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Sample records for breast radiotherapy start

  1. Late normal tissue effects in the arm and shoulder following lymphatic radiotherapy: Results from the UK START (Standardisation of Breast Radiotherapy) trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haviland, Joanne S; Mannino, Mariella; Griffin, Clare; Porta, Nuria; Sydenham, Mark; Bliss, Judith M; Yarnold, John R

    2018-01-01

    Adjuvant lymphatic radiotherapy (LNRT) is recommended for selected axillary node positive women with early breast cancer. We investigated whether hypofractionated LNRT is safe combined with similarly-hypofractionated breast/chest wall radiotherapy (RT). The Standardisation of Breast Radiotherapy (START) pilot, A and B trials randomised women with early breast cancer to schedules of 2.67-3.3 Gy versus 2.0 Gy fractions (control). RT adverse effects were assessed by patients using the EORTC QLQ-BR23 and protocol-specific questions, and by physicians. Rates of arm/shoulder effects were compared between schedules for patients given LNRT. 864/5861 (14.7%) patients received LNRT (385 START-pilot, 318 START-A, 161 START-B). Prevalences of moderate/marked arm/shoulder effects were low up to 10 years. There were no significant differences between the hypofractionated and control groups for patient- and physician-assessed symptoms in START-A or START-B. In START-pilot, adverse effect rates were higher after 13 fractions of 3.3 Gy, consistent with effects reported in the breast/chest wall (significant for shoulder stiffness, HR 3.07, 95%CI 1.62-5.83, p = 0.001). The START trial results suggest that appropriately-dosed hypofractionated LNRT is safe in the long-term, according to patient and physician-assessed arm and shoulder symptoms. These findings are consistent with those reported after the same schedules delivered to the breast/chest wall. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Do Patient-reported Outcome Measures Agree with Clinical and Photographic Assessments of Normal Tissue Effects after Breast Radiotherapy? The Experience of the Standardisation of Breast Radiotherapy (START) Trials in Early Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haviland, J S; Hopwood, P; Mills, J; Sydenham, M; Bliss, J M; Yarnold, J R

    2016-06-01

    In radiotherapy trials, normal tissue effects (NTE) are important end points and it is pertinent to ask whether patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) could replace clinical and/or photographic assessments. Data from the Standardisation of Breast Radiotherapy (START) trials are examined. NTEs in the treated breast were recorded by (i) annual clinical assessments, (ii) photographs at 2 and 5 years, (iii) PROMs at 6 months, 1, 2 and 5 years after radiotherapy. Hazard ratios for the radiotherapy schedules were compared. Measures of agreement of assessments at 2 and 5 years tested concordance. PROMs were available at 2 and/or 5 years for 1939 women, of whom 1870 had clinical and 1444 had photographic assessments. All methods were sensitive to the dose difference between schedules. Patients reported a higher prevalence for all NTE end points than clinicians or photographs (P < 0.001 for most NTEs). Concordance was generally poor; weighted kappa at 2 years ranged from 0.05 (telangiectasia) to 0.21 (shrinkage and oedema). The percentage agreement was lowest between PROMs and photographic assessments of change in breast appearance (38%). All three methods produced similar conclusions for the comparison of trial schedules, despite low concordance between the methods on an individual patient basis. Careful consideration should be given to the different contributions of the measures of NTE in future radiotherapy trials. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Dermatologic radiotherapy and breast cancer

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    Goldschmidt, H.; Gorson, R.O.; Lassen, M.

    1982-03-01

    This study was set up to provide quantitative data to evaluate unsubstantiated claims that improper dermatologic radiation techniques may cause breast cancer. A thin mylar window ionization rate meter placed at the location of the right breast of an Alderson-RANDO anthropomorphic phantom was used to measure direct and scatter radiation reaching the female breast during radiotherapy of the facial region (as given for acne). The results indicate that scatter doses are very small; they are influenced by radiation quality and the use or nonuse of a treatment cone. Quantitative risk estimates show that the very small risk of breast cancer induction can be reduced even further by the use of proper radiation protection measures.

  4. Intraoperative Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleanor E. R. Harris

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT for early stage breast cancer is a technique for partial breast irradiation. There are several technologies in clinical use to perform breast IORT. Regardless of technique, IORT generally refers to the delivery of a single dose of radiation to the periphery of the tumor bed in the immediate intraoperative time frame, although some protocols have performed IORT as a second procedure. There are two large prospective randomized trials establishing the safety and efficacy of breast IORT in early stage breast cancer patients with sufficient follow-up time on thousands of women. The advantages of IORT for partial breast irradiation include: direct visualization of the target tissue ensuring treatment of the high-risk tissue and eliminating the risk of marginal miss; the use of a single dose coordinated with the necessary surgical excision thereby reducing omission of radiation and the selection of mastectomy for women without access to a radiotherapy facility or unable to undergo several weeks of daily radiation; favorable toxicity profiles; patient convenience and cost savings; radiobiological and tumor microenvironment conditions which lead to enhanced tumor control. The main disadvantage of IORT is the lack of final pathologic information on the tumor size, histology, margins, and nodal status. When unexpected findings on final pathology such as positive margins or positive sentinel nodes predict a higher risk of local or regional recurrence, additional whole breast radiation may be indicated, thereby reducing some of the convenience and low-toxicity advantages of sole IORT. However, IORT as a tumor bed boost has also been studied and appears to be safe with acceptable toxicity. IORT has potential efficacy advantages related to overall survival related to reduced cardiopulmonary radiation doses. It may also be very useful in specific situations, such as prior to oncoplastic reconstruction to improve accuracy of

  5. Estimating the Risks of Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taylor, Carolyn; Correa, Candace; Duane, Frances K

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Radiotherapy reduces the absolute risk of breast cancer mortality by a few percentage points in suitable women but can cause a second cancer or heart disease decades later. We estimated the absolute long-term risks of modern breast cancer radiotherapy. Methods First, a systematic literature...... review was performed of lung and heart doses in breast cancer regimens published during 2010 to 2015. Second, individual patient data meta-analyses of 40,781 women randomly assigned to breast cancer radiotherapy versus no radiotherapy in 75 trials yielded rate ratios (RRs) for second primary cancers...... and cause-specific mortality and excess RRs (ERRs) per Gy for incident lung cancer and cardiac mortality. Smoking status was unavailable. Third, the lung or heart ERRs per Gy in the trials and the 2010 to 2015 doses were combined and applied to current smoker and nonsmoker lung cancer and cardiac mortality...

  6. Risk-adapted targeted intraoperative radiotherapy versus whole-breast radiotherapy for breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaidya, Jayant S; Wenz, Frederik; Bulsara, Max

    2014-01-01

    The TARGIT-A trial compared risk-adapted radiotherapy using single-dose targeted intraoperative radiotherapy (TARGIT) versus fractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for breast cancer. We report 5-year results for local recurrence and the first analysis of overall survival....

