PCR, immunoblotting, and reporter assays indicated that the overexpression of interleukin-6 upregulated the expression of the mammary serine protease inhibitor (MASPIN, N-myc downstream gene 1 (NDRG1, and KAI1 proteins in HT1376 cells and that interleukin-6 knockdown reduced the expression of these proteins in T24 cells. In addition, results of immunoblotting assays revealed that interleukin-6 modulated epithelial-mesenchymal transitions by upregulating the expression of the E-cadherin, while downregulation N-cadherin and vimentin proteins. Our results suggest that the effects of interleukin-6 on the regulation of epithelial-mesenchymal transitions and the expressions of the MASPIN, NDRG1, and KAI1 genes attribute to the modulation of tumorigenesis in human bladder carcinoma cells.

  17. Mouse genetics suggests cell-context dependency for Myc-regulated metabolic enzymes during tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Lisa M; Forshell, Tacha Zi Plym; Rimpi, Sara; Kreutzer, Christiane; Pretsch, Walter; Bornkamm, Georg W; Nilsson, Jonas A

    2012-01-01

    c-Myc (hereafter called Myc) belongs to a family of transcription factors that regulates cell growth, cell proliferation, and differentiation. Myc initiates the transcription of a large cast of genes involved in cell growth by stimulating metabolism and protein synthesis. Some of these, like those involved in glycolysis, may be part of the Warburg effect, which is defined as increased glucose uptake and lactate production in the presence of adequate oxygen supply. In this study, we have taken a mouse-genetics approach to challenge the role of select Myc-regulated metabolic enzymes in tumorigenesis in vivo. By breeding λ-Myc transgenic mice, Apc(Min) mice, and p53 knockout mice with mouse models carrying inactivating alleles of Lactate dehydrogenase A (Ldha), 3-Phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (Phgdh) and Serine hydroxymethyltransferase 1 (Shmt1), we obtained offspring that were monitored for tumor development. Very surprisingly, we found that these genes are dispensable for tumorigenesis in these genetic settings. However, experiments in fibroblasts and colon carcinoma cells expressing oncogenic Ras show that these cells are sensitive to Ldha knockdown. Our genetic models reveal cell context dependency and a remarkable ability of tumor cells to adapt to alterations in critical metabolic pathways. Thus, to achieve clinical success, it will be of importance to correctly stratify patients and to find synthetic lethal combinations of inhibitors targeting metabolic enzymes.

  18. m6A RNA Methylation Regulates the Self-Renewal and Tumorigenesis of Glioblastoma Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Cui

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available RNA modifications play critical roles in important biological processes. However, the functions of N6-methyladenosine (m6A mRNA modification in cancer biology and cancer stem cells remain largely unknown. Here, we show that m6A mRNA modification is critical for glioblastoma stem cell (GSC self-renewal and tumorigenesis. Knockdown of METTL3 or METTL14, key components of the RNA methyltransferase complex, dramatically promotes human GSC growth, self-renewal, and tumorigenesis. In contrast, overexpression of METTL3 or inhibition of the RNA demethylase FTO suppresses GSC growth and self-renewal. Moreover, inhibition of FTO suppresses tumor progression and prolongs lifespan of GSC-grafted mice substantially. m6A sequencing reveals that knockdown of METTL3 or METTL14 induced changes in mRNA m6A enrichment and altered mRNA expression of genes (e.g., ADAM19 with critical biological functions in GSCs. In summary, this study identifies the m6A mRNA methylation machinery as promising therapeutic targets for glioblastoma.

  19. m6A RNA Methylation Regulates the Self-Renewal and Tumorigenesis of Glioblastoma Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Qi; Shi, Hailing; Ye, Peng; Li, Li; Qu, Qiuhao; Sun, Guoqiang; Sun, Guihua; Lu, Zhike; Huang, Yue; Yang, Cai-Guang; Riggs, Arthur D; He, Chuan; Shi, Yanhong

    2017-03-14

    RNA modifications play critical roles in important biological processes. However, the functions of N6-methyladenosine (m6A) mRNA modification in cancer biology and cancer stem cells remain largely unknown. Here, we show that m6A mRNA modification is critical for glioblastoma stem cell (GSC) self-renewal and tumorigenesis. Knockdown of METTL3 or METTL14, key components of the RNA methyltransferase complex, dramatically promotes human GSC growth, self-renewal, and tumorigenesis. In contrast, overexpression of METTL3 or inhibition of the RNA demethylase FTO suppresses GSC growth and self-renewal. Moreover, inhibition of FTO suppresses tumor progression and prolongs lifespan of GSC-grafted mice substantially. m6A sequencing reveals that knockdown of METTL3 or METTL14 induced changes in mRNA m6A enrichment and altered mRNA expression of genes (e.g., ADAM19) with critical biological functions in GSCs. In summary, this study identifies the m6A mRNA methylation machinery as promising therapeutic targets for glioblastoma. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Epidemiology of Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    南, 優子; ミナミ, ユウコ; MINAMI, Yuko

    2007-01-01

    During recent decades, breast cancer incidence has been increasing in Japan. Epidemiological studies have clarified the trend in breast cancer incidence and identified risk factors for breast cancer. Established risk factors for breast cancer include early age at menarche, late age at first birth, low parity, postmenopausal obesity, family history of breast cancer, and history of benign breast disease. Breast-feeding and physical activity may also be associated with breast cancer risk. Detail...

  1. Ectopic breasts: familial functional axillary breasts and breast cancer arising in an axillary breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osswald, Sandra S; Osswald, Michael B; Elston, Dirk M

    2011-06-01

    Supernumerary breasts and nipples are not uncommon and have familial and syndrome associations. Although usually of only cosmetic concern, hormonal changes and inflammatory or neoplastic conditions that affect primary breast tissue also may occur in areas of ectopic breast tissue. We describe cases of familial functional axillary breasts and primary carcinoma of the breast arising in ectopic axillary breast tissue.

  2. Breast Rash

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rashes/rash-in-adults. Accessed Dec. 29, 2016. Papadakis MA, et al., eds. Breast disorders. In: Current ... http://www.accessmedicine.com. Accessed Dec. 28, 2016. Papadakis MA, et al., eds. Dermatologic disorders. In: Current ...

  3. Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a reduced risk of breast cancer. The Mediterranean diet focuses mostly on plant-based foods, such as fruits and vegetables, whole grains, legumes, and nuts. People who follow the Mediterranean diet choose healthy fats, such as olive oil, over ...

  4. Breast reduction

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    ... difficulty finding clothes that fit, and low self-confidence. Chronic rashes under your breasts. Unwelcome attention that is making you feel awkward. Inability to participate in sports. Some women may benefit from non-surgical treatments, such as: ...

  5. Dense Breasts

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    ... also appear white on mammography, they can be hidden by or within dense breast tissue. Other imaging ... understanding of the possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed ...

  6. Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease. It’s estimated that about 10% of breast cancer cases are hereditary (run in the family). In many of these cases, you inherited a gene from your parents that has mutated (changed from ...

  7. Stat3 mediates expression of autotaxin in breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janeen Azare

    Full Text Available We determined that signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3 is tyrosine phosphorylated in 37% of primary breast tumors and 63% of paired metastatic axillary lymph nodes. Examination of the distribution of tyrosine phosphorylated (pStat3 in primary tumors revealed heterogenous expression within the tumor with the highest levels found in cells on the edge of tumors with relatively lower levels in the central portion of tumors. In order to determine Stat3 target genes that may be involved in migration and metastasis, we identified those genes that were differentially expressed in primary breast cancer samples as a function of pStat3 levels. In addition to known Stat3 transcriptional targets (Twist, Snail, Tenascin-C and IL-8, we identified ENPP2 as a novel Stat3 regulated gene, which encodes autotaxin (ATX, a secreted lysophospholipase which mediates mammary tumorigenesis and cancer cell migration. A positive correlation between nuclear pStat3 and ATX was determined by immunohistochemical analysis of primary breast cancer samples and matched axillary lymph nodes and in several breast cancer derived cell lines. Inhibition of pStat3 or reducing Stat3 expression led to a decrease in ATX levels and cell migration. An association between Stat3 and the ATX promoter, which contains a number of putative Stat3 binding sites, was determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation. These observations suggest that activated Stat3 may regulate the migration of breast cancer cells through the regulation of ATX.

  8. FoxD3 deficiency promotes breast cancer progression by induction of epithelial–mesenchymal transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Tian-Li [Department of General Surgery, The People’s Hospital of Wuqing, Tianjin (China); Zhao, Hong-Meng [Key Laboratory of Breast Cancer Prevention and Treatment of the Ministry of Education, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin (China); Breast Surgery, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin (China); Li, Yue [Department of Respiration, Affiliated Hospital of Medical College of Chinese People’s Armed Police Force, Tianjin (China); Chen, Ao-Xiang; Sun, Xuan [Key Laboratory of Breast Cancer Prevention and Treatment of the Ministry of Education, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin (China); Breast Surgery, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin (China); Ge, Jie, E-mail: gejie198003@163.com [Key Laboratory of Breast Cancer Prevention and Treatment of the Ministry of Education, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin (China); Breast Surgery, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin (China)

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • FOXD3 is down-regulated in breast cancer tissues. • FOXD3 inhibits breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion. • FoxD3 deficiency induces epithelial–mesenchymal transition. - Abstract: The transcription factor forkhead box D3 (FOXD3) plays an important role in the development of neural crest and gastric cancer cells. However, the function and mechanisms of FOXD3 in the breast tumorigenesis and progression is still limited. Here, we report that FOXD3 is a tumor suppressor of breast cancer tumorigenicity and aggressiveness. We found that FOXD3 is down-regulated in breast cancer tissues. Patients with low FOXD3 expression have a poor outcome. Depletion of FOXD3 expression promotes breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion in vitro, whereas overexpression of FOXD3 inhibits breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, depletion of FOXD3 is linked to epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT)-like phenotype. Our results indicate FOXD3 exhibits tumor suppressive activity and may be useful for breast therapy.

  9. VLDL and LDL, but not HDL, promote breast cancer cell proliferation, metastasis and angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chun-Wun; Lo, Yi-Hsuan; Chen, Chu-Huang; Lin, Ching-Yi; Tsai, Chun-Hao; Chen, Po-Jung; Yang, Yi-Fang; Wang, Chie-Hong; Tan, Chun-Hsiang; Hou, Ming-Feng; Yuan, Shyng-Shiou F

    2017-03-01

    Abnormal lipoprotein profiles are associated with breast cancer progression. However, the mechanisms linking abnormal lipoprotein levels to breast cancer progression, especially metastasis, remain unclear. Herein, we found that L1 and L5 subfractions of LDL and VLDL, but not HDL, enhanced breast cancer cell viability. L1, L5, and VLDL also increased the in vitro tumorigenesis of breast cancer cells in anchorage-independent soft agar assay. In addition, L1, L5, and VLDL, but not HDL, increased the levels of mesenchymal markers Slug, Vimentin, and β-Catenin, and promoted breast cancer cell migration and invasion. L1, L5, and VLDL increased Akt Ser473 phosphorylation and promoted cell migration, which were reversed by the PI3K/Akt inhibitor wortmannin. Further in vitro angiogenesis assay and cytokine array analysis demonstrated that L1, L5, and VLDL enhanced secretion of angiogenic factors in breast cancer cells and promoted angiogenic activity. However, only VLDL reduced anchorage-dependent cell death and promoted lung metastasis in nude mice. In summary, our data suggest that L1, L5, and especially VLDL promote breast cancer progression and metastasis through Akt-induced EMT and angiogenesis, and provide a novel mechanism of how dyslipoproteinemia promotes breast cancer progression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. MicroRNA-138 modulates metastasis and EMT in breast cancer cells by targeting vimentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Liu, Dan; Feng, Zhuo; Mao, Jun; Zhang, Chunying; Lu, Ying; Li, Jiazhi; Zhang, Qingqing; Li, Qing; Li, Lianhong

    2016-02-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that dysregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) plays critical roles in malignant transformation and tumor progression. In this study, in order to investigate the association of miR-138 with breast cancer we investigated the role of miR-138 in breast cancer metastasis. Levels of miR-138 were determined by qRT-PCR in 45 breast cancer samples. Cell migration and invasion assays were performed in a stably expressing miRNA-138 breast cancer cell line established using a lentivirus expression system. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) was evaluated using qRT-PCR and Western Blots to detect epithelial marker E-cadherin and mesenchymal marker, vimentin. Luciferase reporter assays were used to identify downstream targets and biological function of miR-138. Breast cancer tissues had significantly lower expression of miR-138 compared to non-tumor tissues. Low miR-138 levels were associated with lymph node metastasis and invasion. miR-138 overexpression inhibited metastasis of breast cancer cells. miR-138 overexpression also down-regulated vimentin expression and upregulated E-cadherin expression, suggesting that miR-138 inhibited EMT. Our results support the involvement of miR-138 in breast tumorigenesis, especially lymph node metastasis. We propose that miR-138 might be used as therapeutic agent for breast cancer. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  11. Does Skeletal Muscle Mass Influence Breast Cancer? Evaluating Mammary Tumorigenesis and Progression in Genetically Hyper-Muscular Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-01

    muscle growth inhibitor myostatin and mice expressing a dominant negative form of the myostatin receptor (MLC-dnActRIIB mice). Mammary cancer was...hypermuscular mice and the results are pending. In the interim we used genetic and pharmacological inhibition of the myostatin pathway to potentially...metabolic syndrome induced by the tumor. However, despite increasing normal muscle growth, myostatin inhibition failed to protect mice from cancer

  12. The landscape of chromosomal aberrations in breast cancer mouse models reveals driver-specific routes to tumorigenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ben-David, Uri; Ha, Gavin; Khadka, Prasidda; Jin, Xin; Wong, Bang; Franke, Lude; Golub, Todd R.

    Aneuploidy and copy-number alterations (CNAs) are a hallmark of human cancer. Although genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) are commonly used to model human cancer, their chromosomal landscapes remain underexplored. Here we use gene expression profiles to infer CNAs in 3,108 samples from 45

  13. Unraveling the Molecular Mechanism(s) Underlying Er+/PR-Breast Tumorigenesis Using a Novel Genetically Engineered Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    Richard Schlegel and Frank Suprynowicz for generously sharing pHrodo-EGF. We are grateful to Drs. Sandra Haslam, Hans Cheng, Jerry Dodgson, Karen...Rosenfeld, J. L., Moore, R. H., Zimmer , K. P., Alpizar-Foster, E., Dai, W., Zarka, M. N., and Knoll, B. J. (2001) J. Cell Sci. 114, 4499–4508 19. Chen...Acknowledgments We are grateful to Stephen Prescott for generously sharing ACSL4 antibody. We thank Drs. Hans Cheng, Jerry Dodgson, Karen Friderici and Richard

  14. HMGA1: a master regulator of tumor progression in triple-negative breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep N Shah

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence suggests that tumor cells metastasize by co-opting stem cell transcriptional networks, although the molecular underpinnings of this process are poorly understood. Here, we show for the first time that the high mobility group A1 (HMGA1 gene drives metastatic progression in triple negative breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231, Hs578T by reprogramming cancer cells to a stem-like state. Silencing HMGA1 expression in invasive, aggressive breast cancer cells dramatically halts cell growth and results in striking morphologic changes from mesenchymal-like, spindle-shaped cells to cuboidal, epithelial-like cells. Mesenchymal genes (Vimentin, Snail are repressed, while E-cadherin is induced in the knock-down cells. Silencing HMGA1 also blocks oncogenic properties, including proliferation, migration, invasion, and orthotopic tumorigenesis. Metastatic progression following mammary implantation is almost completely abrogated in the HMGA1 knock-down cells. Moreover, silencing HMGA1 inhibits the stem cell property of three-dimensional mammosphere formation, including primary, secondary, and tertiary spheres. In addition, knock-down of HMGA1 depletes cancer initiator/cancer stem cells and prevents tumorigenesis at limiting dilutions. We also discovered an HMGA1 signature in triple negative breast cancer cells that is highly enriched in embryonic stem cells. Together, these findings indicate that HMGA1 is a master regulator of tumor progression in breast cancer by reprogramming cancer cells through stem cell transcriptional networks. Future studies are needed to determine how to target HMGA1 in therapy.

  15. Altered expression of insulin receptor isoforms in breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaqi Huang

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Insulin-like growth factor (IGF signaling through human insulin receptor isoform A (IR-A contributes to tumorigenesis and intrinsic resistance to anti-IGF1R therapy. In the present study, we (a developed quantitative TaqMan real time-PCR-based assays (qRT-PCR to measure human insulin receptor isoforms with high specificity, (b evaluated isoform expression levels in molecularly-defined breast cancer subtypes, and (c identified the IR-A:IR-B mRNA ratio as a potential biomarker guiding patient stratification for anti-IGF therapies. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: mRNA expression levels of IR-A and IR-B were measured in 42 primary breast cancers and 19 matched adjacent normal tissues with TaqMan qRT-PCR assays. The results were further confirmed in 165 breast cancers. The tumor samples were profiled using whole genome microarrays and subsequently subtyped using the PAM50 breast cancer gene signature. The relationship between the IR-A:IR-B ratio and cancer subtype, as well as markers of proliferation were characterized. RESULTS: The mRNA expression levels of IR-A in the breast tumors were similar to those observed in the adjacent normal tissues, while the mRNA levels of IR-B were significantly decreased in tumors. The IR-A:IR-B ratio was significantly higher in luminal B breast cancer than in luminal A. Strong concordance between the IR-A:IR-B ratio and the composite Oncotype DX proliferation score was observed for stratifying the latter two breast cancer subtypes. CONCLUSIONS: The reduction in IR-B expression is the key to the altered IR-A:IR-B ratio observed in breast cancer. The IR-A:IR-B ratio may have biomarker utility in guiding a patient stratification strategy for an anti-IGF therapeutic.

  16. Hormonally up-regulated neu-associated kinase: A novel target for breast cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambrano, Joelle N; Neely, Benjamin A; Yeh, Elizabeth S

    2017-05-01

    Hormonally up-regulated neu-associated Kinase (Hunk) is a protein kinase that was originally identified in the murine mammary gland and has been shown to be highly expressed in Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 positive (HER2 + /ErbB2 + ) breast cancer cell lines as well as MMTV-neu derived mammary tumor cell lines. However, the physiological role of Hunk has been largely elusive since its identification. Though Hunk is predicted to be a Serine/Threonine (Ser/Thr) protein kinase with homology to the SNF1/AMPK family of protein kinases, there are no known Hunk substrates that have been identified to date. Recent work demonstrates a role for Hunk in HER2 + /ErbB2 + breast cancer progression, including drug resistance to HER2/ErbB2 inhibitors, with Hunk potentially acting downstream of HER2/ErbB2 and the PI3K/Akt pathway. These studies have collectively shown that Hunk plays a vital role in promoting mammary tumorigenesis, as Hunk knockdown via shRNA in xenograft tumor models or crossing MMTV-neu or Pten-deficient genetically engineered mouse models into a Hunk knockout (Hunk-/-) background impairs mammary tumor growth in vivo. Because the majority of HER2 + /ErbB2 + breast cancer patients acquire drug resistance to HER2/ErbB2 inhibitors, the characterization of novel drug targets like Hunk that have the potential to simultaneously suppress tumorigenesis and potentially enhance efficacy of current therapeutics is an important facet of drug development. Therefore, work aimed at uncovering specific regulatory functions for Hunk that could contribute to this protein kinase's role in both tumorigenesis and drug resistance will be informative. This review focuses on what is currently known about this under-studied protein kinase, and how targeting Hunk may prove to be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of breast cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Camptosorus sibiricus Rupr Aqueous Extract Prevents Lung Tumorigenesis via Dual Effects against ROS and DNA Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shugui; Ou, Rilan; Wang, Wensheng; Ji, Liyan; Gao, Hui; Zhu, Yuanfeng; Liu, Xiaomin; Zheng, Hongming; Liu, Zhongqiu; Wu, Peng; Lu, Linlin

    2017-12-16

    Camptosorus sibiricus Rupr (CSR) is a widely used herbal medicine with antivasculitis, antitrauma, and antitumor effects. However, the effect of CSR aqueous extract on B[a]P-initiated tumorigenesis and the underlying mechanism remain unclear. Moreover, the compounds in CSR aqueous extract need to be identified and structurally characterized. We aim to investigate the chemopreventive effect of CSR and the underlying molecular mechanism. A B[a]P-stimulated normal cell model (BEAS.2B) and lung adenocarcinoma animal model were established on A/J mice. In B[a]P-treated BEAS.2B cells, the protective effects of CSR aqueous extract on B[a]P-induced DNA damage and ROS production were evaluated through flow cytometry, Western blot, real-time quantitative PCR, single-cell gel electrophoresis, and immunofluorescence. Moreover, a model of B[a]P-initiated lung adenocarcinoma was established on A/J mice to determine the chemopreventive effect of CSR in vivo. The underlying mechanism was analyzed via immunohistochemistry and microscopy. Furthermore, the new compounds in CSR aqueous extract were isolated and structurally characterized using IR, HR-ESI-MS, and 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy. CSR effectively suppressed ROS production by re-activating Nrf2-mediated reductases HO-1 and NQO-1. Simultaneously, CSR attenuated the DNA damage of BEAS.2B cells in the presence of B[a]P. Moreover, CSR at 1.5 and 3g/kg significantly suppressed tumorigenesis with tumor inhibition ratios of 36.65% and 65.80%, respectively. The tumor volume, tumor size, and multiplicity of B[a]P-induced lung adenocarcinoma were effectively decreased by CSR in vivo. After extracting and identifying the compounds in CSR aqueous extract, three new triterpene saponins were isolated and characterized structurally. CSR aqueous extract prevents lung tumorigenesis by exerting dual effects against ROS and DNA damage, suggesting that CSR is a novel and effective agent for B[a]P-induced carcinogenesis. Moreover, by isolating and

  18. CYCLOPENTA-FUSED POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN STRAIN A/J MOUSE LUNG: DNA ADDUCTS, ONCOGENE MUTATIONS, & TUMORIGENESIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyclopenta-fused Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Strain AJJ Mouse Lung: DNA Adducts, Oncogene Mutations, and Tumorigenesis. We have examined the relationships between DNA adducts, Ki-ras oncogene mutations, DNA adducts, and adenoma induction in the lungs of strain A/J...

  19. Spontaneous Intestinal Tumorigenesis in Apc/Min+ Mice Requires Altered T Cell Development with IL-17A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wook-Jin Chae

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The control of inflammatory diseases requires functional regulatory T cells (Tregs with significant Gata-3 expression. Here we address the inhibitory role of Tregs on intestinal tumorigenesis in the Apc/Min+ mouse model that resembles human familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP. Apc/Min+ mice had a markedly increased frequency of Foxp3+ Tregs and yet decreased Gata-3 expression in the lamina propria. To address the role of heterozygous Apc gene mutation in Tregs, we generated Foxp3-Cre, Apcflox/+ mice. Tregs from these mice effectively inhibited tumorigenesis comparable to wild type Tregs after adoptive transfer into Apc/Min+ mice, demonstrating that the heterozygous Apc gene mutation in Tregs does not induce the loss of control over tumor microenvironment. Adoptive transfer of in vitro generated Apc/Min+ iTregs (inducible Tregs failed to inhibit intestinal tumorigenesis, suggesting that naïve CD4 T cells generated from Apc/Min+ mice thymus were impaired. We also showed that adoptively transferred IL-17A-deficient Apc/Min+ Tregs inhibited tumor growth, suggesting that IL-17A was critical to impair the tumor regression function of Apc/Min+ Tregs. Taken together, our results suggest that both T cell development in a functional thymus and IL-17A control the ability of Treg to inhibit intestinal tumorigenesis in Apc/Min+ mice.

  20. Selective roles of E2Fs for ErbB2- and Myc-mediated mammary tumorigenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, L; de Bruin, A; Wang, H; Simmons, T; Cleghorn, W; Goldenberg, L E; Sites, E; Sandy, A; Trimboli, A; Fernandez, S A; Eng, C; Shapiro, C; Leone, G

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that cyclin D1, an upstream regulator of the Rb/E2F pathway, is an essential component of the ErbB2/Ras (but not the Wnt/Myc) oncogenic pathway in the mammary epithelium. However, the role of specific E2fs for ErbB2/Ras-mediated mammary tumorigenesis remains

  1. Breast cancer in the 21st century: from early detection to new therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino Bonilla, J A; Torres Tabanera, M; Ros Mendoza, L H

    The analysis of the causes that have given rise to a change in tendency in the incidence and mortality rates of breast cancer in the last few decades generates important revelations regarding the role of breast screening, the regular application of adjuvant therapies and the change of risk factors. The benefits of early detection have been accompanied by certain adverse effects, even in terms of an excessive number of prophylactic mastectomies. Recently, several updates have been published on the recommendations in breast cancer screening at an international level. On the other hand, the advances in genomics have made it possible to establish a new molecular classification of breast cancer. Our aim is to present an updated overview of the epidemiological situation of breast cancer, as well as some relevant issues from the point of view of diagnosis, such as molecular classification and different strategies for both population-based and opportunistic screening. Copyright © 2017 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. The book of Revelation − an early Christian ‘Search for Meaning’ in critical conversation with its Jewish heritage and Hellenistic-Roman society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Labahn

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The book of Revelation’s attitude towards its political, religious and social environment is aradical one: Revelation 18:4 asks the readers to leave the city of Babylon, less so they do not become victims of God’s punishment, but so that they do not share the sins of this city. Such a narrative program is a counter-cultural access that leads its adherents into isolation at the edge of ancient society. On the other hand, the narrative incorporates pictures and ideas from different ancient milieus. By this, the narrative shows a profound understanding of political, religious and cultural streams. It shows a creative reception and a reworking of motifs or themes into a new literary entity, in terms of producing something new instead of ignorance or simple negation of reality. The rhetoric of good and evil and the subversive power of the autobiographic narrative make the usage of ancient culture a dangerous rhetorical weapon compared to the more dialogical approach to ancient culture used in other Christian groups. John’s narrative is witness of an approach that integrates and selects insights from different religious streams, from 1st century Judaism and 1st century Christianity into a selective and limited model of Christian attitude towards society and culture. The narrative is not simply conservative but integrative in developing new revelation on old ground, whose counter-cultural access is based on the transformation of different cultural means. Therefore, the article describes the apocalyptic and antagonistic strategy of the book of Revelation as acomplex technique of exchange and transformation of religious or cultural ideas and motifs. Die boek Openbaring – ’n vroeëre Christensoeke na betekenis in kritiese gesprek met sy Joodse herkoms en Grieks-Romeinse gemeenskap. Die boek Openbaring se benadering tot sy politieke, religieuse en sosiale omgewing is ingrypend: Openbaring 18:4 versoek die lesers om die stad Babel te verlaat

  3. From the Bottom of the Sea to the Center of the Classroom - REVEL Teacher Falicitates Authentic Student Research in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, D.; Robigou, V.

    2005-12-01

    In 2000, as land-collaborator for REVEL teacher C. Maldonado while on an ocean-going research cruise, I got hooked by seafloor exploration, tectonic plate processes, and biological communities around hydrothermal vent systems. I decided then to bring deep-sea research to my classroom through participation in SEAS (Students Experiments at Sea) in 2003. But, to truly understand the scientific process, I needed to experience research myself. I was selected for the REVEL Project in 2004 and went to sea for a month to study hydrothermal plumes in the N.E. Pacific Ocean. While working with SEAS curriculum helped to introduce my students to authentic research, it wasn't until I experienced a research cruise and all the aspects of research on board that I felt confident enough to help my classes pursue and achieve the honor of sending their own experiments to sea. My 7th grade students wrote 2 proposals for the 2004 SEAS program. Neither proposal was chosen, but my students experienced the scientific process while collaborating with scientists as they wrote up results from experiments that had been implemented. The following year, my 9th grade class proposed to compare how water pressure at different depths affects various materials and different shapes. This proposal was selected and their experiment was deployed on the seafloor during an R/V Atlantis research cruise in April 2005. The material shapes (and controls) were exposed to increasing pressure at variable depths, including that of the seafloor. The results predicted by the students did not occur and the students submitted an "explanation article" explaining the possible reasons for the experiment failure and what they could better to prepare for a future deployment. Throughout the process students interacted with the scientists at sea. Despite the disappointing outcome of the experiment, it was a great learning experience for the class and an honor for all students to have their hard work validated by the

  4. The book of Revelation − an early Christian ‘Search for Meaning’ in critical conversation with its Jewish heritage and Hellenistic-Roman society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Labahn

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The book of Revelation’s attitude towards its political, religious and social environment is aradical one: Revelation 18:4 asks the readers to leave the city of Babylon, less so they do not become victims of God’s punishment, but so that they do not share the sins of this city. Such a narrative program is a counter-cultural access that leads its adherents into isolation at the edge of ancient society. On the other hand, the narrative incorporates pictures and ideas from different ancient milieus. By this, the narrative shows a profound understanding of political, religious and cultural streams. It shows a creative reception and a reworking of motifs or themes into a new literary entity, in terms of producing something new instead of ignorance or simple negation of reality. The rhetoric of good and evil and the subversive power of the autobiographic narrative make the usage of ancient culture a dangerous rhetorical weapon compared to the more dialogical approach to ancient culture used in other Christian groups. John’s narrative is witness of an approach that integrates and selects insights from different religious streams, from 1st century Judaism and 1st century Christianity into a selective and limited model of Christian attitude towards society and culture. The narrative is not simply conservative but integrative in developing new revelation on old ground, whose counter-cultural access is based on the transformation of different cultural means. Therefore, the article describes the apocalyptic and antagonistic strategy of the book of Revelation as acomplex technique of exchange and transformation of religious or cultural ideas and motifs.Die boek Openbaring – ’n vroeëre Christensoeke na betekenis in kritiese gesprek met sy Joodse herkoms en Grieks-Romeinse gemeenskap. Die boek Openbaring se benadering tot sy politieke, religieuse en sosiale omgewing is ingrypend: Openbaring 18:4 versoek die lesers om die stad Babel te verlaat

  5. Oncogene-induced senescence is part of the tumorigenesis barrier imposed by DNA damage checkpoints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartkova, Jirina; Rezaei, Nousin; Liontos, Michalis

    2006-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated the existence of tumorigenesis barriers that slow or inhibit the progression of preneoplastic lesions to neoplasia. One such barrier involves DNA replication stress, which leads to activation of the DNA damage checkpoint and thereby to apoptosis or cell cycle arrest......, whereas a second barrier is mediated by oncogene-induced senescence. The relationship between these two barriers, if any, has not been elucidated. Here we show that oncogene-induced senescence is associated with signs of DNA replication stress, including prematurely terminated DNA replication forks...... and DNA double-strand breaks. Inhibiting the DNA double-strand break response kinase ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) suppressed the induction of senescence and in a mouse model led to increased tumour size and invasiveness. Analysis of human precancerous lesions further indicated that DNA damage...

