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Sample records for breast tumor cells

  1. Breast cancer circulating tumor cells

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    Maria Joao Carvalho

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Metastasization of breast cancer involves various mechanisms responsible for progression from invasive lesion to dissemination in distant organs. Regional lymph node metastasization was considered an initial step in this process, but it is now recognized that hematogenous dissemination is a deviation from lymphatic circulation. The detection of circulating tumor cells (CTC is an aim in several oncology areas. For this purpose, several techniques have been used to detect CTC, including the use of antibodies and techniques with nucleic acids. This study reviews the published studies considering the detection of breast cancer CTC. There are focused the difficulties in identifying a CTC in a heterogeneous population, the handling of the sample, criteria of positivity, analytical techniques, and specific markers. There are systematized various specific markers of breast cancer cells also the problems with false positive results. Finally, we hypothesize clinical applications either as a prognostic marker or as a therapeutic response monitor.

  2. Electric Field Analysis of Breast Tumor Cells

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    V. Gowri Sree

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An attractive alternative treatment for malignant tumors that are refractive to conventional therapies, such as surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy, is electrical-pulse-mediated drug delivery. Electric field distribution of tissue/tumor is important for effective treatment of tissues. This paper deals with the electric field distribution study of a tissue model using MAXWELL 3D Simulator. Our results indicate that tumor tissue had lower electric field strength compared to normal cells, which makes them susceptible to electrical-pulse-mediated drug delivery. This difference could be due to the altered properties of tumor cells compared to normal cells, and our results corroborate this.

  3. Coexistence of Granular Cell Tumor and Invasive Ductal Breast Cancer in Contralateral Breasts: A Case Report

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    Maurizio Di Bonito

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Granular cell tumor (GCT is a benign tumor of the breast that can mimic, on breast imaging, invasive carcinomas. Biological evolution of mammary GCT is unknown, especially if it is associated with an invasive carcinoma in the same or contralateral breast. This report details the morphological features of these synchronous lesions highlighting their biological characteristics and suggesting an appropriate follow up.

  4. Breast Cancer Stem Cells and Tumor Suppressor Genes

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    Wendy W. Hwang-Verslues

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Studies of breast cancer stem cells are in their infancy and many fundamental questions have yet to be fully addressed. The molecular distinction between normal and cancerous breast stem cells is not clear. While there have been recent breakthroughs in mouse mammary stem cells and lineage determination in mammary glands, little has been determined in human cells. Microarray analyses have provided molecular categorization of breast cancer. However, the cellular origin of different types of breast cancer is largely unknown. In addition, the relationship between breast cancer stem cells and mammary progenitor cells has yet to be clarified. One of the key questions is how a normal mammary stem cell becomes a breast cancer stem cell. Importantly, the existence of different types of human breast cancers with distinct pathologic and molecular signatures suggests the possibility that different types of breast cancer stem cells may exist. Here, we aim to review the current evidence for the existence of different subtypes of breast cancer stem cells and provide further insight into how tumor suppressors might be involved in the initiation of breast cancer stem cells.

  5. The cell surface mucin podocalyxin regulates collective breast tumor budding.

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    Graves, Marcia L; Cipollone, Jane A; Austin, Pamela; Bell, Erin M; Nielsen, Julie S; Gilks, C Blake; McNagny, Kelly M; Roskelley, Calvin D

    2016-01-22

    Overexpression of the transmembrane sialomucin podocalyxin, which is known to play a role in lumen formation during polarized epithelial morphogenesis, is an independent indicator of poor prognosis in a number of epithelial cancers, including those that arise in the breast. Therefore, we set out to determine if podocalyxin plays a functional role in breast tumor progression. MCF-7 breast cancer cells, which express little endogenous podocalyxin, were stably transfected with wild type podocalyxin for forced overexpression. 4T1 mammary tumor cells, which express considerable endogenous podocalyxin, were retrovirally transduced with a short hairpin ribonucleic acid (shRNA) targeting podocalyxin for stable knockdown. In vitro, the effects of podocalyxin on collective cellular migration and invasion were assessed in two-dimensional monolayer and three-dimensional basement membrane/collagen gel culture, respectively. In vivo, local invasion was assessed after orthotopic transplantation in immunocompromised mice. Forced overexpression of podocalyxin caused cohesive clusters of epithelial MCF-7 breast tumor cells to bud off from the primary tumor and collectively invade the stroma of the mouse mammary gland in vivo. This budding was not associated with any obvious changes in histoarchitecture, matrix deposition or proliferation in the primary tumour. In vitro, podocalyxin overexpression induced a collective migration of MCF-7 tumor cells in two-dimensional (2-D) monolayer culture that was dependent on the activity of the actin scaffolding protein ezrin, a cytoplasmic binding partner of podocalyxin. In three-dimensional (3-D) culture, podocalyxin overexpression induced a collective budding and invasion that was dependent on actomyosin contractility. Interestingly, the collectively invasive cell aggregates often contained expanded microlumens that were also observed in vivo. Conversely, when endogenous podocalyxin was removed from highly metastatic, but cohesive, 4T1 mammary

  6. Stromal cells in tumor microenvironment and breast cancer.

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    Mao, Yan; Keller, Evan T; Garfield, David H; Shen, Kunwei; Wang, Jianhua

    2013-06-01

    Cancer is a systemic disease encompassing multiple components of both tumor cells themselves and host stromal cells. It is now clear that stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment play an important role in cancer development. Molecular events through which reactive stromal cells affect cancer cells can be defined so that biomarkers and therapeutic targets can be identified. Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) make up the bulk of cancer stroma and affect the tumor microenvironment such that they promote cancer initiation, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. In breast cancer, CAFs not only promote tumor progression but also induce therapeutic resistance. Accordingly, targeting CAFs provides a novel way to control tumors with therapeutic resistance. This review summarizes the current understandings of tumor stroma in breast cancer with a particular emphasis on the role of CAFs and the therapeutic implications of CAFs. In addition, the effects of other stromal components such as endothelial cells, macrophages, and adipocytes in breast cancer are also discussed. Finally, we describe the biologic markers to categorize patients into a specific and confirmed subtype for personalized treatment.

  7. Stroma Cells in Tumor Microenvironment and Breast Cancer

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    Mao, Yan; Keller, Evan T.; Garfield, David H.; Shen, Kunwei; Wang, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a systemic disease, encompassing multiple components of both tumor cells themselves and host stromal cells. It is now clear that stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment play an important role in cancer development. Molecular events through which reactive stromal cells affect cancer cells can be defined so that biomarkers and therapeutic targets can be identified. Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) make up the bulk of cancer stroma and affect the tumor microenvironment such that they promote cancer initiation, angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis. In breast cancer, CAFs not only promote tumor progression, but also induce therapeutic resistances. Accordingly, targeting CAFs provides a novel way to control tumors with therapeutic resistances. This review summarizes the current understanding of tumor stroma in breast cancer with a particular emphasis on the role of CAFs and the therapeutic implications of CAFs. The effects of other stromal components such as endothelial cells, macrophages and adipocytes in breast cancer are also discussed. Finally, we describe the biologic markers to sort patients into a specific and confirmed subtype for personalized treatment. PMID:23114846

  8. Ovarian granulosa cell tumor and increased risk of breast cancer.

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    Hammer, Anne; Lauszus, Finn F; Petersen, Astrid C

    2013-12-01

    Granulosa cell tumor of the ovary (GCT) is a rare neoplasm. The tumor often secretes estrogens and then presents at an earlier stage due to hormone-related symptoms. GCT women are at increased risk of endometrial carcinoma, but there is only limited information about GCTs and potential association to other hormone-related neoplasms such as breast cancer. We conducted a retrospective follow-up study on 163 women with GCT. Medical records and histological sections were reviewed and a search in the pathology registry performed. Eight [95% confidence interval (CI); 3.4-15.8] GCT women were diagnosed with a breast neoplasm; one with Paget's disease of the nipple and seven with breast carcinoma. Based on calculations using incidence rates on breast cancer among Danish women, we would have expected 2.5 cases of breast cancer. The odds ratio was 3.3 (95% CI, 1.6-6.6), suggesting an increased risk of breast cancer in GCT women. © 2013 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  9. Promotion of Tumor-Initiating Cells in Primary and Recurrent Breast Tumors

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    2013-07-01

    Thioridazine (an FDA approved drug that is known to block dopamine receptor signaling and to block MALT1, a factor upstream of IKK) strongly reduces...KR et al. (2008). Breast tumor cells with PI3K mutation or HER2 amplification are selectively addicted to Akt signaling. PLoS ONE 3: e3065. Singh S

  10. Induction of tumor necrosis factor expression and resistance in a human breast tumor cell line.

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    Spriggs, D; Imamura, K; Rodriguez, C; Horiguchi, J; Kufe, D W

    1987-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is a polypeptide cytokine that is cytotoxic to some but not all tumor cells. The basis for resistance to the cytotoxic effects of this agent remains unclear. We have studied the development of TNF resistance in human ZR-75-1 breast carcinoma cells. ZR-75-1 cells have undetectable levels of TNF RNA and protein. However, TNF transcripts are transiently induced in these cells by exposure to recombinant human TNF. This induction of TNF RNA is associated with production...

  11. Opposite Effects of Coinjection and Distant Injection of Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Breast Tumor Cell Growth.

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    Zheng, Huilin; Zou, Weibin; Shen, Jiaying; Xu, Liang; Wang, Shu; Fu, Yang-Xin; Fan, Weimin

    2016-09-01

    : Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) usually promote tumor growth and metastasis. By using a breast tumor 4T1 cell-based animal model, this study determined that coinjection and distant injection of allogeneic bone marrow-derived MSCs with tumor cells could exert different effects on tumor growth. Whereas the coinjection of MSCs with 4T1 cells promoted tumor growth, surprisingly, the injection of MSCs at a site distant from the 4T1 cell inoculation site suppressed tumor growth. We further observed that, in the distant injection model, MSCs decreased the accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and regulatory T cells in tumor tissues by enhancing proinflammatory factors such as interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α, Toll-like receptor (TLR)-3, and TLR-4, promoting host antitumor immunity and inhibiting tumor growth. Unlike previous reports, this is the first study reporting that MSCs may exert opposite roles on tumor growth in the same animal model by modulating the host immune system, which may shed light on the potential application of MSCs as vehicles for tumor therapy and other clinical applications. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been widely investigated for their potential roles in tissue engineering, autoimmune diseases, and tumor therapeutics. This study explored the impact of coinjection and distant injection of allogeneic bone marrow-derived MSCs on mouse 4T1 breast cancer cells. The results showed that the coinjection of MSCs and 4T1 cells promoted tumor growth. MSCs might act as the tumor stromal precursors and cause immunosuppression to protect tumor cells from immunosurveillance, which subsequently facilitated tumor metastasis. Interestingly, the distant injection of MSCs and 4T1 cells suppressed tumor growth. Together, the results of this study revealed the dual functions of MSCs in immunoregulation. ©AlphaMed Press.

  12. ADAM12 produced by tumor cells rather than stromal cells accelerates breast tumor progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frohlich, Camilla; Nehammer, Camilla; Albrechtsen, Reidar

    2011-01-01

    Expression of ADAM12 is low in most normal tissues, but is markedly increased in numerous human cancers, including breast carcinomas. We have previously shown that overexpression of ADAM12 accelerates tumor progression in a mouse model of breast cancer (PyMT). In the present study, we found...

  13. A role for ADAM12 in breast tumor progression and stromal cell apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kveiborg, Marie; Frohlich, Camilla; Albrechtsen, Reidar

    2005-01-01

    of stromal fibroblasts in tumor initiation and progression has been elucidated. Here, we show that stromal cell apoptosis occurs in human breast carcinoma but is only rarely seen in nonmalignant breast lesions. Furthermore, we show that ADAM12, a disintegrin and metalloprotease up-regulated in human breast...... cancer, accelerates tumor progression in a mouse breast cancer model. ADAM12 does not influence tumor cell proliferation but rather confers both decreased tumor cell apoptosis and increased stromal cell apoptosis. This dual role of ADAM12 in governing cell survival is underscored by the finding that ADAM......12 increases the apoptotic sensitivity of nonneoplastic cells in vitro while rendering tumor cells more resistant to apoptosis. Together, these results show that the ability of ADAM12 to influence apoptosis may contribute to tumor progression....

  14. Tumor cell budding from focally disrupted tumor capsules: a common pathway for all breast cancer subtype derived invasion?

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    Yan-gao Man

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Human breast cancer represents a group of highly heterogeneous lesions consisting of about 20 morphologically and immnohistochemically distinct subtypes with substantially different prognoses. Our recent studies have suggested that all breast cancer subtypes, however, may share a common pathway, tumor cell budding from focally disrupted tumor capsules, for their invasion. The potential mechanisms and clinical implications of our observations are discussed.

  15. Breast cancer stem cells, cytokine networks, and the tumor microenvironment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Korkaya, Hasan; Liu, Suling; Wicha, Max S

    2011-01-01

    .... These cancer stem cells (CSCs) are regulated by complex interactions with the components of the tumor microenvironment - including mesenchymal stem cells, adipocytes, tumor associated fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and immune...

  16. Benign granular-cell tumor of the breast: Case report and literature review

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    Devi Meenal Jagannathan, MD(RD, DMRD, DNB(RD, FRCR

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Granular-cell tumor is an uncommon cause of breast mass in premenopausal women that presents as a painless chronic lump. It mimics infiltrating carcinoma clinically and radiologically. Granular-cell tumor is usually benign, and the treatment is wide local excision. Definitive pre-operative diagnosis helps to avoid unnecessary mastectomy. We present clinical, mamographic, and sonographic characteristics of a benign granular-cell tumor of the breast in a 57-year-old woman.

  17. Benign granular-cell tumor of the breast: Case report and literature review.

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    Jagannathan, Devi Meenal

    2015-01-01

    Granular-cell tumor is an uncommon cause of breast mass in premenopausal women that presents as a painless chronic lump. It mimics infiltrating carcinoma clinically and radiologically. Granular-cell tumor is usually benign, and the treatment is wide local excision. Definitive pre-operative diagnosis helps to avoid unnecessary mastectomy. We present clinical, mamographic, and sonographic characteristics of a benign granular-cell tumor of the breast in a 57-year-old woman.

  18. Iatrogenic displacement of tumor cells to the sentinel node after surgical excision in primary breast cancer

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    Tvedskov, Tove F; Jensen, Maj-Britt; Kroman, Niels

    2012-01-01

    Isolated tumor cells (ITC) are more common in the sentinel node (SN) after needle biopsy of a breast cancer, indicating iatrogenic displacement of tumor cells. We here investigate whether similar iatrogenic displacement occurs after surgical excision of a breast tumor. We compared the incidence...... of ITC in the SN of 414 breast cancer patients with recent surgical excision to a group of 16,960 patients without recent surgical procedure in a multivariate analysis by linking data from the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group database and the Danish National Health Register. Moreover, the incidence...

  19. Interplay of Stem Cell Characteristics, EMT, and Microtentacles in Circulating Breast Tumor Cells

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    Charpentier, Monica [Program in Molecular Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 655 W. Baltimore St., Bressler Bldg., Rm 10-20, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum National Cancer Institute Cancer Center, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 655 W. Baltimore St., Bressler Bldg., Rm 10-29, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Martin, Stuart, E-mail: ssmartin@som.umaryland.edu [Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum National Cancer Institute Cancer Center, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 655 W. Baltimore St., Bressler Bldg., Rm 10-29, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Department of Physiology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 655 W. Baltimore St., Bressler Bldg., Rm 10-29, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States)

    2013-11-14

    Metastasis, not the primary tumor, is responsible for the majority of breast cancer-related deaths. Emerging evidence indicates that breast cancer stem cells (CSCs) and the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) cooperate to produce circulating tumor cells (CTCs) that are highly competent for metastasis. CTCs with both CSC and EMT characteristics have recently been identified in the bloodstream of patients with metastatic disease. Breast CSCs have elevated tumorigenicity required for metastatic outgrowth, while EMT may promote CSC character and endows breast cancer cells with enhanced invasive and migratory potential. Both CSCs and EMT are associated with a more flexible cytoskeleton and with anoikis-resistance, which help breast carcinoma cells survive in circulation. Suspended breast carcinoma cells produce tubulin-based extensions of the plasma membrane, termed microtentacles (McTNs), which aid in reattachment. CSC and EMT-associated upregulation of intermediate filament vimentin and increased detyrosination of α-tubulin promote the formation of McTNs. The combined advantages of CSCs and EMT and their associated cytoskeletal alterations increase metastatic efficiency, but understanding the biology of these CTCs also presents new therapeutic targets to reduce metastasis.

  20. Genomic and phenotypic profiles of two Brazilian breast cancer cell lines derived from primary human tumors

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    Corrêa, Natássia C R; Kuasne, Hellen; Faria, Jerusa A Q A

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer among women worldwide. Research using breast cancer cell lines derived from primary tumors may provide valuable additional knowledge regarding this type of cancer. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the phenotypic profiles of MACL-1...... and MGSO-3, the only Brazilian breast cancer cell lines available for comparative studies. We evaluated the presence of hormone receptors, proliferation, differentiation and stem cell markers, using immunohistochemical staining of the primary tumor, cultured cells and xenografts implanted...

  1. T cell receptor sequencing of early-stage breast cancer tumors identifies altered clonal structure of the T cell repertoire.

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    Beausang, John F; Wheeler, Amanda J; Chan, Natalie H; Hanft, Violet R; Dirbas, Frederick M; Jeffrey, Stefanie S; Quake, Stephen R

    2017-11-28

    Tumor-infiltrating T cells play an important role in many cancers, and can improve prognosis and yield therapeutic targets. We characterized T cells infiltrating both breast cancer tumors and the surrounding normal breast tissue to identify T cells specific to each, as well as their abundance in peripheral blood. Using immune profiling of the T cell beta-chain repertoire in 16 patients with early-stage breast cancer, we show that the clonal structure of the tumor is significantly different from adjacent breast tissue, with the tumor containing ∼2.5-fold greater density of T cells and higher clonality compared with normal breast. The clonal structure of T cells in blood and normal breast is more similar than between blood and tumor, and could be used to distinguish tumor from normal breast tissue in 14 of 16 patients. Many T cell sequences overlap between tissue and blood from the same patient, including ∼50% of T cells between tumor and normal breast. Both tumor and normal breast contain high-abundance "enriched" sequences that are absent or of low abundance in the other tissue. Many of these T cells are either not detected or detected with very low frequency in the blood, suggesting the existence of separate compartments of T cells in both tumor and normal breast. Enriched T cell sequences are typically unique to each patient, but a subset is shared between many different patients. We show that many of these are commonly generated sequences, and thus unlikely to play an important role in the tumor microenvironment. Copyright © 2017 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  2. Boswellia sacra essential oil induces tumor cell-specific apoptosis and suppresses tumor aggressiveness in cultured human breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhail Mahmoud M

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gum resins obtained from trees of the Burseraceae family (Boswellia sp. are important ingredients in incense and perfumes. Extracts prepared from Boswellia sp. gum resins have been shown to possess anti-inflammatory and anti-neoplastic effects. Essential oil prepared by distillation of the gum resin traditionally used for aromatic therapy has also been shown to have tumor cell-specific anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activities. The objective of this study was to optimize conditions for preparing Boswellea sacra essential oil with the highest biological activity in inducing tumor cell-specific cytotoxicity and suppressing aggressive tumor phenotypes in human breast cancer cells. Methods Boswellia sacra essential oil was prepared from Omani Hougari grade resins through hydrodistillation at 78 or 100 oC for 12 hours. Chemical compositions were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry; and total boswellic acids contents were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography. Boswellia sacra essential oil-mediated cell viability and death were studied in established human breast cancer cell lines (T47D, MCF7, MDA-MB-231 and an immortalized normal human breast cell line (MCF10-2A. Apoptosis was assayed by genomic DNA fragmentation. Anti-invasive and anti-multicellular tumor properties were evaluated by cellular network and spheroid formation models, respectively. Western blot analysis was performed to study Boswellia sacra essential oil-regulated proteins involved in apoptosis, signaling pathways, and cell cycle regulation. Results More abundant high molecular weight compounds, including boswellic acids, were present in Boswellia sacra essential oil prepared at 100 oC hydrodistillation. All three human breast cancer cell lines were sensitive to essential oil treatment with reduced cell viability and elevated cell death, whereas the immortalized normal human breast cell line was more resistant to essential oil

  3. Boswellia sacra essential oil induces tumor cell-specific apoptosis and suppresses tumor aggressiveness in cultured human breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Gum resins obtained from trees of the Burseraceae family (Boswellia sp.) are important ingredients in incense and perfumes. Extracts prepared from Boswellia sp. gum resins have been shown to possess anti-inflammatory and anti-neoplastic effects. Essential oil prepared by distillation of the gum resin traditionally used for aromatic therapy has also been shown to have tumor cell-specific anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activities. The objective of this study was to optimize conditions for preparing Boswellea sacra essential oil with the highest biological activity in inducing tumor cell-specific cytotoxicity and suppressing aggressive tumor phenotypes in human breast cancer cells. Methods Boswellia sacra essential oil was prepared from Omani Hougari grade resins through hydrodistillation at 78 or 100 oC for 12 hours. Chemical compositions were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry; and total boswellic acids contents were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography. Boswellia sacra essential oil-mediated cell viability and death were studied in established human breast cancer cell lines (T47D, MCF7, MDA-MB-231) and an immortalized normal human breast cell line (MCF10-2A). Apoptosis was assayed by genomic DNA fragmentation. Anti-invasive and anti-multicellular tumor properties were evaluated by cellular network and spheroid formation models, respectively. Western blot analysis was performed to study Boswellia sacra essential oil-regulated proteins involved in apoptosis, signaling pathways, and cell cycle regulation. Results More abundant high molecular weight compounds, including boswellic acids, were present in Boswellia sacra essential oil prepared at 100 oC hydrodistillation. All three human breast cancer cell lines were sensitive to essential oil treatment with reduced cell viability and elevated cell death, whereas the immortalized normal human breast cell line was more resistant to essential oil treatment. Boswellia sacra

  4. Tumor associated macrophage × cancer cell hybrids may acquire cancer stem cell properties in breast cancer.

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    Jingxian Ding

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers among women, and metastasis makes it lethal. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs that acquire an alternatively activated macrophage (M2 phenotype may promote metastasis. However, the underlying mechanisms are still elusive. Here, we examined how TAMs interact with breast cancer cells to promote metastasis. Immunohistochemistry was used to examine the expression of the M2-specific antigen CD163 in paraffin-embedded mammary carcinoma blocks to explore fusion events in breast cancer patients. U937 cells were used as a substitute for human monocytes, and these cells differentiated into M2 macrophages following phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA and M-CSF stimulation. M2 macrophages and the breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 fused in the presence of 50% polyethylene glycol. Hybrids were isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting, and the relevant cell biological properties were compared with their parental counterparts. Breast cancer stem cell (BCSC-related markers were quantified by immunofluorescence staining, RT-PCR, quantitative RT-PCR and/or western blotting. The tumor-initiating and metastatic capacities of the hybrids and their parental counterparts were assessed in NOD/SCID mice. We found that the CD163 expression rate in breast cancer tissues varied significantly and correlated with estrogen receptor status (p0.05. Characterization of the fusion hybrids revealed a more aggressive phenotype, including increased migration, invasion and tumorigenicity, but reduced proliferative ability, compared with the parental lines. The hybrids also gained a CD44(+CD24(-/low phenotype and over-expressed epithelial-mesenchymal transition-associated genes. These results indicate that TAMs may promote breast cancer metastasis through cell fusion, and the hybrids may gain a BCSC phenotype.

  5. Tumor cell migration screen identifies SRPK1 as breast cancer metastasis determinant.

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    van Roosmalen, Wies; Le Dévédec, Sylvia E; Golani, Ofra; Smid, Marcel; Pulyakhina, Irina; Timmermans, Annemieke M; Look, Maxime P; Zi, Di; Pont, Chantal; de Graauw, Marjo; Naffar-Abu-Amara, Suha; Kirsanova, Catherine; Rustici, Gabriella; Hoen, Peter A C 't; Martens, John W M; Foekens, John A; Geiger, Benjamin; van de Water, Bob

    2015-04-01

    Tumor cell migration is a key process for cancer cell dissemination and metastasis that is controlled by signal-mediated cytoskeletal and cell matrix adhesion remodeling. Using a phagokinetic track assay with migratory H1299 cells, we performed an siRNA screen of almost 1,500 genes encoding kinases/phosphatases and adhesome- and migration-related proteins to identify genes that affect tumor cell migration speed and persistence. Thirty candidate genes that altered cell migration were validated in live tumor cell migration assays. Eight were associated with metastasis-free survival in breast cancer patients, with integrin β3-binding protein (ITGB3BP), MAP3K8, NIMA-related kinase (NEK2), and SHC-transforming protein 1 (SHC1) being the most predictive. Examination of genes that modulate migration indicated that SRPK1, encoding the splicing factor kinase SRSF protein kinase 1, is relevant to breast cancer outcomes, as it was highly expressed in basal breast cancer. Furthermore, high SRPK1 expression correlated with poor breast cancer disease outcome and preferential metastasis to the lungs and brain. In 2 independent murine models of breast tumor metastasis, stable shRNA-based SRPK1 knockdown suppressed metastasis to distant organs, including lung, liver, and spleen, and inhibited focal adhesion reorganization. Our study provides comprehensive information on the molecular determinants of tumor cell migration and suggests that SRPK1 has potential as a drug target for limiting breast cancer metastasis.

  6. Salinomycin efficiency assessment in non-tumor (HB4a) and tumor (MCF-7) human breast cells.

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    Niwa, Andressa Megumi; D Epiro, Gláucia Fernanda Rocha; Marques, Lilian Areal; Semprebon, Simone Cristine; Sartori, Daniele; Ribeiro, Lúcia Regina; Mantovani, Mário Sérgio

    2016-06-01

    The search for anticancer drugs has led researchers to study salinomycin, an ionophore antibiotic that selectively destroys cancer stem cells. In this study, salinomycin was assessed in two human cell lines, a breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) and a non-tumor breast cell line (HB4a), to verify its selective action against tumor cells. Real-time assessment of cell proliferation showed that HB4a cells are more resistant to salinomycin than MCF-7 tumor cell line, and these data were confirmed in a cytotoxicity assay. The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values show the increased sensitivity of MCF-7 cells to salinomycin. In the comet assay, only MCF-7 cells showed the induction of DNA damage. Flow cytometric analysis showed that cell death by apoptosis/necrosis was only induced in the MCF-7 cells. The increased expression of GADD45A and CDKN1A genes was observed in all cell lines. Decreased expression of CCNA2 and CCNB1 genes occurred only in tumor cells, suggesting G2/M cell cycle arrest. Consequently, cell death was activated in tumor cells through strong inhibition of the antiapoptotic genes BCL-2, BCL-XL, and BIRC5 genes in MCF-7 cells. These data demonstrate the selectivity of salinomycin in killing human mammary tumor cells. The cell death observed only in MCF-7 tumor cells was confirmed by gene expression analysis, where there was downregulation of antiapoptotic genes. These data contribute to clarifying the mechanism of action of salinomycin as a promising antitumor drug and, for the first time, we observed the higher resistance of HB4a non-tumor breast cells to salinomycin.

  7. Toca-1 is suppressed by p53 to limit breast cancer cell invasion and tumor metastasis.

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    Chander, Harish; Brien, Colin D; Truesdell, Peter; Watt, Kathleen; Meens, Jalna; Schick, Colleen; Germain, Doris; Craig, Andrew W B

    2014-12-30

    Transducer of Cdc42-dependent actin assembly-1 (Toca-1) recruits actin regulatory proteins to invadopodia, and promotes breast tumor metastasis. Since metastatic breast tumors frequently harbor mutations in the tumor suppressor p53, we tested whether p53 regulates Toca-1 expression. Normal mammary epithelial cells (HBL-100, MCF10A) and breast cancer cell lines expressing wild-type (WT) p53 (DU4475, MTLn3) were treated with camptothecin or Nutlin-3 to stabilize p53 to test effects on Toca-1 mRNA and protein levels. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays were performed to identify p53 binding site in Toca-1 gene. Stable silencing of p53 and Toca-1 were performed in MTLn3 cells to test effects on invadopodia and cell invasion in vitro, and tumor metastasis in vivo. We observed that breast cancer cell lines with mutant p53 have high levels of Toca-1 compared to those with WT p53. Stabilization of WT p53 led to further reduction in Toca-1 mRNA and protein levels in normal breast epithelial cells and breast cancer cells. ChIP assays revealed p53 binding within intron 2 of toca1, and reduced histone acetylation within its promoter region upon p53 upregulation or activation. Stable silencing of WT p53 in MTLn3 cells led to increased extracellular matrix degradation and cell invasion compared to control cells. Interestingly, the combined silencing of p53 and Toca-1 led to a partial rescue of these effects of p53 silencing in vitro and reduced lung metastases in mice. In human breast tumors, Toca-1 levels were high in subtypes with frequent p53 mutations, and high Toca-1 transcript levels correlated with increased risk of relapse. Based on these findings, we conclude that loss of p53 tumor suppressor function in breast cancers leads to upregulation of Toca-1, and results in enhanced risk of developing metastatic disease.

  8. Elucidation of altered pathways in tumor-initiating cells of triple-negative breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anne G; Ehmsen, Sidse; Terp, Mikkel G

    2017-01-01

    A limited number of cancer cells within a tumor are thought to have self-renewing and tumor-initiating capabilities that produce the remaining cancer cells in a heterogeneous tumor mass. Elucidation of central pathways preferentially used by tumor-initiating cells/cancer stem cells (CSCs) may allow...... reduction was also observed using patient-derived primary cancer cells. Further, blocking NF-κB signaling in mice transplanted with tumor-initiating cells significantly reduced tumor outgrowth. Our study demonstrates that suppressed apoptosis, activation of pathways associated with cell viability and CSCs...... their exploitation as potential cancer therapy targets. We used single cell cloning to isolate and characterize four isogenic cell clones from a triple-negative breast cancer cell line; two exhibited mesenchymal-like and two epithelial-like characteristics. Within these pairs, one, but not the other, resulted...

  9. Claudin-2 Promotes Breast Cancer Liver Metastasis by Facilitating Tumor Cell Interactions with Hepatocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabariès, Sébastien; Dupuy, Fanny; Dong, Zhifeng; Monast, Anie; Annis, Matthew G.; Spicer, Jonathan; Ferri, Lorenzo E.; Omeroglu, Atilla; Basik, Mark; Amir, Eitan; Clemons, Mark

    2012-01-01

    We previously identified claudin-2 as a functional mediator of breast cancer liver metastasis. We now confirm that claudin-2 levels are elevated in liver metastases, but not in skin metastases, compared to levels in their matched primary tumors in patients with breast cancer. Moreover, claudin-2 is specifically expressed in liver-metastatic breast cancer cells compared to populations derived from bone or lung metastases. The increased liver tropism exhibited by claudin-2-expressing breast cancer cells requires claudin-2-mediated interactions between breast cancer cells and primary hepatocytes. Furthermore, the reduction of the claudin-2 expression level, either in cancer cells or in primary hepatocytes, diminishes these heterotypic cell-cell interactions. Finally, we demonstrate that the first claudin-2 extracellular loop is essential for mediating tumor cell-hepatocyte interactions and the ability of breast cancer cells to form liver metastases in vivo. Thus, during breast cancer liver metastasis, claudin-2 shifts from acting within tight-junctional complexes to functioning as an adhesion molecule between breast cancer cells and hepatocytes. PMID:22645303

  10. Osteoprotegerin mediates tumor-promoting effects of Interleukin-1beta in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Stephanie Tsang Mui; Geerts, Dirk; Roseman, Kim; Renaud, Ashleigh; Connelly, Linda

    2017-02-01

    It is widely recognized that inflammation promotes breast cancer invasion and metastasis. Given the complex nature of the breast tumor inflammatory microenvironment, much remains to be understood of the molecular mechanisms that govern these effects. We have previously shown that osteoprotegerin knockdown in breast cancer cells resulted in reduced invasion and metastasis. Here we present novel insight into the role of osteoprotegerin in inflammation-driven tumor progression in breast cancer by investigating the link between osteoprotegerin, macrophages and the potent pro-inflammatory cytokine Interleukin-1beta. We used human breast cancer cell lines to investigate the effects of Interleukin-1beta treatment on osteoprotegerin secretion as measured by ELISA. We analyzed public datasets containing human breast cancer genome-wide mRNA expression data to reveal a significant and positive correlation between osteoprotegerin mRNA expression and the mRNA expression of Interleukin-1beta and of monocyte chemoattractant protein CC-chemokine ligand 2. Osteoprotegerin, Interleukin-1beta and CC-chemokine ligand 2 mRNA levels were also examined by qPCR on cDNA from normal and cancerous human breast tissue. We determined the effect of Interleukin-1beta-producing macrophages on osteoprotegerin expression by co-culturing breast cancer cells and differentiated THP-1 macrophages. Immunohistochemistry was performed on human breast tumor tissue microarrays to assess macrophage infiltration and osteoprotegerin expression. To demonstrate that osteoprotegerin mediated functional effects of Interleukin-1beta we performed cell invasion studies with control and OPG siRNA knockdown on Interleukin-1beta-treated breast cancer cells. We report that Interleukin-1beta induces osteoprotegerin secretion, independent of breast cancer subtype and basal osteoprotegerin levels. Co-culture of breast cancer cells with Interleukin-1beta-secreting macrophages resulted in a similar increase in osteoprotegerin

  11. Development of Tethered Hsp90 Inhibitors Carrying Radioiodinated Probes to Specifically Discriminate and Kill Malignant Breast Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    tethered Hsp90 inhibitor capable of carrying various radioactive iodine isotopes for early detection and ablation of metastatic breast cancers . These...imaging agents in mouse models of breast cancer . 15. SUBJECT TERMS Radiodination, tethered Hsp90 inhibitor, malignant breast tumor , ectopic Hsp90 16...and 324 ER- tumors ) showed increased Hsp90 expression in all breast cancer cell lines, and in nearly 90% of primary breast cancers (2). A recent

  12. The Role and Clinical Relevance of Disseminated Tumor Cells in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Banys

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor cell dissemination is a common phenomenon observed in most cancers of epithelial origin. One-third of breast cancer patients present with disseminated tumor cells (DTCs in bone marrow at time of diagnosis; these patients, as well as patients with persistent DTCs, have significantly worse clinical outcome than DTC-negative patients. Since DTC phenotype may differ from the primary tumor with regard to ER and HER2 status, reevaluation of predictive markers on DTCs may optimize treatment choices. In the present review, we report on the clinical relevance of DTC detection in breast cancer.

  13. The Role and Clinical Relevance of Disseminated Tumor Cells in Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banys, Malgorzata, E-mail: maggybanys@yahoo.de [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Duesseldorf, Duesseldorf D-40225 (Germany); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Marienkrankenhaus Hamburg, Hamburg D-22087 (Germany); Krawczyk, Natalia; Fehm, Tanja [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Duesseldorf, Duesseldorf D-40225 (Germany)

    2014-01-15

    Tumor cell dissemination is a common phenomenon observed in most cancers of epithelial origin. One-third of breast cancer patients present with disseminated tumor cells (DTCs) in bone marrow at time of diagnosis; these patients, as well as patients with persistent DTCs, have significantly worse clinical outcome than DTC-negative patients. Since DTC phenotype may differ from the primary tumor with regard to ER and HER2 status, reevaluation of predictive markers on DTCs may optimize treatment choices. In the present review, we report on the clinical relevance of DTC detection in breast cancer.

  14. Effects of Herceptin on circulating tumor cells in HER2 positive early breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J-L; Yao, Q; Chen Y Wang, J-H; Wang, H; Fan, Q; Ling, R; Yi, J; Wang, L

    2015-03-20

    The objective of this study was to determine the changes in peripheral blood circulating tumor cells in HER2-positive early breast cancer before and after Herceptin therapy, and to explore the effects of the HER2 gene and Herceptin on circulating tumor cells. CK19 mRNA expression in peripheral blood was evaluated by qRT-PCR as an index of circulating tumor cells in 15 cases of HER-2-positive breast cancer and 18 cases of HER2-negative breast cancer before, and after chemotherapy as well. Ten cases of HER2-positive breast cancer continued on Herceptin therapy for 3 months after chemotherapy, and their peripheral blood was again drawn and assayed for CK-19 mRNA expression. Preoperatively, all cases of HER2-positive cancer were positive for CK19 mRNA in peripheral blood, but 6 cases of HER2-negative breast cancer were positive (33.3%), where there was a substantial difference between the two groups. After 6 cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy, CK19 positive rates in cases of HER2-positive and -negative breast cancer reduced by 93.3 and 11.1%, respectively, with a significant difference still existing. After 3 months of Herceptin therapy, expression of CK19 mRNA declined considerably in 10 cases of HER2 positive breast cancer (113.66 ± 88.65 vs 63.35 ± 49.27, P = 0.025). HER-2 gene expression closely correlated with circulating tumor cells in peripheral blood of early breast cancer patients. Moreover, Herceptin, a monoclonal antibody for HER2, can reduce the number of circulating tumor cells, which can be an early predictive factor for Herceptin therapy effectiveness against breast cancer.

  15. Circulating tumor cell clusters-associated gene plakoglobin and breast cancer survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lingeng; Zeng, Hongmei; Gu, Xinsheng; Ma, Wenxue

    2015-06-01

    Breast cancer recurrence is a major cause of the disease-specific death. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are negatively associated with breast cancer survival. Plakoglobin, a cell adhesion protein, was recently reported as a determinant of CTCs types, single or clustered ones. Here, we aim to summarize the studies on the roles of plakoglobin and evaluate the association of plakoglobin and breast cancer survival. Plakoglobin as a key component in both cell adhesion and the signaling pathways was briefly reviewed first. Then the double-edge functions of plakoglobin in tumors and its association with CTCs and breast cancer metastasis were introduced. Finally, based on an open-access database, the association between plakoglobin and breast cancer survival was investigated using univariate and multivariate survival analyses. Plakoglobin may be a molecule functioning as a double-edge sword. Loss of plakoglobin expression leads to increased motility of epithelial cells, thereby promoting epithelial-mesenchymal transition and further metastasis of cancer. However, studies also show that plakoglobin can function as an oncogene. High expression of plakoglobin results in clustered tumor cells in circulation with high metastatic potential in breast cancer and shortened patient survival. Plakoglobin may be a potential prognostic biomarker that can be exploited to develop as a therapeutic target for breast cancer.

  16. Blood vessel endothelium-directed tumor cell streaming in breast tumors requires the HGF/C-Met signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, E; Xue, A; Wang, Y; Rougerie, P; Sharma, V P; Eddy, R; Cox, D; Condeelis, J

    2017-05-11

    During metastasis to distant sites, tumor cells migrate to blood vessels. In vivo, breast tumor cells utilize a specialized mode of migration known as streaming, where a linear assembly of tumor cells migrate directionally towards blood vessels on fibronectin-collagen I-containing extracellular matrix (ECM) fibers in response to chemotactic signals. We have successfully reconstructed tumor cell streaming in vitro by co-plating tumors cells, macrophages and endothelial cells on 2.5 μm thick ECM-coated micro-patterned substrates. We found that tumor cells and macrophages, when plated together on the micro-patterned substrates, do not demonstrate sustained directional migration in only one direction (sustained directionality) but show random bi-directional walking. Sustained directionality of tumor cells as seen in vivo was established in vitro when beads coated with human umbilical vein endothelial cells were placed at one end of the micro-patterned 'ECM fibers' within the assay. We demonstrated that these endothelial cells supply the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) required for the chemotactic gradient responsible for sustained directionality. Using this in vitro reconstituted streaming system, we found that directional streaming is dependent on, and most effectively blocked, by inhibiting the HGF/C-Met signaling pathway between endothelial cells and tumor cells. Key observations made with the in vitro reconstituted system implicating C-Met signaling were confirmed in vivo in mammary tumors using the in vivo invasion assay and intravital multiphoton imaging of tumor cell streaming. These results establish HGF/C-Met as a central organizing signal in blood vessel-directed tumor cell migration in vivo and highlight a promising role for C-Met inhibitors in blocking tumor cell streaming and metastasis in vivo, and for use in human trials.

  17. Spatial distribution of mast cells and macrophages around tumor glands in human breast ductal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamma, Roberto; Guidolin, Diego; Annese, Tiziana; Tortorella, Cinzia; Ruggieri, Simona; Rega, Serena; Zito, Francesco A; Nico, Beatrice; Ribatti, Domenico

    2017-10-01

    Macrophages and mast cells are usually present in the tumor microenvironment and play an important role as regulators of inflammation, immunological response and angiogenesis in the tumor microenvironment. In this study, we have evaluated macrophage, mast cell, and microvessel density in a selected group of different grade of invasive breast carcinoma tumor specimens. Furthermore, we have investigated the pattern of distribution of CD68-positive macrophages and tryptase-positive mast cells around tumor glands. Results have shown that: A) Macrophages are more numerous in G2 and G3 breast cancer stages respect to controls, the per cent of macrophages in G1 samples was comparable to the controls, and the spatial relationship between macrophages and glands (as indicated by the mean cell-to-gland distance) correlated with CD31-positive vessels. B) Mast cells in G2 and G3 tumor specimens show a significant increase in their number as compared to control samples, and their spatial distribution around the glands did not show any significant difference among groups. Overall, the results of this study confirm the important role of macrophages and mast cells in tumor progression and angiogenesis in human ductal breast cancer, and pointed out the spatial relationship between tumor macrophages and glands, and its correlation with microvascular density. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluating mononuclear cells as nanoparticle delivery vehicles for the treatment of breast tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murton, Jaclyn K.; Hu, Chelin; Ahmed, Mona M.; Hathaway, Helen J.; Nysus, Monique; Anderson Daniels, Tamara; Norenberg, Jeffrey P.; Adolphi, Natalie L.

    2015-08-01

    In breast cancer, certain types of circulating immune cells respond to long-range chemical signals from tumors by leaving the blood stream to actively infiltrate tumor tissue. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether immune cells could be used to deliver therapeutic nanoparticles into breast tumors in mice. Mononuclear splenocytes (MS) were harvested from donor mice, labeled with Indium-111, injected intravenously into immune-competent recipient mice (3 tumor-bearing and 3 control), and imaged longitudinally by SPECT/CT. For comparison, the biodistribution of bonemarrow derived macrophages (BMDM) in one pair of mice was also imaged. Quantitative analysis of the SPECT images demonstrates that, after 24 hours, the concentration of MS detected in mammary tumors is more than 3-fold higher than the concentration detected in normal mammary glands. The ratio of MS concentration in mammary tissue to MS concentration in non-target tissues (muscle, lung, heart, liver, spleen, and kidney) was enhanced in tumor-bearing mice (compared to controls), with statistical significance achieved for mammary/muscle (pimages of tumor sections show qualitatively that nanoparticle-loaded MS retain the ability to infiltrate mammary tumors. Taken together, these results suggest that MS carriers are capable of actively targeting therapeutic nanoparticles to breast tumors.

  19. HMGA1: a master regulator of tumor progression in triple-negative breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep N Shah

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence suggests that tumor cells metastasize by co-opting stem cell transcriptional networks, although the molecular underpinnings of this process are poorly understood. Here, we show for the first time that the high mobility group A1 (HMGA1 gene drives metastatic progression in triple negative breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231, Hs578T by reprogramming cancer cells to a stem-like state. Silencing HMGA1 expression in invasive, aggressive breast cancer cells dramatically halts cell growth and results in striking morphologic changes from mesenchymal-like, spindle-shaped cells to cuboidal, epithelial-like cells. Mesenchymal genes (Vimentin, Snail are repressed, while E-cadherin is induced in the knock-down cells. Silencing HMGA1 also blocks oncogenic properties, including proliferation, migration, invasion, and orthotopic tumorigenesis. Metastatic progression following mammary implantation is almost completely abrogated in the HMGA1 knock-down cells. Moreover, silencing HMGA1 inhibits the stem cell property of three-dimensional mammosphere formation, including primary, secondary, and tertiary spheres. In addition, knock-down of HMGA1 depletes cancer initiator/cancer stem cells and prevents tumorigenesis at limiting dilutions. We also discovered an HMGA1 signature in triple negative breast cancer cells that is highly enriched in embryonic stem cells. Together, these findings indicate that HMGA1 is a master regulator of tumor progression in breast cancer by reprogramming cancer cells through stem cell transcriptional networks. Future studies are needed to determine how to target HMGA1 in therapy.

  20. Interface between breast cancer cells and the tumor microenvironment using platelet-rich plasma to promote tumor angiogenesis - influence of platelets and fibrin bundles on the behavior of breast tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Sheila Siqueira; Sumikawa, Joana Tomomi; Castro, Eloísa Dognani; Batista, Fabricio Pereira; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar; Oliveira, Lilian Carolina; Guerra, Izabel Monastério; Peres, Giovani Bravin; Cavalheiro, Renan Pelluzzi; Juliano, Luiz; Nazário, Afonso Pinto; Facina, Gil; Tsai, Siu Mui; Oliva, Maria Luiza Vilela; Girão, Manoel João Batista Castello

    2017-03-07

    Cancer progression is associated with an evolving tissue interface of direct epithelial-tumor microenvironment interactions. In biopsies of human breast tumors, extensive alterations in molecular pathways are correlated with cancer staging on both sides of the tumor-stroma interface. These interactions provide a pivotal paracrine signaling to induce malignant phenotype transition, the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). We explored how the direct contact between platelets-fibrin bundles primes metastasis using platelet-rich plasma (PRP) as a source of growth factors and mimics the provisional fibrin matrix between actively growing breast cancer cells and the tumor stroma. We have demonstrated PRP functions, modulating cell proliferation that is tumor-subtype and cancer cell-type-specific. Epithelial and stromal primary cells were prepared from breast cancer biopsies from 21 women with different cancer subtypes. Cells supplemented with PRP were immunoblotted with anti-phospho and total Src-Tyr-416, FAK-Try-925, E-cadherin, N-cadherin, TGF-β, Smad2, and Snail monoclonal antibodies. Breast tumor cells from luminal B and HER2 subtypes showed the most malignant profiles and the expression of thrombin and other classes of proteases at levels that were detectable through FRET peptide libraries. The angiogenesis process was investigated in the interface obtained between platelet-fibrin-breast tumor cells co-cultured with HUVEC cells. Luminal B and HER2 cells showed robust endothelial cell capillary-like tubes ex vivo. The studied interface contributes to the attachment of endothelial cells, provides a source of growth factors, and is a solid substrate. Thus, replacement of FBS supplementation with PRP supplementation represents an efficient and simple approach for mimicking the real multifactorial tumor microenvironment.

  1. Mucocele-like tumor and columnar cell hyperplasia of the breast occurring in a morphologic continuum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadare Oluwole

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Mucocele-like tumor was originally described in 1986 as a benign breast proliferation consisting of multiple dilated cysts lined by cytologically bland, flat to cuboidal cells. Subsequent reports described the coexistence of, including the morphologic inter-transitions between, mucocele-like tumor and a variety of other breast proliferations, including intraductal carcinoma, invasive carcinoma, atypical ductal hyperplasia, and hyperplasia of the usual type. The spectrum of breast alterations characterized by variably enlarged terminal-ductal lobular units lined by variably hyperplastic and variably atypical columnar cells has been the subject of significant discussion in the recent literature. In one scheme, these lesions may be classified into four groups, that is, columnar cell change with and without atypia and columnar cell hyperplasia with and without atypia. Morphologic and molecular observations suggest an association, perhaps in a nonobligate precursor role, between some columnar cell lesions and a variety of other neoplastic lesions. Case presentation We describe the case of a 43-year-old woman whose breast tumor contained areas diagnostic of mucocele-like tumor and columnar cell hyperplasia, with morphologic transitions in between. Conclusion Our case represents the second broadly similar case that has been reported, and suggests a potential relationship between these two enigmatic lesions.

  2. Cancer stem cells from human breast tumors are involved in spontaneous metastases in orthotopic mouse models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huiping; Patel, Manishkumar R.; Prescher, Jennifer A.; Patsialou, Antonia; Qian, Dalong; Lin, Jiahui; Wen, Susanna; Chang, Ya-Fang; Bachmann, Michael H.; Shimono, Yohei; Dalerba, Piero; Adorno, Maddalena; Lobo, Neethan; Bueno, Janet; Dirbas, Frederick M.; Goswami, Sumanta; Somlo, George; Condeelis, John; Contag, Christopher H.; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam; Clarke, Michael F.

    2010-01-01

    To examine the role of breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) in metastasis, we generated human-in-mouse breast cancer orthotopic models using patient tumor specimens, labeled with optical reporter fusion genes. These models recapitulate human cancer features not captured with previous models, including spontaneous metastasis in particular, and provide a useful platform for studies of breast tumor initiation and progression. With noninvasive imaging approaches, as few as 10 cells of stably labeled BCSCs could be tracked in vivo, enabling studies of early tumor growth and spontaneous metastasis. These advances in BCSC imaging revealed that CD44+ cells from both primary tumors and lung metastases are highly enriched for tumor-initiating cells. Our metastatic cancer models, combined with noninvasive imaging techniques, constitute an integrated approach that could be applied to dissect the molecular mechanisms underlying the dissemination of metastatic CSCs (MCSCs) and to explore therapeutic strategies targeting MCSCs in general or to evaluate individual patient tumor cells and predict response to therapy. PMID:20921380

  3. Breast cancer cells form primary tumors on ex vivo four-dimensional lung model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pence, Kristi A; Mishra, Dhruva K; Thrall, Michael; Dave, Bhuvanesh; Kim, Min P

    2017-04-01

    Breast cancer mortality is most common in cancer in women, and there are no ex vivo models that can capture the primary growth of tumor with fidelity to the in vivo tumor growth. In this study, we grew human breast cancer cell lines in an acellular lung matrix of the ex vivo four-dimensional lung model to determine if they form primary tumor and the extent to which they mimic the histology and characteristics of the human tumors. Rat lungs were harvested, decellularized, and placed in a bioreactor. To study the primary tumor growth, we seeded the lung via the trachea with human breast cancer cells SUM159, MCF7, or MDMB231 and perfused the pulmonary artery with oxygenated media. Lobectomies were performed and processed for hematoxylin and eosin, Ki-67, caspase-3, estrogen receptor, and progesterone receptor antibodies. All three cell lines grew in the ex vivo four-dimensional model and formed perfusable tumor nodules with similar histology and morphology as the primary tumors. SUM159 and MDAMB231 showed higher proliferation and apoptotic indices than MCF7. In addition, MCF7 retained its estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor positivity, whereas SUM159 and MDAMB 231 did not have any staining. Overall, our study showed that human breast cancer cells can be grown on the ex vivo four-dimensional lung model, which then form primary tumor nodules that mimic the morphology and histology of the original tumor. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Human adipose tissue from normal and tumoral breast regulates the behavior of mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistone Creydt, Virginia; Fletcher, Sabrina Johanna; Giudice, Jimena; Bruzzone, Ariana; Chasseing, Norma Alejandra; Gonzalez, Eduardo Gustavo; Sacca, Paula Alejandra; Calvo, Juan Carlos

    2013-02-01

    Stromal-epithelial interactions mediate both breast development and breast cancer progression. In the present work, we evaluated the effects of conditioned media (CMs) of human adipose tissue explants from normal (hATN) and tumor (hATT) breast on proliferation, adhesion, migration and metalloproteases activity on tumor (MCF-7 and IBH-7) and non-tumor (MCF-10A) human breast epithelial cell lines. Human adipose tissues were obtained from patients and the conditioned medium from hATN and hATT collected after 24 h of incubation. MCF-10A, MCF-7 and IBH-7 cells were grown and incubated with CMs and proliferation and adhesion, as well as migration ability and metalloprotease activity, of epithelial cells after exposing cell cultures to hATN- or hATT-CMs were quantified. The statistical significance between different experimental conditions was evaluated by one-way ANOVA. Tukey's post hoc tests were performed. Tumor and non-tumor breast epithelial cells significantly increased their proliferation activity after 24 h of treatment with hATT-CMs compared to control-CMs. Furthermore, cellular adhesion of these two tumor cell lines was significantly lower with hATT-CMs than with hATN-CMs. Therefore, hATT-CMs seem to induce significantly lower expression or less activity of the components involved in cellular adhesion than hATN-CMs. In addition, hATT-CMs induced pro-MMP-9 and MMP-9 activity and increased the migration of MCF-7 and IBH-7 cells compared to hATN-CMs. We conclude that the microenvironment of the tumor interacts in a dynamic way with the mutated epithelium. This evidence leads to the possibility to modify the tumor behavior/phenotype through the regulation or modification of its microenvironment. We developed a model in which we obtained CMs from adipose tissue explants completely, either from normal or tumor breast. In this way, we studied the contribution of soluble factors independently of the possible effects of direct cell contact.

  5. Myeloid cells in circulation and tumor microenvironment of breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toor, Salman M; Syed Khaja, Azharuddin Sajid; El Salhat, Haytham; Faour, Issam; Kanbar, Jihad; Quadri, Asif A; Albashir, Mohamed; Elkord, Eyad

    2017-06-01

    Pathological conditions including cancers lead to accumulation of a morphological mixture of highly immunosuppressive cells termed as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC). The lack of conclusive markers to identify human MDSC, due to their heterogeneous nature and close phenotypical and functional proximity with other cell subsets, made it challenging to identify these cells. Nevertheless, expansion of MDSC has been reported in periphery and tumor microenvironment of various cancers. The majority of studies on breast cancers were performed on murine models and hence limited literature is available on the relation of MDSC accumulation with clinical settings in breast cancer patients. The aim of this study was to investigate levels and phenotypes of myeloid cells in peripheral blood (n = 23) and tumor microenvironment of primary breast cancer patients (n = 7), compared with blood from healthy donors (n = 21) and paired non-tumor normal breast tissues from the same patients (n = 7). Using multicolor flow cytometric assays, we found that breast cancer patients had significantly higher levels of tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells, which comprised of granulocytes (P = 0.022) and immature cells that lack the expression of markers for fully differentiated monocytes or granulocytes (P = 0.016). Importantly, this expansion was not reflected in the peripheral blood. The immunosuppressive potential of these cells was confirmed by expression of Arginase 1 (ARG1), which is pivotal for T-cell suppression. These findings are important for developing therapeutic modalities to target mechanisms employed by immunosuppressive cells that generate an immune-permissive environment for the progression of cancer.

  6. Intravital multiphoton imaging reveals multicellular streaming as a crucial component of in vivo cell migration in human breast tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patsialou, Antonia; Bravo-Cordero, Jose Javier; Wang, Yarong; Entenberg, David; Liu, Huiping; Clarke, Michael; Condeelis, John S.

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis is the main cause of death in breast cancer patients. Cell migration is an essential component of almost every step of the metastatic cascade, especially the early step of invasion inside the primary tumor. In this report, we have used intravital multiphoton microscopy to visualize the different migration patterns of human breast tumor cells in live primary tumors. We used xenograft tumors of MDA-MB-231 cells as well as a low passage xenograft tumor from orthotopically injected patient-derived breast tumor cells. Direct visualization of human tumor cells in vivo shows two patterns of high-speed migration inside primary tumors: a. single cells and b. multicellular streams (i.e., cells following each other in a single file but without cohesive cell junctions). Critically, we found that only streaming and not random migration of single cells was significantly correlated with proximity to vessels, with intravasation and with numbers of elevated circulating tumor cells in the bloodstream. Finally, although the two human tumors were derived from diverse genetic backgrounds, we found that their migratory tumor cells exhibited coordinated gene expression changes that led to the same end-phenotype of enhanced migration involving activating actin polymerization and myosin contraction. Our data are the first direct visualization and assessment of in vivo migration within a live patient-derived breast xenograft tumor. PMID:25013744

  7. Relevance of Tumor-Infiltrating Immune Cell Composition and Functionality for Disease Outcome in Breast Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bense, Rico D.; Sotiriou, Christos; Piccart-Gebhart, Martine J.; Haanen, John B. A. G.; van Vugt, Marcel A. T. M.; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; Schroeder, Carolien P.; Fehrmann, Rudolf S. N.

    Background: Not all breast cancer patients benefit from neoadjuvant or adjuvant therapy, resulting in considerable undertreatment or overtreatment. New insights into the role of tumor-infiltrating immune cells suggest that their composition, as well as their functionality, might serve as a biomarker

  8. Simultaneous loss of the DLC1 and PTEN tumor suppressors enhances breast cancer cell migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heering, Johanna; Erlmann, Patrik [University of Stuttgart, Institute of Cell Biology and Immunology, Allmandring 31, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Olayioye, Monilola A., E-mail: monilola.olayioye@izi.uni-stuttgart.de [University of Stuttgart, Institute of Cell Biology and Immunology, Allmandring 31, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2009-09-10

    The phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) gene is a tumor suppressor frequently deleted or mutated in sporadic tumors of the breast, prostate, endometrium and brain. The protein acts as a dual specificity phosphatase for lipids and proteins. PTEN loss confers a growth advantage to cells, protects from apoptosis and favors cell migration. The deleted in liver cancer 1 (DLC1) gene has emerged as a novel tumor suppressor downregulated in a variety of tumor types including those of the breast. DLC1 contains a Rho GTPase activating domain that is involved in the inhibition of cell proliferation, migration and invasion. To investigate how simultaneous loss of PTEN and DLC1 contributes to cell transformation, we downregulated both proteins by RNA interference in the non-invasive MCF7 breast carcinoma cell line. Joint depletion of PTEN and DLC1 resulted in enhanced cell migration in wounding and chemotactic transwell assays. Interestingly, both proteins were found to colocalize at the plasma membrane and interacted physically in biochemical pulldowns and coimmunoprecipitations. We therefore postulate that the concerted local inactivation of signaling pathways downstream of PTEN and DLC1, respectively, is required for the tight control of cell migration.

  9. Cytotoxicity and anti-tumor effects of new ruthenium complexes on triple negative breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecília P Popolin

    Full Text Available Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC is a highly aggressive breast cancer subtype. The high rate of metastasis associated to the fact that these cells frequently display multidrug resistance, make the treatment of metastatic disease difficult. Development of antitumor metal-based drugs was started with the discovery of cisplatin, however, the severe side effects represent a limitation for its clinical use. Ruthenium (Ru complexes with different ligands have been successfully studied as prospective antitumor drugs. In this work, we demonstrated the activity of a series of biphosphine bipyridine Ru complexes (1 [Ru(SO4(dppb(bipy], (2 [Ru(CO3(dppb(bipy], (3 [Ru(C2O4(dppb(bipy] and (4 [Ru(CH3CO2(dppb(bipy]PF6 [where dppb = 1,4-bis(diphenylphosphinobutane and bipy = 2,2'-bipyridine], on proliferation of TNBC (MDA-MB-231, estrogen-dependent breast tumor cells (MCF-7 and a non-tumor breast cell line (MCF-10A. Complex (4 was most effective among the complexes and was selected to be further investigated on effects on tumor cell adhesion, migration, invasion and in apoptosis. Moreover, DNA and HSA binding properties of this complex were also investigated. Results show that complex (4 was more efficient inhibiting proliferation of MDA-MB-231 cells over non-tumor cells. In addition, complex (4 was able to inhibit MDA-MB231 cells adhesion, migration and invasion and to induce apoptosis and inhibit MMP-9 secretion in TNBC cells. Complex (4 should be further investigated in vivo in order to stablish its potential to improve breast cancer treatment.

  10. Cleavage/Repair and Signal Transduction Pathways in Irradiated Breast Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-09-01

    influence of p53 function on Radiation Research, 135, 75-80. radiosensitivity of human glioblastoma cells . Cancer SuMŽ•,txRAN,• V. N., EALOVEGA, N’I. WV...after drug exposure while Leung et ted mitotic arrest and giant cell formation in irradiated al. [75] reported that continuous exposure for 24 h to MCF-7...Signal Transduction Pathways in Irradiated Breast Tumor Cells PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: David A. Gewirtz, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Virginia

  11. Malignant phyllodes breast tumor

    OpenAIRE

    Lisa R. Shah-Patel, MD

    2017-01-01

    Malignant phyllodes tumor is a rare tumor of the breast occurring in females usually between the ages of 35 and 55 years. It is often difficult to distinguish benign from malignant phyllodes tumors from other benign entities such as fibroadenomas. This case presentation demonstrates a woman with malignant phyllodes tumor treated with mastectomy with abdominal skin flap reconstruction.

  12. Malignant phyllodes breast tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa R. Shah-Patel, MD

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Malignant phyllodes tumor is a rare tumor of the breast occurring in females usually between the ages of 35 and 55 years. It is often difficult to distinguish benign from malignant phyllodes tumors from other benign entities such as fibroadenomas. This case presentation demonstrates a woman with malignant phyllodes tumor treated with mastectomy with abdominal skin flap reconstruction.

  13. Androgen receptor expression on circulating tumor cells in metastatic breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeo Fujii

    Full Text Available Androgen receptor (AR is frequently detected in breast cancers, and AR-targeted therapies are showing activity in AR-positive (AR+ breast cancer. However, the role of AR in breast cancers is still not fully elucidated and the biology of AR in breast cancer remains incompletely understood. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs can serve as prognostic and diagnostic tools, prompting us to measure AR protein expression and conduct genomic analyses on CTCs in patients with metastatic breast cancer.Blood samples from patients with metastatic breast cancer were deposited on glass slides, subjected to nuclear staining with DAPI, and reacted with fluorescent-labeled antibodies to detect CD45, cytokeratin (CK, and biomarkers of interest (AR, estrogen receptor [ER], and HER2 on all nucleated cells. The stained slides were scanned and enumerated by non-enrichment-based non-biased approach independent of cell surface epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM using the Epic Sciences CTC platform. Data were analyzed using established digital pathology algorithms.Of 68 patients, 51 (75% had at least 1 CTC, and 49 of these 51 (96% had hormone-receptor-positive (HR+/HER2-negative primary tumors. AR was expressed in CK+ CTCs in 10 patients. Of these 10 patients, 3 also had ER expression in CK+ CTCs. Single cell genomic analysis of 78 CTCs from 1 of these 3 patients identified three distinct copy number patterns. AR+ cells had a lower frequency of chromosomal changes than ER+ and HER2+ cells.CTC enumeration and analysis using no enrichment or selection provides a non-biased approach to detect AR expression and chromosomal aberrations in CTCs in patients with metastatic breast cancer. The heterogeneity of intrapatient AR expression in CTCs leads to the new hypothesis that patients with AR+ CTCs have heterogeneous disease with multiple drivers. Further studies are warranted to investigate the clinical applicability of AR+ CTCs and their heterogeneity.

  14. Androgen receptor expression on circulating tumor cells in metastatic breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Takeo; Reuben, James M.; Huo, Lei; Espinosa Fernandez, Jose Rodrigo; Gong, Yun; Krupa, Rachel; Suraneni, Mahipal V.; Graf, Ryon P.; Lee, Jerry; Greene, Stephanie; Rodriguez, Angel; Dugan, Lyndsey; Louw, Jessica; Lim, Bora; Barcenas, Carlos H.; Marx, Angela N.; Tripathy, Debu; Wang, Yipeng; Landers, Mark; Dittamore, Ryan

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Androgen receptor (AR) is frequently detected in breast cancers, and AR-targeted therapies are showing activity in AR-positive (AR+) breast cancer. However, the role of AR in breast cancers is still not fully elucidated and the biology of AR in breast cancer remains incompletely understood. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) can serve as prognostic and diagnostic tools, prompting us to measure AR protein expression and conduct genomic analyses on CTCs in patients with metastatic breast cancer. Methods Blood samples from patients with metastatic breast cancer were deposited on glass slides, subjected to nuclear staining with DAPI, and reacted with fluorescent-labeled antibodies to detect CD45, cytokeratin (CK), and biomarkers of interest (AR, estrogen receptor [ER], and HER2) on all nucleated cells. The stained slides were scanned and enumerated by non-enrichment-based non-biased approach independent of cell surface epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) using the Epic Sciences CTC platform. Data were analyzed using established digital pathology algorithms. Results Of 68 patients, 51 (75%) had at least 1 CTC, and 49 of these 51 (96%) had hormone-receptor-positive (HR+)/HER2-negative primary tumors. AR was expressed in CK+ CTCs in 10 patients. Of these 10 patients, 3 also had ER expression in CK+ CTCs. Single cell genomic analysis of 78 CTCs from 1 of these 3 patients identified three distinct copy number patterns. AR+ cells had a lower frequency of chromosomal changes than ER+ and HER2+ cells. Conclusions CTC enumeration and analysis using no enrichment or selection provides a non-biased approach to detect AR expression and chromosomal aberrations in CTCs in patients with metastatic breast cancer. The heterogeneity of intrapatient AR expression in CTCs leads to the new hypothesis that patients with AR+ CTCs have heterogeneous disease with multiple drivers. Further studies are warranted to investigate the clinical applicability of AR+ CTCs and their

  15. Integrin-dependent response to laminin-511 regulates breast tumor cell invasion and metastasis.

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    Kusuma, Nicole; Denoyer, Delphine; Eble, Johannes A; Redvers, Richard P; Parker, Belinda S; Pelzer, Rebecca; Anderson, Robin L; Pouliot, Normand

    2012-02-01

    The basement membrane protein, laminin (LM)-511, is a potent adhesive and migratory substrate for metastatic breast tumor cells in vitro. Its expression correlates with tumor grade and metastatic potential in vivo. These observations suggest that responsiveness to autocrine or paracrine-derived LM-511 may be an important property regulating breast cancer metastasis in vivo. To address this, we compared the metastatic potential of 4T1 mammary carcinoma cells to that of 4T1 variants isolated by repeated chemotactic migration toward LM-511 in vitro (4T1LMF4) followed by serial injection into the mammary gland and recovery of spontaneous metastases from bone (4T1BM2). Variant subpopulations exhibited a distinct morphology on LM-511 and increased expression of β1 and β4 integrins compared to parental 4T1 cells. Importantly, mice inoculated with 4T1LMF4 and 4T1BM2 variants showed a 2.5- to 4-fold increase in the incidence of spontaneous metastasis to bone compared to 4T1 tumor-bearing mice. Functionally, 4T1BM2 variants were more adherent and more invasive toward LM-511 than parental 4T1 cells. Treatment of 4T1BM2 cells with lebein-1, a disintegrin with selectivity toward LM-type integrin receptors, potently inhibited their migration and invasion toward LM-511. Similarly, α3β1 integrin-dependent migration and invasion of human MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cells toward LM-511 were significantly inhibited by lebein-1. Taken together, these results provide strong evidence that LM-511 contributes to the metastasis of breast tumors and suggest that targeting integrin-LM-511 interactions with lebein-1 or other inhibitors of LM-511 receptors may have therapeutic potential for patients with advanced breast cancer. Copyright © 2011 UICC.

  16. Loss of CSL Unlocks a Hypoxic Response and Enhanced Tumor Growth Potential in Breast Cancer Cells

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    Eike-Benjamin Braune

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Notch signaling is an important regulator of stem cell differentiation. All canonical Notch signaling is transmitted through the DNA-binding protein CSL, and hyperactivated Notch signaling is associated with tumor development; thus it may be anticipated that CSL deficiency should reduce tumor growth. In contrast, we report that genetic removal of CSL in breast tumor cells caused accelerated growth of xenografted tumors. Loss of CSL unleashed a hypoxic response during normoxic conditions, manifested by stabilization of the HIF1α protein and acquisition of a polyploid giant-cell, cancer stem cell-like, phenotype. At the transcriptome level, loss of CSL upregulated more than 1,750 genes and less than 3% of those genes were part of the Notch transcriptional signature. Collectively, this suggests that CSL exerts functions beyond serving as the central node in the Notch signaling cascade and reveals a role for CSL in tumorigenesis and regulation of the cellular hypoxic response.