  7. Contemporary Breast Radiotherapy and Cardiac Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeboa, Debra Nana; Evans, Suzanne Buckley

    2016-01-01

    Long-term cardiac effects are an important component of survivorship after breast radiotherapy. The pathophysiology of cardiotoxicity, history of breast radiotherapy, current methods of cardiac avoidance, modern outcomes, context of historical outcomes, quantifying cardiac effects, and future directions are reviewed in this article. Radiation-induced oxidative stress induces proinflammatory cytokines and is a process that potentiates late effects of fibrosis and intimal proliferation in endothelial vasculature. Breast radiation therapy has changed substantially in recent decades. Several modern technologies exist to improve cardiac avoidance such as deep inspiration breath hold, gating, accelerated partial breast irradiation, and use of modern 3-dimensional planning. Modern outcomes may vary notably from historical long-term cardiac outcomes given the differences in cardiac dose with modern techniques. Methods of quantifying radiation-related cardiotoxicity that correlate with future cardiac risks are needed with current data exploring techniques such as measuring computed tomography coronary artery calcium score, single-photon emission computed tomography imaging, and biomarkers. Placing historical data, dosimetric correlations, and relative cardiac risk in context are key when weighing the benefits of radiotherapy in breast cancer control and survival. Estimating present day cardiac risk in the modern treatment era includes challenges in length of follow-up and the use of confounding cardiotoxic agents such as evolving systemic chemotherapy and targeted therapies. Future directions in both multidisciplinary management and advancing technology in radiation oncology may provide further improvements in patient risk reduction and breast cancer survivorship. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Breast Cancer Radiotherapy Associated Diabetes Mellitus Case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Primary breast cancer when detected early can be treated by radical mastectomy alone. However, 20-30% of women treated as such later on, develop local or regional recurrence. This leads to an additional treatment with radiotherapy by the oncologist for the sake of the 20-30% of patients that may need it postoperatively.

  9. Radiotherapy waiting times for women with breast cancer: a population-based cohort study.

    OpenAIRE

    Jack, RH; Davies, EA; Robinson, D; Sainsbury, R.; Moller, H.

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Waiting times for cancer patients are a national priority in the UK. Previous studies have shown variation between cancer networks in the time between diagnosis and start of radiotherapy for all cancer patients. Studies of the relationship between delay in receiving treatment and survival of breast cancer patients have been inconsistent. This study aimed to examine factors associated with waiting times for radiotherapy for breast cancer patients. Methods 35,354 women resid...

  10. Radiotherapy waiting times for women with breast cancer: a population-based cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Jack, R H; Davies, E A; Robinson, D; Sainsbury, R.; Møller, H

    2007-01-01

    Background: Waiting times for cancer patients are a national priority in the UK. Previous studies have shown variation between cancer networks in the time between diagnosis and start of radiotherapy for all cancer patients. Studies of the relationship between delay in receiving treatment and survival of breast cancer patients have been inconsistent. This study aimed to examine factors associated with waiting times for radiotherapy for breast cancer patients. Methods: 35,354 women r...

  11. Breast edema in breast cancer patients following breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbelen, Hanne; Gebruers, Nick; Beyers, Tinne; De Monie, Anne-Caroline; Tjalma, Wiebren

    2014-10-01

    Breast-conserving surgery (BCS) is commonly used in breast cancer treatment. Despite its benefits, some women will be troubled by breast edema. Breast edema may cause an unsatisfactory cosmetic result, influencing the quality of life. The purpose of this systematic review is to investigate the incidence of breast edema and to identify risk factors of breast edema in breast cancer patients following BCS and radiotherapy. A systematic literature search was performed using different electronic databases (PubMed, Web of Science, Cochrane, Embase) until June 2014. Inclusion criteria were as follows: (1) research studies that included female breast cancer patients who were treated with BCS and radiotherapy and (2) studies that investigated the incidence of breast edema and/or risk factors of breast edema. Exclusion criteria were (1) reviews or case studies and (2) studies published before 1995. We identified in total 28 papers which represented 4,011 patients. There was a great variation in the incidence of breast edema (0-90.4 %). We identified several possible risk factors for breast edema namely increasing irradiated breast volume, increasing boost volume, the use of a photon boost, increasing breast separation, a higher density of the breast tissue, a large tumor, a higher specimen weight, postoperative infection, acute postoperative toxicity, and diabetes mellitus. However, their prognostic value remains uncertain. Breast edema is a common complaint after BCS and radiotherapy. A number of possible risk factors associated with breast edema were identified, but further research is warranted.

  12. DEGRO practical guidelines. Radiotherapy of breast cancer I. Radiotherapy following breast conserving therapy for invasive breast cancer

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    Sedlmayer, F. [Paracelsus Medical Univ. Hospital, Salzburg (Austria). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology; Sautter-Bihl, M.L. [Staedtisches Klinium Karlsruhe (Germany). Klinik fuer Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie; Budach, W. [University Hospital Duesseldorf (Germany)] [and others

    2013-10-15

    Background and purpose: The aim of the present paper is to update the practical guidelines for postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy of breast cancer published in 2007 by the breast cancer expert panel of the German Society for Radiooncology (Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Radioonkologie, DEGRO). The present recommendations are based on a revision of the German interdisciplinary S-3 guidelines published in July 2012. Methods: A comprehensive survey of the literature concerning radiotherapy following breast conserving therapy (BCT) was performed using the search terms 'breast cancer', 'radiotherapy', and 'breast conserving therapy'. Data from lately published meta-analyses, recent randomized trials, and guidelines of international breast cancer societies, yielding new aspects compared to 2007, provided the basis for defining recommendations according to the criteria of evidence-based medicine. In addition to the more general statements of the DKG (Deutsche Krebsgesellschaft), this paper addresses indications, target definition, dosage, and technique of radiotherapy of the breast after conservative surgery for invasive breast cancer. Results: Among numerous reports on the effect of radiotherapy during BCT published since the last recommendations, the recent EBCTCG report builds the largest meta-analysis so far available. In a 15 year follow-up on 10,801 patients, whole breast irradiation (WBI) halves the average annual rate of disease recurrence (RR 0.52, 0.48-0.56) and reduces the annual breast cancer death rate by about one sixth (RR 0.82, 0.75-0.90), with a similar proportional, but different absolute benefit in prognostic subgroups (EBCTCG 2011). Furthermore, there is growing evidence that risk-adapted dose augmentation strategies to the tumor bed as well as the implementation of high precision RT techniques (e.g., intraoperative radiotherapy) contribute substantially to a further reduction of local relapse rates. A main focus of ongoing

  13. Radiotherapy waiting times for women with breast cancer: a population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, Ruth H; Davies, Elizabeth A; Robinson, David; Sainsbury, Richard; Møller, Henrik

    2007-05-01

    Waiting times for cancer patients are a national priority in the UK. Previous studies have shown variation between cancer networks in the time between diagnosis and start of radiotherapy for all cancer patients. Studies of the relationship between delay in receiving treatment and survival of breast cancer patients have been inconsistent. This study aimed to examine factors associated with waiting times for radiotherapy for breast cancer patients. 35,354 women resident in South East England and diagnosed with breast cancer between 1992 and 2001 who received radiotherapy within six months of diagnosis were identified from the Thames Cancer Registry. Time to radiotherapy was measured from either the date of diagnosis or the start of the previous treatment, whichever was shorter. Unadjusted and adjusted logistic regression models were fitted to examine whether patients received radiotherapy within 60 days of their diagnosis or previous treatment. The adjusted proportions of patients receiving radiotherapy within 60 days varied significantly between different cancer networks (range: 43% to 81%), and decreased from 68% in 1992 to 33% in 2001. After adjustment there was no association between deprivation of area of residence, age or stage and radiotherapy wait. Median time waited to radiotherapy increased over the study period whether measured from the start of chemotherapy, hormone therapy, surgery or the date of diagnosis. This study covered a period of time before the investment following the Cancer Plan of 2000. Results are consistent with other findings suggesting variation between cancer networks and increasing waits over time. Further studies should examine different methods of measuring waiting time, the causes and consequences of waits for radiotherapy and the effect of current initiatives and investments.

