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Sample records for breast tumor xenografts

  1. Mass Spectrometric Imaging of Red Fluorescent Protein in Breast Tumor Xenografts

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    Chughtai, Kamila; Jiang, Lu; Post, Harm; Winnard, Paul T.; Greenwood, Tiffany R.; Raman, Venu; Bhujwalla, Zaver M.; Heeren, Ron M. A.; Glunde, Kristine

    2013-05-01

    Mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) in combination with electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) is a powerful technique for visualization and identification of a variety of different biomolecules directly from thin tissue sections. As commonly used tools for molecular reporting, fluorescent proteins are molecular reporter tools that have enabled the elucidation of a multitude of biological pathways and processes. To combine these two approaches, we have performed targeted MS analysis and MALDI-MSI visualization of a tandem dimer (td)Tomato red fluorescent protein, which was expressed exclusively in the hypoxic regions of a breast tumor xenograft model. For the first time, a fluorescent protein has been visualized by both optical microscopy and MALDI-MSI. Visualization of tdTomato by MALDI-MSI directly from breast tumor tissue sections will allow us to simultaneously detect and subsequently identify novel molecules present in hypoxic regions of the tumor. MS and MALDI-MSI of fluorescent proteins, as exemplified in our study, is useful for studies in which the advantages of MS and MSI will benefit from the combination with molecular approaches that use fluorescent proteins as reporters.

  2. Integrated Bottom-Up and Top-Down Proteomics of Patient-Derived Breast Tumor Xenografts.

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    Ntai, Ioanna; LeDuc, Richard D; Fellers, Ryan T; Erdmann-Gilmore, Petra; Davies, Sherri R; Rumsey, Jeanne; Early, Bryan P; Thomas, Paul M; Li, Shunqiang; Compton, Philip D; Ellis, Matthew J C; Ruggles, Kelly V; Fenyö, David; Boja, Emily S; Rodriguez, Henry; Townsend, R Reid; Kelleher, Neil L

    2016-01-01

    Bottom-up proteomics relies on the use of proteases and is the method of choice for identifying thousands of protein groups in complex samples. Top-down proteomics has been shown to be robust for direct analysis of small proteins and offers a solution to the "peptide-to-protein" inference problem inherent with bottom-up approaches. Here, we describe the first large-scale integration of genomic, bottom-up and top-down proteomic data for the comparative analysis of patient-derived mouse xenograft models of basal and luminal B human breast cancer, WHIM2 and WHIM16, respectively. Using these well-characterized xenograft models established by the National Cancer Institute's Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium, we compared and contrasted the performance of bottom-up and top-down proteomics to detect cancer-specific aberrations at the peptide and proteoform levels and to measure differential expression of proteins and proteoforms. Bottom-up proteomic analysis of the tumor xenografts detected almost 10 times as many coding nucleotide polymorphisms and peptides resulting from novel splice junctions than top-down. For proteins in the range of 0-30 kDa, where quantitation was performed using both approaches, bottom-up proteomics quantified 3,519 protein groups from 49,185 peptides, while top-down proteomics quantified 982 proteoforms mapping to 358 proteins. Examples of both concordant and discordant quantitation were found in a ∼60:40 ratio, providing a unique opportunity for top-down to fill in missing information. The two techniques showed complementary performance, with bottom-up yielding eight times more identifications of 0-30 kDa proteins in xenograft proteomes, but failing to detect differences in certain posttranslational modifications (PTMs), such as phosphorylation pattern changes of alpha-endosulfine. This work illustrates the potency of a combined bottom-up and top-down proteomics approach to deepen our knowledge of cancer biology, especially when

  3. Predictive potential of photoacoustic spectroscopy in breast tumor detection based on xenograft serum profiles

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    Priya, Mallika; Chandra, Subhas; Rao, Bola Sadashiva Satish; Ray, Satadru; Mahato, Krishna Kishore

    2015-02-01

    Breast cancer is the second most common cancer all over the world. Heterogeneity in breast cancer makes it a difficult task to detect with the existing serum markers at an early stage. With an aim to detect the disease early at the pre-malignant level, MCF-7 cells xenografts were developed using female nude mice and blood serum were extracted on days 0th, 10th, 15th & 20th post tumor cells injection (N=12 for each time point). Photoacoustic spectra were recorded on the serum samples at 281nm pulsed laser excitations. A total of 144 time domain spectra were recorded from 48 serum samples belonging to 4 different time points. These spectra were then converted into frequency domain (0-1250kHz) using MATLAB algorithms. Subsequently, seven features (mean, median, mode, variance, standard deviation, area under the curve & spectral residuals after 10th degree polynomial fit) were extracted from them and used for PCA. Further, using the first three Principal components (PCs) of the data, Linear Discriminate Analysis has been carried out. The performance of the analysis showed 82.64% accuracy in predicting various time points under study. Further, frequency-region wise analysis was also performed on the data and found 95 - 203.13 kHz region most suitable for the discrimination among the 4 time points. The analysis provided a clear discrimination in most of the spectral features under study suggesting that the photoacoustic technique has the potential to be a diagnostic tool for early detection of breast tumor development

  4. Identification of a population of blood circulating tumor cells from breast cancer patients that initiates metastasis in a xenograft assay.

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    Baccelli, Irène; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Riethdorf, Sabine; Stenzinger, Albrecht; Schillert, Anja; Vogel, Vanessa; Klein, Corinna; Saini, Massimo; Bäuerle, Tobias; Wallwiener, Markus; Holland-Letz, Tim; Höfner, Thomas; Sprick, Martin; Scharpff, Martina; Marmé, Frederik; Sinn, Hans Peter; Pantel, Klaus; Weichert, Wilko; Trumpp, Andreas

    2013-06-01

    It has been hypothesized that carcinoma metastasis is initiated by a subpopulation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) found in the blood of patients. However, although the presence of CTCs is an indicator of poor prognosis in several carcinoma entities, the existence and phenotype of metastasis-initiating cells (MICs) among CTCs has not been experimentally demonstrated. Here we developed a xenograft assay and used it to show that primary human luminal breast cancer CTCs contain MICs that give rise to bone, lung and liver metastases in mice. These MIC-containing CTC populations expressed EPCAM, CD44, CD47 and MET. In a small cohort of patients with metastases, the number of EPCAM(+)CD44(+)CD47(+)MET(+) CTCs, but not of bulk EPCAM(+) CTCs, correlated with lower overall survival and increased number of metastasic sites. These data describe functional circulating MICs and associated markers, which may aid the design of better tools to diagnose and treat metastatic breast cancer.

  5. Nilotinib Enhances Tumor Angiogenesis and Counteracts VEGFR2 Blockade in an Orthotopic Breast Cancer Xenograft Model with Desmoplastic Response

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    Sara Zafarnia

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF/VEGF receptor (VEGFR-targeted therapies predominantly affect nascent, immature tumor vessels. Since platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR blockade inhibits vessel maturation and thus increases the amount of immature tumor vessels, we evaluated whether the combined PDGFR inhibition by nilotinib and VEGFR2 blockade by DC101 has synergistic therapy effects in a desmoplastic breast cancer xenograft model. In this context, besides immunohistological evaluation, molecular ultrasound imaging with BR55, the clinically used VEGFR2-targeted microbubbles, was applied to monitor VEGFR2-positive vessels noninvasively and to assess the therapy effects on tumor angiogenesis. DC101 treatment alone inhibited tumor angiogenesis, resulting in lower tumor growth and in significantly lower vessel density than in the control group after 14 days of therapy. In contrast, nilotinib inhibited vessel maturation but enhanced VEGFR2 expression, leading to markedly increased tumor volumes and a significantly higher vessel density. The combination of both drugs led to an almost similar tumor growth as in the DC101 treatment group, but VEGFR2 expression and microvessel density were higher and comparable to the controls. Further analyses revealed significantly higher levels of tumor cell–derived VEGF in nilotinib-treated tumors. In line with this, nilotinib, especially in low doses, induced an upregulation of VEGF and IL-6 mRNA in the tumor cells in vitro, thus providing an explanation for the enhanced angiogenesis observed in nilotinib-treated tumors in vivo. These findings suggest that nilotinib inhibits vessel maturation but counteracts the effects of antiangiogenic co-therapy by enhancing VEGF expression by the tumor cells and stimulating tumor angiogenesis.

  6. Decorin protein core affects the global gene expression profile of the tumor microenvironment in a triple-negative orthotopic breast carcinoma xenograft model.

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    Simone Buraschi

    Full Text Available Decorin, a member of the small leucine-rich proteoglycan gene family, exists and functions wholly within the tumor microenvironment to suppress tumorigenesis by directly targeting and antagonizing multiple receptor tyrosine kinases, such as the EGFR and Met. This leads to potent and sustained signal attenuation, growth arrest, and angiostasis. We thus sought to evaluate the tumoricidal benefits of systemic decorin on a triple-negative orthotopic breast carcinoma xenograft model. To this end, we employed a novel high-density mixed expression array capable of differentiating and simultaneously measuring gene signatures of both Mus musculus (stromal and Homo sapiens (epithelial tissue origins. We found that decorin protein core modulated the differential expression of 374 genes within the stromal compartment of the tumor xenograft. Further, our top gene ontology classes strongly suggests an unexpected and preferential role for decorin protein core to inhibit genes necessary for immunomodulatory responses while simultaneously inducing expression of those possessing cellular adhesion and tumor suppressive gene properties. Rigorous verification of the top scoring candidates led to the discovery of three genes heretofore unlinked to malignant breast cancer that were reproducibly found to be induced in several models of tumor stroma. Collectively, our data provide highly novel and unexpected stromal gene signatures as a direct function of systemic administration of decorin protein core and reveals a fundamental basis of action for decorin to modulate the tumor stroma as a biological mechanism for the ascribed anti-tumorigenic properties.

  7. Dynamic {sup 18}F-FDG PET for Assessment of Tumor Physiology in Two Breast Carcinoma Xenografts

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    Kristian, Alexandr; Nilsen, Line B.; Roe, Kathrine; Revheim, Monaelisabeth; Engebraten, Olav; Maelandsmo, Gunhild M.; Holm, Ruth; Malinen Eirik; Seierstad, Therese [Oslo Univ. Hospital, Oslo (Norway)

    2013-09-15

    To compare dynamic 2-deoxy-2-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG PET) parameters in two selected human breast cancer xenografts and to evaluate associations with immunohistochemistry and histology. Dynamic {sup 18}F-FDG PET of luminal-like MAS98.06 and basal-like MAS98.12 xenografts was performed, and the compartmental transfer rates (k{sub 1}, k{sub 2}, k{sub 3}), blood volume fraction (v{sub B}) and metabolic rate of {sup 18}F-FDG(MR{sub FDG}) were estimated from pharmacokinetic model analysis. After sacrifice, analyses of hypoxia (pimonidazole), proliferation (Ki-67), vascularization (CD31), glucose transport receptor (GLUT1) and necrosis (HE) was performed. The level of hexokinase 2 (HK2) was estimated from Western blot analysis. The {sup 18}F-FDG uptake curves for the two xenografts were significantly different (p<0.05). k{sub 1} and v{sub B} were higher for MAS98.12 (p<0.01), while k{sub 3} was higher for MAS98.06 (p<0.01). MAS98.12 had a higher fraction of stromal tissue and higher microvessel density (MVD), and it was less necrotic and hypoxic than MAS98.06 MAS98.12 had stronger positive GLUT1 staining and lower Ki-67 than MAS98.06. In both models significant correlations were found between k{sub 1} and the GLUT1 score, between k{sub 3} and the level of HK2, and between v{sub B} and MVD. Significant differences in dynamic {sup 18}F-FDG parameters between the two human breast cancer xenografts were found. The differences could be explained by underlying histological and physiological characteristics.

  8. Administration of the optimized β-Lapachone-poloxamer-cyclodextrin ternary system induces apoptosis, DNA damage and reduces tumor growth in a human breast adenocarcinoma xenograft mouse model.

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    Seoane, Samuel; Díaz-Rodríguez, Patricia; Sendon-Lago, Juan; Gallego, Rosalia; Pérez-Fernández, Román; Landin, Mariana

    2013-08-01

    β-Lapachone (β-Lap) is a 1,2-orthonaphthoquinone that selectively induces cell death in human cancer cells through NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase-1 (NQO1). NQO1 is overexpressed in a variety of tumors, as compared to normal adjacent tissue. However, the low solubility and non-specific distribution of β-Lap limit its suitability for clinical assays. We formulated β-Lap in an optimal random methylated-β-cyclodextrin/poloxamer 407 mixture (i.e., β-Lap ternary system) and, using human breast adenocarcinoma MCF-7 cells and immunodeficient mice, performed in vitro and in vivo evaluation of its anti-tumor effects on proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis, DNA damage, and tumor growth. This ternary system is fluid at room temperature, gels over 29 °C, and provides a significant amount of drug, thus facilitating intratumoral delivery, in situ gelation, and the formation of a depot for time-release. Administration of β-Lap ternary system to MCF-7 cells induces an increase in apoptosis and DNA damage, while producing no changes in cell cycle. Moreover, in a mouse xenograft tumor model, intratumoral injection of the system significantly reduces tumor volume, while increasing apoptosis and DNA damage without visible toxicity to liver or kidney. These anti-tumoral effects and lack of visible toxicity make this system a promising new therapeutic agent for breast cancer treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Styrene maleic acid-encapsulated RL71 micelles suppress tumor growth in a murine xenograft model of triple negative breast cancer.

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    Martey, Orleans; Nimick, Mhairi; Taurin, Sebastien; Sundararajan, Vignesh; Greish, Khaled; Rosengren, Rhonda J

    2017-01-01

    Patients with triple negative breast cancer have a poor prognosis due in part to the lack of targeted therapies. In the search for novel drugs, our laboratory has developed a second-generation curcumin derivative, 3,5-bis(3,4,5-trimethoxybenzylidene)-1-methylpiperidine-4-one (RL71), that exhibits potent in vitro cytotoxicity. To improve the clinical potential of this drug, we have encapsulated it in styrene maleic acid (SMA) micelles. SMA-RL71 showed improved biodistribution, and drug accumulation in the tumor increased 16-fold compared to control. SMA-RL71 (10 mg/kg, intravenously, two times a week for 2 weeks) also significantly suppressed tumor growth compared to control in a xenograft model of triple negative breast cancer. Free RL71 was unable to alter tumor growth. Tumors from SMA-RL71-treated mice showed a decrease in angiogenesis and an increase in apoptosis. The drug treatment also modulated various cell signaling proteins including the epidermal growth factor receptor, with the mechanisms for tumor suppression consistent with previous work with RL71 in vitro. The nanoformulation was also nontoxic as shown by normal levels of plasma markers for liver and kidney injury following weekly administration of SMA-RL71 (10 mg/kg) for 90 days. Thus, we report clinical potential following encapsulation of a novel curcumin derivative, RL71, in SMA micelles.

  10. Monitoring of tumor growth and metastasis potential in MDA-MB-435s/tk-luc human breast cancer xenografts

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    Chang, Y.-F. [Department of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, 155, Sec. 2, Li-Nong Street, Pei-tou 112, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lin, Y.-Y. [Department of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, 155, Sec. 2, Li-Nong Street, Pei-tou 112, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Wang, H.-E. [Department of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, 155, Sec. 2, Li-Nong Street, Pei-tou 112, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Liu, R.-S. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Nuclear Medicine Department, Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Pang Fei [Department of Veterinary Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hwang, J.-J. [Department of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, 155, Sec. 2, Li-Nong Street, Pei-tou 112, Taipei, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: jjhwang@ym.edu.tw

    2007-02-01

    Molecular imaging of reporter gene expression provides a rapid, sensitive and non-invasive monitoring of tumor behaviors. In this study, we reported the establishment of a novel animal model for longitudinal examination of tumor growth kinetics and metastatic spreading in vivo. The highly metastatic human breast carcinoma MDA-MB-435s cell line was engineered to stably express herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV-1-tk) and luciferase (luc). Both {sup 131}I-FIAU and D-luciferin were used as reporter probes. For orthotopic tumor formation, MDA-MB-435s/tk-luc cells were implanted into the first nipple of 6-week-old female NOD/SCID mice. For metastatic study, cells were injected via the lateral tail vein. Mice-bearing MDA-MB-435s/tk-luc tumors were scanned for tumor growth and metastatsis using Xenogen IVIS50 system. Gamma scintigraphy and whole-body autoradiography were also applied to confirm the tumor localization. The results of bioluminescence imaging as well as histopathological finding showed that tumors could be detected in femur, spine, ovary, lungs, kidney, adrenal gland, lymph nodes and muscle at 16 weeks post i.v. injection, and correlated photons could be quantified. This MDA-MB-435s/tk-luc human breast carcinoma-bearing mouse model combined with multimodalities of molecular imaging may facilitate studies on the molecular mechanisms of cancer invasion and metastasis.

  11. Monitoring of tumor growth and metastasis potential in MDA-MB-435s/ tk-luc human breast cancer xenografts

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    Chang, Ya-Fang; Lin, Yi-Yu; Wang, Hsin-Ell; Liu, Ren-Shen; Pang, Fei; Hwang, Jeng-Jong

    2007-02-01

    Molecular imaging of reporter gene expression provides a rapid, sensitive and non-invasive monitoring of tumor behaviors. In this study, we reported the establishment of a novel animal model for longitudinal examination of tumor growth kinetics and metastatic spreading in vivo. The highly metastatic human breast carcinoma MDA-MB-435s cell line was engineered to stably express herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV-1- tk) and luciferase ( luc). Both 131I-FIAU and D-luciferin were used as reporter probes. For orthotopic tumor formation, MDA-MB-435s/ tk-luc cells were implanted into the first nipple of 6-week-old female NOD/SCID mice. For metastatic study, cells were injected via the lateral tail vein. Mice-bearing MDA-MB-435s/ tk-luc tumors were scanned for tumor growth and metastatsis using Xenogen IVIS50 system. Gamma scintigraphy and whole-body autoradiography were also applied to confirm the tumor localization. The results of bioluminescence imaging as well as histopathological finding showed that tumors could be detected in femur, spine, ovary, lungs, kidney, adrenal gland, lymph nodes and muscle at 16 weeks post i.v. injection, and correlated photons could be quantified. This MDA-MB-435s/ tk-luc human breast carcinoma-bearing mouse model combined with multimodalities of molecular imaging may facilitate studies on the molecular mechanisms of cancer invasion and metastasis.

  12. Developing a xenograft human tumor model in immunocompetent mice.

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    Basel, Matthew T; Narayanan, Sanjeev; Ganta, Chanran; Shreshta, Tej B; Marquez, Alejandro; Pyle, Marla; Hill, Jennifer; Bossmann, Stefan H; Troyer, Deryl L

    2018-01-01

    Animal models are essential to cancer research, but current xenograft models are limited in their utility especially due to the lack of an immune system. Here we demonstrate that a xenograft tumor model can be developed in immunocompetent mice by tolerizing murine fetuses to human tumor cells. A375 human melanoma cells were injected into day E14 fetuses and after birth mice were challenged with A375 cells to determine their ability to develop tumors. Intravenous injections of cells resulted in metastatic-like lung tumors, which were verified to be human in origin by immunohistochemistry and PCR. These results were replicated with several other human tumor types: BxPC3 (human pancreatic adenocarcinoma), MDA-MB-231 (human breast adenocarcinoma), M21 (human melanoma), and HeLa (human cervical adenocarcinoma). Development of an immunocompetent xenograft tumor model would allow the further elucidation of the interaction of the immune system with therapy in both preclinical research and patient derived xenografts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Hwanggeumchal sorghum Induces Cell Cycle Arrest, and Suppresses Tumor Growth and Metastasis through Jak2/STAT Pathways in Breast Cancer Xenografts

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    Lim, Eun Joung; Joung, Youn Hee; Hong, Dae Young; Park, Eui U.; Park, Seung Hwa; Choi, Soo Keun; Moon, Eon-Soo; Cho, Byung Wook; Park, Kyung Do; Lee, Hak Kyo; Kim, Myong-Jo; Park, Dong-Sik; Yang, Young Mok

    2012-01-01

    Background Cancer is one of the highly virulent diseases known to humankind with a high mortality rate. Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. Sorghum is a principal cereal food in many parts of the world, and is critical in folk medicine of Asia and Africa. In the present study, we analyzed the effects of HSE in metastatic breast cancer. Methodology/Principal Findings Preliminary studies conducted on MDA-MB 231 and MCF-7 xenograft models showed tumor growth suppression by HSE. Western blotting studies conducted both in vivo and in vitro to check the effect of HSE in Jak/STAT pathways. Anti-metastatic effects of HSE were confirmed using both MDA-MB 231 and MCF-7 metastatic animal models. These studies showed that HSE can modulate Jak/STAT pathways, and it hindered the STAT5b/IGF-1R and STAT3/VEGF pathways not only by down-regulating the expression of these signal molecules and but also by preventing their phosphorylation. The expression of angiogenic factors like VEGF, VEGF-R2 and cell cycle regulators like cyclin D, cyclin E, and pRb were found down-regulated by HSE. In addition, it also targets Brk, p53, and HIF-1α for anti-cancer effects. HSE induced G1 phase arrest and migration inhibition in MDA-MB 231 cells. The metastasis of breast cancer to the lungs also found blocked by HSE in the metastatic animal model. Conclusions/Significance Usage of HS as a dietary supplement is an inexpensive natural cancer therapy, without any side effects. We strongly recommend the use of HS as an edible therapeutic agent as it possesses tumor suppression, migration inhibition, and anti-metastatic effects on breast cancer. PMID:22792362

  14. Hwanggeumchal sorghum induces cell cycle arrest, and suppresses tumor growth and metastasis through Jak2/STAT pathways in breast cancer xenografts.

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    Jin Hee Park

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cancer is one of the highly virulent diseases known to humankind with a high mortality rate. Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. Sorghum is a principal cereal food in many parts of the world, and is critical in folk medicine of Asia and Africa. In the present study, we analyzed the effects of HSE in metastatic breast cancer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Preliminary studies conducted on MDA-MB 231 and MCF-7 xenograft models showed tumor growth suppression by HSE. Western blotting studies conducted both in vivo and in vitro to check the effect of HSE in Jak/STAT pathways. Anti-metastatic effects of HSE were confirmed using both MDA-MB 231 and MCF-7 metastatic animal models. These studies showed that HSE can modulate Jak/STAT pathways, and it hindered the STAT5b/IGF-1R and STAT3/VEGF pathways not only by down-regulating the expression of these signal molecules and but also by preventing their phosphorylation. The expression of angiogenic factors like VEGF, VEGF-R2 and cell cycle regulators like cyclin D, cyclin E, and pRb were found down-regulated by HSE. In addition, it also targets Brk, p53, and HIF-1α for anti-cancer effects. HSE induced G1 phase arrest and migration inhibition in MDA-MB 231 cells. The metastasis of breast cancer to the lungs also found blocked by HSE in the metastatic animal model. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Usage of HS as a dietary supplement is an inexpensive natural cancer therapy, without any side effects. We strongly recommend the use of HS as an edible therapeutic agent as it possesses tumor suppression, migration inhibition, and anti-metastatic effects on breast cancer.

  15. Significant Radiation Enhancement Effects by Gold Nanoparticles in Combination with Cisplatin in Triple Negative Breast Cancer Cells and Tumor Xenografts.

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    Cui, Lei; Her, Sohyoung; Dunne, Michael; Borst, Gerben R; De Souza, Raquel; Bristow, Robert G; Jaffray, David A; Allen, Christine

    2017-02-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and cisplatin have been explored in concomitant chemoradiotherapy, wherein they elicit their effects by distinct and overlapping mechanisms. Cisplatin is one of the most frequently utilized radiosensitizers in the clinical setting; however, the therapeutic window of cisplatin-aided chemoradiotherapy is limited by its toxicity. The goal of this study was to determine whether AuNPs contribute to improving the treatment response when combined with fractionated cisplatin-based chemoradiation in both in vitro and in vivo models of triple-negative breast cancer (MDA-MB-231Luc+). Cellular-targeting AuNPs with receptor-mediated endocytosis (AuNP-RME) in vitro at a noncytotoxic concentration (0.5 mg/ml) or cisplatin at IC25 (12 μM) demonstrated dose enhancement factors (DEFs) of 1.25 and 1.14, respectively; the combination of AuNP-RME and cisplatin resulted in a significant DEF of 1.39 in vitro. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images showed effective cellular uptake of AuNPs at tumor sites 24 h after intratumoral infusion. Computed tomography (CT) images demonstrated that the intratumoral levels of gold remained stable up to 120 h after infusion. AuNPs (0.5 mg gold per tumor) demonstrated a radiation enhancement effect that was equivalent to three doses of cisplatin at IC25 (4 mg/kg), but did not induce intrinsic toxicity or increased radiotoxicity. Results from this study suggest that AuNPs are the true radiosensitizer in these settings. Importantly, AuNPs enhance the treatment response when combined with cisplatin-based fractionated chemoradiation. This combination of AuNPs and cisplatin provides a promising approach to improving the therapeutic ratio of fractionated radiotherapy.

  16. Subharmonic-Aided Pressure Estimation for Monitoring Interstitial Fluid Pressure in Tumors: Calibration and Treatment with Paclitaxel in Breast Cancer Xenografts.

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    Halldorsdottir, Valgerdur G; Dave, Jaydev K; Marshall, Andrew; Forsberg, Anya I; Fox, Traci B; Eisenbrey, John R; Machado, Priscilla; Liu, Ji-Bin; Merton, Daniel A; Forsberg, Flemming

    2017-07-01

    Interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) in rats with breast cancer xenografts was non-invasively estimated using subharmonic-aided pressure estimation (SHAPE) versus an invasive pressure monitor. Moreover, monitoring of IFP changes after chemotherapy was assessed. Eighty-nine rats (calibration n = 25, treatment n = 64) were injected with 5 × 10(6) breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231). Radiofrequency signals were acquired (39 rats successfully imaged) with a Sonix RP scanner (BK Ultrasound, Richmond, BC, Canada) using a linear array (L9-4, transmit/receive: 8/4 MHz) after administration of Definity (Lantheus Medical Imaging, North Billerica, MA, USA; 180 μL/kg) and compared with readings from an invasive pressure monitor (Stryker, Berkshire, UK). An inverse linear relationship was established between tumor IFP and SHAPE (y = -1.06x + 28.27, r = -0.69, p = 0.01) in the calibration group. Use of this relationship in the treatment group resulted in r = 0.74 (p < 0.05) between measured (pressure monitor) and SHAPE-estimated IFP (average error: 6.24 mmHg). No significant before/after differences were observed with respect to paclitaxel treatment (5 mg/kg, Mayne Pharma, Paramus, NJ, USA) with either method (p ≥ 0.15). Copyright © 2017 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Peptides Derived from Type IV Collagen, CXC Chemokines, and Thrombospondin-1 Domain-Containing Proteins Inhibit Neovascularization and Suppress Tumor Growth in MDA-MB-231 Breast Cancer Xenografts

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    Jacob E. Koskimaki

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis or neovascularization, the process of new blood vessel formation from preexisting microvasculature, involves interactions among several cell types including parenchymal, endothelial cells, and immune cells. The formation of new vessels is tightly regulated by a balance between endogenous proangiogenic and antiangiogenic factors to maintain homeostasis in tissue; tumor progression and metastasis in breast cancer have been shown to be angiogenesis-dependent. We previously introduced a systematic methodology to identify putative endogenous antiangiogenic peptides and validated these predictions in vitro in human umbilical vein endothelial cell proliferation and migration assays. These peptides are derived from several protein families including type IV collagen, CXC chemokines, and thrombospondin-1 domain-containing proteins. On the basis of the results from the in vitro screening, we have evaluated the ability of one peptide selected from each family named pentastatin-1, chemokinostatin-1, and properdistatin, respectively, to suppress angiogenesis in an MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer orthotopic xenograft model in severe combined immunodeficient mice. Peptides were administered intraperitoneally once per day. We have demonstrated significant suppression of tumor growth in vivo and subsequent reductions in microvascular density, indicating the potential of these peptides as therapeutic agents for breast cancer.

  18. An Experimental Analysis of the Molecular Effects of Trastuzumab (Herceptin and Fulvestrant (Falsodex, as Single Agents or in Combination, on Human HR+/HER2+ Breast Cancer Cell Lines and Mouse Tumor Xenografts.

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    Qing Chen

    Full Text Available To investigate the effects of trastuzumab (herceptin and fulvestrant (falsodex either in combination or alone, on downstream cell signaling pathways in lab-cultured human HR+/HER2+ breast cancer cell lines ZR-75-1 and BT-474, as well as on protein expression levels in mouse xenograft tissue.Cells were cultivated in the presence of trastuzumab or fulvestrant or both. Molecular events that resulted in an inhibition of cell proliferation and cell cycle progression or in an increased rate of apoptosis were studied. The distribution and abundance of the proteins p-Akt and p-Erk expressed in these cells in response to single agents or combinatorial treatment were also investigated. In addition, the effects of trastuzumab and fulvestrant, either as single agents or in combination on tumor growth as well as on expression of the protein p-MED1 expressed in in vivo mouse xenograft models was also examined.Cell proliferation was increasingly inhibited by trastuzumab or fulvestrant or both, with a CI1 in both human cell lines. The rate of apoptosis increased only in the BT-474 cell line and not in the ZR-75-1 cell line upon treatment with fulvestrant and not trastuzumab as a single agent (P0.05. Cell accumulation in the G1 phase of cell cycle was investigated in all treatment groups (P<0.05, and the combination of trastuzumab and fulvestrant reversed the effects of fulvestrant alone on p-Akt and p-Erk protein expression levels. Using ZR-75-1 or BT-474 to generate in vivo tumor xenografts in BALB/c athymic mouse models, we showed that a combination of both drugs resulted in a stronger inhibition of tumor growth (P<0.05 and a greater decrease in the levels of activated MED1 (p-MED1 expressed in tumor issues compared with the use of either drug as a single agent.We demonstrate that the administration of trastuzumab and fulvestrant in combination results in positive synergistic effects on both, ZR-75-1 and BT-474 cell lines. This combinatorial approach is

  19. An Experimental Analysis of the Molecular Effects of Trastuzumab (Herceptin) and Fulvestrant (Falsodex), as Single Agents or in Combination, on Human HR+/HER2+ Breast Cancer Cell Lines and Mouse Tumor Xenografts.

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    Chen, Qing; Weng, Ziyi; Lu, Yunshu; Jia, Yijun; Ding, Longlong; Bai, Fang; Ge, Meixin; Lin, Qing; Wu, Kejin

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the effects of trastuzumab (herceptin) and fulvestrant (falsodex) either in combination or alone, on downstream cell signaling pathways in lab-cultured human HR+/HER2+ breast cancer cell lines ZR-75-1 and BT-474, as well as on protein expression levels in mouse xenograft tissue. Cells were cultivated in the presence of trastuzumab or fulvestrant or both. Molecular events that resulted in an inhibition of cell proliferation and cell cycle progression or in an increased rate of apoptosis were studied. The distribution and abundance of the proteins p-Akt and p-Erk expressed in these cells in response to single agents or combinatorial treatment were also investigated. In addition, the effects of trastuzumab and fulvestrant, either as single agents or in combination on tumor growth as well as on expression of the protein p-MED1 expressed in in vivo mouse xenograft models was also examined. Cell proliferation was increasingly inhibited by trastuzumab or fulvestrant or both, with a CI1 in both human cell lines. The rate of apoptosis increased only in the BT-474 cell line and not in the ZR-75-1 cell line upon treatment with fulvestrant and not trastuzumab as a single agent (P0.05). Cell accumulation in the G1 phase of cell cycle was investigated in all treatment groups (P<0.05), and the combination of trastuzumab and fulvestrant reversed the effects of fulvestrant alone on p-Akt and p-Erk protein expression levels. Using ZR-75-1 or BT-474 to generate in vivo tumor xenografts in BALB/c athymic mouse models, we showed that a combination of both drugs resulted in a stronger inhibition of tumor growth (P<0.05) and a greater decrease in the levels of activated MED1 (p-MED1) expressed in tumor issues compared with the use of either drug as a single agent. We demonstrate that the administration of trastuzumab and fulvestrant in combination results in positive synergistic effects on both, ZR-75-1 and BT-474 cell lines. This combinatorial approach is likely to reduce

  20. Luteolin inhibits progestin-dependent angiogenesis, stem cell-like characteristics, and growth of human breast cancer xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Matthew T; Liang, Yayun; Besch-Williford, Cynthia; Goyette, Sandy; Mafuvadze, Benford; Hyder, Salman M

    2015-01-01

    Clinical trials and epidemiological evidence have shown that combined estrogen/progestin hormone replacement therapy, but not estrogen therapy alone, increases breast cancer risk in post-menopausal women. Previously we have shown that natural and synthetic progestins, including the widely used synthetic progestin medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA), increase production of a potent angiogenic factor, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), in human breast cancer cells, potentially providing an explanation for progestin's mechanism of action. Here, we tested the effects of luteolin (LU), a flavonoid commonly found in fruits and vegetables, on inhibiting progestin-dependent VEGF induction and angiogenesis in human breast cancer cells, inhibiting stem cell-like characteristics, as well as breast cancer cell xenograft tumor growth in vivo and expression of angiogenesis markers. Viability of both T47-D and BT-474 cells was measured using sulforhodamine B assays. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were used to monitor VEGF secretion from breast cancer cells. Progestin-dependent xenograft tumor growth was used to determine LU effects in vivo. CD31 immunohistochemistry was used to determine blood-vessel density in xenograft tumors. CD44 expression, aldehyde dehydrogenase activity, and mammosphere-formation assays were used to monitor stem cell-like characteristics of breast cancer cells. Luteolin treatment reduced breast cancer cell viability, progestin-dependent VEGF secretion from breast cancer cells, and growth of MPA-dependent human breast cancer cell xenograft tumors in nude mice. LU treatment also decreased xenograft tumor VEGF expression and blood-vessel density. Furthermore, LU blocked MPA-induced acquisition of stem cell-like properties by breast cancer cells. Luteolin effectively blocks progestin-dependent human breast cancer tumor growth and the stem cell-like phenotype in human breast cancer cells.

  1. Humanized mouse xenograft models: narrowing the tumor-microenvironment gap

    OpenAIRE

    Morton, J. Jason; Bird, Gregory; Refaeli, Yosef; Jimeno, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Cancer research has long been hampered by the limitations of the current model systems. Both cultured cells and mouse xenografts grow in an environment highly dissimilar to that of their originating tumor, frequently resulting in promising treatments that are ultimately clinically ineffective. The development of highly immunodeficient mouse strains into which human immune systems can be engrafted can help bridge this gap. Humanized mice (HM) allow researchers to examine xenograft growth in th...

  2. Suicide HSVtk gene delivery by neurotensin-polyplex nanoparticles via the bloodstream and GCV Treatment specifically inhibit the growth of human MDA-MB-231 triple negative breast cancer tumors xenografted in athymic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa A Castillo-Rodríguez

    Full Text Available The human breast adenocarcinoma cell line MDA-MB-231 has the triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC phenotype, which is an aggressive subtype with no specific treatment. MDA-MB-231 cells express neurotensin receptor type 1 (NTSR1, which makes these cells an attractive target of therapeutic genes that are delivered by the neurotensin (NTS-polyplex nanocarrier via the bloodstream. We addressed the relevance of this strategy for TNBC treatment using NTS-polyplex nanoparticles harboring the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk suicide gene and its complementary prodrug ganciclovir (GCV. The reporter gene encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP was used as a control. NTS-polyplex successfully transfected both genes in cultured MDA-MB-231 cells. The transfection was demonstrated pharmacologically to be dependent on activation of NTSR1. The expression of HSVtk gene decreased cell viability by 49% (P<0.0001 and induced apoptosis in cultured MDA-MB-231 cells after complementary GCV treatment. In the MDA-MB-231 xenograft model, NTS-polyplex nanoparticles carrying either the HSVtk gene or GFP gene were injected into the tumors or via the bloodstream. Both routes of administration allowed the NTS-polyplex nanoparticles to reach and transfect tumorous cells. HSVtk expression and GCV led to apoptosis, as shown by the presence of cleaved caspase-3 and Apostain immunoreactivity, and significantly inhibited the tumor growth (55-60% (P<0.001. At the end of the experiment, the weight of tumors transfected with the HSVtk gene was 55% less than that of control tumors (P<0.05. The intravenous transfection did not induce apoptosis in peripheral organs. Our results offer a promising gene therapy for TNBC using the NTS-polyplex nanocarrier.

  3. Collagen density and alignment in responsive and resistant trastuzumab-treated breast cancer xenografts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Alex J.; Cook, Rebecca S.; Lee, Jae H.; Arteaga, Carlos L.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2015-02-01

    Tumor collagen characteristics influence tumor malignancy, invasion, and metastasis. This study investigates the effects of trastuzumab (Tz) on the collagen of Tz-responsive (BT474) and Tz-resistant (HR6) breast cancer xenografts. Collagen content was assessed by in vivo second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging and histological trichrome staining of tumor sections. Collagen SHG imaging of control BT474 and HR6 tumors demonstrated increased collagen density after 14 days of treatment (p0.05), consistent with the physically distinctive nature of these measurements. There was also no correlation between tumor size and collagen endpoints (p>0.05). These results identify changes within the collagen compartment of the tumor microenvironment following Tz treatment, which are independent from the tumor cell response to Tz, and demonstrate that intravital collagen SHG imaging is capable of measuring dynamic changes in tumor microenvironment following treatment that complements trichrome staining.

  4. Comparison of antitumor activities in tumor xenograft treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hua

    2007-02-01

    To compare treatment effects with antitumor therapies, we proposed an intuitive approach to compare the antitumor effects of two different antitumor treatments by investigating tumor volumes which were measured in a given period of time. The approach is, in essence, a comparison of two unknown functions. The implementation of the approach is simple and straightforward. The approach is applied to analyze a real xenograft study of a new antitumor agent, irofulven, combined with irinotecan.

  5. Malignant phyllodes breast tumor

    OpenAIRE

    Lisa R. Shah-Patel, MD

    2017-01-01

    Malignant phyllodes tumor is a rare tumor of the breast occurring in females usually between the ages of 35 and 55 years. It is often difficult to distinguish benign from malignant phyllodes tumors from other benign entities such as fibroadenomas. This case presentation demonstrates a woman with malignant phyllodes tumor treated with mastectomy with abdominal skin flap reconstruction.

  6. Malignant phyllodes breast tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa R. Shah-Patel, MD

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Malignant phyllodes tumor is a rare tumor of the breast occurring in females usually between the ages of 35 and 55 years. It is often difficult to distinguish benign from malignant phyllodes tumors from other benign entities such as fibroadenomas. This case presentation demonstrates a woman with malignant phyllodes tumor treated with mastectomy with abdominal skin flap reconstruction.

  7. Characterizing the metabolic heterogeneity in human breast cancer xenografts by 3D high resolution fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, He N; Zheng, Gang; Tchou, Julia; Nioka, Shoko; Li, Lin Z

    2013-12-01

    We previously reported that tumor mitochondrial redox state and its heterogeneity distinguished between the aggressive and the indolent breast cancer xenografts, suggesting novel metabolic indices as biomarkers for predicting tumor metastatic potential. Additionally, we reported that the identified redox biomarkers successfully differentiated between the normal breast tissue and the cancerous breast tissue from breast cancer patients. The aim of the present study was to further characterize intratumor heterogeneity by its distribution of mitochondrial redox state and glucose uptake pattern in tumor xenografts and to further investigate the metabolic heterogeneity of the clinical biopsy samples. We employed the Chance redox scanner, a multi-section cryogenic fluorescence imager to simultaneously image the intratumor heterogeneity in the mitochondrial redox state and glucose uptake at a high spatial resolution (down to 50 × 50 × 20 μm(3)). The mitochondrial redox state was determined by the ratio of the intrinsic fluorescence signals from reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and oxidized flavoproteins (Fp including FAD, i.e., flavin adenine dinucleotide), and the glucose uptake was measured using a near-infrared fluorescent glucose-analogue, pyropheophorbide 2-deoxyglucosamide (Pyro-2DG). Significant inter- and intratumor metabolic heterogeneity were observed from our imaging data on various types of breast cancer xenografts. The patterns and degrees of heterogeneity of mitochondrial redox state appeared to relate to tumor size and metastatic potential. The glucose uptake was also heterogeneous and generally higher in tumor peripheries. The oxidized and reduced regions mostly corresponded with the lower and the higher pyro-2DG uptake, respectively. However, there were some regions where the glucose uptake did not correlate with the redox indices. Pronounced glucose uptake and high NADH were observed in certain localized areas within the tumor

  8. Humanized Mouse Xenograft Models: Narrowing the Tumor-Microenvironment Gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, J Jason; Bird, Gregory; Refaeli, Yosef; Jimeno, Antonio

    2016-11-01

    Cancer research has long been hampered by the limitations of the current model systems. Both cultured cells and mouse xenografts grow in an environment highly dissimilar to that of their originating tumor, frequently resulting in promising treatments that are ultimately clinically ineffective. The development of highly immunodeficient mouse strains into which human immune systems can be engrafted can help bridge this gap. Humanized mice (HM) allow researchers to examine xenograft growth in the context of a human immune system and resultant tumor microenvironment, and recent studies have highlighted the increased similarities in attendant tumor structure, metastasis, and signaling to those features in cancer patients. This setting also facilitates the examination of investigational cancer therapies, including new immunotherapies. This review discusses recent advancements in the generation and application of HM models, their promise in cancer research, and their potential in generating clinically relevant treatments. This review also focuses on current efforts to improve HM models by engineering mouse strains expressing human cytokines or HLA proteins and implanting human bone, liver, and thymus tissue to facilitate immune cell maturation and trafficking. Finally, we discuss how these improvements may help direct future HM model cancer studies. Cancer Res; 76(21); 6153-8. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  9. DHEA increases epithelial markers and decreases mesenchymal proteins in breast cancer cells and reduces xenograft growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colín-Val, Zaira; González-Puertos, Viridiana Yazmín; Mendoza-Milla, Criselda; Gómez, Erika Olivia; Huesca-Gómez, Claudia; López-Marure, Rebeca

    2017-10-15

    Breast cancer is one of the most common neoplasias and the leading cause of cancer death in women worldwide. Its high mortality rate is linked to a great metastatic capacity associated with the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). During this process, a decrease in epithelial proteins expression and an increase of mesenchymal proteins are observed. On the other hand, it has been shown that dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), the most abundant steroid in human plasma, inhibits migration of breast cancer cells; however, the underlying mechanisms have not been elucidated. In this study, the in vitro effect of DHEA on the expression pattern of some EMT-related proteins, such as E-cadherin (epithelial), N-cadherin, vimentin and Snail (mesenchymal) was measured by Western blot and immunofluorescence in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells with invasive, metastatic and mesenchymal phenotype. Also, the in vivo effect of DHEA on xenograft tumor growth in nude mice (nu(-)/nu(-)) and on expression of the same epithelial and mesenchymal proteins in generated tumors was evaluated. We found that DHEA increased expression of E-cadherin and decreased N-cadherin, vimentin and Snail expression both in MD-MB-231 cells and in the formed tumors, possibly by DHEA-induced reversion of mesenchymal phenotype. These results were correlated with a tumor size reduction in mouse xenografts following DHEA administration either a week earlier or concurrent with breast cancer cells inoculation. In conclusion, DHEA could be useful in the treatment of breast cancer with mesenchymal phenotype. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Characterization of the Tumor-Microenvironment in Patient-Derived Cervix Xenografts (OCICx)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudary, Naz [Ontario Cancer Institute/Princess Margaret Cancer Centre and Campbell Family Institute for Cancer Research, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Pintilie, Melania [Biostatistics Department, Ontario Cancer Institute/Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Schwock, Joerg [Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Dhani, Neesha [Ontario Cancer Institute/Princess Margaret Cancer Centre and Campbell Family Institute for Cancer Research, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Division of Medical Oncology and Hematology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Clarke, Blaise [Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Department of Pathology, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Milosevic, Michael; Fyles, Anthony [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Hill, Richard P., E-mail: hill@uhnres.utoronto.ca [Ontario Cancer Institute/Princess Margaret Cancer Centre and Campbell Family Institute for Cancer Research, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada)

    2012-08-29

    Rationale: The tumor microenvironment (TME) is heterogeneous including both malignant and host cell components as well as regions of hypoxia, elevated interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) and poor nutrient supply. The quantitative extent to which the microenvironmental properties of primary tumors are recapitulated in xenograft models is not well characterized. Methods: Xenografts were generated by implanting tumor biopsies directly into the cervix of mice to create a panel of orthotopically-passaged xenografts (OCICx). Tumors were grown to ~1 cm (diameter) and IFP measurements recorded prior to sacrifice. Enlarged para-aortic lymph nodes (>1–2 mm) were excised for histologic confirmation of metastatic disease. Quantitative histological analysis was used to evaluate hypoxia, proliferation, lymphatic and blood vessels in the epithelial and stromal regions of the xenografts and original patient tumour. Results: IFP and nodal disease were not correlated with tumor engraftment. IFP measurements in the xenografts were generally lower than those in the patient’s tumor. Lymphatic metastasis increased with passage number as did levels of hypoxia in the epithelial component of the xenografts. The blood vessel density in the stromal component of the xenografts increased in parallel. When all the markers were compared between the biopsy and the respective 3rd generation xenograft 10 of 11 tumors showed a good correlation. Conclusions: This ongoing study provides characterization about tumoral and stromal heterogeneity in a unique orthotopic xenograft model.

  11. Biological studies of samarium-153 bleomycin complex in human breast cancer murine xenografts for therapeutic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahrami-Samani, A. [Faculty of Nuclear Engineering and Physics, Amirkabir Univ. of Tech., Tehran (Iran); Ghannadi-Maragheh, M. [Faculty of Nuclear Engineering and Physics, Amirkabir Univ. of Tech., Tehran (Iran); Radiopharmaceutical Research and Development Lab. (RRDL), Nuclear Science and Technology Research Inst. (NSTRI), Tehran (Iran); Jalilian, A.R.; Mazidi, M. [Radiopharmaceutical Research and Development Lab. (RRDL), Nuclear Science and Technology Research Inst. (NSTRI), Tehran (Iran)

    2010-07-01

    In this work, a potential therapeutic DNA targeting agent, {sup 153}Sm-bleomycin complex ({sup 153}Sm-BLM), was developed and the tumor accumulation studies were performed using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and scarification studies. {sup 153}Sm-BLM was prepared at optimized conditions (room temperature, 4-8 h, 0.1 mg bleomycin for 740-3700 MBq {sup 153}SmCl{sub 3}, radiochemical purity over 98%, HPLC, specific activity = 55 TBq/mmol). {sup 153}Sm-BLM was administered into human breast cancer murine xenografts and the biodistribution and imaging studies were performed up to 48 h. {sup 153}Sm-BLM demonstrated superior tumor accumulation properties in contrast with the other radiolabeled bleomycins with tumor:blood ratios of 41, 72 and 182 at 4, 24 and 48 h, respectively, and tumor:muscle ratios of 23, 33 and > 1490 at 4, 24 and 48 h, respectively, while administered intravenously. The SPECT images also demonstrated the obvious tumor uptake at the chest region of the breast-tumor bearing mice. These initial experiments demonstrate significant accumulation of {sup 153}Sm-BLM in tumor tissues. (orig.)

  12. beta 1 integrin inhibition dramatically enhances radiotherapy efficacy in human breast cancer xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Catherine C.; Park, Catherine C.; Zhang, Hui J.; Yao, Evelyn S.; Park, Chong J.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2008-06-02

    {beta}1 integrin signaling has been shown to mediate cellular resistance to apoptosis after exposure to ionizing radiation (IR). Other signaling molecules that increase resistance include Akt, which promotes cell survival downstream of {beta}1 integrin signaling. We showed previously that {beta}1 integrin inhibitory antibodies, AIIB2, enhance apoptosis and decrease growth in human breast cancer cells in 3 dimensional laminin-rich extracellular matrix (3D lrECM) cultures and in vivo. Here we asked whether AIIB2 could synergize with IR to modify Akt-mediated IR resistance. We used 3D lrECM cultures to test the optimal combination of AIIB2 with IR treatment of two breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and HMT3522-T4-2, as well as T4-2 myr-Akt breast cancer colonies or HMT3522-S-1, which form normal organotypic structures in 3D lrECM. Colonies were assayed for apoptosis and {beta}1 integrin/Akt signaling pathways were evaluated using western blot. In addition, mice bearing MCF-7 xenografts were used to validate the findings in 3D lrECM. We report that AIIB2 increased apoptosis optimally post-IR by down regulating Akt in breast cancer colonies in 3D lrECM. In vivo, addition of AIIB2 after IR significantly enhanced tumor growth inhibition and apoptosis compared to either treatment alone. Remarkably, the degree of tumor growth inhibition using AIIB2 plus 2 Gy radiation was similar to that of 8 Gy alone. We showed previously that AIIB2 had no discernible toxicity in mice; here, its addition allowed for a significant reduction in the IR dose that was necessary to achieve comparable growth inhibition and apoptosis in breast cancer xenografts in vivo.

  13. [Chemo- and endocrino-therapy of breast carcinoma xenografts in the dormant or exponential growth phase].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, T

    1995-06-01

    In case of concerning about recurrence case after operative treatment of breast cancer, we must suppose existence of dormant breast cancer cell. To elucidate a rational treatment of the breast cancer in the dormant stage, we have developed a new treatment model using human breast carcinoma xenografts (MCF-7, R-27 and Br-10) in nude mice. After the sc inoculation of the tumors, the treatment was initiated with or without the previous estradiol (E2) stimulation. While MCF-7 was sensitive to mitomycin C (6 mg/kg i.p.) and and tamoxifen pellet (2.5 mg/mouse s.c.) in the dormant and exponential growth phase, R-27 and Br-10 were sensitive to the drugs only in the exponential growth phase but not in the dormant stage. These results suggested that the sensitivity of human breast carcinoma cells in the dormant stage is rather low, however some strain would be also sensitive to the treatment. This model seems to be useful in evaluating the adjuvant therapy of breast carcinoma after surgery.

  14. Dual Probe with Fluorescent and Magnetic Properties for Imaging Solid Tumor Xenografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Shan

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available A dual probe with fluorescent and magnetic reporter groups was constructed by linkage of the near-infrared (NIR fluorescent transferrin conjugate (TfNIR on the surface of contrast agent-encapsulated cationic liposome (Lip-CA. This probe was used for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and optical imaging of MDA-MB-231-luc breast cancer cells grown as a monolayer in vitro and as solid tumor xenografts in nude mice. Confocal microscopy, optical imaging, and MRI showed a dramatic increase of in vitro cellular uptake of the fluorescent and magnetic reporter groups from the probe compared with the uptake of contrast agent or Lip-CA alone. Pretreatment with transferrin (Tf blocked uptake of the probe reporters, indicating the importance and specificity of the Tf moiety for targeting. Intravenous administration of the dual probe to nude mice significantly enhanced the tumor contrast in MRI, and preferential accumulation of the fluorescent signal was clearly seen in NIR-based optical images. More interestingly, the contrast enhancement in MRI showed a heterogeneous pattern within tumors, which reflected the tumor's morphologic heterogeneity. These results indicate that the newly developed dual probe enhances the tumor image contrast and is superior to contrast agent alone for identifying the tumor pathologic features on the basis of MRI but also is suitable for NIR-based optical imaging.

  15. Cyclophosphamide Enhances Human Tumor Growth in Nude Rat Xenografted Tumor Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingjen Jeffrey Wu

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the immunomodulatory chemotherapeutic agent cyclophosphamide (CTX on tumor growth was investigated in primary and metastatic intracerebral and subcutaneous rat xenograft models. Nude rats were treated with CTX (100 mg/kg, intraperitoneally 24 hours before human ovarian carcinoma (SKOV3, small cell lung carcinoma (LX-1 SCLC, and glioma (UW28, U87MG, and U251 tumor cells were inoculated subcutaneously, intraperitoneally, or in the right cerebral hemisphere or were infused into the right internal carotid artery. Tumor development was monitored and recorded. Potential mechanisms were further investigated. Only animals that received both CTX and Matrigel showed consistent growth of subcutaneous tumors. Cyclophosphamide pretreatment increased the percentage (83.3% vs 0% of animals showing intraperitoneal tumors. In intracerebral implantation tumor models, CTX pretreatment increased the tumor volume and the percentage of animals showing tumors. Cyclophosphamide increased lung carcinoma bone and facial metastases after intra-arterial injection, and 20% of animals showed brain metastases. Cyclophosphamide transiently decreased nude rat white blood cell counts and glutathione concentration, whereas serum vascular endothelial growth factor was significantly elevated. Cyclophosphamide also increased CD31 reactivity, a marker of vascular endothelium, and macrophage (CD68-positive infiltration into glioma cell-inoculated rat brains. Cyclophosphamide may enhance primary and metastatic tumor growth through multiple mechanisms, including immune modulation, decreased response to oxidative stress, increased tumor vascularization, and increased macrophage infiltration. These findings may be clinically relevant because chemotherapy may predispose human cancer subjects to tumor growth in the brain or other tissues.

  16. MDM2 Molecular Imaging for the Prediction of Chemotherapeutic Sensitivity in Human Breast Cancer Xenograft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Fu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible use of mouse double-minute 2 (MDM2 molecular imaging to predict chemotherapeutic sensitivity in breast cancer xenografts (BCXs. MCF-7 cells were transfected with MDM2 antisense oligonucleotides (ASONs, and MDM2 expression levels were determined by Western blotting. Cell viability was assessed by 3-(4,5- dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay in MCF-7 cells transfected with ASONs and treated with paclitaxel. BCXs were established in nude mice by injection of ASONs, and tumor volumes were measured after paclitaxel treatment. MDM2 ASONs were labeled with 99mTc to generate an MDM2 molecular probe, and MDM2 expression levels were evaluated by imaging and Western blotting. MDM2 ASONs downregulated MDM2 expression in a dose-dependent manner and increased the rate of paclitaxel-induced cell growth inhibition. Imaging of tumors revealed significant differences in the tumor to skeletal muscle (T/M ratio between groups. Tumor MDM2 protein expression was correlated with T/M ratios at 4 hours (R = .880 and 10 hours (R = .886. The effect of paclitaxel varied among nude mice bearing BCXs with different concentrations of ASONs, as shown by differences in tumor growth. MDM2 molecular imaging could be a promising method for predicting the sensitivity of BCXs to chemotherapy.

  17. Tubulin-destabilizing agent BPR0L075 induces vascular-disruption in human breast cancer mammary fat pad xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Beck, Haley; Wang, Xiaolei; Hsieh, Hsing-Pang; Mason, Ralph P; Liu, Xinli

    2012-01-01

    BPR0L075, 6-methoxy-3-(3',4',5'-trimethoxy-benzoyl)-1H-indole, is a tubulin-binding agent that inhibits tubulin polymerization by binding to the colchicine-binding site. BPR0L075 has shown antimitotic and antiangiogenic activity in vitro. The current study evaluated the vascular-disrupting activity of BPR0L075 in human breast cancer mammary fat pad xenografts using dynamic bioluminescence imaging. A single dose of BPR0L075 (50 mg/kg, intraperitoneally (i.p.)) induced rapid, temporary tumor vascular shutdown (at 2, 4, and 6 hours); evidenced by rapid and reproducible decrease of light emission from luciferase-expressing orthotopic MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 breast tumors after administration of luciferin substrate. A time-dependent reduction of tumor perfusion after BPR0L075 treatment was confirmed by immunohistological staining of the perfusion marker Hoechst 33342 and tumor vasculature marker CD31. The vasculature showed distinct recovery within 24 hours post therapy. A single i.p. injection of 50 mg/kg of BPR0L075 initially produced plasma concentrations in the micromolar range within 6 hours, but subsequent drug distribution and elimination caused BPR0L075 plasma levels to drop rapidly into the nanomolar range within 24 h. Tests with human umbilical vein endothelial (HUVEC) cells and tumor cells in culture showed that BPR0L075 was cytotoxic to both tumor cells and proliferating endothelial cells, and disrupted pre-established vessels in vitro and ex vivo. In conclusion, BPR0L075 caused rapid, albeit, temporary tumor vascular shutdown and led to reduction of tumor perfusion in orthotopic human breast cancer xenografts, suggesting that this antimitotic agent may be useful as a vascular-disrupting cancer therapy.

  18. Recombinant lysyl oxidase propeptide protein inhibits growth and promotes apoptosis of pre-existing murine breast cancer xenografts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish V Bais

    Full Text Available Lysyl oxidase propeptide (LOX-PP ectopic overexpression inhibits the growth of cancer xenografts. Here the ability and mode of action of purified recombinant LOX-PP (rLOX-PP protein to inhibit the growth of pre-existing xenografts was determined. Experimental approaches employed were direct intratumoral injection (i.t. of rLOX-PP protein into murine breast cancer NF639 xenografts, and application of a slow release formulation of rLOX-PP implanted adjacent to tumors in NCR nu/nu mice (n = 10. Tumors were monitored for growth, and after sacrifice were subjected to immunohistochemical and Western blot analyses for several markers of proliferation, apoptosis, and for rLOX-PP itself. Direct i.t. injection of rLOX-PP significantly reduced tumor volume on days 20, 22 and 25 and tumor weight at harvest on day 25 by 30% compared to control. Implantation of beads preloaded with 35 micrograms rLOX-PP (n = 10 in vivo reduced tumor volume and weight at sacrifice when compared to empty beads (p<0.05. A 30% reduction of tumor volume on days 22 and 25 (p<0.05 and final tumor weight on day 25 (p<0.05 were observed with a reduced tumor growth rate of 60% after implantation. rLOX-PP significantly reduced the expression of proliferation markers and Erk1/2 MAP kinase activation, while prominent increases in apoptosis markers were observed. rLOX-PP was detected by immunohistochemistry in harvested rLOX-PP tumors, but not in controls. Data provide pre-clinical findings that support proof of principle for the therapeutic anti-cancer potential of rLOX-PP protein formulations.

  19. Relation between Irofulven (MGI-114) systemic exposure and tumor response in human solid tumor xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggas, Markos; Stewart, Clinton F; Woo, Michael H; Fouladi, Maryam; Cheshire, Pamela J; Peterson, Jennifer K; Friedman, Henry S; Billups, Catherine; Houghton, Peter J

    2002-09-01

    Irofulven is a novel, small molecular weight semisynthetic compound, derived from a family of mushroom toxins known as illudins. This DNA alkylating agent has a chemical structure unlike any other chemotherapeutic agent in clinical use. The molecule is currently being studied in several Phase I, II, and III trials. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the antitumor activity of Irofulven in a panel of 20 pediatric solid tumor xenografts and to relate the Irofulven systemic exposure, defined as area under the concentration time curve, to the antitumor dose associated with tumor regression in the tumor models. Irofulven was administered i.v. daily for 5 days with courses repeated every 21 days for a total of three cycles. The minimum effective dose of Irofulven causing objective regression (> or =50% volume regression) of advanced tumors was determined for each of 19 of 20 independently derived tumor models (12 brain tumors, 4 neuroblastomas, and 4 rhabdomyosarcomas). At the maximum tolerated dose for three cycles of treatment (4.6 mg/kg/day) objective regressions were determined in 14 of 18 tumor lines (78%). However, the dose-response relationship was acute. At 2 mg/kg only 3 of 15 tumors tested demonstrated objective regressions, and in 3 additional tumors volume regressions were not achieved at a higher dose level (3 mg/kg), hence were not additionally tested. After administering the maximum tolerated dose (tolerated for one or two cycles of treatment) of Irofulven, 7 mg/kg, to mice bearing sensitive and resistant human tumors plasma concentration-time profiles were determined. Tumors were highly sensitive to Irofulven, but the systemic exposure required for a significant rate of objective response in this panel of tumors is in excess of that achievable in patients at tolerable doses, using this schedule of drug administration.

  20. Therapeutic Electromagnetic Field (TEMF and gamma irradiation on human breast cancer xenograft growth, angiogenesis and metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardman W Elaine

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effects of a rectified semi-sinewave signal (15 mT amplitude, 120 pulses per second, EMF Therapeutics, Inc. (TEMF alone and in combination with gamma irradiation (IR therapy in nude mice bearing a human MDA MB231 breast cancer xenograft were tested. Green fluorescence protein transfected cancer cells were injected into the mammary fat pad of young female mice. Six weeks later, mice were randomly divided into four treatment groups: untreated controls; 10 minute daily TEMF; 200 cGy of IR every other day (total 800 cGy; IR plus daily TEMF. Some mice in each group were euthanized 24 hours after the end of IR. TEMF treatment continued for 3 additional weeks. Tumor sections were stained for: endothelial cells with CD31 and PAS or hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF. Results Most tumors 3 were white but tumors >35 mm3 were pink and had a vascularized capsule. The cortex within 100 microns of the capsule had little vascularization. Blood vessels, capillaries, and endothelial pseudopods were found at >100 microns from the capsule (subcortex. Tumors >35 mm3 treated with IR 24 hours previously or with TEMF had decreased blood vessels in the subcortex and more endothelial pseudopods projecting into hypoxic, HIF positive areas than tumors from the control group. Mice that received either IR or TEMF had significantly fewer lung metastatic sites and slower tumor growth than did untreated mice. No harmful side effects were attributed to TEMF. Conclusion TEMF therapy provided a safe means for retarding tumor vascularization, growth and metastasis.

  1. Targeted Imaging of Tumor-Associated Macrophages by Cyanine 7-Labeled Mannose in Xenograft Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Jiang MD

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mannose receptor is considered as a hallmark of M2-oriented tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs, but its utility in TAMs was rarely reported. Therefore, deoxymannose (DM, a high-affinity ligand of mannose receptor, was labeled with near-infrared dye cyanine 7 (Cy7, and its feasibility of targeted imaging on TAMs was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The Cy7-DM was synthesized, and its binding affinity with induced TAMs in vitro, whole-body imaging in xenograft tumor mouse model in vivo, and the cellular localization in dissected tissues were evaluated. We demonstrated a high uptake of Cy7-DM by induced M2 macrophages and TAMs in tumor tissues. In vivo near-infrared live imaging visualized abundant TAMs in tumor lesions instead of inflammatory sites by Cy7-DM imaging, and the quantity of Cy7-DM signals in tumors was significantly higher than that shown in inflammatory sites from 1 to 8 hours of imaging. Our results suggest that mannose could rapidly and specifically target TAMs and is a promising candidate for targeted diagnosis of tumor with rich TAMs.

  2. PDX-MI: Minimal Information for Patient-Derived Tumor Xenograft Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meehan, Terrence F.; Conte, Nathalie; Goldstein, Theodore; Inghirami, Giorgio; Murakami, Mark A.; Brabetz, Sebastian; Gu, Zhiping; Wiser, Jeffrey A.; Dunn, Patrick; Begley, Dale A.; Krupke, Debra M.; Bertotti, Andrea; Bruna, Alejandra; Brush, Matthew H.; Byrne, Annette T.; Caldas, Carlos; Christie, Amanda L.; Clark, Dominic A.; Dowst, Heidi; Dry, Jonathan R.; Doroshow, James H.; Duchamp, Olivier; Evrard, Yvonne A.; Ferretti, Stephane; Frese, Kristopher K.; Goodwin, Neal C.; Greenawalt, Danielle; Haendel, Melissa A.; Hermans, Els; Houghton, Peter J.; Jonkers, Jos; Kemper, Kristel; Khor, Tin O.; Lewis, Michael T.; Lloyd, K. C. Kent; Mason, Jeremy; Medico, Enzo; Neuhauser, Steven B.; Olson, James M.; Peeper, Daniel S.; Rueda, Oscar M.; Seong, Je Kyung; Trusolino, Livio; Vinolo, Emilie; Wechsler-Reya, Robert J.; Weinstock, David M.; Welm, Alana; Weroha, S. John; Amant, Frédéric; Pfister, Stefan M.; Kool, Marcel; Parkinson, Helen; Butte, Atul J.; Bult, Carol J.

    2017-01-01

    Patient-derived tumor xenograft (PDX) mouse models have emerged as an important oncology research platform to study tumor evolution, mechanisms of drug response and resistance, and tailoring chemotherapeutic approaches for individual patients. The lack of robust standards for reporting on PDX models

  3. Therapeutic Electromagnetic Field (TEMF) and gamma irradiation on human breast cancer xenograft growth, angiogenesis and metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Ivan L; Sun, Lu-Zhe; Short, Nicholas; Hardman, W Elaine; Williams, C Douglas

    2005-01-01

    Background The effects of a rectified semi-sinewave signal (15 mT amplitude, 120 pulses per second, EMF Therapeutics, Inc.) (TEMF) alone and in combination with gamma irradiation (IR) therapy in nude mice bearing a human MDA MB231 breast cancer xenograft were tested. Green fluorescence protein transfected cancer cells were injected into the mammary fat pad of young female mice. Six weeks later, mice were randomly divided into four treatment groups: untreated controls; 10 minute daily TEMF; 200 cGy of IR every other day (total 800 cGy); IR plus daily TEMF. Some mice in each group were euthanized 24 hours after the end of IR. TEMF treatment continued for 3 additional weeks. Tumor sections were stained for: endothelial cells with CD31 and PAS or hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF). Results Most tumors 35 mm3 were pink and had a vascularized capsule. The cortex within 100 microns of the capsule had little vascularization. Blood vessels, capillaries, and endothelial pseudopods were found at >100 microns from the capsule (subcortex). Tumors >35 mm3 treated with IR 24 hours previously or with TEMF had decreased blood vessels in the subcortex and more endothelial pseudopods projecting into hypoxic, HIF positive areas than tumors from the control group. Mice that received either IR or TEMF had significantly fewer lung metastatic sites and slower tumor growth than did untreated mice. No harmful side effects were attributed to TEMF. Conclusion TEMF therapy provided a safe means for retarding tumor vascularization, growth and metastasis. PMID:16045802

  4. Amplexicaule A exerts anti-tumor effects by inducing apoptosis in human breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Xiang, Meixian; Su, Hanwen; Shu, Guangwen; Wan, Dingrong; He, Feng; Loaec, Morgann; Ding, Yali; Li, Jun; Dovat, Sinisa; Yang, Gaungzhong; Song, Chunhua

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy is the main treatment for patients with breast cancer metastases, but natural alternatives have been receiving attention for their potential as novel anti-tumor reagents. Amplexicaule A (APA) is a flavonoid glucoside isolated from rhizomes of Polygonum amplexicaule D. Don var. sinense Forb (PADF). We found that APA has anti-tumor effects in a breast cancer xenograft mouse model and induces apoptosis in breast cancer cell lines. APA increased levels of cleaved caspase-3,-8,-9 and ...

  5. Inhibition of proteasome activity by the dietary flavonoid apigenin is associated with growth inhibition in cultured breast cancer cells and xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Di; Landis-Piwowar, Kristin R; Chen, Marina S; Dou, Q Ping

    2007-01-01

    Proteasome inhibition is an attractive approach to anticancer therapy and may have relevancy in breast cancer treatment. Natural products, such as dietary flavonoids, have been suggested as natural proteasome inhibitors with potential use for cancer prevention and therapeutics. We previously reported that apigenin, a flavonoid widely distributed in many fruits and vegetables, can inhibit proteasome activity and can induce apoptosis in cultured leukemia Jurkat T cells. Whether apigenin has proteasome-inhibitory activity in the highly metastatic human breast MDA-MB-231 cells and xenografts,however, is unknown. MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell cultures and xenografts were treated with apigenin, followed by measurement of reduced cellular viability/proliferation,proteasome inhibition, and apoptosis induction. Inhibition of the proteasome was determined by levels of the proteasomal chymotrypsin-like activity, by ubiquitinated proteins, and by accumulation of proteasome target proteins in extracts of the treated cells or tumors. Apoptotic cell death was measured by caspase-3/caspase-7 activation, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage, and immunohistochemistry for terminal nucleotidyltransferase-mediated nick end labeling positivity. We report for the first time that apigenin inhibits the proteasomal chymotrypsin-like activity and induces apoptosis not only in cultured MDA-MB-231 cells but also in MDA-MB-231 xenografts. Furthermore, while apigenin has antibreast tumor activity, no apparent toxicity to the tested animals was observed. We have shown that apigenin is an effective proteasome inhibitor in cultured breast cancer cells and in breast cancer xenografts. Furthermore, apigenin induces apoptotic cell death in human breast cancer cells and exhibits anticancer activities in tumors. The results suggest its potential benefits in breast cancer prevention and treatment.

  6. Restriction of dietary protein decreases mTORC1 in tumors and somatic tissues of a tumor-bearing mouse xenograft model

    OpenAIRE

    Lamming, Dudley W.; Cummings, Nicole E.; Rastelli, Antonella L.; Gao, Feng; Cava, Edda; Bertozzi, Beatrice; Spelta, Francesco; Pili, Roberto; Fontana, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Reduced dietary protein intake and intermittent fasting (IF) are both linked to healthy longevity in rodents, and are effective in inhibiting cancer growth. The molecular mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of chronic protein restriction (PR) and IF are unclear, but may be mediated in part by a down-regulation of the IGF/mTOR pathway. In this study we compared the effects of PR and IF on tumor growth in a xenograft mouse model of breast cancer. We also investigated the effects of PR ...

  7. Dietary omega-3 fatty acids and ionizing irradiation on human breast cancer xenograft growth and angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron Ivan L

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effects of an omega-3 (n-3 fatty acid enriched diet alone and in combination with gamma irradiation (IR therapy in nude mice bearing a human MDA-MB231 breast cancer xenograft were tested. The cancer cells were injected into the mammary fat pad of young female mice. Six weeks later, mice were randomly divided into two diet groups: 1 mice with 10% corn oil (rich in omega 6 fatty acids in their food, 2 mice consuming a 10% fat diet that was enriched in n-3 fatty acids. After two weeks on the diet, treatment with 200 cGy of IR every second day for four treatments (total 800 cGy was initiated on half of the mice from each diet group. Some mice in each of the 4 groups were euthanized 24 hours after the end of IR while the remaining mice were followed for 3 additional weeks. Tumor sections were stained for endothelial cells with CD31 and PAS and for hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF-α. Results The tumor cortex within 100 microns of the well-vascularized capsule had little vascularization. Blood vessels, capillaries, and endothelial pseudopods were found at areas greater than 100 microns from the capsule (subcortex. Mice on the corn oil diet and treated with IR 24 hours previously or non-irradiated mice fed the n-3 diet had tumors with fewer blood vessels in the subcortex and more endothelial pseudopods projecting into hypoxic (HIF- α positive areas than did mice from the non-irradiated corn oil fed group. The tumor growth rate of mice that received IR or that were fed the n-3 fatty acid enriched diet was significantly slower than in the mice fed the 10% corn oil diet. Harmful side effects were found only in the IR treated mice. Conclusion The omega-3 fatty acid enriched diet proved to be a safe means for retarding tumor growth and vascularization.

  8. Alvocidib (Flavopiridol) suppresses tumor growth in SCID mice with human esophageal cancer xenografts without inducing apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Shinsuke; Kajiyama, Yoshiaki; Sugano, Masahiko; Iwanuma, Yoshimi; Sonoue, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Toshiharu; Tsurumaru, Masahiko

    2006-08-01

    Alvocidib (Flavopiridol, HMR1275) is a potent inhibitor of multiple cyclin-dependent kinases and has been identified recently as an antitumor agent in several cancers. Previous studies have shown that alvocidib could potentially treat esophageal cancer in vitro. This study evaluates alvocidib for its ability to suppress tumor growth in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice bearing TE8 human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) xenografts. Alvocidib treatment of 10mg/kg body weight reduced tumor volume significantly. Immunohistochemistry analysis of alvocidib-treated tumor sections showed significant reductions in cyclin D1, VEGF, and Rb levels. Alvocidib treatment did not cause a marked increase in apoptotic tumor cells by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) analysis, yet hematoxylin and eosin staining revealed tumor necrosis. In vivo investigation of alvocidib treatment confirmed antitumor activity in TE8 esophageal xenografts. These findings suggest that alvocidib could be a useful anti-cancer agent for esophageal cancer.

  9. The impact of tumor nitric oxide production on VEGFA expression and tumor growth in a zebrafish rat glioma xenograft model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadhir Yousfi

    Full Text Available To investigate the effect of nitric oxide on tumor development, we established a rat tumor xenograft model in zebrafish embryos. The injected tumor cells formed masses in which nitric oxide production could be detected by the use of the cell-permeant DAF-FM-DA (diaminofluorophore 4-amino-5-methylamino-2'-7'-difluorofluorescein diacetate and DAR-4M-AM (diaminorhodamine-4M. This method revealed that nitric oxide production could be co-localized with the tumor xenograft in 46% of the embryos. In 85% of these embryos, tumors were vascularized and blood vessels were observed on day 4 post injection. Furthermore, we demonstrated by qRT-PCR that the transplanted glioma cells highly expressed Nos2, Vegfa and Cyclin D1 mRNA. In the xenografted embryos we also found increased zebrafish vegfa expression. Glioma and zebrafish derived Vegfa and tumor Cyclin D1 expression could be down regulated by the nitric oxide scavenger 2-(4-Carboxyphenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide or CPTIO. We conclude that even if there is a heterogeneous nitric oxide production by the xenografted glioma cells that impacts Vegfa and Cyclin D1 expression levels, our results suggest that reduction of nitric oxide levels by nitric oxide scavenging could be an efficient approach to treat glioma.

  10. Modification of the hypoxic fraction of a xenografted human colon tumor by differentiation-inducing agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leith, J.T.

    1988-05-18

    Xenografted tumors were produced in nude mice by injection of HCT-15 human colon tumor cells. The hypoxic fractions of control tumors as determined from x-ray survival curves were approximately 18%. Other tumors were treated (every day X 9) with daily injections of N-methylformamide (150 mg/kg) or sodium butyrate (2,000 mg/kg). For both agents, it was found that the hypoxic fractions were less than 0.05% and less than 1.7%, respectively. These data indicate that selected differentiation-inducing agents could be of value for treatment of human solid tumors that contain hypoxic cells.

