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Sample records for breast screening programme

  1. Breast and cervical cancer screening programme implementation in 16 countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dowling, Emily C; Klabunde, Carrie; Patnick, Julietta

    2010-01-01

    There is a continuing need to monitor and evaluate the impact of organized screening programmes on cancer incidence and mortality. We report results from a programme assessment conducted within the International Cancer Screening Network (ICSN) to understand the characteristics of cervical screening...... programmes within countries that have established population-based breast cancer screening programmes....

  2. Women's perceptions of breast cancer screening. Spanish screening programme survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baena-Cañada, José M; Rosado-Varela, Petra; Expósito-Álvarez, Inmaculada; González-Guerrero, Macarena; Nieto-Vera, Juan; Benítez-Rodríguez, Encarnación

    2014-12-01

    Participants in breast cancer screening programmes may benefit from early detection but may also be exposed to the risks of overdiagnosis and false positives. We surveyed a sample of Spanish women to assess knowledge, information sources, attitudes and psychosocial impact. A total of 434 breast cancer screening programme participants aged 45-69 years were administered questionnaires regarding knowledge, information sources, attitudes and psychosocial impact. Scores of 5 or more (out of 10) and 12 or less (out of 24) were established as indicating adequate knowledge and a positive attitude, respectively. Psychosocial impact was measured using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and the Cancer Worry Scale. Only 42 women (9.7%) had adequate knowledge. The mean (SD) knowledge score was 2.97 (1.16). Better educated women and women without previous false positives had higher scores. The main sources of information were television, press, Andalusian Health Service documentation and family and friends. Most participants (99.1%) had a positive attitude, with a mean (SD) score of 3.21 (2.66). Mean (SD) scores for anxiety, depression and cancer worry were 1.86 (3.26), 0.72 (1.99) and 9.4 (3.04), respectively. Women have a very positive attitude to breast cancer screening, but are poorly informed and use television as their main information source. They experience no negative psychosocial impact from participation in such programmes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. [The effectiveness of population-based breast cancer screening programme].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szynglarewicz, Bartłomiej; Matkowski, Rafał; Kasprzak, Piotr; Kotowska, Jolanta; Forgacz, Józef; Pudełko, Marek; Kornafel, Jan

    2009-02-01

    Well-organised mammography screening programme can significantly reduce the breast cancer mortality However, changes in mortality rates take a long time thus some early indicators are usually used to monitor the effectiveness of the programme. If these operational objectives are accomplished then the programme can replicate the mortality reduction achieved in randomised trials. To evaluate the quality of breast cancer screening programme in the region of Lower Silesia during the first year of its operating. Centrally organised breast cancer screening has been introduced since the beginning of the year 2007. This population-based programme is designed for women aged 50-69. Females undergoing treatment or being followed-up due to breast cancer are not invited. Screen-film two-view mammography without clinical examination is used as a screening test which is to be performed every two years. The second level diagnostic tools are breast clinical examination and additional imaging (mammography and ultrasound). Following further assessment women are referred to the examination at the routine round length of the programme, at the less interval (short-term recall) or biopsy procedures. Quality assessment was done via early indicators according to the European guidelines. The attendance rate was 41% (79,143 women screened within 192,613 eligible population for one year). Technical repeat rate, further assessment rate, and short-term recall rate were: 0.26%, 6.85%, and 0.91%, respectively. Pathologically confirmed breast cancer was revealed in 364 women giving the detection rate 4.59 for 1000. Cancer detection rate to expected incidence ratio was 3.35. Mammography service performed during the first year of breast cancer screening programme in the region of Lower Silesia conforms to quality assessment parameters recommended by the European guidelines at the acceptable level. The main problem at the start of this programme is too low coverage. Invitation process must be

  4. Prevention of breast cancer in the context of a national breast screening programme

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Howell, A; Astley, S; Warwick, J; Stavrinos, P; Sahin, S; Ingham, S; McBurney, H; Eckersley, B; Harvie, M; Wilson, M; Beetles, U; Warren, R; Hufton, A; Sergeant, J; Newman, W; Buchan, I; Cuzick, J; Evans, D. G

    2012-01-01

    ...; and Cambridge Breast Unit, Addenbrooke’s Hospital, Cambridge; UK). Prevention of breast cancer in the context of a national breast screening programme (Review). J Intern Med 2012; 271 : 321–330...

  5. Evaluation of The Netherlands breast cancer screening programme.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, A.L.M.; Broeders, M.J.M.

    2003-01-01

    The Netherlands breast cancer screening programme for women aged 50-75 years was gradually implemented during 1989-1997. Short-term indicators for this mammography screening are 80% attendance (800 000 examinations yearly), and for the subsequent screening examinations 7.4 referrals for clinical

  6. The breast screening programme and misinforming the public

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtzsche, Peter C; Jørgensen, Karsten Juhl

    2011-01-01

    The information provided to the public by the NHS Breast Screening Programme has been criticized for lack of balance, omission of information on harms and substantially exaggerated estimates of benefit. These shortcomings have been particularly evident in the various invitation leaflets for breast...... about breast screening has had any impact on the contents of the new 2010 leaflet and on the 2010 Annual Review. We conclude that spokespeople for the Programme have stuck to the beliefs about benefit that prevailed 25 years ago. Concerns about over-diagnosis have not been addressed either and official...... screening and in the Programme's own 2008 Annual Review, which celebrated 20 years of screening. The debate on screening has been heated after new data published in the last two years questioned the benefit and documented substantial harm. We therefore analysed whether the recent debate and new pivotal data...

  7. Interval cancer rates in the Irish national breast screening programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Katie M; Dwane, Fiona; Kelleher, Tracy; Sharp, Linda; Comber, Harry

    2015-09-01

    To compare interval cancer rates from the Irish breast screening programme, BreastCheck, for the period 2000-2007 with those from other European countries. Data from BreastCheck was linked to National Cancer Registry breast cancer registrations, to calculate numbers of women screened, screen-detected cancers, and interval cancers, by year of screening, in the first and second years after screening, and by initial or subsequent screen. Estimated underlying cancer incidence from the period 1996-1999 inclusive was used to calculate proportionate incidence. We calculated the interval cancer ratio as an alternative measure of the burden of interval cancers. There were 372,658 screening records for 178,147 women in the period 2000-2007. The overall interval rate was 9.6 per 10,000 screens. In the first year after screening, the interval cancer rate was 5.8 per 10,000 screens and this increased to 13.4 in the second year after screening. The screen detection rate for the period was 53.6 per 10,000 screened for all screens combined. Initial screens produced a higher detection rate at 66.9 per 10,000 screened compared with subsequent screens with a screen-detected rate of 41.4 per 10,000 screens. Interval breast cancer rates for the first years of the programme are within acceptable limits and are comparable with those in other European programmes. Nationwide roll-out together with the adoption of digital mammography may have an impact on interval cancer rates in future years. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. The breast screening programme and misinforming the public

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtzsche, Peter C; Jørgensen, Karsten Juhl

    2011-01-01

    The information provided to the public by the NHS Breast Screening Programme has been criticized for lack of balance, omission of information on harms and substantially exaggerated estimates of benefit. These shortcomings have been particularly evident in the various invitation leaflets for breas...

  9. Breast cancer screening programme: experience from Eastern province, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Mulhim, F A; Syed, A; Bagatadah, W A; Al Muhanna, A F

    2015-04-02

    Programmes for early diagnosis of breast cancer are lacking in most countries in the Eastern Mediterranean Region. This paper reviews a nongovernmental screening programme launched in October 2009 in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia, in which 14 health centres were covered by 2 mobile mammography machines. Annual screening was offered to all women aged 40 years and above. Up to February 2014 a total of 8061 women were screened, an uptake rate of 15.0%. The recall rate was 7.9%. The number of cancers detected was 47, a cancer detection rate of 5.83 per 1000 women screened; 70.2% of the cancers detected had either no mass or the lesions were smaller than 2 cm. The mean age of women with cancer was 50.4 (SD 7.6) years. The screening parameters of our study correlated well with international standards. Despite the controversies regarding universal breast cancer screening, a national breast cancer screening programme for Saudi Arabia is needed.

  10. [Attendance in the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Programme].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebuødegård, Sofie; Sagstad, Silje; Hofvind, Solveig

    2016-09-01

    A high rate of attendance among women invited to the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Programme (NBCSP) is essential to achieve optimal effect, including reduction in breast cancer mortality. This article describes attendance in the programme by county, period and women’s age at invitation. All women in the age group 50 – 69 years who are registered in the National Population Register are invited to attend the NBCSP every second year. In the study period 2007 – 2014, 2 142 369 invitations were sent, and 1 600 293 screening examinations were performed for 710 169 women. Use of the data is pursuant to the Cancer Registry Regulations. Altogether 84 % of the women invited attended at least once in the study period. The average attendance rate per screening round was 75 %. In Rogaland, Nordland and Sogn og Fjordane counties more than 80 % attended, while in Oslo the figure was 62 %. The highest rate of attendance recorded was for women in the age group 62 – 67 years. The attendance in the prior screening round was of influence for reattendance. The mammography screening programme has a high level of acceptance among women in the target group. Possible reasons for the variation in attendance among the county districts should be identified.

  11. An ongoing case-control study to evaluate the NHS breast screening programme

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Massat, Nathalie J; Sasieni, Peter D; Parmar, Dharmishta; Duffy, Stephen W

    2013-01-01

    In England, a national breast screening programme (NHSBSP) has been in place since 1988, and assessment of its impact on breast cancer incidence and mortality is essential to ensure that the programme is indeed doing more good than harm...

  12. Attending the breast screening programme after breast cancer treatment: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Munck, Linda; Kwast, Annemiek; Reiding, Dick; de Bock, Geertruida H; Otter, Renée; Willemse, Pax H B; Siesling, Sabine

    2013-12-01

    In the Netherlands, breast cancer patients are treated and followed at least 5 years after diagnosis. Furthermore, all women aged 50-74 are invited biennially for mammography by the nationwide screening programme. The relation between the outpatient follow-up (follow-up visits in the outpatient clinic for 5 years after treatment) and the screening programme is not well established and attending the screening programme as well as outpatient follow-up is considered undesirable. This study evaluates potential factors influencing women to attend the screening programme during their outpatient follow-up (overlap) and the (re-)attendance to the screening programme after 5 years of outpatient follow-up. Data of breast cancer patients aged 50-74 years, treated for primary breast cancer between 1996 and 2007 were selected from the Netherlands Cancer Registry and linked to the National Breast Cancer Screening Programme in the Northern region. Cox regression analyses were used to study women (re-)attending the screening programme over time, possible overlap with the outpatient follow-up and factors influencing this. In total 11227 breast cancer patients were included, of whom 19% attended the screening programme after breast cancer treatment, 4.4% within 5 years and 15.4% after more than 5 years. Factors that independently influenced attendance within 5 years as well as more than 5 years after treatment were: interval tumours (HR 0.77; 95%CI 0.61-0.97 and HR 0.69; 95%CI 0.53-0.88, ref: screen-detected tumours), receiving adjuvant radiotherapy (HR 0.65; 95%CI 0.47-0.90 and HR 0.66; 95%CI 0.47-0.93; ref: none) and diagnosis of in situ tumours (HR 1.67; 95%CI 1.25-2.23 and HR 1.39; 95%CI 1.05-1.85; ref: stage I tumours). Non-screen related tumours (HR 0.41; 95%CI 0.29-0.58) and recent diagnosis (HR 0.89 per year; 95%CI 0.86-0.92) were only associated with attendance within 5 years after treatment. The interrelation between outpatient follow-up and screening should be improved to

  13. Value of audits in breast cancer screening quality assurance programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geertse, Tanya D; Holland, Roland; Timmers, Janine M H; Paap, Ellen; Pijnappel, Ruud M; Broeders, Mireille J M; den Heeten, Gerard J

    2015-11-01

    Our aim was to retrospectively evaluate the results of all audits performed in the past and to assess their value in the quality assurance of the Dutch breast cancer screening programme. The audit team of the Dutch Reference Centre for Screening (LRCB) conducts triennial audits of all 17 reading units. During audits, screening outcomes like recall rates and detection rates are assessed and a radiological review is performed. This study investigates and compares the results of four audit series: 1996-2000, 2001-2005, 2003-2007 and 2010-2013. The analysis shows increased recall rates (from 0.66%, 1.07%, 1.22% to 1.58%), increased detection rates (from 3.3, 4.5, 4.8 to 5.4 per 1000) and increased sensitivity (from 64.5%, 68.7%, 70.5% to 71.6%), over the four audit series. The percentage of 'missed cancers' among interval cancers and advanced screen-detected cancers did not change (p = 0.4). Our audits not only provide an opportunity for assessing screening outcomes, but also provide moments of self-reflection with peers. For radiologists, an accurate understanding of their performance is essential to identify points of improvement. We therefore recommend a radiological review of screening examinations and immediate feedback as part of an audit. • Radiological review and immediate feedback are recommended as part of an audit. • For breast screening radiologists, audits provide moments of self-reflection with peers. • Radiological review of screening examinations provides insights in recall behaviour. • Accurate understanding of radiologists' performance is essential to identify points of improvement.

  14. Screen-detected versus interval cancers: Effect of imaging modality and breast density in the Flemish Breast Cancer Screening Programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timmermans, Lore; Bacher, Klaus; Thierens, Hubert [Ghent University, Department of Basic Medical Sciences, QCC-Gent, Ghent (Belgium); Bleyen, Luc; Herck, Koen van [Ghent University, Centrum voor Preventie en Vroegtijdige Opsporing van Kanker, Ghent (Belgium); Lemmens, Kim; Ongeval, Chantal van; Steen, Andre van [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Radiology, Leuven (Belgium); Martens, Patrick [Centrum voor Kankeropsporing, Bruges (Belgium); Brabander, Isabel de [Belgian Cancer Registry, Brussels (Belgium); Goossens, Mathieu [UZ Brussel, Dienst Kankerpreventie, Brussels (Belgium)

    2017-09-15

    To investigate if direct radiography (DR) performs better than screen-film mammography (SF) and computed radiography (CR) in dense breasts in a decentralized organised Breast Cancer Screening Programme. To this end, screen-detected versus interval cancers were studied in different BI-RADS density classes for these imaging modalities. The study cohort consisted of 351,532 women who participated in the Flemish Breast Cancer Screening Programme in 2009 and 2010. Information on screen-detected and interval cancers, breast density scores of radiologist second readers, and imaging modality was obtained by linkage of the databases of the Centre of Cancer Detection and the Belgian Cancer Registry. Overall, 67% of occurring breast cancers are screen detected and 33% are interval cancers, with DR performing better than SF and CR. The interval cancer rate increases gradually with breast density, regardless of modality. In the high-density class, the interval cancer rate exceeds the cancer detection rate for SF and CR, but not for DR. DR is superior to SF and CR with respect to cancer detection rates for high-density breasts. To reduce the high interval cancer rate in dense breasts, use of an additional imaging technique in screening can be taken into consideration. (orig.)

  15. Attending the breast screening programme after breast cancer treatment: a population-based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Munck, L.; Kwast, A.; Reiding, D.; de Bock, G.H.; Otter, R.; Willemse, P.H.B.; Siesling, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: In the Netherlands, breast cancer patients are treated and followed at least 5 years after diagnosis. Furthermore, all women aged 50-74 are invited biennially for mammography by the nationwide screening programme. The relation between the outpatient follow-up (follow-up visits in the

  16. Attending the breast screening programme after breast cancer treatment : A population-based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Munck, Linda; Kwast, Annemiek; Reiding, Dick; de Bock, Geertruida H.; Otter, Renee; Willemse, Pax H. B.; Siesling, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: In the Netherlands, breast cancer patients are treated and followed at least 5 years after diagnosis. Furthermore, all women aged 50-74 are invited biennially for mammography by the nationwide screening programme. The relation between the outpatient follow-up (follow-up visits in the

  17. Mean glandular dose in a breast screening programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galvan, H. A.; Perez-Badillo, M. P.; Villasenor, Y. [Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia, Av. San Fernando No. 22, Col Seccion XVI, Mexico, D. F., C. P. 14080 (Mexico)

    2012-10-23

    Breast density has an important role in early detection of breast cancer, because has been reported the strong association between breast density and invasive breast cancer risk. Mammography is the gold standard to early detection of breast cancer, despite of this require ionizing radiation that may increase radio-induced cancer risk. This maybe limited with a quality control programme of mammographic units, with the main goal of achieving high quality images with low radiation dose. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) published in 2011 the {sup Q}uality assurance programme for digital mammography{sup ,} where glandular tissue quantity is an important parameter to compute mean glandular dose (MGD), which is necessary to reduce its associated risk. In this work we show the first results in our country applying this protocol and studying breast density in a small group. MGD complies with national and IAEA dose limits.

  18. Mean glandular dose in a breast screening programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galván, H. A.; Pérez-Badillo, M. P.; Villaseñor, Y.

    2012-10-01

    Breast density has an important role in early detection of breast cancer, because has been reported the strong association between breast density and invasive breast cancer risk. Mammography is the gold standard to early detection of breast cancer, despite of this require ionizing radiation that may increase radio-induced cancer risk. This maybe limited with a quality control programme of mammographic units, with the main goal of achieving high quality images with low radiation dose. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) published in 2011 the "Quality assurance programme for digital mammography", where glandular tissue quantity is an important parameter to compute mean glandular dose (MGD), which is necessary to reduce its associated risk. In this work we show the first results in our country applying this protocol and studying breast density in a small group. MGD complies with national and IAEA dose limits.

  19. Natural history of breast cancers detected in the Swedish mammography screening programme: a cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zahl, Per-Henrik; Gøtzsche, Peter C; Mæhlen, Jan

    2011-01-01

    The natural history of screen-detected breast cancers is not well understood. A previous analysis of the incidence change during the introduction of the Norwegian screening programme in the late 1990s suggested that the natural history of many screen-detected invasive breast cancers is to regress...

  20. The impact of a breast cancer screening programme on quality-adjusted life-years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haes, J. C.; de Koning, H. J.; van Oortmarssen, G. J.; van Agt, H. M.; de Bruyn, A. E.; van der Maas, P. J.

    1991-01-01

    Trials have shown that breast cancer screening is effective in reducing breast cancer mortality and gaining life-years. The question is whether taking into account the impact of a screening programme on quality of life would lead to a less positive view. Screening may have effects on quality of life

  1. Trends in surgery for screen-detected and interval breast cancers in a national screening programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nederend, J; Duijm, L E M; Louwman, M W J; Roumen, R M H; Jansen, F H; Voogd, A C

    2014-07-01

    This population-based study aimed to evaluate trends in surgical approach for screen-detected cancer versus interval breast cancer, and to determine the factors associated with positive resection margins. Screening mammograms of women aged 50-75 years, who underwent biennial screening in a Dutch breast-screening region between 1997 and 2011, were included. Patient and tumour characteristics were compared between women who underwent mastectomy or breast-conserving surgery (BCS) for screen-detected or interval cancer, and women with a negative or positive resection margin after BCS. Some 417,013 consecutive screening mammograms were included. A total of 2224 screen-detected and 825 interval cancers were diagnosed. The BCS rate remained stable (mean 6.1 per 1000 screened women; P = 0.099), whereas mastectomy rates increased significantly during the study from 0.9 (1997-1998) to 1.9 (2009-2010) per 1000 screened women (P breasts, preoperative magnetic resonance imaging, microcalcifications, architectural distortion, tumour size over 20 mm, axillary lymph node metastasis and treating hospital were independent risk factors for mastectomy. Interval cancer, image-guided tumour localization, microcalcifications, breast parenchyma asymmetry, tumour size greater than 20 mm, lobular tumour histology, low tumour grade, extensive invasive component and treating hospital were independent risk factors for positive resection margins. Mastectomy rates doubled during a 14-year period of screening mammography and the proportion of positive resection margins decreased, with variation among hospitals. The latter observation stresses the importance of quality control programmes for hospitals treating women with breast cancer. © 2014 BJS Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Benefit-to-harm ratio of the Danish breast cancer screening programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beau, Anna-Belle; Lynge, Elsebeth; Njor, Sisse Helle

    2017-01-01

    The primary aim of breast cancer screening is to reduce breast cancer mortality, but screening also has negative side-effects as overdiagnosis. To evaluate a screening programme, both benefits and harms should be considered. Published estimates of the benefit-to-harm ratio, the number of breast...... carcinoma in situ (DCIS)] were estimated per 1,000 women aged 50-79, using national published estimates for breast cancer mortality and overdiagnosis, and national incidence and mortality rates. Estimations were made for both invited and screened women. Among 1,000 women invited to screening from age 50...

  3. An ongoing case-control study to evaluate the NHS breast screening programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massat, Nathalie J; Sasieni, Peter D; Parmar, Dharmishta; Duffy, Stephen W

    2013-12-13

    In England, a national breast screening programme (NHSBSP) has been in place since 1988, and assessment of its impact on breast cancer incidence and mortality is essential to ensure that the programme is indeed doing more good than harm. This article describes large observation studies designed to estimate the effects of the current programme in terms of the benefits on breast cancer incidence and mortality and detrimental effect in terms of overdiagnosis. The case-control design of the cervical screening programme evaluation was highly effective in informing policy on screening intervals and age ranges. We propose innovative selection of cases and controls and gathering of additional variables to address new outcomes of interest and develop new methodologies to control for potential sources of bias. Traditional case-control evaluation of breast screening uses women who have died from breast cancer as cases, and women known to be alive at the time of case death as controls. Breast screening histories prior to the cases' date of first diagnosis are compared. If breast screening is preventing mortality from breast cancer, cases will be characterised by a lesser screening history than controls. All deaths and incident cases of primary breast cancer in England within each 2-year study period will be included in this ongoing evaluation. Cases will be age- and area-matched to controls and variables related to cancer treatment and breast tumour pathology will be obtained to investigate the interplay between screening and treatment, and the effect of screening on incidence of advanced stage disease. Screening attendance at other national screening programmes will also be collected to derive superior adjustment for self-selection bias.The study is registered and has received full ethics approval.

  4. Benefit-to-harm ratio of the Danish breast cancer screening programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beau, Anna-Belle; Lynge, Elsebeth; Njor, Sisse Helle

    2017-01-01

    The primary aim of breast cancer screening is to reduce breast cancer mortality, but screening also has negative side-effects as overdiagnosis. To evaluate a screening programme, both benefits and harms should be considered. Published estimates of the benefit-to-harm ratio, the number of breast...... cancer deaths prevented divided by the number of overdiagnosed breast cancer cases, varied considerably. The objective of the study was to estimate the benefit-to-harm ratio of breast cancer screening in Denmark. The numbers of breast cancer deaths prevented and overdiagnosed cases [invasive and ductal...... carcinoma in situ (DCIS)] were estimated per 1,000 women aged 50-79, using national published estimates for breast cancer mortality and overdiagnosis, and national incidence and mortality rates. Estimations were made for both invited and screened women. Among 1,000 women invited to screening from age 50...

  5. Mammographic screening programmes in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giordano, Livia; von Karsa, Lawrence; Tomatis, Mariano

    2012-01-01

    To summarize participation and coverage rates in population mammographic screening programmes for breast cancer in Europe.......To summarize participation and coverage rates in population mammographic screening programmes for breast cancer in Europe....

  6. A Monte Carlo tool to simulate breast cancer screening programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forastero, C.; Zamora, L. I.; Guirado, D.; Lallena, A. M.

    2010-09-01

    A Monte Carlo tool which permits the simulation of screening mammography programmes is developed. Various statistical distributions describing different parameters involved in the problem are used: the characteristics of the population under study, a tumour growth model and a model for tumour detection based on parameters such as sensitivity and specificity which depends on the woman's age. We reproduce results of different actual programmes. The model enables us to find out the configuration (the age of the women who attend the screening trials and screening frequency) which produces maximum benefits with minimum risks. In addition, the model has permitted us to validate some of the assumed hypothesis, such as the probability distribution of the tumour detection as a function of the tumour size, the frequency of the histological types and the transition probability between different histological types.

  7. Rising incidence of breast cancer after completion of the first prevalent round of the breast cancer screening programme.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, L.J.; Rijke, J.M. de; Huveneers, J.A.M.; Verbeek, A.L.M.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: After completion of the prevalent screening round of the breast cancer screening programme in Limburg, The Netherlands, incidences started rising once again. This increase was contrary to expectations, which had predicted a slightly higher, but stable, incidence after the first screening

  8. Benefit-to-harm ratio of the Danish breast cancer screening programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beau, Anna-Belle; Lynge, Elsebeth; Njor, Sisse Helle; Vejborg, Ilse; Lophaven, Søren Nymand

    2017-08-01

    The primary aim of breast cancer screening is to reduce breast cancer mortality, but screening also has negative side-effects as overdiagnosis. To evaluate a screening programme, both benefits and harms should be considered. Published estimates of the benefit-to-harm ratio, the number of breast cancer deaths prevented divided by the number of overdiagnosed breast cancer cases, varied considerably. The objective of the study was to estimate the benefit-to-harm ratio of breast cancer screening in Denmark. The numbers of breast cancer deaths prevented and overdiagnosed cases [invasive and ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS)] were estimated per 1,000 women aged 50-79, using national published estimates for breast cancer mortality and overdiagnosis, and national incidence and mortality rates. Estimations were made for both invited and screened women. Among 1,000 women invited to screening from age 50 to age 69 and followed until age 79, we estimated that 5.4 breast cancer deaths would be prevented and 2.1 cases overdiagnosed, under the observed scenario in Denmark of a breast cancer mortality reduction of 23.4% and 2.3% of the breast cancer cases being overdiagnosed. The estimated benefit-to-harm ratio was 2.6 for invited women and 2.5 for screened women. Hence, 2-3 women would be prevented from dying from breast cancer for every woman overdiagnosed with invasive breast cancer or DCIS. The difference between the previous published ratios and 2.6 for Denmark is probably more a reflection of the accuracy of the underlying estimates than of the actual screening programmes. Therefore, benefit-to-harm ratios should be used cautiously. © 2017 The Authors International Journal of Cancer published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of UICC.

  9. Mammographic positioning quality of newly trained versus experienced radiographers in the Dutch breast cancer screening programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Landsveld-Verhoeven, Cary; den Heeten, Gerard J.; Timmers, Janine; Broeders, Mireille J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Our purpose was to compare mammographic positioning quality of new (NR) versus experienced screening radiographers (ER) in the Netherlands. Before starting to work in breast screening, NR must complete an education programme including a theoretical course (four days), practical training (six weeks),

  10. Cost effectiveness of the NHS breast screening programme: life table model

    OpenAIRE

    Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Sewell, Bernadette; Fitzsimmons,Deborah; Bennett, Hayley S; Pashayan, Nora

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess the overall cost effectiveness of the NHS breast screening programme, based on findings of the Independent UK Panel on Breast Cancer Screening and taking into account the uncertainty of associated estimates of benefits, harms, and costs. Design A life table model comparing data from two cohorts. Setting United Kingdom?s health service. Participants and interventions 364?500 women aged 50 years?the population of 50 year old women in England and Wales who would be eligible f...

  11. Natural history of breast cancers detected in the Swedish mammography screening programme: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahl, Per-Henrik; Gøtzsche, Peter C; Mæhlen, Jan

    2011-11-01

    The natural history of screen-detected breast cancers is not well understood. A previous analysis of the incidence change during the introduction of the Norwegian screening programme in the late 1990s suggested that the natural history of many screen-detected invasive breast cancers is to regress spontaneously but the study was possibly confounded by use of hormone replacement therapy in the population. We did a similar analysis of data collected during an earlier period when few women were exposed to hormone replacement therapy. We compared cumulative breast cancer incidence in age-matched cohorts of women living in seven Swedish counties before and after the initiation of public mammography screening between 1986 and 1990. Women aged 40-49 years were invited to screening every year and women aged 50-74 years were invited every 2 years. A screened group including all women aged 40-69 years (n=328,927) was followed-up for 6 years after the first invitation to the programme. A control group including all women in the same age range (n=317,404) was also followed-up for 6 years--4 years without screening and 2 years when they entered the screening programme. Screening attendance was much the same in both groups (close to 80%). Counts of incident invasive breast cancers were obtained from the Swedish Cancer Registry (in-situ cancers were excluded). Before the age-matched controls were invited to be screened at the end of their follow-up period, the 4-year cumulative incidence of invasive breast cancer was significantly higher in the screened group (982 per 100,000) than it was in the control group (658 per 100,000) (relative risk [RR] 1·49, 95% CI 1·41-1·58). Even after prevalence screening in the control group, the screened group had higher 6-year cumulative incidence of invasive breast cancer (1443 per 100,000 vs 1269 per 100,000; RR 1·14, 1·10-1·18). Because the cumulative incidence among controls did not reach that of the screened group, we believe that many

  12. National Breast Cancer Screening Programme, Singapore: evaluation of participation and performance indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loy, En Yun; Molinar, Darko; Chow, Khuan Yew; Fock, Christine

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate participation rates and performance indicators in the National Breast Cancer Screening Programme, BreastScreen Singapore (BSS). Data on women aged 40-69 screened in the period 2002-2009 was obtained from BSS and from the Singapore Cancer Registry. Participation rates and performance indicators (including screen detection rates, small tumour detection rates, recall rates, accuracy and interval cancer rates) were examined. BSS participation rate has remained above 10% since 2005. Based on health surveys, national mammography rates have increased from 29.7% before BSS to 39.6% in 2010 after BSS. Performance indicators, with the exception of recall rates, specificity, and interval cancer rate (for first screen), generally improved from 2002-2006 to 2007-2009 and are comparable with organized breast screening programmes in other developed countries. BSS breast cancer screening coverage and rescreen rates in Singapore could be improved. Mechanisms to monitor recall rates are in place, and training opportunities are provided to aid the professional development of radiologists. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Cost effectiveness of the NHS breast screening programme: life table model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pharoah, Paul D P; Sewell, Bernadette; Fitzsimmons, Deborah; Bennett, Hayley S; Pashayan, Nora

    2013-05-09

    To assess the overall cost effectiveness of the NHS breast screening programme, based on findings of the Independent UK Panel on Breast Cancer Screening and taking into account the uncertainty of associated estimates of benefits, harms, and costs. A life table model comparing data from two cohorts. United Kingdom's health service. 364,500 women aged 50 years-the population of 50 year old women in England and Wales who would be eligible for screening-were followed up for 35 years without screening, compared with a similar cohort who had regular mammographic screening between ages 50 and 70 years and were then followed for another 15 years. Between the cohorts, we compared the number of breast cancer diagnoses, number of deaths from breast cancer, number of deaths from other causes, person years of survival adjusted for health quality, and person years of survival with breast cancer. We also calculated the costs of treating primary and end stage breast cancer, and the costs of screening. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis explored the effect of uncertainty in key input parameters on the model outputs. Under the base case scenario (using input parameters derived from the Independent Panel Review), there were 1521 fewer deaths from breast cancer and 2722 overdiagnosed breast cancers. Discounting future costs and benefits at a rate of 3.5% resulted in an additional 6907 person years of survival in the screened cohort, at a cost of 40,946 additional years of survival after a diagnosis of breast cancer. Screening was associated with 2040 additional quality adjusted life years (QALYs) at an additional cost of £42.5m (€49.8m; $64.7m) in total or £20,800 per QALY gained. The gain in person time survival over 35 years was 9.2 days per person and 2.7 quality adjusted days per person screened. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis showed that this incremental cost effectiveness ratio varied widely across a range of plausible scenarios. Screening was cost effective at a

  14. Evaluation of health benefits and harms of the breast cancer screening programme in the Basque Country using discrete event simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrospide, Arantzazu; Rue, Montserrat; van Ravesteyn, Nicolien T; Comas, Merce; Larrañaga, Nerea; Sarriugarte, Garbiñe; Mar, Javier

    2015-10-12

    Since the breast cancer screening programme in the Basque Country (BCSPBC) was started in 1996, more than 400,000 women aged 50 to 69 years have been invited to participate. Based on epidemiological observations and simulation techniques it is possible to extend observed short term data into anticipated long term results. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of the programme through 2011 by quantifying the outcomes in breast cancer mortality, life-years gained, false positive results, and overdiagnosis. A discrete event simulation model was constructed to reproduce the natural history of breast cancer (disease-free, pre-clinical, symptomatic, and disease-specific death) and the actual observed characteristics of the screening programme during the evaluated period in the Basque women population. Goodness-of-fit statistics were applied for model validation. The screening effects were measured as differences in benefits and harms between the screened and unscreened populations. Breast cancer mortality reduction and life-years gained were considered as screening benefits, whereas, overdiagnosis and false positive results were assessed as harms. Results for a single cohort were also obtained. The screening programme yielded a 16 % reduction in breast cancer mortality and a 10 % increase in the incidence of breast cancer through 2011. Almost 2 % of all the women in the programme had a false positive result during the evaluation period. When a single cohort was analysed, the number of deaths decreased by 13 %, and 4 % of screen-detected cancers were overdiagnosed. Each woman with BC detected by the screening programme gained 2.5 life years due to early detection corrected by lead time. Fifteen years after the screening programme started, this study supports an important decrease in breast cancer mortality due to the screening programme, with reasonable risk of overdiagnosis and false positive results, and sustains the continuation of the breast cancer

  15. Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography in patients referred from the breast cancer screening programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobbes, Marc B I; Lalji, Ulrich; Houwers, Janneke; Nijssen, Estelle C; Nelemans, Patty J; van Roozendaal, Lori; Smidt, Marjolein L; Heuts, Esther; Wildberger, Joachim E

    2014-07-01

    Feasibility studies have shown that contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM) increases diagnostic accuracy of mammography. We studied diagnostic accuracy of CESM in patients referred from the breast cancer screening programme, who have a lower disease prevalence than previously published papers on CESM. During 6 months, all women referred to our hospital were eligible for CESM. Two radiologists blinded to the final diagnosis provided BI-RADS classifications for conventional mammography and CESM. Statistical significance of differences between mammography and CESM was calculated using McNemar's test. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed for both imaging modalities. Of the 116 eligible women, 113 underwent CESM. CESM increased sensitivity to 100.0% (+3.1%), specificity to 87.7% (+45.7%), PPV to 76.2% (+36.5%) and NPV to 100.0% (+2.9%) as compared to mammography. Differences between conventional mammography and CESM were statistically significant (p mammography, AUC was 0.779. With CESM, AUC increased to 0.976 (p mammography, even in lower prevalence patient populations such as referrals from breast cancer screening. • CESM is feasible in the workflow of referrals from routine breast screening. • CESM is superior to mammography, even in low disease prevalence populations. • CESM has an extremely high negative predictive value for breast cancer. • CESM is comparable to MRI in assessment of breast cancer extent. • CESM is comparable to histopathology in assessment of breast cancer extent.

  16. The Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) in the Dutch breast cancer screening programme: its role as an assessment and stratification tool

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, J. M. H.; van Doorne-Nagtegaal, H. J.; Zonderland, H. M.; van Tinteren, H.; Visser, O.; Verbeek, A. L. M.; den Heeten, G. J.; Broeders, M. J. M.

    2012-01-01

    To assess the suitability of the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) as a quality assessment tool in the Dutch breast cancer screening programme. The data of 93,793 screened women in the Amsterdam screening region (November 2005-July 2006) were reviewed. BI-RADS categories, work-up,

  17. [Perception of healthcare professionals on the Breast Cancer Screening Programme in Barcelona].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serral, G; Puigpinós-Riera, R; Maydana, E; Pons-Vigués, M; Borrell, C

    2013-01-01

    A good communication plan is vital for optimal results in any screening programme. The objective of this study was to assess the knowledge, involvement and opinion of health professionals regarding the Breast Cancer Screening Programme in Barcelona in 2008. A cross-sectional study using an anonymous and self-administered questionnaire. The study population (N = 960) were health professionals from Primary Health-care (PH), Programs for Sexual and Reproductive Health (PSRH), and Community Pharmacies (CP). The dependent variables were: knowledge of the Programme, professional involvement and opinion of the Programme. The independent variables were: sex, age, qualifications, employment status, and health team. A descriptive and bivariate analysis was performed. Using multivariate logistic regression models adjusted for age, an Odds Ratios (OR) were obtained along with the 95% confidence intervals (CI 95%). PSRH professionals know the target population better; 80.2% versus 26.1% PH, and 14.0% CP, respectively. Professional involvement was related to the health care team (ORCP/PH: 0.32, CI 95%: 0.22-0.43) being observed more in PH. The opinion on the Programme in reducing breast cancer mortality was similar in the three teams (61.6% PH, 59.3% PSRH, and 56.5% CP). Healthcare professionals are unaware of some aspects of Programme, such as age range or periodicity. There is great professional involvement and belief that the Programme has helped disseminate information and knowledge on the early detection of breast cancer. Copyright © 2012 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. Impacts of the Finnish service screening programme on breast cancer rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakulinen Timo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the current study was to examine impacts of the Finnish breast cancer (BC screening programme on the population-based incidence and mortality rates. The programme has been historically targeted to a rather narrow age band, mainly women of ages 50–59 years. Methods The study was based on the information on breast cancer during 1971–2003 from the files of the Finnish Cancer Registry. Incidence, cause-specific mortality as well as incidence-based (refined mortality from BC were analysed with Poisson regression. Age-specific incidence and routine cause-specific mortality were estimated for the most recent five-year period available; incidence-based mortality, respectively, for the whole steady state of the programme, 1992–2003. Results There was excess BC incidence with actual screening ages; incidence in ages 50–69 was increased 8% (95 CI 2.9–13.4. There was an increasing temporal tendency in the incidence of localised BC; and, respectively, a decrease in that of non-localised BC. The latter was most consistent in age groups where screening had been on-going several years or eventually after the last screen. The refined mortality rate from BC diagnosed in ages 50–69 was decreased with -11.1% (95% CI -19.4, -2.1. Conclusions The current study demonstrates that BC screening in Finland is effective in reducing mortality rates from breast cancers, even though the impact on the population level is smaller than expected based on the results from randomised trials among women screened in age 50 to 69. This may be explained by the rather young age group targeted in our country. Consideration whether to targeted screening up to age 69 is warranted.

  19. Impact of the digitalisation of mammography on performance parameters and breast dose in the Flemish Breast Cancer Screening Programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timmermans, Lore; Hauwere, An de; Bacher, Klaus; Thierens, Hubert [Ghent University, Department of Basic Medical Sciences, QCC-Gent, Ghent (Belgium); Bosmans, Hilde; Lemmens, Kim; Steen, Andre van [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Radiology, Leuven (Belgium); Bleyen, Luc; Mortier, Griet; Herck, Koen van [Ghent University, Centrum voor Preventie en Vroegtijdige Opsporing van Kanker, Ghent (Belgium); Limbergen, Erik van [Leuvens Universitair Centrum voor Kankerpreventie, Leuven (Belgium); Martens, Patrick [Vroegtijdige Opsporing van Borstklierkanker vzw, Bruges (Belgium)

    2014-08-15

    To investigate the impact of digitalisation on performance parameters and breast dose of the Flemish Breast Cancer Screening Programme. Both computed (CR) and direct radiography (DR) are compared with screen-film mammography (SFM). Data from 975,673 mammographic examinations were collected from units which underwent digitalisation from SFM to CR (41 units) or DR (72 units) in the period 2005-2011. Performance indicators were obtained by consulting the Screening Programme database. Phantom and patient dosimetry data were acquired from the physical technical quality assurance of the programme. Digitalisation induced no significant change in cancer detection rate (CDR), percentage of ductal carcinomas in situ and percentage of breast cancers smaller than 1 cm. A decrease in false-positive results and third readings was observed, which was a time-related observation. After digitalisation, positive predictive value (PPV) increased and recall rates decreased. Compared with SFM, an increase of 30 % in mean glandular dose (MGD) was found for CR, while a similar change in the opposite direction was found for DR. No major differences in performance parameters after digitalisation were found. Transition of SFM to CR resulted in a higher MGD and associated lower detection-over-induction ratio (DIR), while the change to DR induced an improvement of DIR. (orig.)

  20. Impact of the digitalisation of mammography on performance parameters and breast dose in the Flemish Breast Cancer Screening Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermans, Lore; De Hauwere, An; Bacher, Klaus; Bosmans, Hilde; Lemmens, Kim; Bleyen, Luc; Van Limbergen, Erik; Martens, Patrick; Van Steen, Andre; Mortier, Griet; Van Herck, Koen; Thierens, Hubert

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the impact of digitalisation on performance parameters and breast dose of the Flemish Breast Cancer Screening Programme. Both computed (CR) and direct radiography (DR) are compared with screen-film mammography (SFM). Data from 975,673 mammographic examinations were collected from units which underwent digitalisation from SFM to CR (41 units) or DR (72 units) in the period 2005-2011. Performance indicators were obtained by consulting the Screening Programme database. Phantom and patient dosimetry data were acquired from the physical technical quality assurance of the programme. Digitalisation induced no significant change in cancer detection rate (CDR), percentage of ductal carcinomas in situ and percentage of breast cancers smaller than 1 cm. A decrease in false-positive results and third readings was observed, which was a time-related observation. After digitalisation, positive predictive value (PPV) increased and recall rates decreased. Compared with SFM, an increase of 30% in mean glandular dose (MGD) was found for CR, while a similar change in the opposite direction was found for DR. No major differences in performance parameters after digitalisation were found. Transition of SFM to CR resulted in a higher MGD and associated lower detection-over-induction ratio (DIR), while the change to DR induced an improvement of DIR. • Performance parameters showed no major differences after digitalisation to CR or DR. • Transition from SFM to CR results in a higher mean glandular dose. • Transition from SFM to DR results in a lower mean glandular dose.

  1. [Can a mobile phone short message increase participation in breast cancer screening programmes?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcas, M M; Buron, A; Ramis, O; Esturi, M; Hernández, C; Macià, F

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of a mobile phone short message on women's uptake in a breast cancer screening programme. A total of 703 women from a Basic Health Area of Barcelona, and with a mobile phone number registered, were invited to participate in a breast cancer screening programme between 25 January 2011 and 22 March 2011. The control group (n=470) followed the usual appointment track, and the intervention group (n=233) received, after the first letter of invitation, a mobile phone short message reminder. The differences between the two groups were analysed, comparing the uptake rates according to age, educational level, and participation in previous round, as well as the number of re-invitation calls to non-attenders according to uptake, age and level of education;and the percentages of exclusions of both groups. The intervention group had a greater uptake than the control group (78.1% vs. 72.3%), with a significant trend observed in the 55-59 years age group (P=.036) and the low secondary educational level (P=.014).The intervention group mean of re-invitation calls of non-attenders lower than the control group (.41 vs. .65, Pcancer screening programme may increase uptake rates and lead to a management improvement. Copyright © 2013 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Clinicopathological differences between interval and screen-detected breast cancers diagnosed within a screening programme in Northern Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    José Bento, Maria; Gonçalves, Guilherme; Aguiar, Ana; Antunes, Luis; Veloso, Vitor; Rodrigues, Vítor

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate clinicopathological differences between screen-detected (SD) and interval (IC) breast cancers diagnosed in women enrolled in an organized breast screening programme in 2000--2007. Breast Cancer Screening Programme of the north region of Portugal. Using data from the screening programme and from the population-based North Region Cancer Registry, SD and IC were identified. Information on screening history, age, date of diagnosis, tumour size, histological type and grade, lymph node status, tumour stage, biomarkers, and treatment was obtained from the cancer registry and from clinical and pathological reports. Association between mode of detection and these clinicopathological characteristics was estimated by unconditional logistic regression. A total of 442 SD and 112 IC were identified in women aged 50--69. Compared with SD, IC were diagnosed in younger women (60.0 ± 5.8 years and 58.4 ± 6.0 years, respectively), were larger (tumour size >20 mm: 60.2% versus 25.1%), lobular (6.3% versus 16.1%), with a higher differentiation grade (grade 3: 17.7% versus 38.9%), had more lymph node metastases, more advanced stage, and oestrogen receptor (ER) negative (12.9% versus 29.0%) and progesterone negative, and HER2 positive. After multivariable analysis, compared with SD, IC were more likely to be larger than 20 mm, lobular, of grade 3 and negative for ER. Our results are consistent with other studies. IC's have a more aggressive biology than SDs. Our findings did not show any unexpected pattern requiring changes to our screening procedures, but continuous identification and characterization of IC is advisable. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  3. Breast cancer incidence and mortality in the Nordic capitals, 1970-1998. Trends related to mammography screening programmes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Törnberg, Sven; Kemetli, Levent; Lynge, Elsebeth

    2006-01-01

    was expected in Oslo due to too short an observation period. The study showed that the population-based breast cancer mortality trend is too crude a measure to detect the effect of screening on breast cancer mortality during the first years after the start of a programme.......The aim of the present study was to relate the time trends in breast cancer incidence and mortality to the introduction of mammography screening in the Nordic capitals. Helsinki offered screening to women aged 50-59 starting in 1986. The other three capitals offered screening to women aged 50......-69 starting in 1989 in Stockholm, 1991 in Copenhagen, and 1996 in Oslo. Prevalence peaks in breast cancer incidence depended on the age groups covered by the screening, the length of the implementation of screening, and the extent of background opportunistic screening. No mortality reduction following...

  4. Mammographic positioning quality of newly trained versus experienced radiographers in the Dutch breast cancer screening programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Landsveld-Verhoeven, Cary; den Heeten, Gerard J; Timmers, Janine; Broeders, Mireille J M

    2015-11-01

    Our purpose was to compare mammographic positioning quality of new (NR) versus experienced screening radiographers (ER) in the Netherlands. Before starting to work in breast screening, NR must complete an education programme including a theoretical course (four days), practical training (six weeks), and a portfolio-review of 50 mammographic screening examinations performed by the radiographer. Furthermore, Dutch screening has an extensive system of quality assurance, including an audit-review of positioning quality of mammograms by ER. We analysed 13,520 portfolio views (NR) and 14,896 audit views (ER) based on pre-specified criteria, e.g., depiction of inframammary angle. Overall positioning was more adequate for NR than ER (CC views: 97% versus 86%, p = 0.00; MLO views: 92% versus 84%, p = 0.00). NR scored better for most of the CC-criteria and showed, for instance, less folds (inadequate: 10% versus 16%, p = 0.00). In contrast, NR encountered more difficulties for MLO views in, for example, depiction of infra-mammary angle (inadequate: 38% versus 34%, p = 0.00). Overall, mammograms from NR were more often considered adequate, because of less severe errors. NR perform better than ER in overall positioning technique. These results stress the need for continuous monitoring and training in breast screening programmes to keep positioning skills up to date. • We evaluated positioning quality of new and experienced Dutch screening radiographers. • New radiographers outperform their experienced colleagues in mammographic positioning quality. • New radiographers make less severe errors compared to experienced colleagues. • There is a need for a continuous individual monitoring and feedback system.

  5. Film reading in the East Midlands Breast Screening Programme -- are we missing opportunities for earlier diagnosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, J; Murphy, A E; Edmondson-Jones, M; Sibbering, D M; Turnbull, A E

    2014-04-01

    To assess whether there are any significant differences in the film-reading histories of interval or screen-detected cancers, and whether this affects stage at diagnosis. The rates of screen-detected and interval cancers (overall and by radiological categorization) were observed from 268,067 women screened in the East Midlands Breast Screening Programme over 2004-2007 to assess whether there were differences in incidence based on previous film-reading history. Cancers detected at the subsequent screen and film-reading history were analysed to assess whether this affected stage at diagnosis. Analysis undertaken involved cancer detection rates, confidence intervals, and chi-square tests with Monte Carlo simulation. Rates of interval cancers were similar in all groups where at least one reader had indicated recall to assessment (6.1-7.7/1000) and were significantly higher in comparison to women whose previous film-reading outcome was unanimous routine rescreen (2.9/1000; p film-reading history (p = 0.503). The prognosis of screen-detected cancers was similar and few cancers were false negatives regardless of film-reading history at the previous screen. Copyright © 2013 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography in patients referred from the breast cancer screening programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobbes, Marc B.I.; Wildberger, Joachim E. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Lalji, Ulrich; Houwers, Janneke; Nijssen, Estelle C. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Nelemans, Patty J. [Maastricht University, Department of Epidemiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Roozendaal, Lori van; Heuts, Esther [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Surgical Oncology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Smidt, Marjolein L. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Surgical Oncology, Maastricht (Netherlands); GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2014-07-15

    Feasibility studies have shown that contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM) increases diagnostic accuracy of mammography. We studied diagnostic accuracy of CESM in patients referred from the breast cancer screening programme, who have a lower disease prevalence than previously published papers on CESM. During 6 months, all women referred to our hospital were eligible for CESM. Two radiologists blinded to the final diagnosis provided BI-RADS classifications for conventional mammography and CESM. Statistical significance of differences between mammography and CESM was calculated using McNemar's test. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed for both imaging modalities. Of the 116 eligible women, 113 underwent CESM. CESM increased sensitivity to 100.0 % (+3.1 %), specificity to 87.7 % (+45.7 %), PPV to 76.2 % (+36.5 %) and NPV to 100.0 % (+2.9 %) as compared to mammography. Differences between conventional mammography and CESM were statistically significant (p < 0.0001). A similar trend was observed in the ROC curve. For conventional mammography, AUC was 0.779. With CESM, AUC increased to 0.976 (p < 0.0001). In addition, good agreement between tumour diameters measured using CESM, breast MRI and histopathology was observed. CESM increases diagnostic performance of conventional mammography, even in lower prevalence patient populations such as referrals from breast cancer screening. (orig.)

  7. Asymptomatic breast cancer in non-participants of the national screening programme in Norway: a confounding factor in evaluation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, Solveig R; Klepp, Olbjørn; Hofvind, Solveig

    2012-12-01

    To evaluate the extent and histopathological characteristics of asymptomatic breast cancer detected outside the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program (NBCSP) in women targeted by the programme. Our study included 568 primary breast cancers (523 invasive and 45 ductal carcinoma in situ) diagnosed in 553 women aged 50-70, residing in Møre og Romsdal County, 2002-2008. The cancers were divided into screening-detected cancers in the NBCSP, interval cancers (ICs) and cancers detected in women not participating in the NBCSP (never participated and lapsed attendees), and further into asymptomatic and symptomatic cancers. Nottingham Prognostic Index (NPI) was used for comparisons across the groups and the distributions were compared using chi-square tests for statistical significance. Twenty percent (19/97) of the ICs and 32% (69/213) of the breast cancers in non-participants were asymptomatic, with opportunistic screening as the most frequent detection method (42%, 8/19 for ICs and 54%, 37/69 for non-participants). There were no differences in distribution of NPI prognostic categories across subgroups of asymptomatic invasive cancers (screening-detected cancers in the NBCSP, asymptomatic ICs and asymptomatic cancers in non-participants) or between subgroups of symptomatic invasive cancers (symptomatic ICs and symptomatic cancers in non-participants). Asymptomatic cancers had a significantly more favourable distribution of NPI prognostic categories compared with symptomatic cancers (P breast cancers detected outside the organized screening programme were asymptomatic, with a prognostic profile comparable with screening-detected breast cancers in the NBCSP. Individual data regarding the detection method for all breast cancers are needed for a complete evaluation of the organized screening programme in Norway.

  8. Evaluation of health benefits and harms of the breast cancer screening programme in the Basque Country using discrete event simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Arrospide (Arantzazu); M. Rue (Montserrat); N.T. van Ravesteyn (Nicolien); M. Comas (Merce); N. Larrañaga (Nerea); G. Sarriugarte (Garbiñe); J. Mar (Javier)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Since the breast cancer screening programme in the Basque Country (BCSPBC) was started in 1996, more than 400,000 women aged 50 to 69 years have been invited to participate. Based on epidemiological observations and simulation techniques it is possible to extend observed

  9. Economic evaluation of the breast cancer screening programme in the Basque Country: retrospective cost-effectiveness and budget impact analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrospide, Arantzazu; Rue, Montserrat; van Ravesteyn, Nicolien T; Comas, Merce; Soto-Gordoa, Myriam; Sarriugarte, Garbiñe; Mar, Javier

    2016-06-01

    Breast cancer screening in the Basque Country has shown 20 % reduction of the number of BC deaths and an acceptable overdiagnosis level (4 % of screen detected BC). The aim of this study was to evaluate the breast cancer early detection programme in the Basque Country in terms of retrospective cost-effectiveness and budget impact from 1996 to 2011. A discrete event simulation model was built to reproduce the natural history of breast cancer (BC). We estimated for lifetime follow-up the total cost of BC (screening, diagnosis and treatment), as well as quality-adjusted life years (QALY), for women invited to participate in the evaluated programme during the 15-year period in the actual screening scenario and in a hypothetical unscreened scenario. An incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was calculated with the use of aggregated costs. Besides, annual costs were considered for budget impact analysis. Both population level and single-cohort analysis were performed. A probabilistic sensitivity analysis was applied to assess the impact of parameters uncertainty. The actual screening programme involved a cost of 1,127 million euros and provided 6.7 million QALYs over the lifetime of the target population, resulting in a gain of 8,666 QALYs for an additional cost of 36.4 million euros, compared with the unscreened scenario. Thus, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was 4,214€/QALY. All the model runs in the probabilistic sensitivity analysis resulted in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio lower than 10,000€/QALY. The screening programme involved an increase of the annual budget of the Basque Health Service by 5.2 million euros from year 2000 onwards. The BC screening programme in the Basque Country proved to be cost-effective during the evaluated period and determined an affordable budget impact. These results confirm the epidemiological benefits related to the centralised screening system and support the continuation of the programme.

  10. Breast cancer risk reduction--is it feasible to initiate a randomised controlled trial of a lifestyle intervention programme (ActWell) within a national breast screening programme?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Annie S; Macleod, Maureen; Mutrie, Nanette; Sugden, Jacqueline; Dobson, Hilary; Treweek, Shaun; O'Carroll, Ronan E; Thompson, Alistair; Kirk, Alison; Brennan, Graham; Wyke, Sally

    2014-12-17

    Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer and the second cause of cancer deaths amongst women in the UK. The incidence of the disease is increasing and is highest in women from least deprived areas. It is estimated that around 42% of the disease in post-menopausal women could be prevented by increased physical activity and reductions in alcohol intake and body fatness. Breast cancer control endeavours focus on national screening programmes but these do not include communications or interventions for risk reduction. This study aimed to assess the feasibility of delivery, indicative effects and acceptability of a lifestyle intervention programme initiated within the NHS Scottish Breast Screening Programme (NHSSBSP). A 1:1 randomised controlled trial (RCT) of the 3 month ActWell programme (focussing on body weight, physical activity and alcohol) versus usual care conducted in two NHSSBSP sites between June 2013 and January 2014. Feasibility assessments included recruitment, retention, and fidelity to protocol. Indicative outcomes were measured at baseline and 3 month follow-up (body weight, waist circumference, eating and alcohol habits and physical activity). At study end, a questionnaire assessed participant satisfaction and qualitative interviews elicited women's, coaches, and radiographers' experiences. Statistical analysis used Chi squared tests for comparisons in proportions and paired t tests for comparisons of means. Linear regression analyses were performed, adjusted for baseline values, with group allocation as a fixed effect. A pre-set recruitment target of 80 women was achieved within 12 weeks and 65 (81%) participants (29 intervention, 36 control) completed 3 month assessments. Mean age was 58 ± 5.6 years, mean BMI was 29.2 ± 7.0 kg/m(2) and many (44%) reported a family history of breast cancer. The primary analysis (baseline body weight adjusted) showed a significant between group difference favouring the intervention group of 2.04 kg

  11. Performance indicators evaluation of the population-based breast cancer screening programme in Northern Portugal using the European Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bento, Maria José; Gonçalves, Guilherme; Aguiar, Ana; Castro, Clara; Veloso, Vitor; Rodrigues, Vítor

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the first 10 years of operation of the population-based breast cancer screening programme implemented in the Northern Region of Portugal, using selected recommended standard performance indicators. Data from women aged 50-69 screened with two-view mammography, biennially, in the period 2000-2009, were included. Main performance indicators were compared with the recommended levels of the European Guidelines. A total of 202,039 screening examinations were performed, 71,731 (35.5%) in the initial screening and 130,308 (64.5%) in the subsequent screening. Coverage rate by examination reached 74.3% of the target population, in the last period evaluated. Recall rates were 8.1% and 2.4% and cancer detection rates were 4.4/1000 and 2.9/1000 respectively, for initial and subsequent screenings. The breast cancer detection rate, expressed as a multiple of the background expected incidence was 3.1 in initial screen and 2.2 in subsequent screen. The incidence of invasive interval cancers met the desirable recommended levels both the first and second years since last screening examination, in the initial and subsequent screenings. Invasive tumours screenings. Less favourable size, grading and biomarkers expression were found in interval cancers compared to screen-detected cancers. Breast cancer screening programme in the Northern Region of Portugal was well accepted by the population. Most of the performance indicators were consistent with the desirable levels of the European Guidelines, which indicate an effective screening programme. Future research should verify the consistency of some of these results by using updated information from a larger population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Breast cancer mortality trends in Italy by region and screening programme, 1980-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorini, Giuseppe; Zappa, Marco; Cortini, Barbara; Martini, Andrea; Mantellini, Paola; Ventura, Leonardo; Carreras, Giulia

    2014-12-01

    To describe trends in breast cancer mortality in 14 Italian regions representing 90% of the Italian population, and in the country overall, in relation to the diffusion of organized or opportunistic breast cancer screening programmes. Settings : Breast cancer mortality figures from 1980-2008 in Italy and 14 Italian regions were retrieved from the National Statistics Institute. Estimated annual percent change (EAPC) was calculated for three time-periods (1980-1989, 1990-1999, 2000-2008). To estimate the age-adjusted and age-specific EAPC, trends in mortality based on annual data were examined using a log-linear regression model, and the year of death as a regressor variable. In the period 1980-1989 an increasing trend was observed in Italy overall (EAPC = +1.1%; 95% confidence interval [95%CI]: + 0.9%; + 1.3%) and in the 14 regions. In the second decade a decreasing trend was recorded both overall in Italy (EAPC = -1.6%; 95CI:-1.8%;-1.4%) and in all the regions. Between 2000-2008 a slightly decreasing trend was observed in Italy overall (EAPC = -0.8%; 95%CI:-1.0%;-0.5%). A steeper and earlier decrease compared with the rest of Italy was observed in 1990-1999 in Liguria (EAPC = -3.1%; 95%CI:-4.0%,-2.1%), Lombardy (EAPC = -2.3%; 95%CI:-2.8%;-1.9%), and Tuscany (EAPC = -3.0%; 95%CI:-3.7%;-2.2%), mainly due to the 55-64 age-group. There were significant EAPCs between -4.1% and -3.7% in these three regions, 2.5-3.0 times greater than in the rest of Italy (EAPC = -1.4%). This earlier decline in three Italian regions could be partially attributable to local organized screening programmes implemented earlier than in the rest of Italy, and to opportunistic screening that became more common in 1990s. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  13. Successful Repatriation of Breast Cancer Surveillance for High-Risk Women to the UK National Health Service Breast Screening Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVeigh, Terri P; Wiggins, Jennifer; Ward, Simon; Kemp, Zoe; George, Angela J

    2017-10-28

    Since April 2013, the UK's National Health Service Breast Screening Programme (NHSBSP) centers have been obliged to provide services for women at the highest risk of breast cancer, including those carrying highly penetrant single gene mutations (BRCA1, BRCA2, TP53). Since then, such individuals previously undergoing surveillance in the Royal Marsden Hospital were referred to their local NHSBSP centers. We aimed to assess patient experience of surveillance provided by local NHSBSP services at 1 and 3 years after repatriation. High-risk gene mutation carriers referred to the NHSBSP for breast cancer surveillance were identified from a departmental database in the Cancer Genetics Unit and invited to complete questionnaires about their experience of surveillance under this new pathway, first in 2014 and again in 2016. Three hundred forty-six individuals were invited to participate in 2014, of whom 182 responded (53%). A total of 464 patients were invited in 2016, of whom 246 (53%) completed the second questionnaire. Ninety-four percent of patients with residual breast tissue received some screening at the first (n = 161) and second (n = 185) time points. Ninety-one percent of patients (n = 146) received at least recommended surveillance in the year preceding the initial survey, a proportion decreasing slightly by the second time point (n = 164, 87%). Seventeen percent of individuals required additional diagnostic investigations, with cancers detected in 2%. These proportions remained stable between surveys. Repatriation of high-risk individuals from Royal Marsden Hospital to NHSBSP centers has been successfully accomplished. Most individuals received appropriate recommended annual surveillance. Further improvements are required to ensure equal and timely provision of recommended surveillance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Geographic access to mammography screening centre and participation of women in the Quebec Breast Cancer Screening Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Jacques, Sylvie; Philibert, Mathieu D; Langlois, André; Daigle, Jean-Marc; Pelletier, Eric; Major, Diane; Brisson, Jacques

    2013-10-01

    This study evaluated the impact of distance between women's residences and designated screening centres (DSC) on participation in the Quebec Breast Cancer Screening Programme, whether this impact varied according to the rural-urban classification and the proportion of participants who used the DSC nearest to their home. Travel distance between the residence of 833 856 women and the nearest DSC (n=85) was estimated. Data were obtained from administrative and screening programme databases. The analysis made use of a log-binomial regression model adjusting for age and material and social deprivation. The proportions of participants who used the DSC nearest to their residence were measured. Compared to women living <2.5 km from a DSC, absolute decreases of 6.3% and 9.8% in participation rate were observed for distances of 50.0 to <75.0 km (rate ratios (RR)=0.88, 95% CI 0.86 to 0.89) and ≥75.0 km (RR=0.81, 95% CI 0.79 to 0.83), respectively. The lowest participation (42%) was observed in Montreal Island. The distance at which participation started to decrease materially varied according to rural-urban classification. Participation rates decreased at distances of ≥25.0 km in the Montreal suburbs and midsize cities, at ≥12.5 km in small cities and at ≥50.0 km in rural areas (interaction p<0.0001). The proportion of participants who had their mammography at the nearest DSC decreased with increasing distance. Distance affects participation and this effect varies according to rural-urban classification. The lower participation in Montreal Island, where all women lived <12.5 km from a DSC, argues for a major impact of other characteristics or other dimensions of accessibility.