  14. Radiotherapy waiting times for women with breast cancer: a population-based cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sainsbury Richard

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Waiting times for cancer patients are a national priority in the UK. Previous studies have shown variation between cancer networks in the time between diagnosis and start of radiotherapy for all cancer patients. Studies of the relationship between delay in receiving treatment and survival of breast cancer patients have been inconsistent. This study aimed to examine factors associated with waiting times for radiotherapy for breast cancer patients. Methods 35,354 women resident in South East England and diagnosed with breast cancer between 1992 and 2001 who received radiotherapy within six months of diagnosis were identified from the Thames Cancer Registry. Time to radiotherapy was measured from either the date of diagnosis or the start of the previous treatment, whichever was shorter. Unadjusted and adjusted logistic regression models were fitted to examine whether patients received radiotherapy within 60 days of their diagnosis or previous treatment. Results The adjusted proportions of patients receiving radiotherapy within 60 days varied significantly between different cancer networks (range: 43% to 81%, and decreased from 68% in 1992 to 33% in 2001. After adjustment there was no association between deprivation of area of residence, age or stage and radiotherapy wait. Median time waited to radiotherapy increased over the study period whether measured from the start of chemotherapy, hormone therapy, surgery or the date of diagnosis. Conclusion This study covered a period of time before the investment following the Cancer Plan of 2000. Results are consistent with other findings suggesting variation between cancer networks and increasing waits over time. Further studies should examine different methods of measuring waiting time, the causes and consequences of waits for radiotherapy and the effect of current initiatives and investments.

  15. Australian survey on current practices for breast radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dundas, Kylie L; Pogson, Elise M; Batumalai, Vikneswary; Boxer, Miriam M; Yap, Mei Ling; Delaney, Geoff P; Metcalfe, Peter; Holloway, Lois

    2015-12-01

    Detailed, published surveys specific to Australian breast radiotherapy practice were last conducted in 2002. More recent international surveys specific to breast radiotherapy practice include a European survey conducted in 2008/2009 and a Spanish survey conducted in 2009. Radiotherapy techniques continue to evolve, and the utilisation of new techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), is increasing. This survey aimed to determine current breast radiotherapy practices across Australia. An online survey was completed by 50 of the 69 Australian radiation therapy treatment centres. Supine tangential beam whole breast irradiation remains the standard of care for breast radiotherapy in Australia. A growing number of institutions are exploring prone positioning and IMRT utilisation. This survey demonstrated a wide variation in the benchmarks used to limit and report organ at risk doses, prescribed dose regimen, and post-mastectomy bolus practices. This survey also indicated, when compared with international literature, that there may be less interest in or uptake of external beam partial breast irradiation, prone positioning, simultaneous integrated boost and breath hold techniques. These are areas where further review and research may be warranted to ensure Australian patients are receiving the best care possible based on the best evidence available. This survey provides insight into the current radiotherapy practice for breast cancer in Australia. © 2015 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  16. Cardiac Side-effects From Breast Cancer Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, C W; Kirby, A M

    2015-11-01

    Breast cancer radiotherapy reduces the risk of cancer recurrence and death. However, it usually involves some radiation exposure of the heart and analyses of randomised trials have shown that it can increase the risk of heart disease. Estimates of the absolute risks of radiation-related heart disease are needed to help oncologists plan each individual woman's treatment. The risk for an individual woman varies according to her estimated cardiac radiation dose and her background risk of ischaemic heart disease in the absence of radiotherapy. When it is known, this risk can then be compared with the absolute benefit of the radiotherapy. At present, many UK cancer centres are already giving radiotherapy with mean heart doses of less than 3 Gy and for most women the benefits of the radiotherapy will probably far outweigh the risks. Technical approaches to minimising heart dose in breast cancer radiotherapy include optimisation of beam angles, use of multileaf collimator shielding, intensity-modulated radiotherapy, treatment in a prone position, treatment in deep inspiration (including the use of breath-hold and gating techniques), proton therapy and partial breast irradiation. The multileaf collimator is suitable for many women with upper pole left breast cancers, but for women with central or lower pole cancers, breath-holding techniques are now recommended in national UK guidelines. Ongoing work aims to identify ways of irradiating pan-regional lymph nodes that are effective, involve minimal exposure of organs at risk and are feasible to plan, deliver and verify. These will probably include wide tangent-based field-in-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy or arc radiotherapy techniques in combination with deep inspiratory breath-hold, and proton beam irradiation for women who have a high predicted heart dose from intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Copyright © 2015 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Persistent pain after targeted intraoperative radiotherapy (TARGIT) or external breast radiotherapy for breast cancer: A randomized trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kenneth Geving; Gärtner, Rune; Kroman, Niels

    2012-01-01

    Persistent pain after breast cancer treatment (PPBCT) affects between 25 and 60% of patients depending on surgical and adjuvant treatment. External breast radiotherapy (EBRT) has been shown to be a riskfactor for PPBCT, raising the question whether intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT), with its...

  18. Unintended cardiac irradiation during left-sided breast cancer radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goody, R B; O'Hare, J; McKenna, K; Dearey, L; Robinson, J; Bell, P; Clarke, J; McAleer, J J A; O'Sullivan, J M; Hanna, G G

    2013-02-01

    Cardiac irradiation during left-sided breast radiotherapy may lead to deleterious cardiac side effects. Using image guided radiotherapy, it is possible to exclude the heart from treatment fields and monitor reproducibility of virtual simulation (VS) fields at treatment delivery using electronic portal imaging (EPI). Retrospectively, we evaluate the incidence of cardiac irradiation at VS and subsequent unintended cardiac irradiation during treatment. Patients receiving left-sided radiotherapy to the breast or chest wall, treated with a glancing photon field technique during a four-month period, were included. VS images and EPIs during radiotherapy delivery were visually assessed. The presence of any portion of the heart within the treatment field at VS or during treatment was recorded. Central lung distance and maximum heart distance were recorded. Of 128 patients, 45 (35.1%) had any portion of the heart within the planned treatment field. Of these, inclusion of the heart was clinically unavoidable in 25 (55.6%). Of those with no heart included in the treatment fields at VS, 41 (49.4%) had presence of the heart as assessed on EPI during treatment. Unintended cardiac irradiation during left-sided breast radiotherapy treatment occurs in a sizeable proportion of patients. Despite the use of three-dimensional computed tomography simulation and cardiac shielding, sizeable proportions of patients receiving left-sided breast cancer radiotherapy have unintended cardiac irradiation.

