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Sample records for breast tomosynthesis system

  1. Breast Tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancers when they are most curable and breast-conservation therapies are available. See the Mammography page for ... special platform and gradually compressed with a clear plastic paddle. Breast compression is necessary during tomosynthesis imaging ...

  2. Stationary Digital Tomosynthesis System for Early Detection of Breast Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    microcalcifications (MC) which can be a precursor to breast cancer . There are a cluster of six specks in the phantom and the analysis was...21 2 Introduction Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer occurring in women...Early detection is considered as the best hope for decreasing the mortality rate from breast cancer [1-4]. Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT)

  3. Contrast enhanced imaging with a stationary digital breast tomosynthesis system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puett, Connor; Calliste, Jabari; Wu, Gongting; Inscoe, Christina R.; Lee, Yueh Z.; Zhou, Otto; Lu, Jianping

    2017-03-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) captures some depth information and thereby improves the conspicuity of breast lesions, compared to standard mammography. Using contrast during DBT may also help distinguish malignant from benign sites. However, adequate visualization of the low iodine signal requires a subtraction step to remove background signal and increase lesion contrast. Additionally, attention to factors that limit contrast, including scatter, noise, and artifact, are important during the image acquisition and post-acquisition processing steps. Stationary DBT (sDBT) is an emerging technology that offers a higher spatial and temporal resolution than conventional DBT. This phantom-based study explored contrast-enhanced sDBT (CE sDBT) across a range of clinically-appropriate iodine concentrations, lesion sizes, and breast thicknesses. The protocol included an effective scatter correction method and an iterative reconstruction technique that is unique to the sDBT system. The study demonstrated the ability of this CE sDBT system to collect projection images adequate for both temporal subtraction (TS) and dual-energy subtraction (DES). Additionally, the reconstruction approach preserved the improved contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) achieved in the subtraction step. Finally, scatter correction increased the iodine signal and CNR of iodine-containing regions in projection views and reconstructed image slices during both TS and DES. These findings support the ongoing study of sDBT as a potentially useful tool for contrast-enhanced breast imaging and also highlight the significant effect that scatter has on image quality during DBT.

  4. Digital breast tomosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis is an emerging technology intended to screen for and diagnose breast cancer. We believe it will begin moving into the commercial arena within the next couple of years. Find out what we predict for its clinical and business impact.

  5. An object-oriented simulator for 3D digital breast tomosynthesis imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyyedi, Saeed; Cengiz, Kubra; Kamasak, Mustafa; Yildirim, Isa

    2013-01-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is an innovative imaging modality that provides 3D reconstructed images of breast to detect the breast cancer. Projections obtained with an X-ray source moving in a limited angle interval are used to reconstruct 3D image of breast. Several reconstruction algorithms are available for DBT imaging. Filtered back projection algorithm has traditionally been used to reconstruct images from projections. Iterative reconstruction algorithms such as algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) were later developed. Recently, compressed sensing based methods have been proposed in tomosynthesis imaging problem. We have developed an object-oriented simulator for 3D digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) imaging system using C++ programming language. The simulator is capable of implementing different iterative and compressed sensing based reconstruction methods on 3D digital tomosynthesis data sets and phantom models. A user friendly graphical user interface (GUI) helps users to select and run the desired methods on the designed phantom models or real data sets. The simulator has been tested on a phantom study that simulates breast tomosynthesis imaging problem. Results obtained with various methods including algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) and total variation regularized reconstruction techniques (ART+TV) are presented. Reconstruction results of the methods are compared both visually and quantitatively by evaluating performances of the methods using mean structural similarity (MSSIM) values.

  6. An Object-Oriented Simulator for 3D Digital Breast Tomosynthesis Imaging System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Seyyedi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT is an innovative imaging modality that provides 3D reconstructed images of breast to detect the breast cancer. Projections obtained with an X-ray source moving in a limited angle interval are used to reconstruct 3D image of breast. Several reconstruction algorithms are available for DBT imaging. Filtered back projection algorithm has traditionally been used to reconstruct images from projections. Iterative reconstruction algorithms such as algebraic reconstruction technique (ART were later developed. Recently, compressed sensing based methods have been proposed in tomosynthesis imaging problem. We have developed an object-oriented simulator for 3D digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT imaging system using C++ programming language. The simulator is capable of implementing different iterative and compressed sensing based reconstruction methods on 3D digital tomosynthesis data sets and phantom models. A user friendly graphical user interface (GUI helps users to select and run the desired methods on the designed phantom models or real data sets. The simulator has been tested on a phantom study that simulates breast tomosynthesis imaging problem. Results obtained with various methods including algebraic reconstruction technique (ART and total variation regularized reconstruction techniques (ART+TV are presented. Reconstruction results of the methods are compared both visually and quantitatively by evaluating performances of the methods using mean structural similarity (MSSIM values.

  7. The effect of lag on image quality for a digital breast tomosynthesis system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainprize, James G.; Wang, Xinying; Yaffe, Martin J.

    2009-02-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a limited-view, limited-angle computed tomography (CT) technique that has the potential to yield improved lesion conspicuity over that of standard digital mammography. To maintain short acquisition time, the detector must have a rapid temporal response. Transient effects like lag and ghosting have been noted previously in digital mammography systems, but for the times between successive views (approx. 1 minute), their impact on image quality is generally negligible. However, tomosynthesis imaging requires much shorter times between projection images (< 1 s). Under these conditions, detectors that may have been acceptable for digital mammography may not be suitable for tomosynthesis. Transient effects will generally cause both a loss of signal and an increase in image noise. A cascaded systems analysis is used to determine the effect of lag on image quality in a DBT system. It is shown that in the projection images, lag results in artifacts appearing as a "trail" of prior exposures. The effect of lag on image quality is also evaluated with a simple Monte Carlo simulation of a cone-beam tomosynthesis image formation incorporating a filtered back-projection algorithm.

  8. Digital breast tomosynthesis geometry calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinying; Mainprize, James G.; Kempston, Michael P.; Mawdsley, Gordon E.; Yaffe, Martin J.

    2007-03-01

    Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) is a 3D x-ray technique for imaging the breast. The x-ray tube, mounted on a gantry, moves in an arc over a limited angular range around the breast while 7-15 images are acquired over a period of a few seconds. A reconstruction algorithm is used to create a 3D volume dataset from the projection images. This procedure reduces the effects of tissue superposition, often responsible for degrading the quality of projection mammograms. This may help improve sensitivity of cancer detection, while reducing the number of false positive results. For DBT, images are acquired at a set of gantry rotation angles. The image reconstruction process requires several geometrical factors associated with image acquisition to be known accurately, however, vibration, encoder inaccuracy, the effects of gravity on the gantry arm and manufacturing tolerances can produce deviations from the desired acquisition geometry. Unlike cone-beam CT, in which a complete dataset is acquired (500+ projections over 180°), tomosynthesis reconstruction is challenging in that the angular range is narrow (typically from 20°-45°) and there are fewer projection images (~7-15). With such a limited dataset, reconstruction is very sensitive to geometric alignment. Uncertainties in factors such as detector tilt, gantry angle, focal spot location, source-detector distance and source-pivot distance can produce several artifacts in the reconstructed volume. To accurately and efficiently calculate the location and angles of orientation of critical components of the system in DBT geometry, a suitable phantom is required. We have designed a calibration phantom for tomosynthesis and developed software for accurate measurement of the geometric parameters of a DBT system. These have been tested both by simulation and experiment. We will present estimates of the precision available with this technique for a prototype DBT system.

  9. Preliminary Clinical Experience with a Combined Automated Breast Ultrasound and Digital Breast Tomosynthesis System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Eric D; Lee, Won-Mean; Roubidoux, Marilyn A; Goodsitt, Mitchell M; Lashbrook, Chris; Davis, Cynthia E; Kripfgans, Oliver D; Carson, Paul L

    2018-03-01

    We analyzed the performance of a mammographically configured, automated breast ultrasound (McABUS) scanner combined with a digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) system. The GE Invenia ultrasound system was modified for integration with GE DBT systems. Ultrasound and DBT imaging were performed in the same mammographic compression. Our small preliminary study included 13 cases, six of whom had contained invasive cancers. From analysis of these cases, current limitations and corresponding potential improvements of the system were determined. A registration analysis was performed to compare the ease of McABUS to DBT registration for this system with that of two systems designed previously. It was observed that in comparison to data from an earlier study, the McABUS-to-DBT registration alignment errors for both this system and a previously built combined system were smaller than those for a previously built standalone McABUS system. Copyright © 2018 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Optimization of Breast Tomosynthesis Imaging Systems for Computer-Aided Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    a decrease in the mortality rate from breast cancer [1]. Because mammography projects a three-dimensional object onto a two-dimensional surface...M. N. C. Collaborators, “Effect of screening and adjuvant therapy on mortality from breast cancer ,” N Engl J Med 353, pp. 1784–92, Oct 2005. [2] L. T...and J. A. Baker, “Can compression be reduced for breast tomosynthesis? monte carlo study on mass and microcalcification conspicuity in tomosynthesis

  11. Quality control in breast tomosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakubiak, R.R.; Messias, P.C.; Santos, M.F., E-mail: requi@utfpr.edu.br [Universidade Tecnologia Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Departamento Academico de Fisica; Urban, L.A.B.D., E-mail: lineiurban@hotmail.com [Diagnostico Avancado por Imagem, Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    In Brazil, breast cancer is the most common and the leading cause of death among women, with estimated 57,000 new cases in 2014. The mammography (2D) plays an important role in the early detection of breast cancer, but in some cases can be difficult to detect malignant lesions due overlap of breast tissues. The Digital Breasts Tomosynthesis (DBT: 3D) reduces the effects of overlap, providing improved characterization of mammographic findings. However, the dose may double as compared with mammography. This study presents results of Contrast to Noise Ratio (CNR) and image quality evaluation on Siemens mammography equipment Mammomat Inspiration with tomosynthesis. The CNR was determined with Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) layers of 20 to 70 mm thick and an aluminum foils of 0,2 mm thickness and area of 10 mm². Image quality was assessed with the ACR Breast Simulator. In the evaluation of image quality, the detectability of fibers and masses was identical in 2D and 3D systems. Displaying fibers were 4,5 and 4 mass in both modes. In 2D mode were identified 3,5 microcalcifications groups, and 3D showed 3 groups. The Mean Glandular Dose (MGD) for the simulator in 2D mode was 1,17 mGy and 2,35 mGy for the 3D mode. The result reinforces the importance of quality control in the process of obtaining the images and obtained in accordance CNR values, ensuring image quality and compatible dose in 2D and 3D processes. (author)

  12. An adaptive toolkit for image quality evaluation in system performance test of digital breast tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guozhi; Petrov, Dimitar; Marshall, Nicholas; Bosmans, Hilde

    2017-03-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a relatively new diagnostic imaging modality for women. Currently, various models of DBT systems are available on the market and the number of installations is rapidly increasing. EUREF, the European Reference Organization for Quality Assured Breast Screening and Diagnostic Services, has proposed a preliminary Guideline - protocol for the quality control of the physical and technical aspects of digital breast tomosynthesis systems, with an ultimate aim of providing limiting values guaranteeing proper performance for different applications of DBT. In this work, we introduce an adaptive toolkit developed in accordance with this guideline to facilitate the process of image quality evaluation in DBT performance test. This toolkit implements robust algorithms to quantify various technical parameters of DBT images and provides a convenient user interface in practice. Each test is built into a separate module with configurations set corresponding to the European guideline, which can be easily adapted to different settings and extended with additional tests. This toolkit largely improves the efficiency for image quality evaluation of DBT. It is also going to evolve with the development of protocols in quality control of DBT systems.

  13. Evaluation of the clinical performance by using the effective DQE for a prototype digital breast tomosynthesis system

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    Choi, Jae-Gu; Choi, Young-Wook; Ham, Tae-Hee [Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ye-Seul; Park, Hye-Suk; Kim, Hee-Joung [Yonsei University, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    Early experience with the application of tomosynthesis to breast imaging has shown the potential of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), which can improve the specificity of mammography with improved marginal visibility of the lesion and early breast cancer detection, especially for women with dense breasts. The purpose of this study is to characterize the physical properties of the DBT system and to optimize the exposure conditions by using the modulation transfer function (MTF), the noise power spectrum (NPS), the scatter fraction, the transmission fraction and the effective detective quantum efficiency (eDQE) for different breast thicknesses. The first-generation KERI prototype digital tomosynthesis system for breast imaging using a CMOS flat panel detector was used in this study. The spatial frequency depend on metrics depend on both the inherent properties of the detector and the imaging geometry including breast thickness. For a thicker breast, the eDQE decreases as the scatter fraction increases at a fixed tube voltage. Moreover, the MTF shows no significant difference with changing tube voltage while the eDQE at 27 kVp is slightly degraded. Consequently, the above critical properties of the DBT system for different exposure conditions and breast thicknesses should be fully considered before building the system and using it application in clinical applications.

  14. System geometry optimization for molecular breast tomosynthesis with focusing multi-pinhole collimators

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Roosmalen, Jarno; Beekman, Freek J.; Goorden, Marlies C.

    2018-01-01

    Imaging of 99mTc-labelled tracers is gaining popularity for detecting breast tumours. Recently, we proposed a novel design for molecular breast tomosynthesis (MBT) based on two sliding focusing multi-pinhole collimators that scan a modestly compressed breast. Simulation studies indicate that MBT has the potential to improve the tumour-to-background contrast-to-noise ratio significantly over state-of-the-art planar molecular breast imaging. The aim of the present paper is to optimize the collimator-detector geometry of MBT. Using analytical models, we first optimized sensitivity at different fixed system resolutions (ranging from 5 to 12 mm) by tuning the pinhole diameters and the distance between breast and detector for a whole series of automatically generated multi-pinhole designs. We evaluated both MBT with a conventional continuous crystal detector with 3.2 mm intrinsic resolution and with a pixelated detector with 1.6 mm pixels. Subsequently, full system simulations of a breast phantom containing several lesions were performed for the optimized geometry at each system resolution for both types of detector. From these simulations, we found that tumour-to-background contrast-to-noise ratio was highest for systems in the 7 mm–10 mm system resolution range over which it hardly varied. No significant differences between the two detector types were found.

  15. Digital Breast Tomosynthesis: State of the Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedantham, Srinivasan; Karellas, Andrew; Vijayaraghavan, Gopal R; Kopans, Daniel B

    2015-12-01

    This topical review on digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is provided with the intent of describing the state of the art in terms of technology, results from recent clinical studies, advanced applications, and ongoing efforts to develop multimodality imaging systems that include DBT. Particular emphasis is placed on clinical studies. The observations of increase in cancer detection rates, particularly for invasive cancers, and the reduction in false-positive rates with DBT in prospective trials indicate its benefit for breast cancer screening. Retrospective multireader multicase studies show either noninferiority or superiority of DBT compared with mammography. Methods to curtail radiation dose are of importance. (©) RSNA, 2015.

  16. Digital Breast Tomosynthesis: State of the Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedantham, Srinivasan; Vijayaraghavan, Gopal R.; Kopans, Daniel B.

    2015-01-01

    This topical review on digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is provided with the intent of describing the state of the art in terms of technology, results from recent clinical studies, advanced applications, and ongoing efforts to develop multimodality imaging systems that include DBT. Particular emphasis is placed on clinical studies. The observations of increase in cancer detection rates, particularly for invasive cancers, and the reduction in false-positive rates with DBT in prospective trials indicate its benefit for breast cancer screening. Retrospective multireader multicase studies show either noninferiority or superiority of DBT compared with mammography. Methods to curtail radiation dose are of importance. © RSNA, 2015 PMID:26599926

  17. Validation of mean glandular dose values provided by a digital breast tomosynthesis system in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beraldo O, B.; Paixao, L.; Donato da S, S. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear / CNEN, Post-graduation in Sciences and Technology of Radiations Minerals and Materials, Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Araujo T, M. H. [Dr Maria Helena Araujo Teixeira Clinic, Guajajaras 40, 30180-100 Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Nogueira, M. S., E-mail: bbo@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear / CNEN, Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is an emerging imaging modality that provides quasi-three-dimensional structural information of the breast and has strong promise to improve the differentiation of normal tissue and suspicious masses reducing the tissue overlaps. DBT images are reconstructed from a sequence of low-dose X-ray projections of the breast acquired at a small number of angles over a limited angular range. The Ho logic Selen ia Dimensions system is equipped with an amorphous Selenium (a-Se) detector layer of 250 μm thickness and a 70 μm pixel pitch. Studies are needed to determine the radiation dose of patients that are undergoing this emerging procedure to compare with the results obtained in DBT images. The mean glandular dose (D{sub G}) is the dosimetric quantity used in quality control of the mammographic systems. The aim of this work is to validate D{sub G} values for different breast thicknesses provided by a Ho logic Selen ia Dimensions system using a DBT mode in comparison with the same results obtained by a calibrated 90 X 5-6M-model Radcal ionization chamber. D{sub G} values were derived from the incident air kerma (K{sub i}) measurements and tabulated conversion coefficients that are dependent on the half value layer (HVL) of the X-ray spectrum. Voltage and tube loading values were recorded in irradiations using W/Al anode/filter combination, automatic exposure control mode and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) slabs which simulate different breast thicknesses. For K{sub i} measurements, the ionization chamber was positioned at 655 mm from the focus and the same radiographic technique values were selected with the manual mode. D{sub G} values for a complete procedure ranged from 0.9 ± 0.1 to 3.7 ± 0.4 mGy. The results for different breast thicknesses are in accordance with values obtained by DBT images and with acceptable levels established by the Commission of the European Communities (Cec) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA

  18. Dual Energy Tomosynthesis breast phantom imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koukou, V.; Martini, N.; Fountos, G.; Messaris, G.; Michail, C.; Kandarakis, I.; Nikiforidis, G.

    2017-12-01

    Dual energy (DE) imaging technique has been applied to many theoretical and experimental studies. The aim of the current study is to evaluate dual energy in breast tomosynthesis using commercial tomosynthesis system in terms of its potential to better visualize microcalcifications (μCs). The system uses a tungsten target X-ray tube and a selenium direct conversion detector. Low-energy (LE) images were acquired at different tube voltages (28, 30, 32 kV), while high-energy images at 49 kV. Fifteen projections, for the low- and high-energy respectively, were acquired without grid while tube scanned continuously. Log-subtraction algorithm was used in order to obtain the DE images with the weighting factor, w, derived empirically. The subtraction was applied to each pair of LE and HE slices after reconstruction. The TORMAM phantom was imaged with the different settings. Four regions-of-interest including μCs were identified in the inhomogeneous part of the phantom. The μCs in DE images were more clearly visible compared to the low-energy images. Initial results showed that DE tomosynthesis imaging is a promising modality, however more work is required.

  19. Evaluation of effective detective quantum efficiency considering breast thickness and glandularity in prototype digital breast tomosynthesis system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seungyeon; Kim, Ye-seul; Choi, Sunghoon; Lee, Haenghwa; Lee, Donghoon; Choi, Young-Wook; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2017-03-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) system is a novel imaging modality which is strongly depended on the performance of a detector. Recently, effective detective quantum efficiency (eDQE) has been introduced to solve the disadvantages of conventional DQE evaluations which do not consider clinical operating conditions. For eDQE evaluation, the variety of patient breast, especially the glandularity and thickness needs to be studied to consider different races of patient. For these reasons, eDQE in a prototype DBT system considering different breast thickness and glandularity was evaluated. In this study, we used the prototype DBT system with CsI(Tl) scintillator/CMOS flat panel digital detector developed by Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute (KERI). A scatter fraction, a transmission factor, an effective modulation transfer function (eMTF) and an effective normalized noise power spectrum (eNNPS) were measured in different thickness and glandularity of breast equivalent phantom. As results, scatter fraction increased and transmission fraction decreased by a factor of 2.09 and 6.25, respectively, as increasing glandularity and thickness. We also found that the breast phantom with small thickness presented high eMTF and low eNNPS. As results, eDQE from 4 cm thick breast phantom with 30% and 70% glandularity showed small changes from 0.20 to 0.19 at 0.1 mm-1, whereas eDQE from 50% glandularity of 3 cm and 5 cm presented relatively significant increase from 0.16 to 0.20 at 0.1 mm-1 spatial frequency. These indicated that eDQE was strongly affected by phantom thickness, but the effect of glandularity seemed to be trivial. According to our study, the whole system evaluation considering the races of patients from standard to abnormal cases is needed to be studied in future works.

  20. SU-C-209-07: Phantoms for Digital Breast Tomosynthesis Imaging System Evaluation

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    Jacobson, D; Liu, Y [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) is gaining importance in breast imaging. There is a need for phantoms that can be used for image evaluation and comparison. Existing commercially available phantoms for DBT are expensive and may lack clinically relevant test objects. The purpose of this study is to develop phantoms for DBT evaluation. Methods Four phantoms have been designed and constructed to assess the image quality (IQ) of two DBT systems. The first contains a spiral of 0.3 mm SiC beads in gelatin to measure the tomographic slice thickness profile and uniformity of coverage in a series of tomographic planes. The second contains simulated tumors inclined with respect to the phantom base to assess tomographic image quality. The third has a tilted array of discs with varying contrast and diameter. This phantom was imaged alone and in a stack of TE slabs giving 2 to 10 cm thickness. The fourth has a dual wedge of glandular and adipose simulating materials. One wedge contains discs with varying diameter and thickness; the other supports a mass with six simulated spicules of varying size and a cluster of simulated calcifications. The simulated glandular tissue material varies between 35 and 100% of the total thickness (5.5 cm). Results: All phantoms were scanned successfully. The best IQ comparison was achieved with the dual wedge phantom as demonstrated by the spiculated mass and calcifications. Images were evaluated by two radiologists and one physicist. The projection images and corresponding set of tomographic planes were comparable and the synthesized projection images were inferior to the projection images for both systems. Conclusion: Four phantoms were designed, constructed and imaged on two DBT systems. They successfully demonstrated performance differences between two systems, and between true and synthesized projection images. Future work will incorporate these designs into a single phantom.

  1. Digital breast tomosynthesis: a pilot observer study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Walter F; Abrams, Gordon S; Catullo, Victor J; Chough, Denise M; Ganott, Marie A; Hakim, Christiane M; Gur, David

    2008-04-01

    The objective of our study was to assess ergonomic and diagnostic performance-related issues associated with the interpretation of digital breast tomosynthesis-generated examinations. Thirty selected cases were read under three different display conditions by nine experienced radiologists in a fully crossed, mode-balanced observer performance study. The reading modes included full-field digital mammography (FFDM) alone, the 11 low-dose projections acquired for the reconstruction of tomosynthesis images, and the reconstructed digital breast tomosynthesis examination. Observers rated cases under the free-response receiver operating characteristic, as well as a screening paradigm, and provided subjective assessments of the relative diagnostic value of the two digital breast tomosynthesis-based image sets as compared with FFDM. The time to review and diagnose each case was also evaluated. Observer performance measures were not statistically significant (p > 0.05) primarily because of the small sample size in this pilot study, suggesting that showing significant improvements in diagnosis, if any, will require a larger study. Several radiologists did perceive the digital breast tomosynthesis image set and the projection series to be better than FFDM (p < 0.05) for diagnosing this specific case set. The time to review, interpret, and rate the examinations was significantly different for the techniques in question (p < 0.05). Tomosynthesis-based breast imaging may have great potential, but much work is needed before its optimal role in the clinical environment is known.

  2. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Digital Breast Tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    500 or secretions due to pathological activity and can be precursors to breast cancers such as ductal carcinoma22, 23. Breast microcalcifications ... Breast Cancer Screening. Am J Med, in press. 650 2Gilles R, Meunier M, Lucidarme O, et al. (1996) Clustered breast microcalcifications : Evaluation... Breast Cancer , contrast-enhanced imaging, digital breast tomosynthesis, dynamic imaging, x-ray imaging 15. Number of Pages (count all pages

  3. Digital breast tomosynthesis: observer performance study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gur, David; Abrams, Gordon S; Chough, Denise M; Ganott, Marie A; Hakim, Christiane M; Perrin, Ronald L; Rathfon, Grace Y; Sumkin, Jules H; Zuley, Margarita L; Bandos, Andriy I

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare in a retrospective observer study the diagnostic performance of full-field digital mammography (FFDM) with that of digital breast tomosynthesis. Eight experienced radiologists interpreted images from 125 selected examinations, 35 with verified findings of cancer and 90 with no finding of cancer. The four display conditions included FFDM alone, 11 low-dose projections, reconstructed digital breast tomosynthesis images, and a combined display mode of FFDM and digital breast tomosynthesis images. Observers rated examinations using the screening BI-RADS rating scale and the free-response receiver operating characteristic paradigm. Observer performance levels were measured as the proportion of examinations prompting recall of patients for further diagnostic evaluation. The results were presented in terms of true-positive fraction and false-positive fraction. Performance levels were compared among the acquisitions and reading modes. Time to view and interpret an examination also was evaluated. Use of the combination of digital breast tomosynthesis and FFDM was associated with 30% reduction in recall rate for cancer-free examinations that would have led to recall if FFDM had been used alone (p digital breast tomosynthesis alone also tended to reduce recall rates, an average of 10%, although the observed decrease was not statistically significant (p = 0.09 for the participating radiologists). There was no convincing evidence that use of digital breast tomosynthesis alone or in combination with FFDM results in a substantial improvement in sensitivity. Use of digital breast tomosynthesis for breast imaging may result in a substantial decrease in recall rate.

  4. Characterization of lesions in dense breasts: Does tomosynthesis help?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krithika Rangarajan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Mammography in dense breasts is challenging due to lesion obscuration by tissue overlap. Does tomosynthesis offers a solution? Aims: To study the impact of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT in characterizing lesions in breasts of different mammographic densities. Settings and Design: Prospective blinded study comparing mammography in two views with Mammography + Tomosynthesis. Methods and Material: Tomosynthesis was performed in 199 patients who were assigned Breast imaging reporting and data system (BIRADS categories 0, 3, 4, or 5 on two-dimensional (2D mammogram. Mammograms were first categorized into one of 4 mammographic breast densities in accordance with the American College of Radiology (ACR. Three radiologists independently analyzed these images and assigned a BIRADS category first based on 2D mammogram alone, and then assigned a fresh BIRADS category after taking mammography and tomosynthesis into consideration. A composite gold-standard was used in the study (histopathology, ultrasound, follow-up mammogram, magnetic resonance imaging. Each lesion was categorized into 3 groups—superior categorization with DBT, no change in BIRADS, or inferior BIRADS category based on comparison with the gold-standard. The percentage of lesions in each group was calculated for different breast densities. Results: There were 260 lesions (ages 28–85. Overall, superior categorization was seen in 21.2% of our readings on addition of DBT to mammography. DBT was most useful in ACR Densities 3 and 4 breasts where it led to more appropriate categorization in 27 and 42% of lesions, respectively. DBT also increased diagnostic confidence in 54.5 and 63.6% of lesions in ACR Densities 3 and 4, respectively. Conclusions: In a diagnostic setting, the utility of tomosynthesis increases with increasing breast density. This helps in identifying the sub category of patients where DBT can actually change management.

  5. Optimizing configuration parameters of a stationary digital breast tomosynthesis system based on carbon nanotube x-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Andrew; Qian, Xin; Gidcumb, Emily; Spronk, Derrek; Sprenger, Frank; Kuo, Johnny; Ng, Susan; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto

    2012-03-01

    The stationary Digital Breast Tomosynthesis System (s-DBT) has the advantage over the conventional DBT systems as there is no motion blurring in the projection images associated with the x-ray source motion. We have developed a prototype s-DBT system by retrofitting a Hologic Selenia Dimensions rotating gantry tomosynthesis system with a distributed carbon nanotube (CNT) x-ray source array. The linear array consists of 31 x-ray generating focal spots distributed over a 30 degree angle. Each x-ray beam can be electronically activated allowing the flexibility and easy implementation of novel tomosynthesis scanning with different scanning parameters and configurations. Here we report the initial results of investigation on the imaging quality of the s-DBT system and its dependence on the acquisition parameters including the number of projections views, the total angular span of the projection views, the dose distribution between different projections, and the total dose. A mammography phantom is used to visually assess image quality. The modulation transfer function (MTF) of a line wire phantom is used to evaluate the system spatial resolution. For s-DBT the in-plan system resolution, as measured by the MTF, does not change for different configurations. This is in contrast to rotating gantry DBT systems, where the MTF degrades for increased angular span due to increased focal spot blurring associated with the x-ray source motion. The overall image quality factor, a composite measure of the signal difference to noise ratio (SdNR) for mass detection and the z-axis artifact spread function for microcalcification detection, is best for the configuration with a large angular span, an intermediate number of projection views, and an even dose distribution. These results suggest possible directions for further improvement of s-DBT systems for high quality breast cancer imaging.

  6. Digital breast tomosynthesis; Digitale Tomosynthese der Brust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz-Wendtland, Ruediger [Universitaetsklinikum Erlangen (Germany). Radiologisches Inst.; Hermann, Klaus-Peter [Goettingen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik und Biophysik; Uder, Michael [Universitaetsklinik Homburg (Germany). Abt. fuer Radiodiagnostik

    2010-09-15

    Digital mammography is the most important method for early diagnosis of breast cancer. The typical overlapping of normal and pathological tissue during the standard 2D projection, however, often reduces the specificity and sensitivity of the mammographic investigation. Digital breast tomosynthesis provides on the basis of a limited number of single images with different projection angles not superimposed tomograms and may remove the unwanted masking by superimposed structures. Clinical studies must show whether the digital tomosynthesis has the real potential to reduce the recall rate and simultaneously increase the cancer detection rate, especially in women with dense breasts. (orig.)

  7. Estimating corresponding locations in ipsilateral breast tomosynthesis views

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schie, Guido; Tanner, Christine; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2011-03-01

    To improve cancer detection in mammography, breast exams usually consist of two views per breast. To combine information from both views, radiologists and multiview computer-aided detection (CAD) systems need to match corresponding regions in the two views. In digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), finding corresponding regions in ipsilateral volumes may be a difficult and time-consuming task for radiologists, because many slices have to be inspected individually. In this study we developed a method to quickly estimate corresponding locations in ipsilateral tomosynthesis views by applying a mathematical transformation. First a compressed breast model is matched to the tomosynthesis view containing a point of interest. Then we decompress, rotate and compress again to estimate the location of the corresponding point in the ipsilateral view. In this study we use a simple elastically deformable sphere model to obtain an analytical solution for the transformation in a given DBT case. The model is matched to the volume by using automatic segmentation of the pectoral muscle, breast tissue and nipple. For validation we annotated 181 landmarks in both views and applied our method to each location. Results show a median 3D distance between the actual location and estimated location of 1.5 cm; a good starting point for a feature based local search method to link lesions for a multiview CAD system. Half of the estimated locations were at most 1 slice away from the actual location, making our method useful as a tool in mammographic workstations to interactively find corresponding locations in ipsilateral tomosynthesis views.

  8. Digital Mammography Imaging: Breast Tomosynthesis and Advanced Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Helvie, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses recent developments in advanced derivative technologies associated with digital mammography. Digital breast tomosynthesis – its principles, development, and early clinical trials are reviewed. Contrast enhanced digital mammography and combined imaging systems with digital mammography and ultrasound are also discussed. Although all these methods are currently research programs, they hold promise for improving cancer detection and characterization if early results are con...

  9. Breast Cancer: Computer-aided Detection with Digital Breast Tomosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morra, Lia; Sacchetto, Daniela; Durando, Manuela; Agliozzo, Silvano; Carbonaro, Luca Alessandro; Delsanto, Silvia; Pesce, Barbara; Persano, Diego; Mariscotti, Giovanna; Marra, Vincenzo; Fonio, Paolo; Bert, Alberto

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate a commercial tomosynthesis computer-aided detection (CAD) system in an independent, multicenter dataset. Diagnostic and screening tomosynthesis mammographic examinations (n = 175; cranial caudal and mediolateral oblique) were randomly selected from a previous institutional review board-approved trial. All subjects gave informed consent. Examinations were performed in three centers and included 123 patients, with 132 biopsy-proven screening-detected cancers, and 52 examinations with negative results at 1-year follow-up. One hundred eleven lesions were masses and/or microcalcifications (72 masses, 22 microcalcifications, 17 masses with microcalcifications) and 21 were architectural distortions. Lesions were annotated by radiologists who were aware of all available reports. CAD performance was assessed as per-lesion sensitivity and false-positive results per volume in patients with negative results. Use of the CAD system showed per-lesion sensitivity of 89% (99 of 111; 95% confidence interval: 81%, 94%), with 2.7 ± 1.8 false-positive rate per view, 62 of 72 lesions detected were masses, 20 of 22 were microcalcification clusters, and 17 of 17 were masses with microcalcifications. Overall, 37 of 39 microcalcification clusters (95% sensitivity, 95% confidence interval: 81%, 99%) and 79 of 89 masses (89% sensitivity, 95% confidence interval: 80%, 94%) were detected with the CAD system. On average, 0.5 false-positive rate per view were microcalcification clusters, 2.1 were masses, and 0.1 were masses and microcalcifications. A digital breast tomosynthesis CAD system can allow detection of a large percentage (89%, 99 of 111) of breast cancers manifesting as masses and microcalcification clusters, with an acceptable false-positive rate (2.7 per breast view). Further studies with larger datasets acquired with equipment from multiple vendors are needed to replicate the findings and to study the interaction of radiologists and CAD systems. (©) RSNA, 2015.

  10. Evaluation of tomosynthesis elastography in a breast-mimicking phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelken, Florian Jan, E-mail: florian.engelken@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Sack, Ingolf, E-mail: ingolf.sack@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Klatt, Dieter, E-mail: dieter.klatt@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Fischer, Thomas, E-mail: thom.fischer@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Fallenberg, Eva Maria, E-mail: eva.fallenberg@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Bick, Ulrich, E-mail: ulrich.bick@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Diekmann, Felix, E-mail: felix.diekmann@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin (Germany)

    2012-09-15

    Objective: To evaluate whether measurement of strain under static compression in tomosynthesis of a breast-mimicking phantom can be used to distinguish tumor-simulating lesions of different elasticities and to compare the results to values predicted by rheometric analysis as well as results of ultrasound elastography. Materials and methods: We prepared three soft breast-mimicking phantoms containing simulated tumors of different elasticities. The phantoms were imaged using a wide angle tomosynthesis system with increasing compression settings ranging from 0 N to 105 N in steps of 15 N. Strain of the inclusions was measured in two planes using a commercially available mammography workstation. The elasticity of the phantom matrix and inclusion material was determined by rheometric analysis. Ultrasound elastography of the inclusions was performed using two different ultrasound elastography algorithms. Results: Strain at maximal compression was 24.4%/24.5% in plane 1/plane 2, respectively, for the soft inclusion, 19.6%/16.9% for the intermediate inclusion, and 6.0%/10.2% for the firm inclusion. The strain ratios predicted by rheometrical testing were 0.41, 0.83 and 1.26 for the soft, intermediate, and firm inclusions, respectively. The strain ratios obtained for the soft, intermediate, and firm inclusions were 0.72 ± 0.13, 1.02 ± 0.21 and 2.67 ± 1.70, respectively for tomosynthesis elastography, 0.91, 1.64 and 2.07, respectively, for ultrasound tissue strain imaging, and 0.97, 2.06 and 2.37, respectively, for ultrasound real-time elastography. Conclusions: Differentiation of tumor-simulating inclusions by elasticity in a breast mimicking phantom may be possible by measuring strain in tomosynthesis. This method may be useful for assessing elasticity of breast lesions tomosynthesis of the breast.

  11. Molecular Breast Imaging Using Emission Tomosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopan, O. [University of Florida; Gilland, D. [University of Florida; Weisenberger, Andrew G. [JLAB; Kross, Brian J. [JLAB; Welch, Benjamin L. [Dilon Technologies

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: Tour objective is to design a novel SPECT system for molecular breast imaging (MBI) and evaluate its performance. The limited angle SPECT system, or emission tomosynthesis, is designed to achieve 3D images of the breast with high spatial resolution/sensitivity. The system uses a simplified detector motion and is conducive to on-board biopsy and mult-modal imaging with mammography. Methods: The novel feature of the proposed gamma camera is a variable-angle, slant-hole (VASH) collimator, which is well suited for limited angle SPECT of a mildly compressed breast. The collimator holes change slant angle while the camera surface remains flush against the compression paddle. This allows the camera to vary the angular view ({+-}30{degrees}, {+-}45{degrees}) for tomographic imaging while keeping the camera close to the object for high spatial resolution and/or sensitivity. Theoretical analysis and Monte Carlo simulations were performed assuming a point source and isolated breast phantom. Spatial resolution, sensitivity, contrast and SNR were measured. Results were compared to single-view, planar images and conventional SPECT. For both conventional SPECT and VASH, data were reconstructed using iterative algorithms. Finally, a proof-of-concept VASH collimator was constructed for experimental evaluation. Results: Measured spatial resolution/sensitivity with VASH showed good agreement with theory including depth-of-interaction (DOI) effects. The DOI effect diminished the depth resolution by approximately 2 mm. Increasing the slant angle range from {+-}30{degrees} to {+-}45{degrees} resulted in an approximately 1 mm improvement in the depth resolution. In the breast phantom images, VASH showed improved contrast and SNR over conventional SPECT and improved contrast over planar scintimmammography. Reconstructed images from the proof-of-concept VASH collimator demonstrated reasonable depth resolution capabilities using limited angle projection data. Conclusion: We

  12. [Breast tomosynthesis: a new tool for diagnosing breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Miravete, P; Etxano, J

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer continues to be the most common malignant tumor in women in occidental countries. Mammography is currently the technique of choice for screening programs; however, although it has been widely validated, mammography has its limitations, especially in dense breasts. Breast tomosynthesis is a revolutionary advance in the diagnosis of breast cancer. It makes it possible to define lesions that are occult in the glandular tissue and therefore to detect breast tumors that are impossible to see on conventional mammograms. In considering the combined use of mammography and tomosynthesis, many factors must be taken into account apart from cancer detection; these include additional radiation, the recall rate, and the time necessary to carry out and interpret the two tests. In this article, we review the technical principles of tomosynthesis, it main uses, and the future perspective for this imaging technique. Copyright © 2013 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Experimental investigation for determination of optimal X-ray beam tube voltages in a newly developed digital breast tomosynthesis system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hye-Suk, E-mail: radiosugar@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Radiological Science and Research Institute of Health Science, Yonsei University, Wonju, Gangwon 220-710 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ye-Seul, E-mail: radiohesugar@gmail.com [Department of Radiological Science and Research Institute of Health Science, Yonsei University, Wonju, Gangwon 220-710 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Young-Wook, E-mail: ywchoi@keri.re.kr [Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute (KERI), Ansan, Geongki 426-170 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, JaeGu, E-mail: jgchoi88@paran.com [Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute (KERI), Ansan, Geongki 426-170 (Korea, Republic of); Rhee, Yong-Chun, E-mail: ycrhee@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Radiological Science and Research Institute of Health Science, Yonsei University, Wonju, Gangwon 220-710 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hee-Joung, E-mail: hjk1@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Radiological Science and Research Institute of Health Science, Yonsei University, Wonju, Gangwon 220-710 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-01

    Our purpose was to investigate optimal tube voltages (kVp) for a newly developed digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) process and to determine tube current–exposure time products (mA s) for the average glandular dose (AGD), which is similar to that of the two views in conventional mammography (CM). In addition, the optimal acquisition parameters for this system were compared with those of CM. The analysis was based on the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) from the simulated micro-calcifications on homogeneous phantoms, and the figure of merit (FOM) was retrieved from the CNR and AGD at X-ray tube voltages ranging from 24 to 40 kVp at intervals of 2 kV. The optimal kVp increased more than 2 kV with increasing glandularity for thicker (≥50 mm) breast phantoms. The optimal kVp for DBT was found to be 4–7 kV higher than that calculated for CM with breast phantoms thicker than 50 mm. This is likely due to the greater effect of noise and dose reduction by kVp increment when using the lower dose per projection in DBT. It is important to determine optimum acquisition conditions for a maximally effective DBT system. The results of our study provide useful information to further improve DBT for high quality imaging.

  14. Screening Mammography and Digital Breast Tomosynthesis: Controversies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funaro, Kimberly; Drukteinis, Jennifer; Falcon, Shannon

    2017-10-01

    Breast cancer screening with mammography reduces breast cancer mortality; however, diverging recommendations regarding screening have caused controversy. The emerging technology of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) may soon become the mainstay of breast cancer screening. We present recommendations for breast cancer screening based on guidelines. A PubMed literature review was performed and the results from five large clinical studies comparing the efficacy of digital mammography alone versus digital mammography with DBT are examined. We emphasize the importance of annual screening to reduce breast cancer mortality. Our review of the literature demonstrates that DBT increases cancer detection rates and reduces callbacks. Additional research is needed to determine whether the increased cancer detection rates are associated with a decrease in mortality.

  15. Digital Mammography Imaging: Breast Tomosynthesis and Advanced Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helvie, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Synopsis This article discusses recent developments in advanced derivative technologies associated with digital mammography. Digital breast tomosynthesis – its principles, development, and early clinical trials are reviewed. Contrast enhanced digital mammography and combined imaging systems with digital mammography and ultrasound are also discussed. Although all these methods are currently research programs, they hold promise for improving cancer detection and characterization if early results are confirmed by clinical trials. PMID:20868894

  16. Evaluation of scatter effects on image quality for breast tomosynthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Gang; Mainprize, James G.; Boone, John M.; Yaffe, Martin J.

    2009-01-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis uses a limited number (typically 10–20) of low-dose x-ray projections to produce a pseudo-three-dimensional volume tomographic reconstruction of the breast. The purpose of this investigation was to characterize and evaluate the effect of scattered radiation on the image quality for breast tomosynthesis. In a simulation, scatter point spread functions generated by a Monte Carlo simulation method were convolved over the breast projection to estimate the distribution...

  17. A digital x-ray tomosynthesis coupled near infrared spectral tomography system for dual-modality breast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnaswamy, Venkataramanan; Michaelsen, Kelly E; Pogue, Brian W; Poplack, Steven P; Shaw, Ian; Defrietas, Ken; Brooks, Ken; Paulsen, Keith D

    2012-08-13

    A Near Infrared Spectral Tomography (NIRST) system has been developed and integrated into a commercial Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) scanner to allow structural and functional imaging of breast in vivo. The NIRST instrument uses an 8-wavelength continuous wave (CW) laser-based scanning source assembly and a 75-element silicon photodiode solid-state detector panel to produce dense spectral and spatial projection data from which spectrally constrained 3D tomographic images of tissue chromophores are produced. Integration of the optical imaging system into the DBT scanner allows direct co-registration of the optical and DBT images, while also facilitating the synergistic use of x-ray contrast as anatomical priors in optical image reconstruction. Currently, the total scan time for a combined NIRST-DBT exam is ~50s with data collection from 8 wavelengths in the optical scan requiring ~42s to complete. The system was tested in breast simulating phantoms constructed using intralipid and blood in an agarose matrix with a 3 cm x 2 cm cylindrical inclusion at 1 cm depth from the surface. Diffuse image reconstruction of total hemoglobin (HbT) concentration resulted in accurate recovery of the lateral size and position of the inclusion to within 6% and 8%, respectively. Use of DBT structural priors in the NIRST reconstruction process improved the quantitative accuracy of the HbT recovery, and led to linear changes in imaged versus actual contrast, underscoring the advantages of dual-modality optical imaging approaches. The quantitative accuracy of the system can be further improved with independent measurements of scattering properties through integration of frequency or time domain data.

  18. Task-Based Modeling of a 5k Ultra-High-Resolution Medical Imaging System for Digital Breast Tomosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chumin; Kanicki, Jerzy

    2017-09-01

    High-resolution, low-noise X-ray detectors based on CMOS active pixel sensor (APS) technology have demonstrated superior imaging performance for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). This paper presents a task-based model for a high-resolution medical imaging system to evaluate its ability to detect simulated microcalcifications and masses as lesions for breast cancer. A 3-D cascaded system analysis for a 50- [Formula: see text] pixel pitch CMOS APS X-ray detector was integrated with an object task function, a medical imaging display model, and the human eye contrast sensitivity function to calculate the detectability index and area under the ROC curve (AUC). It was demonstrated that the display pixel pitch and zoom factor should be optimized to improve the AUC for detecting small microcalcifications. In addition, detector electronic noise of smaller than 300 e- and a high display maximum luminance (>1000 cd/cm 2) are desirable to distinguish microcalcifications of [Formula: see text] in size. For low contrast mass detection, a medical imaging display with a minimum of 12-bit gray levels is recommended to realize accurate luminance levels. A wide projection angle range of greater than ±30° in combination with the image gray level magnification could improve the mass detectability especially when the anatomical background noise is high. On the other hand, a narrower projection angle range below ±20° can improve the small, high contrast object detection. Due to the low mass contrast and luminance, the ambient luminance should be controlled below 5 cd/ [Formula: see text]. Task-based modeling provides important firsthand imaging performance of the high-resolution CMOS-based medical imaging system that is still at early stage development for DBT. The modeling results could guide the prototype design and clinical studies in the future.

  19. Interpretation of digital breast tomosynthesis: preliminary study on comparison with picture archiving and communication system (PACS) and dedicated workstation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Seon; Chang, Jung Min; Yi, Ann; Shin, Sung Ui; Lee, Myung Eun; Kim, Won Hwa; Cho, Nariya; Moon, Woo Kyung

    2017-08-01

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy and efficiency in the interpretation of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) images using a picture archiving and communication system (PACS) and a dedicated workstation. 97 DBT images obtained for screening or diagnostic purposes were stored in both a workstation and a PACS and evaluated in combination with digital mammography by three independent radiologists retrospectively. Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System final assessments and likelihood of malignancy (%) were assigned and the interpretation time when using the workstation and PACS was recorded. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, sensitivities and specificities were compared with histopathological examination and follow-up data as a reference standard. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve values for cancer detection (0.839 vs 0.815, p = 0.6375) and sensitivity (81.8% vs 75.8%, p = 0.2188) showed no statistically significant differences between the workstation and PACS. However, specificity was significantly higher when analysing on the workstation than when using PACS (83.7% vs 76.9%, p = 0.009). When evaluating DBT images using PACS, only one case was deemed necessary to be reanalysed using the workstation. The mean time to interpret DBT images on PACS (1.68 min/case) was significantly longer than that to interpret on the workstation (1.35 min/case) (p workstation, even though it required a longer reading time. Advances in knowledge: Interpretation of DBT images using PACS is an alternative to evaluate the images when a dedicated workstation is not available.

  20. Effects of breast density and compression on normal breast tissue hemodynamics through breast tomosynthesis guided near-infrared spectral tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Michaelsen, Kelly E.; Krishnaswamy, Venkataramanan; Shi, Linxi; Vedantham, Srinivasan; Karellas, Andrew; Pogue, Brian W.; Paulsen, Keith D.; Poplack, Steven P.

    2016-01-01

    Optically derived tissue properties across a range of breast densities and the effects of breast compression on estimates of hemoglobin, oxygen metabolism, and water and lipid concentrations were obtained from a coregistered imaging system that integrates near-infrared spectral tomography (NIRST) with digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). Image data were analyzed from 27 women who underwent four IRB approved NIRST/DBT exams that included fully and mildly compressed breast acquisitions in two pr...

  1. Using mastectomy specimens to develop breast models for breast tomosynthesis and CT breast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, J. Michael; Das, Mini; Didier, Clay; Mah'D, Mufeed; Glick, Stephen J.

    2008-03-01

    Dedicated x-ray computed tomography (CT) of the breast using a cone-beam flat-panel detector system is a modality under investigation by a number of research teams. As previously reported, we have fabricated a prototype, bench-top flat-panel CT breast imaging (CTBI) system and developed computer simulation software to model such a system. We are developing a methodology to use high resolution, low noise CT reconstructions of fresh mastectomy specimens for generating an ensemble of 3D digital breast phantoms that realistically model 3D compressed and uncompressed breast anatomy. These breast models can be used to simulate realistic projection data for both breast tomosynthesis (BT) and CT systems thereby providing a powerful evaluation and optimization mechanism.

  2. Computer Aided Detection of Breast Masses in Digital Tomosynthesis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Singh, Swatee; Lo, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate feasibility of computer-aided detection of masses and calcification clusters in breast tomosynthesis images and obtain reliable estimates of sensitivity...

  3. A review of breast tomosynthesis. Part I. The image acquisition process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sechopoulos, Ioannis [Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Hematology and Medical Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, 1701 Upper Gate Drive Northeast, Suite 5018, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Mammography is a very well-established imaging modality for the early detection and diagnosis of breast cancer. However, since the introduction of digital imaging to the realm of radiology, more advanced, and especially tomographic imaging methods have been made possible. One of these methods, breast tomosynthesis, has finally been introduced to the clinic for routine everyday use, with potential to in the future replace mammography for screening for breast cancer. In this two part paper, the extensive research performed during the development of breast tomosynthesis is reviewed, with a focus on the research addressing the medical physics aspects of this imaging modality. This first paper will review the research performed on the issues relevant to the image acquisition process, including system design, optimization of geometry and technique, x-ray scatter, and radiation dose. The companion to this paper will review all other aspects of breast tomosynthesis imaging, including the reconstruction process.

  4. A review of breast tomosynthesis. Part I. The image acquisition process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sechopoulos, Ioannis

    2013-01-01

    Mammography is a very well-established imaging modality for the early detection and diagnosis of breast cancer. However, since the introduction of digital imaging to the realm of radiology, more advanced, and especially tomographic imaging methods have been made possible. One of these methods, breast tomosynthesis, has finally been introduced to the clinic for routine everyday use, with potential to in the future replace mammography for screening for breast cancer. In this two part paper, the extensive research performed during the development of breast tomosynthesis is reviewed, with a focus on the research addressing the medical physics aspects of this imaging modality. This first paper will review the research performed on the issues relevant to the image acquisition process, including system design, optimization of geometry and technique, x-ray scatter, and radiation dose. The companion to this paper will review all other aspects of breast tomosynthesis imaging, including the reconstruction process.

  5. Initial results of the FUSION-X-US prototype combining 3D automated breast ultrasound and digital breast tomosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefgen, Benedikt; Heil, Joerg; Barr, Richard G; Radicke, Marcus; Harcos, Aba; Gomez, Christina; Stieber, Anne; Hennigs, André; von Au, Alexandra; Spratte, Julia; Rauch, Geraldine; Rom, Joachim; Schütz, Florian; Sohn, Christof; Golatta, Michael

    2018-01-04

    To determine the feasibility of a prototype device combining 3D-automated breast ultrasound (ABVS) and digital breast tomosynthesis in a single device to detect and characterize breast lesions. In this prospective feasibility study, the FUSION-X-US prototype was used to perform digital breast tomosynthesis and ABVS in 23 patients with an indication for tomosynthesis based on current guidelines after clinical examination and standard imaging. The ABVS and tomosynthesis images of the prototype were interpreted separately by two blinded experts. The study compares the detection and BI-RADS® scores of breast lesions using only the tomosynthesis and ABVS data from the FUSION-X-US prototype to the results of the complete diagnostic workup. Image acquisition and processing by the prototype was fast and accurate, with some limitations in ultrasound coverage and image quality. In the diagnostic workup, 29 solid lesions (23 benign, including three cases with microcalcifications, and six malignant lesions) were identified. Using the prototype, all malignant lesions were detected and classified as malignant or suspicious by both investigators. Solid breast lesions can be localized accurately and fast by the Fusion-X-US system. Technical improvements of the ultrasound image quality and ultrasound coverage are needed to further study this new device. The prototype combines tomosynthesis and automated 3D-ultrasound (ABVS) in one device. It allows accurate detection of malignant lesions, directly correlating tomosynthesis and ABVS data. The diagnostic evaluation of the prototype-acquired data was interpreter-independent. The prototype provides a time-efficient and technically reliable diagnostic procedure. The combination of tomosynthesis and ABVS is a promising diagnostic approach.

  6. Digital tomosynthesis in breast cancer: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-León, F J; Llanos-Méndez, A; Isabel-Gómez, R

    2015-01-01

    To estimate and compare the diagnostic validity of tomosynthesis and digital mammography for screening and diagnosing breast cancer. We systematically searched MedLine, EMBASE, and Web of Science for the terms breast cancer, screening, tomosynthesis, mammography, sensitivity, and specificity in publications in the period comprising June 2010 through February 2013. We included studies on diagnostic tests and systematic reviews. Two reviewers selected and evaluated the articles. We used QUADAS 2 to evaluate the risk of bias and the NICE criteria to determine the level of evidence. We compiled a narrative synthesis. Of the 151 original studies identified, we selected 11 that included a total of 2475 women. The overall quality was low, with a risk of bias and follow-up and limitations regarding the applicability of the results. The level of evidence was not greater than level II. The sensitivity of tomosynthesis ranged from 69% to 100% and the specificity ranged from 54% to 100%. The negative likelihood ratio was good, and this makes tomosynthesis useful as a test to confirm a diagnosis. One-view tomosynthesis was no better than two-view digital mammography, and the evidence for the superiority of two-view tomosynthesis was inconclusive. The results for the diagnostic validity of tomosynthesis in the diagnosis of breast cancer were inconclusive and there were no results for its use in screening. Copyright © 2014 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Quantitative flow phantom for contrast-enhanced breast tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nock, Melissa L.; Kempston, Michael P.; Mainprize, James G.; Yaffe, Martin J.

    2007-03-01

    The use of contrast agents can help to overcome a lack of intrinsic radiographic contrast between malignant and benign breast tissue by taking advantage of the properties of tumour angiogenesis. Studies of contrast-enhanced mammography have demonstrated increased lesion conspicuity and have shown that this technique provides information on contrast uptake kinetics. It has been suggested that malignant and benign lesions can be differentiated in part by their uptake kinetics, so this additional data may lead to more accurate diagnoses. Tomosynthesis is a 3D x-ray imaging technique that permits lesion depth localization and increased conspicuity in comparison with 2D x-ray projection techniques. This modality, used in combination with contrast agents, promises to be a sensitive method of breast cancer detection. To develop the technique of contrast-enhanced breast tomosynthesis, a dynamic flow phantom has been constructed to provide the same types of imaging challenges anticipated in the clinical setting. These challenges include a low-contrast tumour space, relevant temporal contrast agent uptake and washout profiles, and a need for quantitative analysis of enhancement levels. The design of a flow phantom will be presented that includes a dynamic tumour space, a background that masks the tumour space in images without contrast enhancement, and flow characteristics that simulate tumour contrast agent uptake and washout kinetics. The system is calibrated to relate signal to concentration of the contrast agent using a well plate filled with iodinated water. Iodine detectability in the flow phantom is evaluated in terms of the signal-difference-to-noise ratio for various tomosynthesis image acquisition parameters including number of acquired angular views, angular extent, and reconstruction voxel size.

  8. Radiation dosimetry in digital breast tomosynthesis: Report of AAPM Tomosynthesis Subcommittee Task Group 223

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sechopoulos, Ioannis, E-mail: isechop@emory.edu [Departments of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Hematology and Medical Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, 1701 Uppergate Drive Northeast, Suite 5018, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States); Sabol, John M. [GE Healthcare, Global Diagnostic X-Ray, Mailstop W-701, 3000 North Grandview Boulevard, Waukesha, Wisconsin 53188 (United States); Berglund, Johan [Research and Development, Philips Women' s Healthcare, Solna (Sweden); Bolch, Wesley E. [J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Brateman, Libby [University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Christodoulou, Emmanuel; Goodsitt, Mitchell [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Flynn, Michael [Department of Radiology, Henry Ford Health System, Radiology Research 2F, 1 Ford Place, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States); Geiser, William [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030-4009 (United States); Kyle Jones, A. [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Lo, Joseph Y.; Paul Segars, W. [Department of Radiology, Medical Physics Graduate Program, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Maidment, Andrew D. A. [Department of Radiology, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-4206 (United States); Nishino, Kazuyoshi [R and D X-ray Products Group, Shimadzu Corporation, Tokyo (Japan); Nosratieh, Anita [Biomedical Engineering Graduate Group, Department of Radiology, University of California, Davis, California 95817 (United States); and others

    2014-09-15

    The radiation dose involved in any medical imaging modality that uses ionizing radiation needs to be well understood by the medical physics and clinical community. This is especially true of screening modalities. Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has recently been introduced into the clinic and is being used for screening for breast cancer in the general population. Therefore, it is important that the medical physics community have the required information to be able to understand, estimate, and communicate the radiation dose levels involved in breast tomosynthesis imaging. For this purpose, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 223 on Dosimetry in Tomosynthesis Imaging has prepared this report that discusses dosimetry in breast imaging in general, and describes a methodology and provides the data necessary to estimate mean breast glandular dose from a tomosynthesis acquisition. In an effort to maximize familiarity with the procedures and data provided in this Report, the methodology to perform the dose estimation in DBT is based as much as possible on that used in mammography dose estimation.

  9. Evaluation of scatter effects on image quality for breast tomosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Gang; Mainprize, James G.; Boone, John M.; Yaffe, Martin J. [Imaging Research, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, S-657, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada) and Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Department of Radiology, X-ray Imaging Laboratory, U. C. Davis Medical Center, 4701 X Street, Sacramento, California 95817 and Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Imaging Research, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, S-657, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada) and Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada)

    2009-10-15

    Digital breast tomosynthesis uses a limited number (typically 10-20) of low-dose x-ray projections to produce a pseudo-three-dimensional volume tomographic reconstruction of the breast. The purpose of this investigation was to characterize and evaluate the effect of scattered radiation on the image quality for breast tomosynthesis. In a simulation, scatter point spread functions generated by a Monte Carlo simulation method were convolved over the breast projection to estimate the distribution of scatter for each angle of tomosynthesis projection. The results demonstrate that in the absence of scatter reduction techniques, images will be affected by cupping artifacts, and there will be reduced accuracy of attenuation values inferred from the reconstructed images. The effect of x-ray scatter on the contrast, noise, and lesion signal-difference-to-noise ratio (SDNR) in tomosynthesis reconstruction was measured as a function of the tumor size. When a with-scatter reconstruction was compared to one without scatter for a 5 cm compressed breast, the following results were observed. The contrast in the reconstructed central slice image of a tumorlike mass (14 mm in diameter) was reduced by 30%, the voxel value (inferred attenuation coefficient) was reduced by 28%, and the SDNR fell by 60%. The authors have quantified the degree to which scatter degrades the image quality over a wide range of parameters relevant to breast tomosynthesis, including x-ray beam energy, breast thickness, breast diameter, and breast composition. They also demonstrate, though, that even without a scatter rejection device, the contrast and SDNR in the reconstructed tomosynthesis slice are higher than those of conventional mammographic projection images acquired with a grid at an equivalent total exposure.

  10. Evaluation of scatter effects on image quality for breast tomosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Gang; Mainprize, James G; Boone, John M; Yaffe, Martin J

    2009-10-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis uses a limited number (typically 10-20) of low-dose x-ray projections to produce a pseudo-three-dimensional volume tomographic reconstruction of the breast. The purpose of this investigation was to characterize and evaluate the effect of scattered radiation on the image quality for breast tomosynthesis. In a simulation, scatter point spread functions generated by a Monte Carlo simulation method were convolved over the breast projection to estimate the distribution of scatter for each angle of tomosynthesis projection. The results demonstrate that in the absence of scatter reduction techniques, images will be affected by cupping artifacts, and there will be reduced accuracy of attenuation values inferred from the reconstructed images. The effect of x-ray scatter on the contrast, noise, and lesion signal-difference-to-noise ratio (SDNR) in tomosynthesis reconstruction was measured as a function of the tumor size. When a with-scatter reconstruction was compared to one without scatter for a 5 cm compressed breast, the following results were observed. The contrast in the reconstructed central slice image of a tumorlike mass (14 mm in diameter) was reduced by 30%, the voxel value (inferred attenuation coefficient) was reduced by 28%, and the SDNR fell by 60%. The authors have quantified the degree to which scatter degrades the image quality over a wide range of parameters relevant to breast tomosynthesis, including x-ray beam energy, breast thickness, breast diameter, and breast composition. They also demonstrate, though, that even without a scatter rejection device, the contrast and SDNR in the reconstructed tomosynthesis slice are higher than those of conventional mammographic projection images acquired with a grid at an equivalent total exposure.

  11. Validation of a new digital breast tomosynthesis medical display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchessoux, Cédric; Vivien, Nicolas; Kumcu, Asli; Kimpe, Tom

    2011-03-01

    The main objective of this study is to evaluate and validate the new Barco medical display MDMG-5221 which has been optimized for the Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) imaging modality system, and to prove the benefit of the new DBT display in terms of image quality and clinical performance. The clinical performance is evaluated by the detection of micro-calcifications inserted in reconstructed Digital Breast Tomosynthesis slices. The slices are shown in dynamic cine loops, at two frames rates. The statistical analysis chosen for this study is the Receiver Operating Characteristic Multiple-Reader, Multiple-Case methodology, in order to measure the clinical performance of the two displays. Four experienced radiologists are involved in this study. For this clinical study, 50 normal and 50 abnormal independent datasets were used. The result is that the new display outperforms the mammography display for a signal detection task using real DBT images viewed at 25 and 50 slices per second. In the case of 50 slices per second, the p-value = 0.0664. For a cut-off where alpha=0.05, the conclusion is that the null hypothesis cannot be rejected, however the trend is that the new display performs 6% better than the old display in terms of AUC. At 25 slices per second, the difference between the two displays is very apparent. The new display outperforms the mammography display by 10% in terms of AUC, with a good statistical significance of p=0.0415.

  12. Comparative study between breast tomosynthesis and classic digital mammography in the evaluation of different breast lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahar Mansour

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: Three-dimensional tomosynthesis significantly enhanced the detection and characterization of breast lesions on digital mammography especially in the context of dense breast parenchyma (ACR 3&4.

  13. Evaluation of scatter effects on image quality for breast tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Gang; Mainprize, James G.; Boone, John M.; Yaffe, Martin J.

    2007-03-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis uses a limited number of low-dose x-ray projections to produce a three-dimensional (3D) tomographic reconstruction of the breast. The purpose of this investigation was to characterize and evaluate the effect of scatter radiation on image quality for breast tomosynthesis. Generated by a Monte Carlo simulation method, scatter point spread functions (PSF) were convolved over the field of view (FOV) to estimate the distribution of scatter for each angle of tomosynthesis projection. The results demonstrated that in the absence of scatter reduction techniques, the scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR) levels for the average breast are quite high (~0.4 at the centre of mass), and increased with increased breast thickness and with larger FOV. Associated with such levels of x-ray scatter are cupping artifacts, as well as reduced accuracy in reconstruction values. The effect of x-ray scatter on the contrast, noise, and signal-difference-to-noise ratio (SDNR) in tomosynthesis reconstruction was measured as a function of tumour size. For example, the contrast in the reconstructed central slice of a tumour-like mass (14 mm in diameter) was degraded by 30% while the inaccuracy of the voxel value was 28%, and the reduction of SDNR was 60%. We have quantified the degree to which scatter degrades the image quality over a wide range of parameters, including x-ray beam energy, breast thickness, breast diameter, and breast composition. However, even without a scatter rejection device, the contrast and SDNR in the reconstructed tomosynthesis slice is higher than that of conventional mammographic projection images acquired with a grid at an equivalent total exposure.

  14. The compressed breast during mammography and breast tomosynthesis: in vivo shape characterization and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Ruiz, Alejandro; Agasthya, Greeshma A.; Sechopoulos, Ioannis

    2017-09-01

    To characterize and develop a patient-based 3D model of the compressed breast undergoing mammography and breast tomosynthesis. During this IRB-approved, HIPAA-compliant study, 50 women were recruited to undergo 3D breast surface imaging with structured light (SL) during breast compression, along with simultaneous acquisition of a tomosynthesis image. A pair of SL systems were used to acquire 3D surface images by projecting 24 different patterns onto the compressed breast and capturing their reflection off the breast surface in approximately 12-16 s. The 3D surface was characterized and modeled via principal component analysis. The resulting surface model was combined with a previously developed 2D model of projected compressed breast shapes to generate a full 3D model. Data from ten patients were discarded due to technical problems during image acquisition. The maximum breast thickness (found at the chest-wall) had an average value of 56 mm, and decreased 13% towards the nipple (breast tilt angle of 5.2°). The portion of the breast not in contact with the compression paddle or the support table extended on average 17 mm, 18% of the chest-wall to nipple distance. The outermost point along the breast surface lies below the midline of the total thickness. A complete 3D model of compressed breast shapes was created and implemented as a software application available for download, capable of generating new random realistic 3D shapes of breasts undergoing compression. Accurate characterization and modeling of the breast curvature and shape was achieved and will be used for various image processing and clinical tasks.

  15. Optimization of Tomosynthesis Imaging for Improved Mass and Microcalcification Detection in the Breast

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    for Improved Mass and Microcalcification Detection in the Breast PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dan Xia CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION...AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Optimization of Tomosynthesis Imaging for Improved Mass and Microcalcification Detection in the Breast 5b...detec- tion of breast cancer [2,3,4]. Although considerable progress has been made, improvements to several areas of breast tomosynthesis technology are

  16. The simulation of 3D mass models in 2D digital mammography and breast tomosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaheen, Eman, E-mail: eman.shaheen@uzleuven.be; De Keyzer, Frederik; Bosmans, Hilde; Ongeval, Chantal Van [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Dance, David R.; Young, Kenneth C. [National Coordinating Centre for the Physics of Mammography, Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford GU2 7XX, United Kingdom and Department of Physics, Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: This work proposes a new method of building 3D breast mass models with different morphological shapes and describes the validation of the realism of their appearance after simulation into 2D digital mammograms and breast tomosynthesis images. Methods: Twenty-five contrast enhanced MRI breast lesions were collected and each mass was manually segmented in the three orthogonal views: sagittal, coronal, and transversal. The segmented models were combined, resampled to have isotropic voxel sizes, triangularly meshed, and scaled to different sizes. These masses were referred to as nonspiculated masses and were then used as nuclei onto which spicules were grown with an iterative branching algorithm forming a total of 30 spiculated masses. These 55 mass models were projected into 2D projection images to obtain mammograms after image processing and into tomographic sequences of projection images, which were then reconstructed to form 3D tomosynthesis datasets. The realism of the appearance of these mass models was assessed by five radiologists via receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis when compared to 54 real masses. All lesions were also given a breast imaging reporting and data system (BIRADS) score. The data sets of 2D mammography and tomosynthesis were read separately. The Kendall's coefficient of concordance was used for the interrater observer agreement assessment for the BIRADS scores per modality. Further paired analysis, using the Wilcoxon signed rank test, of the BIRADS assessment between 2D and tomosynthesis was separately performed for the real masses and for the simulated masses. Results: The area under the ROC curves, averaged over all observers, was 0.54 (95% confidence interval [0.50, 0.66]) for the 2D study, and 0.67 (95% confidence interval [0.55, 0.79]) for the tomosynthesis study. According to the BIRADS scores, the nonspiculated and the spiculated masses varied in their degrees of malignancy from normal (BIRADS 1) to highly

  17. The simulation of 3D mass models in 2D digital mammography and breast tomosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaheen, Eman; De Keyzer, Frederik; Bosmans, Hilde; Dance, David R; Young, Kenneth C; Van Ongeval, Chantal

    2014-08-01

    This work proposes a new method of building 3D breast mass models with different morphological shapes and describes the validation of the realism of their appearance after simulation into 2D digital mammograms and breast tomosynthesis images. Twenty-five contrast enhanced MRI breast lesions were collected and each mass was manually segmented in the three orthogonal views: sagittal, coronal, and transversal. The segmented models were combined, resampled to have isotropic voxel sizes, triangularly meshed, and scaled to different sizes. These masses were referred to as nonspiculated masses and were then used as nuclei onto which spicules were grown with an iterative branching algorithm forming a total of 30 spiculated masses. These 55 mass models were projected into 2D projection images to obtain mammograms after image processing and into tomographic sequences of projection images, which were then reconstructed to form 3D tomosynthesis datasets. The realism of the appearance of these mass models was assessed by five radiologists via receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis when compared to 54 real masses. All lesions were also given a breast imaging reporting and data system (BIRADS) score. The data sets of 2D mammography and tomosynthesis were read separately. The Kendall's coefficient of concordance was used for the interrater observer agreement assessment for the BIRADS scores per modality. Further paired analysis, using the Wilcoxon signed rank test, of the BIRADS assessment between 2D and tomosynthesis was separately performed for the real masses and for the simulated masses. The area under the ROC curves, averaged over all observers, was 0.54 (95% confidence interval [0.50, 0.66]) for the 2D study, and 0.67 (95% confidence interval [0.55, 0.79]) for the tomosynthesis study. According to the BIRADS scores, the nonspiculated and the spiculated masses varied in their degrees of malignancy from normal (BIRADS 1) to highly suggestive for malignancy (BIRADS 5

  18. Convergence of iterative image reconstruction algorithms for Digital Breast Tomosynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sidky, Emil; Jørgensen, Jakob Heide; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2012-01-01

    solutions can aid in iterative image reconstruction algorithm design. This issue is particularly acute for iterative image reconstruction in Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT), where the corresponding data model IS particularly poorly conditioned. The impact of this poor conditioning is that iterative......Most iterative image reconstruction algorithms are based on some form of optimization, such as minimization of a data-fidelity term plus an image regularizing penalty term. While achieving the solution of these optimization problems may not directly be clinically relevant, accurate optimization...... algorithms applied to this system can be slow to converge. Recent developments in first-order algorithms are now beginning to allow for accurate solutions to optimization problems of interest to tomographic imaging in general. In particular, we investigate an algorithm developed by Chambolle and Pock (2011 J...