  15. Reduction in interval cancer rates following the introduction of two-view mammography in the UK breast screening programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibden, A; Offman, J; Parmar, D; Jenkins, J; Slater, J; Binysh, K; McSorley, J; Scorfield, S; Cumming, P; Liao, X-H; Ryan, M; Harker, D; Stevens, G; Rogers, N; Blanks, R; Sellars, S; Patnick, J; Duffy, S W

    2014-02-04

    The introduction of two-view mammography at incident (subsequent) screens in the National Health Service Breast Screening Programme (NHSBSP) has led to an increased number of cancers detected at screen. However, the effect of two-view mammography on interval cancer rates has yet to be assessed. Routine screening and interval cancer data were collated from all screening programmes in the United Kingdom for women aged 50-64, screened between 1 April 2003 and 31 March 2005. Interval cancer rates were compared based on whether two-view mammography was in use at the last routine screen. The reduction in interval cancers following screening using two-view mammography compared with one view was 0.68 per 1,000 women screened. Overall, this suggests the introduction of two-view mammography at incident screen was accompanied by a 15-20% reduction in interval cancer rates in the NHSBSP. The introduction of two-view mammography at incident screens is associated with a reduction in incidence of interval cancers. This is consistent with previous publications on a contemporaneous increase in screen-detected cancers. The results provide further evidence of the benefit of the use of two-view mammography at incident screens.

  16. Breast cancer screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammogram - breast cancer screening; Breast exam - breast cancer screening; MRI - breast cancer screening ... is performed to screen women to detect early breast cancer when it is more likely to be cured. ...

  17. Breast Cancer Screening Programmes across the WHO European Region: Differences among Countries Based on National Income Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altobelli, Emma; Rapacchietta, Leonardo; Angeletti, Paolo Matteo; Barbante, Luca; Profeta, Filippo Valerio; Fagnano, Roberto

    2017-04-23

    Breast cancer (BC) is the most frequent tumour affecting women all over the world. In low- and middle-income countries, where its incidence is expected to rise further, BC seems set to become a public health emergency. The aim of the present study is to provide a systematic review of current BC screening programmes in WHO European Region to identify possible patterns. Multiple correspondence analysis was performed to evaluate the association among: measures of occurrence; GNI level; type of BC screening programme; organization of public information and awareness campaigns regarding primary prevention of modifiable risk factors; type of BC screening services; year of screening institution; screening coverage and data quality. A key difference between High Income (HI) and Low and Middle Income (LMI) States, emerging from the present data, is that in the former screening programmes are well organized, with approved screening centres, the presence of mobile units to increase coverage, the offer of screening tests free of charge; the fairly high quality of occurrence data based on high-quality sources, and the adoption of accurate methods to estimate incidence and mortality. In conclusion, the governments of LMI countries should allocate sufficient resources to increase screening participation and they should improve the accuracy of incidence and mortality rates.

  18. Breast Cancer Screening Programmes across the WHO European Region: Differences among Countries Based on National Income Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Altobelli

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer (BC is the most frequent tumour affecting women all over the world. In low- and middle-income countries, where its incidence is expected to rise further, BC seems set to become a public health emergency. The aim of the present study is to provide a systematic review of current BC screening programmes in WHO European Region to identify possible patterns. Multiple correspondence analysis was performed to evaluate the association among: measures of occurrence; GNI level; type of BC screening programme; organization of public information and awareness campaigns regarding primary prevention of modifiable risk factors; type of BC screening services; year of screening institution; screening coverage and data quality. A key difference between High Income (HI and Low and Middle Income (LMI States, emerging from the present data, is that in the former screening programmes are well organized, with approved screening centres, the presence of mobile units to increase coverage, the offer of screening tests free of charge; the fairly high quality of occurrence data based on high-quality sources, and the adoption of accurate methods to estimate incidence and mortality. In conclusion, the governments of LMI countries should allocate sufficient resources to increase screening participation and they should improve the accuracy of incidence and mortality rates.

  19. Optimal screening mammography reading volumes; evidence from real life in the East Midlands region of the NHS Breast Screening Programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornford, E., E-mail: eleanor.cornford@nuh.nhs.u [Nottingham Breast Institute, Nottingham University Hospitals, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Reed, J.; Murphy, A. [East Midlands QA Reference centre, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Bennett, R. [Cancer Screening Evaluation Unit, Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton (United Kingdom); Evans, A. [Centre for Oncology and Molecular Medicine, University of Dundee (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-15

    Aim: To assess real-life reader performance as a function of both volume of mammograms read and reading experience in a multicentre cohort. Materials and methods: Thirty-seven film readers from the East Midlands Breast Screening Programme had 3 years of consecutive screen reading results available for comparison. Markers of screening performance as the first film reader [cancer detection rates, small cancer detection rates, recall rates, positive predictive value of recall (PPV), and missed cancers] were compared with both volume of films read and years of film reading experience. For reading volume, readers were categorized according to film reading volume over the 3 year period: <15,000 (i.e., on average less than the recommended 5000/year); 15-<20,000; 20-<25,000; and {>=}25,000. For years of experience, readers were categorized into the following groups: <5 years, 5-<10 years, 10-<15 years, and 15-<20 years. Results: There was no evidence to suggest a relationship between years of film reading experience and film-reading performance. For reading volume, there was a significant difference in the distribution of cancer-detection rate between the four groups (p = 0.01); however, there was no difference in small cancer-detection rates, missed cancers or PPV. The median cancer detection rate in the high-volume group ({>=}25,000 mammograms/3 years) was significantly lower than the other groups combined (6.9 per 1000 women screened versus 7.9 per 1000 women screened). The lowest median recall rate was also in the high-volume group, whilst those readers not meeting the NHSBSP minimum requirement had the highest median recall rate; however, there was borderline evidence to suggest a difference in the distribution of recall rates between the four groups. Conclusion: The data from the East Midlands do not provide any evidence for reducing the threshold volume of 5000 cases /year. However, there appears to be an upper limit above which reader performance deteriorates in

  20. Cost effectiveness of shortening screening interval or extending age range of NHS breast screening programme: computer simulation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Boer (Rob); A. Threlfall; P. Warmerdam (Peter); A. Street (Andrew); E. Friedman (Eitan); C. Woodman; H.J. de Koning (Harry)

    1998-01-01

    markdownabstract__OBJECTIVE__: To compare the cost effectiveness of two possible modifications to the current UK screening programme: shortening the screening interval from three to two years and extending the age of invitation to a final screen from 64 to 69.

  1. Double versus single reading of mammograms in a breast cancer screening programme: a cost-consequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posso, Margarita C; Puig, Teresa; Quintana, Ma Jesus; Solà-Roca, Judit; Bonfill, Xavier

    2016-09-01

    To assess the costs and health-related outcomes of double versus single reading of digital mammograms in a breast cancer screening programme. Based on data from 57,157 digital screening mammograms from women aged 50-69 years, we compared costs, false-positive results, positive predictive value and cancer detection rate using four reading strategies: double reading with and without consensus and arbitration, and single reading with first reader only and second reader only. Four highly trained radiologists read the mammograms. Double reading with consensus and arbitration was 15 % (Euro 334,341) more expensive than single reading with first reader only. False-positive results were more frequent at double reading with consensus and arbitration than at single reading with first reader only (4.5 % and 4.2 %, respectively; p screens; p = 0.283). Our results suggest that changing to single reading of mammograms could produce savings in breast cancer screening. Single reading could reduce the frequency of false-positive results without changing the cancer detection rate. These results are not conclusive and cannot be generalized to other contexts with less trained radiologists. • Double reading of digital mammograms is more expensive than single reading. • Compared to single reading, double reading yields a higher proportion of false-positive results. • The cancer detection rate was similar for double and single readings. • Single reading may be a cost-effective strategy in breast cancer screening programmes.

  2. Breast cancer risk in young women in the national breast screening programme: implications for applying NICE guidelines for additional screening and chemoprevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, D Gareth; Brentnall, Adam R; Harvie, Michelle; Dawe, Sarah; Sergeant, Jamie C; Stavrinos, Paula; Astley, Susan; Wilson, Mary; Ainsworth, John; Cuzick, Jack; Buchan, Iain; Donnelly, Louise S; Howell, Anthony

    2014-10-01

    In the United Kingdom, women at moderate and high risk of breast cancer between the ages of 40 and 49 years are eligible for annual mammographic screening and preventive therapy with tamoxifen. Here, we estimate the numbers of women in a population eligible for this service and the proportion of breast cancers detected in this group compared with the whole population. Women screening in the National Health Service Breast Screening Programme (NHSBSP) completed a risk questionnaire. The proportion at moderate and high risk according to National Institute of Health Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines was estimated. An estimate was also made using a different model of risk estimation (Tyrer-Cuzick). The numbers of cancers detected in the moderate/high risk groups were compared with numbers detected in the whole population. Completed questionnaires were available for 4,360 women between ages 46 and 49 years. Thirty women [0.7%; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.5-1.0%] were at high risk and 130 (3.0%, 2.5-3.5%) were at moderate risk according to NICE guidelines. Thirty-seven cancers were detected by mammography in the whole group. Five of these were found in the moderate-/high-risk group giving a 3.2-fold increase in detection compared with the standard risk group. More women were assigned to the moderate- or high-risk group using the Tyrer-Cuzick model (N = 384), but the numbers of cancers in this group were not appreciably increased (N = 8). Systematic assessment of family history in primary care or through population-based screening will identify appreciable numbers of women in their forties, eligible for additional surveillance and chemoprevention. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  3. Studies of benefit and risk resulting from the UK Breast Screening Programme

    CERN Document Server

    Beckett, J

    2000-01-01

    13% over the age range 35-79 years. This error range can be reduced to 1% when compressed breast thickness and age are used to estimate breast glandularity. At low breast thickness, little difference is found between composition dependent MGD-per-film estimates for women with augmented breasts and their non augmented counterparts. At high breast thickness however, the MGD's per film received by women with breast prostheses are considerably lower. In general, the BRR relating to the NHSBSP is favourable, even for subgroups of women who are thought to be at high risk or to obtain low benefit from the examination. The overall breast cancer mortality reduction for the NHSBSP at steady state was found to be in agreement with the Health of the Nation target of 25% in the age range 55-69 years. The use of mammography as a screening modality must be justified by comparison of the benefits and risks associated with the technique. The benefit risk ratio (BRR) associated with the National Health Service Breast Screening...

  4. Proportional incidence and radiological review of large (T2+) breast cancers as surrogate indicators of screening programme performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciatto, S.; Bernardi, D.; Pellegrini, M.; Borsato, G.; Peterlongo, P. [APSS, U.O. Senologia Clinica e Screening Mammografico, Dipartimento di Radiodiagnostica, Trento (Italy); Gentilini, M.A. [APSS, Servizio Osservatorio Epidemiologico, Direzione promozione ed educazione alla salute, Trento (Italy); Caumo, F. [Centro di Prevenzione Senologica, Verona (Italy); Frigerio, A. [CRR, Centro di Riferimento Regionale per lo Screening Mammografico, Torino (Italy); Houssami, N. [University of Sydney, Screening and Test Evaluation Program, School of Public Health, Sydney Medical School, Sydney (Australia)

    2012-06-15

    Surrogate measures of screening performance [e.g. interval cancer (IC) proportional incidence] allow timely monitoring of sensitivity and quality. This study explored measures using large (T2+) breast cancers as potential indicators of screening performance. The proportional incidence of T2+ cancers (observed/expected cases) in a population-based screening programme (Trento, 2001-2009) was estimated. A parallel review of 'negative' preceding mammograms for screen-detected T2+ and for all ICs, using 'blinded' independent readings and case-mixes (54 T2+, 50 ICs, 170 controls) was also performed. T2+ cancers were observed in 168 screening participants: 48 at first screen, 67 at repeat screening and 53 ICs. The T2+ estimated proportional incidence was 68% (observed/expected = 168/247), corresponding to an estimated 32% reduction in the rate of T2+ cancers in screening participants relative to that expected without screening. Majority review classified 27.8% (15/54) of T2+ and 28% (14/50) of ICs as screening error (P = 0.84), with variable recall rates amongst radiologists (8.8-15.2%). T2+ review could be integrated as part of quality monitoring and potentially prove more feasible than IC review for some screening services. circle Interval breast cancers, assumed as screening failures, are monitored to estimate screening performance circle Large (T2+) cancers at screening may also represent failed prior screening detection circle Analysis of T2+ lesions may be more feasible than assessing interval cancers circle Analysis of T2+ cancers is a potential further measure of screening performance. (orig.)

  5. Impact of intermediate mammography assessment on the likelihood of false-positive results in breast cancer screening programmes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ascunce, Nieves [Public Health Institute, CIBERESP, Navarra Breast Cancer Screening Programme, Pamplona (Spain); Instituto de Salud Publica, Navarra Breast Cancer Screening Programme, Pamplona (Spain); Ederra, Maria; Delfrade, Josu; Erdozain, Nieves [Public Health Institute, CIBERESP, Navarra Breast Cancer Screening Programme, Pamplona (Spain); Baroja, Araceli [Fundacion Rioja Salud, Logrono (Spain); Zubizarreta, Raquel [Public Health and Planning Directorate, Health Office, Galician Breast Cancer Screening Programme, Galicia (Spain); Salas, Dolores [General Directorate Public Health and Centre for Public Health Research (CSISP), Valencia (Spain); Castells, Xavier [Mar Teaching Hospital, CIBERESP, Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Barcelona (Spain)

    2012-02-15

    Breast cancer screening is offered to 100% of the target population in Spain and intermediate mammograms (IMs) are sometimes indicated. This study was aimed at analysing the frequency of IMs, the factors determining their recommendation, and their impact on the risk of false-positive results and the detection rate. Data from 3,471,307 mammograms from Spanish breast cancer screening programmes were included. 3.36% of the mammograms were IMs. The factors associated with the use of IMs were age, initial screening, previous invasive tests, a familial history of breast cancer and use of hormone replacement therapy. In screening episodes with an IM, the probability of a false-positive result was 13.74% (95% CI: 13.43-14.05), almost double that in episodes without IMs (6.02%, 95% CI 5.99-6.05). In young women with previous invasive procedures, a familial history of breast cancer or hormone replacement therapy use who were undergoing their initial screen, this probability was lower when IMs were performed. IMs always increased the detection rate. The factors prompting IMs should be characterised so that radiologists can systematise their recommendations according to the presence of the factors maximising the benefits and minimising the adverse effects of this procedure. (orig.)

  6. Improvement in risk prediction, early detection and prevention of breast cancer in the NHS Breast Screening Programme and family history clinics::a dual cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, Dafydd; Astley, Susan; Stavrinos, Paula; Harkness, Elaine; Donnelly, Louise S; Dawe, Sarah; Jacob, Ian; Harvie, Michelle; Cuzick, Jack; Brentnall, Adam R.; Wilson, Mary; Harrison, Fiona; Payne, Katherine; Howell, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Background: In the UK, women are invited for 3-yearly mammography screening, through the NHS Breast Screening Programme (NHSBSP), from the ages of 47–50 years to the ages of 69–73 years. Women with family histories of breast cancer can, from the age of 40 years, obtain enhanced surveillance and, in exceptionally high-risk cases, magnetic resonance imaging. However, no NHSBSP risk assessment is undertaken. Risk prediction models are able to categorise women by risk using known risk factors, al...

  7. Two-view versus single-view mammography at subsequent screening in a region of the Dutch breast screening programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smallenburg, Vivian van Breest, E-mail: vivianvbreestsm@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Catharina Hospital, PO Box 1350, 5602 ZA Eindhoven (Netherlands); Duijm, Lucien E.M., E-mail: lemduijm@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Catharina Hospital, PO Box 1350, 5602 ZA Eindhoven (Netherlands); Heeten, Gerard J. den, E-mail: g.denheeten@lrcb.nl [National Expert and Training Centre for Breast Cancer Screening, PO Box 6873, 6503 GJ Nijmegen (Netherlands); Groenewoud, Johanna H., E-mail: j.h.groenewoud@hro.nl [Expertise Centre Transitions of Care, Rotterdam University of Applied Sciences, PO Box 25035, 3001 HA Rotterdam (Netherlands); Jansen, Frits H., E-mail: frits.jansen@cze.nl [Department of Radiology, Catharina Hospital, PO Box 1350, 5602 ZA Eindhoven (Netherlands); Fracheboud, Jacques, E-mail: j.fracheboud@erasmusmc.nl [National Evaluation Team for Breast Cancer Screening, Erasmus University Rotterdam, PO Box 1738, 3000 DR Rotterdam (Netherlands); Plaisier, Menno L., E-mail: m.plaisier@planet.nl [Department of Radiology, Maxima Medical Centre, PO Box 7777, 5500 MB Veldhoven (Netherlands); Doorne-Nagtegaal, Heidi J. van, E-mail: h.vandoorne@ikca.nl [Comprehensive Cancer Centre Amsterdam (CCCA), PO Box 9236, Amsterdam 1006 AE (Netherlands); Broeders, Mireille J.M., E-mail: M.Broeders@ebhumcn.nl [National Expert and Training Centre for Breast Cancer Screening, PO Box 6873, 6503 GJ Nijmegen (Netherlands); Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and HTA, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, PO Box 9101, 6500 HB Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2012-09-15

    We retrospectively determined the effect of analogue two-view mammography versus single-view mammography at subsequent screens on breast cancer detection and determined financial consequences for a current digital mammography setting. Two screening radiologists reviewed the mammograms of 536 screen detected cancers (SDCs) and 171 interval cancers (ICs) with single-view mammography (medio-lateral-oblique view) at the last but one screen (SDCs) or latest screen (ICs). They determined whether two-view mammography at the last (but one) screen could have increased the cancer detection rate at that screening round. For subsequent screens, the radiologists also assessed the percentage of SDCs and ICs that had been missed at previous two-view screening mammography (SDC) or latest two-view screening (IC), respectively. Additional personnel and digital storage costs for standard two-view mammography at subsequent screening were calculated for digital screening. Two-view mammography could have facilitated earlier cancer detection in 40.9% (219/536) of SDCs and 39.8% (68/171) of ICs. For two-view screens, 24.4% of SDCs (213/871) were missed at previous two-view screening and 29.3% of ICs (110/375) were missed at the latest screen. Overall costs increase € 1.03/screen after implementation of digital two-view mammography. Standard two-view mammography at subsequent screening may modestly increase cancer detection at an earlier stage, whereas additional screening costs are limited.

  8. Impact of intermediate mammography assessment on the likelihood of false-positive results in breast cancer screening programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascunce, Nieves; Ederra, María; Delfrade, Josu; Baroja, Araceli; Erdozain, Nieves; Zubizarreta, Raquel; Salas, Dolores; Castells, Xavier

    2012-02-01

    Breast cancer screening is offered to 100% of the target population in Spain and intermediate mammograms (IMs) are sometimes indicated. This study was aimed at analysing the frequency of IMs, the factors determining their recommendation, and their impact on the risk of false-positive results and the detection rate. Data from 3,471,307 mammograms from Spanish breast cancer screening programmes were included. 3.36% of the mammograms were IMs. The factors associated with the use of IMs were age, initial screening, previous invasive tests, a familial history of breast cancer and use of hormone replacement therapy. In screening episodes with an IM, the probability of a false-positive result was 13.74% (95% CI: 13.43-14.05), almost double that in episodes without IMs (6.02%, 95% CI 5.99-6.05). In young women with previous invasive procedures, a familial history of breast cancer or hormone replacement therapy use who were undergoing their initial screen, this probability was lower when IMs were performed. IMs always increased the detection rate. The factors prompting IMs should be characterised so that radiologists can systematise their recommendations according to the presence of the factors maximising the benefits and minimising the adverse effects of this procedure. Intermediate mammograms in breast screening offer potential benefits but also disadvantages. Intermediate mammograms increase the false-positive rate except in specific groups. Intermediate mammograms reduce the false-positive rate in younger women and initial screens. Intermediate mammograms also reduce false-positive results in women with personal risk factors. Intermediate mammograms increase cancer detection mainly in women without risk factors.

  9. Presence, characteristics and equity of access to breast cancer screening programmes in 27 European countries in 2010 and 2014. Results from an international survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deandrea, S; Molina-Barceló, A; Uluturk, A

    2016-01-01

    The European Union Council Recommendation of 2 December 2003 on cancer screening suggests the implementation of organised, population-based breast cancer screening programmes based on mammography every other year for women aged 50 to 69years, ensuring equal access to screening, taking into accoun...

  10. Impact of risk factors on different interval cancer subtypes in a population-based breast cancer screening programme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Blanch

    interval cancer subtypes. This information could be useful to improve effectiveness of breast cancer screening programmes and to better classify subgroups of women with different risks of developing cancer.

  11. Impact of risk factors on different interval cancer subtypes in a population-based breast cancer screening programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanch, Jordi; Sala, Maria; Ibáñez, Josefa; Domingo, Laia; Fernandez, Belén; Otegi, Arantza; Barata, Teresa; Zubizarreta, Raquel; Ferrer, Joana; Castells, Xavier; Rué, Montserrat; Salas, Dolores

    2014-01-01

    useful to improve effectiveness of breast cancer screening programmes and to better classify subgroups of women with different risks of developing cancer.

  12. The Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) in the Dutch breast cancer screening programme: its role as an assessment and stratification tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timmers, J.M.H.; Verbeek, A.L.M.; Broeders, M.J.M. [National Expert and Training Centre for Breast Cancer Screening, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and HTA, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Doorne-Nagtegaal, H.J. van; Tinteren, H. van; Visser, O. [Comprehensive Cancer Centre The Netherlands (IKNL), location Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Zonderland, H.M. [Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Heeten, G.J. den [National Expert and Training Centre for Breast Cancer Screening, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-08-15

    To assess the suitability of the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) as a quality assessment tool in the Dutch breast cancer screening programme. The data of 93,793 screened women in the Amsterdam screening region (November 2005-July 2006) were reviewed. BI-RADS categories, work-up, age, final diagnosis and final TNM classification were available from the screening registry. Interval cancers were obtained through linkage with the cancer registry. BI-RADS was introduced as a pilot in the Amsterdam region before the nationwide introduction of digital mammography (2009-2010). A total of 1,559 women were referred to hospital (referral rate 1.7 %). Breast cancer was diagnosed in 485 women (detection rate 0.52 %); 253 interval cancers were reported, yielding a programme sensitivity of 66 % and specificity of 99 %. BI-RADS 0 had a lower positive predictive value (PPV, 14.1 %) than BI-RADS 4 (39.1 %) and BI-RADS 5 (92.9 %; P < 0.0001). The number of invasive procedures and tumour size also differed significantly between BI-RADS categories (P < 0.0001). The significant differences in PPV, invasive procedures and tumour size match with stratification into BI-RADS categories. It revealed inter-observer variability between screening radiologists and can thus be used as a quality assessment tool in screening and as a stratification tool in diagnostic work-up. (orig.)

  13. Inequalities in breast cancer stage at diagnosis in the Trent region, and implications for the NHS Breast Screening Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuthbertson, Sarah A; Goyder, Elizabeth C; Poole, Jason

    2009-09-01

    This study investigates risk factors for diagnosis with late-stage breast cancer in order to identify inequalities and inform the understanding of barriers affecting access to mammography screening. Data from the Trent Cancer Registry were used to identify all women with invasive breast cancer, diagnosed in 1998-2006. Risk of diagnosis with late-stage breast cancer was calculated to quantify strength of association between exposure and outcome. Women outside the age group for routine screening were approximately 30% [70 years, RR = 1.27 (95% CI: 1.19-1.36)] more likely to be diagnosed with late-stage breast cancer; the most deprived women were 37% [RR = 1.37 (95% CI: 1.01-2.56)] more likely to be diagnosed with Stage IV breast cancer; ethnic minority women were 15% [RR = 1.15 (95% CI: 1.09-1.22)] more likely to be diagnosed with late-stage breast cancer and women resident in 5 of 11 Trent Primary Care Trusts (PCT) had a greater than 30% increased risk of diagnosis with late-stage breast cancer than those in Nottingham City PCT. These findings highlight the need for appropriate targeted interventions to address compositional and contextual inequalities that are evident in breast cancer stage at diagnosis.

  14. Health professionals' agreement on density judgements and successful abnormality identification within the UK Breast Screening Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darker, Iain T.; Chen, Yan; Gale, Alastair G.

    2011-03-01

    Higher breast density is associated with a greater chance of developing breast cancer. Additionally, it is well known that higher mammographic breast density is associated with increased difficulty in accurately identifying breast cancer. However, comparatively little is known of the reliability of breast density judgements. All UK breast screeners (primarily radiologists and technologists) annually participate in the PERFORMS self-assessment scheme where they make several judgements about series of challenging recent screening cases of known outcomes. As part of this process, for each case, they provide a radiological assessment of the likelihood of cancer on a confidence scale, alongside an assessment of case density using a three point scale. Analysis of the data from two years of the scheme found that the degree of agreement on case density was significantly greater than no agreement (p < .001). However, only a moderate degree of inter-rater reliability was exhibited (κ = .44) with significant differences between the occupational groups. The reasons for differences between the occupational groups and the relationship between agreement on density rating and case reading ability are explored.

  15. Cost-Effectiveness of Double Reading versus Single Reading of Mammograms in a Breast Cancer Screening Programme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Posso

    Full Text Available The usual practice in breast cancer screening programmes for mammogram interpretation is to perform double reading. However, little is known about its cost-effectiveness in the context of digital mammography. Our purpose was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of double reading versus single reading of digital mammograms in a population-based breast cancer screening programme.Data from 28,636 screened women was used to establish a decision-tree model and to compare three strategies: 1 double reading; 2 double reading for women in their first participation and single reading for women in their subsequent participations; and 3 single reading. We calculated the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER, which was defined as the expected cost per one additionally detected cancer. We performed a deterministic sensitivity analysis to test the robustness of the ICER.The detection rate of double reading (5.17‰ was similar to that of single reading (4.78‰; P = .768. The mean cost of each detected cancer was €8,912 for double reading and €8,287 for single reading. The ICER of double reading versus single reading was €16,684. The sensitivity analysis showed variations in the ICER according to the sensitivity of reading strategies. The strategy that combines double reading in first participation with single reading in subsequent participations was ruled out due to extended dominance.From our results, double reading appears not to be a cost-effective strategy in the context of digital mammography. Double reading would eventually be challenged in screening programmes, as single reading might entail important net savings without significantly changing the cancer detection rate. These results are not conclusive and should be confirmed in prospective studies that investigate long-term outcomes like quality adjusted life years (QALYs.

  16. Women's preferences for the delivery of the National Health Service Breast Screening Programme: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linsell, Louise; Forbes, Lindsay J L; Patnick, Julietta; Wardle, Jane; Austoker, Joan; Ramirez, Amanda J

    2010-01-01

    To elicit women's preferences for delivery of the National Health Service (NHS) Breast Screening Programme. Interview survey. Private households in the UK. Five hundred and ninety-seven women aged 45-75 interviewed as part of the National Statistics Omnibus Survey, December 2008 and January 2009. Preferred setting (hospital or community) and preferred type of screening unit (mobile or permanent). Rated importance of distance, time, convenience and cost of travelling to a screening unit. Forty per cent of women did not mind whether the screening unit was based in a community or hospital setting, and 52% did not mind whether the unit was permanent or mobile. Among those who expressed a preference, 59% preferred a hospital to a community setting, and 62% preferred a permanent to a mobile unit. Many women (63%) said distance to a breast screening unit was an important factor, as was time to travel (58%). Among those with access to a car, 80% regarded the availability of parking as important, but only 40% regarded the cost of car travel as important. Among women with no access to a car, there was a similar pattern for ease of public transport (76%) and cost of public transport (48%). Many women were unconcerned about the type and setting of breast screening units. Among those who were concerned, most preferred hospital over community settings and permanent over mobile units, but nonetheless most women said time and distance were important. Well-situated units with advanced publicity about public transport links and parking facilities may encourage greater uptake.

  17. Risks of Breast Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? ... cancer screening: Cancer Screening Overview General Information About Breast Cancer Key Points Breast cancer is a disease ...

  18. Presence, characteristics and equity of access to breast cancer screening programmes in 27 European countries in 2010 and 2014. Results from an international survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deandrea, S; Molina-Barceló, A; Uluturk, A; Moreno, J; Neamtiu, L; Peiró-Pérez, R; Saz-Parkinson, Z; Lopez-Alcalde, J; Lerda, D; Salas, D

    2016-10-01

    The European Union Council Recommendation of 2 December 2003 on cancer screening suggests the implementation of organised, population-based breast cancer screening programmes based on mammography every other year for women aged 50 to 69years, ensuring equal access to screening, taking into account potential needs for targeting particular socioeconomic groups. A European survey on coverage and participation, and key organisational and policy characteristics of the programmes, targeting years 2010 and 2014, was undertaken in 2014. Overall, 27 countries contributed to this survey, 26 of the 28 European Union member states (92.9%) plus Norway. In 2014, 25 countries reported an ongoing population-based programme, one country reported a pilot programme and another was planning a pilot. In eight countries, the target age range was broader than that proposed by the Council Recommendation, and in three countries the full range was not covered. Fifteen countries reported not reaching some vulnerable populations, such as immigrants, prisoners and people without health insurance, while 22 reported that participation was periodically monitored by socioeconomic variables (e.g. age and territory). Organised, population-based breast cancer screening programmes based on routine mammograms are in place in most EU member states. However, there are still differences in the way screening programmes are implemented, and participation by vulnerable populations should be encouraged. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Dutch digital breast cancer screening: implications for breast cancer care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, Johanna M.; den Heeten, Gerard J.; Adang, Eddy M.; Otten, Johannes D.; Verbeek, André L.; Broeders, Mireille J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: In comparison to other European population-based breast cancer screening programmes, the Dutch programme has a low referral rate, similar breast cancer detection and a high breast cancer mortality reduction. The referral rate in the Netherlands has increased over time and is expected to

  20. Breast cancer screening in the Czech Republic: time trends in performance indicators during the first seven years of the organised programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brabec Petr

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Czech Breast Cancer Screening Programme (CBCSP was initiated in September 2002 by establishing a network of accredited centres. The aim of this article is to describe progress in the programme quality over time after the inception of the organised programme. Methods The CBCSP is monitored using an information system consisting of three principal components: 1 the national cancer registry, 2 a screening registry collecting data on all screening examinations, further assessments and final diagnoses at accredited programme centres, and 3 administrative databases of healthcare payers. Key performance indicators from the European Guidelines have been adopted for continuous monitoring. Results Breast cancer incidence in the Czech Republic has steadily been increasing, however with a growing proportion of less advanced stages. The mortality rate has recently stabilised. The screening registry includes 2,083,285 records on screening episodes between 2002 and 2008. In 2007-2008, 51% of eligible women aged 45-69 were screened. In 2008, the detection rates were 6.1 and 3.7 per 1,000 women in initial and subsequent screening respectively. Corresponding recall rates are 3.9% and 2.2%, however, it is necessary to pay attention to further assessment performed during the screening visits. Benign to malignant open biopsy ratio was 0.1. Of invasive cases detected in screening, 35.6% was less than 10 mm in diameter. Values of early performance indicators, as measured by both crude and standardized estimates, are generally improving and fulfil desirable targets set by European Guidelines. Conclusions Mammography screening in the Czech Republic underwent successful transformation from opportunistic prevention to an organised programme. Values of early indicators confirm continuous improvement in different aspects of process quality. Further stimulation of participation through invitation system is necessary to exploit the full potential of

  1. Breast cancer screening in the Czech Republic: time trends in performance indicators during the first seven years of the organised programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majek, Ondrej; Danes, Jan; Skovajsova, Miroslava; Bartonkova, Helena; Buresova, Lucie; Klimes, Daniel; Brabec, Petr; Kozeny, Pavel; Dusek, Ladislav

    2011-05-10

    The Czech Breast Cancer Screening Programme (CBCSP) was initiated in September 2002 by establishing a network of accredited centres. The aim of this article is to describe progress in the programme quality over time after the inception of the organised programme. The CBCSP is monitored using an information system consisting of three principal components: 1) the national cancer registry, 2) a screening registry collecting data on all screening examinations, further assessments and final diagnoses at accredited programme centres, and 3) administrative databases of healthcare payers. Key performance indicators from the European Guidelines have been adopted for continuous monitoring. Breast cancer incidence in the Czech Republic has steadily been increasing, however with a growing proportion of less advanced stages. The mortality rate has recently stabilised. The screening registry includes 2,083,285 records on screening episodes between 2002 and 2008. In 2007-2008, 51% of eligible women aged 45-69 were screened. In 2008, the detection rates were 6.1 and 3.7 per 1,000 women in initial and subsequent screening respectively. Corresponding recall rates are 3.9% and 2.2%, however, it is necessary to pay attention to further assessment performed during the screening visits. Benign to malignant open biopsy ratio was 0.1. Of invasive cases detected in screening, 35.6% was less than 10 mm in diameter. Values of early performance indicators, as measured by both crude and standardized estimates, are generally improving and fulfil desirable targets set by European Guidelines. Mammography screening in the Czech Republic underwent successful transformation from opportunistic prevention to an organised programme. Values of early indicators confirm continuous improvement in different aspects of process quality. Further stimulation of participation through invitation system is necessary to exploit the full potential of screening mammography at the population level.

  2. Screening for Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niell, Bethany L; Freer, Phoebe E; Weinfurtner, Robert Jared; Arleo, Elizabeth Kagan; Drukteinis, Jennifer S

    2017-11-01

    The goal of screening is to detect breast cancers when still curable to decrease breast cancer-specific mortality. Breast cancer screening in the United States is routinely performed with mammography, supplemental digital breast tomosynthesis, ultrasound, and/or MR imaging. This article aims to review the most commonly used breast imaging modalities for screening, discuss how often and when to begin screening with specific imaging modalities, and examine the pros and cons of screening. By the article's end, the reader will be better equipped to have informed discussions with patients and medical professionals regarding the benefits and disadvantages of breast cancer screening. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Absence of socioeconomic inequalities in access to good-quality breast cancer treatment within a population-wide screening programme in Turin (Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zengarini, Nicolás; Ponti, Antonio; Tomatis, Mariano; Casella, Denise; Giordano, Livia; Mano, Maria P; Segnan, Nereo; Whitehead, Margaret; Costa, Giuseppe; Spadea, Teresa

    2016-11-01

    Several studies suggest that population-based breast cancer screening programmes might help reduce social inequalities in breast cancer survival both by increasing early diagnosis and by improving access to effective treatments. To start disentangling the two effects, we evaluated social inequalities in quality of treatment of screen-detected breast cancer in the city of Turin (Italy). Combining data from the Audit System on Quality of Breast Cancer Treatment and the Turin Longitudinal Study, we analysed 2700 cases in the screening target age class 50-69 diagnosed in the period 1995-2008. We selected 10 indicators of the pathway of care, relative to timeliness and appropriateness of diagnosis and treatment, and three indicators of socioeconomic position: education, occupational status and housing characteristics. For each indicator of care, relative risks of failure were estimated by robust Poisson regression models, controlling for calendar period of diagnosis, size of tumour and activity volume of the surgery units. The principal predictor of failure of the good care indicators was the calendar period of diagnosis, with a general improvement with time in the quality of diagnosis and treatment, followed by size of the tumour and volume of activity. Socioeconomic indicators show only a marginal independent effect on timeliness indicators. The observed associations of quality indicators with socioeconomic characteristics are lower than expected, suggesting a possible role of the screening programme in reducing disparities in the access to good-quality treatments thanks to its capability to enter screen-detected women into a protected pathway of care.

  4. Differences in radiological patterns, tumour characteristics and diagnostic precision between digital mammography and screen-film mammography in four breast cancer screening programmes in Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domingo, Laia; Sala, Maria [IMIM-Hospital del Mar, Department of Epidemiology and Evaluation, Barcelona (Spain); CIBER de Epidemiologia y Salud Publica (CIBERESP), Barcelona (Spain); Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (UAB), EHEA Doctoral Program in Public Health. Department of Pediatrics, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Barcelona (Spain); Romero, Anabel; Belvis, Francesc; Macia, Francesc; Castells, Xavier [IMIM-Hospital del Mar, Department of Epidemiology and Evaluation, Barcelona (Spain); CIBER de Epidemiologia y Salud Publica (CIBERESP), Barcelona (Spain); Sanchez, Mar [Government of Cantabria, General Directorate of Public Health, Department of Health, Santander (Spain); Ferrer, Joana [Radiology Unit. Hospital Santa Caterina, Girona (Spain); Salas, Dolores; Ibanez, Josefa [General Directorate Public Health and Centre for Public Health Research (CSISP), Valencia (Spain); Vega, Alfonso [Hospital Universitario Marques de Valdecilla, Radiology Unit, Santander (Spain); Ferrer, Francesc [Hospital del Mar, Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Service, Barcelona (Spain); Laso, M.S. [Breast Cancer Screening Unit Burjassot, Valencia (Spain)

    2011-09-15

    To compare tumour characteristics between cancers detected with screen-film mammography (SFM) and digital mammography (DM) and to evaluate changes in positive predictive values (PPVs) for further assessments, for invasive procedures and for distinct radiological patterns in recalled women. 242,838 screening mammograms (171,191 SFM and 71,647 DM) from 103,613 women aged 45-69 years, performed in four population-based breast cancer screening programmes in Spain, were included. The tumour characteristics and PPVs of each group were compared. Radiological patterns (masses, calcifications, distortions and asymmetries) among recalled women were described and PPVs were evaluated. The percentages of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) were higher in DM than in SFM both in the first [18.5% vs. 15.8%(p = 0.580)] and in successive screenings [23.2% vs. 15.7%(p = 0.115)]. PPVs for masses, asymmetries and calcifications were higher in DM, being statistically significant in masses (5.3% vs. 3.9%; proportion ratio: 1.37 95%CI: 1.08-1.72). Among cancers detected by calcifications, the percentage of DCIS was higher in DM (60.3% vs. 46.4%, p = 0.060). PPVs were higher when DM was used, both for further assessments and for invasive procedures, with similar cancer detection rates and no statistically significant differences in tumour characteristics. The greatest improvements in PPVs were found for masses. (orig.)

  5. Are Cervical and Breast Cancer Screening Programmes Equitable? The Case of Women with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobigo, V.; Ouellette-Kuntz, H.; Balogh, R.; Leung, F.; Lin, E.; Lunsky, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Effective cancer screening must be available for all eligible individuals without discrimination. Lower rates of cervical and breast cancer screening have been reported in certain groups compared with women from the general population, such as women with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD). Research on the factors…

  6. Evaluation of screening programmes: Stud ies on breast cancer and prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.M.M. Beemsterboer (Petra)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractIn the past century treatment and primary prevention of disease has focussed on decreasing mortality rates (Wolleswinkel-van den Bosch, 1998). The current challenge is directed towards secondary prevention. Screening for disease is becoming increasingly part of medical practice in the

  7. breast cancer screening in

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Is Breast transillumination a viable option for breast cancer screening in limited resource settings? Authors: Elobu EA M.Med, Galukande M M M.Med, MSc, FCS, Namuguzi D M.Med, Muyinda Z M.Med. Affiliations: breast cancer screening in limited resource settings? Authors: Elobu EA1 M.Med, Galukande M1 M M.Med, ...

  8. Effect of implementation of the mass breast cancer screening programme in older women in the Netherlands: population based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Glas, Nienke A; de Craen, Anton J M; Bastiaannet, Esther; Op 't Land, Ester G; Kiderlen, Mandy; van de Water, Willemien; Siesling, Sabine; Portielje, Johanneke E A; Schuttevaer, Herman M; de Bock, Geertruida Truuske H; van de Velde, Cornelis J H; Liefers, Gerrit-Jan

    2014-09-14

    To assess the incidence of early stage and advanced stage breast cancer before and after the implementation of mass screening in women aged 70-75 years in the Netherlands in 1998. Prospective nationwide population based study. National cancer registry, the Netherlands. Patients aged 70-75 years with a diagnosis of invasive or ductal carcinoma in situ breast cancer between 1995 and 2011 (n=25,414). Incidence rates were calculated using population data from Statistics Netherlands. Incidence rates of early stage (I, II, or ductal carcinoma in situ) and advanced stage (III and IV) breast cancer before and after implementation of screening. Hypotheses were formulated before data collection. The incidence of early stage tumours significantly increased after the extension for implementation of screening (248.7 cases per 100,000 women before screening up to 362.9 cases per 100,000 women after implementation of screening, incidence rate ratio 1.46, 95% confidence interval 1.40 to 1.52, Pbreast cancers decreased to a far lesser extent (58.6 cases per 100,000 women before screening to 51.8 cases per 100,000 women after implementation of screening, incidence rate ratio 0.88, 0.81 to 0.97, Pbreast cancer, while that of early stage tumours has strongly increased. © de Glas et al 2014.

  9. The prevalence of medical reasons for non-participation in the Scottish breast and bowel cancer screening programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead, L; Porteous, L; Tait, M; Stoker, R; Payne, S; Calvert, C; Maxwell, D; Katikireddi, S V

    2015-06-01

    Increasing uptake of cancer screening is a priority for health systems internationally, however, some patients may not attend because they are undergoing active treatment for the cancer of interest or have other medical reasons that mean participation would be inappropriate. This study aims to quantify the proportion of non-participants who have a medical reason for not attending cancer screening. Medical reasons for not participating in breast and bowel screening were defined a priori on the basis of a literature review and expert opinion. The notes of 700 patients at two GP practices in Scotland were reviewed, to ascertain the prevalence of medical reasons amongst non-participants. Simple proportions and confidence intervals were calculated. 17.4% of breast and 2.3% of bowel screening non-participants had a medical reason to not participate. The two most common reasons were previous breast cancer follow up (8.86%) and recent mammogram (6.57%). These patients may not benefit from screening while also being distressed by receiving an invitation. This issue also makes accurate monitoring and target-setting for improving uptake difficult. Further work is needed to estimate robustly the extent to which medical reasons account for screening non-participation in a larger population. © The Author(s) 2015 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  10. Effect of implementation of the mass breast cancer screening programme in older women in the Netherlands : population based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Glas, Nienke A; de Craen, Anton J M; Bastiaannet, Esther; Op 't Land, Ester G; Kiderlen, Mandy; van de Water, Willemien; Siesling, Sabine; Portielje, Johanneke E A; Schuttevaer, Herman M; de Bock, Geertruida Truuske H; van de Velde, Cornelis J H; Liefers, Gerrit-Jan

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the incidence of early stage and advanced stage breast cancer before and after the implementation of mass screening in women aged 70-75 years in the Netherlands in 1998. DESIGN: Prospective nationwide population based study. SETTING: National cancer registry, the Netherlands.

  11. Estimation of overdiagnosis using short-term trends and lead time estimates uncontaminated by overdiagnosed cases: Results from the Norwegian Breast Screening Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalopoulos, Dimitrios; Duffy, Stephen W

    2016-12-01

    Estimating overdiagnosis in cancer screening is complicated. Using observational data, estimation of the expected incidence in the screening period and taking account of lead time are two major problems. Using data from the Cancer Registry of Norway and the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Programme, we estimated incidence trends, using age-specific trends by year in the pre-screening period (1985-95). We also estimated sojourn time and sensitivity using interval cancers only. Thus, lead time estimates were uncontaminated by overdiagnosed cases. Finally, we derived estimates of overdiagnosis separately for all cancers, and for invasive cancers only, correcting for lead time, using two different methods. Our results indicate that overdiagnosis of all cancers, invasive and in situ, constituted 15-17% of all screen-detected cancers in 1996-2009. For invasive cancers only, the corresponding figures were -2 to 7% in the same period, suggesting that a substantial proportion of the overdiagnosis in the Norwegian Programme was due to ductal carcinoma in situ. Using short-term trends, instead of long, prior to screening was more effective in predicting incidence in the screening epoch. In addition, sojourn time estimation using symptomatic cancers only avoids over-correction for lead time and consequently underestimation of overdiagnosis. Longer follow-up will provide more precise estimates of overdiagnosis. © The Author(s) 2016.

  12. The predictive value of positive test results in screening for breast cancer by mammography in the Nijmegen programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, P. H.; Verbeek, A. L.; Hendriks, J. H.; Holland, R.; Mravunac, M.

    1987-01-01

    After 10 years of screening for breast cancer by mammography in Nijmegen, the predictive value of positive screening results (PV+) was evaluated. The percentage of women with breast cancer in the group of referred women (PV+) for women under age 50 was 16-26%, regardless of the number of screening examinations they had. The percentage of women with breast cancer in the group of women who were biopsied was 25-40%, regardless of the number of examinations. For women aged 50 and over the predictive value was 34-57% and 58-90% respectively. It was further evaluated whether characteristics such as age, Quetelet index, parity, and Wolfe-classification could be used to increase the PV+ in women who were identified as positive by mammography. A logistic regression model analysis showed that true-positive and false-positive cases differ significantly only in terms of age and breast complaints. Although the model had a good fit, it could not be used to distinguish false-positive from true-positive test results. PMID:3426934

  13. Health workforce planning and service expansion during an economic crisis: A case study of the national breast screening programme in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, S M; Tyrrell, E; Johnson, B; Healy, O; Perry, I J; Normand, C

    2015-12-01

    This article aims to estimate the workforce and resource implications of the proposed age extension of the national breast screening programme, under the economic constraints of reduced health budgets and staffing levels in the Irish health system. Using a mixed method design, a purposive sample of 20 participants were interviewed and data were analysed thematically (June-September 2012). Quantitative data (programme-level activity data, screening activity, staffing levels and screening plans) were used to model potential workload and resource requirements. The analysis indicates that over 90% operational efficiency was achieved throughout the first six months of 2012. Accounting for maternity leave (10%) and sick leave (3.5%), 16.1 additional radiographers (whole time equivalent) would be required for the workload created by the age extension of the screening programme, at 90% operational efficiency. The results suggest that service expansion is possible with relatively minimal additional radiography resources if the efficiency of the skill mix and the use of equipment are improved. Investing in the appropriate skill mix should not be limited to clinical groups but should also include administrative staff to manage and support the service. Workload modelling may contribute to improved health workforce planning and service efficiency. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Lesions of uncertain malignant potential (B3) on core biopsy in the NHS Breast Screening Programme: is the screening round relevant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, R J; Steel, J R; Porter, G J R; Holgate, C S; Watkins, R M

    2012-03-01

    Most women who have screening mammography and undergo subsequent open biopsy following an indeterminate core biopsy result are eventually found to have benign disease. However, a significant number have malignant disease and the rate of malignancy in such cases may be influenced by various factors. This study examined the effect of the type of screening round (prevalent or incident) on the likelihood of breast cancer being present. A total of 199 women who had NHS breast screening mammograms and subsequent indeterminate (B3) core biopsy results followed by excision biopsy over an 11-year period in a single breast screening unit were reviewed. The rate of malignancy following excision of a lesion graded as B3 on core biopsy was 21% for women in the prevalent screening round compared to 33% in subsequent rounds (Fisher's exact test, p=0.038). The incidence of malignancy associated with a B3 core biopsy result appears to be related to the screening round in which the lesion is detected, being approximately 50% higher in the subsequent incident rounds compared to the initial prevalent round. This finding may be useful in formulating management plans for women who have an indeterminate biopsy result.

  15. TMIST Breast Screening Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    TMIST is a randomized breast screening trial that compares two Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved types of digital mammography, standard digital mammography (2-D) with a newer technology called tomosynthesis mammography (3-D).

  16. Expanding the meaning of 'being a peer leader': qualitative findings from a Canadian community-based cervical and breast cancer screening programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Farah; Ferrari, Manuela; Moravac, Catherine; Lofters, Aisha; Dunn, Sheila

    2017-03-01

    Engagement of community members to act as peer workers is a key feature of many community-centred health promotion programmes. However, little is known about their experiences beyond the commonly reported themes of fulfilment through helping people in need and improvement of personal confidence, self-esteem and self-care. This gap in the literature is of particular interest given increasing involvement of peer workers in community-centred programmes addressing health disparities, such as uptake of cancer screening. This paper aims to explore experiences of the peer leaders who worked for the Cancer Awareness: Ready for Education and Screening (CARES) project to promote awareness, knowledge, and uptake of breast and cervical cancer screening among under-/never-screened women who belonged to ethnic minority, recent immigrant and low-income communities in Toronto, Canada. In 2013, three focus groups were conducted with 14 peer leaders to explore their experiences. All were immigrant women between 30 and 50 years of age. All discussions were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim. We used situational maps and analysis to create a visual representation of the data, and to investigate peer leaders experiences. Situational analysis was chosen to bring to light dominant and also silent underlying aspects which define the meaning of being a peer leader. The first level of analysis identified main themes that characterised peer leaders' experience: (i) Helping others (women, friends and family) and themselves by improved self-confidence, self-awareness and self-care and (ii) Redefining professional and social positions through their project activities leading to professional development and networking. The second level of analysis explored the redefining process and identified some peer leaders' negotiations in relation to knowledge (science vs. myth), beliefs (fear vs. assurance) and boundaries (private vs. work). Adding to the literature on the peer workers' experience

  17. Breast density and outcome of mammography screening: a cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, A H; Bihrmann, K; Jensen, M-B

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of breast density on breast cancer (BC) mortality in a mammography screening programme. The cohort included 48 052 women participating in mammography screening in Copenhagen, Denmark, where biennial screening is offered to women aged 50......-69 years. We collected information for the years 1991-2001 on screening outcome, incident BCs (screen-, interval-, and later detected), and BC deaths. Breast density was dichotomised into fatty (F) and mixed/dense (M/D) breasts. Screening sensitivity was measured as the odds ratio of interval versus screen...

  18. [Organized breast cancer screening].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouëssé, Jacques; Sancho-Garnier, Hélèn

    2014-02-01

    Breast screening programs are increasingly controversial, especially regarding two points: the number of breast cancer deaths they avoid, and the problem of over-diagnosis and over-treatment. The French national breast cancer screening program was extended to cover the whole country in 2004. Ten years later it is time to examine the risk/benefit ratio of this program and to discuss the need for change. Like all forms of cancer management, screening must be regularly updated, taking into account the state of the art, new evidence, and uncertainties. All screening providers should keep themselves informed of the latest findings. In the French program, women aged 50-74 with no major individual or familial risk factors for breast cancer are offered screening mammography and clinical breast examination every two years. Images considered non suspicious of malignancy by a first reader are re-examined by a second reader. The devices and procedures are subjected to quality controls. Participating radiologists (both public and private) are required to read at least 500 mammographies per year. The program's national participation rate was 52.7 % in 2012. When individual screening outside of the national program is taken into account (nearly 15 % of women), coverage appears close to the European recommendation of 65 %. Breast cancer mortality has been falling in France by 0.6 % per year for over 30 years, starting before mass screening was implemented, and by 1.5 % since 2005. This decline can be attributed in part to earlier diagnosis and better treatment, so that the specific impact of screening cannot easily be measured. Over-treatment, defined as the detection and treatment of low-malignancy tumors that would otherwise not have been detected in a person's lifetime, is a major negative effect of screening, but its frequency is not precisely known (reported to range from 1 % to 30 %). In view of these uncertainties, it would be advisable to modify the program in order to

  19. Overdiagnosis in mammographic screening for breast cancer in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puliti, Donella; Duffy, Stephen W; Miccinesi, Guido

    2012-01-01

    Overdiagnosis, the detection through screening of a breast cancer that would never have been identified in the lifetime of the woman, is an adverse outcome of screening. We aimed to determine an estimate range for overdiagnosis of breast cancer in European mammographic service screening programmes....

  20. Compliance after 17 years of breast cancer screening - Factors associated with reattendance for periodic breast screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ScafKlomp, W; VanSonderen, E; VandenHeuvel, W

    The motives and reasons for regular attendance, irregular attendance and drop-out were studied in women who were enrolled in a biennial breast screening programme in 1975 and who were invited to each subsequent screening round until 1992. Three compliance groups were compared: 'attended all rounds'

  1. The TOMMY trial: a comparison of TOMosynthesis with digital MammographY in the UK NHS Breast Screening Programme--a multicentre retrospective reading study comparing the diagnostic performance of digital breast tomosynthesis and digital mammography with digital mammography alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Fiona J; Tucker, Lorraine; Gillan, Maureen Gc; Willsher, Paula; Cooke, Julie; Duncan, Karen A; Michell, Michael J; Dobson, Hilary M; Lim, Yit Yoong; Purushothaman, Hema; Strudley, Celia; Astley, Susan M; Morrish, Oliver; Young, Kenneth C; Duffy, Stephen W

    2015-01-01

    feature (p breast density 50% or more, sensitivities were 93% versus 86% (p = 0.03); for grade 2 invasive tumours, sensitivities were 91% versus 87% (p = 0.01); where the dominant radiological feature was a mass, sensitivities were 92% and 89% (p = 0.04) For synthetic 2D + DBT, there was significantly (p = 0.006) higher sensitivity than 2D alone in invasive cancers of size 11-20 mm, with a sensitivity of 91%. The specificity of DBT and 2D was better than 2D alone but there was only marginal improvement in sensitivity. The performance of synthetic 2D appeared to be comparable to standard 2D. If these results were observed with screening cases, DBT and 2D mammography could benefit to the screening programme by reducing the number of women recalled unnecessarily, especially if a synthetic 2D mammogram were used to minimise radiation exposure. Further research is required into the feasibility of implementing DBT in a screening setting, prognostic modelling on outcomes and mortality, and comparison of 2D and synthetic 2D for different lesion types. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN73467396. This project was funded by the NIHR Health Technology Assessment programme and will be published in full in Health Technology Assessment; Vol. 19, No. 4. See the HTA programme website for further project information.

  2. Radiographer gender and breast-screening uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, P; Winston, A; Mooney, T

    2008-06-03

    BreastCheck, the Irish National Breast Screening Programme, screens women aged 50-64. Radiographer recruitment has been a challenge; doubling of numbers is required for full national expansion; to date females are employed. The aim was to document attitudes to male radiographers and effect on return for subsequent screening. In all 85.8% of a random sample of 2000 women recently screened by BreastCheck completed a postal questionnaire. The commonest reaction women felt they would have if there were a male radiographer was embarrassment; significantly greater among those attending a static unit (45.6%) than mobile (38.4%) and in younger women (46%) than older (38.7%). Nine per cent would not have proceeded if the radiographer was male and 9% would only have proceeded if female chaperone present. In all 17.5% (95% CI 15.7-19.4%) agreed that 'If there were male radiographers I would not return for another screening appointment'; 18.3% were unsure. One-quarter agreed 'if I heard there could be male radiographers it would change my opinion of BreastCheck for the worse'. The proportions agreeing with these statements did not vary significantly by screening unit type, age group, area of residence or insurance status. This is the largest published study to date of this important issue; the correct balance between equality and programme performance must be identified.

  3. Influences on Polish migrants' breast screening uptake in Lothian, Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, D R; Porteous, L A

    2018-01-29

    Ethnic minorities are known to have low uptake of cancer screening programmes and Polish populations to have low breast screening uptake. Breast screening uptake by women in Poland and Polish migrants to Scotland is low. We interviewed Polish women living in Lothian, Scotland, about their attitudes to breast screening. Telephone interviews were held with a sample of 11 Polish women registered with Lothian general practices and invited for breast screening in 2013 or 2014. Interviews were between November 2014 and February 2015 and were held in Polish then translated, transcribed and analysed thematically. Women interviewed (mean age 58 years) had lived in Scotland for an average of 7.5 years. Seven had undergone breast screening in both Poland and Scotland, three in only Scotland and one in Poland alone. Respondents usually used Scottish and Polish health systems and screening programmes in parallel. Convenience and familiarity shaped screening choices with written information neither accessed nor answering key questions e.g. about coordination between programmes. Polish women living in Scotland have difficulties in accessing screening there and often use both Polish and Scottish system. Language issues, misunderstandings about screening and different health cultures are key barriers. Combined information in Polish about all cancer screening programmes could help address low uptake. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Overdiagnosis in breast cancer screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynge, Elsebeth; Beau, Anna-Belle; Christiansen, Peer

    2017-01-01

    Overdiagnosis in breast cancer screening is an important issue. A recent study from Denmark concluded that one in three breast cancers diagnosed in screening areas in women aged 50-69 years were overdiagnosed. The purpose of this short communication was to disentangle the study's methodology...

  5. [Organized or individual breast cancer screening: what motivates women?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalecinski, Julie; Régnier-Denois, Véronique; Ouédraogo, Samiratou; Dabakuyo-Yonli, Tienhan Sandrine; Dumas, Agnès; Arveux, Patrick; Chauvin, Franck

    2015-01-01

    The breast cancer screening programme, proposed to all women between 50 and 69 years, consisting of two-view mammography screening every two years, has been generalized in France since 2004. The programme coexists with opportunistic mammography screening, provided outside official frameworks. This qualitative study was designed to identify the pros and cons of these two screening modes. Three hundred and forty-five women were randomly selected from women who had participated in a previous quantitative study and who were invited to attend for breast cancer screening in 13 French departments between 2010 and 2011. These women were asked to participate in a face-to-face semistructured interview conducted by a sociologist. 48 women (17 from deprived areas) were interviewed. All chose to be screened for breast cancer either because they feared cancer, or because they wanted to control their own health. Twenty-seven women chose the organized screening programme, which they considered to be trustworthy, as negative mammograms are double checked by a second radiologist. Twenty-one women preferred individual screening, which they considered to be more reliable, less anonymous and providing them with more liberty to take control of their own health. Gynaecologists play an important role in women’s decision to undergo individual breast cancer screening. They also have an important role to play in the promotion of organized breast cancer screening programme with this public.

  6. Dutch digital breast cancer screening: implications for breast cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmers, Johanna M; den Heeten, Gerard J; Adang, Eddy M; Otten, Johannes D; Verbeek, André L; Broeders, Mireille J

    2012-12-01

    In comparison to other European population-based breast cancer screening programmes, the Dutch programme has a low referral rate, similar breast cancer detection and a high breast cancer mortality reduction. The referral rate in the Netherlands has increased over time and is expected to rise further, mainly following nationwide introduction of digital mammography, completed in 2010. This study explores the consequences of the introduction of digital mammography on the balance between referral rate, detection of breast cancer, diagnostic work-up and associated costs. Detailed information on diagnostic work-up (chart review) was obtained from referred women (n = 988) in 2000-06 (100% analogue mammography) and 2007 (75% digital mammography) in Nijmegen, the Netherlands. The average referral rate increased from 15 (2000-06) to 34 (2007) per 1000 women screened. The number of breast cancers detected increased from 5.5 to 7.8 per 1000 screens, whereas the positive predictive value fell from 37% to 23%. A sharp rise in diagnostic work-up procedures and total diagnostic costs was seen. On the other hand, costs of a single work-up slightly decreased, as less surgical biopsies were performed. Our study shows that a low referral rate in combination with the introduction of digital mammography affects the balance between referral rate and detection rate and can substantially influence breast cancer care and associated costs. Referral rates in the Netherlands are now more comparable to other countries. This effect is therefore of value in countries where implementation of digital breast cancer screening has just started or is still under discussion.

  7. Breast cancer screening in Korean woman with dense breast tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hee Jung [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Eun Sook [Dept. of Radiology, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Ann [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    Asian women, including Korean, have a relatively higher incidence of dense breast tissue, compared with western women. Dense breast tissue has a lower sensitivity for the detection of breast cancer and a higher relative risk for breast cancer, compared with fatty breast tissue. Thus, there were limitations in the mammographic screening for women with dense breast tissue, and many studies for the supplemental screening methods. This review included appropriate screening methods for Korean women with dense breasts. We also reviewed the application and limitation of supplemental screening methods, including breast ultrasound, digital breast tomosynthesis, and breast magnetic resonance imaging; and furthermore investigated the guidelines, as well as the study results.

  8. Overdiagnosis in breast cancer screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynge, Elsebeth; Beau, Anna-Belle; Christiansen, Peer

    2017-01-01

    Overdiagnosis in breast cancer screening is an important issue. A recent study from Denmark concluded that one in three breast cancers diagnosed in screening areas in women aged 50-69 years were overdiagnosed. The purpose of this short communication was to disentangle the study's methodology...... estimate of overdiagnosis. Screening affects cohorts of screened women. Danish registers allow very accurate mapping of the fate of every woman. We should be past the phase where studies of overdiagnosis are based on the fixed age groups from routine statistics....

  9. [Population-based breast cancer screening is not worthwhile. Screening has little effect on mortality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonneux, Luc G A; Autier, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Comparison of breast cancer mortality between pairs of similar countries (Sweden and Norway, Northern Ireland and the Irish Republic, the Netherlands and Belgium or Flanders), each of which had implemented its population-wide breast cancer screening programme at a different point in time, demonstrated little effect of screening on mortality. In the Netherlands, a well-organised population-wide screening programme was started in the early nineties, ten years before such a programme was introduced in Flanders. We used the 1989-1992 period as a baseline and compared breast cancer mortality in the Netherlands with that in Flanders during the 2005-2008 period. The added value of organised screening was low: 11% in the target age group of 55-79 years, or 180 prevented breast-cancer deaths annually. A total of 5000 screening mammograms were needed to prevent one death from breast cancer. Breast cancer screening is not a public health priority. Impartial and transparent information on the disadvantages and benefits of breast cancer screening is urgently needed.

  10. Compliance after 17 years of breast cancer screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scaf-Klomp, W.; van Sonderen, F.L.P.; van den Heuvel, W.J.A.

    1997-01-01

    The motives and reasons for regular attendance, irregular attendance and drop-out were studied in women who were enrolled in a biennial breast cancer screening programme in 1975 and who were invited to each subsequent screening round until 1992. Three compliance groups were compared: 'attended all

  11. Measuring the burden of interval cancers in long-standing screening mammography programmes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Sune Bangsbøll; Törnberg, Sven; Kilpeläinen, Sini

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Mammography screening programme sensitivity is evaluated by comparing the interval cancer rate (ICR) with the expected breast cancer incidence without screening, ie. the proportional interval cancer rate (PICR). The PICR is usually found by extrapolating pre-screening incidence rates...