  6. The Role of HPV in Head and Neck Cancer Stem Cell Formation and Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark S. Swanson

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The cancer stem cell (CSC theory proposes that a minority of tumor cells are capable of self-replication and tumorigenesis. It is these minority of cells that are responsible for cancer metastasis and recurrence in head and neck squamous cell cancers (HNSCC. Human papilloma virus (HPV-related cancer of the oropharynx is becoming more prevalent, which makes understanding of the relationship between HPV and CSCs more important than ever. This relationship is critical because CSC behavior can be predicted based on cell surface markers, which makes them a suitable candidate for targeted therapy. New therapies are an exciting opportunity to advance past the stalled outcomes in HNSCC that have plagued patients and clinicians for several decades.

  7. IKKα promotes intestinal tumorigenesis by limiting recruitment of M1-like polarized myeloid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göktuna, Serkan I; Canli, Ozge; Bollrath, Julia; Fingerle, Alexander A; Horst, David; Diamanti, Michaela A; Pallangyo, Charles; Bennecke, Moritz; Nebelsiek, Tim; Mankan, Arun K; Lang, Roland; Artis, David; Hu, Yinling; Patzelt, Thomas; Ruland, Jürgen; Kirchner, Thomas; Taketo, M Mark; Chariot, Alain; Arkan, Melek C; Greten, Florian R

    2014-06-26

    The recruitment of immune cells into solid tumors is an essential prerequisite of tumor development. Depending on the prevailing polarization profile of these infiltrating leucocytes, tumorigenesis is either promoted or blocked. Here, we identify IκB kinase α (IKKα) as a central regulator of a tumoricidal microenvironment during intestinal carcinogenesis. Mice deficient in IKKα kinase activity are largely protected from intestinal tumor development that is dependent on the enhanced recruitment of interferon γ (IFNγ)-expressing M1-like myeloid cells. In IKKα mutant mice, M1-like polarization is not controlled in a cell-autonomous manner but, rather, depends on the interplay of both IKKα mutant tumor epithelia and immune cells. Because therapies aiming at the tumor microenvironment rather than directly at the mutated cancer cell may circumvent resistance development, we suggest IKKα as a promising target for colorectal cancer (CRC) therapy. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. IKKα Promotes Intestinal Tumorigenesis by Limiting Recruitment of M1-like Polarized Myeloid Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serkan I. Göktuna

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The recruitment of immune cells into solid tumors is an essential prerequisite of tumor development. Depending on the prevailing polarization profile of these infiltrating leucocytes, tumorigenesis is either promoted or blocked. Here, we identify IκB kinase α (IKKα as a central regulator of a tumoricidal microenvironment during intestinal carcinogenesis. Mice deficient in IKKα kinase activity are largely protected from intestinal tumor development that is dependent on the enhanced recruitment of interferon γ (IFNγ-expressing M1-like myeloid cells. In IKKα mutant mice, M1-like polarization is not controlled in a cell-autonomous manner but, rather, depends on the interplay of both IKKα mutant tumor epithelia and immune cells. Because therapies aiming at the tumor microenvironment rather than directly at the mutated cancer cell may circumvent resistance development, we suggest IKKα as a promising target for colorectal cancer (CRC therapy.

  9. Epigenetic Effects and Molecular Mechanisms of Tumorigenesis Induced by Cigarette Smoke: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong-Jane Chen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cigarette smoking is one of the major causes of carcinogenesis. Direct genotoxicity induced by cigarette smoke leads to initiation of carcinogenesis. Nongenotoxic (epigenetic effects of cigarette smoke also act as modulators altering cellular functions. These two effects underlie the mechanisms of tumor promotion and progression. While there is no lack of general reviews on the genotoxic and carcinogenic potentials of cigarette smoke in lung carcinogenesis, updated review on the epigenetic effects and molecular mechanisms of cigarette smoke and carcinogenesis, not limited to lung, is lacking. We are presenting a comprehensive review of recent investigations on cigarette smoke, with special attentions to nicotine, NNK, and PAHs. The current understanding on their molecular mechanisms include (1 receptors, (2 cell cycle regulators, (3 signaling pathways, (4 apoptosis mediators, (5 angiogenic factors, and (6 invasive and metastasis mediators. This review highlighted the complexity biological responses to cigarette smoke components and their involvements in tumorigenesis.

  10. Inhibition of pluripotency networks by the Rb tumor suppressor restricts reprogramming and tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kareta, Michael S; Gorges, Laura L; Hafeez, Sana; Benayoun, Bérénice A; Marro, Samuele; Zmoos, Anne-Flore; Cecchini, Matthew J; Spacek, Damek; Batista, Luis F Z; O'Brien, Megan; Ng, Yi-Han; Ang, Cheen Euong; Vaka, Dedeepya; Artandi, Steven E; Dick, Frederick A; Brunet, Anne; Sage, Julien; Wernig, Marius

    2015-01-08

    Mutations in the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor gene Rb are involved in many forms of human cancer. In this study, we investigated the early consequences of inactivating Rb in the context of cellular reprogramming. We found that Rb inactivation promotes the reprogramming of differentiated cells to a pluripotent state. Unexpectedly, this effect is cell cycle independent, and instead reflects direct binding of Rb to pluripotency genes, including Sox2 and Oct4, which leads to a repressed chromatin state. More broadly, this regulation of pluripotency networks and Sox2 in particular is critical for the initiation of tumors upon loss of Rb in mice. These studies therefore identify Rb as a global transcriptional repressor of pluripotency networks, providing a molecular basis for previous reports about its involvement in cell fate pliability, and implicate misregulation of pluripotency factors such as Sox2 in tumorigenesis related to loss of Rb function. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Ovatodiolide suppresses colon tumorigenesis and prevents polarization of M2 tumor-associated macrophages through YAP oncogenic pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Jiun Huang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An increased expression of Yes-associated protein (YAP1 has been shown to promote tumorigenesis in many cancer types including colon. However, the role of YAP1 in promoting colon tumorigenesis remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that YAP1 expression is associated with M2 tumor-associated macrophage polarization and the generation of colon cancer stem-like cells. YAP1 downregulation by gene silencing or a phytochemical, ovatodiolide, not only suppresses colon cancer tumorigenesis but also prevents M2 TAM polarization. Methods Human monocytic cells, THP-1, and colon cancer cell lines, HCT116 and DLD-1, were co-cultured to mimic the interactions between tumor and its microenvironment. M2 polarization of the THP-1 cells were examined using both flow cytometry and q-PCR technique. The inhibition of YAP1 signaling was achieved by gene-silencing technique or ovatodiolide. The molecular consequences of YAP1 inhibition was demonstrated via colony formation, migration, and colon-sphere formation assays. 5-FU and ovatodiolide were used in drug combination studies. Xenograft and syngeneic mouse models were used to investigate the role of YAP1 in colon tumorigenesis and TAM generation. Results An increased YAP1 expression was found to be associated with a poor prognosis in patients with colon cancer using bioinformatics approach. We showed an increased YAP1 expression in the colon spheres, and colon cancer cells co-cultured with M2 TAMs. YAP1-silencing led to the concomitant decreased expression of major oncogenic pathways including Kras, mTOR, β-catenin, and M2-promoting IL-4 and tumor-promoting IL-6 cytokines. TAM co-cultured colon spheres showed a significantly higher tumor-initiating ability in vivo. Ovatodiolide treatment alone and in combination with 5-FU significantly suppressed in vivo tumorigenesis and less TAM infiltration in CT26 syngeneic mouse model. Conclusions We have identified the dual function of YAP1 where its

  12. Distribution of LGR5+ cells and associated implications during the early stage of gastric tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Gun Jang

    Full Text Available Lgr5 was identified as a promising gastrointestinal tract stem cell marker in mice. Lineage tracing indicates that Lgr5(+ cells may not only be the cells responsible for the origin of tumors; they may also be the so-called cancer stem cells. In the present study, we investigated the presence of Lgr5(+ cells and their biological significance in normal human gastric mucosa and gastric tumors. RNAscope, a newly developed RNA in situ hybridization technique, specifically labeled Lgr5(+ cells at the basal glands of the gastric antrum. Notably, the number of Lgr5(+ cells was remarkably increased in intestinal metaplasia. In total, 76% of gastric adenomas and 43% of early gastric carcinomas were positive for LGR5. Lgr5(+ cells were found more frequently in low-grade tumors with active Wnt signaling and an intestinal gland type, suggesting that LGR5 is likely involved in the very early stages of Wnt-driven tumorigenesis in the stomach. Interestingly, similar to stem cells in normal tissues, Lgr5(+ cells were often restricted to the base of the tumor glands, and such Lgr5(+ restriction was associated with high levels of intestinal stem cell markers such as EPHB2, OLFM4, and ASCL2. Thus, our findings show that Lgr5(+ cells are present at the base of the antral glands in the human stomach and that this cell population significantly expands in intestinal metaplasias. Furthermore, Lgr5(+ cells are seen in a large number of gastric tumors ; their frequent basal arrangements and coexpression of ISC markers support the idea that Lgr5(+ cells act as stem cells during the early stage of intestinal-type gastric tumorigenesis.

  13. Evaluating The Role Of Nitric Oxide Synthase In Oncogenic Ras-Driven Tumorigenesis

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    Chris Counter

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported that oncogenic KRAS activation of the PI3K/AKT pathway stimulates the remaining wild-type HRAS and NRAS proteins in a manner dependent upon both eNOS expression and C118 in HRAS and NRAS, which promoted tumor growth. Interestingly however, we recently found that loss of wild-type HRAS, NRAS, and even more potently, loss of both of these genes actually enhanced oncogenic KRAS-driven early tumorigenesis. Taken together, these results indicate that wild-type RAS proteins are tumor suppressing early in tumorigenesis, but tumor promoting in more malignant settings. Knock-in of a C118S mutation into an endogenous wild-type RAS gene did not, however, hamper oncogenic KRAS-driven tumor initiation. As such, redox-dependent reactions with C118 of wild-type RAS proteins are unlikely to be responsible for the tumor suppressive role of wild-type RAS proteins. This suggests that the redox-dependent reactions with C118 of wild-type RAS proteins are more important in more malignant settings. Given this, it stands to reason that inhibiting redox-dependent reactions like S-nitrosylation of wild-type RAS proteins may be more effective in established cancer settings. Indeed, we find that in three different models of KRAS-driven cancers-skin, pancreatic and lung- the general NOS inhibitor l-NAME reduced tumor burden and/or extended the lifespan of mice. Since oncogenic RAS has so far proven refractory to pharmacologic inhibition, targeting NOS activity may be an actionable approach to inhibiting RAS signaling for the treatment of a broad spectrum of cancers.

  14. Germline Mutations in Mtap Cooperate with Myc to Accelerate Tumorigenesis in Mice.

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    Yuwaraj Kadariya

    Full Text Available The gene encoding the methionine salvage pathway methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP is a tumor suppressor gene that is frequently inactivated in a wide variety of human cancers. In this study, we have examined if heterozygosity for a null mutation in Mtap (Mtap(lacZ could accelerate tumorigenesis development in two different mouse cancer models, Eμ-myc transgenic and Pten(+/- .Mtap Eμ-myc and Mtap Pten mice were generated and tumor-free survival was monitored over time. Tumors were also examined for a variety of histological and protein markers. In addition, microarray analysis was performed on the livers of Mtap(lacZ/+ and Mtap (+/+ mice.Survival in both models was significantly decreased in Mtap(lacZ/+ compared to Mtap(+/+ mice. In Eµ-myc mice, Mtap mutations accelerated the formation of lymphomas from cells in the early pre-B stage, and these tumors tended to be of higher grade and have higher expression levels of ornithine decarboxylase compared to those observed in control Eµ-myc Mtap(+/+ mice. Surprisingly, examination of Mtap status in lymphomas in Eµ-myc Mtap(lacZ/+ and Eµ-myc Mtap(+/+ animals did not reveal significant differences in the frequency of loss of Mtap protein expression, despite having shorter latency times, suggesting that haploinsufficiency of Mtap may be playing a direct role in accelerating tumorigenesis. Consistent with this idea, microarray analysis on liver tissue from age and sex matched Mtap(+/+ and Mtap(lacZ/+ animals found 363 transcripts whose expression changed at least 1.5-fold (P<0.01. Functional categorization of these genes reveals enrichments in several pathways involved in growth control and cancer.Our findings show that germline inactivation of a single Mtap allele alters gene expression and enhances lymphomagenesis in Eµ-myc mice.

  15. Corruption of homeostatic mechanisms in the guanylyl cyclase C signaling pathway underlying colorectal tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Waldman, Scott A

    2010-08-01

    Colon cancer, the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide, originates from the malignant transformation of intestinal epithelial cells. The intestinal epithelium undergoes a highly organized process of rapid regeneration along the crypt-villus axis, characterized by proliferation, migration, differentiation and apoptosis, whose coordination is essential to maintaining the mucosal barrier. Disruption of these homeostatic processes predisposes cells to mutations in tumor suppressors or oncogenes, whose dysfunction provides transformed cells an evolutionary growth advantage. While sequences of genetic mutations at different stages along the neoplastic continuum have been established, little is known of the events initiating tumorigenesis prior to adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) mutations. Here, we examine a role for the corruption of homeostasis induced by silencing novel tumor suppressors, including the intestine-specific transcription factor CDX2 and its gene target guanylyl cyclase C (GCC), as early events predisposing cells to mutations in APC and other sequential genes that initiate colorectal cancer. CDX2 and GCC maintain homeostatic regeneration in the intestine by restricting cell proliferation, promoting cell maturation and adhesion, regulating cell migration and defending the intestinal barrier and genomic integrity. Elimination of CDX2 or GCC promotes intestinal tumor initiation and growth in aged mice, mice carrying APC mutations or mice exposed to carcinogens. The roles of CDX2 and GCC in suppressing intestinal tumorigenesis, universal disruption in their signaling through silencing of hormones driving GCC, and the uniform overexpression of GCC by tumors underscore the potential value of oral replacement with GCC ligands as targeted prevention and therapy for colorectal cancer.

  16. ∆DNMT3B4-del Contributes to Aberrant DNA Methylation Patterns in Lung Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Z. Ma

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aberrant DNA methylation is a hallmark of cancer but mechanisms contributing to the abnormality remain elusive. We have previously shown that ∆DNMT3B is the predominantly expressed form of DNMT3B. In this study, we found that most of the lung cancer cell lines tested predominantly expressed DNMT3B isoforms without exons 21, 22 or both 21 and 22 (a region corresponding to the enzymatic domain of DNMT3B termed DNMT3B/∆DNMT3B-del. In normal bronchial epithelial cells, DNMT3B/ΔDNMT3B and DNMT3B/∆DNMT3B-del displayed equal levels of expression. In contrast, in patients with non-small cell lung cancer NSCLC, 111 (93% of the 119 tumors predominantly expressed DNMT3B/ΔDNMT3B-del, including 47 (39% tumors with no detectable DNMT3B/∆DNMT3B. Using a transgenic mouse model, we further demonstrated the biological impact of ∆DNMT3B4-del, the ∆DNMT3B-del isoform most abundantly expressed in NSCLC, in global DNA methylation patterns and lung tumorigenesis. Expression of ∆DNMT3B4-del in the mouse lungs resulted in an increased global DNA hypomethylation, focal DNA hypermethylation, epithelial hyperplastia and tumor formation when challenged with a tobacco carcinogen. Our results demonstrate ∆DNMT3B4-del as a critical factor in developing aberrant DNA methylation patterns during lung tumorigenesis and suggest that ∆DNMT3B4-del may be a target for lung cancer prevention.

  17. Deletion of Forkhead Box M1 transcription factor from respiratory epithelial cells inhibits pulmonary tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Ching Wang

    Full Text Available The Forkhead Box m1 (Foxm1 protein is induced in a majority of human non-small cell lung cancers and its expression is associated with poor prognosis. However, specific requirements for the Foxm1 in each cell type of the cancer lesion remain unknown. The present study provides the first genetic evidence that the Foxm1 expression in respiratory epithelial cells is essential for lung tumorigenesis. Using transgenic mice, we demonstrated that conditional deletion of Foxm1 from lung epithelial cells (epFoxm1(-/- mice prior to tumor initiation caused a striking reduction in the number and size of lung tumors, induced by either urethane or 3-methylcholanthrene (MCA/butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT. Decreased lung tumorigenesis in epFoxm1(-/- mice was associated with diminished proliferation of tumor cells and reduced expression of Topoisomerase-2alpha (TOPO-2alpha, a critical regulator of tumor cell proliferation. Depletion of Foxm1 mRNA in cultured lung adenocarcinoma cells significantly decreased TOPO-2alpha mRNA and protein levels. Moreover, Foxm1 directly bound to and induced transcription of the mouse TOPO-2alpha promoter region, indicating that TOPO-2alpha is a direct target of Foxm1 in lung tumor cells. Finally, we demonstrated that a conditional deletion of Foxm1 in pre-existing lung tumors dramatically reduced tumor growth in the lung. Expression of Foxm1 in respiratory epithelial cells is critical for lung cancer formation and TOPO-2alpha expression in vivo, suggesting that Foxm1 is a promising target for anti-tumor therapy.

  18. The p53 inhibitor MDM2 facilitates Sonic Hedgehog-mediated tumorigenesis and influences cerebellar foliation.

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    Reem Malek

    Full Text Available Disruption of cerebellar granular neuronal precursor (GNP maturation can result in defects in motor coordination and learning, or in medulloblastoma, the most common childhood brain tumor. The Sonic Hedgehog (Shh pathway is important for GNP proliferation; however, the factors regulating the extent and timing of GNP proliferation, as well as GNP differentiation and migration are poorly understood. The p53 tumor suppressor has been shown to negatively regulate the activity of the Shh effector, Gli1, in neural stem cells; however, the contribution of p53 to the regulation of Shh signaling in GNPs during cerebellar development has not been determined. Here, we exploited a hypomorphic allele of Mdm2 (Mdm2(puro, which encodes a critical negative regulator of p53, to alter the level of wild-type MDM2 and p53 in vivo. We report that mice with reduced levels of MDM2 and increased levels of p53 have small cerebella with shortened folia, reminiscent of deficient Shh signaling. Indeed, Shh signaling in Mdm2-deficient GNPs is attenuated, concomitant with decreased expression of the Shh transducers, Gli1 and Gli2. We also find that Shh stimulation of GNPs promotes MDM2 accumulation and enhances phosphorylation at serine 166, a modification known to increase MDM2-p53 binding. Significantly, loss of MDM2 in Ptch1(+/- mice, a model for Shh-mediated human medulloblastoma, impedes cerebellar tumorigenesis. Together, these results place MDM2 at a major nexus between the p53 and Shh signaling pathways in GNPs, with key roles in cerebellar development, GNP survival, cerebellar foliation, and MB tumorigenesis.

  19. FHL2 silencing reduces Wnt signaling and osteosarcoma tumorigenesis in vitro and in vivo.

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    Julia Brun

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The molecular mechanisms that are involved in the growth and invasiveness of osteosarcoma, an aggressive and invasive primary bone tumor, are not fully understood. The transcriptional co-factor FHL2 (four and a half LIM domains protein 2 acts as an oncoprotein or as a tumor suppressor depending on the tissue context. In this study, we investigated the role of FHL2 in tumorigenesis in osteosarcoma model. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Western blot analyses showed that FHL2 is expressed above normal in most human and murine osteosarcoma cells. Tissue microarray analysis revealed that FHL2 protein expression is high in human osteosarcoma and correlates with osteosarcoma aggressiveness. In murine osteosarcoma cells, FHL2 silencing using shRNA decreased canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling and reduced the expression of Wnt responsive genes as well as of the key Wnt molecules Wnt5a and Wnt10b. This effect resulted in inhibition of osteosarcoma cell proliferation, invasion and migration in vitro. Using xenograft experiments, we showed that FHL2 silencing markedly reduced tumor growth and lung metastasis occurence in mice. The anti-oncogenic effect of FHL2 silencing in vivo was associated with reduced cell proliferation and decreased Wnt signaling in the tumors. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings demonstrate that FHL2 acts as an oncogene in osteosarcoma cells and contributes to tumorigenesis through Wnt signaling. More importantly, FHL2 depletion greatly reduces tumor cell growth and metastasis, which raises the potential therapeutic interest of targeting FHL2 to efficiently impact primary bone tumors.

  20. Evaluation of Methylobacterium radiotolerance and Sphyngomonas yanoikoaie in Sentinel Lymph Nodes of Breast Cancer Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdi, Hamid Reza; Movafagh, Abolfazl; Fallah, Fateme; Alizadeh Shargh, Shohreh; Mansouri, Neda; Heidary Pour, Atefeh; Hashemi, Mehrdad

    2016-01-01

    It has been established that different kinds of bacteria agents are involved in various cancers. Although the mechanism of tumorigenesis is not clearly understood, there is evidence for the presence of bacteria within tumors, with at least a progression effect for some bacteria that prepare suitable microenvironments for tumor cell growth. The aim of current study was to evaluate bacterial dysbiosis in sentinel lymph nodes of breast cancer patients. One hundred and twenty three fresh-frozen sentinel lymph nodes and a corresponding number of normal adjacent breast tissue specimens and five normal mastectomy samples were investigated employing RT-PCR. In addition using genus-specific primers were applied. There was a significant differences as presence of Methylobacterium radiotolerance DNA recorded between patients and normal control group (p= 0.0). Based on our research work, further studies into the role of microbes in breast cancer would be of great interest.

  1. Inflence of coffee and its components on breast cancer: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Mishra

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Amongst females, breast cancer is one of the major culprits for cancer death. Consequently, many scientists have focused their researches to delineate the novel alternative strategies to cure or to reduce the outgrowth of this disease. Amongst the beverages, coffee is widely available and one of the most popular non-alcoholic drink worldwide. Due to the widespread usage of coffee in adults, scientists are trying to delineate its beneficial and harmful influences on human health and diseases. Evidences from an amount of researches have outlined the possible role of coffee and its components as chemoprotective agents against specific carcinogens as well as suppressors for tumorigenesis. Furthermore, some studies tried to elucidate the relationship amid coffee intake and suppression of carcinogenesis in breast tissues. The present review is an effort to highlight the consequence attributable to the intake of coffee and its key chemical components (caffeine, caffeic acid, kahweol and cafestol upon breast cancer developmental process.

  2. Enhancer-Mediated Oncogenic Function of the Menin Tumor Suppressor in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koen M.A. Dreijerink

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available While the multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1 gene functions as a tumor suppressor in a variety of cancer types, we explored its oncogenic role in breast tumorigenesis. The MEN1 gene product menin is involved in H3K4 trimethylation and co-activates transcription. We integrated ChIP-seq and RNA-seq data to identify menin target genes. Our analysis revealed that menin-dependent target gene promoters display looping to distal enhancers that are bound by menin, FOXA1 and GATA3. In this fashion, MEN1 co-regulates a proliferative breast cancer-specific gene expression program in ER+ cells. In primary mammary cells, MEN1 exerts an anti-proliferative function by regulating a distinct expression signature. Our findings clarify the cell-type-specific functions of MEN1 and inform the development of menin-directed treatments for breast cancer.

  3. MiR-300 regulate the malignancy of breast cancer by targeting p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiao-Heng; Li, Da-Wei; Feng, Hui; Chen, Hong-Mei; Song, Yan-Qiu

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the role of miR-300 in regulating cell proliferation and invasion of breast cancer (BC) cells. MicroRNA and protein expression patterns were compared between breast cancer tissue and normal tissue and between two different prognostic groups. The up-regulation of miR-300 was confirmed by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and its expression was analyzed in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. We observed that miR-300 expression was frequently and dramatically up-regulated in human breast cancer tissues and cell lines compared with the matched adjacent normal tissues and cells. We further showed that transient and stable over-expression of miR-300 could promote cell proliferation and cell cycle progression. Moreover, p53, a key inhibitor of cell cycle, was verified as a direct target of miR-300, suggesting that miR-300 might promote breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion by regulating p53 expression. Our findings indicated that miR-300 up-regulation might exert some sort of antagonistic function by targeting p53 in breast cancer cell proliferation during breast tumorigenesis.

  4. UTX promotes hormonally responsive breast carcinogenesis through feed-forward transcription regulation with estrogen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, G; Liu, X; Zhang, Y; Li, W; Liu, S; Chen, Z; Xu, B; Yang, J; He, L; Zhang, Z; Jin, T; Yi, X; Sun, L; Shang, Y; Liang, J

    2017-09-28

    UTX is implicated in embryonic development and lineage specification. However, how this X-linked histone demethylase contributes to the occurrence and progression of breast cancer remains to be clarified. Here we report that UTX is physically associated with estrogen receptor (ER) and functions in ER-regulated transcription. We showed that UTX coordinates with JHDM1D and CBP to direct H3K27 methylation-acetylation transition and to create a permissive chromatin state on ER targets. Genome-wide analysis of the transcriptional targets of UTX by ChIP-seq identified a set of genes such as chemokine receptor CXCR4 that are intimately involved in breast cancer tumorigenesis and metastasis. We demonstrated that UTX promotes the proliferation and migration of ER(+) breast cancer cells. Interestingly, UTX itself is transactivated by ER, forming a feed-forward loop in the regulation of hormone response. Indeed, UTX is upregulated during ER(+) breast cancer progression, and the expression level of UTX is positively correlated with that of CXCR4 and negatively correlated with the overall survival of ER(+) breast cancer patients. Our study identified a feed-forward loop between UTX and ER in the regulation of hormonally responsive breast carcinogenesis, supporting the pursuit of UTX as an emerging therapeutic target for the intervention of certain ER(+) breast cancer with specific epigenetic vulnerability.

  5. Effect of infertility treatment and pregnancy-related hormones on breast cell proliferation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, Anne; Matthews, Laura; Zelivianski, Stanislav; Hardy, Ashley; Jeruss, Jacqueline S

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer development involves a series of mutations in a heterogeneous group of proto-oncogenes/tumor suppressor genes that alter mammary cells to create a microenvironment permissive to tumorigenesis. Exposure to hormones during infertility treatment may have a mutagenic effect on normal mammary epithelial cells, high-risk breast lesions and early-stage breast cancers. Our goal was to understand the association between infertility treatment and normal and cancerous breast cell proliferation. MCF-10A normal mammary cells and the breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 [estrogen receptor (ER)-positive, well differentiated] and HCC 1937 (ER-negative, aggressive, BRCA1 mutation) were treated with the weak ER activator clomiphene citrate and hormones that are increased during infertility treatment. Direct effects of treatment on cell proliferation and colony growth were determined. While clomiphene citrate had no effect on MCF-10A cells or MCF-7 breast cancer cells, it decreased proliferation of HCC 1937 versus untreated cells (P= 0.003). Estrogen had no effect on either MCF-10A or HCC 1937 cells but, as expected, increased cell proliferation (20-100 nM; P≤0.002) and colony growth (10-30 nM; Pinfertility regimens on ER-positive breast cancer cells and validate the potential protective effect of pregnancy-related exposure to hCG.

  6. Ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme complex Uev1A-Ubc13 promotes breast cancer metastasis through nuclear factor-кB mediated matrix metalloproteinase-1 gene regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Zhaojia; Shen, Siqi; Zhang, Zhiling; Zhang, Weiwei; XIAO, WEI

    2014-01-01

    Introduction UEV1A encodes a ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme variant (Ubc13), which is required for Ubc13-catalyzed Lys63-linked polyubiquitination of target proteins and nuclear factor κB (NF-кB) activation. Previous reports have correlated the level of UEV1A expression with tumorigenesis; however, the detailed molecular events leading to tumors particularly breast cancer and metastasis are unclear. This study is to investigate roles of different UEV1 splicing variants, and its close homolog MM...

  7. Breast Cancer Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    FACTS FOR LIFE Breast Cancer Surgery The goal of breast cancer surgery is to remove the whole tumor from the breast. Some lymph nodes ... might still be in the body. Types of breast cancer surgery There are two types of breast cancer ...

  8. Transgenic overexpression of NanogP8 in the mouse prostate is insufficient to initiate tumorigenesis but weakly promotes tumor development in the Hi-Myc mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bigang; Gong, Shuai; Li, Qiuhui; Chen, Xin; Moore, John; Suraneni, Mahipal V; Badeaux, Mark D; Jeter, Collene R; Shen, Jianjun; Mehmood, Rashid; Fan, Qingxia; Tang, Dean G

    2017-08-08

    This project was undertaken to address a critical cancer biology question: Is overexpression of the pluripotency molecule Nanog sufficient to initiate tumor development in a somatic tissue? Nanog1 is critical for the self-renewal and pluripotency of ES cells, and its retrotransposed homolog, NanogP8 is preferentially expressed in somatic cancer cells. Our work has shown that shRNA-mediated knockdown of NanogP8 in prostate, breast, and colon cancer cells inhibits tumor regeneration whereas inducible overexpression of NanogP8 promotes cancer stem cell phenotypes and properties. To address the key unanswered question whether tissue-specific overexpression of NanogP8 is sufficient to promote tumor development in vivo , we generated a NanogP8 transgenic mouse model, in which the ARR 2 PB promoter was used to drive NanogP8 cDNA. Surprisingly, the ARR 2 PB-NanogP8 transgenic mice were viable, developed normally, and did not form spontaneous tumors in >2 years. Also, both wild type and ARR 2 PB-NanogP8 transgenic mice responded similarly to castration and regeneration and castrated ARR 2 PB-NanogP8 transgenic mice also did not develop tumors. By crossing the ARR 2 PB-NanogP8 transgenic mice with ARR 2 PB-Myc (i.e., Hi-Myc) mice, we found that the double transgenic (i.e., ARR 2 PB-NanogP8; Hi-Myc) mice showed similar tumor incidence and histology to the Hi-Myc mice. Interestingly, however, we observed white dots in the ventral lobes of the double transgenic prostates, which were characterized as overgrown ductules/buds featured by crowded atypical Nanog-expressing luminal cells. Taken together, our present work demonstrates that transgenic overexpression of NanogP8 in the mouse prostate is insufficient to initiate tumorigenesis but weakly promotes tumor development in the Hi-Myc mouse model.

