WorldWideScience

Sample records for breast tomosynthesis system

  1. An Object-Oriented Simulator for 3D Digital Breast Tomosynthesis Imaging System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Seyyedi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT is an innovative imaging modality that provides 3D reconstructed images of breast to detect the breast cancer. Projections obtained with an X-ray source moving in a limited angle interval are used to reconstruct 3D image of breast. Several reconstruction algorithms are available for DBT imaging. Filtered back projection algorithm has traditionally been used to reconstruct images from projections. Iterative reconstruction algorithms such as algebraic reconstruction technique (ART were later developed. Recently, compressed sensing based methods have been proposed in tomosynthesis imaging problem. We have developed an object-oriented simulator for 3D digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT imaging system using C++ programming language. The simulator is capable of implementing different iterative and compressed sensing based reconstruction methods on 3D digital tomosynthesis data sets and phantom models. A user friendly graphical user interface (GUI helps users to select and run the desired methods on the designed phantom models or real data sets. The simulator has been tested on a phantom study that simulates breast tomosynthesis imaging problem. Results obtained with various methods including algebraic reconstruction technique (ART and total variation regularized reconstruction techniques (ART+TV are presented. Reconstruction results of the methods are compared both visually and quantitatively by evaluating performances of the methods using mean structural similarity (MSSIM values.

  2. Comparison of mean glandular dose values provided by a digital breast tomosynthesis system in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies are needed to determine the radiation dose of patients that are undergoing Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) procedures. Mean glandular dose (DG) values were derived from the incident air kerma (Ki) measurements and tabulated conversion coefficients. Ki values were obtained through an ionization chamber positioned in a Hologic Selenia Dimensions system using appropriate exposure parameters. This work contributes to determine the reliable radiation dose received by the patients and compare DG values provided by this DBT system images. - Highlights: • Studies are needed to determine the dose of tomosynthesis (DBT) procedures. • Mean glandular dose (DG) results derived from the incident air kerma (Ki). • Ki values were obtained through an ionization chamber. • A DBT system was used with appropriate exposure parameters. • This work contributes to compare DG values provided by this DBT system images

  3. Monte Carlo simulation for the estimation of the glandular breast dose for a digital breast tomosynthesis system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a screening and diagnostic modality that acquires images of the breast at multiple angles during a short scan. The Selenia Dimensions (Hologic, Bedford, Mass) DBT system can perform both full-field digital mammography and DBT. The system acquires 15 projections over a 15 deg. angular range (from -7.5 deg. to +7.5 deg.). An important factor in determining the optimal imaging technique for breast tomosynthesis is the radiation dose. In breast imaging, the radiation dose of concern is that deposited in the glandular tissue of the breast because this is the tissue that has a risk of developing cancer. The concept of the normalised mean glandular dose (DgN) has been introduced as the metric for the dose in breast imaging. The DgN is difficult to measure. The Monte Carlo techniques offer an alternative method for a realistic estimation of the radiation dose. The purpose of this work was to use the Monte Carlo code MCNPX technique to generate monoenergetic glandular dose data for estimating the breast tissue dose in tomosynthesis for arbitrary spectra as well as to observe the deposited radiation dose by projection on the glandular portion of the breast in a Selenia Dimensions DBT system. A Monte Carlo simulation of the system was developed to compute the DgN in a craniocaudal view. Monoenergetic X-ray beams from 10 to 49 keV in 1-keV increments were used. The simulation utilised the assumption of a homogeneous breast composition and three compositions (0 % glandular, 50 % glandular and 100 % glandular). The glandular and adipose tissue compositions were specified according ICRU Report 44. A skin layer of 4 mm was assumed to encapsulate the breast on all surfaces. The breast size was varied using the chest wall-to-nipple distance (CND) and compressed breast thickness (t). In this work, the authors assumed a CND of 5 cm and the thicknesses ranged from 2 to 8 cm, in steps of 2 cm. The fractional energy absorption increases (up to 44

  4. Quality control in breast tomosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakubiak, R.R.; Messias, P.C.; Santos, M.F., E-mail: requi@utfpr.edu.br [Universidade Tecnologia Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Departamento Academico de Fisica; Urban, L.A.B.D., E-mail: lineiurban@hotmail.com [Diagnostico Avancado por Imagem, Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    In Brazil, breast cancer is the most common and the leading cause of death among women, with estimated 57,000 new cases in 2014. The mammography (2D) plays an important role in the early detection of breast cancer, but in some cases can be difficult to detect malignant lesions due overlap of breast tissues. The Digital Breasts Tomosynthesis (DBT: 3D) reduces the effects of overlap, providing improved characterization of mammographic findings. However, the dose may double as compared with mammography. This study presents results of Contrast to Noise Ratio (CNR) and image quality evaluation on Siemens mammography equipment Mammomat Inspiration with tomosynthesis. The CNR was determined with Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) layers of 20 to 70 mm thick and an aluminum foils of 0,2 mm thickness and area of 10 mm². Image quality was assessed with the ACR Breast Simulator. In the evaluation of image quality, the detectability of fibers and masses was identical in 2D and 3D systems. Displaying fibers were 4,5 and 4 mass in both modes. In 2D mode were identified 3,5 microcalcifications groups, and 3D showed 3 groups. The Mean Glandular Dose (MGD) for the simulator in 2D mode was 1,17 mGy and 2,35 mGy for the 3D mode. The result reinforces the importance of quality control in the process of obtaining the images and obtained in accordance CNR values, ensuring image quality and compatible dose in 2D and 3D processes. (author)

  5. Quality control in breast tomosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Brazil, breast cancer is the most common and the leading cause of death among women, with estimated 57,000 new cases in 2014. The mammography (2D) plays an important role in the early detection of breast cancer, but in some cases can be difficult to detect malignant lesions due overlap of breast tissues. The Digital Breasts Tomosynthesis (DBT: 3D) reduces the effects of overlap, providing improved characterization of mammographic findings. However, the dose may double as compared with mammography. This study presents results of Contrast to Noise Ratio (CNR) and image quality evaluation on Siemens mammography equipment Mammomat Inspiration with tomosynthesis. The CNR was determined with Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) layers of 20 to 70 mm thick and an aluminum foils of 0,2 mm thickness and area of 10 mm². Image quality was assessed with the ACR Breast Simulator. In the evaluation of image quality, the detectability of fibers and masses was identical in 2D and 3D systems. Displaying fibers were 4,5 and 4 mass in both modes. In 2D mode were identified 3,5 microcalcifications groups, and 3D showed 3 groups. The Mean Glandular Dose (MGD) for the simulator in 2D mode was 1,17 mGy and 2,35 mGy for the 3D mode. The result reinforces the importance of quality control in the process of obtaining the images and obtained in accordance CNR values, ensuring image quality and compatible dose in 2D and 3D processes. (author)

  6. Quality control in breast tomosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Brazil breast cancer is the most common and the leading cause of death among women, with estimated 57,000 new cases in 2014. The mammography (2D) plays an important role in the early detection of breast cancer, but in some cases can be difficult to detect malignant lesions due overlap of breast tissues. The Breast Digital Tomosynthesis (BDT: 3D) reduces the effects of overlap, providing improved characterization of mammographic findings. However, the dose may double as compared to the mammography. This study presents results of Contrast Ratio Noise tests (CRN) and quality image on a Siemens mammography equipment Mammomat Inspiration with tomosynthesis. The CRN was determined with plates Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) of 20 to 70 mm thickness and an aluminum plate of 10 mm2 and 0.2 mm thickness. Image quality was assessed with the ACR Breast Simulator. In assessment of image quality, the detectability of fibers and masses was identical in 2D and 3D systems. Were visualized 4.5 fibers and 4 mass in both modes. In 2D mode groups have been identified 3.5 microcalcifications, and 3D were 3 groups. The Mean Glandular Dose for the simulator in 2D mode was 1.17 mGy and 2.35 mGy for the 3D mode. The result reinforces the importance of quality control in the process of obtaining the images and obtained in accordance CRN values, ensuring image quality and dose compatible in 2D and 3D processes

  7. Workload and transmission data for the installation of a digital breast tomosynthesis system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Xinhua; Zhang Da; Liu, Bob [Division of Diagnostic Imaging Physics and Webster Center for Advanced Research and Education in Radiation, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) differs from conventional mammography in target/filter, kVp range, and imaging geometry. The aim of this study was to assess the breast input exposure of a DBT system by completing a workload survey of DBT installations, and to determine the parameters {alpha}, {beta}, and {gamma} in the Archer equation for the primary radiation generated by the clinical workload distributions. Methods: The authors conducted a retrospective survey of the x-ray breast imaging performed between September 2011 and September 2012 in three clinical DBT rooms equipped with Selenia Dimensions systems (Hologic Inc., Bedford, MA). A total of 343 examinations were analyzed to calculate the workload (mA-minute) and the primary air kerma at 1 m from the source (K{sup 1}). Transmission curves were calculated for the primary radiation generated by the workload distributions of the DBT rooms, and were fitted to the Archer equation. Results: There were large variations in patient volume and workload in the three examination rooms. In all these rooms, the average tube voltage (kVp) was about 31, the average K{sup 1} per patient was 16-21 mGy, and the average mA-minute per patient was 1.4-2.2 times higher than that of the mammography room described in NCRP Report No. 147. Most DBT screening examinations consisted of four two-dimensional mammographic views plus four tomosynthesis scans; the numbers of views acquired in diagnostic examinations varied widely. Tomosynthesis scans contributed about 30% of total mA-minute and about 50% of K{sup 1}. For the primary radiation generated by the clinical workload distributions, {alpha} was similar to that of 40-45 kVp W/Al (target/filter), and {alpha}+{beta} was similar to that of 30 kVp W/Al. Conclusions: The workload (mA-minute and K{sup 1}) distributions of mammographic examinations with DBT differ from conventional mammography. A field survey of patient volume and x-ray tube usage is important for the shielding

  8. Digital breast tomosynthesis; Digitale Tomosynthese der Brust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haegele, Julian; Barkhausen, Joerg [Universtiaetsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Luebeck (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin; Pursche, Telja [Universtiaetsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Luebeck (Germany). Brustzentrum; Schaefer, Fritz K.W. [Universtiaetsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany). Bereich Mammadiagnostik und Intervention

    2015-09-15

    In digital breast tomosynthesis a digital tomographic data set with a very high spatial resolution is reconstructed from low-dose projections collected over a limited rotation angle. This allows a very detailed assessment of e. g. masses and architectural distortions. The average glandular dose is comparable to 2 D mammography. First clinical studies demonstrated that tomosynthesis is able to supply important additional information in suspicious mammographic findings. In comparison to projection mammography, tomosynthesis shows an at least comparable diagnostic accuracy. In everyday practice, tomosynthesis is currently mostly used for further evaluation of suspicious findings in mammography.

  9. Validation of mean glandular dose values provided by a digital breast tomosynthesis system in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beraldo O, B.; Paixao, L.; Donato da S, S. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear / CNEN, Post-graduation in Sciences and Technology of Radiations Minerals and Materials, Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Araujo T, M. H. [Dr Maria Helena Araujo Teixeira Clinic, Guajajaras 40, 30180-100 Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Nogueira, M. S., E-mail: bbo@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear / CNEN, Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is an emerging imaging modality that provides quasi-three-dimensional structural information of the breast and has strong promise to improve the differentiation of normal tissue and suspicious masses reducing the tissue overlaps. DBT images are reconstructed from a sequence of low-dose X-ray projections of the breast acquired at a small number of angles over a limited angular range. The Ho logic Selen ia Dimensions system is equipped with an amorphous Selenium (a-Se) detector layer of 250 μm thickness and a 70 μm pixel pitch. Studies are needed to determine the radiation dose of patients that are undergoing this emerging procedure to compare with the results obtained in DBT images. The mean glandular dose (D{sub G}) is the dosimetric quantity used in quality control of the mammographic systems. The aim of this work is to validate D{sub G} values for different breast thicknesses provided by a Ho logic Selen ia Dimensions system using a DBT mode in comparison with the same results obtained by a calibrated 90 X 5-6M-model Radcal ionization chamber. D{sub G} values were derived from the incident air kerma (K{sub i}) measurements and tabulated conversion coefficients that are dependent on the half value layer (HVL) of the X-ray spectrum. Voltage and tube loading values were recorded in irradiations using W/Al anode/filter combination, automatic exposure control mode and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) slabs which simulate different breast thicknesses. For K{sub i} measurements, the ionization chamber was positioned at 655 mm from the focus and the same radiographic technique values were selected with the manual mode. D{sub G} values for a complete procedure ranged from 0.9 ± 0.1 to 3.7 ± 0.4 mGy. The results for different breast thicknesses are in accordance with values obtained by DBT images and with acceptable levels established by the Commission of the European Communities (Cec) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA

  10. Characterizing X-ray detectors for prototype digital breast tomosynthesis systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) system is a newly developed 3-D imaging technique that overcomes the tissue superposition problems of conventional mammography. Therefore, it produces fewer false positives. In DBT system, several parameters are involved in image acquisition, including geometric components. A series of projections should be acquired at low exposure. This makes the system strongly dependent on the detector's characteristic performance. This study compares two types of x-ray detectors developed by the Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute (KERI). The first prototype DBT system has a CsI (Tl) scintillator/CMOS based flat panel digital detector (2923 MAM, Dexela Ltd.), with a pixel size of 0.0748 mm. The second uses a-Se based direct conversion full field detector (AXS 2430, analogic) with a pixel size of 0.085 mm. The geometry of both systems is same, with a focal spot 665.8 mm from the detector, and a center of rotation 33 mm above the detector surface. The systems were compared with regard to modulation transfer function (MTF), normalized noise power spectrum (NNPS), detective quantum efficiency (DQE) and a new metric, the relative object detectability (ROD). The ROD quantifies the relative performance of each detector at detecting specified objects. The system response function demonstrated excellent linearity (R2>0.99). The CMOS-based detector had a high sensitivity, while the Anrad detector had a large dynamic range. The higher MTF and noise power spectrum (NPS) values were measured using an Anrad detector. The maximum DQE value of the Dexela detector was higher than that of the Anrad detector with a low exposure level, considering one projection exposure for tomosynthesis. Overall, the Dexela detector performed better than did the Anrad detector with regard to the simulated Al wires, spheres, test objects of ROD with low exposure level. In this study, we compared the newly developed prototype DBT system with two different types of

  11. Characterizing X-ray detectors for prototype digital breast tomosynthesis systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y.-s.; Park, H.-s.; Park, S.-J.; Choi, S.; Lee, H.; Lee, D.; Choi, Y.-W.; Kim, H.-J.

    2016-03-01

    The digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) system is a newly developed 3-D imaging technique that overcomes the tissue superposition problems of conventional mammography. Therefore, it produces fewer false positives. In DBT system, several parameters are involved in image acquisition, including geometric components. A series of projections should be acquired at low exposure. This makes the system strongly dependent on the detector's characteristic performance. This study compares two types of x-ray detectors developed by the Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute (KERI). The first prototype DBT system has a CsI (Tl) scintillator/CMOS based flat panel digital detector (2923 MAM, Dexela Ltd.), with a pixel size of 0.0748 mm. The second uses a-Se based direct conversion full field detector (AXS 2430, analogic) with a pixel size of 0.085 mm. The geometry of both systems is same, with a focal spot 665.8 mm from the detector, and a center of rotation 33 mm above the detector surface. The systems were compared with regard to modulation transfer function (MTF), normalized noise power spectrum (NNPS), detective quantum efficiency (DQE) and a new metric, the relative object detectability (ROD). The ROD quantifies the relative performance of each detector at detecting specified objects. The system response function demonstrated excellent linearity (R2>0.99). The CMOS-based detector had a high sensitivity, while the Anrad detector had a large dynamic range. The higher MTF and noise power spectrum (NPS) values were measured using an Anrad detector. The maximum DQE value of the Dexela detector was higher than that of the Anrad detector with a low exposure level, considering one projection exposure for tomosynthesis. Overall, the Dexela detector performed better than did the Anrad detector with regard to the simulated Al wires, spheres, test objects of ROD with low exposure level. In this study, we compared the newly developed prototype DBT system with two different types of x

  12. Breast MRI, digital mammography and breast tomosynthesis: comparison of three methods for early detection of breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragana Roganovic

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women and early detection is important for its successful treatment. The aim of this study was to investigate the sensitivity and specificity of three methods for early detection of breast cancer: breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, digital mammography, and breast tomosynthesis in comparison to histopathology, as well as to investigate the intraindividual variability between these modalities.  We included 57 breast lesions, each detected by three diagnostic modalities: digital mammography, breast MRI, and breast tomosynthesis, and subsequently confirmed by histopathology. Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS was used for characterizing the lesions. One experienced radiologist interpreted all three diagnostic modalities. Twenty-nine of the breast lesions were malignant while 28 were benign. The sensitivity for digital mammography, breast MRI, and breast tomosynthesis, was 72.4%, 93.1%, and 100%, respectively; while the specificity was 46.4%, 60.7%, and 75%, respectively. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC curve analysis showed an overall diagnostic advantage of breast tomosynthesis over both breast MRI and digital mammography. The difference in performance between breast tomosynthesis and digital mammography was significant (p < 0.001, while the difference between breast tomosynthesis and breast MRI was not significant (p = 0.20. 

  13. Characterization of lesions in dense breasts: Does tomosynthesis help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangarajan, Krithika; Hari, Smriti; Thulkar, Sanjay; Sharma, Sanjay; Srivastava, Anurag; Parshad, Rajinder

    2016-01-01

    Context: Mammography in dense breasts is challenging due to lesion obscuration by tissue overlap. Does tomosynthesis offers a solution? Aims: To study the impact of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) in characterizing lesions in breasts of different mammographic densities. Settings and Design: Prospective blinded study comparing mammography in two views with Mammography + Tomosynthesis. Methods and Material: Tomosynthesis was performed in 199 patients who were assigned Breast imaging reporting and data system (BIRADS) categories 0, 3, 4, or 5 on two-dimensional (2D) mammogram. Mammograms were first categorized into one of 4 mammographic breast densities in accordance with the American College of Radiology (ACR). Three radiologists independently analyzed these images and assigned a BIRADS category first based on 2D mammogram alone, and then assigned a fresh BIRADS category after taking mammography and tomosynthesis into consideration. A composite gold-standard was used in the study (histopathology, ultrasound, follow-up mammogram, magnetic resonance imaging). Each lesion was categorized into 3 groups—superior categorization with DBT, no change in BIRADS, or inferior BIRADS category based on comparison with the gold-standard. The percentage of lesions in each group was calculated for different breast densities. Results: There were 260 lesions (ages 28–85). Overall, superior categorization was seen in 21.2% of our readings on addition of DBT to mammography. DBT was most useful in ACR Densities 3 and 4 breasts where it led to more appropriate categorization in 27 and 42% of lesions, respectively. DBT also increased diagnostic confidence in 54.5 and 63.6% of lesions in ACR Densities 3 and 4, respectively. Conclusions: In a diagnostic setting, the utility of tomosynthesis increases with increasing breast density. This helps in identifying the sub category of patients where DBT can actually change management.

  14. Optimizing configuration parameters of a stationary digital breast tomosynthesis system based on carbon nanotube x-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Andrew; Qian, Xin; Gidcumb, Emily; Spronk, Derrek; Sprenger, Frank; Kuo, Johnny; Ng, Susan; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto

    2012-03-01

    The stationary Digital Breast Tomosynthesis System (s-DBT) has the advantage over the conventional DBT systems as there is no motion blurring in the projection images associated with the x-ray source motion. We have developed a prototype s-DBT system by retrofitting a Hologic Selenia Dimensions rotating gantry tomosynthesis system with a distributed carbon nanotube (CNT) x-ray source array. The linear array consists of 31 x-ray generating focal spots distributed over a 30 degree angle. Each x-ray beam can be electronically activated allowing the flexibility and easy implementation of novel tomosynthesis scanning with different scanning parameters and configurations. Here we report the initial results of investigation on the imaging quality of the s-DBT system and its dependence on the acquisition parameters including the number of projections views, the total angular span of the projection views, the dose distribution between different projections, and the total dose. A mammography phantom is used to visually assess image quality. The modulation transfer function (MTF) of a line wire phantom is used to evaluate the system spatial resolution. For s-DBT the in-plan system resolution, as measured by the MTF, does not change for different configurations. This is in contrast to rotating gantry DBT systems, where the MTF degrades for increased angular span due to increased focal spot blurring associated with the x-ray source motion. The overall image quality factor, a composite measure of the signal difference to noise ratio (SdNR) for mass detection and the z-axis artifact spread function for microcalcification detection, is best for the configuration with a large angular span, an intermediate number of projection views, and an even dose distribution. These results suggest possible directions for further improvement of s-DBT systems for high quality breast cancer imaging.

  15. Molecular Breast Imaging Using Emission Tomosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopan, O. [University of Florida; Gilland, D. [University of Florida; Weisenberger, Andrew G. [JLAB; Kross, Brian J. [JLAB; Welch, Benjamin L. [Dilon Technologies

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: Tour objective is to design a novel SPECT system for molecular breast imaging (MBI) and evaluate its performance. The limited angle SPECT system, or emission tomosynthesis, is designed to achieve 3D images of the breast with high spatial resolution/sensitivity. The system uses a simplified detector motion and is conducive to on-board biopsy and mult-modal imaging with mammography. Methods: The novel feature of the proposed gamma camera is a variable-angle, slant-hole (VASH) collimator, which is well suited for limited angle SPECT of a mildly compressed breast. The collimator holes change slant angle while the camera surface remains flush against the compression paddle. This allows the camera to vary the angular view ({+-}30{degrees}, {+-}45{degrees}) for tomographic imaging while keeping the camera close to the object for high spatial resolution and/or sensitivity. Theoretical analysis and Monte Carlo simulations were performed assuming a point source and isolated breast phantom. Spatial resolution, sensitivity, contrast and SNR were measured. Results were compared to single-view, planar images and conventional SPECT. For both conventional SPECT and VASH, data were reconstructed using iterative algorithms. Finally, a proof-of-concept VASH collimator was constructed for experimental evaluation. Results: Measured spatial resolution/sensitivity with VASH showed good agreement with theory including depth-of-interaction (DOI) effects. The DOI effect diminished the depth resolution by approximately 2 mm. Increasing the slant angle range from {+-}30{degrees} to {+-}45{degrees} resulted in an approximately 1 mm improvement in the depth resolution. In the breast phantom images, VASH showed improved contrast and SNR over conventional SPECT and improved contrast over planar scintimmammography. Reconstructed images from the proof-of-concept VASH collimator demonstrated reasonable depth resolution capabilities using limited angle projection data. Conclusion: We

  16. Experimental investigation for determination of optimal X-ray beam tube voltages in a newly developed digital breast tomosynthesis system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our purpose was to investigate optimal tube voltages (kVp) for a newly developed digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) process and to determine tube current–exposure time products (mA s) for the average glandular dose (AGD), which is similar to that of the two views in conventional mammography (CM). In addition, the optimal acquisition parameters for this system were compared with those of CM. The analysis was based on the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) from the simulated micro-calcifications on homogeneous phantoms, and the figure of merit (FOM) was retrieved from the CNR and AGD at X-ray tube voltages ranging from 24 to 40 kVp at intervals of 2 kV. The optimal kVp increased more than 2 kV with increasing glandularity for thicker (≥50 mm) breast phantoms. The optimal kVp for DBT was found to be 4–7 kV higher than that calculated for CM with breast phantoms thicker than 50 mm. This is likely due to the greater effect of noise and dose reduction by kVp increment when using the lower dose per projection in DBT. It is important to determine optimum acquisition conditions for a maximally effective DBT system. The results of our study provide useful information to further improve DBT for high quality imaging

  17. Experimental investigation for determination of optimal X-ray beam tube voltages in a newly developed digital breast tomosynthesis system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hye-Suk, E-mail: radiosugar@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Radiological Science and Research Institute of Health Science, Yonsei University, Wonju, Gangwon 220-710 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ye-Seul, E-mail: radiohesugar@gmail.com [Department of Radiological Science and Research Institute of Health Science, Yonsei University, Wonju, Gangwon 220-710 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Young-Wook, E-mail: ywchoi@keri.re.kr [Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute (KERI), Ansan, Geongki 426-170 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, JaeGu, E-mail: jgchoi88@paran.com [Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute (KERI), Ansan, Geongki 426-170 (Korea, Republic of); Rhee, Yong-Chun, E-mail: ycrhee@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Radiological Science and Research Institute of Health Science, Yonsei University, Wonju, Gangwon 220-710 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hee-Joung, E-mail: hjk1@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Radiological Science and Research Institute of Health Science, Yonsei University, Wonju, Gangwon 220-710 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-01

    Our purpose was to investigate optimal tube voltages (kVp) for a newly developed digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) process and to determine tube current–exposure time products (mA s) for the average glandular dose (AGD), which is similar to that of the two views in conventional mammography (CM). In addition, the optimal acquisition parameters for this system were compared with those of CM. The analysis was based on the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) from the simulated micro-calcifications on homogeneous phantoms, and the figure of merit (FOM) was retrieved from the CNR and AGD at X-ray tube voltages ranging from 24 to 40 kVp at intervals of 2 kV. The optimal kVp increased more than 2 kV with increasing glandularity for thicker (≥50 mm) breast phantoms. The optimal kVp for DBT was found to be 4–7 kV higher than that calculated for CM with breast phantoms thicker than 50 mm. This is likely due to the greater effect of noise and dose reduction by kVp increment when using the lower dose per projection in DBT. It is important to determine optimum acquisition conditions for a maximally effective DBT system. The results of our study provide useful information to further improve DBT for high quality imaging.

  18. The Adjunctive Digital Breast Tomosynthesis in Diagnosis of Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Tsung-Lung Yang; Huei-Lung Liang; Chen-Pin Chou; Jer-Shyung Huang; Huay-Ben Pan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To compare the diagnostic performance of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) and digital mammography (DM) for breast cancers. Materials and Methods. Fifty-seven female patients with pathologically proved breast cancer were enrolled. Three readers gave a subjective assessment superiority of the index lesions (mass, focal asymmetry, architectural distortion, or calcifications) and a forced BIRADS score, based on DM reading alone and with additional DBT information. The relevance between...

  19. Quantification of resolution in multiplanar reconstructions for digital breast tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vent, Trevor L.; Acciavatti, Raymond J.; Kwon, Young Joon; Maidment, Andrew D. A.

    2016-03-01

    Multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) in digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) allows tomographic images to be portrayed in various orientations. We have conducted research to determine the resolution of tomosynthesis MPR. We built a phantom that houses a star test pattern to measure resolution. This phantom provides three rotational degrees of freedom. The design consists of two hemispheres with longitudinal and latitudinal grooves that reference angular increments. When joined together, the hemispheres form a dome that sits inside a cylindrical encasement. The cylindrical encasement contains reference notches to match the longitudinal and latitudinal grooves that guide the phantom's rotations. With this design, any orientation of the star-pattern can be analyzed. Images of the star-pattern were acquired using a DBT mammography system at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Images taken were reconstructed and analyzed by two different methods. First, the maximum visible frequency (in line pairs per millimeter) of the star test pattern was measured. Then, the contrast was calculated at a fixed spatial frequency. These analyses confirm that resolution decreases with tilt relative to the breast support. They also confirm that resolution in tomosynthesis MPR is dependent on object orientation. Current results verify that the existence of super-resolution depends on the orientation of the frequency; the direction parallel to x-ray tube motion shows super-resolution. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that the direction of the spatial frequency relative to the motion of the x-ray tube is a determinant of resolution in MPR for DBT.

  20. A review of breast tomosynthesis. Part I. The image acquisition process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sechopoulos, Ioannis [Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Hematology and Medical Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, 1701 Upper Gate Drive Northeast, Suite 5018, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Mammography is a very well-established imaging modality for the early detection and diagnosis of breast cancer. However, since the introduction of digital imaging to the realm of radiology, more advanced, and especially tomographic imaging methods have been made possible. One of these methods, breast tomosynthesis, has finally been introduced to the clinic for routine everyday use, with potential to in the future replace mammography for screening for breast cancer. In this two part paper, the extensive research performed during the development of breast tomosynthesis is reviewed, with a focus on the research addressing the medical physics aspects of this imaging modality. This first paper will review the research performed on the issues relevant to the image acquisition process, including system design, optimization of geometry and technique, x-ray scatter, and radiation dose. The companion to this paper will review all other aspects of breast tomosynthesis imaging, including the reconstruction process.

  1. Characterization of Breast Lesions: Comparison of Digital Breast Tomosynthesis and Ultrasonography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sun Ah [Department of Radiology, Human Medical Imaging & Intervention Center, Seoul 135-120 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Jung Min; Cho, Nariya [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Ann [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital Healthcare System Gangnam Center, Seoul 135-984 (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Woo Kyung [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-01

    To compare the diagnostic performance of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) and conventional breast ultrasound (US) to characterize breast lesions as benign or malignant. A total of 332 women, presenting for screening examinations or for breast biopsy between March and June 2012 were recruited to undergo digital mammography (DM), DBT, and breast US examination. Among them, 113 patients with 119 breast lesions depicted on DM were finally included. Three blinded radiologists performed an enriched reader study and reviewed the DBT and US images. Each reader analyzed the lesions in random order, assigned Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) descriptors, rated the images for the likelihood of malignancy (%) and made a BI-RADS final assessment. Diagnostic accuracy, as assessed by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, sensitivity, and specificity of DBT and US were compared. Among the 119 breast lesions depicted on DM, 75 were malignant and the remaining 44 were benign. The average diagnostic performance for characterizing breast lesions as benign or malignant in terms of area under the curve was 0.899 for DBT and 0.914 for US (p = 0.394). Mean sensitivity (97.3% vs. 98.7%, p = 0.508) and specificity (44.7% vs. 39.4%, p = 0.360) were also not significantly different. Digital breast tomosynthesis may provide similar reader lesion characterization performance to that of US for breast lesions depicted on DM.

  2. Evaluation of scatter effects on image quality for breast tomosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Gang; Mainprize, James G.; Boone, John M.; Yaffe, Martin J. [Imaging Research, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, S-657, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada) and Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Department of Radiology, X-ray Imaging Laboratory, U. C. Davis Medical Center, 4701 X Street, Sacramento, California 95817 and Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Imaging Research, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, S-657, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada) and Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada)

    2009-10-15

    Digital breast tomosynthesis uses a limited number (typically 10-20) of low-dose x-ray projections to produce a pseudo-three-dimensional volume tomographic reconstruction of the breast. The purpose of this investigation was to characterize and evaluate the effect of scattered radiation on the image quality for breast tomosynthesis. In a simulation, scatter point spread functions generated by a Monte Carlo simulation method were convolved over the breast projection to estimate the distribution of scatter for each angle of tomosynthesis projection. The results demonstrate that in the absence of scatter reduction techniques, images will be affected by cupping artifacts, and there will be reduced accuracy of attenuation values inferred from the reconstructed images. The effect of x-ray scatter on the contrast, noise, and lesion signal-difference-to-noise ratio (SDNR) in tomosynthesis reconstruction was measured as a function of the tumor size. When a with-scatter reconstruction was compared to one without scatter for a 5 cm compressed breast, the following results were observed. The contrast in the reconstructed central slice image of a tumorlike mass (14 mm in diameter) was reduced by 30%, the voxel value (inferred attenuation coefficient) was reduced by 28%, and the SDNR fell by 60%. The authors have quantified the degree to which scatter degrades the image quality over a wide range of parameters relevant to breast tomosynthesis, including x-ray beam energy, breast thickness, breast diameter, and breast composition. They also demonstrate, though, that even without a scatter rejection device, the contrast and SDNR in the reconstructed tomosynthesis slice are higher than those of conventional mammographic projection images acquired with a grid at an equivalent total exposure.

  3. Radiation dosimetry in digital breast tomosynthesis: Report of AAPM Tomosynthesis Subcommittee Task Group 223

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sechopoulos, Ioannis, E-mail: isechop@emory.edu [Departments of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Hematology and Medical Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, 1701 Uppergate Drive Northeast, Suite 5018, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States); Sabol, John M. [GE Healthcare, Global Diagnostic X-Ray, Mailstop W-701, 3000 North Grandview Boulevard, Waukesha, Wisconsin 53188 (United States); Berglund, Johan [Research and Development, Philips Women' s Healthcare, Solna (Sweden); Bolch, Wesley E. [J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Brateman, Libby [University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Christodoulou, Emmanuel; Goodsitt, Mitchell [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Flynn, Michael [Department of Radiology, Henry Ford Health System, Radiology Research 2F, 1 Ford Place, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States); Geiser, William [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030-4009 (United States); Kyle Jones, A. [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Lo, Joseph Y.; Paul Segars, W. [Department of Radiology, Medical Physics Graduate Program, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Maidment, Andrew D. A. [Department of Radiology, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-4206 (United States); Nishino, Kazuyoshi [R and D X-ray Products Group, Shimadzu Corporation, Tokyo (Japan); Nosratieh, Anita [Biomedical Engineering Graduate Group, Department of Radiology, University of California, Davis, California 95817 (United States); and others

    2014-09-15

    The radiation dose involved in any medical imaging modality that uses ionizing radiation needs to be well understood by the medical physics and clinical community. This is especially true of screening modalities. Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has recently been introduced into the clinic and is being used for screening for breast cancer in the general population. Therefore, it is important that the medical physics community have the required information to be able to understand, estimate, and communicate the radiation dose levels involved in breast tomosynthesis imaging. For this purpose, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 223 on Dosimetry in Tomosynthesis Imaging has prepared this report that discusses dosimetry in breast imaging in general, and describes a methodology and provides the data necessary to estimate mean breast glandular dose from a tomosynthesis acquisition. In an effort to maximize familiarity with the procedures and data provided in this Report, the methodology to perform the dose estimation in DBT is based as much as possible on that used in mammography dose estimation.

  4. Comparative study between breast tomosynthesis and classic digital mammography in the evaluation of different breast lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahar Mansour

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: Three-dimensional tomosynthesis significantly enhanced the detection and characterization of breast lesions on digital mammography especially in the context of dense breast parenchyma (ACR 3&4.

  5. The simulation of 3D mass models in 2D digital mammography and breast tomosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaheen, Eman, E-mail: eman.shaheen@uzleuven.be; De Keyzer, Frederik; Bosmans, Hilde; Ongeval, Chantal Van [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Dance, David R.; Young, Kenneth C. [National Coordinating Centre for the Physics of Mammography, Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford GU2 7XX, United Kingdom and Department of Physics, Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: This work proposes a new method of building 3D breast mass models with different morphological shapes and describes the validation of the realism of their appearance after simulation into 2D digital mammograms and breast tomosynthesis images. Methods: Twenty-five contrast enhanced MRI breast lesions were collected and each mass was manually segmented in the three orthogonal views: sagittal, coronal, and transversal. The segmented models were combined, resampled to have isotropic voxel sizes, triangularly meshed, and scaled to different sizes. These masses were referred to as nonspiculated masses and were then used as nuclei onto which spicules were grown with an iterative branching algorithm forming a total of 30 spiculated masses. These 55 mass models were projected into 2D projection images to obtain mammograms after image processing and into tomographic sequences of projection images, which were then reconstructed to form 3D tomosynthesis datasets. The realism of the appearance of these mass models was assessed by five radiologists via receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis when compared to 54 real masses. All lesions were also given a breast imaging reporting and data system (BIRADS) score. The data sets of 2D mammography and tomosynthesis were read separately. The Kendall's coefficient of concordance was used for the interrater observer agreement assessment for the BIRADS scores per modality. Further paired analysis, using the Wilcoxon signed rank test, of the BIRADS assessment between 2D and tomosynthesis was separately performed for the real masses and for the simulated masses. Results: The area under the ROC curves, averaged over all observers, was 0.54 (95% confidence interval [0.50, 0.66]) for the 2D study, and 0.67 (95% confidence interval [0.55, 0.79]) for the tomosynthesis study. According to the BIRADS scores, the nonspiculated and the spiculated masses varied in their degrees of malignancy from normal (BIRADS 1) to highly

  6. The simulation of 3D mass models in 2D digital mammography and breast tomosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This work proposes a new method of building 3D breast mass models with different morphological shapes and describes the validation of the realism of their appearance after simulation into 2D digital mammograms and breast tomosynthesis images. Methods: Twenty-five contrast enhanced MRI breast lesions were collected and each mass was manually segmented in the three orthogonal views: sagittal, coronal, and transversal. The segmented models were combined, resampled to have isotropic voxel sizes, triangularly meshed, and scaled to different sizes. These masses were referred to as nonspiculated masses and were then used as nuclei onto which spicules were grown with an iterative branching algorithm forming a total of 30 spiculated masses. These 55 mass models were projected into 2D projection images to obtain mammograms after image processing and into tomographic sequences of projection images, which were then reconstructed to form 3D tomosynthesis datasets. The realism of the appearance of these mass models was assessed by five radiologists via receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis when compared to 54 real masses. All lesions were also given a breast imaging reporting and data system (BIRADS) score. The data sets of 2D mammography and tomosynthesis were read separately. The Kendall's coefficient of concordance was used for the interrater observer agreement assessment for the BIRADS scores per modality. Further paired analysis, using the Wilcoxon signed rank test, of the BIRADS assessment between 2D and tomosynthesis was separately performed for the real masses and for the simulated masses. Results: The area under the ROC curves, averaged over all observers, was 0.54 (95% confidence interval [0.50, 0.66]) for the 2D study, and 0.67 (95% confidence interval [0.55, 0.79]) for the tomosynthesis study. According to the BIRADS scores, the nonspiculated and the spiculated masses varied in their degrees of malignancy from normal (BIRADS 1) to highly

  7. Correlating locations in ipsilateral breast tomosynthesis views using an analytical hemispherical compression model

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schie, Guido; Tanner, Christine; Snoeren, Peter; Samulski, Maurice; Leifland, Karin; Wallis, Matthew G.; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2011-08-01

    To improve cancer detection in mammography, breast examinations usually consist of two views per breast. In order to combine information from both views, corresponding regions in the views need to be matched. In 3D digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), this may be a difficult and time-consuming task for radiologists, because many slices have to be inspected individually. For multiview computer-aided detection (CAD) systems, matching corresponding regions is an essential step that needs to be automated. In this study, we developed an automatic method to quickly estimate corresponding locations in ipsilateral tomosynthesis views by applying a spatial transformation. First we match a model of a compressed breast to the tomosynthesis view containing a point of interest. Then we estimate the location of the corresponding point in the ipsilateral view by assuming that this model was decompressed, rotated and compressed again. In this study, we use a relatively simple, elastically deformable sphere model to obtain an analytical solution for the transformation in a given DBT case. We investigate three different methods to match the compression model to the data by using automatic segmentation of the pectoral muscle, breast tissue and nipple. For validation, we annotated 208 landmarks in both views of a total of 146 imaged breasts of 109 different patients and applied our method to each location. The best results are obtained by using the centre of gravity of the breast to define the central axis of the model, around which the breast is assumed to rotate between views. Results show a median 3D distance between the actual location and the estimated location of 14.6 mm, a good starting point for a registration method or a feature-based local search method to link suspicious regions in a multiview CAD system. Approximately half of the estimated locations are at most one slice away from the actual location, which makes the method useful as a mammographic workstation tool for

  8. A proposed European protocol for dosimetry in breast tomosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: A Monte Carlo computer model of X-ray systems for digital breast tomosynthesis has been used to calculate the mean glandular breast dose for a range of imaging geometries, breast sizes and compositions and X-ray spectra. The objective was to provide absorbed dose conversion coefficients which may be used to estimate the mean glandular dose to the breast from measurements of air kerma. A formalism is proposed which extends that used in the Europe for conventional 2D projection mammography by the introduction of a further multiplicative factor T, so that the mean glandular breast dose (D) is obtained as: D = K g c s T (1) where K is a measurement of air kerma, g is the absorbed dose conversion coefficient for a breast of glandularity 50%, as a function of half value layer and breast thickness, the factor c corrects for the actual glandularity of the breast and the factor s allows for spectra which have the same HVL but originate from X-ray tubes with different target/filter combinations. The Monte Carlo model is suitably extended to simulate geometries used for breast tomosynthesis. Two different geometries were treated: firstly a full field imaging system with a rotation point situated 4 cm above a fixed image receptor, which was at 66 cm from the focal spot of the X-ray tube; and secondly a scanning system with a 5 cm wide beam with matched image receptor which scans across the breast as the tube rotates. In the latter case the rotation point was below the breast platform and image receptor at 104 cm from the focal spot. For the first system rotation angles up to ±30 degrees were considered which more than encompasses the angular range of several commercial systems in use or under development. For the second system the annular range was ±17 degrees in accordance with the design of the particular scanning system simulated, a prototype manufactured by Sectra AB (Sweden). The calculations were made for breasts in the thickness range 2-11 cm

  9. Digital breast tomosynthesis versus digital mammography: a clinical performance study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gennaro, Gisella; Baldan, Enrica; Bezzon, Elisabetta; Polico, Ilaria; Proietti, Alessandro; Toffoli, Aida [Venetian Oncological Institute (IOV), IRCCS, Department of Radiology, Padua (Italy); Toledano, Alicia [Statistics Collaborative Inc., Washington, DC (United States); Di Maggio, Cosimo [Padua University, Department of Oncological and Surgical Sciences, Padua (Italy); La Grassa, Manuela [Aviano Oncological Reference Center (CRO), IRCCS, Department of Radiology, Aviano (Pordenone) (Italy); Pescarini, Luigi [Venetian Oncological Institute (IOV), IRCCS, Department of Radiology, Padua (Italy); Padua University, Department of Oncological and Surgical Sciences, Padua (Italy); Muzzio, Pier Carlo [Venetian Oncological Institute (IOV), IRCCS, Department of Radiology, Padua (Italy); Padua University, Department of Medical Diagnostic Sciences, Padua (Italy)

    2010-07-15

    To compare the clinical performance of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) with that of full-field digital mammography (FFDM) in a diagnostic population. The study enrolled 200 consenting women who had at least one breast lesion discovered by mammography and/or ultrasound classified as doubtful or suspicious or probably malignant. They underwent tomosynthesis in one view [mediolateral oblique (MLO)] of both breasts at a dose comparable to that of standard screen-film mammography in two views [craniocaudal (CC) and MLO]. Images were rated by six breast radiologists using the BIRADS score. Ratings were compared with the truth established according to the standard of care and a multiple-reader multiple-case (MRMC) receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed. Clinical performance of DBT compared with that of FFDM was evaluated in terms of the difference between areas under ROC curves (AUCs) for BIRADS scores. Overall clinical performance with DBT and FFDM for malignant versus all other cases was not significantly different (AUCs 0.851 vs 0.836, p = 0.645). The lower limit of the 95% CI or the difference between DBT and FFDM AUCs was -4.9%. Clinical performance of tomosynthesis in one view at the same total dose as standard screen-film mammography is not inferior to digital mammography in two views. (orig.)

  10. Average glandular dose in digital mammography and breast tomosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the average glandular dose (AGD) in digital full-field mammography (2 D imaging mode) and in breast tomosynthesis (3 D imaging mode). Materials and Methods: Using the method described by Boone, the AGD was calculated from the exposure parameters of 2247 conventional 2 D mammograms and 984 mammograms in 3 D imaging mode of 641 patients examined with the digital mammographic system Hologic Selenia Dimensions. The breast glandular tissue content was estimated by the Hologic R2 Quantra automated volumetric breast density measurement tool for each patient from right craniocaudal (RCC) and left craniocaudal (LCC) images in 2 D imaging mode. Results: The mean compressed breast thickness (CBT) was 52.7 mm for craniocaudal (CC) and 56.0 mm for mediolateral oblique (MLO) views. The mean percentage of breast glandular tissue content was 18.0 % and 17.4 % for RCC and LCC projections, respectively. The mean AGD values in 2 D imaging mode per exposure for the standard breast were 1.57 mGy and 1.66 mGy, while the mean AGD values after correction for real breast composition were 1.82 mGy and 1.94 mGy for CC and MLO views, respectively. The mean AGD values in 3 D imaging mode per exposure for the standard breast were 2.19 mGy and 2.29 mGy, while the mean AGD values after correction for the real breast composition were 2.53 mGy and 2.63 mGy for CC and MLO views, respectively. No significant relationship was found between the AGD and CBT in 2 D imaging mode and a good correlation coefficient of 0.98 in 3 D imaging mode. Conclusion: In this study the mean calculated AGD per exposure in 3 D imaging mode was on average 34 % higher than for 2 D imaging mode for patients examined with the same CBT.

  11. Average glandular dose in digital mammography and breast tomosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olgar, T. [Ankara Univ. (Turkey). Dept. of Engineering Physics; Universitaetsklinikum Leipzig AoeR (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Kahn, T.; Gosch, D. [Universitaetsklinikum Leipzig AoeR (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To determine the average glandular dose (AGD) in digital full-field mammography (2 D imaging mode) and in breast tomosynthesis (3 D imaging mode). Materials and Methods: Using the method described by Boone, the AGD was calculated from the exposure parameters of 2247 conventional 2 D mammograms and 984 mammograms in 3 D imaging mode of 641 patients examined with the digital mammographic system Hologic Selenia Dimensions. The breast glandular tissue content was estimated by the Hologic R2 Quantra automated volumetric breast density measurement tool for each patient from right craniocaudal (RCC) and left craniocaudal (LCC) images in 2 D imaging mode. Results: The mean compressed breast thickness (CBT) was 52.7 mm for craniocaudal (CC) and 56.0 mm for mediolateral oblique (MLO) views. The mean percentage of breast glandular tissue content was 18.0 % and 17.4 % for RCC and LCC projections, respectively. The mean AGD values in 2 D imaging mode per exposure for the standard breast were 1.57 mGy and 1.66 mGy, while the mean AGD values after correction for real breast composition were 1.82 mGy and 1.94 mGy for CC and MLO views, respectively. The mean AGD values in 3 D imaging mode per exposure for the standard breast were 2.19 mGy and 2.29 mGy, while the mean AGD values after correction for the real breast composition were 2.53 mGy and 2.63 mGy for CC and MLO views, respectively. No significant relationship was found between the AGD and CBT in 2 D imaging mode and a good correlation coefficient of 0.98 in 3 D imaging mode. Conclusion: In this study the mean calculated AGD per exposure in 3 D imaging mode was on average 34 % higher than for 2 D imaging mode for patients examined with the same CBT.

  12. The simulation of 3D microcalcification clusters in 2D digital mammography and breast tomosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This work proposes a new method of building 3D models of microcalcification clusters and describes the validation of their realistic appearance when simulated into 2D digital mammograms and into breast tomosynthesis images. Methods: A micro-CT unit was used to scan 23 breast biopsy specimens of microcalcification clusters with malignant and benign characteristics and their 3D reconstructed datasets were segmented to obtain 3D models of microcalcification clusters. These models were then adjusted for the x-ray spectrum used and for the system resolution and simulated into 2D projection images to obtain mammograms after image processing and into tomographic sequences of projection images, which were then reconstructed to form 3D tomosynthesis datasets. Six radiologists were asked to distinguish between 40 real and 40 simulated clusters of microcalcifications in two separate studies on 2D mammography and tomosynthesis datasets. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to test the ability of each observer to distinguish between simulated and real microcalcification clusters. The kappa statistic was applied to assess how often the individual simulated and real microcalcification clusters had received similar scores (''agreement'') on their realistic appearance in both modalities. This analysis was performed for all readers and for the real and the simulated group of microcalcification clusters separately. ''Poor'' agreement would reflect radiologists' confusion between simulated and real clusters, i.e., lesions not systematically evaluated in both modalities as either simulated or real, and would therefore be interpreted as a success of the present models. Results: The area under the ROC curve, averaged over the observers, was 0.55 (95% confidence interval [0.44, 0.66]) for the 2D study, and 0.46 (95% confidence interval [0.29, 0.64]) for the tomosynthesis study, indicating no statistically significant difference between real and simulated

  13. Computer-aided detection system for clustered microcalcifications in digital breast tomosynthesis using joint information from volumetric and planar projection images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a novel approach for the detection of microcalcification clusters (MCs) using joint information from digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) volume and planar projection (PPJ) image. A data set of 307 DBT views was collected with IRB approval using a prototype DBT system. The system acquires 21 projection views (PVs) from a wide tomographic angle of 60° (60°-21PV) at about twice the dose of a digital mammography (DM) system, which allows us the flexibility of simulating other DBT acquisition geometries using a subset of the PVs. In this study, we simulated a 30° DBT geometry using the central 11 PVs (30°-11PV). The narrower tomographic angle is closer to DBT geometries commercially available or under development and the dose is matched approximately to that of a DM. We developed a new joint-CAD system for detection of clustered microcalcifications. The DBT volume was reconstructed with a multiscale bilateral filtering regularized method and a PPJ image was generated from the reconstructed volume. Task-specific detection strategies were designed to combine information from the DBT volume and the PPJ image. The data set was divided into a training set (127 views with MCs) and an independent test set (104 views with MCs and 76 views without MCs). The joint-CAD system outperformed the individual CAD systems for DBT volume or PPJ image alone; the differences in the test performances were statistically significant (p  <  0.05) using JAFROC analysis. (paper)

  14. Estimation of scattered radiation in digital breast tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, O.; Dance, D. R.; Young, K. C.; Elangovan, P.; Bakic, P. R.; Wells, K.

    2014-08-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a promising technique to overcome the tissue superposition limitations found in planar 2D x-ray mammography. However, as most DBT systems do not employ an anti-scatter grid, the levels of scattered radiation recorded within the image receptor are significantly higher than that observed in planar 2D x-ray mammography. Knowledge of this field is necessary as part of any correction scheme and for computer modelling and optimisation of this examination. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are often used for this purpose, however they are computationally expensive and a more rapid method of calculation is desirable. This issue is addressed in this work by the development of a fast kernel-based methodology for scatter field estimation using a detailed realistic DBT geometry. Thickness-dependent scatter kernels, which were validated against the literature with a maximum discrepancy of 4% for an idealised geometry, have been calculated and a new physical parameter (air gap distance) was used to estimate more accurately the distribution of scattered radiation for a series of anthropomorphic breast phantom models. The proposed methodology considers, for the first time, the effects of scattered radiation from the compression paddle and breast support plate, which can represent more than 30% of the total scattered radiation recorded within the image receptor. The results show that the scatter field estimator can calculate scattered radiation images in an average of 80 min for projection angles up to 25° with equal to or less than a 10% error across most of the breast area when compared with direct MC simulations.

  15. Estimation of scattered radiation in digital breast tomosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a promising technique to overcome the tissue superposition limitations found in planar 2D x-ray mammography. However, as most DBT systems do not employ an anti-scatter grid, the levels of scattered radiation recorded within the image receptor are significantly higher than that observed in planar 2D x-ray mammography. Knowledge of this field is necessary as part of any correction scheme and for computer modelling and optimisation of this examination. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are often used for this purpose, however they are computationally expensive and a more rapid method of calculation is desirable. This issue is addressed in this work by the development of a fast kernel-based methodology for scatter field estimation using a detailed realistic DBT geometry. Thickness-dependent scatter kernels, which were validated against the literature with a maximum discrepancy of 4% for an idealised geometry, have been calculated and a new physical parameter (air gap distance) was used to estimate more accurately the distribution of scattered radiation for a series of anthropomorphic breast phantom models. The proposed methodology considers, for the first time, the effects of scattered radiation from the compression paddle and breast support plate, which can represent more than 30% of the total scattered radiation recorded within the image receptor. The results show that the scatter field estimator can calculate scattered radiation images in an average of 80 min for projection angles up to 25° with equal to or less than a 10% error across most of the breast area when compared with direct MC simulations. (paper)

  16. Breast tomosynthesis: Accuracy of tumor measurement compared with digital mammography and ultrasonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Mammographic tumor size measurement can be difficult because breast structures are superimposed onto a two-dimensional (2D) plane, potentially obscuring the tumor outline. Breast tomosynthesis (BT) is a 3D X-ray imaging technique in which low-dose images are acquired over a limited angular range at a total dose comparable to digital mammography (DM). These low-dose images are used to mathematically reconstruct a 3D image volume of the breast, thus reducing the problem of superimposed tissue. Purpose: To investigate whether breast cancer size can be more accurately assessed with breast tomosynthesis than with digital mammography and ultrasonography (US), by reducing the disturbance effect of the projected anatomy. Material and Methods: A prototype BT system was used. The main inclusion criterion for BT examination was subtle but suspicious findings of breast cancer on 2D mammography. Sixty-two women with 73 breast cancers were included. BT, DM, and US sizes were measured independently by experienced radiologists without knowledge of the pathology results, which were used as reference. Results: The tumor outline could be determined in significantly more cases with BT (63) and US (60) than DM (49). BT and US size correlated well with pathology (R=0.86 and R=0.85, respectively), and significantly better than DM size (R=0.71). Accordingly, staging was significantly more accurate with BT than with DM. Conclusion: The study indicates that BT is superior to DM in the assessment of breast tumor size and stage

  17. Breast tomosynthesis: Accuracy of tumor measurement compared with digital mammography and ultrasonography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foernvik, Daniel; Svahn, Tony; Timberg, Pontus; Tingberg, Anders (Dept. of Medical Radiation Physics, Lund Univ., Malmoe (Sweden)), e-mail: daniel.fornvik@med.lu.se; Zackrisson, Sophia; Andersson, Ingvar (Diagnostic Centre of Imaging and Functional Medicine, Malmoe Univ. Hospital, Malmoe (Sweden)); Ljungberg, Otto (Dept. of Pathology, Malmoe Univ. Hospital, Malmoe (Sweden))

    2010-04-15

    Background: Mammographic tumor size measurement can be difficult because breast structures are superimposed onto a two-dimensional (2D) plane, potentially obscuring the tumor outline. Breast tomosynthesis (BT) is a 3D X-ray imaging technique in which low-dose images are acquired over a limited angular range at a total dose comparable to digital mammography (DM). These low-dose images are used to mathematically reconstruct a 3D image volume of the breast, thus reducing the problem of superimposed tissue. Purpose: To investigate whether breast cancer size can be more accurately assessed with breast tomosynthesis than with digital mammography and ultrasonography (United States), by reducing the disturbance effect of the projected anatomy. Material and Methods: A prototype BT system was used. The main inclusion criterion for BT examination was subtle but suspicious findings of breast cancer on 2D mammography. Sixty-two women with 73 breast cancers were included. BT, DM, and US sizes were measured independently by experienced radiologists without knowledge of the pathology results, which were used as reference. Results: The tumor outline could be determined in significantly more cases with BT (63) and US (60) than DM (49). BT and US size correlated well with pathology (R=0.86 and R=0.85, respectively), and significantly better than DM size (R=0.71). Accordingly, staging was significantly more accurate with BT than with DM. Conclusion: The study indicates that BT is superior to DM in the assessment of breast tumor size and stage

  18. Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT): initial experience in a clinical setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a promising new technology. Some experimental clinical studies have shown positive results, but the future role and indications of this new technique, whether in a screening or clinical setting, need to be evaluated. Purpose: To compare digital mammography and DBT in a side-by-side feature analysis for cancer conspicuity, and to assess whether there is a potential additional value of DBT to standard state-of-the-art conventional imaging work-up with respect to detection of additional malignancies. Material and Methods: The study had ethics committee approval. A total of 129 women underwent 2D digital mammography including supplementary cone-down and magnification views and breast ultrasonography if indicated, as well as digital breast tomosynthesis. The indication for conventional imaging in the clinical setting included a palpable lump in 30 (23%), abnormal mammographic screening findings in 54 (42%), and surveillance in 45 (35%) of the women. The women were examined according to present guidelines, including spot-magnification views, ultrasonography, and needle biopsies, if indicated. The DBT examinations were interpreted several weeks after the conventional imaging without knowledge of the conventional imaging findings. In a later session, three radiologists performed a side-by-side feature analysis for cancer conspicuity in a sample of 50 cases. Results: State-of-the-art conventional imaging resulted in needle biopsy of 45 breasts, of which 20 lesions were benign and a total of 25 cancers were diagnosed. The remaining 84 women were dismissed with a normal/definitely benign finding and without indication for needle biopsy. The subsequent DBT interpretation found suspicious findings in four of these 84 women, and these four women had to be called back for repeated work-up with knowledge of the tomosynthesis findings. These delayed work-ups resulted in two cancers (increasing the cancer detection by 8%) and two

  19. Efficacy of digital breast tomosynthesis for breast cancer diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alakhras, M.; Mello-Thoms, C.; Rickard, M.; Bourne, R.; Brennan, P. C.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To compare the diagnostic performance of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) in combination with digital mammography (DM) with that of digital mammography alone. Materials and Methods: Twenty six experienced radiologists who specialized in breast imaging read 50 cases (27 cancers and 23 non-cancer cases) of patients who underwent DM and DBT. Both exams included the craniocaudal (CC) and mediolateral oblique (MLO) views. Histopathologic examination established truth in all lesions. Each case was interpreted in two modes, once with DM alone followed by DM+DBT, and the observers were asked to mark the location of any lesions, if present, and give it a score based on a five-category assessment by the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists (RANZCR). The diagnostic performance of DM compared with that of DM+DBT was evaluated in terms of the difference between areas under receiver-operating characteristic curves (AUCs), Jackknife free-response receiver operator characteristics (JAFROC) figure-of-merit, sensitivity, location sensitivity and specificity. Results: Average AUC and JAFROC for DM versus DM+DBT was significantly different (AUCs 0.690 vs 0.781, p=< 0.0001), (JAFROC 0.618 vs. 0.732, p=< 0.0001) respectively. In addition, the use of DM+DBT resulted in an improvement in sensitivity (0.629 vs. 0.701, p=0.0011), location sensitivity (0.548 vs. 0.690, p=< 0.0001) and specificity (0.656 vs. 0.758, p=0.0015) when compared to DM alone. Conclusion: Adding DBT to the standard DM significantly improved radiologists' performance in terms of AUCs, JAFROC figure of merit, sensitivity, location sensitivity and specificity values.

  20. Digital Breast Tomosynthesis: Comparison of Different Methods to Calculate Patient Doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different methods have been proposed in the literature to calculate the dose to the patient's breast in 3-D mammography. The methods described by Dance et al. and Sechopoulos et al. have been compared in this study using the two tomosynthesis systems available in the authors' hospitals (Siemens and Hologic). There is a small but significant difference of 23% for the first X ray system and 13% for the second system between dose calculations performed with Dance's method and Sechopoulos' method. These differences are mainly due to the fact that the two sets of authors used different breast models for their Monte Carlo calculations. For each system, the calculated breast doses were compared with the dose values indicated on the system console. Good agreement was found when the method of Dance et al. was used for a breast glandularity based on the patient age. For the Siemens system, the calculated doses were 5% lower than the indicated dose and for the Hologic system, the calculated doses were 12% higher. Finally, the 3-D dose values were compared with the doses found in a large 2-D dosimetry study. The dose values for tomosynthesis on the Siemens system were almost double the doses in one view 2-D digital mammography. For a typical breast of thickness 45 mm, the dose of one 2-D view was 0.83 mGy and for one 3-D view 1.79 mGy. (author)

  1. Estimation of mean glandular dose for breast tomosynthesis: factors for use with the UK, European and IAEA breast dosimetry protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A formalism is proposed for the estimation of mean glandular dose for breast tomosynthesis, which is a simple extension of the UK, European and IAEA protocols for dosimetry in conventional projection mammography. The formalism introduces t-factors for the calculation of breast dose from a single projection and T-factors for a complete exposure series. Monte Carlo calculations of t-factors have been made for an imaging geometry with full-field irradiation of the breast for a wide range of x-ray spectra, breast sizes and glandularities. The t-factors show little dependence on breast glandularity and tables are provided as a function of projection angle and breast thickness, which may be used for all x-ray spectra simulated. The T-factors for this geometry depend upon the choice of projection angles and weights per projection, but various example calculations gave values in the range 0.93-1.00. T-factors are also provided for the Sectra tomosynthesis system, which employs a scanned narrow-beam imaging geometry. In this quite different configuration, the factor (denoted TS) shows an important dependence on breast thickness, varying between 0.98 and 0.76 for 20 and 110 mm thick breasts, respectively. Additional data are given to extend the current tabulations of g-, c- and s-factors used for dosimetry of conventional 2D mammography.

  2. Convergence of iterative image reconstruction algorithms for Digital Breast Tomosynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sidky, Emil; Jørgensen, Jakob Heide; Pan, Xiaochuan

    Most iterative image reconstruction algorithms are based on some form of optimization, such as minimization of a data-fidelity term plus an image regularizing penalty term. While achieving the solution of these optimization problems may not directly be clinically relevant, accurate optimization...... solutions can aid in iterative image reconstruction algorithm design. This issue is particularly acute for iterative image reconstruction in Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT), where the corresponding data model IS particularly poorly conditioned. The impact of this poor conditioning is that iterative....... Math. Imag. Vol. 40, pgs 120-145) and apply it to iterative image reconstruction in DBT....

  3. Digital tomosynthesis: A new future for breast imaging?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this article is to review the major limitations in current mammography and to describe how these may be addressed by digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). DBT is a novel imaging technology in which an x-ray fan beam sweeps in an arc across the breast, producing tomographic images and enabling the production of volumetric, three-dimensional (3D) data. It can reduce tissue overlap encountered in conventional two-dimensional (2D) mammography, and thus has the potential to improve detection of breast cancer, reduce the suspicious presentations of normal tissues, and facilitate accurate differentiation of lesion types. This paper reviews the latest studies of this new technology. Issues including diagnostic efficacy, reading time, radiation dose, and level of compression; cost and new innovations are considered

  4. Physical aspects of different tomosynthesis systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a new image processing technique based on digital mammography technology. Image slices of the stationary compressed breast are reconstructed from multiple images taken at different angles of the X-ray tube at the same time. The main goal is to achieve a similar radiation dose exposure as common encountered in traditional digital mammography. One of the key advantages of DBT is that lesions are less likely to be hidden amongst normal tissues as they are in traditional digital mammography. This way the quality of diagnosis can be improved, especially for dense breasts. Current DBT implementations from several manufacturers differ in certain features such as scanning angle, number of projections, scanning time, pixel size, reconstruction methods and type of tube movement. A comparison and description of these different characteristics as well as a discussion on the proposed number of imaging planes and related radiation dose requirements are given. (orig.)

  5. A review of breast tomosynthesis. Part II. Image reconstruction, processing and analysis, and advanced applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sechopoulos, Ioannis

    2013-01-01

    Many important post-acquisition aspects of breast tomosynthesis imaging can impact its clinical performance. Chief among them is the reconstruction algorithm that generates the representation of the three-dimensional breast volume from the acquired projections. But even after reconstruction, additional processes, such as artifact reduction algorithms, computer aided detection and diagnosis, among others, can also impact the performance of breast tomosynthesis in the clinical realm. In this two part paper, a review of breast tomosynthesis research is performed, with an emphasis on its medical physics aspects. In the companion paper, the first part of this review, the research performed relevant to the image acquisition process is examined. This second part will review the research on the post-acquisition aspects, including reconstruction, image processing, and analysis, as well as the advanced applications being investigated for breast tomosynthesis. PMID:23298127

  6. Breast MRI, digital mammography and breast tomosynthesis: Comparison of three methods for early detection of breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Dragana Roganovic; Dragana Djilas; Sasa Vujnovic; Dag Pavic; Dragan Stojanov

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women and early detection is important for its successful treatment. The aim of this study was to investigate the sensitivity and specificity of three methods for early detection of breast cancer: breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), digital mammography, and breast tomosynthesis in comparison to histopathology, as well as to investigate the intraindividual variability between these modalities.  We included 57 breast lesions, each detected by ...

  7. Voting strategy for artifact reduction in digital breast tomosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artifacts are observed in digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) reconstructions due to the small number of projections and the narrow angular range that are typically employed in tomosynthesis imaging. In this work, we investigate the reconstruction artifacts that are caused by high-attenuation features in breast and develop several artifact reduction methods based on a 'voting strategy'. The voting strategy identifies the projection(s) that would introduce artifacts to a voxel and rejects the projection(s) when reconstructing the voxel. Four approaches to the voting strategy were compared, including projection segmentation, maximum contribution deduction, one-step classification, and iterative classification. The projection segmentation method, based on segmentation of high-attenuation features from the projections, effectively reduces artifacts caused by metal and large calcifications that can be reliably detected and segmented from projections. The other three methods are based on the observation that contributions from artifact-inducing projections have higher value than those from normal projections. These methods attempt to identify the projection(s) that would cause artifacts by comparing contributions from different projections. Among the three methods, the iterative classification method provides the best artifact reduction; however, it can generate many false positive classifications that degrade the image quality. The maximum contribution deduction method and one-step classification method both reduce artifacts well from small calcifications, although the performance of artifact reduction is slightly better with the one-step classification. The combination of one-step classification and projection segmentation removes artifacts from both large and small calcifications

  8. Generalized filtered back-projection for digital breast tomosynthesis reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhard, Klaus; Grass, Michael; Hitziger, Sebastian; Iske, Armin; Nielsen, Tim

    2012-03-01

    Filtered backprojection (FBP) has been commonly used as an efficient and robust reconstruction technique in tomographic X-ray imaging during the last decades. For standard geometries like circle or helix it is known how to efficiently filter the data. However, for geometries with only few projection views or with a limited angular range, the application of FBP algorithms generally provides poor results. In digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) these limitations give rise to image artifacts due to the limited angular range and the coarse angular sampling. In this work, a generalized FBP algorithm is presented, which uses the filtered projection data of all acquired views for backprojection along one direction. The proposed method yields a computationally efficient generalized FBP algorithm for DBT, which provides similar image quality as iterative reconstruction techniques while preserving the ability for region of interest reconstructions. To demonstrate the excellent performance of this method, examples are given with a simulated breast phantom and the hardware BR3D phantom.

  9. Added value of one-view breast tomosynthesis combined with digital mammography according to reader experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomassin-Naggara, Isabelle, E-mail: isabelle.thomassin@tnn.aphp.fr [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, IUC, 75005 Paris (France); INSERM, UMR970, Equipe 2, Imagerie de l’angiogenèse, 75005 Paris (France); AP-HP, Hôpital Tenon, Department of Radiology, 4 rue de la Chine, 75020 Paris (France); Perrot, Nicolas [AP-HP, Hôpital Tenon, Department of Radiology, 4 rue de la Chine, 75020 Paris (France); Centre Pyramides, Paris (France); Dechoux, Sophie [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, IUC, 75005 Paris (France); AP-HP, Hôpital Tenon, Department of Radiology, 4 rue de la Chine, 75020 Paris (France); Ribeiro, Carine [Centre Pyramides, Paris (France); Chopier, Jocelyne [AP-HP, Hôpital Tenon, Department of Radiology, 4 rue de la Chine, 75020 Paris (France); Bazelaire, Cedric de [APHP, Department of Radiology, Hôpital Saint Louis, 75010 Paris (France)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Breast tomosynthesis improves diagnostic performance especially for radiologists with lower experience in mammography. • Adding only one-view digital breast tomosynthesis to mammography improves the cancer detection rate. • Breast tomosynthesis is mainly useful for helping radiologists to detect architectural distortion. - Abstract: Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the added value of one-view breast tomosynthesis in adjunct with mammography to characterize breast lesions. Materials and methods: Our institutional ethics committees approved the study and granted a waiver of informed consent. One hundred fifty-five women (mean age, 51.3 years, range: 24–92 years) who systematically underwent mammography and breast tomosynthesis with subsequent percutaneous biopsy were analyzed. Four radiologists (two seniors, R1 and R2, and two juniors, R3 and R4 with 30, 10, 3 and 1 years of experience in breast imaging, respectively) independently reviewed exams in two steps: mammography alone and tomosynthesis in adjunct with mammography. The lesions in the cohort included 39.3% (61/155) cancers, 2.5% (4/155) high-risk lesions and 58.1% (90/155) benign lesions. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to compare the results of the two readings. Results: There was almost perfect agreement irrespective of reader experience for the reading of the mammography in adjunct with tomosynthesis, whereas agreement was poor between junior and senior readers for the reading of mammography alone. Area under the ROC (Az) values for the tomosynthesis in adjunct with mammography were significantly better than Az values for mammography alone for all readers except the most experienced, for whom only a tendency was noted. The proportion of cancers undiagnosed by mammography alone that were well diagnosed by tomosynthesis in adjunct with mammography was 6.5% (4/61), 13.1% (8/61), 27.8% (17/61) and 26.2% (16/61) for Readers 1, 2, 3 and 4

  10. Molecular breast tomosynthesis with scanning focus multi-pinhole cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Roosmalen, Jarno; Goorden, Marlies C.; Beekman, Freek J.

    2016-08-01

    Planar molecular breast imaging (MBI) is rapidly gaining in popularity in diagnostic oncology. To add 3D capabilities, we introduce a novel molecular breast tomosynthesis (MBT) scanner concept based on multi-pinhole collimation. In our design, the patient lies prone with the pendant breast lightly compressed between transparent plates. Integrated webcams view the breast through these plates and allow the operator to designate the scan volume (e.g. a whole breast or a suspected region). The breast is then scanned by translating focusing multi-pinhole plates and NaI(Tl) gamma detectors together in a sequence that optimizes count yield from the volume-of-interest. With simulations, we compared MBT with existing planar MBI. In a breast phantom containing different lesions, MBT improved tumour-to-background contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) over planar MBI by 12% and 111% for 4.0 and 6.0 mm lesions respectively in case of whole breast scanning. For the same lesions, much larger CNR improvements of 92% and 241% over planar MBI were found in a scan that focused on a breast region containing several lesions. MBT resolved 3.0 mm rods in a Derenzo resolution phantom in the transverse plane compared to 2.5 mm rods distinguished by planar MBI. While planar MBI cannot provide depth information, MBT offered 4.0 mm depth resolution. Our simulations indicate that besides offering 3D localization of increased tracer uptake, multi-pinhole MBT can significantly increase tumour-to-background CNR compared to planar MBI. These properties could be promising for better estimating the position, extend and shape of lesions and distinguishing between single and multiple lesions.