  17. Polyclonal breast cancer metastases arise from collective dissemination of keratin 14-expressing tumor cell clusters.

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    Cheung, Kevin J; Padmanaban, Veena; Silvestri, Vanesa; Schipper, Koen; Cohen, Joshua D; Fairchild, Amanda N; Gorin, Michael A; Verdone, James E; Pienta, Kenneth J; Bader, Joel S; Ewald, Andrew J

    2016-02-16

    Recent genomic studies challenge the conventional model that each metastasis must arise from a single tumor cell and instead reveal that metastases can be composed of multiple genetically distinct clones. These intriguing observations raise the question: How do polyclonal metastases emerge from the primary tumor? In this study, we used multicolor lineage tracing to demonstrate that polyclonal seeding by cell clusters is a frequent mechanism in a common mouse model of breast cancer, accounting for >90% of metastases. We directly observed multicolored tumor cell clusters across major stages of metastasis, including collective invasion, local dissemination, intravascular emboli, circulating tumor cell clusters, and micrometastases. Experimentally aggregating tumor cells into clusters induced a >15-fold increase in colony formation ex vivo and a >100-fold increase in metastasis formation in vivo. Intriguingly, locally disseminated clusters, circulating tumor cell clusters, and lung micrometastases frequently expressed the epithelial cytoskeletal protein, keratin 14 (K14). RNA-seq analysis revealed that K14(+) cells were enriched for desmosome and hemidesmosome adhesion complex genes, and were depleted for MHC class II genes. Depletion of K14 expression abrogated distant metastases and disrupted expression of multiple metastasis effectors, including Tenascin C (Tnc), Jagged1 (Jag1), and Epiregulin (Ereg). Taken together, our findings reveal K14 as a key regulator of metastasis and establish the concept that K14(+) epithelial tumor cell clusters disseminate collectively to colonize distant organs.

  18. Polyclonal breast cancer metastases arise from collective dissemination of keratin 14-expressing tumor cell clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Kevin J.; Padmanaban, Veena; Silvestri, Vanesa; Schipper, Koen; Cohen, Joshua D.; Fairchild, Amanda N.; Gorin, Michael A.; Verdone, James E.; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Bader, Joel S.; Ewald, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent genomic studies challenge the conventional model that each metastasis must arise from a single tumor cell and instead reveal that metastases can be composed of multiple genetically distinct clones. These intriguing observations raise the question: How do polyclonal metastases emerge from the primary tumor? In this study, we used multicolor lineage tracing to demonstrate that polyclonal seeding by cell clusters is a frequent mechanism in a common mouse model of breast cancer, accounting for >90% of metastases. We directly observed multicolored tumor cell clusters across major stages of metastasis, including collective invasion, local dissemination, intravascular emboli, circulating tumor cell clusters, and micrometastases. Experimentally aggregating tumor cells into clusters induced a >15-fold increase in colony formation ex vivo and a >100-fold increase in metastasis formation in vivo. Intriguingly, locally disseminated clusters, circulating tumor cell clusters, and lung micrometastases frequently expressed the epithelial cytoskeletal protein, keratin 14 (K14). RNA-seq analysis revealed that K14+ cells were enriched for desmosome and hemidesmosome adhesion complex genes, and were depleted for MHC class II genes. Depletion of K14 expression abrogated distant metastases and disrupted expression of multiple metastasis effectors, including Tenascin C (Tnc), Jagged1 (Jag1), and Epiregulin (Ereg). Taken together, our findings reveal K14 as a key regulator of metastasis and establish the concept that K14+ epithelial tumor cell clusters disseminate collectively to colonize distant organs. PMID:26831077

  19. ABCG2 is a potential marker of tumor-initiating cells in breast cancer.

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    Sicchieri, Renata Danielle; da Silveira, Willian Abraham; Mandarano, Larissa Raquel Mouro; de Oliveira, Tatiane Mendes Gonçalves; Carrara, Hélio Humberto Angotti; Muglia, Valdair Francisco; de Andrade, Jurandyr Moreira; Tiezzi, Daniel Guimarães

    2015-12-01

    The existence of tumor-initiating cells (TICs) within solid tumors has been hypothesized to explain tumor heterogeneity and resistance to cancer therapy. In breast cancer, the expression of CD44 and CD24 and the activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) can be used to selectively isolate a cell population enriched in TICs. However, the ideal marker to identify TICs has not been established. The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of novel potential markers for TIC in breast carcinoma. We prospectively analyzed the expression of CD44, CD24, ABCG2, and CXCR4, and the activity of ALDH1 by using flow cytometry in 48 invasive ductal carcinomas from locally advanced and metastatic breast cancer patients who were administered primary chemotherapy. A mammosphere assay was employed in 30 samples. The relationship among flow cytometric analyses, ABCG2 gene expression, and clinical and pathological responses to therapy was analyzed. The GSE32646 database was analyzed in silico to identify genes associated with tumors with low and high ABCG2 expression. We observed that the presence of ABCG2(+) cells within the primary tumor was the only marker to predict the formation of mammospheres in vitro (R (2) = 0.15, p = 0.029). Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) revealed a positive correlation between ABCG2 expression and the presence of ABCG2(+) cells within the primary tumor. The expression of ABCG2 was predictive of the response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in our experiments and in the GSE32646 dataset (p = 0.04 and p = 0.002, respectively). The in silico analysis demonstrated that ABCG2(Up) breast cancer samples have a slower cell cycle and a higher expression of membrane proteins but a greater potential for chromosomal instability, metastasis, immune evasion, and resistance to hypoxia. Such genetic characteristics are compatible with highly aggressive and resistant tumors. Our results support the hypothesis that the presence of ABCG2

  20. Rapid spread of mouse mammary tumor virus in cultured human breast cells

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    Günzburg Walter H

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV as a causative agent in human breast carcinogenesis has recently been the subject of renewed interest. The proposed model is based on the detection of MMTV sequences in human breast cancer but not in healthy breast tissue. One of the main drawbacks to this model, however, was that until now human cells had not been demonstrated to sustain productive MMTV infection. Results Here, we show for the first time the rapid spread of mouse mammary tumor virus, MMTV(GR, in cultured human mammary cells (Hs578T, ultimately leading to the infection of every cell in culture. The replication of the virus was monitored by quantitative PCR, quantitative RT-PCR and immunofluorescence imaging. The infected human cells expressed, upon cultivation with dexamethasone, MMTV structural proteins and released spiked B-type virions, the infectivity of which could be neutralized by anti-MMTV antibody. Replication of the virus was efficiently blocked by an inhibitor of reverse transcription, 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine. The human origin of the infected cells was confirmed by determining a number of integration sites hosting the provirus, which were unequivocally identified as human sequences. Conclusion Taken together, our results show that human cells can support replication of mouse mammary tumor virus.

  1. Adipose progenitor cells increase fibronectin matrix strain and unfolding in breast tumors

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    Chandler, E. M.; Saunders, M. P.; Yoon, C. J.; Gourdon, D.; Fischbach, C.

    2011-02-01

    Increased stiffness represents a hallmark of breast cancer that has been attributed to the altered physicochemical properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM). However, the role of fibronectin (Fn) in modulating the composition and mechanical properties of the tumor-associated ECM remains unclear. We have utilized a combination of biochemical and physical science tools to evaluate whether paracrine signaling between breast cancer cells and adipose progenitor cells regulates Fn matrix assembly and stiffness enhancement in the tumor stroma. In particular, we utilized fluorescence resonance energy transfer imaging to map the molecular conformation and stiffness of Fn that has been assembled by 3T3-L1 preadipocytes in response to conditioned media from MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells. Our results reveal that soluble factors secreted by tumor cells promote Fn expression, unfolding, and stiffening by adipose progenitor cells and that transforming growth factor-β serves as a soluble cue underlying these changes. In vivo experiments using orthotopic co-transplantation of primary human adipose-derived stem cells and MDA-MB231 into SCID mice support the pathological relevance of our results. Insights gained by these studies advance our understanding of the role of Fn in mammary tumorigenesis and may ultimately lead to improved anti-cancer therapies.

  2. Promotion of Tumor-Initiating Cells in Primary and Recurrent Breast Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Her2+ relative to responses to inhibitors and effects on TICs. Experimental approaches: C3Tag and Her2+ transgenic animal genotyping [animals are...Chodosh -- collaborator/W81XWH-12-10-0177 -Univ. Pennsylvania) --- Using conditional transgenic mouse models for Her2/neu-driven breast cancers...plated in 3ml of Mammocult media (Stem Cell Technologies, Vancouver, BC, Canada) on six-well low-adhesion plates ( Corning , Corning , NY, USA). Cells

  3. Aspirin blocks growth of breast tumor cells and tumor-initiating cells and induces reprogramming factors of mesenchymal to epithelial transition.

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    Maity, Gargi; De, Archana; Das, Amlan; Banerjee, Snigdha; Sarkar, Sandipto; Banerjee, Sushanta K

    2015-07-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), also known as aspirin, a classic, nonsteroidal, anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), is widely used to relieve minor aches and pains and to reduce fever. Epidemiological studies and other experimental studies suggest that ASA use reduces the risk of different cancers including breast cancer (BC) and may be used as a chemopreventive agent against BC and other cancers. These studies have raised the tempting possibility that ASA could serve as a preventive medicine for BC. However, lack of in-depth knowledge of the mechanism of action of ASA reshapes the debate of risk and benefit of using ASA in prevention of BC. Our studies, using in vitro and in vivo tumor xenograft models, show a strong beneficial effect of ASA in the prevention of breast carcinogenesis. We find that ASA not only prevents breast tumor cell growth in vitro and tumor growth in nude mice xenograft model through the induction of apoptosis, but also significantly reduces the self-renewal capacity and growth of breast tumor-initiating cells (BTICs)/breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) and delays the formation of a palpable tumor. Moreover, ASA regulates other pathophysiological events in breast carcinogenesis, such as reprogramming the mesenchymal to epithelial transition (MET) and delaying in vitro migration in BC cells. The tumor growth-inhibitory and reprogramming roles of ASA could be mediated through inhibition of TGF-β/SMAD4 signaling pathway that is associated with growth, motility, invasion, and metastasis in advanced BCs. Collectively, ASA has a therapeutic or preventive potential by attacking possible target such as TGF-β in breast carcinogenesis.

  4. Occult Breast Lobular Carcinoma with Numerous Circulating Tumor Cells in Peripheral Blood

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    Kanako Ogura

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We experienced a very rare case of occult breast lobular carcinoma with numerous circulating tumor cells in peripheral blood. The diagnosis was very difficult because there were no symptoms of breast cancer and the preceding chief complaints such as general fatigue and weight loss or abnormality of peripheral blood findings were suggestive of a hematological disease. We could make a correct diagnosis of this case by checking the findings of complete blood count and bone marrow biopsy at the same time using immunohistochemistry.

  5. Exploring Glycan Markers for Immunotyping and Precision-targeting of Breast Circulating Tumor Cells

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    Wang, Denong; Liu, Xiaohe; Hsieh, Ben; Bruce, Richard; Somlo, George; Huang, Jiaoti; Sambucetti, Lidia

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Recognition of abnormal glycosylation in virtually every cancer type has raised great interest in exploration of the tumor glycome for biomarker discovery. Identifying glycan markers of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) represents a new development in tumor biomarker discovery. The aim of this study was to establish an experimental approach to enable rapid screening of CTCs for glycan marker identification and characterization. Methods We applied carbohydrate microarrays and a high-speed fiber-optic array scanning technology (FAST scan) to explore potential glycan markers of breast CTCs (bCTCs) and targeting antibodies. An anti-tumor monoclonal antibody, HAE3-C1 (C1), was identified as a key immunological probe in this study. Results In our carbohydrate microarray analysis, C1 was found to be highly specific for an O-glycan cryptic epitope, gpC1. Using FAST-scan technology, we established a procedure to quantify expression levels of gpC1 in tumor cells. In blood samples from five stage IV metastatic breast cancer patients, the gpC1 positive CTCs were detected in all subjects; ~40% of bCTCs were strongly gpC1 positive. Interestingly, CTCs from a triple-negative breast cancer patient with multiple sites of metastasis were predominantly gpC1 positive (92.5%, 37/40 CTCs). Conclusions Together we present here a practical approach to examine rare cell expression of glycan markers. Using this approach, we identified an O-core glyco-determinant gpC1 as a potential immunological target of bCTCs. Given its bCTC-expression profile, this target warrants an extended investigation in a larger cohort of breast cancer patients. PMID:26657044

  6. Exploring Glycan Markers for Immunotyping and Precision-targeting of Breast Circulating Tumor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Denong; Liu, Xiaohe; Hsieh, Ben; Bruce, Richard; Somlo, George; Huang, Jiaoti; Sambucetti, Lidia

    2015-11-01

    Recognition of abnormal glycosylation in virtually every cancer type has raised great interest in exploration of the tumor glycome for biomarker discovery. Identifying glycan markers of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) represents a new development in tumor biomarker discovery. The aim of this study was to establish an experimental approach to enable rapid screening of CTCs for glycan marker identification and characterization. We applied carbohydrate microarrays and a high-speed fiber-optic array scanning technology (FAST scan) to explore potential glycan markers of breast CTCs (bCTCs) and targeting antibodies. An anti-tumor monoclonal antibody, HAE3-C1 (C1), was identified as a key immunological probe in this study. In our carbohydrate microarray analysis, C1 was found to be highly specific for an O-glycan cryptic epitope, gp(C1). Using FAST-scan technology, we established a procedure to quantify expression levels of gp(C1) in tumor cells. In blood samples from five stage IV metastatic breast cancer patients, the gp(C1) positive CTCs were detected in all subjects; ∼40% of bCTCs were strongly gp(C1) positive. Interestingly, CTCs from a triple-negative breast cancer patient with multiple sites of metastasis were predominantly gp(C1) positive (92.5%, 37/40 CTCs). Together we present here a practical approach to examine rare cell expression of glycan markers. Using this approach, we identified an O-core glyco-determinant gp(C1) as a potential immunological target of bCTCs. Given its bCTC-expression profile, this target warrants an extended investigation in a larger cohort of breast cancer patients. Copyright © 2015 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Chest wall tumors presenting as breast lumps.

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    Shousha, Sami; Sinnett, H Dudley

    2004-01-01

    Two recently seen patients presenting with large breast lumps that proved to be pure mesenchymal tumors arising from the underlying chest wall are presented. One tumor proved to be a giant cell tumor of soft tissue and the other an osteogenic sarcoma. It is suggested that these two cases may not be unique and that some mesenchymal breast tumors might have their origin in the chest wall. Breast computed tomography (CT) scans would help identify similar cases.

  8. Circulating tumor cells in breast cancer: functional heterogeneity, pathogenetic and clinical aspects.

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    Cherdyntseva, N V; Litviakov, N V; Denisov, E V; Gervas, P A; Cherdyntsev, E S

    2017-03-01

    Each patient has a unique history of cancer ecosystem development, resulting in intratumor heterogeneity. In order to effectively kill the tumor cells by chemotherapy, dynamic monitoring of driver molecular alterations is necessary to detect the markers for acquired drug resistance and find the new therapeutic targets. To perform the therapeutic monitoring, frequent tumor biopsy is needed, but it is not always possible due to small tumor size or its regression during the therapy or tumor inaccessibility in advanced cancer patients. Liquid biopsy appears to be a promising approach to overcome this problem, providing the testing of circulating tumor cells (CTC) and/or tumor-specific circulating nucleic acids. Their genomic characteristics make it possible to assess the clonal dynamics of tumors, comparing it with the clinical course and identification of driver mutation that confer resistance to therapy. The main attention in this review is paid to CTC. The biological behavior of the tumor is determined by specific cancer-promoting molecular and genetic alterations of tumor cells, and by the peculiarities of their interactions with the microenvironment that can result in the presence of wide spectrum of circulating tumor clones with various properties and potentialities to contribute to tumor progression and response to chemotherapy and prognostic value. Indeed, data on prognostic or predictive value of CTC are rather contradictory, because there is still no standard method of CTC identification, represented by different populations manifesting various biological behavior as well as different potency to metastasis. Circulating clasters of CTC appear to have essentially greater ability to metastasize in comparison with single CTC, as well as strong association with worse prognosis and chemoresistance in breast cancer patients. The Food and Drug Administration (USA) has approved the CTC-based prognostic test for clinical application in patients with advanced breast

  9. Breast tumor cell-specific knockout ofTwist1inhibits cancer cell plasticity, dissemination, and lung metastasis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yixiang; Lee, Dong-Kee; Feng, Zhen; Xu, Yan; Bu, Wen; Li, Yi; Liao, Lan; Xu, Jianming

    2017-10-24

    Twist1 is an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-inducing transcription factor (TF) that promotes cell migration and invasion. To determine the intrinsic role of Twist1 in EMT and breast cancer initiation, growth, and metastasis, we developed mouse models with an oncogene-induced mammary tumor containing wild-type (WT) Twist1 or tumor cell-specific Twist1 knockout (Twist1 TKO ). Twist1 knockout showed no effects on tumor initiation and growth. In both models with early-stage tumor cells, Twist1, and mesenchymal markers were not expressed, and lung metastasis was absent. Twist1 expression was detected in ∼6% of the advanced WT tumor cells. Most of these Twist1 + cells coexpressed several other EMT-inducing TFs (Snail, Slug, Zeb2), lost ERα and luminal marker K8, acquired basal cell markers (K5, p63), and exhibited a partial EMT plasticity (E-cadherin + /vimentin + ). In advanced Twist1 TKO tumor cells, Twist1 knockout largely diminished the expression of the aforementioned EMT-inducing TFs and basal and mesenchymal markers, but maintained the expression of the luminal markers. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) were commonly detected in mice with advanced WT tumors, but not in mice with advanced Twist1 TKO tumors. Nearly all WT CTCs coexpressed Twist1 with other EMT-inducing TFs and both epithelial and mesenchymal markers. Mice with advanced WT tumors developed extensive lung metastasis consisting of luminal tumor cells with silenced Twist1 and mesenchymal marker expression. Mice with advanced Twist1 TKO tumors developed very little lung metastasis. Therefore, Twist1 is required for the expression of other EMT-inducing TFs in a small subset of tumor cells. Together, they induce partial EMT, basal-like tumor progression, intravasation, and metastasis. Published under the PNAS license.

  10. Aberrant expression of novel and previously described cell membrane markers in human breast cancer cell lines and tumors.

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    Huang, Huayi; Groth, Jeff; Sossey-Alaoui, Khalid; Hawthorn, Lesleyann; Beall, Stephanie; Geradts, Joseph

    2005-06-15

    In a previous gene expression array study, we identified some 300 genes that were differentially expressed in human epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase 2 (HER2)-positive versus HER2-negative breast cancer cells. We have now done validation experiments on a group of three cell membrane components that had previously not been implicated in breast cancer. We also studied the expression of three other cell membrane proteins known to play a role in mammary neoplasia. By immunohistochemistry, we examined up to 130 archival breast carcinomas for Celsr2, E-cadherin, Kai1, and CD9 expression. The expression levels of NET-6 and TROP-2 were determined by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR in a subset of frozen tumors. We also studied fresh pellets and paraffin-embedded cell buttons of nine human breast cell lines. The relationship between the expression of all six membrane proteins and a variety of pathologic and biological variables, including estrogen receptor, HER2, and epidermal growth factor receptor status, was also examined. The NET-6 gene was transfected into a low-expressing cell line, and the effect on cellular morphology, growth, and invasion in vitro was recorded. Celsr2 was down-regulated in one cell line and in 7% of breast cancers. E-cadherin, Kai1, and CD9 were down-regulated in 35%, 76%, and 79% of tumors, respectively, confirming the important role of these markers in human mammary neoplasia. In breast cancer cell lines and tissues, TROP-2 was generally expressed at low levels, although a few specimens showed relative overexpression. NET-6 levels were lower in HER2-negative breast carcinoma cells. In addition, NET-6 was markedly down-regulated in estrogen receptor-negative breast cancers, and expression was lowest in "basal-like" tumors. Ectopic expression of NET-6 in low-expressing MDA-MB-231 cells altered cellular morphology, inhibited growth in vitro, and decreased invasion in a Boyden chamber assay. We have confirmed the expression of

  11. Transcription factor c-Myb inhibits breast cancer lung metastasis by suppression of tumor cell seeding.

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    Knopfová, L; Biglieri, E; Volodko, N; Masařík, M; Hermanová, M; Glaus Garzón, J F; Dúcka, M; Kučírková, T; Souček, K; Šmarda, J; Beneš, P; Borsig, L

    2017-10-30

    Metastasis accounts for most of cancer-related deaths. Paracrine signaling between tumor cells and the stroma induces changes in the tumor microenvironment required for metastasis. Transcription factor c-Myb was associated with breast cancer (BC) progression but its role in metastasis remains unclear. Here we show that increased c-Myb expression in BC cells inhibits spontaneous lung metastasis through impaired tumor cell extravasation. On contrary, BC cells with increased lung metastatic capacity exhibited low c-Myb levels. We identified a specific inflammatory signature, including Ccl2 chemokine, that was expressed in lung metastatic cells but was suppressed in tumor cells with higher c-Myb levels. Tumor cell-derived Ccl2 expression facilitated lung metastasis and rescued trans-endothelial migration of c-Myb overexpressing cells. Clinical data show that the identified inflammatory signature, together with a MYB expression, predicts lung metastasis relapse in BC patients. These results demonstrate that the c-Myb-regulated transcriptional program in BCs results in a blunted inflammatory response and consequently suppresses lung metastasis.Oncogene advance online publication, 30 October 2017; doi:10.1038/onc.2017.392.

  12. Multiple breast cancer cell-lines derived from a single tumor differ in their molecular characteristics and tumorigenic potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goar Mosoyan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Breast cancer cell lines are widely used tools to investigate breast cancer biology and to develop new therapies. Breast cancer tissue contains molecularly heterogeneous cell populations. Thus, it is important to understand which cell lines best represent the primary tumor and have similarly diverse phenotype. Here, we describe the development of five breast cancer cell lines from a single patient's breast cancer tissue. We characterize the molecular profiles, tumorigenicity and metastatic ability in vivo of all five cell lines and compare their responsiveness to 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT treatment. METHODS: Five breast cancer cell lines were derived from a single patient's primary breast cancer tissue. Expression of different antigens including HER2, estrogen receptor (ER, CK8/18, CD44 and CD24 was determined by flow cytometry, western blotting and immunohistochemistry (IHC. In addition, a Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization (FISH assay for HER2 gene amplification and p53 genotyping was performed on all cell lines. A xenograft model in nude mice was utilized to assess the tumorigenic and metastatic abilities of the breast cancer cells. RESULTS: We have isolated, cloned and established five new breast cancer cell lines with different tumorigenicity and metastatic abilities from a single primary breast cancer. Although all the cell lines expressed low levels of ER, their growth was estrogen-independent and all had high-levels of expression of mutated non-functional p53. The HER2 gene was rearranged in all cell lines. Low doses of 4-OHT induced proliferation of these breast cancer cell lines. CONCLUSIONS: All five breast cancer cell lines have different antigenic expression profiles, tumorigenicity and organ specific metastatic abilities although they derive from a single tumor. None of the studied markers correlated with tumorigenic potential. These new cell lines could serve as a model for detailed genomic and proteomic analyses to

  13. Proteolysis-a characteristic of tumor-initiating cells in murine metastatic breast cancer

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    Hillebrand, Larissa E.; Bengsch, Fee; Hochrein, Jochen; Hülsdünker, Jan; Bender, Julia; Follo, Marie; Busch, Hauke; Boerries, Melanie; Reinheckel, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Tumor initiating cells (TICs) have been identified and functionally characterized in hematological malignancies as well as in solid tumors such as breast cancer. In addition to their high tumor-initiating potential, TICs are founder cells for metastasis formation and are involved in chemotherapy resistance. In this study we explored molecular pathways which enable this tumor initiating potential for a cancer cell subset of the transgenic MMTV-PyMT mouse model for metastasizing breast cancer. The cell population, characterized by the marker profile CD24+CD90+CD45−, showed a high tumorigenicity compared to non-CD24+CD90+CD45− cancer cells in colony formation assays, as well as upon orthotopic transplantation into the mammary fat pad of mice. In addition, these orthotopically grown CD24+CD90+CD45− TICs metastasized to the lungs. The transcriptome of TICs freshly isolated from primary tumors by cell sorting was compared with that of sorted non-CD24+CD90+CD45− cancer cells by RNA-seq. In addition to more established TIC signatures, such as epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition or mitogen signaling, an upregulated gene set comprising several classes of proteolytic enzymes was uncovered in the TICs. Accordingly, TICs showed high intra- and extracellular proteolytic activity. Application of a broad range of protease inhibitors to TICs in a colony formation assay reduced anchorage independent growth and had an impact on colony morphology in 3D cell culture assays. We conclude that CD24+CD90+CD45− cells of the MMTV- PyMT mouse model possess an upregulated proteolytic signature which could very well represent a functional hallmark of metastatic TICs from mammary carcinomas. PMID:27542270

  14. Prognostic significance of progesterone receptor-positive tumor cells within immunohistochemically defined luminal A breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prat, Aleix; Cheang, Maggie Chon U; Martín, Miguel; Parker, Joel S; Carrasco, Eva; Caballero, Rosalía; Tyldesley, Scott; Gelmon, Karen; Bernard, Philip S; Nielsen, Torsten O; Perou, Charles M

    2013-01-10

    Current immunohistochemical (IHC)-based definitions of luminal A and B breast cancers are imperfect when compared with multigene expression-based assays. In this study, we sought to improve the IHC subtyping by examining the pathologic and gene expression characteristics of genomically defined luminal A and B subtypes. Gene expression and pathologic features were collected from primary tumors across five independent cohorts: British Columbia Cancer Agency (BCCA) tamoxifen-treated only, Grupo Español de Investigación en Cáncer de Mama 9906 trial, BCCA no systemic treatment cohort, PAM50 microarray training data set, and a combined publicly available microarray data set. Optimal cutoffs of percentage of progesterone receptor (PR) -positive tumor cells to predict survival were derived and independently tested. Multivariable Cox models were used to test the prognostic significance. Clinicopathologic comparisons among luminal A and B subtypes consistently identified higher rates of PR positivity, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) negativity, and histologic grade 1 in luminal A tumors. Quantitative PR gene and protein expression were also found to be significantly higher in luminal A tumors. An empiric cutoff of more than 20% of PR-positive tumor cells was statistically chosen and proved significant for predicting survival differences within IHC-defined luminal A tumors independently of endocrine therapy administration. Finally, no additional prognostic value within hormonal receptor (HR) -positive/HER2-negative disease was observed with the use of the IHC4 score when intrinsic IHC-based subtypes were used that included the more than 20% PR-positive tumor cells and vice versa. Semiquantitative IHC expression of PR adds prognostic value within the current IHC-based luminal A definition by improving the identification of good outcome breast cancers. The new proposed IHC-based definition of luminal A tumors is HR positive/HER2 negative/Ki-67 less than 14

  15. Nuclear location of tumor suppressor protein maspin inhibits proliferation of breast cancer cells without affecting proliferation of normal epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Maspin, which is classified as a tumor suppressor protein, is downregulated in many types of cancer. Several studies have suggested potential anti-proliferative activity of maspin as well as sensitizing activity of maspin for therapeutic cytotoxic agents in breast cancer tissue culture and animal models. All of the experimental data gathered so far have been based on studies with maspin localized cytoplasmically, while maspin in breast cancer tumor cells may be located in the cytoplasm, nucleus or both. In this study, the effect of maspin cytoplasmic and nuclear location and expression level on breast cancer proliferation and patient survival was studied. Methods Tissue sections from 166 patients with invasive ductal breast cancer were stained by immunohistochemistry for maspin and Ki-67 protein. The localization and expression level of maspin were correlated with estimated patient overall survival and percent of Ki-67-positive cells. In further studies, we created constructs for transient transfection of maspin into breast cancer cells with targeted cytoplasmic and nuclear location. We analyzed the effect of maspin location in normal epithelial cell line MCF10A and three breast cancer cell lines - MCF-7, MDA-MB-231 and SKBR-3 - by immunofluorescence and proliferation assay. Results We observed a strong positive correlation between moderate and high nuclear maspin level and survival of patients. Moreover, a statistically significant negative relationship was observed between nuclear maspin and Ki-67 expression in patients with invasive ductal breast cancer. Spearman’s correlation analysis showed a negative correlation between level of maspin localized in nucleus and percentage of Ki-67 positive cells. No such differences were observed in cells with cytoplasmic maspin. We found a strong correlation between nuclear maspin and loss of Ki-67 protein in breast cancer cell lines, while there was no effect in normal epithelial cells from breast. The anti

  16. Paracrine Interactions between Adipocytes and Tumor Cells Recruit and Modify Macrophages to the Mammary Tumor Microenvironment: The Role of Obesity and Inflammation in Breast Adipose Tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santander, Ana M.; Lopez-Ocejo, Omar; Casas, Olivia; Agostini, Thais; Sanchez, Lidia; Lamas-Basulto, Eduardo; Carrio, Roberto [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, 1600 NW 10th Ave, Miami, FL 33136 (United States); Cleary, Margot P. [Hormel Institute, University of Minnesota, Austin, MN 55912 (United States); Gonzalez-Perez, Ruben R. [Department of Microbiology, Biochemistry and Immunology, Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30314 (United States); Torroella-Kouri, Marta, E-mail: mtorroella@med.miami.edu [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, 1600 NW 10th Ave, Miami, FL 33136 (United States); Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, 1475 NW 12th Ave, Miami, FL 33136 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    The relationship between obesity and breast cancer (BC) has focused on serum factors. However, the mammary gland contains adipose tissue (AT) which may enable the crosstalk between adipocytes and tumor cells contributing to tumor macrophage recruitment. We hypothesize that the breast AT (bAT) is inflamed in obese females and plays a major role in breast cancer development. The effects of this interplay on macrophage chemotaxis were examined in vitro, using co-cultures of mouse macrophages, mammary tumor cells and adipocytes. Macrophages were exposed to the adipocyte and tumor paracrine factors leptin, CCL2 and lauric acid (alone or in combinations). In cell supernatants Luminex identified additional molecules with chemotactic and other pro-tumor functions. Focus on the adipokine leptin, which has been shown to have a central role in breast cancer pathogenesis, indicated it modulates macrophage phenotypes and functions. In vivo experiments demonstrate that mammary tumors from obese mice are larger and that bAT from obese tumor-bearers contains higher numbers of macrophages/CLS and hypertrophic adipocytes than bAT from lean tumor-bearers, thus confirming it is more inflamed. Also, bAT distal from the tumor is more inflamed in obese than in lean mice. Our results reveal that bAT plays a role in breast cancer development in obesity.

  17. Osteoprotegerin mediates tumor-promoting effects of Interleukin-1beta in breast cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chung, S.T.M. (Stephanie Tsang Mui); D. Geerts (Dirk); Roseman, K. (Kim); Renaud, A. (Ashleigh); Connelly, L. (Linda)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstract__Background:__ It is widely recognized that inflammation promotes breast cancer invasion and metastasis. Given the complex nature of the breast tumor inflammatory microenvironment, much remains to be understood of the molecular mechanisms that govern these effects. We have

  18. Breast cancer cell behaviors on staged tumorigenesis-mimicking matrices derived from tumor cells at various malignant stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshiba, Takashi; Tanaka, Masaru

    2013-09-20

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) has been focused to understand tumor progression in addition to the genetic mutation of cancer cells. Here, we prepared "staged tumorigenesis-mimicking matrices" which mimic in vivo ECM in tumor tissue at each malignant stage to understand the roles of ECM in tumor progression. Breast tumor cells, MDA-MB-231 (invasive), MCF-7 (non-invasive), and MCF-10A (benign) cells, were cultured to form their own ECM beneath the cells and formed ECM was prepared as staged tumorigenesis-mimicking matrices by decellularization treatment. Cells showed weak attachment on the matrices derived from MDA-MB-231 cancer cells. The proliferations of MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 was promoted on the matrices derived from MDA-MB-231 cancer cells whereas MCF-10A cell proliferation was not promoted. MCF-10A cell proliferation was promoted on the matrices derived from MCF-10A cells. Chemoresistance of MDA-MB-231 cells against 5-fluorouracil increased on only matrices derived from MDA-MB-231 cells. Our results showed that the cells showed different behaviors on staged tumorigenesis-mimicking matrices according to the malignancy of cell sources for ECM preparation. Therefore, staged tumorigenesis-mimicking matrices might be a useful in vitro ECM models to investigate the roles of ECM in tumor progression. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Tocotrienol-adjuvanted dendritic cells inhibit tumor growth and metastasis: a murine model of breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sitti Rahma Abdul Hafid

    Full Text Available Tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF from palm oil is reported to possess anti-cancer and immune-enhancing effects. In this study, TRF supplementation was used as an adjuvant to enhance the anti-cancer effects of dendritic cells (DC-based cancer vaccine in a syngeneic mouse model of breast cancer. Female BALB/c mice were inoculated with 4T1 cells in mammary pad to induce tumor. When the tumor was palpable, the mice in the experimental groups were injected subcutaneously with DC-pulsed with tumor lysate (TL from 4T1 cells (DC+TL once a week for three weeks and fed daily with 1 mg TRF or vehicle. Control mice received unpulsed DC and were fed with vehicle. The combined therapy of using DC+TL injections and TRF supplementation (DC+TL+TRF inhibited (p<0.05 tumor growth and metastasis. Splenocytes from the DC+TL+TRF group cultured with mitomycin-C (MMC-treated 4T1 cells produced higher (p<0.05 levels of IFN-γ and IL-12. The cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL assay also showed enhanced tumor-specific killing (p<0.05 by CD8(+ T-lymphocytes isolated from mice in the DC+TL+TRF group. This study shows that TRF has the potential to be used as an adjuvant to enhance effectiveness of DC-based vaccines.

  20. DC-SCRIPT is a novel regulator of the tumor suppressor gene CDKN2B and induces cell cycle arrest in ERα-positive breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansems, Marleen; Søndergaard, Jonas Nørskov; Sieuwerts, Anieta M; Looman, Maaike W G; Smid, Marcel; de Graaf, Annemarie M A; de Weerd, Vanja; Zuidscherwoude, Malou; Foekens, John A; Martens, John W M; Adema, Gosse J

    2015-02-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer-related deaths in women. The estrogen receptor (ERα) is well known for having growth promoting effects in breast cancer. Recently, we have identified DC-SCRIPT (ZNF366) as a co-suppressor of ERα and as a strong and independent prognostic marker in ESR1 (ERα gene)-positive breast cancer patients. In this study, we further investigated the molecular mechanism on how DC-SCRIPT inhibits breast cancer cell growth. DC-SCRIPT mRNA levels from 190 primary ESR1-positive breast tumors were related to global gene expression, followed by gene ontology and pathway analysis. The effect of DC-SCRIPT on breast cancer cell growth and cell cycle arrest was investigated using novel DC-SCRIPT-inducible MCF7 breast cancer cell lines. Genome-wide expression profiling of DC-SCRIPT-expressing MCF7 cells was performed to investigate the effect of DC-SCRIPT on cell cycle-related gene expression. Findings were validated by real-time PCR in a cohort of 1,132 ESR1-positive breast cancer patients. In the primary ESR1-positive breast tumors, DC-SCRIPT expression negatively correlated with several cell cycle gene ontologies and pathways. DC-SCRIPT expression strongly reduced breast cancer cell growth in vitro, breast tumor growth in vivo, and induced cell cycle arrest. In addition, in the presence of DC-SCRIPT, multiple cell cycles related genes were differentially expressed including the tumor suppressor gene CDKN2B. Moreover, in 1,132 primary ESR1-positive breast tumors, DC-SCRIPT expression also correlated with CDKN2B expression. Collectively, these data show that DC-SCRIPT acts as a novel regulator of CDKN2B and induces cell cycle arrest in ESR1-positive breast cancer cells.

  1. Citral reduces breast tumor growth by inhibiting the cancer stem cell marker ALDH1A3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Margaret Lois; de Antueno, Roberto; Coyle, Krysta Mila; Sultan, Mohammad; Cruickshank, Brianne Marie; Giacomantonio, Michael Anthony; Giacomantonio, Carman Anthony; Duncan, Roy; Marcato, Paola

    2016-11-01

    Breast cancer stem cells (CSCs) can be identified by increased Aldefluor fluorescence caused by increased expression of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A3 (ALDH1A3), as well as ALDH1A1 and ALDH2. In addition to being a CSC marker, ALDH1A3 regulates gene expression via retinoic acid (RA) signaling and plays a key role in the progression and chemotherapy resistance of cancer. Therefore, ALDH1A3 represents a druggable anti-cancer target of interest. Since to date, there are no characterized ALDH1A3 isoform inhibitors, drugs that were previously described as inhibiting the activity of other ALDH isoforms were tested for anti-ALDH1A3 activity. Twelve drugs (3-hydroxy-dl-kynurenine, benomyl, citral, chloral hydrate, cyanamide, daidzin, DEAB, disulfiram, gossypol, kynurenic acid, molinate, and pargyline) were compared for their efficacy in inducing apoptosis and reducing ALDH1A3, ALDH1A1 and ALDH2-associated Aldefluor fluorescence in breast cancer cells. Citral was identified as the best inhibitor of ALDH1A3, reducing the Aldefluor fluorescence in breast cancer cell lines and in a patient-derived tumor xenograft. Nanoparticle encapsulated citral specifically reduced the enhanced tumor growth of MDA-MB-231 cells overexpressing ALDH1A3. To determine the potential mechanisms of citral-mediated tumor growth inhibition, we performed cell proliferation, clonogenic, and gene expression assays. Citral reduced ALDH1A3-mediated colony formation and expression of ALDH1A3-inducible genes. In conclusion, citral is an effective ALDH1A3 inhibitor and is able to block ALDH1A3-mediated breast tumor growth, potentially via blocking its colony forming and gene expression regulation activity. The promise of ALDH1A3 inhibitors as adjuvant therapies for patients with tumors that have a large population of high-ALDH1A3 CSCs is discussed. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Myoepithelial Cells : Any role in aspiration cytology smears of breast tumors?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pattari Sanjib

    2008-01-01

    situ versus malignant (p < .001, Mann Whitney test. However number of ME cell was not significant between PBD versus carcinoma in situ. Conclusion: The number of ME cell in breast lesions may be helpful in distinguishing PBD versus invasive malignant tumors on FNAC smears. However it is not helpful to distinguish benign lesions versus PBD.

  3. Myoepithelial Cells: Any role in aspiration cytology smears of breast tumors?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pattari Sanjib

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aims and Objective To study the role of myoepithelial (ME cells in distinguishing benign, proliferative breast diseases (PBD and frank malignant breast lesions. Materials and methods In this study, histology proven 71 cases of fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC of palpable breast lesions were selected. There were 30 invasive carcinomas (24 infiltrating duct carcinoma and 6 infiltrating lobular carcinoma, 25 cases of benign lesion (21 fibroadenomas and 4 fibrocystic lesions and 11 proliferative breast diseases (other than carcinoma in situ and five cases of carcinoma in situ. The number of ME cells were estimated in respect to 1000 ductal cells. In every case at least 20 high power fields (× 40 were studied. Quantitative estimation of ME cell was correlated with the final diagnosis. Corresponding histopathology cases were also evaluated for diagnostic confirmation along with the pattern of distribution of ME cells. The ME cells were also quantitated on histopathology sections on smooth muscle actin (SMA immunostained sections. Results The mean number of ME cells per 1000 ductal cells on cytology smears was 5.1 ± 5.5, 30.8 ± 25, 28.3 ± 20.2, and 38.4 ± 38.8 in malignant, carcinoma in situ, PBD and benign breast lesions respectively. The non parametric Mann Whitney test showed significant difference in number of the ME cells between benign and malignant groups (p .01. In SMA stained histopathology sections, ME cell in benign, PBD, carcinoma in situ and malignant cases were 741.12 ± 248, 238 ± 172, 121.6 ± 115 and 15.6 ± 25.1 respectively. Statistical analysis showed significantly different number of ME cell between benign versus PBD group, carcinoma in situ and malignant group. It was also significant between PBD versus malignant, and carcinoma in situ versus malignant (p Conclusion The number of ME cell in breast lesions may be helpful in distinguishing PBD versus invasive malignant tumors on FNAC smears. However it is not

  4. A monoclonal antibody cocktail for detection of micrometastatic tumor cells in the bone marrow of breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, M; Ordoñez, N G; Kulkarni, S; Owen, M; Ro, J S; Hortobagyi, G; Reading, C L; Dicke, K A; Spitzer, G

    1989-05-01

    We investigated whether monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) reactive against both acidic and basic cytokeratins alone were sufficient to detect minimal numbers of contaminating epithelial tumor cells in the bone marrow of breast cancer patients. Monoclonal anti-cytokeratin antibodies (AE1 and AE3) were used to stain 14 breast carcinomas by the avidin-biotin-peroxidase technique. Nine tumors (64.3%) showed high reactivity and five (35.7%) showed low or moderate reactivity. Nine MoAbs that proved to be unreactive to light density bone marrow cells by immunoalkaline phosphatase histochemistry were screened for reactivity to breast carcinomas having only low or moderate positivity to cytokeratin antibodies. Three of nine MoAbs showed high percentages of positivity and were selected to supplement the anti-cytokeratin antibodies for immunohistochemical detection of minimal marrow disease in breast cancer patients. A MoAb cocktail was prepared, further tested for reactivity to another five breast carcinomas, and compared with cytokeratin staining alone. The cocktail labeled 100% of carcinoma cells in all the examined specimens. To determine the sensitivity of this panel for detecting minimal numbers of contaminating tumor cells in bone marrow, in vitro mixing experiments were performed. T47D breast carcinoma cells were mixed with bone marrow mononuclear cells at ratios from one tumor cell per 10 bone marrow cells up to one tumor cell per 1 x 10(6) marrow cells, and cytospin preparations were subsequently stained with the MoAb cocktail by the immunoalkaline phosphatase method. Our approach could detect one tumor cell in 1 x 10(5) hematopoietic cells.

  5. Breast Carcinoma Cells in Primary Tumors and Effusions Have Different Gene Array Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophya Konstantinovsky

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The detection of breast carcinoma cells in effusions is associated with rapidly fatal outcome, but these cells are poorly characterized at the molecular level. This study compared the gene array signatures of breast carcinoma cells in primary carcinomas and effusions. The genetic signature of 10 primary tumors and 10 effusions was analyzed using the Array-Ready Oligo set for the Human Genome platform. Results for selected genes were validated using PCR, Western blotting, and immunohistochemistry. Array analysis identified 255 significantly downregulated and 96 upregulated genes in the effusion samples. The majority of differentially expressed genes were part of pathways involved in focal adhesion, extracellular matrix-cell interaction, and the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. Genes that were upregulated in effusions included KRT8, BCAR1, CLDN4, VIL2, while DCN, CLDN19, ITGA7, and ITGA5 were downregulated at this anatomic site. PCR, Western blotting, and immunohistochemistry confirmed the array findings for BCAR1, CLDN4, VIL2, and DCN. Our data show that breast carcinoma cells in primary carcinomas and effusions have different gene expression signatures, and differentially express a large number of molecules related to adhesion, motility, and metastasis. These differences may have a critical role in designing therapy and in prognostication for patients with metastatic disease localized to the serosal cavities.

  6. Toward a siRNA-containing nanoparticle targeted to breast cancer cells and the tumor microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes-da-Silva, Lígia C; Santos, Adriana O; Bimbo, Luís M; Moura, Vera; Ramalho, José S; Pedroso de Lima, Maria C; Simões, Sérgio; Moreira, João N

    2012-09-15

    The present work aimed at designing a lipid-based nanocarrier for siRNA delivery toward two cell sub-populations within breast tumors, the cancer and the endothelial cells from angiogenic tumor blood vessels. To achieve such goal, the F3 peptide, which is specifically internalized by nucleolin overexpressed on both those sub-populations, was used as a targeting moiety. The developed F3-targeted stable nucleic acid lipid particles presented adequate features for systemic administration. In addition, the attachment of the F3 peptide onto the liposomal surface enabled an internalization by both cancer and endothelial cells from angiogenic blood vessels that was significantly higher than the one observed with non-cancer cells. Sequence-specific downregulation of enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) in eGFP-overexpressing human cancer cell lines, both at the protein and mRNA levels, was further observed upon delivery of anti-eGFP siRNA by F3-targeted liposomes, in contrast with the non-targeted counterpart. This effect was highly dependent on the content of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), as evidenced by the co-localization studies between the siRNA and the lysosomes. Overall, the present work represents an important contribution toward a nanoparticle with multi-targeting capabilities in breast cancer, both at the cellular and molecular level. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. DNA ploidy and S phase fraction of breast and ovarian tumor cells treated with a natural anthracycline analog (aloin).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmat, Amr Y; El-Gerzawy, Shadia M; Rafaat, Amira

    2005-01-01

    DNA ploidy and S phase fraction analysis by flow cytometry on breast and ovarian tumor cells continuously exposed to aloin, a natural anthraquinone, at two concentrations (20-60 microg/ml) was done. Untreated breast and ovarian tumor cells (control) showed an aneuploid pattern, with a mean DNA index of 2.10+/-0.10 and S phase fraction of 28.46+/-1.5 and 17.40+/-0.75%, respectively. Treatment of breast and ovarian tumor cells with aloin showed a persistent aneuploid pattern and a significantly dose-dependent increase in the percentage of S phase fraction and in the proportion of cells cycling at a higher ploidy level (>G2M). The polyploidization indicates that aloin does not inhibit initiation of DNA synthesis and that cells replicated a full complement of DNA but had difficulty in M phase.

  8. Molecular profiling of breast cancer cell lines defines relevant tumor models and provides a resource for cancer gene discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Kao

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer cell lines have been used widely to investigate breast cancer pathobiology and new therapies. Breast cancer is a molecularly heterogeneous disease, and it is important to understand how well and which cell lines best model that diversity. In particular, microarray studies have identified molecular subtypes-luminal A, luminal B, ERBB2-associated, basal-like and normal-like-with characteristic gene-expression patterns and underlying DNA copy number alterations (CNAs. Here, we studied a collection of breast cancer cell lines to catalog molecular profiles and to assess their relation to breast cancer subtypes.Whole-genome DNA microarrays were used to profile gene expression and CNAs in a collection of 52 widely-used breast cancer cell lines, and comparisons were made to existing profiles of primary breast tumors. Hierarchical clustering was used to identify gene-expression subtypes, and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA to discover biological features of those subtypes. Genomic and transcriptional profiles were integrated to discover within high-amplitude CNAs candidate cancer genes with coordinately altered gene copy number and expression.Transcriptional profiling of breast cancer cell lines identified one luminal and two basal-like (A and B subtypes. Luminal lines displayed an estrogen receptor (ER signature and resembled luminal-A/B tumors, basal-A lines were associated with ETS-pathway and BRCA1 signatures and resembled basal-like tumors, and basal-B lines displayed mesenchymal and stem/progenitor-cell characteristics. Compared to tumors, cell lines exhibited similar patterns of CNA, but an overall higher complexity of CNA (genetically simple luminal-A tumors were not represented, and only partial conservation of subtype-specific CNAs. We identified 80 high-level DNA amplifications and 13 multi-copy deletions, and the resident genes with concomitantly altered gene-expression, highlighting known and novel candidate breast cancer

  9. Can Biomarker Assessment on Circulating Tumor Cells Help Direct Therapy in Metastatic Breast Cancer?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, Natalie [Sandro Pitigliani Medical Oncology Department, Prato Hospital, Istituto Toscano Tumori, Via Ugo Foscolo, Prato, PO 59100 (Italy); Pestrin, Marta [Sandro Pitigliani Medical Oncology Department, Prato Hospital, Istituto Toscano Tumori, Via Ugo Foscolo, Prato, PO 59100 (Italy); Translational Research Laboratory, Prato Hospital, Via Ugo Foscolo, Prato, PO 59100 (Italy); Galardi, Francesca; De Luca, Francesca [Translational Research Laboratory, Prato Hospital, Via Ugo Foscolo, Prato, PO 59100 (Italy); Malorni, Luca [Sandro Pitigliani Medical Oncology Department, Prato Hospital, Istituto Toscano Tumori, Via Ugo Foscolo, Prato, PO 59100 (Italy); Translational Research Laboratory, Prato Hospital, Via Ugo Foscolo, Prato, PO 59100 (Italy); Di Leo, Angelo, E-mail: adileo@usl4.toscana.it [Sandro Pitigliani Medical Oncology Department, Prato Hospital, Istituto Toscano Tumori, Via Ugo Foscolo, Prato, PO 59100 (Italy)

    2014-03-25

    Circulating tumor cell (CTC) count has prognostic significance in metastatic breast cancer, but the predictive utility of CTCs is uncertain. Molecular studies on CTCs have often been limited by a low number of CTCs isolated from a high background of leukocytes. Improved enrichment techniques are now allowing molecular characterisation of single CTCs, whereby molecular markers on single CTCs may provide a real-time assessment of tumor biomarker status from a blood test or “liquid biopsy”, potentially negating the need for a more invasive tissue biopsy. The predictive ability of CTC biomarker analysis has predominantly been assessed in relation to HER2, with variable and inconclusive results. Limited data exist for other biomarkers, such as the estrogen receptor. In addition to the need to define and validate the most accurate and reproducible method for CTC molecular analysis, the clinical relevance of biomarkers, including gain of HER2 on CTC after HER2 negative primary breast cancer, remains uncertain. This review summarises the currently available data relating to biomarker evaluation on CTCs and its role in directing management in metastatic breast cancer, discusses limitations, and outlines measures that may enable future development of this approach.

  10. Spontaneous formation of tumorigenic hybrids between breast cancer and multipotent stromal cells is a source of tumor heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappa, Germana; Mercapide, Javier; Lorico, Aurelio

    2012-06-01

    Breast cancer progression involves cancer cell heterogeneity, with generation of invasive/metastatic breast cancer cells within populations of nonmetastatic cells of the primary tumor. Sequential genetic mutations, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, interaction with local stroma, and formation of hybrids between cancer cells and normal bone marrow-derived cells have been advocated as tumor progression mechanisms. We report herein the spontaneous in vitro formation of heterotypic hybrids between human bone marrow-derived multipotent stromal cells (MSCs) and two different breast carcinoma cell lines, MDA-MB-231 (MDA) and MA11. Hybrids showed predominantly mesenchymal morphological characteristics, mixed gene expression profiles, and increased DNA ploidy. Both MA11 and MDA hybrids were tumorigenic in immunodeficient mice, and some MDA hybrids had an increased metastatic capacity. Both in culture and as xenografts, hybrids underwent DNA ploidy reduction and morphological reversal to breast carcinoma-like morphological characteristics, while maintaining a mixed breast cancer-mesenchymal expression profile. Analysis of coding single-nucleotide polymorphisms by RNA sequencing revealed genetic contributions from both parental partners to hybrid tumors and metastasis. Because MSCs migrate and localize to breast carcinoma, our findings indicate that formation of MSC-breast cancer cell hybrids is a potential mechanism of the generation of invasive/metastatic breast cancer cells. Our findings reconcile the fusion theory of cancer progression with the common observation that breast cancer metastases are generally aneuploid, but not tetraploid, and are histopathologically similar to the primary neoplasm. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The Potential of Circulating Tumor Cells in Personalized Management of Breast Cancer: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatami, Fatemeh; Aghayan, Hamid Reza; Sanaei, Maryam; Heshmat, Ramin; Tavangar, Seyed Mohammad; Larijani, Bagher

    2017-03-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) recognition and characterization in the peripheral blood of patients with breast cancer have proven practical and predictive value in different studies. However, the clinical significance of CTCs enumeration and molecular characterization in thepersonalization of breast cancer diagnosis and treatment remains under the debate. A literature search in PubMed, Web of Science and Scopus was performed from October 1990 to June 2016 for studies which evaluating CTCs and its association with clinical and pathological characteristics and medical outcome in the field of breast cancer personalization for both diagnosis and treatment categories. The treatment outcomes were progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) or relapse in different patients. Sixty-nine studies met the inclusion criteria. The sample size varies from 1 to 2026. Median follow-up was 15 months (range 3-27). Different molecular techniques have been applied toresearch, but they mostly are based on CTCs enrichment and then detection by using FDA-approved Cell SearchTM. By far the most studies define CTCs as cytokeratins (CK) positive and CD45 negative cells. Despite the differences in methodology, twenty-eight studies for breast cancer diagnosis and prognosis were mainly focused on CTCs isolation and enumeration.Forty-threeresearches were about CTCs count and exact molecular characterization. In the way of precision treatment, CTCs detection before starting the first-line of therapy or during therapy in breast cancer patients is extremely valuable, but in the way of precision medicine it should be supported with some molecular characteristics of CTCs like CTCs phenotypic changes, gene expression analysis of CTCs and molecular characteristics of CTCs.

  12. The Potential of Circulating Tumor Cells in Personalized Management of Breast Cancer: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Khatami

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cells (CTCs recognition and characterization in the peripheral blood of patients with breast cancer have proven practical and predictive value in different studies. However, the clinical significance of CTCs enumeration and molecular characterization in thepersonalization of breast cancer diagnosis and treatment remains under the debate. A literature search in PubMed, Web of Science and Scopus was performed from October 1990 to June 2016 for studies which evaluating CTCs and its association with clinical and pathological characteristics and medical outcome in the field of breast cancer personalization for both diagnosis and treatment categories. The treatment outcomes were progression-free survival (PFS and overall survival (OS or relapse in different patients. Sixty-nine studies met the inclusion criteria. The sample size varies from 1 to 2026. Median follow-up was 15 months (range 3-27. Different molecular techniques have been applied toresearch, but they mostly are based on CTCs enrichment and then detection by using FDA-approved Cell SearchTM. By far the most studies define CTCs as cytokeratins (CK positive and CD45 negative cells. Despite the differences in methodology, twenty-eight studies for breast cancer diagnosis and prognosis were mainly focused on CTCs isolation and enumeration.Forty-threeresearches were about CTCs count and exact molecular characterization. In the way of precision treatment, CTCs detection before starting the first-line of therapy or during therapy in breast cancer patients is extremely valuable, but in the way of precision medicine it should be supported with some molecular characteristics of CTCs like CTCs phenotypic changes, gene expression analysis of CTCs and molecular characteristics of CTCs.

  13. Levels of plasma circulating cell free nuclear and mitochondrial DNA as potential biomarkers for breast tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diesch Claude

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the aim to simplify cancer management, cancer research lately dedicated itself more and more to discover and develop non-invasive biomarkers. In this connection, circulating cell-free DNA (ccf DNA seems to be a promising candidate. Altered levels of ccf nuclear DNA (nDNA and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA have been found in several cancer types and might have a diagnostic value. Methods Using multiplex real-time PCR we investigated the levels of ccf nDNA and mtDNA in plasma samples from patients with malignant and benign breast tumors, and from healthy controls. To evaluate the applicability of plasma ccf nDNA and mtDNA as a biomarker for distinguishing between the three study-groups we performed ROC (Receiver Operating Characteristic curve analysis. We also compared the levels of both species in the cancer group with clinicopathological parameters. Results While the levels of ccf nDNA in the cancer group were significantly higher in comparison with the benign tumor group (P P P P = 0.022. The level of ccf nDNA was also associated with tumor-size (2 cmP = 0.034. Using ROC curve analysis, we were able to distinguish between the breast cancer cases and the healthy controls using ccf nDNA as marker (cut-off: 1866 GE/ml; sensitivity: 81%; specificity: 69%; P P Conclusion Our data suggests that nuclear and mitochondrial ccf DNA have potential as biomarkers in breast tumor management. However, ccf nDNA shows greater promise regarding sensitivity and specificity.

  14. Prognostic Significance of Progesterone Receptor–Positive Tumor Cells Within Immunohistochemically Defined Luminal A Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prat, Aleix; Cheang, Maggie Chon U.; Martín, Miguel; Parker, Joel S.; Carrasco, Eva; Caballero, Rosalía; Tyldesley, Scott; Gelmon, Karen; Bernard, Philip S.; Nielsen, Torsten O.; Perou, Charles M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Current immunohistochemical (IHC)-based definitions of luminal A and B breast cancers are imperfect when compared with multigene expression-based assays. In this study, we sought to improve the IHC subtyping by examining the pathologic and gene expression characteristics of genomically defined luminal A and B subtypes. Patients and Methods Gene expression and pathologic features were collected from primary tumors across five independent cohorts: British Columbia Cancer Agency (BCCA) tamoxifen-treated only, Grupo Español de Investigación en Cáncer de Mama 9906 trial, BCCA no systemic treatment cohort, PAM50 microarray training data set, and a combined publicly available microarray data set. Optimal cutoffs of percentage of progesterone receptor (PR) –positive tumor cells to predict survival were derived and independently tested. Multivariable Cox models were used to test the prognostic significance. Results Clinicopathologic comparisons among luminal A and B subtypes consistently identified higher rates of PR positivity, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) negativity, and histologic grade 1 in luminal A tumors. Quantitative PR gene and protein expression were also found to be significantly higher in luminal A tumors. An empiric cutoff of more than 20% of PR-positive tumor cells was statistically chosen and proved significant for predicting survival differences within IHC-defined luminal A tumors independently of endocrine therapy administration. Finally, no additional prognostic value within hormonal receptor (HR) –positive/HER2-negative disease was observed with the use of the IHC4 score when intrinsic IHC-based subtypes were used that included the more than 20% PR-positive tumor cells and vice versa. Conclusion Semiquantitative IHC expression of PR adds prognostic value within the current IHC-based luminal A definition by improving the identification of good outcome breast cancers. The new proposed IHC-based definition of luminal A

  15. Macroscopic stiffness of breast tumors predicts metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenner, Joseph; Stacer, Amanda C; Winterroth, Frank; Johnson, Timothy D; Luker, Kathryn E; Luker, Gary D

    2014-07-01

    Mechanical properties of tumors differ substantially from normal cells and tissues. Changes in stiffness or elasticity regulate pro-metastatic behaviors of cancer cells, but effects have been documented predominantly in isolated cells or in vitro cell culture systems. To directly link relative stiffness of tumors to cancer progression, we combined a mouse model of metastatic breast cancer with ex vivo measurements of bulk moduli of freshly excised, intact tumors. We found a high, inverse correlation between bulk modulus of resected tumors and subsequent local recurrence and metastasis. More compliant tumors were associated with more frequent, larger local recurrences and more extensive metastases than mice with relatively stiff tumors. We found that collagen content of resected tumors correlated with bulk modulus values. These data establish that relative differences in tumor stiffness correspond with tumor progression and metastasis, supporting further testing and development of tumor compliance as a prognostic biomarker in breast cancer.

  16. Circulating tumoral cells lack circadian-rhythm in hospitalized metastasic breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Sáenz, José Angel; Martín, Miguel; Maestro, Marisa; Vidaurreta, Marta; Veganzones, Silvia; Villalobos, Laura; Rodríguez-Lajusticia, Laura; Rafael, Sara; Sanz-Casla, María Teresa; Casado, Antonio; Sastre, Javier; Arroyo, Manuel; Díaz-Rubio, Eduardo

    2006-11-01

    The relationship between breast cancer and circadian rhythm variation has been extensively studied. Increased breast tumorigenesis has been reported in melatonin-suppressed experimental models and in observational studies. Circulating Tumor Cells (CTC) circadian- rhythm may optimize the timing of therapies. This is a prospective experimental study to ascertain the day-time and night-time CTC levels in hospitalized metastasic breast cancer (MBC) patients. CTC are isolated and enumerated from a 08:00 AM and 08:00 PM blood collections. 23 MBC and 23 healthy volunteers entered the study. 69 samples were collected (23 samples at 08:00 AM and 23 samples at 08:00 PM from MBC; 23 samples from healthy volunteers). Results from two patients were rejected due to sample processing errors. No CTC were isolated from healthy-volunteers. No-differences between daytime and night-time CTC were observed. Therefore, we could not ascertain CTC circadian-rhythm in hospitalized metastasic breast cancer patients.

  17. Genomic aberrations in normal tissue adjacent to HER2-amplified breast cancers: field cancerization or contaminating tumor cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadanandam, Anguraj; Lal, Aseem; Benz, Stephen C; Eppenberger-Castori, Serenella; Scott, Gary; Gray, Joe W; Spellman, Paul; Waldman, Fred; Benz, Christopher C

    2012-12-01

    Field cancerization effects as well as isolated tumor cell foci extending well beyond the invasive tumor margin have been described previously to account for local recurrence rates following breast conserving surgery despite adequate surgical margins and breast radiotherapy. To look for evidence of possible tumor cell contamination or field cancerization by genetic effects, a pilot study (Study 1: 12 sample pairs) followed by a verification study (Study 2: 20 sample pairs) were performed on DNA extracted from HER2-positive breast tumors and matching normal adjacent mammary tissue samples excised 1-3 cm beyond the invasive tumor margin. High-resolution molecular inversion probe (MIP) arrays were used to compare genomic copy number variations, including increased HER2 gene copies, between the paired samples; as well, a detailed histologic and immunohistochemical (IHC) re-evaluation of all Study 2 samples was performed blinded to the genomic results to characterize the adjacent normal tissue composition bracketing the DNA-extracted samples. Overall, 14/32 (44 %) sample pairs from both studies produced genome-wide evidence of genetic aberrations including HER2 copy number gains within the adjacent normal tissue samples. The observed single-parental origin of monoallelic HER2 amplicon haplotypes shared by informative tumor-normal pairs, as well as commonly gained loci elsewhere on 17q, suggested the presence of contaminating tumor cells in the genomically aberrant normal samples. Histologic and IHC analyses identified occult 25-200 μm tumor cell clusters overexpressing HER2 scattered in more than half, but not all, of the genomically aberrant normal samples re-evaluated, but in none of the genomically normal samples. These genomic and microscopic findings support the conclusion that tumor cell contamination rather than genetic field cancerization represents the likeliest cause of local clinical recurrence rates following breast conserving surgery, and mandate caution

  18. Gallotannin imposes S phase arrest in breast cancer cells and suppresses the growth of triple-negative tumors in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiejun Zhao

    Full Text Available Triple-negative breast cancers are associated with poor clinical outcomes and new therapeutic strategies are clearly needed. Gallotannin (Gltn has been previously demonstrated to have potent anti-tumor properties against cholangiocarcinoma in mice, but little is known regarding its capacity to suppress tumor outgrowth in breast cancer models. We tested Gltn for potential growth inhibitory properties against a variety of breast cancer cell lines in vitro. In particular, triple-negative breast cancer cells display higher levels of sensitivity to Gltn. The loss of proliferative capacity in Gltn exposed cells is associated with slowed cell cycle progression and S phase arrest, dependent on Chk2 phosphorylation and further characterized by changes to proliferation related genes, such as cyclin D1 (CcnD1 as determined by Nanostring technology. Importantly, Gltn administered orally or via intraperitoneal (IP injections greatly reduced tumor outgrowth of triple-negative breast cells from mammary fat pads without signs of toxicity. In conclusion, these data strongly suggest that Gltn represents a novel approach to treat triple-negative breast carcinomas.

  19. Signaling Components of the Anti-Tumor Hormone Somatostatin in Breast Cancer Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tentler, John

    1999-01-01

    .... Experimentally and clinically, somatostatin can inhibit breast cancer cell growth, possibly by inhibiting the secretion of growth factors, or by acting directly on the cells themselves to induce...

  20. Signaling Components of the Anti-Tumor Hormone Somatostatin in Breast Cancer Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tentler, John

    2000-01-01

    .... Experimentally and clinically, somatostatin can inhibit breast cancer cell growth, possibly by inhibiting the secretion of growth factors, or by acting directly on the cells themselves to induce...

  1. Identification of a panel of tumor-associated antigens from breast carcinoma cell lines, solid tumors and testis cDNA libraries displayed on lambda phage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cianfriglia Maurizio

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumor-associated antigens recognized by humoral effectors of the immune system are a very attractive target for human cancer diagnostics and therapy. Recent advances in molecular techniques have led to molecular definition of immunogenic tumor proteins based on their reactivity with autologous patient sera (SEREX. Methods Several high complexity phage-displayed cDNA libraries from breast carcinomas, human testis and breast carcinoma cell lines MCF-7, MDA-MB-468 were constructed. The cDNAs were expressed in the libraries as fusion to bacteriophage lambda protein D. Lambda-displayed libraries were efficiently screened with sera from patients with breast cancer. Results A panel of 21 clones representing 18 different antigens, including eight proteins of unknown function, was identified. Three of these antigens (T7-1, T11-3 and T11-9 were found to be overexpressed in tumors as compared to normal breast. A serological analysis of the 21 different antigens revealed a strong cancer-related profile for at least five clones (T6-2, T6-7, T7-1, T9-21 and T9-27. Conclusions Preliminary results indicate that patient serum reactivity against five of the antigens is associated with tumor disease. The novel T7-1 antigen, which is overexpressed in breast tumors and recognized specifically by breast cancer patient sera, is potentially useful in cancer diagnosis.

  2. Occurrence of thymosin beta4 in human breast cancer cells and in other cell types of the tumor microenvironment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, L.-I.; Holck, Susanne

    2007-01-01

    that there is a considerable heterogeneity in the cellular distribution of thymosin beta4 in breast cancer. In most tumors examined, cancer cells showed low or intermediate reactivity for thymosin beta4, whereas leukocytes and macrophages showed intense reactivity. In addition, endothelial cells showed variable reactivity...... to thymosin beta4, whereas myofibroblasts were negative. There was no correlation between the intensity of tumor cell staining and histological grade, whereas there was a tendency toward a correlation between endothelial cell staining and grade. These results demonstrate that multiple cell types within......Previous studies have shown that the G-actin sequestering polypeptide thymosin beta4 frequently is overexpressed in cancers and that such overexpression correlates to malignant progression. However, the localization of thymosin beta4 in human cancers has not been determined. We now demonstrate...

  3. Molecular Detection of Peripheral Blood Breast Cancer mRNA Transcripts as a Surrogate Biomarker for Circulating Tumor Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Adriana Lasa; Arnal Garcia; Carmen Alonso; Pilar Millet; Mónica Cornet; Cajal, Teresa Ramón y; Montserrat Baiget; Agusti Barnadas

    2013-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are becoming a scientifically recognized indicator of primary tumors and/or metastasis. These cells can now be accurately detected and characterized as the result of technological advances. We analyzed the presence of CTCs in the peripheral blood of patients with metastatic breast cancer by real-time reverse-transcription PCR (RT-qPCR) using a panel of selected genes. The analysis of a single marker, without an EpCAM based enrichment approach, allowed the positi...

