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Sample records for breast radiotherapy start

  1. Late normal tissue effects in the arm and shoulder following lymphatic radiotherapy: Results from the UK START (Standardisation of Breast Radiotherapy) trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haviland, Joanne S; Mannino, Mariella; Griffin, Clare; Porta, Nuria; Sydenham, Mark; Bliss, Judith M; Yarnold, John R

    2018-01-01

    Adjuvant lymphatic radiotherapy (LNRT) is recommended for selected axillary node positive women with early breast cancer. We investigated whether hypofractionated LNRT is safe combined with similarly-hypofractionated breast/chest wall radiotherapy (RT). The Standardisation of Breast Radiotherapy (START) pilot, A and B trials randomised women with early breast cancer to schedules of 2.67-3.3 Gy versus 2.0 Gy fractions (control). RT adverse effects were assessed by patients using the EORTC QLQ-BR23 and protocol-specific questions, and by physicians. Rates of arm/shoulder effects were compared between schedules for patients given LNRT. 864/5861 (14.7%) patients received LNRT (385 START-pilot, 318 START-A, 161 START-B). Prevalences of moderate/marked arm/shoulder effects were low up to 10 years. There were no significant differences between the hypofractionated and control groups for patient- and physician-assessed symptoms in START-A or START-B. In START-pilot, adverse effect rates were higher after 13 fractions of 3.3 Gy, consistent with effects reported in the breast/chest wall (significant for shoulder stiffness, HR 3.07, 95%CI 1.62-5.83, p = 0.001). The START trial results suggest that appropriately-dosed hypofractionated LNRT is safe in the long-term, according to patient and physician-assessed arm and shoulder symptoms. These findings are consistent with those reported after the same schedules delivered to the breast/chest wall. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Radiotherapy of breast fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heibel, J.H.

    1979-01-01

    In a retrospective study radiotherapy of breast fibrosis in hormone-treated men with histologically confirmed prostate carcinoma was examined. 10 patients had received hormones even before irradiation, 113 obtained hormone administration only after irradiation. The objective size of the glandular body and the overall size of the breast were measured with a special method developed by the author. 46 patients indicated complaints. With hypertrophic mamma and hypertrophic mamilla in 67 examined patients, 127 different symptoms resulted in total. Four patients of the group who had obtained hormones before irradiation, suffered from subjective symptoms. It resulted that radiotherapy of breast fibrosis carried out during hormone treatment is no gynecomastia prophylaxis, that already existent mamma hypertrophies are irreversible, but that existent sensations were notably reduced within 6 months after irradiation therapy. These results indicate the necessity of a radiotherapy of the mamma fibrosis before the hormone treatment is begun. Particularly in cases of higher operative risks, also the possibility of preferring radiotherapy to mastectomy should be fully utilized, in view of adequate or even better therapeutic results. (orig./MG) [de

  3. Breast cancer radiotherapy: controversies and prospectives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Jin-ming; WANG Yong-sheng

    2008-01-01

    @@ Despite consensus on breast cancer radiotherapy, there are still some controversies over post-mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) in patients with 1-3 positive lymph nodes, accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI), appropriate sequence of radiotherapy, chemotherapy and hormonal treatment, and radiotherapy after preoperative systemic therapy.

  4. Breast post-radiotherapy angiosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavez, O.; Ocampo, P.; Repetto, M.; Schulz, D.; Rompato, S.; Batagelj, E.; Spadavecchia, G.

    2007-01-01

    Breast angiosarcoma after radiotherapy represents a rare pathology that have been increasing in the recent years because of the tendency to treat breast cancer with conservative therapeutic treatments. The forecast depends on the histological degree being the majority of high degree, with frequent lymphatic and local recurrences plus distance metastasis. The selected treatment is the mastectomy and also should be considered the adjuvant chemotherapy [es

  5. Intraoperative radiotherapy in breast cancer: literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfaro Hidalgo, Sabrina A.

    2013-01-01

    A literature review was performed on intraoperative radiotherapy of breast cancer. The strength and attractiveness is established of techniques of partial irradiation in the treatment of breast cancer. The benefit is originated to restrict the area immediate of radiotherapy to the tumor bed or quadrant index and identifying the benefit of being applied during the radiotherapy while surgical lumpectomy. The impact of local recurrence has been established using intraoperative radiotherapy. The advantages of intraoperative radiotherapy was compared in the management of the conservative surgery in early stages of breast cancer with external radiotherapy. Different methods of intraoperative radiotherapy have been compared and individual impact on local recurrence ranges. Intraoperative radiotherapy has had many advantages: radiobiological, technical, clinical, psychological and economical in the handling of conservative surgery in early stages of breast cancer, compared with external radiotherapy [es

  6. Dermatologic radiotherapy and breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldschmidt, H.; Gorson, R.O.; Lassen, M.

    1982-01-01

    This study was set up to provide quantitative data to evaluate unsubstantiated claims that improper dermatologic radiation techniques may cause breast cancer. A thin mylar window ionization rate meter placed at the location of the right breast of an Alderson-RANDO anthropomorphic phantom was used to measure direct and scatter radiation reaching the female breast during radiotherapy of the facial region (as given for acne). The results indicate that scatter doses are very small; they are influenced by radiation quality and the use or nonuse of a treatment cone. Quantitative risk estimates show that the very small risk of breast cancer induction can be reduced even further by the use of proper radiation protection measures. (orig.)

  7. Dermatologic radiotherapy and breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldschmidt, H.; Gorson, R.O.; Lassen, M.

    1982-03-01

    This study was set up to provide quantitative data to evaluate unsubstantiated claims that improper dermatologic radiation techniques may cause breast cancer. A thin mylar window ionization rate meter placed at the location of the right breast of an Alderson-RANDO anthropomorphic phantom was used to measure direct and scatter radiation reaching the female breast during radiotherapy of the facial region (as given for acne). The results indicate that scatter doses are very small; they are influenced by radiation quality and the use or nonuse of a treatment cone. Quantitative risk estimates show that the very small risk of breast cancer induction can be reduced even further by the use of proper radiation protection measures.

  8. Intraoperative Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleanor E. R. Harris

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT for early stage breast cancer is a technique for partial breast irradiation. There are several technologies in clinical use to perform breast IORT. Regardless of technique, IORT generally refers to the delivery of a single dose of radiation to the periphery of the tumor bed in the immediate intraoperative time frame, although some protocols have performed IORT as a second procedure. There are two large prospective randomized trials establishing the safety and efficacy of breast IORT in early stage breast cancer patients with sufficient follow-up time on thousands of women. The advantages of IORT for partial breast irradiation include: direct visualization of the target tissue ensuring treatment of the high-risk tissue and eliminating the risk of marginal miss; the use of a single dose coordinated with the necessary surgical excision thereby reducing omission of radiation and the selection of mastectomy for women without access to a radiotherapy facility or unable to undergo several weeks of daily radiation; favorable toxicity profiles; patient convenience and cost savings; radiobiological and tumor microenvironment conditions which lead to enhanced tumor control. The main disadvantage of IORT is the lack of final pathologic information on the tumor size, histology, margins, and nodal status. When unexpected findings on final pathology such as positive margins or positive sentinel nodes predict a higher risk of local or regional recurrence, additional whole breast radiation may be indicated, thereby reducing some of the convenience and low-toxicity advantages of sole IORT. However, IORT as a tumor bed boost has also been studied and appears to be safe with acceptable toxicity. IORT has potential efficacy advantages related to overall survival related to reduced cardiopulmonary radiation doses. It may also be very useful in specific situations, such as prior to oncoplastic reconstruction to improve accuracy of

  9. Radiotherapy for breast cancer and pacemaker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menard, J.; Campana, F.; Bollet, M.A.; Dendale, R.; Fournier-Bidoz, N.; Marchand, V.; Mazal, A.; Fourquet, A.; Kirova, Y.M.; Kirov, K.M.; Esteve, M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. - Patients with permanent cardiac pacemakers occasionally require radiotherapy. Therapeutic Irradiation may cause pacemakers to malfunction due to the effects of ionizing radiation or electromagnetic interference. We studied the breast cancer patients who needed breast and/or chest wall and lymph node irradiation to assess the feasibility and tolerance in this population of patients. Patients and methods. - From November 2008 to December 2009, more than 900 patients received radiotherapy for their breast cancer in our department using megavoltage linear accelerator (X 4-6 MV and electrons). Among them, seven patients were with permanent pacemaker. All patients have been treated to the breast and chest wall and/or lymph nodes. Total dose to breast and/or chest wall was 50 Gy/25 fractions and 46 Gy/23 fractions to lymph nodes. Patients who underwent conserving surgery followed by breast irradiation were boosted when indicated to tumour bed with 16 Gy/8 fractions. All patients were monitored everyday in presence of radiation oncologist to follow the function of their pacemaker. All pacemakers were controlled before and after radiotherapy by the patients' cardiologist. Results. - Seven patients were referred in our department for postoperative breast cancer radiotherapy. Among them, only one patient was declined for radiotherapy and underwent mastectomy without radiotherapy. In four cases the pacemaker was repositioned before the beginning of radiotherapy. Six patients, aged between 48 and 84 years underwent irradiation for their breast cancer. Four patients were treated with conserving surgery followed by breast radiotherapy and two with mastectomy followed by chest wall and internal mammary chain, supra- and infra-clavicular lymph node irradiation. The dose to the pacemaker generator was kept below 2 Gy. There was no pacemaker dysfunction observed during the radiotherapy. Conclusion. - The multidisciplinary work with position change of the pacemaker before

  10. Differences in breast tissue oxygenation following radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dornfeld, Ken; Gessert, Charles E.; Renier, Colleen M.; McNaney, David D.; Urias, Rodolfo E.; Knowles, Denise M.; Beauduy, Jean L.; Widell, Sherry L.; McDonald, Bonita L.

    2011-01-01

    Tissue perfusion and oxygenation changes following radiotherapy may result from and/or contribute to the toxicity of treatment. Breast tissue oxygenation levels were determined in the treated and non-treated breast 1 year after radiotherapy for breast conserving treatment. Transcutaneous oxygenation varied between subjects in both treated and non-treated breast. Subjects without diabetes mellitus (n = 16) had an average oxygenation level of 64.8 ± 19.9 mmHg in the irradiated breast and an average of 72.3 ± 18.1 mmHg (p = 0.018) at the corresponding location in the control breast. Patients with diabetes (n = 4) showed a different oxygenation pattern, with lower oxygenation levels in control tissue and no decrease in the irradiated breast. This study suggests oxygenation levels in normal tissues vary between patients and may respond differently after radiotherapy.

  11. Radiotherapy for advanced breast cancer. Immediate results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lederman, M.V.; Silveira Filho, L.; Martorelli Filho, B.

    1976-01-01

    Seventy-four patients with advanced breast cancer were submited to local radiotherapy of the affected regions. The response of 155 metastatic lesions are recorded. Early results are good, with objective and functional clinical improvement [pt

  12. Estimating the Risks of Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taylor, Carolyn; Correa, Candace; Duane, Frances K

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Radiotherapy reduces the absolute risk of breast cancer mortality by a few percentage points in suitable women but can cause a second cancer or heart disease decades later. We estimated the absolute long-term risks of modern breast cancer radiotherapy. Methods First, a systematic literature...... review was performed of lung and heart doses in breast cancer regimens published during 2010 to 2015. Second, individual patient data meta-analyses of 40,781 women randomly assigned to breast cancer radiotherapy versus no radiotherapy in 75 trials yielded rate ratios (RRs) for second primary cancers...... and cause-specific mortality and excess RRs (ERRs) per Gy for incident lung cancer and cardiac mortality. Smoking status was unavailable. Third, the lung or heart ERRs per Gy in the trials and the 2010 to 2015 doses were combined and applied to current smoker and nonsmoker lung cancer and cardiac mortality...

  13. Radiotherapy for advanced breast cancer. Immediate results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lederman, M V; Silveira Filho, L; Martorelli Filho, B [Sao Paulo Univ. (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina

    1976-01-01

    Seventy-four patients with advanced breast cancer were submited to local radiotherapy of the affected regions. The response of 155 metastatic lesions are recorded. Early results are good, with objective and functional clinical improvement.

  14. Intensity modulated radiotherapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riou, O.; Fenoglietto, P.; Lemanski, C.; Azria, D.

    2012-01-01

    Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is a technique allowing dose escalation and normal tissue sparing for various cancer types. For breast cancer, the main goals when using IMRT were to improve dose homogeneity within the breast and to enhance coverage of complex target volumes. Nonetheless, better heart and lung protections are achievable with IMRT as compared to standard irradiation for difficult cases. Three prospective randomized controlled trials of IMRT versus standard treatment showed that a better breast homogeneity can translate into better overall cosmetic results. Dosimetric and clinical studies seem to indicate a benefit of IMRT for lymph nodes irradiation, bilateral treatment, left breast and chest wall radiotherapy, or accelerated partial breast irradiation. The multiple technical IMRT solutions available tend to indicate a widespread use for breast irradiation. Nevertheless, indications for breast IMRT should be personalized and selected according to the expected benefit for each individual. (authors)

  15. Risk-adapted targeted intraoperative radiotherapy versus whole-breast radiotherapy for breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaidya, Jayant S; Wenz, Frederik; Bulsara, Max

    2014-01-01

    The TARGIT-A trial compared risk-adapted radiotherapy using single-dose targeted intraoperative radiotherapy (TARGIT) versus fractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for breast cancer. We report 5-year results for local recurrence and the first analysis of overall survival....

  16. Breast cellulitis after conservative surgery and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rescigno, J.; McCormick, B.; Brown, A.E.; Myskowski, P.L.

    1994-01-01

    Cellulitis is a previously unreported complication of conservative surgery and radiation therapy for early stage breast cancer. Patients who presented with breast cellulitis after conservative therapy are described. Eleven patients that developed cellulitis of the breast over a 38-month period of observation are the subject of this report. Clinical characteristics of patients with cellulitis and their treatment and outcome are reported. Potential patient and treatment-related correlates for the development of cellulitis are analyzed. The risk of cellulitis persists years after initial breast cancer therapy. The clinical course of the patients was variable: some patients required aggressive, long-duration antibiotic therapy, while others had rapid resolution with antibiotics. Three patients suffered from multiple episodes of cellulitis. Patients with breast cancer treated with conservative surgery and radiotherapy are at risk for breast cellulitis. Systematic characterization of cases of cellulitis may provide insight into diagnosis, prevention, and more effective therapy for this uncommon complication. 15 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  17. Radiotherapy in breast cancer and its prognosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitter, Mihir

    1980-01-01

    Various aspects of breast cancer are discussed. These include clinical staging, histological grading, site of growth, frequency and lactation, immunological response and prognosis, and survival of untreated cases. Importance of early detection is emphasised and prognosis after radiotherapy alone or in combination with surgery is briefly discussed. (M.G.B.)

  18. Breast Cancer Radiotherapy Associated Diabetes Mellitus Case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Primary breast cancer when detected early can be treated by radical mastectomy alone. However, 20-30% of women treated as such later on, develop local or regional recurrence. This leads to an additional treatment with radiotherapy by the oncologist for the sake of the 20-30% of patients that may need it postoperatively.

  19. Pregnancy and radiotherapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karasawa, Kumiko

    2013-01-01

    Cancer in pregnancy is relatively uncommon but breast cancer is one of the most common malignancy occur with pregnancy. Prescribed doses of radiotherapy are significantly higher than those of diagnostic procedures. Fetal exposure and damage can occur during radiotherapy within target area. Because of those risks, radiotherapy during pregnancy is basically has to avoid. Even though, feral damage depends on fetal dose and has some threshold dose. Practically, even in stochastic effect, there are some minimal doses. A most important point is careful estimation of fetal dose before radiation. The physician has to inform the patient about risk and benefit of radiotherapy to fetus and to mother and have an ethical balance to help the mother and family to make a final decision. (author)

  20. Quadrantectomy and adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabriele, A.M.; Boidi Trotti, A.; Tardy, A.

    1987-01-01

    The conservative treatment of early breast cancer always requires irradiation of residual mammary tissue. The preliminary results obtained in 45 early breast cancer patients, who received quadrantectomy plus axillary dissection, followed by radiation of residual breast are reported. Radiation was performed by the two opposed field technique. In some cases the residual breast tissue was compressed using a special accessory provided with the Theratron 780. In addition to the tumor dose of 50 GY, 10 GY boots was added to the surgical scar using 7 MeV electrons. The 6 patients with positive axillary nodes received 6 courses of adjuvant chemotherapy (CMF) after radiotherapy. All patients are currently alive and free of disease. The 64% (29 patients) were followed up for at least 5 years, and 36% (16 patients) for at least 3 years. Only 2 cases of local recurrence were encountered (4,4%). The esthetic result was satisfactory in all cases. No side effects due to treatment were noted

  1. Metaplastic carcinoma. Breast. Relapse. Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marquez, A.; Terrasa, J.; Garcia, J.M.; Rifa, J.

    1996-01-01

    Metaplastic carcinoma of the breast is a rare tumor. The appearance of unexpected mesenchymal elements within the epithelial tumors is the squamous metaplasia. These tumors have a different clinical behaviour that classical breast carcinoma. We present a case of metaplastic mammary carcinoma with multiple relapses treated with a combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The use of chemotherapy after local treatment has enhanced the relapse-free survival. The combined treatment modality seems to produce some benefit in the management of the local relapses of this neoplasms

  2. Radiotherapy in Locoregional Recurrent Breast Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Sung Whan; Yang, Mi Gyoung; Chung, Woong Ki; Park, Charn Il; Bang, Yung Jue; Kim, Noe Kyung; Choe, Kuk Jin

    1988-01-01

    Thirty eight women with recurrent breast carcinoma involving chest wall and/or regional lymph nodes after surgery with or without systemic therapy were treated with radiation between 1979 and 1986. Among them, 5 patients were excluded from analysis because of incomplete treatment. The median follow up of survivors was 30 months (ranged 1-79 months). Fifteen (45%) patients had their disease confined to the chest wall and eighteen patients had lymph node involvement as some of their locoregional recurrent disease. Within 36 months after the initial treatment, 87% of recurrences manifested themselves. All patients had radiotherapy to at least the site of involvement. In 8 patients, recurrent tumors were treated with complete excision followed by radiation. Of the remaining 25 patients, 18(72%) had complete response (CR) following radiotherapy. The actuarial 3-year survival of all patients following locoregional recurrence was 50%. Three year survival was 24% in those 25 patients who had recurrences within 24 months of the initial treatment. For those 8 patients whose recurrences occurred after more than 24 month disease free interval, the 3-year survival was 100%. For those patients with recurrences confined to chest wall alone, 3-year survival was 57%. The patients who had lymph node involvement as part of their locoregional recurrences had a 43% 3-year survival. The majority of them developed distant metastases. Those patients who had a CR showed 63% 3-year survival. On the other hand, 1 year survival was only 33% for those patients who had a less than CR. Three patients developed carcinoma of the contralateral breast following radiotherapy. Three year survival following locoregional recurrence was 40% for patients whose initial treatment for their primary breast carcinoma was surgery and adjuvant systemic therapy. For those patients whose primary breast carcinoma was treated by surgery alone, the 3-year survival following locoregional recurrence was 71%. In

  3. Sector resection with and without radiotherapy in early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmberg, L.

    1989-01-01

    In 1982 a prospective, multicentre randomized trial of breast preserving surgery for invasive histopathological stage I breast cancer was started in the Uppsala-Oerebro health care region in Sweden. After identical preoperative investigation and surgical treatment, patients are randomly allocated to receive postoperative radiation with 54 Gy to the remaining breast for five weeks, or to serve as controls. The primary aim of the trial is to determine whether a standardized surgical technique aiming at local tumour radicality can reduce the rate of local recurrence to an acceptable level without postoperative radiotherapy. In December 1987 a second trial was initiated, with an almost identical design but including women with tumours mammographically 21-30 mm in diameter and with histopathologically negative nodes. The first trial is near the termination of patient accrual. Studies of the cosmetic result and of the psychosocial adjustment after breast conserving therapy as compared with mastectomy have been coupled to the trials. Among 263 patients who answered a questionnaire, 96.5% found the new appearance of the treated breast good or acceptable. The psychosocial adjustment was assessed in semi-structured interviews 4 and 13 months postoperatively in 99 women, 37 of whom underwent breast conserving surgery and the remainder modified radical mastectomy. There was a consistent but statistically non-significant tendency for the conservatively treated women to adjust better. Overall 5% of the women in the conservatively treated group and 22% of the mastectomized women are still suffering substantial psychosocial disturbance after 13 months. (orig.)

  4. Late toxicity in breast cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Coletti, F.; Rafailovici, L.; Filomia, M.L.; Chiozza, J.; Dosoretz, B.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The aim of this study is to describe and classify chronic complications due to radiotherapy in breast cancer. Also the impact of radiotherapy on the quality of life of patients is evaluated. Materials and methods: 50 patients with breast cancer at early stages (78% in situ, 22% I and II) treated with radiotherapy in breast volume plus boost (45/50 Gy + 18/20 Gy) with a follow up over 5 years. Acute toxicities were found retrospectively and chronic toxicities were assessed though physical examination and review of complementary studies. To facilitate data collection, pre printed forms were used. Bibliographic searches were made. Results: 10% received chemotherapy and 64% tamoxifen. The predominant chronic toxicity were found in skin (66%), although grade I and II (hyperpigmentation 26%, dryness 22%, telangiectasia 10% fibrosis, 4%, other 4%). A 50% of the patients showed hypoesthesia in ipsilateral upper limb. The other toxicities were presented in low rate and magnitude: mastodynia 16%; actinic pneumonitis 4%, pyrosis 4%, Tachycardia 2%, among others. Of the patients with acute toxicity, only 30% were grade III. The 70% of the patients had a positive impact of radiotherapy on quality of life. Conclusions: We found low rates and degrees of late toxicity. It was noticed a relationship between acute and chronic toxicity, because those who presented adverse effects during treatment developed late effects. It reflects the importance of integrating monitoring as part of radiation treatment. It should be adopted a single score of late toxicity measurement to unify data from different series. (authors) [es

  5. Leukemia risk following radiotherapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, R.E.; Boice, J.D. Jr.; Stovall, M.; Flannery, J.T.; Moloney, W.C.

    1989-01-01

    To evaluate further the relationship between high-dose radiotherapy and leukemia incidence, a nested case-control study was conducted in a cohort of 22,753 women who were 18-month survivors of invasive breast cancer diagnosed from 1935 to 1972. Women treated for breast cancer after 1973 were excluded to minimize the possible confounding influence of treatment with chemotherapeutic agents. The cases had histologically confirmed leukemia reported to the Connecticut Tumor Registry (CTR) between 1935 and 1984. A total of 48 cases of leukemia following breast cancer were included in the study. Two controls were individually matched to each leukemia case on the basis of age, calendar year when diagnosed with breast cancer, and survival time. Leukemia diagnoses were verified by one hematologist. Radiation dose to active bone marrow was estimated by medical physicists on the basis of the original radiotherapy records of study subjects. Local radiation doses to each of the 16 bone marrow components for each patient were reconstructed; the dose averaged over the entire body was 530 rad (5.3 Gy). Based on this dosage and assuming a linear relationship between dose and affect, a relative risk (RR) in excess of 10 would have been expected. However, there was little evidence that radiotherapy increased the overall risk of leukemia (RR = 1.16; 90% confidence interval [CI], 0.6 to 2.1). The risk of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, one of the few malignancies without evidence for an association with ionizing radiation, was not significantly increased (RR = 1.8; n = 10); nor was the risk for all other forms of leukemia (RR = 1.0; n = 38). There was no indication that risk varied over categories of radiation dose

  6. Quality assurance in radiotherapy: analysis of the causes of not starting or early radiotherapy withdrawal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arenas, Meritxell; Sabater, Sebastià; Gascón, Marina; Henríquez, Ivan; Bueno, M José; Rius, Àngels; Rovirosa, Àngels; Gómez, David; Lafuerza, Anna; Biete, Albert; Colomer, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the reasons for not starting or for early of radiotherapy at the Radiation Oncology Department. All radiotherapy treatments from March 2010 to February 2012 were included. Early withdrawals from treatment those that never started recorded. Clinical, demographic and dosimetric variables were also noted. From a total of 3250 patients treated and reviewed, 121 (4%) did not start or complete the planned treatment. Of those, 63 (52%) did not receive any radiotherapy fraction and 58 (48%) did not complete the course, 74% were male and 26% were female. The mean age was 67 ± 13 years. The most common primary tumour was lung (28%), followed by rectum (16%). The aim of treatment was 62% radical and 38% palliative, 44% of patients had metastases; the most common metastatic site was bone, followed by brain. In 38% of cases (46 patients) radiotherapy was administered concomitantly with chemotherapy (10 cases (22%) were rectal cancers). The most common reason for not beginning or for early withdrawal of treatment was clinical progression (58/121, 48%). Of those, 43% died (52/121), 35 of them because of the progression of the disease and 17 from other causes. Incomplete treatment regimens were due to toxicity (12/121 (10%), of which 10 patients underwent concomitant chemotherapy for rectal cancer). The number of patients who did not complete their course of treatment is low, which shows good judgement in indications and patient selection. The most common reason for incomplete treatments was clinical progression. Rectal cancer treated with concomitant chemotherapy was the most frequent reason of the interruption of radiotherapy for toxicity

  7. Osteoradionecrosis of the Ribs following Breast Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke Nicholls

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Osteoradionecrosis (ORN of the chest wall is a rare complication after whole-breast radiotherapy (RT. Herein, we report a case of ORN involving the underlying ribs following adjuvant whole-breast RT using standard fractionation and conduct a review of the literature. Case Report: A previously well 43-year-old female with right-sided, early-stage, node-negative breast cancer was treated with breast-conserving surgery. She subsequently underwent adjuvant whole-breast RT receiving 50 Gy in 25 fractions over 5 weeks using standard tangential photon fields with 6 MV photons followed by an electron boost of 10 Gy in 5 fractions according to International Commission on Radiation Units (ICRU requirements. Eleven months after RT, the patient developed right lateral chest wall pain, with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI demonstrating two fractures involving the underlying right fifth and sixth ribs associated with fatty marrow changes in the second to sixth ribs, thus raising the possibility of ORN. Treatments including hyperbaric oxygen, pentoxifylline and vitamin E were used with symptomatic improvements. There was demonstrable resolution on follow-up MRI at 2.5 years. Conclusion: The incidence of ORN utilising modern RT techniques and standard fractionation is rare. Numerous treatments are available, with variable response rates. Emerging evidence of predictive gene profiling to estimate the risk of radiation sensitivity may assist in individualising preventative strategies to mitigate the risk of ORN.

  8. DEGRO practical guidelines. Radiotherapy of breast cancer I. Radiotherapy following breast conserving therapy for invasive breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedlmayer, F.

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: The aim of the present paper is to update the practical guidelines for postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy of breast cancer published in 2007 by the breast cancer expert panel of the German Society for Radiooncology (Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Radioonkologie, DEGRO). The present recommendations are based on a revision of the German interdisciplinary S-3 guidelines published in July 2012. Methods: A comprehensive survey of the literature concerning radiotherapy following breast conserving therapy (BCT) was performed using the search terms 'breast cancer', 'radiotherapy', and 'breast conserving therapy'. Data from lately published meta-analyses, recent randomized trials, and guidelines of international breast cancer societies, yielding new aspects compared to 2007, provided the basis for defining recommendations according to the criteria of evidence-based medicine. In addition to the more general statements of the DKG (Deutsche Krebsgesellschaft), this paper addresses indications, target definition, dosage, and technique of radiotherapy of the breast after conservative surgery for invasive breast cancer. Results: Among numerous reports on the effect of radiotherapy during BCT published since the last recommendations, the recent EBCTCG report builds the largest meta-analysis so far available. In a 15 year follow-up on 10,801 patients, whole breast irradiation (WBI) halves the average annual rate of disease recurrence (RR 0.52, 0.48-0.56) and reduces the annual breast cancer death rate by about one sixth (RR 0.82, 0.75-0.90), with a similar proportional, but different absolute benefit in prognostic subgroups (EBCTCG 2011). Furthermore, there is growing evidence that risk-adapted dose augmentation strategies to the tumor bed as well as the implementation of high precision RT techniques (e.g., intraoperative radiotherapy) contribute substantially to a further reduction of local relapse rates. A main focus of ongoing research lies in partial breast

  9. Determinants of variability in waiting times for radiotherapy in the treatment of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouche, Gauthier; Ingrand, Isabelle; Mathoulin-Pelissier, Simone; Ingrand, Pierre; Breton-Callu, Christel; Migeot, Virginie

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To examine psycho-social and geographic determinants of delay in starting radiotherapy in early invasive breast cancer patients. Material and methods: Waiting time was defined as the time elapsed until the beginning of radiotherapy, starting from the date of surgery (in absence of chemotherapy) or from the end of chemotherapy. Results: Eight hundred and ninety six women aged 24-89 took part in the study. Mean waiting times were 52 days (sd = 19) between surgery and radiotherapy and 31 days (sd = 14) between chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Differences between radiotherapy centres (p < 0.0001) accounted for 30% and 12%, respectively, of total variance in waiting times. Using a multivariate mixed analysis that took into account intra-centre correlation, the time between surgery and radiotherapy was shorter for young patients (p = 0.020), those who had sought information about their illness (p = 0.024) and those who had undergone surgery and radiotherapy in the same centre (p = 0.021). On the other hand, no patient characteristic was associated with the time between chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Conclusion: Centre is the major factor that explained longer waiting times in radiotherapy, emphasising the structural hypothesis. It is important to pursue initiatives to improve the organization within radiotherapy centres and then to verify that these initiatives have succeeded in shortening waiting times.

  10. Radiotherapy for breast cancer and pacemaker; Radiotherapie pour un cancer du sein et stimulateur cardiaque

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menard, J.; Campana, F.; Bollet, M.A.; Dendale, R.; Fournier-Bidoz, N.; Marchand, V.; Mazal, A.; Fourquet, A.; Kirova, Y.M. [Oncologie-radiotherapie, institut Curie, 26, rue d' Ulm, 75005 Paris (France); Kirov, K.M.; Esteve, M. [Departement d' anesthesie-reanimation-douleur, institut Curie, 75005 Paris (France)

    2011-06-15

    Purpose. - Patients with permanent cardiac pacemakers occasionally require radiotherapy. Therapeutic Irradiation may cause pacemakers to malfunction due to the effects of ionizing radiation or electromagnetic interference. We studied the breast cancer patients who needed breast and/or chest wall and lymph node irradiation to assess the feasibility and tolerance in this population of patients. Patients and methods. - From November 2008 to December 2009, more than 900 patients received radiotherapy for their breast cancer in our department using megavoltage linear accelerator (X 4-6 MV and electrons). Among them, seven patients were with permanent pacemaker. All patients have been treated to the breast and chest wall and/or lymph nodes. Total dose to breast and/or chest wall was 50 Gy/25 fractions and 46 Gy/23 fractions to lymph nodes. Patients who underwent conserving surgery followed by breast irradiation were boosted when indicated to tumour bed with 16 Gy/8 fractions. All patients were monitored everyday in presence of radiation oncologist to follow the function of their pacemaker. All pacemakers were controlled before and after radiotherapy by the patients' cardiologist. Results. - Seven patients were referred in our department for postoperative breast cancer radiotherapy. Among them, only one patient was declined for radiotherapy and underwent mastectomy without radiotherapy. In four cases the pacemaker was repositioned before the beginning of radiotherapy. Six patients, aged between 48 and 84 years underwent irradiation for their breast cancer. Four patients were treated with conserving surgery followed by breast radiotherapy and two with mastectomy followed by chest wall and internal mammary chain, supra- and infra-clavicular lymph node irradiation. The dose to the pacemaker generator was kept below 2 Gy. There was no pacemaker dysfunction observed during the radiotherapy. Conclusion. - The multidisciplinary work with position change of the pacemaker

  11. Australian survey on current practices for breast radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dundas, Kylie L; Pogson, Elise M; Batumalai, Vikneswary; Boxer, Miriam M; Yap, Mei Ling; Delaney, Geoff P; Metcalfe, Peter; Holloway, Lois

    2015-12-01

    Detailed, published surveys specific to Australian breast radiotherapy practice were last conducted in 2002. More recent international surveys specific to breast radiotherapy practice include a European survey conducted in 2008/2009 and a Spanish survey conducted in 2009. Radiotherapy techniques continue to evolve, and the utilisation of new techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), is increasing. This survey aimed to determine current breast radiotherapy practices across Australia. An online survey was completed by 50 of the 69 Australian radiation therapy treatment centres. Supine tangential beam whole breast irradiation remains the standard of care for breast radiotherapy in Australia. A growing number of institutions are exploring prone positioning and IMRT utilisation. This survey demonstrated a wide variation in the benchmarks used to limit and report organ at risk doses, prescribed dose regimen, and post-mastectomy bolus practices. This survey also indicated, when compared with international literature, that there may be less interest in or uptake of external beam partial breast irradiation, prone positioning, simultaneous integrated boost and breath hold techniques. These are areas where further review and research may be warranted to ensure Australian patients are receiving the best care possible based on the best evidence available. This survey provides insight into the current radiotherapy practice for breast cancer in Australia. © 2015 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  12. Radiotherapy Boost Following Conservative Surgery for Locally Advanced Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cendales, Ricardo; Ospino, Rosalba; Torres, Felipe; Cotes, Martha

    2009-01-01

    Nearly half of breast cancer patients in developing countries present with a locally advanced cancer. Treatment is centered on a multimodal approach based on chemotherapy, surgery and radiotherapy. The growing use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy has led to a more conservative surgical approach; nonetheless, it is not yet considered as a standard. There are no clear recommendations on the use of a radiotherapy boost in such situation. A Medline search was developed. Most articles are retrospective series. Survival free of locoregional relapse in patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy, breast conserving surgery and radiotherapy is good. All articles described a boost administered to nearly all patients without regard to their prognostic factors, given that a locally advanced tumor is already considered as a poor prognostic factor. Even tough the poor level of evidence, a recommendation can be made: radiotherapy boost should be administered to all patients with locally advanced breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and breast conserving surgery.

  13. Development of three-dimensional radiotherapy techniques in breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, Charlotte E.

    Radiotherapy following conservation surgery decreases local relapse and death from breast cancer. Currently, the challenge is to minimise the morbidity caused by this treatment without losing efficacy. Despite many advances in radiation techniques in other sites of the body, the majority of breast cancer patients are still planned and treated using 2-dimensional simple radiotherapy techniques. In addition, breast irradiation currently consumes 30% of the UK's radiotherapy workload. Therefore, any change to more complex treatment should be of proven benefit. The primary objective of this research is to develop and evaluate novel radiotherapy techniques to decrease irradiation of normal structures and improve localisation of the tumour bed. I have developed a forward-planned intensity modulated (IMRT) breast radiotherapy technique, which has shown improved dosimetry results compared to standard breast radiotherapy. Subsequently, I have developed and implemented a phase III randomised controlled breast IMRT trial. This National Cancer Research Network adopted trial will answer an important question regarding the clinical benefit of breast IMRT. It will provide DNA samples linked with high quality clinical outcome data, for a national translational radiogenomics study investigating variation in normal tissue toxicity. Thus, patients with significant late normal tissue side effects despite good dose homogeneity will provide the best model for finding differences due to underlying genetics. I evaluated a novel technique using high definition free-hand 3-dimensional (3D) ultrasound in a phantom study, and the results suggested that this is an accurate and reproducible method for tumour bed localisation. I then compared recognised methods of tumour bed localisation with the 3D ultrasound method in a clinical study. The 3D ultrasound technique appeared to accurately represent the shape and spatial position of the tumour cavity. This tumour bed localisation research

  14. Cardiac dose sparing and avoidance techniques in breast cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Chirag; Badiyan, Shahed; Berry, Sameer; Khan, Atif J.; Goyal, Sharad; Schulte, Kevin; Nanavati, Anish; Lynch, Melanie; Vicini, Frank A.

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer radiotherapy represents an essential component in the overall management of both early stage and locally advanced breast cancer. As the number of breast cancer survivors has increased, chronic sequelae of breast cancer radiotherapy become more important. While recently published data suggest a potential for an increase in cardiac events with radiotherapy, these studies do not consider the impact of newer radiotherapy techniques commonly utilized. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to evaluate cardiac dose sparing techniques in breast cancer radiotherapy. Current options for cardiac protection/avoidance include (1) maneuvers that displace the heart from the field such as coordinating the breathing cycle or through prone patient positioning, (2) technological advances such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or proton beam therapy (PBT), and (3) techniques that treat a smaller volume around the lumpectomy cavity such as accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI), or intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT). While these techniques have shown promise dosimetrically, limited data on late cardiac events exist due to the difficulties of long-term follow up. Future studies are required to validate the efficacy of cardiac dose sparing techniques and may use surrogates for cardiac events such as biomarkers or perfusion imaging

  15. A case of angiosarcoma of the breast occurring after radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakata, Hisafumi; Maeno, Yoshito; Tatsuoka, Toshihiko

    1995-01-01

    A case of angiosarcoma of the left breast occurring one month after radiotherapy following partial mastectomy for a cancer of the right breast is described. A 43-year-old woman underwent right partial mastectomy and axillary lymphnode dissection for a right breast cancer on February 23, 1993. Radiation therapy (total 50 grey) was given to the right breast for 3 weeks postoperatively. A small hemangioma appeared near the nipple of her left breast in the following month. On June 23, we excised the grain sized hemangioma and diagnosed as angiosarcoma. After her hesitating several months, she underwent left mastectomy because of some relapses appeared around her left breast on January 20, 1994. Now she is doing well without recurrence. Angiosarcoma of the breast is extremely rare in our country and only 20 cases have been seen in the Japanese literature. This case of angiosarcoma of the breast which occurred after radiotherapy is the first report of Stewart-Treves syndrome. Recent increasing use of radiotherapy following breast-sparing operation may contribute to an increase in occurrence of angiosarcoma. We should strictly follow up irradiated patients with breast cancer entertaining possible occurrence of angiosarcoma of the breast as well as that of the upper extremities. (author)

  16. Recent advances in radiotherapy: Partial Breast Irradiation (PBI) in breast cancer patients after breast conserving surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niwinska, A.

    2003-01-01

    The interest in accelerated partial breast irradiation (PBI) after conservative surgery has increased over the past decade as a result of many factors, including clinical and pathological data questioning the efficacy of whole breast irradiation in highly selected patients, as well as factors related to patient's convenience. High dose rate and low dose rate brachytherapy, brachytherapy MammoSite, Electron Intraoperative Therapy - ELIOT and Targeted Intraoperative Radiotherapy - TARGIT are the subject of investigation. The tolerability and efficacy of the treatment are of special interest. In this review article, methods of accelerated PBI, eligibility criteria, techniques of radiotherapy, early results and side effects are reviewed. (author)

  17. Neoadjuvant radiotherapy for primary advanced or locally recurrent breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Hiroaki; Nio, Yoshinori; Inoue, Yasushi; Teramoto, Mutsumi; Nagami, Haruhiko; Yano, Seiji; Sumi, Shoichiro; Tamura, Katsuhiro; Kushima, Takeyuki [Shimane Medical Univ., Izumo (Japan)

    1998-03-01

    Neoadjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer has rarely been reported. In the present study, we investigated the objective response and histopathological effects of neoadjuvant radiotherapy in patients with primary advanced or locally recurrent breast cancer. Between 1992 and 1997, a total of 11 patients with primary or recurrent breast cancer (5 primary advanced and 6 locally recurrent breast cancers) were treated with neoadjuvant radiotherapy before surgery. Six patients received radiotherapy alone and 5 received radiotherapy in combination with chemotherapy, and the objective response was assessed according to the criteria of the Japanese Society of Cancer Therapy. After neoadjuvant radiotherapy or radiochemotherapy, all patients underwent surgery or biopsy, and histopathological effects were assessed according to the criteria of the Japanese Research Society for Gastric Cancer Study. The overall objective response was 27% (3PR/11; 2PR in 5 primary cancers and 1PR in 6 recurrent cancers), and histopathological effects included 5 grade-3 or -2 responses (45%; 2 grade-3 and 1 grade-2 in primary cancers and 2 grade-2 in recurrent cancers). There were no correlations between total radiation dose and objective response or histopathological effects. The objective response rates were 40% (2/5) in the radiochemotherapy group and 17% (1/6) in the radiotherapy alone group, histopathological effects higher than grade-2 were seen in 60% (3/5) in the radiochemotherapy group and 33% (2/6) in the radiotherapy alone group, and a grade-3 response was seen only in the radiochemotherapy group. Neoadjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer resulted in a high response rate and was more effective against primary cancer than recurrent cancer. Furthermore, chemotherapy may be beneficial in improving the efficacy of radiotherapy. (author)

  18. Neoadjuvant radiotherapy for primary advanced or locally recurrent breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Hiroaki; Nio, Yoshinori; Inoue, Yasushi; Teramoto, Mutsumi; Nagami, Haruhiko; Yano, Seiji; Sumi, Shoichiro; Tamura, Katsuhiro; Kushima, Takeyuki

    1998-01-01

    Neoadjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer has rarely been reported. In the present study, we investigated the objective response and histopathological effects of neoadjuvant radiotherapy in patients with primary advanced or locally recurrent breast cancer. Between 1992 and 1997, a total of 11 patients with primary or recurrent breast cancer (5 primary advanced and 6 locally recurrent breast cancers) were treated with neoadjuvant radiotherapy before surgery. Six patients received radiotherapy alone and 5 received radiotherapy in combination with chemotherapy, and the objective response was assessed according to the criteria of the Japanese Society of Cancer Therapy. After neoadjuvant radiotherapy or radiochemotherapy, all patients underwent surgery or biopsy, and histopathological effects were assessed according to the criteria of the Japanese Research Society for Gastric Cancer Study. The overall objective response was 27% (3PR/11; 2PR in 5 primary cancers and 1PR in 6 recurrent cancers), and histopathological effects included 5 grade-3 or -2 responses (45%; 2 grade-3 and 1 grade-2 in primary cancers and 2 grade-2 in recurrent cancers). There were no correlations between total radiation dose and objective response or histopathological effects. The objective response rates were 40% (2/5) in the radiochemotherapy group and 17% (1/6) in the radiotherapy alone group, histopathological effects higher than grade-2 were seen in 60% (3/5) in the radiochemotherapy group and 33% (2/6) in the radiotherapy alone group, and a grade-3 response was seen only in the radiochemotherapy group. Neoadjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer resulted in a high response rate and was more effective against primary cancer than recurrent cancer. Furthermore, chemotherapy may be beneficial in improving the efficacy of radiotherapy. (author)

  19. Radiotherapy of invasive breast cancer: French national guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besnard, S.; Mazeau-Woynar, V.; Verdoni, L.; Cutuli, B.; Fourquet, A.; Giard, S.; Hennequin, C.; Leblanc-Onfroy, M.

    2012-01-01

    The French National Cancer Institute (INCa) and Societe francaise de senologie et pathologie mammaire (SFSPM), in collaboration with a multidisciplinary experts group, have published the French national clinical practice guidelines on a selection of 11 currently debated questions regarding the management of invasive breast cancer. Those guidelines are based on a comprehensive analysis of the current published evidence dealing with those issues, secondly reviewed by 100 reviewers. Radiotherapy was concerned by five of the 11 questions: indications for the boost after whole gland irradiation; hypo-fractionated radiotherapy; partial breast irradiation; indications for mammary internal nodes irradiation, and indications of radiotherapy after neo-adjuvant chemotherapy. (authors)

  20. An improved method of radiotherapy for carcinoma of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahlhoefer, J.

    1991-01-01

    This method of radiotherapy of the breast and lymph nodes in cases of breast cancer reduces exposure of the lung and features small gaps and overlaps at the borders of neighbouring fields. The outline of fields, the design of special absorbing blocks and filters, and some notes on treatment planning are given in this paper. (orig.) [de

  1. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prosnitz, L.R.; Kapp, D.S.; Weissberg, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    This review highlights developments over the past decade in radiotherapy and attempts to summarize the state of the art in the management of the major diseases in which radiotherapy has a meaningful role. The equipment, radiobiology of radiotherapy and carcinoma of the lung, breast and intestines are highlighted

  2. Cardiac Side-effects From Breast Cancer Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, C W; Kirby, A M

    2015-11-01

    Breast cancer radiotherapy reduces the risk of cancer recurrence and death. However, it usually involves some radiation exposure of the heart and analyses of randomised trials have shown that it can increase the risk of heart disease. Estimates of the absolute risks of radiation-related heart disease are needed to help oncologists plan each individual woman's treatment. The risk for an individual woman varies according to her estimated cardiac radiation dose and her background risk of ischaemic heart disease in the absence of radiotherapy. When it is known, this risk can then be compared with the absolute benefit of the radiotherapy. At present, many UK cancer centres are already giving radiotherapy with mean heart doses of less than 3 Gy and for most women the benefits of the radiotherapy will probably far outweigh the risks. Technical approaches to minimising heart dose in breast cancer radiotherapy include optimisation of beam angles, use of multileaf collimator shielding, intensity-modulated radiotherapy, treatment in a prone position, treatment in deep inspiration (including the use of breath-hold and gating techniques), proton therapy and partial breast irradiation. The multileaf collimator is suitable for many women with upper pole left breast cancers, but for women with central or lower pole cancers, breath-holding techniques are now recommended in national UK guidelines. Ongoing work aims to identify ways of irradiating pan-regional lymph nodes that are effective, involve minimal exposure of organs at risk and are feasible to plan, deliver and verify. These will probably include wide tangent-based field-in-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy or arc radiotherapy techniques in combination with deep inspiratory breath-hold, and proton beam irradiation for women who have a high predicted heart dose from intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Copyright © 2015 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Lactation following conservation surgery and radiotherapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varsos, G.; Yahalom, J.

    1991-01-01

    A 38-year-old woman with early stage invasive breast cancer was treated with wide excision of the tumor, axillary lymph node dissection, and breast irradiation. Three years later, she gave birth to a normal baby. She attempted breast feeding and had full lactation from the untreated breast. The irradiated breast underwent only minor changes during pregnancy and postpartum but produced small amounts of colostrum and milk for 2 weeks postpartum. There are only a few reports of lactation after breast irradiation. These cases are reviewed, and possible factors affecting breast function after radiotherapy are discussed. Because of scant information available regarding its safety for the infant, nursing from the irradiated breast is not recommended

  4. Tolerance of radiotherapy combined with adjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrafnkelsson, J.; Nilsson, K.; Soederberg, M.

    1987-01-01

    Forty-three postmenopausal breast cancer patients with axillary lymph node metastasis were randomized to receive postoperative radiotherapy (45 Gy) or the combination of radiotherapy and 6 months of chemotherapy. Forty-three premenopausal patients had postoperative radiotherapy and were randomized to receive one of two different chemotherapy combinations. Pulmonary fibrosis was roentgenologically registered in approximately 70% of the total patient population six months after initiation of therapy. Addition of chemotherapy with doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide significantly increased the proportion of patients with pulmonary fibrosis compared with patients treated with radiotherapy only or radiotherapy combined with cyclophosphamide, methotrexate and 5-fluorouracil. Premenopausal patients tolerated the combination of radiotherapy and chemotherapy better than postmenopausal patients of whom approximately 30% did not tolerate 65% or more of prescribed total dose of chemotherapy. (orig.)

  5. Starting Hormone Therapy at Menopause Increases Breast Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    According to a January 28, 2011 article in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, women who start taking menopausal hormone therapy around the time of menopause have a higher risk of breast cancer than women who begin taking hormones a few years later.

  6. Adjuvant radiotherapy and risk of contralateral breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storm, H.H.; Blettner, M.; Pedersen, J.

    1992-01-01

    To evaluate the relationship between high-dose radiotherapy and secondary breast cancer, a nested and matched case-control study in the cohort of breast cancer patients in Denmark was conducted. Radiation dose to the contralateral breast was reconstructed by medical physicists for each of the 529 cases and 529 controls, 82.4% of each group was treated with radiation. The average breast dose was 2.51 Gy, and a 20% increased risk was expected for this population at average age 51 years. There was no evidence that radiotherapy increased the overall risk of second breast cancer (RR=1.04), although the possibility of a RR as high as 1.46 could not be excluded. There was little indication that the risk varied over categories of radiation dose, time since exposure, or age at exposure. Thus, data provides additional evidence that there is little if any risk of radiation induced breast cancer associated with exposure of breast tissue to low-dose radiation (e.g., from mammographic X-rays or adjuvant radiotherapy) in later life. (author). 9 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  7. Risk Factors of Developing Long-Lasting Breast Pain After Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundstedt, Dan, E-mail: dan.lundstedt@vgregion.se [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Gustafsson, Magnus [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Therapeutic Radiation Physics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Steineck, Gunnar [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology-Pathology, the Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Malmstroem, Per [Skane Department of Oncology, Skane University Hospital, Lund (Sweden); Alsadius, David [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Sundberg, Agnetha [Department of Therapeutic Radiation Physics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Wilderaeng, Ulrica [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Holmberg, Erik [Oncologic Centre, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Johansson, Karl-Axel [Department of Therapeutic Radiation Physics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Karlsson, Per [Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Postoperative radiotherapy decreases breast cancer mortality. However, studies have revealed a long-lasting breast pain among some women after radiotherapy. The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors that contribute to breast pain after breast cancer radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: We identified 1,027 recurrence-free women in two cohorts of Swedish women treated for breast cancer. The women had breast-conserving surgery and postoperative radiotherapy, the breast was treated to 48 Gy in 2.4-Gy fractions or to 50 Gy in 2.0-Gy fractions. Young women received a boost of up to 16 Gy. Women with more than three lymph node metastases had locoregional radiotherapy. Systemic treatments were given according to health-care guidelines. Three to 17 years after radiotherapy, we collected data using a study-specific questionnaire. We investigated the relation between breast pain and potential risk modifiers: age at treatment, time since treatment, chemotherapy, photon energy, fractionation size, boost, loco-regional radiotherapy, axillary surgery, overweight, and smoking. Results: Eight hundred seventy-seven women (85%) returned the questionnaires. Among women up to 39 years of age at treatment, 23.1% had breast pain, compared with 8.7% among women older than 60 years (RR 2.66; 95% CI 1.33-5.36). Higher age at treatment (RR 0.96; 95% CI 0.94-0.98, annual decrease) and longer time since treatment (RR 0.93; 95% CI 0.88-0.98, annual decrease) were related to a lower occurrence of breast pain. Chemotherapy increased the occurrence of breast pain (RR 1.72; 95% CI 1.19-2.47). In the multivariable model only age and time since treatment were statistically significantly related to the occurrence of breast pain. We found no statistically significant relation between breast pain and the other potential risk modifiers. Conclusions: Younger women having undergone breast-conserving surgery with postoperative radiotherapy report a higher occurrence of long

  8. Hypofractionated Adjuvant Whole Breast Radiotherapy: Progress and Prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yarnold, John; Haviland, Joanne

    2010-01-01

    Published results of randomised trials involving >7000 women confirm the safety and efficacy of hypofractionated schedules of adjuvant radiotherapy for women with early breast cancer using fraction sizes between 2 and 3 Gy assuming appropriate downward adjustments to total dose. Unnecessary concerns relating to heart tolerance, suboptimal dose distribution and duration of follow up need not discourage the routine adoption of 15- or 16-fraction schedules in women treated by breast conservation surgery for early breast cancer. Regardless of fractionation regimen, dose escalation to the index quadrant in high risk subgroups will result in a greater relative increase in late adverse effects than tumour control, a therapeutic disadvantage that can only be overcome by exploiting a marked dose-volume effect. A 15-fraction schedule of whole breast radiotherapy is unlikely to represent the lower limits of hypofractionation, and the preliminary results of a 5-fraction regimen are encouraging

  9. Characterization of Target Volume Changes During Breast Radiotherapy Using Implanted Fiducial Markers and Portal Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, Emma J.; Donovan, Ellen M.; Yarnold, John R.; Coles, Charlotte E.; Evans, Philip M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine target volume changes by using volume and shape analysis for patients receiving radiotherapy after breast conservation surgery and to compare different methods of automatically identifying changes in target volume, position, size, and shape during radiotherapy for use in adaptive radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Eleven patients undergoing whole breast radiotherapy had fiducial markers sutured into the excision cavity at the time of surgery. Patients underwent imaging using computed tomography (for planning and at the end of treatment) and during treatment by using portal imaging. A marker volume (MV) was defined by using the measured marker positions. Changes in both individual marker positions and MVs were identified manually and using six automated similarity indices. Comparison of the two types of analysis (manual and automated) was undertaken to establish whether similarity indices can be used to automatically detect changes in target volumes. Results: Manual analysis showed that 3 patients had significant MV reduction. This analysis also showed significant changes between planning computed tomography and the start of treatment for 9 patients, including single and multiple marker movement, deformation (shape change), and rotation. Four of the six similarity indices were shown to be sensitive to the observed changes. Conclusions: Significant changes in size, shape, and position occur to the fiducial marker-defined volume. Four similarity indices can be used to identify these changes, and a protocol for their use in adaptive radiotherapy is suggested

  10. Radiotherapy as a conservative treatment in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfuhl, O.R. von; Miola, U.J.; Campos, J.C.F. de

    1977-01-01

    The review of 545 cases of cancer of the breast, 10% of which were treated by exclusive radiotherapy, emphasized the trend towards conservative treatment, because 29,8% of mastectomized women died within two years from the operation with distant metastases. As it is possible with radiotherapy to cause fibrosis or keep inactive breast tumors up to 5 cm diameter for two years or longer, one must consider irradiation as a good option for young women with small tumors. A combination was used of tangencial radiotherapy up to 5.000 rads to the whole breast with a boost dose two weeks later of 3.000 to 4.000 rads by means of intersticial radiotherapy given only to the palpable tumor. This was fulfilled by the afterloading method according to a system described as geometrization of the breast by parallel plates where holes were drilled for the needles. No recurrence was seen in 4 years in the selected group of 12 patients submitted to the mentioned treatment [pt

  11. Breast cancer in elderly person: which role for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horn, S.; Cutuli, B.

    2011-01-01

    The authors briefly discuss the issue and practices of treatment of elderly women suffering from breast cancer. Even if radiotherapy is sometimes forgotten in such cases, disease characteristics and the tolerance capacity of the patient must be considered before implementing treatment protocols. Short communication

  12. DEGRO practical guidelines: radiotherapy of breast cancer II. Radiotherapy of non-invasive neoplasia of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souchon, R.; Sautter-Bihl, M.L.; Sedlmayer, F.; Budach, W.; Dunst, J.; Feyer, P.; Fietkau, R.; Sauer, R.; Harms, W.; Wenz, F.; Haase, W.

    2014-01-01

    To complement and update the 2007 practice guidelines of the breast cancer expert panel of the German Society of Radiation Oncology (DEGRO) for radiotherapy (RT) of breast cancer. Owing to its growing clinical relevance, in the current version, a separate paper is dedicated to non-invasive proliferating epithelial neoplasia of the breast. In addition to the more general statements of the German interdisciplinary S3 guidelines, this paper is especially focused on indication and technique of RT in addition to breast conserving surgery. The DEGRO expert panel performed a comprehensive survey of the literature comprising recently published data from clinical controlled trials, systematic reviews as well as meta-analyses, referring to the criteria of evidence-based medicine yielding new aspects compared to 2005 and 2007. The literature search encompassed the period 2008 to September 2012 using databases of PubMed and Guidelines International Network (G-I-N). Search terms were ''non invasive breast cancer'', ''ductal carcinoma in situ, ''dcis'', ''borderline breast lesions'', ''lobular neoplasia'', ''radiotherapy'' and ''radiation therapy''. In addition to the more general statements of the German interdisciplinary S3 guidelines, this paper is especially focused on indications of RT and decision making of non-invasive neoplasia of the breast after surgery, especially ductal carcinoma in situ. Among different non-invasive neoplasia of the breast only the subgroup of pure ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS; synonym ductal intraepithelial neoplasia, DIN) is considered for further recurrence risk reduction treatment modalities after complete excision of DCIS, particularly RT following breast conserving surgery (BCS), in order to avoid a mastectomy. About half of recurrences are invasive cancers. Up to 50?% of all recurrences require salvage mastectomy. Randomized clinical trials and a huge number of mostly observational studies have unanimously demonstrated that RT significantly

  13. Pacemaker and radiotherapy in breast cancer: is targeted intraoperative radiotherapy the answer in this setting?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keshtgar, Mohammed RS; Eaton, David J; Reynolds, Claire; Pigott, Katharine; Davidson, Tim; Gauter-Fleckenstein, Benjamin; Wenz, Frederik

    2012-01-01

    We present the case of an 83 year old woman with a cardiac pacemaker located close in distance to a subsequently diagnosed invasive ductal carcinoma of the left breast. Short range intraoperative radiotherapy was given following wide local excision and sentinel node biopsy. The challenges of using ionising radiation with pacemakers is also discussed

  14. Adjuvant radiotherapy for phyllodes tumor of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaney, Arthur W.; Pollack, Alan; Zagars, Gunar K.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The role of radiotherapy for the treatment of phyllodes tumors of the breast remains controversial. Adjuvant radiotherapy is often cited in the existing literature as not providing any benefit over surgical treatment alone. The data supporting this belief are anecdotal. There are also anecdotal reports that radiotherapy may have a role in cases wherein the risk of local failure is high. As with breast carcinomas, conservative surgery (wide local excision) for phyllodes tumors is associated with about a 50% local recurrence rate; diffuse or bulky disease and/or malignant histology are also associated with high local failure rates. We are unaware of any series that examines the role of adjuvant radiotherapy in the management of phyllodes tumor of the breast. We present here a retrospective study of eight patients so treated at MD Anderson Cancer Center. Materials and Methods: Eight patients have been treated with radiotherapy for non-metastatic phyllodes tumor of the breast at MD Anderson Cancer Center between December 1988 and August 1993. All patients were female; the median age was 43 years, with a range of 19 to 62 years. All patients presented with a breast mass, which was associated with pain in one patient, and was ulcerative in three. Results: Tumor size ranged from 3.5 to 16 cm, with a median diameter of 10.4 cm. Six patients had tumors in the upper outer quadrant, and two patients had upper inner tumors. Five patients had malignant tumors, two patients were classified as benign, and one was of indeterminate malignant potential. All five of the malignant tumors displayed stromal overgrowth on pathologic review. The remaining benign and indeterminate tumors lacked this feature. One patient with a benign tumor had a history of two prior recurrences. Primary surgery consisted of either lumpectomy in two patients or mastectomy in six patients. Axillary level I/II lymph node dissections were performed in 5 patients and no involvement was seen

  15. DEGRO practical guidelines for radiotherapy of breast cancer I. Breast-conserving therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sautter-Bihl, M.L.; Budach, W.; Dunst, J.; Feyer, P.; Haase, W.; Harms, W.; Sedlmayer, F.; Souchon, R.; Wenz, F.; Sauer, R.

    2007-01-01

    Background: The present paper is an update of the practical guidelines for radiotherapy of breast cancer published in 2006 by the breast cancer expert panel of the German Society of Radiation Oncology (DEGRO). These recommendations have been elaborated on the basis of the S3 guidelines of the German Cancer Society that were revised in March 2007 by an interdisciplinary panel. Methods: The DEGRO expert panel performed a comprehensive survey of the literature, comprising lately published meta-analyses, data from recent randomized trials and guidelines of international breast cancer societies, referring to the criteria of evidence-based medicine. In addition to the more general statements of the German Cancer Society, this paper emphasizes specific radiotherapeutic aspects. It is focused on radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery. Technique, targeting, and dose are described in detail. Results: Postoperative radiotherapy significantly reduces rates of local recurrence. The more pronounced the achieved reduction is, the more substantially it translates into improved survival. Four prevented local recurrences result in one avoided breast cancer death. This effect is independent of age. An additional boost provides a further absolute risk reduction for local recurrence irrespective of age. Women > 50 years have a hazard ratio of 0.59 in favor of the boost. For DCIS, local recurrence was 2.4% per patient year even in a subgroup with favorable prognostic factors leading to premature closure of the respective study due to ethical reasons. For partial-breast irradiation as a sole method of radiotherapy, results are not yet mature enough to allow definite conclusions. Conclusion: After breast-conserving surgery, whole-breast irradiation remains the gold standard of treatment. The indication for boost irradiation should no longer be restricted to women ≤ 50 years. Partial-breast irradiation is still an experimental treatment and therefore discouraged outside controlled

  16. Partial Breast Irradiation Versus Whole Breast Radiotherapy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer: A Decision Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sher, David J.; Wittenberg, Eve; Taghian, Alphonse G.; Bellon, Jennifer R.; Punglia, Rinaa S.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the quality-adjusted life expectancy between women treated with partial breast irradiation (PBI) vs. whole breast radiotherapy (WBRT) for estrogen receptor-positive early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: We developed a Markov model to describe health states in the 15 years after radiotherapy for estrogen receptor-positive early-stage breast cancer. Breast cancer recurrences were separated into local recurrences and elsewhere failures. Ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) risk was extracted from the Oxford overview, and rates and utilities were adapted from the literature. We studied two cohorts of women (aged 40 and 55 years), both of whom received adjuvant tamoxifen. Results: Assuming a no evidence of disease (NED)-PBI utility of 0.93, quality-adusted life expectancy after PBI (and WBRT) was 12.61 (12.57) and 12.10 (12.06) years for 40-year-old and 55-year-old women, respectively. The NED-PBI utility thresholds for preferring PBI over WBRT were 0.923 and 0.921 for 40-year-old and 55-year-old women, respectively, both slightly greater than the NED-WBRT utility. Outcomes were sensitive to the utility of NED-PBI, the PBI hazard ratio for local recurrence, the baseline IBTR risk, and the percentage of IBTRs that were local. Overall the degree of superiority of PBI over WBRT was greater for 55-year-old women than for 40-year-old women. Conclusions: For most utility values of the NED-PBI health state, PBI was the preferred treatment modality. This result was highly sensitive to patient preferences and was also dependent on patient age, PBI efficacy, IBTR risk, and the fraction of IBTRs that were local

  17. A patient with angiosarcoma of the breast after breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuoka, Rie; Mitsuo, Manabu; Hanioka, Keisuke

    2014-01-01

    An 89-year-old woman underwent breast-conserving surgery and axillary lymph node dissection (right AC region, T2N0M0, stage 2A, invasive ductal carcinoma, papillotubular type) for right breast cancer in February 2005. She received postoperative radiotherapy to the residual breast. She then developed marked edema of the right arm and right breast. A mass developed in the right breast in March 2011 and March 2013. This was originally suspected to be an ipsilateral breast recurrence of the cancer, but turned to be angiosarcoma after developing recurrent mass in March 2013, which histopathology was proved to be showed angiosarcoma of the breast. The patient subsequently had repeated intradermal and subcutaneous metastases and recurrence. She is currently receiving chemotherapy with docetaxel (30 mg/m 2 biweekly). This interesting case of angiosarcoma of the breast after breast-conserving surgery for breast cancer is reported. (author)

  18. Cytokine levels as biomarkers of radiation fibrosis in patients treated with breast radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westbury, Charlotte B; Yarnold, John R; Haviland, Joanne; Davies, Sue; Gothard, Lone; Abdi, Bahja Ahmed; Sydenham, Mark; Bowen, Jo; Stratton, Richard; Short, Susan C

    2014-01-01

    Radiation fibrosis is not easily measurable although clinical scores have been developed for this purpose. Biomarkers present an alternative more objective approach to quantification, and estimation in blood provides accessible samples. We investigated if blood cytokines could be used to measure established fibrosis in patients who have undergone radiotherapy for breast cancer. We studied two cohorts treated by breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy in the UK START Trial A, one with breast fibrosis (cases) and one with no or minimal fibrosis (controls). Two candidate cytokines, plasma connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and serum interleukin-6 (IL6) were estimated by ELISA. Comparisons between cases and controls used the t-test or Mann–Whitney test and associations between blood concentration and clinical factors were assessed using the Spearman rank correlation coefficient. Seventy patients were included (26 cases, 44 controls). Mean time since radiotherapy was 9.9 years (range 8.3-12.0). No statistically significant differences between cases and controls in serum IL6 (median (IQR) 0.84 pg/ml (0.57-1.14), 0.75 pg/ml (0.41-1.43) respectively) or plasma CTGF (331.4 pg/ml (234.8-602.9), 334.5 pg/ml (270.0-452.8) were identified. There were no significant associations between blood cytokine concentration and age, fibrosis severity, breast size or time since radiotherapy. No significant difference in IL6 or CTGF concentrations was detected between patients with breast fibrosis and controls with minimal or no fibrosis

  19. Cardiotoxicity of concomitant radiotherapy and trastuzumab for early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinko, Tanja; Dolenc, Jure; Bilban-Jakopin, Cvetka

    2014-01-01

    Trastuzumab therapy given in combination with one of several chemotherapy regimens is currently considered the standard of care for the treatment of early-stage, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) -positive breast cancer. The treatment with trastuzumab is due to a significant impact on the survival part of the standard adjuvant treatment of patients with HER2-positive breast cancer. Patients treated with postoperative breast or chest wall irradiation receive trastuzumab concomitant with radiotherapy. In a small proportion of patients trastuzumab causes cardiotoxicity. Preclinical findings indicate a radiosensibilizing effect of trastuzumab in breast cancer cells, but it is not yet clear whether it radiosensibilizes cells of healthy tissues too. Special attention is required when left breast or left thoracic wall is irradiated in patient receiving trastuzumab, because long-term effects of the concurrent treatment with trastuzumab and radiotherapy are not yet known. In an era where more patients are surviving a diagnosis of breast cancer, better understanding and earlier detection of therapy-induced cardiac toxicity will be of paramount importance

  20. Cardiotoxicity of concomitant radiotherapy and trastuzumab for early breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinko, Tanja; Dolenc, Jure; Bilban-Jakopin, Cvetka

    2014-06-01

    Trastuzumab therapy given in combination with one of several chemotherapy regimens is currently considered the standard of care for the treatment of early-stage, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) -positive breast cancer. The treatment with trastuzumab is due to a significant impact on the survival part of the standard adjuvant treatment of patients with HER2-positive breast cancer. Patients treated with postoperative breast or chest wall irradiation receive trastuzumab concomitant with radiotherapy. In a small proportion of patients trastuzumab causes cardiotoxicity. Preclinical findings indicate a radiosensibilizing effect of trastuzumab in breast cancer cells, but it is not yet clear whether it radiosensibilizes cells of healthy tissues too. Special attention is required when left breast or left thoracic wall is irradiated in patient receiving trastuzumab, because long-term effects of the concurrent treatment with trastuzumab and radiotherapy are not yet known. In an era where more patients are surviving a diagnosis of breast cancer, better understanding and earlier detection of therapy-induced cardiac toxicity will be of paramount importance.

  1. New Language and Old Problems in Breast Cancer Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiricuţă, Ion Christian

    2017-01-01

    New developments in breast cancer radiotherapy make possible new standards in treatment recommandations based on international guidelines. Developments in radiotherapy irradiation techniques from 2D to 3D-Conformal RT and to IMRT (Intensity Modulated Arc Therapy) make possible to reduce the usual side effects on the organs at risk as: skin, lung, miocard, bone, esophagus and brahial plexus. Dispite of all these progresses acute and late side effects are present. Side effects are as old as the radiotherapy was used. New solutions are available now by improving irradiation techniques. New techniques as sentinel node procedure (SNP) or partial breast irradiation (PBRT) and immediate breast reconstruction with silicon implants (IBRIS) make necessary new considerations regarding the target volume delineations. A new language for definition of gross tumor volume (GTV), clinical target volume (CTV) based on the new diagnostic methods as PET/CT,nonaparticle MRI will have real impact on target delineation and irradiation techniques. "The new common language in breast cancer therapy" would be the first step to improve the endresults and finally the quality of life of the patients. Celsius.

  2. Bronchiolitis obliterans organising pneumonia: a consequence of breast radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahim, Ahmed; Campbell, Anne P; Hart, Simon Paul

    2012-01-18

    The authors describe a case of 51-year-old woman who presented with breathlessness following radiotherapy for breast carcinoma. A chest radiograph and thoracic CT scan revealed extensive airspace consolidation affecting right upper and lower lobes. A trans-bronchial biopsy revealed evidence of foamy macrophages and fibroblastic plugs within alveoli, consistent with organising pneumonia. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy revealed evidence of antiepithelial antibodies. Gradual but complete resolution occurred without any specific treatment. This case highlights the importance of considering radiation induced bronchiolitis obliterans organising pneumonia in the context of parenchymal shadowing following radiotherapy. Although corticosteroids are widely recommended for treatment, this case illustrates that organising pneumonia may resolve spontaneously.

  3. Radiotherapy for breast cancer is not associated with increased risk of cied implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, J. B.; Rehammar, J. C.; Jorgensen, O. D.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Radiotherapy is an important treatment in early stage breast cancer but it is claimed that radiotherapy causes damage to the cardiac conduction system and increases the risk implantation of CIED (pacemaker or ICD). However, this paradigm is based on smaller series of case reports. Due...... to the anatomy, radiotherapy will potential mainly affect the conduction system in left sided breast cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate risk of implantation of a CIED subsequent to radiotherapy for breast cancer by comparing left- versus right sided radiotherapy in a nationwide cohort. Methods: From...... the database of the Danish Breast Cancer Collaborative Group, we identified women treated with radiotherapy for early-stage breast cancer in Denmark from 1982 to 2005. By record linkage to the Danish Pacemaker and ICD Registry information was retrieved on CIED implants subsequent to radiotherapy. The rate...

  4. Efficacy of post-operative radiotherapy in the treatment of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Api, P; Corcione, S; Magnoni, G

    1985-01-01

    A clinical evaluation regarding the efficacy of post-operative radiotherapy in 294 patients with breast cancer is presented. In the author's opinion post-operative radiotherapy is fundamental in the treatment of this tumor. 21 refs.

  5. Late regional density changes of the lung after radiotherapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vagane, Randi; Danielsen, Turi; Fossa, Sophie Dorothea; Lokkevik, Erik; Olsen, Dag Rune

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: To investigate density changes in lung tissue, 3-4 years after postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer, based on dose dependence and regional differences. Material and methods: Sixty-one breast cancer patients, who had received computed tomography (CT) based postoperative radiotherapy, were included. CT scans were performed 35-51 months after start of radiotherapy. Dose information and CT scans from before and after radiotherapy were geometrically aligned in order to analyse changes in air-filled fraction (derived from CT density) as a function of dose for different regions of the lung. Results: Dose-dependent reduction of the air-filled fraction was shown to vary between the different regions of the lung. For lung tissue receiving about 50 Gy, the largest reduction in air-filled fraction was found in the cranial part of the lung. An increased air-filled fraction was observed for lung tissue irradiated to doses below 20 Gy, indicating compensatory response. Conclusions: The treatment-induced change in whole-lung density is a weighted response, involving the different regions, the irradiated volumes, and dose levels to these volumes. Simplistic models may therefore not be appropriate for describing the whole-lung dose-volume-response relationship following inhomogeneous irradiation

  6. Radiation dose to contra lateral breast during treatment of breast malignancy by radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chougule Arun

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: External beam radiotherapy is being used regularly to treat the breast malignancy postoperatively. The contribution of collimator leakage and scatter radiation dose to contralateral breast is of concern because of high radio sensitivity of breast tissue for carcinogenesis. This becomes more important when the treated cancer breast patient is younger than 45 years and therefore the contralateral breast must be treated as organ at risk. Quantification of contralateral dose during primary breast irradiation is helpful to estimate the risk of radiation induced secondary breast malignancy. Materials and Methods: In present study contralateral breast dose was measured in 30 cancer breast patients undergoing external beam therapy by Co-60 teletherapy machine. Postoperative radiotherapy was delivered by medial and lateral tangential fields on alternate days in addition to supraclavicle field daily with 200 cGy/F to a total dose of 5000 cGy in 25 fractions. CaSO4: Dy themoluminescence dosimeter discs were employed for these measurements. Three TLD discs were put on the surface of skin of contra lateral breast, one at the level of nipple and two at 3 cms away from nipple on both side along the midline for each field. At the end treatment of each filed, TLD discs were removed and measured for dose after 24h on Thelmador - 6000 TLD reader. Results: The dose at the contra lateral breast nipple was to be 152.5 to 254.75 cGy for total primary breast dose of 5000 cGy in 25 equal fractions which amounted to 3.05-6.05% of total dose to diseased breast. Further it was observed that the maximum contribution of contralateral breast dose was due to medical tangential half blocked field. Conclusion: CaSO4; Dy thermoluminescence dosimetry is quite easy, accurate and convenient method to measure the contra lateral breast dose.