  11. A software-based x-ray scatter correction method for breast tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia Feng, Steve Si; Sechopoulos, Ioannis

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a software-based scatter correction method for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) imaging and investigate its impact on the image quality of tomosynthesis reconstructions of both phantoms and patients. Methods: A Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of x-ray scatter, with geometry matching that of the cranio-caudal (CC) view of a DBT clinical prototype, was developed using the Geant4 toolkit and used to generate maps of the scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR) of a number of homogeneous standard-shaped breasts of varying sizes. Dimension-matched SPR maps were then deformed and registered to DBT acquisition projections, allowing for the estimation of the primary x-ray signal acquired by the imaging system. Noise filtering of the estimated projections was then performed to reduce the impact of the quantum noise of the x-ray scatter. Three dimensional (3D) reconstruction was then performed using the maximum likelihood-expectation maximization (MLEM) method. This process was tested on acquisitions of a heterogeneous 50/50 adipose/glandular tomosynthesis phantom with embedded masses, fibers, and microcalcifications and on acquisitions of patients. The image quality of the reconstructions of the scatter-corrected and uncorrected projections was analyzed by studying the signal-difference-to-noise ratio (SDNR), the integral of the signal in each mass lesion (integrated mass signal, IMS), and the modulation transfer function (MTF). Results: The reconstructions of the scatter-corrected projections demonstrated superior image quality. The SDNR of masses embedded in a 5 cm thick tomosynthesis phantom improved 60%–66%, while the SDNR of the smallest mass in an 8 cm thick phantom improved by 59% (p < 0.01). The IMS of the masses in the 5 cm thick phantom also improved by 15%–29%, while the IMS of the masses in the 8 cm thick phantom improved by 26%–62% (p < 0.01). Some embedded microcalcifications in the tomosynthesis phantoms were visible only in the scatter

  12. A software-based x-ray scatter correction method for breast tomosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia Feng, Steve Si; Sechopoulos, Ioannis [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University, and Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, 1701 Uppergate Drive Northeast, Suite 5018, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States); Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Hematology and Medical Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, 1701 Uppergate Drive Northeast, Suite 5018, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States)

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: To develop a software-based scatter correction method for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) imaging and investigate its impact on the image quality of tomosynthesis reconstructions of both phantoms and patients. Methods: A Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of x-ray scatter, with geometry matching that of the cranio-caudal (CC) view of a DBT clinical prototype, was developed using the Geant4 toolkit and used to generate maps of the scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR) of a number of homogeneous standard-shaped breasts of varying sizes. Dimension-matched SPR maps were then deformed and registered to DBT acquisition projections, allowing for the estimation of the primary x-ray signal acquired by the imaging system. Noise filtering of the estimated projections was then performed to reduce the impact of the quantum noise of the x-ray scatter. Three dimensional (3D) reconstruction was then performed using the maximum likelihood-expectation maximization (MLEM) method. This process was tested on acquisitions of a heterogeneous 50/50 adipose/glandular tomosynthesis phantom with embedded masses, fibers, and microcalcifications and on acquisitions of patients. The image quality of the reconstructions of the scatter-corrected and uncorrected projections was analyzed by studying the signal-difference-to-noise ratio (SDNR), the integral of the signal in each mass lesion (integrated mass signal, IMS), and the modulation transfer function (MTF). Results: The reconstructions of the scatter-corrected projections demonstrated superior image quality. The SDNR of masses embedded in a 5 cm thick tomosynthesis phantom improved 60%-66%, while the SDNR of the smallest mass in an 8 cm thick phantom improved by 59% (p < 0.01). The IMS of the masses in the 5 cm thick phantom also improved by 15%-29%, while the IMS of the masses in the 8 cm thick phantom improved by 26%-62% (p < 0.01). Some embedded microcalcifications in the tomosynthesis phantoms were visible only in the scatter

  13. A software-based x-ray scatter correction method for breast tomosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To develop a software-based scatter correction method for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) imaging and investigate its impact on the image quality of tomosynthesis reconstructions of both phantoms and patients. Methods: A Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of x-ray scatter, with geometry matching that of the cranio-caudal (CC) view of a DBT clinical prototype, was developed using the Geant4 toolkit and used to generate maps of the scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR) of a number of homogeneous standard-shaped breasts of varying sizes. Dimension-matched SPR maps were then deformed and registered to DBT acquisition projections, allowing for the estimation of the primary x-ray signal acquired by the imaging system. Noise filtering of the estimated projections was then performed to reduce the impact of the quantum noise of the x-ray scatter. Three dimensional (3D) reconstruction was then performed using the maximum likelihood-expectation maximization (MLEM) method. This process was tested on acquisitions of a heterogeneous 50/50 adipose/glandular tomosynthesis phantom with embedded masses, fibers, and microcalcifications and on acquisitions of patients. The image quality of the reconstructions of the scatter-corrected and uncorrected projections was analyzed by studying the signal-difference-to-noise ratio (SDNR), the integral of the signal in each mass lesion (integrated mass signal, IMS), and the modulation transfer function (MTF). Results: The reconstructions of the scatter-corrected projections demonstrated superior image quality. The SDNR of masses embedded in a 5 cm thick tomosynthesis phantom improved 60%-66%, while the SDNR of the smallest mass in an 8 cm thick phantom improved by 59% (p < 0.01). The IMS of the masses in the 5 cm thick phantom also improved by 15%-29%, while the IMS of the masses in the 8 cm thick phantom improved by 26%-62% (p < 0.01). Some embedded microcalcifications in the tomosynthesis phantoms were visible only in the scatter

  14. A parameterization method and application in breast tomosynthesis dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To present a parameterization method based on singular value decomposition (SVD), and to provide analytical parameterization of the mean glandular dose (MGD) conversion factors from eight references for evaluating breast tomosynthesis dose in the Mammography Quality Standards Act (MQSA) protocol and in the UK, European, and IAEA dosimetry protocols.Methods: MGD conversion factor is usually listed in lookup tables for the factors such as beam quality, breast thickness, breast glandularity, and projection angle. The authors analyzed multiple sets of MGD conversion factors from the Hologic Selenia Dimensions quality control manual and seven previous papers. Each data set was parameterized using a one- to three-dimensional polynomial function of 2–16 terms. Variable substitution was used to improve accuracy. A least-squares fit was conducted using the SVD.Results: The differences between the originally tabulated MGD conversion factors and the results computed using the parameterization algorithms were (a) 0.08%–0.18% on average and 1.31% maximum for the Selenia Dimensions quality control manual, (b) 0.09%–0.66% on average and 2.97% maximum for the published data by Dance et al. [Phys. Med. Biol. 35, 1211–1219 (1990); ibid. 45, 3225–3240 (2000); ibid. 54, 4361–4372 (2009); ibid. 56, 453–471 (2011)], (c) 0.74%–0.99% on average and 3.94% maximum for the published data by Sechopoulos et al. [Med. Phys. 34, 221–232 (2007); J. Appl. Clin. Med. Phys. 9, 161–171 (2008)], and (d) 0.66%–1.33% on average and 2.72% maximum for the published data by Feng and Sechopoulos [Radiology 263, 35–42 (2012)], excluding one sample in (d) that does not follow the trends in the published data table.Conclusions: A flexible parameterization method is presented in this paper, and was applied to breast tomosynthesis dosimetry. The resultant data offer easy and accurate computations of MGD conversion factors for evaluating mean glandular breast dose in the MQSA

  15. A task-based comparison of two reconstruction algorithms for digital breast tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadevan, Ravi; Ikejimba, Lynda C.; Lin, Yuan; Samei, Ehsan; Lo, Joseph Y.

    2014-03-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) generates 3-D reconstructions of the breast by taking X-Ray projections at various angles around the breast. DBT improves cancer detection as it minimizes tissue overlap that is present in traditional 2-D mammography. In this work, two methods of reconstruction, filtered backprojection (FBP) and the Newton-Raphson iterative reconstruction were used to create 3-D reconstructions from phantom images acquired on a breast tomosynthesis system. The task based image analysis method was used to compare the performance of each reconstruction technique. The task simulated a 10mm lesion within the breast containing iodine concentrations between 0.0mg/ml and 8.6mg/ml. The TTF was calculated using the reconstruction of an edge phantom, and the NPS was measured with a structured breast phantom (CIRS 020) over different exposure levels. The detectability index d' was calculated to assess image quality of the reconstructed phantom images. Image quality was assessed for both conventional, single energy and dual energy subtracted reconstructions. Dose allocation between the high and low energy scans was also examined. Over the full range of dose allocations, the iterative reconstruction yielded a higher detectability index than the FBP for single energy reconstructions. For dual energy subtraction, detectability index was maximized when most of the dose was allocated to the high energy image. With that dose allocation, the performance trend for reconstruction algorithms reversed; FBP performed better than the corresponding iterative reconstruction. However, FBP performance varied very erratically with changing dose allocation. Therefore, iterative reconstruction is preferred for both imaging modalities despite underperforming dual energy FBP, as it provides stable results.

  16. Quality control in breast tomosynthesis; Controle de qualidade em tomossintese mamaria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakubiak, Rosangela Requi; Messias, Pricila Cordeiro; Santos, Marilia Fernanda, E-mail: requi@gmail.com [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Urban, Linei Augusta B.D., E-mail: ineiurban@hotmail.com [Diagnostico Avancado por Imagem (DAPI), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    In Brazil breast cancer is the most common and the leading cause of death among women, with estimated 57,000 new cases in 2014. The mammography (2D) plays an important role in the early detection of breast cancer, but in some cases can be difficult to detect malignant lesions due overlap of breast tissues. The Breast Digital Tomosynthesis (BDT: 3D) reduces the effects of overlap, providing improved characterization of mammographic findings. However, the dose may double as compared to the mammography. This study presents results of Contrast Ratio Noise tests (CRN) and quality image on a Siemens mammography equipment Mammomat Inspiration with tomosynthesis. The CRN was determined with plates Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) of 20 to 70 mm thickness and an aluminum plate of 10 mm{sup 2} and 0.2 mm thickness. Image quality was assessed with the ACR Breast Simulator. In assessment of image quality, the detectability of fibers and masses was identical in 2D and 3D systems. Were visualized 4.5 fibers and 4 mass in both modes. In 2D mode groups have been identified 3.5 microcalcifications, and 3D were 3 groups. The Mean Glandular Dose for the simulator in 2D mode was 1.17 mGy and 2.35 mGy for the 3D mode. The result reinforces the importance of quality control in the process of obtaining the images and obtained in accordance CRN values, ensuring image quality and dose compatible in 2D and 3D processes.

  17. Task-based strategy for optimized contrast enhanced breast imaging: Analysis of six imaging techniques for mammography and tomosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikejimba, Lynda C., E-mail: lci@duke.edu [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Kiarashi, Nooshin [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Ghate, Sujata V. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Samei, Ehsan [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Lo, Joseph Y. [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The use of contrast agents in breast imaging has the capability of enhancing nodule detectability and providing physiological information. Accordingly, there has been a growing trend toward using iodine as a contrast medium in digital mammography (DM) and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). Widespread use raises concerns about the best way to use iodine in DM and DBT, and thus a comparison is necessary to evaluate typical iodine-enhanced imaging methods. This study used a task-based observer model to determine the optimal imaging approach by analyzing six imaging paradigms in terms of their ability to resolve iodine at a given dose: unsubtracted mammography and tomosynthesis, temporal subtraction mammography and tomosynthesis, and dual energy subtraction mammography and tomosynthesis. Methods: Imaging performance was characterized using a detectability index d{sup ′}, derived from the system task transfer function (TTF), an imaging task, iodine signal difference, and the noise power spectrum (NPS). The task modeled a 10 mm diameter lesion containing iodine concentrations between 2.1 mg/cc and 8.6 mg/cc. TTF was obtained using an edge phantom, and the NPS was measured over several exposure levels, energies, and target-filter combinations. Using a structured CIRS phantom, d{sup ′} was generated as a function of dose and iodine concentration. Results: For all iodine concentrations and dose, temporal subtraction techniques for mammography and tomosynthesis yielded the highest d{sup ′}, while dual energy techniques for both modalities demonstrated the next best performance. Unsubtracted imaging resulted in the lowest d{sup ′} values for both modalities, with unsubtracted mammography performing the worst out of all six paradigms. Conclusions: At any dose, temporal subtraction imaging provides the greatest detectability, with temporally subtracted DBT performing the highest. The authors attribute the successful performance to excellent cancellation of

  18. Task-based strategy for optimized contrast enhanced breast imaging: Analysis of six imaging techniques for mammography and tomosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The use of contrast agents in breast imaging has the capability of enhancing nodule detectability and providing physiological information. Accordingly, there has been a growing trend toward using iodine as a contrast medium in digital mammography (DM) and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). Widespread use raises concerns about the best way to use iodine in DM and DBT, and thus a comparison is necessary to evaluate typical iodine-enhanced imaging methods. This study used a task-based observer model to determine the optimal imaging approach by analyzing six imaging paradigms in terms of their ability to resolve iodine at a given dose: unsubtracted mammography and tomosynthesis, temporal subtraction mammography and tomosynthesis, and dual energy subtraction mammography and tomosynthesis. Methods: Imaging performance was characterized using a detectability index d′, derived from the system task transfer function (TTF), an imaging task, iodine signal difference, and the noise power spectrum (NPS). The task modeled a 10 mm diameter lesion containing iodine concentrations between 2.1 mg/cc and 8.6 mg/cc. TTF was obtained using an edge phantom, and the NPS was measured over several exposure levels, energies, and target-filter combinations. Using a structured CIRS phantom, d′ was generated as a function of dose and iodine concentration. Results: For all iodine concentrations and dose, temporal subtraction techniques for mammography and tomosynthesis yielded the highest d′, while dual energy techniques for both modalities demonstrated the next best performance. Unsubtracted imaging resulted in the lowest d′ values for both modalities, with unsubtracted mammography performing the worst out of all six paradigms. Conclusions: At any dose, temporal subtraction imaging provides the greatest detectability, with temporally subtracted DBT performing the highest. The authors attribute the successful performance to excellent cancellation of inplane structures and

  19. Digital breast tomosynthesis versus mammography and breast ultrasound: a multireader performance study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thibault, Fabienne; Malhaire, Caroline; Tardivon, Anne [Department of Radiology, Paris Cedex 05 (France); Dromain, Clarisse; Balleyguier, Corinne S. [Institut de cancerologie Gustave-Roussy, Department of Radiology, Villejuif (France); Breucq, Catherine [Universitair Ziekenhuis-VUB, Department of Radiology, Bruxelles (Belgium); Steyaert, Luc [Department of Radiology, Brugge (Belgium); Baldan, Enrica [Veneto Institute of Oncology (IOV)-IRCCS, Department of Radiology, Padua (Italy); Drevon, Harir [Numerus Ltd, Lyon (France)

    2013-09-15

    To compare the diagnostic performance of single-view breast tomosynthesis (BT) with that of dual-view mammography (MX); to assess the benefit of adding the craniocaudal (CC) mammographic view to BT, and of adding BT to MX plus breast ultrasound, considered to be the reference work-up. One hundred and fifty-five consenting patients with unresolved mammographic and/or ultrasound findings or breast symptoms underwent conventional work-up plus mediolateral oblique-view BT of the affected breast. The final study set in 130 patients resulted in 55 malignant and 76 benign and normal cases. Seven breast radiologists rated the cases through five sequential techniques using a BIRADS-based scale: MX, MX + ultrasound, MX + ultrasound + BT, BT, BT + MX(CC). Multireader, multicase receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed and performance of the techniques was assessed from the areas under ROC curves. The performance of BT and of BT + MX(CC) was tested versus MX; the performance of MX + ultrasound + BT tested versus MX + ultrasound. Tomosynthesis was found to be non-inferior to mammography. BT + MX(CC) did not appear to be superior to MX, and MX + ultrasound + BT not superior to MX + ultrasound. Overall, none of the five techniques tested outperformed the others. Further clinical studies are needed to clarify the role of BT as a substitute for traditional work-up in the diagnostic environment. (orig.)

  20. Observation of super-resolution in digital breast tomosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a 3D x-ray imaging modality in which tomographic sections of the breast are generated from a limited range of tube angles. Because oblique x-ray incidence shifts the image of an object in subpixel detector element increments with each increasing projection angle, it is demonstrated that DBT is capable of super-resolution (i.e., subpixel resolution). Methods: By convention, DBT reconstructions are performed on planes parallel to the breast support at various depths of the breast volume. In order for resolution in each reconstructed slice to be comparable to the detector, the pixel size should match that of the detector elements; hence, the highest frequency that can be resolved in the plane of reconstruction is the alias frequency of the detector. This study considers reconstruction grids with much smaller pixelation to visualize higher frequencies. For analytical proof of super-resolution, a theoretical framework is developed in which the reconstruction of a high frequency sinusoidal input is calculated using both simple backprojection (SBP) and filtered backprojection. To study the frequency spectrum of the reconstruction, its Fourier transform is also determined. The experimental feasibility of super-resolution was investigated by acquiring images of a bar pattern phantom with frequencies higher than the detector alias frequency. Results: Using analytical modeling, it is shown that the central projection cannot resolve frequencies exceeding the detector alias frequency. The Fourier transform of the central projection is maximized at a lower frequency than the input as evidence of aliasing. By contrast, SBP reconstruction can resolve the input, and its Fourier transform is correctly maximized at the input frequency. Incorporating filters into the reconstruction smoothens pixelation artifacts in the spatial domain and reduces spectral leakage in the Fourier domain. It is also demonstrated that the existence of super

  1. Effect of the glandular composition on digital breast tomosynthesis image quality and dose optimisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the image quality assessment for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), a breast phantom with an average percentage of 50 % glandular tissue is seldom used, which may not be representative of the breast tissue composition of the women undergoing such examination. This work aims at studying the effect of the glandular composition of the breast on the image quality taking into consideration different sizes of lesions. Monte Carlo simulations were performed using the state-of-the-art computer program PENELOPE to validate the image acquisition system of the DBT equipment as well as to calculate the mean glandular dose for each projection image and for different breast compositions. The integrated PENELOPE imaging tool (PenEasy) was used to calculate, in mammography, for each clinical detection task the X-ray energy that maximises the figure of merit. All the 2D cranial-caudal projections for DBT were simulated and then underwent the reconstruction process applying the Simultaneous Algebraic Reconstruction Technique. Finally, through signal-to-noise ratio analysis, the image quality in DBT was assessed. (authors)

  2. Effect of the glandular composition on digital breast tomosynthesis image quality and dose optimisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, T; Ribeiro, A; Di Maria, S; Belchior, A; Cardoso, J; Matela, N; Oliveira, N; Janeiro, L; Almeida, P; Vaz, P

    2015-07-01

    In the image quality assessment for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), a breast phantom with an average percentage of 50 % glandular tissue is seldom used, which may not be representative of the breast tissue composition of the women undergoing such examination. This work aims at studying the effect of the glandular composition of the breast on the image quality taking into consideration different sizes of lesions. Monte Carlo simulations were performed using the state-of-the-art computer program PENELOPE to validate the image acquisition system of the DBT equipment as well as to calculate the mean glandular dose for each projection image and for different breast compositions. The integrated PENELOPE imaging tool (PenEasy) was used to calculate, in mammography, for each clinical detection task the X-ray energy that maximises the figure of merit. All the 2D cranial-caudal projections for DBT were simulated and then underwent the reconstruction process applying the Simultaneous Algebraic Reconstruction Technique. Finally, through signal-to-noise ratio analysis, the image quality in DBT was assessed. PMID:25836692

  3. Description and validation of a scoring system for tomosynthesis in pulmonary cystic fibrosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Vult von Steyern, Kristina; Björkman-Burtscher, Isabella; Höglund, Peter; Bozovic, Gracijela; Wiklund, Marie; Geijer, Mats

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To design and validate a scoring system for tomosynthesis (digital tomography) in pulmonary cystic fibrosis. METHODS: A scoring system dedicated to tomosynthesis in pulmonary cystic fibrosis was designed. Three radiologists independently scored 88 pairs of radiographs and tomosynthesis examinations of the chest in 60 patients with cystic fibrosis and 7 oncology patients. Radiographs were scored according to the Brasfield scoring system and tomosynthesis examination...

  4. Digital breast tomosynthesis and digital mammography: A comparison of figures of merit for various average glandular doses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ye-seul; Park, Hye-Suk; Park, SuJin; Kim, Hee-Joung; Choi, Jae-Gu; Choi, Young-Wook; Park, Jun-Ho; Lee, Jae-Jun

    2013-05-01

    Previous studies on the application of tomosynthesis to breast imaging have demonstrated the potential of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). DBT can improve the specificity of digital mammography (DM) through improved marginal visibility of lesions and early breast cancer detection for women with dense breasts. To investigate possible improvements in the accuracy of lesion detection with DBT systems as compared to DM, we conducted a quantitative evaluation by using simulated lesions embedded in a breast phantom. A prototype DBT and dedicated DM system were used in this study. For the DBT system, the average glandular dose (AGD) was calculated using a formalism that was a simple extension of mammography dosimetry. The DBT and the DM images were acquired with average glandular doses (AGDs) ranging from 1 to 4 mGy. To analyze the results objectively, we calculated metrics for in-plane lesion visibility in the form of the contrast-to-noise ratio for the in-focus plane from the DBT reconstruction image and from the craniocaudal (CC) image from the DM system. The imaging performance of DBT was quantitatively compared with that of DM in terms of the figure of merit. Although the DM showed better results in terms of the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of the mass due to the reduced overlapping of tissue and lesion, an increase in breast thickness of over 3 cm increased the CNR of the mass with the DBT system. For microcalcification detection, the DBT system showed significantly higher CNR than the DM system and gave better predictions of the microcalcification size. We compared the performances of the DM and the DBT systems for various AGDs and breast thicknesses. In conclusion, the results indicate that the DBT systems can play an important role in the detection of masses or microcalcifications without severe compression.

  5. The effect of angular dose distribution on the detection of microcalcifications in digital breast tomosynthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Yue-Houng; Zhao, Wei

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Substantial effort has been devoted to the clinical development of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). DBT is a three-dimensional (3D) x-ray imaging modality that reconstructs a number of thin image slices parallel to a stationary detector plane. Preliminary clinical studies have shown that the removal of overlapping breast tissue reduces image clutter and increases detectability of large, low contrast lesions. However, some studies, as well as anecdotal evidence, suggested decreased...

  6. Value analysis of digital breast tomosynthesis for breast cancer screening in a commercially-insured US population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonafede MM

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Machaon M Bonafede,1 Vivek B Kalra,2 Jeffrey D Miller,1 Laurie L Fajardo3 1Truven Health Analytics, Cambridge, MA, 2Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, 3Department of Radiology, University of Iowa College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA, USA Purpose: The objective of this study was to conduct a value analysis of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT for breast cancer screening among women enrolled in US commercial health insurance plans to assess the potential budget impact associated with the clinical benefits of DBT. Methods: An economic model was developed to estimate the system-wide financial impact of DBT as a breast cancer screening modality within a hypothetical US managed care plan with one million members. Two scenarios were considered for women in the health plan who undergo annual screening mammography, ie, full field digital mammography (FFDM and combined FFDM + DBT. The model focused on two main drivers of DBT value, ie, the capacity for DBT to reduce the number of women recalled for additional follow-up imaging and diagnostic services and the capacity of DBT to facilitate earlier diagnosis of cancer at less invasive stages where treatment costs are lower. Model inputs were derived from published sources and from analyses of the Truven Health MarketScan® Research Databases (2010–2012. Comparative clinical and economic outcomes were simulated for one year following screening and compared on an incremental basis. Results: Base-case analysis results show that 4,523 women in the hypothetical million member health plan who are screened using DBT avoid the use of follow-up services. The overall benefit of DBT was calculated at $78.53 per woman screened. Adjusting for a hypothetical $50 incremental cost of the DBT examination, this translates to $28.53 savings per woman screened, or $0.20 savings per member per month across the plan population and an overall cost savings to the plan of $2.4 million per year. Conclusion: The

  7. Breast Cancer Risk Estimation Using Parenchymal Texture Analysis in Digital Breast Tomosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mammographic parenchymal texture has been shown to correlate with genetic markers of developing breast cancer. Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a novel x-ray imaging technique in which tomographic images of the breast are reconstructed from multiple source projections acquired at different angles of the x-ray tube. Compared to digital mammography (DM), DBT eliminates breast tissue overlap, offering superior parenchymal tissue visualization. We hypothesize that texture analysis in DBT could potentially provide a better assessment of parenchymal texture and ultimately result in more accurate assessment of breast cancer risk. As a first step towards validating this hypothesis, we investigated the association between DBT parenchymal texture and breast percent density (PD), a known breast cancer risk factor, and compared it to DM. Bilateral DBT and DM images from 71 women participating in a breast cancer screening trial were analyzed. Filtered-backprojection was used to reconstruct DBT tomographic planes in 1 mm increments with 0.22 mm in-plane resolution. Corresponding DM images were acquired at 0.1 mm pixel resolution. Retroareolar regions of interest (ROIs) equivalent to 2.5 cm3 were segmented from the DBT images and corresponding 2.5 cm2 ROIs were segmented from the DM images. Breast PD was mammographically estimated using the Cumulus scale. Overall, DBT texture features demonstrated a stronger correlation than DM to PD. The Pearson correlation coefficients for DBT were r = 0.40 (p2 = 0.39) compared to DM (R2 = 0.33). We attribute these observations to the superior parenchymal tissue visualization in DBT. Our study is the first to perform DBT texture analysis in a screening population of women, showing that DBT could potentially provide better breast cancer risk assessment in the future.

  8. Near-infrared spectral tomography integrated with digital breast tomosynthesis: Effects of tissue scattering on optical data acquisition design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Design optimization and phantom validation of an integrated digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) and near-infrared spectral tomography (NIRST) system targeting improvement in sensitivity and specificity of breast cancer detection is presented. Factors affecting instrumentation design include minimization of cost, complexity, and examination time while maintaining high fidelity NIRST measurements with sufficient information to recover accurate optical property maps. Methods: Reconstructed DBT slices from eight patients with abnormal mammograms provided anatomical information for the NIRST simulations. A limited frequency domain (FD) and extensive continuous wave (CW) NIRST system was modeled. The FD components provided tissue scattering estimations used in the reconstruction of the CW data. Scattering estimates were perturbed to study the effects on hemoglobin recovery. Breast mimicking agar phantoms with inclusions were imaged using the combined DBT/NIRST system for comparison with simulation results. Results: Patient simulations derived from DBT images show successful reconstruction of both normal and malignant lesions in the breast. They also demonstrate the importance of accurately quantifying tissue scattering. Specifically, 20% errors in optical scattering resulted in 22.6% or 35.1% error in quantification of total hemoglobin concentrations, depending on whether scattering was over- or underestimated, respectively. Limited frequency-domain optical signal sampling provided two regions scattering estimates (for fat and fibroglandular tissues) that led to hemoglobin concentrations that reduced the error in the tumor region by 31% relative to when a single estimate of optical scattering was used throughout the breast volume of interest. Acquiring frequency-domain data with six wavelengths instead of three did not significantly improve the hemoglobin concentration estimates. Simulation results were confirmed through experiments in two-region breast mimicking

  9. Near-infrared spectral tomography integrated with digital breast tomosynthesis: Effects of tissue scattering on optical data acquisition design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michaelsen, Kelly; Krishnaswamy, Venkat; Pogue, Brian W.; Poplack, Steven P.; Paulsen, Keith D. [Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States); Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Dartmouth Medical School, Lebanon, New Hampshire 03756 (United States); Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 and Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Dartmouth Medical School, Lebanon, New Hampshire 03756 (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Design optimization and phantom validation of an integrated digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) and near-infrared spectral tomography (NIRST) system targeting improvement in sensitivity and specificity of breast cancer detection is presented. Factors affecting instrumentation design include minimization of cost, complexity, and examination time while maintaining high fidelity NIRST measurements with sufficient information to recover accurate optical property maps. Methods: Reconstructed DBT slices from eight patients with abnormal mammograms provided anatomical information for the NIRST simulations. A limited frequency domain (FD) and extensive continuous wave (CW) NIRST system was modeled. The FD components provided tissue scattering estimations used in the reconstruction of the CW data. Scattering estimates were perturbed to study the effects on hemoglobin recovery. Breast mimicking agar phantoms with inclusions were imaged using the combined DBT/NIRST system for comparison with simulation results. Results: Patient simulations derived from DBT images show successful reconstruction of both normal and malignant lesions in the breast. They also demonstrate the importance of accurately quantifying tissue scattering. Specifically, 20% errors in optical scattering resulted in 22.6% or 35.1% error in quantification of total hemoglobin concentrations, depending on whether scattering was over- or underestimated, respectively. Limited frequency-domain optical signal sampling provided two regions scattering estimates (for fat and fibroglandular tissues) that led to hemoglobin concentrations that reduced the error in the tumor region by 31% relative to when a single estimate of optical scattering was used throughout the breast volume of interest. Acquiring frequency-domain data with six wavelengths instead of three did not significantly improve the hemoglobin concentration estimates. Simulation results were confirmed through experiments in two-region breast mimicking

  10. Value analysis of digital breast tomosynthesis for breast cancer screening in a commercially-insured US population

    OpenAIRE

    Bonafede MM; Kalra VB; Miller JD; Fajardo LL

    2015-01-01

    Machaon M Bonafede,1 Vivek B Kalra,2 Jeffrey D Miller,1 Laurie L Fajardo3 1Truven Health Analytics, Cambridge, MA, 2Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, 3Department of Radiology, University of Iowa College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA, USA Purpose: The objective of this study was to conduct a value analysis of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) for breast cancer screening among women enrolled in US commercial health insurance plans to assess the potential budget impact associated...

  11. Average glandular dose in digital mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis: comparison of phantom and patient data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouwman, R. W.; van Engen, R. E.; Young, K. C.; den Heeten, G. J.; Broeders, M. J. M.; Schopphoven, S.; Jeukens, C. R. L. P. N.; Veldkamp, W. J. H.; Dance, D. R.

    2015-10-01

    For the evaluation of the average glandular dose (AGD) in digital mammography (DM) and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) phantoms simulating standard model breasts are used. These phantoms consist of slabs of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) or a combination of PMMA and polyethylene (PE). In the last decades the automatic exposure control (AEC) increased in complexity and became more sensitive to (local) differences in breast composition. The question is how well the AGD estimated using these simple dosimetry phantoms agrees with the average patient AGD. In this study the AGDs for both dosimetry phantoms and for patients have been evaluated for 5 different x-ray systems in DM and DBT modes. It was found that the ratios between patient and phantom AGD did not differ considerably using both dosimetry phantoms. These ratios averaged over all breast thicknesses were 1.14 and 1.15 for the PMMA and PMMA-PE dosimetry phantoms respectively in DM mode and 1.00 and 1.02 in the DBT mode. These ratios were deemed to be sufficiently close to unity to be suitable for dosimetry evaluation in quality control procedures. However care should be taken when comparing systems for DM and DBT since depending on the AEC operation, ratios for particular breast thicknesses may differ substantially (0.83-1.96). Although the predictions of both phantoms are similar we advise the use of PMMA  +  PE slabs for both DM and DBT to harmonize dosimetry protocols and avoid any potential issues with the use of spacers with the PMMA phantoms.

  12. Average glandular dose in digital mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis: comparison of phantom and patient data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the evaluation of the average glandular dose (AGD) in digital mammography (DM) and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) phantoms simulating standard model breasts are used. These phantoms consist of slabs of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) or a combination of PMMA and polyethylene (PE). In the last decades the automatic exposure control (AEC) increased in complexity and became more sensitive to (local) differences in breast composition. The question is how well the AGD estimated using these simple dosimetry phantoms agrees with the average patient AGD. In this study the AGDs for both dosimetry phantoms and for patients have been evaluated for 5 different x-ray systems in DM and DBT modes. It was found that the ratios between patient and phantom AGD did not differ considerably using both dosimetry phantoms. These ratios averaged over all breast thicknesses were 1.14 and 1.15 for the PMMA and PMMA-PE dosimetry phantoms respectively in DM mode and 1.00 and 1.02 in the DBT mode. These ratios were deemed to be sufficiently close to unity to be suitable for dosimetry evaluation in quality control procedures. However care should be taken when comparing systems for DM and DBT since depending on the AEC operation, ratios for particular breast thicknesses may differ substantially (0.83–1.96). Although the predictions of both phantoms are similar we advise the use of PMMA  +  PE slabs for both DM and DBT to harmonize dosimetry protocols and avoid any potential issues with the use of spacers with the PMMA phantoms. (paper)

  13. Estimates of Average Glandular Dose with Auto-modes of X-ray Exposures in Digital Breast Tomosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izdihar Kamal

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this research was to examine the average glandular dose (AGD of radiation among different breast compositions of glandular and adipose tissue with auto-modes of exposure factor selection in digital breast tomosynthesis. Methods: This experimental study was carried out in the National Cancer Society, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, between February 2012 and February 2013 using a tomosynthesis digital mammography X-ray machine. The entrance surface air kerma and the half-value layer were determined using a 100H thermoluminescent dosimeter on 50% glandular and 50% adipose tissue (50/50 and 20% glandular and 80% adipose tissue (20/80 commercially available breast phantoms (Computerized Imaging Reference Systems, Inc., Norfolk, Virginia, USA with auto-time, auto-filter and auto-kilovolt modes. Results: The lowest AGD for the 20/80 phantom with auto-time was 2.28 milliGray (mGy for two dimension (2D and 2.48 mGy for three dimensional (3D images. The lowest AGD for the 50/50 phantom with auto-time was 0.97 mGy for 2D and 1.0 mGy for 3D. Conclusion: The AGD values for both phantoms were lower against a high kilovolt peak and the use of auto-filter mode was more practical for quick acquisition while limiting the probability of operator error.

  14. Description and validation of a scoring system for tomosynthesis in pulmonary cystic fibrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vult von Steyern, Kristina; Bjoerkman-Burtscher, Isabella M.; Bozovic, Gracijela; Wiklund, Marie; Geijer, Mats [Skaane University Hospital, Lund University, Centre for Medical Imaging and Physiology, Lund (Sweden); Hoeglund, Peter [Skaane University Hospital, Competence Centre for Clinical Research, Lund (Sweden)

    2012-12-15

    To design and validate a scoring system for tomosynthesis (digital tomography) in pulmonary cystic fibrosis. A scoring system dedicated to tomosynthesis in pulmonary cystic fibrosis was designed. Three radiologists independently scored 88 pairs of radiographs and tomosynthesis examinations of the chest in 60 patients with cystic fibrosis and 7 oncology patients. Radiographs were scored according to the Brasfield scoring system and tomosynthesis examinations were scored using the new scoring system. Observer agreements for the tomosynthesis score were almost perfect for the total score with square-weighted kappa >0.90, and generally substantial to almost perfect for subscores. Correlation between the tomosynthesis score and the Brasfield score was good for the three observers (Kendall's rank correlation tau 0.68, 0.77 and 0.78). Tomosynthesis was generally scored higher as a percentage of the maximum score. Observer agreements for the total score for Brasfield score were almost perfect (square-weighted kappa 0.80, 0.81 and 0.85). The tomosynthesis scoring system seems robust and correlates well with the Brasfield score. Compared with radiography, tomosynthesis is more sensitive to cystic fibrosis changes, especially bronchiectasis and mucus plugging, and the new tomosynthesis scoring system offers the possibility of more detailed and accurate scoring of disease severity. (orig.)

  15. Description and validation of a scoring system for tomosynthesis in pulmonary cystic fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To design and validate a scoring system for tomosynthesis (digital tomography) in pulmonary cystic fibrosis. A scoring system dedicated to tomosynthesis in pulmonary cystic fibrosis was designed. Three radiologists independently scored 88 pairs of radiographs and tomosynthesis examinations of the chest in 60 patients with cystic fibrosis and 7 oncology patients. Radiographs were scored according to the Brasfield scoring system and tomosynthesis examinations were scored using the new scoring system. Observer agreements for the tomosynthesis score were almost perfect for the total score with square-weighted kappa >0.90, and generally substantial to almost perfect for subscores. Correlation between the tomosynthesis score and the Brasfield score was good for the three observers (Kendall's rank correlation tau 0.68, 0.77 and 0.78). Tomosynthesis was generally scored higher as a percentage of the maximum score. Observer agreements for the total score for Brasfield score were almost perfect (square-weighted kappa 0.80, 0.81 and 0.85). The tomosynthesis scoring system seems robust and correlates well with the Brasfield score. Compared with radiography, tomosynthesis is more sensitive to cystic fibrosis changes, especially bronchiectasis and mucus plugging, and the new tomosynthesis scoring system offers the possibility of more detailed and accurate scoring of disease severity. (orig.)

  16. Comparative study of patient doses calculated with two methods for breast digital tomosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the average glandular doses (DG) delivered in breast tomosynthesis examinations were estimated over a sample of 150 patients using two different methods. In method 1, the conversion factors air-kerma to DG used were those tabulated by Dance et al. and in method 2 were the ones from Feng et al. The protocol for the examination followed in the unit of this study consists in two views per breast, each view composed by a 2D acquisition and a tomosynthesis scan (3D). The resulting DG values from both methods present statistically significant differences (p=0.02) for the 2D modality and were similar for the 3D scan (p=0.22). The estimated median value of DG for the most frequent breasts (thicknesses between 50 and 60 mm) delivered in a single 3D acquisition is 1.7 mGy (36% and 17% higher than the value for the 2D mode estimated with each method) which lies far below the tolerances established by the Spanish Protocol Quality Control in Radiodiagnostic (2011). The total DG for a tomosynthesis examination (6.0 mGy) is a factor 2.4 higher than the dose delivered in a 2D examination with two views (method 1). (Author)

  17. Design and evaluation of a grid reciprocation scheme for use in digital breast tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Tushita; Sporkin, Helen; Peppard, Heather; Williams, Mark B.

    2016-03-01

    This work describes a methodology for efficient removal of scatter radiation during digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). The goal of this approach is to enable grid image obscuration without a large increase in radiation dose by minimizing misalignment of the grid focal point (GFP) and x-ray focal spot (XFS) during grid reciprocation. Hardware for the motion scheme was built and tested on the dual modality breast tomosynthesis (DMT) scanner, which combines DBT and molecular breast tomosynthesis (MBT) on a single gantry. The DMT scanner uses fully isocentric rotation of tube and x-ray detector for maintaining a fixed tube-detector alignment during DBT imaging. A cellular focused copper prototype grid with 80 cm focal length, 3.85 mm height, 0.1 mm thick lamellae, and 1.1 mm hole pitch was tested. Primary transmission of the grid at 28 kV tube voltage was on average 74% with the grid stationary and aligned for maximum transmission. It fell to 72% during grid reciprocation by the proposed method. Residual grid line artifacts (GLAs) in projection views and reconstructed DBT images are characterized and methods for reducing the visibility of GLAs in the reconstructed volume through projection image flat-field correction and spatial frequency-based filtering of the DBT slices are described and evaluated. The software correction methods reduce the visibility of these artifacts in the reconstructed volume, making them imperceptible both in the reconstructed DBT images and their Fourier transforms.

  18. Comparison of computer-aided detection of clustered microcalcifications in digital mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samala, Ravi K.; Chan, Heang-Ping; Lu, Yao; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Wei, Jun; Helvie, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has the potential to replace digital mammography (DM) for breast cancer screening. An effective computer-aided detection (CAD) system for microcalcification clusters (MCs) on DBT will facilitate the transition. In this study, we collected a data set with corresponding DBT and DM for the same breasts. DBT was acquired with IRB approval and informed consent using a GE GEN2 DBT prototype system. The DM acquired with a GE Essential system for the patient's clinical care was collected retrospectively from patient files. DM-based CAD (CADDM) and DBT-based CAD (CADDBT) were previously developed by our group. The major differences between the CAD systems include: (a) CADDBT uses two parallel processes whereas CADDM uses a single process for enhancing MCs and removing the structured background, (b) CADDBT has additional processing steps to reduce the false positives (FPs), including ranking of candidates of cluster seeds and cluster members and the use of adaptive CNR and size thresholds at clustering and FP reduction, (c) CADDM uses convolution neural network (CNN) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) to differentiate true microcalcifications from FPs based on their morphological and CNN features. The performance difference is assessed by FROC analysis using test set (100 views with MCs and 74 views without MCs) independent of their respective training sets. At sensitivities of 70% and 80%, CADDBT achieved FP rates of 0.78 and 1.57 per view compared to 0.66 and 2.10 per image for the CADDM. JAFROC showed no significant difference between MC detection on DM and DBT by the two CAD systems.

  19. Digital Breast Tomosynthesis Changes Management in Patients Seen at a Tertiary Care Breast Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives. To study factors that predict changes in management with digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). Methods. The Institutional Review Board approved this HIPAA compliant study. 996 patients had DBT with full field digital mammography (FFDM). Univariate analysis evaluated predictors of management change and cancer detection. Results. DBT changed management in 109 of 996 (11%); 77 (71%) required less imaging. Recalled patients after abnormal FFDM screen were most likely to have management change—25% (24 of 97 patients) compared to 8% (13/163) of symptomatic patients and 10% (72/736) of screening patients (P < 0.001). Dense breasted patients had a higher likelihood of having DBT change management: 13% (68/526) compared to 9% (41/470) (P = 0.03). Of the 996 patients, 19 (2%) were diagnosed with breast cancer. 15 cancers (83%) were seen on FFDM and DBT; 3 (17%) were diagnosed after DBT (0.3%, 95%CI: 0.1–0.9%). One recurrence was in the skin and was not seen on DBT nor was it seen on FFDM. The increase in cancer detection rate was 17% for asymptomatic patients, 0% for symptomatic patients, and 100% for recalled patients. Conclusions. DBT increased cancer detection rate by 20% and decreased the recall rate in 8–25%. Advances in Knowledge. DBT led to a doubling of the cancer detection rate in recalled patients

  20. High resolution stationary digital breast tomosynthesis using distributed carbon nanotube x-ray source array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of increasing the system spatial resolution and scanning speed of Hologic Selenia Dimensions digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) scanner by replacing the rotating mammography x-ray tube with a specially designed carbon nanotube (CNT) x-ray source array, which generates all the projection images needed for tomosynthesis reconstruction by electronically activating individual x-ray sources without any mechanical motion. The stationary digital breast tomosynthesis (s-DBT) design aims to (i) increase the system spatial resolution by eliminating image blurring due to x-ray tube motion and (ii) reduce the scanning time. Low spatial resolution and long scanning time are the two main technical limitations of current DBT technology. Methods: A CNT x-ray source array was designed and evaluated against a set of targeted system performance parameters. Simulations were performed to determine the maximum anode heat load at the desired focal spot size and to design the electron focusing optics. Field emission current from CNT cathode was measured for an extended period of time to determine the stable life time of CNT cathode for an expected clinical operation scenario. The source array was manufactured, tested, and integrated with a Selenia scanner. An electronic control unit was developed to interface the source array with the detection system and to scan and regulate x-ray beams. The performance of the s-DBT system was evaluated using physical phantoms. Results: The spatially distributed CNT x-ray source array comprised 31 individually addressable x-ray sources covering a 30 angular span with 1 pitch and an isotropic focal spot size of 0.6 mm at full width at half-maximum. Stable operation at 28 kV(peak) anode voltage and 38 mA tube current was demonstrated with extended lifetime and good source-to-source consistency. For the standard imaging protocol of 15 views over 14, 100 mAs dose, and 2 x 2 detector binning

  1. SU-E-P-31: Quantifying the Amount of Missing Tissue in a Digital Breast Tomosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodenough, D [George Washington University, Washington, DC (United States); Olafsdottir, H; Olafsson, I; Fredriksson, J; Kristinsson, S; Oskarsdottir, G; Kristbjornsson, A [Raforninn Ehf., Reykjavik, Gullbringusysla (Iceland); Mallozzi, R; Healy, A; Levy, J [The Phantom Laboratory, Salem, NY (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To automatically quantify the amount of missing tissue in a digital breast tomosynthesis system using four stair-stepped chest wall missing tissue gauges in the Tomophan™ from the Phantom Laboratory and image processing from Image Owl. Methods: The Tomophan™ phantom incorporates four stair-stepped missing tissue gauges by the chest wall, allowing measurement of missing chest wall in two different locations along the chest wall at two different heights. Each of the four gauges has 12 steps in 0.5 mm increments rising from the chest wall. An image processing algorithm was developed by Image Owl that first finds the two slices containing the steps then finds the signal through the highest step in all four gauges. Using the signal drop at the beginning of each gauge the distance to the end of the image gives the length of the missing tissue gauge in millimeters. Results: The Tomophan™ was imaged in digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) systems from various vendors resulting in 46 cases used for testing. The results showed that on average 1.9 mm of 6 mm of the gauges are visible. A small focus group was asked to count the number of visible steps for each case which resulted in a good agreement between observer counts and computed data. Conclusion: First, the results indicate that the amount of missing chest wall can differ between vendors. Secondly it was shown that an automated method to estimate the amount of missing chest wall gauges agreed well with observer assessments. This finding indicates that consistency testing may be simplified using the Tomophan™ phantom and analysis by an automated image processing named Tomo QA. In general the reason for missing chest wall may be due to a function of the beam profile at the chest wall as DBT projects through the angular sampling. Research supported by Image Owl, Inc., The Phantom Laboratory, Inc. and Raforninn ehf; Mallozzi and Healy employed by The Phantom Laboratory, Inc.; Goodenough is a consultant to The

  2. SU-E-P-31: Quantifying the Amount of Missing Tissue in a Digital Breast Tomosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To automatically quantify the amount of missing tissue in a digital breast tomosynthesis system using four stair-stepped chest wall missing tissue gauges in the Tomophan™ from the Phantom Laboratory and image processing from Image Owl. Methods: The Tomophan™ phantom incorporates four stair-stepped missing tissue gauges by the chest wall, allowing measurement of missing chest wall in two different locations along the chest wall at two different heights. Each of the four gauges has 12 steps in 0.5 mm increments rising from the chest wall. An image processing algorithm was developed by Image Owl that first finds the two slices containing the steps then finds the signal through the highest step in all four gauges. Using the signal drop at the beginning of each gauge the distance to the end of the image gives the length of the missing tissue gauge in millimeters. Results: The Tomophan™ was imaged in digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) systems from various vendors resulting in 46 cases used for testing. The results showed that on average 1.9 mm of 6 mm of the gauges are visible. A small focus group was asked to count the number of visible steps for each case which resulted in a good agreement between observer counts and computed data. Conclusion: First, the results indicate that the amount of missing chest wall can differ between vendors. Secondly it was shown that an automated method to estimate the amount of missing chest wall gauges agreed well with observer assessments. This finding indicates that consistency testing may be simplified using the Tomophan™ phantom and analysis by an automated image processing named Tomo QA. In general the reason for missing chest wall may be due to a function of the beam profile at the chest wall as DBT projects through the angular sampling. Research supported by Image Owl, Inc., The Phantom Laboratory, Inc. and Raforninn ehf; Mallozzi and Healy employed by The Phantom Laboratory, Inc.; Goodenough is a consultant to The

  3. False positive reduction of microcalcification cluster detection in digital breast tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ning; Yi, Sheng; Mendonca, Paulo; Tian, Tai-peng; Samala, Ravi; Chan, Heang-Ping

    2014-03-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a new modality that has strong potential in improving the sensitivity and specificity of breast mass detection. However, the detection of microcalcifications (MCs) in DBT is challenging because radiologists have to search for the often subtle signals in many slices. We are developing a computer-aided detection (CAD) system to assist radiologists in reading DBT. The system consists of four major steps, namely: image enhancement; pre-screening of MC candidates; false-positive (FP) reduction, and detection of MC cluster candidates of clinical interest. We propose an algorithm for reducing FPs by using 3D characteristics of MC clusters in DBT. The proposed method takes the MC candidates from the pre-screening step described in [14] as input, which are then iteratively clustered to provide training samples to a random-forest classifier and a rule-based classifier. The random forest classifier is used to learn a discriminative model of MC clusters using 3D texture features, whereas the rule-based classifier revisits the initial training samples and enhances them by combining median filtering and graph-cut-based segmentation followed by thresholding on the final number of MCs belonging to the candidate cluster. The outputs of these two classifiers are combined according to the prediction confidence of the random-forest classifier. We evaluate the proposed FP-reduction algorithm on a data set of two-view DBT from 40 breasts with biopsy-proven MC clusters. The experimental results demonstrate a significant reduction in FP detections, with a final sensitivity of 92.2% for an FP rate of 50%.

  4. Breast tomosynthesis with monochromatic beams: a feasibility study using Monte Carlo simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Malliori, A; Bliznakova, K.; Sechopoulos, I; Kamarianakis, Z; Fei, B; Pallikarakis, N

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study is to investigate the impact on image quality of using monochromatic beams for lower dose breast tomosynthesis (BT). For this purpose, modeling and simulation of BT and mammography imaging processes have been performed using two x-ray beams: one at 28kVp and a monochromatic at 19keV at different entrance surface air kerma ranging between 0.16 and 5.5 mGy. Two 4cm thick computational breast models in a compressed state were used: one simple homogeneous and one heterogeneou...

  5. Enhanced imaging of microcalcifications in digital breast tomosynthesis through improved image-reconstruction algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Sidky, Emil Y; Reiser, Ingrid S; Nishikawa, Robert M; Moore, Richard H; Kopans, Daniel B

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: We develop a practical, iterative algorithm for image-reconstruction in under-sampled tomographic systems, such as digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). METHOD: The algorithm controls image regularity by minimizing the image total $p$-variation (TpV), a function that reduces to the total variation when $p=1.0$ or the image roughness when $p=2.0$. Constraints on the image, such as image positivity and estimated projection-data tolerance, are enforced by projection onto convex sets (POCS). The fact that the tomographic system is under-sampled translates to the mathematical property that many widely varied resultant volumes may correspond to a given data tolerance. Thus the application of image regularity serves two purposes: (1) reduction of the number of resultant volumes out of those allowed by fixing the data tolerance, finding the minimum image TpV for fixed data tolerance, and (2) traditional regularization, sacrificing data fidelity for higher image regularity. The present algorithm allows for this...

  6. Indirect-detection single-photon-counting x-ray detector for breast tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hao; Kaercher, Joerg; Durst, Roger

    2016-03-01

    X-ray mammography is a crucial screening tool for early identification of breast cancer. However, the overlap of anatomical features present in projection images often complicates the task of correctly identifying suspicious masses. As a result, there has been increasing interest in acquisition of volumetric information through digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) which, compared to mammography, offers the advantage of depth information. Since DBT requires acquisition of many projection images, it is desirable that the noise in each projection image be dominated by the statistical noise of the incident x-ray quanta and not by the additive noise of the imaging system (referred to as quantum-limited imaging) and that the cumulative dose be as low as possible (e.g., no more than for a mammogram). Unfortunately, the electronic noise (~2000 electrons) present in current DBT systems based on active matrix, flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs) is still relatively high compared with modest x-ray gain of the a-Se and CsI:Tl x-ray converters often used. To overcome the modest signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) limitations of current DBT systems, we have developed a large-area x-ray imaging detector with the combination of an extremely low noise (~20 electrons) active-pixel CMOS and a specially designed high resolution scintillator. The high sensitivity and low noise of such system provides better SNR by at least an order of magnitude than current state-of-art AMFPI systems and enables x-ray indirect-detection single photon counting (SPC) at mammographic energies with the potential of dose reduction.

  7. Detection of microcalcifications in breast tomosynthesis reconstructed with multiscale bilateral filtering regularization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samala, Ravi K.; Chan, Heang-Ping; Lu, Yao; Hadjiyski, Lubomir; Wei, Jun; Sahiner, Berkman; Helvie, Mark

    2013-03-01

    We are developing a CAD system to assist radiologists in detecting microcalcification clusters (MCs) in digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). In this study, we investigated the feasibility of using as input to the CAD system an enhanced DBT volume that was reconstructed with the iterative simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART) regularized by a new multiscale bilateral filtering (MBiF) method. The MBiF method utilizes the multiscale structures of the breast to selectively enhance MCs and preserve mass spiculations while smoothing noise in the DBT images. The CAD system first extracted the enhancement-modulated calcification response (EMCR) in the DBT volume. Detection of the seed points for MCs and individual calcifications were guided by the EMCR. MC candidates were formed by dynamic clustering. FPs were further reduced by analysis of the feature characteristics of the MCs. With IRB approval, two-view DBT of 91 subjects with biopsy-proven MCs were collected. Seventy-eight views from 39 subjects with MCs were used for training and the remaining 52 cases were used for independent testing. For view-based detection, a sensitivity of 85% was achieved at 3.23 FPs/volume. For case-based detection, the same sensitivity was obtained at 1.63 FPs/volume. The results indicate that the new MBiF method is useful in improving the detection accuracy of clustered microcalcifications. An effective CAD system for microcalcification detection in DBT has the potential to eliminate the need for additional mammograms, thereby reducing patient dose and reading time.

  8. Numerical Methods for Coupled Reconstruction and Registration in Digital Breast Tomosynthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Guang; Hawkes, David J; Arridge, Simon R

    2013-01-01

    Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) provides an insight into the fine details of normal fibroglandular tissues and abnormal lesions by reconstructing a pseudo-3D image of the breast. In this respect, DBT overcomes a major limitation of conventional X-ray mammography by reducing the confounding effects caused by the superposition of breast tissue. In a breast cancer screening or diagnostic context, a radiologist is interested in detecting change, which might be indicative of malignant disease. To help automate this task image registration is required to establish spatial correspondence between time points. Typically, images, such as MRI or CT, are first reconstructed and then registered. This approach can be effective if reconstructing using a complete set of data. However, for ill-posed, limited-angle problems such as DBT, estimating the deformation is complicated by the significant artefacts associated with the reconstruction, leading to severe inaccuracies in the registration. This paper presents a mathemati...

  9. Detection method of visible and invisible nipples on digital breast tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Seung-Hoon; Jeong, Ji-Wook; Lee, Sooyeul; Chae, Eun Young; Kim, Hak Hee; Choi, Young-Wook

    2015-03-01

    Digital Breast Tomosynthesis(DBT) with 3D breast image can improve detection sensitivity of breast cancer more than 2D mammogram on dense breast. The nipple location information is needed to analyze DBT. The nipple location is invaluable information in registration and as a reference point for classifying mass or micro-calcification clusters. Since there are visible nipple and invisible nipple in 2D mammogram or DBT, the nipple detection of breast must be possible to detect visible and invisible nipple of breast. The detection method of visible nipple using shape information of nipple is simple and highly efficient. However, it is difficult to detect invisible nipple because it doesn't have prominent shape. Mammary glands in breast connect nipple, anatomically. The nipple location is detected through analyzing location of mammary glands in breast. In this paper, therefore, we propose a method to detect the nipple on a breast, which has a visible or invisible nipple using changes of breast area and mammary glands, respectively. The result shows that our proposed method has average error of 2.54+/-1.47mm.

  10. Radiation dose differences between digital mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis are dependent on breast thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alakhras, Maram M.; Mello-Thoms, Claudia; Bourne, Roger; Rickard, Mary; Diffey, Jennifer; Brennan, Patrick C.

    2016-03-01

    Purpose To evaluate the radiation dose derived from digital mammography (DM) and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) at different tube current-exposure time product (mAs) and at 6 phantom thicknesses from 10 to 60 mm. Materials and Methods A total of 240 DM and DBT cranio-caudal (CC) phantom images were acquired at each thickness and at four exposure levels (the baseline mAs, 50%, 25% and 12.5% the baseline mAs). The incident Air Kerma (K) at the surface of the phantoms was measured using a solid state dosimeter. Mean Glandular Doses (MGD) were calculated for both modalities (DM and DBT). Results DBT dose was greater than that of DM for all mAs at each phantom thickness. For a breast thickness of 50 mm (close to average sized breast), the dose for DBT (2.32 mGy) was 13% higher than that for DM (2.05 mGy). The results also show that the difference in MGD between DM and DBT was less for the thicker compared with the thinner phantom, this difference being approximately a factor of 2.58 at 10 mm compared with a factor of 1.08 at 60 mm. While the MGD increased with increasing phantom thickness for both modalities, the dose increase with DBT was less than for DM, with the difference between 10 and 60 mm being a factor of 7 for DM and 3 for DBT. Conclusion The radiation dose from DBT was higher than that of DM and the difference in dose between DM and DBT decreases as phantom thickness increases.

  11. Digital breast tomosynthesis: computer-aided detection of clustered microcalcifications on planar projection images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a new approach to detect microcalcification clusters (MCs) in digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) via its planar projection (PPJ) image. With IRB approval, two-view (cranio-caudal and mediolateral oblique views) DBTs of human subject breasts were obtained with a GE GEN2 prototype DBT system that acquires 21 projection angles spanning 60° in 3° increments. A data set of 307 volumes (154 human subjects) was divided by case into independent training (127 with MCs) and test sets (104 with MCs and 76 free of MCs). A simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique with multiscale bilateral filtering (MSBF) regularization was used to enhance microcalcifications and suppress noise. During the MSBF regularized reconstruction, the DBT volume was separated into high frequency (HF) and low frequency components representing microcalcifications and larger structures. At the final iteration, maximum intensity projection was applied to the regularized HF volume to generate a PPJ image that contained MCs with increased contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and reduced search space. High CNR objects in the PPJ image were extracted and labeled as microcalcification candidates. Convolution neural network trained to recognize the image pattern of microcalcifications was used to classify the candidates into true calcifications and tissue structures and artifacts. The remaining microcalcification candidates were grouped into MCs by dynamic conditional clustering based on adaptive CNR threshold and radial distance criteria. False positive (FP) clusters were further reduced using the number of candidates in a cluster, CNR and size of microcalcification candidates. At 85% sensitivity an FP rate of 0.71 and 0.54 was achieved for view- and case-based sensitivity, respectively, compared to 2.16 and 0.85 achieved in DBT. The improvement was significant (p-value = 0.003) by JAFROC analysis. (paper)

  12. Preliminary Clinical Experience with Digital Breast Tomosynthesis in the Visualization of Breast Microcalcifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stamatia V Destounis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To compare the visualization and image quality of microcalcifications imaged with digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT versus conventional digital mammography. Materials and Methods: Patients with microcalcifications detected on full field digital mammography (FFDM recommended for needle core biopsy were enrolled in the study after obtaining patient′s consent and institutional review board approval (n = 177 patients, 179 lesions. All had a bilateral combination DBT exam, after undergoing routine digital mammography, prior to biopsy. The study radiologist reviewed the FFDM and DBT images in a non-blinded comparison and assessed the visibility of the microcalcifications with both methods, including image quality and clarity with which the calcifications were seen. Data recorded included patient demographics, lesion size on FFDM, DBT, and surgical excision (when applicable, biopsy, and surgical pathology, if any. Results: Average lesion size on DBT was 1.5 cm; average lesion size on FFDM was 1.4 cm. The image quality of DBT was assessed as equivalent or superior in 92.2% of cases. In 7.8% of the cases, the FFDM image quality was assessed as equivalent or superior. Conclusion: In our review, DBT image quality appears to be comparable to or better than conventional FFDM in terms of demonstrating microcalcifications, as shown in 92.2% of cases.

  13. Digital breast tomosynthesis reconstruction using spatially weighted non-convex regularization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jiabei; Fessler, Jeffrey A.; Chan, Heang-Ping

    2016-03-01

    Regularization is an effective strategy for reducing noise in tomographic reconstruction. This paper proposes a spatially weighted non-convex (SWNC) regularization method for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) image reconstruction. With a non-convex cost function, this method can suppress noise without blurring microcalcifications (MC) and spiculations of masses. To minimize the non-convex cost function, we apply a majorize-minimize separable quadratic surrogate algorithm (MM-SQS) that is further accelerated by ordered subsets (OS). We applied the new method to a heterogeneous breast phantom and to human subject DBT data, and observed improved image quality in both situations. A quantitative study also showed that the SWNC method can significantly enhance the contrast-to-noise ratio of MCs. By properly selecting its parameters, the SWNC regularizer can preserve the appearance of the mass margins and breast parenchyma.

  14. A second pass correction method for calcification artifacts in digital breast tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhard, Klaus; Grass, Michael; Nielsen, Tim

    2011-03-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) allows a quasi-3D reconstruction of the breast with high in-plane and poor depth resolution by the principles of limited angle tomography. The limited angular range and the coarse angular sampling result in prominent streak artifacts arising from high-contrast structures such as calcifications. These artifacts do not only degrade the image quality but also hold the risk of overlaying suspicious tissue structure in neighbouring slices, which might therefore be overlooked. This work presents a second pass method for correcting these kinds of high-contrast streak artifacts. In a first pass reconstruction the candidate highcontrast calcifications are segmented and subtracted from the original projection data to generate a subsequent artifact-free second pass reconstruction. The method is demonstrated in a simulation study using software breast phantoms, which have been derived from segmented MRI data.

  15. Additional findings at preoperative breast MRI: the value of second-look digital breast tomosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clauser, Paola; Pancot, Martina; Girometti, Rossano; Bazzocchi, Massimo; Zuiani, Chiara [University of Udine, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria, ' ' S.Maria della Misericordia' ' , Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Department of Medical and Biological Sciences, Udine (Italy); Carbonaro, Luca A. [IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Unit of Radiology, Milan (Italy); Sardanelli, Francesco [IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Unit of Radiology, Milan (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Milano, Department of Biomedical Sciences of Health, Milan (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    To evaluate second-look digital breast tomosynthesis (SL-DBT) for additional findings (AFs) at preoperative MRI compared with second-look ultrasound (SL-US). We included 135 patients with breast cancer who underwent digital mammography (DM), DBT, US, and MRI at two centres. MR images were retrospectively evaluated to find AFs, described as focus, mass, or non-mass; ≤10 mm or >10 mm in size; BI-RADS 3, 4, or 5. DM and DBT exams were reviewed looking for MRI AFs; data on SL-US were collected. Reference standard was histopathology or ≥12-month negative follow-up. Fisher exact test and McNemar test were used. Eighty-four AFs were detected in 53/135 patients (39 %, 95 %CI 31-48 %). A correlate was found for 44/84 (52 %, 95 %CI 41-63 %) at SL-US, for 20/84 (24 %, 95 %CI 11-28 %) at SL-DM, for 42/84 (50 %, 95 %CI 39-61 %) at SL-DBT, for 63/84 (75 %, 95 %CI 64-84 %) at SL-DBT, and/or SL-US, the last rate being higher than for SL-US only, overall (p < 0.001), for mass or non-mass, ≤ or >10 mm, BI-RADS 4 or 5, or malignant lesions (p < 0.031). Of 21 AFs occult at both SLs, 17 were malignant (81 %, 95 %CI 58-94 %). When adding SL-DBT to SL-US, AFs detection increased from 52 % to 75 %. MR-guided biopsy is needed for the remaining 25 %. (orig.)

  16. A virtual trial framework for quantifying the detectability of masses in breast tomosynthesis projection data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a promising breast cancer screening tool that has already begun making inroads into clinical practice. However, there is ongoing debate over how to quantitatively evaluate and optimize these systems, because different definitions of image quality can lead to different optimal design strategies. Powerful and accurate tools are desired to extend our understanding of DBT system optimization and validate published design principles. Methods: The authors developed a virtual trial framework for task-specific DBT assessment that uses digital phantoms, open-source x-ray transport codes, and a projection-space, spatial-domain observer model for quantitative system evaluation. The authors considered evaluation of reconstruction algorithms as a separate problem and focused on the information content in the raw, unfiltered projection images. Specifically, the authors investigated the effects of scan angle and number of angular projections on detectability of a small (3 mm diameter) signal embedded in randomly-varying anatomical backgrounds. Detectability was measured by the area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC). Experiments were repeated for three test cases where the detectability-limiting factor was anatomical variability, quantum noise, or electronic noise. The authors also juxtaposed the virtual trial framework with other published studies to illustrate its advantages and disadvantages. Results: The large number of variables in a virtual DBT study make it difficult to directly compare different authors’ results, so each result must be interpreted within the context of the specific virtual trial framework. The following results apply to 25% density phantoms with 5.15 cm compressed thickness and 500 μm3 voxels (larger 500 μm2 detector pixels were used to avoid voxel-edge artifacts): 1. For raw, unfiltered projection images in the anatomical-variability-limited regime, AUC appeared to remain constant or

  17. A virtual trial framework for quantifying the detectability of masses in breast tomosynthesis projection data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Stefano [College of Optical Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States); Bakic, Predrag R. [Radiology Department, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Myers, Kyle J.; Jennings, Robert J.; Park, Subok [Division of Imaging and Applied Mathematics, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, FDA, Silver Spring, Maryland 20993 (United States)

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a promising breast cancer screening tool that has already begun making inroads into clinical practice. However, there is ongoing debate over how to quantitatively evaluate and optimize these systems, because different definitions of image quality can lead to different optimal design strategies. Powerful and accurate tools are desired to extend our understanding of DBT system optimization and validate published design principles. Methods: The authors developed a virtual trial framework for task-specific DBT assessment that uses digital phantoms, open-source x-ray transport codes, and a projection-space, spatial-domain observer model for quantitative system evaluation. The authors considered evaluation of reconstruction algorithms as a separate problem and focused on the information content in the raw, unfiltered projection images. Specifically, the authors investigated the effects of scan angle and number of angular projections on detectability of a small (3 mm diameter) signal embedded in randomly-varying anatomical backgrounds. Detectability was measured by the area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC). Experiments were repeated for three test cases where the detectability-limiting factor was anatomical variability, quantum noise, or electronic noise. The authors also juxtaposed the virtual trial framework with other published studies to illustrate its advantages and disadvantages. Results: The large number of variables in a virtual DBT study make it difficult to directly compare different authors' results, so each result must be interpreted within the context of the specific virtual trial framework. The following results apply to 25% density phantoms with 5.15 cm compressed thickness and 500 {mu}m{sup 3} voxels (larger 500 {mu}m{sup 2} detector pixels were used to avoid voxel-edge artifacts): 1. For raw, unfiltered projection images in the anatomical-variability-limited regime, AUC appeared to

  18. Overview of the evidence on digital breast tomosynthesis in breast cancer detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houssami, Nehmat; Skaane, Per

    2013-04-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT, or 3D-mammography), a three-dimensional derivative of digital mammography (DM), reduces the effect of tissue superimposition and may improve mammographic interpretation. In this review, we examined the evidence on the accuracy of DBT in clinical studies. Published studies of DBT were relatively small studies, mostly test-set observer (reader) studies or clinical series that included symptomatic and screen-recalled cases, and were generally enriched with cancers. With these limitations in mind, the evidence showed some consistent findings, summarized as follows: two-view DBT has at least equal or better accuracy than standard two-view DM, whereas one-view DBT does not have better accuracy than standard DM; the addition of DBT to standard mammography (for mammographic interpretation or for assessment or triage of screen-recalled abnormalities) increases accuracy; improved accuracy from using DBT (relative to, or added to, DM) may be due to increased cancer detection or due to reduced false positive recalls, or both; and subjective interpretation of cancer conspicuity consistently found that cancers were equally or more conspicuous on DBT relative to DM. Preliminary data from population screening trials suggest that the integration of DBT with conventional DM (screen-reading using combined 2D + 3D mammography) may substantially improve breast cancer detection, although final results are not yet available, and many logistical issues need further evaluation to determine the potential implications and cost of combined 2D + 3D mammographic screening. At present, there is insufficient evidence to justify a change from standard DM to DBT however the available data strongly support investment in new large-scale population screening trials. These trials need to avoid the 'double' acquisitions required for 2D + 3D mammograms, and should therefore focus on evaluating integrated 2Dsynthetic + 3D mammography (where 2D-images are

  19. The role of digital tomosynthesis in reducing the number of equivocal breast reportings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alakhras, Maram; Mello-Thoms, Claudia; Rickard, Mary; Bourne, Roger; Brennan, Patrick C.

    2015-03-01

    Purpose To compare radiologists' confidence in assessing breast cancer using combined digital mammography (DM) and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) compared with DM alone as a function of previous experience with DBT. Materials and Methods Institutional ethics approval was obtained. Twenty-three experienced breast radiologists reviewed 50 cases in two modes, DM alone and DM+DBT. Twenty-seven cases presented with breast cancer. Each radiologist was asked to detect breast lesions and give a confidence score of 1-5 (1- Normal, 2- Benign, 3- Equivocal, 4- Suspicious, 5- Malignant). Radiologists were divided into three sub-groups according to their prior experience with DBT (none, workshop experience, and clinical experience). Confidence scores using DM+DBT were compared with DM alone for all readers combined and for each DBT experience subgroup. Statistical analyses, using GraphPad Prism 5, were carried out using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test with statistical significance set at pResults Confidence scores were higher for true positive cancer cases using DM+DBT compared with DM alone for all readers (p cancer diagnosis) with DM+DBT compared with DM alone for all readers (p= 0.018) and readers with no prior DBT experience (p= 0.035). Conclusion Addition of DBT to DM increases the confidence level of radiologists in scoring cancer and normal/benign cases. This finding appears to apply across radiologists with varying levels of DBT experience, however further work involving greater numbers of radiologists is required.

  20. Evaluation of the possibility to use thick slabs of reconstructed outer breast tomosynthesis slice images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersson, Hannie; Dustler, Magnus; Tingberg, Anders; Timberg, Pontus

    2016-03-01

    The large image volumes in breast tomosynthesis (BT) have led to large amounts of data and a heavy workload for breast radiologists. The number of slice images can be decreased by combining adjacent image planes (slabbing) but the decrease in depth resolution can considerably affect the detection of lesions. The aim of this work was to assess if thicker slabbing of the outer slice images (where lesions seldom are present) could be a viable alternative in order to reduce the number of slice images in BT image volumes. The suggested slabbing (an image volume with thick outer slabs and thin slices between) were evaluated in two steps. Firstly, a survey of the depth of 65 cancer lesions within the breast was performed to estimate how many lesions would be affected by outer slabs of different thicknesses. Secondly, a selection of 24 lesions was reconstructed with 2, 6 and 10 mm slab thickness to evaluate how the appearance of lesions located in the thicker slabs would be affected. The results show that few malignant breast lesions are located at a depth less than 10 mm from the surface (especially for breast thicknesses of 50 mm and above). Reconstruction of BT volumes with 6 mm slab thickness yields an image quality that is sufficient for lesion detection for a majority of the investigated cases. Together, this indicates that thicker slabbing of the outer slice images is a promising option in order to reduce the number of slice images in BT image volumes.