  4. Synergistic enhancement of topotecan-induced cell death by ascorbic acid in human breast MCF-7 tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Birandra K; van 't Erve, Thomas J; Kumar, Ashutosh; Bortner, Carl D; Motten, Ann G; Mason, Ronald P

    2017-12-01

    Topotecan, a derivative of camptothecin, is an important anticancer drug for the treatment of various human cancers in the clinic. While the principal mechanism of tumor cell killing by topotecan is due to its interactions with topoisomerase I, other mechanisms, e.g., oxidative stress induced by reactive free radicals, have also been proposed. However, very little is known about how topotecan induces free radical-dependent oxidative stress in tumor cells. In this report we describe the formation of a topotecan radical, catalyzed by a peroxidase-hydrogen peroxide system. While this topotecan radical did not undergo oxidation-reduction with molecular O 2 , it rapidly reacted with reduced glutathione and cysteine, regenerating topotecan and forming the corresponding glutathiyl and cysteinyl radicals. Ascorbic acid, which produces hydrogen peroxide in tumor cells, significantly increased topotecan cytotoxicity in MCF-7 tumor cells. The presence of ascorbic acid also increased both topoisomerase I-dependent topotecan-induced DNA cleavage complex formation and topotecan-induced DNA double-strand breaks, suggesting that ascorbic acid participated in enhancing DNA damage induced by topotecan and that the enhanced DNA damage is responsible for the synergistic interactions of topotecan and ascorbic acid. Cell death by topotecan and the combination of topotecan and ascorbic acid was predominantly due to necrosis of MCF-7 breast tumor cells. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Shikonin Inhibits the Proliferation of Human Breast Cancer Cells by Reducing Tumor-Derived Exosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Wei

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Shikonin is a naphthoquinone isolated from the traditional Chinese medicine Lithospermum. It has been used in the treatment of various tumors. However, the effects of shikonin on such diseases have not been fully elucidated. In the present study, we detected the exosome release of a breast cancer cell line (MCF-7 with shikonin treatment and found a positive relationship between the level of secreted exosomes and cell proliferation. We next analyzed miRNA profiles in MCF-7 cells and exosomes and found that some miRNAs are specifically sorted and abundant in exosomes. Knockdown of the most abundant miRNAs in exosomes and the MCF-7 proliferation assay showed that miR-128 in exosomes negatively regulates the level of Bax in MCF-7 recipient cells and inhibits cell proliferation. These results show that shikonin inhibits the proliferation of MCF-7 cells through reducing tumor-derived exosomal miR-128. The current study suggests that shikonin suppresses MCF-7 growth by the inhibition of exosome release.

  6. Lentivirus mediated RNA interference of EMMPRIN (CD147) gene inhibits the proliferation, matrigel invasion and tumor formation of breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing; Wang, Rong; Li, Hongjiang; Lv, Qing; Meng, Wentong; Yang, Xiaoqin

    2016-07-08

    Overexpression of extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN) or cluster of differentiation 147 (CD147), a glycoprotein enriched on the plasma membrane of tumor cells, promotes proliferation, invasion, metastasis, and survival of malignant tumor cells. In this study, we sought to examine the expression of EMMPRIN in breast tumors, and to identify the potential roles of EMMPRIN on breast cancer cells. EMMPRIN expression in breast cancer tissues was assessed by immunohistochemistry. We used a lentivirus vector-based RNA interference (RNAi) approach expressing short hairpin RNA (shRNA) to knockdown EMMPRIN gene in breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7. In vitro, Cell proliferative, invasive potential were determined by Cell Counting Kit (CCK-8), cell cycle analysis and matrigel invasion assay, respectively. In vivo, tumorigenicity was monitored by inoculating tumor cells into breast fat pad of female nude mice. EMMPRIN was over-expressed in breast tumors and breast cancer cell lines. Down-regulation of EMMPRIN by lentivirus vector-based RNAi led to decreased cell proliferative, decreased matrigel invasion in vitro, and attenuated tumor formation in vivo. High expression of EMMPRIN plays a crucial role in breast cancer cell proliferation, matrigel invasion and tumor formation.

  7. Serum IGF-1, IGFBP-3 levels and circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in early breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Georgios Z; Mavroudis, Dimitrios; Georgoulias, Vasilios; Souglakos, John; Alegakis, Athanasios K; Samonis, George; Bagci, Ulas; Makrigiannakis, Antonis; Zoras, Odysseas

    2017-04-01

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-axis is involved in human oncogenesis and metastasis development for various solid tumors including breast cancer. Aim of this study was to assess the association between IGF-1, IGF-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) serum levels and the presence of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the peripheral blood of women diagnosed with early breast cancer (EBC), before and after adjuvant chemotherapy. 171 patients with early-stage breast adenocarcinomas were retrospectively evaluated. Immunoradiometric (IRMA) assays were employed for the in-vitro determination of IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 serum levels in blood samples collected after surgical treatment and before initiation of adjuvant chemotherapy. CTCs' presence was assessed through detection of cytokeratin-19 (CK-19) mRNA transcripts using quantitative real time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). IGF-1, IGFBP-3 serum levels were correlated with CTCs' presence before and after adjuvant chemotherapy as well as with tumor characteristics including tumor size, axillary lymph node status, oestrogen (ER)/progestorene (PR) and human epidermural growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) receptor status. Log-rank test was applied to investigate possible association between IGF-1, IGFBP-3 serum levels and disease-free interval (DFI) and overall survival (OS). Before initiation of adjuvant therapy IGF-1, IGFBP-3 serum levels were moderately associated (Spearman's rho=0.361, p<0.001) with each other, while presenting significant differences across age groups (all p values<0.05). IGF-1 serum levels did not correlate with the presence of CTCs before initiation (p=0.558) or after completion (p=0.474) of adjuvant chemotherapy. Similarly, IGFBP-3 serum levels did not show significant association with detectable CTCs either before (p=0.487) or after (p=0.134) completion of adjuvant chemotherapy. There was no statistically significant association between the clinical outcome of patients in terms of DFI, OS

  8. Benign phyllodes tumor of the breast recurring as a malignant phyllodes tumor and spindle cell metaplastic carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Kristen E; Tafe, Laura J; de Abreu, Francine B; Peterson, Jason D; Wells, Wendy A; Barth, Richard J; Marotti, Jonathan D

    2015-02-01

    We report a unique case of a 59-year-old woman diagnosed with a benign phyllodes tumor (PT), which recurred twice in the same location over a 7-year period: first as a malignant PT and then as a malignant PT with coexisting spindle cell metaplastic breast carcinoma (MBC). The MBC was differentiated from the malignant PT by expression of cytokeratins (CKs) AE1/AE3, CK MNF-116, CK 5/6, and p63. Somatic mutation analysis using a next-generation sequencing platform revealed a shared mutation in F-box and WD repeat domain containing 7, a tumor suppressor gene that encodes a ubiquitin ligase-associated protein, in the original benign PT and the first recurrent malignant PT. Chromosomal microarray analysis showed shared genetic gains and losses between the malignant PT and MBC. This case highlights the utility of immunohistochemistry to differentiate malignant PT from spindle cell MBC, describes a novel mutation in PT, and demonstrates a biologic relationship between these 2 entities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Surface modification of microparticles causes differential uptake responses in normal and tumoral human breast epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patiño, Tania; Soriano, Jorge; Barrios, Lleonard; Ibáñez, Elena; Nogués, Carme

    2015-01-01

    The use of micro- and nanodevices as multifunctional systems for biomedical applications has experienced an exponential growth during the past decades. Although a large number of studies have focused on the design and fabrication of new micro- and nanosystems capable of developing multiple functions, a deeper understanding of their interaction with cells is required. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of different microparticle surfaces on their interaction with normal and tumoral human breast epithelial cell lines. For this, AlexaFluor488 IgG functionalized polystyrene microparticles (3 μm) were coated with Polyethyleneimine (PEI) at two different molecular weights, 25 and 750 kDa. The effect of microparticle surface properties on cytotoxicity, cellular uptake and endocytic pathways were assessed for both normal and tumoral cell lines. Results showed a differential response between the two cell lines regarding uptake efficiency and mechanisms of endocytosis, highlighting the potential role of microparticle surface tunning for specific cell targeting. PMID:26068810

  10. Inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation and tumor angiogenesis by up-regulating NDRG2 expression in breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Ma

    Full Text Available The N-myc downstream-regulated gene 2 (NDRG2 is involved in tumor cell differentiation and apoptosis, but its function in tumor angiogenesis remains to be established. Here, we employed adenovirus overexpressing NDRG2 (Ad-NDRG2 to efficiently up-regulate target gene expression in the NDRG2-low-expressing, breast cancer cell line MCF-7. Moreover, VEGF secretion was decreased in MCF-7 cells infected by Ad-NDRG2, and medium conditioned by these infected cells could significantly inhibit the proliferation, tube formation and invasion of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. Further study indicated that the angiogenesis promoting factors VEGF and HIF-1α were down-regulated, whereas the angiogenesis suppressing factors p53 and VHL were up-regulated in MCF-7 cells infected by Ad-NDRG2. Finally, in a nude mouse model, intratumoral injections of Ad-NDRG2 every 3 days for 20 days significantly inhibited the growth and angiogenesis of xenografted MCF-7 tumors. In summary, these data indicate that NDRG2 may be involved in angiogenesis by impacting the expression of angiogenesis related factors. Thus, specific overexpression of NDRG2 by adenovirus represents a promising approach for the treatment of tumor angiogenesis.

  11. Radio-photothermal therapy mediated by a single compartment nanoplatform depletes tumor initiating cells and reduces lung metastasis in the orthotopic 4T1 breast tumor model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Min; Zhao, Jun; Tian, Mei; Song, Shaoli; Zhang, Rui; Gupta, Sanjay; Tan, Dongfeng; Shen, Haifa; Ferrari, Mauro; Li, Chun

    2015-11-01

    Tumor Initiating Cells (TICs) are resistant to radiotherapy and chemotherapy, and are believed to be responsible for tumor recurrence and metastasis. Combination therapies can overcome the limitation of conventional cancer treatments, and have demonstrated promising application in the clinic. Here, we show that dual modality radiotherapy (RT) and photothermal therapy (PTT) mediated by a single compartment nanosystem copper-64-labeled copper sulfide nanoparticles ([64Cu]CuS NPs) could suppress breast tumor metastasis through eradication of TICs. Positron electron tomography (PET) imaging and biodistribution studies showed that more than 90% of [64Cu]CuS NPs was retained in subcutaneously grown BT474 breast tumor 24 h after intratumoral (i.t.) injection, indicating the NPs are suitable for the combination therapy. Combined RT/PTT therapy resulted in significant tumor growth delay in the subcutaneous BT474 breast cancer model. Moreover, RT/PTT treatment significantly prolonged the survival of mice bearing orthotopic 4T1 breast tumors compared to no treatment, RT alone, or PTT alone. The RT/PTT combination therapy significantly reduced the number of tumor nodules in the lung and the formation of tumor mammospheres from treated 4T1 tumors. No obvious side effects of the CuS NPs were noted in the treated mice in a pilot toxicity study. Taken together, our data support the feasibility of a therapeutic approach for the suppression of tumor metastasis through localized RT/PTT therapy.Tumor Initiating Cells (TICs) are resistant to radiotherapy and chemotherapy, and are believed to be responsible for tumor recurrence and metastasis. Combination therapies can overcome the limitation of conventional cancer treatments, and have demonstrated promising application in the clinic. Here, we show that dual modality radiotherapy (RT) and photothermal therapy (PTT) mediated by a single compartment nanosystem copper-64-labeled copper sulfide nanoparticles ([64Cu]CuS NPs) could suppress

  12. Circulating Tumor Cells in Metastatic Breast Cancer: A Prognostic and Predictive Marker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayyed Farshid Moussavi-Harami

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The role of circulating tumor cells (CTCs as a marker for disease progression in metastatic cancer is controversial. The current review will serve to summarize the evidence on CTCs as a marker of disease progression in patients with metastatic breast cancer. The immunohistochemistry (IHC-based CellSearch® is the only FDA-approved isolation technique for quantifying CTCs in patients with metastatic breast cancer. We searched PubMed and Web of Knowledge for clinical studies that assessed the prognostic and predictive value of CTCs using IHC-based isolation. The patient outcomes reported include median and Cox-proportional hazard ratios for overall survival (OS and progression-free survival (PFS. All studies reported shorter OS for CTC-positive patients versus CTC-negative. A subset of the selected trials reported significant lower median PFS for CTC-positive patients. The reported trials support the utility of CTC enumeration for patient prognosis. But further studies are required to determine the utility of CTC enumeration for guiding patient therapy. There are three clinical trials ongoing to test this hypothesis. These studies, and others, will further establish the role of CTCs in clinical practice.

  13. Cancer therapy. Ex vivo culture of circulating breast tumor cells for individualized testing of drug susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Min; Bardia, Aditya; Aceto, Nicola; Bersani, Francesca; Madden, Marissa W; Donaldson, Maria C; Desai, Rushil; Zhu, Huili; Comaills, Valentine; Zheng, Zongli; Wittner, Ben S; Stojanov, Petar; Brachtel, Elena; Sgroi, Dennis; Kapur, Ravi; Shioda, Toshihiro; Ting, David T; Ramaswamy, Sridhar; Getz, Gad; Iafrate, A John; Benes, Cyril; Toner, Mehmet; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Haber, Daniel A

    2014-07-11

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are present at low concentrations in the peripheral blood of patients with solid tumors. It has been proposed that the isolation, ex vivo culture, and characterization of CTCs may provide an opportunity to noninvasively monitor the changing patterns of drug susceptibility in individual patients as their tumors acquire new mutations. In a proof-of-concept study, we established CTC cultures from six patients with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. Three of five CTC lines tested were tumorigenic in mice. Genome sequencing of the CTC lines revealed preexisting mutations in the PIK3CA gene and newly acquired mutations in the estrogen receptor gene (ESR1), PIK3CA gene, and fibroblast growth factor receptor gene (FGFR2), among others. Drug sensitivity testing of CTC lines with multiple mutations revealed potential new therapeutic targets. With optimization of CTC culture conditions, this strategy may help identify the best therapies for individual cancer patients over the course of their disease. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  14. Low or undetectable TPO receptor expression in malignant tissue and cell lines derived from breast, lung, and ovarian tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erickson-Miller Connie L

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous efficacious chemotherapy regimens may cause thrombocytopenia. Thrombopoietin receptor (TPO-R agonists, such as eltrombopag, represent a novel approach for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced thrombocytopenia. The TPO-R MPL is expressed on megakaryocytes and megakaryocyte precursors, although little is known about its expression on other tissues. Methods Breast, lung, and ovarian tumor samples were analyzed for MPL expression by microarray and/or quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR, and for TPO-R protein expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC. Cell line proliferation assays were used to analyze the in vitro effect of eltrombopag on breast, lung, and ovarian tumor cell proliferation. The lung carcinoma cell lines were also analyzed for TPO-R protein expression by Western blot. Results MPL mRNA was not detectable in 118 breast tumors and was detectable at only very low levels in 48% of 29 lung tumors studied by microarray analysis. By qRT-PCR, low but detectable levels of MPL mRNA were detectable in some normal (14-43% and malignant (3-17% breast, lung, and ovarian tissues. A comparison of MPL to EPOR, ERBB2, and IGF1R mRNA demonstrates that MPL mRNA levels were far lower than those of EPOR and ERBB2 mRNA in the same tissues. IHC analysis showed negligible TPO-R protein expression in tumor tissues, confirming mRNA analysis. Culture of breast, lung, and ovarian carcinoma cell lines showed no increase, and in fact, showed a decrease in proliferation following incubation with eltrombopag. Western blot analyses revealed no detectable TPO-R protein expression in the lung carcinoma cell lines. Conclusions Multiple analyses of breast, lung, and ovarian tumor samples and/or cell lines show no evidence of MPL mRNA or TPO-R protein expression. Eltrombopag does not stimulate growth of breast, lung, or ovarian tumor cell lines at doses likely to exert their actions on megakaryocytes and

  15. Low or undetectable TPO receptor expression in malignant tissue and cell lines derived from breast, lung, and ovarian tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson-Miller, Connie L; Pillarisetti, Kodandaram; Kirchner, Jennifer; Figueroa, David J; Ottesen, Lone; Martin, Anne-Marie; Liu, Yuan; Kamel, Yasser Mostafa; Messam, Conrad

    2012-09-11

    Numerous efficacious chemotherapy regimens may cause thrombocytopenia. Thrombopoietin receptor (TPO-R) agonists, such as eltrombopag, represent a novel approach for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced thrombocytopenia. The TPO-R MPL is expressed on megakaryocytes and megakaryocyte precursors, although little is known about its expression on other tissues. Breast, lung, and ovarian tumor samples were analyzed for MPL expression by microarray and/or quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), and for TPO-R protein expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Cell line proliferation assays were used to analyze the in vitro effect of eltrombopag on breast, lung, and ovarian tumor cell proliferation. The lung carcinoma cell lines were also analyzed for TPO-R protein expression by Western blot. MPL mRNA was not detectable in 118 breast tumors and was detectable at only very low levels in 48% of 29 lung tumors studied by microarray analysis. By qRT-PCR, low but detectable levels of MPL mRNA were detectable in some normal (14-43%) and malignant (3-17%) breast, lung, and ovarian tissues. A comparison of MPL to EPOR, ERBB2, and IGF1R mRNA demonstrates that MPL mRNA levels were far lower than those of EPOR and ERBB2 mRNA in the same tissues. IHC analysis showed negligible TPO-R protein expression in tumor tissues, confirming mRNA analysis. Culture of breast, lung, and ovarian carcinoma cell lines showed no increase, and in fact, showed a decrease in proliferation following incubation with eltrombopag. Western blot analyses revealed no detectable TPO-R protein expression in the lung carcinoma cell lines. Multiple analyses of breast, lung, and ovarian tumor samples and/or cell lines show no evidence of MPL mRNA or TPO-R protein expression. Eltrombopag does not stimulate growth of breast, lung, or ovarian tumor cell lines at doses likely to exert their actions on megakaryocytes and megakaryocyte precursors.

  16. Homeostatic T Cell Expansion to Induce Anti-Tumor Autoimmunity in Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baccala, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    We have previously shown that effective anti-tumor autoimmunity can be induced if a tumor-cell challenge is given to mice undergoing homeostatic T-cell proliferation, a process dependent on signaling...

  17. Breast cancer-derived transforming growth factor-β and tumor necrosis factor-α compromise interferon-α production by tumor-associated plasmacytoid dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisirak, Vanja; Vey, Nelly; Goutagny, Nadège; Renaudineau, Sarah; Malfroy, Marine; Thys, Sandra; Treilleux, Isabelle; Labidi-Galy, Sana Intidhar; Bachelot, Thomas; Dezutter-Dambuyant, Colette; Ménétrier-Caux, Christine; Blay, Jean-Yves; Caux, Christophe; Bendriss-Vermare, Nathalie

    2013-08-01

    We previously reported that plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) infiltrating breast tumors are impaired for their interferon-α (IFN-α) production, resulting in local regulatory T cells amplification. We designed our study to decipher molecular mechanisms of such functional defect of tumor-associated pDC (TApDC) in breast cancer. We demonstrate that besides IFN-α, the production by Toll-like receptor (TLR)-activated healthy pDC of IFN-β and TNF-α but not IP-10/CXCL10 nor MIP1-α/CCL3 is impaired by the breast tumor environment. Importantly, we identified TGF-β and TNF-α as major soluble factors involved in TApDC functional alteration. Indeed, recombinant TGF-β1 and TNF-α synergistically blocked IFN-α production of TLR-activated pDC, and neutralization of TGF-β and TNF-α in tumor-derived supernatants restored pDCs' IFN-α production. The involvment of tumor-derived TGF-β was further confirmed in situ by the detection of phosphorylated Smad2 in the nuclei of TApDC in breast tumor tissues. Mechanisms of type I IFN inhibition did not involve TLR downregulation but the inhibition of IRF-7 expression and nuclear translocation in pDC after their exposure to tumor-derived supernatants or recombinant TGF-β1 and TNF-α. Our findings indicate that targeting TApDC to restore their IFN-α production might be an achievable strategy to induce antitumor immunity in breast cancer by combining TLR7/9-based immunotherapy with TGF-β and TNF-α antagonists. Copyright © 2013 UICC.

  18. EpCAM-Independent Enrichment of Circulating Tumor Cells in Metastatic Breast Cancer.

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    Helen Schneck

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cells (CTCs are the potential precursors of metastatic disease. Most assays established for the enumeration of CTCs so far-including the gold standard CellSearch-rely on the expression of the cell surface marker epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM. But, these approaches may not detect CTCs that express no/low levels of EpCAM, e.g. by undergoing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT. Here we present an enrichment strategy combining different antibodies specific for surface proteins and extracellular matrix (ECM components to capture an EpCAMlow/neg cell line and EpCAMneg CTCs from blood samples of breast cancer patients depleted for EpCAM-positive cells. The expression of respective proteins (Trop2, CD49f, c-Met, CK8, CD44, ADAM8, CD146, TEM8, CD47 was verified by immunofluorescence on EpCAMpos (e.g. MCF7, SKBR3 and EpCAMlow/neg (MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines. To test antibodies and ECM proteins (e.g. hyaluronic acid (HA, collagen I, laminin for capturing EpCAMneg cells, the capture molecules were first spotted in a single- and multi-array format onto aldehyde-coated glass slides. Tumor cell adhesion of EpCAMpos/neg cell lines was then determined and visualized by Coomassie/MitoTracker staining. In consequence, marginal binding of EpCAMlow/neg MDA-MB-231 cells to EpCAM-antibodies could be observed. However, efficient adhesion/capturing of EpCAMlow/neg cells could be achieved via HA and immobilized antibodies against CD49f and Trop2. Optimal capture conditions were then applied to immunomagnetic beads to detect EpCAMneg CTCs from clinical samples. Captured CTCs were verified/quantified by immunofluorescence staining for anti-pan-Cytokeratin (CK-FITC/anti-CD45 AF647/DAPI. In total, in 20 out of 29 EpCAM-depleted fractions (69% from 25 metastatic breast cancer patients additional EpCAMneg CTCs could be identified [range of 1-24 CTCs per sample] applying Trop2, CD49f, c-Met, CK8 and/or HA magnetic enrichment. Ep

  19. Prognostic Impact of Circulating Tumor Cell Detected Using a Novel Fluidic Cell Microarray Chip System in Patients with Breast Cancer

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    Takeshi Sawada

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Various types of circulating tumor cell (CTC detection systems have recently been developed that show a high CTC detection rate. However, it is a big challenge to find a system that can provide better prognostic value than CellSearch in head-to-head comparison. We have developed a novel semi-automated CTC enumeration system (fluidic cell microarray chip system, FCMC that captures CTC independently of tumor-specific markers or physical properties. Here, we compared the CTC detection sensitivity and the prognostic value of FCMC with CellSearch in breast cancer patients. FCMC was validated in preclinical studies using spike-in samples and in blood samples from 20 healthy donors and 22 breast cancer patients in this study. Using spike-in samples, a statistically higher detection rate (p = 0.010 of MDA-MB-231 cells and an equivalent detection rate (p = 0.497 of MCF-7 cells were obtained with FCMC in comparison with CellSearch. The number of CTC detected in samples from patients that was above a threshold value as determined from healthy donors was evaluated. The CTC number detected using FCMC was significantly higher than that using CellSearch (p = 0.00037. CTC numbers obtained using either FCMC or CellSearch had prognostic value, as assessed by progression free survival. The hazard ratio between CTC+ and CTC− was 4.229 in CellSearch (95% CI, 1.31 to 13.66; p = 0.01591; in contrast, it was 11.31 in FCMC (95% CI, 2.245 to 57.0; p = 0.000244. CTC detected using FCMC, like the CTC detected using CellSearch, have the potential to be a strong prognostic factor for cancer patients.

  20. Prognostic Impact of Circulating Tumor Cell Detected Using a Novel Fluidic Cell Microarray Chip System in Patients with Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Takeshi; Araki, Jungo; Yamashita, Toshinari; Masubuchi, Manami; Chiyoda, Tsuneko; Yunokawa, Mayu; Hoshi, Kumiko; Tao, Shoichi; Yamamura, Shohei; Yatsushiro, Shouki; Abe, Kaori; Kataoka, Masatoshi; Shimoyama, Tatsu; Maeda, Yoshiharu; Kuroi, Katsumasa; Tamura, Kenji; Sawazumi, Tsuneo; Minami, Hironobu; Suda, Yoshihiko; Koizumi, Fumiaki

    2016-09-01

    Various types of circulating tumor cell (CTC) detection systems have recently been developed that show a high CTC detection rate. However, it is a big challenge to find a system that can provide better prognostic value than CellSearch in head-to-head comparison. We have developed a novel semi-automated CTC enumeration system (fluidic cell microarray chip system, FCMC) that captures CTC independently of tumor-specific markers or physical properties. Here, we compared the CTC detection sensitivity and the prognostic value of FCMC with CellSearch in breast cancer patients. FCMC was validated in preclinical studies using spike-in samples and in blood samples from 20 healthy donors and 22 breast cancer patients in this study. Using spike-in samples, a statistically higher detection rate (p=0.010) of MDA-MB-231 cells and an equivalent detection rate (p=0.497) of MCF-7 cells were obtained with FCMC in comparison with CellSearch. The number of CTC detected in samples from patients that was above a threshold value as determined from healthy donors was evaluated. The CTC number detected using FCMC was significantly higher than that using CellSearch (p=0.00037). CTC numbers obtained using either FCMC or CellSearch had prognostic value, as assessed by progression free survival. The hazard ratio between CTC+ and CTC- was 4.229 in CellSearch (95% CI, 1.31 to 13.66; p=0.01591); in contrast, it was 11.31 in FCMC (95% CI, 2.245 to 57.0; p=0.000244). CTC detected using FCMC, like the CTC detected using CellSearch, have the potential to be a strong prognostic factor for cancer patients. Copyright © 2016 Forschungsgesellschaft für Arbeitsphysiologie und Arbeitschutz e.V. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Molecular detection of peripheral blood breast cancer mRNA transcripts as a surrogate biomarker for circulating tumor cells.

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    Adriana Lasa

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cells (CTCs are becoming a scientifically recognized indicator of primary tumors and/or metastasis. These cells can now be accurately detected and characterized as the result of technological advances. We analyzed the presence of CTCs in the peripheral blood of patients with metastatic breast cancer by real-time reverse-transcription PCR (RT-qPCR using a panel of selected genes. The analysis of a single marker, without an EpCAM based enrichment approach, allowed the positive identification of 35% of the metastatic breast cancer patients. The analysis of five genes (SCGB2, TFF1, TFF3, Muc1, KRT20 performed in all the samples increased the detection to 61%. We describe a sensitive, reproducible and easy to implement approach to characterize CTC in patients with metastasic breast cancer.

  2. Molecular detection of peripheral blood breast cancer mRNA transcripts as a surrogate biomarker for circulating tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasa, Adriana; Garcia, Arnal; Alonso, Carmen; Millet, Pilar; Cornet, Mónica; Ramón y Cajal, Teresa; Baiget, Montserrat; Barnadas, Agusti

    2013-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are becoming a scientifically recognized indicator of primary tumors and/or metastasis. These cells can now be accurately detected and characterized as the result of technological advances. We analyzed the presence of CTCs in the peripheral blood of patients with metastatic breast cancer by real-time reverse-transcription PCR (RT-qPCR) using a panel of selected genes. The analysis of a single marker, without an EpCAM based enrichment approach, allowed the positive identification of 35% of the metastatic breast cancer patients. The analysis of five genes (SCGB2, TFF1, TFF3, Muc1, KRT20) performed in all the samples increased the detection to 61%. We describe a sensitive, reproducible and easy to implement approach to characterize CTC in patients with metastasic breast cancer.

  3. Detection of circulating tumor cell-specific markers in breast cancer patients using the quantitative RT-PCR assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hye-Young; Ahn, Sungwoo; Kim, Sunghyun; Park, Sunyoung; Jung, Dongju; Park, Sangjung; Han, Hyunju; Sohn, JooHyuk; Kim, SeungIl; Lee, Hyeyoung

    2015-10-01

    Breast cancer is a highly prevalent disease among women worldwide. While the expression of certain proteins within breast cancer tumors is used to determine the prognosis and select therapies, additional markers need to be identified. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are constituent cells that have detached from a primary tumor to circulate in the bloodstream. CTCs are considered the main source of breast cancer metastases; therefore, detection of CTCs could be a promising diagnostic method for metastatic breast cancer. In this study, the CircleGen CTC RT-qDx assay was used to analyze the mRNA expression levels of six CTC-specific markers including EpCAM, CK19, HER2, Ki67, hTERT, and vimentin with a total of 692 peripheral whole blood samples from 221 breast cancer patients and 376 healthy individuals. This assay showed high specificity with multiple markers; none of the healthy controls were detected positive, whereas 21.7 and 14 % of breast cancer patients were positive for EpCAM and CK19, respectively. Of the 221 breast cancer patients, 84 (38 %), 46 (20.8 %), 83 (37.6 %), and 39 (17.6 %) were positively for HER2, Ki67, hTERT, and vimentin mRNA, respectively. Of the 84 patients who were HER2 positive, nine (4 %) were also positive for EpCAM, CK19, Ki67, hTERT, and vimentin. Of the 139 breast cancer patients who were HER2 negative, 65 (29.1 %) were negative for EpCAM, CK19, Ki67, hTERT, and vimentin. Furthermore, the EpCAM-positive population decreased from 21.5 to 8.3 % after completion of anti-tumor treatment (TP4). Similarly, the CK19, HER2, hTERT, and vimentin positives also decreased from 13.9 to 9.5 %, from 37.7 to 21.4 %, from 37.2 to 33.3 %, and from 17.5 to 14.3 %, respectively, after completion of anti-tumor treatment. In contrast, the Ki67 positives increased from 20.6 to 41.7 % after completion of anti-tumor treatment. mRNA overexpression of six CTC-specific markers was detected by the CircleGen CTC RT-qDx assay with high specificity, and the obtained m

  4. Transcriptome analysis of basal and luminal tumor-initiating cells in ErbB2-driven breast cancer

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    Nicholas Borcherding

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality for females worldwide [1]. Improving early screening strategies and understanding the events that lead to tumor initiation have led to demonstrable improvements in clinical outcome. Our previous work revealed a variance in the tumorigenic capacity between different mammary epithelial cell populations in an MMTV-ErbB2 mouse model. In order to greater understand how different mammary epithelial cells influence the tumorigenic capacity in ErbB2-induced breast cancer, we transplanted different cell populations from pre-neoplastic MMTV-ErbB2 female mice into recipient mice for tumorigenic study. We found that different mammary epithelial cells bear different tumorigenic potentials even when induced by the same ErbB2 proto-oncogene. To understand the difference in tumors formed from different epithelial cells, we performed gene expression profiling using these tumors (GSE64487. Several genes were further validated using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Here we provide further details on the experimental methods and microarray analysis. This data provides a resource to further understanding how different mammary cell populations can initiate ErbB2-driven tumors and the role of these cell populations as putative tumor-initiating cells (TICs.

  5. Enrichment and Molecular Analysis of Breast Cancer Disseminated Tumor Cells from Bone Marrow Using Microfiltration.

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    Sreeraj G Pillai

    Full Text Available Molecular characterization of disseminated tumor cells (DTCs in the bone marrow (BM of breast cancer (BC patients has been hindered by their rarity. To enrich for these cells using an antigen-independent methodology, we have evaluated a size-based microfiltration device in combination with several downstream biomarker assays.BM aspirates were collected from healthy volunteers or BC patients. Healthy BM was mixed with a specified number of BC cells to calculate recovery and fold enrichment by microfiltration. Specimens were pre-filtered using a 70 μm mesh sieve and the effluent filtered through CellSieve microfilters. Captured cells were analyzed by immunocytochemistry (ICC, FISH for HER-2/neu gene amplification status, and RNA in situ hybridization (RISH. Cells eluted from the filter were used for RNA isolation and subsequent qRT-PCR analysis for DTC biomarker gene expression.Filtering an average of 14×106 nucleated BM cells yielded approximately 17-21×103 residual BM cells. In the BC cell spiking experiments, an average of 87% (range 84-92% of tumor cells were recovered with approximately 170- to 400-fold enrichment. Captured BC cells from patients co-stained for cytokeratin and EpCAM, but not CD45 by ICC. RNA yields from 4 ml of patient BM after filtration averaged 135ng per 10 million BM cells filtered with an average RNA Integrity Number (RIN of 5.3. DTC-associated gene expression was detected by both qRT-PCR and RISH in filtered spiked or BC patient specimens but, not in control filtered normal BM.We have tested a microfiltration technique for enrichment of BM DTCs. DTC capture efficiency was shown to range from 84.3% to 92.1% with up to 400-fold enrichment using model BC cell lines. In patients, recovered DTCs can be identified and distinguished from normal BM cells using multiple antibody-, DNA-, and RNA-based biomarker assays.

  6. Expression of protein tyrosine phosphatase alpha (RPTPalpha) in human breast cancer correlates with low tumor grade, and inhibits tumor cell growth in vitro and in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ardini, E; Agresti, R; Tagliabue, E

    2000-01-01

    of Src family kinases, and regulation of integrin signaling, cell adhesion, and growth factor responsiveness. To explore its potential contribution to human neoplasia, we surveyed RPTPalpha protein levels in primary human breast cancer. We found RPTPalpha levels to vary widely among tumors, with 29......% of cases manifesting significant overexpression. High RPTPalpha protein levels correlated significantly with low tumor grade and positive estrogen receptor status. Expression of RPTPalpha in breast carcinoma cells led to growth inhibition, associated with increased accumulation in G0 and G1, and delayed...... tumor growth and metastasis. To our knowledge, this is the first example of a study correlating expression level of a specific bona fide PTP with neoplastic disease status in humans....

  7. Importance of CD200 expression by tumor or host cells to regulation of immunotherapy in a mouse breast cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Anna; Khatri, Ismat; Kos, Olha; Zhu, Fang; Gorczynski, Reginald

    2017-01-01

    Cell-surface CD200 expression by mouse EMT6 breast tumor cells increased primary tumor growth and metastasis to the draining lymph nodes (DLN) in normal (WT) BALB/c female recipients, while lack of CD200R1 expression in a CD200R1-/- host negated this effect. Silencing CD200 expression in EMT6siCD200 tumor cells also reduced their ability to grow and metastasize in WT animals. The cellular mechanisms responsible for these effects have not been studied in detail. We report characterization of tumor infiltrating (TILs) and draining lymph node (DLN) cells in WT and CD200-/- BALB/c mice, receiving WT tumor cells, or EMT6 lacking CD200 expression (EMT6siCD200 cells). Our data show an important correlation with augmented CD8+ cytotoxic T cells and resistance to tumor growth in mice lacking exposure (on either host cells or tumor) to the immunoregulatory molecule CD200. Confirmation of the importance of such CD8+ cells came from monitoring tumor growth and characterization of the TILs and DLN cells in WT mice challenged with EMT6 and EMT6siCD200 tumors and treated with CD8 and CD4 depleting antibodies. Finally, we have assessed the mechanisms(s) whereby addition of metformin as an augmenting chemotherapeutic agent in CD200-/- animals given EMT6 tumors and treated with a previously established immunotherapy regime can increase host resistance. Our data support the hypothesis that increased autophagy in the presence of metformin increases CD8+ responses and tumor resistance, an effect attenuated by the autophagy inhibitor verteporfin.

  8. Importance of CD200 expression by tumor or host cells to regulation of immunotherapy in a mouse breast cancer model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Curry

    Full Text Available Cell-surface CD200 expression by mouse EMT6 breast tumor cells increased primary tumor growth and metastasis to the draining lymph nodes (DLN in normal (WT BALB/c female recipients, while lack of CD200R1 expression in a CD200R1-/- host negated this effect. Silencing CD200 expression in EMT6siCD200 tumor cells also reduced their ability to grow and metastasize in WT animals. The cellular mechanisms responsible for these effects have not been studied in detail. We report characterization of tumor infiltrating (TILs and draining lymph node (DLN cells in WT and CD200-/- BALB/c mice, receiving WT tumor cells, or EMT6 lacking CD200 expression (EMT6siCD200 cells. Our data show an important correlation with augmented CD8+ cytotoxic T cells and resistance to tumor growth in mice lacking exposure (on either host cells or tumor to the immunoregulatory molecule CD200. Confirmation of the importance of such CD8+ cells came from monitoring tumor growth and characterization of the TILs and DLN cells in WT mice challenged with EMT6 and EMT6siCD200 tumors and treated with CD8 and CD4 depleting antibodies. Finally, we have assessed the mechanisms(s whereby addition of metformin as an augmenting chemotherapeutic agent in CD200-/- animals given EMT6 tumors and treated with a previously established immunotherapy regime can increase host resistance. Our data support the hypothesis that increased autophagy in the presence of metformin increases CD8+ responses and tumor resistance, an effect attenuated by the autophagy inhibitor verteporfin.

  9. Fetal bovine serum requirement for pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate-induced apoptotic cell death of MCF-7 breast tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Da Hee; Bang, Jun Soo; Choi, Hyun Mi; Yang, Hyung-In; Yoo, Myung Chul; Kim, Kyoung Soo

    2010-12-15

    Pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) can form a complex with metal ions and then act as a proteasome inhibitor, which leads to tumor cell apoptosis, and could therefore be developed as an anticancer agent. In our efforts to find factors that induce PDTC-mediated apoptosis of tumor cells, the effect of serum concentration on the apoptotic activity of PDTC was investigated. PDTC could not induce MCF-7 breast tumor cell death in serum-free media but significantly induced cell death in a dose-dependent manner at concentrations of ≥25 μM in media containing 10% fetal bovine serum. PDTC-mediated cell death was also dependent on serum concentration. PDTC-mediated cell death occurred through apoptosis. Similar to that in normal FBS, PDTC-mediated apoptotic cell death was also induced in media containing dialyzed FBS, indicating that PDTC-mediated apoptosis does not require metal ions or salts, but rather proteins in fetal bovine serum. In addition, differential apoptotic effects of PDTC were not observed with inhibitors of NF-κB activation such as N-acetylcysteine (NAC), Fenofibrate and carbobenzoxyl-l-leucyl-l-leucyl-l-leucinal (MG132) or with the metal-binding agent, 5-chloro-7-iodo-8-hydroxyquinoline (Clioquinol). These results indicate that serum is required for PDTC-mediated apoptosis and that zinc-binding compounds such as PDTC, N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylenediamine (TPEN) and Clioquinol may each have their own mechanisms by which they induce tumor cell death, even though they are all classified as zinc-binding compounds. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Contractility of the cell rear drives invasion of breast tumor cells in 3D Matrigel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poincloux, Renaud; Collin, Olivier; Lizárraga, Floria; Romao, Maryse; Debray, Marcel; Piel, Matthieu; Chavrier, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Cancer cells use different modes of migration, including integrin-dependent mesenchymal migration of elongated cells along elements of the 3D matrix as opposed to low-adhesion-, contraction-based amoeboid motility of rounded cells. We report that MDA-MB-231 human breast adenocarcinoma cells invade 3D Matrigel with a characteristic rounded morphology and with F-actin and myosin-IIa accumulating at the cell rear in a uropod-like structure. MDA-MB-231 cells display neither lamellipodia nor bleb extensions at the leading edge and do not require Arp2/3 complex activity for 3D invasion in Matrigel. Accumulation of phospho-MLC and blebbing activity were restricted to the uropod as reporters of actomyosin contractility, and velocimetric analysis of fluorescent beads embedded within the 3D matrix showed that pulling forces exerted to the matrix are restricted to the side and rear of cells. Inhibition of actomyosin contractility or β1 integrin function interferes with uropod formation, matrix deformation, and invasion through Matrigel. These findings support a model whereby actomyosin-based uropod contractility generates traction forces on the β1 integrin adhesion system to drive cell propulsion within the 3D matrix, with no contribution of lamellipodia extension or blebbing to movement. PMID:21245302

  11. Tumor initiating but differentiated luminal-like breast cancer cells are highly invasive in the absence of basal-like activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Jiyoung; Villadsen, René; Sørlie, Therese

    2012-01-01

    The majority of human breast cancers exhibit luminal epithelial differentiation. However, most aggressive behavior, including invasion and purported cancer stem cell activity, are considered characteristics of basal-like cells. We asked the following questions: Must luminal-like breast cancer cells...... become basal-like to initiate tumors or to invade? Could luminally differentiated cells within a basally initiated hierarchy also be tumorigenic? To answer these questions, we used rare and mutually exclusive lineage markers to isolate subsets of luminal-like and basal-like cells from human breast tumors....... We enriched for populations with or without prominent basal-like traits from individual tumors or single cell cloning from cell lines and recovered cells with a luminal-like phenotype. Tumor cells with basal-like traits mimicked phenotypic and functional behavior associated with stem cells assessed...

  12. Breast tumor cells with PI3K mutation or HER2 amplification are selectively addicted to Akt signaling.

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    Qing-Bai She

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Dysregulated PI3K/Akt signaling occurs commonly in breast cancers and is due to HER2 amplification, PI3K mutation or PTEN inactivation. The objective of this study was to determine the role of Akt activation in breast cancer as a function of mechanism of activation and whether inhibition of Akt signaling is a feasible approach to therapy.A selective allosteric inhibitor of Akt kinase was used to interrogate a panel of breast cancer cell lines characterized for genetic lesions that activate PI3K/Akt signaling: HER2 amplification or PI3K or PTEN mutations in order to determine the biochemical and biologic consequences of inhibition of this pathway. A variety of molecular techniques and tissue culture and in vivo xenograft models revealed that tumors with mutational activation of Akt signaling were selectively dependent on the pathway. In sensitive cells, pathway inhibition resulted in D-cyclin loss, G1 arrest and induction of apoptosis, whereas cells without pathway activation were unaffected. Most importantly, the drug effectively inhibited Akt kinase and its downstream effectors in vivo and caused complete suppression of the growth of breast cancer xenografts with PI3K mutation or HER2 amplification, including models of the latter selected for resistance to Herceptin. Furthermore, chronic administration of the drug was well-tolerated, causing only transient hyperglycemia without gross toxicity to the host despite the pleiotropic normal functions of Akt.These data demonstrate that breast cancers with PI3K mutation or HER2 amplification are selectively dependent on Akt signaling, and that effective inhibition of Akt in tumors is feasible and effective in vivo. These findings suggest that direct inhibition of Akt may represent a therapeutic strategy for breast and other cancers that are addicted to the pathway including tumors with resistant to Herceptin.

  13. Antitumor activity of zoledronic acid in primary breast cancer cells determined by the ATP tumor chemosensitivity assay

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    Fehm Tanja

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The NeoAzure study has demonstrated that the use of the bisphosphonate zoledronic acid (Zol in the neoadjuvant setting increases the rate of complete response in primary breast cancer and therefore indicates direct antitumor activity. The purpose of this study was to compare the antitumor effect of Zol with standard chemotherapy in primary breast cancer cells using ATP-tumor chemosensitivity assay (ATP-TCA. Methods Breast cancer specimens were obtained from patients with breast cancer who underwent primary breast cancer surgery at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Tübingen, Germany, between 2006 through 2009. Antitumor effects of Zol, TAC (Docetaxel, Adriamycin, Cyclophosphamide and FEC (5-Fluorouracil, Epirubicin, Cyclophosphamide were tested in 116 fresh human primary breast cancer specimens using ATP-TCA. ATP-TCA results were analyzed with different cut-off levels for the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50, for IC90 and for the sensitivity index (IndexSUM. Each single agent or combination was tested at six doubling dilutions from 6.25, 12.5, 25, 50, 100, and 200% of test drug concentrations (TDC derived from the plasma peak concentrations determined by pharmacokinetic data. The assay was carried out in duplicate wells with positive and negative controls. Results The median IndexSUM value was lower for Zol than for the combined regimen FEC (36.8% and TAC (12.9%, respectively, indicating increased antitumor activity of Zol in primary breast cancer cells. The difference regarding Zol and FEC was significant (p  Conclusion Zoledronic acid has a strong antitumor effect on primary breast cancer cells in vitro which is equal or superior to commonly used chemotherapeutic regimens for treating breast cancer.

  14. Changes in keratin expression during metastatic progression of breast cancer: impact on the detection of circulating tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joosse, Simon A; Hannemann, Juliane; Spötter, Julia; Bauche, Andreas; Andreas, Antje; Müller, Volkmar; Pantel, Klaus

    2012-02-15

    Circulating tumor cells (CTC) might function as early markers for breast cancer metastasis or monitoring therapy efficacy. Enrichment and identification of CTCs are based on epithelial markers that might be modulated during epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Little is known about the expression of keratins in CTCs and whether all CTCs can be detected with antibodies directed against a limited panel of keratins. Protein expression of keratin 2, 4-10, 13-16, 18, and 19 were assessed by a cocktail of antibodies (C11, AE1, AE3, and K7) and keratin antibodies C11 and A45-B/B3 alone in 11 breast cancer cell lines and 50 primary breast carcinomas and their lymph node metastases. Furthermore, CTCs were assessed in blood of 70 metastatic breast cancer patients. Claudin-low cell lines did not show expression of normal breast epithelial keratins but were positive for K14 and K16, detected by the cocktail only. Primary breast carcinomas showed changes in keratin expression during metastatic progression to the lymph nodes. In 35 of 70 patients CTCs were identified, of which 83%, 40%, and 57% were identified by the cocktail, C11 and A45-B/B3, respectively. Identification of CTCs by the cocktail was associated with shorter survival (P keratin expression with potential biologic relevance. Individual keratin antibodies recognizing only a limited set of keratins inherit the risk to miss biologically relevant CTCs in cancer patients, and antibody cocktails including these keratins are therefore recommended. ©2012 AACR.

  15. Polyclonal breast cancer metastases arise from collective dissemination of keratin 14-expressing tumor cell clusters

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kevin J. Cheung; Veena Padmanaban; Vanesa Silvestri; Koen Schipper; Joshua D. Cohen; Amanda N. Fairchild; Michael A. Gorin; James E. Verdone; Kenneth J. Pienta; Joel S. Bader; Andrew J. Ewald

    2016-01-01

    ...? In this study, we used multicolor lineage tracing to demonstrate that polyclonal seeding by cell clusters is a frequent mechanism in a common mouse model of breast cancer, accounting for >90% of metastases...

  16. Deregulation of the Pit-1 transcription factor in human breast cancer cells promotes tumor growth and metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Batalla, Isabel; Seoane, Samuel; Garcia-Caballero, Tomas; Gallego, Rosalia; Macia, Manuel; Gonzalez, Luis O.; Vizoso, Francisco; Perez-Fernandez, Roman

    2010-01-01

    The Pit-1 transcription factor (also know as POU1F1) plays a critical role in cell differentiation during organogenesis of the anterior pituitary in mammals and is a transcriptional activator for pituitary gene transcription. Increased expression of Pit-1 has been reported in human tumorigenic breast cells. Here, we found that Pit-1 overexpression or knockdown in human breast cancer cell lines induced profound phenotypic changes in the expression of proteins involved in cell proliferation, apoptosis, and invasion. Some of these protumorigenic effects of Pit-1 were mediated by upregulation of Snai1, an inductor of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition. In immunodeficient mice, Pit-1 overexpression induced tumoral growth and promoted metastasis in lung. In patients with invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast and node-positive tumor, high expression of Pit-1 was significantly correlated with Snai1 positivity. Notably, in these patients elevated expression of Pit-1 was significantly and independently associated with the occurrence of distant metastasis. These findings suggest that Pit-1 could help to make a more accurate prognosis in patients with node-positive breast cancer and may represent a new therapeutic target. PMID:21060149

  17. Human umbilical cord matrix mesenchymal stem cells suppress the growth of breast cancer by expression of tumor suppressor genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi Ohta

    Full Text Available Human and rat umbilical cord matrix mesenchymal stem cells (UCMSC possess the ability to control the growth of breast carcinoma cells. Comparative analyses of two types of UCMSC suggest that rat UCMSC-dependent growth regulation is significantly stronger than that of human UCMSC. Their different tumoricidal abilities were clarified by analyzing gene expression profiles in the two types of UCMSC. Microarray analysis revealed differential gene expression between untreated naïve UCMSC and those co-cultured with species-matched breast carcinoma cells. The analyses screened 17 differentially expressed genes that are commonly detected in both human and rat UCMSC. The comparison between the two sets of gene expression profiles identified two tumor suppressor genes, adipose-differentiation related protein (ADRP and follistatin (FST, that were specifically up-regulated in rat UCMSC, but down-regulated in human UCMSC when they were co-cultured with the corresponding species' breast carcinoma cells. Over-expression of FST, but not ADRP, in human UCMSC enhanced their ability to suppress the growth of MDA-231 cells. The growth of MDA-231 cells was also significantly lower when they were cultured in medium conditioned with FST, but not ADRP over-expressing human UCMSC. In the breast carcinoma lung metastasis model generated with MDA-231 cells, systemic treatment with FST-over-expressing human UCMSC significantly attenuated the tumor burden. These results suggest that FST may play an important role in exhibiting stronger tumoricidal ability in rat UCMSC than human UCMSC and also implies that human UCMSC can be transformed into stronger tumoricidal cells by enhancing tumor suppressor gene expression.

  18. CD44 isoforms are heterogeneously expressed in breast cancer and correlate with tumor subtypes and cancer stem cell markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Eleonor; Honeth, Gabriella; Bendahl, Pär-Ola; Saal, Lao H; Gruvberger-Saal, Sofia; Ringnér, Markus; Vallon-Christersson, Johan; Jönsson, Göran; Holm, Karolina; Lövgren, Kristina; Fernö, Mårten; Grabau, Dorthe; Borg, Ake; Hegardt, Cecilia

    2011-09-29

    The CD44 cell adhesion molecule is aberrantly expressed in many breast tumors and has been implicated in the metastatic process as well as in the putative cancer stem cell (CSC) compartment. We aimed to investigate potential associations between alternatively spliced isoforms of CD44 and CSCs as well as to various breast cancer biomarkers and molecular subtypes. We used q-RT-PCR and exon-exon spanning assays to analyze the expression of four alternatively spliced CD44 isoforms as well as the total expression of CD44 in 187 breast tumors and 13 cell lines. ALDH1 protein expression was determined by IHC on TMA. Breast cancer cell lines showed a heterogeneous expression pattern of the CD44 isoforms, which shifted considerably when cells were grown as mammospheres. Tumors characterized as positive for the CD44+/CD24- phenotype by immunohistochemistry were associated to all isoforms except the CD44 standard (CD44S) isoform, which lacks all variant exons. Conversely, tumors with strong expression of the CSC marker ALDH1 had elevated expression of CD44S. A high expression of the CD44v2-v10 isoform, which retain all variant exons, was correlated to positive steroid receptor status, low proliferation and luminal A subtype. The CD44v3-v10 isoform showed similar correlations, while high expression of CD44v8-v10 was correlated to positive EGFR, negative/low HER2 status and basal-like subtype. High expression of CD44S was associated with strong HER2 staining and also a subgroup of basal-like tumors. Unsupervised hierarchical cluster analysis of CD44 isoform expression data divided tumors into four main clusters, which showed significant correlations to molecular subtypes and differences in 10-year overall survival. We demonstrate that individual CD44 isoforms can be associated to different breast cancer subtypes and clinical markers such as HER2, ER and PgR, which suggests involvement of CD44 splice variants in specific oncogenic signaling pathways. Efforts to link CD44 to CSCs

  19. Quantification of Ultrasonic Scattering Properties of In Vivo Tumor Cell Death in Mouse Models of Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadayyon, Hadi; Sannachi, Lakshmanan; Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Al-Mahrouki, Azza; Tran, William T; Kolios, Michael C; Czarnota, Gregory J

    2015-12-01

    Quantitative ultrasound parameters based on form factor models were investigated as potential biomarkers of cell death in breast tumor (MDA-231) xenografts treated with chemotherapy. Ultrasound backscatter radiofrequency data were acquired from MDA-231 breast cancer tumor-bearing mice (n = 20) before and after the administration of chemotherapy drugs at two ultrasound frequencies: 7 MHz and 20 MHz. Radiofrequency spectral analysis involved estimating the backscatter coefficient from regions of interest in the center of the tumor, to which form factor models were fitted, resulting in estimates of average scatterer diameter and average acoustic concentration (AAC). The ∆AAC parameter extracted from the spherical Gaussian model was found to be the most effective cell death biomarker (at the lower frequency range, r(2) = 0.40). At both frequencies, AAC in the treated tumors increased significantly (P = .026 and .035 at low and high frequencies, respectively) 24 hours after treatment compared with control tumors. Furthermore, stepwise multiple linear regression analysis of the low-frequency data revealed that a multiparameter quantitative ultrasound model was strongly correlated to cell death determined histologically posttreatment (r(2) = 0.74). The Gaussian form factor model-based scattering parameters can potentially be used to track the extent of cell death at clinically relevant frequencies (7 MHz). The 20-MHz results agreed with previous findings in which parameters related to the backscatter intensity (i.e., AAC) increased with cell death. The findings suggested that, in addition to the backscatter coefficient parameter ∆AAC, biological features including tumor heterogeneity and initial tumor volume were important factors in the prediction of cell death response. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Distinction between isolated tumor cells and micrometastases in breast cancer: is it reliable and useful?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mascarel, Isabelle; MacGrogan, Gaetan; Debled, Marc; Brouste, Veronique; Mauriac, Louis

    2008-04-15

    In routine practice, the distinction between isolated tumor cells (ITC) and micrometastases (MIC) in patients with breast cancer is sometimes difficult to discern. The authors assessed differences in classifying patients according to the American Joint Commission on Cancer (AJCC) and the International Union Against Cancer (UICC) definitions and method of sizing. We assessed the characteristics of metastatic deposits in only 1 involved lymph node in 337 patients with operable breast cancer (median follow-up, 15.3 years). When sizing multiple clusters, either the diameter of the area with close clusters (Method 1) or the size of the largest cluster (Method 2) was taken into account. Patients were classified and their survival was assessed according to the 2 sizing methods and the criteria used for definitions (size in AJCC; size and topography in UICC). With the AJCC definitions, 32 patients would be differently classified according to the method of sizing. With the UICC definitions, some patients with parenchymal ITC would be classified as pN1mi, 38 by Method 1 and 53 by Method 2. Some pathologists would classify the 66 patients who had isolated capsular vascular invasion as pN0. Classification was uncertain in 136 (40%) to 151 (45 %) patients. Survival was not significantly different between pN0(i+) and pN1(mi) patients. The distinction between ITC and MIC was often difficult and without any prognostic significance. Precise guidelines are more useful for staging than for therapy. Thus, complete axillary dissection is usually performed in pN0(i+) and pN1(mi) patients, whereas chemotherapy is not indicated or debatable when MIC is the only 1 pejorative criterion.

  1. WISP-2 gene in human breast cancer: estrogen and progesterone inducible expression and regulation of tumor cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Snigdha; Saxena, Neela; Sengupta, Krishanu; Tawfik, Ossama; Mayo, Matthew S; Banerjee, Sushanta K

    2003-01-01

    WISP-2 mRNA and protein was overexpressed in preneoplastic and cancerous cells of human breast. Statistical analyses show a significant association between WISP-2 expression and estrogen receptor (ER) positivity. In normal breast, the expression was virtually undetected. The studies showed that WISP-2 is an estrogen-induced early response gene in MCF-7 cells and the expression was continuously increased to reach a maximum level at 24 h. The estrogen effect was inhibited by a pure antiestrogen (ICI 182,780). Human mammary epithelial cells, in which WISP-2 expression was undetected or minimally detected, responded to 17beta-estradiol by upregulating the WISP-2 gene after transfection with ER-alpha, providing further evidences that WISP-2 expression is mediated through ER-alpha. Overexpression of WISP-2 mRNA by estrogen may be accomplished by both transcriptional activation and stabilization. MCF-7 cells exposed to progesterone had a rapid but transient increase in WISP-2 expression, and PR antagonist RU38486 blocked this mRNA induction. In combination with estradiol, progesterone acted as an antagonist inhibiting the expression of WISP-2 mRNA. Moreover, disruption of WISP-2 signaling in MCF-7 cells by use of antisense oligomers caused a significant reduction in tumor cell proliferation. The results are consistent with the conclusion that WISP-2 expression is a requirement for breast tumor cells proliferation.

  2. WISP-2 Gene in Human Breast Cancer: Estrogen and Progesterone Inducible Expression and Regulation of Tumor Cell Proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snigdha Banerjee

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available WISP-2 mRNA and protein was overexpressed in preneoplastic and cancerous cells of human breast. Statistical analyses show a significant association between WISP-2 expression and estrogen receptor (ER positivity. In normal breast, the expression was virtually undetected. The studies showed that WISP-2 is an estrogen-induced early response gene in MCF-7 cells and the expression was continuously increased to reach a maximum level at 24 h. The estrogen effect was inhibited by a pure antiestrogen (ICI 182,780. Human mammary epithelial cells, in which WISP-2 expression was undetected or minimally detected, responded to 17β-estradiol by upregulating the WISP-2 gene after transfection with ER-α, providing further evidences that WISP-2 expression is mediated through ER-α. Overexpression of WISP-2 mRNA by estrogen may be accomplished by both transcriptional activation and stabilization. MCF-7 cells exposed to progesterone had a rapid but transient increase in WISP-2 expression, and PR antagonist RU38486 blocked this mRNA induction. In combination with estradiol, progesterone acted as an antagonist inhibiting the expression of WISP-2 mRNA. Moreover, disruption of WISP-2 signaling in MCF-7 cells by use of antisense oligomers caused a significant reduction in tumor cell proliferation. The results are consistent with the conclusion that WISP-2 expression is a requirement for breast tumor cells proliferation.

  3. WISP-2 Gene in Human Breast Cancer: Estrogen and Progesterone Inducible Expression and Regulation of Tumor Cell Proliferation1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Snigdha; Saxena, Neela; Sengupta, Krishanu; Tawfik, Ossama; Mayo, Matthew S; Banerjee, Sushanta K

    2003-01-01

    Abstract WISP-2 mRNA and protein was overexpressed in preneoplastic and cancerous cells of human breast. Statistical analyses show a significant association between WISP-2 expression and estrogen receptor (ER) positivity. In normal breast, the expression was virtually undetected. The studies showed that WISP-2 is an estrogen-induced early response gene in MCF-7 cells and the expression was continuously increased to reach a maximum level at 24 h. The estrogen effect was inhibited by a pure antiestrogen (ICI 182,780). Human mammary epithelial cells, in which WISP-2 expression was undetected or minimally detected, responded to 17β-estradiol by upregulating the WISP-2 gene after transfection with ER-α, providing further evidences that WISP-2 expression is mediated through ER-α. Overexpression of WISP-2 mRNA by estrogen may be accomplished by both transcriptional activation and stabilization. MCF-7 cells exposed to progesterone had a rapid but transient increase in WISP-2 expression, and PR antagonist RU38486 blocked this mRNA induction. In combination with estradiol, progesterone acted as an antagonist inhibiting the expression of WISP-2 mRNA. Moreover, disruption of WISP-2 signaling in MCF-7 cells by use of antisense oligomers caused a significant reduction in tumor cell proliferation. The results are consistent with the conclusion that WISP-2 expression is a requirement for breast tumor cells proliferation. PMID:12659671

  4. Induction of interleukin-1β by mouse mammary tumor irradiation promotes triple negative breast cancer cells invasion and metastasis development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Gina; Therriault, Hélène; Bujold, Rachel; Saucier, Caroline; Paquette, Benoit

    2017-05-01

    Radiotherapy increases the level of inflammatory cytokines, some of which are known to promote metastasis. In a mouse model of triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), we determined whether irradiation of the mammary tumor increases the level of key cytokines and favors the development of lung metastases. D2A1 TNBC cells were implanted in the mammary glands of a Balb/c mouse and then 7 days old tumors were irradiated (4 × 6 Gy). The cytokines IL-1β, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-17 and MIP-2 were quantified in plasma before, midway and after irradiation. The effect of tumor irradiation on the invasion of cancer cells, the number of circulating tumor cells (CTC) and lung metastases were also measured. TNBC tumor irradiation significantly increased the plasma level of IL-1β, which was associated with a greater number of CTC (3.5-fold) and lung metastases (2.3-fold), compared to sham-irradiated animals. Enhancement of D2A1 cell invasion in mammary gland was associated with an increase of the matrix metalloproteinases-2 and -9 activity (MMP-2, -9). The ability of IL-1β to stimulate the invasiveness of irradiated D2A1 cells was confirmed by in vitro invasion chamber assays. Irradiation targeting a D2A1 tumor and its microenvironment increased the level of the inflammatory cytokine IL-1β and was associated with the promotion of cancer cell invasion and lung metastasis development.

  5. Molecular characterization of circulating tumor cells from patients with metastatic breast cancer reflects evolutionary changes in gene expression under the pressure of systemic therapy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aaltonen, K. E.; Novosadová, Vendula; Bendahl, P.-O.; Graffman, C.; Larsson, A.-M.; Ryden, L.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 28 (2017), s. 45544-45565 ISSN 1949-2553 Keywords : metastatic breast cancer * circulating tumor cells * gene expression Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.168, year: 2016

  6. Tumor-initiating cells of breast and prostate origin show alterations in the expression of genes related to iron metabolism

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rychtarčíková, Zuzana; Lettlová, Sandra; Tomkova, Veronika; Korenková, Vlasta; Langerová, Lucie; Simonova, Ekaterina; Zjablovskaja, Polina; Alberich-Jorda, Meritxell; Neužil, Jiří; Truksa, Jaroslav

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 4 (2017), s. 6376-6398 ISSN 1949-2553 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-28830S; GA ČR GA15-03796S; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 ; RVO:68378050 Keywords : tumor-initiating cells * breast cancer * iron metabolism Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology; EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology (UMG-J) Impact factor: 5.168, year: 2016

  7. WISP-2/CCN5 is involved as a novel signaling intermediate in phorbol ester-protein kinase Calpha-mediated breast tumor cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Krishanu; Banerjee, Snigdha; Dhar, Kakali; Saxena, Neela K; Mehta, Smita; Campbell, Donald R; Banerjee, Sushanta K

    2006-09-05

    PMA and active phorbol esters stimulate the proliferation of various tumor cells, including ER-positive human breast tumor cell lines. However, the specific signaling pathways involved in the PMA-induced mitogenic effect on breast tumor cells have not been fully elucidated. In the present study, we explored the mechanisms associated with the mitogenic influence of PMA on breast tumor cells. Following an acute exposure (i.e., within 2 to 6 h) to PMA (50 nM), a mitogenic effect was observed on WISP-2/CCN5-positive breast tumor cell lines, including MCF-7, ZR-75-1 and SKBR-3 cells, and induction of WISP-2/CCN5 mRNA expression paralleled the observed mitogenic proliferation. This effect was undetected in WISP-2/CCN5 negative MDA-MB-231 breast tumor cells or human mammary epithelial cells with or without ER-alpha transfection. The mitogenic effect of PMA was perturbed by short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated inhibition of WISP-2/CCN5 signaling in MCF-7 cells. Moreover, the upregulation of WISP-2/CCN5 by PMA is not ER dependent but is instead mediated through a complex PKCalpha-MAPK/ERK and SAPK/JNK signaling pathway, which leads to growth stimulation of MCF-7 breast tumor cells. These series of experiments provide the first evidence that WISP-2/CCN5 is a novel signaling molecule that critically participates in the mitogenic action of PMA on noninvasive, WISP-2/CCN5-positive breast tumor cells through PKCalpha-dependent, multiple molecular signal transduction pathways.

  8. In Situ Malignant Transformation and Progenitor-Mediated Cell Budding: Two Different Pathways for Breast Ductal and Lobular Tumor Invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-gao Man, Mina Izadjoo, Guohong Song, Alexander Stojadinovic

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The human breast lobular and ductal structures and the derived tumors from these structures differ substantial in their morphology, microenvironment, biological presentation, functions, and clinical prognosis. Based on these differences, we have proposed that pre-invasive lobular tumors may progress to invasive lesions through “in situ malignant transformation”, in which the entire myoepithelial cell layer within a given lobule or lobular clusters undergoes extensive degeneration and disruptions, which allows the entire epithelial cell population associated with these myoepithelial cell layers directly invade the stroma or vascular structures. In contrast, pre-invasive ductal tumors may invade the stroma or vascular structures through “progenitor-mediated cell budding”, in which focal myoepithelial cell degeneration-induced aberrant leukocyte infiltration causes focal disruptions in the tumor capsules, which selectively favor monoclonal proliferation of the overlying tumor stem cells or a biologically more aggressive cell clone. Our current study attempted to provide more direct morphological and immunohistochemical data that are consistent with our hypotheses.

  9. Quantification of Ultrasonic Scattering Properties of In Vivo Tumor Cell Death in Mouse Models of Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Tadayyon

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Quantitative ultrasound parameters based on form factor models were investigated as potential biomarkers of cell death in breast tumor (MDA-231 xenografts treated with chemotherapy. METHODS: Ultrasound backscatter radiofrequency data were acquired from MDA-231 breast cancer tumor–bearing mice (n = 20 before and after the administration of chemotherapy drugs at two ultrasound frequencies: 7 MHz and 20 MHz. Radiofrequency spectral analysis involved estimating the backscatter coefficient from regions of interest in the center of the tumor, to which form factor models were fitted, resulting in estimates of average scatterer diameter and average acoustic concentration (AAC. RESULTS: The ∆AAC parameter extracted from the spherical Gaussian model was found to be the most effective cell death biomarker (at the lower frequency range, r2 = 0.40. At both frequencies, AAC in the treated tumors increased significantly (P = .026 and .035 at low and high frequencies, respectively 24 hours after treatment compared with control tumors. Furthermore, stepwise multiple linear regression analysis of the low-frequency data revealed that a multiparameter quantitative ultrasound model was strongly correlated to cell death determined histologically posttreatment (r2 = 0.74. CONCLUSION: The Gaussian form factor model–based scattering parameters can potentially be used to track the extent of cell death at clinically relevant frequencies (7 MHz. The 20-MHz results agreed with previous findings in which parameters related to the backscatter intensity (i.e., AAC increased with cell death. The findings suggested that, in addition to the backscatter coefficient parameter ∆AAC, biological features including tumor heterogeneity and initial tumor volume were important factors in the prediction of cell death response.

  10. Quantitative ultrasound evaluation of tumor cell death response in locally advanced breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Papanicolau, Naum; Falou, Omar; Zubovits, Judit; Dent, Rebecca; Verma, Sunil; Trudeau, Maureen; Boileau, Jean Francois; Spayne, Jacqueline; Iradji, Sara; Sofroni, Ervis; Lee, Justin; Lemon-Wong, Sharon; Yaffe, Martin; Kolios, Michael C; Czarnota, Gregory J

    2013-04-15

    Quantitative ultrasound techniques have been recently shown to be capable of detecting cell death through studies conducted on in vitro and in vivo models. This study investigates for the first time the potential of early detection of tumor cell death in response to clinical cancer therapy administration in patients using quantitative ultrasound spectroscopic methods. Patients (n = 24) with locally advanced breast cancer received neoadjuvant chemotherapy treatments. Ultrasound data were collected before treatment onset and at 4 times during treatment (weeks 1, 4, and 8, and preoperatively). Quantitative ultrasound parameters were evaluated for clinically responsive and nonresponding patients. Results indicated that quantitative ultrasound parameters showed significant changes for patients who responded to treatment, and no similar alteration was observed in treatment-refractory patients. Such differences between clinically and pathologically determined responding and nonresponding patients were statistically significant (P < 0.05) after 4 weeks of chemotherapy. Responding patients showed changes in parameters related to cell death with, on average, an increase in mid-band fit and 0-MHz intercept of 9.1 ± 1.2 dBr and 8.9 ± 1.9 dBr, respectively, whereas spectral slope was invariant. Linear discriminant analysis revealed a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 83.3% for distinguishing nonresponding patients by the fourth week into a course of chemotherapy lasting several months. This study reports for the first time that quantitative ultrasound spectroscopic methods can be applied clinically to evaluate cancer treatment responses noninvasively. The results form a basis for monitoring chemotherapy effects and facilitating the personalization of cancer treatment.