  7. The value of radiotherapy in breast-conserving treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurtz, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    Breast conserving treatment owes its legitimacy to the ability of radiotherapy (RT), in conjunction with limited surgery, to provide local control equivalent to that associated with total mastectomy. This paper will be concerned exclusively with the treatment of the breast, since indications for RT of lymph node areas are independent of the type of breast surgery employed. Randomized trials have enabled quantitation of the effect of reduction in recurrence risk compared to surgery alone. Even though local recurrence is a predictor of metastatic disease, its prevention by breast RT has not yet been shown to improve survival. Thus the main benefits of breast RT relate to preventing the consequences of local failure, namely breast loss. With modern RT techniques, cosmetic results should be satisfactory in 90% of preserved breast. The main clinical research areas concern the optimal sequencing of surgery, RT and chemotherapy, the improvement of local control in high-risk patients, the extension of breast conservation to more advanced cases by the use of neo-adjuvant chemotherapy and RT, the identification of early-stage patients who could be treated with wide excision alone, and the value of RT in ductal in situ carcinomas. (author)

  8. Mammographic Findings after Intraoperative Radiotherapy of the Breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivera, R.; Holmes, D.R.; Smith-Bronstein, V.S.; Villegas-Mendez, S.; Rayhanabad, J.; Sheth, P.; Rashtian, A.

    2012-01-01

    Intraoperative Radiotherapy (IORT) is a form of accelerated partial breast radiation that has been shown to be equivalent to conventional whole breast external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in terms of local cancer control. However, questions have been raised about the potential of f IORT to produce breast parenchymal changes that could interfere with mammographic surveillance of cancer recurrence. The purpose of this study was to identify, quantify, and compare the mammographic findings of patients who received IORT and EBRT in a prospective, randomized controlled clinical trial of women with early stage invasive breast cancer undergoing breast conserving therapy between July 2005 and December 2009. Treatment groups were compared with regard to the 1, 2 and 4-year incidence of 6 post-operative mammographic findings: architectural distortion, skin thickening, skin retraction, calcifications, fat necrosis, and mass density. Blinded review of 90 sets of mammograms of 15 IORT and 16 EBRT patients demonstrated a higher incidence of fat necrosis among IORT recipients at years 1, 2, and 4. However, none of the subjects were judged to have suspicious mammogram findings and fat necrosis did not interfere with mammographic interpretation.

  9. Automatic segmentation of the heart in radiotherapy for breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laugaard Lorenzen, Ebbe; Ewertz, Marianne; Brink, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to evaluate two fully automatic segmentation methods in comparison with manual delineations for their use in delineating the heart on planning computed tomography (CT) used in radiotherapy for breast cancer. Material and methods. Automatic delineation of heart...... in 15 breast cancer patients was performed by two different automatic delineation systems. Analysis of accuracy and precision of the differences between manual and automatic delineations were evaluated on volume, mean dose, maximum dose and spatial distance differences. Two sets of manual delineations...

  10. Medullary breast carcinoma: The role of radiotherapy as primary treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourquet, A.; Vilcoq, J.R.; Zafrani, B.; Schlienger, P.; Campana, F.; Jullien, D.

    1987-01-01

    The results are reported of a selected series of 41 patients with medullary carcinoma of the breast, treated with primary radiotherapy with (24 patients) or without (17 patients) adjuvant chemotherapy. Complete responses to radiotherapy occurred with moderate doses (67% of the patients had a complete response after a dose of 55-60 Gy) and were increased by the addition of an irradiation boost. The 6-year actuarial free of local recurrence survival, metastase-free survival and survival rates were 86, 83, and 83%, respectively. The 6-year actuarial probability of living with breast preserved was 72%. Recurrences and survivals were not influenced by the tumor size or clinical axillary node status. Adjuvant chemotherapy had no effect on the rate of recurrence or survival. 14 refs.; 3 tabs

  11. Concurrent Boost with Adjuvant Breast Hypofractionated Radiotherapy and Toxicity Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona M. Sayed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The use of shorter radiotherapy schedules has an economic and logistic advantage for radiotherapy departments, as well as a high degree of patient convenience. The aim of this study is to assess the acute and short-term late toxicities of a hypofractionated radiotherapy schedule with a concomitant boost. Methods: We enrolled 57 eligible patients as group A. These patients received 42.5 Gy in 16 fractions of 2.66 Gy each to the whole breast over 3.2 weeks. A concomitant electron boost of 12 Gy in 16 fractions was also administered which gave an additional 0.75 Gy daily to the lumpectomy area for a total radiation dose of 54.5 Gy. Toxicity was recorded at three weeks and at three months for this group as well as for a control group (group B. The control group comprised 76 eligible patients treated conventionally with 50 Gy to the whole breast over five weeks followed by a sequential electron boost of 12 Gy in 2 Gy per fraction. Results: There were no statistically significant differences observed in the incidence of acute skin toxicity, breast pain, and edema recorded at three weeks or pigmentation and fibrosis recorded at three months between the two groups (P0.05. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest there are no increased acute and shortterm late toxicities affiliated with the hypofractionated schedule plus a concomitant boost as prescribed compared to the conventional fractionation of adjuvant breast radiotherapy. Large randomized trials and long-term follow-up are needed to confirm these favorable findings.

  12. Monitoring the response of breast cancer to radiotherapy and adjuvant therapy using breast cancer antigen CA 15-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bafarag, Saeed Mohamed Ibrahim

    2001-05-01

    In this study 35 breast cancer patients were followed during their treatment in Radiation and Isotope Center of Khartoum (RICK) using breast cancer antigen CA 15-3 as an indicator of tumor marker. They were classified into three categories of CA 15-3 concentration level as stated by Colomer and Genolla (1989) as follows: normal level less than 40 UI/ml, moderate level more than 40 UI/ml and less than 60 UI/ml, and high level, more than 60 UI/ml to 3000 UI/ml. A 5 ml of venous blood samples' were collected using sterile syringes from patients with different stage of breast cancer. The sample size were thirty-five cases, one of the cases is rejected because the patient discontinued the treatment. The blood samples were collected as follows: before starting the treatment course, at the mid time of treatment course, after completion the treatment course, and after one month of completion of the treatment course. The patients classified into two groups according to their treatment protocol. The first group received only external radiation therapy treatment and those were 18 patients out of 35, while the second group received combined therapy and those were 16 patients out of 35. For those whom received external radiation radiation therapy only, the results showed that the mean value of CA 15-3 concentration level decreased at the mid of the treatment as follows: 26±3 UI/ml, 24±3 UI/ml, 22±3 UI/ml respectively, while the mean value of CA 15-3 concentration level before starting the treatment was found to be 46±14 UI/ml. The number of the patients in the normal concentration level of CA 15-3 increased by 11% at the mid of external radiotherapy treatment and by 13% at the mid combined therapy, while the moderate level decreased by 6% for both external radiotherapy and combined therapy, while the number of patients within the high level decreased by 5% for external radiotherapy and 7% for combined therapy. After completion and after one month of completion of external

  13. DEGRO practical guidelines: radiotherapy of breast cancer III - radiotherapy of the lymphatic pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sautter-Bihl, M.L.; Sedlmayer, F.; Fussl, C.; Budach, W.; Dunst, J.; Feyer, P.; Fietkau, R.; Sauer, R.; Harms, W.; Piroth, M.D.; Souchon, R.; Wenz, F.; Haase, W.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to update the practical guidelines for adjuvant radiotherapy of the regional lymphatics of breast cancer published in 2008 by the breast cancer expert panel of the German Society of Radiation Oncology (DEGRO). A comprehensive survey of the literature concerning regional nodal irradiation (RNI) was performed using the following search terms: ''breast cancer'', ''radiotherapy'', ''regional node irradiation''. Recent randomized trials were analyzed for outcome as well as for differences in target definition. Field arrangements in the different studies were reproduced and superimposed on CT slices with individually contoured node areas. Moreover, data from recently published meta-analyses and guidelines of international breast cancer societies, yielding new aspects compared to 2008, provided the basis for defining recommendations according to the criteria of evidence-based medicine. In addition to the more general statements of the German interdisciplinary S3 guidelines updated in 2012, this paper addresses indications, targeting, and techniques of radiotherapy of the lymphatic pathways after surgery for breast cancer. International guidelines reveal substantial differences regarding indications for RNI. Patients with 1-3 positive nodes seem to profit from RNI compared to whole breast (WBI) or chest wall irradiation alone, both with regard to locoregional control and disease-free survival. Irradiation of the regional lymphatics including axillary, supraclavicular, and internal mammary nodes provided a small but significant survival benefit in recent randomized trials and one meta-analysis. Lymph node irradiation yields comparable tumor control in comparison to axillary lymph node dissection (ALND), while reducing the rate of lymph edema. Data concerning the impact of 1-2 macroscopically affected sentinel node (SN) or microscopic metastases on prognosis are conflicting. Recent data suggest that the current restrictive use of RNI should be

  14. DEGRO practical guidelines for radiotherapy of breast cancer IV. Radiotherapy following mastectomy for invasive breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenz, Frederik; Sperk, Elena; Budach, Wilfried; Dunst, Juergen; Feyer, Petra; Fietkau, Rainer; Sauer, Rolf; Haase, Wulf; Harms, Wolfgang; Piroth, Marc D.; Sautter-Bihl, Marie-Luise; Sedlmayer, Felix; Fussl, Christoph; Souchon, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Since the last recommendations from the Breast Cancer Expert Panel of the German Society for Radiation Oncology (DEGRO) in 2008, evidence for the effectiveness of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) has grown. This growth is based on updates of the national S3 and international guidelines, as well as on new data and meta-analyses. New aspects were considered when updating the DEGRO recommendations. The authors performed a comprehensive survey of the literature. Data from recently published (meta-)analyses, randomized clinical trials and international cancer societies' guidelines yielding new aspects compared to 2008 were reviewed and discussed. New aspects were included in the current guidelines. Specific issues relating to particular PMRT constellations, such as the presence of risk factors (lymphovascular invasion, blood vessel invasion, positive lymph node ratio > 20 %, resection margins 2 cm or a combination of ≥ 2 risk factors) and 1-3 positive lymph nodes are emphasized. The evidence for improved overall survival and local control following PMRT for T4 tumors, positive resection margins, > 3 positive lymph nodes and in T3 N0 patients with risk factors such as lymphovascular invasion, G3 grading, close margins, and young age has increased. Recently identified risk factors such as invasive lobular subtype and negative hormone receptor status were included. For patients with 1-3 positive lymph nodes, the recommendation for PMRT has reached the 1a level of evidence. PMRT is mandatory in patients with T4 tumors and/or positive lymph nodes and/or positive resection margins. PMRT should be strongly considered in patients with T3 N0 tumors and risk factors, particularly when two or more risk factors are present. (orig.) [de

  15. Radiolesions after radiotherapy of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbatucci, J.S.

    1975-01-01

    A study is presented of the late radiolesions which occur after breast cancer irradiation. These lesions are described and the etiological factors are studied, with special emphasis given to the effect of dose and time factors. For the large volume considered in the irradiation of breast cancers, the tolerance dose for normal tissue (skin and connective subcutaneous tissue) can be set at 1,700 rets, that is, 5,600 rads in 28 sessions of 200 rads over a period of 38 days. Technical irradiation problems are given special mention as they can be the cause of dosimetric errors resulting in complications. Dosimetry should be in the whole volume, and not only in a single plane, as is still most often the case [fr

  16. Radiolesions after radiotherapy of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbatucci, J S [Centre Regional de Lutte contre le Cancer, 14 - Caen (France)

    1975-11-01

    A study is presented of the late radiolesions which occur after breast cancer irradiation. These lesions are described and the etiological factors are studied, with special emphasis given to the effect of dose and time factors. For the large volume considered in the irradiation of breast cancers, the tolerance dose for normal tissue (skin and connective subcutaneous tissue) can be set at 1,700 rets, that is, 5,600 rads in 28 sessions of 200 rads over a period of 38 days. Technical irradiation problems are given special mention as they can be the cause of dosimetric errors resulting in complications. Dosimetry should be in the whole volume, and not only in a single plane, as is still most often the case.

  17. Development of Adjustable 3D computational phantoms for breast radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emam, Zohal Alnour Ahmed

    2016-06-01

    Radiotherapy has become an essential part of breast cancer treatment and it was given a great concern during last decades due to aspects of managing breast cancer successfully, reducing recurrence and breast cancer mortality. Monte Carlo simulation has been used heavily in this issue. To use monte Carlo the suitable data set must be found to perform the study. This process is not straight forward and difficult to achieve and an effort is needed to obtain it. In this work we aimed to develop a methodology for obtaining 3D adjustable computational phantoms with different breast sizes to treat this problem. At first make human software was used to generate outer surfaces models with desired anthropomorphic features for our purpose. Three breasts cup sizes have been developed: small (A), medium (C) and large (D) according to European standardization system of dress, then blender software was used to join skeleton and internal organs outer surfaces of the body models in correct anatomical positions and the results were poly mesh anthropomorphic phantom has three breast sizes easy to manipulate positioning and modifying, the prepared models have been voxelised in 3D matrixes (256*256*256) using Binvox software, then voxelised models prepared in suitable formats for Gate (mhd/raw) in 70 axial slice with voxel dimension of 1.394*1.394*5 mm 3 for width, depth and length respectively. Gate monte Carlo was used to simulate the irradiation of virtual tumor bed site in left breasts with direct field electron beam, each breast size was treated with five energies 6, 9, 12, 15, and 18 MeV by field size 5*5 cm 2 , and 100 cm source surface distance (SSD). The results were studied to evaluate the effect of breast size variation on dose distribution. According to criteria of tumor bed coverage by 100% 90% normalised maximum dose and minimum dose to heart and lug which are considering the organs at risks, results show the energy 6 MeV give under cover to tumor bed in the small, medium

  18. Objective assessment of dermatitis following post-operative radiotherapy in patients with breast cancer treated with breast-conserving treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Ken; Takenaka, Tadashi; Tanaka, Eiichi; Kuriyama, Keiko; Yoshida, Mineo; Yamazaki, Hideya; Nishimura, Tsunehiko; Kotsuma, Tadayuki; Fujita, Yuka; Masuda, Norikazu

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate radiation dermatitis objectively in patients with breast cancer who had undergone post-operative radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery. Skin color (L * , a * , and b * values) and moisture analyses were performed for both breasts (before, after, 1 month, 6 months, and 1 year after radiotherapy) to examine irradiated and non-irradiated skin divided into four quadrants in 118 patients. These patients underwent breast conservative surgery followed by 50 Gy/25 fractions (median) of radiotherapy with or without boost irradiation (10 Gy/5 fractions). L * , a * , and moisture values were changed by irradiation and maximized at completion or 1 month after radiotherapy. One year after radiotherapy, the skin color had returned to the range observed prior to radiotherapy. However, moisture did not return to previous values even 1 year after treatment. The lateral upper side (quadrant C) showed greater changes than other quadrants in the L * value (darker) at the end of radiotherapy. The Common Toxicity Criteria version 3 scores were found to correlate well with a * and L * values at the completion and 1 month after radiotherapy. Boost radiotherapy intensified reddish and darker color changes at the completion of radiotherapy, while chemotherapy did not intensify the skin reaction caused by radiotherapy. Moisture impairment as a result of irradiation lasts longer than color alterations. Objective assessments are useful for analyzing radiation dermatitis. (orig.)

  19. Consideration of safety of implant-based breast reconstruction with postreconstruction radiotherapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aomatsu, Naoki; Tei, Seika; Haraoka, Goichi

    2016-01-01

    There is controversy as to whether immediate autologous breast reconstruction followed by postoperative radiotherapy has acceptable complications and aesthetic outcomes. To evaluate the interval between surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation in patients treated with mastectomy and immediate expander-implant reconstruction, and to evaluate locoregional and distant control and cosmesis in these patients. Between 2011 and 2015, 9 patients with breast cancer were treated at our institution with definitive mastectomy and axillary lymph node dissection followed by immediate tissue expander placement and postreconstruction radiotherapy. We reviewed the complications of implant-based breast reconstruction followed by postreconstruction radiotherapy. The timing of irradiation was after implant insertion for 8 patients and after tissue expander insertion for 1 patient. The mean follow-up was 601 days. There were no unacceptable complications or local recurrences. For the majority of patients, overall symmetry, aesthetic results, and patient satisfaction were high. Breast reconstruction using tissue expansion and implants is an acceptable option for the subset of patients who may undergo postreconstruction radiotherapy. (author)

  20. Dosimetric comparison of intensity modulated radiotherapy techniques and standard wedged tangents for whole breast radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fong, Andrew; Bromley, Regina; Beat, Mardi; Vien, Din; Dineley, Jude; Morgan, Graeme

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Prior to introducing intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for whole breast radiotherapy (WBRT) into our department we undertook a comparison of the dose parameters of several IMRT techniques and standard wedged tangents (SWT). Our aim was to improve the dose distribution to the breast and to decrease the dose to organs at risk (OAR): heart, lung and contralateral breast (Contra Br). Treatment plans for 20 women (10 right-sided and 10 left-sided) previously treated with SWT for WBRT were used to compare (a) SWT; (b) electronic compensators IMRT (E-IMRT); (c) tangential beam IMRT (T-IMRT); (d) coplanar multi-field IMRT (CP-IMRT); and (e) non-coplanar multi-field IMRT (NCP-IMRT). Plans for the breast were compared for (i) dose homogeneity (DH); (ii) conformity index (CI); (iii) mean dose; (iv) maximum dose; (v) minimum dose; and dose to OAR were calculated (vi) heart; (vii) lung and (viii) Contra Br. Compared with SWT, all plans except CP-IMRT gave improvement in at least two of the seven parameters evaluated. T-IMRT and NCP-IMRT resulted in significant improvement in all parameters except DH and both gave significant reduction in doses to OAR. As on initial evaluation NCP-IMRT is likely to be too time consuming to introduce on a large scale, T-IMRT is the preferred technique for WBRT for use in our department.

  1. Analysis of whole Breast Radiotherapy Methods for Treatment of Early Stage Breast Cancer after Conserving Surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utehina, O.; Popovs, S.; Berzins, J.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction. At present moment breast cancer in Latvia is at second place for whole population and at first place among women. In year 2004 there were 1012 new breast cancer cases discovered. There was growth in number of breast cancer patients from 58.6 per 100 000 inhabitants in 1995 to 80.4 per 100 000 inhabitants in 2004. This growth is primarily attributed to breast cancer screening program which is nowadays active in Latvia. Breast cancer is third death cause among cancers in Latvia, - in 1995 there where 27.4 deaths per 100 000 inhabitants and in 2004 - 36.2 deaths per 100 000 inhabitants. Due to screening program there is increasing number of patients with stage I and II breast cancer. In 2004 toe where 9884 women with breast cancer registered in Latvian Cancer Registry and among them 79 percent were presented as stage I or II. Breast conservative surgery with adjuvant radiotherapy as standard part of it plays great role in breast cancer treatment in our Center. In year 2004 there were 103 breast conservative surgeries performed in our Center. Radiotherapy is a standard part of treatment in modem breast saving operations for early stage breast cancer, At present, only whole breast postoperative irradiation is performed in Latvia. For selected group of patients this treatment can be substituted with other radiotherapy methods in order to reduce acute reactions and/or late toxicity, maintaining the same tumor control. Aim of this work is to show that during whole breast irradiation dose maximum and tissue volume which receives doses more than 105% from prescribed dose, is linked with size of treated volume (treated volume - tissue volume receiving > 95% from prescribed dose), which is strictly linked with breast volume. Because of this for large breast volumes there is higher complication probability performing whole breast irradiation, and it seems to be meaningful to use Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy or Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation for

  2. Significance of breast boost volume changes during radiotherapy in relation to current clinical interobserver variations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurkmans, Coen; Admiraal, Marjan; Sangen, Maurice van der; Dijkmans, Ingrid

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Nowadays, many departments introduce CT images for breast irradiation techniques, aiming to obtain a better accuracy in the definition of the relevant target volumes. However, the definition of the breast boost volume based on CT images requires further investigation, because it may not only vary between observers, but it may also change during the course of treatment. This study aims to quantify the variability of the CT based visible boost volume (VBV) during the course of treatment in relation to the variability between observers. Materials and methods: Ten patients with stage T1-2 invasive breast cancer treated with breast conservative surgery and post surgical radiotherapy were included in this study. In addition to the regular planning CT which is obtained several days prior to radiotherapy, three additional CT scans were acquired 3, 5 and 7 weeks after the planning CT scan. Four radiation oncologists delineated the VBV in all scans. Conformity of the delineations was analysed both between observers, and between scans taken at different periods of the radiotherapy treatment. Results: The VBV averaged over all patients decreased during the course of the treatment from an initial 40 cm 3 to 28 cm 3 , 27 cm 3 and 25 cm 3 after 3, 5 and 7 weeks, respectively. Assuming the VBV to be spherical, this corresponds to a reduction in diameter of 5-6 mm. More detailed analysis revealed that this reduction was more pronounced when radiotherapy started within 30 days after surgery. These boost volume changes over time were found to be significant (p = 0.02) even in the presence of interobserver variations. Moreover, the conformity index (CI) for the volume changes was of the same magnitude as the conformity index for the interobserver variation (0.25 and 0.31, respectively). Conclusions: Breast boost volume variations during a course of radiotherapy are significant in relation to current clinical interobserver variations. This is an important

  3. Omission of Breast Radiotherapy in Low-risk Luminal A Breast Cancer: Impact on Health Care Costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, K; Yap, M L; Yong, J H E; Mittmann, N; Hoch, J S; Fyles, A W; Warde, P; Gutierrez, E; Lymberiou, T; Foxcroft, S; Liu, F F

    2016-09-01

    The economic burden of cancer care is substantial, including steep increases in costs for breast cancer management. There is mounting evidence that women age ≥ 60 years with grade I/II T1N0 luminal A (ER/PR+, HER2- and Ki67 ≤ 13%) breast cancer have such low local recurrence rates that adjuvant breast radiotherapy might offer limited value. We aimed to determine the total savings to a publicly funded health care system should omission of radiotherapy become standard of care for these patients. The number of women aged ≥ 60 years who received adjuvant radiotherapy for T1N0 ER+ HER2- breast cancer in Ontario was obtained from the provincial cancer agency. The cost of adjuvant breast radiotherapy was estimated through activity-based costing from a public payer perspective. The total saving was calculated by multiplying the estimated number of luminal A cases that received radiotherapy by the cost of radiotherapy minus Ki-67 testing. In 2010, 748 women age ≥ 60 years underwent surgery for pT1N0 ER+ HER2- breast cancer; 539 (72%) underwent adjuvant radiotherapy, of whom 329 were estimated to be grade I/II luminal A subtype. The cost of adjuvant breast radiotherapy per case was estimated at $6135.85; the cost of Ki-67 at $114.71. This translated into an annual saving of about $2.0million if radiotherapy was omitted for all low-risk luminal A breast cancer patients in Ontario and $5.1million across Canada. There will be significant savings to the health care system should omission of radiotherapy become standard practice for women with low-risk luminal A breast cancer. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Risk of ischemic heart disease in women after radiotherapy for breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darby, Sarah C.; Ewertz, Marianne; McGale, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Radiotherapy for breast cancer often involves some incidental exposure of the heart to ionizing radiation. The effect of this exposure on the subsequent risk of ischemic heart disease is uncertain.......Radiotherapy for breast cancer often involves some incidental exposure of the heart to ionizing radiation. The effect of this exposure on the subsequent risk of ischemic heart disease is uncertain....

  5. Portal verification for breast cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petkovska, Sonja; Pejkovikj, Sasho; Apostolovski, Nebojsha

    2013-01-01

    At the University Clinic in Skopje, breast cancer irradiation is being planned and performed by using a mono-iso centrical method, which means that a unique isocenter (I C) for all irradiation fields is used. The goal of this paper is to present the patient’s position in all coordinates before the first treatment session, relative to the position determined during the CT simulation. Deviation of up to 5 mm is allowed. The analysis was made by using a portal verification. Sixty female patients at random selection are reviewed. The matching results show that for each patient deviation exists at least on one axis. The largest deviations are in the longitudinal direction (head-feet) up to 4 mm, mean 1.8 mm. In 60 out of 85 analysed fields, the deviation is towards the head. In lateral direction, median deviation is 1.1 mm and in 65% of the analysed portals those deviations are in medial direction – contralateral breast which can increases the dose in the lung and in the contralateral breast. This deviation for supraclavicular field can increase the dose in the spinal cord. Although these doses are well below the limit, this fact should be taken into account in setting the treatment fields. The final conclusion from the research is that despite of the fact we are dealing with small deviations, in conditions when accuracy in positioning is done with portal, the portal verification needs to be done in the coming weeks of the treatment, not only before the first treatment. This provides information for an intra fractional set-up deviation. (Author)

  6. External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) techniques used in breast cancer treatment to reduce cardiac exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fung, Esther; Hendry, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Radiotherapy in breast cancer treatment has been shown to reduce local recurrence and improve survival rates. However, there is a concern that breast radiotherapy can cause an increase in cardiac mortality, particularly in patients being treated for left-sided breast cancer. This review aims to investigate how cardiac exposure is minimised in breast radiotherapy and determine an optimal method for reducing cardiac dose, using literature from ScienceDirect, Medline and CINAHL. IMRT and breathing-adapted radiotherapy both reduce cardiac exposure but IMRT also increases the irradiated volume at low dose. Several issues were reported with regards to the clinical implementation of these techniques. It is suggested that inspiration breath-hold radiotherapy, is the preferred solution to minimising cardiac exposure but more research is warranted to confirm this. Long-term follow-up is required to determine dose–response relationships. Research needs to focus on breast cancer treatment as a whole in order to effectively reduce cardiac mortality.

  7. Prone breast radiotherapy in early-stage breast cancer: a preliminary analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grann, Alison; McCormick, Beryl; Chabner, Elizabeth S.; Gollamudi, Smitha V.; Schupak, Karen D.; Mychalczak, Borys R.; Heerdt, Alexandra S.; Merchant, Thomas E.; Hunt, Margie A.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: Women with large breasts have marked dose inhomogeneity and often an inferior cosmetic outcome when treated with breast conservation compared to smaller-sized patients. We designed a prone breast board, which both minimizes breast separation and irradiated lung or heart volume. We report feasibility, cosmesis, and preliminary local control and survival for selected women with Stage 0-II breast cancer. Materials and Methods: Fifty-six patients with clinical Stage 0-II breast cancer were treated with lumpectomy and breast irradiation utilizing a prototype prone breast board. A total of 59 breasts were treated. Indications for treatment in the prone position were large or pendulous breast size (n = 57), or a history of cardiopulmonary disease (n = 2). The median bra size was 41D (range, 34D-44EE). Cosmesis was evaluated on a 1-10 (worst-to-best) scale. Results: Acute toxicity included skin erythema (80% of patients experienced Grade I or Grade II erythema), breast edema (72% of patients experienced mild edema), pruritus (20% of patients), and fatigue (20% of patients reported mild fatigue). One patient required a treatment break. The only late toxicity was related to long-term cosmesis. The mean overall cosmesis score for 53 patients was 9.37 (range, 8-10). Actuarial 3- and 5-year local control rates are 98%. Actuarial overall survival at 3 and 5 years are 98% and 94%. Conclusion: Our data indicate that treating selected women with prone breast radiotherapy is feasible and tolerated. The approach results in excellent cosmesis, and short-term outcome is comparable to traditional treatment techniques. This technique offers an innovative alternative to women who might not otherwise be considered candidates for breast conservation

  8. Fetal dose evaluation during breast cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antypas, Christos; Sandilos, Panagiotis; Kouvaris, John; Balafouta, Ersi; Karinou, Eleftheria; Kollaros, Nikos; Vlahos, Lambros

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the work was to estimate the radiation dose delivered to the fetus in a pregnant patient irradiated for breast cancer. Methods and Materials: A 45-year woman was treated for left breast cancer using a 6 MV photon beam with two isocentric opposing tangential unwedged fields. Daily dose was 2.3 Gy at 95% isodose line given by two fields/day, 5 days/week. A total dose of 46 Gy was given in 20 fractions over a 4-week period. Pregnancy confirmed during the second therapeutic week. Treatment lasted between the second and sixth gestation week. Radiation dose to fetus was estimated from in vivo and phantom measurements using thermoluminescence dosimeters and an ionization chamber. In vivo measurements were performed by inserting either a catheter with TL dosimeters or ionization chamber into the patient's rectum. Phantom measurements were performed by simulating the treatment conditions on an anthropomorphic phantom. Results: TLD measurements (in vivo and phantom) revealed fetal dose to be 0.085% of the tumor dose, corresponding to a cumulative fetal dose of 3.9 cGy for the entire treatment of 46 Gy. Chamber measurements (in vivo and phantom) revealed a fetal dose less than the TLD result: 0.079 and 0.083% of the tumor dose corresponding to cumulative fetal dose of 3.6 cGy and 3.8 cGy for in vivo and phantom measurement, respectively. Conclusions: It was concluded that the cumulative dose delivered to the unshielded fetus was 3.9 cGy for a 46 Gy total tumor dose. The estimated fetal dose is low compared to the total tumor dose given due to the early stage of pregnancy, the large distance between fundus-radiation field, and the fact that no wedges and/or lead blocks were used. No deterministic biological effects of radiation on the live-born embryo are expected. The lifetime risk for radiation-induced fatal cancer is higher than the normal incidence, but is considered as inconsequential

  9. The Effect of Breast Reconstruction Prosthesis on Photon Dose Distribution in Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    fatemeh sari

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Siliconeprosthetic implants are commonlyutilizedfor tissue replacement and breast augmentation after mastectomy. On the other hand, some patients require adjuvant radiotherapy in order to preventlocal-regional recurrence and increment ofthe overall survival. In case of recurrence, the radiation oncologist might have to irradiate the prosthesis.The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of silicone prosthesis on photon dose distribution in breast radiotherapy. Materials and Methods: The experimental dosimetry was performed using theprosthetic breast phantom and the female-equivalent mathematical chest phantom. A Computerized Tomographybased treatment planning was performedusing a phantom and by CorePlan Treatment Planning System (TPS. For measuring the absorbed dose, thermoluminescent dosimeter(TLD chips (GR-207A were used. Multiple irradiations were completed for all the TLD positions, and the dose absorbed by the TLDs was read by a lighttelemetry (LTM reader. Results: Statistical comparisons were performed between the absorbed dosesassessed by the TLDs and the TPS calculations forthe same sites. Our initial resultsdemonstratedanacceptable agreement (P=0.064 between the treatment planning data and the measurements. The mean difference between the TPS and TLD resultswas 1.99%.The obtained findings showed that radiotherapy is compatible withsilicone gel prosthesis. Conclusion: It could be concludedthat the siliconbreast prosthesis has no clinicallysignificant effectondistribution of a 6 MV photon beam for reconstructed breasts.

  10. DEGRO practical guidelines: radiotherapy of breast cancer II. Radiotherapy of non-invasive neoplasia of the breast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souchon, R. [University Hospital Tuebingen, Klinik fuer Radioonkologie, Tuebingen (Germany); Sautter-Bihl, M.L. [Municipal Hospital Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe (Germany); Sedlmayer, F. [LKH Salzburg, Paracelsus Medical University Hospital, Salzburg (Austria); Budach, W. [University Hospital Duesseldorf, Duesseldorf (Germany); Dunst, J. [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Luebeck (Germany); Feyer, P. [Klinikum Neukoelln, Berlin (Germany); Fietkau, R.; Sauer, R. [University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Harms, W. [St. Clara Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Wenz, F. [University Hospital Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Haase, W.

    2014-01-15

    To complement and update the 2007 practice guidelines of the breast cancer expert panel of the German Society of Radiation Oncology (DEGRO) for radiotherapy (RT) of breast cancer. Owing to its growing clinical relevance, in the current version, a separate paper is dedicated to non-invasive proliferating epithelial neoplasia of the breast. In addition to the more general statements of the German interdisciplinary S3 guidelines, this paper is especially focused on indication and technique of RT in addition to breast conserving surgery. The DEGRO expert panel performed a comprehensive survey of the literature comprising recently published data from clinical controlled trials, systematic reviews as well as meta-analyses, referring to the criteria of evidence-based medicine yielding new aspects compared to 2005 and 2007. The literature search encompassed the period 2008 to September 2012 using databases of PubMed and Guidelines International Network (G-I-N). Search terms were ''non invasive breast cancer'', ''ductal carcinoma in situ, ''dcis'', ''borderline breast lesions'', ''lobular neoplasia'', ''radiotherapy'' and ''radiation therapy''. In addition to the more general statements of the German interdisciplinary S3 guidelines, this paper is especially focused on indications of RT and decision making of non-invasive neoplasia of the breast after surgery, especially ductal carcinoma in situ. Among different non-invasive neoplasia of the breast only the subgroup of pure ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS; synonym ductal intraepithelial neoplasia, DIN) is considered for further recurrence risk reduction treatment modalities after complete excision of DCIS, particularly RT following breast conserving surgery (BCS), in order to avoid a mastectomy. About half of recurrences are invasive cancers. Up to 50?% of all recurrences require salvage mastectomy

  11. DEGRO practical guidelines: radiotherapy of breast cancer III - radiotherapy of the lymphatic pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sautter-Bihl, M.L. [Staedtisches Klinikum Karlsruhe, Klinik fuer Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie, Karlsruhe (Germany); Sedlmayer, F.; Fussl, C. [LKH Salzburg, Paracelsus Medical University Hospital, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Salzburg (Austria); Budach, W. [University Hospital Duesseldorf, Duesseldorf (Germany); Dunst, J. [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Luebeck (Germany); Feyer, P. [Klinikum Neukoelln, Berlin (Germany); Fietkau, R.; Sauer, R. [University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Harms, W. [St. Clara Hospital, Basel, Basel (Switzerland); Piroth, M.D. [Helios-Klinikum Wuppertal, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Wuppertal (Germany); Souchon, R. [University Hospital Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Wenz, F. [University Hospital Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Haase, W.

    2014-04-15

    The purpose of this work is to update the practical guidelines for adjuvant radiotherapy of the regional lymphatics of breast cancer published in 2008 by the breast cancer expert panel of the German Society of Radiation Oncology (DEGRO). A comprehensive survey of the literature concerning regional nodal irradiation (RNI) was performed using the following search terms: ''breast cancer'', ''radiotherapy'', ''regional node irradiation''. Recent randomized trials were analyzed for outcome as well as for differences in target definition. Field arrangements in the different studies were reproduced and superimposed on CT slices with individually contoured node areas. Moreover, data from recently published meta-analyses and guidelines of international breast cancer societies, yielding new aspects compared to 2008, provided the basis for defining recommendations according to the criteria of evidence-based medicine. In addition to the more general statements of the German interdisciplinary S3 guidelines updated in 2012, this paper addresses indications, targeting, and techniques of radiotherapy of the lymphatic pathways after surgery for breast cancer. International guidelines reveal substantial differences regarding indications for RNI. Patients with 1-3 positive nodes seem to profit from RNI compared to whole breast (WBI) or chest wall irradiation alone, both with regard to locoregional control and disease-free survival. Irradiation of the regional lymphatics including axillary, supraclavicular, and internal mammary nodes provided a small but significant survival benefit in recent randomized trials and one meta-analysis. Lymph node irradiation yields comparable tumor control in comparison to axillary lymph node dissection (ALND), while reducing the rate of lymph edema. Data concerning the impact of 1-2 macroscopically affected sentinel node (SN) or microscopic metastases on prognosis are conflicting. Recent data

  12. DEGRO practical guidelines for radiotherapy of breast cancer IV. Radiotherapy following mastectomy for invasive breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenz, Frederik; Sperk, Elena [Universitaetsmedizin Mannheim, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Mannheim (Germany); Budach, Wilfried [Heinrich-Heine-University, Duesseldorf (Germany); Dunst, Juergen [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Luebeck (Germany); Feyer, Petra [Vivantes Hospital Neukoelln, Berlin (Germany); Fietkau, Rainer; Sauer, Rolf [University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Haase, Wulf [Formerly St.-Vincentius-Hospital, Karlsruhe (Germany); Harms, Wolfgang [St. Clara Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Piroth, Marc D. [Helios Hospital, Wuppertal (Germany); Sautter-Bihl, Marie-Luise [Municipal Hospital, Karlsruhe (Germany); Sedlmayer, Felix; Fussl, Christoph [Paracelsus Medical University Hospital, Salzburg (Germany); Souchon, Rainer; Collaboration: Breast Cancer Expert Panel of the German Society of Radiation Oncology (DEGRO)

    2014-08-15

    Since the last recommendations from the Breast Cancer Expert Panel of the German Society for Radiation Oncology (DEGRO) in 2008, evidence for the effectiveness of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) has grown. This growth is based on updates of the national S3 and international guidelines, as well as on new data and meta-analyses. New aspects were considered when updating the DEGRO recommendations. The authors performed a comprehensive survey of the literature. Data from recently published (meta-)analyses, randomized clinical trials and international cancer societies' guidelines yielding new aspects compared to 2008 were reviewed and discussed. New aspects were included in the current guidelines. Specific issues relating to particular PMRT constellations, such as the presence of risk factors (lymphovascular invasion, blood vessel invasion, positive lymph node ratio > 20 %, resection margins < 3 mm, G3 grading, young age/premenopausal status, extracapsular invasion, negative hormone receptor status, invasive lobular cancer, size > 2 cm or a combination of ≥ 2 risk factors) and 1-3 positive lymph nodes are emphasized. The evidence for improved overall survival and local control following PMRT for T4 tumors, positive resection margins, > 3 positive lymph nodes and in T3 N0 patients with risk factors such as lymphovascular invasion, G3 grading, close margins, and young age has increased. Recently identified risk factors such as invasive lobular subtype and negative hormone receptor status were included. For patients with 1-3 positive lymph nodes, the recommendation for PMRT has reached the 1a level of evidence. PMRT is mandatory in patients with T4 tumors and/or positive lymph nodes and/or positive resection margins. PMRT should be strongly considered in patients with T3 N0 tumors and risk factors, particularly when two or more risk factors are present. (orig.) [German] Seit der letzten Aktualisierung der 2008 publizierten Leitlinie der &apos

  13. Persistent pain after targeted intraoperative radiotherapy (TARGIT) or external breast radiotherapy for breast cancer: A randomized trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kenneth Geving; Gärtner, Rune; Kroman, Niels

    2012-01-01

    for participation, and a total of 244 patients were included and received a detailed questionnaire. The response rate was 98%, leaving 238 patients for the final analysis. Pain prevalence were 33.9% in the EBRT group and 24.6% in the IORT group (p = 0.11). Treatment with IORT may not alter the risk of PPBCT.......Persistent pain after breast cancer treatment (PPBCT) affects between 25 and 60% of patients depending on surgical and adjuvant treatment. External breast radiotherapy (EBRT) has been shown to be a riskfactor for PPBCT, raising the question whether intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT), with its...... smaller radiation field may reduce the development of PPBCT. Using data from the TARGIT-A trial, the aim of this study was to compare these two treatments with regard to development of PPBCT. A total of 281 patients enrolled in the TARGIT-A trial from the Copenhagen University Hospitals was screened...

  14. Cardiac avoidance in breast radiotherapy: a comparison of simple shielding techniques with intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landau, David; Adams, Elizabeth J.; Webb, Steve; Ross, Gillian

    2001-01-01

    Background and purpose: Adjuvant breast radiotherapy (RT) is now part of the routine care of patients with early breast cancer. However, analysis of the Early Breast Cancer Trialists' Collaborative suggests that patients with the lowest risk of dying of breast cancer are at significant risk of cardiac mortality due to longer relapse-free survival. Patients with a significant amount of heart in the high-dose volume have been shown to be at risk of fatal cardiac events. This study was designed to assess whether conformal planning or intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) techniques allow reduced cardiac irradiation whilst maintaining full target coverage. Material and methods: Ten patients with early breast cancer were available for computed tomography (CT) planning. Each had at least 1 cm maximum heart depth within the posterior border of conventional tangents. For each patient, plans were generated and compared using dose volume histograms for planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk. The plans included conventional tangents with and without shielding. The shielding was designed to either completely spare the heart or to shield as much heart as possible without compromising PTV coverage. IMRT plans were also prepared using two- and four-field tangential and six-field arc-like beam arrangements. Results: PTV homogeneity was better for the tangential IMRT techniques. For all patients, cardiac irradiation was reduced by the addition of partial cardiac shielding to conventional tangents, without compromise of PTV coverage. The two- and four-field IMRT techniques also reduced heart doses. The average percentage volume of heart receiving >60% of the prescription dose was 4.4% (range 1.0-7.1%) for conventional tangents, 1.5% (0.2-3.9%) for partial shielding, 2.3% (0.5-4.6%) for the two-field IMRT technique and 2.2% (0.4-5.6%) for the four-field IMRT technique. For patients with larger maximum heart depths the four-field IMRT plan achieved greater heart sparing

  15. Accelerated superfractionated radiotherapy for inflammatory breast carcinoma: complete response predicts outcome and allows for breast conservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthur, Douglas W.; Schmidt-Ullrich, Rupert K.; Friedman, Richard B.; Wazer, David E.; Kachnic, Lisa A.; Amir, Cyrus; Bear, Harry D.; Hackney, Mary Helen; Smith, Thomas J.; Lawrence, Walter

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Chemotherapy and accelerated superfractionated radiotherapy were prospectively applied for inflammatory breast carcinoma with the intent of breast conservation. The efficacy, failure patterns, and patient tolerance utilizing this approach were analyzed. Methods and Materials: Between 1983 and 1996, 52 patients with inflammatory breast carcinoma presented to the Medical College of Virginia Hospitals of VCU and the New England Medical Center. Thirty-eight of these patients were jointly evaluated in multidisciplinary breast clinics and managed according to a defined prospectively applied treatment policy. Patients received induction chemotherapy, accelerated superfractionated radiotherapy, selected use of mastectomy, and concluded with additional chemotherapy. The majority were treated with 1.5 Gy twice daily to field arrangements covering the entire breast and regional lymphatics. An additional 18-21 Gy was then delivered to the breast and clinically involved nodal regions. Total dose to clinically involved areas was 63-66 Gy. Following chemoradiotherapy, patients were evaluated with physical examination, mammogram, and fine needle aspiration x 3. Mastectomy was reserved for those patients with evidence of persistent or progressive disease in the involved breast. All patients received additional chemotherapy. Results: Median age was 51 years. Median follow-up was 23.9 months (6-86) months. The breast preservation rate at the time of last follow-up was 74%. The treated breast or chest wall as the first site of failure occurred in only 13%, and the ultimate local control rate with the selected use of mastectomy was 74%. Ten patients underwent mastectomy, 2 of which had pathologically negative specimens despite a clinically palpable residual mass. Response to chemotherapy was predictive of treatment outcome. Of the 15 patients achieving a complete response, 87% remain locoregionally controlled without the use of mastectomy. Five-year overall survival for

  16. Epidemiological survey of breast and cervical radiotherapy patients in 2008-2010 from the state of Pernambuco, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Mariana L.O.; Cantinha, Rebeca S.; Franca, Elvis J., E-mail: ejfranca@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: marianasantos_ufpe@hotmail.com, E-mail: rebecanuclear@gmail.com [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Oliveira Neto, Aristides M.; Melo, Jonathan A., E-mail: aristidesoliveira466@hotmail.com, E-mail: jonathan@truenet.com.br [Centro de Radioterapia de Pernambuco (CERAPE), Santo Amaro, PE (Brazil); Pessoa, Juanna G.; Melo, Ana M.M.A.; Amancio, Francisco F., E-mail: amdemelo@hotmail.com, E-mail: amanciobike@gmail.com, E-mail: juannapessoa@gmail.com, E-mail: marianasantos_ufpe@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Departamento de Biofisica e Radiobiologia

    2014-07-01

    Breast and cervical cancer are, respectively, the second and the third most common cancers that affect the female population. The State of Pernambuco, Brazil, is one of the highest occurrence of both cancers. Radiotherapy is a powerful alternative usually associated to surgery and chemotherapy for cancer treatment. The knowledge of the disease characteristics, as well as the patient profile, contributes for public policy delineation for prevention, treatment and control of breast and cervical cancers. This work investigated the characteristics concerning patients affected by these diseases, also analyzing intrinsic aspects of the tumor. In the period of the years of 2008, 2009 and 2010, age and region of origin of patients treated by radiotherapy were compiled based on medical records available at the Center of Radiotherapy of Pernambuco (CERAPE), which is the reference center for radiotherapy in Pernambuco. Moreover, the staging of the tumor were evaluated. Results showed that 317 patients were treated in this period for breast cancer, and, in 2010, the highest number of registered cases was observed with 162 diagnosed patients for breast cancer. In the total evaluated period, 306 cases were reported for cervix cancer, however, almost 40% (118 patients) occurred only in 2010. Breast cancer has affected individuals of 50-55 years old, while those from 40 to 60 years old were mostly affected by cervix cancer. There was the highest prevalence of patients originated from the Metropolitan Region of Recife - MRR for both cancers. Stage III was predominated in cervix cancer, while stage II for breast cancer. Although most of patients have been from MRR, this region might not be the most affected by breast and cervix cancer, considering the lack of information on the interior population especially concerning to radiotherapy. It seems that the number of women with breast and cervical cancer has increased in recent years. Considering the risk factors such as physical

  17. Epidemiological survey of breast and cervical radiotherapy patients in 2008-2010 from the state of Pernambuco, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Mariana L.O.; Cantinha, Rebeca S.; Franca, Elvis J.; Oliveira Neto, Aristides M.; Melo, Jonathan A.; Pessoa, Juanna G.; Melo, Ana M.M.A.; Amancio, Francisco F.

    2014-01-01

    Breast and cervical cancer are, respectively, the second and the third most common cancers that affect the female population. The State of Pernambuco, Brazil, is one of the highest occurrence of both cancers. Radiotherapy is a powerful alternative usually associated to surgery and chemotherapy for cancer treatment. The knowledge of the disease characteristics, as well as the patient profile, contributes for public policy delineation for prevention, treatment and control of breast and cervical cancers. This work investigated the characteristics concerning patients affected by these diseases, also analyzing intrinsic aspects of the tumor. In the period of the years of 2008, 2009 and 2010, age and region of origin of patients treated by radiotherapy were compiled based on medical records available at the Center of Radiotherapy of Pernambuco (CERAPE), which is the reference center for radiotherapy in Pernambuco. Moreover, the staging of the tumor were evaluated. Results showed that 317 patients were treated in this period for breast cancer, and, in 2010, the highest number of registered cases was observed with 162 diagnosed patients for breast cancer. In the total evaluated period, 306 cases were reported for cervix cancer, however, almost 40% (118 patients) occurred only in 2010. Breast cancer has affected individuals of 50-55 years old, while those from 40 to 60 years old were mostly affected by cervix cancer. There was the highest prevalence of patients originated from the Metropolitan Region of Recife - MRR for both cancers. Stage III was predominated in cervix cancer, while stage II for breast cancer. Although most of patients have been from MRR, this region might not be the most affected by breast and cervix cancer, considering the lack of information on the interior population especially concerning to radiotherapy. It seems that the number of women with breast and cervical cancer has increased in recent years. Considering the risk factors such as physical

  18. Patient Preferences and Physician Practice Patterns Regarding Breast Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoopes, David J., E-mail: david.hoopes@wpafb.af.mil [Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, WPAFB, OH (United States); Kaziska, David; Chapin, Patrick [Air Force Institute of Technology, WPAFB, OH (United States); Weed, Daniel [Clarian Healthcare, Methodist Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Smith, Benjamin D. [M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Houston, TX (United States); Hale, E. Ronald [Wright-Patterson Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, WPAFB, OH (United States); Johnstone, Peter A. [Indiana University School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: There are multiple current strategies for breast radiotherapy (RT). The alignment of physician practice patterns with best evidence and patient preferences will enhance patient autonomy and improve cancer care. However, there is little information describing patient preferences for breast RT and physician practice patterns. Methods and Materials: Using a reliable and valid instrument, we assessed the preferences of 5,000 randomly selected women (with or without cancer) undergoing mammography. To assess practice patterns, 2,150 randomly selected physician-members of American Society for Radiation Oncology were surveyed. Results: A total of 1,807 women (36%) and 363 physicians (17%) provided usable responses. The 95% confidence interval is < {+-}2.3% for patients and < {+-}5.3% for physicians. Patient preferences were hypofractionated whole breast irradiation (HF-WBI) 62%, partial breast irradiation (PBI) 28%, and conventionally fractionated whole breast irradiation (CF-WBI) 10%. By comparison, 82% of physicians use CF-WBI for more than 2/3 of women and 56% never use HF-WBI. With respect to PBI, 62% of women preferred three-dimensional (3D)-PBI and 38% favor brachytherapy-PBI, whereas 36% of physicians offer 3D-PBI and 66% offer brachytherapy-PBI. 70% of women prefer once-daily RT over 10 days vs. twice-daily RT over 5 days. 55% of physicians who use PBI do not offer PBI on clinical trial. Conclusions: HF-WBI, while preferred by patients and supported by evidence, falls behind the unproven and less preferred strategy of PBI in clinical practice. There is a discrepancy between women's preferences for PBI modality and type of PBI offered by physicians. Further alignment is needed between practice patterns, patient preferences, and clinical evidence.

  19. Patient Preferences and Physician Practice Patterns Regarding Breast Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoopes, David J.; Kaziska, David; Chapin, Patrick; Weed, Daniel; Smith, Benjamin D.; Hale, E. Ronald; Johnstone, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: There are multiple current strategies for breast radiotherapy (RT). The alignment of physician practice patterns with best evidence and patient preferences will enhance patient autonomy and improve cancer care. However, there is little information describing patient preferences for breast RT and physician practice patterns. Methods and Materials: Using a reliable and valid instrument, we assessed the preferences of 5,000 randomly selected women (with or without cancer) undergoing mammography. To assess practice patterns, 2,150 randomly selected physician-members of American Society for Radiation Oncology were surveyed. Results: A total of 1,807 women (36%) and 363 physicians (17%) provided usable responses. The 95% confidence interval is < ±2.3% for patients and < ±5.3% for physicians. Patient preferences were hypofractionated whole breast irradiation (HF-WBI) 62%, partial breast irradiation (PBI) 28%, and conventionally fractionated whole breast irradiation (CF-WBI) 10%. By comparison, 82% of physicians use CF-WBI for more than 2/3 of women and 56% never use HF-WBI. With respect to PBI, 62% of women preferred three-dimensional (3D)-PBI and 38% favor brachytherapy-PBI, whereas 36% of physicians offer 3D-PBI and 66% offer brachytherapy-PBI. 70% of women prefer once-daily RT over 10 days vs. twice-daily RT over 5 days. 55% of physicians who use PBI do not offer PBI on clinical trial. Conclusions: HF-WBI, while preferred by patients and supported by evidence, falls behind the unproven and less preferred strategy of PBI in clinical practice. There is a discrepancy between women’s preferences for PBI modality and type of PBI offered by physicians. Further alignment is needed between practice patterns, patient preferences, and clinical evidence.

  20. Angiosarcoma after breast-conserving therapy: experience with hyperfractionated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feigenberg, Steven J.; Price Mendenhall, Nancy; Reith, John D.; Ward, Jon R.; Copeland, Edward M.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To report our promising results of hyperfractionated radiotherapy (RT) in conjunction with surgery for angiosarcoma occurring after breast-conserving therapy for early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Since 1997, 3 cases of angiosarcoma after breast-conserving therapy have been managed at the University of Florida. The histologic specimens in each case were reviewed and graded by one of us (J.D.R.). Results: Explosive growth of discolored skin lesions coincident with histologic evidence of angiosarcoma characterized all 3 cases but was preceded by a fairly indolent period (almost 2 years) of atypical vascular hyperplasia in 2 patients. All 3 patients were treated initially with radical surgery for the angiosarcoma, but extensive recurrences were noted within 1 to 2 months of surgery. Because of the extremely rapid growth noted before and after surgery, hyperfractionated RT was used. Two of the patients underwent planned resection after RT, and neither specimen demonstrated any evidence of high-grade angiosarcoma. All 3 patients were alive without any recurrent disease 22, 38, and 39 months after treatment. Conclusions: Hyperfractionated irradiation appears to be effective treatment for rapidly proliferating angiosarcoma. For previously untreated angiosarcoma, we now recommend hyperfractionated RT followed by surgery to enhance disease control and remove as much reirradiated tissue as possible

  1. Adjuvant radiotherapy after breast conserving surgery - a comparative effectiveness research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corradini, Stefanie; Niyazi, Maximilian; Niemoeller, Olivier M; Li, Minglun; Roeder, Falk; Eckel, Renate; Schubert-Fritschle, Gabriele; Scheithauer, Heike R; Harbeck, Nadia; Engel, Jutta; Belka, Claus

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective outcome study was to validate the effectiveness of postoperative radiotherapy in breast conserving therapy (BCT) and to evaluate possible causes for omission of radiotherapy after breast conserving surgery (BCS) in a non-trial population. Data were provided by the population-based Munich Cancer Registry. The study included epidemiological data of 30.811 patients diagnosed with breast cancer from 1998 to 2012. The effect of omitting radiotherapy was analysed using Kaplan-Meier-estimates and Cox proportional hazard regression. Variables predicting omission of radiotherapy were analysed using multivariate logistic regression. Use of postoperative radiotherapy after BCS was associated with significant improvements in local control and survival. 10-year loco-regional recurrence-free-survival was 90.8% with postoperative radiotherapy vs. 77.6% with surgery alone (pstudy shows a decrease in local control and a survival disadvantage if postoperative radiotherapy after breast conserving surgery is omitted in an unselected cohort of primary breast cancer patients. Due to its epidemiological nature, it cannot answer the question in whom postoperative radiotherapy can be safely omitted. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. High-dose simultaneously integrated breast boost using intensity-modulated radiotherapy and inverse optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurkmans, Coen W.; Meijer, Gert J.; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van; Sangen, Maurice J. van der; Cassee, Jorien

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Recently a Phase III randomized trial has started comparing a boost of 16 Gy as part of whole-breast irradiation to a high boost of 26 Gy in young women. Our main aim was to develop an efficient simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) technique for the high-dose arm of the trial. Methods and Materials: Treatment planning was performed for 5 left-sided and 5 right-sided tumors. A tangential field intensity-modulated radiotherapy technique added to a sequentially planned 3-field boost (SEQ) was compared with a simultaneously planned technique (SIB) using inverse optimization. Normalized total dose (NTD)-corrected dose volume histogram parameters were calculated and compared. Results: The intended NTD was produced by 31 fractions of 1.66 Gy to the whole breast and 2.38 Gy to the boost volume. The average volume of the PTV-breast and PTV-boost receiving more than 95% of the prescribed dose was 97% or more for both techniques. Also, the mean lung dose and mean heart dose did not differ much between the techniques, with on average 3.5 Gy and 2.6 Gy for the SEQ and 3.8 Gy and 2.6 Gy for the SIB, respectively. However, the SIB resulted in a significantly more conformal irradiation of the PTV-boost. The volume of the PTV-breast, excluding the PTV-boost, receiving a dose higher than 95% of the boost dose could be reduced considerably using the SIB as compared with the SEQ from 129 cc (range, 48-262 cc) to 58 cc (range, 30-102 cc). Conclusions: A high-dose simultaneously integrated breast boost technique has been developed. The unwanted excessive dose to the breast was significantly reduced

  3. Choosing wisely after publication of level I evidence in breast cancer radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niska JR

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Joshua R Niska,1 Sameer R Keole,1 Barbara A Pockaj,2 Michele Y Halyard,1 Samir H Patel,1 Donald W Northfelt,3 Richard J Gray,2 Nabil Wasif,2 Carlos E Vargas,1 William W Wong1 1Department of Radiation Oncology, 2Division of General Surgery, 3Division of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Mayo Clinic Hospital, Phoenix, AZ, USA Background: Recent trials in early-stage breast cancer support hypofractionated whole-breast radiotherapy (WBRT as part of breast-conserving therapy (BCT. Evidence also suggests that radiotherapy (RT omission may be reasonable for some patients over 70 years. Among radiation-delivery techniques, intensity-modulated RT (IMRT is more expensive than 3-dimensional conformal RT (3DCRT. Based on this evidence, in 2013, the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO recommended hypofractionated schedules for women aged ≥50 years with early-stage breast cancer and avoiding routine use of IMRT for WBRT. To assess response to level I evidence and adherence to ASTRO recommendations, we evaluated the pattern of RT use for early-stage breast cancer at our National Comprehensive Cancer Network institution from 2006 to 2008 and 2011 to 2013 and compared the results with national trends. Methods: Data from a prospective database were extracted to include patients treated with BCT, aged ≥50 years, with histologic findings of invasive ductal carcinoma, stage T1-T2N0M0, estrogen receptor-positive, and HER2 normal. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records and estimated costs based on 2016 Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment System (technical fees and Medicare Physician Fee Schedule (professional fees. Results: Among 55 cases from 2006 to 2008, treatment regimens were 11% hypofractionated, 69% traditional schedule, and 20% RT omission (29% of patients were aged >70 years. Among 83 cases from 2011 to 2013, treatment regimens were 54% hypofractionated, 19% traditional schedule, and 27% RT omission (48% of patients were aged >70

  4. Debate about breast cancer: 'Cons: Intraoperative radiotherapy'; Debats autour du cancer du sein: 'contre' la radiotherapie peroperatoire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourgier, C.; Heymann, S.; Verstraet, R.; Biron, B.; Marsiglia, H. [Departement de radiotherapie, institut Gustave-Roussy, 114, rue edouard-Vaillant, 94800 Villejuif (France)

    2011-10-15

    Early breast cancer incidence increases owing to mammography screening. Hypo-fractionated radiotherapy is more and more proposed in women with low local relapse risk breast cancer, especially accelerated partial breast irradiation. Various irradiation modalities have been reported: brachytherapy, intraoperative irradiation, 3D-conformal accelerated partial breast irradiation. We describe limitations of intraoperative irradiation and the advantages of alternative techniques. (authors)

  5. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wannenmacher, M.; Debus, J.; Wenz, F.

    2006-01-01

    The book is focussed on the actual knowledge on the clinical radiotherapy and radio-oncology. Besides fundamental and general contributions specific organ systems are treated in detail. The book contains the following contributions: Basic principles, radiobiological fundamentals, physical background, radiation pathology, basics and technique of brachytherapy, methodology and technique of the stereotactic radiosurgery, whole-body irradiation, operative radiotherapy, hadron therapy, hpyerthermia, combined radio-chemo-therapy, biometric clinical studies, intensity modulated radiotherapy, side effects, oncological diagnostics; central nervous system and sense organs, head-neck carcinomas, breast cancer, thorax organs, esophagus carcinoma, stomach carcinoma, pancreas carcinoma, heptabiliary cancer and liver metastases, rectal carcinomas, kidney and urinary tract, prostate carcinoma, testicular carcinoma, female pelvis, lymphatic system carcinomas, soft tissue carcinoma, skin cancer, bone metastases, pediatric tumors, nonmalignant diseases, emergency in radio-oncology, supporting therapy, palliative therapy

  6. Clinical Experience With Image-Guided Radiotherapy in an Accelerated Partial Breast Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonard, Charles E.; Tallhamer, Michael M.S.; Johnson, Tim; Hunter, Kari C.M.D.; Howell, Kathryn; Kercher, Jane; Widener, Jodi; Kaske, Terese; Paul, Devchand; Sedlacek, Scot; Carter, Dennis L.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To explore the feasibility of fiducial markers for the use of image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) in an accelerated partial breast intensity modulated radiotherapy protocol. Methods and Materials: Nineteen patients consented to an institutional review board approved protocol of accelerated partial breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy with fiducial marker placement and treatment with IGRT. Patients (1 patient with bilateral breast cancer; 20 total breasts) underwent ultrasound guided implantation of three 1.2- x 3-mm gold markers placed around the surgical cavity. For each patient, table shifts (inferior/superior, right/left lateral, and anterior/posterior) and minimum, maximum, mean error with standard deviation were recorded for each of the 10 BID treatments. The dose contribution of daily orthogonal films was also examined. Results: All IGRT patients underwent successful marker placement. In all, 200 IGRT treatment sessions were performed. The average vector displacement was 4 mm (range, 2-7 mm). The average superior/inferior shift was 2 mm (range, 0-5 mm), the average lateral shift was 2 mm (range, 1-4 mm), and the average anterior/posterior shift was 3 mm (range, 1 5 mm). Conclusions: This study shows that the use of IGRT can be successfully used in an accelerated partial breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy protocol. The authors believe that this technique has increased daily treatment accuracy and permitted reduction in the margin added to the clinical target volume to form the planning target volume.

  7. A case of bullous pemphigoid exacerbated by irradiation after breast conservative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isohashi, Fumiaki; Konishi, Koji; Umegaki, Noriko; Tanei, Tomonori; Koizumi, Masahiko; Yoshioka, Yasuo

    2011-01-01

    We present a case, considered to be a form of the Koebner phenomenon, of bullous pemphigoid that was exacerbated mainly within the irradiated field after breast conservative radiotherapy. In May 2009, a 60-year-old woman was diagnosed with bullous pemphigoid, which was treated with steroid therapy. The following month, she was diagnosed with breast cancer (invasive ductal carcinoma, pT1cN0M0). After breast conservative surgery in December 2009, conservative radiotherapy to the right breast was performed (50 Gy in 25 fractions). Portal skin showed no serious change (up to grade 1 skin erythema) and no bullous neogenesis during conservative radiotherapy. However, 2 months after conservative radiotherapy, new blisters became exacerbated mainly within the irradiated field but also in the area outside the irradiated field. Increasing the dosage of oral steroid and minocycline resulted in relief of bullous pemphigoid, although patchy skin pigmentation remained especially in the irradiated skin. (author)

  8. Breast cancer risk accumulation starts early: prevention must also.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colditz, Graham A; Bohlke, Kari; Berkey, Catherine S

    2014-06-01

    Nearly one in four breast cancers is diagnosed before the age of 50, and many early-stage premalignant lesions are present but not yet diagnosed. Therefore, we review evidence to support the strategy that breast cancer prevention efforts must begin early in life. This study follows the literature review methods and format. Exposures during childhood and adolescence affect a woman's long-term risk of breast cancer, but have received far less research attention than exposures that occur later in life. Breast tissue undergoes rapid cellular proliferation between menarche and first full-term pregnancy, and risk accumulates rapidly until the terminal differentiation that accompanies first pregnancy. Evidence on childhood diet and growth in height, and adolescent alcohol intake, among other adolescent factors is related to breast cancer risk and risk of premalignant proliferative benign lesions. Breast cancer prevention efforts will have the greatest effect when initiated at an early age and continued over a lifetime. Gaps in knowledge are identified and deserve increase attention to inform prevention.

  9. Breast cancer risk accumulation starts early – Prevention must also

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colditz, Graham A; Bohlke, Kari; Berkey, Catherine S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Nearly 1 in 4 breast cancers is diagnosed before the age of 50, and many early-stage premalignant lesions are present but not yet diagnosed. Therefore, we review evidence to support the strategy that breast cancer prevention efforts must begin early in life. Methods Literature review Results Exposures during childhood and adolescence affect a woman’s long-term risk of breast cancer, but have received far less research attention than exposures that occur later in life. Breast tissue undergoes rapid cellular proliferation between menarche and first full-term pregnancy, and risk accumulates rapidly until the terminal differentiation that accompanies first pregnancy. Evidence on childhood diet and growth in height, and adolescent alcohol intake, among other adolescent factors are related to breast cancer risk and risk of premalignant proliferative benign lesions. Conclusion Breast cancer prevention efforts will have the greatest effect when initiated at an early age and continued over a lifetime. Gaps in knowledge are identified and deserve increase attention to inform prevention. PMID:24820413

  10. Radiotherapy for breast cancer: respiratory and set-up uncertainties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saliou, M.G.; Giraud, P.; Simon, L.; Fournier-Bidoz, N.; Fourquet, A.; Dendale, R.; Rosenwald, J.C.; Cosset, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    Adjuvant Radiotherapy has been shown to significantly reduce locoregional recurrence but this advantage is associated with increased cardiovascular and pulmonary morbidities. All uncertainties inherent to conformal radiation therapy must be identified in order to increase the precision of treatment; misestimation of these uncertainties increases the potential risk of geometrical misses with, as a consequence, under-dosage of the tumor and/or overdosage of healthy tissues. Geometric uncertainties due to respiratory movements or set-up errors are well known. Two strategies have been proposed to limit their effect: quantification of these uncertainties, which are then taken into account in the final calculation of safety margins and/or reduction of respiratory and set-up uncertainties by an efficient immobilization or gating systems. Measured on portal films with two tangential fields. CLD (central lung distance), defined as the distance between the deep field edge and the interior chest wall at the central axis, seems to be the best predictor of set-up uncertainties. Using CLD, estimated mean set-up errors from the literature are 3.8 and 3.2 mm for the systematic and random errors respectively. These depend partly on the type of immobilization device and could be reduced by the use of portal imaging systems. Furthermore, breast is mobile during respiration with motion amplitude as high as 0.8 to 10 mm in the anteroposterior direction. Respiratory gating techniques, currently on evaluation, have the potential to reduce effect of these movements. Each radiotherapy department should perform its own assessments and determine the geometric uncertainties with respect of the equipment used and its particular treatment practices. This paper is a review of the main geometric uncertainties in breast treatment, due to respiration and set-up, and solutions proposed to limit their impact. (author)

  11. Radiotherapy Results of Breast Cancer Patients with Metastatic Bone Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Dirier

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer patients with bone metastasis who had admitted to Dicle University Department of Radiation Oncology for palliative radiation therapy between September 2001 and December 2003 were evaluated. There were 31 patients (26 female, 5 male. Median age was 43 years (range 23-79. Histopathological subtypes were infiltrating ductal carcinoma (88%, tubulolobuler carcinoma (6% and inflammatory carcinoma (6%. Loci of bone metastasis were vertebra only in twelve patients (39%, non-vertebral bones only in 8 patients (26% and both vertebral and nonvertebral bones in 11 patients (35%. Two patients had refused radiotherapy. Radiation doses were 3000 cGy with 10 fractions in 15 patients, 2000 cGy with 5 fractions in 6 patients and 800 cGy single fraction in eight patients. Complete palliation of pain was achieved in 18 patients (62% and partial palliation was achieved in 11 patients (38%. Treatment related toxicity was grade I-II dermatitis. In conclusion; same respons rates in terms of palliation can be achieved in the three radiotherapy schedules.

  12. The role of radiotherapy in the local treatment of a straightaway metastatic breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, D.

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer is diagnosed when it is already metastatic in about 6 per cent of cases. The author discusses comparative studies which showed that a surgical treatment of the primitive tumour resulted in a global survival benefit for the patients. As the role of radiotherapy in such a situation, either alone or with surgery, is not well documented, he intends to discuss the interest of radiotherapy within the frame of the local treatment of a straightaway metastatic breast cancer. Short communication

  13. Factors influencing time between surgery and radiotherapy : A population based study of breast cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Katik, S.; Gort, M.; Jobsen, Jan J.; Maduro, John H.; Struikmans, H.; Siesling, S.

    2015-01-01

    This study describes variation in the time interval between surgery and radiotherapy in breast cancer (BC) patients and assesses factors at patient, hospital and radiotherapy centre (RTC) level influencing this variation. To do so, the factors were investigated in BC patients using multilevel

  14. The influence of radiotherapy on cosmetic outcome after breast conservative surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCormick, Beryl; Sacchini, Virgilio; Luini, Alberto; Agresti, Roberto; Greco, Marco; Manzari, Antonella; Mariani, Luigi; Zucali, Roberto

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: The influence of radiotherapy in the cosmetic outcome after conservative surgery for breast cancer was evaluated using an objective method of calculating the asymmetry between the two breasts. Methods and Materials: One hundred and one patients treated with the same conservative surgery were evaluated for cosmetic outcome. Sixty-one of them received external radiotherapy (50 + 10 Gy) to the residual breast; the remaining 40 underwent surgery only. The aspect of the patients' breasts was objectively assessed for symmetry by means of a computerized technique. A subjective assessment of the cosmetic outcome was performed both by physician and patient. These objective and subjective assessments were compared in the two groups treated with or without radiotherapy. Results: The results obtained did not show significant differences in terms of cosmetic outcome in the two groups. Skin telangectasia was noted in two radiotherapy patients, while hypertrophic breast scars were only noted in six nonirradiated patients. Conclusions: We found that standard radiotherapy does not seem to influence the symmetry and the cosmetic results in breast conservative treatment when compared to a similar group of patients with the same quadrantectomy procedure and no radiotherapy

  15. Acute radiation dermatitis and pneumonitis in Japanese breast cancer patients with whole breast hypofractionated radiotherapy compared to conventional radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osako, Tomo; Oguchi, Masahiko; Kumada, Madoka; Nemoto, Keiko; Iwase, Takuji; Yamashita, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate acute morbidity, radiation dermatitis and pneumonitis, of Japanese patients treated with whole breast hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT) after breast-conserving surgery (BCS), compared to conventional RT. Japanese patients who received whole breast RT after BCS between October 2003 and September 2006 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients who had selected the conventional or hypofractionated schedule received whole breast irradiation of 50 Gy in 25 fractions plus boost or 40 Gy in 16 fractions plus boost. Radiation dermatitis and symptomatic pneumonitis were graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Of 443 consecutive patients, 377 (85%) received the conventional schedule and 66 (15%) received the hypofractionated schedule. Of patients treated with the conventional schedule, Grade 0, 1, 2 and 3 radiation dermatitis were observed in 16 (4%), 278 (74%), 77 (20%) and 6 (2%), respectively. Of patients treated with the hypofractionated schedule, Grade 0, 1, 2 and 3 dermatitis were observed in 11 (17%), 49 (74%), 5 (8%) and 1 (1%), respectively. Grade 2-3 dermatitis by the hypofractionated schedule (9%) was observed less frequently than that by the conventional schedule (22%) (chi-square test; P=0.016). Moreover, of patients treated with the conventional schedule, 4 (1%) had Grade 2 radiation pneumonitis. No patient treated with the hypofractionated schedule had symptomatic pneumonitis. Radiation dermatitis and pneumonitis in Japanese patients treated with the hypofractionated schedule is acceptable. Especially, radiation dermatitis by the hypofractionated schedule is milder than that by the conventional schedule. (author)

  16. Imaging dose in breast radiotherapy: does breast size affect the dose to the organs at risk and the risk of secondary cancer to the contralateral breast?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batumalai, Vikneswary; Quinn, Alexandra; Jameson, Michael; Delaney, Geoff; Holloway, Lois

    2015-01-01

    Correct target positioning is crucial for accurate dose delivery in breast radiotherapy resulting in utilisation of daily imaging. However, the radiation dose from daily imaging is associated with increased probability of secondary induced cancer. The aim of this study was to quantify doses associated with three imaging modalities and investigate the correlation of dose and varying breast size in breast radiotherapy. Planning computed tomography (CT) data sets of 30 breast cancer patients were utilised to simulate the dose received by various organs from a megavoltage computed tomography (MV-CT), megavoltage electronic portal image (MV-EPI) and megavoltage cone-beam computed tomography (MV-CBCT). The mean dose to organs adjacent to the target volume (contralateral breast, lungs, spinal cord and heart) were analysed. Pearson correlation analysis was performed to determine the relationship between imaging dose and primary breast volume and the lifetime attributable risk (LAR) of induced secondary cancer was calculated for the contralateral breast. The highest contralateral breast mean dose was from the MV-CBCT (1.79 Gy), followed by MV-EPI (0.22 Gy) and MV-CT (0.11 Gy). A similar trend was found for all organs at risk (OAR) analysed. The primary breast volume inversely correlated with the contralateral breast dose for all three imaging modalities. As the primary breast volume increases, the likelihood of a patient developing a radiation-induced secondary cancer to the contralateral breast decreases. MV-CBCT showed a stronger relationship between breast size and LAR of developing a radiation-induced contralateral breast cancer in comparison with the MV-CT and MV-EPI. For breast patients, imaging dose to OAR depends on imaging modality and treated breast size. When considering the use of imaging during breast radiotherapy, the patient's breast size and contralateral breast dose should be taken into account

  17. Breast cancer in elderly person: which role for radiotherapy; Cancer du sein chez la personne agee: place de la radiotherapie?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horn, S. [Centre Oscar-Lambret, Lille (France); Cutuli, B. [ICC Reims, Reims (France)

    2011-10-15

    The authors briefly discuss the issue and practices of treatment of elderly women suffering from breast cancer. Even if radiotherapy is sometimes forgotten in such cases, disease characteristics and the tolerance capacity of the patient must be considered before implementing treatment protocols. Short communication

  18. Quantifying intra- and inter-fractional motion in breast radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Scott, E-mail: scott.jones@health.qld.gov.au [Division of Cancer Services, Radiation Oncology Mater Centre, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane (Australia); Fitzgerald, Rhys [Division of Cancer Services, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane (Australia); Owen, Rebecca; Ramsay, Jonathan [Division of Cancer Services, Radiation Oncology Mater Centre, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane (Australia)

    2015-03-15

    The magnitude of intra- and inter-fractional variation in the set up of breast cancer patients treated with tangential megavoltage photon beams was investigated using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Daily cine-EPID images were captured during delivery of the tangential fields for ten breast cancer patients treated in the supine position. Measurements collected from each image included the central lung distance (CLD), central flash distance (CFD), superior axial measurement (SAM) and the inferior axial measurement (IAM). The variation of motion within a fraction (intra-fraction) and the variation between fractions (inter-fraction) was analysed to quantify set up variation and motion due to respiration. Altogether 3775 EPID images were collected from 10 patients. The effect of respiratory motion during treatment was <0.1 cm standard deviation (SD) in the anterior–posterior (AP) direction. The inter-fraction movement caused by variations in daily set up was larger at 0.28 cm SD in the AP direction. Superior–inferior (SI) variation was more difficult to summarise and proved unreliable as the measurements were taken to an ambiguous point on the images. It was difficult to discern true SI movement from that implicated by AP movement. There is minimal intra-fractional chest wall motion due to respiration during treatment. Inter-fractional variation was larger, however, on average it remained within departmental tolerance (0.5 cm) for set up variations. This review of our current breast technique provides confidence in the feasibility of utilising advanced treatment techniques (field-in-field, intensity modulated radiotherapy or volumetric modulated arc therapy) following a review of the current imaging protocol.