  11. Curcumin in combination with visible light inhibits tumor growth in a xenograft tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dujic, Jadranka; Kippenberger, Stefan; Ramirez-Bosca, Ana; Diaz-Alperi, Joaquin; Bereiter-Hahn, Jürgen; Kaufmann, Roland; Bernd, August; Hofmann, Matthias

    2009-03-15

    It is known that curcumin, a dietary pigment from the plant Curcuma longa, inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in different cell lines; however, the therapeutic benefit is hampered by very low absorption after transdermal or oral application. Recent studies from our laboratory have demonstrated that curcumin at low concentrations (0.2-1 microg/ml) offered the described effects only when applied with UVA or visible light. Nevertheless, the in vivo efficacy of this combination is lacking. In the present study, we used a xenograft tumor model with human epithelial carcinoma A431 cells to test the effect of curcumin and visible light on tumor growth. It was found that tumor growth was significantly inhibited in mice that were i.p. injected with curcumin and consecutively irradiated with visible light. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry showed a reduction of Ki 67 expression, indicating a decrease of cycling cells and induction of apoptotic bodies. The effect on apoptosis was further confirmed by Western blot analysis showing enhanced activation of caspases-9. Vice versa inhibition of extracellular regulated kinases (ERK) 1/2 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) was observed which may aid inhibition of proliferation and induction of apoptosis. In summary, the present findings suggest a combination of curcumin and light as a new therapeutic concept to increase the efficacy of curcumin in the treatment of cancer.

  12. Pharmacologic inhibition of MLK3 kinase activity blocks the in vitro migratory capacity of breast cancer cells but has no effect on breast cancer brain metastasis in a mouse xenograft model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Hyoe Rhoo

    Full Text Available Brain metastasis of breast cancer is an important clinical problem, with few therapeutic options and a poor prognosis. Recent data have implicated mixed lineage kinase 3 (MLK3 in controlling the in vitro migratory capacity of breast cancer cells, as well as the metastasis of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells from the mammary fat pad to distant lymph nodes in a mouse xenograft model. We therefore set out to test whether MLK3 plays a role in brain metastasis of breast cancer cells. To address this question, we used a novel, brain penetrant, MLK3 inhibitor, URMC099. URMC099 efficiently inhibited the migration of breast cancer cells in an in vitro cell monolayer wounding assay, and an in vitro transwell migration assay, but had no effect on in vitro cell growth. We also tested the effect of URMC099 on tumor formation in a mouse xenograft model of breast cancer brain metastasis. This analysis showed that URMC099 had no effect on the either the frequency or size of breast cancer brain metastases. We conclude that pharmacologic inhibition of MLK3 by URMC099 can reduce the in vitro migratory capacity of breast cancer cells, but that it has no effect on either the frequency or size of breast cancer brain metastases, in a mouse xenograft model.

  13. Recombinant human erythropoietin alpha improves the efficacy of radiotherapy of a human tumor xenograft, affecting tumor cells and microvessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loevey, J. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, National Inst. of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary); Bereczky, B.; Gilly, R.; Kenessey, I.; Raso, E.; Simon, E.; Timar, J. [Dept. of Tumor Progression, National Inst. of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary); Dobos, J. [Dept. of Tumor Progression, National Inst. of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary); National Koranyi Inst. of TBC and Pulmonology, Budapest (Hungary); Vago, A. [Central Lab., National Inst. of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary); Kasler, M. [Head and Neck Surgery, National Inst. of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary); Doeme, B. [National Koranyi Inst. of TBC and Pulmonology, Budapest (Hungary); Tovari, J. [National Koranyi Inst. of TBC and Pulmonology, Budapest (Hungary); 1. Inst. of Pathology and Experimental Cancer Research, Semmelweis Univ., Budapest (Hungary)

    2008-01-15

    Background and purpose: tumor-induced anemia often occurs in cancer patients, and is corrected by recombinant human erythropoietins (rHuEPOs). Recent studies indicated that, besides erythroid progenitor cells, tumor and endothelial cells express erythropoietin receptor (EPOR) as well; therefore, rHuEPO may affect their functions. Here, the effect of rHuEPO{alpha} on irradiation in EPOR-positive human squamous cell carcinoma xenograft was tested. Material and methods: A431 tumor-bearing SCID mice were treated from the tumor implantation with rHuEPO{alpha} at human-equivalent dose. Xenografts were irradiated (5 Gy) on day 14, and the final tumor mass was measured on day 22. The systemic effects of rHuEPO{alpha} on the hemoglobin level, on tumor-associated blood vessels and on hypoxia-inducible factor-(HIF-)1{alpha} expression of the tumor xenografts were monitored. The proliferation, apoptosis and clonogenic capacity of A431 cancer cells treated with rHuEPO{alpha} and irradiation were also tested in vitro. Results: in vitro, rHuEPO{alpha} treatment alone did not modify the proliferation of EPOR-positive A431 tumor cells but enhanced the effect of irradiation on proliferation, apoptosis and clonogenic capacity. In vivo, rHuEPO{alpha} administration compensated the tumor-induced anemia in SCID mice and decreased tumoral HIF-1{alpha} expression but had no effect on tumor growth. At the same time rHuEPO{alpha} treatment significantly increased the efficacy of radiotherapy in vivo (tumor weight of 23.9 {+-} 4.7 mg and 34.9 {+-} 4.6 mg, respectively), mediated by increased tumoral blood vessel destruction. Conclusion: rHuEPO{alpha} treatment may modulate the efficacy of cancer radiotherapy not only by reducing systemic hypoxia and tumoral HIF-1{alpha} expression, but also by destroying tumoral vessels. (orig.)

  14. A simulation-based sample size calculation method for pre-clinical tumor xenograft experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jianrong; Yang, Shengping

    2017-04-07

    Pre-clinical tumor xenograft experiments usually require a small sample size that is rarely greater than 20, and data generated from such experiments very often do not have censored observations. Many statistical tests can be used for analyzing such data, but most of them were developed based on large sample approximation. We demonstrate that the type-I error rates of these tests can substantially deviate from the designated rate, especially when the data to be analyzed has a skewed distribution. Consequently, the sample size calculated based on these tests can be erroneous. We propose a modified signed log-likelihood ratio test (MSLRT) to meet the type-I error rate requirement for analyzing pre-clinical tumor xenograft data. The MSLRT has a consistent and symmetric type-I error rate that is very close to the designated rate for a wide range of sample sizes. By simulation, we generated a series of sample size tables based on scenarios commonly expected in tumor xenograft experiments, and we expect that these tables can be used as guidelines for making decisions on the numbers of mice used in tumor xenograft experiments.

  15. Dynamic Quantitative T1 Mapping in Orthotopic Brain Tumor Xenografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelsey Herrmann

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Human brain tumors such as glioblastomas are typically detected using conventional, nonquantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI techniques, such as T2-weighted and contrast enhanced T1-weighted MRI. In this manuscript, we tested whether dynamic quantitative T1 mapping by MRI can localize orthotopic glioma tumors in an objective manner. Quantitative T1 mapping was performed by MRI over multiple time points using the conventional contrast agent Optimark. We compared signal differences to determine the gadolinium concentration in tissues over time. The T1 parametric maps made it easy to identify the regions of contrast enhancement and thus tumor location. Doubling the typical human dose of contrast agent resulted in a clearer demarcation of these tumors. Therefore, T1 mapping of brain tumors is gadolinium dose dependent and improves detection of tumors by MRI. The use of T1 maps provides a quantitative means to evaluate tumor detection by gadolinium-based contrast agents over time. This dynamic quantitative T1 mapping technique will also enable future quantitative evaluation of various targeted MRI contrast agents.

  16. Effect of estrogen withdrawal on energy-rich phosphates and prediction of estrogen dependence monitored by in vivo 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy of four human breast cancer xenografts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, C A; Kristjansen, P E; Brünner, N

    1995-01-01

    The effect of estrogen withdrawal on energy metabolism was studied in four human breast cancer xenografts: the estrogen-dependent MCF-7 and ZR75-1 and the estrogen-independent ZR75/LCC-3 and MDA-MB-231. The tumors were grown in ovariectomized nude mice with a s.c. implanted estrogen pellet. After......-clamped tumors prepared 14 days after estrogen removal were analyzed for ATP and phosphocreatine content. Our findings suggest a correlation between estrogen withdrawal and the steady-state concentrations of ATP, phosphocreatine, and Pi in human breast cancer xenografts. Discrimination analysis...

  17. Lowering of tumor interstitial fluid pressure reduces tumor cell proliferation in a xenograft tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Matthias; Guschel, Maike; Bernd, August; Bereiter-Hahn, Jürgen; Kaufmann, Roland; Tandi, Christa; Wiig, Helge; Kippenberger, Stefan

    2006-02-01

    High tumor interstitial fluid pressure (TIFP) is a characteristic of most solid tumors. TIFP may hamper adequate uptake of macromolecular therapeutics in tumor tissue. In addition, TIFP generates mechanical forces affecting the tumor cortex, which might influence the growth parameters of tumor cells. This seems likely as, in other tissues (namely, blood vessels or the skin), mechanical stretch is known to trigger proliferation. Therefore, we hypothesize that TIFP-induced stretch modulates proliferation-associated parameters. Solid epithelial tumors (A431 and A549) were grown in Naval Medical Research Institute nude mice, generating a TIFP of about 10 mm Hg (A431) or 5 mm Hg (A549). Tumor drainage of the central cystic area led to a rapid decline of TIFP, together with visible relaxation of the tumor cortex. It was found by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blot analysis that TIFP lowering yields a decreased phosphorylation of proliferation-associated p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase and tumor relaxation. In confirmation, immunohistochemical staining showed a decrease of tumor-associated proliferation marker Ki-67 after TIFP lowering. These data suggest that the mechanical stretch induced by TIFP is a positive modulator of tumor proliferation.

  18. Lowering of Tumor Interstitial Fluid Pressure Reduces Tumor Cell Proliferation in a Xenograft Tumor Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Hofmann

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available High tumor interstitial fluid pressure (TIFP is a characteristic of most solid tumors. TIFP may hamper adequate uptake of macromolecular therapeutics in tumor tissue. In addition, TIFP generates mechanical forces affecting the tumor cortex, which might influence the growth parameters of tumor cells. This seems likely as, in other tissues (namely, blood vessels or the skin, mechanical stretch is known to trigger proliferation. Therefore, we hypothesize that TIFP-induced stretch modulates proliferation-associated parameters. Solid epithelial tumors (A431 and A549 were grown in Naval Medical Research Institute nude mice, generating a TIFP of about 10 mm Hg (A431 or 5 mm Hg (A549. Tumor drainage of the central cystic area led to a rapid decline of TIFP, together with visible relaxation of the tumor cortex. It was found by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blot analysis that TIFP lowering yields a decreased phosphorylation of proliferation-associated p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase and tumor relaxation. In confirmation, immunohistochemical staining showed a decrease of tumor-associated proliferation marker Ki-67 after TIFP lowering. These data suggest that the mechanical stretch induced by TIFP is a positive modulator of tumor proliferation.

  19. Lowering of Tumor Interstitial Fluid Pressure Reduces Tumor Cell Proliferation in a Xenograft Tumor Model1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Matthias; Guschel, Maike; Bernd, August; Bereiter-Hahn, Jürgen; Kaufmann, Roland; Tandi, Christa; Wiig, Helge; Kippenberger, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    Abstract High tumor interstitial fluid pressure (TIFP) is a characteristic of most solid tumors. TIFP may hamper adequate uptake of macromolecular therapeutics in tumor tissue. In addition, TIFP generates mechanical forces affecting the tumor cortex, which might influence the growth parameters of tumor cells. This seems likely as, in other tissues (namely, blood vessels or the skin), mechanical stretch is known to trigger proliferation. Therefore, we hypothesize that TIFP-induced stretch modulates proliferation-associated parameters. Solid epithelial tumors (A431 and A549) were grown in Naval Medical Research Institute nude mice, generating a TIFP of about 10 mm Hg (A431) or 5 mm Hg (A549). Tumor drainage of the central cystic area led to a rapid decline of TIFP, together with visible relaxation of the tumor cortex. It was found by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blot analysis that TIFP lowering yields a decreased phosphorylation of proliferation-associated p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase and tumor relaxation. In confirmation, immunohistochemical staining showed a decrease of tumor-associated proliferation marker Ki-67 after TIFP lowering. These data suggest that the mechanical stretch induced by TIFP is a positive modulator of tumor proliferation. PMID:16611401

  20. Tumor volume in subcutaneous mouse xenografts measured by microCT is more accurate and reproducible than determined by 18F-FDG-microPET or external caliper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mette Munk; Jørgensen, Jesper Tranekjaer; Binderup, Tina

    2008-01-01

    and reproducible measures of tumor size in mice compared with caliper measurements. Furthermore, we evaluated the accuracy of tumor volume determined from 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) PET. METHODS: Subcutaneously implanted human breast adenocarcinoma cells in NMRI nude mice served as tumor model. Tumor volume......BACKGROUND: In animal studies tumor size is used to assess responses to anticancer therapy. Current standard for volumetric measurement of xenografted tumors is by external caliper, a method often affected by error. The aim of the present study was to evaluate if microCT gives more accurate...... (n = 20) was determined in vivo by external caliper, microCT and 18F-FDG-PET and subsequently reference volume was determined ex vivo. Intra-observer reproducibility of the microCT and caliper methods were determined by acquiring 10 repeated volume measurements. Volumes of a group of tumors (n = 10...

  1. Imaging of CD47 Expression in Xenograft and Allograft Tumor Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Zheleznyak

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available CD47 functions as a marker of “self” by inhibiting phagocytosis of autologous cells. CD47 has been shown to be overexpressed by various tumor types as a means of escaping the antitumor immune response. The goal of this research was to investigate the utility of CD47 imaging using positron emission tomography (PET in both human xenograft and murine allograft tumor models. Anti-CD47 antibodies were conjugated with p-isothiocyanatobenzyldesferrioxamine (Df-Bz-NCS and labeled with 89Zr. We employed xenograft and allograft small-animal models of cancer in biodistribution and PET imaging studies to investigate the specificity and PET imaging robustness of CD47. Ab-Df-Bz-NCS conjugates were labeled with 89Zr with specific activity of 0.9 to 1.6 μCi/μg. Biodistribution studies in the xenograft and allograft model showed similar specific tumor uptake of the antihuman and antimouse CD47 antibodies. However, the tracer retention in the liver, spleen, and kidneys was significantly higher in the allograft-bearing animals, suggesting uptake mediated by the CD47 normally expressed throughout the reticular endothelial system. CD47, a marker of “self,” was evaluated as a diagnostic PET biomarker in xenograft and allograft cancer animal models. CD47 imaging is feasible, warranting further studies and immunoPET tracer development.

  2. Trastuzumab anti-tumor efficacy in patient-derived esophageal squamous cell carcinoma xenograft (PDECX mouse models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Xianhua

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trastuzumab is currently approved for the clinical treatment of breast and gastric cancer patients with HER-2 positive tumors, but not yet for the treatment of esophageal carcinoma patients, whose tumors typically show 5 ~ 35% HER-2 gene amplification and 0 ~ 56% HER-2 protein expression. This study aimed to investigate the therapeutic efficacy of Trastuzumab in patient-derived esophageal squamous cell carcinoma xenograft (PDECX mouse models. Methods PDECX models were established by implanting patient esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC tissues into immunodeficient (SCID/nude mice. HER-2 gene copy number (GCN and protein expression were determined in xenograft tissues and corresponding patient EC samples by FISH and IHC analysis. Trastuzumab anti-tumor efficacy was evaluated within these PDECX models (n = 8 animals/group. Furthermore, hotspot mutations of EGFR, K-ras, B-raf and PIK3CA genes were screened for in the PDECX models and their corresponding patient’s ESCC tissues. Similarity between the PDECX models and their corresponding patient’s ESCC tissue was confirmed by histology, morphology, HER-2 GCN and mutation. Results None of the PDECX models (or their corresponding patient’s ESCC tissues harbored HER-2 gene amplification. IHC staining showed HER-2 positivity (IHC 2+ in 2 PDECX models and negativity in 3 PDECX models. Significant tumor regression was observed in the Trastuzumab-treated EC044 HER-2 positive model (IHC 2+. A second HER-2 positive (IHC 2+ model, EC039, harbored a known PIK3CA mutation and showed strong activation of the AKT signaling pathway and was insensitive to Trastuzumab treatment, but could be resensitised using a combination of Trastuzumab and AKT inhibitor AZD5363. In summary, we established 5 PDECX mouse models and demonstrated tumor regression in response to Trastuzumab treatment in a HER-2 IHC 2+ model, but resistance in a HER-2 IHC 2+/PIK3CA mutated model. Conclusions

  3. Assessment of Hypoxia in the Stroma of Patient-Derived Pancreatic Tumor Xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohse, Ines; Lourenco, Corey; Ibrahimov, Emin; Pintilie, Melania [Ontario Cancer Institute and Campbell Family Cancer Research Institute, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, University Health Network, 610 University Ave., Toronto, ON M5G2M9 (Canada); Tsao, Ming-Sound [Ontario Cancer Institute and Campbell Family Cancer Research Institute, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, University Health Network, 610 University Ave., Toronto, ON M5G2M9 (Canada); Department of Pathology, University Health Network, 200 Elizabeth Street, Toronto, ON M5G2C4 (Canada); Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, 27 King’s College Circle, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S1A1 (Canada); Hedley, David W., E-mail: david.hedley@uhn.ca [Ontario Cancer Institute and Campbell Family Cancer Research Institute, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, University Health Network, 610 University Ave., Toronto, ON M5G2M9 (Canada); Departments of Medical Biophysics University of Toronto, 610 University Ave., Toronto, ON M5G2M9 (Canada); Departments of Medicine, University of Toronto, 610 University Ave., Toronto, ON M5G2M9 (Canada); Department of Medical Oncology and Hematology, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, 610 University Ave., Toronto, ON M5G2M9 (Canada)

    2014-02-26

    The unusually dense stroma of pancreatic cancers is thought to play an important role in their biological aggression. The presence of hypoxia is also considered an adverse prognostic factor. Although it is usually assumed that this is the result of effects of hypoxia on the epithelial component, it is possible that hypoxia exerts indirect effects via the tumor stroma. We therefore measured hypoxia in the stroma of a series of primary pancreatic cancer xenografts. Nine patient-derived pancreatic xenografts representing a range of oxygenation levels were labeled by immunohistochemistry for EF5 and analyzed using semi-automated pattern recognition software. Hypoxia in the tumor and stroma was correlated with tumor growth and metastatic potential. The extent of hypoxia varied from 1%–39% between the different models. EF5 labeling in the stroma ranged from 0–20% between models, and was correlated with the level of hypoxia in the tumor cell area, but not microvessel density. Tumor hypoxia correlated with spontaneous metastasis formation with the exception of one hypoxic model that showed disproportionately low levels of hypoxia in the stroma and was non-metastatic. Our results demonstrate that hypoxia exists in the stroma of primary pancreatic cancer xenografts and suggest that stromal hypoxia impacts the metastatic potential.

  4. Tumor Heterogeneity in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turashvili, Gulisa; Brogi, Edi

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease and differs greatly among different patients (intertumor heterogeneity) and even within each individual tumor (intratumor heterogeneity). Clinical and morphologic intertumor heterogeneity is reflected by staging systems and histopathologic classification of breast cancer. Heterogeneity in the expression of established prognostic and predictive biomarkers, hormone receptors, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 oncoprotein is the basis for targeted treatment. Molecular classifications are indicators of genetic tumor heterogeneity, which is probed with multigene assays and can lead to improved stratification into low- and high-risk groups for personalized therapy. Intratumor heterogeneity occurs at the morphologic, genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic levels, creating diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Understanding the molecular and cellular mechanisms of tumor heterogeneity that are relevant to the development of treatment resistance is a major area of research. Despite the improved knowledge of the complex genetic and phenotypic features underpinning tumor heterogeneity, there has been only limited advancement in diagnostic, prognostic, or predictive strategies for breast cancer. The current guidelines for reporting of biomarkers aim to maximize patient eligibility for targeted therapy, but do not take into account intratumor heterogeneity. The molecular classification of breast cancer is not implemented in routine clinical practice. Additional studies and in-depth analysis are required to understand the clinical significance of rapidly accumulating data. This review highlights inter- and intratumor heterogeneity of breast carcinoma with special emphasis on pathologic findings, and provides insights into the clinical significance of molecular and cellular mechanisms of heterogeneity. PMID:29276709

  5. Phyllodes Tumors of the Breast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abusalem, Osama Turki; Al-Masri, Anwar

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To study all patients with phyllodes tumors of the breast which were diagnosed at King Hussien Medical Center and Prince Rashid Military Hospital between the 1st of may 2002 till January 2009. Methods: A total of 26 patients diagnosed to have phylloedes tumors were retrieved from the hospital records. All cases were analyzed and assessed in two main categories: demographical characteristics and histopathological parameters. The demographical characteristics included: sex and age of the patients, and tumor size while the histopathological aspects were divided into three subgroups: Benign, Borderline and Malignant tumors with its stromal components characteristics. All the histopathological reports for specimens sent by surgeons were reviewed by 2 senior pathologists. Statistical analysis was done by using Chi square and P-Value. Results: All our patients were females; their age range between 17-67 years, the mean patient age at presentation was 39 years. Out of the 26 patients diagnosed to have phyllodes tumor, 6 had breast-conserving therapy and 20 women had mastectomy. The types of Phyllodes tumors include: A-Benign phyllodes tumors (15 cases), B-Borderline phyllodes (7cases) and C-malignant phyllodes (4 cases). With significant values of benign tumors occurrence (pphyllodes tumors of the breast. The greatest dimension of the tumors ranged from 1 to 15 cm, with a mean of 5 cm. Approximately 73.1% of tumors were less or equal to 5 cm in the greatest dimension and 26.9% >5 cm. The duration of symptoms varied from one month to ten year.s Six patients had painful swellings, whereas in twenty patients the pain was absent. Four patients had recurrent tumors; the distinctive features of those with recurrent tumors were the histological findings of stromal over growth and the presence of positive resection margin. In our series, we found that three patients of those with recurrence discovered to have stromal over growth. While one only had a previous positive

  6. Enhanced antitumor activity of irofulven in combination with irinotecan in pediatric solid tumor xenograft models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Michael H; Peterson, Jennifer K; Billups, Catherine; Liang, Hua; Bjornsti, Mary-Ann; Houghton, Peter J

    2005-05-01

    Irofulven, a novel chemotherapeutic agent with a broad spectrum of activity, is effective against preclinical models of pediatric tumors. The cytotoxic activity of irofulven is augmented when combined with agents that interact with DNA topoisomerase I; however, none of the reported studies have used the protracted dosing schedule found to be active clinically in treatment of childhood cancers. The objective of this study was to evaluate the antitumor activity of irofulven in combination with irinotecan administered on a protracted schedule in a panel of pediatric solid tumor xenografts. Irofulven and irinotecan were evaluated alone or in combination against eight independent xenografts, which included childhood brain tumors (n=5), neuroblastoma (n=1), and rhabdomyosarcoma (n=2). Irofulven was administered i.v. daily for 5 days with courses repeated every 21 days for a total of three cycles. Doses of irofulven ranged from 1.33 to 4.6 mg/kg. Irinotecan was given i.v. daily for 5 days each week for 2 weeks repeated every 21 days for three cycles at doses between 0.28 and 1.25 mg/kg. Irofulven and irinotecan, given as single agents, induced few responses in pediatric solid tumor xenografts at the selected doses. At the same doses, irofulven in combination with irinotecan demonstrated superior antitumor activity, inducing complete responses in seven of the eight xenograft lines. These studies show that the cytotoxic activity of irofulven is greater when combined with protracted administration of irinotecan. Although the systemic exposure of irofulven required to induce objective responses in this panel of pediatric solid tumors was in excess of that achievable in patients receiving maximally tolerated doses using this schedule of drug administration, the enhanced activity of irofulven in combination with irinotecan supports the pursuit of alternative administration strategies and combinations.

  7. [Phyllodes breast tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zedníková, I; Černá, M; Hlaváčková, M; Hes, O

    2015-01-01

    Phyllodes tumour is a breast tumour occurring very rarely. It accounts for only in 1% of all cases of breast tumour. The diagnosis of phyllodes tumours can be difficult in consideration of the small number of cases. Treatment of phyllodes tumours is always surgical. In 2004-2013, we operated on twelve female patients with phyllodes tumours out of the total number of 1564 surgeries for breast tumours (0.8%) at the Department of Surgery at Teaching Hospital in Pilsen. We evaluated the age, the biological behaviour of the tumour depending on the tumour size and duration, the distant metastases, therapy and survival. The average age at the time of surgery was fifty years (2684), the duration of disease to the surgical solution ranged from one month to ten years. Tumour size was in the range of two to twenty-nine centimetres, tumours measuring less than five centimetres were always benign. Tumour excision for benign phyllodes tumour was performed seven times. Malignant phyllodes tumour was diagnosed five times with mastectomy performed in each case, and the axilla was exenterated in three cases where nodes were benign in each of them. In one case, mastectomy was followed by radiotherapy because the tumour reached the edge of the resected part; the other patients were only monitored. In two patients, tumour spreading into the lungs was diagnosed at five to ten months after breast surgery. One patient with generalized disease died, the other ones live with no local recurrence of this disease. Median survival is fifty-two months; the disease-free interval is fifty months. The results show that if phyllodes tumour is diagnosed in time, it is almost exclusively benign. If the case history is longer and the tumour is growing, the likelihood of malignancy increases. Surgical treatment is also sufficient in the case of malignant forms. The breast surgery does not need to be supplemented with exenteration of axilla.Key words: breast - phyllodes tumour.

  8. Enhanced effect of geldanamycin nanocomposite against breast cancer cells growing in vitro and as xenograft with vanquished normal cell toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, Suma; Ananthanarayanan, Preeta; Aziz, Sajida Kannangar; Rai, Sharada; Mutalik, Srinivas; Sadashiva, Satish Rao Bola

    2017-04-01

    Despite enormous advances in remedies developed for breast cancer, an effective therapeutic strategy by targeting malignant cells with the least normal tissue toxicity is yet to be developed. Hsp90 is considered to be an important therapeutic target to inhibit cell proliferation. Geldanamycin (GDM), a potent inhibitor of Hsp90 was withdrawn from clinical trials due to its undesirable hepatotoxicity. We report a superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPION) based polymeric nanocomposite of GDM augmenting anticancer competence with decreased hepatic toxicity. The particle size of nanocomposite was ascertained to be 76±10nm with acceptable stability. A comparative dose dependent in vitro validation of cytotoxicity showed an enhanced cellular damage and necrosis in breast cancer (MCF-7) cell line at a low dose of 5.49nM (in GDM nanocomposite) in contrast to 20nM of pure GDM, while normal breast epithelial cells (MCF-10A) were least affected. Besides, in vivo study (in breast cancer xenografts) substantiated 2.7 fold delay in tumor progression mediated by redundancy in the downstream functions of p-Akt and MAPK-Erk leading to apoptosis with negligible hepatotoxicity. Pure GDM disrupted the function and morphology of liver with lesser therapeutic efficacy than the GDM nanocomposite. These findings deduce that GDM based polymeric magnetite nanocomposite play a vital role in efficacious therapy while vanquishing normal cells and hepatic toxicity and thereby promising it to be reinstated in clinics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Stereotactic intracranial implantation and in vivo bioluminescent imaging of tumor xenografts in a mouse model system of glioblastoma multiforme

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baumann, Brian C; Dorsey, Jay F; Benci, Joseph L; Joh, Daniel Y; Kao, Gary D

    2012-01-01

    .... In this paper, we describe our technique for the precise stereotactic implantation of bio-imageable GBM cancer cells into the brains of nude mice resulting in tumor xenografts that recapitulate key...

  10. CysLT(1)R antagonists inhibit tumor growth in a xenograft model of colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savari, Sayeh; Liu, Minghui; Zhang, Yuan; Sime, Wondossen; Sjölander, Anita

    2013-01-01

    The expression of the inflammatory G-protein coupled receptor CysLT1R has been shown to be upregulated in colon cancer patients and associated with poor prognosis. The present study investigated the correlation between CysLT1R and colon cancer development in vivo using CysLT1R antagonists (ZM198,615 or Montelukast) and the nude mouse xenograft model. Two drug administration regimens were established. The first regimen was established to investigate the importance of CysLT1R in tumor initiation. Nude mice were inoculated with 50 µM CysLT1R antagonist-pretreated HCT-116 colon cancer cells and received continued treatment (5 mg/kg/day, intraperitoneally). The second regimen aimed to address the role of CysLT1R in tumor progression. Nude mice were inoculated with non-pretreated HCT-116 cells and did not receive CysLT1R antagonist treatment until recordable tumor appearance. Both regimens resulted in significantly reduced tumor size, attributed to changes in proliferation and apoptosis as determined by reduced Ki-67 levels and increased levels of p21(WAF/Cip1) (Pcolon cancer cell line HCT-116 and CysLT1R antagonists. In addition to significant reductions in cell proliferation, adhesion and colony formation, we observed induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. The ability of Montelukast to inhibit growth of human colon cancer xenograft was further validated by using two additional colon cancer cell lines, SW-480 and HT-29. Our results demonstrate that CysLT1R antagonists inhibit growth of colon cancer xenografts primarily by reducing proliferation and inducing apoptosis of the tumor cells.

  11. Advances in prostate cancer research models: From transgenic mice to tumor xenografting models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuejiao Huang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The identification of the origin and molecular characteristics of prostate cancer (PCa has crucial implications for personalized treatment. The development of effective treatments for PCa has been limited; however, the recent establishment of several transgenic mouse lines and/or xenografting models is better reflecting the disease in vivo. With appropriate models, valuable tools for elucidating the functions of specific genes have gone deep into prostate development and carcinogenesis. In the present review, we summarize a number of important PCa research models established in our laboratories (PSA-Cre-ERT2/PTEN transgenic mouse models, AP-OX model, tissue recombination-xenografting models and PDX models, which represent advances of translational models from transgenic mouse lines to human tumor xenografting. Better understanding of the developments of these models will offer new insights into tumor progression and may help explain the functional significance of genetic variations in PCa. Additionally, this understanding could lead to new modes for curing PCa based on their particular biological phenotypes.

  12. Chest wall tumors presenting as breast lumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shousha, Sami; Sinnett, H Dudley

    2004-01-01

    Two recently seen patients presenting with large breast lumps that proved to be pure mesenchymal tumors arising from the underlying chest wall are presented. One tumor proved to be a giant cell tumor of soft tissue and the other an osteogenic sarcoma. It is suggested that these two cases may not be unique and that some mesenchymal breast tumors might have their origin in the chest wall. Breast computed tomography (CT) scans would help identify similar cases.

  13. Restriction of dietary protein decreases mTORC1 in tumors and somatic tissues of a tumor-bearing mouse xenograft model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamming, Dudley W; Cummings, Nicole E; Rastelli, Antonella L; Gao, Feng; Cava, Edda; Bertozzi, Beatrice; Spelta, Francesco; Pili, Roberto; Fontana, Luigi

    2015-10-13

    Reduced dietary protein intake and intermittent fasting (IF) are both linked to healthy longevity in rodents, and are effective in inhibiting cancer growth. The molecular mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of chronic protein restriction (PR) and IF are unclear, but may be mediated in part by a down-regulation of the IGF/mTOR pathway. In this study we compared the effects of PR and IF on tumor growth in a xenograft mouse model of breast cancer. We also investigated the effects of PR and IF on the mechanistic Target Of Rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, inhibition of which extends lifespan in model organisms including mice. The mTOR protein kinase is found in two distinct complexes, of which mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) is responsive to acute treatment with amino acids in cell culture and in vivo. We found that both PR and IF inhibit tumor growth and mTORC1 phosphorylation in tumor xenografts. In somatic tissues, we found that PR, but not IF, selectively inhibits the activity of the amino acid sensitive mTORC1, while the activity of the second mTOR complex, mTORC2, was relatively unaffected by PR. In contrast, IF resulted in increased S6 phosphorylation in multiple metabolic tissues. Our work represents the first finding that PR may reduce mTORC1 activity in tumors and multiple somatic tissues, and suggest that PR may represent a highly translatable option for the treatment not only of cancer, but also other age-related diseases.

  14. Tumor Repression of VCaP Xenografts by a Pyrrole-Imidazole Polyamide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda E Hargrove

    Full Text Available Pyrrole-imidazole (Py-Im polyamides are high affinity DNA-binding small molecules that can inhibit protein-DNA interactions. In VCaP cells, a human prostate cancer cell line overexpressing both AR and the TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion, an androgen response element (ARE-targeted Py-Im polyamide significantly downregulates AR driven gene expression. Polyamide exposure to VCaP cells reduced proliferation without causing DNA damage. Py-Im polyamide treatment also reduced tumor growth in a VCaP mouse xenograft model. In addition to the effects on AR regulated transcription, RNA-seq analysis revealed inhibition of topoisomerase-DNA binding as a potential mechanism that contributes to the antitumor effects of polyamides in cell culture and in xenografts. These studies support the therapeutic potential of Py-Im polyamides to target multiple aspects of transcriptional regulation in prostate cancers without genotoxic stress.

  15. Breast cancer circulating tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Joao Carvalho

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Metastasization of breast cancer involves various mechanisms responsible for progression from invasive lesion to dissemination in distant organs. Regional lymph node metastasization was considered an initial step in this process, but it is now recognized that hematogenous dissemination is a deviation from lymphatic circulation. The detection of circulating tumor cells (CTC is an aim in several oncology areas. For this purpose, several techniques have been used to detect CTC, including the use of antibodies and techniques with nucleic acids. This study reviews the published studies considering the detection of breast cancer CTC. There are focused the difficulties in identifying a CTC in a heterogeneous population, the handling of the sample, criteria of positivity, analytical techniques, and specific markers. There are systematized various specific markers of breast cancer cells also the problems with false positive results. Finally, we hypothesize clinical applications either as a prognostic marker or as a therapeutic response monitor.

  16. Recombinant human endostatin normalizes tumor vasculature and enhances radiation response in xenografted human nasopharyngeal carcinoma models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Peng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hypoxic tumor cells can reduce the efficacy of radiation. Antiangiogenic therapy may transiently "normalize" the tumor vasculature to make it more efficient for oxygen delivery. The aim of this study is to investigate whether the recombinant human endostatin (endostar can create a "vascular normalization window" to alleviate hypoxia and enhance the inhibitory effects of radiation therapy in human nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC in mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Transient changes in morphology of tumor vasculature and hypoxic tumor cell fraction in response to endostar were detected in mice bearing CNE-2 and 5-8F human NPC xenografts. Various treatment schedules were tested to assess the influence of endostar on the effect of radiation therapy. Several important factors relevant to the angiogenesis were identified through immunohistochemical staining. During endostar treatment, tumor vascularity decreased, while the basement membrane and pericyte coverage associated with endothelial cells increased, which supported the idea of vessel normalization. Hypoxic tumor cell fraction also decreased after the treatment. The transient modulation of tumor physiology caused by endostar improved the effect of radiation treatment compared with other treatment schedules. The expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2, MMP-9, and MMP-14 decreased, while the level of pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF increased. CONCLUSIONS: Endostar normalized tumor vasculature, which alleviated hypoxia and significantly sensitized the function of radiation in anti-tumor in human NPC. The results provide an important experimental basis for combining endostar with radiation therapy in human NPC.

  17. Yiqi Formula Enhances the Antitumor Effects of Erlotinib for Treatment of Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Xenografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-juan Liao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Yiqi formula (YF, a traditional herbal prescription, has long been used to treat triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC patients. The present study aims to investigate the effects and the related mechanism of YF for treatment of TNBC xenografts. MDA-MB-231 (human TNBC cells were subcutaneously injected into the second mammary fat pad of 40 female nude mice, which were divided into four groups: control, erlotinib (an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor, YF, and combination (YF plus erlotinib. All treatments were administered orally for 30 days. Inhibition rate of tumor weight by erlotinib, YF, and the combination was 26.47%, 17.24%, and 39.15%, respectively. Western blotting showed that YF, erlotinib, and the combination downregulated p-EGFR (P<0.01 and p-Akt1 (pT308 (P<0.05 and upregulated PTEN compared with control, and the combination was more efficacious than erlotinib alone (P<0.05. Similar results were detected by immunohistochemistry. Real-time quantitative PCR showed that YF, erlotinib, and the combination increased PTEN mRNA (P<0.05, P<0.01 compared with control, and the combination was more efficacious than erlotinib alone (P<0.05. In conclusion, YF can regulate the main components of the PI3K/Akt pathway in TNBC xenografts. When YF was used in combination with erlotinib, it enhanced the antitumor effects of erlotinib on TNBC xenografts. These findings suggest that YF is suitable to use for the treatment of TNBC patients.

  18. Amplexicaule A exerts anti-tumor effects by inducing apoptosis in human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Meixian; Su, Hanwen; Shu, Guangwen; Wan, Dingrong; He, Feng; Loaec, Morgann; Ding, Yali; Li, Jun; Dovat, Sinisa; Yang, Gaungzhong; Song, Chunhua

    2016-04-05

    Chemotherapy is the main treatment for patients with breast cancer metastases, but natural alternatives have been receiving attention for their potential as novel anti-tumor reagents. Amplexicaule A (APA) is a flavonoid glucoside isolated from rhizomes of Polygonum amplexicaule D. Don var. sinense Forb (PADF). We found that APA has anti-tumor effects in a breast cancer xenograft mouse model and induces apoptosis in breast cancer cell lines. APA increased levels of cleaved caspase-3,-8,-9 and PARP, which resulted from suppression of MCL-1 and BCL-2 expression in the cells. APA also inactivated the Akt/mTOR pathway in breast cancer cells. Thus, APA exerts a strong anti-tumor effect on breast cancer cells, most likely through induction of apoptosis. Our study is the first to identify this novel anti-tumor compound and provides a new strategy for isolation and separation of single compounds from herbs.

  19. Intravital multiphoton imaging reveals multicellular streaming as a crucial component of in vivo cell migration in human breast tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patsialou, Antonia; Bravo-Cordero, Jose Javier; Wang, Yarong; Entenberg, David; Liu, Huiping; Clarke, Michael; Condeelis, John S.

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis is the main cause of death in breast cancer patients. Cell migration is an essential component of almost every step of the metastatic cascade, especially the early step of invasion inside the primary tumor. In this report, we have used intravital multiphoton microscopy to visualize the different migration patterns of human breast tumor cells in live primary tumors. We used xenograft tumors of MDA-MB-231 cells as well as a low passage xenograft tumor from orthotopically injected patient-derived breast tumor cells. Direct visualization of human tumor cells in vivo shows two patterns of high-speed migration inside primary tumors: a. single cells and b. multicellular streams (i.e., cells following each other in a single file but without cohesive cell junctions). Critically, we found that only streaming and not random migration of single cells was significantly correlated with proximity to vessels, with intravasation and with numbers of elevated circulating tumor cells in the bloodstream. Finally, although the two human tumors were derived from diverse genetic backgrounds, we found that their migratory tumor cells exhibited coordinated gene expression changes that led to the same end-phenotype of enhanced migration involving activating actin polymerization and myosin contraction. Our data are the first direct visualization and assessment of in vivo migration within a live patient-derived breast xenograft tumor. PMID:25013744

  20. Intraductal delivery of adenoviruses targets pancreatic tumors in transgenic Ela-myc mice and orthotopic xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    José, Anabel; Sobrevals, Luciano; Miguel Camacho-Sánchez, Juan; Huch, Meritxell; Andreu, Núria; Ayuso, Eduard; Navarro, Pilar; Alemany, Ramon; Fillat, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Gene-based anticancer therapies delivered by adenoviruses are limited by the poor viral distribution into the tumor. In the current work we have explored the feasibility of targeting pancreatic tumors through a loco-regional route. We have taken advantage of the ductal network in the pancreas to retrogradelly inject adenoviruses through the common bile duct in two different mouse models of pancreatic carcinogenesis: The transgenic Ela-myc mice that develop mixed neoplasms displaying both acinar-like and duct-like neoplastic cells affecting the whole pancreas; and mice bearing PANC-1 and BxPC-3 orthotopic xenografts that constitute a model of localized human neoplastic tumors. We studied tumor targeting and the anticancer effects of newly thymidine kinase-engineered adenoviruses both in vitro and in vivo, and conducted comparative studies between intraductal or intravenous administration. Our data indicate that the intraductal delivery of adenovirus efficiently targets pancreatic tumors in the two mouse models. The in vivo application of AduPARTKT plus ganciclovir (GCV) treatment induced tumor regression in Ela-myc mice. Moreover, the intraductal injection of ICOVIR15-TKT oncolytic adenoviruses significantly improved mean survival of mice bearing PANC-1 and BxPC-3 pancreatic xenografts from 30 to 52 days and from 20 to 68 days respectively (p less than 0.0001) when combined with GCV. Of notice, both AduPARTKT and ICOVIR15-TKT antitumoral responses were stronger by ductal viral application than intravenously, in line with the 38-fold increase in pancreas transduction observed upon ductal administration. In summary our data show that cytotoxic adenoviruses retrogradelly injected to the pancreas can be a feasible approach to treat localized pancreatic tumors.

  1. Genomic and phenotypic profiles of two Brazilian breast cancer cell lines derived from primary human tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corrêa, Natássia C R; Kuasne, Hellen; Faria, Jerusa A Q A

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer among women worldwide. Research using breast cancer cell lines derived from primary tumors may provide valuable additional knowledge regarding this type of cancer. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the phenotypic profiles of MACL-1...... and MGSO-3, the only Brazilian breast cancer cell lines available for comparative studies. We evaluated the presence of hormone receptors, proliferation, differentiation and stem cell markers, using immunohistochemical staining of the primary tumor, cultured cells and xenografts implanted...

  2. Increased Plasma Colloid Osmotic Pressure Facilitates the Uptake of Therapeutic Macromolecules in a Xenograft Tumor Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Hofmann

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Elevated tumor interstitial fluid pressure (TIFP is a characteristic of most solid tumors. Clinically, TIFP may hamper the uptake of chemotherapeutic drugs into the tumor tissue reducing their therapeutic efficacy. In this study, a means of modulating TIFP to increase the flux of macromolecules into tumor tissue is presented, which is based on the rationale that elevated plasma colloid osmotic pressure (COP pulls water from tumor interstitium lowering the TIFP. Concentrated human serum albumin: (20% HSA, used as an agent to enhance COP, reduced the TIFP time-dependently from 8 to 2 mm Hg in human tumor xenograft models bearing A431 epidermoid vulva carcinomas. To evaluate whether this reduction facilitates the uptake of macromolecules, the intratumoral distribution of fluorescently conjugated dextrans (2.5 mg/ml and cetuximab (2.0 mg/ml was probed using novel time domain nearinfrared fluorescence imaging. This method permitted discrimination and semiquantification of tumor-accumulated conjugate from background and unspecific probe fluorescence. The coadministration of 20% HSA together with either dextrans or cetuximab was found to lower the TIFP significantly and increase the concentration of the substances within the tumor tissue in comparison to control tumors. Furthermore, combined administration of 20%HSA plus cetuximab reduced the tumor growth significantly in comparison to standard cetuximab treatment. These data demonstrate that increased COP lowers the TIFP within hours and increases the uptake of therapeutic macromolecules into the tumor interstitium leading to reduced tumor growth. This model represents a novel approach to facilitate the delivery of therapeutics into tumor tissue, particularly monoclonal antibodies.

  3. Increased plasma colloid osmotic pressure facilitates the uptake of therapeutic macromolecules in a xenograft tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Matthias; McCormack, Emmet; Mujić, Maja; Rossberg, Maila; Bernd, August; Bereiter-Hahn, Jürgen; Gjertsen, Bjørn Tore; Wiig, Helge; Kippenberger, Stefan

    2009-08-01

    Elevated tumor interstitial fluid pressure (TIFP) is a characteristic of most solid tumors. Clinically, TIFP may hamper the uptake of chemotherapeutic drugs into the tumor tissue reducing their therapeutic efficacy. In this study, a means of modulating TIFP to increase the flux of macromolecules into tumor tissue is presented, which is based on the rationale that elevated plasma colloid osmotic pressure (COP) pulls water from tumor interstitium lowering the TIFP. Concentrated human serum albumin (20% HSA), used as an agent to enhance COP, reduced the TIFP time-dependently from 8 to 2 mm Hg in human tumor xenograft models bearing A431 epidermoid vulva carcinomas. To evaluate whether this reduction facilitates the uptake of macromolecules, the intratumoral distribution of fluorescently conjugated dextrans (2.5 mg/ml) and cetuximab (2.0 mg/ml) was probed using novel time domain nearinfrared fluorescence imaging. This method permitted discrimination and semiquantification of tumor-accumulated conjugate from background and unspecific probe fluorescence. The coadministration of 20% HSA together with either dextrans or cetuximab was found to lower the TIFP significantly and increase the concentration of the substances within the tumor tissue in comparison to control tumors. Furthermore, combined administration of 20% HSA plus cetuximab reduced the tumor growth significantly in comparison to standard cetuximab treatment. These data demonstrate that increased COP lowers the TIFP within hours and increases the uptake of therapeutic macromolecules into the tumor interstitium leading to reduced tumor growth. This model represents a novel approach to facilitate the delivery of therapeutics into tumor tissue, particularly monoclonal antibodies.

  4. Expression of thrombospondin-1 by tumor cells in patient-derived ovarian carcinoma xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinessi, Denise; Ostano, Paola; Borsotti, Patrizia; Bello, Ezia; Guffanti, Federica; Bizzaro, Francesca; Frapolli, Roberta; Bani, Maria Rosa; Chiorino, Giovanna; Taraboletti, Giulia; Resovi, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1), a major regulator of cell interaction with the environment, is often deregulated in cancers, including ovarian carcinoma. Both the tumor and the host cells can release TSP-1 in the tumor microenvironment. The relative contribution of the two sources in determining TSP-1 levels in ovarian cancer remains to be elucidated. This study was designed to investigate the expression of tumor TSP-1 in a panel of 29 patient-derived ovarian adenocarcinoma xenografts (PDX), using analytical tools specific for human (tumor-derived) rather than murine (host-derived) TSP-1. Human-specific microarray and ELISA were used to measure tumor TSP-1 expression and plasma levels. Tumor-derived TSP-1 was heterogeneously expressed in PDX. Expression was higher in the corresponding original patient's tumor, where stroma-derived TSP-1 is also analyzed, indicating that both the tumor and the host contribute to TSP-1 production. TSP-1 was differentially expressed according to tumor grade, but not affected by p53 expression or mutational status. Findings were confirmed in an external gene expression dataset (101 patients). In a functional enrichment analysis, TSP-1 correlated with genes related to angiogenesis, cell motility, communication and shape. Plasma TSP-1, detectable in 10/11 PDX, was not associated to its expression in the tumor. The possible association of plasma TSP-1 with p53 mutations and response to chemotherapy warrants further investigation. Ovarian carcinoma PDX are a useful tool to investigate the relative contribution of stroma and tumor cells in the production of tumor associated factors, in relation to the tumor behavior, molecular properties and response to therapy.

  5. Phyllodes Tumor in a Lactating Breast

    OpenAIRE

    Murthy, Sudha S.; Raju, K. V. V. N.; Nair, Haripreetha G.

    2016-01-01

    Phyllodes tumor is attributed to a small fraction of primary tumors of the breast. Such tumors occur rarely in pregnancy and lactation. We report a case of a 25-year-old lactating mother presenting with a lump in the left breast. Core needle biopsy was opined as phyllodes tumor with lactational changes, and subsequent wide local excision confirmed the diagnosis of benign phyllodes tumor with lactational changes. The characteristic gross and microscopic findings of a well-circumscribed lesion ...

  6. Ovarian carcinoma patient derived xenografts reproduce their tumor of origin and preserve an oligoclonal structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Pierre-Emmanuel; du Manoir, Stanislas; Orsetti, Béatrice; Bras-Gonçalves, Rui; Lambros, Mario B.; MacKay, Alan; Nguyen, Tien-Tuan; Boissiére, Florence; Pourquier, Didier; Bibeau, Frédéric; Reis-Filho, Jorge S.; Theillet, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Advanced Epithelial Ovarian Cancer (EOC) patients frequently relapse by 24 months and develop resistant disease. Research on EOC therapies relies on cancer cell lines established decades ago making Patient Derived Xenografts (PDX) attractive models, because they are faithful representations of the original tumor. We established 35 ovarian cancer PDXs resulting from the original graft of 77 EOC samples onto immuno-compromised mice. PDXs covered the diversity of EOC histotypes and graft take was correlated with early patient death. Fourteen PDXs were characterized at the genetic and histological levels. PDXs reproduced phenotypic features of the ovarian tumors of origin and conserved the principal characteristics of the original copy number change (CNC) profiles over several passages. However, CNC fluctuations in specific subregions comparing the original tumor and the PDXs indicated the oligoclonal nature of the original tumors. Detailed analysis by CGH, FISH and exome sequencing of one case, for which several tumor nodules were sampled and grafted, revealed that PDXs globally maintained an oligoclonal structure. No overgrowth of a particular subclone present in the original tumor was observed in the PDXs. This suggested that xenotransplantation of ovarian tumors and growth as PDX preserved at least in part the clonal diversity of the original tumor. We believe our data reinforce the potential of PDX as exquisite tools in pre-clinical assays. PMID:26334103

  7. Pathogenesis and progression of fibroepithelial breast tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijper, Arno

    2006-01-01

    Fibroadenoma and phyllodes tumor are fibroepithelial breast tumors. These tumors are biphasic, i.e. they are composed of stroma and epithelium. The behavior of fibroadenomas is benign, whereas phyllodes tumors can recur and even metastasize. Classification criteria for both tumors show considerable

  8. Scanning Acoustic Microscopy-A Novel Noninvasive Method to Determine Tumor Interstitial Fluid Pressure in a Xenograft Tumor Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Matthias; Pflanzer, Ralph; Habib, Anowarul; Shelke, Amit; Bereiter-Hahn, Jürgen; Bernd, August; Kaufmann, Roland; Sader, Robert; Kippenberger, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    Elevated tumor interstitial fluid pressure (TIFP) is a prominent feature of solid tumors and hampers the transmigration of therapeutic macromolecules, for example, large monoclonal antibodies, from tumor-supplying vessels into the tumor interstitium. TIFP values of up to 40 mm Hg have been measured in experimental solid tumors using two conventional invasive techniques: the wick-in-needle and the micropuncture technique. We propose a novel noninvasive method of determining TIFP via ultrasonic investigation with scanning acoustic microscopy at 30-MHz frequency. In our experimental setup, we observed for the impedance fluctuations in the outer tumor hull of A431-vulva carcinoma-derived tumor xenograft mice. The gain dependence of signal strength was quantified, and the relaxation of tissue was calibrated with simultaneous hydrostatic pressure measurements. Signal patterns from the acoustical images were translated into TIFP curves, and a putative saturation effect was found for tumor pressures larger than 3 mm Hg. This is the first noninvasive approach to determine TIFP values in tumors. This technique can provide a potentially promising noninvasive assessment of TIFP and, therefore, can be used to determine the TIFP before treatment approach as well to measure therapeutic efficacy highlighted by lowered TFP values. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Scanning Acoustic Microscopy—A Novel Noninvasive Method to Determine Tumor Interstitial Fluid Pressure in a Xenograft Tumor Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Hofmann

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Elevated tumor interstitial fluid pressure (TIFP is a prominent feature of solid tumors and hampers the transmigration of therapeutic macromolecules, for example, large monoclonal antibodies, from tumor-supplying vessels into the tumor interstitium. TIFP values of up to 40 mm Hg have been measured in experimental solid tumors using two conventional invasive techniques: the wick-in-needle and the micropuncture technique. We propose a novel noninvasive method of determining TIFP via ultrasonic investigation with scanning acoustic microscopy at 30-MHz frequency. In our experimental setup, we observed for the impedance fluctuations in the outer tumor hull of A431-vulva carcinoma–derived tumor xenograft mice. The gain dependence of signal strength was quantified, and the relaxation of tissue was calibrated with simultaneous hydrostatic pressure measurements. Signal patterns from the acoustical images were translated into TIFP curves, and a putative saturation effect was found for tumor pressures larger than 3 mm Hg. This is the first noninvasive approach to determine TIFP values in tumors. This technique can provide a potentially promising noninvasive assessment of TIFP and, therefore, can be used to determine the TIFP before treatment approach as well to measure therapeutic efficacy highlighted by lowered TFP values.

  10. AMG 900, a potent inhibitor of aurora kinases causes pharmacodynamic changes in p-Histone H3 immunoreactivity in human tumor xenografts and proliferating mouse tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan, Gloria; Bush, Tammy L; Ma, Connie; Manoukian, Raffi; Chung, Grace; Hawkins, Jennifer M; Zoog, Stephen; Kendall, Richard; Radinsky, Robert; Loberg, Robert; Friberg, Greg; Payton, Marc

    2014-11-04

    The Aurora family of serine-threonine kinases are essential regulators of cell division in mammalian cells. Aurora-A and -B expression and kinase activity is elevated in a variety of human cancers and is associated with high proliferation rates and poor prognosis. AMG 900 is a highly potent and selective pan-aurora kinase inhibitor that has entered clinical evaluation in adult patients with advanced cancers. In mice, oral administration of AMG 900 blocks the phosphorylation of histone H3 on serine-10 (p-Histone H3), a proximal substrate of aurora-B and inhibits the growth of multiple human tumor xenografts, including multidrug-resistant models. In order to establish a preclinical pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) relationship for AMG 900 that could be translated to the clinic, we used flow cytometry and laser scanning cytometry detection platforms to assess the effects on p-Histone H3 inhibition in terms of sensitivity, precision, and specificity, in human tumor xenografts in conjunction with mouse skin and bone marrow tissues. Mice with established COLO 205 tumors were administered AMG 900 at 3.75, 7.5, and 15 mg/kg and assessed after 3 hours. Significant suppression of p-Histone H3 in mouse skin was only observed at 15 mg/kg (p Histone H3 in tumors and surrogate tissues (although tissues such as skin may be less sensitive for assessing PD effects). To further extend our work, we evaluated the feasibility of measuring p-Histone H3 using fine-needle aspirate (FNA) tumor xenograft biopsies. Treatment with AMG 900 significantly inhibited p-Histone H3 (>99% inhibition, p Histone H3 positive cells using mock FNAs from primary human breast tumor tissues. Phosphorylation of histone H3 is a useful biomarker to determine the pharmacodynamics (PD) activity of AMG 900. FNA biopsies may be a viable approach for assessing AMG 900 PD effects in the clinic.

  11. Antibody directed against human YKL-40 increases tumor volume in a human melanoma xenograft model in scid mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salamon, Johannes; Hoffmann, Tatjana; Elies, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Induced overexpression of the secretory protein YKL-40 promotes tumor growth in xenograft experiments. We investigated if targeting YKL-40 with a monoclonal antibody could inhibit tumor growth. YKL-40 expressing human melanoma cells (LOX) were injected subcutenously in Balb/c scid mice. Animals...

  12. DADS Suppresses Human Esophageal Xenograft Tumors through RAF/MEK/ERK and Mitochondria-Dependent Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoran Yin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Diallyl disulfide (DADS is a natural organosulfur compound isolated from garlic. DADS has various biological properties, including anticancer, antiangiogenic, and antioxidant effects. However, the anticancer mechanisms of DADS in human esophageal carcinoma have not been elucidated, especially in vivo. In this study, MTT assay showed that DADS significantly reduced cell viability in human esophageal carcinoma ECA109 cells, but was relatively less toxic in normal liver cells. The pro–apoptotic effect of DADS on ECA109 cells was detected by Annexin V-FITC/propidium iodide (PI staining. Flow cytometry analysis showed that DADS promoted apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner and the apoptosis rate could be decreased by caspase-3 inhibitor Ac-DEVD-CHO. Xenograft study in nude mice showed that DADS treatment inhibited the growth of ECA109 tumor in both 20 and 40 mg/kg DADS groups without obvious side effects. DADS inhibited ECA109 tumor proliferation by down-regulating proliferation cell nuclear antigen (PCNA. DADS induced apoptosis by activating a mitochondria-dependent pathway with the executor of caspase-3, increasing p53 level and Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, and downregulating the RAF/MEK/ERK pathway in ECA109 xenograft tumosr. Based on studies in cell culture and animal models, the findings here indicate that DADS is an effective and safe anti-cancer agent for esophageal carcinoma.

  13. Calcium antagonist radioprotectors do not reduce radiotherapeutic efficacy in three human tumor xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Floersheim, G.L. [Dept. of Research, Univ. Hospitals, Basel (Switzerland); Racine, C. [Dept. of Research, Univ. Hospitals, Basel (Switzerland)

    1995-07-01

    One Ewing`s sarcoma and 2 colon carcinomas were grown as xenografts in immunosuppressed mice. The mice were treated with diltiazem, nifedipine, nimodipine and nitrendipine. The effect of whole body {gamma}-radiation on the growth of the subcutaneously implanted tumors was assessed. Growth delay or regression of the tumors in mice treated with the calcium antagonists prior to irradiation was not reduced as compared to only irradiated controls. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ein Ewings-Sarkom und zwei Kolonkarzinome wurden als Xenotransplantate in immunsupprimierten Maeusen zum Wachstum gebracht. Zu den Pruefsubstanzen gehoerten Diltiazem, Nifedipin, Nimodipin und Nitrendipin. Beurteilt wurde der Effekt von {gamma}-Ganzkoerperbestrahlung auf das Wachstum der subkutan transplantierten Tumoren. Die Wachstumsverzoegerung oder Rueckbildung der transplantierten Tumoren durch die Bestrahlung wurde durch Vorbehandlung der Maeuse mit Calciumantagonisten im Vergleich zu nur bestrahlten Tieren nicht vermindert. (orig.)

  14. Genetic and Genomic Characterization of 462 Melanoma Patient-Derived Xenografts, Tumor Biopsies, and Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley Garman

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Tumor-sequencing studies have revealed the widespread genetic diversity of melanoma. Sequencing of 108 genes previously implicated in melanomagenesis was performed on 462 patient-derived xenografts (PDXs, cell lines, and tumors to identify mutational and copy number aberrations. Samples came from 371 unique individuals: 263 were naive to treatment, and 108 were previously treated with targeted therapy (34, immunotherapy (54, or both (20. Models of all previously reported major melanoma subtypes (BRAF, NRAS, NF1, KIT, and WT/WT/WT were identified. Multiple minor melanoma subtypes were also recapitulated, including melanomas with multiple activating mutations in the MAPK-signaling pathway and chromatin-remodeling gene mutations. These well-characterized melanoma PDXs and cell lines can be used not only as reagents for a large array of biological studies but also as pre-clinical models to facilitate drug development.

  15. Effect of grape procyanidins on tumor angiogenesis in liver cancer xenograft models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Li-Li; Liu, Bing-Xia; Zhong, Jin-Yi; Sun, Li-Bin; Yu, Hong-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    In recent years a wide variety of flavonoids or polyphenolic substances have been reported to possess substantial anti-carcinogenic and antimutagenic activities. Grape proanthocyanidins (GPC) are considered as good examples for which there is evidence of potential roles as anti-carcinogenic agents. A xenograft model was established using H22 cells subcutaneously injected into mice and used to assess different concentrations of grape proanthocyanidins (GPC) and Endostar. Treatments were maintained for 10 days, then levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and microvessel density (MVD) were examined by immunohistochemistry, while VEGF mRNA was determined by real-time PCR in tumor tissue. The expression of MVD and VEGF decreased gradually as the concentration of GPC increased.There was a significant positive correlation between MVD and VEGF. These results suggest that GPC restrains the growth of tumor, possibly by inhibiting tumour angiogenesis.

  16. Loss of Tumor Suppressor Merlin in Advanced Breast Cancer Is due to Post-translational Regulation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, K. Adam; Das, Shamik; Metge, Brandon J.; Ye, Keqiang; Mulekar, Madhuri S.; Tucker, J. Allan; Samant, Rajeev S.; Shevde, Lalita A.

    2011-01-01

    Unlike malignancies of the nervous system, there have been no mutations identified in Merlin in breast cancer. As such, the role of the tumor suppressor, Merlin, has not been investigated in breast cancer. We assessed Merlin expression in breast cancer tissues by immunohistochemistry and by real-time PCR. The expression of Merlin protein (assessed immunohistochemically) was significantly decreased in breast cancer tissues (although the transcript levels were comparable) simultaneous with increased expression of the tumor-promoting protein, osteopontin (OPN). We further demonstrate that the loss of Merlin in breast cancer is brought about, in part, due to OPN-initiated Akt-mediated phosphorylation of Merlin leading to its proteasomal degradation. Restoring expression of Merlin resulted in reduced malignant attributes of breast cancer, characterized by reduced invasion, migration, motility, and impeded tumor (xenograft) growth in immunocompromised mice. The possibility of developing a model using the relationship between OPN and Merlin was tested with a logistic regression model applied to immunohistochemistry data. This identified consistent loss of immunohistochemical expression of Merlin in breast tumor tissues. Thus, we demonstrate for the first time a role for Merlin in impeding breast malignancy, identify a novel mechanism for the loss of Merlin protein in breast cancer, and have developed a discriminatory model using Merlin and OPN expression in breast tumor tissues. PMID:21965655

  17. Loss of tumor suppressor Merlin in advanced breast cancer is due to post-translational regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, K Adam; Das, Shamik; Metge, Brandon J; Ye, Keqiang; Mulekar, Madhuri S; Tucker, J Allan; Samant, Rajeev S; Shevde, Lalita A

    2011-11-18

    Unlike malignancies of the nervous system, there have been no mutations identified in Merlin in breast cancer. As such, the role of the tumor suppressor, Merlin, has not been investigated in breast cancer. We assessed Merlin expression in breast cancer tissues by immunohistochemistry and by real-time PCR. The expression of Merlin protein (assessed immunohistochemically) was significantly decreased in breast cancer tissues (although the transcript levels were comparable) simultaneous with increased expression of the tumor-promoting protein, osteopontin (OPN). We further demonstrate that the loss of Merlin in breast cancer is brought about, in part, due to OPN-initiated Akt-mediated phosphorylation of Merlin leading to its proteasomal degradation. Restoring expression of Merlin resulted in reduced malignant attributes of breast cancer, characterized by reduced invasion, migration, motility, and impeded tumor (xenograft) growth in immunocompromised mice. The possibility of developing a model using the relationship between OPN and Merlin was tested with a logistic regression model applied to immunohistochemistry data. This identified consistent loss of immunohistochemical expression of Merlin in breast tumor tissues. Thus, we demonstrate for the first time a role for Merlin in impeding breast malignancy, identify a novel mechanism for the loss of Merlin protein in breast cancer, and have developed a discriminatory model using Merlin and OPN expression in breast tumor tissues.

  18. Reproducibility study of [{sup 18}F]FPP(RGD){sub 2} uptake in murine models of human tumor xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Edwin; Liu, Shuangdong; Chin, Frederick; Cheng, Zhen [Stanford University, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Gowrishankar, Gayatri; Yaghoubi, Shahriar [Stanford University, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Stanford University, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Bioengineering, School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Wedgeworth, James Patrick [Stanford University, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Bioengineering, School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Berndorff, Dietmar; Gekeler, Volker [Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Global Drug Discovery, Berlin (Germany); Gambhir, Sanjiv S. [Stanford University, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Stanford University, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Bioengineering, School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Canary Center at Stanford for Cancer Early Detection, Nuclear Medicine, Departments of Radiology and Bioengineering, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2011-04-15

    An {sup 18}F-labeled PEGylated arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) dimer [{sup 18}F]FPP(RGD){sub 2} has been used to image tumor {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} integrin levels in preclinical and clinical studies. Serial positron emission tomography (PET) studies may be useful for monitoring antiangiogenic therapy response or for drug screening; however, the reproducibility of serial scans has not been determined for this PET probe. The purpose of this study was to determine the reproducibility of the integrin {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3}-targeted PET probe, [{sup 18}F ]FPP(RGD){sub 2} using small animal PET. Human HCT116 colon cancer xenografts were implanted into nude mice (n = 12) in the breast and scapular region and grown to mean diameters of 5-15 mm for approximately 2.5 weeks. A 3-min acquisition was performed on a small animal PET scanner approximately 1 h after administration of [{sup 18}F]FPP(RGD){sub 2} (1.9-3.8 MBq, 50-100 {mu}Ci) via the tail vein. A second small animal PET scan was performed approximately 6 h later after reinjection of the probe to assess for reproducibility. Images were analyzed by drawing an ellipsoidal region of interest (ROI) around the tumor xenograft activity. Percentage injected dose per gram (%ID/g) values were calculated from the mean or maximum activity in the ROIs. Coefficients of variation and differences in %ID/g values between studies from the same day were calculated to determine the reproducibility. The coefficient of variation (mean {+-}SD) for %ID{sub mean}/g and %ID{sub max}/g values between [{sup 18}F]FPP(RGD){sub 2} small animal PET scans performed 6 h apart on the same day were 11.1 {+-} 7.6% and 10.4 {+-} 9.3%, respectively. The corresponding differences in %ID{sub mean}/g and %ID{sub max}/g values between scans were -0.025 {+-} 0.067 and -0.039 {+-} 0.426. Immunofluorescence studies revealed a direct relationship between extent of {alpha}{sub {nu}}{beta}{sub 3} integrin expression in tumors and tumor vasculature

  19. [Arsenic trioxide restores ERα expression in ERα-negative human breast cancer cells and its treatment efficacy in combination with tamoxifen in xenografts in nude mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei-jie; Xu, Deng-fei; Fan, Qing-xia; Wu, Xin-ai; Wang, Feng; Wang, Rui; Wang, Liu-xing

    2012-09-01

    To study the demethylation effect of arsenic trioxide (As2O3) on ERα-negative human breast cancer MDA-MB-435s cells and its possible mechanisms, and to observe its treatment efficacy in combination with tamoxifen (TAM) after ERα re-expression. MTT assay was used to examine the inhibitory effect of As2O3 treatment alone or in combination with TAM on cell proliferation. A nude mouse xenograft model was used to further examine the treatment efficacy in vivo. MSP was used to detect the methylation status of ERα gene after treated with As2O3 in MDA-MB-435s cells and the transplanted tumor tissues. RT-PCR was used to detect the mRNA expression of DNMT1 and Erα. Western bolt was used to detect the DNMT1 and ERα protein expression. The diameter of xenograft tumors was measured weekly, and the tumor growth curve was drawn. The level of proliferation of the MDA-MB-435s cells was significantly suppressed after treatment with different concentration of As2O3 alone or As2O3 combined with TAM, and the 4 µmol/L As2O3 + TAM treatment for 72 h showed the highest inhibition rate (62.6%). 1, 2, 4 µmol/L As2O3 had demethylation effect on MDA-MB-435s cells, and the DNMT1 mRNA and protein expression was inhibited and accompanied by ERα mRNA and protein re-expression. The unmethylation specific bands of ERα gene were enhanced after treated by As2O3 alone or As2O3 combined with TAM in the xenograft tumors. The expression of DNMT1 mRNA and protein was inhibited, and accompanied by ERα mRNA and protein re-expression. An significant decrease of volume and weight of the xenograft tumors in the As2O3 treated alone or combined with TAM groups was observed compared with those of the normal saline group or TAM alone group (P breast cancer MDA-MB-435s cells after treated with As2O3 by inhibiting the DNMT1 activity. MDA-MB-435s cells are re-sensitized to endocrine therapy after ERα re-expression. As2O3 combined with TAM may provide a new therapeutic approach for patients with ER

  20. A human colon adenocarcinoma xenograft--radiation response, cellular composition, and tumor disaggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, C M; Keng, P C; Siemann, D W; Sutherland, R M

    1987-02-01

    The human colon adenocarcinoma cell line WiDr was xenografted and the tumor characterized. When athymic mice (NCR-nu) were inoculated with 10(6) cells, tumors appeared after 7-14 days with a 93-100% take rate and grew with an initial volume-doubling time of around 6 days. For optimizing the tumor disaggregation method, a comparison was made of two dissociation procedures and of different dissociation times. An enzyme cocktail (collagenase, DNase, pronase) resulted in total viable cell yields of 1-3 X 10(7) cells/g tumor tissue. Cell yield decreased with increasing tumor weight. Disaggregation with trypsin gave lower cell yields; and so, although the plating efficiencies (PEs) were higher, the enzyme cocktail was chosen for tumor disaggregation. On the basis of morphologic identification, cell suspensions prepared from WiDr tumors, by use of the enzyme cocktail for 2 hours, contained 49% malignant cells as well as a significant fraction of nonneoplastic cells. The major nonneoplastic host cell component was macrophage (33%); lymphocytes (13%) and granulocytes (5%) also were present. Host cells could be separated from neoplastic cells by centrifugal elutriation. By mixing various proportions of host and tumor cells, it was subsequently shown that the presence of host cells did not influence the malignant cell PE unless the cell suspensions contained greater than 90% host cells. Single-cell suspensions prepared from WiDr tumors, with use of the enzyme cocktail for 2 hours, were irradiated and then plated for survival (D0 = 1.5 Gy; n = 5) (D0, the 37% dose slope). A comparison was made of the sensitivity to radiation, after the different dissociation methods. The radiation sensitivities after 1.5-hour trypsinization and 2- and 6-hour enzyme cocktail administrations were similar, but after 0.5 hour of trypsin, the cells were more sensitive to radiation.

  1. Tumor-Associated Macrophages Promote Malignant Progression of Breast Phyllodes Tumors by Inducing Myofibroblast Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Yan; Chen, Jianing; Huang, Di; Yao, Yandan; Chen, Jiewen; Ding, Lin; Zeng, Jiayi; Su, Shicheng; Chao, Xue; Su, Fengxi; Yao, Herui; Hu, Hai; Song, Erwei

    2017-07-01

    Myofibroblast differentiation plays an important role in the malignant progression of phyllodes tumor, a fast-growing neoplasm derived from periductal stromal cells of the breast. Macrophages are frequently found in close proximity with myofibroblasts, but it is uncertain whether they are involved in the myofibroblast differentiation during phyllodes tumor progression. Here we show that increased density of tumor-associated macrophage (TAM) correlates with malignant progression of phyllodes tumor. We found that TAMs stimulated myofibroblast differentiation and promoted the proliferation and invasion of phyllodes tumor cells. Furthermore, we found that levels of the chemokine CCL18 in TAM was an independent prognostic factor of phyllodes tumor. Mechanistic investigations showed that CCL18 promoted expression of α-smooth muscle actin, a hallmark of myofibroblast, along with the proliferation and invasion of phyllodes tumor cells, and that CCL18-driven myofibroblast differentiation was mediated by an NF-κB/miR-21/PTEN/AKT signaling axis. In murine xenograft models of human phyllodes tumor, CCL18 accelerated tumor growth, induced myofibroblast differentiation, and promoted metastasis. Taken together, our findings indicated that TAM drives myofibroblast differentiation and malignant progression of phyllodes tumor through a CCL18-driven signaling cascade amenable to antibody disruption. Cancer Res; 77(13); 3605-18. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  2. Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Therapeutic Targets Revealed by Tumor-Stroma Cross-Talk Analyses in Patient-Derived Xenografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rémy Nicolle

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Preclinical models based on patient-derived xenografts have remarkable specificity in distinguishing transformed human tumor cells from non-transformed murine stromal cells computationally. We obtained 29 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC xenografts from either resectable or non-resectable patients (surgery and endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspirate, respectively. Extensive multiomic profiling revealed two subtypes with distinct clinical outcomes. These subtypes uncovered specific alterations in DNA methylation and transcription as well as in signaling pathways involved in tumor-stromal cross-talk. The analysis of these pathways indicates therapeutic opportunities for targeting both compartments and their interactions. In particular, we show that inhibiting NPC1L1 with Ezetimibe, a clinically available drug, might be an efficient approach for treating pancreatic cancers. These findings uncover the complex and diverse interplay between PDAC tumors and the stroma and demonstrate the pivotal role of xenografts for drug discovery and relevance to PDAC.

  3. Comprehensive Quantitative Analysis of Ovarian and Breast Cancer Tumor Peptidomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zhe; Wu, Chaochao; Xie, Fang; Slysz, Gordon W.; Tolic, Nikola; Monroe, Matthew E.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Payne, Samuel H.; Fujimoto, Grant M.; Moore, Ronald J.; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Levine, Douglas; Townsend, Reid; Davies, Sherri; Li, Shunqiang; Ellis, Matthew; Boja, Emily; Rivers, Robert; Rodriguez, Henry; Rodland, Karin D.; Liu, Tao; Smith, Richard D.

    2015-01-02

    Aberrant degradation of proteins is associated with many pathological states, including cancers. Mass spectrometric analysis of tumor peptidomes, the intracellular and intercellular products of protein degradation, has the potential to provide biological insights on proteolytic processing in cancer. However, attempts to use the information on these smaller protein degradation products from tumors for biomarker discovery and cancer biology studies have been fairly limited to date, largely due to the lack of effective approaches for robust peptidomics identification and quantification, and the prevalence of confounding factors and biases associated with sample handling and processing. Herein, we have developed an effective and robust analytical platform for comprehensive analyses of tissue peptidomes, which is suitable for high throughput quantitative studies. The reproducibility and coverage of the platform, as well as the suitability of clinical ovarian tumor and patient-derived breast tumor xenograft samples with post-excision delay of up to 60 min before freezing for peptidomics analysis, have been demonstrated. Moreover, our data also show that the peptidomics profiles can effectively separate breast cancer subtypes, reflecting tumor-associated protease activities. Peptidomics complements results obtainable from conventional bottom-up proteomics, and provides insights not readily obtainable from such approaches.