  19. Value of Additional Digital Breast Tomosynthesis for Preoperative Staging of Breast Cancer in Dense Breasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krammer, Julia; Stepniewski, Kathrin; Kaiser, Clemens G; Brade, Joachim; Riffel, Philipp; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Wasser, Klaus

    2017-09-01

    This retrospective study was initiated to determine the diagnostic value of additional preoperative breast tomosynthesis (DBT) for breast cancer staging in dense breasts. Sixty-six patients (69 breasts) with findings of American College of Radiology category 3 or 4 with Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System 5, 6 or 0 were included. All patients underwent digital mammography and additional DBT. A total of 40/69 (58%) cancers were detected on both mammography and DBT, 23 (33.3%) were only seen on DBT (p=0.0001); 6/69 (8.7%) carcinomas were not detected by either method, of which three were invasive lobular carcinomas. Sensitivity for multifocal/multicentric disease was significantly higher on DBT (12/19, 63.2%) compared to mammography (4/19, 21.1%) (p=0.02), specificity was comparable (96.0% vs. 90.0%). Multifocal/multicentric disease was not detected on mammography nor DBT in 7/19 (36.8%) patients, including three invasive lobular carcinomas. DBT may significantly improve preoperative breast cancer staging in patients with dense breasts compared to conventional mammography alone. Nevertheless, limitations have to be expected in the case of invasive lobular carcinoma. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  20. Correlating locations in ipsilateral breast tomosynthesis views using an analytical hemispherical compression model

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schie, Guido; Tanner, Christine; Snoeren, Peter; Samulski, Maurice; Leifland, Karin; Wallis, Matthew G.; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2011-08-01

    To improve cancer detection in mammography, breast examinations usually consist of two views per breast. In order to combine information from both views, corresponding regions in the views need to be matched. In 3D digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), this may be a difficult and time-consuming task for radiologists, because many slices have to be inspected individually. For multiview computer-aided detection (CAD) systems, matching corresponding regions is an essential step that needs to be automated. In this study, we developed an automatic method to quickly estimate corresponding locations in ipsilateral tomosynthesis views by applying a spatial transformation. First we match a model of a compressed breast to the tomosynthesis view containing a point of interest. Then we estimate the location of the corresponding point in the ipsilateral view by assuming that this model was decompressed, rotated and compressed again. In this study, we use a relatively simple, elastically deformable sphere model to obtain an analytical solution for the transformation in a given DBT case. We investigate three different methods to match the compression model to the data by using automatic segmentation of the pectoral muscle, breast tissue and nipple. For validation, we annotated 208 landmarks in both views of a total of 146 imaged breasts of 109 different patients and applied our method to each location. The best results are obtained by using the centre of gravity of the breast to define the central axis of the model, around which the breast is assumed to rotate between views. Results show a median 3D distance between the actual location and the estimated location of 14.6 mm, a good starting point for a registration method or a feature-based local search method to link suspicious regions in a multiview CAD system. Approximately half of the estimated locations are at most one slice away from the actual location, which makes the method useful as a mammographic workstation tool for

  1. Correlating locations in ipsilateral breast tomosynthesis views using an analytical hemispherical compression model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Schie, Guido; Snoeren, Peter; Samulski, Maurice; Karssemeijer, Nico [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, 6500 HB Nijmegen (Netherlands); Tanner, Christine [Computer Vision Laboratory, ETH Zuerich, 8092 Zuerich (Switzerland); Leifland, Karin [Unilabs Mammography, Capio S:t Goerans Hospital, SE-112 81 Stockholm (Sweden); Wallis, Matthew G, E-mail: g.schie@rad.umcn.nl [Cambridge Breast Unit, Addenbrookes Hospital, Hills Road, Cambridge, CB2 2QQ (United Kingdom)

    2011-08-07

    To improve cancer detection in mammography, breast examinations usually consist of two views per breast. In order to combine information from both views, corresponding regions in the views need to be matched. In 3D digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), this may be a difficult and time-consuming task for radiologists, because many slices have to be inspected individually. For multiview computer-aided detection (CAD) systems, matching corresponding regions is an essential step that needs to be automated. In this study, we developed an automatic method to quickly estimate corresponding locations in ipsilateral tomosynthesis views by applying a spatial transformation. First we match a model of a compressed breast to the tomosynthesis view containing a point of interest. Then we estimate the location of the corresponding point in the ipsilateral view by assuming that this model was decompressed, rotated and compressed again. In this study, we use a relatively simple, elastically deformable sphere model to obtain an analytical solution for the transformation in a given DBT case. We investigate three different methods to match the compression model to the data by using automatic segmentation of the pectoral muscle, breast tissue and nipple. For validation, we annotated 208 landmarks in both views of a total of 146 imaged breasts of 109 different patients and applied our method to each location. The best results are obtained by using the centre of gravity of the breast to define the central axis of the model, around which the breast is assumed to rotate between views. Results show a median 3D distance between the actual location and the estimated location of 14.6 mm, a good starting point for a registration method or a feature-based local search method to link suspicious regions in a multiview CAD system. Approximately half of the estimated locations are at most one slice away from the actual location, which makes the method useful as a mammographic workstation tool for

  2. Characterisation of noise and sharpness of images from four digital breast tomosynthesis systems for simulation of images for virtual clinical trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Alistair; Marshall, Nicholas W.; Hadjipanteli, Andria; Dance, David R.; Bosmans, Hilde; Young, Kenneth C.

    2017-03-01

    In-depth evaluation of the noise and sharpness characteristics of FujiFilm Innovality, GE SenoClaire, Hologic Selenia Dimensions and Siemens Inspiration digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) systems was performed with the intention of improving image simulation for virtual clinical trials. Noise power spectra (NPS) and modulation transfer function curves (MTF) were measured for planar modes and for the first and central projections for DBT modes. In DBT mode, the x-ray beam was blocked for the projections before the central projection in order to remove the influence of lag and ghosting from the previous images. A quadratic fit between the NPS and linearised pixel value gave the noise coefficients for planar and DBT imaging modes. The spatial frequencies corresponding to an MTF of 0.5 (MTF0.5) were calculated from the MTF measurements made on the breast support and at 40 mm above the breast support. This was done for the first and the central projections. The percentage of signal carried over from the first projection to subsequent images (lag) was measured using a slit. The noise associated with lag was also evaluated. The DBT modes typically had lower electronic noise coefficients but higher structural noise coefficients compared to the respective planar mode MTF0.5 measured 40 mm above the table was between 6% and 47% lower for continuous scanning systems compared to 1% lower for step and shoot systems. For wide angle DBT, the MTF0.5 of the first projection was 18% (FujiFilm) and 28% (Siemens) lower than for the central projection. Lag in the second projection was 2.2%, 0.3%, 0.8% for the FujiFilm, GE and Hologic systems respectively. In all cases, the noise associated with lag was negligible. Current modelling frameworks for virtual clinical trials of breast DBT systems need to be adapted to account for signals from lag and variations in the MTF at wide angles.

  3. Breast cancer screening with tomosynthesis--initial experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tingberg, A; Förnvik, D; Mattsson, S; Svahn, T; Timberg, P; Zackrisson, S

    2011-09-01

    Experiences gained so far using tomosynthesis for breast cancer screening will be reported. A short summary of results from preparatory studies will also be presented. The sensitivity and specificity of breast tomosynthesis (BT) will be compared with conventional two-dimensional digital mammography (DM) for breast cancer screening in a population-based study. Over 2000 women have been examined so far with BT and DM. The BT reading is significantly more time-consuming than the DM reading. Preparatory studies have shown that BT has a higher diagnostic precision and higher accuracy of size measurements and stage determination than DM. There is potential to use lower compression force with BT compared with DM, without decreasing the diagnostic accuracy. BT might play an important role in clinical as well as screening mammography. A large-scale population-based study to investigate BT as a screening modality is underway.

  4. TU-EF-207-04: Advances in Detector Technology for Breast Tomosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, W. [SUNY Stony Brook (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Breast imaging technology is advancing on several fronts. In digital mammography, the major technological trend has been on optimization of approaches for performing combined mammography and tomosynthesis using the same system. In parallel, photon-counting slot-scan mammography is now in clinical use and more efforts are directed towards further development of this approach for spectral imaging. Spectral imaging refers to simultaneous acquisition of two or more energy-windowed images. Depending on the detector and associated electronics, there are a number of ways this can be accomplished. Spectral mammography using photon-counting detectors can suppress electronic noise and importantly, it enables decomposition of the image into various material compositions of interest facilitating quantitative imaging. Spectral imaging can be particularly important in intravenously injected contrast mammography and eventually tomosynthesis. The various approaches and applications of spectral mammography are discussed. Digital breast tomosynthesis relies on the mechanical movement of the x-ray tube to acquire a number of projections in a predefined arc, typically from 9 to 25 projections over a scan angle of +/−7.5 to 25 degrees depending on the particular system. The mechanical x-ray tube motion requires relatively long acquisition time, typically between 3.7 to 25 seconds depending on the system. Moreover, mechanical scanning may have an effect on the spatial resolution due to internal x-ray filament or external mechanical vibrations. New x-ray source arrays have been developed and they are aimed at replacing the scanned x-ray tube for improved acquisition time and potentially for higher spatial resolution. The potential advantages and challenges of this approach are described. Combination of digital mammography and tomosynthesis in a single system places increased demands on certain functional aspects of the detector and overall performance, particularly in the tomosynthesis

  5. Comparison of digital breast tomosynthesis and 2D digital mammography using a hybrid performance test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockmartin, Lesley; Marshall, Nicholas W; Van Ongeval, Chantal; Aerts, Gwen; Stalmans, Davina; Zanca, Federica; Shaheen, Eman; De Keyzer, Frederik; Dance, David R; Young, Kenneth C; Bosmans, Hilde

    2015-05-21

    This paper introduces a hybrid method for performing detection studies in projection image based modalities, based on image acquisitions of target objects and patients. The method was used to compare 2D mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) in terms of the detection performance of spherical densities and microcalcifications. The method starts with the acquisition of spheres of different glandular equivalent densities and microcalcifications of different sizes immersed in a homogeneous breast tissue simulating medium. These target objects are then segmented and the subsequent templates are fused in projection images of patients and processed or reconstructed. This results in hybrid images with true mammographic anatomy and clinically relevant target objects, ready for use in observer studies. The detection study of spherical densities used 108 normal and 178 hybrid 2D and DBT images; 156 normal and 321 hybrid images were used for the microcalcifications. Seven observers scored the presence/absence of the spheres/microcalcifications in a square region via a 5-point confidence rating scale. Detection performance in 2D and DBT was compared via ROC analysis with sub-analyses for the density of the spheres, microcalcification size, breast thickness and z-position. The study was performed on a Siemens Inspiration tomosynthesis system using patient acquisitions with an average age of 58 years and an average breast thickness of 53 mm providing mean glandular doses of 1.06 mGy (2D) and 2.39 mGy (DBT). Study results showed that breast tomosynthesis (AUC = 0.973) outperformed 2D (AUC = 0.831) for the detection of spheres (p  images for a detection study; results showed breast tomosynthesis outperformed 2D for spherical densities while further optimization of DBT for microcalcifications is suggested.

  6. Technical Note: Robust measurement of the slice-sensitivity profile in breast tomosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, Aili K; Mainprize, James G; Yaffe, Martin J

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this work is to improve the repeatability of the measurement of the slice-sensitivity profile (SSP) in reconstructed breast tomosynthesis volumes. A grid of aluminum ball-bearings (BBs) within a PMMA phantom was imaged on breast tomosynthesis systems from three different manufacturers. The full-width half-maximum (FWHM) values were measured for the SSPs of the BBs in the reconstructed volumes. The effect of transforming the volumes from a Cartesian coordinate system (CCS) to a cone-beam coordinate system (CBCS) on the variability in the FWHM values was assessed. Transforming the volumes from a CCS to a CBCS before measuring the SSPs reduced the coefficient of variation (COV) in the measurements of FWHM in repeated measurements by 56% and reduced the dependence of the FWHM values on the location of the BBs within the reconstructed volume by 76%. Measuring the SSP in the volumes in a CBCS improves the robustness of the measurement.

  7. Average glandular dose in digital mammography and breast tomosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olgar, T. [Ankara Univ. (Turkey). Dept. of Engineering Physics; Universitaetsklinikum Leipzig AoeR (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Kahn, T.; Gosch, D. [Universitaetsklinikum Leipzig AoeR (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To determine the average glandular dose (AGD) in digital full-field mammography (2 D imaging mode) and in breast tomosynthesis (3 D imaging mode). Materials and Methods: Using the method described by Boone, the AGD was calculated from the exposure parameters of 2247 conventional 2 D mammograms and 984 mammograms in 3 D imaging mode of 641 patients examined with the digital mammographic system Hologic Selenia Dimensions. The breast glandular tissue content was estimated by the Hologic R2 Quantra automated volumetric breast density measurement tool for each patient from right craniocaudal (RCC) and left craniocaudal (LCC) images in 2 D imaging mode. Results: The mean compressed breast thickness (CBT) was 52.7 mm for craniocaudal (CC) and 56.0 mm for mediolateral oblique (MLO) views. The mean percentage of breast glandular tissue content was 18.0 % and 17.4 % for RCC and LCC projections, respectively. The mean AGD values in 2 D imaging mode per exposure for the standard breast were 1.57 mGy and 1.66 mGy, while the mean AGD values after correction for real breast composition were 1.82 mGy and 1.94 mGy for CC and MLO views, respectively. The mean AGD values in 3 D imaging mode per exposure for the standard breast were 2.19 mGy and 2.29 mGy, while the mean AGD values after correction for the real breast composition were 2.53 mGy and 2.63 mGy for CC and MLO views, respectively. No significant relationship was found between the AGD and CBT in 2 D imaging mode and a good correlation coefficient of 0.98 in 3 D imaging mode. Conclusion: In this study the mean calculated AGD per exposure in 3 D imaging mode was on average 34 % higher than for 2 D imaging mode for patients examined with the same CBT.

  8. Accuracy and reading time for six strategies using digital breast tomosynthesis in women with mammographically negative dense breasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagliafico, Alberto Stefano; Calabrese, Massimo; Bignotti, Bianca; Signori, Alessio; Fisci, Erica; Rossi, Federica; Valdora, Francesca; Houssami, Nehmat

    2017-12-01

    To compare six strategies using digital breast tomosynthesis in women with mammographically negative dense breasts. This is a substudy of the 'ASTOUND' trial. 163 women who underwent tomosynthesis with synthetically reconstructed projection images (S-2D) inclusive of 13 (7.9%) cases diagnosed with breast cancer at histopathology after surgery were evaluated. Accuracy measures and screen-reading time of six reading strategies were assessed: (A) Single reading of S-2D alone, (B) single reading of tomosynthesis alone, (C) single reading of joint interpretation of tomosynthesis + S-2D, (D) double-reading of S-2D alone, (E) double reading of tomosynthesis alone, (F) double reading of joint interpretation of tomosynthesis + S-2D. The median age of the patients was 53 years (range, 36-88 years). The highest global accuracy was obtained with double reading of tomosynthesis + S2D (F) with an AUC of 0.979 (preading time of 154 s versus 34 s for the fastest strategy (single reading of S-2D alone). The AUCs for the other five strategies did not differ from each other. Double reading of tomosynthesis+ S2D had the best accuracy of six screen-reading strategies although it had the longest reading time. • Tomosynthesis acquisitions are progressively implemented with reconstructed synthesized 2D images • Double reading using S-2D plus tomosynthesis had the highest global accuracy (preading of S-2D plus tomosynthesis increased reading time.

  9. Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT): initial experience in a clinical setting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skaane, Per; Gullien, Randi; Eben, Ellen B.; Haakenaasen, Unni; Naess Jebsen, Ingvild; Krager, Mona [Dept of Radiology, Oslo Univ. Hospital Ullevaal, Univ. of Oslo, Oslo (Norway)], e-mail: PERSKA@ous-hf.no; Bjoerndal, Hilde [Dept of Radiology, Oslo Univ. Hospital The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Ekseth, Ulrika [Curato Roentgen Institute, Oslo (Norway); Jahr, Gunnar [Dept. of Radiology, Oslo Univ. Hospital Rikshospitalet, Oslo (Norway)

    2012-06-15

    Background: Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a promising new technology. Some experimental clinical studies have shown positive results, but the future role and indications of this new technique, whether in a screening or clinical setting, need to be evaluated. Purpose: To compare digital mammography and DBT in a side-by-side feature analysis for cancer conspicuity, and to assess whether there is a potential additional value of DBT to standard state-of-the-art conventional imaging work-up with respect to detection of additional malignancies. Material and Methods: The study had ethics committee approval. A total of 129 women underwent 2D digital mammography including supplementary cone-down and magnification views and breast ultrasonography if indicated, as well as digital breast tomosynthesis. The indication for conventional imaging in the clinical setting included a palpable lump in 30 (23%), abnormal mammographic screening findings in 54 (42%), and surveillance in 45 (35%) of the women. The women were examined according to present guidelines, including spot-magnification views, ultrasonography, and needle biopsies, if indicated. The DBT examinations were interpreted several weeks after the conventional imaging without knowledge of the conventional imaging findings. In a later session, three radiologists performed a side-by-side feature analysis for cancer conspicuity in a sample of 50 cases. Results: State-of-the-art conventional imaging resulted in needle biopsy of 45 breasts, of which 20 lesions were benign and a total of 25 cancers were diagnosed. The remaining 84 women were dismissed with a normal/definitely benign finding and without indication for needle biopsy. The subsequent DBT interpretation found suspicious findings in four of these 84 women, and these four women had to be called back for repeated work-up with knowledge of the tomosynthesis findings. These delayed work-ups resulted in two cancers (increasing the cancer detection by 8%) and two

  10. Breast tomosynthesis: Accuracy of tumor measurement compared with digital mammography and ultrasonography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foernvik, Daniel; Svahn, Tony; Timberg, Pontus; Tingberg, Anders (Dept. of Medical Radiation Physics, Lund Univ., Malmoe (Sweden)), e-mail: daniel.fornvik@med.lu.se; Zackrisson, Sophia; Andersson, Ingvar (Diagnostic Centre of Imaging and Functional Medicine, Malmoe Univ. Hospital, Malmoe (Sweden)); Ljungberg, Otto (Dept. of Pathology, Malmoe Univ. Hospital, Malmoe (Sweden))

    2010-04-15

    Background: Mammographic tumor size measurement can be difficult because breast structures are superimposed onto a two-dimensional (2D) plane, potentially obscuring the tumor outline. Breast tomosynthesis (BT) is a 3D X-ray imaging technique in which low-dose images are acquired over a limited angular range at a total dose comparable to digital mammography (DM). These low-dose images are used to mathematically reconstruct a 3D image volume of the breast, thus reducing the problem of superimposed tissue. Purpose: To investigate whether breast cancer size can be more accurately assessed with breast tomosynthesis than with digital mammography and ultrasonography (United States), by reducing the disturbance effect of the projected anatomy. Material and Methods: A prototype BT system was used. The main inclusion criterion for BT examination was subtle but suspicious findings of breast cancer on 2D mammography. Sixty-two women with 73 breast cancers were included. BT, DM, and US sizes were measured independently by experienced radiologists without knowledge of the pathology results, which were used as reference. Results: The tumor outline could be determined in significantly more cases with BT (63) and US (60) than DM (49). BT and US size correlated well with pathology (R=0.86 and R=0.85, respectively), and significantly better than DM size (R=0.71). Accordingly, staging was significantly more accurate with BT than with DM. Conclusion: The study indicates that BT is superior to DM in the assessment of breast tumor size and stage

  11. Quantitative breast density analysis using tomosynthesis and comparison with MRI and digital mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Woo Kyung; Chang, Jie-Fan; Lo, Chung-Ming; Chang, Jung Min; Lee, Su Hyun; Shin, Sung Ui; Huang, Chiun-Sheng; Chang, Ruey-Feng

    2018-02-01

    Breast density at mammography has been used as markers of breast cancer risk. However, newly introduced tomosynthesis and computer-aided quantitative method could provide more reliable breast density evaluation. In the experiment, 98 tomosynthesis image volumes were obtained from 98 women. For each case, an automatic skin removal was used and followed by a fuzzy c-mean (FCM) classifier which separated the fibroglandular tissues from other tissues in breast area. Finally, percent of breast density and breast volume were calculated and the results were compared with MRI. In addition, the percent of breast density and breast area of digital mammography calculated using the software Cumulus (University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.) were also compared with 3-D modalities. Percent of breast density and breast volume, which were computed from tomosynthesis, MRI and digital mammography were 17.37% ± 4.39% and 607.12 cm 3  ± 323.01 cm 3 , 20.3% ± 8.6% and 537.59 cm 3  ± 287.74 cm 3 , and 12.03% ± 4.08%, respectively. There were significant correlations on breast density as well as volume between tomosynthesis and MRI (R = 0.482 and R = 0.805), tomosynthesis and breast density with breast area of digital mammography (R = 0.789 and R = 0.877), and MRI and breast density with breast area of digital mammography (R = 0.482 and R = 0.857) (all P values density and breast volume evaluated from tomosynthesis, MRI and breast density and breast area of digital mammographic images have significant correlations and indicate that tomosynthesis could provide useful 3-D information on breast density through proposed method. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Imaging features of breast cancers on digital breast tomosynthesis according to molecular subtype: association with breast cancer detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Su Hyun; Chang, Jung Min; Shin, Sung Ui; Chu, A Jung; Yi, Ann; Cho, Nariya; Moon, Woo Kyung

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate imaging features of breast cancers on digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) according to molecular subtype and to determine whether the molecular subtype affects breast cancer detection on DBT. This was an institutional review board--approved study with a waiver of informed consent. DBT findings of 288 invasive breast cancers were reviewed according to Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System lexicon. Detectability of breast cancer was quantified by the number of readers (0-3) who correctly detected the cancer in an independent blinded review. DBT features and the cancer detectability score according to molecular subtype were compared using Fisher's exact test and analysis of variance. Of 288 invasive cancers, 194 were hormone receptor (HR)-positive, 48 were human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) positive and 46 were triple negative breast cancers. The most common DBT findings were irregular spiculated masses for HR-positive cancer, fine pleomorphic or linear branching calcifications for HER2 positive cancer and irregular masses with circumscribed margins for triple negative breast cancers (p Cancer detectability on DBT was not significantly different according to molecular subtype (p = 0.213) but rather affected by tumour size, breast density and presence of mass or calcifications. Breast cancers showed different imaging features according to molecular subtype; however, it did not affect the cancer detectability on DBT. Advances in knowledge: DBT showed characteristic imaging features of breast cancers according to molecular subtype. However, cancer detectability on DBT was not affected by molecular subtype of breast cancers.

  13. X-ray spectral measurements for tungsten-anode from 20 to 49 kVp on a digital breast tomosynthesis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Da; Li, Xinhua; Liu, Bob

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents new spectral measurements of a tungsten-target digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) system, including spectra of 43-49 kVp. Raw x-ray spectra of 20-49 kVp were directly measured from the tube port of a Selenia Dimensions DBT system using a CdTe based spectrometer. Two configurations of collimation were employed: one with two tungsten pinholes of 25 μm and 200 μm diameters, and the other with a single pinhole of 25 μm diameter, for acquiring spectra from the focal spot and from the focal spot as well as its vicinity. Stripping correction was applied to the measured spectra to compensate distortions due to escape events. The measured spectra were compared with the existing mammographic spectra of the TASMIP model in terms of photon fluence per exposure, spectral components, and half-value layer (HVL). HVLs were calculated from the spectra with a numerical filtration of 0.7 mm aluminum and were compared against actual measurements on the DBT system using W/Al (target-filter) combination, without paddle in the beam. The spectra from the double-pinhole configuration, in which the acceptance aperture pointed right at the focal spot, were harder than the single-pinhole spectra which include both primary and off-focus radiation. HVL calculated from the single-pinhole setup agreed with the measured HVL within 0.04 mm aluminum, while the HVL values from the double-pinhole setup were larger than the single-pinhole HVL by at most 0.1 mm aluminum. The spectra from single-pinhole setup agreed well with the TASMIP mammographic spectra, and are more relevant for clinical purpose. The spectra data would be useful for future research on DBT system with tungsten targets. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  14. Three-dimensional cascaded system analysis of a 50 µm pixel pitch wafer-scale CMOS active pixel sensor x-ray detector for digital breast tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, C.; Vassiljev, N.; Konstantinidis, A. C.; Speller, R. D.; Kanicki, J.

    2017-03-01

    High-resolution, low-noise x-ray detectors based on the complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensor (APS) technology have been developed and proposed for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). In this study, we evaluated the three-dimensional (3D) imaging performance of a 50 µm pixel pitch CMOS APS x-ray detector named DynAMITe (Dynamic Range Adjustable for Medical Imaging Technology). The two-dimensional (2D) angle-dependent modulation transfer function (MTF), normalized noise power spectrum (NNPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) were experimentally characterized and modeled using the cascaded system analysis at oblique incident angles up to 30°. The cascaded system model was extended to the 3D spatial frequency space in combination with the filtered back-projection (FBP) reconstruction method to calculate the 3D and in-plane MTF, NNPS and DQE parameters. The results demonstrate that the beam obliquity blurs the 2D MTF and DQE in the high spatial frequency range. However, this effect can be eliminated after FBP image reconstruction. In addition, impacts of the image acquisition geometry and detector parameters were evaluated using the 3D cascaded system analysis for DBT. The result shows that a wider projection angle range (e.g.  ±30°) improves the low spatial frequency (below 5 mm-1) performance of the CMOS APS detector. In addition, to maintain a high spatial resolution for DBT, a focal spot size of smaller than 0.3 mm should be used. Theoretical analysis suggests that a pixelated scintillator in combination with the 50 µm pixel pitch CMOS APS detector could further improve the 3D image resolution. Finally, the 3D imaging performance of the CMOS APS and an indirect amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin-film transistor (TFT) passive pixel sensor (PPS) detector was simulated and compared.

  15. Estimation of mean glandular dose for breast tomosynthesis: factors for use with the UK, European and IAEA breast dosimetry protocols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dance, D R; Young, K C [NCCPM, Medical Physics Department, Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford GU2 7XX (United Kingdom); Van Engen, R E, E-mail: daviddance@nhs.net [National Training and Expert Centre for Breast Cancer Screening (LRCB), Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, PO Box 6873, 6532 SZ Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2011-01-21

    A formalism is proposed for the estimation of mean glandular dose for breast tomosynthesis, which is a simple extension of the UK, European and IAEA protocols for dosimetry in conventional projection mammography. The formalism introduces t-factors for the calculation of breast dose from a single projection and T-factors for a complete exposure series. Monte Carlo calculations of t-factors have been made for an imaging geometry with full-field irradiation of the breast for a wide range of x-ray spectra, breast sizes and glandularities. The t-factors show little dependence on breast glandularity and tables are provided as a function of projection angle and breast thickness, which may be used for all x-ray spectra simulated. The T-factors for this geometry depend upon the choice of projection angles and weights per projection, but various example calculations gave values in the range 0.93-1.00. T-factors are also provided for the Sectra tomosynthesis system, which employs a scanned narrow-beam imaging geometry. In this quite different configuration, the factor (denoted T{sub S}) shows an important dependence on breast thickness, varying between 0.98 and 0.76 for 20 and 110 mm thick breasts, respectively. Additional data are given to extend the current tabulations of g-, c- and s-factors used for dosimetry of conventional 2D mammography.

  16. A review of breast tomosynthesis. Part II. Image reconstruction, processing and analysis, and advanced applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sechopoulos, Ioannis

    2013-01-01

    Many important post-acquisition aspects of breast tomosynthesis imaging can impact its clinical performance. Chief among them is the reconstruction algorithm that generates the representation of the three-dimensional breast volume from the acquired projections. But even after reconstruction, additional processes, such as artifact reduction algorithms, computer aided detection and diagnosis, among others, can also impact the performance of breast tomosynthesis in the clinical realm. In this two part paper, a review of breast tomosynthesis research is performed, with an emphasis on its medical physics aspects. In the companion paper, the first part of this review, the research performed relevant to the image acquisition process is examined. This second part will review the research on the post-acquisition aspects, including reconstruction, image processing, and analysis, as well as the advanced applications being investigated for breast tomosynthesis. PMID:23298127

  17. Comparison study of reconstruction algorithms for prototype digital breast tomosynthesis using various breast phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ye-seul; Park, Hye-suk; Lee, Haeng-Hwa; Choi, Young-Wook; Choi, Jae-Gu; Kim, Hak Hee; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2016-02-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a recently developed system for three-dimensional imaging that offers the potential to reduce the false positives of mammography by preventing tissue overlap. Many qualitative evaluations of digital breast tomosynthesis were previously performed by using a phantom with an unrealistic model and with heterogeneous background and noise, which is not representative of real breasts. The purpose of the present work was to compare reconstruction algorithms for DBT by using various breast phantoms; validation was also performed by using patient images. DBT was performed by using a prototype unit that was optimized for very low exposures and rapid readout. Three algorithms were compared: a back-projection (BP) algorithm, a filtered BP (FBP) algorithm, and an iterative expectation maximization (EM) algorithm. To compare the algorithms, three types of breast phantoms (homogeneous background phantom, heterogeneous background phantom, and anthropomorphic breast phantom) were evaluated, and clinical images were also reconstructed by using the different reconstruction algorithms. The in-plane image quality was evaluated based on the line profile and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and out-of-plane artifacts were evaluated by means of the artifact spread function (ASF). Parenchymal texture features of contrast and homogeneity were computed based on reconstructed images of an anthropomorphic breast phantom. The clinical images were studied to validate the effect of reconstruction algorithms. The results showed that the CNRs of masses reconstructed by using the EM algorithm were slightly higher than those obtained by using the BP algorithm, whereas the FBP algorithm yielded much lower CNR due to its high fluctuations of background noise. The FBP algorithm provides the best conspicuity for larger calcifications by enhancing their contrast and sharpness more than the other algorithms; however, in the case of small-size and low

  18. Multimodal breast cancer imaging using coregistered dynamic diffuse optical tomography and digital breast tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Bernhard B.; Deng, Bin; Singh, Bhawana; Martino, Mark; Selb, Juliette; Fang, Qianqian; Sajjadi, Amir Y.; Cormier, Jayne; Moore, Richard H.; Kopans, Daniel B.; Boas, David A.; Saksena, Mansi A.; Carp, Stefan A.

    2017-04-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is emerging as a noninvasive functional imaging method for breast cancer diagnosis and neoadjuvant chemotherapy monitoring. In particular, the multimodal approach of combining DOT with x-ray digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is especially synergistic as DBT prior information can be used to enhance the DOT reconstruction. DOT, in turn, provides a functional information overlay onto the mammographic images, increasing sensitivity and specificity to cancer pathology. We describe a dynamic DOT apparatus designed for tight integration with commercial DBT scanners and providing a fast (up to 1 Hz) image acquisition rate to enable tracking hemodynamic changes induced by the mammographic breast compression. The system integrates 96 continuous-wave and 24 frequency-domain source locations as well as 32 continuous wave and 20 frequency-domain detection locations into low-profile plastic plates that can easily mate to the DBT compression paddle and x-ray detector cover, respectively. We demonstrate system performance using static and dynamic tissue-like phantoms as well as in vivo images acquired from the pool of patients recalled for breast biopsies at the Massachusetts General Hospital Breast Imaging Division.

  19. Issues to consider before implementing digital breast tomosynthesis into a breast imaging practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardesty, Lara A

    2015-03-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this article is to discuss issues surrounding the implementation of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) into a clinical breast imaging practice and assist radiologists, technologists, and administrators who are considering the addition of this new technology to their practices. CONCLUSION. When appropriate attention is given to image acquisition, interpretation, storage, technologist and radiologist training, patient selection, billing, radiation dose, and marketing, implementation of DBT into a breast imaging practice can be successful.

  20. Invasive Lobular Carcinoma of the Breast: Appearance on Digital Breast Tomosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubstein, Ahuva; Rapson, Yael; Morgenstern, Sara; Gadiel, Itai; Haboosheh, Amit; Yerushalmi, Rinat; Cohen, Maya

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the signs of invasive lobular carcinoma of the breast on digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) imaging. The study group included 23 women with pathologically proven invasive lobular carcinoma of the breast for whom both digital mammography (DM) and DBT images were available. The images were read jointly by 2 experienced breast radiologists. Findings were recorded according to the descriptors in the Breast Imaging and Reporting Data System lexicon and correlated with the detailed pathology results. In 21 of the 23 patients, the combination of DM and DBT yielded pathologic findings (91%). Architectural distortions or spiculations were demonstrated in 87% of cases. The addition of DBT to DM improved lesion detection by more clearly depicting both the lesion margins and architectural distortions. Only 2 lesions were occult by both DM and DBT, including 1 lesion in a peripheral location that was not incorporated in the standard mediolateral oblique and craniocaudal views. DBT improves the detection of invasive lobular carcinoma lesions by more clearly depicting architectural distortions and spiculations.

  1. Voting strategy for artifact reduction in digital breast tomosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tao; Moore, Richard H; Kopans, Daniel B

    2006-07-01

    Artifacts are observed in digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) reconstructions due to the small number of projections and the narrow angular range that are typically employed in tomosynthesis imaging. In this work, we investigate the reconstruction artifacts that are caused by high-attenuation features in breast and develop several artifact reduction methods based on a "voting strategy." The voting strategy identifies the projection(s) that would introduce artifacts to a voxel and rejects the projection(s) when reconstructing the voxel. Four approaches to the voting strategy were compared, including projection segmentation, maximum contribution deduction, one-step classification, and iterative classification. The projection segmentation method, based on segmentation of high-attenuation features from the projections, effectively reduces artifacts caused by metal and large calcifications that can be reliably detected and segmented from projections. The other three methods are based on the observation that contributions from artifact-inducing projections have higher value than those from normal projections. These methods attempt to identify the projection(s) that would cause artifacts by comparing contributions from different projections. Among the three methods, the iterative classification method provides the best artifact reduction; however, it can generate many false positive classifications that degrade the image quality. The maximum contribution deduction method and one-step classification method both reduce artifacts well from small calcifications, although the performance of artifact reduction is slightly better with the one-step classification. The combination of one-step classification and projection segmentation removes artifacts from both large and small calcifications.

  2. Optimization of Tomosynthesis Imaging for Improved Mass and Microcalcification Detection in the Breast

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xia, Dan

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this research is to obtain systematic understandings of the effects of various physical factors that are important in breast tomosynthesis imaging and to develop techniques for effectively...

  3. Modeling the Anisotropic Resolution and Noise Properties of Digital Breast Tomosynthesis Image Reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    of microcalcifications , which are subtle signs of breast cancer in many women.15 By reconstructing on grids whose pixel sizes are much smaller than... breast cancer . Key words: Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), super-resolution, bar pattern phantom, 85 microcalcifications , filtered...visibility of microcalcifications and other subtle signs of breast cancer with no increased radiation dose to the patient. In this study, a

  4. Detection and classification of calcifications on digital breast tomosynthesis and 2D digital mammography: a comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangler, M Lee; Zuley, Margarita L; Sumkin, Jules H; Abrams, Gordan; Ganott, Marie A; Hakim, Christiane; Perrin, Ronald; Chough, Denise M; Shah, Ratan; Gur, David

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to compare the ability of digital breast tomosynthesis and full field digital mammography (FFDM) to detect and characterize calcifications. One hundred paired examinations were performed utilizing FFDM and digital breast tomosynthesis. Twenty biopsy-proven cancers, 40 biopsy-proven benign calcifications, and 40 randomly selected negative screening studies were retrospectively reviewed by five radiologists in a crossed multireader multimodal observer performance study. Data collected included the presence of calcifications and forced BI-RADS scores. Receiver operator curve analysis using BI-RADS was performed. Overall calcification detection sensitivity was higher for FFDM (84% [95% CI, 79-88%]) than for digital breast tomosynthesis (75% [95% CI, 70-80%]). [corrected] In the cancer cohort, 75 (76%) of 99 interpretations identified calcification in both modes. Of those, a BI-RADS score less than or equal to 2 was rendered in three (4%) and nine (12%) cases with FFDM and digital breast tomosynthesis, respectively. In the benign cohort, 123 (62%) of 200 interpretations identified calcifications in both modes. Of those, a BI-RADS score greater than or equal to 3 was assigned in 105 (85%) and 93 (76%) cases with FFDM and digital breast tomosynthesis, respectively. There was no significant difference in the nonparametric computed area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC) using the BI-RADS scores (FFDM, AUC = 0.76 and SD = 0.03; digital breast tomosynthesis, AUC = 0.72 and SD = 0.04 [p = 0.1277]). In this small data set, FFDM appears to be slightly more sensitive than digital breast tomosynthesis for the detection of calcification. However, diagnostic performance as measured by area under the curve using BI-RADS was not significantly different. With improvements in processing algorithms and display, digital breast tomosynthesis could potentially be improved for this purpose.

  5. X-ray phase-contrast tomosynthesis for improved breast tissue discrimination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schleede, Simone, E-mail: Schleede@tum.de [Department of Physics and Institute of Medical Engineering, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Strasse 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Bech, Martin, E-mail: martin.bech@tum.de [Department of Physics and Institute of Medical Engineering, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Strasse 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Medical Radiation Physics, Lund University, 22185 Lund (Sweden); Grandl, Susanne, E-mail: Susanne.Grandl@med.uni-muenchen.de [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377 München (Germany); Sztrókay, Aniko, E-mail: Aniko.Sztrokay@med.uni-muenchen.de [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377 München (Germany); Herzen, Julia, E-mail: julia.herzen@hzg.de [Institute of Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Max-Planck-Strasse 1, 21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Mayr, Doris, E-mail: doris.mayr@med.uni-muenchen.de [Institute of Pathology, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Thalkirchner Str. 36, 80337 Munich (Germany); Stockmar, Marco, E-mail: marco.stockmar@ph.tum.de [Department of Physics and Institute of Medical Engineering, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Strasse 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Potdevin, Guillaume, E-mail: potdevinguillaume@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Institute of Medical Engineering, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Strasse 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); and others

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Attenuation-based tomosynthesis has proven to successfully resolve the glandular tissue overlap present in mammography. However, the ability of tomosynthesis to differentiate tumorous and glandular tissue remains limited, due to the small differences in X-ray attenuation in breast tissue. One possibility to overcome this limitation and to further increase the diagnostic value of tomosynthesis exams, is the application of recently developed grating-based phase-contrast methods, which provide complementary information on the phase shift and the local scattering power of the sample. In this study, we report on first phase-contrast breast tomosynthesis results of a mastectomy sample slice with an invasive ductal carcinoma. Material and methods: A slice of a mastectomy sample with histologically proven invasive ductal cancer was imaged at the synchrotron radiation source ESRF (Grenoble, France). We used a two-grating interferometer setup at the ninth fractional Talbot distance and with an X-ray energy of 23 keV. In grating interferometry absorption, differential phase, and scattering images are recorded simultaneously. The tomosynthesis scan comprises 61 projections. Multimodal tomosynthesis results were reconstructed using a standard filtered back-projection approach. Our findings are supported by a comparison of tomographic views to histopathology. Results: Phase-contrast tomosynthesis combines the advantage of improved soft-tissue discrimination in phase-contrast imaging with the ability of tomosynthesis to provide a third dimension so that improved feature visibility is not hampered by superposition artifacts. Our results indicate superior diagnostic value due to the depth resolution supplied in tomosynthesis imaging; a region of necrotic tissue that is obscured in a projection image can clearly be depicted in one single tomosynthesis slice. Compared to absorption tomosynthesis alone, soft tissue contrast is significantly enhanced in phase

  6. Added value of one-view breast tomosynthesis combined with digital mammography according to reader experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomassin-Naggara, Isabelle, E-mail: isabelle.thomassin@tnn.aphp.fr [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, IUC, 75005 Paris (France); INSERM, UMR970, Equipe 2, Imagerie de l’angiogenèse, 75005 Paris (France); AP-HP, Hôpital Tenon, Department of Radiology, 4 rue de la Chine, 75020 Paris (France); Perrot, Nicolas [AP-HP, Hôpital Tenon, Department of Radiology, 4 rue de la Chine, 75020 Paris (France); Centre Pyramides, Paris (France); Dechoux, Sophie [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, IUC, 75005 Paris (France); AP-HP, Hôpital Tenon, Department of Radiology, 4 rue de la Chine, 75020 Paris (France); Ribeiro, Carine [Centre Pyramides, Paris (France); Chopier, Jocelyne [AP-HP, Hôpital Tenon, Department of Radiology, 4 rue de la Chine, 75020 Paris (France); Bazelaire, Cedric de [APHP, Department of Radiology, Hôpital Saint Louis, 75010 Paris (France)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Breast tomosynthesis improves diagnostic performance especially for radiologists with lower experience in mammography. • Adding only one-view digital breast tomosynthesis to mammography improves the cancer detection rate. • Breast tomosynthesis is mainly useful for helping radiologists to detect architectural distortion. - Abstract: Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the added value of one-view breast tomosynthesis in adjunct with mammography to characterize breast lesions. Materials and methods: Our institutional ethics committees approved the study and granted a waiver of informed consent. One hundred fifty-five women (mean age, 51.3 years, range: 24–92 years) who systematically underwent mammography and breast tomosynthesis with subsequent percutaneous biopsy were analyzed. Four radiologists (two seniors, R1 and R2, and two juniors, R3 and R4 with 30, 10, 3 and 1 years of experience in breast imaging, respectively) independently reviewed exams in two steps: mammography alone and tomosynthesis in adjunct with mammography. The lesions in the cohort included 39.3% (61/155) cancers, 2.5% (4/155) high-risk lesions and 58.1% (90/155) benign lesions. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to compare the results of the two readings. Results: There was almost perfect agreement irrespective of reader experience for the reading of the mammography in adjunct with tomosynthesis, whereas agreement was poor between junior and senior readers for the reading of mammography alone. Area under the ROC (Az) values for the tomosynthesis in adjunct with mammography were significantly better than Az values for mammography alone for all readers except the most experienced, for whom only a tendency was noted. The proportion of cancers undiagnosed by mammography alone that were well diagnosed by tomosynthesis in adjunct with mammography was 6.5% (4/61), 13.1% (8/61), 27.8% (17/61) and 26.2% (16/61) for Readers 1, 2, 3 and 4

  7. Wiener filter for filtered back projection in digital breast tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinying; Mainprize, James G.; Wu, Gang; Yaffe, Martin J.

    2012-03-01

    Conventional filtered back projection (FBP) reconstruction for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) can suffer from a low signal to noise ratio. Because of the strong amplification by the reconstruction filters (ramp, apodization and slice thickness), noise at high spatial frequencies can be greatly increased. Image enhancement by Wiener filtering is investigated as a possible method to improve image quality. A neighborhood wavelet coefficient window technique is used to estimate the noise content of projection images and a Wiener filter is applied to the projection images. The neighborhood wavelet coefficient window is a non-linear technique, which may cause the Wiener filters estimated before and after the application of the reconstruction filters to be different. Image quality of a FBP reconstruction with and without Wiener filtering is investigated using a Fourier-based observer detectability metric ( d' ) for evaluation. Simulations of tomosynthesis are performed in both homogeneous and anatomic textured backgrounds containing lowcontrast masses or small microcalcifications. Initial results suggest that improvements in detectability can be achieved when the Wiener filter is applied, especially when the Wiener filter is estimated for the reconstruction filtered projections.

  8. MO-DE-209-04: Radiation Dosimetry in Breast Tomosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sechopoulos, I. [Radboud University Medical Centre (Netherlands)

    2016-06-15

    Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) is rapidly replacing mammography as the standard of care in breast cancer screening and diagnosis. DBT is a form of computed tomography, in which a limited set of projection images are acquired over a small angular range and reconstructed into tomographic data. The angular range varies from 15° to 50° and the number of projections varies between 9 and 25 projections, as determined by the equipment manufacturer. It is equally valid to treat DBT as the digital analog of classical tomography – that is, linear tomography. In fact, the name “tomosynthesis” stands for “synthetic tomography.” DBT shares many common features with classical tomography, including the radiographic appearance, dose, and image quality considerations. As such, both the science and practical physics of DBT systems is a hybrid between computed tomography and classical tomographic methods. In this lecture, we will explore the continuum from radiography to computed tomography to illustrate the characteristics of DBT. This lecture will consist of four presentations that will provide a complete overview of DBT, including a review of the fundamentals of DBT acquisition, a discussion of DBT reconstruction methods, an overview of dosimetry for DBT systems, and summary of the underlying image theory of DBT thereby relating image quality and dose. Learning Objectives: To understand the fundamental principles behind tomosynthesis image acquisition. To understand the fundamentals of tomosynthesis image reconstruction. To learn the determinants of image quality and dose in DBT, including measurement techniques. To learn the image theory underlying tomosynthesis, and the relationship between dose and image quality. ADM is a consultant to, and holds stock in, Real Time Tomography, LLC. ADM receives research support from Hologic Inc., Analogic Inc., and Barco NV.; ADM is a member of the Scientific Advisory Board for Gamma Medica Inc.; A. Maidment, Research Support

  9. TU-EF-207-03: Advances in Stationary Breast Tomosynthesis Using Distributed X-Ray Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, O. [The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Breast imaging technology is advancing on several fronts. In digital mammography, the major technological trend has been on optimization of approaches for performing combined mammography and tomosynthesis using the same system. In parallel, photon-counting slot-scan mammography is now in clinical use and more efforts are directed towards further development of this approach for spectral imaging. Spectral imaging refers to simultaneous acquisition of two or more energy-windowed images. Depending on the detector and associated electronics, there are a number of ways this can be accomplished. Spectral mammography using photon-counting detectors can suppress electronic noise and importantly, it enables decomposition of the image into various material compositions of interest facilitating quantitative imaging. Spectral imaging can be particularly important in intravenously injected contrast mammography and eventually tomosynthesis. The various approaches and applications of spectral mammography are discussed. Digital breast tomosynthesis relies on the mechanical movement of the x-ray tube to acquire a number of projections in a predefined arc, typically from 9 to 25 projections over a scan angle of +/−7.5 to 25 degrees depending on the particular system. The mechanical x-ray tube motion requires relatively long acquisition time, typically between 3.7 to 25 seconds depending on the system. Moreover, mechanical scanning may have an effect on the spatial resolution due to internal x-ray filament or external mechanical vibrations. New x-ray source arrays have been developed and they are aimed at replacing the scanned x-ray tube for improved acquisition time and potentially for higher spatial resolution. The potential advantages and challenges of this approach are described. Combination of digital mammography and tomosynthesis in a single system places increased demands on certain functional aspects of the detector and overall performance, particularly in the tomosynthesis

  10. A software-based x-ray scatter correction method for breast tomosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia Feng, Steve Si; Sechopoulos, Ioannis [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University, and Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, 1701 Uppergate Drive Northeast, Suite 5018, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States); Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Hematology and Medical Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, 1701 Uppergate Drive Northeast, Suite 5018, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States)

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: To develop a software-based scatter correction method for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) imaging and investigate its impact on the image quality of tomosynthesis reconstructions of both phantoms and patients. Methods: A Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of x-ray scatter, with geometry matching that of the cranio-caudal (CC) view of a DBT clinical prototype, was developed using the Geant4 toolkit and used to generate maps of the scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR) of a number of homogeneous standard-shaped breasts of varying sizes. Dimension-matched SPR maps were then deformed and registered to DBT acquisition projections, allowing for the estimation of the primary x-ray signal acquired by the imaging system. Noise filtering of the estimated projections was then performed to reduce the impact of the quantum noise of the x-ray scatter. Three dimensional (3D) reconstruction was then performed using the maximum likelihood-expectation maximization (MLEM) method. This process was tested on acquisitions of a heterogeneous 50/50 adipose/glandular tomosynthesis phantom with embedded masses, fibers, and microcalcifications and on acquisitions of patients. The image quality of the reconstructions of the scatter-corrected and uncorrected projections was analyzed by studying the signal-difference-to-noise ratio (SDNR), the integral of the signal in each mass lesion (integrated mass signal, IMS), and the modulation transfer function (MTF). Results: The reconstructions of the scatter-corrected projections demonstrated superior image quality. The SDNR of masses embedded in a 5 cm thick tomosynthesis phantom improved 60%-66%, while the SDNR of the smallest mass in an 8 cm thick phantom improved by 59% (p < 0.01). The IMS of the masses in the 5 cm thick phantom also improved by 15%-29%, while the IMS of the masses in the 8 cm thick phantom improved by 26%-62% (p < 0.01). Some embedded microcalcifications in the tomosynthesis phantoms were visible only in the scatter

  11. Correlating locations in ipsilateral breast tomosynthesis views using an analytical hemispherical compression model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schie, G. van; Tanner, C.; Snoeren, P.R.; Samulski, M.; Leifland, K.; Wallis, M.G.; Karssemeijer, N.

    2011-01-01

    To improve cancer detection in mammography, breast examinations usually consist of two views per breast. In order to combine information from both views, corresponding regions in the views need to be matched. In 3D digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), this may be a difficult and time-consuming task

  12. A parameterization method and application in breast tomosynthesis dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xinhua; Zhang, Da; Liu, Bob [Division of Diagnostic Imaging Physics and Webster Center for Advanced Research and Education in Radiation, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: To present a parameterization method based on singular value decomposition (SVD), and to provide analytical parameterization of the mean glandular dose (MGD) conversion factors from eight references for evaluating breast tomosynthesis dose in the Mammography Quality Standards Act (MQSA) protocol and in the UK, European, and IAEA dosimetry protocols.Methods: MGD conversion factor is usually listed in lookup tables for the factors such as beam quality, breast thickness, breast glandularity, and projection angle. The authors analyzed multiple sets of MGD conversion factors from the Hologic Selenia Dimensions quality control manual and seven previous papers. Each data set was parameterized using a one- to three-dimensional polynomial function of 2–16 terms. Variable substitution was used to improve accuracy. A least-squares fit was conducted using the SVD.Results: The differences between the originally tabulated MGD conversion factors and the results computed using the parameterization algorithms were (a) 0.08%–0.18% on average and 1.31% maximum for the Selenia Dimensions quality control manual, (b) 0.09%–0.66% on average and 2.97% maximum for the published data by Dance et al. [Phys. Med. Biol. 35, 1211–1219 (1990); ibid. 45, 3225–3240 (2000); ibid. 54, 4361–4372 (2009); ibid. 56, 453–471 (2011)], (c) 0.74%–0.99% on average and 3.94% maximum for the published data by Sechopoulos et al. [Med. Phys. 34, 221–232 (2007); J. Appl. Clin. Med. Phys. 9, 161–171 (2008)], and (d) 0.66%–1.33% on average and 2.72% maximum for the published data by Feng and Sechopoulos [Radiology 263, 35–42 (2012)], excluding one sample in (d) that does not follow the trends in the published data table.Conclusions: A flexible parameterization method is presented in this paper, and was applied to breast tomosynthesis dosimetry. The resultant data offer easy and accurate computations of MGD conversion factors for evaluating mean glandular breast dose in the MQSA

  13. Dual-energy contrast-enhanced breast tomosynthesis: optimization of beam quality for dose and image quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samei, Ehsan; Saunders, Robert S Jr, E-mail: samei@duke.edu [Carl E Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27705 (United States)

    2011-10-07

    Dual-energy contrast-enhanced breast tomosynthesis is a promising technique to obtain three-dimensional functional information from the breast with high resolution and speed. To optimize this new method, this study searched for the beam quality that maximized image quality in terms of mass detection performance. A digital tomosynthesis system was modeled using a fast ray-tracing algorithm, which created simulated projection images by tracking photons through a voxelized anatomical breast phantom containing iodinated lesions. The single-energy images were combined into dual-energy images through a weighted log subtraction process. The weighting factor was optimized to minimize anatomical noise, while the dose distribution was chosen to minimize quantum noise. The dual-energy images were analyzed for the signal difference to noise ratio (SdNR) of iodinated masses. The fast ray-tracing explored 523 776 dual-energy combinations to identify which yields optimum mass SdNR. The ray-tracing results were verified using a Monte Carlo model for a breast tomosynthesis system with a selenium-based flat-panel detector. The projection images from our voxelized breast phantom were obtained at a constant total glandular dose. The projections were combined using weighted log subtraction and reconstructed using commercial reconstruction software. The lesion SdNR was measured in the central reconstructed slice. The SdNR performance varied markedly across the kVp and filtration space. Ray-tracing results indicated that the mass SdNR was maximized with a high-energy tungsten beam at 49 kVp with 92.5 {mu}m of copper filtration and a low-energy tungsten beam at 49 kVp with 95 {mu}m of tin filtration. This result was consistent with Monte Carlo findings. This mammographic technique led to a mass SdNR of 0.92 {+-} 0.03 in the projections and 3.68 {+-} 0.19 in the reconstructed slices. These values were markedly higher than those for non-optimized techniques. Our findings indicate that dual

  14. Task-based strategy for optimized contrast enhanced breast imaging: analysis of six imaging techniques for mammography and tomosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikejimba, Lynda C; Kiarashi, Nooshin; Ghate, Sujata V; Samei, Ehsan; Lo, Joseph Y

    2014-06-01

    The use of contrast agents in breast imaging has the capability of enhancing nodule detectability and providing physiological information. Accordingly, there has been a growing trend toward using iodine as a contrast medium in digital mammography (DM) and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). Widespread use raises concerns about the best way to use iodine in DM and DBT, and thus a comparison is necessary to evaluate typical iodine-enhanced imaging methods. This study used a task-based observer model to determine the optimal imaging approach by analyzing six imaging paradigms in terms of their ability to resolve iodine at a given dose: unsubtracted mammography and tomosynthesis, temporal subtraction mammography and tomosynthesis, and dual energy subtraction mammography and tomosynthesis. Imaging performance was characterized using a detectability index d', derived from the system task transfer function (TTF), an imaging task, iodine signal difference, and the noise power spectrum (NPS). The task modeled a 10 mm diameter lesion containing iodine concentrations between 2.1 mg/cc and 8.6 mg/cc. TTF was obtained using an edge phantom, and the NPS was measured over several exposure levels, energies, and target-filter combinations. Using a structured CIRS phantom, d' was generated as a function of dose and iodine concentration. For all iodine concentrations and dose, temporal subtraction techniques for mammography and tomosynthesis yielded the highest d', while dual energy techniques for both modalities demonstrated the next best performance. Unsubtracted imaging resulted in the lowest d' values for both modalities, with unsubtracted mammography performing the worst out of all six paradigms. At any dose, temporal subtraction imaging provides the greatest detectability, with temporally subtracted DBT performing the highest. The authors attribute the successful performance to excellent cancellation of inplane structures and improved signal difference in the lesion.

  15. Task-based strategy for optimized contrast enhanced breast imaging: Analysis of six imaging techniques for mammography and tomosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikejimba, Lynda C., E-mail: lci@duke.edu [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Kiarashi, Nooshin [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Ghate, Sujata V. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Samei, Ehsan [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Lo, Joseph Y. [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The use of contrast agents in breast imaging has the capability of enhancing nodule detectability and providing physiological information. Accordingly, there has been a growing trend toward using iodine as a contrast medium in digital mammography (DM) and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). Widespread use raises concerns about the best way to use iodine in DM and DBT, and thus a comparison is necessary to evaluate typical iodine-enhanced imaging methods. This study used a task-based observer model to determine the optimal imaging approach by analyzing six imaging paradigms in terms of their ability to resolve iodine at a given dose: unsubtracted mammography and tomosynthesis, temporal subtraction mammography and tomosynthesis, and dual energy subtraction mammography and tomosynthesis. Methods: Imaging performance was characterized using a detectability index d{sup ′}, derived from the system task transfer function (TTF), an imaging task, iodine signal difference, and the noise power spectrum (NPS). The task modeled a 10 mm diameter lesion containing iodine concentrations between 2.1 mg/cc and 8.6 mg/cc. TTF was obtained using an edge phantom, and the NPS was measured over several exposure levels, energies, and target-filter combinations. Using a structured CIRS phantom, d{sup ′} was generated as a function of dose and iodine concentration. Results: For all iodine concentrations and dose, temporal subtraction techniques for mammography and tomosynthesis yielded the highest d{sup ′}, while dual energy techniques for both modalities demonstrated the next best performance. Unsubtracted imaging resulted in the lowest d{sup ′} values for both modalities, with unsubtracted mammography performing the worst out of all six paradigms. Conclusions: At any dose, temporal subtraction imaging provides the greatest detectability, with temporally subtracted DBT performing the highest. The authors attribute the successful performance to excellent cancellation of

  16. Quality control in breast tomosynthesis; Controle de qualidade em tomossintese mamaria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakubiak, Rosangela Requi; Messias, Pricila Cordeiro; Santos, Marilia Fernanda, E-mail: requi@gmail.com [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Urban, Linei Augusta B.D., E-mail: ineiurban@hotmail.com [Diagnostico Avancado por Imagem (DAPI), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    In Brazil breast cancer is the most common and the leading cause of death among women, with estimated 57,000 new cases in 2014. The mammography (2D) plays an important role in the early detection of breast cancer, but in some cases can be difficult to detect malignant lesions due overlap of breast tissues. The Breast Digital Tomosynthesis (BDT: 3D) reduces the effects of overlap, providing improved characterization of mammographic findings. However, the dose may double as compared to the mammography. This study presents results of Contrast Ratio Noise tests (CRN) and quality image on a Siemens mammography equipment Mammomat Inspiration with tomosynthesis. The CRN was determined with plates Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) of 20 to 70 mm thickness and an aluminum plate of 10 mm{sup 2} and 0.2 mm thickness. Image quality was assessed with the ACR Breast Simulator. In assessment of image quality, the detectability of fibers and masses was identical in 2D and 3D systems. Were visualized 4.5 fibers and 4 mass in both modes. In 2D mode groups have been identified 3.5 microcalcifications, and 3D were 3 groups. The Mean Glandular Dose for the simulator in 2D mode was 1.17 mGy and 2.35 mGy for the 3D mode. The result reinforces the importance of quality control in the process of obtaining the images and obtained in accordance CRN values, ensuring image quality and dose compatible in 2D and 3D processes.

  17. The impact of breast structure on lesion detection in breast tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiarashi, Nooshin; Nolte, Loren W.; Lo, Joseph Y.; Segars, William P.; Ghate, Sujata V.; Samei, Ehsan

    2015-03-01

    Virtual clinical trials (VCT) can be carefully designed to inform, orient, or potentially replace clinical trials. The focus of this study was to demonstrate the capability of the sophisticated tools that can be used in the design, implementation, and performance analysis of VCTs, through characterization of the effect of background tissue density and heterogeneity on the detection of irregular masses in digital breast tomosynthesis. Twenty breast phantoms from the extended cardiactorso (XCAT) family, generated based on dedicated breast computed tomography of human subjects, were used to extract a total of 2173 volumes of interest (VOI) from simulated tomosynthesis images. Five different lesions, modeled after human subject tomosynthesis images, were embedded in the breasts, for a total of 6×2173 VOIs with and without lesions. Effects of background tissue density and heterogeneity on the detection of the lesions were studied by implementing a doubly composite hypothesis signal detection theory paradigm with location known exactly, lesion known exactly, and background known statistically. The results indicated that the detection performance as measured by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) deteriorated as density was increased, yielding findings consistent with clinical studies. The detection performance varied substantially across the twenty breasts. Furthermore, the log-likelihood ratio under H0 and H1 seemed to be affected by background tissue density and heterogeneity differently. Considering background tissue variability can change the outcomes of a VCT and is hence of crucial importance. The XCAT breast phantoms can address this concern by offering realistic modeling of background tissue variability based on a wide range of human subjects.

  18. Automated Breast Density Computation in Digital Mammography and Digital Breast Tomosynthesis: Influence on Mean Glandular Dose and BIRADS Density Categorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-García, Maria; Chevalier, Margarita; Garayoa, Julia; Rodriguez-Ruiz, Alejandro; García-Pinto, Diego; Valverde, Julio

    2017-07-01

    The study aimed to compare the breast density estimates from two algorithms on full-field digital mammography (FFDM) and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) and to analyze the clinical implications. We selected 561 FFDM and DBT examinations from patients without breast pathologies. Two versions of a commercial software (Quantra 2D and Quantra 3D) calculated the volumetric breast density automatically in FFDM and DBT, respectively. Other parameters such as area breast density and total breast volume were evaluated. We compared the results from both algorithms using the Mann-Whitney U non-parametric test and the Spearman's rank coefficient for data correlation analysis. Mean glandular dose (MGD) was calculated following the methodology proposed by Dance et al. Measurements with both algorithms are well correlated (r ≥ 0.77). However, there are statistically significant differences between the medians (P density median values from FFDM are, respectively, 8% and 77% higher than DBT estimations. Both algorithms classify 35% and 55% of breasts into BIRADS (Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System) b and c categories, respectively. There are no significant differences between the MGD calculated using the breast density from each algorithm. DBT delivers higher MGD than FFDM, with a lower difference (5%) for breasts in the BIRADS d category. MGD is, on average, 6% higher than values obtained with the breast glandularity proposed by Dance et al. Breast density measurements from both algorithms lead to equivalent BIRADS classification and MGD values, hence showing no difference in clinical outcomes. The median MGD values of FFDM and DBT examinations are similar for dense breasts (BIRADS d category). Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Observation of super-resolution in digital breast tomosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acciavatti, Raymond J.; Maidment, Andrew D. A. [Department of Radiology, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-4206 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a 3D x-ray imaging modality in which tomographic sections of the breast are generated from a limited range of tube angles. Because oblique x-ray incidence shifts the image of an object in subpixel detector element increments with each increasing projection angle, it is demonstrated that DBT is capable of super-resolution (i.e., subpixel resolution). Methods: By convention, DBT reconstructions are performed on planes parallel to the breast support at various depths of the breast volume. In order for resolution in each reconstructed slice to be comparable to the detector, the pixel size should match that of the detector elements; hence, the highest frequency that can be resolved in the plane of reconstruction is the alias frequency of the detector. This study considers reconstruction grids with much smaller pixelation to visualize higher frequencies. For analytical proof of super-resolution, a theoretical framework is developed in which the reconstruction of a high frequency sinusoidal input is calculated using both simple backprojection (SBP) and filtered backprojection. To study the frequency spectrum of the reconstruction, its Fourier transform is also determined. The experimental feasibility of super-resolution was investigated by acquiring images of a bar pattern phantom with frequencies higher than the detector alias frequency. Results: Using analytical modeling, it is shown that the central projection cannot resolve frequencies exceeding the detector alias frequency. The Fourier transform of the central projection is maximized at a lower frequency than the input as evidence of aliasing. By contrast, SBP reconstruction can resolve the input, and its Fourier transform is correctly maximized at the input frequency. Incorporating filters into the reconstruction smoothens pixelation artifacts in the spatial domain and reduces spectral leakage in the Fourier domain. It is also demonstrated that the existence of super

  20. Tomosynthesis-guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsy: A feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldherr, Christian; Berclaz, Gilles; Altermatt, Hans Jörg; Cerny, Peter; Keller, Patrik; Dietz, Uwe; Buser, Katharina; Ciriolo, Michele; Sonnenschein, Martin Josef

    2016-06-01

    Evaluation of feasibility and clinical performance of a tomosynthesis-guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsy (TVAB) system compared to Stereotaxy (SVAB). All biopsies were performed on consecutive patients: 148 TVAB biopsies and 86 biopsies on different patients using SVAB. Evaluation criteria for each biopsy were technical feasibility, histopathology, procedure time, and complications. All 148 TVAB biopsies were technically successful, and gained the targeted groups of microcalcifications (100 %). In 1 of 86 SVAB procedures, it was not possible to gain the targeted microcalcifications (1 %), in 3 of 86 the needle had to be adjusted (4 %). All TVAB biopsies were performed without clinically relevant complications. Distortions were biopsied exclusively by TVAB, mean size 0.9 cm, p cancer, 11 Radial Scars/ CSL. The mean procedure time for TVAB was 15.4 minutes (range 7-28 min), for SVAB 23 minutes (range 11-46 min), p microcalcifications. The increased number of biopsied distortions by TVAB is presumably due to increased use of tomosynthesis and its diagnostic potential. • TVAB is easily feasible. • TVAB is able to target architectural distortions with high accuracy. • TVAB diagnoses microcalcifications with the same clinical performance as SVAB.

  1. Added value of one-view breast tomosynthesis combined with digital mammography according to reader experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomassin-Naggara, Isabelle; Perrot, Nicolas; Dechoux, Sophie; Ribeiro, Carine; Chopier, Jocelyne; de Bazelaire, Cedric

    2015-02-01

    To retrospectively evaluate the added value of one-view breast tomosynthesis in adjunct with mammography to characterize breast lesions. Our institutional ethics committees approved the study and granted a waiver of informed consent. One hundred fifty-five women (mean age, 51.3 years, range: 24-92 years) who systematically underwent mammography and breast tomosynthesis with subsequent percutaneous biopsy were analyzed. Four radiologists (two seniors, R1 and R2, and two juniors, R3 and R4 with 30, 10, 3 and 1 years of experience in breast imaging, respectively) independently reviewed exams in two steps: mammography alone and tomosynthesis in adjunct with mammography. The lesions in the cohort included 39.3% (61/155) cancers, 2.5% (4/155) high-risk lesions and 58.1% (90/155) benign lesions. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to compare the results of the two readings. There was almost perfect agreement irrespective of reader experience for the reading of the mammography in adjunct with tomosynthesis, whereas agreement was poor between junior and senior readers for the reading of mammography alone. Area under the ROC (Az) values for the tomosynthesis in adjunct with mammography were significantly better than Az values for mammography alone for all readers except the most experienced, for whom only a tendency was noted. The proportion of cancers undiagnosed by mammography alone that were well diagnosed by tomosynthesis in adjunct with mammography was 6.5% (4/61), 13.1% (8/61), 27.8% (17/61) and 26.2% (16/61) for Readers 1, 2, 3 and 4, respectively. The proportion of false positive cases induced by the addition of breast tomosynthesis to mammography was 2.1% (2/94), 2.1% (2/94), 9.5% (9/94) and 12.7% (12/94) for Readers 1, 2, 3 and 4, respectively. Adding breast tomosynthesis to mammography improved sensitivity and negative predictive value for all readers except for the most experienced one, in whom only a tendency for improvement

  2. Abbreviated Breast MRI and Digital Tomosynthesis Mammography in Screening Women With Dense Breasts | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well abbreviated breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and digital tomosynthesis mammography work in detecting cancer in women with dense breasts. Abbreviated breast MRI is a low cost procedure in which radio waves and a powerful magnet linked to a computer and used to create detailed pictures of the breast in less than 10 minutes. These pictures can show the difference between normal and diseased tissue. |

  3. Adapted fan-beam volume reconstruction for stationary digital breast tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Gongting; Inscoe, Christine; Calliste, Jabari; Lee, Yueh Z.; Zhou, Otto; Lu, Jianping

    2015-03-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) provides 3D images which remove tissue overlapping and enables better cancer detection. Stationary DBT (s-DBT) uses a fixed X-ray source array to eliminate image blur associated with the x-ray tube motion and provides better image quality as well as faster scanning speed. For limited angle tomography, it is known that iterative reconstructions generally produces better images with fewer artifacts. However classical iterative tomosynthesis reconstruction methods are considerably slower than the filtered back-projection (FBP) reconstruction. The linear x-ray source array used in s-DBT enables a computationally more efficient volume reconstruction using adapted fan beam slice sampling, which transforms the 3-D cone beam reconstruction to a series of 2-D fan beam slice reconstructions. In this paper, we report the first results of the adapted fan-beam volume reconstruction (AFVR) for the s-DBT system currently undergoing clinical trial at UNC, using a simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART). An analytic breast phantom is used to quantitatively analyze the performance of the AFVR. Image quality of a CIRS biopsy phantom reconstructed using the AFVR method are compared to that using FBP algorithm with a commercial package. Our results show a significant reduction in memory usage and an order of magnitude speed increase in reconstructing speed using AFVR compared to that of classical 3-D cone beam reconstruction. We also observed that images reconstructed by AFVR with SART had a better sharpness and contrast compared to that using FBP. Preliminary results on patient images demonstrates the improved detectability of the s-DBT system over the mammography. By utilizing parallel computing with graphics processing unit (GPU), it is expected that the AFVR method will enable iterative reconstruction technique to be practical for clinical applications.