  19. A French survey on breast radiotherapy techniques for simulation and treatment; Enquete sur les techniques de preparation et de traitement utilisees pour la radiotherapie du sein en France

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    Fournier-Bidoz, N.; Rosenwald, J.C. [Institut Curie, Dept. d' Oncologie-Radiotherapie, 75 - Paris (France); Romestaing, P. [Centre Hospitalier Lyon-Sud, Dept. d' Oncologie-Radiotherapie, 69 - Pierre-Benite (France)

    2005-11-15

    Breast radiotherapy is still in progress. The target volumes - whole breast and lymph nodes - are usually located by clinical palpation and the use of bony landmarks. However computed tomography has allowed a better definition of the deep edge of the volumes and the calculation of 3D dose distributions. A survey of 194 centers has started in June 2005 in France. The questionnaire that was sent included questions about general techniques in breast radiotherapy. Preliminary results on 50 centers showed that patient anatomical data were in the vast majority acquired by a simulator-CT or a CT (for 92%). In the 50 departments, beam placement is done either directly at the simulator (20 centers), or on the TPS (16 centers). Virtual simulation software is used in 8 centers. In about 20% (11) radiotherapy departments, 3D target volumes are contoured and the beams adapted to their shapes. (author)

  20. Erythema multiforme after radiotherapy with aromatase inhibitor administration in breast-conservation treatment for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatani, Kimiko; Matsumoto, Masaaki; Ue, Hironobu; Nishioka, Akihito; Tanaka, Yousuke; Kodama, Hajime; Sasaguri, Shiro; Ogawa, Yasuhiro

    2008-01-01

    Generalized eruptions associated with radiotherapy such as erythema multiforme (EM), Steven-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis are uncommon reactions. A few cases of generalized eruptions during and after radiotherapy have been reported with the use of anticonvulsants and anticancer drugs. However, no reports have described mucocutaneous reactions associated with radiotherapy and concurrent use of anastrozole, an aromatase inhibitor. This report describes EM occurring after radiotherapy performed during breast-conserving treatment for breast cancer in a patient who was taking oral anastrozole.

  1. Targeted intraoperative radiotherapy versus whole breast radiotherapy for breast cancer (TARGIT-A trial): an international, prospective, randomised, non-inferiority phase 3 trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaidya, Jayant S; Joseph, David J; Tobias, Jeffrey S

    2010-01-01

    After breast-conserving surgery, 90% of local recurrences occur within the index quadrant despite the presence of multicentric cancers elsewhere in the breast. Thus, restriction of radiation therapy to the tumour bed during surgery might be adequate for selected patients. We compared targeted int...... intraoperative radiotherapy with the conventional policy of whole breast external beam radiotherapy....

  2. Targeted intraoperative radiotherapy versus whole breast radiotherapy for breast cancer (TARGIT-A trial): an international, prospective, randomised, non-inferiority phase 3 trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaidya, Jayant S; Joseph, David J; Tobias, Jeffrey S

    2010-01-01

    After breast-conserving surgery, 90% of local recurrences occur within the index quadrant despite the presence of multicentric cancers elsewhere in the breast. Thus, restriction of radiation therapy to the tumour bed during surgery might be adequate for selected patients. We compared targeted...... intraoperative radiotherapy with the conventional policy of whole breast external beam radiotherapy....

  3. Hypofractionated Adjuvant Whole Breast Radiotherapy: Progress and Prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarnold, John (Section of Radiotherapy, Inst. of Cancer Research, Royal Marsden Hospital, Sutton (United Kingdom)), E-mail: john.yarnold@icr.ac.uk; Haviland, Joanne (Clinical Trials and Statistics Unit (ICR-CTSU), Section of Clinical Trials, Inst. of Cancer Research, Sutton (United Kingdom))

    2010-11-15

    Published results of randomised trials involving >7000 women confirm the safety and efficacy of hypofractionated schedules of adjuvant radiotherapy for women with early breast cancer using fraction sizes between 2 and 3 Gy assuming appropriate downward adjustments to total dose. Unnecessary concerns relating to heart tolerance, suboptimal dose distribution and duration of follow up need not discourage the routine adoption of 15- or 16-fraction schedules in women treated by breast conservation surgery for early breast cancer. Regardless of fractionation regimen, dose escalation to the index quadrant in high risk subgroups will result in a greater relative increase in late adverse effects than tumour control, a therapeutic disadvantage that can only be overcome by exploiting a marked dose-volume effect. A 15-fraction schedule of whole breast radiotherapy is unlikely to represent the lower limits of hypofractionation, and the preliminary results of a 5-fraction regimen are encouraging

  4. Breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy for early breast cancer; Preliminary results

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    Teshima, Teruki; Chatani, Masashi; Hata, Kiyoshi; Inoue, Toshihiko; Koyama, Hiroki; Inaji, Hideo; Yamamoto, Hitoshi (Osaka Prefectural Center for Adult Diseases (Japan))

    1991-02-01

    From March 1987 through September 1989, a total of 31 patients with early breast cancer were treated with breat-conserving surgery and radiotherapy. As of February 1989, all patients are alive without recurrence. Cosmetic results were satisfactory (excellent; 25%, good; 75%) at 1 year after radiotherapy. Mild radiation pneumonitis requiring medication developed in 3 patients. (author).

  5. Risk Factors of Developing Long-Lasting Breast Pain After Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

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    Lundstedt, Dan, E-mail: dan.lundstedt@vgregion.se [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Gustafsson, Magnus [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Therapeutic Radiation Physics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Steineck, Gunnar [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology-Pathology, the Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Malmstroem, Per [Skane Department of Oncology, Skane University Hospital, Lund (Sweden); Alsadius, David [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Sundberg, Agnetha [Department of Therapeutic Radiation Physics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Wilderaeng, Ulrica [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Holmberg, Erik [Oncologic Centre, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Johansson, Karl-Axel [Department of Therapeutic Radiation Physics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Karlsson, Per [Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Postoperative radiotherapy decreases breast cancer mortality. However, studies have revealed a long-lasting breast pain among some women after radiotherapy. The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors that contribute to breast pain after breast cancer radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: We identified 1,027 recurrence-free women in two cohorts of Swedish women treated for breast cancer. The women had breast-conserving surgery and postoperative radiotherapy, the breast was treated to 48 Gy in 2.4-Gy fractions or to 50 Gy in 2.0-Gy fractions. Young women received a boost of up to 16 Gy. Women with more than three lymph node metastases had locoregional radiotherapy. Systemic treatments were given according to health-care guidelines. Three to 17 years after radiotherapy, we collected data using a study-specific questionnaire. We investigated the relation between breast pain and potential risk modifiers: age at treatment, time since treatment, chemotherapy, photon energy, fractionation size, boost, loco-regional radiotherapy, axillary surgery, overweight, and smoking. Results: Eight hundred seventy-seven women (85%) returned the questionnaires. Among women up to 39 years of age at treatment, 23.1% had breast pain, compared with 8.7% among women older than 60 years (RR 2.66; 95% CI 1.33-5.36). Higher age at treatment (RR 0.96; 95% CI 0.94-0.98, annual decrease) and longer time since treatment (RR 0.93; 95% CI 0.88-0.98, annual decrease) were related to a lower occurrence of breast pain. Chemotherapy increased the occurrence of breast pain (RR 1.72; 95% CI 1.19-2.47). In the multivariable model only age and time since treatment were statistically significantly related to the occurrence of breast pain. We found no statistically significant relation between breast pain and the other potential risk modifiers. Conclusions: Younger women having undergone breast-conserving surgery with postoperative radiotherapy report a higher occurrence of long

  6. Effects of an aerobic exercise programme on fatigue for patients with breast cancer undergoing radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tsui-Yun; Chen, Mei-Ling; Li, Chia-Chun