  4. Patient-derived Xenograft (PDX) Models In Basic and Translational Breast Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrolecki, Lacey E.; Airhart, Susie D.; Alferez, Denis G.; Aparicio, Samuel; Behbod, Fariba; Bentires-Alj, Mohamed; Brisken, Cathrin; Bult, Carol J.; Cai, Shirong; Clarke, Robert B.; Dowst, Heidi; Ellis, Matthew J.; Gonzalez-Suarez, Eva; Iggo, Richard D.; Kabos, Peter; Li, Shunqiang; Lindeman, Geoffrey J.; Marangoni, Elisabetta; McCoy, Aaron; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Piwnica-Worms, Helen; Poupon, Marie-France; Reis-Filho, Jorge; Sartorius, Carol A.; Scabia, Valentina; Sflomos, George; Tu, Yizheng; Vaillant, François; Visvader, Jane E.; Welm, Alana; Wicha, Max S.

    2017-01-01

    Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models of a growing spectrum of cancers are rapidly supplanting long-established traditional cell lines as preferred models for conducting basic and translational pre-clinical research. In breast cancer, to complement the now curated collection of approximately 45 long-established human breast cancer cell lines, a newly formed consortium of academic laboratories, currently from Europe, Australia, and North America, herein summarizes data on over 500 stably transplantable PDX models representing all three clinical subtypes of breast cancer (ER+, HER2+, and “Triple-negative” (TNBC)). Many of these models are well-characterized with respect to genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic features, metastatic behavior, and treatment response to a variety of standard-of-care and experimental therapeutics. These stably transplantable PDX lines are generally available for dissemination to laboratories conducting translational research, and contact information for each collection is provided. This review summarizes current experiences related to PDX generation across participating groups, efforts to develop data standards for annotation and dissemination of patient clinical information that does not compromise patient privacy, efforts to develop complementary data standards for annotation of PDX characteristics and biology, and progress toward “credentialing” of PDX models as surrogates to represent individual patients for use in pre-clinical and co-clinical translational research. In addition, this review highlights important unresolved questions, as well as current limitations, that have hampered more efficient generation of PDX lines and more rapid adoption of PDX use in translational breast cancer research. PMID:28025748

  5. Interleukin-12 Inhibits Tumor Growth in a Novel Angiogenesis Canine Hemangiosarcoma Xenograft Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasim Akhtar

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available We established a canine hemangiosarcoma cell line derived from malignant endothelial cells comprising a spontaneous tumor in a dog to provide a renewable source of endothelial cells for studies of angiogenesis in malignancy. Pieces of the hemangiosarcoma biopsy were engrafted subcutaneously in a bg/nu/XID mouse allowing the tumor cells to expand in vivo. A cell line, SB-HSA, was derived from the xenograft. SB-HSA cells expressed vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF receptors 1 and 2, CD31, CD146, and αvβ3 integrin, and produced several growth factors and cytokines, including VEGF, basic fibroblast growth factor, and interleukin (IL-8 that are stimulatory to endothelial cell growth. These results indicated that the cells recapitulated features of mitotically activated endothelia. In vivo, SB-HSA cells stimulated robust angiogenic responses in mice and formed tumor masses composed of aberrant vascular channels in immunocompromised mice providing novel opportunities for investigating the effectiveness of antiangiogenic agents. Using this model, we determined that IL-12, a cytokine with both immunostimulatory and antiangiogenic effects, suppressed angiogenesis induced by, and tumor growth of, SB-HSA cells. The endothelial cell model we have described offers unique opportunities to pursue further investigations with IL-12, as well as other antiangiogenic approaches in cancer therapy.

  6. Interleukin-12 Inhibits Tumor Growth in a Novel Angiogenesis Canine Hemangiosarcoma Xenograft Model1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerson, Erin B; Steinberg, Howard; Breen, Matthew; Auerbach, Robert; Helfand, Stuart C

    2004-01-01

    Abstract We established a canine hemangiosarcoma cell line derived from malignant endothelial cells comprising a spontaneous tumor in a dog to provide a renewable source of endothelial cells for studies of angiogenesis in malignancy. Pieces of the hemangiosarcoma biopsy were engrafted subcutaneously in a bg/nu/XID mouse allowing the tumor cells to expand in vivo. A cell line, SB-HSA, was derived from the xenograft. SB-HSA cells expressed vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptors 1 and 2, CD31, CD146, and αvβ3 integrin, and produced several growth factors and cytokines, including VEGF, basic fibroblast growth factor, and interleukin (IL)-8 that are stimulatory to endothelial cell growth. These results indicated that the cells recapitulated features of mitotically activated endothelia. In vivo, SB-HSA cells stimulated robust angiogenic responses in mice and formed tumor masses composed of aberrant vascular channels in immunocompromised mice providing novel opportunities for investigating the effectiveness of antiangiogenic agents. Using this model, we determined that IL-12, a cytokine with both immunostimulatory and antiangiogenic effects, suppressed angiogenesis induced by, and tumor growth of, SB-HSA cells. The endothelial cell model we have described offers unique opportunities to pursue further investigations with IL-12, as well as other antiangiogenic approaches in cancer therapy. PMID:15140399

  7. Macroscopic stiffness of breast tumors predicts metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenner, Joseph; Stacer, Amanda C; Winterroth, Frank; Johnson, Timothy D; Luker, Kathryn E; Luker, Gary D

    2014-07-01

    Mechanical properties of tumors differ substantially from normal cells and tissues. Changes in stiffness or elasticity regulate pro-metastatic behaviors of cancer cells, but effects have been documented predominantly in isolated cells or in vitro cell culture systems. To directly link relative stiffness of tumors to cancer progression, we combined a mouse model of metastatic breast cancer with ex vivo measurements of bulk moduli of freshly excised, intact tumors. We found a high, inverse correlation between bulk modulus of resected tumors and subsequent local recurrence and metastasis. More compliant tumors were associated with more frequent, larger local recurrences and more extensive metastases than mice with relatively stiff tumors. We found that collagen content of resected tumors correlated with bulk modulus values. These data establish that relative differences in tumor stiffness correspond with tumor progression and metastasis, supporting further testing and development of tumor compliance as a prognostic biomarker in breast cancer.

  8. Clinically relevant doses of candesartan inhibit growth of prostate tumor xenografts in vivo through modulation of tumor angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhusban, Ahmed; Al-Azayzih, Ahmad; Goc, Anna; Gao, Fei; Fagan, Susan C; Somanath, Payaningal R

    2014-09-01

    Angiotensin II receptor type 1 blockers (ARBs), widely used antihypertensive drugs, have also been investigated for their anticancer effects. The effect of ARBs on prostate cancer in experimental models compared with meta-analysis data from clinical trials is conflicting. Whereas this discrepancy might be due to the use of supratherapeutic doses of ARBs in cellular and animal models as compared with the clinical doses used in human trials, further investigation of the effects of clinical doses of ARBs on prostate cancer in experimental models is warranted. In the current study, we sought to determine the effects of candesartan on prostate cancer cellular function in vitro and tumor growth in vivo, and characterize the underlying mechanisms. Our analysis indicated that clinically relevant doses of candesartan significantly inhibited growth of PC3 cell tumor xenografts in mice. Interestingly, the same concentrations of candesartan actually promoted prostate cancer cellular function in vitro, through a modest but significant inhibition in apoptosis. Inhibition of tumor growth by candesartan was associated with a decrease in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in tumors and inhibition of tumor angiogenesis, but normalization of tumor vasculature. Although candesartan did not impair PC3 cell viability, it inhibited endothelial-barrier disruption by tumor-derived factors. Furthermore, candesartan significantly inhibited expression of VEGF in PC3 and DU145 cell lines independent of angiotensin II type 2 receptor, but potentially via angiotensin II type 1 receptor inhibition. Our findings clearly demonstrate the therapeutic potential of candesartan for prostate cancer and establish a link between ARBs, VEGF expression, and prostate tumor angiogenesis. U.S. Government work not protected by U.S. copyright.

  9. Minocycline, a putative neuroprotectant, co-administered with doxorubicin-cyclophosphamide chemotherapy in a xenograft model of triple-negative breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himmel, Lauren E.; Lustberg, Maryam B.; DeVries, A. Courtney; Poi, Ming; Chen, Ching-Shih; Kulp, Samuel K.

    2016-01-01

    Minocycline is purported to have neuroprotective properties in experimental models of some human neurologic diseases, and has therefore been identified as a putative neuroprotectant for chemotherapy-induced cognitive impairment (CICI) in breast cancer patients. However, because its mechanism of action is believed to be mediated through anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, and anti-oxidant pathways, co-administration of minocycline with chemotherapeutic agents has the potential to reduce the efficacy of anticancer drugs. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of minocycline on the activity of the AC chemotherapeutic regimen (Adriamycin [doxorubicin], Cytoxan [cyclophosphamide]) in in vitro and in vivo models of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). Clonogenic and methylthiazol tetrazolium (MTT) assays were used to assess survival and viability in two TNBC cell lines treated with increasing concentrations of AC in the presence or absence of minocycline. Biomarkers of apoptosis, cell stress, and DNA damage were evaluated by western blot. The in vivo effects of AC and minocycline, each alone and in combination, were assessed in a xenograft model of TNBC in female athymic nude mice by weekly tumor volume measurement, body and organ weight measurement, and histopathology. Apoptosis and proliferation were characterized by immunohistochemistry in the xenografts tumors. Brains from tumor-bearing mice were evaluated for microglial activation, glial scars, and the proportion of neural progenitor cells. Data from these in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrate that minocycline does not diminish the cytotoxic and tumor-suppressive effects of this chemotherapeutic drug combination in TNBC cells. Moreover, minocycline appeared to prevent the reduction in doublecortin-positive neural progenitor cells observed in AC-treated mice. We posit that minocycline may be useful clinically for its reported neuroprotective activity in breast cancer patients receiving AC without

  10. Glycolysis-related gene induction and ATP reduction during fractionated irradiation. Markers for radiation responsiveness of human tumor xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goetze, K.; Meyer, S.S.; Mueller-Klieser, W. [University Medical Center Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Physiology and Pathophysiology; Yaromina, A. [Technical Univ. Dresden (Germany). OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology; Zips, D. [University Hospital Tuebingen (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Baumann, M. [Technical Univ. Dresden (Germany). OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology; University Hospital Dresden Technical Univ. Dresden (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2013-09-15

    Background and purpose: Lactate was previously shown to be a prognostic but not a predictive pre-therapeutic marker for radiation response of tumor xenografts. We hypothesize that metabolic changes during fractionated irradiation may restrict the predictiveness of lactate regarding tumor radiosensitivity. Materials and methods: Tumor xenografts were generated in nude mice by implanting 4 head and neck squamous cell carcinoma lines with different sensitivities to fractionated irradiation. Tumors were irradiated with up to 15 fractions of 2 Gy over a period of 3 weeks, and ATP and lactate levels were measured in vital tumor areas with induced metabolic bioluminescence imaging. Corresponding changes in mRNA expression of glycolysis-related genes were determined by quantitative RT-PCR. Results: Lactate content decreased significantly in 3 out of 4 cell lines in the course of irradiation showing no correlation with cell line-specific radiosensitivity. Radiation-induced changes in ATP levels and glycolysis-related mRNA expression, however, only occurred in radiosensitive or intermediately radioresistant xenografts, whereas these parameters remained unchanged in radioresistant tumors. Conclusion: Sensitivity-related differences in the transcriptional response of tumors to radiotherapy may be exploited in the clinic for better individualization of tumor treatment. (orig.)

  11. Chronic moderate ethanol intake differentially regulates vitamin D hydroxylases gene expression in kidneys and xenografted breast cancer cells in female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Quiroz, Janice; García-Becerra, Rocío; Lara-Sotelo, Galia; Avila, Euclides; López, Sofía; Santos-Martínez, Nancy; Halhali, Ali; Ordaz-Rosado, David; Barrera, David; Olmos-Ortiz, Andrea; Ibarra-Sánchez, María J; Esparza-López, José; Larrea, Fernando; Díaz, Lorenza

    2017-10-01

    Factors affecting vitamin D metabolism may preclude anti-carcinogenic effects of its active metabolite calcitriol. Chronic ethanol consumption is an etiological factor for breast cancer that affects vitamin D metabolism; however, the mechanisms underlying this causal association have not been fully clarified. Using a murine model, we examined the effects of chronic moderate ethanol intake on tumoral and renal CYP27B1 and CYP24A1 gene expression, the enzymes involved in calcitriol synthesis and inactivation, respectively. Ethanol (5% w/v) was administered to 25-hydroxyvitamin D 3 -treated or control mice during one month. Afterwards, human breast cancer cells were xenografted and treatments continued another month. Ethanol intake decreased renal Cyp27b1 while increased tumoral CYP24A1 gene expression.Treatment with 25-hydroxyvitamin D 3 significantly stimulated CYP27B1 in tumors of non-alcohol-drinking mice, while increased both renal and tumoral CYP24A1. Coadministration of ethanol and 25-hydroxyvitamin D 3 reduced in 60% renal 25-hydroxyvitamin D 3 -dependent Cyp24a1 upregulation (Pbody weight was higher in 25-hydroxyvitamin D 3 treated groups (Palcohol consumption is associated with vitamin D deficiency and increased breast cancer risk and progression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Intracerebral and subcutaneous xenografts of human sclc in the nude rat - comparison of monoclonal-antibody localization and tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bulte, J. W. M.; Go, K. Gwan; Zuiderveen, F.; The, T. Hauw; de Leij, Lou

    In the WAG/Rij nude rat, subcutaneous (s.c.) and intracerebral (i.c.) xenografts of the human SCLC cell line GLC-28 were evaluated for their growth behavior, in vivo monoclonal antibody binding and presence of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes. For the i.c. xenografts, two models of cerebral tumor

  13. Establishment and characterization of 7 novel hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines from patient-derived tumor xenografts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Xin

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is a common cancer with poor prognosis worldwide and the molecular mechanism is not well understood. This study aimed to establish a collection of human HCC cell lines from patient-derived xenograft (PDX models. From the 20 surgical HCC sample collections, 7 tumors were successfully developed in immunodeficient mice and further established 7 novel HCC cell lines (LIXC002, LIXC003, LIXC004, LIXC006, LIXC011, LIXC012 and CPL0903 by primary culture. The characterization of cell lines was defined by morphology, growth kinetics, cell cycle, chromosome analysis, short tandem repeat (STR analysis, molecular profile, and tumorigenicity. Additionally, response to clinical chemotherapeutics was validated both in vitro and in vivo. STR analysis indicated that all cell lines were unique cells different from known cell lines and free of contamination by bacteria or mycoplasma. The other findings were quite heterogeneous between individual lines. Chromosome aberration could be found in all cell lines. Alpha-fetoprotein was overexpressed only in 3 out of 7 cell lines. 4 cell lines expressed high level of vimentin. Ki67 was strongly stained in all cell lines. mRNA level of retinoic acid induced protein 3 (RAI3 was decreased in all cell lines. The 7 novel cell lines showed variable sensitivity to 8 tested compounds. LIXC011 and CPL0903 possessed multiple drug resistance property. Sorafenib inhibited xenograft tumor growth of LIXC006, but not of LIXC012. Our results indicated that the 7 novel cell lines with low passage maintaining their clinical and pathological characters could be good tools for further exploring the molecular mechanism of HCC and anti-cancer drug screening.

  14. Near-Infrared Fluorescence Imaging of Carbonic Anhydrase IX in Athymic Mice Bearing HT-29 Tumor Xenografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianbo Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF imaging technology is a highly sensitive imaging modality and has been widely used in noninvasively studying the status of receptor expression in small animal models, with an appropriate NIRF probe targeting a specific receptor. In this report, Cy5.5-conjugated anti-CAIX monoclonal antibody (Mab-Cy5.5 was evaluated in athymic mice bearing HT-29 tumor xenografts in order to investigate the effect of conjugate on tumor targeting efficacy. In vitro binding studies showed that Mab-Cy5.5 could specifically bind to the cells which expressed CAIX. Results from in vivo imaging showed that HT-29 tumor xenografts can be clearly visualized at 48 h after injection of Mab-Cy5.5, and in the blocking experiment, free anti-CAIX antibody effectively blocked the concentration of Mab-Cy5.5 in the tumors. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry analysis of HT-29 tumor xenografts verified the expression of CAIX in HT-29 tumors. Mab-Cy5.5 could specifically bind to the tumors which expressed CAIX. These results suggested that Mab-Cy5.5 was suitable for CAIX expression imaging in the preclinical research.

  15. Augmented reality for breast tumors visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaderi, Mohammad Ali; Heydarzadeh, Mehrdad; Nourani, Mehrdad; Gupta, Gopal; Tamil, Lakshman

    2016-08-01

    3D visualization of breast tumors are shown to be effective by previous studies. In this paper, we introduce a new augmented reality application that can help doctors and surgeons to have a more accurate visualization of breast tumors; this system uses a marker-based image-processing technique to render a 3D model of the tumors on the body. The model can be created using a combination of breast 3D mammography by experts. We have tested the system using an Android smartphone and a head-mounted device. This proof of concept can be useful for oncologists to have a more effective screening, and surgeons to plan the surgery.

  16. Ultrasonographic features of spontaneous breast tumor infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyeon Jeong; Kim, Sung Hun; Kang, Bong Joo; Lee, A Won; Song, Byung Joo; Kim, Hyen Sook; Cha, Eun Suk

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate the ultrasonographic features of spontaneous breast tumor infarction. The pathologic information system database of the Department of Radiology was retrospectively searched. Between 2009 and 2011, nine cases in eight patients were pathologically confirmed as spontaneous breast tumor infarctions. Mammographic images and the ultrasonographic images were acquired. Two other radiologists analyzed the mammographic and ultrasonographic findings. Most common features were oval, indistinct, heterogeneously hypoechoic mass with posterior enhancement. All lesions were classified as C4 (suspicious finding) except one case. Spontaneous breast tumor infarction should be included in the differential diagnoses of hetereogeneously hypoechoic suspicious solid lesions mimicking malignancy.

  17. Human xenografts are not rejected in a naturally occurring immunodeficient porcine line: a human tumor model in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basel, Matthew T; Balivada, Sivasai; Beck, Amanda P; Kerrigan, Maureen A; Pyle, Marla M; Dekkers, Jack C M; Wyatt, Carol R; Rowland, Robert R R; Anderson, David E; Bossmann, Stefan H; Troyer, Deryl L

    2012-04-01

    Animal models for cancer therapy are invaluable for preclinical testing of potential cancer treatments; however, therapies tested in such models often fail to translate into clinical settings. Therefore, a better preclinical model for cancer treatment testing is needed. Here we demonstrate that an immunodeficient line of pigs can host and support the growth of xenografted human tumors and has the potential to be an effective animal model for cancer therapy. Wild-type and immunodeficient pigs were injected subcutaneously in the left ear with human melanoma cells (A375SM cells) and in the right ear with human pancreatic carcinoma cells (PANC-1). All immunodeficient pigs developed tumors that were verified by histology and immunohistochemistry. Nonaffected littermates did not develop tumors. Immunodeficient pigs, which do not reject xenografted human tumors, have the potential to become an extremely useful animal model for cancer therapy because of their similarity in size, anatomy, and physiology to humans.

  18. Preclinical evaluation of new radioligand of cholecystokinin/gastrin receptors in endocrine tumors xenograft nude mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brillouet, S. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Institut Claudius Regaud, Toulouse (France) and Inserm U563, Therapeutic Innovation and Molecular Oncologic Department, Institut Claudius Regaud, Toulouse (France)]. E-mail: brillouet.severine@claudiusregaud.fr; Caselles, O. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Institut Claudius Regaud, Toulouse (France); Dierickx, L.O. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Institut Claudius Regaud, Toulouse (France); Mestre, B. [CNRS, LSPCMIB-UMR5068, Universite Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (France); Nalis, J. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Institut Claudius Regaud, Toulouse (France); Picard, C. [CNRS, LSPCMIB-UMR5068, Universite Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (France); Favre, G. [Inserm U563, Therapeutic Innovation and Molecular Oncologic Department, Institut Claudius Regaud, Toulouse (France); Poirot, M. [Inserm U563, Therapeutic Innovation and Molecular Oncologic Department, Institut Claudius Regaud, Toulouse (France); Silvente-Poirot, S. [Inserm U563, Therapeutic Innovation and Molecular Oncologic Department, Institut Claudius Regaud, Toulouse (France); Courbon, F. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Institut Claudius Regaud, Toulouse (France)

    2007-02-01

    The cholecystokinin(CCK)/gastrin 2 receptors (R-CCK2) are overexpressed in 90% of medullary thyroid cancers (MTC) and in 60% of small cell lung cancers but not or poorly in corresponding healthy tissues. They represent a relevant target for the diagnosis and internal targeted radiotherapy of these tumors. Although previous studies have demonstrated the feasibility of radiolabeled CCK/gastrin to target CCK-2 receptor-expressing tissues in animals and patients, some problems remained unsolved to identify an optimum candidate for in vivo targeting of R-CCK2-expressing tumors. By a rational approach and 'in silico' drug design, we synthesized a new CCK-derivative with high affinity for the R-CCK2. The aim of this study was to achieve the radiolabeling of a new radioligand, to assess its efficacy using a published CCK radioligand ({sup 111}In-DTPA-CCK8) as a control for the R-CCK2 targeting. This new CCK-derivative was radiolabeled with {sup 111}In. Nude mice, bearing the human MTC TT tumors and NIH-3T3 cell line expressing a tumorigenic mutant of the R-CCK2, were injected with this radiolabeled peptide. In vivo planar scintigraphies were acquired. Thereafter, biodistribution studies (%ID/g tissue) were done. The conditions of radiolabelling were optimized to obtain a radiochemical purity >90%. Scintigraphic images of xenograft mice showed significant tumor uptake with a target to nontarget ratio higher than two. These results were confirmed by the biodistribution studies which showed as expected a significant activity in the spleen, the liver and the kidneys. Therefore, this new radiolabeled compound is a promised new candidate for molecular imaging and internal radiotherapy for R-CCK2 tumor targeting.

  19. Preclinical evaluation of new radioligand of cholecystokinin/gastrin receptors in endocrine tumors xenograft nude mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brillouet, S.; Caselles, O.; Dierickx, L. O.; Mestre, B.; Nalis, J.; Picard, C.; Favre, G.; Poirot, M.; Silvente-Poirot, S.; Courbon, F.

    2007-02-01

    The cholecystokinin(CCK)/gastrin 2 receptors (R-CCK2) are overexpressed in 90% of medullary thyroid cancers (MTC) and in 60% of small cell lung cancers but not or poorly in corresponding healthy tissues. They represent a relevant target for the diagnosis and internal targeted radiotherapy of these tumors. Although previous studies have demonstrated the feasibility of radiolabeled CCK/gastrin to target CCK-2 receptor-expressing tissues in animals and patients, some problems remained unsolved to identify an optimum candidate for in vivo targeting of R-CCK2-expressing tumors. By a rational approach and " in silico" drug design, we synthesized a new CCK-derivative with high affinity for the R-CCK2. The aim of this study was to achieve the radiolabeling of a new radioligand, to assess its efficacy using a published CCK radioligand ( 111In-DTPA-CCK8) as a control for the R-CCK2 targeting. This new CCK-derivative was radiolabeled with 111In. Nude mice, bearing the human MTC TT tumors and NIH-3T3 cell line expressing a tumorigenic mutant of the R-CCK2, were injected with this radiolabeled peptide. In vivo planar scintigraphies were acquired. Thereafter, biodistribution studies (%ID/g tissue) were done. The conditions of radiolabelling were optimized to obtain a radiochemical purity >90%. Scintigraphic images of xenograft mice showed significant tumor uptake with a target to nontarget ratio higher than two. These results were confirmed by the biodistribution studies which showed as expected a significant activity in the spleen, the liver and the kidneys. Therefore, this new radiolabeled compound is a promised new candidate for molecular imaging and internal radiotherapy for R-CCK2 tumor targeting.

  20. Progesterone receptor membrane component 1 deficiency attenuates growth while promoting chemosensitivity of human endometrial xenograft tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friel, Anne M; Zhang, Ling; Pru, Cindy A; Clark, Nicole C; McCallum, Melissa L; Blok, Leen J; Shioda, Toshi; Peluso, John J; Rueda, Bo R; Pru, James K

    2015-01-28

    Endometrial cancer is the leading gynecologic cancer in women in the United States with 52,630 women predicted to be diagnosed with the disease in 2014. The objective of this study was to determine if progesterone (P4) receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1) influenced endometrial cancer cell viability in response to chemotherapy in vitro and in vivo. A lentiviral-based shRNA knockdown approach was used to generate stable PGRMC1-intact and PGRMC1-deplete Ishikawa endometrial cancer cell lines that also lacked expression of the classical progesterone receptor (PGR). Progesterone treatment inhibited mitosis of PGRMC1-intact, but not PGRMC1-deplete cells, suggesting that PGRMC1 mediates the anti-mitotic actions of P4. To test the hypothesis that PGRMC1 attenuates chemotherapy-induced apoptosis, PGRMC1-intact and PGRMC1-deplete cells were treated in vitro with vehicle, P4 (1 µM), doxorubicin (Dox, 2 µg/ml), or P4 + Dox for 48 h. Doxorubicin treatment of PGRMC1-intact cells resulted in a significant increase in cell death; however, co-treatment with P4 significantly attenuated Dox-induced cell death. This response to P4 was lost in PGRMC1-deplete cells. To extend these observations in vivo, a xenograft model was employed where PGRMC1-intact and PGRMC1-deplete endometrial tumors were generated following subcutaneous and intraperitoneal inoculation of immunocompromised NOD/SCID and nude mice, respectively. Tumors derived from PGRMC1-deplete cells grew slower than tumors from PGRMC1-intact cells. Mice harboring endometrial tumors were then given three treatments of vehicle (1:1 cremophor EL: ethanol + 0.9% saline) or chemotherapy [Paclitaxel (15 mg/kg, i.p.) followed after an interval of 30 minutes by CARBOplatin (50 mg/kg)] at five day intervals. In response to chemotherapy, tumor volume decreased approximately four-fold more in PGRMC1-deplete tumors when compared with PGRMC1-intact control tumors, suggesting that PGRMC1 promotes tumor cell viability

  1. Protective Effect of Perindopril on Tumor Progression and Angiogenesis in Animal Model of Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Snehal S; Nakka, Surender

    2017-01-01

    Studies have shown that the renin angiotensin system via angiogenesis is involved in tumor development. Therefore, objective of the present study was to examine the effect of perindopril on tumor growth and angiogenesis in animal models of breast cancer. In the present study, the effect of perindopril on tumor development of mammary gland cancer induced by 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene, mouse tumor xenograft and corneal micropocket model has been investigated. Anti-angiogenic effect by chick yolk sac membrane assay has also been studied. In the present study, it has been found that perindopril produced a significant inhibition of tumor growth, in DMBA induced breast cancer. Treatment also produced significant suppression of cancer biomarkers such as lactate dehydrogenase, gamma glutamyl transferase and inflammatory markers such as C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Histopathological analysis also showed that perindopril was able to inhibit tumor development by the inhibition of hyperplastic lesions. Perindopril produced significant inhibition of tumor growth, in a mouse xenograft model and caused inhibition of neovascularization in the corneal micropocket model. In chick yolk sac membrane assay, perindopril showed inhibition of vascular growth and reduced blood vessel formation. Therefore, perindopril is widely used in clinical practice, may represent a neo-adjuvant therapy for treatment of breast cancer. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  2. A Targetable EGFR-Dependent Tumor-Initiating Program in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Savage

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Therapies targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR have variable and unpredictable responses in breast cancer. Screening triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC patient-derived xenografts (PDXs, we identify a subset responsive to EGFR inhibition by gefitinib, which displays heterogeneous expression of wild-type EGFR. Deep single-cell RNA sequencing of 3,500 cells from an exceptional responder identified subpopulations displaying distinct biological features, where elevated EGFR expression was significantly enriched in a mesenchymal/stem-like cellular cluster. Sorted EGFRhi subpopulations exhibited enhanced stem-like features, including ALDH activity, sphere-forming efficiency, and tumorigenic and metastatic potential. EGFRhi cells gave rise to EGFRhi and EGFRlo cells in primary and metastatic tumors, demonstrating an EGFR-dependent expansion and hierarchical state transition. Similar tumorigenic EGFRhi subpopulations were identified in independent PDXs, where heterogeneous EGFR expression correlated with gefitinib sensitivity. This provides new understanding for an EGFR-dependent hierarchy in TNBC and for patient stratification for therapeutic intervention. : Savage et al. demonstrate that sensitivity to EGFR inhibitor, gefitinib, in triple-negative breast cancer is paradoxically associated with EGFR heterogeneity. Using single-cell RNA sequencing in conjunction with functional assays, they identify TNBC tumors in which EGFR expression identifies cells with tumor-initiating capacity whose proliferative expansion is sensitive to EGFR inhibition. Keywords: breast cancer, tumor heterogeneity, patient-derived xenograft, single-cell RNA sequencing, EGFR inhibition, therapeutic response, tumor-initiating cell, cell hierarchy, BRCA1 mutation

  3. Endocrine-Therapy-Resistant ESR1 Variants Revealed by Genomic Characterization of Breast-Cancer-Derived Xenografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunqiang Li

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available To characterize patient-derived xenografts (PDXs for functional studies, we made whole-genome comparisons with originating breast cancers representative of the major intrinsic subtypes. Structural and copy number aberrations were found to be retained with high fidelity. However, at the single-nucleotide level, variable numbers of PDX-specific somatic events were documented, although they were only rarely functionally significant. Variant allele frequencies were often preserved in the PDXs, demonstrating that clonal representation can be transplantable. Estrogen-receptor-positive PDXs were associated with ESR1 ligand-binding-domain mutations, gene amplification, or an ESR1/YAP1 translocation. These events produced different endocrine-therapy-response phenotypes in human, cell line, and PDX endocrine-response studies. Hence, deeply sequenced PDX models are an important resource for the search for genome-forward treatment options and capture endocrine-drug-resistance etiologies that are not observed in standard cell lines. The originating tumor genome provides a benchmark for assessing genetic drift and clonal representation after transplantation.

  4. Radiotherapy and chemotherapy change vessel tree geometry and metastatic spread in a small cell lung cancer xenograft mouse tumor model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten Frenzel

    Full Text Available Tumor vasculature is critical for tumor growth, formation of distant metastases and efficiency of radio- and chemotherapy treatments. However, how the vasculature itself is affected during cancer treatment regarding to the metastatic behavior has not been thoroughly investigated. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyze the influence of hypofractionated radiotherapy and cisplatin chemotherapy on vessel tree geometry and metastasis formation in a small cell lung cancer xenograft mouse tumor model to investigate the spread of malignant cells during different treatments modalities.The biological data gained during these experiments were fed into our previously developed computer model "Cancer and Treatment Simulation Tool" (CaTSiT to model the growth of the primary tumor, its metastatic deposit and also the influence on different therapies. Furthermore, we performed quantitative histology analyses to verify our predictions in xenograft mouse tumor model.According to the computer simulation the number of cells engrafting must vary considerably to explain the different weights of the primary tumor at the end of the experiment. Once a primary tumor is established, the fractal dimension of its vasculature correlates with the tumor size. Furthermore, the fractal dimension of the tumor vasculature changes during treatment, indicating that the therapy affects the blood vessels' geometry. We corroborated these findings with a quantitative histological analysis showing that the blood vessel density is depleted during radiotherapy and cisplatin chemotherapy. The CaTSiT computer model reveals that chemotherapy influences the tumor's therapeutic susceptibility and its metastatic spreading behavior.Using a system biological approach in combination with xenograft models and computer simulations revealed that the usage of chemotherapy and radiation therapy determines the spreading behavior by changing the blood vessel geometry of the primary tumor.

  5. Pregnancy stimulates tumor angiogenesis in breast carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genin, Anne-Sophie; Antoine, Martine; Aractingi, Selim; Rouzier, Roman

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms responsible for the poor prognosis of pregnancy-associated breast cancer (PABC) remain not well-understood. We studied angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis as they are known prognostic factors in breast cancer. We conducted a case control study of breast cancer comparing women with and without PABC matched for age and histological parameters. Surgical specimen sections were immunostained with anti-CD31 for angiogenesis and anti-D2-40 for lymphangiogenesis, then analyzed using vessel density, ratio of the vascular area and the Chalkley count. Seventeen patients with PABC and 22 controls were included. Angiogenesis was significantly increased in tumor tissues, and tended to be higher in healthy breast tissues from the PABC group compared to controls. In contrast, no difference between the two groups was found concerning lymphangiogenesis both in tumor and healthy breast tissues. Pregnancy enhances angiogenesis in breast cancer. This phenomenon appears to explain the poor prognosis of PABC.

  6. Potent anti-cancer effects of citrus peel flavonoids in human prostate xenograft tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Ching-Shu; Li, Shiming; Miyauchi, Yutaka; Suzawa, Michiko; Ho, Chi-Tang; Pan, Min-Hsiung

    2013-06-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most prevalent malignancies and is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in men. Fruit and vegetable consumption is a novel, non-toxic therapeutic approach that can be used to prevent and treat prostate cancer. Citrus peels and their extracts have been reported to have potent pharmacological activities and health benefits due to the abundance of flavonoids in citrus fruits, particularly in the peels. Our previous studies demonstrated that oral administration of Gold Lotion (GL), an extract of multiple varieties of citrus peels containing abundant flavonoids, including a large percentage of polymethoxyflavones (PMFs), effectively suppressed azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colonic tumorigenesis. However, the efficacy of GL against prostate cancer has not yet been investigated. Here, we explored the anti-tumor effects of GL using a human prostate tumor xenograft mouse model. Our data demonstrated that treatment with GL by both intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection and oral administration dramatically reduced both the weights (57%-100% inhibition) and volumes (78%-94% inhibition) of the tumors without any observed toxicity. These inhibitory effects were accompanied by mechanistic down-regulation of the protein levels of inflammatory enzymes (inducible nitric oxide synthase, iNOS and cyclooxygenase-2, COX-2), metastasis (matrix metallopeptidase-2, MMP-2 and MMP-9), angiogenesis (vascular endothelial growth factor, VEGF), and proliferative molecules, as well as by the induction of apoptosis in prostate tumors. Our findings suggest that GL is an effective anti-cancer agent that may potentially serve as a novel therapeutic option for prostate cancer treatment.

  7. Autophagy inhibition synergistically enhances anti-cancer efficacy of RAMBA, VN/12-1 in SKBR-3 cells and tumor xenografts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godbole, Abhijit M.; Purushottamachar, Puranik; Martin, Marlena S.; Daskalakis, Constantine; Njar, Vincent C. O.

    2012-01-01

    VN/12-1 is a novel retinoic acid metabolism blocking agent (RAMBA) discovered in our laboratory. The purpose of the study was to elucidate the molecular mechanism of VN/12-1’s anticancer activity in breast cancer cell lines and in tumor xenografts. We investigated the effects of VN/12-1 on induction of autophagy andapoptosis in SKBR-3 cells. Further, we also examined the impact of pharmacological and genomic inhibition of autophagy on VN/12-1’s anti-cancer activity. Finally, the anti-tumor activity of VN/12-1 was evaluated as a single agent and in combination with autophagy inhibitor chloroquine (CHL) in an SKBR-3 mouse xenograft model. Short exposure of low dose (< 10 µM) of VN/12-1 induced endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS), autophagy and inhibits G1-S phase transition and caused a protective response. However, higher dose of VN/12-1 initiates apoptosis in vitro. Inhibition of autophagy using either pharmacological inhibitors or RNA interference of Beclin-1 enhanced anti-cancer activity induced by VN/12-1 in SKBR-3 cells by triggering apoptosis. Importantly, VN/12-1 (5 mg/kg twice weekly) and the combination of VN/12-1 (5 mg/kg twice weekly) + chloroquine (50 mg/kg twice weekly) significantly suppressed established SKBR-3 tumor growth by 81.4% (p < 0.001 vs. control) and 96.2% (p < 0.001 vs. control), respectively. Our novel findings suggest that VN/12-1 may be useful as a single agent or in combination with autophagy inhibitors for treating human breast cancers. Our data provides a strong rationale for clinical evaluation of VN/12-1 as single agent or in combination with autophagy inhibitors. PMID:22334589

  8. A giant phyllodes tumor of the breast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Schillebeeckx

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Phyllodes tumors of the breast are rare, accounting for less than 1% of the breast tumors. They are mostly seen in women between 45 and 49 years old. These are fast growing tumors with a large spectrum of behavior (from benign to metastatic and can resemble fibroadenomas. Correct diagnosis mostly through core needle biopsy is important to decide whether a surgical excision has to be done. Here we report a case of a 57-year-old woman with a fast growing, ulcerated tumor in the left breast. Core needle biopsy suggested a malignant phyllodes tumor with heterologous liposarcomatous differentiation. Treatment with total mastectomy and adjuvant radiotherapy followed. Primary treatment is always surgery, whether radiotherapy or chemotherapy has to follow remains uncertain. There is a high-recurrence rate, especially when the surgical margins are narrow.

  9. Assessment of Tryptophan Uptake and Kinetics Using 1-(2-18F-Fluoroethyl)-l-Tryptophan and α-11C-Methyl-l-Tryptophan PET Imaging in Mice Implanted with Patient-Derived Brain Tumor Xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelhaugh, Sharon K; Muzik, Otto; Guastella, Anthony R; Klinger, Neil V; Polin, Lisa A; Cai, Hancheng; Xin, Yangchun; Mangner, Thomas J; Zhang, Shaohui; Juhász, Csaba; Mittal, Sandeep

    2017-02-01

    Abnormal tryptophan metabolism via the kynurenine pathway is involved in the pathophysiology of a variety of human diseases including cancers. α-11C-methyl-l-tryptophan (11C-AMT) PET imaging demonstrated increased tryptophan uptake and trapping in epileptic foci and brain tumors, but the short half-life of 11C limits its widespread clinical application. Recent in vitro studies suggested that the novel radiotracer 1-(2-18F-fluoroethyl)-l-tryptophan (18F-FETrp) may be useful to assess tryptophan metabolism via the kynurenine pathway. In this study, we tested in vivo organ and tumor uptake and kinetics of 18F-FETrp in patient-derived xenograft mouse models and compared them with 11C-AMT uptake. Xenograft mouse models of glioblastoma and metastatic brain tumors (from lung and breast cancer) were developed by subcutaneous implantation of patient tumor fragments. Dynamic PET scans with 18F-FETrp and 11C-AMT were obtained for mice bearing human brain tumors 1-7 d apart. The biodistribution and tumoral SUVs for both tracers were compared. 18F-FETrp showed prominent uptake in the pancreas and no bone uptake, whereas 11C-AMT showed higher uptake in the kidneys. Both tracers showed uptake in the xenograft tumors, with a plateau of approximately 30 min after injection; however, 18F-FETrp showed higher tumoral SUV than 11C-AMT in all 3 tumor types tested. The radiation dosimetry for 18F-FETrp determined from the mouse data compared favorably with the clinical 18F-FDG PET tracer. 18F-FETrp tumoral uptake, biodistribution, and radiation dosimetry data provide strong preclinical evidence that this new radiotracer warrants further studies that may lead to a broadly applicable molecular imaging tool to examine abnormal tryptophan metabolism in human tumors. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  10. Role of lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes in omega 3 fatty acids induced suppression of breast cancer xenograft growth in mice

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    Cameron Ivan L

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Supplementing mice with high levels of dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs increases the n-3 PUFAs in cell membranes, increases the susceptibility of the cells for lipid peroxidation (LPO and decreases the growth rate of mammary and other tumors. However, the results of an earlier study indicated that a factor in addition to LPO was involved in the reduction in tumor growth in n-3 PUFAs fed mice. Athymic mice bearing MDA-MB-231 human breast carcinoma xenografts, were fed fish oil concentrate (FOC or control diets, with and without supplemental Vitamin E (2000 IU /kg diet and were sacrificed both before and after doxorubicin (DOX treatment to evaluate factors involved in tumor growth suppression. Results Prior to DOX, basal LPO in the tumor of 3% FOC fed mice was slightly higher than in the control fed mice and was decreased in mice consuming FOC with vitamin E. Vitamin E suppressed the DOX induced increase in LPO in the tumors of control mice, however, vitamin E was not sufficient to suppress a DOX induced increase in LPO in the tumors of FOC fed mice. The mean growth rate of tumors of FOC fed mice was significantly less than the mean growth rate of the tumors of control mice. Multiple regression analyses indicated that suppression of glutathione peroxidase (GPX activity by FOC prior to DOX therapy was more important than increased LPO as an explanation of tumor growth suppression. Tumor induced cachexia was decreased in mice consuming FOC. Conclusions It appears that the increased sensitivity to DOX was related to an FOC induced reduction in GPX activity. FOC reduced tumor induced cachexia.

  11. Raloxifene inhibits tumor growth and lymph node metastasis in a xenograft model of metastatic mammary cancer

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    Li Zhong-Lian

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effects of raloxifene, a novel selective estrogen receptor modulator, were studied in a mouse metastatic mammary cancer model expressing cytoplasmic ERα. Methods Mammary tumors, induced by inoculation of syngeneic BALB/c mice with BJMC3879luc2 cells, were subsequently treated with raloxifene at 0, 18 and 27 mg/kg/day using mini-osmotic pumps. Results In vitro study demonstrated that the ERα in BJMC3879luc2 cells was smaller (between 50 and 64 kDa than the normal-sized ERα (66 kDa and showed cytoplasmic localization. A statistically significant but weak estradiol response was observed in this cell line. When BJMC3879luc2 tumors were implanted into mice, the ERα mRNA levels were significantly higher in females than in males. In vitro studies showed that raloxifene induced mitochondria-mediated apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest in the G1-phase and a decrease in the cell population in the S-phase. In animal experiments, tumor volumes were significantly suppressed in the raloxifene-treated groups. The multiplicity of lymph node metastasis was significantly decreased in the 27 mg/kg group. Levels of apoptosis were significantly increased in the raloxifene-treated groups, whereas the levels of DNA synthesis were significantly decreased in these groups. No differences in microvessel density in tumors were observed between the control and raloxifene-treated groups. The numbers of dilated lymphatic vessels containing intraluminal tumor cells were significantly reduced in mammary tumors in the raloxifene-treated groups. The levels of ERα mRNA in mammary tumors tended to be decreased in the raloxifene-treated groups. Conclusion These results suggest that the antimetastatic activity of raloxifene in mammary cancer expressing cytoplasmic ERα may be a crucial finding with clinical applications and that raloxifene may be useful as an adjuvant therapy and for the chemoprevention of breast cancer development.

  12. Raloxifene inhibits tumor growth and lymph node metastasis in a xenograft model of metastatic mammary cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background The effects of raloxifene, a novel selective estrogen receptor modulator, were studied in a mouse metastatic mammary cancer model expressing cytoplasmic ERα. Methods Mammary tumors, induced by inoculation of syngeneic BALB/c mice with BJMC3879luc2 cells, were subsequently treated with raloxifene at 0, 18 and 27 mg/kg/day using mini-osmotic pumps. Results In vitro study demonstrated that the ERα in BJMC3879luc2 cells was smaller (between 50 and 64 kDa) than the normal-sized ERα (66 kDa) and showed cytoplasmic localization. A statistically significant but weak estradiol response was observed in this cell line. When BJMC3879luc2 tumors were implanted into mice, the ERα mRNA levels were significantly higher in females than in males. In vitro studies showed that raloxifene induced mitochondria-mediated apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest in the G1-phase and a decrease in the cell population in the S-phase. In animal experiments, tumor volumes were significantly suppressed in the raloxifene-treated groups. The multiplicity of lymph node metastasis was significantly decreased in the 27 mg/kg group. Levels of apoptosis were significantly increased in the raloxifene-treated groups, whereas the levels of DNA synthesis were significantly decreased in these groups. No differences in microvessel density in tumors were observed between the control and raloxifene-treated groups. The numbers of dilated lymphatic vessels containing intraluminal tumor cells were significantly reduced in mammary tumors in the raloxifene-treated groups. The levels of ERα mRNA in mammary tumors tended to be decreased in the raloxifene-treated groups. Conclusion These results suggest that the antimetastatic activity of raloxifene in mammary cancer expressing cytoplasmic ERα may be a crucial finding with clinical applications and that raloxifene may be useful as an adjuvant therapy and for the chemoprevention of breast cancer development. PMID:20958960

  13. Fractionated therapy of HER2-expressing breast and ovarian cancer xenografts in mice with targeted alpha emitting 227Th-DOTA-p-benzyl-trastuzumab.

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    Helen Heyerdahl

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to investigate therapeutic efficacy and normal tissue toxicity of single dosage and fractionated targeted alpha therapy (TAT in mice with HER2-expressing breast and ovarian cancer xenografts using the low dose rate radioimmunoconjugate (227Th-DOTA-p-benzyl-trastuzumab. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Nude mice carrying HER2-overexpressing subcutaneous SKOV-3 or SKBR-3 xenografts were treated with 1000 kBq/kg (227Th-trastuzumab as single injection or four injections of 250 kBq/kg with intervals of 4-5 days, 2 weeks, or 4 weeks. Control animals were treated with normal saline or unlabeled trastuzumab. In SKOV-3 xenografts tumor growth to 10-fold size was delayed (p<0.01 and survival with tumor diameter less than 16 mm was prolonged (p<0.05 in all TAT groups compared to the control groups. No statistically significant differences were seen among the treated groups. In SKBR-3 xenografts tumor growth to 10-fold size was delayed in the single injection and 4-5 days interval groups (p<0.001 and all except the 4 weeks interval TAT group showed improved survival to the control groups (p<0.05. Toxicity was assessed by blood cell counts, clinical chemistry measurements and body weight. Transient reduction in white blood cells was seen for the single injection and 4-5 days interval groups (p<0.05. No significant changes were seen in red blood cells, platelets or clinical chemistry parameters. Survival without life threatening loss of body weight was significantly prolonged in 4 weeks interval group compared to single injection group (p<0.05 for SKOV-3 animals and in 2 weeks interval group compared with the 4-5 days interval groups (p<0.05 for SKBR-3 animals. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The same concentration of radioactivity split into several fractions may improve toxicity of (227Th-radioimmunotherapy while the therapeutic effect is maintained. Thus, it might be possible to increase the cumulative absorbed radiation dose

  14. Bilateral malignant phyllodes tumor of the breast | Odik | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Phyllodes tumor is one of the breast-specific biphasic tumors, arising from the intra-lobular breast stroma. It constitutes less than 1%of all breast tumors. Bilateralmalignant phyllodes tumor is uncommon.We report a case of 32-year oldmultiparouswoman who died of multi-organ metastatic disease. The diagnosis was based ...

  15. Adoptively transferred human lung tumor specific cytotoxic T cells can control autologous tumor growth and shape tumor phenotype in a SCID mouse xenograft model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrone Soldano

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The anti-tumor efficacy of human immune effector cells, such as cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTLs, has been difficult to study in lung cancer patients in the clinical setting. Improved experimental models for the study of lung tumor-immune cell interaction as well as for evaluating the efficacy of adoptive transfer of immune effector cells are needed. Methods To address questions related to the in vivo interaction of human lung tumor cells and immune effector cells, we obtained an HLA class I + lung tumor cell line from a fresh surgical specimen, and using the infiltrating immune cells, isolated and characterized tumor antigen-specific, CD8+ CTLs. We then established a SCID mouse-human tumor xenograft model with the tumor cell line and used it to study the function of the autologous CTLs provided via adoptive transfer. Results The tumor antigen specific CTLs isolated from the tumor were found to have an activated memory phenotype and able to kill tumor cells in an antigen specific manner in vitro. Additionally, the tumor antigen-specific CTLs were fully capable of homing to and killing autologous tumors in vivo, and expressing IFN-γ, each in an antigen-dependent manner. A single injection of these CTLs was able to provide significant but temporary control of the growth of autologous tumors in vivo without the need for IL-2. The timing of injection of CTLs played an essential role in the outcome of tumor growth control. Moreover, immunohistochemical analysis of surviving tumor cells following CTL treatment indicated that the surviving tumor cells expressed reduced MHC class I antigens on their surface. Conclusion These studies confirm and extend previous studies and provide additional information regarding the characteristics of CTLs which can be found within a patient's tumor. Moreover, the in vivo model described here provides a unique window for observing events that may also occur in patients undergoing adoptive cellular

  16. Imaging of HER2/neu-positive BT-474 human breast cancer xenografts in athymic mice using {sup 111}In-trastuzumab (Herceptin) Fab fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang Ying [Division of Nuclear Medicine, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 2C4 (Canada); Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 2S2 (Canada); Wang, Judy [Division of Nuclear Medicine, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 2C4 (Canada); Scollard, Deborah A. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 2C4 (Canada); Mondal, Hridya [Division of Nuclear Medicine, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 2C4 (Canada); Holloway, Claire [Sunnybrook and Women' s College Health Sciences Center, Toronto, Ontario, M4N 3M5 (Canada); Kahn, Harriette J. [Sunnybrook and Women' s College Health Sciences Center, Toronto, Ontario, M4N 3M5 (Canada); Reilly, Raymond M. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 2C4 (Canada) and Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 2S2 (Canada) and Department of Medical Imaging, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3E2 (Canada)]. E-mail: raymond.reilly@utoronto.ca

    2005-01-01

    Trastuzumab (Herceptin) Fab were prepared by digestion of intact IgG with immobilized papain, derivatized with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) and radiolabeled with {sup 111}In. The dissociation constant (K{sub d}) for binding of Fab to HER2/neu-positive SK-BR-3 human breast cancer cells was two- to threefold higher than for intact IgG (14-36 vs. 8-14 nM). The binding affinity was not significantly decreased after DTPA derivatization (K{sub d}=47 nM). {sup 111}In-trastuzumab Fab localized specifically in HER2/neu-positive BT-474 human breast cancer xenografts in athymic mice with tumor uptake of 7.8{+-}0.7% injected dose (ID)/g and tumor/blood ratio of 25.2{+-}1.6 at 72 h postinjection compared with 2.7{+-}0.7% ID/g and 7.0{+-}0.9 for {sup 111}In-HuM195 anti-CD33 Fab (significantly different, P<.001). Small (3-5 mm in diameter) BT-474 tumors were imaged with {sup 111}In-trastuzumab Fab as early as 24 h postinjection.

  17. Quality Assessments of Long-Term Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Breast Cancer Xenograft Tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jian-Ying [Department; Chen, Lijun [Department; Zhang, Bai [Department; Tian, Yuan [Department; Liu, Tao [Biological; Thomas, Stefani N. [Department; Chen, Li [Department; Schnaubelt, Michael [Department; Boja, Emily [Office; Hiltke, Tara [Office; Kinsinger, Christopher R. [Office; Rodriguez, Henry [Office; Davies, Sherri R. [Department; Li, Shunqiang [Department; Snider, Jacqueline E. [Department; Erdmann-Gilmore, Petra [Department; Tabb, David L. [Department; Townsend, R. Reid [Department; Ellis, Matthew J. [Department; Rodland, Karin D. [Biological; Smith, Richard D. [Biological; Carr, Steven A. [The Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, United States; Zhang, Zhen [Department; Chan, Daniel W. [Department; Zhang, Hui [Department

    2017-09-21

    The identification of protein biomarkers requires large-scale analysis of human specimens to achieve statistical significance. In this study, we evaluated the long-term reproducibility of an iTRAQ (isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification) based quantitative proteomics strategy using one channel for universal normalization across all samples. A total of 307 liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) analyses were completed, generating 107 one-dimensional (1D) LC-MS/MS datasets and 8 offline two-dimensional (2D) LC-MS/MS datasets (25 fractions for each set) for human-in-mouse breast cancer xenograft tissues representative of basal and luminal subtypes. Such large-scale studies require the implementation of robust metrics to assess the contributions of technical and biological variability in the qualitative and quantitative data. Accordingly, we developed a quantification confidence score based on the quality of each peptide-spectrum match (PSM) to remove quantification outliers from each analysis. After combining confidence score filtering and statistical analysis, reproducible protein identification and quantitative results were achieved from LC-MS/MS datasets collected over a 16 month period.

  18. The Effects of Vandetanib on Paclitaxel Tumor Distribution and Antitumor Activity in a Xenograft Model of Human Ovarian Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Cesca

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to determine the effects of vandetanib, a small-molecule receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor and epidermal growth factor receptor, on paclitaxel (PTX tumor distribution and antitumor activity in xenograft models of human ovarian carcinoma. Nude mice bearing A2780-1A9 xenografts received daily (5, 10, or 15 days doses of vandetanib (50 mg/kg per os, combined with PTX (20 mg/kg intravenously. Morphologic and functional modifications associated with the tumor vasculature (CD31 and α-smooth muscle actin staining and Hoechst 33342 perfusion and PTX concentrations in plasma and tumor tissues were analyzed. Activity was evaluated as inhibition of tumor growth subcutaneously and spreading into the peritoneal cavity. Vandetanib treatment produced no significant change in tumor vessel density, although a reduced number of large vessels, an increased percentage of mature vessels, and diminished tumor perfusion were evident. Pretreatment with vandetanib led to decreased tumor PTX levels within 1 hour of PTX injection, although 24 hours later, tumor PTX levels were comparable with controls. In efficacy studies, the combination of vandetanib plus PTX improved antitumor activity compared with vandetanib or PTX alone, with greater effects being obtained when PTX was administered before vandetanib. The combination of PTX plus vandetanib reduced tumor burden in the peritoneal cavity of mice and significantly increased their survival. Analysis of vascular changes and PTX tumor uptake in vandetanib-treated tumors may help to guide the scheduling of vandetanib plus PTX combinations and may have implications for the design of clinical trials with these drugs.

  19. Characterization of a large panel of patient-derived tumor xenografts representing the clinical heterogeneity of human colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julien, Sylvia; Merino-Trigo, Ana; Lacroix, Ludovic; Pocard, Marc; Goéré, Diane; Mariani, Pascale; Landron, Sophie; Bigot, Ludovic; Nemati, Fariba; Dartigues, Peggy; Weiswald, Louis-Bastien; Lantuas, Denis; Morgand, Loïc; Pham, Emmanuel; Gonin, Patrick; Dangles-Marie, Virginie; Job, Bastien; Dessen, Philippe; Bruno, Alain; Pierré, Alain; De Thé, Hugues; Soliman, Hany; Nunes, Manoel; Lardier, Guillaume; Calvet, Loreley; Demers, Brigitte; Prévost, Grégoire; Vrignaud, Patricia; Roman-Roman, Sergio; Duchamp, Olivier; Berthet, Cyril

    2012-10-01

    Patient-derived xenograft models are considered to represent the heterogeneity of human cancers and advanced preclinical models. Our consortium joins efforts to extensively develop and characterize a new collection of patient-derived colorectal cancer (CRC) models. From the 85 unsupervised surgical colorectal samples collection, 54 tumors were successfully xenografted in immunodeficient mice and rats, representing 35 primary tumors, 5 peritoneal carcinoses and 14 metastases. Histologic and molecular characterization of patient tumors, first and late passages on mice includes the sequence of key genes involved in CRC (i.e., APC, KRAS, TP53), aCGH, and transcriptomic analysis. This comprehensive characterization shows that our collection recapitulates the clinical situation about the histopathology and molecular diversity of CRC. Moreover, patient tumors and corresponding models are clustering together allowing comparison studies between clinical and preclinical data. Hence, we conducted pharmacologic monotherapy studies with standard of care for CRC (5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, irinotecan, and cetuximab). Through this extensive in vivo analysis, we have shown the loss of human stroma cells after engraftment, observed a metastatic phenotype in some models, and finally compared the molecular profile with the drug sensitivity of each tumor model. Through an experimental cetuximab phase II trial, we confirmed the key role of KRAS mutation in cetuximab resistance. This new collection could bring benefit to evaluate novel targeted therapeutic strategies and to better understand the basis for sensitivity or resistance of tumors from individual patients.

  20. Over-expression of fibroblast activation protein alpha increases tumor growth in xenografts of ovarian cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lijuan; Ma, Li; Lai, Dongmei

    2013-11-01

    Fibroblast activation protein alpha (FAPα) is a 95-kDa serine protease of post-prolyl peptidase family on cell surface. FAPα is widely expressed in tumor microenvironment. The wide spread association of FAPα expression with cancer suggests that it has important functions in the disease. However, the nature of FAPα's roles in cancer cell activity is not well-determined. It has been showed that FAPα silencing in SKOV3 cells induces ovarian tumors but significantly reduces tumor growth in a xenograft mouse model. To further determine the role of FAPα in epithelial ovarian cancer cells, SKOV3-FAPα and HO8910-FAPα cell lines, which over-expressed FAPα stably, were constructed and then their biological behaviors were investigated. It was found that FAPα promoted ovarian cancer cell proliferation, drug resistance, invasiveness, and migration in vitro. Immunochemistry assay showed that FAPα significantly facilitated tumor growth in xenograft tumor tissues. These results suggested that FAPα might directly promote tumor growth and invasiveness in ovarian cancer cells.

  1. Inhibition of Pediatric Glioblastoma Tumor Growth by the Anti-Cancer Agent OKN-007 in Orthotopic Mouse Xenografts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho de Souza, Patricia; Mallory, Samantha; Smith, Nataliya; Saunders, Debra; Li, Xiao-Nan; McNall-Knapp, Rene Y.; Fung, Kar-Ming; Towner, Rheal A.

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric glioblastomas (pGBM), although rare, are one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths in children, with tumors essentially refractory to existing treatments. Here, we describe the use of conventional and advanced in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques to assess a novel orthotopic xenograft pGBM mouse (IC-3752GBM patient-derived culture) model, and to monitor the effects of the anti-cancer agent OKN-007 as an inhibitor of pGBM tumor growth. Immunohistochemistry support data is also presented for cell proliferation and tumor growth signaling. OKN-007 was found to significantly decrease tumor volumes (pcancer agent for some patients with pGBMs by inhibiting cell proliferation and angiogenesis, possibly via the PDGFRα pathway, and could be considered as an additional therapy for pediatric brain tumor patients. PMID:26248280

  2. Therapeutic Antibodies Targeting CSF1 Impede Macrophage Recruitment in a Xenograft Model of Tenosynovial Giant Cell Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongwei Cheng

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Tenosynovial giant cell tumor is a neoplastic disease of joints that can cause severe morbidity. Recurrences are common following local therapy, and no effective medical therapy currently exists. Recent work has demonstrated that all cases overexpress macrophage colony-stimulating factor (CSF1, usually as a consequence of an activating gene translocation, resulting in an influx of macrophages that form the bulk of the tumor. New anti-CSF1 drugs have been developed; however there are no preclinical models suitable for evaluation of drug benefits in this disease. In this paper, we describe a novel renal subcapsular xenograft model of tenosynovial giant cell tumor. Using this model, we demonstrate that an anti-CSF1 monoclonal antibody significantly inhibits host macrophage infiltration into this tumor. The results from this model support clinical trials of equivalent humanized agents and anti-CSF1R small molecule drugs in cases of tenosynovial giant cell tumor refractory to conventional local therapy.

  3. Tumor markers of breast cancer: New prospectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M. Kabel

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Tumor markers are substances produced by the tumors or by other cells of the body in response to cancer or certain benign conditions. Although most of these markers are made by the normal cells as well as by cancer cells, they are produced at much higher levels in cancerous conditions. These markers are used to evaluate the patient's response to treatment and to detect the presence of metastasis or recurrence. Breast cancer is one of the most common malignancies in females worldwide. The CA 27-29, CA 15-3, CA27.29, carcinoembryonic antigen, tissue polypeptide specific antigen, p53, cathepsin D, cyclin E, nestin and HER-2 are tumor markers that are often expressed in people with breast cancer. They play a crucial role in diagnosis, monitoring response to therapy, early detection of metastasis and determination of recurrence in patients with breast cancer.

  4. High resolution digital autoradiographic and dosimetric analysis of heterogeneous radioactivity distribution in xenografted prostate tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermand, Oskar V; Nilsson, Jenny; Strand, Sven-Erik; Elgqvist, Jörgen

    2016-12-01

    The first main aim of this study was to illustrate the absorbed dose rate distribution from 177Lu in sections of xenografted prostate cancer (PCa) tumors using high resolution digital autoradiography (DAR) and compare it with hypothetical identical radioactivity distributions of 90Y or 7 MeV alpha-particles. Three dosimetry models based on either dose point kernels or Monte Carlo simulations were used and evaluated. The second and overlapping aim, was to perform DAR imaging and dosimetric analysis of the distribution of radioactivity, and hence the absorbed dose rate, in tumor sections at an early time point after injection during radioimmunotherapy using 177Lu-h11B6, directed against the human kallikrein 2 antigen. Male immunodeficient BALB/c nude mice, aged 6-8 w, were inoculated by subcutaneous injection of ∼107 LNCaP cells in a 200 μl suspension of a 1:1 mixture of medium and Matrigel. The antibody h11B6 was conjugated with the chelator CHX-A″-DTPA after which conjugated h11B6 was mixed with 177LuCl3. The incubation was performed at room temperature for 2 h, after which the labeling was terminated and the solution was purified on a NAP-5 column. About 20 MBq 177Lu-h11B6 was injected intravenously in the tail vein. At approximately 10 h postinjection (hpi), the mice were sacrificed and one tumor was collected from each of the five animals and cryosectioned into 10 μm thick slices. The tumor slices were measured and imaged using the DAR MicroImager system and the M3Vision software. Then the absorbed dose rate was calculated using a dose point kernel generated with the Monte Carlo code gate v7.0. The DAR system produced high resolution images of the radioactivity distribution, close to the resolution of single PCa cells. The DAR images revealed a pronounced heterogeneous radioactivity distribution, i.e., count rate per area, in the tumors, indicated by the normalized intensity variations along cross sections as mean ± SD: 0.15 ± 0.15, 0.20 ± 0.18, 0.12

  5. The T61 human breast cancer xenograft: an experimental model of estrogen therapy of breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunner, N; Spang-Thomsen, M; Cullen, K

    1996-01-01

    such as MCF-7 which are stimulated by estrogen. Molecular studies have demonstrated that T61 expresses easily detectable levels of mRNA for a number of peptide growth factors, including transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha) and insulin-like growth factors I and II (IGF-I and IGF......-II), but not transforming growth factor beta-I (TGF-beta1). Of these, IGF-II is the only peptide whose expression is altered by endocrine therapy. Treatment of T61-bearing nude mice with physiologic doses of estrogen is accompanied by loss of IGF-II mRNA expression within 24 hours, and rapid regression of tumor. T61 tumor...

  6. Critical role of c-Jun overexpression in liver metastasis of human breast cancer xenograft model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Lu

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background c-Jun/AP-1 has been linked to invasive properties of aggressive breast cancer. Recently, it has been reported that overexpression of c-Jun in breast cancer cell line MCF-7 resulted in increased AP-1 activity, motility and invasiveness of the cells in vitro and tumor formation in nude mice. However, the role of c-Jun in metastasis of human breast cancer in vivo is currently unknown. Methods To further investigate the direct involvement of c-Jun in tumorigenesis and metastasis, in the present study, the effects of c-Jun overexpression were studied in both in vitro and in nude mice. Results Ectopic overexpression of c-Jun promoted the growth of MCF-7 cells and resulted in a significant increase in the percentage of cells in S phase and increased motility and invasiveness. Introduction of c-Jun gene alone into weakly invasive MCF-7 cells resulted in the transfected cells capable of metastasizing to the nude mouse liver following tail vein injection. Conclusion The present study confirms that overexpression of c-Jun contributes to a more invasive phenotype in MCF-7 cells. It indicates an interesting relationship between c-Jun expression and increased property of adhesion, migration and in vivo liver metastasis of MCF-7/c-Jun cells. The results provide further evidence that c-Jun is involved in the metastasis of breast cancer. The finding also opens an opportunity for development of anti-c-Jun strategies in breast cancer therapy.

  7. Antitumor activity of irofulven against human ovarian cancer cell lines, human tumor colony-forming units, and xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Laar, E S; Izbicka, E; Weitman, S; Medina-Gundrum, L; Macdonald, J R; Waters, S J

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the cytotoxic activity of irofulven (HMAF, MGI 114), a unique chemotherapeutic agent currently under clinical investigation, in various preclinical models of ovarian cancer. Antiproliferative effects of irofulven in ovarian cancer cell lines and ovarian tumor specimens were characterized in vitro using sulforhodamine B and human tumor colony-forming assays, respectively. Irofulven demonstrated marked activity against a panel of ovarian tumor cell lines, including IGROV1, OVCAR-3, OVCAR-4, OVCAR-5, OVCAR-8, and SK-OV-3, all of which exhibit various drug resistance mechanisms. In human tumor cloning assays, irofulven inhibited colony formation in surgically derived ovarian tumors at concentrations as low as 0.001 micro g /ml and indicated superior activity in comparison with paclitaxel when tested against the same tumor specimens. The antitumor activity of irofulven compared to that of paclitaxel was also examined using the SK-OV-3 xenograft model. In mice bearing subcutaneously implanted SK-OV-3 tumors, treatment with paclitaxel failed to inhibit tumor growth; whereas mice treated with maximum tolerated doses of irofulven had a 25% partial shrinkage rate, and the remaining animals had a mean tumor growth inhibition of 82%. The potent activity of irofulven against ovarian tumors in vitro and in vivo supports the evaluation of its clinical activity in ovarian cancer.

  8. Fluorescence lifetime FRET non-invasive imaging of breast cancer xenografts provides a measure of target engagement in vivo (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudkouskaya, Alena; Sinsuebphon, Nattawut; Intes, Xavier; Barroso, Margarida

    2017-02-01

    Fluorescence Lifetime Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FLIM-FRET) is a unique non-invasive imaging platform to monitor and quantify in vivo target engagement in pre-clinical studies. FLIM FRET is a valuable tool in targeted drug delivery due to its nanoscale-range molecular resolution that detects near-infrared labeled ligand binding to dimerized receptors followed by their uptake into cancer cells in vivo. Various imaging platforms, including PET, lack the ability to directly discriminate between unbound and internalized ligands. Since transferrin receptor (TfR) level is significantly elevated in cancer cells compared to non-cancerous cells, transferrin (Tf) has been successfully used in molecular imaging and targeted anti-cancer drug delivery. The dimeric nature of TfR allows for the quantification of Tf internalization into cancer cells by measuring FLIM FRET between receptor-bound Tf donor and acceptor NIR fluorophore pairs, based on the reduction of donor fluorophore lifetime in live mice. We analyzed tumor morphology, the level of expression of TfR, estrogen receptor (ER) and Tf accumulation in human breast cancer tumor xenografts. We found a remarkable heterogeneity of breast cancer tumors regarding their size, cell density, TfR and ER expression and Tf uptake. The results of this study confirm a strong correlation between in vivo NIR FLIM FRET and ex vivo evaluation of Tf uptake into tumor tissues, thus validating FD% as a robust measure of the target engagement of TfR-Tf in tumor cells in vivo.

  9. Comparative analyses of gene copy number and mRNA expression in GBM tumors and GBM xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodgson, J. Graeme; Yeh, Ru-Fang; Ray, Amrita; Wang, Nicholas J.; Smirnov, Ivan; Yu, Mamie; Hariono, Sujatmi; Silber, Joachim; Feiler, Heidi S.; Gray, Joe W.; Spellman, Paul T.; Vandenberg, Scott R.; Berger, Mitchel S.; James, C. David

    2009-04-03

    Development of model systems that recapitulate the molecular heterogeneity observed among glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) tumors will expedite the testing of targeted molecular therapeutic strategies for GBM treatment. In this study, we profiled DNA copy number and mRNA expression in 21 independent GBM tumor lines maintained as subcutaneous xenografts (GBMX), and compared GBMX molecular signatures to those observed in GBM clinical specimens derived from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). The predominant copy number signature in both tumor groups was defined by chromosome-7 gain/chromosome-10 loss, a poor-prognosis genetic signature. We also observed, at frequencies similar to that detected in TCGA GBM tumors, genomic amplification and overexpression of known GBM oncogenes, such as EGFR, MDM2, CDK6, and MYCN, and novel genes, including NUP107, SLC35E3, MMP1, MMP13, and DDX1. The transcriptional signature of GBMX tumors, which was stable over multiple subcutaneous passages, was defined by overexpression of genes involved in M phase, DNA replication, and chromosome organization (MRC) and was highly similar to the poor-prognosis mitosis and cell-cycle module (MCM) in GBM. Assessment of gene expression in TCGA-derived GBMs revealed overexpression of MRC cancer genes AURKB, BIRC5, CCNB1, CCNB2, CDC2, CDK2, and FOXM1, which form a transcriptional network important for G2/M progression and/or checkpoint activation. Our study supports propagation of GBM tumors as subcutaneous xenografts as a useful approach for sustaining key molecular characteristics of patient tumors, and highlights therapeutic opportunities conferred by this GBMX tumor panel for testing targeted therapeutic strategies for GBM treatment.

  10. Breast cancer intra-tumor heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    In recent years it has become clear that cancer cells within a single tumor can display striking morphological, genetic and behavioral variability. Burgeoning genetic, epigenetic and phenomenological data support the existence of intra-tumor genetic heterogeneity in breast cancers; however, its basis is yet to be fully defined. Two of the most widely evoked concepts to explain the origin of heterogeneity within tumors are the cancer stem cell hypothesis and the clonal evolution model. Although the cancer stem cell model appeared to provide an explanation for the variability among the neoplastic cells within a given cancer, advances in massively parallel sequencing have provided several lines of evidence to suggest that intra-tumor genetic heterogeneity likely plays a fundamental role in the phenotypic heterogeneity observed in cancers. Many challenges remain, however, in the interpretation of the next generation sequencing results obtained so far. Here we review the models that explain tumor heterogeneity, the causes of intra-tumor genetic diversity and their impact on our understanding and management of breast cancer, methods to study intra-tumor heterogeneity and the assessment of intra-tumor genetic heterogeneity in the clinic. PMID:25928070

  11. DCE-MRI of patient-derived xenograft models of uterine cervix carcinoma: associations with parameters of the tumor microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anette Hauge

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abnormalities in the tumor microenvironment are associated with resistance to treatment, aggressive growth, and poor clinical outcome in patients with advanced cervical cancer. The potential of dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE MRI to assess the microvascular density (MVD, interstitial fluid pressure (IFP, and hypoxic fraction of patient-derived cervical cancer xenografts was investigated in the present study. Methods Four patient-derived xenograft (PDX models of squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix (BK-12, ED-15, HL-16, and LA-19 were subjected to Gd-DOTA-based DCE-MRI using a 7.05 T preclinical scanner. Parametric images of the volume transfer constant (K trans and the fractional distribution volume (v e of the contrast agent were produced by pharmacokinetic analyses utilizing the standard Tofts model. Whole tumor median values of the DCE-MRI parameters were compared with MVD and the fraction of hypoxic tumor tissue, as determined histologically, and IFP, as measured with a Millar catheter. Results Both on the PDX model level and the single tumor level, a significant inverse correlation was found between K trans and hypoxic fraction. The extent of hypoxia was also associated with the fraction of voxels with unphysiological v e values (v e > 1.0. None of the DCE-MRI parameters were related to MVD or IFP. Conclusions DCE-MRI may provide valuable information on the hypoxic fraction of squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix, and thereby facilitate individualized patient management.

  12. Ovarian tumor attachment, invasion and vascularization reflect unique microenvironments in the peritoneum:Insights from xenograft and mathematical models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara P. Steinkamp

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian cancer relapse is often characterized by metastatic spread throughout the peritoneal cavity with tumors attached to multiple organs. In this study, interaction of ovarian tumor cells with the peritoneal tumor microenvironment was evaluated in a xenograft model based on intraperitoneal injection of fluorescent SKOV3.ip1 ovarian cancer cells. Intra-vital microscopy of mixed GFP-RFP cell populations injected into the peritoneum demonstrated that tumor cells aggregate and attach as mixed spheroids, emphasizing the importance of homotypic adhesion in tumor formation. Electron microscopy provided high resolution structural information about local attachment sites. Experimental measurements from the mouse model were used to build a three-dimensional cellular Potts ovarian tumor model (OvTM that examines ovarian tumor cell attachment, chemotaxis, growth and vascularization. OvTM simulations provide insight into the relative influence of tumor cell-cell adhesion, oxygen availability, and local architecture on tumor growth and morphology. Notably, tumors on the mesentery, omentum or spleen readily invade the open architecture, while tumors attached to the gut encounter barriers that restrict invasion and instead rapidly expand into the peritoneal space. Simulations suggest that rapid neovascularization of SKOV3.ip1 tumors is triggered by constitutive release of angiogenic factors in the absence of hypoxia. This research highlights the importance of cellular adhesion and tumor microenvironment in the seeding of secondary ovarian tumors on diverse organs within the peritoneal cavity. Results of the OvTM simulations indicate that invasion is strongly influenced by features underlying the mesothelial lining at different sites, but is also affected by local production of chemotactic factors. The integrated in vivo mouse model and computer simulations provide a unique platform for evaluating targeted therapies for ovarian cancer relapse.

  13. Mass spectrometry images acylcarnitines, phosphatidylcholines, and sphingomyelin in MDA-MB-231 breast tumor models[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chughtai, Kamila; Jiang, Lu; Greenwood, Tiffany R.; Glunde, Kristine; Heeren, Ron M. A.