  4. Digital Breast Tomosynthesis and the Challenges of Implementing an Emerging Breast Cancer Screening Technology Into Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Christoph I; Lehman, Constance D

    2016-11-01

    Emerging imaging technologies, including digital breast tomosynthesis, have the potential to transform breast cancer screening. However, the rapid adoption of these new technologies outpaces the evidence of their clinical and cost-effectiveness. The authors describe the forces driving the rapid diffusion of tomosynthesis into clinical practice, comparing it with the rapid diffusion of digital mammography shortly after its introduction. They outline the potential positive and negative effects that adoption can have on imaging workflow and describe the practice management challenges when incorporating tomosynthesis. The authors also provide recommendations for collecting evidence supporting the development of policies and best practices. Copyright © 2013 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Digital breast tomosynthesis and digital mammography: A comparison of figures of merit for various average glandular doses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ye-seul; Park, Hye-Suk; Park, SuJin; Kim, Hee-Joung; Choi, Jae-Gu; Choi, Young-Wook; Park, Jun-Ho; Lee, Jae-Jun

    2013-05-01

    Previous studies on the application of tomosynthesis to breast imaging have demonstrated the potential of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). DBT can improve the specificity of digital mammography (DM) through improved marginal visibility of lesions and early breast cancer detection for women with dense breasts. To investigate possible improvements in the accuracy of lesion detection with DBT systems as compared to DM, we conducted a quantitative evaluation by using simulated lesions embedded in a breast phantom. A prototype DBT and dedicated DM system were used in this study. For the DBT system, the average glandular dose (AGD) was calculated using a formalism that was a simple extension of mammography dosimetry. The DBT and the DM images were acquired with average glandular doses (AGDs) ranging from 1 to 4 mGy. To analyze the results objectively, we calculated metrics for in-plane lesion visibility in the form of the contrast-to-noise ratio for the in-focus plane from the DBT reconstruction image and from the craniocaudal (CC) image from the DM system. The imaging performance of DBT was quantitatively compared with that of DM in terms of the figure of merit. Although the DM showed better results in terms of the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of the mass due to the reduced overlapping of tissue and lesion, an increase in breast thickness of over 3 cm increased the CNR of the mass with the DBT system. For microcalcification detection, the DBT system showed significantly higher CNR than the DM system and gave better predictions of the microcalcification size. We compared the performances of the DM and the DBT systems for various AGDs and breast thicknesses. In conclusion, the results indicate that the DBT systems can play an important role in the detection of masses or microcalcifications without severe compression.

  6. Description and validation of a scoring system for tomosynthesis in pulmonary cystic fibrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vult von Steyern, Kristina; Bjoerkman-Burtscher, Isabella M.; Bozovic, Gracijela; Wiklund, Marie; Geijer, Mats [Skaane University Hospital, Lund University, Centre for Medical Imaging and Physiology, Lund (Sweden); Hoeglund, Peter [Skaane University Hospital, Competence Centre for Clinical Research, Lund (Sweden)

    2012-12-15

    To design and validate a scoring system for tomosynthesis (digital tomography) in pulmonary cystic fibrosis. A scoring system dedicated to tomosynthesis in pulmonary cystic fibrosis was designed. Three radiologists independently scored 88 pairs of radiographs and tomosynthesis examinations of the chest in 60 patients with cystic fibrosis and 7 oncology patients. Radiographs were scored according to the Brasfield scoring system and tomosynthesis examinations were scored using the new scoring system. Observer agreements for the tomosynthesis score were almost perfect for the total score with square-weighted kappa >0.90, and generally substantial to almost perfect for subscores. Correlation between the tomosynthesis score and the Brasfield score was good for the three observers (Kendall's rank correlation tau 0.68, 0.77 and 0.78). Tomosynthesis was generally scored higher as a percentage of the maximum score. Observer agreements for the total score for Brasfield score were almost perfect (square-weighted kappa 0.80, 0.81 and 0.85). The tomosynthesis scoring system seems robust and correlates well with the Brasfield score. Compared with radiography, tomosynthesis is more sensitive to cystic fibrosis changes, especially bronchiectasis and mucus plugging, and the new tomosynthesis scoring system offers the possibility of more detailed and accurate scoring of disease severity. (orig.)

  7. Parenchymal Texture Analysis in Digital Breast Tomosynthesis for Breast Cancer Risk Estimation: A Preliminary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontos, Despina; Bakic, Predrag R.; Carton, Ann-Katherine; Troxel, Andrea B.; Conant, Emily F.; Maidment, Andrew D.A.

    2009-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives Studies have demonstrated a relationship between mammographic parenchymal texture and breast cancer risk. Although promising, texture analysis in mammograms is limited by tissue superimposition. Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a novel tomographic x-ray breast imaging modality that alleviates the effect of tissue superimposition, offering superior parenchymal texture visualization compared to mammography. Our study investigates the potential advantages of DBT parenchymal texture analysis for breast cancer risk estimation. Materials and Methods DBT and digital mammography (DM) images of 39 women were analyzed. Texture features, shown in studies with mammograms to correlate with cancer risk, were computed from the retroareolar breast region. We compared the relative performance of DBT and DM texture features in correlating with two measures of breast cancer risk: (i) the Gail and Claus risk estimates, and (ii) mammographic breast density. Linear regression was performed to model the association between texture features and increasing levels of risk. Results No significant correlation was detected between parenchymal texture and the Gail and Claus risk estimates. Significant correlations were observed between texture features and breast density. Overall, the DBT texture features demonstrated stronger correlations with breast percent density (PD) than DM (p ≤0.05). When dividing our study population in groups of increasing breast PD, the DBT texture features appeared to be more discriminative, having regression lines with overall lower p-values, steeper slopes, and higher R2 estimates. Conclusion Although preliminary, our results suggest that DBT parenchymal texture analysis could provide more accurate characterization of breast density patterns, which could ultimately improve breast cancer risk estimation. PMID:19201357

  8. Comparison of detectability in step-and-shoot mode and continuous mode digital tomosynthesis systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Changwoo; Han, Minah; Baek, Jongduk

    2017-03-01

    Digital tomosynthesis system has been widely used in chest, dental, and breast imaging. Since the digital tomosynthesis system provides volumetric images from multiple projection data, structural noise inherent in X-ray radiograph can be reduced, and thus signal detection performance is improved. Currently, tomosynthesis system uses two data acquisition modes: step-and-shoot mode and continuous mode. Several studies have been conducted to compare the system performance of two acquisition modes with respect to spatial resolution and contrast. In this work, we focus on signal detectability in step-and-shoot mode and continuous mode. For evaluation, uniform background is considered, and eight spherical objects with diameters of 0.5, 0.8, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 10 mm are used as signals. Projection data with and without spherical objects are acquired in step-and-shoot mode and continuous mode, respectively, and quantum noise are added. Then, noisy projection data are reconstructed by FDK algorithm. To compare the detection performance of two acquisition modes, we calculate task signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of channelized Hotelling observer with Laguerre-Gauss channels for each spherical object. While the task-SNR values of two acquisition modes are similar for spherical objects larger than 1 mm diameter, step-and-shoot mode yields higher detectability for small signal sizes. The main reason of this behavior is that small signal is more affected by X-ray tube motion blur than large signal. Our results indicate that it is beneficial to use step-and-shoot data acquisition mode to improve the detectability of small signals (i.e., less than 1 mm diameter) in digital tomosynthesis systems.

  9. Value analysis of digital breast tomosynthesis for breast cancer screening in a commercially-insured US population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonafede MM

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Machaon M Bonafede,1 Vivek B Kalra,2 Jeffrey D Miller,1 Laurie L Fajardo3 1Truven Health Analytics, Cambridge, MA, 2Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, 3Department of Radiology, University of Iowa College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA, USA Purpose: The objective of this study was to conduct a value analysis of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT for breast cancer screening among women enrolled in US commercial health insurance plans to assess the potential budget impact associated with the clinical benefits of DBT. Methods: An economic model was developed to estimate the system-wide financial impact of DBT as a breast cancer screening modality within a hypothetical US managed care plan with one million members. Two scenarios were considered for women in the health plan who undergo annual screening mammography, ie, full field digital mammography (FFDM and combined FFDM + DBT. The model focused on two main drivers of DBT value, ie, the capacity for DBT to reduce the number of women recalled for additional follow-up imaging and diagnostic services and the capacity of DBT to facilitate earlier diagnosis of cancer at less invasive stages where treatment costs are lower. Model inputs were derived from published sources and from analyses of the Truven Health MarketScan® Research Databases (2010–2012. Comparative clinical and economic outcomes were simulated for one year following screening and compared on an incremental basis. Results: Base-case analysis results show that 4,523 women in the hypothetical million member health plan who are screened using DBT avoid the use of follow-up services. The overall benefit of DBT was calculated at $78.53 per woman screened. Adjusting for a hypothetical $50 incremental cost of the DBT examination, this translates to $28.53 savings per woman screened, or $0.20 savings per member per month across the plan population and an overall cost savings to the plan of $2.4 million per year. Conclusion: The

  10. 3D density estimation in digital breast tomosynthesis: application to needle path planning for breast biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vancamberg, Laurence; Geeraert, Nausikaa; Iordache, Razvan; Palma, Giovanni; Klausz, Rémy; Muller, Serge

    2011-03-01

    Needle insertion planning for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) guided biopsy has the potential to improve patient comfort and intervention safety. However, a relevant planning should take into account breast tissue deformation and lesion displacement during the procedure. Deformable models, like finite elements, use the elastic characteristics of the breast to evaluate the deformation of tissue during needle insertion. This paper presents a novel approach to locally estimate the Young's modulus of the breast tissue directly from the DBT data. The method consists in computing the fibroglandular percentage in each of the acquired DBT projection images, then reconstructing the density volume. Finally, this density information is used to compute the mechanical parameters for each finite element of the deformable mesh, obtaining a heterogeneous DBT based breast model. Preliminary experiments were performed to evaluate the relevance of this method for needle path planning in DBT guided biopsy. The results show that the heterogeneous DBT based breast model improves needle insertion simulation accuracy in 71% of the cases, compared to a homogeneous model or a binary fat/fibroglandular tissue model.

  11. Comparison of breast specific gamma imaging and molecular breast tomosynthesis in breast cancer detection: Evaluation in phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zongyi; Williams, Mark B

    2015-07-01

    Breast specific gamma imaging or molecular breast imaging (BSGI) obtains 2D images of (99m)Tc sestamibi distribution in the breast. Molecular breast tomosynthesis (MBT) maps the tracer distribution in 3D by acquiring multiple projections over a limited angular range. Here, the authors compare the performance of the two technologies in terms of spatial resolution, lesion contrast, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in phantom studies under conditions of clinically relevant sestamibi dose and imaging time. The systems tested were a Dilon 6800 and a MBT prototype developed at the University of Virginia. Both systems comprise a pixelated sodium iodide scintillator, an array of position sensitive photomultipliers, and a parallel hole collimator. The active areas and energy resolution of the systems are similar. System sensitivity, spatial resolution, lesion contrast, and CNR were measured using a Petri dish, a point source phantom, and a breast phantom containing simulated lesions at two depths, respectively. A single BSGI projection was acquired. Five MBT projections were acquired over ±20°. For both modalities, the total scan count density was comparable to that observed for each in typical 10 min human scans following injection of 22 mCi (814 MBq) of (99m)Tc-sestamibi. To assess the impact of reducing the tracer dose, the pixel counts of projection images were later binomially subsampled by a factor of 2 to give images corresponding to an injected activity of approximately 11 mCi (407 MBq). Both unprocessed (pixelated) BSGI projections and interpolated (smoothed) BSGI images displayed by default on the Dilon 6800 workstation were analyzed. Volumetric images were reconstructed from the MBT projections using a maximum likelihood expectation maximization algorithm and extracted slices were analyzed. Over a depth range of 1.5-7.5 cm, BSGI spatial resolution was 5.6-11.5 mm in unprocessed projections and 5.7-12.0 mm in interpolated images. Over the same range, the in

  12. Segmentation methods for breast vasculature in dual-energy contrast-enhanced digital breast tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Kristen C.; Lee, Hyo Min; Singh, Tanushriya; Maidment, Andrew D. A.

    2015-03-01

    Dual-energy contrast-enhanced digital breast tomosynthesis (DE CE-DBT) uses an iodinated contrast agent to image the three-dimensional breast vasculature. The University of Pennsylvania has an ongoing DE CE-DBT clinical study in patients with known breast cancers. The breast is compressed continuously and imaged at four time points (1 pre-contrast; 3 post-contrast). DE images are obtained by a weighted logarithmic subtraction of the high-energy (HE) and low-energy (LE) image pairs. Temporal subtraction of the post-contrast DE images from the pre-contrast DE image is performed to analyze iodine uptake. Our previous work investigated image registration methods to correct for patient motion, enhancing the evaluation of vascular kinetics. In this project we investigate a segmentation algorithm which identifies blood vessels in the breast from our temporal DE subtraction images. Anisotropic diffusion filtering, Gabor filtering, and morphological filtering are used for the enhancement of vessel features. Vessel labeling methods are then used to distinguish vessel and background features successfully. Statistical and clinical evaluations of segmentation accuracy in DE-CBT images are ongoing.

  13. Estimates of Average Glandular Dose with Auto-modes of X-ray Exposures in Digital Breast Tomosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izdihar Kamal

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this research was to examine the average glandular dose (AGD of radiation among different breast compositions of glandular and adipose tissue with auto-modes of exposure factor selection in digital breast tomosynthesis. Methods: This experimental study was carried out in the National Cancer Society, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, between February 2012 and February 2013 using a tomosynthesis digital mammography X-ray machine. The entrance surface air kerma and the half-value layer were determined using a 100H thermoluminescent dosimeter on 50% glandular and 50% adipose tissue (50/50 and 20% glandular and 80% adipose tissue (20/80 commercially available breast phantoms (Computerized Imaging Reference Systems, Inc., Norfolk, Virginia, USA with auto-time, auto-filter and auto-kilovolt modes. Results: The lowest AGD for the 20/80 phantom with auto-time was 2.28 milliGray (mGy for two dimension (2D and 2.48 mGy for three dimensional (3D images. The lowest AGD for the 50/50 phantom with auto-time was 0.97 mGy for 2D and 1.0 mGy for 3D. Conclusion: The AGD values for both phantoms were lower against a high kilovolt peak and the use of auto-filter mode was more practical for quick acquisition while limiting the probability of operator error.

  14. False positives in breast cancer screening with one-view breast tomosynthesis: An analysis of findings leading to recall, work-up and biopsy rates in the Malmö Breast Tomosynthesis Screening Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lång, Kristina; Nergården, Matilda; Andersson, Ingvar; Rosso, Aldana; Zackrisson, Sophia

    2016-11-01

    To analyse false positives (FPs) in breast cancer screening with tomosynthesis (BT) vs. mammography (DM). The Malmö Breast Tomosynthesis Screening Trial (MBTST) is a prospective population-based study comparing one-view BT to DM in screening. This study is based on the first half of the MBTST population (n = 7,500). Differences in FP recall rate, findings leading to recall, work-up and biopsy rate between cases recalled on BT alone, DM alone and BT+DM were analysed. The FP recall rate was 1.7 % for BT alone (n = 131), 0.9 % for DM alone (n = 69) and 1.1 % for BT + DM (n = 81). The FP recall rate for BT alone was halved after the initial phase of the trial, stabilising at 1.5 %. BT doubled the recall of stellate distortions compared to DM (n = 64 vs. n = 33). There were fewer fibroadenomas and cysts, and the biopsy rate was slightly lower for FP recalled on BT alone compared to DM alone (15.3 % vs. 27.6 %: p = 0.037 and 33.8 % vs. 36.2 %; p = 0.641, respectively). FPs increased with BT screening mainly due to the recall of stellate distortions. The FP recall rate was still well within the European guidelines and showed evidence of a learning curve. Characterisation of rounded lesions was improved with BT. • Tomosynthesis screening gave a higher false-positive recall rate than mammography • There was a decline in the false-positive recall rate for tomosynthesis • The recall due to stellate distortions simulating malignancy was doubled with tomosynthesisTomosynthesis found more radial and postoperative scar tissue than mammography • Tomosynthesis is better at characterising rounded lesions.

  15. Optimization of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) acquisition parameters for human observers: effect of reconstruction algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Rongping; Badano, Aldo; Myers, Kyle J.

    2017-04-01

    We showed in our earlier work that the choice of reconstruction methods does not affect the optimization of DBT acquisition parameters (angular span and number of views) using simulated breast phantom images in detecting lesions with a channelized Hotelling observer (CHO). In this work we investigate whether the model-observer based conclusion is valid when using humans to interpret images. We used previously generated DBT breast phantom images and recruited human readers to find the optimal geometry settings associated with two reconstruction algorithms, filtered back projection (FBP) and simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART). The human reader results show that image quality trends as a function of the acquisition parameters are consistent between FBP and SART reconstructions. The consistent trends confirm that the optimization of DBT system geometry is insensitive to the choice of reconstruction algorithm. The results also show that humans perform better in SART reconstructed images than in FBP reconstructed images. In addition, we applied CHOs with three commonly used channel models, Laguerre-Gauss (LG) channels, square (SQR) channels and sparse difference-of-Gaussian (sDOG) channels. We found that LG channels predict human performance trends better than SQR and sDOG channel models for the task of detecting lesions in tomosynthesis backgrounds. Overall, this work confirms that the choice of reconstruction algorithm is not critical for optimizing DBT system acquisition parameters.

  16. Mammographic density estimation: one-to-one comparison of digital mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis using fully automated software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tagliafico, Alberto [University of Genoa, Institute of Anatomy, Department of Experimental Medicine, Genoa (Italy); Tagliafico, Giulio [University of Genoa, Dipartimento di Chimica e Chimica Industriale (DCCI), Genoa (Italy); Astengo, Davide [University of Genoa, Radiology Department, Genoa, Genova (Italy); Cavagnetto, Francesca; Rosasco, Raffaella [IRCCS Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria San Martino, Department of Medical Physics, Ist Istituto Nazionale per la Ricerca sul Cancro, Genoa, Genova (Italy); Rescinito, Giuseppe; Monetti, Francesco; Calabrese, Massimo [IRCCS Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria San Martino, Department of Diagnostic Senology, Ist Istituto Nazionale per la Ricerca sul Cancro, Genoa (Italy)

    2012-06-15

    To compare breast density on digital mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis using fully automated software. Following institutional approval and written informed consent from all participating women, both digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) and full-field digital mammography (FFDM) were obtained. Breast percentage density was calculated with software on DBT and FFDM. Fifty consecutive patients (mean age, 51 years; range, 35-83 years) underwent both FFDM and DBT. Using a method based on the integral curve, breast density showed higher results on FFDM (68.1 {+-} 12.1 for FFDM and 51.9 {+-} 6.5 for DBT). FFDM overestimated breast density in 16.2% (P < 0.0001). Using a method based on maximum entropy thresholding, breast density showed higher results on FFDM (68.1 {+-} 12.1 for FFDM and 51.9 {+-} 6.5 for DBT). FFDM overestimated breast density in 11.4% (P < 0.0001). There was a good correlation among BI-RADS categories on a four-grade scale and the density evaluated with DBT and FFDM (r = 0.54, P < 0.01 and r = 0.44, P < 0.01). Breast density appeared to be significantly underestimated on digital breast tomosynthesis. Breast density is considered to be an independent risk factor for cancer Density can be assessed on full-field digital mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis Objective automated estimation of breast density eliminates subjectivity Automated estimation is more accurate than BI-RADS quantitative evaluation Breast density may be significantly underestimated on digital breast tomosynthesis. (orig.)

  17. Comparison of digital mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis in the detection of architectural distortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibble, Elizabeth H; Lourenco, Ana P; Baird, Grayson L; Ward, Robert C; Maynard, A Stanley; Mainiero, Martha B

    2018-01-01

    To compare interobserver variability (IOV), reader confidence, and sensitivity/specificity in detecting architectural distortion (AD) on digital mammography (DM) versus digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). This IRB-approved, HIPAA-compliant reader study used a counterbalanced experimental design. We searched radiology reports for AD on screening mammograms from 5 March 2012-27 November 2013. Cases were consensus-reviewed. Controls were selected from demographically matched non-AD examinations. Two radiologists and two fellows blinded to outcomes independently reviewed images from two patient groups in two sessions. Readers recorded presence/absence of AD and confidence level. Agreement and differences in confidence and sensitivity/specificity between DBT versus DM and attendings versus fellows were examined using weighted Kappa and generalised mixed modeling, respectively. There were 59 AD patients and 59 controls for 1,888 observations (59 × 2 (cases and controls) × 2 breasts × 2 imaging techniques × 4 readers). For all readers, agreement improved with DBT versus DM (0.61 vs. 0.37). Confidence was higher with DBT, p = .001. DBT achieved higher sensitivity (.59 vs. .32), p .90). DBT achieved higher positive likelihood ratio values, smaller negative likelihood ratio values, and larger ROC values. DBT decreases IOV, increases confidence, and improves sensitivity while maintaining high specificity in detecting AD. • Digital breast tomosynthesis decreases interobserver variability in the detection of architectural distortion. • Digital breast tomosynthesis increases reader confidence in the detection of architectural distortion. • Digital breast tomosynthesis improves sensitivity in the detection of architectural distortion.

  18. Comparison of computer-aided detection of clustered microcalcifications in digital mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samala, Ravi K.; Chan, Heang-Ping; Lu, Yao; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Wei, Jun; Helvie, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has the potential to replace digital mammography (DM) for breast cancer screening. An effective computer-aided detection (CAD) system for microcalcification clusters (MCs) on DBT will facilitate the transition. In this study, we collected a data set with corresponding DBT and DM for the same breasts. DBT was acquired with IRB approval and informed consent using a GE GEN2 DBT prototype system. The DM acquired with a GE Essential system for the patient's clinical care was collected retrospectively from patient files. DM-based CAD (CADDM) and DBT-based CAD (CADDBT) were previously developed by our group. The major differences between the CAD systems include: (a) CADDBT uses two parallel processes whereas CADDM uses a single process for enhancing MCs and removing the structured background, (b) CADDBT has additional processing steps to reduce the false positives (FPs), including ranking of candidates of cluster seeds and cluster members and the use of adaptive CNR and size thresholds at clustering and FP reduction, (c) CADDM uses convolution neural network (CNN) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) to differentiate true microcalcifications from FPs based on their morphological and CNN features. The performance difference is assessed by FROC analysis using test set (100 views with MCs and 74 views without MCs) independent of their respective training sets. At sensitivities of 70% and 80%, CADDBT achieved FP rates of 0.78 and 1.57 per view compared to 0.66 and 2.10 per image for the CADDM. JAFROC showed no significant difference between MC detection on DM and DBT by the two CAD systems.

  19. Modeling acquisition geometries with improved super-resolution in digital breast tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acciavatti, Raymond J.; Wileyto, E. Paul; Maidment, Andrew D. A.

    2016-03-01

    In digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), a reconstruction is created from multiple x-ray projection images. Our previous work demonstrated that the reconstruction is capable of super-resolution (i.e., subpixel resolution) relative to the detector. In order for super-resolution to yield a reliable improvement in image quality, it should be achievable at all positions in the reconstruction. This paper demonstrates that super-resolution is not achievable at all depths, or at all heights above the breast support. For this purpose, a bar pattern phantom was imaged using a commercial DBT system. A goniometry stand was used to orient the long axis of the parallel bars along an oblique plane relative to the breast support. This setup allowed a single test frequency to be visualized over a continuous range of depths. The orientation of the test frequency was parallel to the direction of x-ray tube motion. An oblique reconstruction in the plane of the bar pattern phantom showed that the existence of super-resolution is depth-dependent. To identify design strategies for optimizing super-resolution, a theoretical model was then developed in which a test frequency higher than the alias frequency of the detector was simulated. Two design modifications that improve super-resolution are identified. In particular, it is shown that reducing the spacing between the x-ray source positions minimizes the number of depths lacking super-resolution. Additionally, introducing detector motion along the direction perpendicular to the breast support allows for more uniform super-resolution throughout the image volume. In conclusion, this work presents strategies for optimizing super-resolution in DBT.

  20. Biologic Profiles of Invasive Breast Cancers Detected Only With Digital Breast Tomosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin You; Kang, Hyun Jung; Shin, Jong Ki; Lee, Nam Kyung; Song, You Seon; Nam, Kyung Jin; Choo, Ki Seok

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the clinicopathologic and immunohistochemical features of invasive breast cancers detected only with digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), compared with those of cancers detected with both DBT and full-field digital mammography (FFDM). The medical records of 261 women (108 without and 153 with symptoms) with invasive breast cancers who underwent FFDM and DBT between April 2015 and June 2016 were retrospectively reviewed. To assess detectability, all DBT and FFDM images were reviewed independently by three radiologists blinded to clinicopathologic information. The reference standard was established by an unblinded consensus review of all images. Clinicopathologic and immunohistochemical features were analyzed according to the detectability status. Of the 261 cancers, 223 (85.4%) were detected with both DBT and FFDM (both-detected group). Twenty-four cancers (9.2%) not detected with FFDM (DBT-only group) were classified by DBT as a mass (58.3%), architectural distortion (33.3%), or asymmetry (8.3%). The remaining 14 cancers (5.4%) were not detected with either DBT or FFDM (both-occult group). On multivariate analysis, a dense breast parenchyma (p = 0.007), small tumor size (≤ 2 cm; p = 0.027), and luminal A-like subtype (estrogen receptor positive or progesterone receptor positive or both, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 negative, and Ki-67 expression cancers, a dense breast parenchyma (p = 0.007) and luminal A-like subtype (p = 0.008) also maintained significance. The addition of DBT to FFDM in screening would aid in the detection of less-aggressive subtypes of invasive breast cancers in women with dense breasts.

  1. Quantitative Digital Tomosynthesis Mammography for Improved Breast Cancer Detection and Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    Karellas, S. Vedantham, S. J. Glick , C. J. D’Orsi, S. P. Baker, and R. L. Webber, “Comparison of tomosynthesis methods used with digital mammography...Acad. Radiol. 7, 1085–1097 2000. 4S. Suryanarayanan, A. Karellas, S. Vedantham, S. P. Baker, S. J. Glick , C. J. D’Orsi, and R. L. Webber...J. A. Thomas and J. Osland, "High Speed, Large Angle Mammography Tomosynthesis System," Proc SPIE 6142, 0C1-0C11, 2006. Proc. of SPIE Vol. 6913

  2. SU-E-P-31: Quantifying the Amount of Missing Tissue in a Digital Breast Tomosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodenough, D [George Washington University, Washington, DC (United States); Olafsdottir, H; Olafsson, I; Fredriksson, J; Kristinsson, S; Oskarsdottir, G; Kristbjornsson, A [Raforninn Ehf., Reykjavik, Gullbringusysla (Iceland); Mallozzi, R; Healy, A; Levy, J [The Phantom Laboratory, Salem, NY (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To automatically quantify the amount of missing tissue in a digital breast tomosynthesis system using four stair-stepped chest wall missing tissue gauges in the Tomophan™ from the Phantom Laboratory and image processing from Image Owl. Methods: The Tomophan™ phantom incorporates four stair-stepped missing tissue gauges by the chest wall, allowing measurement of missing chest wall in two different locations along the chest wall at two different heights. Each of the four gauges has 12 steps in 0.5 mm increments rising from the chest wall. An image processing algorithm was developed by Image Owl that first finds the two slices containing the steps then finds the signal through the highest step in all four gauges. Using the signal drop at the beginning of each gauge the distance to the end of the image gives the length of the missing tissue gauge in millimeters. Results: The Tomophan™ was imaged in digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) systems from various vendors resulting in 46 cases used for testing. The results showed that on average 1.9 mm of 6 mm of the gauges are visible. A small focus group was asked to count the number of visible steps for each case which resulted in a good agreement between observer counts and computed data. Conclusion: First, the results indicate that the amount of missing chest wall can differ between vendors. Secondly it was shown that an automated method to estimate the amount of missing chest wall gauges agreed well with observer assessments. This finding indicates that consistency testing may be simplified using the Tomophan™ phantom and analysis by an automated image processing named Tomo QA. In general the reason for missing chest wall may be due to a function of the beam profile at the chest wall as DBT projects through the angular sampling. Research supported by Image Owl, Inc., The Phantom Laboratory, Inc. and Raforninn ehf; Mallozzi and Healy employed by The Phantom Laboratory, Inc.; Goodenough is a consultant to The

  3. Factors affecting recall rate and false positive fraction in breast cancer screening with breast tomosynthesis - A statistical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosso, Aldana; Lång, Kristina; Petersson, Ingemar F; Zackrisson, Sophia

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we investigate which factors affect the false positive fraction (FPF) for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) compared to digital mammography (DM) in a screening population by using classification and regression trees (C&RT) and binary marginal generalized linear models. The data was obtained from the Malmö Breast Tomosynthesis Screening Trial, which aimed to compare the performance of DBT to DM in breast cancer screening. By using data from the first half of the study population (7500 women), a tree with the recall probability for different groups was calculated. The effect of age and breast density on the FPF was estimated using a binary marginal generalized linear model. Our results show that breast density and breast cancer were the main factors influencing recall. The FPF is mainly affected by breast density and increases with breast density for DBT and DM. In conclusion, the results obtained with C&RT are easy to interpret and similar to those obtained using binary marginal generalized linear models. The FPF is approximately 40% higher for DBT compared to DM for all breast density categories. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Computer-aided detection of clustered microcalcifications in digital breast tomosynthesis: a 3D approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahiner, Berkman; Chan, Heang-Ping; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M; Helvie, Mark A; Wei, Jun; Zhou, Chuan; Lu, Yao

    2012-01-01

    To design a computer-aided detection (CADe) system for clustered microcalcifications in reconstructed digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) volumes and to perform a preliminary evaluation of the CADe system. IRB approval and informed consent were obtained in this study. A data set of two-view DBT of 72 breasts containing microcalcification clusters was collected from 72 subjects who were scheduled to undergo breast biopsy. Based on tissue sampling results, 17 cases had breast cancer and 55 were benign. A separate data set of two-view DBT of 38 breasts free of clustered microcalcifications from 38 subjects was collected to independently estimate the number of false-positives (FPs) generated by the CADe system. A radiologist experienced in breast imaging marked the biopsied cluster of microcalcifications with a 3D bounding box using all available clinical and imaging information. A CADe system was designed to detect microcalcification clusters in the reconstructed volume. The system consisted of prescreening, clustering, and false-positive reduction stages. In the prescreening stage, the conspicuity of microcalcification-like objects was increased by an enhancement-modulated 3D calcification response function. An iterative thresholding and 3D object growing method was used to detect cluster seed objects, which were used as potential centers of microcalcification clusters. In the cluster detection stage, microcalcification candidates were identified using a second iterative thresholding procedure, which was applied to the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) enhanced image voxels with a positive calcification response. Starting with each cluster seed object as the initial cluster center, a dynamic clustering algorithm formed a cluster candidate by including microcalcification candidates within a 3D neighborhood of the cluster seed object that satisfied the clustering criteria. The number, size, and SNR of the microcalcifications in a cluster candidate and the cluster shape were

  5. Three-dimensional segmentation of breast masses from digital breast tomosynthesis images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pöhlmann, Stefanie T L; Lim, Yit Y; Harkness, Elaine; Pritchard, Susan; Taylor, Christopher J; Astley, Susan M

    2017-07-01

    Assessment of three-dimensional (3-D) morphology and volume of breast masses is important for cancer diagnosis, staging, and treatment but cannot be derived from conventional mammography. Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) provides data from which 3-D mass segmentation could be obtained. Our method combined Gaussian mixture models based on intensity and a texture measure indicative of in-focus structure, gray-level variance. Thresholding these voxel probabilities, weighted by distance to the estimated mass center, gave the final 3-D segmentation. Evaluation used 40 masses annotated twice by a consultant radiologist on in-focus slices in two diagnostic views. Human intraobserver variability was assessed as the overlap between repeated annotations (median 77% and range 25% to 91%). Comparing the segmented mass outline with probability-weighted ground truth from these annotations, median agreement was 68%, and range was 7% to 88%. Annotated and segmented diameters correlated well with histological mass size (both Spearman's rank correlations [Formula: see text]). The volumetric segmentation demonstrated better agreement with tumor volumes estimated from pathology than volume derived from radiological annotations (95% limits of agreement [Formula: see text] to 11 ml and [Formula: see text] to 41 ml, respectively). We conclude that it is feasible to assess 3-D mass morphology and volume from DBT, and the method has the potential to aid breast cancer management.

  6. Breast Cancer Risk Estimation Using Parenchymal Texture Analysis in Digital Breast Tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikejimba, Lynda C.; Kontos, Despina; Maidment, Andrew D. A.

    2010-10-01

    Mammographic parenchymal texture has been shown to correlate with genetic markers of developing breast cancer. Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a novel x-ray imaging technique in which tomographic images of the breast are reconstructed from multiple source projections acquired at different angles of the x-ray tube. Compared to digital mammography (DM), DBT eliminates breast tissue overlap, offering superior parenchymal tissue visualization. We hypothesize that texture analysis in DBT could potentially provide a better assessment of parenchymal texture and ultimately result in more accurate assessment of breast cancer risk. As a first step towards validating this hypothesis, we investigated the association between DBT parenchymal texture and breast percent density (PD), a known breast cancer risk factor, and compared it to DM. Bilateral DBT and DM images from 71 women participating in a breast cancer screening trial were analyzed. Filtered-backprojection was used to reconstruct DBT tomographic planes in 1 mm increments with 0.22 mm in-plane resolution. Corresponding DM images were acquired at 0.1 mm pixel resolution. Retroareolar regions of interest (ROIs) equivalent to 2.5 cm3 were segmented from the DBT images and corresponding 2.5 cm2 ROIs were segmented from the DM images. Breast PD was mammographically estimated using the Cumulus scale. Overall, DBT texture features demonstrated a stronger correlation than DM to PD. The Pearson correlation coefficients for DBT were r = 0.40 (p<0.001) for contrast and r = -0.52 (p<0.001) for homogeneity; the corresponding DM correlations were r = 0.26 (p = 0.002) and r = -0.33 (p<0.001). Multiple linear regression of the texture features versus breast PD also demonstrated significantly stronger associations in DBT (R2 = 0.39) compared to DM (R2 = 0.33). We attribute these observations to the superior parenchymal tissue visualization in DBT. Our study is the first to perform DBT texture analysis in a screening population of

  7. Indirect-detection single-photon-counting x-ray detector for breast tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hao; Kaercher, Joerg; Durst, Roger

    2016-03-01

    X-ray mammography is a crucial screening tool for early identification of breast cancer. However, the overlap of anatomical features present in projection images often complicates the task of correctly identifying suspicious masses. As a result, there has been increasing interest in acquisition of volumetric information through digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) which, compared to mammography, offers the advantage of depth information. Since DBT requires acquisition of many projection images, it is desirable that the noise in each projection image be dominated by the statistical noise of the incident x-ray quanta and not by the additive noise of the imaging system (referred to as quantum-limited imaging) and that the cumulative dose be as low as possible (e.g., no more than for a mammogram). Unfortunately, the electronic noise (~2000 electrons) present in current DBT systems based on active matrix, flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs) is still relatively high compared with modest x-ray gain of the a-Se and CsI:Tl x-ray converters often used. To overcome the modest signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) limitations of current DBT systems, we have developed a large-area x-ray imaging detector with the combination of an extremely low noise (~20 electrons) active-pixel CMOS and a specially designed high resolution scintillator. The high sensitivity and low noise of such system provides better SNR by at least an order of magnitude than current state-of-art AMFPI systems and enables x-ray indirect-detection single photon counting (SPC) at mammographic energies with the potential of dose reduction.

  8. Estimating breast tomosynthesis performance in detection tasks with variable-background phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Stefano; Park, Subok; Anderson, S. Kyle; Badano, Aldo; Myers, Kyle J.; Bakic, Predrag

    2009-02-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) shows potential for improving breast cancer detection. However, this technique has not yet been fully characterized with consideration of the various uncertainties in the imaging chain and optimized with respect to system acquisition parameters. To obtain maximum diagnostic information in DBT, system optimization needs to be performed across a range of patients and acquisition parameters to quantify their impact on tumor detection performance. In addition, a balance must be achieved between x-ray dose and image quality to minimize risk to the patient while maximizing the system's detection performance. To date, researchers have applied a task-based approach to the optimization of DBT with use of mathematical observers for tasks in the signal-known-exactly background-known-exactly (SKE/BKE) and signal-known-exactly background-known statistically (SKE/BKS) paradigms1-3. However, previous observer models provided insufficient treatment of the spatial correlations between multi-angle DBT projections, so we incorporated this correlation information into the modeling methodology. We developed a computational approach that includes three-dimensional variable background phantoms for incorporating background variability, accurate ray-tracing and Poisson distributions for generating noise-free and noisy projections of the phantoms, and a channelized-Hotelling observer4 (CHO) for estimating performance in DBT. We demonstrated our method for a DBT acquisition geometry and calculated the performance of the CHO with Laguerre-Gauss channels as a function of the angular span of the system. Preliminary results indicate that the implementation of a CHO model that incorporates correlations between multi-angle projections gives different performance predictions than a CHO model that ignores multi-angle correlations. With improvement of the observer design, we anticipate more accurate investigations into the impact of multi-angle correlations and

  9. Performance of a carbon nanotube field emission X-ray source array for stationary digital breast tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidcumb, Emily Morgan

    This work describes the performance of a stationary digital breast tomosynthesis (s-DBT) X-ray tube based on carbon nanotube (CNT) cathodes, and the imaging system developed around it. The s-DBT system has the potential to improve the detection and diagnosis of breast cancer over commercially available digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) systems. DBT is growing in popularity in the United States, and around the world, as a potential replacement for traditional 2D mammography. The main advantage of DBT over 2D mammography lies in the pseudo-3D nature of the technique allowing the removal of overlapping breast tissue within the image. s-DBT builds on this advantage by removing blur from focal spot motion. Introductions to breast imaging techniques and the DBT modality are given, followed by an introduction to carbon nanotube field emission, the foundation of the s-DBT technology. Details of the s-DBT X-ray tube design and system integration are discussed including specific design parameters, system requirements, and the development process. Also included are summaries of the X-ray tube and system performance over time, and results from characterization measurements. Specific focus is given to the development and completion of a fabrication procedure for tungsten gate mesh, characterization of the CNT cathodes, and improving the system's spatial resolution with use of the focusing electrodes. The tungsten gate mesh is an essential component for extracting electrons from CNTs. A successful deep reactive ion etching fabrication procedure was developed, and the improved gate mesh allowed for higher cathode current and longer pulse widths to be employed in the s-DBT system. Characterization of the CNT cathodes revealed their high-current capacity and the ability to produce relatively long pulse widths, mimicking a 2D imaging modality. This work confirmed that the cathodes are well suited for the task of breast imaging, and explored possible improvements. Lastly, it was

  10. Digital breast tomosynthesis: computer-aided detection of clustered microcalcifications on planar projection images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samala, Ravi K.; Chan, Heang-Ping; Lu, Yao; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Wei, Jun; Helvie, Mark A.

    2014-12-01

    This paper describes a new approach to detect microcalcification clusters (MCs) in digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) via its planar projection (PPJ) image. With IRB approval, two-view (cranio-caudal and mediolateral oblique views) DBTs of human subject breasts were obtained with a GE GEN2 prototype DBT system that acquires 21 projection angles spanning 60° in 3° increments. A data set of 307 volumes (154 human subjects) was divided by case into independent training (127 with MCs) and test sets (104 with MCs and 76 free of MCs). A simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique with multiscale bilateral filtering (MSBF) regularization was used to enhance microcalcifications and suppress noise. During the MSBF regularized reconstruction, the DBT volume was separated into high frequency (HF) and low frequency components representing microcalcifications and larger structures. At the final iteration, maximum intensity projection was applied to the regularized HF volume to generate a PPJ image that contained MCs with increased contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and reduced search space. High CNR objects in the PPJ image were extracted and labeled as microcalcification candidates. Convolution neural network trained to recognize the image pattern of microcalcifications was used to classify the candidates into true calcifications and tissue structures and artifacts. The remaining microcalcification candidates were grouped into MCs by dynamic conditional clustering based on adaptive CNR threshold and radial distance criteria. False positive (FP) clusters were further reduced using the number of candidates in a cluster, CNR and size of microcalcification candidates. At 85% sensitivity an FP rate of 0.71 and 0.54 was achieved for view- and case-based sensitivity, respectively, compared to 2.16 and 0.85 achieved in DBT. The improvement was significant (p-value = 0.003) by JAFROC analysis.

  11. Ultra-Fast Image Reconstruction of Tomosynthesis Mammography Using GPU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arefan D

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT is a technology that creates three dimensional (3D images of breast tissue. Tomosynthesis mammography detects lesions that are not detectable with other imaging systems. If image reconstruction time is in the order of seconds, we can use Tomosynthesis systems to perform Tomosynthesis-guided Interventional procedures. This research has been designed to study ultra-fast image reconstruction technique for Tomosynthesis Mammography systems using Graphics Processing Unit (GPU. At first, projections of Tomosynthesis mammography have been simulated. In order to produce Tomosynthesis projections, it has been designed a 3D breast phantom from empirical data. It is based on MRI data in its natural form. Then, projections have been created from 3D breast phantom. The image reconstruction algorithm based on FBP was programmed with C++ language in two methods using central processing unit (CPU card and the Graphics Processing Unit (GPU. It calculated the time of image reconstruction in two kinds of programming (using CPU and GPU.

  12. Impact of image acquisition timing on image quality for dual energy contrast-enhanced breast tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Melissa L.; Mainprize, James G.; Puong, Sylvie; Carton, Ann-Katherine; Iordache, Razvan; Muller, Serge; Yaffe, Martin J.

    2012-03-01

    Dual-energy contrast-enhanced digital breast tomosynthesis (DE CE-DBT) image quality is affected by a large parameter space including the tomosynthesis acquisition geometry, imaging technique factors, the choice of reconstruction algorithm, and the subject breast characteristics. The influence of most of these factors on reconstructed image quality is well understood for DBT. However, due to the contrast agent uptake kinetics in CE imaging, the subject breast characteristics change over time, presenting a challenge for optimization . In this work we experimentally evaluate the sensitivity of the reconstructed image quality to timing of the low-energy and high-energy images and changes in iodine concentration during image acquisition. For four contrast uptake patterns, a variety of acquisition protocols were tested with different timing and geometry. The influence of the choice of reconstruction algorithm (SART or FBP) was also assessed. Image quality was evaluated in terms of the lesion signal-difference-to-noise ratio (LSDNR) in the central slice of DE CE-DBT reconstructions. Results suggest that for maximum image quality, the low- and high-energy image acquisitions should be made within one x-ray tube sweep, as separate low- and high-energy tube sweeps can degrade LSDNR. In terms of LSDNR per square-root dose, the image quality is nearly equal between SART reconstructions with 9 and 15 angular views, but using fewer angular views can result in a significant improvement in the quantitative accuracy of the reconstructions due to the shorter imaging time interval.

  13. Metal artifact reduction using a patch-based reconstruction for digital breast tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Lucas R.; Bakic, Predrag R.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Vieira, Marcelo A. C.

    2017-03-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is rapidly emerging as the main clinical tool for breast cancer screening. Although several reconstruction methods for DBT are described by the literature, one common issue is the interplane artifacts caused by out-of-focus features. For breasts containing highly attenuating features, such as surgical clips and large calcifications, the artifacts are even more apparent and can limit the detection and characterization of lesions by the radiologist. In this work, we propose a novel method of combining backprojected data into tomographic slices using a patch-based approach, commonly used in denoising. Preliminary tests were performed on a geometry phantom and on an anthropomorphic phantom containing metal inserts. The reconstructed images were compared to a commercial reconstruction solution. Qualitative assessment of the reconstructed images provides evidence that the proposed method reduces artifacts while maintaining low noise levels. Objective assessment supports the visual findings. The artifact spread function shows that the proposed method is capable of suppressing artifacts generated by highly attenuating features. The signal difference to noise ratio shows that the noise levels of the proposed and commercial methods are comparable, even though the commercial method applies post-processing filtering steps, which were not implemented on the proposed method. Thus, the proposed method can produce tomosynthesis reconstructions with reduced artifacts and low noise levels.

  14. Analysis of percent density estimates from digital breast tomosynthesis projection images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakic, Predrag R.; Kontos, Despina; Zhang, Cuiping; Yaffe, Martin J.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.

    2007-03-01

    Women with dense breasts have an increased risk of breast cancer. Breast density is typically measured as the percent density (PD), the percentage of non-fatty (i.e., dense) tissue in breast images. Mammographic PD estimates vary, in part, due to the projective nature of mammograms. Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a novel radiographic method in which 3D images of the breast are reconstructed from a small number of projection (source) images, acquired at different positions of the x-ray focus. DBT provides superior visualization of breast tissue and has improved sensitivity and specificity as compared to mammography. Our long-term goal is to test the hypothesis that PD obtained from DBT is superior in estimating cancer risk compared with other modalities. As a first step, we have analyzed the PD estimates from DBT source projections since the results would be independent of the reconstruction method. We estimated PD from MLO mammograms (PD M) and from individual DBT projections (PD T). We observed good agreement between PD M and PD T from the central projection images of 40 women. This suggests that variations in breast positioning, dose, and scatter between mammography and DBT do not negatively affect PD estimation. The PD T estimated from individual DBT projections of nine women varied with the angle between the projections. This variation is caused by the 3D arrangement of the breast dense tissue and the acquisition geometry.

  15. Additional findings at preoperative breast MRI: the value of second-look digital breast tomosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clauser, Paola; Pancot, Martina; Girometti, Rossano; Bazzocchi, Massimo; Zuiani, Chiara [University of Udine, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria, ' ' S.Maria della Misericordia' ' , Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Department of Medical and Biological Sciences, Udine (Italy); Carbonaro, Luca A. [IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Unit of Radiology, Milan (Italy); Sardanelli, Francesco [IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Unit of Radiology, Milan (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Milano, Department of Biomedical Sciences of Health, Milan (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    To evaluate second-look digital breast tomosynthesis (SL-DBT) for additional findings (AFs) at preoperative MRI compared with second-look ultrasound (SL-US). We included 135 patients with breast cancer who underwent digital mammography (DM), DBT, US, and MRI at two centres. MR images were retrospectively evaluated to find AFs, described as focus, mass, or non-mass; ≤10 mm or >10 mm in size; BI-RADS 3, 4, or 5. DM and DBT exams were reviewed looking for MRI AFs; data on SL-US were collected. Reference standard was histopathology or ≥12-month negative follow-up. Fisher exact test and McNemar test were used. Eighty-four AFs were detected in 53/135 patients (39 %, 95 %CI 31-48 %). A correlate was found for 44/84 (52 %, 95 %CI 41-63 %) at SL-US, for 20/84 (24 %, 95 %CI 11-28 %) at SL-DM, for 42/84 (50 %, 95 %CI 39-61 %) at SL-DBT, for 63/84 (75 %, 95 %CI 64-84 %) at SL-DBT, and/or SL-US, the last rate being higher than for SL-US only, overall (p < 0.001), for mass or non-mass, ≤ or >10 mm, BI-RADS 4 or 5, or malignant lesions (p < 0.031). Of 21 AFs occult at both SLs, 17 were malignant (81 %, 95 %CI 58-94 %). When adding SL-DBT to SL-US, AFs detection increased from 52 % to 75 %. MR-guided biopsy is needed for the remaining 25 %. (orig.)

  16. Digital breast tomosynthesis is comparable to mammographic spot views for mass characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noroozian, Mitra; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Rahnama-Moghadam, Sahand; Klein, Katherine A; Jeffries, Deborah O; Pinsky, Renee W; Chan, Heang-Ping; Carson, Paul L; Helvie, Mark A; Roubidoux, Marilyn A

    2012-01-01

    To determine if digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) performs comparably to mammographic spot views (MSVs) in characterizing breast masses as benign or malignant. This IRB-approved, HIPAA-compliant reader study obtained informed consent from all subjects. Four blinded Mammography Quality Standards Act-certified academic radiologists individually evaluated DBT images and MSVs of 67 masses (30 malignant, 37 benign) in 67 women (age range, 34-88 years). Images were viewed in random order at separate counterbalanced sessions and were rated for visibility (10-point scale), likelihood of malignancy (12-point scale), and Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) classification. Differences in mass visibility were analyzed by using the Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-ranks test. Reader performance was measured by calculating the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (A(z)) and partial area index above a sensitivity threshold of 0.90 (A(z)(0.90)) by using likelihood of malignancy ratings. Masses categorized as BI-RADS 4 or 5 were compared with histopathologic analysis to determine true-positive results for each modality. Mean mass visibility ratings were slightly better with DBT (range, 3.2-4.4) than with MSV (range, 3.8-4.8) for all four readers, with one reader's improvement achieving statistical significance (P = .001). The A(z) ranged 0.89-0.93 for DBT and 0.88-0.93 for MSV (P ≥ .23). The A(z)((0.90)) ranged 0.36-0.52 for DBT and 0.25-0.40 for MSV (P ≥ .20). The readers characterized seven additional malignant masses as BI-RADS 4 or 5 with DBT than with MSV, at a cost of five false-positive biopsy recommendations, with a mean of 1.8 true-positive (range, 0-3) and 1.3 false-positive (range, -1 to 4) assessments per reader. In this small study, mass characterization in terms of visibility ratings, reader performance, and BI-RADS assessment with DBT was similar to that with MSVs. Preliminary findings suggest that MSV might not be necessary for

  17. Improving depth resolution in digital breast tomosynthesis by iterative image reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Erin G.; Kraemer, David N.; Sidky, Emil Y.; Reiser, Ingrid S.; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2015-03-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is currently enjoying tremendous growth in its application to screening for breast cancer. This is because it addresses a major weakness of mammographic projection imaging; namely, a cancer can be hidden by overlapping fibroglandular tissue structures or the same normal structures can mimic a malignant mass. DBT addresses these issues by acquiring few projections over a limited angle scanning arc that provides some depth resolution. As DBT is a relatively new device, there is potential to improve its performance significantly with improved image reconstruction algorithms. Previously, we reported a variation of adaptive steepest descent - projection onto convex sets (ASD-POCS) for DBT, which employed a finite differencing filter to enhance edges for improving visibility of tissue structures and to allow for volume-of-interest reconstruction. In the present work we present a singular value decomposition (SVD) analysis to demonstrate the gain in depth resolution for DBT afforded by use of the finite differencing filter.

  18. Effects on image quality of a 2D antiscatter grid in x-ray digital breast tomosynthesis: Initial experience using the dual modality (x-ray and molecular) breast tomosynthesis scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Tushita, E-mail: tp3rn@virginia.edu [Department of Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States); Peppard, Heather [Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22908 (United States); Williams, Mark B. [Department of Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States); Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22908 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22908 (United States)

    2016-04-15

    Purpose: Radiation scattered from the breast in digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) causes image degradation, including loss of contrast between cancerous and background tissue. Unlike in 2-dimensional (2D) mammography, an antiscatter grid cannot readily be used in DBT because changing alignment between the tube and detector during the scan would result in unacceptable loss of primary radiation. However, in the dual modality breast tomosynthesis (DMT) scanner, which combines DBT and molecular breast tomosynthesis, the tube and detector rotate around a common axis, thereby maintaining a fixed tube-detector alignment. This C-arm geometry raises the possibility of using a 2D (cellular) focused antiscatter grid. The purpose of this study is to assess change in image quality when using an antiscatter grid in the DBT portion of a DMT scan under conditions of fixed radiation dose. Methods: Two 2D focused prototype grids with 80 cm focal length were tested, one stack-laminated from copper (Cu) and one cast from a tungsten-polymer (W-poly). They were reciprocated using a motion scheme designed to maximize transmission of primary x-ray photons. Grid-in and grid-out scatter-to-primary ratios (SPRs) were measured for rectangular blocks of material simulating 30%, 50%, and 70% glandular tissue compositions. For assessment of changes in image quality through the addition of a grid, the Computerized Imaging Reference Systems, Inc., phantom Model 011A containing a set of 1 cm thick blocks simulating a range of glandular/adipose ratios from 0/100 to 100/0 was used. To simulate 6.5 and 8.5 cm thick compressed breasts, 1 cm thick slices of PMMA were added to the Model 011A phantom. DBT images were obtained with and without the grid, with exposure parameters fixed for a given compressed thickness. Signal-difference-to-noise ratios (SDNRs), contrast, and voxel value-based attenuation coefficients (μ) were measured for all blocks from reconstructed phantom images. Results: For 4, 6, and

  19. [Influence of projection data correction on digital breast tomosynthesis imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin-Yu; Zhang, Hua; Bian, Zhao-Ying; Zeng, Dong; He, Ji; Tian, Xiu-Mei; Ma, Jian-Hua; Huang, Jing

    2017-03-20

    To investigate the effect of detector performance during digital breast tomography (DBT) projection data acquisition on reconstructed image quality. With reference to the traditional detector data correction method and the specific data acquisition pattern in DBT imaging, we utilized dark field correction, light field and its gain correction for processing the projection data collected by the detector. The reconstructed images were evaluated using iterative reconstruction method based on total generalized variation (TGV). In physical breast phantom experiment, the proposed method resulted in a reduced Heel effect caused by nonuniform photon number. The reconstructed DBT images after correction showed obviously improved image quality especially in the details with a low contrast. The dark field correction, light field and its gain correction process for DBT image reconstruction can improve the image quality.

  20. Clinical evaluation of contrast-enhanced digital mammography and contrast enhanced tomosynthesis--Comparison to contrast-enhanced breast MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Chen-Pin; Lewin, John M; Chiang, Chia-Ling; Hung, Bao-Hui; Yang, Tsung-Lung; Huang, Jer-Shyung; Liao, Jia-Bin; Pan, Huay-Ben

    2015-12-01

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of contrast-enhanced digital mammography (CEDM) and contrast-enhanced tomosynthesis (CET) to dynamic contrast enhanced breast MRI (DCE-MRI) using a multireader-multicase study. Institutional review board approval and informed consents were obtained. Total 185 patients (mean age 51.3) with BI-RADS 4 or 5 lesions were evaluated before biopsy with mammography, tomosynthesis, CEDM, CET and DCE-MRI. Mediolateral-oblique and cranio-caudal views of the target breast CEDM and CET were acquired at 2 and 4 min after contrast agent injection. A mediolateral-oblique view of the non-target breast was taken at 6 min. Each lesion was scored with forced BI-RADS categories by three readers. Each reader interpreted lesions in the following order: mammography, tomosynthesis, CEDM, CET, and DCE-MRI during a single reading session. Histology showed 81 cancers and 144 benign lesions in the study. Of the 81 malignant lesions, 44% (36/81) were invasive and 56% (45/81) were non-invasive. Areas under the ROC curve, averaged for the 3 readers, were as follows: 0.897 for DCE-MRI, 0.892 for CET, 0.878 for CEDM, 0.784 for tomosynthesis and 0.740 for mammography. Significant differences in AUC were found between the group of contrast enhanced modalities (CEDM, CET, DCE-MRI) and the unenhanced modalities (all p0.05). CET and CEDM may be considered as an alternative modality to MRI for following up women with abnormal mammography. All three contrast modalities were superior in accuracy to conventional digital mammography with or without tomosynthesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Denoised ordered subset statistically penalized algebraic reconstruction technique (DOS-SPART) in digital breast tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, John; Li, Yinsheng; Li, Ke; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2017-03-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a three dimensional (3D) breast imaging modality in which projections are acquired over a limited angular span around the compressed breast and reconstructed into image slices parallel to the detector. DBT has been shown to help alleviate the breast tissue overlapping issues of two dimensional (2D) mammography. Since the overlapping tissues may simulate cancer masses or obscure true cancers, this improvement is critically important for improved breast cancer screening and diagnosis. In this work, a model-based image reconstruction method is presented to show that spatial resolution in DBT volumes can be maintained while dose is reduced using the presented method when compared to that of a state-of-the-art commercial reconstruction technique. Spatial resolution was measured in phantom images and subjectively in a clinical dataset. Noise characteristics were explored in a cadaver study. In both the quantitative and subjective results the image sharpness was maintained and overall image quality was maintained at reduced doses when the model-based iterative reconstruction was used to reconstruct the volumes.

  2. The role of digital tomosynthesis in reducing the number of equivocal breast reportings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alakhras, Maram; Mello-Thoms, Claudia; Rickard, Mary; Bourne, Roger; Brennan, Patrick C.

    2015-03-01

    Purpose To compare radiologists' confidence in assessing breast cancer using combined digital mammography (DM) and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) compared with DM alone as a function of previous experience with DBT. Materials and Methods Institutional ethics approval was obtained. Twenty-three experienced breast radiologists reviewed 50 cases in two modes, DM alone and DM+DBT. Twenty-seven cases presented with breast cancer. Each radiologist was asked to detect breast lesions and give a confidence score of 1-5 (1- Normal, 2- Benign, 3- Equivocal, 4- Suspicious, 5- Malignant). Radiologists were divided into three sub-groups according to their prior experience with DBT (none, workshop experience, and clinical experience). Confidence scores using DM+DBT were compared with DM alone for all readers combined and for each DBT experience subgroup. Statistical analyses, using GraphPad Prism 5, were carried out using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test with statistical significance set at pResults Confidence scores were higher for true positive cancer cases using DM+DBT compared with DM alone for all readers (p Conclusion Addition of DBT to DM increases the confidence level of radiologists in scoring cancer and normal/benign cases. This finding appears to apply across radiologists with varying levels of DBT experience, however further work involving greater numbers of radiologists is required.

  3. Digital breast tomosynthesis in the analysis of fat-containing lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freer, Phoebe E; Wang, Jessica L; Rafferty, Elizabeth A

    2014-01-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is rapidly emerging as an important clinical tool for both screening and diagnosis. DBT improves upon mammography by depicting breast tissue on a dynamic sequence of cross-sectional images reconstructed in planes corresponding to their mammographic planes of acquisition. DBT results in markedly reduced summation of overlapping tissue and depicts the margins of masses in far greater detail than mammography. Fat is commonly recognized in both benign and malignant breast masses at DBT, even when no fat is appreciated at mammography. In cases of encapsulated fat-containing masses, the increased detail at DBT often allows the radiologist to definitively classify a mass as benign (eg, lipoma, hamartoma, galactocele, lipid cyst) when mammographic findings alone are equivocal, thereby avoiding unnecessary biopsy or workup. However, when learning to read DBT images, many radiologists misinterpret this rule, mistaking the presence of any fat within a mass for an indication of benignity or an artifact and falsely concluding that an otherwise suspicious mass is not worrisome. If fat seen in breast masses at DBT is not appropriately analyzed, malignant breast masses may be incorrectly classified as probably or even definitely benign. With use of radiologic-pathologic correlation, the authors illustrate cases in which the presence of fat can help correctly classify a mass as benign, and pitfalls in which the presence or absence of fat within a mass is irrelevant and should not influence analysis. © RSNA, 2014.

  4. Characterization of a constrained paired-view technique in iterative reconstruction for breast tomosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Gang; Yaffe, Martin J. [Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada and Sunnybrook Research Institute, S-657, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 Canada (Canada); Mainprize, James G. [Sunnybrook Research Institute, S-657, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada)

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: The order in which the projection views are employed in the reconstruction of tomosynthesis by iterative algorithms, such as simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique and maximum likelihood, has a strong effect on the rate of convergence, accuracy, and the edge-blurring artifacts in the reconstructed image. The purpose of this investigation was to characterize and evaluate the effects of ordering schemes on image quality for breast tomosynthesis reconstruction and to explore a new constrained paired-view technique that could provide reduction of reconstruction artifacts. In this work, the authors compared several different ordering schemes and characterized the image quality and the formation of out-of-plane artifacts. Furthermore, a new normalization method is presented. It produces more accurate reconstructions with reduced artifacts comparing to the standard method of sequential ordering.Methods: In addition to visual assessment of image quality, several indices such as the signal-difference-to-noise ratio, the artifact-spread function, and the lesion detectability (d{sup ′}) were computed to quantitatively evaluate the effect of ordering scheme. The sets of breast tomosynthesis projection images were simulated for reconstruction; one set had uniform background (white noise only) and the other two contained both anatomic background and quantum noise. Clinical breast images were also studied for comparison.Results: The authors have quantified the image quality in reconstructed slices for a range of tumor sizes. The authors’ proposed method provides better performance for all of the metrics tested (contrast, d{sup ′}, and the level of artifacts) both for the uniform phantom case and in the presence of anatomical structure.Conclusions: The paired projection normalization provides better performance in the image quality of the reconstructed slices, and results in a lower level of artifacts in the Z direction. This implies that even a relatively

  5. Mass detection in digital breast tomosynthesis: Deep convolutional neural network with transfer learning from mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samala, Ravi K; Chan, Heang-Ping; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Helvie, Mark A; Wei, Jun; Cha, Kenny

    2016-12-01

    Develop a computer-aided detection (CAD) system for masses in digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) volume using a deep convolutional neural network (DCNN) with transfer learning from mammograms. A data set containing 2282 digitized film and digital mammograms and 324 DBT volumes were collected with IRB approval. The mass of interest on the images was marked by an experienced breast radiologist as reference standard. The data set was partitioned into a training set (2282 mammograms with 2461 masses and 230 DBT views with 228 masses) and an independent test set (94 DBT views with 89 masses). For DCNN training, the region of interest (ROI) containing the mass (true positive) was extracted from each image. False positive (FP) ROIs were identified at prescreening by their previously developed CAD systems. After data augmentation, a total of 45 072 mammographic ROIs and 37 450 DBT ROIs were obtained. Data normalization and reduction of non-uniformity in the ROIs across heterogeneous data was achieved using a background correction method applied to each ROI. A DCNN with four convolutional layers and three fully connected (FC) layers was first trained on the mammography data. Jittering and dropout techniques were used to reduce overfitting. After training with the mammographic ROIs, all weights in the first three convolutional layers were frozen, and only the last convolution layer and the FC layers were randomly initialized again and trained using the DBT training ROIs. The authors compared the performances of two CAD systems for mass detection in DBT: one used the DCNN-based approach and the other used their previously developed feature-based approach for FP reduction. The prescreening stage was identical in both systems, passing the same set of mass candidates to the FP reduction stage. For the feature-based CAD system, 3D clustering and active contour method was used for segmentation; morphological, gray level, and texture features were extracted and merged with a

  6. Characterization of invisible breast cancers in digital mammography and tomosynthesis: radio-pathological correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar Angulo, P M; Romero Castellano, C; Ruiz Martín, J; Sánchez-Camacho González-Carrato, M P; Cruz Hernández, L M

    To review the radio-pathologic features of symptomatic breast cancers not detected at digital mammography (DM) and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). Retrospective analysis of 169 lesions from symptomatic patients with breast cancer that were studied with DM, DBT, ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance (MR). We identified occult lesions (true false negatives) in DM and DBT. Clinical data, density, US and MR findings were analyzed as well as histopathological results. We identified seven occult lesions in DM and DBT. 57% (4/7) of the lesions were identified in high-density breasts (type c and d), and the rest of them in breasts of density type b. Six carcinomas were identified at US and MR (BI-RADS 4 masses); the remaining lesion was only identified at MR. The tumor size was larger than 3cm at MRI in 57% of the lesions. All tumors were ductal infiltrating carcinomas, six of them with high stromal proportion. According to molecular classification, we found only one triple-negative breast cancer, the other lesions were luminal-type. We analyzed the tumor margins of two resected carcinomas that were not treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy, both lesions presented margins that displaced the adjacent parenchyma without infiltrating it. Occult breast carcinomas in DM and DBT accounted for 4% of lesions detected in patients with symptoms. They were mostly masses, all of them presented the diagnosis of infiltrating ductal carcinoma (with predominance of the luminal immunophenotype) and were detected in breasts of density type b, c and d. Copyright © 2017 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Scatter characterization using a beam-stop-array algorithm for digital breast tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Young-Wook; Choi, Jae-Gu; Kim, Ye-seul; Park, Hye-Suk; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2013-12-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a technique developed to overcome the limitations of conventional digital mammography by reconstructing slices through the breast from projections acquired at different angles from the X-ray source. In the development and the optimization of DBT, the X-ray scatter reduction technique remains a significant challenge due to projectiongeometry and radiation-dose concerns. The purpose of this study was to apply the scatter correction method, which estimates scatter patterns with a beam-stop-array (BSA) by spatial interpolation and obtains primary projections by subtracting the scatter patterns from raw detected projections. The DBT prototype is based on the CsI phosphor/Complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor flat panel detector, which was optimized for low exposures with rapid readout. A simplified beam-stop-array algorithm was used to estimate the scatter pattern for each projection and to obtain only primary projections. We evaluated the distribution of the scatter intensity by using a BSA algorithm and reconstructed breast images based on projections with and without a scatter correction. Comparing corrected and uncorrected slices, we measured the linear attenuation coefficient (LAC) over a breast phantom. These quantitative comparisons indicated improved image quality in terms of contrast, background noise and contrast-to-noise ratio.

  8. Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT): a review of the evidence for use as a screening tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Fiona J; Tucker, Lorraine; Young, Ken C

    2016-02-01

    Breast screening with full-field digital mammography (FFDM) fails to detect 15-30% of cancers. This figure is higher for women with dense breasts. A new tomographic technique in mammography has been developed--digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT)--which allows images to be viewed in sections through the breast and has the potential to improve cancer detection rates. Results from retrospective reading studies comparing DBT with FFDM have been largely favourable with improvement in sensitivity and specificity. Increases in diagnostic accuracy have been reported as being independent of breast density; however there are mixed reports regarding the detection of microcalcification. Prospective screening studies using DBT with FFDM have demonstrated increased rates in cancer detection compared with FFDM alone. A reduction in false-positive recall rates has also been shown. Screening with the addition of DBT would approximately double radiation dose; however a simulated FFDM image can be generated from a DBT scan. The combination of simulated FFDM images and DBT is being evaluated within several studies and some positive results have been published. Interval cancer rates for the UK National Health Service Breast Screening Programme (NHSBSP) demonstrate the limited sensitivity of FFDM in cancer detection. DBT has the potential to increase sensitivity and decrease false-positive recall rates. It has approval for screening and diagnostics in several countries; however, there are issues with DBT as a screening tool including additional reading time, IT storage and connectivity, over-diagnosis, and cost effectiveness. Feasibility and cost-effectiveness trials are needed before the implementation of DBT in NHSBSP can be considered. Copyright © 2015 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Evaluation of the image quality in digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) employed with a compressed-sensing (CS)-based reconstruction algorithm by using the mammographic accreditation phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Yeonok; Cho, Heemoon; Je, Uikyu; Cho, Hyosung, E-mail: hscho1@yonsei.ac.kr; Park, Chulkyu; Lim, Hyunwoo; Kim, Kyuseok; Kim, Guna; Park, Soyoung; Woo, Taeho; Choi, Sungil

    2015-12-21

    In this work, we have developed a prototype digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) system which mainly consists of an x-ray generator (28 kV{sub p}, 7 mA s), a CMOS-type flat-panel detector (70-μm pixel size, 230.5×339 mm{sup 2} active area), and a rotational arm to move the x-ray generator in an arc. We employed a compressed-sensing (CS)-based reconstruction algorithm, rather than a common filtered-backprojection (FBP) one, for more accurate DBT reconstruction. Here the CS is a state-of-the-art mathematical theory for solving the inverse problems, which exploits the sparsity of the image with substantially high accuracy. We evaluated the reconstruction quality in terms of the detectability, the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and the slice-sensitive profile (SSP) by using the mammographic accreditation phantom (Model 015, CIRS Inc.) and compared it to the FBP-based quality. The CS-based algorithm yielded much better image quality, preserving superior image homogeneity, edge sharpening, and cross-plane resolution, compared to the FBP-based one. - Highlights: • A prototype digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) system is developed. • Compressed-sensing (CS) based reconstruction framework is employed. • We reconstructed high-quality DBT images by using the proposed reconstruction framework.