  9. RANK ligand as a potential target for breast cancer prevention in BRCA1-mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Emma; Vaillant, François; Branstetter, Daniel; Pal, Bhupinder; Giner, Göknur; Whitehead, Lachlan; Lok, Sheau W; Mann, Gregory B; Rohrbach, Kathy; Huang, Li-Ya; Soriano, Rosalia; Smyth, Gordon K; Dougall, William C; Visvader, Jane E; Lindeman, Geoffrey J

    2016-08-01

    Individuals who have mutations in the breast-cancer-susceptibility gene BRCA1 (hereafter referred to as BRCA1-mutation carriers) frequently undergo prophylactic mastectomy to minimize their risk of breast cancer. The identification of an effective prevention therapy therefore remains a 'holy grail' for the field. Precancerous BRCA1(mut/+) tissue harbors an aberrant population of luminal progenitor cells, and deregulated progesterone signaling has been implicated in BRCA1-associated oncogenesis. Coupled with the findings that tumor necrosis factor superfamily member 11 (TNFSF11; also known as RANKL) is a key paracrine effector of progesterone signaling and that RANKL and its receptor TNFRSF11A (also known as RANK) contribute to mammary tumorigenesis, we investigated a role for this pathway in the pre-neoplastic phase of BRCA1-mutation carriers. We identified two subsets of luminal progenitors (RANK(+) and RANK(-)) in histologically normal tissue of BRCA1-mutation carriers and showed that RANK(+) cells are highly proliferative, have grossly aberrant DNA repair and bear a molecular signature similar to that of basal-like breast cancer. These data suggest that RANK(+) and not RANK(-) progenitors are a key target population in these women. Inhibition of RANKL signaling by treatment with denosumab in three-dimensional breast organoids derived from pre-neoplastic BRCA1(mut/+) tissue attenuated progesterone-induced proliferation. Notably, proliferation was markedly reduced in breast biopsies from BRCA1-mutation carriers who were treated with denosumab. Furthermore, inhibition of RANKL in a Brca1-deficient mouse model substantially curtailed mammary tumorigenesis. Taken together, these findings identify a targetable pathway in a putative cell-of-origin population in BRCA1-mutation carriers and implicate RANKL blockade as a promising strategy in the prevention of breast cancer.

  10. [Are centrosomal abnormalities correlated to DNA ploidy in breast cancer?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakr, Rita; Fleury, Jocelyne; Prengel, Claudie; Roynard, Patricia; Daraï, Emile; Uzan, Serge; Rouzier, Roman; Bernaudin, Jean-François

    2011-01-01

    ADN ploidy was shown to play a role in genomic instability of cancer cells and prognosis. The implication of the centrosome in the cell cycle was also described. Therefore, new prognostic factors could be suggested for a better-tailored therapy. The purpose of this study is to search for correlation between centrosomal abnormality and ADN ploidy in breast cancer. Cell prints were prepared from cell culture of mesothelial ascitis, fibroblast cell line MRC5 and breast cancer cell lines MCF7 and T47D. Fresh cell prints were also obtained from cases with invasive carcinoma. The centrosome was labelled by an indirect immunofluorescence assay using anti-γ-tubulin antibody and F(ab')(2) FITC before quantification with fluorescence microscopy. ADN ploidy was scored with DNA index obtained by means of flux cytometry. The normal mesothelial cells (94% of cells with only one centrosome) and the diploid cell line MRC5 (68% of cells with two centrosomes) were used as controls. DNA ploidy was found to be correlated with centrosomal abnormality in MCF7 cell line (64% of cells had more than three centrosomes) but not in the 10 cases of invasive ductal carcinoma analysed in this study. The absence of correlation between DNA ploidy and centrosomal abnormality in breast cancer samples may be due to the small numbers of cases, the cell prints or tumorigenesis. Correlation analysis of a larger number of cases and types of breast lesions to numerical and morphological abnormalities of the centrosome are ongoing.

  11. Stereotactic (Mammographically Guided) Breast Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Stereotactic Breast Biopsy Stereotactic breast biopsy uses mammography – a specific type ... Breast Biopsy? What is Stereotactic (Mammographically Guided) Breast Biopsy? Lumps or abnormalities in the breast are often ...

  12. Risks of Breast Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? ... cancer screening: Cancer Screening Overview General Information About Breast Cancer Key Points Breast cancer is a disease ...

  13. Treatment Option Overview (Breast Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  14. General Information about Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  15. Breast cancer

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    "Cancer specialists will soon be able to compare mammograms with computerized images of breast cancer from across Europe, in a bid to improve diagnosis and treatment....The new project, known as MammoGrid, brings together computer and medical imaging experts, cancer specialists, radiologists and epidemiologists from Bristol, Oxford, Cambridge, France and Italy" (1 page).

  16. Breast Calcifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and require no further testing or follow-up. Microcalcifications. These show up as fine, white specks, similar to grains of salt. They're usually noncancerous, but certain patterns can be an early sign of cancer. If breast calcifications appear suspicious on your initial mammogram, you ...

  17. Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Mediterranean diet choose healthy fats, such as olive oil, over butter and fish instead of red meat. Breast cancer risk reduction for women with a high risk If your doctor has assessed your family history and determined that you have other factors, such ...

  18. Mammographic evidence of microenvironment changes in tumorous breasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Zach; Batchelder, Kendra A; Toner, Brian C; Guimond, Lyne; Gerasimova-Chechkina, Evgeniya; Harrow, Amy R; Arneodo, Alain; Khalil, Andre

    2017-04-01

    The microenvironment of breast tumors plays a critical role in tumorigenesis. As long as the structural integrity of the microenvironment is upheld, the tumor is suppressed. If tissue structure is lost through disruptions in the normal cell cycle, the microenvironment may act as a tumor promoter. Therefore, the properties that distinguish between healthy and tumorous tissues may not be solely in the tumor characteristics but rather in surrounding non-tumor tissue. The goal of this paper was to show preliminary evidence that tissue disruption and loss of homeostasis in breast tissue microenvironment and breast bilateral asymmetry can be quantitatively and objectively assessed from mammography via a localized, wavelet-based analysis of the whole breast. A wavelet-based multifractal formalism called the 2D Wavelet Transform Modulus Maxima (WTMM) method was used to quantitate density fluctuations from mammographic breast tissue via the Hurst exponent (H). Each entire mammogram was cut in hundreds of 360 × 360 pixel subregions in a gridding scheme of overlapping sliding windows, with each window boundary separated by 32 pixels. The 2D WTMM method was applied to each subregion individually. A data mining approach was set up to determine which metrics best discriminated between normal vs. cancer cases. These same metrics were then used, without modification, to discriminate between normal vs. benign and benign vs. cancer cases. The density fluctuations in healthy mammographic breast tissue are either monofractal anti-correlated (H 1/2) for dense tissue. However, tissue regions with H~1/2, as well as left vs. right breast asymetries, were found preferably in tumorous (benign or cancer) breasts vs. normal breasts, as quantified via a combination metric yielding a P-value ~ 0.0006. No metric considered showed significant differences between cancer vs. benign breasts. Since mammographic tissue regions associated with uncorrelated (H~1/2) density fluctuations were

  19. Bacteria, plankton, and trace metal, and other data from bottle and CTD casts in the Antarctic from the NATHANIEL B. PALMER and ROGER REVELL in support of the US Joint Global Ocean Flux Study / Antarctic Environments Southern Ocean Process Study (JGOFS /AESOPS) from 1996-10-17 to 1998-03-15 (NODC Accession 0000504)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Phytoplankton and other data were collected in the Antarctic from the NATHANIEL B. PALMER and ROGER REVELL from 17 October 1996 to 15 March 1998. Bottle data include...

  20. Lack of cortistatin or somatostatin differentially influences DMBA-induced mammary gland tumorigenesis in mice in an obesity-dependent mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque, Raúl M; Villa-Osaba, Alicia; L-López, Fernando; Pozo-Salas, Ana I; Sánchez-Sánchez, Rafael; Ortega-Salas, Rosa; de Lecea, Luis; Álvarez-Benito, Marina; López-Miranda, José; Gahete, Manuel D; Castaño, Justo P

    2016-03-08

    Somatostatin (SST) and cortistatin (CORT), two structurally and functionally related peptides, share a family of widespread receptors (sst1-5) to exert apparently similar biological actions, including endocrine/metabolic regulation and suppression of tumor cell proliferation. However, despite their therapeutic potential, attempts to apply SST-analogs to treat breast cancer have yielded unsatisfactory results. Actually, the specific roles of SST and CORT in mammary gland tumorigenesis (MGT), particularly in relation to metabolic dysregulation (i.e. obesity), remain unknown. The role of endogenous SST and CORT in carcinogen-induced MGT was investigated under normal (lean) and obesity conditions. To that end, SST- and CORT-knockout (KO) mice and their respective littermate-controls, fed low-fat (LF) or high-fat (HF) diets, were treated with 7,12-dimethyl-benza-anthracene (DMBA) once a week (wk) for 3 wk, and MGT was monitored for 25 wk. Additionally, we examined the effect of SST or CORT removal in the development of the mammary gland. Lack of SST did not alter DMBA-induced MGT incidence under lean conditions; conversely, lack of endogenous CORT severely aggravated DMBA-induced MGT in LF-fed mice. These differences were not attributable to altered mammary gland development. HF-diet modestly increased the sensitivity to DMBA-induced carcinogenesis in control mice, whereas, as observed in LF-fed CORT-KO, HF-fed CORT-KO mice exhibited aggravated tumor incidence, discarding a major influence of obesity on these CORT actions. In marked contrast, HF-fed SST-KO mice exhibited much higher tumor incidence than LF-fed SST-KO mice, which could be associated with higher mammary complexity. Endogenous SST and CORT distinctly impact on DMBA-induced MGT, in a manner that is strongly dependent on the metabolic/endocrine milieu (lean vs. obese status). Importantly, CORT, rather than SST, could represent a major inhibitor of MGT under normal/lean-conditions, whereas both neuropeptides

  1. Breast lift (mastopexy) - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100188.htm Breast lift (mastopexy) - series—Incisions To use the sharing features ... to slide 3 out of 3 Overview Breast lift (mastopexy) is usually performed for drooping breasts, which ...

  2. Male Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although breast cancer is much more common in women, men can get it too. It happens most often to men between ... 60 and 70. Breast lumps usually aren't cancer. However, most men with breast cancer have lumps. ...

  3. Breast radiation - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiation - breast - discharge ... You may notice changes in the way your breast looks or feels (if you are getting radiation ... after treatment is over. The skin on your breast may become more sensitive or numb. Skin and ...

  4. Breast Cancer Disparities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2.65 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Breast Cancer Black Women Have Higher Death Rates from Breast ... of Page U.S. State Info Number of Additional Breast Cancer Deaths Among Black Women, By State SOURCE: National ...

  5. Types of Breast Pumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health and Consumer Devices Consumer Products Breast Pumps Types of Breast Pumps Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it ... a nipple and used for feeding a baby. Types of Breast Pumps There are three basic types ...

  6. Breast Cancer Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2011 Funding: Increasing Awareness and Support Among Young Women with Breast Cancer Funding: Young Breast Cancer Survivors Funding: Breast Cancer Genomics Statistics Rates by Race and Ethnicity Rates by State ...

  7. Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... breast cancer correctly. Their recommendations are summarized below. Minimum criteria for a diagnosis of inflammatory breast cancer ... Initial biopsy samples from the affected breast show invasive carcinoma. Further examination of tissue from the affected ...

  8. Breast cancer in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Iris; Lindsay, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Pregnancy-associated breast cancer is defined as breast cancer diagnosed during pregnancy or in the first postpartum year. Breast cancer is one of the more common malignancies to occur during pregnancy and, as more women delay childbearing, the incidence of breast cancer in pregnancy is expected to increase. This article provides an overview of diagnosis, staging, and treatment of pregnancy-associated breast cancer. Recommendations for management of breast cancer in pregnancy are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Breast reconstruction after breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serletti, Joseph M; Fosnot, Joshua; Nelson, Jonas A; Disa, Joseph J; Bucky, Louis P

    2011-06-01

    After reading this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Describe the mental, emotional, and physical benefits of reconstruction in breast cancer patients. 2. Compare the most common techniques of reconstruction in patients and detail benefits and risks associated with each. 3. Outline different methods of reconstruction and identify the method considered best for the patient based on timing of the procedures, body type, adjuvant therapies, and other coexisting conditions. 4. Distinguish between some of the different flaps that can be considered for autologous reconstruction. Breast cancer is unfortunately a common disease affecting millions of women, often at a relatively young age. Reconstruction following mastectomy offers women an opportunity to mollify some of the emotional and aesthetic effects of this devastating disease. Although varying techniques of alloplastic and autologous techniques are available, all strive to achieve the same goal: the satisfactory reformation of a breast mound that appears as natural as possible without clothing and at the very least is normal in appearance under clothing. This article summarizes the various approaches to breast reconstruction and offers a balanced view of the risks and benefits of each, all of which in the end offer the opportunity for excellent and predictable results with a high degree of patient satisfaction.

  10. Combined Inactivation of MYC and K-Ras oncogenes reverses tumorigenesis in lung adenocarcinomas and lymphomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phuoc T Tran

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Conditional transgenic models have established that tumors require sustained oncogene activation for tumor maintenance, exhibiting the phenomenon known as "oncogene-addiction." However, most cancers are caused by multiple genetic events making it difficult to determine which oncogenes or combination of oncogenes will be the most effective targets for their treatment.To examine how the MYC and K-ras(G12D oncogenes cooperate for the initiation and maintenance of tumorigenesis, we generated double conditional transgenic tumor models of lung adenocarcinoma and lymphoma. The ability of MYC and K-ras(G12D to cooperate for tumorigenesis and the ability of the inactivation of these oncogenes to result in tumor regression depended upon the specific tissue context. MYC-, K-ras(G12D- or MYC/K-ras(G12D-induced lymphomas exhibited sustained regression upon the inactivation of either or both oncogenes. However, in marked contrast, MYC-induced lung tumors failed to regress completely upon oncogene inactivation; whereas K-ras(G12D-induced lung tumors regressed completely. Importantly, the combined inactivation of both MYC and K-ras(G12D resulted more frequently in complete lung tumor regression. To account for the different roles of MYC and K-ras(G12D in maintenance of lung tumors, we found that the down-stream mediators of K-ras(G12D signaling, Stat3 and Stat5, are dephosphorylated following conditional K-ras(G12D but not MYC inactivation. In contrast, Stat3 becomes dephosphorylated in lymphoma cells upon inactivation of MYC and/or K-ras(G12D. Interestingly, MYC-induced lung tumors that failed to regress upon MYC inactivation were found to have persistent Stat3 and Stat5 phosphorylation.Taken together, our findings point to the importance of the K-Ras and associated down-stream Stat effector pathways in the initiation and maintenance of lymphomas and lung tumors. We suggest that combined targeting of oncogenic pathways is more likely to be effective in the

  11. Arsenic-induced Aurora-A activation contributes to chromosome instability and tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chin-Han; Tseng, Ya-Shih; Yang, Chao-Chun; Kao, Yu-Ting; Sheu, Hamm-Ming; Liu, Hsiao-Sheng

    2013-11-01

    Arsenic may cause serious environmental pollution and is a serious industrial problem. Depending on the dosage, arsenic may trigger the cells undergoing either proliferation or apoptosis-related cell death. Because of lack of the proper animal model to study arsenic induced tumorigenesis, the accurate risk level of arsenic exposure has not been determined. Arsenic shows genotoxic effect on human beings who uptake water contaminated by arsenic. Chromosome aberration is frequently detected in arsenic exposure-related diseases and is associated with increased oxidative stress and decreased DNA repairing activity, but the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Aurora-A is a mitotic kinase, over-expression of Aurora-A leads to centrosome amplification, chromosomal instability and cell transformation. We revealed that Aurora-A is over-expressed in the skin and bladder cancer patients from blackfoot-disease endemic areas. Our cell line studies reveal that arsenic exposure between 0.5 μM and 1 μM for 2-7 days are able to induce Aurora-A expression and activation based on promoter activity, RNA and protein analysis. Aurora-A overexpression further increases the frequency of unsymmetrical chromosome segregation through centrosome amplification followed by cell population accumulated at S phase in immortalized keratinocyte (HaCaT) and uroepithelial cells (E7). Furthermore, Aurora-A over-expression was sustained for 1-4 weeks by chronic treatment of immortalized bladder and skin cells with NaAsO2. Aurora-A promoter methylation and gene amplification was not detected in the long-term arsenic treated E7 cells. Furthermore, the expression level of E2F1 transcription factor (E2F1) is increased in the presence of arsenic, and arsenic-related Aurora-A over-expression is transcriptionally regulated by E2F1. We further demonstrated that overexpression of Aurora-A and mutant Ha-ras or Aurora-A and mutant p53 may act additively to trigger arsenic-related bladder and skin cancer

  12. Alterations in Circulating miRNA Levels following Early-Stage Estrogen Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer Resection in Post-Menopausal Women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kodahl, Annette R; Zeuthen, Pernille; Binder, Harald

    2014-01-01

    these alterations were also observed in an independent data set. METHODS: Global miRNA analysis was performed on prospectively collected serum samples from 24 post-menopausal women with estrogen receptor-positive early-stage breast cancer before surgery and 3 weeks after tumor resection using global LNA...... design and the same qPCR profiling platform, resulting in limited agreement. CONCLUSIONS: A panel of 4 circulating miRNAs exhibited significantly altered levels following radical resection of primary ER+ breast cancers in post-menopausal women. These specific miRNAs may be involved in tumorigenesis...

  13. Follistatin is a metastasis suppressor in a mouse model of HER2-positive breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seachrist, Darcie D; Sizemore, Steven T; Johnson, Emhonta; Abdul-Karim, Fadi W; Weber Bonk, Kristen L; Keri, Ruth A

    2017-06-05

    Follistatin (FST) is an intrinsic inhibitor of activin, a member of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily of ligands. The prognostic value of FST and its family members, the follistatin-like (FSTL) proteins, have been studied in various cancers. However, these studies, as well as limited functional analyses of the FSTL proteins, have yielded conflicting results on the role of these proteins in disease progression. Furthermore, very few have been focused on FST itself. We assessed whether FST may be a suppressor of tumorigenesis and/or metastatic progression in breast cancer. Using publicly available gene expression data, we examined the expression patterns of FST and INHBA, a subunit of activin, in normal and cancerous breast tissue and the prognostic value of FST in breast cancer metastases, recurrence-free survival, and overall survival. The functional effects of activin and FST on in vitro proliferation, migration, and invasion of breast cancer cells were also examined. FST overexpression in an autochthonous mouse model of breast cancer was then used to assess the in vivo impact of FST on metastatic progression. Examination of multiple breast cancer datasets revealed that FST expression is reduced in breast cancers compared with normal tissue and that low FST expression predicts increased metastasis and reduced overall survival. FST expression was also reduced in a mouse model of HER2/Neu-induced metastatic breast cancer. We found that FST blocks activin-induced breast epithelial cell migration in vitro, suggesting that its loss may promote breast cancer aggressiveness. To directly determine if FST restoration could inhibit metastatic progression, we transgenically expressed FST in the HER2/Neu model. Although FST had no impact on tumor initiation or growth, it completely blocked the formation of lung metastases. These data indicate that FST is a bona fide metastasis suppressor in this mouse model and support future efforts to develop an FST mimetic to

  14. Downregulated long non-coding RNA MEG3 in breast cancer regulates proliferation, migration and invasion by depending on p53’s transcriptional activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Lin [West Biostatistics and Cost-effectiveness Research Center, Medical Insurance Office, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, 610041, Sichuan (China); Li, Yu [Department of Anesthesiology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, 610041, Sichuan (China); Yang, Bangxiang, E-mail: b19933009@qq.coom [Department of Pain Management, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, 610041, Sichuan (China)

    2016-09-09

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) was found to play critical roles in tumorigenesis, hence, screen of tumor-related lncRNAs, identification of their biological roles is important for understanding the processes of tumorigenesis. In this study, we identified the expressing difference of several tumor-related lncRNAs in breast cancer samples and found that, MEG3, which is downregulated in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumor tissues, is also downregulated in breast cancer samples compared with adjacent tissues. For figuring out the effect of MEG3 in breast cancer cells MCF7 and MB231, we overexpressed MEG3 in these cells, and found that it resulted the inhibition of proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion capacities by enhancing p53’s transcriptional activity on its target genes, including p21, Maspin and KAI1. MEG3 presented similar effects in MB157, which is a p53-null breast cancer cell line, when functional p53 but not p53R273H mutant, which lacks transcriptional activity, was introduced. Surprisingly, overexpression of MEG3 activates p53’s transcriptional activity by decreasing MDM2’s transcription level, and thus stabilizes and accumulates P53. Taken together, our findings indicate that MEG3 is downregulated in breast cancer tissues and affects breast cancer cells’ malignant behaviors, which indicate MEG3 a potential therapeutic target for breast cancer. - Highlights: • MEG3 RNA is widely downregulated in breast tumor tissue. • MEG3 regulates P53 indirectly through transcriptional regulation of MDM2. • Under unstressed condition, MEG3-related P53 accumulation transcriptionally activates p53’s target genes. • MEG3 expression level tightly regulates proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion in breast tumor cells.

  15. The ubiquitin peptidase UCHL1 induces G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through stabilizing p53 and is frequently silenced in breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingxiu Xiang

    Full Text Available Breast cancer (BrCa is a complex disease driven by aberrant gene alterations and environmental factors. Recent studies reveal that abnormal epigenetic gene regulation also plays an important role in its pathogenesis. Ubiquitin carboxyl- terminal esterase L1 (UCHL1 is a tumor suppressor silenced by promoter methylation in multiple cancers, but its role and alterations in breast tumorigenesis remain unclear.We found that UCHL1 was frequently downregulated or silenced in breast cancer cell lines and tumor tissues, but readily expressed in normal breast tissues and mammary epithelial cells. Promoter methylation of UCHL1 was detected in 9 of 10 breast cancer cell lines (90% and 53 of 66 (80% primary tumors, but rarely in normal breast tissues, which was statistically correlated with advanced clinical stage and progesterone receptor status. Pharmacologic demethylation reactivated UCHL1 expression along with concomitant promoter demethylation. Ectopic expression of UCHL1 significantly suppressed the colony formation and proliferation of breast tumor cells, through inducing G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Subcellular localization study showed that UCHL1 increased cytoplasmic abundance of p53. We further found that UCHL1 induced p53 accumulation and reduced MDM2 protein level, and subsequently upregulated the expression of p21, as well as cleavage of caspase3 and PARP, but not in catalytic mutant UCHL1 C90S-expressed cells.UCHL1 exerts its tumor suppressive functions by inducing G0/G1cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in breast tumorigenesis, requiring its deubiquitinase activity. Its frequent silencing by promoter CpG methylation may serve as a potential tumor marker for breast cancer.

  16. Repression of Intestinal Stem Cell Function and Tumorigenesis through Direct Phosphorylation of β-Catenin and Yap by PKCζ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Llado

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal epithelial homeostasis requires continuous renewal supported by stem cells located in the base of the crypt. Disruption of this balance results in failure to regenerate and initiates tumorigenesis. The β-catenin and Yap pathways in Lgr5+ stem cells have been shown to be central to this process. However, the precise mechanisms by which these signaling molecules are regulated in the stem cell population are not totally understood. Protein kinase C ζ (PKCζ has been previously demonstrated to be a negative regulator of intestinal tumorigenesis. Here, we show that PKCζ suppresses intestinal stem cell function by promoting the downregulation of β-catenin and Yap through direct phosphorylation. PKCζ deficiency results in increased stem cell activity in organoid cultures and in vivo, accounting for the increased tumorigenic and regenerative activity response of Lgr5+-specific PKCζ-deficient mice. This demonstrates that PKCζ is central to the control of stem cells in intestinal cancer and homeostasis.

  17. PI3K/AKT/mTOR: role in breast cancer progression, drug resistance, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Zotano, Angel; Mayer, Ingrid A; Arteaga, Carlos L

    2016-12-01

    Anti-cancer cancer-targeted therapies are designed to exploit a particular vulnerability in the tumor, which in most cases results from its dependence on an oncogene and/or loss of a tumor suppressor. Mutations in the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT/mTOR pathway are freqcuently found in breast cancers and associated with cellular transformation, tumorigenesis, cancer progression, and drug resistance. Several drugs targeting PI3K/ATK/mTOR are currently in clinical trials, mainly in combination with endocrine therapy and anti-HER2 therapy. These drugs are the focus of this review.

  18. The role of the chemokine receptor XCR1 in breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang XL

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Xiao Li Yang,1,* Li Guo Qi,2,* Feng Juan Lin,1 Zhou Luo Ou1 1Department of Oncology, Breast Cancer Institute, Fudan University, Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, 2Department of Neurosurgery, Taian City Central Hospital, Taian, Shangdong, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Considerable attention has recently been paid to the application of chemokines to cancer immunotherapy due to their complex role in cell proliferation, invasion, metastasis, and tumorigenesis, which extends beyond the regulation of lymphocyte migration during immune responses. The expression and the function of the chemokine receptor XCR1 on breast cancer have remained elusive to date. In this study, the expressions of XCR1 mRNA were tested by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction in one breast epithelial cell line (MCF-10A and nine breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB-231, 231HM, 231BO, MDA-MB-468, MCF-7, T47D, Bcap-37, ZR-75-30, and SK-BR-3. We established XCR1-overexpressing breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 (231/XCR1 in XCR1 low expression cell line MDA-MB-231 (231. The ability of proliferation, invasion, and metastasis was measured by CCK8, plate cloning formation, and transwell analysis, respectively, in XCR1-overexpressing breast cancer cell lines (231/XCR1 and their parental cell line MDA-MB-231/Vector (simplified as “231/Vector”; 5×106/100 μL cells were inoculated in mammary fat pad of BALB/c nude mice. There were six BALB/c nude mice in the experimental group and control group. Protein expression was analyzed by cell immunofluorescence and Western blot. The growth of XCR1-overexpressing human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 in vitro was restrained and tumorigenesis in vivo was also extenuated, its mechanism may involve in the inhibition of MAPK and PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway, but increase in LC3 expression. However, the overexpression of XCR1 in human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 in vitro

  19. Methyl-donor nutrients inhibit breast cancer cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chung S; Cho, Kyongshin; Bae, Dong R; Joo, Nam E; Kim, Hyung H; Mabasa, Lawrence; Fowler, Andrea W

    2008-01-01

    Lipotropes (methyl group containing nutrients, including methionine, choline, folate, and vitamin B(12)) are dietary methyl donors and cofactors that are involved in one-carbon metabolism, which is important for genomic DNA methylation reactions and nucleic acid synthesis. One-carbon metabolism provides methyl groups for all biological methylation pathways and is highly dependent on dietary supplementation of methyl nutrients. Nutrition is an important determinant of breast cancer risk and tumor behavior, and dietary intervention may be an effective approach to prevent breast cancer. Apoptosis is important for the regulation of homeostasis and tumorigenesis. The anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 may be a regulatory target in cancer therapy; controlling or modulating its expression may be a therapeutic strategy against breast cancer. In this study, the effects of lipotrope supplementation on the growth and death of human breast cancer cell lines T47D and MCF-7 were examined and found to inhibit growth of both T47D and MCF-7 cells. Furthermore, the ratios of apoptotic cells to the total number of cells were approximately 44% and 34% higher in the lipotrope-supplemented treatments of T47D and MCF-7 cancer cells, respectively, compared with the control treatments. More importantly, Bcl-2 protein expression was decreased by approximately 25% from lipotrope supplementation in T47D cells, suggesting that lipotropes can induce breast cancer cell death by direct downregulation of Bcl-2 protein expression. Cancer treatment failure is often correlated with Bcl-2 protein upregulation. These data may be useful in the development of effective nutritional strategies to prevent and reduce breast cancer in humans.

  20. A zebrafish transgenic model of Ewing’s sarcoma reveals conserved mediators of EWS-FLI1 tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie W. Leacock

    2012-01-01

    Ewing’s sarcoma, a malignant bone tumor of children and young adults, is a member of the small-round-blue-cell tumor family. Ewing’s sarcoma family tumors (ESFTs, which include peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNETs, are characterized by chromosomal translocations that generate fusions between the EWS gene and ETS-family transcription factors, most commonly FLI1. The EWS-FLI1 fusion oncoprotein represents an attractive therapeutic target for treatment of Ewing’s sarcoma. The cell of origin of ESFT and the molecular mechanisms by which EWS-FLI1 mediates tumorigenesis remain unknown, and few animal models of Ewing’s sarcoma exist. Here, we report the use of zebrafish as a vertebrate model of EWS-FLI1 function and tumorigenesis. Mosaic expression of the human EWS-FLI1 fusion protein in zebrafish caused the development of tumors with histology strongly resembling that of human Ewing’s sarcoma. The incidence of tumors increased in a p53 mutant background, suggesting that the p53 pathway suppresses EWS-FLI1-driven tumorigenesis. Gene expression profiling of the zebrafish tumors defined a set of genes that might be regulated by EWS-FLI1, including the zebrafish ortholog of a crucial EWS-FLI1 target gene in humans. Stable zebrafish transgenic lines expressing EWS-FLI1 under the control of the heat-shock promoter exhibit altered embryonic development and defective convergence and extension, suggesting that EWS-FLI1 interacts with conserved developmental pathways. These results indicate that functional targets of EWS-FLI1 that mediate tumorigenesis are conserved from zebrafish to human and provide a novel context in which to study the function of this fusion oncogene.

  1. The p130 Isoform of Angiomotin Is Required for Yap-Mediated Hepatic Epithelial Cell Proliferation and Tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Chunling; Shen, Zhewei; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat; Dawany, Noor; Troutman, Scott; Showe, Louise C.; Liu, Qin; Shimono, Akihiko; Sudol, Marius; Holmgren, Lars; Stanger, Ben Z.; Kissil, Joseph L.