  12. Implementation of Whole-Breast Screening Ultrasonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Melissa A; Hooley, Regina J

    2017-05-01

    Whole-breast screening ultrasonography is being increasingly implemented in breast imaging centers because numerous studies have shown the benefit of supplemental screening for women with dense breasts and breast density notification laws are becoming more widespread. This article reviews the numerous considerations involved in integrating a screening ultrasonography program into a busy practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Increasingly strong reduction in breast cancer mortality due to screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schoor, G; Moss, S M; Otten, J D M; Donders, R; Paap, E; den Heeten, G J; Holland, R; Broeders, M J M; Verbeek, A L M

    2011-01-01

    Background: Favourable outcomes of breast cancer screening trials in the 1970s and 1980s resulted in the launch of population-based service screening programmes in many Western countries. We investigated whether improvements in mammography and treatment modalities have had an influence on the effectiveness of breast cancer screening from 1975 to 2008. Methods: In Nijmegen, the Netherlands, 55 529 women received an invitation for screening between 1975 and 2008. We designed a case–referent study to evaluate the impact of mammographic screening on breast cancer mortality over time from 1975 to 2008. A total number of 282 breast cancer deaths were identified, and 1410 referents aged 50–69 were sampled from the population invited for screening. We estimated the effectiveness by calculating the odds ratio (OR) indicating the breast cancer death rate for screened vs unscreened women. Results: The breast cancer death rate in the screened group over the complete period was 35% lower than in the unscreened group (OR=0.65; 95% CI=0.49–0.87). Analysis by calendar year showed an increasing effectiveness from a 28% reduction in breast cancer mortality in the period 1975–1991 (OR=0.72; 95% CI=0.47–1.09) to 65% in the period 1992–2008 (OR=0.35; 95% CI=0.19–0.64). Conclusion: Our results show an increasingly strong reduction in breast cancer mortality over time because of mammographic screening. PMID:21343930

  14. [Screening for breast cancer: worries about its effectiveness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autier, Philippe

    2013-12-01

    Breast cancer screening in France is done though two parallel systems: individualized screening and a national programme of organized screening. The latter is free of charge and manages a double-reading of mammography films. Since 2004, a steadily greater proportion of French women 50 to 74 years of age participate to the national programme. Justification of screening in France is based on Swedish randomised trials that documented the ability of mammography screening to reduce the risk to die from breast cancer. However, since 3 years, a growing number of studies indicate that screening seems not to have much influence on the incidence of advanced breast cancer and on mortality from breast cancer Moreover, numerous breast cancers are detected that would have never clinically surfaced and would have never been life threatening (overdiagnosis). In view of current doubts, it is better to inform women on health benefits, limitations and possible side effects of mammography screening. For women willing to be screened, it is recommended to invite them to participate to the national programme.

  15. Breast Cancer Screening in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Karsten Juhl; Gøtzsche, Peter C; Kalager, Mette

    2017-01-01

    Background: Effective breast cancer screening should detect early-stage cancer and prevent advanced disease. Objective: To assess the association between screening and the size of detected tumors and to estimate overdiagnosis (detection of tumors that would not become clinically relevant). Design......) and nonadvanced (≤20 mm) breast cancer tumors in screened and nonscreened women were measured. Two approaches were used to estimate the amount of overdiagnosis: comparing the incidence of advanced and nonadvanced tumors among women aged 50 to 84 years in screening and nonscreening areas; and comparing...... rate ratio, 1.49 [95% CI, 1.43 to 1.54]). The first estimation approach found that 271 invasive breast cancer tumors and 179 ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) lesions were overdiagnosed in 2010 (overdiagnosis rate of 24.4% [including DCIS] and 14.7% [excluding DCIS]). The second approach, which accounted...

  16. Breast cancer screening effect across breast density strata: A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Waal, Daniëlle; Ripping, Theodora M; Verbeek, André L M; Broeders, Mireille J M

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer screening is known to reduce breast cancer mortality. A high breast density may affect this reduction. We assessed the effect of screening on breast cancer mortality in women with dense and fatty breasts separately. Analyses were performed within the Nijmegen (Dutch) screening programme (1975-2008), which invites women (aged 50-74 years) biennially. Performance measures were determined. Furthermore, a case-control study was performed for women having dense and women having fatty breasts. Breast density was assessed visually with a dichotomized Wolfe scale. Breast density data were available for cases. The prevalence of dense breasts among controls was estimated with age-specific rates from the general population. Sensitivity analyses were performed on these estimates. Screening performance was better in the fatty than in the dense group (sensitivity 75.7% vs 57.8%). The mortality reduction appeared to be smaller for women with dense breasts, with an odds ratio (OR) of 0.87 (95% CI 0.52-1.45) in the dense and 0.59 (95% CI 0.44-0.79) in the fatty group. We can conclude that high density results in lower screening performance and appears to be associated with a smaller mortality reduction. Breast density is thus a likely candidate for risk-stratified screening. More research is needed on the association between density and screening harms. © 2016 UICC.

  17. Breast cancer screening: comparison of radiologists' performance in a self-assessment scheme and in actual breast screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowley, Helen C.; Gale, Alastair G.

    1999-05-01

    The PERFORMS self-assessment scheme is used by the UK Breast Screening Programme as an educational tool. From this scheme a radiologist can gain insight into their own sensitivity, specificity, feature and cancer detection performance. Such data may, however, be questionable if they are not well related to the radiologist's performance in actual breast screening. Consequently, data from the scheme were compared with those from actual breast screening performance. Some correlations were found in performance, this indicates that continued use of the scheme is important to identify any areas of individual difficulty.

  18. Decreased rates of advanced breast cancer due to mammography screening in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Fracheboud (Jacques); S.J. Otto (Suzie); J.A.A.M. van Dijck; M.J.M. Broeders (Mireille); A.L.M. Verbeek (Andre); H.J. de Koning (Harry)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThe effect of the implementation of the Dutch breast cancer screening programme during 1990-1997 on the incidence rates of breast cancer, particularly advanced breast cancer, was analysed according to stage at diagnosis in seven regions, where no screening took place before 1990. The

  19. Cost-Effectiveness Comparison of Breast Cancer Screening and Vascular Event Primary Prevention with Aspirin in Wales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Gareth

    2011-01-01

    Aim: For the first time, this article presents a cost-effectiveness comparison of a breast cancer screening programme with a possible health education programme with aspirin for vascular event primary prevention. Background: Breast cancer screening is a well established part of cancer control programmes yet recent evidence on this intervention has…

  20. The impact of mammographic screening on breast cancer mortality in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moss, S M; Nyström, L; Jonsson, H.

    2012-01-01

    Analysing trends in population breast cancer mortality statistics appears a simple method of estimating the effectiveness of mammographic screening programmes. We reviewed such studies of population-based screening in Europe to assess their value.......Analysing trends in population breast cancer mortality statistics appears a simple method of estimating the effectiveness of mammographic screening programmes. We reviewed such studies of population-based screening in Europe to assess their value....

  1. Determinants of successful implementation of population-based cancer screening programmes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynge, Elsebeth; Törnberg, Sven; von Karsa, Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    consider when planning, implementing and running population based cancer screening programmes. The list is general and is applicable to breast, cervical and colorectal cancer screening. It is based on evidence presented in the three European Union guidelines on quality assurance in cancer screening......) piloting or trial implementation, (5) scaling up from pilot to service, (6) running of full-scale programme, and (7) sustainability. For each phase, a substantial number of specified conditions have to be met. Successful implementation of a cancer screening programme requires societal acceptance and local...

  2. Effect of structured training programme on the knowledge and behaviors of breast and cervical cancer screening among the female teachers in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayık Temel, Ayla; Dağhan, Şafak; Kaymakçı, Şenay; Öztürk Dönmez, Renginar; Arabacı, Zeynep

    2017-12-07

    Breast cancer and cervical cancer are the most common cancers among women in the world. Many studies on the early detection of cancer have been conducted among women worldwide, but few studies have been performed in the world on female teachers regarding breast self-examination (BSE), mammography (MMG) and Pap smear test (PST). As teachers interact with students, this could play an important role in health education and in developing healthy behavior such as cancer screening. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of a structured teaching program on breast and cervical cancer screening on the knowledge and practice of teachers. The other objective was to encourage teachers to transfer this knowledge to the women who attended their courses. Semi -experimental designs with pre-intervention, post-intervention and six month follow-up tests were used in this study. The data were collected from 37 volunteer teachers and their 64 volunteer students with a sociodemographic form, a questionnaire form for breast and cervical cancer, and a Transtheoretical Model of behavior change for BSE, MMG and PST. Behavior of the teachers related to BSE, MMG, PST was evaluated in pre-training and in the first, third and sixth months post-training, and the behavior of the students was evaluated with point follow-up in the sixth month. In post-training, it was determined that the teachers' knowledge of breast cancer increased from 11.70 ± 2.80 to 14.81 ± 3.22 and their knowledge of cervical cancer increased from 7.75 ± 5.60 to 17.68 ± 3.79. For BSE behavior, 47.8% of teachers were in the action and maintenance stage in pre-training, but this ratio was 81.1% in the sixth month post-training. For MMG behavior, all of the teachers were in the precontemplation stage in pre-training, and 38.9% of them were in the action and maintenance stage in the sixth month post-training. For PST, while 24.3% were in the action and maintenance stage in pre

  3. Women with Disabilities and Breast Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Reasonable Accommodations (RA) Women with Disabilities and Breast Cancer Screening Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... Mammogram During the Past Two Years 1 Breast Cancer Screening Recommendations 2 If you are between the ages ...

  4. The association between general practitioners' attitudes towards breast cancer screening and women's screening participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Line Flytkjær; Mukai, Thomas Ostersen; Andersen, Berit; Vedsted, Peter

    2012-06-18

    Breast cancer screening in Denmark is organised by the health services in the five regions. Although general practitioners (GPs) are not directly involved in the screening process, they are often the first point of contact to the health care system and thus play an important advisory role. No previous studies, in a health care setting like the Danish system, have investigated the association between GPs' attitudes towards breast cancer screening and women's participation in the screening programme. Data on women's screening participation was obtained from the regional screening authorities. Data on GPs' attitudes towards breast cancer screening was taken from a previous survey among GPs in the Central Denmark Region. This study included women aged 50-69 years who were registered with a singlehanded GP who had participated in the survey. The survey involved 67 singlehanded GPs with a total of 13,288 women on their lists. Five GPs (7%) had a negative attitude towards breast cancer screening. Among registered women, 81% participated in the first screening round. Multivariate analyses revealed that women registered with a GP with a negative attitude towards breast cancer screening were 17% (95% CI: 2-34%) more likely to be non-participants compared with women registered with a GP with a positive attitude towards breast cancer screening. The GPs' attitudes may influence the participation rate even in a system where GPs are not directly involved in the screening process. However, further studies are needed to investigate this association.

  5. Is mammography screening history a predictor of future breast cancer risk?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Sune Bangsbøll; Törnberg, Sven; Kilpeläinen, Sini

    2015-01-01

    Inspired by the model by Walter and Day for risk of cervical cancer following negative screens, one might hypothesize that women in a mammography screening programme with a certain number of negative screens had a lower remaining breast cancer risk than that of women in general. We studied whether...... number of negative screens was a predictor for a low remaining breast cancer risk in women participating in the mammography screening programmes in Stockholm, Copenhagen and Funen. Data were collected from the mammography screening programmes in Stockholm, Sweden (1989-2012), Copenhagen, Denmark (1991...... was not a predictor of a low remaining breast cancer risk in women participating in the mammography screening programmes in Stockholm, Sweden, Copenhagen and Funen, Denmark. The history of previous negative screens is therefore not suitable for personalisation of mammography screening....

  6. Overdiagnosis in publicly organised mammography screening programmes: systematic review of incidence trends

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Karsten Juhl; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the extent of overdiagnosis (the detection of cancers that will not cause death or symptoms) in publicly organised screening programmes. DESIGN: Systematic review of published trends in incidence of breast cancer before and after the introduction of mammography screening....... DATA SOURCES: PubMed (April 2007), reference lists, and authors. Review methods One author extracted data on incidence of breast cancer (including carcinoma in situ), population size, screening uptake, time periods, and age groups, which were checked independently by the other author. Linear regression...... of overdiagnosis was compensated for in this review. CONCLUSIONS: The increase in incidence of breast cancer was closely related to the introduction of screening and little of this increase was compensated for by a drop in incidence of breast cancer in previously screened women. One in three breast cancers...

  7. Risk-based Breast Cancer Screening: Implications of Breast Density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Christoph I; Chen, Linda E; Elmore, Joann G

    2017-07-01

    The approach to breast cancer screening has changed over time from a general approach to a more personalized, risk-based approach. Women with dense breasts, one of the most prevalent risk factors, are now being informed that they are at increased risk of developing breast cancer and should consider supplemental screening beyond mammography. This article reviews the current evidence regarding the impact of breast density relative to other known risk factors, the evidence regarding supplemental screening for women with dense breasts, supplemental screening options, and recommendations for physicians having shared decision-making discussions with women who have dense breasts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [The diffusion of screening programmes in Italy, year 2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappa, Marco; Dardanoni, Gabriella; Giorgi Rossi, Paolo; Grazzini, Grazia; Naldoni, Carlo; Paci, Eugenio; Pirola, Maria Elena; Pizzuti, Renato; Segnan, Nereo; Zorzi, Manuel; Federici, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The national meeting of the National Centre for Screening Monitoring (ONS) was given the title "The screening during the crisis" as we realize that the severe economical crisis of our country influences all the health policies and, as a consequence, screening programs. Within this global scenario, the results of 2010 concerning screening programs can be considered as still positive even if the gap between the North and the Central Regions as compared to the South remains. In short, in 2010 almost 9.5 millions people were invited to undergo a screening examination (3,450,000; 2,496,000 and 3,464,000 for cervical, mammographic and colorectal cancer respectively). As compared to the previous year, a large increase was observed for colorectal screening.Whereas a slight decrease was observed both for cervical and for mammographic screening. The latter trend was partially due to the overload consequent to the extension of the programme to women younger than fifty in a couple of regions (Emilia-Romagna and Piemonte). More than 4.3 millions of subjects actually complied to the invitation (1,375,000; 1,382,000 and 1,582,000 for cervical, mammographic and colorectal cancer, respectively). As a consequence of these activities were identified 6,015 breast cancers (31% of annual occurring breast cancers in Italy in the age group 50-69 years according to the most update estimates of breast cancer occurrence), 4,597 CIN2 or more severe cervical lesions, 2,916 colorectal cancers (15% of annual occurring CRC cancer in Italy in the age group 50-69 years) and 15,049 advanced adenomas.

  9. breast cancer screening in a resource poor country: ultrasound ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dence rates, due to lack of early detection programmes with late presentation of the disease, inadequate diag- nostic and treatment facilities in the developing coun- tries.3 Early detection improves the outcomes or surviv- al rates of breast cancer, hence screening of asympto- matic, apparently healthy women is very ...

  10. SCREENING FOR EARLY DETECTION OF BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Rasskazova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a brief overview of the main methods of breast cancer screening. Proven effectiveness of mammography as a screening method in reducing mortality from breast cancer, specified limits of the method. The main trend of increasing the effectiveness of screening is the transition to digital technologies. Properly organized screening with the active participation of the population reduces mortality from breast cancer by 30%.

  11. Is mammography screening history a predictor of future breast cancer risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Sune Bangsbøll; Törnberg, Sven; Kilpeläinen, Sini; Von Euler-Chelpin, My; Njor, Sisse Helle

    2015-02-01

    Inspired by the model by Walter and Day for risk of cervical cancer following negative screens, one might hypothesize that women in a mammography screening programme with a certain number of negative screens had a lower remaining breast cancer risk than that of women in general. We studied whether number of negative screens was a predictor for a low remaining breast cancer risk in women participating in the mammography screening programmes in Stockholm, Copenhagen and Funen. Data were collected from the mammography screening programmes in Stockholm, Sweden (1989-2012), Copenhagen, Denmark (1991-2009) and Funen, Denmark (1993-2009), and linked to the respective cancer registries. We calculated cumulative hazard rates for breast cancer in women in cohorts defined by age at entry and number of negative screens for the maximum follow-up period in each screening centre. For all centres and cohorts, the cumulative hazard were parallel for all number of negative screens, from after the time, when the women were scheduled to be invited for the next screen. This means that the remaining breast cancer risk is similar no matter how many negative screens a woman have had. Number of negative screens was not a predictor of a low remaining breast cancer risk in women participating in the mammography screening programmes in Stockholm, Sweden, Copenhagen and Funen, Denmark. The history of previous negative screens is therefore not suitable for personalisation of mammography screening.

  12. Is the tide turning against breast screening?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Karsten Juhl

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Herein I argue that mammographic screening has not delivered on its fundamental premise: to reduce the incidence of advanced breast cancer. Indeed, achieving this goal is required if screening is to reduce breast cancer mortality or mastectomy use. Rather, screening has caused substanti...

  13. Cervical and Breast Cancer Secreening Programme Results of Etlik KETEM Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iskender Kog

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: The cervical and breast cancer screening programme to report the results between 2008 and 2010 at KETEM in Etlik Zubeyde Hanim Women’s Health Teaching and Research Hospital. METHOD: Populations of healthy women between 2008 and 2010 with a total of 5253 case were evaluated with community-based and opportunistic screening. The cervical cancer screened with the conventional cervical pap smear technique and breast cancer screened with two dimensional bilateral mammography and breast examination. RESULTS: Cervical cancer screening as a result of 65 (1.5% patients had abnormal cytology and abnormal histopathological findings were found in a total of 24 of them. A gynecological examination and biopsy in one case with cervical cancer were detected. In the 4284 women screened for cervical cancer, ASC-US determined in 48 women (1.1%, AGC in four women (0.09%, LGSIL in five women (0.1%, HGSIL in two women (0.045% and ASC-H in six women (0.14%. Although 234 and 664 women screened for breast cancer in year of 2008 and 2009 respectively, breast cancer didn’t find out. However, 10 women (0.9% with breast cancer determined in 1164 screened women in year of 2010. CONCLUSION: Reduced the incidence of cervical and breast cancer and diagnosed at an early stage of tumor is obtained with screening programs in healthy society. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2012; 11(2.000: 145-152

  14. Radiation risk of breast screening in England with digital mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Lucy M; Dance, David R; Young, Kenneth C

    2016-11-01

    To estimate the risks and benefits of breast screening in terms of number of deaths due to radiation-induced cancers and the number of lives saved owing to modern screening in the National Health Service Breast Screening Programme (NHSBSP) in England. Radiation risk model, patient dose data and data from national screening statistics were used to estimate the number of deaths due to radiation-induced breast cancers in the NHSBSP in England. Dose and dose effectiveness factors (DDREFs) equal to one and two were assumed. The breast cancer mortality reduction in the invited population due to screening and the percentage of females diagnosed with symptomatic breast cancer, who die from breast cancer, were collated from the literature. The number of lives saved owing to screening was calculated. Assuming, a total of 1,770,436 females between the ages of 50-70 years were screened each year, and a breast cancer mortality reduction of 20% due to screening in the invited population, the number of screen-detected cancers were 14,872 annually, resulting in 1071 lives saved. Conversely, for the same mortality reduction, the number of radiation-induced cancers was 36 and 18 for DDREFs of 1 and 2, respectively. This resulted in seven and three deaths due to radiation-induced cancers annually for DDREFs of 1 and 2, respectively. The ratios of lives saved owing to screening to radiation-induced cancers were 30 : 1 and 60 : 1 for DDREFs of 1 and 2. The ratios of lives saved owing to screening to deaths due to radiation-induced cancers were 156 : 1 and 312 : 1 for DDREFs of 1 and 2. For the 1.8% of the screening population with very thick breasts, the latter ratios decrease to 94 : 1 and 187 : 1 for DDREFs of 1 and 2. The breast cancer mortality reduction due to screening greatly outweighs the risk of death due to radiation-induced cancers. Advances in knowledge: Estimation of the radiation risk for modern breast screening in England using digital mammography.

  15. Cost-effectiveness of the Norwegian breast cancer screening program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Luijt, P A; Heijnsdijk, E A M; de Koning, H J

    2017-02-15

    The Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Programme (NBCSP) has a nation-wide coverage since 2005. All women aged 50-69 years are invited biennially for mammography screening. We evaluated breast cancer mortality reduction and performed a cost-effectiveness analysis, using our microsimulation model, calibrated to most recent data. The microsimulation model allows for the comparison of mortality and costs between a (hypothetical) situation without screening and a situation with screening. Breast cancer incidence in Norway had a steep increase in the early 1990s. We calibrated the model to simulate this increase and included recent costs for screening, diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer and travel and productivity loss. We estimate a 16% breast cancer mortality reduction for a cohort of women, invited to screening, followed over their complete lifetime. Cost-effectiveness is estimated at NOK 112,162 per QALY gained, when taking only direct medical costs into account (the cost of the buses, examinations, and invitations). We used a 3.5% annual discount rate. Cost-effectiveness estimates are substantially below the threshold of NOK 1,926,366 as recommended by the WHO guidelines. For the Norwegian population, which has been gradually exposed to screening, breast cancer mortality reduction for women exposed to screening is increasing and is estimated to rise to ∼30% in 2020 for women aged 55-80 years. The NBCSP is a highly cost-effective measure to reduce breast cancer specific mortality. We estimate a breast cancer specific mortality reduction of 16-30%, at the cost of 112,162 NOK per QALY gained. © 2016 UICC.

  16. Screening Mammography and Digital Breast Tomosynthesis: Controversies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funaro, Kimberly; Drukteinis, Jennifer; Falcon, Shannon

    2017-10-01

    Breast cancer screening with mammography reduces breast cancer mortality; however, diverging recommendations regarding screening have caused controversy. The emerging technology of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) may soon become the mainstay of breast cancer screening. We present recommendations for breast cancer screening based on guidelines. A PubMed literature review was performed and the results from five large clinical studies comparing the efficacy of digital mammography alone versus digital mammography with DBT are examined. We emphasize the importance of annual screening to reduce breast cancer mortality. Our review of the literature demonstrates that DBT increases cancer detection rates and reduces callbacks. Additional research is needed to determine whether the increased cancer detection rates are associated with a decrease in mortality.

  17. Breast cancer screening: ''reassuring'' the worried well?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodersen, John; Siersma, Volkert; Ryle, Mette

    2011-01-01

    of women offered screening compared to a population of women not offered screening for breast cancer. METHODS: One thousand women, aged 50-69 years, were randomly drawn from the Danish Civil Registration System to receive part I of the questionnaire Consequences of Screening in Breast Cancer (COS-BC1......): the sample consisted of 500 women living in a geographical area where screening mammography had been offered for more than 10 years and 500 women living in an area where the public health authorities had never invited women to breast cancer screening. RESULTS: A total of 759 women returned the questionnaire....... Those living in areas where screening was not offered reported more negative psychosocial aspects compared to women living in areas where screening was offered. CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate that women tend to perceive breast cancer screening as a reassuring preventive initiative. Alternatively...

  18. Testing Precision Screening for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    An NCI research article about individualized approaches that could help identify those at risk of breast cancer who need to be screened and testing screening intervals that are appropriate for each person’s level of risk.

  19. Mammographic density and breast cancer risk in breast screening assessment cases and women with a family history of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Stephen W; Morrish, Oliver W E; Allgood, Prue C; Black, Richard; Gillan, Maureen G C; Willsher, Paula; Cooke, Julie; Duncan, Karen A; Michell, Michael J; Dobson, Hilary M; Maroni, Roberta; Lim, Yit Y; Purushothaman, Hema N; Suaris, Tamara; Astley, Susan M; Young, Kenneth C; Tucker, Lorraine; Gilbert, Fiona J

    2018-01-01

    Mammographic density has been shown to be a strong independent predictor of breast cancer and a causative factor in reducing the sensitivity of mammography. There remain questions as to the use of mammographic density information in the context of screening and risk management, and of the association with cancer in populations known to be at increased risk of breast cancer. To assess the association of breast density with presence of cancer by measuring mammographic density visually as a percentage, and with two automated volumetric methods, Quantra™ and VolparaDensity™. The TOMosynthesis with digital MammographY (TOMMY) study of digital breast tomosynthesis in the Breast Screening Programme of the National Health Service (NHS) of the United Kingdom (UK) included 6020 breast screening assessment cases (of whom 1158 had breast cancer) and 1040 screened women with a family history of breast cancer (of whom two had breast cancer). We assessed the association of each measure with breast cancer risk in these populations at enhanced risk, using logistic regression adjusted for age and total breast volume as a surrogate for body mass index (BMI). All density measures showed a positive association with presence of cancer and all declined with age. The strongest effect was seen with Volpara absolute density, with a significant 3% (95% CI 1-5%) increase in risk per 10 cm 3 of dense tissue. The effect of Volpara volumetric density on risk was stronger for large and grade 3 tumours. Automated absolute breast density is a predictor of breast cancer risk in populations at enhanced risk due to either positive mammographic findings or family history. In the screening context, density could be a trigger for more intensive imaging. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. The association between general practitioners’ attitudes towards breast cancer screening and women’s screening participation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen Line

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer screening in Denmark is organised by the health services in the five regions. Although general practitioners (GPs are not directly involved in the screening process, they are often the first point of contact to the health care system and thus play an important advisory role. No previous studies, in a health care setting like the Danish system, have investigated the association between GPs’ attitudes towards breast cancer screening and women’s participation in the screening programme. Methods Data on women’s screening participation was obtained from the regional screening authorities. Data on GPs’ attitudes towards breast cancer screening was taken from a previous survey among GPs in the Central Denmark Region. This study included women aged 50-69 years who were registered with a singlehanded GP who had participated in the survey. Results The survey involved 67 singlehanded GPs with a total of 13,288 women on their lists. Five GPs (7% had a negative attitude towards breast cancer screening. Among registered women, 81% participated in the first screening round. Multivariate analyses revealed that women registered with a GP with a negative attitude towards breast cancer screening were 17% (95% CI: 2-34% more likely to be non-participants compared with women registered with a GP with a positive attitude towards breast cancer screening. Conclusion The GPs' attitudes may influence the participation rate even in a system where GPs are not directly involved in the screening process. However, further studies are needed to investigate this association.

  1. Breast cancer and breast screening: perceptions of Chinese migrant women living in New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang W

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Migrant Chinese constitute a significant and increasing proportion of New Zealand women. They have lower rates of participation in breast cancer screening than other New Zealanders, but reasons for this are unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate factors affecting Chinese women’s understanding of, and access to, breast health services, to better understand reasons for low participation in screening and their experiences of breast cancer clinic care. METHODS: The participants were 26 Chinese migrant women—19 recruited in the community and seven recruited from 17 eligible women attending a breast clinic between 2008 and 2010 in Wellington, New Zealand. The design was that of a qualitative study, using semi-structured interviews and thematic content analysis. FINDINGS: There were low levels of awareness about the national breast screening programme and limited engagement with preventive primary care services. Concerns about privacy and a range of communication difficulties were identified that related to oral language, lack of written information in Chinese, and limited understanding about Chinese perceptions of ill health and traditional Chinese medicine by New Zealand health professionals. CONCLUSION: Addressing communication barriers for Chinese migrant women has the potential to raise awareness about breast cancer and breast health, and to increase successful participation in breast cancer screening. Greater efforts are needed to ensure this group has an understanding of, and is engaged with a primary care provider. Such efforts are key to improving health for this growing sector of the New Zealand population.

  2. Breast cancer and breast screening: perceptions of Chinese migrant women living in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Rose, Sally B; Foster, Alison; Pullon, Sue; Lawton, Beverley

    2014-06-01

    Migrant Chinese constitute a significant and increasing proportion of New Zealand women. They have lower rates of participation in breast cancer screening than other New Zealanders, but reasons for this are unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate factors affecting Chinese women's understanding of, and access to, breast health services, to better understand reasons for low participation in screening and their experiences of breast cancer clinic care. The participants were 26 Chinese migrant women-19 recruited in the community and seven recruited from 17 eligible women attending a breast clinic between 2008 and 2010 in Wellington, New Zealand. The design was that of a qualitative study, using semi-structured interviews and thematic content analysis. There were low levels of awareness about the national breast screening programme and limited engagement with preventive primary care services. Concerns about privacy and a range of communication difficulties were identified that related to oral language, lack of written information in Chinese, and limited understanding about Chinese perceptions of ill health and traditional Chinese medicine by New Zealand health professionals. Addressing communication barriers for Chinese migrant women has the potential to raise awareness about breast cancer and breast health, and to increase successful participation in breast cancer screening. Greater efforts are needed to ensure this group has an understanding of, and is engaged with a primary care provider. Such efforts are key to improving health for this growing sector of the New Zealand population.

  3. School dental screening programmes for oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Ankita; Khattri, Shivi; Ismail, Noorliza Mastura; Kumbargere Nagraj, Sumanth; Prashanti, Eachempati

    2017-12-21

    School dental screening refers to visual inspection of children's oral cavity in a school setting followed by making parents aware of their child's current oral health status and treatment needs. Screening at school intends to identify children at an earlier stage than symptomatic disease presentation, hence prompting preventive and therapeutic oral health care for the children. This review evaluates the effectiveness of school dental screening in improving oral health status. To assess the effectiveness of school dental screening programmes on overall oral health status and use of dental services. Cochrane Oral Health's Information Specialist searched the following databases: Cochrane Oral Health's Trials Register (to 15 March 2017), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, the Cochrane Register of Studies, to 15 March 2017), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 15 March 2017), and Embase Ovid (15 September 2016 to 15 March 2017). The US National Institutes of Health Trials Registry (ClinicalTrials.gov) and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform were searched for ongoing trials. No restrictions were placed on language or publication status when searching the electronic databases; however, the search of Embase was restricted to the last six months due to the Cochrane Centralised Search Project to identify all clinical trials and add them to CENTRAL. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) (cluster or parallel) that evaluated school dental screening compared with no intervention or with one type of screening compared with another. We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. We included six trials (four were cluster-RCTs) with 19,498 children who were 4 to 15 years of age. Four trials were conducted in the UK and two were based in India. We assessed two trials to be at low risk of bias, one trial to be at high risk of bias and three trials to be at unclear risk of bias.None of the six trials

  4. Screening for breast cancer with mammography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtzsche, Peter C; Jørgensen, Karsten Juhl

    2013-01-01

    A variety of estimates of the benefits and harms of mammographic screening for breast cancer have been published and national policies vary.......A variety of estimates of the benefits and harms of mammographic screening for breast cancer have been published and national policies vary....

  5. Mammography requests in general practice during the introduction of nationwide breast cancer screening, 1988-1995.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beemsterboer, P.M.M.; Koning, H.J. de; Looman, C.W.N.; Borsboom, G.J.J.M.; Bartelds, A.I.M.; Maas, P.J. van der

    1999-01-01

    Introducing an organised breast cancer screening programme for certain age groups in a population might induce opportunistic screening in adjacent (non-invited) age groups and influence health behaviour in the target population. We analysed the effect of the start of the Dutch national screening

  6. Performance of a subsidised mammographic screening programme in Malaysia, a middle-income Asian country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Marianne; Mariapun, Shivaani; Rajaram, Nadia; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Yip, Cheng-Har

    2017-01-28

    The incidence of breast cancer in Asia is increasing because of urbanization and lifestyle changes. In the developing countries in Asia, women present at late stages, and mortality is high. Mammographic screening is the only evidence-based screening modality that reduces breast cancer mortality. To date, only opportunistic screening is offered in the majority of Asian countries because of the lack of justification and funding. Nevertheless, there have been few reports on the effectiveness of such programmes. In this study, we describe the cancer detection rate and challenges experienced in an opportunistic mammographic screening programme in Malaysia. From October 2011 to June 2015, 1,778 asymptomatic women, aged 40-74 years, underwent subsidised mammographic screening. All patients had a clinical breast examination before mammographic screening, and women with mammographic abnormalities were referred to a surgeon. The cancer detection rate and variables associated with a recommendation for adjunct ultrasonography were determined. The mean age for screening was 50.8 years and seven cancers (0.39%) were detected. The detection rate was 0.64% in women aged 50 years and above, and 0.12% in women below 50 years old. Adjunct ultrasonography was recommended in 30.7% of women, and was significantly associated with age, menopausal status, mammographic density and radiologist's experience. The main reasons cited for recommendation of an adjunct ultrasound was dense breasts and mammographic abnormalities. The cancer detection rate is similar to population-based screening mammography programmes in high-income Asian countries. Unlike population-based screening programmes in Caucasian populations where the adjunct ultrasonography rate is 2-4%, we report that 3 out of 10 women attending screening mammography were recommended for adjunct ultrasonography. This could be because Asian women attending screening are likely premenopausal and hence have denser breasts. Radiologists who

  7. Performance of a subsidised mammographic screening programme in Malaysia, a middle-income Asian country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Lee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The incidence of breast cancer in Asia is increasing because of urbanization and lifestyle changes. In the developing countries in Asia, women present at late stages, and mortality is high. Mammographic screening is the only evidence-based screening modality that reduces breast cancer mortality. To date, only opportunistic screening is offered in the majority of Asian countries because of the lack of justification and funding. Nevertheless, there have been few reports on the effectiveness of such programmes. In this study, we describe the cancer detection rate and challenges experienced in an opportunistic mammographic screening programme in Malaysia. Methods From October 2011 to June 2015, 1,778 asymptomatic women, aged 40–74 years, underwent subsidised mammographic screening. All patients had a clinical breast examination before mammographic screening, and women with mammographic abnormalities were referred to a surgeon. The cancer detection rate and variables associated with a recommendation for adjunct ultrasonography were determined. Results The mean age for screening was 50.8 years and seven cancers (0.39% were detected. The detection rate was 0.64% in women aged 50 years and above, and 0.12% in women below 50 years old. Adjunct ultrasonography was recommended in 30.7% of women, and was significantly associated with age, menopausal status, mammographic density and radiologist’s experience. The main reasons cited for recommendation of an adjunct ultrasound was dense breasts and mammographic abnormalities. Discussion The cancer detection rate is similar to population-based screening mammography programmes in high-income Asian countries. Unlike population-based screening programmes in Caucasian populations where the adjunct ultrasonography rate is 2–4%, we report that 3 out of 10 women attending screening mammography were recommended for adjunct ultrasonography. This could be because Asian women attending screening

  8. Mammography screening and breast cancer mortality in Australia: an aggregate cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrell, Stephen; Taylor, Richard; Roder, David; Dobson, Annette

    2012-03-01

    Evidence that mammography screening reduces breast cancer mortality derives from trials, with observational studies broadly supporting trial findings. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the national mammographic screening programme, BreastScreen Australia, using aggregate screening and breast cancer mortality data. Breast cancer mortality from 1990 to 2004 in the whole Australian population was assessed in relation to screening exposure in the target of women aged 50-69 years. Population cohorts were defined by year of screening (and diagnosis), five-year age group at screening (and diagnosis), and local area of residence at screening (and diagnosis). Biennial screening data for BreastScreen Australia were related to cumulated mortality from breast cancer in an event analysis using Poisson regression, and in a time-to-event analysis using Cox proportional hazards regression. Results were adjusted for repeated measures and the potential effects of mammography outside BreastScreen Australia, regionality, and area socio-economic status. From the adjusted Poisson regression model, a 22% (95% CI:12-31%) reduction in six-year cumulated mortality from breast cancer was predicted for screening participation of approximately 60%, compared with no screening; 21% (95% CI:11-30%) for the most recently reported screening participation of 56%; and 25% (95% CI:15-35%) for the programme target of 70% biennial screening participation. Corresponding estimates from the Cox proportional hazard regression model were 30% (95% CI:17-41%), 28% (95% CI:16-38%) and 34% (95% CI:20-46%). Despite data limitations, the results of this nationwide study are consistent with the trial evidence, and with results of other service studies of mammography screening. With sufficient participation, mammography screening substantially reduces mortality from breast cancer.

  9. Screening for breast cancer in England: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogben, Rosalyn Katy F

    2008-12-01

    This year, the National Health Service Breast Screening Programme in the UK (NHSBSP) celebrates its 20th anniversary. Since 1988, it has evolved with the help of randomized control studies to become more efficient at picking up in-situ disease and small invasive cancers. This review will address these new developments and discuss their impact on screening. The introduction of extra mammographic views, the reading of films by two specialists and digital mammography as well as age extension have all made significant differences to the detection of breast cancer through screening. A discussion of how less obvious factors such as organization and structure as well as rigorous national audit have improved matters is also included. Controversial topics such as the screening interval and screening women under 50 will also be addressed in this review. Population-based breast screening will continue to evolve in England. It is unique and with its annual national audit it continues to drive the development of breast services nationally.

  10. [How to assess and reduce social inequalities in cancer screening programmes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binefa, Gemma; García, Montse; Peiró, Rosana; Molina-Barceló, Ana; Ibáñez, Raquel

    2016-01-01

    This field note presents the conclusions and recommendations made at the meeting 'How to reduce social inequalities in cancer screening programmes?' held at the XXVI School of Public Health of Mahon (Menorca, Spain). Participants developed recommendations based on experiences of population-based screening programmes (breast and colorectal) and opportunistic screening (cervical). The conclusions and recommendations focused on four main areas (information systems, evaluation and quality, research, and interventions): the inclusion of social variables at an individual level in health information systems; the establishment of minimum standards for gathering information regarding inequalities in access to preventive services; the performance of actions in vulnerable populations; and the promotion of the exchange of experiences and best practices through the Cancer Screening Programmes Network and working groups of the scientific societies. Copyright © 2016 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. Outcome of breast cancer screening in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynge, Elsebeth; Bak, Martin; von Euler-Chelpin, My

    2017-01-01

    Region than in the rest of Denmrk. Detection rate was slightly below 1% at first screen, 0.6% at subsequent screens, and one region had some fluctuation over time. Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) constituted 13-14% of screen-detected cancers. In subsequent rounds, 80% of screen-detected invasive cancers...... were node negative and 40% ≤10 mm. False-positive rate was around 2%; higher for North Denmark Region than for the rest of Denmark. Three out of 10 breast cancers in screened women were diagnosed as interval cancers. Conclusions: High coverage by examination and low interval cancer rate are required...... for screening to decrease breast cancer mortality. Two pioneer local screening programs starting in the 1990s were followed by a decrease in breast cancer mortality of 22-25%. Coverage by examination and interval cancer rate of the national program were on the favorable side of values from the pioneer programs...

  12. Overview of guidelines on breast screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl Jørgensen, Karsten; Kalager, Mette; Barratt, Alexandra

    2017-01-01

    Updated guidelines on breast cancer screening have been published by several major organisations over the past five years. Recommendations vary regarding both age range, screening interval, and even on whether breast screening should be offered at all. The variation between recommendations reflects...... substantial differences in estimates of the major benefit (breast cancer mortality reduction) and the major harm (overdiagnosis). Estimates vary considerably among randomised trials, as well as observational studies: from no benefit to large reductions, and from no overdiagnosis to substantial levels......, such as small effects in absolute terms. There is a need for agreement on a hierarchy of observational study designs to quantify the major benefit and harm of cancer screening. This review provides a summary of recent guidelines on breast cancer screening and their major strengths and weaknesses, as well...

  13. [Attendance of the fourth (2008-2009) screening round of the Hungarian organized, nationwide breast cancer screening program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boncz, Imre; Döbrőssy, Lajos; Péntek, Zoltán; Kovács, Attila; Budai, András; Imre, László; Vajda, Réka; Sebestyén, Andor

    2013-12-01

    Organised, nationwide screening for breast cancer with mammography in the age group between 45 and 65 years with 2 years screening interval started in Hungary in January 2002. The aim of this study is to analyze the attendance rate of nationwide breast screening programme for the 2008-2009 years. The data derive from the database of the National Health Insurance Fund Administration. The ratio of women in the age group 45-65 years was calculated having either a screening mammography or a diagnostic mammography in the 4th screening round of the programme. In the years 2000-2001, 7.6% of the women had an opportunistic screening mammography while in 2008-2009 31.2% of the target population had screening mammography within the organized programme. During the same periods 20.2% (2000-2001) and 20.4% (2008-2009) of women had a diagnostic mammography. Thus the total (screening and diagnostic) coverage of mammography increased from 26.6% (2000-2001) to 50.1% (2008-2009). The attendance rate failed to change between 2002 and 2009. In order to decrease the mortality due to breast cancer, the attendance rate of mammography screening programme should be increased. Orv. Hetil., 154(50), 1975-1983.

  14. Measuring the burden of interval cancers in long-standing screening mammography programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Sune Bangsbøll; Törnberg, Sven; Kilpeläinen, Sini; Lynge, Elsebeth; Njor, Sisse Helle; Von Euler-Chelpin, My

    2015-06-01

    Mammography screening programme sensitivity is evaluated by comparing the interval cancer rate (ICR) with the expected breast cancer incidence without screening, ie. the proportional interval cancer rate (PICR). The PICR is usually found by extrapolating pre-screening incidence rates, whereas ICR is calculated from data available in the screening programmes. As there is no consensus regarding estimation of background incidence, we seek to validate the ICR measure against the PICR. Screening data from the three mammography screening programmes of Stockholm, Copenhagen, and Funen in the period 1989-2011 provided data to calculate the ICR. The most commonly described methods of extrapolating pre-screening incidence rates to calculate the PICR were illustrated and PICRs were calculated by year and programme using these different methods and compared with the ICRs. PICRs varied greatly, reaching a difference of 32-34% in Stockholm, 79% in Copenhagen, and 100-106% in Funen between the highest and the lowest value, depending on which method was applied. PICRs exhibited large variations yearly and from programme to programme. ICRs did not vary to the same extent, ranging on average from 0.100 to 0.136 in the first 12-months and between 0.201 and 0.225 in the last 12-months of the two-year period after a negative screen across the three programmes. The value of the PICR is hugely influenced by which method is applied, whereas the ICR is calculated purely on data available within programmes. We find that the PICR, the establishing indicator for sensitivity, could preferably be replaced by the ICR. © The Author(s) 2015 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  15. Development and implementation of guidelines for quality assurance in breast cancer screening: The European experience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence von Karsa

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In Europe, as in many other regions of the world, breast cancer is a major cause of suffering and death. Early detection of breast cancer by systematic mammography screening can find lesions for which treatment is more effective and generally more favourable for quality of life. Comprehensive quality assurance guidelines for breast cancer screening based on mammography have been developed in the Europe Against Cancer programme with the aim of maximising screening benefits while minimising adverse effects, such as unnecessary examination or treatment resulting from false-positive screening tests. The present report provides an overview of the European experience in developing and implementing quality assurance guidelines for breast cancer screening. It highlights implications relevant to those regions of the world in which the burden of breast cancer in the coming years will make population-based screening an option for cancer control.

  16. Initiation of population-based mammography screening in Dutch municipalities and effect on breast-cancer mortality: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otto, S.J.; Fracheboud, J.; Looman, C.W.; Broeders, M.J.M.; Boer, R.; Hendriks, J.H.C.L.; Verbeek, A.L.M.; Koning, H.J. de

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: More than a decade ago, a mammography screening programme for women aged 50-69 years was initiated in the Netherlands. Our aim was to assess the effect of this programme on breast-cancer mortality rates. METHODS: We examined data for 27948 women who died of breast-cancer aged 55-74 years

  17. Breast transillumination a viable option for breast cancer screening ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Mammography is an established screening tool for breast cancer in high-income countries but may not be feasible for most resource poor nations. Alternative modalities are needed to mitigate the impact of the increasing incidence and mortality due to breast cancer. This may require the development of new ...

  18. Breast cancer screening implementation and reassurance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østerø, J; Siersma, Volkert Dirk; Brodersen, John

    2013-01-01

    with the previous survey. CONCLUSION: An implementation of a screening mammography programme provides reassurance for those women invited to the screening. This reassurance is in contrast to the unbalanced proportion between the intended benefits and the unintended harms of the screening programme.......BACKGROUND: Women not offered screening mammography reported higher levels of negative psychosocial aspects than women offered screening. This was demonstrated in a questionnaire survey where 1000 women were included: 500 women living in areas where the public authorities had never offered...... screening mammography and 500 women living in areas where women had been invited to screening mammography for >10 years. After this baseline survey, nationwide screening mammography was implemented. The aim of this follow-up study was to resurvey the 1000 women and to investigate if the identified...

  19. To nudge or not to nudge: cancer screening programmes and the limits of libertarian paternalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploug, Thomas; Holm, Søren; Brodersen, John

    2012-12-01

    'Nudging--and the underlying idea 'libertarian paternalism'--to an increasing degree influences policy thinking in the healthcare sector. This article discusses the influence exerted upon a woman's choice of participation in the Danish breast screening programme in light of 'libertarian paternalism'. The basic tenet of 'libertarian paternalism' is outlined and the relationship between 'libertarian paternalism' and informed consent investigated. Key elements in the process of enrolling women into the Danish mammography screening programme are introduced. It is shown that for several reasons the influence exerted upon women's choices of participation cannot be justified within a welfare-enhancing libertarian paternalistic framework. The article suggests that screening programmes alternatively adopt a liberty-enhancing approach and considers the practical implications of this alternative.

  20. Does computer-aided detection have a role in the arbitration of discordant double-reading opinions in a breast-screening programme?

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, J J; Cornford, E J

    2009-01-01

    To investigate whether a computer-aided detection (CAD) system could act as an arbitrator of discordant double-reading opinions, replacing the need for an independent third film reader. The mammograms of the 240 women that underwent arbitration by an independent third reader were identified from the 16,629 women attending our screening centre between July 2003 and April 2004. Mammograms of the arbitration cases were digitized and analysed by a CAD system. To assess the ability of CAD to act as the arbitrator, the site of the CAD prompts was retrospectively compared to the site of any abnormality noted by the original film readers. If a CAD prompt was placed on a region marked by one of the film readers then the decision of CAD as the arbitrator was that the women should be recalled for further assessment. If no mark was placed then the region was considered low risk and the decision was not to recall. The decision of CAD as the arbitrator was retrospectively compared with the original recall decision of the independent third reader. There were 21 cancer cases in the group of women undergoing arbitration, diagnosed both at the original screening episode and subsequently. The independent third reader recalled 15/18 (83%) of the cancers that corresponded with the arbitrated lesion. CAD as the arbitrator would have recalled 16/18 (89%) of the cancers that corresponded to the arbitrated lesion. CAD acting as the arbitrator would have resulted in a significant increase in normal women being recalled to assessment in the arbitration group (Parbitrator of discordant double-reading opinions is to increase the recall rate, significantly above what is found when arbitration is performed by an independent third reader. Using CAD as an arbitrator may be an option to deal with discordant double-reading opinions when no other method of consensus or arbitration is available.

  1. Self-assessed health, perceived stress and non-participation in breast cancer screening: A Danish cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Line Flytkjær; Pedersen, Anette Fischer; Andersen, Berit

    2015-01-01

    and subsequent non-participation in breast cancer screening. Methods This population-based cohort study included 4512 women who had participated in a Health Survey in 2006 and who were also the target group (aged 50–69 years) for the first organised breast cancer screening programme -3 years later in the Central...

  2. Screening for breast cancer with mammography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtzsche, Peter C; Nielsen, Margrethe

    2009-01-01

    were significantly larger in the screened groups (RR 1.31, 95% CI 1.22 to 1.42) for the two adequately randomised trials that measured this outcome; the use of radiotherapy was similarly increased. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Screening is likely to reduce breast cancer mortality. As the effect was lowest...

  3. Breast cancer screening effect across breast density strata: A case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waal, D. van der; Ripping, T.M.; Verbeek, A.L.M.; Broeders, M.J.

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer screening is known to reduce breast cancer mortality. A high breast density may affect this reduction. We assessed the effect of screening on breast cancer mortality in women with dense and fatty breasts separately. Analyses were performed within the Nijmegen (Dutch) screening

  4. Screen-detected mucinous breast carcinoma: Potential for delayed diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhillon, R. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Imaging, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, WA (Australia)]. E-mail: ravinder.dhillon@health.wa.gov.au; Depree, P. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Imaging, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, WA (Australia); Metcalf, C. [Department of Anatomical Pathology, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, WA (Australia); Wylie, E. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Imaging, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, WA (Australia)

    2006-05-15

    AIM: To describe the imaging features of 34 screen-detected mucinous carcinomas lesions. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The BreastScreen Western Australia (WA) database between January 1991 and December 2003 was searched. During this period, 214,507 women were screened and 2745 cases of invasive carcinoma and 45 cases of mucinous carcinoma were recorded. Case notes, radiology films and pathology reports of patients with mucinous carcinoma were reviewed. Thirty-four radiologically detected pure mucinous carcinomas are described. RESULTS: Of the pure mucinous carcinomas, the average age at diagnosis was 65 years (range 48-82 years), which was higher than that of other women with breast cancer (average age 60 years) screened at BreastScreen WA. Characteristic mammographic features of mucinous carcinoma are well-circumscribed masses with lobulated margins (26/34). Only 39% (11/28) of tumours were detected at ultrasound, as the smaller lesions less than 15 mm in diameter were often isoechoic with normal fat. Where histological grade was reported at excision, most (25/26) were low to medium-grade tumours (Bloom, Richardson and Elston grade I and II). A significant number of lesions (13/34) were evident on the previous screening examination where they were misinterpreted as benign lesions. However, none of these cases had positive axillary lymph nodes at final diagnosis. CONCLUSION: Although mammographically benign appearances of mucinous carcinoma caused a delay in diagnosis in 38% of the present cases, mucinous breast carcinomas have a favourable prognosis, as they are often low-grade tumours and rarely metastasize. Delay in diagnosis for these tumours in a screening programme may not lead to a significant adverse outcome for most women.

  5. Ultrasound screening of contralateral breast after surgery for breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Ja [Department of Radiology, Seoul Metropolitan Government Seoul National University, Boramae Medical Center (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Se-Yeong; Chang, Jung Min; Cho, Nariya [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital (Korea, Republic of); Han, Wonshik [Department of Surgery, Seoul National University Hospital (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Woo Kyung, E-mail: moonwk@snu.ac.kr [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • The addition of supplemental US to mammography depicted additional 5.0 cancers per 1000 postoperative women. • Positive biopsy rate of mammography-detected lesions was 66.7% (4 of 6) and that of US-detected lesions was 40.0% (6 of 15). • US can be helpful to detect mammographically occult breast cancer in the contralateral breast in women with previous history of cancer and dense breast. - Abstract: Objective: To determine whether supplemental screening ultrasound (US) to mammography could improve cancer detection rate of the contralateral breast in patients with a personal history of breast cancer and dense breasts. Materials and methods: During a one-year study period, 1314 screening patients with a personal history of breast cancer and dense breasts simultaneously underwent mammography and breast US. BI-RADS categories were given for mammography or US-detected lesions in the contralateral breast. The reference standard was histology and/or 1-year imaging follow-up, and the cancer rate according to BI-RADS categories and cancer detection rate and positive biopsy rate according to detection modality were analyzed. Results: Of 1314 patients, 84 patients (6.4%) were categorized as category 3 with one interval cancer and one cancer which was upgraded to category 4A after 6-month follow-up US (2.5% cancer rate, 95% CIs 1.5–9.1%). Fifteen patients (1.1%) had category 4A or 4B lesions in the contralateral breast. Four lesions were detected on mammography (two lesions were also visible on US) and 11 lesions were detected on US and 5 cancers were confirmed (33.3%, 95% CIs 15.0–58.5%). Six patients (0.5%) had category 4C lesions, 2 detected on mammography and 4 on US and 4 cancers were confirmed (66.7%, 95% CIs 29.6–90.8%). No lesions were categorized as category 5 in the contralateral breast. Cancer detection rate by mammography was 3.3 per 1000 patients and that by US was 5.0 per 1000 patients, therefore overall cancer detection rate by

  6. Effect of population breast screening on breast cancer mortality up to 2005 in England and Wales: an individual-level cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, Louise E; Coleman, Derek A; Swerdlow, Anthony J; Moss, Susan M

    2017-01-17

    Population breast screening has been implemented in the UK for over 25 years, but the size of benefit attributable to such programmes remains controversial. We have conducted the first individual-based cohort evaluation of population breast screening in the UK, to estimate the impact of the NHS breast screening programme (NHSBSP) on breast cancer mortality. We followed 988 090 women aged 49-64 years in 1991 resident in England and Wales, who because of the staggered implementation of the NHSBSP, included both invited subjects and an uninvited control group. Individual-level breast screening histories were linked to individual-level mortality and breast cancer incidence data from national registers. Risk of death from breast cancer was investigated by incidence-based mortality analyses in relation to intention to screen and first round attendance. Overdiagnosis of breast cancer following a single screening round was also investigated. Invitation to NHSBSP screening was associated with a reduction in breast cancer mortality in 1991-2005 of 21% (RR=0.79, 95% CI: 0.73-0.84, PBreast cancer deaths among first invitation attenders were 46% lower than among non-attenders (RR=0.54, 95% CI: 0.51-0·57, Pscreen. The results indicate a substantial, statistically significant reduction in breast cancer mortality between 1991 and 2005 associated with NHSBSP activity. This is important in public health terms.

  7. European Breast Cancer Service Screening Outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paci, Eugenio; Broeders, Mireille; Hofvind, Solveig

    2014-01-01

    A recent comprehensive review has been carried out to quantify the benefits and harms of the European population-based mammographic screening programs. Five literature reviews were conducted on the basis of the observational published studies evaluating breast cancer mortality reduction, breast...... seven to nine breast cancer deaths are avoided, four cases are overdiagnosed, 170 women have at least one recall followed by noninvasive assessment with a negative result, and 30 women have at least one recall followed by invasive procedures yielding a negative result. The chance of a breast cancer...... cancer overdiagnosis, and false-positive results. On the basis of the studies reviewed, the authors present a first estimate of the benefit and harm balance sheet. For every 1,000 women screened biennially from ages 50 to 51 years until ages 68 to 69 years and followed up until age 79 years, an estimated...

  8. [The ethical aspects of population screening programme of rare diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pàmpols Ros, Teresa; Terracini, Benedetto; de Abajo Iglesias, Francisco J; Feito Grande, Lydia; Martín-Arribas, M Concepción; Fernández Soria, José María; Redondo Martín Del Olmo, Tomás; Campos Castelló, Jaime; Herrera Carranza, Joaquín; Júdez Gutiérrez, Javier; Abascal Alonso, Moisés; Morales Piga, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    The Committee on Ethics of the Instituto de Investigación de Enfermedades Raras (CEIIER) of the Spanish National Institute of Health Carlos III, presents this article dealing with ethical guidelines regarding the implementation of screening population programmes with special emphasis on genetic screening. After a critical review it has been addressed 24 recommendations concerning 14 topics: evaluation of the opportunity of the programme, including ethical analysis besides scientific evidences and cost/benefits issues; the need to differentiate between research and public health intervention and to built a specific and comprehensive programme; the creation of an interdisciplinary working group which control its implementation and prepare a protocol including justification, development, therapeutic or preventive actions and follow-up activities; the review of the programme by an independent Ethical committee; the guarantee of the voluntary, universal and equitable population access, which requires sufficient information on the programme and their specific relevant facts, as incidental detection of heterozygous state in minors in newborn screening and the relevance of non directive genetic counselling specially in prenatal screening offered to pregnant women; considerations regarding future uses of samples for research purposes; total quality and periodic programme evaluation; guarantee of personal data confidentiality and the conflict of interest statement of the members of all the Committees involved in the programme.

  9. Outcome of breast cancer screening in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynge, Elsebeth; Bak, Martin; von Euler-Chelpin, My

    2017-01-01

    were node negative and 40% ≤10 mm. False-positive rate was around 2%; higher for North Denmark Region than for the rest of Denmark. Three out of 10 breast cancers in screened women were diagnosed as interval cancers. Conclusions: High coverage by examination and low interval cancer rate are required...... for screening to decrease breast cancer mortality. Two pioneer local screening programs starting in the 1990s were followed by a decrease in breast cancer mortality of 22-25%. Coverage by examination and interval cancer rate of the national program were on the favorable side of values from the pioneer programs...... calculated coverage by examination; participation after invitation; detection-, interval cancer- and false-positive rates; cancer characteristics; sensitivity and specificity, for Denmark and for the five regions. Results: At the national level coverage by examination remained at 75-77%; lower in the Capital...

  10. Round one of the Adelaide and Meath Hospital/Trinity College Colorectal Cancer Screening Programme: programme report and analysis based on established international key performance indices.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McNamara, D

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: In Ireland, colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most frequently diagnosed cancer in men, after prostate cancer, and the second most frequently diagnosed cancer in women, after breast cancer. By 2020, the number of new cases diagnosed annually in Ireland is projected to have increased by 79% in men and 56% in women. Organised screening for CRC is already underway or is in the process of being rolled out in several European countries, either at a regional or national level. The Adelaide and Meath Hospital\\/ Trinity College Dublin Colorectal Cancer Screening Programme (TTC-CRC-SP) is Ireland\\'s first pilot population based bowel screening programme. METHOD: Based on a biennial test model the pilot aimed to assess the accuracy of FIT and to evaluate the whole programme based on established international key performance indices. RESULTS: To date 9,993 individuals aged 50-74 years have been invited to participate in the TTC-CRC-SP with over 5,000 FIT\\'s analysed. Overall uptake was 51% and FIT positivity was 10%. The programme has undertaken over 400 screening colonoscopies and detected 154 precancerous adenomas and 38 cancerous lesions. CONCLUSIONS: The first round of The Adelaide and Meath Hospital Tallaght\\/Trinity College Dublin Colorectal Cancer Screening Programme has been highly successful and confirmed that there is an advantage for FIT based two stage bowel cancer screening programmes.

  11. Round one of the Adelaide and Meath Hospital/Trinity College Colorectal Cancer Screening Programme: programme report and analysis based on established international key performance indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, D; Qasim, A; Lee, N; Condon, C; O'Morain, C

    2011-06-01

    In Ireland, colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most frequently diagnosed cancer in men, after prostate cancer, and the second most frequently diagnosed cancer in women, after breast cancer. By 2020, the number of new cases diagnosed annually in Ireland is projected to have increased by 79% in men and 56% in women. Organised screening for CRC is already underway or is in the process of being rolled out in several European countries, either at a regional or national level. The Adelaide and Meath Hospital/ Trinity College Dublin Colorectal Cancer Screening Programme (TTC-CRC-SP) is Ireland's first pilot population based bowel screening programme. Based on a biennial test model the pilot aimed to assess the accuracy of FIT and to evaluate the whole programme based on established international key performance indices. To date 9,993 individuals aged 50-74 years have been invited to participate in the TTC-CRC-SP with over 5,000 FIT's analysed. Overall uptake was 51% and FIT positivity was 10%. The programme has undertaken over 400 screening colonoscopies and detected 154 precancerous adenomas and 38 cancerous lesions. The first round of The Adelaide and Meath Hospital Tallaght/Trinity College Dublin Colorectal Cancer Screening Programme has been highly successful and confirmed that there is an advantage for FIT based two stage bowel cancer screening programmes.

  12. Diabetic retinopathy - the Ophthalmology Society of Southern Africa screening programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, S

    2013-06-10

    Screening for diabetic retinopathy (DR) not only allows for detection of microvascular complications, but for detection of other comorbidities. Recent advances in digital camera technology have improved screening for DR and many countries have established systems that screen all diabetics for DR annually. However, South Africa has lagged behind due to pressures at the primary care level, with the result that many diabetics are not screened. In response, the Ophthalmology Society of Southern Africa has developed a low-cost 'scorecard' system for a national DR screening programme.

  13. Comparing barriers to colorectal cancer screening with barriers to breast and cervical screening: a population-based survey of screening-age women in Great Britain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Siu Hing; Waller, Jo; Wardle, Jane; von Wagner, Christian

    2013-06-01

    Uptake of cancer screening tends to be lower for colorectal cancer (CRC) than cervical or breast cancer. Dislike of the test itself has often been identified as a barrier to CRC screening with the Faecal Occult Blood (FOB) test, but there have been no head-to-head comparisons of the three tests. Women aged 50-80 (n = 890) were recruited in spring 2012 as part of a population-based TNS Research International survey in Great Britain. Those in the eligible age range were asked if they had ever participated in breast, cervical or CRC screening. For each screening test, women who had never participated were asked for their 'main reason' using a checklist of barriers. Among eligible women, 67%, 83% and 90% reported ever having been screened for CRC, cervical and breast cancer respectively. More socioeconomically deprived women were less likely to report any screening, and single women were less likely to report CRC or breast screening than married women. Age was not associated with participation. Overall there were few differences between tests in the reported barriers, but dislike of the test was endorsed more often for CRC screening. This was the first study to compare barriers to participation in organised screening programmes for CRC, breast and cervical cancer. Cancer screening tests share many barriers, but dislike of the test appears to be a stronger barrier to CRC screening. Women who are non-participants in more than one programme may have more global barriers to screening, such as cancer fatalism. The findings suggest that uptake of CRC screening could be improved by targeting the unpleasantness of stool sampling.

  14. The National Newborn Bloodspot Screening Programme (NNBSP) process review 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, P; Hegarty, M; Smith, L

    2013-06-01

    The National Newborn Bloodspot Screening Programme (NNBSP) incorporates screening for several conditions where early identification helps prevent serious disability or mortality. A national group was established (2009) to plan for the inclusion of screening for cystic fibrosis (CF); as part of this process a review of the existing NNBSP was undertaken. Information was obtained through consultation with the Director of the National Newborn Bloodspot Screening Laboratory (NNBSL) and survey of maternity units (20), Local Health Office (LHO) areas (32), and practicing domiciliary midwives (16). Response rate: hospitals 100%; LHO areas 100%; domiciliary midwives 56%. Potential for strengthening quality assurance was identified e.g. single comprehensive screening register, consistent and timely procedures for checking results. Recommendations, many of which have since been implemented, included overall governance structure, liaison officer, quality assurance programme, ring-fenced funding, standardised unique identifier, dedicated laboratory IT system, secure web-based transmission of results and fail-safe method of tracking samples.