  19. Estimating Cardiac Exposure From Breast Cancer Radiotherapy in Clinical Practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, C.W.; McGale, P.; Povall, J.M.; Thomas, E.; Kumar, S.; Dodwell, D.; Darby, S.C.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the value of maximum heart distance (MHD) in predicting the dose and biologically effective dose (BED) to the heart and the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery for left-tangential breast or chest wall irradiation. Methods and Materials: A total of 50 consecutive breast cancer patients given adjuvant left-tangential irradiation at a large U.K. radiotherapy center during 2006 were selected. For each patient, the following were derived using three-dimensional computed tomography (CT) planning: (1) mean dose and BED to the heart, (2) mean dose and BED to the LAD coronary artery, (3) MHD, (4) position of the CT slice showing the maximum area of the irradiated heart relative to the mid-plane slice, and (5) sternal and contralateral breast thickness (measures of body fat). Results: A strong linear correlation was found between the MHD and the mean heart dose. For every 1-cm increase in MHD, the mean heart dose increased by 2.9% on average (95% confidence interval 2.5-3.3). A strong linear-quadratic relationship was seen between the MHD and the mean heart BED. The mean LAD coronary artery dose and BED were also correlated with the MHD but the associations were weaker. These relationships were not affected by body fat. The mid-plane CT slice did not give a reliable assessment of cardiac irradiation. Conclusion: The MHD is a reliable predictor of the mean heart dose and BED and gives an approximate estimate of the mean LAD coronary artery dose and BED. Doses predicted by the MHD could help assess the risk of radiation-induced cardiac toxicity where individual CT-based cardiac dosimetry is not possible

  20. Regional radiotherapy in high-risk breast cancer: is the issue solved?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krause, M; Petersen, C; Offersen, B V

    2015-01-01

    Adjuvant radiotherapy is the treatment standard for breast cancer with lymph node metastases after breast-conserving surgery or mastectomy. The inclusion of regional lymph nodes into the treatment volumes has been a question in recent clinical trials. Their impact on treatment standards and open...

  1. Intraoperative Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer: The Lasting Effects of a Fleeting Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harriet B. Eldredge-Hindy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In well-selected patients who choose to pursue breast conservation therapy (BCT for early-stage breast cancer, partial breast irradiation (PBI delivered externally or intraoperatively, may be a viable alternative to conventional whole breast irradiation. Two large, contemporary randomized trials have demonstrated breast intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT to be noninferior to whole breast external beam radiotherapy (EBRT when assessing for ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence in select patients. Additionally, IORT and other PBI techniques are likely to be more widely adopted in the future because they improve patient convenience by offering an accelerated course of treatment. Coupled with these novel techniques for breast radiotherapy (RT are distinct toxicity profiles and unique cosmetic alterations that differ from conventional breast EBRT and have the potential to impact disease surveillance and patient satisfaction. This paper will review the level-one evidence for treatment efficacy as well as important secondary endpoints like RT toxicity, breast cosmesis, quality of life, patient satisfaction, and surveillance mammography following BCT with IORT.

  2. Male breast cancer: 20-year survival data for post-mastectomy radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggemann, Holm; Ignatov, Atanas; Stabenow, Roland; von Minckwitz, Gunter; Röhl, Friedrich Wilhelm; Hass, Peter; Costa, Serban-Dan

    2013-08-01

    The goal of this population-based study was to determine the impact of post-mastectomy radiation therapy on long-term overall survival (OS) of male patients with breast cancer. We investigated 20-year OS rates of 664 patients diagnosed with primary stage I-III breast cancer in former East Germany between 1970 and 1989. Patients had a radical mastectomy with axillary lymph node dissection without systemic adjuvant therapy. Median follow-up time was 26.2 years (range 19-38 years). 52.4% of the patients had post-mastectomy radiotherapy. Radiotherapy showed different effects in each stage group after 20 years. Whereas there was an OS trend for radiotherapy to harm patients with stage I disease (hazard ratio (HR) 1.45; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.98-2.15; p = 0.065), radiotherapy showed no benefit in patients with stage II disease (HR 0.82; 95% CI 0.62-1.1; p = 0.15). There was a significant survival benefit for patients with stage III disease receiving radiotherapy (HR 0.60; 95% CI 0.41-0.88; p = 0.008). Post-mastectomy radiotherapy is associated with longer OS in male patients with stage III breast cancer. Male breast cancer patients at stages I and II do not seem to benefit from radiotherapy, but obsolete irradiation techniques might explain adverse long-term effects in earlier stages.

  3. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Plus Hypnosis for Distress During Breast Radiotherapy: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Guy H; Sucala, Madalina; Dillon, Matthew J; Schnur, Julie B

    2017-10-01

    Radiotherapy is a common and effective treatment for women with breast cancer. However, radiotherapy has also been shown to adversely affect patients' emotional well-being. Currently, few mind-body interventions are designed to improve patients' quality of life during radiotherapy. One intervention which has demonstrated clinical efficacy in the breast cancer radiotherapy setting is Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy plus Hypnosis. The goal of this study was to investigate the impact of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy plus Hypnosis on emotional distress in women with breast cancer undergoing radiotherapy. One hundred patients were randomly assigned to either the Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy plus Hypnosis (n = 50) or Attention Control (n = 50) group. Results revealed significant benefits of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy plus Hypnosis on emotional distress at the mid-point (d = 0.54), the conclusion (d = 0.64), and 4 weeks following the conclusion (d = 0.65) of radiotherapy (all ps Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy plus Hypnosis as an evidence-based intervention to reduce emotional distress in women with breast cancer. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy plus Hypnosis has the benefits of being brief, noninvasive, lacking side-effects, and producing beneficial effects which last beyond the conclusion of radiotherapy. Given these strengths, we propose that Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy plus Hypnosis is a strong candidate for greater dissemination and implementation in cancer populations.

  4. Radiotherapy effect in conservation treatment for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sachini, V.; Ferreri, A.J.M.; Farante, G.; Agresti, R.; Galimberti, V.; Zurrida, S.; Veronesi, P.

    1994-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) in conservative treatment for breast cancer (CT-BC) has been proven to be determinant for the local control of the disease. Radiation therapy was described by several authors as the most important factor affecting the cosmetic results of this treatment. Technical progress in RT, use of filters and wedges and an increased knowledge of the influence of fraction size total dose and irradiated volume on breast tissues contributed to avoid major radiotherapeutic side effects in the CT-BC. Cosmetic outcome from 2 groups of patients (pts) with breast cancer in stage T 1-2(T> = 2,5 cm) N 0-1 M o0 of the prospective trial Milan III were compared. Both groups pts (n=89) were treated with quadrantectomyand axillary dissection. 49 pts received complementary RT with a dose of 50 Gy over 5 weeks with a daily fraction of 2 Gy and a further boost of 10 Gy (10 MeV electrons) on the scar. Remaining 40 pts did not receive RT. Cosmetic results were subjectively and objectively (asymmetry index) evaluated. No significant cosmetic differences were observed between the 2 study groups. A good or excellent symmetry was observed in 59% of irradiated pts and 64% of non irradiated pts. Negative results were observed in 4% and 2% respectively. Subjective ovulation showed similar results, with a good or excellent symmetry in 57% of irradiated pts and 72.5% of non irradiated pts. Poor results were observed in 16.3% and 27.5% respectively. Telangiectasia were observed in 4% of irradiated pts, while hypertrophied scars were only noted in non irradiated pts (15%). No acute side effects of RT, as erythema or ulceration of breast skin, were recorded. In our experience, the standard dose of 50 Gy administered by two opposite tangential fields plus a 10 Gy boost did not affect the cosmetic results of CT.BC, whereas it provided a better local control of disease. The possibility to avoid RT in selected group of pts should be justified by the discomfort of this treatment for the pt, cost

  5. Dosimetric comparison of field in field intensity-modulated radiotherapy technique with conformal radiotherapy techniques in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ercan, T.; Alco, G.; Zengin, F.; Atilla, S.; Dincer, M.; Igdem, S.; Okkan, S.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to be able to implement the field-in-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (FiF) technique in our daily practice for breast radiotherapy. To do this, we performed a dosimetric comparison. Treatment plans were produced for 20 consecutive patients. FiF plans and conformal radiotherapy (CRT) plans were compared for doses in the planning target volume (PTV), the dose homogeneity index (DHI), doses in irradiated soft tissue outside the target volume (SST), ipsilateral lung and heart doses for left breast irradiation, and the monitor unit counts (MU) required for treatment. Averaged values were compared using Student's t-test. With FiF, the DHI is improved 7.0% and 5.7%, respectively (P<0.0001) over the bilateral and lateral wedge CRT techniques. When the targeted volumes received 105% and 110% of the prescribed dose in the PTV were compared, significant decreases are found with the FiF technique. With the 105% dose, the SST, heart, and ipsilateral lung doses and the MU counts were also significantly lower with the FiF technique. The FiF technique, compared to CRT, for breast radiotherapy enables significantly better dose distribution in the PTV. Significant differences are also found for soft tissue volume, the ipsilateral lung dose, and the heart dose. Considering the decreased MUs needed for treatment, the FiF technique is preferred over tangential CRT. (author)

  6. 10 year survival after breast-conserving surgery plus radiotherapy compared with mastectomy in early breast cancer in the Netherlands : a population-based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Maaren, Marissa C.; de Munck, Linda; de Bock, Geertruida H.; Jobsen, Jan J.; van Dalen, Thijs; Linn, Sabine C.; Poortmans, Philip; Strobbe, Luc J. A.; Siesling, Sabine

    BACKGROUND: Investigators of registry-based studies report improved survival for breast-conserving surgery plus radiotherapy compared with mastectomy in early breast cancer. As these studies did not present long-term overall and breast cancer-specific survival, the effect of breast-conserving

  7. 10 year survival after breast-conserving surgery plus radiotherapy compared with mastectomy in early breast cancer in the Netherlands: a population-based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maaren, M.C. van; Munck, L.; Bock, G.H. de; Jobsen, J.J.; Dalen, T. van; Linn, S.C.; Poortmans, P.; Strobbe, L.J.A.; Siesling, S.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Investigators of registry-based studies report improved survival for breast-conserving surgery plus radiotherapy compared with mastectomy in early breast cancer. As these studies did not present long-term overall and breast cancer-specific survival, the effect of breast-conserving

  8. 10 year survival after breast-conserving surgery plus radiotherapy compared with mastectomy in early breast cancer in the Netherlands : a population-based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Maaren, Marissa C.; de Munck, Linda; de Bock, Geertruida H.; Jobsen, Jan J.; van Dalen, Thijs; Linn, Sabine C.; Poortmans, Philip; Strobbe, Luc J A; Siesling, Sabine

    Background Investigators of registry-based studies report improved survival for breast-conserving surgery plus radiotherapy compared with mastectomy in early breast cancer. As these studies did not present long-term overall and breast cancer-specific survival, the effect of breast-conserving surgery

  9. Intraoperative Boost Radiotherapy during Targeted Oncoplastic Breast Surgery: Overview and Single Center Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfram Malter

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast-conserving surgery followed by whole-breast irradiation is the standard local therapy for early breast cancer. The international discussion of reduced importance of wider tumor-free resection margins than “tumor not touching ink” leads to the development of five principles in targeted oncoplastic breast surgery. IORT improves local recurrence risk and diminishes toxicity since there is less irradiation of healthy tissue. Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT can be delivered in two settings: an IORT boost followed by a conventional regimen of external beam radiotherapy or a single IORT dose. The data from TARGIT-A and ELIOT reinforce the conviction that intraoperative radiotherapy during breast-conserving surgery is a reliable alternative to conventional postoperative fractionated irradiation, but only in a carefully selected population at low risk of local recurrence. We describe our experiences with IORT boost (50 kV energy X-rays; 20 Gy in combination with targeted oncoplastic breast surgery in a routine clinical setting. Our experiences demonstrate the applicability and reliability of combining IORT boost with targeted oncoplastic breast surgery in breast-conserving therapy of early breast cancer.

  10. Radio-induced malignancies after breast cancer postoperative radiotherapy in patients with Li-Fraumeni syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heymann, Steve; Bourgier, Céline; Delaloge, Suzette; Rahal, Arslane; Caron, Olivier; Frebourg, Thierry; Barreau, Lise; Pachet, Corinne; Mathieu, Marie-Christine; Marsiglia, Hugo

    2010-01-01

    There are no specific recommendations for the management of breast cancer patients with germ-line p53 mutations, an exceptional genetic condition, particularly regarding postoperative radiotherapy. Preclinical data suggested that p53 mutations conferred enhanced radiosensitivity in vitro and in vivo and the few clinical observations showed that Li-Fraumeni families were at a higher risk of secondary radio-induced malignancies. We reviewed a cohort of patients with germ-line p53 mutations who had been treated for breast cancer as the first tumor event. We assessed their outcome and the incidence of secondary radio-induced malignancies. Among 47 documented Li-Fraumeni families treated from 1997 to 2007 at the Institut Gustave Roussy, 8 patients had been diagnosed with breast cancer as the first tumor event. Three patients had undergone conservative breast surgery followed by postoperative radiotherapy and five patients had undergone a mastectomy (3 with postoperative radiotherapy). Thus, 6/8 patients had received postoperative radiotherapy. Median follow-up was 6 years. Median age at the diagnosis of the primary breast cancer was 30 years. The histological characteristics were as follows: intraductal carcinoma in situ (n = 3), invasive ductal carcinoma (n = 4) and a phyllodes tumor (n = 1). Among the 6 patients who had received adjuvant radiotherapy, the following events had occurred: 3 ipsilateral breast recurrences, 3 contralateral breast cancers, 2 radio-induced cancers, and 3 new primaries (1 of which was an in-field thyroid cancer with atypical histology). In contrast, only one event had occurred (a contralateral breast cancer) among patients who had not received radiation therapy. These observations could argue in favor of bilateral mastectomy and the avoidance of radiotherapy

  11. Risk of pacemaker implantation subsequent to radiotherapy for early-stage breast cancer in Denmark, 1982-2005

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehammar, Jens Christian; Videbaek, L.; Brock Johansen, J.

    2015-01-01

    . Objectives: The aim of this study was to examine the risk of severe conduction abnormalities evaluated by implantation of a pacemaker, subsequent to breast cancer radiotherapy. Methods: From the database of the Danish Breast Cancer Collaborative Group, we identified women treated with radiotherapy for early......-stage breast cancer in Denmark from 1982 to 2005. By record linkage to the Danish Pacemaker and ICD Registry information was retrieved on pacemaker implants subsequent to radiotherapy. Rate ratios (RR) of pacemaker implantation for left versus right sided breast cancer were calculated. Results: Among 18......,308 women treated with radiotherapy for early-stage breast cancer, 179 women had a pacemaker implanted subsequent to radiotherapy, 90 in 9,315 left sided and 89 in 8,993 right sided breast cancers. The unadjusted RR was 1.02 (0.76-1.36 95% CI, p=0.91) and the RR adjusted for year, age and time since...

  12. Evaluation of axillary dose coverage following whole breast radiotherapy: Variation with the breast volume and shape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguiar, Artur; Gomes Pereira, Helena; Azevedo, Isabel; Gomes, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the axillary dose coverage in patients treated with tridimensional whole breast radiotherapy (3D-WBRT), according to the breast volume and shape in treatment position. Background: Several studies have demonstrated an insufficient dose contribution to the axillary levels, using 3D-WBRT, remaining unclear whether the breast volume and shape can influence it. Materials and methods: We retrospectively delineated the axillary levels on planning CT-images of 100 patients, treated with 3D-WBRT along 2012 in our institution. To estimate the shape we established an anatomic CT-based interval, defined as the Thoracic Extent (TE). The breast volume matched its CTV. Mean dose levels and V95 (volume receiving at least 95% of the prescribed dose) were evaluated. Results: Mean axillary level I (A1), II (A2) and III (A3) volume was 56.1 cc, 16.5 cc and 18.9 cc, respectively, and mean doses were 43.9 Gy, 38.6 Gy and 19.5 Gy. For breast volumes of <800 cc, 800–999 cc, 1000–1199 cc and >1200 cc, mean A1 V95 was 38%, 51%, 61.2% and 57.2% whereas median A2 V95 was 8.3%, 13.4%, 19.4% and 28% respectively. Regarding shape, where the breast relative position to the TE was categorized in intervals between 31% and 40%, 41% and 50%, 51% and 60%, and 61% and 70%, mean A1 V95 was 38.7%, 43.1%, 51.1% and 77.3% whereas mean A2 V95 was 6.1%, 11.2%, 17.1% and 37% respectively. Conclusions: We observed inadequate dose coverage to all axillary levels, even after applying a sub-analysis accounting for different breast volumes and shapes. Although higher doses were associated with the more voluminous and pendulous breasts, axillary coverage with 3D-WBRT seems to be inefficient, regardless of the breast morphology

  13. Radiotherapy and breast reconstruction: a meta-analysis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Barry, M

    2011-05-01

    The optimum sequencing of breast reconstruction (BR) in patients receiving postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) is controversial. A comprehensive search of published studies that examined postoperative morbidity following immediate or delayed BR with combined radiotherapy was performed. Medical (MEDLINE & EMBASE) databases were searched and cross-referenced for appropriate studies where morbidity following BR was the primary outcome measured. A total of 1,105 patients were identified from 11 appropriately selected studies. Patients undergoing PMRT and BR are more likely to suffer morbidity compared with patients not receiving PMRT (OR = 4.2; 95% CI, 2.4-7.2 [no PMRT vs. PMRT]). Reconstruction technique was also examined with outcome when PMRT was delivered after BR, and this demonstrated that autologous reconstruction is associated with less morbidity in this setting (OR = 0.21; 95% CI, 0.1-0.4 [autologous vs. implant-based]). Delaying BR until after PMRT had no significant effect on outcome (OR = 0.87; 95% CI, 0.47-1.62 [delayed vs. immediate]). PMRT has a detrimental effect on BR outcome. These results suggest that where immediate reconstruction is undertaken with the necessity of PMRT, an autologous flap results in less morbidity when compared with implant-based reconstruction.

  14. Dose to the uterus from radiotherapy procedures for breast carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin Rincon, C.; Jerez Sainz, I.; Modolell Farre, I.; Espana Lopez, M.L.; Lopez Franco, P.

    2001-01-01

    In the early period of the pregnancy, the radiological protection of the unborn child is of particular concern. In several reports dose thresholds for deterministic effects as well as dose values that increase the probability of stochastic effects have been established. The aim of this article was to estimate the peripheral dose (PD) in order to evaluate the absorbed dose in utero for breast carcinoma treatment related to the radiotherapy procedures established in our hospital. The treatment was simulated using an anthropomorphic phantom Alderson-Rando, and two similar treatment planning with and without wedges were performed, taken into account the average field parameters used in 300 treatment planning patients. The PD values were determined with a NE 2571 ionization chamber in a General Electric linac for the treatments considered. Experimental measures provided dose in utero values slightly higher than 5 cGy, dose threshold established in some articles for radioinduced effects in the fetus. The planning system underestimated the PD values and no significant influence with the use of wedges was found. (author)

  15. Association between adjuvant regional radiotherapy and cognitive function in breast cancer patients treated with conservation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibayama, Osamu; Yoshiuchi, Kazuhiro; Inagaki, Masatoshi; Matsuoka, Yutaka; Yoshikawa, Eisho; Sugawara, Yuriko; Akechi, Tatsuo; Wada, Noriaki; Imoto, Shigeru; Murakami, Koji; Ogawa, Asao; Akabayashi, Akira; Uchitomi, Yosuke

    2014-01-01

    Although protracted cognitive impairment has been reported to occur after radiotherapy even when such therapy is not directed to brain areas, the mechanism remains unclear. This study investigated whether breast cancer patients exposed to local radiotherapy showed lower cognitive function mediated by higher plasma interleukin (IL)-6 levels than those unexposed. We performed the Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised (WMS-R) and measured plasma IL-6 levels for 105 breast cancer surgical patients within 1 year after the initial therapy. The group differences in each of the indices of WMS-R were investigated between cancer patients exposed to adjuvant regional radiotherapy (n = 51) and those unexposed (n = 54) using analysis of covariance. We further investigated a mediation effect by plasma IL-6 levels on the relationship between radiotherapy and the indices of WMS-R using the bootstrapping method. The radiotherapy group showed significantly lower Immediate Verbal Memory Index and Delayed Recall Index (P = 0.001, P = 0.008, respectively). Radiotherapy exerted an indirect effect on the lower Delayed Recall Index of WMS-R through elevation of plasma IL-6 levels (bootstrap 95% confidence interval = −2.6626 to −0.0402). This study showed that breast cancer patients exposed to adjuvant regional radiotherapy in conservation therapy might have cognitive impairment even several months after their treatment. The relationship between the therapy and the cognitive impairment could be partially mediated by elevation of plasma IL-6 levels

  16. Radiotherapy without boost in the tumor bed after conserving surgery in the treatment of early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parvanova, V.; Pandova, V.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyse satisfactory local control and breast preservation with particular emphasis on the importance of the microscopic negative margin in patients who not receiving tumor bed boost therapy. Authors analysed 122 consecutive patients with breast cancer in pathological stages I and II, who were treated with quadrantectomy at full axillary dissection between 1992 and 1997. The median follow up was 34 months. The radiation treatment was started 60 - 80 day in 14 patients (11.5%) with high risk for metastases, because they underwent chemotherapy. The patients were treated with external beam radiation therapy on the entire breast to a mean total dose of 48.8 Gy. A boost to a tumor bed was not delivered. Only patients with follow-up period above 24 months were evaluated for the purpose of analysis of cosmetic results. Analyzed variables were: age, size, lymph node status, two-field versus three-field technique, operating scare. The major goal of breast conserving therapy is the preservation of cosmetically acceptable breast without local relapses in all patients of our study. A 43 years old patient with liver metastases and any regional and local relapses was dead 27 months after the radiotherapy. A single significant factor impairing excellent cosmetic outcome in our study is the surgical scar. The very high percent (51) of excellent cosmetic results and low percent of post radiotherapy injury is due to precise for breast conserving therapy, the prevailing number of young patients and precise CT and dosimetric planning on three level of treatment volume (author)

  17. Accelerated partial breast irradiation using robotic radiotherapy: a dosimetric comparison with tomotherapy and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rault, Erwann; Lacornerie, Thomas; Dang, Hong-Phuong; Crop, Frederik; Lartigau, Eric; Reynaert, Nick; Pasquier, David

    2016-02-27

    Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) is a new breast treatment modality aiming to reduce treatment time using hypo fractionation. Compared to conventional whole breast irradiation that takes 5 to 6 weeks, APBI is reported to induce worse cosmetic outcomes both when using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). These late normal tissue effects may be attributed to the dose volume effect because a large portion of the non-target breast tissue volume (NTBTV) receives a high dose. In the context of APBI, non-coplanar beams could spare the NTBTV more efficiently. This study evaluates the dosimetric benefit of using the Cyberknife (CK) for APBI in comparison to IMRT (Tomotherapy) and three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). The possibility of using surgical clips, implanted during surgery, to track target movements is investigated first. A phantom of a female thorax was designed in-house using the measurements of 20 patients. Surgical clips of different sizes were inserted inside the breast. A treatment plan was delivered to the mobile and immobile phantom. The motion compensation accuracy was evaluated using three radiochromic films inserted inside the breast. Three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), Tomotherapy (TOMO) and CK treatment plans were calculated for 10 consecutive patients who received APBI in Lille. To ensure a fair comparison of the three techniques, margins applied to the CTV were set to 10 mm. However, a second CK plan was prepared using 3 mm margins to evaluate the benefits of motion compensation. Only the larger clips (VITALITEC Medium-Large) could be tracked inside the larger breast (all gamma indices below 1 for 1 % of the maximum dose and 1 mm). All techniques meet the guidelines defined in the NSABP/RTOG and SHARE protocols. As the applied dose volume constraints are very strong, insignificant dosimetric differences exist between techniques regarding the PTV

  18. Accelerated partial breast irradiation using robotic radiotherapy: a dosimetric comparison with tomotherapy and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rault, Erwann; Lacornerie, Thomas; Dang, Hong-Phuong; Crop, Frederik; Lartigau, Eric; Reynaert, Nick; Pasquier, David

    2016-01-01

    Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) is a new breast treatment modality aiming to reduce treatment time using hypo fractionation. Compared to conventional whole breast irradiation that takes 5 to 6 weeks, APBI is reported to induce worse cosmetic outcomes both when using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). These late normal tissue effects may be attributed to the dose volume effect because a large portion of the non-target breast tissue volume (NTBTV) receives a high dose. In the context of APBI, non-coplanar beams could spare the NTBTV more efficiently. This study evaluates the dosimetric benefit of using the Cyberknife (CK) for APBI in comparison to IMRT (Tomotherapy) and three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). The possibility of using surgical clips, implanted during surgery, to track target movements is investigated first. A phantom of a female thorax was designed in-house using the measurements of 20 patients. Surgical clips of different sizes were inserted inside the breast. A treatment plan was delivered to the mobile and immobile phantom. The motion compensation accuracy was evaluated using three radiochromic films inserted inside the breast. Three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), Tomotherapy (TOMO) and CK treatment plans were calculated for 10 consecutive patients who received APBI in Lille. To ensure a fair comparison of the three techniques, margins applied to the CTV were set to 10 mm. However, a second CK plan was prepared using 3 mm margins to evaluate the benefits of motion compensation. Only the larger clips (VITALITEC Medium-Large) could be tracked inside the larger breast (all gamma indices below 1 for 1 % of the maximum dose and 1 mm). All techniques meet the guidelines defined in the NSABP/RTOG and SHARE protocols. As the applied dose volume constraints are very strong, insignificant dosimetric differences exist between techniques regarding the PTV

  19. Late sequelae and cosmetic outcome after radiotherapy in breast conserving therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dore, M.; Hennequin, C.

    2012-01-01

    Radiotherapy after breast-conserving therapy for early breast cancer is reported to adversely affect the cosmetic outcome. The incidence of radiation-induced fibro-atrophy is around 10% at 5 years. A better knowledge of its pathophysiology has revealed the essential role of activated fibroblasts and reactive oxygen species, mediated by TGF beta 1, allowing the development of antioxidant in the management of the established radiation-induced fibro-atrophy. Cosmetic sequelae are evaluated with standardized scales, such as the LENT-SOMA and must be monitored during at least 5 years. The main factors determining the occurrence of sequelae are a large breast volume, dose heterogeneity and the use of tumour bed boost after whole-breast radiation therapy. Intensity modulated radiotherapy and partial breast irradiation position themselves as a good alternatives to reduce the incidence of late skin side effects. The use of predictive tests of intrinsic radiosensitivity might fit into the therapeutic strategy. (authors)

  20. Breast radiotherapy in the lateral decubitus position: A technique to prevent lung and heart irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campana, Francois; Kirova, Youlia M.; Rosenwald, Jean-Claude; Dendale, Remi; Vilcoq, Jacques R.; Dreyfus, Helene; Fourquet, Alain

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To present an original technique for breast radiotherapy, with the aim of limiting lung and heart irradiation, satisfying quality assurance criteria. Methods and Material: An original radiotherapy technique for breast irradiation has been developed at the Institute Curie in January 1996. It consists of isocentric breast irradiation in the lateral decubitus position (isocentric lateral decubitus [ILD]). This technique is indicated for voluminous or pendulous breasts needing breast irradiation only. Thin carbon fiber supports and special patient positioning devices have been developed especially for this technique. In vivo measurements were performed to check the dose distribution before the routine use of the technique. Results: ILD has been successfully implemented in routine practice, and 500 patients have been already treated. Breast radiotherapy is performed using a dose of 50 Gy at ICRU point in 25 fractions. ILD shows good homogeneity of the dose in breast treatment volume, treatment fields are perpendicular to the skin ensuring its protection, and extremely low dose is delivered to the underlying lung and heart. Conclusion: In cases of voluminous breasts or patients with a history of lung and heart disease, our technique provides several advantages over the conventional technique with opposing tangential fields. This technique improves the dose homogeneity according to the ICRU recommendations

  1. Baseline Utilization of Breast Radiotherapy Before Institution of the Medicare Practice Quality Reporting Initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Benjamin D.; Smith, Grace L.; Roberts, Kenneth B.; Buchholz, Thomas A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: In 2007, Medicare implemented the Physician Quality Reporting Initiative (PQRI), which provides financial incentives to physicians who report their performance on certain quality measures. PQRI measure no. 74 recommends radiotherapy for patients treated with conservative surgery (CS) for invasive breast cancer. As a first step in evaluating the potential impact of this measure, we assessed baseline use of radiotherapy among women diagnosed with invasive breast cancer before implementation of PQRI. Methods and Materials: Using the SEER-Medicare data set, we identified women aged 66-70 diagnosed with invasive breast cancer and treated with CS between 2000 and 2002. Treatment with radiotherapy was determined using SEER and claims data. Multivariate logistic regression tested whether receipt of radiotherapy varied significantly across clinical, pathologic, and treatment covariates. Results: Of 3,674 patients, 94% (3,445) received radiotherapy. In adjusted analysis, the presence of comorbid illness (odds ratio [OR] 1.69; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.19-2.42) and unmarried marital status were associated with omission of radiotherapy (OR 1.65; 95% CI, 1.22-2.20). In contrast, receipt of chemotherapy was protective against omission of radiotherapy (OR 0.25; 95% CI, 0.16-0.38). Race and geographic region did not correlate with radiotherapy utilization. Conclusions: Utilization of radiotherapy following CS was high for patients treated before institution of PQRI, suggesting that at most 6% of patients could benefit from measure no. 74. Further research is needed to determine whether institution of PQRI will affect radiotherapy utilization.

  2. Local Recurrences After Conservative Treatment of Ductal Carcinoma-In-Situ of the Breast Without Radiotherapy: The Effect of Age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten van der Velden, A.P.; Peeters, P.H.M.; Koot, V.C.M.; Hennipman, A.

    2006-01-01

    Background: The main goal in treatment of ductal carcinoma-in-situ (DCIS) of the breast is to prevent local recurrences. Radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery has been shown to decrease the recurrence rate, although whether all patients should be treated with radiotherapy remains a topic

  3. Locoregional post-mastectomy radiotherapy for breast cancer: literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noel, G.; Mazeron, J.J.

    2000-01-01

    Postoperative radiotherapy is controversial after radical mastectomy. Recent clinical trials have shown an increase in survival with this irradiation and conclusions of previous meta-analyses should be reconsidered and conclusions of previous meta-analyses should be reconsidered. The results of a large number of randomized clinical trials in which women received post-mastectomy radiotherapy or not have been renewed. These trials showed a decrease in locoregional failure with the use of postoperative radiotherapy but survival advantages have not been clearly identified. A large number of randomized clinical trials compared postoperative radiotherapy alone, chemotherapy alone and the association of the two treatments. They showed that chemotherapy was less active locally than radiotherapy and that radiotherapy and chemotherapy significantly increased both disease-free and overall survival rates in the groups which received postoperative radiotherapy. These favourable results were, however, obtained with optimal radiotherapy techniques and a relative sparing of lung tissue and cardiac muscle. Many retrospective clinical analyses concluded that results obtained in locoregional failure rate were poor and that these failures led to an increase in future risks. Both radiotherapy and systemic treatment should be delivered after mastectomy, reserved for patients with a high risk of with a diameter ≥ 5 cm. However, radiotherapy could produce secondary effects, and techniques of radiotherapy should be optimal. (author)

  4. Prophylactic Breast Bud Radiotherapy for Patients Taking Bicalutamide: Should This Still Be Practised for Patients with Prostate Cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Lewis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Prophylactic breast bud radiotherapy is used to prevent gynaecomastia and mastalgia in patients with prostate cancer who are being treated with antiandrogen and oestrogen therapy. Here a case is presented of a patient who developed soft-tissue sarcoma of the breast subsequent to breast bud radiotherapy prior to bicalutamide hormone treatment. Bicalutamide is often prescribed for younger men in the adjuvant setting or as monotherapy for locally advanced disease. The data regarding the efficacy of prophylactic breast bud radiotherapy is reviewed, and it is proposed that alternative therapies should be considered such as tamoxifen.

  5. Survey on changes of breast cancer radiotherapy in four hospitals within southeast coastal region of China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji Yongling; Liu Jingjie; Tian Ye; Li Xianming; Zhu Yaqun; Yu De; Du Xianghui

    2010-01-01

    Objective: to explore the changes and the tendency of breast cancer radiotherapy in China within the past decade. Methods: A survey on breast cancer radiotherapy in 1999 and 2006 was conducted in 4 hospitals located within the southeast coastal region of China, including patients' clinical characteristics, the purpose of radiotherapy and its techniques. Results: The percentage of breast conservative treatment (BCT) increased from 3% in 1999 to 13% in 2006. For radiotherapy techniques in 2066 compared with 1999, the growth trend was found in use of breast immobilization devices (80% vs. 46%), treatment planning system (70% vs. 23%), and CT simulation (14% vs. 0). The frequency was increased in the chest wall irradiation after mastectomy (90% vs. 67%), but decreased in internal mammary region (30% vs. 76%) and axilla (37% vs. 69%) treatment. There were no differences in total dose and fractionation prescription. Conclusions: BCT was performed more frequently, but post-mastectomy radiotherapy was still essential option in China at present. Although some advanced techniques were applied frequently in clinical practice. Simulation, treatment planning, and irradiation target design were urgent for improvement and standardization. (authors)

  6. Estimation of the optimal number of radiotherapy fractions for breast cancer: A review of the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Karen; Delaney, Geoff P; Barton, Michael B

    2015-08-01

    There is variation in radiotherapy fractionation practice, however, there is no evidence-based benchmark for appropriate activity. An evidence-based model was constructed to estimate the optimal number of fractions for the first course of radiotherapy for breast cancer to aid in services planning and performance benchmarking. The published breast cancer radiotherapy utilisation model was adapted. Evidence-based number of fractions was added to each radiotherapy indication. The overall optimal number of fractions was calculated based on the frequency of specific clinical conditions where radiotherapy is indicated and the recommended number of fractions for each condition. Sensitivity analysis was performed to assess the impact of uncertainties on the model. For the entire Australian breast cancer patient population, the estimated optimal number of fractions per patient was 16.8, 14.6, 13.7 and 0.8 for ductal carcinoma in situ, early, advanced and metastatic breast cancer respectively. Overall, the optimal number of fractions per patient was 14.4 (range 14.4-18.7). These results allow comparison with actual practices, and workload prediction to aid in services planning. The model can be easily adapted to other countries by inserting population-specific epidemiological data, and to future changes in cancer incidence, stage distribution and fractionation recommendations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. DEGRO practical guidelines for radiotherapy of breast cancer VI: therapy of locoregional breast cancer recurrences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harms, Wolfgang [St. Claraspital, Abteilung fuer Radioonkologie, Basel (Switzerland); Budach, W. [Heinrich-Heine-University, Duesseldorf (Germany); Dunst, J. [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany); Feyer, P. [Vivantes Hospital Neukoelln, Berlin (Germany); Fietkau, R.; Sauer, R. [University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Krug, D. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Piroth, M.D. [Witten/Herdecke University, HELIOS-Hospital Wuppertal, Wuppertal (Germany); Sautter-Bihl, M.L. [Municipal Hospital, Karlsruhe (Germany); Sedlmayer, F. [Paracelsus Medical University Hospital, Salzburg (Austria); Wenz, F. [University of Heidelberg, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Haase, W.; Souchon, R.; Collaboration: Breast Cancer Expert Panel of the German Society of Radiation Oncology (DEGRO)

    2016-04-15

    To update the practical guidelines for radiotherapy of patients with locoregional breast cancer recurrences based on the current German interdisciplinary S3 guidelines 2012. A comprehensive survey of the literature using the search phrases ''locoregional breast cancer recurrence'', ''chest wall recurrence'', ''local recurrence'', ''regional recurrence'', and ''breast cancer'' was performed, using the limits ''clinical trials'', ''randomized trials'', ''meta-analysis'', ''systematic review'', and ''guidelines''. Patients with isolated in-breast or regional breast cancer recurrences should be treated with curative intent. Mastectomy is the standard of care for patients with ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence. In a subset of patients, a second breast conservation followed by partial breast irradiation (PBI) is an appropriate alternative to mastectomy. If a second breast conservation is performed, additional irradiation should be mandatory. The largest reirradiation experience base exists for multicatheter brachytherapy; however, prospective clinical trials are needed to clearly define selection criteria, long-term local control, and toxicity. Following primary mastectomy, patients with resectable locoregional breast cancer recurrences should receive multimodality therapy including systemic therapy, surgery, and radiation +/- hyperthermia. This approach results in high local control rates and long-term survival is achieved in a subset of patients. In radiation-naive patients with unresectable locoregional recurrences, radiation therapy is mandatory. In previously irradiated patients with a high risk of a second local recurrence after surgical resection or in patients with unresectable recurrences, reirradiation should be strongly considered. Indication and dose concepts

  8. A federal audit of the Belgian radiotherapy departments in breast cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houtte, Paul van; Bourgois, Nicolas; Renard, Francoise; Huget, Philippe; D'hoore, William; Scalliet, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    Background: The Belgian Federal College of Radiotherapy carried out an external audit of breast cancer patient documentation in the 26 Belgian radiotherapy centres. The objective was to assess compliance with the recommendations regarding minimal requirements for documentation of radiotherapy prescription and administration. All centres volunteered to take part in this audit. Methods: Two experienced radiation oncologists site-visited the departments over a 6 month period (Sept. 2003-Feb. 2004), with a list of items to be verified, including details on the surgery, the pathological report, details on systemic treatments, details on the radiotherapy prescription (and consistency with therapeutic guidelines) and delay surgery/radiotherapy. Findings: Three hundred and eighty-nine patients files were reviewed, for a total of 399 breast cancers (10 patients with bilateral cancer). Mean age was 57.8 y (range 29-96). Breast conservative surgery (BCS) was used in 71%; radical mastectomy in 29%. A complete pathological report was present in all files but 2 (99.5% conformity). 5.2% were treated for DCIS, 61.6% for pT1, 28.2% for pT2 and 5% for pT3-4. Data regarding resection margins were specified to be free in 76.2%, tangential in 12% (within 2 mm) and positive for DCIS in 3.8% or invasive cancer in 1.5% (no information, on margins in 6.5%). The pT stage was always specified, and consistent with the macroscopic and microscopic findings. Hormonal receptors were routinely assessed (94.7%), as well as Her2neu (87.4%). Axillary surgery was carried out in 92%, either by sentinel node biopsy or by complete clearance, in which case the median number of nodes analysed was 12 for all centres together (7-17). All radiotherapy prescriptions were in line with evidence-based standards of therapy (i.e., irradiation of breast after BCS or after mamectomy (in case of pN+), but one. The mean delay between surgery and radiotherapy was 5.5 weeks (SD 11days). Conclusion: There was a high

  9. Postmastectomy Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Breast Cancer Receiving Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Icro Meattini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC is widely used in locally advanced breast cancer (BC treatment. The role of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT after NAC is strongly debated. The aim of our analysis was to identify major prognostic factors in a single-center series, with emphasis on PMRT. From 1997 to 2011, 170 patients were treated with NAC and mastectomy at our center; 98 cases (57.6% underwent PMRT and 72 cases (42.4% did not receive radiation. At a median follow-up period of 7.7 years (range 2–16 for the whole cohort, median time to locoregional recurrence (LRR was 3.3 years (range 0.7–12.4. The 5-year and 10-year actuarial LRR rate were 14.5% and 15.9%, respectively. At the multivariate analysis the factors that significantly correlated with survival outcome were ≥4 positive nodes (HR 5.0, 1.51–16.52; P=0.035, extracapsular extension (HR 2.18, 1.37–3.46; P=0.009, and estrogen receptor positive disease (HR 0.57, 0.36–0.90; P=0.003. Concerning LRR according to use of radiation, PMRT reduced LRR for patient with clinical T3 staged disease (P=0.015. Our experience confirmed the impact of pathological nodal involvement on survival outcome. PMRT was found to improve local control in patients presenting with clinical T3 tumors, regardless of the response to chemotherapy.

  10. Large breast size as a risk factor for late adverse effects of breast radiotherapy: Is residual dose inhomogeneity, despite 3D treatment planning and delivery, the main explanation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldsmith, Christy; Haviland, Joanne; Tsang, Yat; Sydenham, Mark; Yarnold, John

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Large breast size is associated with an increased risk of late adverse effects after breast conservation surgery and radiotherapy, even when 3D dosimetry is used. The purpose of this study is to test the hypothesis that residual dose inhomogeneity is sufficient to explain the association. Methods: Patients previously treated after breast conservation surgery with whole breast radiotherapy using 3D dosimetry and followed up in the UK FAST hypofractionation trial were selected for this analysis. The residual level of dose inhomogeneity across the whole breast treatment volume was used to test for association between residual dosimetry and post-treatment change in breast appearance at 2 years post-radiotherapy. Results: At 2 years, 201/279 (72%) of women had no change in photographic breast appearance, 61 (22%) had mild change and 17 (6%) had marked change. Breast size and dosimetry were both significantly associated with late effects in univariate analyses, but only breast size remained an independent significant risk factor for change in breast appearance when included in a multiple regression model together with other prognostic factors (p = 0.006 for trend). Conclusion: Large-breasted women are more likely to suffer change in breast size and shape after whole breast radiotherapy delivered using 3D dosimetry, but residual dose inhomogeneity is insufficient to explain the association.

  11. Novel use of an air-filled breast prosthesis to allow radiotherapy to recurrent colonic cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Duffy, F

    2011-03-01

    AiM: The authors present the novel and successful use of an air-filled breast prosthesis for extra pelvic exclusion of small bowel to facilitate adjuvant radiotherapy following resection of recurrent adenocarcinoma of the ascending bowel. The therapeutic use of radiotherapy in colon cancer can cause acute or chronic radiation enteropathy. Mobile small bowel can be sequestered in \\'dead space\\' or by adhesions exposing it to adjuvant radiotherapy. A variety of pelvic partitioning methods have been described to exclude bowel from radiation fields using both native and prosthetic materials.

  12. Cosmetic outcome and curative effect of radiotherapy for early breast cancer after conservative surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Changuo; Ma Yuanyuan; Zhao Shuhong; Wang Hong

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study the cosmetic outcome and curative effect of 6 MV X-ray tangential field radiotherapy for early stage breast cancer after conservative surgery. Methods: The eligible criteria were single tumor ≤3 cm in diameter, surgical margin negative and lymph node negative. The exclusive criteria were inflammatory carcinoma or male breast cancer. After conservative surgery, 42 patients with stage 0, I or II breast cancer were treated with conventional radiotherapy with a total dose of 50 Gy to the whole breast and 10 Gy boost to the tumor bed. The efficacy and the cosmetic outcome of radiotherapy were evaluated every 3 months for the first 2 years and every 6 months after that and every 12 months after 5 years. Results: The follow up time was 19-90 months (median 56 months). Two patients died of metastasis after 16 months and 36 months, which was diagnosed by CT scan. Excellent or good cosmetic outcome was > 93% at 36 months. The local control rate was 100%. The 1- and 3-year survival rates was 100% and 98%, respectively. Conclusions: Tangential field radiotherapy for early breast cancer after conservative surgery has a satisfied result in both tumor control and cosmetic outcome, which can definitely improve the life quality of the patients. (authors)

  13. Conformity Index and Homogeneity Index of the Postoperative Whole Breast Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, Deva; Smickovska, Snezana; Lazarevska, Emilija

    2017-10-15

    The treatment of breast cancer involves a multidisciplinary approach in which radiotherapy plays a key role. The conformity index and the homogeneity index are two analysis tools of a treatment plan using conformal radiotherapy. The purpose of this article is an analysis of these two parameters in the assessment of the treatment plans in 58 patients undergoing postoperative radiotherapy of the whole breast. All 58 patients participating in the study had a conservatively treated early-stage breast cancer. The treatment was performed using a standard regimen of fractionation in 25 fractions up to a total dose of 50 Gy. Dose-volume histograms were generated for both plans with and without segmental fields. Pair samples t-test was used. The technique with segmental fields allowed us more homogeneity distribution when compared to standard two tangential field techniques. The HI values were 1.08 ± 0.01 and 1.09 ± 0.01 for segment and technique with two tangential fields (p conformity and the homogeneity index are important tools in the analysis of the treatment plans during radiation therapy in patients with early-stage breast cancer. Adding segment fields in the administration of radiotherapy in patients with conservatively treated breast cancer can lead to improved dosage homogeneity and conformity.

  14. Uncertainties in estimating heart doses from 2D-tangential breast cancer radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laugaard Lorenzen, Ebbe; Brink, Carsten; Taylor, Carolyn W.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: We evaluated the accuracy of three methods of estimating radiation dose to the heart from two-dimensional tangential radiotherapy for breast cancer, as used in Denmark during 1982-2002. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Three tangential radiotherapy regimens were reconstructed using CT......-based planning scans for 40 patients with left-sided and 10 with right-sided breast cancer. Setup errors and organ motion were simulated using estimated uncertainties. For left-sided patients, mean heart dose was related to maximum heart distance in the medial field. RESULTS: For left-sided breast cancer, mean...... to the uncertainty of estimates based on individual CT-scans. For right-sided breast cancer patients, mean heart dose based on individual CT-scans was always

  15. Methods and clinical utility of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) in breast-conserving surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyauchi, Mitsuru; Yamamoto, Naoto; Fujita, Yoshihiro; Honda, Ichiro; Hatano, Kazuo; Sekiya, Yuichi; Suzuki, Masato; Nakajima, Nobuyuki.

    1996-01-01

    We have developed an intraoperative radiotherapy technique in breast-conserving surgery. Following lumpectomy and axillary dissection up to Level II, the subcutaneous fat layer was lifted from the gland over the entire breast. Electron beams of 25 Gy were irradiated within cylinder, avoiding the skin and subcutaneous tissue. The surface of the gland was covered with cotton swabs saturated with normal saline to equalize the energy depth to the chest wall. This technique has so far been applied to 8 patients, all of whom went through a successful postoperative period without serious complications. The cosmetic results were satisfactory from immediately after the operation. Intraoperative radiotherapy combined with breast-conserving surgery may be helpful in improving the QOL of patients by eliminating the adverse effects associated radiation injury to the skin of the breast and long-term postoperative follow-up. (author)

  16. Intraoperative radiotherapy in early stage breast cancer: potential indications and evidence to date

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, A M

    2015-01-01

    Following early results of recent studies of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) in the adjuvant treatment of patients with early breast cancer, the clinical utility of IORT is a subject of much recent debate within the breast oncology community. This review describes the intraoperative techniques available, the potential indications and the evidence to date pertaining to local control and toxicity. We also discuss any implications for current practice and future research. PMID:25734489

  17. Anxiety and its time courses during radiotherapy for non-metastatic breast cancer: A longitudinal study

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, Florence; Merckaert, Isabelle; Liénard, Aurore; Libert, Yves; Etienne, Anne-Marie; Reynaert, Christine; Slachmuylder, Jean-Louis; Scalliet, Pierre; Van Houtte, Paul; COUCKE, Philippe; Salamon, Emile; Razavi, Darius

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To our knowledge, no study has specifically assessed the time course of anxiety during radiotherapy (RT). The objective of this study was to assess anxiety time courses in patients with nonmetastatic breast cancer. Material and methods: This multicenter, descriptive longitudinal study included 213 consecutive patients with breast cancer who completed visual analog scales (VASs) assessing state anxiety before and after the RT simulation and the first and last five RT se...

  18. Assessment of factors connected with radiotherapy influencing the cosmetic effect in breast conserving therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaszczyk, P.; Roszkowski, K.; Blaszczyk, E.; Kowalewski, J.

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To compare cosmetic results of different radiotherapy schedules used in the treatment of breast cancer after breast radiotherapy and to identify factors affecting cosmetic outcomes. Material and methods: Ninety-four patients irradiated. Median follow-up of 29 months (range 18-154 mo.). Patients were treated with standard fractionation 45-50 Gy/20-25 fx/4-5 weeks. Boost up to 10 Gy. Late effects were evaluated using the LENT-SOMA scoring scale. The cosmetic results were assessed on a four-point scale and presence of concomitant chemotherapy. Results: LENT-SOMA grade 3 toxicity was observed only in 8 (8,5%) patients. The factor associated with hyperpigmentation is large breast size. The significant risk factors for teleangiectasia are high dose and use photon energy 1,33 MeV beam. Factors found to impact significantly cosmetics adversely fibrosis was large breast size. Breast fibrosis were more frequent observed in woman after whole dose 50 Gy. There were no differences in breast skin thick between analysed factors. Conclusions: After irradiating large breasts more often than one observes the fibrosis of the breast in the case of small and average breasts and discolour of the skin. Irradiating photons from the cobalt source in the comparison with photons about higher energy at women with large breasts, there is the reason more frequent occurrence of the skin angioma. For the final cosmetic effect of radiotherapy in saving treatment, they do not have the impact: tumor size, boost method, chemical treatment, patients age. (authors)

  19. Dose-response relationship for breast cancer induction at radiotherapy dose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gruber Günther

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose Cancer induction after radiation therapy is known as a severe side effect. It is therefore of interest to predict the probability of second cancer appearance for the patient to be treated including breast cancer. Materials and methods In this work a dose-response relationship for breast cancer is derived based on (i the analysis of breast cancer induction after Hodgkin's disease, (ii a cancer risk model developed for high doses including fractionation based on the linear quadratic model, and (iii the reconstruction of treatment plans for Hodgkin's patients treated with radiotherapy, (iv the breast cancer induction of the A-bomb survivor data. Results The fitted model parameters for an α/β = 3 Gy were α = 0.067Gy-1 and R = 0.62. The risk for breast cancer is according to this model for small doses consistent with the finding of the A-bomb survivors, has a maximum at doses of around 20 Gy and drops off only slightly at larger doses. The predicted EAR for breast cancer after radiotherapy of Hodgkin's disease is 11.7/10000PY which can be compared to the findings of several epidemiological studies where EAR for breast cancer varies between 10.5 and 29.4/10000PY. The model was used to predict the impact of the reduction of radiation volume on breast cancer risk. It was estimated that mantle field irradiation is associated with a 3.2-fold increased risk compared with mediastinal irradiation alone, which is in agreement with a published value of 2.7. It was also shown that the modelled age dependency of breast cancer risk is in satisfying agreement with published data. Conclusions The dose-response relationship obtained in this report can be used for the prediction of radiation induced secondary breast cancer of radiotherapy patients.

  20. Late cutaneous effects of a local potent steroid during adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulff, Eva; Maroti, Marianne; Serup, Jörgen

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate whether treatment with a local potent corticosteroid during adjuvant external radiotherapy (ERT) of breast cancer is associated with late skin toxicity. Material and methods: Sixty patients (32 treated with potent corticoid cream versus 28 controls t...

  1. Fetal dose determination in patients with breast cancer submitted to radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melo, H.C.; Roesler, I.C.; Leon, E.

    1985-01-01

    The exposure that the fetus receive during radiotherapy treatment for patients with breast cancer submitted to cobalt 60 and linear accelerator of 6 MV is studied. Measurements with a rando-Alderson Phantom and ionization chamber for each individualized irradiation field, at the body level where the fetus is localized during the several stages of pregnancy, are made. (M.A.C.) [pt

  2. Segmental mastectomy and radiotherapy as treatment of stage II breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faria, S.L.; Chiminazzo Junior, H.; Schlupp, W.R.; Cunha, L.S.M. da

    1987-01-01

    The treatment of operable breast cancer with segmental mastectomy and radiotherapy has been described since decade 30. Many recent prospective and retrospective studies have shown the efficacy of this conservative management, particularly in stage I. There are still doubts in its use in stage II. (Author) [pt

  3. Dosimetric effect of images of double field exposure and positioning in radiotherapy of breast treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bermudez Luna, R.; Rodriguez Rodriguez, C.; Martin Martin, G.; Lopez Fernandez, A.; Caballero Perea, B.; Ludena Martinez, B.; Prados Losa, R.

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study are to quantify the increased dose in white volume and the organ at risk in breast radiotherapy treatment, derived from portals of double-exposure images scheduled for treatment, evaluate dose reduction by passing images of single exposure and consider whether it would be wise to consider this doses in the planning process. (Author)

  4. Morbidity of ischemic heart disease in early breast cancer 15-20 years after adjuvant radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyenes, G.; Rutqvist, L.E.; Fornander, T.; Carlens, P.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the cardiac side effects, primarily the occurrence of ischemic heart disease, in symptom-free patients with early breast cancer treated with radiotherapy. Thirty-seven survivors of a former randomized study of early breast cancer were examined. Twenty patients irradiated pre- or postoperatively for left sided disease (study group patients) were compared with 17 controls who were either treated for right sided disease, or were nonirradiated patients. Radiotherapy was randomized in the original study; either tangential field 60 Co, or electron-therapy was delivered. Echocardiography and bicycle ergometry stress test with 99m Tc SestaMIBI myocardial perfusion scintigraphy were carried out and the patients' major risk factors for ischemic heart disease were also listed. Our results showed a significant difference between the scintigraphic findings of the two groups. Five of the 20 study group patients (25%), while none of the 17 controls exhibited some kind of significant defects on scintigraphy, indicating ischemic heart disease (p < 0.05). No deterioration in left ventricular systolic and/or diastolic function could be detected by echocardiography. Radiotherapy for left sided breast cancer with the mentioned treatment technique may present as an independent risk factor in the long-term development of ischemic heart disease, while left ventricular dysfunction could not be related to the previous irradiation. The authors emphasize the need to optimize adjuvant radiotherapy for early breast cancer by considering the dose both to the heart as well as the cancer. 39 refs., 4 tabs

  5. Elective radiotherapy of the regional lymph node areas in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poortmans, P.M.P.

    2006-01-01

    In breast cancer patients, the incidence of involvement of the regional lymph nodes and the risk for developing a locoregional recurrence are highly influenced by several prognostic factors. A meta-analysis of the EBCTCG showed a reduction of about 70% of the locoregional recurrence rate with radiotherapy for all patients, independent of age, characteristics of the tumour or the administration of systemic treatment. At the same time, this meta-analysis confirmed that radiotherapy can lead to an increased risk for developing contralateral breast cancer and to an increase in the risk of non-breast cancer related mortality, mainly due to cardiac and pulmonary toxicity. Because of this, the net effect of regional radiotherapy will be strongly influenced by the individual risk factors of the patients and by the quality of the technical aspects of the radiotherapy. The thin line between the benefits of elective regional lymph node irradiation and the possible late toxicity for patients with early stage breast cancer is currently the subject of several prospective randomized trials, the results of which will only become available in several years. Moreover, recent developments in the field of novel prognostic factors will open completely new ways to be explored, which might give bus new tools for estimating the individual benefit/risk ratio for every single patient. (author)

  6. Osteosarcoma in the anterior chest wall that developed 20 years after postoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murata, Mariko; Shoji, Tsuyoshi; Nakayama, Ei; Bando, Toru

    2008-01-01

    Sarcomas are a rare complication of radiotherapy for breast cancer and such patients have a poor prognosis. We report resection of an osteosarcoma in the chest wall that developed 20 years after postoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer. A 57-year-old woman was referred to our department for examination and treatment of an anterior chest wall tumor in April 2007. In September 1986, she had undergone a radical mastectomy and postoperative irradiation and chemotherapy for right breast cancer. In December 2003, she underwent chemotherapy for recurrence of breast cancer which was pointed out on computed tomography involving the pleura and left superior clavicular lymph nodes. In March 2006, follow-up computed tomography of the chest demonstrated the destruction of the sternum, which was diagnosed as recurrence and she was followed with chemotherapy for breast cancer continuously thereafter. In April 2007, because of the developing sternal tumor, excisional biopsy was performed and histopathology indicated sarcoma. In May 2007, resection of the chest wall tumor with the sternum, bilateral clavicles, bilateral first and second ribs, and right partial lung (upper and middle lobe) were performed, and the chest wall defect was reconstructed with a rectus abdominis musculocutaneous free flap. Histopathologically, the tumor was osteosarcoma with margin free. Adjuvant radiotherapy to the breast plays a significant role in preventing local disease recurrence in women treated for breast cancer. However, radiotherapy can induce malignant sarcoma after a latency period of several years. The risk is extremely low for the individual patient, but this disease is aggressive and associated with a poor overall prognosis. Therefore, early detection is necessary for optimal treatment and incisional biopsy is necessary for accurate diagnosis. (author)

  7. Excisional biopsy, auxillary node dissection and definitive radiotherapy for Stages I and II breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danoff, B.F.; Pajak, T.F.; Solin, L.J.; Goodman, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    From 1977 to 1982, 189 patients with clinical Stage I and II breast cancer underwent excisional biopsy and auxillary node dissection followed by definitive radiotherapy at the University of Pennsylvania. One hundred and nine patients had T 1 lesions and 80 had T 2 lesions. Histologically negative nodes were found in 136 patients (72%) and histologically positive nodes in 53 patients. Median follow-up from the completion of radiotherapy was 26 months. The four year actuarial disease free survival is 82% for pathologic Stage I and 70% for pathologic Stage II. Cosmesis was judged to be good to excellent in 90% and fair in 9%. Complications included arm edema (7%), symptomatic pneumonitis (1%), rib fractures (1%), pericarditis (1%) and pleural effusion (1%). Primary radiotherapy for Stages I and II breast cancer produces a local-regional control rate of 95% and good to excellent cosmesis in 90% of the patients. While these results are preliminary, they compare favorably with other reported series

  8. Correlation factor analysis between radiation pneumonitis and chemo-radiotherapy in breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Huiping; Wang Junjie; Ma Liwen; Zhang Shulan; Deng Huijing; Jia Tingzhen

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between radiotherapy-induced lung injury and chemotherapy agents as well as other factors. Methods: A total of 85 breast cancer patients received radiotherapy with sequential or concurrent chemotherapy after surgery were analysed for radiation dose, chemotherapy schedule, age, and lung disease history. Results: Five patients had clinical symptoms of radiation pneumonitis, one of them was necessary to treat and 16 patients developed radiological changes (18.8%). Close relationship was noted between incidence of radiation pneumonitis and radiation dose, timing and drugs used in chemotherapy and lung disease history. Conclusion: High irradiation dose, concurrent chemotherapy, and lung disease history can increase the rate of radiotherapy-induced pulmonary injury in breast cancer patients. (authors)

  9. Overexpression of synuclein-γ predicts lack of benefit from radiotherapy for breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Li; Zhang, Cheng; Ma, Ruolan; Li, Xiaofan; Yuan, Hua; Li, Yihao; Chen, Ruxuan; Liu, Caiyun; Guo, Jianping; Qu, Like; Shou, Chengchao

    2016-01-01

    Although radiotherapy following mastectomy was demonstrated to reduce the recurring risk and improve the prognosis of patients with breast cancer, it is also notorious for comprehensive side effects, hence only a selected group of patients can benefit. Therefore, the screening of molecular markers capable of predicting the efficacy of radiotherapy is essential. We have established a cohort of 454 breast cancer cases and selected 238 patients with indications for postoperative radiotherapy. Synuclein-γ (SNCG) protein levels were assessed by immunohistochemistry, and SNCG status was retrospectively correlated with clinical features and survival in patients treated or not treated with radiotherapy. Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) and survival analysis for online datasets were also performed for further validation. Among patients that received radiotherapy (82/238), those demonstrating positive SNCG expression had a 55.0 month shorter median overall survival (OS) in comparison to those demonstrating negative SNCG expression (78.4 vs. 133.4 months, log rank χ 2 = 16.13; p < 0.001). Among the patients that received no radiotherapy (156/238), SNCG status was not correlated with OS (log rank χ 2 = 2.40; p = 0.121). A COX proportional hazard analysis confirmed SNCG as an independent predictor of OS, only for patients who have received radiotherapy. Similar results were also obtained for distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS). A GSEA analysis indicated that SNCG was strongly associated with genes related to a radiation stress response. A survival analysis was performed with online databases consisting of breast cancer, lung cancer, and glioblastoma and further confirmed SNCG’s significance in predicting the survival of patients that have received radiotherapy. A positive SNCG may serve as a potential marker to identify breast cancer patients who are less likely to benefit from radiotherapy and may also be extended to other types of cancer. However, the role of SNCG

  10. Vertical mammaplasty associated with accelerated partial breast radiotherapy: how oncoplastic surgery techniques associated with modern techniques of radiotherapy can improve the aesthetic outcome in selected patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couto, Henrique Lima, E-mail: enriquecouto@hotmail.com [Santa Fe Women' s and Maternity Hospital, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Amorim, Washington Cancado; Guimaraes, Rodrigo [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Hospital Geral; Ramires, Leandro Cruz; Castilho, Marcus Simoes [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina; Dominguez, Lorena Lima Coto [Universidade Estacio de Sa (UNESA), Rio de Janeiro, EJ (Brazil)

    2014-07-15

    Breast cancer is the second most common type of cancer in the world, being the most common among women, responsible for 22% of new cases each year. It's surgical and radiation treatment evolved from radical procedures (Halsted radical mastectomy and total external breast radiotherapy) to less radical and more conservative procedures. With the use of modern oncoplastic surgery techniques and accelerated partial breast radiotherapy, selected patients can benefit with better aesthetic results, fewer side effects, and more comfortable and brief treatments. (author)

  11. Vertical mammaplasty associated with accelerated partial breast radiotherapy: how oncoplastic surgery techniques associated with modern techniques of radiotherapy can improve the aesthetic outcome in selected patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couto, Henrique Lima; Amorim, Washington Cancado; Guimaraes, Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second most common type of cancer in the world, being the most common among women, responsible for 22% of new cases each year. It's surgical and radiation treatment evolved from radical procedures (Halsted radical mastectomy and total external breast radiotherapy) to less radical and more conservative procedures. With the use of modern oncoplastic surgery techniques and accelerated partial breast radiotherapy, selected patients can benefit with better aesthetic results, fewer side effects, and more comfortable and brief treatments. (author)

  12. Intensity modulated radiotherapy with simultaneous integrated boost vs. conventional radiotherapy with sequential boost for breast cancer - A preliminary result.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hsin-Hua; Hou, Ming-Feng; Chuang, Hung-Yi; Huang, Ming-Yii; Tsuei, Le-Ping; Chen, Fang-Ming; Ou-Yang, Fu; Huang, Chih-Jen

    2015-10-01

    This study was aimed to assess the acute dermatological adverse effect from two distinct RT techniques for breast cancer patients. We compared intensity-modulated radiotherapy with simultaneous integrated boost (IMRT-SIB) and conventional radiotherapy followed by sequential boost (CRT-SB). The study population was composed of 126 consecutive female breast cancer patients treated with breast conserving surgery. Sixty-six patients received IMRT-SIB to 2 dose levels simultaneously. They received 50.4 Gy at 1.8 Gy per fraction to the whole breast and 60.2 Gy at 2.15 Gy per fraction to the tumor bed by integral boost. Sixty patients in the CRT-SB group received 50 Gy in 25 fractions to the whole breast followed by a boost irradiation to tumor bed in 5-7 fractions to a total dose of 60-64 Gy. Acute skin toxicities were documented in agreement with the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3 (CTCAE v.3.0). Ninety-eight patients had grade 1 radiation dermatitis while 14 patients had grade 2. Among those with grade 2, there were 3 patients in IMRT-SIB group (4.5%) while 11 in CRT-SB group (18.3%). (P = 0.048) There was no patient with higher than grade 2 toxicity. Three year local control was 99.2%, 3-year disease free survival was 97.5% and 3-year overall survival was 99.2%. A significant reduction in the severity of acute radiation dermatitis from IMRT-SIB comparing with CRT-SB is demonstrated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Role of radiotherapy in the complex treatment for breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlov, A S; Datsenko, V S [Tsentral' nyj Inst. Usovershenstvovaniya Vrachej, Moscow (USSR)

    1978-01-01

    Preoperational irradiation of a primary focus and all the areas of regional metastatic spreading turned out to be most effective in the case of mammary gland cancer complex treating. Postoperational radiotherapy is a less effective version of radiotherapy justified in the case of metastatic affection of lymph nodes and deliberate disturbance of ablastics during the operation. Time interval between the ending of preoperational radiotherapy and the operation must not exceed 3 weeks, as, otherwise, the biological potential of undamaged cancer cells is recovered and the hazard of appearing remote metastases increases. Additional courses of chemotherapy in the case of multiple of lymphogenic metastases improe prognosis for patients with mammary gland cancer.

  14. Axillary radiotherapy in conservative surgery for early-stage breast cancer (stage I and II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Novoa, Alejandra; Acea Nebril, Benigno; Díaz, Inma; Builes Ramírez, Sergio; Varela, Cristina; Cereijo, Carmen; Mosquera Oses, Joaquín; López Calviño, Beatriz; Seoane Pillado, María Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Several clinical studies analyze axillary treatment in women with early-stage breast cancer because of changes in the indication for axillary lymph node dissection. The aim of the study is to analyze the impact of axillary radiotherapy in disease-free and overall survival in women with early breast cancer treated with lumpectomy. Retrospective study in women with initial stages of breast carcinoma treated by lumpectomy. A comparative analysis of high-risk women with axillary lymph node involvement who received axillary radiotherapy with the group of women with low risk without radiotherapy was performed. Logistic regression was used to determine factors influencing survival and lymphedema onset. A total of 541 women were included in the study: 384 patients (71%) without axillary lymph node involvement and 157 women (29%) with 1-3 axillary lymph node involvement. Patients with axillary radiotherapy had a higher number of metastatic lymph node compared to non-irradiated (1.6±0.7 vs. 1.4±0.6, P=.02). The group of women with axillary lymph node involvement and radiotherapy showed an overall and disease-free survival at 10 years similar to that obtained in patients without irradiation (89.7% and 77.2%, respectively). 3 lymph nodes involved multiplied by more than 7 times the risk of death (HR=7.20; 95% CI: 1.36 to 38.12). The multivariate analysis showed axillary lymph node dissection as the only variable associated with the development of lymphedema. The incidence of axillary relapse on stage I and II breast cancer is rare. In these patients axillary radiotherapy does not improve overall survival, but contributes to regional control in those patients with risk factors. Copyright © 2016 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. ACCELERATED REGIMENS OF ADJUVANT RADIOTHERAPY IN THE TREATMENT OF BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. V. Afonin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of breast cancer (BC is a complex multidisciplinary problem. Often, radiation therapy is an obligatory component of treatment of breast cancer patients. Numerous large randomized trials have proved the efficacy of adjuvant radiotherapy in both the standard fractionation regimen in a single focal dose of 2 Gy to a total focal dose of 50 Gy for 25 fractions and in modes of hypofractionation using radiation exposure at a larger daily dose with a reduction in the total treatment time. The presented review summarizes the data of the largest studies on the modes of hypofractionation of postoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer. Most of the studies comparing the standard mode of fractionation of postoperative radiotherapy with the modes of hypofractionation showed comparable results for the main oncological parameters with similar tolerability, frequency of complications and good cosmetic results. It also shows the economic feasibility of applying accelerated regimes in everyday practice. Despite the fact that radiotherapy in the mode of hypofractionation has already become the standard of treatment and is recommended for use by the largest European and American cancer associations, indications for its conduct, the criteria for selection in the studies and the range of recommended single focal doses differ. The obtained results do not give an opportunity to confidently judge the advantage of one or another regime. It is necessary to determine the factors of a favorable and unfavorable prognosis, to clarify the indications for the use of various radiotherapy techniques. Therefore, questions about the optimal mode of hypo-fractionation of adjuvant radiotherapy, the timing of its initiation and the criteria for selecting patients for this type of therapy as part of the comprehensive treatment of breast cancer have not yet been fully resolved. Also open is the choice of optimal single and total doses of radiation, its combination with drug

  16. Skin-sparing Helical Tomotherapy vs 3D-conformal Radiotherapy for Adjuvant Breast Radiotherapy: In Vivo Skin Dosimetry Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capelle, Lisa; Warkentin, Heather; MacKenzie, Marc; Joseph, Kurian; Gabos, Zsolt; Pervez, Nadeem; Tankel, Keith; Chafe, Susan; Amanie, John; Ghosh, Sunita; Parliament, Matthew; Abdulkarim, Bassam

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We investigated whether treatment-planning system (TPS)-calculated dose accurately reflects skin dose received for patients receiving adjuvant breast radiotherapy (RT) with standard three-dimensional conformal RT (3D-CRT) or skin-sparing helical tomotherapy (HT). Methods and Materials: Fifty patients enrolled in a randomized controlled trial investigating acute skin toxicity from adjuvant breast RT with 3D-CRT compared to skin-sparing HT, where a 5-mm strip of ipsilateral breast skin was spared. Thermoluminescent dosimetry or optically stimulated luminescence measurements were made in multiple locations and were compared to TPS-calculated doses. Skin dosimetric parameters and acute skin toxicity were recorded in these patients. Results: With HT there was a significant correlation between calculated and measured dose in the medial and lateral ipsilateral breast (r = 0.67, P V50 (1.4% vs 5.9%, respectively; P=.001) but higher skin V40 and skin V30 (71.7% vs 64.0%, P=.02; and 99.0% vs 93.8%, P=.001, respectively) than 3D-CRT plans. Conclusion: The 3D-CRT TPS more accurately reflected skin dose than the HT TPS, which tended to overestimate dose received by 14% in patients receiving adjuvant breast RT.