  1. Selective-diffusion regularization for enhancement of microcalcifications in digital breast tomosynthesis reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has been shown to improve mass detection. Detection of microcalcifications is more challenging because of the large breast volume to be searched for subtle signals. The simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART) was found to provide good image quality for DBT, but the image noise is amplified with an increasing number of iterations. In this study, the authors developed a selective-diffusion (SD) method for noise regularization with SART to improve the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of microcalcifications in the DBT slices for human or machine detection. Methods: The SD method regularizes SART reconstruction during updating with each projection view. Potential microcalcifications are differentiated from the noisy background by estimating the local gradient information. Different degrees of regularization are applied to the signal or noise classes, such that the microcalcifications will be enhanced while the noise is suppressed. The new SD method was compared to several current methods, including the quadratic Laplacian (QL) method, the total variation (TV) method, and the nonconvex total p-variation (TpV) method for noise regularization with SART. A GE GEN2 prototype DBT system with a stationary digital detector was used for the acquisition of DBT scans at 21 angles in 3 deg. increments over a ±30 deg. range. The reconstruction image quality without regularization and that with the different regularization methods were compared using the DBT scans of an American College of Radiology phantom and a human subject. The CNR and the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the line profiles of microcalcifications within the in-focus DBT slices were used as image quality measures. Results: For the comparison of large microcalcifications in the DBT data of the subject, the SD method resulted in comparable CNR to the nonconvex TpV method. Both of them performed better than the other two methods. For subtle

  2. A scatter correction method for contrast-enhanced dual-energy digital breast tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yihuan; Peng, Boyu; Lau, Beverly A.; Hu, Yue-Houng; Scaduto, David A.; Zhao, Wei; Gindi, Gene

    2015-08-01

    Contrast-enhanced dual energy digital breast tomosynthesis (CE-DE-DBT) is designed to image iodinated masses while suppressing breast anatomical background. Scatter is a problem, especially for high energy acquisition, in that it causes severe cupping artifact and iodine quantitation errors. We propose a patient specific scatter correction (SC) algorithm for CE-DE-DBT. The empirical algorithm works by interpolating scatter data outside the breast shadow into an estimate within the breast shadow. The interpolated estimate is further improved by operations that use an easily obtainable (from phantoms) table of scatter-to-primary-ratios (SPR)—a single SPR value for each breast thickness and acquisition angle. We validated our SC algorithm for two breast emulating phantoms by comparing SPR from our SC algorithm to that measured using a beam-passing pinhole array plate. The error in our SC computed SPR, averaged over acquisition angle and image location, was about 5%, with slightly worse errors for thicker phantoms. The SC projection data, reconstructed using OS-SART, showed a large degree of decupping. We also observed that SC removed the dependence of iodine quantitation on phantom thickness. We applied the SC algorithm to a CE-DE-mammographic patient image with a biopsy confirmed tumor at the breast periphery. In the image without SC, the contrast enhanced tumor was masked by the cupping artifact. With our SC, the tumor was easily visible. An interpolation-based SC was proposed by (Siewerdsen et al 2006 Med. Phys. 33 187-97) for cone-beam CT (CBCT), but our algorithm and application differ in several respects. Other relevant SC techniques include Monte-Carlo and convolution-based methods for CBCT, storage of a precomputed library of scatter maps for DBT, and patient acquisition with a beam-passing pinhole array for breast CT. Our SC algorithm can be accomplished in clinically acceptable times, requires no additional imaging hardware or extra patient dose and is

  3. Development and validation of a modelling framework for simulating 2D-mammography and breast tomosynthesis images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elangovan, Premkumar; Warren, Lucy M; Mackenzie, Alistair; Rashidnasab, Alaleh; Diaz, Oliver; Dance, David R; Young, Kenneth C; Bosmans, Hilde; Strudley, Celia J; Wells, Kevin

    2014-08-01

    Planar 2D x-ray mammography is generally accepted as the preferred screening technique used for breast cancer detection. Recently, digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has been introduced to overcome some of the inherent limitations of conventional planar imaging, and future technological enhancements are expected to result in the introduction of further innovative modalities. However, it is crucial to understand the impact of any new imaging technology or methodology on cancer detection rates and patient recall. Any such assessment conventionally requires large scale clinical trials demanding significant investment in time and resources. The concept of virtual clinical trials and virtual performance assessment may offer a viable alternative to this approach. However, virtual approaches require a collection of specialized modelling tools which can be used to emulate the image acquisition process and simulate images of a quality indistinguishable from their real clinical counterparts. In this paper, we present two image simulation chains constructed using modelling tools that can be used for the evaluation of 2D-mammography and DBT systems. We validate both approaches by comparing simulated images with real images acquired using the system being simulated. A comparison of the contrast-to-noise ratios and image blurring for real and simulated images of test objects shows good agreement ( < 9% error). This suggests that our simulation approach is a promising alternative to conventional physical performance assessment followed by large scale clinical trials. PMID:25029333

  4. Development and validation of a modelling framework for simulating 2D-mammography and breast tomosynthesis images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Planar 2D x-ray mammography is generally accepted as the preferred screening technique used for breast cancer detection. Recently, digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has been introduced to overcome some of the inherent limitations of conventional planar imaging, and future technological enhancements are expected to result in the introduction of further innovative modalities. However, it is crucial to understand the impact of any new imaging technology or methodology on cancer detection rates and patient recall. Any such assessment conventionally requires large scale clinical trials demanding significant investment in time and resources. The concept of virtual clinical trials and virtual performance assessment may offer a viable alternative to this approach. However, virtual approaches require a collection of specialized modelling tools which can be used to emulate the image acquisition process and simulate images of a quality indistinguishable from their real clinical counterparts. In this paper, we present two image simulation chains constructed using modelling tools that can be used for the evaluation of 2D-mammography and DBT systems. We validate both approaches by comparing simulated images with real images acquired using the system being simulated. A comparison of the contrast-to-noise ratios and image blurring for real and simulated images of test objects shows good agreement ( < 9% error). This suggests that our simulation approach is a promising alternative to conventional physical performance assessment followed by large scale clinical trials. (paper)

  5. Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT): a review of the evidence for use as a screening tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Fiona J; Tucker, Lorraine; Young, Ken C

    2016-02-01

    Breast screening with full-field digital mammography (FFDM) fails to detect 15-30% of cancers. This figure is higher for women with dense breasts. A new tomographic technique in mammography has been developed--digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT)--which allows images to be viewed in sections through the breast and has the potential to improve cancer detection rates. Results from retrospective reading studies comparing DBT with FFDM have been largely favourable with improvement in sensitivity and specificity. Increases in diagnostic accuracy have been reported as being independent of breast density; however there are mixed reports regarding the detection of microcalcification. Prospective screening studies using DBT with FFDM have demonstrated increased rates in cancer detection compared with FFDM alone. A reduction in false-positive recall rates has also been shown. Screening with the addition of DBT would approximately double radiation dose; however a simulated FFDM image can be generated from a DBT scan. The combination of simulated FFDM images and DBT is being evaluated within several studies and some positive results have been published. Interval cancer rates for the UK National Health Service Breast Screening Programme (NHSBSP) demonstrate the limited sensitivity of FFDM in cancer detection. DBT has the potential to increase sensitivity and decrease false-positive recall rates. It has approval for screening and diagnostics in several countries; however, there are issues with DBT as a screening tool including additional reading time, IT storage and connectivity, over-diagnosis, and cost effectiveness. Feasibility and cost-effectiveness trials are needed before the implementation of DBT in NHSBSP can be considered. PMID:26707815

  6. Fusion of digital breast tomosynthesis images via wavelet synthesis for improved lesion conspicuity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariharan, Harishwaran; Pomponiu, Victor; Zheng, Bin; Whiting, Bruce; Gur, David

    2014-03-01

    Full-field digital mammography (FFDM) is the most common screening procedure for detecting early breast cancer. However, due to complications such as overlapping breast tissue in projection images, the efficacy of FFDM reading is reduced. Recent studies have shown that digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), in combination with FFDM, increases detection sensitivity considerably while decreasing false-positive, recall rates. There is a huge interest in creating diagnostically accurate 2-D interpretations from the DBT slices. Most of the 2-D syntheses rely on visualizing the maximum intensities (brightness) from each slice through different methods. We propose a wavelet based fusion method, where we focus on preserving holistic information from larger structures such as masses while adding high frequency information that is relevant and helpful for diagnosis. This method enables the spatial generation of a 2D image from a series of DBT images, each of which contains both smooth and coarse structures distributed in the wavelet domain. We believe that the wavelet-synthesized images, generated from their DBT image datasets, provide radiologists with improved lesion and micro-calcification conspicuity as compared with FFDM images. The potential impact of this fusion method is (1) Conception of a device-independent, data-driven modality that increases the conspicuity of lesions, thereby facilitating early detection and potentially reducing recall rates; (2) Reduction of the accompanying radiation dose to the patient.

  7. Breast tomosynthesis with monochromatic beams: a feasibility study using Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to investigate the impact on image quality of using monochromatic beams for lower dose breast tomosynthesis (BT). For this purpose, modeling and simulation of BT and mammography imaging processes have been performed using two x-ray beams: one at 28 kVp and a monochromatic one at 19 keV at different entrance surface air kerma ranging between 0.16 and 5.5 mGy. Two 4 cm thick computational breast models, in a compressed state, were used: one simple homogeneous and one heterogeneous based on CT breast images, with compositions of 50% glandular–50% adipose and 40% glandular–60% adipose tissues by weight, respectively. Modeled lesions, representing masses and calcifications, were inserted within these breast phantoms. X-ray transport in the breast models was simulated with previously developed and validated Monte Carlo application. Results showed that, for the same incident photon fluence, the use of the monochromatic beam in BT resulted in higher image quality compared to the one using polychromatic acquisition, especially in terms of contrast. For the homogenous phantom, the improvement ranged between 15% and 22% for calcifications and masses, respectively, while for the heterogeneous one this improvement was in the order of 33% for the masses and 17% for the calcifications. For different exposures, comparable image quality in terms of signal-difference-to-noise ratio and higher contrast for all features was obtained when using a monochromatic 19 keV beam at a lower mean glandular dose, compared to the polychromatic one. Monochromatic images also provide better detail and, in combination with BT, can lead to substantial improvement in visualization of features, and particularly better edge detection of low-contrast masses. (paper)

  8. Breast tomosynthesis with monochromatic beams: a feasibility study using Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malliori, A.; Bliznakova, K.; Sechopoulos, I.; Kamarianakis, Z.; Fei, B.; Pallikarakis, N.

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the impact on image quality of using monochromatic beams for lower dose breast tomosynthesis (BT). For this purpose, modeling and simulation of BT and mammography imaging processes have been performed using two x-ray beams: one at 28 kVp and a monochromatic one at 19 keV at different entrance surface air kerma ranging between 0.16 and 5.5 mGy. Two 4 cm thick computational breast models, in a compressed state, were used: one simple homogeneous and one heterogeneous based on CT breast images, with compositions of 50% glandular-50% adipose and 40% glandular-60% adipose tissues by weight, respectively. Modeled lesions, representing masses and calcifications, were inserted within these breast phantoms. X-ray transport in the breast models was simulated with previously developed and validated Monte Carlo application. Results showed that, for the same incident photon fluence, the use of the monochromatic beam in BT resulted in higher image quality compared to the one using polychromatic acquisition, especially in terms of contrast. For the homogenous phantom, the improvement ranged between 15% and 22% for calcifications and masses, respectively, while for the heterogeneous one this improvement was in the order of 33% for the masses and 17% for the calcifications. For different exposures, comparable image quality in terms of signal-difference-to-noise ratio and higher contrast for all features was obtained when using a monochromatic 19 keV beam at a lower mean glandular dose, compared to the polychromatic one. Monochromatic images also provide better detail and, in combination with BT, can lead to substantial improvement in visualization of features, and particularly better edge detection of low-contrast masses.

  9. Comparison of the diagnostic performance of digital breast tomosynthesis and magnetic resonance imaging added to digital mammography in women with known breast cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Won Hwa; Chang, Jung Min; Moon, Woo Kyung [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, 101 Daehangno, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Hyeong-Gon [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Ann [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Gangnan Healthcare Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Koo, Hye Ryoung [Hanyang University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Gweon, Hye Mi [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    To compare the diagnostic performance of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) added to mammography in women with known breast cancers. Three radiologists independently reviewed image sets of 172 patients with 184 cancers; mammography alone, DBT plus mammography and MRI plus mammography, and scored for cancer probability using the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS). Jack-knife alternative free-response receiver-operating characteristic (JAFROC), which allows diagnostic performance estimation using single lesion as a statistical unit in a cancer-only population, was used. Sensitivity and positive predictive value (PPV) were compared using the McNemar and Fisher-exact tests. The JAFROC figures of merit (FOMs) was lower in DBT plus mammography (0.937) than MRI plus mammography (0.978, P = 0.0006) but higher than mammography alone (0.900, P = 0.0013). The sensitivity was lower in DBT plus mammography (88.2 %) than MRI plus mammography (97.8 %) but higher than mammography alone (78.3 %, both P < 0.0001). The PPV was significantly higher in DBT plus mammography (93.3 %) than MRI plus mammography (89.6 %, P = 0.0282). DBT provided lower diagnostic performance than MRI as an adjunctive imaging to mammography. However, DBT had higher diagnostic performance than mammography and higher PPV than MRI. (orig.)

  10. Comparison of the diagnostic performance of digital breast tomosynthesis and magnetic resonance imaging added to digital mammography in women with known breast cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare the diagnostic performance of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) added to mammography in women with known breast cancers. Three radiologists independently reviewed image sets of 172 patients with 184 cancers; mammography alone, DBT plus mammography and MRI plus mammography, and scored for cancer probability using the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS). Jack-knife alternative free-response receiver-operating characteristic (JAFROC), which allows diagnostic performance estimation using single lesion as a statistical unit in a cancer-only population, was used. Sensitivity and positive predictive value (PPV) were compared using the McNemar and Fisher-exact tests. The JAFROC figures of merit (FOMs) was lower in DBT plus mammography (0.937) than MRI plus mammography (0.978, P = 0.0006) but higher than mammography alone (0.900, P = 0.0013). The sensitivity was lower in DBT plus mammography (88.2 %) than MRI plus mammography (97.8 %) but higher than mammography alone (78.3 %, both P < 0.0001). The PPV was significantly higher in DBT plus mammography (93.3 %) than MRI plus mammography (89.6 %, P = 0.0282). DBT provided lower diagnostic performance than MRI as an adjunctive imaging to mammography. However, DBT had higher diagnostic performance than mammography and higher PPV than MRI. (orig.)

  11. The effect of reduced breast compression in breast tomo-synthesis: Human observer study using clinical cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the compression force used with conventional mammography can be reduced with breast tomo-synthesis (BT), without adversely affecting the visualisation of normal and pathological structures. Forty-five women were examined with BT using full (same as for 2D mammography) and half compression force. Both examinations were performed with the same acquisition parameters. A total of 103 paired structure images were evaluated according to specified image quality criteria. Three experienced radiologists participated in the study. They had to make a forced choice, i.e. choose the image they felt best fulfilled the image quality criteria. The results showed no evident difference in the image quality, indicating that BT may be performed with substantially less compression force compared with 2D mammography. A majority of the examined women felt that half compression was more comfortable than full compression. (authors)

  12. Tomo-synthesis. Bibliographic study report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomo-synthesis is a recent technique for breast imaging. This technique, qualified as 'pseudo-3D', draws the attention of health professionals. Indeed, this technique could offer a gain in sensibility and in specificity in the detection of breast cancers compared to 2D mammography, thanks to the reduction of the tissues' overlapping in particular. Although its place and its clinical indication are not still clearly defined, tomo-synthesis is already used in France. The introduction of this technique within the national breast cancer screening program, seems to be foreseen by the authorities in the coming years. IRSN, in the scope of its mission of evaluation of the dose impact of innovative techniques, is closely interested in this technique and has proceeded in 2015 to a bibliographical review of the state of the art in tomo-synthesis. This review paid specific attention to the following points: conception of the installations, dose, image quality and quality control. it has highlighted several points of attention, which incite IRSN to formulate certain recommendations to accompany the spreading of this new technique in France. Most of the clinical trials validating the use of tomo-synthesis were realized on systems of a single manufacturer. However, manufacturers' strategies of design are heterogeneous. There is no unique technique of tomo-synthesis but several, of which equivalence in terms of technical and clinical performances is not demonstrated. Due to the heterogeneity of the different models available on the French market, IRSN recommends not to extrapolate the results of clinical studies obtained on a specific system but to consolidate them for all the available systems. In many imaging departments, tomo-synthesis is already implemented in addition or in substitution of 2D mammography without any regulatory quality control and periodic technical checks. The European reference standard for quality control of these devices is not yet

  13. Real time radial and tangential tomosynthesis system dedicated to on line x-ray examination of moving objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This presentation describes a system able to compute and display in real time a reconstructed image of a moving object using tomosynthesis methods. The object being moved on a known trajectory between the x-ray source and a detector, the tomosynthesis is focused on a given surface of the object and allows to reconstruct a sharp image of the structure on the surface superimposed to a blurred image of the surrounding plane. The developed tomosynthesis algorithm is based on a set of look up tables which provide for each position of the object on the trajectory, the projection of a given point of the imaged surface of the object on the detector. Several hundreds of frames can be combined to compute the tomosynthesis image. The signal-to-noise ratio obtained on processed images is equivalent to the one obtained by averaging images with a static object. In order to speed up the tomosynthesis reconstruction and to reach the video frame rate, we integrated a DSP based hardware in a PC host. The geometric calibration parameters and the look up tables are pre-computed on the PC. The on-line tomosynthesis calculation is carried out by the multi DSP architecture which manages in real time, frame acquisition, parallel tomosynthesis calculation and output image display. On this particular implementation of tomosynthesis, up to hundred video frames can be combined. We illustrate the potential of this system on an application of the tomosynthesis to solid rocket motor examination

  14. A scatter correction method for contrast-enhanced dual-energy digital breast tomosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contrast-enhanced dual energy digital breast tomosynthesis (CE-DE-DBT) is designed to image iodinated masses while suppressing breast anatomical background. Scatter is a problem, especially for high energy acquisition, in that it causes severe cupping artifact and iodine quantitation errors. We propose a patient specific scatter correction (SC) algorithm for CE-DE-DBT. The empirical algorithm works by interpolating scatter data outside the breast shadow into an estimate within the breast shadow. The interpolated estimate is further improved by operations that use an easily obtainable (from phantoms) table of scatter-to-primary-ratios (SPR)—a single SPR value for each breast thickness and acquisition angle. We validated our SC algorithm for two breast emulating phantoms by comparing SPR from our SC algorithm to that measured using a beam-passing pinhole array plate. The error in our SC computed SPR, averaged over acquisition angle and image location, was about 5%, with slightly worse errors for thicker phantoms. The SC projection data, reconstructed using OS-SART, showed a large degree of decupping. We also observed that SC removed the dependence of iodine quantitation on phantom thickness. We applied the SC algorithm to a CE-DE-mammographic patient image with a biopsy confirmed tumor at the breast periphery. In the image without SC, the contrast enhanced tumor was masked by the cupping artifact. With our SC, the tumor was easily visible. An interpolation-based SC was proposed by (Siewerdsen et al 2006 Med. Phys. 33 187–97) for cone-beam CT (CBCT), but our algorithm and application differ in several respects. Other relevant SC techniques include Monte-Carlo and convolution-based methods for CBCT, storage of a precomputed library of scatter maps for DBT, and patient acquisition with a beam-passing pinhole array for breast CT. Our SC algorithm can be accomplished in clinically acceptable times, requires no additional imaging hardware or extra patient dose and is

  15. A comparison of image interpretation times in full field digital mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astley, Susan; Connor, Sophie; Lim, Yit; Tate, Catriona; Entwistle, Helen; Morris, Julie; Whiteside, Sigrid; Sergeant, Jamie; Wilson, Mary; Beetles, Ursula; Boggis, Caroline; Gilbert, Fiona

    2013-03-01

    Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) provides three-dimensional images of the breast that enable radiologists to discern whether densities are due to overlapping structures or lesions. To aid assessment of the cost-effectiveness of DBT for screening, we have compared the time taken to interpret DBT images and the corresponding two-dimensional Full Field Digital Mammography (FFDM) images. Four Consultant Radiologists experienced in reading FFDM images (4 years 8 months to 8 years) with training in DBT interpretation but more limited experience (137-407 cases in the past 6 months) were timed reading between 24 and 32 two view FFDM and DBT cases. The images were of women recalled from screening for further assessment and women under surveillance because of a family history of breast cancer. FFDM images were read before DBT, according to local practice. The median time for readers to interpret FFDM images was 17.0 seconds, with an interquartile range of 12.3-23.6 seconds. For DBT, the median time was 66.0 seconds, and the interquartile range was 51.1-80.5 seconds. The difference was statistically significant (p<0.001). Reading times were significantly longer in family history clinics (p<0.01). Although it took approximately four times as long to interpret DBT than FFDM images, the cases were more complex than would be expected for routine screening, and with higher mammographic density. The readers were relatively inexperienced in DBT interpretation and may increase their speed over time. The difference in times between clinics may be due to increased throughput at assessment, or decreased density.

  16. Three-Dimensional Computer-Aided Detection of Microcalcification Clusters in Digital Breast Tomosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Ji-Wook; Chae, Seung-Hoon; Chae, Eun Young; Kim, Hak Hee; Choi, Young-Wook; Lee, Sooyeul

    2016-01-01

    We propose computer-aided detection (CADe) algorithm for microcalcification (MC) clusters in reconstructed digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) images. The algorithm consists of prescreening, MC detection, clustering, and false-positive (FP) reduction steps. The DBT images containing the MC-like objects were enhanced by a multiscale Hessian-based three-dimensional (3D) objectness response function and a connected-component segmentation method was applied to extract the cluster seed objects as potential clustering centers of MCs. Secondly, a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) enhanced image was also generated to detect the individual MC candidates and prescreen the MC-like objects. Each cluster seed candidate was prescreened by counting neighboring individual MC candidates nearby the cluster seed object according to several microcalcification clustering criteria. As a second step, we introduced bounding boxes for the accepted seed candidate, clustered all the overlapping cubes, and examined. After the FP reduction step, the average number of FPs per case was estimated to be 2.47 per DBT volume with a sensitivity of 83.3%. PMID:27274993

  17. Three-Dimensional Computer-Aided Detection of Microcalcification Clusters in Digital Breast Tomosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-wook Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose computer-aided detection (CADe algorithm for microcalcification (MC clusters in reconstructed digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT images. The algorithm consists of prescreening, MC detection, clustering, and false-positive (FP reduction steps. The DBT images containing the MC-like objects were enhanced by a multiscale Hessian-based three-dimensional (3D objectness response function and a connected-component segmentation method was applied to extract the cluster seed objects as potential clustering centers of MCs. Secondly, a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR enhanced image was also generated to detect the individual MC candidates and prescreen the MC-like objects. Each cluster seed candidate was prescreened by counting neighboring individual MC candidates nearby the cluster seed object according to several microcalcification clustering criteria. As a second step, we introduced bounding boxes for the accepted seed candidate, clustered all the overlapping cubes, and examined. After the FP reduction step, the average number of FPs per case was estimated to be 2.47 per DBT volume with a sensitivity of 83.3%.

  18. Digital breast tomosynthesis: application of 2D digital mammography CAD to detection of microcalcification clusters on planar projection image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samala, Ravi K.; Chan, Heang-Ping; Lu, Yao; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Wei, Jun; Helvie, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Computer-aided detection (CAD) has the potential to aid radiologists in detection of microcalcification clusters (MCs). CAD for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) can be developed by using the reconstructed volume, the projection views or other derivatives as input. We have developed a novel method of generating a single planar projection (PPJ) image from a regularized DBT volume to emphasize the high contrast objects such as microcalcifications while removing the anatomical background and noise. In this work, we adapted a CAD system developed for digital mammography (CADDM) to the PPJ image and compared its performance with our CAD system developed for DBT volumes (CADDBT) in the same set of cases. For microcalcification detection in the PPJ image using the CADDM system, the background removal preprocessing step designed for DM was not needed. The other methods and processing steps in the CADDM system were kept without modification while the parameters were optimized with a training set. The linear discriminant analysis classifier using cluster based features was retrained to generate a discriminant score to be used as decision variable. For view-based FROC analysis, at 80% sensitivity, an FP rate of 1.95/volume and 1.54/image were achieved, respectively, for CADDBT and CADDM in an independent test set. At a threshold of 1.2 FPs per image or per DBT volume, the nonparametric analysis of the area under the FROC curve shows that the optimized CADDM for PPJ is significantly better than CADDBT. However, the performance of CADDM drops at higher sensitivity or FP rate, resulting in similar overall performance between the two CAD systems. The higher sensitivity of the CADDM in the low FP rate region and vice versa for the CADDBT indicate that a joint CAD system combining detection in the DBT volume and the PPJ image has the potential to increase the sensitivity and reduce the FP rate.

  19. Computer-aided detection of clustered microcalcifications in multiscale bilateral filtering regularized reconstructed digital breast tomosynthesis volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Develop a computer-aided detection (CADe) system for clustered microcalcifications in digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) volume enhanced with multiscale bilateral filtering (MSBF) regularization. Methods: With Institutional Review Board approval and written informed consent, two-view DBT of 154 breasts, of which 116 had biopsy-proven microcalcification (MC) clusters and 38 were free of MCs, was imaged with a General Electric GEN2 prototype DBT system. The DBT volumes were reconstructed with MSBF-regularized simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART) that was designed to enhance MCs and reduce background noise while preserving the quality of other tissue structures. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of MCs was further improved with enhancement-modulated calcification response (EMCR) preprocessing, which combined multiscale Hessian response to enhance MCs by shape and bandpass filtering to remove the low-frequency structured background. MC candidates were then located in the EMCR volume using iterative thresholding and segmented by adaptive region growing. Two sets of potential MC objects, cluster centroid objects and MC seed objects, were generated and the CNR of each object was calculated. The number of candidates in each set was controlled based on the breast volume. Dynamic clustering around the centroid objects grouped the MC candidates to form clusters. Adaptive criteria were designed to reduce false positive (FP) clusters based on the size, CNR values and the number of MCs in the cluster, cluster shape, and cluster based maximum intensity projection. Free-response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) and jackknife alternative FROC (JAFROC) analyses were used to assess the performance and compare with that of a previous study. Results: Unpaired two-tailedt-test showed a significant increase (p < 0.0001) in the ratio of CNRs for MCs with and without MSBF regularization compared to similar ratios for FPs. For view-based detection, a

  20. Dosimetric characterization and organ dose assessment in digital breast tomosynthesis: Measurements and Monte Carlo simulations using voxel phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Due to its capability to more accurately detect deep lesions inside the breast by removing the effect of overlying anatomy, digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has the potential to replace the standard mammography technique in clinical screening exams. However, the European Guidelines for DBT dosimetry are still a work in progress and there are little data available on organ doses other than to the breast. It is, therefore, of great importance to assess the dosimetric performance of DBT with respect to the one obtained with standard digital mammography (DM) systems. The aim of this work is twofold: (i) to study the dosimetric properties of a combined DBT/DM system (MAMMOMAT Inspiration Siemens®) for a tungsten/rhodium (W/Rh) anode/filter combination and (ii) to evaluate organs doses during a DBT examination. Methods: For the first task, measurements were performed in manual and automatic exposure control (AEC) modes, using two homogeneous breast phantoms: a PMMA slab phantom and a 4 cm thick breast-shaped rigid phantom, with 50% of glandular tissue in its composition. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were performed using Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended v.2.7.0. A MC model was implemented to mimic DM and DBT acquisitions for a wide range of x-ray spectra (24 –34 kV). This was used to calculate mean glandular dose (MGD) and to compute series of backscatter factors (BSFs) that could be inserted into the DBT dosimetric formalism proposed by Dance et al. Regarding the second aim of the study, the implemented MC model of the clinical equipment, together with a female voxel phantom (“Laura”), was used to calculate organ doses considering a typical DBT acquisition. Results were compared with a standard two-view mammography craniocaudal (CC) acquisition. Results: Considering the AEC mode, the acquisition of a single CC view results in a MGD ranging from 0.53 ± 0.07 mGy to 2.41 ± 0.31 mGy in DM mode and from 0.77 ± 0.11 mGy to 2.28 ± 0.32 mGy in DBT mode

  1. Dosimetric characterization and organ dose assessment in digital breast tomosynthesis: Measurements and Monte Carlo simulations using voxel phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baptista, Mariana, E-mail: marianabaptista@ctn.ist.utl.pt; Di Maria, Salvatore; Barros, Sílvia; Vaz, Pedro [Centro de Ciências e Tecnologias Nucleares, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Estrada Nacional 10, km 139,7, Bobadela LRS 2695-066 (Portugal); Figueira, Catarina [Centre for Plasma Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen’s University, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Sarmento, Marta; Orvalho, Lurdes [Serviço de Imagiologia, Hospital da Luz, Avenida Lusíada, 100, Lisboa 1500-650 (Portugal)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Due to its capability to more accurately detect deep lesions inside the breast by removing the effect of overlying anatomy, digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has the potential to replace the standard mammography technique in clinical screening exams. However, the European Guidelines for DBT dosimetry are still a work in progress and there are little data available on organ doses other than to the breast. It is, therefore, of great importance to assess the dosimetric performance of DBT with respect to the one obtained with standard digital mammography (DM) systems. The aim of this work is twofold: (i) to study the dosimetric properties of a combined DBT/DM system (MAMMOMAT Inspiration Siemens{sup ®}) for a tungsten/rhodium (W/Rh) anode/filter combination and (ii) to evaluate organs doses during a DBT examination. Methods: For the first task, measurements were performed in manual and automatic exposure control (AEC) modes, using two homogeneous breast phantoms: a PMMA slab phantom and a 4 cm thick breast-shaped rigid phantom, with 50% of glandular tissue in its composition. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were performed using Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended v.2.7.0. A MC model was implemented to mimic DM and DBT acquisitions for a wide range of x-ray spectra (24 –34 kV). This was used to calculate mean glandular dose (MGD) and to compute series of backscatter factors (BSFs) that could be inserted into the DBT dosimetric formalism proposed by Dance et al. Regarding the second aim of the study, the implemented MC model of the clinical equipment, together with a female voxel phantom (“Laura”), was used to calculate organ doses considering a typical DBT acquisition. Results were compared with a standard two-view mammography craniocaudal (CC) acquisition. Results: Considering the AEC mode, the acquisition of a single CC view results in a MGD ranging from 0.53 ± 0.07 mGy to 2.41 ± 0.31 mGy in DM mode and from 0.77 ± 0.11 mGy to 2.28 ± 0.32 mGy in DBT mode

  2. Digital breast tomosynthesis in one or two views as a replacement or adjunct technique to full-field digital mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinical studies using different imaging protocols to perform digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) were reviewed (2008-14) to assess interpretive accuracy. Descriptive pooled statistics were used to estimate and summarise accuracy measures for each type of imaging protocol in relation to that of two-view full-field digital mammography (FFDM). In studies comparing multiple DBT imaging protocols, a trend of increased performance was often seen when including both the mediolateral oblique and craniocaudal views for DBT alone and even more so for DBT adjunct to FFDM. Overall, the average ΔAUC (%; sd) across studies for stand-alone DBT (relative to FFDM), in one and in two views, were 2.2 (±3.7) and 5.9 (±4.6), and when used together with FFDM, 3.9 (±2.0) and 6.7 (±0.9). With respect to individual studies, improvements in accuracy using DBT were present for different types of imaging protocols although the magnitude of the impact varied between studies, and some studies did not show significant improvements in comparison with FFDM. The most consistent effect of improvement in breast cancer detection was seen across studies for two-view DBT with FFDM. These summary findings may depend on the sampling constraints present in tomosynthesis imaging and on other factors discussed in this paper. In order to investigate these effects more thoroughly and how they might impact outcomes, comparative or randomized-controlled trials are warranted. (authors)

  3. Detection of microcalcification clusters by 2D-mammography and narrow and wide angle digital breast tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjipanteli, Andria; Elangovan, Premkumar; Looney, Padraig T.; Mackenzie, Alistair; Wells, Kevin; Dance, David R.; Young, Kenneth C.

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the detection of microcalcification clusters by human observers in breast images using 2D-mammography and narrow (15°/15 projections) and wide (50°/25 projections) angle digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). Simulated microcalcification clusters with a range of microcalcification diameters (125 μm-275 μm) were inserted into 6 cm thick simulated compressed breasts. Breast images were produced with and without inserted microcalcification clusters using a set of image modelling tools, which were developed to represent clinical imaging by mammography and tomosynthesis. Commercially available software was used for image processing and image reconstruction. The images were then used in a series of 4-alternative forced choice (4AFC) human observer experiments conducted for signal detection with the microcalcification clusters as targets. The minimum detectable calcification diameter was found for each imaging modality: (i) 2D-mammography: 164+/-5 μm (ii) narrow angle DBT: 210+/-5 μm, (iii) wide angle DBT: 255+/-4 μm. A statistically significant difference was found between the minimum detectable calcification diameters that can be detected by the three imaging modalities. Furthermore, it was found that there was not a statistically significant difference between the results of the five observers that participated in this study. In conclusion, this study presents a method that quantifies the threshold diameter required for microcalcification detection, using high resolution, realistic images with observers, for the comparison of DBT geometries with 2D-mammography. 2Dmammography can visualise smaller detail diameter than both DBT imaging modalities and narrow-angle DBT can visualise a smaller detail diameter than wide-angle DBT.

  4. Characterization of prototype full-field breast tomosynthesis by using a CMOS array coupled with a columnar CsI(Tl) scintillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a prototype full-field digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) system by using a complementary-metal-oxide semiconductive (CMOS) array coupled with a columnar CsI(Tl) scintillator. The imaging system consists of a matrix with an active detector area of 3072 x 3888 pixels and a pixel pitch of 74.8 μm. For tomosynthesis imaging, the X-ray tube is automatically rotated in 3 .deg. increments in the shoot mode to acquire projection images at 15 different angles over a ±21 .deg. angular range in less than 10 s. The digital detector is stationary during image acquisition. In this research, we also carried out evaluation studies to characterize the performance of the system in different operational modes designed for the DBT system, e.g., binning mode and the range of view angles, in terms of the modulation transfer function (MTF), the normalized noise power spectra (NNPS), and the detective quantum efficiency (DQE): The MTF value measured at the Nyquist frequency was 18.49%, the NNPS value at zero frequency was about 1.93 x 10-5 (mm2), and the maximum value of DQE was about 47.09% for the full resolution. For the pixel binning mode, the MTF decreased more than it did for the full resolution mode due to the increased effective pixel size. However, the full resolution mode was more sensitive to noise than the pixel binning mode. For the scan angle of the DBT system, oblique incidence of X-rays on a detector caused blurring that reduced resolution. These results seem to be promising for the use of the DBT system in potential clinical applications and will provide important information when comparisons with other DBT systems are made.

  5. Characterization of prototype full-field breast tomosynthesis by using a CMOS array coupled with a columnar CsI(Tl) scintillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae-Gu; Park, Hye-Suk; Kim, Ye-Seul; Choi, Young-Wook; Ham, Tae-Hee; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2012-02-01

    We have developed a prototype full-field digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) system by using a complementary-metal-oxide semiconductive (CMOS) array coupled with a columnar CsI(Tl) scintillator. The imaging system consists of a matrix with an active detector area of 3072 × 3888 pixels and a pixel pitch of 74.8 µm. For tomosynthesis imaging, the X-ray tube is automatically rotated in 3° increments in the shoot mode to acquire projection images at 15 different angles over a ±21° angular range in less than 10 s. The digital detector is stationary during image acquisition. In this research, we also carried out evaluation studies to characterize the performance of the system in different operational modes designed for the DBT system, e.g., binning mode and the range of view angles, in terms of the modulation transfer function (MTF), the normalized noise power spectra (NNPS), and the detective quantum efficiency (DQE): The MTF value measured at the Nyquist frequency was 18.49%, the NNPS value at zero frequency was about 1.93 × 10-5 (mm2), and the maximum value of DQE was about 47.09% for the full resolution. For the pixel binning mode, the MTF decreased more than it did for the full resolution mode due to the increased effective pixel size. However, the full resolution mode was more sensitive to noise than the pixel binning mode. For the scan angle of the DBT system, oblique incidence of X-rays on a detector caused blurring that reduced resolution. These results seem to be promising for the use of the DBT system in potential clinical applications and will provide important information when comparisons with other DBT systems are made.

  6. Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) to characterize MRI-detected additional lesions unidentified at targeted ultrasound in newly diagnosed breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preoperative breast magnetic resonance (MR) often generates additional suspicious findings needing further investigations. Targeted breast ultrasound (US) is the standard tool to characterize MR additional lesions. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the potential role of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) to characterize MR detected additional findings, unidentified at targeted breast US. This prospective study included women who a) had biopsy-proven, newly diagnosed breast cancers detected at conventional 2D mammography and/or US, referred to breast MR for tumour staging; and b) had DBT if additional MR findings were not detected at targeted ('second look') US. In 520 patients, MR identified 164 (in 114 women, 22 %) additional enhancing lesions. Targeted US identified 114/164 (69.5 %) of these, whereas 50/164 (30.5 %) remained unidentified. DBT identified 32/50 of these cases, increasing the overall characterization of MR detected additional findings to 89.0 % (146/164). Using DBT the identified lesions were significantly more likely to be malignant than benign MR-detected additional lesions (p = 0.04). DBT improves the characterization of additional MR findings not identified at targeted breast US in preoperative breast cancer staging. (orig.)

  7. Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) to characterize MRI-detected additional lesions unidentified at targeted ultrasound in newly diagnosed breast cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariscotti, Giovanna; Durando, Manuela; Regini, Elisa; Fornari, Alberto; Fonio, Paolo; Gandini, Giovanni [Breast Imaging Service, Radiology - University of Turin, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiotherapy, A.O.U. Citta della Salute e della Scienza, Torino (Italy); Houssami, Nehmat [University of Sydney, Screening and Test Evaluation Program, School of Public Health, Sydney Medical School, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Campanino, Pier Paolo [Ospedale Koelliker, Breast Imaging Service, Torino (Italy); Bussone, Riccardo [A.O.U. Citta della Salute e della Scienza of Turin, SSCVD Breast Surgery. Department of Surgery, Torino (Italy); Castellano, Isabella; Sapino, Anna [University of Turin, Department of Biomedical Sciences and Human Oncology, A.O.U. Citta della Salute e della Scienza, Torino (Italy)

    2015-09-15

    Preoperative breast magnetic resonance (MR) often generates additional suspicious findings needing further investigations. Targeted breast ultrasound (US) is the standard tool to characterize MR additional lesions. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the potential role of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) to characterize MR detected additional findings, unidentified at targeted breast US. This prospective study included women who a) had biopsy-proven, newly diagnosed breast cancers detected at conventional 2D mammography and/or US, referred to breast MR for tumour staging; and b) had DBT if additional MR findings were not detected at targeted ('second look') US. In 520 patients, MR identified 164 (in 114 women, 22 %) additional enhancing lesions. Targeted US identified 114/164 (69.5 %) of these, whereas 50/164 (30.5 %) remained unidentified. DBT identified 32/50 of these cases, increasing the overall characterization of MR detected additional findings to 89.0 % (146/164). Using DBT the identified lesions were significantly more likely to be malignant than benign MR-detected additional lesions (p = 0.04). DBT improves the characterization of additional MR findings not identified at targeted breast US in preoperative breast cancer staging. (orig.)

  8. Breast tomosynthesis and digital mammography: a comparison of breast cancer visibility and BIRADS classification in a population of cancers with subtle mammographic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main purpose was to compare breast cancer visibility in one-view breast tomosynthesis (BT) to cancer visibility in one- or two-view digital mammography (DM). Thirty-six patients were selected on the basis of subtle signs of breast cancer on DM. One-view BT was performed with the same compression angle as the DM image in which the finding was least/not visible. On BT, 25 projections images were acquired over an angular range of 50 degrees, with double the dose of one-view DM. Two expert breast imagers classified one- and two-view DM, and BT findings for cancer visibility and BIRADS cancer probability in a non-blinded consensus study. Forty breast cancers were found in 37 breasts. The cancers were rated more visible on BT compared to one-view and two-view DM in 22 and 11 cases, respectively, (p<0.01 for both comparisons). Comparing one-view DM to one-view BT, 21 patients were upgraded on BIRADS classification (p<0.01). Comparing two-view DM to one-view BT, 12 patients were upgraded on BIRADS classification (p<0.01). The results indicate that the cancer visibility on BT is superior to DM, which suggests that BT may have a higher sensitivity for breast cancer detection. (orig.)

  9. Digital breast tomosynthesis: studies of the effects of acquisition geometry on contrast-to-noise ratio and observer preference of low-contrast objects in breast phantom images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of acquisition geometry in digital breast tomosynthesis was evaluated with studies of contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) and observer preference. Contrast-detail (CD) test objects in 5 cm thick phantoms with breast-like backgrounds were imaged. Twelve different angular acquisitions (average glandular dose for each ∼1.1 mGy) were performed ranging from narrow angle 16° with 17 projection views (16d17p) to wide angle 64d17p. Focal slices of SART-reconstructed images of the CD arrays were selected for CNR computations and the reader preference study. For the latter, pairs of images obtained with different acquisition geometries were randomized and scored by 7 trained readers. The total scores for all images and readings for each acquisition geometry were compared as were the CNRs. In general, readers preferred images acquired with wide angle as opposed to narrow angle geometries. The mean percent preferred was highly correlated with tomosynthesis angle (R = 0.91). The highest scoring geometries were 60d21p (95%), 64d17p (80%), and 48d17p (72%); the lowest scoring were 16d17p (4%), 24d9p (17%) and 24d13p (33%). The measured CNRs for the various acquisitions showed much overlap but were overall highest for wide-angle acquisitions. Finally, the mean reader scores were well correlated with the mean CNRs (R = 0.83). (paper)

  10. The accuracy of digital breast tomosynthesis compared with coned compression magnification mammography in the assessment of abnormalities found on mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To compare the diagnostic accuracy of the digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) with coned compression magnification mammography (CCMM). Materials and methods: The study design included two reading sessions completed by seven experienced radiologists. In the first session, all readers read bilateral standard two-view mammograms and a CCMM view of the lesion before giving a combined score for assessment. In the second session, readers read bilateral standard two-view mammograms plus one-view DBT. The two reading sessions of the experiment were separated by at least 2 weeks to reduce the chance of reader memory of the images read in the previous session from influencing the performance in the subsequent session. Results: Three hundred and fifty-four lesions were assessed and receiver-operative characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to evaluate the difference between the two modes. For standard two-view mammography plus CCMM, the area under the curve (AUC) was 0.87 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.83–0.91] and for standard two-view mammography plus DBT the AUC was 0.93 (95% CI: 0.91–0.95). The difference between the AUCs was 0.06 with p-value of 0.0014. Conclusion: Two-view mammography with one-view DBT showed significantly improved accuracy compared to two-view mammography and CCMM in the assessment of mammographic abnormalities. These results show that DBT can be used effectively in the further evaluation of mammographic abnormalities found at screening and in symptomatic diagnostic practice. - Highlights: • Diagnostic accuracy of magnification mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis. • There is statistical difference between CCMM and DBT. • DBT has a role in evaluating mammographic abnormalities

  11. Identification of error making patterns in lesion detection on digital breast tomosynthesis using computer-extracted image features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mengyu; Zhang, Jing; Grimm, Lars J.; Ghate, Sujata V.; Walsh, Ruth; Johnson, Karen S.; Lo, Joseph Y.; Mazurowski, Maciej A.

    2016-03-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) can improve lesion visibility by eliminating the issue of overlapping breast tissue present in mammography. However, this new modality likely requires new approaches to training. The issue of training in DBT is not well explored. We propose a computer-aided educational approach for DBT training. Our hypothesis is that the trainees' educational outcomes will improve if they are presented with cases individually selected to address their weaknesses. In this study, we focus on the question of how to select such cases. Specifically, we propose an algorithm that based on previously acquired reading data predicts which lesions will be missed by the trainee for future cases (i.e., we focus on false negative error). A logistic regression classifier was used to predict the likelihood of trainee error and computer-extracted features were used as the predictors. Reader data from 3 expert breast imagers was used to establish the ground truth and reader data from 5 radiology trainees was used to evaluate the algorithm performance with repeated holdout cross validation. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was applied to measure the performance of the proposed individual trainee models. The preliminary experimental results for 5 trainees showed the individual trainee models were able to distinguish the lesions that would be detected from those that would be missed with the average area under the ROC curve of 0.639 (95% CI, 0.580-0.698). The proposed algorithm can be used to identify difficult cases for individual trainees.

  12. Changes in frequency of recall recommendations of examinations depicting cancer with the availability of either priors or digital breast tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, Christiane M.; Bandos, Andriy I.; Ganott, Marie A.; Catullo, Victor J.; Chough, Denise M.; Kelly, Amy E.; Shinde, Dilip D.; Sumkin, Jules H.; Wallace, Luisa P.; Nishikawa, Robert M.; Gur, David

    2016-03-01

    Performance changes in a binary environment when using additional information is affected only when changes in recommendations are made due to the additional information in question. In a recent study, we have shown that, contrary to general expectation, introducing prior examinations improved recall rates, but not sensitivity. In this study, we assessed cancer detection differences when prior examinations and/or digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) were made available to the radiologist. We identified a subset of 21 cancer cases with differences in the number of radiologists who recalled these cases after reviewing either a prior examination or DBT. For the cases with differences in recommendations after viewing either priors or DBT, separately, we evaluated the total number of readers that changed their recommendations, regardless of the specific radiologist in question. Confidence intervals for the number of readers and a test for the hypothesis of no difference was performed using the non-parameteric bootstrap approach addressing both case and reader-related sources of variability by resampling cases and readers. With the addition of priors, there were 14 cancer cases (out of 15) where the number of "recalling radiologists" decreased. With the addition of DBT, the number of "recalling radiologists" decreased in only five cases (out of 15) while increasing in the remaining 9 cases. Unlike most new approaches to breast imaging DBT seems to improve both recall rates and cancer detection rates. Changes in recommendations were noted by all radiologists for all cancers by type, size, and breast density.

  13. Visibility of microcalcification clusters and masses in breast tomosynthesis image volumes and digital mammography: A 4AFC human observer study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the visibility of simulated lesions in digital breast tomosynthesis (BT) image volumes compared with 2D digital mammography (DM). Methods: Simulated lesions (masses and microcalcifications) were added to images of the same women acquired on a DM system (Mammomat Novation, Siemens) and a BT prototype. The same beam quality was used for the DM and BT acquisitions. The total absorbed dose resulting from a 25-projection BT acquisition and reconstruction (BT25) was approximately twice that of a single DM view. By excluding every other projection image from the reconstruction (BT13), approximately the same dose as in DM was effected. Simulated microcalcifications were digitally added with varying contrast to the DM and BT images. Simulated masses with 8 mm diameter were also added to BT images. A series of 4-alternative forced choice (4AFC) human observer experiments were conducted. Four medical physicists participated in all experiments, each consisting of 60 trials per experimental condition. The observers interpreted the BT image volumes in cine-mode at a fixed image sequence speed. The required threshold contrast (St) to achieve a detectability index (d') of 2.5 (i.e., 92.5% correct decisions) was determined. Results: The St for mass detection in DM was approximately a factor of 2 higher than required in BT indicating that the detection of masses was improved under BT conditions compared to DM. St for microcalcification detection was higher for BT than for DM at both BT dose levels (BT25 and BT13), with a statistically significant difference in St between DM and BT13. These results indicate a dose-dependent decrease in detection performance in BT for detection of microcalcifications. Conclusions: In agreement with previous investigations, masses of size 8 mm can be detected with less contrast in BT than in DM indicating improved detection performance for BT. However, for the investigated microcalcifications, the results of this study indicate

  14. Combination of one-view digital breast tomosynthesis with one-view digital mammography versus standard two-view digital mammography: per lesion analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the clinical value of combining one-view mammography (cranio-caudal, CC) with the complementary view tomosynthesis (mediolateral-oblique, MLO) in comparison to standard two-view mammography (MX) in terms of both lesion detection and characterization. A free-response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) experiment was conducted independently by six breast radiologists, obtaining data from 463 breasts of 250 patients. Differences in mean lesion detection fraction (LDF) and mean lesion characterization fraction (LCF) were analysed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) to compare clinical performance of the combination of techniques to standard two-view digital mammography. The 463 cases (breasts) reviewed included 258 with one to three lesions each, and 205 with no lesions. The 258 cases with lesions included 77 cancers in 68 breasts and 271 benign lesions to give a total of 348 proven lesions. The combination, DBT(MLO)+MX(CC), was superior to MX (CC+MLO) in both lesion detection (LDF) and lesion characterization (LCF) overall and for benign lesions. DBT(MLO)+MX(CC) was non-inferior to two-view MX for malignant lesions. This study shows that readers' capabilities in detecting and characterizing breast lesions are improved by combining single-view digital breast tomosynthesis and single-view mammography compared to two-view digital mammography. (orig.)

  15. Combination of one-view digital breast tomosynthesis with one-view digital mammography versus standard two-view digital mammography: per lesion analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gennaro, Gisella; Bezzon, Elisabetta; Pescarini, Luigi; Polico, Ilaria; Proietti, Alessandro; Baldan, Enrica; Pomerri, Fabio; Muzzio, Pier Carlo [Veneto Institute of Oncology (IRCCS), Padua (Italy); Hendrick, R.E. [University of Colorado-Denver, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Aurora, CO (United States); Toledano, Alicia [Biostatistics Consulting, LLC, Kensington, MD (United States); Paquelet, Jean R. [Advanced Medical Imaging Consultants, Fort Collins, CO (United States); Breast Imaging, McKee Medical Center, Loveland, CO (United States); Chersevani, Roberta [Private Medical Practice, Gorizia (Italy); Di Maggio, Cosimo [Private Medical Practice, Padua (Italy); La Grassa, Manuela [Department of Radiology, Oncological Reference Center (IRCCS), Aviano (Italy)

    2013-08-15

    To evaluate the clinical value of combining one-view mammography (cranio-caudal, CC) with the complementary view tomosynthesis (mediolateral-oblique, MLO) in comparison to standard two-view mammography (MX) in terms of both lesion detection and characterization. A free-response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) experiment was conducted independently by six breast radiologists, obtaining data from 463 breasts of 250 patients. Differences in mean lesion detection fraction (LDF) and mean lesion characterization fraction (LCF) were analysed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) to compare clinical performance of the combination of techniques to standard two-view digital mammography. The 463 cases (breasts) reviewed included 258 with one to three lesions each, and 205 with no lesions. The 258 cases with lesions included 77 cancers in 68 breasts and 271 benign lesions to give a total of 348 proven lesions. The combination, DBT{sub (MLO)}+MX{sub (CC)}, was superior to MX (CC+MLO) in both lesion detection (LDF) and lesion characterization (LCF) overall and for benign lesions. DBT{sub (MLO)}+MX{sub (CC)} was non-inferior to two-view MX for malignant lesions. This study shows that readers' capabilities in detecting and characterizing breast lesions are improved by combining single-view digital breast tomosynthesis and single-view mammography compared to two-view digital mammography. (orig.)

  16. Amorphous In–Ga–Zn–O thin-film transistor active pixel sensor x-ray imager for digital breast tomosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The breast cancer detection rate for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is limited by the x-ray image quality. The limiting Nyquist frequency for current DBT systems is around 5 lp/mm, while the fine image details contained in the high spatial frequency region (>5 lp/mm) are lost. Also today the tomosynthesis patient dose is high (0.67–3.52 mGy). To address current issues, in this paper, for the first time, a high-resolution low-dose organic photodetector/amorphous In–Ga–Zn–O thin-film transistor (a-IGZO TFT) active pixel sensor (APS) x-ray imager is proposed for next generation DBT systems. Methods: The indirect x-ray detector is based on a combination of a novel low-cost organic photodiode (OPD) and a cesium iodide-based (CsI:Tl) scintillator. The proposed APS x-ray imager overcomes the difficulty of weak signal detection, when small pixel size and low exposure conditions are used, by an on-pixel signal amplification with a significant charge gain. The electrical performance of a-IGZO TFT APS pixel circuit is investigated by SPICE simulation using modified Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) TFT model. Finally, the noise, detective quantum efficiency (DQE), and resolvability of the complete system are modeled using the cascaded system formalism. Results: The result demonstrates that a large charge gain of 31–122 is achieved for the proposed high-mobility (5–20 cm2/V s) amorphous metal-oxide TFT APS. The charge gain is sufficient to eliminate the TFT thermal noise, flicker noise as well as the external readout circuit noise. Moreover, the low TFT (<10−13 A) and OPD (<10−8 A/cm2) leakage currents can further reduce the APS noise. Cascaded system analysis shows that the proposed APS imager with a 75 μm pixel pitch can effectively resolve the Nyquist frequency of 6.67 lp/mm, which can be further improved to ∼10 lp/mm if the pixel pitch is reduced to 50 μm. Moreover, the detector entrance exposure per

  17. Amorphous In–Ga–Zn–O thin-film transistor active pixel sensor x-ray imager for digital breast tomosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Chumin; Kanicki, Jerzy, E-mail: kanicki@eecs.umich.edu [Solid-State Electronic Laboratory, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: The breast cancer detection rate for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is limited by the x-ray image quality. The limiting Nyquist frequency for current DBT systems is around 5 lp/mm, while the fine image details contained in the high spatial frequency region (>5 lp/mm) are lost. Also today the tomosynthesis patient dose is high (0.67–3.52 mGy). To address current issues, in this paper, for the first time, a high-resolution low-dose organic photodetector/amorphous In–Ga–Zn–O thin-film transistor (a-IGZO TFT) active pixel sensor (APS) x-ray imager is proposed for next generation DBT systems. Methods: The indirect x-ray detector is based on a combination of a novel low-cost organic photodiode (OPD) and a cesium iodide-based (CsI:Tl) scintillator. The proposed APS x-ray imager overcomes the difficulty of weak signal detection, when small pixel size and low exposure conditions are used, by an on-pixel signal amplification with a significant charge gain. The electrical performance of a-IGZO TFT APS pixel circuit is investigated by SPICE simulation using modified Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) TFT model. Finally, the noise, detective quantum efficiency (DQE), and resolvability of the complete system are modeled using the cascaded system formalism. Results: The result demonstrates that a large charge gain of 31–122 is achieved for the proposed high-mobility (5–20 cm{sup 2}/V s) amorphous metal-oxide TFT APS. The charge gain is sufficient to eliminate the TFT thermal noise, flicker noise as well as the external readout circuit noise. Moreover, the low TFT (<10{sup −13} A) and OPD (<10{sup −8} A/cm{sup 2}) leakage currents can further reduce the APS noise. Cascaded system analysis shows that the proposed APS imager with a 75 μm pixel pitch can effectively resolve the Nyquist frequency of 6.67 lp/mm, which can be further improved to ∼10 lp/mm if the pixel pitch is reduced to 50 μm. Moreover, the

  18. Characterization of masses in digital breast tomosynthesis: Comparison of machine learning in projection views and reconstructed slices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), quasi-three-dimensional (3D) structural information is reconstructed from a small number of 2D projection view (PV) mammograms acquired over a limited angular range. The authors developed preliminary computer-aided diagnosis (CADx) methods for classification of malignant and benign masses and compared the effectiveness of analyzing lesion characteristics in the reconstructed DBT slices and in the PVs. Methods: A data set of MLO view DBT of 99 patients containing 107 masses (56 malignant and 51 benign) was collected at the Massachusetts General Hospital with IRB approval. The DBTs were obtained with a GE prototype system which acquired 11 PVs over a 50 deg. arc. The authors reconstructed the DBTs at 1 mm slice interval using a simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique. The region of interest (ROI) containing the mass was marked by a radiologist in the DBT volume and the corresponding ROIs on the PVs were derived based on the imaging geometry. The subsequent processes were fully automated. For classification of masses using the DBT-slice approach, the mass on each slice was segmented by an active contour model initialized with adaptive k-means clustering. A spiculation likelihood map was generated by analysis of the gradient directions around the mass margin and spiculation features were extracted from the map. The rubber band straightening transform (RBST) was applied to a band of pixels around the segmented mass boundary. The RBST image was enhanced by Sobel filtering in the horizontal and vertical directions, from which run-length statistics texture features were extracted. Morphological features including those from the normalized radial length were designed to describe the mass shape. A feature space composed of the spiculation features, texture features, and morphological features extracted from the central slice alone and seven feature spaces obtained by averaging the corresponding features from three to 19

  19. The development of a pseudo-3D imaging system (tomosynthesis) for security screening of passenger baggage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a study investigating the potential of tomosynthesis as a post check-in baggage scanning system. A laboratory system has been constructed consisting of a moveable source and detector, arranged around a mini 90o bend conveyor system, from which multiple projection images can be collected. Simulation code has been developed to allow the optimum source and detector positions to be determined. Reconstruction methods are being developed to modify the Shift-And-Add (SAA) algorithm to accommodate the non-typical imaging geometry.

  20. 50 μm pixel pitch wafer-scale CMOS active pixel sensor x-ray detector for digital breast tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, C.; Konstantinidis, A. C.; Zheng, Y.; Anaxagoras, T.; Speller, R. D.; Kanicki, J.

    2015-12-01

    Wafer-scale CMOS active pixel sensors (APSs) have been developed recently for x-ray imaging applications. The small pixel pitch and low noise are very promising properties for medical imaging applications such as digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). In this work, we evaluated experimentally and through modeling the imaging properties of a 50 μm pixel pitch CMOS APS x-ray detector named DynAMITe (Dynamic Range Adjustable for Medical Imaging Technology). A modified cascaded system model was developed for CMOS APS x-ray detectors by taking into account the device nonlinear signal and noise properties. The imaging properties such as modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) were extracted from both measurements and the nonlinear cascaded system analysis. The results show that the DynAMITe x-ray detector achieves a high spatial resolution of 10 mm-1 and a DQE of around 0.5 at spatial frequencies  CMOS APS x-ray detector, image aquisition geometry and image reconstruction techniques should be considered.

  1. Development of a stationary chest tomosynthesis system using carbon nanotube x-ray source array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Jing

    X-ray imaging system has shown its usefulness for providing quick and easy access of imaging in both clinic settings and emergency situations. It greatly improves the workflow in hospitals. However, the conventional radiography systems, lacks 3D information in the images. The tissue overlapping issue in the 2D projection image result in low sensitivity and specificity. Both computed tomography and digital tomosynthesis, the two conventional 3D imaging modalities, requires a complex gantry to mechanically translate the x-ray source to various positions. Over the past decade, our research group has developed a carbon nanotube (CNT) based x-ray source technology. The CNT x-ray sources allows compacting multiple x-ray sources into a single x-ray tube. Each individual x-ray source in the source array can be electronically switched. This technology allows development of stationary tomographic imaging modalities without any complex mechanical gantries. The goal of this work is to develop a stationary digital chest tomosynthesis (s-DCT) system, and implement it for a clinical trial. The feasibility of s-DCT was investigated. It is found that the CNT source array can provide sufficient x-ray output for chest imaging. Phantom images have shown comparable image qualities as conventional DCT. The s-DBT system was then used to study the effects of source array configurations and tomosynthesis image quality, and the feasibility of a physiological gated s-DCT. Using physical measures for spatial resolution, the 2D source configuration was shown to have improved depth resolution and comparable in-plane resolution. The prospective gated tomosynthesis images have shown substantially reduction of image blur associated with lung motions. The system was also used to investigate the feasibility of using s-DCT as a diagnosis and monitoring tools for cystic fibrosis patients. A new scatter reduction methods for s-DCT was also studied. Finally, a s-DCT system was constructed by

  2. Large area CMOS active pixel sensor x-ray imager for digital breast tomosynthesis: Analysis, modeling, and characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Chumin; Kanicki, Jerzy, E-mail: kanicki@eecs.umich.edu [Solid-State Electronics Laboratory, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Konstantinidis, Anastasios C. [Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, University College London, London WC1E 6BT, United Kingdom and Diagnostic Radiology and Radiation Protection, Christie Medical Physics and Engineering, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester M20 4BX (United Kingdom); Patel, Tushita [Department of Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22908 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Large area x-ray imagers based on complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensor (APS) technology have been proposed for various medical imaging applications including digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). The low electronic noise (50–300 e{sup −}) of CMOS APS x-ray imagers provides a possible route to shrink the pixel pitch to smaller than 75 μm for microcalcification detection and possible reduction of the DBT mean glandular dose (MGD). Methods: In this study, imaging performance of a large area (29 × 23 cm{sup 2}) CMOS APS x-ray imager [Dexela 2923 MAM (PerkinElmer, London)] with a pixel pitch of 75 μm was characterized and modeled. The authors developed a cascaded system model for CMOS APS x-ray imagers using both a broadband x-ray radiation and monochromatic synchrotron radiation. The experimental data including modulation transfer function, noise power spectrum, and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) were theoretically described using the proposed cascaded system model with satisfactory consistency to experimental results. Both high full well and low full well (LFW) modes of the Dexela 2923 MAM CMOS APS x-ray imager were characterized and modeled. The cascaded system analysis results were further used to extract the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) for microcalcifications with sizes of 165–400 μm at various MGDs. The impact of electronic noise on CNR was also evaluated. Results: The LFW mode shows better DQE at low air kerma (K{sub a} < 10 μGy) and should be used for DBT. At current DBT applications, air kerma (K{sub a} ∼ 10 μGy, broadband radiation of 28 kVp), DQE of more than 0.7 and ∼0.3 was achieved using the LFW mode at spatial frequency of 0.5 line pairs per millimeter (lp/mm) and Nyquist frequency ∼6.7 lp/mm, respectively. It is shown that microcalcifications of 165–400 μm in size can be resolved using a MGD range of 0.3–1 mGy, respectively. In comparison to a General Electric GEN2 prototype DBT system (at

  3. Performance comparison of single-view digital breast tomosynthesis plus single-view digital mammography with two-view digital mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the performance of combined single-view mediolateral oblique (MLO) digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) plus single-view cranio-caudal (CC) mammography (MX) compared with that of standard two-view digital mammography. A multi-reader multi-case (MRMC) receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) study was conducted, involving six breast radiologists. Two hundred fifty patients underwent bilateral MX and DBT imaging. MX and DBT images with the adjunct of the CC-MX view from 469 breasts were evaluated and rated independently by six readers. Differences in mean areas under the ROC curves (AUCs), mean sensitivity and mean specificity were analysed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) to assess clinical performance. The combined technique was found to be non-inferior to standard two-view mammography (MX(CC+MLO)) in mean AUC (difference: +0.021;95 % LCL = -0.011), but was not statistically significant for superiority (P = 0.197). The combined technique had equivalent sensitivity to standard mammography (76.2 % vs. 72.8 %, P = 0.269) and equivalent specificity (84.9 % vs. 83.0 %, P = 0.130). Specificity for benign lesions was significantly higher with the combination of techniques versus mammography (45.6 % vs. 36.8 %, P = 0.002). In this enriched study population, the combination of single-view MLO tomosynthesis plus single-view CC mammography was non-inferior to that of standard two-view digital mammography in terms of ROC curve area, sensitivity and specificity. circle Breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has emerged as a valuable adjunct to mammography (MX). (orig.)

  4. Performance comparison of single-view digital breast tomosynthesis plus single-view digital mammography with two-view digital mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gennaro, Gisella; Pescarini, Luigi; Polico, Ilaria; Proietti, Alessandro; Baldan, Enrica; Bezzon, Elisabetta; Pomerri, Fabio; Muzzio, Pier Carlo [Veneto Institute of Oncology (IOV)-IRCCS, Padua (Italy); Hendrick, R.E. [University of Colorado-Denver, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Aurora, CO (United States); Ruppel, Patricia [Innovative Analytics, Kalamazoo, MI (United States); Chersevani, Roberta [Private Clinical Practice, Gorizia (Italy); Di Maggio, Cosimo [Private Clinical Practice, Padua (Italy); La Grassa, Manuela [Oncological Reference Center (CRO)-IRCCS, Aviano, (Pordenone) (Italy)

    2013-03-15

    To determine the performance of combined single-view mediolateral oblique (MLO) digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) plus single-view cranio-caudal (CC) mammography (MX) compared with that of standard two-view digital mammography. A multi-reader multi-case (MRMC) receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) study was conducted, involving six breast radiologists. Two hundred fifty patients underwent bilateral MX and DBT imaging. MX and DBT images with the adjunct of the CC-MX view from 469 breasts were evaluated and rated independently by six readers. Differences in mean areas under the ROC curves (AUCs), mean sensitivity and mean specificity were analysed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) to assess clinical performance. The combined technique was found to be non-inferior to standard two-view mammography (MX{sub (CC+MLO)}) in mean AUC (difference: +0.021;95 % LCL = -0.011), but was not statistically significant for superiority (P = 0.197). The combined technique had equivalent sensitivity to standard mammography (76.2 % vs. 72.8 %, P = 0.269) and equivalent specificity (84.9 % vs. 83.0 %, P = 0.130). Specificity for benign lesions was significantly higher with the combination of techniques versus mammography (45.6 % vs. 36.8 %, P = 0.002). In this enriched study population, the combination of single-view MLO tomosynthesis plus single-view CC mammography was non-inferior to that of standard two-view digital mammography in terms of ROC curve area, sensitivity and specificity. circle Breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has emerged as a valuable adjunct to mammography (MX). (orig.)

  5. 50 μm pixel pitch wafer-scale CMOS active pixel sensor x-ray detector for digital breast tomosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wafer-scale CMOS active pixel sensors (APSs) have been developed recently for x-ray imaging applications. The small pixel pitch and low noise are very promising properties for medical imaging applications such as digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). In this work, we evaluated experimentally and through modeling the imaging properties of a 50 μm pixel pitch CMOS APS x-ray detector named DynAMITe (Dynamic Range Adjustable for Medical Imaging Technology). A modified cascaded system model was developed for CMOS APS x-ray detectors by taking into account the device nonlinear signal and noise properties. The imaging properties such as modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) were extracted from both measurements and the nonlinear cascaded system analysis. The results show that the DynAMITe x-ray detector achieves a high spatial resolution of 10 mm−1 and a DQE of around 0.5 at spatial frequencies  <1 mm−1. In addition, the modeling results were used to calculate the image signal-to-noise ratio (SNRi) of microcalcifications at various mean glandular dose (MGD). For an average breast (5 cm thickness, 50% glandular fraction), 165 μm microcalcifications can be distinguished at a MGD of 27% lower than the clinical value (∼1.3 mGy). To detect 100 μm microcalcifications, further optimizations of the CMOS APS x-ray detector, image aquisition geometry and image reconstruction techniques should be considered. (paper)

  6. Calibration of x-ray digital tomosynthesis system including the compensation for image distortion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Young Jun; Koh, Kuk Won; Cho, Hyungsuck; Kim, Jin-Young; Kim, Hyung C.; Byun, Jong-Eun

    1998-10-01

    X-ray laminography and DT (digital tomosynthesis) are promising technologies to form a cross-section image of 3D objects and can be a good solution for inspection interior defects of industrial products. It has been known that digital tomosynthesis method has several advantages over laminography method in that it can overcome the problems such as blurring effect or artifact. The DT system consists of a scanning x-ray tube, an image intensifier as an x-ray image detector, and a CCD camera. To acquire an x-ray image of an arbitrary plane of objects, a set of images (8 images or more) should be synthesized by averaging or minimally calculating point by point. The images, however are distorted according to the configurations of the image intensifier and the x-ray source position. To get a clear and accurate synthesized image, the corresponding points in the distorted images should be accurately determined, and therefore, precise calibration of the DT system is needed to map the corresponding points correctly. In this work, a series of calibration methods for the DT system are presented including the correction of the center offset between the x-ray and the image intensifer, the x-ray steering calibration, and the correction of the distortion of the image. The calibration models are implemented to the DT system and the experiment results are presented and discussed in detail.

  7. X-ray induced formation of γ-H2AX foci after full-field digital mammography and digital breast-tomosynthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siegfried A Schwab

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To determine in-vivo formation of x-ray induced γ-H2AX foci in systemic blood lymphocytes of patients undergoing full-field digital mammography (FFDM and to estimate foci after FFDM and digital breast-tomosynthesis (DBT using a biological phantom model. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study complies with the Declaration of Helsinki and was performed following approval by the ethic committee of the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg. Written informed consent was obtained from every patient. For in-vivo tests, systemic blood lymphocytes were obtained from 20 patients before and after FFDM. In order to compare in-vivo post-exposure with pre-exposure foci levels, the Wilcoxon matched pairs test was used. For in-vitro experiments, isolated blood lymphocytes from healthy volunteers were irradiated at skin and glandular level of a porcine breast using FFDM and DBT. Cells were stained against the phosphorylated histone variant γ-H2AX, and foci representing distinct DNA damages were quantified. RESULTS: Median in-vivo foci level/cell was 0.086 (range 0.067-0.116 before and 0.094 (0.076-0.126 after FFDM (p = 0.0004. In the in-vitro model, the median x-ray induced foci level/cell after FFDM was 0.120 (range 0.086-0.140 at skin level and 0.035 (range 0.030-0.050 at glandular level. After DBT, the median x-ray induced foci level/cell was 0.061 (range 0.040-0.081 at skin level and 0.015 (range 0.006-0.020 at glandular level. CONCLUSION: In patients, mammography induces a slight but significant increase of γ-H2AX foci in systemic blood lymphocytes. The introduced biological phantom model is suitable for the estimation of x-ray induced DNA damages in breast tissue in different breast imaging techniques.

  8. Volume imaging in fluoroscopy. A clinical prototype system based on a generalized digital tomosynthesis technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This work involves the development of a new digital tomosynthesis technique into a clinical prototype imaging system for the three-dimensional visualization of patient anatomy. Material and Methods: The multiple projection algorithm (MPA) has been developed into a clinical prototype imaging system comprising a digital chain that is interfaced with an isocentric fluoroscopic unit to form an integrated DTS facility. Planes of varying orientations can be synthesized retrospectively on the basis of an acquired set of appropriate projection images extending over the whole volume of interest. Results and Conclusion: The system provides an image reconstruction and processing facility that can effectively augment fluoroscopic examinations. Reconstruction times of a few seconds per plane have been achieved. The region of interest can be approached by tracking through cross-sections with user-selected orientations. Anatomical planes of particular interest can be identified and their reconstructed images can be stored. The characteristics of the image presentation modality have the potential to extend the field of current digital tomosynthesis applications to new areas in radiology and other clinical domains. (orig.)

  9. Comparative evaluation of average glandular dose and breast cancer detection between single-view digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) plus single-view digital mammography (DM) and two-view DM: correlation with breast thickness and density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Sung Ui; Chang, Jung Min; Bae, Min Sun; Lee, Su Hyun; Cho, Nariya; Seo, Mirinae; Kim, Won Hwa; Moon, Woo Kyung [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    To compare the average glandular dose (AGD) and diagnostic performance of mediolateral oblique (MLO) digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) plus cranio-caudal (CC) digital mammography (DM) with two-view DM, and to evaluate the correlation of AGD with breast thickness and density. MLO and CC DM and DBT images of both breasts were obtained in 149 subjects. AGDs of DBT and DM per exposure were recorded, and their correlation with breast thickness and density were evaluated. Paired data of MLO DBT plus CC DM and two-view DM were reviewed for presence of malignancy in a jack-knife alternative free-response ROC (JAFROC) method. The AGDs of both DBT and DM, and differences in AGD between DBT and DM (ΔAGD), were correlated with breast thickness and density. The average JAFROC figure of merit (FOM) was significantly higher on the combined technique than two-view DM (P = 0.005). In dense breasts, the FOM and sensitivity of the combined technique was higher than that of two-view DM (P = 0.003) with small ΔAGD. MLO DBT plus CC DM provided higher diagnostic performance than two-view DM in dense breasts with a small increase in AGD. (orig.)