    2013-01-01

    The lipid compositions of different breast tumor microenvironments are largely unknown due to limitations in lipid imaging techniques. Imaging lipid distributions would enhance our understanding of processes occurring inside growing tumors, such as cancer cell proliferation, invasion, and metastasis. Recent developments in MALDI mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) enable rapid and specific detection of lipids directly from thin tissue sections. In this study, we performed multimodal imaging of acylcarnitines, phosphatidylcholines (PC), a lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC), and a sphingomyelin (SM) from different microenvironments of breast tumor xenograft models, which carried tdTomato red fluorescent protein as a hypoxia-response element-driven reporter gene. The MSI molecular lipid images revealed spatially heterogeneous lipid distributions within tumor tissue. Four of the most-abundant lipid species, namely PC(16:0/16:0), PC(16:0/18:1), PC(18:1/18:1), and PC(18:0/18:1), were localized in viable tumor regions, whereas LPC(16:0/0:0) was detected in necrotic tumor regions. We identified a heterogeneous distribution of palmitoylcarnitine, stearoylcarnitine, PC(16:0/22:1), and SM(d18:1/16:0) sodium adduct, which colocalized primarily with hypoxic tumor regions. For the first time, we have applied a multimodal imaging approach that has combined optical imaging and MALDI-MSI with ion mobility separation to spatially localize and structurally identify acylcarnitines and a variety of lipid species present in breast tumor xenograft models. PMID:22930811

  14. Aspirin blocks growth of breast tumor cells and tumor-initiating cells and induces reprogramming factors of mesenchymal to epithelial transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Gargi; De, Archana; Das, Amlan; Banerjee, Snigdha; Sarkar, Sandipto; Banerjee, Sushanta K

    2015-07-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), also known as aspirin, a classic, nonsteroidal, anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), is widely used to relieve minor aches and pains and to reduce fever. Epidemiological studies and other experimental studies suggest that ASA use reduces the risk of different cancers including breast cancer (BC) and may be used as a chemopreventive agent against BC and other cancers. These studies have raised the tempting possibility that ASA could serve as a preventive medicine for BC. However, lack of in-depth knowledge of the mechanism of action of ASA reshapes the debate of risk and benefit of using ASA in prevention of BC. Our studies, using in vitro and in vivo tumor xenograft models, show a strong beneficial effect of ASA in the prevention of breast carcinogenesis. We find that ASA not only prevents breast tumor cell growth in vitro and tumor growth in nude mice xenograft model through the induction of apoptosis, but also significantly reduces the self-renewal capacity and growth of breast tumor-initiating cells (BTICs)/breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) and delays the formation of a palpable tumor. Moreover, ASA regulates other pathophysiological events in breast carcinogenesis, such as reprogramming the mesenchymal to epithelial transition (MET) and delaying in vitro migration in BC cells. The tumor growth-inhibitory and reprogramming roles of ASA could be mediated through inhibition of TGF-β/SMAD4 signaling pathway that is associated with growth, motility, invasion, and metastasis in advanced BCs. Collectively, ASA has a therapeutic or preventive potential by attacking possible target such as TGF-β in breast carcinogenesis.

  15. King cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) venom L-amino acid oxidase induces apoptosis in PC-3 cells and suppresses PC-3 solid tumor growth in a tumor xenograft mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mui Li; Fung, Shin Yee; Chung, Ivy; Pailoor, Jayalakshmi; Cheah, Swee Hung; Tan, Nget Hong

    2014-01-01

    King cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) venom L-amino acid oxidase (OH-LAAO), a heat stable enzyme, has been shown to exhibit very potent anti-proliferative activity against human breast and lung tumorigenic cells but not in their non-tumorigenic counterparts. We further examine its in vitro and in vivo anti-tumor activity in a human prostate adenocarcinoma (PC-3) model. OH-LAAO demonstrated potent cytotoxicity against PC-3 cells with IC50 of 0.05 µg/mL after 72 h incubation in vitro. It induced apoptosis as evidenced with an increase in caspase-3/7 cleavages and an increase in annexin V-stained cells. To examine its in vivo anti-tumor activity, we treated PC-3 tumor xenograft implanted subcutaneously in immunodeficient NU/NU (nude) mice with 1 µg/g OH-LAAO given intraperitoneally (i.p.). After 8 weeks of treatment, OH-LAAO treated PC-3 tumors were markedly inhibited, when compared to the control group (P cobra venom LAAO can potentially be developed to treat prostate cancer and other solid tumors.

  16. Increased Plasma Colloid Osmotic Pressure Facilitates the Uptake of Therapeutic Macromolecules in a Xenograft Tumor Model1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Matthias; McCormack, Emmet; Mujiç, Maja; Roßberg, Maila; Bernd, August; Bereiter-Hahn, Jürgen; Gjertsen, Bjørn Tore; Wiig, Helge; Kippenberger, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Elevated tumor interstitial fluid pressure (TIFP) is a characteristic of most solid tumors. Clinically, TIFP may hamper the uptake of chemotherapeutic drugs into the tumor tissue reducing their therapeutic efficacy. In this study, a means of modulating TIFP to increase the flux of macromolecules into tumor tissue is presented, which is based on the rationale that elevated plasma colloid osmotic pressure (COP) pulls water from tumor interstitium lowering the TIFP. Concentrated human serum albumin (20% HSA), used as an agent to enhance COP, reduced the TIFP time-dependently from 8 to 2 mm Hg in human tumor xenograft models bearing A431 epidermoid vulva carcinomas. To evaluate whether this reduction facilitates the uptake of macromolecules, the intratumoral distribution of fluorescently conjugated dextrans (2.5 mg/ml) and cetuximab (2.0 mg/ml) was probed using novel time domain nearinfrared fluorescence imaging. This method permitted discrimination and semiquantification of tumor-accumulated conjugate from background and unspecific probe fluorescence. The coadministration of 20% HSA together with either dextrans or cetuximab was found to lower the TIFP significantly and increase the concentration of the substances within the tumor tissue in comparison to control tumors. Furthermore, combined administration of 20% HSA plus cetuximab reduced the tumor growth significantly in comparison to standard cetuximab treatment. These data demonstrate that increased COP lowers the TIFP within hours and increases the uptake of therapeutic macromolecules into the tumor interstitium leading to reduced tumor growth. This model represents a novel approach to facilitate the delivery of therapeutics into tumor tissue, particularly monoclonal antibodies. PMID:19649211

  17. Low penetrance breast cancer susceptibility loci are associated with specific breast tumor subtypes: findings from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Broeks, A; Schmidt, M.K; Sherman, M.E; Couch, F.J; Hopper, J.L; Dite, G.S; Apicella, C; Smith, L.D; Hammet, F; Southey, M.C; Veer, L.J. van 't; Groot, R. de; Smit, V.T; Fasching, P.A; Beckmann, M.W; Jud, S; Ekici, A.B; Hartmann, A; Hein, A; Schulz-Wendtland, R; Burwinkel, B; Marme, F; Schneeweiss, A; Sinn, H.P; Sohn, C; Tchatchou, S; Bojesen, S.E; Nordestgaard, B.G; Flyger, H; Orsted, D.D; Kaur-Knudsen, D; Milne, R.L; Perez, J.I; Zamora, P; Roiguez, P.M; Benitez, J; Brauch, H; Justenhoven, C; Ko, Y.D; Hamann, U; Fischer, H.P; Bruning, T; Pesch, B; Chang-Claude, J; Wang-Gohrke, S; Bremer, M; Karstens, J.H; Hillemanns, P; Dork, T; Nevanlinna, H.A; Heikkinen, T; Heikkila, P; Blomqvist, C; Aittomaki, K; Aaltonen, K; Lindblom, A; Margolin, S; Mannermaa, A; Kosma, V.M; Kauppinen, J.M; Kataja, V; Auvinen, P; Eskelinen, M; Soini, Y; Chenevix-Trench, G; Spurdle, A.B; Beesley, J; Chen, X; Holland, H; Lambrechts, D; Claes, B; Vandorpe, T; Neven, P; Wildiers, H; Flesch-Janys, D; Hein, R; Loning, T; Kosel, M; Fredericksen, Z.S; Wang, X; Giles, G.G; Baglietto, L; Severi, G; McLean, C; Haiman, C.A; Henderson, B.E; Marchand, L. le; Kolonel, L.N; Alnaes, G.G; Kristensen, V; Borresen-Dale, A.L; Hunter, D.J; Hankinson, S.E; Anulis, I.L; Mulligan, A.M; O'Malley, F.P; Devilee, P; Huijts, P.E; Tollenaar, R.A.E.M; Asperen, C.J. van

    2011-01-01

    .... We investigated breast cancer risk associations of eight susceptibility loci identified in GWAS and two putative susceptibility loci in candidate genes in relation to specific breast tumor subtypes...

  18. Comparison of planar, PET and well-counter measurements of total tumor radioactivity in a mouse xenograft model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Michael V; Seidel, Jurgen; Williams, Mark R; Wong, Karen J; Ton, Anita; Basuli, Falguni; Choyke, Peter L; Jagoda, Elaine M

    2017-10-01

    Quantitative small animal radionuclide imaging studies are often carried out with the intention of estimating the total radioactivity content of various tissues such as the radioactivity content of mouse xenograft tumors exposed to putative diagnostic or therapeutic agents. We show that for at least one specific application, positron projection imaging (PPI) and PET yield comparable estimates of absolute total tumor activity and that both of these estimates are highly correlated with direct well-counting of these same tumors. These findings further suggest that in this particular application, PPI is a far more efficient data acquisition and processing methodology than PET. Forty-one athymic mice were implanted with PC3 human prostate cancer cells transfected with prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA (+)) and one additional animal (for a total of 42) with a control blank vector (PSMA (-)). All animals were injected with [18F] DCFPyl, a ligand for PSMA, and imaged for total tumor radioactivity with PET and PPI. The tumors were then removed, assayed by well counting for total radioactivity and the values between these methods intercompared. PET, PPI and well-counter estimates of total tumor radioactivity were highly correlated (R2>0.98) with regression line slopes near unity (0.95tumor radioactivity can be measured with PET or PPI with an accuracy comparable to well counting if certain experimental and pharmacokinetic conditions are met. In this particular application, PPI is significantly more efficient than PET in making these measurements. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Dll4 blockade potentiates the anti-tumor effects of VEGF inhibition in renal cell carcinoma patient-derived xenografts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiersten Marie Miles

    Full Text Available The Notch ligand Delta-like 4 (Dll4 is highly expressed in vascular endothelium and has been shown to play a pivotal role in regulating tumor angiogenesis. Blockade of the Dll4-Notch pathway in preclinical cancer models has been associated with non-productive angiogenesis and reduced tumor growth. Given the cross-talk between the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and Delta-Notch pathways in tumor angiogenesis, we examined the activity of a function-blocking Dll4 antibody, REGN1035, alone and in combination with anti-VEGF therapy in renal cell carcinoma (RCC.Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mice bearing patient-derived clear cell RCC xenografts were treated with REGN1035 and in combination with the multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor sunitinib or the VEGF blocker ziv-aflibercept. Immunohistochemical and immunofluorescent analyses were carried out, as well as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI examinations pre and 24 hours and 2 weeks post treatment. Single agent treatment with REGN1035 resulted in significant tumor growth inhibition (36-62% that was equivalent to or exceeded the single agent anti-tumor activity of the VEGF pathway inhibitors sunitinib (38-54% and ziv-aflibercept (46%. Importantly, combination treatments with REGN1035 plus VEGF inhibitors resulted in enhanced anti-tumor effects (72-80% growth inhibition, including some tumor regression. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a marked decrease in tumor perfusion in all treatment groups. Interestingly, anti-tumor efficacy of the combination of REGN1035 and ziv-aflibercept was also observed in a sunitinib resistant ccRCC model.Overall, these findings demonstrate the potent anti-tumor activity of Dll4 blockade in RCC patient-derived tumors and a combination benefit for the simultaneous targeting of the Dll4 and VEGF signaling pathways, highlighting the therapeutic potential of this treatment modality in RCC.

  20. Loss of CSL Unlocks a Hypoxic Response and Enhanced Tumor Growth Potential in Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eike-Benjamin Braune

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Notch signaling is an important regulator of stem cell differentiation. All canonical Notch signaling is transmitted through the DNA-binding protein CSL, and hyperactivated Notch signaling is associated with tumor development; thus it may be anticipated that CSL deficiency should reduce tumor growth. In contrast, we report that genetic removal of CSL in breast tumor cells caused accelerated growth of xenografted tumors. Loss of CSL unleashed a hypoxic response during normoxic conditions, manifested by stabilization of the HIF1α protein and acquisition of a polyploid giant-cell, cancer stem cell-like, phenotype. At the transcriptome level, loss of CSL upregulated more than 1,750 genes and less than 3% of those genes were part of the Notch transcriptional signature. Collectively, this suggests that CSL exerts functions beyond serving as the central node in the Notch signaling cascade and reveals a role for CSL in tumorigenesis and regulation of the cellular hypoxic response.

  1. Human amniotic fluid-derived stem cells expressing cytosine deaminase and thymidine kinase inhibits the growth of breast cancer cells in cellular and xenograft mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, N-H; Hwang, K-A; Yi, B-R; Lee, H J; Jeung, E-B; Kim, S U; Choi, K-C

    2012-06-01

    As human amniotic fluid-derived stem cells (hAFSCs) are capable of multiple lineage differentiation, extensive self-renewal and tumor targeting, they may be valuable for clinical anticancer therapies. In this study, we used hAFSCs as vehicles for targeted delivery of therapeutic suicide genes to breast cancer cells. hAFSCs were engineered to produce AF2.CD-TK cells in order to express two suicide genes encoding bacterial cytosine deaminase (CD) and herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-TK) that convert non-toxic prodrugs, 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) and mono-phosphorylate ganciclovir (GCV-MP), into cytotoxic metabolites, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and triphosphate ganciclovir (GCV-TP), respectively. In cell viability test in vitro, AF2.CD-TK cells inhibited the growth of MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells in the presence of the 5-FC or GCV prodrugs, or a combination of these two reagents. When the mixture of 5-FC and GCV was treated together, an additive cytotoxic effect was observed in the cell viability. In animal experiments using female BALB/c nude mouse xenografts, which developed by injecting MDA-MB-231 cells, treatment with AF2.CD-TK cells in the presence of 5-FC and GCV significantly reduced tumor volume and weight to the same extent seen in the mice treated with 5-FU. Histopathological and fluorescent staining assays further showed that AF2.CD-TK cells were located exactly at the site of tumor formation. Furthermore, breast tissues treated with AF2.CD-TK cells and two prodrugs maintained their normal structures (for example, the epidermis and reticular layers) while breast tissue structures in 5-FU-treated mice were almost destroyed by the potent cytotoxicity of the drug. Taken together, these results indicate that AF2.CD-TK cells can serve as excellent vehicles in a novel therapeutic cell-based gene-directed prodrug system to selectively target breast malignancies.

  2. Ovarian tumor attachment, invasion, and vascularization reflect unique microenvironments in the peritoneum: insights from xenograft and mathematical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinkamp, Mara P; Winner, Kimberly Kanigel; Davies, Suzy; Muller, Carolyn; Zhang, Yong; Hoffman, Robert M; Shirinifard, Abbas; Moses, Melanie; Jiang, Yi; Wilson, Bridget S

    2013-01-01

    Ovarian cancer relapse is often characterized by metastatic spread throughout the peritoneal cavity with tumors attached to multiple organs. In this study, interaction of ovarian cancer cells with the peritoneal tumor microenvironment was evaluated in a xenograft model based on intraperitoneal injection of fluorescent SKOV3.ip1 ovarian cancer cells. Intra-vital microscopy of mixed GFP-red fluorescent protein (RFP) cell populations injected into the peritoneum demonstrated that cancer cells aggregate and attach as mixed spheroids, emphasizing the importance of homotypic adhesion in tumor formation. Electron microscopy provided high resolution structural information about local attachment sites. Experimental measurements from the mouse model were used to build a three-dimensional cellular Potts ovarian tumor model (OvTM) that examines ovarian cancer cell attachment, chemotaxis, growth, and vascularization. OvTM simulations provide insight into the relative influence of cancer cell-cell adhesion, oxygen availability, and local architecture on tumor growth and morphology. Notably, tumors on the mesentery, omentum, or spleen readily invade the "open" architecture, while tumors attached to the gut encounter barriers that restrict invasion and instead rapidly expand into the peritoneal space. Simulations suggest that rapid neovascularization of SKOV3.ip1 tumors is triggered by constitutive release of angiogenic factors in the absence of hypoxia. This research highlights the importance of cellular adhesion and tumor microenvironment in the seeding of secondary ovarian tumors on diverse organs within the peritoneal cavity. Results of the OvTM simulations indicate that invasion is strongly influenced by features underlying the mesothelial lining at different sites, but is also affected by local production of chemotactic factors. The integrated in vivo mouse model and computer simulations provide a unique platform for evaluating targeted therapies for ovarian cancer relapse.

  3. Tumor-targeted gene therapy using Adv-AFP-HRPC/IAA prodrug system suppresses growth of hepatoma xenografted in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, M; Liu, J; Chen, D-E; Rao, Y; Tang, Z-J; Ho, W-Z; Dong, C-Y

    2012-02-01

    Clinical efficacy of current therapies for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treatment is limited. Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) is non-toxic for mammalian cells. Oxidative decarboxylation of IAA by horseradish peroxidase (HRP) leads to toxic effects of IAA. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a novel gene-targeted enzyme prodrug therapy with IAA on hepatoma growth in vitro and in vivo mouse hepatoma models. We generated a plasmid using adenovirus to express HRP isoenzyme C (HRPC) with the HCC marker, alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), as the promoter (pAdv-AFP-HRPC). Hepatocellular cells were infected with pAdv-AFP-HRPC and treated with IAA. Cell death was detected using MTT assay. Hepatoma xenografts were developed in mice by injection of mouse hepatoma cells. The size and weight of tumors and organs were evaluated. Cell death in tumors was assessed using hematoxylin and eosin-stained tissue sections. HRPC expression in tissues was detected using Reverse Transcriptase-Polymerase Chain Reaction. IAA stimulated death of hepatocellular cells infected with pAdv-AFP-HRPC, in a dose- and time-dependent manner, but not in control cells. Growth of hepatoma xenografts, including the size and weight, was inhibited in mice treated with pAdv-AFP-HRPC and IAA, compared with that in control group. pAdv-AFP-HRPC/IAA treatment induced cell death in hepatoma xenografts in mice. HRPC gene expressed only in hepatoma, but not in other normal organs of mice. pAdv-AFP-HRPC/IAA treatment did not cause any side effects on normal organs. These findings suggest that pAdv-AFP-HRPC/IAA enzyme/prodrug system may serve as a strategy for HCC therapy.

  4. S14 as a Therapeutic Target in Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kinlaw, William

    2004-01-01

    .... Our aims are first to develop a model of anti-S14 breast cancer therapy in mice. Intratumoral adenoviral delivery of an S14-antisense gene into human breast cancer cell xenografts caused a significant inhibition of tumor growth...

  5. High-Dose, Single-Fraction Irradiation Rapidly Reduces Tumor Vasculature and Perfusion in a Xenograft Model of Neuroblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jani, Ashish; Shaikh, Fauzia; Barton, Sunjay [Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Willis, Callen [Department of Surgery, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Banerjee, Debarshi [Department of Pediatrics, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Mitchell, Jason [Department of Surgery, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Hernandez, Sonia L. [Department of Surgery, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Hei, Tom [Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Kadenhe-Chiweshe, Angela [Department of Surgery, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Yamashiro, Darrell J. [Department of Surgery, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Connolly, Eileen P., E-mail: epc2116@cumc.columbia.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Purpose: To characterize the effects of high-dose radiation therapy (HDRT) on neuroblastoma tumor vasculature, including the endothelial cell (EC)–pericyte interaction as a potential target for combined treatment with antiangiogenic agents. Methods and Materials: The vascular effects of radiation therapy were examined in a xenograft model of high-risk neuroblastoma. In vivo 3-dimensional contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (3D-CEUS) imaging and immunohistochemistry (IHC) were performed. Results: HDRT significantly reduced tumor blood volume 6 hours after irradiation compared with the lower doses used in conventionally fractionated radiation. There was a 63% decrease in tumor blood volume after 12-Gy radiation compared with a 24% decrease after 2 Gy. Analysis of tumor vasculature by lectin angiography showed a significant loss of small vessel ends at 6 hours. IHC revealed a significant loss of ECs at 6 and 72 hours after HDRT, with an accompanying loss of immature and mature pericytes at 72 hours. Conclusions: HDRT affects tumor vasculature in a manner not observed at lower doses. The main observation was an early reduction in tumor perfusion resulting from a reduction of small vessel ends with a corresponding loss of endothelial cells and pericytes.

  6. Development and Maintenance of a Preclinical Patient Derived Tumor Xenograft Model for the Investigation of Novel Anti-Cancer Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagby, Stacey; Messersmith, Wells A; Pitts, Todd M; Capasso, Anna; Varella-Garcia, Marileila; Klauck, Peter J; Kim, Jihye; Tan, Aik-Choon; Eckhardt, S Gail; Tentler, John J; Arcaroli, John

    2016-09-30

    Patient derived tumor xenograft (PDTX) models provide a necessary platform in facilitating anti-cancer drug development prior to human trials. Human tumor pieces are injected subcutaneously into athymic nude mice (immunocompromised, T cell deficient) to create a bank of tumors and subsequently are passaged into different generations of mice in order to maintain these tumors from patients. Importantly, cellular heterogeneity of the original tumor is closely emulated in this model, which provides a more clinically relevant model for evaluation of drug efficacy studies (single agent and combination), biomarker analysis, resistant pathways and cancer stem cell biology. Some limitations of the PDTX model include the replacement of the human stroma with mouse stroma after the first generation in mice, inability to investigate treatment effects on metastasis due to the subcutaneous injections of the tumors, and the lack of evaluation of immunotherapies due to the use of immunocompromised mice. However, even with these limitations, the PDTX model provides a powerful preclinical platform in the drug discovery process.

  7. Tumor markers of breast cancer: New prospectives

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed M. Kabel

    2017-01-01

    Tumor markers are substances produced by the tumors or by other cells of the body in response to cancer or certain benign conditions. Although most of these markers are made by the normal cells as well as by cancer cells, they are produced at much higher levels in cancerous conditions. These markers are used to evaluate the patient's response to treatment and to detect the presence of metastasis or recurrence. Breast cancer is one of the most common malignancies in females worldwide. The CA 2...

  8. Recurrent malignant phyllodes tumor of the breast: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qinqin; Su, Jing; Lei, Yutao

    2017-12-01

    Phyllodes tumor is a rare fibro epithelial neoplasm of the breast. They resemble fibroadenomas clinically and can be mistakenly ignored sometimes. We report the case of a young woman with her first presentation to hospital due to a hypoglycemia and she underwent 2 excised fibroadenomas in the same breast before diagnosed of malignant phyllodes tumor. She was complaining about 2 masses presented in her right breast 4 months after mastectomy. Recurrent phyllodes tumor of the breast. We conducted an immediate autologous myocutaneous flap transplantation after a wide-excision. Postoperative radiotherapy was recommended. She was in good general condition without tumor relapses during 8 months of follow-up. Recurrent fibroadenomas in the same breast, especially those of large size with rapid growth rate, suggesting a high transformation possibility from fibroadenoma to phyllodes tumor. We recommend an extended tumor resection and immediate or delayed reconstruction of the breast for the recurrent phyllodes tumor with separately multiple relapses.

  9. Collision tumor with inflammatory breast carcinoma and malignant phyllodes tumor: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Young Duck; Lee, Seul Kee; Kim, Kyu Sun; Park, Mi Ja; Kim, Joo Heon; Yim, Hyun Sun; Choi, Young Jin

    2014-01-08

    There have been some reports of coincidental presentation of breast carcinoma and phyllodes tumor in the same breast. Most of the cases were carcinoma that arose from a phyllodes tumor with a histologically identified transitional area, and they behaved less aggressively than the usually encountered carcinoma. Collision tumors are rare clinical entities in which two histologically distinct tumor types show involvement at the same site. The occurrence of these tumors in the breast is extremely rare. Here, we report a case of 45-year-old woman who had both invasive ductal carcinoma as the finding of inflammatory carcinoma and a malignant phyllodes tumor in the same breast. There was no evidence of a transitional area between the phyllodes tumor and the invasive ductal carcinoma. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a collision tumor of inflammatory breast carcinoma coincident with a malignant phyllodes tumor in same breast.

  10. Photonic Breast Tomography and Tumor Aggressiveness Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    Caspase-3. • Drug (PD901) treatment and cell growth curve m easurement for OVCAR5, T24 , and UMUC3 cell lines. • Flow cytometry technique for cell ...spectroscopic approaches for breast tumor detection. The CCNY researchers received training on (i) small animal handling; (ii) Cell culture, bioluminescence...aging techniques, cell culture, bioluminescence assay, Western Blotting, and other key techniques used in cancer research. Rotation I Laboratory

  11. Real-time PCR-based assay to quantify the relative amount of human and mouse tissue present in tumor xenografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alcoser Sergio Y

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Xenograft samples used to test anti-cancer drug efficacies and toxicities in vivo contain an unknown mix of mouse and human cells. Evaluation of drug activity can be confounded by samples containing large amounts of contaminating mouse tissue. We have developed a real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR assay using TaqMan technology to quantify the amount of mouse tissue that is incorporated into human xenograft samples. Results The forward and reverse primers bind to the same DNA sequence in the human and the mouse genome. Using a set of specially designed fluorescent probes provides species specificity. The linearity and sensitivity of the assay is evaluated using serial dilutions of single species and heterogeneous DNA mixtures. We examined many xenograft samples at various in vivo passages, finding a wide variety of human:mouse DNA ratios. This variation may be influenced by tumor type, number of serial passages in vivo, and even which part of the tumor was collected and used in the assay. Conclusions This novel assay provides an accurate quantitative assessment of human and mouse content in xenograft tumors. This assay can be performed on aberrantly behaving human xenografts, samples used in bioinformatics studies, and periodically for tumor tissue frequently grown by serial passage in vivo.

  12. Malignant phyllodes tumor of the breast: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keim-Malpass, Jessica; Mills, Anne M; Showalter, Shayna L

    2014-10-01

    Malignant phyllodes tumors of the breast are rare, fast-growing tumors that can be difficult to diagnose. A case study is featured about a young adult patient who lacked insurance and received a delayed diagnosis of malignant phyllodes tumor of the breast. This article includes pertinent clinical and age-specific considerations for comprehensive management.

  13. Loss of LSR affects epithelial barrier integrity and tumor xenograft growth of CaCo-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czulkies, Bernd A; Mastroianni, Justin; Lutz, Lisa; Lang, Sarah; Schwan, Carsten; Schmidt, Gudula; Lassmann, Silke; Zeiser, Robert; Aktories, Klaus; Papatheodorou, Panagiotis

    2017-06-06

    The lipolysis-stimulated lipoprotein receptor (LSR) is a lipoprotein receptor, serves as host receptor for clostridial iota-like toxins and is involved in the formation of tricellular contacts. Of particular interest is the role of LSR in progression of various cancers. Here we aimed to study the tumor growth of LSR-deficient colon carcinoma-derived cell lines HCT116 and CaCo-2 in a mouse xenograft model. Whereas knockout of LSR had no effect on tumor growth of HCT116 cells, we observed that CaCo-2 LSR knockout tumors grew to a smaller size than their wild-type counterparts. Histological analysis revealed increased apoptotic and necrotic cell death in a tumor originating from LSR-deficient CaCo-2 cells. LSR-deficient CaCo-2 cells exhibited increased cell proliferation in vitro and an altered epithelial morphology with impaired targeting of tricellulin to tricellular contacts. In addition, loss of LSR reduced the transepithelial electrical resistance of CaCo-2 cell monolayers and increased permeability for small molecules. Moreover, LSR-deficient CaCo-2 cells formed larger cysts in 3D culture than their wild-type counterparts. Our study provides evidence that LSR affects epithelial morphology and barrier formation in CaCo-2 cells and examines for the first time the effects of LSR deficiency on the tumor growth properties of colon carcinoma-derived cell lines.

  14. Drug Helps Fight Breast Tumors Tied to 'Cancer Genes'

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Drug Helps Fight Breast Tumors Tied to 'Cancer Genes' Lynparza may offer a new treatment for women ... with breast cancer linked to BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations, according to the study. Olaparib delayed cancer ...

  15. Gleditsia Saponin C Induces A549 Cell Apoptosis via Caspase-Dependent Cascade and Suppresses Tumor Growth on Xenografts Tumor Animal Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Cheng

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Saponins are natural compounds and possess the most promising anti-cancer function. Here, a saponin gleditsia saponin C (GSC, extracted from gleditsiae fructus abnormalis, could induce apoptosis of lung tumor cell line A549 via caspase dependent cascade and this effect could be prevented by the caspase inhibitors. In addition, GSC induced cell death companied with an increase ratio of Bax:Bcl-2 and inhibition of ERK and Akt signaling pathways. Meanwhile, GSC suppressed TNFα inducing NF-κB activation and increased the susceptibility of lung cancer cell to TNFα induced apoptosis. Furthermore, on mouse xenograft model, GSC significantly suppressed tumor growth and induced cancer cell apoptosis, which validated the anti-tumor effect of GSC. Based on these results, GSC might be a promising drug candidate of anti-lung cancer for its potential clinical applications.

  16. Inhibition of Pediatric Glioblastoma Tumor Growth by the Anti-Cancer Agent OKN-007 in Orthotopic Mouse Xenografts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Coutinho de Souza

    Full Text Available Pediatric glioblastomas (pGBM, although rare, are one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths in children, with tumors essentially refractory to existing treatments. Here, we describe the use of conventional and advanced in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI techniques to assess a novel orthotopic xenograft pGBM mouse (IC-3752GBM patient-derived culture model, and to monitor the effects of the anti-cancer agent OKN-007 as an inhibitor of pGBM tumor growth. Immunohistochemistry support data is also presented for cell proliferation and tumor growth signaling. OKN-007 was found to significantly decrease tumor volumes (p<0.05 and increase animal survival (p<0.05 in all OKN-007-treated mice compared to untreated animals. In a responsive cohort of treated animals, OKN-007 was able to significantly decrease tumor volumes (p<0.0001, increase survival (p<0.001, and increase diffusion (p<0.01 and perfusion rates (p<0.05. OKN-007 also significantly reduced lipid tumor metabolism in responsive animals [(Lip1.3 and Lip0.9-to-creatine ratio (p<0.05], as well as significantly decrease tumor cell proliferation (p<0.05 and microvessel density (p<0.05. Furthermore, in relationship to the PDGFRα pathway, OKN-007 was able to significantly decrease SULF2 (p<0.05 and PDGFR-α (platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α (p<0.05 immunoexpression, and significantly increase decorin expression (p<0.05 in responsive mice. This study indicates that OKN-007 may be an effective anti-cancer agent for some patients with pGBMs by inhibiting cell proliferation and angiogenesis, possibly via the PDGFRα pathway, and could be considered as an additional therapy for pediatric brain tumor patients.

  17. Blood vessel hyperpermeability and pathophysiology in human tumour xenograft models of breast cancer: a comparison of ectopic and orthotopic tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Karyn S

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human tumour xenografts in immune compromised mice are widely used as cancer models because they are easy to reproduce and simple to use in a variety of pre-clinical assessments. Developments in nanomedicine have led to the use of tumour xenografts in testing nanoscale delivery devices, such as nanoparticles and polymer-drug conjugates, for targeting and efficacy via the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR effect. For these results to be meaningful, the hyperpermeable vasculature and reduced lymphatic drainage associated with tumour pathophysiology must be replicated in the model. In pre-clinical breast cancer xenograft models, cells are commonly introduced via injection either orthotopically (mammary fat pad, MFP or ectopically (subcutaneous, SC, and the organ environment experienced by the tumour cells has been shown to influence their behaviour. Methods To evaluate xenograft models of breast cancer in the context of EPR, both orthotopic MFP and ectopic SC injections of MDA-MB-231-H2N cells were given to NOD scid gamma (NSG mice. Animals with matched tumours in two size categories were tested by injection of a high molecular weight dextran as a model nanocarrier. Tumours were collected and sectioned to assess dextran accumulation compared to liver tissue as a positive control. To understand the cellular basis of these observations, tumour sections were also immunostained for endothelial cells, basement membranes, pericytes, and lymphatic vessels. Results SC tumours required longer development times to become size matched to MFP tumours, and also presented wide size variability and ulcerated skin lesions 6 weeks after cell injection. The 3 week MFP tumour model demonstrated greater dextran accumulation than the size matched 5 week SC tumour model (for P  Conclusions Dextran accumulation and immunostaining results suggest that small MFP tumours best replicate the vascular permeability required to observe the EPR effect

  18. The use of matrigel has no influence on tumor development or PET imaging in FaDu human head and neck cancer xenografts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fliedner, Frederikke P.; Hansen, Anders Elias; Jorgensen, Jesper T.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In preclinical research MatrixgelTM Basement Membrane Matrix (MG) is used frequently for the establishment of syngeneic and xenograft cancer models. Limited information on its influence on parameters including; tumor growth, vascularization, hypoxia and imaging characteristics...... is currently available. This study evaluates the potential effect of matrigel use in a human head and neck cancer xenograft model (FaDu; hypopharyngeal carcinoma) in NMRI nude mice. The FaDu cell line was chosen based on its frequent use in studies of cancer imaging and tumor microenvironment. Methods: NMRI...

  19. Effect of antidepressants on body weight, ethology and tumor growth of human pancreatic carcinoma xenografts in nude mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Lin; Shang, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Yu-Yuan

    2008-07-21

    To investigate the effects of mirtazapine and fluoxetine, representatives of the noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressant (NaSSA) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressant respectively, on body weight, ingestive behavior, locomotor activity and tumor growth of human pancreatic carcinoma xenografts in nude mice. A subcutaneous xenograft model of human pancreatic cancer cell line SW1990 was established in nude mice. The tumor-bearing mice were randomly divided into mirtazapine group (10 mg/kg per day), fluoxetine group (10 mg/kg per day) and control group (an equivalent normal saline solution) (7 mice in each group). Doses of all drugs were administered orally, once a day for 42 d. Tumor volume and body weight were measured biweekly. Food intake was recorded once a week. Locomotor activity was detected weekly using an open field test (OFT). Compared to the fluoxetine, mirtazapine significantly increased food intake from d 14 to 42 and attenuated the rate of weight loss from d 28 to 42 (t = 4.38, P < 0.05). Compared to the control group, food intake was significantly suppressed from d 21 to 42 and weight loss was promoted from d 35 to 42 in the fluoxetine group (t = 2.52, P < 0.05). There was a significant difference in body weight of the mice after removal of tumors among the three groups. The body weight of mice was the heaviest (13.66 +/- 1.55 g) in the mirtazapine group and the lightest (11.39 +/- 1.45 g) in the fluoxetine group (F( (2,12) ) = 11.43, P < 0.01). The behavioral test on d 7 showed that the horizontal and vertical activities were significantly increased in the mirtazapine group compared with the fluoxetine and control groups (F( (2,18) ) = 10.89, P < 0.01). These effects disappeared in the mirtazapine and fluoxetine groups during 2-6 wk. The grooming activity was higher in the mirtazapine group than in the fluoxetine group (10.1 +/- 2.1 vs 7.1 +/- 1.9 ) (t = 2.40, P < 0.05) in the second week. There was no

  20. The Impact of the Low Molecular Weight Heparin Tinzaparin on the Sensitization of Cisplatin-Resistant Ovarian Cancers-Preclinical In Vivo Evaluation in Xenograft Tumor Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Thomas; Pfankuchen, Daniel Bastian; Wantoch von Rekowski, Kathleen; Schlesinger, Martin; Reipsch, Franziska; Bendas, Gerd

    2017-05-03

    Resistance formation of tumors against chemotherapeutics is the major obstacle in clinical cancer therapy. Although low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) is an important component in oncology referring to guideline-based antithrombotic prophylaxis of tumor patients, a potential interference of LMWH with chemoresistance is unknown. We have recently shown that LMWH reverses the cisplatin resistance of A2780cis human ovarian cancer cells in vitro. Here we address the question whether this LMWH effect is also valid under in vivo conditions. Therefore, we established tumor xenografts of A2780 and cisplatin resistant A2780cis cells in nude mice and investigated the impact of daily tinzaparin applications (10 mg/kg BW) on anti-tumor activity of cisplatin (6 mg/kg BW, weekly) considering the tumor growth kinetics. Intratumoral platinum accumulation was detected by GF-AAS. Xenografts of A2780 and A2780cis cells strongly differed in cisplatin sensitivity. As an overall consideration, tinzaparin co-treatment affected the response to cisplatin of A2780cis, but not A2780 tumors in the later experimental time range. A subgroup analysis confirmed that initially smaller A2780cis tumors benefit from tinzaparin, but also small A2780 xenografts. Tinzaparin did not affect cisplatin accumulation in A2780cis xenografts, but strongly increased the platinum content in A2780, obviously related to morphological differences in both xenografts. Although we cannot directly confirm a return of A2780cis cisplatin resistance by tinzaparin, as shown in vitro, the present findings give reason to discuss heparin effects on cytostatic drug efficiency for small tumors and warrants further investigation.

  1. Cisplatin and photodynamic therapy exert synergistic inhibitory effects on small-cell lung cancer cell viability and xenograft tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, You-Shuang; Peng, Yin-Bo; Yao, Min; Teng, Ji-Ping; Ni, Da; Zhu, Zhi-Jun; Zhuang, Bu-Feng; Yang, Zhi-Yin

    2017-06-03

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive type of lung cancer that shows an overall 5-year survival rate below 10%. Although chemotherapy using cisplatin has been proven effective in SCLC treatment, conventional dose of cisplatin causes adverse side effects. Photodynamic therapy, a form of non-ionizing radiation therapy, is increasingly used alone or in combination with other therapeutics in cancer treatment. Herein, we aimed to address whether low dose cisplatin combination with PDT can effectively induce SCLC cell death by using in vitro cultured human SCLC NCI-H446 cells and in vivo tumor xenograft model. We found that both cisplatin and PDT showed dose-dependent cytotoxic effects in NCI-H446 cells. Importantly, co-treatment with low dose cisplatin (1 μM) and PDT (1.25 J/cm2) synergistically inhibited cell viability and cell migration. We further showed that the combined therapy induced a higher level of intracellular ROS in cultured NCI-H446 cells. Moreover, the synergistic effect by cisplatin and PDT was recapitulated in tumor xenograft as revealed by a more robust increase in the staining of TUNEL (a marker of cell death) and decrease in tumor volume. Taken together, our findings suggest that low dose cisplatin combination with PDT can be an effective therapeutic modality in the treatment of SCLC patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A direct comparison of tumor angiogenesis with ⁶⁸Ga-labeled NGR and RGD peptides in HT-1080 tumor xenografts using microPET imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yahui; Liang, Wansheng; Kang, Fei; Yang, Weidong; Ma, Xiaowei; Li, Guiyu; Zong, Shu; Chen, Kai; Wang, Jing

    2014-10-01

    Peptides containing asparagine-glycine-arginine (NGR) and arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) sequence are being developed for tumor angiogenesis-targeted imaging and therapy. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of NGR- and RGD-based probes for imaging tumor angiogenesis in HT-1080 tumor xenografts. Two PET probes, (68)Ga-NOTA-G₃-NGR2 and ⁶⁸Ga-NOTA-G₃-RGD2, were successfully prepared. In vitro stability, partition coefficient, tumor cell binding, as well as in vivo biodistribution properties were also analyzed for both PET probes. The results revealed that the two probes were both hydrophilic and stable in vitro and in vivo, and they were excreted predominately and rapidly through the kidneys. For both probes, the higher tumor uptake and lower accumulation in vital organs were determined. No significant difference between two probes was observed in terms of tumor uptake and the in vivo biodistribution properties. We concluded that these two probes are promising in tumor angiogenesis imaging. ⁶⁸Ga-NOTA-G₃-NGR2 has the potential as an alternative for PET imaging in patients with fibrosarcoma, and it may offer an opportunity to noninvasively monitor CD13-targeted therapy.

  3. In vivo VEGF imaging with radiolabeled bevacizumab in a human ovarian tumor xenograft

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagengast, Wouter B.; Hospers, Geke A.; Mulder, Nanno H.; de Jong, Johan R.; Hollema, Harry; Brouwers, Adrienne H.; van Dongen, Guns A.; Perk, Lars R.; Lub-de Hooge, Marjolijn N.

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), released by tumor cells, is an important growth factor in tumor angiogenesis. The humanized monoclonal antibody bevacizumab blocks VEGF-induced tumor angiogenesis by binding, thereby neutralizing VEGF. Our aim was to develop radiolabeled bevacizumab for

  4. Synthetic paclitaxel-octreotide conjugate reversing the resistance of A2780/Taxol to paclitaxel in xenografted tumor in nude mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Zhang, Xiao-Yu; Shen, Yang; Fan, Li-Li; Ren, Mu-Lan; Wu, Yong-Ping

    2016-12-13

    Peptide hormone-based targeted therapy to tumors has been studied extensively. Our previous study shows that somatostatin receptor expresses high level on drug-resistant human ovarian cancer. The paclitaxel-octreotide conjugate (POC) exhibits enhanced growth inhibition, as well as reduced toxicity, in paclitaxel-resistant human ovarian cancer cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of targeted cytotoxicity and potential reversal mechanism of resistance in paclitaxel-resistant human ovarian cancer cells xenografted into nude mice. The SSTR2 shows higher expression levels in tumor tissue. Moreover, fluorescein-labeled POC displays favorable targeting in tumor cells. POC presents the perfect efficacy in inhibiting tumor growth and exerts lower or no toxic effects on normal tissues. Real-time PCR and Western Blotting has demonstrated that the mRNA and protein expressions of SSTR2 in POC group were significantly higher, while MDR1, α-tubulin, βIII-tubulin, VEGF and MMP-9 were significantly lower than in the other treatment groups and controls. Combined with the previous study in vitro, this study evaluates an effective approach on the treatment of paclitaxel-resistant ovarian cancer which expresses somatostatin receptor SSTR. Our investigation has also revealed the possible molecular mechanism of POC in treating the ovarian cancer, and therefore, provided a theoretical basis for the clinical application of this newly-invented compound.

  5. SLITs suppress tumor growth in vivo by silencing Sdf1/Cxcr4 within breast epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlow, Rebecca; Strickland, Phyllis; Lee, Ji Shin; Wu, Xinyan; Pebenito, Milana; Binnewies, Mikhail; Le, Elizabeth K; Moran, Angel; Macias, Hector; Cardiff, Robert D; Sukumar, Saraswati; Hinck, Lindsay

    2008-10-01

    The genes encoding Slits and their Robo receptors are silenced in many types of cancer, including breast, suggesting a role for this signaling pathway in suppressing tumorigenesis. The molecular mechanism underlying these tumor-suppressive effects has not been delineated. Here, we show that loss of Slits, or their Robo1 receptor, in murine mammary gland or human breast carcinoma cells results in coordinate up-regulation of the Sdf1 and Cxcr4 signaling axis, specifically within mammary epithelium. This is accompanied by hyperplastic changes in cells and desmoplastic alterations in the surrounding stroma. A similar inverse correlation between Slit and Cxcr4 expression is identified in human breast tumor tissues. Furthermore, we show in a xenograft model that Slit overexpression down-regulates CXCR4 and dominantly suppresses tumor growth. These studies classify Slits as negative regulators of Sdf1 and Cxcr4 and identify a molecular signature in hyperplastic breast lesions that signifies inappropriate up-regulation of key prometastatic genes.

  6. HER2 Expression Changes in Breast Cancer Xenografts Following Therapeutic Intervention Can Be Quantified Using PET Imaging and 18F-Labelled Affibody Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer-Marek, Gabriela; Kiesewetter, Dale O.; Capala, Jacek

    2009-01-01

    Rationale In vivo imaging of HER2 expression may allow direct assessment of HER2 status in tumor tissue and provide means to quantify changes in receptor expression following HER2-targeted therapies. This work describes in vivo characterization of HER2-specific 18F-FBEM-ZHER2:342–Affibody molecule and its application to study the effect of 17-DMAG on HER2 expression by PET imaging. Methods To assess the correlation of signal observed by PET with receptor expression, the tracer was administered to athymic nude mice bearing subcutaneous human breast cancer xenografts with different levels of HER2 expression. To study the down-regulation of HER2, mice were treated with four doses (40 mg/kg) of 17-DMAG, an inhibitor of Hsp90, known to decrease the HER2 expression. Animals were scanned before and after the treatment. After the last scan, mice were euthanized and tumors were frozen for receptor analysis. Results The tracer was eliminated quickly from the blood and normal tissues, providing high tumor/blood and tumor/muscle ratios as early as 20 min post injection. The high contrast images between normal and tumor tissue were recorded for BT474 and MCF7/clone18 tumors. Very low but still detectable uptake was observed for MCF7 tumors and none for MDA-MB-468. The signal correlated with the receptor expression assessed by immunohistochemistry as well as western blot and ELISA. The levels of HER2 expression, estimated by post-treatment PET imaging, decreased 71% (p < 4 × 10−6) and 33% (p < 0.002), respectively, for BT474- and MCF7/clone18-tumor bearing mice. These changes were confirmed by the biodistribution studies, ELISA and western blot. Conclusion Our results suggest that the described 18F-FBEM-ZHER2:342–Affibody molecule can be used to assess HER2 expression in vivo by PET imaging and monitor possible changes of receptor expression in response to therapeutic interventions. PMID:19525458

  7. Detection of Hypoxia in Human Brain Tumor Xenografts Using a Modified Comet Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingli Wang

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available We used the standard comet assay successfully to generate in vitro dose-response curves under oxic and hypoxic conditions. We then made mixtures of cells that had been irradiated with 3 and 9 Gy of X-rays to simulate two subpopulations in a tumor, but efforts to accurately detect and quantify the subpopulations using the standard comet assay were unsuccessful. Therefore, we investigated a modified comet assay to determine whether it could be used for measuring hypoxia in our model systems. U251 MG cells were grown as subcutaneous tumors in athymic mice; U251 MG and U87 MG cells were grown as intracerebral (i.c. tumors in athymic rats. Animals were injected with RSU 1069, irradiated, and euthanized. Tumors and normal brains were removed, and the cells were analyzed using a modified comet assay. Differences in comet tail moment distributions between tumor and contralateral normal brain, using tail moments at either the 25th or 50th percentile in each distribution, were taken as measures of the degree of tumor hypoxia. For U251 MG tumors, there was a positive relationship between tumor size and the degree of hypoxia, whereas preliminary data from U87 MG i.c. tumors showed less hypoxia and no apparent relationship between tumor size and hypoxia.

  8. Enhancement by N-methylformamide of the effect of ionizing radiation on a human colon tumor xenografted in nude mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dexter, D.L.; Lee, E.S.; Bliven, S.F.; Glicksman, A.S.; Leith, J.T.

    1984-11-01

    Polar solvents, which induce differentiation in murine and human tumor cells, enhance the effect of ionizing radiation on cultured mouse mammary and human colon cancer cells. To determine whether this enhancement occurs in vivo, DLD-2 human colon carcinoma xenografts in nude mice were treated with combinations of 6 MV photon irradiation, the polar solvent N-methylformamide (NMF), or combinations of the two agents. Nude mice bearing 300-mg s.c. implants of DLD-2 tumors were treated i.p. with 150 mg NMF/kg daily for 19 days. Local tumor irradiations were administered as graded single doses or as fractionated doses, daily for 4 days, following the third NMF injection. The growth-inhibiting effect of the radiation treatment for both single dose and fractionation protocols was enhanced by the polar solvent. NMF alone increased the time required for a doubling of initial tumor volume by 1.7 days, compared to control tumors. Initial tumor volume doubling times compared to untreated controls were increased by 3.6 and 7.6 days by photon doses of 10.0 and 13.75 Gy, respectively, whereas NMF plus 10.0 or 13.75 Gy increased the DLD-2 regrowth delay time by 7.5 or 12.9 days. NMF caused essentially equivalent enhancements, whether split-dose schedules of 2.5 Gy daily for 4 days, and 3.44 Gy daily for 4 days, or single doses of 10.0 and 13.75 Gy were used; therefore, radiation enhancement was not due to effects on sublethal damage repair. The results support the use of NMF, currently in Phase 1-Phase 2 clinical trials, with radiation in the therapy of selected human neoplasms.

  9. The impact of bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) on breast cancer metastasis in a mouse xenograft model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampuja, M; Alarmo, E L; Owens, P; Havunen, R; Gorska, A E; Moses, H L; Kallioniemi, A

    2016-06-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) is a key regulator of cell proliferation and differentiation. In breast cancer cells, BMP4 has been shown to reduce proliferation in vitro and interestingly, in some cases, also to induce migration and invasion. Here we investigated whether BMP4 influences breast cancer metastasis formation by using a xenograft mouse model. MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells were injected intracardially into mice and metastasis formation was monitored using bioluminescence imaging. Mice treated with BMP4 developed metastases slightly earlier as compared to control animals but the overall number of metastases was similar in both groups (13 in the BMP4 group vs. 12 in controls). In BMP4-treated mice, bone metastases were more common (10 vs. 7) but adrenal gland metastases were less frequent (1 vs. 5) than in controls. Immunostaining revealed no differences in signaling activation, proliferation rate, blood vessel formation, EMT markers or the number of cancer-associated fibroblasts between the treatment groups. In conclusion, BMP4 caused a trend towards accelerated metastasis formation, especially in bone. More work is needed to uncover the long-term effects of BMP4 and the clinical relevance of these findings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Coexistence of Granular Cell Tumor and Invasive Ductal Breast Cancer in Contralateral Breasts: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Di Bonito

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Granular cell tumor (GCT is a benign tumor of the breast that can mimic, on breast imaging, invasive carcinomas. Biological evolution of mammary GCT is unknown, especially if it is associated with an invasive carcinoma in the same or contralateral breast. This report details the morphological features of these synchronous lesions highlighting their biological characteristics and suggesting an appropriate follow up.

  11. Curcumin-Free Turmeric Exhibits Activity against Human HCT-116 Colon Tumor Xenograft: Comparison with Curcumin and Whole Turmeric

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahdeo Prasad

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Extensive research within last two decades has indicated that curcumin extracted from turmeric (Curcuma longa, exhibits anticancer potential, in part through the modulation of inflammatory pathways. However, the residual antitumor activity of curcumin-free turmeric (CFT relative to curcumin or turmeric is not well-understood. In the present study, therefore, we determined activities of these agents in both in vitro and in vivo models of human HCT-116 colorectal cancer (CRC. When examined in an in vitro antiproliferative, clonogenic or anti-inflammatory assay system, we found that curcumin was highly active whereas turmeric and CFT had relatively poor activity against CRC cells. However, when examined in vivo at an oral dose of either 100 or 500 mg/kg given to nude mice bearing CRC xenografts, all three preparations of curcumin, turmeric, and CFT similarly suppressed the growth of the xenograft. The effect of CFT on suppression of tumor growth was dose-dependent, with 500 mg/kg tending to be more effective than 100 mg/kg. Interestingly, 100 mg/kg curcumin or turmeric was found to be more effective than 500 mg/kg. When examined in vivo for the expression of biomarkers associated with cell survival (cIAP-1, Bcl-2, and survivin, proliferation (Ki-67 and cyclin D1 and metastasis (ICAM-1 and VEGF, all were down-modulated. These agents also suppressed inflammatory transcription factors (NF-κB and STAT3 in tumor cells. Overall, our results with CFT provide evidence that turmeric must contain additional bioactive compounds other than curcumin that, in contrast to curcumin, exhibit greater anticancer potential in vivo than in vitro against human CRC. Moreover, our study highlights the fact that the beneficial effects of turmeric and curcumin in humans may be more effectively realized at lower doses, whereas CFT could be given at higher doses without loss in favorable activity.

  12. Emblica officinalis extract induces autophagy and inhibits human ovarian cancer cell proliferation, angiogenesis, growth of mouse xenograft tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok De

    Full Text Available Patients with ovarian cancer (OC may be treated with surgery, chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy, although none of these strategies are very effective. Several plant-based natural products/dietary supplements, including extracts from Emblicaofficinalis (Amla, have demonstrated potent anti-neoplastic properties. In this study we determined that Amla extract (AE has anti-proliferative effects on OC cells under both in vitro and in vivo conditions. We also determined the anti-proliferative effects one of the components of AE, quercetin, on OC cells under in vitro conditions. AE did not induce apoptotic cell death, but did significantly increase the expression of the autophagic proteins beclin1 and LC3B-II under in vitro conditions. Quercetin also increased the expression of the autophagic proteins beclin1 and LC3B-II under in vitro conditions. AE also significantly reduced the expression of several angiogenic genes, including hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α in OVCAR3 cells. AE acted synergistically with cisplatin to reduce cell proliferation and increase expression of the autophagic proteins beclin1 and LC3B-II under in vitro conditions. AE also had anti-proliferative effects and induced the expression of the autophagic proteins beclin1 and LC3B-II in mouse xenograft tumors. Additionally, AE reduced endothelial cell antigen - CD31 positive blood vessels and HIF-1α expression in mouse xenograft tumors. Together, these studies indicate that AE inhibits OC cell growth both in vitro and in vivo possibly via inhibition of angiogenesis and activation of autophagy in OC. Thus AE may prove useful as an alternative or adjunct therapeutic approach in helping to fight OC.

  13. Evaluation of {sup 99m}Tc-glucarate as a breast cancer imaging agent in a xenograft animal model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gambini, Juan Pablo [Nuclear Medicine Center, Clinical Hospital, University of Uruguay, Montevideo, 11600 (Uruguay); Cabral, Pablo [Nuclear Investigations Center, School of Science, University of Uruguay, Montevideo, 11400 (Uruguay); Alonso, Omar [Nuclear Medicine Center, Clinical Hospital, University of Uruguay, Montevideo, 11600 (Uruguay); Savio, Eduardo [Department of Radiochemistry, School of Chemistry, University of Uruguay, Montevideo, 11800 (Uruguay); Daibes Figueroa, Said [Research Service, Harry S. Truman Veterans Memorial Hospital, Columbia, MO 65201 (United States); Zhang Xiuli [Research Service, Harry S. Truman Veterans Memorial Hospital, Columbia, MO 65201 (United States); Department of Biochemistry, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Ma Lixin [Research Service, Harry S. Truman Veterans Memorial Hospital, Columbia, MO 65201 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65212 (United States); Deutscher, Susan L. [Research Service, Harry S. Truman Veterans Memorial Hospital, Columbia, MO 65201 (United States); Department of Biochemistry, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Quinn, Thomas P., E-mail: quinnt@missouri.ed [Research Service, Harry S. Truman Veterans Memorial Hospital, Columbia, MO 65201 (United States); Department of Biochemistry, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65212 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    Introduction: The use of [{sup 99m}Tc]glucarate has been reported as an infarct-avid agent with the potential for very early detection of myocardial infarction. [{sup 99m}Tc]Glucarate has also been postulated as an agent for non-invasive detection of tumors. The aim of our study was to develop a Glucarate kit and evaluate [{sup 99m}Tc]glucarate as a potential cancer imaging agent in female SCID mice bearing human MDA-MB-435 breast tumors. Methods: Glucarate in a kit formulation was labeled with {sup 99m}Tc and evaluated for radiolabelling efficiency and radiochemical purity. The Glucarate kit stability was assessed by monthly quality controls. The pharmacokinetics of [{sup 99m}Tc]glucarate were determined in female SCID mice bearing MDA-MB-435 human breast carcinoma tumors at 0.5, 1, 2, 4 and 24 h. Nuclear imaging studies were performed with a micro-single photon emission tomography (SPECT)/computed tomography (CT) system at 2 h post injection, while magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was employed for tumor morphology analysis and metastatic deposit localization. Results: The Glucarate kits exhibited a stable shelf life of 6 months. [{sup 99m}Tc]Glucarate was obtained with radiochemical purity greater than 95%. Biodistribution studies demonstrated moderate tumor uptake coupled with high renal clearance. Tumor-to-muscle ratios were 4.85 and 5.14 at 1 and 4 h post injection. MRI analysis showed tumors with dense cellular growth and moderate central necrosis. [{sup 99m}Tc]Glucarate uptake in the primary MDA-MB-435 shoulder tumors and metastatic lesions were clearly visualized with micro-SPECT/CT imaging. Conclusions: Selective tumor uptake and rapid clearance from nontarget organs makes [{sup 99m}Tc]glucarate a potential agent for breast cancer imaging that awaits validation in a clinical trial.

  14. An integrated genomic approach identifies persistent tumor suppressive effects of transforming growth factor-β in human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Misako; Kadota, Mitsutaka; Tang, Binwu; Yang, Howard H; Yang, Yu-an; Shan, Mengge; Weng, Jia; Welsh, Michael A; Flanders, Kathleen C; Nagano, Yoshiko; Michalowski, Aleksandra M; Clifford, Robert J; Lee, Maxwell P; Wakefield, Lalage M

    2014-06-02

    Transforming growth factor-βs (TGF-βs) play a dual role in breast cancer, with context-dependent tumor-suppressive or pro-oncogenic effects. TGF-β antagonists are showing promise in early-phase clinical oncology trials to neutralize the pro-oncogenic effects. However, there is currently no way to determine whether the tumor-suppressive effects of TGF-β are still active in human breast tumors at the time of surgery and treatment, a situation that could lead to adverse therapeutic responses. Using a breast cancer progression model that exemplifies the dual role of TGF-β, promoter-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation and transcriptomic approaches were applied to identify a core set of TGF-β-regulated genes that specifically reflect only the tumor-suppressor arm of the pathway. The clinical significance of this signature and the underlying biology were investigated using bioinformatic analyses in clinical breast cancer datasets, and knockdown validation approaches in tumor xenografts. TGF-β-driven tumor suppression was highly dependent on Smad3, and Smad3 target genes that were specifically enriched for involvement in tumor suppression were identified. Patterns of Smad3 binding reflected the preexisting active chromatin landscape, and target genes were frequently regulated in opposite directions in vitro and in vivo, highlighting the strong contextuality of TGF-β action. An in vivo-weighted TGF-β/Smad3 tumor-suppressor signature was associated with good outcome in estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cohorts. TGF-β/Smad3 effects on cell proliferation, differentiation and ephrin signaling contributed to the observed tumor suppression. Tumor-suppressive effects of TGF-β persist in some breast cancer patients at the time of surgery and affect clinical outcome. Carefully tailored in vitro/in vivo genomic approaches can identify such patients for exclusion from treatment with TGF-β antagonists.

  15. Nanobodies against surface biomarkers enable the analysis of tumor genetic heterogeneity in uveal melanoma patient-derived xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crépin, Ronan; Gentien, David; Duché, Angeline; Rapinat, Audrey; Reyes, Cecile; Némati, Fariba; Massonnet, Gérald; Decaudin, Didier; Djender, Selma; Moutel, Sandrine; Desrumeaux, Klervi; Cassoux, Nathalie; Piperno-Neumann, Sophie; Amigorena, Sebastian; Perez, Franck; Roman-Roman, Sergio; de Marco, Ario

    2017-05-01

    Monoclonal antibodies specific for biomarkers expressed on the surface of uveal melanoma (UM) cells would simplify the immune capture and genomic characterization of heterogeneous tumor cells originated from patient-derived xenografts (PDXs). Antibodies against four independent tumor antigens were isolated by panning a nanobody synthetic library. Such antibodies enabled flow cytometry-based sorting of distinct cell subpopulations from UM PDXs and to analyze their genomic features. The complexity and specificity of the biochemical and genomic biomarker combinations mirrored the UM tumor polyclonality. The data showed that MUC18 is highly and universally displayed on the surface of UM cells with different genetic background and consequently represents a reliable pan-biomarker for their identification and purification. In contrast, the other three biomarkers were detected in very variable combinations in UM PDX cells. The availability of the identified nanobodies will be instrumental in developing clone-specific drug evaluation and rational clinical strategies based on accurate genomic profiling. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. The use of matrigel has no influence on tumor development or PET imaging in FaDu human head and neck cancer xenografts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fliedner, Frederikke P.; Hansen, Anders Elias; Jorgensen, Jesper T.

    2016-01-01

    is currently available. This study evaluates the potential effect of matrigel use in a human head and neck cancer xenograft model (FaDu; hypopharyngeal carcinoma) in NMRI nude mice. The FaDu cell line was chosen based on its frequent use in studies of cancer imaging and tumor microenvironment. Methods: NMRI...

  17. Systemic miRNA-7 delivery inhibits tumor angiogenesis and growth in murine xenograft glioblastoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Babae, N.; Bourajjaj, M.; Liu, Y.; Beijnum, J.R.; Cerisoli, F.; Scaria, P.V.; Verheul, Mark; Berkel, M.P.; Pieters, E.H.; van Haastert, R.J.; Yousefi, A.; Mastrobattista, E.; Storm, Gerrit; Berezikov, E.; Cuppen, E.; Woodle, M.; Schaapveld, R.Q.J.; Prevost, G.P.; Griffioen, A.W.; Noort, P.I.; Schiffelers, R.M.

    2014-01-01

    Tumor-angiogenesis is the multi-factorial process of sprouting of endothelial cells (EC) into micro-vessels to provide tumor cells with nutrients and oxygen. To explore miRNAs as therapeutic angiogenesis-inhibitors, we performed a functional screen to identify miRNAs that are able to decrease EC

  18. CD47 blockade inhibits tumor progression human osteosarcoma in xenograft models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ji-Feng; Pan, Xiao-Hong; Zhang, Shui-Jun; Zhao, Chen; Qiu, Bin-Song; Gu, Hai-Feng; Hong, Jian-Fei; Cao, Li; Chen, Yu; Xia, Bing; Bi, Qin; Wang, Ya-Ping

    2015-09-15

    Osteosarcoma is the most common bone tumors in children and adolescents. Despite intensive chemotherapy, patients with advanced disease still have a poor prognosis, illustrating the need for alternative therapies. In this study, we explored the use of antibodies that block CD47 with a tumor growth suppressive effect on osteosarcoma. We first found that up-regulation of CD47 mRNA levels in the tumorous tissues from eight patients with osteosarcoma when compared with that in adjacent non-tumorous tissues. Further western-blot (WB) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) demonstrated that CD47 protein level was highly expressed in osteosarcoma compared to normal osteoblastic cells and adjacent non-tumorous tissues. Osteosarcoma cancer stem cell markers staining shown that the majority of CD44+ cells expressed CD47 albeit with different percentages (ranging from 80% to 99%). Furthermore, high CD47 mRNA expression levels were associated with a decreased probability of progression-free and overall survival. In addition, blockade of CD47 by specific Abs suppresses the invasive ability of osteosarcoma tumor cells and further inhibits spontaneous pulmonary metastasis of KRIB osteosarcoma cells in vivo. Finally, CD47 blockade increases macrophage phagocytosis of osteosarcoma tumor cells.In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that CD47 is a critical regulator in the metastasis of osteosarcoma and suggest that targeted inhibition of this antigen by anti-CD47 may be a novel immunotherapeutic approach in the management of this tumor.

  19. Upconversion nanoparticles conjugated with Gd(3+) -DOTA and RGD for targeted dual-modality imaging of brain tumor xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jiefu; Xu, Zhenhua; Zhang, Yue; Gu, Yan-Juan; Lam, Michael Hon-Wah; Wong, Wing-Tak

    2013-11-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and malignant form of primary brain tumors in human. Small molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents are used for GBM diagnosis. However, conventional contrast agents have several limitations, such as low T1 relaxivity, short circulation half lives and absence of tumor targeting. Herein, we develop an upconversion nanoprobe labeled with Gd(3+) -DOTA and RGD (UCNP-Gd-RGD) for dual-modality imaging of glioblastoma. The preparation of UCNP-Gd-RGD starts with amine-functional upconversion nanoparticle core, followed by PEGylation, Gd(3+) DOTA conjugation and RGD labeling. The obtained UCNP-Gd-RGD has improved colloidal stability and reduced cytotoxicity compared with the UCNP core counterpart. Meanwhile, UCNP-Gd-RGD shows strong upconversion luminescence in deep-red region and three times enhancement of T1 relaxivity over Gd(3+) DOTA. Due to the recognition between UCNP-Gd-RGD and integrin αv β3 receptors, the nanoprobe specifically binds to U87MG cells, as evidenced by confocal microscopy and quantified by ICP-MS. Furthermore, UCNP-Gd-RGD demonstrates a preferential retention in subcutaneous U87MG tumor xenograft as shown in both in vivo upconversion fluorescence/MR imaging studies and ex vivo analysis. UCNP-Gd-RGD, conjugated with numerous RGD peptide and T1 contrast enhancing molecules, is promising for MR imaging of glioblastoma and delineating the tumor boundary before surgery. In addition, NIR-to-red upconversion characteristic of UCNP-Gd-RGD facilitates its potential intra-operative use for fluorescence-guided tumor resection. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Treatment Approaches to Recurrent Phyllodes Tumors of the Breast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazilet Erözgen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Phyllodes tumors of the breast are a rarely encountered clinical condition. Recurrent cases are even rarer. Treatment protocols vary among breast centers. In our study, we aimed to investigate the prognosis of recurrent breast phyllodes tumors and to present our treatment approach. Methods: Among 31000 patients, who presented to our breast outpatient clinic between March 2005 and December 2011, we retrospectively evaluated three patients with recurrent phyllodes tumors of the breast. Results: The three female patients, aged 24, 28 and 30 years, had been previously operated for phyllodes tumor of the breast. The first tumor localization was the superolateral part of the right breast in all subjects. Recurrences were in the same localizations, but pathologies were more aggressive than the previous reports. In two patients mastectomy and in one breast-conserving surgery were performed. Conclusion: Relapse of phyllodes tumors can result in mastectomy and recurrent phyllodes tumors seem to be more aggressive than the original tumor. (The Me di cal Bul le tin of Ha se ki 2012; 50: 43-7

  1. Dynamic Quantitative T1 Mapping in Orthotopic Brain Tumor Xenografts1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Kelsey; Erokwu, Bernadette O.; Johansen, Mette L.; Basilion, James P.; Gulani, Vikas; Griswold, Mark A.; Flask, Chris A.; Brady-Kalnay, Susann M.

    2016-01-01

    Human brain tumors such as glioblastomas are typically detected using conventional, nonquantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, such as T2-weighted and contrast enhanced T1-weighted MRI. In this manuscript, we tested whether dynamic quantitative T1 mapping by MRI can localize orthotopic glioma tumors in an objective manner. Quantitative T1 mapping was performed by MRI over multiple time points using the conventional contrast agent Optimark. We compared signal differences to determine the gadolinium concentration in tissues over time. The T1 parametric maps made it easy to identify the regions of contrast enhancement and thus tumor location. Doubling the typical human dose of contrast agent resulted in a clearer demarcation of these tumors. Therefore, T1 mapping of brain tumors is gadolinium dose dependent and improves detection of tumors by MRI. The use of T1 maps provides a quantitative means to evaluate tumor detection by gadolinium-based contrast agents over time. This dynamic quantitative T1 mapping technique will also enable future quantitative evaluation of various targeted MRI contrast agents. PMID:27084431

  2. Estimation of Breast Tumor Conductivity using Parabolic Phase Fitting

    OpenAIRE

    Katscher, U.; Djamshidi, K.; Voigt, T; Ivancevic, M.; Abe, H.; Newstead, G.; Keupp, J.

    2012-01-01

    According to ex vivo studies, breast tumors exhibit a significantlyaltered electric conductivity. This feature opens the chance to increase the specificity of breast tumor characterization with MRI. Theelectric conductivity can be measured in vivo using “Electric Properties Tomography (EPT). EPT has shown its potential in phantom, volunteer, and initial clinical studies. However, the complex frayed structure of fat and ductile tissue in the breast hampers the straight-forward application of E...

  3. Inhibition of signaling between human CXCR4 and zebrafish ligands by the small molecule IT1t impairs the formation of triple-negative breast cancer early metastases in a zebrafish xenograft model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Tulotta

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC is a highly aggressive and recurrent type of breast carcinoma that is associated with poor patient prognosis. Because of the limited efficacy of current treatments, new therapeutic strategies need to be developed. The CXCR4-CXCL12 chemokine signaling axis guides cell migration in physiological and pathological processes, including breast cancer metastasis. Although targeted therapies to inhibit the CXCR4-CXCL12 axis are under clinical experimentation, still no effective therapeutic approaches have been established to block CXCR4 in TNBC. To unravel the role of the CXCR4-CXCL12 axis in the formation of TNBC early metastases, we used the zebrafish xenograft model. Importantly, we demonstrate that cross-communication between the zebrafish and human ligands and receptors takes place and human tumor cells expressing CXCR4 initiate early metastatic events by sensing zebrafish cognate ligands at the metastatic site. Taking advantage of the conserved intercommunication between human tumor cells and the zebrafish host, we blocked TNBC early metastatic events by chemical and genetic inhibition of CXCR4 signaling. We used IT1t, a potent CXCR4 antagonist, and show for the first time its promising anti-tumor effects. In conclusion, we confirm the validity of the zebrafish as a xenotransplantation model and propose a pharmacological approach to target CXCR4 in TNBC.

  4. Quantitative proteomic analysis of human lung tumor xenografts treated with the ectopic ATP synthase inhibitor citreoviridin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Hsuan Wu

    Full Text Available ATP synthase is present on the plasma membrane of several types of cancer cells. Citreoviridin, an ATP synthase inhibitor, selectively suppresses the proliferation and growth of lung cancer without affecting normal cells. However, the global effects of targeting ectopic ATP synthase in vivo have not been well defined. In this study, we performed quantitative proteomic analysis using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ and provided a comprehensive insight into the complicated regulation by citreoviridin in a lung cancer xenograft model. With high reproducibility of the quantitation, we obtained quantitative proteomic profiling with 2,659 proteins identified. Bioinformatics analysis of the 141 differentially expressed proteins selected by their relative abundance revealed that citreoviridin induces alterations in the expression of glucose metabolism-related enzymes in lung cancer. The up-regulation of enzymes involved in gluconeogenesis and storage of glucose indicated that citreoviridin may reduce the glycolytic intermediates for macromolecule synthesis and inhibit cell proliferation. Using comprehensive proteomics, the results identify metabolic aspects that help explain the antitumorigenic effect of citreoviridin in lung cancer, which may lead to a better understanding of the links between metabolism and tumorigenesis in cancer therapy.

  5. Establishment of Patient-Derived Tumor Xenograft Models of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer for Preclinical Evaluation of Novel Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Joyce F; Palakurthi, Sangeetha; Zeng, Qing; Zhou, Shan; Ivanova, Elena; Huang, Wei; Zervantonakis, Ioannis K; Selfors, Laura M; Shen, Yiping; Pritchard, Colin C; Zheng, Mei; Adleff, Vilmos; Papp, Eniko; Piao, Huiying; Novak, Marian; Fotheringham, Susan; Wulf, Gerburg M; English, Jessie; Kirschmeier, Paul T; Velculescu, Victor E; Paweletz, Cloud; Mills, Gordon B; Livingston, David M; Brugge, Joan S; Matulonis, Ursula A; Drapkin, Ronny

    2017-03-01

    Purpose: Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from gynecologic malignancy in the United States, with high rates of recurrence and eventual resistance to cytotoxic chemotherapy. Model systems that allow for accurate and reproducible target discovery and validation are needed to support further drug development in this disease.Experimental Design: Clinically annotated patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models were generated from tumor cells isolated from the ascites or pleural fluid of patients undergoing clinical procedures. Models were characterized by IHC and by molecular analyses. Each PDX was luciferized to allow for reproducible in vivo assessment of intraperitoneal tumor burden by bioluminescence imaging (BLI). Plasma assays for CA125 and human LINE-1 were developed as secondary tests of in vivo disease burden.Results: Fourteen clinically annotated and molecularly characterized luciferized ovarian PDX models were generated. Luciferized PDX models retain fidelity to both the nonluciferized PDX and the original patient tumor, as demonstrated by IHC, array CGH, and targeted and whole-exome sequencing analyses. Models demonstrated diversity in specific genetic alterations and activation of PI3K signaling pathway members. Response of luciferized PDX models to standard-of-care therapy could be reproducibly monitored by BLI or plasma markers.Conclusions: We describe the establishment of a collection of 14 clinically annotated and molecularly characterized luciferized ovarian PDX models in which orthotopic tumor burden in the intraperitoneal space can be followed by standard and reproducible methods. This collection is well suited as a platform for proof-of-concept efficacy and biomarker studies and for validation of novel therapeutic strategies in ovarian cancer. Clin Cancer Res; 23(5); 1263-73. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. Photoimmunotherapy Inhibits Tumor Recurrence After Surgical Resection on a Pancreatic Cancer Patient-Derived Orthotopic Xenograft (PDOX) Nude Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Maawy, Ali; Zhang, Yong; Guzman, Miguel Garcia; Heim, Roger; Makings, Lew; Luiken, George A; Kobayashi, Hisataka; Tanaka, Kuniya; Endo, Itaru; Hoffman, Robert M; Bouvet, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Photoimmunotherapy (PIT) uses a target-specific photosensitizer based on a near-infrared (NIR) phthalocyanine dye, IR700, to induce tumor necrosis after irradiation with NIR light to kill cancer cells, such as those that remain after surgery. The purpose of the present study was to sterilize the surgical bed after pancreatic cancer resection with PIT in carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-expressing, patient-derived, orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) nude mouse models. After confirmation of tumor engraftment, mice were randomized to two groups: bright light surgery (BLS)-only and BLS + PIT. Each treatment arm consisted of seven tumor-bearing mice. BLS was performed under standard bright-field with an MVX10 long-working distance, high-magnification microscope on all mice. For BLS + PIT, anti-CEA antibody conjugated with IR700 (anti-CEA-IR700) (50 µg) was injected intravenously in all mice 24 h before surgery. After the surgery, the resection bed was then irradiated with a red-light-emitting diode at 690 ± 5 nm with a power density of 150 mW/cm(2). Anti-CEA-IR700 labelled and illuminated the pancreatic cancer PDOX. Minimal residual cancer of the PDOX was detected by fluorescence after BLS. The local recurrence rate was 85.7 % for BLS-only and 28.6 % for BLS + PIT-treated mice (p = 0.05). The average recurrent tumor weight was 1149.0 ± 794.6 mg for BLS-only and 210.8 ± 336.9 mg for BLS + PIT-treated mice (p = 0.015). Anti-CEA-IR700 was able to label and illuminate a pancreatic cancer PDOX nude mouse model sufficiently for PIT. PIT reduced recurrence by eliminating remaining residual cancer cells after BLS.