  17. Left-sided breast cancer irradiation using rotational and fixed-field radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi, X. Sharon; Liu, Tian X.; Liu, Arthur K.; Newman, Francis; Rabinovitch, Rachel; Kavanagh, Brian; Hu, Y. Angie

    2014-01-01

    The 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) technique is the standard for breast cancer radiotherapy. During treatment planning, not only the coverage of the planning target volume (PTV) but also the minimization of the dose to critical structures, such as the lung, heart, and contralateral breast tissue, need to be considered. Because of the complexity and variations of patient anatomy, more advanced radiotherapy techniques are sometimes desired to better meet the planning goals. In this study, we evaluated external-beam radiation treatment techniques for left breast cancer using various delivery platforms: fixed-field including TomoDirect (TD), static intensity-modulated radiotherapy (sIMRT), and rotational radiotherapy including Elekta volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and tomotherapy helical (TH). A total of 10 patients with left-sided breast cancer who did or did not have positive lymph nodes and were previously treated with 3DCRT/sIMRT to the entire breast were selected, their treatment was planned with Monaco VMAT, TD, and TH. Dosimetric parameters including PTV coverage, organ-at-risk (OAR) sparing, dose-volume histograms, and target minimum/maximum/mean doses were evaluated. It is found that for plans providing comparable PTV coverage, the Elekta VMAT plans were generally more inhomogeneous than the TH and TD plans. For the cases with regional node involvement, the average mean doses administered to the heart were 9.2 (± 5.2) and 8.8 (± 3.0) Gy in the VMAT and TH plans compared with 11.9 (± 6.4) and 11.8 (± 9.2) Gy for the 3DCRT and TD plans, respectively, with slightly higher doses given to the contralateral lung or breast or both. On average, the total monitor units for VMAT plans are 11.6% of those TH plans. Our studies have shown that VMAT and TH plans offer certain dosimetric advantages over fixed-field IMRT plans for advanced breast cancer requiring regional nodal treatment. However, for early-stage breast cancer fixed

  18. Serum Leptin and Adiponectin Levels in Breast Cancer Before and After Post Mastectomy Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nosseir, N.M.; Abdel -Messeih, Ph.L.; Mohamed, S.K.

    2010-01-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for postmenopausal breast cancer and is associated with poor prognosis. Leptin and adiponectin are cytokines synthesized in adipose tissue and have been implicated as a link between obesity and breast cancer. Therefore, in this study we analyzed and compared: serum leptin, adiponectin, lipid profile including cholesterol, triglycerides (TG), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c) and body mass index (BMI) in breast cancer patients before and after Post Mastectomy Radio- therapy (PMRT).Serum leptin and adiponectin significantly increased and decreased respectively in patients after PMRT compared to the controls. BMI statistically decreased after radiotherapy while LDL-c increased in breast cancer patients; in both patients groups. HDL-c was statistically decreased but triglycerides showed significant increase in breast cancer patients. These results denoted that dyslipidemia may be associated with breast cancer risk and the evaluation of leptin and adiponectin can be used for follow up of patients under radiotherapy treatment for breast cancer

  19. Serum Leptin and Adiponectin Levels in Breast Cancer Before and After Post Mastectomy Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nosseir, N M; Abdel -Messeih, Ph L; Mohamed, S.K., E-mail: neveennosseir@Live.co [Health Radiation Research Department, National Center for Radiation Research and Technology, P.O.Box:29 Nasr City-Cairo (Egypt)

    2010-07-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for postmenopausal breast cancer and is associated with poor prognosis. Leptin and adiponectin are cytokines synthesized in adipose tissue and have been implicated as a link between obesity and breast cancer. Therefore, in this study we analyzed and compared: serum leptin, adiponectin, lipid profile including cholesterol, triglycerides (TG), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c) and body mass index (BMI) in breast cancer patients before and after Post Mastectomy Radio- therapy (PMRT).Serum leptin and adiponectin significantly increased and decreased respectively in patients after PMRT compared to the controls. BMI statistically decreased after radiotherapy while LDL-c increased in breast cancer patients; in both patients groups. HDL-c was statistically decreased but triglycerides showed significant increase in breast cancer patients. These results denoted that dyslipidemia may be associated with breast cancer risk and the evaluation of leptin and adiponectin can be used for follow up of patients under radiotherapy treatment for breast cancer

  20. Breast-Conserving Therapy: Radiotherapy Margins for Breast Tumor Bed Boost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topolnjak, Rajko; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Minkema, Danny; Remeijer, Peter; Nijkamp, Jasper; Elkhuizen, Paula; Rasch, Coen

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the interfraction position variability of the excision cavity (EC) and to compare the rib and breast surface as surrogates for the cavity. Additionally, we sought to determine the required margin for on-line, off-line and no correction protocols in external beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 20 patients were studied who had been treated in the supine position for 28 daily fractions. Cone-beam computed tomography scans were regularly acquired according to a shrinking action level setup correction protocol based on bony anatomy registration of the ribs and sternum. The position of the excision area was retrospectively analyzed by gray value cone-beam computed tomography-to-computed tomography registration. Subsequently, three setup correction strategies (on-line, off-line, and no corrections) were applied, according to the rib and breast surface registrations, to estimate the residual setup errors (systematic [Σ] and random [σ]) of the excision area. The required margins were calculated using a margin recipe. Results: The image quality of the cone-beam computed tomography scans was sufficient for localization of the EC. The margins required for the investigated setup correction protocols and the setup errors for the left-right, craniocaudal and anteroposterior directions were 8.3 mm (Σ = 3.0, σ = 2.6), 10.6 mm (Σ = 3.8, σ = 3.2), and 7.7 mm (Σ = 2.7, σ = 2.9) for the no correction strategy; 5.6 mm (Σ = 2.0, Σ = 1.8), 6.5 mm (Σ = 2.3, σ = 2.3), and 4.5 mm (Σ = 1.5, σ = 1.9) for the on-line rib strategy; and 5.1 mm (Σ = 1.8, σ = 1.7), 4.8 mm (Σ = 1.7, σ = 1.6), and 3.3 mm (Σ = 1.1, σ = 1.6) for the on-line surface strategy, respectively. Conclusion: Considerable geometric uncertainties in the position of the EC relative to the bony anatomy and breast surface have been observed. By using registration of the breast surface, instead of the rib, the uncertainties in the position of the EC area were reduced

  1. Spectrophotometer and ultrasound evaluation of late toxicity following breast-cancer radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, E J; Chen, H; Torres, M A; Curran, W J; Liu, T

    2011-10-01

    Radiation-induced normal-tissue toxicities are common, complex, and distressing side effects that affect 90% of patients receiving breast-cancer radiotherapy and 40% of patients post radiotherapy. In this study, the authors investigated the use of spectrophotometry and ultrasound to quantitatively measure radiation-induced skin discoloration and subcutaneous-tissue fibrosis. The study's purpose is to determine whether skin discoloration correlates with the development of fibrosis in breast-cancer radiotherapy. Eighteen breast-cancer patients were enrolled in our initial study. All patients were previously treated with a standard course of radiation, and the median follow-up time was 22 months. The treated and untreated breasts were scanned with a spectrophotometer and an ultrasound. Two spectrophotometer parameters-melanin and erythema indices-were used to quantitatively assess skin discoloration. Two ultrasound parameters-skin thickness and Pearson coefficient of the hypodermis-were used to quantitatively assess severity of fibrosis. These measurements were correlated with clinical assessments (RTOG late morbidity scores). Significant measurement differences between the treated and contralateral breasts were observed among all patients: 27.3% mean increase in skin thickness (p spectrophotometer parameters do not correlate with ultrasound parameters. Spectrophotometry and quantitative ultrasound are objective tools that assess radiation-induced tissue injury. Spectrophotometer parameters did not correlate with those of quantitative ultrasound suggesting that skin discoloration cannot be used as a marker for subcutaneous fibrosis. These tools may prove useful for the reduction of radiation morbidities and improvement of patient quality of life.

  2. Radiotherapy in the curative treatment of breast cancer: current status and future trends. An opinion sample of radiation oncologists active in breast cancer research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurtz, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    A questionnaire regarding the current practice of breast cancer radiotherapy and possible future trends in this field was filled out by 13 radiation oncologists active in breast cancer research. In the opinion of this small group, radiotherapy is presently included in the initial treatment of the large majority of early breast cancers, particularly in the framework of breast-conserving therapy, which is currently used in >50% of these patients. Indications for post-mastectomy irradiation vary greatly among respondents, as do attitudes toward the potentially negative aspects of adjuvant radiotherapy. Most respondents feel that their future practices will be significantly influenced by an increase in screen-detected cancers, the aging of the population, the increasing influence of medical oncologists, participation in clinical trials, and increased patient participation in treatment decisions. An increase is foreseen in the use of breast-conserving approaches, radiotherapy, and systemic therapies, and a decrease in the use of both total mastectomy and axillary dissection. Most respondents feel that there will be a modest decrease in the percentage of conservatively operated patients receiving radiotherapy. A future role is seen for neo-adjuvant chemotherapy, at least in well-defined subgroups, increasing the number of patients offered breast-conserving approaches. Most respondents expect that irradiation of lymph nodal areas will gain new credibility and be used more often. No majority opinion could be elicited regarding ways of improving the therapeutic ratio in breast cancer radiotherapy. (author)

  3. Unilateral solitary choroid metastasis from breast cancer: Rewarding results of external radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmala S

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Intraocular metastatic tumor is the commonest intraocular malignancy in adults, with uveal tract the commonest site. In nearly 85% of cases the choroid is the afflicted site due to its vascularity. Breast and lung are the common primaries. In breast primaries, this could be the first metastatic disease. This condition should always be kept in mind in patients with visual symptoms. Fundus examination, ultrasonography and CT/MRI of the orbit help in diagnosis. Early recognition and timely treatment can save the visual function thus imparting good quality of life to the patient. External beam radiotherapy is a good local form of treatment. Hormone therapy in hormone receptor positive tumors can have additional benefits. Here we report a case of unilateral solitary choroid metastasis in a case of breast cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy.

  4. Cosmetic results following lumpectomy axillary dissection and radiotherapy for smaal breast cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewar, J.A.; Benhamou, S.; Benhamou, E.; Arriagada, R.; Petit, J.Y.; Fontaine, F.; Sarrazin, D.

    1988-01-01

    Between 1970 and April 1982, 592 women, with T/sub 1/, small T/sub 2/, N/sub 0/, N/sub 1/, M/sub 0/ breast cancer were managed by lumpectomy, axillary dissection and radiotherapy at the Institut Gustave Roussy (IGR). The overall cosmetic result and the degree of assymetry, fibrosis and telangiectasia of the treated breast were assessed by the radiation oncologist at each follow-up visit. The changes in these cosmetic parameters with time are shown. At 5 years the overall cosmetic result was excellent in 58%, good in 38% and fair or poor in 8%. A multivariate analysis was performed of the factors associated with a cosmetic defect. The most significant factors were tumour size, the presence of defect after surgery and the daily applied dose per fraction to the breast. Surgical and radiotherapy technique (especially alternate day fractionation) can significantly affect the cosmetic result obtained

  5. Mammary fat necrosis following radiotherapy in the conservative management of localized breast cancer: Does it matter?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trombetta, Mark; Valakh, Vladimir; Julian, Thomas B.; Werts, E. Day; Parda, David

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Fat necrosis is a well-described and relatively common complication arising from post-lumpectomy irradiation of the breast, most commonly breast brachytherapy. We wish to assess the clinical significance of fat necrosis resulting from post-lumpectomy breast irradiation. Methods: We reviewed the literature to determine the overall incidence and significance of fat necrosis to determine whether or not fat necrosis poses a significant clinical problem. Results: Fat necrosis occurs in up to one-quarter of patients following post-lumpectomy breast irradiation. Only rarely is invasive intervention required however, it does significantly degrade the quality of all modalities of breast imaging. Conclusions: Fat necrosis is a common complication of radiotherapy which rarely requires therapeutic intervention. However, post-therapeutic clinical imaging such as mammography, ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging are affected which may result in additional diagnostic procedures up to and including biopsy.

  6. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Results in Significant Decrease in Clinical Toxicities Compared With Conventional Wedge-Based Breast Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harsolia, Asif; Kestin, Larry; Grills, Inga; Wallace, Michelle; Jolly, Shruti; Jones, Cortney; Lala, Moinaktar; Martinez, Alvaro; Schell, Scott; Vicini, Frank A.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: We have previously demonstrated that intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with a static multileaf collimator process results in a more homogenous dose distribution compared with conventional wedge-based whole breast irradiation (WBI). In the present analysis, we reviewed the acute and chronic toxicity of this IMRT approach compared with conventional wedge-based treatment. Methods and Materials: A total of 172 patients with Stage 0-IIB breast cancer were treated with lumpectomy followed by WBI. All patients underwent treatment planning computed tomography and received WBI (median dose, 45 Gy) followed by a boost to 61 Gy. Of the 172 patients, 93 (54%) were treated with IMRT, and the 79 patients (46%) treated with wedge-based RT in a consecutive fashion immediately before this cohort served as the control group. The median follow-up was 4.7 years. Results: A significant reduction in acute Grade 2 or worse dermatitis, edema, and hyperpigmentation was seen with IMRT compared with wedges. A trend was found toward reduced acute Grade 3 or greater dermatitis (6% vs. 1%, p = 0.09) in favor of IMRT. Chronic Grade 2 or worse breast edema was significantly reduced with IMRT compared with conventional wedges. No difference was found in cosmesis scores between the two groups. In patients with larger breasts (≥1,600 cm 3 , n = 64), IMRT resulted in reduced acute (Grade 2 or greater) breast edema (0% vs. 36%, p <0.001) and hyperpigmentation (3% vs. 41%, p 0.001) and chronic (Grade 2 or greater) long-term edema (3% vs. 30%, p 0.007). Conclusion: The use of IMRT in the treatment of the whole breast results in a significant decrease in acute dermatitis, edema, and hyperpigmentation and a reduction in the development of chronic breast edema compared with conventional wedge-based RT

  7. The impact of postmastectomy radiotherapy on local control in patients with invasive lobular breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diepenmaat, Lindy A.; Sangen, Maurice J.C. van der; Poll-Franse, Lonneke V. van de; Beek, Mike W.P.M. van; Berlo, Charles L.H. van; Luiten, Ernest J.T.; Nieuwenhuijzen, Grard A.P.; Voogd, Adri C.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this population-based study was to examine the impact of postmastectomy radiotherapy on the risk of local recurrence in patients with invasive lobular breast cancer (ILC). Methods: The population-based Eindhoven Cancer Registry was used to select all patients with ILC, who underwent mastectomy in five general hospitals in the southern part of Netherlands between 1995 and 2002. Of the 499 patients 383 patients fulfilled the eligibility criteria. Of these patients, 170 (44.4%) had received postmastectomy radiotherapy. The median follow-up was 7.2 years. Fourteen patients (3.7%) were lost to follow-up. Results: During follow-up 22 patients developed a local recurrence, of whom 4 had received postmastectomy radiotherapy. The 5-year actuarial risk of local recurrence was 2.1% for the patients with and 8.7% for the patients without postmastectomy radiotherapy. After adjustment for age at diagnosis, tumour stage and adjuvant systemic treatment, the patients who underwent postmastectomy radiotherapy were found to have a more than 3 times lower risk of local recurrence compared to the patients without (Hazard Ratio 0.30; 95% Confidence Interval: 0.10-0.89). Conclusion: Local control is excellent for patients with ILC who undergo postmastectomy radiotherapy and significantly better than for patients not receiving radiotherapy.

  8. Features of nursing care provided for breast cancer patients treated with radiotherapy following breast-conserving surgery. Comparison of nursing practices between certified nurses in breast cancer nursing and non-specialist nurses working with breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Mariko; Takahira, Yumi; Ichikawa, Kayo; Horikoshi, Masataka; Futawatari, Tamae

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to identifying features of nursing care provided for breast cancer patients during the course of radiotherapy following breast-conserving surgery and improve the quality of nursing care. Subjects were certified nurses in breast cancer nursing (CN) and non-specialist nurses working with breast cancer patients (NS). An anonymous survey questionnaire on nursing care and other practices provided before, during, and after radiotherapy was conducted by postal mail and the results were compared between CN and NS. Valid responses were obtained from 40 CN (41.2%) and 102 NS (56.7%). Significant differences between CN and NS were observed for 15 of 27 (55.6%) care items before radiotherapy, 18 of 18 (100%) items during radiotherapy, and 9 of 20 (45.0%) items after radiotherapy. Among the items with significant differences, significantly more NS than CN performed all nursing care items during the course of radiotherapy, except for one item provided before radiotherapy. These results demonstrate that it is necessary to facilitate enhanced collaboration and coordination between CN and NS providing nursing care for breast cancer patients in order to improve the quality of nursing care delivered to patients. (author)

  9. Radiotherapy and breast reconstruction: complications and cosmesis with TRAM versus tissue expander/implant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chawla, Ashish K.; Kachnic, Lisa A.; Taghian, Alphonse G.; Niemierko, Andrzej; Zapton, Daniel T.; Powell, Simon N.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy (RT) has an important role in breast cancer treatment after modified radical mastectomy. Many of these patients also undergo breast reconstruction. We reviewed our institutions' experience to determine the outcome of patients treated with breast reconstruction and RT. Methods and Materials: Between 1981 and 1999, 48 breast cancer patients underwent modified radical mastectomy, breast reconstruction, and ipsilateral breast RT during their treatment course. Reconstruction either preceded or followed RT. Autologous reconstruction with a transverse rectus abdominus myocutaneous (TRAM) flap was performed in 30 patients, and 18 underwent expander and implant (E/I) reconstruction. The primary endpoint was the quality of the reconstructed, irradiated breast, as measured by analyzing the actuarial incidence of complications. The cosmetic outcome was also assessed by multidisciplinary review of the follow-up visits. Results: The median follow-up from reconstruction was 32 months. The actuarial 2-year complication rate was 53% for patients receiving E/I vs. 12% for those receiving TRAM reconstruction (p<0.01). No other patient or treatment-related factors had a significant impact on complications. The cosmetic outcome was also significantly better in the TRAM subgroup than in the E/I subgroup. Conclusion: The tolerance and cosmetic outcome of breast reconstruction for breast cancer patients in irradiated sites depends significantly on the type of reconstruction used

  10. Precision medicine for early breast cancer radiotherapy: Opening up new horizons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernier, Jacques

    2017-05-01

    So far most efforts put forth to test the value of predictive and prognostic tools in the field of breast radiotherapy remained globally disappointing, or at least below the convincing levels reached for systemic therapy. Nevertheless the addition of predictive tools to the clinical armament tends to prevail over the use of the sole prognostic factors, also in radiotherapy. A number of predictive assays, clinically validated or not, have recently elicited significant associations between molecular profiles and tumor biological aggressiveness and/or radiosensitivity levels. Will it take a long time for these radiation-specific assays to provide added value to the - already crowded - constellation of predictive tools in the breast cancer? On the one hand, optimizing radiotherapy through the integration of precision medicine into the breast cancer management still remains a challenging issue. On the other hand, recent advances in predictive assays aimed at distinguishing patients with a more radioresistant tumor that necessitates radiation dose escalation or a switch to therapeutic approaches other than radiotherapy, plea in favor of an increasing role, in a near future, for radiation-specific molecular signatures. Streamlining predictive assays platforms via concerted actions should imperatively be given high priority, also in terms of health economics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Probabilities of Pulmonary and Cardiac Complications and Radiographic Parameters in Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, O Kyu; Paek, Sung Ho; Ahn, Seung Do; Choi, Eun Kyung; Lee, Sang Wook; Song, Si Yeol; Yoon, Sang Min; Kim, Jong Hoon [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    To evaluate the relationship between the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) of 3- dimensional (3-D) radiotherapy and the radiographic parameters of 2-dimensional (2-D) radiotherapy such as central lung distance (CLD) and maximal heart distance (MHD). We analyzed 110 patients who were treated with postoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer. A two-field tangential technique, a three-field technique, and the reverse hockey stick method were used. The radiation dose administered to whole breast or the chest wall was 50.4 Gy, whereas a 45 Gy was administered to the supraclavicular field. The NTCPs of the heart and lung were calculated by the modified Lyman model and the relative seriality model. For all patients, the NTCPs of radiation-induced pneumonitis and cardiac mortality were 0.5% and 0.7%, respectively. The NTCP of radiation-induced pneumonitis was higher in patients treated with the reverse hockey stick method than in those treated by other two techniques (0.0%, 0.0%, 3.1%, p<0.001). The NTCP of radiation-induced pneumonitis increased with CLD. The NTCP of cardiac mortality increased with MHD (R2=0.808). We found a close correlation between the NTCP of 3-D radiotherapy and 2-D radiographic parameters. Our results are useful to reanalyze the previous 2-D based clinical reports about breast radiation therapy complications as a viewpoint of NTCP.

  12. Probabilities of Pulmonary and Cardiac Complications and Radiographic Parameters in Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noh, O Kyu; Paek, Sung Ho; Ahn, Seung Do; Choi, Eun Kyung; Lee, Sang Wook; Song, Si Yeol; Yoon, Sang Min; Kim, Jong Hoon

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the relationship between the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) of 3- dimensional (3-D) radiotherapy and the radiographic parameters of 2-dimensional (2-D) radiotherapy such as central lung distance (CLD) and maximal heart distance (MHD). We analyzed 110 patients who were treated with postoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer. A two-field tangential technique, a three-field technique, and the reverse hockey stick method were used. The radiation dose administered to whole breast or the chest wall was 50.4 Gy, whereas a 45 Gy was administered to the supraclavicular field. The NTCPs of the heart and lung were calculated by the modified Lyman model and the relative seriality model. For all patients, the NTCPs of radiation-induced pneumonitis and cardiac mortality were 0.5% and 0.7%, respectively. The NTCP of radiation-induced pneumonitis was higher in patients treated with the reverse hockey stick method than in those treated by other two techniques (0.0%, 0.0%, 3.1%, p<0.001). The NTCP of radiation-induced pneumonitis increased with CLD. The NTCP of cardiac mortality increased with MHD (R2=0.808). We found a close correlation between the NTCP of 3-D radiotherapy and 2-D radiographic parameters. Our results are useful to reanalyze the previous 2-D based clinical reports about breast radiation therapy complications as a viewpoint of NTCP.

  13. Risk of second primary lung cancer in women after radiotherapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grantzau, Trine; Thomsen, Mette Skovhus; Væth, Michael; Overgaard, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Background: Several epidemiological studies have reported increased risks of second lung cancers after breast cancer irradiation. In this study we assessed the effects of the delivered radiation dose to the lung and the risk of second primary lung cancer. Methods: We conducted a nested case–control study of second lung cancer in a population based cohort of 23,627 early breast cancer patients treated with post-operative radiotherapy from 1982 to 2007. The cohort included 151 cases diagnosed with second primary lung cancer and 443 controls. Individual dose-reconstructions were performed and the delivered dose to the center of the second lung tumor and the comparable location for the controls were estimated, based on the patient specific radiotherapy charts. Results: The median age at breast cancer diagnosis was 54 years (range 34–74). The median time from breast cancer treatment to second lung cancer diagnosis was 12 years (range 1–26 years). 91% of the cases were categorized as ever smokers vs. 40% among the controls. For patients diagnosed with a second primary lung cancer five or more years after breast cancer treatment the rate of lung cancer increased linearly with 8.5% per Gray (95% confidence interval = 3.1–23.3%; p < 0.001). This rate was enhanced for ever smokers with an excess rate of 17.3% per Gray (95% CI = 4.5–54%; p < 0.005). Conclusions: Second lung cancer after radiotherapy for early breast cancer is associated with the delivered dose to the lung. Although the absolute risk is relative low, the growing number of long-time survivors after breast cancer treatment highlights the need for advances in normal tissue sparing radiation techniques

  14. Breast cancer after radiotherapy for skin hemangioma in infancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundell, M.; Mattsson, A.; Hakulinen, T.; Holm, L.E.

    1996-01-01

    Between 1920 and 1959, 9675 women were irradiated in infancy for skin hemangioma at Radiumhemmet, Stockholm. They were exposed to low to moderate doses of ionizing radiation. The mean age at first exposure was 6 months and the mean absorbed dose to the breast anlage was 0.39 Gy (range 50 years after exposure the ERR at 1 Gy was 2.25 (95% CI 0.59-5.62). The fitted excess absolute risk (EAR) was 22.9 per 10 4 breast-year gray. The breast absorbed dose and time after exposure were important risk determinants for breast cancer excess risk. Forty to 50 years of follow-up was necessary for the excess risk to be expressed. The study confirms previous findings that the breast anlage of female infants is sensitive to ionizing radiation. 17 refs., 6 figs

  15. Prognostic Impact of Adjuvant Radiotherapy in Breast Cancer Patients with One to Three Positive Axillary Lymph Nodes

    OpenAIRE

    Mansour Ansari; Behnam Kadkhodaei; Mehdi Shariat; Abdolrasoul Talei; Majid Akrami; Vahid Zangouri; Niloofar Ahmadloo; Mohammad Mohammadianpanah; Sayed Hasan Hamedi; Hamid Nasrolahi; Shapour Omidvari; Ahmad Mosalaei

    2018-01-01

    Background: Radiotherapy, as an adjuvant treatment, plays a well-known role in prevention of locoregional recurrence in breast cancer patients. This study aims to investigate the impact of radiotherapy in patients with N1 disease. Methods: In this retrospective study, we reviewed the characteristics and treatment outcomes of 316 patients with a biopsy proven diagnosis of breast carcinoma and 1-3 positive axillary lymph nodes. The patients received treatment between 1995 and 201...

  16. Exclusive and adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer patients with synchronous metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Scodan, Romuald; Ali, David; Stevens, Denise

    2010-01-01

    Data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program and the European Concerted Action on survival and Care of Cancer Patients (EUROCARE) project indicate that about 6% of women newly diagnosed with breast cancer have stage IV disease, representing about 12 600 new cases per year in the United States in 2005. Historically, local therapy of the primary tumor in this setting has been aimed solely at symptom palliation. However, several studies suggest that surgical excision of the primary tumor can prolong these patients' survival. Exclusive locoregional radiotherapy is an alternative form of locoregional treatment in this setting and may represent an effective alternative to surgery in this setting. Here we discuss current issues regarding exclusive and adjuvant locoregional radiotherapy in breast cancer patients with synchronous metastases. Several studies suggest that surgery or exclusive irradiation of the primary tumor is associated with better survival in breast cancer patients with synchronous metastases and that exclusive locoregional radiotherapy may represent an effective alternative to surgery in this setting. Results of well-designed prospective studies are needed to re-evaluate treatment of the primary breast tumor in patients with metastases at diagnosis, and to identify those patients who are most likely to benefit

  17. Incidence of new primary cancers after adjuvant tamoxifen therapy and radiotherapy for early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, M.; Storm, H.H.; Mouridsen, H.T.

    1991-01-01

    The incidence of new primary cancers was evaluated in 3538 postmenopausal patients who had received surgical treatment for primary breast cancer. Of these patients, 1828 with a low risk of recurrence received no further treatment. High-risk patients were randomly assigned to one of two groups. The first group (n = 846) received postoperative radiotherapy, while the second group (n = 864) received radiotherapy plus tamoxifen at a dose of 30 mg given daily for 48 weeks. The median observation time was 7.9 years. In comparison with the number of new cancers in the general population, the number of new cancers in the three groups was elevated mostly due to a high number of cancers of the contralateral breast and of colorectal cancers in the high-risk groups. The cumulative risk of nonlymphatic leukemia was increased among patients who received postoperative radiotherapy (P = .04). Cancer incidence in the high-risk tamoxifen-treated group relative to that in the high-risk group not treated with tamoxifen was not significant (1.3). No protective effect of tamoxifen on the opposite breast was seen (rate ratio for breast cancer = 1.1), but a tendency to an elevated risk of endometrial cancer was observed (rate ratio = 3.3; 95% confidence interval = 0.6-32.4). Continued and careful follow-up of women treated with tamoxifen is necessary to clarify the potential cancer-suppressive or cancer-promoting effects of this drug

  18. Effect of presurgical radiotherapy on the steroid receptor concentrations in primary breast carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janssens, J. Ph.; Bonte, J.; Drochmans, A.; Mulier, J.; Rutten, J.; Wittevrongel, C.; Loecker, W. de

    1981-01-01

    With age, oestradiol receptor concentrations increased in primary breast carcinoma while age did not seem to affect the progesterone receptor levels. Above the age of 70, all tumours examined proved to be hormone-dependent. Analysis by light microscope did not allow correlation of the receptor-positive tumours to any specific or predominant cellular structure. Presurgical radiotherapy of 20 gray significantly reduced the oestradiol and to an even greater extent the progesterone receptor concentrations in the tumours. Prebioptic irradiation with 8 gray accentuated the inhibition of steroid receptor proteins. This reduction in receptor concentration after radiotherapy should be taken into account when interpreting steroid receptor values. (author)

  19. 2001 updated standard options and recommendations for radiotherapy in non metastatic breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourquet, A.; Sigal-Zafrani, B.; Cutuli, B.; Luporsi, E.; Lesur, A.

    2002-01-01

    Context. - The 'Standards, Options an Recommendations' (SOR) project, started in 1993, is a collaboration between the Federation of french cancer centers (FNCLCC), the 20 french cancer centers, and specialists from french public universities, general hospitals and private clinics. The main objective is the development of clinical practice guidelines to improve the quality of health care and the outcome of cancer patients. The methodology is based on a literature review and critical appraisal by a multidisciplinary group of experts, with feedback from specialists in cancer care delivery. Objectives. -To develop clinical practice guidelines for non metastatic breast cancer patients according to the definitions of the Standards, Options and Recommendations project. Methods. -Data were identified by searching Medline, web sites, and using the personal reference lists of members of the expert groups. Once the guidelines were defined, the document was submitted for review to 148 independent reviewers. Results. - This article presents the chapter radiotherapy resulting from the 2001 update of the version first published in 1996. The modified 2001 version of the standards, options and recommendations takes into account new information published. The main recommendations are (1) Breast irradiation after conservative surgery significatively decrease the risk of local recurrence (level of evidence A) and the decrease in the risk of local recidivation after chest wall irradiation is greater as the number of risk factors for local recurrence increases (level of evidence A). (2) After conservative surgery, a whole breast irradiation should be performed at a minimum dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions (standard, level of evidence A). (3) A boost in the tumour bed should be performed in women under 50 years, even if the surgical margins are free (standard, level of evidence B). (4) Internal mammary chain irradiation is indicated for internal or central tumours in the absence of axillary

  20. Radiotherapy of breast cancer and dispensary control after the therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odontuya, G.

    1995-01-01

    During the last several years breast cancer is increasing in Mongolia. During 5 years(1990-1994) 142 patients with breast cancer were treated in department of radiology. The 96(77,6%) of those patients were treated by combined radiation therapy and surgery. The 46(32,4%) of those patients were treated palliative therapy. A conclusion:1.Organizing the preventive different examinations among the population in the servicing sphere, involving the family doctors to them. 2.Detection and screening breast cancer in the first period, very important for treatment every patients

  1. Dose to the contralateral breast from radiotherapy and risk of second primary breast cancer in the WECARE study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stovall, M.; Smith, S.A.; Langholz, B.M.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: To quantify the risk of second primary breast cancer in the contralateral breast (CB) after radiotherapy (RT) for first breast cancer. METHODS AND MATERIALS: The study population included participants in the Women's Environmental, Cancer, and Radiation Epidemiology study: 708 cases (women...... calculated using multivariable-adjusted conditional logistic regression models. RESULTS: Across all patients, the mean radiation dose to the specific quadrant of the CB tumor was 1.1 Gy. Women 1.0 Gy of absorbed dose to the specific quadrant of the CB had a 2.5-fold greater...... risk for CB cancer than unexposed women (RR = 2.5, 95% CI 1.4-4.5). No excess risk was observed in women >40 years of age. Women 5 years had a RR of 3.0 (95% CI 1.1-8.1), and the dose response was significant (excess RR per Gy of 1.0, 95% CI 0...

  2. Efficacy of a hydroactive colloid gel versus historical controls for the prevention of radiotherapy-induced moist desquamation in breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Censabella, Sandrine; Claes, Stefan; Orlandini, Marc; Braekers, Roel; Bulens, Paul

    2017-08-01

    Radiotherapy-induced moist desquamation (RIMD) is a complication that can affect patients' quality of life and jeopardize radiotherapy outcomes. The curative use of a hydroactive colloid gel has previously been shown effective in the management of RIMD in breast cancer patients. This study aimed at investigating the efficacy of this same gel but in the prevention of RIMD. A group of breast cancer patients who applied the hydroactive gel from start to end of post-lumpectomy radiotherapy (Preventive Hydrogel group) were compared with two groups of matched historical controls: a group applying a dexpanthenol cream throughout their therapy and a group applying first the dexpanthenol cream then, after 11-14 fractions of radiotherapy, the hydroactive gel (Curative Hydrogel group). All patients received identical fractionation regimen. The clinical outcomes were the incidence and time to onset of RIMD. After 25 fractions of radiotherapy (50 Gy), patients in the Preventive Hydrogel group (N = 202) developed RIMD significantly less frequently and later than patients in the Dexpanthenol group (N = 131; incidence = 7% vs 35% respectively, odds ratios = 7.27; probability of RIMD-free survival after 50 Gy = 0.88 vs 0.62). There were no significant differences between the Preventive and the Curative Hydrogel group (N = 87). These findings confirm our previous results: applying the hydroactive colloid gel, rather than dexpanthenol, delayed the onset and reduced the incidence of RIMD in breast cancer patients. However, applying the hydrogel preventively offered no statistically significant advantages over applying it curatively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Assessment of leakage dose in vivo in patients undergoing radiotherapy for breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peta Lonski

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: Accurate quantification of the relatively small radiation doses delivered to untargeted regions during breast irradiation in patients with breast cancer is of increasing clinical interest for the purpose of estimating long-term radiation-related risks. Out-of-field dose calculations from commercial planning systems however may be inaccurate which can impact estimates for long-term risks associated with treatment. This work compares calculated and measured dose out-of-field and explores the application of a correction for leakage radiation. Materials and methods: Dose calculations of a Boltzmann transport equation solver, pencil beam-type, and superposition-type algorithms from a commercial treatment planning system (TPS were compared with in vivo thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD measurements conducted out-of-field on the contralateral chest at points corresponding to the thyroid, axilla and contralateral breast of eleven patients undergoing tangential beam radiotherapy for breast cancer. Results: Overall, the TPS was found to under-estimate doses at points distal to the radiation field edge with a modern linear Boltzmann transport equation solver providing the best estimates. Application of an additive correction for leakage (0.04% of central axis dose improved correlation between the measured and calculated doses at points greater than 15 cm from the field edge. Conclusions: Application of a correction for leakage doses within peripheral regions is feasible and could improve accuracy of TPS in estimating out-of-field doses in breast radiotherapy. Keywords: Breast radiotherapy, TLD, Leakage dose, Dose calculation algorithm

  4. Risk of second non-breast cancer after radiotherapy for breast cancer: A systematic review and meta-analysis of 762,468 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grantzau, Trine; Overgaard, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose: Radiotherapy for breast cancer both decreases loco-regional recurrence rates and improves overall survival. However, radiotherapy has also been associated with increased second cancer risk at exposed sites. In this meta-analysis, we estimated the risk of second non-breast cancers after radiotherapy for breast cancer. Material and methods: The databases Medline/Pubmed, Cochrane, Embase and Cinahl were systematically searched, for cohort studies on second cancer after radiotherapy for breast cancer, from inception to August 1st 2013. Included studies were to report the relative risk (RR) of second cancers comparing irradiated female breast cancer patients to unirradiated patients. Primary endpoints were all second non-breast-cancers and second cancers of the lung, esophagus, thyroid and second sarcomas. RRs were pooled using random-effects meta-analysis. Results: Thirteen studies comprising 762,468 breast cancer patients were included in the meta-analysis. Five or more years after breast cancer diagnosis radiotherapy was significantly associated with an increased risk of second non-breast cancer RR 1.12 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.06–1.19), second cancer of the lung RR 1.39 (95% CI 1.28–1.51), esophagus RR 1.53 (95% CI 1.01–2.31) and second sarcomas RR 2.53 (95% CI 1.74–3.70). The risk increased over time, and was highest 15 or more years after breast cancer diagnosis, for second lung RR 1.66 (95% CI 1.36–2.01) and second esophagus cancer RR 2.17 (95% CI 1.11–4.25). There was no significant association between radiotherapy and second thyroid cancer. Conclusions: Radiotherapy for breast cancer is significantly associated with increased risks of second non-breast cancer, overall and in organs adjacent to the previous treatment fields. Despite a relative small absolute risk, the growing number of long-time survivors after breast cancer warrants the need for normal tissue sparing radiotherapy techniques

  5. Assessment of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) in breast cancer. Guideline note. Technological evaluation report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daurat, Veronique

    2015-10-01

    The medical questions of this assessment focus on intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT), in women undergoing lumpectomy (breast-conserving surgery) and adjuvant radiotherapy for early breast cancer, in order for it to be refunded by the National Health Insurance. IORT was compared to standard whole-breast irradiation. Medical assessment questions have been grouped within 3 themes: 1. evaluation of conditions for achieving an IORT process (environment, technical platform, multidisciplinary organisation, risk management [anaesthetic, infectious, radiation protection, logistics/ technical] experience and training of professionals); 2. clinical benefit/risk ratio of the IORT in comparison with standard external breast irradiation; 3. population eligible for IORT treatment, with the highest standards in terms of risk factors in the current state of knowledge. The assessment method used in this report is based on: - a critical analysis of data from the selected literature identified through a systematic search; - gathering the viewpoints of relevant stakeholders (National Professional Boards of the medical and health professional domains, as well as national instances and patient associations of the domain). In conclusion, the available data are not mature enough to demonstrate that IORT is useful in adjuvant conservative breast cancer treatment in comparison with standard external whole breast irradiation. As a consequence, at this stage, the elements are not gathered to support IORT payment by National Health Insurance. Long-term data from clinical and medico-economic studies are needed to prove clinical utility of the IORT in early breast cancer. HAS recommends eventually that IORT is performed exclusively in the context of clinical research in breast cancer

  6. Evaluation of compensation in breast radiotherapy: a planning study using multiple static fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donovan, Ellen M.; Johnson, Ursula; Shentall, Glyn; Evans, Philip M.; Neal, Anthony J.; Yarnold, John R.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: A method that uses electronic portal imaging to design intensity-modulated beams for compensation in breast radiotherapy was implemented using multiple static fields in a planning study. We present the results of the study to verify the algorithm, and to assess improvements to the dosimetry. Methods and Materials: Fourteen patients were imaged with computed tomography (CT) and on a treatment unit using an electronic portal imager. The portal imaging data were used to design intensity-modulated beams to give an ideal dose distribution in the breast. These beams were implemented as multiple static fields added to standard wedged tangential fields. Planning of these treatments was performed on a commercial treatment planning system (Target 2, IGE Medical Systems, Slough, U.K.) using the CT data for each patient. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) analysis of the plans with and without multileaf collimator (MLC) compensation was carried out. This work has been used as the basis for a randomized clinical trial investigating whether improvements in dosimetry are correlated with the reduction of long-term side effects from breast radiotherapy. Results: The planning analysis showed a mean increase in target volume receiving 95-105% of prescribed dose of 7.5% (range -0.8% to 15.9%) when additional MLC compensation was applied. There was no change to the minimum dose for all 14 patient data sets. The change in the volume of breast tissue receiving over 105% of prescribed dose, when applying MLC compensation, was between -1.4% and 11.9%, with positive numbers indicating an improvement. These effects showed a correlation with breast size; the larger the breast the greater the amount of improvement. Conclusions: The method for designing compensation for breast treatments using an electronic portal imager has been verified using planning on CT data for 14 patients. An improvement was seen in planning when applying MLC compensation and this effect was greater the larger the

  7. Phase II study assessing the effectiveness of Biafine cream as a prophylactic agent for radiation-induced acute skin toxicity to the breast in women undergoing radiotherapy with concomitant CMF chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szumacher, Ewa; Wighton, Anne; Franssen, Edmee; Chow, Edward; Tsao, May; Ackerman, Ida; Andersson, Lourdes; Kim, John; Wojcicka, Anna; Ung, Yee; Sixel, Katharina; Hayter, Charles

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of Biafine cream in preventing Grade 2 acute radiation dermatitis, according to the National Cancer Institute of Canada skin radiation toxicity criteria in patients undergoing concomitant adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy to the breast. Methods and Materials: Sixty patients participated in this study. Patients were treated with a lumpectomy followed by concomitant chemotherapy and radiotherapy to the breast. Biafine cream was applied daily, starting on the first day and ending 2 weeks post-radiotherapy. Patients underwent weekly skin assessments throughout radiotherapy and at 2 and 4 weeks after treatment. Outcome measures were assessed using a Skin Assessment Questionnaire that was scored according to the National Cancer Institute of Canada skin radiation toxicity criteria and a self-administered questionnaire that evaluated skin symptoms. Results: The maximum skin toxicity observed during the course of treatment was as follows: less than Grade 2 toxicity, 15% (9 patients); Grade 2, 83% (50 patients); Grade 3, 2% (1 patient); Grade 4, 0% (0 patients). The majority of the radiation dermatitis was observed after 3 weeks of radiotherapy. Conclusion: The majority of patients who underwent concomitant chemo- and radiotherapy for breast cancer developed Grade 2 radiation dermatitis with the use of Biafine cream. However, no treatment delays or interruptions were observed because of skin toxicity

  8. Treatment of locally advanced breast carcinoma with high-dose external beam supervoltage radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brufman, G.; Weshler, Z.; Prosnitz, L.R.; Fuks, Z.

    1981-01-01

    Between 1960 and 1978, 87 patients with locally advanced Tsub(3-4)Nsub(0-3)M 0 carcinoma of the breast were treated with 5,000 to 8,000 rad of external beam supervoltage radiotherapy. Initial clinical eradication of the tumour was observed in 76 of 87 cases (87%), but the actuarial probability of local control at 5 yr was only 53%. Furthermore, the actuarial probability of disease-free survival was 25% at 5 yr and 13% at 10 yr. Most of the patients eventually succumbed to metastatic breast carcinoma and the actuarial survival at 5 yr was 43% and at 10 yr, 16%. The addition of adjuvant low-dose chemotherapy, given to 13 patients, did not affect the rates of local control, survival or disease-free survival. The most common long-term complication was extensive and deforming radiation-induced fibrosis of the treated breast. The actuarial probability of 10-yr survival without a local recurrence and without severe fibrosis of the treated breast was only 17.5%. The role of adjuvant high-dose chemotherapy in the treatment of locally advanced breast carcinoma and the possible use of improved radiotherapy techniques to achieve a more effective long-term local control and a more desirable cosmetic end result are discussed. (author)

  9. Radiotherapy improves serum fatty acids and lipid profile in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Sana; Channa, Naseem Aslam; Talpur, Farha Naz; Younis, Muhammad; Tabassum, Naila

    2017-05-18

    Breast cancer is a disease with diverse clinical symptoms, molecular profiles, and its nature to response its therapeutic treatments. Radiotherapy (RT), along with surgery and chemotherapy is a part of treatment in breast cancer. The aim of present study was to investigate pre and post treatment effects of radiotherapy in serum fatty acids and its lipids profile in patients with breast cancer. In this comparative as well as follow up study, Serum fatty acids were performed by gas chromatography to investigate fatty acids and Microlab for analysis of lipid profile. Among serum free and total fatty acids the major saturated fatty acids (SFAs) in serum lipids of breast cancer patients (pre and post treated) were stearic acid (18:0) and palmitic acid (16:0). These fatty acids contributed about 35-50% of total fatty acids. The decreased concentrations of linoleic acid (C18:2) and arachidonic acid (C20:4) with a lower ratio of C18:2/C18:1 was found in pretreated breast cancer patients as compared to controls. The n-3/n-6 ratio of breast cancer patients was decreased before treatment but it was 35% increased after treatment. In addition, plasma activity of D6 desaturase was increased in the breast cancer patients, while the activity of D5 desaturase was decreased. Increased levels of SFAs, monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) and decreased polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) levels in breast cancer patients (pre and post treated) as compared to controls. Serum total cholesterol (TC) (224.4 mg/dL) and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) (142.9 mg/dL) were significantly increased in pretreated breast cancer patients but after the radiotherapy treatment, the TC (150.2 mg/dL) and LDL-C (89.8 mg/dL) were decreased. It seems that RT would have played a potential role in the treatment of BC. After RT the serum levels of PUFAs, TC, and LDL-C are improved. Our study reinforces the important role of RT in the management of BC. The level of PUFAs, TC, and LDL-C can be

  10. Long-Term Results of Targeted Intraoperative Radiotherapy (Targit) Boost During Breast-Conserving Surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaidya, Jayant S., E-mail: jayant.vaidya@ucl.ac.uk [Research Department of Surgery, Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Baum, Michael [Research Department of Surgery, Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Tobias, Jeffrey S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University College London Hospitals, London (United Kingdom); Wenz, Frederik [Radiation Oncology and Gynaecology, University Medical Centre of Mannheim (Germany); Massarut, Samuele [Surgery and Radiation Oncology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico (CRO), Aviano (Italy); Keshtgar, Mohammed [Research Department of Surgery, Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Hilaris, Basil [Radiation Oncology, Our Lady of Mercy, New York Medical College, New York (United States); Saunders, Christobel [Institute of Health and Rehabilitation Research, University of Notre Dame, Fremantle, Western Australia (Australia); Williams, Norman R.; Brew-Graves, Chris [Research Department of Surgery, Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Corica, Tammy [Institute of Health and Rehabilitation Research, University of Notre Dame, Fremantle, Western Australia (Australia); Roncadin, Mario [Surgery and Radiation Oncology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico (CRO), Aviano (Italy); Kraus-Tiefenbacher, Uta; Suetterlin, Marc [Radiation Oncology and Gynaecology, University Medical Centre of Mannheim (Germany); Bulsara, Max [Institute of Health and Rehabilitation Research, University of Notre Dame, Fremantle, Western Australia (Australia); Joseph, David [Radiation Oncology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital and School of Surgery, University of Western Australia, Perth (Australia)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: We have previously shown that delivering targeted radiotherapy to the tumour bed intraoperatively is feasible and desirable. In this study, we report on the feasibility, safety, and long-term efficacy of TARGeted Intraoperative radioTherapy (Targit), using the Intrabeam system. Methods and Materials: A total of 300 cancers in 299 unselected patients underwent breast-conserving surgery and Targit as a boost to the tumor bed. After lumpectomy, a single dose of 20 Gy was delivered intraoperatively. Postoperative external beam whole-breast radiotherapy excluded the usual boost. We also performed a novel individualized case control (ICC) analysis that computed the expected recurrences for the cohort by estimating the risk of recurrence for each patient using their characteristics and follow-up period. Results: The treatment was well tolerated. The median follow up was 60.5 months (range, 10-122 months). Eight patients have had ipsilateral recurrence: 5-year Kaplan Meier estimate for ipsilateral recurrence is 1.73% (SE 0.77), which compares well with that seen in the boosted patients in the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer study (4.3%) and the UK STAndardisation of breast RadioTherapy study (2.8%). In a novel ICC analysis of 242 of the patients, we estimated that there should be 11.4 recurrences; in this group, only 6 recurrences were observed. Conclusions: Lumpectomy and Targit boost combined with external beam radiotherapy results in a low local recurrence rate in a standard risk patient population. Accurate localization and the immediacy of the treatment that has a favorable effect on tumour microenvironment may contribute to this effect. These long-term data establish the long-term safety and efficacy of the Targit technique and generate the hypothesis that Targit boost might be superior to an external beam boost in its efficacy and justifies a randomized trial.

  11. Late effects of adjuvant chemotherapy and postoperative radiotherapy on quality of life among breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berglund, G.; Bolund, C.; Fornander, T.; Rutqvist, L.E.; Sjoeden, P.-O.

    1991-01-01

    Late effects of adjuvant treatment on perceived health and quality of life were assessed through a questionnaire mailed to 448 premenopausal and postmenopausal breast cancer patients, free from recurrence 2-10 years after primary therapy. The patients had been randomised to postoperative radiotherapy or adjuvant chemotherapy as adjuncts to primary surgery. The differences between the two treatments were generally small. However, the radiotherapy patients had significantly greater problems with decreased stamina, symptoms related to the operation scar and anxiety. The chemotherapy patients had significantly more problems with smell aversion. Activity level inside and outside the home, anxiousness and depressive symptoms were similar in both groups. The chemotherapy patients scored their overall quality of life higher than the radiotherapy patients. (author)

  12. Late effects of adjuvant chemotherapy and postoperative radiotherapy on quality of life among breast cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berglund, G.; Bolund, C.; Fornander, T.; Rutqvist, L.E. (Karolinska Sjukhuset, Stockholm (Sweden)); Sjoeden, P.-O. (Uppsala Univ. (Sweden))

    1991-09-01

    Late effects of adjuvant treatment on perceived health and quality of life were assessed through a questionnaire mailed to 448 premenopausal and postmenopausal breast cancer patients, free from recurrence 2-10 years after primary therapy. The patients had been randomised to postoperative radiotherapy or adjuvant chemotherapy as adjuncts to primary surgery. The differences between the two treatments were generally small. However, the radiotherapy patients had significantly greater problems with decreased stamina, symptoms related to the operation scar and anxiety. The chemotherapy patients had significantly more problems with smell aversion. Activity level inside and outside the home, anxiousness and depressive symptoms were similar in both groups. The chemotherapy patients scored their overall quality of life higher than the radiotherapy patients. (author).

  13. c-erbB-2 expression and benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staal, O.; Sullivan, S.; Wingren, S.; Skoog, L.; Rutqvist, L.E.; Nordenskjoeld, B.; Carstensen, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    Frozen tissue from primary tumours of 152 premenopausal breast cancer patients, who participated in a trial comparing radiotherapy with adjuvant chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, 5-fluorouracil, CMF), was analysed for c-erbB-2 protein expression, measured by flow cytometry. The relative risk of distant recurrence or death in the chemotherapy group as compared with the radiotherapy group was 3.0 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1-7.8) for patients whose tumours showed high c-erbB-2 levels and 0.87 (95% CI 0.43-1.7) for those with tumours with low levels of c-erbB-2 protein. Patients with highly proliferative tumours that did not overexpress c-erbB-2 benefited most, in terms of survival, from CMF. In addition, we found an increased risk of locoregional recurrence for tumours overexpressing c-erbB-2 when radiotherapy was replaced by chemotherapy. (author)

  14. Changes in helper and suppressor T lymphocytes following radiotherapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, G.H.; Rees, G.J.G.; Jones, R.S.J.; Grove, E.A.; Preece, A.W.

    1987-01-01

    Changes in total lymphocyte, T lymphocyte, T helper and T suppressor lymphocyte numbers were studied in 22 patients with breast cancer before and after radiotherapy. T lymphocyte subsets were measured using monoclonal antibodies and fluorescence microscopy. After treatment the total lymphocyte count fell significantly and was still reduced 9 months later, but the proportion of cells labelled as T lymphocytes was unchanged during this period. The helper-suppressor ratio, which was within the normal range before radiotherapy, was significantly reduced at 3 months and 9 months after. Following treatment both T helper and T suppressor cell numbers were significantly reduced. T helper cell numbers remained reduced throughout the study period but T suppressor cell numbers showed a recovery to normal values 9 months after radiotherapy. (author)

  15. Hormonal balance of breast cancer patients treated by various radiotherapy schemes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lozinskaya, I.N.; Yakimova, T.P.

    1993-01-01

    Examination of patients with breast cancer has shown a relationship between disease stage, on the one hand, and thyroid function depression, carcinoembryonic antigen and somatotropin levels, on the other. High levels of carcinoembrionic antigen are conducive to depression of immune stromal reactions in the tumor and unfavorably tell on five-year survival. Radiotherapy leads to nonuniversal changes in the hormonal system, related to cancer stage

  16. Side effects of radiotherapy in breast cancer patients : The Internet as an information source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, S; Käsmann, L; Fahlbusch, F B; Rades, D; Vordermark, D

    2018-02-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer type among women necessitating adjuvant radiotherapy. As the Internet has become a major source of information for cancer patients, this study aimed to evaluate the quality of websites giving information on side effects of radiotherapy for breast cancer patients. A patients' search for the English terms "breast cancer - radiotherapy - side effects" and the corresponding German terms "Brustkrebs - Strahlentherapie - Nebenwirkungen" was carried out twice (5 months apart) using the search engine Google. The first 30 search results each were evaluated using the validated 16-question DISCERN Plus instrument, the Health on the Net Code of Conduct (HONcode) certification and the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) benchmark criteria. The overall quality (DISCERN score) of the retrieved websites was further compared to queries via Bing and Yahoo search engines. The DISCERN score showed a great range, with the majority of websites ranking fair to poor. Significantly superior results were found for English websites, particularly for webpages run by hospitals/universities and nongovernmental organizations (NGO), when compared to the respective German categories. In general, only a minority of websites met all JAMA benchmarks and was HONcode certified (both languages). We did not determine a relevant temporal change in website ranking among the top ten search hits, while significant variation occurred thereafter. Mean overall DISCERN score was similar between the various search engines. The Internet can give breast cancer patients seeking information on side effects of radiotherapy an overview. However, based on the currently low overall quality of websites and the lack of transparency for the average layperson, we emphasize the value of personal contact with the treating radio-oncologist in order to integrate and interpret the information found online.

  17. Side effects of radiotherapy in breast cancer patients. The Internet as an information source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janssen, S.; Kaesmann, L.; Rades, D.; Fahlbusch, F.B.; Vordermark, D.

    2018-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer type among women necessitating adjuvant radiotherapy. As the Internet has become a major source of information for cancer patients, this study aimed to evaluate the quality of websites giving information on side effects of radiotherapy for breast cancer patients. A patients' search for the English terms ''breast cancer - radiotherapy - side effects'' and the corresponding German terms ''Brustkrebs - Strahlentherapie - Nebenwirkungen'' was carried out twice (5 months apart) using the search engine Google. The first 30 search results each were evaluated using the validated 16-question DISCERN Plus instrument, the Health on the Net Code of Conduct (HONcode) certification and the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) benchmark criteria. The overall quality (DISCERN score) of the retrieved websites was further compared to queries via Bing and Yahoo search engines. The DISCERN score showed a great range, with the majority of websites ranking fair to poor. Significantly superior results were found for English websites, particularly for webpages run by hospitals/universities and nongovernmental organizations (NGO), when compared to the respective German categories. In general, only a minority of websites met all JAMA benchmarks and was HONcode certified (both languages). We did not determine a relevant temporal change in website ranking among the top ten search hits, while significant variation occurred thereafter. Mean overall DISCERN score was similar between the various search engines. The Internet can give breast cancer patients seeking information on side effects of radiotherapy an overview. However, based on the currently low overall quality of websites and the lack of transparency for the average layperson, we emphasize the value of personal contact with the treating radio-oncologist in order to integrate and interpret the information found online. (orig.) [de

  18. Ultrashort courses of adjuvant breast radiotherapy: wave of the future or a fool's errand?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Atif J; Dale, Roger G; Arthur, Douglas W; Haffty, Bruce G; Todor, Dorin A; Vicini, Frank A

    2012-04-15

    In accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI), the most commonly used fractionation schemes include 340 or 385 centigrays delivered in a twice daily administration. A further progression of the APBI literature has been the recent interest in extremely short courses of adjuvant radiotherapy, usually delivered by intraoperative radiotherapy techniques. This newer area of single-fraction radiotherapy approaches remains highly contentious. In particular, the recently reported TARGIT trial has been the subject of both praise and scorn, and a critical examination of the trial data and the underlying hypotheses is warranted. Short-term outcomes of the related Italian ELIOT approach have also been reported. Although the assumptions of linear quadratic formalism are likely to hold true in the range of 2 to 8 grays, equating different schedules beyond this range is problematic. A major problem of current single-fraction approaches is that the treatment doses are chosen empirically, or are based on tolerability, or on the physical dose delivery characteristics of the chosen technology rather than radiobiological rationale. This review article summarizes the current data on ultrashort courses of adjuvant breast radiotherapy and highlights both the promise and the potential pitfalls of the abbreviated treatment. Copyright © 2011 American Cancer Society.

  19. Usefulness of a thermoplastic breast bra for breast cancer radiotherapy. A prospective analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piroth, Marc D.; Holy, Richard [RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Aachen (Germany); HELIOS University Hospital Wuppertal, Witten/Herdecke University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Wuppertal (Germany); Petz, Dalma; Pinkawa, Michael; Eble, Michael J. [RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Aachen (Germany)

    2016-09-15

    Despite modern techniques, in some patients receiving whole breast radiotherapy (WBI) parts of the heart and the lung might receive doses which are nowadays considered relevant for the development of late morbidity. Our aim was to analyze the usefulness of a thermoplastic breast brassiere to reduce lung and heart doses. A total of 29 patients with left-sided and 16 patients with right-sided breast cancer treated with breast conserving surgery and WBI between 2012 and 2013 were included in a prospective study analyzing the effectiveness of a thermoplastic breast bra. WBI was performed using 3D tangential fields up to 50.4 Gy. Treatment planning was performed with and without bra. Several dosimetrical parameters were analyzed comparatively focusing on the heart and ipsilateral lung. For heart dose comparisons, subvolumes like the left anterior descending artery (LAD) and a defined apical region, so-called ''apical myocardial territory'' (AMT), were defined. By using the bra, the mean lung dose was reduced by 30.6 % (left-sided cancer) and 29.5 % (right-sided; p < 0.001). The V{sub 20Gy} for the left lung was reduced by 39.5 % (4.9 vs. 8.1 % of volume; p < 0.001). The mean and maximum heart doses were significantly lower (1.6 vs. 2.1 Gy and 30.7 vs. 39.3 Gy; p = 0.01 and p < 0.001), which also applies to the mean and maximum dose for the AMT (2.5 vs. 4.4 Gy and 31.0 vs. 47.2 Gy; p < 0.01 and p < 0.001). The mean and maximum dose for LAD was lower without reaching significance. No acute skin toxicities > grade 2 were observed. By using a thermoplastic breast bra, radiation doses to the heart and especially parts of the heart apex and ipsilateral lung can be significantly lowered without additional skin toxicity. (orig.) [German] Trotz moderner Techniken koennen bei manchen Patientinnen bei der Ganzbrustbestrahlung Areale des Herzens und der Lunge Dosen erhalten, die heute als relevant fuer Spaettoxizitaeten gelten. Ziel war es, den Nutzen eines

  20. Intact Mre11/Rad50/Nbs1 Complex Predicts Good Response to Radiotherapy in Early Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soederlund, Karin; Stal, Olle; Skoog, Lambert; Rutqvist, Lars Erik; Nordenskjoeld, Bo; Askmalm, Marie Stenmark

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the expression and predictive role of the Mre11/Rad50/Nbs1 (MRN) complex and the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated protein (ATM) for the outcome of radiotherapy in breast cancer patients. Methods and Materials: The protein expression of ATM and the DNA repair proteins in the MRN complex were investigated using immunohistochemistry in tumors from 224 women with early breast cancer, who were randomized to receive postoperative radiotherapy or adjuvant chemotherapy. Results: Compared with normal breast tissue, the staining intensity of Mre11, Rad50, Nbs1, and ATM was reduced in a majority of the tumors. Weak expression of the MRN complex was correlated with high histologic grade and estrogen receptor negativity (p = 0.01 and p 0.0001, respectively). Radiotherapy significantly reduced the risk of local recurrence as compared with chemotherapy (p = 0.04). The greatest benefit of radiotherapy was seen in patients with moderate/strong expression of the MRN complex (relative risk = 0.27, 95% confidence interval = 0.098-0.72, p 0.009), whereas patients with negative/weak MRN expression had no benefit of radiotherapy compared with adjuvant chemotherapy. These results suggest that an intact MRN complex is important for the tumor cell eradicating effect of radiotherapy. Conclusions: Reduced expression of the MRN complex predicts a poor effect of radiotherapy in patients with early breast cancer

  1. Immunological problems of radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusztai-Markos, Z.

    1979-01-01

    The possible importance of the immune system in early development and progression of breast cancer is being discussed. The different laboratory methods in controlling the specific and non-specific immune reactivity are summarized. The modification of the immunological parameters by radio- resp. chemotherapy is critically presented on the basis of published data and on own results. An analysis of the data obtained by various immunological methods in respect to their consequences in diagnosis and prognosis is done. An immunological monitoring in the control of radio-, chemo- and immunotherapy in breast cancer patients is proposed. (orig.) [de

  2. Dosimetric Comparison in Breast Radiotherapy of 4 MV and 6 MV on Physical Chest Simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donato da Silva, Sabrina; Passos Ribeiro Campos, Tarcisio [Nuclear Engineering Department, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Batista Nogueira, Luciana [Anatomy and Imaging Department, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Lima Souza Castro, Andre [Nuclear Engineering Department, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Institute of Radiation San Francisco, Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Alves de oliveira, Marcio; Galvao Dias, Humberto [Cancer Hospital in Uberlandia, Uberlandia (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    According to the World Health Organization (2014) breast cancer is the main cause of death by cancer in women worldwide. The biggest challenge of radiotherapy in the treatment of cancer is to deposit the entire prescribed dose homogeneously in the breast, sparing the surrounding tissue. In this context, this paper aimed at evaluating and comparing internal dose distribution in the mammary gland based on experimental procedures submitted to two distinct energy spectra produced in breast cancer radiotherapy. The methodology consisted of reproducing opposite parallel fields used in the treatment of breast tumors in a chest phantom. This simulator with synthetic breast, composed of equivalent tissue material (TE), was previously developed by the NRI Research Group (UFMG). The computer tomography (CT) scan of the simulator was obtained antecedently. The radiotherapy planning systems (TPS) in the chest phantom were performed in the ECLIPSE system from Varian Medical Systems and CAT 3D system from MEVIS. The irradiations were reproduced in the Varian linear accelerator, model SL- 20 Precise, 6 MV energy and Varian linear accelerator, 4 MV Clinac 6x SN11 model. Calibrations of the absorbed dose versus optical density from radiochromic films were generated in order to obtain experimental dosimetric distribution at the films positioned within the glandular and skin equivalent tissues of the chest phantom. The spatial dose distribution showed equivalence with the TPS on measurement data performed in the 6 MV spectrum. The average dose found in radiochromic films placed on the skin ranged from 49 to 79%, and from 39 to 49% in the mammary areola, for the prescribed dose. Dosimetric comparisons between the spectra of 4 and 6 MV, keeping the constant geometry of the fields applied in the same phantom, will be presented showing their equivalence in breast radiotherapy, as well as the variations will be discussed. To sum up, the dose distribution has reached the value expected in

  3. Three-Dimensional Conformal Simultaneously Integrated Boost Technique for Breast-Conserving Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laan, Hans Paul van der; Dolsma, Wil V.; Maduro, John H.; Korevaar, Erik W.; Hollander, Miranda; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the target coverage and normal tissue dose with the simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) and the sequential boost technique in breast cancer, and to evaluate the incidence of acute skin toxicity in patients treated with the SIB technique. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with early-stage left-sided breast cancer underwent breast-conserving radiotherapy using the SIB technique. The breast and boost planning target volumes (PTVs) were treated simultaneously (i.e., for each fraction, the breast and boost PTVs received 1.81 Gy and 2.3 Gy, respectively). Three-dimensional conformal beams with wedges were shaped and weighted using forward planning. Dose-volume histograms of the PTVs and organs at risk with the SIB technique, 28 x (1.81 + 0.49 Gy), were compared with those for the sequential boost technique, 25 x 2 Gy + 8 x 2 Gy. Acute skin toxicity was evaluated for 90 patients treated with the SIB technique according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. Results: PTV coverage was adequate with both techniques. With SIB, more efficiently shaped boost beams resulted in smaller irradiated volumes. The mean volume receiving ≥107% of the breast dose was reduced by 20%, the mean volume outside the boost PTV receiving ≥95% of the boost dose was reduced by 54%, and the mean heart and lung dose were reduced by 10%. Of the evaluated patients, 32.2% had Grade 2 or worse toxicity. Conclusion: The SIB technique is proposed for standard use in breast-conserving radiotherapy because of its dose-limiting capabilities, easy implementation, reduced number of treatment fractions, and relatively low incidence of acute skin toxicity

  4. Breast cancer in female carriers of ATM gene alterations: outcome of adjuvant radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, Andreas; John, Esther; Doerk, Thilo; Sohn, Christof; Karstens, Johann H.; Bremer, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Background and purpose: We analyzed the clinical outcome of breast cancer patients carrying sequence variants in the ATM gene who received postoperative radiotherapy after breast conservative surgery to test whether an increased cellular radiosensitivity may translate into enhanced tumor cell killing and thereby result in an improvement of the therapeutic ratio. Patients and methods: We investigated a cohort of 138 breast cancer patients who received adjuvant radiotherapy following breast conservative surgery for T1 and T2 tumors. Genomic DNA samples of these patients had previously been scanned for mutations in the ATM gene. Follow-up data were available in 135 patients, with a median follow-up of 87 months. Local relapse-free, metastasis-free and overall survival were compared between carriers and non-carriers of a sequence variant in the ATM gene. Results: Twenty patients were found to carry a sequence variant in the ATM gene (truncating, 7; missense, 13). The actuarial 7-year local relapse-free survival of carriers vs. non-carriers were 88 vs. 94% (P=0.34). Actuarial metastasis-free and overall survival after 7 years were 63 vs. 85% (P=0.01) and 73 vs. 89% (P=0.055), respectively. However, the presence of a variant in the ATM gene did not remain a significant discriminator for metastasis-free survival in a multivariate Cox regression analysis (P=0.068). Conclusions: Our results do not support the hypothesis that breast cancer patients carrying a sequence variant in the ATM gene differentially benefit from postoperative radiotherapy. These findings have to be verified using larger number of cases to clarify the clinical consequences of sequence variants in the ATM gene

  5. Influence of surgery-radiotherapy interval on recurrence in breast-conserving treatment of small breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourquet, A.; Dreyfus, H.; Maher, M.; Gozy, M.; Campana, F.; Vilcoq, J. R.; Colombani, H.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the possible influence of surgery-radiotherapy interval (SRI) on breast recurrence in patients (pts.) with small breast cancers who had a breast-conserving treatment. Materials and Methods: Between January 1981 and December 1988, of 2012 pts. with stage I-II breast cancers treated with wide excision, axillary node dissection and breast irradiation, 1839 (91%) did not received adjuvant chemotherapy and were included in this study. Median age was 51 yrs. [23-88]. Mean tumor size was 2.1 cm [0.5-5]. Median tumor bed irradiation dose was 65 Gy [50-90]. The median SRI was 32 days [5-137]. Pts. were distributed among three SRI groups: 56 days (61 pts). Breast recurrence risk and survival were determined by Kaplan-Meier estimates. The following prognostic factors were evaluated for their possible influence on breast recurrence: age, tumor size, node involvement, estrogen receptor levels, Bloom and Richardson grading (SBR). Therapeutic factors were also analyzed: place of surgery (inside or outside the institution), breast and tumor bed radiation dose, and SRI as a time-dependent variable. A multivariate analysis of breast recurrence risk was performed to adjust for the various confounding factors. A prognostic index was established and the influence of SRI on recurrence was determined within the various prognostic groups. Results: Median follow-up for living pts. was 78 months [3-158]. Breast recurrence rate at 7 years was 11 % [10-13]. The 7-year survival rate was 89 % [88-91]. The 7-year breast recurrence risks in the three SRI groups were 12 %, 9 %, and 18%, respectively (p=0.045). The relative risk (RR) of breast failure was significantly lower in the 35-56 days SRI group compared with the 56 days) were also associated with a higher risk of recurrence, though not statistically significant because of the small numbers. The effect of SRI was time-dependent, i. e. influencing early recurrences and disappearing after 5 years. It was

  6. Does partial expander deflation exacerbate the adverse effects of radiotherapy in two-stage breast reconstruction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celet Ozden, Burcu; Guven, Erdem; Aslay, Isik; Kemikler, Gonul; Olgac, Vakur; Soluk Tekkesin, Merva; Serarslan, Bengul; Tumerdem Ulug, Burcak; Bilgin Karabulut, Aylin; Arinci, Atilla; Emekli, Ufuk

    2012-02-20

    The optimum protocol for expander volume adjustment with respect to the timing and application of radiotherapy remains controversial. Eighteen New Zealand rabbits were divided into three groups. Metallic port integrated anatomic breast expanders of 250 cc were implanted on the back of each animal and controlled expansion was performed. Group I underwent radiotherapy with full expanders while in Group II, expanders were partially deflated immediately prior to radiotherapy. Control group did not receive radiotherapy.The changes in blood flow at different volume adjustments were investigated in Group II by laser Doppler flowmetry. Variations in the histopathologic properties of the irradiated tissues including the skin, capsule and the pocket floor, were compared in the biopsy specimens taken from different locations in each group. A significant increase in skin blood flow was detected in Group II with partial expander deflation. Overall, histopathologic exam revealed aggravated findings of chronic radiodermatitis (epidermal atrophy, dermal inflammation and fibrosis, neovascularisation and vascular changes as well as increased capsule thickness) especially around the lower expander pole, in Group II. Expander deflation immediately prior to radiotherapy, may augment the adverse effects, especially in the lower expander pole, possibly via enhanced radiosensitization due to a relative increase in the blood flow and tissue oxygenation.

  7. Does partial expander deflation exacerbate the adverse effects of radiotherapy in two-stage breast reconstruction?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celet Ozden Burcu

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The optimum protocol for expander volume adjustment with respect to the timing and application of radiotherapy remains controversial. Methods Eighteen New Zealand rabbits were divided into three groups. Metallic port integrated anatomic breast expanders of 250 cc were implanted on the back of each animal and controlled expansion was performed. Group I underwent radiotherapy with full expanders while in Group II, expanders were partially deflated immediately prior to radiotherapy. Control group did not receive radiotherapy. The changes in blood flow at different volume adjustments were investigated in Group II by laser Doppler flowmetry. Variations in the histopathologic properties of the irradiated tissues including the skin, capsule and the pocket floor, were compared in the biopsy specimens taken from different locations in each group. Results A significant increase in skin blood flow was detected in Group II with partial expander deflation. Overall, histopathologic exam revealed aggravated findings of chronic radiodermatitis (epidermal atrophy, dermal inflammation and fibrosis, neovascularisation and vascular changes as well as increased capsule thickness especially around the lower expander pole, in Group II. Conclusions Expander deflation immediately prior to radiotherapy, may augment the adverse effects, especially in the lower expander pole, possibly via enhanced radiosensitization due to a relative increase in the blood flow and tissue oxygenation.

  8. Comparing Relaxation Programs for Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, women with breast cancer who have had surgery and are scheduled to undergo radiation therapy will be randomly assigned to one of two different stretching and relaxation programs or to a control group that will receive usual care.