    2014-01-01

    The Hippo-Yap signaling pathway regulates a number of developmental and adult cellular processes, including cell fate determination, tissue growth, and tumorigenesis. Members of the scaffold protein angiomotin (Amot) family interact with several Hippo pathway components, including Yap (Yes-associated protein), and either stimulate or inhibit Yap activity. We used a combination of genetic, biochemical, and transcriptional approaches to assess the functional consequences of the Amot-Yap interaction in mice and in human cells. Mice with a liver-specific Amot knockout exhibited reduced hepatic “oval cell” proliferation and tumorigenesis in response to toxin-induced injury or when crossed with mice lacking the tumor suppressor Nf2. Biochemical examination of the Amot-Yap interaction revealed that the p130 splicing isoform of Amot (Amot-p130) and Yap interacted in both the cytoplasm and nucleus, which involved binding of PPxY and LPxY motifs in Amot-p130 to WW domains of Yap. In the cytoplasm, Amot-p130 prevented the phosphorylation of Yap by blocking access of the WW domains to the kinase Lats1. Within the nucleus, Amot-p130 was associated with the transcriptional complex containing Yap and Teads (TEA domain family members) and contributed to the regulation of a subset of Yap target genes, many of which are associated with tumorigenesis. These findings indicated that Amot acts as a Yap cofactor, preventing Yap phosphorylation and augmenting its activity toward a specific set of genes that facilitate tumorigenesis. PMID:24003254

  2. Evaluating the Significance of CDK2-PELP1 Axis in Tumorigenesis and Hormone Therapy Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    Rambabu Challa1, Bramanandam Manavathi3, nee Yew2, Rakesh Kumar4, Rajeshwar Rao Tekmal1, and Ratna K. Vadlamudi1ract Estr influen recept cancer genesi the...breast cancer progression. Cancer Res; 70(18); 7166–75. ©2010 AACR.CDK2 of tum emerg stream crucia Estr prolife glands gressio cycle ductio is prop

  3. Imaging Guided Breast Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masroor, Imrana; Afzal, Shaista; Sufian, Saira Naz

    2016-06-01

    Breast imaging is a developing field, with new and upcoming innovations, decreasing the morbidity and mortality related to breast pathologies with main emphasis on breast cancer. Breast imaging has an essential role in the detection and management of breast disease. It includes a multimodality approach, i.e. mammography, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, nuclear medicine techniques and interventional procedures, done for the diagnosis and definitive management of breast abnormalities. The range of methods to perform biopsy of a suspicious breast lesion found on imaging has also increased markedly from the 1990s with hi-technological progress in surgical as well as percutaneous breast biopsy methods. The image guided percutaneous breast biopsy procedures cause minimal breast scarring, save time, and relieve the patient of the anxiety of going to the operation theatre. The aim of this review was to describe and discuss the different image guided breast biopsy techniques presently employed along with the indications, contraindication, merits and demerits of each method.

  4. Preventive Inhibition of Liver Tumorigenesis by Systemic Activation of Innate Immune Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin; Liao, Rui; Wang, Gaowei; Yang, Bi-Huei; Luo, Xiaolin; Varki, Nissi M; Qiu, Shuang-Jian; Ren, Bing; Fu, Wenxian; Feng, Gen-Sheng

    2017-11-14

    Liver cancer has become the second most deadly malignant disease, with no efficient targeted or immune therapeutic agents available yet. While dissecting the roles of cytoplasmic signaling molecules in hepatocarcinogenesis using an inducible mouse gene targeting system, Mx1-cre, we identified a potent liver tumor-inhibitory effect of synthetic double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (pIC), an inducer of the Mx1-cre system. Injection of pIC at the pre-cancer stage robustly suppressed liver tumorigenesis either induced by chemical carcinogens or by Pten loss and associated hepatosteatosis. The immunostimulatory dsRNA inhibited liver cancer initiation, apparently by boosting multiple anti-tumor activities of innate immunity, including induction of immunoregulatory cytokines, activation of NK cells and dendritic cells, and reprogramming of macrophage polarization. This study paves the way for the development of preventive and early interfering strategies for liver cancer to reduce the rapidly increasing incidences of liver cancer in an ever-growing population with chronic liver disorders. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A FTH1 gene:pseudogene:microRNA network regulates tumorigenesis in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Jia Jia; Kwok, Zhi Hao; Chew, Xiao Hong; Zhang, Bin; Liu, Chao; Soong, Tuck Wah; Yang, Henry; Tay, Yvonne

    2017-12-12

    Non-coding RNAs play a vital role in diverse cellular processes. Pseudogenes, which are non-coding homologs of protein-coding genes, were once considered non-functional evolutional relics. However, recent studies have shown that pseudogene transcripts can regulate their parental transcripts by sequestering shared microRNAs (miRNAs), thus acting as competing endogenous RNAs (ceRNAs). In this study, we utilize an unbiased screen to identify the ferritin heavy chain 1 (FTH1) transcript and multiple FTH1 pseudogenes as targets of several oncogenic miRNAs in prostate cancer (PCa). We characterize the critical role of this FTH1 gene:pseudogene:miRNA network in regulating tumorigenesis in PCa, whereby oncogenic miRNAs downregulate the expression of FTH1 and its pseudogenes to drive oncogenesis. We further show that impairing miRNA binding and subsequent ceRNA crosstalk completely rescues the slow growth phenotype in vitro and in vivo. Our results also demonstrate the reciprocal regulation between the pseudogenes and intracellular iron levels, which are crucial for multiple physiological and pathophysiological processes. In summary, we describe an extensive gene:pseudogene network comprising multiple miRNAs and multiple pseudogenes derived from a single parental gene. The network could be regulated through multiple mechanisms to modulate iron storage in various signaling pathways, the deregulation of which results in PCa development and progression. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  6. Intestinal tumorigenesis is not affected by progesterone signaling in rodent models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarom Heijmans

    Full Text Available Clinical data suggest that progestins have chemopreventive properties in the development of colorectal cancer. We set out to examine a potential protective effect of progestins and progesterone signaling on colon cancer development. In normal and neoplastic intestinal tissue, we found that the progesterone receptor (PR is not expressed. Expression was confined to sporadic mesenchymal cells. To analyze the influence of systemic progesterone receptor signaling, we crossed mice that lacked the progesterone receptor (PRKO to the Apc(Min/+ mouse, a model for spontaneous intestinal polyposis. PRKO-Apc(Min/+ mice exhibited no change in polyp number, size or localization compared to Apc(Min/+. To examine effects of progestins on the intestinal epithelium that are independent of the PR, we treated mice with MPA. We found no effects of either progesterone or MPA on gross intestinal morphology or epithelial proliferation. Also, in rats treated with MPA, injection with the carcinogen azoxymethane did not result in a difference in the number or size of aberrant crypt foci, a surrogate end-point for adenoma development. We conclude that expression of the progesterone receptor is limited to cells in the intestinal mesenchyme. We did not observe any effect of progesterone receptor signaling or of progestin treatment in rodent models of intestinal tumorigenesis.

  7. Tumorigenesis in the U.S. radium luminizers: How unsafe was this occupation?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, R.G.

    1994-05-01

    Dose-response data are presented from the U.S. female workers who were exposed to radium through the painting of luminous dials and who subsequently had their skeletal burdens measured by whole-body counting and radon breath analyses. Lognormal data analyses were done for radium-induced bone sarcomas and head carcinomas after the populations of the respective doses were first determined to be lognormally distributed. The calculated geometric mean and standard deviation for each dose population were used to construct lognormal distributions that subsequently could be used for intercomparisons. To date, a total of 1,391 female luminizers with average estimated skeletal doses below 10 Gy have not shown bone sarcomas or head carcinomas. A primary purpose of this paper is to support the case that {sup 226.228}Ra is one of the radionuclide sources that exemplify in humans a {open_quote}threshold{close_quotes} dose or a dose below which there should be little concern for tumorigenesis.

  8. Aberrantly expressed microRNAs in the context of bladder tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Young Lee

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs, small noncoding RNAs 19–22 nucleotides in length, play a major role in negative regulation of gene expression at the posttranscriptional level. Several miRNAs act as tumor suppressors or oncogenes that control cell differentiation, proliferation, apoptosis, or angiogenesis during tumorigenesis. To date, 19 research groups have published large-scale expression profiles that identified 261 miRNAs differentially expressed in bladder cancer, of which 76 were confirmed to have consistent expression patterns by two or more groups. These consistently expressed miRNAs participated in regulation of multiple biological processes and factors, including axon guidance, cancer-associated proteoglycans, and the ErbB and transforming growth factorbeta signaling pathways. Because miRNAs can be released from cancer cells into urine via secreted particles, we propose that miRNAs differentially expressed between tissue and urine could serve as predictors of bladder cancer, and could thus be exploited for noninvasive diagnosis.

  9. Influence of dietary menhaden oil on 7,12-dimethylbenzanthracene induced mammary tumorigenesis in rats

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    O' Connor, T.P.; Peterson, F.; Campbell, T.C.

    1986-03-05

    The effect of dietary menhaden oil on 7,12-dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA) induced mammary tumorigenesis was examined in female Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats were obtained at age 28 days and acclimated until age 50 days when they received a single i.g. dose of 5 mg DMBA dissolved in 1 ml corn oil. Rats were then randomly assigned to one of four treatment groups with 25 rats per group. One group was fed a diet based on fish protein (freeze-dried cod) and corn oil (F/C). The second group received a diet based on fish protein and menhaden oil (F/M). The third group received a casein based diet with corn oil as the lipid source (C/C). The fourth group was fed a casein based diet with menhaden oil as the lipid source (C/M). Both the protein and lipid sources were fed at a level of 20% by weight of the diets. Rats were palpated weekly to check for mammary tumor development and the experiment was terminated 24 weeks after DMBA administration. Rats fed menhaden oil as a lipid source (F/M and C/M groups) developed significantly fewer mammary tumors than animals on the corn oil based diets (F/C and C/C groups, respectively). Thus, menhaden oil, rich in omega-3 fatty acids, significantly inhibited the development of DMBA induced mammary tumors in this experiment.

  10. Ninjurin 1 has two opposing functions in tumorigenesis in a p53-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hee Jung; Zhang, Jin; Yan, Wensheng; Cho, Seong-Jun; Lucchesi, Christopher; Chen, Mingyi; Huang, Eric C; Scoumanne, Ariane; Zhang, Weici; Chen, Xinbin

    2017-10-24

    WT p53 is critical for tumor suppression, whereas mutant p53 promotes tumor progression. Nerve injury-induced protein 1 (Ninj1) is a target of p53 and forms a feedback loop with p53 by repressing p53 mRNA translation. Here, we show that loss of Ninj1 increased mutant p53 expression and, subsequently, enhanced cell growth and migration in cells carrying a mutant p53. In contrast, loss of Ninj1 inhibited cell growth and migration in cells carrying a WT p53. To explore the biological significance of Ninj1, we generated a cohort of Ninj1-deficient mice and found that Ninj1+/- mice were prone to systemic inflammation and insulitis, but not to spontaneous tumors. We also found that loss of Ninj1 altered the tumor susceptibility in both mutant p53 and p53-null background. Specifically, in a mutant p53(R270H) background, Ninj1 deficiency shortened the lifespan, altered the tumor spectrum, and increased tumor burden, likely via enhanced expression of mutant p53. In a p53-null background, Ninj1 deficiency significantly increased the incidence of T-lymphoblastic lymphoma. Taken together, our data suggest that depending on p53 genetic status, Ninj1 has two opposing functions in tumorigenesis and that the Ninj1-p53 loop may be targeted to manage inflammatory diseases and cancer. Published under the PNAS license.

  11. Nisin ZP, a Bacteriocin and Food Preservative, Inhibits Head and Neck Cancer Tumorigenesis and Prolongs Survival.

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    Kamarajan, Pachiyappan; Hayami, Takayuki; Matte, Bibiana; Liu, Yang; Danciu, Theodora; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Worden, Francis; Kapila, Sunil; Kapila, Yvonne

    2015-01-01

    The use of small antimicrobial peptides or bacteriocins, like nisin, to treat cancer is a new approach that holds great promise. Nisin exemplifies this new approach because it has been used safely in humans for many years as a food preservative, and recent laboratory studies support its anti-tumor potential in head and neck cancer. Previously, we showed that nisin (2.5%, low content) has antitumor potential in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) in vitro and in vivo. The current studies explored a naturally occurring variant of nisin (nisin ZP; 95%, high content) for its antitumor effects in vitro and in vivo. Nisin ZP induced the greatest level of apoptosis in HNSCC cells compared to low content nisin. HNSCC cells treated with increasing concentrations of nisin ZP exhibited increasing levels of apoptosis and decreasing levels of cell proliferation, clonogenic capacity, and sphere formation. Nisin ZP induced apoptosis through a calpain-dependent pathway in HNSCC cells but not in human oral keratinocytes. Nisin ZP also induced apoptosis dose-dependently in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) with concomitant decreases in vascular sprout formation in vitro and reduced intratumoral microvessel density in vivo. Nisin ZP reduced tumorigenesis in vivo and long-term treatment with nisin ZP extended survival. In addition, nisin treated mice exhibited normal organ histology with no evidence of inflammation, fibrosis or necrosis. In summary, nisin ZP exhibits greater antitumor effects than low content nisin, and thus has the potential to serve as a novel therapeutic for HNSCC.

  12. Cancer-associated splicing variant of tumor suppressor AIMP2/p38: pathological implication in tumorigenesis.

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    Jin Woo Choi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Although ARS-interacting multifunctional protein 2 (AIMP2, also named as MSC p38 was first found as a component for a macromolecular tRNA synthetase complex, it was recently discovered to dissociate from the complex and work as a potent tumor suppressor. Upon DNA damage, AIMP2 promotes apoptosis through the protective interaction with p53. However, it was not demonstrated whether AIMP2 was indeed pathologically linked to human cancer. In this work, we found that a splicing variant of AIMP2 lacking exon 2 (AIMP2-DX2 is highly expressed by alternative splicing in human lung cancer cells and patient's tissues. AIMP2-DX2 compromised pro-apoptotic activity of normal AIMP2 through the competitive binding to p53. The cells with higher level of AIMP2-DX2 showed higher propensity to form anchorage-independent colonies and increased resistance to cell death. Mice constitutively expressing this variant showed increased susceptibility to carcinogen-induced lung tumorigenesis. The expression ratio of AIMP2-DX2 to normal AIMP2 was increased according to lung cancer stage and showed a positive correlation with the survival of patients. Thus, this work identified an oncogenic splicing variant of a tumor suppressor, AIMP2/p38, and suggests its potential for anti-cancer target.

  13. A quantitative PCR method to detect blood microRNAs associated with tumorigenesis in transgenic mice

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    Bachireddy Pavan

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract MicroRNA (miRNA dysregulation frequently occurs in cancer. Analysis of whole blood miRNA in tumor models has not been widely reported, but could potentially lead to novel assays for early detection and monitoring of cancer. To determine whether miRNAs associated with malignancy could be detected in the peripheral blood, we used real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR to determine miRNA profiles in whole blood obtained from transgenic mice with c-MYC-induced lymphoma, hepatocellular carcinoma and osteosarcoma. The PCR-based assays used in our studies require only 10 nanograms of total RNA, allowing serial mini-profiles (20 – 30 miRNAs to be carried out on individual animals over time. Blood miRNAs were measured from mice at different stages of MYC-induced lymphomagenesis and regression. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of the data identified specific miRNA expression profiles that correlated with tumor type and stage. The miRNAs found to be altered in the blood of mice with tumors frequently reverted to normal levels upon tumor regression. Our results suggest that specific changes in blood miRNA can be detected during tumorigenesis and tumor regression.

  14. T-cell activation promotes tumorigenesis in inflammation-associated cancer

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    Lairmore Michael

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chronic inflammation has long been associated with a wide range of malignancies, is now widely accepted as a risk factor for development of cancer, and has been implicated as a promoter of a variety of cancers including hematopoietic malignancies. We have described a mouse model uniquely suited to examine the link between inflammation and lymphoma in which the Tax oncogene, expressed in activated T and NK cells, perpetuates chronic inflammation that begins as microscopic intraepithelial lesions and develops into inflammatory nodules, subcutaneous tumors, and large granular lymphocytic leukemia. The use of bioluminescent imaging in these mice has expanded our ability to interrogate aspects of inflammation and tumorigenesis non-invasively. Here we demonstrate that bioluminescence induction in these mice correlated with inflammation resulting from wounding, T cell activation, and exposure to chemical agents. In experiments in which long-term effects of inflammation on disease outcome were monitored, the development of lymphoma was promoted by an inflammatory stimulus. Finally we demonstrated that activation of T-cells in T-cell receptor (TCR transgenic TAX-LUC animals dramatically exacerbated the development of subcutaneous TCR- CD16+ LGL tumors. The role of activated T-cells and acquired immunity in inflammation-associated cancers is broadly applicable to hematopoietic malignancies, and we propose these mice will be of use in dissecting mechanisms by which activated T-cells promote lymphomagenesis in vivo.

  15. β-catenin functions pleiotropically in differentiation and tumorigenesis in mouse embryo-derived stem cells.

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    Noriko Okumura

    Full Text Available The canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway plays a crucial role in the maintenance of the balance between proliferation and differentiation throughout embryogenesis and tissue homeostasis. β-Catenin, encoded by the Ctnnb1 gene, mediates an intracellular signaling cascade activated by Wnt. It also plays an important role in the maintenance of various types of stem cells including adult stem cells and cancer stem cells. However, it is unclear if β-catenin is required for the derivation of mouse embryo-derived stem cells. Here, we established β-catenin-deficient (β-cat(Δ/Δ mouse embryo-derived stem cells and showed that β-catenin is not essential for acquiring self-renewal potential in the derivation of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs. However, teratomas formed from embryo-derived β-cat(Δ/Δ ESCs were immature germ cell tumors without multilineage differentiated cell types. Re-expression of functional β-catenin eliminated their neoplastic, transformed phenotype and restored pluripotency, thereby rescuing the mutant ESCs. Our findings demonstrate that β-catenin has pleiotropic effects in ESCs; it is required for the differentiation of ESCs and prevents them from acquiring tumorigenic character. These results highlight β-catenin as the gatekeeper in differentiation and tumorigenesis in ESCs.

  16. SDH mutations in tumorigenesis and inherited endocrine tumours: lesson from the phaeochromocytoma-paraganglioma syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasini, B; Stratakis, C A

    2009-07-01

    A genetic predisposition for paragangliomas and adrenal or extra-adrenal phaeochromocytomas was recognized years ago. Beside the well-known syndromes associated with an increased risk of adrenal phaeochromocytoma, Von Hippel Lindau disease, multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 and neurofibromatosis type 1, the study of inherited predisposition to head and neck paragangliomas led to the discovery of the novel 'paraganglioma-phaeochromocytoma syndrome' caused by germline mutations in three genes encoding subunits of the succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) enzyme (SDHB, SDHC and SDHD) thus opening an unexpected connection between mitochondrial tumour suppressor genes and neural crest-derived cancers. Germline mutations in SDH genes are responsible for 6% and 9% of sporadic paragangliomas and phaeochromocytomas, respectively, 29% of paediatric cases, 38% of malignant tumours and more than 80% of familial aggregations of paraganglioma and phaeochromocytoma. The disease is characterized by autosomal dominant inheritance with a peculiar parent-of-origin effect for SDHD mutations. Life-time tumour risk seems higher than 70% with variable clinical manifestantions depending on the mutated gene. In this review we summarize the most recent knowledge about the role of SDH deficiency in tumorigenesis, the spectrum and prevalence of SDH mutations derived from several series of cases, the related clinical manifestantions including rare phenotypes, such as the association of paragangliomas with gastrointestinal stromal tumours and kidney cancers, and the biological hypotheses attempting to explain genotype to phenotype correlation.

  17. A potential role for Helicobacter pylori heat shock protein 60 in gastric tumorigenesis

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    Lin, Chen-Si [Department of Biological Science and Technology, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsin-Chu, Taiwan (China); School of Veterinary Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); He, Pei-Juin [Department of Biological Science and Technology, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsin-Chu, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Nu-Man [School of Medical Laboratory and Biotechnology, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Li, Chi-Han; Yang, Shang-Chih; Hsu, Wei-Tung [Department of Biological Science and Technology, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsin-Chu, Taiwan (China); Wu, Ming-Shiang [Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Wu, Chang-Jer [Department of Food Science, National Taiwan Ocean University, Keelung, Taiwan (China); Cheng, Tain-Lu [Department of Biotechnology, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Liao, Kuang-Wen, E-mail: kitchhen@yahoo.com.tw [Department of Biological Science and Technology, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsin-Chu, Taiwan (China)

    2010-02-05

    Helicobacter pylori has been found to promote the malignant process leading to gastric cancer. Heat shock protein 60 of H. pylori (HpHSP60) was previously been identified as a potent immunogene. This study investigates the role of HpHSP60 in gastric cancer carcinogenesis. The effect of HpHSP60 on cell proliferation, anti-death activity, angiogenesis and cell migration were explored. The results showed that HpHSP60 enhanced migration by gastric cancer cells and promoted tube formation by umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs); however, HpHSP60 did not increase cell proliferation nor was this protein able to rescue gastric cancer cells from death. Moreover, the results also indicated HpHSP60 had different effects on AGS gastric cancer cells or THP-1 monocytic cells in terms of their expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, which are known to be important to cancer development. We propose that HpHSP60 may trigger the initiation of carcinogenesis by inducing pro-inflammatory cytokine release and by promoting angiogenesis and metastasis. Thus, this extracellular pathogen-derived HSP60 is potentially a vigorous virulence factor that can act as a carcinogen during gastric tumorigenesis.

  18. Spatiotemporal Heterogeneity Characterizes the Genetic Landscape of Pheochromocytoma and Defines Early Events in Tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crona, Joakim; Backman, Samuel; Maharjan, Rajani; Mayrhofer, Markus; Stålberg, Peter; Isaksson, Anders; Hellman, Per; Björklund, Peyman

    2015-10-01

    Pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma (PPGL) patients display heterogeneity in the clinical presentation and underlying genetic cause. The degree of inter- and intratumor genetic heterogeneity has not yet been defined. In PPGLs from 94 patients, we analyzed LOH, copy-number variations, and mutation status of SDHA, SDHB, SDHC, SDHD, SDHAF2, VHL, EPAS1, NF1, RET, TMEM127, MAX, and HRAS using high-density SNP array and targeted deep sequencing, respectively. Genetic heterogeneity was determined through (i) bioinformatics analysis of individual samples that estimated absolute purity and ploidy from SNP array data and (ii) comparison of paired tumor samples that allowed reconstruction of phylogenetic trees. Mutations were found in 61% of the tumors and correlated with specific patterns of somatic copy-number aberrations (SCNA) and degree of nontumoral cell admixture. Intratumor genetic heterogeneity was observed in 74 of 136 samples using absolute bioinformatics estimations and in 22 of 24 patients by comparison of paired samples. In addition, a low genetic concordance was observed between paired primary tumors and distant metastases. This allowed for reconstructing the life history of individual tumors, identifying somatic mutations as well as copy-number loss of 3p and 11p (VHL subgroup), 1p (Cluster 2), and 17q (NF1 subgroup) as early events in PPGL tumorigenesis. Genomic landscapes of PPGL are specific to mutation subtype and characterized by genetic heterogeneity both within and between tumor lesions of the same patient. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. Long non-coding RNA ROR decoys gene-specific histone methylation to promote tumorigenesis.

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    Fan, Jiayan; Xing, Yue; Wen, Xuyang; Jia, Renbin; Ni, Hongyan; He, Jie; Ding, Xia; Pan, Hui; Qian, Guanxiang; Ge, Shengfang; Hoffman, Andrew R; Zhang, He; Fan, Xianqun

    2015-07-14

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are not translated into proteins and were initially considered to be part of the 'dark matter' of the genome. Recently, it has been shown that lncRNAs play a role in the recruitment of chromatin modifying complexes and can influence gene expression. However, it is unknown if lncRNAs function in a similar way in cancer. Here, we show that the lncRNA ROR occupies and activates the TESC promoter by repelling the histone G9A methyltransferase and promoting the release of histone H3K9 methylation. Suppression of ROR in tumors results in silencing of TESC expression, and G9A-mediated histone H3K9 methylation in the TESC promoter is restored, which significantly reduces tumor growth and metastasis. Without ROR silencing, TESC knockdown presents consistent and significant reductions in tumor progression. Our results reveal a novel mechanism by which ROR may serve as a decoy oncoRNA that blocks binding surfaces, preventing the recruitment of histone modifying enzymes, thereby specifying a new pattern of histone modifications that promote tumorigenesis.

  20. The role of microRNAs in the tumorigenesis of ovarian cancer.

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    Gianpiero eDi Leva

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC is a complex disease, with multiple histological subtypes recognized. There have been major advances in the understanding of the cellular and molecular biology of this human malignancy, however the survival rate of women with epithelial ovarian cancer has changed little since platinum based-treatment was introduced more than 30 years ago. Since 2006, an increasing number of studies have indicated an essential role for microRNAs in ovarian cancer tumorigenesis. Several microRNA profiling studies have shown that they associate with different aspects of ovarian cancer (tumor subtype, stage, histological grade, prognosis and therapy resistance and pointed to a critical role for microRNAs in the pathogenesis and progression of EOC. In this review, we discuss the current data concerning the accumulating evidence of the modulated expression of microRNAs in EOC, their role in diagnosis, prognosis and prediction of response to therapy. Given the heterogeneity of this disease, it is likely that increases in long-term survival might be also achieved by translating the recent insights of miRNAs involvement in EOC into novel targeted therapies that will have a major impact on the management of ovarian cancer.

  1. Targeted p16(Ink4a) epimutation causes tumorigenesis and reduces survival in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Da-Hai; Waterland, Robert A; Zhang, Pumin; Schady, Deborah; Chen, Miao-Hsueh; Guan, Yongtao; Gadkari, Manasi; Shen, Lanlan

    2014-09-01

    Cancer has long been viewed as a genetic disease; however, epigenetic silencing as the result of aberrant promoter DNA methylation is frequently associated with cancer development, suggesting an epigenetic component to the disease. Nonetheless, it has remained unclear whether an epimutation (an aberrant change in epigenetic regulation) can induce tumorigenesis. Here, we exploited a functionally validated cis-acting regulatory element and devised a strategy to induce developmentally regulated genomic targeting of DNA methylation. We used this system to target DNA methylation within the p16(Ink4a) promoter in mice in vivo. Engineered p16(Ink4a) promoter hypermethylation led to transcriptional suppression in somatic tissues during aging and increased the incidence of spontaneous cancers in these mice. Further, mice carrying a germline p16(Ink4a) mutation in one allele and a somatic epimutation in the other had accelerated tumor onset and substantially shortened tumor-free survival. Taken together, these results provide direct functional evidence that p16(Ink4a) epimutation drives tumor formation and malignant progression and validate a targeted methylation approach to epigenetic engineering.

  2. Detection of tumorigenesis in urinary bladder with optical coherence tomography: optical characterization of morphological changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, T.-Q.; Zeidel, M. L.; Pan, Yingtian

    2002-12-01

    Most transitional cell tumorigenesis involves three stages of subcellular morphological changes: hyperplasia, dysplasia and neoplasia. Previous studies demonstrated that owing to its high spatial resolution and intermediate penetration depth, current OCT technology including endoscopic OCT could delineate the urothelium, submucosa and the upper muscular layers of the bladder wall. In this paper, we will discuss the sensitivity and limitations of OCT in diagnosing and staging bladder cancer. Based on histomorphometric evaluations of nuclear morphology, we modeled the resultant backscattering changes and the characteristic changes in OCT image contrast. In the theoretical modeling, we assumed that nuclei were the primary sources of scattering and were uniformly distributed in the uroepithelium, and compared with the results of the corresponding prior OCT measurements. According to our theoretical modeling, normal bladder shows a thin, uniform and low scattering urothelium, so does an inflammatory lesion except thickening in the submucosa. Compared with a normal bladder, a hyperplastic lesion exhibits a thickened, low scattering urothelium whereas a neoplastic lesion shows a thickened urothelium with increased backscattering. These results support our previous animal study that OCT has the potential to differentiate inflammation, hyperplasia, and neoplasia by quantifying the changes in urothelial thickening and backscattering. The results also suggest that OCT might not have the sensitivity to differentiate the subtle morphological changes between hyperplasia and dysplasia based on minor backscattering differences.

  3. MicroRNA-24 Modulates Aflatoxin B1-Related Hepatocellular Carcinoma Prognosis and Tumorigenesis

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    Yi-Xiao Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNA-24 (miR-24 may be involved in neoplastic process; however, the role of this microRNA in the hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC related to aflatoxin B1 (AFB1 has not been well elaborated. Here, we tested miR-24 expression in 207 pathology-diagnosed HCC cases from high AFB1 exposure areas and HCC cells. We found that miR-24 was upregulated in HCC tumor tissues relative to adjacent noncancerous tissue samples, and that the high expression of miR-24 was significantly correlated with larger tumor size, higher microvessel density, and tumor dedifferentiation. Additionally, this microRNA overexpression modified the recurrence-free survival (relative hazard ratio [HR], 4.75; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.66–8.47 and overall survival (HR=3.58, 95% CI = 2.34–5.46 of HCC patients. Furthermore, we observed some evidence of joint effects between miR-24 and AFB1 exposure on HCC prognosis. Functionally, miR-24 overexpression progressed tumor cells proliferation, inhibited cell apoptosis, and developed the formation of AFB1-DNA adducts. These results indicate for the first time that miR-24 may modify AFB1-related HCC prognosis and tumorigenesis.

  4. Effects of hemin and nitrite on intestinal tumorigenesis in the A/J Min/+ mouse model.

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    Marianne Sødring

    Full Text Available Red and processed meats are considered risk factors for colorectal cancer (CRC; however, the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. One cause for the potential link between CRC and meat is the heme iron in red meat. Two pathways by which heme and CRC promotion may be linked have been suggested: fat peroxidation and N-nitrosation. In the present work we have used the novel A/J Min/+ mouse model to test the effects of dietary hemin (a model of red meat, and hemin in combination with nitrite (a model of processed meat on intestinal tumorigenesis. Mice were fed a low Ca2+ and vitamin D semi-synthetic diet with added hemin and/or nitrite for 8 weeks post weaning, before termination followed by excision and examination of the intestinal tract. Our results indicate that dietary hemin decreased the number of colonic lesions in the A/J Min/+ mouse. However, our results also showed that the opposite occurred in the small intestine, where dietary hemin appeared to stimulate tumor growth. Furthermore, we find that nitrite, which did not have an effect in the colon, appeared to have a suppressive effect on tumor growth in the small intestine.