  10. A comparison of the accuracy of film-screen mammography, full-field digital mammography, and digital breast tomosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To measure the change in diagnostic accuracy of conventional film-screen mammography and full-field digital mammography (FFDM) with the addition of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) in women recalled for assessment following routine screening. Materials and methods: Ethics approval for the study was granted. Women recalled for assessment following routine screening with screen-film mammography were invited to participate. Participants underwent bilateral, two-view FFDM and two-view DBT. Readers scored each lesion separately for probability of malignancy on screen-film mammography, FFDM, and then DBT. The scores were compared with the presence or absence of malignancy based on the final histopathology outcome. Results: Seven hundred and thirty-eight women participated (93.2% recruitment rate). Following assessment 204 (26.8%) were diagnosed as malignant (147 invasive and 57 in-situ tumours), 286 (37.68%) as benign, and 269 (35.4%) as normal. The diagnostic accuracy was evaluated by using receiving operating characteristic (ROC) and measurement of area under the curve (AUC). The AUC values demonstrated a significant (p = 0.0001) improvement in the diagnostic accuracy with the addition of DBT combined with FFDM and film-screen mammography (AUC = 0.9671) when compared to FFDM plus film-screen mammography (AUC = 0.8949) and film-screen mammography alone (AUC = 0.7882). The effect was significantly greater for soft-tissue lesions [AUC was 0.9905 with the addition of DBT and AUC was 0.9201 for FFDM with film-screen mammography combined (p = 0.0001)] compared to microcalcification [with the addition of DBT (AUC = 0.7920) and for FFDM with film-screen mammography combined (AUC = 0.7843; p = 0.3182)]. Conclusion: The addition of DBT increases the accuracy of mammography compared to FFDM and film-screen mammography combined and film-screen mammography alone in the assessment of screen-detected soft-tissue mammographic abnormalities.

  11. Synchrotron based planar imaging and digital tomosynthesis of breast and biopsy phantoms using a CMOS active pixel sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szafraniec, Magdalena B; Konstantinidis, Anastasios C; Tromba, Giuliana; Dreossi, Diego; Vecchio, Sara; Rigon, Luigi; Sodini, Nicola; Naday, Steve; Gunn, Spencer; McArthur, Alan; Olivo, Alessandro

    2015-03-01

    The SYRMEP (SYnchrotron Radiation for MEdical Physics) beamline at Elettra is performing the first mammography study on human patients using free-space propagation phase contrast imaging. The stricter spatial resolution requirements of this method currently force the use of conventional films or specialized computed radiography (CR) systems. This also prevents the implementation of three-dimensional (3D) approaches. This paper explores the use of an X-ray detector based on complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensor (APS) technology as a possible alternative, for acquisitions both in planar and tomosynthesis geometry. Results indicate higher quality of the images acquired with the synchrotron set-up in both geometries. This improvement can be partly ascribed to the use of parallel, collimated and monochromatic synchrotron radiation (resulting in scatter rejection, no penumbra-induced blurring and optimized X-ray energy), and partly to phase contrast effects. Even though the pixel size of the used detector is still too large - and thus suboptimal - for free-space propagation phase contrast imaging, a degree of phase-induced edge enhancement can clearly be observed in the images. PMID:25498332

  12. Applying a 2D based CAD scheme for detecting micro-calcification clusters using digital breast tomosynthesis images: an assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang Cheol; Zheng, Bin; Wang, Xiao-Hui; Gur, David

    2008-03-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has emerged as a promising imaging modality for screening mammography. However, visually detecting micro-calcification clusters depicted on DBT images is a difficult task. Computer-aided detection (CAD) schemes for detecting micro-calcification clusters depicted on mammograms can achieve high performance and the use of CAD results can assist radiologists in detecting subtle micro-calcification clusters. In this study, we compared the performance of an available 2D based CAD scheme with one that includes a new grouping and scoring method when applied to both projection and reconstructed DBT images. We selected a dataset involving 96 DBT examinations acquired on 45 women. Each DBT image set included 11 low dose projection images and a varying number of reconstructed image slices ranging from 18 to 87. In this dataset 20 true-positive micro-calcification clusters were visually detected on the projection images and 40 were visually detected on the reconstructed images, respectively. We first applied the CAD scheme that was previously developed in our laboratory to the DBT dataset. We then tested a new grouping method that defines an independent cluster by grouping the same cluster detected on different projection or reconstructed images. We then compared four scoring methods to assess the CAD performance. The maximum sensitivity level observed for the different grouping and scoring methods were 70% and 88% for the projection and reconstructed images with a maximum false-positive rate of 4.0 and 15.9 per examination, respectively. This preliminary study demonstrates that (1) among the maximum, the minimum or the average CAD generated scores, using the maximum score of the grouped cluster regions achieved the highest performance level, (2) the histogram based scoring method is reasonably effective in reducing false-positive detections on the projection images but the overall CAD sensitivity is lower due to lower signal-to-noise ratio

  13. X-ray digital intra-oral tomosynthesis for quasi-three-dimensional imaging: system, reconstruction algorithm, and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liang; Chen, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Ziran; Wu, Dufan

    2013-01-01

    At present, there are mainly three x-ray imaging modalities for dental clinical diagnosis: radiography, panorama and computed tomography (CT). We develop a new x-ray digital intra-oral tomosynthesis (IDT) system for quasi-three-dimensional dental imaging which can be seen as an intermediate modality between traditional radiography and CT. In addition to normal x-ray tube and digital sensor used in intra-oral radiography, IDT has a specially designed mechanical device to complete the tomosynthesis data acquisition. During the scanning, the measurement geometry is such that the sensor is stationary inside the patient's mouth and the x-ray tube moves along an arc trajectory with respect to the intra-oral sensor. Therefore, the projection geometry can be obtained without any other reference objects, which makes it be easily accepted in clinical applications. We also present a compressed sensing-based iterative reconstruction algorithm for this kind of intra-oral tomosynthesis. Finally, simulation and experiment were both carried out to evaluate this intra-oral imaging modality and algorithm. The results show that IDT has its potentiality to become a new tool for dental clinical diagnosis.

  14. Application of a computed tomography based cystic fibrosis scoring system to chest tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderman, Christina; Johnsson, Åse; Vikgren, Jenny; Rystedt, Hans; Ivarsson, Jonas; Rossi Norrlund, Rauni; Nyberg Andersson, Lena; Bâth, Magnus

    2013-03-01

    In the monitoring of progression of lung disease in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), recurrent computed tomography (CT) examinations are often used. The relatively new imaging technique chest tomosynthesis (CTS) may be an interesting alternative in the follow-up of these patients due to its visualization of the chest in slices at radiation doses and costs significantly lower than is the case with CT. A first step towards introducing CTS imaging in the diagnostics of CF patients is to establish a scoring system appropriate for evaluating the severity of CF pulmonary disease based on findings in CTS images. Previously, several such CF scoring systems based on CT imaging have been published. The purpose of the present study was to develop a CF scoring system for CTS, by starting from an existing scoring system dedicated for CT images and making modifications regarded necessary to make it appropriate for use with CTS images. In order to determine any necessary changes, three thoracic radiologists independently used a scoring system dedicated for CT on both CT and CTS images from CF patients. The results of the scoring were jointly evaluated by all the observers, which lead to suggestions for changes to the scoring system. Suggested modifications include excluding the scoring of air trapping and doing the scoring of the findings in quadrants of the image instead of in each lung lobe.

  15. Automatic segmentation of mammogram and tomosynthesis images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, Dusty; Park, Sun Young

    2016-03-01

    Breast cancer is a one of the most common forms of cancer in terms of new cases and deaths both in the United States and worldwide. However, the survival rate with breast cancer is high if it is detected and treated before it spreads to other parts of the body. The most common screening methods for breast cancer are mammography and digital tomosynthesis, which involve acquiring X-ray images of the breasts that are interpreted by radiologists. The work described in this paper is aimed at optimizing the presentation of mammography and tomosynthesis images to the radiologist, thereby improving the early detection rate of breast cancer and the resulting patient outcomes. Breast cancer tissue has greater density than normal breast tissue, and appears as dense white image regions that are asymmetrical between the breasts. These irregularities are easily seen if the breast images are aligned and viewed side-by-side. However, since the breasts are imaged separately during mammography, the images may be poorly centered and aligned relative to each other, and may not properly focus on the tissue area. Similarly, although a full three dimensional reconstruction can be created from digital tomosynthesis images, the same centering and alignment issues can occur for digital tomosynthesis. Thus, a preprocessing algorithm that aligns the breasts for easy side-by-side comparison has the potential to greatly increase the speed and accuracy of mammogram reading. Likewise, the same preprocessing can improve the results of automatic tissue classification algorithms for mammography. In this paper, we present an automated segmentation algorithm for mammogram and tomosynthesis images that aims to improve the speed and accuracy of breast cancer screening by mitigating the above mentioned problems. Our algorithm uses information in the DICOM header to facilitate preprocessing, and incorporates anatomical region segmentation and contour analysis, along with a hidden Markov model (HMM) for

  16. Task-based performance analysis of FBP, SART and ML for digital breast tomosynthesis using signal CNR and Channelised Hotelling Observers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Sompel, Dominique; Brady, Sir Michael; Boone, John

    2011-02-01

    We assess the performance of filtered backprojection (FBP), the simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART) and the maximum likelihood (ML) algorithm for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) under variations in key imaging parameters, including the number of iterations, number of projections, angular range, initial guess, and radiation dose. This is the first study to compare these algorithms for the application of DBT. We present a methodology for the evaluation of DBT reconstructions, and use it to conduct preliminary experiments investigating trade-offs between the selected imaging parameters. This investigation includes trade-offs not previously considered in the DBT literature, such as the use of a stationary detector versus a C-arm imaging geometry. A real breast CT volume serves as a ground truth digital phantom from which to simulate X-ray projections under the various acquisition parameters. The reconstructed image quality is measured using task-based metrics, namely signal CNR and the AUC of a Channelised Hotelling Observer with Laguerre-Gauss basis functions. The task at hand is the detection of a simulated mass inserted into the breast CT volume. We find that the image quality in limited view tomography is highly dependent on the particular acquisition and reconstruction parameters used. In particular, we draw the following conclusions. First, we find that optimising the FBP filter design and SART relaxation parameter yields significant improvements in reconstruction quality from the same projection data. Second, we show that the convergence rate of the maximum likelihood algorithm, optimised with paraboloidal surrogates and conjugate gradient ascent (ML-PSCG), can be greatly accelerated using view-by-view updates. Third, we find that the optimal initial guess is algorithm dependent. In particular, we obtained best results with a zero initial guess for SART, and an FBP initial guess for ML-PSCG. Fourth, when the exposure per view is constant

  17. Comparative study of patient doses calculated with two methods for breast digital tomosynthesis; Estudio de los valores de dosis a pacientes en examenes de tomosintesis de mama estimados con dos metodos distintos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo, M.; Chevalier, M.; Calzado, A.; Garayo, J.; Valverde, J.

    2015-07-01

    In this study, the average glandular doses (DG) delivered in breast tomosynthesis examinations were estimated over a sample of 150 patients using two different methods. In method 1, the conversion factors air-kerma to DG used were those tabulated by Dance et al. and in method 2 were the ones from Feng et al. The protocol for the examination followed in the unit of this study consists in two views per breast, each view composed by a 2D acquisition and a tomosynthesis scan (3D). The resulting DG values from both methods present statistically significant differences (p=0.02) for the 2D modality and were similar for the 3D scan (p=0.22). The estimated median value of DG for the most frequent breasts (thicknesses between 50 and 60 mm) delivered in a single 3D acquisition is 1.7 mGy (36% and 17% higher than the value for the 2D mode estimated with each method) which lies far below the tolerances established by the Spanish Protocol Quality Control in Radiodiagnostic (2011). The total DG for a tomosynthesis examination (6.0 mGy) is a factor 2.4 higher than the dose delivered in a 2D examination with two views (method 1). (Author)

  18. Glandular dose in breast tomosynthesis examinations: Preliminary study with a sample of patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to analyze the mean glandular dose administered to a group of patients with a tomography system (Selenia Dimensions) service installed on a large hospital in which routine tests are done and screening. (Author)

  19. Measurement of slice thickness and in-plane resolution on radiographic tomosynthesis system using modulation transfer function (MTF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baojun; Saunders, Rowland; Uppaluri, Renuka

    2006-03-01

    A novel method to measure in-plane resolution (modulation transfer function, or MTF) and slice thickness (slice sensitivity profile, or SSP) of a digital radiographic tomosynthesis system is presented. With this method, one can measure these two important system IQ characteristics simultaneously without suffering from incontinuous sampling, aliasing, and partial volume effect as do the existing methods. The method is based on imaging a shallow-angled slice ramp phantom. The MTF is measured as the HWHM of the Fourier transformation of the first derivative of edge profiles. The HWHM corresponding to the sharpest of edge profile represents the in-plane resolution of the system, and the slice thickness of the system is determined from the HWHM vs. z-distance curve. The in-plane resolution result has been confirmed by the measurement from an animal skull specimen. The experiment results have shown that, for a typical 40-degree sweep, 61 projections, and using a Specialized Filtered Backprojection (SFBP) algorithm, the in-plane resolution of the measured system is close to 1 lp/mm (as measured by the HWHM of MTF), and effective slice thickness is 1.7 mm and 4.0 mm at HWHM and HW3TM, respectively. It is also observed that, while the in-plane resolution remains constant between planes at 7 cm and 30 cm above the detector plane, SSP has increased (i.e., slice thickness increased) 20% on average with the increase of the plane height. We demonstrate one of the applications of the method to optimize the sweep angle of a tomosynthesis system. The results show that, in a typical angular range from 20 to 60 degrees, the increase in sweep angle can intrinsically reduce slice thickness but less significantly impact in-plane resolution.

  20. The value analysis and guidance of digital breast tomosynthesis for breast cancer scr eening and radical surgery breast augmentation surgery%数字乳腺断层摄影技术用于乳癌筛查的价值分析及对根治术后隆乳术的指导

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡冬鹭; 蔡思清; 颜丽笙; 颜建湘

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨数字乳腺断层摄影技术(digital breast tomosynthesis,DBT)在乳癌筛查及其根治术后隆乳术中的临床诊断价值。方法:对在我院进行检查的1837例女性资料进行分析,入院后采用数字乳腺断层摄影技术对其检测,分析数字乳腺断层摄影技术在乳腺癌中的检出率及其根治手术隆乳的指导,评价其对乳腺癌检出率的敏感度。结果:455例少量腺体型,BI-ARDS分类中117例1级,192例3级,76例2级;1051例多量腺体型,BI-ARDS分类中452例1级,319例3级,99例2级;194例致密性,BI-ARDS分类中71例3级,55例1级,44例2级;194例脂肪型,BI-ARDS分类中52例5级,36例3级;数字乳腺断层摄影技术中检出55例乳腺癌,患者年龄为(29~72)岁,检出率为2.99%(55/1837),其中4例间歇期癌。55例乳腺癌患者均手术治疗。数字乳腺断层摄影技术敏感度为93.22%(55/59)。对于确诊的55例患者均采用根治手术治疗,患者中53例治疗效果理想,治愈率为96.4%。结论:数字乳腺断层摄影技术在女性乳腺癌筛查中效果理想,检出率高,对于多量腺体型以及致密型乳腺可以联合其他方法进行筛查,并且这种方法对根治术后隆乳手术的指导有一定意义,值得推广使用。%Objective To explore the digital breast tomosynthesis(digital breast tomosynthesis,DBT) screening and diagnosis of breast augmentation surgery clinical value in its cure. Methods In our hospital examination were analyzed 1837 cases of women after admission digital breast tomosynthesis its detection, analysis,digital breast tomosynthesis in breast cancer detection rate of breast augmentation surgery and radical guide to evaluate the sensitivity of the detection rate of breast cancer. Results 455 cases a small amount of glandular type,BI-ARDS classification of 117 cases of grade 1 and grade 3 192 cases,76 cases of 2;1 051 cases of large

  1. Breast manifestations of systemic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilaveri CA

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Christina A Dilaveri, Maire Brid Mac Bride, Nicole P Sandhu, Lonzetta Neal, Karthik Ghosh, Dietlind L Wahner-RoedlerDivision of General Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USAAbstract: Although much emphasis has been placed on the primary presentations of breast cancer, little focus has been placed on how systemic illnesses may affect the breast. In this article, we discuss systemic illnesses that can manifest in the breast. We summarize the clinical features, imaging, histopathology, and treatment recommendations for endocrine, vascular, systemic inflammatory, infectious, and hematologic diseases, as well as for the extramammary malignancies that can present in the breast. Despite the rarity of these manifestations of systemic disease, knowledge of these conditions is critical to the appropriate evaluation and treatment of patients presenting with breast symptoms.Keywords: breast, endocrine, hematologic, infectious, vascular

  2. A mathematical model platform for optimizing a multiprojection breast imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Amarpreet S; Samei, Ehsan; Saunders, Robert S; Lo, Joseph Y; Baker, Jay A

    2008-04-01

    Multiprojection imaging is a technique in which a plurality of digital radiographic images of the same patient are acquired within a short interval of time from slightly different angles. Information from each image is combined to determine the final diagnosis. Projection data are either reconstructed into slices as in the case of tomosynthesis or analyzed directly as in the case of multiprojection correlation imaging technique, thereby avoiding reconstruction artifacts. In this study, the authors investigated the optimum geometry of acquisitions of a multiprojection breast correlation imaging system in terms of the number of projections and their total angular span that yield maximum performance in a task that models clinical decision. Twenty-five angular projections of each breast from 82 human subjects in our breast tomosynthesis database were each supplemented with a simulated 3 mm mass. An approach based on Laguerre-Gauss channelized Hotelling observer was developed to assess the detectability of the mass in terms of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Two methodologies were developed to integrate results from individual projections into one combined ROC curve as the overall figure of merit. To optimize the acquisition geometry, different components of acquisitions were changed to investigate which one of the many possible configurations maximized the area under the combined ROC curve. Optimization was investigated under two acquisition dose conditions corresponding to a fixed total dose delivered to the patient and a variable dose condition, based on the number of projections used. In either case, the detectability was dependent on the number of projections used, the total angular span of those projections, and the acquisition dose level. In the first case, the detectability approximately followed a bell curve as a function of the number of projections with the maximum between 8 and 16 projections spanning angular arcs of about 23 degrees-45

  3. Synchrotron based planar imaging and digital tomosynthesis of breast and biopsy phantoms using a CMOS active pixel sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Szafraniec, M. B.; Konstantinidis, A. C.; Tromba, G.; Dreossi, D.; S. Vecchio; Rigon, L.; Sodini, N.; Naday, S.; Gunn, S.; McArthur, A.; Olivo, A.

    2015-01-01

    The SYRMEP (SYnchrotron Radiation for MEdical Physics) beamline at Elettra is performing the first mammography study on human patients using free-space propagation phase contrast imaging. The stricter spatial resolution requirements of this method currently force the use of conventional films or specialized computed radiography (CR) systems. This also prevents the implementation of three-dimensional (3D) approaches. This paper explores the use of an X-ray detector based on complementary metal...

  4. TOMOGRAPHIC MAMMOGRAPHY AND TOMOSYNTHESIS USING OPENGL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Zolotarev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Computed tomography is still being intensively studied and widely used to solve a number of industrial and medical applications. The simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART and Bayesian inference reconstruction (BIR are considered as advantageous iteration methods that are most suitable for improving the quality of the reconstructed 3D-images. The paper deals with the parallel iterative algorithms to ensure the reconstruction of threedimensional images of the breast, recovered from a limited set of noisy X-ray projections. Algebraic method of reconstruction with simultaneous iterations – SART and iterative method for statistical reconstruction of BIR are deemed to be the most preferred iterative methods. We believe that these methods are particularly useful for improving the quality of breast reconstructed image. We use the graphics processor (GPU to accelerate the process of reconstruction. Preliminary results show that all investigated methods are useful in breast reconstruction layered images. However, it was found that the method of classical tomosynthesis SAA is less efficient than iterative methods SART and BIR as the worst suppress the anatomical noise. Despite the fact that the estimated ratio of the contrast / noise ratio in the presence of internal structures with low contrast is higher for classical tomosynthesis method the SAA, its effectiveness in the presence of highly structured background is low. In our opinion the best results can be achieved using statistical iterative reconstruction BIR.

  5. Real-time out-of-plane artifact subtraction tomosynthesis imaging using prior CT for scanning beam digital x-ray system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The scanning beam digital x-ray system (SBDX) is an inverse geometry fluoroscopic system with high dose efficiency and the ability to perform continuous real-time tomosynthesis in multiple planes. This system could be used for image guidance during lung nodule biopsy. However, the reconstructed images suffer from strong out-of-plane artifact due to the small tomographic angle of the system. Methods: The authors propose an out-of-plane artifact subtraction tomosynthesis (OPAST) algorithm that utilizes a prior CT volume to augment the run-time image processing. A blur-and-add (BAA) analytical model, derived from the project-to-backproject physical model, permits the generation of tomosynthesis images that are a good approximation to the shift-and-add (SAA) reconstructed image. A computationally practical algorithm is proposed to simulate images and out-of-plane artifacts from patient-specific prior CT volumes using the BAA model. A 3D image registration algorithm to align the simulated and reconstructed images is described. The accuracy of the BAA analytical model and the OPAST algorithm was evaluated using three lung cancer patients’ CT data. The OPAST and image registration algorithms were also tested with added nonrigid respiratory motions. Results: Image similarity measurements, including the correlation coefficient, mean squared error, and structural similarity index, indicated that the BAA model is very accurate in simulating the SAA images from the prior CT for the SBDX system. The shift-variant effect of the BAA model can be ignored when the shifts between SBDX images and CT volumes are within ±10 mm in the x and y directions. The nodule visibility and depth resolution are improved by subtracting simulated artifacts from the reconstructions. The image registration and OPAST are robust in the presence of added respiratory motions. The dominant artifacts in the subtraction images are caused by the mismatches between the real object and the prior CT

  6. Quantitative imaging of the microbubble concentrations by using an in-line phase contrast tomosynthesis prototype: a preliminary phantom study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Di; Ghani, Muhammad U.; Wong, Molly D.; Li, Yuhua; Yang, Kai; Chen, Wei R.; Zheng, Bin; Liu, Hong

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility of using a high-energy in-line phase contrast tomosynthesis system to quantitatively imaging microbubbles in a tissue simulating phantom under a limited radiation dose. The imaging system used in the investigation was a bench top in-line phase contrast tomosynthesis prototype operated under 120 kVp tube voltage and 0.5 mA tube current. A prime beam filter made of 2.3 mm Cu, 0.8 mm Pb and 1.0 mm Al was employed to obtain as large as possible portion of x-ray photon energy higher than 60 keV. The tissue simulating phantom was built by three acrylic slabs and a wax slab to mimic a 40 mm thick compressed breast. There were two tiny-sized structures with average 1 mm depth engraved on the two different layers. The microbubble suspensions with different concentrations were injected into those tiny structures. The inline phase contrast angular projections acquired were used to reconstruct the in-plane slices of the tiny structures on different layers. The CNRs vs microbubble concentrations were investigated. As the result, the microbubble suspensions were clearly visible, showing higher CNR when compared with the areas with no microbubble. Furthermore, a monotonously increasing relation between CNRs and microbubble concentrations was observed after calculating the area CNR of the phase contrast tomosynthesis slices.

  7. Optimization of exposure parameters in digital tomosynthesis considering effective dose and image quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seungyeon; Choi, Sunghoon; Kim, Ye-seul; Lee, Haenghwa; Lee, Donghoon; Jeon, Pil-Hyun; Jang, Dong-Hyuk; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2016-03-01

    Digital tomosynthesis system (DTS), which scans an object in a limited angle, has been considered as an innovative imaging modality which can present lower patient dose than computed tomography and solve the problem of poor depth resolution in conventional digital radiography. Although it has many powerful advantages, only breast tomosynthesis system has been adopted in many hospitals. In order to reduce the patient dose while maintaining image quality, the acquisition conditions need to be studied. In this study, we analyzed effective dose and image qualities of chest phantom using commercialized universal chest digital tomosynthesis (CDT) R/F system to study the optimized exposure parameters. We set 10 different acquisition conditions including the default acquisition condition by user manual of Shimadzu (100 kVp with 0.5 mAs). The effective dose was calculated from PCXMC software version 1.5.1 by utilizing the total X-ray exposure measured by ion chamber. The image quality was evaluated by signal difference to noise ratio (SDNR) in the regions of interest (ROIs) pulmonary arteries at different axial in-plane. We analyzed a figure of merit (FOM) which considers both the effective dose and the SDNR in order to determine the optimal acquisition condition. The results indicated that the most suitable acquisition parameters among 10 conditions were condition 7 and 8 (120 kVp with 0.04 mAs and 0.1 mAs, respectively), which indicated lower effective dose while maintaining reasonable SDNRs and FOMs for three specified regions. Further studies are needed to be conducted for detailed outcomes in CDT acquisition conditions.

  8. Comparison of patient specific dose metrics between chest radiography, tomosynthesis, and CT for adult patients of wide ranging body habitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yakun [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Li, Xiang [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Department of Physics, Cleveland State University, Cleveland, Ohio 44115 (United States); Segars, W. Paul [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, and Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Samei, Ehsan, E-mail: samei@duke.edu [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Departments of Physics, Biomedical Engineering, and Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Given the radiation concerns inherent to the x-ray modalities, accurately estimating the radiation doses that patients receive during different imaging modalities is crucial. This study estimated organ doses, effective doses, and risk indices for the three clinical chest x-ray imaging techniques (chest radiography, tomosynthesis, and CT) using 59 anatomically variable voxelized phantoms and Monte Carlo simulation methods. Methods: A total of 59 computational anthropomorphic male and female extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) adult phantoms were used in this study. Organ doses and effective doses were estimated for a clinical radiography system with the capability of conducting chest radiography and tomosynthesis (Definium 8000, VolumeRAD, GE Healthcare) and a clinical CT system (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare). A Monte Carlo dose simulation program (PENELOPE, version 2006, Universitat de Barcelona, Spain) was used to mimic these two clinical systems. The Duke University (Durham, NC) technique charts were used to determine the clinical techniques for the radiographic modalities. An exponential relationship between CTDI{sub vol} and patient diameter was used to determine the absolute dose values for CT. The simulations of the two clinical systems compute organ and tissue doses, which were then used to calculate effective dose and risk index. The calculation of the two dose metrics used the tissue weighting factors from ICRP Publication 103 and BEIR VII report. Results: The average effective dose of the chest posteroanterior examination was found to be 0.04 mSv, which was 1.3% that of the chest CT examination. The average effective dose of the chest tomosynthesis examination was found to be about ten times that of the chest posteroanterior examination and about 12% that of the chest CT examination. With increasing patient average chest diameter, both the effective dose and risk index for CT increased considerably in an exponential fashion, while these two dose

  9. Optical geometry calibration method for free-form digital tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chtcheprov, Pavel; Hartman, Allison; Shan, Jing; Lee, Yueh Z.; Zhou, Otto; Lu, Jianping

    2016-03-01

    Digital tomosynthesis is a type of limited angle tomography that allows 3D information to be reconstructed from a set of x-ray projection images taken at various angles using an x-ray tube, a mechanical arm to rotate the tube about the object, and a digital detector. Tomosynthesis reconstruction requires the precise location of the detector with respect to each x-ray source, forcing all current clinical tomosynthesis systems to use a physically coupled source and detector so the geometry is always known and is always the same. This limits the imaging geometries and its large size is impractical for mobile or field operations. To counter this, we have developed a free form tomosynthesis with a decoupled, free-moving source and detector that uses a novel optical method for accurate and real-time geometry calibration to allow for manual, hand-held tomosynthesis and even CT imaging. We accomplish this by using a camera, attached to the source, to track the motion of the source relative to the detector. Attached to the detector is an optical pattern and the image captured by the camera is then used to determine the relative camera/pattern position and orientation by analyzing the pattern distortion and calculating the source positions for each projection, necessary for 3D reconstruction. This allows for portable imaging in the field and also as an inexpensive upgrade to existing 2D systems, such as in developing countries, to provide 3D image data. Here we report the first feasibility demonstrations of free form digital tomosynthesis systems using the method.

  10. Anatomic Breast Coordinate System for Mammogram Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karemore, Gopal Raghunath; Brandt, S; Karssemeijer, N;

    2011-01-01

    represented by geodesic distance (s) from nipple and parametric angle (¿) as shown in figure 1. The scoring technique called MTR (mammographic texture resemblance marker) used this breast coordinate system to extract Gaussian derivative features. The features extracted using the (x,y) and the curve...... alignment error. Potentially this coordinate system may be used also for improving precision in CAD systems. Keywords: Breast Coordinate system, Breast Cancer, Imaging marker.......Purpose Many researchers have investigated measures also other than density in the mammogram such as measures based on texture to improve breast cancer risk assessment. However, parenchymal texture characteristics are highly dependent on the orientation of vasculature structure and fibrous tissue...

  11. Stationary digital chest tomosynthesis for coronary artery calcium scoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Gongting; Wang, Jiong; Potuzko, Marci; Harman, Allison; Pearce, Caleb; Shan, Jing; Lee, Yueh Z.; Zhou, Otto; Lu, Jianping

    2016-03-01

    The coronary artery calcium score (CACS) measures the buildup of calcium on the coronary artery wall and has been shown to be an important predictor of the risk of coronary artery diseases (CAD). Currently CACS is measured using CT, though the relatively high cost and high radiation dose has limited its adoption as a routine screening procedure. Digital Chest Tomosynthesis (DCT), a low dose and low cost alternative to CT, and has been shown to achieve 90% of sensitivity of CT in lung disease screening. However commercial DCT requires long scanning time and cannot be adapted for high resolution gated cardiac imaging, necessary for CACS. The stationary DCT system (s- DCT), developed in our lab, has the potential to significantly shorten the scanning time and enables high resolution cardiac gated imaging. Here we report the preliminary results of using s-DCT to estimate the CACS. A phantom heart model was developed and scanned by the s-DCT system and a clinical CT in a phantom model with realistic coronary calcifications. The adapted fan-beam volume reconstruction (AFVR) method, developed specifically for stationary tomosynthesis systems, is used to obtain high resolution tomosynthesis images. A trained cardiologist segmented out the calcifications and the CACS was obtained. We observed a strong correlation between the tomosynthesis derived CACS and CT CACS (r2 = 0.88). Our results shows s-DCT imaging has the potential to estimate CACS, thus providing a possible low cost and low dose imaging protocol for screening and monitoring CAD.

  12. Research in digital mammography and tomosynthesis at the University of Toronto.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaffe, Martin J

    2014-07-01

    There have been major advances in the field of breast cancer imaging since the early 1970s, both in technological improvements and in the use of the methods of medical physics and image analysis to optimize image quality. The introduction of digital mammography in 2000 provided a marked improvement in imaging of dense breasts. In addition, it became possible to produce tomographic and functional images on modified digital mammography systems. Digital imaging also greatly facilitated the extraction of quantitative information from images. My laboratory has been fortunate in being able to participate in some of these exciting developments. I will highlight some of the areas of our research interest which include modeling of the image formation process, development of high-resolution X-ray detectors for digital mammography and investigating new methods for analyzing image quality. I will also describe our more recent work on developing new applications of digital mammography including tomosynthesis, contrast-enhanced mammography, and measurement of breast density. Finally, I will point to a new area for our research--the application of the techniques of medical imaging to making pathology more quantitative to contribute to use of biomarkers for better characterizing breast cancer and directing therapeutic decisions. PMID:24961727

  13. Breast Cancer in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tessier Cloutier, B; Clarke, A E; Ramsey-Goldman, R;

    2013-01-01

    Evidence points to a decreased breast cancer risk in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We analyzed data from a large multisite SLE cohort, linked to cancer registries.......Evidence points to a decreased breast cancer risk in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We analyzed data from a large multisite SLE cohort, linked to cancer registries....

  14. A novel solid-angle tomosynthesis (SAT) scanning scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Digital tomosynthesis (DTS) recently gained extensive research interests in both diagnostic and radiation therapy fields. Conventional DTS images are generated by scanning an x-ray source and flat-panel detector pair on opposite sides of an object, with the scanning trajectory on a one-dimensional curve. A novel tomosynthesis method named solid-angle tomosynthesis (SAT) is proposed, where the x-ray source scans on an arbitrary shaped two-dimensional surface. Methods: An iterative algorithm in the form of total variation regulated expectation maximization is developed for SAT image reconstruction. The feasibility and effectiveness of SAT is corroborated by computer simulation studies using three-dimensional (3D) numerical phantoms including a 3D Shepp-Logan phantom and a volumetric CT image set of a human breast. Results: SAT is able to cover more space in Fourier domain more uniformly than conventional DTS. Greater coverage and more isotropy in the frequency domain translate to fewer artifacts and more accurately restored features in the in-plane reconstruction. Conclusions: Comparing with conventional DTS, SAT allows cone-shaped x-ray beams to project from more solid angles, thus provides more coverage in the spatial-frequency domain, resulting in better quality of reconstructed image.

  15. A novel solid-angle tomosynthesis (SAT) scanning scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Jin; Yu, Cedric [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 22 S. Greene Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21201 and Xcision Medical System, LLC, 12707 Chapel Chase Drive, Clarksville, Maryland 21209 (United States)

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: Digital tomosynthesis (DTS) recently gained extensive research interests in both diagnostic and radiation therapy fields. Conventional DTS images are generated by scanning an x-ray source and flat-panel detector pair on opposite sides of an object, with the scanning trajectory on a one-dimensional curve. A novel tomosynthesis method named solid-angle tomosynthesis (SAT) is proposed, where the x-ray source scans on an arbitrary shaped two-dimensional surface. Methods: An iterative algorithm in the form of total variation regulated expectation maximization is developed for SAT image reconstruction. The feasibility and effectiveness of SAT is corroborated by computer simulation studies using three-dimensional (3D) numerical phantoms including a 3D Shepp-Logan phantom and a volumetric CT image set of a human breast. Results: SAT is able to cover more space in Fourier domain more uniformly than conventional DTS. Greater coverage and more isotropy in the frequency domain translate to fewer artifacts and more accurately restored features in the in-plane reconstruction. Conclusions: Comparing with conventional DTS, SAT allows cone-shaped x-ray beams to project from more solid angles, thus provides more coverage in the spatial-frequency domain, resulting in better quality of reconstructed image.

  16. Whole-Body Clinical Applications of Digital Tomosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machida, Haruhiko; Yuhara, Toshiyuki; Tamura, Mieko; Ishikawa, Takuya; Tate, Etsuko; Ueno, Eiko; Nye, Katelyn; Sabol, John M

    2016-01-01

    With flat-panel detector mammography, radiography, and fluoroscopy systems, digital tomosynthesis (DT) has been recently introduced as an advanced clinical application that removes overlying structures, enhances local tissue separation, and provides depth information about structures of interest by providing high-quality tomographic images. DT images are generated from projection image data, typically using filtered back-projection or iterative reconstruction. These low-dose x-ray projection images are easily and swiftly acquired over a range of angles during a single linear or arc sweep of the x-ray tube assembly. DT is advantageous in a variety of clinical contexts, including breast, chest, head and neck, orthopedic, emergency, and abdominal imaging. Specifically, compared with conventional mammography, radiography, and fluoroscopy, as a result of reduced tissue overlap DT can improve detection of breast cancer, pulmonary nodules, sinonasal mucosal thickening, and bone fractures and delineation of complex anatomic structures such as the ostiomeatal unit, atlantoaxial joint, carpal and tarsal bones, and pancreatobiliary and gastrointestinal tracts. Compared with computed tomography, DT offers reduced radiation exposure, better in-plane resolution to improve assessment of fine bony changes, and less metallic artifact, improving postoperative evaluation of patients with metallic prostheses and osteosynthesis materials. With more flexible patient positioning, DT is also useful for functional, weight-bearing, and stress tests. To optimize patient management, a comprehensive understanding of the clinical applications and limitations of whole-body DT applications is important for improvement of diagnostic quality, workflow, and cost-effectiveness. Online supplemental material is available for this article. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:27163590

  17. Characterisation of microcalcification clusters on 2D digital mammography (FFDM) and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT): does DBT underestimate microcalcification clusters? Results of a multicentre study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tagliafico, Alberto [University of Genoa, Institute of Anatomy, Department of Experimental Medicine (DIMES), Genoa (Italy); Mariscotti, Giovanna; Durando, Manuela [Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Citta della Salute e della Scienza di Torino, Radiology University of Torino, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiotherapy, Torino (Italy); Stevanin, Carmen [Ospedale Regionale di Bolzano, Bolzano (Italy); Tagliafico, Giulio [Istituto di Matematica Applicata e Tecnologie Informatiche, CNR-IMATI, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Genova (Italy); Martino, Lucia; Bignotti, Bianca [University of Genoa, Department of Health Sciences (DISSAL), Genoa (Italy); Calabrese, Massimo [IRCCS AOU San Martino-IST, Department of Breast Radiology, Genova (Italy); Houssami, Nehmat [University of Sydney, Screening and Test Evaluation Program (STEP), School of Public Health, Sydney Medical School, Sydney (Australia)

    2015-01-15

    To compare DBT and FFDM in the classification of microcalcification clusters (MCs) using BI-RADS. This Institutional Review Board-approved study was undertaken in three centres. A total of 107 MCs evaluated with both DBT and FFDM were randomised for prospective reading by six experienced breast radiologists and classified using BI-RADS. The benign/malignant ratio of MC was 66/41. Of 11/107 discordant results, DBT classified MCs as R2 whereas FFDM classified them as R3 in 9 and R4 in 2. Three of these (3/107 = 2.8 %) were malignant; 8 (7.5 %) were nonmalignant and were correctly classified as R2 on DBT but incorrectly classified as R3 on FFDM. Estimated sensitivity and specificity, respectively, were 100 % (95 % CI: 91 % to 100 %) and 94.6 % (95 % CI: 86.7 % to 98.5 %) for FFDM and 91.1 % (95 % CI: 78.8 % to 97.5 %) and 100 % (95 % CI: 94.8 % to 100 %) for DBT. Overall intra- and interobserver agreements were 0.75 (95 % CI: 0.61-0.84) and 0.73 (95 % CI: 0.62-0.78). Most MCs are scored similarly on FFDM and DBT. Although a minority (11/107) of MCs are classified differently on FFDM (benign MC classified as R3) and DBT (malignant MC classified as R2), this may have clinical relevance. (orig.)

  18. Ectopic Axillary Breast during Systemic Lupus

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Many breast changes may occur in systemic lupus erythematosus. We report a 41-year-old woman with lupus who presented three years after the onset of lupus an ectopic mammary gland confirmed by histological study.

  19. Ectopic Axillary Breast during Systemic Lupus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Besma Ben Dhaou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many breast changes may occur in systemic lupus erythematosus. We report a 41-year-old woman with lupus who presented three years after the onset of lupus an ectopic mammary gland confirmed by histological study.

  20. Glandular dose in breast tomosynthesis examinations: Preliminary study with a sample of patients; Dosis glandular en examenes de tomosintesis de mama: estudio preliminar con una muestra de pacientes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo, M.; Chevalier, M.; Calzado, A.; Valverde, J.

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the mean glandular dose administered to a group of patients with a tomography system (Selenia Dimensions) service installed on a large hospital in which routine tests are done and screening. (Author)

  1. A simple method to retrospectively estimate patient dose-area product for chest tomosynthesis examinations performed using VolumeRAD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Båth, Magnus, E-mail: magnus.bath@vgregion.se; Svalkvist, Angelica [Department of Radiation Physics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg SE-413 45, Sweden and Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg SE-413 45 (Sweden); Söderman, Christina [Department of Radiation Physics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg SE-413 45 (Sweden)

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: The purpose of the present work was to develop and validate a method of retrospectively estimating the dose-area product (DAP) of a chest tomosynthesis examination performed using the VolumeRAD system (GE Healthcare, Chalfont St. Giles, UK) from digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) data available in the scout image. Methods: DICOM data were retrieved for 20 patients undergoing chest tomosynthesis using VolumeRAD. Using information about how the exposure parameters for the tomosynthesis examination are determined by the scout image, a correction factor for the adjustment in field size with projection angle was determined. The correction factor was used to estimate the DAP for 20 additional chest tomosynthesis examinations from DICOM data available in the scout images, which was compared with the actual DAP registered for the projection radiographs acquired during the tomosynthesis examination. Results: A field size correction factor of 0.935 was determined. Applying the developed method using this factor, the average difference between the estimated DAP and the actual DAP was 0.2%, with a standard deviation of 0.8%. However, the difference was not normally distributed and the maximum error was only 1.0%. The validity and reliability of the presented method were thus very high. Conclusions: A method to estimate the DAP of a chest tomosynthesis examination performed using the VolumeRAD system from DICOM data in the scout image was developed and validated. As the scout image normally is the only image connected to the tomosynthesis examination stored in the picture archiving and communication system (PACS) containing dose data, the method may be of value for retrospectively estimating patient dose in clinical use of chest tomosynthesis.

  2. A simple method to retrospectively estimate patient dose-area product for chest tomosynthesis examinations performed using VolumeRAD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of the present work was to develop and validate a method of retrospectively estimating the dose-area product (DAP) of a chest tomosynthesis examination performed using the VolumeRAD system (GE Healthcare, Chalfont St. Giles, UK) from digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) data available in the scout image. Methods: DICOM data were retrieved for 20 patients undergoing chest tomosynthesis using VolumeRAD. Using information about how the exposure parameters for the tomosynthesis examination are determined by the scout image, a correction factor for the adjustment in field size with projection angle was determined. The correction factor was used to estimate the DAP for 20 additional chest tomosynthesis examinations from DICOM data available in the scout images, which was compared with the actual DAP registered for the projection radiographs acquired during the tomosynthesis examination. Results: A field size correction factor of 0.935 was determined. Applying the developed method using this factor, the average difference between the estimated DAP and the actual DAP was 0.2%, with a standard deviation of 0.8%. However, the difference was not normally distributed and the maximum error was only 1.0%. The validity and reliability of the presented method were thus very high. Conclusions: A method to estimate the DAP of a chest tomosynthesis examination performed using the VolumeRAD system from DICOM data in the scout image was developed and validated. As the scout image normally is the only image connected to the tomosynthesis examination stored in the picture archiving and communication system (PACS) containing dose data, the method may be of value for retrospectively estimating patient dose in clinical use of chest tomosynthesis

  3. Possibilities of short-term tomosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Short-term tomosynthesis enables continuous analysis of structures which appear interesting. The results of short-term tomosynthesis were compared with those of plain roentgenography and conventional tomography. Short-term tomosynthesis appears as an alternative to spot-film radiography and as a complement to tomography in the analysis of spatially limited regions. It facilitates orientation in space and free projection of oblique structures. Good results were obtained in examinations of the pyramids (auditory canal and mandibular joint), the paranasal sinuses, the cervical vertebral column, the extremities and their joints. Examination of soft tissues was usually not very promising in view of the conditions under which tomosynthesis was performed. The same applied likewise to the infusion cholecystocholangiogram and the infusion urogram. Technical improvements will certainly bring about an extension of the uses of this method. (orig.)

  4. Insight into osteo-articular digital tomosynthesis: a pictorial essay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of this pictorial essay are to describe osteo-articular imaging using digital tomosynthesis. We provide characteristic examples in eight patients. Digital tomosynthesis allows easy, fast and low-dose imaging, with excellent spatial resolution.

  5. TH-A-18A-01: Innovation in Clinical Breast Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, B [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Yang, K [University of Oklahoma, Oklahomoa City, OK (United States); Yaffe, M [University Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Chen, J [GE/U-Systems, Sunnyvale, CA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Several novel modalities have been or are on the verge of being introduced into the breast imaging clinic. These include tomosynthesis imaging, dedicated breast CT, contrast-enhanced digital mammography, and automated breast ultrasound, all of which are covered in this course. Tomosynthesis and dedicated breast CT address the problem of tissue superimposition that limits mammography screening performance, by improved or full resolution of the 3D breast morphology. Contrast-enhanced digital mammography provides functional information that allows for visualization of tumor angiogenesis. 3D breast ultrasound has high sensitivity for tumor detection in dense breasts, but the imaging exam was traditionally performed by radiologists. In automated breast ultrasound, the scan is performed in an automated fashion, making for a more practical imaging tool, that is now used as an adjunct to digital mammography in breast cancer screening. This course will provide medical physicists with an in-depth understanding of the imaging physics of each of these four novel imaging techniques, as well as the rationale and implementation of QC procedures. Further, basic clinical applications and work flow issues will be discussed. Learning Objectives: To be able to describe the underlying physical and physiological principles of each imaging technique, and to understand the corresponding imaging acquisition process. To be able to describe the critical system components and their performance requirements. To understand the rationale and implementation of quality control procedures, as well as regulatory requirements for systems with FDA approval. To learn about clinical applications and understand risks and benefits/strength and weakness of each modality in terms of clinical breast imaging.

  6. Toward a dose reduction strategy using model-based reconstruction with limited-angle tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haneda, Eri; Tkaczyk, J. E.; Palma, Giovanni; Iordache, Rǎzvan; Zelakiewicz, Scott; Muller, Serge; De Man, Bruno

    2014-03-01

    Model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) is an emerging technique for several imaging modalities and appli- cations including medical CT, security CT, PET, and microscopy. Its success derives from an ability to preserve image resolution and perceived diagnostic quality under impressively reduced signal level. MBIR typically uses a cost optimization framework that models system geometry, photon statistics, and prior knowledge of the recon- structed volume. The challenge of tomosynthetic geometries is that the inverse problem becomes more ill-posed due to the limited angles, meaning the volumetric image solution is not uniquely determined by the incom- pletely sampled projection data. Furthermore, low signal level conditions introduce additional challenges due to noise. A fundamental strength of MBIR for limited-views and limited-angle is that it provides a framework for constraining the solution consistent with prior knowledge of expected image characteristics. In this study, we analyze through simulation the capability of MBIR with respect to prior modeling components for limited-views, limited-angle digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) under low dose conditions. A comparison to ground truth phantoms shows that MBIR with regularization achieves a higher level of fidelity and lower level of blurring and streaking artifacts compared to other state of the art iterative reconstructions, especially for high contrast objects. The benefit of contrast preservation along with less artifacts may lead to detectability improvement of microcalcification for more accurate cancer diagnosis.

  7. Effective dose from chest tomosynthesis in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomosynthesis (digital tomography) is a recently introduced low-dose alternative to CT in the evaluation of the lungs in patients with cystic fibrosis and pulmonary nodules. Previous studies have reported an adult effective dose of 0.12-0.13 mSv for chest tomosynthesis. The aim of this study was to determine the paediatric effective dose from the dose-area-product. During a 3-y period, 38 children with cystic fibrosis and 36 paediatric oncology patients were examined with chest tomosynthesis, totally 169 posteroanterior and 17 anteroposterior examinations (40 boys and 34 girls, mean age 13.7 y, range 7-20 y). Using recently reported paediatric chest tomosynthesis conversion factors (0.23-1.09 mSv Gy cm-2) corrected for sex, age and energy, the mean posteroanterior effective dose calculated was 0.17 mSv; using the proposed simplified conversion factors of 0.6 (8-10 y), 0.4 (11-14 y) and 0.3 mSv Gy cm-2 (15-19 y), the mean posteroanterior effective dose calculated was 0.15 mSv. As the difference in the calculated effective dose was minor, it is recommendable to use the simplified conversion factors. Using the conversion factor for adult chest tomosynthesis (0.26 mSv Gy cm-2), the mean effective dose was 0.11 mSv. Anteroposterior exposures had considerably higher effective dose. By using conversion factors adapted for children, the calculated risks from radiologic procedures will be more accurate. (authors)

  8. An Anatomically Oriented Breast Coordinate System for Mammogram Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Sami; Karemore, Gopal Raghunath; Karssemeijer, Nico;

    2011-01-01

    were taken prior to when the breast cancer became visible to a radiologist. The coordinate system provides both the relative position and orientation information on the breast region from which the features are derived. In addition, the coordinate system can be used in temporal studies to pin...

  9. Prospective gated chest tomosynthesis using CNT X-ray source array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Jing; Burk, Laurel; Wu, Gongting; Lee, Yueh Z.; Heath, Michael D.; Wang, Xiaohui; Foos, David; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto

    2015-03-01

    Chest tomosynthesis is a low-dose 3-D imaging modality that has been shown to have comparable sensitivity as CT in detecting lung nodules and other lung pathologies. We have recently demonstrated the feasibility of stationary chest tomosynthesis (s-DCT) using a distributed CNT X-ray source array. The technology allows acquisition of tomographic projections without moving the X-ray source. The electronically controlled CNT x-ray source also enables physiologically gated imaging, which will minimize image blur due to the patient's respiration motion. In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of prospective gated chest tomosynthesis using a bench-top s-DCT system with a CNT source array, a high- speed at panel detector and realistic patient respiratory signals captured using a pressure sensor. Tomosynthesis images of inflated pig lungs placed inside an anthropomorphic chest phantom were acquired at different respiration rate, with and without gating for image quality comparison. Metal beads of 2 mm diameter were placed on the pig lung for quantitative measure of the image quality. Without gating, the beads were blurred to 3:75 mm during a 3 s tomosynthesis acquisition. When gated to the end of the inhalation and exhalation phase the detected bead size reduced to 2:25 mm, much closer to the actual bead size. With gating the observed airway edges are sharper and there are more visible structural details in the lung. Our results demonstrated the feasibility of prospective gating in the s-DCT, which substantially reduces image blur associated with lung motion.

  10. Initial clinical evaluation of stationary digital chest tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Allison E.; Shan, Jing; Wu, Gongting; Lee, Yueh Z.; Zhou, Otto; Lu, Jianping; Heath, Michael; Wang, Xiaohui; Foos, David

    2016-03-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) is the gold standard for image evaluation of lung disease, including lung cancer and cystic fibrosis. It provides detailed information of the lung anatomy and lesions, but at a relatively high cost and high dose of radiation. Chest radiography is a low dose imaging modality but it has low sensitivity. Digital chest tomosynthesis (DCT) is an imaging modality that produces 3D images by collecting x-ray projection images over a limited angle. DCT is less expensive than CT and requires about 1/10th the dose of radiation. Commercial DCT systems acquire the projection images by mechanically scanning an x-ray tube. The movement of the tube head limits acquisition speed. We recently demonstrated the feasibility of stationary digital chest tomosynthesis (s-DCT) using a carbon nanotube (CNT) x-ray source array in benchtop phantom studies. The stationary x-ray source allows for fast image acquisition. The objective of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility of s-DCT for patient imaging. We have successfully imaged 31 patients. Preliminary evaluation by board certified radiologists suggests good depiction of thoracic anatomy and pathology.

  11. Multimode C-arm fluoroscopy, tomosynthesis, and cone-beam CT for image-guided interventions: from proof of principle to patient protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siewerdsen, J. H.; Daly, M. J.; Bachar, G.; Moseley, D. J.; Bootsma, G.; Brock, K. K.; Ansell, S.; Wilson, G. A.; Chhabra, S.; Jaffray, D. A.; Irish, J. C.

    2007-03-01

    High-performance intraoperative imaging is essential to an ever-expanding scope of therapeutic procedures ranging from tumor surgery to interventional radiology. The need for precise visualization of bony and soft-tissue structures with minimal obstruction to the therapy setup presents challenges and opportunities in the development of novel imaging technologies specifically for image-guided procedures. Over the past ~5 years, a mobile C-arm has been modified in collaboration with Siemens Medical Solutions for 3D imaging. Based upon a Siemens PowerMobil, the device includes: a flat-panel detector (Varian PaxScan 4030CB); a motorized orbit; a system for geometric calibration; integration with real-time tracking and navigation (NDI Polaris); and a computer control system for multi-mode fluoroscopy, tomosynthesis, and cone-beam CT. Investigation of 3D imaging performance (noise-equivalent quanta), image quality (human observer studies), and image artifacts (scatter, truncation, and cone-beam artifacts) has driven the development of imaging techniques appropriate to a host of image-guided interventions. Multi-mode functionality presents a valuable spectrum of acquisition techniques: i.) fluoroscopy for real-time 2D guidance; ii.) limited-angle tomosynthesis for fast 3D imaging (e.g., ~10 sec acquisition of coronal slices containing the surgical target); and iii.) fully 3D cone-beam CT (e.g., ~30-60 sec acquisition providing bony and soft-tissue visualization across the field of view). Phantom and cadaver studies clearly indicate the potential for improved surgical performance - up to a factor of 2 increase in challenging surgical target excisions. The C-arm system is currently being deployed in patient protocols ranging from brachytherapy to chest, breast, spine, and head and neck surgery.

  12. Grating-based phase contrast tomosynthesis imaging: Proof-of-concept experimental studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This paper concerns the feasibility of x-ray differential phase contrast (DPC) tomosynthesis imaging using a grating-based DPC benchtop experimental system, which is equipped with a commercial digital flat-panel detector and a medical-grade rotating-anode x-ray tube. An extensive system characterization was performed to quantify its imaging performance. Methods: The major components of the benchtop system include a diagnostic x-ray tube with a 1.0 mm nominal focal spot size, a flat-panel detector with 96 μm pixel pitch, a sample stage that rotates within a limited angular span of ±30°, and a Talbot-Lau interferometer with three x-ray gratings. A total of 21 projection views acquired with 3° increments were used to reconstruct three sets of tomosynthetic image volumes, including the conventional absorption contrast tomosynthesis image volume (AC-tomo) reconstructed using the filtered-backprojection (FBP) algorithm with the ramp kernel, the phase contrast tomosynthesis image volume (PC-tomo) reconstructed using FBP with a Hilbert kernel, and the differential phase contrast tomosynthesis image volume (DPC-tomo) reconstructed using the shift-and-add algorithm. Three inhouse physical phantoms containing tissue-surrogate materials were used to characterize the signal linearity, the signal difference-to-noise ratio (SDNR), the three-dimensional noise power spectrum (3D NPS), and the through-plane artifact spread function (ASF). Results: While DPC-tomo highlights edges and interfaces in the image object, PC-tomo removes the differential nature of the DPC projection data and its pixel values are linearly related to the decrement of the real part of the x-ray refractive index. The SDNR values of polyoxymethylene in water and polystyrene in oil are 1.5 and 1.0, respectively, in AC-tomo, and the values were improved to 3.0 and 2.0, respectively, in PC-tomo. PC-tomo and AC-tomo demonstrate equivalent ASF, but their noise characteristics quantified by the 3D NPS

  13. Computerized database management system for breast cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Sim, Kok Swee; Chong, Sze Siang; Tso, Chih Ping; Nia, Mohsen Esmaeili; Chong, Aun Kee; Abbas, Siti Fathimah

    2014-01-01

    Data analysis based on breast cancer risk factors such as age, race, breastfeeding, hormone replacement therapy, family history, and obesity was conducted on breast cancer patients using a new enhanced computerized database management system. My Structural Query Language (MySQL) is selected as the application for database management system to store the patient data collected from hospitals in Malaysia. An automatic calculation tool is embedded in this system to assist the data analysis. The r...

  14. Possible Laminographic and Tomosynthesis Applications for Wolter Microscope Scan Geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Wolter microscope includes a number of attractive features for x-ray imaging, and possible connections to laminographic and tomosynthesis 3D object recovery algorithms. This type of instrument employs x-ray optics to sift out single energy x-rays from a broader spectral energy source, and direct those x-rays to a ''focus plane'' similar to the operation of a optical microscope (see Figure 1 for schematic of a Wolter instrument). Unlike optical microscopes the 3D object can be thick in the direction of the x-rays and in this case more of the intensity of the image is affected by the out-of-focus planes, since the ray-paths span the entire depth of the object. It is clear that the ''in-focus'' plane of a Wolter contain more 3D information than a simple ''point-projection'' radiograph. However, it is not clear just how the impact of the out-of-focus planes obscures or distorts features of interest for the in-focus planes. Further, it is not clear just how object positioning can be combined with multiple acquisitions to enable recovery of other planes within the object function or the entire object function. Of particular interest here are Wolter microscopes configured for mesoscale objects (mm extent with um features). Laminographic and tomosynthesis scanning methods can be strategic for this type of inspection instrument. First, photon output for inspection purposes can be meager in this type of ''small field of view'' system. With laboratory x-ray sources a single image can require up to 10 minutes to accumulate adequate signal. Techniques that can obtain 3D object information from small numbers of views, rotational or translational, are consequently at a premium. Laminographic and tomosynthesis scanning methods require relatively small numbers of views (2-30). Secondly, the Wolter microscope scan geometry in a single view is a fit with the type of source-detector geometry achieved through source-object-detector re-positioning in laminographic and tomosynthesis

  15. Possible Laminographic and Tomosynthesis Applications for Wolter Microscope Scan Geometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneberk, D; Jackson, J; Martz, H

    2004-10-05

    The Wolter microscope includes a number of attractive features for x-ray imaging, and possible connections to laminographic and tomosynthesis 3D object recovery algorithms. This type of instrument employs x-ray optics to sift out single energy x-rays from a broader spectral energy source, and direct those x-rays to a ''focus plane'' similar to the operation of a optical microscope (see Figure 1 for schematic of a Wolter instrument). Unlike optical microscopes the 3D object can be thick in the direction of the x-rays and in this case more of the intensity of the image is affected by the out-of-focus planes, since the ray-paths span the entire depth of the object. It is clear that the ''in-focus'' plane of a Wolter contain more 3D information than a simple ''point-projection'' radiograph. However, it is not clear just how the impact of the out-of-focus planes obscures or distorts features of interest for the in-focus planes. Further, it is not clear just how object positioning can be combined with multiple acquisitions to enable recovery of other planes within the object function or the entire object function. Of particular interest here are Wolter microscopes configured for mesoscale objects (mm extent with um features). Laminographic and tomosynthesis scanning methods can be strategic for this type of inspection instrument. First, photon output for inspection purposes can be meager in this type of ''small field of view'' system. With laboratory x-ray sources a single image can require up to 10 minutes to accumulate adequate signal. Techniques that can obtain 3D object information from small numbers of views, rotational or translational, are consequently at a premium. Laminographic and tomosynthesis scanning methods require relatively small numbers of views (2-30). Secondly, the Wolter microscope scan geometry in a single view is a fit with the type of source-detector geometry achieved

  16. Drug delivery system and breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colone, Marisa; Kaliappan, Subramanian; Calcabrini, Annarica; Tortora, Mariarosaria; Cavalieri, Francesca; Stringaro, Annarita

    2016-06-01

    Recently, nanomedicine has received increasing attention for its ability to improve the efficacy of cancer therapeutics. Nanosized polymer therapeutic agents offer the advantage of prolonged circulation in the blood stream, targeting to specific sites, improved efficacy and reduced side effects. In this way, local, controlled delivery of the drug will be achieved with the advantage of a high concentration of drug release at the target site while keeping the systemic concentration of the drug low, thus reducing side effects due to bioaccumulation. Various drug delivery systems such as nanoparticles, liposomes, microparticles and implants have been demonstrated to significantly enhance the preventive/therapeutic efficacy of many drugs by increasing their bioavailability and targetability. As these carriers significantly increase the therapeutic effect of drugs, their administration would become less cost effective in the near future. The purpose of our research work is to develop a delivery system for breast cancer cells using a microvector of drugs. These results highlight the potential uses of these responsive platforms suited for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. At the request of all authors of the paper an updated version was published on 12 July 2016. The manuscript was prepared and submitted without Dr. Francesca Cavalieri's contribution and her name was added without her consent. Her name has been removed in the updated and re-published article.

  17. Anatomical decomposition in dual energy chest digital tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Donghoon; Kim, Ye-seul; Choi, Sunghoon; Lee, Haenghwa; Choi, Seungyeon; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2016-03-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide and the early diagnosis of lung cancer has recently become more important. For early screening lung cancer, computed tomography (CT) has been used as a gold standard for early diagnosis of lung cancer [1]. The major advantage of CT is that it is not susceptible to the problem of misdiagnosis caused by anatomical overlapping while CT has extremely high radiation dose and cost compared to chest radiography. Chest digital tomosynthesis (CDT) is a recently introduced new modality for lung cancer screening with relatively low radiation dose compared to CT [2] and also showing high sensitivity and specificity to prevent anatomical overlapping occurred in chest radiography. Dual energy material decomposition method has been proposed for better detection of pulmonary nodules as means of reducing the anatomical noise [3]. In this study, possibility of material decomposition in CDT was tested by simulation study and actual experiment using prototype CDT. Furthermore organ absorbed dose and effective dose were compared with single energy CDT. The Gate v6 (Geant4 application for tomographic emission), and TASMIP (Tungsten anode spectral model using the interpolating polynomial) code were used for simulation study and simulated cylinder shape phantom consisted of 4 inner beads which were filled with spine, rib, muscle and lung equivalent materials. The patient dose was estimated by PCXMC 1.5 Monte Carlo simulation tool [4]. The tomosynthesis scan was performed with a linear movement and 21 projection images were obtained over 30 degree of angular range with 1.5° degree of angular interval. The proto type CDT system has same geometry with simulation study and composed of E7869X (Toshiba, Japan) x-ray tube and FDX3543RPW (Toshiba, Japan) detector. The result images showed that reconstructed with dual energy clearly visualize lung filed by removing unnecessary bony structure. Furthermore, dual energy CDT could enhance

  18. Combined photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging of human breast in vivo in the mammographic geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhixing; Lee, Won-Mean; Hooi, Fong Ming; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Pinsky, Renee W.; Mueller, Dean; Wang, Xueding; Carson, Paul L.

    2013-03-01

    This photoacoustic volume imaging (PAVI) system is designed to study breast cancer detection and diagnosis in the mammographic geometry in combination with automated 3D ultrasound (AUS). The good penetration of near-infrared (NIR) light and high receiving sensitivity of a broad bandwidth, 572 element, 2D PVDF array at a low center-frequency of 1MHz were utilized with 20 channel simultaneous acquisition. The feasibility of this system in imaging optically absorbing objects in deep breast tissues was assessed first through experiments on ex vivo whole breasts. The blood filled pseudo lesions were imaged at depths up to 49 mm in the specimens. In vivo imaging of human breasts has been conducted. 3D PAVI image stacks of human breasts were coregistered and compared with 3D ultrasound image stacks of the same breasts. Using the designed system, PAVI shows satisfactory imaging depth and sensitivity for coverage of the entire breast when imaged from both sides with mild compression in the mammographic geometry. With its unique soft tissue contrast and excellent sensitivity to the tissue hemodynamic properties of fractional blood volume and blood oxygenation, PAVI, as a complement to 3D ultrasound and digital tomosynthesis mammography, might well contribute to detection, diagnosis and prognosis for breast cancer.

  19. Investigation of a scanned cylindrical ultrasound system for breast hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper investigates the feasibility of a scanned cylindrical ultrasound system for producing uniform heating from the central to the superficial portions of the breast or localized heating within the breast at a specific location. The proposed system consists of plane ultrasound transducer(s) mounted on a scanned cylindrical support. The breast was immersed in water and surrounded by this system during the treatment. The control parameters considered are the size of the transducer, the ultrasound frequency, the scan angle and the shifting distance between the axes of the breast and the system. Three-dimensional acoustical and thermal models were used to calculate the temperature distribution. Non-perfused phantom experiments were performed to verify the simulation results. Simulation results indicate that high frequency ultrasound could be used for the superficial heating, and the scan angle of the transducer could be varied to obtain an appropriate high temperature region to cover the desired treatment region. Low frequency ultrasound could be used for deep heating and the high temperature region could be moved by shifting the system. In addition, a combination of low and high frequency ultrasound could result in a portion treatment from the central to the superficial breast or an entire breast treatment. Good agreement was obtained between non-perfused experiments and simulation results. The findings of this study can be used to determine the effects of the control parameters of this system, as well as to select the optimal parameters for a specific treatment

  20. Initial application of digital tomosynthesis for detection of pulmonary nodules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To discuss the value of digital tomosynthesis for detection of pulmonary nodules. Methods: Thirty patients suspected of having pulmonary nodules underwent chest radiography, digital tomosynthesis and CT examination. Above image data were transferred to postprocessing work station and were reviewed by 2 radiologists with 3 years of chest-radiology diagnosis experience in a double-blind method. The number, location and size of nodules were recorded. Then, 2 radiologists reviewed the all images once more, and discuss in consensus. The sensitivities of chest radiography and digital tomosynthesis for detection of pulmonary nodules were respectively calculated according to the CT results. Chi-square test was used for radiography, digital tomosynthesis and CT examination. Results: Of 30 patients, 21 were detected having pulmonary nodules by X-ray radiography and 9 were negative, the total number of 40 nodules was detected, while 89 nodules in 26 patients were detected by digital tomosynthesis, and only 4 patients were negative. CT demonstrated 102 nodules in 27 patients, and 3 patients were negative. Taking CT as 'gold standard', the sensitivities of X-ray radiography and digital tomosynthesis were 27.4%(28/102)and 87.2%(89/102), X2=4.35, P<0.05, respectively. Conclusion: Digital tomosynthesis has a high sensitivity for detection of pulmonary nodules compared with X-ray radiography, and could be an excellent and necessary supplementary technique of X-ray radiography. (authors)

  1. Refraction-based tomosynthesis: Proof of the concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimenko, Anton; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Ando, Masami; Hashimoto, Eiko

    2007-12-01

    Tomosynthesis is a well known technique for imaging a plane in a target by blurring other planes in the target. Commonly, the tomosynthesis is based on the x-ray absorption contrast. Recently, methods for generating other x-ray contrasts were developed. One of them, the so-called refraction contrast, is extremely sensitive to soft tissues and small defects. It was used as the base for the computed tomography. However, a very promising application of this contrast in the tomosynthesis remains undeveloped. This letter is dedicated to this problem. It includes both theoretical background and experimental implementation of the idea.

  2. Stationary chest tomosynthesis using a carbon nanotube x-ray source array: a feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Jing; Tucker, Andrew W.; Lee, Yueh Z.; Heath, Michael D.; Wang, Xiaohui; Foos, David H.; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto

    2015-01-01

    Chest tomosynthesis is a low-dose, quasi-3D imaging modality that has been demonstrated to improve the detection sensitivity for small lung nodules, compared to 2D chest radiography. The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility and system requirements of stationary chest tomosynthesis (s-DCT) using a spatially distributed carbon nanotube (CNT) x-ray source array, where the projection images are collected by electronically activating individual x-ray focal spots in the source array without mechanical motion of the x-ray source, detector, or the patient. A bench-top system was constructed using an existing CNT field emission source array and a flat panel detector. The tube output, beam quality, focal spot size, system in-plane and in-depth resolution were characterized. Tomosynthesis slices of an anthropomorphic chest phantom were reconstructed for image quality assessment. All 75 CNT sources in the source array were shown to operate reliably at 80 kVp and 5 mA tube current. Source-to-source consistency in the tube current and focal spot size was observed. The incident air kerma reading per mAs was measured as 74.47 uGy mAs-1 at 100 cm. The first half value layer of the beam was 3 mm aluminum. An average focal spot size of 2.5  ×  0.5 mm was measured. The system MTF was measured to be 1.7 cycles mm-1 along the scanning direction, and 3.4 cycles mm-1 perpendicular to the scanning direction. As the angular coverage of 11.6°-34°, the full width at half maximum of the artifact spread function improved greatly from 9.5 to 5.2 mm. The reconstructed tomosynthesis slices clearly show airways and pulmonary vascular structures in the anthropomorphic lung phantom. The results show the CNT source array is capable of generating sufficient dose for chest tomosynthesis imaging. The results obtained so far suggest an s-DCT using a distributed CNT x-ray source array is feasible.

  3. Breast vasculitis in association with breast gigantism in a pregnant patient with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    OpenAIRE

    Propper, D J; Reid, D.M.; Stankler, L.; Eastmond, C J

    1991-01-01

    A 24 year old woman with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) developed widespread necrotic skin ulceration and gigantism of both breasts during an exacerbation of SLE in the last trimester of her second pregnancy. Over the remainder of the pregnancy the ulceration was only controlled by high dose corticosteroids. After parturition, however, it was possible to reduce the steroid dose without recurrence of the ulceration.