  11. Olive phenolics as c-Met inhibitors: (--Oleocanthal attenuates cell proliferation, invasiveness, and tumor growth in breast cancer models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed R Akl

    Full Text Available Dysregulation of the Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF/c-Met signaling axis upregulates diverse tumor cell functions, including cell proliferation, survival, scattering and motility, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. (--Oleocanthal is a naturally occurring secoiridoid from extra-virgin olive oil, which showed antiproliferative and antimigratory activity against different cancer cell lines. The aim of this study was to characterize the intracellular mechanisms involved in mediating the anticancer effects of (--oleocanthal treatment and the potential involvement of c-Met receptor signaling components in breast cancer. Results showed that (--oleocanthal inhibits the growth of human breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231, MCF-7 and BT-474 while similar treatment doses were found to have no effect on normal human MCF10A cell growth. In addition, (--oleocanthal treatment caused a dose-dependent inhibition of HGF-induced cell migration, invasion and G1/S cell cycle progression in breast cancer cell lines. Moreover, (--oleocanthal treatment effects were found to be mediated via inhibition of HGF-induced c-Met activation and its downstream mitogenic signaling pathways. This growth inhibitory effect is associated with blockade of EMT and reduction in cellular motility. Further results from in vivo studies showed that (--oleocanthal treatment suppressed tumor cell growth in an orthotopic model of breast cancer in athymic nude mice. Collectively, the findings of this study suggest that (--oleocanthal is a promising dietary supplement lead with potential for therapeutic use to control malignancies with aberrant c-Met activity.

  12. BDNF is associated with SFRP1 expression in luminal and basal-like breast cancer cell lines and primary breast cancer tissues: a novel role in tumor suppression?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Huth

    Full Text Available Secreted frizzled related protein 1 (SFRP1 functions as an important inhibitor of the Wnt pathway and is a known tumor suppressor gene, which is epigenetically silenced in a variety of tumors e.g. in breast cancer. However, it is still unclear how SFRP1 exactly affects the Wnt pathway. Our aim was to decipher SFRP1 involvement in biochemical signaling in dependency of different breast cancer subtypes and to identify novel SFRP1-regulated genes. We generated SFRP1 over-expressing in vitro breast cancer models, reflecting the two major subtypes by using basal-like BT20 and luminal-like HER2-positive SKBR3 cells. DNA microarray expression profiling of these models revealed that SFRP1 expression potentially modulates Bone morphogenetic protein- and Smoothened signaling (p<0.01, in addition to the known impact on Wnt signaling. Importantly, further statistical analysis revealed that in dependency of the cancer subtype model SFRP1 may affect the canonical and non-canonical Wnt pathway (p<0.01, respectively. While SFRP1 re-expression generally mediated distinct patterns of transcriptionally induced or repressed genes in BT20 and SKBR3 cells, brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF was identified as a SFRP1 induced gene in both cell lines. Although BDNF has been postulated as a putative oncogene, the co-regulation with SFRP1 indicates a potential suppressive function in breast cancer. Indeed, a positive correlation between SFRP1 and BDNF protein expression could be shown (p<0.001 in primary breast cancer samples. Moreover, TCGA dataset based analysis clearly underscores that BDNF mRNA is down-regulated in primary breast cancer samples predicting a poor prognosis of these patients. In line, we functionally provide evidence that stable BDNF re-expression in basal-like BT20 breast cancer cells blocks tumor cell proliferation. Hence, our results suggest that BDNF might rather mediate suppressive than promoting function in human breast cancer whose mode of

  13. Tumor markers of breast cancer: New prospectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M. Kabel

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Tumor markers are substances produced by the tumors or by other cells of the body in response to cancer or certain benign conditions. Although most of these markers are made by the normal cells as well as by cancer cells, they are produced at much higher levels in cancerous conditions. These markers are used to evaluate the patient's response to treatment and to detect the presence of metastasis or recurrence. Breast cancer is one of the most common malignancies in females worldwide. The CA 27-29, CA 15-3, CA27.29, carcinoembryonic antigen, tissue polypeptide specific antigen, p53, cathepsin D, cyclin E, nestin and HER-2 are tumor markers that are often expressed in people with breast cancer. They play a crucial role in diagnosis, monitoring response to therapy, early detection of metastasis and determination of recurrence in patients with breast cancer.

  14. Structurally Novel Antiestrogens Elicit Differential Responses from Constitutively Active Mutant Estrogen Receptors in Breast Cancer Cells and Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuechao; Laws, Mary J; Guillen, Valeria Sanabria; Ziegler, Yvonne; Min, Jian; Sharma, Abhishek; Kim, Sung Hoon; Chu, David; Park, Ben Ho; Oesterreich, Steffi; Mao, Chengjian; Shapiro, David J; Nettles, Kendall W; Katzenellenbogen, John A; Katzenellenbogen, Benita S

    2017-10-15

    Many estrogen receptor α (ERα)-positive breast cancers develop resistance to endocrine therapy via mutation of ERs whose constitutive activation is associated with shorter patient survival. Because there is now a clinical need for new antiestrogens (AE) against these mutant ERs, we describe here our development and characterization of three chemically novel AEs that effectively suppress proliferation of breast cancer cells and tumors. Our AEs are effective against wild-type and Y537S and D538G ERs, the two most commonly occurring constitutively active ERs. The three new AEs suppressed proliferation and estrogen target gene expression in WT and mutant ER-containing cells and were more effective in D538G than in Y537S cells and tumors. Compared with WT ER, mutants exhibited approximately 10- to 20-fold lower binding affinity for AE and a reduced ability to be blocked in coactivator interaction, likely contributing to their relative resistance to inhibition by AE. Comparisons between mutant ER-containing MCF7 and T47D cells revealed that AE responses were compound, cell-type, and ERα-mutant dependent. These new ligands have favorable pharmacokinetic properties and effectively suppressed growth of WT and mutant ER-expressing tumor xenografts in NOD/SCID-γ mice after oral or subcutaneous administration; D538G tumors were more potently inhibited by AE than Y537S tumors. These studies highlight the differential responsiveness of the mutant ERs to different AEs and make clear the value of having a toolkit of AEs for treatment of endocrine therapy-resistant tumors driven by different constitutively active ERs. Cancer Res; 77(20); 5602-13. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  15. Memory CD4+T cell subsets in tumor draining lymph nodes of breast cancer patients: A focus on T stem cell memory cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahidi, Yasmin; Faghih, Zahra; Talei, Abdol-Rasoul; Doroudchi, Mehrnoosh; Ghaderi, Abbas

    2018-02-01

    The compartments of memory T cells play a fundamental role in the immune system by substantiating specific and acquired immunity. A new subset of memory cells, T stem cell memory (T SCM ) cells, with stem cell-like properties, a high capacity to proliferate, a long survival, and an ability to differentiate into all effector and memory cells has recently been introduced. In the present study, we aimed to determine the frequency of CD4 + T SCM and other T memory cell subsets in tumor draining lymph nodes of breast cancer patients. Mononuclear cells were obtained from axillary lymph nodes of 52 untreated patients with breast cancer (BC) and stained with fluorochrome conjugated anti-CD4, -CCR7, -CD45RO and -CD95 antibodies to detect different subtypes of memory cells in CD4 + lymphocyte populations. Data were acquired using a four-color FACSCalibur flow cytometer and analyzed using CellQuest Pro software. We found that >70% of CD4 + lymphocytes in draining lymph nodes of BC patients exhibited a memory phenotype of which 7.04 ± 1.04% had a T SCM phenotype (CD4 + CCR7 + CD45RO - CD95 + ). The frequency of T SCM cells was significantly higher in tumor positive lymph nodes compared to tumor negative lymph nodes (p = 0.026) as well as among those patients who had at least one affected lymph node (p = 0.012). Moreover, we found that the total frequency of central memory T cells (T CM ) with a low expression of CD45RO was significantly higher among these patients. The percentage of CD45RO Low T CM cells was also found to increase with tumor progression from stage I to stage III (p = 0.020). On the other hand, we found that the percentage of CD95 Hi effector memory T cells (T EM ) was significantly decreased in involved lymph nodes (p = 0.009). Our data suggest that following long-term exposure to putative tumor antigens, T SCM cells proliferate to generate a pool of committed memory and effector T cells. As the tumor progresses, the immunosuppressive milieu induced

  16. Cysteine-linked dimerization of BST-2 confers anoikis resistance to breast cancer cells by negating proapoptotic activities to promote tumor cell survival and growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahauad-Fernandez, Wadie D; Okeoma, Chioma M

    2017-03-16

    Almost all breast tumors express the antiviral protein BST-2 with 67%, 25% and 8.2% containing high, medium or low levels of BST-2, respectively. Breast tumor cells and tissues that contain elevated levels of BST-2 are highly aggressive. Suppression of BST-2 expression reprograms tumorigenic properties of cancer cells and diminishes cancer cell aggressiveness. Using structure/function studies, we report that dimerization of BST-2 through cysteine residues located in the BST-2 extracellular domain (ECD), leads to anoikis resistance and cell survival through proteasome-mediated degradation of BIM-a key proapoptotic factor. Importantly, BST-2 dimerization promotes tumor growth in preclinical breast cancer models in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we demonstrate that restoration of the ECD cysteine residues is sufficient to rescue cell survival and tumor growth via a previously unreported pathway-BST-2/GRB2/ERK/BIM/Cas3. These findings suggest that disruption of BST-2 dimerization offers a potential therapeutic approach for breast cancer.

  17. PLC-β2 is modulated by low oxygen availability in breast tumor cells and plays a phenotype dependent role in their hypoxia-related malignant potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugnoli, Federica; Grassilli, Silvia; Al-Qassab, Yasamin; Capitani, Silvano; Bertagnolo, Valeria

    2016-12-01

    Limited oxygen availability plays a critical role in the malignant progression of breast cancer by orchestrating a complex modulation of the gene transcription largely dependent on the tumor phenotype. Invasive breast tumors belonging to different molecular subtypes are characterized by over-expression of PLC-β2, whose amount positively correlates with the malignant evolution of breast neoplasia and supports the invasive potential of breast tumor cells. Here we report that hypoxia modulates the expression of PLC-β2 in breast tumor cells in a phenotype-related manner, since a decrease of the protein was observed in the BT-474 and MCF7 cell lines while an increase was revealed in MDA-MB-231 cells as a consequence of low oxygen availability. Under hypoxia, the down-modulation of PLC-β2 was mainly correlated with the decrease of the EMT marker E-cadherin in the BT-474 cells and with the up-regulation of the stem cell marker CD133 in MCF7 cells. The increase of PLC-β2 induced by low oxygen in MDA-MB-231 cells supports the hypoxia-related reorganization of actin cytoskeleton and sustains invasion capability. In all examined cell lines, but with an opposite role in the ER-positive and ER-negative cells, PLC-β2 was involved in the hypoxia-induced increase of HIF-1α, known to affect both EMT and CD133 expression. Our data include PLC-β2 in the complex and interconnected signaling pathways induced by low oxygen availability in breast tumor cells and suggest that the forced modulation of PLC-β2 programmed on the basis of tumor phenotype may prevent the malignant progression of breast neoplasia as a consequence of intra-tumoral hypoxia. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Prognostic significance of axillary dissection in breast cancer patients with micrometastases or isolated tumor cells in sentinel nodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedskov, Tove Filtenborg; Jensen, Maj-Britt; Ejlertsen, Bent

    2015-01-01

    . In this nationwide study, we found a low risk of AR on 1.58 % and we did not find a significantly increased risk of AR if ALND was omitted in patients with micrometastases or ITC in sentinel nodes. Furthermore, no significant difference in overall survival was seen between patients with and without ALND when......We estimated the impact of axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) on the risk of axillary recurrence (AR) and overall survival (OS) in breast cancer patients with micrometastases or isolated tumor cells (ITC) in sentinel nodes. We used the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group (DBCG) database...... to identify patients with micrometastases or ITC in sentinel nodes following surgery for primary breast cancer between 2002 and 2008. A Cox proportional hazard regression model was developed to assess the hazard ratios (HR) for AR and OS between patients with and without ALND. We identified 2074 patients...

  19. Tumor cryoablation in combination with natural killer cells therapy and Herceptin in patients with HER2-overexpressing recurrent breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Shuzhen; Niu, Lizhi; Xu, Kecheng; Wang, Xiaohua; Liang, Yingqing; Zhang, Mingjie; Chen, Jibing; Lin, Mao

    2017-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the clinical benefits of a combination of tumor cryoablation with natural killer (NK) cells therapy and Herceptin for human epidermal growth factor (HER) 2-overexpressing recurrent breast cancer. From May 2015 to May 2016, 48 patients who met the enrollment criteria were assigned to three groups (n=16): cryoablation group (group I), cryoablation-NK cells therapy group (group II) and cryoablation-NK cells therapy-Herceptin group (group III). Safety and short-term effects were evaluated. All the adverse effects were manageable and acceptable. The three-therapy combination treatment not only yielded good clinical efficacy, it also improved the quality of life; reduced levels of circulating tumor cells (CTCs); reduced carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA) and cancer antigen 15-3 (CA15-3) expression; enhanced immune function significantly. Furthermore, it can resulte in significant prolongation of progression free survival (PFS). This is the first clinical study to demonstrate the benefit of the three-therapy combination of tumor cryoablation, NK cells therapy, and Herceptin for HER2-overexpressing recurrent breast cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Co-treatment of breast cancer cells with pharmacologic doses of 2-deoxy-D-glucose and metformin: Starving tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wokoun, Ulrike; Hellriegel, Martin; Emons, Günter; Gründker, Carsten

    2017-04-01

    A characteristic of tumor cells is the increased aerobic glycolysis for energy production. Thus, inhibition of glycolysis represents a selective therapeutic option. It has been shown that glycolysis inhibitor 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2DG) induces apoptotic cell death in different tumor entities. In addition, the antitumor activity of the anti-diabetic drug metformin has been demonstrated. In the present study, we aimed to ascertain whether the combination of pharmacologic doses of 2DG with metformin increases the antitumor efficacy. Cell viability of MDA-MB-231 and HCC1806 triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells treated without or with 2DG or with metformin alone or with the combination of both agents was measured using Alamar Blue assay. Induction of apoptosis was quantified by measurement of the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and cleavage of PARP. Treatment of breast cancer cells with glycolysis inhibitor 2DG or with the anti-diabetic drug metformin resulted in a significant decrease in cell viability and an increase in apoptosis. Treatment with 2DG in combination with metformin resulted in significantly reduced viability compared with the single agent treatments. The observed reduction in viability was due to induction of apoptosis. In addition, in regards to apoptosis induction a stronger effect in the case of co-treatment compared with single agent treatments was observed. The glycolytic phenotype of human breast cancer cells can be targeted for therapeutic intervention. Co-treatment with doses of the glycolysis inhibitor 2DG and anti-diabetic drug metformin is tolerable in humans and may be a suitable therapy for human breast cancers.

  1. Normal and tumor-derived myoepithelial cells differ in their ability to interact with luminal breast epithelial cells for polarity and basement membrane deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudjonsson, Thorarinn; Rønnov-Jessen, Lone; Villadsen, René; Rank, Fritz; Bissell, Mina J; Petersen, Ole William

    2002-01-01

    The signals that determine the correct polarity of breast epithelial structures in vivo are not understood. We have shown previously that luminal epithelial cells can be polarized when cultured within a reconstituted basement membrane gel. We reasoned that such cues in vivo may be given by myoepithelial cells. Accordingly, we used an assay where luminal epithelial cells are incorrectly polarized to test this hypothesis. We show that culturing human primary luminal epithelial cells within collagen-I gels leads to formation of structures with no lumina and with reverse polarity as judged by dual stainings for sialomucin, epithelial specific antigen or occludin. No basement membrane is deposited, and beta4-integrin staining is negative. Addition of purified human myoepithelial cells isolated from normal glands corrects the inverse polarity, and leads to formation of double-layered acini with central lumina. Among the laminins present in the human breast basement membrane (laminin-1, -5 and -10/11), laminin-1 was unique in its ability to substitute for myoepithelial cells in polarity reversal. Myoepithelial cells were purified also from four different breast cancer sources including a biphasic cell line. Three out of four samples either totally lacked the ability to interact with luminal epithelial cells, or conveyed only correction of polarity in a fraction of acini. This behavior was directly related to the ability of the tumor myoepithelial cells to produce alpha-1 chain of laminin. In vivo, breast carcinomas were either negative for laminin-1 (7/12 biopsies) or showed a focal, fragmented deposition of a less intensely stained basement membrane (5/12 biopsies). Dual staining with myoepithelial markers revealed that tumor-associated myoepithelial cells were either negative or weakly positive for expression of laminin-1, establishing a strong correlation between loss of laminin-1 and breast cancer. We conclude that the double-layered breast acinus may be recapitulated

  2. Photonic Breast Tomography and Tumor Aggressiveness Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    Caspase-3. • Drug (PD901) treatment and cell growth curve m easurement for OVCAR5, T24 , and UMUC3 cell lines. • Flow cytometry technique for cell ...spectroscopic approaches for breast tumor detection. The CCNY researchers received training on (i) small animal handling; (ii) Cell culture, bioluminescence...aging techniques, cell culture, bioluminescence assay, Western Blotting, and other key techniques used in cancer research. Rotation I Laboratory

  3. Homeostatic T Cell Expansion to Induce Anti-Tumor Autoimmunity in Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baccala, Roberto

    2006-01-01

    In previous studies, we have shown that effective anti-tumor autoimmunity can be elicited if a tumorcell challenge is given in conjunction with homeostatic T-cell proliferation, a process occurring...

  4. Accumulation and altered localization of telomere-associated protein TRF2 in immortally transformed and tumor-derived human breast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nijjar, Tarlochan; Bassett, Ekaterina; Garbe, James; Takenaka, Yasuhiro; Stampfer, Martha R.; Gilley, David; Yaswen, Paul

    2004-12-23

    We have used cultured human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) and breast tumor-derived lines to gain information on defects that occur during breast cancer progression. HMEC immortalized by a variety of agents (the chemical carcinogen benzo(a)pyrene, oncogenes c-myc and ZNF217, and/or dominant negative p53 genetic suppressor element GSE22) displayed marked up regulation (10-15 fold) of the telomere binding protein, TRF2. Up-regulation of TRF2 protein was apparently due to differences in post-transcriptional regulation, as mRNA levels remained comparable in finite life span and immortal HMEC. TRF2 protein was not up-regulated by the oncogenic agents alone in the absence of immortalization, nor by expression of exogenously introduced hTERT genes. We found TRF2 levels to be at least 2-fold higher than in control cells in 11/15 breast tumor cell lines, suggesting that elevated TRF2 levels are a frequent occurrence during the transformation of breast tumor cells in vivo. The dispersed distribution of TRF2 throughout the nuclei in some immortalized and tumor-derived cells indicated that not all the TRF2 was associated with telomeres in these cells. The process responsible for accumulation of TRF2 in immortalized HMEC and breast tumor-derived cell lines may promote tumorigenesis by contributing to the cells ability to maintain an indefinite life span.

  5. Overexpression of L1 cell adhesion molecule correlates with aggressive tumor progression of patients with breast cancer and promotes motility of breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Yang, Fei; Ding, Yong; Zhen, Linlin; Han, Xuedong; Jiao, Feng; Tang, Jinhai

    2015-01-01

    L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1CAM) has been observed to be aberrantly expressed and implicated in progression of several types of human cancers. However, its roles in breast cancer have not been fully elucidated. In this study, we aimed to investigate the clinical significance of L1CAM in human breast cancer and to validate whether it participates in cancer cell migration and invasion. Immunohistochemical analysis of 100 breast cancer and matched non-cancerous breast tissues was performed to detect the expression and sub-cellular localization of L1CAM protein. Its associations with clinicopathological characteristics of breast cancer patients were statistically analyzed and its phenotypic effects were also evaluated in vitro. Of the 100 breast cancer patients, 89 (89.0%) were positive for L1CAM immunostaining localized in the membrane of cancer cells. The immunoreactive scores of L1CAM protein in breast cancer tissues were significantly higher than those in matched non-cancerous breast tissues (Pbreast cancer patients. Moreover, we found that RNA interference-mediated knockdown of L1CAM could inhibit the migration and invasion abilities of breast cancer cells in vitro. Our results suggest that the overexpression of L1CAM may be related to several established markers of poor prognosis in breast cancer patients. L1CAM might be a potential therapeutic target against metastatic breast cancer.

  6. Blockade of Fas signaling in breast cancer cells suppresses tumor growth and metastasis via disruption of Fas signaling-initiated cancer-related inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiuyan; Tan, Qinchun; Zheng, Yuanyuan; Chen, Kun; Qian, Cheng; Li, Nan; Wang, Qingqing; Cao, Xuetao

    2014-04-18

    Mechanisms for cancer-related inflammation remain to be fully elucidated. Non-apoptotic functions of Fas signaling have been proposed to play an important role in promoting tumor progression. It has yet to be determined if targeting Fas signaling can control tumor progression through suppression of cancer-related inflammation. In the current study we found that breast cancer cells with constitutive Fas expression were resistant to apoptosis induction by agonistic anti-Fas antibody (Jo2) ligation or Fas ligand cross-linking. Higher expression of Fas in human breast cancer tissue has been significantly correlated with poorer prognosis in breast cancer patients. To determine whether blockade of Fas signaling in breast cancer could suppress tumor progression, we prepared an orthotopic xenograft mouse model with mammary cancer cells 4T1 and found that blockade of Fas signaling in 4T1 cancer cells markedly reduced tumor growth, inhibited tumor metastasis in vivo, and prolonged survival of tumor-bearing mice. Mechanistically, blockade of Fas signaling in cancer cells significantly decreased systemic or local recruitment of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) in vivo. Furthermore, blockade of Fas signaling markedly reduced IL-6, prostaglandin E2 production from breast cancer cells by impairing p-p38, and activity of the NFκB pathway. In addition, administration of a COX-2 inhibitor and anti-IL-6 antibody significantly reduced MDSC accumulation in vivo. Therefore, blockade of Fas signaling can suppress breast cancer progression by inhibiting proinflammatory cytokine production and MDSC accumulation, indicating that Fas signaling-initiated cancer-related inflammation in breast cancer cells may be a potential target for treatment of breast cancer.

  7. Quantitative diagnosis of breast tumors by morphometric classification of microenvironmental myoepithelial cells using a machine learning approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yoichiro; Saito, Akira; Tateishi, Ayako; Shimojo, Hisashi; Kanno, Hiroyuki; Tsuchiya, Shinichi; Ito, Ken-ichi; Cosatto, Eric; Graf, Hans Peter; Moraleda, Rodrigo R.; Eils, Roland; Grabe, Niels

    2017-01-01

    Machine learning systems have recently received increased attention for their broad applications in several fields. In this study, we show for the first time that histological types of breast tumors can be classified using subtle morphological differences of microenvironmental myoepithelial cell nuclei without any direct information about neoplastic tumor cells. We quantitatively measured 11661 nuclei on the four histological types: normal cases, usual ductal hyperplasia and low/high grade ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). Using a machine learning system, we succeeded in classifying the four histological types with 90.9% accuracy. Electron microscopy observations suggested that the activity of typical myoepithelial cells in DCIS was lowered. Through these observations as well as meta-analytic database analyses, we developed a paracrine cross-talk-based biological mechanism of DCIS progressing to invasive cancer. Our observations support novel approaches in clinical computational diagnostics as well as in therapy development against progression. PMID:28440283

  8. Normal and tumor-derived myoepithelial cells differ in their ability to interact with luminal breast epithelial cells for polarity and basement membrane deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gudjonsson, Thorarinn; Ronnov-Jessen, Lone; Villadsen, Rene; Rank, Fritz; Bissell, Mina J.; Petersen, Ole William

    2001-10-04

    The signals that determine the correct polarity of breast epithelial structures in vivo are not understood. We have shown previously that luminal epithelial cells can be polarized when cultured within a reconstituted basement membrane gel. We reasoned that such cues in vivo may be given by myoepithelial cells. Accordingly, we used an assay where luminal epithelial cells are incorrectly polarized to test this hypothesis. We show that culturing human primary luminal epithelial cells within collagen-I gels leads to formation of structures with no lumina and with reverse polarity as judged by dual stainings for sialomucin, epithelial specific antigen or occludin. No basement membrane is deposited, and {beta}4-integrin staining is negative. Addition of purified human myoepithelial cells isolated from normal glands corrects the inverse polarity, and leads to formation of double-layered acini with central lumina. Among the laminins present in the human breast basement membrane (laminin-1, -5 and -10/11), laminin-1 was unique in its ability to substitute for myoepithelial cells in polarity reversal. Myoepithelial cells were purified also from four different breast cancer sources including a biphasic cell line. Three out of four samples either totally lacked the ability to interact with luminal epithelial cells, or conveyed only correction of polarity in a fraction of acini. This behavior was directly related to the ability of the tumor myoepithelial cells to produce {alpha}-1 chain of laminin. In vivo, breast carcinomas were either negative for laminin-1 (7/12 biopsies) or showed a focal, fragmented deposition of a less intensely stained basement membrane (5/12 biopsies). Dual staining with myoepithelial markers revealed that tumorassociated myoepithelial cells were either negative or weakly positive for expression of laminin-1, establishing a strong correlation between loss of laminin-1 and breast cancer. We conclude that the double-layered breast acinus may be

  9. Progressive Deregulation of the Cell Cycle With Higher Tumor Grade in the Stroma of Breast Phyllodes Tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijper, Arno; Vos, R.A.I. de; Lagendijk, J.H.; Wall, E. van der; Diest, P.J. van

    2005-01-01

    We studied cell cycle–regulating proteins in phyllodes tumor pathogenesis by immunohistochemical analysis for Ki-67, cyclin A, cyclin D1, retinoblastoma protein (pRb), p53, p16INK4A, bcl-2, and p21waf1 in the epithelium and stroma of 40 primary (benign, 21; borderline, 8; malignant, 11) and 7

  10. Identification of a population of blood circulating tumor cells from breast cancer patients that initiates metastasis in a xenograft assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccelli, Irène; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Riethdorf, Sabine; Stenzinger, Albrecht; Schillert, Anja; Vogel, Vanessa; Klein, Corinna; Saini, Massimo; Bäuerle, Tobias; Wallwiener, Markus; Holland-Letz, Tim; Höfner, Thomas; Sprick, Martin; Scharpff, Martina; Marmé, Frederik; Sinn, Hans Peter; Pantel, Klaus; Weichert, Wilko; Trumpp, Andreas

    2013-06-01

    It has been hypothesized that carcinoma metastasis is initiated by a subpopulation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) found in the blood of patients. However, although the presence of CTCs is an indicator of poor prognosis in several carcinoma entities, the existence and phenotype of metastasis-initiating cells (MICs) among CTCs has not been experimentally demonstrated. Here we developed a xenograft assay and used it to show that primary human luminal breast cancer CTCs contain MICs that give rise to bone, lung and liver metastases in mice. These MIC-containing CTC populations expressed EPCAM, CD44, CD47 and MET. In a small cohort of patients with metastases, the number of EPCAM(+)CD44(+)CD47(+)MET(+) CTCs, but not of bulk EPCAM(+) CTCs, correlated with lower overall survival and increased number of metastasic sites. These data describe functional circulating MICs and associated markers, which may aid the design of better tools to diagnose and treat metastatic breast cancer.

  11. Leydig cell tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumor - Leydig cell; Testicular tumor - Leydig; Testicular neoplasm ... The cause of this tumor is unknown. There are no known risk factors for this tumor. Unlike germ cell tumors of the testicles, this tumor ...

  12. Overexpression of L1 cell adhesion molecule correlates with aggressive tumor progression of patients with breast cancer and promotes motility of breast cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jian; Yang, Fei; Ding, Yong; Zhen, Linlin; Han, Xuedong; Jiao, Feng; Tang, Jinhai

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose: L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1CAM) has been observed to be aberrantly expressed and implicated in progression of several types of human cancers. However, its roles in breast cancer have not been fully elucidated. In this study, we aimed to investigate the clinical significance of L1CAM in human breast cancer and to validate whether it participates in cancer cell migration and invasion. Methods: Immunohistochemical analysis of 100 breast cancer and matched non-cancerous ...

  13. Elucidation of Altered Pathways in Tumor-Initiating Cells of Triple-Negative Breast Cancer: A Useful Cell Model System for Drug Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Anne G; Ehmsen, Sidse; Terp, Mikkel G; Batra, Richa; Alcaraz, Nicolas; Baumbach, Jan; Noer, Julie B; Moreira, José; Leth-Larsen, Rikke; Larsen, Martin R; Ditzel, Henrik J

    2017-08-01

    A limited number of cancer cells within a tumor are thought to have self-renewing and tumor-initiating capabilities that produce the remaining cancer cells in a heterogeneous tumor mass. Elucidation of central pathways preferentially used by tumor-initiating cells/cancer stem cells (CSCs) may allow their exploitation as potential cancer therapy targets. We used single cell cloning to isolate and characterize four isogenic cell clones from a triple-negative breast cancer cell line; two exhibited mesenchymal-like and two epithelial-like characteristics. Within these pairs, one, but not the other, resulted in tumors in immunodeficient NOD/Shi-scid/IL-2 Rγ null mice and efficiently formed mammospheres. Quantitative proteomics and phosphoproteomics were used to map signaling pathways associated with the tumor-initiating ability. Signaling associated with apoptosis was suppressed in tumor-initiating versus nontumorigenic counterparts with pro-apoptotic proteins, such as Bcl2-associated agonist of cell death (BAD), FAS-associated death domain protein (FADD), and myeloid differentiation primary response protein (MYD88), downregulated in tumor-initiating epithelial-like cells. Functional studies confirmed significantly lower apoptosis in tumor-initiating versus nontumorigenic cells. Moreover, central pathways, including β-catenin and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB)-related signaling, exhibited increased activation in the tumor-initiating cells. To evaluate the CSC model as a tool for drug screening, we assessed the effect of separately blocking NF-κB and Wnt/β-catenin signaling and found markedly reduced mammosphere formation, particularly for tumor-initiating cells. Similar reduction was also observed using patient-derived primary cancer cells. Furthermore, blocking NF-κB signaling in mice transplanted with tumor-initiating cells significantly reduced tumor outgrowth. Our study demonstrates that suppressed apoptosis, activation

  14. Assessment of maturation status of tumor-infiltrating dendritic cells in invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast: relation with vascular endothelial growth factor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Deeb, Nevine M F; Mehanna, Radwa A

    2013-01-01

    Poor immunogenicity has been described in breast carcinoma although dendritic cells, the major antigen presenters, are known to infiltrate the tumor. Vascular endothelial growth factor has been proposed to reduce local immune response in tumors. We investigated the maturation status of dendritic cells in invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast in relation to vascular endothelial growth factor expression and clinicopathological parameters. Fifty invasive ductal carcinomas of the breast were immunostained with CD1a (marker of immature dendritic cells); CD83 (marker of mature dendritic cells), vascular endothelial growth factor, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor. Mature dendritic cells were detected in 36 cases (72%), and correlated with smaller tumor size, negative lymph nodes, positive steroid receptor status, and lower grade (P cells were found in 100% of cases and correlated only with negative steroid receptor expression (estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor) (P=0.006 and 0.020 respectively). Vascular endothelial growth factor expression was detected in 44 cases (88%), and correlated directly with positive nodal metastases (P=0.014), correlated inversely with mature dendritic cell count (P=0.005); and did not correlate with immature dendritic cell count (P=0.104). Mature dendritic cell count correlates with good prognostic features in invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast, suggesting their role in initiating primary anti-tumor immune response. Vascular endothelial growth factor expression may play a role in inhibition of dendritic cell maturation sequence in the tumor microenvironment.

  15. A FISH-based method for assessment of HER-2 amplification status in breast cancer circulating tumor cells following CellSearch isolation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frithiof H

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Henrik Frithiof,1 Kristina Aaltonen,1 Lisa Rydén2,3 1Division of Oncology and Pathology, 2Division of Surgery, Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Lund University, Lund, 3Department of Surgery, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden Introduction: Amplification of the HER-2/neu (HER-2 proto-oncogene occurs in 10%–15% of primary breast cancer, leading to an activated HER-2 receptor, augmenting growth of cancer cells. Tumor classification is determined in primary tumor tissue and metastatic biopsies. However, malignant cells tend to alter their phenotype during disease progression. Circulating tumor cell (CTC analysis may serve as an alternative to repeated biopsies. The Food and Drug Administration-approved CellSearch system allows determination of the HER-2 protein, but not of the HER-2 gene. The aim of this study was to optimize a fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH-based method to quantitatively determine HER-2 amplification in breast cancer CTCs following CellSearch-based isolation and verify the method in patient samples. Methods: Using healthy donor blood spiked with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2-positive breast cancer cell lines, SKBr-3 and BT-474, and a corresponding negative control (the HER-2-negative MCF-7 cell line, an in vitro CTC model system was designed. Following isolation in the CellSearch system, CTC samples were further enriched and fixed on microscope slides. Immunocytochemical staining with cytokeratin and 4',6-diamidino-2'-phenylindole dihydrochloride identified CTCs under a fluorescence microscope. A FISH-based procedure was optimized by applying the HER2 IQFISH pharmDx assay for assessment of HER-2 amplification status in breast cancer CTCs. Results: A method for defining the presence of HER-2 amplification in single breast cancer CTCs after CellSearch isolation was established using cell lines as positive and negative controls. The method was validated in blood from breast cancer patients

  16. Granzyme B-based cytolytic fusion protein targeting EpCAM specifically kills triple negative breast cancer cells in vitro and inhibits tumor growth in a subcutaneous mouse tumor model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amoury, Manal; Kolberg, Katharina; Pham, Anh-Tuan; Hristodorov, Dmitrij; Mladenov, Radoslav; Di Fiore, Stefano; Helfrich, Wijnand; Kiessling, Fabian; Fischer, Rainer; Pardo, Alessa; Thepen, Theophilus; Hussain, Ahmad F.; Nachreiner, Thomas; Barth, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is associated with poor prognosis and high prevalence among young premenopausal women. Unlike in other breast cancer subtypes, no targeted therapy is currently available. Overexpression of epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) in 60% of TNBC tumors correlates

  17. Breast cancer intra-tumor heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    In recent years it has become clear that cancer cells within a single tumor can display striking morphological, genetic and behavioral variability. Burgeoning genetic, epigenetic and phenomenological data support the existence of intra-tumor genetic heterogeneity in breast cancers; however, its basis is yet to be fully defined. Two of the most widely evoked concepts to explain the origin of heterogeneity within tumors are the cancer stem cell hypothesis and the clonal evolution model. Although the cancer stem cell model appeared to provide an explanation for the variability among the neoplastic cells within a given cancer, advances in massively parallel sequencing have provided several lines of evidence to suggest that intra-tumor genetic heterogeneity likely plays a fundamental role in the phenotypic heterogeneity observed in cancers. Many challenges remain, however, in the interpretation of the next generation sequencing results obtained so far. Here we review the models that explain tumor heterogeneity, the causes of intra-tumor genetic diversity and their impact on our understanding and management of breast cancer, methods to study intra-tumor heterogeneity and the assessment of intra-tumor genetic heterogeneity in the clinic. PMID:25928070

  18. Flow Cytometric DNA Analysis Using Cytokeratin Labeling for Identification of Tumor Cells in Carcinomas of the Breast and the Female Genital Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rainer Kimmig

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Flow cytometric assessment of DNA‐ploidy and S‐phase fraction in malignant tumors is compromised by the heterogeneity of cell subpopulations derived from the malignant and surrounding connective tissue, e.g., tumor, stromal and inflammatory cells. To evaluate the effect on quality of DNA cell cycle analysis and determination of DNA ploidy, cytokeratin labeling of epithelial cells was used for tumor cell enrichment in breast, ovarian, cervical and endometrial cancer prior to DNA analysis. In a prospective study, tumor cell subpopulations of 620 malignant tumors were labeled by a FITC‐conjugated cytokeratin antibody (CK 5, 6, CK18 and CK 5, 6, 8 and CK 17, respectively prior to flow cytometric cell cycle analysis. Compared to total cell analysis, detection rate of DNA‐aneuploid tumors following cytokeratin labeling was increased from 62% to 76.5% in breast cancer, from 68% to 77% in ovarian cancer, from 60% to 80% in cervical cancer and from 30% to 53% in endometrial cancer. Predominantly in DNA‐diploid tumors, a significantly improved detection of S‐phase fraction of the tumor cells was shown due to the elimination of contaminating nonproliferating “normal cells”. S‐phase fraction following tumor cell enrichment was increased by 10% (mean following cytokeratin staining in ovarian and endometrial cancer, by 30% in breast cancer and even by 70% in cervical cancer compared to total cell analysis. Thus, diagnostic accuracy of DNA‐analysis was enhanced by cytokeratin labeling of tumor cells for all tumor entities investigated.

  19. Tristetraprolin induces cell cycle arrest in breast tumor cells through targeting AP-1/c-Jun and NF-κB pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Li; Ning, Huan; Gu, Ling; Wang, Qinghong; Lu, Wenbao; Peng, Hui; Cui, Weiguang; Ying, Baoling; Ross, Christina R; Wilson, Gerald M; Wei, Lin; Wold, William S M; Liu, Jianguo

    2015-12-08

    The main characteristic of cancers, including breast cancer, is the ability of cancer cells to proliferate uncontrollably. However, the underlying mechanisms of cancer cell proliferation, especially those regulated by the RNA binding protein tristetraprolin (TTP), are not completely understood. In this study, we found that TTP inhibits cell proliferation in vitro and suppresses tumor growth in vivo through inducing cell cycle arrest at the S phase. Our studies demonstrate that TTP inhibits c-Jun expression through the C-terminal Zn finger and therefore increases Wee1 expression, a regulatory molecule which controls cell cycle transition from the S to the G2 phase. In contrast to the well-known function of TTP in regulating mRNA stability, TTP inhibits c-Jun expression at the level of transcription by selectively blocking NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation. Reconstitution of NF-κB p65 completely abolishes the inhibition of c-Jun transcription by TTP. Moreover, reconstitution of c-Jun in TTP-expressing breast tumor cells diminishes Wee1 overexpression and promotes cell proliferation. Our results indicate that TTP suppresses c-Jun expression that results in Wee1 induction which causes cell cycle arrest at the S phase and inhibition of cell proliferation. Our study provides a new pathway for TTP function as a tumor suppressor which could be targeted in tumor treatment.

  20. Occurrence of thymosin ß4 in human breast cancer cells and in other cell types of the tumor microenvironment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, Lars-Inge; Holck, Susanne

    2007-01-01

    to thymosin ß4, whereas myofibroblasts were negative. There was no correlation between the intensity of tumor cell staining and histological grade, whereas there was a tendency toward a correlation between endothelial cell staining and grade. These results demonstrate that multiple cell types within the tumor...

  1. Tumor Heterogeneity in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turashvili, Gulisa; Brogi, Edi

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease and differs greatly among different patients (intertumor heterogeneity) and even within each individual tumor (intratumor heterogeneity). Clinical and morphologic intertumor heterogeneity is reflected by staging systems and histopathologic classification of breast cancer. Heterogeneity in the expression of established prognostic and predictive biomarkers, hormone receptors, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 oncoprotein is the basis for targeted treatment. Molecular classifications are indicators of genetic tumor heterogeneity, which is probed with multigene assays and can lead to improved stratification into low- and high-risk groups for personalized therapy. Intratumor heterogeneity occurs at the morphologic, genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic levels, creating diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Understanding the molecular and cellular mechanisms of tumor heterogeneity that are relevant to the development of treatment resistance is a major area of research. Despite the improved knowledge of the complex genetic and phenotypic features underpinning tumor heterogeneity, there has been only limited advancement in diagnostic, prognostic, or predictive strategies for breast cancer. The current guidelines for reporting of biomarkers aim to maximize patient eligibility for targeted therapy, but do not take into account intratumor heterogeneity. The molecular classification of breast cancer is not implemented in routine clinical practice. Additional studies and in-depth analysis are required to understand the clinical significance of rapidly accumulating data. This review highlights inter- and intratumor heterogeneity of breast carcinoma with special emphasis on pathologic findings, and provides insights into the clinical significance of molecular and cellular mechanisms of heterogeneity. PMID:29276709

  2. Phyllodes Tumors of the Breast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abusalem, Osama Turki; Al-Masri, Anwar

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To study all patients with phyllodes tumors of the breast which were diagnosed at King Hussien Medical Center and Prince Rashid Military Hospital between the 1st of may 2002 till January 2009. Methods: A total of 26 patients diagnosed to have phylloedes tumors were retrieved from the hospital records. All cases were analyzed and assessed in two main categories: demographical characteristics and histopathological parameters. The demographical characteristics included: sex and age of the patients, and tumor size while the histopathological aspects were divided into three subgroups: Benign, Borderline and Malignant tumors with its stromal components characteristics. All the histopathological reports for specimens sent by surgeons were reviewed by 2 senior pathologists. Statistical analysis was done by using Chi square and P-Value. Results: All our patients were females; their age range between 17-67 years, the mean patient age at presentation was 39 years. Out of the 26 patients diagnosed to have phyllodes tumor, 6 had breast-conserving therapy and 20 women had mastectomy. The types of Phyllodes tumors include: A-Benign phyllodes tumors (15 cases), B-Borderline phyllodes (7cases) and C-malignant phyllodes (4 cases). With significant values of benign tumors occurrence (pphyllodes tumors of the breast. The greatest dimension of the tumors ranged from 1 to 15 cm, with a mean of 5 cm. Approximately 73.1% of tumors were less or equal to 5 cm in the greatest dimension and 26.9% >5 cm. The duration of symptoms varied from one month to ten year.s Six patients had painful swellings, whereas in twenty patients the pain was absent. Four patients had recurrent tumors; the distinctive features of those with recurrent tumors were the histological findings of stromal over growth and the presence of positive resection margin. In our series, we found that three patients of those with recurrence discovered to have stromal over growth. While one only had a previous positive

  3. Flavopiridol induces cellular FLICE-inhibitory protein degradation by the proteasome and promotes TRAIL-induced early signaling and apoptosis in breast tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, Carmen; Yerbes, Rosario; López-Rivas, Abelardo

    2006-09-01

    The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor flavopiridol is undergoing clinical trials as an antitumor drug. We show here that pretreatment of different human breast cancer cell lines with flavopiridol facilitates tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-induced apoptosis. In breast tumor cells, apoptosis induction by TRAIL is blocked at the level of apical caspase-8 activation. Flavopiridol treatment enhances TRAIL-induced formation of death-inducing signaling complex and early processing of procaspase-8. Subsequently, a TRAIL-induced, mitochondria-operated pathway of apoptosis is activated in cells treated with flavopiridol. Down-regulation of cellular FLICE-inhibitory proteins (c-FLIP; c-FLIP(L) and c-FLIP(S)) is observed on flavopiridol treatment. c-FLIP loss and apoptosis sensitization by flavopiridol are both prevented in cells treated with an inhibitor of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Furthermore, targeting c-FLIP directly with small interfering RNA oligonucleotides also sensitizes various human breast tumor cell lines to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Our results indicate that flavopiridol sensitizes breast cancer cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis by facilitating early events in the apoptotic pathway, and this combination treatment could be regarded as a potential therapeutic tool against breast tumors.

  4. Dietary Regulation of PTEN Signaling and Mammary Tumor Initiating Cells: Implications for Breast Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    questions raised than answered. Nutr Rev 2007;65:459–66. [36] Lof M, Weiderpass E. Impact of diet on breast cancer risk. Curr Opin Obstet Gynecol 2009;21...Wnt and mammary stem cells: hormones cannot fly wingless. Curr Opin Pharmacol 2010; 10:643-649. 7. Tsukamoto AS, Grosschedl R, Guzman RC, Parslow T...Biol 2009;21:11–8. [16] Tlsty TD, Hein PW. Know thy neighbor: stromal cells can contribute oncogenic signals. Curr Opin Genet Dev 2001;11:54–9. [17

  5. Tumor markers of breast cancer: New prospectives

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed M. Kabel

    2017-01-01

    Tumor markers are substances produced by the tumors or by other cells of the body in response to cancer or certain benign conditions. Although most of these markers are made by the normal cells as well as by cancer cells, they are produced at much higher levels in cancerous conditions. These markers are used to evaluate the patient's response to treatment and to detect the presence of metastasis or recurrence. Breast cancer is one of the most common malignancies in females worldwide. The CA 2...

  6. Equol enhances tamoxifen's anti-tumor activity by induction of caspase-mediated apoptosis in MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charalambous, Christiana; Pitta, Chara A; Constantinou, Andreas I

    2013-05-15

    Soy phytoestrogens, such as daidzein and its metabolite equol, have been proposed to be responsible for the low breast cancer rate in Asian women. Since the majority of estrogen receptor positive breast cancer patients are treated with tamoxifen, the basic objective of this study is to determine whether equol enhances tamoxifen's anti-tumor effect, and to identify the molecular mechanisms involved. For this purpose, we examined the individual and combined effects of equol and tamoxifen on the estrogen-dependent MCF-7 breast cancer cells using viability assays, annexin-V/PI staining, cell cycle and western blot analysis. We found that equol (>50 μM) and 4-hydroxy-tamoxifen (4-OHT; >100 nM) significantly reduced the MCF-7 cell viability. Furthermore, the combination of equol (100 μM) and 4-OHT (10 μM) induced apoptosis more effectively than each compound alone. Subsequent treatment of MCF-7 cells with the pan-caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK inhibited equol- and 4-OHT-mediated apoptosis, which was accompanied by PARP and α-fodrin cleavage, indicating that apoptosis is mainly caspase-mediated. These compounds also induced a marked reduction in the bcl-2:bax ratio, which was accompanied by caspase-9 and caspase-7 activation and cytochrome-c release to the cytosol. Taken together, these data support the notion that the combination of equol and tamoxifen activates the intrinsic apoptotic pathway more efficiently than each compound alone. Consequently, equol may be used therapeutically in combination treatments and clinical studies to enhance tamoxifen's effect by providing additional protection against estrogen-responsive breast cancers.

  7. Microenvironment promotes tumor cell reprogramming in human breast cancer cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio D'Anselmi

    Full Text Available The microenvironment drives mammary gland development and function, and may influence significantly both malignant behavior and cell growth of mammary cancer cells. By restoring context, and forcing cells to properly interpret native signals from the microenvironment, the cancer cell aberrant behavior can be quelled, and organization re-established. In order to restore functional and morphological differentiation, human mammary MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cancer cells were allowed to grow in a culture medium filled with a 10% of the albumen (EW, Egg White from unfertilized chicken egg. That unique microenvironment behaves akin a 3D culture and induces MCF-7 cells to produce acini and branching duct-like structures, distinctive of mammary gland differentiation. EW-treated MDA-MB-231 cells developed buds of acini and duct-like structures. Both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells produced β-casein, a key milk component. Furthermore, E-cadherin expression was reactivated in MDA-MB-231 cells, as a consequence of the increased cdh1 expression; meanwhile β-catenin - a key cytoskeleton component - was displaced behind the inner cell membrane. Such modification hinders the epithelial-mesenchymal transition in MDA-MB-231 cells. This differentiating pathway is supported by the contemporary down-regulation of canonical pluripotency markers (Klf4, Nanog. Given that egg-conditioned medium behaves as a 3D-medium, it is likely that cancer phenotype reversion could be ascribed to the changed interactions between cells and their microenvironment.

  8. Enhanced stimulation of anti-breast cancer T cells responses by dendritic cells loaded with poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA nanoparticle encapsulated tumor antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soodabeh Iranpour

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Developing safe and effective cancer vaccine formulations is a primary focus in the field of cancer immunotherapy. Dendritic cells (DC are currently employed as cellular vaccine in clinical trials of tumor immunotherapy. Recognizing the critical role of DCs in initiating anti-tumor immunity has resulted in the development of several strategies that target vaccine antigens to DCs to trigger anti-tumor T cell responses. To increase the efficiency of antigen delivery systems for anti-tumor vaccines, encapsulation of tumor-associated antigens in polymer nanoparticles (NPs has been established. Methods In this study, the effect of tumor lysate antigen obtained from three stage III breast cancer tissues encapsulated within PLGA NPs to enhance the DC maturation was investigated. The T-cell immune response activation was then fallowed up. Fresh breast tumors were initially used to generate tumor lysate antigens containing poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA NP. The encapsulation efficiency and release kinetics were profiled. The efficiency of encapsulation was measured using Bradford protein assays measuring the dissolved NPs. The stability of released antigen from NPs was verified using SDS-PAGE. To evaluate the hypothesis that NPs enhances antigen presentation, including soluble tumor lysate, tumor lysate containing NPs and control NPs the efficiency of NP-mediated tumor lysate delivery to DCs was evaluated by assessing CD3+ T-cell stimulation after T cell/and DCs co-culture. Results The rate of encapsulation was increased by enhancing the antigen concentration of tumor lysate. However, increasing the antigen concentration diminished the encapsulation efficiency. In addition, higher initial protein contenting NPs led to a greater cumulative release. All three patients released variable amounts of IFN-γ, IL-10, IL-12 and IL-4 in response to re-stimulation. T cells stimulated with lysate-pulsed DCs induced a substantial increase in

  9. Tumor-associated macrophages regulate murine breast cancer stem cells through a novel paracrine EGFR/Stat3/Sox-2 signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian; Liao, Debbie; Chen, Cong; Liu, Yan; Chuang, Tsung-Hsien; Xiang, Rong; Markowitz, Dorothy; Reisfeld, Ralph A; Luo, Yunping

    2013-02-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis has gained significant recognition as a descriptor of tumorigenesis. Additionally, tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are known to promote growth and metastasis of breast cancer. However, it is not known whether TAMs mediate tumorigenesis through regulation of breast CSCs. Here, we report that TAMs promote CSC-like phenotypes in murine breast cancer cells by upregulating their expression of Sox-2. These CSC-like phenotypes were characterized by increased Sox-2, Oct-4, Nanog, AbcG2, and Sca-1 gene expression, in addition to increased drug-efflux capacity, resistance to chemotherapy, and increased tumorigenicity in vivo. Downregulation of Sox-2 in tumor cells by siRNA blocked the ability of TAMs to induce these CSC-like phenotypes and inhibited tumor growth in vivo. Furthermore, we identified a novel epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (Stat3)/Sox-2 paracrine signaling pathway between macrophages and mouse breast cancer cells that is required for macrophage-induced upregulation of Sox-2 and CSC phenotypes in tumor cells. We showed that this crosstalk was effectively blocked by the small molecule inhibitors AG1478 or CDDO-Im against EGFR and Stat3, respectively. Therefore, our report identifies a novel role for TAMs in breast CSC regulation and establishes a rationale for targeting the EGFR/Stat3/Sox-2 signaling pathway for CSC therapy. Copyright © 2012 AlphaMed Press.

  10. Gene expression markers in circulating tumor cells may predict bone metastasis and response to hormonal treatment in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haiying; Molina, Julian; Jiang, John; Ferber, Matthew; Pruthi, Sandhya; Jatkoe, Timothy; Derecho, Carlo; Rajpurohit, Yashoda; Zheng, Jian; Wang, Yixin

    2013-11-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have recently attracted attention due to their potential as prognostic and predictive markers for the clinical management of metastatic breast cancer patients. The isolation of CTCs from patients may enable the molecular characterization of these cells, which may help establish a minimally invasive assay for the prediction of metastasis and further optimization of treatment. Molecular markers of proven clinical value may therefore be useful in predicting disease aggressiveness and response to treatment. In our earlier study, we identified a gene signature in breast cancer that appears to be significantly associated with bone metastasis. Among the genes that constitute this signature, trefoil factor 1 (TFF1) was identified as the most differentially expressed gene associated with bone metastasis. In this study, we investigated 25 candidate gene markers in the CTCs of metastatic breast cancer patients with different metastatic sites. The panel of the 25 markers was investigated in 80 baseline samples (first blood draw of CTCs) and 30 follow-up samples. In addition, 40 healthy blood donors (HBDs) were analyzed as controls. The assay was performed using quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) with RNA extracted from CTCs captured by the CellSearch system. Our study indicated that 12 of the genes were uniquely expressed in CTCs and 10 were highly expressed in the CTCs obtained from patients compared to those obtained from HBDs. Among these genes, the expression of keratin 19 was highly correlated with the CTC count. The TFF1 expression in CTCs was a strong predictor of bone metastasis and the patients with a high expression of estrogen receptor β in CTCs exhibited a better response to hormonal treatment. Molecular characterization of these genes in CTCs may provide a better understanding of the mechanism underlying tumor metastasis and identify gene markers in CTCs for predicting disease progression and

  11. Anti-estrogen Resistance in Human Breast Tumors Is Driven by JAG1-NOTCH4-Dependent Cancer Stem Cell Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno M. Simões

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancers (BCs typically express estrogen receptors (ERs but frequently exhibit de novo or acquired resistance to hormonal therapies. Here, we show that short-term treatment with the anti-estrogens tamoxifen or fulvestrant decrease cell proliferation but increase BC stem cell (BCSC activity through JAG1-NOTCH4 receptor activation both in patient-derived samples and xenograft (PDX tumors. In support of this mechanism, we demonstrate that high ALDH1 predicts resistance in women treated with tamoxifen and that a NOTCH4/HES/HEY gene signature predicts for a poor response/prognosis in 2 ER+ patient cohorts. Targeting of NOTCH4 reverses the increase in Notch and BCSC activity induced by anti-estrogens. Importantly, in PDX tumors with acquired tamoxifen resistance, NOTCH4 inhibition reduced BCSC activity. Thus, we establish that BCSC and NOTCH4 activities predict both de novo and acquired tamoxifen resistance and that combining endocrine therapy with targeting JAG1-NOTCH4 overcomes resistance in human breast cancers.

  12. [Phyllodes breast tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zedníková, I; Černá, M; Hlaváčková, M; Hes, O

    2015-01-01

    Phyllodes tumour is a breast tumour occurring very rarely. It accounts for only in 1% of all cases of breast tumour. The diagnosis of phyllodes tumours can be difficult in consideration of the small number of cases. Treatment of phyllodes tumours is always surgical. In 2004-2013, we operated on twelve female patients with phyllodes tumours out of the total number of 1564 surgeries for breast tumours (0.8%) at the Department of Surgery at Teaching Hospital in Pilsen. We evaluated the age, the biological behaviour of the tumour depending on the tumour size and duration, the distant metastases, therapy and survival. The average age at the time of surgery was fifty years (2684), the duration of disease to the surgical solution ranged from one month to ten years. Tumour size was in the range of two to twenty-nine centimetres, tumours measuring less than five centimetres were always benign. Tumour excision for benign phyllodes tumour was performed seven times. Malignant phyllodes tumour was diagnosed five times with mastectomy performed in each case, and the axilla was exenterated in three cases where nodes were benign in each of them. In one case, mastectomy was followed by radiotherapy because the tumour reached the edge of the resected part; the other patients were only monitored. In two patients, tumour spreading into the lungs was diagnosed at five to ten months after breast surgery. One patient with generalized disease died, the other ones live with no local recurrence of this disease. Median survival is fifty-two months; the disease-free interval is fifty months. The results show that if phyllodes tumour is diagnosed in time, it is almost exclusively benign. If the case history is longer and the tumour is growing, the likelihood of malignancy increases. Surgical treatment is also sufficient in the case of malignant forms. The breast surgery does not need to be supplemented with exenteration of axilla.Key words: breast - phyllodes tumour.

  13. T-cell receptor v-alpha and v-Beta gene usage in interleukin-2-cultured tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes from patients with breast-cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, E; Scholler, J; Straten, P

    1994-01-01

    . The different TIL cultures exhibited varying levels of cytotoxicity against the natural killer (NK)-sensitive cell line K562 and breast cancer cell line T47D. The level of clonality, as measured by PCR-based analyses of usage of the different V segments was low, as only a few tumors showed patterns...

  14. Epidermal growth factor induces WISP-2/CCN5 expression in estrogen receptor-alpha-positive breast tumor cells through multiple molecular cross-talks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Snigdha; Sengupta, Krishanu; Saxena, Neela K; Dhar, Kakali; Banerjee, Sushanta K

    2005-03-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is a mitogen for estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast tumor cells, and it has been proven that EGF occasionally mimicked estrogen action and cross-talks with ER-alpha to exert its activity. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to explore whether EGF is able to modulate the expression of Wnt-1-induced signaling protein-2/connective tissue growth factor/cysteine-rich 61/nephroblastoma overexpressed 5 (WISP-2/CCN5), an estrogen-responsive gene, in normal and transformed cell lines of the human breast and, if so, whether this induction is critical for EGF mitogenesis and what downstream signaling pathways are associated with this event. Here, we show that EGF-induced WISP-2 expression in ER- and EGF receptor-positive noninvasive MCF-7 breast tumor cells was dose and time dependent and that expression was modulated at transcription level. A synergism was seen in combination with estrogen. Moreover, small interfering RNA-mediated inhibition of WISP-2/CCN5 activity in MCF-7 cells resulted in abrogation of proliferation by EGF. The multiple molecular cross-talks, including the interactions between phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways and two diverse receptors (i.e., ER-alpha and EGFR), were essential in the event of EGF-induced WISP-2/CCN5 up-regulation in MCF-7 cells. Moreover, EGF action on WISP-2/CCN5 is restricted to ER- and EGFR-positive noninvasive breast tumor cells, and this effect of EGF cannot be instigated in ER-alpha-negative and EGFR-positive normal or invasive breast tumor cells by introducing ER-alpha. Finally, regulation of phosphorylation of ER-alpha and EGFR may play critical roles in EGF-induced transcriptional activation of WISP-2 gene in breast tumor cells.

  15. EGFR signaling enhances aerobic glycolysis in triple negative breast cancer cells to promote tumor growth and immune escape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Seung-Oe; Li, Chia-Wei; Xia, Weiya; Lee, Heng-Huan; Chang, Shih-Shin; Shen, Jia; Hsu, Jennifer L.; Raftery, Dan; Djukovic, Danijel; Gu, Haiwei; Chang, Wei-Chao; Wang, Hung-Ling; Chen, Mong-Liang; Huo, Longfei; Chen, Chung-Hsuan; Wu, Yun; Sahin, Aysegul; Hanash, Samir M.; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2016-01-01

    Oncogenic signaling reprograms cancer cell metabolism to augment the production of glycolytic metabolites in favor of tumor growth. The ability of cancer cells to evade immunosurveillance and the role of metabolic regulators in T cell functions suggest that oncogene-induced metabolic reprogramming may be linked to immune escape. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) signaling, frequently dysregulated in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), is also associated with increased glycolysis. Here, we demonstrated in TNBC cells that EGF signaling activates the first step in glycolysis, but impedes the last step, leading to an accumulation of metabolic intermediates in this pathway. Furthermore, we showed that one of these intermediates, fructose 1,6 bisphosphate (F1,6BP), directly binds to and enhances the activity of the EGF receptor (EGFR), thereby increasing lactate excretion which leads to inhibition of local cytotoxic T cell activity. Notably, combining the glycolysis inhibitor 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) with the EGFR inhibitor gefitinib effectively suppressed TNBC cell proliferation and tumor growth. Our results illustrate how jointly targeting the EGFR/F1,6BP signaling axis may offer an immediately applicable therapeutic strategy to treat TNBC. PMID:26759242

  16. EGFR Signaling Enhances Aerobic Glycolysis in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Cells to Promote Tumor Growth and Immune Escape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Seung-Oe; Li, Chia-Wei; Xia, Weiya; Lee, Heng-Huan; Chang, Shih-Shin; Shen, Jia; Hsu, Jennifer L; Raftery, Daniel; Djukovic, Danijel; Gu, Haiwei; Chang, Wei-Chao; Wang, Hung-Ling; Chen, Mong-Liang; Huo, Longfei; Chen, Chung-Hsuan; Wu, Yun; Sahin, Aysegul; Hanash, Samir M; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2016-03-01

    Oncogenic signaling reprograms cancer cell metabolism to augment the production of glycolytic metabolites in favor of tumor growth. The ability of cancer cells to evade immunosurveillance and the role of metabolic regulators in T-cell functions suggest that oncogene-induced metabolic reprogramming may be linked to immune escape. EGF signaling, frequently dysregulated in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), is also associated with increased glycolysis. Here, we demonstrated in TNBC cells that EGF signaling activates the first step in glycolysis, but impedes the last step, leading to an accumulation of metabolic intermediates in this pathway. Furthermore, we showed that one of these intermediates, fructose 1,6 bisphosphate (F1,6BP), directly binds to and enhances the activity of the EGFR, thereby increasing lactate excretion, which leads to inhibition of local cytotoxic T-cell activity. Notably, combining the glycolysis inhibitor 2-deoxy-d-glucose with the EGFR inhibitor gefitinib effectively suppressed TNBC cell proliferation and tumor growth. Our results illustrate how jointly targeting the EGFR/F1,6BP signaling axis may offer an immediately applicable therapeutic strategy to treat TNBC. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  17. Gene Expression Profiles of NO- and HNO-donor Treated Breast Cancer Cells: Insights into Tumor Response and Resistance Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Robert YS; Basudhar, Debashree; Ridnour, Lisa A.; Heinecke, Julie L.; Kesarwala, Aparna H.; Glynn, Sharon; Switzer, Christopher H.; Ambs, Stefan; Miranda, Katrina M.; Wink, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) synthase 2 (NOS2), a major inflammatory protein, modulates disease progression via NO in a number of pathologies, including cancer. The role of NOS2-derived NO is not only flux-dependent, which is higher in mouse vs. human cells, but also varies based on spatial and temporal distribution both within tumor cells and in the tumor microenvironment. NO donors have been utilized to mimic NO flux conditions and to investigate the effects of varied NO concentrations. As a wide range of effects mediated by NO and other nitrogen oxides such as nitroxyl (HNO) have been elucidated, multiple NO- and HNO-releasing compounds have been developed as potential therapeutics, including as tumor modulators. One of the challenges is to determine differences in biomarker expression from extracellular vs. intracellular generation of NO or HNO. Taking advantage of new NO and HNO releasing agents, we have characterized the gene expression profile of estrogen receptor-negative human breast cancer (MDA-MB-231) cells following exposure to aspirin, the NO donor DEA/NO, the HNO donor IPA/NO and their intracellularly-activated prodrug conjugates DEA/NO-aspirin and IPA/NO-aspirin. Comparison of the gene expression profiles demonstrated that several genes were uniquely expressed with respect to NO or HNO, such as miR-21, HSP70, cystathionine γ-lyase and IL24. These findings provide insight into targets and pathways that could be therapeutically exploited by the redox related species NO and HNO. PMID:25153034

  18. Salinomycin possesses anti-tumor activity and inhibits breast cancer stem-like cells via an apoptosis-independent pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Hyunsook; Kim, Ji Young; Lee, Nahyun; Cho, Youngkwan; Oh, Eunhye [Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Korea University College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul 152-703 (Korea, Republic of); Brain Korea 21 Program for Biomedicine Science, Korea University College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul 152-703 (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Jae Hong, E-mail: cancer@korea.ac.kr [Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Korea University College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul 152-703 (Korea, Republic of); Brain Korea 21 Program for Biomedicine Science, Korea University College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul 152-703 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-30

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) play important roles in the formation, growth and recurrence of tumors, particularly following therapeutic intervention. Salinomycin has received recent attention for its ability to target breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs), but the mechanisms of action involved are not fully understood. In the present study, we sought to investigate the mechanisms responsible for salinomycin's selective targeting of BCSCs and its anti-tumor activity. Salinomycin suppressed cell viability, concomitant with the downregulation of cyclin D1 and increased p27{sup kip1} nuclear accumulation. Mammosphere formation assays revealed that salinomycin suppresses self-renewal of ALDH1-positive BCSCs and downregulates the transcription factors Nanog, Oct4 and Sox2. TUNEL analysis of MDA-MB-231-derived xenografts revealed that salinomycin administration elicited a significant reduction in tumor growth with a marked downregulation of ALDH1 and CD44 levels, but seemingly without the induction of apoptosis. Our findings shed further light on the mechanisms responsible for salinomycin's effects on BCSCs. - Highlights: • Salinomycin suppresses mammosphere formation. • Salinomycin reduces ALDH1 activity and downregulates Nanog, Oct4 and Sox2. • Salinomycin targets BCSCs via an apoptosis-independent pathway.

  19. Active Roles of Tumor Stroma in Breast Cancer Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahraa I. Khamis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastasis is the major cause of death for breast cancer patients. Tumors are heterogenous cellular entities composed of cancer cells and cells of the microenvironment in which they reside. A reciprocal dynamic interaction occurs between the tumor cells and their surrounding stroma under physiological and pathological conditions. This tumor-host communication interface mediates the escape of tumor cells at the primary site, survival of circulating cancer cells in the vasculature, and growth of metastatic cancer at secondary site. Each step of the metastatic process is accompanied by recruitment of stromal cells from the microenvironment and production of unique array of growth factors and chemokines. Stromal microenvironment may play active roles in breast cancer metastasis. Elucidating the types of cells recruited and signal pathways involved in the crosstalk between tumor cells and stromal cells will help identify novel strategies for cotargeting cancer cells and tumor stromal cells to suppress metastasis and improve patient outcome.

  20. In silico ascription of gene expression differences to tumor and stromal cells in a model to study impact on breast cancer outcome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simen Myhre

    Full Text Available Breast tumors consist of several different tissue components. Despite the heterogeneity, most gene expression analyses have traditionally been performed without prior microdissection of the tissue sample. Thus, the gene expression profiles obtained reflect the mRNA contribution from the various tissue components. We utilized histopathological estimations of area fractions of tumor and stromal tissue components in 198 fresh-frozen breast tumor tissue samples for a cell type-associated gene expression analysis associated with distant metastasis. Sets of differentially expressed gene-probes were identified in tumors from patients who developed distant metastasis compared with those who did not, by weighing the contribution from each tumor with the relative content of stromal and tumor epithelial cells in their individual tumor specimen. The analyses were performed under various assumptions of mRNA transcription level from tumor epithelial cells compared with stromal cells. A set of 30 differentially expressed gene-probes was ascribed solely to carcinoma cells. Furthermore, two sets of 38 and five differentially expressed gene-probes were mostly associated to tumor epithelial and stromal cells, respectively. Finally, a set of 26 differentially expressed gene-probes was identified independently of cell type focus. The differentially expressed genes were validated in independent gene expression data from a set of laser capture microdissected invasive ductal carcinomas. We present a method for identifying and ascribing differentially expressed genes to tumor epithelial and/or stromal cells, by utilizing pathologic information and weighted t-statistics. Although a transcriptional contribution from the stromal cell fraction is detectable in microarray experiments performed on bulk tumor, the gene expression differences between the distant metastasis and no distant metastasis group were mostly ascribed to the tumor epithelial cells of the primary breast

  1. Effect of grape seed proanthocyanidins on tumor vasculogenic mimicry in human triple-negative breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Yun-Yan; Liu, Zi-Min; Zhong, Jin-Yi; Yao, Ru-Yong; Yu, Hong-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Vasculogenic mimicry (VM) refers to the unique ability of highly aggressive tumor cells to mimic the pattern of embryonic vasculogenesis, which was associated with invasion and metastasis. The grape seed proanthocyanidins (GSPs) had attracted much attention as a potential bioactive anti-carcinogenic agent. However, GSPs regulation of VM and its possible mechanisms in a triple-negative breast cancer cells (TNBCs) remain not clear. Therefore, we examined the effect of GSPs on VM information in HCC1937 cell model. In this study, we identified the VM structure via the three-dimensional (3D) matrix in vitro. Cell viability was measured using the CCK8 assay. The effects of GSPs on human triple-negative breast cancer cells (TNBCs) HCC1937 in terms of related proteins of VM information were determined using western blot analysis. In vitro, the tubular networks were found in highly invasive HCC1937 cells but not in the non-invasive MCF-7 cells when plated on matrigel. The number of vascular channels was significantly reduced when cells were exposed in GSPs (100 μg/ml) and GSPs (200 μg/ml) groups (all p<0.001). Furthermore, we found that treatment with GSPs promoted transition of the mesenchymal state to the epithelial state in HCC1937 cells as well as reducing the expression of Twist1 protein, a master EMT regulator.GSPs has the ability to inhibit VM information by the suppression of Twist1 protein that could be related to the reversal of epithelial-to-mesenchymal (EMT) process. It is firstly concluded that GSPs may be an potential anti-VM botanical agent for human TNBCs.