  15. The need for supplemental breast cancer screening modalities: a perspective of population-based breast cancer screening programs in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uematsu, Takayoshi

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses possible supplemental breast cancer screening modalities for younger women with dense breasts from a perspective of population-based breast cancer screening program in Japan. Supplemental breast cancer screening modalities have been proposed to increase the sensitivity and detection rates of early stage breast cancer in women with dense breasts; however, there are no global guidelines that recommend the use of supplemental breast cancer screening modalities in such women. Also, no criterion standard exists for breast density assessment. Based on the current situation of breast imaging in Japan, the possible supplemental breast cancer screening modalities are ultrasonography, digital breast tomosynthesis, and breast magnetic resonance imaging. An appropriate population-based breast cancer screening program based on the balance between cost and benefit should be a high priority. Further research based on evidence-based medicine is encouraged. It is very important that the ethnicity, workforce, workflow, and resources for breast cancer screening in each country should be considered when considering supplemental breast cancer screening modalities for women with dense breasts.

  16. Breast cancer incidence and mortality in Tyrol/Austria after fifteen years of opportunistic mammography screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frede Thomas

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to analyse breast cancer incidence and mortality in Tyrol from 1970 to 2006, namely after performing more than a decade of opportunistic mammography screening and just before piloting an organised screening programme. Our investigation was conducted on a population level. Methods To study time trends in breast cancer incidence and mortality, we applied the age-period-cohort model by Poisson regression to the official mortality data covering more than three decades from 1970 to 2006 and to the incidence data ranging from 1988 to 2006. In addition, for incidence data we analysed data on breast cancer staging and compared these with EU guidelines. Results For the analysis of time trend in breast cancer mortality in age groups 40-79, an age-period-cohort model fits well and shows for years 2002-2006 a statistically significant reduction of 26% (95% CI 13%-36% in breast cancer mortality as compared to 1992-1996. We see only slight non-significant increases in breast cancer incidence. For the past five years, incidence data show a 10% proportion of in situ cases, and of 50% for cases in stages II+. Conclusions The opportunistic breast cancer screening programme in Tyrol has only in part exploited the mortality reduction known for organised screening programmes. There seems to be potential for further improvement, and we recommend that an organised screening programme and a detailed screening database be introduced to collect all information needed to analyse the quality indicators suggested by the EU guidelines.

  17. Preconceptions influence women's perceptions of information on breast cancer screening: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, Mikael Johannes Vuokko; Guassora, Ann Dorrit; Brodersen, John

    2015-09-03

    Screening for breast cancer has been subject to intense debate in recent decades regarding benefits and risks. Participation in breast cancer screening should be based on informed choice, and most countries approach this by sending information leaflets with invitations to attend screening. However, very little attention has been paid to the decision-making process and how the information leaflets are used and understood by women. The aim of this study is twofold. First, we use a theoretical framework to explore how the framing of information influences the intention to participate in breast cancer screening. Second, we discuss how information and attitudes held prior to receiving the invitation influence the perception of the balance between the benefits and risks harms of screening. We used a qualitative design and interviewed six women who were soon to receive their first invitation to participate in the breast screening programme in Denmark. The selected women received a copy of the official information leaflet 1 week before we interviewed them. The six women were interviewed individually using an interview guide based on the theory of planned behaviour. We used meaning condensation for our initial analysis, and further analysis was guided by the theory of cognitive dissonance. For our participants, the decision-making process was dominated by the attitudes of the women's circle of acquaintances and, to a lesser extent, by the information that accompanied the screening invitation. Information that conflicted with attitudes the women already held was actively disregarded. The risk of overdiagnosis as a potentially harmful effect of participation in mammography screening was unknown to the women in our study. An isolated framing effect was not found. Women have expectations about breast cancer screening that are formed before they receive information from the screening programme. These expectations compromise the perception of balance between screening benefits

  18. Balancing the benefits and detriments among women targeted by the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofvind, Solveig; Román, Marta; Sebuødegård, Sofie; Falk, Ragnhild S

    2016-12-01

    To compute a ratio between the estimated numbers of lives saved from breast cancer death and the number of women diagnosed with a breast cancer that never would have been diagnosed during the woman's lifetime had she not attended screening (epidemiologic over-diagnosis) in the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program. The Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program invites women aged 50-69 to biennial mammographic screening. Results from published studies using individual level data from the programme for estimating breast cancer mortality and epidemiologic over-diagnosis comprised the basis for the ratio. The mortality reduction varied from 36.8% to 43% among screened women, while estimates on epidemiologic over-diagnosis ranged from 7% to 19.6%. We computed the average estimates for both values. The benefit-detriment ratio, number of lives saved, and number of women over-diagnosed were computed for different scenarios of reduction in breast cancer mortality and epidemiologic over-diagnosis. For every 10,000 biennially screened women, followed until age 79, we estimated that 53-61 (average 57) women were saved from breast cancer death, and 45-126 (average 82) were over-diagnosed. The benefit-detriment ratio using average estimates was 1:1.4, indicating that the programme saved about one life per 1-2 women with epidemiologic over-diagnosis. The benefit-detriment ratio estimates of the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program, expressed as lives saved from breast cancer death and epidemiologic over-diagnosis, should be interpreted with care due to substantial uncertainties in the estimates, and the differences in the scale of values of the events compared. © The Author(s) 2016.

  19. Interventions for increasing uptake in screening programmes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Droste, Sigrid

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Opportunities for the early detection of disease are not sufficiently being taken advantage of. Specific interventions could increase the uptake of prevention programmes. A comprehensive analysis of effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of these interventions with reference to Germany is still needed. Objectives: This report aimed to describe and assess interventions to increase uptake in primary and secondary prevention and to explore the assessment of their cost-effectiveness. Methods: 29 scientific databases were systematically searched in a wide strategy. Additional references were located from bibliographies. All published systematic reviews and primary studies were assessed for inclusion without language restrictions. Teams of two reviewers identified the literature, extracted data and assessed the quality of the publications independently. Results: Four HTA reports and 22 systematic reviews were identified for the medical evaluation covering a variety of interventions. The economic evaluation was based on two HTA-reports, one meta-analysis and 15 studies. The evidence was consistent for the effectiveness of invitations and reminders aimed at users, and for prompts aimed at health care professionals. These interventions were the most commonly analysed. (Financial Incentives for users and professionals were identified in a small number of studies. Limited evidence was available for cost-effectiveness showing incremental costs for follow-up reminders and invitations by telephone. Evidence for ethical, social and legal aspects pointed to needs in vulnerable populations. Discussion: The material was heterogeneous regarding interventions used, study populations and settings. The majority of references originated from the United States and focused on secondary prevention. Approaching all target groups by invitations and reminders was recommended to increase uptake in prevention programmes in general. Conclusions: Further research

  20. Initial results from the newborn hearing screening programme in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, A

    2013-03-02

    INTRODUCTION: Hearing screening programmes aim to detect hearing loss in the neonate. The Health Service Executive (HSE) South was the first phase of a national roll-out of a neonatal hearing screening programme in Ireland, going live on 28 April 2011. RESULTS: Over 11,738 babies have been screened for permanent childhood hearing impairment (PCHI) during the first 12 months. The percentage of eligible babies offered hearing screening was 99.2 %. Only 0.2 % (n = 25) of those offered screening declined. 493 (4 %) were referred for immediate diagnostic audiological assessment. The average time between screen and diagnostic audiology appointment was 2 weeks. 15 (1.3\\/1,000) babies have been identified with a PCHI over the 12-month period. 946 (4 %) babies screened were admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) for >48 h. The prevalance of PCHI is 7.3\\/1,000 in the NICU population compared to 0.6\\/1000 in the well baby population. 214 (1.8 % of total babies screened) had a clear response in the screening programmes, but were deemed to be at risk of an acquired childhood hearing impairment. These babies will be reassessed with a diagnostic audiology appointment at 8-9 months of age. To date, there is one case of acquired hearing impairment through this targeted follow-up screen. Of the 15 cases of PCHI identified, 8 (53 %) of these had one or more risk factors for hearing loss and 7 (37 %) were admitted to the NICU for >48 h. Four babies were referred for assessment at the National Cochlear Implant Centre.

  1. Comparison of early performance indicators for screening projects within the European Breast Cancer Network: 1989-2000.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broeders, M.J.M.; Scharpantgen, A.; Ascunce, N.; Gairard, B.; Olsen, A.H.; Mantellini, P.; Mota, T.C.; Limbergen, E. van; Seradour, B.; Ponti, A.; Trejo, L.S.; Nystrom, L.

    2005-01-01

    In 1989 the European Breast Cancer Network (EBCN) was established by the first pilot projects for breast cancer screening, co-funded by the Europe Against Cancer programme. We report early performance indicators for these EBCN projects while taking into account their organizational setting. Out of

  2. Comparison of breast and bowel cancer screening uptake patterns in a common cohort of South Asian women in England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gumber Anil K

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inequalities in uptake of cancer screening by ethnic minority populations are well documented in a number of international studies. However, most studies to date have explored screening uptake for a single cancer only. This paper compares breast and bowel cancer screening uptake for a cohort of South Asian women invited to undertake both, and similarly investigates these women's breast cancer screening behaviour over a period of fifteen years. Methods Screening data for rounds 1, 2 and 5 (1989-2004 of the NHS breast cancer screening programme and for round 1 of the NHS bowel screening pilot (2000-2002 were obtained for women aged 50-69 resident in the English bowel screening pilot site, Coventry and Warwickshire, who had been invited to undertake breast and bowel cancer screening in the period 2000-2002. Breast and bowel cancer screening uptake levels were calculated and compared using the chi-squared test. Results 72,566 women were invited to breast and bowel cancer screening after exclusions. Of these, 3,539 were South Asian and 69,027 non-Asian; 18,730 had been invited to mammography over the previous fifteen years (rounds 1 to 5. South Asian women were significantly less likely to undertake both breast and bowel cancer screening; 29.9% (n = 1,057 compared to 59.4% (n = 40,969 for non-Asians (p Conclusions Culturally appropriate targeted interventions are required to reduce observed disparities in cancer screening uptakes.

  3. Overdiagnosis in breast cancer screening: the importance of length of observation period and lead time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Stephen W; Parmar, Dharmishta

    2013-05-16

    Overdiagnosis in breast cancer screening is a controversial topic. One difficulty in estimation of overdiagnosis is the separation of overdiagnosis from lead time that is the advance in the time of diagnosis of cancers, which confers an artificial increase in incidence when a screening programme is introduced. We postulated a female population aged 50-79 with a similar age structure and age-specific breast cancer incidence as in England and Wales before the screening programme. We then imposed a two-yearly screening programme; screening women aged 50-69, to run for twenty years, with exponentially distributed lead time with an average of 40 months in screen-detected cancers. We imposed no effect of the screening on incidence other than lead time. Comparison of age- and time-specific incidence between the screened and unscreened populations showed a major effect of lead time, which could only be adjusted for by follow-up for more than two decades and including ten years after the last screen. From lead time alone, twenty-year observation at ages 50-69 would confer an observed excess incidence of 37%. The excess would only fall below 10% with 25 years or more follow-up. For the excess to be nullified, we would require 30 year follow-up including observation up to 10 years above the upper age limit for screening. Studies using shorter observation periods will overestimate overdiagnosis by inclusion of cancers diagnosed early due to lead time among the nominally overdiagnosed tumours.

  4. Values in breast cancer screening: an empirical study with Australian experts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Lisa; Rychetnik, Lucie; Carter, Stacy

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore what Australian experts value in breast screening, how these values are conceptualised and prioritised, and how they inform experts’ reasoning and judgement about the Australian breast-screening programme. Design Qualitative study based on interviews with experts. Participants 33 experts, including clinicians, programme managers, policymakers, advocates and researchers selected for their recognisable influence in the Australian breast-screening setting. Setting Australian breast-screening policy, practice and research settings. Results Experts expressed 2 types of values: ethical values (about what was good, important or right) and epistemological values (about how evidence should be created and used). Ethical values included delivering benefit, avoiding harm, promoting autonomy, fairness, cost effectiveness, accountability, professionalism and transparency. Epistemological values informed experts’ arguments about prioritising and evaluating evidence methodology, source population and professional interests. Some values were conceptualised differently by experts: for example, delivering benefit could mean reducing breast cancer mortality, reducing all-cause mortality, reducing mortality in younger women, reducing need for aggressive treatment, and/or reassuring women they were cancer free. When values came into conflict, experts prioritised them differently: for example, when experts perceived a conflict between delivering benefits and promoting autonomy, there were differences in which value was prioritised. We explain the complexity of the relationship between held values and experts’ overall views on breast cancer screening. Conclusions Experts’ positions in breast screening are influenced by evidence and a wide range of ethical and epistemological values. We conclude that discussions about values should be a regular part of breast-screening review in order to build understanding between those who hold different positions, and

  5. Values in breast cancer screening: an empirical study with Australian experts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Lisa; Rychetnik, Lucie; Carter, Stacy

    2015-05-20

    To explore what Australian experts value in breast screening, how these values are conceptualised and prioritised, and how they inform experts' reasoning and judgement about the Australian breast-screening programme. Qualitative study based on interviews with experts. 33 experts, including clinicians, programme managers, policymakers, advocates and researchers selected for their recognisable influence in the Australian breast-screening setting. Australian breast-screening policy, practice and research settings. Experts expressed 2 types of values: ethical values (about what was good, important or right) and epistemological values (about how evidence should be created and used). Ethical values included delivering benefit, avoiding harm, promoting autonomy, fairness, cost effectiveness, accountability, professionalism and transparency. Epistemological values informed experts' arguments about prioritising and evaluating evidence methodology, source population and professional interests. Some values were conceptualised differently by experts: for example, delivering benefit could mean reducing breast cancer mortality, reducing all-cause mortality, reducing mortality in younger women, reducing need for aggressive treatment, and/or reassuring women they were cancer free. When values came into conflict, experts prioritised them differently: for example, when experts perceived a conflict between delivering benefits and promoting autonomy, there were differences in which value was prioritised. We explain the complexity of the relationship between held values and experts' overall views on breast cancer screening. Experts' positions in breast screening are influenced by evidence and a wide range of ethical and epistemological values. We conclude that discussions about values should be a regular part of breast-screening review in order to build understanding between those who hold different positions, and provide a mechanism for responding to these differences. Published by

  6. Medical auditing of whole-breast screening ultrasonography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Jung [Dept. of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-07-15

    Since breast ultrasonography (US) has been used as an adjunctive screening modality in women with dense breasts, the need has arisen to evaluate and monitor its possible harm and benefits in comparison with other screening modalities such as mammography. Recently, the fifth edition of the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System published by the American College of Radiology has suggested auditing methods for screening breast US. However, the method proposed therein is slightly different from how diagnostic performance was calculated in previous studies on screening breast US. In this article, the background and core aspects of medical audits of breast cancer screening will be reviewed to provide an introduction to the medical auditing of screening breast US, with the goal of helping radiologists to understand and identify potential ways to improve outcomes.

  7. Medical auditing of whole-breast screening ultrasonography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Jung Kim

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Since breast ultrasonography (US has been used as an adjunctive screening modality in women with dense breasts, the need has arisen to evaluate and monitor its possible harm and benefits in comparison with other screening modalities such as mammography. Recently, the fifth edition of the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System published by the American College of Radiology has suggested auditing methods for screening breast US. However, the method proposed therein is slightly different from how diagnostic performance was calculated in previous studies on screening breast US. In this article, the background and core aspects of medical audits of breast cancer screening will be reviewed to provide an introduction to the medical auditing of screening breast US, with the goal of helping radiologists to understand and identify potential ways to improve outcomes.

  8. A dedicated BI-RADS training programme: Effect on the inter-observer variation among screening radiologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timmers, J.M.H., E-mail: j.timmers@lrcb.nl [National Expert and Training Centre for Breast Cancer Screening, PO Box 6873, 6503 GJ Nijmegen (Netherlands); Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and HTA, PO Box 9101, 6500 HB Nijmegen (Netherlands); Doorne-Nagtegaal, H.J. van [Comprehensive Cancer Centre the Netherlands (IKNL), location Amsterdam, PO Box 9236, 1006 AE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Verbeek, A.L.M. [National Expert and Training Centre for Breast Cancer Screening, PO Box 6873, 6503 GJ Nijmegen (Netherlands); Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and HTA, PO Box 9101, 6500 HB Nijmegen (Netherlands); Heeten, G.J. den [National Expert and Training Centre for Breast Cancer Screening, PO Box 6873, 6503 GJ Nijmegen (Netherlands); Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, PO Box 22660, 100 MD Amsterdam (Netherlands); Broeders, M.J.M. [National Expert and Training Centre for Breast Cancer Screening, PO Box 6873, 6503 GJ Nijmegen (Netherlands); Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and HTA, PO Box 9101, 6500 HB Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2012-09-15

    Introduction: The Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) was introduced in the Dutch breast cancer screening programme to improve communication between medical specialists. Following introduction, a substantial variation in the use of the BI-RADS lexicon for final assessment categories was noted among screening radiologists. We set up a dedicated training programme to reduce this variation. This study evaluates whether this programme was effective. Materials and methods: Two comparable test sets were read before and after completion of the training programme. Each set contained 30 screening mammograms of referred women selected from screening practice. The sets were read by 25 experienced and 30 new screening radiologists. Cohen's kappa (κ) was used to calculate the inter-observer agreement. The BI-RADS 2003 version was implemented in the screening programme as the BI-RADS 2008 version requires the availability of diagnostic work-up, and this is unavailable. Results: The inter-observer agreement of all participating radiologists (n = 55) with the expert panel increased from a pre-training κ-value of 0.44 to a post-training κ-value of 0.48 (p = 0.14). The inter-observer agreement of the new screening radiologists (n = 30) with the expert panel increased from κ = 0.41 to κ = 0.50 (p = 0.01), whereas there was no difference in agreement among the 25 experienced radiologists (from κ = 0.48 to κ = 0.46, p = 0.60). Conclusion: Our training programme in the BI-RADS lexicon resulted in a significant improvement of agreement among new screening radiologists. Overall, the agreement among radiologists was moderate (guidelines Landis and Koch). This is in line with results found in the literature.

  9. Overdiagnosis of breast cancer in population screening: does it make breast screening worthless?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houssami, Nehmat

    2017-01-01

    The risk of breast cancer (BC) overdiagnosis attributed to mammography screening is an unresolved issue, complicated by heterogeneity in the methodology of quantifying its magnitude, and both political and scientific elements surrounding interpretation of the evidence on this phenomenon. Evidence from randomized trials and also from observational studies shows that mammography screening reduces the risk of BC death; similarly, these studies provide sufficient evidence that overdiagnosis represents a serious harm from population breast screening. For both these outcomes of screening, BC mortality reduction and overdiagnosis, estimates of magnitude vary between studies however overdiagnosis estimates are associated with substantial uncertainty. The trade-off between the benefit and the collective harms of BC screening, including false-positives and overdiagnosis, is more finely balanced than initially recognized, however the snapshot of evidence presented on overdiagnosis does not mean that breast screening is worthless. Future efforts should be directed towards (a) ensuring that any changes in the implementation of BC screening optimize the balance between benefit and harms, including assessing how planned or actual changes modify the risk of overdiagnosis; (b) informing women of all the outcomes that may affect them when they participate in screening using well-crafted and balanced information; and (c) investing in research that will help define and reduce the ensuing overtreatment of screen-detected BC. PMID:28443199

  10. Knowledge of breast cancer screening methods and the practice of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mammography still remains the best method for breast cancer screening. Objective: To assess the knowledge of female nursing students in a tertiary health institution on the screening methods for breast cancer as well as their practice of breast self-examination. Design: A descriptive cross-sectional study. Setting: School of ...

  11. Breast Cancer Screening (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breast cancer screening is performed using mammogram, clinical breast exam (CBE), and MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) tests. Learn about these and other tests that have been studied to detect or screen for breast cancer in this expert-reviewed and evidence-based summary.

  12. Breast cancer in Iran: need for greater women awareness of warning signs and effective screening methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montazeri Ali

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer remains an important public health problem. This study aimed to investigate about female knowledge of breast cancer and self-reported practice of breast self-examination in Iran. Methods This was a population-based survey carried out in Tehran, Iran. Data were collected via a structured questionnaire containing 15 questions on demographic status, history of personal and family breast problems, subjective knowledge about breast cancer covering its symptoms, the screening methods and practice of breast self-examination (BSE. A trained female nurse interviewed each respondent. Analysis included descriptive statistics and the Chi-squared test where necessary. Results A total of 1402 women were interviewed. The mean age of respondents was 43.4 (SD = 14.4 years; most were married (85%, and without any personal (94% and family history (90% of breast problems. It was found that 64% of the respondents were familiar with breast cancer and 61% (n = 851 believed that 'the disease is relatively common among women in Iran'. Most women (44% perceived a painless mass as a breast cancer symptom. Overall, 61% of the respondents stated that they knew about breast cancer screening programs and most indicated that electronic media (television 34% and radio 14% were their source of information. Only 17% of women said that 'they were conducting regular breast self-examination'. The main reason for women not doing breast self-examination was due to the fact that they did not know how to do it (64%. The findings indicated that performing breast self-examination is significantly related to: age, marital status, education, knowledge of breast cancer and knowledge about breast cancer screening programs (p Conclusion This descriptive study provides useful information that could be utilized by both researchers and those involved in public health programmes. The findings indicated that the women awareness of breast cancer warning signs

  13. BREAST CANCER IN SLOVENIA: EPIDEMIOLOGY AND SCREENING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Primic Žakelj

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Breast is the most frequent cancer site in Slovenian female population. In the year 2000 there were 932 new breast cancer cases registered (91.2/100,000, the incidence is expected to increase in the next ten years. Primary prevention includes general recommendations for healthy life style, e.g. avoidance of obesity, diet, physical activity and moderate alcohol consumption. Randomised controlled trials conducted in the USA, Canada, Scotland and Sweden have shown that regular mammography, alone or in combination with clinical examination, is effective in reducing mortality for about 25% in women over the age of 50, and much less in younger population. However, mammography screening has several drawbacks, the major being its tendency towards false positive and false negative results with all their potential psychosocial consequences. High quality assurance and control, as well as effective and readily available diagnostics and treatment, all of which demand high investments, are indispensable for good results.Conclusions. In Slovenia there are standards for breast cancer screening units, but their implementation in every day’s work is still a problem. In any case, breast cancer control could be achieved only by combined efforts directed into primary prevention and early detection, as well as by improving availability of effective treatment.

  14. Alternative screening for women with dense breasts: breast-specific gamma imaging (molecular breast imaging).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, Anna; Newel, Mary S

    2015-02-01

    OBJECTIVE. Given mammography's limitations in evaluating dense breasts, examination with breast-specific gamma imaging (BSGI)-also called molecular breast imaging (MBI)-has been proposed. We review the literature pertinent to the performance of BSGI in patients with dense breasts. CONCLUSION. Many studies have reported the sensitivity of BSGI in finding cancers even in dense breasts. However, BSGI has not yet been validated as an effective screening tool in large prospective studies. In addition, whole-body dose remains a significant concern.

  15. Comparing Visually Assessed BI-RADS Breast Density and Automated Volumetric Breast Density Software: A Cross-Sectional Study in a Breast Cancer Screening Setting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniëlle van der Waal

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to compare different methods for measuring breast density, both visual assessments and automated volumetric density, in a breast cancer screening setting. These measures could potentially be implemented in future screening programmes, in the context of personalised screening or screening evaluation.Digital mammographic exams (N = 992 of women participating in the Dutch breast cancer screening programme (age 50-75y in 2013 were included. Breast density was measured in three different ways: BI-RADS density (5th edition and with two commercially available automated software programs (Quantra and Volpara volumetric density. BI-RADS density (ordinal scale was assessed by three radiologists. Quantra (v1.3 and Volpara (v1.5.0 provide continuous estimates. Different comparison methods were used, including Bland-Altman plots and correlation coefficients (e.g., intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC].Based on the BI-RADS classification, 40.8% of the women had 'heterogeneously or extremely dense' breasts. The median volumetric percent density was 12.1% (IQR: 9.6-16.5 for Quantra, which was higher than the Volpara estimate (median 6.6%, IQR: 4.4-10.9. The mean difference between Quantra and Volpara was 5.19% (95% CI: 5.04-5.34 (ICC: 0.64. There was a clear increase in volumetric percent dense volume as BI-RADS density increased. The highest accuracy for predicting the presence of BI-RADS c+d (heterogeneously or extremely dense was observed with a cut-off value of 8.0% for Volpara and 13.8% for Quantra.Although there was no perfect agreement, there appeared to be a strong association between all three measures. Both volumetric density measures seem to be usable in breast cancer screening programmes, provided that the required data flow can be realized.

  16. Cost-effectiveness of annual versus biennial screening mammography for women with high mammographic breast density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pataky, Reka; Ismail, Zahra; Coldman, Andrew J; Elwood, Mark; Gelmon, Karen; Hedden, Lindsay; Hislop, Greg; Kan, Lisa; McCoy, Bonnie; Olivotto, Ivo A; Peacock, Stuart

    2014-12-01

    The sensitivity of screening mammography is much lower among women who have dense breast tissue, compared with women who have largely fatty breasts, and they are also at much higher risk of developing the disease. Increasing mammography screening frequency from biennially to annually has been suggested as a policy option to address the elevated risk in this population. The purpose of this study was to assess the cost-effectiveness of annual versus biennial screening mammography among women aged 50-79 with dense breast tissue. A Markov model was constructed based on screening, diagnostic, and treatment pathways for the population-based screening and cancer care programme in British Columbia, Canada. Model probabilities and screening costs were calculated from screening programme data. Costs for breast cancer treatment were calculated from treatment data, and utility values were obtained from the literature. Incremental cost-effectiveness was expressed as cost per quality adjusted life year (QALY), and probabilistic sensitivity analysis was conducted. Compared with biennial screening, annual screening generated an additional 0.0014 QALYs (95% CI: -0.0480-0.0359) at a cost of $819 ($ = Canadian dollars) per patient (95% CI: 506-1185), resulting in an incremental cost effectiveness ratio of $565,912/QALY. Annual screening had a 37.5% probability of being cost-effective at a willingness-to-pay threshold of $100,000/QALY. There is considerable uncertainty about the incremental cost-effectiveness of annual mammography. Further research on the comparative effectiveness of screening strategies for women with high mammographic breast density is warranted, particularly as digital mammography and density measurement become more widespread, before cost-effectiveness can be reevaluated. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  17. Stage and survival in breast cancer patients in screened and non-screened Danish and Swedish populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anni R; Garne, Jens P; Storm, Hans H

    2003-01-01

    approach those of the Swedish registry. Complete population-based cohorts of patients with breast cancer in the years 1996-1997 from well-defined areas in Denmark and Sweden were compared. The study regions were a Danish (Funen) and a Swedish (Malmö) county with mammography screening and two Danish...... of populations provided with a screening programme. Five-year survival was 5-6%, higher in screening populations than in Danish non-screening counties. Corresponding disease-specific survival enhanced the difference. In a multivariate analysis increasing age, tumour size and stage decreased survival. Adjusting......Comparisons between the Danish and Swedish Cancer Registry revealed a 9% difference in 5-year survival for breast cancer patients diagnosed between 1983 and 1989. The purpose of this study was to determine whether previous differences in survival and stage still exist or whether the Danish figures...

  18. Breast cancer screening and cost-effectiveness; policy alternatives, quality of life considerations and the possible impact of uncertain factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Koning, H. J.; van Ineveld, B. M.; van Oortmarssen, G. J.; de Haes, J. C.; Collette, H. J.; Hendriks, J. H.; van der Maas, P. J.

    1991-01-01

    Mammographic screening for women aged 50-70 is effective in reducing breast cancer mortality, but the impact on quality of life and the attainable mortality reduction remain to be discussed. The consequences of expanding screening programmes to include women in other age groups are uncertain. We

  19. Lay Epistemology of Breast Cancer Screening Guidelines Among Appalachian Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Record, Rachael A; Scott, Allison M; Shaunfield, Sara; Jones, M Grace; Collins, Tom; Cohen, Elisia L

    2017-09-01

    Recent changes to the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force guidelines for breast cancer screening have contributed to increased patient uncertainty regarding the timing and appropriateness of screening behaviors. To gain insight into the lay epistemology of women regarding breast cancer screening practices, we conducted in-depth, face-to-face interviews with 24 adult women living in a medically underserved Appalachian region. We found that women were unaware of breast cancer screening guidelines (i.e., start age, frequency, stop age). Qualitative analysis revealed two lay epistemological narratives establishing (a) uncertain knowledge and ambiguity about breast cancer screening guidelines but certain knowledge of other women's experiences with breast cancer diagnoses, and (b) feelings of knowing one's own body best and seeing the value in "overscreening" to save even one life. Our findings have theoretical and practical implications for scholars and practitioners seeking to improve knowledge or behavior regarding adherence to breast cancer screening recommendations.

  20. Sickle cell disease: time for a targeted neonatal screening programme.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gibbons, C

    2015-02-01

    Ireland has seen a steady increase in paediatric sickle cell disease (SCD). In 2005, only 25% of children with SCD were referred to the haemoglobinopathy service in their first year. A non-funded screening programme was implemented. This review aimed to assess the impact screening has had. All children referred to the haemoglobinopathy service born in Ireland after 2005 were identified. Data was collected from the medical chart and laboratory system. Information was analysed using Microsoft Excel. 77 children with SCD were identified. The median age at antibiotic commencement in the screened group was 56 days compared with 447 days in the unscreened group, p = < 0.0003. 22 (28%) of infants were born in centre\\'s that do not screen and 17 (81%) were over 6 months old at referral, compared with 14 (21%) in the screened group. 6 (27%) of those in the unscreened group presented in acute crisis compared with 2 (3%) in the screened population. The point prevalence of SCD in Ireland is 0.2% in children under 15 yr of African and Asian descent. We identified delays in referral and treatment, which reflect the lack of government funded support and policy. We suggest all maternity units commence screening for newborns at risk of SCD. It is a cost effective intervention with a number needed to screen of just 4 to prevent a potentially fatal crisis.

  1. Can a lifestyle intervention be offered through NHS breast cancer screening? Challenges and opportunities identified in a qualitative study of women attending screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Ellie; Wyke, Sally; Sugden, Jacqui; Mutrie, Nanette; Anderson, Annie S

    2016-08-11

    Around one third of breast cancers in post-menopausal women could be prevented by decreasing body fatness and alcohol intake and increasing physical activity. This study aimed to explore views and attitudes on lifestyle intervention approaches in order to inform the proposed content of a lifestyle intervention programme amongst women attending breast cancer screening. Women attending breast cancer screening clinics in Dundee and Glasgow, were invited to participate in focus group discussions (FGD) by clinic staff. The groups were convened out with the clinic setting and moderated by an experienced researcher who attained brief details on socio-demographic background and audio-recorded the discussions. Data analysis was guided by the framework approach. The main topics of enquiry were: Understanding of risk of breast cancer and its prevention, views on engaging with a lifestyle intervention programme offered through breast cancer screening and programme design and content. Thirty one women attended 5 focus groups. Participant ages ranged from 51 to 78 years and 38 % lived in the two most deprived quintiles of residential areas. Women were generally positive about being offered a programme at breast cancer screening but sceptical about lifestyle associated risk, citing genetics, bad luck and knowing women with breast cancer who led healthy lifestyles as reasons to query the importance of lifestyle. Engagement via clinic staff and delivery of the programme by lifestyle coaches out with the screening setting was viewed favourably. The importance of body weight, physical activity and alcohol consumption with disease was widely known although most were surprised at the association with breast cancer. They were particularly surprised about the role of alcohol and resistant to thinking about themselves having a problem. They expressed frustration that lifestyle guidance was often conflicting and divergent over time. The concept of focussing on small lifestyle changes

  2. Can a lifestyle intervention be offered through NHS breast cancer screening? Challenges and opportunities identified in a qualitative study of women attending screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellie Conway

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Around one third of breast cancers in post-menopausal women could be prevented by decreasing body fatness and alcohol intake and increasing physical activity. This study aimed to explore views and attitudes on lifestyle intervention approaches in order to inform the proposed content of a lifestyle intervention programme amongst women attending breast cancer screening. Methods Women attending breast cancer screening clinics in Dundee and Glasgow, were invited to participate in focus group discussions (FGD by clinic staff. The groups were convened out with the clinic setting and moderated by an experienced researcher who attained brief details on socio-demographic background and audio-recorded the discussions. Data analysis was guided by the framework approach. The main topics of enquiry were: Understanding of risk of breast cancer and its prevention, views on engaging with a lifestyle intervention programme offered through breast cancer screening and programme design and content. Results Thirty one women attended 5 focus groups. Participant ages ranged from 51 to 78 years and 38 % lived in the two most deprived quintiles of residential areas. Women were generally positive about being offered a programme at breast cancer screening but sceptical about lifestyle associated risk, citing genetics, bad luck and knowing women with breast cancer who led healthy lifestyles as reasons to query the importance of lifestyle. Engagement via clinic staff and delivery of the programme by lifestyle coaches out with the screening setting was viewed favourably. The importance of body weight, physical activity and alcohol consumption with disease was widely known although most were surprised at the association with breast cancer. They were particularly surprised about the role of alcohol and resistant to thinking about themselves having a problem. They expressed frustration that lifestyle guidance was often conflicting and divergent over time

  3. Does breast cancer screening level health inequalities out? A population-based study in an Italian region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacelli, Barbara; Carretta, Elisa; Spadea, Teresa; Caranci, Nicola; Di Felice, Enza; Stivanello, Elisa; Cavuto, Silvio; Cisbani, Luca; Candela, Silvia; De Palma, Rossana; Fantini, Maria P

    2014-04-01

    Although population-based screening has the potential to reduce inequalities in breast cancer survival, evidence on this topic is controversial. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether the full implementation of a mammography screening programme in Emilia-Romagna in Italy had an impact on variations in breast cancer survival by educational level. A cohort study was performed, including all women breast cancer registered in 1997-2000 (transitional screening period) or 2001-03 (consolidation screening period). Cancer cases were retrieved from the regional Breast Cancer Registry and followed up for 5 years. Educational level was determined from census data and allocated to cancer cases by individual record linkage. Age at diagnosis was classified into two groups (30-49, 50-69: screening target population). A total of 9639 cases were analyzed. In the 1997-2000 period, low-educated women had significantly lower survival compared with high-educated women, both in the younger and in the older age-groups. After the full implementation of the screening programme, these differences decreased in both age-groups, until disappearing completely among women in the age-group invited to screening. Our findings suggest that a fee-free population-based organized mammography screening programme with active invitation of the whole target population could be effective in reducing differences in survival in the population targeted by the screening.

  4. Intermittent attendance at breast cancer screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padraic Fleming

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. To determine why women skip rounds and factors influencing return of previous non attenders (PNAs to breast screening. Design and methods. Retrospective, quantitative, structured questionnaire posted to 2500 women. First PNAs did not attend their first screening appointment in 2007/2008 but then attended in 2010; First Controls first attended in 2010 without missed previous appointments. Women who attended screening in 2006 or earlier then skipped a round but returned in 2010 were Subsequent PNAs; Subsequent Controls attended all appointments.Results. More First Controls than First PNAs had family history of cancer (72.7% vs 63.2%; P=0.003; breast cancer (31.3% vs 24.8%; P=0.04. More PNAs lived rurally; more First PNAs had 3rd level education (33.2% vs 23.6%; P=0.002 and fewer had private insurance than First Controls (57.7% vs 64.8%; P=0.04. Excellent/good health was reported in First PNAs and First Controls (82.9% vs 83.2%, but fewer Subsequent PNAs than Subsequent Controls (72.7% vs 84.9%; P=0.000. Common considerations at time of missed appointment were had mammogram elsewhere (33% First PNA and postponed to next round (16% First PNA, 18.8% Subsequent PNA. Considerations when returning to screening were similar for First PNAs and Subsequent PNAs: I am older (35.4%, 29.6%, I made sure I remembered (29%, 23.6%, could reschedule (17.6%, 20.6%, illness of more concern (16.5%, 19%. More First PNAs stated my family/friends advised (22.3% vs 15.2% or my GP (12.6% vs 4.6% advised me to attend, heard good things about BreastCheck (28.8% vs 13.6%.Conclusions. Intermittent attenders do not fit socio-demographic patterns of non-attenders; GP recommendation and word of mouth were important in women’s return to screening. Fear and anxiety seem to act as a screening facilitator rather than an inhibitor.

  5. Position paper on screening for breast cancer by the European Society of Breast Imaging (EUSOBI) and 30 national breast radiology bodies from Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sardanelli, Francesco; Aase, Hildegunn S; Álvarez, Marina

    2017-01-01

    be given to population screening programmes on a territorial basis, with double reading. Adoption of digital mammography (not film-screen or phosphor-plate computer radiography) is a priority, which also improves sensitivity in dense breasts. Radiologists qualified as screening readers should be involved...... national breast radiology bodies support screening mammography. • A first priority is double-reading biennial mammography for women aged 50-69 years. • Extension to 73-75 and from 40-45 to 49 years is also encouraged. • Digital mammography (not film-screen or computer radiography) should be used. • DBT...

  6. Ring of Silence: African American Women's Experiences Related to Their Breasts and Breast Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Eileen

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore women's memories and feelings concerning their breasts and breast cancer screening experiences in relation to their current breast cancer screening behaviors. Twelve African American women shared stories that were generated in written narratives and individual interviews. Two core themes emerged from the…

  7. Breast cancer screening in England and the United States: a comparison of provision and utilisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Joseph; Garvican, Linda; Tosteson, Anna N A; Goodman, David C; Onega, Tracy

    2015-12-01

    Comparing breast cancer screening across countries within the context of some of the benefits and harms offers the opportunity to improve effectiveness through mutual learning. This paper describes the provision of breast cancer screening in England and the United States. The various recommendations for accessing breast cancer screening in the two countries are set out and the organisation of services including quality assurance, incentives and performance mechanisms considered. In the United States, younger women are routinely screened; they are less likely to benefit and more likely to be harmed. The utilisation of breast cancer screening amongst eligible women is broadly comparable in the two countries. However, there are differences in technical performance; the reasons for these including radiological reading procedures and cultural factors are explored. Despite a well-functioning screening programme, breast cancer mortality and survival in England are poor relative to other countries. Emphasis for American improvement should be on reducing false-positive recall rates, while the English NHS could supplement existing efforts to understand and improve comparatively poor survival and mortality.

  8. Automatically assessed volumetric breast density and breast cancer risk : The era of digital screening mammography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wanders, J.O.P .

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer among females worldwide. As the burden of breast cancer is high, many countries have introduced a breast cancer screening program with the aim to find and treat breast cancers in an early stage. In the Netherlands, women between the ages of 50

  9. Knowledge and Practice of Breast Cancer Screening Among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Breast cancer is the most common cancer among African women. Most researchers have attributed the late presentation to poor knowledge of breast cancer symptoms. Objective: This study was designed to evaluate the relationship between knowledge and practice of breast cancer screening in two groups of ...

  10. Breast cancer mortality in mammographic screening in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Njor, Sisse Helle; Nyström, Lennarth; Moss, Sue

    2012-01-01

    To estimate the impact of service mammography screening on breast cancer mortality using European incidence-based mortality (IBM) studies (or refined mortality studies). IBM studies include only breast cancer deaths occurring in women with breast cancer diagnosed after their first invitation...

  11. The Clinical Breast Examination: A Useful Screening Tool?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Lo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The standardization of the clinical breast examination as a screening tool for breast cancer has been a topic of controversy. Current recommendations vary significantly from organization to organization without consensus. There currently does not seem to be sufficient evidence regarding overall survival benefit of the clinical breast exam. However, as adjunct screening with mammography, it may help find earlier breast cancers and the up to 5–10% of cancers missed by mammography. The most appropriate standardized protocol may be that the clinical breast exam can be performed at the discretion of the provider and patient, with more inclination toward use in women in whom the exam carries greater sensitivity.

  12. Communicating the balance sheet in breast cancer screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giordano, Livia; Cogo, Carla; Patnick, Julietta

    2012-01-01

    Despite the difficulties, there is a moral responsibility to provide the public with the best estimates of benefits and harms of breast cancer screening.......Despite the difficulties, there is a moral responsibility to provide the public with the best estimates of benefits and harms of breast cancer screening....

  13. An ongoing case-control study to evaluate the NHS Bowel Cancer Screening Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massat, Nathalie J; Sasieni, Peter D; Parmar, Dharmishta; Duffy, Stephen W

    2014-12-13

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cause of cancer death in both males and females in England. A national bowel cancer screening programme was rolled out in England between 2006 and 2010. In the post-randomised controlled trials epoch, assessment of the impact of the programme using observational studies is needed. This study protocol was set up at the request of the UK Policy Research Unit in Cancer Awareness, Screening and Early Diagnosis to evaluate the effect of the current bowel cancer screening programme on incidence of advanced primary colorectal cancer. All incident cases of primary colorectal cancer in England will be included. Cases will be matched to controls with respect to sex, age, area of registration and year of first invitation to screening. Each evaluation round will cover a 2-year period, starting from January 2012, and ongoing thereafter. In the first instance, a pilot will be carried out in a single region. Variables related to colorectal tumour pathology will be obtained to enable selection and matching of cases and controls, and to allow analyses stratification by anatomical subsite within the bowel. Cases at Duke's stage B or worse will be considered as "advanced stage". The influence of sex will also be investigated. The incidence ratio observed in randomised controlled trials between controls (not invited) and non-attender invitees will be used to correct for self-selection bias overall. Screening participation at other national screening programmes (cervical, breast) will also be collected to derive a more contemporaneous adjustment factor for self-selection bias and assess consistency in self-selection correction in female patients.Full ethical approval was obtained from the Health Research Authority. The case-control design is potentially prone to a number of biases. The size of the planned study, the design specifications and the development of analytical strategies to cope with bias should enable us to obtain accurate

  14. Beyond Mammography: New Frontiers in Breast Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drukteinis, Jennifer S.; Mooney, Blaise P.; Flowers, Chris I.; Gatenby, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer screening remains a subject of intense and, at times, passionate debate. Mammography has long been the mainstay of breast cancer detection and is the only screening test proven to reduce mortality. Although it remains the gold standard of breast cancer screening, there is increasing awareness of subpopulations of women for whom mammography has reduced sensitivity. Mammography has also undergone increased scrutiny for false positives and excessive biopsies, which increase radiation dose, cost and patient anxiety. In response to these challenges, new technologies for breast cancer screening have been developed, including; low dose mammography; contrast enhanced mammography, tomosynthesis, automated whole breast ultrasound, molecular imaging and MRI. Here we examine some of the current controversies and promising new technologies that may improve detection of breast cancer both in the general population and in high-risk groups, such as women with dense breasts. We propose that optimal breast cancer screening will ultimately require a personalized approach based on metrics of cancer risk with selective application of specific screening technologies best suited to the individual’s age, risk, and breast density. PMID:23561631

  15. User acceptability of an alpha-fetoprotein screening programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Finn Stener

    1995-01-01

    (high or low) and the tests were later found to be false positives. There was a strong association between anxiety experienced in conjunction with the alpha-fetoprotein screening programme and the alpha-fetoprotein test result. Two percent of the women with a normal test result reported severe anxiety...... and duration of anxiety, influence on daily life and whether the woman wanted the alpha-fetoprotein test again in a new pregnancy. Three thousand, three hundred and thirty-one questionnaires were analyzed. The participation rate was 81.2%. For 219 women (6.6%), the first alpha-fetoprotein test was abnormal...

  16. Process performance of cervical screening programmes in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ronco, Guglielmo; Ballegooijen, Marjolein van; Becker, Nikolaus

    2009-01-01

    Standardised tables of aggregated data were collected from 15 European national or regional cervical screening programmes and key performance indicators computed as reported in European Union (EU) Guidelines, 2nd edition. Cytological results varied widely between countries both for the total...... intraepithelial lesion (LSIL) cytology. However, cytology-specific PPV also showed remarkable variability. The detection rate of CIN2+ histology ranged from Poland to >1% in England and Denmark. Low attendance for colposcopy after referral was observed in some east-European countries...

  17. Breast Cancer Screening in an Era of Personalized Regimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onega, Tracy; Beaber, Elisabeth F.; Sprague, Brian L.; Barlow, William E.; Haas, Jennifer S.; Tosteson, Anna N.A.; Schnall, Mitchell D.; Armstrong, Katrina; Schapira, Marilyn M.; Geller, Berta; Weaver, Donald L.; Conant, Emily F.

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer screening holds a prominent place in public health, health care delivery, policy, and women’s health care decisions. Several factors are driving shifts in how population-based breast cancer screening is approached, including advanced imaging technologies, health system performance measures, health care reform, concern for “overdiagnosis,” and improved understanding of risk. Maximizing benefits while minimizing the harms of screening requires moving from a “1-size-fits-all” guideline paradigm to more personalized strategies. A refined conceptual model for breast cancer screening is needed to align women’s risks and preferences with screening regimens. A conceptual model of personalized breast cancer screening is presented herein that emphasizes key domains and transitions throughout the screening process, as well as multilevel perspectives. The key domains of screening awareness, detection, diagnosis, and treatment and survivorship are conceptualized to function at the level of the patient, provider, facility, health care system, and population/policy arena. Personalized breast cancer screening can be assessed across these domains with both process and outcome measures. Identifying, evaluating, and monitoring process measures in screening is a focus of a National Cancer Institute initiative entitled PROSPR (Population-based Research Optimizing Screening through Personalized Regimens), which will provide generalizable evidence for a risk-based model of breast cancer screening, The model presented builds on prior breast cancer screening models and may serve to identify new measures to optimize benefits-to-harms tradeoffs in population-based screening, which is a timely goal in the era of health care reform. PMID:24830599

  18. Oncological screening for Bilateral Breast Reduction: a survey of practice variations in UK Breast and Plastics surgeons 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennedige, Anusha A; Kong, Tze Yean; Gandhi, Ashu

    2011-07-01

    Bilateral Breast Reduction (BBR) is a common procedure performed by Breast and Plastic surgeons in the UK. No consensus exists regarding preoperative screening for malignancy or for selective criteria for such screening. Preoperative BBR screening practices among UK Breast and Plastic surgeons are unknown. Ascertain the preoperative and postoperative BBR screening practices of UK Breast and Plastic surgeons. A questionnaire was posted to all 434 Breast and 335 Plastic surgeons in the UK. All results were analysed with relevant statistical methods. 64% of Breast surgeons and 72% of Plastic surgeons responded. 40% of Breast surgeons and 91% of Plastic surgeons perform BBR. Routine radiological screening: 92% Breast 41% Plastic (p Plastic. Routine histology for BBR specimens: 96% Breast 90% Plastic. Selective screening of patients aged 30-40 years old: Breast 38% Plastic 10%. Selective screening of patients aged 40-50: Breast 78%, Plastic 53%. Selective screening of patients with strong family history of breast cancer: Breast 72%, Plastic 91%. Selective screening of patients with previous breast cancer: Breast 77%, Plastic 93%. There are significant differences in practice between UK Breast surgeons and Plastic surgeons in preoperative oncological screening for BBR. The large discrepancy in preoperative radiological screening, reflects a ubiquitous pro-screening ideology among Breast surgeons not prevalent among Plastic surgeons. These results will provoke debate towards the direction of consensus to ultimately reflect best practice. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19.   Personal invitations for population-based breast cancer screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saalasti-Koskinen, Ulla; Mäkelä, Marjukka; Saarenmaa, Irma

    2010-01-01

    . The objective of this study was to evaluate the information breast cancer screening units send to women invited for screening in Finland. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A questionnaire was sent to all breast cancer screening units in Finland in 2005 and 2008, and the information (eg, invitations, results letters...... optimizing participation. The high participation rate (approximately 88%) in Finland may be due partly to the prescriptive nature of the invitation letters. National templates for information letters would be useful....

  20. [Colorectal cancer screening programme in Aragon (Spain): preliminary results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solé Llop, Mª Esther; Cano Del Pozo, Mabel; García Montero, José-Ignacio; Carrera-Lasfuentes, Patricia; Lanas, Ángel

    2017-08-04

    To describe preliminary findings from the colorectal cancer screening programme in Aragon (Spain) to evaluate its implementation. We have collected data from the first year of the program (2014) based on faecal occult blood immunochemical (FOBTi) test in patients 60-69 years old. We report "indicators" defined by the "Red Nacional de Cribado". Invited population after exclusions: 12,518. Program participation rate: 45.28% (95%CI: 44.41-46.15). Inadequate tests: 0.21% (95%CI: 0.12-0.37); positive FOBTi test 10.75% (95%CI: 9.97-11.58) and colonoscopy acceptance 95.07% (95%CI: 93.04-96.52). Colonoscopy was appropriate and complete in 97.58% (95%CI: 95.98-98.55) of cases. The high- and low-risk adenoma detection rates were 14.7‰ (95%CI: 11.9-18.2) and 5.55‰ (95%CI: 3.9-7.8) respectively. The positive predictive value for any adenoma was 58.55% (95%CI: 54.49-62.49) and for invasive cancer was 5.36% (95%CI: 3.8-7.51). The indicator analysis of the ongoing programme suggests the programme is being implemented correctly in our community. Copyright © 2017 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Mammographic breast density: impact on breast cancer risk and implications for screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freer, Phoebe E

    2015-01-01

    Mammographic breast density is rapidly becoming a hot topic in both the medical literature and the lay press. In the United States, recent legislative changes in 19 states now require radiologists to notify patients regarding breast density as well as the possible need for supplemental screening. Federal legislation regarding breast density notification has been introduced, and its passage is likely on the horizon. An understanding of the context, scientific evidence, and controversies surrounding the topic of breast density as a risk factor for breast cancer is critical for radiologists. The current state of evidence is presented regarding supplemental screening for women with dense breasts, including the use of digital breast tomosynthesis, whole-breast ultrasonography, and gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. A review of current practice guidelines and additional sources of information will improve radiologists' understanding of the relevant subject of breast density and enable them to respond appropriately to questions from patients, clinicians, and the media. (©)RSNA, 2015.

  2. The benefits and harms of screening for cancer with a focus on breast screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodersen, John; Juhl Jørgensen, Karsten; Gøtzsche, Peter C.

    2010-01-01

    . The effects of routine clinical breast examination are unknown, but considering the results of the breast self-examination trials, it is likely that it is harmful. The effects of screening for breast cancer with thermography, ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging are unknown. It is not clear whether...

  3. Guidelines for Follow-Up of Women at High Risk for Inherited Breast Cancer: Consensus Statement from the Biomed 2 Demonstration Programme on Inherited Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Møller

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Protocols for activity aiming at early diagnosis and treatment of inherited breast or breast-ovarian cancer have been reported. Available reports on outcome of such programmes are considered here. It is concluded that the ongoing activities should continue with minor modifications. Direct evidence of a survival benefit from breast and ovarian screening is not yet available. On the basis of expert opinion and preliminary results from intervention programmes indicating good detection rates for early breast cancers and 5-year survival concordant with early diagnosis, we propose that women at high risk for inherited breast cancer be offered genetic counselling, education in ‘breast awareness’ and annual mammography and clinical expert examination from around 30 years of age. Mammography every second year may be sufficient from 60 years on. BRCA1 mutation carriers may benefit from more frequent examinations and cancer risk may be reduced by oophorectomy before 40–50 years of age. We strongly advocate that all activities should be organized as multicentre studies subjected to continuous evaluation to measure the effects of the interventions on long-term mortality, to match management options more precisely to individual risks and to prepare the ground for studies on chemoprevention.

  4. In search of the best upper age limit for breast cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boer, R; de Koning, H J; van Oortmarssen, G J; van der Maas, P J

    1995-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the best upper age limit for a breast cancer screening programme. We used a model-based study using optimistic and pessimistic assumptions, concerning improvement of prognosis due to screen-detection and duration of the period of mammographic detectability, resulting in upper and lower limits for favourable and unfavourable effects. Under pessimistic assumptions, the balance between positive and negative effects of screening remains favourable up to an age of around 80 years. Under optimistic assumptions, this balance never becomes clearly negative with increase of the upper age limit of a screening programme. When including the costs in the analysis, the balance between effects and costs of increasing the upper age limit from 69 to 75 years is likely to be at least as favourable as intensifying a screening programme within the age group 50-69 years. A further increase leads to a markedly less favourable balance. Competing causes of death do not lead to missing net benefit for women up to at least age 80 years, but the disproportional rise of negative effects of screening with age in older women leads to a lower cost-effectiveness ratio than intensifying screening at ages 50-69 years.

  5. Breast cancer screening: Evidence of the effect of adjunct ultrasound screening in women with unilateral mammography-negative dense breasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atoosa Adibi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients with the previous history of breast cancer are in risk of contralateral breast cancer. On the other hand, increased breast density is a risk factor for breast cancer and the sensitivity of detecting nonpalpable cancers in screening mammography in radiographically dense breasts is low. The use of ultrasonography in dense breast remains a controversial topic. The purpose of this study was to assess the usefulness of routine ultrasonography in follow-up of women with the previous history of breast cancer and negative mammography but dense breasts. Materials and Methods: In a cross-sectional study, a total of 267 individuals with unilateral postmastectomy mammogram screened and 153 subjects assigned to study. There were 28 subjects with American College of Radiology (ACR breast density 2 and 125 with ACR breast density 3-4, which there was no new finding in their mammogram in comparison to previous studies. We assumed subjects with ACR breast density 3-4 as mammographic Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS category 0 for malignancy. Standard two-view mammogram was performed for all participants, and breast ultrasound (US examinations were performed by an expert radiologist in radial and anti-radial planes. The data were analyzed using SPSS version 20.0 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, Illinois, USA. Results: The results showed that in subjects with ACR breast density 3-4, when there was no new density in two consecutive mammograms in comparison to previous studies, US also showed no possibility for malignancy (BI-RADS 1-2. And also in subjects with ACR breast density 2, when the mammographic results were BI-RADS 1-2, the US results was the same. Conclusion: Our data indicate that for the detection of breast cancer, sensitivity of US was not greater than mammography in patients with postmastectomy unilateral dense breast if there is not any new density.

  6. Breast cancer screening: Evidence of the effect of adjunct ultrasound screening in women with unilateral mammography-negative dense breasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adibi, Atoosa; Golshahi, Maryam; Sirus, Mehri; Kazemi, Kimia

    2015-03-01

    Patients with the previous history of breast cancer are in risk of contralateral breast cancer. On the other hand, increased breast density is a risk factor for breast cancer and the sensitivity of detecting nonpalpable cancers in screening mammography in radiographically dense breasts is low. The use of ultrasonography in dense breast remains a controversial topic. The purpose of this study was to assess the usefulness of routine ultrasonography in follow-up of women with the previous history of breast cancer and negative mammography but dense breasts. In a cross-sectional study, a total of 267 individuals with unilateral postmastectomy mammogram screened and 153 subjects assigned to study. There were 28 subjects with American College of Radiology (ACR) breast density 2 and 125 with ACR breast density 3-4, which there was no new finding in their mammogram in comparison to previous studies. We assumed subjects with ACR breast density 3-4 as mammographic Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) category 0 for malignancy. Standard two-view mammogram was performed for all participants, and breast ultrasound (US) examinations were performed by an expert radiologist in radial and anti-radial planes. The data were analyzed using SPSS version 20.0 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, Illinois, USA). The results showed that in subjects with ACR breast density 3-4, when there was no new density in two consecutive mammograms in comparison to previous studies, US also showed no possibility for malignancy (BI-RADS 1-2). And also in subjects with ACR breast density 2, when the mammographic results were BI-RADS 1-2, the US results was the same. Our data indicate that for the detection of breast cancer, sensitivity of US was not greater than mammography in patients with postmastectomy unilateral dense breast if there is not any new density.

  7. Overdiagnosis and overtreatment associated with breast cancer mammography screening: A simulation study with calibration to population-based data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seigneurin, Arnaud; Labarère, José; François, Olivier; Exbrayat, Catherine; Dupouy, Maylis; Filippi, Marc; Colonna, Marc

    2016-08-01

    The magnitude of overdiagnosis of breast cancer associated with mammography screening remains controversial because of methodological issues. The objective of this study was to quantify overdiagnosis and overtreatment associated with a population-based screening programme, taking into account lead time and uncertainty concerning baseline incidence of breast cancers. A simulation model was developed to replicate incidence and detection rates of breast cancer observed in the Isère Département, France. The parameters of the model were estimated using an approximate Bayesian computation method. For women aged 50-74 years during the 2007-2010 period, overdiagnosis of non-progressive breast cancers accounted for 17.0% (95% credibility interval (CI): 2.5%-35.5%) of all in situ cancers diagnosed, 5.5% (95% CI: 0.8%-9.8%) of all invasive cancers diagnosed, and 20.3% (95% CI: 3.0%-38.9%) of in situ and 13.0% (95% CI: 2.2%-23.3%) of invasive screen detected breast cancers. The estimates of overdiagnosis due to competitive causes of death were 1.0% (95% CI: 0.2%-%1.7) and 1.1% (95% CI: 0.6%-1.7%) for all in situ and invasive cancers diagnosed, respectively, and 1.3% (95% CI: 0.2%-2.0%) and 2.6% (95% CI: 1.4%-4.0%) of all in situ and invasive screen detected breast cancers, respectively. Among 1000 screen-detected cancers in 2010, 155 (95% CI: 27-284), 134 (95% CI: 10-242) and 140 (95% CI: 25-254) women underwent breast conserving surgery, lymph node dissection and radiation therapy for overdiagnosed cancers, respectively. Our estimates of overdiagnosis should be balanced against the reduction of breast cancer mortality to assess the value of breast cancer screening programme. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT): a review of the evidence for use as a screening tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Fiona J; Tucker, Lorraine; Young, Ken C

    2016-02-01

    Breast screening with full-field digital mammography (FFDM) fails to detect 15-30% of cancers. This figure is higher for women with dense breasts. A new tomographic technique in mammography has been developed--digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT)--which allows images to be viewed in sections through the breast and has the potential to improve cancer detection rates. Results from retrospective reading studies comparing DBT with FFDM have been largely favourable with improvement in sensitivity and specificity. Increases in diagnostic accuracy have been reported as being independent of breast density; however there are mixed reports regarding the detection of microcalcification. Prospective screening studies using DBT with FFDM have demonstrated increased rates in cancer detection compared with FFDM alone. A reduction in false-positive recall rates has also been shown. Screening with the addition of DBT would approximately double radiation dose; however a simulated FFDM image can be generated from a DBT scan. The combination of simulated FFDM images and DBT is being evaluated within several studies and some positive results have been published. Interval cancer rates for the UK National Health Service Breast Screening Programme (NHSBSP) demonstrate the limited sensitivity of FFDM in cancer detection. DBT has the potential to increase sensitivity and decrease false-positive recall rates. It has approval for screening and diagnostics in several countries; however, there are issues with DBT as a screening tool including additional reading time, IT storage and connectivity, over-diagnosis, and cost effectiveness. Feasibility and cost-effectiveness trials are needed before the implementation of DBT in NHSBSP can be considered. Copyright © 2015 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Women's participation in breast cancer screening in France--an ethical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutel, Grégoire; Duchange, Nathalie; Darquy, Sylviane; de Montgolfier, Sandrine; Papin-Lefebvre, Frédérique; Jullian, Odile; Viguier, Jérôme; Sancho-Garnier, Hélène

    2014-08-16

    Breast cancer is a major public health challenge. Organized mammography screening (OS) is considered one way to reduce breast cancer mortality. EU recommendations prone mass deployment of OS, and back in 2004, France introduced a national OS programme for women aged 50-74 years. However, in 2012, participation rate was still just 52.7%, well short of the targeted 70% objective. In an effort to re-address the (in) efficiency of the programme, the French National Cancer Institute has drafted an expert-group review of the ethical issues surrounding breast cancer mammography screening. Prompted by emerging debate over the efficiency of the screening scheme and its allied public information provision, we keynote the experts' report based on analysis of epidemiological data and participation rate from the public health authorities. The low coverage of the OS scheme may be partly explained by the fact that a significant number of women undergo mammography outside OS and thus outside OS criteria. These findings call for further thinking on (i) the ethical principles of beneficence and non-malfeasance underpinning this public health initiative, (ii) the reasons behind women's and professionals' behavior, and (iii) the need to analyze how information provision to women and the doctor-patient relationship need to evolve in response to scientific controversy over the risks and benefits of conducting mammographic screening. This work calls for a reappraisal of the provision of screening programme information. We advocate a move to integrate the points sparking debate over the efficiency of the screening scheme to guarantee full transparency. The perspective is to strengthen the respect for autonomy allowing women to make an informed choice in their decision on whether or not to participate.

  10. User acceptability of an alpha-fetoprotein screening programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Finn Stener

    1995-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine user acceptability among women who were classified as false positives or test negatives in an alpha-fetoprotein screening programme. The study was performed as a questionnaire study over a one-year period from October 1, 1988 to September 30, 1989...... at Hvidovre University Hospital, Copenhagen, and the county hospitals of Sønderjylland, Denmark. The participating subjects were 4104 pregnant women who had had an alpha-fetoprotein test and had completed 30 weeks of gestation, when the questionnaire was delivered. Main outcome measures were degree...... and duration of anxiety, influence on daily life and whether the woman wanted the alpha-fetoprotein test again in a new pregnancy. Three thousand, three hundred and thirty-one questionnaires were analyzed. The participation rate was 81.2%. For 219 women (6.6%), the first alpha-fetoprotein test was abnormal...