  4. A comparison of reconstruction algorithms for C-arm mammography tomosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Digital tomosynthesis is an imaging technique to produce a tomographic image from a series of angular digital images in a manner similar to conventional focal plane tomography. Unlike film focal plane tomography, the acquisition of the data in a C-arm geometry causes the image receptor to be positioned at various angles to the reconstruction tomogram. The digital nature of the data allows for input images to be combined into the desired plane with the flexibility of generating tomograms of many separate planes from a single set of input data. Angular datasets were obtained of a low contrast detectability (LCD) phantom and cadaver breast utilizing a Lorad stereotactic biopsy unit with a coupled source and digital detector in a C-arm configuration. Datasets of 9 and 41 low-dose projections were collected over a 30 deg. angular range. Tomographic images were reconstructed using a Backprojection (BP) algorithm, an Iterative Subtraction (IS) algorithm that allows the partial subtraction of out-of-focus planes, and an Algebraic Reconstruction (AR) algorithm. These were compared with single view digital radiographs. The methods' effectiveness at enhancing visibility of an obscured LCD phantom was quantified in terms of the Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR), and Signal to Background Ratio (SBR), all normalized to the metric value for the single projection image. The methods' effectiveness at removing ghosting artifacts in a cadaver breast was quantified in terms of the Artifact Spread Function (ASF). The technology proved effective at partially removing out of focus structures and enhancing SNR and SBR. The normalized SNR was highest at 4.85 for the obscured LCD phantom, using nine projections and IS algorithm. The normalized SBR was highest at 23.2 for the obscured LCD phantom, using 41 projections and an AR algorithm. The highest normalized metric values occurred with the obscured phantom. This supports the assertion that the greatest value of tomosynthesis is in imaging

  5. Value of breast imaging reporting and data system in Chinese breast cancer screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the value of breast imaging reporting and data system (BI-RADS) in Chinese breast cancer screening. Methods: A total number of 3483 women participated in breast cancer screening with mammography in Hexi district in Tianjin from August to December 2009, which was organized by ministry of public health. BI-RADS assessment categories and recommendations were compared with histological findings. The precision, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) were calculated. Results: Among 3483 screening mammography cases, 267 were almost entirely fat breast, 1245 were scattered fibroglandular, 1890 were dense and 81 extremely dense. There were 1011 patients (29.0%) with category 1, 1741 (50.0%) with category 2, 383 (11.0%) with category 3, 59 patients (1.7%) with category 4 and 16 (0.5%) with category 5 according to BI-RADS assessment categories. Totally, 71 women with 77 lesions were confirmed by histological examinations. There were 29 malignant and 48 benign lesions. The diagnostic precision, sensitivity, specificity of' BI-RADS were 63.6% (49/77), 93.1% (27/29) and 45.8% (22/48). The general PPV of BI-RADS was 50.9% (27/53). The PPV of categories 0.4, 5 were 25.0% (1/4), 36.4% (12/33) and 87.5% (14/16). The NPV of categories 2 and 3 were 90.9% (10/11), 100.0% (12/12). Conclusions: BI-RADS is of much value in assessing the breast malignancy. It is applicable in Chinese breast cancer screening. (authors)

  6. A statistical, task-based evaluation method for three-dimensional x-ray breast imaging systems using variable-background phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: For the last few years, development and optimization of three-dimensional (3D) x-ray breast imaging systems, such as digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) and computed tomography, have drawn much attention from the medical imaging community, either academia or industry. However, there is still much room for understanding how to best optimize and evaluate the devices over a large space of many different system parameters and geometries. Current evaluation methods, which work well for 2D systems, do not incorporate the depth information from the 3D imaging systems. Therefore, it is critical to develop a statistically sound evaluation method to investigate the usefulness of inclusion of depth and background-variability information into the assessment and optimization of the 3D systems. Methods: In this paper, we present a mathematical framework for a statistical assessment of planar and 3D x-ray breast imaging systems. Our method is based on statistical decision theory, in particular, making use of the ideal linear observer called the Hotelling observer. We also present a physical phantom that consists of spheres of different sizes and materials for producing an ensemble of randomly varying backgrounds to be imaged for a given patient class. Lastly, we demonstrate our evaluation method in comparing laboratory mammography and three-angle DBT systems for signal detection tasks using the phantom's projection data. We compare the variable phantom case to that of a phantom of the same dimensions filled with water, which we call the uniform phantom, based on the performance of the Hotelling observer as a function of signal size and intensity. Results: Detectability trends calculated using the variable and uniform phantom methods are different from each other for both mammography and DBT systems. Conclusions: Our results indicate that measuring the system's detection performance with consideration of background variability may lead to differences in system performance

  7. Prototype of Microwave Imaging System for Breast-Cancer Screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubæk, Tonny; Zhurbenko, Vitaliy

    2009-01-01

    Microwave imaging for breast-cancer detection has received the attention of a large number of research groups in the last decade. In this paper, the imaging system currently being developed at the Technical university of Denmark is presented. This includes a description of the antenna system, the...

  8. The thioredoxin system in breast cancer cell invasion and migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Maneet; McGrath, Kelly L; Di Trapani, Giovanna; Charoentong, Pornpimol; Shah, Fenil; King, Mallory M; Clarke, Frank M; Tonissen, Kathryn F

    2016-08-01

    Metastasis is the most life threatening aspect of breast cancer. It is a multi-step process involving invasion and migration of primary tumor cells with a subsequent colonization of these cells at a secondary location. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of thioredoxin (Trx1) in the invasion and migration of breast cancer cells and to assess the strength of the association between high levels of Trx1 and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR1) expression with breast cancer patient survival. Our results indicate that the expression of both Trx1 and TrxR1 are statistically significantly increased in breast cancer patient cells compared with paired normal breast tissue from the same patient. Over-expression of Trx1 in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines enhanced cell invasion in in vitro assays while expression of a redox inactive mutant form of Trx1 (designated 1SS) or the antisense mRNA inhibited cell invasion. Addition of exogenous Trx1 also enhanced cell invasion, while addition of a specific monoclonal antibody that inhibits Trx1 redox function decreased cell invasion. Over-expression of intracellular Trx1 did not increase cell migration but expression of intracellular 1SS inhibited migration. Addition of exogenous Trx1 enhanced cell migration while 1SS had no effect. Treatment with auranofin inhibited TrxR activity, cell migration and clonogenic activity of MDA-MB-231 cells, while increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Analysis of 25 independent cohorts with 5910 patients showed that Trx1 and TrxR1 were both associated with a poor patient prognosis in terms of overall survival, distant metastasis free survival and disease free survival. Therefore, targeting the Trx system with auranofin or other specific inhibitors may provide improved breast cancer patient outcomes through inhibition of cancer invasion and migration. PMID:26760912

  9. The thioredoxin system in breast cancer cell invasion and migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maneet Bhatia

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Metastasis is the most life threatening aspect of breast cancer. It is a multi-step process involving invasion and migration of primary tumor cells with a subsequent colonization of these cells at a secondary location. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of thioredoxin (Trx1 in the invasion and migration of breast cancer cells and to assess the strength of the association between high levels of Trx1 and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR1 expression with breast cancer patient survival. Our results indicate that the expression of both Trx1 and TrxR1 are statistically significantly increased in breast cancer patient cells compared with paired normal breast tissue from the same patient. Over-expression of Trx1 in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines enhanced cell invasion in in vitro assays while expression of a redox inactive mutant form of Trx1 (designated 1SS or the antisense mRNA inhibited cell invasion. Addition of exogenous Trx1 also enhanced cell invasion, while addition of a specific monoclonal antibody that inhibits Trx1 redox function decreased cell invasion. Over-expression of intracellular Trx1 did not increase cell migration but expression of intracellular 1SS inhibited migration. Addition of exogenous Trx1 enhanced cell migration while 1SS had no effect. Treatment with auranofin inhibited TrxR activity, cell migration and clonogenic activity of MDA-MB-231 cells, while increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS levels. Analysis of 25 independent cohorts with 5910 patients showed that Trx1 and TrxR1 were both associated with a poor patient prognosis in terms of overall survival, distant metastasis free survival and disease free survival. Therefore, targeting the Trx system with auranofin or other specific inhibitors may provide improved breast cancer patient outcomes through inhibition of cancer invasion and migration.

  10. A review of biomechanically informed breast image registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hipwell, John H.; Vavourakis, Vasileios; Han, Lianghao; Mertzanidou, Thomy; Eiben, Björn; Hawkes, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Breast radiology encompasses the full range of imaging modalities from routine imaging via x-ray mammography, magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound (both two- and three-dimensional), to more recent technologies such as digital breast tomosynthesis, and dedicated breast imaging systems for positron emission mammography and ultrasound tomography. In addition new and experimental modalities, such as Photoacoustics, Near Infrared Spectroscopy and Electrical Impedance Tomography etc, are emerging. The breast is a highly deformable structure however, and this greatly complicates visual comparison of imaging modalities for the purposes of breast screening, cancer diagnosis (including image guided biopsy), tumour staging, treatment monitoring, surgical planning and simulation of the effects of surgery and wound healing etc. Due primarily to the challenges posed by these gross, non-rigid deformations, development of automated methods which enable registration, and hence fusion, of information within and across breast imaging modalities, and between the images and the physical space of the breast during interventions, remains an active research field which has yet to translate suitable methods into clinical practice. This review describes current research in the field of breast biomechanical modelling and identifies relevant publications where the resulting models have been incorporated into breast image registration and simulation algorithms. Despite these developments there remain a number of issues that limit clinical application of biomechanical modelling. These include the accuracy of constitutive modelling, implementation of representative boundary conditions, failure to meet clinically acceptable levels of computational cost, challenges associated with automating patient-specific model generation (i.e. robust image segmentation and mesh generation) and the complexity of applying biomechanical modelling methods in routine clinical practice.

  11. Systemic chemotherapy for metastatic breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yannan Zhao; Biyun Wang

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer among women worldwide and the most common cancer in China. Many factors influence the treatment strategy for metastatic breast cancer (MBC). Chemotherapy should be administered to patients with hormone receptor-negative tumors, symptomatic visceral metastasis, and a short disease-free interval. Sequential single-agent chemotherapy has similar efficacy as combination agents in terms of overall survival and quality of life. Anthracyclines are the cornerstone of first-line treatment for MBC, and taxanes represent the second treatment option after resistance. When progression or intolerable toxicity occurs after optimal treatment, the alternative treatments include capecitabine, vinorel-bine, and gemcitabine. Ixabepilone and eribulin are relatively new effective single agents. A combination of cytotoxic agents for patients with rapid clinical progression can further improve the overall response rate and time to progression compared to single-agent treatment. For patients with MBC who were pretreated with anthracyclines in the neoadjuvant/adjuvant setting, a taxane-containing regimen such as docetaxel plus capecitabine or gemcitabine plus paclitaxel should be administered. Platinum-based therapies such as cisplatin or carboplatin have a role in the treatment of triple-negative breast cancer. Meanwhile, the efficacy of the addition of targeted drugs such as iniparib, bevacizumab, and cetuximab to chemotherapy remains unproven. Maintenance chemotherapy is routinely recommended in clinical practice at present. Patients who were previously treated with paclitaxel and gemcitabine have better progression-free and overall survival with maintenance chemotherapy according to a Korean phase Ⅲ clinical trial. Sequential maintenance treatment with capecitabine monotherapy after capecitabine-based combination chemotherapy (X-based X) appears favorable based on a series of domestic studies.

  12. Design of a CZT based BreastSPECT system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high-resolution SPECT instrument dedicated to breast imaging has been designed incorporating arrays of collimated Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT) detectors tiled on either a cylindrical surface or a hemispherical surface surrounding the breast. The performance characteristics of a three-segment rotating parallel-hole collimator as well as a stationary multiple pin-hole collimator were considered for the cylindrical system. A stationary multiple pin-hole collimated system was also considered for the hemispherical design. Monte Carlo studies suggest that at almost equal spatial resolution of 0.5 cm, the cylindrical design with parallel-hole collimator would have an approximately a factor of two higher geometrical efficiency than the hemispherical pin-hole collimated system including effects of attenuation in the breast. However, whereas the parallel-hole collimator must be rotated to acquire data from multiple angles of view, the pin-hole version has the advantage of recording data from 112 views in a stationary mode. Monte Carlo studies of filtered backprojections as well as a Bayesian reconstruction approach including attenuation and scatter within the breast, where the breast was modeled as a 15 cm hemisphere of uniform activity distribution containing three spherical lesions of diameters 1.0 cm, 0.7 cm and 0.5 cm respectively suggest that the 0.5 cm could be detected with either design in a one-hour SPECT study assuming a 10:1 tumor to background ratio. The authors conclude that a high resolution Breast SPECT instrument where the resolution is limited to about 0.5 cm is viable with CZT detectors

  13. Design of a CZT based BreastSPECT system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, M.; Mumcuoglu, E. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1998-06-01

    A high-resolution SPECT instrument dedicated to breast imaging has been designed incorporating arrays of collimated Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT) detectors tiled on either a cylindrical surface or a hemispherical surface surrounding the breast. The performance characteristics of a three-segment rotating parallel-hole collimator as well as a stationary multiple pin-hole collimator were considered for the cylindrical system. A stationary multiple pin-hole collimated system was also considered for the hemispherical design. Monte Carlo studies suggest that at almost equal spatial resolution of 0.5 cm, the cylindrical design with parallel-hole collimator would have an approximately a factor of two higher geometrical efficiency than the hemispherical pin-hole collimated system including effects of attenuation in the breast. However, whereas the parallel-hole collimator must be rotated to acquire data from multiple angles of view, the pin-hole version has the advantage of recording data from 112 views in a stationary mode. Monte Carlo studies of filtered backprojections as well as a Bayesian reconstruction approach including attenuation and scatter within the breast, where the breast was modeled as a 15 cm hemisphere of uniform activity distribution containing three spherical lesions of diameters 1.0 cm, 0.7 cm and 0.5 cm respectively suggest that the 0.5 cm could be detected with either design in a one-hour SPECT study assuming a 10:1 tumor to background ratio. The authors conclude that a high resolution Breast SPECT instrument where the resolution is limited to about 0.5 cm is viable with CZT detectors.

  14. Digital tomosynthesis (DTS) with a Circular X-ray tube: Its image reconstruction based on total-variation minimization and the image characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Y. O.; Hong, D. K.; Cho, H. S.; Je, U. K.; Oh, J. E.; Lee, M. S.; Kim, H. J.; Lee, S. H.; Jang, W. S.; Cho, H. M.; Choi, S. I.; Koo, Y. S.

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, we introduce an effective imaging system for digital tomosynthesis (DTS) with a circular X-ray tube, the so-called circular-DTS (CDTS) system, and its image reconstruction algorithm based on the total-variation (TV) minimization method for low-dose, high-accuracy X-ray imaging. Here, the X-ray tube is equipped with a series of cathodes distributed around a rotating anode, and the detector remains stationary throughout the image acquisition. We considered a TV-based reconstruction algorithm that exploited the sparsity of the image with substantially high image accuracy. We implemented the algorithm for the CDTS geometry and successfully reconstructed images of high accuracy. The image characteristics were investigated quantitatively by using some figures of merit, including the universal-quality index (UQI) and the depth resolution. For selected tomographic angles of 20, 40, and 60°, the corresponding UQI values in the tomographic view were estimated to be about 0.94, 0.97, and 0.98, and the depth resolutions were about 4.6, 3.1, and 1.2 voxels in full width at half maximum (FWHM), respectively. We expect the proposed method to be applicable to developing a next-generation dental or breast X-ray imaging system.

  15. 21 CFR 866.6040 - Gene expression profiling test system for breast cancer prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... cancer prognosis. (a) Identification. A gene expression profiling test system for breast cancer prognosis... previously diagnosed breast cancer. (b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The special control is... Profiling Test System for Breast Cancer Prognosis.” See § 866.1(e) for the availability of this...

  16. Limited angle C-arm tomosynthesis reconstruction algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malalla, Nuhad A. Y.; Xu, Shiyu; Chen, Ying

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, C-arm tomosynthesis with digital detector was investigated as a novel three dimensional (3D) imaging technique. Digital tomosythses is an imaging technique to provide 3D information of the object by reconstructing slices passing through the object, based on a series of angular projection views with respect to the object. C-arm tomosynthesis provides two dimensional (2D) X-ray projection images with rotation (-/+20 angular range) of both X-ray source and detector. In this paper, four representative reconstruction algorithms including point by point back projection (BP), filtered back projection (FBP), simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART) and maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) were investigated. Dataset of 25 projection views of 3D spherical object that located at center of C-arm imaging space was simulated from 25 angular locations over a total view angle of 40 degrees. With reconstructed images, 3D mesh plot and 2D line profile of normalized pixel intensities on focus reconstruction plane crossing the center of the object were studied with each reconstruction algorithm. Results demonstrated the capability to generate 3D information from limited angle C-arm tomosynthesis. Since C-arm tomosynthesis is relatively compact, portable and can avoid moving patients, it has been investigated for different clinical applications ranging from tumor surgery to interventional radiology. It is very important to evaluate C-arm tomosynthesis for valuable applications.

  17. Introducing DeBRa: a detailed breast model for radiological studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Andy K. W.; Gunn, Spencer; Darambara, Dimitra G.

    2009-07-01

    Currently, x-ray mammography is the method of choice in breast cancer screening programmes. As the mammography technology moves from 2D imaging modalities to 3D, conventional computational phantoms do not have sufficient detail to support the studies of these advanced imaging systems. Studies of these 3D imaging systems call for a realistic and sophisticated computational model of the breast. DeBRa (Detailed Breast model for Radiological studies) is the most advanced, detailed, 3D computational model of the breast developed recently for breast imaging studies. A DeBRa phantom can be constructed to model a compressed breast, as in film/screen, digital mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis studies, or a non-compressed breast as in positron emission mammography and breast CT studies. Both the cranial-caudal and mediolateral oblique views can be modelled. The anatomical details inside the phantom include the lactiferous duct system, the Cooper ligaments and the pectoral muscle. The fibroglandular tissues are also modelled realistically. In addition, abnormalities such as microcalcifications, irregular tumours and spiculated tumours are inserted into the phantom. Existing sophisticated breast models require specialized simulation codes. Unlike its predecessors, DeBRa has elemental compositions and densities incorporated into its voxels including those of the explicitly modelled anatomical structures and the noise-like fibroglandular tissues. The voxel dimensions are specified as needed by any study and the microcalcifications are embedded into the voxels so that the microcalcification sizes are not limited by the voxel dimensions. Therefore, DeBRa works with general-purpose Monte Carlo codes. Furthermore, general-purpose Monte Carlo codes allow different types of imaging modalities and detector characteristics to be simulated with ease. DeBRa is a versatile and multipurpose model specifically designed for both x-ray and γ-ray imaging studies.

  18. Introducing DeBRa: a detailed breast model for radiological studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Andy K W; Darambara, Dimitra G [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Fulham Road, London SW3 6JJ (United Kingdom); Gunn, Spencer [Dexela Ltd, Wenlock Business Centre, 50/52 Wharf Road, London N1 7SF (United Kingdom)], E-mail: andyma@physics.org, E-mail: dimitra.darambara@icr.ac.uk, E-mail: spencer@dexelaimaging.com

    2009-07-21

    Currently, x-ray mammography is the method of choice in breast cancer screening programmes. As the mammography technology moves from 2D imaging modalities to 3D, conventional computational phantoms do not have sufficient detail to support the studies of these advanced imaging systems. Studies of these 3D imaging systems call for a realistic and sophisticated computational model of the breast. DeBRa (Detailed Breast model for Radiological studies) is the most advanced, detailed, 3D computational model of the breast developed recently for breast imaging studies. A DeBRa phantom can be constructed to model a compressed breast, as in film/screen, digital mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis studies, or a non-compressed breast as in positron emission mammography and breast CT studies. Both the cranial-caudal and mediolateral oblique views can be modelled. The anatomical details inside the phantom include the lactiferous duct system, the Cooper ligaments and the pectoral muscle. The fibroglandular tissues are also modelled realistically. In addition, abnormalities such as microcalcifications, irregular tumours and spiculated tumours are inserted into the phantom. Existing sophisticated breast models require specialized simulation codes. Unlike its predecessors, DeBRa has elemental compositions and densities incorporated into its voxels including those of the explicitly modelled anatomical structures and the noise-like fibroglandular tissues. The voxel dimensions are specified as needed by any study and the microcalcifications are embedded into the voxels so that the microcalcification sizes are not limited by the voxel dimensions. Therefore, DeBRa works with general-purpose Monte Carlo codes. Furthermore, general-purpose Monte Carlo codes allow different types of imaging modalities and detector characteristics to be simulated with ease. DeBRa is a versatile and multipurpose model specifically designed for both x-ray and {gamma}-ray imaging studies.

  19. Impulse response in various scanning geometries for digital tomosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, JeeYoung; Youn, Han Bean; Cho, Min Kook; Kim, Ho Kyung [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-05-15

    Digital tomosynthesis (DTS) is a three-dimensional imaging technique to reconstruct a set of planes in the object. Opposed to the computed tomography (CT), however, DTS uses projection images obtained from limited angular scanning, hence there exist some artifacts such as blurs that are originated from depletion of data in the Fourier domain. The main advantages of DTS technique are shorter reconstruction time and less patient dose. There are various geometries for angular scanning available in DTS, and which is mainly dependent upon specific imaging task and applications, such as mammography, dental imaging, industrial laminography etc. In principle, DTS shares the same concept in imaging reconstruction with the conventional CT, and thus incorporates a back-projection operation. This backprojection operation determines the transfer function, which is mainly resulted from the scanning geometry, if we regard the image reconstruction as an inverse problem. Therefore, the investigation of impulse response with respect to various imaging geometries is valuable to identify artifacts associated with the scanning geometry and thus optimize the system performance. We investigate and compare the system-transfer functions (impulse-response functions) for various image acquisition schemes to acquire projection data by numerical simulation. This study may suggest fundamental limitations of a certain scanning geometry and provide the best geometry with least blur artifacts

  20. Impulse response in various scanning geometries for digital tomosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Digital tomosynthesis (DTS) is a three-dimensional imaging technique to reconstruct a set of planes in the object. Opposed to the computed tomography (CT), however, DTS uses projection images obtained from limited angular scanning, hence there exist some artifacts such as blurs that are originated from depletion of data in the Fourier domain. The main advantages of DTS technique are shorter reconstruction time and less patient dose. There are various geometries for angular scanning available in DTS, and which is mainly dependent upon specific imaging task and applications, such as mammography, dental imaging, industrial laminography etc. In principle, DTS shares the same concept in imaging reconstruction with the conventional CT, and thus incorporates a back-projection operation. This backprojection operation determines the transfer function, which is mainly resulted from the scanning geometry, if we regard the image reconstruction as an inverse problem. Therefore, the investigation of impulse response with respect to various imaging geometries is valuable to identify artifacts associated with the scanning geometry and thus optimize the system performance. We investigate and compare the system-transfer functions (impulse-response functions) for various image acquisition schemes to acquire projection data by numerical simulation. This study may suggest fundamental limitations of a certain scanning geometry and provide the best geometry with least blur artifacts

  1. Preliminary attempt on maximum likelihood tomosynthesis reconstruction of DEI data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomosynthesis is a three-dimension reconstruction method that can remove the effect of superimposition with limited angle projections. It is especially promising in mammography where radiation dose is concerned. In this paper, we propose a maximum likelihood tomosynthesis reconstruction algorithm (ML-TS) on the apparent absorption data of diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI). The motivation of this contribution is to develop a tomosynthesis algorithm in low-dose or noisy circumstances and make DEI get closer to clinic application. The theoretical statistical models of DEI data in physics are analyzed and the proposed algorithm is validated with the experimental data at the Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BSRF). The results of ML-TS have better contrast compared with the well known 'shift-and-add' algorithm and FBP algorithm. (authors)

  2. Breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultrasound is not an efficacious screening modality to detect early-stage breast malignancy in a clinically unremarkable population of women. Computed body tomography is similarly not practical for screening because of slice thickness and partial volume averaging, a higher radiation dose than modern mammography, and the lack of availability of such units for such a high throughput requirement. Nevertheless, these two imaging modalities can be very useful in management to guide the least invasive and efficacious treatment of the patient. X-ray mammography remains the principal imaging modality in the search for breast malignancy, but ultrasound is the single most important second study in the diagnostic evaluation of the breast. The combined use of these techniques and the ability to perform guided aspiration and localization procedures can result in a reduction in the surgical removal of benign cysts and reduction in the amount of tissue volume required if excision becomes necessary

  3. Development of realistic physical breast phantoms matched to virtual breast phantoms based on human subject data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Physical phantoms are essential for the development, optimization, and evaluation of x-ray breast imaging systems. Recognizing the major effect of anatomy on image quality and clinical performance, such phantoms should ideally reflect the three-dimensional structure of the human breast. Currently, there is no commercially available three-dimensional physical breast phantom that is anthropomorphic. The authors present the development of a new suite of physical breast phantoms based on human data. Methods: The phantoms were designed to match the extended cardiac-torso virtual breast phantoms that were based on dedicated breast computed tomography images of human subjects. The phantoms were fabricated by high-resolution multimaterial additive manufacturing (3D printing) technology. The glandular equivalency of the photopolymer materials was measured relative to breast tissue-equivalent plastic materials. Based on the current state-of-the-art in the technology and available materials, two variations were fabricated. The first was a dual-material phantom, the Doublet. Fibroglandular tissue and skin were represented by the most radiographically dense material available; adipose tissue was represented by the least radiographically dense material. The second variation, the Singlet, was fabricated with a single material to represent fibroglandular tissue and skin. It was subsequently filled with adipose-equivalent materials including oil, beeswax, and permanent urethane-based polymer. Simulated microcalcification clusters were further included in the phantoms via crushed eggshells. The phantoms were imaged and characterized visually and quantitatively. Results: The mammographic projections and tomosynthesis reconstructed images of the fabricated phantoms yielded realistic breast background. The mammograms of the phantoms demonstrated close correlation with simulated mammographic projection images of the corresponding virtual phantoms. Furthermore, power

  4. Development of realistic physical breast phantoms matched to virtual breast phantoms based on human subject data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiarashi, Nooshin [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Nolte, Adam C. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Ghate, Sujata V. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Segars, William P. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 and Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Nolte, Loren W. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Samei, Ehsan [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); and others

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Physical phantoms are essential for the development, optimization, and evaluation of x-ray breast imaging systems. Recognizing the major effect of anatomy on image quality and clinical performance, such phantoms should ideally reflect the three-dimensional structure of the human breast. Currently, there is no commercially available three-dimensional physical breast phantom that is anthropomorphic. The authors present the development of a new suite of physical breast phantoms based on human data. Methods: The phantoms were designed to match the extended cardiac-torso virtual breast phantoms that were based on dedicated breast computed tomography images of human subjects. The phantoms were fabricated by high-resolution multimaterial additive manufacturing (3D printing) technology. The glandular equivalency of the photopolymer materials was measured relative to breast tissue-equivalent plastic materials. Based on the current state-of-the-art in the technology and available materials, two variations were fabricated. The first was a dual-material phantom, the Doublet. Fibroglandular tissue and skin were represented by the most radiographically dense material available; adipose tissue was represented by the least radiographically dense material. The second variation, the Singlet, was fabricated with a single material to represent fibroglandular tissue and skin. It was subsequently filled with adipose-equivalent materials including oil, beeswax, and permanent urethane-based polymer. Simulated microcalcification clusters were further included in the phantoms via crushed eggshells. The phantoms were imaged and characterized visually and quantitatively. Results: The mammographic projections and tomosynthesis reconstructed images of the fabricated phantoms yielded realistic breast background. The mammograms of the phantoms demonstrated close correlation with simulated mammographic projection images of the corresponding virtual phantoms. Furthermore, power

  5. Protective Effects of Breast Milk on Central Nervous System and the Incidence of Febrile Convulsion in Breast-Fed Children

    OpenAIRE

    A Tayarani Bathayi; KH Farivar

    1999-01-01

    It is known that central nervous system is well protected in breast-fed children, recognized in decreased incidence of multiple sclerosis, infectious and malignant diseases of the central nervous system, sudden infant death syndrome, 5th day convulsion, and botulism as well as an increase in IQ rates. In this retrospective study we have found also an indirect correlation between in incidence of febrile convulsion and length of breast-feeding. Among 270 cases of febrile convulsion 144 (53.3%) ...

  6. Development of a physical 3D anthropomorphic breast phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Develop a technique to fabricate a 3D anthropomorphic breast phantom with known ground truth for image quality assessment of 2D and 3D breast x-ray imaging systems. Methods: The phantom design is based on an existing computer model that can generate breast voxel phantoms of varying composition, size, and shape. The physical phantom is produced in two steps. First, the portion of the voxel phantom consisting of the glandular tissue, skin, and Cooper's ligaments is separated into sections. These sections are then fabricated by high-resolution rapid prototyping using a single material with 50% glandular equivalence. The remaining adipose compartments are then filled using an epoxy-based resin (EBR) with 100% adipose equivalence. The phantom sections are stacked to form the physical anthropomorphic phantom. Results: The authors fabricated a prototype phantom corresponding to a 450 ml breast with 45% dense tissue, deformed to a 5 cm compressed thickness. Both the rapid prototype (RP) and EBR phantom materials are radiographically uniform. The coefficient of variation (CoV) of the relative attenuation between RP and EBR phantom samples was <1% and the CoV of the signal intensity within RP and EBR phantom samples was <1.5% on average. Digital mammography and reconstructed digital breast tomosynthesis images of the authors' phantom were reviewed by two radiologists; they reported that the images are similar in appearance to clinical images, noting there are still artifacts from air bubbles in the EBR. Conclusions: The authors have developed a technique to produce 3D anthropomorphic breast phantoms with known ground truth, yielding highly realistic x-ray images. Such phantoms may serve both qualitative and quantitative performance assessments for 2D and 3D breast x-ray imaging systems.

  7. Breast cancer brain metastases: new directions in systemic therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Nancy U

    2013-01-01

    The management of patients with brain metastases from breast cancer continues to be a major clinical challenge. The standard initial therapeutic approach depends upon the size, location, and number of metastatic lesions and includes consideration of surgical resection, whole-brain radiotherapy, and stereotactic radiosurgery. As systemic therapies for control of extracranial disease improve, patients are surviving long enough to experience subsequent progression events in the brain. Therefore,...

  8. Digital tomosynthesis of hands using simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique with distance driven projector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Digital tomosynthesis (DT) is an X-ray tomographic technique for producing a three-dimensional stack of crosssectional images, based on a limited number of low-dose two-dimensional projections, acquired over a limited angular range. Currently, DT has mainly been investigated for the breast and chest imaging. Another application of DT may be an orthopaedic imaging of hands. A three-dimensional reconstruction with a high in-plane resolution, a low dose and potentially low costs make DT attractive for hand imaging comparing with the planar radiography or computed tomography. However, it should be noted that an accurate image reconstruction in DT is a challenging task due to the high degree of data incompleteness. Images are affected by the residual blur of structures that are located above and below the plane of interest. A human hand consists of 27 bones and therefore the artifact problem becomes even more acute in this case, since the magnitude of artifacts is related not only to the chosen reconstruction type but also to the size and contrast of the artifact-generating object. The study presented in the current work has been performed to show a capability of Simultaneous Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (SART) for hand visualization in tomosynthesis. A distance-driven type for the projector and backprojector operator has been used to make the calculation fast and accurate. Studies have been carried out on a phantom with an uniform background and millimeter-sized balls, a dried finger bone and an in toto hand phantom. A Siemens Mammomat Inspiration device has been used to acquire the projection data. Experimental results show that SART is able to reduce out-of-plane artifacts caused by bone tissue. It provides reconstruction with acceptable quality in only one iteration with the recovered visibility of the obscured trabecular structures as well as the joint spaces and the margins. (orig.)

  9. Performance analysis of a dedicated breast MR-HIFU system for tumor ablation in breast cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckers, R.; Merckel, L. G.; de Senneville, B. Denis; Schubert, G.; Köhler, M.; Knuttel, F. M.; Mali, W. P. Th M.; Moonen, C. T. W.; van den Bosch, M. A. A. J.; Bartels, L. W.

    2015-07-01

    MR-guided HIFU ablation is a promising technique for the non-invasive treatment of breast cancer. A phase I study was performed to assess the safety and treatment accuracy and precision of MR-HIFU ablation in breast cancer patients (n=10 ) using a newly developed MR-HIFU platform dedicated to applications in the breast. In this paper a technical analysis of the performance of the dedicated breast MR-HIFU system during breast tumors ablation is described. The main points of investigation were the spatial targeting accuracy and precision of the system and the performance of real-time respiration-corrected MR thermometry. The mean targeting accuracy was in the range of 2.4-2.6 mm, whereas the mean targeting precision was in the range of 1.5-1.8 mm. To correct for respiration-induced magnetic field fluctuations during MR temperature mapping a look-up-table (LUT)-based correction method was used. An optimized procedural sedation protocol in combination with the LUT-based correction method allowed for precise MR thermometry during the ablation procedure (temperature standard deviation HIFU system allows for safe, accurate and precise ablation of breast tumors.

  10. Oblique reconstructions in tomosynthesis. II. Super-resolution

    OpenAIRE

    Acciavatti, Raymond J.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: In tomosynthesis, super-resolution has been demonstrated using reconstruction planes parallel to the detector. Super-resolution allows for subpixel resolution relative to the detector. The purpose of this work is to develop an analytical model that generalizes super-resolution to oblique reconstruction planes.

  11. Ultrasound-guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsy using Mammotome biopsy system for detection of breast cancer: results from two high volume hospitals

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Shaobo; Liu, Wenguang; Jin, Ketao; Liu, Yu; Zhou, Yunxiao

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsy (VABB) has been recently regarded as a feasible, effective, minimally invasive and safe method for removal of benign breast lesions without serious complications. The frequency of detection of noninvasive malignant breast lesions by ultrasound-guided VABB is increasing. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of the ultrasound-guided VABB using Mammotome biopsy system in the early detection of breast cancer. Retrospective review between J...

  12. Breast Glandularity in Malaysian Women from a Full-Field Digital Mammography System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is undertaken to estimate breast glandularity in Malaysian women from a Full-Field Digital mammography System. This study involved 223 women (Malay=100;Chinese=101 and Indian=22) underwent voluntary screening mammography at Breast Centre, International Islamic University Malaysia (IIUM Breast Centre) for the first quarter of year 2009. Those are women aged between 31 to 69 years old (median age, 49 years). Data on miliampere-seconds, kilo voltage and compressed breast thickness for each cranio caudal view are used to estimate breast glandularity for an individual breast. Breast glandularity is calculated using the fitted equation reported earlier. The difference in breast glandularity among ethnic groups was tested for significance using the nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis test. The average breast glandularity estimated in our study, using FFDM system is 52.94±27.63 %. No significant difference was seen in breast glandularity among the ethnic groups (p>0.05, Kruskan Wallis test). Breast glandularity decrease as age increases, up to 60 years old. (author)

  13. Progress in diagnosis of breast cancer: Advances in radiology technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Mari Beth Linder

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer in females between the ages of 15 and 54, and the second leading cause of cancer death in women in the United States. Diagnosis begins with detection by breast examination (clinical breast exam or breast self-exam or by radiologic studies, like mammography. Many advances in the diagnosis of breast cancer have taken place in recent years. This article will review the history of radiologic advances in the diagnosis of breast cancer. Use of technological advancements in digital breast tomosynthesis, magnetic resonance imaging, and ultrasound in breast cancer diagnosis will be presented. Advantages and disadvantages of these diagnostic interventions when compared to older, traditional X-ray films will be discussed. It is important for all nurses, including radiology and oncology nurses, to be well informed about these varied diagnostic modalities, and appreciate the fact that advances in radiologic imaging technologies can yield improved outcomes for breast cancer patients.

  14. Design and evaluation of a laboratory prototype system for 3D photoacoustic full breast tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Xia, W; Piras, D; Singh, M. K. A.; van Hespen, J. C. G.; Van Leeuwen, T. G.; Steenbergen, W Van; Manohar, S.

    2013-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging can visualize vascularization-driven optical absorption contrast with great potential for breast cancer detection and diagnosis. State-of-the-art photoacoustic breast imaging systems are promising but are limited either by only a 2D imaging capability or by an insufficient imaging field-of-view (FOV). We present a laboratory prototype system designed for 3D photoacoustic full breast tomography, and comprehensively characterize it and evaluate its performance in imaging p...

  15. Assessing and improving cobalt-60 digital tomosynthesis image quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Matthew B.; Schreiner, L. John; Kerr, Andrew T.

    2014-03-01

    Image guidance capability is an important feature of modern radiotherapy linacs, and future cobalt-60 units will be expected to have similar capabilities. Imaging with the treatment beam is an appealing option, for reasons of simplicity and cost, but the dose needed to produce cone beam CT (CBCT) images in a Co-60 treatment beam is too high for this modality to be clinically useful. Digital tomosynthesis (DT) offers a quasi-3D image, of sufficient quality to identify bony anatomy or fiducial markers, while delivering a much lower dose than CBCT. A series of experiments were conducted on a prototype Co-60 cone beam imaging system to quantify the resolution, selectivity, geometric accuracy and contrast sensitivity of Co-60 DT. Although the resolution is severely limited by the penumbra cast by the ~2 cm diameter source, it is possible to identify high contrast objects on the order of 1 mm in width, and bony anatomy in anthropomorphic phantoms is clearly recognizable. Low contrast sensitivity down to electron density differences of 3% is obtained, for uniform features of similar thickness. The conventional shift-and-add reconstruction algorithm was compared to several variants of the Feldkamp-Davis-Kress filtered backprojection algorithm result. The Co-60 DT images were obtained with a total dose of 5 to 15 cGy each. We conclude that Co-60 radiotherapy units upgraded for modern conformal therapy could also incorporate imaging using filtered backprojection DT in the treatment beam. DT is a versatile and promising modality that would be well suited to image guidance requirements.

  16. Observer detection limits for a dedicated SPECT breast imaging system

    OpenAIRE

    Cutler, S J; Perez, K L; Barnhart, H. X.; Tornai, M P

    2010-01-01

    An observer-based contrast-detail study is performed in an effort to evaluate the limits of object detectability using a dedicated CZT-based breast SPECT imaging system under various imaging conditions. A custom geometric contrast-resolution phantom was developed that can be used for both positive (‘hot’) and negative contrasts (‘cold’). The 3 cm long fillable tubes are arranged in six sectors having equal inner diameters ranging from 1 mm to 6 mm with plastic wall thicknesses of

  17. Overview of two years of clinical experience of chest tomo-synthesis at Sahlgrenska university hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since December 2006, ∼ 3800 clinical chest tomo-synthesis examinations have been performed at our department at Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital. A subset of the examinations has been included in studies of the detectability of pulmonary nodules, using computed tomography (CT) as the gold standard. Visibility studies, in which chest tomo-synthesis and CT have been compared side-by side, have been used to determine the depiction potential of chest tomo-synthesis. Comparisons with conventional chest radiography have been made. In the clinical setting, chest tomo-synthesis has mostly been used as an additional examination. The most frequent indication for chest tomo-synthesis has been suspicion of a nodule or tumour. In visibility studies, tomo-synthesis has depicted over 90% of the nodules seen on the CT scan. The corresponding figure for chest radiography has been <30%. In the detection studies, the lesion-level sensitivity has been ∼ 60% for tomo-synthesis and 20% for chest radiography. In one of the detection studies, an analysis of all false-positive nodules was performed. This analysis showed that all findings had morphological correlates on the CT examinations. The majority of the false-positive nodules were localised in the immediate sub-pleural region. In conclusion, chest tomo-synthesis is an improved chest radiography method, which can be used to optimise the use of CT resources, thereby reducing the radiation dose to the patient population. However, there are some limitations with chest tomo-synthesis. For example, patients undergoing tomo-synthesis have to be able to stand still and hold their breath firmly for 10 s. Also, chest tomo-synthesis has a limited depth resolution, which may explain why pathology in the sub-pleural region is more difficult to interpret and artefacts from medical devices may occur. (authors)

  18. The role of intratumoral and systemic IL-6 in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dethlefsen, Christine; Højfeldt, Grith Westergaard; Hojman, Pernille

    2013-01-01

    circulating IL-6 and risk of breast cancer, prognosis for patients with prevalent disease, adverse effects and interventions to control systemic IL-6 levels in patients are discussed. In summary, direct application of IL-6 on breast cancer cells inhibits proliferation in estrogen receptor positive cells......Chronic low-grade inflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of several cancer forms including breast cancer. The pleiotropic cytokine IL-6 is a key player in systemic inflammation, regulating both the inflammatory response and tissue metabolism during acute stimulations. Here, we...... review the associations between IL-6 and breast cancer ranging from in vitro cell culture studies to clinical studies, covering the role of IL-6 in controlling breast cancer cell growth, regulation of cancer stem cell renewal, as well as breast cancer cell migration. Moreover, associations between...

  19. Virtual reality and women's health: a breast biopsy system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahora, F; Temkin, B; Marcy, W; Gorman, P J; Krummel, T M; Heinrichs, W L

    1999-01-01

    Minimally invasive procedures are becoming much more common in surgical practice because of the many advantages for patient comfort and convenience, and improved surgical access. However some of the major problems leading to occasional surgical errors with this minimal access method are restricted vision, limited sense of touch, difficulties in identification in 3D space of the position of the instrument tips, and their handling during delicate, short-distance movements toward the surgical target area. These factors emphasize the need for computer simulated training in surgical manipulations and procedures in preparation for conducting them in patients. The key new feature of our proof-of-concept training simulator is a preventive mechanism that serves at least two functions. As the surgical target (or a critical structure) is approached, a haptically generated preventive force forewarns the surgeon, making it possible to abort those maneuvers that may lead to adverse results. By announcing a potential collision of a virtual instrument tip with a surgical target, the time used for searching for the target is shortened, and the haptic signal minimizes the potential of tissue damage. This real-time, interactive, virtual reality based, haptic breast biopsy-training simulation is a PC/NT based multitasking, multithreading system. It is based upon an advanced force feedback device. The system monitors and indirectly guides the surgeon's movements, while providing high fidelity visual and force feedback cues as the area of surgical interest is approached. Our first application is with human breast. PMID:10538389

  20. Does adjuvant systemic therapy contribute to decrease of breast recurrence after breast-conserving surgery?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preventing breast recurrence after breast-conserving surgery is an important issue. The main factors contributing to breast recurrences are positive margins and absence of radiotherapy. In late years a standard adjuvant treatment is widely used in Japan. We examined whether these standard treatments contributed to reduction of a breast recurrence. By March 2003, 845 patients were treated by breast-conserving surgery, and the cases were divided into two groups by operation period; 426 cases until 1998 (the first half group) and 202 patients with follow-up periods more than 2 years (the latter group). There were much positive margins and patients with radiotherapy in a latter group in background factor. An endocrine therapy for estrogen receptor (ER) positive was performed in 68.1% in first half period, and in contrast 94.2% in the latter period, and chemotherapy was performed in 87% (mainly Epirubicin) for ER negative in the latter period, and 77% (mainly oral agent) in the first half period. There was a significant difference of breast recurrence-free survival between 2 groups; an early recurrence was seen in 19 cases (4.5%) in the first half period and 2 cases (1.0%) in the latter group. In particular the difference was significant in patients with absence of radiotherapy or negative ER. Multivariate analysis revealed that the operation time was a significant factor for breast recurrence. In conclusion, an apparent reduction of breast recurrence may be brought by a standard adjuvant therapy. (authors)

  1. Breast cancer metastasis to the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weil, Robert J; Palmieri, Diane C; Bronder, Julie L; Stark, Andreas M; Steeg, Patricia S

    2005-10-01

    Clinically symptomatic metastases to the central nervous system (CNS) occur in approximately 10 to 15% of patients with metastatic beast cancer. CNS metastases are traditionally viewed as a late complication of systemic disease, for which few effective treatment options exist. Recently, patients with Her-2-positive breast tumors who were treated with trastuzumab have been reported to develop CNS metastases at higher rates, often while responding favorably to treatment. The blood:brain barrier and the unique brain microenvironment are hypothesized to promote distinct molecular features in CNS metastases that may require tailored therapeutic approaches. New research approaches using cell lines that reliably and preferentially metastasize in vivo to the brain have been reported. Using such model systems, as well as in vitro analogs of blood-brain barrier penetration and tissue-based studies, new molecular leads into this disease are unfolding. PMID:16192626

  2. Mechanized radiation testing of austenitic pipe welds. Testing of media filled pipes and determination of the flaw depth by tomosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A compact detection system was built for multi-angle inspection of pipes, consisting of a high-sensitivity radiometric line scanner and an ultrasonic manipulator. Improved flaw imaging quality is achieved with this system as compared to film radiography. Measurements have been carried out on site in a nuclear power plant and in a laboratory. Better flaw imaging quality was also achieved in the testing of water-filled pipes. Non-linear tomosynthesis was applied for processing and interpretation of measured data. The system delivers considerably better images of planary materials inhomogeneitites, (such as cracks and lack-of-bond defects). (orig./CB)

  3. A second generation of physical anthropomorphic 3D breast phantoms based on human subject data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolte, Adam; Kiarashi, Nooshin; Samei, Ehsan; Segars, W. P.; Lo, Joseph Y.

    2014-03-01

    Previous fabrication of anthropomorphic breast phantoms has demonstrated their viability as a model for 2D (mammography) and 3D (tomosynthesis) breast imaging systems. Further development of these models will be essential for the evaluation of breast x-ray systems. There is also the potential to use them as the ground truth in virtual clinical trials. The first generation of phantoms was segmented from human subject dedicated breast computed tomography data and fabricated into physical models using highresolution 3D printing. Two variations were made. The first was a multi-material model (doublet) printed with two photopolymers to represent glandular and adipose tissues with the greatest physical contrast available, mimicking 75% and 35% glandular tissue. The second model was printed with a single 75% glandular equivalent photopolymer (singlet) to represent glandular tissue, which can be filled independently with an adipose-equivalent material such as oil. For this study, we have focused on improving the latter, the singlet phantom. First, the temporary oil filler has been replaced with a permanent adipose-equivalent urethane-based polymer. This offers more realistic contrast as compared to the multi-material approach at the expense of air bubbles and pockets that form during the filling process. Second, microcalcification clusters have been included in the singlet model via crushed eggshells, which have very similar chemical composition to calcifications in vivo. The results from these new prototypes demonstrate significant improvement over the first generation of anthropomorphic physical phantoms.

  4. Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) breast composition descriptors: Automated measurement development for full field digital mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, E. E.; Sellers, T. A.; Lu, B. [Department of Cancer Epidemiology, Division of Population Sciences, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States); Heine, J. J. [Department of Cancer Imaging and Metabolism, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: The Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) breast composition descriptors are used for standardized mammographic reporting and are assessed visually. This reporting is clinically relevant because breast composition can impact mammographic sensitivity and is a breast cancer risk factor. New techniques are presented and evaluated for generating automated BI-RADS breast composition descriptors using both raw and calibrated full field digital mammography (FFDM) image data.Methods: A matched case-control dataset with FFDM images was used to develop three automated measures for the BI-RADS breast composition descriptors. Histograms of each calibrated mammogram in the percent glandular (pg) representation were processed to create the new BR{sub pg} measure. Two previously validated measures of breast density derived from calibrated and raw mammograms were converted to the new BR{sub vc} and BR{sub vr} measures, respectively. These three measures were compared with the radiologist-reported BI-RADS compositions assessments from the patient records. The authors used two optimization strategies with differential evolution to create these measures: method-1 used breast cancer status; and method-2 matched the reported BI-RADS descriptors. Weighted kappa (κ) analysis was used to assess the agreement between the new measures and the reported measures. Each measure's association with breast cancer was evaluated with odds ratios (ORs) adjusted for body mass index, breast area, and menopausal status. ORs were estimated as per unit increase with 95% confidence intervals.Results: The three BI-RADS measures generated by method-1 had κ between 0.25–0.34. These measures were significantly associated with breast cancer status in the adjusted models: (a) OR = 1.87 (1.34, 2.59) for BR{sub pg}; (b) OR = 1.93 (1.36, 2.74) for BR{sub vc}; and (c) OR = 1.37 (1.05, 1.80) for BR{sub vr}. The measures generated by method-2 had κ between 0.42–0.45. Two of these

  5. A Clinical Decision Support System for Breast Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Ana S.; Alves, Pedro; Jarman, Ian H.; Etchells, Terence A.; Fonseca, José M.; Lisboa, Paulo J. G.

    This paper proposes a Web clinical decision support system for clinical oncologists and for breast cancer patients making prognostic assessments, using the particular characteristics of the individual patient. This system comprises three different prognostic modelling methodologies: the clinically widely used Nottingham prognostic index (NPI); the Cox regression modelling and a partial logistic artificial neural network with automatic relevance determination (PLANN-ARD). All three models yield a different prognostic index that can be analysed together in order to obtain a more accurate prognostic assessment of the patient. Missing data is incorporated in the mentioned models, a common issue in medical data that was overcome using multiple imputation techniques. Risk group assignments are also provided through a methodology based on regression trees, where Boolean rules can be obtained expressed with patient characteristics.

  6. Regularization approach for tomosynthesis X-ray inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tigkos, Konstantinos; Hassler, Ulf; Holub, Wolfgang; Woerlein, Norbert; Rehak, Markus

    2014-02-01

    X-ray inspection is intended to be used as an escalation technique for inspection of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) in aerospace applications, especially in case of unclear indications from ultrasonic or other NDT modalities. Due to their large dimensions, most aerospace components cannot be scanned by conventional computed tomography. In such cases, X-ray Laminography may be applied, allowing a pseudo 3D slice-by-slice reconstruction of the sample with Tomosynthesis. However, due to the limited angle acquisition geometry, reconstruction artifacts arise, especially at surfaces parallel to the imaging plane. To regularize the Tomosynthesis approach, we propose an additional prescan of the object to detect outer sample surfaces. We recommend the use of contrasted markers which are temporarily attached to the sample surfaces. The depth position of the markers is then derived from that prescan. As long as the sample surface remains simple, few markers are required to fit the respective object surfaces. The knowledge about this surface may then be used to regularize the final Tomosynthesis reconstruction, performed with markerless projections. Eventually, it can also serve as prior information for an ART reconstruction or to register a CAD model of the sample. The presented work is carried out within the European FP7 project QUICOM. We demonstrate the proposed approach within a simulation study applying an acquisition geometry suited for CFRP part inspection. A practical verification of the approach is planned later in the project.

  7. Regularization approach for tomosynthesis X-ray inspection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tigkos, Konstantinos; Hassler, Ulf; Holub, Wolfgang; Woerlein, Norbert; Rehak, Markus [Fraunhofer Development Center X-ray Technologies (EZRT), Dept. Application Specific Methods and Systems (AMS), Fraunhofer IIS, Flugplatzstraße 75, 90768 Fürth (Germany)

    2014-02-18

    X-ray inspection is intended to be used as an escalation technique for inspection of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) in aerospace applications, especially in case of unclear indications from ultrasonic or other NDT modalities. Due to their large dimensions, most aerospace components cannot be scanned by conventional computed tomography. In such cases, X-ray Laminography may be applied, allowing a pseudo 3D slice-by-slice reconstruction of the sample with Tomosynthesis. However, due to the limited angle acquisition geometry, reconstruction artifacts arise, especially at surfaces parallel to the imaging plane. To regularize the Tomosynthesis approach, we propose an additional prescan of the object to detect outer sample surfaces. We recommend the use of contrasted markers which are temporarily attached to the sample surfaces. The depth position of the markers is then derived from that prescan. As long as the sample surface remains simple, few markers are required to fit the respective object surfaces. The knowledge about this surface may then be used to regularize the final Tomosynthesis reconstruction, performed with markerless projections. Eventually, it can also serve as prior information for an ART reconstruction or to register a CAD model of the sample. The presented work is carried out within the European FP7 project QUICOM. We demonstrate the proposed approach within a simulation study applying an acquisition geometry suited for CFRP part inspection. A practical verification of the approach is planned later in the project.

  8. Regularization approach for tomosynthesis X-ray inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray inspection is intended to be used as an escalation technique for inspection of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) in aerospace applications, especially in case of unclear indications from ultrasonic or other NDT modalities. Due to their large dimensions, most aerospace components cannot be scanned by conventional computed tomography. In such cases, X-ray Laminography may be applied, allowing a pseudo 3D slice-by-slice reconstruction of the sample with Tomosynthesis. However, due to the limited angle acquisition geometry, reconstruction artifacts arise, especially at surfaces parallel to the imaging plane. To regularize the Tomosynthesis approach, we propose an additional prescan of the object to detect outer sample surfaces. We recommend the use of contrasted markers which are temporarily attached to the sample surfaces. The depth position of the markers is then derived from that prescan. As long as the sample surface remains simple, few markers are required to fit the respective object surfaces. The knowledge about this surface may then be used to regularize the final Tomosynthesis reconstruction, performed with markerless projections. Eventually, it can also serve as prior information for an ART reconstruction or to register a CAD model of the sample. The presented work is carried out within the European FP7 project QUICOM. We demonstrate the proposed approach within a simulation study applying an acquisition geometry suited for CFRP part inspection. A practical verification of the approach is planned later in the project

  9. SU-E-J-56: Static Gantry Digital Tomosynthesis From the Beam’s-Eye-View

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose We have designed a novel TumoTrak™ x-ray system that delivers 19 distinct kV views with the linac gantry stationary. It images MV treatment beam above and below the patient with a kV tomosysthesis slice image from the therapy beam’s-eye-view. Results will be high quality images without MLC shadowing for notable improvements relative to conventional fluoroscopic MV imaging and fluoroscopic kV imaging. Methods A complete design has a kV electron beam multisource X-ray tube that fits around the MV treatment beam path, with little interference with normal radiotherapy and unblocked by the multi-leaf-collimator. To simulate digital tomosynthesis, we used cone-beam CT projection data from a lung SBRT patient. These data were acquired at 125 kVp and 11 fps (0.4 mAs per projection). We chose 19 projections evenly spaced over 27° around one of the treatment angles (240°). Digital tomosynthesis reconstruction of a slice through the tumor was performed using iterative reconstruction. The visibility of the lesion was assessed for the reconstructed digital tomosynthesis (DTS), using fluoroscopy MV images acquired during radiation therapy, and a kV single projection image acquired at the same angle as the treatment field (240°). Results The fluoroscopic DTS images provide the best tumor contrast, surpassing the conventional radiographic and the in-treatment MV portal images. The electron beam multisource X-ray tube design has been completed and the tube is being fabricated. The estimated time to cycle through all 19 projections is 700 ms, enabling high frame-rate imaging. While the initial proposed use case is for image guided and gated treatment delivery, the enhanced imaging will also deliver superior radiographic images for patient setup. Conclusion The proposed device will deliver high quality planar images from the beam’s-eye-view without MLC obstruction. The prototype has been designed and is being assembled with first imaging scheduled for May 2015. L

  10. Systemic therapy for breast cancer and risk of subsequent contralateral breast cancer in the WECARE Study

    OpenAIRE

    Langballe, Rikke; Mellemkjær, Lene; Malone, Kathleen E.; Lynch, Charles F.; John, Esther M.; Julia A. Knight; Bernstein, Leslie; Brooks, Jennifer; Andersson, Michael; Reiner, Anne S.; Liang, Xiaolin; Woods, Meghan; Concannon, Patrick J.; ,; Bernstein, Jonine L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Treatment with tamoxifen or chemotherapy reduces the risk of contralateral breast cancer (CBC). However, it is uncertain how long the protection lasts and whether the protective effect is modified by patient, tumor, or treatment characteristics. Methods The population-based WECARE Study included 1521 cases with CBC and 2212 age- and year of first diagnosis-matched controls with unilateral breast cancer recruited during two phases in the USA, Canada, and Denmark. Women were diagnose...

  11. Digital tomosynthesis of hand joints for arthritis assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The two principal forms of hand arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA) have large clinical and economic costs. Radiography has been shown to be a useful tool to assess the condition of the disease. A hand radiograph, however, is a two-dimensional projection of a three-dimensional object. In this report we present the results of a study that applied digital tomosynthesis to hand radiography in order to extract three-dimensional outcome measures that should be more sensitive to arthritis progression. The study was performed using simulated projection radiographs created using micro computed tomography (μCT) and a set of five dry-bone hand skeletons. These simulated projection images were then reconstructed into tomographic slices using the matrix inversion tomosynthesis (MITS) algorithm. The accuracy of the tomosynthesis reconstruction was evaluated by comparing the reconstructed images to a gold standard created using the μCT data. A parameter from image registration science, normalized mutual information, provided a quantifiable figure of merit. This study examined the effects of source displacement, number of reconstructed planes, number of acquisitions, noise added to the gray scale images, and errors in the location of a fiducial marker. We also optimized the reconstruction as a function of two variables k and α, that controlled the mixing of MITS with conventional shift-and-add tomosynthesis. A study using hand delineated joint margins demonstrated that MITS images provided a better measurement of average joint space width. We found good agreement between the MITS slices and the true planes. Both joint margins and trabecular structure were visible and the reconstructed slices showed additional structures not visible with the standard projection image. Using hand-delineated joint margins we compared the average joint space width of the gold standard slices to the MITS and projection images. A root-mean square deviation (RMSD), calculated

  12. Observer detection limits for a dedicated SPECT breast imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutler, S. J.; Perez, K. L.; Barnhart, H. X.; Tornai, M. P.

    2010-04-01

    An observer-based contrast-detail study is performed in an effort to evaluate the limits of object detectability using a dedicated CZT-based breast SPECT imaging system under various imaging conditions. A custom geometric contrast-resolution phantom was developed that can be used for both positive ('hot') and negative contrasts ('cold'). The 3 cm long fillable tubes are arranged in six sectors having equal inner diameters ranging from 1 mm to 6 mm with plastic wall thicknesses of SPECT camera having 2.5 mm intrinsic pixels, the mean detectable rod was ~3.4 mm at a 10:1 ratio, degrading to ~5.2 mm with the 2.5:1 concentration ratio. The smallest object detail was observed using a 45° tilted trajectory acquisition. The complex 3D projected sine wave acquisition, however, had the most consistent combined intra- and inter-observer results, making it potentially the best imaging approach for consistent results.

  13. Parallel-scanning tomosynthesis using a slot scanning technique: Fixed-focus reconstruction and the resulting image quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibata, Koichi, E-mail: shibatak@suzuka-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiological Technology, Faculty of Health Science, Suzuka University of Medical Science 1001-1, Kishioka-cho, Suzuka 510-0293 (Japan); Notohara, Daisuke; Sakai, Takihito [R and D Department, Medical Systems Division, Shimadzu Corporation 1, Nishinokyo-Kuwabara-cho, Nakagyo-ku, Kyoto 604-8511 (Japan)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Parallel-scanning tomosynthesis (PS-TS) is a novel technique that fuses the slot scanning technique and the conventional tomosynthesis (TS) technique. This approach allows one to obtain long-view tomosynthesis images in addition to normally sized tomosynthesis images, even when using a system that has no linear tomographic scanning function. The reconstruction technique and an evaluation of the resulting image quality for PS-TS are described in this paper. Methods: The PS-TS image-reconstruction technique consists of several steps (1) the projection images are divided into strips, (2) the strips are stitched together to construct images corresponding to the reconstruction plane, (3) the stitched images are filtered, and (4) the filtered stitched images are back-projected. In the case of PS-TS using the fixed-focus reconstruction method (PS-TS-F), one set of stitched images is used for the reconstruction planes at all heights, thus avoiding the necessity of repeating steps (1)–(3). A physical evaluation of the image quality of PS-TS-F compared with that of the conventional linear TS was performed using a R/F table (Sonialvision safire, Shimadzu Corp., Kyoto, Japan). The tomographic plane with the best theoretical spatial resolution (the in-focus plane, IFP) was set at a height of 100 mm from the table top by adjusting the reconstruction program. First, the spatial frequency response was evaluated at heights of −100, −50, 0, 50, 100, and 150 mm from the IFP using the edge of a 0.3-mm-thick copper plate. Second, the spatial resolution at each height was visually evaluated using an x-ray test pattern (Model No. 38, PTW Freiburg, Germany). Third, the slice sensitivity at each height was evaluated via the wire method using a 0.1-mm-diameter tungsten wire. Phantom studies using a knee phantom and a whole-body phantom were also performed. Results: The spatial frequency response of PS-TS-F yielded the best results at the IFP and degraded slightly as the

  14. Parallel-scanning tomosynthesis using a slot scanning technique: Fixed-focus reconstruction and the resulting image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Parallel-scanning tomosynthesis (PS-TS) is a novel technique that fuses the slot scanning technique and the conventional tomosynthesis (TS) technique. This approach allows one to obtain long-view tomosynthesis images in addition to normally sized tomosynthesis images, even when using a system that has no linear tomographic scanning function. The reconstruction technique and an evaluation of the resulting image quality for PS-TS are described in this paper. Methods: The PS-TS image-reconstruction technique consists of several steps (1) the projection images are divided into strips, (2) the strips are stitched together to construct images corresponding to the reconstruction plane, (3) the stitched images are filtered, and (4) the filtered stitched images are back-projected. In the case of PS-TS using the fixed-focus reconstruction method (PS-TS-F), one set of stitched images is used for the reconstruction planes at all heights, thus avoiding the necessity of repeating steps (1)–(3). A physical evaluation of the image quality of PS-TS-F compared with that of the conventional linear TS was performed using a R/F table (Sonialvision safire, Shimadzu Corp., Kyoto, Japan). The tomographic plane with the best theoretical spatial resolution (the in-focus plane, IFP) was set at a height of 100 mm from the table top by adjusting the reconstruction program. First, the spatial frequency response was evaluated at heights of −100, −50, 0, 50, 100, and 150 mm from the IFP using the edge of a 0.3-mm-thick copper plate. Second, the spatial resolution at each height was visually evaluated using an x-ray test pattern (Model No. 38, PTW Freiburg, Germany). Third, the slice sensitivity at each height was evaluated via the wire method using a 0.1-mm-diameter tungsten wire. Phantom studies using a knee phantom and a whole-body phantom were also performed. Results: The spatial frequency response of PS-TS-F yielded the best results at the IFP and degraded slightly as the

  15. Feasibility study of the diagnosis and monitoring of cystic fibrosis in pediatric patients using stationary digital chest tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potuzko, Marci; Shan, Jing; Pearce, Caleb; Lee, Yueh Z.; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto

    2015-03-01

    Digital chest tomosynthesis (DCT) is a 3D imaging modality which has been shown to approach the diagnostic capability of CT, but uses only one-tenth the radiation dose of CT. One limitation of current commercial DCT is the mechanical motion of the x-ray source which prolongs image acquisition time and introduces motion blurring in images. By using a carbon nanotube (CNT) x-ray source array, we have developed a stationary digital chest tomosynthesis (s- DCT) system which can acquire tomosynthesis images without mechanical motion, thus enhancing the image quality. The low dose and high quality 3D image makes the s-DCT system a viable imaging tool for monitoring cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. The low dose is especially important in pediatric patients who are both more radiosensitive and have a longer lifespan for radiation symptoms to develop. The purpose of this research is to evaluate the feasibility of using s-DCT as a faster, lower dose means for diagnosis and monitoring of CF in pediatric patients. We have created an imaging phantom by injecting a gelatinous mucus substitute into porcine lungs and imaging the lungs from within an anthropomorphic hollow chest phantom in order to mimic the human conditions of a CF patient in the laboratory setting. We have found that our s-DCT images show evidence of mucus plugging in the lungs and provide a clear picture of the airways in the lung, allowing for the possibility of using s- DCT to supplement or replace CT as the imaging modality for CF patients.

  16. Analysis of breast imaging reporting and data system category 4 complex cystic masses of the breast: Do all the complex cystic breast masses merit a biopsy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate whether sonographic findings can predict malignancy in complex echoic breast masses using the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) lexicon and to demonstrate the need for biopsy recommendations for all complex breast masses. 135 pathologically proven complex echoic masses detected on sonography were identified. We retrospectively reviewed the sonographic findings according to the BI-RADS lexicon which include shape, margin, orientation, lesion boundary, posterior acoustic features, and vascularity. The sonographic findings were correlated with the pathology and mammographic findings. Differentiation between the sonographic appearance of benign and malignant complex cystic lesions was evaluated using the chi-square test or the Mann-Whitney U test. 59.3% (80/135) were benign lesions and 40.7% (55/135) were malignant lesions. Malignant lesions were correlated with irregular (p < 0.001), nonparallel (p = 0.023), noncircumscribed (p < 0.001), echogenic halo (p < 0.001), increased vascularity (p = 0.001) and large size (p = 0.002) compared to benign lesions. However, 12.7% (7/55) of benign looking complex cystic masses were proved to be malignant. All seven lesions had malignant microcalcifications or abnormality on mammography. Using the sonographic BI-RADS lexicon can be useful for differentiating between malignant and benign complex cystic breast masses. Notably, 12.7% of the complex cystic lesions showing a benign appearance on sonography were pathologically proven malignant. Therefore, radiologist should recommend biopsy for complex cystic lesions.

  17. Observer detection limits for a dedicated SPECT breast imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An observer-based contrast-detail study is performed in an effort to evaluate the limits of object detectability using a dedicated CZT-based breast SPECT imaging system under various imaging conditions. A custom geometric contrast-resolution phantom was developed that can be used for both positive ('hot') and negative contrasts ('cold'). The 3 cm long fillable tubes are arranged in six sectors having equal inner diameters ranging from 1 mm to 6 mm with plastic wall thicknesses of <0.25 mm, on a pitch of twice their inner diameters. Scans of the activity filled tubes using simple circular trajectories are obtained in a 215 mL uniform water filled cylinder, varying the rod:background concentration ratios from 10:1 to 1:10 simulating a large range of biological uptake ratios. The rod phantom is then placed inside a non-uniformly shaped 500 mL breast phantom and scans are again acquired using both simple and complex 3D trajectories for similarly varying contrasts. Summed slice and contiguous multi-slice images are evaluated by five independent readers, identifying the smallest distinguishable rod for each concentration and experimental setup. Linear and quadratic regression is used to compare the resulting contrast-detail curves. Results indicate that in a moderately low-noise 500 mL background, using the SPECT camera having 2.5 mm intrinsic pixels, the mean detectable rod was ∼3.4 mm at a 10:1 ratio, degrading to ∼5.2 mm with the 2.5:1 concentration ratio. The smallest object detail was observed using a 45 deg. tilted trajectory acquisition. The complex 3D projected sine wave acquisition, however, had the most consistent combined intra- and inter-observer results, making it potentially the best imaging approach for consistent results.

  18. Observer detection limits for a dedicated SPECT breast imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cutler, S J; Tornai, M P [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Perez, K L [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Barnhart, H X [Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke University, Durham, NC 27715 (United States)], E-mail: spencer.cutler@duke.edu

    2010-04-07

    An observer-based contrast-detail study is performed in an effort to evaluate the limits of object detectability using a dedicated CZT-based breast SPECT imaging system under various imaging conditions. A custom geometric contrast-resolution phantom was developed that can be used for both positive ('hot') and negative contrasts ('cold'). The 3 cm long fillable tubes are arranged in six sectors having equal inner diameters ranging from 1 mm to 6 mm with plastic wall thicknesses of <0.25 mm, on a pitch of twice their inner diameters. Scans of the activity filled tubes using simple circular trajectories are obtained in a 215 mL uniform water filled cylinder, varying the rod:background concentration ratios from 10:1 to 1:10 simulating a large range of biological uptake ratios. The rod phantom is then placed inside a non-uniformly shaped 500 mL breast phantom and scans are again acquired using both simple and complex 3D trajectories for similarly varying contrasts. Summed slice and contiguous multi-slice images are evaluated by five independent readers, identifying the smallest distinguishable rod for each concentration and experimental setup. Linear and quadratic regression is used to compare the resulting contrast-detail curves. Results indicate that in a moderately low-noise 500 mL background, using the SPECT camera having 2.5 mm intrinsic pixels, the mean detectable rod was {approx}3.4 mm at a 10:1 ratio, degrading to {approx}5.2 mm with the 2.5:1 concentration ratio. The smallest object detail was observed using a 45 deg. tilted trajectory acquisition. The complex 3D projected sine wave acquisition, however, had the most consistent combined intra- and inter-observer results, making it potentially the best imaging approach for consistent results.

  19. RETROSPECTIVE ESTIMATION OF PATIENT DOSE-AREA PRODUCT IN THORACIC SPINE TOMOSYNTHESIS PERFORMED USING VOLUMERAD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Båth, Magnus; Söderman, Christina; Svalkvist, Angelica

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of a recently developed method of retrospectively estimating the patient dose-area product (DAP) of a chest tomosynthesis examination, performed using VolumeRAD, in thoracic spine tomosynthesis and to determine the necessary field-size correction factor. Digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) data for the projection radiographs acquired during a thoracic spine tomosynthesis examination were retrieved directly from the modality for 17 patients. Using the previously developed method, an estimated DAP for the tomosynthesis examination was determined from DICOM data in the scout image. By comparing the estimated DAP with the actual DAP registered for the projection radiographs, a field-size correction factor was determined. The field-size correction factor for thoracic spine tomosynthesis was determined to 0.92. Applying this factor to the DAP estimated retrospectively, the maximum difference between the estimated DAP and the actual DAP was <3 %. In conclusion, the previously developed method of retrospectively estimating the DAP in chest tomosynthesis can be applied to thoracic spine tomosynthesis. PMID:26590395

  20. A multi-image approach to CADx of breast cancer with integration into PACS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elter, Matthias; Wittenberg, Thomas; Schulz-Wendtland, Rüdiger; Deserno, Thomas M.

    2009-02-01

    While screening mammography is accepted as the most adequate technique for the early detection of breast cancer, its low positive predictive value leads to many breast biopsies performed on benign lesions. Therefore, we have previously developed a knowledge-based system for computer-aided diagnosis (CADx) of mammographic lesions. It supports the radiologist in the discrimination of benign and malignant lesions. So far, our approach operates on the lesion level and employs the paradigm of content-based image retrieval (CBIR). Similar lesions with known diagnosis are retrieved automatically from a library of references. However, radiologists base their diagnostic decisions on additional resources, such as related mammographic projections, other modalities (e.g. ultrasound, MRI), and clinical data. Nonetheless, most CADx systems disregard the relation between the craniocaudal (CC) and mediolateral-oblique (MLO) views of conventional mammography. Therefore, we extend our approach to the full case level: (i) Multi-frame features are developed that jointly describe a lesion in different views of mammography. Taking into account the geometric relation between different images, these features can also be extracted from multi-modal data; (ii) the CADx system architecture is extended appropriately; (iii) the CADx system is integrated into the radiology information system (RIS) and the picture archiving and communication system (PACS). Here, the framework for image retrieval in medical applications (IRMA) is used to support access to the patient's health care record. Of particular interest is the application of the proposed CADx system to digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), which has the potential to succeed digital mammography as the standard technique for breast cancer screening. The proposed system is a natural extension of CADx approaches that integrate only two modalities. However, we are still collecting a large enough database of breast lesions with images from

  1. Development and assessment of a clinically viable system for breast ultrasound computer-aided diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruszauskas, Nicholas Peter

    The chances of surviving a breast cancer diagnosis as well as the effectiveness of any potential treatments increase significantly with early detection of the disease. As such, a considerable amount of research is being conducted to augment the breast cancer detection and diagnosis process. One such area of research involves the investigation and application of sophisticated computer algorithms to assist clinicians in detecting and diagnosing breast cancer on medical images (termed generally as "computer-aided diagnosis" or CAD). This study investigated a previously-developed breast ultrasound CAD system with the intent of translating it into a clinically-viable system. While past studies have demonstrated that breast ultrasound CAD may be a beneficial aid during the diagnosis of breast cancer on ultrasound, there are no investigations concerning its potential clinical translation and there are currently no commercially-available implementations of such systems. This study "bridges the gap" between the laboratory-developed system and the steps necessary for clinical implementation. A novel observer study was conducted that mimicked the clinical use of the breast ultrasound CAD system in order to assess the impact it had on the diagnostic performance of the user. Several robustness studies were also performed: the sonographic features used by the system were evaluated and the databases used for calibration and testing were characterized, the effect of the user's input was assessed by evaluating the performance of the system with variations in lesion identification and image selection, and the performance of the system on different patient populations was investigated by evaluating its performance on a database consisting solely of patients with Asian ethnicity. The analyses performed here indicate that the breast ultrasound CAD system under investigation is robust and demonstrates only minor variability when subjected to "real-world" use. All of these results are

  2. Coded aperture coherent scatter imaging for breast cancer detection: a Monte Carlo evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmanan, Manu N.; Morris, Robert E.; Greenberg, Joel A.; Samei, Ehsan; Kapadia, Anuj J.