  7. Male Malignant Phyllodes Breast Tumor After Prophylactic Breast Radiotherapy and Bicalutamide Treatment: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karihtala, Peeter; Rissanen, Tarja; Tuominen, Hannu

    2016-07-01

    Phyllodes tumor in male breast is an exceptionally rare neoplasm with only few published case reports. Herein, we present a case of malignant phyllodes tumor in male breast nine years after prophylactic breast 10 Gy radiotherapy and after nine year bicalutamide treatment. The imaging findings of the tumor and pathological correlation are also presented. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  8. Local delivery of cannabinoid-loaded microparticles inhibits tumor growth in a murine xenograft model of glioblastoma multiforme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolores Hernán Pérez de la Ossa

    Full Text Available Cannabinoids, the active components of marijuana and their derivatives, are currently investigated due to their potential therapeutic application for the management of many different diseases, including cancer. Specifically, Δ(9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC and Cannabidiol (CBD - the two major ingredients of marijuana - have been shown to inhibit tumor growth in a number of animal models of cancer, including glioma. Although there are several pharmaceutical preparations that permit the oral administration of THC or its analogue nabilone or the oromucosal delivery of a THC- and CBD-enriched cannabis extract, the systemic administration of cannabinoids has several limitations in part derived from the high lipophilicity exhibited by these compounds. In this work we analyzed CBD- and THC-loaded poly-ε-caprolactone microparticles as an alternative delivery system for long-term cannabinoid administration in a murine xenograft model of glioma. In vitro characterization of THC- and CBD-loaded microparticles showed that this method of microencapsulation facilitates a sustained release of the two cannabinoids for several days. Local administration of THC-, CBD- or a mixture (1:1 w:w of THC- and CBD-loaded microparticles every 5 days to mice bearing glioma xenografts reduced tumour growth with the same efficacy than a daily local administration of the equivalent amount of those cannabinoids in solution. Moreover, treatment with cannabinoid-loaded microparticles enhanced apoptosis and decreased cell proliferation and angiogenesis in these tumours. Our findings support that THC- and CBD-loaded microparticles could be used as an alternative method of cannabinoid delivery in anticancer therapies.

  9. Nerve Fibers in Breast Cancer Tissues Indicate Aggressive Tumor Progression

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Di; Su, Shicheng; Cui, Xiuying; Shen, Ximing; Zeng, Yunjie; Wu, Wei; Chen, Jianing; Chen, Fei; He, Chonghua; Liu, Jiang; Huang, Wei; Liu, Qiang; Su, Fengxi; Song, Erwei; Ouyang, Nengtai

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Emerging evidence has indicated nerve fibers as a marker in the progression of various types of cancers, such as pancreatic cancer and prostate cancer. However, whether nerve fibers are associated with breast cancer progression remains unclear. In this study, we evaluated the presence of nerve fibers in 352 breast cancer specimens and 83 benign breast tissue specimens including 43 cases of cystic fibrosis and 40 cases of fibroadenoma from 2 independent breast tumor center using immun...

  10. Multiple breast cancer cell-lines derived from a single tumor differ in their molecular characteristics and tumorigenic potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goar Mosoyan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Breast cancer cell lines are widely used tools to investigate breast cancer biology and to develop new therapies. Breast cancer tissue contains molecularly heterogeneous cell populations. Thus, it is important to understand which cell lines best represent the primary tumor and have similarly diverse phenotype. Here, we describe the development of five breast cancer cell lines from a single patient's breast cancer tissue. We characterize the molecular profiles, tumorigenicity and metastatic ability in vivo of all five cell lines and compare their responsiveness to 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT treatment. METHODS: Five breast cancer cell lines were derived from a single patient's primary breast cancer tissue. Expression of different antigens including HER2, estrogen receptor (ER, CK8/18, CD44 and CD24 was determined by flow cytometry, western blotting and immunohistochemistry (IHC. In addition, a Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization (FISH assay for HER2 gene amplification and p53 genotyping was performed on all cell lines. A xenograft model in nude mice was utilized to assess the tumorigenic and metastatic abilities of the breast cancer cells. RESULTS: We have isolated, cloned and established five new breast cancer cell lines with different tumorigenicity and metastatic abilities from a single primary breast cancer. Although all the cell lines expressed low levels of ER, their growth was estrogen-independent and all had high-levels of expression of mutated non-functional p53. The HER2 gene was rearranged in all cell lines. Low doses of 4-OHT induced proliferation of these breast cancer cell lines. CONCLUSIONS: All five breast cancer cell lines have different antigenic expression profiles, tumorigenicity and organ specific metastatic abilities although they derive from a single tumor. None of the studied markers correlated with tumorigenic potential. These new cell lines could serve as a model for detailed genomic and proteomic analyses to

  11. MP0250, a VEGF and HGF neutralizing DARPin® molecule shows high anti-tumor efficacy in mouse xenograft and patient-derived tumor models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, Ulrike; Ekawardhani, Savira; Cornelius, Andreas; Gilboy, Pat; Bakker, Talitha R; Dolado, Ignacio; Stumpp, Michael T; Dawson, Keith M

    2017-11-17

    The VEGF/VEGFR and the HGF/cMET pathways are key mediators of the interplay of tumor cells and their microenvironment. However, inhibition of VEGF has been shown to produce only limited clinical benefit and inhibition of the activation of cMET by HGF has not translated into clinical benefit in pivotal trials. MP0250, a DARPin® molecule that specifically inhibits both VEGF and HGF has been developed to explore the clinical potential of dual inhibition of these pathways. MP0250 binding to VEGF and HGF inhibited downstream signalling through VEGFR2 and cMET resulting in inhibition of proliferation of VEGF- and HGF-dependent cells. Antitumor activity was demonstrated in VEGF- and HGF-dependent xenograft and syngeneic models with activity superior to that of individual VEGF- and HGF-blocking DARPin® molecules. Combination therapy studies showed potentiation of the antitumor activity of chemotherapy and immunotherapy agents, including an anti-PD1 antibody. Potency of MP0250 was assessed in cellular models and in a variety of xenograft models as monotherapy or in combination with standard-of-care drugs. Dual inhibition of VEGF and HGF by MP0250 produced powerful single agent and combination antitumor activity. This, together with increasing understanding of the role of the HGF/cMET pathway in resistance to VEGF (and other agents), supports testing of MP0250 in the clinic.

  12. Tumor-specific expression of αvβ3 integrin promotes spontaneous metastasis of breast cancer to bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, Erica K; Pouliot, Normand; Stanley, Kym L; Chia, Jenny; Moseley, Jane M; Hards, Daphne K; Anderson, Robin L

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Studies in xenograft models and experimental models of metastasis have implicated several β3 integrin-expressing cell populations, including endothelium, platelets and osteoclasts, in breast tumor progression. Since orthotopic human xenograft models of breast cancer are poorly metastatic to bone and experimental models bypass the formation of a primary tumor, however, the precise contribution of tumor-specific αvβ3 to the spontaneous metastasis of breast tumors from the mammary gland to bone remains unclear. Methods We used a syngeneic orthotopic model of spontaneous breast cancer metastasis to test whether exogenous expression of αvβ3 in a mammary carcinoma line (66cl4) that metastasizes to the lung, but not to bone, was sufficient to promote its spontaneous metastasis to bone from the mammary gland. The tumor burden in the spine and the lung following inoculation of αvβ3-expressing 66cl4 (66cl4beta3) tumor cells or control 66cl4pBabe into the mammary gland was analyzed by real-time quantitative PCR. The ability of these cells to grow and form osteolytic lesions in bone was determined by histology and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining of bone sections following intratibial injection of tumor cells. The adhesive, migratory and invasive properties of 66cl4pBabe and 66cl4beta3 cells were evaluated in standard in vitro assays. Results The 66cl4beta3 tumors showed a 20-fold increase in metastatic burden in the spine compared with 66cl4pBabe. A similar trend in lung metastasis was observed. αvβ3 did not increase the proliferation of 66cl4 cells in vitro or in the mammary gland in vivo. Similarly, αvβ3 is not required for the proliferation of 66cl4 cells in bone as both 66cl4pBabe and 66cl4beta3 proliferated to the same extent when injected directly into the tibia. 66cl4beta3 tumor growth in the tibia, however, increased osteoclast recruitment and bone resorption compared with 66cl4 tumors. Moreover, αvβ3 increased 66cl4 tumor cell

  13. Experimental radioimmunotherapy of a xenografted human colonic tumor (GW-39) producing carcinoembryonic antigen

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    Goldenberg, D.M.; Gaffar, S.A.; Bennett, S.J.; Beach, J.L.

    1981-11-01

    Experiments were undertaken to evaluate the antitumor effects of 131I-labeled goat antibody immunoglobulin G prepared against carcinoembryonic antigen in hamsters bearing the carcinoembryonic antigen-producing GW-39 human colonic carcinoma. At a single injection of 1 mCi 131I and higher, a marked growth inhibition of GW-39 tumors, as well as a considerable increase in the survival time of the tumor-bearing hamsters, could be achieved. At a dose of 1 mCi, the radioactive affinity-purified antibody appeared to be superior to radioactive normal goat immunoglobulin G in influencing tumor growth and survival time, but no significant difference could be seen at the higher dose of 2 mCi given. Radiobiological calculations indicated that the tumors received, at up to 20 days after therapy, 1325 rads for the specific antibody and only 411 rads for the normal immunoglobulin G preparation. These findings encourage the further evaluation of antibodies to tumor markers for isotopic cancer therapy.

  14. Noninvasive detection of temozolomide in brain tumor xenografts by magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kato, Y.; Holm, David Alberg; Okollie, B.

    2010-01-01

    detection of drug directly in the tumor can be critically important for accessing, predicting, and eventually improving effectiveness of therapy. In this study, in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was used to detect an anticancer agent, temozolomide (TMZ), in vivo in murine xenotransplants of U87......MG human brain cancer. Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with the low-molecular-weight contrast agent, gadolinium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (GdDTPA), was used to evaluate tumor vascular parameters. Carbon-13-labeled TMZ ([C-13]TMZ, 99%) was intraperitoneally administered at a dose...... experiments demonstrated slower recovery of MRI signal following an intravenous bolus injection of GdDTPA, higher vascular flow and volume obtained by T-2*-weighted MRI, as well as enhanced uptake of the contrast agent in the brain tumor compared with normal brain detected by T-1-weighted MRI. These data...

  15. Pharmacokinetic Analysis of 64Cu-ATSM Dynamic PET in Human Xenograft Tumors in Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Fan; Jørgensen, Jesper Tranekjær; Madsen, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility to perform voxel-wise kinetic modeling on datasets obtained from tumor-bearing mice that underwent dynamic PET scans with 64Cu-ATSM and extract useful physiological parameters.METHODS: Tumor-bearing mice underwent 90-min dynamic PET scans...... with 64Cu-ATSM and CT scans with contrast. Irreversible and reversible two-tissue compartment models were fitted to time activity curves (TACs) obtained from whole tumor volumes and compared using the Akaike information criterion (AIC). Based on voxel-wise pharmacokinetic analysis, parametric maps...... of model rate constants k₁, k₃ and Ki were generated and compared to 64Cu-ATSM uptake.RESULTS: Based on the AIC, an irreversible two-tissue compartment model was selected for voxel-wise pharmacokinetic analysis. Of the extracted parameters, k₁ (~perfusion) showed a strong correlation with early tracer...

  16. Efficacy of Anti-mesothelin Immunotoxin RG7787 plus Nab-Paclitaxel against Mesothelioma Patient-Derived Xenografts and Mesothelin as a Biomarker of Tumor Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingli; Khanna, Swati; Jiang, Qun; Alewine, Christine; Miettinen, Markku; Pastan, Ira; Hassan, Raffit

    2017-03-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antitumor efficacy of the reduced immunogenicity anti-mesothelin immunotoxin RG7787 plus nab-paclitaxel against primary mesothelioma cell lines and tumor xenografts and the utility of mesothelin as a biomarker of tumor response. Experimental Design: Early-passage human malignant mesothelioma cell lines NCI-Meso16, NCI-Meso19, NCI-Meso21, and NCI-Meso29 were evaluated for sensitivity to RG7787 or nab-paclitaxel alone or in combination. In addition, the antitumor activity of RG7787 plus nab-paclitaxel was evaluated using NCI-Meso16, NCI-Meso21, and NCI-Meso29 tumor xenografts in immunodeficient mice. Serum mesothelin was measured at different time points to determine whether its levels correlated with tumor response. Results: All four primary mesothelioma cell lines highly expressed mesothelin with 41 × 10 3 to 346 × 10 3 mesothelin sites per cell and were sensitive to RG7787, with IC 50 ranging from 0.3 to 10 ng/mL. Except for NCI-Meso19, these cells were also sensitive to nab-paclitaxel, with IC 50 of 10 to 25 ng/mL. In vitro , RG7787 plus nab-paclitaxel led to decreased cell viability compared with either agent alone. In NCI-Meso16 tumor xenografts, treatment with RG7787 plus nab-paclitaxel led to sustained complete tumor regressions. Similar antitumor efficacy was observed against NCI-Meso21 and NCI-Meso29 tumor xenografts. In all three tumor xenograft models, changes in human serum mesothelin correlated with response to therapy and were undetectable in mice with complete tumor regression with RG7787 and nab-paclitaxel. Conclusions: RG7787 plus nab-paclitaxel is very active against primary human mesothelioma cells in vitro as well as in vivo , with serum mesothelin levels correlating with tumor response. These results indicate that this combination could be useful for treating patients with mesothelioma. Clin Cancer Res; 23(6); 1564-74. ©2016 AACR . ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  17. Migrating glioma cells express stem cell markers and give rise to new tumors upon xenografting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munthe, Sune; Sørensen, Mia D; Thomassen, Mads

    2016-01-01

    -related genes and the HOX-gene list in migrating cells compared to spheroids. Determination of GBM molecular subtypes revealed that subtypes of spheroids and migrating cells were identical. In conclusion, migrating tumor cells preserve expression of stem cell markers and functional CSC characteristics. Since...

  18. Imaging beta-galactosidase activity in human tumor xenografts and transgenic mice using a chemiluminescent substrate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Detection of enzyme activity or transgene expression offers potential insight into developmental biology, disease progression, and potentially personalized medicine. Historically, the lacZ gene encoding the enzyme beta-galactosidase has been the most common reporter gene and many chromogenic and fluorogenic substrates are well established, but limited to histology or in vitro assays. We now present a novel approach for in vivo detection of beta-galactosidase using optical imaging to detect light emission following administration of the chemiluminescent 1,2-dioxetane substrate Galacto-Light PlusTM. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: B-gal activity was visualized in stably transfected human MCF7-lacZ tumors growing in mice. LacZ tumors were identified versus contralateral wild type tumors as controls, based on two- to tenfold greater light emission following direct intra tumoral or intravenous administration of reporter substrate. The 1,2-dioxetane substrate is commercially available as a kit for microplate-based assays for beta-gal detection, and we have adapted it for in vivo application. Typically, 100 microl substrate mixture was administered intravenously and light emission was detected from the lacZ tumor immediately with gradual decrease over the next 20 mins. Imaging was also undertaken in transgenic ROSA26 mice following subcutaneous or intravenous injection of substrate mixture. CONCLUSION AND SIGNIFICANCE: Light emission was detectable using standard instrumentation designed for more traditional bioluminescent imaging. Use of 1,2-dioxetane substrates to detect enzyme activity offers a new paradigm for non-invasive biochemistry in vivo.

  19. TRAIL-R2 promotes skeletal metastasis in a breast cancer xenograft mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritsche, Hendrik; Heilmann, Thorsten; Tower, Robert J; Hauser, Charlotte; von Au, Anja; El-Sheikh, Doaa; Campbell, Graeme M; Alp, Göhkan; Schewe, Denis; Hübner, Sebastian; Tiwari, Sanjay; Kownatzki, Daniel; Boretius, Susann; Adam, Dieter; Jonat, Walter; Becker, Thomas; Glüer, Claus C; Zöller, Margot; Kalthoff, Holger; Schem, Christian; Trauzold, Anna

    2015-04-20

    Despite improvements in detection, surgical approaches and systemic therapies, breast cancer remains typically incurable once distant metastases occur. High expression of TRAIL-R2 was found to be associated with poor prognostic parameters in breast cancer patients, suggesting an oncogenic function of this receptor. In the present study, we aimed to determine the impact of TRAIL-R2 on breast cancer metastasis. Using an osteotropic variant of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, we examine the effects of TRAIL-R2 knockdown in vitro and in vivo. Strikingly, in addition to the reduced levels of the proliferation-promoting factor HMGA2 and corresponding inhibition of cell proliferation, knockdown of TRAIL-R2 increased the levels of E-Cadherin and decreased migration. In vivo, these cells were strongly impaired in their ability to form bone metastases after intracardiac injection. Evaluating possible underlying mechanisms revealed a strong downregulation of CXCR4, the receptor for the chemokine SDF-1 important for homing of cancers cells to the bone. In accordance, cell migration towards SDF-1 was significantly impaired by TRAIL-R2 knockdown. Conversely, overexpression of TRAIL-R2 upregulated CXCR4 levels and enhanced SDF-1-directed migration. We therefore postulate that inhibition of TRAIL-R2 expression could represent a promising therapeutic strategy leading to an effective impairment of breast cancer cell capability to form skeletal metastases.

  20. Giant phyllodes tumor of the breast: a clinical observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Volchenko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes a case of giant phyllodes tumor of the breast. Phyllodes tumor is a rare type of fibroepithelial tumor composed of epithelial and connective tissue with the predominant development of a connective tissue component. Surgery is the only radical treatment.

  1. Breast tumor cells with PI3K mutation or HER2 amplification are selectively addicted to Akt signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-Bai She

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Dysregulated PI3K/Akt signaling occurs commonly in breast cancers and is due to HER2 amplification, PI3K mutation or PTEN inactivation. The objective of this study was to determine the role of Akt activation in breast cancer as a function of mechanism of activation and whether inhibition of Akt signaling is a feasible approach to therapy.A selective allosteric inhibitor of Akt kinase was used to interrogate a panel of breast cancer cell lines characterized for genetic lesions that activate PI3K/Akt signaling: HER2 amplification or PI3K or PTEN mutations in order to determine the biochemical and biologic consequences of inhibition of this pathway. A variety of molecular techniques and tissue culture and in vivo xenograft models revealed that tumors with mutational activation of Akt signaling were selectively dependent on the pathway. In sensitive cells, pathway inhibition resulted in D-cyclin loss, G1 arrest and induction of apoptosis, whereas cells without pathway activation were unaffected. Most importantly, the drug effectively inhibited Akt kinase and its downstream effectors in vivo and caused complete suppression of the growth of breast cancer xenografts with PI3K mutation or HER2 amplification, including models of the latter selected for resistance to Herceptin. Furthermore, chronic administration of the drug was well-tolerated, causing only transient hyperglycemia without gross toxicity to the host despite the pleiotropic normal functions of Akt.These data demonstrate that breast cancers with PI3K mutation or HER2 amplification are selectively dependent on Akt signaling, and that effective inhibition of Akt in tumors is feasible and effective in vivo. These findings suggest that direct inhibition of Akt may represent a therapeutic strategy for breast and other cancers that are addicted to the pathway including tumors with resistant to Herceptin.

  2. Enhancement of tumor initiation and expression of KCNMA1, MORF4L2 and ASPM genes in the adenocarcinoma of lung xenograft after vorinostat treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Wei-Ying; Wu, Chun-Yi; Hwu, Luen; Lee, Jhih-Shian; Tsai, Cheng-Han; Lin, Kang-Ping; Wang, Hsin-Ell; Chou, Teh-Ying; Tsai, Chun-Ming; Gelovani, Juri; Liu, Ren-Shyan

    2015-04-20

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are usually tolerant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy and associated with tumor relapse. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACI), is currently being used in clinical trials of lung cancer. However, SAHA facilitates the formation of induced pluripotent stem cells from somatic cells. We hypothesized that SAHA would mediate the CSCs properties and subsequently confer a more malignant phenotype in lung cancer. Transfected H1299 lung cancer cells, which stably expresses a triple fused reporter gene (DsRedm-Fluc-tTKsr39) under the control of CMV promoter was used to establish a xenograft mouse model. After the treatment of SAHA, H1299 cell line and tumor xenografts were sorted by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) based on aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity. We found that SAHA could suppress the growth of xenografted H1299 tumors with decreased proportion of ALDHbr lung cancer cells indicating that SAHA may target CSCs. However, SAHA significantly enhanced the tumor initiating capacity and the expression of malignant genes such as KCNMA1, MORF4L2 and ASPM in the remaining living ALDHbr cells. These findings suggested that SAHA treatment created a more drug-resistant state in residual ALDHbr cells. The in vivo imaging technique may facilitate searching and characterization of CSCs.

  3. Development of a Fully Human Anti-PDGFRβ Antibody That Suppresses Growth of Human Tumor Xenografts and Enhances Antitumor Activity of an Anti-VEGFR2 Antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juqun Shen

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFRβ is upregulated in most of solid tumors. It is expressed by pericytes/smooth muscle cells, fibroblast, macrophage, and certain tumor cells. Several PDGF receptor-related antagonists are being developed as potential antitumor agents and have demonstrated promising antitumor activity in both preclinical and clinical settings. Here, we produced a fully human neutralizing antibody, IMC-2C5, directed against PDGFRβ from an antibody phage display library. IMC-2C5 binds to both human and mouse PDGFRβ and blocks PDGF-B from binding to the receptor. IMC-2C5 also blocks ligand-stimulated activation of PDGFRβ and downstream signaling molecules in tumor cells. In animal studies, IMC-2C5 significantly delayed the growth of OVCAR-8 and NCI-H460 human tumor xenografts in nude mice but failed to show antitumor activities in OVCAR-5 and Caki-1 xenografts. Our results indicate that the antitumor efficacy of IMC-2C5 is primarily due to its effects on tumor stroma, rather than on tumor cells directly. Combination of IMC-2C5 and DC101, an anti-mouse vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 antibody, resulted in significantly enhanced antitumor activity in BxPC-3, NCI-H460, and HCT-116 xenografts, compared with DC101 alone, and the trend of additive effects to DC101 treatment in several other tumor models. ELISA analysis of NCI-H460 tumor homogenates showed that IMC-2C5 attenuated protein level of vascular endothelial growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor elevated by DC101 treatment. Finally, IMC-2C5 showed a trend of additive effects when combined with DC101/chemotherapy in MIA-PaCa-2 and NCI-H460 models. Taken together, these results lend great support to the use of PDGFRβ antagonists in combination with other antiangiogenic agents in the treatment of a broad range of human cancers.

  4. Noninvasive measurement of the electrical bioimpedance of breast tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmine, Y; Morimoto, T; Kinouchi, Y; Iritani, T; Takeuchi, M; Monden, Y

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the possibility of differential diagnosis of tumors, such as breast cancer, by measuring the mammary electrical bioimpedance via the skin surface noninvasively and by examining the relationship between the tissue structure of the breast and electrical bioimpedance. The mammary electrical bioimpedance was measured in 24 patients with breast cancer. Taking into account the measurement results and the distribution of the mammary glands and fatty tissue, a breast model with tumors was proposed. Based on this model, the distributions of the electric potential and electric field in the tissue were theoretically analyzed by the three-dimensional finite element method. In clinical cases, the Re values of the diseased breast were significantly larger than those of the contralateral healthy breast. In theoretical analysis based on the breast model, the Re value of mammary electrical bioimpedance varied due to the structure of the breast, that is, the ratio of fatty tissue to mammary gland and the presence of mammary tumors. The results of the measurement agreed with the theoretical analyses. These results suggest that differential diagnosis of breast tumors is possible by measuring the mammary electrical bioimpedance using noninvasive electrodes on the skin.

  5. Cultured circulating tumor cells and their derived xenografts for personalized oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruoxiang Wang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent cancer research has demonstrated the existence of circulating tumor cells (CTCs in cancer patient's blood. Once identified, CTC biomarkers will be invaluable tools for clinical diagnosis, prognosis and treatment. In this review, we propose ex vivo culture as a rational strategy for large scale amplification of the limited numbers of CTCs from a patient sample, to derive enough CTCs for accurate and reproducible characterization of the biophysical, biochemical, gene expressional and behavioral properties of the harvested cells. Because of tumor cell heterogeneity, it is important to amplify all the CTCs in a blood sample for a comprehensive understanding of their role in cancer metastasis. By analyzing critical steps and technical issues in ex vivo CTC culture, we developed a cost-effective and reproducible protocol directly culturing whole peripheral blood mononuclear cells, relying on an assumed survival advantage in CTCs and CTC-like cells over the normal cells to amplify this specified cluster of cancer cells.

  6. Pattern of Ipsilateral Breast Tumor Recurrence After Breast-Conserving Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jobsen, Jan; van der Palen, Jacobus Adrianus Maria; Riemersma, Sietske; Heijmans, Harald; Ong, Francisca; Struikmans, Henk

    2014-01-01

    The rate of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) in breast cancer after breast-conserving therapy was analyzed. We demonstrate that after 12 years' follow-up, there is an especially high recurrence rate for women ≤40 years old. For women ≤40 years old, the absence of adjuvant systemic therapy

  7. MicroRNA-627 mediates the epigenetic mechanisms of vitamin D to suppress proliferation of human colorectal cancer cells and growth of xenograft tumors in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padi, Sathish K R; Zhang, Qunshu; Rustum, Youcef M; Morrison, Carl; Guo, Bin

    2013-08-01

    Vitamin D protects against colorectal cancer through unclear mechanisms. We investigated the effects of calcitriol (1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3; the active form of vitamin D) on levels of different microRNAs (miRNAs) in colorectal cancer cells from humans and xenograft tumors in mice. Expression of miRNAs in colorectal cancer cell lines was examined using the Ambion mirVana miRNA Bioarray. The effects of calcitriol on expression of miR-627 and cell proliferation were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction and WST-1 assay, respectively; growth of colorectal xenograft tumors was examined in nude mice. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to analyze levels of miR-627 in human colon adenocarcinoma samples and nontumor colon mucosa tissues (controls). In HT-29 cells, miR-627 was the only miRNA significantly up-regulated by calcitriol. Jumonji domain containing 1A (JMJD1A), which encodes a histone demethylase, was found to be a target of miR-627. By down-regulating JMJD1A, miR-627 increased methylation of histone H3K9 and suppressed expression of proliferative factors, such as growth and differentiation factor 15. Calcitriol induced expression of miR-627, which down-regulated JMJD1A and suppressed growth of xenograft tumors from HCT-116 cells in nude mice. Overexpression of miR-627 prevented proliferation of colorectal cancer cell lines in culture and growth of xenograft tumors in mice. Conversely, blocking the activity of miR-627 inhibited the tumor suppressive effects of calcitriol in cultured colorectal cancer cells and in mice. Levels of miR-627 were decreased in human colon adenocarcinoma samples compared with controls. miR-627 mediates tumor-suppressive epigenetic activities of vitamin D on colorectal cancer cells and xenograft tumors in mice. The messenger RNA that encodes the histone demethylase JMJD1A is a direct target of miR-627. Reagents designed to target JMJD1A or its messenger RNA, or increase the function of miR-627, might have the same

  8. Phyllodes tumor masquerading as a fungating breast mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Nolan R; Carlson, Jacob T; Barnard, Kayla J; Henry-Tillman, Ronda

    2017-12-01

    Phyllodes tumor of the breast is an uncommonly encountered disease. The tumor presenting as fungating breast mass or 'ruptured' breast is an even more rare presentation of an unusual disease. This report documents the case of a 60-year-old female with delayed presentation of a large exophytic mass of the left breast. Biopsy of this lesion was non-diagnostic, so excision via left total mastectomy was performed. The final pathology was consistent with malignant phyllodes tumor. This report highlights the features of a rare breast cancer, the challenges in obtaining a definitive diagnosis, and the treatment of this disease, in an effort to provide clinicians with an example of the management of such a peculiar entity.

  9. Morphine Promotes Tumor Angiogenesis and Increases Breast Cancer Progression

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    Sabrina Bimonte

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Morphine is considered a highly potent analgesic agent used to relieve suffering of patients with cancer. Several in vitro and in vivo studies showed that morphine also modulates angiogenesis and regulates tumour cell growth. Unfortunately, the results obtained by these studies are still contradictory. In order to better dissect the role of morphine in cancer cell growth and angiogenesis we performed in vitro studies on ER-negative human breast carcinoma cells, MDA.MB231 and in vivo studies on heterotopic mouse model of human triple negative breast cancer, TNBC. We demonstrated that morphine in vitro enhanced the proliferation and inhibited the apoptosis of MDA.MB231 cells. In vivo studies performed on xenograft mouse model of TNBC revealed that tumours of mice treated with morphine were larger than those observed in other groups. Moreover, morphine was able to enhance the neoangiogenesis. Our data showed that morphine at clinical relevant doses promotes angiogenesis and increases breast cancer progression.

  10. Tumor-to-breast volume ratio as measured on MRI: a possible predictor of breast-conserving surgery versus mastectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faermann, Renata; Sperber, Fani; Schneebaum, Schlomo; Barsuk, Daphna

    2014-02-01

    The surgical approach to breast cancer changed dramatically in the past 20 years. The surgical objective today is to remove the tumor, ensuring negative margins and good cosmetic results, and preserving the breast when possible. Magnetic resonance imaging of the breast has become an essential imaging tool prior to surgery, diagnosing additional tumors and assessing tumor extent. Tumor-to-breast volume ratio, an important predictor of breast conservation, can be measured with MRI and may change the surgical decision. To measure the tumor-to-breast volume ratio using MRI in order to assess whether there is a correlation between this ratio and the type of surgery selected (breast-conserving or mastectomy). The volumes of the tumor and the breast and the tumor-to-breast volume ratio were retrospectively calculated using preoperative breast MRI in 76 patients who underwent breast-conserving surgery or mastectomy. Breast-conserving surgery (lumpectomy) was performed in 64 patients and mastectomy in 12. The average tumor-to-breast volume ratio was 0.06 (6%) in the lumpectomy group and 0.30 (30%) in the mastectomy group (P < 0.0001). The tumor-to-breast volume ratio correlated with the type of surgery. As measured on MRI, this ratio is an accurate means of determining the type of surgery best suited for a given patient. It is recommended that MRI-determined tumor-to-breast volume ratio become part of the surgical planning protocol for patients diagnosed with breast cancer.

  11. Near-infrared fluorescence imaging of mammalian cells and xenograft tumors with SNAP-tag.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haibiao Gong

    Full Text Available Fluorescence in the near-infrared (NIR spectral region is suitable for in vivo imaging due to its reduced background and high penetration capability compared to visible fluorescence. SNAP(f is a fast-labeling variant of SNAP-tag that reacts with a fluorescent dye-conjugated benzylguanine (BG substrate, leading to covalent attachment of the fluorescent dye to the SNAP(f. This property makes SNAP(f a valuable tool for fluorescence imaging. The NIR fluorescent substrate BG-800, a conjugate between BG and IRDye 800CW, was synthesized and characterized in this study. HEK293, MDA-MB-231 and SK-OV-3 cells stably expressing SNAP(f-Beta-2 adrenergic receptor (SNAP(f-ADRβ2 fusion protein were created. The ADRβ2 portion of the protein directs the localization of the protein to the cell membrane. The expression of SNAP(f-ADRβ2 in the stable cell lines was confirmed by the reaction between BG-800 substrate and cell lysates. Microscopic examination confirmed that SNAP(f-ADRβ2 was localized on the cell membrane. The signal intensity of the labeled cells was dependent on the BG-800 concentration. In vivo imaging study showed that BG-800 could be used to visualize xenograph tumors expressing SNAP(f-ADRβ2. However, the background signal was relatively high, which may be a reflection of non-specific accumulation of BG-800 in the skin. To address the background issue, quenched substrates that only fluoresce upon reaction with SNAP-tag were synthesized and characterized. Although the fluorescence was successfully quenched, in vivo imaging with the quenched substrate CBG-800-PEG-QC1 failed to visualize the SNAP(f-ADRβ2 expressing tumor, possibly due to the reduced reaction rate. Further improvement is needed to apply this system for in vivo imaging.

  12. Extremely rare borderline phyllodes tumor in the male breast: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Gyu; Kim, Shin Young; Jung, Hae Yoen; Lee, Deuk Young; Lee, Jong Eun

    2015-01-01

    Phyllodes tumor of the male breast is an extremely rare disease, and far fewer cases of borderline phyllodes tumors than benign or malignant tumors in the male breast have been reported. We report a case of borderline phyllodes tumor in the male breast with imaging findings of the tumor and pathologic correlation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Radiologic findings of metastatic tumors to the breast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang Heum; Cha, Eun Suk; Park, Jeong Mi; Kim, Hak Hee; Kim, Ji Young; Park, Young Ha; Shinn, Kyung Sub [The Catholic Univ. of Korea College of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-09-01

    To analyze the radiologic findings of metastatic tumors of the breast. We retrospectively analyzed the findings of mammography (n = 12), ultrasonography (n = 9) and CT (n = 4) of 13 patients with metastatic tumors of the breast. Methods for confirmation were biopsy (n = 8) and clinical follow-up (n = 5). The patient' s ages ranged from 24 to 63 (mean 43)years. Primary malignancies were contralateral breast cancer (n = 3), non-Hodgkin' s lymphoma (n = 3), stomach cancer (n = 2), uterine cervix cancer (n = 1), laryngeal cancer (n = 1), esophageal melanoma (n = 1), malignant thymoma (n 1), and lung cancer (n = 1). Patterns of metastasis from contralateral breast cancer and the stomach cancer were diffuse and infiltrative, while metastasis from other cancers was of the focal mass-forming type. The radiologic findings of metastasis from contralateral breast cancer (n = 3) were diffuse skin thickening and increased density or echogenicity in the medial aspect of the breast, while in cases involving metastasis from stomach cancer (n = 2) radiographs revealed extensive skin thickening, increased density or echogenicity, lymphedema and ipsilateral lymphadenopathy in the left breast. In cases of metastatic tumors to the breast in which focal masses were seen on mammography (n = 7), marginal spiculation or microcalcification of the tumors was not present. In six such cases, ultrasonography revealed well-defined margin, posterior acoustic shadowing or an irregular thick echogenic boundary was not seen. It two patients who underwent CT scanning, well-defined masses with moderate contrast enhancement were present. Radiographs of metastatic tumors to the breast from contralateral breast cancer and stomach cancer showed diffuse infiltration. The metastatic tumors with focal masses showed oval to round, smooth-mar-ginated, well-defined masses without spiculation or microcalcification on mammography, and a well-defined mass without posterior acoustic shadowing or irregular

  14. Development of a Patient-Derived Xenograft (PDX of Breast Cancer Bone Metastasis in a Zebrafish Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Mercatali

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Bone metastasis is a complex process that needs to be better understood in order to help clinicians prevent and treat it. Xenografts using patient-derived material (PDX rather than cancer cell lines are a novel approach that guarantees more clinically realistic results. A primary culture of bone metastasis derived from a 67-year-old patient with breast cancer was cultured and then injected into zebrafish (ZF embryos to study its metastatic potential. In vivo behavior and results of gene expression analyses of the primary culture were compared with those of cancer cell lines with different metastatic potential (MCF7 and MDA-MB-231. The MCF7 cell line, which has the same hormonal receptor status as the bone metastasis primary culture, did not survive in the in vivo model. Conversely, MDA-MB-231 disseminated and colonized different parts of the ZF, including caudal hematopoietic tissues (CHT, revealing a migratory phenotype. Primary culture cells disseminated and in later stages extravasated from the vessels, engrafting into ZF tissues and reaching the CHT. Primary cell behavior reflected the clinical course of the patient’s medical history. Our results underline the potential for using PDX models in bone metastasis research and outline new methods for the clinical application of this in vivo model.

  15. The role of MMP-1 in breast cancer growth and metastasis to the brain in a xenograft model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Kato, Yukinari; Erzinger, Stephanie A; Kiriakova, Galina M; Qian, Yongzhen; Palmieri, Diane; Steeg, Patricia S; Price, Janet E

    2012-12-07

    Brain metastasis is an increasingly common complication for breast cancer patients; approximately 15- 30% of breast cancer patients develop brain metastasis. However, relatively little is known about how these metastases form, and what phenotypes are characteristic of cells with brain metastasizing potential. In this study, we show that the targeted knockdown of MMP-1 in breast cancer cells with enhanced brain metastatic ability not only reduced primary tumor growth, but also significantly inhibited brain metastasis. Two variants of the MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell line selected for enhanced ability to form brain metastases in nude mice (231-BR and 231-BR3 cells) were found to express high levels of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1). Short hairpin RNA-mediated stable knockdown of MMP-1 in 231-BR and 231-BR3 cells were established to analyze tumorigenic ability and metastatic ability. Short hairpin RNA-mediated stable knockdown of MMP-1 inhibited the invasive ability of MDA-MB 231 variant cells in vitro, and inhibited breast cancer growth when the cells were injected into the mammary fat pad of nude mice. Reduction of MMP-1 expression significantly attenuated brain metastasis and lung metastasis formation following injection of cells into the left ventricle of the heart and tail vein, respectively. There were significantly fewer proliferating cells in brain metastases of cells with reduced MMP-1 expression. Furthermore, reduced MMP-1 expression was associated with decreased TGFα release and phospho-EGFR expression in 231-BR and BR3 cells. Our results show that elevated expression of MMP-1 can promote the local growth and the formation of brain metastases by breast cancer cells.

  16. Spontaneous formation of tumorigenic hybrids between breast cancer and multipotent stromal cells is a source of tumor heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappa, Germana; Mercapide, Javier; Lorico, Aurelio

    2012-06-01

    Breast cancer progression involves cancer cell heterogeneity, with generation of invasive/metastatic breast cancer cells within populations of nonmetastatic cells of the primary tumor. Sequential genetic mutations, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, interaction with local stroma, and formation of hybrids between cancer cells and normal bone marrow-derived cells have been advocated as tumor progression mechanisms. We report herein the spontaneous in vitro formation of heterotypic hybrids between human bone marrow-derived multipotent stromal cells (MSCs) and two different breast carcinoma cell lines, MDA-MB-231 (MDA) and MA11. Hybrids showed predominantly mesenchymal morphological characteristics, mixed gene expression profiles, and increased DNA ploidy. Both MA11 and MDA hybrids were tumorigenic in immunodeficient mice, and some MDA hybrids had an increased metastatic capacity. Both in culture and as xenografts, hybrids underwent DNA ploidy reduction and morphological reversal to breast carcinoma-like morphological characteristics, while maintaining a mixed breast cancer-mesenchymal expression profile. Analysis of coding single-nucleotide polymorphisms by RNA sequencing revealed genetic contributions from both parental partners to hybrid tumors and metastasis. Because MSCs migrate and localize to breast carcinoma, our findings indicate that formation of MSC-breast cancer cell hybrids is a potential mechanism of the generation of invasive/metastatic breast cancer cells. Our findings reconcile the fusion theory of cancer progression with the common observation that breast cancer metastases are generally aneuploid, but not tetraploid, and are histopathologically similar to the primary neoplasm. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. mTORC1 is a target of nordihydroguaiaretic acid to prevent breast tumor growth in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue; Xu, Song; Lin, Jun; Yao, Guangyu; Han, Zelong; Liang, Bo; Zou, Zhenhong; Chen, Zhenguo; Song, Qiancheng; Dai, Yifan; Gao, Tianming; Liu, Anling; Bai, Xiaochun

    2012-11-01

    Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) is a natural phenolic compound isolated from the creosote bush Larrea divaricata, which has anti-tumor activities both in vitro and in vivo. Its analogs are in clinical development for use in refractory solid tumors. But the mechanisms underlying the anti-cancer effect of NDGA are not fully understood. In this study, we identified mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) as a target of NDGA both in cultured breast cancer cells and in xenograft models. NDGA effectively inhibited basal level of mTORC1 but not mTORC2 activity in breast cancer cell lines. NDGA also suppressed mTORC1 downstream signaling such as expression of cyclin D1, hypoxia-inducible factor-α and VEGF, and prevented proliferation in breast cancer cells. Although NDGA stimulated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)/tuberous sclerosis complex 2 (TSC2) signaling, which negatively regulates mTORC1, AMPK and TSC2 deletion could not diminish the inhibition of mTORC1 by NDGA. Subsequent studies revealed that NDGA may also direct target mTORC1 complex because NDGA suppressed amino acids- and insulin-stimulated mTORC1 and acted like rapamycin to disrupt mTOR-Raptor interaction. Most importantly, NDGA repressed breast tumor growth and targeted mTORC1 and its downstream signaling in xenograft models. Together our data provide a novel mechanism for NDGA activity which could help explain its anti-cancer activity. Disruption of mTOR-Raptor complex and activation of AMPK/TSC signaling may contribute to inhibitory effects of NDGA against mTORC1. Our data also raise the possibility that NDGA, as an mTORC1 inhibitor, may have a broad spectrum of action on breast cancers.

  18. Negligible colon cancer risk from food-borne acrylamide exposure in male F344 rats and nude (nu/nu mice-bearing human colon tumor xenografts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayadev Raju

    Full Text Available Acrylamide, a possible human carcinogen, is formed in certain carbohydrate-rich foods processed at high temperature. We evaluated if dietary acrylamide, at doses (0.5, 1.0 or 2.0 mg/kg diet reflecting upper levels found in human foods, modulated colon tumorigenesis in two rodent models. Male F344 rats were randomized to receive diets without (control or with acrylamide. 2-weeks later, rats in each group received two weekly subcutaneous injections of either azoxymethane (AOM or saline, and were killed 20 weeks post-injections; colons were assessed for tumors. Male athymic nude (nu/nu mice bearing HT-29 human colon adenocarcinoma cells-derived tumor xenografts received diets without (control or with acrylamide; tumor growth was monitored and mice were killed 4 weeks later. In the F344 rat study, no tumors were found in the colons of the saline-injected rats. However, the colon tumor incidence was 54.2% and 66.7% in the control and the 2 mg/kg acrylamide-treated AOM-injected groups, respectively. While tumor multiplicity was similar across all diet groups, tumor size and burden were higher in the 2 mg/kg acrylamide group compared to the AOM control. These results suggest that acrylamide by itself is not a "complete carcinogen", but acts as a "co-carcinogen" by exacerbating the effects of AOM. The nude mouse study indicated no differences in the growth of human colon tumor xenografts between acrylamide-treated and control mice, suggesting that acrylamide does not aid in the progression of established tumors. Hence, food-borne acrylamide at levels comparable to those found in human foods is neither an independent carcinogen nor a tumor promoter in the colon. However, our results characterize a potential hazard of acrylamide as a colon co-carcinogen in association with known and possibly other environmental tumor initiators/promoters.

  19. Negligible Colon Cancer Risk from Food-Borne Acrylamide Exposure in Male F344 Rats and Nude (nu/nu) Mice-Bearing Human Colon Tumor Xenografts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, Jayadev; Roberts, Jennifer; Sondagar, Chandni; Kapal, Kamla; Aziz, Syed A.; Caldwell, Don; Mehta, Rekha

    2013-01-01

    Acrylamide, a possible human carcinogen, is formed in certain carbohydrate-rich foods processed at high temperature. We evaluated if dietary acrylamide, at doses (0.5, 1.0 or 2.0 mg/kg diet) reflecting upper levels found in human foods, modulated colon tumorigenesis in two rodent models. Male F344 rats were randomized to receive diets without (control) or with acrylamide. 2-weeks later, rats in each group received two weekly subcutaneous injections of either azoxymethane (AOM) or saline, and were killed 20 weeks post-injections; colons were assessed for tumors. Male athymic nude (nu/nu) mice bearing HT-29 human colon adenocarcinoma cells-derived tumor xenografts received diets without (control) or with acrylamide; tumor growth was monitored and mice were killed 4 weeks later. In the F344 rat study, no tumors were found in the colons of the saline-injected rats. However, the colon tumor incidence was 54.2% and 66.7% in the control and the 2 mg/kg acrylamide-treated AOM-injected groups, respectively. While tumor multiplicity was similar across all diet groups, tumor size and burden were higher in the 2 mg/kg acrylamide group compared to the AOM control. These results suggest that acrylamide by itself is not a “complete carcinogen”, but acts as a “co-carcinogen” by exacerbating the effects of AOM. The nude mouse study indicated no differences in the growth of human colon tumor xenografts between acrylamide-treated and control mice, suggesting that acrylamide does not aid in the progression of established tumors. Hence, food-borne acrylamide at levels comparable to those found in human foods is neither an independent carcinogen nor a tumor promoter in the colon. However, our results characterize a potential hazard of acrylamide as a colon co-carcinogen in association with known and possibly other environmental tumor initiators/promoters. PMID:24040114

  20. Tumor Accumulation of NIR Fluorescent PEG-PLA Nanoparticles: Impact of Particle Size and Human Xenograft Tumor Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schädlich, Andreas; Caysa, Henrike; Mueller, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    parameter for the nanoparticle accumulation in tumor tissues. In the present study the influence of the size of biodegradable nanoparticles was investigated in detail, combining in vivo and ex vivo analysis with comprehensive particle size characterizations. Polyethylene glycol-polyesters poly......(lactide) block polymers were synthesized and used for the production of three defined, stable, and nontoxic near-infrared (NIR) dye-loaded nanoparticle batches. Size analysis based on asymmetrical field flow field fractionation coupled with multiangle laser light scattering and photon correlation spectroscopy...

  1. The utility of fecal corticosterone metabolites and animal welfare assessment protocols as predictive parameters of tumor development and animal welfare in a murine xenograft model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Kirsten Rosenmaj; Jørgensen, Pernille Schønning; Pipper, Christian Bressen

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the utility of various non-invasive parameters for the prediction of tumor development and animal welfare in a murine xenograft model in male C.B-17 SCID (C.B-Igh-1(b)/IcrTac-Prkdc(scid)) mice. The study showed that body weight, food and water consumpt......The aim of the present study was to evaluate the utility of various non-invasive parameters for the prediction of tumor development and animal welfare in a murine xenograft model in male C.B-17 SCID (C.B-Igh-1(b)/IcrTac-Prkdc(scid)) mice. The study showed that body weight, food and water...... consumption, and an animal welfare assessment (AWA) protocol revealed marked differences between control and cancer lines as the size of the tumor increased. However, only the AWA protocol was effective in predicting the tumor size and the level of fecal corticosterone metabolites (FCM). FCM levels were......, however, negatively-correlated to the AWA score, and the tumor size, both when evaluated on a given day and when accumulated over the entire period. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that body weight and food and water consumption were negatively-affected as tumor developed but only the animal...

  2. In Vivo Imaging of Xenograft Tumors Using an Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-Specific Affibody Molecule Labeled with a Near-infrared Fluorophore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haibiao Gong

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR is associated with many types of cancers. It is of great interest to noninvasively image the EGFR expression in vivo. In this study, we labeled an EGFR-specific Affibody molecule (Eaff with a near-infrared (NIR dye IRDye800CW maleimide and tested the binding of this labeled molecule (Eaff800 in cell culture and xenograft mouse tumor models. Unlike EGF, Eaff did not activate the EGFR signaling pathway. Results showed that Eaff800 was bound and taken up specifically by EGFR-overexpressing A431 cells. When Eaff800 was intravenously injected into nude mice bearing A431 xenograft tumors, the tumor could be identified 1 hour after injection and it became most prominent after 1 day. Images of dissected tissue sections demonstrated that the accumulation of Eaff800 was highest in the liver, followed by the tumor and kidney. Moreover, in combination with a human EGFR type 2 (HER2-specific probe Haff682, Eaff800 could be used to distinguish between EGFR- and HER2-overexpressing tumors. Interestingly, the organ distribution pattern and the clearance rate of Eaff800 were different from those of Haff682. In conclusion, Eaff molecule labeled with a NIR fluorophore is a promising molecular imaging agent for EGFR-overexpressing tumors.

  3. Nerve fibers in breast cancer tissues indicate aggressive tumor progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Di; Su, Shicheng; Cui, Xiuying; Shen, Ximing; Zeng, Yunjie; Wu, Wei; Chen, Jianing; Chen, Fei; He, Chonghua; Liu, Jiang; Huang, Wei; Liu, Qiang; Su, Fengxi; Song, Erwei; Ouyang, Nengtai

    2014-12-01

    Emerging evidence has indicated nerve fibers as a marker in the progression of various types of cancers, such as pancreatic cancer and prostate cancer. However, whether nerve fibers are associated with breast cancer progression remains unclear. In this study, we evaluated the presence of nerve fibers in 352 breast cancer specimens and 83 benign breast tissue specimens including 43 cases of cystic fibrosis and 40 cases of fibroadenoma from 2 independent breast tumor center using immunohistochemical staining for specific peripheral nerve fiber markers.In all, nerve fibers were present in 130 out of 352 breast cancer tissue specimens, while none were detected in normal breast tissue specimens. Among 352 cases, we defined 239 cases from Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Guangzhou, China, as the training set, and 113 cases from the First Affiliated Hospital of Shantou University, Guangdong, China, as the validation set. The thickness of tumor-involving nerve fibers is significantly correlated with poor differentiation, lymph node metastasis, high clinical staging, and triple negative subtype in breast cancer. More importantly, Cox multifactor analysis indicates that the thickness of tumor-involving nerve fibers is a previously unappreciated independent prognostic factors associated with shorter disease-free survival of breast cancer patients. Our findings are further validated by online Oncomine database. In conclusion, our results show that nerve fiber involvement in breast cancer is associated with progression of the malignancy and warrant further studies in the future.

  4. Nerve Fibers in Breast Cancer Tissues Indicate Aggressive Tumor Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Di; Su, Shicheng; Cui, Xiuying; Shen, Ximing; Zeng, Yunjie; Wu, Wei; Chen, Jianing; Chen, Fei; He, Chonghua; Liu, Jiang; Huang, Wei; Liu, Qiang; Su, Fengxi; Song, Erwei; Ouyang, Nengtai

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Emerging evidence has indicated nerve fibers as a marker in the progression of various types of cancers, such as pancreatic cancer and prostate cancer. However, whether nerve fibers are associated with breast cancer progression remains unclear. In this study, we evaluated the presence of nerve fibers in 352 breast cancer specimens and 83 benign breast tissue specimens including 43 cases of cystic fibrosis and 40 cases of fibroadenoma from 2 independent breast tumor center using immunohistochemical staining for specific peripheral nerve fiber markers. In all, nerve fibers were present in 130 out of 352 breast cancer tissue specimens, while none were detected in normal breast tissue specimens. Among 352 cases, we defined 239 cases from Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Guangzhou, China, as the training set, and 113 cases from the First Affiliated Hospital of Shantou University, Guangdong, China, as the validation set. The thickness of tumor-involving nerve fibers is significantly correlated with poor differentiation, lymph node metastasis, high clinical staging, and triple negative subtype in breast cancer. More importantly, Cox multifactor analysis indicates that the thickness of tumor-involving nerve fibers is a previously unappreciated independent prognostic factors associated with shorter disease-free survival of breast cancer patients. Our findings are further validated by online Oncomine database. In conclusion, our results show that nerve fiber involvement in breast cancer is associated with progression of the malignancy and warrant further studies in the future. PMID:25501061

  5. Recurrent angio-fibroma of breast masquerading as phyllodes tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaurasia, Jai K; Alam, Feroz; Shadan, Mariam; Naim, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    A young Indian female presented with a recurring tumor in the right breast masquerading as phyllodes tumor. Patient had history of five times excision and recurrences of the tumor, diagnosed as fibrous phyllodes of the breast. Presently, a well-circumscribed tumor of about 10 cm size, comprising of benign fibrous-angiomatous tissue with evidence of foci of pyogenic vasculitis was observed. Immuno-histochemical markers for the myo-epithelial and epithelial elements excluded the possibility of fibrous phyllodes, inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor, desmoid fibromatosis, and metaplastic carcinoma. The present findings were diagnostic of an inflammatory angio-fibroma of the right breast, not reported in the earlier literature. The observations indicated that the female breast may be susceptible to spontaneous productive and common-antibiotic-resistant focal septic vascular inflammation giving rise to angio-fibromatous proliferation producing a well-defined tumor mass in the breast, distinguishable from the other breast lesions by the connective tissue stains and immuno-histochemical markers.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of benign phyllodes tumors of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Takayuki; Fukutomi, Takashi; Kubochi, Kiyoshi

    2004-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has the potential to become a useful adjunct in breast imaging. Contrast-enhanced breast MRI has demonstrated a high sensitivity in the detection of benign and malignant breast disease. Our study aimed to correlate the dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI appearance of benign phyllodes tumor of the breast with histopathologic findings. We retrospectively reviewed the MRI findings in eight patients with benign phyllodes tumor of the breast to describe the image characteristics of this disease. The architectural features and enhancement patterns of this tumor were assessed and compared with other breast diseases. MRIs demonstrated some characteristics for large benign phyllodes tumors (more than 3 cm in size). On T(2)-weighted images, they were imaged as spotted tumors in high to iso signal intensity with cystic components or septations inside. In the time-signal intensity curve for the eight patients in our study who underwent dynamic MRI, we demonstrated two patterns of their curve: rapidly and gradually enhanced. In conclusion, MRI findings in benign phyllodes tumor include dynamic curves of gradually and rapidly enhancing types, and a low and inhomogeneous signal intensity on T(2)-weighted images compared with fibroadenoma. These findings appear to be useful for diagnosis.

  7. LOXL4 knockdown enhances tumor growth and lung metastasis through collagen-dependent extracellular matrix changes in triple-negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sul Ki; Kim, Hoe Suk; Jin, Tiefeng; Moon, Woo Kyung

    2017-02-14

    Lysyl oxidase (LOX) family genes catalyze collagen cross-link formation. To determine the effects of lysyl oxidase-like 4 (LOXL4) expression on breast tumor formation and metastasis, we evaluated primary tumor growth and lung metastasis in mice injected with LOXL4-knockdown MDA-MB-231 triple-negative human breast cancer cells. In addition, we analyzed overall survival in breast cancer patients based on LOXL4 expression using a public online database. In the mouse xenograft model, LOXL4 knockdown increased primary tumor growth and lung colonization as well as collagen I and IV, lysine hydroxylase 1 and 2, and prolyl 4-hydroxylase subunit alpha 1 and 2 levels. Second harmonic generation imaging revealed that LOXL4 knockdown resulted in the thickening of collagen bundles within tumors. In addition, weak LOXL4 expression was associated with poor overall survival in breast cancer patients from the BreastMark dataset, and this association was strongest in triple-negative breast cancer patients. These results demonstrate that weak LOXL4 expression leads to remodeling of the extracellular matrix through induction of collagen synthesis, deposition, and structural changes. These alterations in turn promote tumor growth and metastasis and are associated with poor clinical outcomes in triple-negative breast cancer.

  8. Phyllodes tumors of the breast: diagnosis, treatment and prognostic factors related to recurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhi-Rui; Wang, Chen-Chen; Yang, Zhao-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Phyllodes tumors of the breast are rare tumor types that consist of 0.3–1.0% in all breast tumors. The naming and classification of breast phyllodes tumor have been debated for years. Based on the classification criteria modified by WHO in 2003, this review mainly introduced the clinicopathologic characteristics, pre-operational diagnosis and the treatment of breast phyllodes tumors, and also summarized the prognostic factors related to tumor recurrence. PMID:28066617

  9. Breast Cancer Risk Prediction with Heterogeneous Risk Profiles According to Breast Cancer Tumor Markers

    OpenAIRE

    Rosner, Bernard; Glynn, Robert J.; Tamimi, Rulla M.; Chen, Wendy Y.; Colditz, Graham A.; Willett, Walter C.; Hankinson, Susan E.

    2013-01-01

    Relationships between some risk factors and breast cancer incidence are known to vary by tumor subtype. However, breast tumors can be classified according to a number of markers, which may be correlated, making it difficult to identify heterogeneity of risk factors with specific tumor markers when using standard competing-risk survival analysis. In this paper, we propose a constrained competing-risk survival model that allows for assessment of heterogeneity of risk factor associations accordi...

  10. Correlation of ultrasound contrast agent derived blood flow parameters with immunohistochemical angiogenesis markers in murine xenograft tumor models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenbrey, John R; Wilson, Christian C; Ro, Raymond J; Fox, Traci B; Liu, Ji-Bin; Chiou, See-Ying; Forsberg, Flemming

    2013-09-01

    In this study we used temporal analysis of ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) estimate blood flow dynamics and demonstrate their improved correlation to angiogenesis markers relative to previously reported, non-temporal fractional vascularity estimates. Breast tumor (NMU) or glioma (C6) cells were implanted in either the abdomen or thigh of 144 rats. After 6, 8 or 10 days, rats received a bolus UCA injection of Optison (GE Healthcare, Princeton, NJ; 0.4 ml/kg) during power Doppler imaging (PDI), harmonic imaging (HI), and microflow imaging (MFI) using an Aplio ultrasound scanner with 7.5 MHz linear array (Toshiba America Medical Systems, Tustin, CA). Time-intensity curves of contrast wash-in were constructed on a pixel-by-pixel basis and averaged to calculate maximum intensity, time to peak, perfusion, and time integrated intensity (TII). Tumors were then stained for four immunohistochemical markers (bFGF, CD31, COX-2, and VEGF). Correlations between temporal parameters and the angiogenesis markers were investigated for each imaging mode. Effects of tumor model and implant location on these correlations were also investigated. Significant correlation over the entire dataset was only observed between TII and VEGF for all three imaging modes (R=-0.35, -0.54, -0.32 for PDI, HI and MFI, respectively; p<0.0001). Tumor type and location affected these correlations, with the strongest correlation of TII to VEGF found to be with implanted C6 cells (R=-0.43, -0.54, -0.52 for PDI, HI and MFI, respectively; p<0.0002). While UCA-derived temporal blood flow parameters were found to correlate strongly with VEGF expression, these correlations were also found to be influenced by both tumor type and implant location. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Cancer-associated adipocytes promotes breast tumor radioresistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bochet, Ludivine; Meulle, Aline [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex (France); CNRS, IPBS (Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale), 205 route de Narbonne, BP 64182, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex (France); Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale, INSERM U1048, 1 Avenue du Pr Jean Poulhes, BP 84225, F-31432 Toulouse Cedex (France); Imbert, Sandrine [CNRS, IPBS (Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale), 205 route de Narbonne, BP 64182, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex (France); Salles, Bernard [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex (France); CNRS, IPBS (Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale), 205 route de Narbonne, BP 64182, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex (France); Valet, Philippe [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex (France); Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale, INSERM U1048, 1 Avenue du Pr Jean Poulhes, BP 84225, F-31432 Toulouse Cedex (France); Muller, Catherine, E-mail: muller@ipbs.fr [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex (France); CNRS, IPBS (Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale), 205 route de Narbonne, BP 64182, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex (France)

    2011-07-22

    Highlights: {yields} Tumor-surrounding adipocytes contribute to breast cancer progression. {yields} Breast tumor cells previously co-cultivated with mature adipocytes exhibit radioresistance. {yields} Increased in Chk1 phosphorylation is observed in irradiated co-cultivated tumor cells. {yields} IL-6 is over-expressed in tumor cells co-cultivated with adipocytes. {yields} IL-6 exposure confers increased Chk1 phosphorylation and radioresistance in tumor cells. -- Abstract: Mature adipocytes are excellent candidates to influence tumor behavior through heterotypic signaling processes since these cells produce hormones, growth factors, cytokines and other molecules, a heterogeneous group of molecules named adipokines. Using a 2D coculture system, we demonstrate that breast tumor cells previously co-cultivated with mature adipocytes exhibit radioresistance and an earlier and higher increase in the effector kinase Chk1, a phenotype that was associated with decreased cell death as compared to tumor cells grown alone. Interestingly, the adipocytes-induced tumor changes taking place during the coculture time preceding the exposure to IR were sufficient to confer the radioresistant effect. Notorious among the changes brought by adipocytes was the significant increase of IL-6 expression in tumor cells, whose activity may well account for the observed tumor cell protection from IR toxicity. Indeed, our data confirmed the protective role of this cytokine as tumor cells incubated after irradiation with recombinant IL-6 exhibit an increased in Chk1 phosphorylation and a radioresistant phenotype, thus far recapitulating the effects observed in the presence of adipocytes. Our current study sheds light on a new role of tumor-surrounding adipocytes in fostering a radioresistant phenotype in breast tumors, a finding that might have important clinical implications in obese patients that frequently exhibit aggressive diseases.

  12. Associations of Breast Cancer Risk Factors With Tumor Subtypes: A Pooled Analysis From the Breast Cancer Association Consortium Studies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    ...; Yang, Xiaohong R; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Goode, Ellen L; Couch, Fergus J; Nevanlinna, Heli; Milne, Roger L; Gaudet, Mia; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Broeks, Annegien; Cox, Angela; Fasching, Peter A; Hein, Rebecca; Spurdle, Amanda B; Blows, Fiona; ver, Kristy; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Heinz, Judith; Sinn, Peter; Vrieling, Alina; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Aittomaeki, Kristiina; Heikkilae, Paeivi; Blomqvist, Carl; Lissowska, Jolanta; Peplonska, Beata; Chanock, Stephen; Figueroa, Jonine; Brinton, Louise; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Humphreys, Keith; Darabi, Hatef; Liu, Jianjun; Van 't Veer, Laura J; Van Leeuwen, Flora E; Anulis, Irene L; Glendon, Gord; Knight, Julia A; Mulligan, Anna Marie; O'Malley, Frances P; Weerasooriya, Nayana; John, Esther M; Beckmann, Matthias W; Hartmann, Arndt; Weihbrecht, Sebastian B; Wachter, David L; Jud, Sebastian M. S; Loehberg, Christian R; Baglietto, Laura; English, Dallas R; Giles, Graham G; McLean, Catriona A; Severi, Gianluca; Lambrechts, Diether; Vandorpe, Thijs; Weltens, Caroline; Paridaens, Robert; Smeets, Ann; Neven, Patrick; Wildiers, Hans; Wang, Xianshu; Olson, Janet E; Cafourek, Victoria; Fredericksen, Zachary; Kosel, Matthew; Vachon, Celine; Cramp, Helen E; Connley, Daniel; Cross, Simon S; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy P; Reed, Malcolm W. R; Doerk, Thilo; Bremer, Michael; Meyer, Aneas; Karstens, Johann H; Ay, Aysun; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Hillemanns, Peter; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Menendez Roiguez, Primitiva; Zamora, Pilar; Bentez, Javier; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Fischer, Hans-Peter; Hamann, Ute; Pesch, Beate; Bruening, Thomas; Justenhoven, Christina; Brauch, Hiltrud; Eccles, Diana M; Tapper, William J; Gerty, Sue M; Sawyer, Elinor J; Tomlinson, Ian P; Jones, Angela; Kerin, Michael; Miller, Nicola; McInerney, Niall; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios

    2011-01-01

    ...) and progesterone receptor (PR) expression status of the tumors. Methods We pooled tumor marker and epidemiological risk factor data from 35 568 invasive breast cancer case patients from 34 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium...

  13. Oncolytic Herpes Virus rRp450 Shows Efficacy in Orthotopic Xenograft Group 3/4 Medulloblastomas and Atypical Teratoid/Rhabdoid Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam W. Studebaker

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric brain tumors including medulloblastoma and atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor are associated with significant mortality and treatment-associated morbidity. While medulloblastoma tumors within molecular subgroups 3 and 4 have a propensity to metastasize, atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors frequently afflict a very young patient population. Adjuvant treatment options for children suffering with these tumors are not only sub-optimal but also associated with many neurocognitive obstacles. A potentially novel treatment approach is oncolytic virotherapy, a developing therapeutic platform currently in early-phase clinical trials for pediatric brain tumors and recently US Food and Drug Administration (FDA-approved to treat melanoma in adults. We evaluated the therapeutic potential of the clinically available oncolytic herpes simplex vector rRp450 in cell lines derived from medulloblastoma and atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor. Cells of both tumor types were supportive of virus replication and virus-mediated cytotoxicity. Orthotopic xenograft models of medulloblastoma and atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors displayed significantly prolonged survival following a single, stereotactic intratumoral injection of rRp450. Furthermore, addition of the chemotherapeutic prodrug cyclophosphamide (CPA enhanced rRp450’s in vivo efficacy. In conclusion, oncolytic herpes viruses with the ability to bioactivate the prodrug CPA within the tumor microenvironment warrant further investigation as a potential therapy for pediatric brain tumors.

  14. A Peptide Antagonist of the ErbB1 Receptor Inhibits Receptor Activation, Tumor Cell Growth and Migration In Vitro and Xenograft Tumor Growth In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ruodan; Povlsen, Gro Klitgaard; Soroka, Vladislav; Bock, Elisabeth; Berezin, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor family of receptor tyrosine kinases (ErbBs) plays essential roles in tumorigenesis and cancer disease progression, and therefore has become an attractive target for structure-based drug design. ErbB receptors are activated by ligand-induced homo- and heterodimerization. Structural studies have revealed that ErbB receptor dimers are stabilized by receptor–receptor interactions, primarily mediated by a region in the second extracellular domain, termed the “dimerization arm”. The present study is the first biological characterization of a peptide, termed Inherbin3, which constitutes part of the dimerization arm of ErbB3. Inherbin3 binds to the extracellular domains of all four ErbB receptors, with the lowest peptide binding affinity for ErbB4. Inherbin3 functions as an antagonist of epidermal growth factor (EGF)-ErbB1 signaling. We show that Inherbin3 inhibits EGF-induced ErbB1 phosphorylation, cell growth, and migration in two human tumor cell lines, A549 and HN5, expressing moderate and high ErbB1 levels, respectively. Furthermore, we show that Inherbin3 inhibits tumor growth in vivo and induces apoptosis in a tumor xenograft model employing the human non-small cell lung cancer cell line A549. The Inherbin3 peptide may be a useful tool for investigating the mechanisms of ErbB receptor homo- and heterodimerization. Moreover, the here described biological effects of Inherbin3 suggest that peptide-based targeting of ErbB receptor dimerization is a promising anti-cancer therapeutic strategy. PMID:20364069

  15. A Peptide Antagonist of the ErbB1 Receptor Inhibits Receptor Activation, Tumor Cell Growth and Migration In Vitro and Xenograft Tumor Growth In Vivo

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    Ruodan Xu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The epidermal growth factor family of receptor tyrosine kinases (ErbBs plays essential roles in tumorigenesis and cancer disease progression, and therefore has become an attractive target for structure-based drug design. ErbB receptors are activated by ligand-induced homo- and heterodimerization. Structural studies have revealed that ErbB receptor dimers are stabilized by receptor–receptor interactions, primarily mediated by a region in the second extracellular domain, termed the “dimerization arm”. The present study is the first biological characterization of a peptide, termed Inherbin3, which constitutes part of the dimerization arm of ErbB3. Inherbin3 binds to the extracellular domains of all four ErbB receptors, with the lowest peptide binding affinity for ErbB4. Inherbin3 functions as an antagonist of epidermal growth factor (EGF-ErbB1 signaling. We show that Inherbin3 inhibits EGF-induced ErbB1 phosphorylation, cell growth, and migration in two human tumor cell lines, A549 and HN5, expressing moderate and high ErbB1 levels, respectively. Furthermore, we show that Inherbin3 inhibits tumor growth in vivo and induces apoptosis in a tumor xenograft model employing the human non-small cell lung cancer cell line A549. The Inherbin3 peptide may be a useful tool for investigating the mechanisms of ErbB receptor homo- and heterodimerization. Moreover, the here described biological effects of Inherbin3 suggest that peptide-based targeting of ErbB receptor dimerization is a promising anti-cancer therapeutic strategy.

  16. In Vivo Inhibition of Proteasome Activity and Tumour Growth by Murraya koenigii Leaf Extract in Breast Cancer Xenografts and by Its Active Flavonoids in Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noolu, Bindu; Gogulothu, Ramesh; Bhat, Mehrajuddin; Qadri, Syed S Y H; Reddy, V Sudhakar; Reddy, G Bhanuprakash; Ismail, Ayesha

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of the 26S proteasome is an attractive approach for anticancer therapy. Proteasome inhibitors are known to selectively target cancer cells and make them more sensitive to chemotherapeutic agents. Murraya koenigii is a medicinally important herb of Asian origin and a rich source of bioactive compounds such as flavonoids and alkaloids. In the present study, we investigated the proteasome inhibitory and apoptotic effect of M. koenigii leaf extract in vivo in a xenograft tumor mouse model, and also assessed the toxicity if any in normal mice. M. koenigii extract did not lead to any toxicity in mice. Analysis of extract revealed the presence of flavonoid compounds which act as proteasome inhibitors. Quercetin treatment led to the decrease in the cell viability and arrest of cells in G2/M phase. Quercetin, Apigenin, Kaempferol and Rutin; flavonoids present in the leaf extract, dose-dependently inhibited the endogenous 26S proteasome activity in MDA-MB-231 cells. Reduction in tumor growth was associated with a decrease in proteasomal enzyme activities in the treated groups. Increased caspase-3 activity and TUNEL-positive cells indicated enhanced apoptosis with Murraya leaf extract treatment. Decreased expression of angiogenic and anti-apoptotic gene markers is indicative of inhibition of angiogenesis and promotion of apoptosis in the leaf extract treated tumors.

  17. Low penetrance breast cancer susceptibility loci are associated with specific breast tumor subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broeks, Annegien; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Sherman, Mark E

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancers demonstrate substantial biological, clinical and etiological heterogeneity. We investigated breast cancer risk associations of eight susceptibility loci identified in GWAS and two putative susceptibility loci in candidate genes in relation to specific breast tumor subtypes. Subtypes...... were defined by five markers (ER, PR, HER2, CK5/6, EGFR) and other pathological and clinical features. Analyses included up to 30 040 invasive breast cancer cases and 53 692 controls from 31 studies within the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. We confirmed previous reports of stronger associations......3803662 (16q12), rs889312 (5q11), rs3817198 (11p15) and rs13387042 (2q35); however, only two of them (16q12 and 2q35) were associated with tumors with the core basal phenotype (P ≤ 0.002). These analyses are consistent with different biological origins of breast cancers, and indicate that tumor...

  18. Low penetrance breast cancer susceptibility loci are associated with specific breast tumor subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broeks, Annegien; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Sherman, Mark E

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancers demonstrate substantial biological, clinical and etiological heterogeneity. We investigated breast cancer risk associations of eight susceptibility loci identified in GWAS and two putative susceptibility loci in candidate genes in relation to specific breast tumor subtypes. Subtypes...... were defined by five markers (ER, PR, HER2, CK5/6, EGFR) and other pathological and clinical features. Analyses included up to 30 040 invasive breast cancer cases and 53 692 controls from 31 studies within the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. We confirmed previous reports of stronger associations......3803662 (16q12), rs889312 (5q11), rs3817198 (11p15) and rs13387042 (2q35); however, only two of them (16q12 and 2q35) were associated with tumors with the core basal phenotype (P = 0.002). These analyses are consistent with different biological origins of breast cancers, and indicate that tumor...

  19. Ets2 in tumor fibroblasts promotes angiogenesis in breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie A Wallace

    Full Text Available Tumor fibroblasts are active partners in tumor progression, but the genes and pathways that mediate this collaboration are ill-defined. Previous work demonstrates that Ets2 function in stromal cells significantly contributes to breast tumor progression. Conditional mouse models were used to study the function of Ets2 in both mammary stromal fibroblasts and epithelial cells. Conditional inactivation of Ets2 in stromal fibroblasts in PyMT and ErbB2 driven tumors significantly reduced tumor growth, however deletion of Ets2 in epithelial cells in the PyMT model had no significant effect. Analysis of gene expression in fibroblasts revealed a tumor- and Ets2-dependent gene signature that was enriched in genes important for ECM remodeling, cell migration, and angiogenesis in both PyMT and ErbB2 driven-tumors. Consistent with these results, PyMT and ErbB2 tumors lacking Ets2 in fibroblasts had fewer functional blood vessels, and Ets2 in fibroblasts elicited changes in gene expression in tumor endothelial cells consistent with this phenotype. An in vivo angiogenesis assay revealed the ability of Ets2 in fibroblasts to promote blood vessel formation in the absence of tumor cells. Importantly, the Ets2-dependent gene expression signatures from both mouse models were able to distinguish human breast tumor stroma from normal stroma, and correlated with patient outcomes in two whole tumor breast cancer data sets. The data reveals a key function for Ets2 in tumor fibroblasts in signaling to endothelial cells to promote tumor angiogenesis. The results highlight the collaborative networks that orchestrate communication between stromal cells and tumor cells, and suggest that targeting tumor fibroblasts may be an effective strategy for developing novel anti-angiogenic therapies.

  20. A model of tumor architecture and spatial interactions with tumor microenvironment in breast carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Cheikh, Bassem; Bor-Angelier, Catherine; Racoceanu, Daniel

    2017-03-01

    Breast carcinomas are cancers that arise from the epithelial cells of the breast, which are the cells that line the lobules and the lactiferous ducts. Breast carcinoma is the most common type of breast cancer and can be divided into different subtypes based on architectural features and growth patterns, recognized during a histopathological examination. Tumor microenvironment (TME) is the cellular environment in which tumor cells develop. Being composed of various cell types having different biological roles, TME is recognized as playing an important role in the progression of the disease. The architectural heterogeneity in breast carcinomas and the spatial interactions with TME are, to date, not well understood. Developing a spatial model of tumor architecture and spatial interactions with TME can advance our understanding of tumor heterogeneity. Furthermore, generating histological synthetic datasets can contribute to validating, and comparing analytical methods that are used in digital pathology. In this work, we propose a modeling method that applies to different breast carcinoma subtypes and TME spatial distributions based on mathematical morphology. The model is based on a few morphological parameters that give access to a large spectrum of breast tumor architectures and are able to differentiate in-situ ductal carcinomas (DCIS) and histological subtypes of invasive carcinomas such as ductal (IDC) and lobular carcinoma (ILC). In addition, a part of the parameters of the model controls the spatial distribution of TME relative to the tumor. The validation of the model has been performed by comparing morphological features between real and simulated images.