  11. Analysis of proportional incidence and review of interval cancer cases observed within the mammography screening programme in Trento province, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, M; Bernardi, D; Di Michele, S; Tuttobene, P; Fantò, C; Valentini, M; Peterlongo, P; Caumo, F; Frigerio, A; Ciatto, S

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the performance of the mammography screening programme in Trento Province, Italy, by analysing the interval cancers (IC) observed from 2001 to 2008. IC were identified by linking screening archives with local cancer registry and pathology archives as well as with hospital discharge records. Proportional incidence was determined according to breast cancers expected in the absence of screening, estimated on the basis of patients/year at risk and age-specific incidence. The review of screening mammograms preceding ICs was performed by an external (three radiologists) and an internal (five radiologists) panel and aimed at assessing the proportion of IC reviewed as screening errors. Results were compared with European Community (EC) recommended standards. IC proportional incidence was 15.90% for the first year (EC standard screening errors (identified by at least two of three reviewers), whereas at internal review (identified by at least three of five reviewers) it was 17.4% (EC standard screening programme in Trento Province, Italy. Comparable results of external and internal reviews suggest that the latter, no doubt easier to be implemented, might be adopted as a routine procedure to assess this early efficacy indicator.

  12. The benefits and harms of screening for cancer with a focus on breast screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodersen, John; Juhl Jørgensen, Karsten; Gøtzsche, Peter C.

    2010-01-01

    . The effects of routine clinical breast examination are unknown, but considering the results of the breast self-examination trials, it is likely that it is harmful. The effects of screening for breast cancer with thermography, ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging are unknown. It is not clear whether......The balance between benefits and harms is delicate for cancer screening programs. By attending screening with mammography some women will avoid dying from breast cancer or receive less aggressive treatment. But many more women will be overdiagnosed, receive needless treatment, have a false...... and will be treated unnecessarily. Furthermore, more than 200 women will experience substantial psychosocial distress for months because of false-positive findings. Regular breast self-examination does not reduce breast cancer mortality, but doubles the number of biopsies, and it therefore cannot be recommended...

  13. False-positive findings in mammography screening induces short-term distress - breast cancer-specific concern prevails longer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aro, A R; Pilvikki Absetz, S; van Elderen, T M

    2000-01-01

    -ups at 2 and 12 months postscreening. At 2 months, there was a moderate multivariate effect of group on distress; and intrusive thinking and worry about breast cancer, in particular, were most frequent amongst the false positives. Intrusive thinking still prevailed at 12 months, in addition to a higher...... findings (n=1407), false-positive findings (n=492) and referents from outside the screening programme (n=1718, age 48-49 years). Distress was measured as illness worry, anxiety, depression, cancer beliefs and early detection behaviour. Measurements were one month before screening invitation with follow...... perceived breast cancer risk and susceptibility. Distress related to screening and false-positive findings seems to be moderate, but prevailing cancer-specific concerns call for improvements in screening programmes....

  14. Cancer fatalism and breast cancer screening in African American women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurlock, Wanda Raby; Cullins, Leah S

    2006-01-01

    Despite significant advances in science, medicine, and technology African American women are more likely to die from breast cancer than Caucasian women. There is a growing body of literature that describes strategies to improve breast cancer screening among African American women. However, data suggest that African American women, compared to Caucasian women, are less likely to participate in regular breast cancer screening. The belief that a diagnosis of cancer will result in death has been identified as a potential barrier to cancer screening in African American population groups. However, research examining the degree to which perceptions of fatalism influence breast cancer screening in culturally and ethnically diverse population groups is scant. This repot describes the outcomes of a study undertaken to examine relationships between perceptions of cancer fatalism and breast cancer screening in African American women. Findings support the postulation that fatalism negatively influences health promoting practices such as breast cancer screening. However, contrary to prior research findings age was observed to be inversely associated with cancer fatalism.

  15. Effect of endoscopy screening on stage at gastric cancer diagnosis: results of the National Cancer Screening Programme in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, K S; Jun, J K; Suh, M; Park, B; Noh, D K; Song, S H; Jung, K W; Lee, H-Y; Choi, I J; Park, E-C

    2014-01-01

    Background: Although gastric cancer screening is common among countries with a high prevalence of gastric cancer, there is little data to support the effectiveness of this screening. This study was designed to determine the differences in stage at diagnosis of gastric cancer according to the screening history and screening method (upper gastrointestinal series (UGIS) vs endoscopy). Methods: The study population was derived from the National Cancer Screening Programme (NCSP), a nationwide orga...

  16. Optimal breast cancer screening strategies for older women: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braithwaite D

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Dejana Braithwaite,1 Joshua Demb,1 Louise M Henderson2 1Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, CA, 2Department of Radiology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA Abstract: Breast cancer is a major cause of cancer-related deaths among older women, aged 65 years or older. Screening mammography has been shown to be effective in reducing breast cancer mortality in women aged 50–74 years but not among those aged 75 years or older. Given the large heterogeneity in comorbidity status and life expectancy among older women, controversy remains over screening mammography in this population. Diminished life expectancy with aging may decrease the potential screening benefit and increase the risk of harms. In this review, we summarize the evidence on screening mammography utilization, performance, and outcomes and highlight evidence gaps. Optimizing the screening strategy will involve separating older women who will benefit from screening from those who will not benefit by using information on comorbidity status and life expectancy. This review has identified areas related to screening mammography in older women that warrant additional research, including the need to evaluate emerging screening technologies, such as tomosynthesis among older women and precision cancer screening. In the absence of randomized controlled trials, the benefits and harms of continued screening mammography in older women need to be estimated using both population-based cohort data and simulation models. Keywords: aging, breast cancer, precision cancer screening

  17. Reasons why patients fail screening in Indian breast cancer trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Mahajan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: An increased number of screen failure patients in a clinical trial increases time and cost required for the recruitment. Assessment of reasons for screen failure can help reduce screen failure rates and improve recruitment. Materials and Methods: We collected retrospective data of human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER2 positive Indian breast cancer patients, who failed screening for phase 3 clinical trials and ascertained their reasons for screen failure from screening logs. Statistical comparison was done to ascertain if there are any differences between private and public sites. Results: Of 727 patients screened at 14 sites, 408 (56.1% failed screening. The data on the specific reasons for screen failures was not available at one of the public sites (38 screen failures out of 83 screened patients. Hence, after excluding that site, further analysis is based on 644 patients, of which 370 failed screening. Of these, 296 (80% screen failure patients did not meet selection criteria. The majority -266 were HER2 negative. Among logistical issues, 39 patients had inadequate breast tissue sample. Sixteen patients withdrew their consent at private sites as compared to six at public sites. The difference between private and public sites for the above three reasons was statistically significant. Conclusion: Use of prescreening logs to reduce the number of patients not meeting selection criteria and protocol logistics, and patient counseling to reduce consent withdrawals could be used to reduce screen failure rate.

  18. Life expectancy of screen-detected invasive breast cancer patients compared with women invited to the Nijmegen Screening Program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.D.M. Otten; M.J.M. Broeders (Mireille); G.J. den Heeten (Gerard); R. Holland (Roland); J. Fracheboud (Jacques); H.J. de Koning (Harry); A.L.M. Verbeek (Andre)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Screening can lead to earlier detection of breast cancer and thus to an improvement in survival. The authors studied the life expectancy of women with screen-detected invasive breast cancer (patients) compared with women invited to the breast cancer screening program in

  19. Life expectancy of screen-detected invasive breast cancer patients compared with women invited to the Nijmegen screening program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otten, Johannes D. M.; Broeders, Mireille J. M.; den Heeten, Gerard J.; Holland, Roland; Fracheboud, Jacques; de Koning, Harry J.; Verbeek, André L. M.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND:: Screening can lead to earlier detection of breast cancer and thus to an improvement in survival. The authors studied the life expectancy of women with screen-detected invasive breast cancer (patients) compared with women invited to the breast cancer screening program in Nijmegen, the

  20. Introduction of an organised programme and social inequalities in mammography screening: A 22-year population-based study in Geneva, Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, José Luis; Theler, Jean-Marc; Cullati, Stéphane; Bouchardy, Christine; Manor, Orly; Gaspoz, Jean-Michel; Guessous, Idris

    2017-10-01

    In developed countries, breast cancer mortality has decreased during the last decades due to, at least partially, the advent of mammography screening. Organised programmes aim, among other objectives, to increase participation and decrease social inequalities in screening access. We aimed to characterise the evolution of socioeconomic disparities in mammography screening before and after the implementation of an organised programme in Geneva, Switzerland. We included 5345 women, aged 50-74years, without past history of breast cancer who participated in the cross-sectional Bus Santé study, between 1992 and 2014. Outcome measures were: 1) never had a mammography (1992-2014) and 2) never had a mammography or not screened in the two years before being surveyed (subgroup analysis, 2007-2014). Educational attainment was divided in three groups (primary, secondary and tertiary) and period in two (before/after introduction of a screening programme in 1999). We calculated measures of relative and absolute change, including the relative (RII) and slope (SII) indices of social inequality adjusted for age and nationality. We compared the prevalence of screening before and after screening programme implementation using Poisson models. The proportion of unscreened women decreased during the study period from 30.5% to 3.6%. Lower educated women were more frequently unscreened (RII=2.39, p<0.001; SII=0.10, p<0.001). Organised screening decreased the proportion of unscreened women independently of education (prevalence ratiobefore vs. after=4.41, p<0.001), but absolute and relative inequalities persisted (RII=2.11, p=0.01; SII=0.04, p=0.01). Introduction of an organised programme increased women's adherence to mammography screening but did not eliminate social disparities in screening participation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Risk-benefit analysis for mass screening of breast cancer utilizing mammography as a screening test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iinuma, T.A.; Tateno, Yukio (National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan))

    1989-09-01

    Incidence of breast cancers in Japanese women is increasing steadily. Mass screening of breast cancer was started in Japan under auspices of Adult Health Promotion Act of the Japanese Government from 1987. As the first screening method, the palpation of breasts is employed at present, but it is expected to be replaced by the mammography. In this report, the risk-benefit analysis is presented between risk of breast carcinogenesis due to radiation and benefit of mass screening of breast cancer. The benefit of mass screening is taken as the net elongation of average life expectancy of women due to survival from breast cancers. The risk of mammography is taken as the net loss of average life expectancy of women due to breast carcinogenesis. In the latter, the latency time and plateau period of radiation carcinogenesis were taken into consideration in the calculation. The results show that the ages at which the benefit and risk become equal are between 30 and 35 years old when dose equivalent of mammography is between 10 and 20 mSv, that are conventionally used. However, the critical age will be reduced to 20 years old if the dose equivalent becomes 1 mSv. Therefore, it is strongly recommended that a low dose mammographic system should be developed in order to achieve 1 mSv for the mass screening of breast cancer of Japanese women. In author's opinion, this is quite feasible by employing a new digital radiography with imaging plate. (author).

  2. Breast Cancer Screening for Average-Risk Women: Recommendations From the ACR Commission on Breast Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monticciolo, Debra L; Newell, Mary S; Hendrick, R Edward; Helvie, Mark A; Moy, Linda; Monsees, Barbara; Kopans, Daniel B; Eby, Peter R; Sickles, Edward A

    2017-09-01

    Breast cancer is the most common non-skin cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death for women in the United States. Before the introduction of widespread mammographic screening in the mid-1980s, the death rate from breast cancer in the US had remained unchanged for more than 4 decades. Since 1990, the death rate has declined by at least 38%. Much of this change is attributed to early detection with mammography. ACR breast cancer screening experts have reviewed data from RCTs, observational studies, US screening data, and other peer-reviewed literature to update our recommendations. Mammography screening has consistently been shown to significantly reduce breast cancer mortality over a variety of study designs. The ACR recommends annual mammography screening starting at age 40 for women of average risk of developing breast cancer. Our recommendation is based on maximizing proven benefits, which include a substantial reduction in breast cancer mortality afforded by regular screening and improved treatment options for those diagnosed with breast cancer. The risks associated with mammography screening are also considered to assist women in making an informed choice. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Barriers to uptake of breast cancer screening in Kenya | Wachira ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Subjects: Community members (18 years and older) who did not attend the screening events. Outcome Measure: The outcome measure was having heard about the breast cancer screening events. Both structured and open-ended questions were used for data collection. Item frequency, correlations, and content analyses ...

  4. Breast and Cervical Cancers Awareness and Screening Practices ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Only 4/11(36.4%) of those who knew something about cervical cancer mentioned vaginal examination for cervical cancer screening and only one (0.1%) respondent mentioned Pap smear. The poor level of awareness and screening practices for breast and cervical cancers among women in these rural communities ...

  5. Breast cancer screening in a resource poor country: Ultrasound ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Breast cancer is the commonest female cancer in Nigeria. Despite its increased awareness, affordability of available screening tools is a bane. Mammography, the goal standard for screening is costly and not widely available in terms of infrastructure, technical/personnel capabilities. Ultrasound is accessible ...

  6. Attitudes of women about breast cancer and cervical cancern screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ilknur Aydin Avci

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: This research revealed that the women had moderate knowlege about breast and cervical cancer screening and artcipation in screening is low. Beside, the women who had BSE and mammography had more PAP smear. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2015; 14(3.000: 235-239

  7. Immediate and delayed effects of mammographic screening on breast cancer mortality and incidence in birth cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripping, T M; Verbeek, A L M; van der Waal, D; Otten, J D M; den Heeten, G J; Fracheboud, J; de Koning, H J; Broeders, M J M

    2013-10-29

    Trend studies investigating the impact of mammographic screening usually display age-specific mortality and incidence rates over time, resulting in an underestimate of the benefit of screening, that is, mortality reduction, and an overestimate of its major harmful effect, that is, overdiagnosis. This study proposes a more appropriate way of analysing trends. Breast cancer mortality (1950-2009) and incidence data (1975-2009) were obtained from Statistics Netherlands, 'Stg. Medische registratie' and the National Cancer Registry in the Netherlands for women aged 25-85 years. Data were visualised in age-birth cohort and age-period figures. Birth cohorts invited to participate in the mammographic screening programme showed a deflection in the breast cancer mortality rates within the first 5 years after invitation. Thereafter, the mortality rate increased, although less rapidly than in uninvited birth cohorts. Furthermore, invited birth cohorts showed a sharp increase in invasive breast cancer incidence rate during the first 5 years of invitation, followed by a moderate increase during the following screening years and a decline after passing the upper age limit. When applying a trend study to estimate the impact of mammographic screening, we recommend using a birth cohort approach.

  8. Observed and Predicted Risk of Breast Cancer Death in Randomized Trials on Breast Cancer Screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Autier

    Full Text Available The role of breast screening in breast cancer mortality declines is debated. Screening impacts cancer mortality through decreasing the number of advanced cancers with poor diagnosis, while cancer treatment works through decreasing the case-fatality rate. Hence, reductions in cancer death rates thanks to screening should directly reflect reductions in advanced cancer rates. We verified whether in breast screening trials, the observed reductions in the risk of breast cancer death could be predicted from reductions of advanced breast cancer rates.The Greater New York Health Insurance Plan trial (HIP is the only breast screening trial that reported stage-specific cancer fatality for the screening and for the control group separately. The Swedish Two-County trial (TCT reported size-specific fatalities for cancer patients in both screening and control groups. We computed predicted numbers of breast cancer deaths, from which we calculated predicted relative risks (RR and (95% confidence intervals. The Age trial in England performed its own calculations of predicted relative risk.The observed and predicted RR of breast cancer death were 0.72 (0.56-0.94 and 0.98 (0.77-1.24 in the HIP trial, and 0.79 (0.78-1.01 and 0.90 (0.80-1.01 in the Age trial. In the TCT, the observed RR was 0.73 (0.62-0.87, while the predicted RR was 0.89 (0.75-1.05 if overdiagnosis was assumed to be negligible and 0.83 (0.70-0.97 if extra cancers were excluded.In breast screening trials, factors other than screening have contributed to reductions in the risk of breast cancer death most probably by reducing the fatality of advanced cancers in screening groups. These factors were the better management of breast cancer patients and the underreporting of breast cancer as the underlying cause of death. Breast screening trials should publish stage-specific fatalities observed in each group.

  9. [Participation rates in the third round (2006-2007) of the breast cancer screening program in Hungary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boncz, Imre; Döbrõssy, Lajos; Péntek, Zoltán; Kovács, Attila; Budai, András; Vajda, Réka; Sebestyén, Andor

    2013-09-01

    Organised, nationwide screening for breast cancer with mammography in the age group of 45-65 years with 2 years screening interval started in Hungary in January 2002. The aim of this study is to analyse the attendance rate of breast screening programme for the 2006/2007 years, including the analysis of the ratio of screening and diagnostic mammography examinations. The data derive from the financial database of the National Health Insurance Fund Administration (NHIFA) covering the 8 years period between 2000 and 2007. The ratio of women in the age group of 45-65 years was calculated having either a screening mammography or a diagnostic mammography. The analysis was carried out for the years 2000-2001 before and 2006-2007 after the implementation of nationwide organised programme. In the years 2000-2001 7.26% of the women aged 45-65 years had an opportunistic screening mammography while in 2006-2007 29.4% of the target population had screening mammography within the organised programme. During the same periods 19.8% (2000-2001) and 21.8% (2006-2007) of women aged 45-65 years had a diagnostic mammography. Thus the total (screening and diagnostic) coverage of mammography increased from 26.2% (2000-2001) to 49.7% (2006-2007). The attendance of the Hungarian organised breast cancer screening programme slightly declined in 2006-2007 compared to 2002-2003/2004-2005, and to achieve the expected results in mortality decrease a further improvement of the uptake is necessary.

  10. Breast cancer screening with tomosynthesis--initial experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tingberg, A; Förnvik, D; Mattsson, S; Svahn, T; Timberg, P; Zackrisson, S

    2011-09-01

    Experiences gained so far using tomosynthesis for breast cancer screening will be reported. A short summary of results from preparatory studies will also be presented. The sensitivity and specificity of breast tomosynthesis (BT) will be compared with conventional two-dimensional digital mammography (DM) for breast cancer screening in a population-based study. Over 2000 women have been examined so far with BT and DM. The BT reading is significantly more time-consuming than the DM reading. Preparatory studies have shown that BT has a higher diagnostic precision and higher accuracy of size measurements and stage determination than DM. There is potential to use lower compression force with BT compared with DM, without decreasing the diagnostic accuracy. BT might play an important role in clinical as well as screening mammography. A large-scale population-based study to investigate BT as a screening modality is underway.

  11. Automated assessment of bilateral breast volume asymmetry as a breast cancer biomarker during mammographic screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Alex C [ORNL; Hitt, Austin N [ORNL; Voisin, Sophie [ORNL; Tourassi, Georgia [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    The biological concept of bilateral symmetry as a marker of developmental stability and good health is well established. Although most individuals deviate slightly from perfect symmetry, humans are essentially considered bilaterally symmetrical. Consequently, increased fluctuating asymmetry of paired structures could be an indicator of disease. There are several published studies linking bilateral breast size asymmetry with increased breast cancer risk. These studies were based on radiologists manual measurements of breast size from mammographic images. We aim to develop a computerized technique to assess fluctuating breast volume asymmetry in screening mammograms and investigate whether it correlates with the presence of breast cancer. Using a large database of screening mammograms with known ground truth we applied automated breast region segmentation and automated breast size measurements in CC and MLO views using three well established methods. All three methods confirmed that indeed patients with breast cancer have statistically significantly higher fluctuating asymmetry of their breast volumes. However, statistically significant difference between patients with cancer and benign lesions was observed only for the MLO views. The study suggests that automated assessment of global bilateral asymmetry could serve as a breast cancer risk biomarker for women undergoing mammographic screening. Such biomarker could be used to alert radiologists or computer-assisted detection (CAD) systems to exercise increased vigilance if higher than normal cancer risk is suspected.

  12. Thermography is not a feasible method for breast cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brkljacić, Boris; Miletić, Damir; Sardanelli, Francesco

    2013-06-01

    Breast cancer is a common malignancy causing high mortality in women especially in developed countries. Due to the contribution of mammographic screening and improvements in therapy, the mortality rate from breast cancer has decreased considerably. An imaging-based early detection of breast cancer improves the treatment outcome. Mammography is generally established not only as diagnostic but also as screening tool, while breast ultrasound plays a major role in the diagnostic setting in distinguishing solid lesions from cysts and in guiding tissue sampling. Several indications are established for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. Thermography was not validated as a screening tool and the only study performed long ago for evaluating this technology in the screening setting demonstrated very poor results. The conclusion that thermography might be feasible for screening cannot be derived from studies with small sample size, unclear selection of patients, and in which mammography and thermography were not blindly compared as screening modalities. Thermography can not be used to aspirate, biopsy or localize lesions preoperatively since no method so far was described to accurately transpose the thermographic location of the lesion to the mammogram or ultrasound and to surgical specimen. Thermography cannot be proclaimed as a screening method, without any evidence whatsoever.

  13. The effect of a self-efficacy-based educational programme on maternal breast feeding self-efficacy, breast feeding duration and exclusive breast feeding rates: A longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Man Yi; Ip, Wan Yim; Choi, Kai Chow

    2016-05-01

    breast feeding has a number of well-documented benefits. Numerous studies have been conducted to investigate an effective approach to increase the breast feeding rate, duration and exclusive breast feeding rate, in which maternal breast feeding self-efficacy was determined as one of the major contributors. Although numerous breast feeding educational programmes have been developed to enhance maternal breastfeeding self-efficacy, results on the effectiveness of these programmes remain inconclusive. this study aims to investigate the effectiveness of a self-efficacy-based breast feeding educational programme (SEBEP) in enhancing breast feeding self-efficacy, breast feeding duration and exclusive breast feeding rates among mothers in Hong Kong. eligible pregnant women were randomized to attend a 2.5-hour breast feeding workshop at 28-38 weeks of gestation and receive 30-60minutes of telephone counselling at two weeks post partum, whereas both intervention and control groups received usual care. At two weeks postpartum, the Breast feeding Self-Efficacy Scale-Short Form (BSES-SF) and a self-developed post partum questionnaire were completed via telephone interviews. The breast feeding duration, pattern of breast feeding and exclusive breast feeding rates were recorded at two weeks, four weeks, eight weeks and six months post partum. results of analyses based on an intention-to-treat (ITT) assumption showed a significant difference (pbreast feeding rate was 11.4% for the intervention group and 5.6% for the control group at six months post partum. the findings of this study highlight the feasibility of a major trial to implement breast feeding education targeted at increasing breast feeding self-efficacy and exclusive breast feeding rates in Hong Kong. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Digital mammography in a screening programme and its implications for pathology: a comparative study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Feeley, Linda

    2011-03-01

    Most studies comparing full-field digital mammography (FFDM) with conventional screen-film mammography (SFM) have been radiology-based. The pathological implications of FFDM have received little attention in the literature, especially in the context of screening programmes. The primary objective of this retrospective study is to compare FFDM with SFM in a population-based screening programme with regard to a number of pathological parameters.

  15. Awareness Of Breast Cancer Screening Among Female ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The mortality and morbidity rate of carcinoma of the breast among Nigerian women is alarming and is a serious health issue to health professionals especially nurses. The high rate of mortality and morbidity associated with breast cancer can be reduced through early detection measures which include mammography, ...

  16. The Effect of California's Breast Density Notification Legislation on Breast Cancer Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Stephanie Lynn; Alabaster, Amy; Luikart, Karin; Brenman, Leslie Manace; Habel, Laurel A

    2017-04-01

    Half of US states mandate women be notified if they have dense breasts on their mammogram, yet guidelines and data on supplemental screening modalities are limited. Breast density (BD) refers to the extent that breast tissue appears radiographically dense on mammograms. High BD reduces the sensitivity of screening mammography and increases breast cancer risk. The aim of this study was to determine the potential impact of California's 2013 BD notification legislation on breast cancer screening patterns. We conducted a cohort study of women aged 40 to 74 years who were members of a large Northern California integrated health plan (approximately 3.9 million members) in 2011-2015. We calculated pre- and post-legislation rates of screening mammography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We also examined whether women with dense breasts (defined as BI-RADS density c or d) had higher MRI rates than women with nondense breasts (defined as BI-RADS density a or b). After adjustment for race/ethnicity, age, body mass index, medical facility, neighborhood median income, and cancer history, there was a relative 6.6% decrease (relative risk [RR] 0.934, confidence interval [CI] 0.92-0.95) in the rate of screening mammography, largely driven by a decrease among women breasts (BI-RADS d) had 2.77 times (CI 1.93-3.95) the odds of a MRI within 9 months of a screening mammogram compared with women with nondense breasts (BI-RADS b). In this setting, MRI rates increased in the postlegislation period. In addition, women with higher BD were more likely to have supplementary MRI. The decrease in mammography rates seen primarily among younger women may have been due to changes in national screening guidelines.

  17. Breast density in multiethnic women presenting for screening mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppong, Bridget A; Dash, Chiranjeev; O'Neill, Suzanne; Li, Yinan; Makambi, Kepher; Pien, Edward; Makariou, Erini; Coleman, Tesha; Adams-Campbell, Lucile L

    2017-10-24

    Data on ethnic variations in breast density are limited and often not inclusive of underrepresented minorities. As breast density is associated with elevated breast cancer risk, investigating racial and ethnic difference may elucidate the observed differences in breast cancer risk among different populations. We reviewed breast density from initial screening of women from the Capital Breast Care Center and Georgetown University Hospital from 2010 to 2014. Patient demographics including race, age at screening, education, menopausal status, and body mass index were abstracted. We recorded the BI-RADS density categories: (1) "fatty," (2) "scattered fibroglandular densities," (3) "heterogeneously dense," and (4) "extremely dense." Multivariable unconditional logistic regression was used to identify predictors of breast density. Density categorization was recorded for 2146 women over the 5-year period, comprising Blacks (n = 940), Hispanics (n = 893), and Whites (n = 314). Analysis of subject characteristics by breast density showed that high category is observed in younger, Hispanic, nulliparous, premenopausal, and nonobese women (t-test or chi-square test, P-values density. Being Hispanic, premenopausal, and nonobese were predictive of high density on logistic regression. In this analysis of density distribution in a diverse sample, Hispanic women have the highest breast density, followed by Blacks and Whites. Unique in our findings is women who identify as Hispanic have the highest breast density and lower rates of obesity. Further investigation of the impact of obesity on breast density, especially in the understudied Hispanic group is needed. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. [Mammography breast cancer screening in Italy: 2010 survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgi, Daniela; Giordano, Livia; Ventura, Leonardo; Frigerio, Alfonso; Paci, Eugenio; Zappa, Marco

    2012-01-01

    This report is an update of similar previous papers that have been published by the ONS (Osservatorio nazionale screening, National Centre for Screening Monitoring) since 2002. Data for the survey come from several different programmes that may have changed over time, and may have different settings of organisation and management. During 2010, the first slight decrease in theoretical extension was recorded. Currently, all Italian regions have implemented screening programmes. In 2010, almost 2,496,000 women aged 50-69 years were invited to have a screening mammogram, and more than 1,382,000 were screened. Theoretical extension was 91.7%, while actual extension was 69.1%. An imbalance in extension is still present when comparing northern and central Italy to southern Italy, which only has a 75% coverage by organised screening. The Italian mean value (69%) of two-year extension (period 2009-2010) suggests that, at full capacity, Italian programmes are able to invite only three quarters of the target population. The percentage of women screened during 2010 was 36.7% of the national target population. During the last few years, participation rates were substantially stable, around 55-57% for crude rate, and 59-61% for adjusted rate, respectively. A decreasing trend towards the South of Italy is evident for this parameter, too. Many programmes work with low volumes of activity (below 10,000 or even 5,000 examinations per year), and only one region surpassed the desirable level of at least 20,000 examinations for each programme. Referral rates of 8.8% at first screening and 4.6% at repeat screening were recorded. Direct standardised detection rate was 6.2x1,000 at first screening and 4.3x1,000 at repeat screening, while benign to malignant ratio for first and repeat screening was 0.26 and 0.12, respectively. Detection rate of invasive cancers ≤10 mm was 1.36x1,000 at first screening and 1.49x1,000 at repeat screening; the proportion of in situ carcinomas was 13.9% and

  19. Annual Screening Mammogram and its Relation to Breast Density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabek EAS

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Current national screening programs totally depend on mammographic evaluation. After increased incidence of breast cancer in women under the age of 35, mammography sensitivity in now a question. Several factors added to decrease sensitivity of mammography, such as increased density in older age groups and increased aggressiveness of tumour biology. All these factors will change the reliability of the screening program. The study is a retrospective study conducted at Ain Shams University. Method: 138 patients diagnosed with cancer breast underwent both mammography and sonography to determine percentage of patient with more than one focus, age and density distribution breast cancer in the affected patient and accuracy of both mammography and US. Results: By studying this population, we found that around 61,44% have areas of density ranging from dense breast, heterogenous density or scattered density. These areas of density render the mammography a less sensitive tool as its sensitivity fall to 34.09%, while that of US was 77.27%. Conclusion: As breast cancer is prevalent in younger population, also with increased density in older population who are relatively insensitive to mammography, we recommended the use of Automated Breast Ultrasound (ABUS in the national screening program.

  20. Breast cancer screening and the changing population pyramid of Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Ken; Ohashi, Hitoshi; Kinoshita, Satoki; Nogi, Hiroko; Kato, Kumiko; Toriumi, Yasuo; Yamashita, Akinori; Kamio, Makiko; Mimoto, Rei; Takeyama, Hiroshi

    2015-03-01

    Breast cancer has been the most prevalent cancer in Japan since the 1990s. The mortality from breast cancer is increasing in Japan, whereas in other industrialized countries it has been decreasing since 1990. On the other hand, Japan faces unparalleled growth in its aging population. The aim of this study was to report the mammography screening among Japanese women and the related upcoming changes in the population pyramid of Japan. The reference data for our study were obtained from the Center for Cancer Control and Information Services, Japan Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications, Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, the Japanese Cancer Society, and the National Institute of Population and Social Security. The survey data were obtained from breast cancer and mammography screenings in the Tokyo Prefecture in 2008. The following parameters were analyzed: annual breast cancer incidence, current screening rates, average life-span, and predicted demographic statistics. Our results showed that breast cancer incidence and mortality have been increasing annually in Japan. The average age of breast cancer patients increased to 58.40 years in 2010. The incidence of breast cancer in women aged 65 years and older increased from 25.3 to 32.9 % in the last 10 years and is expected to continue to increase in the future. The check-up rate was 16.0-20.0 % for women aged 65-74 years and 43.0-46.0 % for women aged 40-54 years. According to our questionnaire survey, concerns about breast cancer and mammography screening were high in the young and low in the elderly women. The Japanese population aged 65 years and older was 30,740 (24.1 %) in 2012 and is estimated to increase by 40 % over the next 20 years despite Japan's declining population size. Breast cancer incidence has increased in Japan, even among patients aged 65 years and older. Breast cancer has become increasingly prevalent in older Japanese women. As the population pyramid of Japan changes, women aged 65

  1. Breast Cancer Screening in Albania During 2007-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopeci, Aurel; Çanaku, Dorina; Muja, Herion; Petrela, Kreshnik; Mone, Iris; Qirjako, Gentiana; Hyska, Jolanda; Preza, Krenar

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Our aim was to assess the prevalence of breast cancer among women who showed up and participated in the breast cancer screening program during October 2007-October 2008 in Tirana, the Albanian capital city. Methods: A breast cancer prevention and treatment campaign was undertaken in Tirana, Albania, in 2007 which included also mammography examination for the early detection of breast cancer. All women residing in Tirana municipality were invited to undergo a mammography examination free of charge. Results: A total number of 5224 women underwent mammography examination during October 2007 – October 2008 time period in Tirana. The highest number of mammography tests were performed in October 2008 (1284 tests), followed by June 2008 with 746 mammography examinations realized. In general, the prevalence of breast cancer positive mammography readings where higher among women older than 60 years, followed by the 51-60 and 41-50 years age-groups. Conclusion: Our findings indicate that, among 5224 examined women during a one-year period, 1.9% had a positive reading in mammography. This is one of the few reports large-scale breast cancer screening in Albania. The increasing of breast cancer rates necessitates implementation of multi-directional programs to prevent, early diagnose and control this condition in Albanian women. PMID:24511273

  2. Systematic selection of screening participants by risk score in a Chlamydia screening programme is feasible and effective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, Ingrid V. F.; Brouwers, Elfi E. H. G.; Götz, Hannelore M.; van Bergen, Jan E. A. M.; Op de Coul, Eline L. M.; Fennema, Johannes S. A.; Koekenbier, Rik H.; Pars, Lydia L.; van Ravesteijn, Sander M.; Hoebe, Christian J. P. A.

    2012-01-01

    Systematic screening for Chlamydia trachomatis by individual invitation can be optimised by filtering participants on risk profile, excluding people at no or low risk. The authors investigated this technique in a large-scale chlamydia screening programme in The Netherlands in one rural region where

  3. Predictors of competing mortality to invasive breast cancer incidence in the Canadian National Breast Screening study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taghipour Sharareh

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evaluating the cost-effectiveness of breast cancer screening requires estimates of the absolute risk of breast cancer, which is modified by various risk factors. Breast cancer incidence, and thus mortality, is altered by the occurrence of competing events. More accurate estimates of competing risks should improve the estimation of absolute risk of breast cancer and benefit from breast cancer screening, leading to more effective preventive, diagnostic, and treatment policies. We have previously described the effect of breast cancer risk factors on breast cancer incidence in the presence of competing risks. In this study, we investigate the association of the same risk factors with mortality as a competing event with breast cancer incidence. Methods We use data from the Canadian National Breast Screening Study, consisting of two randomized controlled trials, which included data on 39 risk factors for breast cancer. The participants were followed up for the incidence of breast cancer and mortality due to breast cancer and other causes. We stratified all-cause mortality into death from other types of cancer and death from non-cancer causes. We conducted separate analyses for cause-specific mortalities. Results We found that “age at entry” is a significant factor for all-cause mortality, and cancer-specific and non-cancer mortality. “Menstruation length” and “number of live births” are significant factors for all-cause mortality, and cancer-specific mortality. “Ever noted lumps in right/left breasts” is a factor associated with all-cause mortality, and non-cancer mortality. Conclusions For proper estimation of absolute risk of the main event of interest common risk factors associated with competing events should be identified and considered.

  4. BREAST CANCER SCREENING KNOWLEDGE AND PRACTICE AMONG WOMEN IN SOUTHEAST OF IRAN

    OpenAIRE

    Heidari, Z; H. R Mahmoudzadeh-Sagheb; N Sakhavar

    2008-01-01

    "nBreast cancer is the most common cancer occurring among women. The mortality rate of breast cancer can be reduced by regular breast cancer screening program. This study was carried out to identify the knowledge and practice of women about breast cancer screening in Zahedan, southeast of Iran. In this cross- sectional study, 384 women were selected as an improbability sample of women referring to Qouds maternity hospital. Knowledge and practice of them about breast cancer screening were...

  5. Performance Benchmarks for Screening Breast MR Imaging in Community Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Janie M; Ichikawa, Laura; Valencia, Elizabeth; Miglioretti, Diana L; Wernli, Karen; Buist, Diana S M; Kerlikowske, Karla; Henderson, Louise M; Sprague, Brian L; Onega, Tracy; Rauscher, Garth H; Lehman, Constance D

    2017-10-01

    Purpose To compare screening magnetic resonance (MR) imaging performance in the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (BCSC) with Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) benchmarks. Materials and Methods This study was approved by the institutional review board and compliant with HIPAA and included BCSC screening MR examinations collected between 2005 and 2013 from 5343 women (8387 MR examinations) linked to regional Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program registries, state tumor registries, and pathologic information databases that identified breast cancer cases and tumor characteristics. Clinical, demographic, and imaging characteristics were assessed. Performance measures were calculated according to BI-RADS fifth edition and included cancer detection rate (CDR), positive predictive value of biopsy recommendation (PPV2), sensitivity, and specificity. Results The median patient age was 52 years; 52% of MR examinations were performed in women with a first-degree family history of breast cancer, 46% in women with a personal history of breast cancer, and 15% in women with both risk factors. Screening MR imaging depicted 146 cancers, and 35 interval cancers were identified (181 total-54 in situ, 125 invasive, and two status unknown). The CDR was 17 per 1000 screening examinations (95% confidence interval [CI]: 15, 20 per 1000 screening examinations; BI-RADS benchmark, 20-30 per 1000 screening examinations). PPV2 was 19% (95% CI: 16%, 22%; benchmark, 15%). Sensitivity was 81% (95% CI: 75%, 86%; benchmark, >80%), and specificity was 83% (95% CI: 82%, 84%; benchmark, 85%-90%). The median tumor size of invasive cancers was 10 mm; 88% were node negative. Conclusion The interpretative performance of screening MR imaging in the BCSC meets most BI-RADS benchmarks and approaches benchmark levels for remaining measures. Clinical practice performance data can inform ongoing benchmark development and help identify areas for quality improvement. (©) RSNA

  6. Preconceptions influence women’s perceptions of information on breast cancer screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Mikael Johannes Vuokko; Guassora, Ann Dorrit Kristiane; Brodersen, John

    2015-01-01

    condensation for our initial analysis, and further analysis was guided by the theory of cognitive dissonance. Results: For our participants, the decision-making process was dominated by the attitudes of the women’s circle of acquaintances and, to a lesser extent, by the information that accompanied...... invitation toparticipate in the breast screening programme in Denmark. The selected women received a copy of the official information leaflet 1 week before we interviewed them. The six women were interviewed individually using an interviewguide based on the theory of planned behaviour. We used meaning...

  7. Psychological effects of a cosmetic education programme in patients with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, H Y; Kim, J H; Choi, S; Kang, E; Oh, S; Kim, J Y; Kim, S W

    2015-07-01

    Treatments for breast cancer often include interventions related to psychosocial issues such as negative body image, loss of femininity, and low self-esteem. We identified the psychological effects of a cosmetics education programme in patients with breast cancer. Cosmetic programme is a specific care designed to help patients handle appearance-related side effects. Thirty-one women with breast cancer at a university hospital in South Korea who received a cosmetics education programme were compared with 29 subjects in a control group who received the treatment as usual. Psychological factors including distress, self-esteem, and sexual functioning were assessed three times (before and after the programme, and at the 1-month follow-up). After the programme, patients in the treatment group were significantly less likely than those in the control group to rely on distress (P = 0.038) and avoidance coping (P cosmetics education programme for reducing distress and reliance on negative coping strategies. Implementing a cosmetics programme for patients with breast cancer may encourage patients to control negative psychological factors. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Level and distribution of the radiation dose to the population from a mammography screening programme in New Zealand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulling, S.M.; Nicoll, J.J. [Otago Univ., Dunedin (New Zealand). Dept. of Physics

    1995-12-31

    The Otago Southland Breast Screening Programme offers biennial mammography to 19,000 eligible women on the South Island of New Zealand. A Quality Assurance programme ensures that international performance standards are met, in particular the radiation dose for a mammogram of 5 cm CIRS-X phantom is 1.7 mGy and careful retake analysis undertaken. This however does not reveal the absorbed dose received by individuals, nor how this varies between individuals. Machine parameters and compressed breast thickness for each film were recorded for 310 women who attended one centre during the three months ending February 1993 and absorbed doses calculated using Monte Carlo data. The mean compressed breast thickness for the 310 women was 4.9 cm, doses received for individual films ranged from 0.7 to 8.5 mGy while patient total doses were in the range 4 to 29 mGy with 75% of women receiving a dose of 7.1 mGy or less. (Author).

  9. "Subcutaneous ICD screening with the boston scientific ZOOM programmer versus a 12 lead ECG machine".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shu C; Patton, Kristen K; Robinson, Melissa R; Poole, Jeanne E; Prutkin, Jordan M

    2018-02-24

    The subcutaneous implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (S-ICD) requires pre-implant screening to ensure appropriate sensing and reduce risk of inappropriate shocks. Screening can be performed using either an ICD programmer or a 12 lead ECG machine. It is unclear whether differences in signal filtering and digital sampling change the screening success rate. Subjects were recruited if they had a transvenous single lead ICD without pacing requirements or were candidates for a new ICD. Screening was performed using both a Boston Scientific ZOOM programmer and General Electric MAC® 5000 ECG machine. A pass was defined as having at least one lead that fit within the screening template in both supine and sitting positions. 69 subjects were included. 27 sets of ECG leads had differing screening results between the two machines (7%). Of these sets, 22 (81%) passed using the ECG machine but failed using the programmer and 5 (19%) passed using the ECG machine but failed using the programmer (p < 0.001). Four subjects (6%) passed screening using the ECG machine but failed using the programmer. No subject passed screening with the programmer but failed with the ECG machine. There can be occasional disagreement in S-ICD patient screening between an ICD programmer and ECG machine, all of whom passed with the ECG machine but failed using the programmer. On a per lead basis, the ECG machine passes more subjects. It is unknown what the inappropriate shock rate would be if an S-ICD was implanted. Clinical judgment should be used in borderline cases. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Mammography Screening Among African-American Women with a Family History of Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lipkus, Issac

    1997-01-01

    Comparisons were made between African-American women with and without a family history of breast cancer with respect to mammography screening, attitudes towards mammography screening and perceptions...

  11. Decision aid for women considering breast cancer screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pasternack, Iris; Saalasti-Koskinen, Ulla; Mäkelä, Marjukka

    2011-01-01

    relevant content and format for the decision aid for breast cancer screening. Feedback from women was sought for the draft documents. RESULTS: A decision aid attached to the invitation letter for screening was considered the best way to ensure access to information. In addition, tailored letter templates...... for all phases of the screening program, a poster, and a public website were developed. Initial feedback from users (women, professionals, and service providers), was mainly positive. Six months after publishing, the implementation of the decision aid was still incomplete. CONCLUSIONS: Providing balanced...... information for women invited to breast cancer screening is demanding and requires careful planning. Professionals and service providers need to be engaged in the HTA process to ensure proper dissemination and implementation of the information. End user participation is essential in the formulation...

  12. Reduction in advanced breast cancer after introduction of a mammography screening program in Tyrol/Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberaigner, W; Geiger-Gritsch, Sabine; Edlinger, M; Daniaux, M; Knapp, R; Hubalek, M; Siebert, U; Marth, C; Buchberger, W

    2017-06-01

    We analysed all female breast cancer (BC) cases in Tyrol/Austria regarding the shift in cancer characteristics, especially the shift in advanced BC, for the group exposed to screening as compared to the group unexposed to screening. The analysis was based on all BC cases diagnosed in women aged 40-69 years, resident in Tyrol, and diagnosed between 2009 and 2013. The data were linked to the Tyrolean mammography screening programme database to classify BC cases as "exposed to screening" or "unexposed to screening". Age-adjusted relative risks (RR) were estimated by relating the exposed to the unexposed group. In a total of about 145,000 women aged 40-69 years living in Tyrol during the study period, 1475 invasive BC cases were registered. We estimated an age-adjusted relative risk (RR) for tumour size ≥ 21 mm of 0.72 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.60 to 0.86), for metastatic BC of 0.27 (95% CI 0.17 to 0.46) and for advanced BC of 0.83 (95% CI 0.71 to 0.96), each comparing those exposed to those unexposed to screening, respectively. In our population-based registry analysis we observed that participation in the mammography screening programme in Tyrol is associated with a 28% decrease in risk for BC cases with tumour size ≥ 21 mm and a 17% decrease in risk for advanced BC. We therefore expect the Tyrolean mammography programme to show a reduction in BC mortality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Benefits and Harms of Breast Cancer Screening: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Evan R; Moorman, Patricia; Gierisch, Jennifer M; Havrilesky, Laura J; Grimm, Lars J; Ghate, Sujata; Davidson, Brittany; Mongtomery, Ranee Chatterjee; Crowley, Matthew J; McCrory, Douglas C; Kendrick, Amy; Sanders, Gillian D

    2015-10-20

    Patients need to consider both benefits and harms of breast cancer screening. To systematically synthesize available evidence on the association of mammographic screening and clinical breast examination (CBE) at different ages and intervals with breast cancer mortality, overdiagnosis, false-positive biopsy findings, life expectancy, and quality-adjusted life expectancy. We searched PubMed (to March 6, 2014), CINAHL (to September 10, 2013), and PsycINFO (to September 10, 2013) for systematic reviews, randomized clinical trials (RCTs) (with no limit to publication date), and observational and modeling studies published after January 1, 2000, as well as systematic reviews of all study designs. Included studies (7 reviews, 10 RCTs, 72 observational, 1 modeling) provided evidence on the association between screening with mammography, CBE, or both and prespecified critical outcomes among women at average risk of breast cancer (no known genetic susceptibility, family history, previous breast neoplasia, or chest irradiation). We used summary estimates from existing reviews, supplemented by qualitative synthesis of studies not included in those reviews. Across all ages of women at average risk, pooled estimates of association between mammography screening and mortality reduction after 13 years of follow-up were similar for 3 meta-analyses of clinical trials (UK Independent Panel: relative risk [RR], 0.80 [95% CI, 0.73-0.89]; Canadian Task Force: RR, 0.82 [95% CI, 0.74-0.94]; Cochrane: RR, 0.81 [95% CI, 0.74-0.87]); were greater in a meta-analysis of cohort studies (RR, 0.75 [95% CI, 0.69 to 0.81]); and were comparable in a modeling study (CISNET; median RR equivalent among 7 models, 0.85 [range, 0.77-0.93]). Uncertainty remains about the magnitude of associated mortality reduction in the entire US population, among women 40 to 49 years, and with annual screening compared with biennial screening. There is uncertainty about the magnitude of overdiagnosis associated with

  14. The expansion and performance of national newborn screening programmes for cystic fibrosis in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barben, Jürg; Castellani, Carlo; Dankert-Roelse, Jeannette; Gartner, Silvia; Kashirskaya, Nataliya; Linnane, Barry; Mayell, Sarah; Munck, Anne; Sands, Dorota; Sommerburg, Olaf; Pybus, Simon; Winters, Victoria; Southern, Kevin W

    2017-03-01

    Newborn screening (NBS) for cystic fibrosis (CF) is a well-established public health strategy with international standards. The aim of this study was to provide an update on NBS for CF in Europe and assess performance against the standards. Questionnaires were sent to key workers in each European country. In 2016, there were 17 national programmes, 4 countries with regional programmes and 25 countries not screening in Europe. All national programmes employed different protocols, with IRT-DNA the most common strategy. Five countries were not using DNA analysis. In addition, the processing and structure of programmes varied considerably. Most programmes were achieving the ECFS standards with respect to timeliness, but were less successful with respect to sensitivity and specificity. There has been a steady increase in national CF NBS programmes across Europe with variable strategies and outcomes that reflect the different approaches. Copyright © 2016 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of endoscopy screening on stage at gastric cancer diagnosis: results of the National Cancer Screening Programme in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, K S; Jun, J K; Suh, M; Park, B; Noh, D K; Song, S H; Jung, K W; Lee, H-Y; Choi, I J; Park, E-C

    2015-02-03

    Although gastric cancer screening is common among countries with a high prevalence of gastric cancer, there is little data to support the effectiveness of this screening. This study was designed to determine the differences in stage at diagnosis of gastric cancer according to the screening history and screening method (upper gastrointestinal series (UGIS) vs endoscopy). The study population was derived from the National Cancer Screening Programme (NCSP), a nationwide organised screening programme in Korea. The study cohort consisted of 19 168 gastric cancer patients who had been diagnosed in 2007 and who were invited to undergo gastric cancer screening via the NCSP between 2002 and 2007. Compared with never-screened patients, the odds ratios for being diagnosed with localised gastric cancer in endoscopy-screened patients and UGIS-screened patients were 2.10 (95% CI=1.90-2.33) and 1.24 (95% CI=1.13-1.36), respectively. Screening by endoscopy was more strongly associated with a diagnosis of localised stage gastric cancer compared with screening by UGIS.

  16. Breast-Cancer Tumor Size, Overdiagnosis, and Mammography Screening Effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, H Gilbert; Prorok, Philip C; O'Malley, A James; Kramer, Barnett S

    2016-10-13

    The goal of screening mammography is to detect small malignant tumors before they grow large enough to cause symptoms. Effective screening should therefore lead to the detection of a greater number of small tumors, followed by fewer large tumors over time. We used data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program, 1975 through 2012, to calculate the tumor-size distribution and size-specific incidence of breast cancer among women 40 years of age or older. We then calculated the size-specific cancer case fatality rate for two time periods: a baseline period before the implementation of widespread screening mammography (1975 through 1979) and a period encompassing the most recent years for which 10 years of follow-up data were available (2000 through 2002). After the advent of screening mammography, the proportion of detected breast tumors that were small (invasive tumors measuring <2 cm or in situ carcinomas) increased from 36% to 68%; the proportion of detected tumors that were large (invasive tumors measuring ≥2 cm) decreased from 64% to 32%. However, this trend was less the result of a substantial decrease in the incidence of large tumors (with 30 fewer cases of cancer observed per 100,000 women in the period after the advent of screening than in the period before screening) and more the result of a substantial increase in the detection of small tumors (with 162 more cases of cancer observed per 100,000 women). Assuming that the underlying disease burden was stable, only 30 of the 162 additional small tumors per 100,000 women that were diagnosed were expected to progress to become large, which implied that the remaining 132 cases of cancer per 100,000 women were overdiagnosed (i.e., cases of cancer were detected on screening that never would have led to clinical symptoms). The potential of screening to lower breast cancer mortality is reflected in the declining incidence of larger tumors. However, with respect to only these large tumors

  17. Prenatal detection of congenital heart disease - Results of a national screening programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Velzen, C. L.; Clur, S. A.; Rijlaarsdam, M. E B; Bax, C. J.; Pajkrt, E.; Heymans, M. W.; Bekker, M. N.; Hruda, J.; De Groot, C. J M; Blom, N. A.; Haak, M. C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common congenital malformation and causes major morbidity and mortality. Prenatal detection improves the neonatal condition before surgery, resulting in less morbidity and mortality. In the Netherlands a national prenatal screening programme was

  18. What determines individuals' preferences for colorectal cancer screening programmes? A discrete choice experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dam, L; Hol, L; de Bekker-Grob, E W; Steyerberg, E W; Kuipers, E J; Habbema, J D F; Essink-Bot, M L; van Leerdam, M E

    2010-01-01

    In many countries uptake of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening remains low. To assess how procedural characteristics of CRC screening programmes determine preferences for participation and how individuals weigh these against the perceived benefits from participation in CRC screening. A discrete choice experiment was conducted among subjects in the age group of 50-75 years, including both screening-naïve subjects and participants of a CRC screening programme. Subjects were asked on their preferences for aspects of CRC screening programmes using scenarios based on pain, risk of complications, screening location, preparation, duration of procedure, screening interval and risk reduction of CRC-related death. The response was 31% (156/500) for screening-naïve and 57% (124/210) for CRC screening participants. All aspects proved to significantly influence the respondents' preferences. For both groups combined, respondents required an additional relative risk reduction of CRC-related death by a screening programme of 1% for every additional 10 min of duration, 5% in order to expose themselves to a small risk of complications, 10% to accept mild pain, 10% to undergo preparation with an enema, 12% to use 0.75l of oral preparation combined with 12h fasting and 32% to use an extensive bowel preparation. Screening intervals shorter than 10 years were significantly preferred to a 10-year screening interval. This study shows that especially type of bowel preparation, risk reduction of CRC related death and length of screening interval influence CRC screening preferences. Furthermore, improving awareness on CRC mortality reduction by CRC screening may increase uptake.

  19. Breast cancer screening: An outpatient clinic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Girgin

    2017-03-01

    Conclusion: A multidisciplinary cancer screening program should be maintained. With such a process, the aim is to reduce the morbidity and mortality of the disease without adversely affecting the health conditions of asymptomatic individuals based on the screening. Success is brought about by the combination of individual features. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2017; 6(1.000: 23-27

  20. Self-assessed health, perceived stress and non-participation in breast cancer screening: A Danish cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Line Flytkjær; Pedersen, Anette Fischer; Andersen, Berit; Vedsted, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Population-based cancer screening is offered in many countries to detect early stages of cancer and reduce mortality. Screening efficiency and equality is susceptible due to a group of non-participants. We investigated associations between self-assessed health, perceived stress and subsequent non-participation in breast cancer screening. This population-based cohort study included 4512 women who had participated in a Health Survey in 2006 and who were also the target group (aged 50-69 years) for the first organised breast cancer screening programme -3 years later in the Central Denmark Region in 2008-2009. A U-shaped association was observed for physical health assessment as women with the highest (PR=1.28, 95% CI: 1.06-1.55), and the lowest (PR=1.41, 95% CI: 1.18-1.68) physical health scores were less likely to participate in the programme than women with physical health scores in the middle range. Women with low mental health assessment were more likely not to participate than women with mental health scores in the middle range (PR=1.44, 95% CI: 1.22-1.69). Higher non-participation propensity was also observed for women with the highest perceived stress scores (PR=1.27, 95% CI: 1.07-1.51) compared with women scoring in the middle range. Women with highest and lowest self-assessed physical health, with lowest mental health or highest perceived stress were significantly more likely not to participate in breast cancer screening 2-3 years later than women who reported average health. Interventions targeting these groups may promote equal participation in future breast cancer screening programmes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. [CBO guideline 'Breast cancer: screening and diagnosis'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutgers, E.; Tuut, M.K.; Verbeek, A.L.M.

    2001-01-01

    New developments in the diagnostic procedures for women with an increased risk for, or symptoms related to breast cancer led to development of new guidelines by a working group under the auspices of the Dutch Institute for Health Care Improvement, the Organisation of Comprehensive Cancer Centres and

  2. Simulation models in population breast cancer screening : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koleva-Kolarova, Rositsa G; Zhan, Zhuozhao; Greuter, Marcel J W; Feenstra, Talitha L; De Bock, Geertruida H

    The aim of this review was to critically evaluate published simulation models for breast cancer screening of the general population and provide a direction for future modeling. A systematic literature search was performed to identify simulation models with more than one application. A framework for

  3. Awareness level and attitude towards breast cancer screening ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated breast cancer screening practices among female health workers in Esanland, Edo State. The study was descriptive and adopted the survey research design. The participants were 750 females from the five local government areas of Esanland, Edo State. The instrument used was a questionnaire, ...

  4. Determinants of breast cancer screening uptake in Kurdishwomen of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayyereh Aminisani

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion: It was found that the level of breast screening uptake was low among Kurdish women compared to those reported in the previous studies. Designing participation enhancing interventions with a specific focus on older, illiterate and post-menopausal women are recommended.

  5. The effects and costs of breast cancer screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.J. de Koning (Harry)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractIn 1986, the Dutch Ministry of Welfare, Health and Cultural Affairs asked a research group to investigate the expected effect of breast cancer screening on mortality and possibly morbidity, if implemented in the Netherlands. The research group consisted of members from 3 centres, the

  6. Temporal trend in socioeconomic inequalities in the uptake of cancer screening programmes in France between 2005 and 2010: results from the Cancer Barometer surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, David Mark; Estaquio, Carla; Léon, Christophe; Arwidson, Pierre; Nabi, Hermann

    2017-12-14

    Cancer screening is a form of secondary prevention for a disease which is now the leading cause of death in France. Various socioeconomic indicators have been identified as potential factors for disparities in breast, cervical and colorectal cancer screening uptake. We aimed to identify the socioeconomic inequalities, which persisted in screening uptake for these cancers, and to quantify these disparities over a 5-year period. The Cancer Barometer was a population-based-survey carried out in 2005 and 2010 in France. A randomly selected sample of participants aged 15-85 years (n=3820 in 2005 and n=3727 in 2010) were interviewed on their participation in breast, cervical and colorectal cancer screening-programmes and their socioeconomic profile. For each type of screening programme, we calculated participation rates, OR and relative inequality indices (RII) for participation, derived from logistic regression of the following socioeconomic variables: income, education, occupation, employment and health insurance. Changes in participation between 2005 and 2010 were then analysed. Participation rates for breast and colorectal screening increased significantly among the majority of socioeconomic categories, whereas for cervical cancer screening there were no significant changes between 2005 and 2010. RIIs for income remained significant for cervical smear in 2005 (RII=0.25, 95% CI 0.13 to 0.48) and in 2010 (RII=0.31, 95% CI 0.15 to 0.64). RIIs for education in mammography (RII=0.43, 95% CI 0.19 to 0.98) and cervical smear (RII=0.36, 95% CI 0.21 to 0.64) were significant in 2005 and remained significant for cervical smear (RII=0.40, 95% CI 0.22 to 0.74) in 2010. There was a persistence of socioeconomic inequalities in the uptake of opportunistic cervical cancer screening. Conversely, organised screening programmes for breast and colorectal cancer saw a reduction in relative socioeconomic inequalities, even though the results were not statistically significant

  7. Organisation of newborn hearing screening programmes in the European Union: widely implemented, differently performed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, Bénédicte; Senterre, Christelle; Lagasse, Raphaël; Tognola, Gabriella; Levêque, Alain

    2016-06-01

    Implementation of newborn hearing screening programmes is widely recommended and programme organisational designs may differ in practice. The objective of this article was to establish an overview of the newborn hearing screening programmes in the 28 countries of the European Union on four topics (policy-decision, financing, general designs, organisational features). National or regional programme coordinators completed an online self-administered questionnaire focusing on protocol description and programme organisation. Thirty-nine key informants, representing 24 countries, from national or regional levels completed the questionnaire. Newborn hearing screening programmes are or will be shortly implemented largely in the European Union countries. Levels of policy decision-making and organisational decisions are diverse (national, regional or combined). Designs of the programmes (number of steps before diagnosis referral, single or dual target group protocol) highly varied. However, common organisational elements were observed: hearing screening tests are often performed by nursing staff, in hospitals and early in life. This pattern does not apply when a screening protocol is specifically implemented for newborns with risk factor(s) for hearing impairment or admitted to neonatal intensive care units. Hearing test financing frequently involved public sources, including government and public health funds. Despite the same goal of early identification of hearing-impaired children, there is a high level of diversity in programmes, including policy decisions, financing, general designs and pragmatic organisational choices (e.g. professionals involved, location or time for screening, number of steps in the protocol). Further investigations should analyse these differences in relation to the programmes' contexts and outcomes. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  8. International variation in management of screen-detected ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponti, Antonio; Lynge, Elsebeth; James, Ted; Májek, Ondřej; von Euler-Chelpin, My; Anttila, Ahti; Fitzpatrick, Patricia; Mano, Maria Piera; Kawai, Masaaki; Scharpantgen, Astrid; Fracheboud, Jacques; Hofvind, Solveig; Vidal, Carmen; Ascunce, Nieves; Salas, Dolores; Bulliard, Jean-Luc; Segnan, Nereo; Kerlikowske, Karla; Taplin, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Background Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) incidence has grown with the implementation of screening and its detection varies across International Cancer Screening Network (ICSN) countries. The aim of this survey is to describe the management of screen-detected DCIS in ICSN countries and to evaluate the potential for treatment related morbidity. Methods We sought screen-detected DCIS data from the ICSN countries identified during 2004–2008. We adopted standardised data collection forms and analysis and explored DCIS diagnosis and treatment processes ranging from pre-operative diagnosis to type of surgery and radiotherapy. Results Twelve countries contributed data from a total of 15 screening programmes, all from Europe except the United States of America and Japan. Among women aged 50–69 years, 7,176,050 screening tests and 5324 screen-detected DCIS were reported. From 21% to 93% of DCIS had a pre-operative diagnosis (PO); 67–90% of DCIS received breast conservation surgery (BCS), and in 41–100% of the cases this was followed by radiotherapy; 6.4–59% received sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) only and 0.8–49% axillary dissection (ALND) with 0.6% (range by programmes 0–8.1%) being node positive. Among BCS patients 35% received SLNB only and 4.8% received ALND. Starting in 2006, PO and SLNB use increased while ALND remained stable. SLNB and ALND were associated with larger size and higher grade DCIS lesions. Conclusions Variation in DCIS management among screened women is wide and includes lymph node surgery beyond what is currently recommended. This indicates the presence of varying levels of overtreatment and the potential for its reduction. PMID:25149183

  9. Appalachian women's perspectives on breast and cervical cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenberg, Nancy E; Kruger, Tina M; Bardach, Shoshana; Howell, Britteny M

    2013-01-01

    Although breast and cervical cancer screening rates have been increasing over the three past decades, many Appalachian women in the USA do not receive screening, leading to disproportionate mortality rates. The aims of this study were to: (1) better understand barriers to and facilitators of breast and cervical cancer screening among Appalachian women; and (2) identify strategies to increase cancer screening. Eight focus groups and 19 key informant interviews were conducted with 79 participants. Tape-recorded session were transcribed and content analyzed. Findings consistent with screening determinants research include: inadequate personal and community resources, attitudinal and knowledge barriers, and competing demands. Less commonly described factors include family cancer history, personal health habits, and the multiple influences of healthcare providers. Interpreting findings in terms of consumer information processing theory, healthcare providers and supports play a key role in educating and influencing the screening uptake among Appalachian Kentucky women. These findings have the potential to inform innovative and culturally consonant intervention approaches capable of increasing screening and decreasing mortality rates.

  10. Outcomes of an Australian Nursing Student-Led School Vision and Hearing Screening Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolchard, Barry; Stuhlmiller, Cynthia M.