  10. A novel pre-processing technique for improving image quality in digital breast tomosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyeongseok; Lee, Taewon; Hong, Joonpyo; Sabir, Sohail; Lee, Jung-Ryun; Choi, Young Wook; Kim, Hak Hee; Chae, Eun Young; Cho, Seungryong

    2017-02-01

    Nonlinear pre-reconstruction processing of the projection data in computed tomography (CT) where accurate recovery of the CT numbers is important for diagnosis is usually discouraged, for such a processing would violate the physics of image formation in CT. However, one can devise a pre-processing step to enhance detectability of lesions in digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) where accurate recovery of the CT numbers is fundamentally impossible due to the incompleteness of the scanned data. Since the detection of lesions such as micro-calcifications and mass in breasts is the purpose of using DBT, it is justified that a technique producing higher detectability of lesions is a virtue. A histogram modification technique was developed in the projection data domain. Histogram of raw projection data was first divided into two parts: One for the breast projection data and the other for background. Background pixel values were set to a single value that represents the boundary between breast and background. After that, both histogram parts were shifted by an appropriate amount of offset and the histogram-modified projection data were log-transformed. Filtered-backprojection (FBP) algorithm was used for image reconstruction of DBT. To evaluate performance of the proposed method, we computed the detectability index for the reconstructed images from clinically acquired data. Typical breast border enhancement artifacts were greatly suppressed and the detectability of calcifications and masses was increased by use of the proposed method. Compared to a global threshold-based post-reconstruction processing technique, the proposed method produced images of higher contrast without invoking additional image artifacts. In this work, we report a novel pre-processing technique that improves detectability of lesions in DBT and has potential advantages over the global threshold-based post-reconstruction processing technique. The proposed method not only increased the lesion detectability

  11. Simplified false-positive reduction in computer-aided detection scheme of clustered microcalcifications in digital breast tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Ji-Wook; Chae, Seung-Hoon; Lee, Sooyeul; Chae, Eun Young; Kim, Hak Hee; Choi, Young-Wook

    2015-03-01

    A computer-aided detection (CADe) system for clustered microcalcifications (MCs) in reconstructed digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) volumes was suggested. The system consisted of prescreening, MC detecting, clustering, and falsepositive reduction steps. In the prescreening stage, the MC-like objects were enhanced by a multiscale-based 3D calcification response function. A connected component segmentation method was used to detect cluster seed objects, which were considered as potential clustering centers of MCs. Starting with each cluster seed object as the initial cluster center, a cluster candidate was formed by including nearby MC candidates within a 3D neighborhood of the cluster seed object satisfying the clustering criteria during the clustering step. The size and number of the clustered MCs in a cluster seed candidate were used to reduce the number of FPs. A bounding cube for each MCC was generated for each accepted seed candidates. Then, the overlapping cubes were combined and examined according to the FP reduction criteria. After FP reduction step, we obtained the average number of FPs of 2.47 per DBT volume with sensitivity of 83.3%. Our study indicates the simplified false-positive reduction approach applied to the detection of clustered MCs in DBT is promising as an efficient CADe system.

  12. A limited memory BFGS method for a nonlinear inverse problem in digital breast tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landi, G.; Loli Piccolomini, E.; Nagy, J. G.

    2017-09-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is an imaging technique that allows the reconstruction of a pseudo three-dimensional image of the breast from a finite number of low-dose two-dimensional projections obtained by different x-ray tube angles. An issue that is often ignored in DBT is the fact that an x-ray beam is polyenergetic, i.e. it is composed of photons with different levels of energy. The polyenergetic model requires solving a large-scale, nonlinear inverse problem, which is more expensive than the typically used simplified, linear monoenergetic model. However, the polyenergetic model is much less susceptible to beam hardening artifacts, which show up as dark streaks and cupping (i.e. background nonuniformities) in the reconstructed image. In addition, it has been shown that the polyenergetic model can be exploited to obtain additional quantitative information about the material of the object being imaged. In this paper we consider the multimaterial polyenergetic DBT model, and solve the nonlinear inverse problem with a limited memory BFGS quasi-Newton method. Regularization is enforced at each iteration using a diagonally modified approximation of the Hessian matrix, and by truncating the iterations.

  13. Investigation on location-dependent detectability of a small mass for digital breast tomosynthesis evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Changwoo; Baek, Jongduk; Park, Subok

    2016-03-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is an emerging imaging modality for improved breast cancer detection and diagnosis [1-5]. Numerous efforts have been made to find quantitative metrics associated with mammographic image quality assessment, such as the exponent β of anatomical noise power spectrum, glandularity, contrast noise ratio, etc. [6-8]. In addition, with the use of Fourier-domain detectability for a task-based assessment of DBT, a stationarity assumption on reconstructed image statistics was often made [9-11], resulting in the use of multiple regions-of-interest (ROIs) from different locations in order to increase sample size. While all these metrics provide some information on mammographic image characteristics and signal detection, the relationship between these metrics and detectability in DBT evaluation has not been fully understood. In this work, we investigated spatial-domain detectability trends and levels as a function of the number of slices Ns at three different ROI locations on the same image slice, where background statistics differ in terms of the aforementioned metrics. Detectabilities for the three ROI locations were calculated using multi-slice channelized Hotelling observers with 2D/3D Laguerre-Gauss channels. Our simulation results show that detectability levels and trends as a function of Ns vary across these three ROI locations. They also show that the exponent β, mean glandularity, and mean attenuation coefficient vary across the three ROI locations but they do not necessarily predict the ranking of detectability levels and trends across these ROI locations.

  14. Exploration of strategies for implementation of screen-printed mercuric iodide converters in direct detection AMFPIs for digital breast tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonuk, Larry E.; El-Mohri, Youcef; Zhao, Qihua; Jiang, Hao

    2017-03-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has become an increasingly important tool in the diagnosis of breast disease. For those DBT imaging systems based on active matrix, flat-panel imager (AMFPI) arrays, the incident radiation is detected directly or indirectly by means of an a-Se or CsI:Tl x-ray converter, respectively. While all AMFPI DBT devices provide clinically useful volumetric information, their performance is limited by the relatively modest average signal generated per interacting X ray by present converters compared to the electronic additive noise of the system. To address this constraint, we are pursuing the development of a screen-printed form of mercuric iodide (SP HgI2) which has demonstrated considerably higher sensitivities (i.e., larger average signal per interacting X ray) than those of conventional a-Se and CsI:Tl converters, as well as impressive DQE and MTF performance under mammographic irradiation conditions. A converter offering such enhanced sensitivity would greatly improve signal-to-noise performance and facilitate quantum-limited imaging down to significantly lower exposures than present AMFPI DBT systems. However, before this novel converter material can be implemented practically, challenges associated with SP HgI2 must be addressed. Most significantly, high levels of charge trapping (which lead to image lag as well as fall-off in DQE at higher exposures) need to be reduced - while improving the uniformity in pixel-to-pixel signal response as well as maintaining low dark current and otherwise favorable DQE performance. In this paper, a pair of novel strategies for overcoming the challenge of charge trapping in SP HgI2 converters are described, and initial results from empirical and calculational studies of these strategies are reported.

  15. Detection of soft tissue densities from digital breast tomosynthesis: comparison of conventional and deep learning approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotin, Sergei V.; Yin, Yin; Haldankar, Hrishikesh; Hoffmeister, Jeffrey W.; Periaswamy, Senthil

    2016-03-01

    Computer-aided detection (CAD) has been used in screening mammography for many years and is likely to be utilized for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). Higher detection performance is desirable as it may have an impact on radiologist's decisions and clinical outcomes. Recently the algorithms based on deep convolutional architectures have been shown to achieve state of the art performance in object classification and detection. Similarly, we trained a deep convolutional neural network directly on patches sampled from two-dimensional mammography and reconstructed DBT volumes and compared its performance to a conventional CAD algorithm that is based on computation and classification of hand-engineered features. The detection performance was evaluated on the independent test set of 344 DBT reconstructions (GE SenoClaire 3D, iterative reconstruction algorithm) containing 328 suspicious and 115 malignant soft tissue densities including masses and architectural distortions. Detection sensitivity was measured on a region of interest (ROI) basis at the rate of five detection marks per volume. Moving from conventional to deep learning approach resulted in increase of ROI sensitivity from 0:832 +/- 0:040 to 0:893 +/- 0:033 for suspicious ROIs; and from 0:852 +/- 0:065 to 0:930 +/- 0:046 for malignant ROIs. These results indicate the high utility of deep feature learning in the analysis of DBT data and high potential of the method for broader medical image analysis tasks.

  16. Three-Dimensional Computer-Aided Detection of Microcalcification Clusters in Digital Breast Tomosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-wook Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose computer-aided detection (CADe algorithm for microcalcification (MC clusters in reconstructed digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT images. The algorithm consists of prescreening, MC detection, clustering, and false-positive (FP reduction steps. The DBT images containing the MC-like objects were enhanced by a multiscale Hessian-based three-dimensional (3D objectness response function and a connected-component segmentation method was applied to extract the cluster seed objects as potential clustering centers of MCs. Secondly, a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR enhanced image was also generated to detect the individual MC candidates and prescreen the MC-like objects. Each cluster seed candidate was prescreened by counting neighboring individual MC candidates nearby the cluster seed object according to several microcalcification clustering criteria. As a second step, we introduced bounding boxes for the accepted seed candidate, clustered all the overlapping cubes, and examined. After the FP reduction step, the average number of FPs per case was estimated to be 2.47 per DBT volume with a sensitivity of 83.3%.

  17. Dynamic relaxation in algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) for breast tomosynthesis imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, N; Mota, A M; Matela, N; Janeiro, L; Almeida, P

    2016-08-01

    A major challenge in Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) is handling image noise since the 3D reconstructed images are obtained from low dose projections and limited angular range. The use of the iterative reconstruction algorithm Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (ART) in clinical context depends on two key factors: the number of iterations needed (time consuming) and the image noise after iterations. Both factors depend highly on a relaxation coefficient (λ), which may give rise to slow or noisy reconstructions, when a single λ value is considered for the entire iterative process. The aim of this work is to present a new implementation for the ART that takes into account a dynamic mode to calculate λ in DBT image reconstruction. A set of initial reconstructions of real phantom data was done using constant λ values. The results were used to choose, for each iteration, the suitable λ value, taking into account the image noise level and the convergence speed. A methodology to optimize λ automatically during the image reconstruction was proposed. Results showed we can dynamically choose λ values in such a way that the time needed to reconstruct the images can be significantly reduced (up to 70%) while achieving similar image quality. These results were confirmed with one clinical dataset. With simple methodology we were able to dynamically choose λ in DBT image reconstruction with ART, allowing a shorter image reconstruction time without increasing image noise. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Suggestion of the manual exposure condition guideline for reducing patient dose in digital breast tomosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Eun Ae [Dept. of Radiology, Korea University Guro Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, In Ja [Dept. of Radiologic Technology, Dongnam Health University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The conditions after exposure to digital mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis were analyzed. The examinations for the ACR phantom were done using manual exposure, not auto exposure, to examine image discrimination and patient dose. As a result, the following results were derived: In the CC exposure , the kVp was 2kVp higher while mAs decreased to 58.6% for the 3D tomography. Such result showed an approximate decrease of 60mAs. At that time, the patients Average Glandular Dose (AGD) was 1.65mGy in 2D and 1.87mGy in 3D; thus, AGD of 3D was shown to have about 1.13 times higher. The result of the manual exposure revealed a reduced mAs of up to 80%; there was no effect in the assessment standard in terms of image discrimination, resulting in more than 10 points. When mAs was reduced to 80% in the manual exposure for ACR phantom, AGD was decreased to 0.66mGy. The diagnostic values of images were maintained and patients dose was reduced in the manual exposure in the AEC condition for 3D. Since the use of 3D has recently increased, using the manual exposure has been recommended in this study to improve the diagnostic value, while, simultaneously reducing patients dose.

  19. Image reconstruction for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) by using projection-angle-dependent filter functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Yeonok; Park, Chulkyu; Cho, Hyosung; Je, Uikyu; Hong, Daeki; Lee, Minsik; Cho, Heemoon; Choi, Sungil; Koo, Yangseo [Yonsei University, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is considered in clinics as a standard three-dimensional imaging modality, allowing the earlier detection of cancer. It typically acquires only 10-30 projections over a limited angle range of 15 - 60 .deg. with a stationary detector and typically uses a computationally-efficient filtered-backprojection (FBP) algorithm for image reconstruction. However, a common FBP algorithm yields poor image quality resulting from the loss of average image value and the presence of severe image artifacts due to the elimination of the dc component of the image by the ramp filter and to the incomplete data, respectively. As an alternative, iterative reconstruction methods are often used in DBT to overcome these difficulties, even though they are still computationally expensive. In this study, as a compromise, we considered a projection-angle dependent filtering method in which one-dimensional geometry-adapted filter kernels are computed with the aid of a conjugate-gradient method and are incorporated into the standard FBP framework. We implemented the proposed algorithm and performed systematic simulation works to investigate the imaging characteristics. Our results indicate that the proposed method is superior to a conventional FBP method for DBT imaging and has a comparable computational cost, while preserving good image homogeneity and edge sharpening with no serious image artifacts.

  20. Influence of X-ray scatter radiation on image quality in Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, M. J.; Di Maria, S.; Baptista, M.; Belchior, A.; Afonso, J.; Venâncio, J.; Vaz, P.

    2017-11-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a quasi-three-dimensional imaging technique that was developed to solve the principal limitation of mammography, namely the overlapping tissue effect. This issue in standard mammography (SM) leads to two main problems: low sensitivity (difficulty to detect lesions) and low specificity (non-negligible percentage of false positives). Although DBT is now being introduced in clinical practice the features of this technique have not yet been fully and accurately assessed. Consequently, optimization studies in terms of choosing the most suitable parameters which maximize image quality according to the known limits of breast dosimetry are currently performing. In DBT, scatter radiation can lead to a loss of contrast and to an increase of image noise by reducing the signal-to-difference-noise ratio (SDNR) of a lesion. Moreover the use of an anti-scatter grid is a concern due to the low exposure of the photon flux available per projection. For this reason the main aim of this study was to analyze the influence of the scatter radiation on image quality and the dose delivered to the breast. In particular a detailed analysis of the scatter radiation on the optimal energy that maximizes the SDNR was performed for different monochromatic energies and voltages. To reach this objective the PenEasy Monte Carlo (MC) simulation tool imbedded in the general-purpose main program PENELOPE, was used. After a successful validation of the MC model with measurements, 2D projection images of primary, coherent and incoherent photons were obtained. For that, a homogeneous breast phantom (2, 4, 6, 8 cm) with 25%, 50% and 75% glandular compositions was used, including a 5 mm thick tumor. The images were generated for each monochromatic X-ray energies in the range from 16 keV to 32 keV. For each angular projection considered (25 angular projections covering an arc of 50°) the scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR), the mean glandular dose (MGD) and the signal

  1. Development of a prototype chest digital tomosynthesis R/F system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sunghoon; Lee, Haenghwa; Lee, Donghoon; Choi, Seungyeon; Shin, Jungwook; Jang, Woojin; Seo, Chang-Woo; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2017-03-01

    Digital tomosynthesis has an advantage of low radiation dose compared to conventional computed tomography (CT) by utilizing small number of projections ( 80) acquired over a limited angular range. It can produce 3D volumetric data although they may have some artifacts due to incomplete sampling. Based upon these attractive merits, we developed a prototype digital tomosynthesis R/F system especially for the purpose of applications in chest imaging. Prototype chest digital tomosynthesis (CDT) R/F system contains an X-ray tube with high power R/F pulse generator, flat-panel detector, R/F table, electromechanical radiographic subsystems including precise motor controller, and a reconstruction server. For image reconstruction, users could select the reconstruction option between analytic and iterative methods. Reconstructed images of Catphan700 and LUNGMAN phantoms clearly and rapidly described the internal structures of the phantoms using graphics processing unit (GPU) programming. Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) values of the CTP682 module was higher in images using the simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART) than those using filtered backprojection (FBP) for all materials by factors of 2.60, 3.78, 5.50, 2.30, 3.70, and 2.52 for air, lung foam, low density polyethylene (LDPE), Delrin (acetal homopolymer resin), bone 50% (hydroxyapatite), and Teflon, respectively. Total elapsed times for producing 3D volume were 2.92 sec and 86.29 sec on average for FBP and SART (20 iterations), respectively. The times required for reconstruction were clinically feasible. Moreover, the total radiation dose from the system (5.68 mGy) could demonstrate a significant lowered radiation dose compared to conventional chest CT scan. Consequently, our prototype tomosynthesis R/F system represents an important advance in digital tomosynthesis applications.

  2. Clinical implementation of synthesized mammography with digital breast tomosynthesis in a routine clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freer, Phoebe E; Riegert, Joanna; Eisenmenger, Laura; Ose, Dominik; Winkler, Nicole; Stein, Matthew A; Stoddard, Gregory J; Hess, Rachel

    2017-11-01

    Most published studies evaluating digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) included a separate 2-dimensional full-field digital mammogram (FFDM) for DBT screening protocols, increasing radiation from screening mammography. Synthesized mammography (SM) creates a 2-dimensional image from the DBT source data, and if used in place of FFDM, it reduces radiation of DBT screening. This study evaluated the implementation of SM + DBT in routine screening practice in terms of recall rates, cancer detection rates (CDR), % of minimal cancers, % of node-positive cancers, and positive predictive values (PPV). A multivariate retrospective institutional analysis was performed on 31,979 women who obtained screening mammography (10/2013-12/2015) with cohorts divided by modality (SM + DBT, FFDM + DBT, and FFDM). We adjusted for comparison mammograms, age, breast density, and the interpreting radiologist. Recall type was analyzed for differences (focal asymmetry, asymmetry, masses, calcifications, architectural distortion). SM + DBT significantly decreased the recall rate compared to FFDM (5.52 vs. 7.83%, p < 0.001) with no differences in overall CDR (p = 0.66), invasive and/or in situ CDR, or percentages of minimal and node-negative cancers. PPV1 significantly increased with SM + DBT relative to FFDM (9.1 vs. 6.2%, p = 0.02). SM + DBT did not differ significantly in recall rate or overall CDR compared to FFDM + DBT. There were statistically significant differences in certain findings recalled by screening modality (e.g., focal asymmetries). SM + DBT reduces false positives compared to FFDM, while maintaining the CDR and other desirable audit outcome data. SM + DBT is more accurate than FFDM alone, and is a desirable alternative to FFDM + DBT, given the added benefit of radiation reduction.

  3. Design and characterization of a spatially distributed multibeam field emission x-ray source for stationary digital breast tomosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian Xin; Rajaram, Ramya; Calderon-Colon, Xiomara; Yang Guang; Phan, Tuyen; Lalush, David S.; Lu Jianping; Zhou, Otto [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Curriculum in Applied Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States) and Department of Biomedical Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27659 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States) and Curriculum in Applied Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Curriculum in Applied Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States) and Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States)

    2009-10-15

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a limited angle computed tomography technique that can distinguish tumors from its overlying breast tissues and has potentials for detection of cancers at a smaller size and earlier stage. Current prototype DBT scanners are based on the regular full-field digital mammography systems and require partial isocentric motion of an x-ray tube over certain angular range to record the projection views. This prolongs the scanning time and, in turn, degrades the imaging quality due to motion blur. To mitigate the above limitations, the concept of a stationary DBT (s-DBT) scanner has been recently proposed based on the newly developed spatially distributed multibeam field emission x-ray (MBFEX) source technique using the carbon nanotube. The purpose of this article is to evaluate the performance of the 25-beam MBFEX source array that has been designed and fabricated for the s-DBT system. The s-DBT system records all the projection images by electronically activating the multiple x-ray beams from different viewing angles without any mechanical motion. The configuration of the MBFEX source is close to the published values from the Siemens Mammomat system. The key issues including the x-ray flux, focal spot size, spatial resolution, scanning time, beam-to-beam consistency, and reliability are evaluated using the standard procedures. In this article, the authors describe the design and performance of a distributed x-ray source array specifically designed for the s-DBT system. They evaluate the emission current, current variation, lifetime, and focal spot sizes of the source array. An emission current of up to 18 mA was obtained at 0.5x0.3 mm effective focal spot size. The experimentally measured focal spot sizes are comparable to that of a typical commercial mammography tube without motion blurring. Trade-off between the system spatial resolution, x-ray flux, and scanning time are also discussed. Projection images of a breast phantom were

  4. Computer-aided detection of clustered microcalcifications in multiscale bilateral filtering regularized reconstructed digital breast tomosynthesis volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samala, Ravi K., E-mail: rsamala@umich.edu; Chan, Heang-Ping; Lu, Yao; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Wei, Jun; Helvie, Mark A. [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-5842 (United States); Sahiner, Berkman [Center for Devices and Radiological Health, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Maryland 20993 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Develop a computer-aided detection (CADe) system for clustered microcalcifications in digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) volume enhanced with multiscale bilateral filtering (MSBF) regularization. Methods: With Institutional Review Board approval and written informed consent, two-view DBT of 154 breasts, of which 116 had biopsy-proven microcalcification (MC) clusters and 38 were free of MCs, was imaged with a General Electric GEN2 prototype DBT system. The DBT volumes were reconstructed with MSBF-regularized simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART) that was designed to enhance MCs and reduce background noise while preserving the quality of other tissue structures. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of MCs was further improved with enhancement-modulated calcification response (EMCR) preprocessing, which combined multiscale Hessian response to enhance MCs by shape and bandpass filtering to remove the low-frequency structured background. MC candidates were then located in the EMCR volume using iterative thresholding and segmented by adaptive region growing. Two sets of potential MC objects, cluster centroid objects and MC seed objects, were generated and the CNR of each object was calculated. The number of candidates in each set was controlled based on the breast volume. Dynamic clustering around the centroid objects grouped the MC candidates to form clusters. Adaptive criteria were designed to reduce false positive (FP) clusters based on the size, CNR values and the number of MCs in the cluster, cluster shape, and cluster based maximum intensity projection. Free-response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) and jackknife alternative FROC (JAFROC) analyses were used to assess the performance and compare with that of a previous study. Results: Unpaired two-tailedt-test showed a significant increase (p < 0.0001) in the ratio of CNRs for MCs with and without MSBF regularization compared to similar ratios for FPs. For view-based detection, a

  5. Dosimetric characterization and organ dose assessment in digital breast tomosynthesis: Measurements and Monte Carlo simulations using voxel phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baptista, Mariana, E-mail: marianabaptista@ctn.ist.utl.pt; Di Maria, Salvatore; Barros, Sílvia; Vaz, Pedro [Centro de Ciências e Tecnologias Nucleares, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Estrada Nacional 10, km 139,7, Bobadela LRS 2695-066 (Portugal); Figueira, Catarina [Centre for Plasma Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen’s University, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Sarmento, Marta; Orvalho, Lurdes [Serviço de Imagiologia, Hospital da Luz, Avenida Lusíada, 100, Lisboa 1500-650 (Portugal)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Due to its capability to more accurately detect deep lesions inside the breast by removing the effect of overlying anatomy, digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has the potential to replace the standard mammography technique in clinical screening exams. However, the European Guidelines for DBT dosimetry are still a work in progress and there are little data available on organ doses other than to the breast. It is, therefore, of great importance to assess the dosimetric performance of DBT with respect to the one obtained with standard digital mammography (DM) systems. The aim of this work is twofold: (i) to study the dosimetric properties of a combined DBT/DM system (MAMMOMAT Inspiration Siemens{sup ®}) for a tungsten/rhodium (W/Rh) anode/filter combination and (ii) to evaluate organs doses during a DBT examination. Methods: For the first task, measurements were performed in manual and automatic exposure control (AEC) modes, using two homogeneous breast phantoms: a PMMA slab phantom and a 4 cm thick breast-shaped rigid phantom, with 50% of glandular tissue in its composition. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were performed using Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended v.2.7.0. A MC model was implemented to mimic DM and DBT acquisitions for a wide range of x-ray spectra (24 –34 kV). This was used to calculate mean glandular dose (MGD) and to compute series of backscatter factors (BSFs) that could be inserted into the DBT dosimetric formalism proposed by Dance et al. Regarding the second aim of the study, the implemented MC model of the clinical equipment, together with a female voxel phantom (“Laura”), was used to calculate organ doses considering a typical DBT acquisition. Results were compared with a standard two-view mammography craniocaudal (CC) acquisition. Results: Considering the AEC mode, the acquisition of a single CC view results in a MGD ranging from 0.53 ± 0.07 mGy to 2.41 ± 0.31 mGy in DM mode and from 0.77 ± 0.11 mGy to 2.28 ± 0.32 mGy in DBT mode

  6. Preoperative Tomosynthesis-guided Needle Localization of Mammographically and Sonographically Occult Breast Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freer, Phoebe E; Niell, Bethany; Rafferty, Elizabeth A

    2015-05-01

    To assess the feasibility and accuracy of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT)-guided needle localization for DBT-detected suspicious abnormalities not visualized with other modalities and to analyze the imaging and pathologic characteristics of abnormalities detected only with DBT to determine the positive predictive value for malignancy. This HIPAA-compliant study was approved by the institutional review board, and the requirement to obtain informed consent was waived. A retrospective query of the imaging database identified 34 consecutive women (average age, 55 years; age range, 28-84 years) with 36 lesions who underwent DBT-guided needle localization between April 2011 and January 2013 with use of commercially available equipment. Imaging findings and medical records were reviewed. Findings that were attributable to previous surgical changes were classified as benign or probably benign and excluded from analysis because the lesions did not proceed to localization. Architectural distortion was the imaging finding identified in all 36 abnormalities (100%). Findings from pathologic examination after the first attempt at localization were concordant with those from imaging in 35 of the 36 lesions (97%), which is suggestive of appropriate sampling. Histologic findings were malignant in 17 of the 36 lesions (47%; 95% confidence interval: 30.4%, 64.5%). Thirteen of the 17 lesions (76%; 95% confidence interval: 50.1%, 93.1%) were invasive malignancies. Twenty-two of the 36 abnormalities (61%) were either malignant or high-risk lesions (atypical ductal hyperplasia, lobular carcinoma in situ, atypical lobular hyperplasia). DBT-guided needle localization is an accurate and feasible method with which to biopsy DBT-detected suspicious architectural distortions not visualized at mammography or sonography. The high risk of malignancy in abnormalities detected only with DBT (47%) confirms that routine biopsy is required for histologic analysis. (©) RSNA,

  7. Pipeline for effective denoising of digital mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Lucas R.; Bakic, Predrag R.; Foi, Alessandro; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Vieira, Marcelo A. C.

    2017-03-01

    Denoising can be used as a tool to enhance image quality and enforce low radiation doses in X-ray medical imaging. The effectiveness of denoising techniques relies on the validity of the underlying noise model. In full-field digital mammography (FFDM) and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), calibration steps like the detector offset and flat-fielding can affect some assumptions made by most denoising techniques. Furthermore, quantum noise found in X-ray images is signal-dependent and can only be treated by specific filters. In this work we propose a pipeline for FFDM and DBT image denoising that considers the calibration steps and simplifies the modeling of the noise statistics through variance-stabilizing transformations (VST). The performance of a state-of-the-art denoising method was tested with and without the proposed pipeline. To evaluate the method, objective metrics such as the normalized root mean square error (N-RMSE), noise power spectrum, modulation transfer function (MTF) and the frequency signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were analyzed. Preliminary tests show that the pipeline improves denoising. When the pipeline is not used, bright pixels of the denoised image are under-filtered and dark pixels are over-smoothed due to the assumption of a signal-independent Gaussian model. The pipeline improved denoising up to 20% in terms of spatial N-RMSE and up to 15% in terms of frequency SNR. Besides improving the denoising, the pipeline does not increase signal smoothing significantly, as shown by the MTF. Thus, the proposed pipeline can be used with state-of-the-art denoising techniques to improve the quality of DBT and FFDM images.

  8. Design and application of a structured phantom for detection performance comparison between breast tomosynthesis and digital mammography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockmartin, L.; Marshall, N. W.; Zhang, G.; Lemmens, K.; Shaheen, E.; Van Ongeval, C.; Fredenberg, E.; Dance, D. R.; Salvagnini, E.; Michielsen, K.; Bosmans, H.

    2017-02-01

    This paper introduces and applies a structured phantom with inserted target objects for the comparison of detection performance of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) against 2D full field digital mammography (FFDM). The phantom consists of a 48 mm thick breast-shaped polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) container filled with water and PMMA spheres of different diameters. Three-dimensionally (3D) printed spiculated masses (diameter range: 3.8-9.7 mm) and non-spiculated masses (1.6-6.2 mm) along with microcalcifications (90-250 µm) were inserted as targets. Reproducibility of the phantom application was studied on a single system using 30 acquisitions. Next, the phantom was evaluated on five different combined FFDM & DBT systems and target detection was compared for FFDM and DBT modes. Ten phantom images in both FFDM and DBT modes were acquired on these 5 systems using automatic exposure control. Five readers evaluated target detectability. Images were read with the four-alternative forced-choice (4-AFC) paradigm, with always one segment including a target and 3 normal background segments. The percentage of correct responses (PC) was assessed based on 10 trials of each reader for each object type, size and imaging modality. Additionally, detection threshold diameters at 62.5 PC were assessed via non-linear regression fitting of the psychometric curve. The reproducibility study showed no significant differences in PC values. Evaluation of target detection in FFDM showed that microcalcification detection thresholds ranged between 110 and 118 µm and were similar compared to the detection in DBT (range of 106-158 µm). In DBT, detection of both mass types increased significantly (p  =  0.0001 and p  =  0.0002 for non-spiculated and spiculated masses respectively) compared to FFDM, achieving almost 100% detection for all spiculated mass diameters. In conclusion, a structured phantom with inserted targets was able to show evidence for detectability

  9. Characterization of prototype full-field breast tomosynthesis by using a CMOS array coupled with a columnar CsI(Tl) scintillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jae-Gu; Choi, Young-Wook; Ham, Tae-Hee [Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hye-Suk; Kim, Ye-Seul; Kim, Hee-Joung [Yonsei University, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    We have developed a prototype full-field digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) system by using a complementary-metal-oxide semiconductive (CMOS) array coupled with a columnar CsI(Tl) scintillator. The imaging system consists of a matrix with an active detector area of 3072 x 3888 pixels and a pixel pitch of 74.8 μm. For tomosynthesis imaging, the X-ray tube is automatically rotated in 3 .deg. increments in the shoot mode to acquire projection images at 15 different angles over a ±21 .deg. angular range in less than 10 s. The digital detector is stationary during image acquisition. In this research, we also carried out evaluation studies to characterize the performance of the system in different operational modes designed for the DBT system, e.g., binning mode and the range of view angles, in terms of the modulation transfer function (MTF), the normalized noise power spectra (NNPS), and the detective quantum efficiency (DQE): The MTF value measured at the Nyquist frequency was 18.49%, the NNPS value at zero frequency was about 1.93 x 10{sup -5} (mm{sup 2}), and the maximum value of DQE was about 47.09% for the full resolution. For the pixel binning mode, the MTF decreased more than it did for the full resolution mode due to the increased effective pixel size. However, the full resolution mode was more sensitive to noise than the pixel binning mode. For the scan angle of the DBT system, oblique incidence of X-rays on a detector caused blurring that reduced resolution. These results seem to be promising for the use of the DBT system in potential clinical applications and will provide important information when comparisons with other DBT systems are made.

  10. Strategies to Increase Cancer Detection: Review of True-Positive and False-Negative Results at Digital Breast Tomosynthesis Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korhonen, Katrina E; Weinstein, Susan P; McDonald, Elizabeth S; Conant, Emily F

    2016-01-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) represents a valuable addition to breast cancer screening by decreasing recall rates while increasing cancer detection rates. The increased accuracy achieved with DBT is due to the quasi-three-dimensional format of the reconstructed images and the ability to "scroll through" breast tissue in the reconstructed images, thereby reducing the effect of tissue superimposition found with conventional planar digital mammography. The margins of both benign and malignant lesions are more conspicuous at DBT, which allows improved lesion characterization, increased reader confidence, and improved screening outcomes. However, even with the improvements in accuracy achieved with DBT, there remain differences in breast cancer conspicuity by mammographic view. Early data suggest that breast cancers may be more conspicuous on craniocaudal (CC) views than on mediolateral oblique (MLO) views. While some very laterally located breast cancers may be visualized on only the MLO view, the increased conspicuity of cancers on the CC view compared with the MLO view suggests that DBT screening should be performed with two-view imaging. Even with the improved conspicuity of lesions at DBT, there may still be false-negative studies. Subtle lesions seen on only one view may be discounted, and dense and/or complex tissue patterns may make some cancers occult or extremely difficult to detect. Therefore, radiologists should be cognizant of both perceptual and cognitive errors to avoid potential pitfalls in lesion detection and characterization. ©RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  11. [Digital TV tomosynthesis--system development, digital image processing and clinical applications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sone, S

    1990-12-25

    We have designed and developed two types of high-resolution digital X-ray TV tomosynthesis systems which incorporate an X-ray TV fluororadiographic unit with tomographic function and a digital image processor, which handles image data from the image intensifier-TV camera chain. We have studied methods of improving image quality of the tomosynthesis images and their clinical applicability. As a result of clinical application of this method, a number of advantages have already become apparent, as listed below: 1) Low patient radiation dose per examination, short examination time, and early display of the image on the CRT. 2) Reconstruction of the tomograms at any desired depth and oblique tomograms. 3) Spatial frequency filtering to improve the image quality, particularly one-dimensional spatial filtering process to reduce linear tomographic blur. 4) Digital angiotomosynthesis with and without subtraction. 5) Dual energy subtraction digital tomosynthesis. 6) Electronic storage and transmission of image data. Clinical effectiveness of this method was shown in such areas as imaging of the ear, spine and lung, angiography of the brain and abdominal organs, and arthrography.

  12. Geometry calibration between X-ray source and detector for tomosynthesis with a portable X-ray system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kohei; Ohnishi, Takashi; Sekine, Masashi; Haneishi, Hideaki

    2017-05-01

    Tomosynthesis is attracting attention as a low-dose tomography technology compared with X-ray CT. However, conventional tomosynthesis imaging devices are large and stationary. Furthermore, there is a limitation in the working range of the X-ray source during image acquisition. We have previously proposed the use of a portable X-ray device for tomosynthesis that can be used for ward rounds and emergency medicine. The weight of this device can be reduced by using a flat panel detector (FPD), and flexibility is realized by the free placement of the X-ray source and FPD. Tomosynthesis using a portable X-ray device requires calibration of the geometry between the X-ray source and detector at each image acquisition. We propose a method for geometry calibration and demonstrate tomosynthesis image reconstruction by this method. An image processing-based calibration method using an asymmetric and multilayered calibration object (AMCO) is presented. Since the AMCO is always attached to the X-ray source housing for geometry calibration, the additional setting of a calibration object or marker around or on the patients is not required. The AMCO's multilayer structure improves the calibration accuracy, especially in the out-of-plane direction. Two experiments were conducted. The first was performed to evaluate the calibration accuracy using an XY positioning stage and a gonio stage. As a result, an accuracy of approximately 1 mm was achieved both in the in-plane and out-of-plane directions. An angular accuracy of approximately [Formula: see text] was confirmed. The second experiment was conducted to evaluate the reconstructed image using a foot model phantom. Only the sagittal plane could be clearly observed with the proposed method. We proposed a tomosynthesis imaging system using a portable X-ray device. From the experimental results, the proposed method could provide sufficient calibration accuracy and a clear sagittal plane of the reconstructed tomosynthesis image.

  13. Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) to characterize MRI-detected additional lesions unidentified at targeted ultrasound in newly diagnosed breast cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariscotti, Giovanna; Durando, Manuela; Regini, Elisa; Fornari, Alberto; Fonio, Paolo; Gandini, Giovanni [Breast Imaging Service, Radiology - University of Turin, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiotherapy, A.O.U. Citta della Salute e della Scienza, Torino (Italy); Houssami, Nehmat [University of Sydney, Screening and Test Evaluation Program, School of Public Health, Sydney Medical School, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Campanino, Pier Paolo [Ospedale Koelliker, Breast Imaging Service, Torino (Italy); Bussone, Riccardo [A.O.U. Citta della Salute e della Scienza of Turin, SSCVD Breast Surgery. Department of Surgery, Torino (Italy); Castellano, Isabella; Sapino, Anna [University of Turin, Department of Biomedical Sciences and Human Oncology, A.O.U. Citta della Salute e della Scienza, Torino (Italy)

    2015-09-15

    Preoperative breast magnetic resonance (MR) often generates additional suspicious findings needing further investigations. Targeted breast ultrasound (US) is the standard tool to characterize MR additional lesions. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the potential role of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) to characterize MR detected additional findings, unidentified at targeted breast US. This prospective study included women who a) had biopsy-proven, newly diagnosed breast cancers detected at conventional 2D mammography and/or US, referred to breast MR for tumour staging; and b) had DBT if additional MR findings were not detected at targeted ('second look') US. In 520 patients, MR identified 164 (in 114 women, 22 %) additional enhancing lesions. Targeted US identified 114/164 (69.5 %) of these, whereas 50/164 (30.5 %) remained unidentified. DBT identified 32/50 of these cases, increasing the overall characterization of MR detected additional findings to 89.0 % (146/164). Using DBT the identified lesions were significantly more likely to be malignant than benign MR-detected additional lesions (p = 0.04). DBT improves the characterization of additional MR findings not identified at targeted breast US in preoperative breast cancer staging. (orig.)

  14. Digital breast tomosynthesis in one or two views as a replacement or adjunct technique to full-field digital mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svahn, T M; Houssami, N

    2015-07-01

    Clinical studies using different imaging protocols to perform digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) were reviewed (2008-14) to assess interpretive accuracy. Descriptive pooled statistics were used to estimate and summarise accuracy measures for each type of imaging protocol in relation to that of two-view full-field digital mammography (FFDM). In studies comparing multiple DBT imaging protocols, a trend of increased performance was often seen when including both the mediolateral oblique and craniocaudal views for DBT alone and even more so for DBT adjunct to FFDM. Overall, the average ΔAUC (%; sd) across studies for stand-alone DBT (relative to FFDM), in one and in two views, were 2.2 (± 3.7) and 5.9 (± 4.6), and when used together with FFDM, 3.9 (± 2.0) and 6.7 (± 0.9). With respect to individual studies, improvements in accuracy using DBT were present for different types of imaging protocols although the magnitude of the impact varied between studies, and some studies did not show significant improvements in comparison with FFDM. The most consistent effect of improvement in breast cancer detection was seen across studies for two-view DBT with FFDM. These summary findings may depend on the sampling constraints present in tomosynthesis imaging and on other factors discussed in this paper. In order to investigate these effects more thoroughly and how they might impact outcomes, comparative or randomized-controlled trials are warranted. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Segmented separable footprint projector for digital breast tomosynthesis and its application for subpixel reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jiabei; Fessler, Jeffrey A; Chan, Heang-Ping

    2017-03-01

    Digital forward and back projectors play a significant role in iterative image reconstruction. The accuracy of the projector affects the quality of the reconstructed images. Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) often uses the ray-tracing (RT) projector that ignores finite detector element size. This paper proposes a modified version of the separable footprint (SF) projector, called the segmented separable footprint (SG) projector, that calculates efficiently the Radon transform mean value over each detector element. The SG projector is specifically designed for DBT reconstruction because of the large height-to-width ratio of the voxels generally used in DBT. This study evaluates the effectiveness of the SG projector in reducing projection error and improving DBT reconstruction quality. We quantitatively compared the projection error of the RT and the SG projector at different locations and their performance in regular and subpixel DBT reconstruction. Subpixel reconstructions used finer voxels in the imaged volume than the detector pixel size. Subpixel reconstruction with RT projector uses interpolated projection views as input to provide adequate coverage of the finer voxel grid with the traced rays. Subpixel reconstruction with the SG projector, however, uses the measured projection views without interpolation. We simulated DBT projections of a test phantom using CatSim (GE Global Research, Niskayuna, NY) under idealized imaging conditions without noise and blur, to analyze the effects of the projectors and subpixel reconstruction without other image degrading factors. The phantom contained an array of horizontal and vertical line pair patterns (1 to 9.5 line pairs/mm) and pairs of closely spaced spheres (diameters 0.053 to 0.5 mm) embedded at the mid-plane of a 5-cm-thick breast tissue-equivalent uniform volume. The images were reconstructed with regular simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART) and subpixel SART using different projectors. The

  16. Breast tomosynthesis and digital mammography: a comparison of breast cancer visibility and BIRADS classification in a population of cancers with subtle mammographic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Ingvar; Zackrisson, Sophia [Malmoe University Hospital, Diagnostic Centre of Imaging and Functional Medicine, Malmoe (Sweden); Ikeda, Debra M. [Stanford University, Stanford Advanced Medicine Center, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States); Ruschin, Mark [Lund University, Malmoe University Hospital, Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Malmoe (Sweden); University Health Network/Princess Margaret Hospital, Department of Radiation Physics, Toronto, ON (Canada); Svahn, Tony; Timberg, Pontus; Tingberg, Anders [Lund University, Malmoe University Hospital, Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Malmoe (Sweden)

    2008-12-15

    The main purpose was to compare breast cancer visibility in one-view breast tomosynthesis (BT) to cancer visibility in one- or two-view digital mammography (DM). Thirty-six patients were selected on the basis of subtle signs of breast cancer on DM. One-view BT was performed with the same compression angle as the DM image in which the finding was least/not visible. On BT, 25 projections images were acquired over an angular range of 50 degrees, with double the dose of one-view DM. Two expert breast imagers classified one- and two-view DM, and BT findings for cancer visibility and BIRADS cancer probability in a non-blinded consensus study. Forty breast cancers were found in 37 breasts. The cancers were rated more visible on BT compared to one-view and two-view DM in 22 and 11 cases, respectively, (p<0.01 for both comparisons). Comparing one-view DM to one-view BT, 21 patients were upgraded on BIRADS classification (p<0.01). Comparing two-view DM to one-view BT, 12 patients were upgraded on BIRADS classification (p<0.01). The results indicate that the cancer visibility on BT is superior to DM, which suggests that BT may have a higher sensitivity for breast cancer detection. (orig.)

  17. Digital breast tomosynthesis for detecting multifocal and multicentric breast cancer: influence of acquisition geometry on model observer performance in breast phantom images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Gezheng; Park, Subok; Markey, Mia K.

    2017-03-01

    Multifocal and multicentric breast cancer (MFMC), i.e., the presence of two or more tumor foci within the same breast, has an immense clinical impact on treatment planning and survival outcomes. Detecting multiple breast tumors is challenging as MFMC breast cancer is relatively uncommon, and human observers do not know the number or locations of tumors a priori. Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), in which an x-ray beam sweeps over a limited angular range across the breast, has the potential to improve the detection of multiple tumors.1, 2 However, prior efforts to optimize DBT image quality only considered unifocal breast cancers (e.g.,3-9), so the recommended geometries may not necessarily yield images that are informative for the task of detecting MFMC. Hence, the goal of this study is to employ a 3D multi-lesion (ml) channelized-Hotelling observer (CHO) to identify optimal DBT acquisition geometries for MFMC. Digital breast phantoms and simulated DBT scanners of different geometries (e.g., wide or narrow arc scans, different number of projections in each scan) were used to generate image data for the simulation study. Multiple 3D synthetic lesions were inserted into different breast regions to simulate MF cases and MC cases. 3D partial least squares (PLS) channels, and 3D Laguerre-Gauss (LG) channels were estimated to capture discriminant information and correlations among signals in locally varying anatomical backgrounds, enabling the model observer to make both image-level and location-specific detection decisions. The 3D ml-CHO with PLS channels outperformed that with LG channels in this study. The simulated MC cases and MC cases were not equally difficult for the ml-CHO to detect across the different simulated DBT geometries considered in this analysis. Also, the results suggest that the optimal design of DBT may vary as the task of clinical interest changes, e.g., a geometry that is better for finding at least one lesion may be worse for counting the

  18. Identification of error making patterns in lesion detection on digital breast tomosynthesis using computer-extracted image features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mengyu; Zhang, Jing; Grimm, Lars J.; Ghate, Sujata V.; Walsh, Ruth; Johnson, Karen S.; Lo, Joseph Y.; Mazurowski, Maciej A.

    2016-03-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) can improve lesion visibility by eliminating the issue of overlapping breast tissue present in mammography. However, this new modality likely requires new approaches to training. The issue of training in DBT is not well explored. We propose a computer-aided educational approach for DBT training. Our hypothesis is that the trainees' educational outcomes will improve if they are presented with cases individually selected to address their weaknesses. In this study, we focus on the question of how to select such cases. Specifically, we propose an algorithm that based on previously acquired reading data predicts which lesions will be missed by the trainee for future cases (i.e., we focus on false negative error). A logistic regression classifier was used to predict the likelihood of trainee error and computer-extracted features were used as the predictors. Reader data from 3 expert breast imagers was used to establish the ground truth and reader data from 5 radiology trainees was used to evaluate the algorithm performance with repeated holdout cross validation. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was applied to measure the performance of the proposed individual trainee models. The preliminary experimental results for 5 trainees showed the individual trainee models were able to distinguish the lesions that would be detected from those that would be missed with the average area under the ROC curve of 0.639 (95% CI, 0.580-0.698). The proposed algorithm can be used to identify difficult cases for individual trainees.

  19. Combination of one-view digital breast tomosynthesis with one-view digital mammography versus standard two-view digital mammography: per lesion analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennaro, Gisella; Hendrick, R Edward; Toledano, Alicia; Paquelet, Jean R; Bezzon, Elisabetta; Chersevani, Roberta; di Maggio, Cosimo; La Grassa, Manuela; Pescarini, Luigi; Polico, Ilaria; Proietti, Alessandro; Baldan, Enrica; Pomerri, Fabio; Muzzio, Pier Carlo

    2013-08-01

    To evaluate the clinical value of combining one-view mammography (cranio-caudal, CC) with the complementary view tomosynthesis (mediolateral-oblique, MLO) in comparison to standard two-view mammography (MX) in terms of both lesion detection and characterization. A free-response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) experiment was conducted independently by six breast radiologists, obtaining data from 463 breasts of 250 patients. Differences in mean lesion detection fraction (LDF) and mean lesion characterization fraction (LCF) were analysed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) to compare clinical performance of the combination of techniques to standard two-view digital mammography. The 463 cases (breasts) reviewed included 258 with one to three lesions each, and 205 with no lesions. The 258 cases with lesions included 77 cancers in 68 breasts and 271 benign lesions to give a total of 348 proven lesions. The combination, DBT(MLO)+MX(CC), was superior to MX (CC+MLO) in both lesion detection (LDF) and lesion characterization (LCF) overall and for benign lesions. DBT(MLO)+MX(CC) was non-inferior to two-view MX for malignant lesions. This study shows that readers' capabilities in detecting and characterizing breast lesions are improved by combining single-view digital breast tomosynthesis and single-view mammography compared to two-view digital mammography. • Digital breast tomosynthesis is becoming adopted as an adjunct to mammography (MX) • DBT (MLO) +MX (CC) is superior to MX (CC+MLO) in lesion detection (overall and benign lesions) • DBT (MLO) +MX (CC) is non-inferior to MX (CC+MLO) in cancer detection • DBT (MLO) +MX (CC) is superior to MX (CC+MLO) in lesion characterization (overall and benign lesions) • DBT (MLO) +MX (CC) is non-inferior to MX (CC+MLO) in characterization of malignant lesions.

  20. Optimization of phosphor-based detector design for oblique x-ray incidence in digital breast tomosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acciavatti, Raymond J.; Maidment, Andrew D. A. [Department of Radiology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: In digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), a volumetric reconstruction of the breast is generated from a limited range of x-ray projections. One trade-off of DBT is resolution loss in the projections due to non-normal (i.e., oblique) x-ray incidence. Although degradation in image quality due to oblique incidence has been studied using empirical data and Monte Carlo simulations, a theoretical treatment has been lacking. The purpose of this work is to extend Swank's calculations of the transfer functions of turbid granular phosphors to oblique incidence. The model is ultimately used as a tool for optimizing the design of DBT detectors. Methods: A quantum-limited system and 20 keV x-rays are considered. Under these assumptions, the modulation transfer function (MTF) and noise power spectra (NPS) are derived using the diffusion approximation to the Boltzmann equation to model optical scatter within the phosphor. This approach is applicable to a nonstructured scintillator such as gadolinium oxysulfide doped with terbium (Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Tb), which is commonly used in breast imaging and which can reasonably approximate other detector materials. The detective quantum efficiency (DQE) is then determined from the Nishikawa formulation, where it is written as the product of the x-ray quantum detection efficiency, the Swank factor, and the Lubberts fraction. Transfer functions are calculated for both front- and back-screen configurations, which differ by positioning the photocathode at the exit or entrance point of the x-ray beam, respectively. Results: In the front-screen configuration, MTF and DQE are found to have considerable angular dependence, while NPS is shown to vary minimally with projection angle. As expected, the high frequency MTF and DQE are degraded substantially at large angles. By contrast, all transfer functions for the back-screen configuration have the advantage of significantly less angular dependence. Using these models, we investigated the

  1. Towards standardization of x-ray beam filters in digital mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis: Monte Carlo simulations and analytical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Suman; Vedantham, Srinivasan; Karellas, Andrew

    2017-03-01

    In digital breast tomosynthesis and digital mammography, the x-ray beam filter material and thickness vary between systems. Replacing K-edge filters with Al was investigated with the intent to reduce exposure duration and to simplify system design. Tungsten target x-ray spectra were simulated with K-edge filters (50 µm Rh; 50 µm Ag) and Al filters of varying thickness. Monte Carlo simulations were conducted to quantify the x-ray scatter from various filters alone, scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR) with compressed breasts, and to determine the radiation dose to the breast. These data were used to analytically compute the signal-difference-to-noise ratio (SDNR) at unit (1 mGy) mean glandular dose (MGD) for W/Rh and W/Ag spectra. At SDNR matched between K-edge and Al filtered spectra, the reductions in exposure duration and MGD were quantified for three strategies: (i) fixed Al thickness and matched tube potential in kilovolts (kV); (ii) fixed Al thickness and varying the kV to match the half-value layer (HVL) between Al and K-edge filtered spectra; and, (iii) matched kV and varying the Al thickness to match the HVL between Al and K-edge filtered spectra. Monte Carlo simulations indicate that the SPR with and without the breast were not different between Al and K-edge filters. Modelling for fixed Al thickness (700 µm) and kV matched to K-edge filtered spectra, identical SDNR was achieved with 37-57% reduction in exposure duration and with 2-20% reduction in MGD, depending on breast thickness. Modelling for fixed Al thickness (700 µm) and HVL matched by increasing the kV over (0,4) range, identical SDNR was achieved with 62-65% decrease in exposure duration and with 2-24% reduction in MGD, depending on breast thickness. For kV and HVL matched to K-edge filtered spectra by varying Al filter thickness over (700, 880) µm range, identical SDNR was achieved with 23-56% reduction in exposure duration and 2-20% reduction in MGD, depending on breast thickness. These

  2. Towards standardization of x-ray beam filters in digital mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis: Monte Carlo simulations and analytical modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Suman; Vedantham, Srinivasan; Karellas, Andrew

    2017-03-07

    In digital breast tomosynthesis and digital mammography, the x-ray beam filter material and thickness vary between systems. Replacing K-edge filters with Al was investigated with the intent to reduce exposure duration and to simplify system design. Tungsten target x-ray spectra were simulated with K-edge filters (50 µm Rh; 50 µm Ag) and Al filters of varying thickness. Monte Carlo simulations were conducted to quantify the x-ray scatter from various filters alone, scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR) with compressed breasts, and to determine the radiation dose to the breast. These data were used to analytically compute the signal-difference-to-noise ratio (SDNR) at unit (1 mGy) mean glandular dose (MGD) for W/Rh and W/Ag spectra. At SDNR matched between K-edge and Al filtered spectra, the reductions in exposure duration and MGD were quantified for three strategies: (i) fixed Al thickness and matched tube potential in kilovolts (kV); (ii) fixed Al thickness and varying the kV to match the half-value layer (HVL) between Al and K-edge filtered spectra; and, (iii) matched kV and varying the Al thickness to match the HVL between Al and K-edge filtered spectra. Monte Carlo simulations indicate that the SPR with and without the breast were not different between Al and K-edge filters. Modelling for fixed Al thickness (700 µm) and kV matched to K-edge filtered spectra, identical SDNR was achieved with 37-57% reduction in exposure duration and with 2-20% reduction in MGD, depending on breast thickness. Modelling for fixed Al thickness (700 µm) and HVL matched by increasing the kV over (0,4) range, identical SDNR was achieved with 62-65% decrease in exposure duration and with 2-24% reduction in MGD, depending on breast thickness. For kV and HVL matched to K-edge filtered spectra by varying Al filter thickness over (700, 880) µm range, identical SDNR was achieved with 23-56% reduction in exposure duration and 2-20% reduction in MGD, depending on breast thickness. These

  3. Combination of one-view digital breast tomosynthesis with one-view digital mammography versus standard two-view digital mammography: per lesion analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gennaro, Gisella; Bezzon, Elisabetta; Pescarini, Luigi; Polico, Ilaria; Proietti, Alessandro; Baldan, Enrica; Pomerri, Fabio; Muzzio, Pier Carlo [Veneto Institute of Oncology (IRCCS), Padua (Italy); Hendrick, R.E. [University of Colorado-Denver, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Aurora, CO (United States); Toledano, Alicia [Biostatistics Consulting, LLC, Kensington, MD (United States); Paquelet, Jean R. [Advanced Medical Imaging Consultants, Fort Collins, CO (United States); Breast Imaging, McKee Medical Center, Loveland, CO (United States); Chersevani, Roberta [Private Medical Practice, Gorizia (Italy); Di Maggio, Cosimo [Private Medical Practice, Padua (Italy); La Grassa, Manuela [Department of Radiology, Oncological Reference Center (IRCCS), Aviano (Italy)

    2013-08-15

    To evaluate the clinical value of combining one-view mammography (cranio-caudal, CC) with the complementary view tomosynthesis (mediolateral-oblique, MLO) in comparison to standard two-view mammography (MX) in terms of both lesion detection and characterization. A free-response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) experiment was conducted independently by six breast radiologists, obtaining data from 463 breasts of 250 patients. Differences in mean lesion detection fraction (LDF) and mean lesion characterization fraction (LCF) were analysed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) to compare clinical performance of the combination of techniques to standard two-view digital mammography. The 463 cases (breasts) reviewed included 258 with one to three lesions each, and 205 with no lesions. The 258 cases with lesions included 77 cancers in 68 breasts and 271 benign lesions to give a total of 348 proven lesions. The combination, DBT{sub (MLO)}+MX{sub (CC)}, was superior to MX (CC+MLO) in both lesion detection (LDF) and lesion characterization (LCF) overall and for benign lesions. DBT{sub (MLO)}+MX{sub (CC)} was non-inferior to two-view MX for malignant lesions. This study shows that readers' capabilities in detecting and characterizing breast lesions are improved by combining single-view digital breast tomosynthesis and single-view mammography compared to two-view digital mammography. (orig.)

  4. 3D computer-aided detection for digital breast tomosynthesis: Comparison with 2D computer-aided detection for digital mammography in the detection of calcifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, A Jung; Cho, Nariya; Chang, Jung Min; Kim, Won Hwa; Lee, Su Hyun; Song, Sung Eun; Shin, Sung Ui; Moon, Woo Kyung [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-15

    To retrospectively evaluate the performance of 3D computer-aided detection (CAD) for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) in the detection of calcifications in comparison with 2D CAD for digital mammography (DM). Between 2012 and 2013, both 3D CAD and 2D CAD systems were retrospectively applied to the calcification data set including 69 calcifications (31 malignant calcifications and 38 benign calcifications) and the normal data set including 20 bilateral normal mammograms. Each data set consisted of paired DBT and DM images. Sensitivities for the detection of malignant calcifications were calculated from the calcification data set. False-positive mark rates were calculated from the normal data set. They were compared between the two systems. Sensitivities of 3D CAD [100% (31/31) at levels 2, 1, and 0] were same as those of the 2D CAD system [100% (31/31) at levels 2 and 1] (p = 1.0, respectively). The mean value of false-positive marks per view with 3D CAD was higher than that with 2D CAD at level 2 (0.52 marks ± 0.91 vs. 0.07 marks ± 0.26, p = 0.009). 3D CAD for DBT showed equivalent sensitivity, albeit with a higher false-positive mark rate, than 2D CAD for DM in the detection of calcifications.

  5. Improvement of image performance in digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) by incorporating a compressed-sensing (CS)-based deblurring scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyuseok; Park, Yeonok; Cho, Heemoon; Cho, Hyosung; Je, Uikyu; Park, Chulkyu; Lim, Hyunwoo; Park, Soyoung; Woo, Taeho; Choi, Sungil

    2016-10-01

    In this work, we investigated a compressed-sensing (CS)-based deblurring scheme incorporated with the total-variation (TV) regularization penalty for image deblurring of high accuracy and adopted it into the image reconstruction in conventional digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). We implemented the proposed algorithm and performed a systematic simulation to demonstrate its viability for improving the image performance in DBT as well as two-dimensional (2D) mammography. In the simulation, blurred noisy projection images of a 3D numerical breast phantom were generated by convolving their original (or exact) version by a designed 2D Gaussian filter kernel (standard deviation=2 in pixel unit, kernel size=11×11), followed by adding Gaussian noise (mean=0, variance=0.05), and deblurred by using the algorithm before performing the DBT reconstruction procedure. Here the projection images were taken with a half tomographic angle of θ=20° and an angle step of Δθ=2°. We investigated the image performance of the reconstructed DBT images quantitatively in terms of the modulation and the slice-sensitive profile (SSP).

  6. Comparison of model-observer and human-observer performance for breast tomosynthesis: effect of reconstruction and acquisition parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Mini; Gifford, Howard C.

    2011-03-01

    The problem of optimizing the acquisition and reconstruction parameters for breast-cancer detection with digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is becoming increasingly important due to the potential of DBT for clinical screening. Ideally, one wants a set of parameters suitable for both microcalcification (MC) and mass detection that specifies the lowest possible radiation dose to the patient. Attacking this multiparametric optimization problem using human-observer studies (which are the gold standard) would be very expensive. On the other hand, there are numerous limitations to having existing mathematical model observers as replacements. Our aim is to develop a model observer that can reliably mimic human observers at clinically realistic DBT detection tasks. In this paper, we present a novel visual-search (VS) model observer for MC detection and localization. Validation of this observer against human data was carried out in a study with simulated DBT test images. Radiation dose was a study parameter, with tested acquisition levels of 0.7, 1.0 and 1.5 mGy. All test images were reconstructed with a penalized-maximum-likelihood reconstruction method. Good agreement at all three dose levels was obtained between the VS and human observers. We believe that this new model observer has the potential to take the field of image-quality research in a new direction with a number of practical clinical ramifications.

  7. Comparing search patterns in digital breast tomosynthesis and full-field digital mammography: an eye tracking study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizenman, Avi; Drew, Trafton; Ehinger, Krista A; Georgian-Smith, Dianne; Wolfe, Jeremy M

    2017-10-01

    As a promising imaging modality, digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) leads to better diagnostic performance than traditional full-field digital mammograms (FFDM) alone. DBT allows different planes of the breast to be visualized, reducing occlusion from overlapping tissue. Although DBT is gaining popularity, best practices for search strategies in this medium are unclear. Eye tracking allowed us to describe search patterns adopted by radiologists searching DBT and FFDM images. Eleven radiologists examined eight DBT and FFDM cases. Observers marked suspicious masses with mouse clicks. Eye position was recorded at 1000 Hz and was coregistered with slice/depth plane as the radiologist scrolled through the DBT images, allowing a 3-D representation of eye position. Hit rate for masses was higher for tomography cases than 2-D cases and DBT led to lower false positive rates. However, search duration was much longer for DBT cases than FFDM. DBT was associated with longer fixations but similar saccadic amplitude compared with FFDM. When comparing radiologists' eye movements to a previous study, which tracked eye movements as radiologists read chest CT, we found DBT viewers did not align with previously identified "driller" or "scanner" strategies, although their search strategy most closely aligns with a type of vigorous drilling strategy.

  8. Assessment of disease extent on contrast-enhanced MRI in breast cancer detected at digital breast tomosynthesis versus digital mammography alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudgar, A V; Conant, E F; Weinstein, S P; Keller, B M; Synnestvedt, M; Yamartino, P; McDonald, E S

    2017-07-01

    To compare the utility of breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in determining the extent of disease in patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer detected on combination digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) versus digital screening mammography (DM). Review of 24,563 DBT-screened patients and 10,751 DM-screened patients was performed. Two hundred and thirty-five DBT patients underwent subsequent MRI examinations; 82 to determine extent of disease after newly diagnosed breast cancer. Eighty-three DM patients underwent subsequent MRI examinations; 23 to determine extent of disease. MRI examinations performed to assess disease extent were considered true positives if additional disease was discovered in the contralateral breast or >2 cm away from the index malignancy. Differences in cancer subtypes and MRI outcomes between the DM and DBT cohorts were compared using chi-squared tests and post-hoc Bonferroni-adjusted tests for equal proportions. No differences in cancer subtype findings were observed between the two cohorts; however, MRI outcomes were found to differ between the DBT and DM cohorts (p=0.024). Specifically, the DBT cohort had significantly (p=0.013) fewer true-positive findings (7/82, 8.5%) than did the DM cohort (7/23; 30%), whereas the false-positive rate was similar between the cohorts (not statistically significant). When stratifying by breast density, this difference in true-positive rates was primarily observed when evaluating women with non-dense breasts (p=0.001). In both the DM- and DBT-screened populations with new cancer diagnoses, MRI is able to detect additional cancer; however, in those patients who have DBT screen-detected cancers the positive impact of preoperative MRI is diminished, particularly in those women with non-dense breasts. Copyright © 2017 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Evaluation of the image quality in digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) employed with a compressed-sensing (CS)-based reconstruction algorithm by using the mammographic accreditation phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yeonok; Cho, Heemoon; Je, Uikyu; Cho, Hyosung; Park, Chulkyu; Lim, Hyunwoo; Kim, Kyuseok; Kim, Guna; Park, Soyoung; Woo, Taeho; Choi, Sungil

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we have developed a prototype digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) system which mainly consists of an x-ray generator (28 kVp, 7 mA s), a CMOS-type flat-panel detector (70-μm pixel size, 230.5×339 mm2 active area), and a rotational arm to move the x-ray generator in an arc. We employed a compressed-sensing (CS)-based reconstruction algorithm, rather than a common filtered-backprojection (FBP) one, for more accurate DBT reconstruction. Here the CS is a state-of-the-art mathematical theory for solving the inverse problems, which exploits the sparsity of the image with substantially high accuracy. We evaluated the reconstruction quality in terms of the detectability, the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and the slice-sensitive profile (SSP) by using the mammographic accreditation phantom (Model 015, CIRS Inc.) and compared it to the FBP-based quality. The CS-based algorithm yielded much better image quality, preserving superior image homogeneity, edge sharpening, and cross-plane resolution, compared to the FBP-based one.

  10. The diagnostic accuracy of dual-view digital mammography, single-view breast tomosynthesis and a dual-view combination of breast tomosynthesis and digital mammography in a free-response observer performance study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svahn, T; Andersson, I; Chakraborty, D; Svensson, S; Ikeda, D; Förnvik, D; Mattsson, S; Tingberg, A; Zackrisson, S

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of dual-view digital mammography (DM), single-view breast tomosynthesis (BT) and BT combined with the opposite DM view. Patients with subtle lesions were selected to undergo BT examinations. Two radiologists who are non-participants in the study and have experience in using DM and BT determined the locations and extents of lesions in the images. Five expert mammographers interpreted the cases using the free-response paradigm. The task was to mark and rate clinically reportable findings suspicious for malignancy and clinically relevant benign findings. The marks were scored with reference to the outlined regions into lesion localization or non-lesion localization, and analysed by the jackknife alternative free-response receiver operating characteristic method. The analysis yielded statistically significant differences between the combined modality and dual-view DM (p < 0.05). No differences were found between single-view BT and dual-view DM or between single-view BT and the combined modality.

  11. Improving image quality for digital breast tomosynthesis: an automated detection and diffusion-based method for metal artifact reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yao; Chan, Heang-Ping; Wei, Jun; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Samala, Ravi K.

    2017-10-01

    In digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), the high-attenuation metallic clips marking a previous biopsy site in the breast cause errors in the estimation of attenuation along the ray paths intersecting the markers during reconstruction, which result in interplane and inplane artifacts obscuring the visibility of subtle lesions. We proposed a new metal artifact reduction (MAR) method to improve image quality. Our method uses automatic detection and segmentation to generate a marker location map for each projection (PV). A voting technique based on the geometric correlation among different PVs is designed to reduce false positives (FPs) and to label the pixels on the PVs and the voxels in the imaged volume that represent the location and shape of the markers. An iterative diffusion method replaces the labeled pixels on the PVs with estimated tissue intensity from the neighboring regions while preserving the original pixel values in the neighboring regions. The inpainted PVs are then used for DBT reconstruction. The markers are repainted on the reconstructed DBT slices for radiologists’ information. The MAR method is independent of reconstruction techniques or acquisition geometry. For the training set, the method achieved 100% success rate with one FP in 19 views. For the test set, the success rate by view was 97.2% for core biopsy microclips and 66.7% for clusters of large post-lumpectomy markers with a total of 10 FPs in 58 views. All FPs were large dense benign calcifications that also generated artifacts if they were not corrected by MAR. For the views with successful detection, the metal artifacts were reduced to a level that was not visually apparent in the reconstructed slices. The visibility of breast lesions obscured by the reconstruction artifacts from the metallic markers was restored.

  12. Performance comparison of single-view digital breast tomosynthesis plus single-view digital mammography with two-view digital mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gennaro, Gisella; Pescarini, Luigi; Polico, Ilaria; Proietti, Alessandro; Baldan, Enrica; Bezzon, Elisabetta; Pomerri, Fabio; Muzzio, Pier Carlo [Veneto Institute of Oncology (IOV)-IRCCS, Padua (Italy); Hendrick, R.E. [University of Colorado-Denver, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Aurora, CO (United States); Ruppel, Patricia [Innovative Analytics, Kalamazoo, MI (United States); Chersevani, Roberta [Private Clinical Practice, Gorizia (Italy); Di Maggio, Cosimo [Private Clinical Practice, Padua (Italy); La Grassa, Manuela [Oncological Reference Center (CRO)-IRCCS, Aviano, (Pordenone) (Italy)

    2013-03-15

    To determine the performance of combined single-view mediolateral oblique (MLO) digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) plus single-view cranio-caudal (CC) mammography (MX) compared with that of standard two-view digital mammography. A multi-reader multi-case (MRMC) receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) study was conducted, involving six breast radiologists. Two hundred fifty patients underwent bilateral MX and DBT imaging. MX and DBT images with the adjunct of the CC-MX view from 469 breasts were evaluated and rated independently by six readers. Differences in mean areas under the ROC curves (AUCs), mean sensitivity and mean specificity were analysed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) to assess clinical performance. The combined technique was found to be non-inferior to standard two-view mammography (MX{sub (CC+MLO)}) in mean AUC (difference: +0.021;95 % LCL = -0.011), but was not statistically significant for superiority (P = 0.197). The combined technique had equivalent sensitivity to standard mammography (76.2 % vs. 72.8 %, P = 0.269) and equivalent specificity (84.9 % vs. 83.0 %, P = 0.130). Specificity for benign lesions was significantly higher with the combination of techniques versus mammography (45.6 % vs. 36.8 %, P = 0.002). In this enriched study population, the combination of single-view MLO tomosynthesis plus single-view CC mammography was non-inferior to that of standard two-view digital mammography in terms of ROC curve area, sensitivity and specificity. circle Breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has emerged as a valuable adjunct to mammography (MX). (orig.)

  13. Average glandular dose in paired digital mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis acquisitions in a population based screening program: effects of measuring breast density, air kerma and beam quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helge Østerås, Bjørn; Skaane, Per; Gullien, Randi; Catrine Trægde Martinsen, Anne

    2018-02-01

    The main purpose was to compare average glandular dose (AGD) for same-compression digital mammography (DM) and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) acquisitions in a population based screening program, with and without breast density stratification, as determined by automatically calculated breast density (Quantra™). Secondary, to compare AGD estimates based on measured breast density, air kerma and half value layer (HVL) to DICOM metadata based estimates. AGD was estimated for 3819 women participating in the screening trial. All received craniocaudal and mediolateral oblique views of each breasts with paired DM and DBT acquisitions. Exposure parameters were extracted from DICOM metadata. Air kerma and HVL were measured for all beam qualities used to acquire the mammograms. Volumetric breast density was estimated using Quantra™. AGD was estimated using the Dance model. AGD reported directly from the DICOM metadata was also assessed. Mean AGD was 1.74 and 2.10 mGy for DM and DBT, respectively. Mean DBT/DM AGD ratio was 1.24. For fatty breasts: mean AGD was 1.74 and 2.27 mGy for DM and DBT, respectively. For dense breasts: mean AGD was 1.73 and 1.79 mGy, for DM and DBT, respectively. For breasts of similar thickness, dense breasts had higher AGD for DM and similar AGD for DBT. The DBT/DM dose ratio was substantially lower for dense compared to fatty breasts (1.08 versus 1.33). The average c-factor was 1.16. Using previously published polynomials to estimate glandularity from thickness underestimated the c-factor by 5.9% on average. Mean AGD error between estimates based on measurements (air kerma and HVL) versus DICOM header data was 3.8%, but for one mammography unit as high as 7.9%. Mean error of using the AGD value reported in the DICOM header was 10.7 and 13.3%, respectively. Thus, measurement of breast density, radiation dose and beam quality can substantially affect AGD estimates.

  14. Optimizing viewing procedures of breast tomosynthesis image volumes using eye tracking combined with a free response human observer study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lång, Kristina; Zackrisson, Sophia; Holmqvist, Kenneth; Nystrom, Marcus; Andersson, Ingvar; Förnvik, Daniel; Tingberg, Anders; Timberg, Pontus

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate four different viewing procedures as part of improving viewing conditions of breast tomosynthesis (BT) image volumes. The procedures consisted of free scroll volume browsing, and a combination of initial cine loops at three different frame rates (9, 14 and 25 fps) terminated upon request followed by free scroll volume browsing. Fifty-five normal BT image volumes in MLO view were collected. In these, simulated lesions (20 masses and 20 clusters of microcalcifications) were randomly inserted, creating four unique image sets for each procedure. Four readers interpreted the cases in a random order. Their task was to locate a lesion, mark and assign a five level confidence scale. The diagnostic accuracy was analyzed using Jackknife Free Receiver Operating Characteristics (JAFROC). Time efficiency and visual search behavior were also investigated using eye tracking. The results indicate that there was no statistically significant difference in JAFROC FOM between the different viewing procedures, however the medium cine loop speed seemed to be the preferred viewing procedure in terms of total analyze time and dwell time.