  2. Data on the recurrence of breast tumors fit a model in which dormant cells are subject to slow attrition but can randomly awaken to become malignant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stein, Wilfred D; Litman, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    by the body's immune system, or by random apoptosis or senescence. (iv) Recurrence suppressor mechanisms exist. (v) When such genes are disabled by random mutations, the dormant metastatic cell is activated, and will develop to a cancer recurrence. The model was also fitted to data on the survival......We successfully modeled the recurrence of tumors in breast cancer patients, assuming that: (i) A breast cancer patient is likely to have some circulating metastatic cells, even after initial surgery. (ii) These metastatic cells are dormant. (iii) The dormant cells are subject to attrition...

  3. Copper (II and 2,2'-bipyridine complexation improves chemopreventive effects of naringenin against breast tumor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlio César Conceição Filho

    Full Text Available Cancer is the second leading cause of death worldwide and there is epidemiological evidence that demonstrates this tendency is emerging. Naringenin (NGEN is a trihydroxyflavanone that shows various biological effects such as antioxidant, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, and antiviral activities. It belongs to flavanone class, which represents flavonoids with a C6-C3-C6 skeleton. Flavonoids do not exhibit sufficient activity to be used for chemotherapy, however they can be chemically modified by complexation with metals such as copper (Cu (II for instance, in order to be applied for adjuvant therapy. This study investigated the effects of Cu(II and 2,2'-bipyridine complexation with naringenin on MDA-MB-231 cells. We demonstrated that naringenin complexed with Cu(II and 2,2'-bipyridine (NGENCuB was more efficient inhibiting colony formation, proliferation and migration of MDA-MB-231 tumor cells, than naringenin (NGEN itself. Furthermore, we verified that NGENCuB was more effective than NGEN inhibiting pro-MMP9 activity by zymography assays. Finally, through flow cytometry, we showed that NGENCuB is more efficient than NGEN inducing apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 cells. These results were confirmed by gene expression analysis in real time PCR. We observed that NGENCuB upregulated the expression of pro-apoptotic gene caspase-9, but did not change the expression of caspase-8 or anti-apoptotic gene Bcl-2. There are only few works investigating the effects of Cu(II complexation with naringenin on tumor cells. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work describing the effects of Cu(II complexation of a flavonoid on MDA-MB-231 breast tumor cells.

  4. The efficacy of lapatinib in metastatic breast cancer with HER2 non-amplified primary tumors and EGFR positive circulating tumor cells: a proof-of-concept study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Stebbing

    Full Text Available Analysis of circulating tumor cells (CTCs provides real-time measures of cancer sub-populations with potential for CTC-directed therapeutics. We examined whether lapatinib which binds both HER2 and EGFR could induce depletion of the EGFR-positive pool of CTCs, which may in turn lead to clinical benefits.Patients with metastatic breast cancer and HER2 non-amplified primary tumors with EGFR-positive CTCs were recruited and lapatinib 1500 mg daily was administered, in a standard two step phase 2 trial.There were no responses leading to termination at the first analysis with 16 patients recruited out of 43 screened. In 6 out of 14 (43% individuals eligible for the efficacy analysis, a decrease in CTCs was observed with most of these having a greater decrease in their EGFR-positive CTC pool.This is one of the first studies of CTC-directed therapeutics and suggests that lapatinib monotherapy is not having any demonstrable clinical effects by reducing the EGFR-positive pool of CTCs in HER2 non-amplified primary tumors. Our attempt to expand the pool of patients eligible for a targeted therapy was unsuccessful; the role of clonal populations in cancer biology and therapeutic strategies to control them will require extensive evaluation in years to come.Clinical trials.gov NCT00820924.

  5. Methylation Status of Tumor-Related Genes in Mcf7, Mda-Mb-468 and Bt-474 Breast Cancer Cell Lines with Different Estrogen Receptor Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mozhgan Rasti

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background:Many breast cancer tumor suppressor genes have been reported to undergo hypermethylation, including ER, RASSF1A, HIC, CDH1, GSPT1, APC, TWIST and CCND2. We first determined the promoter methylation of the above eight tumor suppressor genes as epigenetic markers of breast cancer in three cell lines with different ER status. Methods: This study was an experimental study performed on three cell lines: ER-positive MCF-7, ER-negative MDA-MB-468 and the ER- and HER2-positive breast cancer cell line (BT-474. For this purpose DNA was extracted from these cell lines and gene promoter methylation was analyzed by methylation-specific PCR. Results: Our results showed that all studied genes were hypermethylated in ER- negative MDA-MB-468 cells. We detected hypermethylation of GSPT1, RASSF1A and CCND2 genes in these three cell lines. In addition, the ER-positive MCF-7 cells showed methylation of TWIST and APC genes. Conclusion: The numbers of methylated molecular biomarkers is increased with tumor progression.This finding may be important in breast cancer therapy for different ER status.

  6. Cancer-associated adipocytes promotes breast tumor radioresistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bochet, Ludivine; Meulle, Aline [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex (France); CNRS, IPBS (Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale), 205 route de Narbonne, BP 64182, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex (France); Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale, INSERM U1048, 1 Avenue du Pr Jean Poulhes, BP 84225, F-31432 Toulouse Cedex (France); Imbert, Sandrine [CNRS, IPBS (Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale), 205 route de Narbonne, BP 64182, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex (France); Salles, Bernard [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex (France); CNRS, IPBS (Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale), 205 route de Narbonne, BP 64182, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex (France); Valet, Philippe [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex (France); Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale, INSERM U1048, 1 Avenue du Pr Jean Poulhes, BP 84225, F-31432 Toulouse Cedex (France); Muller, Catherine, E-mail: muller@ipbs.fr [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex (France); CNRS, IPBS (Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale), 205 route de Narbonne, BP 64182, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex (France)

    2011-07-22

    Highlights: {yields} Tumor-surrounding adipocytes contribute to breast cancer progression. {yields} Breast tumor cells previously co-cultivated with mature adipocytes exhibit radioresistance. {yields} Increased in Chk1 phosphorylation is observed in irradiated co-cultivated tumor cells. {yields} IL-6 is over-expressed in tumor cells co-cultivated with adipocytes. {yields} IL-6 exposure confers increased Chk1 phosphorylation and radioresistance in tumor cells. -- Abstract: Mature adipocytes are excellent candidates to influence tumor behavior through heterotypic signaling processes since these cells produce hormones, growth factors, cytokines and other molecules, a heterogeneous group of molecules named adipokines. Using a 2D coculture system, we demonstrate that breast tumor cells previously co-cultivated with mature adipocytes exhibit radioresistance and an earlier and higher increase in the effector kinase Chk1, a phenotype that was associated with decreased cell death as compared to tumor cells grown alone. Interestingly, the adipocytes-induced tumor changes taking place during the coculture time preceding the exposure to IR were sufficient to confer the radioresistant effect. Notorious among the changes brought by adipocytes was the significant increase of IL-6 expression in tumor cells, whose activity may well account for the observed tumor cell protection from IR toxicity. Indeed, our data confirmed the protective role of this cytokine as tumor cells incubated after irradiation with recombinant IL-6 exhibit an increased in Chk1 phosphorylation and a radioresistant phenotype, thus far recapitulating the effects observed in the presence of adipocytes. Our current study sheds light on a new role of tumor-surrounding adipocytes in fostering a radioresistant phenotype in breast tumors, a finding that might have important clinical implications in obese patients that frequently exhibit aggressive diseases.

  7. Phyllodes Tumor in a Lactating Breast

    OpenAIRE

    Murthy, Sudha S.; Raju, K. V. V. N.; Nair, Haripreetha G.

    2016-01-01

    Phyllodes tumor is attributed to a small fraction of primary tumors of the breast. Such tumors occur rarely in pregnancy and lactation. We report a case of a 25-year-old lactating mother presenting with a lump in the left breast. Core needle biopsy was opined as phyllodes tumor with lactational changes, and subsequent wide local excision confirmed the diagnosis of benign phyllodes tumor with lactational changes. The characteristic gross and microscopic findings of a well-circumscribed lesion ...

  8. WISP-2: a serum-inducible gene differentially expressed in human normal breast epithelial cells and in MCF-7 breast tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoubine, M N; Banerjee, S; Saxena, N K; Campbell, D R; Banerjee, S K

    2001-03-30

    WISP-2 is a Wnt-1-induced signaling protein identified as a member of CCN growth factor family. A role for this molecule during tumorigenesis is suspected but remains unproven. Here we show that WISP-2 expression was undetectable, or minimally detectable, in nontransformed human mammary epithelial cells, but was overexpressed in MCF-7 cells. Expression of WISP-2 in MCF-7 cells was modulated by serum and correlated with the serum-induced MCF-7 tumor cell proliferation, suggesting that WISP-2 is serum responsive and may be a positive regulator of tumor cell proliferation. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  9. Pathogenesis and progression of fibroepithelial breast tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijper, Arno

    2006-01-01

    Fibroadenoma and phyllodes tumor are fibroepithelial breast tumors. These tumors are biphasic, i.e. they are composed of stroma and epithelium. The behavior of fibroadenomas is benign, whereas phyllodes tumors can recur and even metastasize. Classification criteria for both tumors show considerable

  10. In vitro study of tumor seeking radiopharmaceutical uptake by human breast cancer cell line MCF-7 after paclitaxel treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Joon Young; Choi, Yong; Choe, Yearn Seong; Lee, Kyung Han; Kim, Byung Tae [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-10-15

    This study was designed to investigate the cellular uptake of various tumor imaging radiopharmaceuticals in human breast cancer cells before and after paclitaxel exposure considering viable cell number. F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose, C-11-methionine. TI-201, Tc-99m-MIBI, and Tc-99m-tetrofosmin were used to evaluate the cellular uptake in MCF-7 cells. MCF-7 cells were cultured in multi-well plates. Wells were divided into DMSO exposure control group, and paclitaxel exposure group. The exposure durations of paclitaxel with 10 nM or 100 nM were 2 h, 6 h, 12 h, 24 h, and 48 h. Viable cell fraction was reduced as the concentration and exposure time of paclitaxel increased. After 10 nM paclitaxel exposure, the cellular uptake of all 5 radiopharmaceuticals was not reduced significantly, irrespective of exposure time and viable cell fraction. After 100 nM paclitaxel exposure, the cellular uptake of all 5 radiopharmaceuticals was enhanced significantly irrespective of viable cell fraction. The peak uptake was observed in experimental groups with paclitaxel exposure for 6 to 48 h according the type of radiopharmaceutical. When the cellular uptake was adjusted for the viable cell fraction and cell count, the peak cellular uptake was observed in experimental groups with paclitaxel exposure for 48 h, irrespective of the type of radiopharmaceutical. The cellular uptake of F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose, C-11-methionine, TI-201, Tc-99m-MIBI, and Tc-99m-tetrofosmin did not reflect viable cell number in MCF-7 cells after paclitaxel exposure for up to 48 h.

  11. Interaction of platelet-derived autotaxin with tumor integrin αVβ3 controls metastasis of breast cancer cells to bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, Raphael; Lee, Sue-Chin; David, Marion; Bordet, Jean-Claude; Norman, Derek D.; Patil, Renukadevi; Miller, Duane; Sahay, Debashish; Ribeiro, Johnny; Clézardin, Philippe; Tigyi, Gabor J.

    2014-01-01

    Autotaxin (ATX), through its lysophospholipase D activity controls physiological levels of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) in blood. ATX is overexpressed in multiple types of cancers, and together with LPA generated during platelet activation promotes skeletal metastasis of breast cancer. However, the pathophysiological sequelae of regulated interactions between circulating LPA, ATX, and platelets remain undefined in cancer. In this study, we show that ATX is stored in α-granules of resting human platelets and released upon tumor cell-induced platelet aggregation, leading to the production of LPA. Our in vitro and in vivo experiments using human breast cancer cells that do not express ATX (MDA-MB-231 and MDA-B02) demonstrate that nontumoral ATX controls the early stage of bone colonization by tumor cells. Moreover, expression of a dominant negative integrin αvβ3-Δ744 or treatment with the anti-human αvβ3 monoclonal antibody LM609, completely abolished binding of ATX to tumor cells, demonstrating the requirement of a fully active integrin αvβ3 in this process. The present results establish a new mechanism for platelet contribution to LPA-dependent metastasis of breast cancer cells, and demonstrate the therapeutic potential of disrupting the binding of nontumor-derived ATX with the tumor cells for the prevention of metastasis. PMID:25277122

  12. Characterization of Cell-Type-Specific Drug Transport and Resistance of Breast Cancers Using Tumor-Microenvironment-on-Chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Kyeonggon; Klosterhoff, Brett S; Han, Bumsoo

    2016-07-05

    Heterogeneous response and resistance of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drugs pose a significant challenge for successful cancer treatments. In this study, an integrated experimental and theoretical analysis of cellular drug transport was developed. The experimental platform, called tumor-microenvironment-on-chip (T-MOC), is a microfluidic platform where cancer cells were cultured within a three-dimensional extracellular matrix perfused with interstitial fluid. Three types of human breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, and SUM-159PT) were cultured on this T-MOC platform, and their drug response and resistance to doxorubicin were characterized by time-lapse quantitative fluorescence microscopy. To study the effects of nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery, the transport and action of doxorubicin encapsulated nanoparticles were also examined. Based on the experimental data obtained, a theoretical model was developed to quantify and ultimately predict the cellular transport processes of drugs cell-type specifically. The results demonstrate that the cellular drug transport can be cell-type-specifically quantified by rate constants representing the uptake and efflux of doxorubicin across the cellular membrane.

  13. Identification of immunoglobulin V(D)J recombinations in solid tumor specimen exome files: Evidence for high level B-cell infiltrates in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Wei Lue; Tu, Yaping N; Samy, Mohammad D; Sexton, Wade J; Blanck, George

    2017-03-04

    It has recently become apparent that it is possible to characterize productively recombined, T-cell receptor (TcR) gene segments in tumor exome files, which presumably include representations of the DNA of other cells in the microenvironment. Similar characterizations have been done for TcR recombinations in tumor specimen RNASeq files. While exome files have been used to characterize immunoglobulin gene segment recombinations for tumors closely related to B-cells, immunoglobulin recombinations have yet to be characterized for putative microenvironment cells for solid tumors. Here we report a novel scripted algorithm that detects productive and unproductive immunoglobulin recombinations in both B-cell related tumor exome files and in solid tumor exome files, with the most important result being the relatively high level B-cell infiltrate in breast cancer. This analysis has the potential of streamlining and dramatically augmenting the knowledge base regarding B-cell infiltrates into solid tumors; and leading to antibody reagents directed against tumor antigens and tissue resident, infectious pathogens.

  14. Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase-interacting multifunctional protein 1 suppresses tumor growth in breast cancer-bearing mice by negatively regulating myeloid-derived suppressor cell functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hye-Jin; Lim, Hui Xuan; Song, Ju Han; Lee, Arim; Kim, Eugene; Cho, Daeho; Cohen, Edward P; Kim, Tae Sung

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are one of the most important cell types that contribute to negative regulation of immune responses in the tumor microenvironment. Recently, aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase-interacting multifunctional protein 1 (AIMP1), a novel pleiotropic cytokine, was identified as an antitumor protein that inhibits angiogenesis and induces antitumor responses. However, the effect of AIMP1 on MDSCs in the tumor environment remains unclear. In the present study, we demonstrated that AIMP1 significantly inhibited tumor growth in 4T1 breast cancer-bearing mice and reduced MDSCs population of tumor sites and spleens of tumor-bearing mice. AIMP1 reduced expansion of MDSCs from bone marrow-derived cells in the tumor-conditioned media. AIMP1 also negatively regulated suppressive activities of MDSCs by inhibiting IL-6 and NO production, and Arg-1 expression. Furthermore, treatment of breast cancer-bearing mice with AIMP1 decreased the capacity of MDSCs to suppress T cell proliferation and Treg cell induction. Western blot and inhibition experiments showed that downregulation of MDSCs functions by AIMP1 may result from attenuated activation of STATs, Akt, and ERK. These findings indicate that AIMP1 plays an essential role in negative regulation of suppressive functions of MDSCs. Therefore, it has a significant potential as a therapeutic agent for cancer treatment.

  15. E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Cbl-b Prevents Tumor Metastasis by Maintaining the Epithelial Phenotype in Multiple Drug-Resistant Gastric and Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ling; Zhang, Ye; Qu, Xiujuan; Che, Xiaofang; Guo, Tianshu; Cai, Ying; Li, Aodi; Li, Danni; Li, Ce; Wen, Ti; Fan, Yibo; Hou, Kezuo; Ma, Yanju; Hu, Xuejun; Liu, Yunpeng

    2017-04-01

    Multiple drug resistance (MDR) and metastasis are two major factors that contribute to the failure of cancer treatment. However, the relationship between MDR and metastasis has not been characterized. Additionally, the role of the E3 ubiquitin ligase Cbl-b in metastasis of MDR gastric and breast cancer is not well known. In the present study, we found that MDR gastric and breast cancer cells possess a typical mesenchymal phenotype and enhanced cell migration capacity. Additionally, Cbl-b is poorly expressed in MDR gastric and breast cancer cells. In MDR gastric adenocarcinoma tissues, gastric cancer patients with low Cbl-b expression were more likely to have tumor invasion (P=.016) and lymph node metastasis (P=.007). Moreover, overexpression of Cbl-b reduced cell migration in MDR cell cultures both in vitro and in vivo. Cbl-b overexpression also prevented EMT by inducing ubiquitination and degradation of EGFR, leading to inhibition of the EGFR-ERK/Akt-miR-200c-ZEB1 axis. However, further overexpression of EGFR on a background of Cbl-b overexpression restored both the mesenchymal phenotype and cell migration capacity of MDR gastric and breast cancer cells. These results suggest that Cbl-b is an important factor for maintenance of the epithelial phenotype and inhibition of cell migration in MDR gastric and breast cancer cells. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Ets2 in tumor fibroblasts promotes angiogenesis in breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie A Wallace

    Full Text Available Tumor fibroblasts are active partners in tumor progression, but the genes and pathways that mediate this collaboration are ill-defined. Previous work demonstrates that Ets2 function in stromal cells significantly contributes to breast tumor progression. Conditional mouse models were used to study the function of Ets2 in both mammary stromal fibroblasts and epithelial cells. Conditional inactivation of Ets2 in stromal fibroblasts in PyMT and ErbB2 driven tumors significantly reduced tumor growth, however deletion of Ets2 in epithelial cells in the PyMT model had no significant effect. Analysis of gene expression in fibroblasts revealed a tumor- and Ets2-dependent gene signature that was enriched in genes important for ECM remodeling, cell migration, and angiogenesis in both PyMT and ErbB2 driven-tumors. Consistent with these results, PyMT and ErbB2 tumors lacking Ets2 in fibroblasts had fewer functional blood vessels, and Ets2 in fibroblasts elicited changes in gene expression in tumor endothelial cells consistent with this phenotype. An in vivo angiogenesis assay revealed the ability of Ets2 in fibroblasts to promote blood vessel formation in the absence of tumor cells. Importantly, the Ets2-dependent gene expression signatures from both mouse models were able to distinguish human breast tumor stroma from normal stroma, and correlated with patient outcomes in two whole tumor breast cancer data sets. The data reveals a key function for Ets2 in tumor fibroblasts in signaling to endothelial cells to promote tumor angiogenesis. The results highlight the collaborative networks that orchestrate communication between stromal cells and tumor cells, and suggest that targeting tumor fibroblasts may be an effective strategy for developing novel anti-angiogenic therapies.

  17. Circulating tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondi, Cristina; Nicolazzo, Chiara; Gradilone, Angela; Giannini, Giuseppe; De Falco, Elena; Chimenti, Isotta; Varriale, Elisa; Hauch, Siegfried; Plappert, Linda; Cortesi, Enrico; Gazzaniga, Paola

    2014-01-01

    The hypothesis of the “liquid biopsy” using circulating tumor cells (CTCs) emerged as a minimally invasive alternative to traditional tissue biopsy to determine cancer therapy. Discordance for biomarkers expression between primary tumor tissue and circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has been widely reported, thus rendering the biological characterization of CTCs an attractive tool for biomarkers assessment and treatment selection. Studies performed in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients using CellSearch, the only FDA-cleared test for CTCs assessment, demonstrated a much lower yield of CTCs in this tumor type compared with breast and prostate cancer, both at baseline and during the course of treatment. Thus, although attractive, the possibility to use CTCs as therapy-related biomarker for colorectal cancer patients is still limited by a number of technical issues mainly due to the low sensitivity of the CellSearch method. In the present study we found a significant discordance between CellSearch and AdnaTest in the detection of CTCs from mCRC patients. We then investigated KRAS pathway activating mutations in CTCs and determined the degree of heterogeneity for KRAS oncogenic mutations between CTCs and tumor tissues. Whether KRAS gene amplification may represent an alternative pathway responsible for KRAS activation was further explored. KRAS gene amplification emerged as a functionally equivalent and mutually exclusive mechanism of KRAS pathway activation in CTCs, possibly related to transcriptional activation. The serial assessment of CTCs may represent an early biomarker of treatment response, able to overcome the intrinsic limit of current molecular biomarkers represented by intratumor heterogeneity. PMID:24521660

  18. Targeting of GIT1 by miR-149* in breast cancer suppresses cell proliferation and metastasis in vitro and tumor growth in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Y

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Yan Dong,1,* Cai Chang,2,* Jingtian Liu,3 Jinwei Qiang4 1Department of Ultrasonography, Jinshan Hospital, 2Department of Ultrasonography, Cancer Center, 3Department of General Surgery, 4Department of Radiology, Jinshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Breast cancer remains a major cause of cancer-related death in women worldwide. Dysregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs is involved in the initiation and progression of breast cancer. Moreover, it was found that GIT1 was widely involved in the development of many human cancers. Herein, we aimed to investigate the expression changes of miR-149* and GIT1 and the functional effects of miR-149*/GIT1 link in breast cancer. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR and Western blot (WB were used to examine the expression levels of miR-149* and GIT1. Dual luciferase reporter assay was utilized to confirm the target interaction between miR-149* and GIT1. The biological functions, including cell proliferation, invasion, and migration, of miR-149* and GIT1 were determined by MTT assay and Transwell assays, respectively. Eventually, the tumor xenograft model in nude mice injected with stable transfected MDA-MB-231 cells was established to verify the effects of miR-149* and GIT1 on tumor growth. Our results showed that miR-149* expression was decreased, whereas GIT1 expression was increased in clinical samples of breast cancer. Based on the inverse expression trend between miR-149* and GIT1, we further demonstrated that miR-149* indeed directly targets GIT1. Subsequently, it was observed that inhibition of miR-149* significantly promoted cell proliferation, invasion, and migration, but the ability of cell proliferation, invasion, and migration was obviously declined after silencing of GIT1 in MDA-MB-231 cells transfected with miR-149* mimic and/or si-GIT1. Finally, it was also found that elevated miR-149* decelerated

  19. Gene expression profiling of breast tumor cell lines to predict for therapeutic response to microtubule-stabilizing agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadra, Gais; Finetti, Pascal; Toiron, Yves; Viens, Patrice; Birnbaum, Daniel; Borg, Jean-Paul; Bertucci, François; Gonçalves, Anthony

    2012-04-01

    Microtubule-targeting agents, including taxanes (Tax) and ixabepilone (Ixa), are important components of modern breast cancer chemotherapy regimens, but no molecular parameter is currently available that can predict for their efficiency. We sought to develop pharmacogenomic predictors of Tax- and Ixa-response from a large panel of human breast tumor cell lines (BTCL), then to evaluate their performance in clinical samples. Thirty-two BTCL, representative of the molecular diversity of breast cancers (BC), were treated in vitro with Tax (paclitaxel (Pac), docetaxel (Doc)), and ixabepilone (Ixa), then classified as drug-sensitive or resistant according to their 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s). Baseline gene expression data were obtained using Affymetrix U133 Plus 2.0 human oligonucleotide microarrays. Gene expression set (GES) predictors of response to taxanes were derived, then tested for validation internally and in publicly available gene expression datasets. In vitro IC50s of Pac and Doc were almost identical, whereas some Tax-resistant BTCL retained sensitivity to Ixa. GES predictors for Tax-sensitivity (333 genes) and Ixa-sensitivity (79 genes) were defined. They displayed a limited number of overlapping genes. Both were validated by leave-n-out cross-validation (n = 4; for overall accuracy (OA), P = 0.028 for Tax, and P = 0.0005 for Ixa). The GES predictor of Tax-sensitivity was tested on publicly available external datasets and significantly predicted Pac-sensitivity in 16 BTCL (P = 0.04 for OA), and pathological complete response to Pac-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy in BC patients (P = 0.0045 for OA). Applying Tax and Ixa-GES to a dataset of clinically annotated early BC patients identified subsets of tumors with potentially distinct phenotypes of drug sensitivity: predicted Ixa-sensitive/Tax-resistant BC were significantly (P Tax-sensitive BC. Genomic predictors for Tax- and Ixa-sensitivity can be derived from BTCL and may be helpful for better

  20. A model of tumor architecture and spatial interactions with tumor microenvironment in breast carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Cheikh, Bassem; Bor-Angelier, Catherine; Racoceanu, Daniel

    2017-03-01

    Breast carcinomas are cancers that arise from the epithelial cells of the breast, which are the cells that line the lobules and the lactiferous ducts. Breast carcinoma is the most common type of breast cancer and can be divided into different subtypes based on architectural features and growth patterns, recognized during a histopathological examination. Tumor microenvironment (TME) is the cellular environment in which tumor cells develop. Being composed of various cell types having different biological roles, TME is recognized as playing an important role in the progression of the disease. The architectural heterogeneity in breast carcinomas and the spatial interactions with TME are, to date, not well understood. Developing a spatial model of tumor architecture and spatial interactions with TME can advance our understanding of tumor heterogeneity. Furthermore, generating histological synthetic datasets can contribute to validating, and comparing analytical methods that are used in digital pathology. In this work, we propose a modeling method that applies to different breast carcinoma subtypes and TME spatial distributions based on mathematical morphology. The model is based on a few morphological parameters that give access to a large spectrum of breast tumor architectures and are able to differentiate in-situ ductal carcinomas (DCIS) and histological subtypes of invasive carcinomas such as ductal (IDC) and lobular carcinoma (ILC). In addition, a part of the parameters of the model controls the spatial distribution of TME relative to the tumor. The validation of the model has been performed by comparing morphological features between real and simulated images.

  1. CCN5/WISP-2 expression in breast adenocarcinoma is associated with less frequent progression of the disease and suppresses the invasive phenotypes of tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Snigdha; Dhar, Gopal; Haque, Inamul; Kambhampati, Suman; Mehta, Smita; Sengupta, Krishanu; Tawfik, Ossama; Phillips, Teresa A; Banerjee, Sushanta K

    2008-09-15

    Although previous in vitro studies predicted that CCN5/WISP-2 may act as an anti-invasive gene in breast cancer, the distribution pattern of CCN5 in breast cancer samples is conflicting. Thus, we systematically investigated the CCN5 expression profile in noninvasive and invasive breast tumor samples and its functional relevance in breast cancer progression. The studies showed that CCN5 expression is biphasic, such that in normal samples CCN5 expression is undetectable, whereas its expression is markedly increased in noninvasive breast lesions, including atypical ductal hyperplasia and ductal carcinoma in situ. Further, CCN5 mRNA and protein levels are significantly reduced as the cancer progresses from a noninvasive to invasive type. Additionally, we showed that CCN5 mRNA and protein level was almost undetectable in poorly differentiated cancers compared with the moderately or well-differentiated samples and its expression inversely correlated with lymph node positivity. The result was further supported by evaluating the RNA expression profile in microdissected sections using real-time PCR analysis. Therefore, our data suggest a protective function of CCN5 in noninvasive breast tumor cells. This hypothesis was further supported by our in vitro studies illuminating that CCN5 is a negative regulator of migration and invasion of breast cancer cells, and these events could be regulated by CCN5 through the modulation of the expression of genes essential for an invasive front. These include Snail-E-cadherin signaling and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 and MMP-2. Collectively, these studies suggest that the protective effect of CCN5 in breast cancer progression may have important therapeutic implications.

  2. Evaluation Frequency of Merkel Cell Polyoma, Epstein-Barr and Mouse Mammary Tumor Viruses in Patients with Breast Cancer in Kerman, Southeast of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reza, Malekpour Afshar; Reza, Mollaie Hamid; Mahdiyeh, Lashkarizadeh; Mehdi, Fazlalipour; Hamid, Zeinali Nejad

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women worldwide. Roles of the Epstein-Barr, Merkel cell polyoma and mouse mammary tumor viruses in breast carcinogenesis are still controversial although any relationship would clearly be important for breast cancer etiology, early detection and prevention. In the present study associations between EBV, MMTV and Merkel cell polyoma virus and breast cancer in 100 Iranian patients were evaluated using paraffin-embedded tissues. EBER RNA and expression of p53 and large T antigen were evaluated by real time PCR and CD34, p63, HER2, PR and ER markers were studied by immunohistochemistry. EBV was detected in 8/100 (8%), MMTV in 12/100 (12%), MPy in 3/100 (3%) and EBER RNA in 18/100 (18%) cases. None of the control samples demonstrated any of the viruses. p53 was suppressed in EBV, MPy and MMTV positive samples. The large T antigen rate was raised in MPy positive samples. Our results showed that EBV, MMTV and the Merkel cell polyoma virus are foundwith some proportion of breast cancers in our patients, suggesting that these viruses might have a significant role in breast cancer in Kerman, southeast of Iran.

  3. Evaluation of Two Different Analytical Methods for Circulating Tumor Cell Detection in Peripheral Blood of Patients with Primary Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. S. Jaeger

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Evidence is accumulating that circulating tumor cells (CTC out of peripheral blood can serve as prognostic marker not only in metastatic but also in early breast cancer (BC. Various methods are available to detect CTC. Comparisons between the different techniques, however, are rare. Material and Methods. We evaluate two different methods for CTC enrichment and detection in primary BC patients: the FDA-approved CellSearch System (CSS; Veridex, Warren, USA and a manual immunocytochemistry (MICC. The cut-off value for positivity was ≥1 CTC. Results. The two different nonoverlapping patient cohorts evaluated with one or the other method were well balanced regarding common clinical parameters. Before adjuvant CHT 21.1% (416 out of 1972 and 20.6% (247 out of 1198 of the patients were CTC-positive, while after CHT 22.5% (359 out of 1598 and 16.6% (177 out of 1066 of the patients were CTC-positive using CSS or MICC, respectively. CTC positivity rate before CHT was thus similar and not significantly different (P=0.749, while CTC positivity rate immediately after CHT was significantly lower using MICC compared to CSS (P<0.001. Conclusion. Using CSS or MICC for CTC detection, we found comparable prevalence of CTC before but not after adjuvant CHT.

  4. The NHERF1 PDZ2 domain regulates PKA-RhoA-p38-mediated NHE1 activation and invasion in breast tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardone, Rosa A; Bellizzi, Antonia; Busco, Giovanni; Weinman, Edward J; Dell'Aquila, Maria E; Casavola, Valeria; Azzariti, Amalia; Mangia, Anita; Paradiso, Angelo; Reshkin, Stephan J

    2007-05-01

    Understanding the signal transduction systems governing invasion is fundamental for the design of therapeutic strategies against metastasis. Na(+)/H(+) exchanger regulatory factor (NHERF1) is a postsynaptic density 95/disc-large/zona occludens (PDZ) domain-containing protein that recruits membrane receptors/transporters and cytoplasmic signaling proteins into functional complexes. NHERF1 expression is altered in breast cancer, but its effective role in mammary carcinogenesis remains undefined. We report here that NHERF1 overexpression in human breast tumor biopsies is associated with metastatic progression, poor prognosis, and hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha expression. In cultured tumor cells, hypoxia and serum deprivation increase NHERF1 expression, promote the formation of leading-edge pseudopodia, and redistribute NHERF1 to these pseudopodia. This pseudopodial localization of NHERF1 was verified in breast biopsies and in three-dimensional Matrigel culture. Furthermore, serum deprivation and hypoxia stimulate the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger, invasion, and activate a protein kinase A (PKA)-gated RhoA/p38 invasion signal module. Significantly, NHERF1 overexpression was sufficient to induce these morphological and functional changes, and it potentiated their induction by serum deprivation. Functional experiments with truncated and binding groove-mutated PDZ domain constructs demonstrated that NHERF1 regulates these processes through its PDZ2 domain. We conclude that NHERF1 overexpression enhances the invasive phenotype in breast cancer cells, both alone and in synergy with exposure to the tumor microenvironment, via the coordination of PKA-gated RhoA/p38 signaling.

  5. Circulating Tumor Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vicki Plaks; Charlotte D. Koopman; Zena Werb

    2013-01-01

    .... During successful dissemination, tumor cells invade the surrounding tissue of the primary tumor, intravasate into blood and lymphatic vessels, translocate to distant tissues, extravasate, adapt...

  6. Highly sensitive proximity mediated immunoassay reveals HER2 status conversion in the circulating tumor cells of metastatic breast cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Phillip

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The clinical benefits associated with targeted oncology agents are generally limited to subsets of patients. Even with favorable biomarker profiles, many patients do not respond or acquire resistance. Existing technologies are ineffective for treatment monitoring as they provide only static and limited information and require substantial amounts of tissue. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop methods that can profile potential therapeutic targets with limited clinical specimens during the course of treatment. Methods We have developed a novel proteomics-based assay, Collaborative Enzyme Enhanced Reactive-immunoassay (CEER that can be used for analyzing clinical samples. CEER utilizes the formation of unique immuno-complex between capture-antibodies and two additional detector-Abs on a microarray surface. One of the detector-Abs is conjugated to glucose oxidase (GO, and the other is conjugated to Horse Radish Peroxidase (HRP. Target detection requires the presence of both detector-Abs because the enzyme channeling event between GO and HRP will not occur unless both Abs are in close proximity. Results CEER was able to detect single-cell level expression and phosphorylation of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 and human epidermal growth factor receptor 1 (HER1 in breast cancer (BCa systems. The shift in phosphorylation profiles of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs and other signal transduction proteins upon differential ligand stimulation further demonstrated extreme assay specificity in a multiplexed array format. HER2 analysis by CEER in 227 BCa tissues showed superior accuracy when compared to the outcome from immunohistochemistry (IHC (83% vs. 96%. A significant incidence of HER2 status alteration with recurrent disease was observed via circulating tumor cell (CTC analysis, suggesting an evolving and dynamic disease progression. HER2-positive CTCs were found in 41% (7/17 while CTCs with significant HER2

  7. Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy and Isolated Tumor Cells in Invasive Lobular Versus Ductal Breast Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Truin, Wilfred; Roumen, Rudi M.; Siesling, Sabine; van der Heiden-van der Loo, Margriet; Lobbezoo, Dorien J.; Tjan-Heijnen, Vivianne C.G.; Voogd, Adri C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy is the standard of care for axillary staging in invasive breast cancer. The introduction of SLN biopsy with an extensive pathology examination, in addition to the introduction of the 2002 TNM classification, led to different axillary classification

  8. Tetrandrine, a Compound Common in Chinese Traditional Medicine, Preferentially Kills Breast Cancer Tumor Initiating Cells (TICs) In Vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Wei; Debeb, Bisrat G.; Lacerda, Lara; Li, Jessica; Woodward, Wendy A., E-mail: wwoodward@mdanderson.org [Division of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2011-05-04

    Tetrandrine is a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid found in Stephania tetrandra, a Chinese medicine commonly used as an anti-inflammatory. It has extensive pharmacological activity, including positive ion channel blockade and inhibition of multiple drug resistance proteins. These activities are very similar to that of salinomycin, a known drug targeting breast cancer initiation cells (TICs). Herein, we tested tetrandrine targeting of breast cancer TICs. SUM-149, an inflammatory breast cancer cell line and SUM-159, a non-inflammatory metaplastic breast cancer cell line were used in these studies. In proliferation assays using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl) -2H-tetrazolium (MTS), we found that the IC{sub 50} for inhibition of proliferation is 15.3 ± 4.1 μM for SUM-149 and 24.3 ± 2.1 μM for SUM-159 cells. Tetrandrine also inhibited mammosphere formation, a surrogate for breast cancer TICs growth in vitro with IC{sub 50} around 1 μM for SUM-149 and around 2 μM for SUM-159 cells. Tetrandrine has similar effects on the mammosphere formation from cells isolated from fresh patient sample. Moreover, tetrandrine decreases the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) positive population in SUM-159 by 45% ± 5.45% P = 0.005. In summary, tetrandrine demonstrates significant efficacy against in vitro surrogates for inflammatory and aggressive breast cancer TICs.

  9. Tetrandrine, a Compound Common in Chinese Traditional Medicine, Preferentially Kills Breast Cancer Tumor Initiating Cells (TICs In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Li

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Tetrandrine is a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid found in Stephania tetrandra, a Chinese medicine commonly used as an anti-inflammatory. It has extensive pharmacological activity, including positive ion channel blockade and inhibition of multiple drug resistance proteins. These activities are very similar to that of salinomycin, a known drug targeting breast cancer initiation cells (TICs. Herein, we tested tetrandrine targeting of breast cancer TICs. SUM-149, an inflammatory breast cancer cell line and SUM-159, a non-inflammatory metaplastic breast cancer cell line were used in these studies. In proliferation assays using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl-2-(4-sulfophenyl-2H-tetrazolium (MTS, we found that the IC50 for inhibition of proliferation is 15.3 ± 4.1 µM for SUM-149 and 24.3 ± 2.1 µM for SUM-159 cells. Tetrandrine also inhibited mammosphere formation, a surrogate for breast cancer TICs growth in vitro with IC50 around 1 µM for SUM-149 and around 2 µM for SUM-159 cells. Tetrandrine has similar effects on the mammosphere formation from cells isolated from fresh patient sample. Moreover, tetrandrine decreases the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH positive population in SUM-159 by 45% ± 5.45% P = 0.005. In summary, tetrandrine demonstrates significant efficacy against in vitro surrogates for inflammatory and aggressive breast cancer TICs.

  10. Combined inhibition of the mevalonate pathway with statins and zoledronic acid potentiates their anti-tumor effects in human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göbel, Andy; Thiele, Stefanie; Browne, Andrew J; Rauner, Martina; Zinna, Valentina M; Hofbauer, Lorenz C; Rachner, Tilman D

    2016-05-28

    Amino-bisphosphonates are antiresorptive drugs for the treatment of osteolytic bone metastases, which are frequently caused by breast and other solid tumors. Like statins, amino-bisphosphonates inhibit the mevalonate pathway. Direct anti-tumor effects of amino-bisphosphonates and statins have been proposed, although high concentrations are required to achieve these effects. Here, we demonstrate that the treatment of different human breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB-231, MDA-Bone, and MDA-Met) by combined inhibition of the mevalonate pathway using statins and zoledronic acid at the same time significantly reduces the concentrations required to achieve a meaningful anti-tumor effect over a single agent approach (50% reduction of cell vitality and 4-fold increase of apoptosis; p < 0.05). The effects were mediated by suppressed protein geranylation that caused an accumulation of GTP-bound RhoA and CDC42. Importantly, the knockdown of both proteins prior to mevalonate pathway inhibition reduced apoptosis by up to 65% (p < 0.01), indicating the accumulation of the GTP-bound GTPases as the mediator of apoptosis. Our results point to effective anti-tumor effects in breast cancer by the combination of statins and zoledronic acid and warrant further validation in preclinical settings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Herbal Extract SH003 Suppresses Tumor Growth and Metastasis of MDA-MB-231 Breast Cancer Cells by Inhibiting STAT3-IL-6 Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youn Kyung Choi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer inflammation promotes cancer progression, resulting in a high risk of cancer. Here, we demonstrate that our new herbal extract, SH003, suppresses both tumor growth and metastasis of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells via inhibiting STAT3-IL-6 signaling path. Our new herbal formula, SH003, mixed extract from Astragalus membranaceus, Angelica gigas, and Trichosanthes kirilowii Maximowicz, suppressed MDA-MB-231 tumor growth and lung metastasis in vivo and reduced the viability and metastatic abilities of MDA-MB-231 cells in vitro. Furthermore, SH003 inhibited STAT3 activation, which resulted in a reduction of IL-6 production. Therefore, we conclude that SH003 suppresses highly metastatic breast cancer growth and metastasis by inhibiting STAT3-IL-6 signaling path.

  12. Tumor Suppression and Sensitization to Taxol Induced Apoptosis of E1A in Breast Cancer Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liao, Yong

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to study the molecular mechanisms underlying ElA's proapoptotic effect and anti-tumor activity and to dissect the functional domains of ElA that are critical for its antitumor activity...

  13. Tumor Suppression and Sensitization to Taxol Induces Apoptosis of EIA in Breast Cancer Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liao, Yong

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to study the molecular mechanisms underlying ElA's proapoptotic effect and anti-tumor activity and to dissect the functional domains of ElA that are critical for its antitumor activity...

  14. Tumor Suppression and Sensitization to Taxol Induced Apoptosis of E1A In Breast Cancer Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liao, Yong

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to study the molecular mechanisms underlying E1A's proapoptotic effect and anti-tumor activity and to dissect the functional domains of El A that are critical for its antitumor activity...

  15. NF-kappaB Activity in Macrophages Determines Metastatic Potential of Breast Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    as an official Department of the Army position , policy or decision unless so designated by other documentation. REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form...defined using the antibody against F4/80. However, within the F4/80 positive population there is a trend towards an increase in the numbers of early... preterm birth caused by an arrest in airway morphogenesis (Blackwell et al 2011 – appended). Funding applications BC101825 DOD Breast Cancer

  16. Efficacy of Lapatinib in Therapy-Resistant HER2-Positive Circulating Tumor Cells in Metastatic Breast Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Agelaki

    Full Text Available To evaluate the efficacy of lapatinib, a dual EGFR and HER2 tyrosine kinase inhibitor, in therapy-resistant HER2-positive CTCs in metastatic breast cancer (MBC.Patients with MBC and HER2-positive CTCs despite disease stabilization or response to prior therapy, received lapatinib 1500 mg daily in monthly cycles, till disease progression or CTC increase. CTC monitoring was performed by immunofluorescent microscopy using cytospins of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs double stained for HER2 or EGFR and cytokeratin.A total of 120 cycles were administered in 22 patients; median age was 62.5 years, 15 (68.2% patients were post-menopausal and 20 (90.1% had HER2-negative primary tumors. At the end of the second course, HER2-positive CTC counts decreased in 76.2% of patients; the median number of HER2-positive CTCs/patient also declined significantly (p = 0.013, however the decrease was significant only among patients presenting disease stabilization (p = 0.018 but not among those with disease progression during lapatinib treatment. No objective responses were observed. All CTC-positive patients harbored EGFR-positive CTCs on progression compared to 62.5% at baseline (p = 0.054. The ratio of EGFR-positive CTCs/total CTCs detected in all patients increased from 17.1% at baseline to 37.6% on progression, whereas the mean percentage of HER2-negative CTCs/patient increased from 2.4% to 30.6% (p = 0.03.The above results indicate that lapatinib is effective in decreasing HER2-positive CTCs in patients with MBC irrespectively of the HER2 status of the primary tumor and imply the feasibility of monitoring the molecular changes on CTCs during treatment with targeted agents.Clinical trial.gov NCT00694252.

  17. Low-Symmetry Mixed Fluorinated Subphthalocyanines as Fluorescence Imaging Probes in MDA-MB-231 Breast Tumor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine J. McAuliffe

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Boron subphthalocyanines (SPcs are aromatic macrocycles that possess a combination of physical and optical properties that make them excellent candidates for application as fluorescent imaging probes. These molecules have intense electronic absorption and emission, and structural versatility that allows for specific tuning of physical properties. Herein, we report the synthesis of a series of low-symmetry fluorinated SPcs and compare them to analogous compounds with varying numbers of peripheral fluorine atoms and varied aromaticity. Across the series, with increasing addition of fluorine atoms to the periphery of the ring, a downfield chemical shift in 19F NMR and a bathochromic shift of electronic absorption were observed. Expanding the size of the aromatic ring by replacing peripheral benzo- groups with naphtho- groups prompted a far more drastic bathochromic shift to absorption and emission. Fluorescence quantum yields (Φf proved to be sufficiently high to observe intracellular fluorescence from MDA-MB-231 breast tumor cells in vitro by epifluorescence microscopy; fluorination proved vital for this purpose to improve solubility. This report lays the groundwork for the future development of these promising SPcs for their ultimate application as near-infrared (NIR fluorescent imaging probes in biological systems.

  18. Elimination of Tumor Cells Using Folate Receptor Targeting by Antibody-Conjugated, Gold-Coated Magnetite Nanoparticles in a Murine Breast Cancer Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evan S. Krystofiak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The chemotherapeutic treatment of cancer suffers from poor specificity for targeting the tumor cells and often results in adverse effects such as systemic toxicity, damage to nontarget tissues, and development of drug-resistant tumors in patients. Increasingly, drug nanocarriers have been explored as a way of lessening or overcoming these problems. In this study, antibody-conjugated Au-coated magnetite nanoparticles, in conjunction with inductive heating produced by exposure to an oscillating magnetic field (OMF, were evaluated for their effects on the viability of tumor cells in a murine model of breast cancer. Treatment effects were evaluated by light microscopy and SEM. Results. 4T1 mammary epithelial carcinoma cells overexpressing the folate receptor were targeted with an anti-folate receptor primary antibody, followed by labeling with secondary antibody-conjugated Au-coated magnetite nanoparticles. In the absence of OMF exposure, nanoparticle labeling had no effect on 4T1 cell viability. However, following OMF treatment, many of the labeled 4T1 cells showed extensive membrane damage by SEM analysis, and dramatically reduced viability as assessed using a live/dead staining assay. Conclusions. These results demonstrate that Au-coated magnetite targeted to tumor cells through binding to an overexpressed surface receptor, in the presence of an OMF, can lead to tumor cell death.

  19. A mouse model for triple-negative breast cancer tumor-initiating cells (TNBC-TICs) exhibits similar aggressive phenotype to the human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Punit; Nagaraja, Ganachari M; Zheng, Hongying; Gizachew, Dawit; Galukande, Moses; Krishnan, Sunil; Asea, Alexzander

    2012-03-27

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) exhibit characteristics quite distinct from other kinds of breast cancer, presenting as an aggressive disease--recurring and metastasizing more often than other kinds of breast cancer, without tumor-specific treatment options and accounts for 15% of all types of breast cancer with higher percentages in premenopausal African-American and Hispanic women. The reason for this aggressive phenotype is currently the focus of intensive research. However, progress is hampered by the lack of suitable TNBC cell model systems. To understand the mechanistic basis for the aggressiveness of TNBC, we produced a stable TNBC cell line by sorting for 4T1 cells that do not express the estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PgR) or the gene for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2). As a control, we produced a stable triple-positive breast cancer (TPBC) cell line by transfecting 4T1 cells with rat HER2, ER and PgR genes and sorted for cells with high expression of ER and PgR by flow cytometry and high expression of the HER2 gene by Western blot analysis. We isolated tumor-initiating cells (TICs) by sorting for CD24+/CD44high/ALDH1+ cells from TNBC (TNBC-TICs) and TPBC (TPBC-TICs) stable cell lines. Limiting dilution transplantation experiments revealed that CD24+/CD44high/ALDH1+ cells derived from TNBC (TNBC-TICs) and TPBC (TPBC-TICs) were significantly more effective at repopulating the mammary glands of naïve female BALB/c mice than CD24-/CD44-/ALDH1- cells. Implantation of the TNBC-TICs resulted in significantly larger tumors, which metastasized to the lungs to a significantly greater extent than TNBC, TPBC-TICs, TPBC or parental 4T1 cells. We further demonstrated that the increased aggressiveness of TNBC-TICs correlates with the presence of high levels of mouse twenty-five kDa heat shock protein (Hsp25/mouse HspB1) and seventy-two kDa heat shock protein (Hsp72/HspA1A). Taken together, we have developed a TNBC-TICs model system

  20. A mouse model for triple-negative breast cancer tumor-initiating cells (TNBC-TICs exhibits similar aggressive phenotype to the human disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kau Punit

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC exhibit characteristics quite distinct from other kinds of breast cancer, presenting as an aggressive disease--recurring and metastasizing more often than other kinds of breast cancer, without tumor-specific treatment options and accounts for 15% of all types of breast cancer with higher percentages in premenopausal African-American and Hispanic women. The reason for this aggressive phenotype is currently the focus of intensive research. However, progress is hampered by the lack of suitable TNBC cell model systems. Methods To understand the mechanistic basis for the aggressiveness of TNBC, we produced a stable TNBC cell line by sorting for 4T1 cells that do not express the estrogen receptor (ER, progesterone receptor (PgR or the gene for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2. As a control, we produced a stable triple-positive breast cancer (TPBC cell line by transfecting 4T1 cells with rat HER2, ER and PgR genes and sorted for cells with high expression of ER and PgR by flow cytometry and high expression of the HER2 gene by Western blot analysis. Results We isolated tumor-initiating cells (TICs by sorting for CD24+/CD44high/ALDH1+ cells from TNBC (TNBC-TICs and TPBC (TPBC-TICs stable cell lines. Limiting dilution transplantation experiments revealed that CD24+/CD44high/ALDH1+ cells derived from TNBC (TNBC-TICs and TPBC (TPBC-TICs were significantly more effective at repopulating the mammary glands of naïve female BALB/c mice than CD24-/CD44-/ALDH1- cells. Implantation of the TNBC-TICs resulted in significantly larger tumors, which metastasized to the lungs to a significantly greater extent than TNBC, TPBC-TICs, TPBC or parental 4T1 cells. We further demonstrated that the increased aggressiveness of TNBC-TICs correlates with the presence of high levels of mouse twenty-five kDa heat shock protein (Hsp25/mouse HspB1 and seventy-two kDa heat shock protein (Hsp72/HspA1A. Conclusions

  1. In situ localization of tumor cells associated with the epithelial-mesenchymal transition marker Snail and the prognostic impact of lymphocytes in the tumor microenvironment in invasive ductal breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkatout, Ibrahim; Hübner, Friederike; Wenners, Antonia; Hedderich, Jürgen; Wiedermann, Meike; Sánchez, Cristina; Röcken, Christoph; Mathiak, Micaela; Maass, Nicolai; Klapper, Wolfram

    2017-04-01

    Tumor surgery is aimed at complete resection of the lesion while ensuring a sufficient tumor-specific safety distance. Nevertheless, in many cases the most peripheral part - the invasion front - remains in situ. Tumor cells at the tumor margin have been reported to lose their epithelial properties and acquire features of mesenchymal cells. The process of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is believed to be of prime importance for tissue and vessel invasion. Furthermore, the detection of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes in the microenvironment of breast cancer might serve as a reliable prognostic marker. We investigated tissue microarrays of 352 breast cancer patients with regard to the presence and distribution of the EMT factor Snail, and the presence of FoxP3, CD3 and CD8 in the immune microenvironment. The expression of the transcription factor Snail is strongly associated with longer disease-free and overall survival. The presence of CD3, CD8 or FoxP3 is associated with a better outcome, although statistically significant results were noted only for FoxP3. The prognostic significance of FoxP3 and Snail were also proven in multivariate analysis. Based on previous studies concerning the intratumoral heterogeneity of EMT, our results suggest that Snail and FoxP3 are possible prognostic markers for breast cancer. The diverse presence of lymphocytes in the tumor microenvironment (CD3 and CD8) was confirmed. Although the importance of these markers is known, their specific role in tumor invasion and metastasis as well as their hierarchical organization in these tumors remain unclear. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Genomic DNA of MCF-7 breast cancer cells not an ideal choice as positive control for PCR amplification based detection of Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus-Like Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Bhushan B; Hiremath, Shivaprakash V; Kulkarni, Suyamindra S; Hallikeri, Umesh R; Patil, Basavaraj R; Gai, Pramod B

    2013-11-01

    The identification of the etiology of breast cancer is a crucial research issue for the development of an effective preventive and treatment strategies. Researchers are exploring the possible involvement of Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV) in causing human breast cancer. Hence, it becomes very important to use a consistent positive control agent in PCR amplification based detection of MMTV-Like Sequence (MMTV-LS) in human breast cancer for accurate and reproducible results. This study was done to investigate the feasibility of using genomic DNA of MCF-7 breast cancer cells to detect MMTV-LS using PCR amplification based detection. MMTV env and SAG gene located at the 3' long terminal repeat (LTR) sequences were targeted for the PCR based detection. No amplification was observed in case of the genomic DNA of MCF-7 breast cancer cells. However, the 2.7 kb DNA fragment comprising MMTV env and SAG LTR sequences yielded the products of desired size. From these results it can be concluded that Genomic DNA of MCF-7 cell is not a suitable choice as positive control for PCR or RT-PCR based detection of MMTV-LS. It is also suggested that plasmids containing the cloned genes or sequences of MMTV be used as positive control for detection of MMTV-LS. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Expression Pattern of a Homeotic Gene, HOXA5, in Normal Breast and in Breast Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory S. Henderson

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Homeotic (HOX gene products are now known to be functionally associated with breast cancer biogenesis. Recent evidence has indicated that HOXA5 regulates both p53 and progesterone receptor expression levels in breast cancer cells. In addition, HOXA5 has been shown to interact and regulate the activity of another protein referred to as Twist. As homeotic genes play a pivotal role in development, we sought to decipher the expression pattern in both normal breast tissues and in breast carcinomas. Methods: RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry were performed, to assay the levels of HOXA5 expression, on a panel of normal breast tissue and its corresponding primary breast tumors. Results and Conclusions: We show that HOXA5 expression was maintained at stable levels at different reproductive stages of a woman's life, except during lactation. This evidence indicates that HOXA5 may play a role in maintaining the differentiated state within the breast epithelium. However, nearly 70% of all breast carcinomas had decreased HOXA5 protein levels as compared to normal breast tissues. In addition, we demonstrate that HOXA5 protein expression levels in breast carcinomas inversely co-relates with Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR expression. Furthermore, we found that the survival rate amongst the different low levels of HOXA5 expressing breast tumors was not significant, indicative of an early tumorigenesis process in the absence of innate levels of HOXA5 in normal breast cells.

  4. GT198 Expression Defines Mutant Tumor Stroma in Human Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zheqiong; Peng, Min; Cheng, Liang; Jones, Kimya; Maihle, Nita J; Mivechi, Nahid F; Ko, Lan

    2016-05-01

    Human breast cancer precursor cells remain to be elucidated. Using breast cancer gene product GT198 (PSMC3IP; alias TBPIP or Hop2) as a unique marker, we revealed the cellular identities of GT198 mutant cells in human breast tumor stroma. GT198 is a steroid hormone receptor coactivator and a crucial factor in DNA repair. Germline mutations in GT198 are present in breast and ovarian cancer families. Somatic mutations in GT198 are present in ovarian tumor stromal cells. Herein, we show that human breast tumor stromal cells carry GT198 somatic mutations and express cytoplasmic GT198 protein. GT198(+) stromal cells share vascular smooth muscle cell origin, including myoepithelial cells, adipocytes, capillary pericytes, and stromal fibroblasts. Frequent GT198 mutations are associated with GT198(+) tumor stroma but not with GT198(-) tumor cells. GT198(+) progenitor cells are mostly capillary pericytes. When tested in cultured cells, mutant GT198 induces vascular endothelial growth factor promoter, and potentially promotes angiogenesis and adipogenesis. Our results suggest that multiple lineages of breast tumor stromal cells are mutated in GT198. These findings imply the presence of mutant progenitors, whereas their descendants, carrying the same GT198 mutations, are collectively responsible for forming breast tumor microenvironment. GT198 expression is, therefore, a specific marker of mutant breast tumor stroma and has the potential to facilitate diagnosis and targeted treatment of human breast cancer. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Augmented reality for breast tumors visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaderi, Mohammad Ali; Heydarzadeh, Mehrdad; Nourani, Mehrdad; Gupta, Gopal; Tamil, Lakshman

    2016-08-01

    3D visualization of breast tumors are shown to be effective by previous studies. In this paper, we introduce a new augmented reality application that can help doctors and surgeons to have a more accurate visualization of breast tumors; this system uses a marker-based image-processing technique to render a 3D model of the tumors on the body. The model can be created using a combination of breast 3D mammography by experts. We have tested the system using an Android smartphone and a head-mounted device. This proof of concept can be useful for oncologists to have a more effective screening, and surgeons to plan the surgery.

  6. Ultrasonographic features of spontaneous breast tumor infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyeon Jeong; Kim, Sung Hun; Kang, Bong Joo; Lee, A Won; Song, Byung Joo; Kim, Hyen Sook; Cha, Eun Suk

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate the ultrasonographic features of spontaneous breast tumor infarction. The pathologic information system database of the Department of Radiology was retrospectively searched. Between 2009 and 2011, nine cases in eight patients were pathologically confirmed as spontaneous breast tumor infarctions. Mammographic images and the ultrasonographic images were acquired. Two other radiologists analyzed the mammographic and ultrasonographic findings. Most common features were oval, indistinct, heterogeneously hypoechoic mass with posterior enhancement. All lesions were classified as C4 (suspicious finding) except one case. Spontaneous breast tumor infarction should be included in the differential diagnoses of hetereogeneously hypoechoic suspicious solid lesions mimicking malignancy.

  7. IN VITRO EFFECTS OF CHEMICAL AGENTS ON BREAST TUMOR CELLS UNDER 24-HOUR INCUBATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Navruzov

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of cytostatics is frequently limited due to their high toxicity and inadequate selectivity. This makes one search for adjuvant treat- ments to limit tumor growth and extent, to eliminate traditional chemotherapy sequels, and to ensure stable and prolonged remission. This investigation has revealed the specific features of using natural and recombinant cytokines in combination with chemical agents in therapy for malignancies. The findings open up new vistas for the treatment of malignancies with natural cytokines.

  8. Tumor-Homing Cell-Penetrating Peptide Linked to Colloidal Mesoporous Silica Encapsulated (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate as Drug Delivery System for Breast Cancer Therapy in Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jie; Yao, Jing; Xue, Jingjing; Li, Rong; Bao, Bo; Jiang, Liping; Zhu, Jun-jie; He, Zhiwei

    2015-08-19

    Chemotherapy is the use of chemical drugs to prevent cancer cell proliferation, invasion, and metastasis, but a serious obstacle is that chemotherapeutics strikes not only on cancerous cells, but also on normal cells. Thus, anticancer drugs without side effects should be developed and extracted. (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a major ingredient of green tea, possesses excellent medicinal values, such as anticancer effects, DNA-protective effects, etc. However, EGCG will be mostly metabolized if it is directly orally ingested. Here, we report a drug delivery system (DDS) for loading EGCG to enhance its stability, promising target and anticancer effects in vitro and in vivo. The designed DDS is composed of three main moieties: anticancer drug, EGCG; drug vector, colloidal mesoporous silica (CMS); target ligand, breast tumor-homing cell-penetrating peptide (PEGA-pVEC peptide). Based on the results of CCK-8 assay, confocal imaging, cell cycle analysis, and Western blot, the anticancer effect of EGCG was increased by loading of EGCG into CMS and CMS@peptide. In vivo treatment displayed that CMS had a not obvious influence on breast tumor bearing mice, but CMS@peptide@EGCG showed the greatest tumor inhibition rate, with about 89.66%. H&E staining of organs showed no tissue injury in all experimental groups. All the above results prove that EGCG is an excellent anticancer drug without side effects and CMS@peptide could greatly promote the efficacy of EGCG on breast tumors by targeted accumulation and release, which provide much evidence for the CMS@peptide as a promising and targeting vector for DDS.

  9. Bisphenol A activates EGFR and ERK promoting proliferation, tumor spheroid formation and resistance to EGFR pathway inhibition in estrogen receptor-negative inflammatory breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Scott J; Tarpley, Michael; Shah, Imran; Save, Akshay V; Lyerly, H Kim; Patierno, Steven R; Williams, Kevin P; Devi, Gayathri R

    2017-03-01

    Emerging evidence from epidemiological studies suggests a link between environmental chemical exposure and progression of aggressive breast cancer subtypes. Of all clinically distinct types of breast cancers, the most lethal phenotypic variant is inflammatory breast cancer (IBC). Overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR/HER2) along with estrogen receptor (ER) negativity is common in IBC tumor cells, which instead of a solid mass present as rapidly proliferating diffuse tumor cell clusters. Our previous studies have demonstrated a role of an adaptive response of increased antioxidants in acquired resistance to EGFR-targeting drugs in IBC. Environmental chemicals are known to induce oxidative stress resulting in perturbations in signal transduction pathways. It is therefore of interest to identify chemicals that can potentiate EGFR mitogenic effects in IBC. Herein, we assessed in ER-negative IBC cells a subset of chemicals from the EPA ToxCast set for their effect on EGFR activation and in multiple cancer phenotypic assays. We demonstrated that endocrine-disrupting chemicals such as bisphenol A (BPA) and 2,2-bis(p-hydroxyphenyl)-1,1,1-trichloroethane can increase EGFR/ERK signaling. BPA also caused a corresponding increase in expression of SOD1 and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2, key markers of antioxidant and anti-apoptotic processes. BPA potentiated clonogenic growth and tumor spheroid formation in vitro, reflecting IBC-specific pathological characteristics. Furthermore, we identified that BPA was able to attenuate the inhibitory effect of an EGFR targeted drug in a longer-term anchorage-independent growth assay. These findings provide a potential mechanistic basis for environmental chemicals such as BPA in potentiating a hyperproliferative and death-resistant phenotype in cancer cells by activating mitogenic pathways to which the tumor cells are addicted for survival. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For

  10. Anti-tumor effects of retinoids combined with trastuzumab or tamoxifen in breast cancer cells: induction of apoptosis by retinoid/trastuzumab combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koay, Debbie C; Zerillo, Cynthia; Narayan, Murli; Harris, Lyndsay N; DiGiovanna, Michael P

    2010-01-01

    HER2 and estrogen receptor (ER) are important in breast cancer and are therapeutic targets of trastuzumab (Herceptin) and tamoxifen, respectively. Retinoids inhibit breast cancer growth, and modulate signaling by HER2 and ER. We hypothesized that treatment with retinoids and simultaneous targeting of HER2 and/or ER may have enhanced anti-tumor effects. The effects of retinoids combined with trastuzumab or tamoxifen were examined in two human breast cancer cell lines in culture, BT474 and SKBR3. Assays of proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, cell cycle distribution, and receptor signaling were performed. In HER2-overexpressing/ER-positive BT474 cells, combining all-trans retinoic acid (atRA) with tamoxifen or trastuzumab synergistically inhibited cell growth, and altered cell differentiation and cell cycle. Only atRA/trastuzumab-containing combinations induced apoptosis. BT474 and HER2-overexpressing/ER-negative SKBR3 cells were treated with a panel of retinoids (atRA, 9-cis-retinoic acid, 13-cis-retinoic acid, or N-(4-hydroxyphenyl) retinamide (fenretinide) (4-HPR)) combined with trastuzumab. In BT474 cells, none of the single agents except 4-HPR induced apoptosis, but again combinations of each retinoid with trastuzumab did induce apoptosis. In contrast, the single retinoid agents did cause apoptosis in SKBR3 cells; this was only modestly enhanced by addition of trastuzumab. The retinoid drug combinations altered signaling by HER2 and ER. Retinoids were inactive in trastuzumab-resistant BT474 cells. Combining retinoids with trastuzumab maximally inhibits cell growth and induces apoptosis in trastuzumab-sensitive cells. Treatment with such combinations may have benefit for breast cancer patients.

  11. Comparison of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes between primary and metastatic tumors in breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogiya, Rin; Niikura, Naoki; Kumaki, Nobue; Bianchini, Giampaolo; Kitano, Shigehisa; Iwamoto, Takayuki; Hayashi, Naoki; Yokoyama, Kozue; Oshitanai, Risa; Terao, Mayako; Morioka, Toru; Tsuda, Banri; Okamura, Takuho; Saito, Yuki; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Tokuda, Yutaka

    2016-12-01

    The presence of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) is associated with favorable long-term outcome in breast cancer. However, little is known about changes in TILs during metastatic progression. To confirm our hypothesis that malignant tumors escape from the host immune system during metastasis, we evaluated the percentage of TILs in paired samples of primary and metastatic breast tumors. We retrospectively identified 25 patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2 + , n = 14) and triple negative (TN, n = 11) early breast cancer diagnosed between 1990 and 2009 at Tokai University Hospital (Isehara, Japan) and who subsequently experienced regional or distant recurrence confirmed by tumor biopsy/resection. Hematoxylin-eosin-stained slides of these paired samples were evaluated for stromal TILs. Immunohistochemical staining was carried out using primary antibodies against CD4, CD8, Foxp3, programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1), PD-L2, and HLA class I for characterizing the TILs and breast tumors. The percentage of TILs in the primary tumors was significantly higher (average 34.6%) than that in metastatic tumors (average 15.7%) (paired t-test, P = 0.004) and that of CD8 + and CD4 + T cells significantly decreased from primary to metastatic tumors (paired t-test, P = 0.008 and P = 0.026, respectively). The PD-L1, PD-L2, and HLA class I antibody expression changed from positive to negative and vice versa from the primary to the metastatic tumors. Tumors at first metastatic recurrence in HER2 + and TN breast cancers have a lower percentage of TILs and CD8 + and CD4 + T cells compared to primary tumors, which indicates that immune escape plays a role in tumor progression. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  12. Pregnancy stimulates tumor angiogenesis in breast carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genin, Anne-Sophie; Antoine, Martine; Aractingi, Selim; Rouzier, Roman

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms responsible for the poor prognosis of pregnancy-associated breast cancer (PABC) remain not well-understood. We studied angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis as they are known prognostic factors in breast cancer. We conducted a case control study of breast cancer comparing women with and without PABC matched for age and histological parameters. Surgical specimen sections were immunostained with anti-CD31 for angiogenesis and anti-D2-40 for lymphangiogenesis, then analyzed using vessel density, ratio of the vascular area and the Chalkley count. Seventeen patients with PABC and 22 controls were included. Angiogenesis was significantly increased in tumor tissues, and tended to be higher in healthy breast tissues from the PABC group compared to controls. In contrast, no difference between the two groups was found concerning lymphangiogenesis both in tumor and healthy breast tissues. Pregnancy enhances angiogenesis in breast cancer. This phenomenon appears to explain the poor prognosis of PABC.