    2018-01-01

    Nursing students typically do not undertake clinical training in school settings. However, they are well placed to have a role in providing health screening and education in schools or community health venues under supervision of qualified nurses. This study provides a description and outcomes of a vision and hearing screening programme delivered…

  11. Impact of mammographic screening on ethnic and socioeconomic inequities in breast cancer stage at diagnosis and survival in New Zealand: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seneviratne, Sanjeewa; Campbell, Ian; Scott, Nina; Shirley, Rachel; Lawrenson, Ross

    2015-01-31

    Indigenous Māori women experience a 60% higher breast cancer mortality rate compared with European women in New Zealand. We explored the impact of differences in rates of screen detected breast cancer on inequities in cancer stage at diagnosis and survival between Māori and NZ European women. All primary breast cancers diagnosed in screening age women (as defined by the New Zealand National Breast Cancer Screening Programme) during 1999-2012 in the Waikato area (n = 1846) were identified from the Waikato Breast Cancer Register and the National Screening Database. Stage at diagnosis and survival were compared for screen detected (n = 1106) and non-screen detected (n = 740) breast cancer by ethnicity and socioeconomic status. Indigenous Māori women were significantly more likely to be diagnosed with more advanced cancer compared with NZ European women (OR = 1.51), and approximately a half of this difference was explained by lower rate of screen detected cancer for Māori women. For non-screen detected cancer, Māori had significantly lower 10-year breast cancer survival compared with NZ European (46.5% vs. 73.2%) as did most deprived compared with most affluent socioeconomic quintiles (64.8% vs. 81.1%). No significant survival differences were observed for screen detected cancer by ethnicity or socioeconomic deprivation. The lower rate of screen detected breast cancer appears to be a key contributor towards the higher rate of advanced cancer at diagnosis and lower breast cancer survival for Māori compared with NZ European women. Among women with screen-detected breast cancer, Māori women do just as well as NZ European women, demonstrating the success of breast screening for Māori women who are able to access screening. Increasing breast cancer screening rates has the potential to improve survival for Māori women and reduce breast cancer survival inequity between Māori and NZ European women.

  12. The cumulative risk of false-positive screening results across screening centres in the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roman, M., E-mail: Marta.Roman@kreftregisteret.no [Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo (Norway); Department of Women and Children’s Health, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Skaane, P., E-mail: PERSK@ous-hf.no [Department of Radiology, Oslo University Hospital Ullevaal, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Hofvind, S., E-mail: Solveig.Hofvind@kreftregisteret.no [Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo (Norway); Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences, Faculty of Health Science, Oslo (Norway)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • We found variation in early performance measures across screening centres. • Radiologists’ performance may play a key role in the variability. • Potential to improve the effectiveness of breast cancer screening programs. • Continuous surveillance of screening centres and radiologists is essential. - Abstract: Background: Recall for assessment in mammographic screening entails an inevitable number of false-positive screening results. This study aimed to investigate the variation in the cumulative risk of a false positive screening result and the positive predictive value across the screening centres in the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program. Methods: We studied 618,636 women aged 50–69 years who underwent 2,090,575 screening exams (1996–2010. Recall rate, positive predictive value, rate of screen-detected cancer, and the cumulative risk of a false positive screening result, without and with invasive procedures across the screening centres were calculated. Generalized linear models were used to estimate the probability of a false positive screening result and to compute the cumulative false-positive risk for up to ten biennial screening examinations. Results: The cumulative risk of a false-positive screening exam varied from 10.7% (95% CI: 9.4–12.0%) to 41.5% (95% CI: 34.1–48.9%) across screening centres, with a highest to lowest ratio of 3.9 (95% CI: 3.7–4.0). The highest to lowest ratio for the cumulative risk of undergoing an invasive procedure with a benign outcome was 4.3 (95% CI: 4.0–4.6). The positive predictive value of recall varied between 12.0% (95% CI: 11.0–12.9%) and 19.9% (95% CI: 18.3–21.5%), with a highest to lowest ratio of 1.7 (95% CI: 1.5–1.9). Conclusions: A substantial variation in the performance measures across the screening centres in the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program was identified, despite of similar administration, procedures, and quality assurance requirements. Differences in the

  13. Artificial intelligence for breast cancer screening: Opportunity or hype?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houssami, Nehmat; Lee, Christoph I; Buist, Diana S M; Tao, Dacheng

    2017-12-01

    Interpretation of mammography for breast cancer (BC) screening can confer a mortality benefit through early BC detection, can miss a cancer that is present or fast growing, or can result in false-positives. Efforts to improve screening outcomes have mostly focused on intensifying imaging practices (double instead of single-reading, more frequent screens, or supplemental imaging) that may add substantial resource expenditures and harms associated with population screening. Less attention has been given to making mammography screening practice 'smarter' or more efficient. Artificial intelligence (AI) is capable of advanced learning using large complex datasets and has the potential to perform tasks such as image interpretation. With both highly-specific capabilities, and also possible un-intended (and poorly understood) consequences, this viewpoint considers the promise and current reality of AI in BC detection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Using record linkage to monitor equity and variation in screening programmes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O’Reilly Dermot

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ecological or survey based methods to investigate screening uptake rates are fraught with many limitations which can be circumvented by record linkage between Census and health services datasets using variations in breast screening attendance as an exemplar. The aim of this current study is to identify the demographic, socio-economic factors associated with uptake of breast screening. Methods Record linkage study: combining 2001 Census data within the Northern Ireland Longitudinal Study (NILS with data relating to validated breast screening histories from the National Breast Screening System. A cohort was identified of 37,059 women aged 48-64 at the Census who were invited for routine breast screening in the three years following the Census. All cohort attributes were as recorded on the Census form. Results The record linkage methodology enabled the records of almost 40,000 of those invited for screening to be analysed at an individual level, exceeding the largest published survey by a factor of ten. This produced a more robust analysis and demonstrated (in fully adjusted models the lower uptake amongst non-married women and those in the lowest social class (OR 0.74; 95%CI 0.66, 0.82, factors that had not been reported earlier in the UK. In addition, with the availability of both individual and area information it was possible to show that the much lower screening uptake in urban areas is not due to differences in population composition suggesting unrecognised organisational problems. Conclusions Linkage of screening data to Census-based longitudinal studies is an efficient and powerful way to increase the evidence base on sources of variation in screening uptake within the UK.

  15. Comparison of digital mammography and screen-film mammography in breast cancer screening: a review in the Irish breast screening program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambly, Niamh M; McNicholas, Michelle M; Phelan, Niall; Hargaden, Gormlaith C; O'Doherty, Ann; Flanagan, Fidelma L

    2009-10-01

    Clinical trials to date into the use of full-field digital mammography (FFDM) for breast cancer screening have shown variable results. The aim of this study was to review the use of FFDM in a population-based breast cancer screening program and to compare the results with screen-film mammography. The study included 188,823 screening examinations of women between 50 and 64 years old; 35,204 (18.6%) mammograms were obtained using FFDM. All films were double read using a 5-point rating scale to indicate the probability of cancer. Patients with positive scores were recalled for further workup. The recall rate, cancer detection rate, and positive predictive value (PPV) of FFDM were compared with screen-film mammography. The cancer detection rate was significantly higher for FFDM than screen-film mammography (6.3 vs 5.2 per 1,000, respectively; p = 0.01). The cancer detection rate for FFDM was higher than screen-film mammography for initial screening and subsequent screening, for invasive cancer and ductal carcinoma in situ, and across all age groups. The cancer detection rate for cancers presenting as microcalcifications was significantly higher for FFDM than for screen-film mammography (1.9 vs 1.3 per 1,000, p = 0.01). The recall rate was significantly higher for FFDM than screen-film mammography (4.0% vs 3.1%, p film mammography (15.7% and 16.7%, p = 0.383). FFDM resulted in significantly higher cancer detection and recall rates than screen-film mammography in women 50-64 years old. The PPVs of FFDM and screen-film mammography were comparable. The results of this study suggest that FFDM can be safely implemented in breast cancer screening programs.

  16. Expanding newborn screening programmes and strengthening informed consent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijsingh, N.M.

    2012-01-01

    Part I offers the context to the claim that informed consent requirements need to be strengthened to the extent that newborn screening conveys more disadvantages relative to the advantages. This includes a discussion of the Dutch debate on expanding newborn screening. From this discussion it becomes

  17. Predicting the risk of a false-positive test for women following a mammography screening programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Njor, Sisse Helle; Olsen, Anne Helene; Schwartz, Walter

    2007-01-01

    screening to women aged 50-69 years in Copenhagen and Fyn, Denmark. METHODS: We defined the outcome from a screen as being either a false-positive test or not a false-positive test. We then tested whether the outcomes from subsequent screens were independent, and afterwards estimated the risk over 10......OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study was to provide a simple estimate of the cumulative risk of a false-positive test for women participating in mammography screening. To test the method, we used data from two well-established, organized mammography screening programmes offering biennial...... screens of a false-positive test, i.e. the risk of getting at least one false-positive test for a woman participating in all 10 screens typically offered in Europe. RESULTS: The outcomes of subsequent screens were found to be independent. After completion of screening rounds 3-5, the risk of a false...

  18. Impact of organised mammography screening on breast cancer mortality in a case–control and cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinävaara, Sirpa; Sarkeala, Tytti; Anttila, Ahti

    2016-01-01

    Background: The usefulness of case–control studies has been questioned. Our aim was to evaluate the long-term effect of screening on breast cancer mortality within the population-based mammography programme in Finland using a case–control design, and to compare the analyses with the earlier cohort study. Methods: The cases were women invited to screening, diagnosed and died from breast cancer in 1992–2011 while being 50–84 years at death. We chose 10 controls for each case with non-restrictive eligibility criteria. Our data included 1907 cases and 18 978 matched controls. We analysed associations between the screening participation and the risk of breast cancer death using the conditional Cox proportional hazards model. The effect estimates were corrected for self-selection bias. Results: An overall effect of screening was 0.67 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.49–0.90), and that remained unchanged over time. Analyses with matching criteria comparable to the cohort study yielded an effect (0.70, 95% CI: 0.49–1.00) in 1992–2003 similar to that of the previous cohort analysis (0.72, 95% CI: 0.56–0.88). Conclusions: Organised mammography screening decreases mortality from breast cancer by 33% among the participants. If made comparable, a case–cohort study can yield effect estimates similar to a cohort study. PMID:27010748

  19. Impact of organised mammography screening on breast cancer mortality in a case-control and cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinävaara, Sirpa; Sarkeala, Tytti; Anttila, Ahti

    2016-04-26

    The usefulness of case-control studies has been questioned. Our aim was to evaluate the long-term effect of screening on breast cancer mortality within the population-based mammography programme in Finland using a case-control design, and to compare the analyses with the earlier cohort study. The cases were women invited to screening, diagnosed and died from breast cancer in 1992-2011 while being 50-84 years at death. We chose 10 controls for each case with non-restrictive eligibility criteria. Our data included 1907 cases and 18 978 matched controls. We analysed associations between the screening participation and the risk of breast cancer death using the conditional Cox proportional hazards model. The effect estimates were corrected for self-selection bias. An overall effect of screening was 0.67 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.49-0.90), and that remained unchanged over time. Analyses with matching criteria comparable to the cohort study yielded an effect (0.70, 95% CI: 0.49-1.00) in 1992-2003 similar to that of the previous cohort analysis (0.72, 95% CI: 0.56-0.88). Organised mammography screening decreases mortality from breast cancer by 33% among the participants. If made comparable, a case-cohort study can yield effect estimates similar to a cohort study.

  20. Will supplemental screening ultrasound increase breast cancer overdiagnosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molleran, Virginia M

    2015-08-01

    Overdiagnosis refers to the detection of cancers that would never come to light in a patient's lifetime and are only identified by means of screening. Exactly how much overdiagnosis currently exists with screening mammography is uncertain. Because we do not know for certain which tumors would ultimately lead to death if left untreated and which would not, we cannot directly measure overdiagnosis and how best to estimate it is a matter of controversy. A conservative estimate of overdiagnosis with mammography would be on the order of 10%, but estimates have ranged as high as 54%. We know from multiple studies that ultrasound (US) screening mostly detects small, invasive, node-negative cancers; and in the ACRIN 6666 study, there was a greater tendency for US-only-detected tumors to be low grade than those detected with mammography. However, the population of patients undergoing screening US can be expected to differ from the average screening mammography population in that they will have higher breast density, they will be younger, and they may also have higher breast cancer risk than the population undergoing screening mammography. These factors may be associated with more aggressive tumors. There is no way to know whether we will be increasing overdiagnosis without performing a large randomized controlled study with very long-term follow-up. Even if some cancers are overdiagnosed with US, there will be a greater proportion of lethal breast cancers that are successfully treated because of screening US. The more important task is to learn how to correctly diagnose and appropriately treat nonlethal cancers. Copyright © 2015 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Digital Compared with Screen-Film Mammography: Measures of Diagnostic Accuracy among Women Screened in the Ontario Breast Screening Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prummel, Maegan V; Muradali, Derek; Shumak, Rene; Majpruz, Vicky; Brown, Patrick; Jiang, Hedy; Done, Susan J; Yaffe, Martin J; Chiarelli, Anna M

    2016-02-01

    To compare measures of diagnostic accuracy between large concurrent cohorts of women screened with digital computed radiography (CR), direct radiography (DR), and screen-film mammography (SFM). This study was approved by the University of Toronto Research Ethics Board; informed consent was not required. Three concurrent cohorts of women aged 50-74 years who were screened from 2008-2009 in the Ontario Breast Screening Program with SFM (487,334 screening examinations, 403,688 women), DR (254,758 screening examinations, 220,520 women), or CR (74,140 screening examinations, 64,210 women) were followed for 2 years or until breast cancer diagnosis. Breast cancers were classified as screening-detected or interval on the basis of the woman's final screening and assessment results. Interval cancer rate (per 10 000 negative screening examinations), sensitivity, and specificity were compared across the cohorts by using mixed-effects logistic regression analysis. Interval cancer rates were higher, although not significantly so, for CR (15.2 per 10,000; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 12.8, 17.8) and were similar for DR (13.7 per 10,000; 95% CI: 12.4, 15.0) compared with SFM (13.0 per 10,000; 95% CI: 12.1, 13.9). For CR versus SFM, specificity was similar while sensitivity was significantly lower (odds ratio [OR] = 0.62; 95% CI: 0.47, 0.83; P = .001), particularly for invasive cancers detected at a rescreening examination, for women with breast density of less than 75%, for women with no family history, and for postmenopausal women. For DR versus SFM, sensitivity was similar while specificity was lower (OR = 0.92; 95% CI: 0.87, 0.98; P = .01), particularly for rescreening examinations, for women aged 60-74 years, for women with breast density of less than 75%, for women with a family history, and for women who were postmenopausal. Given the 38% lower sensitivity of CR imaging systems compared with SFM, programs should assess the continued use of this technology for breast

  2. False-positive results in mammographic screening for breast cancer in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofvind, Solveig; Ponti, Antonio; Patnick, Julietta

    2012-01-01

    To estimate the cumulative risk of a false-positive screening result in European mammographic screening programmes, and examine the rates and procedures of further assessment.......To estimate the cumulative risk of a false-positive screening result in European mammographic screening programmes, and examine the rates and procedures of further assessment....

  3. Quality assessment of the mammographic screening programme in the Azienda Sanitaria locale Provincia Milano 1 -- analysis of interval cancers and discussion of possible causes of diagnostic error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burani, Rossella; Caimi, Francesco; Maggioni, Carlo; Marinoni, Guia; Pellizzoni, Romana; Pirola, Maria Elena; Villa, Roberto; Ciatto, Stefano

    2005-03-01

    To evaluate the sensitivity of the mammographic screening programme and the causes of diagnostic fault in cases surfacing as interval cancers. Interval cancers (CI) were identified by linkage of the screening database for the years 2000-2002 to the database of hospital discharge records (HDR) for breast cancer during 2000-2002. Linkage between screening attenders during 2000-2001 and HDR (biennial follow-up for year 2000, one year follow-up for year 2001) was used to calculate the proportional rate of observed/expected IC. The observed/ expected rate was compared with international standards and literature data. Screening mammograms followed by IC, randomly admixtured with negative controls, underwent blind review by an independent radiologist, using the recommended classification criteria to evaluate causes of error (occult, minimal signs, screening error). The analysis of HDR during 2000-2002 allowed us to identify 31 out of 89 expected IC. Proportional observed/expected IC rate in the first or second year of screening interval was 26 or 67%, respectively. Screening mammograms for radiological review were available in 38 of 61 total IC: 20 cases (52.6%) were classified as occult, whereas minimal signs or screening errors were 2 (5.2%) or 16 (42.1%), respectively. Diagnostic suspicion had been reported at screening in 7 of 16 cases classified as screening error, but were not diagnosed at the subsequent diagnostic assessment. Proportional IC rate was higher than reported in the literature or currently recommended (<30% in the 1st, <50% in the 2nd year). The analysis of error causes shows an excess of screening errors with respect to current recommendations (<20% of IC should be classified as screening error at review), but also an excess of IC suspected at screening but misdiagnosed at assessment (7/38=18.4 %). Overall the analysis revealed a reduced sensitivity of the screening programme, as often observed in service screening as compared to excellence centres

  4. [Evaluation of a screening programme for diabetic retinopathy (DODIA study)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, Jean-Pierre; Massin, Pascale; Audran, Ghislaine; Ben Mehidi, Amina; Bernit, Blandine; Bouée, Stéphane; Bouhassira, Myriam; Bourovitch, Jean-Claude; Erginay, Ali; Eschwege, Evelyne; Jamet, Marina; Marre, Michel; Nougairède, Michel; Tcherny-Lessenot, Stéphanie

    2007-06-15

    In France, 43% to 63% of diabetics have an annual fundoscopy. Do the new screening tools, coupled with teletransmission of the images, allow for satisfying ophthalmological screening? It is an important matter given the foreseeable reduction in the number of French ophthalmologists in the forthcoming years. To measure the quality of screening for diabetic retinopathy (DR), in the framework of a network, by the provision of a retinograph by numeric camera (with teletransmission of the images and centralised interpretation), in a screening centre located in town. The study evaluated the quality of screening obtained in two comparable groups of general practitioners, one using the retinograph and the other using the classical method of screening by ophthalmologist. The screening was targeted at diabetics who had not had a fundoscopy in the preceding year, nor had known DR or a treating ophthalmologist (for the retinography group only). 667 patients were sampled in the retinography group (456 included) and 707 in the control group (426 included) between 1/04/02 and 1/11/02; 417 patients were followed until the end of the study in the 2 groups. A screening examination was considered effective if it was performed within the six months following its request, and by the presence of a report in the file of the general practitioner. The percentage of patients thus screened was 74% in the retinography group and 71,5% in the other group (not significant). 16% of diabetics in the retinography group had DR compared with 10% of patients in the control group. The analysis of the level of satisfaction of patients tended to show a preference for the system of screening by fundal photography. In the framework of a healthcare network, the availability of a retinograph by numeric camera, with the interpretation of photos by teletransmission of the images, obtained a high level of quality of screening for diabetic retinopathy that was at least as good as that obtained by a healthcare

  5. Resource-stratified implementation of a community-based breast cancer management programme in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggan, Catherine; Dvaladze, Allison L; Tsu, Vivien; Jeronimo, Jose; Constant, Tara K Hayes; Romanoff, Anya; Scheel, John R; Patel, Shilpen; Gralow, Julie R; Anderson, Benjamin O

    2017-10-01

    Breast cancer incidence and mortality rates continue to rise in Peru, with related deaths projected to increase from 1208 in 2012, to 2054 in 2030. Despite improvements in national cancer control plans, various barriers to positive breast cancer outcomes remain. Multiorganisational stakeholder collaboration is needed for the development of functional, sustainable early diagnosis, treatment and supportive care programmes with the potential to achieve measurable outcomes. In 2011, PATH, the Peruvian Ministry of Health, the National Cancer Institute in Lima, and the Regional Cancer Institute in Trujillo collaborated to establish the Community-based Program for Breast Health, the aim of which was to improve breast health-care delivery in Peru. A four-step, resource-stratified implementation strategy was used to establish an effective community-based triage programme and a practical early diagnosis scheme within existing multilevel health-care infrastructure. The phased implementation model was initially developed by the Breast Cancer Initiative 2·5: a group of health and non-governmental organisations who collaborate to improve breast cancer outcomes. To date, the Community-based Program for Breast Health has successfully implemented steps 1, 2, and 3 of the Breast Cancer Initiative 2·5 model in Peru, with reports of increased awareness of breast cancer among women, improved capacity for early diagnosis among health workers, and the creation of stronger and more functional linkages between the primary levels (ie, local or community) and higher levels (ie, district, region, and national) of health care. The Community-based Program for Breast Health is a successful example of stakeholder and collaborator involvement-both internal and external to Peru-in the design and implementation of resource-appropriate interventions to increase breast health-care capacity in a middle-income Latin American country. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Understanding barriers to organized breast cancer screening in France: women's perceptions, attitudes, and knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrat, Emilie; Le Breton, Julien; Djassibel, Memtolom; Veerabudun, Kalaivani; Brixi, Zahida; Attali, Claude; Renard, Vincent

    2013-08-01

    The participation rate in organized breast cancer screening in France is lower than recommended. Non-participants either use opportunistic screening or do not use either screening modality. To assess any differences in perceptions, attitudes and knowledge related to breast cancer screening between users of opportunistic screening and non-users of any screening mammograms and to identify potential barriers to participation in organized screening. Six focus groups were conducted in May 2010 with 34 French non-participants in organized screening, 15 who used opportunistic screening (OpS group) and 19 who used no screening (NoS group). The guide used for both groups explored perceptions and attitudes related to health, cancer and screening; perceptions of femininity; and knowledge about breast cancer screening. Thematic content analysis was performed. Perceptions, attitudes and knowledge differed between the two groups. Women in the OpS group perceived a high susceptibility to breast cancer, visited their gynaecologist regularly, were unfamiliar with organized screening modalities and had doubts about its quality. NoS women had very high- or low-perceived susceptibility to breast cancer, knew about screening modalities, had doubts about its usefulness and expressed negative opinions of mammograms. Differences in perceptions and attitudes related to breast cancer screening partially explain why some women choose opportunistic screening or no screening. General practitioners and gynaecologists are in a unique position to provide individually tailored preventative messages to improve participation in organized screening.

  7. Overdiagnosis by mammographic screening for breast cancer studied in birth cohorts in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ripping, T.M.; Verbeek, A.L.; Fracheboud, J.; Koning, H.J. de; Ravesteyn, N.T. van; Broeders, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    A drawback of early detection of breast cancer through mammographic screening is the diagnosis of breast cancers that would never have become clinically detected. This phenomenon, called overdiagnosis, is ideally quantified from the breast cancer incidence of screened and unscreened cohorts of women

  8. Advanced breast cancer rates in the epoch of service screening: The 400,000 women cohort study from Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puliti, Donella; Bucchi, Lauro; Mancini, Silvia; Paci, Eugenio; Baracco, Susanna; Campari, Cinzia; Canuti, Debora; Cirilli, Claudia; Collina, Natalina; Conti, Giovanni Maria; Di Felice, Enza; Falcini, Fabio; Michiara, Maria; Negri, Rossella; Ravaioli, Alessandra; Sassoli De' Bianchi, Priscilla; Serafini, Monica; Zorzi, Manuel; Caldarella, Adele; Cataliotti, Luigi; Zappa, Marco

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate if mammography screening attendance is associated with a reduction in late-stage breast cancer incidence. The cohort included over 400,000 Italian women who were first invited to participate in regional screening programmes during the 1990s and were followed for breast cancer incidence for 13 years. We obtained individual data on their exposure to screening and correlated this with total and stage-specific breast cancer incidence. Socio-economic status and pre-screening incidence data were used to assess the presence of self-selection bias. Overall, screening attendance was associated with a 10% excess risk of in situ and invasive breast cancer (IRR = 1.10; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.06-1.14), which dropped to 5% for invasive cancers only (IRR = 1.05; 95% CI: 1.01-1.09). There were significant reductions among attenders for specific cancer stages; we observed a 39% reduction for T2 or larger (IRR = 0.61; 95% CI: 0.57-0.66), 19% for node positives (IRR = 0.81; 95% CI: 0.76-0.86) and 28% for stage II and higher (IRR = 0.72; 95% CI: 0.68-0.76). Our data suggest that the presence of self-selection bias is limited and, overall, invited women experienced a 17% reduction of advanced cancers compared with pre-screening rates. Comparing attenders' and non-attenders' stage-specific breast cancer incidence, we have estimated that screening attendance is associated with a reduction of nearly 30% for stages II+. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Impact of selected environmental factors on attendance in the Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Programme in the Wielkopolska Province of Poland during 2007–2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witold Kycler

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Breast and cervical cancer represent a significant health and economic issue for Polish society, although if detected early, both can be cured successfully. For this reason, since 2006, according to the National Cancer Combat Programme, population-based screening programmes have been implemented, aimed at reducing the mortality and morbidity for breast and cervical cancer. The aim of this study is to determine which of the selected four environmental factors affect attendance for screening mammography and cytology. Analysis included data from questionnaires filled in during mammography by 582,959 women aged 50–69 years, and 288,142 women during cytology, aged 25–59 years, in 2007–2012 in the Wielkopolska Province of Poland. It was found that the impact of medical staff on the attendance for cytological screening was the strongest statistically significant factor (p = 0,0001. Invitation by name (p=0,001 and other factors (p= 0,0001 also affected the attendance. In the cytological screening, medical staff was the factor that had the greatest impact on attendance. Other factors, such as self-reporting, increased participation in the next screening rounds, although the factors that affect attendance changed over time. Their constant analysis is essential for the efficient and effective evaluation of screening programsme.

  10. Impact of selected environmental factors on attendance in the Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Programme in the Wielkopolska Province of Poland during 2007-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kycler, Witold; Kubiak, Anna; Rzymski, Paweł; Wilczak, Maciej; Trojanowski, Maciej; Roszak, Magdalena; Włoszczak-Szubzda, Anna; Rzymska, Izabela

    2017-09-21

    Breast and cervical cancer represent a significant health and economic issue for Polish society, although if detected early, both can be cured successfully. For this reason, since 2006, according to the National Cancer Combat Programme, population-based screening programmes have been implemented, aimed at reducing the mortality and morbidity for breast and cervical cancer. The aim of this study is to determine which of the selected four environmental factors affect attendance for screening mammography and cytology. Analysis included data from questionnaires filled in during mammography by 582,959 women aged 50-69 years, and 288,142 women during cytology, aged 25-59 years, in 2007-2012 in the Wielkopolska Province of Poland. It was found that the impact of medical staff on the attendance for cytological screening was the strongest statistically significant factor (p = 0,0001). Invitation by name (p=0,001) and other factors (p= 0,0001) also affected the attendance. In the cytological screening, medical staff was the factor that had the greatest impact on attendance. Other factors, such as self-reporting, increased participation in the next screening rounds, although the factors that affect attendance changed over time. Their constant analysis is essential for the efficient and effective evaluation of screening programsme.

  11. Digital compared to screen-film mammography: breast cancer prognostic features in an organized screening program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prummel, Maegan V; Done, Susan J; Muradali, Derek; Majpruz, Vicky; Brown, Patrick; Jiang, Hedy; Shumak, Rene S; Yaffe, Martin J; Holloway, Claire M B; Chiarelli, Anna M

    2014-09-01

    Our previous study found cancer detection rates were equivalent for direct radiography compared to screen-film mammography, while rates for computed radiography were significantly lower. This study compares prognostic features of invasive breast cancers by type of mammography. Approved by the University of Toronto Research Ethics Board, this study identified invasive breast cancers diagnosed among concurrent cohorts of women aged 50-74 screened by direct radiography, computed radiography, or screen-film mammography from January 1, 2008 to December 31, 2009. During the study period, 816,232 mammograms were performed on 668,418 women, and 3,323 invasive breast cancers were diagnosed. Of 2,642 eligible women contacted, 2,041 participated (77.3 %). The final sample size for analysis included 1,405 screen-detected and 418 interval cancers (diagnosed within 24 months of a negative screening mammogram). Polytomous logistic regression was performed to evaluate the association between tumour characteristics and type of mammography, and between tumour characteristics and detection method. Odds ratios (OR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI) were recorded. Cancers detected by computed radiography compared to screen-film mammography were significantly more likely to be lymph node positive (OR 1.94, 95 %CI 1.01-3.73) and have higher stage (II:I, OR 2.14, 95 %CI 1.11-4.13 and III/IV:I, OR 2.97, 95 %CI 1.02-8.59). Compared to screen-film mammography, significantly more cancers detected by direct radiography (OR 1.64, 95 %CI 1.12-2.38) were lymph node positive. Interval cancers had worse prognostic features compared to screen-detected cancers, irrespective of mammography type. Screening with computed radiography may lead to the detection of cancers with a less favourable stage distribution compared to screen-film mammography that may reflect a delayed diagnosis. Screening programs should re-evaluate their use of computed radiography for breast screening.

  12. Breast cancer screening, outside the population-screening program, of women from breast cancer families without proven BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations : a simulation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobi, C.E.; Nagelkerke, N.J.D.; van Houwelingen, J.C.; de Bock, G.H.

    Purpose: We assessed the cost-effectiveness of mammography screening for women under the age of 50, from breast cancer families without proven BRCA1./BRCA2 mutations, because current criteria for screening healthy women from breast cancer families are not evidence-based. Methods: We did simulation

  13. Breast cancer screening, outside the population-screening program, of women from breast cancer families without proven BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations: a simulation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobi, C.E.; Nagelkerke, N.J.D.; van Houwelingen, J.C.; de Bock, Truuske

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: We assessed the cost-effectiveness of mammography screening for women under the age of 50, from breast cancer families without proven BRCA1./BRCA2 mutations, because current criteria for screening healthy women from breast cancer families are not evidence-based. Methods: We did simulation

  14. Glandularity and mean glandular dose determined for individual women at four regional breast cancer screening units in The Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoetelief, J.; Veldkamp, W. J. H.; Thijssen, M. A. O.; Jansen, J. T. M.

    2006-04-01

    The nationwide breast cancer screening programme using mammography has been in full operation in The Netherlands since 1997. There is concern that the mean glandular doses due to mammography might be differing between different regions of the country due to differences in glandularity and compressed breast thickness. To investigate regional differences, glandularity, compressed breast thickness and mean glandular dose were determined for individual breasts during screening at mammography units at four locations in The Netherlands. Differences in glandularity were observed, which could be related qualitatively to differences in age of the participants at the different locations. Mean glandular dose depends on compressed breast thickness, glandularity and technical conditions of screening. The lowest average value of the mean glandular dose was found for the unit in Amsterdam. This is most likely due to the use of the Mo/Rh anode/filter combination at this unit, in addition to the Mo/Mo combination. At the other three units, almost exclusively the Mo/Mo anode/filter combination was used. Differences in mean glandular dose averaged per unit could be related mainly to differences in tube-current exposure-time product values. Consequently, it is concluded that differences in mean glandular dose at different units are marginal.

  15. Breast screening technologists: When is a difficult case truly difficult and for whom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Hazel J.; Gale, Alastair G.

    2005-04-01

    Each year almost all film readers in the UK Breast Screening Programme voluntarily read a set of difficult mammographic cases as a means of self-assessing their film reading skills. We set out to investigate what case characteristics, if any, actually constituted a 'difficult' or 'easy' case in the opinion of radiological experts. We also examined how UK Breast Screening personnel performed on those cases which the experts deemed were difficult, in order to build up a profile of the types of cases that provide film readers with the most problems. We examined two main elements of case diagnosis, case classification and case features and investigated if there were any group differences in terms of case difficulty and the percentage of incorrectly reported cases. Data from over 15 radiological experts and approximately 400 film readers were compared on 180 cases. Significant differences were found between the expert and screening populations (p < .05) in terms of these case characteristics. These data contribute to the understanding of just what constitutes a difficult case as considered by experts and other film-readers, with a view to elucidating the type of cases most appropriate for advanced mammographic training.

  16. Overdiagnosis associated with breast cancer screening: A simulation study to compare lead-time adjustment methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seigneurin, A; Labarère, J; Duffy, S W; Colonna, M

    2015-12-01

    Estimating overdiagnosis associated with breast cancer screening may use annual incidence rates of cancer. We simulated populations invited to screening programmes to assess two lead-time adjustment methods. Overdiagnosis estimates were computed using the compensatory drop method, which considered the decrease in incidence of cancers among older age groups no longer offered screening, and the method based on the decrease in incidence of late-stage cancers. The true value of overdiagnosis was 0% in all the data sets simulated. The compensatory drop method yielded an overdiagnosis estimate of -0.1% (95% credibility interval -0.5% to 0.5%) when participation rates among the population and risk of cancers were constant. However, if participation rates increased with calendar year as well as risk of cancer with birth cohorts, the overdiagnosis estimated was 11.0% (10.5-11.6%). Using the method based on the incidence of early- and late-stage cancers, overdiagnosis estimates were 8.9% (8.5-9.3%) and 17.6% (17.4-17.9%) when participation rates and risks of cancer were constant or increased with time, respectively. Adjustment for lead time based on the compensatory drop method is accurate only when participation rates and risks of cancer remain constant, whereas the adjustment method based on the incidence of early- and late-stage cancers results in overestimating overdiagnosis regardless of stability of participation rates and breast cancer risk. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The relationship between real life breast screening and an annual self assessment scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Hazel J.; Evans, Andrew; Gale, Alastair G.; Murphy, Alison; Reed, Jacquie

    2009-02-01

    Incidence of cancer in the UK NHS Breast Screening Programme (NHSBSP) is relatively low (approximately 7% per 1,000 cases screened). As such, feedback from cancers missed or interval cancers can be a relatively lengthy process (whereby a woman will not present for corroborating imaging for a further three years). Therefore in order to monitor their radiological skill, all breast screening radiologists and technologists read a self-assessed, standard set of challenging mammographic images bi-yearly. This scheme, 'PERFORMS' (Personal Performance in Mammographic Screening) has been running since near the inception of the NHSBSP in 1991. Although PERFORMS has functioned as an educational tool for film-readers on the UKBSP for decades, its relation to real life screening in past years has proven to be somewhat equivocal (Cowley & Gale, 1999). The present study investigated the relationship between performance measures in real life and their equivalent on the PERFORMS self assessment scheme namely: Miss Rate (FN), Cases Arbitrated and Returned to Routine screening and Incorrect recall (FP), Specificity (TN) and Cancer Detection (TP). Over 40 individuals from one NHS region in the UK submitted their real life data for comparison with PERFORMS results from the same time frame. Data from this initial study were taken from the year 2005-2006 and compared with the relevant PERFORMS set of cases. Results indicated a significant positive correlation between PERFORMS performance measures and performance measures for real life. These results are discussed in the light of the legitimacy of self-assessment comparative to film-reading skill (during real life clinical practice).

  18. Impact of invitation schemes on breast cancer screening coverage: A cohort study from Copenhagen, Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Katja Kemp; von Euler Chelpin, My; Vejborg, Ilse; Lynge, Elsebeth

    2017-03-01

    Background The purpose of mammography screening is to decrease breast cancer mortality. To achieve this a high coverage by examination is needed. Within an organized screening programme, we examined the impact of changes in the invitation schedule on the interplay between coverage and participation. Method We studied nine cohorts aged 50-51 when first targeted by mammography screening in Copenhagen, Denmark. Population data were retrieved from the Danish Civil Registration System; invitation and attendance data from the screening programme database. Data were linked using unique personal identification numbers. Coverage by invitation was defined as (number of invited women/number of targeted women), coverage by examination as (number of screened women/number of targeted women), and participation rate as (number of screened women/number of invited women). Results Coverage by invitation was close to or above 95% for all newly recruited cohorts. In subsequent invitation rounds, both technical errors and changes in the invitation scheme affected the coverage by invitation. Coverage by examination at first invitation was 72.5% for the first cohort, but dropped to 64.2% for the latest cohort. Furthermore, coverage by examination dropped by increasing invitation number and with omission of re-invitation of previous non-attenders. Participation rate closely reflected changes in the invitation scheme. Conclusion Changes in the invitation schemes influenced coverage by invitation, coverage by examination, and participation rate. We observed a considerable gap between coverage by examination and participation rate, strongly indicating that the latter cannot without reservations, be taken as an indicator of the first.

  19. Capacity strengthening through pre-migration tuberculosis screening programmes: IRHWG experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, P; Posey, D L; Zenner, D; Robson, J; Abubakar, I; Giovinazzo, G

    2017-07-01

    Effective tuberculosis (TB) prevention and care for migrants requires population health-based approaches that treat the relationship between migration and health as a progressive, interactive process influenced by many variables and addressed as far upstream in the process as possible. By including capacity building in source countries, pre-migration medical screening has the potential to become an integral component of public health promotion, as well as infection and disease prevention, in migrant-receiving nations, while simultaneously increasing capabilities in countries of origin. This article describes the collaborative experiences of five countries (Australia, Canada, New Zealand, United Kingdom and the United States of America, members of the Immigration and Refugee Health Working Group [IRHWG]), with similar pre-migration screening programmes for TB that are mandated. Qualitative examples of capacity building through IRHWG programmes are provided. Combined, the IRHWG member countries screen approximately 2 million persons overseas every year. Large-scale pre-entry screening programmes undertaken by IRHWG countries require building additional capacity for health care providers, radiology facilities and laboratories. This has resulted in significant improvements in laboratory and treatment capacity, providing availability of these facilities for national public health programmes. As long as global health disparities and disease prevalence differentials exist, national public health programmes and policies in migrant-receiving nations will continue to be challenged to manage the diseases prevalent in these migrating populations. National TB programmes and regulatory systems alone will not be able to achieve TB elimination. The management of health issues resulting from population mobility will require integration of national and global health initiatives which, as demonstrated here, can be supported through the capacity-building endeavours of pre

  20. What we need to know about dense breasts: implications for breast cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreira Gómez, M C; Estrada Blan, M C

    High breast density and its relationship to the risk of breast cancer has become a hot topic in the medical literature and in the lay press, especially in the United States, where it has brought about changes in the legal framework that require radiologists to inform clinicians and patients about breast density. Radiologists, who are mainly responsible for this information, need to know the scientific evidence and controversies regarding this subject. The discussion is centered on the real importance of the risk, the limitation that not having standardized methods of measurement represents, and the possible application of complementary screening techniques (ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, or tomosynthesis) for which clear recommendations have yet to be established. We need controlled studies that evaluate the application of these techniques in women with dense breasts, including the possibility that they can lead to overdiagnosis. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. A case control study on the effectiveness of breast cancer screening by clinical breast examination in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanemura, S; Tsuji, I; Ohuchi, N; Takei, H; Yokoe, T; Koibuchi, Y; Ohnuki, K; Fukao, A; Satomi, S; Hisamichi, S

    1999-06-01

    A case-control study was conducted in Miyagi and Gunma prefectures, Japan, to evaluate the effectiveness of breast cancer screening by clinical breast examination (CBE) alone in reducing breast cancer mortality. Case subjects, who were female and had died of breast cancer, were collected from residential registry files and medical records. Control subjects matched in sex, age and residence were randomly selected from residential registry files. The screening histories during 5 years prior to the cases having been diagnosed as breast cancer were surveyed using the examinee files of the screening facilities. Finally, the data of 93 cases and 375 controls were analyzed. The odds ratio (OR) of breast cancer death for participating in screening at least once during 5 years was 0.93 (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.48-1.79). The cases were more symptomatic than the controls when screened. If the participants who had had symptoms in their breasts were classified as not screened, the OR decreased to 0.56 (95% CI 0.27-1.18). The case control study suggests that the current screening modality (CBE) lacks effectiveness (OR = 0.93), although it might be effective for an asymptomatic population (OR = 0.56). The number of cases was small, and a larger case-control study is desirable to define whether CBE is effective or not. However, it is necessary to consider the introduction of mammographic screening to reduce breast cancer mortality in Japan.

  2. Problems, solutions, and perspectives in the evaluation of interval cancers in Italian mammography screening programmes: a position paper from the Italian group for mammography screening (GISMa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucchi, Lauro; Frigerio, Alfonso; Zorzi, Manuel; Fedato, Chiara; Angiolucci, Giovanni; Bernardi, Daniela; Campari, Cinzia; Crocetti, Emanuele; Ferretti, Stefano; Giorgi, Daniela; Marchisio, Francesca; Morrone, Doralba; Naldoni, Carlo; Petrella, Marco; Ponti, Antonio; Ravaioli, Alessandra; Saguatti, Gianni; Santini, Dolores; Sassoli de Bianchi, Priscilla; Serafini, Monica; Vergini, Viviana; Giordano, Livia

    2015-01-01

    In this position paper, a self-convened team of experts from the Italian Group for Mammography Screening (Gruppo italiano screening mammografico, GISMa) pointed out the problems that increasingly hamper the feasibility and validity of the estimate of the proportional incidence of interval breast cancer (IBC) in Italy, suggested potential solutions and an agenda for research, and proposed that the question of the sensitivity of mammography be viewed in a larger perspective, with a greater attention to radiological review activities and breast radiology quality assurance programmes. The main problems are as follows: the coverage of cancer registration is incomplete; the robustness of using the pre-screening incidence rates as underlying rates decreases with time since the start of screening; the intermediate mammograms performed for early detection purposes may cause an overrepresentation of IBCs; the classification of many borderline screening histories is prone to subjectivity; and, finally, the composition of cohorts of women with negative screening results is uncertain, because several mammography reports are neither clearly negative nor clearly positive, and because of the limitations and instability of the electronic mammography records. Several possibilities can be considered to cope with these issues: standard methods for using the hospital discharge records in the identification of IBCs should be established; for the calculation of regional estimates of the underlying incidence, a suitable mathematical model should be identified; the definition of IBC according to the 2008 GISMa guidelines needs to be updated, especially with respect to in situ cancers and to invasive cancers with borderline screening histories; a closer adherence to standard screening protocols, with a simplified patient management, would make it easier to objectively identify IBCs; alternative methods for estimating the sensitivity of mammography should be taken into consideration; and

  3. Beliefs related to breast cancer and breast cancer screening among Lebanese Armenian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arevian, Mary; Noureddine, Samar; Abboud, Sarah

    2011-11-01

    Our purpose of this article was to investigate women's beliefs about breast cancer, breast cancer screening, and intervention programs. We designed the study using a cross-sectional/descriptive correlation. The participants were drawn from a convenience sample (N=94). The instrument included Champion's Revised Health Belief Model Scale (CHBMS). Analysis was performed using SPSS (2005), 15.0. More than sixty-four percent (64.8%) of women surveyed were over 41. Results showed that 80.9% of women surveyed had heard of breast self-exams (BSEs), while 76.6% had heard of mammography. However, 53.2% never practiced breast self-examinations, and 79.6% never underwent mammography. Mean belief scores follow: low susceptibility (14.32), barriers to BSE (15.24), barriers to mammography (14.85), high seriousness (23.42), benefits to breast self-examination (22.7), confidence (36.45), health motivation (27.27), and benefits to mammography (24.28). Significant relationships included the relationship between barriers to breast self-examination and whether women had heard about breast self-examinations (p=.02); the relationship between susceptibility and whether women had heard of or underwent mammography (p=.027); the relationship between confidence and whether women had heard of mammography (p=.056); the relationship between confidence and perceived financial status (p=.05); and benefits of mammography (p=.05). Appropriate interventions are developed.

  4. Role of carotid duplex imaging in carotid screening programmes – an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillard Jonathan H

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stroke is the third most common cause of death in the UK and the largest single cause of severe disability. Each year more than 110,000 people in England suffer from a stroke which costs the National Health Service (NHS over GBP2.8 billion. Thus, it is imperative that patients at risk be screened for underlying carotid artery atherosclerosis. Aim To assess the role of carotid ultrasound in different carotid screening programmes. Methods A literature overview was carried out by using PubMed search engine, to identify different carotid screening programmes that had used ultrasound scan as a screening tool. Results It appears that the carotid ultrasound is an effective method for screening carotid artery disease in community as it effectively predicts the presence of stenosis with high accuracy. There is a need for primary care to recommend high risk patients for regular screening, to reduce stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA related morbidity and mortality. Conclusion Screening programmes using carotid ultrasonography contribute to public health awareness and promotion which in long term could potentially benefit in disease prevention and essentially promote better standards of healthcare.

  5. Evaluation of a school screening programme for young people from refugee backgrounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodland, Lisa; Kang, Melissa; Elliot, Christopher; Perry, Astrid; Eagar, Sandy; Zwi, Karen

    2016-01-01

    To describe the development of the Optimising Health and Learning Program, guided by the only available published framework for the delivery of health services to newly arrived refugee children and report on the evaluation of the programme. We conducted process and impact evaluation using a mixed methods approach. The sample was 294 refugee young people enrolled in two Intensive English Centres in New South Wales. We collected quantitative data (demographic and clinical information) as well as qualitative data via focus groups, key informant interviews, surveys and programme documentation. Qualitative data were subjected to thematic analysis; programme documents underwent document review. There were high levels of programme participation (90%), and the yield from routine health screening was high (80% of participants screened positive for two or more health conditions). All identified programme development strategies were implemented; programme partners and participants reported satisfaction with the programme. Sixteen programme partners were identified with a high level of intersectoral collaboration reported. Significant in-kind contributions and seed funding enabled the uptake of the programme to increase from one to five Intensive English Centres over a 4-year period. Process and impact evaluation identified that the programme was well implemented and met its stated objectives of increasing the detection of health conditions likely to impact on student health and learning; linkage of newly arrived students and their families with primary health care; and coordination of care across primary health and specialist services. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2015 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  6. Cervical cancer screening in Europe: Quality assurance and organisation of programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfström, K Miriam; Arnheim-Dahlström, Lisen; von Karsa, Lawrence; Dillner, Joakim

    2015-05-01

    Cervical screening programmes have reduced cervical cancer incidence and mortality but the level of success is highly variable between countries. Organisation of programmes is essential for equity and cost-effectiveness. However, there are differences in effectiveness, also among organised programmes. In order to identify the key organisational components that determine effectiveness, we performed a Europe-wide survey on the current status of organisation and organised quality assurance (QA) measures in cervical cancer prevention programmes, as well as organisation-associated costs. A comprehensive questionnaire was developed through systematic review of literature and existing guidelines. The survey was sent to programme organisers, Ministries of Health and experts in 34 European Union (EU) and European Free Trade Agreement (EFTA) countries. Detailed aspects of programme organisation, quality assurance, monitoring, evaluation and corresponding line-item costs were recorded. Documentation of programme guidelines, protocols and publications was requested. Twenty-nine of 34 countries responded. The results showed that organised efforts for QA, monitoring and evaluation were carried out to a differing extent and were not standardised, making it difficult to compare the cost-effectiveness of organisation and QA strategies. Most countries found it hard to estimate the costs associated with launching and operating the organised programme. To our knowledge, this is the first questionnaire to request detailed information on the actual organisation and QA of programmes. The results of this survey can be used as a basis for further development of standardised guidelines on organisation and QA of cervical cancer screening programmes in Europe. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Scarce information about breast cancer screening: An Italian websites analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attena, Francesco; Cancellieri, Mariagrazia; Pelullo, Concetta Paola

    2016-12-01

    Although the public should have complete and correct information about risk/benefit ratio of breast cancer screening, public knowledge appears generally scarce and oriented to overestimate benefits, with little awareness of possible disadvantages of the screening.We evaluated any document specifically addressed to the general female public and posted on internet by Italian public health services. The presence of false positive, false positive after biopsy, false negative, interval cancer, overdiagnosis, lead-time bias, exposure to irradiation, and mortality reduction was analyzed.Of the 255 websites consulted, 136 (53.3%) had sites addressed to the female public. The most commonly reported information points were the false-positive (30.8% of sites) and radiation exposure (29.4%) rates. Only 11 documents mentioned overdiagnosis, 2 mentioned risk of false positive with biopsy, and only 1 mentioned lead-time bias. Moreover, only 15 sites (11.0%) reported quantitative data for any risk variables.Most documents about breast cancer screening published on the web for the female public contained little or no information about risk/benefit ratio and were biased in favor of screening.

  8. [Variations in the diagnostic confirmation process between breast cancer mass screening units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natal, Carmen; Fernández-Somoano, Ana; Torá-Rocamora, Isabel; Tardón, Adonina; Castells, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    To analyse variations in the diagnostic confirmation process between screening units, variations in the outcome of each episode and the relationship between the use of the different diagnostic confirmation tests and the lesion detection rate. Observational study of variability of the standardised use of diagnostic and lesion detection tests in 34 breast cancer mass screening units participating in early-detection programmes in three Spanish regions from 2002-2011. The diagnostic test variation ratio in percentiles 25-75 ranged from 1.68 (further appointments) to 3.39 (fine-needle aspiration). The variation ratio in detection rates of benign lesions, ductal carcinoma in situ and invasive cancer were 2.79, 1.99 and 1.36, respectively. A positive relationship between rates of testing and detection rates was found with fine-needle aspiration-benign lesions (R(2): 0.53), fine-needle aspiration-invasive carcinoma (R(2): 0 28), core biopsy-benign lesions (R(2): 0.64), core biopsy-ductal carcinoma in situ (R(2): 0.61) and core biopsy-invasive carcinoma (R(2): 0.48). Variation in the use of invasive tests between the breast cancer screening units participating in early-detection programmes was found to be significantly higher than variations in lesion detection. Units which conducted more fine-needle aspiration tests had higher benign lesion detection rates, while units that conducted more core biopsies detected more benign lesions and cancer. Copyright © 2016 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Experience with breast cancer, pre-screening perceived susceptibility and the psychological impact of screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Absetz, Pilvikki; Aro, Arja R; Sutton, Stephen R

    2003-01-01

    This prospective study examined whether the psychological impact of organized mammography screening is influenced by women's pre-existing experience with breast cancer and perceived susceptibility (PS) to the disease. From a target population of 16,886, a random sample of women with a normal...... responded to the follow-ups. Psychological impact was measured as anxiety (STAI-S), depression (BDI), health-related concerns (IAS), and breast cancer-specific beliefs and concerns. Data was analyzed with repeated measures analyses of variance, with estimates of effect size based on Eta-squared. Women...

  10. BREAST CANCER SCREENING KNOWLEDGE AND PRACTICE AMONG WOMEN IN SOUTHEAST OF IRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z Heidari

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available "nBreast cancer is the most common cancer occurring among women. The mortality rate of breast cancer can be reduced by regular breast cancer screening program. This study was carried out to identify the knowledge and practice of women about breast cancer screening in Zahedan, southeast of Iran. In this cross- sectional study, 384 women were selected as an improbability sample of women referring to Qouds maternity hospital. Knowledge and practice of them about breast cancer screening were investigated through face-to-face interview based on a purposed questionnaire, and data were analyzed using descriptive and analytical statistics. Only 8.3% of women were aware of breast cancer screening methods. About breast self-examination 21.6%, and about mammography 3.4% had good knowledge. Overall knowledge of breast cancer screening was insufficient in 67.4%. There was statistically significant relationship between knowledge of breast cancer screening and level of education, history of individual breast disease, and history of breast cancer in their families (P < 0.001. There was statistically significant and inverse relationship between knowledge of how to examine the breasts and knowledge about mammography with age (P < 0.001. Practices of women in Zahedan about Breast cancer screening were very low. Only 4.5% of women performed breast self examination (BSE, on a regular basis, 4.1% had ever had a clinical breast examination (CBE, and %1.3 had a mammography throughout their life. Our findings suggest that knowledge and practice about breast cancer screening was relatively in a weak level and it needs to be improved.

  11. The Effect of Telephone Counseling and Education on Breast Cancer Screening in Family Caregivers of Breast Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiriani, Khadijeh; Motevasselian, Monireh; Farnia, Farahnaz; Shiryazdi, Seyed Mostafa; Khodayarian, Mahsa

    2017-10-01

    Breast cancer is the most common form of malignancy among females. Family history is a key risk factor for breast cancer. Breast cancer screening practices are vital in patients with family history of breast cancer. Telephone counseling and education may be appropriate for improved breast cancer screening. This study was done to determine family caregiver patients' knowledge of risk factors for breast cancer and practice of breast cancer screening and also to assess the effect of telephone counseling and education on mammography screening. This study was a community-based trial. The participants of the study were 90 caregivers who were randomly divided into an experimental group, telephone counseling and education, and a control group. The intervention group received counseling and education phone calls. A three-section questionnaire was responded and filled out through telephone interviews with the participants. The collected data were analyzed with SPSS18, using descriptive and inferential statistics. The results showed that 88.9% of the participants did not know when to do breast self-exam (BSE). Mammography was performed by the participants before and after the telephone counseling in intervention group (Ppatients was low. Telephone counseling and educating may provide a suitable technique for earlier detection of breast cancer in family caregivers of breast cancer patients and it can influence the decision making regarding mammography screening among 40-year-old or older women. Trial Registration Number: 2017052316870N3.

  12. Parameter estimates for invasive breast cancer progression in the Canadian National Breast Screening Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghipour, S; Banjevic, D; Miller, A B; Montgomery, N; Jardine, A K S; Harvey, B J

    2013-02-19

    The aim of screening is to detect a cancer in the preclinical state. However, a false-positive or a false-negative test result is a real possibility. We describe invasive breast cancer progression in the Canadian National Breast Screening Study and construct progression models with and without covariates. The effect of risk factors on transition intensities and false-negative probability is investigated. We estimate the transition rates, the sojourn time and sensitivity of diagnostic tests for women aged 40-49 and 50-59. Although younger women have a slower transition rate from healthy state to preclinical, their screen-detected tumour becomes evident sooner. Women aged 50-59 have a higher mortality rate compared with younger women. The mean sojourn times for women aged 40-49 and 50-59 are 2.5 years (95% CI: 1.7, 3.8) and 3.0 years (95% CI: 2.1, 4.3), respectively. Sensitivity of diagnostic procedures for older women is estimated to be 0.75 (95% CI: 0.55, 0.88), while women aged 40-49 have a lower sensitivity (0.61, 95% CI: 0.42, 0.77). Age is the only factor that affects the false-negative probability. For women aged 40-49, 'age at entry', 'history of breast disease' and 'families with breast cancer' are found to be significant for some of the transition rates. For the age-group 50-59, 'age at entry', 'history of breast disease', 'menstruation length' and 'number of live births' are found to affect the transition rates. Modelling and estimating the parameters of cancer progression are essential steps towards evaluating the effectiveness of screening policies. The parameters include the transition rates, the preclinical sojourn time, the sensitivity, and the effect of different risk factors on cancer progression.

  13. Do socioeconomic factors influence breast cancer screening practices among Arab women in Qatar?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Tam Truong; Al Khater, Al-Hareth; Al Kuwari, Mohamed Ghaith; Al-Bader, Salha Bujassoum; Al-Meer, Nabila; Abdulmalik, Mariam; Singh, Rajvir; Chaudhry, Sofia; Fung, Tak

    2015-01-22

    Breast cancer incidence rates are rising in Qatar. Although the Qatari government provides subsidised healthcare and screening programmes that reduce cost barriers for residents, breast cancer screening (BCS) practices among women remain low. This study explores the influence of socioeconomic status on BCS among Arab women in Qatar. A multicentre, cross-sectional quantitative survey was conducted with 1063 Arab women (87.5% response rate) in Qatar from March 2011 to July 2011. Women who were 35 years or older and had lived in Qatar for at least 10 years were recruited from seven primary healthcare centres and women's health clinics in urban and semiurban regions of Qatar. Associations between socioeconomic factors and BCS practice were estimated using χ(2) tests and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Findings indicate that less than one-third of the participants practised BCS appropriately, whereas less than half of the participants were familiar with recent BCS guidelines. Married women and women with higher education and income levels were significantly more likely to be aware of and to practise BCS than women who had lower education and income levels. Findings indicate low levels of awareness and low participation rates in BCS among Arab women in Qatar. Socioeconomic factors influence these women's participation in BCS activities. The strongest predictors for BCS practice are higher education and higher income levels. Additional research is needed to explore the impact of economic factors on healthcare seeking behaviours in the Middle Eastern countries that have a high national gross domestic product where healthcare services are free or heavily subsidised by the government; promotion of BCS and intervention strategies in these countries should focus on raising awareness about breast cancer, the cost and benefit of early screening for this disease, particularly among low-income women. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to

  14. Thermography--a feasible method for screening breast cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolarić, Darko; Herceg, Zeljko; Nola, Iskra Alexandra; Ramljak, Vesna; Kulis, Tomislav; Holjevac, Jadranka Katancić; Deutsch, Judith A; Antonini, Svetlana

    2013-06-01

    Potential use of thermography for more effective detection of breast carcinoma was evaluated on 26 patients scheduled for breast carcinoma surgery. Ultrasonographic scan, mammography and thermography were performed at the University Hospital for Tumors. Thermographic imaging was performed using a new generation of digital thermal cameras with high sensitivity and resolution (ThermoTracer TH7102WL, NEC). Five images for each patient were recorded: front, right semi-oblique, right oblique, left- semi oblique and left oblique. While mammography detected 31 changes in 26 patients, thermography was more sensitive and detected 6 more changes in the same patients. All 37 changes were subjected to the cytological analysis and it was found that 16 of samples were malignant, 8 were suspected malignant and 11 were benign with atypia or proliferation while only 2 samples had benign findings. The pathohistological method (PHD) recorded 75.75% malignant changes within the total number of samples. Statistical analysis of the data has shown a probability of a correct mammographic finding in 85% of the cases (sensitivity of 85%, specificity of 84%) and a probability of a correct thermographic finding in 92% of the cases (sensitivity of 100%, specificity of 79%). As breast cancer remains the most prevalent cancer in women and thermography exhibited superior sensitivity, we believe that thermography should immediately find its place in the screening programs for early detection of breast carcinoma, in order to reduce the sufferings from this devastating disease.

  15. Predicting the stage shift as a result of breast cancer screening in low- and middle-income countries: a proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelle, Sten G; Baltussen, Rob; Otten, Johannes D M; Heijnsdijk, Eveline A M; van Schoor, Guido; Broeders, Mireille J M

    2015-03-01

    To provide proof of concept for a simple model to estimate the stage shift as a result of breast cancer screening in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Stage shift is an essential early detection indicator and an important proxy for the performance and possible further impact of screening programmes. Our model could help LIMCs to choose appropriate control strategies. We assessed our model concept in three steps. First, we calculated the proportional performance rates (i.e. index number Z) based on 16 screening rounds of the Nijmegen Screening Program (384,884 screened women). Second, we used linear regression to assess the association between Z and the amount of stage shift observed in the programme. Third, we hypothesized how Z could be used to estimate the stage shift as a result of breast cancer screening in LMICs. Stage shifts can be estimated by the proportional performance rates (Zs) using linear regression. Zs calculated for each screening round are highly associated with the observed stage shifts in the Nijmegen Screening Program (Pearson's R: 0.798, R square: 0.637). Our model can predict the stage shifts in the Nijmegen Screening Program, and could be applied to settings with different characteristics, although it should not be straightforwardly used to estimate the impact on mortality. Further research should investigate the extrapolation of our model to other settings. As stage shift is an essential screening performance indicator, our model could provide important information on the performance of breast cancer screening programmes that LMICs consider implementing. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  16. Approaches to improving breast screening uptake: evidence and experience from Tower Hamlets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilbert, K W; Carroll, K; Peach, J; Khatoon, S; Basnett, I; McCulloch, N

    2009-12-03

    This paper reports on an innovative whole-systems approach to improving uptake of breast screening in Tower Hamlets, a deprived borough in the East End of London with a large minority ethnic population. The approach, developed by the public health team at NHS Tower Hamlets, draws on analysis of needs and existing literature about effective interventions to promote breast screening. Social marketing research led to a campaign targeted at Bangladeshi women, together with a range of initiatives to promote breast screening through primary care services and community outreach through local well-known organisations. The breast screening service itself was upgraded and a new service specification is being introduced from April 2009.

  17. Explaining low uptake for Down syndrome screening in the Netherlands : (and predicting utilisation of other programmes)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crombag, NMTH

    2016-01-01

    In the Netherlands, only a quarter of all pregnant women take part in the current Down syndrome screening(DSS) programme. Compared to other Northern European countries, Dutch uptake rates are very low. This thesis concentrates on the test-utilisation of DSS, in particular the factors impeding or

  18. Positive diagnostic values and histological detection ratios from the Rotterdam cervical cancer screening programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.A. Kreuger; H. Beerman (Henk); H.G. Nijs (Huub); M. van Ballegooijen (Marjolein)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: In organized screening programmes for cervical cancer, pre-cancerous lesions are detected by cervical smears. However, during follow-up after a positive smear these pre-cancerous lesions are not always found. The purpose of the study is to

  19. Prenatal detection of congenital heart diseaseresults of a national screening programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Velzen, C. L.; Clur, S. A.; Rijlaarsdam, Meb; Bax, C. J.; Pajkrt, E.; Heymans, M. W.; Bekker, M. N.; Hruda, J.; de Groot, Cjm; Blom, N. A.; Haak, M. C.

    2016-01-01

    ObjectiveCongenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common congenital malformation and causes major morbidity and mortality. Prenatal detection improves the neonatal condition before surgery, resulting in less morbidity and mortality. In the Netherlands a national prenatal screening programme was

  20. Feasibility of a rubella screening and vaccination programme for unvaccinated young women.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijs, W.L.M.; Hulscher, M.E.J.L.; Hahne, S.J.; Binnendijk, R.S. van; Velden, J. van der

    2009-01-01

    The feasibility of a rubella screening and vaccination programme for unvaccinated young women was assessed after the 2004/2005 epidemic in The Netherlands. All 640 young women in two villages with low vaccination coverage were invited for a rubella seroprevalence test. Information on vaccination

  1. Balancing sensitivity and specificity: sixteen year's of experience from the mammography screening programme in Copenhagen, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Utzon-Frank, Nicolai; Vejborg, Ilse; von Euler-Chelpin, My Catarina

    2011-01-01

    To report on sensitivity and specificity from 7 invitation rounds of the organised, population-based mammography screening programme started in Copenhagen, Denmark, in 1991, and offered biennially to women aged 50-69. Changes over time were related to organisation and technology....

  2. To nudge or not to nudge: cancer screening programmes and the limits of libertarian paternalism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ploug, T.; Holm, S.; Brodersen, J.

    2012-01-01

    '. The basic tenet of 'libertarian paternalism' is outlined and the relationship between 'libertarian paternalism' and informed consent investigated. Key elements in the process of enrolling women into the Danish mammography screening programme are introduced. It is shown that for several reasons the influence...