  15. X-ray induced formation of γ-H2AX foci after full-field digital mammography and digital breast-tomosynthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siegfried A Schwab

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To determine in-vivo formation of x-ray induced γ-H2AX foci in systemic blood lymphocytes of patients undergoing full-field digital mammography (FFDM and to estimate foci after FFDM and digital breast-tomosynthesis (DBT using a biological phantom model. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study complies with the Declaration of Helsinki and was performed following approval by the ethic committee of the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg. Written informed consent was obtained from every patient. For in-vivo tests, systemic blood lymphocytes were obtained from 20 patients before and after FFDM. In order to compare in-vivo post-exposure with pre-exposure foci levels, the Wilcoxon matched pairs test was used. For in-vitro experiments, isolated blood lymphocytes from healthy volunteers were irradiated at skin and glandular level of a porcine breast using FFDM and DBT. Cells were stained against the phosphorylated histone variant γ-H2AX, and foci representing distinct DNA damages were quantified. RESULTS: Median in-vivo foci level/cell was 0.086 (range 0.067-0.116 before and 0.094 (0.076-0.126 after FFDM (p = 0.0004. In the in-vitro model, the median x-ray induced foci level/cell after FFDM was 0.120 (range 0.086-0.140 at skin level and 0.035 (range 0.030-0.050 at glandular level. After DBT, the median x-ray induced foci level/cell was 0.061 (range 0.040-0.081 at skin level and 0.015 (range 0.006-0.020 at glandular level. CONCLUSION: In patients, mammography induces a slight but significant increase of γ-H2AX foci in systemic blood lymphocytes. The introduced biological phantom model is suitable for the estimation of x-ray induced DNA damages in breast tissue in different breast imaging techniques.

  16. Comparison of effects of dose on image quality in digital breast tomosynthesis across multiple vendors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Amy; Santana, Maira; Samei, Ehsan; Lo, Joseph

    2017-03-01

    In traditional radiography and computed tomography (CT), contrast is an important measure of image quality that, in theory, does not vary with dose. While increasing dose may increase the overall contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), the contrast in an image should be primarily dependent on variation in tissue density and attenuation. We investigated the behavior of all three currently FDA-approved vendors' 3D DBT systems (Siemens, Hologic, and General Electric (GE)) using the Computerized Imaging Reference Systems (CIRS) Model 011A Breast Phantom and found that for both Siemens and Hologic systems, contrast increased with dose across multiple repeated trials. For these two systems, experimental CNR also appeared to increase above the expected CNR, which suggests that these systems seem to have introduced post-processing by manipulation of contrast, and thus DBT data cannot be used to reliably quantify tissue characteristics. Additional experimentation with both 2D mammography and 3D DBT systems from GE in addition to the previously mentioned vendors, however, suggested that this relationship is not true for all systems. An initial comparison of contrast vs. dose showed no relationship between contrast and dose for 2D mammography, with the contrast remaining relatively constant in the dose range of 33% of the automatic exposure control setting (AEC) to 300% AEC for all three vendors. The GE DBT system also did not exhibit increased contrast with increased dose, suggesting that the behavior of 3D DBT systems is vendor-specific.

  17. Digital Breast Tomosynthesis: Cost-Effectiveness of Using Private and Medicare Insurance in Community-Based Health Care Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Sara A; Morris, Colleen; Nelson, Karl; Snyder, Brandon J; Poulton, Thomas B

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a cost-effective alternative to full-field digital mammography (FFDM) for both Medicare and privately insured patients undergoing screening mammography. A retrospective data analysis was performed between July 15, 2013, and July 14, 2014, with data on women presenting for screening mammography that included any additional radiologic workup (n = 6319). Patients chose to undergo DBT or FFDM on the basis of personal preference, physician suggestion, and cost difference. The summation of findings over the 1-year period were used to calculate recall rates, cancer detection rates, and billing costs for a regional private insurer and Medicare. Data from the 6319 patients who participated were divided: 3655 patients underwent DBT, and 2664 underwent FFDM during the year of screening. Private insurance billing cost $2.9 million, and Medicare cost $1.2 million for screening, follow-up imaging, and radiologic procedures. Per-person costs were approximately $40 higher for the DBT group using both forms of insurance. However, cost per cancer detected was lower in the DBT group for both private and governmental insurance, leading to potentially $3.7 million and $899,000 saved per 100 cancers found. After standardization of the difference in cancer detection rates between the two groups, DBT was a cost-equivalent alternative to FFDM for private insurance billing but was a cost-inefficient alternative with respect to Medicare costs. In a community-based setting, DBT is a cost-equivalent or potentially cost-effective alternative to FFDM and has the capacity for improving cancer detection and recall rates.

  18. The TOMMY trial: a comparison of TOMosynthesis with digital MammographY in the UK NHS Breast Screening Programme--a multicentre retrospective reading study comparing the diagnostic performance of digital breast tomosynthesis and digital mammography with digital mammography alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Fiona J; Tucker, Lorraine; Gillan, Maureen Gc; Willsher, Paula; Cooke, Julie; Duncan, Karen A; Michell, Michael J; Dobson, Hilary M; Lim, Yit Yoong; Purushothaman, Hema; Strudley, Celia; Astley, Susan M; Morrish, Oliver; Young, Kenneth C; Duffy, Stephen W

    2015-01-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a three-dimensional mammography technique with the potential to improve accuracy by improving differentiation between malignant and non-malignant lesions. The objectives of the study were to compare the diagnostic accuracy of DBT in conjunction with two-dimensional (2D) mammography or synthetic 2D mammography, against standard 2D mammography and to determine if DBT improves the accuracy of detection of different types of lesions. Women (aged 47-73 years) recalled for further assessment after routine breast screening and women (aged 40-49 years) with moderate/high of risk of developing breast cancer attending annual mammography screening were recruited after giving written informed consent. All participants underwent a two-view 2D mammography of both breasts and two-view DBT imaging. Image-processing software generated a synthetic 2D mammogram from the DBT data sets. In an independent blinded retrospective study, readers reviewed (1) 2D or (2) 2D + DBT or (3) synthetic 2D + DBT images for each case without access to original screening mammograms or prior examinations. Sensitivities and specificities were calculated for each reading arm and by subgroup analyses. Data were available for 7060 subjects comprising 6020 (1158 cancers) assessment cases and 1040 (two cancers) family history screening cases. Overall sensitivity was 87% [95% confidence interval (CI) 85% to 89%] for 2D only, 89% (95% CI 87% to 91%) for 2D + DBT and 88% (95% CI 86% to 90%) for synthetic 2D + DBT. The difference in sensitivity between 2D and 2D + DBT was of borderline significance (p = 0.07) and for synthetic 2D + DBT there was no significant difference (p = 0.6). Specificity was 58% (95% CI 56% to 60%) for 2D, 69% (95% CI 67% to 71%) for 2D + DBT and 71% (95% CI 69% to 73%) for synthetic 2D + DBT. Specificity was significantly higher in both DBT reading arms for all subgroups of age, density and dominant radiological

  19. Temporal Subtraction of Digital Breast Tomosynthesis Images for Improved Mass Detection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Christina M

    2007-01-01

    .... The purpose of this project is to determine the feasibility of using temporal subtraction on DBT phantom images to allow for easier and earlier detection of breast cancer than with either technique alone...

  20. Comparative evaluation of average glandular dose and breast cancer detection between single-view digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) plus single-view digital mammography (DM) and two-view DM: correlation with breast thickness and density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Sung Ui; Chang, Jung Min; Bae, Min Sun; Lee, Su Hyun; Cho, Nariya; Seo, Mirinae; Kim, Won Hwa; Moon, Woo Kyung [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    To compare the average glandular dose (AGD) and diagnostic performance of mediolateral oblique (MLO) digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) plus cranio-caudal (CC) digital mammography (DM) with two-view DM, and to evaluate the correlation of AGD with breast thickness and density. MLO and CC DM and DBT images of both breasts were obtained in 149 subjects. AGDs of DBT and DM per exposure were recorded, and their correlation with breast thickness and density were evaluated. Paired data of MLO DBT plus CC DM and two-view DM were reviewed for presence of malignancy in a jack-knife alternative free-response ROC (JAFROC) method. The AGDs of both DBT and DM, and differences in AGD between DBT and DM (ΔAGD), were correlated with breast thickness and density. The average JAFROC figure of merit (FOM) was significantly higher on the combined technique than two-view DM (P = 0.005). In dense breasts, the FOM and sensitivity of the combined technique was higher than that of two-view DM (P = 0.003) with small ΔAGD. MLO DBT plus CC DM provided higher diagnostic performance than two-view DM in dense breasts with a small increase in AGD. (orig.)

  1. X-ray digital intra-oral tomosynthesis for quasi-three-dimensional imaging: system, reconstruction algorithm, and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liang; Chen, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Ziran; Wu, Dufan

    2013-01-01

    At present, there are mainly three x-ray imaging modalities for dental clinical diagnosis: radiography, panorama and computed tomography (CT). We develop a new x-ray digital intra-oral tomosynthesis (IDT) system for quasi-three-dimensional dental imaging which can be seen as an intermediate modality between traditional radiography and CT. In addition to normal x-ray tube and digital sensor used in intra-oral radiography, IDT has a specially designed mechanical device to complete the tomosynthesis data acquisition. During the scanning, the measurement geometry is such that the sensor is stationary inside the patient's mouth and the x-ray tube moves along an arc trajectory with respect to the intra-oral sensor. Therefore, the projection geometry can be obtained without any other reference objects, which makes it be easily accepted in clinical applications. We also present a compressed sensing-based iterative reconstruction algorithm for this kind of intra-oral tomosynthesis. Finally, simulation and experiment were both carried out to evaluate this intra-oral imaging modality and algorithm. The results show that IDT has its potentiality to become a new tool for dental clinical diagnosis.

  2. Evaluation of effective dose with chest digital tomosynthesis system using Monte Carlo simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dohyeon; Jo, Byungdu; Lee, Youngjin; Park, Su-Jin; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2015-03-01

    Chest digital tomosynthesis (CDT) system has recently been introduced and studied. This system offers the potential to be a substantial improvement over conventional chest radiography for the lung nodule detection and reduces the radiation dose with limited angles. PC-based Monte Carlo program (PCXMC) simulation toolkit (STUK, Helsinki, Finland) is widely used to evaluate radiation dose in CDT system. However, this toolkit has two significant limits. Although PCXMC is not possible to describe a model for every individual patient and does not describe the accurate X-ray beam spectrum, Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) simulation describes the various size of phantom for individual patient and proper X-ray spectrum. However, few studies have been conducted to evaluate effective dose in CDT system with the Monte Carlo simulation toolkit using GATE. The purpose of this study was to evaluate effective dose in virtual infant chest phantom of posterior-anterior (PA) view in CDT system using GATE simulation. We obtained the effective dose at different tube angles by applying dose actor function in GATE simulation which was commonly used to obtain the medical radiation dosimetry. The results indicated that GATE simulation was useful to estimate distribution of absorbed dose. Consequently, we obtained the acceptable distribution of effective dose at each projection. These results indicated that GATE simulation can be alternative method of calculating effective dose in CDT applications.

  3. Performance evaluation of algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) for prototype chest digital tomosynthesis (CDT) system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Haenghwa; Choi, Sunghoon; Jo, Byungdu; Kim, Hyemi; Lee, Donghoon; Kim, Dohyeon; Choi, Seungyeon; Lee, Youngjin; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2017-03-01

    Chest digital tomosynthesis (CDT) is a new 3D imaging technique that can be expected to improve the detection of subtle lung disease over conventional chest radiography. Algorithm development for CDT system is challenging in that a limited number of low-dose projections are acquired over a limited angular range. To confirm the feasibility of algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) method under variations in key imaging parameters, quality metrics were conducted using LUNGMAN phantom included grand-glass opacity (GGO) tumor. Reconstructed images were acquired from the total 41 projection images over a total angular range of +/-20°. We evaluated contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and artifacts spread function (ASF) to investigate the effect of reconstruction parameters such as number of iterations, relaxation parameter and initial guess on image quality. We found that proper value of ART relaxation parameter could improve image quality from the same projection. In this study, proper value of relaxation parameters for zero-image (ZI) and back-projection (BP) initial guesses were 0.4 and 0.6, respectively. Also, the maximum CNR values and the minimum full width at half maximum (FWHM) of ASF were acquired in the reconstructed images after 20 iterations and 3 iterations, respectively. According to the results, BP initial guess for ART method could provide better image quality than ZI initial guess. In conclusion, ART method with proper reconstruction parameters could improve image quality due to the limited angular range in CDT system.

  4. Microcalcification detectability in tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Beverly A.; Reiser, Ingrid S.; Nishikawa, Robert M.

    2008-03-01

    Microcalcifications (MCs) are an important early sign of breast cancer. In conventional mammography, MC detectability is limited primarily due to quantum noise. In tomosynthesis, a dose comparable to that delivered in one projection mammogram is divided across a number of projection views (typically ranging between 10 and 30). This potentially will reduce the detectability of MCs, if detector noise is not very low. The purpose of this study is to explore the relationship between MC detectability in the projection views and in the reconstructed image. The effect of angular range and number of angles on detectability will also be evaluated for an ideal detector. Microcalcification detectability is shown to be greater in the sinogram than in the reconstructed images. Further, the detectability is reduced when the MC is located far from the center of the breast. Also, the detectability in the projection images is dependent on the projection angle.

  5. A comparison of the accuracy of film-screen mammography, full-field digital mammography, and digital breast tomosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michell, M J; Iqbal, A; Wasan, R K; Evans, D R; Peacock, C; Lawinski, C P; Douiri, A; Wilson, R; Whelehan, P

    2012-10-01

    To measure the change in diagnostic accuracy of conventional film-screen mammography and full-field digital mammography (FFDM) with the addition of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) in women recalled for assessment following routine screening. Ethics approval for the study was granted. Women recalled for assessment following routine screening with screen-film mammography were invited to participate. Participants underwent bilateral, two-view FFDM and two-view DBT. Readers scored each lesion separately for probability of malignancy on screen-film mammography, FFDM, and then DBT. The scores were compared with the presence or absence of malignancy based on the final histopathology outcome. Seven hundred and thirty-eight women participated (93.2% recruitment rate). Following assessment 204 (26.8%) were diagnosed as malignant (147 invasive and 57 in-situ tumours), 286 (37.68%) as benign, and 269 (35.4%) as normal. The diagnostic accuracy was evaluated by using receiving operating characteristic (ROC) and measurement of area under the curve (AUC). The AUC values demonstrated a significant (p = 0.0001) improvement in the diagnostic accuracy with the addition of DBT combined with FFDM and film-screen mammography (AUC = 0.9671) when compared to FFDM plus film-screen mammography (AUC = 0.8949) and film-screen mammography alone (AUC = 0.7882). The effect was significantly greater for soft-tissue lesions [AUC was 0.9905 with the addition of DBT and AUC was 0.9201 for FFDM with film-screen mammography combined (p = 0.0001)] compared to microcalcification [with the addition of DBT (AUC = 0.7920) and for FFDM with film-screen mammography combined (AUC = 0.7843; p = 0.3182)]. The addition of DBT increases the accuracy of mammography compared to FFDM and film-screen mammography combined and film-screen mammography alone in the assessment of screen-detected soft-tissue mammographic abnormalities. Copyright © 2012 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by

  6. Automatic segmentation of mammogram and tomosynthesis images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, Dusty; Park, Sun Young

    2016-03-01

    Breast cancer is a one of the most common forms of cancer in terms of new cases and deaths both in the United States and worldwide. However, the survival rate with breast cancer is high if it is detected and treated before it spreads to other parts of the body. The most common screening methods for breast cancer are mammography and digital tomosynthesis, which involve acquiring X-ray images of the breasts that are interpreted by radiologists. The work described in this paper is aimed at optimizing the presentation of mammography and tomosynthesis images to the radiologist, thereby improving the early detection rate of breast cancer and the resulting patient outcomes. Breast cancer tissue has greater density than normal breast tissue, and appears as dense white image regions that are asymmetrical between the breasts. These irregularities are easily seen if the breast images are aligned and viewed side-by-side. However, since the breasts are imaged separately during mammography, the images may be poorly centered and aligned relative to each other, and may not properly focus on the tissue area. Similarly, although a full three dimensional reconstruction can be created from digital tomosynthesis images, the same centering and alignment issues can occur for digital tomosynthesis. Thus, a preprocessing algorithm that aligns the breasts for easy side-by-side comparison has the potential to greatly increase the speed and accuracy of mammogram reading. Likewise, the same preprocessing can improve the results of automatic tissue classification algorithms for mammography. In this paper, we present an automated segmentation algorithm for mammogram and tomosynthesis images that aims to improve the speed and accuracy of breast cancer screening by mitigating the above mentioned problems. Our algorithm uses information in the DICOM header to facilitate preprocessing, and incorporates anatomical region segmentation and contour analysis, along with a hidden Markov model (HMM) for

  7. Comparative evaluation of average glandular dose and breast cancer detection between single-view digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) plus single-view digital mammography (DM) and two-view DM: correlation with breast thickness and density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sung Ui; Chang, Jung Min; Bae, Min Sun; Lee, Su Hyun; Cho, Nariya; Seo, Mirinae; Kim, Won Hwa; Moon, Woo Kyung

    2015-01-01

    To compare the average glandular dose (AGD) and diagnostic performance of mediolateral oblique (MLO) digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) plus cranio-caudal (CC) digital mammography (DM) with two-view DM, and to evaluate the correlation of AGD with breast thickness and density. MLO and CC DM and DBT images of both breasts were obtained in 149 subjects. AGDs of DBT and DM per exposure were recorded, and their correlation with breast thickness and density were evaluated. Paired data of MLO DBT plus CC DM and two-view DM were reviewed for presence of malignancy in a jack-knife alternative free-response ROC (JAFROC) method. The AGDs of both DBT and DM, and differences in AGD between DBT and DM (ΔAGD), were correlated with breast thickness and density. The average JAFROC figure of merit (FOM) was significantly higher on the combined technique than two-view DM (P = 0.005). In dense breasts, the FOM and sensitivity of the combined technique was higher than that of two-view DM (P = 0.003) with small ΔAGD. MLO DBT plus CC DM provided higher diagnostic performance than two-view DM in dense breasts with a small increase in AGD. • DBT has higher diagnostic performance and potential to overcome limitations of DM. • Dose differences (DBT-DM, ΔAGD) were inversely correlated with breast thickness and density. • Figure of merit of MLO-DBT/CC-DM was higher than that of two-view DM. • In dense breasts, MLO-DBT/CC-DM provides better diagnostic performance with a small AGD increase.

  8. Improving digital breast tomosynthesis reading time: A pilot multi-reader, multi-case study using concurrent Computer-Aided Detection (CAD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balleyguier, Corinne; Arfi-Rouche, Julia; Levy, Laurent; Toubiana, Patrick R; Cohen-Scali, Franck; Toledano, Alicia Y; Boyer, Bruno

    2017-12-01

    Evaluate concurrent Computer-Aided Detection (CAD) with Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) to determine impact on radiologist performance and reading time. The CAD system detects and extracts suspicious masses, architectural distortions and asymmetries from DBT planes that are blended into corresponding synthetic images to form CAD-enhanced synthetic images. Review of CAD-enhanced images and navigation to corresponding planes to confirm or dismiss potential lesions allows radiologists to more quickly review DBT planes. A retrospective, crossover study with and without CAD was conducted with six radiologists who read an enriched sample of 80 DBT cases including 23 malignant lesions in 21 women. Area Under the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) Curve (AUC) compared the readings with and without CAD to determine the effect of CAD on overall interpretation performance. Sensitivity, specificity, recall rate and reading time were also assessed. Multi-reader, multi-case (MRMC) methods accounting for correlation and requiring correct lesion localization were used to analyze all endpoints. AUCs were based on a 0-100% probability of malignancy (POM) score. Sensitivity and specificity were based on BI-RADS scores, where 3 or higher was positive. Average AUC across readers without CAD was 0.854 (range: 0.785-0.891, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.769,0.939) and 0.850 (range: 0.746-0.905, 95% CI: 0.751,0.949) with CAD (95% CI for difference: -0.046,0.039), demonstrating non-inferiority of AUC. Average reduction in reading time with CAD was 23.5% (95% CI: 7.0-37.0% improvement), from an average 48.2 (95% CI: 39.1,59.6) seconds without CAD to 39.1 (95% CI: 26.2,54.5) seconds with CAD. Per-patient sensitivity was the same with and without CAD (0.865; 95% CI for difference: -0.070,0.070), and there was a small 0.022 improvement (95% CI for difference: -0.046,0.089) in per-lesion sensitivity from 0.790 without CAD to 0.812 with CAD. A slight reduction in specificity with a -0

  9. Comparative study of patient doses calculated with two methods for breast digital tomosynthesis; Estudio de los valores de dosis a pacientes en examenes de tomosintesis de mama estimados con dos metodos distintos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo, M.; Chevalier, M.; Calzado, A.; Garayo, J.; Valverde, J.

    2015-07-01

    In this study, the average glandular doses (DG) delivered in breast tomosynthesis examinations were estimated over a sample of 150 patients using two different methods. In method 1, the conversion factors air-kerma to DG used were those tabulated by Dance et al. and in method 2 were the ones from Feng et al. The protocol for the examination followed in the unit of this study consists in two views per breast, each view composed by a 2D acquisition and a tomosynthesis scan (3D). The resulting DG values from both methods present statistically significant differences (p=0.02) for the 2D modality and were similar for the 3D scan (p=0.22). The estimated median value of DG for the most frequent breasts (thicknesses between 50 and 60 mm) delivered in a single 3D acquisition is 1.7 mGy (36% and 17% higher than the value for the 2D mode estimated with each method) which lies far below the tolerances established by the Spanish Protocol Quality Control in Radiodiagnostic (2011). The total DG for a tomosynthesis examination (6.0 mGy) is a factor 2.4 higher than the dose delivered in a 2D examination with two views (method 1). (Author)

  10. Development of a prototype chest digital tomosynthesis (CDT) R/F system with fast image reconstruction using graphics processing unit (GPU) programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sunghoon; Lee, Seungwan; Lee, Haenghwa; Lee, Donghoon; Choi, Seungyeon; Shin, Jungwook; Seo, Chang-Woo; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2017-03-01

    Digital tomosynthesis offers the advantage of low radiation doses compared to conventional computed tomography (CT) by utilizing small numbers of projections ( 80) acquired over a limited angular range. It produces 3D volumetric data, although there are artifacts due to incomplete sampling. Based upon these characteristics, we developed a prototype digital tomosynthesis R/F system for applications in chest imaging. Our prototype chest digital tomosynthesis (CDT) R/F system contains an X-ray tube with high power R/F pulse generator, flat-panel detector, R/F table, electromechanical radiographic subsystems including a precise motor controller, and a reconstruction server. For image reconstruction, users select between analytic and iterative reconstruction methods. Our reconstructed images of Catphan700 and LUNGMAN phantoms clearly and rapidly described the internal structures of phantoms using graphics processing unit (GPU) programming. Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) values of the CTP682 module of Catphan700 were higher in images using a simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART) than in those using filtered back-projection (FBP) for all materials by factors of 2.60, 3.78, 5.50, 2.30, 3.70, and 2.52 for air, lung foam, low density polyethylene (LDPE), Delrin® (acetal homopolymer resin), bone 50% (hydroxyapatite), and Teflon, respectively. Total elapsed times for producing 3D volume were 2.92 s and 86.29 s on average for FBP and SART (20 iterations), respectively. The times required for reconstruction were clinically feasible. Moreover, the total radiation dose from our system (5.68 mGy) was lower than that of conventional chest CT scan. Consequently, our prototype tomosynthesis R/F system represents an important advance in digital tomosynthesis applications.

  11. Development of a prototype chest digital tomosynthesis (CDT) R/F system with fast image reconstruction using graphics processing unit (GPU) programming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Sunghoon, E-mail: choi.sh@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Radiological Science, College of Health Science, Yonsei University, 1 Yonseidae-gil, Wonju, Gangwon-do 220-710 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seungwan [Department of Radiological Science, College of Medical Science, Konyang University, 158 Gwanjeodong-ro, Daejeon, 308-812 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Haenghwa [Department of Radiological Science, College of Health Science, Yonsei University, 1 Yonseidae-gil, Wonju, Gangwon-do 220-710 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Donghoon; Choi, Seungyeon [Department of Radiation Convergence Engineering, College of Health Science, Yonsei University, 1 Yonseidae-gil, Wonju, Gangwon-do 220-710 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Jungwook [LISTEM Corporation, 94 Donghwagongdan-ro, Munmak-eup, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Chang-Woo [Department of Radiological Science, College of Health Science, Yonsei University, 1 Yonseidae-gil, Wonju, Gangwon-do 220-710 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hee-Joung, E-mail: hjk1@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Radiological Science, College of Health Science, Yonsei University, 1 Yonseidae-gil, Wonju, Gangwon-do 220-710 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Convergence Engineering, College of Health Science, Yonsei University, 1 Yonseidae-gil, Wonju, Gangwon-do 220-710 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-11

    Digital tomosynthesis offers the advantage of low radiation doses compared to conventional computed tomography (CT) by utilizing small numbers of projections (~80) acquired over a limited angular range. It produces 3D volumetric data, although there are artifacts due to incomplete sampling. Based upon these characteristics, we developed a prototype digital tomosynthesis R/F system for applications in chest imaging. Our prototype chest digital tomosynthesis (CDT) R/F system contains an X-ray tube with high power R/F pulse generator, flat-panel detector, R/F table, electromechanical radiographic subsystems including a precise motor controller, and a reconstruction server. For image reconstruction, users select between analytic and iterative reconstruction methods. Our reconstructed images of Catphan700 and LUNGMAN phantoms clearly and rapidly described the internal structures of phantoms using graphics processing unit (GPU) programming. Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) values of the CTP682 module of Catphan700 were higher in images using a simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART) than in those using filtered back-projection (FBP) for all materials by factors of 2.60, 3.78, 5.50, 2.30, 3.70, and 2.52 for air, lung foam, low density polyethylene (LDPE), Delrin{sup ®} (acetal homopolymer resin), bone 50% (hydroxyapatite), and Teflon, respectively. Total elapsed times for producing 3D volume were 2.92 s and 86.29 s on average for FBP and SART (20 iterations), respectively. The times required for reconstruction were clinically feasible. Moreover, the total radiation dose from our system (5.68 mGy) was lower than that of conventional chest CT scan. Consequently, our prototype tomosynthesis R/F system represents an important advance in digital tomosynthesis applications.

  12. MO-DE-209-01: Primer On Tomosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maidment, A. [Univ Pennsylvania (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) is rapidly replacing mammography as the standard of care in breast cancer screening and diagnosis. DBT is a form of computed tomography, in which a limited set of projection images are acquired over a small angular range and reconstructed into tomographic data. The angular range varies from 15° to 50° and the number of projections varies between 9 and 25 projections, as determined by the equipment manufacturer. It is equally valid to treat DBT as the digital analog of classical tomography – that is, linear tomography. In fact, the name “tomosynthesis” stands for “synthetic tomography.” DBT shares many common features with classical tomography, including the radiographic appearance, dose, and image quality considerations. As such, both the science and practical physics of DBT systems is a hybrid between computed tomography and classical tomographic methods. In this lecture, we will explore the continuum from radiography to computed tomography to illustrate the characteristics of DBT. This lecture will consist of four presentations that will provide a complete overview of DBT, including a review of the fundamentals of DBT acquisition, a discussion of DBT reconstruction methods, an overview of dosimetry for DBT systems, and summary of the underlying image theory of DBT thereby relating image quality and dose. Learning Objectives: To understand the fundamental principles behind tomosynthesis image acquisition. To understand the fundamentals of tomosynthesis image reconstruction. To learn the determinants of image quality and dose in DBT, including measurement techniques. To learn the image theory underlying tomosynthesis, and the relationship between dose and image quality. ADM is a consultant to, and holds stock in, Real Time Tomography, LLC. ADM receives research support from Hologic Inc., Analogic Inc., and Barco NV.; ADM is a member of the Scientific Advisory Board for Gamma Medica Inc.; A. Maidment, Research Support

  13. MO-DE-209-02: Tomosynthesis Reconstruction Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mainprize, J. [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) is rapidly replacing mammography as the standard of care in breast cancer screening and diagnosis. DBT is a form of computed tomography, in which a limited set of projection images are acquired over a small angular range and reconstructed into tomographic data. The angular range varies from 15° to 50° and the number of projections varies between 9 and 25 projections, as determined by the equipment manufacturer. It is equally valid to treat DBT as the digital analog of classical tomography – that is, linear tomography. In fact, the name “tomosynthesis” stands for “synthetic tomography.” DBT shares many common features with classical tomography, including the radiographic appearance, dose, and image quality considerations. As such, both the science and practical physics of DBT systems is a hybrid between computed tomography and classical tomographic methods. In this lecture, we will explore the continuum from radiography to computed tomography to illustrate the characteristics of DBT. This lecture will consist of four presentations that will provide a complete overview of DBT, including a review of the fundamentals of DBT acquisition, a discussion of DBT reconstruction methods, an overview of dosimetry for DBT systems, and summary of the underlying image theory of DBT thereby relating image quality and dose. Learning Objectives: To understand the fundamental principles behind tomosynthesis image acquisition. To understand the fundamentals of tomosynthesis image reconstruction. To learn the determinants of image quality and dose in DBT, including measurement techniques. To learn the image theory underlying tomosynthesis, and the relationship between dose and image quality. ADM is a consultant to, and holds stock in, Real Time Tomography, LLC. ADM receives research support from Hologic Inc., Analogic Inc., and Barco NV.; ADM is a member of the Scientific Advisory Board for Gamma Medica Inc.; A. Maidment, Research Support

  14. Can horizontally oriented breast tomosynthesis image volumes or the use of a systematic search strategy improve interpretation? An eye tracking and free response human observer study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lång, Kristina; Zackrisson, Sophia; Holmqvist, Kenneth; Nyström, Marcus; Andersson, Ingvar; Förnvik, Daniel; Tingberg, Anders; Timberg, Pontus

    2011-03-01

    Our aim was to evaluate if there is a benefit in diagnostic accuracy and efficiency of viewing breast tomosynthesis (BT) image volumes presented horizontally oriented, but also to evaluate the use of a systematic search strategy where the breast is divided, and analyzed consecutively, into two sections. These image presentations were compared to regular vertical image presentation. All methods were investigated using viewing procedures consisting of free scroll volume browsing, and a combination of initial cine loops at three different frame rates (9, 14, 25 fps) terminated upon request followed by free scroll volume browsing if needed. Fifty-five normal BT image volumes in MLO view were collected. In these, simulated lesions (20 masses and 20 clusters of microcalcifications) were randomly inserted, creating four unique image sets for each procedure. Four readers interpreted the cases in a random order. Their task was to locate the lesions, mark and assign a five level confidence scale. The diagnostic accuracy was analyzed using Jackknife Free Receiver Operating Characteristics (JAFROC). Time efficiency and visual search behavior were also investigated using eye tracking. Results indicate there was no statistically significant difference in JAFROC FOM between the different image presentations, although visual search was more time efficient when viewing horizontally oriented image volumes in medium cine loops.

  15. Oblique reconstructions in tomosynthesis. II. Super-resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acciavatti, Raymond J.; Maidment, Andrew D. A. [Department of Radiology, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-4206 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: In tomosynthesis, super-resolution has been demonstrated using reconstruction planes parallel to the detector. Super-resolution allows for subpixel resolution relative to the detector. The purpose of this work is to develop an analytical model that generalizes super-resolution to oblique reconstruction planes.Methods: In a digital tomosynthesis system, a sinusoidal test object is modeled along oblique angles (i.e., “pitches”) relative to the plane of the detector in a 3D divergent-beam acquisition geometry. To investigate the potential for super-resolution, the input frequency is specified to be greater than the alias frequency of the detector. Reconstructions are evaluated in an oblique plane along the extent of the object using simple backprojection (SBP) and filtered backprojection (FBP). By comparing the amplitude of the reconstruction against the attenuation coefficient of the object at various frequencies, the modulation transfer function (MTF) is calculated to determine whether modulation is within detectable limits for super-resolution. For experimental validation of super-resolution, a goniometry stand was used to orient a bar pattern phantom along various pitches relative to the breast support in a commercial digital breast tomosynthesis system.Results: Using theoretical modeling, it is shown that a single projection image cannot resolve a sine input whose frequency exceeds the detector alias frequency. The high frequency input is correctly visualized in SBP or FBP reconstruction using a slice along the pitch of the object. The Fourier transform of this reconstructed slice is maximized at the input frequency as proof that the object is resolved. Consistent with the theoretical results, experimental images of a bar pattern phantom showed super-resolution in oblique reconstructions. At various pitches, the highest frequency with detectable modulation was determined by visual inspection of the bar patterns. The dependency of the highest

  16. Computer-aided detection of microcalcifications in digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT): a multichannel signal detection approach on projection views

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jun; Chan, Heang-Ping; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Helvie, Mark A.; Zhou, Chuan; Lu, Yao

    2012-03-01

    DBT is one of the promising imaging modalities that may improve the sensitivity and specificity for breast cancer detection. We are developing a computer-aided detection (CADe) system for clustered microcalcifications (MC) in DBT. A data set of two-view DBTs from 42 breasts was collected with a GE prototype system. We investigated a 2D approach to MC detection using projection view (PV) images rather than reconstructed 3D DBT volume. Our 2D approach consisted of two major stages: 1) detecting individual MC candidates on each PV, and 2) correlating the MC candidates from the different PVs and detecting clusters in the breast volume. With the MC candidates detected by prescreening on PVs, a trained multi-channel (MCH) filter bank was used to extract signal response from each MC candidate. A ray-tracing process was performed to fuse the MCH responses and localize the MC candidates in 3D using the geometrical information of the DBT system. Potential MC clusters were then identified by dynamic clustering of the MCs in 3D. A two-fold cross-validation method was used to train and test the CADe system. The detection performance of clustered MCs was assessed by free receiver operating characteristic (FROC) analysis. It was found that the CADe system achieved a case-based sensitivity of 90% at an average false positive rate of 2.1 clusters per DBT volume. Our study demonstrated that the CADe system using 2D MCH filter bank is promising for detection of clustered MCs in DBT.

  17. Diagnostic performance of digital breast tomosynthesis with a wide scan angle compared to full-field digital mammography for the detection and characterization of microcalcifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clauser, Paola, E-mail: paola.clauser@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-Guided Therapy, Division of Molecular and Gender Imaging, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Nagl, Georg [Department for Radiology and Interventional Radiology, Landesklinikum Horn, Spitalgasse 10, 3580 Horn (Austria); Helbich, Thomas H., E-mail: thomas.helbich@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-Guided Therapy, Division of Molecular and Gender Imaging, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Pinker-Domenig, Katja [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-Guided Therapy, Division of Molecular and Gender Imaging, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Weber, Michael [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-Guided Therapy, Division of General and Pediatric Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Kapetas, Panagiotis; Bernathova, Maria; Baltzer, Pascal A.T. [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-Guided Therapy, Division of Molecular and Gender Imaging, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Wide scan-angle DBT alone shows a high detection rate for microcalcifications. • DBT and FFDM can characterize microcalcifications at a comparable level. • Characterization is influenced by reader and by lesion type (benign vs malignant). • DBT might be used as a stand-alone technique for the assessment of microcalcifications. - Abstract: Objectives: To assess the diagnostic performance of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), with a wide scan-angle, compared to full-field digital mammography (FFDM), for the detection and characterization of microcalcifications. Methods: IRB approval was obtained for this retrospective study. We selected 150 FFDM and DBT (50 benign and 50 malignant histologically verified microcalcifications, 50 cases classified as BI-RADS 1). Four radiologists evaluated, in separate sessions and blinded to patients’ history and histology, the presence of microcalcifications. Cases with microcalcifications were assessed for visibility, characteristics, and grade of suspicion using BI-RADS categories. Detection rate and diagnostic performance were calculated. Visibility, lesions’ characteristics and reading time were analysed. Results: Detection rate and visibility were good for both FFDM and DBT, without intra-reader differences (P = 0.510). Inter-reader differences were detected (P < 0.018). Only two lesions were not detected by any reader on either FFDM or DBT. Diagnostic performance with DBT was as good as that of FFDM, but a significant inter-reader difference was found (P = 0.041). High inter-reader variability in the use of the descriptors was found. Reading time for DBT was almost twice that for FFDM (44 and 25 s, respectively). Conclusion: Wide scan-angle DBT enabled the detection and characterization of microcalcifications with no significant differences from FFDM. Inter-reader variability was seen.

  18. Development and application of a suite of 4-D virtual breast phantoms for optimization and evaluation of breast imaging systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiarashi, Nooshin; Lo, Joseph Y; Lin, Yuan; Ikejimba, Lynda C; Ghate, Sujata V; Nolte, Loren W; Dobbins, James T; Segars, William P; Samei, Ehsan

    2014-07-01

    Mammography is currently the most widely utilized tool for detection and diagnosis of breast cancer. However, in women with dense breast tissue, tissue overlap may obscure lesions. Digital breast tomosynthesis can reduce tissue overlap. Furthermore, imaging with contrast enhancement can provide additional functional information about lesions, such as morphology and kinetics, which in turn may improve lesion identification and characterization. The performance of these imaging techniques is strongly dependent on the structural composition of the breast, which varies significantly among patients. Therefore, imaging system and imaging technique optimization should take patient variability into consideration. Furthermore, optimization of imaging techniques that employ contrast agents should include the temporally varying breast composition with respect to the contrast agent uptake kinetics. To these ends, we have developed a suite of 4-D virtual breast phantoms, which are incorporated with the kinetics of contrast agent propagation in different tissues and can realistically model normal breast parenchyma as well as benign and malignant lesions. This development presents a new approach in performing simulation studies using truly anthropomorphic models. To demonstrate the utility of the proposed 4-D phantoms, we present a simplified example study to compare the performance of 14 imaging paradigms qualitatively and quantitatively.

  19. Breast screening using 2D-mammography or integrating digital breast tomosynthesis (3D-mammography) for single-reading or double-reading--evidence to guide future screening strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houssami, Nehmat; Macaskill, Petra; Bernardi, Daniela; Caumo, Francesca; Pellegrini, Marco; Brunelli, Silvia; Tuttobene, Paola; Bricolo, Paola; Fantò, Carmine; Valentini, Marvi; Ciatto, Stefano

    2014-07-01

    We compared detection measures for breast screening strategies comprising single-reading or double-reading using standard 2D-mammography or 2D/3D-mammography, based on the 'screening with tomosynthesis or standard mammography' (STORM) trial. STORM prospectively examined screen-reading in two sequential phases, 2D-mammography alone and integrated 2D/3D-mammography, in asymptomatic women participating in Trento and Verona (Northern Italy) population-based screening services. Outcomes were ascertained from assessment and/or excision histology or follow-up. For each screen-reading strategy we calculated the number of detected and non-detected (including interval) cancers, cancer detection rates (CDRs), false positive recall (FPR) measures and incremental CDR relative to a comparator strategy. We estimated the false:true positive (FP:TP) ratio and sensitivity of each mammography screening strategy. Paired binary data were compared using McNemar's test. Amongst 7292 screening participants, there were 65 (including six interval) breast cancers; estimated first-year interval cancer rate was 0.82/1000 screens (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.30-1.79/1000). For single-reading, 35 cancers were detected at both 2D and 2D/3D-mammography, 20 cancers were detected only with 2D/3D-mammography compared with none at 2D-mammography alone (pstrategies had more favourable FP to TP trade-off and higher sensitivity, applying single-reading or double-reading, relative to 2D-mammography screening. The evidence we report warrants rethinking of breast screening strategies and should be used to inform future evaluations of 2D/3D-mammography that assess whether or not the estimated incremental detection translates into improved screening outcomes such as a reduction in interval cancer rates. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Characterization of a high-energy in-line phase contrast tomosynthesis prototype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Di; Yan, Aimin; Li, Yuhua; Wong, Molly D; Zheng, Bin; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2015-05-01

    In this research, a high-energy in-line phase contrast tomosynthesis prototype was developed and characterized through quantitative investigations and phantom studies. The prototype system consists of an x-ray source, a motorized rotation stage, and a CMOS detector with a pixel pitch of 0.05 mm. The x-ray source was operated at 120 kVp for this study, and the objects were mounted on the rotation stage 76.2 cm (R1) from the source and 114.3 cm (R2) from the detector. The large air gap between the object and detector guarantees sufficient phase-shift effects. The quantitative evaluation of this prototype included modulation transfer function and noise power spectrum measurements conducted under both projection mode and tomosynthesis mode. Phantom studies were performed including three custom designed phantoms with complex structures: a five-layer bubble wrap phantom, a fishbone phantom, and a chicken breast phantom with embedded fibrils and mass structures extracted from an ACR phantom. In-plane images of the phantoms were acquired to investigate their image qualities through observation, intensity profile plots, edge enhancement evaluations, and/or contrast-to-noise ratio calculations. In addition, the robust phase-attenuation duality (PAD)-based phase retrieval method was applied to tomosynthesis for the first time in this research. It was utilized as a preprocessing method to fully exhibit phase contrast on the angular projection before reconstruction. The resolution and noise characteristics of this high-energy in-line phase contrast tomosynthesis prototype were successfully investigated and demonstrated. The phantom studies demonstrated that this imaging prototype can successfully remove the structure overlapping in phantom projections, obtain delineate interfaces, and achieve better contrast-to-noise ratio after applying phase retrieval to the angular projections. This research successfully demonstrated a high-energy in-line phase contrast tomosynthesis

  1. Effect of the Availability of Prior Full-Field Digital Mammography and Digital Breast Tomosynthesis Images on the Interpretation of Mammograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, Christiane M; Catullo, Victor J; Chough, Denise M; Ganott, Marie A; Kelly, Amy E; Shinde, Dilip D; Sumkin, Jules H; Wallace, Luisa P; Bandos, Andriy I; Gur, David

    2015-07-01

    To assess the effect of and interaction between the availability of prior images and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) images in decisions to recall women during mammogram interpretation. Verbal informed consent was obtained for this HIPAA-compliant institutional review board-approved protocol. Eight radiologists independently interpreted twice deidentified mammograms obtained in 153 women (age range, 37-83 years; mean age, 53.7 years ± 9.3 [standard deviation]) in a mode by reader by case-balanced fully crossed study. Each study consisted of current and prior full-field digital mammography (FFDM) images and DBT images that were acquired in our facility between June 2009 and January 2013. For one reading, sequential ratings were provided by using (a) current FFDM images only, (b) current FFDM and DBT images, and (c) current FFDM, DBT, and prior FFDM images. The other reading consisted of (a) current FFDM images only, (b) current and prior FFDM images, and (c) current FFDM, prior FFDM, and DBT images. Fifty verified cancer cases, 60 negative and benign cases (clinically not recalled), and 43 benign cases (clinically recalled) were included. Recall recommendations and interaction between the effect of prior FFDM and DBT images were assessed by using a generalized linear model accounting for case and reader variability. Average recall rates in noncancer cases were significantly reduced with the addition of prior FFDM images by 34% (145 of 421) and 32% (106 of 333) without and with DBT images, respectively (P images resulted in a smaller reduction in recall rates (false-positive interpretations) of 19% (76 of 409) and 26% (71 of 276) without and with prior FFDM images, respectively (P = .001). Availability of DBT images resulted in 4% (15 of 338) and 8% (25 of 322) increases in sensitivity, respectively (P = .007). The effects of the availability of prior FFDM images or DBT images did not significantly change regardless of the sequence in presentation (P = .81 and P

  2. Tomosynthesis and contrast-enhanced digital mammography: recent advances in digital mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diekmann, Felix; Bick, Ulrich

    2007-12-01

    Digital mammography is more and more replacing conventional mammography. Initial concerns about an inferior image quality of digital mammography have been largely overcome and recent studies even show digital mammography to be superior in women with dense breasts, while at the same time reducing radiation exposure. Nevertheless, an important limitation of digital mammography remains: namely, the fact that summation may obscure lesions in dense breast tissue. However, digital mammography offers the option of so-called advanced applications, and two of these, contrast-enhanced mammography and tomosynthesis, are promising candidates for improving the detection of breast lesions otherwise obscured by the summation of dense tissue. Two techniques of contrast-enhanced mammography are available: temporal subtraction of images acquired before and after contrast administration and the so-called dual-energy technique, which means that pairs of low/high-energy images acquired after contrast administration are subtracted. Tomosynthesis on the other hand provides three-dimensional information on the breast. The images are acquired with different angulations of the X-ray tube while the object or detector is static. Various reconstruction algorithms can then be applied to the set of typically nine to 28 source images to reconstruct 1-mm slices with a reduced risk of obscuring pathology. Combinations of both advanced applications have only been investigated in individual experimental studies; more advanced software algorithms and CAD systems are still in their infancy and have only undergone preliminary clinical evaluation.

  3. Effect of a gel retainment dam on automated ultrasound coverage in a dual-modality breast imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Goodsitt, Mitchell M; Padilla, Frederic; Fowlkes, J Brian; Hooi, Fong Ming; Lashbrook, Christine R; Thomenius, Kai E; Carson, Paul L

    2010-07-01

    The goal of this work was to evaluate a possible improvement in ultrasound coverage for a dual-modality breast imaging system in the mammographic geometry. A pilot study was performed to evaluate use of a rubber dam to retain ultrasound gel and improve imaging coverage at the breast periphery on a combined imaging system consisting of an ultrasound scanner and a digital x-ray tomosynthesis unit. Several dams were constructed to encompass the shapes of various sizes of compressed breasts. Visual tracings of the breast-to-paddle contact area and breast periphery were made for 8 breasts to estimate coverage area. Two readers independently reviewed the resulting images and were asked to rate the overall breast image quality. The percentages of breast in contact with the paddle were greater (P image quality of automated ultrasound with the rubber dam was consistently judged to be superior to that without the dam. This method can enhance the absolute and percentage area of the breast in contact with the paddle, reducing noncontact gaps at the breast periphery. Gently pressing the breast periphery with the dam inserted toward the chest wall improves coverage in automated breast ultrasound scanning.

  4. Optimal angular dose distribution to acquire 3D and extra 2D images for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hye-Suk; Kim, Ye-Seul; Lee, Haeng-Hwa; Gang, Won-Suk; Kim, Hee-Joung; Choi, Young-Wook; Choi, JaeGu

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the optimal non-uniform angular dose distribution to improve the quality of the 3D reconstructed images and to acquire extra 2D projection images. In this analysis, 7 acquisition sets were generated by using four different values for the number of projections (11, 15, 21, and 29) and total angular range (±14°, ±17.5°, ±21°, and ±24.5° ). For all acquisition sets, the zero-degree projection was used as the 2D image that was close to that of standard conventional mammography (CM). Exposures used were 50, 100, 150, and 200 mR for the zero-degree projection, and the remaining dose was distributed over the remaining projection angles. To quantitatively evaluate image quality, we computed the CNR (contrast-to-noise ratio) and the ASF (artifact spread function) for the same radiation dose. The results indicate that, for microcalcifications, acquisition sets with approximately 4 times higher exposure on the zero-degree projection than the average exposure for the remaining projection angles yielded higher CNR values and were 3% higher than the uniform distribution. However, very high dose concentrations toward the zero-degree projection may reduce the quality of the reconstructed images due to increasing noise in the peripheral views. The zero-degree projection of the non-uniform dose distribution offers a 2D image similar to that of standard CM, but with a significantly lower radiation dose. Therefore, we need to evaluate the diagnostic potential of extra 2D projection image when diagnose breast cancer by using 3D images with non-uniform angular dose distributions.

  5. TOMOGRAPHIC MAMMOGRAPHY AND TOMOSYNTHESIS USING OPENGL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Zolotarev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Computed tomography is still being intensively studied and widely used to solve a number of industrial and medical applications. The simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART and Bayesian inference reconstruction (BIR are considered as advantageous iteration methods that are most suitable for improving the quality of the reconstructed 3D-images. The paper deals with the parallel iterative algorithms to ensure the reconstruction of threedimensional images of the breast, recovered from a limited set of noisy X-ray projections. Algebraic method of reconstruction with simultaneous iterations – SART and iterative method for statistical reconstruction of BIR are deemed to be the most preferred iterative methods. We believe that these methods are particularly useful for improving the quality of breast reconstructed image. We use the graphics processor (GPU to accelerate the process of reconstruction. Preliminary results show that all investigated methods are useful in breast reconstruction layered images. However, it was found that the method of classical tomosynthesis SAA is less efficient than iterative methods SART and BIR as the worst suppress the anatomical noise. Despite the fact that the estimated ratio of the contrast / noise ratio in the presence of internal structures with low contrast is higher for classical tomosynthesis method the SAA, its effectiveness in the presence of highly structured background is low. In our opinion the best results can be achieved using statistical iterative reconstruction BIR.

  6. Breast cancer in systemic lupus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernatsky, S.; Ramsey-Goldman, R.; Petri, M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective There is a decreased breast cancer risk in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) versus the general population. We assessed a large sample of SLE patients, evaluating demographic and clinical characteristics and breast cancer risk. Methods We performed case-cohort analyses within a multi......-center international SLE sample. We calculated the breast cancer hazard ratio (HR) in female SLE patients, relative to demographics, reproductive history, family history of breast cancer, and time-dependent measures of anti-dsDNA positivity, cumulative disease activity, and drugs, adjusted for SLE duration. Results...... There were 86 SLE breast cancers and 4498 female SLE cancer-free controls. Patients were followed on average for 7.6 years. Versus controls, SLE breast cancer cases tended to be white and older. Breast cancer cases were similar to controls regarding anti-dsDNA positivity, disease activity, and most drug...

  7. Comparison of patient specific dose metrics between chest radiography, tomosynthesis, and CT for adult patients of wide ranging body habitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yakun [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Li, Xiang [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Department of Physics, Cleveland State University, Cleveland, Ohio 44115 (United States); Segars, W. Paul [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, and Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Samei, Ehsan, E-mail: samei@duke.edu [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Departments of Physics, Biomedical Engineering, and Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Given the radiation concerns inherent to the x-ray modalities, accurately estimating the radiation doses that patients receive during different imaging modalities is crucial. This study estimated organ doses, effective doses, and risk indices for the three clinical chest x-ray imaging techniques (chest radiography, tomosynthesis, and CT) using 59 anatomically variable voxelized phantoms and Monte Carlo simulation methods. Methods: A total of 59 computational anthropomorphic male and female extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) adult phantoms were used in this study. Organ doses and effective doses were estimated for a clinical radiography system with the capability of conducting chest radiography and tomosynthesis (Definium 8000, VolumeRAD, GE Healthcare) and a clinical CT system (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare). A Monte Carlo dose simulation program (PENELOPE, version 2006, Universitat de Barcelona, Spain) was used to mimic these two clinical systems. The Duke University (Durham, NC) technique charts were used to determine the clinical techniques for the radiographic modalities. An exponential relationship between CTDI{sub vol} and patient diameter was used to determine the absolute dose values for CT. The simulations of the two clinical systems compute organ and tissue doses, which were then used to calculate effective dose and risk index. The calculation of the two dose metrics used the tissue weighting factors from ICRP Publication 103 and BEIR VII report. Results: The average effective dose of the chest posteroanterior examination was found to be 0.04 mSv, which was 1.3% that of the chest CT examination. The average effective dose of the chest tomosynthesis examination was found to be about ten times that of the chest posteroanterior examination and about 12% that of the chest CT examination. With increasing patient average chest diameter, both the effective dose and risk index for CT increased considerably in an exponential fashion, while these two dose

  8. Comparison of patient specific dose metrics between chest radiography, tomosynthesis, and CT for adult patients of wide ranging body habitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yakun; Li, Xiang; Segars, W Paul; Samei, Ehsan

    2014-02-01

    Given the radiation concerns inherent to the x-ray modalities, accurately estimating the radiation doses that patients receive during different imaging modalities is crucial. This study estimated organ doses, effective doses, and risk indices for the three clinical chest x-ray imaging techniques (chest radiography, tomosynthesis, and CT) using 59 anatomically variable voxelized phantoms and Monte Carlo simulation methods. A total of 59 computational anthropomorphic male and female extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) adult phantoms were used in this study. Organ doses and effective doses were estimated for a clinical radiography system with the capability of conducting chest radiography and tomosynthesis (Definium 8000, VolumeRAD, GE Healthcare) and a clinical CT system (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare). A Monte Carlo dose simulation program (PENELOPE, version 2006, Universitat de Barcelona, Spain) was used to mimic these two clinical systems. The Duke University (Durham, NC) technique charts were used to determine the clinical techniques for the radiographic modalities. An exponential relationship between CTDIvol and patient diameter was used to determine the absolute dose values for CT. The simulations of the two clinical systems compute organ and tissue doses, which were then used to calculate effective dose and risk index. The calculation of the two dose metrics used the tissue weighting factors from ICRP Publication 103 and BEIR VII report. The average effective dose of the chest posteroanterior examination was found to be 0.04 mSv, which was 1.3% that of the chest CT examination. The average effective dose of the chest tomosynthesis examination was found to be about ten times that of the chest posteroanterior examination and about 12% that of the chest CT examination. With increasing patient average chest diameter, both the effective dose and risk index for CT increased considerably in an exponential fashion, while these two dose metrics only increased slightly for

  9. TMIST Breast Screening Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    TMIST is a randomized breast screening trial that compares two Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved types of digital mammography, standard digital mammography (2-D) with a newer technology called tomosynthesis mammography (3-D).

  10. TU-EF-207-00: Advances in Breast Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-06-15

    Breast imaging technology is advancing on several fronts. In digital mammography, the major technological trend has been on optimization of approaches for performing combined mammography and tomosynthesis using the same system. In parallel, photon-counting slot-scan mammography is now in clinical use and more efforts are directed towards further development of this approach for spectral imaging. Spectral imaging refers to simultaneous acquisition of two or more energy-windowed images. Depending on the detector and associated electronics, there are a number of ways this can be accomplished. Spectral mammography using photon-counting detectors can suppress electronic noise and importantly, it enables decomposition of the image into various material compositions of interest facilitating quantitative imaging. Spectral imaging can be particularly important in intravenously injected contrast mammography and eventually tomosynthesis. The various approaches and applications of spectral mammography are discussed. Digital breast tomosynthesis relies on the mechanical movement of the x-ray tube to acquire a number of projections in a predefined arc, typically from 9 to 25 projections over a scan angle of +/−7.5 to 25 degrees depending on the particular system. The mechanical x-ray tube motion requires relatively long acquisition time, typically between 3.7 to 25 seconds depending on the system. Moreover, mechanical scanning may have an effect on the spatial resolution due to internal x-ray filament or external mechanical vibrations. New x-ray source arrays have been developed and they are aimed at replacing the scanned x-ray tube for improved acquisition time and potentially for higher spatial resolution. The potential advantages and challenges of this approach are described. Combination of digital mammography and tomosynthesis in a single system places increased demands on certain functional aspects of the detector and overall performance, particularly in the tomosynthesis

  11. Replacing single-view mediolateral oblique (MLO) digital mammography (DM) with synthesized mammography (SM) with digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) images: Comparison of the diagnostic performance and radiation dose with two-view DM with or without MLO-DBT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyo-Jin; Chang, Jung Min; Lee, Joongyub; Song, Sung Eun; Shin, Sung Ui; Kim, Won Hwa; Bae, Min Sun; Moon, Woo Kyung

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance and radiation dose of single view cranio-caudal (CC) digital mammography (DM) plus mediolateral oblique (MLO) digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) combined with synthesized mammography (SM) in comparison with two-view DM with or without DBT. This study was approved by our institutional review board, and informed consent was obtained from 130 women. Paired two-view DM and single MLO-DBT with SM images were acquired, and four independent retrospective reading sessions of different combinations of DM, SM and DBT were performed for the presence of malignant tumors using jackknife alternative free-response receiver operator curve (JAFROC) methods. The diagnostic performances and average glandular dose (AGD) were compared between different combinations of DM, SM and DBT. Of 159 lesions in 130 patients, 27 were malignant. When using MLO-DBT with SM instead of MLO-DM, a significantly higher sensitivity (P=0.016) and specificity (P=0.012) were noted than with two-view DM, and comparable figure of merit (FOM), sensitivity, and specificity to two-view DM with DBT were noted. The mean AGD of CC-DM plus MLO-DBT with SM was 5.78mGy±1.06 per patient, which was significantly lower than that with two-view DM with MLO-DBT (8.45mGy±1.32; P MLO-DBT with SM showed higher sensitivity and specificity to two-view DM with a smaller AGD increment and comparable diagnostic performance to that of two-view DM with MLO-DBT with a significantly lower mean AGD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Breast Imaging: How We Manage Diagnostic Technology at a Multidisciplinary Breast Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Tejerina Bernal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the most important aspects and problems related to the management of breast cancer imaging, at a center specialized in breast pathology. We review the established and emerging diagnostic techniques, their indications, and peculiarities: digital mammography, CAD systems, and the recent digital breast tomosynthesis, ultrasound and complementary elastography, molecular imaging techniques, magnetic resonance imaging, advanced sequences (diffusion, and positron emission mammography (PEM. The adequate integration and rational management of these techniques is essential, but this is not always easy, in order to achieve a successful diagnosis.

  13. A novel solid-angle tomosynthesis (SAT) scanning scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin; Yu, Cedric

    2010-08-01

    Digital tomosynthesis (DTS) recently gained extensive research interests in both diagnostic and radiation therapy fields. Conventional DTS images are generated by scanning an x-ray source and flat-panel detector pair on opposite sides of an object, with the scanning trajectory on a one-dimensional curve. A novel tomosynthesis method named solid-angle tomosynthesis (SAT) is proposed, where the x-ray source scans on an arbitrary shaped two-dimensional surface. An iterative algorithm in the form of total variation regulated expectation maximization is developed for SAT image reconstruction. The feasibility and effectiveness of SAT is corroborated by computer simulation studies using three-dimensional (3D) numerical phantoms including a 3D Shepp-Logan phantom and a volumetric CT image set of a human breast. SAT is able to cover more space in Fourier domain more uniformly than conventional DTS. Greater coverage and more isotropy in the frequency domain translate to fewer artifacts and more accurately restored features in the in-plane reconstruction. Comparing with conventional DTS, SAT allows cone-shaped x-ray beams to project from more solid angles, thus provides more coverage in the spatial-frequency domain, resulting in better quality of reconstructed image.

  14. Stationary intraoral digital tomosynthesis using a carbon nanotube X-ray source array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, J; Tucker, A W; Gaalaas, L R; Wu, G; Platin, E; Mol, A; Lu, J; Zhou, O

    2015-01-01

    Intraoral dental tomosynthesis and closely related tuned-aperture CT (TACT) are low-dose three-dimensional (3D) imaging modalities that have shown improved detection of multiple dental diseases. Clinical interest in implementing these technologies waned owing to their time-consuming nature. Recently developed carbon nanotube (CNT) X-ray sources allow rapid multi-image acquisition without mechanical motion, making tomosynthesis a clinically viable technique. The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the feasibility of and produce high-quality images from a digital tomosynthesis system employing CNT X-ray technology. A test-bed stationary intraoral tomosynthesis unit was constructed using a CNT X-ray source array and a digital intraoral sensor. The source-to-image distance was modified to make the system comparable in image resolution to current two-dimensional intraoral radiography imaging systems. Anthropomorphic phantoms containing teeth with simulated and real caries lesions were imaged using a dose comparable to D-speed film dose with a rectangular collimation. Images were reconstructed and analysed. Tomosynthesis images of the phantom and teeth specimen demonstrated perceived image quality equivalent or superior to standard digital images with the added benefit of 3D information. The ability to "scroll" through slices in a buccal-lingual direction significantly improved visualization of anatomical details. In addition, the subjective visibility of dental caries was increased. Feasibility of the stationary intraoral tomosynthesis is demonstrated. The results show clinical promise and suitability for more robust observer and clinical studies.

  15. Comparing the imaging performance of computed super resolution and magnification tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maidment, Tristan D.; Vent, Trevor L.; Ferris, William S.; Wurtele, David E.; Acciavatti, Raymond J.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.

    2017-03-01

    Computed super-resolution (SR) is a method of reconstructing images with pixels that are smaller than the detector element size; superior spatial resolution is achieved through the elimination of aliasing and alteration of the sampling function imposed by the reconstructed pixel aperture. By comparison, magnification mammography is a method of projection imaging that uses geometric magnification to increase spatial resolution. This study explores the development and application of magnification digital breast tomosynthesis (MDBT). Four different acquisition geometries are compared in terms of various image metrics. High-contrast spatial resolution was measured in various axes using a lead star pattern. A modified Defrise phantom was used to determine the low-frequency spatial resolution. An anthropomorphic phantom was used to simulate clinical imaging. Each experiment was conducted at three different magnifications: contact (1.04x), MAG1 (1.3x), and MAG2 (1.6x). All images were taken on our next generation tomosynthesis system, an in-house solution designed to optimize SR. It is demonstrated that both computed SR and MDBT (MAG1 and MAG2) provide improved spatial resolution over non-SR contact imaging. To achieve the highest resolution, SR and MDBT should be combined. However, MDBT is adversely affected by patient motion at higher magnifications. In addition, MDBT requires more radiation dose and delays diagnosis, since MDBT would be conducted upon recall. By comparison, SR can be conducted with the original screening data. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that computed SR and MDBT are both viable methods of imaging the breast.

  16. TU-EF-207-05: Dedicated Cone-beam Breast CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vedantham, S. [Univ. of Massachusetts Medical School (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Breast imaging technology is advancing on several fronts. In digital mammography, the major technological trend has been on optimization of approaches for performing combined mammography and tomosynthesis using the same system. In parallel, photon-counting slot-scan mammography is now in clinical use and more efforts are directed towards further development of this approach for spectral imaging. Spectral imaging refers to simultaneous acquisition of two or more energy-windowed images. Depending on the detector and associated electronics, there are a number of ways this can be accomplished. Spectral mammography using photon-counting detectors can suppress electronic noise and importantly, it enables decomposition of the image into various material compositions of interest facilitating quantitative imaging. Spectral imaging can be particularly important in intravenously injected contrast mammography and eventually tomosynthesis. The various approaches and applications of spectral mammography are discussed. Digital breast tomosynthesis relies on the mechanical movement of the x-ray tube to acquire a number of projections in a predefined arc, typically from 9 to 25 projections over a scan angle of +/−7.5 to 25 degrees depending on the particular system. The mechanical x-ray tube motion requires relatively long acquisition time, typically between 3.7 to 25 seconds depending on the system. Moreover, mechanical scanning may have an effect on the spatial resolution due to internal x-ray filament or external mechanical vibrations. New x-ray source arrays have been developed and they are aimed at replacing the scanned x-ray tube for improved acquisition time and potentially for higher spatial resolution. The potential advantages and challenges of this approach are described. Combination of digital mammography and tomosynthesis in a single system places increased demands on certain functional aspects of the detector and overall performance, particularly in the tomosynthesis

  17. TU-EF-207-01: Introductory Remarks on Recent Advances in Breast Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karellas, A. [University of Massachusetts Medical School (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Breast imaging technology is advancing on several fronts. In digital mammography, the major technological trend has been on optimization of approaches for performing combined mammography and tomosynthesis using the same system. In parallel, photon-counting slot-scan mammography is now in clinical use and more efforts are directed towards further development of this approach for spectral imaging. Spectral imaging refers to simultaneous acquisition of two or more energy-windowed images. Depending on the detector and associated electronics, there are a number of ways this can be accomplished. Spectral mammography using photon-counting detectors can suppress electronic noise and importantly, it enables decomposition of the image into various material compositions of interest facilitating quantitative imaging. Spectral imaging can be particularly important in intravenously injected contrast mammography and eventually tomosynthesis. The various approaches and applications of spectral mammography are discussed. Digital breast tomosynthesis relies on the mechanical movement of the x-ray tube to acquire a number of projections in a predefined arc, typically from 9 to 25 projections over a scan angle of +/−7.5 to 25 degrees depending on the particular system. The mechanical x-ray tube motion requires relatively long acquisition time, typically between 3.7 to 25 seconds depending on the system. Moreover, mechanical scanning may have an effect on the spatial resolution due to internal x-ray filament or external mechanical vibrations. New x-ray source arrays have been developed and they are aimed at replacing the scanned x-ray tube for improved acquisition time and potentially for higher spatial resolution. The potential advantages and challenges of this approach are described. Combination of digital mammography and tomosynthesis in a single system places increased demands on certain functional aspects of the detector and overall performance, particularly in the tomosynthesis

  18. Comparison of power spectra for tomosynthesis projections and reconstructed images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engstrom, Emma; Reiser, Ingrid; Nishikawa, Robert [Royal Institute of Technology, 11231 Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Radiology, University of Chicago, Chicago 60637 (United States)

    2009-05-15

    Burgess et al. [Med. Phys. 28, 419-437 (2001)] showed that the power spectrum of mammographic breast background follows a power law and that lesion detectability is affected by the power-law exponent {beta} which measures the amount of structure in the background. Following the study of Burgess et al., the authors measured and compared the power-law exponent of mammographic backgrounds in tomosynthesis projections and reconstructed slices to investigate the effect of tomosynthesis imaging on background structure. Our data set consisted of 55 patient cases. For each case, regions of interest (ROIs) were extracted from both projection images and reconstructed slices. The periodogram of each ROI was computed by taking the squared modulus of the Fourier transform of the ROI. The power-law exponent was determined for each periodogram and averaged across all ROIs extracted from all projections or reconstructed slices for each patient data set. For the projections, the mean {beta} averaged across the 55 cases was 3.06 (standard deviation of 0.21), while it was 2.87 (0.24) for the corresponding reconstructions. The difference in {beta} for a given patient between the projection ROIs and the reconstructed ROIs averaged across the 55 cases was 0.194, which was statistically significant (p<0.001). The 95% CI for the difference between the mean value of {beta} for the projections and reconstructions was [0.170, 0.218]. The results are consistent with the observation that the amount of breast structure in the tomosynthesis slice is reduced compared to projection mammography and that this may lead to improved lesion detectability.

  19. Breast Cancer in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tessier Cloutier, B; Clarke, A E; Ramsey-Goldman, R

    2013-01-01

    Evidence points to a decreased breast cancer risk in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We analyzed data from a large multisite SLE cohort, linked to cancer registries.......Evidence points to a decreased breast cancer risk in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We analyzed data from a large multisite SLE cohort, linked to cancer registries....

  20. Breast-Dedicated Radionuclide Imaging Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, David F C; Freese, David L; Levin, Craig S

    2016-02-01

    Breast-dedicated radionuclide imaging systems show promise for increasing clinical sensitivity for breast cancer while minimizing patient dose and cost. We present several breast-dedicated coincidence-photon and single-photon camera designs that have been described in the literature and examine their intrinsic performance, clinical relevance, and impact. Recent tracer development is mentioned, results from recent clinical tests are summarized, and potential areas for improvement are highlighted. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  1. Anatomic breast coordinate system for mammogram analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karemore, Gopal; Brandt, S.; Karssemeijer, N.

    2011-01-01

    methodologies as seen from table 2 in given temporal study. Conclusion The curve-linear anatomical breast coordinate system facilitated computerized analysis of mammograms. The proposed coordinate system slightly improved the risk segregation by Mammographic Texture Resemblance and minimized the geometrical......Purpose Many researchers have investigated measures also other than density in the mammogram such as measures based on texture to improve breast cancer risk assessment. However, parenchymal texture characteristics are highly dependent on the orientation of vasculature structure and fibrous tissue...... inside the breast. Most of the risk assessment and CAD modules use a breast region in a image centered Cartesian x,y coordinate system. Nevertheless, anatomical structure follows curve-linear trajectories. We examined an anatomical breast coordinate system that preserves the anatomical correspondence...