    2016-03-01

    It is known that conventional x-ray imaging provides a maximum contrast between cancerous and healthy fibroglandular breast tissues of 3% based on their linear x-ray attenuation coefficients at 17.5 keV, whereas coherent scatter signal provides a maximum contrast of 19% based on their differential coherent scatter cross sections. Therefore in order to exploit this potential contrast, we seek to evaluate the performance of a coded- aperture coherent scatter imaging system for breast cancer detection and investigate its accuracy using Monte Carlo simulations. In the simulations we modeled our experimental system, which consists of a raster-scanned pencil beam of x-rays, a bismuth-tin coded aperture mask comprised of a repeating slit pattern with 2-mm periodicity, and a linear-array of 128 detector pixels with 6.5-keV energy resolution. The breast tissue that was scanned comprised a 3-cm sample taken from a patient-based XCAT breast phantom containing a tomosynthesis- based realistic simulated lesion. The differential coherent scatter cross section was reconstructed at each pixel in the image using an iterative reconstruction algorithm. Each pixel in the reconstructed image was then classified as being either air or the type of breast tissue with which its normalized reconstructed differential coherent scatter cross section had the highest correlation coefficient. Comparison of the final tissue classification results with the ground truth image showed that the coded aperture imaging technique has a cancerous pixel detection sensitivity (correct identification of cancerous pixels), specificity (correctly ruling out healthy pixels as not being cancer) and accuracy of 92.4%, 91.9% and 92.0%, respectively. Our Monte Carlo evaluation of our experimental coded aperture coherent scatter imaging system shows that it is able to exploit the greater contrast available from coherently scattered x-rays to increase the accuracy of detecting cancerous regions within the breast.

  3. Feasibility study for image reconstruction in circular digital tomosynthesis (CDTS) from limited-scan angle data based on compressed-sensing theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, we performed a feasibility study for image reconstruction in a circular digital tomosynthesis (CDTS) from limited-scan angle data based on compressed-sensing (CS) theory. Here, the X-ray source moves along an arc within a limited-scan angle (≤ 180°) on a circular path set perpendicularly to the axial direction during the image acquisition. This geometry, compared to full-angle (360°) scan geometry, allows imaging system to be designed more compactly and gives better tomographic quality than conventional linear digital tomosynthesis (DTS). We implemented an efficient CS-based reconstruction algorithm for the proposed geometry and performed systematic simulations to investigate the image characteristics. We successfully reconstructed CDTS images with incomplete projections acquired at several selected limited-scan angles of 45°, 90°, 135°, and 180° for a given tomographic angle of 80° and evaluated the reconstruction quality. Our simulation results indicate that the proposed method can provide superior tomographic quality for axial view and even for the other views (i.e., sagittal and coronal), as in computed tomography, to conventional DTS. - Highlights: • Image reconstruction is done in circular digital tomosynthesis (CDTS). • The designed geometry allows imaging system to be the better image. • An efficient compressed-sensing (CS)-based reconstruction algorithm is performed. • Proposed method can provide superior tomographic quality for the axial view

  4. Experimental dosimetry in conformal breast teletherapy compared with the planning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to compare and analyse the absorbed dose profiles from the conformal radiotherapy planning and experimental dosimetry taken in a breast anthropomorphic and anthropometric phantom. Conformal radiotherapy planning was elaborated in the Treatment Planning System (TPS). EBT2 Gafchromic radiochromic films were applied as dosimeters, positioned internally and superficially in the breast phantom. The standard radiation protocol was applied in the breast phantom. The films were digitalised, and their responses were analysed in RGB. The optical densities were processed, reproducing the spatial dose distribution. - Highlights: • Distributions of absorbed doses were generated by the TPS and measured by radiochromic films. • The breast phantom simulated a human breast in position for treatment. • A large portion of the glandular tissue absorbed doses that were equivalent to the radiotherapy planning. • There were regions of hot spots and small areas of under dosage in deeper areas at the lung interface

  5. A feasibility study for anatomical noise reduction in dual-energy chest digital tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, D.; Kim, Y.-s.; Choi, S.; Lee, H.; Choi, S.; Kim, H.-J.

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Thus, early diagnosis is of considerable importance. For early screening of lung cancer, computed tomography (CT) has been used as the gold standard. Chest digital tomosynthesis (CDT) is a recently introduced modality for lung cancer screening with a relatively low radiation dose compared to CT. The dual energy material decomposition method has been proposed for better detection of pulmonary nodules by means of reducing anatomical noise. In this study, the possibility of material decomposition in CDT was tested by both a simulation study and an experimental study using a CDT prototype. The Geant4 application for tomographic emission (GATE) v6 and tungsten anode spectral model using interpolating polynomials (TASMIP) codes were used for the simulation study to create simulated phantom shapes consisting of five inner cylinders filled with different densities of bone and airequivalent materials. Furthermore, the CDT prototype system and human phantom chest were used for the experimental study. CDT scan in both the simulation and experimental studies was performed with linear movement and 21 projection images were obtained over a 30 degree angular range with a 1.5 degree angular interval. To obtain materialselective images, a projectionbased energy subtraction technique was applied to high and low energy images. The resultant simulation images showed that dual-energy reconstruction could achieve an approximately 32% higher contrast to noise ratio (CNR) in images and the difference in CNR value according to bone density was significant compared to single energy CDT. Additionally, image artifacts were effectively corrected in dual energy CDT simulation studies. Likewise the experimental study with dual energy produced clear images of lung fields and bone structure by removing unnecessary anatomical structures. Dual energy tomosynthesis is a new technique; therefore, there is little guidance regarding its

  6. A feasibility study for anatomical noise reduction in dual-energy chest digital tomosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Thus, early diagnosis is of considerable importance. For early screening of lung cancer, computed tomography (CT) has been used as the gold standard. Chest digital tomosynthesis (CDT) is a recently introduced modality for lung cancer screening with a relatively low radiation dose compared to CT. The dual energy material decomposition method has been proposed for better detection of pulmonary nodules by means of reducing anatomical noise. In this study, the possibility of material decomposition in CDT was tested by both a simulation study and an experimental study using a CDT prototype. The Geant4 application for tomographic emission (GATE) v6 and tungsten anode spectral model using interpolating polynomials (TASMIP) codes were used for the simulation study to create simulated phantom shapes consisting of five inner cylinders filled with different densities of bone and airequivalent materials. Furthermore, the CDT prototype system and human phantom chest were used for the experimental study. CDT scan in both the simulation and experimental studies was performed with linear movement and 21 projection images were obtained over a 30 degree angular range with a 1.5 degree angular interval. To obtain materialselective images, a projectionbased energy subtraction technique was applied to high and low energy images. The resultant simulation images showed that dual-energy reconstruction could achieve an approximately 32% higher contrast to noise ratio (CNR) in images and the difference in CNR value according to bone density was significant compared to single energy CDT. Additionally, image artifacts were effectively corrected in dual energy CDT simulation studies. Likewise the experimental study with dual energy produced clear images of lung fields and bone structure by removing unnecessary anatomical structures. Dual energy tomosynthesis is a new technique; therefore, there is little guidance regarding its

  7. Mammotome® biopsy system for the resection of breast lesions: Clinical experience in two high-volume teaching hospitals

    OpenAIRE

    JIANG, YANGPING; LAN, HUANRONG; Ye, Qian; Jin, Ketao; Zhu, Min; Hu, Xiaoyan; Teng, Lisong; CAO, FEILIN; Lin, Xianfang

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsy (VABB) is regarded as a feasible, effective, minimally invasive and safe method for the removal of benign breast lesions, without the occurrence of serious complications. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, efficacy and safety of ultrasound-guided VABB using the Mammotome® biopsy system in the treatment of breast lesions. The clinical outcomes of 3,681 patients with breast lesions were evaluated following excisions by ultrasou...

  8. Ultrashort Microwave-Pumped Real-Time Thermoacoustic Breast Tumor Imaging System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Fanghao; Ji, Zhong; Ding, Wenzheng; Lou, Cunguang; Yang, Sihua; Xing, Da

    2016-03-01

    We report the design of a real-time thermoacoustic (TA) scanner dedicated to imaging deep breast tumors and investigate its imaging performance. The TA imaging system is composed of an ultrashort microwave pulse generator and a ring transducer array with 384 elements. By vertically scanning the transducer array that encircles the breast phantom, we achieve real-time, 3D thermoacoustic imaging (TAI) with an imaging speed of 16.7 frames per second. The stability of the microwave energy and its distribution in the cling-skin acoustic coupling cup are measured. The results indicate that there is a nearly uniform electromagnetic field in each XY-imaging plane. Three plastic tubes filled with salt water are imaged dynamically to evaluate the real-time performance of our system, followed by 3D imaging of an excised breast tumor embedded in a breast phantom. Finally, to demonstrate the potential for clinical applications, the excised breast of a ewe embedded with an ex vivo human breast tumor is imaged clearly with a contrast of about 1:2.8. The high imaging speed, large field of view, and 3D imaging performance of our dedicated TAI system provide the potential for clinical routine breast screening. PMID:26552081

  9. The thioredoxin system in breast cancer cell invasion and migration

    OpenAIRE

    Maneet Bhatia; Kelly L. McGrath; Giovanna Di Trapani; Pornpimol Charoentong; Fenil Shah; Mallory M. King; Clarke, Frank M.; Tonissen, Kathryn F

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis is the most life threatening aspect of breast cancer. It is a multi-step process involving invasion and migration of primary tumor cells with a subsequent colonization of these cells at a secondary location. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of thioredoxin (Trx1) in the invasion and migration of breast cancer cells and to assess the strength of the association between high levels of Trx1 and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR1) expression with breast cancer patient ...

  10. An Integrated Knowledge Base System Architecture for Histopathological Diagnosis of Breast Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Aderonke A Kayode; Babajide S.Afolabi; Adelusola, Kayode A

    2012-01-01

    The histopathological diagnosis of breast diseases requires highly trained and experienced experts, and often strains pathologists’ cognitive capabilities. Accurate and timely diagnosis of breast diseases is essential for the appropriate management of the patients. The paper presents a knowledge base system that uses a combination of rule-based and case-based techniques to achieve the diagnosis. Rule-based systems handle problems with well-defined knowledge bases this limits the flexibility o...

  11. Enhancing Supportive-Educative Nursing Systems to Reduce Risk of Post-Breast Cancer Lymphedema

    OpenAIRE

    Jane M Armer; Shook, Robin P.; Schneider, Melanie K; Brooks, Constance W.; Peterson, Julie; Stewart, Bob R.

    2009-01-01

    This study describes the use of data regarding self-care agency to enhance a supportive-educative nursing system for breast cancer survivors to reduce the risk of developing lymphedema post surgery. Impetus for this study came from the analysis of participant feedback from a parent study (Lance Armstrong Foundation pilot study) that sought to plan an educational program for nurses that will improve their supportive-educative nursing system when working with breast cancer survivors. The goal i...

  12. Noise power properties of a cone-beam CT system for breast cancer detection

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Kai; Kwan, Alexander L.C.; Huang, Shih-Ying; Packard, Nathan J.; Boone, John M.

    2008-01-01

    The noise power properties of a cone-beam computed tomography (CT) system dedicated for breast cancer detection were investigated. Uniform polyethylene cylinders of various diameters were scanned under different system acquisition conditions. Noise power spectra were calculated from difference data generated by subtraction between two identical scans. Multidimensional noise power spectra (NPS) were used as the metric to evaluate the noise properties of the breast CT (bCT) under different syst...

  13. Development of a 3D high-resolution physical anthropomorphic breast phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carton, Ann-Katherine; Bakic, Predrag; Ullberg, Christer; Maidment, Andrew D. A.

    2010-04-01

    Analysis of complex imaging tasks requires a phantom that simulates the patient anatomy. We have developed a technique to fabricate 3D physical anthropomorphic breast phantoms for image quality assessment of 2D and 3D breast x-ray imaging systems. The phantom design is based on an existing computer model that can generate breast voxel phantoms of varying size, shape, glandularity, and internal composition. The physical phantom is produced in two steps. First, the computer model of the glandular tissue, skin and Coopers' ligaments is separated into sections. These sections are fabricated by high-resolution rapid prototype printing using a single tissue equivalent material. The adipose tissue regions in the sections are filled using an epoxy-based resin combined with phenolic microspheres. The phantom sections are then stacked. The phantom is provided with an extra section modified to include iodine-enhanced masses. We fabricated a prototype phantom corresponding to a 450 ml breast with 45% dense tissue deformed to represent a 5 cm compressed thickness. The rapid prototype and epoxy based resin phantom materials attenuate x rays similar to 50% glandular tissue and 100% adipose tissue, respectively. The iodinated masses are between 4.0 and 9.6 mm thick and contain 2.5 mg/ml and 5 mg/ml iodine. Digital mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis images of the phantom are qualitatively similar in appearance to clinical images. In summary, a method to fabricate a 3D physical anthropomorphic breast phantom has been developed with known ground truth in the form of a companion voxel phantom. This combined system of physical and computational phantoms allows for both qualitative and quantitative image quality assessment.

  14. Targeting Notch degradation system provides promise for breast cancer therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Shen, Jia-Xin; Wen, Xiao-Fen; Guo, Yu-Xian; Zhang, Guo-Jun

    2016-08-01

    Notch receptor signaling pathways play an important role, not only in normal breast development but also in breast cancer development and progression. As a group of ligand-induced proteins, different subtypes of mammalian Notch (Notch1-4) are sensitive to subtle changes in protein levels. Thus, a clear understanding of mechanisms of Notch protein turnover is essential for understanding normal and pathological mechanisms of Notch functions. It has been suggested that there is a close relationship between the carcinogenesis and the dysregulation of Notch degradation. However, this relationship remains mostly undefined in the context of breast cancer, as protein degradation is mediated by numerous signaling pathways as well as certain molecule modulators (activators/inhibitors). In this review, we summarize the published data regarding the regulation of Notch family member degradation in breast cancer, while emphasizing areas that are likely to provide new therapeutic modalities for mechanism-based anti-cancer drugs. PMID:27263934

  15. Breast Reconstruction after a Bilateral Mastectomy Using the BRAVA Expansion System and Fat Grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ondrej Mestak, MD

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Fat graft breast reconstruction following a mastectomy is always limited by the size of the skin envelope, which affects the amount of graft that can be injected in 1 session. Because the fat graft naturally resorbs in all patients, several sessions of fat grafting are necessary. BRAVA’s negative pressure causes a “reverse” expansion of the skin envelope, thus permitting more space for the fat graft. This allows decreasing number of required procedures for an adequate breast reconstruction. We operated on a 38-year-old patient 4 years after bilateral mastectomy without irradiation for breast cancer. Before the procedure, the patient was instructed to wear the BRAVA system for 12 hours daily for 2 months before the first session, at all times between the sessions and for 1 month following the last fat grafting session. We performed 3 fat grafting sessions, as planned. Altogether, we injected 840 cm3 of fat on the right side and 790 cm3 of fat on the left side. Four months after the last operation, the patient was very satisfied with her new breasts. The breasts were soft, with good sensation and a natural feel. Using the BRAVA external expansion system for the enhancement of fat grafting is a suitable technique for breast reconstruction after a mastectomy. This technique produces soft and natural feeling breasts in fewer operative sessions, with a minimal risk of complications. Patient compliance, however, is greatly needed to achieve the desired results.

  16. Inter-plane artifact suppression in tomosynthesis using 3D CT image data

    OpenAIRE

    Kim Jae G; Jin Seung O; Cho Min H; Lee Soo Y

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Despite its superb lateral resolution, flat-panel-detector (FPD) based tomosynthesis suffers from low contrast and inter-plane artifacts caused by incomplete cancellation of the projection components stemming from outside the focal plane. The incomplete cancellation of the projection components, mostly due to the limited scan angle in the conventional tomosynthesis scan geometry, often makes the image contrast too low to differentiate the malignant tissues from the backgro...

  17. Tomosynthesis-based localization of radioactive seeds in prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accurately assessing the quality of prostate brachytherapy intraoperatively would be valuable for improved clinical outcome by ensuring the delivery of a prescribed tumoricidal radiation dose to the entire prostate gland. One necessary step towards this goal is the robust and rapid localization of implanted seeds. Several methods have been developed to locate seeds from x-ray projection images, but they fail to detect completely-overlapping seeds, thus necessitating manual intervention. To overcome this limitation, we have developed a new method where (1) a three-dimensional volume is reconstructed from x-ray projection images using a brachytherapy-specific tomosynthesis reconstruction algorithm with built-in blur compensation and (2) the seeds are located in this reconstructed volume. In contrast to other projection-based methods, our method can detect completely overlapping seeds. Our simulation results indicate that we can locate all implanted seeds in the prostate using a tomosynthesis angle of 30 deg. and seven projection images. The mean localization error is 1.27 mm for a case with 100 seeds. We have also tested our method using a prostate phantom with 61 implanted seeds and succeeded in locating all seeds automatically. We believe this new method can be useful for the intraoperative quality assessment of prostate brachytherapy in the future

  18. Learning aspects and potential pitfalls regarding detection of pulmonary nodules in chest tomosynthesis and proposed related quality criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background In chest tomosynthesis, low-dose projections collected over a limited angular range are used for reconstruction of an arbitrary number of section images of the chest, resulting in a moderately increased radiation dose compared to chest radiography. Purpose To investigate the effects of learning with feedback on the detection of pulmonary nodules for observers with varying experience of chest tomosynthesis, to identify pitfalls regarding detection of pulmonary nodules, and present suggestions for how to avoid them, and to adapt the European quality criteria for chest radiography and computed tomography (CT) to chest tomosynthesis. Material and Methods Six observers analyzed tomosynthesis cases for presence of nodules in a jackknife alternative free-response receiver-operating characteristics (JAFROC) study. CT was used as reference. The same tomosynthesis cases were analyzed before and after learning with feedback, which included a collective learning session. The difference in performance between the two readings was calculated using the JAFROC figure of merit as principal measure of detectability. Results Significant improvement in performance after learning with feedback was found only for observers inexperienced in tomosynthesis. At the collective learning session, localization of pleural and sub pleural nodules or structures was identified as the main difficulty in analyzing tomosynthesis images. Conclusion The results indicate that inexperienced observers can reach a high level of performance regarding nodule detection in tomosynthesis after learning with feedback and that the main problem with chest tomosynthesis is related to the limited depth resolution

  19. Mammaglobin-A Immunohistochemistry in Primary Central Nervous System Neoplasms and Intracranial Metastatic Breast Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Cimino, Patrick J.; Perrin, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Metastases represent the most common type of intracranial neoplasm. In women, 30% of such tumors derive from breast carcinoma. In neurosurgical cases with ambiguous cellular morphology and/or limited biopsy material, immunohistochemistry (IHC) is often performed to distinguish metastases from primary central nervous system (CNS) neoplasms. IHC for mammaglobin-A (MGA), a protein expressed in a majority of breast carcinomas, is commonly applied in this setting, but its utility for distinguishin...

  20. Computational Validation of a 3-D Microwave Imaging System for Breast-Cancer Screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubæk, Tonny; Kim, Oleksiy S.; Meincke, Peter

    2009-01-01

    signals improves its performance when compared to the more commonly used complex phasor formulation. This improvement is illustrated by imaging a simulated hemispherical breast model using both formulations. In addition to this, the importance of using the correct position and orientation of the antennas...... in the measurement system is shown by imaging the same breast model using a measurement setup in which the antennas are vertically oriented....

  1. Decision Support System for Histopathological Diagnosis of Breast Diseases in Women

    OpenAIRE

    Aderonke A. Kayode; Babajide S.Afolabi; Bernard I. Akhigbe; Ifiok J. Udo; A Ominiyi

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a representation of histological features for histopathological diagnosis of breast diseases in women. Hence, a Decision Support System (DSS) for histopathological interpretation and diagnosis of breast diseases was implemented and evaluated. The Expert knowledge used was elicited through interview and literature search. The needed diagnostic knowledge was represented using diseases' profile in the form of frame. UML, JAVA and MYSQL were used for the design and implementat...

  2. Clinical utility of tomosynthesis in suspected scaphoid fracture. A pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geijer, Mats [Lund University, Skaane University Hospital, Center for Medical Imaging and Physiology, Lund (Sweden); Boerjesson, Annika M.; Goethlin, Jan H. [Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Moelndal (Sweden)

    2011-07-15

    Radiography alone will not detect all scaphoid fractures. There is a reported prevalence between 9 and 33% of occult scaphoid fractures. The evidence-based literature suggests that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the most suitable secondary imaging modality due to the ability to evaluate the bone marrow directly and to also identify other injuries. However, there is no consensus on the choice of follow-up imaging strategy - computed tomography, MRI, or bone scan - across different institutions. Tomosynthesis is a new digital tomographic method creating multiple thin tomographic sections. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical utility of tomosynthesis in suspected occult fracture. Thirty-five patients with a clinically suspected occult scaphoid fracture after initial normal radiography were imaged with repeat radiography and tomosynthesis scan 2 weeks after trauma. Repeat radiography revealed one previously undetected scaphoid tubercle avulsion and one scaphoid waist fracture, confirmed by tomosynthesis. Tomosynthesis revealed two additional scaphoid waist fractures. In total, three initially occult scaphoid waist fractures were detected (9%). No additional fractures were detected in the remaining 32 patients during a 1-year follow-up. Tomosynthesis can demonstrate occult scaphoid fractures not visible at radiography. (orig.)

  3. Systems consequences of amplicon formation in human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaki, Koichiro; Menghi, Francesca; Woo, Xing Yi; Wagner, Joel P; Jacques, Pierre-Étienne; Lee, Yi Fang; Shreckengast, Phung Trang; Soon, Wendy WeiJia; Malhotra, Ankit; Teo, Audrey S M; Hillmer, Axel M; Khng, Alexis Jiaying; Ruan, Xiaoan; Ong, Swee Hoe; Bertrand, Denis; Nagarajan, Niranjan; Karuturi, R Krishna Murthy; Miranda, Alfredo Hidalgo; Liu, Edison T

    2014-10-01

    Chromosomal structural variations play an important role in determining the transcriptional landscape of human breast cancers. To assess the nature of these structural variations, we analyzed eight breast tumor samples with a focus on regions of gene amplification using mate-pair sequencing of long-insert genomic DNA with matched transcriptome profiling. We found that tandem duplications appear to be early events in tumor evolution, especially in the genesis of amplicons. In a detailed reconstruction of events on chromosome 17, we found large unpaired inversions and deletions connect a tandemly duplicated ERBB2 with neighboring 17q21.3 amplicons while simultaneously deleting the intervening BRCA1 tumor suppressor locus. This series of events appeared to be unusually common when examined in larger genomic data sets of breast cancers albeit using approaches with lesser resolution. Using siRNAs in breast cancer cell lines, we showed that the 17q21.3 amplicon harbored a significant number of weak oncogenes that appeared consistently coamplified in primary tumors. Down-regulation of BRCA1 expression augmented the cell proliferation in ERBB2-transfected human normal mammary epithelial cells. Coamplification of other functionally tested oncogenic elements in other breast tumors examined, such as RIPK2 and MYC on chromosome 8, also parallel these findings. Our analyses suggest that structural variations efficiently orchestrate the gain and loss of cancer gene cassettes that engage many oncogenic pathways simultaneously and that such oncogenic cassettes are favored during the evolution of a cancer. PMID:25186909

  4. Multidimensional visualization for the immune system state presentation in breast cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stakheyeva, M.; Eidenzon, D.; Cherdyntseva, N.; Slonimskaya, E.; Cherdyntsev, E.

    2015-11-01

    The immune system is a complex organization system possessing its hierarchical structure of morphological and functional elements united into an integral unity. Therefore the immune system state should be characterized as an integral unity. The use of the NovoSpark Visualisation approach (Canada) to multidimensional data visualization provides the visual image representing the immune system state as an integral unity. This uniform visual characteristic is formed by values of individual immunological parameters in every person. The curves appropriating the immune system states in breast cancer patients with and without cancer progression (hematogenous metastases) during a 3-year follow-up are located in disjoint areas of the multidimensional data space. The obtained data suggest that the immune system greatly influences the course and outcome of breast cancer. In prospect this approach can be useful for a breast cancer outcome prognosis.

  5. Identifying Geographic Disparities in the Early Detection of Breast Cancer Using a Geographic Information System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luxme Hariharan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionIdentifying communities with lower rates of mammography screening is a critical step to providing targeted screening programs; however, population-based data necessary for identifying these geographic areas are limited. This study presents methods to identify geographic disparities in the early detection of breast cancer.MethodsData for all women residing in Dane County, Wisconsin, at the time of their breast cancer diagnosis from 1981 through 2000 (N = 4769 were obtained from the Wisconsin Cancer Reporting System (Wisconsin’s tumor registry by ZIP code of residence. Hierarchical logistic regression models for disease mapping were used to identify geographic differences in the early detection of breast cancer.ResultsThe percentage of breast cancer cases diagnosed in situ (excluding lobular carcinoma in situ increased from 1.3% in 1981 to 11.9% in 2000. This increase, reflecting increasing mammography use, occurred sooner in Dane County than in Wisconsin as a whole. From 1981 through 1985, the proportion of breast cancer diagnosed in situ in Dane county was universally low (2%–3%. From 1986 through 1990, urban and suburban ZIP codes had significantly higher rates (10% compared with rural ZIP codes (5%. From 1991 through 1995, mammography screening had increased in rural ZIP codes (7% of breast cancer diagnosed in situ. From 1996 through 2000, mammography use was fairly homogeneous across the entire county (13%–14% of breast cancer diagnosed in situ.ConclusionThe percentage of breast cancer cases diagnosed in situ increased in the state and in all areas of Dane County from 1981 through 2000. Visual display of the geographic differences in the early detection of breast cancer demonstrates the diffusion of mammography use across the county over the 20-year period.

  6. Breast dosimetry system in screen/film mammography

    OpenAIRE

    Goto, Sachiko; Azuma, Yoshiharu; Toshinori MARUYAMA; Nakagiri, Yoshitada; TAKEDA, Yoshihiro; Sugita, Katsuhiko; Kadohisa, Shigefumi

    2000-01-01

    The average glandular dose to glandular tissue m mammography is generally assumed to be a function of beam quality (HVL), x-ray tube target material, tube voltage, breast thickness, breast composition and, to a lesser extent, x-ray tube voltage waveform. The average glandular dose is generally determined from published tables with knowledge of the above function. Tables for a high frequency x-ray generator are not yet published. In our study, the lookup tables for the average glandular dose w...

  7. An Artificial Immune System-Based Support Vector Machine Approach for Classifying Ultrasound Breast Tumor Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wen-Jie; Lin, Shih-Wei; Moon, Woo Kyung

    2015-10-01

    A rapid and highly accurate diagnostic tool for distinguishing benign tumors from malignant ones is required owing to the high incidence of breast cancer. Although various computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems have been developed to interpret ultrasound images of breast tumors, feature selection and the setting of parameters are still essential to classification accuracy and the minimization of computational complexity. This work develops a highly accurate CAD system that is based on a support vector machine (SVM) and the artificial immune system (AIS) algorithm for evaluating breast tumors. Experiments demonstrate that the accuracy of the proposed CAD system for classifying breast tumors is 96.67%. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of the proposed CAD system are 96.67, 96.67, 95.60, and 97.48%, respectively. The receiver operator characteristic (ROC) area index A z is 0.9827. Hence, the proposed CAD system can reduce the number of biopsies and yield useful results that assist physicians in diagnosing breast tumors. PMID:25561066

  8. Reconstructing 3-D skin surface motion for the DIET breast cancer screening system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botterill, Tom; Lotz, Thomas; Kashif, Amer; Chase, J Geoffrey

    2014-05-01

    Digital image-based elasto-tomography (DIET) is a prototype system for breast cancer screening. A breast is imaged while being vibrated, and the observed surface motion is used to infer the internal stiffness of the breast, hence identifying tumors. This paper describes a computer vision system for accurately measuring 3-D surface motion. A model-based segmentation is used to identify the profile of the breast in each image, and the 3-D surface is reconstructed by fitting a model to the profiles. The surface motion is measured using a modern optical flow implementation customized to the application, then trajectories of points on the 3-D surface are given by fusing the optical flow with the reconstructed surfaces. On data from human trials, the system is shown to exceed the performance of an earlier marker-based system at tracking skin surface motion. We demonstrate that the system can detect a 10 mm tumor in a silicone phantom breast. PMID:24770915

  9. Visualization of suspicious lesions in breast MRI based on intelligent neural systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twellmann, Thorsten; Lange, Oliver; Nattkemper, Tim Wilhelm; Meyer-Bäse, Anke

    2006-05-01

    Intelligent medical systems based on supervised and unsupervised artificial neural networks are applied to the automatic visualization and classification of suspicious lesions in breast MRI. These systems represent an important component of future sophisticated computer-aided diagnosis systems and enable the extraction of spatial and temporal features of dynamic MRI data stemming from patients with confirmed lesion diagnosis. By taking into account the heterogenity of the cancerous tissue, these techniques reveal the malignant, benign and normal kinetic signals and and provide a regional subclassification of pathological breast tissue. Intelligent medical systems are expected to have substantial implications in healthcare politics by contributing to the diagnosis of indeterminate breast lesions by non-invasive imaging.

  10. Role of radiation therapy on the use of primary (''neoadjuvant'') systemic treatment of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: the indications for primary (''neoadjuvant'') systemic treatment (PST) for breast cancer have evolved over the last few years. PST is not only used in patients with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) and inoperable tumors but also plays a role for operable tumors aiming at breast conservation and higher complete remission rates (ypCR). The contribution of radiotherapy and the optimal sequencing of chemotherapy, surgery and radiotherapy still have to be defined. Material and methods: objectives and results of PST for inflammatory, locally advanced and operable breast cancer were analyzed according to tumor stage. Results: radiotherapy following PST and surgery is the standard of care for inflammatory breast cancer, LABC and nonresectable lesions. Comparable results are achieved for good responders after PST receiving radiotherapy or surgery. The evaluation of a preoperative radiotherapeutic approach is complicated by different chemo- and radiotherapy regimens, continuation of chemotherapy after surgery and heterogeneous patient groups. Conclusion: for LABC and inflammatory breast cancer the role of PST is well defined. For operable lesions, however, the value of preoperative radiotherapy still has to be established. This should be assessed within the framework of a clinical trial using standardized parameters for applying chemotherapy as well as radiation therapy. (orig.)

  11. Tomosynthesis for the early detection of pulmonary emphysema: diagnostic performance compared with chest radiography, using multidetector computed tomography as reference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Yoshitake [Keio University School of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Tokyo (Japan); Nippon Koukan Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kawasaki-shi, Kanagawa (Japan); Jinzaki, Masahiro; Hashimoto, Masahiro; Shiomi, Eisuke; Kuribayashi, Sachio [Keio University School of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Tokyo (Japan); Abe, Takayuki [Keio University School of Medicine, Center for Clinical Research, Tokyo (Japan); Ogawa, Kenji [Nippon Koukan Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kawasaki-shi, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2013-08-15

    To compare the diagnostic performance of tomosynthesis with that of chest radiography for the detection of pulmonary emphysema, using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) as reference. Forty-eight patients with and 63 without pulmonary emphysema underwent chest MDCT, tomosynthesis and radiography on the same day. Two blinded radiologists independently evaluated the tomosynthesis images and radiographs for the presence of pulmonary emphysema. Axial and coronal MDCT images served as the reference standard and the percentage lung volume with attenuation values of -950 HU or lower (LAA{sub -950}) was evaluated to determine the extent of emphysema. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and generalised estimating equations model were used. ROC analysis revealed significantly better performance (P < 0.0001) of tomosynthesis than radiography for the detection of pulmonary emphysema. The average sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of tomosynthesis were 0.875, 0.968, 0.955 and 0.910, respectively, whereas the values for radiography were 0.479, 0.913, 0.815 and 0.697, respectively. For both tomosynthesis and radiography, the sensitivity increased with increasing LAA{sub -950}. The diagnostic performance of tomosynthesis was significantly superior to that of radiography for the detection of pulmonary emphysema. In both tomosynthesis and radiography, the sensitivity was affected by the LAA{sub -950}. (orig.)

  12. An update in breast cancer screening and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrier, Sanjay; Tapia, Grace; Goltsman, David; Beith, Jane

    2016-03-01

    This article provides an overview of the main controversies in a number of key areas of breast cancer management. Relevant studies that have contributed to guide the treatment of this heterogeneous disease in the field of breast screening, surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy are highlighted. Mammography and ultrasound are the main methods of breast screening. MRI and tomosynthesis are emerging as new screening tools for a selected group of breast cancer patients. From a surgical perspective, oncoplastic techniques and neoadjuvant chemotherapy are improving cosmetic results in breast-conserving surgery. For high-risk patients, controversies still remain regarding prophylactic mastectomies. Finally, the appropriate management of the axilla continues evolving with the increasing role of radiotherapy as an alternative treatment to axillary dissection. PMID:26689336

  13. Mechanized weld inspection for detection of planar defects and depth measurements by tomosynthesis and planartomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A digital radiography (DR) system was developed featuring a high sensitivity line camera, a custom manipulator, and a 225 kV x-ray tube. This system is designed to scan circumferential pipe welds. The pixel resolution is 50 μm with 2048 pixels per line. The camera and tube are supported 180 deg. apart and rotate together around the pipe to acquire DR images line by line. The technique of line scanning yields several advantages in comparison to film radiography. The radiation direction corresponds to the central projection technique which always employs radial penetration and avoids long tangential paths. Thus radial flaws are detected with maximum available contrast. The slit collimator of the camera significantly reduces the proportion of scattered radiation in the image. This DR system thus provides image quality superior to film when properly aligned. The mechanism of this system allows the adjustment of the radiation direction for inspection of side wall flaws by a second translational manipulator. Scanning the weld at different angles provides multiple projections which improve the probability of detection for laminar flaws such as cracks and lack of fusion. Results employing tomosynthesis and planar tomography algorithms are presented that demonstrate improved image interpretation

  14. Mechanized weld inspection for detection of planar defects and depth measurements by tomosynthesis and planartomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewert, Uwe; Redmer, Bernhard; Müller, Jürgen

    2000-05-01

    A digital radiography (DR) system was developed featuring a high sensitivity line camera, a custom manipulator, and a 225 kV x-ray tube. This system is designed to scan circumferential pipe welds. The pixel resolution is 50 μm with 2048 pixels per line. The camera and tube are supported 180° apart and rotate together around the pipe to acquire DR images line by line. The technique of line scanning yields several advantages in comparison to film radiography. The radiation direction corresponds to the central projection technique which always employs radial penetration and avoids long tangential paths. Thus radial flaws are detected with maximum available contrast. The slit collimator of the camera significantly reduces the proportion of scattered radiation in the image. This DR system thus provides image quality superior to film when properly aligned. The mechanism of this system allows the adjustment of the radiation direction for inspection of side wall flaws by a second translational manipulator. Scanning the weld at different angles provides multiple projections which improve the probability of detection for laminar flaws such as cracks and lack of fusion. Results employing tomosynthesis and planar tomography algorithms are presented that demonstrate improved image interpretation.

  15. Phantom experiments with a microwave imaging system for breast-cancer screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubæk, Tonny; Zhurbenko, Vitaliy

    2009-01-01

    Microwave imaging is emerging as a promising technique for breast-cancer detection. In this paper, the microwave imaging system currently being developed at the Technical University of Denmark is introduced. This system consists of 32 antennas positioned in a cylindrical setup, each equipped with...

  16. The Impact of Acquisition Dose on Quantitative Breast Density Estimation with Digital Mammography: Results from ACRIN PA 4006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Ray, Shonket; Keller, Brad M; Pertuz, Said; McDonald, Elizabeth S; Conant, Emily F; Kontos, Despina

    2016-09-01

    Purpose To investigate the impact of radiation dose on breast density estimation in digital mammography. Materials and Methods With institutional review board approval and Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act compliance under waiver of consent, a cohort of women from the American College of Radiology Imaging Network Pennsylvania 4006 trial was retrospectively analyzed. All patients underwent breast screening with a combination of dose protocols, including standard full-field digital mammography, low-dose digital mammography, and digital breast tomosynthesis. A total of 5832 images from 486 women were analyzed with previously validated, fully automated software for quantitative estimation of density. Clinical Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) density assessment results were also available from the trial reports. The influence of image acquisition radiation dose on quantitative breast density estimation was investigated with analysis of variance and linear regression. Pairwise comparisons of density estimations at different dose levels were performed with Student t test. Agreement of estimation was evaluated with quartile-weighted Cohen kappa values and Bland-Altman limits of agreement. Results Radiation dose of image acquisition did not significantly affect quantitative density measurements (analysis of variance, P = .37 to P = .75), with percent density demonstrating a high overall correlation between protocols (r = 0.88-0.95; weighted κ = 0.83-0.90). However, differences in breast percent density (1.04% and 3.84%, P mammography are not substantially affected by variations in radiation dose; thus, the use of low-dose techniques for the purpose of density estimation may be feasible. (©) RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:27002418

  17. Tomosynthesis for the early detection of pulmonary emphysema: diagnostic performance compared with chest radiography, using multidetector computed tomography as reference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare the diagnostic performance of tomosynthesis with that of chest radiography for the detection of pulmonary emphysema, using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) as reference. Forty-eight patients with and 63 without pulmonary emphysema underwent chest MDCT, tomosynthesis and radiography on the same day. Two blinded radiologists independently evaluated the tomosynthesis images and radiographs for the presence of pulmonary emphysema. Axial and coronal MDCT images served as the reference standard and the percentage lung volume with attenuation values of -950 HU or lower (LAA-950) was evaluated to determine the extent of emphysema. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and generalised estimating equations model were used. ROC analysis revealed significantly better performance (P -950. The diagnostic performance of tomosynthesis was significantly superior to that of radiography for the detection of pulmonary emphysema. In both tomosynthesis and radiography, the sensitivity was affected by the LAA-950. (orig.)

  18. Mammaglobin-A immunohistochemistry in primary central nervous system neoplasms and intracranial metastatic breast carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimino, Patrick J; Perrin, Richard J

    2014-07-01

    Metastases represent the most common type of intracranial neoplasm. In women, 30% of such tumors derive from breast carcinoma. In neurosurgical cases with ambiguous cellular morphology and/or limited biopsy material, immunohistochemistry (IHC) is often performed to distinguish metastases from primary central nervous system (CNS) neoplasms. IHC for mammaglobin-A (MGA), a protein expressed in a majority of breast carcinomas, is commonly applied in this setting, but its utility for distinguishing primary CNS neoplasms from metastatic breast carcinoma is unknown; the reactivity of MGA in primary and metastatic CNS neoplasms has never been described. Here, we describe the frequency and patterns of IHC reactivity for MGA in metastatic and primary CNS neoplasms from patients with well-documented histories of breast carcinoma. Following a published protocol previously applied to non-CNS neoplasms, MGA staining of moderate to strong intensity within 5% or more of a neoplasm was considered positive. On the basis of these criteria, 3 of 12 (25.0%) glioblastomas, 1 of 10 (10.0%) meningiomas, and 47 of 95 (49.5%) metastases were positive. Importantly, the cytoarchitectural staining characteristics among all 4 MGA-positive primary CNS neoplasms (cytoplasmic and nuclear) differed from those of the metastases (cytoplasmic and membranous). These findings suggest that MGA IHC staining intensity and distribution can distinguish metastases from primary CNS neoplasms (P=0.0086) in women with a history of breast carcinoma but also indicate that cytologic staining patterns must be interpreted for more accurate tumor classification. PMID:23958549

  19. Challenges in the Design of Microwave Imaging Systems for Breast Cancer Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhurbenko, Vitaliy

    2011-01-01

    community. This paper presents the survey of the ongoing research in the field of microwave imaging of biological tissues, with major focus on the breast tumor detection application. The existing microwave imaging systems are categorized on the basis of the employed measurement concepts. The advantages and...

  20. Assessment of three different software systems in the evaluation of dynamic MRI of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: The aim was to compare the diagnostic performance and handling of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI of the breast with two commercial software solutions ('CADstream' and '3TP') and one self-developed software system ('Mammatool'). Materials and methods: Identical data sets of dynamic breast MRI from 21 patients were evaluated retrospectively with all three software systems. The exams were classified according to the BI-RADS classification. The number of lesions in the parametric mapping was compared to histology or follow-up of more than 2 years. In addition, 25 quality criteria were judged by 3 independent investigators with a score from 0 to 5. Statistical analysis was performed to document the quality ranking of the different software systems. Results: There were 9 invasive carcinomas, one pure DCIS, one papilloma, one radial scar, three histologically proven changes due to mastopathy, one adenosis and two fibroadenomas. Additionally two patients with enhancing parenchyma followed with MRI for more than 3 years and one scar after breast conserving therapy were included. All malignant lesions were classified as BI-RADS 4 or 5 using all software systems and showed significant enhancement in the parametric mapping. 'CADstream' showed the best score on subjective quality criteria. '3TP' showed the lowest number of false-positive results. 'Mammatool' produced the lowest number of benign tissues indicated with parametric overlay. Conclusion: All three software programs tested were adequate for sensitive and efficient assessment of dynamic MRI of the breast. Improvements in specificity may be achievable

  1. Technical innovation: digital tomosynthesis of the hip following intra-articular administration of contrast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To demonstrate the clinical use of digital tomosynthesis in the depiction of labral and chondral pathology in the setting of post-operative CAM-type impingement of the hip following intra-articular administration of dilute iodinated contrast. We present images from a 46 year-old African American female with suspected CAM-type femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) following percutaneous pinning of the right hip for slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE). A partial tear of the labrum and clinically significant acetabular chondral abnormalities were demonstrated with the use of digital tomosynthesis with superb anatomic detail. Digital tomosynthesis can be of great clinical utility and can depict pathology in superb anatomic detail, particularly in situations in which MRI is not available as well as under circumstances in which artifact due to orthopedic hardware is of concern as shown in this case. (orig.)

  2. Technical innovation: digital tomosynthesis of the hip following intra-articular administration of contrast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gazaille, Roland E.; Flynn, Michael J.; Page, Walter; Finley, Sonia; Holsbeeck, Marnix van [Henry Ford Hospital, Department of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2011-11-15

    To demonstrate the clinical use of digital tomosynthesis in the depiction of labral and chondral pathology in the setting of post-operative CAM-type impingement of the hip following intra-articular administration of dilute iodinated contrast. We present images from a 46 year-old African American female with suspected CAM-type femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) following percutaneous pinning of the right hip for slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE). A partial tear of the labrum and clinically significant acetabular chondral abnormalities were demonstrated with the use of digital tomosynthesis with superb anatomic detail. Digital tomosynthesis can be of great clinical utility and can depict pathology in superb anatomic detail, particularly in situations in which MRI is not available as well as under circumstances in which artifact due to orthopedic hardware is of concern as shown in this case. (orig.)

  3. Refractive-index based tomosynthesis using dark-field imaging optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomosynthesis (TS) is a pseudo-3-dimensional image reconstruction method to recover depth-resolved information using restricted number of projections. In this research, refraction index based TS imaging using dark-field imaging (DFI) optics is proposed and biomedical soft tissues were imaged in low dose exposure. By a single exposure of an object, two projected images are obtained from a Laue-case analyzer of DFI. Calculating the both images refraction component is deduced, while two exposures are needed in DEI (diffraction enhanced imaging). Thus the measurement time and the radiation dose in DFI are half of DEI. In addition, the proposed reconstruction algorithm, derived from the quantitative relationship in measurement process, allows high contrast tomographic imaging in spite of one order smaller number of projections for CT (computed tomography). To demonstrate the proposed imaging protocol efficacy, an ex-vivo excised tissue of human lung were imaged using a system constructed at the vertical wiggler beamline at PF-BL14C at KEK. TS image is successfully delineated high quality soft tissue structures comparable to CT.

  4. Application of digital tomosynthesis (DTS) of optimal deblurring filters for dental X-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, J. E.; Cho, H. S.; Kim, D. S.; Choi, S. I.; Je, U. K.

    2012-04-01

    Digital tomosynthesis (DTS) is a limited-angle tomographic technique that provides some of the tomographic benefits of computed tomography (CT) but at reduced dose and cost. Thus, the potential for application of DTS to dental X-ray imaging seems promising. As a continuation of our dental radiography R&D, we developed an effective DTS reconstruction algorithm and implemented it in conjunction with a commercial dental CT system for potential use in dental implant placement. The reconstruction algorithm employed a backprojection filtering (BPF) method based upon optimal deblurring filters to suppress effectively both the blur artifacts originating from the out-focus planes and the high-frequency noise. To verify the usefulness of the reconstruction algorithm, we performed systematic simulation works and evaluated the image characteristics. We also performed experimental works in which DTS images of enhanced anatomical resolution were successfully obtained by using the algorithm and were promising to our ongoing applications to dental X-ray imaging. In this paper, our approach to the development of the DTS reconstruction algorithm and the results are described in detail.

  5. Application of digital tomosynthesis (DTS) of optimal deblurring filters for dental X-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, J. E.; Cho, H. S.; Kim, D. S.; Choi, S. I.; Je, U. K. [Yonsei University, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-04-15

    Digital tomosynthesis (DTS) is a limited-angle tomographic technique that provides some of the tomographic benefits of computed tomography (CT) but at reduced dose and cost. Thus, the potential for application of DTS to dental X-ray imaging seems promising. As a continuation of our dental radiography R and D, we developed an effective DTS reconstruction algorithm and implemented it in conjunction with a commercial dental CT system for potential use in dental implant placement. The reconstruction algorithm employed a backprojection filtering (BPF) method based upon optimal deblurring filters to suppress effectively both the blur artifacts originating from the out-focus planes and the high-frequency noise. To verify the usefulness of the reconstruction algorithm, we performed systematic simulation works and evaluated the image characteristics. We also performed experimental works in which DTS images of enhanced anatomical resolution were successfully obtained by using the algorithm and were promising to our ongoing applications to dental X-ray imaging. In this paper, our approach to the development of the DTS reconstruction algorithm and the results are described in detail.

  6. Application of digital tomosynthesis (DTS) of optimal deblurring filters for dental X-ray imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Digital tomosynthesis (DTS) is a limited-angle tomographic technique that provides some of the tomographic benefits of computed tomography (CT) but at reduced dose and cost. Thus, the potential for application of DTS to dental X-ray imaging seems promising. As a continuation of our dental radiography R and D, we developed an effective DTS reconstruction algorithm and implemented it in conjunction with a commercial dental CT system for potential use in dental implant placement. The reconstruction algorithm employed a backprojection filtering (BPF) method based upon optimal deblurring filters to suppress effectively both the blur artifacts originating from the out-focus planes and the high-frequency noise. To verify the usefulness of the reconstruction algorithm, we performed systematic simulation works and evaluated the image characteristics. We also performed experimental works in which DTS images of enhanced anatomical resolution were successfully obtained by using the algorithm and were promising to our ongoing applications to dental X-ray imaging. In this paper, our approach to the development of the DTS reconstruction algorithm and the results are described in detail.

  7. Conceptual detector development and Monte Carlo simulation of a novel 3D breast computed tomography system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegle, Jens; Müller, Bernhard H.; Neumann, Bernd; Hoeschen, Christoph

    2016-03-01

    A new 3D breast computed tomography (CT) system is under development enabling imaging of microcalcifications in a fully uncompressed breast including posterior chest wall tissue. The system setup uses a steered electron beam impinging on small tungsten targets surrounding the breast to emit X-rays. A realization of the corresponding detector concept is presented in this work and it is modeled through Monte Carlo simulations in order to quantify first characteristics of transmission and secondary photons. The modeled system comprises a vertical alignment of linear detectors hold by a case that also hosts the breast. Detectors are separated by gaps to allow the passage of X-rays towards the breast volume. The detectors located directly on the opposite side of the gaps detect incident X-rays. Mechanically moving parts in an imaging system increase the duration of image acquisition and thus can cause motion artifacts. So, a major advantage of the presented system design is the combination of the fixed detectors and the fast steering electron beam which enable a greatly reduced scan time. Thereby potential motion artifacts are reduced so that the visualization of small structures such as microcalcifications is improved. The result of the simulation of a single projection shows high attenuation by parts of the detector electronics causing low count levels at the opposing detectors which would require a flat field correction, but it also shows a secondary to transmission ratio of all counted X-rays of less than 1 percent. Additionally, a single slice with details of various sizes was reconstructed using filtered backprojection. The smallest detail which was still visible in the reconstructed image has a size of 0.2mm.

  8. Systemic chemotherapy induces microsatellite instability in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Systemic chemotherapy is an important part of treatment for breast cancer. We conducted the present study to evaluate whether systemic chemotherapy could produce microsatellite instability (MSI) in the peripheral blood mononuclear cell fraction of breast cancer patients. We studied 119 sequential blood samples from 30 previously untreated breast cancer patients before, during and after chemotherapy. For comparison, we also evaluated 20 women who had no relevant medical history (control group). In 27 out of 30 patients we observed MSI in at least one sample, and six patients had loss of heterozygosity. We found a significant correlation between the number of MSI events per sample and chemotherapy with alkylating agents (P < 0.0001). We also observed an inverse correlation between the percentage of cells positive for hMSH2 and the number of MSI events per sample (P = 0.00019) and use of alkylating agents (P = 0.019). We conclude that systemic chemotherapy may induce MSI and loss of heterozygosity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from breast cancer patients receiving alkylating agents, possibly mediated by a chemotherapy-induced decrease in the expression of hMSH2. These effects may be related to the generation of secondary leukaemia in some patients, and may also intensify the genetic instability of tumours and increase resistance to treatment

  9. Decision Support System for Histopathological Diagnosis of Breast Diseases in Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aderonke A Kayode

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a representation of histological features for histopathological diagnosis of breast diseases in women. Hence, a Decision Support System (DSS for histopathological interpretation and diagnosis of breast diseases was implemented and evaluated. The Expert knowledge used was elicited through interview and literature search. The needed diagnostic knowledge was represented using diseases' profile in the form of frame. UML, JAVA and MYSQL were used for the design and implementation of the system. 150 samples of retrospective cases were used for the system's implementation, while a Consultant Pathologist's interpretation was used to evaluate the system. Results for Sensitivity, Specificity, Positive Prediction Value and the Negative Prediction Value are 97.7%, 95.0%, 99.2% and 86.3% respectively. Thus, the result showed that the system is capable of assisting an inexperience pathologist in making accurate, consistent and timely diagnoses, also in the study of diagnostic protocol, education, self-assessment, and quality control.

  10. Estimation of the average glandular dose on a team of tomosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seeking to improve the information that gives us an image of mammography the manufacturers have implemented tomosynthesis. With this method of acquisition and reconstruction of image we went from having a 2D to a 3D image image, in such a way that it reduces or eliminates the effect of overlap of tissues. The estimate of the dose, which is always a fundamental parameter in the control of quality of radiology equipment, is more in the case of mammography by the radiosensitivity of this body and the frequency of their use. The objective of this work is the determination of the mean in a team glandular dose of with tomosynthesis mammography. (Author)

  11. Classification System for Identifying Women at Risk for Altered Partial Breast Irradiation Recommendations After Breast Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalchik, Kristin V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Vallow, Laura A., E-mail: vallow.laura@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); McDonough, Michelle [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Thomas, Colleen S.; Heckman, Michael G. [Section of Biostatistics, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Peterson, Jennifer L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Adkisson, Cameron D. [Department of General Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Serago, Christopher [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); McLaughlin, Sarah A. [Department of General Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To study the utility of preoperative breast MRI for partial breast irradiation (PBI) patient selection, using multivariable analysis of significant risk factors to create a classification rule. Methods and Materials: Between 2002 and 2009, 712 women with newly diagnosed breast cancer underwent preoperative bilateral breast MRI at Mayo Clinic Florida. Of this cohort, 566 were retrospectively deemed eligible for PBI according to the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project Protocol B-39 inclusion criteria using physical examination, mammogram, and/or ultrasound. Magnetic resonance images were then reviewed to determine their impact on patient eligibility. The patient and tumor characteristics were evaluated to determine risk factors for altered PBI eligibility after MRI and to create a classification rule. Results: Of the 566 patients initially eligible for PBI, 141 (25%) were found ineligible because of pathologically proven MRI findings. Magnetic resonance imaging detected additional ipsilateral breast cancer in 118 (21%). Of these, 62 (11%) had more extensive disease than originally noted before MRI, and 64 (11%) had multicentric disease. Contralateral breast cancer was detected in 28 (5%). Four characteristics were found to be significantly associated with PBI ineligibility after MRI on multivariable analysis: premenopausal status (P=.021), detection by palpation (P<.001), first-degree relative with a history of breast cancer (P=.033), and lobular histology (P=.002). Risk factors were assigned a score of 0-2. The risk of altered PBI eligibility from MRI based on number of risk factors was 0:18%; 1:22%; 2:42%; 3:65%. Conclusions: Preoperative bilateral breast MRI altered the PBI recommendations for 25% of women. Women who may undergo PBI should be considered for breast MRI, especially those with lobular histology or with 2 or more of the following risk factors: premenopausal, detection by palpation, and first-degree relative with a history of

  12. Classification System for Identifying Women at Risk for Altered Partial Breast Irradiation Recommendations After Breast Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To study the utility of preoperative breast MRI for partial breast irradiation (PBI) patient selection, using multivariable analysis of significant risk factors to create a classification rule. Methods and Materials: Between 2002 and 2009, 712 women with newly diagnosed breast cancer underwent preoperative bilateral breast MRI at Mayo Clinic Florida. Of this cohort, 566 were retrospectively deemed eligible for PBI according to the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project Protocol B-39 inclusion criteria using physical examination, mammogram, and/or ultrasound. Magnetic resonance images were then reviewed to determine their impact on patient eligibility. The patient and tumor characteristics were evaluated to determine risk factors for altered PBI eligibility after MRI and to create a classification rule. Results: Of the 566 patients initially eligible for PBI, 141 (25%) were found ineligible because of pathologically proven MRI findings. Magnetic resonance imaging detected additional ipsilateral breast cancer in 118 (21%). Of these, 62 (11%) had more extensive disease than originally noted before MRI, and 64 (11%) had multicentric disease. Contralateral breast cancer was detected in 28 (5%). Four characteristics were found to be significantly associated with PBI ineligibility after MRI on multivariable analysis: premenopausal status (P=.021), detection by palpation (P<.001), first-degree relative with a history of breast cancer (P=.033), and lobular histology (P=.002). Risk factors were assigned a score of 0-2. The risk of altered PBI eligibility from MRI based on number of risk factors was 0:18%; 1:22%; 2:42%; 3:65%. Conclusions: Preoperative bilateral breast MRI altered the PBI recommendations for 25% of women. Women who may undergo PBI should be considered for breast MRI, especially those with lobular histology or with 2 or more of the following risk factors: premenopausal, detection by palpation, and first-degree relative with a history of

  13. The effect of menopause and hysterectomy on systemic vascular endothelial growth factor in women undergoing surgery for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent angiogenic cytokine produced physiologically by the uterus. Pathological secretion by tumours promotes growth and metastasis. High circulating VEGF levels potentially have a deleterious effect on breast cancer by promoting disease progression. The aims of this study were to investigate circulating VEGF levels in breast cancer patients and assess the effect of menopause or hysterectomy on systemic VEGF. Patients undergoing primary surgery for breast cancer and controls matched for age, menopausal and hysterectomy status were prospectively recruited. Serum VEGF, FSH, LH, estrogen, progesterone and platelet levels were measured. Serum VEGF was corrected for platelet load (sVEGFp) to provide a biologically relevant measurement of circulating VEGF. SVEGFp levels were analyzed with respect to tumor characteristics, menopausal status and hysterectomy status. Two hundred women were included in the study; 89 breast cancer patients and 111 controls. SVEGFp levels were significantly higher in breast cancer patients compared to controls (p = 0.0001), but were not associated with clinico-pathological tumor characteristics. Systemic VEGF levels reduced significantly in the breast cancer patients following tumor excision (p = 0.018). The highest systemic VEGF levels were observed in postmenopausal breast cancer patients. Postmenopausal women who had had a previous hysterectomy had significantly higher VEGF levels than those with an intact postmenopausal uterus (p = 0.001). This study identifies an intact postmenopausal uterus as a potential means of reducing circulating levels of VEGF which could confer a protective effect against breast cancer metastatic potential

  14. An Integrated Knowledge Base System Architecture for Histopathological Diagnosis of Breast Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aderonke A. Kayode

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The histopathological diagnosis of breast diseases requires highly trained and experienced experts, and often strains pathologists’ cognitive capabilities. Accurate and timely diagnosis of breast diseases is essential for the appropriate management of the patients. The paper presents a knowledge base system that uses a combination of rule-based and case-based techniques to achieve the diagnosis. Rule-based systems handle problems with well-defined knowledge bases this limits the flexibility of such system. Case-based reasoning has been adopted to overcome this inherent weakness of rule-based systems by incorporating previous cases in the generation of new cases to improve the performance of the system. The result of this research shows that the system is capable of assisting pathologists in making accurate, consistent and timely diagnoses. The system also aid in eliminating errors of omission that have been viewed as a prominent cause of medical errors. In conclusion this paper investigated the histological features used in the diagnosis of breast diseases and proposed an integrated knowledge base system based on the features.

  15. Stereo-vision system for finger tracking in breast self-examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jianchao; Wang, Yue J.; Freedman, Matthew T.; Mun, Seong K.

    1997-05-01

    Early detection of breast cancer, one of the leading causes of death by cancer for women in the US is key to any strategy designed to reduce breast cancer mortality. Breast self-examination (BSE) is considered as the most cost- effective approach available for early breast cancer detection because it is simple and non-invasive, and a large fraction of breast cancers are actually found by patients using this technique today. In BSE, the patient should use a proper search strategy to cover the whole breast region in order to detect al possible tumors. At present there is no objective approach or clinical data to evaluate the effectiveness of a particular BSE strategy. Even if a particular strategy is determined to be the most effective, training women to use it is still difficult because there is no objective way for them to know whether they are doing it correctly. We have developed a system using vision-based motion tracking technology to gather quantitative data about the breast palpation process for analysis of the BSE technique. By tracking position of the fingers, the system can provide the first objective quantitative data about the BSE process, and thus can improve our knowledge of the technique and help analyze its effectiveness. By visually displaying all the touched position information to the patient as the BSE is being conducted, the system can provide interactive feedback to the patient and create a prototype for a computer-based BSE training system. We propose to use color features, put them on the finger nails and track these features, because in breast palpation the background is the breast itself which is similar to the hand in color. This situation can hinder the ability/efficiency of other features if real time performance is required. To simplify feature extraction process, color transform is utilized instead of RGB values. Although the clinical environment will be well illuminated, normalization of color attributes is applied to compensate for

  16. Incorporating texture features in a computer-aided breast lesion diagnosis system for automated three-dimensional breast ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haixia; Tan, Tao; van Zelst, Jan; Mann, Ritse; Karssemeijer, Nico; Platel, Bram

    2014-07-01

    We investigated the benefits of incorporating texture features into an existing computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system for classifying benign and malignant lesions in automated three-dimensional breast ultrasound images. The existing system takes into account 11 different features, describing different lesion properties; however, it does not include texture features. In this work, we expand the system by including texture features based on local binary patterns, gray level co-occurrence matrices, and Gabor filters computed from each lesion to be diagnosed. To deal with the resulting large number of features, we proposed a combination of feature-oriented classifiers combining each group of texture features into a single likelihood, resulting in three additional features used for the final classification. The classification was performed using support vector machine classifiers, and the evaluation was done with 10-fold cross validation on a dataset containing 424 lesions (239 benign and 185 malignant lesions). We compared the classification performance of the CAD system with and without texture features. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve increased from 0.90 to 0.91 after adding texture features ([Formula: see text]). PMID:26158036

  17. Ultrasound-guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsy using Mammotome biopsy system for detection of breast cancer: results from two high volume hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Shaobo; Liu, Wenguang; Jin, Ketao; Liu, Yu; Zhou, Yunxiao

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsy (VABB) has been recently regarded as a feasible, effective, minimally invasive and safe method for removal of benign breast lesions without serious complications. The frequency of detection of noninvasive malignant breast lesions by ultrasound-guided VABB is increasing. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of the ultrasound-guided VABB using Mammotome biopsy system in the early detection of breast cancer. Retrospective review between January 2008 to March 2013 the First Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine and Taizhou Hospital, Wenzhou Medical College. From January 2008 to March 2013, a total of 5232 ultrasound-guided VABB procedures were performed in 3985 patients whose mean ages were 36.3 years (range: 16-73). The histological results of 5232 ultrasound-guided VABB were retrospectively reviewed. Ultrasonography follow-up was performed at 3 to 6 month intervals in order to assess recurrence. Two hundred twenty three high risk lesions (comprising 59 papilloma, 57 papillomatosis, and 107 atypical hyperplasia) and 61 malignant lesions (comprising 23 ductal carcinoma in situ, 21 lobular carcinoma in situ, 12 infiltrating ductal carcinoma, and 5 infiltrating mucinous carcinoma) were identified. Sensitivity (100%) and diagnostic accuracy (100%) regarding the detection of malignancy were excellent for ultrasound-guided VABB using Mammotome biopsy system. Our results indicate that ultrasound-guided VABB using Mammotome biopsy system is an accurate technique for the sampling, diagnosis, and early detection of breast cancer. It is recommended that the Mammotome biopsy system could be as the method of choice for detecting nonpalpable early breast cancer. PMID:24482711

  18. Dosimetric validation of planning system Eclipse 10 in partial breast irradiation treatments with IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partial breast irradiation is a new type of external radiation therapy to treat breast cancer in early clinical stages. Consist of administering to the channel surgical high doses of radiation in few treatment sessions. In this paper the dose calculations of the planning system Eclipse version 10 for a treatment of partial breast irradiation with X-rays beams (6 MV) intensity modulated were compared against the measurements made with OSL dosimeters and radio-chromic dye film. An anthropomorphic mannequin was used in which OSL dosimeters were collocated near the surface, an inside the radio-chromic dye film one plate; with this latest one dimensional dose distribution was measured. Previously dosimeters were calibrated irradiating them with a beam of X-rays 6 MV under the conditions specified in the IAEA-398 protocol. The OSL dosimeters were read in the Micro star Landauer equipment, the radio-chromic dye films were read with a scanner Epson 10000-Xl and analyzed with FilmCal and PTW Verisoft programs. The differences between measured and calculated dose were as follows: 3.6±1% for the OSL dosimeter and 96.3±1% of the analyzed points approved the gamma index criterion (3%, 3m m) when comparing the matrices of calculated dose and measured with the radio-chromic dye film. These results confirm the good dosimetric performance of planning system used under specific conditions used in the partial breast irradiation technique. (Author)

  19. Breast imaging reporting and data system (BI-RADS) lexicon for breast MRI: Interobserver variability in the description and assignment of BI-RADS category

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Khoury, Mona, E-mail: monelkhoury@gmail.com [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Montréal, Breast Centre, Radiology Department, 3840 Rue Saint Urbain, Montréal, QC H2W1T8 (Canada); Lalonde, Lucie; David, Julie; Labelle, Maude [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Montréal, Breast Centre, Radiology Department, 3840 Rue Saint Urbain, Montréal, QC H2W1T8 (Canada); Mesurolle, Benoit [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de McGill, Cedar Breast Centre, Radiology Department, 687 Pine Avenue West, Montreal, QC H3A1A1 (Canada); Trop, Isabelle [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Montréal, Breast Centre, Radiology Department, 3840 Rue Saint Urbain, Montréal, QC H2W1T8 (Canada)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • The use of BI-RADS lexicon in interpreting breast MRI examinations is beneficial. • Our study shows: (a) moderate to substantial agreement between observers and (b) better agreement in interpreting mass than non-mass enhancement (NME). • Careful analysis of the NME should be done to help detect cancer as early as possible. - Abstract: Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate interobserver variability between breast radiologists when describing abnormal enhancement on breast MR examinations and assigning a BI-RADS category using the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) terminology. Materials and methods: Five breast radiologists blinded to patients’ medical history and pathologic results retrospectively and independently reviewed 257 abnormal areas of enhancement on breast MRI performed in 173 women. Each radiologist described the focal enhancement using BI-RADS terminology and assigned a final BI-RADS category. Krippendorff's α coefficient of agreement was used to asses interobserver variability. Results: All radiologists agreed on the morphology of enhancement in 183/257 (71%) lesions, yielding a substantial agreement (Krippendorff's α = 0.71). Moderate agreement was obtained for mass descriptors – shape, margins and internal enhancement – (α = 0.55, 0.51 and 0.45 respectively) and NME (non-mass enhancement) descriptors – distribution and internal enhancement – (α = 0.54 and 0.43). Overall substantial agreement was obtained for BI-RADS category assignment (α = 0.71). It was however only moderate (α = 0.38) for NME compared to mass (α = 0.80). Conclusion: Our study shows good agreement in describing mass and NME on a breast MR examination but a better agreement in predicting malignancy for mass than NME.

  20. Breast dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The estimation of the absorbed dose to the breast is an important part of the quality control of the mammographic examination. Knowledge of breast dose is essential for the design and performance assessment of mammographic imaging systems. This review gives a historical introduction to the measurement of breast dose. The mean glandular dose (MGD) is introduced as an appropriate measure of breast dose. MGD can be estimated from measurements of the incident air kerma at the surface of the breast and the application of an appropriate conversion factor. Methods of calculating and measuring this conversion factor are described and the results discussed. The incident air kerma itself may be measured for patients or for a test phantom simulating the breast. In each case the dose may be determined using TLD measurements, or known exposure parameters and measurements of tube output. The methodology appropriate to each case is considered and the results from sample surveys of breast dose are presented. Finally the various national protocols for breast dosimetry are compared

  1. Predictive model for contrast-enhanced ultrasound of the breast: Is it feasible in malignant risk assessment of breast imaging reporting and data system 4 lesions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jun; Chen, Ji-Dong; Chen, Qing; Yue, Lin-Xian; Zhou, Guo; Lan, Cheng; Li, Yi; Wu, Chi-Hua; Lu, Jing-Qiao

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To build and evaluate predictive models for contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) of the breast to distinguish between benign and malignant lesions. METHODS: A total of 235 breast imaging reporting and data system (BI-RADS) 4 solid breast lesions were imaged via CEUS before core needle biopsy or surgical resection. CEUS results were analyzed on 10 enhancing patterns to evaluate diagnostic performance of three benign and three malignant CEUS models, with pathological results used as the gold standard. A logistic regression model was developed basing on the CEUS results, and then evaluated with receiver operating curve (ROC). RESULTS: Except in cases of enhanced homogeneity, the rest of the 9 enhancement appearances were statistically significant (P biopsy, and provide accurate BI-RADS classification. PMID:27358688

  2. Animal testing using 3D microwave tomography system for breast cancer detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Moon; Son, Sung Ho; Kim, Hyuk Je; Kim, Bo Ra; Choi, Heyng Do; Jeon, Soon Ik

    2014-01-01

    The three dimensional microwave tomography (3D MT) system of the Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI) comprises an antenna array, transmitting receiving module, switch matrix module and a signal processing component. This system also includes a patient interface bed as well as a 3D reconstruction algorithm. Here, we perform a comparative analysis of image reconstruction results using the assembled system and MRI results, which is used to image the breasts of dogs. Microwave imaging reconstruction results (at 1,500 MHz) obtained using the ETRI 3D MT system are presented. The system provides computationally reliable diagnosis results from the reconstructed MT Image. PMID:25160233

  3. Validity of breast-specific gamma imaging for Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System 4 lesions on mammography and/or ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Min Jeng; Yu, Yeong Beom; Park, Kyoung Sik; Chung, Hyun Woo; So, Young; Choi, Nami; Kim, Mi Young

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to assess the breast-specific gamma imaging (BSGI) in Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) 4 lesions on mammography and/or ultrasound. Methods We performed a retrospective review of 162 patients who underwent BSGI in BI-RADS 4 lesions on mammography and/or ultrasound. Results Of the 162 breast lesions, 66 were malignant tumors and 96 were benign tumors. Sensitivity and specificity of BSGI were 90.9% and 78.1%, and positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 74.1% and 92.6%. The sensitivity or specificity of mammography and ultrasound were 74.2% and 56.3% and 87.9% and 19.8%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of BSGI for breast lesions ≤1 cm were 88.0% and 86.8%, while the values of beast lesions >1 cm were 92.7% and 61.5%. The sensitivity or specificity of BSGI and mammography for patients with dense breasts were 92.0% and 81.3% and 72.0% and 50.0%, respectively. 26 patients showed neither a nodule nor microcalcification on ultrasound, but showed suspicious calcification on mammography. The sensitivity and specificity of BSGI with microcalcification only lesion were 75.0% and 94.4%. Conclusion This study demonstrated that BSGI had shown high sensitivity and specificity, as well as positive and negative predictive values in BI-RADS 4 lesions on ultrasound and/or mammography. BSGI showed excellent results in dense breasts, in lesions that are less than 1 cm in size and lesions with suspicious microcalcification only. PMID:27073789

  4. Breast, ovarian, and endometrial malignancies in systemic lupus erythematosus: a meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Bernatsky, S; Ramsey-Goldman, R; Foulkes, W D; Gordon, C; A E Clarke

    2011-01-01

    Background: An increased lymphoma risk is well documented in systemic lupus (SLE). Less attention has been focused on women's cancers, even though SLE affects mostly females. Our objective was to estimate the risk of breast, ovarian, and endometrial cancers in SLE, relative to the general population. Methods: Data were included from five recent studies of large SLE cohorts. The number of cancers observed was determined for each cancer type. The expected number of malignancies was ascertained ...

  5. Assessment of three different software systems in the evaluation of dynamic MRI of the breast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurz, K.D. [Department of Radiology, Stavanger University Hospital, Postbox 8100, Stavanger (Norway)], E-mail: kurk@sus.no; Steinhaus, D. [Institute of Daignostic Radiology, Duesseldorf University Hospital, Moorenstr. 5, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany)], E-mail: Daniele.Steinhaus@med.uni-duesseldorf.de; Klar, V. [Institute of Daignostic Radiology, Duesseldorf University Hospital, Moorenstr. 5, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany)], E-mail: verena.klar@uni-duesseldorf.de; Cohnen, M. [Institute of Daignostic Radiology, Duesseldorf University Hospital, Moorenstr. 5, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany)], E-mail: cohnen@med.uni-duesseldorf.de; Wittsack, H.J. [Institute of Daignostic Radiology, Duesseldorf University Hospital, Moorenstr. 5, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany)], E-mail: wittsack@uni-duesseldorf.de; Saleh, A. [Institute of Daignostic Radiology, Duesseldorf University Hospital, Moorenstr. 5, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany)], E-mail: saleh@uni-duesseldorf.de; Moedder, U. [Institute of Daignostic Radiology, Duesseldorf University Hospital, Moorenstr. 5, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany)], E-mail: moedder@med.uni-duesseldorf.de; Blondin, D. [Institute of Daignostic Radiology, Duesseldorf University Hospital, Moorenstr. 5, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany)], E-mail: blondin@med.uni-duesseldorf.de

    2009-02-15

    Objective: The aim was to compare the diagnostic performance and handling of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI of the breast with two commercial software solutions ('CADstream' and '3TP') and one self-developed software system ('Mammatool'). Materials and methods: Identical data sets of dynamic breast MRI from 21 patients were evaluated retrospectively with all three software systems. The exams were classified according to the BI-RADS classification. The number of lesions in the parametric mapping was compared to histology or follow-up of more than 2 years. In addition, 25 quality criteria were judged by 3 independent investigators with a score from 0 to 5. Statistical analysis was performed to document the quality ranking of the different software systems. Results: There were 9 invasive carcinomas, one pure DCIS, one papilloma, one radial scar, three histologically proven changes due to mastopathy, one adenosis and two fibroadenomas. Additionally two patients with enhancing parenchyma followed with MRI for more than 3 years and one scar after breast conserving therapy were included. All malignant lesions were classified as BI-RADS 4 or 5 using all software systems and showed significant enhancement in the parametric mapping. 'CADstream' showed the best score on subjective quality criteria. '3TP' showed the lowest number of false-positive results. 'Mammatool' produced the lowest number of benign tissues indicated with parametric overlay. Conclusion: All three software programs tested were adequate for sensitive and efficient assessment of dynamic MRI of the breast. Improvements in specificity may be achievable.