  13. Homeostatic T Cell Expansion to Induce Anti-Tumor Antoimmunity in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-04-01

    in aged mice was due to defects in the responding T cells or to age- related changes in the environment that supports such responses, additional groups...antigens are either lineage-specific membrane proteins also expressed by normal melanocytes, or differentiation proteins expressed by melanoma cells... Melan A27-35 elicits anti-melanoma CD8÷ T cells with enhanced functional characteristics: implication for more effective immunotherapy. Cancer Res 59:301

  14. Simultaneous Vascular Targeting and Tumor Targeting of Cerebral Breast Cancer Metastases Using a T-Cell Receptor Mimic Antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    in May 2013, the difference between nude mice (which lack T- cells , but still have a partially functional adaptive and innate immune system) and NSG...Mangada J, Greiner DL, Handgretinger R. Human lymphoid and myeloid cell development in NOD/LtSz-scid IL2R gamma null mice engrafted with mobilized human...Targeting of Cerebral Breast Cancer Metastases Using a T- Cell Receptor Mimic Antibody PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Ulrich Bickel

  15. Tumor-associated macrophages: unwitting accomplices in breast cancer malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Carly Bess; Yeh, Elizabeth S; Soloff, Adam C

    Deleterious inflammation is a primary feature of breast cancer. Accumulating evidence demonstrates that macrophages, the most abundant leukocyte population in mammary tumors, have a critical role at each stage of cancer progression. Such tumor-associated macrophages facilitate neoplastic transformation, tumor immune evasion and the subsequent metastatic cascade. Herein, we discuss the dynamic process whereby molecular and cellular features of the tumor microenvironment act to license tissue-repair mechanisms of macrophages, fostering angiogenesis, metastasis and the support of cancer stem cells. We illustrate how tumors induce, then exploit trophic macrophages to subvert innate and adaptive immune responses capable of destroying malignant cells. Finally, we discuss compelling evidence from murine models of cancer and early clinical trials in support of macrophage-targeted intervention strategies with the potential to dramatically reduce breast cancer morbidity and mortality.

  16. Phyllodes Tumor of the Breast Metastasizing to the Vulva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olusegun Kayode Ajenifuja

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Phyllodes tumors of the breast are rare breast tumors that resemble fibroadenoma. They are composed of two types of tissues: stromal and glandular tissues. Unlike fibroadenoma, they are commonly found in the third decade of life and they tend to grow more rapidly. Depending on the relative components of the cells and mitotic activity, they are classified into benign, borderline, and malignant. They are usually present as a lump in the breast. Phyllodes tumors are usually managed by wide excision. The excision should be wide enough to ensure a tumor-free margin. Recurrence rate is very high and most recurrences are usually local. Metastasis to the vulva has not been reported.

  17. A giant phyllodes tumor of the breast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Schillebeeckx

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Phyllodes tumors of the breast are rare, accounting for less than 1% of the breast tumors. They are mostly seen in women between 45 and 49 years old. These are fast growing tumors with a large spectrum of behavior (from benign to metastatic and can resemble fibroadenomas. Correct diagnosis mostly through core needle biopsy is important to decide whether a surgical excision has to be done. Here we report a case of a 57-year-old woman with a fast growing, ulcerated tumor in the left breast. Core needle biopsy suggested a malignant phyllodes tumor with heterologous liposarcomatous differentiation. Treatment with total mastectomy and adjuvant radiotherapy followed. Primary treatment is always surgery, whether radiotherapy or chemotherapy has to follow remains uncertain. There is a high-recurrence rate, especially when the surgical margins are narrow.

  18. Granular Cell Tumor

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ultrastructure and immunochemical staining. 4 strongly suggest Schwann cell derivation . hyperplasia at the edges of the tumor. Necrosis within the tumor was absent, no mitosis was. Granular cell tumors are seldom diagnosed identified in the section and the edges of the accurately clinically. The lesion in this case was.

  19. Molecular characterization of circulating tumor cells from patients with metastatic breast cancer reflects evolutionary changes in gene expression under the pressure of systemic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, Kristina E.; Novosadová, Vendula; Bendahl, Pär-Ola; Graffman, Cecilia; Larsson, Anna-Maria; Rydén, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    Resistance to systemic therapy is a major problem in metastatic breast cancer (MBC) that can be explained by initial tumor heterogeneity as well as by evolutionary changes during therapy and tumor progression. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) detected in a liquid biopsy can be sampled and characterized repeatedly during therapy in order to monitor treatment response and disease progression. Our aim was to investigate how CTC derived gene expression of treatment predictive markers (ESR1/HER2) and other cancer associated markers changed in patient blood samples during six months of first-line systemic treatment for MBC. CTCs from 36 patients were enriched using CellSearch (Janssen Diagnostics) and AdnaTest (QIAGEN) before gene expression analysis was performed with a customized gene panel (TATAA Biocenter). Our results show that antibodies against HER2 and EGFR were valuable to isolate CTCs unidentified by CellSearch and possibly lacking EpCAM expression. Evaluation of patients with clinically different breast cancer subgroups demonstrated that gene expression of treatment predictive markers changed over time. This change was especially prominent for HER2 expression. In conclusion, we found that changed gene expression during first-line systemic therapy for MBC could be a possible explanation for treatment resistance. Characterization of CTCs at several time-points during therapy could be informative for treatment selection. PMID:28489591

  20. HET is a Novel Tumor Suppressor Gene in Human Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Oesterreich, Steffi

    1999-01-01

    .... In the first specific aim we will directly answer whether HET is the tumor suppressor gene by performing additional LOB analysis and mutational analysis of BET in breast cancer cell lines as well as in tumors...

  1. Metaphyseal giant cell tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, L.F.; Hemais, P.M.P.G.; Aymore, I.L.; Carmo, M.C.R. do; Cunha, M.E.P.R. da; Resende, C.M.C.

    Three cases of metaphyseal giant cell tumor are presented. A review of the literature is done, demostrating the lesion is rare and that there are few articles about it. Age incidence and characteristics of the tumor are discussed.

  2. High expression of miR-21 in tumor stroma correlates with increased cancer cell proliferation in human breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rask, Lene; Balslev, Eva; Jørgensen, Stine

    2011-01-01

    features, we performed in situ hybridization and semi-quantitative assessment of the miR-21 signal on 12 LN negative grade I (assumed low risk), and 12 LN positive grade II (high risk) breast cancers. miR-21 was predominantly seen in cancer associated fibroblast-like cells, with no difference in expression......Low-risk and high-risk breast cancer patients are stratified primarily according to their lymph node (LN) status and grading. However, some low-risk patients relapse, and some high-risk patients have a favorable clinical outcome, implying a need for better prognostic and predictive tests. Micro...... RNAs are often aberrantly expressed in cancer and microRNA-21 is upregulated in a variety of cancers, including breast cancer. High miR-21 levels have been associated with poor prognosis. To determine the cellular localization of miR-21 and to compare its expression levels with histopathological...

  3. Mammographic evidence of microenvironment changes in tumorous breasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Zach; Batchelder, Kendra A; Toner, Brian C; Guimond, Lyne; Gerasimova-Chechkina, Evgeniya; Harrow, Amy R; Arneodo, Alain; Khalil, Andre

    2017-04-01

    The microenvironment of breast tumors plays a critical role in tumorigenesis. As long as the structural integrity of the microenvironment is upheld, the tumor is suppressed. If tissue structure is lost through disruptions in the normal cell cycle, the microenvironment may act as a tumor promoter. Therefore, the properties that distinguish between healthy and tumorous tissues may not be solely in the tumor characteristics but rather in surrounding non-tumor tissue. The goal of this paper was to show preliminary evidence that tissue disruption and loss of homeostasis in breast tissue microenvironment and breast bilateral asymmetry can be quantitatively and objectively assessed from mammography via a localized, wavelet-based analysis of the whole breast. A wavelet-based multifractal formalism called the 2D Wavelet Transform Modulus Maxima (WTMM) method was used to quantitate density fluctuations from mammographic breast tissue via the Hurst exponent (H). Each entire mammogram was cut in hundreds of 360 × 360 pixel subregions in a gridding scheme of overlapping sliding windows, with each window boundary separated by 32 pixels. The 2D WTMM method was applied to each subregion individually. A data mining approach was set up to determine which metrics best discriminated between normal vs. cancer cases. These same metrics were then used, without modification, to discriminate between normal vs. benign and benign vs. cancer cases. The density fluctuations in healthy mammographic breast tissue are either monofractal anti-correlated (H 1/2) for dense tissue. However, tissue regions with H~1/2, as well as left vs. right breast asymetries, were found preferably in tumorous (benign or cancer) breasts vs. normal breasts, as quantified via a combination metric yielding a P-value ~ 0.0006. No metric considered showed significant differences between cancer vs. benign breasts. Since mammographic tissue regions associated with uncorrelated (H~1/2) density fluctuations were

  4. Human neutrophils facilitate tumor cell transendothelial migration.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wu, Q D

    2012-02-03

    Tumor cell extravasation plays a key role in tumor metastasis. However, the precise mechanisms by which tumor cells migrate through normal vascular endothelium remain unclear. In this study, using an in vitro transendothelial migration model, we show that human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) assist the human breast tumor cell line MDA-MB-231 to cross the endothelial barrier. We found that tumor-conditioned medium (TCM) downregulated PMN cytocidal function, delayed PMN apoptosis, and concomitantly upregulated PMN adhesion molecule expression. These PMN treated with TCM attached to tumor cells and facilitated tumor cell migration through different endothelial monolayers. In contrast, MDA-MB-231 cells alone did not transmigrate. FACScan analysis revealed that these tumor cells expressed high levels of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) but did not express CD11a, CD11b, or CD18. Blockage of CD11b and CD18 on PMN and of ICAM-1 on MDA-MB-231 cells significantly attenuated TCM-treated, PMN-mediated tumor cell migration. These tumor cells still possessed the ability to proliferate after PMN-assisted transmigration. These results indicate that TCM-treated PMN may serve as a carrier to assist tumor cell transendothelial migration and suggest that tumor cells can exploit PMN and alter their function to facilitate their extravasation.

  5. Human neutrophils facilitate tumor cell transendothelial migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Q D; Wang, J H; Condron, C; Bouchier-Hayes, D; Redmond, H P

    2001-04-01

    Tumor cell extravasation plays a key role in tumor metastasis. However, the precise mechanisms by which tumor cells migrate through normal vascular endothelium remain unclear. In this study, using an in vitro transendothelial migration model, we show that human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) assist the human breast tumor cell line MDA-MB-231 to cross the endothelial barrier. We found that tumor-conditioned medium (TCM) downregulated PMN cytocidal function, delayed PMN apoptosis, and concomitantly upregulated PMN adhesion molecule expression. These PMN treated with TCM attached to tumor cells and facilitated tumor cell migration through different endothelial monolayers. In contrast, MDA-MB-231 cells alone did not transmigrate. FACScan analysis revealed that these tumor cells expressed high levels of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) but did not express CD11a, CD11b, or CD18. Blockage of CD11b and CD18 on PMN and of ICAM-1 on MDA-MB-231 cells significantly attenuated TCM-treated, PMN-mediated tumor cell migration. These tumor cells still possessed the ability to proliferate after PMN-assisted transmigration. These results indicate that TCM-treated PMN may serve as a carrier to assist tumor cell transendothelial migration and suggest that tumor cells can exploit PMN and alter their function to facilitate their extravasation.

  6. IL-15 induces strong but short-lived tumor-infiltrating CD8 T cell responses through the regulation of Tim-3 in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heon, Elise K. [University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Wulan, Hasi [Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, PLA General Hospital, Beijing, 100853 (China); Macdonald, Loch P.; Malek, Adel O.; Braunstein, Glenn H.; Eaves, Connie G.; Schattner, Mark D. [Brown University, Providence, RI 02912 (United States); Allen, Peter M.; Alexander, Michael O.; Hawkins, Cynthia A.; McGovern, Dermot W.; Freeman, Richard L. [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Amir, Eitan P.; Huse, Jason D. [University of Illinois, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); Zaltzman, Jeffrey S.; Kauff, Noah P.; Meyers, Paul G. [University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Gleason, Michelle H., E-mail: GleasonM@cblabs.org [University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Overholtzer, Michael G., E-mail: OverholtzerM@cblabs.org [University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Wiseman, Sam S. [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); and others

    2015-08-14

    IL-15 has pivotal roles in the control of CD8{sup +} memory T cells and has been investigated as a therapeutic option in cancer therapy. Although IL-15 and IL-2 share many functions together, including the stimulation of CD8 T cell proliferation and IFN-γ production, the different in vivo roles of IL-15 and IL-2 have been increasingly recognized. Here, we explored the different effects of IL-15 and IL-2 on tumor-infiltrating (TI) T cells from resected breast tumors. We found that neither IL-2 nor IL-15 induced intratumoral CD8 T cell proliferation by itself, but after CD3/CD28-stimulation, IL-15 induced significantly higher proliferation than IL-2 during early time points, at day 2, day 3 and day 6. However, the IL-15-induced proliferation leveled off at day 9 and day 12, whereas IL-2 induced lower but progressive proliferation at each time point. Furthermore, IL-15 caused an early and robust increase of IFN-γ in the supernatant of TI cell cultures, which diminished at later time points, while the IL-2-induced IFN-γ production remained constant over time. In addition, the IL-15-costimulated CD8 T cells presented higher frequencies of apoptotic cells. The diminishing IL-15-induced response was possibly due to regulatory and/or exhaustion mechanisms. We did not observe increased IL-10 or PD-1 upregulation, but we have found an increase of Tim-3 upregulation on IL-15-, but not IL-2-stimulated cells. Blocking Tim-3 function using anti-Tim-3 antibodies resulted in increased IL-15-induced proliferation and IFN-γ production for a prolonged period of time, whereas adding Tim-3 ligand galectin 9 led to reduced proliferation and IFN-γ production. Our results suggest that IL-15 in combination of Tim-3 blocking antibodies could potentially act as an IL-2 alternative in tumor CD8 T cell expansion in vitro, a crucial step in adoptive T cell therapy. - Highlights: • We explored the effects of IL-15 and IL-2 on tumor-infiltrating (TI) T cells of breast cancer. • IL-15

  7. Robust and validated models to predict high risk of non-sentinel node metastases in breast cancer patients with micrometastases or isolated tumor cells in the sentinel node

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedskov, Tove F; Jensen, Maj-Britt; Balslev, Eva

    2014-01-01

    micrometastases or isolated tumor cells are found in sentinel node. The aim of this study was to validate these models in an independent Danish dataset. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We included 720 breast cancer patients with micrometastases and 180 with isolated tumor cells in sentinel node operated in 2009-2010 from...... in the original cohort: 0.63 and 0.64, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity for predicting risk of non-sentinel node metastases over 30% was 0.36 and 0.81, respectively, in the validation cohort. AUC for the model for patients with isolated tumor cells decreased from 0.73 in the original cohort to 0.......60 in the validation cohort. When dividing patients with isolated tumor cells into high and low risk of non-sentinel node metastases according to number of risk factors present, 37% in the high-risk group had non-sentinel node metastases. Specificity and sensitivity was 0.48 and 0.88, respectively, in the validation...

  8. Bilateral malignant phyllodes tumor of the breast | Odik | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Phyllodes tumor is one of the breast-specific biphasic tumors, arising from the intra-lobular breast stroma. It constitutes less than 1%of all breast tumors. Bilateralmalignant phyllodes tumor is uncommon.We report a case of 32-year oldmultiparouswoman who died of multi-organ metastatic disease. The diagnosis was based ...

  9. Development and Characterization of a Humanized Anti-HER2 Antibody HuA21 with Potent Anti-Tumor Properties in Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruilin Li

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 is one of the most studied tumor-associated antigens for cancer immunotherapy. An engineered anti-HER-2 chimeric A21 antibody (chA21 is a chimeric antibody targeted to subdomain I of the HER2 extracellular domain. Here, we report the anti-tumor activity of the novel engineered monoclonal antibody humanized chA21 (HuA21 that targets HER2 on the basis of chA21, and we describe the underlying mechanisms. Our results reveal that HuA21 markedly inhibits the proliferation and migration of HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cells and causes enhanced antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity potency against HER2-overexpressing tumor cells. In particular, HuA21, but not trastuzumab (Tra, markedly suppresses growth and enhances the internalization of the antibody in Tra-resistant BT-474 breast cancer cells. These characteristics are highly associated with the intrinsic ability of HuA21 to down-regulate HER2 activation and inhibit the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2 and protein kinase B (Akt signaling pathways. Furthermore, the combination of HuA21 with Tra synergistically enhances the anti-tumor effects in vitro and in vivo and inhibits HER2 activation and the ERK1/2 and Akt signaling pathways. Altogether, our results suggest that HuA21 may represent a unique anti-HER2 antibody with potential as a therapeutic candidate alone or in combination with other anti-HER2 reagents in cancer therapy.

  10. Cross-validation of three predictive tools for non-sentinel node metastases in breast cancer patients with micrometastases or isolated tumor cells in the sentinel node

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedskov, T F; Meretoja, T J; Jensen, M B

    2014-01-01

    metastases while less than 1% was identified by the Finish model. In contrast, the Finish model predicted a much larger proportion of patients being in the low-risk group with less than 10% risk of non-sentinel node metastases. CONCLUSION: The Danish model for micrometastases worked well in predicting high......BACKGROUND: We cross-validated three existing models for the prediction of non-sentinel node metastases in patients with micrometastases or isolated tumor cells (ITC) in the sentinel node, developed in Danish and Finnish cohorts of breast cancer patients, to find the best model to identify patients...... who might benefit from further axillary treatment. MATERIAL AND METHOD: Based on 484 Finnish breast cancer patients with micrometastases or ITC in sentinel node a model has been developed for the prediction of non-sentinel node metastases. Likewise, two separate models have been developed in 1577...

  11. Hwanggeumchal sorghum Induces Cell Cycle Arrest, and Suppresses Tumor Growth and Metastasis through Jak2/STAT Pathways in Breast Cancer Xenografts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Eun Joung; Joung, Youn Hee; Hong, Dae Young; Park, Eui U.; Park, Seung Hwa; Choi, Soo Keun; Moon, Eon-Soo; Cho, Byung Wook; Park, Kyung Do; Lee, Hak Kyo; Kim, Myong-Jo; Park, Dong-Sik; Yang, Young Mok

    2012-01-01

    Background Cancer is one of the highly virulent diseases known to humankind with a high mortality rate. Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. Sorghum is a principal cereal food in many parts of the world, and is critical in folk medicine of Asia and Africa. In the present study, we analyzed the effects of HSE in metastatic breast cancer. Methodology/Principal Findings Preliminary studies conducted on MDA-MB 231 and MCF-7 xenograft models showed tumor growth suppression by HSE. Western blotting studies conducted both in vivo and in vitro to check the effect of HSE in Jak/STAT pathways. Anti-metastatic effects of HSE were confirmed using both MDA-MB 231 and MCF-7 metastatic animal models. These studies showed that HSE can modulate Jak/STAT pathways, and it hindered the STAT5b/IGF-1R and STAT3/VEGF pathways not only by down-regulating the expression of these signal molecules and but also by preventing their phosphorylation. The expression of angiogenic factors like VEGF, VEGF-R2 and cell cycle regulators like cyclin D, cyclin E, and pRb were found down-regulated by HSE. In addition, it also targets Brk, p53, and HIF-1α for anti-cancer effects. HSE induced G1 phase arrest and migration inhibition in MDA-MB 231 cells. The metastasis of breast cancer to the lungs also found blocked by HSE in the metastatic animal model. Conclusions/Significance Usage of HS as a dietary supplement is an inexpensive natural cancer therapy, without any side effects. We strongly recommend the use of HS as an edible therapeutic agent as it possesses tumor suppression, migration inhibition, and anti-metastatic effects on breast cancer. PMID:22792362

  12. Hwanggeumchal sorghum induces cell cycle arrest, and suppresses tumor growth and metastasis through Jak2/STAT pathways in breast cancer xenografts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Hee Park

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cancer is one of the highly virulent diseases known to humankind with a high mortality rate. Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. Sorghum is a principal cereal food in many parts of the world, and is critical in folk medicine of Asia and Africa. In the present study, we analyzed the effects of HSE in metastatic breast cancer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Preliminary studies conducted on MDA-MB 231 and MCF-7 xenograft models showed tumor growth suppression by HSE. Western blotting studies conducted both in vivo and in vitro to check the effect of HSE in Jak/STAT pathways. Anti-metastatic effects of HSE were confirmed using both MDA-MB 231 and MCF-7 metastatic animal models. These studies showed that HSE can modulate Jak/STAT pathways, and it hindered the STAT5b/IGF-1R and STAT3/VEGF pathways not only by down-regulating the expression of these signal molecules and but also by preventing their phosphorylation. The expression of angiogenic factors like VEGF, VEGF-R2 and cell cycle regulators like cyclin D, cyclin E, and pRb were found down-regulated by HSE. In addition, it also targets Brk, p53, and HIF-1α for anti-cancer effects. HSE induced G1 phase arrest and migration inhibition in MDA-MB 231 cells. The metastasis of breast cancer to the lungs also found blocked by HSE in the metastatic animal model. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Usage of HS as a dietary supplement is an inexpensive natural cancer therapy, without any side effects. We strongly recommend the use of HS as an edible therapeutic agent as it possesses tumor suppression, migration inhibition, and anti-metastatic effects on breast cancer.

  13. Detection of circulating tumor cells in blood of metastatic breast cancer patients using a combination of cytokeratin and EpCAM antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weissenstein Ulrike

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Circulating tumor cells (CTCs are detectable in peripheral blood of metastatic breast cancer patients (MBC. In this paper we evaluate a new CTC separation method based on a combination of anti-EpCAM- and anti-cytokeratin magnetic cell separation with the aim to improve CTC detection with low target antigen densities. Methods Blood samples of healthy donors spiked with breast cancer cell line HCC1937 were used to determine accuracy and precision of the method. 10 healthy subjects were examined to evaluate specificity. CTC counts in 59 patients with MBC were measured to evaluate the prognostic value on overall survival. Results Regression analysis of numbers of recovered vs. spiked HCC1937 cells yielded a coefficient of determination of R2 = 0.957. The average percentage of cell recovery was 84%. The average within-run coefficient of variation for spiking of 185, 85 and 30 cells was 14%. For spiking of 10 cells the within-run CV was 30%. No CTCs were detected in blood of 10 healthy subjects examined. A standard threshold of 5 CTC/7.5 ml blood as a cut-off point between risk groups led to a highly significant prognostic marker (p  Conclusions We show that our CTC detection method is feasible and leads to accurate and reliable results. Our data suggest that a refined differentiation between patients with different CTC levels is reasonable.

  14. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the breast: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Somak

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor is a rare soft tissue sarcoma of ectomesenchymal origin. It is the malignant counterpart of benign soft tissue tumors like neurofibromas and schwannomas and may often follow them. Common sites include deeper soft tissues, usually in the proximity of a nerve trunk. Breast is an extremely rare location of this lesion and presentation as a breast lump in the absence of pain or previous benign neural tumor is even rarer. Case presentation A 38-year-old female presented with complaints of painless, hard breast lump for three months which was clinically suspected to be a ductal carcinoma with inconclusive fine needle aspiration cytology. Histopathology revealed a malignant spindle cell tumor which was confirmed to be malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor on the basis of immunopositivity for vimentin, neurone specific enolase and S-100. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge only six such case reports have been published in literature. The differential diagnosis of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor should be considered by the clinician as well as the pathologists in the work-up of a breast neoplasm as treatment and prognosis of this rare malignancy is different.

  15. Epidermal Growth Factor and Estrogen Act by Independent Pathways to Additively Promote the Release of the Angiogenic Chemokine CXCL8 by Breast Tumor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Haim

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The tumor microenvironment contains multiple cancer-supporting factors, whose joint activities promote malignancy. Here, we show that epidermal growth factor (EGF and estrogen upregulate in an additive manner the transcription and the secretion of the angiogenic chemokine CXCL8 (interleukin 8 [IL-8] in breast tumor cells. In view of published findings on cross-regulatory interactions between EGF receptors and estrogen receptors in breast tumor cells, we asked whether the additive effects of EGF and estrogen were due to their ability to (1 induce intracellular cross talk and amplify shared regulatory pathways or (2 act in independent mechanisms, which complement each other. We found that stimulation by EGF alone induced the release of CXCL8 through signaling pathways involving ErbB2, ErbB1, Erk, and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K. ErbB2 and Erk were also involved in estrogen activities on CXCL8 but to a lower extent than with EGF. However, in the joint stimulatory setup, the addition of estrogen to EGF has led to partial (ErbB2, ErbB1, Erk or complete (PI3K shutoff of the involvement of these activation pathways in CXCL8 up-regulation. Furthermore, when costimulation by EGF + estrogen was applied, the effects of estrogen were channeled to regulation of CXCL8 at the transcription level, acting through the transcription factor estrogen receptor α (ERα. In parallel, in the joint stimulation, EGF acted independently at the transcription level through AP-1, to upregulate CXCL8 expression. The independent activities of EGF and estrogen on CXCL8 transcription reinforce the need to introduce simultaneous targeting of ErbBs and ERα to achieve effective therapy in breast cancer.

  16. Glutathione Transferase GSTπ In Breast Tumors Evaluated By Three Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Molina

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available The glutathione transferases are involved in intracellular detoxification reactions. One of these, GSTπ, is elevated in some breast cancer cells, particularly cells selected for resistance to anticancer agents. We evaluated GSTπ expression in 60 human breast tumors by three techniques, immunohistochemistry, Northern hybridization, and Western blot analysis. There was a significant positive correlation between the three methods, with complete concordance seen in 64% of the tumors. There was strong, inverse relationship between GSTπ expression and steroid receptor status with all of the techniques utili zed. [n addition, there was a trend toward higher GSTπ expression in poorly differentiated tumors, but no correlation was found between tumor GSTπ content and DNA ploidy or %S-phase. GSTπ expression was also detected in adjacent benign breast tissue as well as infiltrating lymphocytes; this expression may contribute to GSTπ measurements using either Northern hybridization or Western blot analysis. These re sults suggest that immunohistochemistry is the method of choice for measuring GSTπ in breast tumors.

  17. Breast Cancer Vaccines Based on Dendritic Cells and the Chemokines

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mule, James

    1998-01-01

    The major objective of this project is to establish a new modality for the treatment of breast cancer that employs the combination of chemokine gene-modified fibroblasts with breast tumor-pulsed dendritic cells (DC...

  18. Breast Cancer Vaccines Based on Dendritic Cells and the Chemokines

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mule, James

    1997-01-01

    The major objective of this project is to establish a new modality for the treatment of breast cancer that employs the combination of chemokine gene modified fibroblasts with breast tumor pulsed dendritic cells (DC...

  19. c-Jun N-terminal kinase 2 prevents luminal cell commitment in normal mammary glands and tumors by inhibiting p53/Notch1 and breast cancer gene 1 expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfefferle, Adam D.; Perou, Charles M.; Van Den Berg, Carla Lynn

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease with several subtypes carrying unique prognoses. Patients with differentiated luminal tumors experience better outcomes, while effective treatments are unavailable for poorly differentiated tumors, including the basal-like subtype. Mechanisms governing mammary tumor subtype generation could prove critical to developing better treatments. C-Jun N-terminal kinase 2 (JNK2) is important in mammary tumorigenesis and tumor progression. Using a variety of mouse models, human breast cancer cell lines and tumor expression data, studies herein support that JNK2 inhibits cell differentiation in normal and cancer-derived mammary cells. JNK2 prevents precocious pubertal mammary development and inhibits Notch-dependent expansion of luminal cell populations. Likewise, JNK2 suppresses luminal populations in a p53-competent Polyoma Middle T-antigen tumor model where jnk2 knockout causes p53-dependent upregulation of Notch1 transcription. In a p53 knockout model, JNK2 restricts luminal populations independently of Notch1, by suppressing Brca1 expression and promoting epithelial to mesenchymal transition. JNK2 also inhibits estrogen receptor (ER) expression and confers resistance to fulvestrant, an ER inhibitor, while stimulating tumor progression. These data suggest that therapies inhibiting JNK2 in breast cancer may promote tumor differentiation, improve endocrine therapy response, and inhibit metastasis. PMID:25970777

  20. Equol enhances tamoxifen’s anti-tumor activity by induction of caspase-mediated apoptosis in MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Soy phytoestrogens, such as daidzein and its metabolite equol, have been proposed to be responsible for the low breast cancer rate in Asian women. Since the majority of estrogen receptor positive breast cancer patients are treated with tamoxifen, the basic objective of this study is to determine whether equol enhances tamoxifen’s anti-tumor effect, and to identify the molecular mechanisms involved. Methods For this purpose, we examined the individual and combined effects of equol and tamoxifen on the estrogen-dependent MCF-7 breast cancer cells using viability assays, annexin-V/PI staining, cell cycle and western blot analysis. Results We found that equol (>50 μM) and 4-hydroxy-tamoxifen (4-OHT; >100 nM) significantly reduced the MCF-7 cell viability. Furthermore, the combination of equol (100 μM) and 4-OHT (10 μM) induced apoptosis more effectively than each compound alone. Subsequent treatment of MCF-7 cells with the pan-caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK inhibited equol- and 4-OHT-mediated apoptosis, which was accompanied by PARP and α-fodrin cleavage, indicating that apoptosis is mainly caspase-mediated. These compounds also induced a marked reduction in the bcl-2:bax ratio, which was accompanied by caspase-9 and caspase-7 activation and cytochrome-c release to the cytosol. Taken together, these data support the notion that the combination of equol and tamoxifen activates the intrinsic apoptotic pathway more efficiently than each compound alone. Conclusions Consequently, equol may be used therapeutically in combination treatments and clinical studies to enhance tamoxifen’s effect by providing additional protection against estrogen-responsive breast cancers. PMID:23675643

  1. Targeting Neuronal-like Metabolism of Metastatic Tumor Cells as a Novel Therapy for Breast Cancer Brain Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    to reconstruct the brain metastasis landscape in 3D, but also provides new, exceptionally accurate perspectives on phenotypic heterogeneity of... Heterogeneous Metastasis Landscapes ”. This award is acknowledged. 7. Participants & Other Collaborating Organizations…………… What individuals have worked...brain astrocytes, tumor cell, proliferating cell (Edu) and blood vessel. We have conducted 3D reconstruction of brain metastasis landscape . We will

  2. Dissecting Tumor-Stromal Interactions in Breast Cancer Bone Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yibin Kang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Bone metastasis is a frequent occurrence in breast cancer, affecting more than 70% of late stage cancer patients with severe complications such as fracture, bone pain, and hypercalcemia. The pathogenesis of osteolytic bone metastasis depends on cross-communications between tumor cells and various stromal cells residing in the bone microenvironment. Several growth factor signaling pathways, secreted micro RNAs (miRNAs and exosomes are functional mediators of tumor-stromal interactions in bone metastasis. We developed a functional genomic approach to systemically identified molecular pathways utilized by breast cancer cells to engage the bone stroma in order to generate osteolytic bone metastasis. We showed that elevated expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM1 in disseminated breast tumor cells mediates the recruitment of pre-osteoclasts and promotes their differentiation to mature osteoclasts during the bone metastasis formation. Transforming growth factor β (TGF-β is released from bone matrix upon bone destruction, and signals to breast cancer to further enhance their malignancy in developing bone metastasis. We furthered identified Jagged1 as a TGF-β target genes in tumor cells that engaged bone stromal cells through the activation of Notch signaling to provide a positive feedback to promote tumor growth and to activate osteoclast differentiation. Substantially change in miRNA expression was observed in osteoclasts during their differentiation and maturation, which can be exploited as circulating biomarkers of emerging bone metastasis and therapeutic targets for the treatment of bone metastasis. Further research in this direction may lead to improved diagnosis and treatment strategies for bone metastasis.

  3. A Cross-Sectional Comparison of Druggable Mutations in Primary Tumors, Metastatic Tissue, Circulating Tumor Cells, and Cell-Free Circulating DNA in Patients with Metastatic Breast Cancer: The MIRROR Study Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Rivera, Milagros; Picornell, Antoni C; Alvarez, Enrique L; Martin, Miguel

    2016-08-16

    Characterization of the driver mutations in an individual metastatic breast cancer (MBC) patient is critical to selecting effective targeted therapies. Currently, it is believed that the limited efficacy of many targeted drugs may be due to the expansion of drug resistant clones with different genotypes that were already present in the primary tumor. Identifying the genomic alterations of these clones, and introducing combined or sequential targeted drug regimens, could lead to a significant increase in the efficacy of currently available targeted therapies. The primary objective of this study is to assess the concordance/discordance of mutations between the primary tumor and metastatic tissue in MBC patients. Secondary objectives include comparing the genomic profiles of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and circulating free DNA (cfDNA) from peripheral blood with those of the primary tumor and metastatic tissue for each patient, evaluating these mutations in the signaling pathways that are relevant to the disease, and testing the feasibility of introducing liquid biopsy as a translational laboratory tool in clinical practice. The multicenter, transversal, observational MIRROR study is currently ongoing in three participating hospitals. All consecutive patients with MBC confirmed by radiologic findings will be screened for eligibility, either at first relapse or if tumor regrowth occurs while on treatment for metastatic disease. Patient recruitment is currently ongoing. To date, 41 patients have a complete set of tissue samples available (plasma, CTCs, and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded primary tumor and metastatic tumor). However, none of these samples have undergone nucleic acids extraction or targeted deep sequencing. The results of this study may have a significant influence on the practical management of patients with MBC, and may provide clues to clinicians that lead towards a better stratification of patients, resulting in more selective and less toxic

  4. A cytotoxic Petiveria alliacea dry extract induces ATP depletion and decreases β-F1-ATPase expression in breast cancer cells and promotes survival in tumor-bearing mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F. Hernández

    Full Text Available Abstract Metabolic plasticity in cancer cells assures cell survival and cell proliferation under variable levels of oxygen and nutrients. Therefore, new anticancer treatments endeavor to target such plasticity by modifying main metabolic pathways as glycolysis or oxidative phosphorylation. In American traditional medicine Petiveria alliacea L., Phytolaccacea, leaf extracts have been used for leukemia and breast cancer treatments. Herein, we study cytotoxicity and antitumoral effects of P. alliacea extract in tumor/non-tumorigenic cell lines and murine breast cancer model. Breast cancer cells treated with P. alliacea dry extract showed reduction in β-F1-ATPase expression, glycolytic flux triggering diminished intracellular ATP levels, mitochondrial basal respiration and oxygen consumption. Consequently, a decline in cell proliferation was observed in conventional and three-dimension spheres breast cancer cells culture. Additionally, in vivo treatment of BALB/c mice transplanted with the murine breast cancer TS/A tumor showed that P. alliacea extract via i.p. decreases the primary tumor growth and increases survival in the TS/A model.

  5. Three-dimensional in vitro co-culture model of breast tumor using magnetic levitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaganathan, Hamsa; Gage, Jacob; Leonard, Fransisca; Srinivasan, Srimeenakshi; Souza, Glauco R; Dave, Bhuvanesh; Godin, Biana

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we investigate a novel in vitro model to mimic heterogeneous breast tumors without the use of a scaffold while allowing for cell-cell and tumor-fibroblast interactions. Previous studies have shown that magnetic levitation system under conventional culturing conditions results in the formation of three-dimensional (3D) structures, closely resembling in vivo tissues (fat tissue, vasculature, etc.). Three-dimensional heterogeneous tumor models for breast cancer were designed to effectively model the influences of the tumor microenvironment on drug efficiency. Various breast cancer cells were co-cultured with fibroblasts and then magnetically levitated. Size and cell density of the resulting tumors were measured. The model was phenotypically compared to in vivo tumors and examined for the presence of ECM proteins. Lastly, the effects of tumor stroma in the 3D in vitro model on drug transport and efficiency were assessed. Our data suggest that the proposed 3D in vitro breast tumor is advantageous due to the ability to: (1) form large-sized (millimeter in diameter) breast tumor models within 24 h; (2) control tumor cell composition and density; (3) accurately mimic the in vivo tumor microenvironment; and (4) test drug efficiency in an in vitro model that is comparable to in vivo tumors.

  6. Antibody-supervised deep learning for quantification of tumor-infiltrating immune cells in hematoxylin and eosin stained breast cancer samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riku Turkki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Immune cell infiltration in tumor is an emerging prognostic biomarker in breast cancer. The gold standard for quantification of immune cells in tissue sections is visual assessment through a microscope, which is subjective and semi-quantitative. In this study, we propose and evaluate an approach based on antibody-guided annotation and deep learning to quantify immune cell-rich areas in hematoxylin and eosin (H&E stained samples. Methods: Consecutive sections of formalin-fixed parafin-embedded samples obtained from the primary tumor of twenty breast cancer patients were cut and stained with H&E and the pan-leukocyte CD45 antibody. The stained slides were digitally scanned, and a training set of immune cell-rich and cell-poor tissue regions was annotated in H&E whole-slide images using the CD45-expression as a guide. In analysis, the images were divided into small homogenous regions, superpixels, from which features were extracted using a pretrained convolutional neural network (CNN and classified with a support of vector machine. The CNN approach was compared to texture-based classification and to visual assessments performed by two pathologists. Results: In a set of 123,442 labeled superpixels, the CNN approach achieved an F-score of 0.94 (range: 0.92-0.94 in discrimination of immune cell-rich and cell-poor regions, as compared to an F-score of 0.88 (range: 0.87-0.89 obtained with the texture-based classification. When compared to visual assessment of 200 images, an agreement of 90% (k = 0.79 to quantify immune infiltration with the CNN approach was achieved while the inter-observer agreement between pathologists was 90% (k = 0.78. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that deep learning can be applied to quantify immune cell infiltration in breast cancer samples using a basic morphology staining only. A good discrimination of immune cell-rich areas was achieved, well in concordance with both leukocyte antigen expression and

  7. Two-dimensional electrophoretic comparison of metastatic and non-metastatic human breast tumors using in vitro cultured epithelial cells derived from the cancer tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buršíková Eva

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast carcinomas represent a heterogeneous group of tumors diverse in behavior, outcome, and response to therapy. Identification of proteins resembling the tumor biology can improve the diagnosis, prediction, treatment selection, and targeting of therapy. Since the beginning of the post-genomic era, the focus of molecular biology gradually moved from genomes to proteins and proteomes and to their functionality. Proteomics can potentially capture dynamic changes in protein expression integrating both genetic and epigenetic influences. Methods We prepared primary cultures of epithelial cells from 23 breast cancer tissue samples and performed comparative proteomic analysis. Seven patients developed distant metastases within three-year follow-up. These samples were included into a metastase-positive group, the others formed a metastase-negative group. Two-dimensional electrophoretical (2-DE gels in pH range 4–7 were prepared. Spot densities in 2-DE protein maps were subjected to statistical analyses (R/maanova package and data-mining analysis (GUHA. For identification of proteins in selected spots, liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS was employed. Results Three protein spots were significantly altered between the metastatic and non-metastatic groups. The correlations were proven at the 0.05 significance level. Nucleophosmin was increased in the group with metastases. The levels of 2,3-trans-enoyl-CoA isomerase and glutathione peroxidase 1 were decreased. Conclusion We have performed an extensive proteomic study of mammary epithelial cells from breast cancer patients. We have found differentially expressed proteins between the samples from metastase-positive and metastase-negative patient groups.

  8. Multiparametric classification links tumor microenvironments with tumor cell phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojana Gligorijevic

    2014-11-01

    occurred in spatially distinct microenvironments of primary tumors. We show how machine-learning analysis can classify heterogeneous microenvironments in vivo to enable prediction of motility phenotypes and tumor cell fate. The ability to predict the locations of tumor cell behavior leading to metastasis in breast cancer models may lead towards understanding the heterogeneity of response to treatment.

  9. Tumor-infiltrating B lymphocytes as an efficient source of highly specific immunoglobulins recognizing tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pelliccia Angela

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is much evidence that tumor cells elicit a humoral immune response in patients. In most cases, the presence of antibodies in peripheral blood is detected only in small proportion of patients with tumors overexpressing the corresponding antigen. In the present study, we analyzed the significance of local humoral response provided by tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes in breast cancer patients. Methods The ability of a patient's immune system to produce specific antibodies inside tumor tissue, capable of recognizing tumor cells, was explored through analysis of the oligoclonality of antibodies derived from tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and construction of a series of recombinant antibody libraries in scFv format, derived from breast tumor-infiltrating B lymphocytes. These libraries and one from peripheral blood lymphocytes of a single breast cancer patient were panned against three purified surface tumor antigens, such as CEA, MUC1 and ED-B domain, and against intact MCF7 breast carcinoma cells. Results Application of novel display vector, pKM19, allowed isolation of a large panel of breast cancer-specific antibodies against known tumor antigens, as well as against breast carcinoma cells. Reactivity of novel scFvs was confirmed by ELISA, immunohistochemistry, fluorescence staining and flow cytometry. We demonstrated that seven of ten primary breast tumor specimens, obtained using discarded surgical material, could be exploited as an appropriate source for generation of phage display libraries, giving highly specific antitumor antibodies which recognize heterologous tumor cells. Conclusion Local humoral immune response within tumor tissue in breast cancer patients frequently has an oligoclonal character. Efficient selection of specific antitumor antibodies from recombinant antibody libraries, derived from such oligoclonal tumor-infiltrated B lymphocytes, indicates the presence of natural immune response against tumor antigens

  10. Tumor-expressed adrenomedullin accelerates breast cancer bone metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siclari, Valerie A; Mohammad, Khalid S; Tompkins, Douglas R; Davis, Holly; McKenna, C Ryan; Peng, Xianghong; Wessner, Lisa L; Niewolna, Maria; Guise, Theresa A; Suvannasankha, Attaya; Chirgwin, John M

    2014-12-02

    Adrenomedullin (AM) is secreted by breast cancer cells and increased by hypoxia. It is a multifunctional peptide that stimulates angiogenesis and proliferation. The peptide is also a potent paracrine stimulator of osteoblasts and bone formation, suggesting a role in skeletal metastases-a major site of treatment-refractory tumor growth in patients with advanced disease. The role of adrenomedullin in bone metastases was tested by stable overexpression in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, which cause osteolytic bone metastases in a standard animal model. Cells with fivefold increased expression of AM were characterized in vitro, inoculated into immunodeficient mice and compared for their ability to form bone metastases versus control subclones. Bone destruction was monitored by X-ray, and tumor burden and osteoclast numbers were determined by quantitative histomorphometry. The effects of AM overexpression on tumor growth and angiogenesis in the mammary fat pad were determined. The effects of AM peptide on osteoclast-like multinucleated cell formation were tested in vitro. A small-molecule AM antagonist was tested for its effects on AM-stimulated ex vivo bone cell cultures and co-cultures with tumor cells, where responses of tumor and bone were distinguished by species-specific real-time PCR. Overexpression of AM mRNA did not alter cell proliferation in vitro, expression of tumor-secreted factors or cell cycle progression. AM-overexpressing cells caused osteolytic bone metastases to develop more rapidly, which was accompanied by decreased survival. In the mammary fat pad, tumors grew more rapidly with unchanged blood vessel formation. Tumor growth in the bone was also more rapid, and osteoclasts were increased. AM peptide potently stimulated bone cultures ex vivo; responses that were blocked by small-molecule adrenomedullin antagonists in the absence of cellular toxicity. Antagonist treatment dramatically suppressed tumor growth in bone and decreased markers of

  11. Amplexicaule A exerts anti-tumor effects by inducing apoptosis in human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Meixian; Su, Hanwen; Shu, Guangwen; Wan, Dingrong; He, Feng; Loaec, Morgann; Ding, Yali; Li, Jun; Dovat, Sinisa; Yang, Gaungzhong; Song, Chunhua

    2016-04-05

    Chemotherapy is the main treatment for patients with breast cancer metastases, but natural alternatives have been receiving attention for their potential as novel anti-tumor reagents. Amplexicaule A (APA) is a flavonoid glucoside isolated from rhizomes of Polygonum amplexicaule D. Don var. sinense Forb (PADF). We found that APA has anti-tumor effects in a breast cancer xenograft mouse model and induces apoptosis in breast cancer cell lines. APA increased levels of cleaved caspase-3,-8,-9 and PARP, which resulted from suppression of MCL-1 and BCL-2 expression in the cells. APA also inactivated the Akt/mTOR pathway in breast cancer cells. Thus, APA exerts a strong anti-tumor effect on breast cancer cells, most likely through induction of apoptosis. Our study is the first to identify this novel anti-tumor compound and provides a new strategy for isolation and separation of single compounds from herbs.

  12. ID genes mediate tumor reinitiation during breast cancer lung metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Gaorav P.; Perk, Jonathan; Acharyya, Swarnali; de Candia, Paola; Mittal, Vivek; Todorova-Manova, Katia; Gerald, William L.; Brogi, Edi; Benezra, Robert; Massagué, Joan

    2007-01-01

    The establishment of distant metastases depends on the capacity of small numbers of cancer cells to regenerate a tumor after entering a target tissue. The mechanisms that confer this capacity remain to be defined. Here we identify a role for the transcriptional inhibitors of differentiation Id1 and Id3 as selective mediators of lung metastatic colonization in the triple negative [TN, i.e., lacking expression of estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor, and lacking Her2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) amplification] subgroup of human breast cancer. Although broad expression of Id1 has recently been documented in tumors of the rare metaplastic subtype, here we report that rare Id1-expressing cells are also present in the more common TN subset of human breast tumors but not in other subtypes. We also provide evidence that Id1 expression is enriched in clinically obtained hormone receptor negative lung metastases. Functional studies demonstrate that Id1 and its closely related family member Id3 are required for tumor initiating functions, both in the context of primary tumor formation and during metastatic colonization of the lung microenvironment. In vivo characterization of lung metastatic progression reveals that Id1 and Id3 facilitate sustained proliferation during the early stages of metastatic colonization, subsequent to extravasation into the lung parenchyma. These results shed light on the proliferative mechanisms that initiate metastatic colonization, and they implicate Id1 and Id3 as mediators of this malignant function in the TN subgroup of breast cancers. PMID:18048329

  13. CDDO-Me Redirects Activation of Breast Tumor Associated Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Michael S; Shipman, Emilie P; Kim, Hyunjung; Liby, Karen T; Pioli, Patricia A

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages can account for up to 50% of the tumor mass in breast cancer patients and high TAM density is associated with poor clinical prognosis. Because TAMs enhance tumor growth, development, and metastatic potential, redirection of TAM activation may have significant therapeutic benefit. Our studies in primary human macrophages and murine breast TAMs suggest that the synthetic oleanane triterpenoid CDDO-methyl ester (CDDO-Me) reprograms the activation profile of TAMs from tumor-promoting to tumor-inhibiting. We show that CDDO-Me treatment inhibits expression of IL-10 and VEGF in stimulated human M2 macrophages and TAMs but increases expression of TNF-α and IL-6. Surface expression of CD206 and CD163, which are characteristic of M2 activation, is significantly attenuated by CDDO-Me. In contrast, CDDO-Me up-regulates surface expression of HLA-DR and CD80, which are markers of M1 activation, and importantly potentiates macrophage activation of autologous T cells but inhibits endothelial cell vascularization. These results show for the first time that CDDO-Me redirects activation of M2 macrophages and TAMs from immune-suppressive to immune-stimulatory, and implicate a role for CDDO-Me as an immunotherapeutic in the treatment of breast and potentially other types of cancer.

  14. Therapeutic effects of dendrosomal solanine on a metastatic breast tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohsenikia, Maryam; Farhangi, Baharak; Alizadeh, Ali Mohammad; Khodayari, Hamid; Khodayari, Saeed; Khori, Vahid; Arjmand Abbassi, Yasaman; Vesovic, Milica; Soleymani, Ali; Najafi, Farhood

    2016-03-01

    Our previous studies showed that alpha-solanine can inhibit tumor growth in cell culture and animal models of breast cancer. However, solanine is insoluble in common solvents; therefore, we developed a special nanoparticle with high-capacity solubility. The present study is aimed to deliberate the therapeutic effects of dendrosomal solanine (DNS) on a metastatic breast tumor in vitro and in vivo. After DNS preparation and dosing procedures, forty-five mice were equally divided into five groups to investigate the anti-metastatic effects of DNS on mammary tumor-bearing mice. Compared to solanine, DNS significantly suppressed the proliferation of 4 T1 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. DNS showed a remarkable safety rate of up to 10mg/kg. A significant decrease in white blood-cell count was seen at 20mg/kg DNS in comparison with control animals. Mice treated with DNS had smaller tumor volume (mm(3)) in comparison with control and solanine groups. Moreover, the incidence of the breast tumor metastases was about 67% in the control animals, where as solanine and DNS 1mg/kg were about 22% and 0%, respectively. Furthermore, the number of metastases per mouse varied from one to three. The tissues of tumor, brain, liver, spleen, and lung showed higher expression levels of Bcl-2 but lower expression levels of Bax, MMP-2, MMP-9, mTOR, and Akt in DNS-treated mice than control and solanine groups. The findings suggest that DNS has a more impactful therapeutic effect than solanine on 4 T1-induced breast tumorigenesis via influencing the tissue microenvironment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Low penetrance breast cancer susceptibility loci are associated with specific breast tumor subtypes: findings from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Broeks, A; Schmidt, M.K; Sherman, M.E; Couch, F.J; Hopper, J.L; Dite, G.S; Apicella, C; Smith, L.D; Hammet, F; Southey, M.C; Veer, L.J. van 't; Groot, R. de; Smit, V.T; Fasching, P.A; Beckmann, M.W; Jud, S; Ekici, A.B; Hartmann, A; Hein, A; Schulz-Wendtland, R; Burwinkel, B; Marme, F; Schneeweiss, A; Sinn, H.P; Sohn, C; Tchatchou, S; Bojesen, S.E; Nordestgaard, B.G; Flyger, H; Orsted, D.D; Kaur-Knudsen, D; Milne, R.L; Perez, J.I; Zamora, P; Roiguez, P.M; Benitez, J; Brauch, H; Justenhoven, C; Ko, Y.D; Hamann, U; Fischer, H.P; Bruning, T; Pesch, B; Chang-Claude, J; Wang-Gohrke, S; Bremer, M; Karstens, J.H; Hillemanns, P; Dork, T; Nevanlinna, H.A; Heikkinen, T; Heikkila, P; Blomqvist, C; Aittomaki, K; Aaltonen, K; Lindblom, A; Margolin, S; Mannermaa, A; Kosma, V.M; Kauppinen, J.M; Kataja, V; Auvinen, P; Eskelinen, M; Soini, Y; Chenevix-Trench, G; Spurdle, A.B; Beesley, J; Chen, X; Holland, H; Lambrechts, D; Claes, B; Vandorpe, T; Neven, P; Wildiers, H; Flesch-Janys, D; Hein, R; Loning, T; Kosel, M; Fredericksen, Z.S; Wang, X; Giles, G.G; Baglietto, L; Severi, G; McLean, C; Haiman, C.A; Henderson, B.E; Marchand, L. le; Kolonel, L.N; Alnaes, G.G; Kristensen, V; Borresen-Dale, A.L; Hunter, D.J; Hankinson, S.E; Anulis, I.L; Mulligan, A.M; O'Malley, F.P; Devilee, P; Huijts, P.E; Tollenaar, R.A.E.M; Asperen, C.J. van

    2011-01-01

    .... We investigated breast cancer risk associations of eight susceptibility loci identified in GWAS and two putative susceptibility loci in candidate genes in relation to specific breast tumor subtypes...

  16. Amplexicaule A exerts anti-tumor effects by inducing apoptosis in human breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Xiang, Meixian; Su, Hanwen; Shu, Guangwen; Wan, Dingrong; He, Feng; Loaec, Morgann; Ding, Yali; Li, Jun; Dovat, Sinisa; Yang, Gaungzhong; Song, Chunhua

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy is the main treatment for patients with breast cancer metastases, but natural alternatives have been receiving attention for their potential as novel anti-tumor reagents. Amplexicaule A (APA) is a flavonoid glucoside isolated from rhizomes of Polygonum amplexicaule D. Don var. sinense Forb (PADF). We found that APA has anti-tumor effects in a breast cancer xenograft mouse model and induces apoptosis in breast cancer cell lines. APA increased levels of cleaved caspase-3,-8,-9 and ...

  17. Effect of Helix aspersa extract on TNFα, NF-κB and some tumor suppressor genes in breast cancer cell line Hs578T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Ouar, Ibtissem; Braicu, Cornelia; Naimi, Dalila; Irimie, Alexendru; Berindan-Neagoe, Ioana

    2017-01-01

    The garden snail, Helix aspersa, is a big land snail widely found in the Mediterranean countries. It is one of the most consumed species and widely used in zootherapy. The present study was carried out to investigate for the first time the first time the antitumor activity of an aqueous extract from Helix aspersa. The effect of H. aspersa extract was studied on a triple negative breast cancer cell line Hs578T. Firstly, the morphological changes and the mode of cell death induced by the extract have been evaluated by microscopy and acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining. The effect of the extract at dilution 0.1% and 1% was then tested on some genes, regulators of cell death and proliferation like tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), NF- κB, and the tumor suppressor genes P53 and PTEN. Data demonstrate that the extract induces necrosis in tumor cells. It enhances significantly the expression of TNFα; mRNA levels were 20 and 10 times more important in treated cells compared to nontreated cells. NF-κB and PTEN were inhibited with the dilution 1% after 8 and 24 hours of treatment. P53 expression was further inhibited but only with the highest dose, after 4, 8, and 24 hours. Our results show that H. aspersa extract has an antitumor activity against Hs578T cells; it is a potent stimulator for TNFα and a good inhibitor for NF-κB. Abbreviations used: AO: acridine orange; Bcl-2: B cell lymphoma 2. cDNA: complementary DNA; ELISA: enzyme linked immunosorbent assay; EB: ethidium bromide; IC50: the half maximal inhibitory concentration; mRNA: messenger RNA. MAPK: mitogen-activated protein kinase; NF-κB: nuclearfactorkappa B; PBS: phosphate buffered saline. PI3K: phospho-inositol 3 kinase; PTEN: phosphatase and tensin homolog; ROS: reactive oxygen species. RT-PCR: reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction; TNFα: tumor necrosis factor alpha. TNFR1: TNF receptor-1; TP53: tumor protein 53.

  18. Significant Radiation Enhancement Effects by Gold Nanoparticles in Combination with Cisplatin in Triple Negative Breast Cancer Cells and Tumor Xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Lei; Her, Sohyoung; Dunne, Michael; Borst, Gerben R; De Souza, Raquel; Bristow, Robert G; Jaffray, David A; Allen, Christine

    2017-02-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and cisplatin have been explored in concomitant chemoradiotherapy, wherein they elicit their effects by distinct and overlapping mechanisms. Cisplatin is one of the most frequently utilized radiosensitizers in the clinical setting; however, the therapeutic window of cisplatin-aided chemoradiotherapy is limited by its toxicity. The goal of this study was to determine whether AuNPs contribute to improving the treatment response when combined with fractionated cisplatin-based chemoradiation in both in vitro and in vivo models of triple-negative breast cancer (MDA-MB-231Luc+). Cellular-targeting AuNPs with receptor-mediated endocytosis (AuNP-RME) in vitro at a noncytotoxic concentration (0.5 mg/ml) or cisplatin at IC25 (12 μM) demonstrated dose enhancement factors (DEFs) of 1.25 and 1.14, respectively; the combination of AuNP-RME and cisplatin resulted in a significant DEF of 1.39 in vitro. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images showed effective cellular uptake of AuNPs at tumor sites 24 h after intratumoral infusion. Computed tomography (CT) images demonstrated that the intratumoral levels of gold remained stable up to 120 h after infusion. AuNPs (0.5 mg gold per tumor) demonstrated a radiation enhancement effect that was equivalent to three doses of cisplatin at IC25 (4 mg/kg), but did not induce intrinsic toxicity or increased radiotoxicity. Results from this study suggest that AuNPs are the true radiosensitizer in these settings. Importantly, AuNPs enhance the treatment response when combined with cisplatin-based fractionated chemoradiation. This combination of AuNPs and cisplatin provides a promising approach to improving the therapeutic ratio of fractionated radiotherapy.

  19. High tumor budding stratifies breast cancer with metastatic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salhia, Bodour; Trippel, Mafalda; Pfaltz, Katrin; Cihoric, Nikola; Grogg, André; Lädrach, Claudia; Zlobec, Inti; Tapia, Coya

    2015-04-01

    Tumor budding refers to single or small cluster of tumor cells detached from the main tumor mass. In colon cancer high tumor budding is associated with positive lymph nodes and worse prognosis. Therefore, we investigated the value of tumor budding as a predictive feature of lymph node status in breast cancer (BC). Whole tissue sections from 148 surgical resection specimens (SRS) and 99 matched preoperative core biopsies (CB) with invasive BC of no special type were analyzed on one slide stained with pan-cytokeratin. In SRS, the total number of intratumoral (ITB) and peripheral tumor buds (PTB) in ten high-power fields (HPF) were counted. A bud was defined as a single tumor cell or a cluster of up to five tumor cells. High tumor budding equated to scores averaging >4 tumor buds across 10HPFs. In CB high tumor budding was defined as ≥10 buds/HPF. The results were correlated with pathological parameters. In SRS high PTB stratified BC with lymph node metastases (p ≤ 0.03) and lymphatic invasion (p ≤ 0.015). In CB high tumor budding was significantly (p = 0.0063) associated with venous invasion. Pathologists are able, based on morphology, to categorize BC into a high and low risk groups based in part on lymph node status. This risk assessment can be easily performed during routine diagnostics and it is time and cost effective. These results suggest that high PTB is associated with loco-regional metastasis, highlighting the possibility that this tumor feature may help in therapeutic decision-making.

  20. Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) induces WISP-2/CCN5 via multiple molecular cross-talks and is essential for mitogenic switch by IGF-1 axis in estrogen receptor-positive breast tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Kakali; Banerjee, Snigdha; Dhar, Gopal; Sengupta, Krishanu; Banerjee, Sushanta K

    2007-02-15

    Previously, we have shown that the expression of Wnt-1-induced signaling protein-2 (WISP-2), also known as CCN5, can be regulated by multiple stimulants in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast tumor cells to exert their mitogenic action in these cells. Here, we show that insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), a strong mitogen, enhanced the expression of the WISP-2/CCN5 gene parallel with the induction of proliferation of ER-positive breast tumor cells. An additive effect was also seen in combination with estrogen. Perturbation of IGF-1-induced WISP-2/CCN5 expression by WISP-2-specific RNA interference impaired the mitogenic action of IGF-1 on ER-positive breast tumor cells. Furthermore, the studies have shown that the multiple molecular cross-talks and side-talks among IGF-1R, ER-alpha, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling molecules are required to induce WISP-2/CCN5 mRNA by IGF-1 in ER-positive, noninvasive breast tumor cells. Because a pure anti-ER ICI 182,780 is not only able to suppress the up-regulation of WISP-2/CCN5 mRNA expression by IGF-1, it also suppresses the PI3K/Akt activity induced by IGF-1 in MCF-7 cells; we anticipate that the membrane ER receptor may participate in this event. Collectively, these studies propose for the first time that WISP-2/CCN5 is an integral signaling molecule in mitogenic action of IGF-1 axis in ER-positive human breast tumor cells.

  1. CD8 T-cell responses against cyclin B1 in breast cancer patients with tumors overexpressing p53

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Rikke Baek; Andersen, Rikke Sick; Svane, Inge Marie

    2009-01-01

    CD8 T-cell response against at least one of the peptides; strongest reactivity was detected against the CB9L2 peptide. Because the level of cyclin B1 has been shown to be influenced by the level of p53, which in turn is elevated in cancer cells because of point mutation, we analyzed the level of p53...... protein in biopsies from the patients by immune histochemistry. Combined data showed that anti-cyclin B1 reactivity was predominantly detected in patients with tumors characterized by elevated expression of p53. Interestingly, no reactivity was detected against six peptides derived from the p53 protein....... CONCLUSIONS: Our data support the notion of cyclin B1 as a prominent target for immunologic recognition in cancer patients harboring p53-mutated cancer cells. Because mutation of p53 is one of the most frequent genetic alterations in human cancers, this suggests that immunotherapy based on targeting of cyclin...

  2. Tumor-Associated Macrophages Promote Malignant Progression of Breast Phyllodes Tumors by Inducing Myofibroblast Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Yan; Chen, Jianing; Huang, Di; Yao, Yandan; Chen, Jiewen; Ding, Lin; Zeng, Jiayi; Su, Shicheng; Chao, Xue; Su, Fengxi; Yao, Herui; Hu, Hai; Song, Erwei

    2017-07-01

    Myofibroblast differentiation plays an important role in the malignant progression of phyllodes tumor, a fast-growing neoplasm derived from periductal stromal cells of the breast. Macrophages are frequently found in close proximity with myofibroblasts, but it is uncertain whether they are involved in the myofibroblast differentiation during phyllodes tumor progression. Here we show that increased density of tumor-associated macrophage (TAM) correlates with malignant progression of phyllodes tumor. We found that TAMs stimulated myofibroblast differentiation and promoted the proliferation and invasion of phyllodes tumor cells. Furthermore, we found that levels of the chemokine CCL18 in TAM was an independent prognostic factor of phyllodes tumor. Mechanistic investigations showed that CCL18 promoted expression of α-smooth muscle actin, a hallmark of myofibroblast, along with the proliferation and invasion of phyllodes tumor cells, and that CCL18-driven myofibroblast differentiation was mediated by an NF-κB/miR-21/PTEN/AKT signaling axis. In murine xenograft models of human phyllodes tumor, CCL18 accelerated tumor growth, induced myofibroblast differentiation, and promoted metastasis. Taken together, our findings indicated that TAM drives myofibroblast differentiation and malignant progression of phyllodes tumor through a CCL18-driven signaling cascade amenable to antibody disruption. Cancer Res; 77(13); 3605-18. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  3. Second harmonic generation reveals matrix alterations during breast tumor progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Kathleen; Tang, Ping; Brown, Edward

    2013-03-01

    Alteration of the extracellular matrix in tumor stroma influences efficiency of cell locomotion away from the primary tumor into surrounding tissues and vasculature, thereby affecting metastatic potential. We study matrix changes in breast cancer through the use of second harmonic generation (SHG) of collagen in order to improve the current understanding of breast tumor stromal development. Specifically, we utilize a quantitative analysis of the ratio of forward to backward propagating SHG signal (F/B ratio) to monitor collagen throughout ductal and lobular carcinoma development. After detection of a significant decrease in the F/B ratio of invasive but not in situ ductal carcinoma compared with healthy tissue, the collagen F/B ratio is investigated to determine the evolution of fibrillar collagen changes throughout tumor progression. Results are compared with the progression of lobular carcinoma, whose F/B signature also underwent significant evolution during progression, albeit in a different manner, which offers insight into varying methods of tissue penetration and collagen manipulation between the carcinomas. This research provides insights into trends of stromal reorganization throughout breast tumor development.

  4. The Role of Tumor Associated Macrophage in Recurrent Growth of Tumor Stem Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    recent cancer stem cell (CSC) theory, recurrent tumor must arise from a dormant tumor stem cell whose re-growth is triggered by shifting of...microenvironment. This project aims at clarifying the roles of TAM in recurrent growth of dormant stem cell in breast cancer. We hypothesize that the balance of...dormancy and recurrence is determined by the ability of the tumor stem cells to recruit TAM which in turn promotes self-renewal of the stem cell . We

  5. AZU-1: A Candidate Breast Tumor Suppressor and Biomarker for Tumor Progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Huei-Mei; Schmeichel, Karen L; Mian, I. Saira; Lelie`vre, Sophie; Petersen, Ole W; Bissell, Mina J

    2000-02-04

    To identify genes misregulated in the final stages of breast carcinogenesis, we performed differential display to compare the gene expression patterns of the human tumorigenic mammary epithelial cells, HMT-3522-T4-2, with those of their immediate premalignant progenitors, HMT-3522-S2. We identified a novel gene, called anti-zuai-1 (AZU-1), that was abundantly expressed in non- and premalignant cells and tissues but was appreciably reduced in breast tumor cell types and in primary tumors. The AZU-1 gene encodes an acidic 571-amino-acid protein containing at least two structurally distinct domains with potential protein-binding functions: an N-terminal serine and proline-rich domain with a predicted immunoglobulin-like fold and a C-terminal coiled-coil domain. In HMT-3522 cells, the bulk of AZU-1 protein resided in a detergent-extractable cytoplasmic pool and was present at much lower levels in tumorigenic T4-2 cells than in their nonmalignant counterparts. Reversion of the tumorigenic phenotype of T4-2 cells, by means described previously, was accompanied by the up-regulation of AZU-1. In addition, reexpression of AZU-1 in T4-2 cells, using viral vectors, was sufficient to reduce their malignant phenotype substantially, both in culture and in vivo. These results indicate that AZU-1 is a candidate breast tumor suppressor that may exert its effects by promoting correct tissue morphogenesis.

  6. Sensitivity of Breast Tumors to Oncolytic Viruses

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ahmed, Maryam

    2006-01-01

    ...). Studies have shown that matrix (M) protein mutants of VSV such as rM51R-M virus are excellent candidates for anti-tumor therapies due to the ability of these viruses to target and kill tumor cells while sparing normal cells...

  7. Antrodia salmonea induces G2 cell-cycle arrest in human triple-negative breast cancer (MDA-MB-231) cells and suppresses tumor growth in athymic nude mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia-Ting; Hseu, You-Cheng; Thiyagarajan, Varadharajan; Huang, Hui-Chi; Hsu, Li-Sung; Huang, Pei-Jane; Liu, Jer-Yuh; Liao, Jiunn-Wang; Yang, Hsin-Ling

    2017-01-20

    Antrodia salmonea (AS), is a well-known folk medicinal mushroom in Taiwan, has been reported to exhibit anti-oxidant, anti-angiogenic, and anti-inflammatory effects. In the present study, we examined the effects of AS on cell-cycle arrest in vitro in MDA-MB-231 cells and on tumor regression in vivo using an athymic nude mice model. AS (0-200μg/mL) treatment significantly induced G2 cell-cycle arrest in MDA-MB-231 cells by reducing the levels of cyclin B1, cyclin A, cyclin E, and CDC2 proteins. In addition, N-acetylcysteine (NAC) pretreatment prevented AS induced G2 cell-cycle arrest, indicating that ROS accumulation and subsequent cell cycle arrest might be a major mechanism of AS-induced cytotoxicity. Further, AS treatment decreased COX-2 expression and induced PARP cleavage was significantly reversed by NAC pretreatment in MDA-MB-231 cells. The in vivo study results revealed that AS treatment was effective in terms of delaying the tumor incidence and reducing the tumor growth in MDA-MB-231-xenografted nude mice. TUNEL assay, immunohistochemical staining and Western blotting confirmed that AS significantly modulated the xenografted tumor progression as demonstrated by induction of apoptosis, autophagy, and cell-cycle arrest. Our data strongly suggest that Antrodia salmonea could be an anti-cancer agent for human breast cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Signaling pathways involved in the antiproliferative effect of molecular iodine in normal and tumoral breast cells: evidence that 6-iodolactone mediates apoptotic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo-Helguera, O; Rojas, E; Delgado, G; Aceves, C

    2008-12-01

    Previous reports have documented the antiproliferative properties of I(2) and the arachidonic acid (AA) derivative 6-iodolactone (6-IL) in both thyroid and mammary glands. In this study, we characterized the cellular pathways activated by these molecules and their effects on cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in normal (MCF-12F) and cancerous (MCF-7) breast cells. Low-to-moderate concentrations of I(2) (10-20 microM) cause G1 and G2/M phase arrest in MCF-12F and caspase-dependent apoptosis in MCF-7 cells. In normal cells, only high doses of I(2) (40 microM) induced apoptosis, and this effect was mediated by poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP1) and the apoptosis-induced factor, suggesting an oxidative influence of iodine at high concentrations. Our data indicate that both I(2) and 6-IL trigger the same intracellular pathways and suggest that the antineoplasic effect of I(2) in mammary cancer involves the intracellular formation of 6-IL. Mammary cancer cells are known to contain high concentrations of AA, which might explain why I(2) exerts apoptotic effects at lower concentrations only in tumoral cells.