  1. Coexistence of malignant phyllodes tumor and her2-positive locally advanced breast cancer in distinct breasts: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tomoi; Muto, Ichiro; Sakai, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Phyllodes tumor of the breast is a rare biphasic neoplasm, accounting for less than 1% of all breast tumors. Coexistence of phyllodes tumor and breast cancer in distinct breasts is extremely rare. A 47-year-old Japanese woman presented with bilateral breast lumps. A HER2-positive, unresectable invasive carcinoma in the right breast and fibroadenoma in the left were diagnosed via core needle biopsy. During chemotherapy with anti-HER2 therapy, the breast cancer shrank quickly, while the left breast lump suddenly enlarged. Under a diagnosis of malignant neoplasm of the breast, left mastectomy was performed. Malignant phyllodes tumor was diagnosed by postoperative histological examination and recurred in multiple areas as early as 2 months after surgery. Only 10 cases of coexisting phyllodes tumor and breast cancer in distinct breasts have been reported in the English literature. Phyllodes tumor associated with breast cancer in distinct breasts tends to be malignant. This is the first case of phyllodes tumor rapidly enlarging during anti-HER2 chemotherapy for locally advanced HER2-positive breast cancer. Even during effective treatment of advanced or recurrent breast cancer, attention should also be paid to the contralateral breast for the possible association of a second malignancy such as phyllodes tumor. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. How to approach phyllodes tumors of the breast?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acar, Turan; Tarcan, Ercüment; Hacıyanlı, Mehmet; Kamer, Erdinç; Peşkersoy, Mustafa; Yiğit, Seyran; Gür, Özlem; Cin, Necat; Sarı, Ayşegül Akder; Tatar, Fatma

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Phyllodes tumor of the breast is a rare fibroepithelial breast tumor that comprise 0.3–0.9% of primary breast neoplasms. In this study, we aimed to present clinicopathologic symptoms of our patients along with their treatment modality. Material and Methods: Clinicopathologic properties and treatment modality of 20 phyllodes tumor patients who underwent surgery between January 2008 and January 2013 were retrospectively evaluated. Results: Median patient age was 47 years (22–75). Fine-needle aspiration biopsy was applied to 19 patients. Biopsy results were reported as suspicious in four, malignant in three, benign in 11, and as non-diagnostic in one patient. Final histopathology reports revealed two benign, one malignant and one borderline tumor out of the four patients with suspicious findings on fine needle aspiration biopsy; all patients with malignant cytology had malignancy. There were two borderline and nine benign lesions within the benign biopsy group. Sixteen patients underwent segmental mastectomy, four patients underwent mastectomy with/without axillary dissection. The median tumor size was 6 (1–13) cm. Histopathologically, 11 (55%) tumors were benign, 5 (25%) were borderline, and 4 (20%) were malignant. Two of the four patients with malignancy underwent radiotherapy and chemotherapy, and one patient only received chemotherapy as adjuvant treatment. Conclusion: Phyllodes tumors are rare, mix-type breast tumors. Due to high rates of local recurrence and potential for malignancy, preoperative diagnosis and accurate management are important. PMID:26668526

  3. Metformin impairs Rho GTPase signaling to induce apoptosis in neuroblastoma cells and inhibits growth of tumors in the xenograft mouse model of neuroblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ambrish; Al-Sammarraie, Nadia; DiPette, Donald J.; Singh, Ugra S.

    2014-01-01

    Metformin has been shown to inhibit tumor growth in xenograft rodent models of adult cancers, and various human clinical trials are in progress. However, the precise molecular mechanisms of metformin action are largely unknown. In the present study we examined the anti-tumor activity of metformin against neuroblastoma, and determined the underlying signaling mechanisms. Using human neuroblastoma xenograft mice, we demonstrated that oral administration of metformin (100 and 250 mg/kg body weight) significantly inhibited the growth of tumors. The interference of metformin in spheroid formation further confirmed the anti-tumor activity of metformin. In tumors, the activation of Rac1 (GTP-Rac1) and Cdc42 (GTP-Cdc42) was increased while RhoA activation (GTP-RhoA) was decreased by metformin. It also induced phosphorylation of JNK and inhibited the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 without affecting p38 MAP Kinase. Infection of cells by adenoviruses expressing dominant negative Rac1 (Rac1-N17), Cdc42 (Cdc42-N17) or constitutively active RhoA (RhoA-V14), or incubation of cells with pharmacological inhibitors of Rac1 (NSC23766) or Cdc42 (ML141) significantly protected neuroblastoma cells from metformin-induced apoptosis. Additionally, inhibition of JNK activity along with Rac1 or Cdc42 attenuated cytotoxic effects of metformin. These studies demonstrated that metformin impairs Rho GTPases signaling to induce apoptosis via JNK pathway. PMID:25365944

  4. Radio-adjuvant effects of ginsan on murine breast carcinoma xenografted model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Ji Young; Son, Hyeog Jin; Kim, Hyung Doo; Han, Young Soo; Yun, Yeon Sook; Song, Jie Young [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    In a number of studies, polysaccharide extracted from Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer, ginsan has been demonstrated to be a potent promising biological response modifier (BRM), including proliferation of lymphocyte, generation of lymphokine activated killer cells, and production of several cytokines. Macrophages are the first line of defense to infections or pathogens in host innate immunity. In addition, it plays a prominent role as a professional antigen presenting cells to trigger cellular immunity. In the light of that, the current study was designed to evaluate whether ginsan exhibits anti-tumor effect as well as synergistic function with chemo- or radio-therapy.

  5. Combined 5-FU and ChoKα inhibitors as a new alternative therapy of colorectal cancer: evidence in human tumor-derived cell lines and mouse xenografts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana de la Cueva

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third major cause of cancer related deaths in the world. 5-fluorouracil (5-FU is widely used for the treatment of colorectal cancer but as a single-agent renders low response rates. Choline kinase alpha (ChoKα, an enzyme that plays a role in cell proliferation and transformation, has been reported overexpressed in many different tumors, including colorectal tumors. ChoKα inhibitors have recently entered clinical trials as a novel antitumor strategy.ChoKα specific inhibitors, MN58b and TCD-717, have demonstrated a potent antitumoral activity both in vitro and in vivo against several tumor-derived cell line xenografts including CRC-derived cell lines. The effect of ChoKα inhibitors in combination with 5-FU as a new alternative for the treatment of colon tumors has been investigated both in vitro in CRC-tumour derived cell lines, and in vivo in mouse xenografts models. The effects on thymidilate synthase (TS and thymidine kinase (TK1 levels, two enzymes known to play an essential role in the mechanism of action of 5-FU, were analyzed by western blotting and quantitative PCR analysis. The combination of 5-FU with ChoKα inhibitors resulted in a synergistic effect in vitro in three different human colon cancer cell lines, and in vivo against human colon xenografts in nude mice. ChoKα inhibitors modulate the expression levels of TS and TK1 through inhibition of E2F production, providing a rational for its mechanism of action.Our data suggest that both drugs in combination display a synergistic antitumoral effect due to ChoKα inhibitors-driven modulation of the metabolization of 5-FU. The clinical relevance of these findings is strongly supported since TCD-717 has recently entered Phase I clinical trials against solid tumors.

  6. Breast-Cancer Tumor Size, Overdiagnosis, and Mammography Screening Effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, H Gilbert; Prorok, Philip C; O'Malley, A James; Kramer, Barnett S

    2016-10-13

    The goal of screening mammography is to detect small malignant tumors before they grow large enough to cause symptoms. Effective screening should therefore lead to the detection of a greater number of small tumors, followed by fewer large tumors over time. We used data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program, 1975 through 2012, to calculate the tumor-size distribution and size-specific incidence of breast cancer among women 40 years of age or older. We then calculated the size-specific cancer case fatality rate for two time periods: a baseline period before the implementation of widespread screening mammography (1975 through 1979) and a period encompassing the most recent years for which 10 years of follow-up data were available (2000 through 2002). After the advent of screening mammography, the proportion of detected breast tumors that were small (invasive tumors measuring <2 cm or in situ carcinomas) increased from 36% to 68%; the proportion of detected tumors that were large (invasive tumors measuring ≥2 cm) decreased from 64% to 32%. However, this trend was less the result of a substantial decrease in the incidence of large tumors (with 30 fewer cases of cancer observed per 100,000 women in the period after the advent of screening than in the period before screening) and more the result of a substantial increase in the detection of small tumors (with 162 more cases of cancer observed per 100,000 women). Assuming that the underlying disease burden was stable, only 30 of the 162 additional small tumors per 100,000 women that were diagnosed were expected to progress to become large, which implied that the remaining 132 cases of cancer per 100,000 women were overdiagnosed (i.e., cases of cancer were detected on screening that never would have led to clinical symptoms). The potential of screening to lower breast cancer mortality is reflected in the declining incidence of larger tumors. However, with respect to only these large tumors

  7. Active Roles of Tumor Stroma in Breast Cancer Metastasis

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    Zahraa I. Khamis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastasis is the major cause of death for breast cancer patients. Tumors are heterogenous cellular entities composed of cancer cells and cells of the microenvironment in which they reside. A reciprocal dynamic interaction occurs between the tumor cells and their surrounding stroma under physiological and pathological conditions. This tumor-host communication interface mediates the escape of tumor cells at the primary site, survival of circulating cancer cells in the vasculature, and growth of metastatic cancer at secondary site. Each step of the metastatic process is accompanied by recruitment of stromal cells from the microenvironment and production of unique array of growth factors and chemokines. Stromal microenvironment may play active roles in breast cancer metastasis. Elucidating the types of cells recruited and signal pathways involved in the crosstalk between tumor cells and stromal cells will help identify novel strategies for cotargeting cancer cells and tumor stromal cells to suppress metastasis and improve patient outcome.

  8. Mammographic evidence of microenvironment changes in tumorous breasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Zach; Batchelder, Kendra A; Toner, Brian C; Guimond, Lyne; Gerasimova-Chechkina, Evgeniya; Harrow, Amy R; Arneodo, Alain; Khalil, Andre

    2017-04-01

    The microenvironment of breast tumors plays a critical role in tumorigenesis. As long as the structural integrity of the microenvironment is upheld, the tumor is suppressed. If tissue structure is lost through disruptions in the normal cell cycle, the microenvironment may act as a tumor promoter. Therefore, the properties that distinguish between healthy and tumorous tissues may not be solely in the tumor characteristics but rather in surrounding non-tumor tissue. The goal of this paper was to show preliminary evidence that tissue disruption and loss of homeostasis in breast tissue microenvironment and breast bilateral asymmetry can be quantitatively and objectively assessed from mammography via a localized, wavelet-based analysis of the whole breast. A wavelet-based multifractal formalism called the 2D Wavelet Transform Modulus Maxima (WTMM) method was used to quantitate density fluctuations from mammographic breast tissue via the Hurst exponent (H). Each entire mammogram was cut in hundreds of 360 × 360 pixel subregions in a gridding scheme of overlapping sliding windows, with each window boundary separated by 32 pixels. The 2D WTMM method was applied to each subregion individually. A data mining approach was set up to determine which metrics best discriminated between normal vs. cancer cases. These same metrics were then used, without modification, to discriminate between normal vs. benign and benign vs. cancer cases. The density fluctuations in healthy mammographic breast tissue are either monofractal anti-correlated (H 1/2) for dense tissue. However, tissue regions with H~1/2, as well as left vs. right breast asymetries, were found preferably in tumorous (benign or cancer) breasts vs. normal breasts, as quantified via a combination metric yielding a P-value ~ 0.0006. No metric considered showed significant differences between cancer vs. benign breasts. Since mammographic tissue regions associated with uncorrelated (H~1/2) density fluctuations were

  9. Background parenchymal enhancement in breast MRIs of breast cancer patients: impact on tumor size estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Ji Eun; Kim, Sung Hun; Lee, Ah Won

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate whether the degree of background parenchymal enhancement affects the accuracy of tumor size estimation based on breast MRI. Three hundred and twenty-two patients who had known breast cancer and underwent breast MRIs were recruited in our study. The total number of breast cancer cases was 339. All images were assessed retrospectively for the level of background parenchymal enhancement based on the BI-RADS criteria. Maximal lesion diameters were measured on the MRIs, and tumor types (mass vs. non-mass) were assessed. Tumor size differences between the MRI-based estimates and estimates based on pathological examinations were analyzed. The relationship between accuracy and tumor types and clinicopathologic features were also evaluated. The cases included minimal (47.5%), mild (28.9%), moderate (12.4%) and marked background parenchymal enhancement (11.2%). The tumors of patients with minimal or mild background parenchymal enhancement were more accurately estimated than those of patients with moderate or marked enhancement (72.1% vs. 56.8%; p=0.003). The tumors of women with mass type lesions were significantly more accurately estimated than those of the women with non-mass type lesions (81.6% vs. 28.6%; penhancement is related to the inaccurate estimation of tumor size based on MRI. Non-mass type breast cancer and HER2-positive breast cancer are other factors that may cause inaccurate assessment of tumor size. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Increased expression of CYP4Z1 promotes tumor angiogenesis and growth in human breast cancer

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    Yu, Wei [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Chai, Hongyan [Center for Gene Diagnosis, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Li, Ying; Zhao, Haixia; Xie, Xianfei; Zheng, Hao; Wang, Chenlong; Wang, Xue [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Yang, Guifang [Department of Pathology, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Cai, Xiaojun [Department of Ophthalmology, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Falck, John R. [Department of Biochemistry, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390 (United States); Yang, Jing, E-mail: yangjingliu@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Research Center of Food and Drug Evaluation, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China)

    2012-10-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 4Z1, a novel CYP4 family member, is over-expressed in human mammary carcinoma and associated with high-grade tumors and poor prognosis. However, the precise role of CYP4Z1 in tumor progression is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that CYP4Z1 overexpression promotes tumor angiogenesis and growth in breast cancer. Stable expression of CYP4Z1 in T47D and BT-474 human breast cancer cells significantly increased mRNA expression and production of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A, and decreased mRNA levels and secretion of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2), without affecting cell proliferation and anchorage-independent cell growth in vitro. Notably, the conditioned medium from CYP4Z1-expressing cells enhanced proliferation, migration and tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells, and promoted angiogenesis in the zebrafish embryo and chorioallantoic membrane of the chick embryo. In addition, there were lower levels of myristic acid and lauric acid, and higher contents of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) in CYP4Z1-expressing T47D cells compared with vector control. CYP4Z1 overexpression significantly increased tumor weight and microvessel density by 2.6-fold and 1.9-fold in human tumor xenograft models, respectively. Moreover, CYP4Z1 transfection increased the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and PI3K/Akt, while PI3K or ERK inhibitors and siRNA silencing reversed CYP4Z1-mediated changes in VEGF-A and TIMP-2 expression. Conversely, HET0016, an inhibitor of the CYP4 family, potently inhibited the tumor-induced angiogenesis with associated changes in the intracellular levels of myristic acid, lauric acid and 20-HETE. Collectively, these data suggest that increased CYP4Z1 expression promotes tumor angiogenesis and growth in breast cancer partly via PI3K/Akt and ERK1/2 activation. -- Highlights: ► CYP4Z1 overexpression promotes human breast cancer growth and angiogenesis. ► The pro-angiogenic effects of CYP4Z1 have

  11. "Ruptured" malignant phyllodes tumor of the breast: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ditsatham C

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Chagkrit Ditsatham, Areewan Somwangprasert, Kirati Watcharachan, Phanchaporn WongmaneerungDivision of Head, Neck and Breast, Department of Surgery, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, ThailandAbstract: Phyllodes tumor or cystosarcoma phyllodes is a rare disease and is usually seen in middle-aged patients. Ruptured phyllodes tumor is a very rare condition. Our study reports patient presentation, diagnosis method, and treatment of an unusual case. A 58-year-old premenopausal female was diagnosed with a phyllodes tumor and presented with a rapidly growing mass for 2 months that ruptured 1 month later. She underwent simple mastectomy at the left side of her breast and received adjuvant radiotherapy. No recurrence was found 4 months after operation.Keywords: ruptured, malignant, phyllodes tumor, breast 

  12. Phyllodes Tumor of the Breast Metastasizing to the Vulva

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    Olusegun Kayode Ajenifuja

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Phyllodes tumors of the breast are rare breast tumors that resemble fibroadenoma. They are composed of two types of tissues: stromal and glandular tissues. Unlike fibroadenoma, they are commonly found in the third decade of life and they tend to grow more rapidly. Depending on the relative components of the cells and mitotic activity, they are classified into benign, borderline, and malignant. They are usually present as a lump in the breast. Phyllodes tumors are usually managed by wide excision. The excision should be wide enough to ensure a tumor-free margin. Recurrence rate is very high and most recurrences are usually local. Metastasis to the vulva has not been reported.

  13. Expression Pattern of a Homeotic Gene, HOXA5, in Normal Breast and in Breast Tumors

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    Gregory S. Henderson

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Homeotic (HOX gene products are now known to be functionally associated with breast cancer biogenesis. Recent evidence has indicated that HOXA5 regulates both p53 and progesterone receptor expression levels in breast cancer cells. In addition, HOXA5 has been shown to interact and regulate the activity of another protein referred to as Twist. As homeotic genes play a pivotal role in development, we sought to decipher the expression pattern in both normal breast tissues and in breast carcinomas. Methods: RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry were performed, to assay the levels of HOXA5 expression, on a panel of normal breast tissue and its corresponding primary breast tumors. Results and Conclusions: We show that HOXA5 expression was maintained at stable levels at different reproductive stages of a woman's life, except during lactation. This evidence indicates that HOXA5 may play a role in maintaining the differentiated state within the breast epithelium. However, nearly 70% of all breast carcinomas had decreased HOXA5 protein levels as compared to normal breast tissues. In addition, we demonstrate that HOXA5 protein expression levels in breast carcinomas inversely co-relates with Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR expression. Furthermore, we found that the survival rate amongst the different low levels of HOXA5 expressing breast tumors was not significant, indicative of an early tumorigenesis process in the absence of innate levels of HOXA5 in normal breast cells.

  14. ADAM12 produced by tumor cells rather than stromal cells accelerates breast tumor progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frohlich, Camilla; Nehammer, Camilla; Albrechtsen, Reidar

    2011-01-01

    Expression of ADAM12 is low in most normal tissues, but is markedly increased in numerous human cancers, including breast carcinomas. We have previously shown that overexpression of ADAM12 accelerates tumor progression in a mouse model of breast cancer (PyMT). In the present study, we found...

  15. Thrombospondin promoted anti-tumor of adenovirus-mediated calreticulin in breast cancer: Relationship with anti-CD47.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qifeng; Fang, Xiaoming; Jiang, Chaohui; Yao, Ning; Fang, Xudong

    2015-07-01

    Calreticulin (CRT) protein has multifaceted role in carcinogenesis, however its role in breast cancer remains unidentified. In this study, we attempted to evaluate the effect of overexpressed CRT on breast cancer cells viability and proliferation. Levels of mRNA and protein expression for CRT and CD47 in cells were determined by Quantitative RT-PCR analysis and Western blot, respectively. Cells apoptosis was evaluated using Annexin V-FITC assay with flow cytometry. Cell viability was assessed using MTT assay. Cell migration and autophagy were also evaluated. In breast cancer cells of MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, both CRT and CD47 expression were enhanced, compared with that in normal breast cells of MCF-10A. Overexpression of CRT by MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells transfected with significantly suppressed cell migration, viability as well as promote cell apoptosis while exerted no effected on cell autophagy. Interestingly, combining of thrombospondin (TSP) and overexpression of CRT significantly induced cell autophagy and inhibited tumor growth in MCF-7 cells xenograft. In result of chip assay, we observed that TSP treatment promoted interaction of TSP with CRT and CD47. TSP promoted anti-tumor of adenovirus-mediated CRT via forming complexes with CRT and CD47 in breast cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Molecular Markers for Breast Cancer: Prediction on Tumor Behavior

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    Bruna Karina Banin Hirata

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers with greater than 1,300,000 cases and 450,000 deaths each year worldwide. The development of breast cancer involves a progression through intermediate stages until the invasive carcinoma and finally into metastatic disease. Given the variability in clinical progression, the identification of markers that could predict the tumor behavior is particularly important in breast cancer. The determination of tumor markers is a useful tool for clinical management in cancer patients, assisting in diagnostic, staging, evaluation of therapeutic response, detection of recurrence and metastasis, and development of new treatment modalities. In this context, this review aims to discuss the main tumor markers in breast carcinogenesis. The most well-established breast molecular markers with prognostic and/or therapeutic value like hormone receptors, HER-2 oncogene, Ki-67, and p53 proteins, and the genes for hereditary breast cancer will be presented. Furthermore, this review shows the new molecular targets in breast cancer: CXCR4, caveolin, miRNA, and FOXP3, as promising candidates for future development of effective and targeted therapies, also with lower toxicity.

  17. Serum total PSA and free PSA in breast tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Prakruti; Pati, Sanghamitra; Mangaraj, Manaswini; Sahu, Pratima Kumari; Mohapatra, Prakash Chandra

    2011-04-01

    Now a days measurement of molecular forms of PSA has gained importance in clinical practice. Several studies have demonstrated the production of PSA in female tissues, such as breast. The present piece of work has been undertaken with an objective to estimate the relative proportion of the molecular forms of PSA in serum along with serum testosterone in benign and malignant breast tumor cases and to analyze their association with the severity of the disease process 34 malignant and 26 benign breast disease cases along with 33 healthy controls of same age group were enrolled in this study for evaluation. Serum testosterone was measured by ELISA, whereas serum total PSA (TPSA) and free PSA (FPSA) were estimated by electrochemiluminescence immunoassay. A significant rise of fasting plasma glucose along with prominent dyslipidemia was observed in breast tumor cases. Marked rise in serum testosterone as well as TPSA and FPSA was documented in both benign and malignant breast tumor cases. Serum testosterone revealed a significant positive association with both TPSA and FPSA pointing towards an etiological association between them. However, surgical removal of tumor mass resulted in a marked decline of presurgical value of both TPSA and FPSA with a non-significant fall in serum testosterone revealing tumor tissue as the source of FPSA and TPSA. Thus, estimation of PSA provides prognostic information that may assist in future treatment.

  18. Comparison of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes between primary and metastatic tumors in breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogiya, Rin; Niikura, Naoki; Kumaki, Nobue; Bianchini, Giampaolo; Kitano, Shigehisa; Iwamoto, Takayuki; Hayashi, Naoki; Yokoyama, Kozue; Oshitanai, Risa; Terao, Mayako; Morioka, Toru; Tsuda, Banri; Okamura, Takuho; Saito, Yuki; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Tokuda, Yutaka

    2016-12-01

    The presence of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) is associated with favorable long-term outcome in breast cancer. However, little is known about changes in TILs during metastatic progression. To confirm our hypothesis that malignant tumors escape from the host immune system during metastasis, we evaluated the percentage of TILs in paired samples of primary and metastatic breast tumors. We retrospectively identified 25 patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2 + , n = 14) and triple negative (TN, n = 11) early breast cancer diagnosed between 1990 and 2009 at Tokai University Hospital (Isehara, Japan) and who subsequently experienced regional or distant recurrence confirmed by tumor biopsy/resection. Hematoxylin-eosin-stained slides of these paired samples were evaluated for stromal TILs. Immunohistochemical staining was carried out using primary antibodies against CD4, CD8, Foxp3, programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1), PD-L2, and HLA class I for characterizing the TILs and breast tumors. The percentage of TILs in the primary tumors was significantly higher (average 34.6%) than that in metastatic tumors (average 15.7%) (paired t-test, P = 0.004) and that of CD8 + and CD4 + T cells significantly decreased from primary to metastatic tumors (paired t-test, P = 0.008 and P = 0.026, respectively). The PD-L1, PD-L2, and HLA class I antibody expression changed from positive to negative and vice versa from the primary to the metastatic tumors. Tumors at first metastatic recurrence in HER2 + and TN breast cancers have a lower percentage of TILs and CD8 + and CD4 + T cells compared to primary tumors, which indicates that immune escape plays a role in tumor progression. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  19. Breast Cancer Stem Cells and Tumor Suppressor Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy W. Hwang-Verslues

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Studies of breast cancer stem cells are in their infancy and many fundamental questions have yet to be fully addressed. The molecular distinction between normal and cancerous breast stem cells is not clear. While there have been recent breakthroughs in mouse mammary stem cells and lineage determination in mammary glands, little has been determined in human cells. Microarray analyses have provided molecular categorization of breast cancer. However, the cellular origin of different types of breast cancer is largely unknown. In addition, the relationship between breast cancer stem cells and mammary progenitor cells has yet to be clarified. One of the key questions is how a normal mammary stem cell becomes a breast cancer stem cell. Importantly, the existence of different types of human breast cancers with distinct pathologic and molecular signatures suggests the possibility that different types of breast cancer stem cells may exist. Here, we aim to review the current evidence for the existence of different subtypes of breast cancer stem cells and provide further insight into how tumor suppressors might be involved in the initiation of breast cancer stem cells.

  20. Analysis of patients with phyllodes tumor of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atalay, Can; Kınaş, Volkan; Çelebioğlu, Sait

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis and management of phyllodes tumors is challenging due to its low incidence. The treatment of these tumors is surgery, however the extent of surgery, the application of adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy are still controversial. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate patients who were treated with a diagnosis of phyllodes tumor of the breast in our clinic. Patients who were treated with a diagnosis of phyllodes tumor of the breast between June 2011 and June 2013 were reviewed retrospectively. Patient demographic characteristics (age, gender), menopausal status, symptoms, radiologic and surgical methods used for diagnosis and treatment, histopathologic features of the tumor and type of adjuvant therapy were evaluated. Patients were grouped as benign or borderline/malignant according to histopathological diagnosis. Patients in these groups were compared in terms of age, menopausal status, tumor size and the number of mitosis within the tumor. The median age was 26 years (17-59), and 30 patients were female. The surgical treatment of choice was wide local excision with tumor-free surgical margins in 29 patients and mastectomy in one patient. Histopathological diagnosis after surgery was benign in 21 patients (70%), borderline in 6 patients (20%) and malignant phyllodes tumor in 3 patients (10%). Patients with borderline and malignant phyllodes tumors were significantly older (p=0.002) and had higher mitotic counts (pphyllodes tumors and menopausal status (p=0.06) or tumor size (p=0.1). Surgery is the treatment of choice for phyllodes tumors, and obtaining tumor-free margins is important. Since phyllodes tumors might recur as borderline/malignant tumors, local control with surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy should be provided when required. In this way, distant metastases and death that may arise due to possible malignant recurrences might be avoided.

  1. Breast cancer risk prediction with heterogeneous risk profiles according to breast cancer tumor markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, Bernard; Glynn, Robert J; Tamimi, Rulla M; Chen, Wendy Y; Colditz, Graham A; Willett, Walter C; Hankinson, Susan E

    2013-07-15

    Relationships between some risk factors and breast cancer incidence are known to vary by tumor subtype. However, breast tumors can be classified according to a number of markers, which may be correlated, making it difficult to identify heterogeneity of risk factors with specific tumor markers when using standard competing-risk survival analysis. In this paper, we propose a constrained competing-risk survival model that allows for assessment of heterogeneity of risk factor associations according to specific tumor markers while controlling for other markers. These methods are applied to Nurses' Health Study data from 1980-2006, during which 3,398 incident invasive breast cancers occurred over 1.4 million person-years of follow-up. Results suggested that when estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) status are mutually considered, some risk factors thought to be characteristic of "estrogen-positive tumors," such as high body mass index during postmenopause and increased height, are actually significantly associated with PR-positive tumors but not ER-positive tumors, while other risk factors thought to be characteristic of "estrogen-negative tumors," such as late age at first birth, are actually significantly associated with PR-negative rather than ER-negative breast cancer. This approach provides a strategy for evaluating heterogeneity of risk factor associations by tumor marker levels while controlling for additional tumor markers.

  2. Tumor-associated macrophages: unwitting accomplices in breast cancer malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Carly Bess; Yeh, Elizabeth S; Soloff, Adam C

    Deleterious inflammation is a primary feature of breast cancer. Accumulating evidence demonstrates that macrophages, the most abundant leukocyte population in mammary tumors, have a critical role at each stage of cancer progression. Such tumor-associated macrophages facilitate neoplastic transformation, tumor immune evasion and the subsequent metastatic cascade. Herein, we discuss the dynamic process whereby molecular and cellular features of the tumor microenvironment act to license tissue-repair mechanisms of macrophages, fostering angiogenesis, metastasis and the support of cancer stem cells. We illustrate how tumors induce, then exploit trophic macrophages to subvert innate and adaptive immune responses capable of destroying malignant cells. Finally, we discuss compelling evidence from murine models of cancer and early clinical trials in support of macrophage-targeted intervention strategies with the potential to dramatically reduce breast cancer morbidity and mortality.

  3. [Phyllodes tumor of the breast: clinicopathologic analysis of 22 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velázquez-Dohorn, Magalie; Gamboa-Domínguez, Armando; Medina-Franco, Heriberto

    2013-01-01

    Phyllodes tumors of the breast are uncommon fibroepithelial neoplasms that have potential for recurrence. They are classified as benign, borderline, and malignant, based on a constellation of histologic characteristics that includes the degree of stromal hypercellularity, cytologic atypia and mitotic activity. To analyze the clinical and pathological features of 22 women treated at a referral center in Mexico City. We performed a retrospective analysis of women with phyllodes tumors of the breast treated at our institution between 1998 and 2011. Age, tumor size, surgical method, stromal cellular atypia, mitotic activity, stromal overgrowth, histological classification and surgical margin status were analyzed to determine their possible association with tumor recurrence. Mean patient age at presentation was 42 years. Ten of them (43.5%) had late menarche. Six patients (27.27%) used hormones. Twenty patients (91%) had tumor detected by self-examination. Mean size of the lesion was 7.4 cm. Most lesions were located in the upper outer quadrant (77.3%) and in the left breast (59.1%). Fourteen patients (63.6%) were treated with conservative surgery. Three patients (13.6%) presented local recurrence, two as benign tumors and one patient with two recurrences, first as benign tumor thereafter as malignant phyllodes tumor at 72 and 108 months respectively. . In our study, surgical positive margin status is the main prognostic factor for recurrence.

  4. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the breast: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Somak

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor is a rare soft tissue sarcoma of ectomesenchymal origin. It is the malignant counterpart of benign soft tissue tumors like neurofibromas and schwannomas and may often follow them. Common sites include deeper soft tissues, usually in the proximity of a nerve trunk. Breast is an extremely rare location of this lesion and presentation as a breast lump in the absence of pain or previous benign neural tumor is even rarer. Case presentation A 38-year-old female presented with complaints of painless, hard breast lump for three months which was clinically suspected to be a ductal carcinoma with inconclusive fine needle aspiration cytology. Histopathology revealed a malignant spindle cell tumor which was confirmed to be malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor on the basis of immunopositivity for vimentin, neurone specific enolase and S-100. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge only six such case reports have been published in literature. The differential diagnosis of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor should be considered by the clinician as well as the pathologists in the work-up of a breast neoplasm as treatment and prognosis of this rare malignancy is different.

  5. Star-PAP, a poly(A) polymerase, functions as a tumor suppressor in an orthotopic human breast cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, C; Gong, Y; Zhou, H; Wang, M; Kong, L; Liu, J; An, T; Zhu, H; Li, Y

    2017-02-02

    Star-PAP is a noncanonical poly(A) polymerase and required for the expression of a select set of mRNAs. However, the pathological role of Star-PAP in cancer largely remains unknown. In this study, we observed decreased expression of Star-PAP in breast cancer cell lines and tissues. Ectopic Star-PAP expression inhibited proliferation as well as colony-forming ability of breast cancer cells. In breast cancer patients, high levels of Star-PAP correlated with an improved prognosis. Moreover, by regulating the expression of BIK (BCL2-interacting killer), Star-PAP induced apoptosis of breast cancer cells through the mitochondrial pathway. The growth of breast cancer xenografts in NOD/SCID mice was also inhibited by the doxycycline-induced Star-PAP overexpression. Furthermore, Star-PAP sensitized breast cancer cells to chemotherapy drugs both in vitro and in vivo. In mammary epithelial cells, Star-PAP knockdown partially transformed these cells and induced them to undergo epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). These findings suggested that Star-PAP possesses tumor-suppressing activity and can be a valuable target for developing new cancer therapeutic strategies.

  6. 18F-FDG and 18F-FLT-PET imaging for monitoring everolimus effect on tumor-growth in neuroendocrine tumors: studies in human tumor xenografts in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla Bardram Johnbeck

    Full Text Available The mTOR inhibitor everolimus has shown promising results in some but not all neuroendocrine tumors. Therefore, early assessment of treatment response would be beneficial. In this study, we investigated the in vivo and in vitro treatment effect of everolimus in neuroendocrine tumors and evaluated the performance of 18F-FDG and the proliferation tracer 18F-FLT for treatment response assessment by PET imaging.The effect of everolimus on the human carcinoid cell line H727 was examined in vitro with the MTT assay and in vivo on H727 xenograft tumors. The mice were scanned at baseline with 18F-FDG or 18F-FLT and then treated with either placebo or everolimus (5 mg/kg daily for 10 days. PET/CT scans were repeated at day 1,3 and 10.Everolimus showed significant inhibition of H727 cell proliferation in vitro at concentrations above 1 nM. In vivo tumor volumes measured relative to baseline were significantly lower in the everolimus group compared to the control group at day 3 (126±6% vs. 152±6%; p = 0.016, day 7 (164±7% vs. 226±13%; p<0.001 and at day 10 (194±10% vs. 281±18%; p<0.001. Uptake of 18F-FDG and 18F-FLT showed little differences between control and treatment groups, but individual mean uptake of 18F-FDG at day 3 correlated with tumor growth day 10 (r2 = 0.45; P = 0.034, 18F-FLT mean uptake at day 1 correlated with tumor growth day 7 (r2 = 0.63; P = 0.019 and at day 3 18F-FLT correlated with tumor growth day 7 (r2 = 0.87; P<0.001 and day 10 (r2 = 0.58; P = 0.027.Everolimus was effective in vitro and in vivo in human xenografts lung carcinoid NETs and especially early 18F-FLT uptake predicted subsequent tumor growth. We suggest that 18F-FLT PET can be used for tailoring therapy for neuroendocrine tumor patients through early identification of responders and non-responders.

  7. Serum total PSA and free PSA in breast tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Dash, Prakruti; Pati, Sanghamitra; Mangaraj, Manaswini; Sahu, Pratima Kumari; Mohapatra, Prakash Chandra

    2011-01-01

    Now a days measurement of molecular forms of PSA has gained importance in clinical practice. Several studies have demonstrated the production of PSA in female tissues, such as breast. The present piece of work has been undertaken with an objective to estimate the relative proportion of the molecular forms of PSA in serum along with serum testosterone in benign and malignant breast tumor cases and to analyze their association with the severity of the disease process 34 malignant and 26 benign ...

  8. Targeting Tumor Cells with Anti-CD44 Antibody Triggers Macrophage-Mediated Immune Modulatory Effects in a Cancer Xenograft Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Maisel

    Full Text Available CD44, a transmembrane receptor reported to be involved in various cellular functions, is overexpressed in several cancer types and supposed to be involved in the initiation, progression and prognosis of these cancers. Since the sequence of events following the blockage of the CD44-HA interaction has not yet been studied in detail, we profiled xenograft tumors by RNA Sequencing to elucidate the mode of action of the anti-CD44 antibody RG7356. Analysis of tumor and host gene-expression profiles led us to the hypothesis that treatment with RG7356 antibody leads to an activation of the immune system. Using cytokine measurements we further show that this activation involves the secretion of chemo-attractants necessary for the recruitment of immune cells (i.e. macrophages to the tumor site. We finally provide evidence for antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP of the malignant cells by macrophages.

  9. MDA-7/IL-24 functions as a tumor suppressor gene in vivo in transgenic mouse models of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Mitchell E; Shen, Xue-Ning; Das, Swadesh K; Emdad, Luni; Guo, Chunqing; Yuan, Fang; Li, You-Jun; Archer, Michael C; Zacksenhaus, Eldad; Windle, Jolene J; Subler, Mark A; Ben-David, Yaacov; Sarkar, Devanand; Wang, Xiang-Yang; Fisher, Paul B

    2015-11-10

    Melanoma differentiation associated gene-7/Interleukin-24 (MDA-7/IL-24) is a novel member of the IL-10 gene family that selectively induces apoptosis and toxic autophagy in a broad spectrum of human cancers, including breast cancer, without harming normal cells or tissues. The ability to investigate the critical events underlying cancer initiation and progression, as well as the capacity to test the efficacy of novel therapeutics, has been significantly advanced by the development of genetically engineered mice (GEMs) that accurately recapitulate specific human cancers. We utilized three transgenic mouse models to better comprehend the in vivo role of MDA-7/IL-24 in breast cancer. Using the MMTV-PyMT spontaneous mammary tumor model, we confirmed that exogenously introducing MDA-7/IL-24 using a Cancer Terminator Virus caused a reduction in tumor burden and also produced an antitumor "bystander" effect. Next we performed xenograft studies in a newly created MMTV-MDA-7 transgenic model that over-expresses MDA-7/IL-24 in the mammary glands during pregnancy and lactation, and found that MDA-7/IL-24 overexpression delayed tumor growth following orthotopic injection of a murine PDX tumor cell line (mPDX) derived from a tumor formed in an MMTV-PyMT mouse. We also crossed the MMTV-MDA-7 line to MMTV-Erbb2 transgenic mice and found that MDA-7/IL-24 overexpression delayed the onset of mammary tumor development in this model of spontaneous mammary tumorigenesis as well. Finally, we assessed the role of MDA-7/IL-24 in immune regulation, which can potentially contribute to tumor suppression in vivo. Our findings provide further direct in vivo evidence for the role of MDA-7/IL-24 in tumor suppression in breast cancer in immune-competent transgenic mice.

  10. Suppression and activation of the malignant phenotype by extracellular matrix in xenograft models of bladder cancer: a model for tumor cell "dormancy".

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert E Hurst

    Full Text Available A major problem in cancer research is the lack of a tractable model for delayed metastasis. Herein we show that cancer cells suppressed by SISgel, a gel-forming normal ECM material derived from Small Intestine Submucosa (SIS, in flank xenografts show properties of suppression and re-activation that are very similar to normal delayed metastasis and suggest these suppressed cells can serve as a novel model for developing therapeutics to target micrometastases or suppressed cancer cells. Co-injection with SISgel suppressed the malignant phenotype of highly invasive J82 bladder cancer cells and highly metastatic JB-V bladder cancer cells in nude mouse flank xenografts. Cells could remain viable up to 120 days without forming tumors and appeared much more highly differentiated and less atypical than tumors from cells co-injected with Matrigel. In 40% of SISgel xenografts, growth resumed in the malignant phenotype after a period of suppression or dormancy for at least 30 days and was more likely with implantation of 3 million or more cells. Ordinary Type I collagen did not suppress malignant growth, and tumors developed about as well with collagen as with Matrigel. A clear signal in gene expression over different cell lines was not seen by transcriptome microarray analysis, but in contrast, Reverse Phase Protein Analysis of 250 proteins across 4 cell lines identified Integrin Linked Kinase (ILK signaling that was functionally confirmed by an ILK inhibitor. We suggest that cancer cells suppressed on SISgel could serve as a model for dormancy and re-awakening to allow for the identification of therapeutic targets for treating micrometastases.

  11. DMAPT inhibits NF-κB activity and increases sensitivity of prostate cancer cells to X-rays in vitro and in tumor xenografts in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonca, Marc S; Turchan, William T; Alpuche, Melanie E; Watson, Christopher N; Estabrook, Neil C; Chin-Sinex, Helen; Shapiro, Jeremy B; Imasuen-Williams, Imade E; Rangel, Gabriel; Gilley, David P; Huda, Nazmul; Crooks, Peter A; Shapiro, Ronald H

    2017-11-01

    Constitutive activation of the pro-survival transcription factor NF-κB has been associated with resistance to both chemotherapy and radiation therapy in many human cancers, including prostate cancer. Our lab and others have demonstrated that the natural product parthenolide can inhibit NF-κB activity and sensitize PC-3 prostate cancers cells to X-rays in vitro; however, parthenolide has poor bioavailability in vivo and therefore has little clinical utility in this regard. We show here that treatment of PC-3 and DU145 human prostate cancer cells with dimethylaminoparthenolide (DMAPT), a parthenolide derivative with increased bioavailability, inhibits constitutive and radiation-induced NF-κB binding activity and slows prostate cancer cell growth. We also show that DMAPT increases single and fractionated X-ray-induced killing of prostate cancer cells through inhibition of DNA double strand break repair and also that DMAPT-induced radiosensitization is, at least partially, dependent upon the alteration of intracellular thiol reduction-oxidation chemistry. Finally, we demonstrate that the treatment of PC-3 prostate tumor xenografts with oral DMAPT in addition to radiation therapy significantly decreases tumor growth and results in significantly smaller tumor volumes compared to xenografts treated with either DMAPT or radiation therapy alone, suggesting that DMAPT might have a potential clinical role as a radiosensitizing agent in the treatment of prostate cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of Depleting Tumor-Associated Macrophages on Breast Cancer Growth and Response to Chemotherapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tsan, Min-Fu; Gao, Baochong

    2005-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages may comprise up to 50% of the tumor mass in breast cancer and are capable of producing estrogen and angiogenic cytokines that regulate the growth and angiogenesis of breast cancer...

  13. The cell surface mucin podocalyxin regulates collective breast tumor budding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Marcia L; Cipollone, Jane A; Austin, Pamela; Bell, Erin M; Nielsen, Julie S; Gilks, C Blake; McNagny, Kelly M; Roskelley, Calvin D

    2016-01-22

    Overexpression of the transmembrane sialomucin podocalyxin, which is known to play a role in lumen formation during polarized epithelial morphogenesis, is an independent indicator of poor prognosis in a number of epithelial cancers, including those that arise in the breast. Therefore, we set out to determine if podocalyxin plays a functional role in breast tumor progression. MCF-7 breast cancer cells, which express little endogenous podocalyxin, were stably transfected with wild type podocalyxin for forced overexpression. 4T1 mammary tumor cells, which express considerable endogenous podocalyxin, were retrovirally transduced with a short hairpin ribonucleic acid (shRNA) targeting podocalyxin for stable knockdown. In vitro, the effects of podocalyxin on collective cellular migration and invasion were assessed in two-dimensional monolayer and three-dimensional basement membrane/collagen gel culture, respectively. In vivo, local invasion was assessed after orthotopic transplantation in immunocompromised mice. Forced overexpression of podocalyxin caused cohesive clusters of epithelial MCF-7 breast tumor cells to bud off from the primary tumor and collectively invade the stroma of the mouse mammary gland in vivo. This budding was not associated with any obvious changes in histoarchitecture, matrix deposition or proliferation in the primary tumour. In vitro, podocalyxin overexpression induced a collective migration of MCF-7 tumor cells in two-dimensional (2-D) monolayer culture that was dependent on the activity of the actin scaffolding protein ezrin, a cytoplasmic binding partner of podocalyxin. In three-dimensional (3-D) culture, podocalyxin overexpression induced a collective budding and invasion that was dependent on actomyosin contractility. Interestingly, the collectively invasive cell aggregates often contained expanded microlumens that were also observed in vivo. Conversely, when endogenous podocalyxin was removed from highly metastatic, but cohesive, 4T1 mammary

  14. Citral reduces breast tumor growth by inhibiting the cancer stem cell marker ALDH1A3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Margaret Lois; de Antueno, Roberto; Coyle, Krysta Mila; Sultan, Mohammad; Cruickshank, Brianne Marie; Giacomantonio, Michael Anthony; Giacomantonio, Carman Anthony; Duncan, Roy; Marcato, Paola

    2016-11-01

    Breast cancer stem cells (CSCs) can be identified by increased Aldefluor fluorescence caused by increased expression of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A3 (ALDH1A3), as well as ALDH1A1 and ALDH2. In addition to being a CSC marker, ALDH1A3 regulates gene expression via retinoic acid (RA) signaling and plays a key role in the progression and chemotherapy resistance of cancer. Therefore, ALDH1A3 represents a druggable anti-cancer target of interest. Since to date, there are no characterized ALDH1A3 isoform inhibitors, drugs that were previously described as inhibiting the activity of other ALDH isoforms were tested for anti-ALDH1A3 activity. Twelve drugs (3-hydroxy-dl-kynurenine, benomyl, citral, chloral hydrate, cyanamide, daidzin, DEAB, disulfiram, gossypol, kynurenic acid, molinate, and pargyline) were compared for their efficacy in inducing apoptosis and reducing ALDH1A3, ALDH1A1 and ALDH2-associated Aldefluor fluorescence in breast cancer cells. Citral was identified as the best inhibitor of ALDH1A3, reducing the Aldefluor fluorescence in breast cancer cell lines and in a patient-derived tumor xenograft. Nanoparticle encapsulated citral specifically reduced the enhanced tumor growth of MDA-MB-231 cells overexpressing ALDH1A3. To determine the potential mechanisms of citral-mediated tumor growth inhibition, we performed cell proliferation, clonogenic, and gene expression assays. Citral reduced ALDH1A3-mediated colony formation and expression of ALDH1A3-inducible genes. In conclusion, citral is an effective ALDH1A3 inhibitor and is able to block ALDH1A3-mediated breast tumor growth, potentially via blocking its colony forming and gene expression regulation activity. The promise of ALDH1A3 inhibitors as adjuvant therapies for patients with tumors that have a large population of high-ALDH1A3 CSCs is discussed. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Unusual aggressive breast cancer: metastatic malignant phyllodes tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Adam; Tresley, Jonathan; Velazquez-Vega, Jose; Yepes, Monica

    2013-02-01

    For the year of 2012, it has been estimated that breast cancer will account for the greatest number of newly diagnosed cancers and the second highest proportion of cancer related deaths among women. Breast cancer, while often lumped together as one disease, represents a diverse group of malignancies with different imaging findings, histological appearances and behavior. While most invasive primary breast cancers are epithelial derived adenocarcinomas, rare neoplasms such as the phyllodes tumor may arise from mesenchymal tissue. Compared to the breast adenocarcinoma, the phyllodes tumor tends to affect a younger population, follows a different clinical course, is associated with different imaging and histological findings and is managed distinctively. There may be difficulty in differentiating the phyllodes tumor from a large fibroadenoma, but the mammographer plays a key role in reviewing the clinical and imaging data in order to arrive at the correct diagnosis. Early diagnosis with proper surgical management can often cure non-metastatic phyllodes tumors. However, in rare cases where metastasis occurs, prognosis tends to be poor. This report describes the presentation, imaging findings and management of a metastatic malignant phyllodes tumor.

  16. Intrinsic Near-Infrared Spectroscopic Markers of Breast Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shwayta Kukreti

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We have discovered quantitative optical biomarkers unique to cancer by developing a double-differential spectroscopic analysis method for near-infrared (NIR, 650–1000 nm spectra acquired non-invasively from breast tumors. These biomarkers are characterized by specific NIR absorption bands. The double-differential method removes patient specific variations in molecular composition which are not related to cancer, and reveals these specific cancer biomarkers. Based on the spectral regions of absorption, we identify these biomarkers with lipids that are present in tumors either in different abundance than in the normal breast or new lipid components that are generated by tumor metabolism. Furthermore, the O-H overtone regions (980–1000 nm show distinct variations in the tumor as compared to the normal breast. To quantify spectral variation in the absorption bands, we constructed the Specific Tumor Component (STC index. In a pilot study of 12 cancer patients we found 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity for lesion identification. The STC index, combined with other previously described tissue optical indices, further improves the diagnostic power of NIR for breast cancer detection.

  17. Enhancing Tumor Detection in IR-UWB Breast Cancer System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoname, Reda; Elmahdy, Abd Elmonem; Zekry, Abd Elhalim

    2017-01-01

    An ultra-wideband (UWB) microwave system for breast cancer detection is presented. The proposed system includes monocycle pulse generator, antipodal Vivaldi antenna, breast model, and calibration algorithm for tumor detection. Firstly, our pulse generator employs transmission gate in glitch generator to achieve several advantages such as low power consumption and low ringing level. Secondly, the antipodal Vivaldi antenna is designed assuming FR4 dielectric substrate material, and developed antenna element (80 × 80 mm2) features a −10 dB return loss and bandwidth ranges from 2.3 GHz to more than 11 GHz. Thirdly, the phantom breast can be modeled as a layer of skin, fat, and then tumor is inserted in this layer. Finally, subtract and add algorithm (SAD) is used as a calibration algorithm in tumor detection system. The proposed system suggested that horizontal antenna position with 90° between transmitting and receiving antennas is localized as a suitable antenna position with different rotating location and a 0.5 cm near to phantom. The mean advantages of this localization and tracking position around breast is a high received power signal approximately around mv as a higher recognized signal in tumor detection. Using our proposed system we can detect tumor in 5 mm diameter. PMID:28421208

  18. Enhancing Tumor Detection in IR-UWB Breast Cancer System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Fouad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An ultra-wideband (UWB microwave system for breast cancer detection is presented. The proposed system includes monocycle pulse generator, antipodal Vivaldi antenna, breast model, and calibration algorithm for tumor detection. Firstly, our pulse generator employs transmission gate in glitch generator to achieve several advantages such as low power consumption and low ringing level. Secondly, the antipodal Vivaldi antenna is designed assuming FR4 dielectric substrate material, and developed antenna element (80×80 mm2 features a −10 dB return loss and bandwidth ranges from 2.3 GHz to more than 11 GHz. Thirdly, the phantom breast can be modeled as a layer of skin, fat, and then tumor is inserted in this layer. Finally, subtract and add algorithm (SAD is used as a calibration algorithm in tumor detection system. The proposed system suggested that horizontal antenna position with 90° between transmitting and receiving antennas is localized as a suitable antenna position with different rotating location and a 0.5 cm near to phantom. The mean advantages of this localization and tracking position around breast is a high received power signal approximately around mv as a higher recognized signal in tumor detection. Using our proposed system we can detect tumor in 5 mm diameter.

  19. Glutathione Transferase GSTπ In Breast Tumors Evaluated By Three Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Molina

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available The glutathione transferases are involved in intracellular detoxification reactions. One of these, GSTπ, is elevated in some breast cancer cells, particularly cells selected for resistance to anticancer agents. We evaluated GSTπ expression in 60 human breast tumors by three techniques, immunohistochemistry, Northern hybridization, and Western blot analysis. There was a significant positive correlation between the three methods, with complete concordance seen in 64% of the tumors. There was strong, inverse relationship between GSTπ expression and steroid receptor status with all of the techniques utili zed. [n addition, there was a trend toward higher GSTπ expression in poorly differentiated tumors, but no correlation was found between tumor GSTπ content and DNA ploidy or %S-phase. GSTπ expression was also detected in adjacent benign breast tissue as well as infiltrating lymphocytes; this expression may contribute to GSTπ measurements using either Northern hybridization or Western blot analysis. These re sults suggest that immunohistochemistry is the method of choice for measuring GSTπ in breast tumors.

  20. Investigating the KLF4 Gene Expression as a New Molecular Marker in Breast Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MA Hosseinpour Feizi

    2013-12-01

    Results: The results showed that: 1 KLF4 is over expressed in Breast tumors rather than adjacent normal tissues. 2 KLF4 is an oncogene in breast tumors (at least in IDC type. 3 The KLF4 expression levels are related significantly with nature of malignant breast tumors. Conclusion: Findings do not confirm KLF4 as a diagnostic marker in classification and identification of tumoral tissues from non-tumoral ones in breast, but we can use this marker to identify at least 50% of invasive Ductal Carcinoma in breast and utilize it as a potential predictive factor to demonstrate severity degree in various tumors.

  1. EGFRvIII-specific chimeric antigen receptor T cells migrate to and kill tumor deposits infiltrating the brain parenchyma in an invasive xenograft model of glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Hongsheng; Choi, Bryan D; Suryadevara, Carter M; Sanchez-Perez, Luis; Yang, Shicheng; De Leon, Gabriel; Sayour, Elias J; McLendon, Roger; Herndon, James E; Healy, Patrick; Archer, Gary E; Bigner, Darell D; Johnson, Laura A; Sampson, John H

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common primary malignant brain tumor in adults and is uniformly lethal. T-cell-based immunotherapy offers a promising platform for treatment given its potential to specifically target tumor tissue while sparing the normal brain. However, the diffuse and infiltrative nature of these tumors in the brain parenchyma may pose an exceptional hurdle to successful immunotherapy in patients. Areas of invasive tumor are thought to reside behind an intact blood brain barrier, isolating them from effective immunosurveillance and thereby predisposing the development of "immunologically silent" tumor peninsulas. Therefore, it remains unclear if adoptively transferred T cells can migrate to and mediate regression in areas of invasive GBM. One barrier has been the lack of a preclinical mouse model that accurately recapitulates the growth patterns of human GBM in vivo. Here, we demonstrate that D-270 MG xenografts exhibit the classical features of GBM and produce the diffuse and invasive tumors seen in patients. Using this model, we designed experiments to assess whether T cells expressing third-generation chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) targeting the tumor-specific mutation of the epidermal growth factor receptor, EGFRvIII, would localize to and treat invasive intracerebral GBM. EGFRvIII-targeted CAR (EGFRvIII+ CAR) T cells demonstrated in vitro EGFRvIII antigen-specific recognition and reactivity to the D-270 MG cell line, which naturally expresses EGFRvIII. Moreover, when administered systemically, EGFRvIII+ CAR T cells localized to areas of invasive tumor, suppressed tumor growth, and enhanced survival of mice with established intracranial D-270 MG tumors. Together, these data demonstrate that systemically administered T cells are capable of migrating to the invasive edges of GBM to mediate antitumor efficacy and tumor regression.

  2. Dual Agent Loaded PLGA Nanoparticles Enhanced Antitumor Activity in a Multidrug-Resistant Breast Tumor Eenograft Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Chen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Multidrug-resistant breast cancers have limited and ineffective clinical treatment options. This study aimed to develop PLGA nanoparticles containing a synergistic combination of vincristine and verapamil to achieve less toxicity and enhanced efficacy on multidrug-resistant breast cancers. The 1:250 molar ratio of VCR/VRP showed strong synergism with the reversal index of approximately 130 in the multidrug-resistant MCF-7/ADR cells compared to drug-sensitive MCF-7 cells. The lyophilized nanoparticles could get dispersed quickly with the similar size distribution, zeta potential and encapsulation efficiency to the pre-lyophilized nanoparticles suspension, and maintain the synergistic in vitro release ratio of drugs. The co-encapsulated nanoparticle formulation had lower toxicity than free vincristine/verapamil combinations according to the acute-toxicity test. Furthermore, the most effective tumor growth inhibition in the MCF-7/ADR human breast tumor xenograft was observed in the co-delivery nanoparticle formulation group in comparison with saline control, free vincristine, free vincristine/verapamil combinations and single-drug nanoparticle combinations. All the data demonstrated that PLGANPs simultaneously loaded with chemotherapeutic drug and chemosensitizer might be one of the most potential formulations in the treatment of multidrug-resistant breast cancer in clinic.

  3. Background parenchymal enhancement in breast MRIs of breast cancer patients: Impact on tumor size estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Ji Eun [Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Hun, E-mail: rad-ksh@catholic.ac.kr [Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ah Won [Department of Hospital Pathology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    Objective: To evaluate whether the degree of background parenchymal enhancement affects the accuracy of tumor size estimation based on breast MRI. Methods: Three hundred and twenty-two patients who had known breast cancer and underwent breast MRIs were recruited in our study. The total number of breast cancer cases was 339. All images were assessed retrospectively for the level of background parenchymal enhancement based on the BI-RADS criteria. Maximal lesion diameters were measured on the MRIs, and tumor types (mass vs. non-mass) were assessed. Tumor size differences between the MRI-based estimates and estimates based on pathological examinations were analyzed. The relationship between accuracy and tumor types and clinicopathologic features were also evaluated. Results: The cases included minimal (47.5%), mild (28.9%), moderate (12.4%) and marked background parenchymal enhancement (11.2%). The tumors of patients with minimal or mild background parenchymal enhancement were more accurately estimated than those of patients with moderate or marked enhancement (72.1% vs. 56.8%; p = 0.003). The tumors of women with mass type lesions were significantly more accurately estimated than those of the women with non-mass type lesions (81.6% vs. 28.6%; p < 0.001). The tumor of women negative for HER2 was more accurately estimated than those of women positive for HER2 (72.2% vs. 51.6%; p = 0.047). Conclusion: Moderate and marked background parenchymal enhancement is related to the inaccurate estimation of tumor size based on MRI. Non-mass type breast cancer and HER2-positive breast cancer are other factors that may cause inaccurate assessment of tumor size.

  4. Comparison of two new angiogenesis PET tracers 68Ga-NODAGA-E[c(RGDyK)]2 and 64Cu-NODAGA-E[c(RGDyK)]2; in vivo imaging studies in human xenograft tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oxbøl, Jytte; Brandt-Larsen, Malene; Schjøth-Eskesen, Christina

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to synthesize and perform a side-by-side comparison of two new tumor-angiogenesis PET tracers (68)Ga-NODAGA-E[c(RGDyK)](2) and (64)Cu-NODAGA-E[c(RGDyK)](2) in vivo using human xenograft tumors in mice. Human radiation burden was estimated to evaluate potent...

  5. ?Ruptured? malignant phyllodes tumor of the breast: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Ditsatham, Chagkrit; Somwangprasert, Areewan; Watcharachan, Kirati; Wongmaneerung, Phanchaporn

    2016-01-01

    Chagkrit Ditsatham, Areewan Somwangprasert, Kirati Watcharachan, Phanchaporn WongmaneerungDivision of Head, Neck and Breast, Department of Surgery, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, ThailandAbstract: Phyllodes tumor or cystosarcoma phyllodes is a rare disease and is usually seen in middle-aged patients. Ruptured phyllodes tumor is a very rare condition. Our study reports patient presentation, diagnosis method, and treatment of an unusual case. A 58-year-old premenopausal female was diagnosed...

  6. One-Carbon Metabolism and Methylation in Breast Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    149 TABLE A.34 Odds ratios and 95% CI for risk of p16 methylation tumor by MTHFR A1298C genotype, WNYDS *adjusted for age, education...AD_________________ Award Number: DAMD17-03-1-0344 TITLE: One – Carbon Metabolism and Methylation ...CONTRACT NUMBER One – Carbon Metabolism and Methylation in Breast Tumors 5b. GRANT NUMBER DAMD17-03-1-0344 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR

  7. Electric Field Analysis of Breast Tumor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Gowri Sree

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An attractive alternative treatment for malignant tumors that are refractive to conventional therapies, such as surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy, is electrical-pulse-mediated drug delivery. Electric field distribution of tissue/tumor is important for effective treatment of tissues. This paper deals with the electric field distribution study of a tissue model using MAXWELL 3D Simulator. Our results indicate that tumor tissue had lower electric field strength compared to normal cells, which makes them susceptible to electrical-pulse-mediated drug delivery. This difference could be due to the altered properties of tumor cells compared to normal cells, and our results corroborate this.

  8. Nature of tumor control by permanently and transiently modified GD2 chimeric antigen receptor T cells in xenograft models of neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nathan; Liu, Xiaojun; Hulitt, Jessica; Jiang, Shuguang; June, Carl H; Grupp, Stephan A; Barrett, David M; Zhao, Yangbing

    2014-11-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) therapy has begun to demonstrate success as a novel treatment modality for hematologic malignancies. The success observed thus far has been with T cells permanently engineered to express chimeric receptors. T cells engineered using RNA electroporation represent an alternative with the potential for similar efficacy and greater safety when initially targeting novel antigens. Neuroblastoma is a common pediatric solid tumor with the potential to be targeted using immunotherapy. We performed xenograft studies in NSG mice in which we assessed the efficacy of both permanently modified and transiently modified CAR T cells directed against the neuroblastoma antigen GD2 in both local and disseminated disease models. Disease response was monitored by tumor volume measurement and histologic examination, as well as in vivo bioluminescence. RNA-modified GD2 CAR T cells mediated rapid tumor destruction when delivered locally. A single infusion of lentivirally modified GD2 CAR T cells resulted in long-term control of disseminated disease. Multiple infusions of RNA GD2 CAR T cells slowed the progression of disseminated disease and improved survival, but did not result in long-term disease control. Histologic examination revealed that the transiently modified cells were unable to significantly penetrate the tumor environment when delivered systemically, despite multiple infusions of CAR T cells. Thus, we demonstrate that RNA-modified GD2 CAR T cells can mediate effective antitumor responses in vivo, and permanently modified cells are able to control disseminated neuroblastoma in xenograft mice. Lack of long-term disease control by RNA-engineered cells resulted from an inability to penetrate the tumor microenvironment. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  9. Blockade of Fas signaling in breast cancer cells suppresses tumor growth and metastasis via disruption of Fas signaling-initiated cancer-related inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiuyan; Tan, Qinchun; Zheng, Yuanyuan; Chen, Kun; Qian, Cheng; Li, Nan; Wang, Qingqing; Cao, Xuetao

    2014-04-18

    Mechanisms for cancer-related inflammation remain to be fully elucidated. Non-apoptotic functions of Fas signaling have been proposed to play an important role in promoting tumor progression. It has yet to be determined if targeting Fas signaling can control tumor progression through suppression of cancer-related inflammation. In the current study we found that breast cancer cells with constitutive Fas expression were resistant to apoptosis induction by agonistic anti-Fas antibody (Jo2) ligation or Fas ligand cross-linking. Higher expression of Fas in human breast cancer tissue has been significantly correlated with poorer prognosis in breast cancer patients. To determine whether blockade of Fas signaling in breast cancer could suppress tumor progression, we prepared an orthotopic xenograft mouse model with mammary cancer cells 4T1 and found that blockade of Fas signaling in 4T1 cancer cells markedly reduced tumor growth, inhibited tumor metastasis in vivo, and prolonged survival of tumor-bearing mice. Mechanistically, blockade of Fas signaling in cancer cells significantly decreased systemic or local recruitment of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) in vivo. Furthermore, blockade of Fas signaling markedly reduced IL-6, prostaglandin E2 production from breast cancer cells by impairing p-p38, and activity of the NFκB pathway. In addition, administration of a COX-2 inhibitor and anti-IL-6 antibody significantly reduced MDSC accumulation in vivo. Therefore, blockade of Fas signaling can suppress breast cancer progression by inhibiting proinflammatory cytokine production and MDSC accumulation, indicating that Fas signaling-initiated cancer-related inflammation in breast cancer cells may be a potential target for treatment of breast cancer.

  10. Targeting RPL39 and MLF2 reduces tumor initiation and metastasis in breast cancer by inhibiting nitric oxide synthase signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Bhuvanesh; Granados-Principal, Sergio; Zhu, Rui; Benz, Stephen; Rabizadeh, Shahrooz; Soon-Shiong, Patrick; Yu, Ke-Da; Shao, Zhimin; Li, Xiaoxian; Gilcrease, Michael; Lai, Zhao; Chen, Yidong; Huang, Tim H-M; Shen, Haifa; Liu, Xuewu; Ferrari, Mauro; Zhan, Ming; Wong, Stephen T C; Kumaraswami, Muthiah; Mittal, Vivek; Chen, Xi; Gross, Steven S; Chang, Jenny C

    2014-06-17

    We previously described a gene signature for breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) derived from patient biopsies. Selective shRNA knockdown identified ribosomal protein L39 (RPL39) and myeloid leukemia factor 2 (MLF2) as the top candidates that affect BCSC self-renewal. Knockdown of RPL39 and MLF2 by specific siRNA nanoparticles in patient-derived and human cancer xenografts reduced tumor volume and lung metastases with a concomitant decrease in BCSCs. RNA deep sequencing identified damaging mutations in both genes. These mutations were confirmed in patient lung metastases (n = 53) and were statistically associated with shorter median time to pulmonary metastasis. Both genes affect the nitric oxide synthase pathway and are altered by hypoxia. These findings support that extensive tumor heterogeneity exists within primary cancers; distinct subpopulations associated with stem-like properties have increased metastatic potential.

  11. Stromal cells in tumor microenvironment and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yan; Keller, Evan T; Garfield, David H; Shen, Kunwei; Wang, Jianhua

    2013-06-01

    Cancer is a systemic disease encompassing multiple components of both tumor cells themselves and host stromal cells. It is now clear that stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment play an important role in cancer development. Molecular events through which reactive stromal cells affect cancer cells can be defined so that biomarkers and therapeutic targets can be identified. Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) make up the bulk of cancer stroma and affect the tumor microenvironment such that they promote cancer initiation, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. In breast cancer, CAFs not only promote tumor progression but also induce therapeutic resistance. Accordingly, targeting CAFs provides a novel way to control tumors with therapeutic resistance. This review summarizes the current understandings of tumor stroma in breast cancer with a particular emphasis on the role of CAFs and the therapeutic implications of CAFs. In addition, the effects of other stromal components such as endothelial cells, macrophages, and adipocytes in breast cancer are also discussed. Finally, we describe the biologic markers to categorize patients into a specific and confirmed subtype for personalized treatment.

  12. Stroma Cells in Tumor Microenvironment and Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yan; Keller, Evan T.; Garfield, David H.; Shen, Kunwei; Wang, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a systemic disease, encompassing multiple components of both tumor cells themselves and host stromal cells. It is now clear that stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment play an important role in cancer development. Molecular events through which reactive stromal cells affect cancer cells can be defined so that biomarkers and therapeutic targets can be identified. Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) make up the bulk of cancer stroma and affect the tumor microenvironment such that they promote cancer initiation, angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis. In breast cancer, CAFs not only promote tumor progression, but also induce therapeutic resistances. Accordingly, targeting CAFs provides a novel way to control tumors with therapeutic resistances. This review summarizes the current understanding of tumor stroma in breast cancer with a particular emphasis on the role of CAFs and the therapeutic implications of CAFs. The effects of other stromal components such as endothelial cells, macrophages and adipocytes in breast cancer are also discussed. Finally, we describe the biologic markers to sort patients into a specific and confirmed subtype for personalized treatment. PMID:23114846

  13. Tumor tissue protein signatures reflect histological grade of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoog, Petter; Ohlsson, Mattias; Fernö, Mårten; Rydén, Lisa; Borrebaeck, Carl A K; Wingren, Christer

    2017-01-01

    Histological grade is one of the most commonly used prognostic factors for patients diagnosed with breast cancer. However, conventional grading has proven technically challenging, and up to 60% of the tumors are classified as histological grade 2, which represents a heterogeneous cohort less informative for clinical decision making. In an attempt to study and extend the molecular puzzle of histologically graded breast cancer, we have in this pilot project searched for additional protein biomarkers in a new space of the proteome. To this end, we have for the first time performed protein expression profiling of breast cancer tumor tissue, using recombinant antibody microarrays, targeting mainly immunoregulatory proteins. Thus, we have explored the immune system as a disease-specific sensor (clinical immunoproteomics). Uniquely, the results showed that several biologically relevant proteins reflecting histological grade could be delineated. In more detail, the tentative biomarker panels could be used to i) build a candidate model classifying grade 1 vs. grade 3 tumors, ii) demonstrate the molecular heterogeneity among grade 2 tumors, and iii) potentially re-classify several of the grade 2 tumors to more like grade 1 or grade 3 tumors. This could, in the long-term run, lead to improved prognosis, by which the patients could benefit from improved tailored care.

  14. Human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells (HAMLET) kills human glioblastoma cells in brain xenografts by an apoptosis-like mechanism and prolongs survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Walter; Gustafsson, Lotta; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Gronli, Janne; Mork, Sverre; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Svanborg, Catharina

    2004-03-15

    Malignant brain tumors present a major therapeutic challenge because no selective or efficient treatment is available. Here, we demonstrate that intratumoral administration of human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells (HAMLET) prolongs survival in a human glioblastoma (GBM) xenograft model, by selective induction of tumor cell apoptosis. HAMLET is a protein-lipid complex that is formed from alpha-lactalbumin when the protein changes its tertiary conformation and binds oleic acid as a cofactor. HAMLET induces apoptosis in a wide range of tumor cells in vitro, but the therapeutic effect in vivo has not been examined. In this study, invasively growing human GBM tumors were established in nude rats (Han:rnu/rnu Rowett, n = 20) by transplantation of human GBM biopsy spheroids. After 7 days, HAMLET was administered by intracerebral convection-enhanced delivery for 24 h into the tumor area; and alpha-lactalbumin, the native, folded variant of the same protein, was used as a control. HAMLET reduced the intracranial tumor volume and delayed the onset of pressure symptoms in the tumor-bearing rats. After 8 weeks, all alpha-lactalbumin-treated rats had developed pressure symptoms, but the HAMLET-treated rats remained asymptomatic. Magnetic resonance imaging scans revealed large differences in tumor volume (456 versus 63 mm(3)). HAMLET caused apoptosis in vivo in the tumor but not in adjacent intact brain tissue or in nontransformed human astrocytes, and no toxic side effects were observed. The results identify HAMLET as a new candidate in cancer therapy and suggest that HAMLET should be additionally explored as a novel approach to controlling GBM progression.

  15. Malignant phyllodes tumor of the breast: treatment and prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mituś, Jerzy; Reinfuss, Marian; Mituś, Jerzy W; Jakubowicz, Jerzy; Blecharz, Pawel; Wysocki, Wojciech M; Skotnicki, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Surgery remains the mainstay of the treatment in patients with malignant phyllodes tumor of the breast (MPTB); however, the extent of surgery (breast conserving surgery [BCS] versus mastectomy) and the role of adjuvant radiotherapy have been controversial. We report a single institution's experience with MPTB. We discuss controversial therapeutic aspects of this rare tumor. Seventy patients with MPTB treated primarily with surgery were evaluated. The mean age was 50 years (21-76), and the mean size of the tumor was 6 cm. Thirty-four (48.6%) patients were treated with total mastectomy, and 36 (51.4%) were treated with BCS (lumpectomy or wide local excision). Microscopic surgical margins were free of tumor in all cases. In 64 (91.4%) patients, margins were ≥1 cm. Remaining 6 (8.6%) patients treated with BCS margins were tumor-free margin ≥1 cm) and BCS with irradiation (tumor-free margin tumor-free margins cannot be obtained by BCS. Adjuvant radiotherapy may be considered if tumor-free margins are <1 cm. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Modeling the Effect of Tumor Size in Early Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschraegen, Claire; Vinh-Hung, Vincent; Cserni, Gábor; Gordon, Richard; Royce, Melanie E.; Vlastos, Georges; Tai, Patricia; Storme, Guy

    2005-01-01

    Summary Background Data: The purpose of this study was to determine the type of relationship between tumor size and mortality in early breast carcinoma. Methods: The data was abstracted from 83,686 cases registered in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program of women diagnosed with primary breast carcinoma between 1988 and 1997 presenting with a T1–T2 lesion and no metastasis in whom axillary node dissection was performed: 58,070 women were node-negative (N0) and 25,616 were node-positive (N+). End point was death from any cause. Tumor size was modeled as a continuous variable by proportional hazards using a generalized additive models procedure. Results: Functionally, a Gompertzian expression exp(-exp(-(size-15)/10)) provided a good fit to the effect of tumor size (in millimeters) on mortality, irrespective of nodal status. Quantitatively, for tumor size between 3 and 50 mm, the increase of crude cumulative death rate (number of observed deaths divided by the number of patients at risk) increased with size from 10% to 25% for N0 and from 20% to 40% for N+. Conclusions: The functional relationship of tumor size with mortality is concordant with current knowledge of tumor growth. However, its qualitative and quantitative independence of nodal status is in contradiction with the prevailing concept of sequential disease progression from primary tumor to regional nodes. This argues against the perception that nodal metastases are caused by the primary tumor. PMID:15650642

  17. Functional and molecular mapping of uncoupling between vascular permeability and loss of vascular maturation in ovarian carcinoma xenografts: the role of stroma cells in tumor angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilad, Assaf A; Israely, Tomer; Dafni, Hagit; Meir, Gila; Cohen, Batya; Neeman, Michal

    2005-11-01

    Maintaining homogeneous perfusion in tissues undergoing remodeling and vascular expansion requires tight orchestration of the signals leading to endothelial sprouting and subsequent recruitment of perivascular contractile cells and vascular maturation. This regulation, however, is frequently disrupted in tumors. We previously demonstrated the role of tumor-associated myofibroblasts in vascularization and exit from dormancy of human ovarian carcinoma xenografts in nude mice. The aim of this work was to determine the contribution of stroma- and tumor cell-derived angiogenic growth factors to the heterogeneity of vascular permeability and maturation in MLS human ovarian carcinoma tumors. We show by RT-PCR and by in situ hybridization that VEGF was expressed by the tumor cells, while angiopoietin-1 and -2 were expressed only by the infiltrating host stroma cells. Vascular maturation was detected in vivo by vasoreactivity to hypercapnia, measured by BOLD contrast MRI and validated by immunostaining of histologic sections to alpha-smooth muscle actin. Vascular permeability was measured in vivo by dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI using albumin-based contrast material and validated in histologic sections by fluorescent staining of the biotinylated contrast material. MRI as well as histologic correlation maps between vascular maturation and vascular permeability revealed a wide range of vascular phenotypes, in which the distribution of vascular maturation and vasoreactivity did not overlap spatially with reduced permeability. The large heterogeneity in the degree of vascular maturation and permeability is consistent with the differential expression pattern of VEGF and angiopoietins during tumor angiogenesis.