  6. Preservation of biomolecules in breast cancer tissue by a formalin-free histology system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morales Azorides R

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The potential problems associated with the use of formalin in histology, such as health hazards, degradation of RNA and cross-linking of proteins are well recognized. We describe the utilization of a formalin-free fixation and processing system for tissue detection of two important biopredictors in breast cancer – estrogen receptor and HER2 – at the RNA and protein levels. Methods Parallel sections of 62 cases of breast cancer were fixed in an alcohol-based molecular fixative and in formalin. Molecular fixative samples were processed by a novel formalin-free microwave-assisted processing system that preserves DNA, RNA and proteins. Formalin-fixed samples were processed using the conventional method. Estrogen receptor was assessed by immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR. HER2 was assessed by immunohistochemistry, FISH, CISH and real-time PCR. Results The immunohistochemical reaction for estrogen receptor was similar in molecular- and formalin-fixed samples (Spearman Rank R = 0.83, p Conclusion The formalin-free tissue fixation and processing system is a practical platform for evaluation of biomolecular markers in breast cancer and it allows reliable DNA and RNA and protein studies.

  7. Cosmetic evaluation of breast conserving treatment for mammary cancer; Proposal of a quantitative scoring system. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Limbergen, E.; Van der Schueren, E.; Van Tongelen, K. (Leuven University (Belgium). University Hospital St. Rafael, Department of Radiotherapy)

    1989-11-01

    In a population of 142 patients with stage I and II breast cancer, treated with tumor excision and external radiotherapy, using a wide range of radiation doses and fractionation schedules, an attempt was made to quantify the cosmetic outcome. Quantitative measurements of nipple displacement and breast contour retraction were compared and correlated with qualitative scoring by a panel. In the vast majority, the quantitative assessments correlate very well with subjective, qualitative scoring, making this method relevant for clinical use. There are a few exceptions, mainly cases where localized skin changes such as severe teleangiectasia or skin necrosis affect strongly the cosmetic result but can go undetected in this measuring system. Also limited surgical deformations, which can detract seriously from cosmetic success, particularly when they occur in the medio inferior quadrants, taken in standard conditions is needed. Measurements can be carried out quickly, using the plottin device of a treatment planning system. This system may be of great use for follow-up of new treatment modalities and the study of the development of radiation fibrosis in breast cancer. (author). 15 refs.; 3 figs.; 2 tabs.

  8. A Comparison of Behavioral Inhibition/ Activation System, Type D and Optimism in the Breast Cancer Patients and Healthy Controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Alipoor

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Nowadays, the role and importance of psychosocial factors on physical health, as well as the influence of personality characteristics in having psychosomatic diseases such as cancer are of interest to many researchers. In spite of increase in breast cancer in Iran, very few studies have been carried out on risk factors of breast cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the comparative Behavioral inhibition / Activation System, type D and optimism in the breast cancer patients and healthy individuals. Methods: In the present casual-comparative study, 190 people (95 Patients and 95 Normal Subjects were selected in Rasht, Iran. Moreover, the groups were matched for demographic characteristics (age, gender and education. All individuals diagnosed with Breast Cancer and Normal Subjects received a Gary-Wilson Personality Questionnaire, Life Orientation Test and Type D Personality Scale. Collected data were analyzed using multivariate analysis of variance and regression. Results: The findings revealed that there were significant differences between cancer and normal groups in behavioral inhibition/activation system, type D Personality and optimism. In this regard, the Breast Cancer group had higher scores subscales of negative affect, social inhibition, passive avoidance, extinction and fight-flight than normal group. In addition, subscales of approach, active avoidance and optimism in the normal group were more than the Breast Cancer group. Conclusion: The present study supported the role of psychological variables in breast cancer patients which is essential for improving patients’ health and quality of life.

  9. Evaluation of radiation dosage in chest digital tomosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility of chest digital tomosynthesis (DTS) for lung lesion screening by comparing the effective dose of chest DTS with chest digital radiography (DR), low-dose MSCT and MSCT examinations. Methods: The Fluke lung/chest phantom underwent posterior-anterior (PA), left lateral (LAT) chest DR and DTS with automatic exposure control technique. Using RTI DoseGuard and WinODS, the dose area product (DAP) and effective dose of PA, LAT and total DTS were calculated. CareDose technique was used for MSCT and low-dose MSCT scans, the dose length products (DLP) was acquired.According to the DLP to E (k) conversion coefficient in ICRP 103, the effective dose of low-dose MSCT and MSCT were calculated. Paired t test was used for comparison of the mean effective dose of DTS, DR and low-dose MSCT. Results: The mean effective dose was 0.13 mSv for chest DR and 0.11 mSv for DTS examination. The mean effective dose of low-dose MSCT and MSCT scans were 1.13 mSv and 6.38 mSv. The effective dose of chest DTS was comparable to that of chest DR, and was approximately 1/10 and 1/60 times lower than that of low-dose MSCT and MSCT scans. There was no statistical difference between chest DTS and DR (t=3.514, P>0.01), and there was a significant difference between chest DTS and low-dose MSCT (t=178.769, P<0.01). Conclusion: DTS is a new X-ray tomography which has the advantage of low radiation dosage in chest examination for lung lesion screening comparing with low-dose MSCT. (authors)

  10. Clear-PEM: A PET imaging system dedicated to breast cancer diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, M C; Albuquerque, E; Almeida, F G; Almeida, P; Amaral, P; Auffray, Etiennette; Bento, P; Bruyndonckx, P; Bugalho, R; Carriço, B; Cordeiro, H; Ferreira, M; Ferreira, N C; Gonçalves, F; Lecoq, Paul; Leong, C; Lopes, F; Lousã, P; Luyten, J; Martins, M V; Matela, N; Rato-Mendes, P; Moura, R; Nobre, J; Oliveira, N; Ortigão, C; Peralta, L; Rego, J; Ribeiro, R; Rodrigues, P; Santos, A I; Silva, J C; Silva, M M; Tavernier, Stefaan; Teixeira, I C; Texeira, J P; Trindade, A; Trummer, Julia; Varela, J

    2007-01-01

    The Clear-PEM scanner for positron emission mammography under development is described. The detector is based on pixelized LYSO crystals optically coupled to avalanche photodiodes and readout by a fast low-noise electronic system. A dedicated digital trigger (TGR) and data acquisition (DAQ) system is used for on-line selection of coincidence events with high efficiency, large bandwidth and small dead-time. A specialized gantry allows to perform exams of the breast and of the axilla. In this paper we present results of the measurement of detector modules that integrate the system under construction as well as the imaging performance estimated from Monte Carlo simulated data.

  11. Salvage of a TRAM breast reconstruction flap using the retrograde internal mammary artery system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameena Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Free tissue transfer provides an optimal means for breast reconstruction in creating an aesthetically natural appearance that is durable over time. The choice of donor vessels vary from surgeon to surgeon, but the internal mammary axis is one of the most popular choices together with the thoracodorsal vessels. Aims and Results: We present the case of a salvaged free transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous breast reconstruction in which end-to-end antegrade anastomosis to the internal mammary artery (IMA was not possible due to frail vessel walls, but retrograde anastomosis to the IMA and antegrade anastomosis of internal mammary vessel resulted in a perfused and viable flap. Conclusion: We suggest the use of the retrograde internal mammary arterial system for microsurgical anastomosis when the anterograde flow is not adequate, the vessel wall is friable, and when other more common options are not available.

  12. Clinical effect of percutaneous radiofrequency ablation for residual lung metastases from breast cancer after systemic chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine the clinical effect of Radiofrequency Ablation (RFA) for residual lung metastases from breast cancer after systemic chemotherapy. Study Design: An experimental study. Place and Duration of Study: The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, China, from January 2008 to October 2014. Methodology: Thirty-five breast cancer patients with 67 pulmonary metastases were involved in this study. All lesions were treated by RFA and followed by CT-scan. Primary endpoint of this clinical study was local control; secondary endpoints were overall survival and treatment-related toxicities. Results: Complete Response (CR) was observed in 59 lesions, with Partial Response (PR) in 4 lesions, Stable Disease (SD) in 1 lesion and Progression Disease (PD) in 3 lesions. The lesion diameter > 2 cm was related to poor local control (p=0.04). The median Overall Survival (OS) was 33 months (95%CI: 21.6 - 44.4). One, 2-, and 3-year OS rates were 88.6%, 59.3% and 42.8% respectively. The mumber of pulmonary metastases (2), the diameter of lesion (> 2 cm) and coexisting with liver metastases were significantly correlated to poor OS by multivariate analysis. Log-rank test showed statistically significant difference of OS in diameter of lesion and coexisting with other metastases. Conclusion: RFA is a promising treatment option for patients with residual lung metastases from breast cancer after systemic chemotherapy in selected patients. (author)

  13. The usefulness of scoring system distinguishing between benign and malignant breast masses on ultrasonogram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate a scoring system based on ultrasonographic findings as a means of distinguishing between benign and malignant solid breast masses. Histopathologically confirmed benign (n=102) and malignant (n=73) breast masses which ultrasonographic findings of histopathologic masses were reviewed for shape, border, internal echo, boundary echo, posterior echo, lateral echo, and ratio of transverse to anteroposterior diameter. There were statistically significant (p<0.001;chi-square test) differences in each feature for benign and malignant lesions. The findings suggesting benignancy, equivocality, and malignancy of the masses were scored as 0, 1, and 2 rspectively. The scores for all features were summed for each lesion. An ROC curve was obtained. When the score was 6, five benign and seven malignant cases were found. Scores of 0 and 1 indicated benign masses and a score above 11, malignancy. The turning point was a score of 6, so a score above 7 suggests malignancy. A ultrasonographic scoring system can be used to characterise breast masses. A score of a mass above 7 suggests probable malignancy and a score below 5 suggests benignancy

  14. The usefulness of scoring system distinguishing between benign and malignant breast masses on ultrasonogram

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Won Kyu; Bae, Kyoung Kug; Choi, Jong O; Hwang, Mi Soo; Byun, Woo Mok; Park, Bok Hwan; Lee, Hwa Jin [Yeungnam Univ. College of Medicine, Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-05-01

    To evaluate a scoring system based on ultrasonographic findings as a means of distinguishing between benign and malignant solid breast masses. Histopathologically confirmed benign (n=102) and malignant (n=73) breast masses which ultrasonographic findings of histopathologic masses were reviewed for shape, border, internal echo, boundary echo, posterior echo, lateral echo, and ratio of transverse to anteroposterior diameter. There were statistically significant (p<0.001;chi-square test) differences in each feature for benign and malignant lesions. The findings suggesting benignancy, equivocality, and malignancy of the masses were scored as 0, 1, and 2 rspectively. The scores for all features were summed for each lesion. An ROC curve was obtained. When the score was 6, five benign and seven malignant cases were found. Scores of 0 and 1 indicated benign masses and a score above 11, malignancy. The turning point was a score of 6, so a score above 7 suggests malignancy. A ultrasonographic scoring system can be used to characterise breast masses. A score of a mass above 7 suggests probable malignancy and a score below 5 suggests benignancy.

  15. Breast lift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastopexy; Breast lift with reduction; Breast lift with augmentation ... enlargement with implants) when they have a breast lift. ... it for medical reasons. Women usually have breast lifts to lift sagging, loose breasts. Pregnancy, breastfeeding, and ...

  16. Therapeutic application of ultrasound-guided 8-gauge Mammotome system in presumed benign breast lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hao-jun; Chen, Xin; Tu, Gang; Wang, Jing; Wu, Cheng-yi; Yang, Guang-lun

    2011-01-01

    The stereotactic or ultrasound-guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsy (Mammotome, MMT) system is a minimally invasive surgical technique. Increasingly, it is used to remove benign breast lesions as management. To evaluate the therapeutic value of 8-gauge ultrasound-guided MMT system (UMS) in presumed benign breast lesions, a retrospective analysis was performed on a series of 2,167 consecutive 8-gauge UMS procedures. The parameters used in this analysis included lesion size, location, breast imaging reporting and data system for ultrasound category, histopathologic diagnosis, and others. A total of 1,119 women whose mean ages were 36.6 years (range: 12-71, SD: 9.6) underwent 2,167 consecutive 8-gauge UMS procedures. Among the patients, 298 cases (26.63%) did not have palpable mass, 430 (38.43%) had multiple lesions, and 237 (21.18%) had bilateral ones. The average size of excised lesions was 15.8 mm (range: 5-55, SD: 6.7) in the largest dimension, including 294 lesions < 10 mm (13.57%); 1,359 lesions, 10-19 mm (62.71%); 420 lesions, 20-29 mm (19.38%), and 94 lesions ≥ 30 mm (4.34%). Predominant lesions (81.59%) were solid on ultrasound image and nearly half (48.59%) of them were localized in the upper outer quadrant. Histopathologic diagnosis revealed that the overwhelming majority of specimens (96.61%) were benign, most of which manifested as fibroadenoma and fibrocystic changes, while high-risk lesions were revealed in 31 (2.29%) cases and malignancies in 15 (1.11%). Average time for procedure was 8.6 minutes (range: 3.5-38, SD: 5.4) and mean number of cores removed in the procedure was 9.3 (range: 2-42, SD: 3.7). Complete excision was achieved predominantly (99.82%). Complications (59, 5.27%) in which hematoma (41, 3.66%) was the majority were acceptable. In conclusion, the 8-gauge UMS procedure is a safe and potent therapeutic management with satisfactory cosmetic outcome for benign and high-risk breast lesions, especially for bilateral, multiple, and

  17. Systemic Sclerosis and Silicone Breast Implant: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonios Psarras

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmentally induced systemic sclerosis is a well-recognized condition, which is correlated with exposure to various chemical compounds or drugs. However, development of scleroderma-like disease after exposure to silicone has always been a controversial issue and, over time, it has triggered spirited debate whether there is a certain association or not. Herein, we report the case of a 35-year-old female who developed Raynaud’s phenomenon and, finally, systemic sclerosis shortly after silicone breast implantation surgery.

  18. Predicting the continuous values of breast cancer relapse time by type-2 fuzzy logic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microarray analysis and gene expression profile have been widely used in tumor classification, survival analysis and ER statues of breast cancer. Sample discrimination as well as identification of significant genes have been the focus of most previous studies. The aim of this research is to propose a fuzzy model to predict the relapse time of breast cancer by using breast cancer dataset published by van't Veer. Fuzzy rule mining based on support vector machine has been used in a hybrid method with rule pruning and shown its ability to divide the samples in many subgroups. To handle the existence of uncertainties in linguistic variables and fuzzy sets, the TSK model of Interval type-2 fuzzy logic system has been used and a new simple method is also developed to consider the uncertainties of the rules which have been optimized by genetic algorithm. B632 validation method is applied to estimate the error of the model. The results with 95 % confidence interval show a reasonable accuracy in prediction.

  19. Image quality and localization accuracy in C-arm tomosynthesis-guided head and neck surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The image quality and localization accuracy for C-arm tomosynthesis and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) guidance of head and neck surgery were investigated. A continuum in image acquisition was explored, ranging from a single exposure (radiograph) to multiple projections acquired over a limited arc (tomosynthesis) to a full semicircular trajectory (CBCT). Experiments were performed using a prototype mobile C-arm modified to perform 3D image acquisition (a modified Siemens PowerMobil). The tradeoffs in image quality associated with the extent of the source-detector arc (θtot), the number of projection views, and the total imaging dose were evaluated in phantom and cadaver studies. Surgical localization performance was evaluated using three cadaver heads imaged as a function of θtot. Six localization tasks were considered, ranging from high-contrast feature identification (e.g., tip of a K-wire pointer) to more challenging soft-tissue delineation (e.g., junction of the hard and soft palate). Five head and neck surgeons and one radiologist participated as observers. For each localization task, the 3D coordinates of landmarks pinpointed by each observer were analyzed as a function of θtot. For all tomosynthesis angles, image quality was highest in the coronal plane, whereas sagittal and axial planes exhibited a substantial decrease in spatial resolution associated with out-of-plane blur and distortion. Tasks involving complex, lower-contrast features demonstrated steeper degradation with smaller tomosynthetic arc. Localization accuracy in the coronal plane was correspondingly high, maintained to tot∼30 deg. , whereas sagittal and axial localization degraded rapidly below θtot∼60 deg. . Similarly, localization precision was better than ∼1 mm within the coronal plane, compared to ∼2-3 mm out-of-plane for tomosynthesis angles below θtot∼45 deg. . An overall 3D localization accuracy of ∼2.5 mm was achieved with θtot∼ 90 deg. for most tasks. The

  20. A systems analysis of the chemosensitivity of breast cancer cells to the polyamine analogue PG-11047

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuo, Wen-Lin; Das, Debopriya; Ziyad, Safiyyah; Bhattacharya, Sanchita; Gibb, William J.; Heiser, Laura M.; Sadanandam, Anguraj; Fontenay, Gerald V.; Hu, Zhi; Wang, Nicholas J.; Bayani, Nora; Feiler, Heidi S.; Neve, Richard M.; Wyrobek, Andrew J.; Spellman, Paul T.; Marton, Laurence J.; Gray, Joe W.

    2009-11-14

    Polyamines regulate important cellular functions and polyamine dysregulation frequently occurs in cancer. The objective of this study was to use a systems approach to study the relative effects of PG-11047, a polyamine analogue, across breast cancer cells derived from different patients and to identify genetic markers associated with differential cytotoxicity. A panel of 48 breast cell lines that mirror many transcriptional and genomic features present in primary human breast tumours were used to study the antiproliferative activity of PG-11047. Sensitive cell lines were further examined for cell cycle distribution and apoptotic response. Cell line responses, quantified by the GI50 (dose required for 50% relative growth inhibition) were correlated with the omic profiles of the cell lines to identify markers that predict response and cellular functions associated with drug sensitivity. The concentrations of PG-11047 needed to inhibit growth of members of the panel of breast cell lines varied over a wide range, with basal-like cell lines being inhibited at lower concentrations than the luminal cell lines. Sensitive cell lines showed a significant decrease in S phase fraction at doses that produced little apoptosis. Correlation of the GI50 values with the omic profiles of the cell lines identified genomic, transcriptional and proteomic variables associated with response. A 13-gene transcriptional marker set was developed as a predictor of response to PG-11047 that warrants clinical evaluation. Analyses of the pathways, networks and genes associated with response to PG-11047 suggest that response may be influenced by interferon signaling and differential inhibition of aspects of motility and epithelial to mesenchymal transition.

  1. Generation of 3D synthetic breast tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elangovan, Premkumar; Dance, David R.; Young, Kenneth C.; Wells, Kevin

    2016-03-01

    Virtual clinical trials are an emergent approach for the rapid evaluation and comparison of various breast imaging technologies and techniques using computer-based modeling tools. A fundamental requirement of this approach for mammography is the use of realistic looking breast anatomy in the studies to produce clinically relevant results. In this work, a biologically inspired approach has been used to simulate realistic synthetic breast phantom blocks for use in virtual clinical trials. A variety of high and low frequency features (including Cooper's ligaments, blood vessels and glandular tissue) have been extracted from clinical digital breast tomosynthesis images and used to simulate synthetic breast blocks. The appearance of the phantom blocks was validated by presenting a selection of simulated 2D and DBT images interleaved with real images to a team of experienced readers for rating using an ROC paradigm. The average areas under the curve for 2D and DBT images were 0.53+/-.04 and 0.55+/-.07 respectively; errors are the standard errors of the mean. The values indicate that the observers had difficulty in differentiating the real images from simulated images. The statistical properties of simulated images of the phantom blocks were evaluated by means of power spectrum analysis. The power spectrum curves for real and simulated images closely match and overlap indicating good agreement.

  2. Initial evaluation of a full breast digital system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full-field digital mammography systems have been developed for overcoming the limitations of the screen-film mammography. This work is focused on the system from GE Medical Systems (Senographe 2000) which has been recently installed in our institution. The imager consists of a thin Ics:Tl scintillator which is in narrow contact with an array of amorphous silicon detectors mounted in a single panel. The flat-panel detector is integrated in a x-ray system with a high-frequency generator Senographe DM and dual track anode of Mo and Rh with Mo and Rh filtration. The aim of this work is to analyse the defaults exposure factors set at the installation of the x-ray unit. The image quality has been evaluated by using one of the two phantoms recommended in the ACR Accreditation Program. Phantom images were obtained at each of the three available imaging modes: contrast (CNT), standard (STD) and DOSE. While maintaining the defaults of kilovoltage and anode/filter combination, phantom images were obtained at lower dose vales. The contrast noise ratio (CNR) was calculated for each of the low contrast objects (masses) of the phantom images and the detail visibility was also evaluated. The results obtained for both parameters reveal that similar image quality can be obtained with significant reductions of the average glandular dose. (author)

  3. Effect of adjuvant systemic treatment on cosmetic outcome and late normal-tissue reactions after breast conservation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Jørgen; Overgaard, Jens; Overgaard, Marie

    2007-01-01

    To investigate whether adjuvant treatment with CMF or tamoxifen predisposes to an unfavorable cosmetic outcome or increased breast morbidity after radiotherapy in breast conservation. Data from 266 patients who entered a randomized breast conservation trial (DBCG-82TM protocol) was analyzed. The......-risk patients: premenopausal patients (n = 67) received eight cycles of CMF intravenously (600/40/600 mg per m(2)) every fourth week; postmenopausal patients (n = 27) received 30 mg of tamoxifen daily for one year. Clinical assessments included cosmetic outcome, breast fibrosis, skin telangiectasia, and...... premenopausal patients, systemic treatment with CMF independently predicted a fair/poor cosmetic outcome, RR = 2.2 (95% CI 1.2-4.2), as well as increased skin telangiectasia, RR = 3.3 (1.4-8.2). There was no impact of tamoxifen treatment on cosmetic outcome in postmenopausal patients (p = 0.32). However...

  4. Computer-aided detection system performance on current and previous digital mammograms in patients with contralateral metachronous breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: The computer-aided detection (CAD) system is widely used for screening mammography. The performance of the CAD system for contralateral breast cancer has not been reported for women with a history of breast cancer. Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the performance of a CAD system on current and previous mammograms in patients with contralateral metachronous breast cancer. Material and Methods: During a 3-year period, 4945 postoperative patients had follow-up examinations, from whom we selected 55 women with contralateral breast cancers. Among them, 38 had visible malignant signs on the current mammograms. We analyzed the sensitivity and false-positive marks of the system on the current and previous mammograms according to lesion type and breast density. Results: The total visible lesion components on the current mammograms included 27 masses and 14 calcifications in 38 patients. The case-based sensitivity for all lesion types was 63.2% (24/38) with false-positive marks of 0.71 per patient. The lesion-based sensitivity for masses and calcifications was 59.3% (16/27) and 71.4% (10/14), respectively. The lesion-based sensitivity for masses in fatty and dense breasts was 68.8% (11/16) and 45.5% (5/11), respectively. The lesion-based sensitivity for calcifications in fatty and dense breasts was 100.0% (3/3) and 63.6% (7/11), respectively. The total visible lesion components on the previous mammograms included 13 masses and three calcifications in 16 patients, and the sensitivity for all lesion types was 31.3% (5/16) with false-positive marks of 0.81 per patient. On these mammograms, the sensitivity for masses and calcifications was 30.8% (4/13) and 33.3% (1/3), respectively. The sensitivity in fatty and dense breasts was 28.6% (2/7) and 33.3% (3/9), respectively. Conclusion: In the women with a history of breast cancer, the sensitivity of the CAD system in visible contralateral breast cancer was lower than in most previous reports using the same CAD

  5. Collimator design for a dedicated molecular breast imaging-guided biopsy system: Proof-of-concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Molecular breast imaging (MBI) is a dedicated nuclear medicine breast imaging modality that employs dual-head cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) gamma cameras to functionally detect breast cancer. MBI has been shown to detect breast cancers otherwise occult on mammography and ultrasound. Currently, a MBI-guided biopsy system does not exist to biopsy such lesions. Our objective was to consider the utility of a novel conical slant-hole (CSH) collimator for rapid (<1 min) and accurate monitoring of lesion position to serve as part of a MBI-guided biopsy system. Methods: An initial CSH collimator design was derived from the dimensions of a parallel-hole collimator optimized for MBI performed with dual-head CZT gamma cameras. The parameters of the CSH collimator included the collimator height, cone slant angle, thickness of septa and cones of the collimator, and the annular areas exposed at the base of the cones. These parameters were varied within the geometric constraints of the MBI system to create several potential CSH collimator designs. The CSH collimator designs were evaluated using Monte Carlo simulations. The model included a breast compressed to a thickness of 6 cm with a 1-cm diameter lesion located 3 cm from the collimator face. The number of particles simulated was chosen to represent the count density of a low-dose, screening MBI study acquired with the parallel-hole collimator for 10 min after a ∼150 MBq (4 mCi) injection of Tc-99m sestamibi. The same number of particles was used for the CSH collimator simulations. In the resulting simulated images, the count sensitivity, spatial resolution, and accuracy of the lesion depth determined from the lesion profile width were evaluated. Results: The CSH collimator design with default parameters derived from the optimal parallel-hole collimator provided 1-min images with error in the lesion depth estimation of 1.1 ± 0.7 mm and over 21 times the lesion count sensitivity relative to 1-min images acquired with

  6. Collimator design for a dedicated molecular breast imaging-guided biopsy system: Proof-of-concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinmann, Amanda L.; Hruska, Carrie B.; Conners, Amy L.; O' Connor, Michael K. [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: Molecular breast imaging (MBI) is a dedicated nuclear medicine breast imaging modality that employs dual-head cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) gamma cameras to functionally detect breast cancer. MBI has been shown to detect breast cancers otherwise occult on mammography and ultrasound. Currently, a MBI-guided biopsy system does not exist to biopsy such lesions. Our objective was to consider the utility of a novel conical slant-hole (CSH) collimator for rapid (<1 min) and accurate monitoring of lesion position to serve as part of a MBI-guided biopsy system. Methods: An initial CSH collimator design was derived from the dimensions of a parallel-hole collimator optimized for MBI performed with dual-head CZT gamma cameras. The parameters of the CSH collimator included the collimator height, cone slant angle, thickness of septa and cones of the collimator, and the annular areas exposed at the base of the cones. These parameters were varied within the geometric constraints of the MBI system to create several potential CSH collimator designs. The CSH collimator designs were evaluated using Monte Carlo simulations. The model included a breast compressed to a thickness of 6 cm with a 1-cm diameter lesion located 3 cm from the collimator face. The number of particles simulated was chosen to represent the count density of a low-dose, screening MBI study acquired with the parallel-hole collimator for 10 min after a {approx}150 MBq (4 mCi) injection of Tc-99m sestamibi. The same number of particles was used for the CSH collimator simulations. In the resulting simulated images, the count sensitivity, spatial resolution, and accuracy of the lesion depth determined from the lesion profile width were evaluated. Results: The CSH collimator design with default parameters derived from the optimal parallel-hole collimator provided 1-min images with error in the lesion depth estimation of 1.1 {+-} 0.7 mm and over 21 times the lesion count sensitivity relative to 1-min images

  7. Validating a Prognostic Scoring System for Postmastectomy Locoregional Recurrence in Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This study is designed to validate a previously developed locoregional recurrence risk (LRR) scoring system and further define which groups of patients with breast cancer would benefit from postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT). Methods and Materials: An LRR risk scoring system was developed previously at our institution using breast cancer patients initially treated with modified radical mastectomy between 1990 and 2001. The LRR score comprised 4 factors: patient age, lymphovascular invasion, estrogen receptor negativity, and number of involved lymph nodes. We sought to validate the original study by examining a new dataset of 1545 patients treated between 2002 and 2007. Results: The 1545 patients were scored according to the previously developed criteria: 920 (59.6%) were low risk (score 0-1), 493 (31.9%) intermediate risk (score 2-3), and 132 (8.5%) were high risk (score ≥4). The 5-year locoregional control rates with and without PMRT in low-risk, intermediate-risk, and high-risk groups were 98% versus 97% (P=.41), 97% versus 91% (P=.0005), and 89% versus 50% (P=.0002) respectively. Conclusions: This analysis of an additional 1545 patients treated between 2002 and 2007 validates our previously reported LRR scoring system and suggests appropriate patients for whom PMRT will be beneficial. Independent validation of this scoring system by other institutions is recommended

  8. Validating a Prognostic Scoring System for Postmastectomy Locoregional Recurrence in Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Skye Hung-Chun, E-mail: skye@kfsyscc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Koo Foundation Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Clinical Research Office, Koo Foundation Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Tsai, Stella Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Koo Foundation Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Yu, Ben-Long [Department of Surgery, Koo Foundation Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Horng, Cheng-Fang [Clinical Research Office, Koo Foundation Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chii-Ming [Department of Surgery, Koo Foundation Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Jian, James J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Koo Foundation Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Chu, Nan-Min [Department of Medical Oncology, Koo Foundation Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Tsou, Mei-Hua [Department of Pathology, Koo Foundation Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Liu, Mei-Ching [Department of Medical Oncology, Koo Foundation Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Huang, Andrew T. [Department of Medical Oncology, Koo Foundation Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Prosnitz, Leonard R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: This study is designed to validate a previously developed locoregional recurrence risk (LRR) scoring system and further define which groups of patients with breast cancer would benefit from postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT). Methods and Materials: An LRR risk scoring system was developed previously at our institution using breast cancer patients initially treated with modified radical mastectomy between 1990 and 2001. The LRR score comprised 4 factors: patient age, lymphovascular invasion, estrogen receptor negativity, and number of involved lymph nodes. We sought to validate the original study by examining a new dataset of 1545 patients treated between 2002 and 2007. Results: The 1545 patients were scored according to the previously developed criteria: 920 (59.6%) were low risk (score 0-1), 493 (31.9%) intermediate risk (score 2-3), and 132 (8.5%) were high risk (score ≥4). The 5-year locoregional control rates with and without PMRT in low-risk, intermediate-risk, and high-risk groups were 98% versus 97% (P=.41), 97% versus 91% (P=.0005), and 89% versus 50% (P=.0002) respectively. Conclusions: This analysis of an additional 1545 patients treated between 2002 and 2007 validates our previously reported LRR scoring system and suggests appropriate patients for whom PMRT will be beneficial. Independent validation of this scoring system by other institutions is recommended.

  9. How to improve your breast cancer program: Standardized reporting using the new American College of Radiology Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the USA, the use of the American College of Radiology Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (ACR BI-RADS) has served not only as a quality assurance tool and guide to standardizing breast imaging reports but has also improved communication between referring physicians, researchers, and patients. In fact, in the USA, the Mammography Quality Standards Act of 1997 requires that all mammograms be assigned a BI-RADS category based on the finding of most concern. In this manuscript, we aim to review the recommendations provided in the 4th edition of the ACR BI-RADS for mammography, USG, and MRI. We also review the major controversies surrounding the use of ACR BI-RADS

  10. Taking the lymphatic system into consideration in nursing : How lymphedema impacts the breast cancer patients’ quality of life

    OpenAIRE

    Haapiainen, Tiina

    2015-01-01

    The lymphatic system has several vital functions to maintain a healthy immune system. Breast cancer-related lymphedema is a non-curable condition that refers to post-surgical chronic and painful swelling of the upper limb. The aim of this study was to review existing literature to see what information is available for nurses about the importance of the lymphatic system. The study focused on breast cancer related lymphedema patients and two research questions were asked 1) What are some of the...

  11. Optimized tomography and tomosynthesis methods for determination of depth by mechanized radiographic testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A major task of inspection of austenitic pipes of NPP is to detect stress corrosion cracking, and in particular to differentiate notch-type defects from cracks. Differentiation requires information on the geometrical depth and extension of a defect in the material. Determination of those parameters can be done by 3D reconstruction methods and application of digital laminography, or linear or non-linear tomosynthesis algorithms. (orig./CB)

  12. kV x-ray dual digital tomosynthesis for image guided lung SBRT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partain, Larry; Boyd, Douglas; Kim, Namho; Hernandez, Andrew; Daly, Megan; Boone, John

    2016-03-01

    Two simulated sets of digital tomosynthesis images of the lungs, each acquired at a 90 degree angle from the other, with 19 projection images used for each set and SART iterative reconstructed, gives dual tomosynthesis slice image quality approaching that of spiral CT, and with a data acquisition time that is 3% of that of cone beam CT. This fast kV acquisition, should allow near real time tracking of lung tumors in patients receiving SBRT, based on a novel TumoTrakTM multi-source X-ray tube design. Until this TumoTrakTM prototype is completed over the next year, its projected performance was simulated from the DRR images created from a spiral CT data set from a lung cancer patient. The resulting dual digital tomosynthesis reconstructed images of the lung tumor were exceptional and approached that of the gold standard Feldkamp CT reconstruction of breath hold, diagnostic, spiral, multirow, CT data. The relative dose at 46 mAs was less than 10% of what it would have been if the digital tomosynthesis had been done at the 472 mAs of the CT data set. This is for a 0.77 fps imaging rate sufficient to resolve respiratory motion in many free breathing patients during SBRT. Such image guidance could decrease the magnitudes of targeting error margins by as much as 20 mm or more in the craniocaudal direction for lower lobe lesions while markedly reducing dose to normal lung, heart and other critical structures. These initial results suggest a wide range of topics for future work.

  13. CHESS (Comprehensive Health Enhancement Support System): an interactive computer system for women with breast cancer piloted with an underserved population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McTavish, F M; Gustafson, D H; Owens, B H; Hawkins, R P; Pingree, S; Wise, M; Taylor, J O; Apantaku, F M

    1995-07-01

    The Comprehensive Health Enhancement Support System (CHESS) is an interactive computer system containing information, social support, and problem-solving tools. It was developed with intensive input from potential users through needs-assessment surveys and field testing. CHESS had previously been used by women in the middle and upper socioeconomic classes with high school and college education. This article reports on the results of a pilot study involving eight African-American women with breast cancer from impoverished neighborhoods in Chicago. CHESS was very well received; was extensively used; and produced feelings of acceptance, motivation, understanding, and relief. PMID:10143478

  14. Evaluation of an Automated Information Extraction Tool for Imaging Data Elements to Populate a Breast Cancer Screening Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacson, Ronilda; Harris, Kimberly; Brawarsky, Phyllis; Tosteson, Tor D; Onega, Tracy; Tosteson, Anna N A; Kaye, Abby; Gonzalez, Irina; Birdwell, Robyn; Haas, Jennifer S

    2015-10-01

    Breast cancer screening is central to early breast cancer detection. Identifying and monitoring process measures for screening is a focus of the National Cancer Institute's Population-based Research Optimizing Screening through Personalized Regimens (PROSPR) initiative, which requires participating centers to report structured data across the cancer screening continuum. We evaluate the accuracy of automated information extraction of imaging findings from radiology reports, which are available as unstructured text. We present prevalence estimates of imaging findings for breast imaging received by women who obtained care in a primary care network participating in PROSPR (n = 139,953 radiology reports) and compared automatically extracted data elements to a "gold standard" based on manual review for a validation sample of 941 randomly selected radiology reports, including mammograms, digital breast tomosynthesis, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The prevalence of imaging findings vary by data element and modality (e.g., suspicious calcification noted in 2.6% of screening mammograms, 12.1% of diagnostic mammograms, and 9.4% of tomosynthesis exams). In the validation sample, the accuracy of identifying imaging findings, including suspicious calcifications, masses, and architectural distortion (on mammogram and tomosynthesis); masses, cysts, non-mass enhancement, and enhancing foci (on MRI); and masses and cysts (on ultrasound), range from 0.8 to1.0 for recall, precision, and F-measure. Information extraction tools can be used for accurate documentation of imaging findings as structured data elements from text reports for a variety of breast imaging modalities. These data can be used to populate screening registries to help elucidate more effective breast cancer screening processes. PMID:25561069

  15. Real-time 3-dimensional virtual reality navigation system with open MRI for breast-conserving surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report here the early experiences using a real-time three-dimensional (3D) virtual reality navigation system with open magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for breast-conserving surgery (BCS). Two patients with a non-palpable MRI-detected breast tumor underwent BCS under the guidance of the navigation system. An initial MRI for the breast tumor using skin-affixed markers was performed immediately prior to excision. A percutaneous intramammary dye marker was applied to delineate an excision line, and the computer software '3D Slicer' generated a real-time 3D virtual reality model of the tumor and the puncture needle in the breast. Under guidance by the navigation system, marking procedures were performed without any difficulties. Fiducial registration errors were 3.00 mm for patient no.1, and 4.07 mm for patient no.2. The real-time 3D virtual reality navigation system with open MRI is feasible for safe and accurate excision of non-palpable MRI-detected breast tumors. (author)

  16. Digital tomosynthesis-experiences with a new imaging device for the dental field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Christoph M; Franetzki, Manfred; Denig, Tina; Mühling, Joachim; Hassfeld, Stefan

    2003-03-01

    Based on the principles of classic film tomography, a new digital X-ray device for dental sites was developed and clinically evaluated. The tomosynthesis process produces several slices from a finite number of radiographs taken from different projection angles, obtaining a three-dimensional image of the jaws and teeth. During evaluation of an industrial prototype, a total of 52 tomosynthesis data sets were made covering different anatomic areas. Of those, 32 sets were assessed by ten radiologically experienced dentists. Anatomic regions not shown on conventional intraoral dental films were displayed due to the extraoral sensor. Diagnostic images of high value were mainly achieved within the scope of lateral views and transverse views in the frontal region. Even small structures such as the periodontal ligament could be shown in several planes, resulting in superposition-free representation. The elimination of metal artefacts caused by dental restorations was facilitated. However, improvements can be made in definition and resolution. Views in the sagittal plane and incomplete blurring of the contralateral jaw are difficulties that remain. The tomosynthesis process combined with a planned 3D representation is likely to be well suited for dental radiology. The use of such a device could be much less expensive than computed tomography (CT). Furthermore, it offers higher spatial resolution, exposes patients to less radiation, and could be easily used in daily practice, even chairside. PMID:12673437

  17. The Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) in the Dutch breast cancer screening programme: its role as an assessment and stratification tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the suitability of the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) as a quality assessment tool in the Dutch breast cancer screening programme. The data of 93,793 screened women in the Amsterdam screening region (November 2005-July 2006) were reviewed. BI-RADS categories, work-up, age, final diagnosis and final TNM classification were available from the screening registry. Interval cancers were obtained through linkage with the cancer registry. BI-RADS was introduced as a pilot in the Amsterdam region before the nationwide introduction of digital mammography (2009-2010). A total of 1,559 women were referred to hospital (referral rate 1.7 %). Breast cancer was diagnosed in 485 women (detection rate 0.52 %); 253 interval cancers were reported, yielding a programme sensitivity of 66 % and specificity of 99 %. BI-RADS 0 had a lower positive predictive value (PPV, 14.1 %) than BI-RADS 4 (39.1 %) and BI-RADS 5 (92.9 %; P < 0.0001). The number of invasive procedures and tumour size also differed significantly between BI-RADS categories (P < 0.0001). The significant differences in PPV, invasive procedures and tumour size match with stratification into BI-RADS categories. It revealed inter-observer variability between screening radiologists and can thus be used as a quality assessment tool in screening and as a stratification tool in diagnostic work-up. (orig.)

  18. Comparative performance of modern digital mammography systems in a large breast screening program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaffe, Martin J., E-mail: martin.yaffe@sri.utoronto.ca; Bloomquist, Aili K.; Hunter, David M.; Mawdsley, Gordon E. [Physical Sciences Division, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Departments of Medical Biophysics and Medical Imaging, University of Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Chiarelli, Anna M. [Prevention and Cancer Control, Cancer Care Ontario, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5, Canada and Ontario Breast Screening Program, Cancer Care Ontario, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1X3 (Canada); Muradali, Derek [Ontario Breast Screening Program, Cancer Care Ontario, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1X3 (Canada); Mainprize, James G. [Physical Sciences Division, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To compare physical measures pertaining to image quality among digital mammography systems utilized in a large breast screening program. To examine qualitatively differences in these measures and differences in clinical cancer detection rates between CR and DR among sites within that program. Methods: As part of the routine quality assurance program for screening, field measurements are made of several variables considered to correlate with the diagnostic quality of medical images including: modulation transfer function, noise equivalent quanta, d′ (an index of lesion detectability) and air kerma to allow estimation of mean glandular dose. In addition, images of the mammography accreditation phantom are evaluated. Results: It was found that overall there were marked differences between the performance measures of DR and CR mammography systems. In particular, the modulation transfer functions obtained with the DR systems were found to be higher, even for larger detector element sizes. Similarly, the noise equivalent quanta, d′, and the phantom scores were higher, while the failure rates associated with low signal-to-noise ratio and high dose were lower with DR. These results were consistent with previous findings in the authors’ program that the breast cancer detection rates at sites employing CR technology were, on average, 30.6% lower than those that used DR mammography. Conclusions: While the clinical study was not large enough to allow a statistically powered system-by-system assessment of cancer detection accuracy, the physical measures expressing spatial resolution, and signal-to-noise ratio are consistent with the published finding that sites employing CR systems had lower cancer detection rates than those using DR systems for screening mammography.

  19. Comparative performance of modern digital mammography systems in a large breast screening program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare physical measures pertaining to image quality among digital mammography systems utilized in a large breast screening program. To examine qualitatively differences in these measures and differences in clinical cancer detection rates between CR and DR among sites within that program. Methods: As part of the routine quality assurance program for screening, field measurements are made of several variables considered to correlate with the diagnostic quality of medical images including: modulation transfer function, noise equivalent quanta, d′ (an index of lesion detectability) and air kerma to allow estimation of mean glandular dose. In addition, images of the mammography accreditation phantom are evaluated. Results: It was found that overall there were marked differences between the performance measures of DR and CR mammography systems. In particular, the modulation transfer functions obtained with the DR systems were found to be higher, even for larger detector element sizes. Similarly, the noise equivalent quanta, d′, and the phantom scores were higher, while the failure rates associated with low signal-to-noise ratio and high dose were lower with DR. These results were consistent with previous findings in the authors’ program that the breast cancer detection rates at sites employing CR technology were, on average, 30.6% lower than those that used DR mammography. Conclusions: While the clinical study was not large enough to allow a statistically powered system-by-system assessment of cancer detection accuracy, the physical measures expressing spatial resolution, and signal-to-noise ratio are consistent with the published finding that sites employing CR systems had lower cancer detection rates than those using DR systems for screening mammography

  20. Inhibiting metastasis of breast cancer cells in vitro using gold nanorod-siRNA delivery system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weiqi; Meng, Jie; Ji, Yinglu; Li, Xiaojin; Kong, Hua; Wu, Xiaochun; Xu, Haiyan

    2011-09-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignant disease in women, and it is not the primary tumor but its metastasis kills most patients with breast cancer. Anti-metastasis therapy based on RNA interference (RNAi) is emerging as one of promising strategies in tumor therapy. However, construction of an efficient delivery system for siRNA is still one of the major challenges. In this work, siRNA against protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) which is a pivotal gene involved in tumor metastasis was conjugated to gold nanorods (AuNRs) via electrostatic interaction and delivered to highly metastatic human breast cancer cells. It was demonstrated that the siRNA oligos were successfully delivered into the cancer cells and mainly located in vesicle-like structures including lysosome. After transfected with the complex of AuNRs and PAR-1 siRNA (AuNRs@PAR-1 siRNA), expression of PAR-1 at both mRNA and protein levels were efficiently down regulated, as evidenced by quantitative real time PCR and flow cytometry analysis, respectively. Transwell migration assay confirmed the decrease in metastatic ability of the cancer cells. The silencing efficiency of the complex was in-between that of TurboFect and Lipofectamine, however, the cytotoxicity of the AuNRs was lower than that of the latter two. Taken together, AuNRs with PAR-1 siRNA are suited for RNAi based anti-metastasis therapy.Breast cancer is the most common malignant disease in women, and it is not the primary tumor but its metastasis kills most patients with breast cancer. Anti-metastasis therapy based on RNA interference (RNAi) is emerging as one of promising strategies in tumor therapy. However, construction of an efficient delivery system for siRNA is still one of the major challenges. In this work, siRNA against protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) which is a pivotal gene involved in tumor metastasis was conjugated to gold nanorods (AuNRs) via electrostatic interaction and delivered to highly metastatic human breast cancer

  1. Timing of Chemotherapy After MammoSite Radiation Therapy System Breast Brachytherapy: Analysis of the American Society of Breast Surgeons MammoSite Breast Brachytherapy Registry Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate cosmetic outcome and radiation recall in the American Society of Breast Surgeons registry trial, as a function of the interval between accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) and initiation of chemotherapy (CTX). Methods and Materials: A total of 1440 patients at 97 institutions participated in this trial. After lumpectomy for early-stage breast cancer, patients received APBI (34 Gy in 10 fractions) with MammoSite RTS brachytherapy. A total of 148 patients received CTX within 90 days of APBI. Cosmetic outcome was evaluated at each follow-up visit and dichotomized as excellent/good or fair/poor. Results: Chemotherapy was initiated at a mean of 3.9 weeks after the final MammoSite procedure and was administered ≤3 weeks after APBI in 54 patients (36%) and >3 weeks after APBI in 94 patients (64%). The early and delayed groups were well balanced with respect to multiple factors that may impact on cosmetic outcome. There was a superior cosmetic outcome in those receiving chemotherapy >3 weeks after APBI (excellent/good in 72.2% at ≤3 weeks vs. excellent/good in 93.8% at >3 weeks; p = 0.01). Radiation recall in those receiving CTX at ≤3 weeks was 9 of 50 (18%), compared with 6 of 81(7.4%) in those receiving chemotherapy at >3 weeks (p = 0.09). Conclusion: The majority of patients receiving CTX after APBI have excellent/good cosmetic outcomes, with a low rate of radiation recall. Chemotherapy initiated >3 weeks after the final MammoSite procedure seems to be associated with a better cosmetic outcome and lower rate of radiation recall. An excellent/good cosmetic outcome in patients receiving CTX after 3 weeks was similar to the cosmetic outcome of the overall patient population who did not receive CTX

  2. An X-ray fluorescence system for measuring trace element concentrations in breast tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray fluorescence is being used as a technique for measuring concentrations of trace elements in breast tissue samples, both healthy and pathological. The aim is to establish the levels of some trace elements in normal tissue and subsequently compare with those in cancerous, as there are indications that there is a correlation between elevated concentrations of some elements in breast tissue and development of cancer. As a first step of these pilot studies we are investigating four such elements, Fe, Ca, Zn and Cu, but we plan to expand the study to include Se and Rb. The tissue samples are kept at -85 deg C and are stored in thin walled polypropylene tubes of 8 mm diameter, which can be unsealed from one end so that the samples can be exposed to the beam. The experimental set-up consists of a high output tungsten target X-ray source, a secondary target from which characteristic X-rays of an appropriate energy are produced, a sample holder and a Si detector. The geometry is highly collimated in order to promote a high signal to noise ratio for the fluorescence X-rays from the sample. The measurements will be compared to reference solutions of various concentrations of the elements of interest. The aim is to establish a calibration curve for each element, from which the correlation between fluorescence yield and element concentration can be extracted, leading to actual trace element levels in tissue. We hope to prove the feasibility of monitoring elements in levels normally found in breast tissue, using this XRF technique. We plan to show results referring both to normal and neoplastic tissue, stating levels of as many trace elements as possible. We should also be able to present minimum detectable levels regarding every element investigated with this system, as well as have propositions for further optimising the performance of the technique. (author)

  3. Early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breast cancer remains a common disease throughout the world. Here we review new knowledge about early breast cancer obtained during the past 5 years. The prognosis of early breast cancer is generally favorable. Especially, ductal carcinoma in situ has been regarded as a non-life-threatening disease. Therefore, early diagnosis and early onset of the treatment has been important. Early age at menarche, late age at first birth, and late age at menopause are related to breast cancer risk. Examination by mammography and ultrasonography is still the most effective means of detection for premenopausal and postmenopausal women, respectively. Additionally, there have been important advances in MRI, sentinel lymph node biopsy, breast-conserving surgery, partial breast irradiation, neoadjuvant systemic therapy, and adjuvant systemic therapy. Another approach to keeping the disease under control is the elucidation of breast cancer's molecular biological features. Assessment of potential molecular targets can lead to early diagnosis and molecular targeted treatment. (author)

  4. Ultrasound characterization of breast masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A lump in the breast is a cause of great concern. High frequency, high-resolution USG helps in its evaluation. This is exemplified in women with dense breast tissue where USG is useful in detecting small breast cancers that are not seen on mammography. Several studies in the past have addressed the issue of differentiating benign from malignant lesions in the breast. The American College of Radiology has also brought out a BIRADS-US classification system for categorizing focal breast lesions

  5. Imaging-Assisted Large-Format Breast Pathology: Program Rationale and Development in a Nonprofit Health System in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Lee Tucker

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern breast imaging, including magnetic resonance imaging, provides an increasingly clear depiction of breast cancer extent, often with suboptimal pathologic confirmation. Pathologic findings guide management decisions, and small increments in reported tumor characteristics may rationalize significant changes in therapy and staging. Pathologic techniques to grossly examine resected breast tissue have changed little during this era of improved breast imaging and still rely primarily on the techniques of gross inspection and specimen palpation. Only limited imaging information is typically conveyed to pathologists, typically in the form of wire-localization images from breast-conserving procedures. Conventional techniques of specimen dissection and section submission destroy the three-dimensional integrity of the breast anatomy and tumor distribution. These traditional methods of breast specimen examination impose unnecessary limitations on correlation with imaging studies, measurement of cancer extent, multifocality, and margin distance. Improvements in pathologic diagnosis, reporting, and correlation of breast cancer characteristics can be achieved by integrating breast imagers into the specimen examination process and the use of large-format sections which preserve local anatomy. This paper describes the successful creation of a large-format pathology program to routinely serve all patients in a busy interdisciplinary breast center associated with a community-based nonprofit health system in the United States.

  6. Design and analysis of a conformal patch antenna for a wearable breast hyperthermia treatment system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curto, Sergio; Ramasamy, Manoshika; Suh, Minyoung; Prakash, Punit

    2015-03-01

    To overcome the limitations of currently available clinical hyperthermia systems which are based on rigid waveguide antennas, a wearable microwave hyperthermia system is presented. A light wearable system can improve patient comfort and be located in close proximity to the breast, thereby enhancing energy deposition and reducing power requirements. The objective of this work was to design and assess the feasibility of a conformal patch antenna element of an array system to be integrated into a wearable hyperthermia bra. The feasibility of implementing antennas with silver printed ink technology on flexible substrates was evaluated. A coupled electromagnetic-bioheat transfer solver and a hemispheric heterogeneous numerical breast phantom were used to design and optimize a 915 MHz patch antenna. The optimization goals were device miniaturization, operating bandwidth, enhanced energy deposition pattern in targets, and reduced Efield back radiation. The antenna performance was evaluated for devices incorporating a hemispheric conformal groundplane and a rectangular groundplane configuration. Simulated results indicated a stable -10 dB return loss bandwidth of 88 MHz for both the conformal and rectangular groundplane configurations. Considering applied power levels restricted to 15 W, treatment volumes (T>410C) and depth from the skin surface were 11.32 cm3 and 27.94 mm, respectively, for the conformal groundplane configuration, and 2.79 cm3 and 19.72 mm, respectively, for the rectangular groundplane configuration. E-field back-radiation reduced by 85.06% for the conformal groundplane compared to the rectangular groundplane configuration. A prototype antenna with rectangular groundplane was fabricatd and experimentally evaluated. The groundplane was created by printing silver ink (Metalon JS-B25P) on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) film surface. Experiments revealed stable antenna performance for power levels up to 15.3 W. In conclusion, the proposed patch antenna with

  7. The systematic and random errors determination using realtime 3D surface tracking system in breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanphet, J.; Suriyapee, S.; Dumrongkijudom, N.; Sanghangthum, T.; Kumkhwao, J.; Wisetrintong, M.

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study to determine the patient setup uncertainties in deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) radiation therapy for left breast cancer patients using real-time 3D surface tracking system. The six breast cancer patients treated by 6 MV photon beams from TrueBeam linear accelerator were selected. The patient setup errors and motion during treatment were observed and calculated for interfraction and intrafraction motions. The systematic and random errors were calculated in vertical, longitudinal and lateral directions. From 180 images tracking before and during treatment, the maximum systematic error of interfraction and intrafraction motions were 0.56 mm and 0.23 mm, the maximum random error of interfraction and intrafraction motions were 1.18 mm and 0.53 mm, respectively. The interfraction was more pronounce than the intrafraction, while the systematic error was less impact than random error. In conclusion the intrafraction motion error from patient setup uncertainty is about half of interfraction motion error, which is less impact due to the stability in organ movement from DIBH. The systematic reproducibility is also half of random error because of the high efficiency of modern linac machine that can reduce the systematic uncertainty effectively, while the random errors is uncontrollable.

  8. Imaging results of multi-modal ultrasound computerized tomography system designed for breast diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opieliński, Krzysztof J; Pruchnicki, Piotr; Gudra, Tadeusz; Podgórski, Przemysław; Kurcz, Jacek; Kraśnicki, Tomasz; Sąsiadek, Marek; Majewski, Jarosław

    2015-12-01

    Nowadays, in the era of common computerization, transmission and reflection methods are intensively developed in addition to improving classical ultrasound methods (US) for imaging of tissue structure, in particular ultrasound transmission tomography UTT (analogous to computed tomography CT which uses X-rays) and reflection tomography URT (based on the synthetic aperture method used in radar imaging techniques). This paper presents and analyses the results of ultrasound transmission tomography imaging of the internal structure of the female breast biopsy phantom CIRS Model 052A and the results of the ultrasound reflection tomography imaging of a wire sample. Imaging was performed using a multi-modal ultrasound computerized tomography system developed with the participation of a private investor. The results were compared with the results of imaging obtained using dual energy CT, MR mammography and conventional US method. The obtained results indicate that the developed UTT and URT methods, after the acceleration of the scanning process, thus enabling in vivo examination, may be successfully used for detection and detailed characterization of breast lesions in women. PMID:25759234

  9. Chloroquine Engages the Immune System to Eradicate Irradiated Breast Tumors in Mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This study used chloroquine to direct radiation-induced tumor cell death pathways to harness the antitumor activity of the immune system. Methods and Materials: Chloroquine given immediately after tumor irradiation increased the cure rate of MCaK breast cancer in C3H mice. Chloroquine blocked radiation-induced autophagy and drove MCaK cells into a more rapid apoptotic and more immunogenic form of cell death. Results: Chloroquine treatment made irradiated tumor vaccines superior at inducing strong interferon gamma-associated immune responses in vivo and protecting mice from further tumor challenge. In vitro, chloroquine slowed antigen uptake and degradation by dendritic cells, although T-cell stimulation was unaffected. Conclusions: This study illustrates a novel approach to improve the efficacy of breast cancer radiation therapy by blocking endosomal pathways, which enhances radiation-induced cell death within the field and drives antitumor immunity to assist therapeutic cure. The study illuminates and merges seemingly disparate concepts regarding the importance of autophagy in cancer therapy

  10. Chloroquine Engages the Immune System to Eradicate Irradiated Breast Tumors in Mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratikan, Josephine Anna [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California (United States); Sayre, James William [Public Health Biostatistics/Radiology at UCLA, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California (United States); Schaue, Dörthe, E-mail: dschaue@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: This study used chloroquine to direct radiation-induced tumor cell death pathways to harness the antitumor activity of the immune system. Methods and Materials: Chloroquine given immediately after tumor irradiation increased the cure rate of MCaK breast cancer in C3H mice. Chloroquine blocked radiation-induced autophagy and drove MCaK cells into a more rapid apoptotic and more immunogenic form of cell death. Results: Chloroquine treatment made irradiated tumor vaccines superior at inducing strong interferon gamma-associated immune responses in vivo and protecting mice from further tumor challenge. In vitro, chloroquine slowed antigen uptake and degradation by dendritic cells, although T-cell stimulation was unaffected. Conclusions: This study illustrates a novel approach to improve the efficacy of breast cancer radiation therapy by blocking endosomal pathways, which enhances radiation-induced cell death within the field and drives antitumor immunity to assist therapeutic cure. The study illuminates and merges seemingly disparate concepts regarding the importance of autophagy in cancer therapy.

  11. Digital tomosynthesis (DTS) for verification of target position in early stage lung cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The ability to verify intrafraction tumor position is clinically useful for hypofractionated treatments. Short arc kV digital tomosynthesis (DTS) could facilitate more frequent target verification. The authors used DTS combined with triangulation to determine the mean temporal position of small-volume lung tumor targets treated with stereotactic radiotherapy. DTS registration results were benchmarked against online clinical localization using registration between free-breathing cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and the average intensity projection (AvIP) of the planning 4DCT.Methods: In this retrospective study, 76 sets of kV-projection images from online CBCT scans of 13 patients were used to generate DTS image slices (CB-DTS) with nonclinical research software (DTS Toolkit, Varian Medical Systems). Three-dimensional tumor motion was 1.3–4 mm in six patients and 6.1–25.4 mm in seven patients on 4DCT (significant difference in the mean of the groups, P 4 mm (P < 0.02) but increased Z-direction accuracy was only observed with 55° total gantry rotation. The 95th percentile deviations with this overlapping technique in X-, Y-, and Z-directions were 1.3, 2.0, and 2.5 mm, respectively. For the five patients with mobile tumors where DTS + triangulation was performed with 45° intervals, the pooled deviation from online CBCT correction showed, for X-, Y-, and Z-directions, mean of 1.1 mm, standard deviations (SD) of 0.9, 1.0, and 0.9 mm, respectively. The mean + 2 SD was <3 mm for each direction.Conclusions: Short-arc DTS verification of time averaged lung tumor position is feasible using free-breathing kV projection data and the AvIP of the 4DCT as a reference. Observed differences between DTS and online CBCT registration with AvIP were ≤3 mm (mean + 2 SD), however, the increased temporal resolution of DTS + triangulation also identified short period deviations from the average target position on the CBCT. Short-arc DTS appears promising for

  12. The natural history of local regional breast cancer recurrence: prognosis and implications for systemic therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to determine the natural history and long term outcome of breast cancer patients sustaining local regional failure as their first site of relapse in an effort to design a prospective study evaluating systemic therapy at the time of local regional relapse. Materials and Methods: Between January 1970 and December 1992, over 4000 patients with a diagnosis of breast cancer were treated at our facilities with mastectomy or conservative surgery with radiation therapy (CS+RT). A total of 195 patients sustained a local regional relapse, without evidence of distant metastasis, as the first site of failure and serve as the population base for this study. The 195 patients with local-regional recurrence of disease were distributed as follows: 59 patients relapsed in the ipsilateral breast following CS+RT within 5 years of original diagnosis (EARLYBR); 45 patients relapsed in the ipsilateral breast >5 years from original diagnosis (LATEBR); 52 patients relapsed in the chest wall following mastectomy (CWREC); and 23 patients failed in the regional lymphatics following mastectomy or CS+RT (REGREC). Patients with EARLYBR or LATEBR were generally treated with salvage mastectomy and patients with CWREC or REGREC were treated with definitive irradiation to the chest wall and/or regional nodes. Systemic therapy at the time of locoregional relapse was highly individualized, ranging from observation to tamoxifen to high dose chemotherapy with transplantation. Patient charts were reviewed with all clinical, pathologic, treatment, and outcome parameters entered onto a computerized database. Survival curves were calculated using the life table method with differences between survival curves compared by the Mantle-Haensel statistic. Survival, disease-free survival and distant metastasis rates were calculated from the date of original diagnosis, as well as from the date of local regional relapse. Local regional recurrence-free time was calculated from

  13. Breast dosimetry in transverse and longitudinal field MRI-Linac radiotherapy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In the framework of developing the integration of a MRI-Linac system, configurations of MRI-Linac units were simulated in order to improve the dose distribution in tangential breast radiotherapy using transverse and longitudinal magnetic field geometries of Lorentz force for both medial and lateral tangential fields. Methods: In this work, the GEANT4 Monte Carlo (MC) code was utilized to compare dose distributions in breast radiotherapy for Linac-MR systems in the transverse and longitudinal geometries within humanoid phantoms across a range of magnetic field strengths of 0.5 and 1.5 T. The dose increment due to scattering from the coils was investigated for both geometries as well. Computed tomography images of two patients were used for MC simulations. One patient had intact breast while the other was mastectomized. In the simulations, planning and methods of chest wall irradiation were similar to the actual clinical planning. Results: In a longitudinal geometry, the magnetic field is shown to restrict the lateral spread of secondary electrons to the lung, heart, and contralateral organs, which reduced the mean dose of the ipsilateral lung and heart by means of 17.2% and 6% at 1.5 T, respectively. The transverse configuration exhibits a significant increase in tissue interface effects, which increased dose buildup in the entrance regions of the lateral and medial tangent beams to the planning target volume (PTV) and improved dose homogeneity within the PTV. The improved relative average homogeneity index for two patients to the PTV at magnetic field strength of 1.5 T with respect to no magnetic field case evaluated was 11.79% and 34.45% in the LRBP and TRBP geometries, respectively. In both geometries, the simulations show significant mean dose reductions in the contralateral breast and chest wall skin, respectively, by a mean of 16.6% and 24.9% at 0.5 T and 17.2% and 28.1% at 1.5 T in the transverse geometry, and 10.56% and 14.6% at 0.5 T and 11.3% and

  14. Evaluation of scoring system in cytological diagnosis and management of breast lesion with review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N M Nandini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC breast is generally considered as a rapid, reliable, and safe diagnostic tool to distinguish non-neoplastic from neoplastic breast lesions. Masood′s Scoring Index has been proposed to help in sub-grouping of breast lesions so as to help in surgical management. Aims: To assess the accuracy of Modified Masood′s Scoring Index (MMSI in the diagnosis of benign and malignant breast lesions in patients with palpable breast lump, and review of literature. Settings and Design: A prospective study from a tertiary care center. Material and Methods: This prospective study included a total of 100 cases, both females and males, with palpable breast lump, in the age range of 10-80 years, over a period of 2 years from January 2007 to 2009, who underwent FNAC. They were cytologically grouped into five categories as suggested by Masood et al, and confirmed by histopathology. Results: Evaluation of Masood Scoring Index led to modification (Modified Masood Scoring Index; MMSI by shifting score 9 from Group I to Group II, thus increasing the diagnostic accuracy of the breast lesions. Conclusions: MMSI was found to be a useful, easily reproducible scoring method of breast lesions to improve diagnostic accuracy of nonproliferative breast disease and proliferative breast disease without atypia cases, as the prognosis and treatment of these cases varies.

  15. Impact of high energy resolution detectors on the performance of a PET system dedicated to breast cancer imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Craig S; Foudray, Angela M K; Habte, Frezghi

    2006-01-01

    We are developing a high resolution, high sensitivity PET camera dedicated to breast cancer imaging. We are studying two novel detector technologies for this imaging system: a scintillation detector comprising layers of small lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) crystals coupled to new position sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPDs), and a pure semiconductor detector comprising cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) crystal slabs with thin anode and cathode strips deposited in orthogonal directions on either side of each slab. Both detectors achieve 1 mm spatial resolution with 3-5 mm directly measured photon interaction depth resolution, which promotes uniform reconstructed spatial resolution throughout a compact, breast-size field of view. Both detector types also achieve outstanding energy resolution (4 kcps for 200 microCi in a simulated breast phantom. PMID:17645990

  16. Disparities in Breast Cancer Treatment and Outcomes: Biological, Social, and Health System Determinants and Opportunities for Research

    OpenAIRE

    Wheeler, Stephanie B.; Reeder-Hayes, Katherine E.; Carey, Lisa A.

    2013-01-01

    This article summarizes existing literature exploring reasons for racial disparities in breast cancer mortality, with an emphasis on treatment disparities and opportunities for future research. Recognition that variation in cancer care quality may be correlated with race (and socioeconomic and health system factors) may assist policy makers in identifying strategies to more equally distribute clinical expertise and health infrastructure across multiple user populations.

  17. Treatment of Breast Cancer Cells by IGF1R Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Combined with Conventional Systemic Drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartog, H.; Van der Graaf, W. T. A.; Boezen, H. M.; Wesseling, J.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: Insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R) is a tyrosine kinase receptor mediating cell growth and survival of cancer cells. We studied responses to IGF1R tyrosine kinase inhibitor NVP-AEW541 combined with conventional systemic drugs in breast cancer cell lines of different clinical subtype.

  18. Treatment of breast cancer cells by IGF1R tyrosine kinase inhibitor combined with conventional systemic drugs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartog, H.; Graaf, W.T.A. van der; Boezen, H.M.; Wesseling, J.

    2012-01-01

    AIM: Insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R) is a tyrosine kinase receptor mediating cell growth and survival of cancer cells. We studied responses to IGF1R tyrosine kinase inhibitor NVP-AEW541 combined with conventional systemic drugs in breast cancer cell lines of different clinical subtype.

  19. Design and realisation of a microwave three-dimensional imaging system with application to breast-cancer detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhurbenko, Vitaliy; Rubæk, T.; Krozer, V.; Meincke, P.

    2010-01-01

    An active microwave-imaging system for non-invasive detection of breast cancer based on dedicated hardware is described. Thirty-two transceiving channels are used to measure the amplitude and phase of the scattered fields in the three-dimensional (3D) imaging domain using electronic scanning. The 3...

  20. Clinical performance of computer-assisted detection (CAD) system in detecting carcinoma in breasts of different densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the clinical performance of a computer-assisted detection (CAD) system in detecting carcinoma in breasts of different densities. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 264 sets of bilateral screening mammograms taken in craniocaudal and medial-lateral oblique projections during the year 1997 were divided into four groups according to the BI-RADS density classification: fatty (pattern 1), scattered fibroglandular (pattern 2), heterogeneously dense (pattern 3) and extremely dense (pattern 4). Each group contained about 60% normal and 40% biopsy-proven cancer cases. Of the malignant cases, there were a mixture of mammographic findings including focal masses (2.5 cm were not included. The chosen cases were then digitized and analysed by the CAD system. Sensitivity was calculated as detection of cancer by at least one marker in at least one view. Specificity was calculated as the number of false-positive marks per image on normal cases. Statistical tests of significance were performed by using contingency tables and Chi square test. RESULTS: The CAD system detected 14 out of the total 15 cancer cases in totally fatty breasts with a sensitivity of 93.3% at a specificity of 1.3 false-positive marks per image. In breasts with scattered fibroglandular pattern, the sensitivity was 93.9% (31/33) and the specificity was 1.6 false-positive marks per image while in heterogeneously dense breasts, the sensitivity of the CAD system fell to 84.8% at a specificity of 1.6 false-positive marks per image. The sensitivity of the CAD system further dropped to 64.3% in markedly dense breasts while maintaining a specificity of 1.2 false-positive marks per image. The decrease in sensitivity in dense breast was found to be significant (p = 0.046). CONCLUSION: The sensitivity of the CAD system deteriorated significantly as the density of the breast increased while the specificity of the system remained relatively constant. Ho, W. T. and Lam,P.W. (2003). Clinical Radiology58

  1. What Is Breast Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Next Topic Types of breast cancers What is breast cancer? Breast cancer starts when cells in the breast ... breast cancer? ” and Non-cancerous Breast Conditions . How Breast Cancer Spreads Breast cancer can spread through the lymph ...

  2. Breast-feeding and Vitamin D Supplementation Rates in the Ochsner Health System

    OpenAIRE

    Ponnapakkam, Tulasi; Ravichandran, Anisha; Bradford, Elease; Tobin, Gregory; Gensure, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Breast-feeding imparts many benefits to both mothers and infants. Because of these numerous recognized benefits, there has been an effort to increase breast-feeding rates nationwide; increasing breast-feeding rates was one of the goals of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Healthy People 2010 initiative. This study examined the breast-feeding rate at the Ochsner Clinic Foundation by conducting a retrospective chart review of patients aged 0–12 months who visited any branch of t...