  9. Dose to the Contralateral Breast From Radiotherapy and Risk of Second Primary Breast Cancer in the WECARE Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stovall, Marilyn; Smith, Susan A.; Langholz, Bryan M.; Boice, John D.; Shore, Roy E.; Andersson, Michael; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Capanu, Marinela; Bernstein, Leslie; Lynch, Charles F.; Malone, Kathleen E.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Haile, Robert W.; Rosenstein, Barry S.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the risk of second primary breast cancer in the contralateral breast (CB) after radiotherapy (RT) for first breast cancer. Methods and Materials: The study population included participants in the Women's Environmental, Cancer, and Radiation Epidemiology study: 708 cases (women with asynchronous bilateral breast cancer) and 1399 controls (women with unilateral breast cancer) counter-matched on radiation treatment. Participants were 1.0 Gy of absorbed dose to the specific quadrant of the CB had a 2.5-fold greater risk for CB cancer than unexposed women (RR = 2.5, 95% CI 1.4-4.5). No excess risk was observed in women >40 years of age. Women 5 years had a RR of 3.0 (95% CI 1.1-8.1), and the dose response was significant (excess RR per Gy of 1.0, 95% CI 0.1-3.0). Conclusions: Women 1.0 Gy to the CB had an elevated, long-term risk of developing a second primary CB cancer. The risk is inversely related to age at exposure and is dose dependent

  10. Physical and psychosocial support requirements of 1,500 patients starting radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchheiner, K.; Czajka, A.; Luetgendorf-Cacig, C.; Schmid, M.P.; Komarek, E.; Poetter, R. [Medical Univ. of Vienna, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Ponocny-Seliger, E. [Sigmund Freud Private Univ. Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Psychology; Doerr, W. [Medical Univ. of Vienna, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Medical Univ. of Vienna (Austria). Christian Doppler Lab. for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology

    2013-05-15

    Background. The need for psychosocial support in cancer patients is estimated in the literature at 14-50%. At the Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, approximately 3,000 patients are seen annually. Due to limited staff resources, highly distressed patients need to be selected for focused support. A multidisciplinary screening questionnaire covering physical, social and psychological problems and needs was successfully implemented in clinical routine. We present the results of a representative sample of 1,500 heterogeneous cancer patients before beginning radiotherapy. Patients and methods. The prevalence rates of physical, social and psychological problems and needs were evaluated. Independent risk factors for critical psychological distress were analyzed in a multivariate logistic regression model, in order to identify vulnerable subgroups for focused psychosocial support. Results. Critical psychological distress was found in 22% of the overall cohort, of whom only 26% reported a need for psychological information. Clinically relevant pain was suffered by 31%. Patients' most frequent complaints were weakness, sleeping difficulties and exhaustion. Consequently, 40% were impaired in activities and 35% reported a requirement for support in daily life. A need for further information was expressed by 37% of patients. Significant risk factors for critical psychological distress included pain, functional status, support requirements and patient-reported symptoms. Differences in tumor type, metastases and sociodemographic variables had no impact on critical psychological distress. Conclusion. Approximately one third of all patients beginning radiotherapy have physical, social and psychological problems and should receive focused psychosocial support. Multivariate analysis reveals that patients with impaired ''physical integrity'' are at a significantly higher risk of experiencing critical psychological distress. (orig.)

  11. Physical and psychosocial support requirements of 1,500 patients starting radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchheiner, K.; Czajka, A.; Luetgendorf-Cacig, C.; Schmid, M.P.; Komarek, E.; Poetter, R.; Ponocny-Seliger, E.; Doerr, W.; Medical Univ. of Vienna

    2013-01-01

    Background. The need for psychosocial support in cancer patients is estimated in the literature at 14-50%. At the Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, approximately 3,000 patients are seen annually. Due to limited staff resources, highly distressed patients need to be selected for focused support. A multidisciplinary screening questionnaire covering physical, social and psychological problems and needs was successfully implemented in clinical routine. We present the results of a representative sample of 1,500 heterogeneous cancer patients before beginning radiotherapy. Patients and methods. The prevalence rates of physical, social and psychological problems and needs were evaluated. Independent risk factors for critical psychological distress were analyzed in a multivariate logistic regression model, in order to identify vulnerable subgroups for focused psychosocial support. Results. Critical psychological distress was found in 22% of the overall cohort, of whom only 26% reported a need for psychological information. Clinically relevant pain was suffered by 31%. Patients' most frequent complaints were weakness, sleeping difficulties and exhaustion. Consequently, 40% were impaired in activities and 35% reported a requirement for support in daily life. A need for further information was expressed by 37% of patients. Significant risk factors for critical psychological distress included pain, functional status, support requirements and patient-reported symptoms. Differences in tumor type, metastases and sociodemographic variables had no impact on critical psychological distress. Conclusion. Approximately one third of all patients beginning radiotherapy have physical, social and psychological problems and should receive focused psychosocial support. Multivariate analysis reveals that patients with impaired ''physical integrity'' are at a significantly higher risk of experiencing critical psychological distress. (orig.)

  12. Less increase of CT-based calcium scores of the coronary arteries. Effect three years after breast-conserving radiotherapy using breath-hold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mast, M.E.; Kempen-Harteveld, M.L. van; Petoukhova, A.L. [Centre West, Radiotherapy, The Hague (Netherlands); Heijenbrok, M.W. [Medical Center Haaglanden, Department of Radiology, The Hague (Netherlands); Scholten, A.N. [Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Wolterbeek, R. [Leiden University Medical Centre, Department of Medical Statistics and Bioinformatics, Leiden (Netherlands); Schreur, J.H.M. [Medical Center Haaglanden, Department of Cardiology, The Hague (Netherlands); Struikmans, H. [Centre West, Radiotherapy, The Hague (Netherlands); Leiden University Medical Centre, Department of Clinical Oncology, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2016-10-15

    The aim of this prospective longitudinal study was to compare coronary artery calcium (CAC) scores determined before the start of whole breast irradiation with those determined 3 years afterwards. Changes in CAC scores were analysed in 99 breast cancer patients. Three groups were compared: patients receiving left- and right-sided radiotherapy, and those receiving left-sided radiotherapy with breath-hold. We analysed overall CAC scores and left anterior descending (LAD) and right coronary artery (RCA) CAC scores. Between the three groups, changes of the value of the LAD minus the RCA CAC scores of each individual patient were also compared. Three years after breath-hold-based whole breast irradiation, a less pronounced increase of CAC scores was noted. Furthermore, LAD minus RCA scores in patients treated for left-sided breast cancer without breath-hold were higher when compared to LAD minus RCA scores of patients with right-sided breast cancers and those with left-sided breast cancer treated with breath-hold. Breath-hold in breast-conserving radiotherapy leads to a less pronounced increase of CT-based CAC scores. Therefore, breath-hold probably prevents the development of radiation-induced coronary artery disease. However, the sample size of this study is limited and the follow-up period relatively short. (orig.) [German] Das Ziel dieser prospektiven Langzeitstudie war der Vergleich der Coronary-Artery-Calcium-(CAC-)Werte vor Beginn der Brustbestrahlung mit den Werten nach 3 Jahren. Aenderungen der CAC-Werte wurden bei 99 Brustkrebspatienten analysiert. Drei Gruppen wurden untersucht: Patienten nach links- und rechtsseitiger Strahlentherapie sowie mit Bestrahlung unter Atemanhalt. Wir analysierten die Gesamt-CAC-Werte sowie die CAC-Werte der vorderen linken absteigenden (''left anterior descending'', LAD) und der rechten Koronararterie (''right coronary artery'', RCA). Zwischen den drei Gruppen wurden auch die Veraenderungen

  13. Ipsilateral Breast Tumor Relapse: Local Recurrence Versus New Primary Tumor and the Effect of Whole-Breast Radiotherapy on the Rate of New Primaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gujral, Dorothy M.; Sumo, Georges; Owen, John R.; Ashton, Anita; Bliss, Judith M.; Haviland, Joanne; Yarnold, John R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The justification for partial breast radiotherapy after breast conservation surgery assumes that ipsilateral breast tumor relapses (IBTR) outside the index quadrant are mostly new primary (NP) tumors that develop despite radiotherapy. We tested the hypothesis that whole-breast radiotherapy (WBRT) is ineffective in preventing NP by comparing development rates in irradiated and contralateral breasts after tumor excision and WBRT. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 1,410 women with breast cancer who were entered into a prospective randomized trial of radiotherapy fractionation and monitored annually for ipsilateral breast tumor relapses (IBTR) and contralateral breast cancer (CLBC). Cases of IBTR were classified into local recurrence (LR) or NP tumors based on location and histology and were subdivided as definite or likely depending on clinical data. Rates of ipsilateral NP and CLBC were compared over a 15-year period of follow-up. Results: At a median follow-up of 10.1 years, there were 150 documented cases of IBTR: 118 (79%) cases were definite or likely LR; 27 (18%) cases were definite or likely NP; and 5 (3%) cases could not be classified. There were 71 cases of CLBC. The crude proportion of definite-plus-likely NP was 1.9% (27/1,410) patients compared with 5% (71/1,410) CLBC patients. Cumulative incidence rates at 5, 10, and 15 years were 0.8%, 2.0%, and 3.5%, respectively, for definite-plus-likely NP and 2.4%, 5.8%, and 7.9%, respectively for CLBC, suggesting a difference in the rates of NP and CLBC. Conclusions: This analysis suggests that WBRT reduces the rate of ipsilateral NP tumors. The late presentation of NP has implications for the reporting of trials that are testing partial breast radiotherapy.

  14. Conservative surgery and radiotherapy in the treatment of breast cancer. Preliminary results of 148 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faria, S.L.; Chiminazzo Junior, H.; Koseki, N.; Oliveira Filho, J.A. de

    1986-01-01

    The combination of tumoral resection and radiotherapy with preservation of the breast is called conservative treatment of breast cancer. The literature considers this treatment a good option if used by an experient team and with appropriate equipment. This paper shows the results of 148 cases of breast cancer treated by this conservative approach at Centro de Oncologia Campinas. Follow-up varied from 3 to 87 months (mean 28) considered by the histological diagnosis. Overall actuarial survival of 5 years was 77% disease-free survival 55%. Twelve patients (8%) presented local relapse and 13 (9%) had distant metastases as the first therapeutic failure. Cosmetic results were considered good and fair in 89% of patients. These results are similar to others published in the literature (Author) [pt

  15. Cardiac dose estimates from Danish and Swedish breast cancer radiotherapy during 1977-2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, Carolyn W.; Bronnum, Dorthe; Darby, Sarah C.; Gagliardi, Giovanna; Hall, Per; Jensen, Maj-Britt; McGale, Paul; Nisbet, Andrew; Ewertz, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose: To estimate target and cardiac doses from breast cancer radiotherapy in Denmark and in the Stockholm and Umea areas of Sweden during 1977-2001. Methods: Representative samples of irradiated women were identified from the databases of the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group and the Swedish Nationwide Cancer Registry. Virtual simulation, computed tomography planning and manual planning were used to reconstruct radiotherapy regimens on a typical woman. Estimates of target dose and various measures of cardiac dose were derived from individual radiotherapy charts. Results: Doses were estimated in 681 Danish and 130 Swedish women. Mean heart dose for individual women varied from 1.6 to 14.9 Gray in Denmark and from 1.2 to 22.1 Gray in Sweden. In Denmark, mean target doses averaged across women increased from 40.6 to 53.8 Gray during 1977-2001 but, despite this, mean heart dose averaged across women remained around 6 Gy for left-sided and 2-3 Gray for right-sided radiotherapy. In Sweden mean target dose averaged across women increased from 38.7 to 46.6 Gray during 1977-2001, while mean heart dose averaged across women decreased from 12.0 to 7.3 Gray for left-sided and from 3.6 to 3.2 Gray for right-sided radiotherapy. Temporal trends for mean biologically effective dose [BED] to the heart, mean dose to the left anterior descending coronary artery, the right coronary artery and the circumflex coronary artery were broadly similar. Conclusions: Cardiac doses in Denmark were low relative to those in Sweden. In both countries, target dose increased during 1977-2001. Despite this, cardiac doses remained constant in Denmark and decreased in Sweden.

  16. Surface dosimetry for breast radiotherapy in the presence of immobilization cast material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, Andrew; Hardcastle, Nicholas; Metcalfe, Peter; Cutajar, Dean; Quinn, Alexandra; Cardoso, Michael; Rosenfeld, Anatoly; Foo, Kerwyn; Barlin, Sheree

    2011-01-01

    Curative breast radiotherapy typically leaves patients with varying degrees of cosmetic damage. One problem interfering with cosmetically acceptable breast radiotherapy is the external contour for large pendulous breasts which often results in high doses to skin folds. Thermoplastic casts are often employed to secure the breasts to maintain setup reproducibility and limit the presence of skin folds. This paper aims to determine changes in surface dose that can be attributed to the use of thermoplastic immobilization casts. Skin dose for a clinical hybrid conformal/IMRT breast plan was measured using radiochromic film and MOSFET detectors at a range of water equivalent depths representative of the different skin layers. The radiochromic film was used as an integrating dosimeter, while the MOSFETs were used for real-time dosimetry to isolate the contribution of skin dose from individual IMRT segments. Strips of film were placed at various locations on the breast and the MOSFETs were used to measure skin dose at 16 positions spaced along the film strips for comparison of data. The results showed an increase in skin dose in the presence of the immobilization cast of up to 45.7% and 62.3% of the skin dose without the immobilization cast present as measured with Gafchromic EBT film and MOSFETs, respectively. The increase in skin dose due to the immobilization cast varied with the angle of beam incidence and was greatest when the beam was normally incident on the phantom. The increase in surface dose with the immobilization cast was greater under entrance dose conditions compared to exit dose conditions.

  17. Limited benefit of inversely optimised intensity modulation in breast conserving radiotherapy with simultaneously integrated boost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laan, Hans Paul van der; Dolsma, Wil V.; Schilstra, Cornelis; Korevaar, Erik W.; Bock, Geertruida H. de; Maduro, John H.; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: To examine whether in breast-conserving radiotherapy (RT) with simultaneously integrated boost (SIB), application of inversely planned intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT-SIB) instead of three-dimensional RT (3D-CRT-SIB) has benefits that justify the additional costs, and to evaluate whether a potential benefit of IMRT-SIB depends on specific patient characteristics. Material and methods: 3D-CRT-SIB and various IMRT-SIB treatment plans were constructed and optimised for 30 patients with early stage left-sided breast cancer. Coverage of planning target volumes (PTVs) and dose delivered to organs at risk (OARs) were determined for each plan. Overlap between heart and breast PTV (OHB), size of breast and boost PTVs and boost location were examined in their ability to identify patients that might benefit from IMRT-SIB. Results: All plans had adequate PTV coverage. IMRT-SIB generally reduced dose levels delivered to heart, lungs, and normal breast tissue relative to 3D-CRT-SIB. However, IMRT-SIB benefit differed per patient. For many patients, comparable results were obtained with 3D-CRT-SIB, while patients with OHB > 1.4 cm and a relatively large boost PTV volume (>125 cm 3 ) gained most from the use of IMRT-SIB. Conclusions: In breast-conserving RT, results obtained with 3D-CRT-SIB and IMRT-SIB are generally comparable. Patient characteristics could be used to identify patients that are most likely to benefit from IMRT-SIB.

  18. Surface dosimetry for breast radiotherapy in the presence of immobilization cast material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Andrew; Hardcastle, Nicholas; Metcalfe, Peter; Cutajar, Dean; Quinn, Alexandra; Foo, Kerwyn; Cardoso, Michael; Barlin, Sheree; Rosenfeld, Anatoly

    2011-02-01

    Curative breast radiotherapy typically leaves patients with varying degrees of cosmetic damage. One problem interfering with cosmetically acceptable breast radiotherapy is the external contour for large pendulous breasts which often results in high doses to skin folds. Thermoplastic casts are often employed to secure the breasts to maintain setup reproducibility and limit the presence of skin folds. This paper aims to determine changes in surface dose that can be attributed to the use of thermoplastic immobilization casts. Skin dose for a clinical hybrid conformal/IMRT breast plan was measured using radiochromic film and MOSFET detectors at a range of water equivalent depths representative of the different skin layers. The radiochromic film was used as an integrating dosimeter, while the MOSFETs were used for real-time dosimetry to isolate the contribution of skin dose from individual IMRT segments. Strips of film were placed at various locations on the breast and the MOSFETs were used to measure skin dose at 16 positions spaced along the film strips for comparison of data. The results showed an increase in skin dose in the presence of the immobilization cast of up to 45.7% and 62.3% of the skin dose without the immobilization cast present as measured with Gafchromic EBT film and MOSFETs, respectively. The increase in skin dose due to the immobilization cast varied with the angle of beam incidence and was greatest when the beam was normally incident on the phantom. The increase in surface dose with the immobilization cast was greater under entrance dose conditions compared to exit dose conditions.

  19. The complications of radiotherapy of cancers of the breast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarrazin, D; Fontaine, F; Mouriesse, H [Institut Gustave Roussy, 94 - Villejuif (France)

    1975-11-01

    A retroactive computer registration of 459 mammary cancers irradiated at Institut Gustave Roussy from 1967 to 1971 has permitted a qualitative and quantitative study of the sequelli and complications of irradiation of cancer of the breast. These have been subdivided into minor and disabling, and reported according to type of treatment: for 21% local and regional radiation, and for 79% combination radiation and surgery. A limiting dose has been chosen for each treatment volume to correlate total dose and complications. Another method to study the role of the dose is to report complications according to the time of treatment. The final parameter of irradiation analyzed is the variation of complications with NSD. The respective delay in the appearance of complications is expressed. An analyses of these different parameters results in a discussion of prophylactic and therapeutic doses recommended for irradiation of cancers of the breast.

  20. Adjuvant immunotherapy after surgery and radiotherapy for breast carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papavasiliou, C.; Pappas, J.; Pavlatou, M.; Keramopoulos, A.; Giannakoulis, N.; Koumantakis, E.; Nicolaidis, C.

    1982-04-01

    One hundred patients with operable breast cancer received 'prophylactic' postoperative irradiation after mastectomy. In addition, during irradiation and for four months afterwards, part of the patients received immunotherapy (BCG scarification and oral administration of levamisole), while the rest served as controls. Although survival time in the two groups was about the same, disease-free survival time was significantly longer in the immunotherapy group. Tumor reactivation was preceded by deterioration of the Leucocyte Migration Inhibition Index.

  1. Adjuvant immunotherapy after surgery and radiotherapy for breast carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papavasiliou, C.; Pappas, J.; Pavlatou, M.; Keramopoulos, A.; Giannakoulis, N.; Koumantakis, E.; Nicolaidis, C.

    1982-01-01

    One hundred patients with operable breast cancer received 'prophylactic' postoperative irradiation after mastectomy. In addition, during irradiation and for four months afterwards, part of the patients received immunotherapy (BCG scarification and oral administration of levamisole), while the rest served as controls. Although survival time in the two groups was about the same, disease-free survival time was significantly longer in the immunotherapy group. Tumor reactivation was preceded by deterioration of the Leucocyte Migration Inhibition Index. (orig.) [de

  2. Symptoms 10-17 years after breast cancer radiotherapy data from the randomised SWEBCG91-RT trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundstedt, Dan; Gustafsson, Magnus; Malmstroem, Per; Johansson, Karl-Axel; Alsadius, David; Sundberg, Agnetha; Wilderaeng, Ulrica; Holmberg, Erik; Anderson, Harald; Steineck, Gunnar; Karlsson, Per

    2010-01-01

    Background: Postoperative radiotherapy decreases the risk for local recurrence and improves overall survival in women with breast cancer. We have limited information on radiotherapy-induced symptoms 10-17 years after therapy. Material and methods: Between 1991 and 1997, women with lymph node-negative breast cancer were randomised in a Swedish multi-institutional trial to breast conserving surgery with or without postoperative radiotherapy. In 2007, 10-17 years after randomisation, the group included 422 recurrence-free women. We collected data with a study-specific questionnaire on eight pre-selected symptom groups. Results: For six symptom groups (oedema in breast or arm, erysipelas, heart symptoms, lung symptoms, rib fractures, and decreased shoulder mobility) we found similar occurrence in both groups. Excess occurrence after radiotherapy was observed for pain in the breast or in the skin, reported to occur 'occasionally' by 38.1% of survivors having undergone radiotherapy and surgery versus 24.0% of those with surgery alone (absolute difference 14.1%; p = 0.004) and at least once a week by 10.3% of the radiotherapy group versus 1.7% (absolute difference 8.6%; p = 0.001). Daily life and analgesic use did not differ between the groups. Conclusions: Ten to 17 years after postoperative radiotherapy 1 in 12 women had weekly pain that could be attributed to radiotherapy. The symptoms did not significantly affect daily life and thus the reduced risk for local recurrence seems to outweigh the risk for long-term symptoms for most women.

  3. Cardiac Dose From Tangential Breast Cancer Radiotherapy in the Year 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, Carolyn W.; Povall, Julie M.; McGale, Paul; Nisbet, Andrew; Dodwell, David; Smith, Jonathan T.; Darby, Sarah C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the radiation doses received by the heart and coronary arteries from contemporary tangential breast or chest wall radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Fifty consecutive patients with left-sided breast cancer and 5 consecutive patients with right-sided breast cancer treated at a large United Kingdom radiotherapy center during the year 2006 were selected. All patients were irradiated with 6- or 8-MV tangential beams to the breast or chest wall. For each dose plan, dose-volume histograms for the heart and left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery were calculated. For 5 of the left-sided and all 5 right-sided patients, dose-volume histograms for the right and circumflex coronary arteries were also calculated. Detailed spatial assessment of dose to the LAD coronary artery was performed for 3 left-sided patients. Results: For the 50 patients given left-sided irradiation, the average mean (SD) dose was 2.3 (0.7) Gy to the heart and 7.6 (4.5) Gy to the LAD coronary artery, with the distal LAD receiving the highest doses. The right and circumflex coronary arteries received approximately 2 Gy mean dose. Part of the heart received >20 Gy in 22 left-sided patients (44%). For the 5 patients given right-sided irradiation, average mean doses to all cardiac structures were in the range 1.2 to 2 Gy. Conclusions: Heart dose from left-tangential radiotherapy has decreased considerably over the past 40 years, but part of the heart still receives >20 Gy for approximately half of left-sided patients. Cardiac dose for right-sided patients was generally from scattered irradiation alone

  4. Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rema Jyothirmayi

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Conservative treatment in the form of limited surgery and post-operative radiotherapy is controversial in hand and foot sarcomas, both due to poor radiation tolerance of the palm and sole, and due to technical difficulties in achieving adequate margins.This paper describes the local control and survival of 41 patients with soft tissue sarcoma of the hand or foot treated with conservative surgery and radiotherapy. The acute and late toxicity of megavoltage radiotherapy to the hand and foot are described. The technical issues and details of treatment delivery are discussed. The factors influencing local control after radiotherapy are analysed.

  5. Dosimetric aspects of breast radiotherapy with three-dimensional and intensity-modulated radiotherapy helical tomotherapy planning modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadav, Poonam [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Service of Radiation Therapy, University of Wisconsin Aspirus Cancer Center, Wisconsin Rapids, WI (United States); Yan, Yue, E-mail: yyan5@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Ignatowski, Tasha [Service of Radiation Therapy, University of Wisconsin Aspirus Cancer Center, Wisconsin Rapids, WI (United States); Olson, Anna [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Service of Radiation Therapy, University of Wisconsin Aspirus Cancer Center, Wisconsin Rapids, WI (United States)

    2017-04-01

    In this work, we investigated the dosimetric differences between the intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans and the three-dimensional (3D) helical plans based on the TomoTherapy system. A total of 15 patients with supine setup were randomly selected from the data base. For patients with lumpectomy planning target volume (PTV), regional lymph nodes were also included as part of the target. For dose sparing, the significant differences between the helical IMRT and helical 3D were only found in the heart and contralateral breast. For the dose to the heart, helical IMRT reduced the maximum point dose by 6.98 Gy compared to the helical 3D plan (p = 0.01). For contralateral breast, the helical IMRT plans significantly reduced the maximum point dose by 5.6 Gy compared to the helical 3D plan. However, compared to the helical 3D plan, the helical IMRT plan increased the volume for lower dose (13.08% increase in V{sub 5} {sub Gy}, p = 0.01). In general, there are no significant differences in dose sparing between helical IMRT and helical 3D plans.

  6. Dosimetric aspects of breast radiotherapy with three-dimensional and intensity-modulated radiotherapy helical tomotherapy planning modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, Poonam; Yan, Yue; Ignatowski, Tasha; Olson, Anna

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we investigated the dosimetric differences between the intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans and the three-dimensional (3D) helical plans based on the TomoTherapy system. A total of 15 patients with supine setup were randomly selected from the data base. For patients with lumpectomy planning target volume (PTV), regional lymph nodes were also included as part of the target. For dose sparing, the significant differences between the helical IMRT and helical 3D were only found in the heart and contralateral breast. For the dose to the heart, helical IMRT reduced the maximum point dose by 6.98 Gy compared to the helical 3D plan (p = 0.01). For contralateral breast, the helical IMRT plans significantly reduced the maximum point dose by 5.6 Gy compared to the helical 3D plan. However, compared to the helical 3D plan, the helical IMRT plan increased the volume for lower dose (13.08% increase in V 5 Gy , p = 0.01). In general, there are no significant differences in dose sparing between helical IMRT and helical 3D plans.

  7. Toxicity and cosmetic outcome of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for accelerated partial breast irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gatti, M.; Bresciani, S.; Ponzone, R.; Panaia, R.; Salatino, A.; Stasi, M.; Gabriele, P. [IRCC, Candiolo (Italy)

    2011-10-15

    Full text of publication follows: Purpose.- To analyse the incidence and severity of acute and late normal tissue toxicity and cosmetic outcome using three - dimensional conformal radiotherapy to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation. Patients and Methods.- 70 patients with stage I disease were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for accelerated partial breast irradiation, in an approved protocol. The prescribed dose was 34 Gy in all patients delivered in 10 fractions over 5 consecutive days. On all CT scans gross tumor volume (GTV ) was defined around surgical clips. A 1.5 cm margin was added in order to account for clinical target volume (CTV) . A margin of 1 cm was added to CTI to define the planning target volume (PTV). The dose-volume constraints were followed in accordance with the specifications as dictated in the NSABP/RTOG protocol. After treatment, patients underwent a clinical and cosmetic evaluation every 3 months. Late toxicity was evaluated according to the RTOG grading schema. The cosmetic assessment was performed by the physicians using the controlateral untreated breast as the reference (Harvard scale). Results.- Median patient age was 66 years (range 51-80). Median follow-up was 15 months (range 6-46). Tumor size was < 10 mm in 33 patients (53%) and > 2 cm in 4(6%). The mean value of the ratio between the PTV and the whole ipsilateral breast volume was 38 % and the median percentage whole breast volume that received 95 % of prescribed dose was 34% (range 16%-55%). The rate of G1 and G2 acute skin toxicity was 28% and 2% respectively and the late toxicity was 17% (G1). G2 or greater toxicities were not observed. The most pronounced G1 late toxicity was subcutaneous fibrosis, developed in 3 patients. The cosmetic outcome was excellent in 83% and good in 17%. Conclusion.- Accelerated partial breast irradiation using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy is technically feasible with very low acute and late toxicity. Long

  8. Toxicity and cosmetic outcome of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for accelerated partial breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatti, M.; Bresciani, S.; Ponzone, R.; Panaia, R.; Salatino, A.; Stasi, M.; Gabriele, P.

    2011-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Purpose.- To analyse the incidence and severity of acute and late normal tissue toxicity and cosmetic outcome using three - dimensional conformal radiotherapy to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation. Patients and Methods.- 70 patients with stage I disease were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for accelerated partial breast irradiation, in an approved protocol. The prescribed dose was 34 Gy in all patients delivered in 10 fractions over 5 consecutive days. On all CT scans gross tumor volume (GTV ) was defined around surgical clips. A 1.5 cm margin was added in order to account for clinical target volume (CTV) . A margin of 1 cm was added to CTI to define the planning target volume (PTV). The dose-volume constraints were followed in accordance with the specifications as dictated in the NSABP/RTOG protocol. After treatment, patients underwent a clinical and cosmetic evaluation every 3 months. Late toxicity was evaluated according to the RTOG grading schema. The cosmetic assessment was performed by the physicians using the controlateral untreated breast as the reference (Harvard scale). Results.- Median patient age was 66 years (range 51-80). Median follow-up was 15 months (range 6-46). Tumor size was 2 cm in 4(6%). The mean value of the ratio between the PTV and the whole ipsilateral breast volume was 38 % and the median percentage whole breast volume that received 95 % of prescribed dose was 34% (range 16%-55%). The rate of G1 and G2 acute skin toxicity was 28% and 2% respectively and the late toxicity was 17% (G1). G2 or greater toxicities were not observed. The most pronounced G1 late toxicity was subcutaneous fibrosis, developed in 3 patients. The cosmetic outcome was excellent in 83% and good in 17%. Conclusion.- Accelerated partial breast irradiation using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy is technically feasible with very low acute and late toxicity. Long-term results are needed to assess

  9. Five Year Outcome of 145 Patients With Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS) After Accelerated Breast Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciervide, Raquel [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Dhage, Shubhada; Guth, Amber; Shapiro, Richard L.; Axelrod, Deborah M.; Roses, Daniel F. [Department of Surgery, New York University School of Medicine, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Formenti, Silvia C., E-mail: silvia.formenti@nyumc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Background: Accelerated whole-breast radiotherapy (RT) with tumor bed boost in the treatment of early invasive breast cancer has demonstrated equivalent local control and cosmesis when compared with standard RT. Its efficacy in the treatment of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) remains unknown. Methods and Materials: Patients treated for DCIS with lumpectomy and negative margins were eligible for 2 consecutive hypofractionated whole-breast RT clinical trials. The first trial (New York University [NYU] 01-51) prescribed to the whole breast 42 Gy (2.8 Gy in 15 fractions) and the second trial (NYU 05-181) 40.5 Gy (2.7 Gy in 15 fractions) with an additional daily boost of 0.5 Gy to the surgical cavity. Results: Between 2002 and 2009, 145 DCIS patients accrued, 59 to the first protocol and 86 to the second trial. Median age was 56 years and 65% were postmenopausal at the time of treatment. Based on optimal sparing of normal tissue, 79% of the patients were planned and treated prone and 21% supine. At 5 years' median follow-up (60 months; range 2.6-105.5 months), 6 patients (4.1%) experienced an ipsilateral breast recurrence in all cases of DCIS histology. In 3/6 patients, recurrence occurred at the original site of DCIS and in the remaining 3 cases outside the original tumor bed. New contralateral breast cancers arose in 3 cases (1 DCIS and 2 invasive carcinomas). Cosmetic self-assessment at least 2 years after treatment is available in 125 patients: 91% reported good-to-excellent and 9% reported fair-to-poor outcomes. Conclusions: With a median follow-up of 5 years, the ipsilateral local recurrence rate is 4.1%, comparable to that reported from the NSABP (National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project) trials that employed 50 Gy in 25 fractions of radiotherapy for DCIS. There were no invasive recurrences. These results provide preliminary evidence that accelerated hypofractionated external beam radiotherapy is a viable option for DCIS.

  10. Sequencing chemotherapy and radiotherapy in locoregional advanced breast cancer patients after mastectomy – a retrospective analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piroth, Marc D; Pinkawa, Michael; Gagel, Bernd; Stanzel, Sven; Asadpour, Branka; Eble, Michael J

    2008-01-01

    Combined chemo- and radiotherapy are established in breast cancer treatment. Chemotherapy is recommended prior to radiotherapy but decisive data on the optimal sequence are rare. This retrospective analysis aimed to assess the role of sequencing in patients after mastectomy because of advanced locoregional disease. A total of 212 eligible patients had a stage III breast cancer and had adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy after mastectomy and axillary dissection between 1996 and 2004. According to concerted multi-modality treatment strategies 86 patients were treated sequentially (chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy) (SEQgroup), 70 patients had a sandwich treatment (SW-group) and 56 patients had simultaneous chemoradiation (SIM-group) during that time period. Radiotherapy comprised the thoracic wall and/or regional lymph nodes. The total dose was 45–50.4 Gray. As simultaneous chemoradiation CMF was given in 95.4% of patients while in sequential or sandwich application in 86% and 87.1% of patients an anthracycline-based chemotherapy was given. Concerning the parameters nodal involvement, lymphovascular invasion, extracapsular spread and extension of the irradiated region the three treatment groups were significantly imbalanced. The other parameters, e.g. age, pathological tumor stage, grading and receptor status were homogeneously distributed. Looking on those two groups with an equally effective chemotherapy (EC, FEC), the SEQ- and SW-group, the sole imbalance was the extension of LVI (57.1 vs. 25.6%, p < 0.0001). 5-year overall- and disease free survival were 53.2%/56%, 38.1%/32% and 64.2%/50%, for the sequential, sandwich and simultaneous regime, respectively, which differed significantly in the univariate analysis (p = 0.04 and p = 0.03, log-rank test). Also the 5-year locoregional or distant recurrence free survival showed no significant differences according to the sequence of chemo- and radiotherapy. In the multivariate analyses the sequence had no

  11. Bax/Bcl-2 expression ratio in prediction of response to breast cancer radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosein Azimian

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Radiotherapy is one of the most effective modalities of cancer therapy, but clinical responses of individual patients varies considerably. To enhance treatment efficiency it is essential to implement an individual-based treatment. The aim of present study was to identify the mechanism of intrinsic apoptosis pathway on radiosensitivity and normal tissue complications caused by the radiotherapy. Materials and Methods: Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from ten breast cancer patients were exposed to 6MV X-rays to deliver 1 and 2 Gy. Expression levels of Bax, Bcl-2, and Bax/Bcl-2 ratio were examined by relative quantitative RT-PCR. All the patients received similar tangential irradiation of the whole breast and conventional fractionation. Skin dosimetry was done by GAFChromic EBT-3 film and clinical radiosensitivity was determined using the acute reactions to radiotherapy of the skin according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group score. All statistical analyses were performed using GraphPad Prism, version 7.01. Results: In the in-vitro experiment, Bax and Bax/Bcl-2 ratios were significantly increased with 1 and 2 Gy doses (PP0.05 for all patients. Conclusion: Significant correlation between Bax/Bcl-2 ratio determined before radiation therapy and clinical response in the patients, can be used as a biomarker to identify radiosensitive individuals. However, further studies are required to validate radiation-induced apoptotic biomarkers.

  12. Radiotherapy-induced depigmentation in breast cancer patients without prior history of vitiligo: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshankumar A Patil

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vitiligo is a relatively common pigment disorder. Exacerbation or complete depigmentation within the radiation portals as a result of the Koebner phenomenon in patients with preexisting vitiligo has been reported in the literature. However, new-onset vitiligo triggered by radiation in patients without prior history of the disorder is a rare occurrence. Methods: The authors report one such occurrence in a breast cancer patient wherein the depigmentation remained localised within the radiotherapy target volume without generalisation. This young lady had received adjuvant radiotherapy to the right breast and ipsilateral supraclavicular fossa to a dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions followed by 15 Gy in 6 fractions to the tumour bed. Discussion: The authors present a short review of the literature and discussion on the etiopathogenesis and therapeutic implication of the condition in cancer management. Conclusion: This rare occurrence highlights the importance of taking decision on radiotherapy on a case-to-case basis in patients known to have vitiligo as it has direct bearing on the ultimate cosmetic and psychological outcome. However, it is also equally important to be aware that radiation-induced depigmentation be a precursor of subsequent new-onset generalised vitiligo.

  13. Fatigue during breast cancer radiotherapy: an initial randomized study of cognitive-behavioral therapy plus hypnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Guy H; Kangas, Maria; David, Daniel; Hallquist, Michael N; Green, Sheryl; Bovbjerg, Dana H; Schnur, Julie B

    2009-05-01

    The study purpose was to test the effectiveness of a psychological intervention combining cognitive-behavioral therapy and hypnosis (CBTH) to treat radiotherapy-related fatigue. Women (n = 42) scheduled for breast cancer radiotherapy were randomly assigned to receive standard medical care (SMC) (n = 20) or a CBTH intervention (n = 22) in addition to SMC. Participants assigned to receive CBTH met individually with a clinical psychologist. CBTH participants received training in hypnosis and CBT. Participants assigned to the SMC control condition did not meet with a study psychologist. Fatigue was measured on a weekly basis by using the fatigue subscale of the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy (FACIT) and daily using visual analogue scales. Multilevel modeling indicated that for weekly FACIT fatigue data, there was a significant effect of the CBTH intervention on the rate of change in fatigue (p < .05), such that on average, CBTH participants' fatigue did not increase over the course of treatment, whereas control group participants' fatigue increased linearly. Daily data corroborated the analyses of weekly data. The results suggest that CBTH is an effective means for controlling and potentially preventing fatigue in breast cancer radiotherapy patients.

  14. Nursing interventions for radiation dermatitis during breast radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Shiho; Nagai, Yuko

    2015-01-01

    Radiation dermatitis occurs in 95% of the women undergoing radiation therapy (RT) for breast cancer. Radiation dermatitis is one of the common acute side effects of RT and includes erythema, dry desquamation, and moist desquamation. Radiation dermatitis may cause physical distress, such as pain and itchiness, and influence individual's quality of life as well. Nurses are to reduce the distress and improve quality of life by managing the symptoms and enhancing patient's self-care ability. This article describes the supportive care for radiation dermatitis from nurse's point of view. (author)

  15. Efficacy of hypofractionated radiotherapy in loco-regional tumor control in breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riaz, O.; Mahmood, A.; Rasul, S.; Haider, N.; Gul, S.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of hypofractionated radiotherapy (HFRT) in locoregional control (LRC) in breast cancer. Study Design: Descriptive case series. Place and Duration of Study: Oncology Department of CMH Rawalpindi, from Jan 2014 to Oct 2014. Material and Methods: Fifty three female patients with histopathologically confirmed breast cancer and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (ECOG-PS) greater than equal to 2 were enrolled in the study. These patients required post-operative radio-therapy to intact breast/ chest wall / residual breast tissue were treated using linear accelerator. Lateral/medial tangential and ipsilateral supraclavicular fields were employed to a dose of 39 Gy in 13 fractions with 6 MV photon beam. The ipsilateral axilla was also radiated if required to same dose with postero-anterior field. Scar boost was administered using 6 MeV electron beam to a dose of 7.5 Gy in 3 fractions in patients with high risk features for local recurrence like high grade, positive axillary nodes, lymphovascular invasion and close or positive surgical resection margins. Patients were followed up weekly during radio-therapy (RT) and three monthly after completion of RT for a period of 6 months. Any suspicious lesion was subjected to biopsy. Data analysis was done with the help of the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 19 software, which included descriptive analysis. Loco-regional control (LRC) and loco-regional recurrence (LRR) rates were calculated. LRC was no recurrence of tumor/tumor control in chest wall, axilla, residual breast tissue, and/or infraclavicular/supraclavicular lymph nodes. LRR was appearance of nodules / leison at local site which was biopsied and confirmed histopathologically. Results: Fifty three female patients with histopathologically confirmed breast cancer and ECOG-PS greater than equal to 2 requiring post-operative radio-therapy to intact breast/chest wall/ residual breast tissue were

  16. Comparison of early quality of life in patients treated with radiotherapy following mastectomy or breast conservation therapy: A prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munshi, Anusheel; Dutta, Debnarayan; Kakkar, Sajal; Budrukkar, Ashwini; Jalali, Rakesh; Sarin, Rajiv; Gupta, Sudeep; Parmar, Vani; Badwe, Rajendra

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: To compare quality of life (QOL) in breast cancer patients from a developing country after breast conservation surgery (BCS) or mastectomy and adjuvant radiotherapy (RT). Materials and methods: In a 6-month period, all consecutive early and locally advanced breast cancer patients treated with either BCS or mastectomy and treated with RT were analyzed. All patients who underwent mastectomy were treated with 45 Gray/20/4 weeks. Patients with BCS were treated with a dose of 45-50 Gray/25/5 weeks to whole breast followed by tumor bed boost (15 Gray/6/6 days with suitable energy electrons). Prospective evaluation of QOL using EORTC QLQ C30 and breast cancer specific QLQ BR23 was done before starting RT (baseline), at mid-RT and at RT conclusion for all patients. Results: One hundred and thirteen patients had mastectomy and 142 patients underwent BCS. Reliability test (Cronbach alpha) for questionnaire filling was 0.669-0.886. At pre-RT assessment, global QOL scores in mastectomy and BCS groups were 71.1 and 71.3, respectively. There was no significant difference in pre-RT EORTC QLQ C30 functional and symptom domains between mastectomy and BCS patients. However, social function domain score was higher in patients who underwent mastectomy (83 versus 73.9; p = 0.018). In QLQ BR23 domains, body image and sexual functioning domains were similar between the two groups. However, sexual enjoyment (10.9 versus 47.6; p = 0.006) and future perspective (7.4 versus 37.1; p = 0.036) domains were significantly better in BCS arm. There was no difference between systemic side effect (BRSSE), breast symptom (BRBS) and arm symptom (BRAS) domain scores between the groups. There was no significant difference in change of QOL scores between mastectomy and BCS patients at RT completion as compared to baseline. Conclusions: There was no significant difference in quality of life in patients with BCS versus those with mastectomy. However, patients who underwent BCS had better

  17. Second primary cancers after adjuvant radiotherapy in early breast cancer patients: A national population based study under the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group (DBCG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grantzau, Trine; Mellemkjær, Lene; Overgaard, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: To analyze the long-term risk of second primary solid non-breast cancer in a national population-based cohort of 46,176 patients treated for early breast cancer between 1982 and 2007. Patients and methods: All patients studied were treated according to the national guidelines of the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group. The risk of second primary cancers was estimated by Standardised incidence ratios (SIRs) and multivariate Cox regression models were used to estimate adjusted hazard ratios (HR) among irradiated women compared to non-irradiated. All irradiated patients were treated on linear accelerators. Second cancers were a priori categorized into two groups; radiotherapy-associated- (oesophagus, lung, heart/mediastinum, pleura, bones, and connective tissue) and non-radiotherapy-associated sites (all other cancers). Results: 2358 second cancers had occurred during the follow-up. For the radiotherapy-associated sites the HR among irradiated women was 1.34 (95% CI 1.11–1.61) with significantly increased HRs for the time periods of 10–14 years (HR 1.55; 95% CI 1.08–2.24) and ⩾15 years after treatment (HR 1.79; 95% CI 1.14–2.81). There was no increased risk for the non-radiotherapy-associated sites (HR 1.04; 95% CI 0.94–1.1). The estimated attributable risk related to radiotherapy for the radiotherapy-associated sites translates into one radiation-induced second cancer in every 200 women treated with radiotherapy. Conclusions: Radiotherapy treated breast cancer patients have a small but significantly excess risk of second cancers

  18. Survival After Palliative Radiotherapy in Patients with Breast Cancer and Bone-only Metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieder, Carsten; Dalhaug, Astrid; Pawinski, Adam; Mannsåker, Bård; Haukland, Ellinor

    Patients with bone-only metastases survive longer than patients with widespread visceral disease. We analyzed the prognostic impact of different baseline parameters, such as abnormal blood tests and receptor status in patients who received local radiotherapy, in addition to contemporary systemic treatment, according to national guidelines. Retrospective uni- and multivariate analyses of 57 consecutive female patients treated in the time period 2007-2014 (median follow-up=29 months). The median age was 59 years and the median time interval from the initial diagnosis of breast cancer was 57 months. The median survival was 23 months from radiotherapy and 32 months from initial diagnosis of metastatic disease. Five-year survival rates were 13 and 21%, respectively. Survival after radiotherapy was significantly longer in patients who were prescribed higher radiation doses; 29 months after ≥30 Gy and 10 months after radiotherapy improves survival in patients with bone-only disease suitable for local therapy. Copyright © 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  19. Voluntary Breath-hold Technique for Reducing Heart Dose in Left Breast Radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Frederick R.; Colgan, Ruth M.; Donovan, Ellen M.; Carr, Karen; Landeg, Steven; Clements, Nicola; McNair, Helen A.; Locke, Imogen; Evans, Philip M.; Haviland, Joanne S.; Yarnold, John R.; Kirby, Anna M.

    2014-01-01

    Breath-holding techniques reduce the amount of radiation received by cardiac structures during tangential-field left breast radiotherapy. With these techniques, patients hold their breath while radiotherapy is delivered, pushing the heart down and away from the radiotherapy field. Despite clear dosimetric benefits, these techniques are not yet in widespread use. One reason for this is that commercially available solutions require specialist equipment, necessitating not only significant capital investment, but often also incurring ongoing costs such as a need for daily disposable mouthpieces. The voluntary breath-hold technique described here does not require any additional specialist equipment. All breath-holding techniques require a surrogate to monitor breath-hold consistency and whether breath-hold is maintained. Voluntary breath-hold uses the distance moved by the anterior and lateral reference marks (tattoos) away from the treatment room lasers in breath-hold to monitor consistency at CT-planning and treatment setup. Light fields are then used to monitor breath-hold consistency prior to and during radiotherapy delivery. PMID:25046661

  20. Determination of the optimal method for the field-in-field technique in breast tangential radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Hidekazu; Hayashi, Shinya; Hoshi, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have reported the usefulness of the field-in-field (FIF) technique in breast radiotherapy. However, the methods for the FIF technique used in these studies vary. These methods were classified into three categories. We simulated a radiotherapy plan with each method and analyzed the outcomes. In the first method, a pair of subfields was added to each main field: the single pair of subfields method (SSM). In the second method, three pairs of subfields were added to each main field: the multiple pairs of subfields method (MSM). In the third method, subfields were alternately added: the alternate subfields method (ASM). A total of 51 patients were enrolled in this study. The maximum dose to the planning target volume (PTV) (Dmax) and the volumes of the PTV receiving 100% of the prescription dose (V100%) were calculated. The thickness of the breast between the chest wall and skin surface was measured, and patients were divided into two groups according to the median. In the overall series, the average V100% with ASM (60.3%) was significantly higher than with SSM (52.6%) and MSM (48.7%). In the thin breast group as well, the average V100% with ASM (57.3%) and SSM (54.2%) was significantly higher than that with MSM (43.3%). In the thick breast group, the average V100% with ASM (63.4%) was significantly higher than that with SSM (51.0%) and MSM (54.4%). ASM resulted in better dose distribution, regardless of the breast size. Moreover, planning for ASM required a relatively short time. ASM was considered the most preferred method. (author)

  1. Intensity modulated radiotherapy with fixed collimator jaws for locoregional left-sided breast cancer irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juanqi; Yang, Zhaozhi; Hu, Weigang; Chen, Zhi; Yu, Xiaoli; Guo, Xiaomao

    2017-05-16

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with the fixed collimator jaws technique (FJT) for the left breast and regional lymph node. The targeted breast tissue and the lymph nodes, and the normal tissues were contoured for 16 left-sided breast cancer patients previously treated with radiotherapy after lumpectomy. For each patient, treatment plans using different planning techniques, i.e., volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), tangential IMRT (tangential-IMRT), and IMRT with FJT (FJT-IMRT) were developed for dosimetric comparisons. A dose of 50Gy was prescribed to the planning target volume. The dose-volume histograms were generated, and the paired t-test was used to analyze the dose differences. FJT-IMRT had similar mean heart volume receiving 30Gy (V30 Gy) with tangential-IMRT (1.5% and 1.6%, p = 0.41), but inferior to the VMAT (0.8%, p < 0.001). In the average heart mean dose comparison, FJT-IMRT had the lowest value, and it was 0.6Gy lower than that for the VMAT plans (p < 0.01). A significant dose increase in the contralateral breast and lung was observed in VMAT plans. Compared with tangential-IMRT and VMAT plans, FJT-IMRT reduced the mean dose of thyroid, humeral head and cervical esophageal by 47.6% (p < 0.01) and 45.7% (p < 0.01), 74.3% (p =< 0.01) and 73% (p =< 0.01), and 26.7% (p =< 0.01) and 29.2% (p =< 0.01). In conclusion, compared with tangential-IMRT and VMAT, FJT-IMRT plan has the lowest thyroid, humeral head and cervical esophageal mean dose and it can be a reasonable treatment option for a certain subgroup of patients, such as young left-breast cancer patients and/or patients with previous thyroid disease.

  2. Clinical outcome and cosmetics in breast cancer patients treated with conservative surgery and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Rongqing; Jin Yening; Wang Yajie

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness and the cosmetics result of radiotherapy after conservative surgery for early breast cancer. Methods: Altogether 109 patients were treated by post-operative whole-breast irradiation and a tumor bed boost from May, 1995 to December, 2002. Among them 79 cases received a brachytherapy boost ( 192 Ir HDR implant Nucletron ) of 10-12 Gy(DB) by single plan of implantation with 1.5 cm between the needles for T1 and double plan for T2-4 tumors, and 30 cases received an electron beam boost with 15 Gy. External beam irradiation was applied to the whole breast with 45-52 Gy(mean 48.6 Gy) in 25 fractions over 5 weeks followed or concurrently with chemotherapy (CMF or CEF) and hormonotherapy. The cosmetic result was scored by a doctor and patients via questionnaire. Results: The median follow-up time was 52 months. The actuarial 5-year overall survival rate was 93.8% using Kaplan-Meier method and the within breast recurrence rate was 6.5%. No radiation- induced ulcer in the breast occurred except acute inflammation of skin around the pinholes in 5 patients. Cosmetic results were scored to be good by patients and the doctor (81% and 87%, respectively) for 75 followed-up cases, and good cosmetic rate was reported by the doctor for 82% (39/48) of the cases treated with brachytherapy boost and 85.2%(23/27) for those treated with external beam boost. There was no difference in cosmetic results between these two groups(P>0.05). Conclusion: In patients at high risk for local recurrence, tumor-bed boost with brachytherapy or electron beam carried out after limited surgery and external radiotherapy can provide satisfactory local control without morbidity. Cosmetic result may not be influenced by the boost technique. (authors)

  3. The incidence of postoperative radiotherapy-induced acute dermatitis in breast cancer and its influencing factors for Chinese women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding J

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Jingxian Ding,1,2,* Yonghong Guo,3,* Qingge Li,1 Jun Chen,4 Pinghua Hu,4 Qiuming Liu,4 Yali Cao,4 Jiong Wu5,6 1Department of Radiation Oncology, The Third Hospital of Nanchang, Nanchang, China; 2Department of Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, China; 3Department of Radiation Oncology, The Fourth Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Nanchang, China; 4Department of Breast Surgery, The Third Hospital of Nanchang, Nanchang, China; 5Department of Breast Surgery, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, China; 6Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai, China *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: To investigate the incidence of skin acute reaction and its influencing factors in postoperative breast cancer radiotherapy patients. Methods: One hundred and seventy three cases of breast cancer patients treated with postoperative radiotherapy were consecutively enrolled from June 1, 2016 to July 31, 2017 in our breast cancer center. Irradiation technology includes conformal intensity-modulated radiotherapy and a conventional two-dimensional one with conventional fraction. Any acute radiation dermatitis was recorded and the influencing factors were analyzed at the end of the radiation treatment. Results: Radiotherapy-induced acute dermatitis in patients with breast-conserving surgery was relatively mild. Among the 173 patients, 33 cases had no obvious changes in the skin (grade 0; 121 cases had grade 1 skin reactions, manifested as local dark erythema and dry peeling; 29 cases had grade 2 skin reactions, characterized by edema, hyperemia, or erosion part; no grade 3 cases of skin reactions were observed. The incidence of grade 0, grade 1, and grade 2 reactions in all patients was 19.1%, 69.9%, and 11.0%, respectively. The severity of skin acute reaction is independent of the tumor sites, molecular subtypes, patients’ age, and irradiation modalities, but it

  4. Case of acute myelogenous leukemia following aplastic anemia after radiotherapy and chemotherapy for breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takano, Y; Chinen, T; Ogawa, M; Kato, Y; Kitagawa, T [Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo. Hospital

    1980-12-01

    A 53 years old mastectomized woman for breast cancer treated with radiotherapy (total doses 12,600 rad) and with long term oral administration of cyclophosphamide (CPM) and ftorafur (FT), developed aplastic anemia and thereafter acute myelogenous leukemia. About six months after discontinuation of the above therapies, she developed anemia and leukopenia and was referred to our clinic. Hematological improvement was obtained by the administration of anabolic hormone, however, two months later she became pancytopenic again. At that time, quite atypical myeloblasts contained peroxidase positive granules, were found 39% in the peripheral blood and 89.4% in the bone marrow, respectively. Leukemic hiatus was present. A bone marrow biopsy revealed coexistence of leukemic cells and breast cancer cells. A diagnosis of breast cancer complicated with acute myelogenous leukemia was made. A combined therapy of adriamycin, CPM and FT was ineffective. OAP regimen of vincristine, cytosine arabinoside and predonisolone revealed transient hematologic improvement. Finally, the patient died of septicemia due to klebsiella. Autopsy revealed wide spread coexistence of leukemia and cancer in the bone marrow, liver, and thyroid. The authors discuss some possible explanations for development of acute leukemia after radiotherapy and chemotherapy.

  5. Effect of radiotherapy on lymphocyte subpopulations in patients with carcinoma of the breast and uterine cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guha Thakurta, S.; De, M.; Roy Chowdhury, J.

    1983-01-01

    Immune competence was evaluated in 43 patients of carcinoma breast, 77 patients of cancer cervix, as compared to 30 normal healthy women. The study also included 25 women from the two carcinoma groups, who had undergone radiotherapy. A reduction in the white blood cell count, absolute lymphocyte count, active T-cell count and absolute T-cell count were observed in patients with carcinoma of the breast and cervix prior to irradiation. Radiation therapy resulted in a striking reduction of all the three parameters in both the carcinoma groups. Substantial recovery was observed within a year after cessation of therapy. Increased number of peripheral B lymphocytes was observed in carcinoma of the breast as well as the cervix prior to irradiation. At completion of radiation, the number decreased markedly in both groups of patients. Gradual recovery took place within a year. The reduction in lymphocyte numbers and its subpopulations could not be attributed to thymic irradiation, since patients receiving pelvic and mediastinal (including thymic) radiotherapy showed similar changes. (author)

  6. Breast cancer patients receiving postoperative radiotherapy: Distress, depressive symptoms and unmet needs of psychosocial support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luutonen, Sinikka; Vahlberg, Tero; Eloranta, Sini; Hyvaeri, Heidi; Salminen, Eeva

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose: The diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer can cause considerable psychological consequences, which may remain unrecognized and untreated. In this study, the prevalence of depressive symptoms and distress, and unmet needs for psychosocial support were assessed among breast cancer patients receiving postoperative radiotherapy. Material and methods: Out of 389 consecutive patients, 276 responded and comprised the final study group. Depressive symptoms were assessed with the Beck Depression Inventory. Distress was measured with the Distress Thermometer. Hospital records of the patients were examined for additional information. Results: Nearly one third of patients (32.1%) displayed depressive symptoms, and more than a quarter of patients (28.4%) experienced distress. Younger age (p = 0.001) and negative hormone receptor status (p = 0.008) were independent factors associated with distress. One quarter of the patients expressed an unmet need for psychosocial support, which was independently associated with depressive symptoms and/or distress (p = 0.001) and younger age (p = 0.006). Conclusions: During radiotherapy for breast cancer, the staff should have awareness of the higher risk of depression and distress in their patients and should consider screening tools to recognise distress and depressive symptoms. Special attention should be paid to younger patients.

  7. True Local Recurrence Rate in the Conserved Breast After Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Targeted Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whipp, Elisabeth; Beresford, Mark; Sawyer, Elinor; Halliwell, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Better accuracy of local radiotherapy may substantially improve local control and thus long-term breast cancer survival. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has high resolution and sensitivity in breast tissue and may depict the tumor bed more accurately than conventional planning techniques. A postoperative complex (POCx) comprises all visible changes thought to be related to surgery within the breast and acts as a surrogate for the tumor bed. This study reports on local recurrence rates after MRI-assisted radiotherapy planning to ensure adequate coverage of the POCx. Methods and Materials: Simple opposed tangential fields were defined by surface anatomy in the conventional manner in 221 consecutive patients. After MRI, fields were modified by a single radiation oncologist to ensure encompassment of the POCx with a 10-mm margin. Genetic analysis was performed on all local relapses (LRs) to distinguish true recurrences (TRs) from new primaries (NPs). Results: This was a high risk cohort at 5 years: only 9.5% were classified as low risk (St Gallen): 43.4% were Grade 3 and 19.9% had surgical margins <1 mm; 62.4% of patients received boosts. Adjustments of standard field margins were required in 69%. After a median follow-up of 5 years, there were 3 LRs (1.3%) as the site of first relapse in 221 patients, comprising two TRs (0.9%) and one NP (0.4%). Conclusions: Accurate targeting of the true tumor bed is critical. MRI may better define the tumor bed.

  8. Comparison between intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and 3D tangential beams technique used in patients with early-stage breast cancer who received breast-conserving therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sas-Korczynska, B.; Kokoszka, A.; Korzeniowski, S.; Sladowska, A.; Rozwadowska-Bogusz, B.; Lesiak, J.; Dyczek, S.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The most often found complications in patients with breast cancer who received radiotherapy are cardiac and pulmonary function disorders and development of second malignancies. Aim: To compare the intensity modulated radiotherapy with the 3D tangential beams technique in respect of dose distribution in target volume and critical organs they generate in patients with early-stage breast cancer who received breast-conserving therapy. Materials and methods: A dosimetric analysis was performed to assess the three radiotherapy techniques used in each of 10 consecutive patients with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy. Radiotherapy was planned with the use of all the three techniques: 3D tangential beams with electron boost, IMRT with electron boost, and intensity modulated radiotherapy with simultaneous integrated boost. Results: The use of the IMRT techniques enables more homogenous dose distribution in target volume. The range of mean and median dose to the heart and lung was lower with the IMRT techniques in comparison to the 3D tangential beams technique. The range of mean dose to the heart amounted to 0.3 - 3.5 Gy for the IMRT techniques and 0.4 - 4.3 for the tangential beams technique. The median dose to the lung on the irradiated side amounted to 4.9 - 5 Gy for the IMRT techniques and 5.6 Gy for the 3D tangential beams technique. Conclusion: The application of the IMRT techniques in radiotherapy patients with early-stage breast cancer allows to obtain more homogenous dose distribution in target volume, while permitting to reduce the dose to critical organs. (authors)

  9. Simple shielding reduces dose to the contralateral breast during prone breast cancer radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goyal, Uma, E-mail: uma.goyal@gmail.com; Locke, Angela; Smith-Raymond, Lexie; Georgiev, Georgi N.

    2016-07-01

    Our goal was to design a prone breast shield for the contralateral breast and study its efficacy in decreasing scatter radiation to the contralateral breast in a prone breast phantom setup receiving radiation therapy designed for breast cancer. We constructed a prone breast phantom setup consisting of (1) A thermoplastic mask with a left-sided depression created by a water balloon for a breast shape; (2) 2 plastic bags to hold water in the thermoplastic mask depression; (3) 2000 mL of water to fill the thermoplastic mask depression to create a water-based false breast; (4) 1-cm thick bolus placed in the contralateral breast holder; (5) 2 lead (Pb) sheets, each 0.1-cm thick for blocking scatter radiation in the contralateral bolus-based false breast; (6) a prone breast board to hold the thermoplastic mask, water, bolus, and lead; (7) 9 cm solid water on top of the breast board to simulate body; (8) a diode was used to verify dose for each treatment field of the treated water-based breast; (9) metal–oxide–semiconductor-field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters to measure dose to the contralateral bolus-based breast. The phantom prone breast setup was CT simulated and treatment was designed with 95% isodose line covering the treated breast. The maximum dose was 107.1%. Megavoltage (MV) port images ensured accurate setup. Measurements were done using diodes on the treated water-based breast and MOSFET dosimeters at the medial and lateral sides of the contralateral bolus-based breast without and with the Pb shield. Five treatments were done for each of the 3 data sets and recorded individually for statistical purposes. All treatments were completed with 6 MV photons at 200 cGy per treatment. The dose contributions from each of the 3 data sets including 15 treatments total without and with the prone lead shield to the medial and lateral portions of contralateral bolus-based breast were averaged individually. Unshielded dose means were 37.11 and 2.94 cGy, and

  10. Increased cardiovascular mortality more than fifteen years after radiotherapy for breast cancer: a population-based study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roychoudhuri, Rahul; Robinson, David; Putcha, Venkata; Cuzick, Jack; Darby, Sarah; Møller, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    Breast radiotherapy as practised in the 1970s and 1980s resulted in significant myocardial exposure, and this was higher when the left breast was treated. It has been proposed that this difference might result in greater cardiovascular mortality following irradiation of the left breast when compared with the right. All cases of female breast cancer diagnosed between 1971 and 1988 and recorded on the Thames Cancer Registry database were followed up to the end of 2003 to identify cases who had died from ischaemic heart disease (IHD) or any cardiovascular disease (CVD). A proportional hazards regression analysis was performed, stratified by time since diagnosis, using as the baseline group those women with right-sided disease who did not receive radiotherapy, and adjusting for age at diagnosis. A total of 20,871 women with breast cancer were included in the analysis, of which 51% had left-sided disease. Mortality at 15+ years after diagnosis was increased in recipients of left-breast radiotherapy compared to non-irradiated women with right-sided breast cancer, both for IHD (hazard ratio 1.59; 95% confidence interval 1.21–2.08; p = 0.001) and all CVD (hazard ratio 1.27; 95% confidence interval 1.07–1.51; p = 0.006). When irradiated women with left-sided breast cancer were compared with irradiated women with right-sided breast cancer, cardiovascular mortality at 15+ years after diagnosis was raised by around 25% (IHD: hazard ratio 1.23; 95% confidence interval 0.95–1.60; p = 0.114; CVD: hazard ratio 1.25; 95% confidence interval 1.05–1.49; p = 0.014). We have found an elevation in cardiovascular mortality more than 15 years after breast radiotherapy in women diagnosed with breast cancer between 1971 and 1988. The risk was greater following irradiation of the left breast compared with the right. This confirms that radiotherapy as practised in the 1970s and 1980s has resulted in significant long-term cardiac toxicity. In absolute terms, the increase in

  11. Association of childhood trauma with fatigue, depression, stress, and inflammation in breast cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Tatiana J; Felger, Jennifer C; Lee, Anna; Mister, Donna; Miller, Andrew H; Torres, Mylin A

    2016-02-01

    This pilot study examined whether breast cancer patients with childhood trauma exhibit increased fatigue, depression, and stress in association with inflammation as a result of whole breast radiotherapy (RT). Twenty breast cancer patients were enrolled in a prospective, longitudinal study of fatigue, depression, and perceived stress prior to RT, week 6 of RT, and 6 weeks post-RT. Six weeks after RT, subjects completed the childhood trauma questionnaire (CTQ). Patients were also administered the multidimensional fatigue inventory, inventory of depressive symptomatology-self-reported, and perceived stress scale at all three time-points and underwent blood sampling prior to RT for gene expression and inflammatory markers previously associated with childhood trauma and behavioral symptoms in breast cancer patients. Eight subjects (40%) had past childhood trauma (CTQ+). Compared to CTQ- patients, CTQ+ patients had significantly higher fatigue, depression, and stress scores before, during, and after RT (p fatigue, and stress scores in CTQ+ but not CTQ- patients. Childhood trauma was prevalent and was associated with increased symptoms of fatigue, depression, and stress irrespective of RT. Increased symptoms in CTQ+ patients were also associated with baseline inflammatory markers. Treatments targeting childhood trauma and related inflammation may improve symptoms in breast cancer patients. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. The use of a compensator library to reduce dose inhomogeneity in tangential radiotherapy of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilks, Robin J.; Bliss, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Background and purpose: The dose variation throughout the volume of the breast from tangential fields can exceed 20% for large breasts. This is postulated to result in poor cosmesis [Radiother Oncol 16 (1989) 253], particularly at the inframammary fold, where the dose is highest. Compensators may be used to reduce this variation, but at the cost of the time to manufacture each unique compensator for the individual patients. This paper outlines the implementation and routine use of a library of reusable compensators. Materials and methods: For the period of December 1999 to May 2001, 94 patients attending for breast radiotherapy received treatment using breast compensators calculated from multiple outlines measured using the Osiris system. The compensators manufactured for the early patients were added to a library for possible reuse by later patients. Of the 94 patients, 28 patients' compensators formed the library and 66 subsequent patients have been treated using compensators derived from the library. Selection of the most appropriate library compensator was determined from the analysis of the distribution of the calculated dose-volume histogram for the whole breast, excluding lung, penumbra and build-up regions. Once the library was complete, approximately 50% of all subsequent breast patients were treated with compensators (46% from the library and 4% with individual compensators). This represented a usage rate of 92% for the library compensators for those patients requiring compensation. Results: In all cases the compensators reduced the variation in the dose distribution. For example, the group treated with a library compensator demonstrated a mean reduction from 29 to 9% for the volume of breast tissue receiving more than 5% greater than the reference dose. If the same patients had been treated using their own individual compensators, the corresponding value would have been 7%. There is a small systematic, but negligible, difference in the two populations of

  13. Second cancer incidence risk estimates using BEIR VII models for standard and complex external beam radiotherapy for early breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donovan, E. M.; James, H.; Bonora, M.; Yarnold, J. R.; Evans, P. M. [Joint Department of Physics, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust and Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton SM2 5PT (United Kingdom); Physics Department, Ipswich Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Ipswich IP4 5PD (United Kingdom); Department of Academic Radiotherapy, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton SM2 5PT, United Kingdom and School of Radiotherapy, University of Milan, Milan 20122 (Italy); Department of Academic Radiotherapy, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton SM2 5PT (United Kingdom); Centre for Vision Speech and Signal Processing, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To compare organ specific cancer incidence risks for standard and complex external beam radiotherapy (including cone beam CT verification) following breast conservation surgery for early breast cancer.Method: Doses from breast radiotherapy and kilovoltage cone beam CT (CBCT) exposures were obtained from thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements in an anthropomorphic phantom in which the positions of radiosensitive organs were delineated. Five treatment deliveries were investigated: (i) conventional tangential field whole breast radiotherapy (WBRT), (ii) noncoplanar conformal delivery applicable to accelerated partial beast irradiation (APBI), (iii) two-volume simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) treatment, (iv) forward planned three-volume SIB, and (v) inverse-planned three volume SIB. Conformal and intensity modulated radiotherapy methods were used to plan the complex treatments. Techniques spanned the range from simple methods appropriate for patient cohorts with a low cancer recurrence risk to complex plans relevant to cohorts with high recurrence risk. Delineated organs at risk included brain, salivary glands, thyroid, contralateral breast, left and right lung, esophagus, stomach, liver, colon, and bladder. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR) VII cancer incidence models were applied to the measured mean organ doses to determine lifetime attributable risk (LAR) for ages at exposure from 35 to 80 yr according to radiotherapy techniques, and included dose from the CBCT imaging. Results: All LAR decreased with age at exposure and were lowest for brain, thyroid, liver, and bladder (<0.1%). There was little dependence of LAR on radiotherapy technique for these organs and for colon and stomach. LAR values for the lungs for the three SIB techniques were two to three times those from WBRT and APBI. Uncertainties in the LAR models outweigh any differences in lung LAR between the SIB methods. Constraints in the planning of the SIB methods ensured that

  14. Second cancer incidence risk estimates using BEIR VII models for standard and complex external beam radiotherapy for early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donovan, E. M.; James, H.; Bonora, M.; Yarnold, J. R.; Evans, P. M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To compare organ specific cancer incidence risks for standard and complex external beam radiotherapy (including cone beam CT verification) following breast conservation surgery for early breast cancer.Method: Doses from breast radiotherapy and kilovoltage cone beam CT (CBCT) exposures were obtained from thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements in an anthropomorphic phantom in which the positions of radiosensitive organs were delineated. Five treatment deliveries were investigated: (i) conventional tangential field whole breast radiotherapy (WBRT), (ii) noncoplanar conformal delivery applicable to accelerated partial beast irradiation (APBI), (iii) two-volume simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) treatment, (iv) forward planned three-volume SIB, and (v) inverse-planned three volume SIB. Conformal and intensity modulated radiotherapy methods were used to plan the complex treatments. Techniques spanned the range from simple methods appropriate for patient cohorts with a low cancer recurrence risk to complex plans relevant to cohorts with high recurrence risk. Delineated organs at risk included brain, salivary glands, thyroid, contralateral breast, left and right lung, esophagus, stomach, liver, colon, and bladder. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR) VII cancer incidence models were applied to the measured mean organ doses to determine lifetime attributable risk (LAR) for ages at exposure from 35 to 80 yr according to radiotherapy techniques, and included dose from the CBCT imaging. Results: All LAR decreased with age at exposure and were lowest for brain, thyroid, liver, and bladder (<0.1%). There was little dependence of LAR on radiotherapy technique for these organs and for colon and stomach. LAR values for the lungs for the three SIB techniques were two to three times those from WBRT and APBI. Uncertainties in the LAR models outweigh any differences in lung LAR between the SIB methods. Constraints in the planning of the SIB methods ensured that

  15. Prophylactic beclomethasone spray to the skin during postoperative radiotherapy of carcinoma breast: a prospective randomized study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, P.N.; Gairola, M.; Mohanti, B.K.; Rath, G.K.