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of an aerobic exercise programme on fatigue for Taiwanese breast cancer women under radiotherapy (RT). Cancer-related fatigue has been widely reported by patients undergoing radiotherapy as strongly and profoundly interfering with their quality of life. Evidence has shown that exercise can be beneficial to patients with breast cancer. A quasi-experimental design was used. Patients with early-stage breast cancer scheduled for radiotherapy were invited to participate. The first 28 women who agreed to participate were assigned to the intervention group with a six-week mild- to moderate-intensity aerobic exercise training programme during their radiotherapy. The next 30 women were assigned to the routine care control group without special exercise intervention. Fatigue was measured at pre-radiotherapy and weekly after starting radiotherapy for six weeks using the Taiwanese version of the Brief Fatigue Inventory. The mean age of these 47 women was 50·3 years (standard deviation = 9·5). The baseline fatigue severity for the intervention group and control group were 3·04 and 2·95 respectively; and the baseline fatigue interference for the intervention group and the control group were 3·48 and 3·55 respectively. The student t-test showed no group differences in baseline fatigue severity, fatigue interference, or haemoglobin levels. Multivariate analyses showed a significant group-by-time-interaction effect for fatigue severity and interference (p ≦ 0·001); the fatigue severity and interference decreased significantly over time for women in the intervention group but increased over time for women in the control group. The mild- to moderate-intensity aerobic exercise programme reduces the fatigue of Taiwanese women with breast cancer undergoing radiotherapy. The issues of cancer-related fatigue should also be discussed as they relate to other treatment modalities. Aerobic exercise intervention should be offered as an

  7. Effect of radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery in older patients with early breast cancer and breast ductal carcinoma in situ: a meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Xuan-zhang; Chen, You; Chen, Wen-Jun; Zhang, Xi; Wu, Cong-cong; Zhang, Chao-ying; Sun, Shuang-shuang; Wu, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Background There are no consistent agreements on whether radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) could provide local control and survival benefit for older patients with early breast cancer or breast ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of radiotherapy after BCS in older patients with early breast cancer or DCIS. Results Radiotherapy could reduce the risk of local relapse in older patients with early breast cancer. The 5-year AR of local...

  8. Bronchiolitis obliterans organising pneumonia: a consequence of breast radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahim, Ahmed; Campbell, Anne P; Hart, Simon Paul

    2012-01-18

    The authors describe a case of 51-year-old woman who presented with breathlessness following radiotherapy for breast carcinoma. A chest radiograph and thoracic CT scan revealed extensive airspace consolidation affecting right upper and lower lobes. A trans-bronchial biopsy revealed evidence of foamy macrophages and fibroblastic plugs within alveoli, consistent with organising pneumonia. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy revealed evidence of antiepithelial antibodies. Gradual but complete resolution occurred without any specific treatment. This case highlights the importance of considering radiation induced bronchiolitis obliterans organising pneumonia in the context of parenchymal shadowing following radiotherapy. Although corticosteroids are widely recommended for treatment, this case illustrates that organising pneumonia may resolve spontaneously.

  9. DEGRO practical guidelines for radiotherapy of breast cancer I. Breast-conserving therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sautter-Bihl, M.L. [Municipal Hospital Karlsruhe (Germany); Budach, W. [Univ. Hospital Duesseldorf (Germany); Dunst, J. [Univ. Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Luebeck (Germany); Feyer, P. [Klinikum Neukoelln, Berlin (Germany); Haase, W. [St.-Vincentius-Kliniken, Karlsruhe (Germany); Harms, W. [Univ. Hospital Heidelberg (Germany); Sedlmayer, F. [Univ. Hospital, Salzburger Landeskliniken, Salzburg (Austria); Souchon, R. [Allgemeines Krankenhaus Hagen (Germany); Wenz, F. [Univ. Hospital Mannheim (Germany); Sauer, R. [Univ. Hospital Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen (Germany)

    2007-12-15

    Background: The present paper is an update of the practical guidelines for radiotherapy of breast cancer published in 2006 by the breast cancer expert panel of the German Society of Radiation Oncology (DEGRO). These recommendations have been elaborated on the basis of the S3 guidelines of the German Cancer Society that were revised in March 2007 by an interdisciplinary panel. Methods: The DEGRO expert panel performed a comprehensive survey of the literature, comprising lately published meta-analyses, data from recent randomized trials and guidelines of international breast cancer societies, referring to the criteria of evidence-based medicine. In addition to the more general statements of the German Cancer Society, this paper emphasizes specific radiotherapeutic aspects. It is focused on radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery. Technique, targeting, and dose are described in detail. Results: Postoperative radiotherapy significantly reduces rates of local recurrence. The more pronounced the achieved reduction is, the more substantially it translates into improved survival. Four prevented local recurrences result in one avoided breast cancer death. This effect is independent of age. An additional boost provides a further absolute risk reduction for local recurrence irrespective of age. Women > 50 years have a hazard ratio of 0.59 in favor of the boost. For DCIS, local recurrence was 2.4% per patient year even in a subgroup with favorable prognostic factors leading to premature closure of the respective study due to ethical reasons. For partial-breast irradiation as a sole method of radiotherapy, results are not yet mature enough to allow definite conclusions. Conclusion: After breast-conserving surgery, whole-breast irradiation remains the gold standard of treatment. The indication for boost irradiation should no longer be restricted to women {<=} 50 years. Partial-breast irradiation is still an experimental treatment and therefore discouraged outside controlled

  10. Male Malignant Phyllodes Breast Tumor After Prophylactic Breast Radiotherapy and Bicalutamide Treatment: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karihtala, Peeter; Rissanen, Tarja; Tuominen, Hannu

    2016-07-01

    Phyllodes tumor in male breast is an exceptionally rare neoplasm with only few published case reports. Herein, we present a case of malignant phyllodes tumor in male breast nine years after prophylactic breast 10 Gy radiotherapy and after nine year bicalutamide treatment. The imaging findings of the tumor and pathological correlation are also presented. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  11. Intraoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer: its perceived simplicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, Robert B; Williams, Venita L; Wagman, Lawrence D; Forouzannia, Afshin

    2013-02-01

    Over one-quarter of a million cases of breast cancer are diagnosed in the United States each year, many of which are early stage.The radiotherapeutic options after breast-conserving surgery in early-stage breast cancer are evolving quickly, with a focus on minimizing treatment volume, toxicity, and treatment duration. One such emerging option is intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT), administered either as a single fraction or as a boost.With many centers seeking to adopt such technology, there are licensing, proctoring, staffing, technical support, and reimbursement issues that need to be considered. We have reviewed the current international experience and describe one community cancer center's experience with initiating an IORT breast cancer program.

  12. Effects of exercise on sleep problems in breast cancer patients receiving radiotherapy: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steindorf, Karen; Wiskemann, Joachim; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Schmidt, Martina E

    2017-04-01

    Sleep problems frequently affect breast cancer patients during and after treatment and reduce their quality of life. Treatment strategies are mostly unknown. Thus, we assessed within a randomized controlled trial whether a 12-week exercise program starting with the radiotherapy influences sleep trajectories. Sleep quality and problems were assessed via self-report in 160 breast cancer patients before, during, and 2, 6, and 12 months after participation in a trial investigating resistance exercise versus a relaxation control group concomitant with radiotherapy. As additional comparison group, 25 age-matched healthy women exercised and followed identical study procedures. Ordinal logistic regression analyses were used. The exercise intervention significantly decreased sleep problems compared to the relaxation control group (scale: 0-100, with between-group mean differences of -10.2 (p = 0.03) from baseline to the end of radiotherapy and -10.9 (p = 0.005) to the end of the intervention), with sleep problems decreasing in the exercise group and increasing in the control group. At 12 months, differences were still observed but statistically non-significant (mean difference = -5.9, p = 0.20). Further adjustment for potential confounders did not change the results. Several determinants of sleep problems at baseline were identified, e.g., previous chemotherapy and higher body mass index. Our randomized exercise intervention trial confirmed results from earlier but mostly smaller studies that radiotherapy aggravates sleep problems in breast cancer patients and that exercise can ameliorate these effects. Considering that sleep quality can be a major predictor of quality of life, our findings are of substantial importance to many breast cancer patients.