  18. Sensitivity of Breast Tumors to Oncolytic Viruses

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ahmed, Maryam

    2006-01-01

    ...). Studies have shown that matrix (M) protein mutants of VSV such as rM51R-M virus are excellent candidates for anti-tumor therapies due to the ability of these viruses to target and kill tumor cells while sparing normal cells...

  19. α-Mangostin extracted from the pericarp of the mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana Linn reduces tumor growth and lymph node metastasis in an immunocompetent xenograft model of metastatic mammary cancer carrying a p53 mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okuno Yasushi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mangosteen fruit has a long history of medicinal use in Chinese and Ayurvedic medicine. Recently, the compound α-mangostin, which is isolated from the pericarp of the fruit, was shown to induce cell death in various types of cancer cells in in vitro studies. This led us to investigate the antitumor growth and antimetastatic activities of α-mangostin in an immunocompetent xenograft model of mouse metastatic mammary cancer having a p53 mutation that induces a metastatic spectrum similar to that seen in human breast cancers. Methods Mammary tumors, induced by inoculation of BALB/c mice syngeneic with metastatic BJMC3879luc2 cells, were subsequently treated with α-mangostin at 0, 10 and 20 mg/kg/day using mini-osmotic pumps and histopathologically examined. To investigate the mechanisms of antitumor ability by α-mangostin, in vitro studies were also conducted. Results Not only were in vivo survival rates significantly higher in the 20 mg/kg/day α-mangostin group versus controls, but both tumor volume and the multiplicity of lymph node metastases were significantly suppressed. Apoptotic levels were significantly increased in the mammary tumors of mice receiving 20 mg/kg/day and were associated with increased expression of active caspase-3 and -9. Other significant effects noted at this dose level were decreased microvessel density and lower numbers of dilated lymphatic vessels containing intraluminal tumor cells in mammary carcinoma tissues. In vitro, α-mangostin induced mitochondria-mediated apoptosis and G1-phase arrest and S-phase suppression in the cell cycle. Since activation by Akt phosphorylation plays a central role in a variety of oncogenic processes, including cell proliferation, anti-apoptotic cell death, angiogenesis and metastasis, we also investigated alterations in Akt phosphorylation induced by α-mangostin treatment both in vitro and in vivo. Quantitative analysis and immunohistochemistry showed that

  20. α-Mangostin extracted from the pericarp of the mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana Linn) reduces tumor growth and lymph node metastasis in an immunocompetent xenograft model of metastatic mammary cancer carrying a p53 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Masa-Aki; Iinuma, Munekazu; Morimoto, Junji; Kurose, Hitomi; Akamatsu, Kanako; Okuno, Yasushi; Akao, Yukihiro; Otsuki, Yoshinori

    2011-06-03

    The mangosteen fruit has a long history of medicinal use in Chinese and Ayurvedic medicine. Recently, the compound α-mangostin, which is isolated from the pericarp of the fruit, was shown to induce cell death in various types of cancer cells in in vitro studies. This led us to investigate the antitumor growth and antimetastatic activities of α-mangostin in an immunocompetent xenograft model of mouse metastatic mammary cancer having a p53 mutation that induces a metastatic spectrum similar to that seen in human breast cancers. Mammary tumors, induced by inoculation of BALB/c mice syngeneic with metastatic BJMC3879luc2 cells, were subsequently treated with α-mangostin at 0, 10 and 20 mg/kg/day using mini-osmotic pumps and histopathologically examined. To investigate the mechanisms of antitumor ability by α-mangostin, in vitro studies were also conducted. Not only were in vivo survival rates significantly higher in the 20 mg/kg/day α-mangostin group versus controls, but both tumor volume and the multiplicity of lymph node metastases were significantly suppressed. Apoptotic levels were significantly increased in the mammary tumors of mice receiving 20 mg/kg/day and were associated with increased expression of active caspase-3 and -9. Other significant effects noted at this dose level were decreased microvessel density and lower numbers of dilated lymphatic vessels containing intraluminal tumor cells in mammary carcinoma tissues. In vitro, α-mangostin induced mitochondria-mediated apoptosis and G1-phase arrest and S-phase suppression in the cell cycle. Since activation by Akt phosphorylation plays a central role in a variety of oncogenic processes, including cell proliferation, anti-apoptotic cell death, angiogenesis and metastasis, we also investigated alterations in Akt phosphorylation induced by α-mangostin treatment both in vitro and in vivo. Quantitative analysis and immunohistochemistry showed that α-mangostin significantly decreased the levels of phospho

  1. A novel rabbit anti-hepatocyte growth factor monoclonal neutralizing antibody inhibits tumor growth in prostate cancer cells and mouse xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Yanlan; Chen, Yicheng; Ding, Guoqing; Wang, Mingchao; Wu, Haiyang; Xu, Liwei; Rui, Xuefang; Zhang, Zhigen, E-mail: srrshurology@163.com

    2015-08-14

    The hepatocyte growth factor and its receptor c-Met are correlated with castration-resistance in prostate cancer. Although HGF has been considered as an attractive target for therapeutic antibodies, the lack of cross-reactivity of monoclonal antibodies with human/mouse HGFs is a major obstacle in preclinical developments. We generated a panel of anti-HGF RabMAbs either blocking HGF/c-Met interaction or inhibiting c-Met phosphorylation. We selected one RabMAb with mouse cross-reactivity and demonstrated that it blocked HGF-stimulated downstream activation in PC-3 and DU145 cells. Anti-HGF RabMAb inhibited not only the growth of PC-3 cells but also HGF-dependent proliferation in HUVECs. We further demonstrated the efficacy and potency of the anti-HGF RabMAb in tumor xenograft mice models. Through these in vitro and in vivo experiments, we explored a novel therapeutic antibody for advanced prostate cancer. - Highlights: • HGF is an attractive target for castration-refractory prostate cancer. • We generated and characterized a panel of anti-HGF rabbit monoclonal antibodies. • More than half of these anti-HGF RabMAbs was cross-reactive with mouse HGF. • Anti-HGF RabMAb blocks HGF-stimulated phosphorylation and cell growth in vitro. • Anti-HGF RabMAb inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis in xenograft mice.

  2. Ovarian granulosa cell tumor and increased risk of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Anne; Lauszus, Finn F; Petersen, Astrid C

    2013-12-01

    Granulosa cell tumor of the ovary (GCT) is a rare neoplasm. The tumor often secretes estrogens and then presents at an earlier stage due to hormone-related symptoms. GCT women are at increased risk of endometrial carcinoma, but there is only limited information about GCTs and potential association to other hormone-related neoplasms such as breast cancer. We conducted a retrospective follow-up study on 163 women with GCT. Medical records and histological sections were reviewed and a search in the pathology registry performed. Eight [95% confidence interval (CI); 3.4-15.8] GCT women were diagnosed with a breast neoplasm; one with Paget's disease of the nipple and seven with breast carcinoma. Based on calculations using incidence rates on breast cancer among Danish women, we would have expected 2.5 cases of breast cancer. The odds ratio was 3.3 (95% CI, 1.6-6.6), suggesting an increased risk of breast cancer in GCT women. © 2013 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  3. Percutaneous Image-Guided Ablation of Breast Tumors: An Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Sag, Alan A.; Maybody, Majid; Comstock, Christopher; Solomon, Stephen B.

    2014-01-01

    Percutaneous non-surgical image-guided ablation is emerging as an adjunct or alternative to surgery in the management of benign and malignant breast tumors. This review covers the current state of the literature regarding percutaneous image-guided ablation modalities, clinical factors regarding patient selection, and future directions for research.

  4. Percutaneous image-guided ablation of breast tumors: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sag, Alan A; Maybody, Majid; Comstock, Christopher; Solomon, Stephen B

    2014-06-01

    Percutaneous non-surgical image-guided ablation is emerging as an adjunct or alternative to surgery in the management of benign and malignant breast tumors. This review covers the current state of the literature regarding percutaneous image-guided ablation modalities, clinical factors regarding patient selection, and future directions for research.

  5. Enhanced anti-tumor activity of the glycoengineered type II CD20 antibody obinutuzumab (GA101) in combination with chemotherapy in xenograft models of human lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herting, Frank; Friess, Thomas; Bader, Sabine; Muth, Gunter; Hölzlwimmer, Gabriele; Rieder, Natascha; Umana, Pablo; Klein, Christian

    2014-09-01

    Obinutuzumab (GA101) is a novel glycoengineered type II CD20 antibody in development for non-Hodgkin lymphoma. We compared the anti-tumor activity of obinutuzumab and rituximab in preclinical studies using subcutaneous Z138 and WSU-DLCL2 xenograft mouse models. Obinutuzumab and rituximab were assessed alone and in combination with bendamustine, fludarabine, chlorambucil, doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide/vincristine. Owing to strong single-agent efficacy in these models, suboptimal doses of obinutuzumab were applied to demonstrate a combination effect. Obinutuzumab plus bendamustine achieved superior tumor growth inhibition versus rituximab plus bendamustine and showed a statistically significant effect versus the respective single treatments. Combinations of obinutuzumab with fludarabine, chlorambucil or cyclophosphamide/vincristine demonstrated significantly superior activity to rituximab-based treatment. Obinutuzumab monotherapy was at least as effective as rituximab plus chemotherapy in vivo, and obinutuzumab plus chemotherapy was superior to the respective monotherapies. These data support further clinical investigation of obinutuzumab plus chemotherapy.

  6. PKM2 Thr454 phosphorylation increases its nuclear translocation and promotes xenograft tumor growth in A549 human lung cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Zhenhai, E-mail: tomsyu@163.com [Center for Reproductive Medicine, Affiliated Hospital of Weifang Medical University, Weifang, Shandong, 261031 (China); Huang, Liangqian [Institute of Health Sciences, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences (SIBS), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) & Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine -SJTUSM, Shanghai, 200025 (China); Qiao, Pengyun; Jiang, Aifang; Wang, Li; Yang, Tingting [Center for Reproductive Medicine, Affiliated Hospital of Weifang Medical University, Weifang, Shandong, 261031 (China); Tang, Shengjian; Zhang, Wei [Plastic Surgery Institute of Weifang Medical University, Weifang, Shandong, 261041 (China); Ren, Chune, E-mail: ren@wfmc.edu.cn [Center for Reproductive Medicine, Affiliated Hospital of Weifang Medical University, Weifang, Shandong, 261031 (China)

    2016-05-13

    Pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) is a key enzyme of glycolysis which is highly expressed in many tumor cells, and plays an important role in the Warburg effect. In previous study, we found PIM2 phosphorylates PKM2 at Thr454 residue (Yu, etl 2013). However, the functions of PKM2 Thr454 modification in cancer cells still remain unclear. Here we find PKM2 translocates into the nucleus after Thr454 phosphorylation. Replacement of wild type PKM2 with a mutant (T454A) enhances mitochondrial respiration, decreases pentose phosphate pathway, and enhances chemosensitivity in A549 cells. In addition, the mutant (T454A) PKM2 reduces xenograft tumor growth in nude mice. These findings demonstrate that PKM2 T454 phosphorylation is a potential therapeutic target in lung cancer.

  7. ID genes mediate tumor reinitiation during breast cancer lung metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Gaorav P.; Perk, Jonathan; Acharyya, Swarnali; de Candia, Paola; Mittal, Vivek; Todorova-Manova, Katia; Gerald, William L.; Brogi, Edi; Benezra, Robert; Massagué, Joan

    2007-01-01

    The establishment of distant metastases depends on the capacity of small numbers of cancer cells to regenerate a tumor after entering a target tissue. The mechanisms that confer this capacity remain to be defined. Here we identify a role for the transcriptional inhibitors of differentiation Id1 and Id3 as selective mediators of lung metastatic colonization in the triple negative [TN, i.e., lacking expression of estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor, and lacking Her2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) amplification] subgroup of human breast cancer. Although broad expression of Id1 has recently been documented in tumors of the rare metaplastic subtype, here we report that rare Id1-expressing cells are also present in the more common TN subset of human breast tumors but not in other subtypes. We also provide evidence that Id1 expression is enriched in clinically obtained hormone receptor negative lung metastases. Functional studies demonstrate that Id1 and its closely related family member Id3 are required for tumor initiating functions, both in the context of primary tumor formation and during metastatic colonization of the lung microenvironment. In vivo characterization of lung metastatic progression reveals that Id1 and Id3 facilitate sustained proliferation during the early stages of metastatic colonization, subsequent to extravasation into the lung parenchyma. These results shed light on the proliferative mechanisms that initiate metastatic colonization, and they implicate Id1 and Id3 as mediators of this malignant function in the TN subgroup of breast cancers. PMID:18048329

  8. CDDO-Me Redirects Activation of Breast Tumor Associated Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Michael S; Shipman, Emilie P; Kim, Hyunjung; Liby, Karen T; Pioli, Patricia A

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages can account for up to 50% of the tumor mass in breast cancer patients and high TAM density is associated with poor clinical prognosis. Because TAMs enhance tumor growth, development, and metastatic potential, redirection of TAM activation may have significant therapeutic benefit. Our studies in primary human macrophages and murine breast TAMs suggest that the synthetic oleanane triterpenoid CDDO-methyl ester (CDDO-Me) reprograms the activation profile of TAMs from tumor-promoting to tumor-inhibiting. We show that CDDO-Me treatment inhibits expression of IL-10 and VEGF in stimulated human M2 macrophages and TAMs but increases expression of TNF-α and IL-6. Surface expression of CD206 and CD163, which are characteristic of M2 activation, is significantly attenuated by CDDO-Me. In contrast, CDDO-Me up-regulates surface expression of HLA-DR and CD80, which are markers of M1 activation, and importantly potentiates macrophage activation of autologous T cells but inhibits endothelial cell vascularization. These results show for the first time that CDDO-Me redirects activation of M2 macrophages and TAMs from immune-suppressive to immune-stimulatory, and implicate a role for CDDO-Me as an immunotherapeutic in the treatment of breast and potentially other types of cancer.

  9. Second harmonic generation reveals matrix alterations during breast tumor progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Kathleen; Tang, Ping; Brown, Edward

    2013-03-01

    Alteration of the extracellular matrix in tumor stroma influences efficiency of cell locomotion away from the primary tumor into surrounding tissues and vasculature, thereby affecting metastatic potential. We study matrix changes in breast cancer through the use of second harmonic generation (SHG) of collagen in order to improve the current understanding of breast tumor stromal development. Specifically, we utilize a quantitative analysis of the ratio of forward to backward propagating SHG signal (F/B ratio) to monitor collagen throughout ductal and lobular carcinoma development. After detection of a significant decrease in the F/B ratio of invasive but not in situ ductal carcinoma compared with healthy tissue, the collagen F/B ratio is investigated to determine the evolution of fibrillar collagen changes throughout tumor progression. Results are compared with the progression of lobular carcinoma, whose F/B signature also underwent significant evolution during progression, albeit in a different manner, which offers insight into varying methods of tissue penetration and collagen manipulation between the carcinomas. This research provides insights into trends of stromal reorganization throughout breast tumor development.

  10. Infrared Spectra of Human Breast Tumor Tissue and Experimental Animal Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolstorozhev, G. B.; Belkov, M. V.; Skornyakov, I. V.; Pekhnyo, V. I.; Kozachkova, A. N.; Tsarik, H. V.; Kutsenko, I. P.; Sharykina, N. I.; Butra, V. A.

    2015-01-01

    We have used Fourier transform IR spectroscopy methods to conduct comparative studies of human breast tumors and sarcoma 180 tumor grafted into mice. The IR spectral parameters used to identify tumor tissue in mice with the sarcoma 180 strain proved to be identical to the parameters for human breast tissue in cancer. In the presence of a malignant tumor in humans, the most intense C=O vibrational bands in the protein molecules are observed in the interval 1710-1680 cm-1. For a benign tumor, in the IR spectra of breast tissue the intense bands are located in the interval 1670-1650 cm-1. We spectroscopically monitored the diagnosis and the chemotherapy process using the model of sarcoma 180 in mice. As the therapeutic drugs, we used synthesized coordination compounds based on palladium complexes with diphosphonic acid derivatives. We demonstrate the promising potential of palladium complexes with zoledronic acid as an effective cytostatic. In therapy using a palladium complex with zoledronic acid, the effect of tumor growth inhibition is accompanied by a change in its spectral characteristics. The parameters of the IR spectra for tumor tissue after treatment are close to those of the IR spectra for healthy tissue.

  11. An evaluation of 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose and 3'-deoxy-3'-[18F]-fluorothymidine uptake in human tumor xenograft models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keen, Heather; Pichler, Bernd; Kukuk, Damaris; Duchamp, Olivier; Raguin, Olivier; Shannon, Aoife; Whalley, Nichola; Jacobs, Vivien; Bales, Juliana; Gingles, Neill; Ricketts, Sally-Ann; Wedge, Stephen R

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the variability of 2-deoxy-2-[(18)F]fluoro-D: -glucose ([(18)F]-FDG) and 3'-deoxy-3'-[(18)F]-fluorothymidine ([(18)F]-FLT) uptake in pre-clinical tumor models and examine the relationship between imaging data and related histological biomarkers. [(18)F]-FDG and [(18)F]-FLT studies were carried out in nine human tumor xenograft models in mice. A selection of the models underwent histological analysis for endpoints relevant to radiotracer uptake. Comparisons were made between in vitro uptake, in vivo imaging, and ex vivo histopathology data using quantitative and semi-quantitative analysis. In vitro data revealed that [1-(14)C]-2-deoxy-D: -glucose ([(14)C]-2DG) uptake in the tumor cell lines was variable. In vivo, [(18)F]-FDG and [(18)F]-FLT uptake was highly variable across tumor types and uptake of one tracer was not predictive for the other. [(14)C]-2DG uptake in vitro did not predict for [(18)F]-FDG uptake in vivo. [(18)F]-FDG SUV was inversely proportional to Ki67 and necrosis levels and positively correlated with HKI. [(18)F]-FLT uptake positively correlated with Ki67 and TK1. When evaluating imaging biomarkers in response to therapy, the choice of tumor model should take into account in vivo baseline radiotracer uptake, which can vary significantly between models.

  12. Therapeutic effects of dendrosomal solanine on a metastatic breast tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohsenikia, Maryam; Farhangi, Baharak; Alizadeh, Ali Mohammad; Khodayari, Hamid; Khodayari, Saeed; Khori, Vahid; Arjmand Abbassi, Yasaman; Vesovic, Milica; Soleymani, Ali; Najafi, Farhood

    2016-03-01

    Our previous studies showed that alpha-solanine can inhibit tumor growth in cell culture and animal models of breast cancer. However, solanine is insoluble in common solvents; therefore, we developed a special nanoparticle with high-capacity solubility. The present study is aimed to deliberate the therapeutic effects of dendrosomal solanine (DNS) on a metastatic breast tumor in vitro and in vivo. After DNS preparation and dosing procedures, forty-five mice were equally divided into five groups to investigate the anti-metastatic effects of DNS on mammary tumor-bearing mice. Compared to solanine, DNS significantly suppressed the proliferation of 4 T1 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. DNS showed a remarkable safety rate of up to 10mg/kg. A significant decrease in white blood-cell count was seen at 20mg/kg DNS in comparison with control animals. Mice treated with DNS had smaller tumor volume (mm(3)) in comparison with control and solanine groups. Moreover, the incidence of the breast tumor metastases was about 67% in the control animals, where as solanine and DNS 1mg/kg were about 22% and 0%, respectively. Furthermore, the number of metastases per mouse varied from one to three. The tissues of tumor, brain, liver, spleen, and lung showed higher expression levels of Bcl-2 but lower expression levels of Bax, MMP-2, MMP-9, mTOR, and Akt in DNS-treated mice than control and solanine groups. The findings suggest that DNS has a more impactful therapeutic effect than solanine on 4 T1-induced breast tumorigenesis via influencing the tissue microenvironment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The Role of Tumor Metastases Suppressor Gene, Drg-1, in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    regulates NM23 in hepatocarcinoma cells. Increased adhesion to ECM in vitro Inhibits the growth of xenograft tumors and gastric cancer cell metastasis to...expression of NM23 was also shown to be up-regulated by ATRA in human hepatocarcinoma cell line and gastric cancer cell lines [226,227]. Liu et al...invasion of human hepatocarcinoma cell line [226]. Furthermore, Wu et al. examined the effect of ATRA treatment in xenografted nude mice and found that

  14. Influence of mammographic density on the diagnostic accuracy of tumor size assessment and association with breast cancer tumor characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fasching, Peter A. [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Erlangen University Hospital, Universitaetsstrasse 21-23, D-91054 Erlangen (Germany)]. E-mail: peter.fasching@gyn.med.uni-erlangen.de; Heusinger, Katharina [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Erlangen University Hospital, Universitaetsstrasse 21-23, D-91054 Erlangen (Germany); Loehberg, Christian R. [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Erlangen University Hospital, Universitaetsstrasse 21-23, D-91054 Erlangen (Germany); Wenkel, Evelyn [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Erlangen University Hospital, Erlangen (Germany); Lux, Michael P. [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Erlangen University Hospital, Universitaetsstrasse 21-23, D-91054 Erlangen (Germany); Schrauder, Michael [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Erlangen University Hospital, Universitaetsstrasse 21-23, D-91054 Erlangen (Germany); Koscheck, Thomas [Institute of Pathology, Friedrich Alexander University, Erlangen-Nuremberg (Germany); Bautz, Werner [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Erlangen University Hospital, Erlangen (Germany); Schulz-Wendtland, Ruediger [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Erlangen University Hospital, Erlangen (Germany); Beckmann, Matthias W. [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Erlangen University Hospital, Universitaetsstrasse 21-23, D-91054 Erlangen (Germany); Bani, Mayada R. [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Erlangen University Hospital, Universitaetsstrasse 21-23, D-91054 Erlangen (Germany)

    2006-12-15

    Purpose: The accuracy of breast cancer staging involves the estimation of the tumor size for the initial decision-making in the treatment. We investigated the accuracy of tumor size estimation and the association between tumor characteristics and breast density (BD). Materials and methods: A total of 434 women with a primary diagnosis of breast cancer were included in this prospective study at a specialist breast unit. Estimated tumor characteristics included tumor size, nodal status, estrogen/progesterone receptor status, Ki-67, HER2/neu, vascular invasion. Radiomorphological data included tumor size as assessed by mammography, breast ultrasonography, and clinical examination, and American College of Radiology (ACR) categories for BD. Results: BD did not have a significant impact on the assessment of tumor size using breast ultrasound (deviation from ACR categories 1-4: 0.55-0.68 cm; P = 0.331). The deviation in mammography was significantly different dependent on BD (0.42-0.9 cm; P < 0.001). The clinical examination was not affected by BD. Age and tumor size were the only parameters associated with a denser breast in the multivariate analysis. Older women were less likely to have dense breasts (odds ratio 0.157 for women aged {>=}70 years), and patients with larger tumors were less likely to have dense breasts (adjusted OR 0.36 for tumors > 2 cm). Conclusion: Breast ultrasonography is more accurate than mammography for assessing tumor size in breasts with a higher BD. The difference in tumor size assessment needs to be taken into consideration in the design of clinical trials and treatment decisions.

  15. NEMO, a Transcriptional Target of Estrogen and Progesterone, Is Linked to Tumor Suppressor PML in Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsarraj, Hanan S; Valdez, Kelli E; Hong, Yan; Grimm, Sandra L; Ricci, Lawrence R; Fan, Fang; Tawfik, Ossama; May, Lisa; Cusick, Therese; Inciardi, Marc; Redick, Mark; Gatewood, Jason; Winblad, Onalisa; Hilsenbeck, Susan; Edwards, Dean P; Hagan, Christy R; Godwin, Andrew K; Fabian, Carol; Behbod, Fariba

    2017-07-15

    The beneficial versus detrimental roles of estrogen plus progesterone (E+P) in breast cancer remains controversial. Here we report a beneficial mechanism of E+P treatment in breast cancer cells driven by transcriptional upregulation of the NFκB modulator NEMO, which in turn promotes expression of the tumor suppressor protein promyelocytic leukemia (PML). E+P treatment of patient-derived epithelial cells derived from ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) increased secretion of the proinflammatory cytokine IL6. Mechanistic investigations indicated that IL6 upregulation occurred as a result of transcriptional upregulation of NEMO, the gene that harbored estrogen receptor (ER) binding sites within its promoter. Accordingly, E+P treatment of breast cancer cells increased ER binding to the NEMO promoter, thereby increasing NEMO expression, NFκB activation, and IL6 secretion. In two mouse xenograft models of DCIS, we found that RNAi-mediated silencing of NEMO increased tumor invasion and progression. This seemingly paradoxical result was linked to NEMO-mediated regulation of NFκB and IL6 secretion, increased phosphorylation of STAT3 on Ser727, and increased expression of PML, a STAT3 transcriptional target. In identifying NEMO as a pivotal transcriptional target of E+P signaling in breast cancer cells, our work offers a mechanistic explanation for the paradoxical antitumorigenic roles of E+P in breast cancer by showing how it upregulates the tumor suppressor protein PML. Cancer Res; 77(14); 3802-13. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  16. Giant breast tumors: Surgical management of phyllodes tumors, potential for reconstructive surgery and a review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McKelvey Michael T

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phyllodes tumors are biphasic fibroepithelial neoplasms of the breast. While the surgical management of these relatively uncommon tumors has been addressed in the literature, few reports have commented on the surgical approach to tumors greater than ten centimeters in diameter – the giant phyllodes tumor. Case presentation We report two cases of giant breast tumors and discuss the techniques utilized for pre-operative diagnosis, tumor removal, and breast reconstruction. A review of the literature on the surgical management of phyllodes tumors was performed. Conclusion Management of the giant phyllodes tumor presents the surgeon with unique challenges. The majority of these tumors can be managed by simple mastectomy. Axillary lymph node metastasis is rare, and dissection should be limited to patients with pathologic evidence of tumor in the lymph nodes.

  17. Breast cancer tumor classification using LASSO method selection approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celaya P, J. M.; Ortiz M, J. A.; Martinez B, M. R.; Solis S, L. O.; Castaneda M, R.; Garza V, I.; Martinez F, M.; Ortiz R, J. M., E-mail: morvymm@yahoo.com.mx [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Av. Ramon Lopez Velarde 801, Col. Centro, 98000 Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico)

    2016-10-15

    Breast cancer is one of the leading causes of deaths worldwide among women. Early tumor detection is key in reducing breast cancer deaths and screening mammography is the widest available method for early detection. Mammography is the most common and effective breast cancer screening test. However, the rate of positive findings is very low, making the radiologic interpretation monotonous and biased toward errors. In an attempt to alleviate radiological workload, this work presents a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD x) method aimed to automatically classify tumor lesions into malign or benign as a means to a second opinion. The CAD x methos, extracts image features, and classifies the screening mammogram abnormality into one of two categories: subject at risk of having malignant tumor (malign), and healthy subject (benign). In this study, 143 abnormal segmentation s (57 malign and 86 benign) from the Breast Cancer Digital Repository (BCD R) public database were used to train and evaluate the CAD x system. Percentile-rank (p-rank) was used to standardize the data. Using the LASSO feature selection methodology, the model achieved a Leave-one-out-cross-validation area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (Auc) of 0.950. The proposed method has the potential to rank abnormal lesions with high probability of malignant findings aiding in the detection of potential malign cases as a second opinion to the radiologist. (Author)

  18. Targeted gene delivery in tumor xenografts by the combination of ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction and polyethylenimine to inhibit survivin gene expression and induce apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu Ri-Xiang

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Noninvasive and tissue-specific technologies of gene transfection would be valuable in clinical gene therapy. This present study was designed to determine whether it could enhance gene transfection in vivo by the combination of ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD with polyethylenimine (PEI in tumor xenografts, and illuminate the effects of gene silencing and apoptosis induction with short hairpin RNA (shRNA interference therapy targeting human survivin by this novel technique. Methods Two different expression vectors (pCMV-LUC and pSIREN were incubated with PEI to prepare cationic complexes (PEI/DNA and confirmed by the gel retardation assay. Human cervical carcinoma (Hela tumors were planted subcutaneously in both flanks of nude mice. Tumor-bearing mice were administered by tail vein with PBS, plasmid, plasmid and SonoVue microbubble, PEI/DNA and SonoVue microbubble. One tumor was exposed to ultrasound irradiation, while the other served as control. The feasibility of targeted delivery and tissue specificity facilitated by UTMD and PEI were investigated. Moreover, immunohistochemistry analyses about gene silencing and apoptosis induction were detected. Results Electrophoresis experiment revealed that PEI could condense DNA efficiently. The application of UTMD significantly increases the tissue transfection. Both expression vectors showed that gene expressions were present in all sections of tumors that received ultrasound exposure but not in control tumors. More importantly, the increases in transgene expression were related to UTMD with the presence of PEI significantly. Silencing of the survivin gene could induce apoptosis effectively by downregulating survivin and bcl-2 expression, also cause up-regulation of bax and caspase-3 expression. Conclusions This noninvasive, novel combination of UTMD with PEI could enhance targeted gene delivery and gene expression in tumor xenografts at intravenous administration

  19. Cancer progression by breast tumors with Pit-1-overexpression is blocked by inhibition of metalloproteinase (MMP)-13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendon-Lago, Juan; Seoane, Samuel; Eiro, Noemi; Bermudez, Maria A; Macia, Manuel; Garcia-Caballero, Tomas; Vizoso, Francisco J; Perez-Fernandez, Roman

    2014-12-20

    The POU class 1 homeobox 1 transcription factor (POU1F1, also known as Pit-1) is expressed in the mammary gland and its overexpression induces profound phenotypic changes in proteins involved in cell proliferation, apoptosis, and invasion. Patients with breast cancer and elevated expression of Pit-1 show a positive correlation with the occurrence of distant metastasis. In this study we evaluate the relationship between Pit-1 and two collagenases: matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) and matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13), which have been related to metastasis in breast cancer. We began by transfecting the MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast adenocarcinoma cell lines with the Pit-1 overexpression vector (pRSV-hPit-1). Afterward, the mRNA, protein, and transcriptional regulation of both MMP-1 and MMP-13 were evaluated by real-time PCR, Western blot, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), and luciferase reporter assays. We also evaluated Pit-1 overexpression with MMP-1 and MMP-13 knockdown in a severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mouse tumor xenograft model. Finally, by immunohistochemistry we correlated Pit-1 with MMP-1 and MMP-13 protein expression in 110 human breast tumors samples. Our data show that Pit-1 increases mRNA and protein of both MMP-1 and MMP-13 through direct transcriptional regulation. In SCID mice, knockdown of MMP-13 completely blocked lung metastasis in Pit-1-overexpressing MCF-7 cells injected into the mammary fat pad. In breast cancer patients, expression of Pit-1 was found to be positively correlated with the presence of both MMP-1 and MMP-13. Our data indicates that Pit-1 regulates MMP-1 and MMP-13, and that inhibition of MMP-13 blocked invasiveness to lung in Pit-1-overexpressed breast cancer cells.

  20. High tumor budding stratifies breast cancer with metastatic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salhia, Bodour; Trippel, Mafalda; Pfaltz, Katrin; Cihoric, Nikola; Grogg, André; Lädrach, Claudia; Zlobec, Inti; Tapia, Coya

    2015-04-01

    Tumor budding refers to single or small cluster of tumor cells detached from the main tumor mass. In colon cancer high tumor budding is associated with positive lymph nodes and worse prognosis. Therefore, we investigated the value of tumor budding as a predictive feature of lymph node status in breast cancer (BC). Whole tissue sections from 148 surgical resection specimens (SRS) and 99 matched preoperative core biopsies (CB) with invasive BC of no special type were analyzed on one slide stained with pan-cytokeratin. In SRS, the total number of intratumoral (ITB) and peripheral tumor buds (PTB) in ten high-power fields (HPF) were counted. A bud was defined as a single tumor cell or a cluster of up to five tumor cells. High tumor budding equated to scores averaging >4 tumor buds across 10HPFs. In CB high tumor budding was defined as ≥10 buds/HPF. The results were correlated with pathological parameters. In SRS high PTB stratified BC with lymph node metastases (p ≤ 0.03) and lymphatic invasion (p ≤ 0.015). In CB high tumor budding was significantly (p = 0.0063) associated with venous invasion. Pathologists are able, based on morphology, to categorize BC into a high and low risk groups based in part on lymph node status. This risk assessment can be easily performed during routine diagnostics and it is time and cost effective. These results suggest that high PTB is associated with loco-regional metastasis, highlighting the possibility that this tumor feature may help in therapeutic decision-making.

  1. Chlorella sorokiniana induces mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis in human non-small cell lung cancer cells and inhibits xenograft tumor growth in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ping-Yi; Tsai, Ching-Tsan; Chuang, Wan-Ling; Chao, Ya-Hsuan; Pan, I-Horng; Chen, Yu-Kuo; Lin, Chi-Chen; Wang, Bing-Yen

    2017-02-01

    Lung cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer related deaths worldwide. Marine microalgae are a source of biologically active compounds and are widely consumed as a nutritional supplement in East Asian countries. It has been reported that Chlorella or Chlorella extracts have various beneficial pharmacological compounds that modulate immune responses; however, no studies have investigated the anti-cancer effects of Chlorella sorokiniana (CS) on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In this study, we evaluated the anti-cancer effects of CS in two human NSCLC cell lines (A549 and CL1-5 human lung adenocarcinoma cells), and its effects on tumor growth in a subcutaneous xenograft tumor model. We also investigated the possible molecular mechanisms governing the pharmacological function of CS. Our results showed that exposure of the two cell lines to CS resulted in a concentration-dependent reduction in cell viability. In addition, the percentage of apoptotic cells increased in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting that CS might induce apoptosis in human NSCLC cells. Western blot analysis revealed that exposure to CS resulted in increased protein expression of the cleaved/activated forms of caspase-3, caspase-9, and PARP, except caspase-8. ZDEVD (caspase-3 inhibitor) and Z-LEHD (caspase-9 inhibitor) were sufficient at preventing apoptosis in both A549 and CL1-5 cells, proving that CS induced cell death via the mitochondria-mediated apoptotic pathway. Exposure of A549 and CL1-5 cells to CS for 24 h resulted in decreased expression of Bcl-2 protein and increased expression of Bax protein as well as decreased expression of two IAP family proteins, survivin and XIAP. We demonstrated that CS induces mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis in NSCLC cells via downregulation of Bcl-2, XIAP and survivin. In addition, we also found that the tumors growth of subcutaneous xenograft in vivo was markedly inhibited after oral intake of CS.

  2. SLC25A22 Promotes Proliferation and Survival of Colorectal Cancer Cells With KRAS Mutations and Xenograft Tumor Progression in Mice via Intracellular Synthesis of Aspartate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Chi Chun; Qian, Yun; Li, Xiaona; Xu, Jiaying; Kang, Wei; Tong, Joanna H; To, Ka-Fai; Jin, Ye; Li, Weilin; Chen, Huarong; Go, Minnie Y Y; Wu, Jian-Lin; Cheng, Ka Wing; Ng, Simon S M; Sung, Joseph J Y; Cai, Zongwei; Yu, Jun

    2016-11-01

    Many colorectal cancer (CRC) cells contain mutations in KRAS. Analyses of CRC cells with mutations in APC or CTNNB1 and KRAS identified SLC25A22, which encodes mitochondrial glutamate transporter, as a synthetic lethal gene. We investigated the functions of SLC25A22 in CRC cells with mutations in KRAS. We measured levels of SLC25A22 messenger RNA and protein in paired tumor and nontumor colon tissues collected from 130 patients in Hong Kong and 17 patients in China and compared protein levels with patient survival times. Expression of SLC25A22 was knocked down in KRAS mutant CRC cell lines (DLD1, HCT116, LOVO, SW480, SW620, and SW1116) and CRC cell lines without mutations in KRAS (CACO-2, COLO205, HT29, and SW48); cells were analyzed for colony formation, proliferation, glutaminolysis and aspartate synthesis, and apoptosis in Matrigel and polymerase chain reaction array analyses. DLD1 and HCT116 cells with SLC25A22 knockdown were grown as xenograft tumors in nude mice; tumor growth and metastasis were measured. SLC25A22 was expressed ectopically in HCT116 cells, which were analyzed in vitro and grown as xenograft tumors in nude mice. Levels of SLC25A22 messenger RNA and protein were increased in colorectal tumor tissues compared with matched nontumor colon tissues; increased protein levels were associated with shorter survival times of patients (P = .01). Knockdown of SLC25A22 in KRAS mutant CRC cells reduced their proliferation, migration, and invasion in vitro, and tumor formation and metastasis in mice, compared with cells without SLC25A22 knockdown. Knockdown of SLC25A22 reduced aspartate biosynthesis, leading to apoptosis, decreased cell proliferation in KRAS mutant CRC cells. Incubation of KRAS mutant CRC cells with knockdown of SLC25A22 with aspartate increased proliferation and reduced apoptosis, which required GOT1, indicating that oxaloacetate is required for cell survival. Decreased levels of oxaloacetate in cells with knockdown of SLC25A22 reduced

  3. Biodistribution and Gamma Camera Image of Anti-VEGF-2 Humanized Antibody, TTAC0001 in Xenografted Tumor Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Tae Sup; Son, Jin Ju; Jung, Jae Ho; Woo, Kwnag Sun; Jung, Wee Sup; Kang, Joo Hyun; Cheon, Gi Jeong [KIRAMS, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Jin San [KRIBB, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Young Seo [Kyungwn University, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-15

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptors (VEGFR) have been implicated in promoting solid tumor growth and metastasis via stimulating tumor-associated angiogenesis. Recently, antiangiogenic therapies that interfere with the VEGF/VEGFR pathway may represent novel approaches to effective treatment. This study is aimed to evaluate tumor targeting of VEGFR-2 Ab in melanoma and chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) tumor model for the feasibility of treatment using anti- VEGFR-2 antibody, TTAC-0001.

  4. Dissecting Tumor-Stromal Interactions in Breast Cancer Bone Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yibin Kang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Bone metastasis is a frequent occurrence in breast cancer, affecting more than 70% of late stage cancer patients with severe complications such as fracture, bone pain, and hypercalcemia. The pathogenesis of osteolytic bone metastasis depends on cross-communications between tumor cells and various stromal cells residing in the bone microenvironment. Several growth factor signaling pathways, secreted micro RNAs (miRNAs and exosomes are functional mediators of tumor-stromal interactions in bone metastasis. We developed a functional genomic approach to systemically identified molecular pathways utilized by breast cancer cells to engage the bone stroma in order to generate osteolytic bone metastasis. We showed that elevated expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM1 in disseminated breast tumor cells mediates the recruitment of pre-osteoclasts and promotes their differentiation to mature osteoclasts during the bone metastasis formation. Transforming growth factor β (TGF-β is released from bone matrix upon bone destruction, and signals to breast cancer to further enhance their malignancy in developing bone metastasis. We furthered identified Jagged1 as a TGF-β target genes in tumor cells that engaged bone stromal cells through the activation of Notch signaling to provide a positive feedback to promote tumor growth and to activate osteoclast differentiation. Substantially change in miRNA expression was observed in osteoclasts during their differentiation and maturation, which can be exploited as circulating biomarkers of emerging bone metastasis and therapeutic targets for the treatment of bone metastasis. Further research in this direction may lead to improved diagnosis and treatment strategies for bone metastasis.

  5. Preliminary investigation of breast tumor detection using cross-vivaldi antenna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingjing; Fear, Elise; Johnston, Ronald

    2005-01-01

    The contrast in dielectric properties between normal breast tissues and malignant tumors is significant. Based on this fact, detection of breast cancer with microwaves has been proposed. Here, a cross-Vivaldi antenna capable of measuring cross-polarization is investigated for tumor detection. Observation of cross-polarized reflections reduces reflections from surfaces such as skin, permitting more reliable detection of small tumors. Simulation results indicate that the antenna has the potential to detect breast tumors using this approach.

  6. CK2 targeted RNAi therapeutic delivered via malignant cell-directed tenfibgen nanocapsule: dose and molecular mechanisms of response in xenograft prostate tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Rachel I.; Shaughnessy, Daniel P.; Nacusi, Lucas; Korman, Vicci L.; Li, Yingming; Dehm, Scott M.; Zimmerman, Cheryl L.; Niehans, Gloria A.; Unger, Gretchen M.; Trembley, Janeen H.

    2016-01-01

    CK2, a protein serine/threonine kinase, promotes cell proliferation and suppresses cell death. This essential-for-survival signal demonstrates elevated expression and activity in all cancers examined, and is considered an attractive target for cancer therapy. Here, we present data on the efficacy of a tenfibgen (TBG) coated nanocapsule which delivers its cargo of siRNA (siCK2) or single stranded RNA/DNA oligomers (RNAi-CK2) simultaneously targeting CK2α and α′ catalytic subunits. Intravenous administration of TBG-siCK2 or TBG-RNAi-CK2 resulted in significant xenograft tumor reduction at low doses in PC3-LN4 and 22Rv1 models of prostate cancer. Malignant cell uptake and specificity in vivo was verified by FACS analysis and immunofluorescent detection of nanocapsules and PCR detection of released oligomers. Dose response was concordant with CK2αα′ RNA transcript levels and the tumors demonstrated changes in CK2 protein and in markers of proliferation and cell death. Therapeutic response corresponded to expression levels for argonaute and GW proteins, which function in oligomer processing and translational repression. No toxicity was detected in non-tumor tissues or by serum chemistry. Tumor specific delivery of anti-CK2 RNAi via the TBG nanoencapsulation technology warrants further consideration of translational potential. PMID:27557516

  7. Predicting tumor location by modeling the deformation of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathmanathan, Pras; Gavaghan, David J; Whiteley, Jonathan P; Chapman, S Jonathan; Brady, J Michael

    2008-10-01

    Breast cancer is one of the biggest killers in the western world, and early diagnosis is essential for improved prognosis. The shape of the breast varies hugely between the scenarios of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (patient lies prone, breast hanging down under gravity), X-ray mammography (breast strongly compressed) and ultrasound or biopsy/surgery (patient lies supine), rendering image fusion an extremely difficult task. This paper is concerned with the use of the finite-element method and nonlinear elasticity to build a 3-D, patient-specific, anatomically accurate model of the breast. The model is constructed from MR images and can be deformed to simulate breast shape and predict tumor location during mammography or biopsy/surgery. Two extensions of the standard elasticity problem need to be solved: an inverse elasticity problem (arising from the fact that only a deformed, stressed, state is known initially), and the contact problem of modeling compression. The model is used for craniocaudal mediolateral oblique mammographic image matching, and a number of numerical experiments are performed.

  8. Quantification of Ultrasonic Scattering Properties of In Vivo Tumor Cell Death in Mouse Models of Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadayyon, Hadi; Sannachi, Lakshmanan; Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Al-Mahrouki, Azza; Tran, William T; Kolios, Michael C; Czarnota, Gregory J

    2015-12-01

    Quantitative ultrasound parameters based on form factor models were investigated as potential biomarkers of cell death in breast tumor (MDA-231) xenografts treated with chemotherapy. Ultrasound backscatter radiofrequency data were acquired from MDA-231 breast cancer tumor-bearing mice (n = 20) before and after the administration of chemotherapy drugs at two ultrasound frequencies: 7 MHz and 20 MHz. Radiofrequency spectral analysis involved estimating the backscatter coefficient from regions of interest in the center of the tumor, to which form factor models were fitted, resulting in estimates of average scatterer diameter and average acoustic concentration (AAC). The ∆AAC parameter extracted from the spherical Gaussian model was found to be the most effective cell death biomarker (at the lower frequency range, r(2) = 0.40). At both frequencies, AAC in the treated tumors increased significantly (P = .026 and .035 at low and high frequencies, respectively) 24 hours after treatment compared with control tumors. Furthermore, stepwise multiple linear regression analysis of the low-frequency data revealed that a multiparameter quantitative ultrasound model was strongly correlated to cell death determined histologically posttreatment (r(2) = 0.74). The Gaussian form factor model-based scattering parameters can potentially be used to track the extent of cell death at clinically relevant frequencies (7 MHz). The 20-MHz results agreed with previous findings in which parameters related to the backscatter intensity (i.e., AAC) increased with cell death. The findings suggested that, in addition to the backscatter coefficient parameter ∆AAC, biological features including tumor heterogeneity and initial tumor volume were important factors in the prediction of cell death response. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Promotion of Tumor-Initiating Cells in Primary and Recurrent Breast Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Thioridazine (an FDA approved drug that is known to block dopamine receptor signaling and to block MALT1, a factor upstream of IKK) strongly reduces...KR et al. (2008). Breast tumor cells with PI3K mutation or HER2 amplification are selectively addicted to Akt signaling. PLoS ONE 3: e3065. Singh S

  10. Uncommon breast tumors in perspective: incidence, treatment and survival in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louwman, M.W.; Vriezen, M.; Beek, M.W. van; Nolthenius-Puylaert, M.C.; Sangen, M.J. van der; Roumen, R.M.H.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Coebergh, J.W.W.

    2007-01-01

    The relatively small group of patients with breast tumors other than the ductal, lobular or mixed ducto-lobular types, has reached nonnegligible numbers due to the ongoing increase in the incidence of breast cancer. We investigated stage and grade distribution of uncommon breast tumors using the

  11. Tumor cell budding from focally disrupted tumor capsules: a common pathway for all breast cancer subtype derived invasion?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-gao Man

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Human breast cancer represents a group of highly heterogeneous lesions consisting of about 20 morphologically and immnohistochemically distinct subtypes with substantially different prognoses. Our recent studies have suggested that all breast cancer subtypes, however, may share a common pathway, tumor cell budding from focally disrupted tumor capsules, for their invasion. The potential mechanisms and clinical implications of our observations are discussed.

  12. Computer-Aided tumor diagnosis in 3-D breast elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yao-Sian; Takada, Etsuo; Konno, Sachiyo; Huang, Chiun-Shen; Kuo, Ming-Hao; Chang, Ruey-Feng

    2018-01-01

    Breast cancer is the major cause of cancer-related mortality in women. However, the death rate can be effectively decreased if the breast cancer can be detected early and treated appropriately. In recent years, many studies have indicated that the elastography has the better diagnosis performance than conventional ultrasound (US). In this study, the 3-D tumor contour is obtained by using the proposed segmentation methods and then the features containing texture information, shape information, ellipsoid fitting information are extracted respectively by using the segmented 3-D tumor contour and B-mode images, and the features containing elasticity information are calculated using the same contour and elastographic images. In this experiment, totally 40 biopsy-proved lesions containing 20 benign tumors and 20 malignant tumors are used to evaluate the proposed computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system. From the experimental results, the combination of shape, ellipsoid fitting and elastographic features has the best performance with accuracy 90.50% (36/40), sensitivity 85.00% (17/20), specificity 95.00% (19/20), and the area under the ROC curve Az 0.987. The result shows that tumors can be diagnosed more precisely by using the elastography images. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Tumor-Host Interaction in Breast Cancer Bone Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Kallioniemi, O.-P., and Ethier, S. P. Molecular cytogenetic analysis of 11 new breast cancer cell lines. Br J Cancer, 81: 1328-1334, 1999. 26. Harris, A...1.318480186 NM_000546 TP53 Tumor protein p53 (Li-Fraumeni syndrome ) 0.875703301 NM_006670 TPBG Trophoblast glycoprotein 1.130637565 NM_003379 VIL2 Villin...primary tumors was determined according to the Richardson– Bloom grading system [17]. BM assessment BM (10 cc) was aspirated from the sternum and both

  14. Ultrasound imaging of breast tumor perfusion and neovascular morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyt, Kenneth; Umphrey, Heidi; Lockhart, Mark; Robbin, Michelle; Forero-Torres, Andres

    2015-09-01

    A novel image processing strategy is detailed for simultaneous measurement of tumor perfusion and neovascular morphology parameters from a sequence of dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US) images. After normalization and tumor segmentation, a global time-intensity curve describing contrast agent flow was analyzed to derive surrogate measures of tumor perfusion (i.e., peak intensity, time-to-peak intensity, area under the curve, wash-in rate, wash-out rate). A maximum intensity image was generated from these same segmented image sequences, and each vascular component was skeletonized via a thinning algorithm. This skeletonized data set and collection of vessel segments were then investigated to extract parameters related to the neovascular network and physical architecture (i.e., vessel-to-tissue ratio, number of bifurcations, vessel count, average vessel length and tortuosity). An efficient computation of local perfusion parameters was also introduced and operated by averaging time-intensity curve data over each individual neovascular segment. Each skeletonized neovascular segment was then color-coded by these local measures to produce a parametric map detailing spatial properties of tumor perfusion. Longitudinal DCE-US image data sets were collected in six patients diagnosed with invasive breast cancer using a Philips iU22 ultrasound system equipped with a L9-3 transducer and Definity contrast agent. Patients were imaged using US before and after contrast agent dosing at baseline and again at weeks 6, 12, 18 and 24 after treatment started. Preliminary clinical results suggested that breast tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy may be associated with temporal and spatial changes in DCE-US-derived parametric measures of tumor perfusion. Moreover, changes in neovascular morphology parametric measures may also help identify any breast tumor response (or lack thereof) to systemic treatment. Breast cancer management from early detection to therapeutic

  15. Comparison of Tumor and Microenvironment Secretomes in Plasma and in Platelets during Prostate Cancer Growth in a Xenograft Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bethany A. Kerr

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available To survive and metastasize, tumors interact with surrounding tissues by secreting growth factors and cytokines. In return, surrounding host tissues respond by changing their secretome. Numerous factors theoretically function as therapeutic targets or biomarkers of cancer growth and metastatic risk. However, it is unclear if these factors are tumor-derived or actually represent the host defense. To analyze the concentrations of tumor- and microenvironmentderived factors associated with neoplastic growth, we used ELISA-based arrays specific for murine or human proteins to establish a profile of tumor- or host-derived factors circulating in the plasma or within the platelets upon human tumor implantation into mice. Many factors characterized as tumor-derived were actually secreted by host tissues. This study uncovered the origin of various cytokines and revealed their circulation methods. We found that tumor-produced cytokines are predominantly sequestered in platelets. Sequestered proteins are protected from degradation and, thus, may be functional at metastatic sites. These findings identify tumor-specific targets for the detection and prevention of tumor growth and metastasis. As predicted by our model, monocyte chemotactic protein 1 and tumor necrosis factor α may be biomarkers for human cancers. Thus, our study identified several potential biomarkers that might be predictive of prostate cancer.

  16. Predictive pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling of tumor growth kinetics in xenograft models after administration of anticancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeoni, Monica; Magni, Paolo; Cammia, Cristiano; De Nicolao, Giuseppe; Croci, Valter; Pesenti, Enrico; Germani, Massimiliano; Poggesi, Italo; Rocchetti, Maurizio

    2004-02-01

    The available mathematical models describing tumor growth and the effect of anticancer treatments on tumors in animals are of limited use within the drug industry. A simple and effective model would allow applying quantitative thinking to the preclinical development of oncology drugs. In this article, a minimal pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model is presented, based on a system of ordinary differential equations that link the dosing regimen of a compound to the tumor growth in animal models. The growth of tumors in nontreated animals is described by an exponential growth followed by a linear growth. In treated animals, the tumor growth rate is decreased by a factor proportional to both drug concentration and number of proliferating tumor cells. A transit compartmental system is used to model the process of cell death, which occurs at later times. The parameters of the pharmacodynamic model are related to the growth characteristics of the tumor, to the drug potency, and to the kinetics of the tumor cell death. Therefore, such parameters can be used for ranking compounds based on their potency and for evaluating potential differences in the tumor cell death process. The model was extensively tested on discovery candidates and known anticancer drugs. It fitted well the experimental data, providing reliable parameter estimates. On the basis of the parameters estimated in a first experiment, the model successfully predicted the response of tumors exposed to drugs given at different dose levels and/or schedules. It is, thus, possible to use the model prospectively, optimizing the design of new experiments.

  17. [Pulmonary Metastasis from a Phyllodes Tumor of the Breast Developing Sixteen Years after Initial Surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Sung-Soo; Nakano, Takayuki; Okamoto, Taku; Takabatake, Daisuke

    2015-11-01

    We report a case of solitary pulmonary metastasis from a phyllodes tumor of the breast appearing 16 years after initial surgery. The patient was a 56-year-old woman who had undergone surgical extirpation of a left breast tumor diagnosed as phyllodes tumor (borderline malignancy) in 1998, and a right breast tumor diagnosed as fibromatosis in 2000. Sixteen years after the initial operation, she consulted our hospital because of a chest X-ray abnormality detected at a screening examination. Chest computed tomography revealed a well defined nodular shadow in the left upper lobe of the lung. Surgery was done since primary lung cancer was suspected. However, pathological diagnosis was a pulmonary metastasis from the phyllodes tumor of the left breast. Right breast tumor was also diagnosed as a metastasis from the left breast tumor by histopathological re-evaluation.

  18. Tumor-expressed adrenomedullin accelerates breast cancer bone metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siclari, Valerie A; Mohammad, Khalid S; Tompkins, Douglas R; Davis, Holly; McKenna, C Ryan; Peng, Xianghong; Wessner, Lisa L; Niewolna, Maria; Guise, Theresa A; Suvannasankha, Attaya; Chirgwin, John M

    2014-12-02

    Adrenomedullin (AM) is secreted by breast cancer cells and increased by hypoxia. It is a multifunctional peptide that stimulates angiogenesis and proliferation. The peptide is also a potent paracrine stimulator of osteoblasts and bone formation, suggesting a role in skeletal metastases-a major site of treatment-refractory tumor growth in patients with advanced disease. The role of adrenomedullin in bone metastases was tested by stable overexpression in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, which cause osteolytic bone metastases in a standard animal model. Cells with fivefold increased expression of AM were characterized in vitro, inoculated into immunodeficient mice and compared for their ability to form bone metastases versus control subclones. Bone destruction was monitored by X-ray, and tumor burden and osteoclast numbers were determined by quantitative histomorphometry. The effects of AM overexpression on tumor growth and angiogenesis in the mammary fat pad were determined. The effects of AM peptide on osteoclast-like multinucleated cell formation were tested in vitro. A small-molecule AM antagonist was tested for its effects on AM-stimulated ex vivo bone cell cultures and co-cultures with tumor cells, where responses of tumor and bone were distinguished by species-specific real-time PCR. Overexpression of AM mRNA did not alter cell proliferation in vitro, expression of tumor-secreted factors or cell cycle progression. AM-overexpressing cells caused osteolytic bone metastases to develop more rapidly, which was accompanied by decreased survival. In the mammary fat pad, tumors grew more rapidly with unchanged blood vessel formation. Tumor growth in the bone was also more rapid, and osteoclasts were increased. AM peptide potently stimulated bone cultures ex vivo; responses that were blocked by small-molecule adrenomedullin antagonists in the absence of cellular toxicity. Antagonist treatment dramatically suppressed tumor growth in bone and decreased markers of

  19. Precursor States of Brain Tumor Initiating Cell Lines Are Predictive of Survival in Xenografts and Associated with Glioblastoma Subtypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Cusulin

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, brain-tumor-initiating cells (BTICs with cancer stem cell characteristics have been identified and proposed as primordial cells responsible for disease initiation, recurrence, and therapeutic resistance. However, the extent to which individual, patient-derived BTIC lines reflect the heterogeneity of GBM remains poorly understood. Here we applied a stem cell biology approach and compared self-renewal, marker expression, label retention, and asymmetric cell division in 20 BTIC lines. Through cluster analysis, we identified two subgroups of BTIC lines with distinct precursor states, stem- or progenitor-like, predictive of survival after xenograft. Moreover, stem and progenitor transcriptomic signatures were identified, which showed a strong association with the proneural and mesenchymal subtypes, respectively, in the TCGA cohort. This study proposes a different framework for the study and use of BTIC lines and provides precursor biology insights into GBM.

  20. 64Cu-NODAGA-c(RGDyK) Is a Promising New Angiogenesis PET Tracer: Correlation between Tumor Uptake and Integrin αvβ3 Expression in Human Neuroendocrine Tumor Xenografts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oxbøl, Jytte; Schjøth-Eskesen, Christina; El Ali, Henrik H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate a new PET tracer (64)Cu-NODAGA-c(RGDyK) for imaging of tumor angiogenesis using gene expression of angiogenesis markers as reference and to estimate radiation dosimetry for humans. Procedures. Nude mice with human neuroendocrine tumor xenografts (H...... human radiation-absorbed doses were estimated using OLINDA/EXM. Results. Tumor uptake was 1.2%ID/g with strong correlations between gene expression and tracer uptake, for integrin α(V) R = 0.76, integrin β(3) R = 0.75 and VEGF-A R = 0.81 (all P body effective dose for humans...... was estimated to be 0.038 and 0.029 mSv/MBq for females and males, respectively, with highest absorbed dose in bladder wall. Conclusion. (64)Cu-NODAGA-c(RGDyK) is a promising new angiogenesis PET tracer with potential for human use....

  1. Intrinsic Near-Infrared Spectroscopic Markers of Breast Tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Kukreti, Shwayta; Cerussi, Albert; Tromberg, Bruce; Gratton, Enrico

    2009-01-01

    We have discovered quantitative optical biomarkers unique to cancer by developing a double-differential spectroscopic analysis method for near-infrared (NIR, 650–1000 nm) spectra acquired non-invasively from breast tumors. These biomarkers are characterized by specific NIR absorption bands. The double-differential method removes patient specific variations in molecular composition which are not related to cancer, and reveals these specific cancer biomarkers. Based on the spectral regions of a...

  2. Wavelength optimization for quantitative spectral imaging of breast tumor margins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Y Lo

    Full Text Available A wavelength selection method that combines an inverse Monte Carlo model of reflectance and a genetic algorithm for global optimization was developed for the application of spectral imaging of breast tumor margins. The selection of wavelengths impacts system design in cost, size, and accuracy of tissue quantitation. The minimum number of wavelengths required for the accurate quantitation of tissue optical properties is 8, with diminishing gains for additional wavelengths. The resulting wavelength choices for the specific probe geometry used for the breast tumor margin spectral imaging application were tested in an independent pathology-confirmed ex vivo breast tissue data set and in tissue-mimicking phantoms. In breast tissue, the optical endpoints (hemoglobin, β-carotene, and scattering that provide the contrast between normal and malignant tissue specimens are extracted with the optimized 8-wavelength set with <9% error compared to the full spectrum (450-600 nm. A multi-absorber liquid phantom study was also performed to show the improved extraction accuracy with optimization and without optimization. This technique for selecting wavelengths can be used for designing spectral imaging systems for other clinical applications.

  3. YKL-40 IN SERA OF BREAST TUMOR PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Kazakova

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available YKL-40, also known as human cartilage glycoprotein 39, is a member of the “mammalian chitinase-like proteins”, but lacking of chitinase activity. Increased variations in serum concentrations are associated with inflammatory processes and several types of cancer.In this study we evaluated serum YKL-40 levels in healthy controls and in women with benign and malignant breast tumors. YKL-40 serum levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay – ELISA in 32 patients. The effect of the various factors was analyzed using correlation and regression analyses simultaneously determining the size and direction of correlation. The level of statistical significance of null hypothesis was P<0.05. Our study showed that serum YKL-40 level in breast carcinoma was significantly higher than the concentration in healthy controls (p<0.01. The changes in protein levels were higher than 25%. Serum YKL-40 increased with age (rxy=0.46. The correlation between glycoprotein quantity and age was positive, but feeble.This investigation is first in Bulgaria to demonstrate significantly elevated serum YKL-40 level in breast carcinoma compared to women with benign breast tumors and healthy controls. Longitudinal studies are needed to confirm YKL-40 as a potential and reliable biomarker.

  4. Growth kinetics of four human breast carcinomas grown in nude mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spang-Thomsen, M; Rygaard, K; Hansen, L

    1989-01-01

    The immune-deficient nude mouse with human tumor xenografts is an appropriate model system for performing detailed growth kinetic examinations. In the present study one estrogen and progesterone receptor-negative (T60) and three receptor-positive (Br-10, MCF-7, T61) human breast cancer xenografts...

  5. Molecular pathogenesis of progression and recurrence in breast phyllodes tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jara-Lazaro, Ana Richelia; Tan, Puay Hoon

    2009-01-01

    Breast phyllodes tumors are rare fibroepithelial neoplasms that need to be distinguished from the common morphologically similar fibroadenomas, because phyllodes tumors can recur and progress to malignancy. Their potentially recurring and metastasizing behavior is attributed to their stromal characteristics, for which categorization between benign, borderline and malignant tumors have not been universally established. Previous clonality studies revealing monoclonal stromal cells versus a polyclonal epithelial component theorized that phyllodes tumors are mainly stromal neoplasms, possibly arising from fibroadenomas. More recent chromosomal imbalances in both epithelium and stroma have challenged this theory to favor neoplasia of both epithelium and stroma, with initial interdependence between the two components. Inverse correlations between epithelial and stromal overexpression for various biological markers like estrogen receptor, p53, c-kit, Ki-67, endothelin-1, epidermal growth factor receptor, heparan sulfate, in addition to findings of epithelial Wnt signalling with stromal insulin growth factors and beta-catenin expression, suggest an initial epithelial-stromal interdependence at the benign phase. Upon progression to malignancy, the stroma is hypothesized to assume an autonomous growth overriding any epithelial influence. Frequent genetic alterations are chromosomal gains of 1q and losses at chromosome 13. Acquisition of new genetic imbalances within the tumor consistent with intratumoral heterogeneity, and subclones within histologically benign phyllodes tumors that recur or metastasize are the current theories explaining these tumors' unpredictable clinical behavior. PMID:19966935

  6. Computer-aided tumor diagnosis using shear wave breast elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Woo Kyung; Huang, Yao-Sian; Lee, Yan-Wei; Chang, Shao-Chien; Lo, Chung-Ming; Yang, Min-Chun; Bae, Min Sun; Lee, Su Hyun; Chang, Jung Min; Huang, Chiun-Sheng; Lin, Yi-Ting; Chang, Ruey-Feng

    2017-07-01

    The shear wave elastography (SWE) uses the acoustic radiation force to measure the stiffness of tissues and is less operator dependent in data acquisition compared to strain elastography. However, the reproducibility of the result is still interpreter dependent. The purpose of this study is to develop a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) method to differentiate benign from malignant breast tumors using SWE images. After applying the level set method to automatically segment the tumor contour and hue-saturation-value color transformation, SWE features including average tissue elasticity, sectional stiffness ratio, and normalized minimum distance for grouped stiffer pixels are calculated. Finally, the performance of CAD based on SWE features are compared with those based on B-mode ultrasound (morphologic and textural) features, and a combination of both feature sets to differentiate benign from malignant tumors. In this study, we use 109 biopsy-proved breast tumors composed of 57 benign and 52 malignant cases. The experimental results show that the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and the area under the receiver operating characteristic ROC curve (Az value) of CAD are 86.5%, 93.0%, 89.9%, and 0.905 for SWE features whereas they are 86.5%, 80.7%, 83.5% and 0.893 for B-mode features and 90.4%, 94.7%, 92.3% and 0.961 for the combined features. The Az value of combined feature set is significantly higher compared to the B-mode and SWE feature sets (p=0.0296 and p=0.0204, respectively). Our results suggest that the CAD based on SWE features has the potential to improve the performance of classifying breast tumors with US. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Associations of Breast Cancer Risk Factors With Tumor Subtypes : A Pooled Analysis From the Breast Cancer Association Consortium Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Xiaohong R.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Goode, Ellen L.; Couch, Fergus J.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Milne, Roger L.; Gaudet, Mia; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Cox, Angela; Fasching, Peter A.; Hein, Rebecca; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Blows, Fiona; Driver, Kristy; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Heinz, Judith; Sinn, Peter; Vrieling, Alina; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Aittomaeki, Kristiina; Heikkilae, Paeivi; Blomqvist, Carl; Lissowska, Jolanta; Peplonska, Beata; Chanock, Stephen; Figueroa, Jonine; Brinton, Louise; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Humphreys, Keith; Darabi, Hatef; Liu, Jianjun; Van 't Veer, Laura J.; Van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Knight, Julia A.; Mulligan, Anna Marie; O'Malley, Frances P.; Weerasooriya, Nayana; John, Esther M.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Hartmann, Arndt; Weihbrecht, Sebastian B.; Wachter, David L.; Jud, Sebastian M. S.; Loehberg, Christian R.; Baglietto, Laura; English, Dallas R.; Giles, Graham G.; McLean, Catriona A.; Severi, Gianluca; Lambrechts, Diether; Vandorpe, Thijs; Weltens, Caroline; Paridaens, Robert; Smeets, Ann; Neven, Patrick; Wildiers, Hans; Wang, Xianshu; Olson, Janet E.; Cafourek, Victoria; Fredericksen, Zachary; Kosel, Matthew; Vachon, Celine; Cramp, Helen E.; Connley, Daniel; Cross, Simon S.; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy P.; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Doerk, Thilo; Bremer, Michael; Meyer, Andreas; Karstens, Johann H.; Ay, Aysun; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Hillemanns, Peter; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Menendez Rodriguez, Primitiva; Zamora, Pilar; Bentez, Javier; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Fischer, Hans-Peter; Hamann, Ute; Pesch, Beate; Bruening, Thomas; Justenhoven, Christina; Brauch, Hiltrud; Eccles, Diana M.; Tapper, William J.; Gerty, Sue M.; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian P.; Jones, Angela; Kerin, Michael; Miller, Nicola; McInerney, Niall; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Wu, Pei-Ei; Yang, Show-Lin; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Chen, Shou-Tung; Hsu, Giu-Cheng; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Le Marchand, Loic; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Gorski, Bohdan; Gronwald, Jacek; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Jager, Agnes; Kriege, Mieke; Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine M. A.; Collee, Margriet; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Pylkaes, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Mononen, Kari; Grip, Mervi; Hirvikoski, Pasi; Winqvist, Robert; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kauppinen, Jaana; Kataja, Vesa; Auvinen, Paeivi; Soini, Ylermi; Sironen, Reijo; Bojesen, Stig E.; Orsted, David Dynnes; Kaur-Knudsen, Diljit; Flyger, Henrik; Nordestgaard, Borge G.; Holland, Helene; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Manoukian, Siranoush; Barile, Monica; Radice, Paolo; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hunter, David J.; Tamimi, Rulla; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Brennan, Paul; Mckay, James; Odefrey, Fabrice; Gaborieau, Valerie; Devilee, Peter; Huijts, P. E. A.; Tollenaar, R. A. E. M.; Seynaeve, C.; Dite, Gillian S.; Apicella, Carmel; Hopper, John L.; Hammet, Fleur; Tsimiklis, Helen; Smith, Letitia D.; Southey, Melissa C.; Humphreys, Manjeet K.; Easton, Douglas; Pharoah, Paul; Sherman, Mark E.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat

    Background Previous studies have suggested that breast cancer risk factors are associated with estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) expression status of the tumors. Methods We pooled tumor marker and epidemiological risk factor data from 35 568 invasive breast cancer case patients

  8. Associations of breast cancer risk factors with tumor subtypes: a pooled analysis from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Xiaohong R; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Goode, Ellen L

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that breast cancer risk factors are associated with estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) expression status of the tumors.......Previous studies have suggested that breast cancer risk factors are associated with estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) expression status of the tumors....

  9. Quantification of Ultrasonic Scattering Properties of In Vivo Tumor Cell Death in Mouse Models of Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Tadayyon

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Quantitative ultrasound parameters based on form factor models were investigated as potential biomarkers of cell death in breast tumor (MDA-231 xenografts treated with chemotherapy. METHODS: Ultrasound backscatter radiofrequency data were acquired from MDA-231 breast cancer tumor–bearing mice (n = 20 before and after the administration of chemotherapy drugs at two ultrasound frequencies: 7 MHz and 20 MHz. Radiofrequency spectral analysis involved estimating the backscatter coefficient from regions of interest in the center of the tumor, to which form factor models were fitted, resulting in estimates of average scatterer diameter and average acoustic concentration (AAC. RESULTS: The ∆AAC parameter extracted from the spherical Gaussian model was found to be the most effective cell death biomarker (at the lower frequency range, r2 = 0.40. At both frequencies, AAC in the treated tumors increased significantly (P = .026 and .035 at low and high frequencies, respectively 24 hours after treatment compared with control tumors. Furthermore, stepwise multiple linear regression analysis of the low-frequency data revealed that a multiparameter quantitative ultrasound model was strongly correlated to cell death determined histologically posttreatment (r2 = 0.74. CONCLUSION: The Gaussian form factor model–based scattering parameters can potentially be used to track the extent of cell death at clinically relevant frequencies (7 MHz. The 20-MHz results agreed with previous findings in which parameters related to the backscatter intensity (i.e., AAC increased with cell death. The findings suggested that, in addition to the backscatter coefficient parameter ∆AAC, biological features including tumor heterogeneity and initial tumor volume were important factors in the prediction of cell death response.

  10. Structurally Novel Antiestrogens Elicit Differential Responses from Constitutively Active Mutant Estrogen Receptors in Breast Cancer Cells and Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuechao; Laws, Mary J; Guillen, Valeria Sanabria; Ziegler, Yvonne; Min, Jian; Sharma, Abhishek; Kim, Sung Hoon; Chu, David; Park, Ben Ho; Oesterreich, Steffi; Mao, Chengjian; Shapiro, David J; Nettles, Kendall W; Katzenellenbogen, John A; Katzenellenbogen, Benita S

    2017-10-15

    Many estrogen receptor α (ERα)-positive breast cancers develop resistance to endocrine therapy via mutation of ERs whose constitutive activation is associated with shorter patient survival. Because there is now a clinical need for new antiestrogens (AE) against these mutant ERs, we describe here our development and characterization of three chemically novel AEs that effectively suppress proliferation of breast cancer cells and tumors. Our AEs are effective against wild-type and Y537S and D538G ERs, the two most commonly occurring constitutively active ERs. The three new AEs suppressed proliferation and estrogen target gene expression in WT and mutant ER-containing cells and were more effective in D538G than in Y537S cells and tumors. Compared with WT ER, mutants exhibited approximately 10- to 20-fold lower binding affinity for AE and a reduced ability to be blocked in coactivator interaction, likely contributing to their relative resistance to inhibition by AE. Comparisons between mutant ER-containing MCF7 and T47D cells revealed that AE responses were compound, cell-type, and ERα-mutant dependent. These new ligands have favorable pharmacokinetic properties and effectively suppressed growth of WT and mutant ER-expressing tumor xenografts in NOD/SCID-γ mice after oral or subcutaneous administration; D538G tumors were more potently inhibited by AE than Y537S tumors. These studies highlight the differential responsiveness of the mutant ERs to different AEs and make clear the value of having a toolkit of AEs for treatment of endocrine therapy-resistant tumors driven by different constitutively active ERs. Cancer Res; 77(20); 5602-13. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. Targeting of GIT1 by miR-149* in breast cancer suppresses cell proliferation and metastasis in vitro and tumor growth in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Y

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Yan Dong,1,* Cai Chang,2,* Jingtian Liu,3 Jinwei Qiang4 1Department of Ultrasonography, Jinshan Hospital, 2Department of Ultrasonography, Cancer Center, 3Department of General Surgery, 4Department of Radiology, Jinshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Breast cancer remains a major cause of cancer-related death in women worldwide. Dysregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs is involved in the initiation and progression of breast cancer. Moreover, it was found that GIT1 was widely involved in the development of many human cancers. Herein, we aimed to investigate the expression changes of miR-149* and GIT1 and the functional effects of miR-149*/GIT1 link in breast cancer. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR and Western blot (WB were used to examine the expression levels of miR-149* and GIT1. Dual luciferase reporter assay was utilized to confirm the target interaction between miR-149* and GIT1. The biological functions, including cell proliferation, invasion, and migration, of miR-149* and GIT1 were determined by MTT assay and Transwell assays, respectively. Eventually, the tumor xenograft model in nude mice injected with stable transfected MDA-MB-231 cells was established to verify the effects of miR-149* and GIT1 on tumor growth. Our results showed that miR-149* expression was decreased, whereas GIT1 expression was increased in clinical samples of breast cancer. Based on the inverse expression trend between miR-149* and GIT1, we further demonstrated that miR-149* indeed directly targets GIT1. Subsequently, it was observed that inhibition of miR-149* significantly promoted cell proliferation, invasion, and migration, but the ability of cell proliferation, invasion, and migration was obviously declined after silencing of GIT1 in MDA-MB-231 cells transfected with miR-149* mimic and/or si-GIT1. Finally, it was also found that elevated miR-149* decelerated

  12. Osteoprotegerin mediates tumor-promoting effects of Interleukin-1beta in breast cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chung, S.T.M. (Stephanie Tsang Mui); D. Geerts (Dirk); Roseman, K. (Kim); Renaud, A. (Ashleigh); Connelly, L. (Linda)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstract__Background:__ It is widely recognized that inflammation promotes breast cancer invasion and metastasis. Given the complex nature of the breast tumor inflammatory microenvironment, much remains to be understood of the molecular mechanisms that govern these effects. We have

  13. Human breast adipose tissue: characterization of factors that change during tumor progression in human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Sabrina Johanna; Sacca, Paula Alejandra; Pistone-Creydt, Mercedes; Coló, Federico Andrés; Serra, María Florencia; Santino, Flavia Eliana; Sasso, Corina Verónica; Lopez-Fontana, Constanza Matilde; Carón, Rubén Walter; Calvo, Juan Carlos; Pistone-Creydt, Virginia

    2017-02-07

    Adipose microenvironment is involved in signaling pathways that influence breast cancer. We aim to characterize factors that are modified: 1) in tumor and non tumor human breast epithelial cell lines when incubated with conditioned media (CMs) from human breast cancer adipose tissue explants (hATT) or normal breast adipose tissue explants (hATN); 2) in hATN-CMs vs hATT-CMs; 3) in the tumor associated adipocytes vs. non tumor associated adipocytes. We used hATN or hATT- CMs on tumor and non-tumor breast cancer cell lines. We evaluated changes in versican, CD44, ADAMTS1 and Adipo R1 expression on cell lines or in the different CMs. In addition we evaluated changes in the morphology and expression of these factors in slices of the different adipose tissues. The statistical significance between different experimental conditions was evaluated by one-way ANOVA. Tukey's post-hoc tests were performed within each individual treatment. hATT-CMs increase versican, CD44, ADAMTS1 and Adipo R1 expression in breast cancer epithelial cells. Furthermore, hATT-CMs present higher levels of versican expression compared to hATN-CMs. In addition, we observed a loss of effect in cellular migration when we pre-incubated hATT-CMs with chondroitinase ABC, which cleaves GAGs chains bound to the versican core protein, thus losing the ability to bind to CD44. Adipocytes associated with the invasive front are reduced in size compared to adipocytes that are farther away. Also, hATT adipocytes express significantly higher amounts of versican, CD44 and Adipo R1, and significantly lower amounts of adiponectin and perilipin, unlike hATN adipocytes. We conclude that hATT secrete a different set of proteins compared to hATN. Furthermore, versican, a proteoglycan that is overexpressed in hATT-CMs compared to hATN-CMs, might be involved in the tumorogenic behavior observed in both cell lines employed. In addition, we may conclude that adipocytes from the tumor microenvironment show a less differentiated

  14. Enhanced antitumor activity of 6-hydroxymethylacylfulvene in combination with irinotecan and 5-fluorouracil in the HT29 human colon tumor xenograft model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britten, C D; Hilsenbeck, S G; Eckhardt, S G; Marty, J; Mangold, G; MacDonald, J R; Rowinsky, E K; Von Hoff, D D; Weitman, S

    1999-03-01

    6-Hydroxymethylacylfulvene (MGI-114) is a semisynthetic analogue of the toxin illudin S, a product of the Omphalotus mushroom. MGI-114 induces cytotoxicity in a variety of solid tumors in vivo, including the refractory HT29 human colon cancer xenograft. In this study, the potential application of MGI-114 in the treatment of colon cancer was further explored by evaluating the activity of MGI-114 in combination with irinotecan (CPT-11) and 5-fluorouracil (5FU). Groups of 9 nude mice bearing HT29 xenografts were treated with either single agent MGI-114, CPT-11, or 5FU, or MGI-114 in combination with CPT-11 or 5FU. MGI-114 was administered at doses of 3.5 and 7 mg/kg i.p. daily on days 1 through 5, and CPT-11 and 5FU were administered at doses of 50 and 100 mg/kg i.p. on days 1, 12, and 19. In the single agent studies, MGI-114, CPT-11, and 5FU all resulted in decreased final tumor weights compared with vehicle-treated controls (P<0.05), but only MGI-114 at 7 mg/kg produced partial responses. When MGI-114 at 3.5 mg/kg was combined with CPT-11, significant decrements in final tumor weights occurred compared with monotherapy with the same doses of MGI-114 and CPT-11 (P< or =0.001). Also, administration of the low-dose combination (MGI-114 at 35 mg/kg and CPT-11 at 50 mg/kg) resulted in final tumor weights similar to those achieved after administration of high-dose MGI-114 as a single agent. Moreover, the combination of MGI-114 and CPT-11 produced partial responses in nearly all of the animals, with some animals achieving complete responses. The outcome with the combination of MGI-114 and 5FU was less striking, with fewer partial responses and no complete responses. These results suggest enhanced activity when MGI-114 is combined with CPT-11, and clinical trials to further evaluate this combination regimen are planned.