  5. The Dynamic Epigenetic Landscape of the Retina During Development, Reprogramming, and Tumorigenesis.

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    Aldiri, Issam; Xu, Beisi; Wang, Lu; Chen, Xiang; Hiler, Daniel; Griffiths, Lyra; Valentine, Marc; Shirinifard, Abbas; Thiagarajan, Suresh; Sablauer, Andras; Barabas, Marie-Elizabeth; Zhang, Jiakun; Johnson, Dianna; Frase, Sharon; Zhou, Xin; Easton, John; Zhang, Jinghui; Mardis, Elaine R; Wilson, Richard K; Downing, James R; Dyer, Michael A

    2017-05-03

    In the developing retina, multipotent neural progenitors undergo unidirectional differentiation in a precise spatiotemporal order. Here we profile the epigenetic and transcriptional changes that occur during retinogenesis in mice and humans. Although some progenitor genes and cell cycle genes were epigenetically silenced during retinogenesis, the most dramatic change was derepression of cell-type-specific differentiation programs. We identified developmental-stage-specific super-enhancers and showed that most epigenetic changes are conserved in humans and mice. To determine how the epigenome changes during tumorigenesis and reprogramming, we performed integrated epigenetic analysis of murine and human retinoblastomas and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from murine rod photoreceptors. The retinoblastoma epigenome mapped to the developmental stage when retinal progenitors switch from neurogenic to terminal patterns of cell division. The epigenome of retinoblastomas was more similar to that of the normal retina than that of retina-derived iPSCs, and we identified retina-specific epigenetic memory. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Absence of ERK5/MAPK7 delays tumorigenesis in Atm-/- mice.

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    Granados-Jaén, Alba; Angulo-Ibáñez, Maria; Rovira-Clavé, Xavier; Gamez, Celina Paola Vasquez; Soriano, Francesc X; Reina, Manuel; Espel, Enric

    2016-11-15

    Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is a cell cycle checkpoint kinase that upon activation by DNA damage leads to cell cycle arrest and DNA repair or apoptosis. The absence of Atm or the occurrence of loss-of-function mutations in Atm predisposes to tumorigenesis. MAPK7 has been implicated in numerous types of cancer with pro-survival and pro-growth roles in tumor cells, but its functional relation with tumor suppressors is not clear. In this study, we show that absence of MAPK7 delays death due to spontaneous tumor development in Atm-/- mice. Compared with Atm-/- thymocytes, Mapk7-/-Atm-/- thymocytes exhibited an improved response to DNA damage (increased phosphorylation of H2AX) and a restored apoptotic response after treatment of mice with ionizing radiation. These findings define an antagonistic function of ATM and MAPK7 in the thymocyte response to DNA damage, and suggest that the lack of MAPK7 inhibits thymic lymphoma growth in Atm-/- mice by partially restoring the DNA damage response in thymocytes.

  7. Control of Paneth Cell Fate, Intestinal Inflammation, and Tumorigenesis by PKCλ/ι

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    Yuki Nakanishi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Paneth cells are a highly specialized population of intestinal epithelial cells located in the crypt adjacent to Lgr5+ stem cells, from which they differentiate through a process that requires downregulation of the Notch pathway. Their ability to store and release antimicrobial peptides protects the host from intestinal pathogens and controls intestinal inflammation. Here, we show that PKCλ/ι is required for Paneth cell differentiation at the level of Atoh1 and Gfi1, through the control of EZH2 stability by direct phosphorylation. The selective inactivation of PKCλ/ι in epithelial cells results in the loss of mature Paneth cells, increased apoptosis and inflammation, and enhanced tumorigenesis. Importantly, PKCλ/ι expression in human Paneth cells decreases with progression of Crohn’s disease. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis of colorectal cancer (CRC patients revealed that low PRKCI levels correlated with significantly worse patient survival rates. Therefore, PKCλ/ι is a negative regulator of intestinal inflammation and cancer through its role in Paneth cell homeostasis.

  8. RIP140 increases APC expression and controls intestinal homeostasis and tumorigenesis

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    Lapierre, Marion; Bonnet, Sandrine; Bascoul-Mollevi, Caroline; Ait-Arsa, Imade; Jalaguier, Stéphan; Del Rio, Maguy; Plateroti, Michela; Roepman, Paul; Ychou, Marc; Pannequin, Julie; Hollande, Frédéric; Parker, Malcolm; Cavailles, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Deregulation of the Wnt/APC/β-catenin signaling pathway is an important consequence of tumor suppressor APC dysfunction. Genetic and molecular data have established that disruption of this pathway contributes to the development of colorectal cancer. Here, we demonstrate that the transcriptional coregulator RIP140 regulates intestinal homeostasis and tumorigenesis. Using Rip140-null mice and mice overexpressing human RIP140, we found that RIP140 inhibited intestinal epithelial cell proliferation and apoptosis. Interestingly, following whole-body irradiation, mice lacking RIP140 exhibited improved regenerative capacity in the intestine, while mice overexpressing RIP140 displayed reduced recovery. Enhanced RIP140 expression strongly repressed human colon cancer cell proliferation in vitro and after grafting onto nude mice. Moreover, in murine tissues and human cancer cells, RIP140 stimulated APC transcription and inhibited β-catenin activation and target gene expression. Finally, RIP140 mRNA and RIP140 protein levels were decreased in human colon cancers compared with those in normal mucosal tissue, and low levels of RIP140 expression in adenocarcinomas from patients correlated with poor prognosis. Together, these results support a tumor suppressor role for RIP140 in colon cancer. PMID:24667635

  9. Partial Hepatectomy in Acetylation-Deficient Mice Corroborates that Chromosome Missegregation Initiates Tumorigenesis

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    Yoo-Kyung Lee

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundAneuploidy has been suggested as one of the major causes of cancer from the time of Boveri. In support of this notion, many studies have shown that cancer cells exhibit aneuploidy. However, there are evidences that do not support the aneuploidy hypothesis. We have previously reported that the spindle assembly checkpoint protein BubR1 is acetylated in mitosis and that the acetylation of BubR1 is crucial for checkpoint maintenance and chromosome-spindle attachment. Mice heterozygous for acetylation-deficient BubR1 (K243R/+ spontaneously develop cancer with chromosome instability. As K243R/+ mice develop hepatocellular carcinoma, we set out to test if chromosome mis-segregation was the cause of their liver cancer.MethodsPrimary hepatocytes in the regenerating liver after partial hepatectomy (PH were analyzed and compared for various mitotic parameters.ResultsPrimary hepatocytes isolated from K243R/+ mice after PH displayed a marked increase of chromosome misalignment, accompanied by an increase of micronuclei. In comparison, the number of nuclei per cell and the centrosome numbers were not different between wild-type and K243R/+ mice. Taken together, chromosome mis-segregation provokes tumorigenesis in mouse liver.ConclusionOur results corroborate that PH provides a reliable tool for assessing mitotic infidelity and cancer in mice.

  10. Effect of commercial saccharin preparations on urethan-induced lung tumorigenesis in strain A mice.

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    Theiss, J C; Arnold, L J; Shimkin, M B

    1980-11-01

    The effect of commercial saccharin preparations on urethan-induced mouse lung tumorigenesis was assessed by gavaging groups of male strain A mice with 1-g/kg doses of each saccharin preparation on a daily basis 5 days/week. Gavage was initiated 1 week before i.p. injection of either a low (0.1 mg/g) or a high (1 mg/g) dose of urethan and continued until the mice were sacrificed 16 weeks after urethan administration. The average number of surface lung tumors per mouse for each group of mice was determined and was compared statistically with the appropriate control group. The commercial saccharin preparations did not produce an elevated lung tumor response when administered alone. One of the four saccharin preparations enhanced the lung tumor response to urethan when given in conjunction with the low dose of urethan, but this enhancement was not statistically significant. At the high urethan dose, all saccharin preparations produced a statistically significant enhancement of the lung tumor response to urethan.

  11. Tumor-associated macrophages regulate murine breast cancer stem cells through a novel paracrine EGFR/Stat3/Sox-2 signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian; Liao, Debbie; Chen, Cong; Liu, Yan; Chuang, Tsung-Hsien; Xiang, Rong; Markowitz, Dorothy; Reisfeld, Ralph A; Luo, Yunping

    2013-02-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis has gained significant recognition as a descriptor of tumorigenesis. Additionally, tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are known to promote growth and metastasis of breast cancer. However, it is not known whether TAMs mediate tumorigenesis through regulation of breast CSCs. Here, we report that TAMs promote CSC-like phenotypes in murine breast cancer cells by upregulating their expression of Sox-2. These CSC-like phenotypes were characterized by increased Sox-2, Oct-4, Nanog, AbcG2, and Sca-1 gene expression, in addition to increased drug-efflux capacity, resistance to chemotherapy, and increased tumorigenicity in vivo. Downregulation of Sox-2 in tumor cells by siRNA blocked the ability of TAMs to induce these CSC-like phenotypes and inhibited tumor growth in vivo. Furthermore, we identified a novel epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (Stat3)/Sox-2 paracrine signaling pathway between macrophages and mouse breast cancer cells that is required for macrophage-induced upregulation of Sox-2 and CSC phenotypes in tumor cells. We showed that this crosstalk was effectively blocked by the small molecule inhibitors AG1478 or CDDO-Im against EGFR and Stat3, respectively. Therefore, our report identifies a novel role for TAMs in breast CSC regulation and establishes a rationale for targeting the EGFR/Stat3/Sox-2 signaling pathway for CSC therapy. Copyright © 2012 AlphaMed Press.

  12. Mammary tumorigenesis in APC{sup min/+} mice is enhanced by X-irradiation with a characteristic age dependence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatsuhiko, Imaoka; Mayumi, Nishimura; Shizuko, Kakinuma; Yoshiya, Shimada [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Experimental Radiobiology for Children' s Health Research Group, Research, Center for Radiation Protection (Japan); Mieko, Okamoto [Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science (Japan)

    2006-07-01

    The ApcM{sup min/+} (Min) mouse is a genetically predisposed model of both intestinal and mammary tumorigenesis. We investigated age-related changes in the susceptibility of mice (before, during and after puberty) to radiation-induced mammary tumorigenesis using this model. Female Min and wild-type mice having the C57BL/6J background were irradiated with 2 Gy of X-rays at 2, 5, 7 and 10 weeks and sacrificed at 18 weeks of age. Min mice irradiated at 7 to 10 weeks of age (after puberty) developed mammary tumors with squamous metaplasia, whereas their wild-type litter-mates did not. Interestingly, irradiation of Min mice at 2 to 5 weeks (before and during puberty, respectively) did not induce mammary tumors but rather cystic nodules with metaplasia. The mammary tumors exhibited increased nuclear beta-catenin protein and loss of the wild-type Apc allele. Our results show that susceptibility to radiation-induced mammary tumorigenesis increases after puberty in Min mice, suggesting that the tumorigenic effect of ionizing radiation targets the lobular-alveolar progenitor cells, which increase in number with age and are controlled by beta-catenin signaling. (author)

  13. Metformin suppresses diethylnitrosamine-induced liver tumorigenesis in obese and diabetic C57BL/KsJ-+Leprdb/+Leprdb mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiko Ohno

    Full Text Available Obesity and related metabolic disorders, such as diabetes mellitus, raise the risk of liver carcinogenesis. Metformin, which is widely used in the treatment of diabetes, ameliorates insulin sensitivity. Metformin is also thought to have antineoplastic activities and to reduce cancer risk. The present study examined the preventive effect of metformin on the development of diethylnitrosamine (DEN-induced liver tumorigenesis in C57BL/KsJ-+Leprdb/+Leprdb (db/db obese and diabetic mice. The mice were given a single injection of DEN at 2 weeks of age and subsequently received drinking water containing metformin for 20 weeks. Metformin administration significantly reduced the multiplicity of hepatic premalignant lesions and inhibited liver cell neoplasms. Metformin also markedly decreased serum levels of insulin and reduced insulin resistance, and inhibited phosphorylation of Akt, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR, and p70S6 in the liver. Furthermore, serum levels of leptin were decreased, while those of adiponectin were increased by metformin. These findings suggest that metformin prevents liver tumorigenesis by ameliorating insulin sensitivity, inhibiting the activation of Akt/mTOR/p70S6 signaling, and improving adipokine imbalance. Therefore, metformin may be a potent candidate for chemoprevention of liver tumorigenesis in patients with obesity or diabetes.

  14. Isoform-Specific Effects of Wild-Type Ras Genes on Carcinogen-Induced Lung Tumorigenesis in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie D Weyandt

    Full Text Available The gene KRAS is commonly mutated in lung cancer to encode a constitutively active and oncogenic protein that is well established to initiate and maintain lung tumorigenesis. However, the remaining wild-type KRAS protein, or the other family members HRAS and NRAS, can still be activated in the presence of oncogenic KRAS. Moreover, loss of any one of these three genes has been shown to increase the sensitivity of mice to the carcinogen urethane, which induces Kras mutation-positive early lung lesions. To determine the contribution of progressively disrupting Hras and Nras genes on urethane lung tumorigenesis, mice with different combinations of wild-type and null alleles of Hras and Nras were exposed with urethane and tumor burden was assessed. As previously reported, loss of one allele of Hras increased the sensitivity of mice to this carcinogen, and this effect was further exacerbated by the loss of the second Hras allele. However, loss of one or both alleles of Nras failed to alter tumor burden, either in the absence or presence of Hras, after exposure to urethane. Additionally, no obvious difference between lung lesions in mice with wild-type versus null alleles was detected, suggesting that wild-type Ras proteins may exert a tumor suppressive effects at the time of initiation, although other interpretations are certainly possible. In summary, these data suggest that in some genetic backgrounds inactivation of different wild-type Ras genes can have different effects on urethane-induced lung tumorigenesis.

  15. Distinct functions of epidermal and myeloid-derived VEGF-A in skin tumorigenesis mediated by HPV8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xiaolei; Lucas, Tina; Marcuzzi, Gian P; Pfister, Herbert; Eming, Sabine A

    2015-01-15

    Beta human papillomaviruses (HPV) have been suspected to be carcinogenic in nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSC), but the basis for potential viral contributions to these cancers is poorly understood. In particular, it is unresolved how HPV-infected keratinocytes escape cell-cycle control and whether their cross-talk with immune cells is critical for tumorigenesis. In nonviral preclinical models, the angiogenic cytokine VEGF-A has been identified as a critical regulator of NMSC. In this study, we dissected the contribution of epidermal versus myeloid cell-derived VEGF-A in HPV-mediated skin cancer by interbreeding an HPV8 transgenic mouse model with a conditional disruption of VEGF-A restricted to either epidermal or myeloid cells. Although only epidermal-derived VEGF-A was essential for initiation of skin tumor development, both spontaneously and UV-light triggered, both epidermal and myeloid cell-derived VEGF-A contributed to regeneration-induced tumorigenesis upon HPV8 overexpression, partly not only through a paracrine effect on endothelial cells, but also most probably through an additional autocrine effect on epidermal cells. Our findings offer new mechanistic insights into distinct functions of epidermal versus myeloid cell-derived VEGF-A during HPV-mediated tumorigenesis, with possible implications for preventing this disease. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  16. Butylated Hydroxyanisole Blocks the Occurrence of Tumor Associated Macrophages in Tobacco Smoke Carcinogen-Induced Lung Tumorigenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yan; Choksi, Swati; Liu, Zheng-Gang, E-mail: zgliu@helix.nih.gov [Cell and Cancer Biology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)

    2013-12-04

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) promote tumorigenesis because of their proangiogenic and immune-suppressive functions. Here, we report that butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) blocks occurrence of tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) in tobacco smoke carcinogen-induced lung tumorigenesis. Continuous administration of butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), a ROS inhibitor, before or after NNK treatment significantly blocked tumor development, although less effectively when BHA is administered after NNK treatment. Strikingly, BHA abolished the occurrence of F4/80{sup +} macrophages with similar efficiency no matter whether it was administered before or after NNK treatment. Detection of cells from bronchioalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) confirmed that BHA markedly inhibited the accumulation of macrophages while slightly reducing the number of lymphocytes that were induced by NNK. Immunohistological staining showed that BHA specifically abolished the occurrence of CD206{sup +} TAMs when it was administered before or after NNK treatment. Western blot analysis of TAMs markers, arginase I and Ym-1, showed that BHA blocked NNK-induced TAMs accumulation. Our study clearly demonstrated that inhibiting the occurrence of TAMs by BHA contributes to the inhibition of tobacco smoke carcinogen-induced tumorigenesis, suggesting ROS inhibitors may serve as a therapeutic target for treating smoke-induced lung cancer.

  17. Butylated Hydroxyanisole Blocks the Occurrence of Tumor Associated Macrophages in Tobacco Smoke Carcinogen-Induced Lung Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs promote tumorigenesis because of their proangiogenic and immune-suppressive functions. Here, we report that butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA blocks occurrence of tumor associated macrophages (TAMs in tobacco smoke carcinogen-induced lung tumorigenesis. Continuous administration of butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA, a ROS inhibitor, before or after NNK treatment significantly blocked tumor development, although less effectively when BHA is administered after NNK treatment. Strikingly, BHA abolished the occurrence of F4/80+ macrophages with similar efficiency no matter whether it was administered before or after NNK treatment. Detection of cells from bronchioalveolar lavage fluid (BALF confirmed that BHA markedly inhibited the accumulation of macrophages while slightly reducing the number of lymphocytes that were induced by NNK. Immunohistological staining showed that BHA specifically abolished the occurrence of CD206+ TAMs when it was administered before or after NNK treatment. Western blot analysis of TAMs markers, arginase I and Ym-1, showed that BHA blocked NNK-induced TAMs accumulation. Our study clearly demonstrated that inhibiting the occurrence of TAMs by BHA contributes to the inhibition of tobacco smoke carcinogen-induced tumorigenesis, suggesting ROS inhibitors may serve as a therapeutic target for treating smoke-induced lung cancer.

  18. Isoform-Specific Effects of Wild-Type Ras Genes on Carcinogen-Induced Lung Tumorigenesis in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyandt, Jamie D; Carney, John M; Pavlisko, Elizabeth N; Xu, MengMeng; Counter, Christopher M

    2016-01-01

    The gene KRAS is commonly mutated in lung cancer to encode a constitutively active and oncogenic protein that is well established to initiate and maintain lung tumorigenesis. However, the remaining wild-type KRAS protein, or the other family members HRAS and NRAS, can still be activated in the presence of oncogenic KRAS. Moreover, loss of any one of these three genes has been shown to increase the sensitivity of mice to the carcinogen urethane, which induces Kras mutation-positive early lung lesions. To determine the contribution of progressively disrupting Hras and Nras genes on urethane lung tumorigenesis, mice with different combinations of wild-type and null alleles of Hras and Nras were exposed with urethane and tumor burden was assessed. As previously reported, loss of one allele of Hras increased the sensitivity of mice to this carcinogen, and this effect was further exacerbated by the loss of the second Hras allele. However, loss of one or both alleles of Nras failed to alter tumor burden, either in the absence or presence of Hras, after exposure to urethane. Additionally, no obvious difference between lung lesions in mice with wild-type versus null alleles was detected, suggesting that wild-type Ras proteins may exert a tumor suppressive effects at the time of initiation, although other interpretations are certainly possible. In summary, these data suggest that in some genetic backgrounds inactivation of different wild-type Ras genes can have different effects on urethane-induced lung tumorigenesis.

  19. [Fibrocystic breast disease--breast cancer sequence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habor, V; Habor, A; Copotoiu, C; Panţîru, A

    2010-01-01

    Fibrocystic breast disease has developed a major issue: the breast cancer sequence. Its involvement regarding the increse of breast cancer risk has 2 aspects: it may be either the marker of a prone tissue or a premalignant hystological deffect. Difficult differential diagnosis of benign proliferative breast lession and carcinoma led to the idea of sequency between the two: cancer does not initiate on normal mammary epithelia; it takes several proliferative stages for it to occur. In our series we analized a number of 677 breast surgical procedures where the pathologic examination reveals 115 cases (17%) of coexistence between cancer and fibrocystic breast disease. This aspect has proved to be related to earlier debut of breast cancer, suggesting that epithelial hyperplasia is a risk factor for breast cancer.

  20. High mobility group box-1 and its clinical value in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun S

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Shanping Sun,1,2 Wei Zhang,2 Zhaoqing Cui,2 Qi Chen,2 Panpan Xie,2 Changxin Zhou,2 Baoguo Liu,2 Xiangeng Peng,2 Yang Zhang21Department of Breast Surgery, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Shandong, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Breast and Thyroid Surgery, Liaocheng People’s Hospital, Liaocheng, Shandong Province, People’s Republic of ChinaBackground: High mobility group box-1 (HMGB1 is a factor regulating malignant tumorigenesis, proliferation, and metastasis, and is associated with poor clinical pathology in various human cancers. We investigated the differential concentrations of HMGB1 in tissues and sera, and their clinical value for diagnosis in patients with breast cancer, benign breast disease, and healthy individuals.Methods: HMGB1 levels in tumor tissues, adjacent normal tissues, and benign breast disease tissues was detected via immunohistochemistry. Serum HMGB1 was measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 56 patients with breast cancer, 25 patients with benign breast disease, and 30 healthy control subjects. The clinicopathological features of the patients were compared. Tissues were evaluated histopathologically by pathologists.Results: HMGB1 levels in the tissues and sera of patients with breast cancer were significantly higher than those in patients with benign breast disease or normal individuals. The 56 cancer patients were classified as having high tissue HMGB1 levels (n=41 or low tissue HMGB1 levels (n=15, but the corresponsive serum HMGB1 in these two groups was not significantly different. HMGB1 levels in breast cancer tissues significantly correlated with differentiation grade, lymphatic metastasis, and tumor-node-metastasis stage, but not patient age, tumor size, or HER-2/neu expression; no association between serum HMGB1 levels and these clinicopathological parameters was found. The sensitivity and specificity of tissue HMGB1 levels for the diagnosis of breast cancer were 73.21% and 84

  1. Breast cancer in men

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in situ - male; Intraductal carcinoma - male; Inflammatory breast cancer - male; Paget disease of the nipple - male; Breast cancer - male ... The cause of breast cancer in men is not clear. But there are risk factors that make breast cancer more likely in men: Exposure to ...

  2. Breast Cancer Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are here Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer Breast Cancer This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer. Use the menu below to choose the Overview/ ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer Introduction Statistics Medical Illustrations Risk Factors and Prevention ...

  3. Breast Cancer -- Male

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer in Men Breast Cancer in Men This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer in Men. Use the menu below to choose ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer in Men Introduction Statistics Risk Factors and Prevention ...

  4. High incidence of protein-truncating TP53 mutations in BRCA1-related breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holstege, Henne; Joosse, Simon A; van Oostrom, Conny Th M; Nederlof, Petra M; de Vries, Annemieke; Jonkers, Jos

    2009-04-15

    Approximately half of all hereditary breast cancers are compromised in their DNA repair mechanisms due to loss of BRCA1 or BRCA2 function. Previous research has found a strong correlation between BRCA mutation and TP53 mutation. However, TP53 mutation status is often indirectly assessed by immunohistochemical staining of accumulated p53 protein. We sequenced TP53 exons 2 to 9 in 21 BRCA1-related breast cancers and 37 sporadic breast tumors. Strikingly, all BRCA1-related breast tumors contained TP53 mutations, whereas only half of these tumors stained positive for p53 accumulation. Positive p53 staining correlates with the presence of TP53 hotspot mutations in both BRCA1-related and sporadic breast tumors. However, whereas the majority of sporadic breast tumors that stained negative for p53 accumulation had wild-type TP53, the majority of BRCA1-associated breast tumors that stained negative for p53 accumulation had protein-truncating TP53 mutations (nonsense, frameshift, and splice mutations). Therefore, the strong selection for p53 loss in BRCA1-related tumors is achieved by an increase of protein-truncating TP53 mutations rather than hotspot mutations. Hence, immunohistochemical detection of TP53 mutation could lead to misdiagnosis in approximately half of all BRCA1-related tumors. The presence of deleterious TP53 mutations in most, if not all, BRCA1-related breast cancers suggests that p53 loss of function is essential for BRCA1-associated tumorigenesis. BRCA1-related tumors may therefore be treated not only with drugs that target BRCA1 deficiency [e.g., poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors] but also with drugs that selectively target p53-deficient cells. This raises interesting possibilities for combination therapies against BRCA1-deficient breast cancers and BRCA1-like tumors with homologous recombination deficiency.

  5. HP1β is a biomarker for breast cancer prognosis and PARP inhibitor therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Ho Lee

    Full Text Available Members of the heterochromatin protein 1 family (HP1α, β and γ are mostly associated with heterochromatin and play important roles in gene regulation and DNA damage response. Altered expression of individual HP1 subtype has profound impacts on cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. We analyzed the expression profile of HP1 family by data mining using a published microarray data set coupled with retrospective immunohistochemistry analyses of archived breast cancer biospecimens. We found that the patient group overexpressing HP1β mRNA is associated with poorly differentiated breast tumors and with a significantly lower survival rate. Immunohistochemical staining against HP1α, HP1β and HP1γ shows that respective HP1 expression level is frequently altered in breast cancers. 57.4-60.1% of samples examined showed high HP1β expression and 39.9-42.6 % of examined tumors showed no or low expression of each HP1 subtype. Interestingly, comparative analysis on HP1 expression profile and breast cancer markers revealed a positive correlation between the respective expression level of all three HP1 subtypes and Ki-67, a cell proliferation and well-known breast cancer marker. To explore the effect of individual HP1 on PARP inhibitor therapy for breast cancer, MCF7 breast cancer cells and individually HP1-depleted MCF7 cells were treated with PARP inhibitor ABT-888 with or without carboplatin. Notably, HP1β-knockdown cells are hypersensitive to the PARP inhibitor ABT-888 alone and its combination with carboplatin. In summary, while increased HP1β expression is associated with the poor prognosis in breast cancer, compromised HP1β abundance may serve as a useful predictive marker for chemotherapy, including PARP inhibitors against breast cancer.

  6. Upregulation of MEK5 by Stat3 promotes breast cancer cell invasion and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fang; Zhang, Hao; Song, Hui

    2017-01-01

    Mitogen extracellular-signal-regulated kinase kinase 5 (MEK5) plays an important role in promoting cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. The aberrant expression of MEK5 has been reported in various malignant diseases including cancers of breast, prostate, lung, colorectal and brain. However, the function and regulation of MEK5 signaling pathway are ambiguous and remain elusive with respect to its oncogenic roles in various cancers, especially in the regulation of the initiation and progression of cancer invasion and metastasis. Ectopic expression of MEK5 or knockdown of MEK5 by shRNA with in vitro cell based models demonstrated the role of MEK5 in regulation of epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) and breast cancer invasion and metastasis. Here, we show that MEK5 upregulated by Stat3 promotes breast cancer cell invasion through EMT. Further study demonstrated that Stat3 could bind to promoter region of MEK5 and enhanced MEK5 transcription and expression. In addition, the phosphorylation of MEK5 significantly increased in breast cancer cells corresponding to metastatic capability of breast cancer cells. The depletion of MEK5 by shRNA significantly decreased breast cancer invasion. Ectopic expression of MEK5 could confer non-invasive breast cancer cells to become invasion capable cells. Moreover, the phosphorylation of Erk5, a MEK5-regulated downstream kinase, was also upregulated consistent with the increased level of active MEK5. Our studies provide insights into a molecular mechanism by which MEK5 transcriptionally upregulated by Stat3 augments breast cancer cell EMT, which subsequently enhances cancer cell invasion and metastasis. This finding may suggest that Stat3 and MEK5/Erk5 pathways could be an effective therapeutic target for inhibition of breast cancer invasion and metastasis.

  7. Cancer Exosomes Perform Cell-Independent MicroRNA Biogenesis and Promote Tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Sonia A.; Sugimoto, Hikaru; O’Connell, Joyce T.; Kato, Noritoshi; Villanueva, Alberto; Vidal, August; Qiu, Le; Vitkin, Edward; Perelman, Lev T.; Melo, Carlos A.; Lucci, Anthony; Ivan, Cristina; Calin, George A.; Kalluri, Raghu

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Exosomes are secreted by all cell types and contain proteins and nucleic acids. Here, we report that breast cancer associated exosomes contain microRNAs (miRNAs) associated with the RISC Loading Complex (RLC) and display cell-independent capacity to process precursor microRNAs (pre-miRNAs) into mature miRNAs. Pre-miRNAs, along with Dicer, AGO2, and TRBP, are present in exosomes of cancer cells. CD43 mediates the accumulation of Dicer specifically in cancer exosomes. Cancer exosomes mediate an efficient and rapid silencing of mRNAs to reprogram the target cell transcriptome. Exosomes derived from cells and sera of patients with breast cancer instigate non-tumorigenic epithelial cells to form tumors in a Dicer-dependent manner. These findings offer opportunities for the development of exosomes based biomarkers and therapies. PMID:25446899

  8. Relationship between histology, development and tumorigenesis of mammary gland in female rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    LÍŠKA, Ján; BRTKO, Július; DUBOVICKÝ, Michal; MACEJOVÁ, Dana; KISSOVÁ, Viktória; POLÁK, Štefan; UJHÁZY, Eduard

    2015-01-01

    The mammary gland is a dynamic organ that undergoes structural and functional changes associated with growth, reproduction, and post-menopausal regression. The postnatal transformations of the epithelium and stromal cells of the mammary gland may contribute to its susceptibility to carcinogenesis. The increased cancer incidence in mammary glands of humans and similarly of rodents in association with their development is believed to be partly explained by proliferative activity together with lesser degree of differentiation, but it is not completely understood how the virgin gland retains its higher susceptibility to carcinogenesis. During its developmental cycle, the mammary gland displays many of the properties associated with breast cancer. An early first full-term pregnancy may have a protective effect. Rodent models are useful for investigating potential breast carcinogens. The purpose of this review is to help recognizing histological appearance of the epithelium and the stroma of the normal mammary gland in rats, and throughout its development in relation to tumorigenic potential. PMID:26424555

  9. Imaging male breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doyle, S., E-mail: sdoyle2@nhs.net [Primrose Breast Care Unit, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom); Steel, J.; Porter, G. [Primrose Breast Care Unit, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-15

    Male breast cancer is rare, with some pathological and radiological differences from female breast cancer. There is less familiarity with the imaging appearances of male breast cancer, due to its rarity and the more variable use of preoperative imaging. This review will illustrate the commonest imaging appearances of male breast cancer, with emphasis on differences from female breast cancer and potential pitfalls in diagnosis, based on a 10 year experience in our institution.