  3. Full-field digital mammography compared to screen film mammography in the prevalent round of a population-based screening programme: the Vestfold County Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigeland, Einar [Vestfold Hospital, Department of Radiology, Toensberg (Norway); Klaasen, Herman [Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, Department of Radiology, Aberdeen, Scotland (United Kingdom); Klingen, Tor A. [Vestfold Hospital, Department of Pathology, Toensberg (Norway); Hofvind, Solveig [The Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo (Norway); Skaane, Per [Ullevaal University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Oslo (Norway)

    2008-01-15

    The purpose of the study was to compare the performance of full-field digital mammography (FFDM) with soft-copy reading to screen film mammography (SFM) used during the first prevalent 2-year round of population-based screening. A total of 18,239 women aged 50-69 years were screened with FFDM as part of the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Programme (NBCSP). Process indicators were compared to data from 324,763 women screened with SFM using the common national database of the NBCSP. The cancer detection rates were 0.77% (140/18,239) for FFDM and 0.65% (2,105/324,763) for SFM (p = 0.058). For ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) alone, the results were: FFDM 0.21% (38/18,239) compared to SFM 0.11% (343/324,763) (p < 0.001). Recall rates due to positive mammography were for FFDM 4.09% (746/18,239), while for SFM 4.16% (13,520/324,764) (p = 0.645), due to technically insufficient imaging: FFDM 0.22% (40/18,239) versus SFM 0.61% (1,993/324,763) (p < 0.001). The positive predictive value (PPV) in the FFDM group was 16.6% (140/843), while 13.5% (2,105/15,537) for SFM (p = 0.014). No statistically significant differences were recorded concerning histological morphology, tumour size, or lymph node involvement. In conclusion FFDM had a significantly higher detection rate for DCIS than SFM. For invasive cancers no difference was seen. FFDM also had a significantly higher PPV and a significantly lower technical recall rate. (orig.)

  4. Full-field digital mammography compared to screen film mammography in the prevalent round of a population-based screening programme: the Vestfold County Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigeland, Einar; Klaasen, Herman; Klingen, Tor Audun; Hofvind, Solveig; Skaane, Per

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the performance of full-field digital mammography (FFDM) with soft-copy reading to screen film mammography (SFM) used during the first prevalent 2-year round of population-based screening. A total of 18,239 women aged 50-69 years were screened with FFDM as part of the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Programme (NBCSP). Process indicators were compared to data from 324,763 women screened with SFM using the common national database of the NBCSP. The cancer detection rates were 0.77% (140/18,239) for FFDM and 0.65% (2,105/324,763) for SFM (p = 0.058). For ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) alone, the results were: FFDM 0.21% (38/18,239) compared to SFM 0.11% (343/324,763) (p < 0.001). Recall rates due to positive mammography were for FFDM 4.09% (746/18,239), while for SFM 4.16% (13,520/324,764) (p = 0.645), due to technically insufficient imaging: FFDM 0.22% (40/18,239) versus SFM 0.61% (1,993/324,763) (p < 0.001). The positive predictive value (PPV) in the FFDM group was 16.6% (140/843), while 13.5% (2,105/15,537) for SFM (p = 0.014). No statistically significant differences were recorded concerning histological morphology, tumour size, or lymph node involvement. In conclusion FFDM had a significantly higher detection rate for DCIS than SFM. For invasive cancers no difference was seen. FFDM also had a significantly higher PPV and a significantly lower technical recall rate.

  5. A review of interval breast cancers diagnosed among participants of the Nova Scotia Breast Screening Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Jennifer I; Caines, Judy S; Gallant, Julie; Foley, Theresa J

    2013-01-01

    To conduct a radiologic review of interval breast cancer cases to determine rates of true interval and missed cancers in Nova Scotia, Canada. This quality assurance project was exempt from institutional review board approval. Interval cancer cases were identified among women aged 40-69 years who were participants in the Nova Scotia Breast Screening Program from 1991 to 2004. For each case, the index negative screening mammogram was reviewed blindly by three radiologists from a pool of experienced radiologists. Cases were identified as those with normal or abnormal findings, the latter being a case that required further investigation. True interval cases were identified as cases in which a minimum of two radiologists reviewed the findings as normal. True interval and missed cancer rates were calculated separately for women according to age group and screening interval (for ages 40-49 years, a 1-year interval; for ages 50-69 years, a 1-year and a 2-year interval). The rate of missed cancers per 1000 women screened was one-half of the true interval rate among women screened annually (for ages 40-49 years, 0.45 vs 0.93; for ages 50-69 years, 1.08 vs 2.22). Among women aged 50-69 years who were screened biennially, the rate of missed cancers per 1000 women screened was one-third of the true interval rate (0.90 vs 3.15). Similarly, the rate of missed cancers per 10,000 screening examinations was one-half of the true interval rate among those 40-49 years old (1.95 vs 3.99) and one-third of the true interval rate among those 50-69 years old (3.34 vs 10.44). In screening programs, true interval cancer rates should be differentiated from missed cancer rates as part of ongoing quality assurance. RSNA, 2012

  6. Breast cancer screening in an urban population in northern Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghisi, A; Donato, F; Lucini, L; Marcianò, P; Miccichè, C; Nardi, G; Nardi, M E; Pasini, M; Spiazzi, R

    1990-02-28

    A mammographic and clinical screening for breast cancer started in June 1987 in the Health District of Brescia, Northern Italy, including the town and 23 surrounding municipalities. This paper describes the organization and the results of the first 12 months of screening. Of 7791 invited women aged 50-60 years, 5217 (67%) agreed to participate. There was a trend for response rates to decline with increasing age and education. Of the 5217 women examined, 66 (1.3%) were referred for biopsy and 64 (1.2%) underwent this procedure. A histologically confirmed malignancy was found in 42 women, corresponding to a prevalence of 8.1/1000. Positive predictive value of the screening was 65.6%. Among the 42 breast cancers, 4.8% were carcinoma in situ and 42.9% invasive tumors up to 10 mm in size. According to the p-TNM classification, 92.9% of all cancers were either TIS or in stage T1, 4.8% were in T2 and one tumor was classified in T4. Lymph node involvement was assessed in 41 cases, and 71.4% of all cancers detected by screening were negative for lymph node metastasis. In comparison, the classification of tumors found in women of the same age group and living in Brescia, histologically diagnosed in the urban hospitals during 1986, one year before the beginning of the screening, was as follows: 7.1% carcinoma in situ, and 16.7% invasive tumors up to 10 mm in size. 38.1%, 2.4% and 2.4% of all tumors were in stages T2, T3 and T4 respectively.

  7. Implementation of a nation-wide automated auditory brainstem response hearing screening programme in neonatal intensive care units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Straaten, H.L.M. van; Hille, E.T.M.; Kok, J.H.; Verkerk, P.H.; Baerts, W.; Bunkers, C.M.; Smink, E.W.A.; Elburg, R.M. van; Kleine, M.J.K. de; Ilsen, A.; Maingay-Visser, A.P.G.F.; Vries, L.S. de; Weisglas-Kuperus, N.

    2003-01-01

    Aim: As part of a future national neonatal hearing screening programme in the Netherlands, automated auditory brainstem response (AABR) hearing screening was implemented in seven neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). The objective was to evaluate key outcomes of this programme: participation rate,

  8. Breast cancer screening results 5 years after introduction of digital mammography in a population-based screening program.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karssemeijer, N.; Bluekens, A.M.; Beijerinck, D.; Deurenberg, J.J.; Beekman, M.; Visser, R.; Engen, R. van; Bartels-Kortland, A.; Broeders, M.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare full-field digital mammography (FFDM) using computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) with screen-film mammography (SFM) in a population-based breast cancer screening program for initial and subsequent screening examinations. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study was approved by the regional

  9. An exploration of mammographers' attitudes towards the use of social media for providing breast screening information to clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scragg, B; Shaikh, S; Shires, G; Stein Hodgins, J; Mercer, C; Robinson, L; Wray, J

    2017-08-01

    Increasingly patients and clients of health services are using social media to locate information about medical procedures and outcomes. There is increasing pressure for health professionals to engage in on-line spaces to provide clear and accurate information to their patient community. Research suggests there are some anxieties on the part of practitioners to do this. This study aimed to explore the attitudes of the NHS breast screening programme workforce towards engaging in online discussions with clients about breast screening. 78 practitioners, representing a range of professional roles within the NHS Breast Screening Programme, attended one of 4 workshops. We used a Nominal Group Technique to identify and rank responses to the question: "What are the challenges that practitioners face in using SoME as part of their role?" Responses were categorised into themes. Participants were also asked to identify solutions to these challenges. Challenges: We identified two overarching themes: (1) Working within boundaries: which was further categorised into (a) Professional/legal accountability; (b) Information accuracy and (c)Time as a boundary, and (2) Support: further categorised into (a) Employer and (b) Manager. Solutions: These included: training in technical and interactional aspects of on-line communication and a responsibility to better understand employer and professional body SoMe policies. The study participants appeared willing and motivated to engage in SoMe. However, in keeping with the literature from other disciplines, a number of challenges need to be overcome for its use to be adopted more widely by breast screening professionals. Copyright © 2017 The College of Radiographers. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Impact of second reminder invitation on uptake of screening and cancer detection in BreastCheck.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fleming, P

    2012-01-01

    This research aims to quantify the impact of reminder invitations on uptake and cancer detection in Ireland. Examination of BreastCheck\\'s clinical database (2000-2010) to determine number of women screened following first invitation and after reminder; comparison by age group and screening phase with outcomes of recall rate, cancer detection and true positive rates. Of 819,182 first invitations sent 448,974 (54.8%) women attended. 245,157 (66.2%) women attended after reminder invitations, increasing uptake by 29.9% to 694,131 (84.7%) and cancers detected by 1,550 (35%). Women awaiting a reminder were less likely recalled for assessment 9,555 (3.9%) than respondents to first invitation 2,887 (4.04%) (p=0.004). Younger, mainly initial women were more likely recalled for assessment after first invitation. There was no difference between cohorts for cancer detection rate or true positive rate. Reminders increased uptake, supporting international evidence. For programme efficiency attendance at first invitation is optimal. For maximum programme effectiveness attendance must be encouraged with reminders.

  11. The Effect of Telephone Counseling and Education on Breast Cancer Screening in Family Caregivers of Breast Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khadijeh Nasiriani

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Breast cancer is the most common form of malignancy among females. Family history is a key risk factor for breast cancer. Breast cancer screening practices are vital in patients with family history of breast cancer. Telephone counseling and education may be appropriate for improved breast cancer screening. This study was done to determine family caregiver patients’ knowledge of risk factors for breast cancer and practice of breast cancer screening and also to assess the effect of telephone counseling and education on mammography screening. Methods: This study was a community-based trial. The participants of the study were 90 caregivers who were randomly divided into an experimental group, telephone counseling and education, and a control group. The intervention group received counseling and education phone calls. A three-section questionnaire was responded and filled out through telephone interviews with the participants. The collected data were analyzed with SPSS18, using descriptive and inferential statistics. Results: The results showed that 88.9% of the participants did not know when to do breast self-exam (BSE. Mammography was performed by the participants before and after the telephone counseling in intervention group (P<0.00, which were 13.3% and 77.8% respectively. Moreover, the major cause of failure to participate in mammography was lack of enough knowledge in 73.3% of the participants. Conclusion: This study concluded that knowledge and practice on breast cancer screening in family caregiver of breast cancer patients was low. Telephone counseling and educating may provide a suitable technique for earlier detection of breast cancer in family caregivers of breast cancer patients and it can influence the decision making regarding mammography screening among 40-year-old or older women. Trial Registration Number: 2017052316870N3

  12. Retrospective Proteomic Screening of 100 Breast Cancer Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucci-Minafra, Ida; Di Cara, Gianluca; Musso, Rosa; Albanese, Nadia Ninfa; Roz, Elena; Minafra, Salvatore

    2017-01-01

    The present investigation has been conducted on one hundred tissue fragments of breast cancer, collected and immediately cryopreserved following the surgical resection. The specimens were selected from patients with invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast, the most frequent and potentially aggressive type of mammary cancer, with the objective to increase the knowledge of breast cancer molecular markers potentially useful for clinical applications. The proteomic screening; by 2D-IPG and mass spectrometry; allowed us to identify two main classes of protein clusters: proteins expressed ubiquitously at high levels in all patients; and proteins expressed sporadically among the same patients. Within the group of ubiquitous proteins, glycolytic enzymes and proteins with anti-apoptotic activity were predominant. Among the sporadic ones, proteins involved in cell motility, molecular chaperones and proteins involved in the detoxification appeared prevalent. The data of the present study indicates that the primary tumor growth is reasonably supported by concurrent events: the inhibition of apoptosis and stimulation of cellular proliferation, and the increased expression of glycolytic enzymes with multiple functions. The second phase of the evolution of the tumor can be prematurely scheduled by the occasional presence of proteins involved in cell motility and in the defenses of the oxidative stress. We suggest that this approach on large-scale 2D-IPG proteomics of breast cancer is currently a valid tool that offers the opportunity to evaluate on the same assay the presence and recurrence of individual proteins, their isoforms and short forms, to be proposed as prognostic indicators and susceptibility to metastasis in patients operated on for invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast. PMID:28686225

  13. Breast and cervical cancer screening behaviours among colorectal cancer survivors in Nova Scotia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corkum, M.; Urquhart, R.; Kephart, G.; Hayden, J.A.; Porter, G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We analyzed patterns and factors associated with receipt of breast and cervical cancer screening in a cohort of colorectal cancer survivors. Methods Individuals diagnosed with colorectal cancer in Nova Scotia between January 2001 and December 2005 were eligible for inclusion. Receipt of breast and cervical cancer screening was determined using administrative data. General-population age restrictions were used in the analysis (breast: 40–69 years; cervical: 21–75 years). Kaplan–Meier and Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess time to first screen. Results Of 318 and 443 colorectal cancer survivors eligible for the breast and cervical cancer screening analysis respectively, 30.1% [95% confidence interval (ci): 21.2% to 39.0%] never received screening mammography, and 47.9% (95% ci: 37.8% to 58.0%) never received cervical cancer screening during the study period. Receipt of screening before the colorectal cancer diagnosis was strongly associated with receipt of screening after diagnosis (hazard ratio for breast cancer screening: 4.71; 95% ci: 3.42 to 6.51; hazard ratio for cervical cancer screening: 6.83; 95% ci: 4.58 to 10.16). Conclusions Many colorectal cancer survivors within general-population screening age recommendations did not receive breast and cervical cancer screening. Future research should focus on survivors who meet age recommendations for population-based cancer screening. PMID:25302037

  14. Incidence of register-based diabetes 10 years after a stepwise diabetes screening programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, S. S.; Johansen, Nanna; Witte, D. R.

    2016-01-01

    criteria. Seven incremental levels of diabetes risk were defined and followed for incident diabetes recorded in the Danish National Diabetes Register until December 2012. For each group, cumulative diabetes incidence was calculated. Incidence rates and rate ratios were estimated by Poisson regression......Aims/hypothesis: Screening programmes for type 2 diabetes inevitably find more people at high risk of developing diabetes than people with undiagnosed prevalent diabetes. We describe the incidence of diabetes for risk groups according to advancement in a screening process. Methods: In 2001......–2006, a diabetes screening programme based on the Danish diabetes risk score and measures of HbA1c and glucose was carried out in Danish general practices. The present study includes 13,249 individuals with low diabetes risk scores and 22,726 with high diabetes risk scores but no diabetes according to WHO 1999...

  15. Seventeen-years overview of breast cancer inside and outside screening in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domingo, Laia; Jacobsen, Katja Kemp; von Euler-Chelpin, My Catarina

    2013-01-01

    Background. Long-term data on breast cancer detection in mammography screening programs are warranted to better understand the mechanisms by which screening changes the breast cancer pattern in the population. We aimed to analyze 17 years of breast cancer detection rates inside and outside...... to women aged 50-69 years. We identified targeted, eligible, invited and participating women. We calculated screening detection and interval cancer rates for participants, and breast cancer incidence in non-screened women (= targeted women excluding participants) by biennial invitation rounds. Tumor...... characteristics were tabulated for each of the three groups of cancers. Results. Start of screening resulted in a prevalence peak in participants, followed by a decrease to a fairly stable detection rate in subsequent invitation rounds. A similar pattern was found for breast cancer incidence in non-screened women...

  16. Sociodemographic gradients in breast and cervical cancer screening in Korea: the Korean National Cancer Screening Survey (KNCSS) 2005-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Mi Jin; Park, Eun-Cheol; Choi, Kui Son; Jun, Jae Kwan; Lee, Hoo-Yeon

    2011-06-17

    Cancer screening rates in Korea for five cancer types have increased steadily since 2002. With regard to the life-time cancer screening rates in 2009 according to cancer sites, the second highest was breast cancer (78.1%) and the third highest was cervical cancer (76.1%). Despite overall increases in the screening rate, disparities in breast and cervical cancer screening, based on sociodemographic characteristics, still exist. Data from 4,139 women aged 40 to 74 years from the 2005 to 2009 Korea National Cancer Screening Survey were used to analyze the relationship between sociodemographic characteristics and receiving mammograms and Pap smears. The main outcome measures were ever having had a mammogram and ever having had a Pap smear. Using these items of information, we classified women into those who had had both types of screening, only one screening type, and neither screening type. We used logistic regression to investigate relationships between screening history and sociodemographic characteristics of the women. Being married, having a higher education, a rural residence, and private health insurance were significantly associated with higher rates of breast and cervical cancer screening after adjusting for age and sociodemographic factors. Household income was not significantly associated with mammograms or Pap smears after adjusting for age and sociodemographic factors. Disparities in breast and cervical cancer screening associated with low sociodemographic status persist in Korea.

  17. Position paper on screening for breast cancer by the European Society of Breast Imaging (EUSOBI) and 30 national breast radiology bodies from Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Israel, Lithuania, Moldova, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Serbia, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardanelli, Francesco; Aase, Hildegunn S; Álvarez, Marina; Azavedo, Edward; Baarslag, Henk J; Balleyguier, Corinne; Baltzer, Pascal A; Beslagic, Vanesa; Bick, Ulrich; Bogdanovic-Stojanovic, Dragana; Briediene, Ruta; Brkljacic, Boris; Camps Herrero, Julia; Colin, Catherine; Cornford, Eleanor; Danes, Jan; de Geer, Gérard; Esen, Gul; Evans, Andrew; Fuchsjaeger, Michael H; Gilbert, Fiona J; Graf, Oswald; Hargaden, Gormlaith; Helbich, Thomas H; Heywang-Köbrunner, Sylvia H; Ivanov, Valentin; Jónsson, Ásbjörn; Kuhl, Christiane K; Lisencu, Eugenia C; Luczynska, Elzbieta; Mann, Ritse M; Marques, Jose C; Martincich, Laura; Mortier, Margarete; Müller-Schimpfle, Markus; Ormandi, Katalin; Panizza, Pietro; Pediconi, Federica; Pijnappel, Ruud M; Pinker, Katja; Rissanen, Tarja; Rotaru, Natalia; Saguatti, Gianni; Sella, Tamar; Slobodníková, Jana; Talk, Maret; Taourel, Patrice; Trimboli, Rubina M; Vejborg, Ilse; Vourtsis, Athina; Forrai, Gabor

    2017-07-01

    EUSOBI and 30 national breast radiology bodies support mammography for population-based screening, demonstrated to reduce breast cancer (BC) mortality and treatment impact. According to the International Agency for Research on Cancer, the reduction in mortality is 40 % for women aged 50-69 years taking up the invitation while the probability of false-positive needle biopsy is <1 % per round and overdiagnosis is only 1-10 % for a 20-year screening. Mortality reduction was also observed for the age groups 40-49 years and 70-74 years, although with "limited evidence". Thus, we firstly recommend biennial screening mammography for average-risk women aged 50-69 years; extension up to 73 or 75 years, biennially, is a second priority, from 40-45 to 49 years, annually, a third priority. Screening with thermography or other optical tools as alternatives to mammography is discouraged. Preference should be given to population screening programmes on a territorial basis, with double reading. Adoption of digital mammography (not film-screen or phosphor-plate computer radiography) is a priority, which also improves sensitivity in dense breasts. Radiologists qualified as screening readers should be involved in programmes. Digital breast tomosynthesis is also set to become "routine mammography" in the screening setting in the next future. Dedicated pathways for high-risk women offering breast MRI according to national or international guidelines and recommendations are encouraged. • EUSOBI and 30 national breast radiology bodies support screening mammography. • A first priority is double-reading biennial mammography for women aged 50-69 years. • Extension to 73-75 and from 40-45 to 49 years is also encouraged. • Digital mammography (not film-screen or computer radiography) should be used. • DBT is set to become "routine mammography" in the screening setting in the next future.

  18. The relationship of mammographic density and age: implications for breast cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checka, Cristina M; Chun, Jennifer E; Schnabel, Freya R; Lee, Jiyon; Toth, Hildegard

    2012-03-01

    Breast density is increasingly recognized as an independent risk factor for the development of breast cancer, because it has been shown to be associated with a four- to sixfold increase in a woman's risk of malignant breast disease. Increased breast density as identified on mammography is also known to decrease the diagnostic sensitivity of the examination, which is of great concern to women at increased risk for breast cancer. Dense tissue has generally been associated with younger age and premenopausal status, with the assumption that breast density gradually decreases after menopause. However, the actual proportion of older women with dense breasts is unknown. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between age and breast density, particularly focusing on postmenopausal women. All screening mammograms completed at the New York University Langone Medical Center in 2008 were retrospectively reviewed. Analysis of variance and descriptive analyses were used to evaluate the relationship between patient age and breast density. A total of 7007 screening mammograms were performed. The median age of our cohort was 57 years. Within each subgroup categorized by decade of age, there was a normal distribution among the categories of breast density. There was a significant inverse relationship between age and breast density (p breasts. This percentage decreased to 57% of women in their 50s. However, 44% of women in their 60s and 36% of women in their 70s had dense breasts as characterized on their screening mammograms. In general, we found an inverse relationship between patient age and mammographic breast density. However, there were outliers at the extremes of age. A meaningful proportion of young women had predominantly fatty breasts and a subset of older women had extremely dense breasts. Increased density renders mammography a less sensitive tool for early detection. Breast density should be considered when evaluating the potential benefit of extended

  19. [Breast cancer at the 1st Surgical Department, University Hospital Olomouc assessing the number and age of patients and benefit of breast screening].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bébarová, L; Zlámalová, N; Švach, I; Neoral, Č

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women. It affects mostly women between the ages of 60 and 70; however, in the past years, the number of younger female patients has been increasing. The incidence of breast cancer has been rising worldwide, especially in the United States and Western Europe. Breast carcinoma mortality, on the other hand, has shown a slight decrease due to early screening programmes and advanced treatment methods. We included patients who had undergone surgery for breast carcinoma in the 1st Department of Surgery at Teaching Hospital in Olomouc between 1 January 2008 and 31 December 2012. In each patient, her age at the time of diagnosis/surgery was calculated. All patients were divided into 10-year age groups. At the same time, a sub-group of breast cancer patients younger than 45 years was created. We compared the numbers of patients in the respective groups and sub-groups in every year. The mean age and the median of age were also calculated. To evaluate the benefit of mammary screening, we compared the staging of operated tumours in the different years studied. The results were statistically processed and evaluated. The total number of 980 patients underwent surgery for breast carcinoma at our department between 2008 and 2012 with age ranging from 20 to 88 years. 101 of them were younger than 45 years. The mean age of the patients was 59 years, the median was 60 years. The total number of patients increased from 153 in 2008 to 240 in 2012. There was no significant increase in the number of patients younger than 45 years. There were more patients diagnosed with stage II carcinoma and fewer patients with stage III carcinoma in 2012 than in 2010. The analysis of our group of patients confirmed the increasing tendencies of breast cancer incidence in total. We did not prove a statistically significant increase in the number of patients in pre-screening age (i.e., younger than 45 years). More frequent diagnosis of early-stage disease was

  20. Breast cancer mortality trends in England and the assessment of the effectiveness of mammography screening: population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhtar, Toqir K; Yeates, David Rg; Goldacre, Michael J

    2013-06-01

    To investigate whether mortality statistics show an effect of mammographic screening on population-based breast cancer mortality in England. Joinpoint regression analyses, and other analyses, of population-based mortality data. Analysis of mortality rates in the Oxford region, UK (1979-2009) because, unlike the rest of England, all causes of death mentioned on each death certificate for its residents (not just the underlying cause) are available prior to commencement of the English National Breast Screening Programme (NHSBSP). In addition, analysis of English national breast cancer mortality rates (1971-2009). Women who died from breast cancer in the Oxford region (1979--2009) and England (1971--2009) MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Age-specific mortality rates, and age-standardized mortality rates. Joinpoint regression analysis was used to estimate years ('joinpoints') in which trends changed, and annual percentage change between joinpoints, with confidence intervals. In the Oxford region, trends for breast cancer mortality based on underlying cause and on mentions were very similar. For all ages combined, mortality rates peaked for both underlying cause and mentions in 1985 and then started to decline, prior to the introduction of the NHSBSP in 1988. Between 1979 and 2009, for mortality measured as underlying cause, rates declined by -2.1% (95% CI -2.7 to -1.4) per year for women aged 40-49 years (unscreened), and by the same percentage per year (-2.1% [-2.4 to -1.7]) for women aged 50-64 years (screened). In England, the first estimated changes in trend occurred prior to the introduction of screening, or before screening was likely to have had an effect (between 1982 and 1989). Thereafter, the downward trend was greatest in women aged under 40 years: -2.0% per year (-2.8 to -1.2) in 1988-2001 and -5.0% per year (-6.7 to -3.3) in 2001-2009. There was no evidence that declines in mortality rates were consistently greater in women in age groups and cohorts that had been

  1. Screening for Breast Cancer Using Near Field Infrared Spectroscopy of a Single Strand of Hair

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Erramilli, Shyamsunder

    2001-01-01

    ... predisposition to breast cancer because of the breast of a mutation of the BRCA1 gene. We would like to develop a new method for the screening of breast cancer based on infrared spectroscopy of a single strand of human hair...

  2. Awareness and practice of breast screening and its impact on early ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among females in Nigeria. The concept of breast screening (BS) is that it would result in presentation at earlier stages. We evaluated the impact of BS on early detection and presentation of breast cancer and determined the aspects BS need improvement. Patients ...

  3. Breast cancer screening in older women: law and patient rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annas, G J

    1992-11-01

    Legal principles that apply to breast cancer in older women have been developed in judicial decisions related to other medical screening tests. There are no special legal rules for either mammography or older women, although older women seldom file malpractice suits. The general standard is that a screening test must be offered to any particular age group when it is considered "reasonably prudent" to do so, and this almost always means when the medical profession--usually speaking though its specialty boards--declares it the standard of care. The standard of care should be set by medical professionals, with open opportunity for public input, rather than by lawyers or risk managers. In actual practice, private regulation may not be sufficient to protect the public, and both state and federal regulation of mammography facilities now seems inevitable. Patients have the right to be fully informed prior to screening, the right to refuse screening, and the right to have full knowledge of the consequences of such refusal. Mammography is not a consumer good, but American women should be actively involved in determining issues of costs and benefits, as well as helping to develop the best strategies for counseling and informed consent.

  4. Prenatal detection of congenital heart disease--results of a national screening programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Velzen, C L; Clur, S A; Rijlaarsdam, M E B; Bax, C J; Pajkrt, E; Heymans, M W; Bekker, M N; Hruda, J; de Groot, C J M; Blom, N A; Haak, M C

    2016-02-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common congenital malformation and causes major morbidity and mortality. Prenatal detection improves the neonatal condition before surgery, resulting in less morbidity and mortality. In the Netherlands a national prenatal screening programme was introduced in 2007. This study evaluates the effects of this screening programme. Geographical cohort study. Large referral region of three tertiary care centres. Fetuses and infants diagnosed with severe CHD born between 1 January 2002 and 1 January 2012. Cases were divided into two groups: before and after the introduction of screening. Detection rates were calculated. The prenatal detection rate (n = 1912) increased with 23.9% (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 19.5-28.3) from 35.8 to 59.7% after the introduction of screening and of isolated CHD with 21.4% (95% CI 16.0-26.8) from 22.8 to 44.2%. The highest detection rates were found in the hypoplastic left heart syndrome, other univentricular defects and complex defects with atrial isomerism (>93%). Since the introduction of screening, the 'late' referrals (after 24 weeks of gestation) decreased by 24.3% (95% CI 19.3-29.3). This is the largest cohort study to investigate the prenatal detection rate of severe CHD in an unselected population. A nationally organised screening has resulted in a remarkably high detection rate of CHD (59.7%) compared with earlier literature. © 2015 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  5. Improving the quality of communication in organised cervical cancer screening programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Livia; Webster, Premila; Anthony, Charles; Szarewski, Anne; Davies, Philip; Arbyn, Marc; Segnan, Nereo; Austoker, Joan

    2008-07-01

    To provide health professionals involved in cervical cancer screening with an insight into the complex issues relating to communication about screening and to provide a framework for a more effective communication strategy. This paper has been compiled by a multidisciplinary pan-European group of health professionals and cancer advocates from several European screening programmes. European surveys on screening communication, literature reviews and group discussion were used for this purpose. Information on cervical screening must be accessible, relevant, comprehensible, comprehensive, client-centred, phase-specific and multilevel. An effective communication strategy should consider health professionals' screening knowledge and their communication skills, consumers' health literacy skills and the communication needs of specific sub-groups in the target population. Co-operation between screening professionals, advocacy groups and journalists should be promoted. To communicate effectively and appropriately is a complex task which can be influenced by a number of factors. Screening workers need better information themselves and must take into account the needs and characteristics of the target population. This document should provide a useful tool to help screening professionals in designing and developing good quality and effective communication strategies.

  6. Cervical and Breast Cancer-Screening Knowledge of Women with Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parish, Susan L.; Swaine, Jamie G.; Luken, Karen; Rose, Roderick A.; Dababnah, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Women with developmental disabilities are significantly less likely than women without disabilities to receive cervical and breast cancer screening according to clinical guidelines. The reasons for this gap are not understood. The present study examined the extent of women's knowledge about cervical and breast cancer screening, with the intention…

  7. The impact of mammographic screening on breast cancer mortality in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broeders, Mireille; Moss, Sue; Nyström, Lennarth

    2012-01-01

    To assess the impact of population-based mammographic screening on breast cancer mortality in Europe, considering different methodologies and limitations of the data.......To assess the impact of population-based mammographic screening on breast cancer mortality in Europe, considering different methodologies and limitations of the data....

  8. Radiation-induced breast cancer incidence and mortality from digital mammography screening a modeling study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.L. Miglioretti (Diana); J. Lange (Jane); J.J. Van Den Broek (Jeroen J.); C.I. Lee (Christoph I.); N.T. van Ravesteyn (Nicolien); D. Ritley (Dominique); K. Kerlikowske (Karla); J.J. Fenton (Joshua J.); J. Melnikow (Joy); H.J. de Koning (Harry); R.A. Hubbard (Rebecca)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Estimates of risk for radiation-induced breast cancer from mammography screening have not considered variation in dose exposure or diagnostic work-up after abnormal screening results. Objective: To estimate distributions of radiation-induced breast cancer incidence and

  9. Overdiagnosis in mammographic screening for breast cancer in Europe: A literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Puliti (Donella); S.W. Duffy (Stephen); G. Miccinesi (Guido); H.J. de Koning (Harry); E. Lynge (Elsebeth); M. Zappa (Marco); E. Paci (Eugenio)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractObjectives Overdiagnosis, the detection through screening of a breast cancer that would never have been identified in the lifetime of the woman, is an adverse outcome of screening. We aimed to determine an estimate range for overdiagnosis of breast cancer in European mammographic service

  10. Breast cancer screening (BCS) chart: a basic and preliminary model for making screening mammography more productive and efficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorolajal, Jalal; Akbari, Mohammad Esmaeil; Ziaee, Fatane; Karami, Manoochehr; Ghoncheh, Mahshid

    2017-05-15

    The breast cancer screening (BCS) chart is suggested as a basic and preliminary tool to improve efficiency of screening mammography. We conducted this case-control study in 2016 and enrolled 1422 women aged 30-75 years, including 506 women with breast cancer (cases) and 916 women without breast cancer (controls). We developed the BCS chart using a multiple logistic regression analysis. We combined the risks of breast cancer to predict the individual risk of breast cancer. Then, we stratified and colored the predicted risk probabilities as follows: chart provides the risk probability of breast cancer, based on age, body mass index, late menopause, having a benign breast disease and a positive family history of breast cancer among the first-degree or the second/third-degree relatives. According to this chart, an individual can be classified in a category of low risk (green), medium risk (yellow and orange), high risk (red and brown) and very high risk (black) for breast cancer. This chart is a flexible and easy to use tool that can detect high-risk subjects and make the screening program more efficient and productive.

  11. Trends in breast cancer mortality in Sweden before and after implementation of mammography screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jari Haukka

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Incidence-based mortality modelling comparing the risk of breast cancer death in screened and unscreened women in nine Swedish counties has suggested a 39% risk reduction in women 40 to 69 years old after introduction of mammography screening in the 1980s and 1990s. OBJECTIVE: We evaluated changes in breast cancer mortality in the same nine Swedish counties using a model approach based on official Swedish breast cancer mortality statistics, robust to effects of over-diagnosis and treatment changes. Using mortality data from the NordCan database from 1974 until 2003, we estimated the change in breast cancer mortality before and after introduction of mammography screening in at least the 13 years that followed screening start. RESULTS: Breast mortality decreased by 16% (95% CI: 9 to 22% in women 40 to 69, and by 11% (95% CI: 2 to 20% in women 40 to 79 years of age. DISCUSSION: Without individual data it is impossible to completely separate the effects of improved treatment and health service organisation from that of screening, which would bias our results in favour of screening. There will also be some contamination of post-screening mortality from breast cancer diagnosed prior to screening, beyond our attempts to adjust for delayed benefit. This would bias against screening. However, our estimates from publicly available data suggest considerably lower benefits than estimates based on comparison of screened versus non-screened women.

  12. An evaluation of two guidance programmes to promote breast-feeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Steyn

    1989-09-01

    Full Text Available During the past ten years a comprehensive research project has been undertaken to develop a guidance programme in three adjacent communities in the South- Western Cape with the aim o f lowering the high incidence o f coronary heart disease. The purpose o f this substudy was to determine whether the guidance provided in the different communities had any influence on the knowledge o f and attitudes towards the nutrition o f pregnant women, babies and infants as well as breast-feeding practices o f the women who gave birth during the period 1980 to 1986. In the first community guidance was provided by means o f small mass media and interpersonal communication whereas only the small mass media were employed in the second. The third served as the control community. The findings suggest that the combined interpersonal and mass media programme was more successful than the mass media programme alone.

  13. MRI screening for breast cancer in women with familial or genetic predisposition : design of the Dutch National Study (MRISC)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kriege, M; Brekelmans, C T; Boetes, C; Rutgers, E J; Oosterwijk, J C; Tollenaar, R A; Manoliu, R A; Holland, R; de Koning, H J; Klijn, J G

    2001-01-01

    Mammography screening of women aged 50-70 years for breast cancer has proven to be effective in reducing breast cancer mortality. There is no consensus about the value of breast cancer screening in women aged 40-49 years. Five to ten per cent of all breast cancers are hereditary. One of the options

  14. A theory-based intervention to improve breast cancer awareness and screening in Jamaica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anakwenze, Chidinma P; Coronado-Interis, Evelyn; Aung, Maung; Jolly, Pauline E

    2015-05-01

    Despite declines in breast cancer mortality rates in developed countries, mortality rates remain high in Jamaica due to low levels of screening and lack of early detection. We hypothesized that a theory-based health educational intervention would increase awareness of breast cancer and intention to screen among women in Western Jamaica. Two hundred and forty six women attending hospitals or clinics were enrolled in an educational intervention consisting of a pretest, breast cancer presentation, and posttest if they had never been screened or had not been screened in 5 years or more. The questionnaires assessed attitudes and knowledge of risk factors and symptoms related to breast cancer. Participants were followed approximately 6 months after the intervention to determine whether they accessed breast cancer screening. There were statistically significant increases (p Jamaica and other developing countries.

  15. What's the Buzz: Tell Me What's Happening in Breast Cancer Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Sharon K

    2017-01-01

    Many controversies have come to light related to breast cancer screening recommendations for average- and high-risk populations. This manuscript focuses on factors to consider when coordinating and conducting breast cancer screening programs in an average or "healthy women" population. As presented at the 2016 ONS Congress, a brief comparison of current screening recommendations among various organizations for early detection of breast cancer is provided. Lessons learned regarding key components of successful screening programs such as being patient focused, accessible, and sustainable are shared. Practice implications such as gaining confidence in providing individualized patient education, encouraging every woman to discuss her risk of breast cancer with her health-care provider, advocating for patients needs and being involved in or aware of clinical and translational research on the efficacy of the clinical breast examination and screening services are critical roles for nurses and advanced practice nurse providers.

  16. What's the buzz: Tell me what's happening in breast cancer screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon K Byrne

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Many controversies have come to light related to breast cancer screening recommendations for average- and high-risk populations. This manuscript focuses on factors to consider when coordinating and conducting breast cancer screening programs in an average or “healthy women” population. As presented at the 2016 ONS Congress, a brief comparison of current screening recommendations among various organizations for early detection of breast cancer is provided. Lessons learned regarding key components of successful screening programs such as being patient focused, accessible, and sustainable are shared. Practice implications such as gaining confidence in providing individualized patient education, encouraging every woman to discuss her risk of breast cancer with her health-care provider, advocating for patients needs and being involved in or aware of clinical and translational research on the efficacy of the clinical breast examination and screening services are critical roles for nurses and advanced practice nurse providers.

  17. Improving Breast Cancer Outcomes among Women in China: Practices, Knowledge, and Attitudes Related to Breast Cancer Screening

    OpenAIRE

    Tsu-Yin Wu; Yi-Lan Liu; Scott Chung

    2012-01-01

    Background. Breast cancer is a major public health issue and the most commonly diagnosed cancer for women worldwide. Despite lower incidence rates than those living in Western countries, breast cancer incidence among Chinese women has increased dramatically in the past 20 years. Nevertheless, there is a paucity of studies reporting the attitudes toward and practices of breast cancer screening among Chinese women. Methods. This cross-sectional study examined the practices, knowledge, and attit...

  18. Measurement of the radiation dose and assessment of the risk in mammography screening for early detection of cancer of the breast, in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broisman, A; Schlesinger, T; Alfassi, Z B

    2011-01-01

    The mean glandular doses to samples of women attending for mammographic screening are measured routinely at screening centres in Israel. As at present, no detailed and systematic data have been collected regarding the average glandular dose in mammography screening procedures carried out in Israel for the last 20 y. Especially data are lacking related to the glandular dose (GD) involved in mammography with the new digital mammography systems. In this work, partial results of the measurements are presented to asses the radiation dose to the breast and to the glandular tissue within the Israeli national mammography programme updated to year 2009.

  19. Distribution of dense breasts using screening mammography in Korean women: a retrospective observational study

    OpenAIRE

    Bae, Jong-Myon; Shin, Sang Yop; Kim, Eun Hee; Kim, Yoon-Nam; Nam, Chung Mo

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This retrospective observational study evaluated the distribution of dense breasts by age group among healthy Korean women. METHODS: Participants were women aged 30 years and older who voluntarily underwent screening mammography between January 2007 and December 2011. Women who received the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System for mammographic density of 3 or 4 were defined as having dense breasts. The proportion of women with dense breasts (PDB, %) was calculated by dividing ...

  20. Factors affecting recall rate and false positive fraction in breast cancer screening with breast tomosynthesis - A statistical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosso, Aldana; Lång, Kristina; Petersson, Ingemar F; Zackrisson, Sophia

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we investigate which factors affect the false positive fraction (FPF) for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) compared to digital mammography (DM) in a screening population by using classification and regression trees (C&RT) and binary marginal generalized linear models. The data was obtained from the Malmö Breast Tomosynthesis Screening Trial, which aimed to compare the performance of DBT to DM in breast cancer screening. By using data from the first half of the study population (7500 women), a tree with the recall probability for different groups was calculated. The effect of age and breast density on the FPF was estimated using a binary marginal generalized linear model. Our results show that breast density and breast cancer were the main factors influencing recall. The FPF is mainly affected by breast density and increases with breast density for DBT and DM. In conclusion, the results obtained with C&RT are easy to interpret and similar to those obtained using binary marginal generalized linear models. The FPF is approximately 40% higher for DBT compared to DM for all breast density categories. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The Effect of Personal Characteristics, Perceived Threat, Efficacy and Breast Cancer Anxiety on Breast Cancer Screening Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick De Pelsmacker

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to activate women to participate in breast cancer screening programs, a good understanding is needed of the personal characteristics that influence how women can be activated to search for more information, consult friends and doctors, and participate in breast cancer screening programs. In the current study, we investigate the effect of six personal characteristics that have in previous research been identified as important triggers of health behavior on breast cancer screening activation: Health awareness, Need for Cognition, Affect Intensity, Breast cancer knowledge, Topic involvement, and the Perceived breast cancer risk. We test the effect of these factors on four activation variables: intention of future information seeking, forwarding the message to a friend, talking to a doctor, and actual breast cancer screening attendance. Additionally, we try to unravel the process by means of which the antecedents (the six personal characteristics lead to activation. To that end, we test the mediating role of perceived breast cancer threat, perceived efficacy of screening, and the evoked breast cancer anxiety as mediators in this process. The data were collected by means of a cross-sectional survey in a sample of 700 Flemish (Belgium women who were invited to the free-of-charge breast cancer population screening. Screening attendance of this sample was provided by the government agency in charge of the organisation of the screening. Health awareness, affects intensity, topic involvement, and perceived risk have the strongest influence on activation. Breast cancer anxiety and perceived breast cancer threat have a substantial mediation effect on these effects. Efficacy perceptions are less important in the activation process. Increased health awareness and a higher level of perceived risk lead to less participation in the free of charge population based breast screening program. Implications for theory and practice are offered. The limitation

  2. The Effect of Personal Characteristics, Perceived Threat, Efficacy and Breast Cancer Anxiety on Breast Cancer Screening Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pelsmacker, Patrick; Lewi, Martine; Cauberghe, Veroline

    2017-09-27

    In order to activate women to participate in breast cancer screening programs, a good understanding is needed of the personal characteristics that influence how women can be activated to search for more information, consult friends and doctors, and participate in breast cancer screening programs. In the current study, we investigate the effect of six personal characteristics that have in previous research been identified as important triggers of health behavior on breast cancer screening activation: Health awareness, Need for Cognition, Affect Intensity, Breast cancer knowledge, Topic involvement, and the Perceived breast cancer risk. We test the effect of these factors on four activation variables: intention of future information seeking, forwarding the message to a friend, talking to a doctor, and actual breast cancer screening attendance. Additionally, we try to unravel the process by means of which the antecedents (the six personal characteristics) lead to activation. To that end, we test the mediating role of perceived breast cancer threat, perceived efficacy of screening, and the evoked breast cancer anxiety as mediators in this process. The data were collected by means of a cross-sectional survey in a sample of 700 Flemish (Belgium) women who were invited to the free-of-charge breast cancer population screening. Screening attendance of this sample was provided by the government agency in charge of the organisation of the screening. Health awareness, affects intensity, topic involvement, and perceived risk have the strongest influence on activation. Breast cancer anxiety and perceived breast cancer threat have a substantial mediation effect on these effects. Efficacy perceptions are less important in the activation process. Increased health awareness and a higher level of perceived risk lead to less participation in the free of charge population based breast screening program. Implications for theory and practice are offered. The limitation of the study is

  3. Take your blood pressure to heart! Screening programme 24-27 March

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    In Switzerland, one person in four suffers from high blood pressure without knowing it. This silent killer can only be detected by carrying out regular blood pressure tests.     Following our last campaign in October 2014, 30% of participants were found to have previously undetected hypertension. This year, the nurses of the Medical Service are once again organising a blood pressure screening programme. See the flyer for more information. CERN Medical Service

  4. Likelihood of early detection of breast cancer in relation to false-positive risk in life-time mammographic screening: population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otten, J D M; Fracheboud, J; den Heeten, G J; Otto, S J; Holland, R; de Koning, H J; Broeders, M J M; Verbeek, A L M

    2013-10-01

    Women require balanced, high-quality information when making an informed decision on screening benefits and harms before attending biennial mammographic screening. The cumulative risk of a false-positive recall and/or (small) screen-detected or interval cancer over 13 consecutive screening examinations for women aged 50 from the start of screening were estimated using data from the Nijmegen programme, the Netherlands. Women who underwent 13 successive screens in the period 1975-1976 had a 5.3% cumulative chance of a screen-detected cancer, with a 4.2% risk of at least one false-positive recall. The risk of being diagnosed with interval cancer was 3.7%. Two decades later, these estimates were 6.9%, 7.3% and 2.9%, respectively. The chance of detection of a small, favourable invasive breast cancer, anticipating a normal life-expectancy, rose from 2.3% to 3.7%. Extrapolation to digital screening mammography indicates that the proportion of false-positive results will rise to 16%. Dutch women about to participate in the screening programme can be reassured that the chance of false-positive recall in the Netherlands is relatively low. A new screening policy and improved mammography have increased the detection of an early screening carcinoma and lowering the risk of interval carcinoma.

  5. Cultural Beliefs and Attitudes About Breast Cancer and Screening Practices Among Arabic Women in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Cannas; Endrawes, Gihane; Lee, Chun Fan

    2016-01-01

    Arabic women have been consistently reported as having remarkably low participation rates in breast cancer screening measures in their home countries and after migration to Western countries. Little is known about the screening behaviors of Arabic women in Australia. This study aimed to report breast cancer screening practices among Arabic women in Australia and to examine the relationship between (1) demographic factors and (2) the Arabic version of the Breast Cancer Screening Beliefs Questionnaire (BCSBQ) score and women's breast screening behaviors. A descriptive cross-sectional method was used. Both English and Arabic versions of the BCSBQ were administered to the 251 Arabic Australian women 18 years or older who participated in the study. The majority of participants (62.9%-92%) had heard of breast awareness, clinical breast examination, and mammography. However, only 7.6% practiced breast awareness monthly, 21.4% had undergone clinical breast examination annually, and 40.3% had biannual mammography. Length of stay in Australia, being retired, and being unemployed were positively associated with the recommended performance of breast awareness and mammography. In terms of BCSBQ scores, women who engaged in the 3 screening practices had significantly higher scores on the attitudes to health check-ups and barriers to mammography subscales. Attitudes toward health check-ups and perceived barriers to mammography were important determinants of breast cancer screening practices among Arabic Australian women. To fully understand barriers discouraging Arabic Australian women from participating in breast cancer screening practices, efforts should be focused on specific subgroup (ie, working group) of Arabic Australian women.

  6. Factors Affecting Preferences of Iranian Women for Breast Cancer Screening Based on Marketing Mix Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourfarzi, Farhad; Fouladi, Nasrin; Amani, Firouz; Ahari, Saeid Sadegieh; Roshani, Zohre; Alimohammadi, Sara

    2016-01-01

    According to recent statistics, the breast cancer rate is growing fast in developing countries. In North West Iran, the incidence of breast cancer after esophageal and gastric cancers has the highest rate. Previous studies have also indicated that women in this region show reluctance to do breast cancer screening. There is a great need for change to promote breast cancer screening among women. Social marketing is a discipline that uses the systematic application of commercial marketing techniques to promote the adoption of behavior by the target audience. In the present qualitative study, thirty-two women with breast cancer were interviewed about their experiences of breast cancer screening. A semi-structured interview guide was designed to elicit information specific to the 4 P's in social marketing. Three main categories emerged from the analysis: price, service and promotion. Subcategories related to these main categories included factors effective in increasing and decreasing cost of screening, current and desirable features of screening services, and weakness of promotion. Screening programs should be designed to be of low cost, to meet patients' needs and should be provided in suitable places. Furthermore, it is essential that the cultural beliefs of society be improved through education. It seems necessary to design an executive protocol for breast cancer screening at different levels of primary health care to increase the women's willingness to undergo screening.

  7. [The Nordic cervical screening programmes through 1995. Evaluation of incidence and mortality rates, targeted age groups and screening intervals.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigurdsson, K

    1999-11-01

    The objective of cervical cancer screening is to lower the incidence and mortality rates of the disease. The Nordic countries have a long experience in cervical cancer screening. Based on this experience this study evaluates the UICC and EC guidelines regarding the effectiveness of organized vs. spontaneous screening, targeted age groups and screening intervals. The study analyses the features of the Icelandic and the Nordic screening programmes and the observed trends in the incidence and mortality rates in these countries through 1995. It also analyses the trends for cytologic preinvasive lesions at first visit and at second and later visits after a normal test(s). The frequency of histologic lesions was calculated for the birth cohort 1920-1926 from the age of 60 and among women referred for colposcopic examination in 1994. Organized screening started in all the Nordic countries except Norway soon after 1960. Up to 1985 the target age group and screening interval were most intensive in Iceland. All countries intensified the screening intervals after 1985. The reduction in both the mortality and the incidence rates was greatest in Iceland and Finland, intermediate in Sweden and Denmark, and lowest in Norway but in that country organized screening started in 1994. The age-specific incidence in the 20-29 age group has been increasing since 1971 in all the Nordic countries, except in Finland. In Iceland screening has greatly affected the rate of all stages of squamous cell carcinoma, but not the rate of adeno-and adenosquamous carcinomas. The prevalence of preinvasive disease has increased significantly since 1980. The rate of moderate to high-grade cytologic changes begins increasing as early as at 20 years of age and moderate to high-grade histologic lesions start to accumulate at 24 to 36 months after a normal smear. The rate of these lesions decreases with the number of negative smears taken. Moderate to high-grade histologic lesions and invasive cancer are

  8. The association of breast density with breast cancer mortality in African American and white women screened in community practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shengfan; Ivy, Julie S; Diehl, Kathleen M; Yankaskas, Bonnie C

    2013-01-01

    The effect of breast density on survival outcomes for American women who participate in screening remains unknown. We studied the role of breast density on both breast cancer and other cause of mortality in screened women. Data for women with breast cancer, identified from the community-based Carolina Mammography Registry, were linked with the North Carolina cancer registry and NC death tapes for this study. Cause-specific Cox proportional hazards models were developed to analyze the effect of several covariates on breast cancer mortality-namely, age, race (African American/White), cancer stage at diagnosis (in situ, local, regional, and distant), and breast density (BI-RADS( ® ) 1-4). Two stratified Cox models were considered controlling for (1) age and race, and (2) age and cancer stage, respectively, to further study the effect of density. The cumulative incidence function with confidence interval approximation was used to quantify mortality probabilities over time. For this study, 22,597 screened women were identified as having breast cancer. The non-stratified and stratified Cox models showed no significant statistical difference in mortality between dense tissue and fatty tissue, while controlling for other covariate effects (p value = 0.1242, 0.0717, and 0.0619 for the non-stratified, race-stratified, and cancer stage-stratified models, respectively). The cumulative mortality probability estimates showed that women with dense breast tissues did not have significantly different breast cancer mortality than women with fatty breast tissue, regardless of age (e.g., 10-year confidence interval of mortality probabilities for whites aged 60-69 white: 0.056-0.090 vs. 0.054-0.083). Aging, African American race, and advanced cancer stage were found to be significant risk factors for breast cancer mortality (hazard ratio >1.0). After controlling for cancer incidence, there was not a significant association between mammographic breast density and mortality, adjusting

  9. Intrinsic motivation factors based on the self-determinant theory for regular breast cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Su Mi; Jo, Heui-Sug

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify factors of intrinsic motivation that affect regular breast cancer screening and contribute to development of a program for strategies to improve effective breast cancer screening. Subjects were residing in South Korea Gangwon-Province and were female over 40 and under 69 years of age. For the investigation, the Intrinsic Motivation Inventory (IMI) was modified to the situation of cancer screening and was used to survey 905 inhabitants. Multinominal logistic regression analyses were conducted for regular breast cancer screening (RS), one-time breast cancer screening (OS) and non-breast cancer screening (NS). For statistical analysis, IBM SPSS 20.0 was utilized. The determinant factors between RS and NS were "perceived effort and choice" and "stress and strain" - internal motivations related to regular breast cancer screening. Also, determinant factors between RS and OS are "age" and "perceived effort and choice" for internal motivation related to cancer screening. To increase regular screening, strategies that address individual perceived effort and choice are recommended.

  10. Public health implications of establishing a national programme to screen young athletes in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elston, Julian; Stein, Ken

    2011-06-01

    To assess how much competitive sport contributes to sudden cardiac death (SCD) in young athletes and the impact on population health if this group were to be screened in the UK. Using reported and imputed incidence rates of SCD in athletes and non-athletes and false-negative and false-positive test rates reported in three key Italian screening studies, the authors calculated the population and attributable risk fractions of SCD in young athletes and the total population (athletes and non-athletes) aged 12-35 years before and after screening; the number of athletes needed to screen (NNS) to prevent one SCD and the sensitivity and the specificity of screening with electrocardiogram. Using these parameters, the authors developed a decision tree model based on the UK population aged 12-35 years to estimate the annual number of SCDs, the expected number of screening and diagnostic tests and the number of athletes disqualified from competitive sport per SCD prevented. Participation in competitive athletics contributes to 81.9% (62.4% to 91.6%) of SCD in athletes but only 26.6% (-20.3% to 55.8%) in the total population. After screening, the contribution in the total population falls to 7.2% (-10.7% to 22.4%). The NNS is 38 151 (20 534 to 267 380). A UK screening programme would result in 1 520 021 young athletes being screened, with 140 361 referred for diagnosis. Of an expected 196 SCDs per year, 40 (6 to 74) would be prevented. For every life saved, 791 athletes would be disqualified. The impact of screening on reducing SCD in young athletes is only modest and would be achieved with significant harms to population health.

  11. The potential impact of a prophylactic vaccine for human papillomavirus on the current cervical screening programme in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koljonen, Paul A

    2007-08-01

    To review and summarise current controversies in cervical screening in Hong Kong and discuss the potential impact of prophylactic human papillomavirus vaccination. Literature search of Medline to December 2006, the Hong Kong Cancer Registry, and Centre of Disease Control. Key words search terms were: 'human papillomavirus', 'vaccine', 'cervical cancer', 'screening programme', and 'Hong Kong'. Original articles, review papers, books, and the worldwide web. Cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers in Hong Kong, and can be prevented if detected at its pre-cancerous stage. Despite the huge disease burden this imposes on our society and robust advocacy by the academic sector, an appropriate screening programme is still not in place. Existence of a vaccine that could potentially reduce the costs of universal screening should prompt our government to re-consider subsidising such a programme. While a combined screening-vaccination programme may be more cost-effective than screening alone, the vaccine is still costly, and the government must consider all the pros and cons. The new human papillomavirus vaccine, combined with an organised screening programme, is probably a more cost-effective way of preventing morbidity and mortality due to cervical cancer than the current programme in Hong Kong. More research and cost-effectiveness analyses are needed to decide on the ideal ages for primary vaccination and the requirement for booster shots.

  12. The psychological profile of women attending breast-screening tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreitler, S; Chaitchik, S; Kreitler, H

    1990-01-01

    Though the benefits of early detection of breast cancer are generally known, only few women attend breast-screening examinations. The study was designed to gain insight into the problem by exploring the psychological profile of clinic attenders. In order to find out whether there is such a profile, 210 self-referred women were compared with 210 nonattending women, from the same working and social environments, matched in age, education and occupational level. All subjects were administered 10 tests in 7 domains. The tests were administered as part of a health survey. The results showed that clinic attenders scored higher on negative emotions and total emotions and lower on positive emotions; higher on repression; lower on daydreams; lower on range of self-concept, references to others and negative self-references but higher on positive self-references; scored higher on self-references describing oneself in a functional and in a passive way and scored lower on those describing oneself in terms of one's attitudes, body and appearance; scored lower on neuroticism; scored lower on different somatic complaints and health orientation but higher in alexithymia. No differences were found in authoritarianism, locus of control and self-complexity. Conclusions are that there is a psychological profile of clinic attenders, that it is focused on dysphoric emotions, psychological disease promotion and defensiveness and that it includes characteristics of the construct that is sometimes called the cancer-prone personality.

  13. Evaluating the correlation between film mammography and MRI for screening women with increased breast cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Janie M; Halpern, Elkan F; Rafferty, Elizabeth A; Gazelle, G Scott

    2009-11-01

    Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly being added to mammography for screening asymptomatic women at increased risk of breast cancer. Because the direction and extent of correlation between mammography and MRI could potentially result in over- or underestimation of the diagnostic gain related to using MRI as an adjunct to mammographic screening, we performed an analysis to evaluate the extent of correlation between mammography and MRI. We reviewed the published literature to identify multimodality breast cancer screening studies reporting the sensitivity of mammography and MRI, alone and in combination, for breast cancer diagnosis. After calculating the expected sensitivity of combined mammography and MRI under conditions of test independence (no correlation), we compared the calculated and observed sensitivities for combined mammography and MRI. We then calculated correlation coefficients for mammography and MRI. Seven studies of multimodality screening in women at increased risk of developing breast cancer were included for analysis. Of these studies, the correlation between film mammography and MRI was positive in three studies, negative in two studies, and not identified in two studies. The calculated correlation coefficients ranged from -0.38 to 0.18. In six of seven studies, the 95% confidence interval for the correlation coefficient included 0.0, indicating no significant correlation. Evidence from published trials of multimodality breast cancer screening identified no statistically significant correlation between film mammography and MRI. Using both tests for breast cancer screening is likely to improve the early detection of breast cancer in women at increased risk.

  14. Breast and cervical cancer screening in obese minority women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrante, Jeanne M; Chen, Ping-Hsin; Jacobs, Abbie

    2006-06-01

    Studies using survey data from mostly white women showed that obese women are less likely than nonobese women to undergo breast and cervical cancer screening. It is unclear if these findings are true in nonwhite women. Using chart audit data, we examined the relationship between obesity and mammography and Pap smear screening among minority women. Data from retrospective chart review of women in three urban New Jersey academic family medicine practices were analyzed (n = 1809) using hierarchical logistic regression models. Outcome measures were being up-to-date in mammography and Pap smears among obese and nonobese women. There was no difference in mammography rates among obese and nonobese women. Independent risk factors for not being up-to-date in mammography included age 40-49, smoking, and comorbidity. Obese women were less likely than nonobese women to be upto- date in Pap smears (69% vs. 77%, p = 0.001). In multivariate analysis, obesity was associated with 25% decreased odds of being up-to-date on Pap smears (OR, 0.75, 95% CI, 0.58-0.99, p = 0.041). Age >or=65 years was also associated with decreased odds of being up-to-date in Pap smears. Hispanic women had increased odds of being up-to-date in mammography (OR 2.43, 95% CI 1.63-3.63) and Pap smears (OR 1.94, 95% CI 1.24-3.03) compared with white women. Obesity was associated with decreased Pap smear screening but not with decreased mammography. Further studies are needed to determine barriers and effective interventions to improve screening in obese minority women.

  15. Improving Breast Cancer Outcomes among Women in China: Practices, Knowledge, and Attitudes Related to Breast Cancer Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsu-Yin Wu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Breast cancer is a major public health issue and the most commonly diagnosed cancer for women worldwide. Despite lower incidence rates than those living in Western countries, breast cancer incidence among Chinese women has increased dramatically in the past 20 years. Nevertheless, there is a paucity of studies reporting the attitudes toward and practices of breast cancer screening among Chinese women. Methods. This cross-sectional study examined the practices, knowledge, and attitudes toward breast cancer screening (BCS on a convenience sample of 400 Chinese women. Results. Among study participants, 75% of the women never had a mammogram and the top three barriers reported were low priority, feeling OK, and lack of awareness/knowledge toward breast cancer screening. The results from the logistic regression model showed increased self-efficacy; having performed monthly self-exams, and having had clinical breast exams in the past two years were significant correlates while demographic variables were not correlated with screening behaviors. Conclusion. The findings provide a foundation to better understand beliefs and practices of Chinese women toward BCS and highlight the critical need for general public, health professionals, and the health care system to work collaboratively toward improving the quality of breast cancer care in this population.

  16. Socio-economic inequalities in breast and cervical cancer screening practices in Europe: influence of the type of screening program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palència, Laia; Espelt, Albert; Rodríguez-Sanz, Maica; Puigpinós, Rosa; Pons-Vigués, Mariona; Pasarín, M. Isabel; Spadea, Teresa; Kunst, Anton E.; Borrell, Carme

    2010-01-01

    Methods A cross-sectional study was performed using individual-level data from the WHO World Health Survey (2002) and data regarding the implementation of cancer screening programmes. The study population consisted of women from 22 European countries, aged 25-69 years for cervical cancer screening

  17. The transtheoretical model, health belief model, and breast cancer screening among Iranian women with a family history of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farajzadegan, Ziba; Fathollahi-Dehkordi, Fariba; Hematti, Simin; Sirous, Reza; Tavakoli, Neda; Rouzbahani, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Participation of Iranian women with a family history of breast cancer in breast cancer screening programs is low. This study evaluates the compliance of women having a family history of breast cancer with clinical breast exam (CBE) according to the stage of transtheoretical model (TTM) and health belief model (HBM). In this cross-sectional study, we used Persian version of champion's HBM scale to collect factors associated with TTM stages applied to screening from women over 20 years and older. The obtained data were analyzed by SPSS, using descriptive statistics, Chi-square test, independent t-test, and analysis of covariance. Final sample size was 162 women. Thirty-three percent were in action/maintenance stage. Older women, family history of breast cancer in first-degree relatives, personal history of breast disease, insurance coverage, and a history of breast self-examination were associated with action/maintenance stage. Furthermore, women in action/maintenance stages had significantly fewer perceived barriers in terms of CBE in comparison to women in other stages (P 0.05). The finding indicates that the rate of women in action/maintenance stage of CBE is low. Moreover, results show a strong association between perceived barriers and having a regular CBE. These clarify the necessity of promoting national target programs for breast cancer screening, which should be considered as the first preference for reducing CBE barriers.