  3. Computerized Ultrasound Risk Evaluation (CURE) System: Development of Combined Transmission and Reflection Ultrasound with New Reconstruction Algorithms for Breast Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Littrup, P J; Duric, N; Azevedo, S; Chambers, D; Candy, J V; Johnson, S; Auner, G; Rather, J; Holsapple, E T

    2001-09-07

    Our Computerized Ultrasound Risk Evaluation (CURE) system has been developed to the engineering prototype stage and generated unique data sets of both transmission and reflection ultrasound (US). This paper will help define the clinical underpinnings of the developmental process and interpret the imaging results from a similar perspective. The CURE project was designed to incorporate numerous diagnostic parameters to improve upon two major areas of early breast cancer detection. CURE may provide improved tissue characterization of breast masses and reliable detection of abnormal microcalcifications found in some breast cancers and ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). Current breast US is limited to mass evaluation, whereas mammography also detects and guides biopsy of malignant calcifications. Screening with CURE remains a distant goal, but improved follow-up of mammographic abnormalities may represent a feasible breakthrough. Improved tissue characterization could result in reduction of the estimated one million benign biopsies each year in the United States, costing up to several billion dollars. Most breast calcifications are benign and comprise-80% of stereotactic biopsies guided by mammography. Ultrasound has the capability of finding some groups of calcifications, but further improvements in resolution should also address tissue characterization to define the soft tissue filling of ducts by DCIS. In this manner, CURE may be able to more accurately identify the malignant calcifications associated with progression of DCIS or early cancers. Currently, high-resolution US images of the breast are performed in the reflection mode at higher frequencies, which also limits depth of penetration. Reconstruction of reflection ultrasound images relies upon acoustic impedance differences in the tissue and includes only direct backscatter of the ultrasound signal. Resolution and tissue contrast of current US continues to improve with denser transducer arrays and image

  4. Whole brain radiotherapy for brain metastases from breast cancer: estimation of survival using two stratification systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brain metastases (BM) are the most common form of intracranial cancer. The incidence of BM seems to have increased over the past decade. Recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) of data from three Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trials (1200 patients) has allowed three prognostic groups to be identified. More recently a simplified stratification system that uses the evaluation of three main prognostics factors for radiosurgery in BM was developed. To analyze the overall survival rate (OS), prognostic factors affecting outcomes and to estimate the potential improvement in OS for patients with BM from breast cancer, stratified by RPA class and brain metastases score (BS-BM). From January 1996 to December 2004, 174 medical records of patients with diagnosis of BM from breast cancer, who received WBRT were analyzed. The surgery followed by WBRT was used in 15.5% of patients and 84.5% of others patients were submitted at WBRT alone; 108 patients (62.1%) received the fractionation schedule of 30 Gy in 10 fractions. Solitary BM was present in 37.9 % of patients. The prognostic factors evaluated for OS were: age, Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS), number of lesions, localization of lesions, neurosurgery, chemotherapy, absence extracranial disease, RPA class, BS-BM and radiation doses and fractionation. The OS in 1, 2 and 3 years was 33.4 %, 16.7%, and 8.8 %, respectively. The RPA class analysis showed strong relation with OS (p < 0.0001). The median survival time by RPA class in months was: class I 11.7, class II 6.2 and class III 3.0. The significant prognostic factors associated with better OS were: higher KPS (p < 0.0001), neurosurgery (P < 0.0001), single metastases (p = 0.003), BS-BM (p < 0.0001), control primary tumor (p = 0.002) and absence of extracranial metastases (p = 0.001). In multivariate analysis, the factors associated positively with OS were: neurosurgery (p < 0.0001), absence of extracranial metastases (p <0.0001) and RPA class I (p < 0.0001). Our

  5. Weighted simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique for tomosynthesis imaging of objects with high-attenuation features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levakhina, Y. M. [Institute of Medical Engineering, University of Luebeck, Luebeck 23562, Germany and Graduate School for Computing in Medicine and Life Sciences, Luebeck 23562 (Germany); Mueller, J.; Buzug, T. M. [Institute of Medical Engineering, University of Luebeck, Luebeck 23562 (Germany); Duschka, R. L.; Vogt, F.; Barkhausen, J. [Clinic for Radiology, University Clinics Schleswig-Holstein, Luebeck 23562 (Germany)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: This paper introduces a nonlinear weighting scheme into the backprojection operation within the simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART). It is designed for tomosynthesis imaging of objects with high-attenuation features in order to reduce limited angle artifacts. Methods: The algorithm estimates which projections potentially produce artifacts in a voxel. The contribution of those projections into the updating term is reduced. In order to identify those projections automatically, a four-dimensional backprojected space representation is used. Weighting coefficients are calculated based on a dissimilarity measure, evaluated in this space. For each combination of an angular view direction and a voxel position an individual weighting coefficient for the updating term is calculated. Results: The feasibility of the proposed approach is shown based on reconstructions of the following real three-dimensional tomosynthesis datasets: a mammography quality phantom, an apple with metal needles, a dried finger bone in water, and a human hand. Datasets have been acquired with a Siemens Mammomat Inspiration tomosynthesis device and reconstructed using SART with and without suggested weighting. Out-of-focus artifacts are described using line profiles and measured using standard deviation (STD) in the plane and below the plane which contains artifact-causing features. Artifacts distribution in axial direction is measured using an artifact spread function (ASF). The volumes reconstructed with the weighting scheme demonstrate the reduction of out-of-focus artifacts, lower STD (meaning reduction of artifacts), and narrower ASF compared to nonweighted SART reconstruction. It is achieved successfully for different kinds of structures: point-like structures such as phantom features, long structures such as metal needles, and fine structures such as trabecular bone structures. Conclusions: Results indicate the feasibility of the proposed algorithm to reduce typical

  6. Weighted simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique for tomosynthesis imaging of objects with high-attenuation features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This paper introduces a nonlinear weighting scheme into the backprojection operation within the simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART). It is designed for tomosynthesis imaging of objects with high-attenuation features in order to reduce limited angle artifacts. Methods: The algorithm estimates which projections potentially produce artifacts in a voxel. The contribution of those projections into the updating term is reduced. In order to identify those projections automatically, a four-dimensional backprojected space representation is used. Weighting coefficients are calculated based on a dissimilarity measure, evaluated in this space. For each combination of an angular view direction and a voxel position an individual weighting coefficient for the updating term is calculated. Results: The feasibility of the proposed approach is shown based on reconstructions of the following real three-dimensional tomosynthesis datasets: a mammography quality phantom, an apple with metal needles, a dried finger bone in water, and a human hand. Datasets have been acquired with a Siemens Mammomat Inspiration tomosynthesis device and reconstructed using SART with and without suggested weighting. Out-of-focus artifacts are described using line profiles and measured using standard deviation (STD) in the plane and below the plane which contains artifact-causing features. Artifacts distribution in axial direction is measured using an artifact spread function (ASF). The volumes reconstructed with the weighting scheme demonstrate the reduction of out-of-focus artifacts, lower STD (meaning reduction of artifacts), and narrower ASF compared to nonweighted SART reconstruction. It is achieved successfully for different kinds of structures: point-like structures such as phantom features, long structures such as metal needles, and fine structures such as trabecular bone structures. Conclusions: Results indicate the feasibility of the proposed algorithm to reduce typical

  7. Breast-fed and bottle-fed infant rhesus macaques develop distinct gut microbiotas and immune systems

    OpenAIRE

    Ardeshir, Amir; Narayan, Nicole R; Méndez-Lagares, Gema; Lu, Ding; Rauch, Marcus; Huang, Yong; Van Rompay, Koen K. A.; Lynch, Susan V.; Hartigan-O'Connor, Dennis J.

    2014-01-01

    Diet has a strong influence on the intestinal microbiota in both humans and animal models. It is well established that microbial colonization is required for normal development of the immune system and that specific microbial constituents prompt the differentiation or expansion of certain immune cell subsets. Nonetheless, it has been unclear how profoundly diet might shape the primate immune system or how durable the influence might be. We show that breast-fed and bottle-fed infant rhesus mac...

  8. Breast cancer risk in elderly women with systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases: a population-based case–control study

    OpenAIRE

    Gadalla, S M; Amr, S; LANGENBERG P.; Baumgarten, M.; Davidson, W F; Schairer, C; Engels, E A; Pfeiffer, R M; Goedert, J J

    2009-01-01

    Systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases (SARDs) are chronic inflammatory and immuno-modulatory conditions that have been suggested to affect cancer risk. Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results–Medicare-linked database, women aged 67–99 years and diagnosed with incident breast cancer in 1993–2002 (n=84 778) were compared with an equal number of age-matched cancer-free female controls. Diagnoses of SARDs, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA, n=5238), systemic lupus erythematosus (SL...

  9. SUBMIT: Systemic therapy with or without up front surgery of the primary tumor in breast cancer patients with distant metastases at initial presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiterkamp Jetske

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Five percent of all patients with breast cancer have distant metastatic disease at initial presentation. Because metastatic breast cancer is considered to be an incurable disease, it is generally treated with a palliative intent. Recent non-randomized studies have demonstrated that (complete resection of the primary tumor is associated with a significant improvement of the survival of patients with primary metastatic breast cancer. However, other studies have suggested that the claimed survival benefit by surgery may be caused by selection bias. Therefore, a randomized controlled trial will be performed to assess whether breast surgery in patients with primary distant metastatic breast cancer will improve the prognosis. Design Randomization will take place after the diagnosis of primary distant metastatic breast cancer. Patients will either be randomized to up front surgery of the breast tumor followed by systemic therapy or to systemic therapy, followed by delayed local treatment of the breast tumor if clinically indicated. Patients with primary distant metastatic breast cancer, with no prior treatment of the breast cancer, who are 18 years or older and fit enough to undergo surgery and systemic therapy are eligible. Important exclusion criteria are: prior invasive breast cancer, surgical treatment or radiotherapy of this breast tumor before randomization, irresectable T4 tumor and synchronous bilateral breast cancer. The primary endpoint is 2-year survival. Quality of life and local tumor control are among the secondary endpoints. Based on the results of prior research it was calculated that 258 patients are needed in each treatment arm, assuming a power of 80%. Total accrual time is expected to take 60 months. An interim analysis will be performed to assess any clinically significant safety concerns and to determine whether there is evidence that up front surgery is clinically or statistically inferior to systemic therapy

  10. Mammotome(®) biopsy system for the resection of breast lesions: Clinical experience in two high-volume teaching hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yangping; Lan, Huanrong; Ye, Qian; Jin, Ketao; Zhu, Min; Hu, Xiaoyan; Teng, Lisong; Cao, Feilin; Lin, Xianfang

    2013-09-01

    Ultrasound-guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsy (VABB) is regarded as a feasible, effective, minimally invasive and safe method for the removal of benign breast lesions, without the occurrence of serious complications. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, efficacy and safety of ultrasound-guided VABB using the Mammotome(®) biopsy system in the treatment of breast lesions. The clinical outcomes of 3,681 patients with breast lesions were evaluated following excisions by ultrasound-guided VABB in two high-volume teaching hospitals. From January 2008 to December 2012, a total of 4,867 ultrasound-guided VABB procedures were performed in the 3,681 patients, who had a mean age of 37.8 years (range, 16-73 years). The parameters examined in this analysis included lesion size, lesion location in the inner breast, Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) ultrasound category and histopathological diagnosis. Ultrasonography follow-up was performed at 3-6 month intervals in order to assess recurrence. The size of the investigated lesions ranged between 6 and 62 mm and a histopathological diagnosis was made in 100% of cases. The results indicated that the majority of specimens (98.89%) were benign. On average, the ultrasound-guided VABB was performed in 10.3 min (range, 7.5-43 min) and the mean number of cores removed in the procedure was 8.1 (range, 3-32). A complete excision was achieved in the majority of cases (99.7%). The presence of a hematoma was the most common complication following the biopsy, and was observed in 27.5% of patients. The mean follow-up period was 25.5 months (range, 1-60 months), during which the rate of recurrence was 4.4%. The results indicated that ultrasound-guided VABB using the Mammotome biopsy system is an effective and safe procedure that is able to rapidly remove the majority of benign breast lesions using a small incision and without the occurrence of scarring or complications. PMID:24137261

  11. Mammotome® biopsy system for the resection of breast lesions: Clinical experience in two high-volume teaching hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    JIANG, YANGPING; LAN, HUANRONG; YE, QIAN; JIN, KETAO; ZHU, MIN; HU, XIAOYAN; TENG, LISONG; CAO, FEILIN; LIN, XIANFANG

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsy (VABB) is regarded as a feasible, effective, minimally invasive and safe method for the removal of benign breast lesions, without the occurrence of serious complications. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, efficacy and safety of ultrasound-guided VABB using the Mammotome® biopsy system in the treatment of breast lesions. The clinical outcomes of 3,681 patients with breast lesions were evaluated following excisions by ultrasound-guided VABB in two high-volume teaching hospitals. From January 2008 to December 2012, a total of 4,867 ultrasound-guided VABB procedures were performed in the 3,681 patients, who had a mean age of 37.8 years (range, 16–73 years). The parameters examined in this analysis included lesion size, lesion location in the inner breast, Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) ultrasound category and histopathological diagnosis. Ultrasonography follow-up was performed at 3–6 month intervals in order to assess recurrence. The size of the investigated lesions ranged between 6 and 62 mm and a histopathological diagnosis was made in 100% of cases. The results indicated that the majority of specimens (98.89%) were benign. On average, the ultrasound-guided VABB was performed in 10.3 min (range, 7.5–43 min) and the mean number of cores removed in the procedure was 8.1 (range, 3–32). A complete excision was achieved in the majority of cases (99.7%). The presence of a hematoma was the most common complication following the biopsy, and was observed in 27.5% of patients. The mean follow-up period was 25.5 months (range, 1–60 months), during which the rate of recurrence was 4.4%. The results indicated that ultrasound-guided VABB using the Mammotome biopsy system is an effective and safe procedure that is able to rapidly remove the majority of benign breast lesions using a small incision and without the occurrence of scarring or complications. PMID:24137261

  12. Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breast cancer affects one in eight women during their lives. Breast cancer kills more women in the United States than ... cancer. No one knows why some women get breast cancer, but there are a number of risk factors. ...

  13. Effect of adjuvant systemic treatment on cosmetic outcome and late normal-tissue reactions after breast conservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansen, Joergen [Dept. of Oncology, Odense Univ. Hospital, Odense (Denmark); Overgaard, Jens [Dept. of Experimental Clinical Oncology, Danish Cancer Society, Aarhus (Denmark); Overgaard, Marie [Dept. of Oncology, Aarhus Univ. Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark)

    2007-05-15

    To investigate whether adjuvant treatment with CMF or tamoxifen predisposes to an unfavorable cosmetic outcome or increased breast morbidity after radiotherapy in breast conservation. Data from 266 patients who entered a randomized breast conservation trial (DBCG-82TM protocol) was analyzed. The patients were treated with lumpectomy and axillary dissection followed by external beam radiotherapy to the residual breast. High-risk patients (n 94), as well as 31 low-risk patients, received additional radiation to the regional lymph nodes. Adjuvant systemic treatment was given to all high-risk patients: premenopausal patients (n = 67) received eight cycles of CMF intravenously (600/40/600 mg/m{sup 2}) every fourth week; postmenopausal patients (n = 27) received 30 mg of tamoxifen daily for one year. Clinical assessments included cosmetic outcome, breast fibrosis, skin telangiectasia, and dyspigmentation which were scored on a 4-point categorical scale after median 6.6 years. The observations were analyzed in multivariate logistic regression analysis which included potential risk factors on outcome related to systemic treatment, surgery, radiation technique, tumor, and patient characteristics. In premenopausal patients, systemic treatment with CMF independently predicted a fair/poor cosmetic outcome, RR = 2.2 (95% CI 1.2-4.2), as well as increased skin telangiectasia, RR = 3.3 (1.4-8.2). There was no impact of tamoxifen treatment on cosmetic outcome in postmenopausal patients (p 0.32). However, univariate analysis showed that tamoxifen was significantly associated with breast fibrosis (p <0.004), as was radiation to the regional lymph nodes (p <0.0001). A strong interaction between axillary irradiation and tamoxifen treatment occurred since 26 of 27 high-risk postmenopausal patients had received both tamoxifen and axillary irradiation. In multivariate regression analysis, axillary irradiation independently predicted moderate/severe breast fibrosis with a relative risk of

  14. Effect of adjuvant systemic treatment on cosmetic outcome and late normal-tissue reactions after breast conservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate whether adjuvant treatment with CMF or tamoxifen predisposes to an unfavorable cosmetic outcome or increased breast morbidity after radiotherapy in breast conservation. Data from 266 patients who entered a randomized breast conservation trial (DBCG-82TM protocol) was analyzed. The patients were treated with lumpectomy and axillary dissection followed by external beam radiotherapy to the residual breast. High-risk patients (n 94), as well as 31 low-risk patients, received additional radiation to the regional lymph nodes. Adjuvant systemic treatment was given to all high-risk patients: premenopausal patients (n = 67) received eight cycles of CMF intravenously (600/40/600 mg/m2) every fourth week; postmenopausal patients (n = 27) received 30 mg of tamoxifen daily for one year. Clinical assessments included cosmetic outcome, breast fibrosis, skin telangiectasia, and dyspigmentation which were scored on a 4-point categorical scale after median 6.6 years. The observations were analyzed in multivariate logistic regression analysis which included potential risk factors on outcome related to systemic treatment, surgery, radiation technique, tumor, and patient characteristics. In premenopausal patients, systemic treatment with CMF independently predicted a fair/poor cosmetic outcome, RR = 2.2 (95% CI 1.2-4.2), as well as increased skin telangiectasia, RR = 3.3 (1.4-8.2). There was no impact of tamoxifen treatment on cosmetic outcome in postmenopausal patients (p 0.32). However, univariate analysis showed that tamoxifen was significantly associated with breast fibrosis (p <0.004), as was radiation to the regional lymph nodes (p <0.0001). A strong interaction between axillary irradiation and tamoxifen treatment occurred since 26 of 27 high-risk postmenopausal patients had received both tamoxifen and axillary irradiation. In multivariate regression analysis, axillary irradiation independently predicted moderate/severe breast fibrosis with a relative risk of 5

  15. The utilization of an ultrasound-guided 8-gauge vacuum-assisted breast biopsy system as an innovative approach to accomplishing complete eradication of multiple bilateral breast fibroadenomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Povoski Stephen P

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ultrasound-guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsy technology is extremely useful for diagnostic biopsy of suspicious breast lesions and for attempted complete excision of appropriately selected presumed benign breast lesions. Case presentation A female patient presented with 16 breast lesions (eight within each breast, documented on ultrasound and all presumed to be fibroadenomas. Over a ten and one-half month period of time, 14 of these 16 breast lesions were removed under ultrasound guidance during a total of 11 separate 8-gauge Mammotome® excision procedures performed during seven separate sessions. Additionally, two of these 16 breast lesions were removed by open surgical excision. A histopathologic diagnosis of fibroadenoma and/or fibroadenomatous changes was confirmed at all lesion excision sites. Interval follow-up ultrasound imaging revealed no evidence of a residual lesion at the site of any of the 16 original breast lesions. Conclusion This report describes an innovative approach of utilizing ultrasound-guided 8-gauge vacuum-assisted breast biopsy technology for assisting in achieving complete eradication of multiple bilateral fibroadenomas in a patient who presented with 16 documented breast lesions. As such, this innovative approach is highly recommended in similar appropriately selected patients.

  16. Follow-up of endovascular aortic aneurysm repair: Preliminary validation of digital tomosynthesis and contrast enhanced ultrasound in detection of medium- to long-term complications

    OpenAIRE

    Mazzei, Maria Antonietta; Guerrini, Susanna; Mazzei, Francesco Giuseppe; Cioffi Squitieri, Nevada; Notaro, Dario; de Donato, Gianmarco; Galzerano, Giuseppe; Sacco, Palmino; Setacci, Francesco; Volterrani, Luca; Setacci, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To validate the feasibility of digital tomosynthesis of the abdomen (DTA) combined with contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in assessing complications after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) by using computed tomography angiography (CTA) as the gold standard.

  17. 3D Raman imaging of systemic endothelial dysfunction in the murine model of metastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacia, Marta Z; Buczek, Elzbieta; Blazejczyk, Agnieszka; Gregorius, Aleksandra; Wietrzyk, Joanna; Chlopicki, Stefan; Baranska, Malgorzata; Kaczor, Agnieszka

    2016-05-01

    It was recently reported in the murine model of metastatic breast cancer (4T1) that tumor progression and development of metastasis is associated with systemic endothelial dysfunction characterized by impaired nitric oxide (NO) production. Using Raman 3D confocal imaging with the analysis of the individual layers of the vascular wall combined with AFM endothelial surface imaging, we demonstrated that metastasis-induced systemic endothelial dysfunction resulted in distinct chemical changes in the endothelium of the aorta. These changes, manifested as a significant increase in the protein content (18 %) and a slight decrease in the lipid content (4 %), were limited to the endothelium and did not occur in the deeper layers of the vascular wall. The altered lipid to protein ratio in the endothelium, although more pronounced in the fixed vascular wall, was also observed in the freshly isolated unfixed vascular wall samples in the aqueous environment (12 and 7 % change of protein and lipid content, respectively). Our results support the finding that the metastasis induces systemic endothelial dysfunction that may contribute to cancer progression. Graphical Abstract Schematic illustration of methodology of sample preparation and measurement. PMID:26935932

  18. Evaluation of the efficiency of biofield diagnostic system in breast cancer detection using clinical study results and classifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbhuraam, Vinitha Sree; Ng, E Y K; Kaw, G; Acharya U, Rajendra; Chong, B K

    2012-02-01

    The division of breast cancer cells results in regions of electrical depolarisation within the breast. These regions extend to the skin surface from where diagnostic information can be obtained through measurements of the skin surface electropotentials using sensors. This technique is used by the Biofield Diagnostic System (BDS) to detect the presence of malignancy. This paper evaluates the efficiency of BDS in breast cancer detection and also evaluates the use of classifiers for improving the accuracy of BDS. 182 women scheduled for either mammography or ultrasound or both tests participated in the BDS clinical study conducted at Tan Tock Seng hospital, Singapore. Using the BDS index obtained from the BDS examination and the level of suspicion score obtained from mammography/ultrasound results, the final BDS result was deciphered. BDS demonstrated high values for sensitivity (96.23%), specificity (93.80%), and accuracy (94.51%). Also, we have studied the performance of five supervised learning based classifiers (back propagation network, probabilistic neural network, linear discriminant analysis, support vector machines, and a fuzzy classifier), by feeding selected features from the collected dataset. The clinical study results show that BDS can help physicians to differentiate benign and malignant breast lesions, and thereby, aid in making better biopsy recommendations. PMID:20703753

  19. Investigation of optimal parameters for penalized maximum-likelihood reconstruction applied to iodinated contrast-enhanced breast CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makeev, Andrey; Ikejimba, Lynda; Lo, Joseph Y.; Glick, Stephen J.

    2016-03-01

    Although digital mammography has reduced breast cancer mortality by approximately 30%, sensitivity and specificity are still far from perfect. In particular, the performance of mammography is especially limited for women with dense breast tissue. Two out of every three biopsies performed in the U.S. are unnecessary, thereby resulting in increased patient anxiety, pain, and possible complications. One promising tomographic breast imaging method that has recently been approved by the FDA is dedicated breast computed tomography (BCT). However, visualizing lesions with BCT can still be challenging for women with dense breast tissue due to the minimal contrast for lesions surrounded by fibroglandular tissue. In recent years there has been renewed interest in improving lesion conspicuity in x-ray breast imaging by administration of an iodinated contrast agent. Due to the fully 3-D imaging nature of BCT, as well as sub-optimal contrast enhancement while the breast is under compression with mammography and breast tomosynthesis, dedicated BCT of the uncompressed breast is likely to offer the best solution for injected contrast-enhanced x-ray breast imaging. It is well known that use of statistically-based iterative reconstruction in CT results in improved image quality at lower radiation dose. Here we investigate possible improvements in image reconstruction for BCT, by optimizing free regularization parameter in method of maximum likelihood and comparing its performance with clinical cone-beam filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithm.

  20. The Evolution of the Local and System Therapy of Breast Cancer Stage I: 27-Years’s Data Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolyadina I.V.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation is to study the dynamics of approaches in surgery, adjuvant radiotherapy and systemic therapy for breast cancer stage I over the past 27 years. Materials and Methods. In the study included 1341 women (aged 21–88 years with invasive breast cancer stage I, who had received treatment in N.N. Blokhin Russian Cancer Research Center and Clinic of RMAPE (Moscow from 1985 to 2012. The first stage of treatment for all the patients included radical surgery (43.5% patients — radical mastectomy; and 56.5% — breast-conserving surgery. More than half of the patients (58.9% received adjuvant radiotherapy; adjuvant systemic therapy was used in 821 patients (61.0%, endocrine therapy alone — in the third of patients (432 women, 32.1%, chemotherapy alone — in 124 women (9.2%, and 526 patients (19.7% received a combined systemic therapy (chemotherapy and endocrine therapy. We analyzed the change of approach to the surgical treatment, adjuvant radiotherapy and systemic therapy from 1985 to 2012. A statistical analysis was made by international statistical program SPSS 20.0. Results. Over the past 27 years local treatment structure of stage I breast cancer has changed: radiotherapy has become an indispensible part of breast conserving therapy, and was added by “boost” (radiotherapy with a dose of 14–16 Gy on tumor bed by a half of women (50.3%. The part of patients who received radiotherapy after radical mastectomy has decreased (from 14.6 to 4.5%, p < 0.05. Adjuvant systemic therapy has been used by the majority of women (86.7%: a part of patients receiving endocrine therapy has significantly increased (from 20.7 to 44.3%, chemotherapy (from 2.6 to 13.6%, or chemo-hormone therapy (from 8.4 to 28.8%, p < 0.05. Chemotherapy regimens have been changed: non-anthracycline combinations are used instead of anthracycline regimens, and after 2005 — taxanes. HER2-status detection has been used in clinical practice since 2000, and

  1. An attempt to estimate out-of-plane lung nodule elongation in tomosynthesis images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chodorowski, Artur; Arvidsson, Jonathan; Söderman, Christina; Svalkvist, Angelica; Johnsson, Šse A.; Bâth, Magnus

    2015-03-01

    In chest tomosynthesis (TS) the most commonly used reconstruction methods are based on Filtered Back Projection (FBP) algorithms. Due to the limited angular range of x-ray projections, FBP reconstructed data is typically associated with a low spatial resolution in the out-of-plane dimension. Lung nodule measures that depend on depth information such as 3D shape and volume are therefore difficult to estimate. In this paper the relation between features from FBP reconstructed lung nodules and the true out-of-plane nodule elongation is investigated and a method for estimating the out-of-plane nodule elongation is proposed. In order to study these relations a number of steps that include simulation of spheroidal-shaped nodules, insertion into synthetic data volumes, construction of TS-projections and FBP-reconstruction were performed. In addition, the same procedure was used to simulate nodules and insert them into clinical chest TS projection data. The reconstructed nodule data was then investigated with respect to in-plane diameter, out-of-plane elongation, and attenuation coefficient. It was found that the voxel value in each nodule increased linearly with nodule elongation, for nodules with a constant attenuation coefficient. Similarly, the voxel value increased linearly with in-plane diameter. These observations indicate the possibility to predict the nodule elongation from the reconstructed voxel intensity values. Such a method would represent a quantitative approach to chest tomosynthesis that may be useful in future work on volume and growth rate estimation of lung nodules.

  2. SU-E-J-134: An Augmented-Reality Optical Imaging System for Accurate Breast Positioning During Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Breast radiotherapy, particularly electronic compensation, may involve large dose gradients and difficult patient positioning problems. We have developed a simple self-calibrating augmented-reality system, which assists in accurately and reproducibly positioning the patient, by displaying her live image from a single camera superimposed on the correct perspective projection of her 3D CT data. Our method requires only a standard digital camera capable of live-view mode, installed in the treatment suite at an approximately-known orientation and position (rotation R; translation T). Methods: A 10-sphere calibration jig was constructed and CT imaged to provide a 3D model. The (R,T) relating the camera to the CT coordinate system were determined by acquiring a photograph of the jig and optimizing an objective function, which compares the true image points to points calculated with a given candidate R and T geometry. Using this geometric information, 3D CT patient data, viewed from the camera's perspective, is plotted using a Matlab routine. This image data is superimposed onto the real-time patient image, acquired by the camera, and displayed using standard live-view software. This enables the therapists to view both the patient's current and desired positions, and guide the patient into assuming the correct position. The method was evaluated using an in-house developed bolus-like breast phantom, mounted on a supporting platform, which could be tilted at various angles to simulate treatment-like geometries. Results: Our system allowed breast phantom alignment, with an accuracy of about 0.5 cm and 1 ± 0.5 degree. Better resolution could be possible using a camera with higher-zoom capabilities. Conclusion: We have developed an augmented-reality system, which combines a perspective projection of a CT image with a patient's real-time optical image. This system has the potential to improve patient setup accuracy during breast radiotherapy, and could possibly be

  3. Inhibition of system L (LAT1/CD98hc) reduces the growth of cultured human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shennan, David B; Thomson, Jean

    2008-10-01

    It has been suggested that system L (LAT1/CD98hc) is up-regulated in cancer cells, including breast tumour cells, and is therefore a promising molecular target to inhibit or limit tumour cell growth. In view of this, we have examined the effect of BCH and other inhibitors of system L on the growth of MCF-7, ZR-75-1 and MDA-MB-231 cells. Treating cells with BCH markedly inhibited the metabolism of WST-1 in a dose-dependent fashion. Similarly, melphalan and D-leucine inhibited the growth of cultured breast cancer cells whereas MeAIB, an inhibitor of system A, was without effect. The effects of BCH and melphalan on cell growth were non-additive suggesting that both compounds were acting at a single locus. The results indicate that system L is required to maintain MCF-7, ZR-75-1 and MDA-MB-231 cell growth and support the notion that LAT1/CD98hc may be a suitable target to inhibit breast cancer progression. PMID:18813831

  4. An RF Therapy System for Breast Cancer Using Dual Deformable Mirrors — Computational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunachalam, Kavitha; Udpa, Satish S.; Udpa, Lalita

    2007-03-01

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths amongst women in the United States. In the past two decades, the potential of non-ionizing high power RF waves to destroy cancerous biological tissues is actively investigated for cancer therapy. This paper presents the computational feasibility study of an alternative mode of electromagnetic radiation therapy that employs dual source and deformable mirror. The adaptive focusing capability of the deformable mirror is exploited for preferential energy deposition at the tumor site in the breast irradiated by electromagnetic radiation. The outcome of the computational study for the proposed deformable mirror-based thermal therapy for breast cancer is presented in this paper.

  5. Clinical Report on the First Prototype of a Photoacoustic Tomography System with Dual Illumination for Breast Cancer Imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Fakhrejahani

    Full Text Available Photoacoustic tomography is a recently developed imaging modality that can provide high spatial-resolution images of hemoglobin distribution in tissues such as the breast. Because breast cancer is an angiogenesis-dependent type of malignancy, we evaluated the clinical acceptability of breast tissue images produced using our first prototype photoacoustic mammography (PAM system in patients with known cancer. Post-excisionally, histological sections of the tumors were stained immunohistochemically (IHC for CD31 (an endothelial marker and carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX (a marker of hypoxia. Whole-slide scanning and image analyses were used to evaluate the tumor microvessel distribution pattern and to calculate the total vascular perimeter (TVP/area for each lesion. In this clinical study, 42 lesions were primarily scanned using PAM preoperatively, three of which were reported to be benign and were excluded from statistical analysis. Images were produced for 29 out of 39 cancers (visibility rate = 74.4% at the median depth of 26.5 (3.25-51.2 mm. Age, menopausal status, body mass index, history of neoadjuvant treatment, clinical stage and histological tumor angiogenesis markers did not seem to affect the visibility. The oxygen saturation level in all of the measured lesions was lower than in the subcutaneous counterpart vessels (Wilcoxon test, p value<0.001, as well as in the counterpart contralateral normal breast region of interest (ROI (Wilcoxon test, p value = 0.001. Although the oxygen saturation level was not statistically significant between CAIX-positive vs. -negative cases, lesional TVP/area showed a positive correlation with the oxygen saturation level only in the group that had received therapy before PAM. In conclusion, the vascular and oxygenation data obtained by PAM have great potential for identifying functional features of breast tumors.

  6. Classifying breast cancer surgery: a novel, complexity-based system for oncological, oncoplastic and reconstructive procedures, and proof of principle by analysis of 1225 operations in 1166 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wallwiener Diethelm

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the basic prerequisites for generating evidence-based data is the availability of classification systems. Attempts to date to classify breast cancer operations have focussed on specific problems, e.g. the avoidance of secondary corrective surgery for surgical defects, rather than taking a generic approach. Methods Starting from an existing, simpler empirical scheme based on the complexity of breast surgical procedures, which was used in-house primarily in operative report-writing, a novel classification of ablative and breast-conserving procedures initially needed to be developed and elaborated systematically. To obtain proof of principle, a prospectively planned analysis of patient records for all major breast cancer-related operations performed at our breast centre in 2005 and 2006 was conducted using the new classification. Data were analysed using basic descriptive statistics such as frequency tables. Results A novel two-type, six-tier classification system comprising 12 main categories, 13 subcategories and 39 sub-subcategories of oncological, oncoplastic and reconstructive breast cancer-related surgery was successfully developed. Our system permitted unequivocal classification, without exception, of all 1225 procedures performed in 1166 breast cancer patients in 2005 and 2006. Conclusion Breast cancer-related surgical procedures can be generically classified according to their surgical complexity. Analysis of all major procedures performed at our breast centre during the study period provides proof of principle for this novel classification system. We envisage various applications for this classification, including uses in randomised clinical trials, guideline development, specialist surgical training, continuing professional development as well as quality of care and public health research.

  7. Slow gantry rotation acquisition technique for on-board four-dimensional digital tomosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (4D CBCT) has been investigated for motion imaging in the radiotherapy treatment room. The drawbacks of 4D CBCT are long scan times and high imaging doses. The aims of this study were to develop and investigate a slow gantry rotation acquisition protocol for four-dimensional digital tomosynthesis (4D DTS) as a faster, lower dose alternative to 4D CBCT. Methods: This technique was implemented using an On-Board Imager kV imaging system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) mounted on the gantry of a linear accelerator. The general procedure for 4D DTS imaging using slow gantry rotation acquisition consists of the following steps: (1) acquire projections over a limited gantry rotation angle in a single motion with constant frame rate and gantry rotation speed; (2) generate a respiratory signal and temporally match projection images with appropriate points from the respiratory signal; (3) use the respiratory signal to assign phases to each of the projection images; (4) sort projection images into phase bins; and (5) reconstruct phase images. Phantom studies were conducted to validate theoretically derived relationships between acquisition and respiratory parameters. Optimization of acquisition parameters was then conducted by simulating lung scans using patient data. Lung tumors with approximate volumes ranging from 0.12 to 1.53 cm3 were studied. Results: A protocol for slow gantry rotation 4D DTS was presented. Equations were derived to express relationships between acquisition parameters (frame rate, phase window, and angular intervals between projections), respiratory cycle durations, and resulting acquisition times and numbers of projections. The phantom studies validated the relationships, and the patient studies resulted in determinations of appropriate acquisition parameters. The phase window must be set according to clinical goals. For 10% phase windows, we found that appropriate frame rates ranging from

  8. A flexible low-cost, high-precision, single interface electrical impedance tomography system for breast cancer detection using FPGA

    OpenAIRE

    Zarafshani, Ali; Huber, Nicolas; Béqo, Nevis; Tunstall, Benjamin; Sze, Gerald; Chatwin, Chris; Wang, Wei

    2010-01-01

    Typically, in multi-frequency Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) systems, a current is applied and the voltages developed across the subject are detected. However, due to the complexity of designing stable current sources, there has been mention in the literature of applying a voltage to the subject whilst measuring the consequent current flow. This paper presents a comparative study between the two techniques in a novel design suitable for the detection of breast cancers. The suggested in...

  9. Socioeconomic variation in admission for diseases of female genital system and breast in a national cohort aged 15-43.

    OpenAIRE

    Kuh, D; Stirling, S

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate socioeconomic variation among young women in the risk of hospital admission for diseases (including neoplasms) of the female genital system and breast and for the common surgical procedures of dilatation and curettage and hysterectomy. DESIGN--Large nationally representative cohort study with individual records of confirmed admissions to NHS and private hospitals since birth and data on occupational and educational experience. SETTING--England, Scotland, and Wales. P...

  10. Effect of dietary supplementation with Agaricus sylvaticus fungus on the hematology and immunology systems of breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Valadares, Fabiana; Novaes, Maria Rita Carvalho Garbi; Roberto Cañete VILLAFRANCA; Marília da Cunha MENEZES; Mariana Campos REIS; Gonçalves, Daniella Rodrigues

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Patients with cancer tend to develop hematological and immunological alterations during the disease process. Medicinal fungi can stimulate the immune and hematopoietic systems, promoting improvements in the prognosis and physiological response. In this trial it is aimed to evaluate changes in hematological and immunological parameters in patients with breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy after dietary supplementation with Agaricus sylvaticus. Method: A randomized, double-blind, pl...

  11. Experimental measurement of radiation dose in a dedicated breast CT system

    CERN Document Server

    Shan-Wei, Shen; Hang, Shu; Xiao, Tang; Cun-Feng, Wei; Yu-Shou, Song; Rong-Jian, Shi; Long, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Radiation dose is an important performance indicator of a dedicated breast CT (DBCT). In this paper, the method of putting thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) into a breast shaped PMMA phantom to study the dose distribution in breasts was improved by using smaller TLDs and a new half-ellipsoid PMMA phantom. Then the weighted CT dose index (CTDIw) was introduced to average glandular assessment in DBCT for the first time and two measurement modes were proposed for different sizes of breasts. The dose deviations caused by using cylindrical phantoms were simulated using the Monte Carlo method and a set of correction factors were calculated. The results of the confirmatory measurement with a cylindrical phantom (11cm/8cm) show that CTDIw gives a relatively conservative overestimate of the average glandular dose comparing to the results of Monte Carlo simulation and TLDs measurement. But with better practicability and stability, the CTDIw is suitable for dose evaluations in daily clinical practice. Both of the TLDs ...

  12. Increased concentrations of growth factors and activation of the EGFR system in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aalund Olsen, Dorte; Bechmann, Troels; Østergaard, Birthe;

    2012-01-01

    In this study the total and phosphorylated amount of epidermal growth factor receptor 1 (EGFR) and 2 (HER2) were measured together with EGFR ligands in tissue samples of breast cancer patients in order to investigate interrelations and possible prognostic values.......In this study the total and phosphorylated amount of epidermal growth factor receptor 1 (EGFR) and 2 (HER2) were measured together with EGFR ligands in tissue samples of breast cancer patients in order to investigate interrelations and possible prognostic values....

  13. Identifying Geographic Disparities in the Early Detection of Breast Cancer Using a Geographic Information System

    OpenAIRE

    Luxme Hariharan; Ronald E. Gangnon, PhD; Patrick L. Remington, MD, MPH; Jane A. McElroy, PhD; LeAnn D. Andersen, MS

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Identifying communities with lower rates of mammography screening is a critical step to providing targeted screening programs; however, population-based data necessary for identifying these geographic areas are limited. This study presents methods to identify geographic disparities in the early detection of breast cancer. Methods Data for all women residing in Dane County, Wisconsin, at the time of their breast cancer diagnosis from 1981 through 2000 (N = 4769) were obtained from...

  14. Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... I found something when I did my breast self-exam. What should I do now? How often should I have mammograms? I have breast cancer. What are my treatment options? How often should I do breast self-exams? I have breast cancer. Is my daughter ...

  15. Typetesting of physical characteristics of digital mammography systems for screening within the Flemish breast cancer screening programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate compliance with the acceptance criteria of the European guidelines for quality assurance in breast cancer screening, a typetesting programme of the physical characteristics of digital mammography systems based on direct readout (DR) technology or computed radiography (CR) was organised and executed within the Flemish breast cancer screening programme. While in general image quality/dose characteristics of flat panel DR systems passed the acceptance criteria more easily than CR systems, the slit-scanning direct photon counting system included in present study was outstanding in combining a very low dose with a good image quality. The data obtained up to now indicate the necessity of retuning the AEC for DR systems according to constant contrast to noise ratio (CNR) over the whole range of PMMA thicknesses (20-70 mm) to improve image quality in imaging breasts of large thickness at the cost of higher doses. For the two CR systems which passed the typetesting procedure dose levels do not allow a similar improvement of CNR for thick objects for these systems. The obtained results highlight the importance of the use of high Z target/filter combinations in X-ray generating systems for imaging thick objects to meet the image quality/dose criteria. With respect to image display aspects high-quality 3-megapixel LCD monitors succeeded also in the typetesting procedure in addition to 5-megapixel monitors. However, as zooming and scrolling are necessary for 3-megapixel monitors to get the full resolution capabilities of the image capture system, 5-megapixel monitors are preferred in a busy screening environment.

  16. Late treatment-related morbidity in breast cancer patients randomized to postmastectomy radiotherapy and systemic treatment versus systemic treatment alone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoejris, I.; Andersen, J.; Overgaard, M.; Overgaard, J. [Aarhus Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Oncology

    2000-07-01

    Late treatment-related morbidity after mastectomy and adjuvant systemic treatment with and without postoperative irradiation was assessed in 84 patients randomized in the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group Trials 82b and c. A structured interview and physical examination, using a standardized assessment sheet, constructed on the basis of the late effects normal tissues (LENT) scoring system, was used. The median length of follow-up from mastectomy was 9 years (range 6-13 years). Lymphedema was measured in 14%, of the irradiated patients versus 3% of the non-irradiated patients (NS). Slightly decreased shoulder morbidity was measured in 45% of the irradiated women versus 15% of the non-irradiated patients, but moderate or more severe impairment was seen in only 5% of the irradiated patients and in none of the non-irradiated patients (p = 0.004). Seventeen percent of the irradiated patients and 2% of the non-irradiated patients found that impairment of shoulder movement caused symptoms (p = 0.001)

  17. Late treatment-related morbidity in breast cancer patients randomized to postmastectomy radiotherapy and systemic treatment versus systemic treatment alone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Late treatment-related morbidity after mastectomy and adjuvant systemic treatment with and without postoperative irradiation was assessed in 84 patients randomized in the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group Trials 82b and c. A structured interview and physical examination, using a standardized assessment sheet, constructed on the basis of the late effects normal tissues (LENT) scoring system, was used. The median length of follow-up from mastectomy was 9 years (range 6-13 years). Lymphedema was measured in 14%, of the irradiated patients versus 3% of the non-irradiated patients (NS). Slightly decreased shoulder morbidity was measured in 45% of the irradiated women versus 15% of the non-irradiated patients, but moderate or more severe impairment was seen in only 5% of the irradiated patients and in none of the non-irradiated patients (p = 0.004). Seventeen percent of the irradiated patients and 2% of the non-irradiated patients found that impairment of shoulder movement caused symptoms (p = 0.001)

  18. Inherited polymorphisms in hyaluronan synthase 1 predict risk of systemic B-cell malignancies but not of breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemalatha Kuppusamy

    Full Text Available Genetic variations in the hyaluronan synthase 1 gene (HAS1 influence HAS1 aberrant splicing. HAS1 is aberrantly spliced in malignant cells from multiple myeloma (MM and Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia (WM, but not in their counterparts from healthy donors. The presence of aberrant HAS1 splice variants predicts for poor survival in multiple myeloma (MM. We evaluated the influence of inherited HAS1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP on the risk of having a systemic B cell malignancy in 1414 individuals compromising 832 patients and 582 healthy controls, including familial analysis of an Icelandic kindred. We sequenced HAS1 gene segments from 181 patients with MM, 98 with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS, 72 with Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia (WM, 169 with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL, as well as 34 members of a monoclonal gammopathy-prone Icelandic family, 212 age-matched healthy donors and a case-control cohort of 295 breast cancer patients with 353 healthy controls. Three linked single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP in HAS1 intron3 are significantly associated with B-cell malignancies (range p = 0.007 to p = 10(-5, but not MGUS or breast cancer, and predict risk in a 34 member Icelandic family (p = 0.005, Odds Ratio = 5.8 (OR, a relatively homogeneous cohort. In contrast, exon3 SNPs were not significantly different among the study groups. Pooled analyses showed a strong association between the linked HAS1 intron3 SNPs and B-cell malignancies (OR = 1.78, but not for sporadic MGUS or for breast cancer (OR<1.0. The minor allele genotypes of HAS1 SNPs are significantly more frequent in MM, WM, CLL and in affected members of a monoclonal gammopathy-prone family than they are in breast cancer, sporadic MGUS or healthy donors. These inherited changes may increase the risk for systemic B-cell malignancies but not for solid tumors.

  19. A new, preoperative, MRI-based scoring system for diagnosing malignant axillary lymph nodes in women evaluated for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: Malignant axillary lymph nodes are an important predictor for breast cancer recurrence, but invasive dissection or biopsy is required for the diagnosis. We determined whether and how malignant nodes could be diagnosed preoperatively with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Materials and methods: We obtained MR images of all women evaluated for breast cancer at the Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center in 2010 and correlated the image characteristics of each axillary node with the pathologic diagnosis of the same node. Results: We analyzed 251 nodes (117 benign; 134 malignant) from 136 women (mean age, 44 years; range, 20–67). Mean diameter of the nodes was 18 mm (range, 5–58 mm). With pathologic diagnosis as the reference standard, MRI-based interpretations were 66.4% sensitive, 94% specific, and 79% accurate. Diameter, pathologic type, apparent diffusion coefficient value (ADC, b = 500 and 800), time-intensity curve (TIC) type of breast tumors correlated with node metastasis; ADC value (b = 500 and 800), TIC type, early enhancement rate, long-axis, short-axis, shape, margin and the location of nodes correlated with node metastasis (P < 0.001 for all). Tumor immunohistochemistry results for estrogen receptors, progesterone receptors, c-erbB-2, vascular endothelial growth factor, and Ki67 were not. An MRI-based lymph node scoring system based on these correlations had a specificity of 91%, a sensitivity of 93%, and an area under the ROC curve of 0.95 (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Metastatic axillary lymph nodes can be accurately diagnosed by MR in women with early breast cancer preoperatively and non-invasively. The scoring system appears to be superior to current methods

  20. CHESS: An interactive computer system for women with breast cancer piloted with an under-served population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McTavish, F M; Gustafson, D H; Owens, B H; Wise, M; Taylor, J O; Apantaku, F M; Berhe, H; Thorson, B

    1994-01-01

    The Comprehensive Health Enhancement Support System (CHESS) is an interactive computer system containing information, social support and problem solving tools. It was developed with intensive input from potential users through needs-assessment surveys and field testing. CHESS had previously been used by women in the middle and upper socio-economic classes with high school and college education. This article reports on the results of a pilot study involving eight African-American women with breast cancer from impoverished neighborhoods in the city of Chicago. CHESS was very well received, extensively used and produced feelings of acceptance, motivation, understanding and relief. PMID:7949998

  1. Predictors and Effects of Training on an Online Health Education and Support System for Women with Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    McDowell, Helene; Kim, Eunkyung; Shaw, Bret R.; Han, Jeong Yeob; Gumieny, Lauren

    2010-01-01

    Many breast cancer patients currently turn to Internet-based education and support to help them cope with their illness. This study explores the role of training in influencing how patients use a particular Interactive Cancer Communication System (ICCS) over time and also examines what pre-test characteristics predict which people are most likely to opt in or out of training in the first place. With use of pre-test survey and unobtrusive individual records of ICCS system use data (N = 216), n...

  2. Enhancement of Image Sharpness in X-ray Digital Tomosynthesis Using Self-Layer Subtraction Backprojection Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray digital tomosynthesis is widely used in the nondestructive testing and evaluation, especially for the printed circuit boards (PCBs). In this study, we propose a simple method to reduce the blur artefact, frequently claimed in the conventional digital tomosynthesis based on SAA (shift-and-add) algorithm, and thus restore the image sharpness. The proposed method is basically based on the SAA, but has a correction procedure by finding blur artefacts from the forward-and back-projection for the firstly obtained, manipulated backprojection data. The manipulation is the replacement of the original data at the POI (plane-of-interest) by zeros. This method has been compared with the conventional SAA algorithm using the experimental measurements and Monte Carlo simulation for the designed PCB phantom. The comparison showed a much enhancement of sharpness in the images obtained from the proposed method

  3. Sentinel lymph node detection in breast cancer patients using surgical navigation system based on fluorescence molecular imaging technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Chongwei; Kou, Deqiang; Ye, Jinzuo; Mao, Yamin; Qiu, Jingdan; Wang, Jiandong; Yang, Xin; Tian, Jie

    2015-03-01

    Introduction: Precision and personalization treatments are expected to be effective methods for early stage cancer studies. Breast cancer is a major threat to women's health and sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) is an effective method to realize precision and personalized treatment for axillary lymph node (ALN) negative patients. In this study, we developed a surgical navigation system (SNS) based on optical molecular imaging technology for the precise detection of the sentinel lymph node (SLN) in breast cancer patients. This approach helps surgeons in precise positioning during surgery. Methods: The SNS was mainly based on the technology of optical molecular imaging. A novel optical path has been designed in our hardware system and a feature-matching algorithm has been devised to achieve rapid fluorescence and color image registration fusion. Ten in vivo studies of SLN detection in rabbits using indocyanine green (ICG) and blue dye were executed for system evaluation and 8 breast cancer patients accepted the combination method for therapy. Results: The detection rate of the combination method was 100% and an average of 2.6 SLNs was found in all patients. Our results showed that the method of using SNS to detect SLN has the potential to promote its application. Conclusion: The advantage of this system is the real-time tracing of lymph flow in a one-step procedure. The results demonstrated the feasibility of the system for providing accurate location and reliable treatment for surgeons. Our approach delivers valuable information and facilitates more detailed exploration for image-guided surgery research.

  4. Role of digital tomosynthesis and dual energy subtraction digital radiography in detecting pulmonary nodules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Accuracy of digital tomosynthesis for nodule detection is substantially higher. • Improvement in diagnostic accuracy is most pronounced for nodules <10 mm. • There is five times increase in radiation dose compared to DR. - Abstract: Objective: Digital tomosynthesis (DT) and dual-energy subtraction digital radiography (DES-DR) are known to perform better than conventional radiography in the detection of pulmonary nodules. Yet the comparative diagnostic performances of DT, DES-DR and digital radiography (DR) is not known. The present study compares the diagnostic performances of DT, DES-DR and DR in detecting pulmonary nodules. Subjects and methods: The institutional Review Board approved the study and informed written consent was obtained. Fifty-five patients (30 with pulmonary nodules, 25 with non-nodular focal chest pathology) were included in the study. DT and DES-DR were performed within14 days of MDCT. Composite images acquired at high kVp as part of DES-DR were used as DR images. Images were analyzed for presence of nodules and calcification in nodules. Interpretations were assigned confidence levels from 1 to 5 according to Five-Point rating scale. Areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves were compared using Z test. Results: A total of 110 (88 non-calcified, 22 calcified) nodules were identified on MDCT. For detection of nodules, DR showed cumulative sensitivity and specificity of 25.45% and 67.97%, respectively. DT showed a cumulative sensitivity and specificity of 60.9% and 85.07%, respectively. The performance was significantly better than DR (p < 0.003). DES-DR showed sensitivity and specificity of 27.75% and 82.64%, not statistically different from those of DR (p—0.92). In detection of calcification, there was no statistically significant difference between DT, DES-DR and DR. Conclusions: DT performs significantly better than DES-DR and DR at the cost of moderate increase in radiation dose

  5. Imaging Lymphatic System in Breast Cancer Patients with Magnetic Resonance Lymphangiography

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Qing; Hua, Jia; Kassir, Mohammad M.; DelProposto, Zachary; Dai, Yongming; Sun, Jingyi; Haacke, Mark; Hu, Jiani

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the feasibility of gadolinium (Gd) contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance lymphangiography (MRL) in breast cancer patients within a typical clinical setting, and to establish a Gd-MRL protocol and identify potential MRL biomarkers for differentiating metastatic from non-metastatic lymph nodes. Materials and Methods 32 patients with unilateral breast cancer were enrolled and divided into 4 groups of 8 patients. Groups I, II, and III received 1.0, 0.5, and 0.3 ml of intra...

  6. The role of CRKL in Breast Cancer Metastasis: Insights from Systems Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Chafik, Abderrahim

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression post-transcriptionally. They are involved in key biological processes and then may play a major role in the development of human diseases including cancer, in particular their involvement in breast cancer metastasis has been confirmed. Recently, the authors of ref.(\\cite{key1} have found that miR-429 may have a role in the inhibition of breast cancer metastasis and have identified its target gene CRKL as a potential ca...

  7. MCF-10A-NeoST: A New Cell System for Studying Cell-ECM and Cell-Cell Interactions in Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zantek, Nicole Dodge; Walker-Daniels, Jennifer; Stewart, Jane; Hansen, Rhonda K.; Robinson, Daniel; Miao, Hui; Wang, Bingcheng; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Bissell, Mina J.; Kinch, Michael S.

    2001-08-22

    There is a continuing need for genetically matched cell systems to model cellular behaviors that are frequently observed in aggressive breast cancers. We report here the isolation and initial characterization of a spontaneously arising variant of MCF-10A cells, NeoST, which provides a new model to study cell adhesion and signal transduction in breast cancer. NeoST cells recapitulate important biological and biochemical features of metastatic breast cancer, including anchorage-independent growth, invasiveness in threedimensional reconstituted membranes, loss of E-cadherin expression, and increased tyrosine kinase activity. A comprehensive analysis of tyrosine kinase expression revealed overexpression or functional activation of the Axl, FAK, and EphA2 tyrosine kinases in transformed MCF-10A cells. MCF-10A and these new derivatives provide a genetically matched model to study defects in cell adhesion and signaling that are relevant to cellular behaviors that often typify aggressive breast cancer cells.

  8. Geographic information system for Long Island: An epidemiologic systems approach to identify environmental breast cancer risks on Long Island. Phase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barancik, J.I.; Kramer, C.F.; Thode, H.C. Jr.

    1995-12-01

    BNL is developing and implementing the project ``Geographic Information System (GIS) for Long Island`` to address the potential relationship of environmental and occupational exposures to breast cancer etiology on Long Island. The project is divided into two major phases: The four month-feasibility project (Phase 1), and the major development and implementation project (Phase 2). This report summarizes the work completed in the four month Phase 1 Project, ``Feasibility of a Geographic Information System for Long Island.`` It provides the baseline information needed to further define and prioritize the scope of work for subsequent tasks. Phase 2 will build upon this foundation to develop an operational GIS for the Long Island Breast Cancer Study Project (LIBCSP).

  9. Geographic information system for Long Island: An epidemiologic systems approach to identify environmental breast cancer risks on Long Island. Phase 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BNL is developing and implementing the project ''Geographic Information System (GIS) for Long Island'' to address the potential relationship of environmental and occupational exposures to breast cancer etiology on Long Island. The project is divided into two major phases: The four month-feasibility project (Phase 1), and the major development and implementation project (Phase 2). This report summarizes the work completed in the four month Phase 1 Project, ''Feasibility of a Geographic Information System for Long Island.'' It provides the baseline information needed to further define and prioritize the scope of work for subsequent tasks. Phase 2 will build upon this foundation to develop an operational GIS for the Long Island Breast Cancer Study Project (LIBCSP)

  10. Microwave Breast Imaging Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhurbenko, Vitaliy; Rubæk, Tonny

    2010-01-01

    This paper outlines the applicability of microwave radiation for breast cancer detection. Microwave imaging systems are categorized based on their hardware architecture. The advantages and disadvantages of various imaging techniques are discussed. The fundamental tradeoffs are indicated between...

  11. Clinical usefulness of breast-specific gamma imaging as an adjunct modality to mammography for diagnosis of breast cancer: a systemic review and meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic performance of breast-specific gamma imaging (BSGI) as an adjunct modality to mammography for detecting breast cancer. Comprehensive searches of MEDLINE (1984 to August 2012) and EMBASE (1994 to August 2012) were performed. A summary receiver operating characteristic curve (SROC) was constructed to summarize the overall test performance of BSGI. The sensitivities for detecting subcentimetre cancer and ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) were pooled. The potential of BSGI to complement mammography was also evaluated by identifying mammography-occult breast cancer. Analysis of the studies revealed that the overall validity estimates of BSGI in detecting breast cancer were as follows: sensitivity 95 % (95 % CI 93-96 %), specificity 80 % (95 % CI 78-82 %), positive likelihood ratio 4.63 (95 % CI 3.13-6.85), negative likelihood ratio 0.08 (95 % CI 0.05-0.14), and diagnostic odds ratio 56.67 (95 % CI 26.68-120.34). The area under the SROC was 0.9552 and the Q* point was 0.8977. The pooled sensitivities for detecting subcentimetre cancer and DCIS were 84 % (95 % CI 80-88 %) and 88 % (95 % CI 81-92 %), respectively. Among patients with normal mammography, 4 % were diagnosed with breast cancer by BSGI, and among those with mammography suggestive of malignancy or new biopsy-proven breast cancer, 6 % were diagnosed with additional cancers in the breast by BSGI. BSGI had a high diagnostic performance as an excellent adjunct modality to mammography for detecting breast cancer. The ability to identify subcentimetre cancer and DCIS was also high. (orig.)

  12. Clinical usefulness of breast-specific gamma imaging as an adjunct modality to mammography for diagnosis of breast cancer: a systemic review and meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Yu.; Wei, Wei; Yang, Hua-Wei; Liu, Jian-Lun [Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Guangxi Medical University, Department of Breast Surgery of Guangxi Cancer Hospital, Nanning, Guangxi (China)

    2013-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic performance of breast-specific gamma imaging (BSGI) as an adjunct modality to mammography for detecting breast cancer. Comprehensive searches of MEDLINE (1984 to August 2012) and EMBASE (1994 to August 2012) were performed. A summary receiver operating characteristic curve (SROC) was constructed to summarize the overall test performance of BSGI. The sensitivities for detecting subcentimetre cancer and ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) were pooled. The potential of BSGI to complement mammography was also evaluated by identifying mammography-occult breast cancer. Analysis of the studies revealed that the overall validity estimates of BSGI in detecting breast cancer were as follows: sensitivity 95 % (95 % CI 93-96 %), specificity 80 % (95 % CI 78-82 %), positive likelihood ratio 4.63 (95 % CI 3.13-6.85), negative likelihood ratio 0.08 (95 % CI 0.05-0.14), and diagnostic odds ratio 56.67 (95 % CI 26.68-120.34). The area under the SROC was 0.9552 and the Q* point was 0.8977. The pooled sensitivities for detecting subcentimetre cancer and DCIS were 84 % (95 % CI 80-88 %) and 88 % (95 % CI 81-92 %), respectively. Among patients with normal mammography, 4 % were diagnosed with breast cancer by BSGI, and among those with mammography suggestive of malignancy or new biopsy-proven breast cancer, 6 % were diagnosed with additional cancers in the breast by BSGI. BSGI had a high diagnostic performance as an excellent adjunct modality to mammography for detecting breast cancer. The ability to identify subcentimetre cancer and DCIS was also high. (orig.)

  13. Breast Gangrene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husasin Irfan

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast gangrene is rare in surgical practice. Gangrene of breast can be idiopathic or secondary to some causative factor. Antibiotics and debridement are used for management. Acute inflammatory infiltrate, severe necrosis of breast tissue, necrotizing arteritis, and venous thrombosis is observed on histopathology. The aim of was to study patients who had breast gangrene. Methods A prospective study of 10 patients who had breast gangrene over a period of 6 years were analyzed Results All the patients in the study group were female. Total of 10 patients were encountered who had breast gangrene. Six patients presented with breast gangrene on the right breast whereas four had on left breast. Out of 10 patients, three had breast abscess after teeth bite followed by gangrene, one had iatrogenic trauma by needle aspiration of erythematous area of breast under septic conditions. Four had history of application of belladonna on cutaneous breast abscess and had then gangrene. All were lactating female. Amongst the rest two were elderly, one of which was a diabetic who had gangrene of breast and had no application of belladonna. All except one had debridement under cover of broad spectrum antibiotics. Three patients had grafting to cover the raw area. Conclusion Breast gangrene occurs rarely. Etiology is variable and mutifactorial. Teeth bite while lactation and the iatrogenic trauma by needle aspiration of breast abscess under unsterlised conditions could be causative. Uncontrolled diabetes can be one more causative factor for the breast gangrene. Belladonna application as a topical agent could be inciting factor. Sometimes gangrene of breast can be idiopathic. Treatment is antibiotics and debridement.

  14. SU-E-J-134: An Augmented-Reality Optical Imaging System for Accurate Breast Positioning During Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazareth, D; Malhotra, H; French, S [Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY (United States); Hoffmann, K [Neurosurgery at SUNY at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY (United States); Merrow, C [Bassett Healthcare, Oneonta, NY (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Breast radiotherapy, particularly electronic compensation, may involve large dose gradients and difficult patient positioning problems. We have developed a simple self-calibrating augmented-reality system, which assists in accurately and reproducibly positioning the patient, by displaying her live image from a single camera superimposed on the correct perspective projection of her 3D CT data. Our method requires only a standard digital camera capable of live-view mode, installed in the treatment suite at an approximately-known orientation and position (rotation R; translation T). Methods: A 10-sphere calibration jig was constructed and CT imaged to provide a 3D model. The (R,T) relating the camera to the CT coordinate system were determined by acquiring a photograph of the jig and optimizing an objective function, which compares the true image points to points calculated with a given candidate R and T geometry. Using this geometric information, 3D CT patient data, viewed from the camera's perspective, is plotted using a Matlab routine. This image data is superimposed onto the real-time patient image, acquired by the camera, and displayed using standard live-view software. This enables the therapists to view both the patient's current and desired positions, and guide the patient into assuming the correct position. The method was evaluated using an in-house developed bolus-like breast phantom, mounted on a supporting platform, which could be tilted at various angles to simulate treatment-like geometries. Results: Our system allowed breast phantom alignment, with an accuracy of about 0.5 cm and 1 ± 0.5 degree. Better resolution could be possible using a camera with higher-zoom capabilities. Conclusion: We have developed an augmented-reality system, which combines a perspective projection of a CT image with a patient's real-time optical image. This system has the potential to improve patient setup accuracy during breast radiotherapy, and could

  15. Breast cancer fatalism: The role of women's perceptions of the health care system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer fatalism, which can be understood as the belief that cancer is a death sentence, has been found to be a deterrent to preventive cancer screening participation. This study examines factors associated with breast cancer fatalism among women. We analyzed data from a 2003 survey of women 40 years...

  16. Quantitative Clinical Evaluation of a Simultaneous PETI MRI Breast Imaging System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlyer D. J.; Schlyer, D.J.

    2013-04-03

    A prototype simultaneous PET-MRI breast scanner has been developed for conducting clinical studies with the goal of obtaining high resolution anatomical and functional information in the same scan which can lead to faster and better diagnosis, reduction of unwanted biopsies, and better patient care.

  17. Breast lift

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... One breast that is larger than the other (asymmetry of the breasts) Uneven position of the nipples ... to achieve this important distinction for online health information and services. Learn more about A.D.A. ...

  18. Breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... perform breast self-exams each month. However, the importance of self-exams for detecting breast cancer is ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  19. Cardiac dose reduction with breathing adapted radiotherapy using self respiration monitoring system for left-sided breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To quantify the cardiac dose reduction during breathing adapted radiotherapy using Real-time Position Management (RPM) system in the treatment of left-sided breast cancer. Twenty-two patients with left-sided breast cancer underwent CT scans during breathing maneuvers including free breathing (FB), deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH), and end inspiration breath-hold (EIBH). The RPM system was used to monitor respiratory motion, and the in-house self respiration monitoring (SRM) system was used for visual feedback. For each scan, treatment plans were generated and dosimetric parameters from DIBH and EIBH plans were compared to those of FB plans. All patients completed CT scans with different breathing maneuvers. When compared with FB plans, DIBH plans demonstrated significant reductions in irradiated heart volume and the heart V25, with the relative reduction of 71% and 70%, respectively (p < 0.001). EIBH plans also resulted in significantly smaller irradiated heart volume and lower heart V25 than FB plans, with the relative reduction of 39% and 37%, respectively (p = 0.002). Despite of significant expansion of lung volume using inspiration breath-hold, there were no significant differences in left lung V25 among the three plans. In comparison with FB, both DIBH and EIBH plans demonstrated a significant reduction of radiation dose to the heart. In the training course, SRM system was useful and effective in terms of positional reproducibility and patient compliance.

  20. Percutaneous excisional biopsy of clinically benign breast lesions with vacuum-assisted system: Comparison of three devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare three devices in percutaneous excisional biopsy of clinically benign breast lesions in terms of complete excision rate, duration of procedure and complications. Materials and methods: In a retrospective study from March 2005 to May 2009, 983 lesions underwent ultrasound-guided excisional biopsy with three vacuum-assisted systems, respectively. The lesions were category 3 lesions as determined by ultrasound imaging according to Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) (n = 951) or had been confirmed as benign by a previous core needle biopsy (n = 32). The completely excision rate, duration of procedure and complications (hematoma, pain and ecchymosis) were recorded. Results: 99.7% (980/983) lesions were demonstrated to be benign by pathology after percutaneous excisional biopsy. The overall complete excision rate was 94.8% (932/983). In lesions whose largest diameter equal to or larger than 1.5 cm, the complete excision rates of EnCor® group (97.8%, 348/356) and Mammotome® group (97.2%, 139/143) were significantly higher than that of Vacora® group (91.9%, 445/484) (P ® group (6.6 ± 6.5 min) had a significant less duration than Mammotome® (10.6 ± 9.3 min) and Vacora® group (25.6 ± 23.3 min) (P ® group and Mammotome® group than in Vacora® group (P < 0.05). Conclusions: All these three vacuum-assisted systems are highly successful for excisional biopsy of benign breast lesions.

  1. Update on new technologies in digital mammography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patterson SK

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Stephanie K Patterson, Marilyn A Roubidoux Division of Breast Imaging, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI, USA Abstract: Despite controversy regarding mammography's efficacy, it continues to be the most commonly used breast cancer-screening modality. With the development of digital mammography, some improved benefit has been shown in women with dense breast tissue. However, the density of breast tissue continues to limit the sensitivity of conventional mammography. We discuss the development of some derivative digital technologies, primarily digital breast tomosynthesis, and their strengths, weaknesses, and potential patient impact. Keywords: screening mammography, breast cancer, contrast media, digital breast tomosynthesis

  2. Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breast cancer affects one in eight women during their lives. No one knows why some women get breast cancer, but there are many risk factors. Risks that ... who have family members with breast or ovarian cancer may wish to be tested for the genes. ...

  3. Ultrasound - Breast

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Even so, mammograms do not detect all breast cancers. Some breast lesions and abnormalities are not visible or are difficult to interpret on mammograms. In breasts that are dense, meaning there is a lot ... and less fat, many cancers can be hard to see on mammography. Many ...

  4. Pre-surgery localization of non-palpable lesions of the breast using a 1.0 Tesla MRI system and a body coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the study was to verify whether examination with a non-dedicated MRI body coil, i.e. without complementing electronic hardware, will reliably locate the lesion revealed by the MR-mammography. The idea was that if the results obtained were equal in value, a less expensive alternative for tumor localization might have been found. Material and methods: In 18 patients we performed a contrast enhanced (i.v. 0.2 mmol Gd-DTPA/kg b.w.) breast MRI on a 1.0 Tesla system (Magnetom Impact, Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) using a body coil and a GRE 3D sequence. In prone position, the patients were placed in a customized positioning device offering lateral access to the breast. The localizations were done with a MRI-compatible wire (n=21). In addition, all patients underwent the same imaging protocol using a dedicated breast coil (without localization). For both MRI modalities, the signal intensities of the lesion, the normal breast tissue, and the background noise were measured. The lesion-to-fat contrast (LFC), the lesion-to-breast tissue contrast (LCB) and the percentage of signal change pre- and post-contrast administration were calculated and compared. The localization results were correlated to pathologic findings. Results: There was no difference in lesion detection. Regarding the LCF and LBC, the body coil was superior to the dedicated breast coil. However, the background noise was higher using the body coil. In all cases the localization was successful. (orig./CB)

  5. Role of digital tomosynthesis and dual energy subtraction digital radiography in detection of parenchymal lesions in active pulmonary tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Madhurima, E-mail: madhurimashrm88@gmail.com [Department of Radiodiagnosis and Imaging, PGIMER, Chandigarh 160012 (India); Sandhu, Manavjit Singh, E-mail: manavjitsandhu@yahoo.com [Department of Radiodiagnosis and Imaging, PGIMER, Chandigarh 160012 (India); Gorsi, Ujjwal, E-mail: ujjwalgorsi@gmail.com [Department of Radiodiagnosis and Imaging, PGIMER, Chandigarh 160012 (India); Gupta, Dheeraj, E-mail: dheeraj1910@gmail.com [Department of Pulmonary Medicine, PGIMER, Chandigarh 160012 (India); Khandelwal, Niranjan, E-mail: khandelwaln@hotmail.com [Department of Radiodiagnosis and Imaging, PGIMER, Chandigarh 160012 (India)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Digital tomosynthesis and dual energy subtraction digital radiography are modifications of digital radiography. • These modalities perform better than digital radiography in detection of parenchymal lesions in active pulmonary tuberculosis. • Digital tomosynthesis has a sensitivity of 100% in detection of cavities. • Centrilobular nodules seen on CT in active pulmonary tuberculosis, were also demonstrated on digital tomosynthesis in our study. • Digital tomosynthesis can be used for diagnosis and follow up of patients in pulmonary tuberculosis, thereby reducing the number of CT examinations. - Abstract: Objective: To assess the role of digital tomosynthesis (DTS) and dual energy subtraction digital radiography (DES-DR) in detection of parenchymal lesions in active pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) and to compare them with digital radiography (DR). Materials and methods: This prospective study was approved by our institutional review committee. DTS and DES-DR were performed in 62 patients with active pulmonary TB within one week of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) study. Findings of active pulmonary TB, that is consolidation, cavitation and nodules were noted on digital radiography (DR), DTS and DES-DR in all patients. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of all 3 modalities was calculated with MDCT as reference standard. In addition presence of centrilobular nodules was also noted on DTS. Results: Our study comprised of 62 patients (33 males, 29 females with age range 18–82 years). Sensitivity and specificity of DTS for detection of nodules and cavitation was better than DR and DES-DR. Sensitivity and specificity of DTS for detection of consolidation was comparable to DR and DES-DR. DES-DR performed better than DR in detection of nodules and cavitation. DTS was also able to detect centrilobular nodules with sensitivity and specificity of 57.4% and 86.5% respectively. Conclusion: DTS and DES-DR perform better

  6. Role of digital tomosynthesis and dual energy subtraction digital radiography in detection of parenchymal lesions in active pulmonary tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Digital tomosynthesis and dual energy subtraction digital radiography are modifications of digital radiography. • These modalities perform better than digital radiography in detection of parenchymal lesions in active pulmonary tuberculosis. • Digital tomosynthesis has a sensitivity of 100% in detection of cavities. • Centrilobular nodules seen on CT in active pulmonary tuberculosis, were also demonstrated on digital tomosynthesis in our study. • Digital tomosynthesis can be used for diagnosis and follow up of patients in pulmonary tuberculosis, thereby reducing the number of CT examinations. - Abstract: Objective: To assess the role of digital tomosynthesis (DTS) and dual energy subtraction digital radiography (DES-DR) in detection of parenchymal lesions in active pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) and to compare them with digital radiography (DR). Materials and methods: This prospective study was approved by our institutional review committee. DTS and DES-DR were performed in 62 patients with active pulmonary TB within one week of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) study. Findings of active pulmonary TB, that is consolidation, cavitation and nodules were noted on digital radiography (DR), DTS and DES-DR in all patients. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of all 3 modalities was calculated with MDCT as reference standard. In addition presence of centrilobular nodules was also noted on DTS. Results: Our study comprised of 62 patients (33 males, 29 females with age range 18–82 years). Sensitivity and specificity of DTS for detection of nodules and cavitation was better than DR and DES-DR. Sensitivity and specificity of DTS for detection of consolidation was comparable to DR and DES-DR. DES-DR performed better than DR in detection of nodules and cavitation. DTS was also able to detect centrilobular nodules with sensitivity and specificity of 57.4% and