  10. EGFR Is Regulated by TFAP2C in Luminal Breast Cancer and Is a Target for Vandetanib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Andrade, James P; Park, Jung M; Gu, Vivian W; Woodfield, George W; Kulak, Mikhail V; Lorenzen, Allison W; Wu, Vincent T; Van Dorin, Sarah E; Spanheimer, Philip M; Weigel, Ronald J

    2016-03-01

    Expression of TFAP2C in luminal breast cancer is associated with reduced survival and hormone resistance, partially explained through regulation of RET. TFAP2C also regulates EGFR in HER2 breast cancer. We sought to elucidate the regulation and functional role of EGFR in luminal breast cancer. We used gene knockdown (KD) and treatment with a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) in cell lines and primary cancer isolates to determine the role of RET and EGFR in regulation of p-ERK and tumorigenesis. KD of TFAP2C decreased expression of EGFR in a panel of luminal breast cancers, and chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) confirmed that TFAP2C targets the EGFR gene. Stable KD of TFAP2C significantly decreased cell proliferation and tumor growth, mediated in part through EGFR. While KD of RET or EGFR reduced proliferation (31% and 34%, P breast cancers to TKIs assessed by ERK activation established a correlation with expression of RET and EGFR. We conclude that TFAP2C regulates EGFR in luminal breast cancer. Response to vandetanib was mediated through the TFAP2C target genes EGFR and RET. Vandetanib may provide a therapeutic effect in luminal breast cancer, and RET and EGFR can serve as molecular markers for response. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. Emblems of Revelation and Instruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach-Nielsen, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    Da reformationen blev fejret i 1817 skete det med festdekorationer af kirkerne. Disse kaldtes emblemer, men var måske ikke emblemer i egentlig forstand.......Da reformationen blev fejret i 1817 skete det med festdekorationer af kirkerne. Disse kaldtes emblemer, men var måske ikke emblemer i egentlig forstand....

  12. Mismatch repair deficiency commonly precedes adenoma formation in Lynch Syndrome-Associated colorectal tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, Shigeki; Mori, Taisuke; Ogawa, Reiko; Tanaka, Masahiro; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Taniguchi, Hirokazu; Nakajima, Takeshi; Sugano, Kokichi; Yoshida, Teruhiko; Kato, Mamoru; Furukawa, Eisaku; Ochiai, Atsushi; Hiraoka, Nobuyoshi

    2017-08-01

    Lynch syndrome is a cancer predisposition syndrome caused by germline mutations in mismatch repair (MMR) genes. MMR deficiency is a ubiquitous feature of Lynch syndrome-associated colorectal adenocarcinomas; however, it remains unclear when the MMR-deficient phenotype is acquired during tumorigenesis. To probe this issue, the present study examined genetic alterations and MMR statuses in Lynch syndrome-associated colorectal adenomas and adenocarcinomas, in comparison with sporadic adenomas. Among the Lynch syndrome-associated colorectal tumors, 68 of 86 adenomas (79%) and all adenocarcinomas were MMR-deficient, whereas all the sporadic adenomas were MMR-proficient, as determined by microsatellite instability testing and immunohistochemistry for MMR proteins. Sequencing analyses identified APC or CTNNB1 mutations in the majority of sporadic adenomas (58/84, 69%) and MMR-proficient Lynch syndrome-associated adenomas (13/18, 72%). However, MMR-deficient Lynch syndrome-associated adenomas had less APC or CTNNB1 mutations (25/68, 37%) and frequent frameshift RNF43 mutations involving mononucleotide repeats (45/68, 66%). Furthermore, frameshift mutations affecting repeat sequences constituted 14 of 26 APC mutations (54%) in MMR-deficient adenomas whereas these frameshift mutations were rare in MMR-proficient adenomas in patients with Lynch syndrome (1/12, 8%) and in sporadic adenomas (3/52, 6%). Lynch syndrome-associated adenocarcinomas exhibited mutation profiles similar to those of MMR-deficient adenomas. Considering that WNT pathway activation sufficiently drives colorectal adenoma formation, the distinct mutation profiles of WNT pathway genes in Lynch syndrome-associated adenomas suggest that MMR deficiency commonly precedes adenoma formation.

  13. The ING gene family in the regulation of cell growth and tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, Andrew H; Jones, Stephen N

    2009-01-01

    The five members of the inhibitor of growth (ING) gene family have garnered significant interest due to their putative roles as tumor suppressors. However, the precise role(s) of these ING proteins in regulating cell growth and tumorigenesis remains uncertain. Biochemical and molecular biological analysis has revealed that all ING members encode a PHD finger motif proposed to bind methylated histones and phosphoinosital, and all ING proteins have been found as components of large chromatin remodeling complexes that also include histone acetyl transferase (HAT) and histone deacetylase (HDAC) enzymes, suggesting a role for ING proteins in regulating gene transcription. Additionally, the results of forced overexpression studies performed in tissue culture have indicated that several of the ING proteins can interact with the p53 tumor suppressor protein and/or the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB) protein complex. As these ING-associated proteins play well-established roles in numerous cell processes, including DNA repair, cell growth and survival, inflammation, and tumor suppression, several models have been proposed that ING proteins act as key regulators of cell growth not only through their ability to modify gene transcription but also through their ability to alter p53 and NF-kappaB activity. However, these models have yet to be substantiated by in vivo experimentation. This review summarizes what is currently known about the biological functions of the five ING genes based upon in vitro experiments and recent mouse modeling efforts, and will highlight the potential impact of INGs on the development of cancer. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. A protein knockdown strategy to study the function of β-catenin in tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Pengbo

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Wnt signaling pathway plays critical roles in cell proliferation and cell fate determination at many stages of development. A critical downstream target of Wnt signaling is the cytosolic β-catenin, which is stabilized upon Wnt activation and promotes transcription of a variety of target genes including c-myc and cyclin D. Aberrant Wnt signaling, which results from mutations of either β-catenin or adenomatous polyposis coli (APC, renders β-catenin resistant to degradation, and has been associated with multiple types of human cancers. Results A protein knockdown strategy was designed to reduce the cytosolic β-catenin levels through accelerating its turnover rate. By engineering a chimeric protein with the β-catenin binding domain of E-cadherin fused to βTrCP ubiquitin-protein ligase, the stable β-catenin mutant was recruited to the cellular SCF (Skp1, Cullin 1, and F-box-containing substrate receptor ubiquitination machinery for ubiquitination and degradation. The DLD1 colon cancer cells express wild type β-catenin at abnormally high levels due to loss of APC. Remarkably, conditional expression of βTrCP-E-cadherin under the control of a tetracycline-repressive promoter in DLD1 cells selectively knocked down the cytosolic, but not membrane-associated subpopulation of β-catenin. As a result, DLD1 cells were impaired in their growth and clonogenic ability in vitro, and lost their tumorigenic potential in nude mice. Conclusion We have designed a novel approach to induce degradation of stabilized/mutated β-catenin. Our results suggest that a high concentration of cytoplasmic β-catenin is critical for the growth of colorectal tumor cells. The protein knockdown strategy can be utilized not only as a novel method to dissect the role of oncoproteins in tumorigenesis, but also as a unique tool to delineate the function of a subpopulation of proteins localized to a specific subcellular compartment.

  15. Dietary Feeding of Grape Seed Extract Prevents Intestinal Tumorigenesis in APCmin/+ Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balaiya Velmurugan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemopreventive effects and associated mechanisms of grape seed extract (GSE against intestinal/colon cancer development are largely unknown. Herein, we investigated GSE efficacy against intestinal tumorigenesis in APCmin/+ mice. Female APCmin/+ mice were fed control or 0.5% GSE (wt/wt mixed AIN-76A diet for 6 weeks. At the end of the experiment, GSE feeding decreased the total number of intestinal polyps by 40%. The decrease in polyp formation in the small intestine was 42%, which was mostly in its middle (51% and distal (49% portions compared with the proximal one. GSE also decreased polyp growth where the number of polyps of 1 to 2 mm in size decreased by 42% and greater than 2 mm in size by 71%, without any significant change in polyps less than 1 mm in size. Immunohistochemical analyses of small intestinal tissue samples revealed a decrease (80%–86% in cell proliferation and an increase (four- to eight-fold in apoptosis. GSE feeding also showed decreased protein levels of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 (56%–64%, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS (58%–60%, and β-catenin (43%–59% but an increased Cip1/p21-positive cells (1.9- to 2.6-fold. GSE also decreased cyclin D1 and c-Myc protein levels in small intestine. Together, these findings show the chemopreventive potential of GSE against intestinal polyp formation and growth in APCmin/+ mice, which was accompanied with reduced cell proliferation and increased apoptosis together with down-regulation in COX-2, iNOS, β-catenin, cyclin D1, and c-Myc expression, but increased Cip1/p21. In conclusion, the present study suggests potential usefulness of GSE for the chemoprevention of human intestinal/colorectal cancer.

  16. Hypermethylated MAL gene – a silent marker of early colon tumorigenesis

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    Kallioniemi Anne

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumor-derived aberrantly methylated DNA might serve as diagnostic biomarkers for cancer, but so far, few such markers have been identified. The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential of the MAL (T-cell differentiation protein gene as an early epigenetic diagnostic marker for colorectal tumors. Methods Using methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP the promoter methylation status of MAL was analyzed in 218 samples, including normal mucosa (n = 44, colorectal adenomas (n = 63, carcinomas (n = 65, and various cancer cell lines (n = 46. Direct bisulphite sequencing was performed to confirm the MSP results. MAL gene expression was investigated with real time quantitative analyses before and after epigenetic drug treatment. Immunohistochemical analysis of MAL was done using normal colon mucosa samples (n = 5 and a tissue microarray with 292 colorectal tumors. Results Bisulphite sequencing revealed that the methylation was unequally distributed within the MAL promoter and by MSP analysis a region close to the transcription start point was shown to be hypermethylated in the majority of colorectal carcinomas (49/61, 80% as well as in adenomas (45/63, 71%. In contrast, only a minority of the normal mucosa samples displayed hypermethylation (1/23, 4%. The hypermethylation of MAL was significantly associated with reduced or lost gene expression in in vitro models. Furthermore, removal of the methylation re-induced gene expression in colon cancer cell lines. Finally, MAL protein was expressed in epithelial cells of normal colon mucosa, but not in the malignant cells of the same type. Conclusion Promoter hypermethylation of MAL was present in the vast majority of benign and malignant colorectal tumors, and only rarely in normal mucosa, which makes it suitable as a diagnostic marker for early colorectal tumorigenesis.

  17. Regulation of the Mdm2-p53 signaling axis in the DNA damage response and tumorigenesis

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    Carr, Michael I.; Jones, Stephen N.

    2017-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor acts as a guardian of the genome in mammalian cells undergoing DNA double strand breaks induced by a various forms of cell stress, including inappropriate growth signals or ionizing radiation. Following damage, p53 protein levels become greatly elevated in cells and p53 functions primarily as a transcription factor to regulate the expression a wide variety of genes that coordinate this DNA damage response. In cells undergoing high amounts of DNA damage, p53 can promote apoptosis, whereas in cells undergoing less damage, p53 promotes senescence or transient cell growth arrest and the expression of genes involved in DNA repair, depending upon the cell type and level of damage. Failure of the damaged cell to undergo growth arrest or apoptosis, or to respond to the DNA damage by other p53-coordinated mechanisms, can lead to inappropriate cell growth and tumorigenesis. In cells that have successfully responded to genetic damage, the amount of p53 present in the cell must return to basal levels in order for the cell to resume normal growth and function. Although regulation of p53 levels and function is coordinated by many proteins, it is now widely accepted that the master regulator of p53 is Mdm2. In this review, we discuss the role(s) of p53 in the DNA damage response and in tumor suppression, and how post-translational modification of Mdm2 regulates the Mdm2-p53 signaling axis to govern p53 activities in the cell. PMID:28690977

  18. Effects of Melatonin and Its Analogues on Pancreatic Inflammation, Enzyme Secretion, and Tumorigenesis

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    Jolanta Jaworek

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin is an indoleamine produced from the amino acid l-tryptophan, whereas metabolites of melatonin are known as kynuramines. One of the best-known kynuramines is N1-acetyl-N1-formyl-5-methoxykynuramine (AFMK. Melatonin has attracted scientific attention as a potent antioxidant and protector of tissue against oxidative stress. l-Tryptophan and kynuramines share common beneficial features with melatonin. Melatonin was originally discovered as a pineal product, has been detected in the gastrointestinal tract, and its receptors have been identified in the pancreas. The role of melatonin in the pancreatic gland is not explained, however several arguments support the opinion that melatonin is probably implicated in the physiology and pathophysiology of the pancreas. (1 Melatonin stimulates pancreatic enzyme secretion through the activation of entero-pancreatic reflex and cholecystokinin (CCK release. l-Tryptophan and AFMK are less effective than melatonin in the stimulation of pancreatic exocrine function; (2 Melatonin is a successful pancreatic protector, which prevents the pancreas from developing of acute pancreatitis and reduces pancreatic damage. This effect is related to its direct and indirect antioxidant action, to the strengthening of immune defense, and to the modulation of apoptosis. Like melatonin, its precursor and AFMK are able to mimic its protective effect, and it is commonly accepted that all these substances create an antioxidant cascade to intensify the pancreatic protection and acinar cells viability; (3 In pancreatic cancer cells, melatonin and AFMK activated a signal transduction pathway for apoptosis and stimulated heat shock proteins. The role of melatonin and AFMK in pancreatic tumorigenesis remains to be elucidated.

  19. Nisin ZP, a Bacteriocin and Food Preservative, Inhibits Head and Neck Cancer Tumorigenesis and Prolongs Survival.

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    Pachiyappan Kamarajan

    Full Text Available The use of small antimicrobial peptides or bacteriocins, like nisin, to treat cancer is a new approach that holds great promise. Nisin exemplifies this new approach because it has been used safely in humans for many years as a food preservative, and recent laboratory studies support its anti-tumor potential in head and neck cancer. Previously, we showed that nisin (2.5%, low content has antitumor potential in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC in vitro and in vivo. The current studies explored a naturally occurring variant of nisin (nisin ZP; 95%, high content for its antitumor effects in vitro and in vivo. Nisin ZP induced the greatest level of apoptosis in HNSCC cells compared to low content nisin. HNSCC cells treated with increasing concentrations of nisin ZP exhibited increasing levels of apoptosis and decreasing levels of cell proliferation, clonogenic capacity, and sphere formation. Nisin ZP induced apoptosis through a calpain-dependent pathway in HNSCC cells but not in human oral keratinocytes. Nisin ZP also induced apoptosis dose-dependently in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC with concomitant decreases in vascular sprout formation in vitro and reduced intratumoral microvessel density in vivo. Nisin ZP reduced tumorigenesis in vivo and long-term treatment with nisin ZP extended survival. In addition, nisin treated mice exhibited normal organ histology with no evidence of inflammation, fibrosis or necrosis. In summary, nisin ZP exhibits greater antitumor effects than low content nisin, and thus has the potential to serve as a novel therapeutic for HNSCC.

  20. Zebrafish neurofibromatosis type 1 genes have redundant functions in tumorigenesis and embryonic development

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    Jimann Shin

    2012-11-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1 is a common, dominantly inherited genetic disorder that results from mutations in the neurofibromin 1 (NF1 gene. Affected individuals demonstrate abnormalities in neural-crest-derived tissues that include hyperpigmented skin lesions and benign peripheral nerve sheath tumors. NF1 patients also have a predisposition to malignancies including juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML, optic glioma, glioblastoma, schwannoma and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs. In an effort to better define the molecular and cellular determinants of NF1 disease pathogenesis in vivo, we employed targeted mutagenesis strategies to generate zebrafish harboring stable germline mutations in nf1a and nf1b, orthologues of NF1. Animals homozygous for loss-of-function alleles of nf1a or nf1b alone are phenotypically normal and viable. Homozygous loss of both alleles in combination generates larval phenotypes that resemble aspects of the human disease and results in larval lethality between 7 and 10 days post fertilization. nf1-null larvae demonstrate significant central and peripheral nervous system defects. These include aberrant proliferation and differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs, dysmorphic myelin sheaths and hyperplasia of Schwann cells. Loss of nf1 contributes to tumorigenesis as demonstrated by an accelerated onset and increased penetrance of high-grade gliomas and MPNSTs in adult nf1a+/−; nf1b−/−; p53e7/e7 animals. nf1-null larvae also demonstrate significant motor and learning defects. Importantly, we identify and quantitatively analyze a novel melanophore phenotype in nf1-null larvae, providing the first animal model of the pathognomonic pigmentation lesions of NF1. Together, these findings support a role for nf1a and nf1b as potent tumor suppressor genes that also function in the development of both central and peripheral glial cells as well as melanophores in zebrafish.

  1. Loss of p53 Induces Tumorigenesis in p21-Deficient Mesenchymal Stem Cells

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    Rene Rodriguez

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available There is growing evidence about the role of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs as cancer stem cells in many sarcomas. Nevertheless, little is still known about the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying MSCs transformation. We aimed at investigating the role of p53 and p21, two important regulators of the cell cycle progression and apoptosis normally involved in protection against tumorigenesis. Mesenchymal stem cells from wild-type, p21-/-p53+/+, and p21-/-p53+/- mice were cultured in vitro and analyzed for the appearance of tumoral transformation properties after low, medium, and high number of passages both in vitro and in vivo. Wild-type or p21-/-p53+/+ MSCs did not show any sign of tumoral transformation. Indeed, after short-term in vitro culture, wild-type MSCs became senescent, and p21-/-p53+/+ MSCs showed an elevated spontaneous apoptosis rate. Conversely, MSCs carrying a mutation in one allele of the p53 gene (p21-/-p53+/- MSCs completely lost p53 expression after in vitro long-term culture. Loss of p53 was accompanied by a significant increase in the growth rate, gain of karyotypic instability, loss of p16 expression, and lack of senescence response. Finally, these cells were able to form fibrosarcomas partially differentiated into different mesenchymal lineages when injected in immunodeficient mice both after subcutaneous and intrafemoral injection. These findings show that MSCs are very sensitive to mutations in genes involved in cell cycle control and that these deficiencies can be at the origin of some mesodermic tumors.

  2. Identification of Aging-Associated Gene Expression Signatures That Precede Intestinal Tumorigenesis.

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    Yoshihisa Okuchi

    Full Text Available Aging-associated alterations of cellular functions have been implicated in various disorders including cancers. Due to difficulties in identifying aging cells in living tissues, most studies have focused on aging-associated changes in whole tissues or certain cell pools. Thus, it remains unclear what kinds of alterations accumulate in each cell during aging. While analyzing several mouse lines expressing fluorescent proteins (FPs, we found that expression of FPs is gradually silenced in the intestinal epithelium during aging in units of single crypt composed of clonal stem cell progeny. The cells with low FP expression retained the wild-type Apc allele and the tissues composed of them did not exhibit any histological abnormality. Notably, the silencing of FPs was also observed in intestinal adenomas and the surrounding normal mucosae of Apc-mutant mice, and mediated by DNA methylation of the upstream promoter. Our genome-wide analysis then showed that the silencing of FPs reflects specific gene expression alterations during aging, and that these alterations occur in not only mouse adenomas but also human sporadic and hereditary (familial adenomatous polyposis adenomas. Importantly, pharmacological inhibition of DNA methylation, which suppresses adenoma development in Apc-mutant mice, reverted the aging-associated silencing of FPs and gene expression alterations. These results identify aging-associated gene expression signatures that are heterogeneously induced by DNA methylation and precede intestinal tumorigenesis triggered by Apc inactivation, and suggest that pharmacological inhibition of the signature genes could be a novel strategy for the prevention and treatment of intestinal tumors.

  3. Hyperglycemia promotes K-Ras-induced lung tumorigenesis through BASCs amplification.

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    Carla Micucci

    Full Text Available Oncogenic K-Ras represents the most common molecular change in human lung adenocarcinomas, the major histologic subtype of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. The presence of K-Ras mutation is associated with a poor prognosis, but no effective treatment strategies are available for K-Ras -mutant NSCLC. Epidemiological studies report higher lung cancer mortality rates in patients with type 2 diabetes. Here, we use a mouse model of K-Ras-mediated lung cancer on a background of chronic hyperglycemia to determine whether elevated circulating glycemic levels could influence oncogenic K-Ras-mediated tumor development. Inducible oncogenic K-Ras mouse model was treated with subtoxic doses of streptozotocin (STZ to induce chronic hyperglycemia. We observed increased tumor mass and higher grade of malignancy in STZ treated diabetic mice analyzed at 4, 12 and 24 weeks, suggesting that oncogenic K-Ras increased lung tumorigenesis in hyperglycemic condition. This promoting effect is achieved by expansion of tumor-initiating lung bronchio-alveolar stem cells (BASCs in bronchio-alveolar duct junction, indicating a role of hyperglycemia in the activity of K-Ras-transformed putative lung stem cells. Notably, after oncogene K-Ras activation, BASCs show upregulation of the glucose transporter (Glut1/Slc2a1, considered as an important player of the active control of tumor cell metabolism by oncogenic K-Ras. Our novel findings suggest that anti-hyperglycemic drugs, such as metformin, may act as therapeutic agent to restrict lung neoplasia promotion and progression.

  4. MicroRNA signature in massive macronodular adrenocortical disease and implications for adrenocortical tumorigenesis

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    Bimpaki, Eirini I.; Iliopoulos, Dimitrios; Moraitis, Andreas; Stratakis, Constantine A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Massive macronodular adrenocortical disease (MMAD) may be caused by aberrant microRNA expression. To determine the microRNA profile in MMAD and identify putative microRNA-gene target pairs involved in adrenal tumorigenesis. Experimental design We performed microRNA microarray analysis in 10 patients with ACTH-independent Cushing syndrome caused by MMAD (ages 39 - 60 years) and 4 normal adrenal cortex samples were used as controls. Microarray data were validated by real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Identification of potential microRNA-gene target pairs implicated in MMAD pathogenesis has been done by integrating our microRNA data with previously obtained cDNA microarray data. Experimental validation of specific microRNA gene targets was performed by transfection experiments and luciferase assay. Results A total of 37 microRNAs were differentially expressed between MMAD and normal tissues; 16 microRNAs were down-regulated, including miR-200b and miR-203, while 21 microRNAs were up-regulated, miR-210 and miR-484 among them. Comparison of microRNA data with different clinicopathological parameters revealed miR-130a and miR-382 as putative diagnostic MMAD markers. Interestingly, we detected miR-200b targeting directly Matrin 3 (MATR3) expression in an adrenocortical cancer cell line (H295R). Conclusions MicroRNAs appear to have distinct regulatory effects in MMAD, including an association with clinical presentation and severity of the disease, expressed by the degree of hypercortisolism. This is the first investigation of microRNAs in MMAD, a disease with complex pathogenesis; the data indicate that specific microRNAs such as miR-200b may play a significant role in MMAD formation and/or progression. PMID:19849700

  5. Role of PINCH and its partner tumor suppressor Rsu-1 in regulating liver size and tumorigenesis.

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    Shashikiran Donthamsetty

    Full Text Available Particularly interesting new cysteine-histidine-rich protein (PINCH protein is part of the ternary complex known as the IPP (integrin linked kinase (ILK-PINCH-Parvin-α complex. PINCH itself binds to ILK and to another protein known as Rsu-1 (Ras suppressor 1. We generated PINCH 1 and PINCH 2 Double knockout mice (referred as PINCH DKO mice. PINCH2 elimination was systemic whereas PINCH1 elimination was targeted to hepatocytes. The genetically modified mice were born normal. The mice were sacrificed at different ages after birth. Soon after birth, they developed abnormal hepatic histology characterized by disorderly hepatic plates, increased proliferation of hepatocytes and biliary cells and increased deposition of extracellular matrix. After a sustained and prolonged proliferation of all epithelial components, proliferation subsided and final liver weight by the end of 30 weeks in livers with PINCH DKO deficient hepatocytes was 40% larger than the control mice. The livers of the PINCH DKO mice were also very stiff due to increased ECM deposition throughout the liver, with no observed nodularity. Mice developed liver cancer by one year. These mice regenerated normally when subjected to 70% partial hepatectomy and did not show any termination defect. Ras suppressor 1 (Rsu-1 protein, the binding partner of PINCH is frequently deleted in human liver cancers. Rsu-1 expression is dramatically decreased in PINCH DKO mouse livers. Increased expression of Rsu-1 suppressed cell proliferation and migration in HCC cell lines. These changes were brought about not by affecting activation of Ras (as its name suggests but by suppression of Ras downstream signaling via RhoGTPase proteins. In conclusion, our studies suggest that removal of PINCH results in enlargement of liver and tumorigenesis. Decreased levels of Rsu-1, a partner for PINCH and a protein often deleted in human liver cancer, may play an important role in the development of the observed phenotype.

  6. Choroid plexus papillomas: advances in molecular biology and understanding of tumorigenesis

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    Safaee, Michael; Oh, Michael C.; Bloch, Orin; Sun, Matthew Z.; Kaur, Gurvinder; Auguste, Kurtis I.; Tihan, Tarik; Parsa, Andrew T.

    2013-01-01

    Choroid plexus papillomas are rare, benign tumors originating from the choroid plexus. Although generally found within the ventricular system, they can arise ectopically in the brain parenchyma or disseminate throughout the neuraxis. We sought to review recent advances in our understanding of the molecular biology and oncogenic pathways associated with this disease. A comprehensive PubMed literature review was conducted to identify manuscripts discussing the clinical, molecular, and genetic features of choroid plexus papillomas. Articles concerning diagnosis, treatment, and long-term patient outcomes were also reviewed. The introduction of atypical choroid plexus papilloma as a distinct entity has increased the need for accurate histopathologic diagnosis. Advances in immunohistochemical staining have improved our ability to differentiate choroid plexus papillomas from other intracranial tumors or metastatic lesions using combinations of key markers and mitotic indices. Recent findings have implicated Notch3 signaling, the transcription factor TWIST1, platelet-derived growth factor receptor, and the tumor necrosis factor–related apoptosis-inducing ligand pathway in choroid plexus papilloma tumorigenesis. A combination of commonly occurring chromosomal duplications and deletions has also been identified. Surgical resection remains the standard of care, although chemotherapy and radiotherapy may be considered for recurrent or metastatic lesions. While generally considered benign, these tumors possess a complex biology that sheds insight into other choroid plexus tumors, particularly malignant choroid plexus carcinomas. Improving our understanding of the molecular biology, genetics, and oncogenic pathways associated with this tumor will allow for the development of targeted therapies and improved outcomes for patients with this disease. PMID:23172371

  7. Increased Transgenerational Intestinal Tumorigenesis in Offspring of Ionizing Radiation Exposed Parent APC1638N/+ Mice.

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    Suman, Shubhankar; Kumar, Santosh; Moon, Bo-Hyun; Fornace, Albert J; Kallakury, Bhaskar V S; Datta, Kamal

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess transgenerational intestinal tumorigenic effects of low dose ionizing radiation employing a well-characterized mouse model of human colorectal cancer. Mice (6 to 8 weeks old APC1638N/+ mice; n=20 per study group) were exposed to whole-body 25 cGy x-rays and mated 2 days post-irradiation. Intestinal tumorigenesis in male and female F1 mice from No Parents Irradiated (NPI), Both Parents Irradiated (BPI), and Male Parent Irradiated (MPI) groups were compared 210 days after birth. Male and female Direct Parent Irradiated (DPI) groups were additional controls for male and female F1 groups respectively. Data showed higher intestinal tumor frequency (± standard error of the mean) in male and female F1 from BPI (male: 7.81 ± 0.91; female: 5.45 ± 0.36) as well as from MPI (male: 6.30 ± 0.33; female: 4.45 ± 0.33) mice relative to F1 from NPI mice (male: 4.2 ± 0.48; female: 3.35 ± 0.37). Compared to male and female DPI (male: 5.55 ± 0.40; female: 3.60 ± 0.22), tumor frequency in F1 mice of BPI and MPI, though higher, was not statistically significant except for DPI vs. BPI in male mice. Additionally, both BPI and MPI showed increased frequency of larger tumors relative to NPI. In summary, our observations demonstrated that the APC1638N/+ mice due to its low spontaneous tumor frequency could serve as an effective model to study risk of transgenerational carcinogenesis in gastrointestinal tissues after exposure to clinically relevant low doses of ionizing radiation.

  8. Cooperation of the BTB-Zinc finger protein, Abrupt, with cytoskeletal regulators in Drosophila epithelial tumorigenesis

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    Nezaket Turkel

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The deregulation of cell polarity or cytoskeletal regulators is a common occurrence in human epithelial cancers. Moreover, there is accumulating evidence in human epithelial cancer that BTB-ZF genes, such as Bcl6 and ZBTB7A, are oncogenic. From our previous studies in the vinegar fly, Drosophila melanogaster, we have identified a cooperative interaction between a mutation in the apico-basal cell polarity regulator Scribble (Scrib and overexpression of the BTB-ZF protein Abrupt (Ab. Herein, we show that co-expression of ab with actin cytoskeletal regulators, RhoGEF2 or Src64B, in the developing eye-antennal epithelial tissue results in the formation of overgrown amorphous tumours, whereas ab and DRac1 co-expression leads to non-cell autonomous overgrowth. Together with ab, these genes affect the expression of differentiation genes, resulting in tumours locked in a progenitor cell fate. Finally, we show that the expression of two mammalian genes related to ab, Bcl6 and ZBTB7A, which are oncogenes in mammalian epithelial cancers, significantly correlate with the upregulation of cytoskeletal genes or downregulation of apico-basal cell polarity neoplastic tumour suppressor genes in colorectal, lung and other human epithelial cancers. Altogether, this analysis has revealed that upregulation of cytoskeletal regulators cooperate with Abrupt in Drosophila epithelial tumorigenesis, and that high expression of human BTB-ZF genes, Bcl6 and ZBTB7A, shows significant correlations with cytoskeletal and cell polarity gene expression in specific epithelial tumour types. This highlights the need for further investigation of the cooperation between these genes in mammalian systems.