  9. Human breast adipose tissue: characterization of factors that change during tumor progression in human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Sabrina Johanna; Sacca, Paula Alejandra; Pistone-Creydt, Mercedes; Coló, Federico Andrés; Serra, María Florencia; Santino, Flavia Eliana; Sasso, Corina Verónica; Lopez-Fontana, Constanza Matilde; Carón, Rubén Walter; Calvo, Juan Carlos; Pistone-Creydt, Virginia

    2017-02-07

    Adipose microenvironment is involved in signaling pathways that influence breast cancer. We aim to characterize factors that are modified: 1) in tumor and non tumor human breast epithelial cell lines when incubated with conditioned media (CMs) from human breast cancer adipose tissue explants (hATT) or normal breast adipose tissue explants (hATN); 2) in hATN-CMs vs hATT-CMs; 3) in the tumor associated adipocytes vs. non tumor associated adipocytes. We used hATN or hATT- CMs on tumor and non-tumor breast cancer cell lines. We evaluated changes in versican, CD44, ADAMTS1 and Adipo R1 expression on cell lines or in the different CMs. In addition we evaluated changes in the morphology and expression of these factors in slices of the different adipose tissues. The statistical significance between different experimental conditions was evaluated by one-way ANOVA. Tukey's post-hoc tests were performed within each individual treatment. hATT-CMs increase versican, CD44, ADAMTS1 and Adipo R1 expression in breast cancer epithelial cells. Furthermore, hATT-CMs present higher levels of versican expression compared to hATN-CMs. In addition, we observed a loss of effect in cellular migration when we pre-incubated hATT-CMs with chondroitinase ABC, which cleaves GAGs chains bound to the versican core protein, thus losing the ability to bind to CD44. Adipocytes associated with the invasive front are reduced in size compared to adipocytes that are farther away. Also, hATT adipocytes express significantly higher amounts of versican, CD44 and Adipo R1, and significantly lower amounts of adiponectin and perilipin, unlike hATN adipocytes. We conclude that hATT secrete a different set of proteins compared to hATN. Furthermore, versican, a proteoglycan that is overexpressed in hATT-CMs compared to hATN-CMs, might be involved in the tumorogenic behavior observed in both cell lines employed. In addition, we may conclude that adipocytes from the tumor microenvironment show a less differentiated

  10. Recurrent malignant phyllodes tumor of the breast: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qinqin; Su, Jing; Lei, Yutao

    2017-12-01

    Phyllodes tumor is a rare fibro epithelial neoplasm of the breast. They resemble fibroadenomas clinically and can be mistakenly ignored sometimes. We report the case of a young woman with her first presentation to hospital due to a hypoglycemia and she underwent 2 excised fibroadenomas in the same breast before diagnosed of malignant phyllodes tumor. She was complaining about 2 masses presented in her right breast 4 months after mastectomy. Recurrent phyllodes tumor of the breast. We conducted an immediate autologous myocutaneous flap transplantation after a wide-excision. Postoperative radiotherapy was recommended. She was in good general condition without tumor relapses during 8 months of follow-up. Recurrent fibroadenomas in the same breast, especially those of large size with rapid growth rate, suggesting a high transformation possibility from fibroadenoma to phyllodes tumor. We recommend an extended tumor resection and immediate or delayed reconstruction of the breast for the recurrent phyllodes tumor with separately multiple relapses.

  11. Cisplatin induces differentiation of breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakaran, Praseetha; Hassiotou, Foteini; Blancafort, Pilar; Filgueira, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Breast tumors are heterogeneous including cells with stem cell properties and more differentiated cells. This heterogeneity is reflected into the molecular breast cancer subtypes. Breast cancer stem cells are resistant to chemotherapy, thus recent efforts are focusing on identifying treatments that shift them toward a more differentiated phenotype, making them more susceptible to chemotherapy. We examined whether the drug cisplatin induces differentiation in breast cancer cell lines that represent different breast cancer subtypes. We used three cell lines representing triple-negative breast cancers, BT-549 and MDA-MB-231 (claudin-low), and MDA-MB-468 (basal-like), along with estrogen and progesterone receptor positive MCF-7 cells (luminal). Cisplatin was applied at 2.5, 5, 10, and 20 μM, and cell viability and proliferation were measured using MTS and BrdU assays, respectively. The effect of cisplatin on the cellular hierarchy was examined by flow cytometry, immunofluorescence and qRT-PCR. Cisplatin treatment of 10 and 20 μM reduced cell viability by 36-51% and proliferation capacity by 36-67%. Treatment with cisplatin resulted in 12-67% down-regulation of stem cell markers (CD49f, SSEA4) and 10-130% up-regulation of differentiation markers (CK18, SMA, β-tubulin). At the mRNA level, CD49f was down-regulated whilst β-tubulin was up-regulated in the claudin-low cell lines. SSEA4 protein expression decreased upon cisplatin treatment, but SSEA4 mRNA expression increased indicating a differential regulation of cisplatin at the post-transcriptional level. It is concluded that cisplatin reduces breast cancer cell survival and induces differentiation of stem/progenitor cell subpopulations within breast cancer cell lines. These effects indicate the potential of this drug to target specific chemotherapy-resistant cells within a tumor.

  12. Collision tumor with inflammatory breast carcinoma and malignant phyllodes tumor: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Young Duck; Lee, Seul Kee; Kim, Kyu Sun; Park, Mi Ja; Kim, Joo Heon; Yim, Hyun Sun; Choi, Young Jin

    2014-01-08

    There have been some reports of coincidental presentation of breast carcinoma and phyllodes tumor in the same breast. Most of the cases were carcinoma that arose from a phyllodes tumor with a histologically identified transitional area, and they behaved less aggressively than the usually encountered carcinoma. Collision tumors are rare clinical entities in which two histologically distinct tumor types show involvement at the same site. The occurrence of these tumors in the breast is extremely rare. Here, we report a case of 45-year-old woman who had both invasive ductal carcinoma as the finding of inflammatory carcinoma and a malignant phyllodes tumor in the same breast. There was no evidence of a transitional area between the phyllodes tumor and the invasive ductal carcinoma. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a collision tumor of inflammatory breast carcinoma coincident with a malignant phyllodes tumor in same breast.

  13. Pioglitazone, an anti-diabetic drug requires sustained MAPK activation for its anti-tumor activity in MCF7 breast cancer cells, independent of PPAR-γ pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kole, Labanyamoy; Sarkar, Mrinmoy; Deb, Anwesha; Giri, Biplab

    2016-02-01

    The thiazolidinedione (TZD) class of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ) ligands are known for their ability to induce adipocyte differentiation, to increase insulin sensitivity including anticancer properties. But, whether or not upstream events like MAPK activation or PPAR-γ signaling are involved or associated with this anticancer activity is not well understood in breast cancer cells. The role of MAPK and PPAR pathways during the pioglitazone (Pio) induced PPAR-γ independent anticancer activity in MCF7 cells has been focused here. The anticancer activity of Pio has been investigated in breast cancer cells in vitro. Anti-tumor effects were assessed by alamar blue assay, Western blot analysis, cell cycle analysis, and annexin V-FITC/PI binding assay by flow cytometry, Hoechst staining and luciferase assay. The anticancer activity of Pio is found to be correlating with the up regulation of CDKIs (p21/p27) and down regulation of CDK-4. This study demonstrates that the induction of CDKIs by Pio is due to the sustained activation of MAPK. The Pio-mediated activation of MAPK is transmitted to activate ELK-1 and the related anti-proliferation is blocked by MEK inhibitor (PD-184352). Pio suppresses the proliferation of MCF7 cells, at least partly by a PPAR-γ-independent mechanism involving the induction of p21 which in turn requires sustained activation of MAPK. These findings implicate the utility of Pio in the treatment of PPAR positive or negative human cancers and the development of a new class of compounds to enhance the effectiveness of Pio. Copyright © 2015 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  14. MMTV-PyMT and Derived Met-1 Mouse Mammary Tumor Cells as Models for Studying the Role of the Androgen Receptor in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christenson, Jessica L; Butterfield, Kiel T; Spoelstra, Nicole S; Norris, John D; Josan, Jatinder S; Pollock, Julie A; McDonnell, Donald P; Katzenellenbogen, Benita S; Katzenellenbogen, John A; Richer, Jennifer K

    2017-04-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) has a faster rate of metastasis compared to other breast cancer subtypes, and no effective targeted therapies are currently FDA-approved. Recent data indicate that the androgen receptor (AR) promotes tumor survival and may serve as a potential therapeutic target in TNBC. Studies of AR in disease progression and the systemic effects of anti-androgens have been hindered by the lack of an AR-positive (AR+) immunocompetent preclinical model. In this study, we identified the transgenic MMTV-PyMT (mouse mammary tumor virus-polyoma middle tumor-antigen) mouse mammary gland carcinoma model of breast cancer and Met-1 cells derived from this model as tools to study the role of AR in breast cancer progression. AR protein expression was examined in late-stage primary tumors and lung metastases from MMTV-PyMT mice as well as in Met-1 cells by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Sensitivity of Met-1 cells to the AR agonist dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and anti-androgen therapy was examined using cell viability, migration/invasion, and anchorage-independent growth assays. Late-stage primary tumors and lung metastases from MMTV-PyMT mice and Met-1 cells expressed abundant nuclear AR protein, while negative for estrogen and progesterone receptors. Met-1 sensitivity to DHT and AR antagonists demonstrated a reliance on AR for survival, and AR antagonists inhibited invasion and anchorage-independent growth. These data suggest that the MMTV-PyMT model and Met-1 cells may serve as valuable tools for mechanistic studies of the role of AR in disease progression and how anti-androgens affect the tumor microenvironment.

  15. Stem cells in the human breast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Ole William; Polyak, Kornelia

    2010-01-01

    The origins of the epithelial cells participating in the development, tissue homeostasis, and cancer of the human breast are poorly understood. However, emerging evidence suggests a role for adult tissue-specific stem cells in these processes. In a hierarchical manner, these generate the two main...... mammary cell lineages, producing an increasing number of cells with distinct properties. Understanding the biological characteristics of human breast stem cells and their progeny is crucial in attempts to compare the features of normal stem cells and cancer precursor cells and distinguish these from...... nonprecursor cells and cells from the bulk of a tumor. A historical overview of research on human breast stem cells in primary tissue and in culture reveals the progress that has been made in this area, whereas a focus on the cell-of-origin and reprogramming that occurs during neoplastic conversion provides...

  16. Tumor-Host Interaction in Breast Cancer Bone Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Kallioniemi, O.-P., and Ethier, S. P. Molecular cytogenetic analysis of 11 new breast cancer cell lines. Br J Cancer, 81: 1328-1334, 1999. 26. Harris, A...1.318480186 NM_000546 TP53 Tumor protein p53 (Li-Fraumeni syndrome ) 0.875703301 NM_006670 TPBG Trophoblast glycoprotein 1.130637565 NM_003379 VIL2 Villin...primary tumors was determined according to the Richardson– Bloom grading system [17]. BM assessment BM (10 cc) was aspirated from the sternum and both

  17. E2F-HDAC complexes negatively regulate the tumor suppressor gene ARHI in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Z; Luo, R Z; Peng, H

    2006-01-01

    ARHI is a maternally imprinted tumor suppressor gene whose expression is markedly downregulated in breast cancer. Reactivation of ARHI expression in breast cancer cells is associated with increased histone H3 acetylation and decreased lysine 9 methylation of histone H3. An ARHI promoter segment...... of the tumor suppressor gene ARHI in breast cancer cells....... that spanned bases -420 to +58 (designated the P2 region) exhibits significantly higher promoter activity in normal cells than in cancer cells. To better understand the molecular mechanisms contributing to this differential transcriptional activity, we sought to identify transcription factors that bind...

  18. Malignant phyllodes tumor of the breast: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keim-Malpass, Jessica; Mills, Anne M; Showalter, Shayna L

    2014-10-01

    Malignant phyllodes tumors of the breast are rare, fast-growing tumors that can be difficult to diagnose. A case study is featured about a young adult patient who lacked insurance and received a delayed diagnosis of malignant phyllodes tumor of the breast. This article includes pertinent clinical and age-specific considerations for comprehensive management.

  19. Oriented collagen fibers direct tumor cell intravasation

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Weijing

    2016-09-24

    In this work, we constructed a Collagen I-Matrigel composite extracellular matrix (ECM). The composite ECM was used to determine the influence of the local collagen fiber orientation on the collective intravasation ability of tumor cells. We found that the local fiber alignment enhanced cell-ECM interactions. Specifically, metastatic MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells followed the local fiber alignment direction during the intravasation into rigid Matrigel (∼10 mg/mL protein concentration).

  20. Drug Helps Fight Breast Tumors Tied to 'Cancer Genes'

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Drug Helps Fight Breast Tumors Tied to 'Cancer Genes' Lynparza may offer a new treatment for women ... with breast cancer linked to BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations, according to the study. Olaparib delayed cancer ...

  1. Expression of osteoprotegerin, receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand, tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand, stromal cell-derived factor-1 and their receptors in epithelial metastatic breast cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labovsky Vivian

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While breast cancer (BC is the major cause of death among women worldwide, there is no guarantee of better patient survival because many of these patients develop primarily metastases, despite efforts to detect it in its early stages. Bone metastasis is a common complication that occurs in 65-80 % of patients with disseminated disease, but the molecular basis underlying dormancy, dissemination and establishment of metastasis is not understood. Our objective has been to evaluate simultaneously osteoprotegerin (OPG, receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL, tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL, stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1, and their receptors (R in 2 human BC cell lines, MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7. Methods OPG, RANKL, TRAIL and SDF-1 expression and release, in addition to the expression of their receptors has been investigated using immunofluorescence, immunocytochemistry and ELISA analyses. Results MCF-7 cells released higher levels of OPG in conditioned media (CM than MDA-MB-231 cells; 100 % of both types of cell expressed OPG, RANKL, TRAIL and SDF-1. Moreover, 100 % in both lines expressed membrane RANKL and RANK, whereas only 50 % expressed CXCR4. Furthermore, 100 % expressed TRAIL-R1 and R4, 30-50 % TRAIL-R2, and 40-55 % TRAIL-R3. Conclusions MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells not only released OPG, but expressed RANKL, TRAIL and SDF-1. The majority of the cells also expressed RANK, CXCR4 and TRAIL-R. Since these ligands and their receptors are implicated in the regulation of proliferation, survival, migration and future bone metastasis during breast tumor progression, assessment of these molecules in tumor biopsies of BC patients could be useful in identifying patients with more aggressive tumors that are also at risk of bone metastasis, which may thus improve the available options for therapeutic intervention.

  2. Breast cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W Owens

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Cancer metastasis, resistance to therapies and disease recurrence are significant hurdles to successful treatment of breast cancer. Identifying mechanisms by which cancer spreads, survives treatment regimes and regenerates more aggressive tumours are critical to improving patient survival. Substantial evidence gathered over the last 10 years suggests that breast cancer progression and recurrence is supported by cancer stem cells (CSCs. Understanding how CSCs form and how they contribute to the pathology of breast cancer will greatly aid the pursuit of novel therapies targeted at eliminating these cells. This review will summarise what is currently known about the origins of breast CSCs, their role in disease progression and ways in which they may be targeted therapeutically.

  3. LL-202, a newly synthesized flavonoid, inhibits tumor growth via inducing G(2)/M phase arrest and cell apoptosis in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Lei; Fu, Rong; Wang, Xiaoping; Yao, Jing; Zhou, Yuxin; Dai, Qinsheng; Li, Zhiyu; Lu, Na; Wang, Weiyun

    2014-07-03

    We recently established that LL-202, a newly synthesized flavonoid, exhibited obvious anticancer effects against human breast cells in vivo and in vitro. The underlying mechanism of its anticancer activity remains to be elucidated. In this study, we demonstrated that LL-202 inhibited the growth and proliferation of human breast cancer MCF-7 cells in a concentration and time-dependent manner. We reported that LL-202 induced both mitochondrial- and death-receptor-mediated apoptosis, which were characterized by the dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), cytochrome c (Cyt c) release from mitochondria to cytosol, the activation of several caspases and induction of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and Bid cleavage. N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a general ROS scavenger, partly blocked the LL-202-induced ROS levels and apoptosis. In addition, LL-202 induced arrest in cell cycle progression at G2/M phase in MCF-7 cells. After the treatment with LL-202, the expression of cell cycle-related proteins, such as cyclin B1, cyclin A, and p-CDK1 (Thr161) were down-regulated, whereas the expression of p21(WAF1/Cip1) and p-CDK1 (Thr14/Tyr15) were up-regulated. Finally, in vivo studies, LL-202 significantly suppressed the growth of MCF-7 breast cancer xenograft tumors in a dose-dependent manner with low systemic toxicity. In conclusion, the results showed that LL-202 had significant anticancer effects against human breast cells via the induction of apoptosis and G2/M phase arrest and it may be a novel anticancer agent for treatment of breast cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Detection of tumor cell-specific mRNA in the peripheral blood of patients with breast cancer—evaluation of several markers with real-time reverse transcription-PCR.

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    Andergassen, Ulrich; Hofmann, Simone; Kölbl, Alexandra C; Schindlbeck, Christian; Neugebauer, Julia; Hutter, Stefan; Engelstädter, Verena; Ilmer, Matthias; Friese, Klaus; Jeschke, Udo

    2013-01-08

    It is widely known that cells from epithelial tumors, e.g., breast cancer, detach from their primary tissue and enter blood circulation. We show that the presence of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in samples of patients with primary and metastatic breast cancer can be detected with an array of selected tumor-marker-genes by reverse transcription real-time PCR. The focus of the presented work is on detecting differences in gene expression between healthy individuals and adjuvant and metastatic breast cancer patients, not an accurate quantification of these differences. Therefore, total RNA was isolated from blood samples of healthy donors and patients with primary or metastatic breast cancer after enrichment of mononuclear cells by density gradient centrifugation. After reverse transcription real-time PCR was carried out with a set of marker genes (BCSP, CK8, Her2, MGL, CK18, CK19). B2M and GAPDH were used as reference genes. Blood samples from patients with metastatic disease revealed increased cytokine gene levels in comparison to normal blood samples. Detection of a single gene was not sufficient to detect CTCs by reverse transcription real-time PCR. Markers used here were selected based on a recent study detecting cancer cells on different protein levels. The combination of such a marker array leads to higher and more specific discovery rates, predominantly in metastatic patients. Identification of CTCs by PCR methods may lead to better diagnosis and prognosis and could help to choose an adequate therapy.

  5. Detection of Tumor Cell-Specific mRNA in the Peripheral Blood of Patients with Breast Cancer — Evaluation of Several Markers with Real-Time Reverse Transcription-PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Andergassen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It is widely known that cells from epithelial tumors, e.g., breast cancer, detach from their primary tissue and enter blood circulation. We show that the presence of circulating tumor cells (CTCs in samples of patients with primary and metastatic breast cancer can be detected with an array of selected tumor-marker-genes by reverse transcription real-time PCR. The focus of the presented work is on detecting differences in gene expression between healthy individuals and adjuvant and metastatic breast cancer patients, not an accurate quantification of these differences. Therefore, total RNA was isolated from blood samples of healthy donors and patients with primary or metastatic breast cancer after enrichment of mononuclear cells by density gradient centrifugation. After reverse transcription real-time PCR was carried out with a set of marker genes (BCSP, CK8, Her2, MGL, CK18, CK19. B2M and GAPDH were used as reference genes. Blood samples from patients with metastatic disease revealed increased cytokine gene levels in comparison to normal blood samples. Detection of a single gene was not sufficient to detect CTCs by reverse transcription real-time PCR. Markers used here were selected based on a recent study detecting cancer cells on different protein levels. The combination of such a marker array leads to higher and more specific discovery rates, predominantly in metastatic patients. Identification of CTCs by PCR methods may lead to better diagnosis and prognosis and could help to choose an adequate therapy.

  6. Polyphenolics from peach (Prunus persica var. Rich Lady) inhibit tumor growth and metastasis of MDA-MB-435 breast cancer cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noratto, Giuliana; Porter, Weston; Byrne, David; Cisneros-Zevallos, Luis

    2014-07-01

    The tumor growth inhibition and anti-metastatic effects of peach polyphenolics were investigated in vivo using a xenograft model and MDA-MB-435 breast cancer cells. Results showed that tumor growth and lung metastasis were inhibited in vivo by peach polyphenolics in a dose range of 0.8-1.6 mg/day, and these effects were mediated by inhibition of metalloproteinases gene expression. Modulation of metalloproteinase-2, metalloproteinase-3 and metalloproteinase-13 gene expression may be some of the molecular targets for anti-metastatic activity of peach polyphenolics. Therefore, these compounds may constitute a novel chemopreventive tool to reduce the risk of metastasis in the combination therapy when primary cancer is diagnosed. Conversion to equivalent human intake for future clinical studies using the body surface area normalization method gave a dose of ~370.6 mg/day for a human adult of 60 kg, which can be supplied by consuming two to three peach fruit per day or alternatively using a dietary supplement peach polyphenol extract powder. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of Phytoestrogen Extracts Isolated from Elder Flower on Hormone Production and Receptor Expression of Trophoblast Tumor Cells JEG-3 and BeWo, as well as MCF7 Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Lennard; Richter, Dagmar Ulrike; Piechulla, Birgit; Chrobak, Mareike; Kuhn, Christina; Schulze, Sandra; Abarzua, Sybille; Jeschke, Udo; Weissenbacher, Tobias

    2016-10-08

    Hereinwe investigated the effect of elderflower extracts (EFE) and of enterolactone/enterodiol on hormone production and proliferation of trophoblast tumor cell lines JEG-3 and BeWo, as well as MCF7 breast cancer cells. The EFE was analyzed by mass spectrometry. Cells were incubated with various concentrations of EFE. Untreated cells served as controls. Supernatants were tested for estradiol production with an ELISA method. Furthermore, the effect of the EFE on ER/ER/PR expression was assessed by immunocytochemistry. EFE contains a substantial amount of lignans. Estradiol production was inhibited in all cells in a concentration-dependent manner. EFE upregulated ER in JEG-3 cell lines. In MCF7 cells, a significant ER downregulation and PR upregulation were observed. The control substances enterolactone and enterodiol in contrast inhibited the expression of both ER and of PR in MCF7 cells. In addition, the production of estradiol was upregulated in BeWo and MCF7 cells in a concentration dependent manner. The downregulating effect of EFE on ER expression and the upregulation of the PR expression in MFC-7 cells are promising results. Therefore, additional unknown substances might be responsible for ER downregulation and PR upregulation. These findings suggest potential use of EFE in breast cancer prevention and/or treatment and warrant further investigation.

  8. Effects of Phytoestrogen Extracts Isolated from Elder Flower on Hormone Production and Receptor Expression of Trophoblast Tumor Cells JEG-3 and BeWo, as well as MCF7 Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lennard Schröder

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Hereinwe investigated the effect of elderflower extracts (EFE and of enterolactone/enterodiol on hormone production and proliferation of trophoblast tumor cell lines JEG-3 and BeWo, as well as MCF7 breast cancer cells. The EFE was analyzed by mass spectrometry. Cells were incubated with various concentrations of EFE. Untreated cells served as controls. Supernatants were tested for estradiol production with an ELISA method. Furthermore, the effect of the EFE on ERα/ERβ/PR expression was assessed by immunocytochemistry. EFE contains a substantial amount of lignans. Estradiol production was inhibited in all cells in a concentration-dependent manner. EFE upregulated ERα in JEG-3 cell lines. In MCF7 cells, a significant ERα downregulation and PR upregulation were observed. The control substances enterolactone and enterodiol in contrast inhibited the expression of both ER and of PR in MCF7 cells. In addition, the production of estradiol was upregulated in BeWo and MCF7 cells in a concentration dependent manner. The downregulating effect of EFE on ERα expression and the upregulation of the PR expression in MFC-7 cells are promising results. Therefore, additional unknown substances might be responsible for ERα downregulation and PR upregulation. These findings suggest potential use of EFE in breast cancer prevention and/or treatment and warrant further investigation.

  9. MMP1, MMP9, and COX2 Expressions in Promonocytes Are Induced by Breast Cancer Cells and Correlate with Collagen Degradation, Transformation-Like Morphological Changes in MCF-10A Acini, and Tumor Aggressiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. K. Chimal-Ramírez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor-associated immune cells often lack immune effector activities, and instead they present protumoral functions. To understand how tumors promote this immunological switch, invasive and noninvasive breast cancer cell (BRC lines were cocultured with a promonocytic cell line in a Matrigel-based 3D system. We hypothesized that if communication exists between tumor and immune cells, coculturing would result in augmented expression of genes associated with tumor malignancy. Upregulation of proteases MMP1 and MMP9 and inflammatory COX2 genes was found likely in response to soluble factors. Interestingly, changes were more apparent in promonocytes and correlated with the aggressiveness of the BRC line. Increased gene expression was confirmed by collagen degradation assays and immunocytochemistry of prostaglandin 2, a product of COX2 activity. Untransformed MCF-10A cells were then used as a sensor of soluble factors with transformation-like capabilities, finding that acini formed in the presence of supernatants of the highly aggressive BRC/promonocyte cocultures often exhibited total loss of the normal architecture. These data support that tumor cells can modify immune cell gene expression and tumor aggressiveness may importantly reside in this capacity. Modeling interactions in the tumor stroma will allow the identification of genes useful as cancer prognostic markers and therapy targets.

  10. In patients with metastatic breast cancer the identification of circulating tumor cells in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition is associated with a poor prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulfoni, Michela; Gerratana, Lorenzo; Del Ben, Fabio; Marzinotto, Stefania; Sorrentino, Marisa; Turetta, Matteo; Scoles, Giacinto; Toffoletto, Barbara; Isola, Miriam; Beltrami, Carlo Alberto; Di Loreto, Carla; Beltrami, Antonio Paolo; Puglisi, Fabio; Cesselli, Daniela

    2016-03-09

    Although recent models suggest that the detection of Circulating Tumor Cells (CTC) in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EM CTC) might be related to disease progression in metastatic breast cancer (MBC) patients, current detection methods are not efficient in identifying this subpopulation of cells. Furthermore, the possible association of EM CTC with both clinicopathological features and prognosis of MBC patients has still to be demonstrated. Aims of this study were: first, to optimize a DEPArray-based protocol meant to identify, quantify and sort single, viable EM CTC and, subsequently, to test the association of EM CTC frequency with clinical data. This prospective observational study enrolled 56 MBC patients regardless of the line of treatment. Blood samples, depleted of CD45(pos) leukocytes, were stained with an antibody cocktail recognizing both epithelial and mesenchymal markers. Four CD45(neg) cell subpopulations were identified: cells expressing only epithelial markers (E CTC), cells co-expressing epithelial and mesenchymal markers (EM CTC), cells expressing only mesenchymal markers (MES) and cells negative for every tested marker (NEG). CTC subpopulations were quantified as both absolute cell count and relative frequency. The association of CTC subpopulations with clinicopathological features, progression free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) was explored by Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test and Univariate Cox Regression Analysis, respectively. By employing the DEPArray-based strategy, we were able to assess the presence of cells pertaining to the above-described classes in every MBC patient. We observed a significant association between specific CD45(neg) subpopulations and tumor subtypes (e.g. NEG and triple negative), proliferation (NEG and Ki67 expression) and sites of metastatic spread (e.g. E CTC and bone; NEG and brain). Importantly, the fraction of CD45(neg) cells co-expressing epithelial and mesenchymal markers (EM CTC) was significantly

  11. Resistin and interleukin-6 exhibit racially-disparate expression in breast cancer patients, display molecular association and promote growth and aggressiveness of tumor cells through STAT3 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Sachin K; Srivastava, Sanjeev K; Bhardwaj, Arun; Singh, Ajay P; Tyagi, Nikhil; Marimuthu, Saravanakumar; Dyess, Donna L; Dal Zotto, Valeria; Carter, James E; Singh, Seema

    2015-05-10

    African-American (AA) women with breast cancer (BC) are diagnosed with more aggressive disease, have higher risk of recurrence and poorer prognosis as compared to Caucasian American (CA) women. Therefore, it is imperative to define the factors associated with such disparities to reduce the unequal burden of cancer. Emerging data suggest that inherent differences exist in the tumor microenvironment of AA and CA BC patients, however, its molecular bases and functional impact have remained poorly understood. Here, we conducted cytokine profiling in serum samples from AA and CA BC patients and identified resistin and IL-6 to be the most differentially-expressed cytokines with relative greater expression in AA patients. Resistin and IL-6 exhibited positive correlation in serum levels and treatment of BC cells with resistin led to enhanced production of IL-6. Moreover, resistin also enhanced the expression and phosphorylation of STAT3, and treatment of BC cells with IL-6-neutralizing antibody prior to resistin stimulation abolished STAT3 phosphorylation. In addition, resistin promoted growth and aggressiveness of BC cells, and these effects were mediated through STAT3 activation. Together, these findings suggest a crucial role of resistin, IL-6 and STAT3 in BC racial disparity.

  12. Three-Dimensional Breast Cancer Models Mimic Hallmarks of Size-Induced Tumor Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manjulata; Mukundan, Shilpaa; Jaramillo, Maria; Oesterreich, Steffi; Sant, Shilpa

    2016-07-01

    Tumor size is strongly correlated with breast cancer metastasis and patient survival. Increased tumor size contributes to hypoxic and metabolic gradients in the solid tumor and to an aggressive tumor phenotype. Thus, it is important to develop three-dimensional (3D) breast tumor models that recapitulate size-induced microenvironmental changes and, consequently, natural tumor progression in real time without the use of artificial culture conditions or gene manipulations. Here, we developed size-controlled multicellular aggregates ("microtumors") of subtype-specific breast cancer cells by using non-adhesive polyethylene glycol dimethacrylate hydrogel microwells of defined sizes (150-600 μm). These 3D microtumor models faithfully represent size-induced microenvironmental changes, such as hypoxic gradients, cellular heterogeneity, and spatial distribution of necrotic/proliferating cells. These microtumors acquire hallmarks of tumor progression in the same cell lines within 6 days. Of note, large microtumors of hormone receptor-positive cells exhibited an aggressive phenotype characterized by collective cell migration and upregulation of mesenchymal markers at mRNA and protein level, which was not observed in small microtumors. Interestingly, triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cell lines did not show size-dependent upregulation of mesenchymal markers. In conclusion, size-controlled microtumor models successfully recapitulated clinically observed positive association between tumor size and aggressive phenotype in hormone receptor-positive breast cancer while maintaining clinically proven poor correlation of tumor size with aggressive phenotype in TNBC. Such clinically relevant 3D models generated under controlled experimental conditions can serve as precise preclinical models to study mechanisms involved in breast tumor progression as well as antitumor drug effects as a function of tumor progression. Cancer Res; 76(13); 3732-43. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American

  13. Next generation sequencing of disseminated tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elen Kristine Møller

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Disseminated tumor cells (DTCs detected in the bone marrow have been shown as an independent prognostic factor for women with breast cancer. However, the mechanisms behind the tumor cell dissemination are still unclear and more detailed knowledge is needed to fully understand why some cells remain dormant and others metastasize. Sequencing of single cells has opened for the possibility to dissect the genetic content of subclones of a primary tumor, as well as DTCs. Previous studies of genetic changes in DTCs have employed single-cell array comparative genomic hybridization which provides information about larger aberrations. To date, next generation sequencing provides the possibility to discover new, smaller and copy neutral genetic changes. In this study, we performed whole genome amplification and subsequently next generation sequencing to analyze DTCs from two breast cancer patients. We compared copy number profiles of the DTCs and the corresponding primary tumor generated from sequencing and SNP-CGH data, respectively. While one tumor revealed mostly whole arm gains and losses, the other had more complex alterations, as well as subclonal amplification and deletions. Whole arm gains or losses in the primary tumor were in general also observed in the corresponding DTC. Both primary tumors showed amplification of chromosome 1q and deletion of parts of chromosome 16q, which was recaptured in the corresponding DTCs. Interestingly, clear differences were also observed, indicating that the DTC underwent further evolution at the copy number level. This study provides a proof-of-principle for sequencing of DTCs and correlation with primary copy number profiles. The analyses allow insight into tumor cell dissemination and show ongoing copy number evolution in DTCs compared to the primary tumors.

  14. A novel 3-D mineralized tumor model to study breast cancer bone metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddharth P Pathi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic bone disease is a frequent cause of morbidity in patients with advanced breast cancer, but the role of the bone mineral hydroxyapatite (HA in this process remains unclear. We have developed a novel mineralized 3-D tumor model and have employed this culture system to systematically investigate the pro-metastatic role of HA under physiologically relevant conditions in vitro.MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells were cultured within non-mineralized or mineralized polymeric scaffolds fabricated by a gas foaming-particulate leaching technique. Tumor cell adhesion, proliferation, and secretion of pro-osteoclastic interleukin-8 (IL-8 was increased in mineralized tumor models as compared to non-mineralized tumor models, and IL-8 secretion was more pronounced for bone-specific MDA-MB231 subpopulations relative to lung-specific breast cancer cells. These differences were pathologically significant as conditioned media collected from mineralized tumor models promoted osteoclastogenesis in an IL-8 dependent manner. Finally, drug testing and signaling studies with transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta confirmed the clinical relevance of our culture system and revealed that breast cancer cell behavior is broadly affected by HA.Our results indicate that HA promotes features associated with the neoplastic and metastatic growth of breast carcinoma cells in bone and that IL-8 may play an important role in this process. The developed mineralized tumor models may help to reveal the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms that may ultimately enable more efficacious therapy of patients with advanced breast cancer.

  15. Macrophage Polarization: Anti-Cancer Strategies to Target Tumor-Associated Macrophage in Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tariq, Muhammad; Zhang, Jieqiong; Liang, Guikai; Ding, Ling; He, Qiaojun; Yang, Bo

    2017-09-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are the most abundant inflammatory cells and orchestrate different stages of breast cancer development. TAMs participate in the tumor angiogenesis, matrix remodeling, invasion, immunosuppression, metastasis, and chemoresistance in breast cancer. Several clinical studies indicate the association between the high influx of TAMs in tumor with poor prognosis in hepatocellular, ovarian, cervical, and breast cancer. Previously developed hypotheses have proposed that TAMs participate in antitumor responses of the body, while recently many clinical and experimental studies have revealed that TAMs in tumor microenvironment predominantly resemble with M2-like polarized macrophages and produce a high amount of anti-inflammatory factors which are directly responsible for the development of tumor. Various studies have shown that TAMs in tumor either enhance or antagonize the anti-tumor efficacy of cytotoxic agents, antibodies-targeting cancer cells, and therapeutic agents depending on the nature of treatment. Thereby, multiple roles of TAMs suggests that it is very important to develop novel therapeutic strategies to target TAMs in breast tumor. In this review, we have discussed the functional role of TAMs in breast cancer and summarized available recent advances potential therapeutic strategies that effectively target to TAMs cells. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 2484-2501, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Detection of circulating tumor cells in blood of metastatic breast cancer patients using a combination of cytokeratin and EpCAM antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissenstein, Ulrike; Schumann, Agnes; Reif, Marcus; Link, Susanne; Toffol-Schmidt, Ulrike D; Heusser, Peter

    2012-05-30

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are detectable in peripheral blood of metastatic breast cancer patients (MBC). In this paper we evaluate a new CTC separation method based on a combination of anti-EpCAM- and anti-cytokeratin magnetic cell separation with the aim to improve CTC detection with low target antigen densities. Blood samples of healthy donors spiked with breast cancer cell line HCC1937 were used to determine accuracy and precision of the method. 10 healthy subjects were examined to evaluate specificity. CTC counts in 59 patients with MBC were measured to evaluate the prognostic value on overall survival. Regression analysis of numbers of recovered vs. spiked HCC1937 cells yielded a coefficient of determination of R(2) = 0.957. The average percentage of cell recovery was 84%. The average within-run coefficient of variation for spiking of 185, 85 and 30 cells was 14%. For spiking of 10 cells the within-run CV was 30%. No CTCs were detected in blood of 10 healthy subjects examined. A standard threshold of 5 CTC/7.5 ml blood as a cut-off point between risk groups led to a highly significant prognostic marker (p < 0.001). To assess the prognostic value of medium CTC levels we additionally considered a low (CTC-L: 0 CTC), a medium (CTC-M: 1-4 CTC) and a high risk group (CTC-H: ≥5 CTC). The effect of this CTC-LMH marker on overall survival was significant as well (p < 0.001). A log-ratio test performed to compare the model with 3 vs. the model with 2 risk groups rejected the model with 2 risk groups (p = 0.026). For CTC as a count variable, we propose an offset reciprocal transformation 1/(1 + x) for overall survival prediction (p < 0.001). We show that our CTC detection method is feasible and leads to accurate and reliable results. Our data suggest that a refined differentiation between patients with different CTC levels is reasonable.

  17. MMP13 is potentially a new tumor marker for breast cancer diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hui-Jen; Yang, Ming-Je; Yang, Yu-Hsiang; Hou, Ming-Feng; Hsueh, Er-Jung; Lin, Shiu-Ru

    2009-11-01

    Within the past decade, the incidence of breast cancer in Taiwan has been rising year after year. Breast cancer is the first most prevalent cancer and the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths among women in Taiwan. The early stage of breast cancer not only have a wider range of therapeutic options, but also obtain a higher success rate of therapy than those with advanced breast cancer. A test for tumor markers is the most convenient method to screen for breast cancer. However, the tumor markers currently available for breast cancer detection include carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), carbohydrate antigen 15.3 (CA15.3), and carbohydrate antigen 27.29 (CA27.29) exhibited certain limitations. Poor sensitivity and specificity greatly limits the diagnostic accuracy of these markers. This study aims to identify potential tumor markers for breast cancer. At first, we analyzed genes expression in infiltrating lobular carcinoma, metaplastic carcinoma, and infiltrating ductal carcinoma of paired specimens (tumor and normal tissue) from breast cancer patients using microarray technology. We selected 371 overexpressed genes in all of the three cell type. In advanced breast cancer tissue, we detected four genes MMP13, CAMP, COL10A1 and FLJ25416 from 25 overexpressed genes which encoded secretion protein more specifically for breast cancer than other genes. After validation with 15 pairs of breast cancer tissue and paired to normal adjacent tissues by membrane array and quantitative RT-PCR, we found MMP13 was 100% overexpressed and confirmed to be a secreted protein by Western blot analysis of the cell culture medium. The expression level of MMP13 was also measured by immunohistochemical staining. We suggest that MMP13 is a highly overexpressed secretion protein in breast cancer tissue. It has potential to be a new tumor marker for breast cancer diagnosis.

  18. Anti-estrogen resistance in breast cancer is induced by the tumor microenvironment and can be overcome by inhibiting mitochondrial function in epithelial cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Goldberg, Allison; Lin, Zhao; Ko, Ying-Hui; Flomenberg, Neal; Wang, Chenguang; Pavlides, Stephanos; Pestell, Richard G; Howell, Anthony; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P

    2011-11-15

    Here, we show that tamoxifen resistance is induced by cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs). Coculture of estrogen receptor positive (ER+) MCF7 cells with fibroblasts induces tamoxifen and fulvestrant resistance with 4.4 and 2.5-fold reductions, respectively, in apoptosis compared with homotypic MCF7 cell cultures. Treatment of MCF7 cells cultured alone with high-energy mitochondrial "fuels" (L-lactate or ketone bodies) is sufficient to confer tamoxifen resistance, mimicking the effects of coculture with fibroblasts. To further demonstrate that epithelial cancer cell mitochondrial activity is the origin of tamoxifen resistance, we employed complementary pharmacological and genetic approaches. First, we studied the effects of two mitochondrial "poisons," namely metformin and arsenic trioxide (ATO), on fibroblast-induced tamoxifen resistance. We show here that treatment with metformin or ATO overcomes fibroblast-induced tamoxifen resistance in MCF7 cells. Treatment with the combination of tamoxifen plus metformin or ATO leads to increases in glucose uptake in MCF7 cells, reflecting metabolic uncoupling between epithelial cancer cells and fibroblasts. In coculture, tamoxifen induces the upregulation of TIGAR (TP53-induced glycolysis and apoptosis regulator), a p53 regulated gene that simultaneously inhibits glycolysis, autophagy and apoptosis and reduces ROS generation, thereby promoting oxidative mitochondrial metabolism. To genetically mimic the effects of coculture, we next recombinantly overexpressed TIGAR in MCF7 cells. Remarkably, TIGAR overexpression protects epithelial cancer cells from tamoxifen-induced apoptosis, providing genetic evidence that increased mitochondrial function confers tamoxifen resistance. Finally, CAFs also protect MCF7 cells against apoptosis induced by other anticancer agents, such as the topoisomerase inhibitor doxorubicin (adriamycin) and the PARP-1 inhibitor ABT-888. These results suggest that the tumor microenvironment may be a general

  19. Benign notochordal cell tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Gamarra, C; Bernabéu Taboada, D; Pozo Kreilinger, J J; Tapia Viñé, M

    2017-08-01

    Benign notochordal cell tumors (TBCN) are lesions with notochordal differentiation which affect the axial skeleton. They are characterized by asymptomatic or non-specific symptomatology and are radiologically unnoticed because of their small size, or because they are mistaken with other benign bone lesions, such as vertebral hemangiomas. When they are large, or symptomatic, can be differential diagnosis with metastases, primary bone tumors and chordomas. We present a case of a TBCN in a 50-year-old woman, with a sacral lesion seen in MRI. A CT-guided biopsy was scheduled to analyze the lesion, finding that the tumor was not clearly recognizable on CT, so the anatomical references of MRI were used to select the appropriate plane. The planning of the approach and the radio-pathological correlation were determinant to reach the definitive diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Ovarian Germ Cell Tumors Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fallopian Tube, & Primary Peritoneal Cancer Screening Research Ovarian Germ Cell Tumors Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Ovarian Germ Cell Tumors Go to Health Professional Version Key ...

  1. Testicular germ cell tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamantopoulos, N; Kortsaris, A

    2010-01-01

    Testicular cancer is the most frequent solid tumor in young male adults and a disease with elusive pathogenesis. Germ cell tumors represent 95% of all testicular cancers. There was an increasing incidence of testicular germ cell tumors during the second half of the 20th century. Despite their increased incidence, mortality is lower than 10% and the cure rate has reached 95%. Epidemiology of the disease shows remarkable geographic and racial variation. Known risk factors and the increased incidence during the last 50 years have led to the development of the two prevalent theories for the pathogenesis of the disease, Henderson theory and Rajpertde Meyts and Skakkebaek theory. Appropriate diagnosis and staging of the disease are crucial for successful management. Testicular ultrasound, CT scans, histological examination and serum tumor markers should be utilized in order to stratify the patient correctly. Treatment strategy is chosen according to the patient stage and prognostic group stratification. "Fine tuning" is needed in order to find the balance between treatment, cure and toxicity. Despite progress in therapeutic management, cure rates for poor risk patients do not exceed 50%. These patients should be encouraged to participate in clinical trials. Long-term toxicity of testicular germ cell tumors' treatment is also another issue that should be kept in mind during follow-up of these patients. This disease became the model of "curable" cancer and gave hope for cure of metastatic malignant diseases in general, as only 400 patients die from this disease in USA annually. More progress will be made only through well-designed clinical trials.

  2. Molecular pathogenesis of progression and recurrence in breast phyllodes tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jara-Lazaro, Ana Richelia; Tan, Puay Hoon

    2009-01-01

    Breast phyllodes tumors are rare fibroepithelial neoplasms that need to be distinguished from the common morphologically similar fibroadenomas, because phyllodes tumors can recur and progress to malignancy. Their potentially recurring and metastasizing behavior is attributed to their stromal characteristics, for which categorization between benign, borderline and malignant tumors have not been universally established. Previous clonality studies revealing monoclonal stromal cells versus a polyclonal epithelial component theorized that phyllodes tumors are mainly stromal neoplasms, possibly arising from fibroadenomas. More recent chromosomal imbalances in both epithelium and stroma have challenged this theory to favor neoplasia of both epithelium and stroma, with initial interdependence between the two components. Inverse correlations between epithelial and stromal overexpression for various biological markers like estrogen receptor, p53, c-kit, Ki-67, endothelin-1, epidermal growth factor receptor, heparan sulfate, in addition to findings of epithelial Wnt signalling with stromal insulin growth factors and beta-catenin expression, suggest an initial epithelial-stromal interdependence at the benign phase. Upon progression to malignancy, the stroma is hypothesized to assume an autonomous growth overriding any epithelial influence. Frequent genetic alterations are chromosomal gains of 1q and losses at chromosome 13. Acquisition of new genetic imbalances within the tumor consistent with intratumoral heterogeneity, and subclones within histologically benign phyllodes tumors that recur or metastasize are the current theories explaining these tumors' unpredictable clinical behavior. PMID:19966935

  3. Differential Ratios of Omega Fatty Acids (AA/EPA+DHA Modulate Growth, Lipid Peroxidation and Expression of Tumor Regulatory MARBPs in Breast Cancer Cell Lines MCF7 and MDA-MB-231.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash P Mansara

    Full Text Available Omega 3 (n3 and Omega 6 (n6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs have been reported to exhibit opposing roles in cancer progression. Our objective was to determine whether different ratios of n6/n3 (AA/EPA+DHA FAs could modulate the cell viability, lipid peroxidation, total cellular fatty acid composition and expression of tumor regulatory Matrix Attachment Region binding proteins (MARBPs in breast cancer cell lines and in non-cancerous, MCF10A cells. Low ratios of n6/n3 (1:2.5, 1:4, 1:5, 1:10 FA decreased the viability and growth of MDA-MB-231 and MCF7 significantly compared to the non-cancerous cells (MCF10A. Contrarily, higher n6/n3 FA (2.5:1, 4:1, 5:1, 10:1 decreased the survival of both the cancerous and non-cancerous cell types. Lower ratios of n6/n3 selectively induced LPO in the breast cancer cells whereas the higher ratios induced in both cancerous and non-cancerous cell types. Interestingly, compared to higher n6/n3 FA ratios, lower ratios increased the expression of tumor suppressor MARBP, SMAR1 and decreased the expression of tumor activator Cux/CDP in both breast cancer and non-cancerous, MCF10A cells. Low n6/n3 FAs significantly increased SMAR1 expression which resulted into activation of p21WAF1/CIP1 in MDA-MB-231 and MCF7, the increase being ratio dependent in MDA-MB-231. These results suggest that increased intake of n3 fatty acids in our diet could help both in the prevention as well as management of breast cancer.

  4. Anti-tumor effects of everolimus and metformin are complementary and glucose-dependent in breast cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ariaans, Gerke; Jalving, Mathilde; de Vries, Emma Geertruida Elisabeth; de Jong, Steven

    2017-01-01

    Background: Clinical efficacy of the mTOR inhibitor everolimus is limited in breast cancer and regularly leads to side-effects including hyperglycemia. The AMPK inhibitor and anti-diabetic drug metformin may counteract everolimus-induced hyperglycemia, as well as enhancing anti-cancer efficacy. We

  5. A comparison of breast cancer tumor cells with varying expression of the Her2/neu receptor by Raman microspectroscopic imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartsuiker, Liesbeth; Zeijen, Nicole Jeane Louise; Zeijen, Nicole J.L.; Terstappen, Leonardus Wendelinus Mathias Marie; Otto, Cornelis

    2010-01-01

    The Her2/neu proto-oncogene is amplified in 25 to 30 percent of human primary breast carcinomas. The roles of Her2/neu have been reported before in literature, showing different relations to intracellular lipid composition. Here, we use Raman microspectroscopic imaging to reveal the chemical

  6. Treatment Approaches to Recurrent Phyllodes Tumors of the Breast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazilet Erözgen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Phyllodes tumors of the breast are a rarely encountered clinical condition. Recurrent cases are even rarer. Treatment protocols vary among breast centers. In our study, we aimed to investigate the prognosis of recurrent breast phyllodes tumors and to present our treatment approach. Methods: Among 31000 patients, who presented to our breast outpatient clinic between March 2005 and December 2011, we retrospectively evaluated three patients with recurrent phyllodes tumors of the breast. Results: The three female patients, aged 24, 28 and 30 years, had been previously operated for phyllodes tumor of the breast. The first tumor localization was the superolateral part of the right breast in all subjects. Recurrences were in the same localizations, but pathologies were more aggressive than the previous reports. In two patients mastectomy and in one breast-conserving surgery were performed. Conclusion: Relapse of phyllodes tumors can result in mastectomy and recurrent phyllodes tumors seem to be more aggressive than the original tumor. (The Me di cal Bul le tin of Ha se ki 2012; 50: 43-7

  7. Tumor Suppression and Sensitization to Taxol-Induced Apoptosis of E1A in Breast Cancer Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liao, Yong

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to study the molecular mechanisms underlying ElA's proapoptotic effect and anti-tumor activity and to dissect the functional domains of ElA that are critical for its antitumor activity...

  8. Estimation of Breast Tumor Conductivity using Parabolic Phase Fitting

    OpenAIRE

    Katscher, U.; Djamshidi, K.; Voigt, T; Ivancevic, M.; Abe, H.; Newstead, G.; Keupp, J.

    2012-01-01

    According to ex vivo studies, breast tumors exhibit a significantlyaltered electric conductivity. This feature opens the chance to increase the specificity of breast tumor characterization with MRI. Theelectric conductivity can be measured in vivo using “Electric Properties Tomography (EPT). EPT has shown its potential in phantom, volunteer, and initial clinical studies. However, the complex frayed structure of fat and ductile tissue in the breast hampers the straight-forward application of E...

  9. Tumor Budding in Breast Carcinoma: Relation to E-Cadherin, MMP-9 Expression, and Metastasis Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Putu Sriwidyani

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tumor budding is a histopathologic entity refers to small cluster of cancer cells at the invasive edge of tumor. It was assumed that tumor budding is linked to epithelial-mesenchymal transition, an early event in metastasis. Objective: This study aimed to find out the correlation of tumor budding with E-cadherin and MMP-9 expression and risk of metastasis in breast carcinoma. Method: We investigated 35 cases breast carcinoma with metastasis and 35 cases without metastasis. The number of tumor budding was counted in cytokeratin-stained slides with 400x magnification (0.57 mm2. Result: Cut-off point by ROC analysis was 11 and the patient was categorized into low grade (0-10 buds and high grade (11 or more buds tumor budding. Inter-observer agreement was good with K value 0.914. Low level of E-cadherin was not significantly correlated with high grade tumor budding (p=0.660, meanwhile high level of MMP-9 was significantly correlated with high grade tumor budding (p=0.001. High grade tumor budding was a significant, independent risk factor of metastasis in breast carcinoma (OR=38.2, 95% CI 7.5-193.7, p<0.001. Conclusion: In conclusion, tumor budding grade is related to level of MMP-9 but has no correlation E-cadherin expression. High grade tumor budding is an independent risk factor of metastasis in breast carcinoma.

  10. The role of lipolysis stimulated lipoprotein receptor in breast cancer and directing breast cancer cell behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise K Reaves

    Full Text Available The claudin-low molecular subtype of breast cancer is of particular interest for clinically the majority of these tumors are poor prognosis, triple negative, invasive ductal carcinomas. Claudin-low tumors are characterized by cancer stem cell-like features and low expression of cell junction and adhesion proteins. Herein, we sought to define the role of lipolysis stimulated lipoprotein receptor (LSR in breast cancer and cancer cell behavior as LSR was recently correlated with tumor-initiating features. We show that LSR was expressed in epithelium, endothelium, and stromal cells within the healthy breast tissue, as well as in tumor epithelium. In primary breast tumor bioposies, LSR expression was significantly correlated with invasive ductal carcinomas compared to invasive lobular carcinomas, as well as ERα positive tumors and breast cancer cell lines. LSR levels were significantly reduced in claudin-low breast cancer cell lines and functional studies illustrated that re-introduction of LSR into a claudin-low cell line suppressed the EMT phenotype and reduced individual cell migration. However, our data suggest that LSR may promote collective cell migration. Re-introduction of LSR in claudin-low breast cancer cell lines reestablished tight junction protein expression and correlated with transepithelial electrical resistance, thereby reverting claudin-low lines to other intrinsic molecular subtypes. Moreover, overexpression of LSR altered gene expression of pathways involved in transformation and tumorigenesis as well as enhanced proliferation and survival in anchorage independent conditions, highlighting that reestablishment of LSR signaling promotes aggressive/tumor initiating cell behaviors. Collectively, these data highlight a direct role for LSR in driving aggressive breast cancer behavior.

  11. Male Malignant Phyllodes Breast Tumor After Prophylactic Breast Radiotherapy and Bicalutamide Treatment: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karihtala, Peeter; Rissanen, Tarja; Tuominen, Hannu

    2016-07-01

    Phyllodes tumor in male breast is an exceptionally rare neoplasm with only few published case reports. Herein, we present a case of malignant phyllodes tumor in male breast nine years after prophylactic breast 10 Gy radiotherapy and after nine year bicalutamide treatment. The imaging findings of the tumor and pathological correlation are also presented. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  12. Syncytin is involved in breast cancer-endothelial cell fusions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, B; Holck, Susanne; Christensen, Ib Jarle

    2006-01-01

    Cancer cells can fuse spontaneously with normal host cells, including endothelial cells, and such fusions may strongly modulate the biological behaviour of tumors. However, the underlying mechanisms are unknown. We now show that human breast cancer cell lines and 63 out of 165 (38%) breast cancer...... and inhibits fusions between breast cancer cells and endothelial cells. Moreover, a syncytin inhibitory peptide also inhibits fusions between cancer and endothelial cells. These results are the first to show that syncytin is expressed by human cancer cells and is involved in cancer-endothelial cell fusions....

  13. Technology of building an expert system based on a set of quantitative features of tumor cell nuclei for diagnosing breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirillov, Vladimir

    2013-06-01

    The technology of building an expert system for diagnosing malignant nature of invasive tumors of the mammary gland based on a set of quantitative features of the cell nuclei has been developed. Its peculiarity was the presence of weighting coefficients in all the features. Quantitative features were obtained by transforming the initial morphometric data with the help of simple (evaluation of mean values and building of histograms) and complex (regression analysis) mathematical operations. The expert system consisted of one-dimensional X-matrix used for investigations and two-dimensional standard S-matrix. The X-matrix elements were assigned for filling with the quantitative features of the studied sample with a nonestablished diagnosis. The S-matrix elements contained threshold values of quantitative features from the system of diagnostic decision criteria for malignant forms of diseases and their weighting coefficients. Threshold values of nuclear features (larger or smaller) were determined taking into account the range of their values in the groups of malignant and benign pathology. Significance of quantitative features in diagnosing diseases has been assessed. The presence of weighting coefficients allowed diagnosing malignant and benign pathology in a quantitative form by the diagnostic index value. Diagnostic index was calculated by the sum of weighting coefficients of features of the studied sample, which fell within the range of system of the S-matrix diagnostic decision criteria. Clinical trials revealed high efficiency of the developed approach while diagnosis of breast cancer invasive forms at a preoperative stage. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Nerve Fibers in Breast Cancer Tissues Indicate Aggressive Tumor Progression

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Di; Su, Shicheng; Cui, Xiuying; Shen, Ximing; Zeng, Yunjie; Wu, Wei; Chen, Jianing; Chen, Fei; He, Chonghua; Liu, Jiang; Huang, Wei; Liu, Qiang; Su, Fengxi; Song, Erwei; Ouyang, Nengtai

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Emerging evidence has indicated nerve fibers as a marker in the progression of various types of cancers, such as pancreatic cancer and prostate cancer. However, whether nerve fibers are associated with breast cancer progression remains unclear. In this study, we evaluated the presence of nerve fibers in 352 breast cancer specimens and 83 benign breast tissue specimens including 43 cases of cystic fibrosis and 40 cases of fibroadenoma from 2 independent breast tumor center using immun...

  15. Osteoprotegerin rich tumor microenvironment: implications in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Sudeshna; Sharma-Walia, Neelam

    2016-07-05

    Osteoprotegerin (OPG) is a soluble decoy receptor for tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL). It belongs to the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily (TNFRSF). OPG was initially discovered to contribute to homeostasis of bone turnover due to its capability of binding to receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kB). However, apart from bone turnover, OPG plays important and diverse role(s) in many biological functions. Besides having anti-osteoclastic activity, OPG is thought to exert a protective anti-apoptotic action in OPG-expressing tumors by overcoming the physiologic mechanism of tumor surveillance exerted by TRAIL. Along with inhibiting TRAIL induced apoptosis, it can induce proliferation by binding to various cell surface receptors and thus turning on the canonical cell survival and proliferative pathways. OPG also induces angiogenesis, one of the hallmarks of cancer, thus facilitating tumor growth. Recently, the understanding of OPG and its different roles has been augmented substantially. This review is aimed at providing a very informative overview as to how OPG affects cancer progression especially breast cancer.

  16. Pericytes limit tumor cell metastasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xian, Xiaojie; Håkansson, Joakim; Ståhlberg, Anders

    2006-01-01

    Previously we observed that neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) deficiency in beta tumor cells facilitates metastasis into distant organs and local lymph nodes. Here, we show that NCAM-deficient beta cell tumors grew leaky blood vessels with perturbed pericyte-endothelial cell-cell interactions...... the microvessel wall. To directly address whether pericyte dysfunction increases the metastatic potential of solid tumors, we studied beta cell tumorigenesis in primary pericyte-deficient Pdgfb(ret/ret) mice. This resulted in beta tumor cell metastases in distant organs and local lymph nodes, demonstrating a role...... and deficient perivascular deposition of ECM components. Conversely, tumor cell expression of NCAM in a fibrosarcoma model (T241) improved pericyte recruitment and increased perivascular deposition of ECM molecules. Together, these findings suggest that NCAM may limit tumor cell metastasis by stabilizing...

  17. Biophysical Profiling of Tumor Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick Coffman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite significant differences in genetic profiles, cancer cells share common phenotypic properties, including membrane-associated changes that facilitate invasion and metastasis. The Corning Epic® optical biosensor was used to monitor dynamic mass rearrangements within and proximal to the cell membrane in tumor cell lines derived from cancers of the colon, bone, cervix, lung and breast. Data was collected in real time and required no exogenously added signaling moiety (signal-free technology. Cell lines displayed unique profiles over the time-courses: the time-courses all displayed initial signal increases to maximal values, but the rate of increase to those maxima and the value of those maxima were distinct for each cell line. The rate of decline following the maxima also differed among cell lines. There were correlations between the signal maxima and the observed metastatic behavior of the cells in xenograft experiments; for most cell types the cells that were more highly metastatic in mice had lower time-course maxima values, however the reverse was seen in breast cancer cells. The unique profiles of these cell lines and the correlation of at least one profile characteristic with metastatic behavior demonstrate the potential utility of biophysical tumor cell profiling in the study of cancer biology.

  18. Cellular Interaction and Tumoral Penetration Properties of Cyclodextrin Nanoparticles on 3D Breast Tumor Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamze Varan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Amphiphilic cyclodextrins are biocompatible oligosaccharides that can be used for drug delivery especially for the delivery of drugs with solubility problems thanks to their unique molecular structures. In this paper, Paclitaxel was used as a model anticancer drug to determine the inclusion complex properties of amphiphilic cyclodextrins with different surface charge. Paclitaxel-loaded cyclodextrin nanoparticles were characterized in terms of mean particle diameter, zeta potential, encapsulation efficacy, drug release profile and cell culture studies. It was determined that the nanoparticles prepared from the inclusion complex according to characterization studies have a longer release profile than the conventionally prepared nanoparticles. In order to mimic the tumor microenvironment, breast cancer cells and healthy fibroblast cells were used in 3-dimensional (3D cell culture studies. It was determined that the activities of nanoparticles prepared by conventional methods behave differently in 2-dimensional (2D and 3D cell cultures. In addition, it was observed that the nanoparticles prepared from the inclusion complex have a stronger anti-tumoral activity in the 3D multicellular tumor model than the drug solution. Furthermore, polycationic amphiphilic cyclodextrin nanoparticles can diffuse and penetrate through multilayer cells in a 3D tumor model, which is crucial for an eventual antitumor effect.

  19. A Targetable EGFR-Dependent Tumor-Initiating Program in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Savage

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Therapies targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR have variable and unpredictable responses in breast cancer. Screening triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC patient-derived xenografts (PDXs, we identify a subset responsive to EGFR inhibition by gefitinib, which displays heterogeneous expression of wild-type EGFR. Deep single-cell RNA sequencing of 3,500 cells from an exceptional responder identified subpopulations displaying distinct biological features, where elevated EGFR expression was significantly enriched in a mesenchymal/stem-like cellular cluster. Sorted EGFRhi subpopulations exhibited enhanced stem-like features, including ALDH activity, sphere-forming efficiency, and tumorigenic and metastatic potential. EGFRhi cells gave rise to EGFRhi and EGFRlo cells in primary and metastatic tumors, demonstrating an EGFR-dependent expansion and hierarchical state transition. Similar tumorigenic EGFRhi subpopulations were identified in independent PDXs, where heterogeneous EGFR expression correlated with gefitinib sensitivity. This provides new understanding for an EGFR-dependent hierarchy in TNBC and for patient stratification for therapeutic intervention. : Savage et al. demonstrate that sensitivity to EGFR inhibitor, gefitinib, in triple-negative breast cancer is paradoxically associated with EGFR heterogeneity. Using single-cell RNA sequencing in conjunction with functional assays, they identify TNBC tumors in which EGFR expression identifies cells with tumor-initiating capacity whose proliferative expansion is sensitive to EGFR inhibition. Keywords: breast cancer, tumor heterogeneity, patient-derived xenograft, single-cell RNA sequencing, EGFR inhibition, therapeutic response, tumor-initiating cell, cell hierarchy, BRCA1 mutation

  20. Vasodilator-Stimulated Phosphoprotein (VASP) depletion from breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells inhibits tumor spheroid invasion through downregulation of Migfilin, β-catenin and urokinase-plasminogen activator (uPA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gkretsi, Vasiliki; Stylianou, Andreas; Stylianopoulos, Triantafyllos, E-mail: tstylian@ucy.ac.cy

    2017-03-15

    A hallmark of cancer cells is their ability to invade surrounding tissues and form metastases. Cell-extracellular matrix (ECM)-adhesion proteins are crucial in metastasis, connecting tumor ECM with actin cytoskeleton thus enabling cells to respond to mechanical cues. Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) is an actin-polymerization regulator which interacts with cell-ECM adhesion protein Migfilin, and regulates cell migration. We compared VASP expression in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer (BC) cells and found that more invasive MDA-MB-231 cells overexpress VASP. We then utilized a 3-dimensional (3D) approach to study metastasis in MDA-MB-231 cells using a system that considers mechanical forces exerted by the ECM. We prepared 3D collagen I gels of increasing concentration, imaged them by atomic force microscopy, and used them to either embed cells or tumor spheroids, in the presence or absence of VASP. We show, for the first time, that VASP silencing downregulated Migfilin, β-catenin and urokinase plasminogen activator both in 2D and 3D, suggesting a matrix-independent mechanism. Tumor spheroids lacking VASP demonstrated impaired invasion, indicating VASP’s involvement in metastasis, which was corroborated by Kaplan-Meier plotter showing high VASP expression to be associated with poor remission-free survival in lymph node-positive BC patients. Hence, VASP may be a novel BC metastasis biomarker. - Highlights: • More invasive MDA-MB-231 overexpress VASP compared to MCF-7 breast cancer cells. • We prepared 3D collagen I gels of increasing concentration and characterized them. • VASP silencing downregulated Migfilin, β-catenin and uPA both in 2D and 3D culture. • Tumor spheroids lacking VASP demonstrated impaired invasion. • Kaplan-Meier plotter shows association of high VASP expression with poor survival.

  1. [Breast carcinoma metastasis into a renal cell carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Christophe; Talarmin, Marie; Fontaine, Aurélie; Kerbrat, Pierre; Audrain, Odile; Rioux-Leclercq, Nathalie; Chiforeanu, Dan Cristian

    2011-10-01

    We report the case of a patient carrying a right breast carcinoma whose imaging exams showed lung and bone metastasic release, and incidentally synchronous right renal tumor. Histologic examination of the renal tumor found a mammary carcinoma metastasis into a clear renal cell carcinoma. This is the second case report of breast cancer with metastasis in a resected renal clear cell carcinoma. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Metastatic tumors in the breast: a report of 5 cases and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canda, Aras Emre; Sevinc, Ali Ibrahim; Kocdor, Mehmet Ali; Canda, Tulay; Balci, Pinar; Saydam, Serdar; Harmancioglu, Omer

    2007-06-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women. However, metastases to the breast from nonmammary malignant neoplasms are rare and were detected at a rate of 0.28% in our series. Clinical and pathologic findings in 5 cases of metastatic tumors (malign mesenchymal tumor, squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and Sézary syndrome) in the breast are presented and discussed with respect to the literature. Detailed clinical history and a multidisciplinary approach are useful in establishing correct diagnosis and preventing unnecessary radical surgery.

  3. Tumor microenvironment: driving forces and potential therapeutic targets for breast cancer metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hong-Yan; Shao, Zhi-Min; Li, Da-Qiang

    2017-03-29

    Distant metastasis to specific target organs is responsible for over 90% of breast cancer-related deaths, but the underlying molecular mechanism is unclear. Mounting evidence suggests that the interplay between breast cancer cells and the target organ microenvironment is the key determinant of organ-specific metastasis of this lethal disease. Here, we highlight new findings and concepts concerning the emerging role of the tumor microenvironment in breast cancer metastasis; we also discuss potential therapeutic intervention strategies aimed at targeting components of the tumor microenvironment.

  4. Non-overlapping activities of ADF and cofilin-1 during the migration of metastatic breast tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahtamouni, Lubna H; Shaw, Alisa E; Hasan, Maram H; Yasin, Salem R; Bamburg, James R

    2013-10-05

    ADF/cofilin proteins are key modulators of actin dynamics in metastasis and invasion of cancer cells. Here we focused on the roles of ADF and cofilin-1 individually in the development of polarized migration of rat mammary adenocarcinoma (MTLn3) cells, which express nearly equal amounts of each protein. Small interference RNA (siRNA) technology was used to knockdown (KD) the expression of ADF and cofilin-1 independently. Either ADF KD or cofilin KD caused cell elongation, a reduction in cell area, a decreased ability to form invadopodia, and a decreased percentage of polarized cells after 180 s of epidermal growth factor stimulation. Moreover, ADF KD or cofilin KD increased the rate of cell migration and the time of lamellipodia protrusion but through different mechanisms: lamellipodia protrude more frequently in ADF KD cells and are more persistent in cofilin KD cells. ADF KD cells showed a significant increase in F-actin aggregates, whereas cofilin KD cells showed a significant increase in prominent F-actin bundles and increased cell adhesion. Focal adhesion area and cell adhesion in cofilin KD cells were returned to control levels by expressing exogenous cofilin but not ADF. Return to control rates of cell migration in ADF KD cells was achieved by expression of exogenous ADF but not cofilin, whereas in cofilin KD cells, expression of cofilin efficiently rescued control migration rates. Although ADF and cofilin have many redundant functions, each of these isoforms has functional differences that affect F-actin structures, cell adhesion and lamellipodial dynamics, all of which are important determinants of cell migration.