  2. Development of a dynamic 4D anthropomorphic breast phantom for contrast-based breast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiarashi, Nooshin; Lin, Yuan; Segars, William P.; Ghate, Sujata V.; Ikejimba, Lynda; Chen, Baiyu; Lo, Joseph Y.; Dobbins, James T., III; Nolte, Loren W.; Samei, Ehsan

    2012-03-01

    Mammography is currently the most widely accepted tool for detection and diagnosis of breast cancer. However, the sensitivity of mammography is reduced in women with dense breast tissue due to tissue overlap, which may obscure lesions. Digital breast tomosynthesis with contrast enhancement reduces tissue overlap and provides additional functional information about lesions (i.e. morphology and kinetics), which in turn may improve lesion characterization. The performance of such techniques is highly dependent on the structural composition of the breast, which varies significantly across patients. Therefore, optimization of breast imaging systems should be done with respect to this patient versatility. Furthermore, imaging techniques that employ contrast require the inclusion of a temporally varying breast composition with respect to the contrast agent kinetics to enable the optimization of the system. To these ends, we have developed a dynamic 4D anthropomorphic breast phantom, which can be used for optimizing a breast imaging system by incorporating material characteristics. The presented dynamic phantom is based on two recently developed anthropomorphic breast phantoms, which can be representative of a whole population through their randomized anatomical feature generation and various compression levels. The 4D dynamic phantom is incorporated with the kinetics of contrast agent uptake in different tissues and can realistically model benign and malignant lesions. To demonstrate the utility of the proposed dynamic phantom, contrast-enhanced digital mammography and breast tomosynthesis were simulated where a ray-tracing algorithm emulated the projections, a filtered back projection algorithm was used for reconstruction, and dual-energy and temporal subtractions were performed and compared.

  3. Digital x-ray tomosynthesis: current state of the art and clinical potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    III, James T Dobbins [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Godfrey, Devon J [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States)

    2003-10-07

    Digital x-ray tomosynthesis is a technique for producing slice images using conventional x-ray systems. It is a refinement of conventional geometric tomography, which has been known since the 1930s. In conventional geometric tomography, the x-ray tube and image receptor move in synchrony on opposite sides of the patient to produce a plane of structures in sharp focus at the plane containing the fulcrum of the motion; all other structures above and below the fulcrum plane are blurred and thus less visible in the resulting image. Tomosynthesis improves upon conventional geometric tomography in that it allows an arbitrary number of in-focus planes to be generated retrospectively from a sequence of projection radiographs that are acquired during a single motion of the x-ray tube. By shifting and adding these projection radiographs, specific planes may be reconstructed. This topical review describes the various reconstruction algorithms used to produce tomosynthesis images, as well as approaches used to minimize the residual blur from out-of-plane structures. Historical background and mathematical details are given for the various approaches described. Approaches for optimizing the tomosynthesis image are given. Applications of tomosynthesis to various clinical tasks, including angiography, chest imaging, mammography, dental imaging and orthopaedic imaging, are also described. (topical review)

  4. Acoustic performance of mesh compression paddles for a multimodality breast imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeCarpentier, Gerald L; Goodsitt, Mitchell M; Verweij, Sacha; Li, Jie; Padilla, Frederic R; Carson, Paul L

    2014-07-01

    A system incorporating automated 3-D ultrasound and digital X-ray tomosynthesis is being developed for improved breast lesion detection and characterization. The goal of this work is to develop and test candidates for a dual-modality mesh compression paddle. A Computerized Imaging Reference Systems (Norfork, VA, USA) ultrasound phantom with tilted low-contrast cylindrical objects was used. Polyester mesh fabrics (1- and 2-mm spacing), a high-density polyethylene filament grid (Dyneema, DSM Dyneema, Stanley, NC, USA) and a solid polymethylpentene (TPX; Mitsui Plastics, Inc., White Plains, NY) paddle were compared with no overlying structures using a GE Logic 9 with M12L transducer. A viscous gel provided coupling. The phantom was scanned 10 times over 9 cm for each configuration. Image volumes were analyzed for signal strength, contrast and contrast-to-noise ratio. X-ray tests confirmed X-ray transparency for all materials. By all measures, both mesh fabrics outperformed TPX and Dyneema, and there were essentially no differences between 2-mm mesh and unobstructed configurations. Copyright © 2014 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Breast cancer screening in Korean woman with dense breast tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hee Jung [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Eun Sook [Dept. of Radiology, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Ann [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    Asian women, including Korean, have a relatively higher incidence of dense breast tissue, compared with western women. Dense breast tissue has a lower sensitivity for the detection of breast cancer and a higher relative risk for breast cancer, compared with fatty breast tissue. Thus, there were limitations in the mammographic screening for women with dense breast tissue, and many studies for the supplemental screening methods. This review included appropriate screening methods for Korean women with dense breasts. We also reviewed the application and limitation of supplemental screening methods, including breast ultrasound, digital breast tomosynthesis, and breast magnetic resonance imaging; and furthermore investigated the guidelines, as well as the study results.

  6. Stereotactic breast biopsy: pitfalls and pearls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Monica L; Adrada, Beatriz E; Candelaria, Rosalind; Thames, Deborah; Dawson, Debora; Yang, Wei T

    2014-03-01

    Stereotactic breast biopsies have become indispensable and the standard of care for patients in whom screening mammography or tomosynthesis reveals breast lesions suggestive of malignancy. A variety of stereotactic biopsy systems and needle types are now available, which allow more accurate sampling of lesions as well as successful biopsy of lesions in difficult locations in patients of all body habitus. We discuss how to plan, perform, and follow up stereotactic biopsies. Most importantly, we offer suggestions on how to avoid problems and complications and detail how to achieve technical success even in the most challenging cases. Stereotactic biopsy has proven over time to be an accurate and acceptable alternative to surgical biopsy for histopathologic diagnosis of breast abnormalities. Successful performance of this minimally invasive procedure spares women from undergoing potentially deforming and expensive procedures to diagnose breast disease. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Ectopic Axillary Breast during Systemic Lupus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Besma Ben Dhaou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many breast changes may occur in systemic lupus erythematosus. We report a 41-year-old woman with lupus who presented three years after the onset of lupus an ectopic mammary gland confirmed by histological study.

  8. 21 CFR 884.2990 - Breast lesion documentation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Breast lesion documentation system. 884.2990... Devices § 884.2990 Breast lesion documentation system. (a) Identification. A breast lesion documentation... lesions identified during a clinical breast examination. (b) Classification. Class II (special controls...

  9. System delays in breast cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In South Africa (SA), breast cancer is the 4th most common cause of death from all malignancies.[1] In SA, we notice a discrepancy in incidence rates between various ethnic/race groups. African women have rates similar to those in other developing countries. Caucasian women have rates that are comparable with ...

  10. An anatomically oriented breast coordinate system for mammogram analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandt, S.S.; Karemore, G.; Karssemeijer, N.; Nielsen, M.

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a breast coordinate system that is based on breast anatomy to register female breasts into a common coordinate frame in 2-D mediolateral (ML) or mediolateral oblique (MLO) view mammograms. The breasts are registered according to the location of the pectoral muscle and the nipple

  11. Toward a dose reduction strategy using model-based reconstruction with limited-angle tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haneda, Eri; Tkaczyk, J. E.; Palma, Giovanni; Iordache, Rǎzvan; Zelakiewicz, Scott; Muller, Serge; De Man, Bruno

    2014-03-01

    Model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) is an emerging technique for several imaging modalities and appli- cations including medical CT, security CT, PET, and microscopy. Its success derives from an ability to preserve image resolution and perceived diagnostic quality under impressively reduced signal level. MBIR typically uses a cost optimization framework that models system geometry, photon statistics, and prior knowledge of the recon- structed volume. The challenge of tomosynthetic geometries is that the inverse problem becomes more ill-posed due to the limited angles, meaning the volumetric image solution is not uniquely determined by the incom- pletely sampled projection data. Furthermore, low signal level conditions introduce additional challenges due to noise. A fundamental strength of MBIR for limited-views and limited-angle is that it provides a framework for constraining the solution consistent with prior knowledge of expected image characteristics. In this study, we analyze through simulation the capability of MBIR with respect to prior modeling components for limited-views, limited-angle digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) under low dose conditions. A comparison to ground truth phantoms shows that MBIR with regularization achieves a higher level of fidelity and lower level of blurring and streaking artifacts compared to other state of the art iterative reconstructions, especially for high contrast objects. The benefit of contrast preservation along with less artifacts may lead to detectability improvement of microcalcification for more accurate cancer diagnosis.

  12. Screening for Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niell, Bethany L; Freer, Phoebe E; Weinfurtner, Robert Jared; Arleo, Elizabeth Kagan; Drukteinis, Jennifer S

    2017-11-01

    The goal of screening is to detect breast cancers when still curable to decrease breast cancer-specific mortality. Breast cancer screening in the United States is routinely performed with mammography, supplemental digital breast tomosynthesis, ultrasound, and/or MR imaging. This article aims to review the most commonly used breast imaging modalities for screening, discuss how often and when to begin screening with specific imaging modalities, and examine the pros and cons of screening. By the article's end, the reader will be better equipped to have informed discussions with patients and medical professionals regarding the benefits and disadvantages of breast cancer screening. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Digital tomosynthesis--a new lease of life for the intravenous urogram?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, I T P; Raju, V M; Rowberry, B K; Johns, S; Freeman, S J; Wells, I P

    2011-05-01

    Digital tomosynthesis is a new digital technique based on conventional X-ray tomography. It acquires multiple low-dose projections during a single sweep of the X-ray tube, which are reassembled to provide high-resolution slices at different depths. Suggested uses include visualisation of pulmonary nodules, mammography, angiography, dental imaging and delineation of fractures. This study aims to evaluate its potential role as part of an intravenous urogram (IVU) by assessing the diagnostic quality in imaging the kidneys in clinical practice. 100 renal units from consecutive traditional IVU studies were retrospectively compared with 101 renal units imaged using digital tomosynthesis. These were scored for visualisation of the renal outline and collecting system, presence of a renal cyst or mass and overall diagnostic quality. Radiation doses were calculated. 46.5% of traditional IVUs were found to be of diagnostic quality. The IVUs with digital tomosynthesis were of diagnostic quality in 95.5%. This represents a highly statistically significant difference (pIVU, and significantly reduces radiation. It also offers considerable advantages in ease and speed of imaging. For these reasons, in any situation where IVU is still being used to assess the kidneys, digital tomosynthesis is likely to be of considerable benefit in improving diagnostic quality.

  14. Interventional C-arm tomosynthesis for vascular imaging: initial results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langan, David A.; Claus, Bernhard E. H.; Al Assad, Omar; Trousset, Yves; Riddell, Cyril; Avignon, Gregoire; Solomon, Stephen B.; Lai, Hao; Wang, Xin

    2015-03-01

    As percutaneous endovascular procedures address more complex and broader disease states, there is an increasing need for intra-procedure 3D vascular imaging. In this paper, we investigate C-Arm 2-axis tomosynthesis ("Tomo") as an alternative to C-Arm Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) for workflow situations in which the CBCT acquisition may be inconvenient or prohibited. We report on our experience in performing tomosynthesis acquisitions with a digital angiographic imaging system (GE Healthcare Innova 4100 Angiographic Imaging System, Milwaukee, WI). During a tomo acquisition the detector and tube each orbit on a plane above and below the table respectively. The tomo orbit may be circular or elliptical, and the tomographic half-angle in our studies varied from approximately 16 to 28 degrees as a function of orbit period. The trajectory, geometric calibration, and gantry performance are presented. We overview a multi-resolution iterative reconstruction employing compressed sensing techniques to mitigate artifacts associated with incomplete data reconstructions. In this work, we focus on the reconstruction of small high contrast objects such as iodinated vasculature and interventional devices. We evaluate the overall performance of the acquisition and reconstruction through phantom acquisitions and a swine study. Both tomo and comparable CBCT acquisitions were performed during the swine study thereby enabling the use of CBCT as a reference in the evaluation of tomo vascular imaging. We close with a discussion of potential clinical applications for tomo, reflecting on the imaging and workflow results achieved.

  15. Variable Appearances of Ductal Carcinoma In Situ Calcifications on Digital Mammography, Synthesized Mammography, and Tomosynthesis: A Pictorial Essay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Esther; Szabo, Janet; Sonnenblick, Emily B; Margolies, Laurie R

    2017-09-22

    This pictorial essay demonstrates the variable appearances of ductal carcinoma in situ on full-field digital mammography, synthesized mammography, and digital breast tomosynthesis. The spectrum of intercase and intracase variability suggests further refinement of reconstruction algorithms for synthesized mammography may be necessary to maximize early detection of ductal carcinoma in situ. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Association of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Preliminary Results of a New Auxiliary Mechatronic Near-Field Radar System to 3D Mammography for Early Detection of Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashkan Ghanbarzadeh Dagheyan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate and early detection of breast cancer is of high importance, as it is directly associated with the patients’ overall well-being during treatment and their chances of survival. Uncertainties in current breast imaging methods can potentially cause two main problems: (1 missing newly formed or small tumors; and (2 false alarms, which could be a source of stress for patients. A recent study at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH indicates that using Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT can reduce the number of false alarms, when compared to conventional mammography. Despite the image quality enhancement DBT provides, the accurate detection of cancerous masses is still limited by low radiological contrast (about 1% between the fibro-glandular tissue and affected tissue at X-ray frequencies. In a lower frequency region, at microwave frequencies, the contrast is comparatively higher (about 10% between the aforementioned tissues; yet, microwave imaging suffers from low spatial resolution. This work reviews conventional X-ray breast imaging and describes the preliminary results of a novel near-field radar imaging mechatronic system (NRIMS that can be fused with the DBT, in a co-registered fashion, to combine the advantages of both modalities. The NRIMS consists of two antipodal Vivaldi antennas, an XY positioner, and an ethanol container, all of which are particularly designed based on the DBT physical specifications. In this paper, the independent performance of the NRIMS is assessed by (1 imaging a bearing ball immersed in sunflower oil and (2 computing the heat Specific Absorption Rate (SAR due to the electromagnetic power transmitted into the breast. The preliminary results demonstrate that the system is capable of generating images of the ball. Furthermore, the SAR results show that the system complies with the standards set for human trials. As a result, a configuration based on this design might be suitable for use in realistic clinical

  17. TH-A-18A-01: Innovation in Clinical Breast Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, B [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Yang, K [University of Oklahoma, Oklahomoa City, OK (United States); Yaffe, M [University Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Chen, J [GE/U-Systems, Sunnyvale, CA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Several novel modalities have been or are on the verge of being introduced into the breast imaging clinic. These include tomosynthesis imaging, dedicated breast CT, contrast-enhanced digital mammography, and automated breast ultrasound, all of which are covered in this course. Tomosynthesis and dedicated breast CT address the problem of tissue superimposition that limits mammography screening performance, by improved or full resolution of the 3D breast morphology. Contrast-enhanced digital mammography provides functional information that allows for visualization of tumor angiogenesis. 3D breast ultrasound has high sensitivity for tumor detection in dense breasts, but the imaging exam was traditionally performed by radiologists. In automated breast ultrasound, the scan is performed in an automated fashion, making for a more practical imaging tool, that is now used as an adjunct to digital mammography in breast cancer screening. This course will provide medical physicists with an in-depth understanding of the imaging physics of each of these four novel imaging techniques, as well as the rationale and implementation of QC procedures. Further, basic clinical applications and work flow issues will be discussed. Learning Objectives: To be able to describe the underlying physical and physiological principles of each imaging technique, and to understand the corresponding imaging acquisition process. To be able to describe the critical system components and their performance requirements. To understand the rationale and implementation of quality control procedures, as well as regulatory requirements for systems with FDA approval. To learn about clinical applications and understand risks and benefits/strength and weakness of each modality in terms of clinical breast imaging.

  18. Grating-based phase contrast tomosynthesis imaging: Proof-of-concept experimental studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ke; Ge, Yongshuai; Garrett, John; Bevins, Nicholas; Zambelli, Joseph [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Chen, Guang-Hong, E-mail: gchen7@wisc.edu [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 and Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: This paper concerns the feasibility of x-ray differential phase contrast (DPC) tomosynthesis imaging using a grating-based DPC benchtop experimental system, which is equipped with a commercial digital flat-panel detector and a medical-grade rotating-anode x-ray tube. An extensive system characterization was performed to quantify its imaging performance. Methods: The major components of the benchtop system include a diagnostic x-ray tube with a 1.0 mm nominal focal spot size, a flat-panel detector with 96 μm pixel pitch, a sample stage that rotates within a limited angular span of ±30°, and a Talbot-Lau interferometer with three x-ray gratings. A total of 21 projection views acquired with 3° increments were used to reconstruct three sets of tomosynthetic image volumes, including the conventional absorption contrast tomosynthesis image volume (AC-tomo) reconstructed using the filtered-backprojection (FBP) algorithm with the ramp kernel, the phase contrast tomosynthesis image volume (PC-tomo) reconstructed using FBP with a Hilbert kernel, and the differential phase contrast tomosynthesis image volume (DPC-tomo) reconstructed using the shift-and-add algorithm. Three inhouse physical phantoms containing tissue-surrogate materials were used to characterize the signal linearity, the signal difference-to-noise ratio (SDNR), the three-dimensional noise power spectrum (3D NPS), and the through-plane artifact spread function (ASF). Results: While DPC-tomo highlights edges and interfaces in the image object, PC-tomo removes the differential nature of the DPC projection data and its pixel values are linearly related to the decrement of the real part of the x-ray refractive index. The SDNR values of polyoxymethylene in water and polystyrene in oil are 1.5 and 1.0, respectively, in AC-tomo, and the values were improved to 3.0 and 2.0, respectively, in PC-tomo. PC-tomo and AC-tomo demonstrate equivalent ASF, but their noise characteristics quantified by the 3D NPS

  19. Multimode C-arm fluoroscopy, tomosynthesis, and cone-beam CT for image-guided interventions: from proof of principle to patient protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siewerdsen, J. H.; Daly, M. J.; Bachar, G.; Moseley, D. J.; Bootsma, G.; Brock, K. K.; Ansell, S.; Wilson, G. A.; Chhabra, S.; Jaffray, D. A.; Irish, J. C.

    2007-03-01

    High-performance intraoperative imaging is essential to an ever-expanding scope of therapeutic procedures ranging from tumor surgery to interventional radiology. The need for precise visualization of bony and soft-tissue structures with minimal obstruction to the therapy setup presents challenges and opportunities in the development of novel imaging technologies specifically for image-guided procedures. Over the past ~5 years, a mobile C-arm has been modified in collaboration with Siemens Medical Solutions for 3D imaging. Based upon a Siemens PowerMobil, the device includes: a flat-panel detector (Varian PaxScan 4030CB); a motorized orbit; a system for geometric calibration; integration with real-time tracking and navigation (NDI Polaris); and a computer control system for multi-mode fluoroscopy, tomosynthesis, and cone-beam CT. Investigation of 3D imaging performance (noise-equivalent quanta), image quality (human observer studies), and image artifacts (scatter, truncation, and cone-beam artifacts) has driven the development of imaging techniques appropriate to a host of image-guided interventions. Multi-mode functionality presents a valuable spectrum of acquisition techniques: i.) fluoroscopy for real-time 2D guidance; ii.) limited-angle tomosynthesis for fast 3D imaging (e.g., ~10 sec acquisition of coronal slices containing the surgical target); and iii.) fully 3D cone-beam CT (e.g., ~30-60 sec acquisition providing bony and soft-tissue visualization across the field of view). Phantom and cadaver studies clearly indicate the potential for improved surgical performance - up to a factor of 2 increase in challenging surgical target excisions. The C-arm system is currently being deployed in patient protocols ranging from brachytherapy to chest, breast, spine, and head and neck surgery.

  20. Thick slices from tomosynthesis data sets: phantom study for the evaluation of different algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diekmann, Felix; Meyer, Henning; Diekmann, Susanne; Puong, Sylvie; Muller, Serge; Bick, Ulrich; Rogalla, Patrik

    2009-10-01

    Tomosynthesis is a 3-dimensional mammography technique that generates thin slices separated one to the other by typically 1 mm from source data sets. The relatively high image noise in these thin slices raises the value of 1-cm thick slices computed from the set of reconstructed slices for image interpretation. In an initial evaluation, we investigated the potential of different algorithms for generating thick slices from tomosynthesis source data (maximum intensity projection-MIP; average algorithm-AV, and image generation by means of a new algorithm, so-called softMip). The three postprocessing techniques were evaluated using a homogeneous phantom with one textured slab with a total thickness of about 5 cm in which two 0.5-cm-thick slabs contained objects to simulate microcalcifications, spiculated masses, and round masses. The phantom was examined by tomosynthesis (GE Healthcare). Microcalcifications were simulated by inclusion of calcium particles of four different sizes. The slabs containing the inclusions were examined in two different configurations: adjacent to each other and close to the detector and with the two slabs separated by two 1-cm thick breast equivalent material slabs. The reconstructed tomosynthesis slices were postprocessed using MIP, AV, and softMip to generate 1-cm thick slices with a lower noise level. The three postprocessing algorithms were assessed by calculating the resulting contrast versus background for the simulated microcalcifications and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) for the other objects. The CNRs of the simulated round and spiculated masses were most favorable for the thick slices generated with the average algorithm, followed by softMip and MIP. Contrast of the simulated microcalcifications was best for MIP, followed by softMip and average projections. Our results suggest that the additional generation of thick slices may improve the visualization of objects in tomosynthesis. This improvement differs from the different

  1. Optimization of contrast-enhanced breast imaging: Analysis using a cascaded linear system model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yue-Houng; Scaduto, David A; Zhao, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced (CE) breast imaging involves the injection contrast agents (i.e., iodine) to increase conspicuity of malignant lesions. CE imaging may be used in conjunction with digital mammography (DM) or digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) and has shown promise in improving diagnostic specificity. Both CE-DM and CE-DBT techniques require optimization as clinical diagnostic tools. Physical factors including x-ray spectra, subtraction technique, and the signal from iodine contrast, must be considered to provide the greatest object detectability and image quality. We developed a cascaded linear system model (CLSM) for the optimization of CE-DM and CE-DBT employing dual energy (DE) subtraction or temporal (TE) subtraction. We have previously developed a CLSM for DBT implemented with an a-Se flat panel imager (FPI) and filtered backprojection (FBP) reconstruction algorithm. The model is used to track image quality metrics - modulation transfer function (MTF) and noise power spectrum (NPS) - at each stage of the imaging chain. In this study, the CLSM is extended for CE breast imaging. The effect of x-ray spectrum (varied by changing tube potential and the filter) and DE and TE subtraction techniques on breast structural noise was measured was studied and included as a deterministic source of noise in the CLSM. From the two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) MTF and NPS, the ideal observer signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), also known as the detectability index (d'), may be calculated. Using d' as a FOM, we discuss the optimization of CE imaging for the task of iodinated contrast object detection within structured backgrounds. Increasing x-ray energy was determined to decrease the magnitude of structural noise and not its correlation. By performing DE subtraction, the magnitude of the structural noise was further reduced at the expense of increased stochastic (quantum and electronic) noise. TE subtraction exhibited essentially no residual structural noise at the

  2. Localized detection and classification of abnormalities on FFDM and tomosynthesis examinations rated under an FROC paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gur, David; Bandos, Andriy I; Rockette, Howard E; Zuley, Margarita L; Sumkin, Jules H; Chough, Denise M; Hakim, Christiane M

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of our study was to assess diagnostic performance when retrospectively interpreting full-field digital mammography (FFDM) and breast tomosynthesis examinations under a free-response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) paradigm. We performed FROC analysis of a previously reported study in which eight experienced radiologists interpreted 125 examinations, including 35 with verified cancers. The FROC paradigm involves detecting, locating, and rating each suspected abnormality. Radiologists reviewed and rated both FFDM alone and a combined display mode of FFDM and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) (combined). Observer performance levels were assessed and compared with respect to the fraction of correctly identified abnormalities, the number of reported location-specific findings (both true and false), and their associated ratings. The analysis accounts for the number and locations of findings and the location-based ratings using a summary performance index (Λ), which is the FROC analog of the area between the receiver operating characteristic curve and the diagonal (chance) line. Under the FROC paradigm, each reader detected more true abnormalities associated with cancer, or a higher true-positive fraction, under the combined mode. In an analysis focused on both the number of findings and associated location-based ratings, each of the radiologists performed better under the combined mode compared with FFDM alone, with increases in Λ ranging from 5% to 34%. On average, under the combined mode radiologists achieved a 16% improvement in Λ compared with the FFDM alone mode (95% CI, 7-26%; p paradigm.

  3. Improvements of an objective model of compressed breasts undergoing mammography: Generation and characterization of breast shapes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodriguez Ruiz, A.; Feng, S.S.J.; Zelst, J.C.M. van; Vreemann, S.; Mann, J.R.; D'Orsi, C.J.; Sechopoulos, I.

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To develop a set of accurate 2D models of compressed breasts undergoing mammography or breast tomosynthesis, based on objective analysis, to accurately characterize mammograms with few linearly independent parameters, and to generate novel clinically realistic paired cranio-caudal (CC) and

  4. Breast Tumor Classification Based on a Computerized Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System Feature System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Mengyun; Hu, Yuzhou; Guo, Yi; Wang, Yuanyuan; Yu, Jinhua

    2017-08-14

    This work focused on extracting novel and validated digital high-throughput features to present a detailed and comprehensive description of the American College of Radiology Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) with the goal of improving the accuracy of ultrasound breast cancer diagnosis. First, the phase congruency approach was used to segment the tumors automatically. Second, high-throughput features were designed and extracted on the basis of each BI-RADS category. Then features were selected based on the basis of a Student t test and genetic algorithm. Finally, the AdaBoost classifier was used to differentiate benign tumors from malignant ones. Experiments were conducted on a database of 138 pathologically proven breast tumors. The system was compared with 6 state-of-art BI-RADS feature extraction methods. By using leave-one-out cross-validation, our system achieved a highest overall accuracy of 93.48%, a sensitivity of 94.20%, a specificity of 92.75%, and an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 95.67%, respectively, which were superior to those of other methods. The experiments demonstrated that our computerized BI-RADS feature system was capable of helping radiologists detect breast cancers more accurately and provided more guidance for final decisions. © 2017 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  5. An atlas-based organ dose estimator for tomosynthesis and radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoye, Jocelyn; Zhang, Yakun; Agasthya, Greeshma; Sturgeon, Greg; Kapadia, Anuj; Segars, W. Paul; Samei, Ehsan

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide patient-specific organ dose estimation based on an atlas of human models for twenty tomosynthesis and radiography protocols. The study utilized a library of 54 adult computational phantoms (age: 18-78 years, weight 52-117 kg) and a validated Monte-Carlo simulation (PENELOPE) of a tomosynthesis and radiography system to estimate organ dose. Positioning of patient anatomy was based on radiographic positioning handbooks. The field of view for each exam was calculated to include relevant organs per protocol. Through simulations, the energy deposited in each organ was binned to estimate normalized organ doses into a reference database. The database can be used as the basis to devise a dose calculator to predict patient-specific organ dose values based on kVp, mAs, exposure in air, and patient habitus for a given protocol. As an example of the utility of this tool, dose to an organ was studied as a function of average patient thickness in the field of view for a given exam and as a function of Body Mass Index (BMI). For tomosynthesis, organ doses can also be studied as a function of x-ray tube position. This work developed comprehensive information for organ dose dependencies across tomosynthesis and radiography. There was a general exponential decrease dependency with increasing patient size that is highly protocol dependent. There was a wide range of variability in organ dose across the patient population, which needs to be incorporated in the metrology of organ dose.

  6. Comparative evaluation of six cytological grading systems in breast carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushik Saha

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: Robinson′s grading system is simple, more objective and reproducible, and demonstrated the best concordance with histological grading. So, Robinson′s system should be used routinely for breast carcinoma aspirates.

  7. A porcine model system of BRCA1 driven breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoff eClark

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available BRCA1 is a breast and ovarian tumor suppressor. Hereditary mutations in BRCA1 result in a predisposition to breast cancer, and BRCA1 expression is down-regulated in ~30% of sporadic cases. The function of BRCA1 remains poorly understood, but it appears to play an important role in DNA repair and the maintenance of genetic stability. Mouse models of BRCA1 deficiency have been developed in an attempt to understand the role of the gene in vivo. However, the subtle nature of BRCA1 function and the well-known discrepancies between human and murine breast cancer biology and genetics may limit the utility of mouse systems in defining the function of BRCA1 in cancer and validating the development of novel therapeutics for breast cancer. In contrast to mice, pig biological systems and cancer genetics appear to more closely resemble their human counterparts. To determine if BRCA1 inactivation in pig cells promotes their transformation and may serve as a model for the human disease, we developed an immortalized porcine breast cell line and stably inactivated BRCA1 using miRNA. The cell line developed characteristics of breast cancer stem cells and exhibited a transformed phenotype. These results validate the concept of using pigs as a model to study BRCA1 defects in breast cancer and establish the first porcine breast tumor cell line.

  8. Overdiagnosis in breast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Andy; Vinnicombe, Sarah

    2017-02-01

    The main harm of overdiagnosis is overtreatment. However a form of overdiagnosis also occurs when foci of cancer are found by imaging in addition to the symptomatic lesion when this leads to additional treatment which does not benefit the patient. Even if overtreatment is avoided, knowledge of the diagnosis can still cause psychological harm. Overdiagnosis is an inevitable effect of mammographic screening as the benefit comes from diagnosing breast cancer prior to clinical detectability. Estimates of the rate of overdiagnosis at screening are around 10%. DCIS represents 20% of cancers detected by screening and is the main focus in the overdiagnosis debate. Detection and treatment of low grade DCIS and invasive tubular cancer would appear to represent overdiagnosis in most cases. Supplementary screening with tomosynthesis or US are both likely to increase overdiagnosis as both modalities detect predominantly low grade invasive cancers. MRI causes overdiagnosis because it is so sensitive that it detects real tumour foci which after radiotherapy and systemic therapy do not, in many cases go on and cause local recurrence if the women had had no MRI and undergone breast conservation and adjuvant therapy with these small foci left in situ. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Dose Reduction in Tomosynthesis of the Wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Anton S; Martini, Katharina; Higashigaito, Kai; Guggenberger, Roman; Andreisek, Gustav; Frauenfelder, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantitatively and qualitatively determine the impact of radiation dose reduction on the image noise and quality of tomosynthesis studies of the wrist. Imaging of six cadaver wrists was performed with tomosynthesis in anteroposterior position at a tube voltage of 60 kV and tube current of 80 mA and subsequently at 60 or 50 kV with different tube currents of 80, 40, or 32 mA. Dose-area products (DAP) were obtained from the electronically logged protocol. Image noise was measured with an ROI. Two independent and blinded readers evaluated all images. Interreader agreement was measured with a Cohen kappa. Readers assessed overall quality and delineation of soft tissue, cortical bone, and trabecular bone on a 4-point Likert scale. The highest DAP (3.892 ± 0.432 Gy · cm(2)) was recorded for images obtained with 60 kV and 80 mA; the lowest (0.857 ± 0.178 Gy · cm(2)) was recorded for images obtained with 50 kV and 32 mA. Noise was highest when a combination of 50 kV and 32 mA (389 ± 26.6) was used and lowest when a combination of 60 kV and 80 mA (218 ± 12.3) was used. The amount of noise on images acquired using 60 kV and 80 mA was statistically significantly different from the amount measured on all other images (p wrist is possible while image quality and delineation of anatomic structures remain preserved.

  10. Improving Breast Ultrasound Interpretation in Uganda Using a Condensed Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheel, John R; Peacock, Sue; Orem, Jackson; Bugeza, Samuel; Muyinda, Zeridah; Porter, Peggy L; Wood, William C; Comis, Robert L; Lehman, Constance D

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to determine whether a 2-day educational course using a condensed Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (condensed BI-RADS) improved the accuracy of Ugandan healthcare workers interpreting breast ultrasound. The target audience of this intervention was Ugandan healthcare workers involved in performing, interpreting, or acting on the results of breast ultrasound. The educational course consisted of a pretest knowledge assessment, a series of lectures on breast imaging interpretation and standardized reporting using a condensed BI-RADS, and a posttest knowledge assessment. Participants interpreted 53 different ultrasound test cases by selecting the finding type, descriptors for masses, and recommendations. We compared the percent correct on the pretest and posttest based on occupation and training level. Sixty-one Ugandan healthcare workers participated in this study, including 13 radiologists, 13 other physicians, 12 technologists, and 23 midlevel providers. Most groups improved in identifying the finding type (P breast ultrasound education using a condensed BI-RADS improved the interpretive performance of healthcare workers and was particularly successful in reducing the frequency of unnecessary biopsies for normal and benign findings. Multimodal educational efforts to improve accuracy and management of breast ultrasound findings may augment breast cancer early detection efforts in resource-limited settings. Copyright © 2016 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. An anatomically oriented breast coordinate system for mammogram analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Sami; Karemore, Gopal; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2011-01-01

    and orientations are registered and extracted without non-linearly deforming the images. We use the proposed breast coordinate transform in a cross-sectional breast cancer risk assessment study of 490 women, in which we attempt to learn breast cancer risk factors from mammograms that were taken prior to when...... between the mammograms of each woman and among the mammograms of all of the women in the study. The results of the cross-sectional study show that the classification into cancer and control groups can be improved by using the new coordinate system, compared to other systems evaluated. Comparisons were...

  12. Latina Breast Cancer Patients and Their Informal Support System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hayes-Bautista, David

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this research project is to understand the influence of Latino culture in breast cancer treatment, by developing a conceptual model of the informal support system utilized by 60 triads...

  13. Evaluation of a breast software model for 2D and 3D X-ray imaging studies of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baneva, Yanka; Bliznakova, Kristina; Cockmartin, Lesley; Marinov, Stoyko; Buliev, Ivan; Mettivier, Giovanni; Bosmans, Hilde; Russo, Paolo; Marshall, Nicholas; Bliznakov, Zhivko

    2017-09-01

    In X-ray imaging, test objects reproducing breast anatomy characteristics are realized to optimize issues such as image processing or reconstruction, lesion detection performance, image quality and radiation induced detriment. Recently, a physical phantom with a structured background has been introduced for both 2D mammography and breast tomosynthesis. A software version of this phantom and a few related versions are now available and a comparison between these 3D software phantoms and the physical phantom will be presented. The software breast phantom simulates a semi-cylindrical container filled with spherical beads of different diameters. Four computational breast phantoms were generated with a dedicated software application and for two of these, physical phantoms are also available and they are used for the side by side comparison. Planar projections in mammography and tomosynthesis were simulated under identical incident air kerma conditions. Tomosynthesis slices were reconstructed with an in-house developed reconstruction software. In addition to a visual comparison, parameters like fractal dimension, power law exponent β and second order statistics (skewness, kurtosis) of planar projections and tomosynthesis reconstructed images were compared. Visually, an excellent agreement between simulated and real planar and tomosynthesis images is observed. The comparison shows also an overall very good agreement between parameters evaluated from simulated and experimental images. The computational breast phantoms showed a close match with their physical versions. The detailed mathematical analysis of the images confirms the agreement between real and simulated 2D mammography and tomosynthesis images. The software phantom is ready for optimization purpose and extrapolation of the phantom to other breast imaging techniques. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Limited angle C-arm tomosynthesis reconstruction algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malalla, Nuhad A. Y.; Xu, Shiyu; Chen, Ying

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, C-arm tomosynthesis with digital detector was investigated as a novel three dimensional (3D) imaging technique. Digital tomosythses is an imaging technique to provide 3D information of the object by reconstructing slices passing through the object, based on a series of angular projection views with respect to the object. C-arm tomosynthesis provides two dimensional (2D) X-ray projection images with rotation (-/+20 angular range) of both X-ray source and detector. In this paper, four representative reconstruction algorithms including point by point back projection (BP), filtered back projection (FBP), simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART) and maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) were investigated. Dataset of 25 projection views of 3D spherical object that located at center of C-arm imaging space was simulated from 25 angular locations over a total view angle of 40 degrees. With reconstructed images, 3D mesh plot and 2D line profile of normalized pixel intensities on focus reconstruction plane crossing the center of the object were studied with each reconstruction algorithm. Results demonstrated the capability to generate 3D information from limited angle C-arm tomosynthesis. Since C-arm tomosynthesis is relatively compact, portable and can avoid moving patients, it has been investigated for different clinical applications ranging from tumor surgery to interventional radiology. It is very important to evaluate C-arm tomosynthesis for valuable applications.

  15. 3D imaging using magnetic resonance tomosynthesis (MRT) technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Oh; Zho, Sang-Young; Kim, Dong-Hyun

    2012-08-01

    To introduce an alternative approach to three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging using a method that is similar to x-ray tomosynthesis. Variable angle tilted-projection images are acquired using a multiple-oblique view (MOV) pulse sequence. Reconstruction is performed using three methods similar to that of x-ray tomosynthesis, which generate a set of tomographic images with multiple 2D projection images. The reconstruction algorithm is further modified to reformat to the practical imaging situations of MR. The procedure is therefore termed magnetic resonance tomosynthesis (MRT). To analyze the characteristics of MRT, simulations are performed. Phantom and in vivo experiments were done to suggest potential applications. Simulation results show anisotropic features that are structurally dependent in terms of resolution. Partial blurrings along slice direction were observed. In phantom and in vivo experiments, the reconstruction performance is particularly noticeable in the low SNR case where improved images with lower noise are obtained. Reformatted reconstruction using thinner slice thickness and∕or extended field-of-view can increase spatial resolution partially and alleviate slice profile imperfection. Results demonstrate that MRT can generate adequate 3D images using the MOV images. Various reconstruction methods in tomosynthesis were readily adapted, while allowing other tomosynthesis reconstruction algorithms to be incorporated. A reformatted reconstruction process was incorporated for applications relevant to MR imaging.

  16. Digital tomosynthesis (DTS) with a Circular X-ray tube: Its image reconstruction based on total-variation minimization and the image characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Y. O.; Hong, D. K.; Cho, H. S.; Je, U. K.; Oh, J. E.; Lee, M. S.; Kim, H. J.; Lee, S. H.; Jang, W. S.; Cho, H. M.; Choi, S. I.; Koo, Y. S.

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, we introduce an effective imaging system for digital tomosynthesis (DTS) with a circular X-ray tube, the so-called circular-DTS (CDTS) system, and its image reconstruction algorithm based on the total-variation (TV) minimization method for low-dose, high-accuracy X-ray imaging. Here, the X-ray tube is equipped with a series of cathodes distributed around a rotating anode, and the detector remains stationary throughout the image acquisition. We considered a TV-based reconstruction algorithm that exploited the sparsity of the image with substantially high image accuracy. We implemented the algorithm for the CDTS geometry and successfully reconstructed images of high accuracy. The image characteristics were investigated quantitatively by using some figures of merit, including the universal-quality index (UQI) and the depth resolution. For selected tomographic angles of 20, 40, and 60°, the corresponding UQI values in the tomographic view were estimated to be about 0.94, 0.97, and 0.98, and the depth resolutions were about 4.6, 3.1, and 1.2 voxels in full width at half maximum (FWHM), respectively. We expect the proposed method to be applicable to developing a next-generation dental or breast X-ray imaging system.

  17. Targeted Silver Nanoparticles for Dual-Energy Breast X-Ray Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    the applicability of AgNP as contrast agents for use in DE-CE digital breast tomosynthesis and digital mammography . Three objectives have been...silver (Ag) nanoparticle (NP) contrast agent optimized for dual- energy (DE) contrast -enhanced (CE) breast x-ray imaging. CE digital breast imaging...provides an accurate method for decomposition of images into distinct breast tissue and contrast agent signals. At present, DE-CE breast imaging is

  18. Automated System for Early Breast Cancer Detection in Mammograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankman, Isaac N.; Kim, Dong W.; Christens-Barry, William A.; Weinberg, Irving N.; Gatewood, Olga B.; Brody, William R.

    1993-01-01

    The increasing demand on mammographic screening for early breast cancer detection, and the subtlety of early breast cancer signs on mammograms, suggest an automated image processing system that can serve as a diagnostic aid in radiology clinics. We present a fully automated algorithm for detecting clusters of microcalcifications that are the most common signs of early, potentially curable breast cancer. By using the contour map of the mammogram, the algorithm circumvents some of the difficulties encountered with standard image processing methods. The clinical implementation of an automated instrument based on this algorithm is also discussed.

  19. Experience with breast biopsies using the Advanced Breast Biopsy Instrumentation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibman, A J; Frager, D; Choi, P

    1999-05-01

    A retrospective review of our experience with advanced breast biopsy instrumentation (ABBI) was undertaken to evaluate its efficacy for excisional breast biopsy of lesions detected on mammography. To our knowledge, experience with ABBI has not been previously reported in the radiology literature. Biopsies using the ABBI system and an adapted dedicated table were performed in 53 patients who had 54 mammographically evident lesions. Samples were obtained with cannulas ranging in size between 5 and 20 mm. Indications for biopsy were calcifications (n = 22) and masses (n = 31). Forty-five specimens (44 patients) had benign results at pathology: 15 specimens were diagnosed as fibroadenoma, 15 as cystic breast disease, and four as reactive lymph nodes; the remaining 11 specimens had benign diagnoses of adenosis, fibrosis, and hyperplasia. The average specimen size was 4.8 cm in greatest longitudinal dimension. One patient had a nondiagnostic biopsy for calcifications later found to be dermal. Seven patients were diagnosed as having breast cancer; in six of these, the tumor involved the margins of the specimen. One patient had marked atypia that required reexcision for the diagnosis of intraductal carcinoma to be made. The ABBI procedure is a more invasive and less readily available procedure than core needle biopsy for sampling of benign breast lesions. In seven cases of malignancy diagnosed at breast biopsy, the ABBI technique completely excised only a single lesion. In our experience, the ABBI procedure offered no advantages over core needle biopsy for either benign or malignant lesions.

  20. Computerized database management system for breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Kok Swee; Chong, Sze Siang; Tso, Chih Ping; Nia, Mohsen Esmaeili; Chong, Aun Kee; Abbas, Siti Fathimah

    2014-01-01

    Data analysis based on breast cancer risk factors such as age, race, breastfeeding, hormone replacement therapy, family history, and obesity was conducted on breast cancer patients using a new enhanced computerized database management system. My Structural Query Language (MySQL) is selected as the application for database management system to store the patient data collected from hospitals in Malaysia. An automatic calculation tool is embedded in this system to assist the data analysis. The results are plotted automatically and a user-friendly graphical user interface is developed that can control the MySQL database. Case studies show breast cancer incidence rate is highest among Malay women, followed by Chinese and Indian. The peak age for breast cancer incidence is from 50 to 59 years old. Results suggest that the chance of developing breast cancer is increased in older women, and reduced with breastfeeding practice. The weight status might affect the breast cancer risk differently. Additional studies are needed to confirm these findings.

  1. Stationary intraoral tomosynthesis for dental imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inscoe, Christina R.; Wu, Gongting; Soulioti, Danai E.; Platin, Enrique; Mol, Andre; Gaalaas, Laurence R.; Anderson, Michael R.; Tucker, Andrew W.; Boyce, Sarah; Shan, Jing; Gonzales, Brian; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto

    2017-03-01

    Despite recent advances in dental radiography, the diagnostic accuracies for some of the most common dental diseases have not improved significantly, and in some cases remain low. Intraoral x-ray is the most commonly used x-ray diagnostic tool in dental clinics. It however suffers from the typical limitations of a 2D imaging modality including structure overlap. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) uses high radiation dose and suffers from image artifacts and relatively low resolution. The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of developing a stationary intraoral tomosynthesis (s-IOT) using spatially distributed carbon nanotube (CNT) x-ray array technology, and to evaluate its diagnostic accuracy compared to conventional 2D intraoral x-ray. A bench-top s-IOT device was constructed using a linear CNT based X-ray source array and a digital intraoral detector. Image reconstruction was performed using an iterative reconstruction algorithm. Studies were performed to optimize the imaging configuration. For evaluation of s-IOT's diagnostic accuracy, images of a dental quality assurance phantom, and extracted human tooth specimens were acquired. Results show s-IOT increases the diagnostic sensitivity for caries compared to intraoral x-ray at a comparable dose level.

  2. Impact of breast MRI on surgical treatment, axillary approach, and systemic therapy for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mameri, Claudia S; Kemp, Claudio; Goldman, Suzan M; Sobral, Luiz A; Ajzen, Sergio

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine how often breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brings additional information that influences management of patients with breast cancer concerning surgical treatment, axillary lymph node approach, and systemic therapy. From July 2004 to July 2005, 99 patients recently diagnosed with breast cancer in clinical stages 0, I, and II were prospectively evaluated about their therapeutic plans, at first based on usual protocol (physical examination, mammography and ultrasound) and next going through bilateral breast MR. Examinations were carried out at 1.5 T on five sequences of FSPGR 3D for 90 seconds (four post-gadolinium diethylenetriaminepenta acetic acid 0.16 mM/Kg). Parameters analyzed on MRI were extension of primary lesion; detection of multifocality, multicentricity, or contra lateral lesion; muscular or skin involvement; and presence of lymph node involvement. Pathologic confirmation of additional lesions was achieved by core or excisional biopsy. MRI made 69 additional findings in 53 patients. Fifty-one findings were true-positives (51/69 = 73.9%) including 16 larger single lesions; 18 cases of multifocality; 7 cases of multicentricity; 3 cases of contra lateral lesion; 5 cases of lymph node involvement (one of them involved medial thoracic chain); 1 with muscular involvement; 1 with skin involvement. MRI has changed previous management plans in 44.4% of 99 patients. We observed increase in mastectomies (26.8%) on axillary lymph node dissection (25%) and changes on systemic therapy (20.2%), all because of additional MRI true-positive findings. Breast MRI alters significantly the rate of mastectomy, the approach of axillary chain for staging, and the use of systemic therapy because of its accuracy in evaluating breast cancer local extent.

  3. Breast cancer subtypes and outcomes of central nervous system metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Ulku Y; Oksuzoglu, Berna; Aksoy, Sercan; Harputluoglu, Hakan; Turker, Ibrahim; Ozisik, Yavuz; Dizdar, Omer; Altundag, Kadri; Alkis, Necati; Zengin, Nurullah

    2011-12-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) metastases are detected in up to one third of patients with advanced breast cancer, but their incidence and outcomes by breast cancer subtypes are not precisely documented. Herein, we retrospectively analyzed clinicopathologic data of 259 breast cancer patients with CNS metastases to evaluate the association between breast cancer subtypes and CNS metastasis. The patient groups were classified according to their hormone receptor status and HER-2 expression. Median follow-up time among the patients was 42 months and median survival after CNS metastasis detection was 7.8 months. In HER-2 overexpressing group, median time period between the diagnosis of breast cancer and the detection of CNS metastasis (15.9 months) was significantly shorter compared to the other groups (p = 0.01). The triple negative group had the shortest median survival time after CNS metastasis (6.6 months), although statistically not significant (p = 0.3). In multivariate Cox regression analyses, having solitary CNS metastasis (HR 0.4, 95% CI; 0.2-0.7, p = 0.004), and receiving chemotherapy after CNS metastasis (HR 0.4, 95% CI; 0.287-0.772, p = 0.003) were independent prognostic factors for increasing survival after CNS metastasis. In conclusion, new and effective treatment strategies are required for breast carcinoma patients with brain metastasis considering the positive effect of the treatment on survival. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Prototype of Microwave Imaging System for Breast-Cancer Screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubæk, Tonny; Zhurbenko, Vitaliy

    2009-01-01

    Microwave imaging for breast-cancer detection has received the attention of a large number of research groups in the last decade. In this paper, the imaging system currently being developed at the Technical university of Denmark is presented. This includes a description of the antenna system, the...

  5. 21 CFR 866.6040 - Gene expression profiling test system for breast cancer prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gene expression profiling test system for breast... Associated Antigen immunological Test Systems § 866.6040 Gene expression profiling test system for breast cancer prognosis. (a) Identification. A gene expression profiling test system for breast cancer prognosis...

  6. Novel ultrasound elastography system for multifocal breast cancer assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavakh, Shadi; Fenster, Aaron; Samani, Abbas

    2012-03-01

    Elastography is a non-invasive imaging technique that images tissue stiffness. Given the well known association between tissue stiffness and cancer type, it can be used effectively for breast cancer detection and assessment. This study involves system development of a real-time ultrasound based elastography system designed for assessing multifocal breast cancer. This system is capable of imaging breast tissues absolute Young's Moduli. The imaging involves tissue mechanical stimulation, displacement and force data acquisition followed by Young's modulus reconstruction using a constrained full-inversion approach. This approach utilizes axial strain field and surface force data acquired by the elastography system via an iterative numerical process to construct the breast tissue Young's modulus. The strain field is obtained using an ultrasound machine equipped with an RF signal processing module. For force data acquisition, a system comprised of two load cells attached at the ultrasound system probe was employed. Each iteration of the reconstruction algorithm involves tissue stress calculation followed by tissue Young's modulus updating. To speed up the reconstruction process, a novel accelerated finite element method developed in our laboratory was used for stress calculation. To validate the proposed method, tissue-mimicking phantom studies were conducted. These studies showed promising results paving the way for further validation and application in a clinical setting.

  7. A review of biomechanically informed breast image registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hipwell, John H.; Vavourakis, Vasileios; Han, Lianghao; Mertzanidou, Thomy; Eiben, Björn; Hawkes, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Breast radiology encompasses the full range of imaging modalities from routine imaging via x-ray mammography, magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound (both two- and three-dimensional), to more recent technologies such as digital breast tomosynthesis, and dedicated breast imaging systems for positron emission mammography and ultrasound tomography. In addition new and experimental modalities, such as Photoacoustics, Near Infrared Spectroscopy and Electrical Impedance Tomography etc, are emerging. The breast is a highly deformable structure however, and this greatly complicates visual comparison of imaging modalities for the purposes of breast screening, cancer diagnosis (including image guided biopsy), tumour staging, treatment monitoring, surgical planning and simulation of the effects of surgery and wound healing etc. Due primarily to the challenges posed by these gross, non-rigid deformations, development of automated methods which enable registration, and hence fusion, of information within and across breast imaging modalities, and between the images and the physical space of the breast during interventions, remains an active research field which has yet to translate suitable methods into clinical practice. This review describes current research in the field of breast biomechanical modelling and identifies relevant publications where the resulting models have been incorporated into breast image registration and simulation algorithms. Despite these developments there remain a number of issues that limit clinical application of biomechanical modelling. These include the accuracy of constitutive modelling, implementation of representative boundary conditions, failure to meet clinically acceptable levels of computational cost, challenges associated with automating patient-specific model generation (i.e. robust image segmentation and mesh generation) and the complexity of applying biomechanical modelling methods in routine clinical practice.

  8. Enhancing Tumor Detection in IR-UWB Breast Cancer System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoname, Reda; Elmahdy, Abd Elmonem; Zekry, Abd Elhalim

    2017-01-01

    An ultra-wideband (UWB) microwave system for breast cancer detection is presented. The proposed system includes monocycle pulse generator, antipodal Vivaldi antenna, breast model, and calibration algorithm for tumor detection. Firstly, our pulse generator employs transmission gate in glitch generator to achieve several advantages such as low power consumption and low ringing level. Secondly, the antipodal Vivaldi antenna is designed assuming FR4 dielectric substrate material, and developed antenna element (80 × 80 mm2) features a −10 dB return loss and bandwidth ranges from 2.3 GHz to more than 11 GHz. Thirdly, the phantom breast can be modeled as a layer of skin, fat, and then tumor is inserted in this layer. Finally, subtract and add algorithm (SAD) is used as a calibration algorithm in tumor detection system. The proposed system suggested that horizontal antenna position with 90° between transmitting and receiving antennas is localized as a suitable antenna position with different rotating location and a 0.5 cm near to phantom. The mean advantages of this localization and tracking position around breast is a high received power signal approximately around mv as a higher recognized signal in tumor detection. Using our proposed system we can detect tumor in 5 mm diameter. PMID:28421208

  9. Enhancing Tumor Detection in IR-UWB Breast Cancer System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Fouad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An ultra-wideband (UWB microwave system for breast cancer detection is presented. The proposed system includes monocycle pulse generator, antipodal Vivaldi antenna, breast model, and calibration algorithm for tumor detection. Firstly, our pulse generator employs transmission gate in glitch generator to achieve several advantages such as low power consumption and low ringing level. Secondly, the antipodal Vivaldi antenna is designed assuming FR4 dielectric substrate material, and developed antenna element (80×80 mm2 features a −10 dB return loss and bandwidth ranges from 2.3 GHz to more than 11 GHz. Thirdly, the phantom breast can be modeled as a layer of skin, fat, and then tumor is inserted in this layer. Finally, subtract and add algorithm (SAD is used as a calibration algorithm in tumor detection system. The proposed system suggested that horizontal antenna position with 90° between transmitting and receiving antennas is localized as a suitable antenna position with different rotating location and a 0.5 cm near to phantom. The mean advantages of this localization and tracking position around breast is a high received power signal approximately around mv as a higher recognized signal in tumor detection. Using our proposed system we can detect tumor in 5 mm diameter.

  10. The thioredoxin system in breast cancer cell invasion and migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maneet Bhatia

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Metastasis is the most life threatening aspect of breast cancer. It is a multi-step process involving invasion and migration of primary tumor cells with a subsequent colonization of these cells at a secondary location. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of thioredoxin (Trx1 in the invasion and migration of breast cancer cells and to assess the strength of the association between high levels of Trx1 and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR1 expression with breast cancer patient survival. Our results indicate that the expression of both Trx1 and TrxR1 are statistically significantly increased in breast cancer patient cells compared with paired normal breast tissue from the same patient. Over-expression of Trx1 in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines enhanced cell invasion in in vitro assays while expression of a redox inactive mutant form of Trx1 (designated 1SS or the antisense mRNA inhibited cell invasion. Addition of exogenous Trx1 also enhanced cell invasion, while addition of a specific monoclonal antibody that inhibits Trx1 redox function decreased cell invasion. Over-expression of intracellular Trx1 did not increase cell migration but expression of intracellular 1SS inhibited migration. Addition of exogenous Trx1 enhanced cell migration while 1SS had no effect. Treatment with auranofin inhibited TrxR activity, cell migration and clonogenic activity of MDA-MB-231 cells, while increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS levels. Analysis of 25 independent cohorts with 5910 patients showed that Trx1 and TrxR1 were both associated with a poor patient prognosis in terms of overall survival, distant metastasis free survival and disease free survival. Therefore, targeting the Trx system with auranofin or other specific inhibitors may provide improved breast cancer patient outcomes through inhibition of cancer invasion and migration.

  11. Computer Aided Detection of Breast Masses in Digital Tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    median filter. (c) Gabor filter: Another promising filter for image denoising and texture analysis is the Gabor filter (34). This type of multichannel ...retrieval in mammography: Using texture features for correlation with BI-RADS categories,” Proceedings of the 6th International Work- shop on Digital

  12. Utilization of Cancer Information System for Breast Cancer Control in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: there is a substantial increase in the incidence of breast cancer in Nigeria usually with the late stage presentations and subsequent poor rates of survival attributed mainly to a low level of cancer awareness and ignorance amongst patients. Cancer information system (CIS) is now assuming an emerging role in ...

  13. Breast density classification to reduce false positives in CADe systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vállez, Noelia; Bueno, Gloria; Déniz, Oscar; Dorado, Julián; Seoane, José Antonio; Pazos, Alejandro; Pastor, Carlos

    2014-02-01

    This paper describes a novel weighted voting tree classification scheme for breast density classification. Breast parenchymal density is an important risk factor in breast cancer. Moreover, it is known that mammogram interpretation is more difficult when dense tissue is involved. Therefore, automated breast density classification may aid in breast lesion detection and analysis. Several classification methods have been compared and a novel hierarchical classification procedure of combined classifiers with linear discriminant analysis (LDA) is proposed as the best solution to classify the mammograms into the four BIRADS tissue classes. The classification scheme is based on 298 texture features. Statistical analysis to test the normality and homoscedasticity of the data was carried out for feature selection. Thus, only features that are influenced by the tissue type were considered. The novel classification techniques have been incorporated into a CADe system to drive the detection algorithms and tested with 1459 images. The results obtained on the 322 screen-film mammograms (SFM) of the mini-MIAS dataset show that 99.75% of samples were correctly classified. On the 1137 full-field digital mammograms (FFDM) dataset results show 91.58% agreement. The results of the lesion detection algorithms were obtained from modules integrated within the CADe system developed by the authors and show that using breast tissue classification prior to lesion detection leads to an improvement of the detection results. The tools enhance the detectability of lesions and they are able to distinguish their local attenuation without local tissue density constraints. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Introducing DeBRa: a detailed breast model for radiological studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Andy K. W.; Gunn, Spencer; Darambara, Dimitra G.

    2009-07-01

    Currently, x-ray mammography is the method of choice in breast cancer screening programmes. As the mammography technology moves from 2D imaging modalities to 3D, conventional computational phantoms do not have sufficient detail to support the studies of these advanced imaging systems. Studies of these 3D imaging systems call for a realistic and sophisticated computational model of the breast. DeBRa (Detailed Breast model for Radiological studies) is the most advanced, detailed, 3D computational model of the breast developed recently for breast imaging studies. A DeBRa phantom can be constructed to model a compressed breast, as in film/screen, digital mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis studies, or a non-compressed breast as in positron emission mammography and breast CT studies. Both the cranial-caudal and mediolateral oblique views can be modelled. The anatomical details inside the phantom include the lactiferous duct system, the Cooper ligaments and the pectoral muscle. The fibroglandular tissues are also modelled realistically. In addition, abnormalities such as microcalcifications, irregular tumours and spiculated tumours are inserted into the phantom. Existing sophisticated breast models require specialized simulation codes. Unlike its predecessors, DeBRa has elemental compositions and densities incorporated into its voxels including those of the explicitly modelled anatomical structures and the noise-like fibroglandular tissues. The voxel dimensions are specified as needed by any study and the microcalcifications are embedded into the voxels so that the microcalcification sizes are not limited by the voxel dimensions. Therefore, DeBRa works with general-purpose Monte Carlo codes. Furthermore, general-purpose Monte Carlo codes allow different types of imaging modalities and detector characteristics to be simulated with ease. DeBRa is a versatile and multipurpose model specifically designed for both x-ray and γ-ray imaging studies.

  15. Introducing DeBRa: a detailed breast model for radiological studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Andy K W; Darambara, Dimitra G [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Fulham Road, London SW3 6JJ (United Kingdom); Gunn, Spencer [Dexela Ltd, Wenlock Business Centre, 50/52 Wharf Road, London N1 7SF (United Kingdom)], E-mail: andyma@physics.org, E-mail: dimitra.darambara@icr.ac.uk, E-mail: spencer@dexelaimaging.com

    2009-07-21

    Currently, x-ray mammography is the method of choice in breast cancer screening programmes. As the mammography technology moves from 2D imaging modalities to 3D, conventional computational phantoms do not have sufficient detail to support the studies of these advanced imaging systems. Studies of these 3D imaging systems call for a realistic and sophisticated computational model of the breast. DeBRa (Detailed Breast model for Radiological studies) is the most advanced, detailed, 3D computational model of the breast developed recently for breast imaging studies. A DeBRa phantom can be constructed to model a compressed breast, as in film/screen, digital mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis studies, or a non-compressed breast as in positron emission mammography and breast CT studies. Both the cranial-caudal and mediolateral oblique views can be modelled. The anatomical details inside the phantom include the lactiferous duct system, the Cooper ligaments and the pectoral muscle. The fibroglandular tissues are also modelled realistically. In addition, abnormalities such as microcalcifications, irregular tumours and spiculated tumours are inserted into the phantom. Existing sophisticated breast models require specialized simulation codes. Unlike its predecessors, DeBRa has elemental compositions and densities incorporated into its voxels including those of the explicitly modelled anatomical structures and the noise-like fibroglandular tissues. The voxel dimensions are specified as needed by any study and the microcalcifications are embedded into the voxels so that the microcalcification sizes are not limited by the voxel dimensions. Therefore, DeBRa works with general-purpose Monte Carlo codes. Furthermore, general-purpose Monte Carlo codes allow different types of imaging modalities and detector characteristics to be simulated with ease. DeBRa is a versatile and multipurpose model specifically designed for both x-ray and {gamma}-ray imaging studies.

  16. The effect of averaging adjacent planes for artifact reduction in matrix inversion tomosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godfrey, Devon J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Page McAdams, H. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Dobbins, James T. III [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Department of Physics, and Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: Matrix inversion tomosynthesis (MITS) uses linear systems theory and knowledge of the imaging geometry to remove tomographic blur that is present in conventional backprojection tomosynthesis reconstructions, leaving in-plane detail rendered clearly. The use of partial-pixel interpolation during the backprojection process introduces imprecision in the MITS modeling of tomographic blur, and creates low-contrast artifacts in some MITS planes. This paper examines the use of MITS slabs, created by averaging several adjacent MITS planes, as a method for suppressing partial-pixel artifacts. Methods: Human chest tomosynthesis projection data, acquired as part of an IRB-approved pilot study, were used to generate MITS planes, three-plane MITS slabs (MITSa3), five-plane MITS slabs (MITSa5), and seven-plane MITS slabs (MITSa7). These were qualitatively examined for partial-pixel artifacts and the visibility of normal and abnormal anatomy. Additionally, small (5 mm) subtle pulmonary nodules were simulated and digitally superimposed upon human chest tomosynthesis projection images, and their visibility was qualitatively assessed in the different reconstruction techniques. Simulated images of a thin wire were used to generate modulation transfer function (MTF) and slice-sensitivity profile curves for the different MITS and MITS slab techniques, and these were examined for indications of partial-pixel artifacts and frequency response uniformity. Finally, mean-subtracted, exposure-normalized noise power spectra (ENNPS) estimates were computed and compared for MITS and MITS slab reconstructions, generated from 10 sets of tomosynthesis projection data of an acrylic slab. The simulated in-plane MTF response of each technique was also combined with the square root of the ENNPS estimate to yield stochastic signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) information about the different reconstruction techniques. Results: For scan angles of 20 Degree-Sign and 5 mm plane separation, seven MITS

  17. Tomosynthesis of the thoracic spine: added value in diagnosing vertebral fractures in the elderly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geijer, Mats [Oerebro University, Department of Radiology, Oerebro (Sweden); Lund University, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund (Sweden); Gunnlaugsson, Eirikur; Goetestrand, Simon [Lund University and Skaane University Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging and Physiology, Lund (Sweden); Weber, Lars [Lund University, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund (Sweden); Skaane University Hospital, Department of Radiation Physics, Lund (Sweden); Geijer, Haakan [Oerebro University, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Oerebro (Sweden)

    2017-02-15

    Thoracic spine radiography becomes more difficult with age. Tomosynthesis is a low-dose tomographic extension of radiography which may facilitate thoracic spine evaluation. This study assessed the added value of tomosynthesis in imaging of the thoracic spine in the elderly. Four observers compared the image quality of 50 consecutive thoracic spine radiography and tomosynthesis data sets from 48 patients (median age 67 years, range 55-92 years) on a number of image quality criteria. Observer variation was determined by free-marginal multirater kappa. The conversion factor and effective dose were determined from the dose-area product values. For all observers significantly more vertebrae were seen with tomosynthesis than with radiography (mean 12.4/9.3, P < 0.001) as well as significantly more fractures (mean 0.9/0.7, P = 0.017). The image quality score for tomosynthesis was significantly higher than for radiography, for all evaluated structures. Tomosynthesis took longer to evaluate than radiography. Despite this, all observers scored a clear preference for tomosynthesis. Observer agreement was substantial (mean κ = 0.73, range 0.51-0.94). The calibration or conversion factor was 0.11 mSv/(Gy cm{sup 2}) for the combined examination. The resulting effective dose was 0.87 mSv. Tomosynthesis can increase the detection rate of thoracic vertebral fractures in the elderly, at low added radiation dose. (orig.)

  18. Mammographic breast density: impact on breast cancer risk and implications for screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freer, Phoebe E

    2015-01-01

    Mammographic breast density is rapidly becoming a hot topic in both the medical literature and the lay press. In the United States, recent legislative changes in 19 states now require radiologists to notify patients regarding breast density as well as the possible need for supplemental screening. Federal legislation regarding breast density notification has been introduced, and its passage is likely on the horizon. An understanding of the context, scientific evidence, and controversies surrounding the topic of breast density as a risk factor for breast cancer is critical for radiologists. The current state of evidence is presented regarding supplemental screening for women with dense breasts, including the use of digital breast tomosynthesis, whole-breast ultrasonography, and gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. A review of current practice guidelines and additional sources of information will improve radiologists' understanding of the relevant subject of breast density and enable them to respond appropriately to questions from patients, clinicians, and the media. (©)RSNA, 2015.

  19. Development of realistic physical breast phantoms matched to virtual breast phantoms based on human subject data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiarashi, Nooshin; Nolte, Adam C; Sturgeon, Gregory M; Segars, William P; Ghate, Sujata V; Nolte, Loren W; Samei, Ehsan; Lo, Joseph Y

    2015-07-01

    Physical phantoms are essential for the development, optimization, and evaluation of x-ray breast imaging systems. Recognizing the major effect of anatomy on image quality and clinical performance, such phantoms should ideally reflect the three-dimensional structure of the human breast. Currently, there is no commercially available three-dimensional physical breast phantom that is anthropomorphic. The authors present the development of a new suite of physical breast phantoms based on human data. The phantoms were designed to match the extended cardiac-torso virtual breast phantoms that were based on dedicated breast computed tomography images of human subjects. The phantoms were fabricated by high-resolution multimaterial additive manufacturing (3D printing) technology. The glandular equivalency of the photopolymer materials was measured relative to breast tissue-equivalent plastic materials. Based on the current state-of-the-art in the technology and available materials, two variations were fabricated. The first was a dual-material phantom, the Doublet. Fibroglandular tissue and skin were represented by the most radiographically dense material available; adipose tissue was represented by the least radiographically dense material. The second variation, the Singlet, was fabricated with a single material to represent fibroglandular tissue and skin. It was subsequently filled with adipose-equivalent materials including oil, beeswax, and permanent urethane-based polymer. Simulated microcalcification clusters were further included in the phantoms via crushed eggshells. The phantoms were imaged and characterized visually and quantitatively. The mammographic projections and tomosynthesis reconstructed images of the fabricated phantoms yielded realistic breast background. The mammograms of the phantoms demonstrated close correlation with simulated mammographic projection images of the corresponding virtual phantoms. Furthermore, power-law descriptions of the phantom images

  20. Development of realistic physical breast phantoms matched to virtual breast phantoms based on human subject data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiarashi, Nooshin [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Nolte, Adam C. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Ghate, Sujata V. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Segars, William P. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 and Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Nolte, Loren W. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Samei, Ehsan [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); and others

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Physical phantoms are essential for the development, optimization, and evaluation of x-ray breast imaging systems. Recognizing the major effect of anatomy on image quality and clinical performance, such phantoms should ideally reflect the three-dimensional structure of the human breast. Currently, there is no commercially available three-dimensional physical breast phantom that is anthropomorphic. The authors present the development of a new suite of physical breast phantoms based on human data. Methods: The phantoms were designed to match the extended cardiac-torso virtual breast phantoms that were based on dedicated breast computed tomography images of human subjects. The phantoms were fabricated by high-resolution multimaterial additive manufacturing (3D printing) technology. The glandular equivalency of the photopolymer materials was measured relative to breast tissue-equivalent plastic materials. Based on the current state-of-the-art in the technology and available materials, two variations were fabricated. The first was a dual-material phantom, the Doublet. Fibroglandular tissue and skin were represented by the most radiographically dense material available; adipose tissue was represented by the least radiographically dense material. The second variation, the Singlet, was fabricated with a single material to represent fibroglandular tissue and skin. It was subsequently filled with adipose-equivalent materials including oil, beeswax, and permanent urethane-based polymer. Simulated microcalcification clusters were further included in the phantoms via crushed eggshells. The phantoms were imaged and characterized visually and quantitatively. Results: The mammographic projections and tomosynthesis reconstructed images of the fabricated phantoms yielded realistic breast background. The mammograms of the phantoms demonstrated close correlation with simulated mammographic projection images of the corresponding virtual phantoms. Furthermore, power

  1. A feasibility study of a hybrid breast-immobilization system for early breast cancer in proton beam therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimura, Takeshi; Ogino, Takashi; Yoshiura, Takashi; Matsuyama, Mitsugi; Kondo, Naoaki; Miyazaki, Hideki; Sakuragi, Akari; Ohara, Takayuki; Ogo, Etsuyo; Hishikawa, Yoshio

    2017-04-01

    We aimed to develop a new breast-immobilizing system for proton beam therapy (PBT) of early breast cancer (EBC) that would provide the optimum breast shape during the treatment as well as increased fixation reliability by reducing the influence of respiratory movement. The breast-immobilizing system (HyBIS; hybrid breast-immobilizing system) consists of a whole body immobilization system (WBIS), position-converting device (to change patient position), photo-scanning system, breast cup (made using a three-dimensional printer), breast cup-fitting apparatus, breast cup-holding device (to ensure the breast remains lifted in the supine position), and dedicated stretcher fixed to the WBIS (to carry the patient). We conducted a phantom experiment to evaluate the effect of the HyBIS on breast immobilization during the respiratory cycle. Thirteen markers were embedded in the right breast of a female phantom that simulated respiratory thoracic movement at an amplitude of 15 mm, and their displacements on four-dimensional computed tomography were compared between conditions with and without immobilization by HyBIS. When immobilization was applied with the HyBIS, breast protrusion was maintained in the phantom in the supine treatment position. The mean values of the anteroposterior, superoinferior, lateral, and three-dimensional (3D) displacement of the markers were 2.7 ± 1.7, 0.3 ± 0.5, 0.9 ± 0.8, and 3.1 ± 1.6 mm with HyBIS, and 5.5 ± 2.9, 0.6 ± 0.8, 0.5 ± 0.4, and 5.6 ± 2.9 mm without HyBIS, respectively; thus, the anteroposterior (P = 0.014) and 3D (P = 0.007) displacements significantly improved with HyBIS. We demonstrated that the HyBIS can help retain the protruded breast shape in the supine position during treatment and can reduce the influence of respiratory movement. Thus, the HyBIS can help to reliably and precisely perform PBT for EBC. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  2. Quantitative evaluation of anatomical noise in chest digital tomosynthesis, digital radiography, and computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, D.; Choi, S.; Lee, H.; Kim, D.; Choi, S.; Kim, H.-J.