  9. EBV-induced human CD8+ NKT cells suppress tumorigenesis by EBV-associated malignancies.

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    Yuling, He; Ruijing, Xiao; Li, Li; Xiang, Ji; Rui, Zhou; Yujuan, Wang; Lijun, Zhang; Chunxian, Du; Xinti, Tan; Wei, Xiao; Lang, Chen; Yanping, Jiang; Tao, Xiong; Mengjun, Wu; Jie, Xiong; Youxin, Jin; Jinquan, Tan

    2009-10-15

    The underlying mechanism of the protective and suppressive role of NKT cells in human tumor immunosurveillance remains to be fully elucidated. We show that the frequencies of CD8(+) NKT cells in patients with EBV-associated Hodgkin's lymphoma or nasopharyngeal carcinoma are significantly lower than those in healthy EBV carriers. These CD8(+) NKT cells in tumor patients are also functionally impaired. In human-thymus-severe combined immunodeficient (hu-thym-SCID) chimeras, EBV challenge efficiently promotes the generation of IFN-gamma-biased CD8(+) NKT cells. These cells are strongly cytotoxic, drive syngeneic T cells into a Th1 bias, and enhance T-cell cytotoxicity to EBV-associated tumor cells. Interleukin-4-biased CD4(+) NKT cells are predominately generated in unchallenged chimeras. These cells are noncytotoxic, drive syngeneic T cells into a Th2 bias, and do not affect T-cell cytotoxicity. In humanized xenogeneic tumor-transplanted hu-thym-SCID chimeras, adoptive transfer with EBV-induced CD8(+) NKT cells significantly suppresses tumorigenesis by EBV-associated malignancies. EBV-induced CD8(+) NKT cells are necessary and sufficient to enhance the T-cell immunity to EBV-associated malignancies in the hu-thym-SCID chimeras. CD4(+) NKT cells are synergetic with CD8(+) NKT cells, leading to a more pronounced T-cell antitumor response in the chimeras cotransferred with CD4(+) and CD8(+) NKT cells. Thus, immune reconstitution with EBV-induced CD8(+) NKT cells could be a useful strategy in management of EBV-associated malignancies.

  10. miR-935 suppresses gastric signet ring cell carcinoma tumorigenesis by targeting Notch1 expression

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    Yan, Chao [Department of General Surgery, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Science and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, 100730 (China); Yu, Jianchun, E-mail: yu_jchpumch@163.com [Department of General Surgery, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Science and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, 100730 (China); Kang, Weiming [Department of General Surgery, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Science and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, 100730 (China); Liu, Yuqin [Cell Culture Center, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, 100005 (China); Ma, Zhiqiang; Zhou, Li [Department of General Surgery, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Science and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, 100730 (China)

    2016-01-29

    Gastric signet ring cell carcinoma (GSRCC) is a unique pathological type of gastric carcinoma that is extremely invasive and has a poor prognosis. Expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) has been closely linked to the carcinogenesis of gastric cancer and has been considered as a powerful prognostic marker. The function of miR-935 has never been reported in cancer before. We found, using microRNA array, that expression of miR-935 in GSRCC cell lines is lower than in non-GSRCC cell lines, and enhanced expression of miR-935 in GSRCC cell-lines inhibit cell proliferation, migration and invasion. We also identified Notch1 as a direct target of miR-935. Knockdown of Notch1 reduced proliferation, migration/invasion of GSRCC cells, and overexpression Notch1's activated form (Notch intracellular domain) could rescue miR-935's tumor suppressive effect on GSRCC. Expression of miR-935 was lower in gastric carcinoma tissue than in paired normal tissue samples, and lower in GSRCC than in non-GSRCC. Our results demonstrate the inverse correlation between the expression of miR-935 and Notch1 in gastric tissues. We conclude that miR-935 inhibits gastric carcinoma cell proliferation, migration and invasion by targeting Notch1, suggesting potential applications of the miR-935-Notch1 pathway in gastric cancer clinical diagnosis and therapeutics, especially in gastric signet ring cell carcinoma. - Highlights: • The expression of miR-935 is lower in GC tissue than in paired normal tissue. • The expression of miR-935 is lower in GSRCC tissue than in non-GSRCC. • Enhanced expression of miR-935 suppresses tumorigenesis of GSRCC. • Notch1 is a direct target of miR-935.

  11. Characterization of regions of chromosomes 12 and 16 involved in nephroblastoma tumorigenesis.

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    Austruy, E; Candon, S; Henry, I; Gyapay, G; Tournade, M F; Mannens, M; Callen, D; Junien, C; Jeanpierre, C

    1995-12-01

    There are at least three loci involved in Wilms' tumor (WT) tumorigenesis: WT1 in 11p13, WT2 in 11p15.5, and WT3, as yet unmapped. A compilation of cytogenetic data published for 107 WT revealed that deletion of chromosome 16 and duplication of chromosome 12 occur as frequently as the well-documented 11p deletions. Allelic imbalance for chromosomes 16 and 12 was investigated in a series of 28 WT. By use of a large panel of restriction fragment length polymorphisms and (CA)n probes, we demonstrated loss of heterozygosity (LOH) for 16q in seven (25%) of the tumors. The whole length of 16q was involved in six of the tumors. Moreover, consistent with a previous report of 16q13 LOH in a sporadic WT and a constitutional breakpoint with a Beckwith-Wiedemann patient, we map a region of particular interest to between D16S308 and D16S320. The assumption that 16q LOH may be an early event was based on: 1) the detection of 16q LOH in one case of nephroblastomatosis; 2) the presence of a complete (clonal) 16q LOH in a tumor with partial (mosaic) 11p LOH; and 3) 16q LOH as the sole abnormality in one WT. By quantification of chromosome 12 allelic imbalance, we detected duplication in 18% of the total series and in 25% of the sporadic unilateral cases. The common region extended from the centromere to D12S7 in 12q21.1-q23. We also suggest that the various pathogenetically important loci are not equally involved in the different forms of WT and that their sequential involvement may differ.

  12. Do myoepithelial cells hold the key for breast tumorprogression?

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    Polyak, Kornelia; Hu, Min

    2005-11-18

    Mammary myoepithelial cells have been the foster child of breast cancer biology and have been largely ignored since they were considered to be less important for tumorigenesis than luminal epithelial cells from which most of breast carcinomas are thought to arise. In recent years as our knowledge in stem cell biology and the cellular microenvironment has been increasing myoepithelial cells are slowly starting to gain more attention. Emerging data raise the hypothesis if myoepithelial cells play a key role in breast tumor progression by regulating the in situ to invasive carcinoma transition and if myoepithelial cells are part of the mammary stem cell niche. Paracrine interactions between myoepithelial and luminal epithelial cells are known to be important for cell cycle arrest, establishing epithelial cell polarity, and inhibiting migration and invasion. Based on these functions normal mammary myoepithelial cells have been called ''natural tumor suppressors''. However, during tumor progression myoepithelial cells seem to loose these properties and eventually they themselves diminish as tumors become invasive. Better understanding of myoepithelial cell function and their role in tumor progression may lead to their exploitation for cancer therapeutic and preventative measures.

  13. Telomerase Activity and Genetic Alterations in Primary Breast Carcinomas

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    Anna Papadopoulou

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available It has been proposed that the structural and numerical chromosome abnormalities recorded in breast cancer could be the result of telomere dysfunction and that telomerase is activated de novo to provide a survival mechanism curtailing further chromosomal aberrations. However, recent in vivo and in vitro data show that the ectopic expression of telomerase promotes tumorigenesis via a telomere length-independent mechanism. In this study, the relation between telomerase expression and the extent of chromosomal aberrations was investigated in 62 primary breast carcinomas. Telomerase activity was measured using a polymerase chain reaction-based telomeric repeat amplification protocol assay and 92% of the tumors were found to express telomerase with a relative activity ranging from 0 to 3839.6. Genetic alterations were determined by G-banding and comparative genomic hybridization analysis and 97% of the tumors exhibited chromosomal aberrations ranging from 0 to 44 (average: 10.98. In the overall series, the relationship between telomerase activity levels and genetic changes could be best described by a quadratic model, whereas in tumors with below-average genetic alteration numbers, a significant positive association was recorded between the two variables (coefficient=0.374, P= .017. The relationship between telomerase activity levels and the extent of genetic alteration may reflect the complex effect of telomerase activation upon tumor progression in breast carcinomas.

  14. HER2-associated radiation resistance of breast cancer stem cells isolated from HER2-negative breast cancer cells

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    Duru, Nadire; Fan, Ming; Candas, Demet; Menaa, Cheikh; Liu, Hsin-Chen; Nantajit, Danupon; Wen, Yunfei; Xiao, Kai; Eldridge, Angela; Chromy, Brett A.; Li, Shiyong; Spitz, Douglas R.; Lam, Kit S.; Wicha, Max S.; Li, Jian Jian

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To understand the role of HER2-associated signaling network in breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs); using radiation-resistant breast cancer cells and clinical recurrent breast cancers to evaluate HER2-targeted therapy as a tumor eliminating strategy for recurrent HER2−/low breast cancers. Experimental Design HER2-expressing BCSCs (HER2+/CD44+/CD24−/low) were isolated from radiation-treated breast cancer MCF7 cells and in vivo irradiated MCF7 xenograft tumors. Tumor aggressiveness and radiation resistance were analyzed by gap filling, Matrigel invasion, tumor-sphere formation, and clonogenic survival assays. The HER2/CD44 feature was analyzed in 40 primary and recurrent breast cancer specimens. Protein expression profiling in HER2+/CD44+/CD24−/low versus HER2−/CD44+/CD24−/low BCSCs was conducted with 2-D DIGE and HPLC-MS/MS analysis and HER2-mediated signaling network was generated by MetaCore™ program. Results Compared to HER2-negative BCSCs, HER2+/CD44+/CD24−/low cells showed elevated aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity and aggressiveness tested by matrigel invasion, tumor sphere formation and in vivo tumorigenesis. The enhanced aggressive phenotype and radioresistance of the HER2+/CD44+/CD24−/low cells were markedly reduced by inhibition of HER2 via siRNA or Herceptin treatments. Clinical breast cancer specimens revealed that cells co-expressing HER2 and CD44 were more frequently detected in recurrent (84.6%) than primary tumors (57.1%). In addition, 2-D DIGE and HPLC-MS/MS of HER2+/CD44+/CD24−/low versus HER2−/CD44+/CD24−/low BCSCs reported a unique HER2-associated protein profile including effectors involved in tumor metastasis, apoptosis, mitochondrial function and DNA repair. A specific feature of HER2-STAT3 network was identified. Conclusion This study provides the evidence that HER2-mediated pro-survival signaling network is responsible for the aggressive phenotype of breast cancer stem cells that could be targeted to control

  15. Outcomes in patients with aggressive or refractory disease from REVEL: A randomized phase III study of docetaxel with ramucirumab or placebo for second-line treatment of stage IV non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reck, Martin; Paz-Ares, Luis; Bidoli, Paolo; Cappuzzo, Federico; Dakhil, Shaker; Moro-Sibilot, Denis; Borghaei, Hossein; Johnson, Melissa; Jotte, Robert; Pennell, Nathan A; Shepherd, Frances A; Tsao, Anne; Thomas, Michael; Carter, Gebra Cuyun; Chan-Diehl, Faye; Alexandris, Ekaterine; Lee, Pablo; Zimmermann, Annamaria; Sashegyi, Andreas; Pérol, Maurice

    2017-10-01

    The REVEL study demonstrated improved efficacy for patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer treated with ramucirumab plus docetaxel, independent of histology. This exploratory analysis characterized the treatment effect in REVEL patients who were refractory to prior first-line treatment. Refractory patients had a best response of progressive disease to first-line treatment. Endpoints included overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), objective response rate (ORR), quality of life (QoL), and safety. Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards regression were performed for OS and PFS, and Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel test was used for response. QoL was assessed with the Lung Cancer Symptom Scale. Sensitivity analyses were performed on subgroups of the intent-to-treat population with limited time on first-line therapy. Of 1253 randomized patients in REVEL, 360 (29%) were refractory to first-line treatment. Baseline characteristics were largely balanced between treatment arms. In the control arm, median OS for refractory patients was 6.3 versus 10.3 months for patients not meeting this criterion, demonstrating the poor prognosis of refractory patients. Median OS (8.3 vs. 6.3 months; HR, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.68-1.08), median PFS (4.0 vs. 2.5 months; HR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.57-0.88), and ORR (22.5% vs. 12.6%) were improved in refractory patients treated with ramucirumab compared to placebo, without new safety concerns or further deteriorating patient QoL. The effect of ramucirumab in refractory patients is similar to that in the intent-to-treat population. The benefit/risk profile for refractory patients suggests that ramucirumab plus docetaxel is an appropriate treatment option even in this difficult-to-treat population. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Stages of Male Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  17. Breast development and anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Sonali; Moore, Richard G

    2011-03-01

    In this article, the development of the female breast, as well as the functional anatomy, blood supply, innervation and lymphatic drainage are described. A thorough understanding of the breast anatomy is an important adjunct to a meticulous clinical breast examination. Breast examination is a complex skill involving key maneuvers, including careful inspection and palpation. Clinical breast examination can provide an opportunity for the clinician to educate patients about their breast and about breast cancer, its symptoms, risk factors, early detection, and normal breast composition, and specifically variability. Clinical breast examination can help to detect some cancers not found by mammography, and clinicians should not override their examination findings if imaging is not supportive of the physical findings.

  18. The roles of ncRNAs and histone-modifiers in regulating breast cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiju Zhao

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cancer stem cells (CSCs, a subpopulation of cancer cells with ability of initiating tumorigenesis, exist in many kinds of tumors including breast cancer. Cancer stem cells contribute to treatment resistance and relapse. Conventional treatments only kill differentiated cancer cells, but spare CSCs. Combining conventional treatments with therapeutic drugs targeting to CSCs will eradicate cancer cells more efficiently. Studying the molecular mechanisms of CSCs regulation is essential for developing new therapeutic strategies. Growing evidences showed CSCs are regulated by non-coding RNA (ncRNA including microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs, and histone-modifiers, such as let-7, miR-93, miR-100, HOTAIR, Bmi-1 and EZH2. Herein we review the roles of microRNAs, lncRNAs and histone-modifiers especially Polycomb family proteins in regulating breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs.

  19. Dysregulated miR-183 inhibits migration in breast cancer cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lowery, Aoife J

    2010-01-01

    The involvement of miRNAs in the regulation of fundamental cellular functions has placed them at the fore of ongoing investigations into the processes underlying carcinogenesis. MiRNA expression patterns have been shown to be dysregulated in numerous human malignancies, including breast cancer, suggesting their probable involvement as novel classes of oncogenes or tumour suppressor genes. The identification of differentially expressed miRNAs and elucidation of their functional roles may provide insight into the complex and diverse molecular mechanisms of tumorigenesis. MiR-183 is located on chromosome 7q32 and is part of a miRNA family which are dysregulated in numerous cancers. The aims of this study were to further examine the expression and functional role of miR-183 in breast cancer.

  20. Breast development gives insights into breast disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osin, P P; Anbazhagan, R; Bartkova, J; Nathan, B; Gusterson, B A

    1998-09-01

    Studies of developing human breasts are essential for understanding the organogenesis as well as molecular pathogenesis of benign and malignant breast diseases. In this study we have examined the distribution of TGF-alpha, TGF-beta 1, tenascin-C and collagen type IV with the aim of starting to build a picture of the profile of molecules that may be involved in the development of the human breast. Ten fetal breasts (16 to 23 weeks of gestation) and 45 infant breasts, ranging in age from newborn to 2 years, were used in this study. Paraffin sections from these samples were immunostained with antibodies for these proteins and for Ki67 to elucidate the level of proliferative activity in different stages of breast development. TGF-alpha immunoreactivity was observed both in the stromal and the epithelial cells within fetal and infant breasts up to 25 days. TGF-beta 1 immunoreactivity was localized in the extracellular matrix. Tenascin-C was found around the neck of the developing breast bud and in the extracellular matrix of the infant with peaks in the newborn at 6-12 weeks. The immunoreactivity for type IV collagen was more intense in the region of the breast bud neck in the fetal breasts and reduced around the tips of lobular and terminal-end buds within the infant breasts. The distribution of the growth factors and extracellular matrix proteins within the developing human breast indicates that they play a significant role in different cellular compartments during morphogenesis and provides insights into breast disease.

  1. A short synthetic peptide fragment of human C2ORF40 has therapeutic potential in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chaoyang [Shandong Univ., Jinan (China); Zhang, Pengju [Shandong Univ., Jinan (China); Jiang, Anli [Shandong Univ., Jinan (China); Mao, Jian-Hua [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Wei, Guangwei [Shandong Univ. School of Medicine, Jinan (China)

    2017-03-30

    C2ORF40 encodes a secreted protein which is cleaved to generate soluble peptides by proteolytic processing and this process is believed to be necessary for C2ORF40 to exert cell type specific biological activity. Here, we reported a short mimic peptide of human C2ORF40 acts potential therapeutic efficacy in human cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. We synthesized a short peptide of human C2ORF40, named C2ORF40 mimic peptide fragment and assessed its biological function on cancer cell growth, migration and tumorigenesis. Cell growth assay showed that C2ORF40 mimic peptide fragment significantly suppressed cell proliferation of breast and lung cancer cells. Moreover, C2ORF40 mimic peptide fragment significantly inhibited the migration and invasion of breast cancer cells. Furthermore, we showed that this peptide suppressed tumorigenesis in breast tumor xenograft model. Cell cycle assay indicated that the C2ORF40 mimic peptide fragment suppressed the growth of tumor cells through inducing mitotic phase arrest. In conclusion, our results firstly suggested that this short synthetic peptide of human C2ORF40 may be a candidate tumor therapeutic agent.

  2. MicroRNA-27b suppresses Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric tumorigenesis through negatively regulating Frizzled7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Yan; Lu, Xiaolan; Wu, Xiaokang; Xue, Li; Wang, Xiangling; Xu, Jiru

    2016-04-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are novel tools for cancer therapy. Frizzled7 (FZD7) is an important co-receptor in the WNT signaling pathway. The WNT signaling pathway is aberrantly activated in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)‑infected gastric cancer cells. However, the role of FZD7 in H. pylori‑induced gastric tumorigenesis remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the potential role of FZD7 in H. pylori-induced gastric tumorigenesis and validated the possibility that targeting of FZD7 by specific miRNA inhibits H. pylori-induced gastric tumorigenesis. First, we found that FZD7 was significantly induced by H. pylori infection in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Knockdown of FZD7 by FZD7 small interfering RNA effectively inhibited H. pylori infection-induced cell proliferation of gastric cancer cells. We found that microRNA-27b (miR-27b) was the predicted miRNA for FZD7 and that miR-27b negatively regulated FZD7 expression by targeting the 3'-untranslated region of FZD7. Furthermore, miR-27b overexpression significantly inhibited H. pylori infection-induced cell proliferation and WNT signaling pathway activation in gastric cancer cells. Restoration of FZD7 expression significantly attenuated the inhibitory effect of miR-27b overexpression on cell proliferation and WNT signaling pathway activation. Collectively, our study suggests that FZD7 triggered by H. pylori infection contributes to the H. pylori infection-induced cell proliferation that links the WNT. Thus, miR-27b may be a promising molecular target for the treatment of the disease.

  3. Dysregulated estrogen receptor signaling in the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis leads to ovarian epithelial tumorigenesis in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary J Laws

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The etiology of ovarian epithelial cancer is poorly understood, mainly due to the lack of an appropriate experimental model for studying the onset and progression of this disease. We have created a mutant mouse model in which aberrant estrogen receptor alpha (ERα signaling in the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis leads to ovarian epithelial tumorigenesis. In these mice, termed ERαd/d, the ERα gene was conditionally deleted in the anterior pituitary, but remained intact in the hypothalamus and the ovary. The loss of negative-feedback regulation by estrogen (E at the level of the pituitary led to increased production of luteinizing hormone (LH by this tissue. Hyperstimulation of the ovarian cells by LH resulted in elevated steroidogenesis, producing high circulating levels of steroid hormones, including E. The ERαd/d mice exhibited formation of palpable ovarian epithelial tumors starting at 5 months of age with 100% penetrance. By 15 months of age, 80% of ERαd/d mice die. Besides proliferating epithelial cells, these tumors also contained an expanded population of luteinized stromal cells, which acquire the ability to express P450 aromatase and synthesize E locally. In response to the elevated levels of E, the ERα signaling was accentuated in the ovarian epithelial cells of ERαd/d mice, triggering increased ERα-dependent gene expression, abnormal cell proliferation, and tumorigenesis. Consistent with these findings, treatment of ERαd/d mice with letrozole, an aromatase inhibitor, markedly reduced circulating E and ovarian tumor volume. We have, therefore, developed a unique animal model, which serves as a useful tool for exploring the involvement of E-dependent signaling pathways in ovarian epithelial tumorigenesis.

  4. Sex-dependent Differences in Intestinal Tumorigenesis Induced in Apc1638N/+ Mice by Exposure to {gamma} Rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trani, Daniela [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular and Cellular Biology, Georgetown University, Washington, District of Columbia (United States); Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, District of Columbia (United States); Maastricht Radiation Oncology (MaastRO) Lab, GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, University of Maastricht (Netherlands); Moon, Bo-Hyun [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular and Cellular Biology, Georgetown University, Washington, District of Columbia (United States); Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, District of Columbia (United States); Kallakury, Bhaskar; Hartmann, Dan P. [Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, District of Columbia (United States); Datta, Kamal [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular and Cellular Biology, Georgetown University, Washington, District of Columbia (United States); Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, District of Columbia (United States); Fornace, Albert J., E-mail: af294@georgetown.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular and Cellular Biology, Georgetown University, Washington, District of Columbia (United States); Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, District of Columbia (United States); Center of Excellence in Genomic Medicine Research (CEGMR), King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to assess the effect of 1 and 5 Gy radiation doses and to investigate the interplay of gender and radiation with regard to intestinal tumorigenesis in an adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) mutant mouse model. Methods and Materials: Apc1638N/+ female and male mice were exposed whole body to either 1 Gy or 5 Gy of {gamma} rays and euthanized when most of the treated mice became moribund. Small and large intestines were processed to determine tumor burden, distribution, and grade. Expression of proliferation marker Ki-67 and estrogen receptor (ER)-{alpha} were also assessed by immunohistochemistry. Results: We observed that, with both 1 Gy and 5 Gy of {gamma} rays, females displayed reduced susceptibility to radiation-induced intestinal tumorigenesis compared with males. As for radiation effect on small intestinal tumor progression, although no substantial differences were found in the relative frequency and degree of dysplasia of adenomas in irradiated animals compared with controls, invasive carcinomas were found in 1-Gy- and 5-Gy-irradiated animals. Radiation exposure was also shown to induce an increase in protein levels of proliferation marker Ki-67 and sex-hormone receptor ER-{alpha} in both non tumor mucosa and intestinal tumors from irradiated male mice. Conclusions: We observed important sex-dependent differences in susceptibility to radiation-induced intestinal tumorigenesis in Apc1638N/+ mutants. Furthermore, our data provide evidence that exposure to radiation doses as low as 1 Gy can induce a significant increase in intestinal tumor multiplicity as well as enhance tumor progression in vivo.

  5. Dysregulated Estrogen Receptor Signaling in the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Ovarian Axis Leads to Ovarian Epithelial Tumorigenesis in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laws, Mary J.; Kannan, Athilakshmi; Pawar, Sandeep; Haschek, Wanda M.; Bagchi, Milan K.; Bagchi, Indrani C.

    2014-01-01

    The etiology of ovarian epithelial cancer is poorly understood, mainly due to the lack of an appropriate experimental model for studying the onset and progression of this disease. We have created a mutant mouse model in which aberrant estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) signaling in the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis leads to ovarian epithelial tumorigenesis. In these mice, termed ERαd/d, the ERα gene was conditionally deleted in the anterior pituitary, but remained intact in the hypothalamus and the ovary. The loss of negative-feedback regulation by estrogen (E) at the level of the pituitary led to increased production of luteinizing hormone (LH) by this tissue. Hyperstimulation of the ovarian cells by LH resulted in elevated steroidogenesis, producing high circulating levels of steroid hormones, including E. The ERαd/d mice exhibited formation of palpable ovarian epithelial tumors starting at 5 months of age with 100% penetrance. By 15 months of age, 80% of ERαd/d mice die. Besides proliferating epithelial cells, these tumors also contained an expanded population of luteinized stromal cells, which acquire the ability to express P450 aromatase and synthesize E locally. In response to the elevated levels of E, the ERα signaling was accentuated in the ovarian epithelial cells of ERαd/d mice, triggering increased ERα-dependent gene expression, abnormal cell proliferation, and tumorigenesis. Consistent with these findings, treatment of ERαd/d mice with letrozole, an aromatase inhibitor, markedly reduced circulating E and ovarian tumor volume. We have, therefore, developed a unique animal model, which serves as a useful tool for exploring the involvement of E-dependent signaling pathways in ovarian epithelial tumorigenesis. PMID:24603706

  6. Epithelial periostin expression is correlated with poor survival in patients with invasive breast carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ga-Eon Kim

    Full Text Available Invasion and metastasis are direct causes of mortality in patients with breast cancer and require reciprocal interactions between cancer cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM. Periostin, a fasciclin-containing adhesive ECM glycoprotein, is frequently overexpressed in various types of human cancer, and its overexpression in cancer-associated stroma and/or cancer cells is usually associated with poor clinical outcomes. However, the expression of periostin in the successive steps of breast tumorigenesis and its association with outcome variables have not been well established in breast carcinoma. The present study aimed to assess the role of periostin alteration in breast tumorigenesis and evaluate the putative prognostic value of periostin as a function of its compartmentalization. Immunohistochemical staining with anti-periostin antibody was performed in a total of 300 patients (26 patients with normal breast tissues, 76 patients with ductal carcinoma in situ [DCIS], and 198 patients with invasive breast carcinoma [IBC] using tissue microarray. Periostin immunoreactivity was assessed in both epithelial tissue and the surrounding stromal compartment. The mRNA and protein expression of periostin were analyzed in 10 paired normal/invasive cancer frozen specimens by quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis, respectively. In cancer tissues, periostin mRNA and protein expression were increased compared with adjacent normal tissues. Both epithelial and stromal periostin staining scores significantly increased in a stepwise manner with disease progression from normal breast tissue to DCIS and IBC (P = 0.000 and 0.000, respectively. High epithelial and stromal periostin expression was observed in 109/189 (57.7% and 158/189 (83.6% cases of IBC, respectively. High epithelial periostin expression was more frequently observed in the distant metastatic relapse-positive group than in the distant metastatic relapse

  7. Epidemiological Evidences on Dietary Flavonoids and Breast Cancer Risk: A Narrative Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sak, Katrin

    2017-09-27

    Epidemiological studies on associations between intake of flavonoids and breast cancer risk are highly needed to assess the actual effects of flavonoids in humans. Experimental investigations in vitro conditions cannot detect and model the real action of these phytochemicals due to the limitations to consider absorption and metabolic biotransformation as well as several complex interactions. Therefore, the data about association findings between intake of flavonoids and breast cancer risk are compiled and analyzed in the current review by evaluating both the results obtained using food composition databases as well as different biomarkers. Although several case-control studies demonstrate some reduction in breast cancer risk related to high consumption of flavones and flavonols, large-scale prospective cohort studies with follow-up times of many years do not confirm these findings. Intake of isoflavones can be associated with a decrease in breast tumorigenesis only in Asian countries where the consumption of soy foods is high but not among Western women with significantly lower ingestion amounts, suggesting the presence of so-called threshold level of effect. Besides doses, the timing of exposure to isoflavones seems also to be a significant factor as childhood and prepubertal age can be critical periods. Although women may need to consume high amounts of isoflavones typical to Asian diets to gain beneficial effects and protection against mammary carcinogenesis, it is still too early to give any specific recommendations to prevent breast tumors by diet rich in certain flavonoids. Creative Commons Attribution License

  8. Cellular calcium dynamics in lactation and breast cancer: from physiology to pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Brandie M; Breitwieser, Gerda E; Reinhardt, Timothy A; Rao, Rajini

    2014-03-15

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer mortality in women, estimated at nearly 40,000 deaths and more than 230,000 new cases diagnosed in the U.S. this year alone. One of the defining characteristics of breast cancer is the radiographic presence of microcalcifications. These palpable mineral precipitates are commonly found in the breast after formation of a tumor. Since free Ca(2+) plays a crucial role as a second messenger inside cells, we hypothesize that these chelated precipitates may be a result of dysregulated Ca(2+) secretion associated with tumorigenesis. Transient and sustained elevations of intracellular Ca(2+) regulate cell proliferation, apoptosis and cell migration, and offer numerous therapeutic possibilities in controlling tumor growth and metastasis. During lactation, a developmentally determined program of gene expression controls the massive transcellular mobilization of Ca(2+) from the blood into milk by the coordinated action of calcium transporters, including pumps, channels, sensors and buffers, in a functional module that we term CALTRANS. Here we assess the evidence implicating genes that regulate free and buffered Ca(2+) in normal breast epithelium and cancer cells and discuss mechanisms that are likely to contribute to the pathological characteristics of breast cancer.