  5. T cell recognition of breast cancer antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nadia Viborg; Andersen, Sofie Ramskov; Andersen, Rikke Sick

    Recent studies are encouraging research of breast cancer immunogenicity to evaluate the applicability ofimmunotherapy as a treatment strategy. The epitope landscape in breast cancer is minimally described, thus it is necessary to identify T cell targets to develop immune mediated therapies.......This project investigates four proteins commonly upregulated in breast cancer and thus probable tumor associated antigens (TAAs). Aromatase, prolactin, NEK3, and PIAS3 contribute to increase growth, survival, and motility of malignant cells. Aspiring to uncover novel epitopes for cytotoxic T cells, a reverse...... immunology approach is applied. Via in silico screening of the protein sequences, 415 peptides were predicted as HLA-A*0201 and HLA-B*0702 binders. Subsequent in vitro binding analysis in a MHC ELISA platform confirmed binding for 147 of the 415 predicted binders. The 147 peptides were evaluated for T cell...

  6. Giant phyllodes tumor of the breast: a clinical observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Volchenko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes a case of giant phyllodes tumor of the breast. Phyllodes tumor is a rare type of fibroepithelial tumor composed of epithelial and connective tissue with the predominant development of a connective tissue component. Surgery is the only radical treatment.

  7. Differential Processing of Cyclin E Variants in Normal vs Tumor cells and their Role in Breast Cancer Oncogenesis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McGahren, Mollianne

    2003-01-01

    ... and S. This commits the cell to complete one round of cell division. Previous findings by this laboratory have found that overexpression of cyclin E and the presence of lower molecular weight isoforms (LMW...

  8. Differential Processing of Cyclin E Variants in Normal Versus Tumor Cells and Their Role in Breast Cancer Oncogenesis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McGahren, Mollianne

    2002-01-01

    ... and S. This commits the cell to complete one round of cell division. Previous findings by this laboratory have found that overexpression of cyclin E and the presence of lower molecular weight isoforms (LMW...

  9. Diet, Stem Cells, and Breast Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    abrogated by small interfering RNA to PTEN, indicating PTEN-dependence. Using FACS analysis , we showed that GEN induced cell cycle arrest at G0-G1 phase...isolated from WT (PND 100) and Tg (PND75) mice. The percentage of mammary SCs was quantified by Fluorescence activated cell sorting analysis of...fruits and vegetables in breast cancer prevention due to their phytochemical components, yet mechanisms underlying their presumed anti-tumor activities

  10. Malignant small round cell tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajwanshi, Arvind; Srinivas, Radhika; Upasana, Gautam

    2009-01-01

    Malignant small round cell tumors are characterised by small, round, relatively undifferentiated cells. They generally include Ewing's sarcoma, peripheral neuroectodermal tumor, rhabdomyosarcoma, synovial sarcoma, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, retinoblastoma, neuroblastoma, hepatoblastoma, and nephroblastoma or Wilms’ tumor. Other differential diagnoses of small round cell tumors include small cell osteogenic sarcoma, undifferentiated hepatoblastoma, granulocytic sarcoma, and intraabdominal desmoplastic small round cell tumor. Differential diagnosis of small round cell tumors is particularly difficult due to their undifferentiated or primitive character. Tumors that show good differentiation are generally easy to diagnose, but when a tumor is poorly differentiated, identification of the diagnostic, morphological features is difficult and therefore, no definitive diagnosis may be possible. As seen in several study reports, fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) has become an important modality of diagnosis for these tumors. The technique yields adequate numbers of dissociated, viable cells, making it ideally suitable for ancillary techniques. Typically, a multimodal approach is employed and the principal ancillary techniques that have been found to be useful in classification are immunohistochemistry and immunophenotyping by flow cytometry, reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and electron microscopy. However, the recent characterization of chromosomal breakpoints and the corresponding genes involved in malignant small round cell tumors means that it is possible to use molecular genetic approaches for detection. PMID:21938141

  11. Noninvasive measurement of the electrical bioimpedance of breast tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmine, Y; Morimoto, T; Kinouchi, Y; Iritani, T; Takeuchi, M; Monden, Y

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the possibility of differential diagnosis of tumors, such as breast cancer, by measuring the mammary electrical bioimpedance via the skin surface noninvasively and by examining the relationship between the tissue structure of the breast and electrical bioimpedance. The mammary electrical bioimpedance was measured in 24 patients with breast cancer. Taking into account the measurement results and the distribution of the mammary glands and fatty tissue, a breast model with tumors was proposed. Based on this model, the distributions of the electric potential and electric field in the tissue were theoretically analyzed by the three-dimensional finite element method. In clinical cases, the Re values of the diseased breast were significantly larger than those of the contralateral healthy breast. In theoretical analysis based on the breast model, the Re value of mammary electrical bioimpedance varied due to the structure of the breast, that is, the ratio of fatty tissue to mammary gland and the presence of mammary tumors. The results of the measurement agreed with the theoretical analyses. These results suggest that differential diagnosis of breast tumors is possible by measuring the mammary electrical bioimpedance using noninvasive electrodes on the skin.

  12. Expression of EMT markers and mode of surgery are prognostic in phyllodes tumors of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiaolong; Zhao, Lin; Shen, Honghong; Liu, Xiaozhen; Yang, Yang; Lv, Shuhua; Niu, Yun

    2017-05-16

    Phyllodes tumors of the breast are rare neoplasms that account for tumors and 2-3% of fibro-epithelial neoplasms of the breast. We evaluated the clinicopathological characteristics of a cohort of 246 Chinese patients in relation to the expression of epithelial-to-mesenchymal (EMT) markers in benign, borderline and malignant tumors and the prognostic value of different surgical regimens. We observed that survival outcomes correlated with the mode of surgical management in the three patient groups. Expression of E-cadherin, Snail, Slug and Twist were higher in epithelial cells from borderline and malignant tumors than those in benign tumors, whereas the expression of N-cadherin was opposite. Levels of the EMT markers Snail and Slug in the stromal compartment increased with the advancing tumor grade. Expression of mesenchymal stem cell markers contributed to the inherent heterogeneity in the malignant tumors. Based on Cox models, surgical management emerged as an independent predictor for disease-free survival, whereas a history of recent growth and tumor grade were independent predictors for overall survival. These findings show that expression of EMT markers, the mode of surgical management, and a history of recent tumor growth had prognostic potential for patients with phyllodes tumors of the breast.

  13. Expression of EMT markers and mode of surgery are prognostic in phyllodes tumors of the breast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiaolong; Zhao, Lin; Shen, Honghong; Liu, Xiaozhen; Yang, Yang; Lv, Shuhua; Niu, Yun

    2017-01-01

    Phyllodes tumors of the breast are rare neoplasms that account for tumors and 2-3% of fibro-epithelial neoplasms of the breast. We evaluated the clinicopathological characteristics of a cohort of 246 Chinese patients in relation to the expression of epithelial-to-mesenchymal (EMT) markers in benign, borderline and malignant tumors and the prognostic value of different surgical regimens. We observed that survival outcomes correlated with the mode of surgical management in the three patient groups. Expression of E-cadherin, Snail, Slug and Twist were higher in epithelial cells from borderline and malignant tumors than those in benign tumors, whereas the expression of N-cadherin was opposite. Levels of the EMT markers Snail and Slug in the stromal compartment increased with the advancing tumor grade. Expression of mesenchymal stem cell markers contributed to the inherent heterogeneity in the malignant tumors. Based on Cox models, surgical management emerged as an independent predictor for disease-free survival, whereas a history of recent growth and tumor grade were independent predictors for overall survival. These findings show that expression of EMT markers, the mode of surgical management, and a history of recent tumor growth had prognostic potential for patients with phyllodes tumors of the breast. PMID:28380418

  14. The Pit-1/Pou1f1 transcription factor regulates and correlates with prolactin expression in human breast cell lines and tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Batalla, I; Seoane, S; Macia, M; Garcia-Caballero, T; Gonzalez, L O; Vizoso, F; Perez-Fernandez, R

    2010-01-01

    The transcription factor Pit-1/Pou1f1 regulates GH and prolactin (PRL) secretion in the pituitary gland. Pit-1 expression and GH regulation by Pit-1 have also been demonstrated in mammary gland. However, no data are available on the role of Pit-1 on breast PRL. To evaluate this role, several human breast cancer cell lines were transfected with either the Pit-1 expression vector or a Pit-1 small interference RNA construct, followed by PRL mRNA and protein evaluation. In addition, transient transfection of MCF-7 cells by a reporter construct containing the proximal PRL promoter, and ChIP assays were performed. Our data indicate that Pit-1 regulates mammary PRL at transcriptional level by binding to the proximal PRL promoter. We also found that Pit-1 raises cyclin D1 expression before increasing PRL levels, suggesting a PRL-independent effect of Pit-1 on cell proliferation. By using immunohistochemistry, we found a significant correlation between Pit-1 and PRL expression in 94 human breast invasive ductal carcinomas. Considering the possible role of PRL in breast cancer disorders, the function of Pit-1 in breast should be the focus of further research. PMID:19808898

  15. Switching addictions between HER2 and FGFR2 in HER2-positive breast tumor cells: FGFR2 as a potential target for salvage after lapatinib failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azuma, Koichi [Department of Medical Oncology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, 377-2 Ohnohigashi, Osakasayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan); Tsurutani, Junji, E-mail: tsurutani_j@dotd.med.kindai.ac.jp [Department of Medical Oncology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, 377-2 Ohnohigashi, Osakasayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan); Sakai, Kazuko; Kaneda, Hiroyasu [Department of Genome Biology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, 377-2 Ohnohigashi, Osakasayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan); Fujisaka, Yasuhito; Takeda, Masayuki [Department of Medical Oncology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, 377-2 Ohnohigashi, Osakasayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan); Watatani, Masahiro [Department of Surgery, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, 377-2 Ohnohigashi, Osakasayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan); Arao, Tokuzo [Department of Genome Biology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, 377-2 Ohnohigashi, Osakasayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan); Satoh, Taroh; Okamoto, Isamu; Kurata, Takayasu [Department of Medical Oncology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, 377-2 Ohnohigashi, Osakasayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan); Nishio, Kazuto [Department of Genome Biology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, 377-2 Ohnohigashi, Osakasayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan); Nakagawa, Kazuhiko [Department of Medical Oncology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, 377-2 Ohnohigashi, Osakasayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan)

    2011-04-01

    Highlights: {yields} A lapatinib-resistant breast cancer cell line, UACC812 (UACC812/LR), was found to harbor amplification of the FGFR2 gene. {yields} Inhibition of the molecule by a specific inhibitor of FGFR dramatically induced growth inhibition accompanied by cell death. {yields} Immunohistochemical analysis of patients with HER2-positive breast cancer demonstrated an association between FGFR2 expression and poor outcome for lapatinib-containing chemotherapy. -- Abstract: Agents that target HER2 have improved the prognosis of patients with HER2-amplified breast cancers. However, patients who initially respond to such targeted therapy eventually develop resistance to the treatment. We have established a line of lapatinib-resistant breast cancer cells (UACC812/LR) by chronic exposure of HER2-amplified and lapatinib-sensitive UACC812 cells to the drug. The mechanism by which UACC812/LR acquired resistance to lapatinib was explored using comprehensive gene hybridization. The FGFR2 gene in UACC812/LR was highly amplified, accompanied by overexpression of FGFR2 and reduced expression of HER2, and a cell proliferation assay showed that the IC{sub 50} of PD173074, a small-molecule inhibitor of FGFR tyrosine kinase, was 10,000 times lower in UACC812/LR than in the parent cells. PD173074 decreased the phosphorylation of FGFR2 and substantially induced apoptosis in UACC812/LR, but not in the parent cells. FGFR2 appeared to be a pivotal molecule for the survival of UACC812/LR as they became independent of the HER2 pathway, suggesting that a switch of addiction from the HER2 to the FGFR2 pathway enabled cancer cells to become resistant to HER2-targeted therapy. The present study is the first to implicate FGFR in the development of resistance to lapatinib in cancer, and suggests that FGFR-targeted therapy might become a promising salvage strategy after lapatinib failure in patients with HER2-positive breast cancer.

  16. Pattern of Ipsilateral Breast Tumor Recurrence After Breast-Conserving Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jobsen, Jan; van der Palen, Jacobus Adrianus Maria; Riemersma, Sietske; Heijmans, Harald; Ong, Francisca; Struikmans, Henk

    2014-01-01

    The rate of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) in breast cancer after breast-conserving therapy was analyzed. We demonstrate that after 12 years' follow-up, there is an especially high recurrence rate for women ≤40 years old. For women ≤40 years old, the absence of adjuvant systemic therapy

  17. Epigenetic silencing of the tumor suppressor klotho in human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinek, Tami; Shulman, Michal; Israeli, Shira; Bose, Shikha; Avraham, Ayelet; Zundelevich, Adi; Evron, Ella; Gal-Yam, Einav Nili; Kaufman, Bella; Wolf, Ido

    2012-06-01

    Klotho is a single pass transmembrane protein, associated with premature aging. We identified tumor suppressor activities for klotho, associated with reduced expression in breast cancer. We now aimed to analyze klotho expression in early stages of breast tumorigenesis and elucidate mechanisms leading to klotho silencing in breast tumors. We studied klotho expression, using immunohistochemistry, and found high klotho expression in all normal and mild hyperplasia samples, whereas reduced expression was associated with moderate and atypical ductal hyperplasia. Promoter methylation and histone deacetylation were studied as possible mechanisms for klotho silencing. Using bisulfite sequencing, and methylation-specific PCR, we identified KLOTHO promoter methylation in five breast cancer cell lines and in hyperplastic MCF-12A cells, but not in the non-tumorous mammary cell line HB2. Importantly, methylation status inversely correlated with klotho mRNA levels, and treatment of breast caner cells with 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine elevated klotho expression by up to 150-fold. KLOTHO promoter methylation was detected in 8/23 of breast cancer samples but not in normal breast samples. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that in HB2 KLOTHO promoter was enriched with AcH3K9; however, in breast cancer cells, H3K9 was deacetylated, and treatment with the histone deacetylase inhibitor suberoylanilide bishydroxamide (SAHA) restored H3K9 acetylation. Taken together, these data indicate loss of klotho expression as an early event in breast cancer development, and suggest a role for DNA methylation and histone deacetylation in klotho silencing. Klotho expression and methylation may, therefore, serve as early markers for breast tumorigenesis.

  18. Phyllodes tumor masquerading as a fungating breast mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Nolan R; Carlson, Jacob T; Barnard, Kayla J; Henry-Tillman, Ronda

    2017-12-01

    Phyllodes tumor of the breast is an uncommonly encountered disease. The tumor presenting as fungating breast mass or 'ruptured' breast is an even more rare presentation of an unusual disease. This report documents the case of a 60-year-old female with delayed presentation of a large exophytic mass of the left breast. Biopsy of this lesion was non-diagnostic, so excision via left total mastectomy was performed. The final pathology was consistent with malignant phyllodes tumor. This report highlights the features of a rare breast cancer, the challenges in obtaining a definitive diagnosis, and the treatment of this disease, in an effort to provide clinicians with an example of the management of such a peculiar entity.

  19. Identification of high independent prognostic value of nanotechnology based circulating tumor cell enumeration in first-line chemotherapy for metastatic breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Ran; Shao, Bin; Peng, Jia-Xi; Li, Hui-Ping; Yang, Yan-Lian; Kong, Wei-Yao; Song, Guo-Hong; Jiang, Han-Fang; Liang, Xu; Yan, Ying

    2017-04-01

    Enumeration of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is a promising tool in the management of metastatic breast cancer (MBC). This study investigated the capturing efficiency and prognostic value of our previously reported peptide-based nanomagnetic CTC isolation system (Pep@MNPs). We counted CTCs in blood samples taken at baseline (n = 102) and later at patients' first clinical evaluation after starting firstline chemotherapy (n = 72) in a cohort of women treated for MBC. Their median follow-up was 16.3 months (range: 9.0-31.0 months). The CTC detection rate was 69.6 % for the baseline samples. Patients with ≤2 CTC/2 ml at baseline had longer median progression-free survival (PFS) than did those with >2 CTC/2 ml (17.0 months vs. 8.0 months; P = 0.002). Patients with ≤2 CTC/2 ml both at baseline and first clinical evaluation had longest PFS (18.2 months) among all patient groups (P = 0.004). Particularly, among patients with stable disease (SD; per imaging evaluation) our assay could identify those with longer PFS (P 2 CTC/2 ml at baseline were also significantly more likely to suffer liver metastasis (P = 0.010). This study confirmed the prognostic value of Pep@MNPs assays for MBC patients who undergo firstline chemotherapy, and offered extra stratification regarding PFS for patients with SD, and a possible indicator for patients at risk for liver metastasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Tumor-to-breast volume ratio as measured on MRI: a possible predictor of breast-conserving surgery versus mastectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faermann, Renata; Sperber, Fani; Schneebaum, Schlomo; Barsuk, Daphna

    2014-02-01

    The surgical approach to breast cancer changed dramatically in the past 20 years. The surgical objective today is to remove the tumor, ensuring negative margins and good cosmetic results, and preserving the breast when possible. Magnetic resonance imaging of the breast has become an essential imaging tool prior to surgery, diagnosing additional tumors and assessing tumor extent. Tumor-to-breast volume ratio, an important predictor of breast conservation, can be measured with MRI and may change the surgical decision. To measure the tumor-to-breast volume ratio using MRI in order to assess whether there is a correlation between this ratio and the type of surgery selected (breast-conserving or mastectomy). The volumes of the tumor and the breast and the tumor-to-breast volume ratio were retrospectively calculated using preoperative breast MRI in 76 patients who underwent breast-conserving surgery or mastectomy. Breast-conserving surgery (lumpectomy) was performed in 64 patients and mastectomy in 12. The average tumor-to-breast volume ratio was 0.06 (6%) in the lumpectomy group and 0.30 (30%) in the mastectomy group (P < 0.0001). The tumor-to-breast volume ratio correlated with the type of surgery. As measured on MRI, this ratio is an accurate means of determining the type of surgery best suited for a given patient. It is recommended that MRI-determined tumor-to-breast volume ratio become part of the surgical planning protocol for patients diagnosed with breast cancer.

  1. Extremely rare borderline phyllodes tumor in the male breast: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Gyu; Kim, Shin Young; Jung, Hae Yoen; Lee, Deuk Young; Lee, Jong Eun

    2015-01-01

    Phyllodes tumor of the male breast is an extremely rare disease, and far fewer cases of borderline phyllodes tumors than benign or malignant tumors in the male breast have been reported. We report a case of borderline phyllodes tumor in the male breast with imaging findings of the tumor and pathologic correlation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Radiologic findings of metastatic tumors to the breast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang Heum; Cha, Eun Suk; Park, Jeong Mi; Kim, Hak Hee; Kim, Ji Young; Park, Young Ha; Shinn, Kyung Sub [The Catholic Univ. of Korea College of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-09-01

    To analyze the radiologic findings of metastatic tumors of the breast. We retrospectively analyzed the findings of mammography (n = 12), ultrasonography (n = 9) and CT (n = 4) of 13 patients with metastatic tumors of the breast. Methods for confirmation were biopsy (n = 8) and clinical follow-up (n = 5). The patient' s ages ranged from 24 to 63 (mean 43)years. Primary malignancies were contralateral breast cancer (n = 3), non-Hodgkin' s lymphoma (n = 3), stomach cancer (n = 2), uterine cervix cancer (n = 1), laryngeal cancer (n = 1), esophageal melanoma (n = 1), malignant thymoma (n 1), and lung cancer (n = 1). Patterns of metastasis from contralateral breast cancer and the stomach cancer were diffuse and infiltrative, while metastasis from other cancers was of the focal mass-forming type. The radiologic findings of metastasis from contralateral breast cancer (n = 3) were diffuse skin thickening and increased density or echogenicity in the medial aspect of the breast, while in cases involving metastasis from stomach cancer (n = 2) radiographs revealed extensive skin thickening, increased density or echogenicity, lymphedema and ipsilateral lymphadenopathy in the left breast. In cases of metastatic tumors to the breast in which focal masses were seen on mammography (n = 7), marginal spiculation or microcalcification of the tumors was not present. In six such cases, ultrasonography revealed well-defined margin, posterior acoustic shadowing or an irregular thick echogenic boundary was not seen. It two patients who underwent CT scanning, well-defined masses with moderate contrast enhancement were present. Radiographs of metastatic tumors to the breast from contralateral breast cancer and stomach cancer showed diffuse infiltration. The metastatic tumors with focal masses showed oval to round, smooth-mar-ginated, well-defined masses without spiculation or microcalcification on mammography, and a well-defined mass without posterior acoustic shadowing or irregular

  3. Phyllodes Tumor of the Breast With Malignant Melanoma Component: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergine, Marco; Guy, Catherine; Taylor, Mark R

    2015-09-01

    Phyllodes tumors of the breast display a wide variation in histological appearance and are classified into benign, borderline, and malignant categories based on a combination of histological parameters. These tumors may include a malignant heterologous component that is believed to originate through a process of multidirectional differentiation from a cancer stem cell. In these cases, the tumor is classified as a malignant phyllodes tumor. Among the heterologous elements that have been described in malignant phyllodes tumors are rhabdomyosarcoma, chondrosarcoma, osteosarcoma, liposarcoma and angiosarcoma. We present the first case of a phyllodes tumor with a malignant melanoma component in the breast of a 71-year-old lady, discussing the clinical implications of this diagnosis. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. Sildenafil and Phosphodiesterase-5 Inhibitors to Reduce Cardiotoxicity and Enhance the Response of Breast Tumor Cells to Doxorubicin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    of the few agents used clinically for cardioprotection (principally against Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi... cardiomyopathy and congestive heart failure [1, 2]. In order to address these problems, Dexrazoxane (ICRF187) Bone marrow cells 80% 100% 40% 60% subG1/G0 G2/M

  5. Profiling of microRNAs in tumor interstitial fluid of breast tumors – a novel resource to identify biomarkers for prognostic classification and detection of cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halvorsen, Ann Rita; Helland, Åslaug; Gromov, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    and to elucidate the cross-talk that exists among cells in a tumor microenvironment. Matched tumor interstitial fluid samples (TIF, n = 60), normal interstitial fluid samples (NIF, n = 51), corresponding tumor tissue specimens (n = 54), and serum samples (n = 27) were collected from patients with breast cancer......, and detectable microRNAs were analyzed and compared. In addition, serum data from 32 patients with breast cancer and 22 healthy controls were obtained for a validation study. To identify potential serum biomarkers of breast cancer, first the microRNA profiles of TIF and NIF samples were compared. A total of 266...

  6. A Role for T-Lymphocytes in Human Breast Cancer and in Canine Mammary Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Isabel Carvalho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammation in the tumor microenvironment has a prominent role in carcinogenesis and benefits the proliferation and survival of malignant cells, promoting angiogenesis and metastasis. Mammary tumors are frequently infiltrated by a heterogeneous population of immune cells where T-lymphocytes have a great importance. Interestingly, similar inflammatory cell infiltrates, cytokine and chemokine expression in humans and canine mammary tumors were recently described. However, in both species, despite all the scientific evidences that appoint for a significant role of T-lymphocytes, a definitive conclusion concerning the effectiveness of T-cell dependent immune mechanisms has not been achieved yet. In the present review, we describe similarities between human breast cancer and canine mammary tumors regarding tumor T-lymphocyte infiltration, such as relationship of TILs and mammary tumors malignancy, association of ratio CD4+/ CD8+ T-cells with low survival rates, promotion of tumor progression by Th2 cells actions, and association of great amounts of Treg cells with poor prognostic factors. This apparent parallelism together with the fact that dogs develop spontaneous tumors in the context of a natural immune system highlight the dog as a possible useful biological model for studies in human breast cancer immunology.

  7. Characterization of the Role of Breast Tumor Kinase (BRK) in Breast Cancer Cells Non-responsive to EGFR-targeted Agents

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nimnual, Anjaruwee

    2006-01-01

    .... PI-3 kinase/AKT pathway mediates EGF-induced cell growth and survival and is involved in cellular resistance to anti-cancer drugs/AKT pathway is regulated by multiple activators downregulation...

  8. The Inhibition of Stat5 by a Peptide Aptamer Ligand Specific for the DNA Binding Domain Prevents Target Gene Transactivation and the Growth of Breast and Prostate Tumor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vida Vafaizadeh

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The signal transducer and activator of transcription Stat5 is transiently activated by growth factor and cytokine signals in normal cells, but its persistent activation has been observed in a wide range of human tumors. Aberrant Stat5 activity was initially observed in leukemias, but subsequently also found in carcinomas. We investigated the importance of Stat5 in human tumor cell lines. shRNA mediated downregulation of Stat5 revealed the dependence of prostate and breast cancer cells on the expression of this transcription factor. We extended these inhibition studies and derived a peptide aptamer (PA ligand, which directly interacts with the DNA-binding domain of Stat5 in a yeast-two-hybrid screen. The Stat5 specific PA sequence is embedded in a thioredoxin (hTRX scaffold protein. The resulting recombinant protein S5-DBD-PA was expressed in bacteria, purified and introduced into tumor cells by protein transduction. Alternatively, S5-DBD-PA was expressed in the tumor cells after infection with a S5-DBD-PA encoding gene transfer vector. Both strategies impaired the DNA-binding ability of Stat5, suppressed Stat5 dependent transactivation and caused its intracellular degradation. Our experiments describe a peptide based inhibitor of Stat5 protein activity which can serve as a lead for the development of a clinically useful compound for cancer treatment.

  9. Circulating tumor cells in patients with testicular germ cell tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nastały, Paulina; Ruf, Christian; Becker, Pascal; Bednarz-Knoll, Natalia; Stoupiec, Małgorzata; Kavsur, Refik; Isbarn, Hendrik; Matthies, Cord; Wagner, Walter; Höppner, Dirk; Fisch, Margit; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Ahyai, Sascha; Honecker, Friedemann; Riethdorf, Sabine; Pantel, Klaus

    2014-07-15

    Germ cell tumors (GCTs) represent the most frequent malignancies among young men, but little is known about circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in these tumors. Considering their heterogeneity, CTCs were investigated using two independent assays targeting germ cell tumor and epithelial cell-specific markers, and results were correlated with disease stage, histology, and serum tumor markers. CTCs were enriched from peripheral blood (n = 143 patients) and testicular vein blood (TVB, n = 19 patients) using Ficoll density gradient centrifugation. For CTC detection, a combination of germ cell tumor (anti-SALL4, anti-OCT3/4) and epithelial cell-specific (anti-keratin, anti-EpCAM) antibodies was used. In parallel, 122 corresponding peripheral blood samples were analyzed using the CellSearch system. In total, CTCs were detected in 25 of 143 (17.5%) peripheral blood samples, whereas only 11.5% of patients were CTC-positive when considering exclusively the CellSearch assay. The presence of CTCs in peripheral blood correlated with clinical stage (P < 0.001) with 41% of CTC positivity in patients with metastasized tumors and 100% in patients with relapsed and chemotherapy-refractory disease. Histologically, CTC-positive patients suffered more frequently from nonseminomatous primary tumors (P < 0.001), with higher percentage of yolk sac (P < 0.001) and teratoma (P = 0.004) components. Furthermore, CTC detection was associated with elevated serum levels of α-fetoprotein (AFP; P = 0.025), β-human chorionic gonadotropin (βHCG; P = 0.002), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH; P = 0.002). Incidence and numbers of CTCs in TVB were much higher than in peripheral blood. The inclusion of germ cell tumor-specific markers improves CTC detection in GCTs. CTCs occur frequently in patients with more aggressive disease, and there is a gradient of CTCs with decreasing numbers from the tumor-draining vein to the periphery. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  10. Nerve fibers in breast cancer tissues indicate aggressive tumor progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Di; Su, Shicheng; Cui, Xiuying; Shen, Ximing; Zeng, Yunjie; Wu, Wei; Chen, Jianing; Chen, Fei; He, Chonghua; Liu, Jiang; Huang, Wei; Liu, Qiang; Su, Fengxi; Song, Erwei; Ouyang, Nengtai

    2014-12-01

    Emerging evidence has indicated nerve fibers as a marker in the progression of various types of cancers, such as pancreatic cancer and prostate cancer. However, whether nerve fibers are associated with breast cancer progression remains unclear. In this study, we evaluated the presence of nerve fibers in 352 breast cancer specimens and 83 benign breast tissue specimens including 43 cases of cystic fibrosis and 40 cases of fibroadenoma from 2 independent breast tumor center using immunohistochemical staining for specific peripheral nerve fiber markers.In all, nerve fibers were present in 130 out of 352 breast cancer tissue specimens, while none were detected in normal breast tissue specimens. Among 352 cases, we defined 239 cases from Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Guangzhou, China, as the training set, and 113 cases from the First Affiliated Hospital of Shantou University, Guangdong, China, as the validation set. The thickness of tumor-involving nerve fibers is significantly correlated with poor differentiation, lymph node metastasis, high clinical staging, and triple negative subtype in breast cancer. More importantly, Cox multifactor analysis indicates that the thickness of tumor-involving nerve fibers is a previously unappreciated independent prognostic factors associated with shorter disease-free survival of breast cancer patients. Our findings are further validated by online Oncomine database. In conclusion, our results show that nerve fiber involvement in breast cancer is associated with progression of the malignancy and warrant further studies in the future.

  11. Nerve Fibers in Breast Cancer Tissues Indicate Aggressive Tumor Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Di; Su, Shicheng; Cui, Xiuying; Shen, Ximing; Zeng, Yunjie; Wu, Wei; Chen, Jianing; Chen, Fei; He, Chonghua; Liu, Jiang; Huang, Wei; Liu, Qiang; Su, Fengxi; Song, Erwei; Ouyang, Nengtai

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Emerging evidence has indicated nerve fibers as a marker in the progression of various types of cancers, such as pancreatic cancer and prostate cancer. However, whether nerve fibers are associated with breast cancer progression remains unclear. In this study, we evaluated the presence of nerve fibers in 352 breast cancer specimens and 83 benign breast tissue specimens including 43 cases of cystic fibrosis and 40 cases of fibroadenoma from 2 independent breast tumor center using immunohistochemical staining for specific peripheral nerve fiber markers. In all, nerve fibers were present in 130 out of 352 breast cancer tissue specimens, while none were detected in normal breast tissue specimens. Among 352 cases, we defined 239 cases from Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Guangzhou, China, as the training set, and 113 cases from the First Affiliated Hospital of Shantou University, Guangdong, China, as the validation set. The thickness of tumor-involving nerve fibers is significantly correlated with poor differentiation, lymph node metastasis, high clinical staging, and triple negative subtype in breast cancer. More importantly, Cox multifactor analysis indicates that the thickness of tumor-involving nerve fibers is a previously unappreciated independent prognostic factors associated with shorter disease-free survival of breast cancer patients. Our findings are further validated by online Oncomine database. In conclusion, our results show that nerve fiber involvement in breast cancer is associated with progression of the malignancy and warrant further studies in the future. PMID:25501061

  12. Recurrent angio-fibroma of breast masquerading as phyllodes tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaurasia, Jai K; Alam, Feroz; Shadan, Mariam; Naim, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    A young Indian female presented with a recurring tumor in the right breast masquerading as phyllodes tumor. Patient had history of five times excision and recurrences of the tumor, diagnosed as fibrous phyllodes of the breast. Presently, a well-circumscribed tumor of about 10 cm size, comprising of benign fibrous-angiomatous tissue with evidence of foci of pyogenic vasculitis was observed. Immuno-histochemical markers for the myo-epithelial and epithelial elements excluded the possibility of fibrous phyllodes, inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor, desmoid fibromatosis, and metaplastic carcinoma. The present findings were diagnostic of an inflammatory angio-fibroma of the right breast, not reported in the earlier literature. The observations indicated that the female breast may be susceptible to spontaneous productive and common-antibiotic-resistant focal septic vascular inflammation giving rise to angio-fibromatous proliferation producing a well-defined tumor mass in the breast, distinguishable from the other breast lesions by the connective tissue stains and immuno-histochemical markers.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of benign phyllodes tumors of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Takayuki; Fukutomi, Takashi; Kubochi, Kiyoshi

    2004-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has the potential to become a useful adjunct in breast imaging. Contrast-enhanced breast MRI has demonstrated a high sensitivity in the detection of benign and malignant breast disease. Our study aimed to correlate the dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI appearance of benign phyllodes tumor of the breast with histopathologic findings. We retrospectively reviewed the MRI findings in eight patients with benign phyllodes tumor of the breast to describe the image characteristics of this disease. The architectural features and enhancement patterns of this tumor were assessed and compared with other breast diseases. MRIs demonstrated some characteristics for large benign phyllodes tumors (more than 3 cm in size). On T(2)-weighted images, they were imaged as spotted tumors in high to iso signal intensity with cystic components or septations inside. In the time-signal intensity curve for the eight patients in our study who underwent dynamic MRI, we demonstrated two patterns of their curve: rapidly and gradually enhanced. In conclusion, MRI findings in benign phyllodes tumor include dynamic curves of gradually and rapidly enhancing types, and a low and inhomogeneous signal intensity on T(2)-weighted images compared with fibroadenoma. These findings appear to be useful for diagnosis.

  14. Hypoxic conditions induce a cancer-like phenotype in human breast epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaapil, Marica; Helczynska, Karolina; Villadsen, René

    2012-01-01

    Solid tumors are less oxygenated than their tissue of origin. Low intra-tumor oxygen levels are associated with worse outcome, increased metastatic potential and immature phenotype in breast cancer. We have reported that tumor hypoxia correlates to low differentiation status in breast cancer. Less...... is known about effects of hypoxia on non-malignant cells. Here we address whether hypoxia influences the differentiation stage of non-malignant breast epithelial cells and potentially have bearing on early stages of tumorigenesis....

  15. Identification of Novel Biomarkers and Targeting Tumor-Initiating Cell Clones of the Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Subtype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehmsen, Sidse

    dysregulering i mange kræftformer. S100-proteiner, inklusiv S100A14, er involveret i adskillige biologiske funktioner i kræftceller. Derudover er de centrale for kræftudvikling og progression, såsom cellevækst, celledød og metastasering, og endelig er de associeret med en dårligere prognose i flere forskellige...

  16. Molecular portraits revealing the heterogeneity of breast tumor subtypes defined using immunohistochemistry markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xiaofeng; Li, Yang; Bai, Zhonghu; Tang, Xu-Qing

    2015-09-25

    Breast cancer is highly heterogeneous. The subtypes defined using immunohistochemistry markers and gene expression profilings (GEP) are related but not equivalent, with inter-connections under investigated. Our previous study revealed a set of differentially expressed genes (diff-genes), containing 1015 mRNAs and 69 miRNAs, which characterize the immunohistochemistry-defined breast tumor subtypes at the GEP level. However, they may convey redundant information due to the large amount of genes included. By reducing the dimension of the diff-genes, we identified 119 mRNAs and 20 miRNAs best explaining breast tumor heterogeneity with the most succinct number of genes found using hierarchical clustering and nearest-to-center principle. The final signature panel contains 119 mRNAs, whose superiority over diff-genes was replicated in two independent public datasets. The comparison of our signature with two pioneering signatures, the Sorlie's signature and PAM50, suggests a novel marker, FOXA1, in breast cancer classification. Subtype-specific feature genes are reported to characterize each immunohistochemistry-defined subgroup. Pathway and network analysis reveal the critical roles of Notch signalings in [ER+|PR+]HER2- and cell cycle in [ER+|PR+]HER2+ tumors. Our study reveals the primary differences among the four immunohistochemistry-defined breast tumors at the mRNA and miRNA levels, and proposes a novel signature for breast tumor subtyping given GEP data.

  17. Phyllodes tumors of the breast: diagnosis, treatment and prognostic factors related to recurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhi-Rui; Wang, Chen-Chen; Yang, Zhao-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Phyllodes tumors of the breast are rare tumor types that consist of 0.3–1.0% in all breast tumors. The naming and classification of breast phyllodes tumor have been debated for years. Based on the classification criteria modified by WHO in 2003, this review mainly introduced the clinicopathologic characteristics, pre-operational diagnosis and the treatment of breast phyllodes tumors, and also summarized the prognostic factors related to tumor recurrence. PMID:28066617

  18. Breast Cancer Risk Prediction with Heterogeneous Risk Profiles According to Breast Cancer Tumor Markers

    OpenAIRE

    Rosner, Bernard; Glynn, Robert J.; Tamimi, Rulla M.; Chen, Wendy Y.; Colditz, Graham A.; Willett, Walter C.; Hankinson, Susan E.

    2013-01-01

    Relationships between some risk factors and breast cancer incidence are known to vary by tumor subtype. However, breast tumors can be classified according to a number of markers, which may be correlated, making it difficult to identify heterogeneity of risk factors with specific tumor markers when using standard competing-risk survival analysis. In this paper, we propose a constrained competing-risk survival model that allows for assessment of heterogeneity of risk factor associations accordi...

  19. Identification and Localization of Genes Which Restore Senescence in Breast Cancer Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reddy, Deepthi

    1997-01-01

    .... Cell X cell hybridizations between breast tumor cells and normal cell lines containing gpt tagged human chromosomes 2, 3, 6 and 9 resulted in senesced hybrid clones whereas hybrid clones containing...

  20. Identification of cell-surface markers for detecting breast cancer cells in ovarian tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Inge T A; Hilders, Carina G J M; Sier, Cornelis F M; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L; Smit, Vincent T H B M; Baptist Trimbos, J; Kuppen, Peter J K

    2016-08-01

    The safety of ovarian tissue autotransplantation in oncology patients cannot be ensured, as current tumor-detection methods compromise the ovarian tissue viability. Although non-destructive methods (for instance near-infrared fluorescence imaging) can discriminate malignant from healthy tissues while leaving the examined tissues unaffected, they require specific cell-surface tumor markers. We determined which tumor markers are suitable targets for tumor-specific imaging to exclude the presence of breast cancer cells in ovarian tissue. Immunohistochemistry was performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded specimens of ten ovaries from premenopausal patients. Additionally, we screened a tissue microarray containing tumor tissue cores from 24 breast cancer patients being eligible for ovarian tissue cryopreservation. The following cell-surface tumor markers were tested: E-cadherin, EMA (epithelial membrane antigen), Her2/neu (human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2), αvβ6 integrin, EpCAM (epithelial cell adhesion molecule), CEA (carcinoembryonic antigen), FR-α (folate receptor-alpha), and uPAR (urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor). For each tumor, the percentage of positive breast tumor cells was measured. None of the ten ovaries were positive for any of the markers tested. However, all markers (except CEA and uPAR) were present on epithelial cells of inclusion cysts. E-cadherin was present in the majority of breast tumors: ≥90 % of tumor cells were positive for E-cadherin in 17 out of 24 tumors, and 100 % of tumor cells were positive in 5 out of 24 tumors. Of the markers tested, E-cadherin is the most suitable marker for a tumor-specific probe in ovarian tissue. Methods are required to distinguish inclusion cysts from breast tumor cells.

  1. Development of Tethered Hsp90 Inhibitors Carrying Radioiodinated Probes to Specifically Discriminate and Kill Malignant Breast Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    specifically target a surface form of heat shock protein 90 (eHsp90)that is expressed on malignant cells and internalized. In this report we describe our...cancer deaths annually. Clinical data indicate a strong link between high expression/activation of Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) with poor prognosis in...MeOH/ NH3 in CH2Cl2) to give iodide 2 (203 mg, 57%) as a clear oil. LC/MS gives m/z = 820.4 [M+1]+. Bisalkylation product was also isolated (91 mg

  2. DC-SCRIPT is a novel regulator of the tumor suppressor gene CDKN2B and induces cell cycle arrest in ERα-positive breast cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Ansems (Marleen); J.N. Søndergaard (Jonas Nørskov); A.M. Sieuwerts (Anieta); M.W.G. Looman (Maaike W. G.); M. Smid (Marcel); A.M.A. de Graaf (Annemarie M. A.); V. de Weerd (Vanja); M. Zuidscherwoude (Malou); J.A. Foekens (John); J.W.M. Martens (John); G.J. Adema (Gosse J.)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBreast cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer-related deaths in women. The estrogen receptor (ERα) is well known for having growth promoting effects in breast cancer. Recently, we have identified DC-SCRIPT (ZNF366) as a co-suppressor of ERα and as a strong and independent

  3. DC-SCRIPT is a novel regulator of the tumor suppressor gene CDKN2B and induces cell cycle arrest in ERalpha-positive breast cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ansems, M.; Sondergaard, J.N.; Sieuwerts, A.M.; Looman, M.W.G.; Smid, M.; Graaf, A.M.A. de; Weerd, V. de; Zuidscherwoude, M.; Foekens, J.A.; Martens, J.W.; Adema, G.J.

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer-related deaths in women. The estrogen receptor (ERalpha) is well known for having growth promoting effects in breast cancer. Recently, we have identified DC-SCRIPT (ZNF366) as a co-suppressor of ERalpha and as a strong and independent

  4. Inhibition of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth by apigenin through induction of G2/M arrest and histone H3 acetylation-mediated p21(WAF1/CIP1) expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Tsui-Hwa; Chien, Ming-Hsien; Lin, Wea-Lung; Wen, Yu-Ching; Chow, Jyh-Ming; Chen, Chi-Kuan; Kuo, Tsang-Chih; Lee, Wei-Jiunn

    2017-02-01

    Apigenin (4',5,7-trihydroxyflavone), a flavonoid commonly found in fruits and vegetables, has anticancer properties in various malignant cancer cells. However, the molecular basis of the anticancer effect remains to be elucidated. In this study, we investigated the cellular mechanisms underlying the induction of cell cycle arrest by apigenin. Our results showed that apigenin at the nonapoptotic induction concentration inhibited cell proliferation and induced cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase in the MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line. Immunoblot analysis indicated that apigenin suppressed the expression of cyclin A, cyclin B, and cyclin-dependent kinase-1 (CDK1), which control the G2-to-M phase transition in the cell cycle. In addition, apigenin upregulated p21(WAF1/CIP1) and increased the interaction of p21(WAF1/CIP1) with proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), which inhibits cell cycle progression. Furthermore, apigenin significantly inhibited histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity and induced histone H3 acetylation. The subsequent chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay indicated that apigenin increased acetylation of histone H3 in the p21(WAF1/CIP1) promoter region, resulting in the increase of p21(WAF1/CIP1) transcription. In a tumor xenograft model, apigenin effectively delayed tumor growth. In these apigenin-treated tumors, we also observed reductions in the levels of cyclin A and cyclin B and increases in the levels of p21(WAF1/CIP1) and acetylated histone H3. These findings demonstrate for the first time that apigenin can be used in breast cancer prevention and treatment through epigenetic regulation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 434-444, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Associations of Breast Cancer Risk Factors With Tumor Subtypes: A Pooled Analysis From the Breast Cancer Association Consortium Studies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    ...; Yang, Xiaohong R; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Goode, Ellen L; Couch, Fergus J; Nevanlinna, Heli; Milne, Roger L; Gaudet, Mia; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Broeks, Annegien; Cox, Angela; Fasching, Peter A; Hein, Rebecca; Spurdle, Amanda B; Blows, Fiona; ver, Kristy; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Heinz, Judith; Sinn, Peter; Vrieling, Alina; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Aittomaeki, Kristiina; Heikkilae, Paeivi; Blomqvist, Carl; Lissowska, Jolanta; Peplonska, Beata; Chanock, Stephen; Figueroa, Jonine; Brinton, Louise; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Humphreys, Keith; Darabi, Hatef; Liu, Jianjun; Van 't Veer, Laura J; Van Leeuwen, Flora E; Anulis, Irene L; Glendon, Gord; Knight, Julia A; Mulligan, Anna Marie; O'Malley, Frances P; Weerasooriya, Nayana; John, Esther M; Beckmann, Matthias W; Hartmann, Arndt; Weihbrecht, Sebastian B; Wachter, David L; Jud, Sebastian M. S; Loehberg, Christian R; Baglietto, Laura; English, Dallas R; Giles, Graham G; McLean, Catriona A; Severi, Gianluca; Lambrechts, Diether; Vandorpe, Thijs; Weltens, Caroline; Paridaens, Robert; Smeets, Ann; Neven, Patrick; Wildiers, Hans; Wang, Xianshu; Olson, Janet E; Cafourek, Victoria; Fredericksen, Zachary; Kosel, Matthew; Vachon, Celine; Cramp, Helen E; Connley, Daniel; Cross, Simon S; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy P; Reed, Malcolm W. R; Doerk, Thilo; Bremer, Michael; Meyer, Aneas; Karstens, Johann H; Ay, Aysun; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Hillemanns, Peter; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Menendez Roiguez, Primitiva; Zamora, Pilar; Bentez, Javier; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Fischer, Hans-Peter; Hamann, Ute; Pesch, Beate; Bruening, Thomas; Justenhoven, Christina; Brauch, Hiltrud; Eccles, Diana M; Tapper, William J; Gerty, Sue M; Sawyer, Elinor J; Tomlinson, Ian P; Jones, Angela; Kerin, Michael; Miller, Nicola; McInerney, Niall; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios

    2011-01-01

    ...) and progesterone receptor (PR) expression status of the tumors. Methods We pooled tumor marker and epidemiological risk factor data from 35 568 invasive breast cancer case patients from 34 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium...

  6. In vivo study of doxorubicin-loaded cell-penetrating peptide-modified pH-sensitive liposomes: biocompatibility, bio-distribution, and pharmacodynamics in BALB/c nude mice bearing human breast tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Y

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Yuan Ding,1,* Wei Cui,2,* Dan Sun,1 Gui-Ling Wang,1 Yu Hei,1 Shuai Meng,1 Jian-Hua Chen,3 Ying Xie,1 Zhi-Qiang Wang4 1Beijing Key Laboratory of Molecular Pharmaceutics and New Drug Delivery Systems, Department of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Peking University, 2School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 3School of Medicine, Jianghan University, Wuhan, People’s Republic of China; 4Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Kent State University Geauga, Burton, OH, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: In vivo evaluation of drug delivery vectors is essential for clinical translation. In BALB/c nude mice bearing human breast cancer tumors, we investigated the biocompatibility, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of doxorubicin (DOX-loaded novel cell-penetrating peptide (CPP-modified pH-sensitive liposomes (CPPL (referred to as CPPL(DOX with an optimal CPP density of 4%. In CPPL, a polyethylene glycol (PEG derivative formed by conjugating PEG with stearate via acid-degradable hydrazone bond (PEG2000-Hz-stearate was inserted into the surface of liposomes, and CPP was directly attached to liposome surfaces via coupling with stearate to simultaneously achieve long circulation time in blood and improve the selectivity and efficacy of CPP for tumor targeting. Compared to PEGylated liposomes, CPPL enhanced DOX accumulation in tumors up to 1.9-fold (p<0.01 and resulted in more cell apoptosis as a result of DNA disruption as well as a relatively lower tumor growth ratio (T/C%. Histological examination did not show any signs of necrosis or inflammation in normal tissues, but large cell dissolving areas were found in tumors following the treatment of animals with CPPL(DOX. Our findings provide important and detailed information regarding the distribution of CPPL(DOX in vivo and reveal their abilities of tumor penetration and potential for the treatment of

  7. FIBROMATOSIS (DESMOID TUMOR OF THE BREAST. Fibromatosis (tumor desmoide de mama

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaneta P Boceska

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available El tumor desmoide (fibromatosis es una entidad patológica extremadamente rara que se desarrolla de la fascia muscular y la aponeusorsis. Aunque sin potencial metastático, estos tumores son localmente muy agresivos y tienden a infiltrarse en los tejidos circundantes. Nosotros presentamos un caso de tumour desmoide de mama, que tuvo apariencias clínicas sugestivas a carcinoma. La paciente, de 56 años presentó una masa palpable de mama derecho. La citología por aspiracion con aguja fina (AGF no detectó ninguna célula maligna, por lo que se hizo una escisión local conservadora. La paciente no recibió ningun tratamiento postoperatorio adicional, y continúa viva y sana en los siguientes 18 meses. Desmoid tumor (fibromatosis is extremely rare benign pathological entity that develops from muscular fasciae and aponeuroses. Although without metastatic potential, these tumors are locally very aggressive and tend to infiltrate the surrounding tissues. We present a case of a desmoid tumor of the breast that had clinical appearance suggestive of carcinoma. The patient was 56 years old female with a previous history of surgical trauma who presented with a palpable mass in the right breast. A fine needle aspiration (FNA cytology did not reveal any malignant cells, thus conservative local excision was performed. The patient did not receive any additional postoperative treatment and was alive and free of disease after 18 months of follow-up. 

  8. Low penetrance breast cancer susceptibility loci are associated with specific breast tumor subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broeks, Annegien; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Sherman, Mark E

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancers demonstrate substantial biological, clinical and etiological heterogeneity. We investigated breast cancer risk associations of eight susceptibility loci identified in GWAS and two putative susceptibility loci in candidate genes in relation to specific breast tumor subtypes. Subtypes...... were defined by five markers (ER, PR, HER2, CK5/6, EGFR) and other pathological and clinical features. Analyses included up to 30 040 invasive breast cancer cases and 53 692 controls from 31 studies within the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. We confirmed previous reports of stronger associations......3803662 (16q12), rs889312 (5q11), rs3817198 (11p15) and rs13387042 (2q35); however, only two of them (16q12 and 2q35) were associated with tumors with the core basal phenotype (P ≤ 0.002). These analyses are consistent with different biological origins of breast cancers, and indicate that tumor...

  9. Low penetrance breast cancer susceptibility loci are associated with specific breast tumor subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broeks, Annegien; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Sherman, Mark E

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancers demonstrate substantial biological, clinical and etiological heterogeneity. We investigated breast cancer risk associations of eight susceptibility loci identified in GWAS and two putative susceptibility loci in candidate genes in relation to specific breast tumor subtypes. Subtypes...... were defined by five markers (ER, PR, HER2, CK5/6, EGFR) and other pathological and clinical features. Analyses included up to 30 040 invasive breast cancer cases and 53 692 controls from 31 studies within the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. We confirmed previous reports of stronger associations......3803662 (16q12), rs889312 (5q11), rs3817198 (11p15) and rs13387042 (2q35); however, only two of them (16q12 and 2q35) were associated with tumors with the core basal phenotype (P = 0.002). These analyses are consistent with different biological origins of breast cancers, and indicate that tumor...

  10. Tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R prevents experimental human breast cancer bone metastasis in nude mice

    OpenAIRE

    Miwa, Shinji; Yano, Shuya; Zhang, Yong; Matsumoto,Yasunori; Uehara, Fuminari; Yamamoto, Mako; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Kimura, Hiroaki; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Yamamoto, Norio; Bouvet, Michael; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Hoffman, Robert M.; Zhao, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Bone metastasis is a lethal and morbid late stage of breast cancer that is currently treatment resistant. More effective mouse models and treatment are necessary. High bone-metastatic variants of human breast cancer cells were selected in nude mice by cardiac injection. After cardiac injection of a high bone-metastatic variant of breast cancer, all untreated mice had bone metastases compared to only 20% with parental cells. Treatment with tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R completely...

  11. Coexistence of malignant phyllodes tumor and her2-positive locally advanced breast cancer in distinct breasts: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tomoi; Muto, Ichiro; Sakai, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Phyllodes tumor of the breast is a rare biphasic neoplasm, accounting for less than 1% of all breast tumors. Coexistence of phyllodes tumor and breast cancer in distinct breasts is extremely rare. A 47-year-old Japanese woman presented with bilateral breast lumps. A HER2-positive, unresectable invasive carcinoma in the right breast and fibroadenoma in the left were diagnosed via core needle biopsy. During chemotherapy with anti-HER2 therapy, the breast cancer shrank quickly, while the left breast lump suddenly enlarged. Under a diagnosis of malignant neoplasm of the breast, left mastectomy was performed. Malignant phyllodes tumor was diagnosed by postoperative histological examination and recurred in multiple areas as early as 2 months after surgery. Only 10 cases of coexisting phyllodes tumor and breast cancer in distinct breasts have been reported in the English literature. Phyllodes tumor associated with breast cancer in distinct breasts tends to be malignant. This is the first case of phyllodes tumor rapidly enlarging during anti-HER2 chemotherapy for locally advanced HER2-positive breast cancer. Even during effective treatment of advanced or recurrent breast cancer, attention should also be paid to the contralateral breast for the possible association of a second malignancy such as phyllodes tumor. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. How to approach phyllodes tumors of the breast?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acar, Turan; Tarcan, Ercüment; Hacıyanlı, Mehmet; Kamer, Erdinç; Peşkersoy, Mustafa; Yiğit, Seyran; Gür, Özlem; Cin, Necat; Sarı, Ayşegül Akder; Tatar, Fatma

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Phyllodes tumor of the breast is a rare fibroepithelial breast tumor that comprise 0.3–0.9% of primary breast neoplasms. In this study, we aimed to present clinicopathologic symptoms of our patients along with their treatment modality. Material and Methods: Clinicopathologic properties and treatment modality of 20 phyllodes tumor patients who underwent surgery between January 2008 and January 2013 were retrospectively evaluated. Results: Median patient age was 47 years (22–75). Fine-needle aspiration biopsy was applied to 19 patients. Biopsy results were reported as suspicious in four, malignant in three, benign in 11, and as non-diagnostic in one patient. Final histopathology reports revealed two benign, one malignant and one borderline tumor out of the four patients with suspicious findings on fine needle aspiration biopsy; all patients with malignant cytology had malignancy. There were two borderline and nine benign lesions within the benign biopsy group. Sixteen patients underwent segmental mastectomy, four patients underwent mastectomy with/without axillary dissection. The median tumor size was 6 (1–13) cm. Histopathologically, 11 (55%) tumors were benign, 5 (25%) were borderline, and 4 (20%) were malignant. Two of the four patients with malignancy underwent radiotherapy and chemotherapy, and one patient only received chemotherapy as adjuvant treatment. Conclusion: Phyllodes tumors are rare, mix-type breast tumors. Due to high rates of local recurrence and potential for malignancy, preoperative diagnosis and accurate management are important. PMID:26668526

  13. Glycan Markers as Potential Immunological Targets in Circulating Tumor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Denong; Wu, Lisa; Liu, Xiaohe

    2017-01-01

    We present here an experimental approach for exploring a new class of tumor biomarkers that are overexpressed by circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and are likely targetable in immunotherapy against tumor metastasis. Using carbohydrate microarrays, anti-tumor monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were scanned against a large panel of carbohydrate antigens to identify potential tumor glycan markers. Subsequently, flow cytometry and fiber-optic array scanning technology (FAST) were applied to determine whether the identified targets are tumor-specific cell-surface markers and are, therefore, likely suitable for targeted immunotherapy. Finally, the tumor glycan-specific antibodies identified were validated using cancer patients' blood samples for their performance in CTC-detection and immunotyping analysis. In this article, identifying breast CTC-specific glycan markers and targeting mAbs serve as examples to illustrate this tumor biomarker discovery strategy.

  14. Breast-Cancer Tumor Size, Overdiagnosis, and Mammography Screening Effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, H Gilbert; Prorok, Philip C; O'Malley, A James; Kramer, Barnett S

    2016-10-13

    The goal of screening mammography is to detect small malignant tumors before they grow large enough to cause symptoms. Effective screening should therefore lead to the detection of a greater number of small tumors, followed by fewer large tumors over time. We used data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program, 1975 through 2012, to calculate the tumor-size distribution and size-specific incidence of breast cancer among women 40 years of age or older. We then calculated the size-specific cancer case fatality rate for two time periods: a baseline period before the implementation of widespread screening mammography (1975 through 1979) and a period encompassing the most recent years for which 10 years of follow-up data were available (2000 through 2002). After the advent of screening mammography, the proportion of detected breast tumors that were small (invasive tumors measuring <2 cm or in situ carcinomas) increased from 36% to 68%; the proportion of detected tumors that were large (invasive tumors measuring ≥2 cm) decreased from 64% to 32%. However, this trend was less the result of a substantial decrease in the incidence of large tumors (with 30 fewer cases of cancer observed per 100,000 women in the period after the advent of screening than in the period before screening) and more the result of a substantial increase in the detection of small tumors (with 162 more cases of cancer observed per 100,000 women). Assuming that the underlying disease burden was stable, only 30 of the 162 additional small tumors per 100,000 women that were diagnosed were expected to progress to become large, which implied that the remaining 132 cases of cancer per 100,000 women were overdiagnosed (i.e., cases of cancer were detected on screening that never would have led to clinical symptoms). The potential of screening to lower breast cancer mortality is reflected in the declining incidence of larger tumors. However, with respect to only these large tumors

  15. Tumor endothelial expression of P-glycoprotein upon microvesicular transfer of TrpC5 derived from adriamycin-resistant breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, YePing; Pan, QiongXi; Jiang, Li; Chen, Zhen; Zhang, FangFang; Liu, YanJun; Xing, Hui; Shi, Mei; Li, Jiao; Li, XiYuan; Zhu, YaoDan; Chen, Yun; Bruce, Iain C.; Jin, Jian, E-mail: jinjian31@126.com; Ma, Xin, E-mail: maxin@jiangnan.edu.cn

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • TrpC5 was mainly accumulated in microvesicles of drug-resistant MCF-7/ADM cells. • Microvesicles from MCF-7/ADM transferred TrpC5 to endothelial cells. • TrpC5 inhibition reduced P-glycoprotein accumulation on tumor blood vessels in vivo. - Abstract: Treatment of carcinoma commonly fails due to chemoresistance. Studies have shown that endothelial cells acquire resistance via the tumor microenvironment. Microvesicle (MV) shedding from the cell membrane to the microenvironment plays an important role in communication between cells. The aim of the present study was to determine whether MCF-7 adriamycin-resistant cells (MCF-7/ADM) shed MVs that alter the characteristics of human microvessel endothelial cells (HMECs). MVs from tumor cells transferred a Ca{sup 2+}-permeable channel TrpC5 to HMECs, inducing the expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) by activation of the transcription factor NFATc3 (nuclear factor of activated T cells isoform c3). Expression of the mdr1 gene was blocked by the TrpC5-blocking antibody T5E3, and the production of P-gp in HMECs was reduced by blockade of TrpC5. Thus, we postulate that endothelial cells acquire the resistant protein upon exposure to TrpC5-containg MVs in the microenvironment, and express P-gp in the TrpC5–NFATc3 signal pathway.

  16. Up-modulation of PLC-β2 reduces the number and malignancy of triple-negative breast tumor cells with a CD133+/EpCAM+phenotype: a promising target for preventing progression of TNBC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugnoli, Federica; Grassilli, Silvia; Lanuti, Paola; Marchisio, Marco; Al-Qassab, Yasamin; Vezzali, Federica; Capitani, Silvano; Bertagnolo, Valeria

    2017-09-04

    The malignant potential of triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is also dependent on a sub-population of cells with a stem-like phenotype. Among the cancer stem cell markers, CD133 and EpCAM strongly correlate with breast tumor aggressiveness, suggesting that simultaneous targeting of the two surface antigens may be beneficial in treatment of TNBC. Since in TNBC-derived cells we demonstrated that PLC-β2 induces the conversion of CD133 high to CD133 low cells, here we explored its possible role in down-modulating the expression of both CD133 and EpCAM and, ultimately, in reducing the number of TNBC cells with a stem-like phenotype. A magnetic step-by-step cell isolation with antibodies directed against CD133 and/or EpCAM was performed on the TNBC-derived MDA-MB-231 cell line. In the same cell model, PLC-β2 was over-expressed or down-modulated and cell proliferation and invasion capability were evaluated by Real-time cell assays. The surface expression of CD133, EpCAM and CD44 in the different experimental conditions were measured by multi-color flow cytometry immunophenotyping. A CD133 + /EpCAM + sub-population with high proliferation rate and invasion capability is present in the MDA-MB-231 cell line. Over-expression of PLC-β2 in CD133 + /EpCAM + cells reduced the surface expression of both CD133 and EpCAM, as well as proliferation and invasion capability of this cellular subset. On the other hand, the up-modulation of PLC-β2 in the whole MDA-MB-231 cell population reduced the number of cells with a CD44 + /CD133 + /EpCAM + stem-like phenotype. Since selective targeting of the cells with the highest aggressive potential may have a great clinical importance for TNBC, the up-modulation of PLC-β2, reducing the number of cells with a stem-like phenotype, may be a promising goal for novel therapies aimed to prevent the progression of aggressive breast tumors.

  17. Background parenchymal enhancement in breast MRIs of breast cancer patients: impact on tumor size estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Ji Eun; Kim, Sung Hun; Lee, Ah Won

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate whether the degree of background parenchymal enhancement affects the accuracy of tumor size estimation based on breast MRI. Three hundred and twenty-two patients who had known breast cancer and underwent breast MRIs were recruited in our study. The total number of breast cancer cases was 339. All images were assessed retrospectively for the level of background parenchymal enhancement based on the BI-RADS criteria. Maximal lesion diameters were measured on the MRIs, and tumor types (mass vs. non-mass) were assessed. Tumor size differences between the MRI-based estimates and estimates based on pathological examinations were analyzed. The relationship between accuracy and tumor types and clinicopathologic features were also evaluated. The cases included minimal (47.5%), mild (28.9%), moderate (12.4%) and marked background parenchymal enhancement (11.2%). The tumors of patients with minimal or mild background parenchymal enhancement were more accurately estimated than those of patients with moderate or marked enhancement (72.1% vs. 56.8%; p=0.003). The tumors of women with mass type lesions were significantly more accurately estimated than those of the women with non-mass type lesions (81.6% vs. 28.6%; penhancement is related to the inaccurate estimation of tumor size based on MRI. Non-mass type breast cancer and HER2-positive breast cancer are other factors that may cause inaccurate assessment of tumor size. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. RORα, a Potential Tumor Suppressor and Therapeutic Target of Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Du

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The function of the nuclear receptor (NR in breast cancer progression has been investigated for decades. The majority of the nuclear receptors have well characterized natural ligands, but a few of them are orphan receptors for which no ligand has been identified. RORα, one member of the retinoid orphan nuclear receptor (ROR subfamily of orphan receptors, regulates various cellular and pathological activities. RORα is commonly down-regulated and/or hypoactivated in breast cancer compared to normal mammary tissue. Expression of RORα suppresses malignant phenotypes in breast cancer cells, in vitro and in vivo. Activity of RORα can be categorized into the canonical and non-canonical nuclear receptor pathways, which in turn regulate various breast cancer cellular function, including cell proliferation, apoptosis and invasion. This information suggests that RORα is a potent tumor suppressor and a potential therapeutic target for breast cancer.

  19. An Experimental Analysis of the Molecular Effects of Trastuzumab (Herceptin and Fulvestrant (Falsodex, as Single Agents or in Combination, on Human HR+/HER2+ Breast Cancer Cell Lines and Mouse Tumor Xenografts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Chen

    Full Text Available To investigate the effects of trastuzumab (herceptin and fulvestrant (falsodex either in combination or alone, on downstream cell signaling pathways in lab-cultured human HR+/HER2+ breast cancer cell lines ZR-75-1 and BT-474, as well as on protein expression levels in mouse xenograft tissue.Cells were cultivated in the presence of trastuzumab or fulvestrant or both. Molecular events that resulted in an inhibition of cell proliferation and cell cycle progression or in an increased rate of apoptosis were studied. The distribution and abundance of the proteins p-Akt and p-Erk expressed in these cells in response to single agents or combinatorial treatment were also investigated. In addition, the effects of trastuzumab and fulvestrant, either as single agents or in combination on tumor growth as well as on expression of the protein p-MED1 expressed in in vivo mouse xenograft models was also examined.Cell proliferation was increasingly inhibited by trastuzumab or fulvestrant or both, with a CI1 in both human cell lines. The rate of apoptosis increased only in the BT-474 cell line and not in the ZR-75-1 cell line upon treatment with fulvestrant and not trastuzumab as a single agent (P0.05. Cell accumulation in the G1 phase of cell cycle was investigated in all treatment groups (P<0.05, and the combination of trastuzumab and fulvestrant reversed the effects of fulvestrant alone on p-Akt and p-Erk protein expression levels. Using ZR-75-1 or BT-474 to generate in vivo tumor xenografts in BALB/c athymic mouse models, we showed that a combination of both drugs resulted in a stronger inhibition of tumor growth (P<0.05 and a greater decrease in the levels of activated MED1 (p-MED1 expressed in tumor issues compared with the use of either drug as a single agent.We demonstrate that the administration of trastuzumab and fulvestrant in combination results in positive synergistic effects on both, ZR-75-1 and BT-474 cell lines. This combinatorial approach is

  20. An Experimental Analysis of the Molecular Effects of Trastuzumab (Herceptin) and Fulvestrant (Falsodex), as Single Agents or in Combination, on Human HR+/HER2+ Breast Cancer Cell Lines and Mouse Tumor Xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qing; Weng, Ziyi; Lu, Yunshu; Jia, Yijun; Ding, Longlong; Bai, Fang; Ge, Meixin; Lin, Qing; Wu, Kejin

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the effects of trastuzumab (herceptin) and fulvestrant (falsodex) either in combination or alone, on downstream cell signaling pathways in lab-cultured human HR+/HER2+ breast cancer cell lines ZR-75-1 and BT-474, as well as on protein expression levels in mouse xenograft tissue. Cells were cultivated in the presence of trastuzumab or fulvestrant or both. Molecular events that resulted in an inhibition of cell proliferation and cell cycle progression or in an increased rate of apoptosis were studied. The distribution and abundance of the proteins p-Akt and p-Erk expressed in these cells in response to single agents or combinatorial treatment were also investigated. In addition, the effects of trastuzumab and fulvestrant, either as single agents or in combination on tumor growth as well as on expression of the protein p-MED1 expressed in in vivo mouse xenograft models was also examined. Cell proliferation was increasingly inhibited by trastuzumab or fulvestrant or both, with a CI1 in both human cell lines. The rate of apoptosis increased only in the BT-474 cell line and not in the ZR-75-1 cell line upon treatment with fulvestrant and not trastuzumab as a single agent (P0.05). Cell accumulation in the G1 phase of cell cycle was investigated in all treatment groups (P<0.05), and the combination of trastuzumab and fulvestrant reversed the effects of fulvestrant alone on p-Akt and p-Erk protein expression levels. Using ZR-75-1 or BT-474 to generate in vivo tumor xenografts in BALB/c athymic mouse models, we showed that a combination of both drugs resulted in a stronger inhibition of tumor growth (P<0.05) and a greater decrease in the levels of activated MED1 (p-MED1) expressed in tumor issues compared with the use of either drug as a single agent. We demonstrate that the administration of trastuzumab and fulvestrant in combination results in positive synergistic effects on both, ZR-75-1 and BT-474 cell lines. This combinatorial approach is likely to reduce