  13. The value of radiotherapy in breast-conserving treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurtz, J.M. [Radiation Oncology, Univ. Hospital, Geneva (Switzerland)

    1994-12-31

    Breast conserving treatment owes its legitimacy to the ability of radiotherapy (RT), in conjunction with limited surgery, to provide local control equivalent to that associated with total mastectomy. This paper will be concerned exclusively with the treatment of the breast, since indications for RT of lymph node areas are independent of the type of breast surgery employed. Randomized trials have enabled quantitation of the effect of reduction in recurrence risk compared to surgery alone. Even though local recurrence is a predictor of metastatic disease, its prevention by breast RT has not yet been shown to improve survival. Thus the main benefits of breast RT relate to preventing the consequences of local failure, namely breast loss. With modern RT techniques, cosmetic results should be satisfactory in 90% of preserved breast. The main clinical research areas concern the optimal sequencing of surgery, RT and chemotherapy, the improvement of local control in high-risk patients, the extension of breast conservation to more advanced cases by the use of neo-adjuvant chemotherapy and RT, the identification of early-stage patients who could be treated with wide excision alone, and the value of RT in ductal in situ carcinomas. (author). 14 refs, 2 tabs.

  14. Concurrent Boost with Adjuvant Breast Hypofractionated Radiotherapy and Toxicity Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona M. Sayed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The use of shorter radiotherapy schedules has an economic and logistic advantage for radiotherapy departments, as well as a high degree of patient convenience. The aim of this study is to assess the acute and short-term late toxicities of a hypofractionated radiotherapy schedule with a concomitant boost. Methods: We enrolled 57 eligible patients as group A. These patients received 42.5 Gy in 16 fractions of 2.66 Gy each to the whole breast over 3.2 weeks. A concomitant electron boost of 12 Gy in 16 fractions was also administered which gave an additional 0.75 Gy daily to the lumpectomy area for a total radiation dose of 54.5 Gy. Toxicity was recorded at three weeks and at three months for this group as well as for a control group (group B. The control group comprised 76 eligible patients treated conventionally with 50 Gy to the whole breast over five weeks followed by a sequential electron boost of 12 Gy in 2 Gy per fraction. Results: There were no statistically significant differences observed in the incidence of acute skin toxicity, breast pain, and edema recorded at three weeks or pigmentation and fibrosis recorded at three months between the two groups (P0.05. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest there are no increased acute and shortterm late toxicities affiliated with the hypofractionated schedule plus a concomitant boost as prescribed compared to the conventional fractionation of adjuvant breast radiotherapy. Large randomized trials and long-term follow-up are needed to confirm these favorable findings.

  15. Starting Hormone Therapy at Menopause Increases Breast Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    According to a January 28, 2011 article in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, women who start taking menopausal hormone therapy around the time of menopause have a higher risk of breast cancer than women who begin taking hormones a few years later.

  16. Radiation dose to contra lateral breast during treatment of breast malignancy by radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chougule Arun

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: External beam radiotherapy is being used regularly to treat the breast malignancy postoperatively. The contribution of collimator leakage and scatter radiation dose to contralateral breast is of concern because of high radio sensitivity of breast tissue for carcinogenesis. This becomes more important when the treated cancer breast patient is younger than 45 years and therefore the contralateral breast must be treated as organ at risk. Quantification of contralateral dose during primary breast irradiation is helpful to estimate the risk of radiation induced secondary breast malignancy. Materials and Methods: In present study contralateral breast dose was measured in 30 cancer breast patients undergoing external beam therapy by Co-60 teletherapy machine. Postoperative radiotherapy was delivered by medial and lateral tangential fields on alternate days in addition to supraclavicle field daily with 200 cGy/F to a total dose of 5000 cGy in 25 fractions. CaSO4: Dy themoluminescence dosimeter discs were employed for these measurements. Three TLD discs were put on the surface of skin of contra lateral breast, one at the level of nipple and two at 3 cms away from nipple on both side along the midline for each field. At the end treatment of each filed, TLD discs were removed and measured for dose after 24h on Thelmador - 6000 TLD reader. Results: The dose at the contra lateral breast nipple was to be 152.5 to 254.75 cGy for total primary breast dose of 5000 cGy in 25 equal fractions which amounted to 3.05-6.05% of total dose to diseased breast. Further it was observed that the maximum contribution of contralateral breast dose was due to medical tangential half blocked field. Conclusion: CaSO4; Dy thermoluminescence dosimetry is quite easy, accurate and convenient method to measure the contra lateral breast dose.