    2017-04-01

    Lung cancer is currently the worldwide leading cause of death from cancer. Thus, detection of lung cancer at its early stages is critical for improving the survival rate of patients. Chest digital tomosynthesis (CDT) is a recently developed imaging modality, combining many advantages of digital radiography (DR) and computed tomography (CT). This method has the potential to be widely used in the clinical setting. In this study, we introduce a developed CDT R/F system and compare its image quality with those of DR and CT, especially with respect to anatomical noise and lung nodule conspicuity, for LUNGMAN phantoms. The developed CDT R/F system consists of a CsI scintillator flat panel detector, X-ray tube, and tomosynthesis data acquisition geometry. For CDT R/F imaging, 41 projections were acquired at different angles, over the ± 20° angular range, in a linear translation geometry. To evaluate the clinical effectiveness of the CDT R/F system, the acquired images were compared with CT (Philips brilliance CT 64, Philips healthcare, U.S.) and DR (ADR-M, LISTEM, Korea) phantom images in terms of the anatomical noise power spectrum (aNPS). DR images exhibited low conspicuity for a small-size lung nodule, while CDT R/F and CT exhibited relatively high sensitivity for all lung nodule sizes. The aNPS of the CDT R/F system was better than that of DR, by resolving anatomical overlapping problems. In conclusion, the developed CDT R/F system is likely to contribute to early diagnosis of lung cancer, while requiring a relatively low patient dose, compared with CT.

  3. Augmented Reality Imaging System: 3D Viewing of a Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, David B; Boone, John M; Petricoin, Emanuel; Liotta, Lance; Wilson, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    To display images of breast cancer from a dedicated breast CT using Depth 3-Dimensional (D3D) augmented reality. A case of breast cancer imaged using contrast-enhanced breast CT (Computed Tomography) was viewed with the augmented reality imaging, which uses a head display unit (HDU) and joystick control interface. The augmented reality system demonstrated 3D viewing of the breast mass with head position tracking, stereoscopic depth perception, focal point convergence and the use of a 3D cursor and joy-stick enabled fly through with visualization of the spiculations extending from the breast cancer. The augmented reality system provided 3D visualization of the breast cancer with depth perception and visualization of the mass's spiculations. The augmented reality system should be further researched to determine the utility in clinical practice.

  4. Feasibility study of the diagnosis and monitoring of cystic fibrosis in pediatric patients using stationary digital chest tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potuzko, Marci; Shan, Jing; Pearce, Caleb; Lee, Yueh Z.; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto

    2015-03-01

    Digital chest tomosynthesis (DCT) is a 3D imaging modality which has been shown to approach the diagnostic capability of CT, but uses only one-tenth the radiation dose of CT. One limitation of current commercial DCT is the mechanical motion of the x-ray source which prolongs image acquisition time and introduces motion blurring in images. By using a carbon nanotube (CNT) x-ray source array, we have developed a stationary digital chest tomosynthesis (s- DCT) system which can acquire tomosynthesis images without mechanical motion, thus enhancing the image quality. The low dose and high quality 3D image makes the s-DCT system a viable imaging tool for monitoring cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. The low dose is especially important in pediatric patients who are both more radiosensitive and have a longer lifespan for radiation symptoms to develop. The purpose of this research is to evaluate the feasibility of using s-DCT as a faster, lower dose means for diagnosis and monitoring of CF in pediatric patients. We have created an imaging phantom by injecting a gelatinous mucus substitute into porcine lungs and imaging the lungs from within an anthropomorphic hollow chest phantom in order to mimic the human conditions of a CF patient in the laboratory setting. We have found that our s-DCT images show evidence of mucus plugging in the lungs and provide a clear picture of the airways in the lung, allowing for the possibility of using s- DCT to supplement or replace CT as the imaging modality for CF patients.

  5. Applying high frame-rate digital radiography and dual-energy distributed-sources for advanced tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travish, Gil; Rangel, Felix J.; Evans, Mark A.; Schmiedehausen, Kristin

    2013-09-01

    Conventional radiography uses a single point x-ray source with a fan or cone beam to visualize various areas of the human body. An imager records the transmitted photons—historically film and now increasingly digital radiography (DR) flat panel detectors—followed by optional image post-processing. Some post-processing techniques of particular interest are tomosynthesis, and dual energy subtraction. Tomosynthesis adds the ability to recreate quasi-3D images from a series of 2D projections. These exposures are typically taken along an arc or other path; and, tomosynthesis reconstruction is used to form a three-dimensional representation of the area of interest. Dual-energy radiography adds the ability to enhance or "eliminate" structures based on their different attenuation of well-separated end-point energies in two exposures. These advanced capabilities come at a high cost in terms of complexity, imaging time, capital equipment, space, and potentially reduced image quality due to motion blur if acquired sequentially. Recently, the prospect of creating x-ray sources, which are composed of arrays of micro-emitters, has been put forward. These arrays offer a flat-panel geometry and may afford advantages in fabrication methodology, size and cost. They also facilitate the use of the dual energy technology. Here we examine the possibility of using such an array of x-ray sources combined with high frame-rate (~kHz) DR detectors to produce advanced medical images without the need for moving gantries or other complex motion systems. Combining the advantages of dual energy imaging with the ability to determine the relative depth location of anatomical structures or pathological findings from imaging procedures should prove to be a powerful diagnostic tool. We also present use cases that would benefit from the capabilities of this modality.

  6. Tomosynthesis for the early detection of pulmonary emphysema: diagnostic performance compared with chest radiography, using multidetector computed tomography as reference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yoshitake; Jinzaki, Masahiro; Hashimoto, Masahiro; Shiomi, Eisuke; Abe, Takayuki; Kuribayashi, Sachio; Ogawa, Kenji

    2013-08-01

    To compare the diagnostic performance of tomosynthesis with that of chest radiography for the detection of pulmonary emphysema, using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) as reference. Forty-eight patients with and 63 without pulmonary emphysema underwent chest MDCT, tomosynthesis and radiography on the same day. Two blinded radiologists independently evaluated the tomosynthesis images and radiographs for the presence of pulmonary emphysema. Axial and coronal MDCT images served as the reference standard and the percentage lung volume with attenuation values of -950 HU or lower (LAA-950) was evaluated to determine the extent of emphysema. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and generalised estimating equations model were used. ROC analysis revealed significantly better performance (P performance of tomosynthesis was significantly superior to that of radiography for the detection of pulmonary emphysema. In both tomosynthesis and radiography, the sensitivity was affected by the LAA-950. • Tomosynthesis showed significantly better diagnostic performance for pulmonary emphysema than radiography. • Interobserver agreement for tomosynthesis was significantly higher than that for radiography. • Sensitivity increased with increasing LAA -950 in both tomosynthesis and radiography. • Tomosynthesis imparts a similar radiation dose to two projection chest radiography. • Radiation dose and cost of tomosynthesis are lower than those of MDCT.

  7. Imaging Management of Breast Density, a Controversial Risk Factor for Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcon, Shannon; Williams, Angela; Weinfurtner, Jared; Drukteinis, Jennifer S

    2017-04-01

    Breast density is well recognized as an independent risk factor for the development of breast cancer. However, the magnitude of risk is controversial. As the public becomes increasingly aware of breast density as a risk factor, legislation and notification laws in relation to breast density have become common throughout the United States. Awareness of breast density as a risk factor for breast cancer presents new challenges for the clinician in the approach to the management and screening of women with dense breasts. The evidence and controversy surrounding breast density as a risk factor for the development of breast cancer are discussed. Common supplemental screening modalities for breast cancer are also discussed, including tomosynthesis, ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging. A management strategy for screening women with dense breasts is also presented. The American College of Radiology recognizes breast density as a controversial risk factor for breast cancer, whereas the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recognizes breast density as a modest risk factor. Neither organization recommends the routine use of supplemental screening in women with dense breasts without considering additional patient-related risk factors. Breast density is a poorly understood and controversial risk factor for the development of breast cancer. Mammography is a screening modality proven to reduce breast cancer-related mortality rates and is the single most appropriate tool for population-based screening. Use of supplemental screening modalities should be tailored to individual risk assessment.

  8. Feasibility study for image reconstruction in circular digital tomosynthesis (CDTS) from limited-scan angle data based on compressed-sensing theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Yeonok; Je, Uikyu; Cho, Hyosung, E-mail: hscho1@yonsei.ac.kr; Hong, Daeki; Park, Chulkyu; Cho, Heemoon; Choi, Sungil; Woo, Taeho

    2015-03-21

    In this work, we performed a feasibility study for image reconstruction in a circular digital tomosynthesis (CDTS) from limited-scan angle data based on compressed-sensing (CS) theory. Here, the X-ray source moves along an arc within a limited-scan angle (≤ 180°) on a circular path set perpendicularly to the axial direction during the image acquisition. This geometry, compared to full-angle (360°) scan geometry, allows imaging system to be designed more compactly and gives better tomographic quality than conventional linear digital tomosynthesis (DTS). We implemented an efficient CS-based reconstruction algorithm for the proposed geometry and performed systematic simulations to investigate the image characteristics. We successfully reconstructed CDTS images with incomplete projections acquired at several selected limited-scan angles of 45°, 90°, 135°, and 180° for a given tomographic angle of 80° and evaluated the reconstruction quality. Our simulation results indicate that the proposed method can provide superior tomographic quality for axial view and even for the other views (i.e., sagittal and coronal), as in computed tomography, to conventional DTS. - Highlights: • Image reconstruction is done in circular digital tomosynthesis (CDTS). • The designed geometry allows imaging system to be the better image. • An efficient compressed-sensing (CS)-based reconstruction algorithm is performed. • Proposed method can provide superior tomographic quality for the axial view.

  9. The Athena Breast Health Network: developing a rapid learning system in breast cancer prevention, screening, treatment, and care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elson, Sarah L; Hiatt, Robert A; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Howell, Lydia P; Naeim, Arash; Parker, Barbara A; Van't Veer, Laura J; Hogarth, Michael; Pierce, John P; Duwors, Robert J; Hajopoulos, Kathy; Esserman, Laura J

    2013-07-01

    The term breast cancer covers many different conditions, whose clinical course ranges from indolent to aggressive. However, current practice in breast cancer prevention and care, and in breast cancer epidemiology, does not take into account the heterogeneity of the disease. A comprehensive understanding of the etiology and progression of different breast cancer subtypes would enable a more patient-centered approach to breast health care: assessing an individual's risk of getting specific subtypes of the disease, providing risk-based screening and prevention recommendations, and, for those diagnosed with the disease, tailored treatment options based on risk and timing of progression and mortality. The Athena Breast Health Network is an initiative of the five University of California medical and cancer centers to prototype this approach and to enable the development of a rapid learning system-connecting risk and outcome information from a heterogeneous patient population in real time and using new knowledge from research to continuously improve the quality of care. The Network is based on integrating clinical and research processes to create a comprehensive approach to accelerating patient-centered breast health care. Since its inception in 2009, the Network has developed a multi-site, transdisciplinary collaboration that enables the learning system. The five-campus collaboration has implemented a shared informatics platform, standardized electronic patient intake questionnaires, and common biospecimen protocols, as well as new clinical programs and multi-center research projects. The Athena Breast Health Network can serve as a model of a rapid learning system that integrates epidemiologic, behavioral, and clinical research with clinical care improvements.

  10. A feasibility study for anatomical noise reduction in dual-energy chest digital tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, D.; Kim, Y.-s.; Choi, S.; Lee, H.; Choi, S.; Kim, H.-J.

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Thus, early diagnosis is of considerable importance. For early screening of lung cancer, computed tomography (CT) has been used as the gold standard. Chest digital tomosynthesis (CDT) is a recently introduced modality for lung cancer screening with a relatively low radiation dose compared to CT. The dual energy material decomposition method has been proposed for better detection of pulmonary nodules by means of reducing anatomical noise. In this study, the possibility of material decomposition in CDT was tested by both a simulation study and an experimental study using a CDT prototype. The Geant4 application for tomographic emission (GATE) v6 and tungsten anode spectral model using interpolating polynomials (TASMIP) codes were used for the simulation study to create simulated phantom shapes consisting of five inner cylinders filled with different densities of bone and airequivalent materials. Furthermore, the CDT prototype system and human phantom chest were used for the experimental study. CDT scan in both the simulation and experimental studies was performed with linear movement and 21 projection images were obtained over a 30 degree angular range with a 1.5 degree angular interval. To obtain materialselective images, a projectionbased energy subtraction technique was applied to high and low energy images. The resultant simulation images showed that dual-energy reconstruction could achieve an approximately 32% higher contrast to noise ratio (CNR) in images and the difference in CNR value according to bone density was significant compared to single energy CDT. Additionally, image artifacts were effectively corrected in dual energy CDT simulation studies. Likewise the experimental study with dual energy produced clear images of lung fields and bone structure by removing unnecessary anatomical structures. Dual energy tomosynthesis is a new technique; therefore, there is little guidance regarding its

  11. A measurement system for evaluation of shape changes and proportions after cosmetic breast surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Eric

    2012-04-01

    Evaluation of changes in breast shape, particularly "upper pole fullness," "breast projection," and "bottoming out," has been made difficult by the lack of an accepted definition of these entities and no standardized system for measurements and comparison. Three-dimensional imaging is impractical for most surgeons and limited in providing evidence-based assessments. Using standardized photographs and computer imaging software to match size and orientation, breast shape and size are measured and compared before and after cosmetic breast surgery. Practical landmarks and analysis allow assessment of results using standard two-dimensional frontal and lateral views. A horizontal plane at the level of maximum postoperative breast projection and a vertical plane dropped from the sternal notch serve as the reference planes. Breast projection, upper pole projection, lower pole level, nipple level, lower pole width, breast parenchymal ratio, and lower pole ratio (a measure of the boxiness of the lower pole) are defined and measured. These simple measurements may be easily used by surgeons to evaluate the effectiveness of their techniques in breast augmentation, mastopexy, augmentation/mastopexy, and reduction. Claims regarding changes in breast projection, upper pole projection, and breast mound elevation may be objectively evaluated. This measurement system provides a highly practical means with which to quantitate breast shape changes after surgery and assess surgical results using well-defined references. Therapeutic, V.

  12. Staging of breast cancer and the advanced applications of digital mammogram: what the physician needs to know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helal, Maha H; Mansour, Sahar M; Zaglol, Mai; Salaleldin, Lamia A; Nada, Omniya M; Haggag, Marwa A

    2017-03-01

    To study the role of advanced applications of digital mammogram, whether contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM) or digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), in the "T" staging of histologically proven breast cancer before planning for treatment management. In this prospective analysis, we evaluated 98 proved malignant breast masses regarding their size, multiplicity and the presence of associated clusters of microcalcifications. Evaluation methods included digital mammography (DM), 3D tomosynthesis and CESM. Traditional DM was first performed then in a period of 10-14-day interval; breast tomosynthesis and contrast-based mammography were performed for the involved breast only. Views at tomosynthesis were acquired in a "step-and-shoot" tube motion mode to produce multiple (11-15), low-dose images and in contrast-enhanced study, low-energy (22-33 kVp) and high-energy (44-49 kVp) exposures were taken after the i.v. injection of the contrast agent. Operative data were the gold standard reference. Breast tomosynthesis showed the highest accuracy in size assessment (n = 69, 70.4%) than contrast-enhanced (n = 49, 50%) and regular mammography (n = 59, 60.2%). Contrast-enhanced mammography presented the least performance in assessing calcifications, yet it was most sensitive in the detection of multiplicity (92.3%), followed by tomosynthesis (77%) and regular mammography (53.8%). The combined analysis of the three modalities provided an accuracy of 74% in the "T" staging of breast cancer. The combined application of tomosynthesis and contrast-enhanced digital mammogram enhanced the performance of the traditional DM and presented an informative method in the staging of breast cancer. Advances in knowledge: Staging and management planning of breast cancer can divert according to tumour size, multiplicity and the presence of microcalcifications. DBT shows sharp outlines of the tumour with no overlap tissue and spots microcalcifications. Contrast

  13. Progress in diagnosis of breast cancer: Advances in radiology technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Mari Beth Linder

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer in females between the ages of 15 and 54, and the second leading cause of cancer death in women in the United States. Diagnosis begins with detection by breast examination (clinical breast exam or breast self-exam or by radiologic studies, like mammography. Many advances in the diagnosis of breast cancer have taken place in recent years. This article will review the history of radiologic advances in the diagnosis of breast cancer. Use of technological advancements in digital breast tomosynthesis, magnetic resonance imaging, and ultrasound in breast cancer diagnosis will be presented. Advantages and disadvantages of these diagnostic interventions when compared to older, traditional X-ray films will be discussed. It is important for all nurses, including radiology and oncology nurses, to be well informed about these varied diagnostic modalities, and appreciate the fact that advances in radiologic imaging technologies can yield improved outcomes for breast cancer patients.

  14. Mammographic density and breast cancer risk in breast screening assessment cases and women with a family history of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Stephen W; Morrish, Oliver W E; Allgood, Prue C; Black, Richard; Gillan, Maureen G C; Willsher, Paula; Cooke, Julie; Duncan, Karen A; Michell, Michael J; Dobson, Hilary M; Maroni, Roberta; Lim, Yit Y; Purushothaman, Hema N; Suaris, Tamara; Astley, Susan M; Young, Kenneth C; Tucker, Lorraine; Gilbert, Fiona J

    2018-01-01

    Mammographic density has been shown to be a strong independent predictor of breast cancer and a causative factor in reducing the sensitivity of mammography. There remain questions as to the use of mammographic density information in the context of screening and risk management, and of the association with cancer in populations known to be at increased risk of breast cancer. To assess the association of breast density with presence of cancer by measuring mammographic density visually as a percentage, and with two automated volumetric methods, Quantra™ and VolparaDensity™. The TOMosynthesis with digital MammographY (TOMMY) study of digital breast tomosynthesis in the Breast Screening Programme of the National Health Service (NHS) of the United Kingdom (UK) included 6020 breast screening assessment cases (of whom 1158 had breast cancer) and 1040 screened women with a family history of breast cancer (of whom two had breast cancer). We assessed the association of each measure with breast cancer risk in these populations at enhanced risk, using logistic regression adjusted for age and total breast volume as a surrogate for body mass index (BMI). All density measures showed a positive association with presence of cancer and all declined with age. The strongest effect was seen with Volpara absolute density, with a significant 3% (95% CI 1-5%) increase in risk per 10 cm 3 of dense tissue. The effect of Volpara volumetric density on risk was stronger for large and grade 3 tumours. Automated absolute breast density is a predictor of breast cancer risk in populations at enhanced risk due to either positive mammographic findings or family history. In the screening context, density could be a trigger for more intensive imaging. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Primary systemic chemotherapy of breast cancer: indication and predictive factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinno, Hiromitsu; Sakata, Michio; Hayashida, Tetsu; Takahashi, Maiko; Sato, Tomomi; Seki, Hirohito; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2011-04-01

    Primary systemic chemotherapy has become a standard of care for operable breast cancer patients who are candidates for adjuvant chemotherapy. Induction of pathological complete response (pCR) is one of the main goals of primary systemic chemotherapy because patients with pCR have shown a better prognosis. The definition of pCR has varied across clinical trials. It would be ideal for all researchers to use the same terminology in describing pathologic response. Identification of accurate predictive factors of pCR to primary systemic chemotherapy is urgent, because patients with a low chance of pCR and clinical response should be spared unnecessary toxicity. Early response to primary systemic chemotherapy might be correlated with a high probability of a pCR. Therefore, evaluation of early response is useful to avoid unnecessary toxicity without potential benefit from chemotherapy.

  16. Associations between gene expression profiles of invasive breast cancer and Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System MRI lexicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ga Ram; Ku, You Jin; Cho, Soon Gu; Kim, Sei Joong; Min, Byung Soh

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate whether the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) MRI lexicon could reflect the genomic information of breast cancers and to suggest intuitive imaging features as biomarkers. Matched breast MRI data from The Cancer Imaging Archive and gene expression profile from The Cancer Genome Atlas of 70 invasive breast cancers were analyzed. Magnetic resonance images were reviewed according to the BI-RADS MRI lexicon of mass morphology. The cancers were divided into 2 groups of gene clustering by gene set enrichment an alysis. Clinicopathologic and imaging characteristics were compared between the 2 groups. The luminal subtype was predominant in the group 1 gene set and the triple-negative subtype was predominant in the group 2 gene set (55 of 56, 98.2% vs. 9 of 14, 64.3%). Internal enhancement descriptors were different between the 2 groups; heterogeneity was most frequent in group 1 (27 of 56, 48.2%) and rim enhancement was dominant in group 2 (10 of 14, 71.4%). In group 1, the gene sets related to mammary gland development were overexpressed whereas the gene sets related to mitotic cell division were overexpressed in group 2. We identified intuitive imaging features of breast MRI associated with distinct gene expression profiles using the standard imaging variables of BI-RADS. The internal enhancement pattern on MRI might reflect specific gene expression profiles of breast cancers, which can be recognized by visual distinction.

  17. Incorporating texture features in a computer-aided breast lesion diagnosis system for automated three-dimensional breast ultrasound

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, H.; Tan, T.; Zelst, J. van; Mann, R.; Karssemeijer, N.; Platel, B.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the benefits of incorporating texture features into an existing computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system for classifying benign and malignant lesions in automated three-dimensional breast ultrasound images. The existing system takes into account 11 different features, describing

  18. Quantifying the tibiofemoral joint space using x-ray tomosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinosky, Benjamin; Sabol, John M; Piacsek, Kelly; Heckel, Beth; Gilat Schmidt, Taly

    2011-12-01

    Digital x-ray tomosynthesis (DTS) has the potential to provide 3D information about the knee joint in a load-bearing posture, which may improve diagnosis and monitoring of knee osteoarthritis compared with projection radiography, the current standard of care. Manually quantifying and visualizing the joint space width (JSW) from 3D tomosynthesis datasets may be challenging. This work developed a semiautomated algorithm for quantifying the 3D tibiofemoral JSW from reconstructed DTS images. The algorithm was validated through anthropomorphic phantom experiments and applied to three clinical datasets. A user-selected volume of interest within the reconstructed DTS volume was enhanced with 1D multiscale gradient kernels. The edge-enhanced volumes were divided by polarity into tibial and femoral edge maps and combined across kernel scales. A 2D connected components algorithm was performed to determine candidate tibial and femoral edges. A 2D joint space width map (JSW) was constructed to represent the 3D tibiofemoral joint space. To quantify the algorithm accuracy, an adjustable knee phantom was constructed, and eleven posterior-anterior (PA) and lateral DTS scans were acquired with the medial minimum JSW of the phantom set to 0-5 mm in 0.5 mm increments (VolumeRad™, GE Healthcare, Chalfont St. Giles, United Kingdom). The accuracy of the algorithm was quantified by comparing the minimum JSW in a region of interest in the medial compartment of the JSW map to the measured phantom setting for each trial. In addition, the algorithm was applied to DTS scans of a static knee phantom and the JSW map compared to values estimated from a manually segmented computed tomography (CT) dataset. The algorithm was also applied to three clinical DTS datasets of osteoarthritic patients. The algorithm segmented the JSW and generated a JSW map for all phantom and clinical datasets. For the adjustable phantom, the estimated minimum JSW values were plotted against the measured values for all

  19. Defining the Survival Benchmark for Breast Cancer Patients with Systemic Relapse

    OpenAIRE

    Zeichner, Simon B.; Tadeu Ambros; John Zaravinos; Montero, Alberto J.; Mahtani, Reshma L; Ahn, Eugene R; Aruna Mani; Nathan J. Markward; Vogel, Charles L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Our original paper, published in 1992, reported a median overall survival after first relapse in breast cancer of 26 months. The current retrospective review concentrates more specifically on patients with first systemic relapse, recognizing that subsets of patients with local recurrence are potentially curable. METHODS Records of 5,168 patients from a largely breast-cancer-specific oncology practice were reviewed to identify breast cancer patients with their first relapse between ...

  20. Evaluation of the effect of geometry for measuring section thickness in tomosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Ryohei; Ishii, Rie; Kishimoto, Junichi; Yamato, Shinichiro; Takahata, Akira; Kohama, Chiyuki

    2014-01-01

    Our aim in this study was to evaluate the effect of geometry for measuring section thickness in tomosynthesis by using a metal bead device (bead method). Tomosynthesis images were obtained from two types of tomosynthesis equipment, Safire17 (ST, Shimadzu, Kyoto, Japan) and XR650 (GT, GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI). After tomosynthesis radiography with each device, the bead tomosynthesis images were obtained by image reconstruction. The digital profile was obtained from the digital value of the bead central coordinate in the perpendicular direction, and we acquired the slice sensitivity profile (SSP). The section thickness was defined with the full width at half maximum obtained from the SSP. We investigated the change in section thickness under different evaluation conditions: the angular range, the height of the bead position, the source-image receptor distance (SID), and image processing. The section thickness decreased when the angular range and height of the bead position increased. Also, the section thickness varied with a change in the SID. The section thickness differed according to the geometry for measuring the section thickness. Thus, the effect of the geometry used for measurement should be considered when the section thickness in tomosynthesis is measured by the bead method.

  1. A Clinical Decision Support System for Breast Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Ana S.; Alves, Pedro; Jarman, Ian H.; Etchells, Terence A.; Fonseca, José M.; Lisboa, Paulo J. G.

    This paper proposes a Web clinical decision support system for clinical oncologists and for breast cancer patients making prognostic assessments, using the particular characteristics of the individual patient. This system comprises three different prognostic modelling methodologies: the clinically widely used Nottingham prognostic index (NPI); the Cox regression modelling and a partial logistic artificial neural network with automatic relevance determination (PLANN-ARD). All three models yield a different prognostic index that can be analysed together in order to obtain a more accurate prognostic assessment of the patient. Missing data is incorporated in the mentioned models, a common issue in medical data that was overcome using multiple imputation techniques. Risk group assignments are also provided through a methodology based on regression trees, where Boolean rules can be obtained expressed with patient characteristics.

  2. Rates and indications for surgical breast biopsies in a community-based health system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soot, Laurel; Weerasinghe, Roshanthi; Wang, Lian; Nelson, Heidi D

    2014-04-01

    High rates of surgical breast biopsies in community hospitals have been reported but may misrepresent actual practice. Patient-level data from 5,757 women who underwent breast biopsies in a large integrated health system were evaluated to determine biopsy types, rates, indications, and diagnoses. Between 2008 and 2010, 6,047 breast biopsies were performed on 5,757 women. Surgical biopsy was the initial diagnostic procedure in 16% (n = 942) of women overall and in 6% (72 of 1,236) of women with newly diagnosed invasive breast cancer. Invasive breast cancer was diagnosed in 72 women (8%) undergoing surgical biopsy compared with 1,164 (24%) undergoing core needle biopsy (P biopsies included symptomatic abnormalities, technical challenges, and patient choice. Surgical biopsy was the initial diagnostic procedure in 16% of women with breast abnormalities, comparable with rates at academic centers. Rates could be improved by more careful consideration of indications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) breast composition descriptors: Automated measurement development for full field digital mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, E. E.; Sellers, T. A.; Lu, B. [Department of Cancer Epidemiology, Division of Population Sciences, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States); Heine, J. J. [Department of Cancer Imaging and Metabolism, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: The Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) breast composition descriptors are used for standardized mammographic reporting and are assessed visually. This reporting is clinically relevant because breast composition can impact mammographic sensitivity and is a breast cancer risk factor. New techniques are presented and evaluated for generating automated BI-RADS breast composition descriptors using both raw and calibrated full field digital mammography (FFDM) image data.Methods: A matched case-control dataset with FFDM images was used to develop three automated measures for the BI-RADS breast composition descriptors. Histograms of each calibrated mammogram in the percent glandular (pg) representation were processed to create the new BR{sub pg} measure. Two previously validated measures of breast density derived from calibrated and raw mammograms were converted to the new BR{sub vc} and BR{sub vr} measures, respectively. These three measures were compared with the radiologist-reported BI-RADS compositions assessments from the patient records. The authors used two optimization strategies with differential evolution to create these measures: method-1 used breast cancer status; and method-2 matched the reported BI-RADS descriptors. Weighted kappa (κ) analysis was used to assess the agreement between the new measures and the reported measures. Each measure's association with breast cancer was evaluated with odds ratios (ORs) adjusted for body mass index, breast area, and menopausal status. ORs were estimated as per unit increase with 95% confidence intervals.Results: The three BI-RADS measures generated by method-1 had κ between 0.25–0.34. These measures were significantly associated with breast cancer status in the adjusted models: (a) OR = 1.87 (1.34, 2.59) for BR{sub pg}; (b) OR = 1.93 (1.36, 2.74) for BR{sub vc}; and (c) OR = 1.37 (1.05, 1.80) for BR{sub vr}. The measures generated by method-2 had κ between 0.42–0.45. Two of these

  4. MRI and ultrasound evaluation of invasive lobular carcinoma of the breast after primary systemic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Miki; Tsunoda, Hiroko; Takamoto, Yayoi; Murai, Michiko; Kikuchi, Mari; Honda, Satoshi; Suzuki, Koyu; Yamauchi, Hideko

    2015-07-01

    To assess magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound (US) evaluation of invasive lobular carcinoma after primary systemic therapy compared to the primary surgery group. A total of 218 breasts with invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC), which were diagnosed by core needle biopsy and underwent surgery between 2004 and 2010 in St. Luke's International Hospital, were reviewed. Of these, 44 breasts received primary systemic therapy (PST) and the residual 174 breasts underwent surgery first. Before surgery, MRI and second-look US were performed. Patients whose extent of lesion from MRI and US was over 90° were recommended to receive total mastectomy. Diagnostic image evaluation was categorized from the final pathology. A negative margin of breast-conserving surgery (BCS) and mastectomy which has over 90° tumor extent in pathology were regarded as "appropriate". A positive margin of BCS was regarded as "underestimated". "Overestimation" was determined when the pathological extension was small enough for BCS although MRI and US diagnosis was over 90°. Of 44 breasts which received PST, 26 breasts received BCS as initial surgery. Of these, 14 (53.8 %) breasts were "underestimated". Of these 14, 5 breasts received additional total mastectomy. Of 174 breasts that received surgery first, 121 (69.5 %) breasts received BCS as the initial surgery. Of these, 46 (38.0 %) breasts were "underestimated" and 6 breast of these 46 received additional total mastectomy. "Underestimated" rate was similar in the two groups, but the additional total mastectomy rate was significantly higher in the PST group (p = 0.025). There were no "overestimations". The "appropriate" rate was similar between the PST (68.2 %) and surgery-first groups (73.6 %). Although 68.2 % of ILC patients were evaluated "appropriately" even after PST, higher additional total mastectomy rates should be considered when selecting the surgical procedure.

  5. Non-Gaussian statistical properties of breast images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbey, Craig K.; Nosratieh, Anita; Sohl-Dickstein, Jascha; Yang, Kai; Boone, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Several studies have shown that the power spectrum of x-ray breast images is well described by a power-law at lower frequencies where anatomical variability dominates. However, an image generated from a Gaussian process with this spectrum is easily distinguished from an image of actual breast tissue by eye. This demonstrates that higher order non-Gaussian statistical properties of mammograms are readily accessible to the visual system. The authors’ purpose is to quantify and characterize non-Gaussian statistical properties of breast images as influenced by processing of a digital mammogram, different imaging modalities, and breast density. Methods: To quantify non-Gaussian statistical properties, the authors consider histograms of filter responses from the interior of a breast image that have similar properties to receptive fields in the early visual system. They quantify departure from a Gaussian distribution by the relative entropy of the histogram compared to a best-fit Gaussian distribution. This entropy is normalized by the relative entropy of a best-fit Laplacian distribution into a measure they refer to as Laplacian fractional entropy (LFE). They test the LFE on a set of 26 patients recalled at screening for which they have available full-field digital mammography (FFDM), digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), and dedicated breast CT (bCT) images as well as breast density scores and biopsy results. Results: A study of LFE in FFDM comparing the raw “for-processing” transmission data from the device to log-converted density estimates and the processed “for-display” data shows that processing mammographic image data enhances the non-Gaussian content of the image. A check of the methodology using a Gaussian process with a power-law power spectrum shows relatively little bias from the finite extent of the region of interests used. A second study comparing LFE across FFDM, DBT, and bCT modalities shows that each maximized the non-Gaussian content

  6. Comparative performance of multiview stereoscopic and mammographic display modalities for breast lesion detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, Lincoln J.; Samei, Ehsan; Lo, Joseph Y.; Baker, Jay A.; Ghate, Sujata V.; Kim, Connie; Soo, Mary Scott; Walsh, Ruth [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Medical Physics Graduate Program, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: Mammography is known to be one of the most difficult radiographic exams to interpret. Mammography has important limitations, including the superposition of normal tissue that can obscure a mass, chance alignment of normal tissue to mimic a true lesion and the inability to derive volumetric information. It has been shown that stereomammography can overcome these deficiencies by showing that layers of normal tissue lay at different depths. If standard stereomammography (i.e., a single stereoscopic pair consisting of two projection images) can significantly improve lesion detection, how will multiview stereoscopy (MVS), where many projection images are used, compare to mammography? The aim of this study was to assess the relative performance of MVS compared to mammography for breast mass detection. Methods: The MVS image sets consisted of the 25 raw projection images acquired over an arc of approximately 45 deg. using a Siemens prototype breast tomosynthesis system. The mammograms were acquired using a commercial Siemens FFDM system. The raw data were taken from both of these systems for 27 cases and realistic simulated mass lesions were added to duplicates of the 27 images at the same local contrast. The images with lesions (27 mammography and 27 MVS) and the images without lesions (27 mammography and 27 MVS) were then postprocessed to provide comparable and representative image appearance across the two modalities. All 108 image sets were shown to five full-time breast imaging radiologists in random order on a state-of-the-art stereoscopic display. The observers were asked to give a confidence rating for each image (0 for lesion definitely not present, 100 for lesion definitely present). The ratings were then compiled and processed using ROC and variance analysis. Results: The mean AUC for the five observers was 0.614{+-}0.055 for mammography and 0.778{+-}0.052 for multiview stereoscopy. The difference of 0.164{+-}0.065 was statistically significant with a

  7. Comparative performance of multiview stereoscopic and mammographic display modalities for breast lesion detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Lincoln J; Samei, Ehsan; Lo, Joseph Y; Baker, Jay A; Ghate, Sujata V; Kim, Connie; Soo, Mary Scott; Walsh, Ruth

    2011-04-01

    Mammography is known to be one of the most difficult radiographic exams to interpret. Mammography has important limitations, including the superposition of normal tissue that can obscure a mass, chance alignment of normal tissue to mimic a true lesion and the inability to derive volumetric information. It has been shown that stereomammography can overcome these deficiencies by showing that layers of normal tissue lay at different depths. If standard stereomammography (i.e., a single stereoscopic pair consisting of two projection images) can significantly improve lesion detection, how will multiview stereoscopy (MVS), where many projection images are used, compare to mammography? The aim of this study was to assess the relative performance of MVS compared to mammography for breast mass detection. The MVS image sets consisted of the 25 raw projection images acquired over an arc of approximately 45 degrees using a Siemens prototype breast tomosynthesis system. The mammograms were acquired using a commercial Siemens FFDM system. The raw data were taken from both of these systems for 27 cases and realistic simulated mass lesions were added to duplicates of the 27 images at the same local contrast. The images with lesions (27 mammography and 27 MVS) and the images without lesions (27 mammography and 27 MVS) were then postprocessed to provide comparable and representative image appearance across the two modalities. All 108 image sets were shown to five full-time breast imaging radiologists in random order on a state-of-the-art stereoscopic display. The observers were asked to give a confidence rating for each image (0 for lesion definitely not present, 100 for lesion definitely present). The ratings were then compiled and processed using ROC and variance analysis. The mean AUC for the five observers was 0.614 +/- 0.055 for mammography and 0.778 +/- 0.052 for multiview stereoscopy. The difference of 0.164 +/- 0.065 was statistically significant with a p-value of 0

  8. Design and characterization of Stormram 4 : an MRI-compatible robotic system for breast biopsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenhuis, Vincent; Siepel, Françoise Jeanette; Veltman, Jeroen; Stramigioli, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    Targeting of small lesions with high precision is essential in an early phase of breast cancer for diagnosis and accurate follow up, and subsequently determines prognosis. Current techniques to diagnose breast cancer are suboptimal, and there is a need for a small, MRI-compatible robotic system able

  9. Genetically engineered bifidobacterium as a drug delivery system for systemic therapy of metastatic breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimori, Minoru

    2006-01-01

    A fundamental obstacle in systemic therapy for metastatic breast cancer patients is specific targeting of therapy directly to a solid tumor. Hypoxic or necrotic regions are characteristic of solid tumors in many murine and human tumors, including the majority of primary tumors of the breast. A strain of anaerobic bacteria such as Bifidobacterium or Clostridium selectively localizes to and proliferates in solid tumors after systemic application. Another approach uses attenuated Salmonella strains that need tumor-specific nutrients to selectively proliferate and is a potential gene delivery system. We constructed a plasmid, pBLES100-S-eCD, which included the cytosine deaminase gene. Transfected Bifidobacterium longum produced cytosine deaminase in the hypoxic tumor. Enzyme/pro-drug therapy was confirmed to be effective for systemic administration.

  10. A multi-image approach to CADx of breast cancer with integration into PACS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elter, Matthias; Wittenberg, Thomas; Schulz-Wendtland, Rüdiger; Deserno, Thomas M.

    2009-02-01

    While screening mammography is accepted as the most adequate technique for the early detection of breast cancer, its low positive predictive value leads to many breast biopsies performed on benign lesions. Therefore, we have previously developed a knowledge-based system for computer-aided diagnosis (CADx) of mammographic lesions. It supports the radiologist in the discrimination of benign and malignant lesions. So far, our approach operates on the lesion level and employs the paradigm of content-based image retrieval (CBIR). Similar lesions with known diagnosis are retrieved automatically from a library of references. However, radiologists base their diagnostic decisions on additional resources, such as related mammographic projections, other modalities (e.g. ultrasound, MRI), and clinical data. Nonetheless, most CADx systems disregard the relation between the craniocaudal (CC) and mediolateral-oblique (MLO) views of conventional mammography. Therefore, we extend our approach to the full case level: (i) Multi-frame features are developed that jointly describe a lesion in different views of mammography. Taking into account the geometric relation between different images, these features can also be extracted from multi-modal data; (ii) the CADx system architecture is extended appropriately; (iii) the CADx system is integrated into the radiology information system (RIS) and the picture archiving and communication system (PACS). Here, the framework for image retrieval in medical applications (IRMA) is used to support access to the patient's health care record. Of particular interest is the application of the proposed CADx system to digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), which has the potential to succeed digital mammography as the standard technique for breast cancer screening. The proposed system is a natural extension of CADx approaches that integrate only two modalities. However, we are still collecting a large enough database of breast lesions with images from

  11. Progress in the Biological Understanding and Management of Breast Cancer-Associated Central Nervous System Metastases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana M.

    2013-01-01

    Metastasis to the central nervous system (CNS) is a devastating neurological complication of systemic cancer. Brain metastases from breast cancer have been documented to occur in approximately 10%–16% of cases over the natural course of the disease with leptomeningeal metastases occurring in approximately 2%–5% of cases of breast cancer. CNS metastases among women with breast cancer tend to occur among those who are younger, have larger tumors, and have a more aggressive histological subtype such as the triple negative and HER2-positive subtypes. Treatment of CNS metastases involves various combinations of whole brain radiation therapy, surgery, stereotactic radiosurgery, and chemotherapy. We will discuss the progress made in the treatment and prevention of breast cancer-associated CNS metastases and will delve into the biological underpinnings of CNS metastases including evaluating the role of breast tumor subtype on the incidence, natural history, prognostic outcome, and impact of therapeutic efficacy. PMID:23740934

  12. Tomosynthesis for the early detection of pulmonary emphysema: diagnostic performance compared with chest radiography, using multidetector computed tomography as reference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Yoshitake [Keio University School of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Tokyo (Japan); Nippon Koukan Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kawasaki-shi, Kanagawa (Japan); Jinzaki, Masahiro; Hashimoto, Masahiro; Shiomi, Eisuke; Kuribayashi, Sachio [Keio University School of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Tokyo (Japan); Abe, Takayuki [Keio University School of Medicine, Center for Clinical Research, Tokyo (Japan); Ogawa, Kenji [Nippon Koukan Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kawasaki-shi, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2013-08-15

    To compare the diagnostic performance of tomosynthesis with that of chest radiography for the detection of pulmonary emphysema, using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) as reference. Forty-eight patients with and 63 without pulmonary emphysema underwent chest MDCT, tomosynthesis and radiography on the same day. Two blinded radiologists independently evaluated the tomosynthesis images and radiographs for the presence of pulmonary emphysema. Axial and coronal MDCT images served as the reference standard and the percentage lung volume with attenuation values of -950 HU or lower (LAA{sub -950}) was evaluated to determine the extent of emphysema. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and generalised estimating equations model were used. ROC analysis revealed significantly better performance (P < 0.0001) of tomosynthesis than radiography for the detection of pulmonary emphysema. The average sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of tomosynthesis were 0.875, 0.968, 0.955 and 0.910, respectively, whereas the values for radiography were 0.479, 0.913, 0.815 and 0.697, respectively. For both tomosynthesis and radiography, the sensitivity increased with increasing LAA{sub -950}. The diagnostic performance of tomosynthesis was significantly superior to that of radiography for the detection of pulmonary emphysema. In both tomosynthesis and radiography, the sensitivity was affected by the LAA{sub -950}. (orig.)

  13. A fast, angle-dependent, analytical model of CsI detector response for optimization of 3D x-ray breast imaging systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, Melanie; Park, Subok; Badano, Aldo

    2010-06-01

    Accurate models of detector blur are crucial for performing meaningful optimizations of three-dimensional (3D) x-ray breast imaging systems as well as for developing reconstruction algorithms that faithfully reproduce the imaged object anatomy. So far, x-ray detector blur has either been ignored or modeled as a shift-invariant symmetric function for these applications. The recent development of a Monte Carlo simulation package called MANTIS has allowed detailed modeling of these detector blur functions and demonstrated the magnitude of the anisotropy for both tomosynthesis and breast CT imaging systems. Despite the detailed results that MANTIS produces, the long simulation times required make inclusion of these results impractical in rigorous optimization and reconstruction algorithms. As a result, there is a need for detector blur models that can be rapidly generated. In this study, the authors have derived an analytical model for deterministic detector blur functions, referred to here as point response functions (PRFs), of columnar CsI phosphor screens. The analytical model is x-ray energy and incidence angle dependent and draws on results from MANTIS to indirectly include complicated interactions that are not explicitly included in the mathematical model. Once the mathematical expression is derived, values of the coefficients are determined by a two-dimensional (2D) fit to MANTIS-generated results based on a figure-of-merit (FOM) that measures the normalized differences between the MANTIS and analytical model results averaged over a region of interest. A smaller FOM indicates a better fit. This analysis was performed for a monochromatic x-ray energy of 25 keV, a CsI scintillator thickness of 150 microm, and four incidence angles (0 degrees, 15 degrees, 30 degrees, and 45 degrees). The FOMs comparing the analytical model to MANTIS for these parameters were 0.1951 +/- 0.0011, 0.1915 +/- 0.0014, 0.2266 +/- 0.0021, and 0.2416 +/- 0.0074 for 0 degrees, 15 degrees, 30

  14. Effects of circuit exercise on autonomic nerve system of survivors after surgery of breast cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shin, Hyeng-Cheol; Yang, Jung-Ok; Kim, Seung-Ryol

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the effects of exercise on the autonomic nervous system of breast cancer survivors by measuring heart rate variability during an 8-week circulation exercise program...

  15. Computer-Aided Diagnosis Sensor and System of Breast Sonography: A Clinical Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jong-Ha Lee; Eun-Jin Lee

    2014-01-01

    .... This paper discusses novel Fourier-based shape feature extraction techniques that provide enhanced classification accuracy for breast tumors in the computer-aided B-mode ultrasound diagnosis system...

  16. Cosmetic outcome 1-5 years after breast conservative surgery, irradiation and systemic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelemen, Gyöngyi; Varga, Zoltán; Lázár, György; Thurzó, László; Kahán, Zsuzsanna

    2012-04-01

    The late side-effects of the local therapy of early breast cancer depend on many patient- and therapy-related parameters. We aimed at investigating the factors that influence the cosmetic and functional outcomes among our breast cancer patients after breast-conserving surgery and conformal radiotherapy, with or without adjuvant systemic therapy. A study was made of the association of the cosmetic outcome after a median follow-up time of 2.4 years and the clinical data on 198 patients extracted from a prospectively compiled database. Breast tenderness occurred more frequently among patients ≤50 years old (p cosmetic outcome after breast-conserving surgery and postoperative radiotherapy.

  17. POSSIBILITIES OF BREAST FEEDING ORGANIZATION FOR CHILDREN WITH PERINATAL LESIONS OF CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. L. Lukoyanova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute and/or chronic hypoxia is a leading cause of perinatal lesions of central nervous system. Severe consequences of this condition can be the reason of temporary withdrawal from breast-feeding started soon after birth. Study objectives included: scrutiny of lactation establishment, influence of various factors on lactation duration in mothers of children with perinatal lesions of CNS. Study included 86 pairs mother-child, with duration of 12 months. It has been shown that in cases where breast feeding was impossible, regular expression of breast milk with the help of breast pump in the early lactation period allows not only to organize breast feeding by the time of discharge from the hospital, but also to extend its duration almost to the normal one. Severity of perinatal CNS lesion does not correspond with the duration of lactation period of the mother.

  18. Detection of lung nodules in chest digital tomosynthesis (CDT): effects of the different angular dose distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Byungdu; Lee, Youngjin; Kim, Dohyeon; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Jin, Seong-Soo; Mu, Shou-Chih; Kim, Hye-Mi; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2015-03-01

    Chest digital tomosynthesis (CDT) is a recently introduced new imaging modality for better detection of high- and smallcontrast lung nodules compared to conventional X-ray radiography. In CDT system, several projection views need to be acquired with limited angular range. The acquisition of insufficient number of projection data can degrade the reconstructed image quality. This image degradation easily affected by acquisition parameters such as angular dose distribution, number of projection views and reconstruction algorithm. To investigate the imaging characteristics, we evaluated the impact of the angular dose distribution on image quality by simulation studies with Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE). We designed the different angular dose distribution conditions. The results showed that the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) improves when exposed the higher dose at central projection views than peripheral views. While it was found that increasing angular dose distribution at central views improved lung nodule detectability, although both peripheral regions slightly suffer from image noise due to low dose distribution. The improvements of CNR by using proposed image acquisition technique suggest possible directions for further improvement of CDT system for lung nodule detection with high quality imaging capabilities.

  19. Breast Cancer Diagnostic System Final Report CRADA No. TC02098.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubenchik, A. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); DaSilva, L. B. [BioTelligent, Inc., Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-06

    This was a collaborative effort between Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (formerly The Regents of the University of California)/Lawrence Liver more National Laboratory (LLNL) and BioTelligent, Inc. together with a Russian Institution (BioFil, Ltd.), to develop a new system ( diagnostic device, operating procedures, algorithms and software) to accurately distinguish between benign and malignant breast tissue (Breast Cancer Diagnostic System, BCDS).

  20. Exercise regulates breast cancer cell viability: systemic training adaptations versus acute exercise responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dethlefsen, Christine; Lillelund, Christian; Midtgaard, Julie; Andersen, Christina; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund; Christensen, Jesper Frank; Hojman, Pernille

    2016-10-01

    Exercise decreases breast cancer risk and disease recurrence, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Training adaptations in systemic factors have been suggested as mediating causes. We aimed to examine if systemic adaptations to training over time, or acute exercise responses, in breast cancer survivors could regulate breast cancer cell viability in vitro. Blood samples were collected from breast cancer survivors, partaking in either a 6-month training intervention or across a 2 h acute exercise session. Changes in training parameters and systemic factors were evaluated and pre/post exercise-conditioned sera from both studies were used to stimulate breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, MDA-MB-231) in vitro. Six months of training increased VO2peak (16.4 %, p cancer cell viability in vitro. During 2 h of acute exercise, increases in serum lactate (6-fold, p exercise reduced viability by -9.2 % in MCF-7 (p = 0.04) and -9.4 % in MDA-MB-231 (p exercise session reduced breast cancer viability, while adaptations to 6 months of training had no impact. Our data question the prevailing dogma that training-dependent baseline reductions in risk factors mediate the protective effect of exercise on breast cancer. Instead, we propose that the cancer protection is driven by accumulative effects of repeated acute exercise responses.

  1. The need for supplemental breast cancer screening modalities: a perspective of population-based breast cancer screening programs in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uematsu, Takayoshi

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses possible supplemental breast cancer screening modalities for younger women with dense breasts from a perspective of population-based breast cancer screening program in Japan. Supplemental breast cancer screening modalities have been proposed to increase the sensitivity and detection rates of early stage breast cancer in women with dense breasts; however, there are no global guidelines that recommend the use of supplemental breast cancer screening modalities in such women. Also, no criterion standard exists for breast density assessment. Based on the current situation of breast imaging in Japan, the possible supplemental breast cancer screening modalities are ultrasonography, digital breast tomosynthesis, and breast magnetic resonance imaging. An appropriate population-based breast cancer screening program based on the balance between cost and benefit should be a high priority. Further research based on evidence-based medicine is encouraged. It is very important that the ethnicity, workforce, workflow, and resources for breast cancer screening in each country should be considered when considering supplemental breast cancer screening modalities for women with dense breasts.

  2. Foundation and methodologies in computer-aided diagnosis systems for breast cancer detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalalian, Afsaneh; Mashohor, Syamsiah; Mahmud, Rozi; Karasfi, Babak; Saripan, M Iqbal B; Ramli, Abdul Rahman B

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most prevalent cancer that affects women all over the world. Early detection and treatment of breast cancer could decline the mortality rate. Some issues such as technical reasons, which related to imaging quality and human error, increase misdiagnosis of breast cancer by radiologists. Computer-aided detection systems (CADs) are developed to overcome these restrictions and have been studied in many imaging modalities for breast cancer detection in recent years. The CAD systems improve radiologists' performance in finding and discriminating between the normal and abnormal tissues. These procedures are performed only as a double reader but the absolute decisions are still made by the radiologist. In this study, the recent CAD systems for breast cancer detection on different modalities such as mammography, ultrasound, MRI, and biopsy histopathological images are introduced. The foundation of CAD systems generally consist of four stages: Pre-processing, Segmentation, Feature extraction, and Classification. The approaches which applied to design different stages of CAD system are summarised. Advantages and disadvantages of different segmentation, feature extraction and classification techniques are listed. In addition, the impact of imbalanced datasets in classification outcomes and appropriate methods to solve these issues are discussed. As well as, performance evaluation metrics for various stages of breast cancer detection CAD systems are reviewed.

  3. Foundation and methodologies in computer-aided diagnosis systems for breast cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalalian, Afsaneh; Mashohor, Syamsiah; Mahmud, Rozi; Karasfi, Babak; Saripan, M. Iqbal B.; Ramli, Abdul Rahman B.

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most prevalent cancer that affects women all over the world. Early detection and treatment of breast cancer could decline the mortality rate. Some issues such as technical reasons, which related to imaging quality and human error, increase misdiagnosis of breast cancer by radiologists. Computer-aided detection systems (CADs) are developed to overcome these restrictions and have been studied in many imaging modalities for breast cancer detection in recent years. The CAD systems improve radiologists' performance in finding and discriminating between the normal and abnormal tissues. These procedures are performed only as a double reader but the absolute decisions are still made by the radiologist. In this study, the recent CAD systems for breast cancer detection on different modalities such as mammography, ultrasound, MRI, and biopsy histopathological images are introduced. The foundation of CAD systems generally consist of four stages: Pre-processing, Segmentation, Feature extraction, and Classification. The approaches which applied to design different stages of CAD system are summarised. Advantages and disadvantages of different segmentation, feature extraction and classification techniques are listed. In addition, the impact of imbalanced datasets in classification outcomes and appropriate methods to solve these issues are discussed. As well as, performance evaluation metrics for various stages of breast cancer detection CAD systems are reviewed. PMID:28435432

  4. The Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) in the Dutch breast cancer screening programme: its role as an assessment and stratification tool

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, J. M. H.; van Doorne-Nagtegaal, H. J.; Zonderland, H. M.; van Tinteren, H.; Visser, O.; Verbeek, A. L. M.; den Heeten, G. J.; Broeders, M. J. M.

    2012-01-01

    To assess the suitability of the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) as a quality assessment tool in the Dutch breast cancer screening programme. The data of 93,793 screened women in the Amsterdam screening region (November 2005-July 2006) were reviewed. BI-RADS categories, work-up,

  5. Preoperative indication for systemic therapy extended to patients with early-stage breast cancer using multiparametric 7-tesla breast MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, A M T; Veldhuis, W B; Menke-Pluijmers, M B E; van der Kemp, W J M; van der Velden, T A; Viergever, M A; Mali, W P T M; Kock, M C J M; Westenend, P J; Klomp, D W J; Gilhuijs, K G A

    2017-01-01

    To establish a preoperative decision model for accurate indication of systemic therapy in early-stage breast cancer using multiparametric MRI at 7-tesla field strength. Patients eligible for breast-conserving therapy were consecutively included. Patients underwent conventional diagnostic workup and one preoperative multiparametric 7-tesla breast MRI. The postoperative (gold standard) indication for systemic therapy was established from resected tumor and lymph-node tissue, based on 10-year risk-estimates of breast cancer mortality and relapse using Adjuvant! Online. Preoperative indication was estimated using similar guidelines, but from conventional diagnostic workup. Agreement was established between preoperative and postoperative indication, and MRI-characteristics used to improve agreement. MRI-characteristics included phospomonoester/phosphodiester (PME/PDE) ratio on 31-phosphorus spectroscopy (31P-MRS), apparent diffusion coefficients on diffusion-weighted imaging, and tumor size on dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI. A decision model was built to estimate the postoperative indication from preoperatively available data. We included 46 women (age: 43-74yrs) with 48 invasive carcinomas. Postoperatively, 20 patients (43%) had positive, and 26 patients (57%) negative indication for systemic therapy. Using conventional workup, positive preoperative indication agreed excellently with positive postoperative indication (N = 8/8; 100%). Negative preoperative indication was correct in only 26/38 (68%) patients. However, 31P-MRS score (p = 0.030) and tumor size (p = 0.002) were associated with the postoperative indication. The decision model shows that negative indication is correct in 21/22 (96%) patients when exempting tumors larger than 2.0cm on DCE-MRI or with PME>PDE ratios at 31P-MRS. Preoperatively, positive indication for systemic therapy is highly accurate. Negative indication is highly accurate (96%) for tumors sized ≤2,0cm on DCE-MRI and with PME

  6. The role of intratumoral and systemic IL-6 in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dethlefsen, Christine; Højfeldt, Grith Westergaard; Hojman, Pernille

    2013-01-01

    Chronic low-grade inflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of several cancer forms including breast cancer. The pleiotropic cytokine IL-6 is a key player in systemic inflammation, regulating both the inflammatory response and tissue metabolism during acute stimulations. Here, we...... circulating IL-6 and risk of breast cancer, prognosis for patients with prevalent disease, adverse effects and interventions to control systemic IL-6 levels in patients are discussed. In summary, direct application of IL-6 on breast cancer cells inhibits proliferation in estrogen receptor positive cells......, while high circulating IL-6 levels are correlated with a poor prognosis in breast cancer patients. This discrepancy reflects distinct roles of IL-6, with elevated systemic levels being a biomarker for tumor burden, physical inactivity, and impaired metabolism, while local intratumoral IL-6 signaling...

  7. Developing and Implementing the AJCC Prognostic System for Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Goodman, Philip

    1997-01-01

    Accurate survival prediction is important for women with breast cancer because a woman's expected survival determines her therapy, provides her with vital outcome information, and is one of the main...

  8. Latina Breast Cancer Patients and Their Informal Support System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hayes-Bautista, David

    2001-01-01

    ... consisting of Latina cancer patients, their spouses/significant others and family/friends. Participants are drawn from the Breast Cancer Treatment fund, which provides payment for services for uninsured women. Findings...

  9. Technical innovation: digital tomosynthesis of the hip following intra-articular administration of contrast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gazaille, Roland E.; Flynn, Michael J.; Page, Walter; Finley, Sonia; Holsbeeck, Marnix van [Henry Ford Hospital, Department of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2011-11-15

    To demonstrate the clinical use of digital tomosynthesis in the depiction of labral and chondral pathology in the setting of post-operative CAM-type impingement of the hip following intra-articular administration of dilute iodinated contrast. We present images from a 46 year-old African American female with suspected CAM-type femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) following percutaneous pinning of the right hip for slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE). A partial tear of the labrum and clinically significant acetabular chondral abnormalities were demonstrated with the use of digital tomosynthesis with superb anatomic detail. Digital tomosynthesis can be of great clinical utility and can depict pathology in superb anatomic detail, particularly in situations in which MRI is not available as well as under circumstances in which artifact due to orthopedic hardware is of concern as shown in this case. (orig.)

  10. Breast Reconstruction after a Bilateral Mastectomy Using the BRAVA Expansion System and Fat Grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ondrej Mestak, MD

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Fat graft breast reconstruction following a mastectomy is always limited by the size of the skin envelope, which affects the amount of graft that can be injected in 1 session. Because the fat graft naturally resorbs in all patients, several sessions of fat grafting are necessary. BRAVA’s negative pressure causes a “reverse” expansion of the skin envelope, thus permitting more space for the fat graft. This allows decreasing number of required procedures for an adequate breast reconstruction. We operated on a 38-year-old patient 4 years after bilateral mastectomy without irradiation for breast cancer. Before the procedure, the patient was instructed to wear the BRAVA system for 12 hours daily for 2 months before the first session, at all times between the sessions and for 1 month following the last fat grafting session. We performed 3 fat grafting sessions, as planned. Altogether, we injected 840 cm3 of fat on the right side and 790 cm3 of fat on the left side. Four months after the last operation, the patient was very satisfied with her new breasts. The breasts were soft, with good sensation and a natural feel. Using the BRAVA external expansion system for the enhancement of fat grafting is a suitable technique for breast reconstruction after a mastectomy. This technique produces soft and natural feeling breasts in fewer operative sessions, with a minimal risk of complications. Patient compliance, however, is greatly needed to achieve the desired results.

  11. Every exercise bout matters: linking systemic exercise responses to breast cancer control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dethlefsen, Christine; Pedersen, Katrine Seide; Hojman, Pernille

    2017-04-01

    Cumulative epidemiological evidence shows that regular exercise lowers the risk of developing breast cancer and decreases the risk of disease recurrence. The causality underlying this relation has not been fully established, and the exercise recommendations for breast cancer patients follow the general physical activity guidelines, prescribing 150 min of exercise per week. Thus, elucidations of the causal mechanisms are important to prescribe and implement the most optimal training regimen in breast cancer prevention and treatment. The prevailing hypothesis on the positive association within exercise oncology has focused on lowering of the basal systemic levels of cancer risk factors with exercise training. However, another rather overlooked systemic exercise response is the marked acute increases in several potential anti-cancer components during each acute exercise bout. Here, we review the evidence of the exercise-mediated changes in systemic components with the ability to influence breast cancer progression. In the first part, we focus on systemic risk factors for breast cancer, i.e., sex hormones, insulin, and inflammatory markers, and their adaptation to long-term training. In the second part, we describe the systemic factors induced acutely during exercise, including catecholamines and myokines. In conclusion, we propose that the transient increases in exercise factors during acute exercise appear to be mediating the positive effect of regular exercise on breast cancer progression.

  12. The Outcome of Breast Cancer Is Associated with National Human Development Index and Health System Attainment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Kaimin; Lou, Lixia; Tian, Wei; Pan, Tao; Ye, Juan; Zhang, Suzhan

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is a worldwide threat to female health with patient outcomes varying widely. The exact correlation between global outcomes of breast cancer and the national socioeconomic status is still undetermined. Mortality-to-incidence ratio (MIR) of breast cancer was calculated with the contemporary age standardized incidence and mortality rates for countries with data available at GLOBOCAN 2012 database. The MIR matched national human development indexes (HDIs) and health system attainments were respectively obtained from Human Development Report and World Health Report. Correlation analysis, regression analysis, and Tukey-Kramer post hoc test were used to explore the effects of HDI and health system attainment on breast cancer MIR. Our results demonstrated that breast cancer MIR was inversely correlated with national HDI (r = -.950; P < .001) and health system attainment (r = -.898; P < .001). Countries with very high HDI had significantly lower MIRs than those with high, medium and low HDI (P < .001). Liner regression model by ordinary least squares also indicated negative effects of both HDI (adjusted R2 = .903, standardize β = -.699, P < .001) and health system attainment (adjusted R2 =. 805, standardized β = -.009; P < .001), with greater effects in developing countries identified by quantile regression analysis. It is noteworthy that significant health care disparities exist among countries in accordance with the discrepancy of HDI. Policies should be made in less developed countries, which are more likely to obtain worse outcomes in female breast cancer, that in order to improve their comprehensive economic strength and optimize their health system performance.

  13. To Evaluate the Applicability of Parameters of Cytological Grading Systems on Aspirates of Breast Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Priyanshu; Kumar, Binay; Joshi, Usha; Bano, Mehar

    2018-01-01

    Background: Fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) is still an important first line diagnostic procedure in developing countries. FNAC of breast lesions is quite specific and sensitive investigation and the results are comparable to histopathology. Aim: To evaluate applicability of parameters of different cytological grading (CG) systems, for aspirates of breast cancers, and its correlation with histopathology grading parameters. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional observational study was carried out on 30 female patients with ductal carcinoma breast, diagnosed on FNAC and subsequently confirmed histopathologically. The cytological smears were graded using six different cytological parameters/criteria described by Robinson et al. (Robinson grading system) and modified Scarff-Bloom-Richardson (SBR) grading system considering three parameters. The results of cytological grade (CG) were compared with parameters of gold standard modified SBR histological grading (HG) system. Results: Important influential cytological parameters to predict final RBS cytological score came out to be chromatin, nucleoli, nuclear size, cell uniformity, and cell dissociation with statistically significant P value (0.0001) except for mitotic count. The important influential predictor of final SBR histological score is nuclear pleomorphism. Conclusion: SBR HG has good correlation with both RBS and SBR CG systems. The cytological nuclear grade provides important prognostic information which is very sensitive and equally specific hence should be done in breast aspirates and is now replaced by Core Needle biopsy. In developing country like India FNAC of breast aspirates still holds diagnostic value in the classification of breast lesions as compared to core guided image biopsy. PMID:29403164

  14. Incorporating Tumor Characteristics to the American Joint Committee on Cancer Breast Cancer Staging System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez-MacGregor, Mariana; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A; Clarke, Christina A; Lichtensztajn, Daphne Y; Hunt, Kelly K; Giordano, Sharon H

    2017-11-01

    The American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) breast cancer staging system provides important prognostic information. The recently published eighth edition incorporates biological markers and recommends the use of a complex "prognostic stage." In this study, we assessed the relationship between stage, breast cancer subtype, grade, and outcome in a large population-based cohort and evaluated a risk score system incorporating tumor characteristic to the AJCC anatomic staging system. Patients diagnosed with primary breast cancer stage I-IV between 2005-2008 were identified in the California Cancer Registry. For patients with stage I-III disease, pathologic stage was recorded. For patients with stage IV disease, clinical stage was utilized. Five-year breast cancer specific survival (BCSS) and overall survival (OS) rates were determined for each potential tumor size-node involvement-metastases (TNM) combination according to breast cancer subtype. A risk score point-based system using grade, estrogen receptor, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) status was designed to complement the anatomic AJCC staging system. Survival probabilities between groups were compared using log-rank test. Cox proportional hazards models were used. Among 43,938 patients, we observed differences in 5-year BCSS and OS for each TNM combination according to breast cancer subtype. The most favorable outcomes were seen for hormone receptor-positive tumors followed closely by HER2-positive tumors, with the worst outcomes observed for triple negative breast cancer. Our risk score system separated patients into four risk groups within each stage category (all p  system incorporates biological factors into the AJCC anatomic staging system, providing accurate prognostic information. This study demonstrates that stage, but also breast cancer subtype and grade, define prognosis in a large population of breast cancer patients. It shows that a point-based risk score system that incorporates

  15. Immediate systemic allergic reaction in an infant to fish allergen ingested through breast milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arima, Takayasu; Campos-Alberto, Eduardo; Funakoshi, Hiraku; Inoue, Yuzaburo; Tomiita, Minako; Kohno, Yoichi; Shimojo, Naoki

    2016-10-01

    This is a rare case report of systemic allergic reaction to fish allergen ingested through breast milk. Mother ate raw fish more than 3 times a week. Her consumption of fish was associated with urticaria and wheeze in an infant via breast-feeding. Fish-specific IgE antibodies were detected by skin prick test but not by in vitro IgE test. This case demonstrates that fish protein ingested by mother can cause an immediate systemic allergic reaction in offspring through breast-feeding. Although fish intake is generally recommended for prevention of allergy, one should be aware that frequent intake of fish by a lactating mother may sensitize the baby and induce an allergic reaction through breast-feeding.

  16. The Application Of The Support System Decision Stadium Of Breast Cancer Using Fuzzy Logic Based Android

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rico Adrial

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer treatable while still stadium early. The first step in the treatment of disease breast cancer is detection by true that symptoms appearing on the body patient is really cancer cells. Stadium cancer is the result of diagnostic by physicians so that ease in understanding for patients . On this research used fuzzy logic as a method that helps in making the support system of decision in determining stadium breast cancer. today much android applications are made  in the provision of information in the field of health. By combining knowledge in the health sector , fuzzy logic and android is expected to become an application latest supporters of intelligible decision by many people on the health sector. The support system decision stadium disease breast cancer using fuzzy logic android based was designed . We can conclude that the application apply calculation based on fuzzy logic method sugeno and has been tested by calculation on matlab and manually.

  17. Experience of breast-conservation treatment intensified with systemic chemotherapy and endocrine therapy for stage II breast cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Yasuhiro; Nishioka, Akihito; Inomata, Taisuke (Kochi Medical School, Nankoku (Japan)) (and others)

    1993-12-01

    From August 1989 to October 1992, a total of 27 patients with breast cancer of stage II received breast-conservation treatment (BCT) intensified with systemic chemotherapy and endocrine therapy. All these patients visited the out-patient clinic of the Department of Radiology of Kochi Medical School Hospital, with an obvious desire of undertaking BCT. During this period, another two patients with the same desire were treated with modified radical mastectomy because of obviously positive surgical margins in frozen sections obtained at surgery. The percentage of patients treated by BCT was, therefore, 93.1%. These were all females, and their average age was 50.9 years. Twenty-five out of these 27 patients underwent lumpectomy, and another 2 patients with suspected extensive intraductal component were performed quadrantectomy. Eleven of these 27 patients, who were over 70 years old or had no clinical detectable axillary lymph node swelling received tangential field radiotherapy to their ipsilateral axillary region instead of axillary dissection. For n0 or nX cases, radiotherapy was delivered using opposed tangential fields alone, and for n1 cases tangential fields and irradiation to the ipsilateral axillary and supraclavicular regions were administered. After the radiotherapy, systemic chemotherapy was performed intravenously using cyclophosphamide, pirarubicin and 5-fluorouracil. As an endocrine therapy, tamoxifen was routinely administered at a dose of 20-40 mg/day. By the end of February 1993, 1out of these 27 patients had died of the progression of distant metastases of breast cancer to bone, liver, lung and brain. And another one had died of pneumonia with no evidence of breast cancer progression. Therefore, cause-specific survival rates were 100% (21/21), 91.7% (11/12) and 83.3% (5/6), at 1, 2 and 3 years, respectively. As for side effects of the theraphy, no severe sequelae has been experienced. Cosmetic results of the theraphy were considerably good. (author).