    2006-01-01

    Background and aims: Radiation induced wet desquamation of skin in carcinoma breast patients is a painful condition. In this study topical beclomethasone dipropionate spray was used as prophylaxis with the purpose of reducing risk of the wet desquamation of skin in irradiated field. Materials and methods: sixty patients of carcinoma breast were planned for postoperative loco regional radiotherapy (50 Gy in 25 fraction over five weeks) were prospectively randomized into two groups (1) steroid group-patients were advised to use beclomethasone dipropionate spray in irradiated axilla from day one of radiotherapy, (2) control group-patients were not allowed to use any topical agent in irradiated area. Radiation induced skin reaction was noted in terms of erythema, dry desquamation and wet desquamation weekly till end of prescribed 50Gy dose of the radiation therapy. Statistical method: Chi-square test was used to see the statistical significance of the difference in wet desquamation between two arms of the study. Chi-square value and P-value was calculated for the difference of wet desquamation in two study arms. Result: In steroid group 4/30 (13.33%) patients developed wet desquamation of the axillary skin at the end of the radiotherapy. For the control group, this figure was 11/30 (36.66%). The difference in wet desquamation of the axillary skin in the two groups was statistically significant (P-value=0.0369). Conclusion: Topical steroid (beclomethasone dipropionate spray) for skin during radiotherapy significantly reduces the risk of wet desquamation of the skin. (author)

  16. Automated planning of breast radiotherapy using cone beam CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amit, Guy; Purdie, Thomas G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Develop and clinically validate a methodology for using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging in an automated treatment planning framework for breast IMRT. Methods: A technique for intensity correction of CBCT images was developed and evaluated. The technique is based on histogram matching of CBCT image sets, using information from “similar” planning CT image sets from a database of paired CBCT and CT image sets (n = 38). Automated treatment plans were generated for a testing subset (n = 15) on the planning CT and the corrected CBCT. The plans generated on the corrected CBCT were compared to the CT-based plans in terms of beam parameters, dosimetric indices, and dose distributions. Results: The corrected CBCT images showed considerable similarity to their corresponding planning CTs (average mutual information 1.0±0.1, average sum of absolute differences 185 ± 38). The automated CBCT-based plans were clinically acceptable, as well as equivalent to the CT-based plans with average gantry angle difference of 0.99°±1.1°, target volume overlap index (Dice) of 0.89±0.04 although with slightly higher maximum target doses (4482±90 vs 4560±84, P < 0.05). Gamma index analysis (3%, 3 mm) showed that the CBCT-based plans had the same dose distribution as plans calculated with the same beams on the registered planning CTs (average gamma index 0.12±0.04, gamma <1 in 99.4%±0.3%). Conclusions: The proposed method demonstrates the potential for a clinically feasible and efficient online adaptive breast IMRT planning method based on CBCT imaging, integrating automation

  17. A Qualitative Analysis of Acute Skin Toxicity among Breast Cancer Radiotherapy Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnur, Julie B.; Ouellette, Suzanne C.; DiLorenzo, Terry A.; Green, Sheryl; Montgomery, Guy H.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives One of the most common acute side effects of breast cancer radiotherapy is treatment induced skin changes, referred to as skin toxicity. Yet no research to date has focused expressly on skin toxicity-related quality of life in breast cancer radiotherapy patients. Therefore, our aim was to use qualitative approaches to better understand the impact of skin toxicity on quality of life. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 20 women (Stage 0-III breast cancer), during their last week of external beam radiotherapy. Each interview was transcribed verbatim, and thematic analysis was performed. Results Three themes were identified based on the interview responses: First, skin changes affect multiple dimensions of quality of life. They cause physical discomfort, body image disturbance, emotional distress, and impair both day-to-day functioning and satisfaction with radiation treatment. Second, individual differences affect women’s experiences. Generally African-American women, younger women, women who are not currently in a relationship, women who are being treated during the summer, and women who are more invested in their appearance are more distressed by skin toxicity. Third, women use a variety of symptom management strategies including self-medication, complementary/alternative medicine approaches, and psychological strategies. Conclusions Implications of results are: 1) Skin toxicity affects numerous dimensions of quality of life, and assessment approaches and psychosocial interventions should address this; 2) individual differences may affect the experience of skin toxicity, and should be considered in treatment and education approaches; and 3) participants’ own creativity and problem-solving should be used to improve the treatment experience. PMID:20238306

  18. Automated Planning of Tangential Breast Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Using Heuristic Optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purdie, Thomas G.; Dinniwell, Robert E.; Letourneau, Daniel; Hill, Christine; Sharpe, Michael B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To present an automated technique for two-field tangential breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment planning. Method and Materials: A total of 158 planned patients with Stage 0, I, and II breast cancer treated using whole-breast IMRT were retrospectively replanned using automated treatment planning tools. The tools developed are integrated into the existing clinical treatment planning system (Pinnacle 3 ) and are designed to perform the manual volume delineation, beam placement, and IMRT treatment planning steps carried out by the treatment planning radiation therapist. The automated algorithm, using only the radio-opaque markers placed at CT simulation as inputs, optimizes the tangential beam parameters to geometrically minimize the amount of lung and heart treated while covering the whole-breast volume. The IMRT parameters are optimized according to the automatically delineated whole-breast volume. Results: The mean time to generate a complete treatment plan was 6 min, 50 s ± 1 min 12 s. For the automated plans, 157 of 158 plans (99%) were deemed clinically acceptable, and 138 of 158 plans (87%) were deemed clinically improved or equal to the corresponding clinical plan when reviewed in a randomized, double-blinded study by one experienced breast radiation oncologist. In addition, overall the automated plans were dosimetrically equivalent to the clinical plans when scored for target coverage and lung and heart doses. Conclusion: We have developed robust and efficient automated tools for fully inversed planned tangential breast IMRT planning that can be readily integrated into clinical practice. The tools produce clinically acceptable plans using only the common anatomic landmarks from the CT simulation process as an input. We anticipate the tools will improve patient access to high-quality IMRT treatment by simplifying the planning process and will reduce the effort and cost of incorporating more advanced planning into clinical practice.

  19. Classification of fibroglandular tissue distribution in the breast based on radiotherapy planning CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juneja, Prabhjot; Evans, Philip; Windridge, David; Harris, Emma

    2016-01-01

    Accurate segmentation of breast tissues is required for a number of applications such as model based deformable registration in breast radiotherapy. The accuracy of breast tissue segmentation is affected by the spatial distribution (or pattern) of fibroglandular tissue (FT). The goal of this study was to develop and evaluate texture features, determined from planning computed tomography (CT) data, to classify the spatial distribution of FT in the breast. Planning CT data of 23 patients were evaluated in this study. Texture features were derived from the radial glandular fraction (RGF), which described the distribution of FT within three breast regions (posterior, middle, and anterior). Using visual assessment, experts grouped patients according to FT spatial distribution: sparse or non-sparse. Differences in the features between the two groups were investigated using the Wilcoxon rank test. Classification performance of the features was evaluated for a range of support vector machine (SVM) classifiers. Experts found eight patients and 15 patients had sparse and non-sparse spatial distribution of FT, respectively. A large proportion of features (>9 of 13) from the individual breast regions had significant differences (p <0.05) between the sparse and non-sparse group. The features from middle region had most significant differences and gave the highest classification accuracy for all the SVM kernels investigated. Overall, the features from middle breast region achieved highest accuracy (91 %) with the linear SVM kernel. This study found that features based on radial glandular fraction provide a means for discriminating between fibroglandular tissue distributions and could achieve a classification accuracy of 91 %

  20. Radiation Field Design and Patterns of Locoregional Recurrence Following Definitive Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Susie A.; Schuster, David M.; Mister, Donna; Liu Tian; Godette, Karen; Torres, Mylin A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Locoregional control is associated with breast cancer-specific and overall survival in select women with breast cancer. Although several patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics have been shown to contribute to locoregional recurrence (LRR), studies evaluating factors related to radiotherapy (XRT) technique have been limited. We investigated the relationship between LRR location and XRT fields and dose delivered to the primary breast cancer in women experiencing subsequent locoregional relapse. Methods and Materials: We identified 21 women who were previously treated definitively with surgery and XRT for breast cancer. All patients developed biopsy-result proven LRR and presented to Emory University Hospital between 2004 and 2010 for treatment. Computed tomography (CT) simulation scans with XRT dose files for the initial breast cancer were fused with 18 F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET)/CT images in DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine) format identifying the LRR. Each LRR was categorized as in-field, defined as ≥95% of the LRR volume receiving ≥95% of the prescribed whole-breast dose; marginal, defined as LRR at the field edge and/or not receiving ≥95% of the prescribed dose to ≥95% of the volume; or out-of-field, that is, LRR intentionally not treated with the original XRT plan. Results: Of the 24 identified LRRs (3 patients experienced two LRRs), 3 were in-field, 9 were marginal, and 12 were out-of-field. Two of the 3 in-field LRRs were marginal misses of the additional boost XRT dose. Out-of-field LRRs consisted of six supraclavicular and six internal mammary nodal recurrences. Conclusions: Most LRRs in our study occurred in areas not fully covered by the prescribed XRT dose or were purposely excluded from the original XRT fields. Our data suggest that XRT technique, field design, and dose play a critical role in preventing LRR in women with breast cancer.

  1. Radiotherapy with or without hyperthermia in the treatment of superficial localized breast cancer: results from five randomized controlled trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vernon, Clare C.; Hand, Jeffrey W.; Field, Stanley B.; Machin, David; Whaley, Jill B.; Zee, Jacoba van der; Putten, Wim L.J. van; Rhoon, Gerard C. van; Dijk, Jan D.P. van; Gonzalez, Dionisio Gonzalez; Liu, F.-F.; Goodman, Phyllis; Sherar, Michael

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Claims for the value of hyperthermia as an adjunct to radiotherapy in the treatment of cancer have mostly been based on small Phase I or II trials. To test the benefit of this form of treatment, randomized Phase III trials were needed. Methods and Materials: Five randomized trials addressing this question were started between 1988 and 1991. In these trials, patients were eligible if they had advanced primary or recurrent breast cancer, and local radiotherapy was indicated in preference to surgery. In addition, heating of the lesions and treatment with a prescribed (re)irradiation schedule had to be feasible and informed consent was obtained. The primary endpoint of all trials was local complete response. Slow recruitment led to a decision to collaborate and combine the trial results in one analysis, and report them simultaneously in one publication. Interim analyses were carried out and the trials were closed to recruitment when a previously agreed statistically significant difference in complete response rate was observed in the two larger trials. Results: We report on pretreatment characteristics, the treatments received, the local response observed, duration of response, time to local failure, distant progression and survival, and treatment toxicity of the 306 patients randomized. The overall CR rate for RT alone was 41% and for the combined treatment arm was 59%, giving, after stratification by trial, an odds ratio of 2.3. Not all trials demonstrated an advantage for the combined treatment, although the 95% confidence intervals of the different trials all contain the pooled odds ratio. The greatest effect was observed in patients with recurrent lesions in previously irradiated areas, where further irradiation was limited to low doses. Conclusion: The combined result of the five trials has demonstrated the efficacy of hyperthermia as an adjunct to radiotherapy for treatment of recurrent breast cancer. The implication of these encouraging results is that

  2. Hypnosis and cognitive-behavioral therapy during breast cancer radiotherapy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnur, Julie B; Montgomery, Guy H

    2008-01-01

    This case report describes an effort to control two primary side-effects of breast cancer radiotherapy (fatigue and skin discomfort) that used a combination of cognitive-behavioral therapy with hypnosis (CBTH). Two patients, matched on demographic and medical variables (marital status, employment status, number of children, cancer diagnosis, surgical history, radiation dose), were compared: one who received a CBTH intervention and one who received standard care. Results were consistent with the view that CBTH was effective in managing fatigue and skin discomfort, and increasing relaxation.

  3. The role of radiotherapy in breast conserving treatment; Uloha radioterapie pri prsnik zachovavajucej liecbe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mardiak, J.; Mego, M.; Palacka, P.; Rajec, J.; Liskova, S.; Chovanec, M. [Univerzita Komenskeho v Bratislave, Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2012-07-01

    This book offers chapters on diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. The text is intended for physicians preparing for Clinical Oncology attestation. The attention is mostly paid to systemic treatment. The chapters dealing with the diagnosis, surgical treatment and radiotherapy are focused only on the aspects which are necessary for medical oncologist [Slovak] Kniha predklada kapitoly z diagnostiky a liecby karcinomu prsnika. Text je urceny pre lekarov pripravujucich sa na atestaciu z klinickej onkologie. Vacsia pozornost bola venovana systemovej liecbe. Kapitoly zaoberajuce sa diagnostikou, chirurgickou liecbou a radioterapiou su zamerane iba na tie aspekty uvedenych kapitol, ktore su potrebne pre pracu klinickeho onkologa.

  4. The effect of local breast radiotherapy on circulating CD34+ cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alajez, Nehad M.; Wang Wei; Biswas, Debashis; Teh, Amy; Sutherland, Robert; Pintilie, Melania; Minden, Mark; Messner, Hans; Fyles, Anthony; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Keating, Armand; Liu, Fei-Fei

    2011-01-01

    The number of circulating CD34 + (hematopoietic stem) cells (HSCs) was observed to decline by 15% in breast cancer patients after starting adjuvant radiation therapy, regardless of age or preceding chemotherapy. These data demonstrate that local radiation therapy can profoundly affect HSC homeostasis, which might have a myriad of important implications.

  5. Long-term mortality from cardiac causes after adjuvant hypofractionated vs. conventional radiotherapy for localized left-sided breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Elisa K; Woods, Ryan; Virani, Sean; Speers, Caroline; Wai, Elaine S; Nichol, Alan; McBride, Mary L; Tyldesley, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Ongoing concern remains regarding cardiac injury with hypofractionated whole breast/chest-wall radiotherapy (HF-WBI) compared to conventional radiotherapy (CF-WBI) in left-sided breast cancer patients. The purpose was to determine if cardiac mortality increases with HF-WBI relative to CF-WBI. Between 1990 and 1998, 5334 women with early-stage breast cancer received post-operative radiotherapy to the breast/chest wall alone. A population-based database recorded baseline patient, tumor and treatment factors. Baseline cardiovascular risk factors were identified from hospital administrative records. A propensity-score model balanced risk factors between radiotherapy groups. Cause of death was coded as breast cancer, cardiac or other cause. Cumulative mortality from each cause after radiotherapy was estimated using a competing risk approach. For left-sided cases, median follow-up was 14.2 years. 485 women received CF-WBI, 2221 women received HF-WBI. There was no difference in 15-year mortality from cardiac causes: 4.8% with HF-WBI and 4.2% with CF-WBI (p=0.74), even after propensity-score adjustment (p=0.45). There was no difference in breast cancer mortality or other cause mortality. For right-sided cases, there was no difference in mortality for the three causes of death. At 15-years follow-up, cardiac mortality is not statistically different among left-sided breast cancer patients treated with HF-WBI or CF-WBI. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Long-term mortality from cardiac causes after adjuvant hypofractionated vs. conventional radiotherapy for localized left-sided breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, Elisa K.; Woods, Ryan; Virani, Sean; Speers, Caroline; Wai, Elaine S.; Nichol, Alan; McBride, Mary L.; Tyldesley, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose: Ongoing concern remains regarding cardiac injury with hypofractionated whole breast/chest-wall radiotherapy (HF-WBI) compared to conventional radiotherapy (CF-WBI) in left-sided breast cancer patients. The purpose was to determine if cardiac mortality increases with HF-WBI relative to CF-WBI. Materials and methods: Between 1990 and 1998, 5334 women with early-stage breast cancer received post-operative radiotherapy to the breast/chest wall alone. A population-based database recorded baseline patient, tumor and treatment factors. Baseline cardiovascular risk factors were identified from hospital administrative records. A propensity-score model balanced risk factors between radiotherapy groups. Cause of death was coded as breast cancer, cardiac or other cause. Cumulative mortality from each cause after radiotherapy was estimated using a competing risk approach. Results: For left-sided cases, median follow-up was 14.2 years. 485 women received CF-WBI, 2221 women received HF-WBI. There was no difference in 15-year mortality from cardiac causes: 4.8% with HF-WBI and 4.2% with CF-WBI (p = 0.74), even after propensity-score adjustment (p = 0.45). There was no difference in breast cancer mortality or other cause mortality. For right-sided cases, there was no difference in mortality for the three causes of death. Conclusions: At 15-years follow-up, cardiac mortality is not statistically different among left-sided breast cancer patients treated with HF-WBI or CF-WBI

  7. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zedgenidze, G.A.; Kulikov, V.A.; Mardynskij, Yu.S.

    1984-01-01

    The technique for roentgenotopometric and medicamentous preparation of patients for radiotherapy has been reported in detail. The features of planning and performing of remote, intracavitary and combined therapy in urinary bladder cancer are considered. The more effective methods of radiotherapy have been proposed taking into account own experience as well as literature data. The comparative evaluation of treatment results and prognosis are given. Radiation pathomorphism of tumors and tissues of urinary bladder is considered in detail. The problems of diagnosis, prophylaxis and treatment of complications following radiodiagnosis and radiotherapy in patients with urinary bladder cancer are illustrated widely

  8. Identification of a starting point of breast skin tears during chicken plucking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitcovski, J; Ohana, N; Amzaleg, L; Krispel, S; Bercovich, D; Pinchasov, Y

    1997-02-01

    A site (STP) was identified on the skin of the chicken, during defeathering in the slaughter house, at which about 90% of breast skin tears started. This site is on the ventral side of the pectoral tract area. There was no difference in location of this site with respect to different commercial lines, sexes, flocks, or time of the day. In order to demonstrate the importance of a small skin tear to ultimate damage, defeathered chickens with a minor tear at a particular site and undamaged defeathered chickens were passed through the defeathering machine a second time. Thirty-six percent of the STP chickens were torn further, but only a small percentage (about 4%) of the undamaged chickens were harmed.

  9. Surface dose measurements in and out of field. Implications for breast radiotherapy with megavoltage photon beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lonski, Peta; Kron, Tomas [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); RMIT Univ., Melbourne (Australia); Ramachandran, Prabhakar; Franich, Rick [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia)

    2017-07-01

    This study examines the difference in surface dose between flat and flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams in the context of breast radiotherapy. The surface dose was measured for 6 MV, 6 MV FFF, 10 MV, 10 MV FFF and 18 MV photon beams using a thin window ionisation chamber for various field sizes. Profiles were acquired to ascertain the change in surface dose off-axis. Out-of-field measurements were included in a clinically representative half beam block tangential breast field. In the field centres of FFF beams the surface dose was found to be increased for small fields and decreased for large fields compared to flat beams. For FFF beams, surface dose was found to decrease off-axis and resulted in lower surface dose out-of-field compared to flat beams.

  10. CT images and radiotherapy treatment planning of patients with breast cancer: A dataset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Rezaei

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The data presented here were originally collected for the research project “CT-Scan processing and analysis in patient with breast cancer after radiotherapy”. Also, it reported in our study “Prediction of Lung Tissue Damage by Evaluating Clinical and Dosimetric Parameters in Breast Cancer Patients” (Hasanabdali et al., 2016 [1]. This article describes and directly links to 52 subjects referred to Mahdieh Oncology and Radiotherapy Center from February to August 2015. Treatment planning was done for delivering 50 Gy dose to PTV in 25 fractions. the lungs and heart objects were extracted from CT images along with compliance Dose plan. Dose-volume histogram (DVH and Dose-mass histogram (DMH extracted using CT images and dose plan matrix. Moreover, the complete clinical and dosimetric specifications of subjects is attached.

  11. Better compliance with hypofractionation vs. conventional fractionation in adjuvant breast cancer radiotherapy. Results of a single, institutional, retrospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudat, Volker; Nour, Alaa; Hammoud, Mohamed; Abou Ghaida, Salam

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to identify factors significantly associated with the occurrence of unintended treatment interruptions in adjuvant breast cancer radiotherapy. Patients treated with postoperative radiotherapy of the breast or chest wall between March 2014 and August 2016 were evaluated. The radiotherapy regimens and techniques applied were either conventional fractionation (CF; 28 daily fractions of 1.8 Gy or 25 fractions of 2.0 Gy) or hypofractionation (HF; 15 daily fractions of 2.67 Gy) with inverse planned intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or three-dimensional planned conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). Logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with noncompliance. Noncompliance was defined as the missing of at least one scheduled radiotherapy fraction. In all, 19 of 140 (13.6%) patients treated with HF and 39 of 146 (26.7%) treated with CF experienced treatment interruptions. Of 23 factors tested, the fractionation regimen emerged as the only independent significant prognostic factor for noncompliance on multivariate analysis (CF; p = 0.007; odds ratio, 2.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-4.2). No statistically significant differences concerning the reasons for treatment interruptions could be detected between patients treated with CF or HF. HF is significantly associated with a better patient compliance with the prescribed radiotherapy schedule compared with CF. The data suggest that this finding is basically related to the shorter overall treatment time of HF. (orig.) [de

  12. A survey of radiotherapy quality control practice in the United Kingdom for the START trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venables, Karen; Winfield, Elizabeth; Deighton, Amanda; Aird, Edwin; Hoskin, Peter

    2001-01-01

    Background and purpose: This paper compares the quality control checks performed in departments in the United Kingdom with those recommended by the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM) in Report 81. Method: The data were gathered by the quality assurance team for the START trial, during visits to individual departments. Data are compared with the frequencies suggested in IPEM report 81. Where applicable, data are also analyzed with respect to machine manufacturer. Results: All departments with linear accelerators check the output at least weekly for both photons and electrons, however 11% of departments do not perform a constancy check of the output on a daily basis. The majority of departments check flatness at gantry zero on a monthly basis. However 27% of departments never check at non-zero gantry angles. In 51% of departments no fluoroscopy checks are performed on simulators on a daily basis. Conclusion: The majority of departments are following the frequencies suggested in IPEM report 81 although there are a number of discrepancies particularly for simulators. Accelerator type needs to be considered when designing quality assurance checks. In many departments more time than is currently allocated is needed on equipment, particularly simulators, to complete all of the checks suggested in Report 81

  13. Plexus brachialis injury following surgery and radiotherapy for breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todorov, J; Kostov, N [Meditsinska Akademiya, Sofia (Bulgaria). Nauchen Inst. po Rentgenologiya i Radiobiologiya

    1980-01-01

    Five-year active follow-up of 236 breast cancer patients undergoing radical amputation with subsequent telegammatherapy showed in 21 (8.9%) of the cases development, on the lesion side, of brachial plexitis varying in severity and becoming manifest from 6 to 28 months following completion of complex treatment. The patients presented with the initial and leading symptom of progressively increasing diffuse causalgic pain spreading over the whole arm. Clinical findings corresponded to injury of nerve fiber interlacings in this zone, with distal parts of the extremity selectively affected and dominance of signs from damage to individual nerves. Evidence obtained by a variety of techniques (capillary microscopy, oscillography, skin and axillar thermometry, and the ''white spot'' symptom) indicated formation of a distinct trophovascular syndrome associated with the clinical pattern of plexitis. The complexity of causative factors in development of the pathologic process is pointed out: surgical intervention and postoperative period, direct radiation exposure of the brachial plexus, sympathetic ganglia and vascular bundle, as well as substantial fibrous changes in soft tissues. The treatment administered (pharmacotherapy, exercise therapy, physiotherapy) brought relief in a measure depending on the state of plexitis at the time of diagnosing.

  14. Accelerated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy to Breast in Prone Position: Dosimetric Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Wyngaert, J. Keith; Jozsef, Gabor; Mitchell, James; Rosenstein, Barry; Formenti, Silvia C.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To report the physics and dosimetry results of a trial of accelerated intensity-modulated radiotherapy to the whole breast with a concomitant boost to the tumor bed in patients treated in the prone position. Methods and Materials: Patients underwent computed tomography planning and treatment in the prone position on a dedicated treatment platform. The platform has an open aperture on the side to allow for the index breast to fall away from the chest wall. Noncontrast computed tomography images were acquired at 2.5- or 3.75-mm-thick intervals, from the level of the mandible to below the diaphragm. A dose of 40.5 Gy was delivered to the entire breast at 2.7-Gy fractions in 15 fractions. An additional dose of 0.5 Gy was delivered as a concomitant boost to the lumpectomy site, with a 1-cm margin, using inverse planning, for a total dose of 48 Gy in 15 fractions. No more than 10% of the heart and lung volume was allowed to receive >18 and >20 Gy, respectively. Results: Between September 2003 and August 2005, 91 patients were enrolled in the study. The median volume of heart that received ≥18 Gy was 0.5%, with a maximal value of 4.7%. The median volume of ipsilateral lung that received ≥20 Gy was 0.8%, with a maximum of 7.2%. Conclusion: This technique for whole breast radiotherapy is feasible and enables an accelerated regimen in the prone position while sparing the lung and heart

  15. Measurement of Thyroid Dose by TLD arising from Radiotherapy of Breast Cancer Patients from Supraclavicular Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhood B.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer and the leading global cause of cancer death among women worldwide. Radiotherapy plays a significant role in treatment of breast cancer and reduces locoregional recurrence and eventually improves survival. The treatment fields applied for breast cancer treatment include: tangential, axillary, supraclavicular and internal mammary fields. Objective: In the present study, due to the presence of sensitive organ such as thyroid inside the supraclavicular field, thyroid dose and its effective factors were investigated. Materials and Methods: Thyroid dose of 31 female patients of breast cancer with involved supraclavicular lymph nodes which had undergone radiotherapy were measured. For each patient, three TLD-100 chips were placed on their thyroid gland surface, and thyroid doses of patients were measured. The variables of the study include shield shape, the time of patient’s setup, the technologists’ experience and qualification. Finally, the results were analyzed by ANOVA test using SPSS 11.5 software. Results: The average age of the patients was 46±10 years. The average of thyroid dose of the patients was 140±45 mGy (ranged 288.2 and 80.8 in single fraction. There was a significant relationship between the thyroid dose and shield shape. There was also a significant relationship between the thyroid dose and the patient’s setup time. Conclusion: Beside organ at risk such as thyroid which is in the supraclavicular field, thyroid dose possibility should be reduced. For solving this problem, an appropriate shield shape, the appropriate time of the patient’s setup, etc. could be considered.

  16. A review of setup error in supine breast radiotherapy using cone-beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batumalai, Vikneswary, E-mail: Vikneswary.batumalai@sswahs.nsw.gov.au [South Western Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, New South Wales (Australia); Ingham Institute of Applied Medical Research, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Holloway, Lois [South Western Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, New South Wales (Australia); Ingham Institute of Applied Medical Research, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales (Australia); Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Delaney, Geoff P. [South Western Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, New South Wales (Australia); Ingham Institute of Applied Medical Research, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia)

    2016-10-01

    Setup error in breast radiotherapy (RT) measured with 3-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is becoming more common. The purpose of this study is to review the literature relating to the magnitude of setup error in breast RT measured with CBCT. The different methods of image registration between CBCT and planning computed tomography (CT) scan were also explored. A literature search, not limited by date, was conducted using Medline and Google Scholar with the following key words: breast cancer, RT, setup error, and CBCT. This review includes studies that reported on systematic and random errors, and the methods used when registering CBCT scans with planning CT scan. A total of 11 relevant studies were identified for inclusion in this review. The average magnitude of error is generally less than 5 mm across a number of studies reviewed. The common registration methods used when registering CBCT scans with planning CT scan are based on bony anatomy, soft tissue, and surgical clips. No clear relationships between the setup errors detected and methods of registration were observed from this review. Further studies are needed to assess the benefit of CBCT over electronic portal image, as CBCT remains unproven to be of wide benefit in breast RT.

  17. In vivo measurement of radiation dose during radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using MOSFET dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Lili; Tu Yu; Zhou Juying; Lu Ye; Xu Xiaoting; Li Li; Qin Songbing

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the study was to observe and analysis the actual dosage of patients with breast cancer using metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) detector. Methods: First, Phantom measurements were performed to investigate dose distribution in the area of the junction in a half-field matching method and the influence of factors related to the accelerator. In vivo dose measurements were performed for patients with breast cancer to investigate the skin dose and the junction of supraclavicular-axillary field and tangential field in 6 MV X-ray beams. Results: Phantom measurements showed that the relative deviation in the junction were within ±3%, and the dose distributions in the junction area depended on the matching field direction (x or y). In vivo measurement of tangential region for patients showed that, the maximum dose deviation between measurement and calculation was -30.39%,the minimum deviation was -18.85%, the average dose deviation was -24.76%. The dose deviation of tangential fields for patients with breast-conserving surgery was larger than that patients with radical surgery (t =2.40, P<0.05), while dose deviation of supraclavicular-axillary fields was not significantly different. The average values of 15 fraction in the junction area showed more stable than one individual measurement. Conclusions: It is important to real-time, in vivo measurement of radiation dose during radiotherapy in patients with breast cancer, and change treatment plan in time, to ensure the accuracy of target dose. (authors)

  18. A review of setup error in supine breast radiotherapy using cone-beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batumalai, Vikneswary; Holloway, Lois; Delaney, Geoff P.

    2016-01-01

    Setup error in breast radiotherapy (RT) measured with 3-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is becoming more common. The purpose of this study is to review the literature relating to the magnitude of setup error in breast RT measured with CBCT. The different methods of image registration between CBCT and planning computed tomography (CT) scan were also explored. A literature search, not limited by date, was conducted using Medline and Google Scholar with the following key words: breast cancer, RT, setup error, and CBCT. This review includes studies that reported on systematic and random errors, and the methods used when registering CBCT scans with planning CT scan. A total of 11 relevant studies were identified for inclusion in this review. The average magnitude of error is generally less than 5 mm across a number of studies reviewed. The common registration methods used when registering CBCT scans with planning CT scan are based on bony anatomy, soft tissue, and surgical clips. No clear relationships between the setup errors detected and methods of registration were observed from this review. Further studies are needed to assess the benefit of CBCT over electronic portal image, as CBCT remains unproven to be of wide benefit in breast RT.

  19. No serious late cardiac effects after adjuvant radiotherapy following mastectomy in premenopausal women with early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustavsson, Anita; Bendahl, Pear-Ola; Cwikiel, Magdalena; Eskilsson, Jan; Thapper, Kerstin Leofvander; Pahlm, Olle

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To assess cardiac mortality, coronary artery disease, myocardial dysfunction, and valvular heart disease in women younger than 65 years of age, at least 10 years after adjuvant radiotherapy following mastectomy in early breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Ninety women (45-64 years old) with Stage II breast cancer without relapse, included in the South Sweden Breast Cancer Trial (premenopausal arm), with or without adjuvant postoperative radiotherapy ± cyclophosphamide were examined with myocardial scintigraphy and echocardiography/Doppler, 10-17 years after radiotherapy. Thirty-four patients had been irradiated for left-sided tumors, 33 for right-sided tumors, and 23 patients had not been treated with radiotherapy. The radiotherapy (conventional roentgen, electron beams, and high-energy photon beams combined, in each patient) included the chest wall and the regional lymph nodes, with a specified target dose of 38-48 Gy, administered in daily fractions of 1.9-2.4 Gy, 5 days/week. Results: No cardiac deaths were found among the original 275 patients randomized to adjuvant therapy. In the 90 patients examined, abnormal findings were recorded for ECG (14 patients), exercise test (5 patients), myocardial scintigraphy (6 patients), thickening of valve cusps (14 patients), and mild valvular regurgitation (20 patients). All patients had normal systolic function. Diastolic dysfunction was observed in 6 patients (abnormal relaxation in 4 patients and restrictive filling abnormality in 2 patients). Although no significant differences were found between the 3 study groups, there was a tendency to more abnormal findings after radiotherapy. Conclusion: Women younger than 50 years of age at the time of adjuvant radiotherapy following mastectomy in early breast cancer, had no serious cardiac sequelae 13 years (median) later, despite partly old-fashioned radiation techniques

  20. Comparing the effects of conventional and hypofractionated radiotherapies on early skin toxicity and cosmetic outcomes after breast cancer conserving surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amouzegar Hashemi F

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The high number of breast cancer patients who receive radiation therapy after surgery has caused many to think about a shorter period of radiotherapy, which can significantly reduce the radiotherapy machine time, labor hours, and fewer patient visits. This study was designed to evaluate the acute skin effects and cosmetic outcomes of short course radiotherapy in early-stage breast cancer in comparison with the conventional treatment method.Methods: Fifty-two patients with operable breast cancer (pT1-3pN0M0 who underwent breast conservation surgery in Tehran Cancer Institute during January 2011 to January 2012, were randomly assigned to undergo radiotherapy by either receiving conventional treatment (dose: 50 Gy in 25 fractions with subsequent electron boost or a short-course hypofractionated radiotherapy (dose: 42.5 Gy in 16 fractions and a subsequent electron boost.Results: There were no skin changes during the first or the second week of treatment in the two groups. Cutaneous complications began after the third week as grade 1 skin toxicity after termination of the short-course radiotherapy but there were no difference in complication rate after four weeks of treatment. Six months and one year after treatment, there were no differences in terms of skin complications or cosmetic outcomes between the two groups.Conclusion: Although the use of a whole-breast irradiation with a hypofractionated schedule was associated with desirable outcomes, in term of skin toxicity and cosmetics, but longer follow-up periods with larger sample sizes are needed to confirm these results.

  1. Breast cancer in patients carrying a germ-line CHEK2 mutation: Outcome after breast conserving surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, Andreas; Doerk, Thilo; Sohn, Christof; Karstens, Johann H.; Bremer, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Women carrying mutations in the CHEK2 gene are at an increased breast cancer risk. Data about outcome and prognosis for these patients after standard multimodality treatment are scarce at present. Materials and methods: One-hundred and fifty (150) patients with non-metastasized early-stage breast cancer (T1-2) receiving postoperative radiotherapy following breast-conservative surgery at our department were included in this analysis. Carriers were identified using mutation-specific restriction enzyme-based screening assays in previous investigations. Twenty-five breast cancer patients were heterozygous for one of three CHEK2 gene mutations (I157T, n = 13; 1100delC, n = 10; IVS2+1G > A, n = 2). The comparison group consisted of 125 early-stage breast cancer patients without a CHEK2 gene mutation (non-carriers). Median follow-up was 87 months for the total cohort of patients. Results: Local recurrences occurred in 13 patients (carriers, 3 (12%); non-carriers, 10 (8%)) and distant metastases occurred in 27 patients (carriers, 8 (32%); non-carriers, 19 (15%)). Twenty-five patients had deceased (carriers, 8 (32%); non-carriers, 17 (14%)) with all but 3 deaths related to breast cancer. Actuarial 7-year local relapse-free survival was 86% in carriers versus 90% in non-carriers (p = 0.48). Actuarial metastasis-free, disease-free and overall survival at 7 years were 64% vs. 84% (p = 0.045), 59% vs. 78% (p = 0.07) and 69% vs. 87% (p = 0.10), respectively. In a multivariate step-wise Cox regression analysis presence of a CHEK2 mutation remained a borderline significant discriminator for metastasis-free survival (p = 0.048; OR = 0.4; 95% CI 0.2-1.0) next to T-stage (p = 0.001; OR 0.3; 95% CI 0.1-0.6). Conclusions: Heterozygosity for a germline CHEK2 mutation appears to represent an adverse prognostic factor in patients with early-stage breast cancer. If confirmed in larger studies these data may serve as a basis for future surveillance and treatment

  2. Dosimetric Comparison of Three Dimensional Conformal Radiation Radiotherapy and Helical Tomotherapy Partial Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dae Woong; Kim, Jong Won; Choi, Yun Kyeong; Kim, Jung Soo; Hwang, Jae Woong; Jeong, Kyeong Sik; Choi, Gye Suk

    2008-01-01

    The goal of radiation treatment is to deliver a prescribed radiation dose to the target volume accurately while minimizing dose to normal tissues. In this paper, we comparing the dose distribution between three dimensional conformal radiation radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and helical tomotherapy (TOMO) plan for partial breast cancer. Twenty patients were included in the study, and plans for two techniques were developed for each patient (left breast:10 patients, right breast:10 patients). For each patient 3D-CRT planning was using pinnacle planning system, inverse plan was made using Tomotherapy Hi-Art system and using the same targets and optimization goals. We comparing the Homogeneity index (HI), Conformity index (CI) and sparing of the organs at risk for dose-volume histogram. Whereas the HI, CI of TOMO was significantly better than the other, 3D-CRT was observed to have significantly poorer HI, CI. The percentage ipsilateral non-PTV breast volume that was delivered 50% of the prescribed dose was 3D-CRT (mean: 40.4%), TOMO (mean: 18.3%). The average ipsilateral lung volume percentage receiving 20% of the PD was 3D-CRT (mean: 4.8%), TOMO (mean: 14.2), concerning the average heart volume receiving 20% and 10% of the PD during treatment of left breast cancer 3D-CRT (mean: 1.6%, 3.0%), TOMO (mean: 9.7%, 26.3%) In summary, 3D-CRT and TOMO techniques were found to have acceptable PTV coverage in our study. However, in TOMO, high conformity to the PTV and effective breast tissue sparing was achieved at the expense of considerable dose exposure to the lung and heart.

  3. Pulmonary function following adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy for breast cancer and the issue of three-dimensional treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lind, P.A.R.M.; Glas, U.; Fornander, T.; Rosfors, S.; Bevegard, S.; Wennberg, B.

    1998-01-01

    Background and purpose: The frequency and grade of pulmonary complications following adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer are still debated. This study focuses on loss of pulmonary function. Materials and methods: We have measured the reduction of pulmonary function 5 months following radiotherapy in 144 node-positive stage II breast cancer patients by using pulmonary function tests. Results: No deterioration of pulmonary function was detected among the patients who were treated with local radiotherapy. On the contrary, there was a mean increase in diffusion capacity by 7% (P=0.004) following radiotherapy, which most likely was explained by the adjuvant chemotherapy administered prior to the baseline pulmonary function tests. Patients undergoing loco-regional radiotherapy showed a mean reduction in diffusion capacity by 5% (P<0.001) and in vital capacity by 3% (P=0.001). The subset of patients (9%) who were diagnosed with severe pulmonary complications needing cortisone treatment had significantly larger mean paired differences in vital capacity (-0.446 L, -15% (equivalent to 15 years of normal ageing or the loss of 3/4 of a lung lobe)) compared to the patients who were asymptomatic (-0.084 L) (P<0.05). When the effects of potential confounding factors and different radiotherapy techniques were tested on the reduction of pulmonary function by stepwise multiple regression analysis, a significant correlation was found only to loco-regional radiotherapy including the lower internal mammary lymph nodes. Conclusions: We conclude that a clinically important reduction of pulmonary function is seen in the subset of patients who are diagnosed with severe pulmonary complication following loco-regional radiotherapy for breast cancer. The results of this study warrant further studies based on individual lung dose volume histograms. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  4. Preventing the acute skin side effects in patients treated with radiotherapy for breast cancer: the use of corneometry in order to evaluate the protective effect of moisturizing creams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Franco, Rossella; Cappabianca, Salvatore; Muto, Paolo; Ravo, Vincenzo; Sammarco, Elena; Calvanese, Maria Grazia; De Natale, Flora; Falivene, Sara; Di Lecce, Ada; Giugliano, Francesca Maria; Murino, Paola; Manzo, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to add, to the objective evaluation, an instrumental assessment of the skin damage induced by radiation therapy. A group of 100 patients affected by breast cancer was recruited in the study over one year. Patients were divided into five groups of 20 patients. For each group it was prescribed a different topical treatment. The following products were used: Betaglucan, sodium hyaluronate (Neoviderm®), Vitis vinifera A. s-I-M.t-O.dij (Ixoderm®), Alga Atlantica plus Ethylbisiminomethylguaicolo and Manganese Cloruro (Radioskin1®) and Metal Esculetina plus Ginko Biloba and Aloe vera (Radioskin 2®); Natural triglycerides-fitosterols (Xderit®); Selectiose plus thermal water of Avene (Trixera+®). All hydrating creams were applied twice a day starting 15 days before and one month after treatment with radiations. Before and during treatment patients underwent weekly skin assessments and corneometry to evaluate the symptoms related to skin toxicity and state of hydration. Evaluation of acute cutaneous toxicity was defined according to the RTOG scale. All patients completed radiotherapy; 72% of patients presented a G1 cutaneous toxicity, 18% developed a G2 cutaneous toxicity, 10% developed a G3 toxicity, no one presented G4 toxicity. The corneometry study confirmed the protective role of effective creams used in radiation therapy of breast cancer and showed its usefulness to identify radiation-induced dermatitis in a very early stage. The preventive use of topic products reduces the incidence of skin side effects in patients treated with radiotherapy for breast cancer. An instrumental evaluation of skin hydration can help the radiation oncologist to use strategies that prevent the onset of toxicity of high degree. All moisturizing creams used in this study were equally valid in the treatment of skin damage induced by radiotherapy

  5. Experience of women with breast cancer in radiotherapy and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huhn, A.; Melo, J.A.C.; Borges, L.M.; Claro, S.

    2017-01-01

    The worldwide incidence of cancer is growing. Regarding breast cancer in Brazil, the outlook is of 57 cases per 100,000 women. Even with advances in medicine, cancer is often associated with the anguish and suffering. Method: This was a qualitative, exploratory and descriptive research guided by the phenomenological approach, approved in an ethics committee in human research. A semi-structured interview was conducted with women aged between 40 and 65 years, in a public hospital in southern Brazil. The general objective was to analyze how women diagnosed with breast cancer experienced radiotherapy and the understanding of radiation protection. Results: It is a fact that the patients seek subsidies, besides the medical treatment, to face the period of treatment of the mammary neoplasia and the understanding of the radiological protection in this treatment. The reports show strength of faith, family support, treatment safety and radiological protection of adjacent areas to overcome the problem. Conclusion: Both the disease and the radiotherapy treatment provoked intense turbulence in the participants' lives, generating significant changes, such as difficult of psychological and social adaptation

  6. Examining Mediators and Moderators of Yoga for Women With Breast Cancer Undergoing Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratcliff, Chelsea G; Milbury, Kathrin; Chandwani, Kavita D; Chaoul, Alejandro; Perkins, George; Nagarathna, Raghuram; Haddad, Robin; Nagendra, Hongasandra Ramarao; Raghuram, N V; Spelman, Amy; Arun, Banu; Wei, Qi; Cohen, Lorenzo

    2016-09-01

    Hypothesis This study examines moderators and mediators of a yoga intervention targeting quality-of-life (QOL) outcomes in women with breast cancer receiving radiotherapy.Methods Women undergoing 6 weeks of radiotherapy were randomized to a yoga (YG; n = 53) or stretching (ST; n = 56) intervention or a waitlist control group (WL; n = 54). Depressive symptoms and sleep disturbances were measured at baseline. Mediator (posttraumatic stress symptoms, benefit finding, and cortisol slope) and outcome (36-item Short Form [SF]-36 mental and physical component scales [MCS and PCS]) variables were assessed at baseline, end-of-treatment, and 1-, 3-, and 6-months posttreatment. Results Baseline depressive symptoms (P = .03) and sleep disturbances (P moderated the Group × Time effect on MCS, but not PCS. Women with high baseline depressive symptoms in YG reported marginally higher 3-month MCS than their counterparts in WL (P = .11). Women with high baseline sleep disturbances in YG reported higher 3-months MCS than their counterparts in WL (P mediated the effect of YG on 6-month PCS. Posttraumatic stress symptoms and cortisol slope did not mediate treatment effect on QOL. Conclusion Yoga may provide the greatest mental-health-related QOL benefits for those experiencing pre-radiotherapy sleep disturbance and depressive symptoms. Yoga may improve physical-health-related QOL by increasing ability to find benefit in the cancer experience. © The Author(s) 2016.

  7. Novel use of an air-filled breast prosthesis to allow radiotherapy to recurrent colonic cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Duffy, F

    2012-02-01

    AiM: The authors present the novel and successful use of an air-filled breast prosthesis for extra pelvic exclusion of small bowel to facilitate adjuvant radiotherapy following resection of recurrent adenocarcinoma of the ascending bowel. The therapeutic use of radiotherapy in colon cancer can cause acute or chronic radiation enteropathy. Mobile small bowel can be sequestered in \\'dead space\\' or by adhesions exposing it to adjuvant radiotherapy. A variety of pelvic partitioning methods have been described to exclude bowel from radiation fields using both native and prosthetic materials. METHOD: In this case a 68 year old presented with ascending colon adenocarcinoma invading the peritoneum and underwent en bloc peritoneal resection. Thirty-seven months later surveillance CT identified a local recurrence. Subsequent resection resulted in a large iliacus muscle defect which would sequester small bowel loops thus exposing the patient to radiation enteropathy. The lateral position of the defect precluded the use of traditional pelvic partitioning methods which would be unlikely to remain in place long enough to allow radiotherapy. A lightweight air-filled breast prosthesis (Allergan 133 FV 750 cms) secured in place with an omentoplasty was used to fill the defect. RESULTS: Following well tolerated radiotherapy the prosthesis was deflated under ultrasound guidance and removed via a 7-cm transverse incision above the right iliac crest. The patient is disease free 18 months later with no evidence of treatment related morbidity. CONCLUSION: The use of a malleable air-filled prosthesis for pelvic partitioning allows specific tailoring of the prosthesis size and shape for individual patient defects. It is also lightweight enough to be secured in place using an omentoplasty to prevent movement related prosthesis migration. In the absence of adequate omentum a mesh sling may be considered to allow fixation. In this case the anatomy of the prosthesis position allowed for its

  8. Choosing wisely after publication of level I evidence in breast cancer radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niska, Joshua R; Keole, Sameer R; Pockaj, Barbara A; Halyard, Michele Y; Patel, Samir H; Northfelt, Donald W; Gray, Richard J; Wasif, Nabil; Vargas, Carlos E; Wong, William W

    2018-01-01

    Recent trials in early-stage breast cancer support hypofractionated whole-breast radiotherapy (WBRT) as part of breast-conserving therapy (BCT). Evidence also suggests that radiotherapy (RT) omission may be reasonable for some patients over 70 years. Among radiation-delivery techniques, intensity-modulated RT (IMRT) is more expensive than 3-dimensional conformal RT (3DCRT). Based on this evidence, in 2013, the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) recommended hypofractionated schedules for women aged ≥50 years with early-stage breast cancer and avoiding routine use of IMRT for WBRT. To assess response to level I evidence and adherence to ASTRO recommendations, we evaluated the pattern of RT use for early-stage breast cancer at our National Comprehensive Cancer Network institution from 2006 to 2008 and 2011 to 2013 and compared the results with national trends. Data from a prospective database were extracted to include patients treated with BCT, aged ≥50 years, with histologic findings of invasive ductal carcinoma, stage T1-T2N0M0, estrogen receptor-positive, and HER2 normal. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records and estimated costs based on 2016 Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment System (technical fees) and Medicare Physician Fee Schedule (professional fees). Among 55 cases from 2006 to 2008, treatment regimens were 11% hypofractionated, 69% traditional schedule, and 20% RT omission (29% of patients were aged >70 years). Among 83 cases from 2011 to 2013, treatment regimens were 54% hypofractionated, 19% traditional schedule, and 27% RT omission (48% of patients were aged >70 years). 3DCRT was used for all WBRT treatments. Direct medical cost estimates were as follows: 15 fractions 3DCRT, $7,197.87; 15 fractions IMRT, $11,232.33; 25 fractions 3DCRT, $9,731.39; and 25 fractions IMRT, $16,877.45. Despite apparent resistance to shorter radiation schedules in the United States, we demonstrate that rapid practice change in response to level I

  9. Comparison of measured and calculated contralateral breast doses in whole breast radiotherapy for VMAT and standard tangent techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tse, T.L.J; Bromley, R.; Booth, J.; Gray, A.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Objective This study aims to evaluate the accuracy of calculated dose with the Eclipse analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA) for contralateral breast (CB) in left-sided breast radiotherapy for dual-arc VMA T and standard wedged tangent (SWT) techniques. Methods and materials Internal and surface CB doses were measured with EBT2 film in an anthropomorphic phantom mounted with C-cup and D-cup breasts. The measured point dose was approximated by averaging doses over the 4 x 4 mm 2 central region of each 2 x 2 cm2 piece of film. The dose in the target region of the breast was also measured. The measured results were compared to AAA calculations with calculation grids of I, 2.5 and 5 mm. Results In SWT plans, the average ratios of calculation to measurement for internal doses were 0.63 ± 0.081 and 0.5 I ± 0.28 in the medial and lateral aspects, respectively. Corresponding ratios for surface doses were 0.88 ± 0.22 and 0.38 ± 0.38. In VMAT plans, however, the calculation accuracies showed little dependence on the measurement locations, the ratios were 0.78 ± O. I I and 0.81 ± 0.085 for internal and surface doses. In general, finer calculation resolutions did not inevitably improve the dose estimates of internal doses. For surface doses, using smaller grid size I mm could improve the calculation accuracies on the medial but not the lateral aspects of CB. Conclusion In all plans, AAA had a tendency to underestimate both internal and surface CB doses. Overall, it produces more accurate results in VMAT than SWT plans.

  10. Side effects of radiotherapy in breast cancer patients. The Internet as an information source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janssen, S. [Medical Practice for Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Hannover (Germany); University of Luebeck, Department of Radiation Oncology, Luebeck (Germany); Kaesmann, L.; Rades, D. [University of Luebeck, Department of Radiation Oncology, Luebeck (Germany); Fahlbusch, F.B. [Friedrich-Alexander-University of Erlangen-Nuernberg, Department of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Erlangen (Germany); Vordermark, D. [University Hospital Halle (Saale), Department of Radiation Oncology, Halle (Saale) (Germany)

    2018-02-15

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer type among women necessitating adjuvant radiotherapy. As the Internet has become a major source of information for cancer patients, this study aimed to evaluate the quality of websites giving information on side effects of radiotherapy for breast cancer patients. A patients' search for the English terms ''breast cancer - radiotherapy - side effects'' and the corresponding German terms ''Brustkrebs - Strahlentherapie - Nebenwirkungen'' was carried out twice (5 months apart) using the search engine Google. The first 30 search results each were evaluated using the validated 16-question DISCERN Plus instrument, the Health on the Net Code of Conduct (HONcode) certification and the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) benchmark criteria. The overall quality (DISCERN score) of the retrieved websites was further compared to queries via Bing and Yahoo search engines. The DISCERN score showed a great range, with the majority of websites ranking fair to poor. Significantly superior results were found for English websites, particularly for webpages run by hospitals/universities and nongovernmental organizations (NGO), when compared to the respective German categories. In general, only a minority of websites met all JAMA benchmarks and was HONcode certified (both languages). We did not determine a relevant temporal change in website ranking among the top ten search hits, while significant variation occurred thereafter. Mean overall DISCERN score was similar between the various search engines. The Internet can give breast cancer patients seeking information on side effects of radiotherapy an overview. However, based on the currently low overall quality of websites and the lack of transparency for the average layperson, we emphasize the value of personal contact with the treating radio-oncologist in order to integrate and interpret the information found online. (orig.) [German

  11. Single-Fraction Intraoperative Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer: Early Cosmetic Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beal, Kathryn; McCormick, Beryl; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Borgen, Patrick; Fey, Jane; Goldberg, Jessica; Sacchini, Virgilio

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the cosmetic outcome of patients treated with wide local excision and intraoperative radiotherapy for early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 50 women were treated on a pilot study to evaluate the feasibility of intraoperative radiotherapy at wide local excision. The eligibility criteria included age >60, tumor size ≤2.0 cm, clinically negative lymph nodes, and biopsy-established diagnosis. After wide local excision, a custom breast applicator was placed in the excision cavity, and a dose of 20 Gy was prescribed to a depth of 1 cm. After 18 patients were treated, the dose was constrained laterally to 18 Gy. The cosmetic outcome was evaluated by photographs at baseline and at 6 and 12 months postoperatively. Four examiners graded the photographs for symmetry, edema, discoloration, contour, and scarring. The grades were evaluated in relationship to the volume of irradiated tissue, tumor location, and dose at the lateral aspects of the cavity. Results: The median volume of tissue receiving 100% of the prescription dose was 47 cm 3 (range, 20-97 cm 3 ). Patients with ≤47 cm 3 of treated tissue had better cosmetic outcomes than did the women who had >47 cm 3 of treated tissue. Women who had received 18 Gy at the lateral aspects of their cavities had better cosmetic outcomes than did women who had received 20 Gy at the lateral aspects. When comparing the 6- and 12-month results, the scores remained stable for 63%, improved for 17%, and worsened for 20%. Conclusion: Intraoperative radiotherapy appears feasible for selected patients. A favorable cosmetic outcome appears to be related to a smaller treatment volume. The cosmetic outcome is acceptable, although additional follow-up is necessary

  12. Neoadjuvant radiotherapy followed by mastectomy and immediate breast reconstruction. An alternative treatment option for locally advanced breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pazos, Montserrat; Corradini, Stefanie; Schoenecker, Stephan; Scheithauer, Heike; Belka, Claus [LMU Munich, Department of Radiation Oncology, Munich (Germany); Dian, Darius [Mednord Munich Clinic, Munich (Germany); Bodungen, Vera von; Ditsch, Nina; Wuerstlein, Rachel; Harbeck, Nadia [LMU Munich, Breast Center, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Munich (Germany)

    2017-04-15

    The optimal sequence of mastectomy with immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) and radiotherapy (RT) for the treatment of locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) is still under debate. Increased rates of postoperative complications are described following postmastectomy RT. Neoadjuvant RT aims to improve the aesthetic results and simplify the reconstructive pathway. A total of 22 patients diagnosed with LABC and treated with neoadjuvant RT followed by mastectomy and IBR between 04/2012 and 03/2015 were retrospectively analyzed. RT consisted of external beam RT to the breast and the regional lymphatics, if indicated. Both implant-based and autologous tissue-transfer reconstruction techniques were used. At the time of RT, 10 patients had no prior surgery and 12 patients had previously undergone breast-conserving surgery (BCS) with positive resection margins without the possibility to perform a second BCS. Additional neoadjuvant chemotherapy was administered in 18 patients prior to RT. A complete pathological response was achieved in 55.0% of patients. The 2-year overall survival rate was 89.3%, the 2-year disease-free-survival 79.8% and the local-recurrence-free survival was 95.2%. The cosmetic result was excellent or good in 66% of the patients treated with upfront mastectomy and 37% of the patients who had previously undergone BCS. Among patients who received implant-based IBR, 4 patients developed serious wound-healing problems with implant loss. The most satisfactory results were achieved with autologous tissue reconstruction. A sequential neoadjuvant chemo-/radiotherapy to allow IBR following mastectomy in selected cases of LABC seems feasible and can be safely attempted. Careful patient selection, close monitoring, and continuous patient support is mandatory to ensure compliance in this treatment strategy. (orig.) [German] Die optimale Therapiesequenz von Mastektomie mit sofortiger Brustrekonstruktion (IBR) und Radiotherapie (RT) beim lokal fortgeschrittenen

  13. Toxicity and cosmetic outcome of hypofractionated whole-breast radiotherapy: predictive clinical and dosimetric factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciammella, Patrizia; Podgornii, Ala; Galeandro, Maria; Micera, Renato; Ramundo, Dafne; Palmieri, Tamara; Cagni, Elisabetta; Iotti, Cinzia

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate toxicity and cosmetic outcome in breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant hypo fractionated radiotherapy to the whole breast, and to identify the risk factors for toxicity. Two hundred twelve women with early breast cancer underwent conserving surgery were enrolled in the study. The patients received 40.05 Gy in 15 daily fractions, 2.67 Gy per fraction. The boost to the tumor bed was administered with a total dose of 9 Gy in 3 consecutive fractions in 55 women. Physician-rated acute and late toxicity and cosmetic outcome (both subjective and objective) were prospectively assessed during and after radiotherapy. In our population study the mean age was 63 with the 17% (36 pts) of the women younger than 50 years. The median follow-up was 34 months. By the end of RT, 35 patients out of 212 (16%) no acute toxicity, according to the RTOG criteria, while 145 (68%) and 31 patients (15%) developed grade 1 and grade 2 acute skin toxicity, respectively. Late skin toxicity evaluation was available for all 212 patients with a minimum follow up of 8 months. The distribution of toxicity was: 39 pts (18%) with grade 1 and 2 pts (1%) with grade 2. No worse late skin toxicity was observed. Late subcutaneous grade 0-1 toxicity was recorded in 208 patients (98%) and grade 2 toxicity in 3 patients (2%), while grade 3 was observed in 1 patient only. At last follow up, a subjective and objective good or excellent cosmetic outcome was reported in 93% and 92% of the women, respectively. At univariate and multivariate analysis, the late skin toxicity was correlated with the additional boost delivery (p=0.007 and p=0.023). Regarding the late subcutaneous tissue, a correlation with diabetes was found (p=0.0283). These results confirm the feasibility and safety of the hypofractionated radiotherapy in patients with early breast cancer. In our population the boost administration was resulted to be a significant adverse prognostic factor for acute

  14. Three dimensional conformal radiotherapy for synchronous bilateral breast irradiation using a mono iso-center technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Karthick Raj; Basu, Saumen; Bhuiyan, Md Anisuzzaman; Ahmed, Sharif; Sumon, Mostafa Aziz; Haque, Kh Anamul; Sengupta, Ashim Kumar; Un Nabi, Md Rashid; Das, K. J. Maria

    2017-06-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the synchronous bilateral breast irradiation radiotherapy technique using a single isocenter. Materials and Methods: Six patients of synchronous bilateral breast were treated with single isocenter technique from February 2011 to June 2016. All the patients underwent a CT-simulation using appropriate positioning device. Target volumes and critical structures like heart, lung, esophagus, thyroid, etc., were delineated slice by slice in the CT data. An isocenter was placed above the sternum on the skin and both medial tangential and lateral tangential of the breast / chest wall were created using asymmetrical jaws to avoid the beam divergence through the lung and heart. The field weighting were adjusted manually to obtain a homogenous dose distribution. The planning objectives were to deliver uniform doses around the target and keep the doses to the organ at risk within the permissible limit. The beam energy of 6 MV or combination of 6 MV and 15 MV photons were used in the tangential fields according to the tangential separation. Boluses were used for all the mastectomy patients to increase the doses on the chest wall. In addition to that enhanced dynamic wedge and field in field technique were also used to obtain a homogenous distribution around the target volume and reduce the hot spots. The isocenter was just kept on the skin, such that the beam junctions will be overlapped only on the air just above the sternum. Acute toxicity during the treatment and late toxicity were recorded during the patient's follow-up. Results: During the radiotherapy treatment follow-up there were no acute skin reactions in the field junctions, but one patient had grade 1 esophagitis and two patients had grade 2 skin reactions in the chest wall. With a median follow-up of 38.5 months (range: 8 - 49 months), no patients had a local recurrence, but one patients with triple negative disease had a distant metastases in brain and died

  15. Survival benefit of post-mastectomy radiotherapy in breast carcinoma patients with T1-2 tumor and 1-3 axillary lymph node(s) metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duraker, N.; Demir, D.; Bati, B.; Yilmaz, B.D.; Bati, Y.; Sobutay, E.; Caynak, Z.C.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the role of post-mastectomy radiotherapy in breast carcinoma patients with a tumor size of 5 cm or smaller (T1-2) and 1-3 axillary lymph node(s) metastasis (N1). We retrospectively reviewed the file records of 575 patients receiving radiotherapy (452 patients) and not receiving radiotherapy (123 patients). In the whole series, locoregional recurrence-free survival was significantly better in patients receiving radiotherapy compared with patients not receiving radiotherapy (P 0.25 and in T2N1 breast carcinoma patients with a lymph node ratio of >0.08. In patients with a lymph node ratio equal to or less than these ratios, post-mastectomy radiotherapy could be omitted to avoid radiotherapy-related risks. (author)

  16. Evaluation of the perturbation of the mesh Bra Breast TiLoop in the planning process-radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camacho, C.; Pujades, M. C.; Perez-Calatayud, J.; Lliso, F.; Carmona, V.; Richart, J.; Ballester, F.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the dosimetric impact TiLoop Mesh Bra breast radiotherapy treatments, and their influence on both the quality and the disruption of the gray levels of the radiographic image required for treatment planning.

  17. Revisiting the impact of age and molecular subtype on overall survival after radiotherapy in breast cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mao, Jian Hua; Diest, Paul J.Van; Perez-Losada, Jesus; Snijders, Antoine M

    2017-01-01

    Adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) in breast cancer (BC) is often used to eradicate remaining tumor cells following surgery with the goal of maximizing local control and increasing overall survival. The current study investigated the impact of age and BC molecular subtype on overall survival after RT using

  18. Effect of radiotherapy after mastectomy and axillary surgery on 10-year recurrence and 20-year breast cancer mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGale, P; Taylor, C; Correa, C

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Postmastectomy radiotherapy was shown in previous meta-analyses to reduce the risks of both recurrence and breast cancer mortality in all women with node-positive disease considered together. However, the benefit in women with only one to three positive lymph nodes is uncertain. We ai...

  19. Inter-observer variation in delineation of the heart and left anterior descending coronary artery in radiotherapy for breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laugaard Lorenzen, Ebbe; Taylor, C. W.; Maraldo, M.

    2013-01-01

    receiving left breast radiotherapy. The delineations were carried out twice, first without guidelines and then with a set of common guidelines. RESULTS: For the heart, most spatial variation in delineation was near the base of the heart whereas for the LADCA most variation was in its length at the apex...

  20. Fibrotic changes after postmastectomy radiotherapy and reconstructive surgery in breast cancer. A retrospective analysis in 109 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Classen, Johannes; St. Vincentius-Kliniken, Karlsruhe; Nitzsche, Sibille; Wallwiener, Diethelm; Brucker, Sara; Kristen, Peter; Souchon, Rainer; Bamberg, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the probability and time course of fibrotic changes in breast reconstruction before or after postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT). Between 1995 and 2004, 109 patients were treated with PMRT at Tuebingen University and underwent heterologous (HL) or autologous (AL) breast reconstruction prior or subsequent to radiation therapy. Fibrosis of the reconstructed breast after radiotherapy was assessed using the Baker score for HL reconstructions and the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) for all patients. Actuarial rates of fibrosis were calculated for the maximum degree acquired during follow- up and at the last follow-up visit documented. Median time to follow-up was 34 months (3-227 months). Radiotherapy was applied with a median total dose of 50.4 Gy. A total of 44 patients (40.4%) received a boost treatment with a median dose of 10 Gy. Breast reconstruction was performed with AL, HL, or combined techniques in 20, 82, and 7 patients, respectively. The 3-year incidence of ≥ grade III maximum fibrosis was 20% and 43% for Baker and CTCAE scores, respectively. The corresponding figures for fibrosis at last follow-up visit were 18% and 2%. The 3-year rate of surgical correction of the contralateral breast was 30%. Initially unplanned surgery of the reconstructed breast was performed in 39 patients (35.8%). Boost treatment and type of cosmetic surgery (HL vs. AL) were not significantly associated with the incidence of fibrosis. We found severe fibrosis to be a frequent complication after PMRT radiotherapy and breast reconstruction. However, surgical intervention can ameliorate the majority of high grade fibrotic events leading to acceptable long-term results. No treatment parameters associated with the rate of fibrosis could be identified. (orig.)

  1. Targeted intraoperative radiotherapy tumour bed boost during breast-conserving surgery after neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolberg, Hans-Christian; Akpolat-Basci, Leyla; Stephanou, Miltiades [Marienhospital Bottrop gGmbH, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Bottrop (Germany); Loevey, Gyoergy [BORAD, Bottrop (Germany); Fasching, Peter A. [University of Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Untch, Michael [Helios Klinikum Berlin-Buch, Berlin (Germany); Liedtke, Cornelia [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein/Campus Luebeck, Luebeck (Germany); Bulsara, Max [University of Notre Dame, Fremantle (Australia); University College, London (United Kingdom); Vaidya, Jayant S. [University College, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-01-15

    The use of targeted intraoperative radiotherapy (TARGIT-IORT) as a tumour bed boost during breast-conserving surgery (BCS) for breast cancer has been reported since 1998. We present its use in patients undergoing breast conservation following neoadjuvant therapy (NACT). In this retrospective study involving 116 patients after NACT we compared outcomes of 61 patients who received a tumour bed boost with IORT during lumpectomy versus 55 patients treated in the previous 13 months with external (EBRT) boost. All patients received whole breast radiotherapy. Local recurrence-free survival (LRFS), disease-free survival (DFS), distant disease-free survival (DDFS), breast cancer mortality (BCM), non-breast cancer mortality (NBCM) and overall mortality (OS) were compared. Median follow up was 49 months. The differences in LRFS, DFS and BCM were not statistically significant. The 5-year Kaplan-Meier estimate of OS was significantly better by 15% with IORT: IORT 2 events (96.7%, 95%CI 87.5-99.2), EBRT 9 events (81.7%, 95%CI 67.6-90.1), hazard ratio (HR) 0.19 (0.04-0.87), log rank p = 0.016, mainly due to a reduction of 10.1% in NBCM: IORT 100%, EBRT 89.9% (77.3-95.7), HR (not calculable), log rank p = 0.015. The DDFS was as follows: IORT 3 events (95.1%, 85.5-98.4), EBRT 12 events (69.0%, 49.1-82.4), HR 0.23 (0.06-0.80), log rank p = 0.012. IORT during lumpectomy after neoadjuvant chemotherapy as a tumour bed boost appears to give results that are not worse than external beam radiotherapy boost. These data give further support to the inclusion of such patients in the TARGIT-B (boost) randomised trial that is testing whether IORT boost is superior to EBRT boost. (orig.) [German] Die intraoperative Radiotherapie (TARGIT-IORT) als vorgezogener Boost im Rahmen der brusterhaltenden Therapie (BET) ist seit 1998 Gegenstand der wissenschaftlichen Diskussion. Wir praesentieren Daten zum Einsatz der IORT bei der BET nach neoadjuvanter Therapie (NACT). In diese retrospektive Analyse

  2. Tumour bed delineation for partial breast/breast boost radiotherapy: What is the optimal number of implanted markers?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirby, Anna NM.; Jena, Rajesh; Harris, Emma J.; Evans, Phil M.; Crowley, Clare; Gregory, Deborah L.; Coles, Charlotte E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: International consensus has not been reached regarding the optimal number of implanted tumour bed (TB) markers for partial breast/breast boost radiotherapy target volume delineation. Four common methods are: insertion of 6 clips (4 radial, 1 deep and 1 superficial), 5 clips (4 radial and 1 deep), 1 clip at the chest wall, and no clips. We compared TB volumes delineated using 6, 5, 1 and 0 clips in women who have undergone wide-local excision (WLE) of breast cancer (BC) with full-thickness closure of the excision cavity, in order to determine the additional margin required for breast boost or partial breast irradiation (PBI) when fewer than 6 clips are used. Methods: Ten patients with invasive ductal BC who had undergone WLE followed by implantation of six fiducial markers (titanium clips) each underwent CT imaging for radiotherapy planning purposes. Retrospective processing of the DICOM image datasets was performed to remove markers and associated imaging artefacts, using an in-house software algorithm. Four observers outlined TB volumes on four different datasets for each case: (1) all markers present (CT 6M ); (2) the superficial marker removed (CT 5M ); (3) all but the chest wall marker removed (CT CW ); (4) all markers removed (CT 0M ). For each observer, the additional margin required around each of TB 0M , TB CW , and TB 5M in order to encompass TB 6M was calculated. The conformity level index (CLI) and differences in centre-of-mass (COM) between observers were quantified for CT 0M , CT CW , CT 5M , CT 6M . Results: The overall median additional margins required to encompass TB 6M were 8 mm (range 0–28 mm) for TB 0M , 5 mm (range 1–13 mm) for TB CW , and 2 mm (range 0–7 mm) for TB 5M . CLI were higher for TB volumes delineated using CT 6M (0.31) CT 5M (0.32) than for CT CW (0.19) and CT 0M (0.15). Conclusions: In women who have undergone WLE of breast cancer with full-thickness closure of the excision cavity and who are proceeding to PBI or

  3. An imaging evaluation of the simultaneously integrated boost breast radiotherapy technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turley, Jessica; Claridge Mackonis, Elizabeth [Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, New South Wales (Australia)

    2015-09-15

    To evaluate in-field megavoltage (MV) imaging of simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) breast fields to determine its feasibility in treatment verification for the SIB breast radiotherapy technique, and to assess whether the current-imaging protocol and treatment margins are sufficient. For nine patients undergoing SIB breast radiotherapy, in-field MV images of the SIB fields were acquired on days that regular treatment verification imaging was performed. The in-field images were matched offline according to the scar wire on digitally reconstructed radiographs. The offline image correction results were then applied to a margin recipe formula to calculate safe margins that account for random and systematic uncertainties in the position of the boost volume when an offline correction protocol has been applied. After offline assessment of the acquired images, 96% were within the tolerance set in the current department-imaging protocol. Retrospectively performing the maximum position deviations on the Eclipse™ treatment planning system demonstrated that the clinical target volume (CTV) boost received a minimum dose difference of 0.4% and a maximum dose difference of 1.4% less than planned. Furthermore, applying our results to the Van Herk margin formula to ensure that 90% of patients receive 95% of the prescribed dose, the calculated CTV margins were comparable to the current departmental procedure used. Based on the in-field boost images acquired and the feasible application of these results to the margin formula the current CTV-planning target volume margins used are appropriate for the accurate treatment of the SIB boost volume without additional imaging.

  4. An imaging evaluation of the simultaneously integrated boost breast radiotherapy technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turley, Jessica; Claridge Mackonis, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate in-field megavoltage (MV) imaging of simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) breast fields to determine its feasibility in treatment verification for the SIB breast radiotherapy technique, and to assess whether the current-imaging protocol and treatment margins are sufficient. For nine patients undergoing SIB breast radiotherapy, in-field MV images of the SIB fields were acquired on days that regular treatment verification imaging was performed. The in-field images were matched offline according to the scar wire on digitally reconstructed radiographs. The offline image correction results were then applied to a margin recipe formula to calculate safe margins that account for random and systematic uncertainties in the position of the boost volume when an offline correction protocol has been applied. After offline assessment of the acquired images, 96% were within the tolerance set in the current department-imaging protocol. Retrospectively performing the maximum position deviations on the Eclipse™ treatment planning system demonstrated that the clinical target volume (CTV) boost received a minimum dose difference of 0.4% and a maximum dose difference of 1.4% less than planned. Furthermore, applying our results to the Van Herk margin formula to ensure that 90% of patients receive 95% of the prescribed dose, the calculated CTV margins were comparable to the current departmental procedure used. Based on the in-field boost images acquired and the feasible application of these results to the margin formula the current CTV-planning target volume margins used are appropriate for the accurate treatment of the SIB boost volume without additional imaging

  5. Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Sonja; Debus, Jürgen; Neuhof, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    Solitary plasmocytoma occurring in bone (solitary plasmocytoma of the bone, SBP) or in soft tissue (extramedullary plasmocytoma, EP) can be treated effectively and with little toxicity by local radiotherapy. Ten-year local control rates of up to 90% can be achieved. Patients with multiple myeloma often suffer from symptoms such as pain or neurological impairments that are amenable to palliative radiotherapy. In a palliative setting, short treatment schedules and lower radiation doses are used to reduce toxicity and duration of hospitalization. In future, low-dose total body irradiation (TBI) may play a role in a potentially curative regimen with nonmyeloablative conditioning followed by allogenic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation.

  6. Relationship between in vitro chromosomal radiosensitivity of peripheral blood lymphocytes and the expression of normal tissue damage following radiotherapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barber, J.B.P.; Burrill, W.; Spreadborough, A.R.; Levine, E.; Warren, C.; Scott, D.; Kiltie, A.E.; Roberts, S.A.

    2000-01-01

    There is a need for rapid and reliable tests for the prediction of normal tissue responses to radiotherapy, as this could lead to individualization of patient radiotherapy schedules and thus improvements in the therapeutic ratio. Because the use of cultured fibroblasts is too slow to be practicable in a clinical setting, we evaluated the predictive role of assays of lymphocyte chromosomal radiosensitivity in patients having radiotherapy for breast cancer. Radiosensitivity was assessed using a macronucleus (MN) assay at high dose rate (HDR) and low dose rate (LDR) on lymphocytes irradiated in the G 0 phase of the cell cycle (Scott D, Barber JB, Levine EL, Burril W, Roberts SA. Radiation-induced micronucleus induction in lymphocytes identifies a frequency of radiosensitive cases among breast cancer patients: a test for predisposition? Br. J. Cancer 1998;77;614-620) and an assay of G 2 phase chromatid radiosensitivity ('G 2 assay') (Scott D, Spreadborough A, Levine E, Roberts SA. Genetic predisposition in breast cancer. Lancet 1994; 344: 1444). In a study of acute reactions, blood samples were taken from breast cancer patients before the start of radiotherapy, and the skin reaction documented. 116 patients were tested with the HDR MN assay, 73 with the LDR MN assay and 123 with the G 2 assay. In a study of late reactions, samples were taken from a series of breast cancer patients 8-14 years after radiotherapy and the patients assessed for the severity of late effects according to the 'LENT SOMA' scales. 47 were tested with the HDR assay, 26 with the LDR assay and 19 with the G 2 assay. For each clinical endpoint, patients were classified as being normal reactors or 'highly radiosensitive patients' (HR patients (Burnet NG. Johansen J, Turesson I, Nyman J. Describing patients' normal tissue reactions: Concerning the possibility of individualising radiotherapy dose prescriptions based on potential predictive assays of normal tissue radiosensitivity. Int. J. Cancer 1998

  7. Preoperative single fraction partial breast radiotherapy for early-stage breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palta, Manisha; Yoo, Sua; Adamson, Justus D; Prosnitz, Leonard R; Horton, Janet K

    2012-01-01

    Several recent series evaluating external beam accelerated partial breast irradiation (PBI) have reported adverse cosmetic outcomes, possibly related to large volumes of normal tissue receiving near-prescription doses. We hypothesized that delivery of external beam PBI in a single fraction to the preoperative tumor volume would be feasible and result in a decreased dose to the uninvolved breast compared with institutional postoperative PBI historical controls. A total of 17 patients with unifocal Stage T1 breast cancer were identified. Contrast-enhanced subtraction magnetic resonance images were loaded into an Eclipse treatment planning system and used to define the target volumes. A "virtual plan" was created using four photon beams in a noncoplanar beam arrangement and optimized to deliver 15 Gy to the planning target volume. The median breast volume was 1,713 cm(3) (range: 1,014-2,140), and the median clinical target volume was 44 cm(3) (range: 26-73). In all cases, 100% of the prescription dose covered 95% of the clinical target volume. The median conformity index was 0.86 (range: 0.70-1.12). The median percentage of the ipsilateral breast volume receiving 100% and 50% of the prescribed dose was 3.8% (range: 2.2-6.9) and 13.3% (range: 7.5-20.8) compared with 18% (range: 3-42) and 53% (range: 24-65) in the institutional historical controls treated with postoperative external beam PBI (p = .002). The median maximum skin dose was 9 Gy. The median dose to 1 and 10 cm(3) of skin was 6.7 and 4.9 Gy. The doses to the heart and ipsilateral lung were negligible. Preoperative PBI resulted in a substantial reduction in ipsilateral breast tissue dose compared with postoperative PBI. The skin dose appeared reasonable, given the small volumes. A prospective Phase I trial evaluating this technique is ongoing. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Accelerated partial-breast irradiation vs conventional whole-breast radiotherapy in early breast cancer: A case-control study of disease control, cosmesis, and complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wadasadawala Tabassum

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI using various approaches is being increasingly employed for selected women with early breast cancer (EBC. Aims: To conduct a case-control study comparing disease control, cosmesis, and complications in patients with EBC undergoing APBI using multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy vs those receiving conventional whole breast radiotherapy (WBRT. Settings and Design: Women with EBC fulfilling the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS criteria were selected as ′cases′ if treated with APBI or as ′controls′ if offered WBRT during the period from May 2000 to December 2004. Materials and Methods: APBI patients were treated with high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR to a dose of 34 Gy/10#/6-8 days. WBRT was delivered to the whole breast to a dose of 45 Gy/25# followed by tumor bed boost, either with electrons (15 Gy/6# or interstitial brachytherapy (HDR 10 Gy/1#. Results: At the median follow-up of 43.05 months in APBI and 51.08 months in WBRT there was no difference in overall survival (OS, disease-free survival (DFS, late arm edema, and symptomatic fat necrosis between the two groups. However, APBI resulted in increase in mild breast fibrosis at the tumor bed. Telangiectasias were observed in three patients of the APBI group. The cosmetic outcome was significantly better in the APBI group as compared to the WBRT group (P = 0.003. Conclusions: This study revealed equivalent locoregional and distant disease control in the two groups. APBI offered better overall cosmetic outcome, though at the cost of a slight increase in mild breast fibrosis and telangiectasias.