  17. Overview of the randomized trials of radiotherapy in ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Correa, C.; McGale, P.; Taylor, C.; Wang, Y.; Clarke, M.; Davies, C.; Peto, R.; Bijker, N.; Solin, L.; Darby, S.; Abe, O.; Abe, R.; Enomoto, K.; Kikuchi, K.; Koyama, H.; Masuda, H.; Nomura, Y.; Ohashi, Y.; Sakai, K.; Sugimachi, K.; Toi, M.; Tominaga, T.; Uchino, J.; Yoshida, M.; Haybittle, J. L.; Leonard, C. F.; Calais, G.; Geraud, P.; Collett, V.; Delmestri, A.; Sayer, J.; Harvey, V. J.; Holdaway, T. M.; Kay, R. G.; Mason, B. H.; Forbes, J. F.; Wilcken, N.; Bauernhofer, T.; Dubsky, P.; Fesl, C.; Fohler, H.; Filipcic, L.; Filipits, M.; Fridrik, M.; Gnant, M.; Greil, R.; Hegenbarth, K.; Jakesz, R.; Kwasny, W.; Lang, A.; Luschin-Ebengreuth, G.; Marth, C.; Menzel, C.; Mlineritsch, B.; Samonigg, H.; Seifert, M.; Sevelda, P.; Singer, C.; Steger, G. G.; Stöger, H.; Thaler, J.; Tschmelitsch, J.; Zielinski, C.; Canney, P.; Yosef, H. M. A.; Focan, C.; Peek, U.; Oates, G. D.; Powell, J.; Durand, M.; Mauriac, L.; Di Leo, A.; Dolci, S.; Piccart, M. J.; Masood, M. B.; Parker, D.; Price, J. J.; Lindsay, M. A.; Mackey, J.; Martin, M.; Hupperets, P. S. G. J.; Bates, T.; Blamey, R. W.; Chetty, U.; Ellis, I. O.; Mallon, E.; Morgan, D. A. L.; Patnick, J.; Pinder, S.; Jackson, S.; Ragaz, J.; Berry, D.; Broadwater, G.; Cirrincione, C.; Muss, H.; Norto, L.; Weiss, R. B.; Abu-Zahra, H. T.; Portnoj, S. M.; Baum, M.; Cuzick, J.; Dowsett, M.; Houghton, J.; Ledermann, J.; Riley, D.; Bowdon, S.; Brookes, C.; Fernando, I.; Rea, D.; Spooner, D.; Mansel, R. E.; Gordon, N. H.; Davis, H. L.; Lehingue, Y.; Romestaing, P.; Dubois, J. B.; Delozier, T.; Griffon, B.; Mace Lesec'h, J.; Rambert, P.; Mustacchi, G.; Petruzelka, L.; Pribylova, O.; Owen, J. R.; Harbeck, N.; Jänicke, F.; Meisner, C.; Schmitt, M.; Thomssen, C.; Meier, P.; Howell, A.; Swindell, R.; Burrett, J.; Collins, R.; Cutter, D.; Davies, K.; Elphinstone, P.; Evans, V.; Gettins, L.; GodwinF, J.; Gray, R.; Gregory, C.; Hermans, D.; Hicks, C.; James, S.; Kerr, A.; MacKinnon, E.; Lay, M.; McHugh, T.; Albano, J.; de Oliveira, C. F.; Gervásio, H.; Gordilho, J.; Johansen, H.; Mouridsen, H. T.; Gelman, R. S.; Harris, J. R.; Hayes, D.; Henderson, I. C.; Shapiro, C. L.; Winer, E.; Christiansen, P.; Ejlertsen, B.; Ewertz, M.; Møller, S.; Overgaard, M.; Carstensen, B.; Palshof, T.; Trampisch, H. J.; Dalesio, O.; de Vries, E. G. E.; Rodenhuis, S.; van Tinteren, H.; ComisF, R. L.; DavidsonF, N. E.; Robert, N.; SledgeF, G.; Solin, F. J.; Tormey, D. C.; Wood, W.; Cameron, D.; Forrest, P.; Jack, W.; Rossbach, J.; Klijn, J. G. M.; Treurniet-Donker, A. D.; van Putten, W. L. J.; Costa, A.; Veronesi, U.; Viale, G.; Bartelink, H.; Bogaerts, J.; Julien, J. P.; Legrand, C.; Rutgers, E.; Sylvester, R.; van de Velde, C. J. H.; van Nes, J. G. H.; Cunningham, M. P.; Huovinen, R.; Joensuu, H.; Tinterri, C.; Valagussa, P.; Goldstein, L. J.; Bonneterre, J.; Fargeot, P.; Fumoleau, P.; Kerbrat, P.; Luporsi, E.; Namer, M.; Eiermann, W.; Hilfrich, J.; Jonat, W.; Kaufmann, M.; KreienbergF, R.; Schumacher, M.; Bastert, G.; Rauschecker, H.; Sauer, R.; Sauerbrei, W.; Schauer, A.; Blohmer, J. U.; Costa, S. D.; Eidtmann, H.; Gerber, B.; Jackisch, C.; Loibl, S.; von Minckwitz, G.; de Schryver, A.; Vakaet, L.; Belfiglio, M.; Nicolucci, A.; Pellegrini, F.; Sacco, M.; Valentini, M.; McArdle, C. S.; Smith, D. C.; Stallard, S.; Galligioni, E.; Lopez, M.; Boccardo, F.; Rubagotti, A.; Dent, D. M.; Gudgeon, C. A.; Hacking, A.; Murray, E.; Panieri, E.; Briones, L.; Carrasco, E.; Erazo, A.; Medina, J. Y.; Horiguchi, J.; Takei, H.; Fentiman, I. S.; Hayward, J. L.; Rubens, R. D.; Skilton, D.; Scheurlen, H.; Sohn, H. C.; Untch, M.; Dafni, U.; Markopoulos, C.; Fountzilas, G.; Mavroudis, D.; Klefstrom, P.; Blomqvist, C.; Saarto, C.; Gallen, M.; Margreiter, R.; de Lafontan, B.; Mihura, J.; RochéF, H.; Asselain, B.; Salmon, R. J.; Vilcoq, J. R.; Arriagada, R.; Hill, C.; Laplanche, A.; Lê, M. G.; Spielmann, M.; A'Hern, R.; Barrett-Lee, P.; Bliss, J.; Ellis, P.; Kilburn, L.; Yarnold, J. R.; Bruzzi, P.; del Mastro, L.; Pronzato, P.; Sertoli, M. R.; Venturini, M.; Amadori, D.; Benraadt, J.; Kooi, M.; van de Velde, A. O.; van Dongen, J. A.; Vermorken, J. B.; Castiglione, M.; Cavalli, F.; Coates, A.; Collins, J.; Forbes, J.; Gelber, R. D.; Goldhirsch, A.; Lindtner, J.; Price, K. N.; Raina, V.; Rudenstam, C. M.; Senn, H. J.; Bliss, J. M.; Chilvers, C. E. D.; Coombes, R. C.; Hall, E.; Marty, M.; Buyse, M.; Possinger, K.; Schmid, P.; Wallwiener, D.; Borovik, R.; Brufman, G.; Hayat, H.; Robinson, E.; Yaal-Hahoshen, N.; Bonadonna, G.; Camerini, T.; de Palo, G.; Di MauroF, M. G.; Formelli, F.; Martoni, A.; Pannuti, F.; Cocconi, G.; Colozza, A.; Camisa, R.; Gori, S.; Aogi, K.; Takashima, S.; Ikeda, T.; Inokuchi, K.; Sawa, K.; Sonoo, H.; Korzeniowski, S.; Skolyszewski, J.; Ogawa, M.; Yamashita, J.; Christiaens, R.; Neven, P.; Paridaens, R.; van den Bogaert, W.; Braun, S.; Janni, W.; Martin, P.; Romain, S.; Hakes, T.; Hudis, C. A.; Norton, L.; Wittes, R.; Giokas, G.; Kondylis, D.; Lissaios, B.; de la Huerta, R.; Sainz, M. G.; Altemus, R.; Camphausen, K.; Cowan, K.; Danforth, D.; Lichter, A.; Lippman, M.; O'Shaughnessy, J.; PierceF, L. J.; Steinberg, S.; Venzon, D.; Zujewski, J. A.; D'Amico, C.; Lioce, M.; Paradiso, A.; Chapman, J. W.; Goss, P. E.; Levine, M. N.; Myles, J. D.; Pater, J. L.; Pritchard, K. I.; Shepherd, L. E.; Tu, D.; Whelan, D.; Zee, B.; Anderson, S.; Bass, G.; Brown, A.; Bryant, J.; Costantino, J.; Fisher, B.; Geyer, C.; Paik, S.; Redmond, C.; Wickerham, L.; Wolmark, N.; Jackson, I. M.; Palmer, M. K.; Perez, E.; Ingle, J. N.; Suman, V. J.; Bengtsson, N. O.; Emdin, S.; Granstrand, B.; Jonsson, H.; Lythgoe, J. P.; Kissin, M.; Erikstein, B.; Hannisdal, E.; Jacobsen, A. B.; Varhaug, J. E.; Gundersen, S.; Hauer-Jensen, M.; Høst, H.; Nissen-Meyer, R.; Mitchell, A. K.; Robertson, J. F. R.; Di Palma, M.; Mathé, G.; Misset, J. L.; Clark, R. M.; LevineF, M.; Whelan, T.; Morimoto, K.; Takatsuka, Y.; Crossley, E.; Harris, A.; Talbot, D.; Taylor, M.; Martin, A. L.; Roché, H.; di Blasio, B.; Ivanov, V.; Semiglazov, V.; Brockschmidt, J.; Cooper, M. R.; Ueo, H.; Falkson, C. I.; Ashley, S.; Makris, A.; Powles, T. J.; Smith, I. E.; Gazet, J. C.; Browne, L.; Graham, P.; Corcoran, N.; Deshpande, N.; di Martino, L.; Douglas, P.; Lindtner, A.; Notter, G.; Bryant, A. J. S.; Ewing, G. H.; Firth, L. A.; Krushen-Kosloski, J. L.; Foster, L.; George, W. D.; Stewart, H. J.; Stroner, P.; Anderson, H.; Malmström, P.; Möller, T. R.; Ringberg, A.; Rydén, L.; Tengrup, I.; Tennvall-Nittby, L.; Arnesson, L.-G.; Carstensen, J.; Dufmats, M.; Nordenskjöld, B.; Söderberg, M.; Carpenter, J. T.; AlbainF, K.; Barlow, W.; CrowleyF, J.; Gralow, J.; Green, S.; Hortobagyi, G.; Livingston, R.; Martino, S.; Osborne, C. K.; Ravdin, P. M.; Murray, N.; Royle, G. T.; Simmonds, P. D.; Askergren, J.; Bäckdahl, M.; Bergh, J.; Fernstad, R.; Fornander, T.; Frisell, J.; Glas, U.; Hatschek, T.; Ideström, K.; Johansson, U.; Perbeck, L.; Rotstein, S.; Rutqvist, L. E.; Sandelin, K.; Singnomklao, T.; Skoog, L.; Somell, A.; Wallgren, A.; Wilking, N.; Maibach, R.; Thürlimann, B.; Holli, K.; Rouhento, K.; Brenner, H.; Hercbergs, A.; Yoshimoto, M.; DeBoer, G.; Paterson, A. H. G.; Fyles, A.; Meakin, J. W.; Panzarella, T.; Shan, Y.; Shao, Y. F.; Wang, X.; Zhao, D. B.; Bahi, J.; Reid, M.; Spittle, M.; Bishop, H.; Bundred, N. J.; Forsyth, S.; Pai, V. R.; Pinder, S. E.; Sestak, I.; Deutsch, G. P.; KwongF, D. L. W.; Senanayake, F.; Bianco, A. R.; Carlomagno, C.; de Laurentiis, M.; de Placido, S.; Broglio, K.; Buzdar, A. U.; Love, R. R.; Garmo, H.; Holmberg, L.; Liljegren, G.; NilssonF, J.; Jones, S. E.; Loesch, D. M.; Janauer, M.; Zielinski, C. C.; Gluz, O.; Nitz, U.; Dunn, J. A.; Hills, R. K.; Lee, M.; Morrison, J. M.; Poole, C.; Litton, A.; Karlsson, P.; Chlebowski, R. T.; Caffier, H.