  18. The Effects of New Screening Tests in the Dutch Cervical Cancer Screening Programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Rozemeijer (Kirsten)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractCervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer in women all over the world, mainly affecting young women. As cervical cancer is easy to prevent by early detection and treatment of the disease, screening was introduced in the Netherlands in the 1970s. The number of cervical cancer

  19. Family History of Breast Cancer, Breast Density, and Breast Cancer Risk in a U.S. Breast Cancer Screening Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahern, Thomas P; Sprague, Brian L; Bissell, Michael C S; Miglioretti, Diana L; Buist, Diana S M; Braithwaite, Dejana; Kerlikowske, Karla

    2017-06-01

    Background: The utility of incorporating detailed family history into breast cancer risk prediction hinges on its independent contribution to breast cancer risk. We evaluated associations between detailed family history and breast cancer risk while accounting for breast density.Methods: We followed 222,019 participants ages 35 to 74 in the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium, of whom 2,456 developed invasive breast cancer. We calculated standardized breast cancer risks within joint strata of breast density and simple (1st-degree female relative) or detailed (first-degree, second-degree, or first- and second-degree female relative) breast cancer family history. We fit log-binomial models to estimate age-specific breast cancer associations for simple and detailed family history, accounting for breast density.Results: Simple first-degree family history was associated with increased breast cancer risk compared with no first-degree history [Risk ratio (RR), 1.5; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.0-2.1 at age 40; RR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.3-1.7 at age 50; RR, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.2-1.6 at age 60; RR, 1.3; 95% CI, 1.1-1.5 at age 70). Breast cancer associations with detailed family history were strongest for women with first- and second-degree family history compared with no history (RR, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.1-3.2 at age 40); this association weakened in higher age groups (RR, 1.2; 95% CI, 0.88-1.5 at age 70). Associations did not change substantially when adjusted for breast density.Conclusions: Even with adjustment for breast density, a history of breast cancer in both first- and second-degree relatives is more strongly associated with breast cancer than simple first-degree family history.Impact: Future efforts to improve breast cancer risk prediction models should evaluate detailed family history as a risk factor. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(6); 938-44. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  20. The EUROMED CANCER network: state-of-art of cancer screening programmes in non-EU Mediterranean countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Livia; Bisanti, Luigi; Salamina, Giuseppe; Ancelle Park, Rosemary; Sancho-Garnier, Hélène; Espinas, Josep; Berling, Christine; Rennert, Gad; Castagno, Roberta; Dotti, Marta; Jaramillo, Lina; Segnan, Nereo

    2016-02-01

    The EUROMED CANCER Network project aims to support non-EU Mediterranean countries in the development of cancer early detection and screening policies. Through a structured questionnaire information from 15 countries (Albania, Algeria, Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH), Croatia, Egypt, Jordan, UN Interim Administration Mission in Kosovo, Lebanon, Montenegro, Morocco, Palestinian National Authority, Serbia, Syria, Tunisia and Turkey) were collected on cancer epidemiology and control. Large differences between countries are evident. Breast cancer (BC) is the commonest cancer among women, though the incidence rate is much lower in non-EU than in EU Mediterranean countries. Conversely, cervical cancer (CC) is much more common in the former than in the latter countries. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is more frequent in Northern than in Eastern and Southern Mediterranean shores. Population-based cancer registries are available in few countries but most of them lack information on disease staging. Opportunistic screening for CC and BC is unevenly spread across and within countries; organised screening programmes are rare and do not meet international recommendations. BC and CC early detection is extensively considered a priority, while a few countries included CRC into their agenda. Collected data witnesses inadequacy of health information system and, in general, of the strategies for cancer control in the involved countries. A uniform approach for strengthening cancer control is not realistic neither feasible. Tailored preventive actions for cancer early detection have to be started concurrently with the development of a reliable health information system and, specifically, with cancer registration. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  1. Participation behaviour following a false positive test in the Copenhagen mammography screening programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Sune Bangsbøll; Vejborg, Ilse; von Euler-Chelpin, My

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: There is an ongoing debate concerning possible disadvantages of mammography screening, one being the consequence of receiving a false positive test-result. It is argued that receiving a false positive answer may have short- and/or long-term adverse psychological effects on women......, but results from different studies are conflicting. We tested if there was a difference in continued participation behaviour between the group of women who have been subject to a false positive result and those who have not. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study used the registers from the first six invitation...... rounds of the mammography screening programme in Copenhagen (1991-2003). We estimated the relative risk of not participating in the subsequent screening round for women with a false positive test using women with a negative test as baseline. As outcome measure odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence...

  2. Is breast compression associated with breast cancer detection and other early performance measures in a population-based breast cancer screening program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshina, Nataliia; Sebuødegård, Sofie; Hofvind, Solveig

    2017-06-01

    We aimed to investigate early performance measures in a population-based breast cancer screening program stratified by compression force and pressure at the time of mammographic screening examination. Early performance measures included recall rate, rates of screen-detected and interval breast cancers, positive predictive value of recall (PPV), sensitivity, specificity, and histopathologic characteristics of screen-detected and interval breast cancers. Information on 261,641 mammographic examinations from 93,444 subsequently screened women was used for analyses. The study period was 2007-2015. Compression force and pressure were categorized using tertiles as low, medium, or high. χ 2 test, t tests, and test for trend were used to examine differences between early performance measures across categories of compression force and pressure. We applied generalized estimating equations to identify the odds ratios (OR) of screen-detected or interval breast cancer associated with compression force and pressure, adjusting for fibroglandular and/or breast volume and age. The recall rate decreased, while PPV and specificity increased with increasing compression force (p for trend cancer, PPV, sensitivity, and specificity decreased with increasing compression pressure (p for trend breast cancer compared with low compression pressure (1.89; 95% CI 1.43-2.48). High compression force and low compression pressure were associated with more favorable early performance measures in the screening program.

  3. Retrospective observation on contribution and limitations of screening for breast cancer with mammography in Korea: detection rate of breast cancer and incidence rate of interval cancer of the breast

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Kunsei; Kim, Hyeongsu; Lee, Jung Hyun; Jeong, Hyoseon; Shin, Soon Ae; Han, Taehwa; Seo, Young Lan; Yoo, Youngbum; Nam, Sang Eun; Park, Jong Heon; Park, Yoo Mi

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to determine the benefits and limitations of screening for breast cancer using mammography. Methods Descriptive design with follow-up was used in the study. Data from breast cancer screening and health insurance claim data were used. The study population consisted of all participants in breast cancer screening from 2009 to 2014. Crude detection rate, positive predictive value and sensitivity and specificity of breast cancer screening and, incidence rat...

  4. Prospective assessment of the Hong Kong Hospital Authority universal Down syndrome screening programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahota, Daljit S; Leung, W C; Chan, W P; To, William Wk; Lau, Elizabeth T; Leung, T Y

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate the performance of the locally developed universal Down syndrome screening programme. Population-based cohort study in the period July 2010 to June 2011 inclusive. Four Hong Kong Hospital Authority Departments of Obstetrics and Gynaecology and a central university-based laboratory for maternal serum processing and risk determination. Women were offered either a first-trimester combined test (nuchal translucency, free beta human chorionic gonadotropin, and pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A) or nuchal-translucency-only test, or a second-trimester double test (alpha-fetoprotein and total human chorionic gonadotropin) for detection of Down syndrome according to their gestational age. Those with a trisomy 21 term risk of 1:250 or higher were offered a diagnostic test. A total of 16 205 pregnancies were screened of which 13 331 (82.3%) had a first-trimester combined test, 125 (0.8%) had a nuchal-translucency test only, and 2749 (17.0%) had a second-trimester double test. There were 38 pregnancies affected by Down syndrome. The first-trimester screening tests had a 91.2% (31/34) detection rate with a screen-positive rate of 5.1% (690/13 456). The second-trimester test had a 100% (4/4) detection rate with a screen-positive rate of 6.3% (172/2749). There were seven (0.9%) pregnancies that miscarried following an invasive diagnostic test. There were two Down syndrome-affected live births, both with an estimated first-trimester trisomy 21 term risk lower than 1:250. The universal screening programme offered at the four units was effective and achieved the expected detection rates and low false-positive rates, and to maintain these, the current emphasis on training, quality control, and regular auditing must continue.

  5. Stage distribution of breast cancer diagnosed before and after implementation of population-based mammographic screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofvind, S. [Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo (Norway). Research; Skaane, P. [Oslo Univ. Hospital Ullevaal (Norway). Dept. of Radiology

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: The German mammographic screening program is very similar to the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program (NBCSP), which started about 10 years earlier. This study analyzes the stage distribution of invasive breast cancers diagnosed in the pre-screening and screening period, and evaluates the overall mortality in women aged 55 - 74 in the pilot and non-pilot counties of the NBCSP. Materials and Methods: The NBCSP invites women aged 50 - 69 to participate in two-view mammography biennially. Chi-square statistics were used to compare percentages of the stage and treatment of invasive breast cancers diagnosed in women residing in the four pilot counties in the pre-screening (1984 - 1995) and screening (1996 - 2007) period. An ecological approach was used to analyze the age-specific mortality in the pilot and non-pilot counties for the period 1970 - 2007. Results: 50 % of the breast cancers diagnosed in the pre-screening period, 70 % of the cases detected with screening, 43 % of the interval cancers, and 52 % of the cancers diagnosed outside the NBCSP were stage I. Stage III + was present in 11 % of the cancers in the pre-screening period, and in 1 % of the cancers detected with screening. In the screening period, the breast cancer mortality rate decreased substantially more in the pilot counties than in the non-pilot counties. Conclusion: The stage distribution of breast cancer diagnosed in the NBCSP is prognostically favorable compared to cancers diagnosed outside the screening program. The reduction in the breast cancer mortality rate was more pronounced in the four pilot counties compared to the non-pilot counties. It is necessary to evaluate the program based on individual data. (orig.)

  6. Risk of breast cancer after false-positive test results in screening mammography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Euler-Chelpin, My Catarina; Risør, Louise Madeleine; Thorsted, Brian Larsen

    2012-01-01

    Screening for disease in healthy people inevitably leads to some false-positive tests in disease-free individuals. Normally, women with false-positive screening tests for breast cancer are referred back to routine screening. However, the long-term outcome for women with false-positive tests...

  7. A prospective study of the screening for breast cancer by using DMR; Collaboration with four institutes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endo, Tokiko; Kido, Choichiro; Horita, Katsuhei (Aichi Cancer Center, Nagoya (Japan). Hospital) (and others)

    1991-05-01

    Digital mammoradiography (DMR) is a new apparatus for mammography. Three thousands and six hundred seventy four breasts, including 192 cancer lesions, were evaluated by DMR and palpation in each institute. Screening ability for breast cancer was discussed by ROC analysis in the each group. Results were as follows: (1) DMR group showed inferior results compared with palpation group; (2) But, true positive rate was not enough for screening; (3) By a good education, higher true positive rate could be acquired in DMR group. In conclusion, DMR is an useful apparatus for mass screening for breast cancer in combination with palpation. (author).

  8. Trends in breast biopsies for abnormalities detected at screening mammography: a population-based study in the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    van Breest Smallenburg, V; Nederend, J; Voogd, A C; Coebergh, J W W; van Beek, M; Jansen, F H; Louwman, W J; Duijm, L E M

    2013-01-01

    Background: Diagnostic surgical breast biopsies have several disadvantages, therefore, they should be used with hesitation. We determined time trends in types of breast biopsies for the workup of abnormalities detected at screening mammography. We also examined diagnostic delays. Methods: In a Dutch breast cancer screening region 6230 women were referred for an abnormal screening mammogram between 1 January 1997 and 1 January 2011. During two year follow-up clinical data, breast imaging-, bio...

  9. Results of a nationally implemented de novo cardiac screening programme in elite rugby players in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghani, Saqib; Papadakis, Michael; Kemp, Simon; Zaidi, Abbas; Sheikh, Nabeel; Gati, Sabiha; Raju, Hariharan; Smith, Andy; Palmer, Corin; Somauroo, John; Sharma, Sanjay

    2016-06-23

    Screening of young competitive athletes remains a contentious issue. In 2010, a nationwide cardiac screening for all elite rugby players was introduced in England. This provided a unique opportunity to prospectively assess the feasibility and cost-effectiveness of a de novo, ECG-based cardiac screening programme. Between 2010 and 2012, 1191 rugby players aged ≥14 years underwent cardiac screening with a health questionnaire, 12-lead ECG and a consultation with a cardiologist. The players with concerning findings on initial evaluation were offered on-site transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE). Athletes were referred for further investigations as deemed necessary. The overall cost of the screening programme was estimated. After initial evaluation, 9.7% of athletes underwent on-site TTE; 8.2% underwent on-site TTE due to ECG anomalies and 1.4% underwent on-site TTE due to concerns on the questionnaire. After TTE, only 2.9% of the total cohort was referred for further evaluation. Two players were diagnosed with potentially serious conditions; one with Wolff-Parkinson-White, who resumed competition after catheter ablation, and one with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, who withdrew from competition. During a mean follow-up of 52.8±5.5 months, none of the players who were reassured experienced any adverse cardiac events. The total cost of the screening programme was £59 875, which averaged to a cost of £50 per player or £29 938 per condition identified. Application of refined ECG criteria would reduce the ECG false-positive rate to 4.9%. Preparticipation cardiac screening with 12-lead ECG is feasible. Refinement of the ECG criteria, the use of on-site TTE and expert setting can minimise the burden of unnecessary investigations and reduce costs. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  10. Domestic violence screening and intervention programmes for adults with dental or facial injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulthard, Paul; Yong, Sin Leong; Adamson, Linda; Warburton, Alison; Worthington, Helen V; Esposito, Marco; Sharif, Mohammad O

    2010-12-08

    Domestic violence exists in all communities across the world. Healthcare services have a pivotal role in the identification, assessment and response to domestic violence. As the face is a common target in assault, dentists and oral and maxillofacial surgeons are in a unique position to screen for domestic violence in the context of presentation of dental and facial injury. Owing to lack of training, dentists and oral and maxillofacial surgeons may not be the best persons to give advice to someone experiencing domestic violence. Improper advice such as encouragement to leave an abusive relationship may escalate the frequency of violence. It may be more appropriate to refer to specialist agencies for intervention and support. It would, therefore be useful to know whether screening and intervention programmes are effective. (1) To assess the benefits and harms of intervention programmes employed to reduce and or prevent domestic violence in adults with dental and/or facial injuries. (2) To assess the benefits and harms of screening and the use of different screening tools in the detection of the proportion of adult victims of domestic violence who present with dental and/or facial injury. The following electronic databases were searched: the Cochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register (to 18 May 2010), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2010, Issue 2), MEDLINE via OVID (1950 to 18 May 2010), EMBASE via OVID (1980 to 18 May 2010), PsycINFO via OVID (1950 to 18 May 2010), LILACS via BIREME (1982 to 18 May 2010) and CINAHL via EBSCO (1980 to 18 May 2010). There were no restrictions regarding language or date of publication. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) involving adults aged 16 years and over presenting with dental and/or facial injury relating to domestic violence in any healthcare setting. Screening of eligible studies was conducted in duplicate and independently by two reviewers. Results were to be expressed as

  11. Breast density in screening mammography in Indian population - Is it different from western population?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Tulika; Khandelwal, Niranjan; Singla, Veenu; Kumar, Dileep; Gupta, Madhu; Singh, Gurpreet; Bal, Amanjit

    2017-11-15

    Mammography is the only method presently considered appropriate for mass screening of breast cancer. However, higher breast density was strongly associated with lower mammographic sensitivity. Breast density is also identified as independent and strongest risk factors for breast cancer. Studies have shown women with high breast density have four to six times increased risk of breast cancer as compare to women with fatty breast. It varies between different age group it generally decreases with increasing age in postmenopausal women and it can be different in different ethnic groups and people from different geographical areas. This study evaluates the breast density in Indian population and its relationship with the age. We reviewed of all screening mammography examinations performed from May 2012 to January 2015 at our institute PGIMER, Chandigarh, INDIA. Descriptive analyses were used to examine the association between age and breast density. A total of 6132 screening mammograms were performed. Each subgroup categorized by decade of age. There was a significant inverse relationship between age and breast density (P density in Indian and Western population with more Indians having ACR Grade 1 and 2 and Western population having 2 and 3. We found an inverse relationship between patient age and mammographic breast density. However, there were a large proportion of young women who had lower grades of mammographic density which could potentially benefit from the use of routine screening mammography in this subgroup of patients. Moreover, the breast density of Indian population is less when compared to the Western population. This might suggest that mammography is a good modality of choice for screening Indian population. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Evaluating the knowledge of breast cancer screening and prevention among Arab-American women in Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshad, Samia; Williams, Karen Patricia; Mabiso, Athur; Dey, Subhojit; Soliman, Amr S

    2011-03-01

    Arab-American women are more likely to be diagnosed with advanced staged breast cancer. We analyzed data from 100 women utilizing a breast cancer literacy assessment tool aimed at understanding functional literacy levels about breast-self exams (BSE), clinical breast exams (CBE), and mammograms. The educational program improved women's knowledge of BSE (OR = 0.15; 95% CI = 0.04, 0.50) and CBE (OR = 0.15; 95% CI = 0.04, 0.54), more for women with higher education. Consideration of women's educational status is an important factor in planning educational programs to improve knowledge on breast cancer screening and prevention in this minority population.

  13. Breast cancer detection among young survivors of pediatric Hodgkin lymphoma with screening magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tieu, Minh Thi; Cigsar, Candemir; Ahmed, Sameera; Ng, Andrea; Diller, Lisa; Millar, B-A; Crystal, Pavel; Hodgson, David C

    2014-08-15

    Female survivors of pediatric Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) who have received chest radiotherapy are at increased risk of breast cancer. Guidelines for early breast cancer screening among these survivors are based on little data regarding clinical outcomes. This study reports outcomes of breast cancer screening with MRI and mammography (MMG) after childhood HL. We evaluated the results of breast MRI and MMG screening among 96 female survivors of childhood HL treated with chest radiotherapy. Outcomes measured included imaging sensitivity and specificity, breast cancer characteristics, and incidence of additional imaging and breast biopsy. Median age at first screening was 30 years, and the median number of MRI screening rounds was 3. Ten breast cancers were detected in 9 women at a median age of 39 years (range, 24-43 years). Half were invasive and half were preinvasive. The median size of invasive tumors was 8 mm (range, 3-15 mm), and none had lymph node involvement. Sensitivity and specificity of the screening modalities were as follows: for MRI alone, 80% and 93.5%, respectively; MMG alone, 70% and 95%, respectively; both modalities combined, 100% and 88.6%, respectively. All invasive tumors were detected by MRI. Additional investigations were required in 52 patients, (54%), and 26 patients (27%) required breast biopsy, with 10 patients requiring more than 1 biopsy. Screening including breast MRI with MMG has high sensitivity and specificity in pediatric HL survivors, with breast cancers detected at an early stage, although it is associated with a substantial rate of additional investigations. © 2014 The Authors. Cancer published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Cancer Society.

  14. Effects of an aerobic exercise programme on fatigue for patients with breast cancer undergoing radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tsui-Yun; Chen, Mei-Ling; Li, Chia-Chun

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of an aerobic exercise programme on fatigue for Taiwanese breast cancer women under radiotherapy (RT). Cancer-related fatigue has been widely reported by patients undergoing radiotherapy as strongly and profoundly interfering with their quality of life. Evidence has shown that exercise can be beneficial to patients with breast cancer. A quasi-experimental design was used. Patients with early-stage breast cancer scheduled for radiotherapy were invited to participate. The first 28 women who agreed to participate were assigned to the intervention group with a six-week mild- to moderate-intensity aerobic exercise training programme during their radiotherapy. The next 30 women were assigned to the routine care control group without special exercise intervention. Fatigue was measured at pre-radiotherapy and weekly after starting radiotherapy for six weeks using the Taiwanese version of the Brief Fatigue Inventory. The mean age of these 47 women was 50·3 years (standard deviation = 9·5). The baseline fatigue severity for the intervention group and control group were 3·04 and 2·95 respectively; and the baseline fatigue interference for the intervention group and the control group were 3·48 and 3·55 respectively. The student t-test showed no group differences in baseline fatigue severity, fatigue interference, or haemoglobin levels. Multivariate analyses showed a significant group-by-time-interaction effect for fatigue severity and interference (p ≦ 0·001); the fatigue severity and interference decreased significantly over time for women in the intervention group but increased over time for women in the control group. The mild- to moderate-intensity aerobic exercise programme reduces the fatigue of Taiwanese women with breast cancer undergoing radiotherapy. The issues of cancer-related fatigue should also be discussed as they relate to other treatment modalities. Aerobic exercise intervention should be offered as an

  15. Validation of the Korean Version of the Breast Cancer Screening Beliefs Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Cannas; Lee, Mi-Joung; Lee, Chun Fan

    Korean immigrant women have been consistently reported as having low participation in breast cancer screening practices. A valid and reliable instrument to explore factors that affect their cancer screening behaviors is essential. The aim of this study was to report the psychometric properties of the Korean version of the Breast Cancer Screening Beliefs Questionnaire (BCSBQ). A convenience sample of 249 Korean Australian women was recruited through a number of Korean community organizations in Sydney. Exploratory factor analysis supports a similar fit for the original 3-factor structure of our data set. A significant association was found between the attitudes of these women toward general health checkups and the frequency of their performance of the breast awareness practices and having mammograms. Furthermore, it was found that knowledge and perceptions about the breast cancer scales were significantly associated with education level and that barriers to mammographic screening were much less evident among women who engaged in the 3 screening practices. The results indicated that the Korean version of the BCSBQ had satisfactory validity and internal consistency. The Cronbach's α of the 3 subscales ranged between .80 and .88. The Korean version of the BCSBQ was confirmed to be a culturally appropriate, valid, and reliable instrument for assessing the beliefs, knowledge, and attitudes to breast cancer and breast cancer screening practices among women of Korean background living in Australia. The Korean version of the BCBSQ can provide nurses with insights into the development of culturally sensitive breast health education programs.

  16. Breast Cancer Screening Behaviors of First Degree Relatives of Women Receiving Breast Cancer Treatment and the Affecting Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kırca, Nurcan; Tuzcu, Ayla; Gözüm, Sebahat

    2018-01-01

    Objective First-degree relatives of women with breast cancer are under higher risk when compared with the general population. The aim of this study is to evaluate breast cancer screening behaviors of women who are first-degree relatives of women with breast cancer and factors affecting these behaviors. Materials and Methods This descriptive study included 240 patient relatives, who agreed to participate in the study through contact with first-degree relatives of 133 patients who were receiving breast cancer treatment at the Oncology and Chemotherapy unit of an university hospital in Turkey. Data were collected using the “Descriptive Characteristics Form,” which consisted of socio-demographic characteristics, health history, breast cancer risk level and health beliefs as well as the “Breast Cancer Screening Behavior Evaluation Form”. Results Out of the subjects, 17% reported doing breast self examination (BSE), 18% reported getting clinic breast examination (CBE) and 17% reported getting mammography. Logistic regression analysis showed that perceived susceptibility increased BSE by 0.57 times and increased mammography by 0.77 times. Physical exercise increased CBE by 0.21 times and increased mammography by 0.13 times. Conclusions It was found that women with familial breast cancer history (FBCH) had lower participation in screening behaviors. Higher susceptibility perception and regular physical exercise are the determinant variables. Women with a higher susceptibility can be led towards the screening and their participation can be increased. In women with family history, the development of healthy lifestyle behaviors like physical exercise should be supported. PMID:29322115

  17. Breast and bowel cancer screening uptake patterns over 15 years for UK south Asian ethnic minority populations, corrected for differences in socio-demographic characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Price Charlotte

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of studies have reported low uptake of cancer screening programmes by South Asian populations in the UK. However, studies to date have not adjusted findings for differences in demographics and socio-economic status of these populations. Methods Subjects: All residents in Coventry and Warwickshire, UK, eligible for screening. Uptakes compared for round 1 (2000–02 and round 2 (2003–05 of a national bowel cancer screening pilot, and for rounds 1, 2 and 5 of the established NHS breast cancer screening programme (commenced 1989. Data: Bowel screening data were analysed for 123,367 invitees in round 1 and 116,773 in round 2 (total 240,140 cases. Breast screening data were analysed for 61,934, 62,829 and 86,749 invitees in rounds 1, 2 and 5 respectively (total 211,512 cases. Analysis: Screening uptake was compared for two broad meta-categories (South Asian and non-Asian and for five Asian subgroups (Hindu-Gujarati; Hindu-Other; Muslim; Sikh; South Asian Other. Univariate and multivariate analyses examined screening uptake and various demographic attributes of invitees, including age, gender, deprivation and ethnic group. Results South Asians demonstrated significantly lower (p For Muslims registered with an Asian (vs. non-Asian GP, bowel screening uptake was significantly lower (p p = 0.12 in the same period. Colonoscopy and breast assessment uptakes were similar for both meta-categories, but Asian response time appeared slower for colonoscopy. The percentage of abnormal FOBT results was significantly higher for South Asian invitees. A slight increase in abnormal mammograms was observed for Muslims over time (2.7% to 4.2% in rounds 1 and 5 respectively. Conclusion The lower cancer screening uptakes observed for the South Asian population cannot be attributed to socio-economic, age or gender population differences. Although breast screening disparities have reduced over time, significant differences remain. We conclude

  18. A simple way to measure the burden of interval cancers in breast cancer screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Sune Bangsbøll; Törnberg, Sven; Lynge, Elsebeth

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The sensitivity of a mammography program is normally evaluated by comparing the interval cancer rate to the expected breast cancer incidence without screening, i.e. the proportional interval cancer rate (PICR). The expected breast cancer incidence in absence of screening is, however......, difficult to estimate when a program has been running for some time. As an alternative to the PICR we propose the interval cancer ratio ICR=intervalcancersintervalcancers+screendetectedcancers. We validated this simple measure by comparing it with the traditionally used PICR. METHOD: We undertook...... a systematic review and included studies: 1) covering a service screening program, 2) women aged 50-69 years, 3) observed data, 4) interval cancers, women screened, or interval cancer rate, screen detected cases, or screen detection rate, and 5) estimated breast cancer incidence rate of background population...

  19. Health seeking behavioral analysis associated with breast cancer screening among Asian American women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma GX

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Grace X Ma,1 Wanzhen Gao,1 Sunmin Lee,2 MinQi Wang,3 Yin Tan,1 Steven E Shive,1,41Department of Public Health, Center for Asian Health, College of Health Professions, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 2Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University of Maryland, College Park, MD, USA; 3Department of Public and Community Health, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland, MD, USA; 4East Stroudsburg University, East Stroudsburg, PA, USAObjective: The purpose of this community-based study was to apply a Sociocultural Health Behavior Model to determine the association of factors proposed in the model with breast cancer screening behaviors among Asian American women.Methods: A cross-sectional design included a sample of 682 Chinese, Korean, and Vietnamese women aged 40 years and older. The frequency distribution analysis and Chi-square analysis were used for the initial screening of the following variables: sociodemographic, cultural, enabling, environmental, and social support. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted on factors for breast cancer screening using multinomial logistic regression analysis.Results: Correlates to positive breast cancer screening included demographics (ethnicity, cultural factors (living in the United States for 15 years or more, speaking English well, enabling factors (having a regular physician to visit, health insurance covering the screening, and family/social support factors (those who had a family/friend receiving a mammogram.Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that breast cancer screening programs will be more effective if they include the cultural and health beliefs, enabling, and social support factors associated with breast cancer screening. The use of community organizations may play a role in helping to increase breast cancer screening rates among Asian American women.Keywords: breast cancer screening, Vietnamese, Korean, Chinese, breast

  20. Changes in equipment and image quality. Impact of one year Austrian breast cancer early detection programme; Aenderungen in der Geraetelandschaft und Bildqualitaet. Auswirkungen nach einem Jahr Oesterreichischem Brustkrebsfrueherkennungsprogramm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menhart, S.; Osanna-Elliott, A.; Semturs, F.; Schloegl, C.; Wildner, S.; Zwettler, G. [AGES, Wien (Austria). Referenzzentrum fuer technische Qualitaetssicherung im Brustkrebsfrueherkennungsprogramm

    2015-07-01

    The nationwide Austrian Breast Cancer Early Detection Programme (''BKFP'') started in January 2014. The Austrian Agency for Health and Food Safety Ltd. was entrusted with running the reference center for technical quality control (''RefZQS'') on April 1, 2014. The quality of the radiologists' equipment is evaluated against the standards described in the EUREF-Oeprotocol, which is based on the European guidelines for quality assurance in breast cancer screening and diagnosis (EPQC V4, 2006) and has been optimized for Austrian requirements. In its first year of operation the RefZQS has controlled the entire equipment (mammography, periphery and ultrasound system) of all participating radiologists. A significant number of systems had to be adjusted to meet the EUREF-Oecriteria. Some of the systems could not be adjusted accordingly, and had to be replaced. In the wake of the start of the screening programme, several sites switched from CR to more modern DR systems, yielding a significant benefit by reduction of radiation burden. The most important data after one year of RefZQS, especially according to adjustments and replacements, are presented.

  1. Migration from low- to high-risk countries: a qualitative study of perceived risk of breast cancer and the influence on participation in mammography screening among migrant women in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristiansen, M; Lue-Kessing, L; Mygind, A; Razum, O; Norredam, M

    2014-03-01

    Migrants are less likely to participate in mammography screening programmes compared with local-born populations in Europe. We explored perceptions of breast cancer risk and the influence on participation in mammography screening programmes among migrant women born in countries with low incidence rates of breast cancer. We conducted eight individual interviews and six group interviews including a total of 29 women aged 50-69 years living in Copenhagen, Denmark. Women were migrants born in Somalia, Turkey, Pakistan or Arab countries. Phenomenological analysis was used. Breast cancer was perceived to be caused by multiple factors, including genetics, health behaviour, stress, fertility and breastfeeding. Some women perceived breast cancer to be more prevalent in Denmark as compared with their country of birth, and perceived their risk of developing breast cancer to increase with length of stay in Denmark. Although most women agreed on the relevance of mammography screening, other cancers, chronic and infectious diseases and mental health problems were mentioned as equally or more important to target in public health programmes. A life course perspective comprising previous and current circumstances in country of birth as well as immigration country is important for understanding and influencing the screening behaviour of migrants. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Risk modeling and screening for BRCA1 mutations among Filipino breast cancer patients

    CERN Document Server

    Nato, A Q J

    2003-01-01

    Breast cancer susceptibility gene, type 1(BRCA1) has been thought to be responsible for approx 45% of families with multiple breast carcinomas and for approx 80% of breast and ovarian cancer families. In this study, we investigated 34 familial Filipino breast cancer (BC) patients to: (a) estimate breast cancer risks and BRCA1/2 mutation carrier probabilities using risk assessment and prior probability models, respectively; (b) screen for putative polymorphisms at selected smaller exons of BRCA1 by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis; (c) screen for truncated mutations at BRCA1 exon 11 by radioactive protein truncation test (PTT); and (d) estimate posterior probabilities upon incorporation of screening results. SSCP analysis revealed 8 unique putative polymorphisms. Low prevalence of unique putative polymorphisms at exon 2, 5, 17, and 22 may indicate probable mutations. Contrastingly, high prevalence of unique putative polymorphisms at exons 13, 15, and 16 may suggest true polymorphisms whi...

  3. Effect of educational level on knowledge and use of breast cancer screening practices in Bangladeshi women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasu, Rafia S; Rianon, Nahid J; Shahidullah, Sheikh M; Faisel, Abu J; Selwyn, Beatrice J

    2011-03-01

    The Breast Health Global Initiative 2007 emphasized education and cultural values for promoting breast cancer screening in developing countries. This cross-sectional study investigated if educational level and cultural beliefs affect breast cancer screening practices in 152 women 40 years or older in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Women with a higher (>12 years) educational level were more likely to know about breast self-examination (BSE; OR(adj), 95%CI = 22, 6.39-76.76), to know about mammograms (6, 2.49-15.70), and to practice BSE (3, 1.27-6.83) compared with those with a lower educational level. Breast cancer screening practices or knowledge was not affected by perceiving barriers to having mammograms.

  4. Breast cancer mortality in Norway after the introduction of mammography screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Anne Helene; Lynge, Elsebeth; Njor, Sisse H

    2013-01-01

    An organized mammography screening program was gradually implemented in Norway during the period 1996-2004. Norwegian authorities have initiated an evaluation of the program. Our study focused on breast cancer mortality. Using Poisson regression, we compared the change in breast cancer mortality...... from before to during screening in four counties starting the program early controlling for change in breast cancer mortality during the same time in counties starting the program late. A follow-up model included death in all breast cancers diagnosed during the follow-up period. An evaluation model...... to the program, the implementation of the organized mammography screening program was associated with a statistically nonsignificant decrease in breast cancer mortality of around 11%....

  5. Women's knowledge about cervical cancer risk factors, screening, and reasons for non-participation in cervical cancer screening programme in Estonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The attendance rate in Estonian cervical cancer screening programme is too low therefore the programme is hardly effective. A cross-sectional population based survey was performed to identify awareness of cervical cancer risk factors, reasons why women do not want to participate in cervical screening programme and wishes for better organisation of the programme. Method An anonymous questionnaire with a covering letter and a prepaid envelope was sent together with the screening invitation to 2942 randomly selected women. Results are based on the analysis of 1054 (36%) returned questionnaires. Results Main reasons for non-participation in the national screening programme were a recent visit to a gynaecologist (42.3%), fear to give a Pap-smear (14.3%), long appointment queues (12.9%) and unsuitable reception hours (11.8%). Fear to give a Pap-smear was higher among women aged 30 and 35 than 50 and 55 (RR 1.46; 95% CI: 0.82-2.59) and women with one or no deliveries (RR 1.56, 95% CI: 0.94-2.58). In general, awareness of cervical cancer risk factors is poor and it does not depend on socio-demographic factors. Awareness of screening was higher among Estonians than Russians (RR 1.64, 95% CI: 1.46-1.86). Most women prefer to receive information about screening from personally mailed invitation letters (74.8%). Conclusions Women need more information about cervical cancer risk factors and the screening programme. They prefer personally addressed information sharing. Minority groups should be addressed in their own language. A better collaboration with service providers and discouraging smears outside the programme are also required. PMID:21951661

  6. Knowledge, attitudes and practices toward breast cancer screening in a rural South African community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramathuba, Dorah U; Ratshirumbi, Confidence T; Mashamba, Tshilidzi M

    2015-02-27

    The study assessed the knowledge, attitudes and breast cancer screening practices amongst women aged 30-65 years residing in a rural South African community. A quantitative, descriptive cross-sectional design was used and a systematic sampling technique was employed to select 150 participants. The questionnaire was pretested for validity and consistency. Ethical considerations were adhered to in protecting the rights of participants. Thereafter, data were collected and analysed descriptively using the Predictive Analytics Software program. Findings revealed that the level of knowledge about breast cancer of women in Makwarani Community was relatively low. The attitude toward breast cancer was negative whereas the majority of women had never performed breast cancer diagnostic methods. Health education on breast cancer screening practices is lacking and the knowledge deficit can contribute negatively to early detection of breast cancer and compound late detection. Based on the findings, community-based intervention was recommended in order to bridge the knowledge gap.

  7. Impact of peer counselling breast-feeding support programme protocols on any and exclusive breast-feeding discontinuation in low-income women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozga, Mary R; Kerver, Jean M; Olson, Beth H

    2015-02-01

    Peer counselling (PC) programmes have been shown to improve breast-feeding outcomes in populations at risk for early discontinuation. Our objective was to describe associations between programme components (individual and combinations) and breast-feeding outcomes (duration and exclusivity) in a PC programme for low-income women. Secondary analysis of programme data. Multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazards models were used to examine associations between type and quantity of peer contacts with breast-feeding outcomes. Types of contacts included in-person (hospital or home), phone or other (e.g. mail, text). Quantities of contacts were considered 'optimal' if they adhered to standard programme guidelines. Programme data collected from 2005 to 2011 in Michigan's Breastfeeding Initiative Peer Counseling Program. Low-income (n 5886) women enrolled prenatally. For each additional home, phone and other PC contact there was a significant reduction in the hazard of discontinuing any breast-feeding by 6 months (hazard ratio (HR)=0·90 (95% CI 0·88, 0·92); HR=0·89 (95% CI 0·87, 0·90); and HR=0·93 (95% CI 0·90, 0·96), respectively) and exclusive breast-feeding by 3 months (HR=0·92 (95% CI 0·89, 0·95); HR=0·90 (95% CI 0·88, 0·91); and HR=0·93 (95% CI 0·89, 0·97), respectively). Participants receiving greater than optimal in-person and less than optimal phone contacts had a reduced hazard of any and exclusive breast-feeding discontinuation compared with those who were considered to have optimum quantities of contacts (HR=0·17 (95% CI 0·14, 0·20) and HR=0·28 (95% CI 0·23, 0·35), respectively). Specific components of a large PC programme appeared to have an appreciable impact on breast-feeding outcomes. In-person contacts were essential to improving breast-feeding outcomes, but defining optimal programme components is complex.

  8. Predictors of Non-Adherence to Breast Cancer Screening among Hospitalized Women: e0145492

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Waseem Khaliq; Ali Aamar; Scott M Wright

    2015-01-01

    .... Patients and Methods A cross sectional bedside survey was conducted to collect socio-demographic and clinical comorbidity data thought to effect breast cancer screening adherence of hospitalized women aged 50-75 years...

  9. Factors Affecting Preferences of Iranian Women for Breast Cancer Screening Based on Marketing Mix Components

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pourfarzi, Farhad; Fouladi, Nasrin; Amani, Firouz; Ahari, Saeid Sadegieh; Roshani, Zohre; Alimohammadi, Sara

    2016-01-01

    .... There is a great need for change to promote breast cancer screening among women. Social marketing is a discipline that uses the systematic application of commercial marketing techniques to promote the adoption of behavior by the target audience...

  10. Take your blood pressure to heart! Screening programme 13-17 October

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    The silent health threat, high blood pressure, can only be detected by regular blood pressure tests. In Switzerland, one in four people suffer from high blood pressure without being aware of it.  A screening programme will take place from 13 to 17 October 2014 at the Medical Service Infirmary, Building 57, from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. and from 1.30 to 4.30 p.m. Blood pressure tests, advice and general information on high blood pressure will be available to everyone working at CERN. Medical Service

  11. Breast cancer and screening in persons with an intellectual disability living in institutions in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trétarre, B; Bourgarel, S; Stoebner-Delbarre, A; Jacot, W; Bessaoud, F; Satge, D

    2017-03-01

    We aimed to describe, among a population of women with intellectual disabilities (ID) living in institutions in France, the characteristics in whom breast cancer (BC) was diagnosed and of those who participated in BC screening. Study was performed in 2009 among a random, representative sample of women with ID living in institutions in France. Participants answered a questionnaire either directly by themselves, or with the help of an intermediary. In total, 978 women with ID aged over 18 years were included, and 14 were diagnosed with BC. The incidence observed in this sample of women with ID is similar to that of the general population (standardised incidence ratio, SIR 0.857, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.42-1.53). Average age at diagnosis was 47.8 years, and the risk of developing BC before the age of 50 was 2.03% (0.4-3.66). This risk was not significantly different from that of the general population (2.4%, 1.0-3.78). Obesity was almost twice as frequent in women who had BC as compared to those without BC (43% vs. 22.5%, P = 0.0196). Among the 310 women aged >50 years and eligible for the national BC screening programme, 238 (77%) had already had at least one mammogram, and 199 had had it within the previous 2 years. Adherence to the screening programme was 64.2% (199/310) in the participating institutions. This rate was slightly higher than the national average of 62% for the same period. The results of this study show that BC is equally as frequent among women with ID living in institutions as in the general population, and occurs at around the same age. Obesity was significantly more frequent among women in whom BC was diagnosed in our study. Participation in BC screening is slightly higher among women with ID living in institutions than among the general population. © 2016 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Adding family history to faecal immunochemical testing increases the detection of advanced neoplasia in a colorectal cancer screening programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kallenberg, F. G. J.; Vleugels, J. L. A.; de Wijkerslooth, T. R.; Stegeman, I.; Stoop, E. M.; van Leerdam, M. E.; Kuipers, E. J.; Bossuyt, P. M. M.; Dekker, E.

    Background Faecal immunochemical testing (FIT) for colorectal cancer (CRC) screening has suboptimal sensitivity for detecting advanced neoplasia. To increase its performance, FIT could be combined with other risk factors. Aim To evaluate the incremental yield of a screening programme using a

  13. Adding family history to faecal immunochemical testing increases the detection of advanced neoplasia in a colorectal cancer screening programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kallenberg, F. G. J.; Vleugels, J. L. A.; de Wijkerslooth, T. R.; Stegeman, I.; Stoop, E. M.; van Leerdam, M. E.; Kuipers, E. J.; Bossuyt, P. M. M.; Dekker, E.

    2016-01-01

    Faecal immunochemical testing (FIT) for colorectal cancer (CRC) screening has suboptimal sensitivity for detecting advanced neoplasia. To increase its performance, FIT could be combined with other risk factors. To evaluate the incremental yield of a screening programme using a positive FIT or a CRC

  14. Are there characteristics of the false-negative cases from the first trimester combined screening programme for Down syndrome?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartwig, Tanja Schlaikjær; Sørensen, Steen; Jørgensen, Finn Stener

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To review if there are any characteristics of false-negative cases from the first trimester combined screening programme for Down syndrome and by that to stimulate new approaches for improvements of the screening performance. RECENT FINDINGS: We are aware of only two studies ba...

  15. The impact of Jade Goody's diagnosis and death on the NHS Cervical Screening Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancucki, L; Sasieni, P; Patnick, J; Day, T J; Vessey, M P

    2012-06-01

    In August 2008 the British reality TV star Jade Goody made public her diagnosis of cervical cancer. In February 2009 it was announced that she was terminally ill and she died a few weeks later. A surge in cervical screening attendances associated with these events was widely reported. This paper aims to quantify the size of that effect across England, its duration, and whether it affected some groups of women more than others. The Cervical Screening Programme in England. Routinely collected statistics for the months around Jade Goody's diagnosis and death were compared with those for other periods. About half a million extra cervical screening attendances occurred in England between mid-2008 and mid-2009, the period during which Jade Goody was diagnosed and died; among these were 370 attendances where the test result was suspected neoplasia. At its peak in March 2009, attendance was 70% higher than expected. Increases were seen in both initial and follow-up screening attendances and in colposcopy attendances, and at all ages, though the magnitude was greater for women aged under 50. A substantially greater proportion of the extra attendances of women aged 25-49 on routine recall occurred in women whose attendance was overdue (28% occurred at 60 months or more) and relatively little represented over-screening (8% had been screened within the last 30 months). The pattern of increased attendance mirrored the pattern of media coverage of Jade Goody's diagnosis and death. It is likely that the increased screening resulted in a number of lives saved.

  16. Does lack of resources impair access to breast and cervical cancer screening in Japan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Hiroshi; Goto, Rei; Hamashima, Chisato

    2017-01-01

    To assess the impact of the quantity of resources for breast and cervical cancer screening on the participation rates in screening in clinical settings in municipalities, as well as to clarify whether lack of resources impairs access to cancer screening in Japan. Of the 1,746 municipalities in 2010, 1,443 (82.6%) and 1,469 (84.1%) were included in the analyses for breast and cervical cancer screening, respectively. In order to estimate the effects of the number of mammography units and of gynecologists on the participation rates in breast and cervical cancer screening in clinical settings, multiple regression analyses were performed using the interaction term for urban municipalities. The average participation rate in screening in clinical settings was 6.01% for breast cancer, and was 8.93% for cervical cancer. The marginal effect of the number of mammography units per 1,000 women was significantly positive in urban municipalities (8.20 percent point). The marginal effect of the number of gynecologists per 1,000 women was significantly positive in all municipalities (2.54 percent point) and rural municipalities (3.68 percent point). Lack of mammography units in urban areas and of gynecologists particularly in rural areas impaired access to breast and cervical cancer screening. Strategies are required that quickly improve access for the residents and increase their participation rates in cancer screening.

  17. European breast cancer service screening outcomes: a first balance sheet of the benefits and harms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paci, E.; Broeders, M.J.M.; Hofvind, S.; Puliti, D.; Duffy, S.W.

    2014-01-01

    A recent comprehensive review has been carried out to quantify the benefits and harms of the European population-based mammographic screening programs. Five literature reviews were conducted on the basis of the observational published studies evaluating breast cancer mortality reduction, breast

  18. American Cancer Society guidelines for breast screening with MRI as an adjunct to mammography.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saslow, D.; Boetes, C.; Burke, W.; Harms, S.; Leach, M.O.; Lehman, C.D.; Morris, E.; Pisano, E.; Schnall, M.; Sener, S.; Smith, R.A.; Warner, E.; Yaffe, M.; Andrews, K.S.; Russell, C.A.

    2007-01-01

    New evidence on breast Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) screening has become available since the American Cancer Society (ACS) last issued guidelines for the early detection of breast cancer in 2003. A guideline panel has reviewed this evidence and developed new recommendations for women at

  19. Approaches to improving breast screening uptake: evidence and experience from Tower Hamlets

    OpenAIRE

    Eilbert, K W; Carroll, K.; Peach, J.; Khatoon, S; Basnett, I; McCulloch, N

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on an innovative whole-systems approach to improving uptake of breast screening in Tower Hamlets, a deprived borough in the East End of London with a large minority ethnic population. The approach, developed by the public health team at NHS Tower Hamlets, draws on analysis of needs and existing literature about effective interventions to promote breast screening. Social marketing research led to a campaign targeted at Bangladeshi women, together with a range of initiatives ...

  20. BMI and breast cancer prognosis benefit: mammography screening reveals differences between normal weight and overweight women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crispo, Anna; Grimaldi, Maria; D'Aiuto, Massimiliano; Rinaldo, Massimo; Capasso, Immacolata; Amore, Alfonso; D'Aiuto, Giuseppe; Giudice, Aldo; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Montella, Maurizio

    2015-02-01

    Few studies are available on the potential impact of body weight on breast cancer prognosis in screen-detected patients. Moreover, it is not known whether body mass index (BMI) could have a different prognostic impact in screen-detected versus symptomatic breast cancer patients. To investigate these unsolved issues, we carried out a retrospective study evaluating the effect of BMI on breast cancer prognosis in screen-detected vs symptomatic breast cancer patients. We conducted a follow-up study on 448 women diagnosed with incident, histologically-confirmed breast cancer. Patients were categorized according to their BMI as normal weight, overweight and obese. Disease free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS), and BMI curves were compared according to mode of cancer detection. Among screen-detected patients, higher BMI was associated with a significant lower DFS, whereas no significant difference was observed among symptomatic patients. OS showed similar results. In the multivariate analysis adjusting for age, education, tumor size, nodal status, estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and menopausal status, the risk for high level of BMI among screen-detected patients did not reach the statistical significance for either recurrence or survival. Our study highlights the potential impact of high bodyweight in breast cancer prognosis, the findings confirm that obesity plays a role in women breast cancer prognosis independently from diagnosis mode. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Survey of the Role of Combined Screening Method with Ultrasonography in the Diagnosis of Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Gharekhanloo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: The breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women and in recent years it is seen in younger ages. Because of dense breast tissue in these ages, the mammography sensitivity for breast cancer detection is reduced, so high quality ultrasonography (US as a combined screening method is effective. The aim of this study is the evaluation of the mammographic finding with the positive finding of ultrasonogarphy.Materials & Methods: In this cross-sectional study 300 cases were referred to the Mehr Medical Imaging Center for breast US and sonography of breast and axilla was performed. Mammography before or after US was also performed by another radiologist. All suspicious patients were referred for biopsy or surgery.Results: Mean age of patients was 46 y/o with the range of 32-76 y/o. Pathologic specimens approved malignancy in 21 patients and abscess in 1 patient. The most frequent symptom was palpable breast mass with mean diameter of 29 mm. Mean diameter of lymph nodes was 17.3 mm. Positive mammographic findings were seen in 85.7%and negative findings or only an asymmetric density in 14.3%.Conclusion: According to dense breast tissue especially in young women sensitivity of single screening by mammography is reduced in breast cancer detection, so combined screening with sonography and mammography especially in younger women improves the detection rate of breast carcinoma. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2011;17(4:57-60

  2. Determinants of non-compliance to recommendations on breast cancer screening among women participating in the French E3N cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flamant, Camille; Gauthier, Estelle; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise

    2006-02-01

    Evidence of the benefits of screening for breast cancer using mammography after the age of 50 is considered sufficient. Information on the determinants of compliance to the recommendations on mammography is needed to identify women to which public health messages should be specifically addressed and also to interpret results from epidemiological data in which some breast cancer cases are detected through screening programmes and others are not. The general characteristics and dietary data of French women participating in the E3N cohort study were analysed. Odds ratios of the frequency of non-compliance to recommendations on breast cancer screening were computed in women over and under the age of 50. Non-compliant women over 50 (i.e. never attenders) had a poorer access to physicians and poorer health with regard to specific risk factors even after adjustment for age and educational level. Women who were used to referring to gynaecologists early in life were better attenders later on. Logically, women under 50 who were over-screened, as compared to public health recommendations, had the opposite characteristics. Public health recommendations should be designed specifically according to targeted subgroups of women. Determinants of attendance for screening should be kept in mind in the interpretation of epidemiological studies in which some cases may be over-screened and others not.

  3. Evaluation of the Utility of Screening Mammography for High-Risk Women Undergoing Screening Breast MR Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Glen; Scaranelo, Anabel M; Aboras, Hana; Ghai, Sandeep; Kulkarni, Supriya; Fleming, Rachel; Bukhanov, Karina; Crystal, Pavel

    2017-10-01

    Purpose To evaluate the value of mammography in detecting breast cancer in high-risk women undergoing screening breast magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Materials and Methods An ethics-approved, retrospective review of prospective databases was performed to identify outcomes of 3934 screening studies (1977 screening MR imaging examinations and 1957 screening mammograms) performed between January 2012 and July 2014 in 1249 high-risk women. Performance measures including recall and cancer detection rates, sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive values were calculated for both mammography and MR imaging. Results A total of 45 cancers (33 invasive and 12 ductal carcinomas in situ) were diagnosed, 43 were seen with MR imaging and 14 with both mammography and MR imaging. Additional tests (further imaging and/or biopsy) were recommended in 461 screening MR imaging studies (recall rate, 23.3%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 21.5%, 25.2%), and mammography recalled 217 (recall rate, 11.1%; 95% CI: 9.7%, 12.6%). The cancer detection rate for MR imaging was 21.8 cancers per 1000 examinations (95% CI: 15.78, 29.19) and that for mammography was 7.2 cancers per 1000 examinations (95% CI: 3.92, 11.97; P imaging were 96% and 78% respectively, and those of mammography were 31% and 89%, respectively (P imaging recalls was 9.3% (95% CI: 6.83%, 12.36%) and that for mammography recalls was 6.5% (95% CI: 3.57%, 10.59%). Conclusion Contemporaneous screening mammography did not have added value in detection of breast cancer for women who undergo screening MR imaging. Routine use of screening mammography in women undergoing screening breast MR imaging warrants reconsideration. (©) RSNA, 2017 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  4. The transtheoretical model, health belief model, and breast cancer screening among Iranian women with a family history of breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziba Farajzadegan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Participation of Iranian women with a family history of breast cancer in breast cancer screening programs is low. This study evaluates the compliance of women having a family history of breast cancer with clinical breast exam (CBE according to the stage of transtheoretical model (TTM and health belief model (HBM. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, we used Persian version of champion's HBM scale to collect factors associated with TTM stages applied to screening from women over 20 years and older. The obtained data were analyzed by SPSS, using descriptive statistics, Chi-square test, independent t-test, and analysis of covariance. Results: Final sample size was 162 women. Thirty-three percent were in action/maintenance stage. Older women, family history of breast cancer in first-degree relatives, personal history of breast disease, insurance coverage, and a history of breast self-examination were associated with action/maintenance stage. Furthermore, women in action/maintenance stages had significantly fewer perceived barriers in terms of CBE in comparison to women in other stages (P < 0.05. There was no significant difference in other HBM subscales scores between various stages of CBE screening behavior (P < 0.05. Conclusion: The finding indicates that the rate of women in action/maintenance stage of CBE is low. Moreover, results show a strong association between perceived barriers and having a regular CBE. These clarify the necessity of promoting national target programs for breast cancer screening, which should be considered as the first preference for reducing CBE barriers.

  5. Breast cancer screening practices of African migrant women in Australia: a descriptive cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunsiji, Olayide Oluyemisi; Kwok, Cannas; Fan, Lee Chun

    2017-04-17

    Breast cancer is the most diagnosed cancer among women and a leading cause of mortality and morbidity, globally. Breast cancer mortality can be improved through routine cancer screening, yet migrant populations have lower participation rates. While African migrants are among the fastest growing migrant population in Australia, their breast cancer screening behaviour is under-studied. The aims of this study were to report breast cancer screening status of African migrant women and factors associated with their breast cancer screening behaviour in Australia. A descriptive, cross-sectional approach was utilised for this study. Two hundred and sixty four African migrant women aged 18-69 years and recruited from a number of organisations responded to a self-reported African version of the Breast Cancer Screening Beliefs Questionnaire (BCSBQ). Main research variables are breast cancer screening practices and demographic characteristics and total scores on each of the BCSBQ subscales. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to investigate the impact of the demographic variables on the likelihood of women in the target age range 50-74 years having screening practices as recommended. While most of the participants heard of breast awareness (76.1%) and mammogram (85.2%), only 11.4% practised monthly breast awareness, whereas 65.9% had ever had a mammogram as frequently as recommended. Age and employment were determining factors for participating in mammogram. Significant different scores were found in the "Practical barriers" between women at the target age who had and had not performed breast awareness (80.4 versus 77.5, p-value = 0.002) and mammogram (77.1 versus 70.3, p-value = 0.009) regularly as recommended. Moreover, attitudes towards general health check-ups subscale scores were significantly higher in women who had performed clinical breast examination as frequently as recommended than those who had not. The research reveals that practical

  6. Effect of screening mammography on breast-cancer mortality in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalager, Mette; Zelen, Marvin; Langmark, Frøydis; Adami, Hans-Olov

    2010-09-23

    A challenge in quantifying the effect of screening mammography on breast-cancer mortality is to provide valid comparison groups. The use of historical control subjects does not take into account chronologic trends associated with advances in breast-cancer awareness and treatment. The Norwegian breast-cancer screening program was started in 1996 and expanded geographically during the subsequent 9 years. Women between the ages of 50 and 69 years were offered screening mammography every 2 years. We compared the incidence-based rates of death from breast cancer in four groups: two groups of women who from 1996 through 2005 were living in counties with screening (screening group) or without screening (nonscreening group); and two historical-comparison groups that from 1986 through 1995 mirrored the current groups. We analyzed data from 40,075 women with breast cancer. The rate of death was reduced by 7.2 deaths per 100,000 person-years in the screening group as compared with the historical screening group (rate ratio, 0.72; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.63 to 0.81) and by 4.8 deaths per 100,000 person-years in the nonscreening group as compared with the historical nonscreening group (rate ratio, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.71 to 0.93; Pscreening group (P=0.13). Thus, the difference in the reduction in mortality between the current and historical groups that could be attributed to screening alone was 2.4 deaths per 100,000 person-years, or a third of the total reduction of 7.2 deaths. The availability of screening mammography was associated with a reduction in the rate of death from breast cancer, but the screening itself accounted for only about a third of the total reduction. (Funded by the Cancer Registry of Norway and the Research Council of Norway.)

  7. Performance of screening mammography: A report of the alliance for breast cancer screening in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Hye [Bucheon Hospital, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Keum Woo [Konyang University Hospital, Konyang University College of Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Joong [Gangneung Asan Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2016-07-15

    To analyze the diagnostic accuracy and trend in screening mammography in Korea. We retrospectively linked the information from hospitals participating in the Alliance of Breast Cancer Screening in Korea (ABCS-K) and the database of the National Cancer Screening Program. We calculated performance indicators, including the recall rate, cancer detection rate (CDR), positive predictive value (PPV), sensitivity, specificity, false-positive rate (FPR), and interval cancer rate (ICR). Changes in the performance indicators were calculated as the annual percent change with 95% confidence interval (CI). We enrolled 128756 cases from 10 hospitals from 2005 to 2010. The recall rate was 19.1% with a downward trend over time (-12.1% per year; 95% CI, -15.9 to -8.2). The CDR was 2.69 per 1000 examinations, without a significant trend. The PPV was 1.4% with an upward trend (20.8% per year; 95% CI, 15.2 to 26.7). The sensitivity was 86.5% without a significant trend, whereas the specificity was 81.1% with an upward trend (3.3% per year; 95% CI, 2.1 to 4.5). The FPR was 18.9% with a downward trend (-12.4% per year; 95% CI, -16.2 to -8.4). The ICR was 0.5 per 1000 negative examinations without a significant trend. There were institutional variations in the diagnostic accuracy and trend except for the CDR, sensitivity, and ICR. The sensitivity and CDR of screening mammography in the ABCS-K from 2005 to 2010 were compatible with those for Western women. The recall rate, PPV and specificity, however, were suboptimal, although they showed significant improvements over this period. A further analysis is required to explain institutional variations.

  8. Screening sensitivity and sojourn time from breast cancer early detection clinical trials: mammograms and physical examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Y; Zelen, M

    2001-08-01

    To estimate sensitivities of breast cancer screening modalities and preclinical duration of the disease from eight breast cancer screening clinical trials. Screening programs invariably lead to diagnosis of disease before signs or symptoms are present. Two key quantities of screening programs are the sensitivity of the disease detection modality and the mean sojourn time (MST). The observed screening histories in a periodically screened cohort make it possible to estimate these quantities of interest. We applied recently developed statistical methods to data from eight randomized breast cancer screening trials to estimate the sensitivities of early detection modalities and MST. Moreover, when a screening trial involved two screening modalities, our methods enabled the estimation of the individual sensitivity of each screening modality. We analyzed breast cancer data from several screening trials and have relatively complete data from the Health Insurance Plan (HIP), Edinburgh, and two Canadian studies. The screening sensitivity for mammography, physical examination, and MST were, respectively, HIP: 0.39, 0.47, and 2.5 years; Edinburgh: 0.63, 0.40, and 4.3 years; Canadian (age 40 to 49 at entry): 0.61, 0.59, and 1.9 years; Canadian (age 50 to 59 at entry): 0.66, 0.39, and 3.1 years. The public debate on early breast cancer detection is mainly centered on mammograms. However, the current study indicates that a physical examination is of comparable importance. Cautious interpretation of trial differences is required as a result of various experimental designs and the age dependency of screening sensitivity and MST.

  9. Mammographic density and structural features can individually and jointly contribute to breast cancer risk assessment in mammography screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkel, Rikke Rass; von Euler-Chelpin, My Catarina; Nielsen, Mads

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mammographic density is a well-established risk factor for breast cancer. We investigated the association between three different methods of measuring density or parenchymal pattern/texture on digitized film-based mammograms, and examined to what extent textural features independently...... and jointly with density can improve the ability to identify screening women at increased risk of breast cancer. METHODS: The study included 121 cases and 259 age- and time matched controls based on a cohort of 14,736 women with negative screening mammograms from a population-based screening programme...... individually able to segregate women into different risk groups showing significant ORs for BI-RADS D3 and D4 (OR: 2.37; 1.32-4.25 and 3.93; 1.88-8.20), Tabár's PIII and PIV (OR: 3.23; 1.20-8.75 and 4.40; 2.31-8.38), and the highest quartile of the texture score (3.04; 1.63-5.67). AUCs for BI-RADS, Tabár...

  10. Testing novel patient financial incentives to increase breast cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrick, Elizabeth Levy; Hodgkin, Dominic; Horgan, Constance M; Lorenz, Laura S; Panas, Lee; Ritter, Grant A; Kasuba, Paul; Poskanzer, Debra; Nefussy, Renee Altman

    2015-11-01

    To examine the effects of 3 types of low-cost financial incentives for patients, including a novel "person-centered" approach on breast cancer screening (mammogram) rates. Randomized controlled trial with 4 arms: 3 types of financial incentives ($15 gift card, entry into lottery for $250 gift card, and a person-centered incentive with choice of $15 gift card or lottery) and a control group. Sample included privately insured Tufts Health Plan members in Massachusetts who were women aged 42 to 69 years with no mammogram claim in ≥ 2.6 years. A sample of 4700 eligible members were randomized to 4 study arms. The control group received a standard reminder letter and the incentive groups received a reminder letter plus an incentive offer for obtaining a mammogram within the next 4 months. Bivariate tests and multivariate logistic regression were used to assess the incentives' impact on mammogram receipt. Data were analyzed for 4427 members (after exclusions such as undeliverable mail). The percent of members receiving a mammogram during the study was 11.7% (gift card), 12.1% (lottery), 13.4% (person-centered/choice), and 11.9% (controls). Differences were not statistically significant in bivariate or multivariate full-sample analyses. In exploratory subgroup analyses of members with a mammogram during the most recent year prior to the study-defined gap, person-centered incentives were associated with a higher likelihood of mammogram receipt. None of the low-cost incentives tested had a statistically significant effect on mammogram rates in the full sample. Exploratory findings for members who were more recently screened suggest that they may be more responsive to person-centered incentives.

  11. Confirmatory factor analysis of the Chinese Breast Cancer Screening Beliefs Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Cannas; Fethney, Judith; White, Kate

    2012-01-01

    Chinese women have been consistently reported as having low breast cancer screening practices. The Chinese Breast Cancer Screening Beliefs Questionnaire (CBCSB) was designed to assess Chinese Australian women's beliefs, knowledge, and attitudes toward breast cancer and screening practices. The objectives of the study were to confirm the factor structure of the CBCSB with a new, larger sample of immigrant Chinese Australian women and to report its clinical validity. A convenience sample of 785 Chinese Australian women was recruited from Chinese community organizations and shopping malls. Cronbach α was used to assess internal consistency reliability, and Amos v18 was used for confirmatory factor analysis. Clinical validity was assessed through linear regression using SPSS v18. The 3-factor structure of the CBCSB was confirmed, although the model required re