  9. A cosmetic evaluation of breast cancer treatment: A randomized study of radiotherapy boost technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vass, Sylvie; Bairati, Isabelle

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To compare cosmetic results of two different radiotherapy (RT) boost techniques used in the treatment of breast cancer after whole breast radiotherapy and to identify factors affecting cosmetic outcomes. Methods and Materials: Between 1996 and 1998, 142 patients with Stage I and II breast cancer were treated with breast conservative surgery and adjuvant RT. Patients were then randomly assigned to receive a boost dose of 15 Gy delivered to the tumor bed either by iridium 192, or a combination of photons and electrons. Cosmetic evaluations were done on a 6-month basis, with a final evaluation at 36 months after RT. The evaluations were done using a panel of global and specific subjective scores, a digitized scoring system using the breast retraction assessment (BRA) measurement, and a patient's self-assessment evaluation. As cosmetic results were graded according to severity, the comparison of boost techniques was done using the ordinal logistic regression model. Adjusted odds ratios (OR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) are presented. Results: At 36 months of follow-up, there was no significant difference between the two groups with respect to the global subjective cosmetic outcome (OR = 1.40; 95%CI = 0.69-2.85, p = 0.35). Good to excellent scores were observed in 65% of implant patients and 62% of photon/electron patients. At 24 months and beyond, telangiectasia was more severe in the implant group with an OR of 9.64 (95%CI = 4.05-22.92, p < 0.0001) at 36 months. The only variable associated with a worse global cosmetic outcome was the presence of concomitant chemotherapy (OR = 3.87; 95%CI = 1.74-8.62). The BRA value once adjusted for age, concomitant chemotherapy, and boost volume showed a positive association with the boost technique. The BRA value was significantly greater in the implant group (p 0.03). There was no difference in the patient's final self-assessment score between the two groups. Three variables were statistically associated with

  10. Laser Doppler imaging, thermographic imaging, and tissue oxygen saturation measurements detect early skin reactions during breast radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, David K.; Harrison, Eileen M.; Newton, David J.; Windsor, Phyllis M.

    2001-05-01

    A range of acute skin reactions, ranging from mild erythema to moist desquamation, can be seen in patients receiving standard fractionated radiotherapy to the breast for conservation therapy of breast carcinoma. In a number of cases these reactions can cause considerable discomfort and seriously affect the patient's quality of life. In previous studies we have used the techniques of laser Doppler imaging, digital thermographic imaging and lightguide spectrophotometry to study oxygen supply and blood flow in inflammatory reactions induced experimentally in forearm skin. The present study is an attempt to use the same techniques to investigate whether any or all of them can detect changes in breast skin very early on in the course of radiotherapy treatment. A further aim of the longer term study is to investigate to what extent these early changes may be able to predict the occurrence later of severe acute or delayed reactions.

  11. One life saved by four prevented recurrencies? Update of the early breast cancer trialists confirms. Postoperative radiotherapy improves survival after breast conserving surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sautter-Bihl, M.L.; Budach, W.

    2012-01-01

    The debate about the impact of local control on survival in early breast cancer patients is still going on, in spite of the continuously growing evidence that avoidance of locoregional disease reduces the risk of tumor-specific death. Recently, B. Fisher, one of the pioneers of breast conserving therapy claimed that during the last two decades, as a result of the use of systemic therapy in conjunction with breast conserving surgery and radiation, the incidence of locoregional recurrence has been reduced to a level where further reduction is likely to have little impact on survival. The penultimate meta-analysis of the Early Breast Cancer Trialists' Collaborative Group (EBCTCG) reported the effect of radiotherapy in early breast cancer on recurrence and survival in 2005 and provided the essential message that four prevented local recurrences at 5 years would avoid one breast cancer death in 15 years. The scientific community has eagerly awaited the quinquennial update of the EBCTCG which has now been published. A total of 17 randomized studies comparing postoperative radiotherapy vs. none were analyzed and comprised 7 new studies in addition to follow-up data of from 9 previously reported trials. A total of 10,801 patients with pT1-2 tumors were included, the majority of whom (n=7,287) were node negative, while 1,050 were node positive (2,464 unknown). In contrast to the previous meta-analysis, all patients received breast conserving surgery, consisting of lumpectomy (n=8,422) or more extensive techniques like quadrantectomy or sectoral resection (n= 2,399). The effect of radiotherapy on 10-year recurrences of any type and their relation to the 15-year breast cancer death rate were studied in correlation to various prognostic parameters and treatment characteristics (e.g., surgery, tamoxifen use). Moreover, a subgroup analysis was performed according to low, intermediate, and high initial risk of recurrence, from which the expected absolute benefit was derived by

  12. Multiple Cutaneous Angiosarcomas after Breast Conserving Surgery and Bilateral Adjuvant Radiotherapy: An Unusual Case and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Icro Meattini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast angiosarcomas (BAs are rare but serious events that may arise after radiation exposure. Disease outcome is poor, with high risk of local and distant failure. Recurrences are frequent also after resection with negative margins. The spectrum of vascular proliferations associated with radiotherapy in the setting of breast cancer has expanded, including radiation-associated atypical vascular lesions (AVLs of the breast skin as a rare, but well-recognized, entity. Although pursuing a benign behavior, AVLs have been regarded as possible precursors of postradiation BAs. We report an unusual case of a 71-year-old woman affected by well-differentiated bilateral cutaneous BA, diagnosed 1.9 years after adjuvant RT for synchronous bilateral breast cancer. Whole-life clinical followup is of crucial importance in breast cancer patients.

  13. Radiotherapy of the chest wall following mastectomy for early-stage breast cancer: impact on local recurrence and overall survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janni, Wolfgang; Dimpfl, Thomas; Braun, Stephan; Knobbe, Angelika; Peschers, Ursula; Rjosk, Dorothea; Lampe, Bjoern; Genz, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    Introduction: Recent studies have renewed an old controversy about the efficacy of adjuvant radiotherapy following mastectomy for breast cancer. Radiotherapy is usually recommended for advanced disease, but whether or not to use it in pT1-T2 pN0 situations is still being debated. This study was designed to clarify whether or not routine radiotherapy of the chest wall following mastectomy reduces the risk of local recurrence and if it influences the overall survival rate. Methods: Retrospective analysis of patients treated with mastectomy for pT1-T2 pN0 tumors and no systemic treatment. Patients treated with radiotherapy of the chest wall following mastectomy (Group A) are compared with those treated with mastectomy alone (Group B). Results: A total of 918 patients underwent mastectomy. Patients who received adjuvant radiotherapy after mastectomy (n = 114) had a significantly lower risk for local recurrence. Ten years after the primary diagnosis, 98.1% of the patients with radiotherapy were disease free compared to 86.4% of the patients without radiotherapy. The average time interval from primary diagnosis until local recurrence was 8.9 years in Group A and 2.8 years in Group B. The Cox regression analysis including radiotherapy, tumor size and tumor grading found the highest risk for local recurrence for patients without radiotherapy (p < 0.0004). In terms of overall survival however, the Kaplan-Meier analysis showed no difference between the two groups (p = 0.8787) and the Cox regression analysis failed to show any impact on overall survival. Conclusion: With observation spanning over 35 years, this study shows that adjuvant radiotherapy of the chest wall following mastectomy reduces the risk for local recurrence in node-negative patients with pT1-T2 tumors but has no impact on the overall survival rate

  14. Locoregional Recurrence of Breast Cancer in Patients Treated With Breast Conservation Surgery and Radiotherapy Following Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Sun Young [Center for Breast Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Department of Surgery, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung Ju [Center for Breast Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Kyung Hwan, E-mail: radiat@ncc.re.kr [Center for Breast Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Proton Therapy Center, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Park, In Hae; Jung, So-Youn; Lee, Keun Seok; Ro, Jungsil; Lee, Seeyoun; Kim, Seok Won [Center for Breast Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Hyun [Proton Therapy Center, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Han-Sung [Center for Breast Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Kwan Ho [Proton Therapy Center, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Breast conservation surgery (BCS) and radiotherapy (RT) following neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) have been linked with high locoregional recurrence (LRR) rates and ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) rates. The purpose of this study was to analyze clinical outcomes in patients who exhibited LRR and IBTR after being treated by BCS and RT following NCT. Methods and Materials: In total, 251 breast cancer patients treated with BCS and RT following NCT between 2001 and 2006 were included. All patients had been shown to be clinically node-positive. Clinical stage at diagnosis (2003 AJCC) was II in 68% of patients and III in 32% of patients. Of those, 50%, 35%, and 15% of patients received anthracycline-based, taxane-based, and combined anthracycline-taxane NCT, respectively. All patients received RT. Results: During follow-up (median, 55 months), 26 (10%) patients had LRR, 19 of these patients had IBTR. Five-year actuarial rates of IBTR-free and LRR-free survival were 91% and 89%, respectively. In multivariate analyses, lack of hormone suppression therapy was found to increase both LRR and IBTR rates. Hazard ratios were 7.99 (p < 0.0001) and 4.22 (p = 0.004), respectively. Additionally, pathology stage N2 to N3 increased LRR rate (hazard ratio, 4.22; p = 0.004), and clinical AJCC stage III IBTR rate (hazard ratio, 9.05; p = 0.034). Achievement of pathological complete response and presence of multifocal tumors did not affect LRR or IBTR. Conclusions: In patients with locally advanced disease, who were clinically node-positive at presentation, BCS after NCT resulted in acceptably low rates of IBTR and LRR. Mastectomy should be considered as an option in patients who present with clinical stage III tumors or who are not treated with adjuvant hormone suppression therapy, because they exhibit high IBTR rates after NCT and BCS.

  15. Locoregional Recurrence of Breast Cancer in Patients Treated With Breast Conservation Surgery and Radiotherapy Following Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Sun Young; Lee, Seung Ju; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Park, In Hae; Jung, So-Youn; Lee, Keun Seok; Ro, Jungsil; Lee, Seeyoun; Kim, Seok Won; Kim, Tae Hyun; Kang, Han-Sung; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Breast conservation surgery (BCS) and radiotherapy (RT) following neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) have been linked with high locoregional recurrence (LRR) rates and ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) rates. The purpose of this study was to analyze clinical outcomes in patients who exhibited LRR and IBTR after being treated by BCS and RT following NCT. Methods and Materials: In total, 251 breast cancer patients treated with BCS and RT following NCT between 2001 and 2006 were included. All patients had been shown to be clinically node-positive. Clinical stage at diagnosis (2003 AJCC) was II in 68% of patients and III in 32% of patients. Of those, 50%, 35%, and 15% of patients received anthracycline-based, taxane-based, and combined anthracycline-taxane NCT, respectively. All patients received RT. Results: During follow-up (median, 55 months), 26 (10%) patients had LRR, 19 of these patients had IBTR. Five-year actuarial rates of IBTR-free and LRR-free survival were 91% and 89%, respectively. In multivariate analyses, lack of hormone suppression therapy was found to increase both LRR and IBTR rates. Hazard ratios were 7.99 (p < 0.0001) and 4.22 (p = 0.004), respectively. Additionally, pathology stage N2 to N3 increased LRR rate (hazard ratio, 4.22; p = 0.004), and clinical AJCC stage III IBTR rate (hazard ratio, 9.05; p = 0.034). Achievement of pathological complete response and presence of multifocal tumors did not affect LRR or IBTR. Conclusions: In patients with locally advanced disease, who were clinically node-positive at presentation, BCS after NCT resulted in acceptably low rates of IBTR and LRR. Mastectomy should be considered as an option in patients who present with clinical stage III tumors or who are not treated with adjuvant hormone suppression therapy, because they exhibit high IBTR rates after NCT and BCS.

  16. Intraoperative radiotherapy for early breast cancer: do health professionals choose convenience or risk?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corica, Tammy; Joseph, David; Saunders, Christobel; Bulsara, Max; Nowak, Anna K

    2014-01-01

    The randomized TARGIT trial comparing experimental intra-operative radiotherapy (IORT) to up to 7 weeks of daily conventional external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) recruited participants in Western Australia between 2003 and 2012. We aimed to understand preferences for this evolving radiotherapy treatment for early breast cancer (EBC) in health professionals, and how they changed over time and in response to emerging data. Preferences for single dose IORT or EBRT for EBC were elicited in 2004 and 2011, together with factors that may be associated with these preferences. Western Australian health professionals working with breast cancer patients were invited to complete a validated, self-administered questionnaire. The questionnaire used hypothetical scenarios and trade-off methodology to determine the maximum increase in risk of local recurrence health professionals were willing to accept in order to have a single dose of IORT in the place of EBRT if they were faced with this decision themselves. Health professional characteristics were similar across the two time points although 2011 included a higher number of nurse (49% vs. 36%) and allied health (10% vs. 4%) participants and a lower number of radiation therapists (17% vs. 32%) compared to 2004. Health professional preferences varied, with 7.5% and 3% judging IORT unacceptable at any risk, 18% and 21% judging IORT acceptable only if offering an equivalent risk, 56% and 59% judging IORT acceptable with a low maximum increase in risk (1-3%) and 19% and 17% judging a high maximum increase in risk acceptable (4-5%), in 2004 and 2011 respectively. A significantly greater number of nurses accepted IORT as a treatment option in 2011. Most Western Australian health professionals working with breast cancer patients are willing to accept an increase in risk of local recurrence in order to replace EBRT with IORT in a hypothetical setting. This finding was consistent over two time points spanning 7 years despite the duration of

  17. Tumour bed boost radiotherapy for women after breast-conserving surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindts, Isabelle; Laenen, Annouschka; Depuydt, Tom; Weltens, Caroline

    2017-11-06

    Breast-conserving therapy, involving breast-conserving surgery followed by whole-breast irradiation and optionally a boost to the tumour bed, is a standard therapeutic option for women with early-stage breast cancer. A boost to the tumour bed means that an extra dose of radiation is applied that covers the initial tumour site. The rationale for a boost of radiotherapy to the tumour bed is that (i) local recurrence occurs mostly at the site of the primary tumour because remaining microscopic tumour cells are most likely situated there; and (ii) radiation can eliminate these causative microscopic tumour cells. The boost continues to be used in women at high risk of local recurrence, but is less widely accepted for women at lower risk. Reasons for questioning the boost are twofold. Firstly, the boost brings higher treatment costs. Secondly, the potential adverse events are not negligible. In this Cochrane Review, we investigated the effect of the tumour bed boost on local control and side effects. To assess the effects of tumour bed boost radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery and whole-breast irradiation for the treatment of breast cancer. We searched the Cochrane Breast Cancer Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE (January 1966 to 1 March 2017), Embase (1980 to 1 March 2017), the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, and ClinicalTrials.gov on 1 March 2017. We also searched the European Society of Radiotherapy and Oncology Annual Meeting, the St Gallen Oncology Conferences, and the American Society for Radiation Oncology Annual Meeting for abstracts. Randomised controlled trials comparing the addition and the omission of breast cancer tumour bed boost radiotherapy. Two review authors (IK and CW) performed data extraction and assessed risk of bias using Cochrane's 'Risk of bias' tool, resolving any disagreements through discussion. We entered data into Review Manager 5 for

  18. Preoperative Single Fraction Partial Breast Radiotherapy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palta, Manisha; Yoo, Sua; Adamson, Justus D.; Prosnitz, Leonard R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Horton, Janet K., E-mail: janet.horton@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Several recent series evaluating external beam accelerated partial breast irradiation (PBI) have reported adverse cosmetic outcomes, possibly related to large volumes of normal tissue receiving near-prescription doses. We hypothesized that delivery of external beam PBI in a single fraction to the preoperative tumor volume would be feasible and result in a decreased dose to the uninvolved breast compared with institutional postoperative PBI historical controls. Methods and Materials: A total of 17 patients with unifocal Stage T1 breast cancer were identified. Contrast-enhanced subtraction magnetic resonance images were loaded into an Eclipse treatment planning system and used to define the target volumes. A 'virtual plan' was created using four photon beams in a noncoplanar beam arrangement and optimized to deliver 15 Gy to the planning target volume. Results: The median breast volume was 1,713 cm{sup 3} (range: 1,014-2,140), and the median clinical target volume was 44 cm{sup 3} (range: 26-73). In all cases, 100% of the prescription dose covered 95% of the clinical target volume. The median conformity index was 0.86 (range: 0.70-1.12). The median percentage of the ipsilateral breast volume receiving 100% and 50% of the prescribed dose was 3.8% (range: 2.2-6.9) and 13.3% (range: 7.5-20.8) compared with 18% (range: 3-42) and 53% (range: 24-65) in the institutional historical controls treated with postoperative external beam PBI (p = .002). The median maximum skin dose was 9 Gy. The median dose to 1 and 10 cm{sup 3} of skin was 6.7 and 4.9 Gy. The doses to the heart and ipsilateral lung were negligible. Conclusion: Preoperative PBI resulted in a substantial reduction in ipsilateral breast tissue dose compared with postoperative PBI. The skin dose appeared reasonable, given the small volumes. A prospective Phase I trial evaluating this technique is ongoing.

  19. Preoperative Single Fraction Partial Breast Radiotherapy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palta, Manisha; Yoo, Sua; Adamson, Justus D.; Prosnitz, Leonard R.; Horton, Janet K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Several recent series evaluating external beam accelerated partial breast irradiation (PBI) have reported adverse cosmetic outcomes, possibly related to large volumes of normal tissue receiving near-prescription doses. We hypothesized that delivery of external beam PBI in a single fraction to the preoperative tumor volume would be feasible and result in a decreased dose to the uninvolved breast compared with institutional postoperative PBI historical controls. Methods and Materials: A total of 17 patients with unifocal Stage T1 breast cancer were identified. Contrast-enhanced subtraction magnetic resonance images were loaded into an Eclipse treatment planning system and used to define the target volumes. A “virtual plan” was created using four photon beams in a noncoplanar beam arrangement and optimized to deliver 15 Gy to the planning target volume. Results: The median breast volume was 1,713 cm 3 (range: 1,014–2,140), and the median clinical target volume was 44 cm 3 (range: 26–73). In all cases, 100% of the prescription dose covered 95% of the clinical target volume. The median conformity index was 0.86 (range: 0.70–1.12). The median percentage of the ipsilateral breast volume receiving 100% and 50% of the prescribed dose was 3.8% (range: 2.2–6.9) and 13.3% (range: 7.5–20.8) compared with 18% (range: 3–42) and 53% (range: 24–65) in the institutional historical controls treated with postoperative external beam PBI (p = .002). The median maximum skin dose was 9 Gy. The median dose to 1 and 10 cm 3 of skin was 6.7 and 4.9 Gy. The doses to the heart and ipsilateral lung were negligible. Conclusion: Preoperative PBI resulted in a substantial reduction in ipsilateral breast tissue dose compared with postoperative PBI. The skin dose appeared reasonable, given the small volumes. A prospective Phase I trial evaluating this technique is ongoing.

  20. Radiotherapy of early breast cancer in scleroderma patients: our experience with four cases and a short review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyrgias G

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available George Kyrgias1,2, Kiki Theodorou3,4, Anna Zygogianni1, Konstantinos Tsanadis2, Stefanos Zervoudis5, John Tzitzikas6, Michael Koukourakis71Academic Radiotherapy, University of Thessaly, Medical School, Greece; 2Radiation Oncology Department, University Hospital of Larissa, Greece; 3Academic Medical Physics, University of Thessaly, Medical School, Greece; 4Medical Physics Department, University Hospital of Larissa, 5Breast Unit, REA Hospital, Athens, Greece; 6Radiation Oncology Department, AHEPA University Hospital of Thessaloniki, Greece; 7Radiotherapy-Oncology Department, University Hospital of Alexandroupolis, GreecePurpose: Connective vascular diseases (CVD, including scleroderma, are reported to represent for some researchers a relative contraindication and for others absolute contraindication for radiotherapy. The purpose of our study is to add four new cases to the existing body of international literature and to determine whether women with pre-existing scleroderma who have been surgically treated for early breast cancer could undergo postsurgical radiotherapy without serious early and late complications.Patients and methods: From May 1998 to November 2010, we irradiated for early breast cancer four patients suffering from pre-existing scleroderma; after conservative surgery, we performed whole breast postoperative radiotherapy of 50.4 Gy total dose to the whole breast plus a 9 Gy boost to the tumor bed. We reviewed the records of all four patients and evaluated the early and late reactions using acute radiation morbidity scoring criteria (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group [RTOG], American College of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA and late radiation morbidity scoring scheme (European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer [EORTC], Brussels, Belgium and RTOG.Results: After a median follow-up of 105 months (range 12–155 months the early and late toxicity concerning the skin, the subcutaneous tissues, the lungs, and the heart have

  1. Breast-conserving radiation therapy using combined electron and intensity-modulated radiotherapy technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J.G.; Williams, S.S.; Goffinet, D.R.; Boer, A.L.; Xing, L.

    2000-01-01

    An electron beam with appropriate energy was combined with four intensity modulated photon beams. The direction of the electron beam was chosen to be tilted 10-20 laterally from the anteroposterior direction. Two of the intensity-modulated photon beams had the same gantry angles as the conventional tangential fields, whereas the other two beams were rotated 15-25' toward the anteroposterior directions from the first two photon beams. An iterative algorithm was developed which optimizes the weight of the electron beam as well as the fluence profiles of the photon beams for a given patient. Two breast cancer patients with early-stage breast tumors were planned with the new technique and the results were compared with those from 3D planning using tangential fields as well as 9-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) techniques. The combined electron and IMRT plans showed better dose conformity to the target with significantly reduced dose to the ipsilateral lung and, in the case of the left-breast patient, reduced dose to the heart, than the tangential field plans. In both the right-sided and left-sided breast plans, the dose to other normal structures was similar to that from conventional plans and was much smaller than that from the 9-field IMRT plans. The optimized electron beam provided between 70 to 80% of the prescribed dose at the depth of maximum dose of the electron beam. The combined electron and IMRT technique showed improvement over the conventional treatment technique using tangential fields with reduced dose to the ipsilateral lung and the heart. The customized beam directions of the four IMRT fields also kept the dose to other critical structures to a minimum. (author)

  2. Subclinical ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast: treatment with conservative surgery and radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amichetti, M; Caffo, O; Richetti, A; Zini, G; Rigon, A; Antonello, M; Roncadin, M; Coghetto, F; Valdagni, R; Fasan, S; Maluta, S; Di Marco, A; Neri, S; Vidali, C; Panizzoni, G; Aristei, C

    1999-01-01

    In spite of the fact that ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast is a frequently encountered clinical problem, there is no consensus about the optimal treatment of clinically occult (i.e., mammographic presentation only) DCIS. Interest in breast conservation therapy has recently increased. Few data are available in Italy on the conservative treatment with surgery and adjuvant postoperative radiotherapy. A retrospective multi-institutional study was performed in 15 Radiation Oncology Departments in northern Italy involving 112 women with subclinical DCIS of the breast treated between 1982 and 1993. Age of the patients ranged between 32 and 72 years (median, 50 years). All of them underwent conservative surgery: quadrantectomy in 89, tumorectomy in 11, and wide excision in 12 cases. The most common histologic subtype was comedocarcinoma (37%). The median pathologic size was 10 mm (range 1 to 55 mm). Axillary dissection was performed in 83 cases: all the patients were node negative. All the patients received adjunctive radiation therapy with 60Co units (77%) or 6 MV linear accelerators (23%) for a median total dose to the entire breast of 50 Gy (mean, 49.48 Gy; range, 45-60 Gy). Seventy-six cases (68%) received a boost to the tumor bed at a dose of 8-20 Gy (median 10 Gy) for a minimum tumor dose of 58 Gy. At a median follow-up of 66 months, 8 local recurrences were observed, 4 intraductal and 4 invasive. All recurrent patients had a salvage mastectomy and are alive and free of disease at this writing. The 10-year actuarial overall, cause-specific, and recurrence-free survival was of 98.8%, 100%, and 91%, respectively. The retrospective multicentric study, with a local control rate of more than 90% at 10 years with 100% cause-specific survival, showed that conservative surgery and adjuvant radiation therapy is a safe and efficacious treatment for patients with occult, non-palpable DCIS.

  3. In vivo dosimetry and acute toxicity in breast cancer patients undergoing intraoperative radiotherapy as boost

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jason Joon Bock; Choi, Jin Hyun; Lee, Ik Jae; Park, Kwang Woo; Kim, Kang Pyo; Kim, Jun Won [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Sung Gwe; Jeong, Joon [Dept. of Surgery, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    To report the results of a correlation analysis of skin dose assessed by in vivo dosimetry and the incidence of acute toxicity. This is a phase 2 trial evaluating the feasibility of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) as a boost for breast cancer patients. Eligible patients were treated with IORT of 20 Gy followed by whole breast irradiation (WBI) of 46 Gy. A total of 55 patients with a minimum follow-up of 1 month after WBI were evaluated. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimeter (OSLD) detected radiation dose delivered to the skin during IORT. Acute toxicity was recorded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v4.0. Clinical parameters were correlated with seroma formation and maximum skin dose. Median follow-up after IORT was 25.9 weeks (range, 12.7 to 50.3 weeks). Prior to WBI, only one patient developed acute toxicity. Following WBI, 30 patients experienced grade 1 skin toxicity and three patients had grade 2 skin toxicity. Skin dose during IORT exceeded 5 Gy in two patients: with grade 2 complications around the surgical scar in one patient who received 8.42 Gy. Breast volume on preoperative images (p = 0.001), ratio of applicator diameter and breast volume (p = 0.002), and distance between skin and tumor (p = 0.003) showed significant correlations with maximum skin dose. IORT as a boost was well-tolerated among Korean women without severe acute complication. In vivo dosimetry with OSLD can help ensure safe delivery of IORT as a boost.

  4. Decision to adopt medical technology: case study of breast cancer radiotherapy techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Heather Taffet; Pitrelli, Kimberly; Hayes, Mary Katherine; Murphy, Madhuvanti Mahadeo

    2014-11-01

    To understand decision making concerning adoption and nonadoption of accelerated partial breast radiotherapy (RT) prior to long-term randomized trial evidence. A total of 36 radiation oncologists and surgeons were recruited through purposive and snowball sampling strategies from September 2010 through January 2013. Semistructured phone interviews were conducted and audio-recorded and lasted 20-45 minutes. Qualitative analysis was conducted using a framework approach, iteratively exploring key concepts and emerging issues raised by subjects. Interviews were transcribed and imported into Atlas.ti v6. Transcripts were independently coded by 3 researchers shortly after each interview, followed by consensus development on each coded transcript. Barriers and facilitators of adoption, practice patterns, and informational/educational sources concerning accelerated partial breast RT were all assessed to determine major themes. Nearly half of physicians were surgeons (47%), and half were radiation oncologists (53%), with 61% overall in urban settings. Twenty-nine of the 36 physicians interviewed used brachytherapy-based partial breast RT. Five major factors were involved in physicians' decisions to adopt accelerated partial breast RT: facilitators encouraging adoption (e.g., enthusiastic colleagues and patient convenience), financial and prestige incentives, pressures to adopt (e.g., potential declines in referrals), judgment concerning acceptable level of scientific evidence, and barriers (e.g., not having appropriate machinery or referral mechanism in place). If technology was adopted, clinical guideline adherence varied. Technology adoption is based on financial and social pressures, along with often-limited scientific evidence and what seems "best" for patients. For technology adoption and diffusion to be rational and evidence-based, we must encourage appropriate financial payment models to curb use outside of research studies and promote development of additional

  5. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pistenma, D.A.

    1980-01-01

    The need for radiotherapy research is exemplified by the 100,000 cancer patients who will fail treatment locally and/or regionally annually for the next several years but who would benefit from better local treatment modalities. Theoretically, all of the areas of investigation discussed in this projection paper have the potential to significantly improve local-regional treatment of cancer by radiotherapy alone or in combination with other modalities. In many of the areas of investigation discussed in this paper encouraging results have been obtained in cellular and animal tumor studies and in limited studies in humans as well. In the not too distant future the number of patients who would benefit from better local control may increase by tens of thousands if developments in chemotherapy and/or immunotherapy provide a means to eradicate disseminated microscopic foci of cancer. Thus the efforts to improve local-regional control take on even greater significance

  6. Imaging analysis of heart movement for improving the respiration-gated radiotherapy in patients with left sided breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdelhamid, Rania; Farrag, A.; Khalifa, A. [Clinical Oncology Department, Assiut University (Egypt); Block, Andreas [Institut fuer Medizinische Strahlenphysik und Strahlenschutz, Klinikum Dortmund (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Respiration induced heart movement during radiotherapy exposes the heart to the inevitable risks of radio-exposure, and hence radiation injury, in cases of Lt. sided breast cancer. The impact of such a risk is additionally aggravated by the use of radiotherapy in combination with cardiotoxic chemotherapeutic agents. Radio-oncologists pay special attention to the coronary arteries that might be included in this small part of the heart exposed to radiation. The aim of this study was to include the internal heart movement for improving respiration-gated radiotherapy of left sided breast cancer. For 70 patients, all females left sided breast cancer, two planning CT's in inspiration and expiration, and one free breathing scan are performed. The heart motion was analyzed with the clinic-developed software ORAT in the simulator sequence for acquiring information of the cranio-caudal amplitude of heart movements in free breathing (respiration-induced amplitude) and a 15 seconds breath-hold phase (inherent amplitude). The role of inherent heart movement varies from one patient to another which should be taken in consideration during defining the parameters of respiration-gated radiotherapy. The inherent amplitude of the heart motion is the physiological lower limit of the respiration-gating window.

  7. The prognostic value of age for 1030 patients with early stage breast cancer after postoperative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Liming; Li Ruiying; Wang Ping; Xu Liang; Hao Jianlei; Liu Xiaobin; Pang Qingsong; Zhu Li; Cui Yong

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the prognostic value of age in patients with early stage breast cancer. Methods: The clinical characteristics of 1030 patients with early stage breast cancer (the number of positive axillary lymph nodes was less than 3) were retrospectively reviewed. Of all the patients, 468(stage I, n = 227; and stage II , n = 241) received breast conserving surgery (BCS) and 562 (stage I, n =184; and stage II, n= 378) received modified mastectomy. Patients were divided into young-age group (≤35, 136 patients), middle-age group (> 35-≤60,738 patients) and old-age group (> 60, 156 patients). The number of patients without postoperative radiation therapy after BCS is 16, 60 and 39 in the three groups, respectively. Two-dimensional conventional fractionated radiotherapy was administered. The prognostic value of the tumor size, status of axillary lymph nodes or hormonal receptors, postoperative radiation therapy were analyzed. Results: The follow-up rate was 97.86%. Of 795 patients followed up more than 5 years, 110, 569 and 116 patients were devided into the three groups, respectively. There were 40, 202 and 87 patients without radiation therapy in the three groups. The 5-year recurrence rates of the three groups were 6.2%, 8.7% and 10.4% (χ 2 = 1.14, P= 0.567). The 5-year distant metastasis rates were 4.3% , 9.5 % and 2. 5% (χ 2 = 5.31 , P = 0.070) . The 5 - year survival rates were 91.2% , 92.6% and 82.1% (χ 2 = 6. 83, P = 0.033). The young-age group had more tumors smaller than 2. 0 cm (65.4%), less positive axillary lymph nodes (13.2%), poorer differential tumor and less positive hormone acceptors (48.0%). Of patients with tumor larger than 2. 0 cm who had no radiotherapy after BCS, the 5-year survival rates were 94%, 87% and 71% (χ 2 = 20.69, P= 0.000) in the three groups. The corresponding recurrence rates were 23%, 18% ,7%, (χ 2 = 9.97, P = 0.007), and distant metastasis rates were 23%, 25% and 10% (χ 2 =8.51, P=0.014). Conclusions: The age is

  8. Use of A and C vitamins for efficiency of macrofractionated preoperative radiotherapy of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gersamiya, G.K.; Madich, K.K.; Vepkhvadze, D.R.

    1988-01-01

    Two groups of patients with breast carcinoma were examined. The first group includes 55 patients, who were treated before operation using large-fractional telegamma-therapy (5 fractions, integral focus dose 20-25 Gy) at the background of treatment with A and C vitamins. The second group included 50 patients, who were treated before operation using large-fractional radio-therapy without vitamins. Radiation pathomorphism of tumor was studied in both groups after radical mastectomy. It is established that a complex of postirradiation structural changes in mammary gland tumors is aggravated at the background of carrying out vitaminization in patients and it is presented in the form of dystrophic changes depending on the degree of malignant tumor. Violation of mitotic activity in tumor cells is also marked. 14 refs

  9. On the prevention of cutaneous injuries caused by radiotherapy of carcinomas of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pischnamazzadeh-Hedjabi, M.

    1983-01-01

    A longitudinal, randomised study was carried out to assess the efficacy of O-(beta-hydroxyethyl)-rutoside (HR), when used as a radioprotective substance in radiotherapy of carcinomas of the breast. A total of 62 patients were included in the study and randomly assigned to one treatment group and one control group, each of which consisted of 31 patients. Except for the use of HR, the therapeutic strategies followed in the two study groups were identical. The protective effect against radiation-induced cutaneous injuries seen under treatment with Venoruton attained statistical significance as proven by the Chi-square test. Undesirable manifestations attributable to the test substance could not be observed, the only exception being one allergic reaction. It is reasonably safe to assume that there are no further protective influences of the substance on the tumour tissue. (orig.) [de

  10. Prognostic Impact of Adjuvant Radiotherapy in Breast Cancer Patients with One to Three Positive Axillary Lymph Nodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansour Ansari

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Radiotherapy, as an adjuvant treatment, plays a well-known role in prevention of locoregional recurrence in breast cancer patients. This study aims to investigate the impact of radiotherapy in patients with N1 disease. Methods: In this retrospective study, we reviewed the characteristics and treatment outcomes of 316 patients with a biopsy proven diagnosis of breast carcinoma and 1-3 positive axillary lymph nodes. The patients received treatment between 1995 and 2014. The patients had a median follow-up of 60 (range: 6-182 months. Results: This study was conducted on 316 patients with a median age of 48 (range: 26-86 years. Among patients, 215 underwent modified radical mastectomy and 101 had breast-conserving surgery before adjuvant treatment. Indeed, 259 patients received radiotherapy (radiation group and 57 did not (control group. There was locoregional recurrence in one control group patient and two patients in the radiation group. Multivariate analysis results indicated hormone receptor status as an independent prognostic factor for the 5-year disease-free survival rate. Estrogen and progesterone receptor negativity (HR = 1.80, 95% CI: 1.02-3.19, P=0.043 also had a negative influence on the 5-year disease-free survival rate. However, radiotherapy had no significant effect on disease-free survival (P=0.446 and overall survival (P=0.058 rates. Conclusion: The results showed that adjuvant radiotherapy had no prognostic impacts on locoregional and distant disease control in breast cancer patients with N1 disease.

  11. Single nucleotide polymorphisms and unacceptable late toxicity in breast cancer adjuvant radiotherapy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazzari G

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Grazia Lazzari,1 Maria Iole Natalicchio,2 Angela Terlizzi,3 Francesco Perri,4 Giovanni Silvano1 1Radiation Oncology Unit, San Giuseppe Moscati Hospital, Taranto, 2Molecular Biology Laboratory, Pathological Anatomy Department, Ospedali Riuniti, Foggia, 3Medical Physic Unit, San Giuseppe Moscati Hospital, 4Medical Oncology Unit, Presidio Ospedaliero Centrale - Santissima Annunziata, Taranto, Italy Background: There has recently been a strong interest in the inter-individual variation in normal tissue and tumor response to radiotherapy (RT, because tissue radiosensitivity seems to be under genetic control. Evidence is accumulating on the role of polymorphic genetic variants, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs that could influence normal tissue response after radiation. The most studied SNPs include those in genes involved in DNA repair (single- and double-strand breaks, and base excision and those active in the response to oxidative stress.Case report: We present the case report of a 60-year-old woman with early breast cancer who underwent adjuvant hormone therapy and conventional radiotherapy, and subsequently developed unacceptable cosmetic toxicities of the irradiated breast requiring a genetic test of genes involved in DNA repair mechanisms. The patient was found to be heterozygous for G28152A (T/C and C18067T (A/G mutations in X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1 and 3 (XRCC3, respectively, homozygous for A313G (G/G mutation in glutathione S transferase Pi 1 (GSTP1, and wild-type for A4541G (A/A in XRCC3 and G135C (G/G in RAD51 recombinase.Conclusion: The role of SNPs should be taken into account when a severe phenomenon appears in normal tissues after radiation treatment, because understanding the molecular basis of individual radiosensitivity may be useful for identifying moderately or extremely radiosensitive patients who may need tailored therapeutic strategies. Keywords: radiosensitivity, SNPs, fibrosis, DNA repair

  12. Improving oncoplastic breast tumor bed localization for radiotherapy planning using image registration algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wodzinski, Marek; Skalski, Andrzej; Ciepiela, Izabela; Kuszewski, Tomasz; Kedzierawski, Piotr; Gajda, Janusz

    2018-02-01

    Knowledge about tumor bed localization and its shape analysis is a crucial factor for preventing irradiation of healthy tissues during supportive radiotherapy and as a result, cancer recurrence. The localization process is especially hard for tumors placed nearby soft tissues, which undergo complex, nonrigid deformations. Among them, breast cancer can be considered as the most representative example. A natural approach to improving tumor bed localization is the use of image registration algorithms. However, this involves two unusual aspects which are not common in typical medical image registration: the real deformation field is discontinuous, and there is no direct correspondence between the cancer and its bed in the source and the target 3D images respectively. The tumor no longer exists during radiotherapy planning. Therefore, a traditional evaluation approach based on known, smooth deformations and target registration error are not directly applicable. In this work, we propose alternative artificial deformations which model the tumor bed creation process. We perform a comprehensive evaluation of the most commonly used deformable registration algorithms: B-Splines free form deformations (B-Splines FFD), different variants of the Demons and TV-L1 optical flow. The evaluation procedure includes quantitative assessment of the dedicated artificial deformations, target registration error calculation, 3D contour propagation and medical experts visual judgment. The results demonstrate that the currently, practically applied image registration (rigid registration and B-Splines FFD) are not able to correctly reconstruct discontinuous deformation fields. We show that the symmetric Demons provide the most accurate soft tissues alignment in terms of the ability to reconstruct the deformation field, target registration error and relative tumor volume change, while B-Splines FFD and TV-L1 optical flow are not an appropriate choice for the breast tumor bed localization problem

  13. Quality control in health care: an experiment in radiotherapy planning for breast cancer patients after mastectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holli, Kaija; Laippala, Pekka; Ojala, Antti; Pitkaenen, Maunu

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: The importance of evaluating and improving quality in clinical practice is now generally acknowledged. In this study we estimated different sources of variation in radiotherapy planning for breast cancer patients after mastectomy and sought to test the applicability of a reproducibility and repeatability (R and R) study in a clinical context. Methods: Eleven radiation oncologists planned radiotherapy three times for three different kinds of breast cancer patients without knowing they were handling the same patient three times. Variation was divided into different components: physicians as operators, patients as parts, and repeated measurements as trials. Variation due to difference across trials (repeatability), that across the physicians (reproducibility), and that across the patients (variability) were estimated, as well as interactions between physicians and patients. Calculation was based on the sum of squares, and analysis was supported by various graphical presentations such as range charts and box plots. Results: Some parts of the planning process were characterized by higher and different kinds of variation than the others. Interphysician variation (i.e., reproducibility) was not high but there were some clearly outlying physicians. The highest variation was in repeatability (intraphysician variation). The major part of the variation was, however, that from patient to patient: 33% of the total in Parameter 1 and 85% of the total in Parameter 2. Conclusions: R and R studies are applicable and are needed to evaluate and improve quality in clinical practice. This kind of analysis provides opportunities to establish which kinds of patients require particularly careful attention, which points in the process are most critical for variation, which are the most difficult aspects for each physician and call for more careful description in documents, and which physicians need further training

  14. Targeted Intraoperative Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer in Patients in Whom External Beam Radiation Is Not Possible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keshtgar, Mohammed R.S.; Vaidya, Jayant S.; Tobias, Jeffrey S.; Wenz, Frederik; Joseph, David; Stacey, Chris; Metaxas, Marinos G.; Keller, Anke; Corica, Tammy; Williams, Norman R.; Baum, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: External beam radiation therapy (EBRT) following wide local excision of the primary tumor is the standard treatment in early breast cancer. In some circumstances this procedure is not possible or is contraindicated or difficult. The purpose of this study was to determine the safety and efficacy of targeted intraoperative radiotherapy (TARGIT) when EBRT is not feasible. Methods and Materials: We report our experience with TARGIT in three centers (Australia, Germany, and the United Kingdom) between 1999 and 2008. Patients at these centers received a single radiation dose of 20 Gy to the breast tissue in contact with the applicator (or 6 Gy at 1-cm distance), as they could not be given EBRT and were keen to avoid mastectomy. Results: Eighty patients were treated with TARGIT. Reasons for using TARGIT were 21 patients had previously received EBRT, and 31 patients had clinical reasons such as systemic lupus erythematosus, motor neuron disease, Parkinson's disease, ankylosing spondylitis, morbid obesity, and cardiovascular or severe respiratory disease. Three of these patients received percutaneous radiotherapy without surgery; 28 patients were included for compelling personal reasons, usually on compassionate grounds. After a median follow-up of 38 months, only two local recurrences were observed, an annual local recurrence rate of 0.75% (95% confidence interval, 0.09%-2.70%). Conclusions: While we await the results of the randomized trial (over 2,000 patients have already been recruited), TARGIT is an acceptable option but only in highly selected cases that cannot be recruited in the trial and in whom EBRT is not feasible/possible.

  15. Prophylactic radiotherapy of the breast in patients with prostatic carcinoma before application of contrasexual hormones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arndt, D.; Heibel, J.H.

    1983-08-01

    Symptoms and objective parameters of gynecomastia are analysed in 113 patients, who received prophylactic irradiation of the breast (12 Gy in 3 fractions) prior to estrogen therapy of prostatic carcinoma. Another 10 patients were treated equally after estrogens had caused severe complaints. Symptoms increased from 10% to 100% in relation to 4 classes of gynecomastia. They were mild in 27.5%, moderate in 23.9% and severe in 8.8%. A correlation between metric classification and graded symptoms became more evident when only 2 groups were distinguished. With a maximum diameter of 3.5 cm only 17% of the patients had mostly slight discomfort in contrast to 70% of the patients with a gland of more than 3.5 cm in diameter; they revealed moderate or serious complaints. These results indicate that prophylactic radiotherapy may reduce severe complications to less than 10% as compared to 70-80% without irradiation. If gynecomastia has developed, regression by subsequent radiotherapy seems to be impossible; but the intensity of complaints could be reduced in our ten patients. Provided that irradiation precedes estrogen application, this sequence may be considered as a reasonable alternative to expensive antiandrogen therapy.

  16. Measurement of subcutaneous fibrosis after postmastectomy radiotherapy by dielectric properties of breast skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahtinen, T.; Tirkkonen, A.; Tenhunen, M.; Nuutinen, J.; Nuortio, L.; Auvinen, P.

    1995-01-01

    Dielectric properties of a biological material determine the interaction of high frequency electromagnetic (EM) fields and material. Since radiation induces changes in the structure and composition of the tissue, measurement of the altered dielectric properties could yield useful data on the radiation reactions. Dielectric constant of irradiated breast skin of 36 patients was measured 64 to 99 months after postmastectomy radiotherapy with three dose-fractionation schedules. A single dose-fractionation schedule consisted of a photon and electron or a photon and 150 kV x-ray beam. An EM frequency of 300 MHz was guided into the skin via a specially constructed coaxial probe. The attenuation and the phase shift of the reflected wave was measured by the network analyzer. From these data the dielectric constant of the skin could be calculated. Although there was a general tendency that the dielectric constant in the treated side was higher than in the untreated side, the increase was statistically significant only with one photon and electron beam. A significant negative correlation was found between the dielectric constant and the occurrence of clinically assessed mild fibrosis or when all degrees of fibrosis were combined. The study demonstrates that the dielectric measurements are useful in the assessment of the response of radiotherapy dose-fractionation schedules for the development and follow-up of subcutaneous fibrosis. Due to the large variation of the dielectric constants between patients in various dose-fractionation schedules, the dielectric measurements are not capable of differentiating different degrees of fibrosis

  17. Frequency of unstable chromosome aberrations in peripheral lymphocytes of women with breast cancer treated with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinoza Jeria, Marcela; Castro Acuna, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    This study proposes to obtain information about the behavior of the frequency and distribution of radiation induced lymphocyte dicentric chromosome aberrations with therapeutic doses in women with breast cancer treated only with radiotherapy, about which there are no existing works in Chile. Blood samples were taken from 6 women volunteers included in the study, with their informed consent, treated in the Fundacion Arturo Lopez Perez, aged 24 to 65 years old, without prior or parallel chemotherapy, nor prior radiotherapy. Three peripheral blood samples were taken from each patient in 0, 16.2 and 43.2 Gy doses. The lymphocytes obtained from each sample were cultivated using the micro-culture technique following the protocol in IAEA Technical Report No. 405, 2001. The samples were evaluated under a microscope and the unstable chromosome aberrations for lymphocytes were counted. A total of 500 cells per sample was evaluated in most cases, which were distributed depending on the number of aberrations that they had. The results were analyzed by treatment dose for each of the study patients, using the Papworth u test, Dolphin's 'Contaminated Poisson' method and Sasaki's 'QDR'. Great variations were observed in the frequency distribution of aberrations among the patients studied, which could be due to the influence of factors related to the patients' partial irradiations (C.Wood)

  18. A randomized trial of a cognitive-behavioral therapy and hypnosis intervention on positive and negative affect during breast cancer radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Schnur, Julie B.; David, Daniel; Kangas, Maria; Green, Sheryl; Bovbjerg, Dana H.; Montgomery, Guy H.

    2009-01-01

    Breast cancer radiotherapy can be an emotionally difficult experience. Despite this, few studies have examined the effectiveness of psychological interventions to reduce negative affect, and none to date have explicitly examined interventions to improve positive affect among breast cancer radiotherapy patients. The present study examined the effectiveness of a multimodal psychotherapeutic approach, combining cognitive-behavioral therapy and hypnosis (CBTH), to reduce negative affect and incre...

  19. No difference in dose distribution in organs at risk in postmastectomy radiotherapy with or without breast implant reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liljegren, Annelie; Unukovych, Dmytro; Gagliardi, Giovanna; Bjöhle, Judith; Wickman, Marie; Johansson, Hemming; Sandelin, Kerstin

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the variation in doses to organs at risk (ipsilateral lung and heart) and the clinical target volume (CTV) in the presence of breast implants. In this retrospective cohort study, patients were identified through the National Breast Cancer Register. Consecutive breast cancer patients undergoing mastectomy between 2009 and 2011 and completing a full course of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) were eligible. All included patients (n = 818) were identified in the ARIA© oncology information system and further stratified for immediate breast reconstruction (IBR+, n = 162) and no immediate breast reconstruction (IBR-, n = 656). Dose statistics for ipsilateral lung, heart and CTV were retrieved from the system. Radiation plans for patients with chest wall (CW) only (n = 242) and CW plus lymph nodes (n = 576) irradiation were studied separately. The outcome variables were dichotomized as follows: lung, V 20Gy ≤ 30% vs. V 20Gy > 30%; heart, D mean ≤ 5 Gy vs. D mean > 5 Gy; CTV, V 95% ≥ median vs. V 95% < median. In the univariate and multivariate regression models no correlation between potential confounders (i.e. breast reconstruction, side of PMRT, CW index) and the outcome variables was found. Multivariate analysis of CW plus lymph nodes radiation plans, for example, showed no association of breast reconstruction with dosimetric outcomes in neither lung nor heart- lung V 20Gy (odds ratio [OR]: 0.6, 95%CI, 0.4 to 1.0, p = 0.07) or heart D mean (OR: 1.2, 95%CI, 0.5 to 3.1, p = 0.72), respectively. CTV was statistically significantly larger in the IBR+ group (i.e. included breast implant), but no correlation between the implant type and dosimetric characteristics of the organs at risk was revealed. In the current study, the presence of breast implants during postmastectomy radiotherapy was not associated with increased doses to ipsilateral lung and heart, but CTV definition and its dosimetric characteristics urge further

  20. Prospective Assessment of Optimal Individual Position (Prone Versus Supine) for Breast Radiotherapy: Volumetric and Dosimetric Correlations in 100 Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lymberis, Stella C.; Wyngaert, John Keith de; Parhar, Preeti; Chhabra, Arpit M.; Fenton-Kerimian, Maria; Chang Jengwha; Hochman, Tsivia; Guth, Amber; Roses, Daniel; Goldberg, Judith D.; Formenti, Silvia C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Damage to heart and lung from breast radiotherapy is associated with increased cardiovascular mortality and lung cancer development. We conducted a prospective study to evaluate which position is best to spare lung and heart from radiotherapy exposure. Methods and Materials: One hundred consecutive Stage 0–IIA breast cancer patients consented to participate in a research trial that required two computed tomography simulation scans for planning both supine and prone positions. The optimal position was defined as that which best covered the contoured breast and tumor bed while it minimized critical organ irradiation, as quantified by the in-field heart and lung volume. The trial was designed to plan the first 100 patients in each position to study correlations between in-field volumes of organs at risk and dose. Results: Fifty-three left and 47 right breast cancer patients were consecutively accrued to the trial. In all patients, the prone position was optimal for sparing lung volume compared to the supine setup (mean lung volume reduction was 93.5 cc for right and 103.6 cc for left breast cancer patients). In 46/53 (87%) left breast cancer patients best treated prone, in-field heart volume was reduced by a mean of 12 cc and by 1.8 cc for the other 7/53 (13%) patients best treated supine. As predicted, supine-prone differences in in-field volume and mean dose of heart and lung were highly correlated (Spearman's correlation coefficient for left breast cancer patients was 0.90 for heart and 0.94 for lung and 0.92 for right breast cancer patients for lung). Conclusions: Prone setup reduced the amount of irradiated lung in all patients and reduced the amount of heart volume irradiated in 87% of left breast cancer patients. In-field organ volume is a valid surrogate for predicting dose; the trial continued to the planned target of 400.

  1. Evaluation of time, attendance of medical staff, and resources during radiotherapy for breast cancer patients. The DEGRO-QUIRO trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blank, E.; Wenz, F.; Sack, H.

    2012-01-01

    To conform to recommendations regarding the treatment of breast cancer, an estimation of costs and personnel to assure treatment is required. To date no recommendations based on real time measurements are available. The DEGRO (German Society of Radiation Oncology), therefore, initiated a prospective multicenter evaluation of core procedures of radiotherapy. In this analysis, the results regarding human resources and room occupation during the treatment of breast cancer are presented. Three academic radiation oncology centers (Erlangen, Muenster, Mannheim) prospectively documented their workflow and working time for all breast cancer patients from July-October 2008. Subsequently, a statistical analysis was performed. The longest working time of physicians was the definition of the target volume and organs at risk (mean 33 min). Furthermore, physicians needed much time for general tasks, which included conversations. Physicists needed the most time for treatment planning and authorization (64 min), whereas technicians were mostly needed in day-to-day radiotherapy treatment (15 min, 31 min including verification). Despite significant differences in specific steps between centers, overall working times and room occupation were comparable and representative. Special procedures (intraoperative radiotherapy/multicatheter brachytherapy) required considerable amounts of additional working time of physicians and physicists. In this prospective analysis, data of human resources and room occupation during treatment of breast cancer are presented for the first time. Each patient consumes about 12 h of human resources for treatment and 3.75 h for general tasks (physicians 4.7 h, physicists 1.8 h, and technicians 9.2 h). (orig.)

  2. Two cases of acute leukemia in heavily exposed a-bomb survivors following radiotherapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikami, Motoko; Kuramoto, Atsushi; Kamada, Nanao; Ohkita, Takeshi; Sawada, Hisao.

    1980-03-01

    Two cases of acute leukemia in heavily exposed atomic bomb survivors following postoperative 60 Co radiotherapy for breast cancer are presented. Case 1, a female who received an estimated dose of 364 rad from the A-bomb at the age of 22, was diagnosed as having left breast cancer 17 years later. At the age of 48, about 8 years after undergoing postoperative 60 Co radiotherapy, she developed acute monocytic leukemia. Case 2, a female who received an estimated dose of 594 rad from the A-bomb at the age of 37, was diagnosed as having right breast cancer 22 years later. At the age of 63, 4 years after postoperative 60 Co radiotherapy, she was found to have acute erythroleukemia. Both cases had been exposed to the A-bomb in Hiroshima and to therapeutic radiation after developing breast cancer presumably induced by A-bomb exposure. Thus it is proposed that acute leukemia was induced by exposure to large doses of radiation from two sources. (author)

  3. Do patients with very few brain metastases from breast cancer benefit from whole-brain radiotherapy in addition to radiosurgery?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rades, Dirk; Huttenlocher, Stefan; Hornung, Dagmar; Blanck, Oliver; Schild, Steven E; Fischer, Dorothea

    2014-01-01

    An important issue in palliative radiation oncology is the whether whole-brain radiotherapy should be added to radiosurgery when treating a limited number of brain metastases. To optimize personalized treatment of cancer patients with brain metastases, the value of whole-brain radiotherapy should be described separately for each tumor entity. This study investigated the role of whole-brain radiotherapy added to radiosurgery in breast cancer patients. Fifty-eight patients with 1–3 brain metastases from breast cancer were included in this retrospective study. Of these patients, 30 were treated with radiosurgery alone and 28 with radiosurgery plus whole-brain radiotherapy. Both groups were compared for local control of the irradiated metastases, freedom from new brain metastases and survival. Furthermore, eight additional factors were analyzed including dose of radiosurgery, age at radiotherapy, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance score, number of brain metastases, maximum diameter of all brain metastases, site of brain metastases, extra-cranial metastases and the time from breast cancer diagnosis to radiotherapy. The treatment regimen had no significant impact on local control in the univariate analysis (p = 0.59). Age ≤59 years showed a trend towards improved local control on univariate (p = 0.066) and multivariate analysis (p = 0.07). On univariate analysis, radiosurgery plus whole-brain radiotherapy (p = 0.040) and ECOG 0–1 (p = 0.012) showed positive associations with freedom from new brain metastases. Both treatment regimen (p = 0.039) and performance status (p = 0.028) maintained significance on multivariate analysis. ECOG 0–1 was positively correlated with survival on univariate analysis (p < 0.001); age ≤59 years showed a strong trend (p = 0.054). On multivariate analysis, performance status (p < 0.001) and age (p = 0.041) were significant. In breast cancer patients with few brain metastases, radiosurgery plus whole

  4. Survey on nursing of breast cancer patients treated with radiotherapy following to breast-conserving surgery. Actual states and problems for nursing care by certified nurses in breast cancer nursing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Mariko; Higuchi, Yuki; Hirose, Kiyomi; Nakanishi, Yoko; Ichikawa, Kayo; Horikoshi, Masataka; Futawatari, Tamae

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to elucidate the actual states and problems of nursing care provided by certified nurses in breast cancer patients treated with radiotherapy following to breast-conserving surgery. The survey was conducted by a postal anonymous questionnaire. Participants were drawn from the list of certified nurses on the website of Japanese Nursing Association. The questionnaires consisted of multiple choice questions regarding the contents of care performed before, during and after radiotherapy, and free questionnaire on the related problems. The rate of valid replies was 41.2% (40 out of 97 subjects). Before radiotherapy, the accomplishing rate exceeded 70% in about half of all nursing cares. The accomplishing rates were 30 to 50% in about 90% of all cares and 40 to 60% in all cares during and after radiotherapy, respectively. Problems were classified into three categories high-quality practice of radiotherapy nursing, establishment of continuing care system and improvement of cooperation. It is recommended to achieve high quality radiotherapy nursing by certified nurses, the establishment of continuing care system and the improvement of cooperation in order to improve nursing care during and after radiotherapy. (author)

  5. Experiences of the Breast Cancer Patients Undergoing Radiotherapy at a Public Hospital Peshawar Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulzar Habibullah

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aimed to explore the experiences of female breast cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy (RT in a public hospital in Peshawar, Pakistan. Methods: This study employed a descriptive exploratory method. A purposive sample of 14 breast cancer women undergoing RT was selected for this study. Data were collected over the period of 5 months, using a semi-structured interview guide and conducting in-depth face-to-face interviews. These interviews were audio taped and transcribed by a bilingual transcriber. The translated version of the interview was coded, and the analysis was done manually. Results: Four main categories emerged from data analysis, which were: feelings and perceptions of the patients, their challenges, coping strategies, and teaching and informational needs. Conclusions: Women undergoing RT in this culture experience more intense psychological effects, as compared to the physical effects. Keeping in mind, the magnitude of the emotional stress experienced by the participants, recommendations for policy reforms, and training for female RT staff are suggested based on findings of this research.

  6. Dose distribution of chest wall electron beam radiotherapy for patients with breast cancer after radical mastectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cong Yetong; Chen Dawei; Bai Lan; Zhou Yinhang; Piao Yongfeng; Wang Xi; Qu Yaqin

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the dose distribution of different bolus after different energy electron beam irradiation to different chest wall radiotherapy for the patients with breast cancer. Methods: The paper simulated the dose distribution of women's left breast cancer after radical mastectomy by 6 and 9 MeV electron beam irradiation, and TLD was used to measure. Results: The dose of skin became higher and the dose of lung was less when 0.5 and 1.0 cm bolus were used on the body; with the increasing of the energy of electron beam, the high dose field became larger; and with the same energy of electron beam, the high dose field moved to surface of the body when the bolus was thicker. Conclusion: When different energy electron ray irradiates different thickness bolus, the dosage of skin surface increases and the dosage of anterior margin of lung reduces. With electron ray energy increasing, the high dosage field is widen, when the electron ray energy is identity, the high dosage field migrates to the surface after adding bolus. Using certain depth bolus may attain the therapeutical dose of target area. (authors)

  7. Radiobiological analysis of the field in field technique in breast cancer radiotherapy treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medel B, E.; Vasquez R, M. A. [IMSS, Centro Medico Nacional Manuel Avila Camacho, Calle 2 Nte. 2004, Barrio de San Francisco, 72090 Puebla, Pue. (Mexico); Tejeda M, G., E-mail: marcosalivasquez@gmail.com [Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Facultad de Ciencias Fisico Matematicas, Av. San Claudio y 18 Sur, Ciudad Universitaria, 72570 Puebla, Pue. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: In vivo dosimetry was performed in 6 unilateral breast cancer patients treated with external beam radiation therapy in order to evaluate the dose calculated by the radiotherapy treatment planning system (Xi O, ELEKTA). Results show a maximum difference of 0.473 Gy between the dose calculated by the treatment planning system and the dose measured in vivo using solid state detectors. Based on the DVHs statistics, tumor control probability (Tcp) was obtained using the Target-Poisson model, with the following Tcp parameters: α=0.288/Gy, α{sub s}pread= 0.13 and α/β=4.9 Gy. Tcp average obtained for the Clinical Tumor Volume (Ctv) is 35.1% and for Supra Clavicle Volume (Scv) is 35.345%. Finally using Lyman model Normal Tissue Complication Probability (Ntcp) was obtained for the following endpoints: contralateral breast fibrosis, lung radiation pneumonitis and heart pericarditis. Nonetheless the Ntcp values are not high; the improvement of the Tcp based on this plan makes Ntcp for lung radiation pneumonitis reach the 100% of probability in some cases. (Author)

  8. Anxiety and its time courses during radiotherapy for non-metastatic breast cancer: A longitudinal study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, Florence; Merckaert, Isabelle; Liénard, Aurore; Libert, Yves; Etienne, Anne-Marie; Reynaert, Christine; Slachmuylder, Jean-Louis; Scalliet, Pierre; Paul, Van Houtte; Coucke, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To our knowledge, no study has specifically assessed the time course of anxiety during radiotherapy (RT). The objective of this study was to assess anxiety time courses in patients with non-metastatic breast cancer. Material and methods: This multicenter, descriptive longitudinal study included 213 consecutive patients with breast cancer who completed visual analog scales (VASs) assessing state anxiety before and after the RT simulation and the first and last five RT sessions. Results: Pre- and post-session anxiety mean levels were highest at the RT simulation (respectively, 2.9 ± 2.9 and 1.6 ± 2.5) and first RT session (respectively, 3.4 ± 2.9 and 2.0 ± 2.4), then declined rapidly. Clinically relevant mean differences (⩾1 cm on the VAS) between pre- and post-simulation/session VAS scores were found only for the RT simulation (−1.3 ± 2.7; p < 0.001) and first RT session (−1.4 ± 2.4; p < 0.001). Five percent to 16% of patients presented clinically relevant anxiety (pre- and post-simulation/session VAS scores ⩾ 4 cm) throughout treatment. Conclusions: To optimize care, RT team members should offer all patients appropriate information about treatment at the simulation, check patients’ understanding, and identify patients with clinically relevant anxiety requiring appropriate support throughout RT

  9. CT planning of boost irradiation in radiotherapy of breast cancer after conservative surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messer, Peter M.; Kirikuta, Ion C.; Bratengeier, Klaus; Flentje, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Background and purpose: A study was performed to compare the accuracy of clinical treatment set-up and CT planning of boost irradiation in radiotherapy of breast cancer. Material and methods: Between September 1993 and October 1994, 45 women who underwent breast conserving surgery and irradiation containing a boost to the tumour bed were investigated. Prospective evaluation of CT planning of the boost was carried out. The target volume/boost field, electron energy and treatment set-up had been defined on the basis of clinical examination, initial and postsurgical mammograms by one radiotherapist. Next, a planning CT was performed in treatment position and a CT-based treatment plan was calculated according to a target volume defined by another radiotherapist. The clinical treatment set-up was imported into our computer planning system and the resulting isodose plots were compared with those from CT planning and reviewed critically. Results: The clinically defined treatment set-up had to be modified in 80% of the patients. Most discrepancies observed were related to the size of the boost field itself and the chosen electron energy. Minor changes had to be made with respect to angle of table and gantry. Conclusions: Critical review of the isodose plots from both methods showed clear advantages for CT planning. Guidelines for target definition in CT planning of boost irradiation and subgroups of patients benefiting from this technique are described

  10. Incidental irradiation of internal mammary lymph nodes in breast cancer: conventional two-dimensional radiotherapy versus conformal three-dimensional radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leite, Elton Trigo Teixeira; Ugino, Rafael Tsuneki; Lopes, Mauricio Russo; Pelosi, Edilson Lopes; Silva, Joao Luis Fernandes da, E-mail: eltontt@gmail.com [Hospital Sirio-Libanes, Sao paulo, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Radiologia e Oncologia; Santana, Marco Antonio; Ferreira, Denis Vasconcelos; Carvalho, Heloisa de Andrade [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FM/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Departamento de Radiologia e Oncologia

    2016-05-15

    Objective: to evaluate incidental irradiation of the internal mammary lymph nodes (IMLNs) through opposed tangential fields with conventional two-dimensional (2D) or three-dimensional (3D) radiotherapy techniques and to compare the results between the two techniques. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective study of 80 breast cancer patients in whom radiotherapy of the IMLNs was not indicated: 40 underwent 2D radiotherapy with computed tomography for dosimetric control, and 40 underwent 3D radiotherapy. The total prescribed dose was 50.0 Gy or 50.4 Gy (2.0 or 1.8 Gy/day, respectively). We reviewed all plans and defined the IMLNs following the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group recommendations. For the IMLNs, we analyzed the proportion of the volume that received 45 Gy, the proportion of the volume that received 25 Gy, the dose to 95% of the volume, the dose to 50% of the volume, the mean dose, the minimum dose (Dmin), and the maximum dose (Dmax). Results: Left-sided treatments predominated in the 3D cohort. There were no differences between the 2D and 3D cohorts regarding tumor stage, type of surgery (mastectomy, breast-conserving surgery, or mastectomy with immediate reconstruction), or mean delineated IMLN volume (6.8 vs. 5.9 mL; p = 0.411). Except for the Dmin, all dosimetric parameters presented higher mean values in the 3D cohort (p < 0.05). The median Dmax in the 3D cohort was 50.34 Gy. However, the mean dose to the IMLNs was 7.93 Gy in the 2D cohort, compared with 20.64 Gy in the 3D cohort. Conclusion: Neither technique delivered enough doses to the IMLNs to achieve subclinical disease control. However, all of the dosimetric parameters were significantly higher for the 3D technique. (author)

  11. Simultaneous adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy for stage I and II breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamb, D.; Dady, P. [Wellington Hospital, Wellington, (New Zealand); Atkinson, C. [Christchurch Hospital, Christchurch, (New Zealand); Joseph, D. [Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, Perth, (Australia); O`Brien, P.; Ackland, S.; Bonaventura, A.; Hamilton, C.; Stewart, J.; Denham, J. [Newcastle Mater Misericordiae Hospital, Waratah, NSW (Australia); Spry, N. [Geelong Hospital, Geelong, VIC (Australia)

    1999-05-01

    The purpose of the present paper was to evaluate treatment outcome after conservative breast surgery or mastectomy followed by simultaneous adjuvant radiotherapy and cyclophosphamide, methotrexate and fluorouracil (CMF) therapy. Two hundred and sixty eight (268) patients were treated at two Australian and two New Zealand centres between 1981 and July 1995. One hundred and sixty-nine patients underwent conservation surgery and 99 had mastectomies. Median follow-up was 53 months. Conventionally fractionated radiation was delivered simultaneously during the first two cycles of CMF, avoiding radiation on the Fridays that the intravenous components of CMF were delivered. In conservatively treated patients, 5-year actuarial rates of any recurrence, distant recurrence and overall survival were 34.5 {+-} 5.2%, 25.4 {+-} 4.5% and 75.5 {+-} 4.8%, respectively. Crude incidence of local relapse at 4 years was 6.3% and at regional/distant sites was 26.3%. Highest grades of granulocyte toxicity (< 0.5 x 10{sup 9}/L), moist desquamation, radiation pneumonitis and persistent breast oedema were recorded in 10.7, 8.5, 8.9 and 17.2%, respectively. In patients treated by mastectomy, 5-year actuarial rates of any recurrence, distant recurrence and overall survival were 59.7 {+-} 7.3%, 56.7 {+-} 7.4% and 50.1 {+-} 7%. The crude incidence of local relapse at 4 years was 5.6% and at regional/distant sites it was 45.7%. The issue of appropriate timing of adjuvant therapies has become particularly important with the increasing acknowledgement of the value of anthracycline-based regimens. For women in lower risk categories (e.g. 1-3 nodes positive or node negative), CMF may offer a potentially better therapy, particularly where breast-conserving surgical techniques have been used. In such cases CMF allows the simultaneous delivery of radiotherapy with the result of optimum local control, without compromise or regional or systemic relapse rates. Further randomized trials that directly address

  12. Anatomic features of interest in women at risk of cardiac exposure from whole breast radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Grace; Rosewall, Tara; Fyles, Anthony; Harnett, Nicole; Dinniwell, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose: Left-sided breast radiotherapy (RT) can result in cardiac exposure. This study aims to identify predictive anatomic features in women requiring breath-hold (RT BH ) for cardiac sparing during adjuvant whole breast RT. Material and methods: We retrospectively reviewed free-breathing (FB) CT scans of 80 women previously treated with left-sided breast RT. Unfavourable cardiac anatomy was defined as the number of consecutive axial CT slices (2 mm) in which the anterior chest wall contacted the heart (Contact Heart ) or left ventricle (Contact LV ). The sternal angle and Haller Index (HI) were used to measure chest concavity. Position and volume of post-operative cavity was also quantified. Results: Heart mean dose (D mean ) was strongly correlated with Contact LV (r = 0.625, p < 0.001) and Contact Heart (r = 0.524, p < 0.001) but not significantly correlated with tumor size, cavity volume, heart volume, cavity distance to chest wall, sternal angle, or HI. ROC analysis of Contact Heart was most predictive of the need for breath-hold (RT BH ) technique [Area Under Curve = 0.815 (SE: 0.048; 95% CI: 0.721–0.91)] and ⩾25 Contact Heart CT slices predicted for heart D mean ⩾1.7 Gy (68% sensitivity and 82% specificity). Conclusion: Contact Heart on FB CT of ⩾25 axial slices (2 mm), ⩾50 mm of para-sagittal heart contact, was predictive of higher heart D mean and suggest a potential need for RT BH

  13. SU-F-J-132: Evaluation of CTV-To-PTV Expansion for Whole Breast Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgdorf, B; Freedman, G; Teo, B

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The current standard CTV-to-PTV expansion for whole breast radiotherapy (WBRT) is 7mm, as recommended by RTOG-1005.This expansion is derived from the uncertainty due to patient positioning (±5mm) and respiratory motion (±5mm). We evaluated the expansion needed for respiratory motion uncertainty using 4DCT. After determining the appropriate expansion margins, RT plans were generated to evaluate the reduction in heart and lung dose. Methods: 4DCT images were acquired during treatment simulation and retrospectively analyzed for 34 WBRT patients. Breast CTVs were contoured on the maximum inhale and exhale phase. Breast CTV displacement was measured in the L-R, A-P, and SUP-INF directions using rigid registration between phase images. Averaging over the 34 patients, we determined the margin due to respiratory motion. Plans were generated for 10 left-sided cases comparing the new expansion with the 7mm PTV expansion. Results: The results for respiratory motion uncertainty are shown in Table 1. Drawing on previous work by White et al at Princess Margaret Hospital (1) (see supporting document for reference) which studied the uncertainty due to patient positioning, we concluded that, in total, a 5mm expansion was sufficient. The results for our suggested PTV margin are shown in Table 2, combining the patient positioning results from White et al with our respiratory motion results. The planning results demonstrating the heart and lung dose differences in the 5mm CTV-to-PTV expanded plan compared to the 7mm plan are shown in Table 3. Conclusion: Our work evaluating the expansion needed for respiratory motion along with previous work evaluating the expansion needed for setup uncertainty shows that a CTV-to-PTV expansion of 5mm is acceptable and conservative. By reducing the PTV expansion, significant dose reduction to the heart and lung are achievable.