  15. CR108, a novel vitamin K3 derivative induces apoptosis and breast tumor inhibition by reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Chun-Ru [Department of Biological Science and Technology, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30068, Taiwan (China); Liao, Wei-Siang [Institute of Molecular Medicine and Bioengineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30068, Taiwan (China); Wu, Ya-Hui [Department of Biological Science and Technology, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30068, Taiwan (China); Murugan, Kaliyappan [Department of Chemistry, National Dong Hwa University, Hualien 974, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chinpiao, E-mail: chinpiao@mail.ndhu.edu.tw [Department of Chemistry, National Dong Hwa University, Hualien 974, Taiwan (China); Chao, Jui-I, E-mail: jichao@faculty.nctu.edu.tw [Department of Biological Science and Technology, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30068, Taiwan (China); Institute of Molecular Medicine and Bioengineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30068, Taiwan (China)

    2013-12-15

    Vitamin K3 derivatives have been shown to exert anticancer activities. Here we show a novel vitamin K3 derivative (S)-2-(2-hydroxy-3-methylbutylthio)naphthalene-1,4-dione, which is named as CR108 that induces apoptosis and tumor inhibition through reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondrial dysfunction in human breast cancer. CR108 is more effective on the breast cancer cell death than other vitamin K3 derivatives. Moreover, CR108 induced apoptosis in both the non-HER-2-overexpressed MCF-7 and HER-2-overexpressed BT-474 breast cancer cells. CR108 caused the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c released from mitochondria to cytosol, and cleaved PARP proteins for apoptosis induction. CR108 markedly increased ROS levels in breast cancer cells. N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a general ROS scavenger, completely blocked the CR108-induced ROS levels, mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis. Interestingly, CR108 increased the phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase but conversely inhibited the survivin protein expression. NAC treatment prevented the activation of p38 MAP kinase and rescued the survivin protein levels. SB202190, a specific p38 MAP kinase inhibitor, recovered the survivin protein levels and attenuated the cytotoxicity of CR108-treated cells. Furthermore, CR108 inhibited the xenografted human breast tumor growth in nude mice. Together, we demonstrate that CR108 is a novel vitamin K3 derivative that induces apoptosis and tumor inhibition by ROS production and mitochondrial dysfunction and associates with the phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase and the inhibition of survivin in the human breast cancer. - Highlights: • CR108 is more effective on the cell death than other vitamin K3 derivatives. • CR108 induces apoptosis and tumor inhibition by ROS and mitochondrial dysfunction. • CR108 induces apoptosis by p38 kinase activation and survivin inhibition. • CR108 is a potent vitamin K3 analog that can develop for breast cancer therapy.

  16. Reduced 64Cu uptake and tumor growth inhibition by knockdown of human copper transporter 1 in xenograft mouse model of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Huawei; Wu, Jiu-sheng; Muzik, Otto; Hsieh, Jer-Tsong; Lee, Robert J; Peng, Fangyu

    2014-04-01

    Copper is an element required for cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Human prostate cancer xenografts with increased (64)Cu radioactivity were visualized previously by PET using (64)CuCl2 as a radiotracer ((64)CuCl2 PET). This study aimed to determine whether the increased tumor (64)Cu radioactivity was due to increased cellular uptake of (64)Cu mediated by human copper transporter 1 (hCtr1) or simply due to nonspecific binding of ionic (64)CuCl2 to tumor tissue. In addition, the functional role of hCtr1 in proliferation of prostate cancer cells and tumor growth was also assessed. A lentiviral vector encoding short-hairpin RNA specific for hCtr1 (Lenti-hCtr1-shRNA) was constructed for RNA interference-mediated knockdown of hCtr1 expression in prostate cancer cells. The degree of hCtr1 knockdown was determined by Western blot, and the effect of hCtr1 knockdown on copper uptake and proliferation were examined in vitro by cellular (64)Cu uptake and cell proliferation assays. The effects of hCtr1 knockdown on tumor uptake of (64)Cu were determined by PET quantification and tissue radioactivity assay. The effects of hCtr1 knockdown on tumor growth were assessed by PET/CT and tumor size measurement with a caliper. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of hCtr1 was associated with the reduced cellular uptake of (64)Cu and the suppression of prostate cancer cell proliferation in vitro. At 24 h after intravenous injection of the tracer (64)CuCl2, the (64)Cu uptake by the tumors with knockdown of hCtr1 (4.02 ± 0.31 percentage injected dose per gram [%ID/g] in Lenti-hCtr1-shRNA-PC-3 and 2.30 ± 0.59 %ID/g in Lenti-hCtr1-shRNA-DU-145) was significantly lower than the (64)Cu uptake by the control tumors without knockdown of hCtr1 (7.21 ± 1.48 %ID/g in Lenti-SCR-shRNA-PC-3 and 5.57 ± 1.20 %ID/g in Lenti-SCR-shRNA-DU-145, P cancer xenograft tumors with knockdown of hCtr1 (179 ± 111 mm(3) for Lenti-hCtr1-shRNA-PC-3 or 39 ± 22 mm(3) for Lenti-hCtr1-shRNA-DU-145) were

  17. A pharmacologic inhibitor of the protease Taspase1 effectively inhibits breast and brain tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, David Y; Lee, Yishan; Van Tine, Brian A; Searleman, Adam C; Westergard, Todd D; Liu, Han; Tu, Ho-Chou; Takeda, Shugaku; Dong, Yiyu; Piwnica-Worms, David R; Oh, Kyoung J; Korsmeyer, Stanley J; Hermone, Ann; Gussio, Richard; Shoemaker, Robert H; Cheng, Emily H-Y; Hsieh, James J-D

    2012-02-01

    The threonine endopeptidase Taspase1 has a critical role in cancer cell proliferation and apoptosis. In this study, we developed and evaluated small molecule inhibitors of Taspase1 as a new candidate class of therapeutic modalities. Genetic deletion of Taspase1 in the mouse produced no overt deficiencies, suggesting the possibility of a wide therapeutic index for use of Taspase1 inhibitors in cancers. We defined the peptidyl motifs recognized by Taspase1 and conducted a cell-based dual-fluorescent proteolytic screen of the National Cancer Institute diversity library to identify Taspase1 inhibitors (TASPIN). On the basis of secondary and tertiary screens the 4-[(4-arsonophenyl)methyl]phenyl] arsonic acid NSC48300 was determined to be the most specific active compound. Structure-activity relationship studies indicated a crucial role for the arsenic acid moiety in mediating Taspase1 inhibition. Additional fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based kinetic analysis characterized NSC48300 as a reversible, noncompetitive inhibitor of Taspase1 (K(i) = 4.22 μmol/L). In the MMTV-neu mouse model of breast cancer and the U251 xenograft model of brain cancer, NSC48300 produced effective tumor growth inhibition. Our results offer an initial preclinical proof-of-concept to develop TASPINs for cancer therapy. ©2011 AACR.

  18. The expression of succinate dehydrogenase in breast phyllodes tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Junjeong; Kim, Do Hee; Jung, WooHee; Koo, Ja Seung

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the expression of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH)A, SDHB, and HIF-1α in phyllodes tumors and the association with clinic-pathologic factors. Using tissue microarray (TMA) for 206 phyllodes tumor cases, we performed immunohistochemical stains for SDHA, SDHB, and HIF-1α and analyzed their expression in regard to clinicopathologic parameters of each case. The cases were comprised of 156 benign, 34 borderline, and 16 malignant phyllodes tumors. The expression of stromal SDHA and epithelial- and stromal- SDHB increased as the tumor progressed from benign to malignant (P⟨0.001). There were five stromal SDHA-negative cases and 31 stromal SDHB-negative cases. SDHB negativity was associated with a lower histologic grade (P=0.054) and lower stromal atypia (P=0.048). Univariate analysis revealed that a shorter disease free survival (DFS) was associated with stromal SDHB high-positivity (P=0.013) and a shorter overall survival (OS) was associated with high-positivity of stromal SDHA and SDHB (P⟨0.001 and P⟨0.001, respectively). The multivariate Cox analysis with the variables stromal cellularity, stromal atypia, stromal mitosis, stromal overgrowth, tumor margin, stromal SDHA expression, and stromal SDHB expression revealed that stromal overgrowth was associated with a shorter DFS (hazard ratio: 24.78, 95% CI: 3.126-196.5, P=0.002) and a shorter OS (hazard ratio: 176.7, 95% CI: 8.466-3691, P=0.001). In conclusion, Tumor grade is positively correlated with SDHA and SDHB expression in the tumor stroma in phyllodes tumors of the breast. This result may be attributed to the increased metabolic demand in high grade tumors.

  19. Compartment-specific activation of PPARγ governs breast cancer tumor growth, via metabolic reprogramming and symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avena, Paola; Anselmo, Wanda; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Wang, Chenguang; Pestell, Richard G; Lamb, Rebecca S; Hulit, James; Casaburi, Ivan; Andò, Sebastiano; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Lisanti, Michael P; Sotgia, Federica

    2013-05-01

    The role of PPARγ in cancer therapy is controversial, with studies showing either pro-tumorigenic or antineoplastic effects. This debate is very clinically relevant, because PPARγ agonists are used as antidiabetic drugs. Here, we evaluated if the effects of PPARγ on tumorigenesis are determined by the cell type in which PPARγ is activated. Second, we examined if the metabolic changes induced by PPARγ, such as glycolysis and autophagy, play any role in the tumorigenic process. To this end, PPARγ was overexpressed in breast cancer cells or in stromal cells. PPARγ-overexpressing cells were examined with respect to (1) their tumorigenic potential, using xenograft models, and (2) regarding their metabolic features. In xenograft models, we show that when PPARγ is activated in cancer cells, tumor growth is inhibited by 40%. However, when PPARγ is activated in stromal cells, the growth of co-injected breast cancer cells is enhanced by 60%. Thus, the effect(s) of PPARγ on tumorigenesis are dependent on the cell compartment in which PPARγ is activated. Mechanistically, stromal cells with activated PPARγ display metabolic features of cancer-associated fibroblasts, with increased autophagy, glycolysis and senescence. Indeed, fibroblasts overexpressing PPARγ show increased expression of autophagic markers, increased numbers of acidic autophagic vacuoles, increased production of L-lactate, cell hypertrophy and mitochondrial dysfunction. In addition, PPARγ fibroblasts show increased expression of CDKs (p16/p21) and β-galactosidase, which are markers of cell cycle arrest and senescence. Finally, PPARγ induces the activation of the two major transcription factors that promote autophagy and glycolysis, i.e., HIF-1α and NFκB, in stromal cells. Thus, PPARγ activation in stromal cells results in the formation of a catabolic pro-inflammatory microenvironment that metabolically supports cancer growth. Interestingly, the tumor inhibition observed when PPARγ is

  20. Evaluation of the therapeutic efficacy of a VEGFR2-blocking antibody using sodium-iodide symporter molecular imaging in a tumor xenograft model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheong, Su-Jin; Lee, Chang-Moon; Kim, Eun-Mi [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju-si, Jeonbuk 561-712 (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute of Clinical Medicine, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju-si, Jeonbuk 561-712 (Korea, Republic of); Cyclotron Research Center, Chonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonju-si, Jeonbuk 561-712 (Korea, Republic of); Uhm, Tai-Boong [Faculty of Biological Science, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju-si, jeonbuk 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Hwan-Jeong, E-mail: jayjeong@chonbuk.ac.k [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju-si, Jeonbuk 561-712 (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute of Clinical Medicine, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju-si, Jeonbuk 561-712 (Korea, Republic of); Cyclotron Research Center, Chonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonju-si, Jeonbuk 561-712 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Wook; Lim, Seok Tae; Sohn, Myung-Hee [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju-si, Jeonbuk 561-712 (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute of Clinical Medicine, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju-si, Jeonbuk 561-712 (Korea, Republic of); Cyclotron Research Center, Chonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonju-si, Jeonbuk 561-712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2-blocking antibody (DC101) has inhibitory effects on tumor growth and angiogenesis in vivo. The human sodium/iodide symporter (hNIS) gene has been shown to be a useful molecular imaging reporter gene. Here, we investigated the evaluation of therapeutic efficacy by molecular imaging in reporter gene transfected tumor xenografts using a gamma imaging system. Methods: The hNIS gene was transfected into MDA-MB-231 cells using Lipofectamine. The correlation between the number of MDA-MB-231-hNIS cells and the uptake of {sup 99m}Tc-pertechnetate or {sup 125}I was investigated in vitro by gamma imaging and counting. MDA-MB-231-hNIS cells were injected subcutaneously into mice. When the tumor volume reached 180-200 mm{sup 3}, we randomly assigned five animals to each of three groups representing different tumor therapies; no DC101 (control), 100 {mu}g, or 150 {mu}g DC101/mouse. One week and 2 weeks after the first injection of DC101, gamma imaging was performed. Mice were sacrificed 2 weeks after the first injection of DC101. The tumor tissues were used for reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and CD31 staining. Results: Uptake of {sup 125}I and {sup 99m}Tc-pertechnetate into MDA-MB-231-hNIS cells in vitro showed correlation with the number of cells. In DC101 treatment groups, the mean tumor volume was smaller than that of the control mice. Furthermore, tumor uptake of {sup 125}I was lower than in the controls. The CD31 staining and RT-PCR assay results showed that vessel formation and expression of the hNIS gene were significantly reduced in the tumor tissues of treatment groups. Conclusion: This study demonstrated the power of molecular imaging using a gamma imaging system for evaluating the therapeutic efficacy of an antitumor treatment. Molecular imaging systems may be useful in evaluation and development of effective diagnostic and/or therapeutic antibodies for specific target molecules.

  1. Radiolabeling of substance P with Lutetium-177 and biodistribution study in AR42J pancreatic tumor xenografted Nude mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Bortoleti de; Pujatti, Priscilla Brunelli; Barrio, Ofelia; Caldeira, Jose S.; Mengatti, Jair, E-mail: ebaraujo@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Radiopharmacy Center; Suzuki, Miriam F. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Biotecnologia

    2008-07-01

    Pancreatic tumor (PT) is a neuroendocrine neoplasm that usually origin metastases in the respiratory and gastrointestinal tract. In recent years, new developments in targeted therapies have emerged and the presence of peptide receptors at the cell membrane of PT constitutes the basis of the clinical use of specific radiolabeled ligands. Substance P, an 11-amino acid peptide which has an important role in modulating pain transmission trough neurokinin 1 and 2 receptors (NKr), may play a role in the pathogenesis of PT, because approximately 10% of these tumors over express NKr. The aim of the present work was to produce a pure and stable SP analog (DOTA-SP) radiolabeled with Lutetium-177 ({sup 177}Lu), and to evaluate its in vivo target to AR42J pancreatic tumor cells in Nude mice in other to verify if SP can be used in this pancreatic tumor detection and treatment. {sup 177}Lu (half-life 6.7 days) has both β and γ-emissions suitable for radiotherapy and imaging respectively. Substance P was successfully labeled with high yield (>99%) at optimized conditions and kept stable for more than 72 hours at 4 deg C and 24 hours in human plasma. Biodistribution studies showed that SP excretion was mainly performed by renal pathway. In addition, {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-SP showed higher uptake by tumor than normal pancreas, indicating the presence of NK receptors in AR42J pancreatic tumor. (author)

  2. Inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation and tumor angiogenesis by up-regulating NDRG2 expression in breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Ma

    Full Text Available The N-myc downstream-regulated gene 2 (NDRG2 is involved in tumor cell differentiation and apoptosis, but its function in tumor angiogenesis remains to be established. Here, we employed adenovirus overexpressing NDRG2 (Ad-NDRG2 to efficiently up-regulate target gene expression in the NDRG2-low-expressing, breast cancer cell line MCF-7. Moreover, VEGF secretion was decreased in MCF-7 cells infected by Ad-NDRG2, and medium conditioned by these infected cells could significantly inhibit the proliferation, tube formation and invasion of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. Further study indicated that the angiogenesis promoting factors VEGF and HIF-1α were down-regulated, whereas the angiogenesis suppressing factors p53 and VHL were up-regulated in MCF-7 cells infected by Ad-NDRG2. Finally, in a nude mouse model, intratumoral injections of Ad-NDRG2 every 3 days for 20 days significantly inhibited the growth and angiogenesis of xenografted MCF-7 tumors. In summary, these data indicate that NDRG2 may be involved in angiogenesis by impacting the expression of angiogenesis related factors. Thus, specific overexpression of NDRG2 by adenovirus represents a promising approach for the treatment of tumor angiogenesis.

  3. Breast Tumor Classification Based on a Computerized Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System Feature System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Mengyun; Hu, Yuzhou; Guo, Yi; Wang, Yuanyuan; Yu, Jinhua

    2017-08-14

    This work focused on extracting novel and validated digital high-throughput features to present a detailed and comprehensive description of the American College of Radiology Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) with the goal of improving the accuracy of ultrasound breast cancer diagnosis. First, the phase congruency approach was used to segment the tumors automatically. Second, high-throughput features were designed and extracted on the basis of each BI-RADS category. Then features were selected based on the basis of a Student t test and genetic algorithm. Finally, the AdaBoost classifier was used to differentiate benign tumors from malignant ones. Experiments were conducted on a database of 138 pathologically proven breast tumors. The system was compared with 6 state-of-art BI-RADS feature extraction methods. By using leave-one-out cross-validation, our system achieved a highest overall accuracy of 93.48%, a sensitivity of 94.20%, a specificity of 92.75%, and an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 95.67%, respectively, which were superior to those of other methods. The experiments demonstrated that our computerized BI-RADS feature system was capable of helping radiologists detect breast cancers more accurately and provided more guidance for final decisions. © 2017 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  4. The vitamin E analog, alpha-tocopheryloxyacetic acid enhances the anti-tumor activity of trastuzumab against HER2/neu-expressing breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penichet Manuel L

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HER2/neu is an oncogene that facilitates neoplastic transformation due to its ability to transduce growth signals in a ligand-independent manner, is over-expressed in 20-30% of human breast cancers correlating with aggressive disease and has been successfully targeted with trastuzumab (Herceptin®. Because trastuzumab alone achieves only a 15-30% response rate, it is now commonly combined with conventional chemotherapeutic drugs. While the combination of trastuzumab plus chemotherapy has greatly improved response rates and increased survival, these conventional chemotherapy drugs are frequently associated with gastrointestinal and cardiac toxicity, bone marrow and immune suppression. These drawbacks necessitate the development of new, less toxic drugs that can be combined with trastuzumab. Recently, we reported that orally administered alpha-tocopheryloxyacetic acid (α-TEA, a novel ether derivative of alpha-tocopherol, dramatically suppressed primary tumor growth and reduced the incidence of lung metastases both in a transplanted and a spontaneous mouse model of breast cancer without discernable toxicity. Methods In this study we examined the effect of α-TEA plus HER2/neu-specific antibody treatment on HER2/neu-expressing breast cancer cells in vitro and in a HER2/neu positive human xenograft tumor model in vivo. Results We show in vitro that α-TEA plus anti-HER2/neu antibody has an increased cytotoxic effect against murine mammary tumor cells and human breast cancer cells and that the anti-tumor effect of α-TEA is independent of HER2/neu status. More importantly, in a human breast cancer xenograft model, the combination of α-TEA plus trastuzumab resulted in faster tumor regression and more tumor-free animals than trastuzumab alone. Conclusion Due to the cancer cell selectivity of α-TEA, and because α-TEA kills both HER2/neu positive and HER2/neu negative breast cancer cells, it has the potential to be effective and

  5. Luteolin inhibits progestin-dependent angiogenesis, stem cell-like characteristics, and growth of human breast cancer xenografts

    OpenAIRE

    Cook, Matthew T.; Liang, Yayun; BESCH-WILLIFORD, CYNTHIA; Goyette, Sandy; Mafuvadze, Benford; Hyder, Salman M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Clinical trials and epidemiological evidence have shown that combined estrogen/progestin hormone replacement therapy, but not estrogen therapy alone, increases breast cancer risk in post-menopausal women. Previously we have shown that natural and synthetic progestins, including the widely used synthetic progestin medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA), increase production of a potent angiogenic factor, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), in human breast cancer cells, potentially pro...

  6. An orthotopic xenograft model for high-risk non-muscle invasive bladder cancer in mice: influence of mouse strain, tumor cell count, dwell time and bladder pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebner, Doreen; Rieger, Christiane; Bergmann, Ralf; Ullrich, Martin; Meister, Sebastian; Toma, Marieta; Wiedemuth, Ralf; Temme, Achim; Novotny, Vladimir; Wirth, Manfred P; Bachmann, Michael; Pietzsch, Jens; Fuessel, Susanne

    2017-11-23

    Novel theranostic options for high-risk non-muscle invasive bladder cancer are urgently needed. This requires a thorough evaluation of experimental approaches in animal models best possibly reflecting human disease before entering clinical studies. Although several bladder cancer xenograft models were used in the literature, the establishment of an orthotopic bladder cancer model in mice remains challenging. Luciferase-transduced UM-UC-3LUCK1 bladder cancer cells were instilled transurethrally via 24G permanent venous catheters into athymic NMRI and BALB/c nude mice as well as into SCID-beige mice. Besides the mouse strain, the pretreatment of the bladder wall (trypsin or poly-L-lysine), tumor cell count (0.5 × 106-5.0 × 106) and tumor cell dwell time in the murine bladder (30 min - 2 h) were varied. Tumors were morphologically and functionally visualized using bioluminescence imaging (BLI), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography (PET). Immunodeficiency of the mouse strains was the most important factor influencing cancer cell engraftment, whereas modifying cell count and instillation time allowed fine-tuning of the BLI signal start and duration - both representing the possible treatment period for the evaluation of new therapeutics. Best orthotopic tumor growth was achieved by transurethral instillation of 1.0 × 106 UM-UC-3LUCK1 bladder cancer cells into SCID-beige mice for 2 h after bladder pretreatment with poly-L-lysine. A pilot PET experiment using 68Ga-cetuximab as transurethrally administered radiotracer revealed functional expression of epidermal growth factor receptor as representative molecular characteristic of engrafted cancer cells in the bladder. With the optimized protocol in SCID-beige mice an applicable and reliable model of high-risk non-muscle invasive bladder cancer for the development of novel theranostic approaches was established.

  7. Human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER-1:HER-3) Fc-mediated heterodimer has broad antiproliferative activity in vitro and in human tumor xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarup, Jay; Jin, Pei; Turin, Lisa; Bai, Xiaomei; Beryt, Malgorzata; Brdlik, Cathleen; Higaki, Jeffrey N; Jorgensen, Brett; Lau, Francis W; Lindley, Peter; Liu, Jim; Ni, Irene; Rozzelle, James; Kumari, Rajendra; Watson, Susan A; Zhang, Juan; Shepard, H Michael

    2008-10-01

    All four members of the human epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (HER) family are implicated in human cancers. Although efficacious in a subset of patients, resistance to single-targeted anti-HER therapy [i.e., cetuximab (Erbitux) and trastuzumab (Herceptin)] is often associated with coexpression of other HER family members. This may be overcome by a HER ligand binding molecule that sequesters multiple EGF-like ligands, preventing ligand-dependent receptor activation. Toward this end, we have combined the HER-1/EGFR and HER-3 ligand binding domains, dimerized with fusion of an Fc fragment of human IgG1. This resulted in a mixture of HER-1/Fc homodimer (HFD100), HER-3/Fc homodimer (HFD300), and HER-1/Fc:HER-3/Fc heterodimer (RB200), also termed Hermodulins. The purified first-generation RB200 bound EGF and neuregulin 1 (NRG1)-beta1 ligands, determined by cross-linking and direct binding studies. The binding affinity for both was approximately 10 nmol/L by dissociation-enhanced lanthanide fluorescence immunoassay using europium (Eu)-labeled ligands. Competition studies with RB200 using Eu-EGF or Eu-NRG1-beta1 revealed that RB200 bound HER-1 ligands, including transforming growth factor-alpha and heparin-binding EGF, and HER-3 ligands NRG1-alpha and NRG1-beta3. RB200 inhibited EGF- and NRG1-beta1-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of HER family proteins, proliferation of a diverse range of tumor cells in monolayer cell growth assays, tumor cell proliferation as a single agent and in synergy with tyrosine kinase inhibitors, lysophosphatidic acid-stimulated cell proliferation, and tumor growth in two human tumor xenograft nude mouse models. Taken together, the data reveal that RB200 has the potential to sequester multiple HER ligands and interfere with signaling by HER-1, HER-2, and HER-3.

  8. A novel toll-like receptor 9 agonist cooperates with trastuzumab in trastuzumab-resistant breast tumors through multiple mechanisms of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiano, Vincenzo; Garofalo, Sonia; Rosa, Roberta; Bianco, Roberto; Caputo, Rosa; Gelardi, Teresa; Merola, Gerardina; Racioppi, Luigi; Garbi, Corrado; Kandimalla, Ekambar R; Agrawal, Sudhir; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2009-11-15

    Resistance to anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody trastuzumab is a relevant issue in breast cancer patients. Among the mechanisms implicated in trastuzumab resistance, increasing evidence supports a role of tumor microenvironment. We previously found that a novel toll-like receptor 9 agonist, referred to as immune modulatory oligonucleotide (IMO) and currently under clinical investigation, acts through epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and shows direct antiangiogenic effects by cooperating with anti-EGFR or anti-VEGF drugs, thus interfering with cancer cells and microenvironment. In this study, we used KPL-4 and JIMT-1 trastuzumab-resistant breast cancer cells to evaluate the combination IMO plus trastuzumab as a therapeutic option for trastuzumab-resistant breast cancers. IMO inhibits KPL-4 and JIMT-1 xenografts growth and potentiates trastuzumab antitumor effect, with complete suppression of tumor growth, potent enhancement of trastuzumab-mediated antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, and strong inhibition of EGFR/HER2-related signaling. In KPL-4 xenografts, IMO alone interferes with HER signal transduction, whereas trastuzumab is ineffective. IMO induces an HER-dependent signal inhibition also in vitro by modulating a functional interaction between toll-like receptor 9 and HER receptors occurring at membrane level. Finally, IMO plus trastuzumab produces a cooperative antiangiogenic effect related to suppression of endothelial HER-related signaling. We showed a cooperative effect of IMO plus trastuzumab in trastuzumab-resistant breast cancers due to IMO direct antitumor and antiangiogenic activity and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity enhancement. Moreover, we provided first evidence of a toll-like receptor 9/HER interaction at membrane level as novel mechanism of action. Altogether, we propose IMO plus trastuzumab as an effective strategy in trastuzumab-resistant breast cancers.

  9. Growth inhibition by 8-chloro cyclic AMP of human HT29 colorectal and ZR-75-1 breast carcinoma xenografts is associated with selective modulation of protein kinase A isoenzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramage, A D; Langdon, S P; Ritchie, A A; Burns, D J; Miller, W R

    1995-06-01

    Significant dose-related inhibition of growth of HT29 human colorectal cancer xenografts and ZR-75-1 breast cancer xenografts in immune-suppressed mice was induced by the cyclic AMP analogue, 8-chloroadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-Cl-cyclic AMP) when given by alzet mini-pumps over a 7-day period at doses of either 50 or 100 mg/kg/day. Levels and types of cyclic AMP binding proteins were measured by ligand binding and photoaffinity labelling, respectively, in tumours harvested at the end of the treatment period. Compared with levels in tumours from control animals, values of tumour cyclic AMP binding proteins from treated animals were significantly reduced. These effects were associated with an apparent modulation of the types of cyclic AMP binding proteins, 8-Cl-cyclic AMP-treated xenografts displaying a reduced ratio of RI/RII isoforms compared with untreated control tumours.

  10. Induction of tumor necrosis factor expression and resistance in a human breast tumor cell line.

    OpenAIRE

    Spriggs, D; Imamura, K; Rodriguez, C; Horiguchi, J; Kufe, D W

    1987-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is a polypeptide cytokine that is cytotoxic to some but not all tumor cells. The basis for resistance to the cytotoxic effects of this agent remains unclear. We have studied the development of TNF resistance in human ZR-75-1 breast carcinoma cells. ZR-75-1 cells have undetectable levels of TNF RNA and protein. However, TNF transcripts are transiently induced in these cells by exposure to recombinant human TNF. This induction of TNF RNA is associated with production...

  11. Masticadienonic and 3α-OH Masticadienoic Acids Induce Apoptosis and Inhibit Cell Proliferation and Tumor Growth in Prostate Cancer Xenografts in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma. Beatriz Sánchez-Monroy

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The triterpenes have been constituted as a group of interesting molecules as possible antitumor agents. Despite several of them not presenting a potent cytotoxic activity in vitro against cancer cells, in vivo in xenotransplant tumors studies, they show promising results. Based on the above considerations, we investigated the antitumor activity of both masticadienonic (MDA and 3α-OH masticadienoic (3α-OH MDA acids in a mouse prostate cancer xenograft model. Immunohistochemical assays were used to evaluate the decrease in the expression of the Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA and the Ki-67 induced by MDA and 3α-OH MDA. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL assay was performed to demonstrate the fragmentation of DNA. Our results showed that the two triterpenes inhibited tumor growth, had anti-proliferative effect in vivo and induced cell death by apoptosis. Collectively, our data suggested that the antitumor mechanism of MDA and 3α-OH MDA involves several molecular targets related to cell proliferation and apoptosis.

  12. Anti-estrogen Resistance in Human Breast Tumors Is Driven by JAG1-NOTCH4-Dependent Cancer Stem Cell Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno M. Simões

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancers (BCs typically express estrogen receptors (ERs but frequently exhibit de novo or acquired resistance to hormonal therapies. Here, we show that short-term treatment with the anti-estrogens tamoxifen or fulvestrant decrease cell proliferation but increase BC stem cell (BCSC activity through JAG1-NOTCH4 receptor activation both in patient-derived samples and xenograft (PDX tumors. In support of this mechanism, we demonstrate that high ALDH1 predicts resistance in women treated with tamoxifen and that a NOTCH4/HES/HEY gene signature predicts for a poor response/prognosis in 2 ER+ patient cohorts. Targeting of NOTCH4 reverses the increase in Notch and BCSC activity induced by anti-estrogens. Importantly, in PDX tumors with acquired tamoxifen resistance, NOTCH4 inhibition reduced BCSC activity. Thus, we establish that BCSC and NOTCH4 activities predict both de novo and acquired tamoxifen resistance and that combining endocrine therapy with targeting JAG1-NOTCH4 overcomes resistance in human breast cancers.

  13. Multifocal and Multicentric Breast Carcinoma: A Significantly More Aggressive Tumor than Unifocal Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Zhiqiang; Wu, Yanqiu; Li, Cuiyan; Li, Xinna; Wang, Xuan; Qu, Guimei

    2017-08-01

    There are still many questions that surround multifocal or multicentric breast carcinoma (MMBC). The aim of this study was to analyze the clinicopathological characteristics of MMBC and provide feasible suggestions for therapy. A total of 156 cases of MMBC in 3,597 invasive ductal breast carcinomas were collected and reviewed. Some factors related with prognosis such as tumor size, lymph node metastasis and others were assessed in each tumor focus, and mismatches among foci were recorded. The majority of MMBC had aggregate dimensions over 2 cm (85.90%). The rate of axillary lymph node metastasis was 56.41% (88/156) compared to unifocal tumors of 33.01% (1,136/3,441). Most cases had higher Ki-67 proliferative indices (91/156). Mismatches in ER status were present in 6 cases, PR in 4 cases, proliferative index (Ki-67) in 9 cases and HER2-positive status in 2 cases. The larger aggregate dimension of tumor, the higher metastatic rate of axillary lymph node and the high Ki-67 proliferative index seen in most cases, suggest that MMBC is biologically more aggressive than unifocal breast cancer. In addition, every focus should be tested owing to the existence of different expressions of immunostaining between foci. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  14. HET is a Novel Tumor Suppressor Gene in Human Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Oesterreich, Steffi

    1999-01-01

    .... In the first specific aim we will directly answer whether HET is the tumor suppressor gene by performing additional LOB analysis and mutational analysis of BET in breast cancer cell lines as well as in tumors...

  15. Established breast cancer risk factors and risk of intrinsic tumor subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Mollie E; Boeke, Caroline E; Tamimi, Rulla M

    2015-08-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease with multiple intrinsic tumor subtypes. These subtypes vary in tumor gene expression and phenotype, and are most commonly grouped into four major subtypes: luminal A, luminal B, HER2-overexpressing and triple negative (or basal-like). A growing number of studies have evaluated the relationship between established breast cancer risk factors and risk of one or more intrinsic tumor subtypes. We conducted a systematic review of 38 studies to synthesize their results and identify areas requiring more research. Taken together, published studies suggest that most established breast cancer risk factors reflect risk factors for the luminal A subtype of breast cancer, and some breast cancer risk factors may be differentially associated with other intrinsic tumor subtypes. Future breast cancer research will need to consider etiologic differences across subtypes and design studies focused on understanding the etiology and prevention of less common tumor subtypes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Terahertz Imaging of Three-Dimensional Dehydrated Breast Cancer Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Tyler; Wu, Yuhao; Gauch, John; Campbell, Lucas K.; El-Shenawee, Magda

    2017-06-01

    This work presents the application of terahertz imaging to three-dimensional formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded human breast cancer tumors. The results demonstrate the capability of terahertz for in-depth scanning to produce cross section images without the need to slice the tumor. Samples of tumors excised from women diagnosed with infiltrating ductal carcinoma and lobular carcinoma are investigated using a pulsed terahertz time domain imaging system. A time of flight estimation is used to obtain vertical and horizontal cross section images of tumor tissues embedded in paraffin block. Strong agreement is shown comparing the terahertz images obtained by electronically scanning the tumor in-depth in comparison with histopathology images. The detection of cancer tissue inside the block is found to be accurate to depths over 1 mm. Image processing techniques are applied to provide improved contrast and automation of the obtained terahertz images. In particular, unsharp masking and edge detection methods are found to be most effective for three-dimensional block imaging.

  17. Osteoprotegerin rich tumor microenvironment: implications in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Sudeshna; Sharma-Walia, Neelam

    2016-07-05

    Osteoprotegerin (OPG) is a soluble decoy receptor for tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL). It belongs to the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily (TNFRSF). OPG was initially discovered to contribute to homeostasis of bone turnover due to its capability of binding to receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kB). However, apart from bone turnover, OPG plays important and diverse role(s) in many biological functions. Besides having anti-osteoclastic activity, OPG is thought to exert a protective anti-apoptotic action in OPG-expressing tumors by overcoming the physiologic mechanism of tumor surveillance exerted by TRAIL. Along with inhibiting TRAIL induced apoptosis, it can induce proliferation by binding to various cell surface receptors and thus turning on the canonical cell survival and proliferative pathways. OPG also induces angiogenesis, one of the hallmarks of cancer, thus facilitating tumor growth. Recently, the understanding of OPG and its different roles has been augmented substantially. This review is aimed at providing a very informative overview as to how OPG affects cancer progression especially breast cancer.

  18. AZU-1: A Candidate Breast Tumor Suppressor and Biomarker for Tumor Progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Huei-Mei; Schmeichel, Karen L; Mian, I. Saira; Lelie`vre, Sophie; Petersen, Ole W; Bissell, Mina J

    2000-02-04

    To identify genes misregulated in the final stages of breast carcinogenesis, we performed differential display to compare the gene expression patterns of the human tumorigenic mammary epithelial cells, HMT-3522-T4-2, with those of their immediate premalignant progenitors, HMT-3522-S2. We identified a novel gene, called anti-zuai-1 (AZU-1), that was abundantly expressed in non- and premalignant cells and tissues but was appreciably reduced in breast tumor cell types and in primary tumors. The AZU-1 gene encodes an acidic 571-amino-acid protein containing at least two structurally distinct domains with potential protein-binding functions: an N-terminal serine and proline-rich domain with a predicted immunoglobulin-like fold and a C-terminal coiled-coil domain. In HMT-3522 cells, the bulk of AZU-1 protein resided in a detergent-extractable cytoplasmic pool and was present at much lower levels in tumorigenic T4-2 cells than in their nonmalignant counterparts. Reversion of the tumorigenic phenotype of T4-2 cells, by means described previously, was accompanied by the up-regulation of AZU-1. In addition, reexpression of AZU-1 in T4-2 cells, using viral vectors, was sufficient to reduce their malignant phenotype substantially, both in culture and in vivo. These results indicate that AZU-1 is a candidate breast tumor suppressor that may exert its effects by promoting correct tissue morphogenesis.

  19. GT198 Expression Defines Mutant Tumor Stroma in Human Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zheqiong; Peng, Min; Cheng, Liang; Jones, Kimya; Maihle, Nita J; Mivechi, Nahid F; Ko, Lan

    2016-05-01

    Human breast cancer precursor cells remain to be elucidated. Using breast cancer gene product GT198 (PSMC3IP; alias TBPIP or Hop2) as a unique marker, we revealed the cellular identities of GT198 mutant cells in human breast tumor stroma. GT198 is a steroid hormone receptor coactivator and a crucial factor in DNA repair. Germline mutations in GT198 are present in breast and ovarian cancer families. Somatic mutations in GT198 are present in ovarian tumor stromal cells. Herein, we show that human breast tumor stromal cells carry GT198 somatic mutations and express cytoplasmic GT198 protein. GT198(+) stromal cells share vascular smooth muscle cell origin, including myoepithelial cells, adipocytes, capillary pericytes, and stromal fibroblasts. Frequent GT198 mutations are associated with GT198(+) tumor stroma but not with GT198(-) tumor cells. GT198(+) progenitor cells are mostly capillary pericytes. When tested in cultured cells, mutant GT198 induces vascular endothelial growth factor promoter, and potentially promotes angiogenesis and adipogenesis. Our results suggest that multiple lineages of breast tumor stromal cells are mutated in GT198. These findings imply the presence of mutant progenitors, whereas their descendants, carrying the same GT198 mutations, are collectively responsible for forming breast tumor microenvironment. GT198 expression is, therefore, a specific marker of mutant breast tumor stroma and has the potential to facilitate diagnosis and targeted treatment of human breast cancer. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Pleomorphic liposarcoma arising in a malignant phyllodes tumor of breast: A rare occurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancheti, Sankalp M; Sawaimoon, Satyakam K; Ahmed, Rosina

    2015-01-01

    Primary malignant phyllodes tumor of the breast accounts for 0.3-1% of all the tumors of breast and only a couple of cases of pleomorphic liposarcoma (PL) arising in a malignant phyllodes (MP) tumor have been reported. A thorough sampling is most essential in phyllodes tumor, not only to detect high grade component of the neoplasm but also to diagnose heterologous elements in the same lesion elsewhere, as it may affect the prognosis adversely and may have a greater metastatic potential.

  1. Mechanisms of Cell Killing Response from Low Linear Energy Transfer (LET Radiation Originating from 177Lu Radioimmunotherapy Targeting Disseminated Intraperitoneal Tumor Xenografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwon Joong Yong

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Radiolabeled antibodies (mAbs provide efficient tools for cancer therapy. The combination of low energy β−-emissions (500 keVmax; 130 keVave along with a γ-emission for imaging makes 177Lu (T1/2 = 6.7 day a suitable radionuclide for radioimmunotherapy (RIT of tumor burdens possibly too large to treat with α-particle radiation. RIT with 177Lu-trastuzumab has proven to be effective for treatment of disseminated HER2 positive peritoneal disease in a pre-clinical model. To elucidate mechanisms originating from this RIT therapy at the molecular level, tumor bearing mice (LS-174T intraperitoneal xenografts were treated with 177Lu-trastuzumab comparatively to animals treated with a non-specific control, 177Lu-HuIgG, and then to prior published results obtained using 212Pb-trastuzumab, an α-particle RIT agent. 177Lu-trastuzumab induced cell death via DNA double strand breaks (DSB, caspase-3 apoptosis, and interfered with DNA-PK expression, which is associated with the repair of DNA non-homologous end joining damage. This contrasts to prior results, wherein 212Pb-trastuzumab was found to down-regulate RAD51, which is involved with homologous recombination DNA damage repair. 177Lu-trastuzumab therapy was associated with significant chromosomal disruption and up-regulation of genes in the apoptotic process. These results suggest an inhibition of the repair mechanism specific to the type of radiation damage being inflicted by either high or low linear energy transfer radiation. Understanding the mechanisms of action of β−- and α-particle RIT comparatively through an in vivo tumor environment offers real information suitable to enhance combination therapy regimens involving α- and β−-particle RIT for the management of intraperitoneal disease.

  2. Applying near-infrared photoimmunotherapy to B-cell lymphoma: comparative evaluation with radioimmunotherapy in tumor xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heryanto, Yusri-Dwi; Hanaoka, Hirofumi; Nakajima, Takahito; Yamaguchi, Aiko; Tsushima, Yoshito

    2017-11-01

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) has proven effective for patients with relapsed and refractory lymphoma. However, new types of therapy are strongly desired as B-cell lymphoma remains incurable for many patients. Photoimmunotherapy (PIT) is an emerging targeted cancer therapy that uses photosensitizer (IR700)-conjugated monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to specifically kill cancer cells. To evaluate the usefulness and potential role of PIT for treating B-cell lymphoma in a comparison with RIT, we performed in vivo PIT and RIT studies with an IR700 or (90)Y-conjugated anti-CD20 mAb, NuB2. IR700 or (90)Y were conjugated to NuB2. Since cell aggressiveness greatly affects the therapeutic effect, we selected both an indolent (RPMI 1788) and an aggressive (Ramos) type of B-cell lymphoma cell line. The in vitro therapeutic effect of PIT and the biodistribution profiles of IR700-NuB2 were evaluated. In vivo PIT and RIT studies were performed with 100 or 500 μg of IR700-NuB2 and 150 μCi/20 μg of (90)Y-NuB2, respectively, in two types of B-cell lymphoma-bearing mice. The in vitro studies revealed that Ramos was more sensitive than RPMI 1788 to PIT. The therapeutic effect of PIT with 500 µg IR700-NuB2 was superior to any other therapies against aggressive Ramos tumors, whereas RIT showed the highest therapeutic effect in indolent RPMI 1788 tumors. Since the uptake levels and intratumoral distribution of IR700-NuB2 were comparable in both tumors, a possible cause of this difference is the tumor growth rate. The PIT with 500 µg (IR700-NuB2) group showed a significantly greater therapeutic effect than the PIT with 100 µg group due to the higher and more homogeneous tumor distribution of IR700-NuB2. PIT was effective for both indolent and aggressive B-cell lymphoma, and the higher dose provided a better therapeutic effect. In aggressive tumors, PIT was more effective than RIT. Thus, PIT would be a promising strategy for the locoregional treatment or control of B-cell lymphoma

  3. Problems of diagnostics and treatment of breast phyllodes tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Shu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The study revealed that in case of standard survey of patients with phyllodes tumors (PT, mistakes are made in 66 % of cases. The use of a sonoelastography and ultrasonography with contrasting allows avoiding errors in most cases. Long-term results of treatment correlate with the PT subgroup. Recurrence–free (overall survival figures in case of benign PT are reliably higher than in case of malignant PT. Limited excision of the tumor is followed by highly frequent local recurrence in case of any subgroup of PT (30 %. Lumpectomy is also followed by highly frequent local recurrence that first of all concerns malignant PT (57 %. The main options for surgical treatment of malignant PT are breast amputation or a mastectomy.

  4. Correlation of primary tumor size and axillary nodal status with tumor suppressor gene p53 in breast carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Topić Brano

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Correlation of standard path morphological prognostic parameters, primary tumor size and axillary nodal status with new prognostic factor in breast carcinoma: tumor suppressor gene p53 was analyzed. The studied sample included 65 women who underwent surgery for breast carcinoma at the Surgical Clinic of Clinical Center Banja Luka, from January 1st 1997 till January 1st 1999. Statistical data analysis was performed and correlation of prognostic factors was determined. The majority of authors in this field agree that the primary tumor size and axillary nodal status are the two most important prognostic factors. These factors are the best predictors of prognosis and survival of women who had the tumor and were operated on. Tumor markers were immunohistochemically determined in the last ten years and, according to the majority of authors, are still considered the additional or relative prognostic factors in breast carcinoma. Their prognostic value and significance increase almost daily. Most frequently determined tumor markers are bcl-2, pS2, Ki-67 and p53. There was a positive, directly proportional relationship between primary tumor size and tumor suppressor gene p53, but there was no positive correlation between the axillary nodal status and tumor suppressor gene p53. Significance of determination of new tumor markers as the prognostic factors was emphasized. These markers represent a powerful tool in the early detection and prevention of breast carcinoma.

  5. Automatic outer and inner breast tissue segmentation using multi-parametric MRI images of breast tumor patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakran, Snekha; Chatterjee, Subhajit; Singhal, Meenakshi; Gupta, Rakesh Kumar; Singh, Anup

    2018-01-01

    The objectives of the study were to develop a framework for automatic outer and inner breast tissue segmentation using multi-parametric MRI images of the breast tumor patients; and to perform breast density and tumor tissue analysis. MRI of the breast was performed on 30 patients at 3T-MRI. T1, T2 and PD-weighted(W) images, with and without fat saturation(WWFS), and dynamic-contrast-enhanced(DCE)-MRI data were acquired. The proposed automatic segmentation approach was performed in two steps. In step-1, outer segmentation of breast tissue from rest of body parts was performed on structural images (T2-W/T1-W/PD-W without fat saturation images) using automatic landmarks detection technique based on operations like profile screening, Otsu thresholding, morphological operations and empirical observation. In step-2, inner segmentation of breast tissue into fibro-glandular(FG), fatty and tumor tissue was performed. For validation of breast tissue segmentation, manual segmentation was carried out by two radiologists and similarity coefficients(Dice and Jaccard) were computed for outer as well as inner tissues. FG density and tumor volume were also computed and analyzed. The proposed outer and inner segmentation approach worked well for all the subjects and was validated by two radiologists. The average Dice and Jaccard coefficients value for outer segmentation using T2-W images, obtained by two radiologists, were 0.977 and 0.951 respectively. These coefficient values for FG tissue were 0.915 and 0.875 respectively whereas for tumor tissue, values were 0.968 and 0.95 respectively. The volume of segmented tumor ranged over 2.1 cm3-7.08 cm3. The proposed approach provided automatic outer and inner breast tissue segmentation, which enables automatic calculations of breast tissue density and tumor volume. This is a complete framework for outer and inner breast segmentation method for all structural images.

  6. Automatic outer and inner breast tissue segmentation using multi-parametric MRI images of breast tumor patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snekha Thakran

    Full Text Available The objectives of the study were to develop a framework for automatic outer and inner breast tissue segmentation using multi-parametric MRI images of the breast tumor patients; and to perform breast density and tumor tissue analysis. MRI of the breast was performed on 30 patients at 3T-MRI. T1, T2 and PD-weighted(W images, with and without fat saturation(WWFS, and dynamic-contrast-enhanced(DCE-MRI data were acquired. The proposed automatic segmentation approach was performed in two steps. In step-1, outer segmentation of breast tissue from rest of body parts was performed on structural images (T2-W/T1-W/PD-W without fat saturation images using automatic landmarks detection technique based on operations like profile screening, Otsu thresholding, morphological operations and empirical observation. In step-2, inner segmentation of breast tissue into fibro-glandular(FG, fatty and tumor tissue was performed. For validation of breast tissue segmentation, manual segmentation was carried out by two radiologists and similarity coefficients(Dice and Jaccard were computed for outer as well as inner tissues. FG density and tumor volume were also computed and analyzed. The proposed outer and inner segmentation approach worked well for all the subjects and was validated by two radiologists. The average Dice and Jaccard coefficients value for outer segmentation using T2-W images, obtained by two radiologists, were 0.977 and 0.951 respectively. These coefficient values for FG tissue were 0.915 and 0.875 respectively whereas for tumor tissue, values were 0.968 and 0.95 respectively. The volume of segmented tumor ranged over 2.1 cm3-7.08 cm3. The proposed approach provided automatic outer and inner breast tissue segmentation, which enables automatic calculations of breast tissue density and tumor volume. This is a complete framework for outer and inner breast segmentation method for all structural images.

  7. Formulation, Characterization, and Antitumor Properties of Trans- and Cis-Citral in the 4T1 Breast Cancer Xenograft Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, San; Kapur, Arvinder; Patankar, Manish S; Xiong, May P

    2015-08-01

    Citral is composed of a random mixture of two geometric stereoisomers geranial (trans-citral) and neral (cis-citral) yet few studies have directly compared their in vivo antitumor properties. A micelle formulation was therefore developed. Geranial and neral were synthesized. Commercially-purchased citral, geranial, and neral were formulated in PEG-b-PCL (block sizes of 5000:10,000, Mw/Mn 1.26) micelles. In vitro degradation, drug release, cytotoxicity, flow cytometry, and western blot studies were conducted. The antitumor properties of drug formulations (40 and 80 mg/kg based on MTD studies) were evaluated on the 4T1 xenograft mouse model and tumor tissues were analyzed by western blot. Micelles encapsulated drugs with >50% LE at 5-40% drug to polymer (w/w), displayed sustained release (t1/2 of 8-9 h), and improved drug stability at pH 5.0. The IC50 of drug formulations against 4T1 cells ranged from 1.4 to 9.9 μM. Western blot revealed that autophagy was the main cause of cytotoxicity. Geranial at 80 mg/kg was most effective at inhibiting tumor growth. Geranial is significantly more potent than neral and citral at 80 mg/kg (p < 0.001) and western blot of tumor tissues confirms that autophagy and not apoptosis is the major mechanism of tumor growth inhibition in p53-null 4T1 cells.

  8. Salinomycin possesses anti-tumor activity and inhibits breast cancer stem-like cells via an apoptosis-independent pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Hyunsook; Kim, Ji Young; Lee, Nahyun; Cho, Youngkwan; Oh, Eunhye [Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Korea University College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul 152-703 (Korea, Republic of); Brain Korea 21 Program for Biomedicine Science, Korea University College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul 152-703 (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Jae Hong, E-mail: cancer@korea.ac.kr [Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Korea University College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul 152-703 (Korea, Republic of); Brain Korea 21 Program for Biomedicine Science, Korea University College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul 152-703 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-30

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) play important roles in the formation, growth and recurrence of tumors, particularly following therapeutic intervention. Salinomycin has received recent attention for its ability to target breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs), but the mechanisms of action involved are not fully understood. In the present study, we sought to investigate the mechanisms responsible for salinomycin's selective targeting of BCSCs and its anti-tumor activity. Salinomycin suppressed cell viability, concomitant with the downregulation of cyclin D1 and increased p27{sup kip1} nuclear accumulation. Mammosphere formation assays revealed that salinomycin suppresses self-renewal of ALDH1-positive BCSCs and downregulates the transcription factors Nanog, Oct4 and Sox2. TUNEL analysis of MDA-MB-231-derived xenografts revealed that salinomycin administration elicited a significant reduction in tumor growth with a marked downregulation of ALDH1 and CD44 levels, but seemingly without the induction of apoptosis. Our findings shed further light on the mechanisms responsible for salinomycin's effects on BCSCs. - Highlights: • Salinomycin suppresses mammosphere formation. • Salinomycin reduces ALDH1 activity and downregulates Nanog, Oct4 and Sox2. • Salinomycin targets BCSCs via an apoptosis-independent pathway.

  9. Comparison of the clinical and prognostic features of primary breast sarcomas and malignant phyllodes tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Jia, Yan; Tong, Zhongsheng

    2015-02-01

    Primary breast sarcoma is a kind of extremely rare disease. Malignant phyllodes tumor represents a specific subset of breast soft tissue tumors. So till now, the classification and clinical management of primary breast sarcoma and malignant phyllodes tumor are controversial. The aim of this study is to explore the differences in clinical features, treatment, disease-free survival and overall survival between primary breast sarcoma and malignant phyllodes tumor group. A retrospective review of 35 cases with primary breast sarcoma and 70 cases with malignant phyllodes tumor registered from 1995 to 2010 was carried out in Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital. Prognosis in terms of disease-free survival and overall survival was evaluated. In primary breast sarcoma group, the result of univariate analysis demonstrated that surgical type, histopathological nodal status and local recurrence were significantly correlated with disease-free survival and overall survival. While, the result of monofactorial analysis showed the tumor size was significant prognostic indicator of disease-free survival and overall survival in malignant phyllodes tumor group. The Kaplan-Meier curves for 5-year disease-free survival rates and overall survival rates demonstrated that no significant difference was found between the primary breast sarcoma and malignant phyllodes tumor group (P = 0.702 and 0.772, respectively). The primary breast sarcoma patients had identical disease-free survival and overall survival compared with the malignant phyllodes tumor patients, which indicated that primary breast sarcoma and malignant phyllodes tumor patients should be treated with the same strategies. Surgical management is important for both the primary breast sarcoma and malignant phyllodes tumor patients. The role of the adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy remains uncertain. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email

  10. Iatrogenic displacement of tumor cells to the sentinel node after surgical excision in primary breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedskov, Tove F; Jensen, Maj-Britt; Kroman, Niels

    2012-01-01

    Isolated tumor cells (ITC) are more common in the sentinel node (SN) after needle biopsy of a breast cancer, indicating iatrogenic displacement of tumor cells. We here investigate whether similar iatrogenic displacement occurs after surgical excision of a breast tumor. We compared the incidence...... of ITC in the SN of 414 breast cancer patients with recent surgical excision to a group of 16,960 patients without recent surgical procedure in a multivariate analysis by linking data from the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group database and the Danish National Health Register. Moreover, the incidence...

  11. Radiation-associated breast tumors display a distinct gene expression profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broeks, Annegien; Braaf, Linde M; Wessels, Lodewyk F A

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: Women who received irradiation for Hodgkin's lymphoma have a strong increased risk for developing breast cancer. Approximately 90% of the breast cancers in these patients can be attributed to their radiation treatment, rendering such series extremely useful to determine whether a common...... at the same age. RNA was obtained from fresh frozen tissue samples from 22 patients who developed breast cancer after Hodgkin's lymphoma (BfHL) and from 20 control breast tumors. RESULTS: Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of the profile data resulted in a clustering of the radiation-associated tumors...... radiation-associated cause underlies the carcinogenic process. METHODS AND MATERIALS: In this study we used gene expression profiling technology to assess gene expression changes in radiation-associated breast tumors compared with a set of control breast tumors of women unexposed to radiation, diagnosed...

  12. Simulation of holographic radar application in detection of breast tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alborova, I. L.; Anishchenko, Lesya

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents the results of experiments and mathematical simulation carried out to confirm the possibility of using holographic radar for the detection of breast tumors. In the work the software designed for the numerical solution of electromagnetic problems using the Finite-Difference Time-Domain Method. The simulation was performed with the three probe frequencies 4, 7 and 15 GHz. The model is a parallelepiped with dimensions 200×200×100 mm - mimicking the normal tissue of the breast, with the inclusion of a sphere - malignant neoplasm of breast tissue, the radius and depth of which have been varied. Frequency dispersion of normal and malignant tissues dielectric properties (conductivity and permittivity) was taken into account. It was shown both by theoretical and experimental results that it is preferable to use lower-frequency probing signal, namely, 4GHz, which can detect the inclusion of 5 mm diameter up to a depth of 10 mm. While using of probing signals of 7 and 15 GHz the depth limit of detection inclusion is not more than 5 mm, which is caused by the high attenuation in a medium. However, their usage is preferred because of higher resolution.

  13. Genomic signature of BRCA1 deficiency in sporadic basal-like breast tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joosse, Simon A; Brandwijk, Kim I M; Mulder, Lennart; Wesseling, Jelle; Hannemann, Juliane; Nederlof, Petra M

    2011-02-01

    About 10-20% of all breast carcinomas show a basal-like phenotype, while ∼ 90% of breast tumors from BRCA1-mutation carriers are of this subtype. There is growing evidence that BRCA1-mutated tumors are not just a specific subset of the basal-like tumors, but that (the majority of) basal-like tumors show a dysfunctional BRCA1 pathway. This has major treatment implications, because emerging regimens specifically targeting DNA repair mechanisms would then be most effective against these tumors. To further understand the involvement of BRCA1 deficiency in sporadic basal-like tumors, we investigated 41 basal-like tumors for BRCA1 mRNA expression by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, BRCA1 promoter methylation, their genomic profile by array-CGH, and gene expression levels by whole genome expression arrays. Array-CGH results were compared to those of 34 proven BRCA1-mutated tumors. Basal-like tumors were subdivided into two equal groups: deficient and proficient in BRCA1 gene expression. The chromosomal makeup of BRCA1 deficient sporadic basal-like tumors was similar to that of BRCA1-mutated tumors. BRCA1 proficient sporadic basal-like tumors were more similar to nonbasal-like tumors. Only half of the basal-like breast tumors are actually deficient in BRCA1 expression. Gain of chromosome arm 3q is a marker for BRCA1 deficiency in hereditary and sporadic breast tumors. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Prevalence of papillomaviruses, polyomaviruses, and herpesviruses in triple-negative and inflammatory breast tumors from algeria compared with other types of breast cancer tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbex, Marilys; Bouzbid, Sabiha; Traverse-Glehen, Alexandra; Aouras, Hayette; McKay-Chopin, Sandrine; Carreira, Christine; Lankar, Abdelaziz; Tommasino, Massimo; Gheit, Tarik

    2014-01-01

    The possible role of viruses in breast cancer etiology remains an unresolved question. We hypothesized that if some viruses are involved, it may be in a subgroup of breast cancers only. Epidemiological arguments drove our interest in breast cancer subgroups that are more frequent in Africa, namely inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) and triple-negative breast cancer. We tested whether viral prevalence was significantly higher in these subgroups. One hundred fifty-five paraffin-embedded malignant breast tumors were randomly selected at the pathology laboratory of the University Hospital of Annaba (Algeria) to include one third of IBC and two thirds of non-IBC. They were tested for the presence of DNA from 61 viral agents (46 human papillomaviruses, 10 polyomaviruses, and 5 herpesviruses) using type-specific multiplex genotyping assays, which combine multiplex PCR and bead-based Luminex technology. Viral DNA was found in 22 (17.9%) of 123 tumors. The most prevalent viruses were EBV1 and HPV16. IBC tumors carried significantly more viruses (any type) than non-IBC tumors (30% vs. 13%, pbreast cancer phenotypes (IBC, triple-negative). While preliminary, they underline the importance of focusing on subgroups when studying viral etiology in breast cancer. Further studies on viruses in breast cancer should be conducted in much larger samples to confirm these initial findings.

  15. Stimulation of MCF-7 tumor progression in athymic nude mice by 17beta-estradiol induces WISP-2/CCN5 expression in xenografts: a novel signaling molecule in hormonal carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Gibanananda; Banerjee, Snigdha; Saxena, Neela K; Campbell, Donald R; Van Veldhuizen, Peter; Banerjee, Sushanta K

    2005-03-01

    There was 100% solid tumor formation following inoculation of MCF-7 cells. However, MCF-7 tumor progression was significantly greater in the mice exposed to 17beta-estradiol (17beta-E2) compared to unexposed mice. WISP-2/CCN5 mRNA expression was correspondingly increased in 17beta-E2 exposed MCF-7 tumors compared to unexposed xenografts. Moreover, estrogen exposure followed by anti-estrogen tamoxifen treatment drastically inhibited the tumor growth and WISP-2 expression in nude mice. Therefore, the study suggests that higher WISP-2/CCN5 expression by estrogen may be associated with the estrogen-induced growth of MCF-7 tumors in vivo. Finally, overexpression of WISP-2/CCN5 may be considered as a prognostic marker of estrogen-sensitive tumor growth.

  16. Facile Synthesis of Folic Acid-Modified Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Targeted MR Imaging in Pulmonary Tumor Xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zaixian; Hu, Yong; Yang, Jia; Xu, Yanhong; Zhang, Chengzhong; Wang, Zhongling; Shi, Xiangyang; Zhang, Guixiang

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop folic acid (FA)-modified iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles (NPs) for targeted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of H460 lung carcinoma cells. Water-dispersible Fe3O4 NPs synthesized via a mild reduction method were conjugated with FA to generate FA-targeted Fe3O4 NPs. The specificity of FA-targeted Fe3O4 NPs to bind FA receptor was investigated in vitro by cellular uptake and cell MRI and in vivo by MRI of H460 tumors. The formed NPs displayed good biocompatibility and ultrahigh r 2 relaxivity (440.01/mM/s). The targeting effect of the NPs to H460 cells was confirmed by in vitro cellular uptake and cell MRI. H460 tumors showed a significant reduction in T2 signal intensity at 0.85 h, which then recovered and returned to control at 2.35 h. The results indicate that the prepared FA-targeted Fe3O4 NPs have potential to be used as T2 negative contrast agents in targeted MRI.

  17. Quantitative analysis of peri-tumor tissue elasticity based on shear-wave elastography for breast tumor classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yang; Zeng, Jie; Qian, Ming; Zheng, Rongqin; Zheng, Hairong

    2013-01-01

    For shear-wave elastography (SWE) images, the most common site of tumor-associated stiffness is generally in the surrounding stroma rather than the tumor itself. The aim of this study is to assess the value of the peri-tumor tissue elasticity in the classification of breast tumors. SWE images of 106 breast tumors (65 benign, 41 malignant) were collected from 82 consecutive patients. By applying the image processing method, 5 elastographic features of the peri-tumor area (elasticity modulus mean, maximum, standard deviation, hardness degree and elasticity ratio) were computed to represent peri-tumor tissue elasticity. B-mode Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) were used for comparing the diagnostic performances between the grayscale US and color SWE images. Histopathologic results were used as the reference standard. The t-test, point biserial correlation coefficient and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis were performed for statistical analysis. As a result, the Az values (area under ROC curve) were 0.92, 0.95, 0.94, 0.91, and 0.98 for the classifiers using the five elastographic features respectively, and 0.91 for BI-RADS assessment. The results showed that the peri-tumor tissue elasticity could provide valuable information for breast tumor classification.

  18. Cerebellar metastases of recurrent phyllodes tumor breast; a rare phenomenon reflecting the unpredictable outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jyotsna; Majumdar, Kaushik; Gupta, Rahul; Batra, Vineeta Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Carcinomas of lung, breast, colon, kidney, and malignant melanomas are the most common malignancies that metastasize to the central nervous system (CNS). Phyllodes tumor is a rare fibroepithelial tumor of the breast, often having unpredictable recurrences, with increasing histological grade and distant metastasis. Malignant forms exist, which may develop distant metastases usually to the lung, pleura, bone, and liver. CNS metastasis of phyllodes tumor is rare and associated with a poor prognosis, with resistance to chemotherapy and radiation. We present a rare case of cerebellar metastasis in recurrent phyllodes tumor breast with subsequent rapid downhill course.

  19. Three-dimensional in vitro co-culture model of breast tumor using magnetic levitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaganathan, Hamsa; Gage, Jacob; Leonard, Fransisca; Srinivasan, Srimeenakshi; Souza, Glauco R; Dave, Bhuvanesh; Godin, Biana

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we investigate a novel in vitro model to mimic heterogeneous breast tumors without the use of a scaffold while allowing for cell-cell and tumor-fibroblast interactions. Previous studies have shown that magnetic levitation system under conventional culturing conditions results in the formation of three-dimensional (3D) structures, closely resembling in vivo tissues (fat tissue, vasculature, etc.). Three-dimensional heterogeneous tumor models for breast cancer were designed to effectively model the influences of the tumor microenvironment on drug efficiency. Various breast cancer cells were co-cultured with fibroblasts and then magnetically levitated. Size and cell density of the resulting tumors were measured. The model was phenotypically compared to in vivo tumors and examined for the presence of ECM proteins. Lastly, the effects of tumor stroma in the 3D in vitro model on drug transport and efficiency were assessed. Our data suggest that the proposed 3D in vitro breast tumor is advantageous due to the ability to: (1) form large-sized (millimeter in diameter) breast tumor models within 24 h; (2) control tumor cell composition and density; (3) accurately mimic the in vivo tumor microenvironment; and (4) test drug efficiency in an in vitro model that is comparable to in vivo tumors.

  20. FIBROMATOSIS (DESMOID TUMOR OF THE BREAST. Fibromatosis (tumor desmoide de mama

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaneta P Boceska

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available El tumor desmoide (fibromatosis es una entidad patológica extremadamente rara que se desarrolla de la fascia muscular y la aponeusorsis. Aunque sin potencial metastático, estos tumores son localmente muy agresivos y tienden a infiltrarse en los tejidos circundantes. Nosotros presentamos un caso de tumour desmoide de mama, que tuvo apariencias clínicas sugestivas a carcinoma. La paciente, de 56 años presentó una masa palpable de mama derecho. La citología por aspiracion con aguja fina (AGF no detectó ninguna célula maligna, por lo que se hizo una escisión local conservadora. La paciente no recibió ningun tratamiento postoperatorio adicional, y continúa viva y sana en los siguientes 18 meses. Desmoid tumor (fibromatosis is extremely rare benign pathological entity that develops from muscular fasciae and aponeuroses. Although without metastatic potential, these tumors are locally very aggressive and tend to infiltrate the surrounding tissues. We present a case of a desmoid tumor of the breast that had clinical appearance suggestive of carcinoma. The patient was 56 years old female with a previous history of surgical trauma who presented with a palpable mass in the right breast. A fine needle aspiration (FNA cytology did not reveal any malignant cells, thus conservative local excision was performed. The patient did not receive any additional postoperative treatment and was alive and free of disease after 18 months of follow-up. 

  1. Prevalence of papillomaviruses, polyomaviruses, and herpesviruses in triple-negative and inflammatory breast tumors from algeria compared with other types of breast cancer tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilys Corbex

    Full Text Available The possible role of viruses in breast cancer etiology remains an unresolved question. We hypothesized that if some viruses are involved, it may be in a subgroup of breast cancers only. Epidemiological arguments drove our interest in breast cancer subgroups that are more frequent in Africa, namely inflammatory breast cancer (IBC and triple-negative breast cancer. We tested whether viral prevalence was significantly higher in these subgroups.One hundred fifty-five paraffin-embedded malignant breast tumors were randomly selected at the pathology laboratory of the University Hospital of Annaba (Algeria to include one third of IBC and two thirds of non-IBC. They were tested for the presence of DNA from 61 viral agents (46 human papillomaviruses, 10 polyomaviruses, and 5 herpesviruses using type-specific multiplex genotyping assays, which combine multiplex PCR and bead-based Luminex technology.Viral DNA was found in 22 (17.9% of 123 tumors. The most prevalent viruses were EBV1 and HPV16. IBC tumors carried significantly more viruses (any type than non-IBC tumors (30% vs. 13%, p<0.04. Similarly, triple-negative tumors displayed higher virus-positivity than non-triple-negative tumors (44% vs. 14%, p<0.009.Our results suggest an association between the presence of viral DNA and aggressive breast cancer phenotypes (IBC, triple-negative. While preliminary, they underline the importance of focusing on subgroups when studying viral etiology in breast cancer. Further studies on viruses in breast cancer should be conducted in much larger samples to confirm these initial findings.

  2. High-sensitivity detection of breast tumors in vivo by use of a pH-sensitive near-infrared fluorescence probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathejczyk, Julia Eva; Pauli, Jutta; Dullin, Christian; Resch-Genger, Ute; Alves, Frauke; Napp, Joanna

    2012-07-01

    We investigated the potential of the pH-sensitive dye, CypHer5E, conjugated to Herceptin (pH-Her) for the sensitive detection of breast tumors in mice using noninvasive time-domain near-infrared fluorescence imaging and different methods of data analysis. First, the fluorescence properties of pH-Her were analyzed as function of pH and/or dye-to-protein ratio, and binding specificity was confirmed in cell-based assays. Subsequently, the performance of pH-Her in nude mice bearing orthotopic HER2-positive (KPL-4) and HER2-negative (MDA-MB-231) breast carcinoma xenografts was compared to that of an always-on fluorescent conjugate Alexa Fluor 647-Herceptin (Alexa-Her). Subtraction of autofluorescence and lifetime (LT)-gated image analyses were performed for background fluorescence suppression. In mice bearing HER2-positive tumors, autofluorescence subtraction together with the selective fluorescence enhancement of pH-Her solely in the tumor's acidic environment provided high contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs). This led to an improved sensitivity of tumor detection compared to Alexa-Her. In contrast, LT-gated imaging using LTs determined in model systems did not improve tumor-detection sensitivity in vivo for either probe. In conclusion, pH-Her is suitable for sensitive in vivo monitoring of HER2-expressing breast tumors with imaging in the intensity domain and represents a promising tool for detection of weak fluorescent signals deriving from small tumors or metastases.

  3. A role for ADAM12 in breast tumor progression and stromal cell apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kveiborg, Marie; Frohlich, Camilla; Albrechtsen, Reidar

    2005-01-01

    of stromal fibroblasts in tumor initiation and progression has been elucidated. Here, we show that stromal cell apoptosis occurs in human breast carcinoma but is only rarely seen in nonmalignant breast lesions. Furthermore, we show that ADAM12, a disintegrin and metalloprotease up-regulated in human breast...... cancer, accelerates tumor progression in a mouse breast cancer model. ADAM12 does not influence tumor cell proliferation but rather confers both decreased tumor cell apoptosis and increased stromal cell apoptosis. This dual role of ADAM12 in governing cell survival is underscored by the finding that ADAM......12 increases the apoptotic sensitivity of nonneoplastic cells in vitro while rendering tumor cells more resistant to apoptosis. Together, these results show that the ability of ADAM12 to influence apoptosis may contribute to tumor progression....

  4. Boundary condition generating large strain on breast tumor for nonlinear elasticity estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukune, Mariko; Hatano, Maya; Kobayashi, Yo; Miyashita, Tomoyuki; Fujie, M G

    2013-01-01

    We describe a robotic palpation system that determines whether a breast tumor is benign or malignant by measuring its nonlinear elasticity. Two indenters compress the breast from different directions to generate sufficient strain on the inner tumor, which simply represents clinical dynamic testing. The nonlinear elasticity of the inner tumor is estimated by correcting the reaction force data of the surrounding soft tissue. Here, we present the basic concept of our study and simulation results considering geometric conditions of the indenters using a finite element breast model. Indenters with variable width are applied to the breast at several contact positions in a simulation for comparison. Our results indicate that when the spring stiffness between the contact position of one indenter and the center of the tumor equals the spring stiffness between the contact position of the other indenter and the center of the tumor, a larger contact area (i.e., larger spring stiffness) provides larger strain acting on the inner tumor.

  5. The B-Raf Status of Tumor Cells May Be a Significant Determinant of Both Antitumor and Anti-Angiogenic Effects of Pazopanib in Xenograft Tumor Models

    Science.gov (United States)