  9. Identification of EDIL3 on extracellular vesicles involved in breast cancer cell invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong-Eun; Moon, Pyong-Gon; Cho, Young-Eun; Kim, Young-Bum; Kim, In-San; Park, Hoyong; Baek, Moon-Chang

    2016-01-10

    Cancer cell-derived extracellular vesicles have been linked to the pathogenesis of various cancers; however, the role of extracellular vesicles in tumorigenesis remains unclear. To identify extracellular vesicle proteins involved in cancer metastasis, quantitative proteomic analyses were performed on extracellular vesicles derived from two representative breast cancer cell lines: the less invasive MCF-7 and the invasive MDA-MB-231. Proteomic analysis allowed for the identification of 270 proteins in the extracellular vesicles. Here we report a new function of EDIL3 on extracellular vesicles, which are sufficient for enhancement of cell invasion and for acceleration of lung metastasis in vivo. This invasion is most likely mediated via the integrin-FAK signaling cascade in breast cancer cells. However, these effects are suppressed when EDIL3 is inactivated, providing evidence for a critical role of EDIL3 in development of cancer. Consistently, in human patients with metastatic breast cancer, the levels of EDIL3 on circulating extracellular vesicles are significantly elevated. This information is a remarkable breakthrough in understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying metastasis of breast cancer as well as in the research for cancer biomarkers using circulating extracellular vesicles. Furthermore, targeting EDIL3 on extracellular vesicles may lead to a new therapeutic option for treatment of breast cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Screening for Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niell, Bethany L; Freer, Phoebe E; Weinfurtner, Robert Jared; Arleo, Elizabeth Kagan; Drukteinis, Jennifer S

    2017-11-01

    The goal of screening is to detect breast cancers when still curable to decrease breast cancer-specific mortality. Breast cancer screening in the United States is routinely performed with mammography, supplemental digital breast tomosynthesis, ultrasound, and/or MR imaging. This article aims to review the most commonly used breast imaging modalities for screening, discuss how often and when to begin screening with specific imaging modalities, and examine the pros and cons of screening. By the article's end, the reader will be better equipped to have informed discussions with patients and medical professionals regarding the benefits and disadvantages of breast cancer screening. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Transforming Growth Factor-β Promotes Liver Tumorigenesis in Mice via Up-regulation of Snail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Hyuk; Ju, Hye-Lim; Chung, Sook In; Cho, Kyung Joo; Eun, Jung Woo; Nam, Suk Woo; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Calvisi, Diego F; Ro, Simon Weonsang

    2017-11-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) suppresses early stages of tumorigenesis, but also contributes to migration and metastasis of cancer cells. A large number of human tumors contain mutations that inactivate its receptors, or downstream proteins such as Smad transcription factors, indicating that the TGF-β signaling pathway prevents tumor growth. We investigated the effects of TGF-β inhibition on liver tumorigenesis in mice. C57BL/6 mice received hydrodynamic tail-vein injections of transposons encoding HRAS G12V and a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) to down-regulate p53, or those encoding HRAS G12V and MYC, or those encoding HRAS G12V and TAZ S89A , to induce liver tumor formation; mice were also given injections of transposons encoding SMAD7 or shRNA against SMAD2, SMAD3, SMAD4, or SNAI1 (Snail), with or without ectopic expression of Snail. Survival times were compared, and livers were weighted and examined for tumors. Liver tumor tissues were analyzed by quantitative reverse-transcription PCR, RNA sequencing, immunoblots, and immunohistochemistry. We analyzed gene expression levels in human hepatocellular carcinoma samples deposited in The Cancer Genome Atlas. A cell proliferation assay was performed using human liver cancer cell lines (HepG2 and Huh7) stably expressing Snail or shRNA against Snail. TGF-β inhibition via overexpression of SMAD7 (or knockdown of SMAD2, SMAD3, or SMAD4) consistently reduced formation and growth of liver tumors in mice that expressed activated RAS plus shRNA against p53, or in mice that expressed activated RAS and TAZ. TGF-β signaling activated transcription of the Snail gene in liver tumors induced by HRAS G12V and shRNA against p53, and by activated RAS and TAZ. Knockdown of Snail reduced liver tumor formation in both tumor models. Ectopic expression of Snail restored liver tumorigenesis suppressed by disruption of TGF-β signaling. In human hepatocellular carcinoma, Snail expression correlated with TGF-β activation. Ectopic

  12. Phospholipase C-beta 2 promotes mitosis and migration of human breast cancer-derived cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertagnolo, Valeria; Benedusi, Mascia; Brugnoli, Federica; Lanuti, Paola; Marchisio, Marco; Querzoli, Patrizia; Capitani, Silvano

    2007-08-01

    Like most human neoplasm, breast cancer has aberrations in signal transduction elements that can lead to increased proliferative potential, apoptosis inhibition, tissue invasion and metastasis. Due to the high heterogeneity of this tumor, currently, no markers are clearly associated with the insurgence of breast cancer, as well as with its progression from in situ lesion to invasive carcinoma. We have recently demonstrated an altered expression of the beta2 isoform of the phosphoinositide-dependent phospholipase C (PLC) in invasive breast tumors with different histopathological features. In primary breast tumor cells, elevated amounts of this protein are closely correlated with a poor prognosis of patients with mammary carcinoma, suggesting that PLC-beta2 may be involved in the development and worsening of the malignant phenotype. Here we demonstrate that PLC-beta2 may improve some malignant characteristics of tumor cells, like motility and invasion capability, but it fails to induce tumorigenesis in non-transformed breast-derived cells. We also report that, compared with the G(0)/G(1) phases of the cell cycle, the cells in S/G(2)/M phases show high PLC-beta2 expressions that reach the greatest levels during the late mitotic stages. In addition, even if unable to modify the proliferation rate and the expression of cell cycle-related enzymes of malignant cells, PLC-beta2 may promote the G(2)/M progression, a critical event in cancer evolution. Since phosphoinositides, substrates of PLC, are involved in regulating cytoskeleton architecture, PLC-beta2 in breast tumor cells may mediate the modification of cell shape that characterizes cell division, motility and invasion. On the basis of these data, PLC-beta2 may constitute a molecular marker of breast tumor cells able to monitor the progression to invasive cancers and a target for novel therapeutic breast cancer strategies.

  13. Lycopene attenuated hepatic tumorigenesis via differential mechanisms depending on carotenoid cleavage enzyme in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Blanche C.; Liu, Chun; Ausman, Lynne M.; von Lintig, Johannes; Wang, Xiang-Dong

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is associated with increased liver cancer risks and mortality. We recently showed that apo-10’-lycopenoic acid, a lycopene metabolite generated by beta-carotene-9’,10’-oxygenase (BCO2), inhibited carcinogen-initiated, high-fat diet (HFD)-promoted liver inflammation and hepatic tumorigenesis development. The present investigation examined the outstanding question of whether the lycopene could suppress HFD-promoted hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) progression, and if BCO2 is important in BCO2-knockout (BCO2-KO) and wild-type male mice. Results showed that lycopene supplementation (100 mg/kg diet) for 24 weeks resulted in comparable accumulation of hepatic lycopene (19.4 vs 18.2 nmol/g) and had similar effects on suppressing HFD-promoted HCC incidence (19% vs 20%) and multiplicity (58% vs 62%) in wild-type and BCO2-KO mice, respectively. Intriguingly, lycopene chemopreventive effects in wild-type mice were associated with reduced hepatic pro-inflammatory signaling (phosphorylation of nuclear factor-κB p65 and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3; interleukin-6 protein) and inflammatory foci. In contrast, the protective effects of lycopene in BCO2-KO but not in wild-type mice were associated with reduced hepatic endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated unfolded protein response (ERUPR), through decreasing ERUPR-mediated protein kinase RNA-activated like kinase– eukaryotic initiation factor 2α activation, and inositol requiring 1α–X-box binding protein 1 signaling. Lycopene supplementation in BCO2-KO mice suppressed oncogenic signals including Met mRNA, β-catenin protein, and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 activation, which was associated with increased hepatic microRNA (miR)-199a/b and miR-214 levels. These results provided novel experimental evidence that dietary lycopene can prevent HFD-promoted HCC incidence and multiplicity in mice, and may elicit different mechanisms depending on BCO2 expression. PMID:25293877

  14. Dioxin receptor regulates aldehyde dehydrogenase to block melanoma tumorigenesis and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contador-Troca, María; Alvarez-Barrientos, Alberto; Merino, Jaime M; Morales-Hernández, Antonio; Rodríguez, María I; Rey-Barroso, Javier; Barrasa, Eva; Cerezo-Guisado, María I; Catalina-Fernández, Inmaculada; Sáenz-Santamaría, Javier; Oliver, Francisco J; Fernandez-Salguero, Pedro M

    2015-08-05

    The dioxin (AhR) receptor can have oncogenic or tumor suppressor activities depending on the phenotype of the target cell. We have shown that AhR knockdown promotes melanoma primary tumorigenesis and lung metastasis in the mouse and that human metastatic melanomas had reduced AhR levels with respect to benign nevi. Mouse melanoma B16F10 cells were engineered by retroviral transduction to stably downregulate AhR expression, Aldh1a1 expression or both. They were characterized for Aldh1a1 activity, stem cell markers and migration and invasion in vitro. Their tumorigenicity in vivo was analyzed using xenografts and lung metastasis assays as well as in vivo imaging. Depletion of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1a1 (Aldh1a1) impairs the pro-tumorigenic and pro-metastatic advantage of melanoma cells lacking AhR expression (sh-AhR). Thus, Aldh1a1 knockdown in sh-AhR cells (sh-AhR + sh-Aldh1a1) diminished their migration and invasion potentials and blocked tumor growth and metastasis to the lungs in immunocompetent AhR+/+ recipient mice. However, Aldh1a1 downmodulation in AhR-expressing B16F10 cells did not significantly affect tumor growth in vivo. Aldh1a1 knockdown reduced the high levels of CD133(+)/CD29(+)/CD44(+) cells, melanosphere size and the expression of the pluripotency marker Sox2 in sh-AhR cells. Interestingly, Sox2 increased Aldh1a1 expression in sh-AhR but not in sh-AhR + sh-Aldh1a1 cells, suggesting that Aldh1a1 and Sox2 may be co-regulated in melanoma cells. In vivo imaging revealed that mice inoculated with AhR + Aldh1a1 knockdown cells had reduced tumor burden and enhanced survival than those receiving Aldh1a1-expressing sh-AhR cells. Aldh1a1 overactivation in an AhR-deficient background enhances melanoma progression. Since AhR may antagonize the protumoral effects of Aldh1a1, the AhR(low)-Aldh1a1(high) phenotype could be indicative of bad outcome in melanoma.

  15. Modulatory effects of Azadirachta indica on benzo(a)pyrene-induced forestomach tumorigenesis in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangar, Subhash Chander; Sandhir, Rajat; Rai, Durg Vijay; Koul, Ashwani

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the chemopreventive effects of aqueous Azadirachta indica (A indica) leaf extract (AAILE) against benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P]-induced forestomach tumorigenesis in Balb/c mice. METHODS: Female Balb/c mice were divided into four groups of 10-12 animals each. For induction of forestomach tumors, starting from d 14 of the experi-ment, mice of B(a)P and B(a)P + A indica groups were given intra-gastric instillations of B(a)P (40 mg/kg), twice a week for four weeks. Mice of A indica and B(a)P + A indica groups were orally administered with AAILE (100 mg/kg), two weeks prior to B(a)P instillations till the end of the experiment. After 22 wk of the first B(a)P instillation, mice were sacrificed and the forestomachs were analyzed for development of tumors, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and histopathology. RESULTS: Tumor incidence was observed to be 100% in mice that received only B(a)P. However, treatment with AAILE reduced the tumor incidence by 58.4% as observed in mice of B(a)P + A indica group when compared to that of B(a)P group. Similarly, the tumor burden and multiplicity were seen to decrease by 87.3% and 69.6% respectively in mice of B(a)P + A indica group when compared to those of B(a)P group. Scanning electron microscopy analysis showed that AAILE treatment itself did not cause any abnormalities on the surface architecture of forestomach epithelium. In tumorous forestomach, surface disruption was observed. Over the forestomach tumors of B(a)P group of mice certain rounded structures were seen in addition to closely placed tongue-shaped squamous cells. Interestingly, these rounded structures were not observed in B(a)P + A indica group of mice. Histopathalogically, the tumors were identical and diagnosed to be papillomas. Mice from control and A indica groups of mice did not develop any forestomach tumors and showed normal histo-architecture. CONCLUSION: The present data suggest that A indica exerts chemopreventive effects against B

  16. Changes in mitochondrial DNA alter expression of nuclear encoded genes associated with tumorigenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jandova, Jana; Janda, Jaroslav [Southern Arizona VA Healthcare System, Department of Medicine, Dermatology Division and Arizona Cancer Center, University of Arizona, 1515 N Campbell Avenue, Tucson, AZ 857 24 (United States); Sligh, James E, E-mail: jsligh@azcc.arizona.edu [Southern Arizona VA Healthcare System, Department of Medicine, Dermatology Division and Arizona Cancer Center, University of Arizona, 1515 N Campbell Avenue, Tucson, AZ 857 24 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    genes associated with tumorigenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MMP-9 is up-regulated and Col1a1 is down-regulated in mutant cybrids. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GM6001 reduced the enhanced motility of mutant cybrids caused by up-regulated MMP-9. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The MMP-9 expression and invasiveness of mutant cybrids were reduced by Bay 11-7802.

  17. Non-Targeted Effects and the Dose Response for Heavy Ion Tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappelli, Lori J.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is no human epidemiology data available to estimate the heavy ion cancer risks experienced by astronauts in space. Studies of tumor induction in mice are a necessary step to estimate risks to astronauts. Previous experimental data can be better utilized to model dose response for heavy ion tumorigenesis and plan future low dose studies. DOSE RESPONSE MODELS: The Harderian Gland data of Alpen et al.[1-3] was re-analyzed [4] using non-linear least square regression. The data set measured the induction of Harderian gland tumors in mice by high-energy protons, helium, neon, iron, niobium and lanthanum with LET s ranging from 0.4 to 950 keV/micron. We were able to strengthen the individual ion models by combining data for all ions into a model that relates both radiation dose and LET for the ion to tumor prevalence. We compared models based on Targeted Effects (TE) to one motivated by Non-targeted Effects (NTE) that included a bystander term that increased tumor induction at low doses non-linearly. When comparing fitted models to the experimental data, we considered the adjusted R2, the Akaike Information Criteria (AIC), and the Bayesian Information Criteria (BIC) to test for Goodness of fit.In the adjusted R2test, the model with the highest R2values provides a better fit to the available data. In the AIC and BIC tests, the model with the smaller values of the summary value provides the better fit. The non-linear NTE models fit the combined data better than the TE models that are linear at low doses. We evaluated the differences in the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) and found the NTE model provides a higher RBE at low dose compared to the TE model. POWER ANALYSIS: The final NTE model estimates were used to simulate example data to consider the design of new experiments to detect NTE at low dose for validation. Power and sample sizes were calculated for a variety of radiation qualities including some not considered in the Harderian Gland data

  18. BTB-Zinc Finger Oncogenes Are Required for Ras and Notch-Driven Tumorigenesis in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doggett, Karen; Turkel, Nezaket; Willoughby, Lee F; Ellul, Jason; Murray, Michael J; Richardson, Helena E; Brumby, Anthony M

    2015-01-01

    During tumorigenesis, pathways that promote the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) can both facilitate metastasis and endow tumor cells with cancer stem cell properties. To gain a greater understanding of how these properties are interlinked in cancers we used Drosophila epithelial tumor models, which are driven by orthologues of human oncogenes (activated alleles of Ras and Notch) in cooperation with the loss of the cell polarity regulator, scribbled (scrib). Within these tumors, both invasive, mesenchymal-like cell morphology and continual tumor overgrowth, are dependent upon Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activity. To identify JNK-dependent changes within the tumors we used a comparative microarray analysis to define a JNK gene signature common to both Ras and Notch-driven tumors. Amongst the JNK-dependent changes was a significant enrichment for BTB-Zinc Finger (ZF) domain genes, including chronologically inappropriate morphogenesis (chinmo). chinmo was upregulated by JNK within the tumors, and overexpression of chinmo with either RasV12 or Nintra was sufficient to promote JNK-independent epithelial tumor formation in the eye/antennal disc, and, in cooperation with RasV12, promote tumor formation in the adult midgut epithelium. Chinmo primes cells for oncogene-mediated transformation through blocking differentiation in the eye disc, and promoting an escargot-expressing stem or enteroblast cell state in the adult midgut. BTB-ZF genes are also required for Ras and Notch-driven overgrowth of scrib mutant tissue, since, although loss of chinmo alone did not significantly impede tumor development, when loss of chinmo was combined with loss of a functionally related BTB-ZF gene, abrupt, tumor overgrowth was significantly reduced. abrupt is not a JNK-induced gene, however, Abrupt is present in JNK-positive tumor cells, consistent with a JNK-associated oncogenic role. As some mammalian BTB-ZF proteins are also highly oncogenic, our work suggests that EMT

  19. Resting potential, oncogene-induced tumorigenesis, and metastasis: the bioelectric basis of cancer in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobikin, Maria; Chernet, Brook; Lobo, Daniel; Levin, Michael

    2012-12-01

    Cancer may result from localized failure of instructive cues that normally orchestrate cell behaviors toward the patterning needs of the organism. Steady-state gradients of transmembrane voltage (Vmem) in non-neural cells are instructive, epigenetic signals that regulate pattern formation during embryogenesis and morphostatic repair. Here, we review molecular data on the role of bioelectric cues in cancer and present new findings in the Xenopus laevis model on how the microenvironment's biophysical properties contribute to cancer in vivo. First, we investigated the melanoma-like phenotype arising from serotonergic signaling by ‘instructor’ cells—a cell population that is able to induce a metastatic phenotype in normal melanocytes. We show that when these instructor cells are depolarized, blood vessel patterning is disrupted in addition to the metastatic phenotype induced in melanocytes. Surprisingly, very few instructor cells need to be depolarized for the hyperpigmentation phenotype to occur; we present a model of antagonistic signaling by serotonin receptors that explains the unusual all-or-none nature of this effect. In addition to the body-wide depolarization-induced metastatic phenotype, we investigated the bioelectrical properties of tumor-like structures induced by canonical oncogenes and cancer-causing compounds. Exposure to carcinogen 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4NQO) induces localized tumors, but has a broad (and variable) effect on the bioelectric properties of the whole body. Tumors induced by oncogenes show aberrantly high sodium content, representing a non-invasive diagnostic modality. Importantly, depolarized transmembrane potential is not only a marker of cancer but is functionally instructive: susceptibility to oncogene-induced tumorigenesis is significantly reduced by forced prior expression of hyperpolarizing ion channels. Importantly, the same effect can be achieved by pharmacological manipulation of endogenous chloride channels, suggesting

  20. Prevention of mammary tumorigenesis by intermittent caloric restriction: does caloric intake during refeeding modulate the response?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Margot P; Hu, Xin; Grossmann, Michael E; Juneja, Subhash C; Dogan, Soner; Grande, Joseph P; Maihle, Nita J

    2007-01-01

    Chronic caloric restriction (CCR) prevents mammary tumorigenesis in rodents, but a protective effect for intermittent caloric restriction (ICR) is less well documented. We recently reported that ICR reduced mammary tumor (MT) incidence of mouse mammary tumor virus-transforming growth factor (MMTV-TGF)-alpha mice to a greater extent than did CCR. Here, we repeated this protocol and obtained serum and tissue samples. Ad libitum (AL) MMTV-TGF-alpha mice were fed AIN-93M diet. Beginning at 10 weeks of age, ICR mice received isocaloric AIN-93M-mod diet (2-fold increases in protein, fat, vitamins, and minerals) at 50% of ad libitum for 3 weeks followed by 3 weeks refeeding with AIN-93M diet. CCR mice were pair-fed AIN-93M:AIN-93M-mod (2:1) matching intakes for restriction/refeeding cycles. Mice were sacrificed for MT size, at 79 (end of 12th restriction) or at 80 (1 week after 12th refeeding) weeks of age. AL and ICR-80 mice had heavier body weights than ICR-79 and CCR mice (P food intakes of ICR and CCR mice were reduced 12% and 15% versus AL mice (P food than did AL mice during refeeding. MT incidence was 84%, 13%, and 27% for AL, ICR, and CCR mice, respectively. MT weight (P < 0.0011) and number (P < 0.01) were higher for AL mice compared with ICR and CCR mice. AL and ICR-80 mice had similar serum IGF-I levels, but only AL values were higher than those of ICR-79 and CCR mice (P < 0.0017). ICR mice had more MT DNA breaks compared with AL and CCR mice, suggesting enhanced apoptosis (P < 0.02). AL mice had higher mammary fat pad ObR and ObRb leptin receptor mRNA expression than did ICR and CCR mice (P < 0.001), but there was no effect on MTs. These results confirm that ICR prevents development of MTs to a greater extent than does CCR, although "overeating" during refeeding may compromise this protection.

  1. BTB-Zinc Finger Oncogenes Are Required for Ras and Notch-Driven Tumorigenesis in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Doggett

    Full Text Available During tumorigenesis, pathways that promote the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT can both facilitate metastasis and endow tumor cells with cancer stem cell properties. To gain a greater understanding of how these properties are interlinked in cancers we used Drosophila epithelial tumor models, which are driven by orthologues of human oncogenes (activated alleles of Ras and Notch in cooperation with the loss of the cell polarity regulator, scribbled (scrib. Within these tumors, both invasive, mesenchymal-like cell morphology and continual tumor overgrowth, are dependent upon Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK activity. To identify JNK-dependent changes within the tumors we used a comparative microarray analysis to define a JNK gene signature common to both Ras and Notch-driven tumors. Amongst the JNK-dependent changes was a significant enrichment for BTB-Zinc Finger (ZF domain genes, including chronologically inappropriate morphogenesis (chinmo. chinmo was upregulated by JNK within the tumors, and overexpression of chinmo with either RasV12 or Nintra was sufficient to promote JNK-independent epithelial tumor formation in the eye/antennal disc, and, in cooperation with RasV12, promote tumor formation in the adult midgut epithelium. Chinmo primes cells for oncogene-mediated transformation through blocking differentiation in the eye disc, and promoting an escargot-expressing stem or enteroblast cell state in the adult midgut. BTB-ZF genes are also required for Ras and Notch-driven overgrowth of scrib mutant tissue, since, although loss of chinmo alone did not significantly impede tumor development, when loss of chinmo was combined with loss of a functionally related BTB-ZF gene, abrupt, tumor overgrowth was significantly reduced. abrupt is not a JNK-induced gene, however, Abrupt is present in JNK-positive tumor cells, consistent with a JNK-associated oncogenic role. As some mammalian BTB-ZF proteins are also highly oncogenic, our work suggests that

  2. Breast cancer screening in Korean woman with dense breast tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hee Jung [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Eun Sook [Dept. of Radiology, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Ann [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    Asian women, including Korean, have a relatively higher incidence of dense breast tissue, compared with western women. Dense breast tissue has a lower sensitivity for the detection of breast cancer and a higher relative risk for breast cancer, compared with fatty breast tissue. Thus, there were limitations in the mammographic screening for women with dense breast tissue, and many studies for the supplemental screening methods. This review included appropriate screening methods for Korean women with dense breasts. We also reviewed the application and limitation of supplemental screening methods, including breast ultrasound, digital breast tomosynthesis, and breast magnetic resonance imaging; and furthermore investigated the guidelines, as well as the study results.

  3. Developmental and lactational exposure to dieldrin alters mammary tumorigenesis in Her2/neu transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather L Cameron

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common cancer in Western women and while its precise etiology is unknown, environmental factors are thought to play a role. The organochlorine pesticide dieldrin is a persistent environmental toxicant thought to increase the risk of breast cancer and reduce survival in the human population. The objective of this study was to define the effect of developmental exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of dieldrin, on mammary tumor development in the offspring. Sexually mature FVB-MMTV/neu female mice were treated with vehicle (corn oil, or dieldrin (0.45, 2.25, and 4.5 microg/g body weight daily by gavage for 5 days prior to mating and then once weekly throughout gestation and lactation until weaning. Dieldrin concentrations were selected to produce serum levels representative of human background body burdens, occupational exposure, and overt toxicity. Treatment had no effect on litter size, birth weight or the number of pups surviving to weaning. The highest dose of dieldrin significantly increased the total tumor burden and the volume and number of tumors found in the thoracic mammary glands. Increased mRNA and protein expression of the neurotrophin BDNF and its receptor TrkB was increased in tumors from the offspring of dieldrin treated dams. This study indicates that developmental exposure to the environmental contaminant dieldrin causes increased tumor burden in genetically predisposed mice. Dieldrin exposure also altered the expression of BNDF and TrkB, novel modulators of cancer pathogenesis.

  4. The IL-6/JAK/Stat3 Feed-Forward Loop Drives Tumorigenesis and Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Chang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the importance of interleukin-6 (IL-6 in promoting tumor growth and metastasis. In human primary breast cancers, increased levels of IL-6 were found at the tumor leading edge and positively correlated with advanced stage, suggesting a mechanistic link between tumor cell production of IL-6 and invasion. In support of this hypothesis, we showed that the IL-6/Janus kinase (JAK/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3 pathway drives tumor progression through the stroma and metastatic niche. Overexpression of IL-6 in tumor cell lines promoted myeloid cell recruitment, angiogenesis, and induced metastases. We demonstrated the therapeutic potential of interrupting this pathway with IL-6 receptor blockade or by inhibiting its downstream effectors JAK1/2 or Stat3. These clinically relevant interventions did not inhibit tumor cell proliferation in vitro but had profound effects in vivo on tumor progression, interfering broadly with tumor-supportive stromal functions, including angiogenesis, fibroblast infiltration, and myeloid suppressor cell recruitment in both the tumor and pre-metastatic niche. This study provides the first evidence for IL-6 expression at the leading edge of invasive human breast tumors and demonstrates mechanistically that IL-6/JAK/Stat3 signaling plays a critical and pharmacologically targetable role in orchestrating the composition of the tumor microenvironment that promotes growth, invasion, and metastasis.

  5. Optical Imaging of the Breast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Jung; Kim, Eun Kyung [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-03-15

    As the increased prevalence of breast cancer and the advances in breast evaluation awareness have resulted in an increased number of breast examinations and benign breast biopsies, several investigations have been performed to improve the diagnostic accuracy for breast lesions. Optical imaging of the breast that uses nearinfrared light to assess the optical properties of breast tissue is a novel non-invasive imaging technique to characterize breast lesions in clinical practice. This review provides a summary of the current state of optical breast imaging and it describes the basic concepts of optical imaging, the potential clinical applications for breast cancer imaging and its potential incorporation with other imaging modalities

  6. Risks of Breast Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tissue Disease The FDA has not detected any association between silicone gel-filled breast implants and connective tissue disease, breast cancer, or reproductive problems. In order to rule out ...

  7. Breast ultrasound: current concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candelaria, Rosalind P; Hwang, Lindsay; Bouchard, Richard R; Whitman, Gary J

    2013-06-01

    Breast ultrasound plays a major role in the identification, diagnosis, and staging of breast cancer. Gray-scale (brightness mode) is the most common form of ultrasound used in breast imaging (BI); newer techniques such as harmonic imaging, Doppler imaging, three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound, and elasticity imaging have also been employed. Breast lesions that are initially identified on mammography and magnetic resonance imaging can be further characterized with ultrasound. Breast ultrasound can differentiate solid from cystic masses, suspicious from benign lesions, and abnormal from normal lymph nodes. Ultrasound can guide needle biopsy of suspicious breast lesions and lymph nodes. Breast ultrasound can also be valuable when staging breast cancer and can help to determine if there is multifocal or multicentric disease, and also if there is associated regional lymphadenopathy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Leiomyosarcoma of the breast

    OpenAIRE

    Oktay, Y; Fikret, A

    2011-01-01

    Leiomyosarcomas of the breast are rare tumors. Less than 16 such cases have been reported in the literature so far. We present a case of a 44 year female patient who was found to have primary leiomyosarcoma of the breast.

  9. Breast Reduction Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to achieve a breast size proportionate to your body. Breast reduction surgery might also help improve your self-image and self-confidence and your ability to participate in physical activities. ...

  10. The tuberous male breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, S; Gault, D

    2003-04-01

    Whilst tuberous female breasts are well described, the tuberous male breast is a very unusual variant of gynaecomastia. Two cases are presented, the development of the condition is considered and the surgical management is discussed.

  11. Breast cancer staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000911.htm Breast cancer staging To use the sharing features on this ... Once your health care team knows you have breast cancer , they will do more tests to stage it. ...

  12. Cosmetic breast surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000273.htm Cosmetic breast surgery - discharge To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. You had cosmetic breast surgery to change the size or shape ...

  13. Whole breast radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 11, 2016. www.cancer.gov/types/breast/hp/breast-treatment-pdq . Accessed September 13, 2016. National Cancer Institute. Radiation therapy and you: support for people who have cancer. Cancer.gov Web ...

  14. Partial breast brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 11, 2016. www.cancer.gov/types/breast/hp/breast-treatment-pdq . Accessed September 13, 2016. National Cancer Institute. Radiation therapy and you: support for people who have cancer. Cancer.gov Web ...

  15. Breast infection (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most breast infections occur in breastfeeding women when bacteria enters the breast through cracks in the nipple. In severe infections, abscesses may occur. Antibiotics may be indicated for treatment.

  16. HEREDITARY BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Bit-Sava

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary breast cancer occurs in 5–20 % of cases and it is associated with inherited mutations in particular genes, such as BRCA1 и BRCA2 in most cases. The CHEK2, PTEN, TP53, ATM, RAD51, BLM, PALB2, Nbs genes are associated with low and median risks ofdeveloping breast cancer. Molecular genetic studies identify germinal mutations underlying hereditary breast cancer. In most cases hereditary breast cancer refers to triple-negative phenotype, which is the most aggressive type of breast cancer, that does not express the genes for estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2. The review presents the diagnostic and treatment methods of hereditary breast cancer. Clinical-morphological aspects allow the new diagnostic and treatment methods of hereditary breast cancer to be identified. Poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP inhibitors demonstrate the potential for effective treatment of BRCA-associated breast cancer.

  17. Stereotactic Image-Guided Navigation During Breast Reconstruction in Patients With Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-12

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  18. Subtype-specific CpG island shore methylation and mutation patterns in 30 breast cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Heejoon; Lee, Sangseon; Nephew, Kenneth P; Kim, Sun

    2016-12-23

    Aberrant epigenetic modifications, including DNA methylation, are key regulators of gene activity in tumorigenesis. Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease, and large-scale analyses indicate that tumor from normal and benign tissues, as well as molecular subtypes of breast cancer, can be distinguished based on their distinct genomic, transcriptomic, and epigenomic profiles. In this study, we used affinity-based methylation sequencing data in 30 breast cancer cell lines representing functionally distinct cancer subtypes to investigate methylation and mutation patterns at the whole genome level. Our analysis revealed significant differences in CpG island (CpGI) shore methylation and mutation patterns among breast cancer subtypes. In particular, the basal-like B type, a highly aggressive form of the disease, displayed distinct CpGI shore hypomethylation patterns that were significantly associated with downstream gene regulation. We determined that mutation rates at CpG sites were highly correlated with DNA methylation status and observed distinct mutation rates among the breast cancer subtypes. These findings were validated by using targeted bisulfite sequencing of differentially expressed genes (n=85) among the cell lines. Our results suggest that alterations in DNA methylation play critical roles in gene regulatory process as well as cytosine substitution rates at CpG sites in molecular subtypes of breast cancer.

  19. [Breast cancer surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlastos, Georges; Berclaz, Gilles; Langer, Igor; Pittet-Cuenod, Brigitte; Delaloye, Jean-François

    2007-10-24

    Breast conserving surgery followed by radiation therapy is the treatment of choice for early breast cancer. For patients who choice or need a mastectomy, breast reconstruction provides an acceptable alternative. Breast cancer surgery has been evolving through minimally invasive approaches. Sentinel node biopsy has already remplaced axillary lymph node dissection in the evaluation of the axilla. Local ablation of the tumor may be a valuable alternative to surgery in the future.

  20. Tamoxifen for Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Karn

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is one of the common cancers. Hormonal therapy along with surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and targeted therapy are vital modalities for the management of breast cancer. Tamoxifen has been the most widely used hormonal therapy for more than two decades. In this article we review the benefits, dose, duration and timing of Tamoxifen therapy in patients with breast cancer. Keywords: breast cancer, hormonal therapy, tamoxifen.