  14. Some aspects of the design of intensity modulated beams for breast radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, PM; Hansen, VN; Swindell, W

    1995-01-01

    An electronic portal imaging system has been used to design intensity modulated beams to achieve compensation for missing tissue and tissue heterogeneity in tangential irradiation of the breast. A portal image of the breast is calibrated for radiological thickness and an estimate of the outline of lung and soft tissue is made. This is used with the desired dose prescription to design intensity modulated beams, IMBs. The practical implementation of the IMBs may be achieved using a multileaf collimator, MLC. The leaves of the MLC may be scanned dynamically or a set of multiple static fields may be used. We have compared the uniformity of the achievable dose distribution for both cases. In the static case, the effects of varying the number of fields and their relative intensities have been investigated. The use of scanning leaves yields a dose distribution which is close to optimal. Multiple static fields produce results close to optimal if a large number, typically 30 are used. However, even for the more practicable case of 5 fields, the hot and cold spots are significantly reduced compared to a simple wedge. When studying the optimum intensity distribution for the set of static fields, it was found that having the first field with a large intensity irradiating the whole target volume and a set of 'top-up' fields of equal magnitude was best. This study suggests that an MLC may indeed be used to deliver IMBs for radiotherapy of the breast. We can presently deliver the multiple static field technique. For the small number of beams which are presently deliverable, an improvement of dosimetry over the use of a simple wedge is indicated. In the future, with the scanning leaves technique, dose distributions with greatly reduced dose inhomogeneities should be achievable

  15. Intensity modulation in breast radiotherapy: Development of an innovative field-in-field technique at Institut Gustave-Roussy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heymann, S.; Bourhis, J.; Bourgier, C.; Verstraet, R.; Pichenot, C.; Vergne, E.; Lefkopoulos, D.; Husson, F.; Kafrouni, H.; Mahe, J.; Kandalaft, B.; Marsiglia, H.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. - To assess the potential dosimetric gain of pre-segmentation modulated radiotherapy (OAPS, DosiSoft TM ) of breast, compared to routine 3D conformal radiotherapy. Patients and methods. - Twenty patients treated with conservative surgery for breast cancer (9 right and 11 left sided) with various breast volume (median 537 cm 3 ; range [100-1049 cm 3 ]) have been selected. For each patient, we have delineated a breast volume and a compensation volume (target volumes), as well as organs at risk (lungs and heart). Two treatment plans have been generated: one using the routine 3D conformal technique and the other with the pre-segmentation algorithm of DosiSoft TM (OAPS). The dose distribution were analyzed using the conformity index for target volumes, mean dose and V 30 Gy for the heart, and mean dose, V 20 Gy and V 30 Gy for lungs. Results. - Over the 20 patients, the conformity index increased from 0.897 with routine technique to 0.978 with OAPS (P TM ) is an original method of segmentation of breast. It is automatic, fast and easy, and is able to increase the conformity index, while sparing organ at risk. (authors)

  16. Risk of pacemaker or implantable cardioverter defibrillator after radiotherapy for early-stage breast cancer in Denmark, 1982-2005

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehammar, Jens Christian; Johansen, Jens Brock; Jensen, Maj-Britt

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To examine the risk of cardiac conduction abnormalities or severe ventricular arrhythmias requiring implantation of a cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED), either a pacemaker or an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator, subsequent to breast cancer (BC) radiotherapy...... (RT). MATERIAL AND METHODS: All women treated for early-stage BC in Denmark from 1982 to 2005 were identified from the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group. By record linkage to the Danish Pacemaker and ICD Registry information was retrieved on CIED implants subsequent to RT. Standardized incidence...

  17. Genetic variants in TGFβ-1 and PAI-1 as possible risk factors for cardiovascular disease after radiotherapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilbers, Florentine S.M.; Boekel, Naomi B.; Broek, Alexandra J. van den; Hien, Richard van; Cornelissen, Sten; Aleman, Berthe M.P.; Veer, Laura J. van’t; Leeuwen, Flora E. van; Schmidt, Marjanka K.

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: It has been established that radiotherapy can increase cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Genetic variants, which play a role in the tissue, damage response and angiogenesis regulating TGFβ pathway might give us insight into the mechanisms underlying radiation-induced CVD. We examined the effects of two polymorphisms, TGFβ1 29C > T and PAI-1 5G > 4G, on CVD incidence. Materials and methods: This retrospective cohort study included 422 10-year breast cancer survivors, aged 4G and CVD risk. Conclusion: Our study suggests there might be an association between the TGFβ1 29C > T polymorphism and CVD risk in long-term breast cancer survivors.

  18. [Is radiotherapy of the lymph node stages useful after the conservative treatment of the initial stage of breast carcinoma?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gava, A; Coghetto, F

    1989-05-01

    Twenty-four lectures were reviewed of the XXXIII SIRMN National Congress (Rome, October 1988) on the conservative radiosurgical treatment of breast cancer. A whole of 3462 cases were divided into 2 groups: group A--2824 patients who underwent targeted radiotherapy after conservative surgery (mostly quadrantectomy)--and group B--638 patients where, in case of N+ and internal quadrant tumors, irradiation was extended to lymph nodes. No significant differences were demonstrated between group A and group B as far as loco-regional relapses were concerned. Thus, no significant advantage seems to be yielded by lymph node irradiation in the early treatment of breast cancer.

  19. Dosimetric consequences of the shift towards computed tomography guided target definition and planning for breast conserving radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korevaar Erik W

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The shift from conventional two-dimensional (2D to three-dimensional (3D-conformal target definition and dose-planning seems to have introduced volumetric as well as geometric changes. The purpose of this study was to compare coverage of computed tomography (CT-based breast and boost planning target volumes (PTV, absolute volumes irradiated, and dose delivered to the organs at risk with conventional 2D and 3D-conformal breast conserving radiotherapy. Methods Twenty-five patients with left-sided breast cancer were subject of CT-guided target definition and 3D-conformal dose-planning, and conventionally defined target volumes and treatment plans were reconstructed on the planning CT. Accumulated dose-distributions were calculated for the conventional and 3D-conformal dose-plans, taking into account a prescribed dose of 50 Gy for the breast plans and 16 Gy for the boost plans. Results With conventional treatment plans, CT-based breast and boost PTVs received the intended dose in 78% and 32% of the patients, respectively, and smaller volumes received the prescribed breast and boost doses compared with 3D-conformal dose-planning. The mean lung dose, the volume of the lungs receiving > 20 Gy, the mean heart dose, and volume of the heart receiving > 30 Gy were significantly less with conventional treatment plans. Specific areas within the breast and boost PTVs systematically received a lower than intended dose with conventional treatment plans. Conclusion The shift towards CT-guided target definition and planning as the golden standard for breast conserving radiotherapy has resulted in improved target coverage at the cost of larger irradiated volumes and an increased dose delivered to organs at risk. Tissue is now included into the breast and boost target volumes that was never explicitly defined or included with conventional treatment. Therefore, a coherent definition of the breast and boost target volumes is needed, based on

  20. Dosimetric consequences of the shift towards computed tomography guided target definition and planning for breast conserving radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laan, Hans Paul van der; Dolsma, Wil V; Maduro, John H; Korevaar, Erik W; Langendijk, Johannes A

    2008-01-01

    The shift from conventional two-dimensional (2D) to three-dimensional (3D)-conformal target definition and dose-planning seems to have introduced volumetric as well as geometric changes. The purpose of this study was to compare coverage of computed tomography (CT)-based breast and boost planning target volumes (PTV), absolute volumes irradiated, and dose delivered to the organs at risk with conventional 2D and 3D-conformal breast conserving radiotherapy. Twenty-five patients with left-sided breast cancer were subject of CT-guided target definition and 3D-conformal dose-planning, and conventionally defined target volumes and treatment plans were reconstructed on the planning CT. Accumulated dose-distributions were calculated for the conventional and 3D-conformal dose-plans, taking into account a prescribed dose of 50 Gy for the breast plans and 16 Gy for the boost plans. With conventional treatment plans, CT-based breast and boost PTVs received the intended dose in 78% and 32% of the patients, respectively, and smaller volumes received the prescribed breast and boost doses compared with 3D-conformal dose-planning. The mean lung dose, the volume of the lungs receiving > 20 Gy, the mean heart dose, and volume of the heart receiving > 30 Gy were significantly less with conventional treatment plans. Specific areas within the breast and boost PTVs systematically received a lower than intended dose with conventional treatment plans. The shift towards CT-guided target definition and planning as the golden standard for breast conserving radiotherapy has resulted in improved target coverage at the cost of larger irradiated volumes and an increased dose delivered to organs at risk. Tissue is now included into the breast and boost target volumes that was never explicitly defined or included with conventional treatment. Therefore, a coherent definition of the breast and boost target volumes is needed, based on clinical data confirming tumour control probability and normal

  1. Hypo-fractionated radiotherapy in the treatment of breast cancer in elderly patients; Radiotherapie hypofractionnee dans le traitement du cancer du sein de la personne agee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merikhi, T.; Meziane, A.; Laarit, I.; Bali, M.S.; Bendjazia-Djemaa, A. [CHU de Constantine, Constantine (Algeria)

    2011-10-15

    The authors report an assessment on the long term of the efficiency and toxicity of a hypo-fractionated radiotherapy scheme: 5 Gy on d1 and d3, 6,5 Gy on d15 and d17, and 5 Gy on d29 and d31. The study is based on 144 patients treated between 1990 and 2007. Results are presented in terms of average follow-up, of survival rate without relapse by 5 and 8 years. This treatment could be a good solution to reduce therapeutic delays and a good response to expectations of elderly patients suffering from breast cancer. Short communication

  2. The use of adjuvant radiotherapy in elderly patients with early-stage breast cancer: changes in practice patterns after publication of Cancer and Leukemia Group B 9343.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palta, Manisha; Palta, Priya; Bhavsar, Nrupen A; Horton, Janet K; Blitzblau, Rachel C

    2015-01-15

    The Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) 9343 randomized phase 3 trial established lumpectomy and adjuvant therapy with tamoxifen alone, rather than both radiotherapy and tamoxifen, as a reasonable treatment course for women aged >70 years with clinical stage I (AJCC 7th edition), estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. An analysis of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registry was undertaken to assess practice patterns before and after the publication of this landmark study. The SEER database from 2000 to 2009 was used to identify 40,583 women aged ≥70 years who were treated with breast-conserving surgery for clinical stage I, estrogen receptor-positive and/or progesterone receptor-positive breast cancer. The percentage of patients receiving radiotherapy and the type of radiotherapy delivered was assessed over time. Administration of radiotherapy was further assessed across age groups; SEER cohort; and tumor size, grade, and laterality. Approximately 68.6% of patients treated between 2000 and 2004 compared with 61.7% of patients who were treated between 2005 and 2009 received some form of adjuvant radiotherapy (P < .001). Coinciding with a decline in the use of external beam radiotherapy, there was an increase in the use of implant radiotherapy from 1.4% between 2000 and 2004 to 6.2% between 2005 to 2009 (P < .001). There were significant reductions in the frequency of radiotherapy delivery over time across age groups, tumor size, and tumor grade and regardless of laterality (P < .001 for all). Randomized phase 3 data support the omission of adjuvant radiotherapy in elderly women with early-stage breast cancer. Analysis of practice patterns before and after the publication of these data indicates a significant decline in radiotherapy use; however, nearly two-thirds of women continue to receive adjuvant radiotherapy. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  3. The effect of postoperative radiotherapy on leukocyte zinc, serum trace elements and nutritional status of breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antila, H.M.J.; Salo, M.S.; Kirvelae, O.; Nikkanen, V.

    1992-01-01

    Mononuclear (MNC) and polymorphonuclear cell (PMNC) zinc content was determined together with serum zinc, copper, selenium and iron concentrations in 24 operable breast cancer patients during and after postoperative radiotherapy. Anthropometric and biochemical indices of nutritional status were measured as background data. The measurements were carried out in the years 1987-1988. Nine patients used unconventional multivitamin or trace element preparations. A steady but statistically insignificant decrease in PMNC zinc was seen during treatment. No changes occurred in MNC zinc. Serum copper levels increased in five patients possibly due to tamoxifen treatment, but no other alterations occurred in serum trace element levels. Appetite was well maintained and nutritional status remained unaltered. Postoperative radiotherapy for breast carcinoma had thus no effect on either trace element or nutritional status. Patient-initiated alternative treatments did not significantly affect their trace element levels. This was probably due to small supplementation doses or irregular use of the preparations. (orig.)

  4. Breathing adapted radiotherapy for breast cancer: comparison of free breathing gating with the breath-hold technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korreman, Stine Sofia; Pedersen, Anders N; Nøttrup, Trine Jakobi

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Adjuvant radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery for breast cancer implies a risk of late cardiac and pulmonary toxicity. This is the first study to evaluate cardiopulmonary dose sparing of breathing adapted radiotherapy (BART) using free breathing gating......, and to compare this respiratory technique with voluntary breath-hold. PATIENTS AND METHODS: 17 patients were CT-scanned during non-coached breathing manoeuvre including free breathing (FB), end-inspiration gating (IG), end-expiration gating (EG), deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) and end-expiration breath......-hold (EBH). The Varian Real-time Position Management system (RPM) was used to monitor respiratory movement and to gate the scanner. For each breathing phase, a population based internal margin (IM) was estimated based on average chest wall excursion, and incorporated into an individually optimised three...

  5. Evaluation of thyroid gland as an organ at risk after breast cancer radiotherapy: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darvish, L; Ghorbani, M; Teshnizi, S Hosseini; Roozbeh, N; Seif, F; Bayatiani, M Reza; Knaup, C; Amraee, A

    2018-05-14

    Radiotherapy can often lead to thyroid dysfunction. Some studies demonstrated that treatment of breast cancer by RT can expose thyroid gland to high doses of radiation. The aim of this systematic review is to evaluate consideration of thyroid gland as an organ at risk. In this systematic review and meta-analysis to select initial studies, a comprehensive search by two independent reviewers was performed. Electronical databases following: Web of Science, Google Scholar, Scopus, PubMed, Elsevier, Embase, ProQuest and Persian databases such as Iranmedex, Magiran, and SID were searched. All searches were restricted to English language between 1985 and 2017. A random effect meta-analysis is applied to estimate pooled effect size across initial studies. Funnel plot with Egger's test is used to assess potential publication bias. Totally, five studies (478 samples) were included in meta-analysis. The meta-analyses of result showed that thyroid gland is affected by radiotherapy significantly and the TSH increased after radiotherapy (z = 2.68, P = 0.007). The pooled estimate of difference mean for TSH was 0.90 (95% CI 0.24, 1.55). In studies among patients with breast cancer RT, hypothyroidism was reported more than other thyroid disorders. There was not showed possibility publication bias among studies (P > 0.05). This study demonstrated that thyroid gland is affected by radiotherapy significantly and the TSH increased after radiotherapy. Protecting thyroid gland during radiation and follow-up of patients with breast cancer RT are suggested for the assessment of thyroid gland dysfunction.

  6. Combined treatment of radiotherapy and local hyperthermia using 8 MHz RF-wave for advanced carcinoma of the breast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuwa, Nobukazu

    1988-01-01

    During the period from January 1983 through September 1986, 13 patients with carcinoma of the breast were treated with local hyperthermia combined with radiotherapy. Six patients were inoperable advanced cases and the other 7 were recurrent cases. Local heat was applied with an 8-MHz RF-capacitive heating equipment, once or twice a week after radiotherapy, for 40 approx. 60 minutes per session. Of the 6 cases with inoperable advanced lesions, 4 achieved CR and the other 2 achieved PRa (80 approx. 100 % regression), and of the 7 cases with local recurrent tumors, 3 achieved CR and the other 4 achieved PRa. As complications of the thermoradiotherapy, grade I-II skin burns were observed in 9 cases, pain around the ribs in 8 cases, mild lassitude in 2 cases, persistent tachycardia in 1 case and acute erosive gastritis in 1 case. It is worth noting that CR was achieved in these huge tumors, which can not be controlled by radiotherapy alone.

  7. Evaluation the consistency of location of moist desquamation and skin high dose area for breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant radiotherapy after breast conservative surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Li-Min; Huang, Eng-Yen; Liang, Ji-An; Meng, Fan-Yun; Chang, Gia-Hsin; Tsao, Min-Jen

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate whether the location of moist desquamation matches high dose area for breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) after breast conservative surgery. One hundred and nine breast cancer patients were enrolled to this study. Their highest skin dose area (the hot spot) was estimated from the treatment planning. We divided the irradiated field into breast; sternal/parasternal; axillary; and inframammary fold areas. The location for moist desquamation was recorded to see if it matches the hot spot. We also analyzed other possible risk factors which may be related to the moist desquamation. Forty-eight patients with 65 locations developed moist desquamation during the RT course. Patients with larger breast sizes and easy to sweat are two independent risk factors for moist desquamation. The distribution of moist desquamation occurred most in the axillary area. All nine patients with the hot spots located at the axillary area developed moist desquamation at the axillary area, and six out of seven patients with the hot spots located at the inframammary fold developed moist desquamation there. The majority of patients with moist desquamation over the breast or sternal/parasternal areas had the hot spots located at these areas. For a patient with moist desquamation, if a hot spot is located at the axillary or inframammary fold areas, it is very likely to have moist desquamation occur there. On the other hand, if moist desquamation occurs over the breast or sternal/parasternal areas, we can highly expect these two areas are also the hot spot locations

  8. Subsets of Women With Close or Positive Margins After Breast-Conserving Surgery With High Local Recurrence Risk Despite Breast Plus Boost Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lupe, Krystine; Truong, Pauline T.; Alexander, Cheryl; Lesperance, Mary; Speers, Caroline; Tyldesley, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: (1) To examine the effect of surgical margin status on local recurrence (LR) and survival following breast-conserving therapy; (2) To identify subsets with close or positive margins with high LR risk despite whole breast radiotherapy (RT) plus boost. Methods and Materials: Subjects were 2,264 women with pT1–3, any N, M0 invasive breast cancer, treated with breast-conserving surgery and whole breast ± boost RT. Five-year Kaplan-Meier (KM) LR, breast cancer–specific and overall survival (BCSS and OS) were compared between cohorts with negative (n = 1,980), close (n = 222), and positive (n = 62) margins. LR rates were analyzed according to clinicopathologic characteristics. Multivariable Cox regression modeling and matched analysis of close/positive margin cases and negative margin controls were performed. Results: Median follow-up was 5.2 years. Boost RT was used in 92% of patients with close or positive margins. Five-year KM LR rates in the negative, close and positive margin cohorts were 1.3%, 4.0%, and 5.2%, respectively (p = 0.001). BCSS and OS were similar in the three margin subgroups. In the close/positive margin cohort, LR rates were 10.2% with age 10% despite whole breast plus boost RT. These patients should be considered for more definitive surgery.

  9. Radiation-induced sarcoma following radiotherapy for breast cancer: report of eight cases and review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirova, Y.M.; Feuilhade, F.; Calitchi, E.; Otmezguine, Y.; Belembaogo, E.; Le Bourgeois, J.P.

    1998-01-01

    Retrospective analysis of eight new cases of radiation-induced sarcomas following radiotherapy for breast carcinoma and literature review. Eleven patients presenting with radiation-induced sarcoma after radiotherapy for breast cancer have been treated between 1983 and 1997 at Henri Mondor University Hospital (France). Eight of these patients respected the criteria established by Cahan et al. The others had Stewart-Treves Syndrome and were thus excluded from the analysis. Only one of the eight patients had received chemotherapy. All of the patients at the time of diagnosis of radiation-induced sarcoma were free of breast cancer recurrence. Radiation-induced sarcoma appeared with a latency period of 5 to 18 years (mean: 10.3 years). Patients' ages ranged from 39 to 88 years (mean: 57.6 years) at the time of diagnosis of sarcoma. Three sarcomas occurred in the treated breast, two in the chest wall, one in the pre-clavicular area and two in the axillary region. There were two angiosarcomas, three fibrosarcomas, one osteosarcoma, one malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH), and one undifferentiated sarcoma. All patients have received treatment for their sarcoma: all of them underwent surgery, one patient combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy, and three patients chemotherapy. Two patients were alive and free from disease. Six patients died (5-34 months); all six had local and/or metastatic recurrence. Radiotherapy can induce malignancies after a latent period of several years. Radiation-induced sarcomas are associated with poor overall prognosis. The treatment in most of the cases is late and ineffective, therefore careful follow-up is needed. There are still many uncertainties and questions about radiation-induced sarcomas. (authors)

  10. Breast Cancer Patients' Preferences for Adjuvant Radiotherapy Post Lumpectomy: Whole Breast Irradiation vs. Partial Breast Irradiation-Single Institutional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonin, Katija; McGuffin, Merrylee; Presutti, Roseanna; Harth, Tamara; Mesci, Aruz; Feldman-Stewart, Deb; Chow, Edward; Di Prospero, Lisa; Vesprini, Danny; Rakovitch, Eileen; Lee, Justin; Paszat, Lawrence; Doherty, Mary; Soliman, Hany; Ackerman, Ida; Cao, Xingshan; Kiss, Alex; Szumacher, Ewa

    2018-02-01

    This study was conducted to elucidate patients with early breast cancer preference for standard whole breast irradiation (WBI) or partial breast irradiation (PBI) following lumpectomy, as well as identify important factors for patients when making their treatment decisions. Based on relevant literature and ASTRO consensus statement guidelines, an educational tool and questionnaire were developed. Consenting, eligible women reviewed the educational tool and completed the trade-off questionnaire. Descriptive statistics were calculated, as well as chi-squares and a logistic regression model. Of the 90 patients who completed the study, 62 % preferred WBI, 30 % preferred PBI, 4 % required more information, and 3 % had no preferences. Of the patients who chose WBI, 58 % preferred hypofractionated RT, whereas 25 % preferred the conventional RT regimen. The majority of patients rated recurrence rate [WBI = 55/55 (100 %), PBI = 26/26 (100 %)] and survival [WBI = 54/55 (98 %), PBI = 26/26 (100 %)] as important factors contributing to their choice of treatment preference. Financial factors [WBI = 21/55 (38 %), PBI = 14/26 (53 %)] and convenience [WBI = 36/54 (67 %), PBI = 18/26 (69 %)] were rated as important less frequently. Significantly, more patients who preferred WBI also rated standard method of treatment as important when compared to patients who preferred PBI [WBI = 52/54 (96 %), PBI = 16/26 (61 %), χ 2  = 16.63, p = 0.001]. The majority of patients with early breast cancer who were surveyed for this study preferred WBI as an adjuvant treatment post lumpectomy, yet there was a sizeable minority who preferred PBI. This was associated with the importance patients place on standard treatment. These results will help medical professionals treat patients according to patient values.

  11. Prospective comparison of breast pain in patients participating in a randomized trial of breast-conserving surgery and tamoxifen with or without radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rayan, Gamal; Dawson, Laura A.; Bezjak, Andrea; Lau, Anthea; Fyles, Anthony W.; Yi, Q.-L.; Merante, Pat; Vallis, Katherine A.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether breast pain affects quality of life (QOL) after breast-conserving surgery and tamoxifen (TAM) with or without adjuvant breast radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: A randomized clinical trial was carried out at the Princess Margaret Hospital between 1992 and 2000 to evaluate the need for breast RT in addition to TAM in women ≥50 years treated with breast-conserving surgery for T1-T2N0 breast cancer. A companion study to assess breast pain was carried out during the last 2 years of the randomized clinical trial. The short-form McGill Pain Questionnaire (SF-MPQ), the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QOL (QLQ-C30) and EORTC breast cancer module (QLQ-BR23) questionnaires were completed by patients within 1 week of randomization in the randomized clinical trial (baseline) and at 3, 6, and 12 months. Results: Eighty-six patients participated in the breast pain study; 41 received RT plus TAM and 45 received TAM alone. The median age was 70 years (range 51-80). The baseline pain and QOL scores were similar for the two groups. No significant difference was found between the two groups for each scale of the QLQ-C30 and QLQ-BR23 questionnaires at 3, 6, or 12 months (p>0.100), except that at 12 months, the score for role function (QLQ-C30) was higher in the RT plus TAM group than in the RT-only group (p=0.02). At 3 months, the difference between the mean scores for the SF-MPQ was 0.553 (p=0.47). At 12 months, the pain scores had decreased in both groups; the difference was 0.199 (p=0.71). The number of breast operations or surgical complications did not correlate with breast pain in either group. Acute RT toxicity scores did not correlate with breast pain or QOL scores at 12 months. Conclusion: These results suggest that breast RT does not significantly contribute to breast pain or adversely impact the QOL up to 12 months after treatment in postmenopausal patients with node-negative breast cancer who take

  12. Cosmetic Evaluation of long term results following intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) of conservative surgery for breast carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fussl, C. M.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction In breast conserving therapy (BCT) of breast cancer, cosmetic results have become next to tumor-related outcome parameters a criterion of increasing awareness. The aim of this study is the evaluation of long term cosmetic results after conservative surgery and intraoperative radiotherapy with 10 Gy electrons (IOERT), followed by whole breast radiotherapy (WBRT) with 50-54 Gy. Patients and Methods From October 1998 to October 2005, 818 patients (median age 57.89 years) were treated by IOERT during breast conserving surgery, 12 of them for bilateral cancer. 32 patients were referred to mastectomy within primary treatment, 50 were reported as dead at the beginning of the study, 4 patients had developed an in-breast-recurrence and had been salvaged by secondary mastectomy, and in 41 cases an intercurrent dissemination was noted. All 679 remaining patients were invited in written form to participate in the cosmesis study. 403 of them (59.4%) have answered and were object of the evaluation (August 2006 to April 2007). To provide reproducible examination conditions, a standardized photo-documentation in four positions (frontal, loose-hanging and elevated arms; left and right lateral, elevated arms) was accomplished. Patients and treating physicians evaluated the cosmetic results separately within a 5-point-score (Excellent, Good, Moderate, Bad, Complications). Patient-, tumor- and treatment-related factors were investigated with regard to possible impact on the cosmetic outcome in all patients (group 1). A separate subgroup analysis was carried out for 261 patients with a follow-up of at least three years after completion of local treatment (group 2). For computation of the statistic correlation between the variables and the cosmetic evaluation the rank correlation coefficients Kendall's τ Spearman's ρ were used. A correlation is significant below a p-value of 0.05. Results The self-assessment of the patients in group 1 yielded around 69% excellent, 25

  13. Retrospective methods to estimate radiation dose at the site of breast cancer development after Hodgkin lymphoma radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola S. Russell

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: An increased risk of breast cancer following radiotherapy for Hodgkin lymphoma (HL has now been robustly established. In order to estimate the dose–response relationship more accurately, and to aid clinical decision making, a retrospective estimation of the radiation dose delivered to the site of the subsequent breast cancer is required. Methods: For 174 Dutch and 170 UK female patients with breast cancer following HL treatment, the 3-dimensional position of the breast cancer in the affected breast was determined and transferred onto a CT-based anthropomorphic phantom. Using a radiotherapy treatment planning system the dose distribution on the CT-based phantom was calculated for the 46 different radiation treatment field set-ups used in the study population. The estimated dose at the centre of the breast cancer, and a margin to reflect dose uncertainty were determined on the basis of the location of the tumour and the isodose lines from the treatment planning. We assessed inter-observer variation and for 47 patients we compared the results with a previously applied dosimetry method. Results: The estimated median point dose at the centre of the breast cancer location was 29.75 Gy (IQR 5.8–37.2, or about 75% of the prescribed radiotherapy dose. The median dose uncertainty range was 5.97 Gy. We observed an excellent inter-observer variation (ICC 0.89 (95% CI: 0.74–0.95. The absolute agreement intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC for inter-method variation was 0.59 (95% CI: 0.37–0.75, indicating (nearly good agreement. There were no systematic differences in the dose estimates between observers or methods. Conclusion: Estimates of the dose at the point of a subsequent breast cancer show good correlation between methods, but the retrospective nature of the estimates means that there is always some uncertainty to be accounted for. Keywords: Retrospective dosimetry, Hodgkin lymphoma, Breast carcinogenesis

  14. Short course radiotherapy with simultaneous integrated boost for stage I-II breast cancer, early toxicities of a randomized clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background TomoBreast is a unicenter, non-blinded randomized trial comparing conventional radiotherapy (CR) vs. hypofractionated Tomotherapy (TT) for post-operative treatment of breast cancer. The purpose of the trial is to compare whether TT can reduce heart and pulmonary toxicity. We evaluate early toxicities. Methods The trial started inclusion in May 2007 and reached its recruitment in August 2011. Women with stage T1-3N0M0 or T1-2N1M0 breast cancer completely resected by tumorectomy (BCS) or by mastectomy (MA) who consented to participate were randomized, according to a prescribed computer-generated randomization schedule, between control arm of CR 25x2 Gy/5 weeks by tangential fields on breast/chest wall, plus supraclavicular-axillary field if node-positive, and sequential boost 8x2 Gy/2 weeks if BCS (cumulative dose 66 Gy/7 weeks), versus experimental TT arm of 15x2.8 Gy/3 weeks, including nodal areas if node-positive and simultaneous integrated boost of 0.6 Gy if BCS (cumulative dose 51 Gy/3 weeks). Outcomes evaluated were the pulmonary and heart function. Comparison of proportions used one-sided Fisher's exact test. Results By May 2010, 70 patients were randomized and had more than 1 year of follow-up. Out of 69 evaluable cases, 32 were assigned to CR (21 BCS, 11 MA), 37 to TT (20 BCS, 17 MA). Skin toxicity of grade ≥1 at 2 years was 60% in CR, vs. 30% in TT arm. Heart function showed no significant difference for left ventricular ejection fraction at 2 years, CR 4.8% vs. TT 4.6%. Pulmonary function tests at 2 years showed grade ≥1 decline of FEV1 in 21% of CR, vs. 15% of TT and decline of DLco in 29% of CR, vs. 7% of TT (P = 0.05). Conclusions There were no unexpected severe toxicities. Short course radiotherapy of the breast with simultaneous integrated boost over 3 weeks proved feasible without excess toxicities. Pulmonary tests showed a slight trend in favor of Tomotherapy, which will need confirmation with longer

  15. Automated beam placement for breast radiotherapy using a support vector machine based algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Xuan; Kong, Dewen; Jozsef, Gabor; Chang, Jenghwa; Wong, Edward K.; Formenti, Silvia C.; Wang Yao

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To develop an automated beam placement technique for whole breast radiotherapy using tangential beams. We seek to find optimal parameters for tangential beams to cover the whole ipsilateral breast (WB) and minimize the dose to the organs at risk (OARs). Methods: A support vector machine (SVM) based method is proposed to determine the optimal posterior plane of the tangential beams. Relative significances of including/avoiding the volumes of interests are incorporated into the cost function of the SVM. After finding the optimal 3-D plane that separates the whole breast (WB) and the included clinical target volumes (CTVs) from the OARs, the gantry angle, collimator angle, and posterior jaw size of the tangential beams are derived from the separating plane equation. Dosimetric measures of the treatment plans determined by the automated method are compared with those obtained by applying manual beam placement by the physicians. The method can be further extended to use multileaf collimator (MLC) blocking by optimizing posterior MLC positions. Results: The plans for 36 patients (23 prone- and 13 supine-treated) with left breast cancer were analyzed. Our algorithm reduced the volume of the heart that receives >500 cGy dose (V5) from 2.7 to 1.7 cm 3 (p = 0.058) on average and the volume of the ipsilateral lung that receives >1000 cGy dose (V10) from 55.2 to 40.7 cm 3 (p = 0.0013). The dose coverage as measured by volume receiving >95% of the prescription dose (V95%) of the WB without a 5 mm superficial layer decreases by only 0.74% (p = 0.0002) and the V95% for the tumor bed with 1.5 cm margin remains unchanged. Conclusions: This study has demonstrated the feasibility of using a SVM-based algorithm to determine optimal beam placement without a physician's intervention. The proposed method reduced the dose to OARs, especially for supine treated patients, without any relevant degradation of dose homogeneity and coverage in general.

  16. WE-FG-BRA-11: Theranostic Platinum Nanoparticle for Radiation Sensitization in Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yue, Y; Wagner, S; Medina-Kauwe, L; Cui, X; Zhang, G; Shiao, S; Sandler, H; Fraass, B [Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    nanoparticle has excellent receptor targeting specificity and enhanced radiation sensitization compared to nanoparticle alone, suggesting potential for clinical applications in breast cancer radiotherapy.

  17. Concurrent chemo-radiotherapy following neoadjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zinser-Sierra Juan

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite broad advances in multimodal treatment of locally advanced breast cancer (LABC, 30 to 40% of patients develop loco-regional relapse. The aim of this study was to analyze in a retrospective manner the effectiveness of concurrent chemo-radiotherapy (CCRTh after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT in patients with LABC. Methods One hundred twelve patients with LABC (stage IIB-IIIB were treated with NCT (5-fluorouracil 500 mg/m2, doxorubicin 50 mg/m2, and cyclophosphamide 500 mg/m2 (FAC, or doxorubicin 50 mg/m2 and cyclophosphamide 500 mg/m2 (AC IV in four 21-day courses followed by CCRTh (60 Gy breast irradiation and weekly mitomycin 5 mg/m2, 5-fluorouracil 500 mg/m2, and dexamethasone 16 mg, or cisplatin 30 mg/m2, gemcitabine 100 mg/m2 and dexamethasone 16 mg, and 6–8 weeks later, surgery and two additional courses of FAC, AC, or paclitaxel 90 mg/m2 weekly for 12 weeks, and in case of estrogen-receptor positive patients, hormonal therapy. Results Stages IIB, IIIA and -B were 21.4, 42.9, and 35.7%, respectively. Pathological complete response (pCR in the breast was 42% (95% CI, 33.2–50.5% and, 29.5% (95% CI, 21.4–37.5% if including both the breast and the axillary nodes. Multivariate analysis showed that the main determinant of pCR was negative estrogen-receptor status (HR = 3.8; 95% CI, 1.5–9; p = 0.016. The 5-year disease-free survival (DFS was 76.9% (95% CI, 68.2–84.7%. No relationship between pCR and DFS was found. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that the main DFS determinant was clinical stage (IIB and IIIA vs. IIIB, HR = 3.1; 95% CI, 1.02–9.74; p = 0.04. Only one patient had local recurrence. Five-year overall survival was 84.2% (95% CI, 75–93.2%. The toxicity profile was acceptable. Conclusion This non-conventional multimodal treatment has good loco-regional control for LABC. Randomized clinical trials of preoperative CCRTh following chemotherapy, in patients with LABC are warranted.

  18. WE-FG-BRA-11: Theranostic Platinum Nanoparticle for Radiation Sensitization in Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue, Y; Wagner, S; Medina-Kauwe, L; Cui, X; Zhang, G; Shiao, S; Sandler, H; Fraass, B

    2016-01-01

    nanoparticle has excellent receptor targeting specificity and enhanced radiation sensitization compared to nanoparticle alone, suggesting potential for clinical applications in breast cancer radiotherapy.

  19. Modeling of the metallic port in breast tissue expanders for photon radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jihyung; Xie, Yibo; Heins, David; Zhang, Rui

    2018-03-30

    The purpose of this study was to model the metallic port in breast tissue expanders and to improve the accuracy of dose calculations in a commercial photon treatment planning system (TPS). The density of the model was determined by comparing TPS calculations and ion chamber (IC) measurements. The model was further validated and compared with two widely used clinical models by using a simplified anthropomorphic phantom and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) measurements. Dose perturbations and target coverage for a single postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) patient were also evaluated. The dimensions of the metallic port model were determined to be 1.75 cm in diameter and 5 mm in thickness. The density of the port was adjusted to be 7.5 g/cm 3 which minimized the differences between IC measurements and TPS calculations. Using the simplified anthropomorphic phantom, we found the TPS calculated point doses based on the new model were in agreement with TLD measurements within 5.0% and were more accurate than doses calculated based on the clinical models. Based on the photon treatment plans for a real patient, we found that the metallic port has a negligible dosimetric impact on chest wall, while the port introduced significant dose shadow in skin area. The current clinical port models either overestimate or underestimate the attenuation from the metallic port, and the dose perturbation depends on the plan and the model in a complex way. TPS calculations based on our model of the metallic port showed good agreement with measurements for all cases. This new model could improve the accuracy of dose calculations for PMRT patients who have temporary tissue expanders implanted during radiotherapy and could potentially reduce the risk of complications after the treatment. © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  20. Stability of spinal bone metastases in breast cancer after radiotherapy. A retrospective analysis of 157 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlampp, Ingmar; Rieken, Stefan; Habermehl, Daniel; Foerster, Robert; Debus, Juergen; Rief, Harald [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Bruckner, Thomas [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Medical Biometry, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-09-15

    This retrospective analysis was performed to evaluate osteolytic bone lesions of breast cancer in the thoracic and lumbar spine after radiotherapy (RT) in terms of stability using a validated scoring system. The stability of 157 osteolytic metastases, treated from January 2000 to January 2012, in 115 patients with breast cancer was evaluated retrospectively using the Taneichi score. Predictive factors for stability were analyzed and survival rates were calculated. Eighty-five (54 %) lesions were classified as unstable prior to RT. After 3 and 6 months, 109 (70 %) and 124 (79 %) lesions, respectively, were classified as stable. Thirty fractures were detected prior to RT, and after RT seven cases (4.5 %) with pathologic fractures were found within 6 months. None of the examined predictive factors showed significant correlation with stability 6 months after RT. After a median follow-up of 16.7 months, Kaplan-Meier estimates revealed an overall survival of 83 % after 5 years. The majority of patients showed an improved or unchanged stability of the involved vertebral bodies after 6 months. The patients showed only minor cancer-related morbidity during follow-up and reached comparably high survival rates. (orig.) [German] Die retrospektive Analyse untersuchte osteolytische Knochenmetastasen von Patienten mit Mammakarzinom der thorakalen und lumbalen Wirbelsaeule nach Radiotherapie (RT) hinsichtlich Stabilitaet anhand eines validierten Scores. Die Stabilitaet von 157 osteolytischen Metastasen bei 115 Patienten mit Brustkrebs, behandelt von Januar 2000 bis Januar 2012, wurde retrospektiv anhand des Taneichi-Scores evaluiert. Prognostische Faktoren bezueglich Stabilitaet und Ueberlebensraten wurden analysiert. Vor RT wurden 85 Laesionen (54 %) als instabil gewertet. Nach 3 und 6 Monaten wurden 109 (70 %) und 124 (79 %) Laesionen als stabil klassifiziert. Vor RT wurden 30 Frakturen gefunden, nach RT zeigten sich 7 weitere (4,5 %) pathologische Frakturen. Kein prognostischer

  1. A randomised controlled trial to evaluate both the role and the optimal fractionation of radiotherapy in the conservative management of early breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spooner, D; Stocken, D D; Jordan, S; Bathers, S; Dunn, J A; Jevons, C; Dodson, L; Morrison, J M; Oates, G D; Grieve, R J

    2012-12-01

    Postoperative radiotherapy is routinely used in early breast cancer employing either 50 Gy in 25 daily fractions (long course) or 40 Gy in 15 daily fractions (short course). The role of radiotherapy and shorter fractionation regimens require validation. Patients with clinical stage I and II disease were randomised to receive immediate radiotherapy or delayed salvage treatment (no radiotherapy). Patients receiving radiotherapy were further randomised between long (50 Gy in 25 daily fractions) or short (40 Gy in 15 daily fractions) regimens. The primary outcome measure was time to first locoregional relapse. Reported results are at a median follow-up of 16.9 years (interquartile range 15.4-18.8). In total, 707 women were recruited between 1985 and 1992: median age 59 years (range 28-80), 68% postmenopausal, median tumour size 2.0 cm (range 0.12-8.0); 271 patients have relapsed: 110 radiotherapy, 161 no radiotherapy. The site of first relapse was locoregional158 (64%) and distant 87 (36%). There was an estimated 24% reduction in the risk of any competing event (local relapse, distant relapse or death) with radiotherapy (hazard ratio = 0.76; 95% confidence interval 0.65, 0.88). The benefit of radiotherapy treatment for all competing event types was statistically significant (X(Wald)(2) = 36.04, P < 0.001). Immediate radiotherapy reduced the risk of locoregional relapse by 62% (hazard ratio = 0.38; 95% confidence interval 0.27, 0.53), consistent across prognostic subgroups. No differences were seen between either radiotherapy fractionation schedules. This study confirmed better locoregional control for patients with early breast cancer receiving radiotherapy. A radiotherapy schedule of 40 Gy in 15 daily fractions is an efficient and effective regimen that is at least as good as the international conventional regimen of 50 Gy in 25 daily fractions. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Comparison of three instrumental methods for the objective evaluation of radiotherapy induced erythema in breast cancer patients and a study of the effect of skin lotions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nystroem, Josefina; Lindholm-Sethson, Britta [Dept. of Chemistry, Umeaa Univ ., Umeaa (Sweden); Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics, Umeaa Univ., Umeaa (Sweden); Geladi, Paul [Unit of Biomass Technology and Chemistry, SLU Roebaecksdal en, Umeaa (Sweden); Svensk, Ann-Christine; Larson, Johan; Franzen, Lars [Dept. of Oncology, N orthern Univ. Hospital, Umeaa (Sweden)

    2007-10-15

    A non-blinded three armed study of the effect of Aloe vera, Essex and no lotion on erythema was performed. The erythema is an effect of radiotherapy treatment in breast cancer patients. The study required testing of objective methods for measuring the erythema. The chosen experimental methods were Near Infrared Spectroscopy, Laser Doppler Imaging and Digital Colour Photography. The experimental setup was made in such a way that in parallel with testing the effect of the lotions there was also a test of the sensitivity of the instruments. Fifty women were selected consecutively to participate in the study. They were all subjected to treatment with high-energy electrons (9-20 MeV) after mastectomy, 2 Gy/day to a total dose of 50 Gy. Measurements were performed before the start of radiotherapy and thereafter once a week during the course of treatment. Aloe vera and Essex lotion were applied twice every radiation day in selected sites. The increase in skin redness could be monitored with all techniques with a detection limit of 8 Gy for Digital Colour Photography and Near Infrared Spectroscopy and 18 Gy for Laser Doppler Imaging. In clinical practice our recommendation is to use Digital Colour Photography. No significant median differences were observed between the pairs no lotion-Essex, no lotion-Aloe vera and Essex-Aloe vera for any of the techniques tested.

  3. Comparison of three instrumental methods for the objective evaluation of radiotherapy induced erythema in breast cancer patients and a study of the effect of skin lotions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nystroem, Josefina; Lindholm-Sethson, Britta; Geladi, Paul; Svensk, Ann-Christine; Larson, Johan; Franzen, Lars

    2007-01-01

    A non-blinded three armed study of the effect of Aloe vera, Essex and no lotion on erythema was performed. The erythema is an effect of radiotherapy treatment in breast cancer patients. The study required testing of objective methods for measuring the erythema. The chosen experimental methods were Near Infrared Spectroscopy, Laser Doppler Imaging and Digital Colour Photography. The experimental setup was made in such a way that in parallel with testing the effect of the lotions there was also a test of the sensitivity of the instruments. Fifty women were selected consecutively to participate in the study. They were all subjected to treatment with high-energy electrons (9-20 MeV) after mastectomy, 2 Gy/day to a total dose of 50 Gy. Measurements were performed before the start of radiotherapy and thereafter once a week during the course of treatment. Aloe vera and Essex lotion were applied twice every radiation day in selected sites. The increase in skin redness could be monitored with all techniques with a detection limit of 8 Gy for Digital Colour Photography and Near Infrared Spectroscopy and 18 Gy for Laser Doppler Imaging. In clinical practice our recommendation is to use Digital Colour Photography. No significant median differences were observed between the pairs no lotion-Essex, no lotion-Aloe vera and Essex-Aloe vera for any of the techniques tested

  4. Late radiation side effects, cosmetic outcomes and pain in breast cancer patients after breast-conserving surgery and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. Risk-modifying factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hille-Betz, Ursula; Soergel, Philipp; Kundu, Sudip; Klapdor, Ruediger; Hillemanns, Peter; Vaske, Bernhard; Bremer, Michael; Henkenberens, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to identify parameters influencing the risk of late radiation side effects, fair or poor cosmetic outcomes (COs) and pain in breast cancer patients after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Between 2006 and 2013, 159 patients were treated at the Hannover Medical School. Physician-rated toxicity according to the LENT-SOMA criteria, CO and pain were assessed by multivariate analysis. LENT-SOMA grade 1-4 toxicity was observed as follows: fibrosis 10.7 %, telangiectasia 1.2 %, arm oedema 8.8 % and breast oedema 5.0 %. In addition, 15.1 % of patients reported moderate or severe breast pain, and 21.4 % complained about moderate or severe pain in the arm or shoulder. In multivariate analysis, axillary clearing (AC) was significantly associated with lymphoedema of the arm [odds ratio (OR) 4.37, p = 0.011, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.4-13.58]. Breast oedema was also highly associated with AC (OR 10.59, p = 0.004, 95 % CI 2.1-53.36), a ptosis grade 2/3 or pseudoptosis and a bra size ≥ cup C (OR 5.34, p = 0.029, 95 % CI 1.2-24.12). A ptosis grade 2/3 or pseudoptosis and a bra size ≥ cup C were the parameters significantly associated with an unfavourable CO (OR 3.19, p = 0.019, 95 % CI 1.2-8.4). Concerning chronic breast pain, we found a trend related to the prescribed radiation dose including boost (OR 1.077, p = 0.060, 95 % CI 0.997-1.164). Chronic shoulder or arm pain was statistically significantly associated with lymphoedema of the arm (OR 3.9, p = 0.027, 95 % CI 1.17-13.5). Chronic arm and breast oedema were significantly influenced by the extent of surgery (AC). Ptotic and large breasts were significantly associated with unfavourable COs and chronic breast oedema. Late toxicities exclusive breast pain were not associated with radiotherapy parameters. (orig.) [de

  5. Random start ovarian stimulation for fertility preservation appears unlikely to delay initiation of neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letourneau, Joseph M; Sinha, Nikita; Wald, Kaitlyn; Harris, Eve; Quinn, Molly; Imbar, Tal; Mok-Lin, Evelyn; Chien, A Jo; Rosen, Mitchell

    2017-10-01

    Is random start ovarian stimulation associated with delays in initiation of neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer? Among women who complete fertility preservation (FP) consultation, random start ovarian stimulation is unlikely to delay time to initiation of neoadjuvant chemotherapy start. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy is now a widely accepted treatment modality for operable breast cancer and random start ovarian stimulation is an increasingly-utilized modality for FP. While conventional ovarian stimulation does not appear to delay starting adjuvant chemotherapy, the relationship between random start ovarian stimulation and neoadjuvant chemotherapy start is not well-understood. Cross-sectional study of all women seen between from January 2011 to April 2017 for FP consultation prior to starting neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer. A chart-review was performed. Study inclusion criteria were female sex; age 18-45; non-metastatic breast cancer diagnosis; underwent FP consultation; underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Referrals for FP evaluation came from a regional referral base of oncology clinics. Various time-points related to cancer diagnosis, FP or chemotherapy were obtained from medical record review. We compared time-points between those who underwent ovarian stimulation for FP versus those who did not using T-tests and linear modeling. A total of 89 women who had FP consultation prior to neoadjuvant chemotherapy were identified. Sixty-seven percent underwent ovarian stimulation prior to cancer treatment and 33% did not. Women who underwent ovarian stimulation were similar in parity and clinical cancer stage to those who did not. Overall, the average time from cancer diagnosis to chemotherapy start was similar between the group that did undergo ovarian stimulation and those who did not (38.1 ± 11.3 versus 39.4 ± 18.5 days, P = 0.672). Those that underwent ovarian stimulation were referred 9.4 ± 6.8 days after diagnosis versus 17.9 ± 15.3 days for those

  6. Effect of radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery on 10-year recurrence and 15-year breast cancer death: meta-analysis of individual patient data for 10,801 women in 17 randomised trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darby, S; McGale, P; Correa, C

    2011-01-01

    After breast-conserving surgery, radiotherapy reduces recurrence and breast cancer death, but it may do so more for some groups of women than for others. We describe the absolute magnitude of these reductions according to various prognostic and other patient characteristics, and relate the absolute...

  7. Complications of Radiotherapy after Immediate Breast Reconstruction with Implant: Risk Factors and Management - Our Institute’s Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heba G. El-Sheredy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Breast cancer is the most frequent malignant tumor in women worldwide. In recent years, defined reconstruction principles along with numerous surgical techniques with volume replacement have been published. Autologous breast reconstruction is more natural but leaves donor site morbidity. It provides the opportunity to restore the breast mound without the need for scars. This study aims to evaluate the complications of radiotherapy after immediate breast reconstruction with implants in breast cancer patients who submitted to skin sparing mastectomy and nipple sparing mastectomy by taking into consideration the risk factors and management at our institution. Methods: The current study prospectively included patients with invasive breast cancer admitted between January and June 2012 who were scheduled for skin sparing mastectomy or nipple sparing mastectomy and axillary dissection followed by immediate breast reconstruction with implant. Patients received adjuvant chemotherapy followed by conventional fractionated radiation. Complications were classified as either minor or major. The minor complications included capsular contracture (Baker 1-2, seroma, minor skin infection and skin dehiscence without exposure of the implant. Major complications included capsular contracture (Baker 3-4, severe infection and major wound dehiscence with implant exposure. Capsular contracture was scored according to the modified Baker classification. Results: The study included 38 patients. Of these, 28 had skin sparing mastectomy while 10 underwent nipple sparing mastectomy. The overall complication rate was 71%. We observed minor complications in 18 patients while 9 patients had major complications. Complications occurred with a median time of 13 months following radiotherapy completion. All minor complications were managed conservatively whereas all major complications required repeat surgery. No loco-regional recurrences occurred during the follow up

  8. Breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, G.G.

    1985-01-01

    The treatment of malignant disease of the breast arouses more controversy and emotion than that of any other form of malignant disease. Many clinical trials have been carried out and others are still in progress. In addition, research work continues in regard to other aspects of the disease, such as epidemiology, population screening, and endocrine factors; yet little is really known about the true biological nature of carcinoma of the breast. A vast amount of literature has accumulated on the treatment of ''operable'' carcinoma of the breast, but it is not proposed to discuss here the merits or demerits of the various suggested treatments. Instead this chapter will be confined to the practical management of carcinoma of the breast as seen from the point of view of radiotherapist. For this reason greater attention will be paid to the radiotherapy techniques as practised at the Christie Hospital

  9. Angiosarcoma after breast-conserving therapy: long-term outcomes with hyperfractionated radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palta, Manisha; Morris, Christopher G; Grobmyer, Stephen R; Copeland, Edward M; Mendenhall, Nancy P

    2010-04-15

    With breast-conserving therapy (BCT) as the standard of care for patients with noninvasive and early stage invasive breast cancer, a small incidence of post-BCT angiosarcoma has emerged. The majority of therapeutic interventions have been unsuccessful. To the authors' knowledge, there is no consensus in the medical literature to date regarding the treatment of this malignancy. The current study was conducted to report the long-term outcomes of a novel approach using hyperfractionated and accelerated radiotherapy (HART) for angiosarcoma developing after BCT. The authors retrospectively reviewed the outcomes of 14 patients treated with HART with or without surgery at the University of Florida between November 1997 and March 2006 for angiosarcoma that developed after BCT. At the time of last follow-up, 9 patients had remained continuously without evidence of disease for a median of 61 months after HART (range, 36-127 months). Five patients had further manifestations of angiosarcoma after HART at a median of 1 month (range, 1-28 months): 3 with progressive pulmonary and/or mediastinal disease that was likely present before HART and 2 with local or regional disease extension. Progression-free survival rates for the 14 patients at 2 years and 5 years were 71% and 64%, respectively. The overall and cause-specific survival rates were both 86% at 2 years and 5 years. To the best of the authors' knowledge, HART with or without subsequent surgery, as documented in the current series, is the first approach to provide a high rate of local control, disease-free survival, and overall survival after the development of post-BCT angiosarcoma. The authors believe the success noted with this approach is related to both the hyperfractionation and acceleration of the RT. (c) 2010 American Cancer Society.

  10. Changes in mast cell number and stem cell factor expression in human skin after radiotherapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westbury, Charlotte B.; Freeman, Alex; Rashid, Mohammed; Pearson, Ann; Yarnold, John R.; Short, Susan C.

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: Mast cells are involved in the pathogenesis of radiation fibrosis and may be a therapeutic target. The mechanism of increased mast cell number in relation to acute and late tissue responses in human skin was investigated. Materials and methods: Punch biopsies of skin 1 and 15–18 months after breast radiotherapy and a contralateral control biopsy were collected. Mast cells were quantified by immunohistochemistry using the markers c-Kit and tryptase. Stem cell factor (SCF) and collagen-1 expression was analysed by qRT-PCR. Clinical photographic scores were performed at post-surgical baseline and 18 months and 5 years post-radiotherapy. Primary human dermal microvascular endothelial cell (HDMEC) cultures were exposed to 2 Gy ionising radiation and p53 and SCF expression was analysed by Western blotting and ELISA. Results: Dermal mast cell numbers were increased at 1 (p = 0.047) and 18 months (p = 0.040) using c-Kit, and at 18 months (p = 0.024) using tryptase immunostaining. Collagen-1 mRNA in skin was increased at 1 month (p = 0.047) and 18 months (p = 0.032) and SCF mRNA increased at 1 month (p = 0.003). None of 16 cases scored had a change in photographic appearance at 5 years, compared to baseline. SCF expression was not increased in HDMECs irradiated in vitro. Conclusions: Increased mast cell number was associated with up-regulated collagen-1 expression in human skin at early and late time points. This increase could be secondary to elevated SCF expression at 1 month after radiotherapy. Although mast cells accumulate around blood vessels, no endothelial cell secretion of SCF was seen after in vitro irradiation. Modification of mast cell number and collagen-1 expression may be observed in skin at 1 and 18 months after radiotherapy in breast cancer patients with no change in photographic breast appearance at 5 years

  11. The expression level of HJURP has an independent prognostic impact and predicts the sensitivity to radiotherapy in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Zhi; Huang, Ge; Sadanandam, Anguraj; Gu, Shenda; Lenburg, Marc E.; Pai, Melody; Bayani, Nora; Blakely, Eleanor A.; Gray, Joe W.; Mao, Jian-Hua

    2010-01-01

    HJURP (Holliday Junction Recognition Protein) is a newly discovered gene reported to function at centromeres and to interact with CENPA. However its role in tumor development remains largely unknown. The goal of this study was to investigate the clinical significance of HJURP in breast cancer and its correlation with radiotherapeutic outcome. We measured HJURP expression level in human breast cancer cell lines and primary breast cancers by Western blot and/or by Affymetrix Microarray; and determined its associations with clinical variables using standard statistical methods. Validation was performed with the use of published microarray data. We assessed cell growth and apoptosis of breast cancer cells after radiation using high-content image analysis. HJURP was expressed at higher level in breast cancer than in normal breast tissue. HJURP mRNA levels were significantly associated with estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), Scarff-Bloom-Richardson (SBR) grade, age and Ki67 proliferation indices, but not with pathologic stage, ERBB2, tumor size, or lymph node status. Higher HJURP mRNA levels significantly decreased disease-free and overall survival. HJURP mRNA levels predicted the prognosis better than Ki67 proliferation indices. In a multivariate Cox proportional-hazard regression, including clinical variables as covariates, HJURP mRNA levels remained an independent prognostic factor for disease-free and overall survival. In addition HJURP mRNA levels were an independent prognostic factor over molecular subtypes (normal like, luminal, Erbb2 and basal). Poor clinical outcomes among patients with high HJURP expression were validated in five additional breast cancer cohorts. Furthermore, the patients with high HJURP levels were much more sensitive to radiotherapy. In vitro studies in breast cancer cell lines showed that cells with high HJURP levels were more sensitive to radiation treatment and had a higher rate of apoptosis than those with low levels

  12. The expression level of HJURP has an independent prognostic impact and predicts the sensitivity to radiotherapy in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Zhi; Huang, Ge; Sadanandam, Anguraj; Gu, Shenda; Lenburg, Marc E; Pai, Melody; Bayani, Nora; Blakely, Eleanor A; Gray, Joe W; Mao, Jian-Hua

    2010-06-25

    Introduction: HJURP (Holliday Junction Recognition Protein) is a newly discovered gene reported to function at centromeres and to interact with CENPA. However its role in tumor development remains largely unknown. The goal of this study was to investigate the clinical significance of HJURP in breast cancer and its correlation with radiotherapeutic outcome. Methods: We measured HJURP expression level in human breast cancer cell lines and primary breast cancers by Western blot and/or by Affymetrix Microarray; and determined its associations with clinical variables using standard statistical methods. Validation was performed with the use of published microarray data. We assessed cell growth and apoptosis of breast cancer cells after radiation using high-content image analysis. Results: HJURP was expressed at higher level in breast cancer than in normal breast tissue. HJURP mRNA levels were significantly associated with estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), Scarff-Bloom-Richardson (SBR) grade, age and Ki67 proliferation indices, but not with pathologic stage, ERBB2, tumor size, or lymph node status. Higher HJURP mRNA levels significantly decreased disease-free and overall survival. HJURP mRNA levels predicted the prognosis better than Ki67 proliferation indices. In a multivariate Cox proportional-hazard regression, including clinical variables as covariates, HJURP mRNA levels remained an independent prognostic factor for disease-free and overall survival. In addition HJURP mRNA levels were an independent prognostic factor over molecular subtypes (normal like, luminal, Erbb2 and basal). Poor clinical outcomes among patients with high HJURP expression werevalidated in five additional breast cancer cohorts. Furthermore, the patients with high HJURP levels were much more sensitive to radiotherapy. In vitro studies in breast cancer cell lines showed that cells with high HJURP levels were more sensitive to radiation treatment and had a higher rate of apoptosis

  13. Music Therapy Reduces Radiotherapy-Induced Fatigue in Patients With Breast or Gynecological Cancer: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcântara-Silva, Tereza Raquel; de Freitas-Junior, Ruffo; Freitas, Nilceana Maya Aires; de Paula Junior, Wanderley; da Silva, Delson José; Machado, Graziela Dias Pinheiro; Ribeiro, Mayara Kelly Alves; Carneiro, Jonathas Paiva; Soares, Leonardo Ribeiro

    2018-04-01

    To investigate the influence of music therapy on the reduction of fatigue in women with breast or gynecological malignant neoplasia during radiotherapy, since it is one of the most frequent side effects of this type of treatment, and may interfere with self-esteem, social activities, and quality of life. Randomized controlled trial (control group [CG] and music therapy group [MTG]) to assess fatigue, quality of life, and symptoms of depression in women undergoing radiotherapy using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy: Fatigue (FACT-F) version 4, Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General (FACT-G) version 4, and Beck Depression Inventory in 3 separate times, namely, during the first week of radiotherapy, on the week of the intermediary phase, and during the last week of radiotherapy. Individual 30- to 40-minute sessions of music therapy with the presence of a trained music therapist were offered to participants. In this study, 164 women were randomized and 116 (63 CG and 53 MTG) were included in the analyses, with mean age of 52.90 years (CG) and 51.85 years (MTG). Participants in the MTG had an average of 10 music therapy sessions, totaling 509 sessions throughout the study. FACT-F results were significant regarding Trial Outcome Index ( P = .011), FACT-G ( P = .005), and FACT-F ( P = .001) for the MTG compared with the CG. Individual music therapy sessions may be effective to reduce fatigue related to cancer and symptoms of depression, as well as to improve quality of life for women with breast or gynecological cancer undergoing radiotherapy. Further well-designed research studies are needed to adequately determine the effects of music therapy on fatigue.

  14. Prospective study of postoperative whole breast radiotherapy for Japanese large-breasted women: a clinical and dosimetric comparisons between supine and prone positions and a dose measurement using a breast phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Kana; Morota, Madoka; Kagami, Yoshikazu; Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Sekii, Shuhei; Inaba, Koji; Murakami, Naoya; Igaki, Hiroshi; Ito, Yoshinori; Uno, Takashi; Itami, Jun

    2016-01-01

    This prospective study aimed to compare dose volume histograms (DVH) of the breasts and organs at risk (OARs) of whole breast radiotherapy in the supine and prone positions, and frequency and severity of acute and late toxicities were analyzed. Early-stage breast cancer patients with large breasts (Japanese bra size C or larger, or the widest measurements of the bust ≥ 95 cm) undergoing partial mastectomy participated in this study. CT-based treatment plans were made in each position, and various dosimetric parameters for the breast and OARs were calculated to compare the supine and prone radiotherapy plans. The actual treatment was delivered in the position regarded as better. From 2009 to 2010, 22 patients were prospectively accrued. Median follow-up period was 58 months. The homogeneity index and lung doses were significantly lower in the prone position (P = 0.008, P < 0.0001 and P < 0.0001, respectively). Cardiac dose showed no significant differences between two positions. By comparing two plans, the prone position was chosen in 77 % of the patients. In the prone position, ≥ grade 2 acute dermatitis were seen in 47 % of patients treated, whereas 20 % of the patients treated in the supine position had grade 2 and no cases of grade 3, although without a statistical significance of the rates of ≥ grade 2 acute dermatitis between the two positions (P = 0.28). The actual dose measurement using a breast phantom revealed significantly higher surface dose of the breast treated in the prone position than that in the supine position. Breast irradiation in the prone position improves PTV homogeneity and lowers doses to the OARs in the Japanese large-breast patients. However meticulous positioning of the breast in the prone board avoiding the bolus effect is necessary to prevent acute dermatitis

  15. A randomized trial of a cognitive-behavioral therapy and hypnosis intervention on positive and negative affect during breast cancer radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnur, Julie B; David, Daniel; Kangas, Maria; Green, Sheryl; Bovbjerg, Dana H; Montgomery, Guy H

    2009-04-01

    Breast cancer radiotherapy can be an emotionally difficult experience. Despite this, few studies have examined the effectiveness of psychological interventions to reduce negative affect, and none to date have explicitly examined interventions to improve positive affect among breast cancer radiotherapy patients. The present study examined the effectiveness of a multimodal psychotherapeutic approach, combining cognitive-behavioral therapy and hypnosis (CBTH), to reduce negative affect and increase positive affect in 40 women undergoing breast cancer radiotherapy. Participants were randomly assigned to receive either CBTH or standard care. Participants completed weekly self-report measures of positive and negative affect. Repeated and univariate analyses of variance revealed that the CBTH approach reduced levels of negative affect [F(1, 38)=13.49; p=.0007, omega(2)=.56], and increased levels of positive affect [F(1, 38)=9.67; p=.0035, omega(2)=.48], during the course of radiotherapy. Additionally, relative to the control group, the CBTH group demonstrated significantly more intense positive affect [F(1, 38)=7.09; p=.0113, d=.71] and significantly less intense negative affect [F(1, 38)=10.30; p=.0027, d=.90] during radiotherapy. The CBTH group also had a significantly higher frequency of days where positive affect was greater than negative affect (85% of days assessed for the CBTH group versus 43% of the Control group) [F(1, 38)=18.16; p=.0001, d=1.16]. Therefore, the CBTH intervention has the potential to improve the affective experience of women undergoing breast cancer radiotherapy.

  16. A phase III randomized study on the sequencing of radiotherapy and chemotherapy in the conservative management of early-stage breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arcangeli, Giorgio; Pinnaro, Paola; Rambone, Rita; Giannarelli, Diana; Benassi, Marcello

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To compare two different timings of radiation treatment in patients with breast cancer who underwent conservative surgery and were candidates to receive adjuvant cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and fluorouracil (CMF) chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 206 patients who had quadrantectomy and axillary dissection for breast cancer and were planned to receive adjuvant CMF chemotherapy were randomized to concurrent or sequential radiotherapy. Radiotherapy was delivered only to the whole breast through tangential fields to a dose of 50 Gy in 20 fractions over 4 weeks, followed by an electron boost of 10-15 Gy in 4-6 fractions to the tumor bed. Results: No differences in 5-year breast recurrence-free, metastasis-free, disease-free, and overall survival were observed in the two treatment groups. All patients completed the planned radiotherapy. No evidence of an increased risk of toxicity was observed between the two arms. No difference in radiotherapy and in the chemotherapy dose intensity was observed in the two groups. Conclusions: In patients with negative surgical margins receiving adjuvant chemotherapy, radiotherapy can be delayed to up to 7 months. Concurrent administration of CMF chemotherapy and radiotherapy is safe and might be reserved for patients at high risk of local recurrence, such as those with positive surgical margins or larger tumor diameters

  17. Estimating the Need for Radiotherapy for Patients With Prostate, Breast, and Lung Cancers: Verification of Model Estimates of Need With Radiotherapy Utilization Data From British Columbia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyldesley, Scott; Delaney, Geoff; Foroudi, Farshad; Barbera, Lisa; Kerba, Marc; Mackillop, William

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Estimates of the need for radiotherapy (RT) using different methods (criterion based benchmarking [CBB] and the Canadian [C-EBEST] and Australian [A-EBEST] epidemiologically based estimates) exist for various cancer sites. We compared these model estimates to actual RT rates for lung, breast, and prostate cancers in British Columbia (BC). Methods and Materials: All cases of lung, breast, and prostate cancers in BC from 1997 to 2004 and all patients receiving RT within 1 year (RT 1Y ) and within 5 years (RT 5Y ) of diagnosis were identified. The RT 1Y and RT 5Y proportions in health regions with a cancer center for the most recent year were then calculated. RT rates were compared with CBB and EBEST estimates of RT needs. Variation was assessed by time and region. Results: The RT 1Y in regions with a cancer center for lung, breast, and prostate cancers were 51%, 58%, and 33% compared with 45%, 57%, and 32% for C-EBEST and 41%, 61%, and 37% for CBB models. The RT 5Y rates in regions with a cancer center for lung, breast, and prostate cancers were 59%, 61%, and 40% compared with 61%, 66%, and 61% for C-EBEST and 75%, 83%, and 60% for A-EBEST models. The RT 1Y rates increased for breast and prostate cancers. Conclusions: C-EBEST and CBB model estimates are closer to the actual RT rates than the A-EBEST estimates. Application of these model estimates by health care decision makers should be undertaken with an understanding of the methods used and the assumptions on which they were based.

  18. A randomized control trial evaluating fluorescent ink versus dark ink tattoos for breast radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landeg, Steven J; Kirby, Anna M; Lee, Steven F; Bartlett, Freddie; Titmarsh, Kumud; Donovan, Ellen; Griffin, Clare L; Gothard, Lone; Locke, Imogen; McNair, Helen A

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this UK study was to evaluate interfraction reproducibility and body image score when using ultraviolet (UV) tattoos (not visible in ambient lighting) for external references during breast/chest wall radiotherapy and compare with conventional dark ink. In this non-blinded, single-centre, parallel group, randomized control trial, patients were allocated to receive either conventional dark ink or UV ink tattoos using computer-generated random blocks. Participant assignment was not masked. Systematic (∑) and random (σ) setup errors were determined using electronic portal images. Body image questionnaires were completed at pre-treatment, 1 month and 6 months to determine the impact of tattoo type on body image. The primary end point was to determine that UV tattoo random error (σ setup ) was no less accurate than with conventional dark ink tattoos, i.e. tattoos. 45 patients completed treatment (UV: n = 23, dark: n = 22). σ setup for the UV tattoo group was tattoo group compared with the dark ink group at 1 month [56% (13/23) vs 14% (3/22), respectively] and 6 months [52% (11/21) vs 38% (8/21), respectively]. UV tattoos were associated with interfraction setup reproducibility comparable with conventional dark ink. Patients reported a more favourable change in body image score up to 6 months following treatment. Advances in knowledge: This study is the first to evaluate UV tattoo external references in a randomized control trial.

  19. SU-F-T-115: Uncertainty in the Esophagus Dose in Retrospective Epidemiological Study of Breast Cancer Radiotherapy Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosher, E; Kim, S; Lee, C [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD (United States); Lee, C [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Pelletier, C; Jung, J [Department of Physics, East Carolina University Greenville, NC (United States); Jones, E [Radiology and Imaging Sciences Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Epidemiological studies of second cancer risks in breast cancer radiotherapy patients often use generic patient anatomy to reconstruct normal tissue doses when CT images of patients are not available. To evaluate the uncertainty involved in the dosimetry approach, we evaluated the esophagus dose in five sample patients by simulating breast cancer treatments. Methods: We obtained the diagnostic CT images of five anonymized adult female patients in different Body Mass Index (BMI) categories (16– 36kg/m2) from National Institutes of Health Clinical Center. We contoured the esophagus on the CT images and imported them into a Treatment Planning System (TPS) to create treatment plans and calculate esophagus doses. Esophagus dose was calculated once again via experimentally-validated Monte Carlo (MC) transport code, XVMC under the same geometries. We compared the esophagus doses from TPS and the MC method. We also investigated the degree of variation in the esophagus dose across the five patients and also the relationship between the patient characteristics and the esophagus doses. Results: Eclipse TPS using Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm (AAA) significantly underestimates the esophagus dose in breast cancer radiotherapy compared to MC. In the worst case, the esophagus dose from AAA was only 40% of the MC dose. The Coefficient of Variation across the patients was 48%. We found that the maximum esophagus dose was up to 2.7 times greater than the minimum. We finally observed linear relationship (Dose = 0.0218 × BMI – 0.1, R2=0.54) between patient’s BMI and the esophagus doses. Conclusion: We quantified the degree of uncertainty in the esophagus dose in five sample breast radiotherapy patients. The results of the study underscore the importance of individualized dose reconstruction for the study cohort to avoid misclassification in the risk analysis of second cancer. We are currently extending the number of patients up to 30.

  20. SU-F-T-115: Uncertainty in the Esophagus Dose in Retrospective Epidemiological Study of Breast Cancer Radiotherapy Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosher, E; Kim, S; Lee, C; Lee, C; Pelletier, C; Jung, J; Jones, E

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Epidemiological studies of second cancer risks in breast cancer radiotherapy patients often use generic patient anatomy to reconstruct normal tissue doses when CT images of patients are not available. To evaluate the uncertainty involved in the dosimetry approach, we evaluated the esophagus dose in five sample patients by simulating breast cancer treatments. Methods: We obtained the diagnostic CT images of five anonymized adult female patients in different Body Mass Index (BMI) categories (16– 36kg/m2) from National Institutes of Health Clinical Center. We contoured the esophagus on the CT images and imported them into a Treatment Planning System (TPS) to create treatment plans and calculate esophagus doses. Esophagus dose was calculated once again via experimentally-validated Monte Carlo (MC) transport code, XVMC under the same geometries. We compared the esophagus doses from TPS and the MC method. We also investigated the degree of variation in the esophagus dose across the five patients and also the relationship between the patient characteristics and the esophagus doses. Results: Eclipse TPS using Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm (AAA) significantly underestimates the esophagus dose in breast cancer radiotherapy compared to MC. In the worst case, the esophagus dose from AAA was only 40% of the MC dose. The Coefficient of Variation across the patients was 48%. We found that the maximum esophagus dose was up to 2.7 times greater than the minimum. We finally observed linear relationship (Dose = 0.0218 × BMI – 0.1, R2=0.54) between patient’s BMI and the esophagus doses. Conclusion: We quantified the degree of uncertainty in the esophagus dose in five sample breast radiotherapy patients. The results of the study underscore the importance of individualized dose reconstruction for the study cohort to avoid misclassification in the risk analysis of second cancer. We are currently extending the number of patients up to 30.