  18. Systemic therapy for breast cancer and risk of subsequent contralateral breast cancer in the WECARE Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langballe, Rikke; Mellemkjær, Lene; Malone, Kathleen E; Lynch, Charles F; John, Esther M; Knight, Julia A; Bernstein, Leslie; Brooks, Jennifer; Andersson, Michael; Reiner, Anne S; Liang, Xiaolin; Woods, Meghan; Concannon, Patrick J; Bernstein, Jonine L

    2016-07-12

    Treatment with tamoxifen or chemotherapy reduces the risk of contralateral breast cancer (CBC). However, it is uncertain how long the protection lasts and whether the protective effect is modified by patient, tumor, or treatment characteristics. The population-based WECARE Study included 1521 cases with CBC and 2212 age- and year of first diagnosis-matched controls with unilateral breast cancer recruited during two phases in the USA, Canada, and Denmark. Women were diagnosed with a first breast cancer before age 55 years during 1985-2008. Abstraction of medical records provided detailed treatment information, while information on risk factors was obtained during telephone interviews. Risk ratios (RRs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) for CBC were obtained from multivariable conditional logistic regression models. Compared with never users of tamoxifen, the RR of CBC was lower for current users of tamoxifen (RR = 0.73; 95 % CI = 0.55-0.97) and for past users within 3 years of last use (RR = 0.73; 95 % CI = 0.53-1.00). There was no evidence of an increased risk of estrogen receptor-negative CBC associated with ever use of tamoxifen or use for 4.5 or more years. Use of chemotherapy (ever versus never use) was associated with a significantly reduced RR of developing CBC 1-4 years (RR = 0.59; 95 % CI = 0.45-0.77) and 5-9 years (RR = 0.73; 95 % CI = 0.56-0.95) after first breast cancer diagnosis. RRs of CBC associated with tamoxifen or with chemotherapy use were independent of age, family history of breast cancer, body mass index and tumor characteristics of the first breast cancer with the exception that the RR of CBC was lower for lobular histology compared with other histologies. Our findings are consistent with previous studies showing that treatment with tamoxifen or chemotherapy is associated with a lower risk of CBC although the risk reduction appears to last for a limited time period after treatment is completed.

  19. GPU-accelerated compressed-sensing (CS) image reconstruction in chest digital tomosynthesis (CDT) using CUDA programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sunghoon; Lee, Haenghwa; Lee, Donghoon; Choi, Seungyeon; Shin, Jungwook; Jang, Woojin; Seo, Chang-Woo; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2017-03-01

    A compressed-sensing (CS) technique has been rapidly applied in medical imaging field for retrieving volumetric data from highly under-sampled projections. Among many variant forms, CS technique based on a total-variation (TV) regularization strategy shows fairly reasonable results in cone-beam geometry. In this study, we implemented the TV-based CS image reconstruction strategy in our prototype chest digital tomosynthesis (CDT) R/F system. Due to the iterative nature of time consuming processes in solving a cost function, we took advantage of parallel computing using graphics processing units (GPU) by the compute unified device architecture (CUDA) programming to accelerate our algorithm. In order to compare the algorithmic performance of our proposed CS algorithm, conventional filtered back-projection (FBP) and simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART) reconstruction schemes were also studied. The results indicated that the CS produced better contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) in the physical phantom images (Teflon region-of-interest) by factors of 3.91 and 1.93 than FBP and SART images, respectively. The resulted human chest phantom images including lung nodules with different diameters also showed better visual appearance in the CS images. Our proposed GPU-accelerated CS reconstruction scheme could produce volumetric data up to 80 times than CPU programming. Total elapsed time for producing 50 coronal planes with 1024×1024 image matrix using 41 projection views were 216.74 seconds for proposed CS algorithms on our GPU programming, which could match the clinically feasible time ( 3 min). Consequently, our results demonstrated that the proposed CS method showed a potential of additional dose reduction in digital tomosynthesis with reasonable image quality in a fast time.

  20. Digital tomosynthesis in lung cancer: state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolaccini, Luca; Viti, Andrea; Terzi, Alberto

    2015-06-01

    Chest digital tomosynthesis (CDT) is a limited angle image tomography, which improves the visibility of anatomy compared with radiographic imaging. Due to the limited acquisition angle of CDT, it has the potential to significantly increase the temporal resolution of patient surveillance at the cost of reduced resolution in one direction. CDT is 3 times more effective in identifying pulmonary nodules compared to conventional radiography and at lower doses and cost compared with routine chest computed tomography (CT) examinations. There is only one report in which CDT was used in a single-arm observational study for lung cancer detection in at-risk population while a few studies suggested that CDT sensitivity is superior to radiography but inferior to CT in detecting lung nodules, other studies on the accuracy of CDT suggest that the specificity is much closer to CT than radiography. Therefore, large-scale randomized controlled trial would be needed to confirm benefits of CDT and identify where it is best used in the clinical setting. CDT seems to be a cost-effectiveness first-line lung cancer screening tool to detect potential lung cancer nodule.

  1. Maternal intention to breast-feed and breast-feeding outcomes in term and preterm infants: Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS), 2000-2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colaizy, Tarah T; Saftlas, Audrey F; Morriss, Frank H

    2012-04-01

    To determine the effect of intention to breast-feed on short-term breast-feeding outcomes in women delivering term and preterm infants. Data from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) for three states, Ohio, Michigan and Arkansas, during 2000-2003 were analysed. SAS 9·1·3 and SUDAAN 10 statistical software packages were used for analyses. Arkansas, Michigan and Ohio, USA. Mothers of recently delivered infants, selected by birth certificate sampling. Of 16,839 mothers included, 9·7% delivered preterm. Some 52·2% expressed definite intention to breast-feed, 16·8% expressed tentative intention, 4·3% were uncertain and 26·8% had no intention to breast-feed. Overall 65·2% initiated breast-feeding, 52·0% breast-fed for ≥4 weeks and 30·8% breast-fed for ≥10 weeks. Women with definite intention were more likely to initiate (OR = 24·3, 95% CI 18·4, 32·1), to breast-feed for ≥4 weeks (OR = 7·12, 95% CI 5·95, 8·51) and to breast-feed for ≥10 weeks (OR = 2·75, 95% CI 2·20, 3·45) compared with women with tentative intention. Levels of intention did not differ between women delivering preterm and term. Women delivering at breast-feeding (OR = 2·24, 95% CI 1·64, 3·06) and to breast-feed for ≥4 weeks (OR = 2·58, 95% CI 1·96, 3·41), but less likely to breast-feed for ≥10 weeks (OR = 0·55, 95% CI 0·44, 0·68), compared with those delivering at term. Women delivering between 34 and 36 weeks were less likely to breast-feed for ≥10 weeks than those delivering at term (OR = 0·63, 95% CI 0·49, 0·81). Prenatal intention to breast-feed is a powerful predictor of short-term breast-feeding outcomes in women delivering both at term and prematurely.

  2. Optimization and Comparison of Different Digital Mammographic Tomosynthesis Reconstruction Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    microcalcifications , which have an important bearing in clinical breast cancer detection tasks. A point-by-point back projection (BP) is important for...sharpness of structures such as microcalcifications , which bear important meaning in clinical tasks for breast 14 cancer detection. A novel algorithm of...radiologists in discriminating malignant from benign microcalcification patterns, and thereby improve the accuracy of breast cancer detection. 2

  3. Feasibility study of a breast density measurement within a direct photon-counting mammography scanner system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machida, Youichi; Tozaki, Mitsuhiro; Yoshida, Tamiko; Saita, Ai; Yakabe, Mari; Nii, Kanae

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the clinical feasibility of breast density measurements by a new application within a direct photon-counting mammography scanner system. A retrospective study of consecutive women who underwent mammography using a direct photon-counting mammography scanner system (MicroDose mammography SI; Philips Digital Mammography Sweden AB) was performed at the authors' institution between September and December 2013. Quantitative volumetric glandularity measurements were performed automatically for each acquired mammographic image using an application (Breast Density Measurement; Philips Digital Mammography Sweden AB). The quantitative volumetric glandularity of each breast was defined as the average values for the mediolateral oblique (MLO) and craniocaudal (CC) mammogram views. Of the 44 women who underwent bilateral mammogram acquisitions, the breast density measurements were performed successfully in 40 patients (90.9%). A very good to excellent correlation in the quantitative breast density measurements acquired from the MLO and CC images was obtained in the 40 evaluable patients (R = 0.99). The calculated volumetric glandularity using this new application should correspond well with the true volumetric density of each breast.

  4. Investigation of various reconstruction parameters for algebraic reconstruction technique in a newly developed chest digital tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H.; Choi, S.; Lee, D.; Kim, Y.-s.; Park, H.-S.; Lee, Y.; Seo, C.-W.; Kim, H.-J.

    2017-08-01

    Chest digital tomosynthesis (CDT) is a promising new modality that provides 3D information by reconstructing limited projection views. CDT systems have been developed to improve the limitations of conventional radiography such as image degradation and low sensitivity. However, the development of reconstruction methods is challenging because of the limited projection views within various angular ranges. Optimization of reconstruction parameters for various reconsturction methods in CDT system also is needed. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) method, and to evaluate the effect of the reconstruction parameters for our newly developed CDT system. We designed ART method with 41 projection views over an angular range of ±20°. To investigate the effect of reconstruction parameters, we measured the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), artifact spread function (ASF), and quality factor (QF) using LUNGMAN phantom included tumors. We found that the proper choice of reconstruction parameters such as relaxation parameter, initial guess, and number of iterations improved the quality of reconstructed images from the same projection views. Optimal values of ART relaxation parameter with uniform (UI) and back-projection (BP) initial guesses were 0.4 and 0.6, respectively. BP initial guess improved image quality in comparison with UI initial guess, in terms of providing a higher CNR and QF values with a faster speed. CNR and QF values improved with increasing number of iteration. Particularly, ART method with BP initial guess (when β = 0.6) after 3-terations provide satisfactory reconstructed image. In conclusion, the use of ART method with proper reconstruction parameters provided better image quality than FBP method as well as conventional radiography. These results indicated that the ART method with optimal reconstruction parameters could improve image quality for nodule detection using the CDT system.

  5. Visualization of suspicious lesions in breast MRI based on intelligent neural systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twellmann, Thorsten; Lange, Oliver; Nattkemper, Tim Wilhelm; Meyer-Bäse, Anke

    2006-05-01

    Intelligent medical systems based on supervised and unsupervised artificial neural networks are applied to the automatic visualization and classification of suspicious lesions in breast MRI. These systems represent an important component of future sophisticated computer-aided diagnosis systems and enable the extraction of spatial and temporal features of dynamic MRI data stemming from patients with confirmed lesion diagnosis. By taking into account the heterogenity of the cancerous tissue, these techniques reveal the malignant, benign and normal kinetic signals and and provide a regional subclassification of pathological breast tissue. Intelligent medical systems are expected to have substantial implications in healthcare politics by contributing to the diagnosis of indeterminate breast lesions by non-invasive imaging.

  6. What we need to know about dense breasts: implications for breast cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreira Gómez, M C; Estrada Blan, M C

    High breast density and its relationship to the risk of breast cancer has become a hot topic in the medical literature and in the lay press, especially in the United States, where it has brought about changes in the legal framework that require radiologists to inform clinicians and patients about breast density. Radiologists, who are mainly responsible for this information, need to know the scientific evidence and controversies regarding this subject. The discussion is centered on the real importance of the risk, the limitation that not having standardized methods of measurement represents, and the possible application of complementary screening techniques (ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, or tomosynthesis) for which clear recommendations have yet to be established. We need controlled studies that evaluate the application of these techniques in women with dense breasts, including the possibility that they can lead to overdiagnosis. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. System delays in breast cancer | Dalwai | South African Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Centralised multidisciplinary management of breast cancer occurs in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, and requires a diagnostic and staging pathway at the referring hospital. Delays in this pathway are unknown. This study, conducted at a referring hospital, R K Khan (RKK), quantifies and analyses these delays.

  8. Sin-quadratic model for chest tomosynthesis respiratory signal analysis and its application in four dimensional chest tomosynthesis reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Xi; Zhang, Hua; Qin, Genggeng; Ma, Jianhua; Feng, Qianjin; Chen, Wufan

    2018-02-01

    Chest tomosynthesis (CTS) is a newly developed imaging technique which provides pseudo-3D volume anatomical information of thorax from limited-angle projections and contains much less of superimposed anatomy than the chest X-ray radiography. One of the relatively common problems in CTS is the patient respiratory motion during image acquisition, which negatively impacts the detectability. In this work, we propose a sin-quadratic model to analyze the respiratory motion during CTS scan, which is a real time method where the respiratory signal is generated by extracting the motion of diaphragm from projection radiographs. According to the estimated respiratory signal, the CTS projections were then amplitude-based sorted into four to eight phases, and an iterative reconstruction strategy with total variation regularization was adopted to reconstruct the CTS images at each phase. Simulated digital XCAT phantom data and three sets of patient data were adopted for the experiments to validate the performance of the sin-quadratic model and its application in four dimensional (4D) CTS reconstruction. Results of the XCAT phantom simulation study show that the correlation coefficient between the extracted respiratory signal and the originally designed respiratory signal is 0.9964, which suggests that the proposed model could exactly extract the respiratory signal from CTS projections. The 4D CTS reconstructions of both the phantom data and the patient data show clear reduction of motion-induced blur. Copyright © 2018 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Assembling a prototype resonance electrical impedance spectroscopy system for breast tissue signal detection: preliminary assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumkin, Jules; Zheng, Bin; Gruss, Michelle; Drescher, John; Leader, Joseph; Good, Walter; Lu, Amy; Cohen, Cathy; Shah, Ratan; Zuley, Margarita; Gur, David

    2008-03-01

    Using electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) technology to detect breast abnormalities in general and cancer in particular has been attracting research interests for decades. Large clinical tests suggest that current EIS systems can achieve high specificity (>= 90%) at a relatively low sensitivity ranging from 15% to 35%. In this study, we explore a new resonance frequency based electrical impedance spectroscopy (REIS) technology to measure breast tissue EIS signals in vivo, which aims to be more sensitive to small tissue changes. Through collaboration between our imaging research group and a commercial company, a unique prototype REIS system has been assembled and preliminary signal acquisition has commenced. This REIS system has two detection probes mounted in the two ends of a Y-shape support device with probe separation of 60 mm. During REIS measurement, one probe touches the nipple and the other touches to an outer point of the breast. The electronic system continuously generates sweeps of multi-frequency electrical pulses ranging from 100 to 4100 kHz. The maximum electric voltage and the current applied to the probes are 1.5V and 30mA, respectively. Once a "record" command is entered, multi-frequency sweeps are recorded every 12 seconds until the program receives a "stop recording" command. In our imaging center, we have collected REIS measurements from 150 women under an IRB approved protocol. The database includes 58 biopsy cases, 78 screening negative cases, and other "recalled" cases (for additional imaging procedures). We measured eight signal features from the effective REIS sweep of each breast. We applied a multi-feature based artificial neural network (ANN) to classify between "biopsy" and normal "non-biopsy" breasts. The ANN performance is evaluated using a leave-one-out validation method and ROC analysis. We conducted two experiments. The first experiment attempted to classify 58 "biopsy" breasts and 58 "non-biopsy" breasts acquired on 58 women

  10. The innate and adaptive infiltrating immune systems as targets for breast cancer immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Andrew M K; Lim, Elgene; Ormandy, Christopher J

    2017-01-01

    A cancer cell-centric view has long dominated the field of cancer biology. Research efforts have focussed on aberrant cancer cell signalling pathways and on changes to cancer cell DNA. Mounting evidence demonstrates that many cancer-associated cell types within the tumour stroma co-evolve and support tumour growth and development, greatly modifying cancer cell behaviour, facilitating invasion and metastasis and controlling dormancy and sensitivity to drug therapy. Thus, these stromal cells represent potential targets for cancer therapy. Among these cell types, immune cells have emerged as a promising target for therapy. The adaptive and the innate immune system play an important role in normal mammary development and breast cancer. The number of infiltrating adaptive immune system cells with tumour-rejecting capacity, primarily, T lymphocytes, is lower in breast cancer compared with other cancer types, but infiltration occurs in a large proportion of cases. There is strong evidence demonstrating the importance of the immunosuppressive role of the innate immune system during breast cancer progression. A consideration of components of both the innate and the adaptive immune system is essential for the design and development of immunotherapies in breast cancer. In this review, we focus on the importance of immunosuppressive myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) as potential targets for breast cancer therapy. PMID:28193698

  11. The Outcome of Breast Cancer Is Associated with National Human Development Index and Health System Attainment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaimin Hu

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is a worldwide threat to female health with patient outcomes varying widely. The exact correlation between global outcomes of breast cancer and the national socioeconomic status is still undetermined. Mortality-to-incidence ratio (MIR of breast cancer was calculated with the contemporary age standardized incidence and mortality rates for countries with data available at GLOBOCAN 2012 database. The MIR matched national human development indexes (HDIs and health system attainments were respectively obtained from Human Development Report and World Health Report. Correlation analysis, regression analysis, and Tukey-Kramer post hoc test were used to explore the effects of HDI and health system attainment on breast cancer MIR. Our results demonstrated that breast cancer MIR was inversely correlated with national HDI (r = -.950; P < .001 and health system attainment (r = -.898; P < .001. Countries with very high HDI had significantly lower MIRs than those with high, medium and low HDI (P < .001. Liner regression model by ordinary least squares also indicated negative effects of both HDI (adjusted R2 = .903, standardize β = -.699, P < .001 and health system attainment (adjusted R2 =. 805, standardized β = -.009; P < .001, with greater effects in developing countries identified by quantile regression analysis. It is noteworthy that significant health care disparities exist among countries in accordance with the discrepancy of HDI. Policies should be made in less developed countries, which are more likely to obtain worse outcomes in female breast cancer, that in order to improve their comprehensive economic strength and optimize their health system performance.

  12. Malignancy rates of non-masslike enhancement on breast magnetic resonance imaging using American College of Radiology Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System descriptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Annamaria; McDonough, Michelle D; DePeri, Elizabeth R

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the malignancy rates for non-masslike enhancement on breast magnetic resonance imaging by American College of Radiology Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System descriptors. We retrospectively reviewed breast magnetic resonance imaging reports with non-masslike enhancement performed at Mayo Clinic Florida from April 1, 2003, through March 14, 2007. Each descriptor of non-masslike enhancement as per the American College of Radiology Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System magnetic resonance lexicon was correlated with percutaneous biopsy pathologic results and/or surgical pathologic results and follow-up imaging. Positive predictive values were obtained for each Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System descriptor. We identified 578 incidents of non-masslike enhancement in 378 patients. Of 343 non-masslike enhancements that could be correlated with pathology results, 141 (41.1%) were malignant. Of the malignant lesions, 53% were found to be ductal carcinoma in situ at percutaneous biopsy. Clumped pattern of enhancement and segmental distribution of non-masslike enhancement had the highest sensitivities of 40.5% and 23.5%, respectively. Asymmetric pattern and segmental distribution had the highest positive predictive values of 75.0% and 57.4%, respectively. We concluded that the moderate positive predictive values make it difficult to establish guidelines for management of non-masslike enhancement and reveal the current limitations of breast magnetic resonance imaging. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Invasive lobular breast cancer and its variants: how special are they for systemic therapy decisions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiu, Séverine; Wolfer, Anita; Jacot, William; Fumoleau, Pierre; Romieu, Gilles; Bonnetain, Franck; Fiche, Maryse

    2014-12-01

    The WHO classification of breast tumors distinguishes, besides invasive breast cancer 'of no special type' (former invasive ductal carcinoma, representing 60-70% of all breast cancers), 30 special types, of which invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) is the most common (5-15%). We review the literature on (i) the specificity and heterogeneity of ILC biology as documented by various analytical techniques, including the results of molecular testing for risk of recurrence; (ii) the impact of lobular histology on prediction of prognosis and effect of systemic therapies in patients. Though it is generally admitted that ILC has a better prognosis than IDC, is endocrine responsive, and responds poorly to chemotherapy, currently available data do not unanimously support these assumptions. This review demonstrates some lack of specific data and a need for improving clinical research design to allow oncologists to make informed systemic therapy decisions in patients with ILC. Importantly, future studies should compare various endpoints in ILC breast cancer patients among the group of hormonosensitive breast cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Design, Implementation, and Characterization of a Dedicated Breast Computed MammoTomography System for Enhanced Lesion Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    4 Introduction In the USA, breast cancer in women is one of the leading causes of malignancy and the second leading cause of death due to cancer ...lead to a commercial system capable of in vivo tissue differentiation resulting in an improvement in the detection and diagnosis of breast cancer ...completeness. Task 3(a). This subtask was to evaluate different breast sizes, compositions, lesion sizes, microcalcifications to determine upper and

  15. Simulation study of an X-ray diffraction system for breast tumor detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marticke, F.; Montémont, G.; Paulus, C.; Michel, O.; Mars, J. I.; Verger, L.

    2017-09-01

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) is a powerful technique used to determine the molecular structure of biological tissues. In breast tissues for example, the scattering signatures of dense fibroglandular tissue and carcinoma have been shown to be significantly different. In this study, XRD was used as a second control level when conventional mammography results were unclear, for instance because of overly high breast density. A system optimized for this issue, called multifocal XRD, was developed combining energy dispersive spectral information at different scattering angles. This system allows depth-imaging in one go but needs an x,y-direction scan to image the region conventional mammography identified as suspect. The scan-time for about 10 cm3 with an incident flux of about 4.8·107 photons per second would be around 2 s. For this study, breast phantoms with and without cancerous nodule were simulated to assess the separation power of the method and to determine the radiation dose required to obtain nearly ideal separation. For tumors situated in the center of the breast, the required dose was only about 0.3 mGy, even for breasts with high density. The tumor position was shown to have a low impact on detectability provided it remained in a zone where the system was sufficiently sensitive. The influence of incident spectrum maximum energy was also studied. The required dose remained very low with any of the incident spectra tested. Finally, an image slice was reconstructed in the x-direction and showed that the system can detect the presence of a small tumor (4 mm). Hence, XRD is a very promising tool to reduce the number of unnecessary invasive breast biopsies.

  16. Imaging Surveillance After Primary Breast Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Diana L.; Houssami, Nehmat; Lee, Janie M.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Current clinical guidelines are consistent in supporting annual mammography for women after treatment of primary breast cancer. Surveillance imaging beyond standard digital mammography, including digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), breast ultrasound, and MRI, may improve outcomes. This article reviews the evidence on the performance and effectiveness of breast imaging modalities available for surveillance after treatment of sporadic unilateral primary breast cancer and identifies additional factors to be considered when selecting an imaging surveillance regimen. CONCLUSION Evidence review supports the use of mammography for surveillance after primary breast cancer treatment. Variability exists in guideline recommendations for surveillance initiation, interval, and cessation. DBT offers the most promise as a potential modality to replace standard digital mammography as a front-line surveillance test; a single published study to date has shown a significant decrease in recall rates compared with standard digital mammography alone. Most guidelines do not support the use of whole-breast ultrasound in breast cancer surveillance, and further studies are needed to define the characteristics of women who may benefit from MRI surveillance. The emerging evidence about surveillance imaging outcomes suggests that additional factors, including patient and imaging characteristics, tumor biology and gene expression profile, and choice of treatment, warrant consideration in selecting personalized posttreatment imaging surveillance regimens. PMID:28075622

  17. The electromagnetic-trait imaging computation of traveling wave method in breast tumor microwave sensor system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Zhi-Fu; Han, Zhong-Ling; Yao, Meng

    2011-01-01

    Using the difference of dielectric constant between malignant tumor tissue and normal breast tissue, breast tumor microwave sensor system (BRATUMASS) determines the detected target of imaging electromagnetic trait by analyzing the properties of target tissue back wave obtained after near-field microwave radicalization (conelrad). The key of obtained target properties relationship and reconstructed detected space is to analyze the characteristics of the whole process from microwave transmission to back wave reception. Using traveling wave method, we derive spatial transmission properties and the relationship of the relation detected points distances, and valuate the properties of each unit by statistical valuation theory. This chapter gives the experimental data analysis results.

  18. Side-effects of systemic therapy for the management of breast cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Oncology Unit, Life Vincent Pallotti Hospital, Cape Town, South Africa. Corresponding author: A Gudgeon (anneg@iafrica.com). Systemic treatment for breast cancer is given as .... myocardial infarction, stroke and angina. Hypertension, proteinuria and nephrotic syndrome can occur. Hypersensitivity may manifest as.

  19. Stormram 3: A Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Compatible Robotic System for Breast Biopsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenhuis, Vincent; Veltman, Jeroen; Siepel, Françoise Jeanette; Stramigioli, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    Stormram 3 is an MRI-compatible robotic system that can perform MR guided breast biopsies of suspicious lesions. The base of the robot measures 160x180x90 mm and it is actuated by five custom pneumatic linear stepper motors, driven by a valve manifold outside the Faraday cage of the MRI scanner. All

  20. A New Paradigm for African American Breast Cancer Involving Stem Cell Differentiation in a Novel Cell Culture System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-10-01

    Latimer human mammary tissue engineering system outcomes. This timeline shows the progressive differentiation manifested by non- diseased breast ...of normal histologies including hyperplasia and fibrocystic disease . No tissue was cultured that contained atypia. We collected these tissues...tissue (20 matched isogenic pairs) and non- diseased breast reduction mammoplasty tissues derived from Magee Womens Hospital (MWH). Our recent focus

  1. Simulation model to analyze the scatter radiation effects on breast cancer diagnosis by CAD system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irita, Ricardo T.; Frere, Annie F.; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2002-05-01

    One of factors that more affect the radiographic image quality is the scatter radiation produced by interaction between the x-ray and the radiographed object. Recently the Computer Aided Diagnosis (CAD) Systems are coming to aid the detection of breast small details. Nevertheless, we not sure how much the scatter radiation decrease the efficiency of this systems. This work presents a model in order to quantify the scatter radiation and find it relation between CAD's results used for the microcalcification detection. We simulated scatter photons that reaches the film and we added it to the mammography image. The new images were processed and the alterations of the CAD's results were analyzed. The information loss to breast composed by 80 percent adipose tissue was 0,0561 per each centimeter increased in the breast's thickness. We calculated these same data considering a proportion variation of adipose tissue and considering the breast composition of 90 percent and 70 percent the loss it would be of 0.0504 and 0.07559 per increased cm, respectively. We can increase the wanted scattered radiation to any image with its own characteristics and analyze the disturbances that it can bring to the visual inspection or the automatic detection (CAD system) efficiently.

  2. Overview of resistance to systemic therapy in patients with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana Maria; Morales-Vasquez, Flavia; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N

    2007-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death in American women. It was the second most common cancer in the world in 2002, with more than 1 million new cases. Despite advances in early detection and the understanding of the molecular bases of breast cancer biology, about 30% of patients with early-stage breast cancer have recurrent disease. To offer more effective and less toxic treatment, selecting therapies requires considering the patient and the clinical and molecular characteristics of the tumor. Systemic treatment of breast cancer includes cytotoxic, hormonal, and immunotherapeutic agents. These medications are used in the adjuvant, neoadjuvant, and metastatic settings. In general, systemic agents are active at the beginning of therapy in 90% of primary breast cancers and 50% of metastases. However, after a variable period of time, progression occurs. At that point, resistance to therapy is not only common but expected. Herein we review general mechanisms of drug resistance, including multidrug resistance by P-glycoprotein and the multidrug resistance protein family in association with specific agents and their metabolism, emergence of refractory tumors associated with multiple resistance mechanisms, and resistance factors unique to host-tumor-drug interactions. Important anticancer agents specific to breast cancer are described. Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death in American women. In 2002, 209,995 new cases of breast cancer were registered, and 42,913 patients died of it. In 5 years, the annual prevalence of breast cancer will reach 968,731 cases in the United States. World wide, the problem is just as significant, as breast cancer is the most frequent cancer after nonmelanoma skin cancer, with more than 1 million new cases in 2002 and an expected annual prevalence of more than 4.4 million in 5 years. Breast cancer treatment currently requires the joint efforts

  3. High resolution amplified pixel sensor architectures for large area digital mammography tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghibakhsh, Farhad; Karim, Karim S.

    2008-03-01

    Amplified Pixel Sensor (APS) architectures using two transistors per pixel are introduced in this research for digital mammography tomosynthesis that requires high resolution and low noise imaging capability. The fewer number of on-pixel elements and reduced pixel complexity result in a smaller pixel pitch and higher gain, which makes the two-transistor (2T) APS architectures promising for high resolution, low noise and high speed digital imaging including medical imaging modalities such as tomosynthesis and cone beam computed tomography. Measured results from in-house fabricated test arrays using amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin film transistor (TFTs) are presented as well as driving schemes for minimizing the threshold voltage metastability problem and increasing frame rate. The results indicate that a pixel input referred noise value of down to 220 electrons is achievable with a 50μm pixel pitch a-Si 2T APS.

  4. [Anaerobic bacteria as a gene delivery system for breast cancer therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimori, Minoru

    2008-06-01

    A fundamental obstacle in systemic therapy for metastatic breast cancer patients is specific targeting of therapy directly to a solid tumor. Hypoxic or necrotic regions are characteristic of solid tumors in many murine and human tumors, including the majority of primary tumors of the breast. A strain of anaerobic bacteria such as Bifidobacterium or Clostridium selectively localizes to and proliferates in solid tumors after systemic application. Another approach uses attenuated Salmonella strains that need tumor-specific nutrients to selectively proliferate and is a potential gene delivery system. We constructed a plasmid, pBLES100-S-eCD, which included the cytosine deaminase gene. Transfected Bifidobacterium longum produced cytosine deaminase in the hypoxic tumor. Enzyme/pro-drug therapy was confirmed to be effective for systemic administration.

  5. The role of breast-feeding in infant immune system: a systems perspective on the intestinal microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praveen, Paurush; Jordan, Ferenc; Priami, Corrado; Morine, Melissa J

    2015-09-24

    The human intestinal microbiota changes from being sparsely populated and variable to possessing a mature, adult-like stable microbiome during the first 2 years of life. This assembly process of the microbiota can lead to either negative or positive effects on health, depending on the colonization sequence and diet. An integrative study on the diet, the microbiota, and genomic activity at the transcriptomic level may give an insight into the role of diet in shaping the human/microbiome relationship. This study aims at better understanding the effects of microbial community and feeding mode (breast-fed and formula-fed) on the immune system, by comparing intestinal metagenomic and transcriptomic data from breast-fed and formula-fed babies. We re-analyzed a published metagenomics and host gene expression dataset from a systems biology perspective. Our results show that breast-fed samples co-express genes associated with immunological, metabolic, and biosynthetic activities. The diversity of the microbiota is higher in formula-fed than breast-fed infants, potentially reflecting the weaker dependence of infants on maternal microbiome. We mapped the microbial composition and the expression patterns for host systems and studied their relationship from a systems biology perspective, focusing on the differences. Our findings revealed that there is co-expression of more genes in breast-fed samples but lower microbial diversity compared to formula-fed. Applying network-based systems biology approach via enrichment of microbial species with host genes revealed the novel key relationships of the microbiota with immune and metabolic activity. This was supported statistically by data and literature.

  6. Preliminary results of miniaturized and robust ultrasound guided diffuse optical tomography system for breast cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavadi, Hamed; Mostafa, Atahar; Li, Jinglong; Zhou, Feifei; Uddin, Shihab; Xu, Chen; Zhu, Quing

    2017-02-01

    According to the World Health Organization, breast cancer is the most common cancer among women worldwide, claiming the lives of hundreds of thousands of women each year. Near infrared diffuse optical tomography (DOT) has demonstrated a great potential as an adjunct modality for differentiation of malignant and benign breast lesions and for monitoring treatment response of patients with locally advanced breast cancers. The path toward commercialization of DOT techniques depends upon the improvement of robustness and user-friendliness of this technique in hardware and software. In the past, our group have developed three frequency domain prototype systems which were used in several clinical studies. In this study, we introduce our newly under development US-guided DOT system which is being improved in terms of size, robustness and user friendliness by several custom electronic and mechanical design. A new and robust probe designed to reduce preparation time in clinical process. The processing procedure, data selection and user interface software also updated. With all these improvements, our new system is more robust and accurate which is one step closer to commercialization and wide use of this technology in clinical settings. This system is aimed to be used by minimally trained user in the clinical settings with robust performance. The system performance has been tested in the phantom experiment and initial results are demonstrated in this study. We are currently working on finalizing this system and do further testing to validate the performance of this system. We are aiming toward use of this system in clinical setting for patients with breast cancer.

  7. Phantom experiments with a microwave imaging system for breast-cancer screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubæk, Tonny; Zhurbenko, Vitaliy

    2009-01-01

    Microwave imaging is emerging as a promising technique for breast-cancer detection. In this paper, the microwave imaging system currently being developed at the Technical University of Denmark is introduced. This system consists of 32 antennas positioned in a cylindrical setup, each equipped with...... with its own transceiver module. The images are reconstructed using a Newton-based algorithm to solve the nonlinear inverse scattering problem....

  8. Incorporating texture features in a computer-aided breast lesion diagnosis system for automated three-dimensional breast ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haixia; Tan, Tao; van Zelst, Jan; Mann, Ritse; Karssemeijer, Nico; Platel, Bram

    2014-07-01

    We investigated the benefits of incorporating texture features into an existing computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system for classifying benign and malignant lesions in automated three-dimensional breast ultrasound images. The existing system takes into account 11 different features, describing different lesion properties; however, it does not include texture features. In this work, we expand the system by including texture features based on local binary patterns, gray level co-occurrence matrices, and Gabor filters computed from each lesion to be diagnosed. To deal with the resulting large number of features, we proposed a combination of feature-oriented classifiers combining each group of texture features into a single likelihood, resulting in three additional features used for the final classification. The classification was performed using support vector machine classifiers, and the evaluation was done with 10-fold cross validation on a dataset containing 424 lesions (239 benign and 185 malignant lesions). We compared the classification performance of the CAD system with and without texture features. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve increased from 0.90 to 0.91 after adding texture features ([Formula: see text]).

  9. Classification System for Identifying Women at Risk for Altered Partial Breast Irradiation Recommendations After Breast Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalchik, Kristin V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Vallow, Laura A., E-mail: vallow.laura@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); McDonough, Michelle [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Thomas, Colleen S.; Heckman, Michael G. [Section of Biostatistics, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Peterson, Jennifer L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Adkisson, Cameron D. [Department of General Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Serago, Christopher [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); McLaughlin, Sarah A. [Department of General Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To study the utility of preoperative breast MRI for partial breast irradiation (PBI) patient selection, using multivariable analysis of significant risk factors to create a classification rule. Methods and Materials: Between 2002 and 2009, 712 women with newly diagnosed breast cancer underwent preoperative bilateral breast MRI at Mayo Clinic Florida. Of this cohort, 566 were retrospectively deemed eligible for PBI according to the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project Protocol B-39 inclusion criteria using physical examination, mammogram, and/or ultrasound. Magnetic resonance images were then reviewed to determine their impact on patient eligibility. The patient and tumor characteristics were evaluated to determine risk factors for altered PBI eligibility after MRI and to create a classification rule. Results: Of the 566 patients initially eligible for PBI, 141 (25%) were found ineligible because of pathologically proven MRI findings. Magnetic resonance imaging detected additional ipsilateral breast cancer in 118 (21%). Of these, 62 (11%) had more extensive disease than originally noted before MRI, and 64 (11%) had multicentric disease. Contralateral breast cancer was detected in 28 (5%). Four characteristics were found to be significantly associated with PBI ineligibility after MRI on multivariable analysis: premenopausal status (P=.021), detection by palpation (P<.001), first-degree relative with a history of breast cancer (P=.033), and lobular histology (P=.002). Risk factors were assigned a score of 0-2. The risk of altered PBI eligibility from MRI based on number of risk factors was 0:18%; 1:22%; 2:42%; 3:65%. Conclusions: Preoperative bilateral breast MRI altered the PBI recommendations for 25% of women. Women who may undergo PBI should be considered for breast MRI, especially those with lobular histology or with 2 or more of the following risk factors: premenopausal, detection by palpation, and first-degree relative with a history of

  10. [Clinical application of digital TV tomosynthesis to disorders of the wrist and their post-operative evaluation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, J; Nakatsuchi, Y; Hirano, H; Saitoh, S; Matsuda, S; Tsuchigane, A; Karakida, O; Seo, G S; Itoh, K; Kasuga, T

    1995-05-01

    The clinical utility of digital TV tomosynthesis was assessed in 13 patients with chronic disorders of the wrist and the first carpometacarpal joints, and a post-operative evaluation was carried out. The disorders included nonunion of the scaphoid in five patients, Kienböck's disease in four, subluxation of the distal radioulnar joint in two, and osteoarthrosis of the first carpometacarpal joint in two. The total time needed to obtain two sets of tomographs of a wrist by digital TV tomosynthesis was about 10 minutes, or approximately one third of the time required with conventional methods. The total radiation exposure in obtaining all tomographs of one direction with digital TV tomosynthesis was less than that in obtaining only one tomograph with conventional methods. Digital TV tomosynthetic images were judged superior to conventional tomographs by four orthopedic surgeons and four radiologists, because tomographic blur was reduced in part by a spatial frequency filter processing. Clinically, digital TV tomosynthesis was very helpful in evaluating nonunion of the scaphoid and Kienböck's disease, especially in their post-operative conditions with metallic fixative devices. Digital TV tomosynthesis was found to be a fast, feasible and inexpensive method with low radiation exposure for evaluating disorders of the wrist.

  11. Performance analysis of a dedicated breast MR-HIFU system for tumor ablation in breast cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deckers, R.; Merckel, L. G.; de Senneville, B. Denis; Schubert, G.; Koehler, M.; Knuttel, F.M.; Mali, W.P.Th.M.; Moonen, C. T. W.; van den Bosch, Maurice; Bartels, L. W.

    2015-01-01

    MR-guided HIFU ablation is a promising technique for the non-invasive treatment of breast cancer. A phase I study was performed to assess the safety and treatment accuracy and precision of MR-HIFU ablation in breast cancer patients (n = 10) using a newly developed MR-HIFU platform dedicated to

  12. Breast imaging reporting and data system (BI-RADS) lexicon for breast MRI: Interobserver variability in the description and assignment of BI-RADS category

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Khoury, Mona, E-mail: monelkhoury@gmail.com [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Montréal, Breast Centre, Radiology Department, 3840 Rue Saint Urbain, Montréal, QC H2W1T8 (Canada); Lalonde, Lucie; David, Julie; Labelle, Maude [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Montréal, Breast Centre, Radiology Department, 3840 Rue Saint Urbain, Montréal, QC H2W1T8 (Canada); Mesurolle, Benoit [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de McGill, Cedar Breast Centre, Radiology Department, 687 Pine Avenue West, Montreal, QC H3A1A1 (Canada); Trop, Isabelle [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Montréal, Breast Centre, Radiology Department, 3840 Rue Saint Urbain, Montréal, QC H2W1T8 (Canada)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • The use of BI-RADS lexicon in interpreting breast MRI examinations is beneficial. • Our study shows: (a) moderate to substantial agreement between observers and (b) better agreement in interpreting mass than non-mass enhancement (NME). • Careful analysis of the NME should be done to help detect cancer as early as possible. - Abstract: Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate interobserver variability between breast radiologists when describing abnormal enhancement on breast MR examinations and assigning a BI-RADS category using the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) terminology. Materials and methods: Five breast radiologists blinded to patients’ medical history and pathologic results retrospectively and independently reviewed 257 abnormal areas of enhancement on breast MRI performed in 173 women. Each radiologist described the focal enhancement using BI-RADS terminology and assigned a final BI-RADS category. Krippendorff's α coefficient of agreement was used to asses interobserver variability. Results: All radiologists agreed on the morphology of enhancement in 183/257 (71%) lesions, yielding a substantial agreement (Krippendorff's α = 0.71). Moderate agreement was obtained for mass descriptors – shape, margins and internal enhancement – (α = 0.55, 0.51 and 0.45 respectively) and NME (non-mass enhancement) descriptors – distribution and internal enhancement – (α = 0.54 and 0.43). Overall substantial agreement was obtained for BI-RADS category assignment (α = 0.71). It was however only moderate (α = 0.38) for NME compared to mass (α = 0.80). Conclusion: Our study shows good agreement in describing mass and NME on a breast MR examination but a better agreement in predicting malignancy for mass than NME.

  13. Evaluation of a Hanging-Breast PET System for Primary Tumor Visualization in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer: Comparison With Standard PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Suzana C; Rebolleda, José Ferrér; Koolen, Bas B; Wesseling, Jelle; Jurado, Raúl Sánchez; Stokkel, Marcel P M; Del Puig Cózar Santiago, María; van der Noort, Vincent; Rutgers, Emiel J Th; Valdés Olmos, Renato A

    2016-06-01

    The purposes of this study were to evaluate the performance of a mammography with molecular imaging PET (MAMMI-PET) system for breast imaging in the hanging-breast position for the visualization of primary breast cancer lesions and to compare this method with whole-body PET/CT. Between March 2011 and March 2014, a prospective evaluation included women with one or more histologically confirmed primary breast cancer lesions (index lesions). After injection of 180-240 MBq of (18)F-FDG, whole-body PET/CT and MAMMI-PET acquisitions were performed, index lesions were scored 0, 1, or 2 for FDG uptake relative to background. Detection and FDG uptake were compared by breast length, maximal tumor diameter, affected breast quadrants, tumor grade, and histologic and immunologic sub-types. Finally, the two PET modalities were compared for detection of index lesions. For 234 index lesions (diameter, 5-170 mm), the overall sensitivity was 88.9% for MAMMI-PET and 91% for PET/CT (p = 0.61). Twenty-three (9.8%) index lesions located too close to the pectoral muscle were missed with MAMMI-PET, and 20 index lesions were missed with PET/CT. Lesion visibility on MAMMI-PET images was influenced by tumor grade (p = 0.034) but not by cancer subtype (p = 0.65). Although in an overall evaluation MAMMI-PET was not superior to PET/CT, MAMMI-PET does have higher sensitivity for primary breast cancer lesions within the scanning range of the device. Optimization of the positioning device may increase visualization of the most dorsal lesions.

  14. Surgical treatment of early-stage breast cancer in the Department of Defense Healthcare System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelemen, J J; Poulton, T; Swartz, M T; Jatoi, I

    2001-03-01

    The choice between breast-conserving surgery and modified radical mastectomy in the treatment of women with early stage breast cancer in the Department of Defense Healthcare System may be influenced by demographic factors. The Department of Defense Automated Central Tumor Registry (ACTUR) was queried for women diagnosed with American Joint Committee on Cancer Stage I or II invasive breast carcinoma from January 1, 1986, to December 31, 1996. Univariate analysis and multivariate analysis were applied to the study variables. Year of diagnosis, age at diagnosis, tumor size, type of hospital, geographic region, and local availability of radiation therapy were evaluated with respect to the type of surgical treatment performed. Surgical treatment was either breast conservation therapy (BCT) or modified radical mastectomy. After excluding women for whom the data were incomplete (n = 308), 7,815 women were identified who met study criteria. There was a progressive increase in the use of BCT to treat tumors of all sizes from 16% to 47% over the 11 years of the study (p mastectomy (55.5 years versus 56.8 years, p versus 28%, p therapy did not influence choice of treatment. The use of BCT to treat early stage invasive breast carcinoma in the Department of Defense Healthcare System is increasing. But BCT is used less often to treat larger tumors. Regional differences in the use of BCT persist, even after controlling for other factors. Patient age and type of hospital (community versus academic center) appear to exert little influence on the choice of treatment. Local availability of radiation therapy did not seem to influence the choice of treatment. Our data suggest that efforts to promote the use of BCT should target the central and southwestern USA. Use of BCT should also be emphasized for women with larger tumors (> 2 cm).

  15. Curative-intent stereotactic body radiation therapy for residual breast cancer liver metastasis after systemic chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagara, Naofumi; Nakano, Yoshiaki; Watanabe, Ami; Inatome, Junichi; Nakamura, Hidetoshi; Kim, Chiwan; Danno, Katsuki; Taniguchi, Hirokazu; Kanoh, Toshiyuki; Kimura, Yutaka; Ohnishi, Tadashi; Tono, Takeshi; Monden, Takushi; Imaoka, Shingi; Kagawa, Kazufumi

    2014-11-01

    Liver metastases from breast cancer are generally treated with systemic therapy such as chemotherapy or hormonotherapy. However, local treatment options such as resection, radiofrequency ablation (RFA), and radiotherapy can also be considered to treat oligometastases. We report the case of a 45-year-old female treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) after chemotherapy against a solitary liver metastasis from primary breast cancer. A liver metastasis with diameter of 35 mm developed 3.5 years after surgery for primary breast cancer in 2004. Fourteen courses of triweekly docetaxel treatments considerably decreased the metastatic lesion, but there still remained a tiny lesion radiographically. Chemotherapy was stopped because of the side-effects of docetaxel, and then SBRT was selected for additional treatment, aiming at complete cure of metastasis. X-ray irradiation (52.8 Gy/4 fractions) was applied to the remaining metastatic lesion, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed no evidence of residual tumor 4 months after irradiation. Neither regrowth nor recurrences have been found until now, 24 months after SBRT. SBRT for oligometastases of breast cancer may be one of the possible curative-intent options, being less invasive than surgical resection or RFA.

  16. Robust breast cancer prediction system based on rough set theory at National Cancer Institute of Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamouda, Saeed Khodary M; Wahed, Mohammed E; Abo Alez, Reda H; Riad, Khaled

    2018-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the major death causing diseases of the women in the world. Every year more than million women are diagnosed with breast cancer more than half of them will die because of inaccuracies and delays in diagnosis of the disease. High accuracy in cancer prediction is important to improve the treatment quality and the survivability rate of patients. In this paper, we are going to propose a new and robust breast cancer prediction and diagnosis system based on the Rough Set (RS). Also, introducing the robust classification process based on some new and most effective attributes. Comparing and evaluating the performance of our proposed approach with the clinical, Radial Basis Function, and Artificial Neural Networks classification schemes. The dataset used in our experiments consists of 60 samples obtained from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) of Egypt. We have used the RS theory to robustly find dependence relationships among data, and evaluate the importance of attributes through: Results: Conclusion: We have introduced the robustness of the RS theory in early predicting and diagnosing the breast cancer. This lay more importance to the contribution and efficiency of RS theory in the field of computational biology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Designing a tunable 3D heterocellular breast cancer tissue test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, C C; Burg, K J L

    2015-03-01

    It is increasingly recognized that the tissue microenvironment is crucial in cell signaling and regulation of normal and malignant cell function. Components and properties of the microenvironment such as extracellular matrix, adhesion integrins, tissue architectures and tissue modulus regulate growth, differentiation and apoptosis of cells. These properties control cell fate through complex signals that are influenced either by interactions between neighbouring cells or by stimulated cell surface receptors. In this study, we established an in vitro engineered microenvironment: i.e., a tissue test system that combined heterocellular tumour spheroids, polymeric microcarriers and adipocytes, an abundant stromal cell type in breast tissue, to investigate the behaviour of breast cancer cells in response to different environmental stimuli in a more relevant 3D microenvironment. Results showed the engineered microenvironment influenced breast cancer cell proliferation, differentiation and migration through multi-cellular interactions and changes in microenvironmental stiffness and that stromal cells such as adipocytes play a critical role in the breast cancer process. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Fuzzy-probabilistic multi agent system for breast cancer risk assessment and insurance premium assignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatari, Farzaneh; Akbarzadeh-T, Mohammad-R; Sabahi, Ahmad

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, we present an agent-based system for distributed risk assessment of breast cancer development employing fuzzy and probabilistic computing. The proposed fuzzy multi agent system consists of multiple fuzzy agents that benefit from fuzzy set theory to demonstrate their soft information (linguistic information). Fuzzy risk assessment is quantified by two linguistic variables of high and low. Through fuzzy computations, the multi agent system computes the fuzzy probabilities of breast cancer development based on various risk factors. By such ranking of high risk and low risk fuzzy probabilities, the multi agent system (MAS) decides whether the risk of breast cancer development is high or low. This information is then fed into an insurance premium adjuster in order to provide preventive decision making as well as to make appropriate adjustment of insurance premium and risk. This final step of insurance analysis also provides a numeric measure to demonstrate the utility of the approach. Furthermore, actual data are gathered from two hospitals in Mashhad during 1 year. The results are then compared with a fuzzy distributed approach. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Breast cancer and primary systemic therapy. Results of the Consensus Meeting on the recommendations for pathological examination and histological report of breast cancer specimens in the Marche Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santinelli, A; De Nictolis, M; Mambelli, V; Ranaldi, R; Bearzi, I; Battellpi, N; Mariotti, C; Fabbietti, L; Baldassarre, S; Giuseppetti, G M; Fabris, G

    2011-10-01

    Primary systemic therapy (PST) adds some practical problems to the pathologic examination of neoplastic breast tissue obtained from patients before and after chemotherapy. Pathologists, oncologists, breast surgeons, radiotherapists and radiologists in the Marche Region held a Consensus Meeting in Ancona on May 13, 2010, in which 15 statements dealing with neoadjuvant chemotherapy were approved by all participants. The first two statements are related to the pre-PST phase and concern the technical procedures and the histological report of the core biopsy. The other statements deal with similar issues of the post-PST surgical specimen.

  20. Timing of radiotherapy in breast-conserving therapy: a large prospective cohort study of node-negative breast cancer patients without adjuvant systemic therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jobsen, J.J.; van der Palen, Jacobus Adrianus Maria; Baum, M.; Brinkhuis, M.; Struikmans, H.

    2013-01-01

    Background: To investigate the issue of timing of radiation therapy (RT) after lumpectomy in relation to recurrences and outcome. Methods: Analysis was done on 1107 breast-conserving therapies (BCT) with 1070 women, all without lymph node metastasis and without any adjuvant systemic therapy. Timing

  1. Electrochemotherapy - Supplementary Treatment for Loco-regional Metastasized Breast Carcinoma Administered to Concomitant Systemic Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grischke, Eva-Maria; Röhm, Carmen; Stauß, Eva; Taran, Florin-Andrei; Brucker, Sara Y; Wallwiener, Diethelm

    2017-09-01

    Electrochemotherapy (ECT) is an established procedure for treating breast cancer loco-regional recurrences following surgical intervention and/or radiotherapy. Limited information is available on ECT application as a concomitant procedure to systemic therapy in recurrent breast cancer. The primary objective of this study was to determine if the application of ECT in close temporal relation to systemic chemotherapy could lead to increased local and/or systemic side effects. For this purpose we evaluated the safety of ECT as a supplemental local therapy to systemic therapy. ECT local and systemic toxicity and side effects were recorded and whether the anticipated local therapeutic effect of ECT would be influenced by the concomitant use of systemic therapies was investigated. This is an observational study. Thirty three patients with loco-regional metastasized breast carcinoma were treated and observed over a period of three years with 46 ECT applications for local tumour control in addition to established systemic therapy. A specific timeline for ECT administration was not fixed up, but was generally performed one week before the following chemotherapy administration with the aim to avoid the so called nadir, this means the peak period with risk of neutropenia. Data was collected over a period of three years on a population of 33 metastatic patients. Fifteen patients, received neo-adjuvant therapy as part of their primary treatment, but still had an advanced stage tumour. Some patients received repeated ECT applications. Objective tumour response was observed in 90% of the treated patients. Patients showed no increased local toxicity, especially no higher dermal toxicity, e.g. formation of local necrosis. ECT proved to be an effective supplement to a cytotoxic systemic therapy, especially for high-risk patients who did not respond well to systemic therapy of loco-regional metastases, without creating any greater systemic or loco-regional toxicities.

  2. Electrochemotherapy – Supplementary Treatment for Loco-regional Metastasized Breast Carcinoma Administered to Concomitant Systemic Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röhm, Carmen; Stauß, Eva; Taran, Florin-Andrei; Brucker, Sara Y.; Wallwiener, Diethelm

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Electrochemotherapy (ECT) is an established procedure for treating breast cancer loco-regional recurrences following surgical intervention and/or radiotherapy. Limited information is available on ECT application as a concomitant procedure to systemic therapy in recurrent breast cancer. The primary objective of this study was to determine if the application of ECT in close temporal relation to systemic chemotherapy could lead to increased local and/or systemic side effects. For this purpose we evaluated the safety of ECT as a supplemental local therapy to systemic therapy. ECT local and systemic toxicity and side effects were recorded and whether the anticipated local therapeutic effect of ECT would be influenced by the concomitant use of systemic therapies was investigated. Patients and methods This is an observational study. Thirty three patients with loco-regional metastasized breast carcinoma were treated and observed over a period of three years with 46 ECT applications for local tumour control in addition to established systemic therapy. A specific timeline for ECT administration was not fixed up, but was generally performed one week before the following chemotherapy administration with the aim to avoid the so called nadir, this means the peak period with risk of neutropenia. Results Data was collected over a period of three years on a population of 33 metastatic patients. Fifteen patients, received neo-adjuvant therapy as part of their primary treatment, but still had an advanced stage tumour. Some patients received repeated ECT applications. Objective tumour response was observed in 90% of the treated patients. Patients showed no increased local toxicity, especially no higher dermal toxicity, e.g. formation of local necrosis. Conclusions ECT proved to be an effective supplement to a cytotoxic systemic therapy, especially for high-risk patients who did not respond well to systemic therapy of loco-regional metastases, without creating any

  3. Preservation of biomolecules in breast cancer tissue by a formalin-free histology system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morales Azorides R

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The potential problems associated with the use of formalin in histology, such as health hazards, degradation of RNA and cross-linking of proteins are well recognized. We describe the utilization of a formalin-free fixation and processing system for tissue detection of two important biopredictors in breast cancer – estrogen receptor and HER2 – at the RNA and protein levels. Methods Parallel sections of 62 cases of breast cancer were fixed in an alcohol-based molecular fixative and in formalin. Molecular fixative samples were processed by a novel formalin-free microwave-assisted processing system that preserves DNA, RNA and proteins. Formalin-fixed samples were processed using the conventional method. Estrogen receptor was assessed by immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR. HER2 was assessed by immunohistochemistry, FISH, CISH and real-time PCR. Results The immunohistochemical reaction for estrogen receptor was similar in molecular- and formalin-fixed samples (Spearman Rank R = 0.83, p Conclusion The formalin-free tissue fixation and processing system is a practical platform for evaluation of biomolecular markers in breast cancer and it allows reliable DNA and RNA and protein studies.

  4. Issues Affecting the Loco-regional and Systemic Management of Patients with Invasive Lobular Carcinoma of the Breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Carmel; Clemons, Mark; Addison, Christina; Robertson, Susan; Arnaout, Angel

    2016-01-01

    Invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) of the breast is the second most common type of invasive breast carcinoma accounting for 8-14% of all breast cancers. Traditional management of ILC has followed similar paradigms as that for invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). However, ILC represents a pathologically, clinically and biologically unique variant of breast cancer with particular management challenges. These challenges are seen in both the loco-regional management of ILC; where ILC tumors tend to avoid detection and hence present as more clinically advanced and surgically challenging carcinomas, and the systemic management with a unique response pattern to standard systemic therapies. Because of these challenges, the outcome for patients with ILC has likely lagged behind the continued improvements seen in outcome for patients with IDC. Here, we discuss some of the unique challenges ILC presents and discuss possible management strategies to best overcome the difficulties in the loco-regional and systemic management of patients with ILC. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Clear-PEM: A PET imaging system dedicated to breast cancer diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, M C; Albuquerque, E; Almeida, F G; Almeida, P; Amaral, P; Auffray, Etiennette; Bento, P; Bruyndonckx, P; Bugalho, R; Carriço, B; Cordeiro, H; Ferreira, M; Ferreira, N C; Gonçalves, F; Lecoq, Paul; Leong, C; Lopes, F; Lousã, P; Luyten, J; Martins, M V; Matela, N; Rato-Mendes, P; Moura, R; Nobre, J; Oliveira, N; Ortigão, C; Peralta, L; Rego, J; Ribeiro, R; Rodrigues, P; Santos, A I; Silva, J C; Silva, M M; Tavernier, Stefaan; Teixeira, I C; Texeira, J P; Trindade, A; Trummer, Julia; Varela, J

    2007-01-01

    The Clear-PEM scanner for positron emission mammography under development is described. The detector is based on pixelized LYSO crystals optically coupled to avalanche photodiodes and readout by a fast low-noise electronic system. A dedicated digital trigger (TGR) and data acquisition (DAQ) system is used for on-line selection of coincidence events with high efficiency, large bandwidth and small dead-time. A specialized gantry allows to perform exams of the breast and of the axilla. In this paper we present results of the measurement of detector modules that integrate the system under construction as well as the imaging performance estimated from Monte Carlo simulated data.

  6. A Comparison of Behavioral Inhibition/ Activation System, Type D and Optimism in the Breast Cancer Patients and Healthy Controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Alipoor

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Nowadays, the role and importance of psychosocial factors on physical health, as well as the influence of personality characteristics in having psychosomatic diseases such as cancer are of interest to many researchers. In spite of increase in breast cancer in Iran, very few studies have been carried out on risk factors of breast cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the comparative Behavioral inhibition / Activation System, type D and optimism in the breast cancer patients and healthy individuals. Methods: In the present casual-comparative study, 190 people (95 Patients and 95 Normal Subjects were selected in Rasht, Iran. Moreover, the groups were matched for demographic characteristics (age, gender and education. All individuals diagnosed with Breast Cancer and Normal Subjects received a Gary-Wilson Personality Questionnaire, Life Orientation Test and Type D Personality Scale. Collected data were analyzed using multivariate analysis of variance and regression. Results: The findings revealed that there were significant differences between cancer and normal groups in behavioral inhibition/activation system, type D Personality and optimism. In this regard, the Breast Cancer group had higher scores subscales of negative affect, social inhibition, passive avoidance, extinction and fight-flight than normal group. In addition, subscales of approach, active avoidance and optimism in the normal group were more than the Breast Cancer group. Conclusion: The present study supported the role of psychological variables in breast cancer patients which is essential for improving patients’ health and quality of life.

  7. Use of Tomosynthesis for Detection of Bone Erosions of the Foot in Patients With Established Rheumatoid Arthritis: Comparison With Radiography and CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoni, Paolo; Gérard, Laurent; Kaiser, Marie-Joëlle; Ribbens, Clio; Rinkin, Charline; Malaise, Olivier; Malaise, Michel

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare tomosynthesis with radiography for the detection of bone erosions of the foot in patients with established rheumatoid arthritis (RA) using MDCT as a reference standard. Eighteen consecutive patients with established RA were included. Each patient underwent radiography, tomosynthesis, and CT examinations of the feet on the same day. Two radiologists independently determined the number of bone erosions and the Sharp-van der Heijde score with each of the three imaging modalities. On a total of 216 joints from 18 patients, 216 bone erosions were detected on CT, 215 on tomosynthesis, and 181 with radiography. The mean (± SD) Sharp-van der Heijde score was equivalent for tomosynthesis (18.8 ± 16.8) and CT (19.8 ± 18.5) but was statistically lower for radiography (16.4 ± 18.0) (p = 0.030). The respective overall sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for tomosynthesis were 80%, 75%, 78%, 76%, and 80%, whereas the respective corresponding values for radiography were 66%, 81%, 74%, 77%, and 71%. The radiation burden of tomosynthesis was almost equivalent to that of radiography. Tomosynthesis has a higher sensitivity than radiography to detect bone erosions of the foot in patients with established RA and imparts an almost equivalent radiation burden.

  8. Beyond Mammography: New Frontiers in Breast Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drukteinis, Jennifer S.; Mooney, Blaise P.; Flowers, Chris I.; Gatenby, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer screening remains a subject of intense and, at times, passionate debate. Mammography has long been the mainstay of breast cancer detection and is the only screening test proven to reduce mortality. Although it remains the gold standard of breast cancer screening, there is increasing awareness of subpopulations of women for whom mammography has reduced sensitivity. Mammography has also undergone increased scrutiny for false positives and excessive biopsies, which increase radiation dose, cost and patient anxiety. In response to these challenges, new technologies for breast cancer screening have been developed, including; low dose mammography; contrast enhanced mammography, tomosynthesis, automated whole breast ultrasound, molecular imaging and MRI. Here we examine some of the current controversies and promising new technologies that may improve detection of breast cancer both in the general population and in high-risk groups, such as women with dense breasts. We propose that optimal breast cancer screening will ultimately require a personalized approach based on metrics of cancer risk with selective application of specific screening technologies best suited to the individual’s age, risk, and breast density. PMID:23561631

  9. Defining the Survival Benchmark for Breast Cancer Patients with Systemic Relapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeichner, Simon B; Ambros, Tadeu; Zaravinos, John; Montero, Alberto J; Mahtani, Reshma L; Ahn, Eugene R; Mani, Aruna; Markward, Nathan J; Vogel, Charles L

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Our original paper, published in 1992, reported a median overall survival after first relapse in breast cancer of 26 months. The current retrospective review concentrates more specifically on patients with first systemic relapse, recognizing that subsets of patients with local recurrence are potentially curable. METHODS Records of 5,168 patients from a largely breast-cancer-specific oncology practice were reviewed to identify breast cancer patients with their first relapse between 1996 and 2006 after primary treatment. There were 189 patients diagnosed with metastatic disease within 2 months of being seen by our therapeutic team and 101 patients diagnosed with metastatic disease greater than 2 months. The patients were divided in order to account for lead-time bias than could potentially confound the analysis of the latter 101 patients. RESULTS Median survival for our primary study population of 189 patients was 33 months. As expected, the median survival from first systemic relapse (MSFSR) for the 101 patients excluded because of the potential for lead-time bias was better at 46 months. Factors influencing prognosis included estrogen receptor (ER) status, disease-free interval (DFI), and dominant site of metastasis. Compared with our original series, even with elimination of local-regional recurrences in our present series, the median survival from first relapse has improved by 7 months over the past two decades. CONCLUSION The new benchmark for MSFSR approaches 3 years. PMID:25922577

  10. [Breast Reconstruction Post-Mastectomy in the Public Health System of Andalusia, Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Puente, Alberto; Maañón-di Leo, José Claudio; Lara-Blanquer, Antonio

    2016-05-09

    Breast reconstruction (BR) after mastectomy is widely recommended but there are significant variations in its application. The objective was to know the rate of BR in the Andalusian Public Health System (APHS), timing (immediate or delayed), surgical procedure, frequency of postoperative complications and their characteristics. We used the Minimum Basic Data Set of the APHS with personal data and identification of hospitals encrypted. We selected discharges for breast cancer and mastectomy in 2010-2013 and related readmissions of the same patients in 2010-2014. BR rates were calculated according to patient age and type of mastectomy. Timing of BR (immediate or delayed) and surgical techniques used were described. Postoperative complications were analyzed in the initial episode and in readmissions occurring within a minimum period of 2 years. BR failures were specifically studied. We analyzed the information of 6,026 women, of which 4,412 met the inclusion criteria (basically, two years follow-up). The BR rate was 29% (22% immediate and 7% delayed) and reached 58% in women younger than 46 years. BR was performed by 27 of the 36 hospitals that practice mastectomies. Global percentage of postoperative complications was 18.6% for immediate BR, 12.1% for delayed BR and 7.9% for patients without BR. Failure occurred in 12.7% of immediate BR and 7.2% of delayed BR. In the Andalusian Public Health System the Breast reconstruction rate, is at a similar level to that reported nationally and in other countries.

  11. Efficacy analysis of tomosynthesis in the diagnosis of the femoral head osteochondropathy (Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease

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    A. Yu. Vasil'ev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite the fact that the prevalence of the femoral head osteochondropathy is 2.9% of all bone and muscle disorders and 25% of the disorders of the hip joint, this problem demands special attention, while late diagnosis could lead to disability of the patient.Aim: To compare and clarify X-ray symptomatology of Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease found by standard digital radiography and by tomosynthesis.Materials and methods: Eighty six patients aged from 5 to 12 years with the femoral head osteochondropathy were allocated into two groups: 43  patients from the group  1 were assessed by standard two-plane digital radiography (frontal and Lauenstein projections, whereas 43  patients from the group  2 were assessed by direct plane tomosynthesis only. The investigations were performed with the X-ray machine FDR AcSelerate  200 (Fujifilm, Japan with the function of tomosynthesis. Radiographic symptoms of the disease were assessed in the subgroups that were identified depending on the disease stage: 24 patients had stage I, 20 – stage II, 20 – stage III, and 22 – stages IV and V.Results: Standard radiography could not detect any bone abnormalities in any patient with stage I of Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease (n1=12, 100%; however, by means of tomosynthesis, all patients from this subgroup (n2=12, 100% had minimally increased density on the affected side. In 9  (75% patients, tomosynthesis showed cystiform remodeling of trabecular structure in subchondral parts of the femoral head of the affected hip, and in 2 (17% patients, flattening of the inner epiphysis pole was visualized. At stage II of the disease standard radiography showed femoral head compression with widening of the joint space in 8 (80% patients, absence of subchondral lucency in 6 (60%, and increased density of the femoral head in 4 (40%. In all these patients (n2=10, 100% tomosynthesis showed signs of intra-articular effusion, in 6 (60% cases there were areas of

  12. Systemic Sclerosis and Silicone Breast Implant: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

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    Antonios Psarras

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmentally induced systemic sclerosis is a well-recognized condition, which is correlated with exposure to various chemical compounds or drugs. However, development of scleroderma-like disease after exposure to silicone has always been a controversial issue and, over time, it has triggered spirited debate whether there is a certain association or not. Herein, we report the case of a 35-year-old female who developed Raynaud’s phenomenon and, finally, systemic sclerosis shortly after silicone breast implantation surgery.

  13. A feasibility study of automatic lung nodule detection in chest digital tomosynthesis with machine learning based on support vector machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Donghoon; Kim, Ye-seul; Choi, Sunghoon; Lee, Haenghwa; Jo, Byungdu; Choi, Seungyeon; Shin, Jungwook; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2017-03-01

    The chest digital tomosynthesis(CDT) is recently developed medical device that has several advantage for diagnosing lung disease. For example, CDT provides depth information with relatively low radiation dose compared to computed tomography (CT). However, a major problem with CDT is the image artifacts associated with data incompleteness resulting from limited angle data acquisition in CDT geometry. For this reason, the sensitivity of lung disease was not clear compared to CT. In this study, to improve sensitivity of lung disease detection in CDT, we developed computer aided diagnosis (CAD) systems based on machine learning. For design CAD systems, we used 100 cases of lung nodules cropped images and 100 cases of normal lesion cropped images acquired by lung man phantoms and proto type CDT. We used machine learning techniques based on support vector machine and Gabor filter. The Gabor filter was used for extracting characteristics of lung nodules and we compared performance of feature extraction of Gabor filter with various scale and orientation parameters. We used 3, 4, 5 scales and 4, 6, 8 orientations. After extracting features, support vector machine (SVM) was used for classifying feature of lesions. The linear, polynomial and Gaussian kernels of SVM were compared to decide the best SVM conditions for CDT reconstruction images. The results of CAD system with machine learning showed the capability of automatically lung lesion detection. Furthermore detection performance was the best when Gabor filter with 5 scale and 8 orientation and SVM with Gaussian kernel were used. In conclusion, our suggested CAD system showed improving sensitivity of lung lesion detection in CDT and decide Gabor filter and SVM conditions to achieve higher detection performance of our developed CAD system for CDT.

  14. Are systemic antibiotics indicated in aesthetic breast surgery? A systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardwicke, Joseph T; Bechar, Janak; Skillman, Joanna M

    2013-06-01

    The use of systemic prophylactic antibiotics to reduce surgical-site infection in aesthetic breast surgery remains controversial. The aim of this review is to weigh the available evidence with respect to reducing surgical-site infection. Two literature searches were performed to analyze the available data for studies involving either reduction or augmentation mammaplasty and the results of different antibiotics regimens. Outcome measures included surgical-site infection and capsular contracture. A total of 2971 patients (5891 breasts) were included. A meta-analysis of surgical-site infection incidence after aesthetic breast surgery revealed a significant reduction in infections overall with antibiotic prophylaxis compared with controls (p=0.02). This was most significant with a single preoperative antibiotic dose (p=0.02). In cases of reduction mammaplasty, when antibiotics are administered as a single preoperative dose, the risk of developing surgical-site infection is halved. With augmentation mammaplasty, there was no effect on infection rates with any antibiotic regimen. Data concerning the incidence of capsular contracture were insufficient for meta-analysis. For cases of reduction mammaplasty, the authors recommend a single intravenous perioperative dose of antibiotic with action against Staphylococcus species. For augmentation mammaplasty, there is no evidence to refute current guidelines, based on recommendations obtained from other forms of implant surgery. Therapeutic, II.

  15. PARANEOPLASTIC DAMAGE TO THE CENTRAL AND PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM IN BREAST CANCER: A CASE REPORT

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    E. S. Koroleva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Paraneoplastic neurological syndrome involves the concurrent development of cancer and neurologicaldiseases. Breast cancer is the second most common cancer associated with paraneoplastic damage to the central and peripheral nervous system. Autoimmune genesis of the disease is characterized by the presence of highly specific onconeural antibodies, which selectively affect neurons in the brain cord, spinal cord and spinal ganglia, and cause the onset of neurological symptoms within 2 years before cancer is detected. Six well-characterized onconeural antibodies detected in the blood serum of breast cancer patients can be used for the laboratory diagnosis of paraneoplastic neurological syndrome. Of them, anti-Hu, anti-CV2 and anti-amphiphysin antibodies cause polyneuropathy most often. Anti-Yo antibody is usually associated with cerebellar degeneration. Multiple neuronal autoantibodies can be simultaneously detected in a patient. Removal of the tumor may lead to stabilization and even partial regression of the neurological symptom