    2010-01-01

    Individual patient data were available for all four of the randomized trials that began before 1995, and that compared adjuvant radiotherapy vs no radiotherapy following breast-conserving surgery for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). A total of 3729 women were eligible for analysis. Radiotherapy

  18. Radiotherapy for breast cancer is not associated with increased risk of cied implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, J. B.; Rehammar, J. C.; Jorgensen, O. D.

    2015-01-01

    tests were calculated. Results: Among 18,308 women treated with radiotherapy for early-stage breast cancer, 179 women had a CIED implanted (166 pacemakers, 13 ICD) subsequent to radiotherapy, 90 in 9,315 left sided and 89 in 8,993 right sided breast cancers. Follow-up time was minimum 8 years...

  19. Cardiac dose estimates from Danish and Swedish breast cancer radiotherapy during 1977-2001

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taylor, Carolyn W; Brønnum, Dorthe; Darby, Sarah C

    2011-01-01

    To estimate target and cardiac doses from breast cancer radiotherapy in Denmark and in the Stockholm and Umeå areas of Sweden during 1977-2001.......To estimate target and cardiac doses from breast cancer radiotherapy in Denmark and in the Stockholm and Umeå areas of Sweden during 1977-2001....

  20. Fat necrosis of the breast: an unusual complication of lumpectomy and radiotherapy in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rostom, A.Y.; El-Sayed, M.E.

    1987-01-01

    Fat necrosis is a well-recognised complication of trauma to the breast. It has also been described following breast surgery. In this report, we describe four patients who developed a small tender nodule following excision and radiotherapy for early breast cancer. These were in or near the excision scar. Histology of the resected nodules revealed fat necrosis with no evidence of recurrence. It is recommended that in all cases when a tender, inflamed nodule in or adjacent to the excision scar is found, a biopsy should be carried out to distinguish between this condition and recurrence.

  1. DEGRO practical guidelines: radiotherapy of breast cancer III - radiotherapy of the lymphatic pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sautter-Bihl, M.L. [Staedtisches Klinikum Karlsruhe, Klinik fuer Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie, Karlsruhe (Germany); Sedlmayer, F.; Fussl, C. [LKH Salzburg, Paracelsus Medical University Hospital, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Salzburg (Austria); Budach, W. [University Hospital Duesseldorf, Duesseldorf (Germany); Dunst, J. [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Luebeck (Germany); Feyer, P. [Klinikum Neukoelln, Berlin (Germany); Fietkau, R.; Sauer, R. [University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Harms, W. [St. Clara Hospital, Basel, Basel (Switzerland); Piroth, M.D. [Helios-Klinikum Wuppertal, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Wuppertal (Germany); Souchon, R. [University Hospital Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Wenz, F. [University Hospital Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Haase, W.

    2014-04-15

    The purpose of this work is to update the practical guidelines for adjuvant radiotherapy of the regional lymphatics of breast cancer published in 2008 by the breast cancer expert panel of the German Society of Radiation Oncology (DEGRO). A comprehensive survey of the literature concerning regional nodal irradiation (RNI) was performed using the following search terms: ''breast cancer'', ''radiotherapy'', ''regional node irradiation''. Recent randomized trials were analyzed for outcome as well as for differences in target definition. Field arrangements in the different studies were reproduced and superimposed on CT slices with individually contoured node areas. Moreover, data from recently published meta-analyses and guidelines of international breast cancer societies, yielding new aspects compared to 2008, provided the basis for defining recommendations according to the criteria of evidence-based medicine. In addition to the more general statements of the German interdisciplinary S3 guidelines updated in 2012, this paper addresses indications, targeting, and techniques of radiotherapy of the lymphatic pathways after surgery for breast cancer. International guidelines reveal substantial differences regarding indications for RNI. Patients with 1-3 positive nodes seem to profit from RNI compared to whole breast (WBI) or chest wall irradiation alone, both with regard to locoregional control and disease-free survival. Irradiation of the regional lymphatics including axillary, supraclavicular, and internal mammary nodes provided a small but significant survival benefit in recent randomized trials and one meta-analysis. Lymph node irradiation yields comparable tumor control in comparison to axillary lymph node dissection (ALND), while reducing the rate of lymph edema. Data concerning the impact of 1-2 macroscopically affected sentinel node (SN) or microscopic metastases on prognosis are conflicting. Recent data

  2. Automatic segmentation of the heart in radiotherapy for breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laugaard Lorenzen, Ebbe; Ewertz, Marianne; Brink, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to evaluate two fully automatic segmentation methods in comparison with manual delineations for their use in delineating the heart on planning computed tomography (CT) used in radiotherapy for breast cancer. Material and methods. Automatic delineation of heart...... in 15 breast cancer patients was performed by two different automatic delineation systems. Analysis of accuracy and precision of the differences between manual and automatic delineations were evaluated on volume, mean dose, maximum dose and spatial distance differences. Two sets of manual delineations....... Automatic delineation is an equal alternative to manual delineation when compared to the inter-observer variation. The reduction in precision of measured dose was small compared to other uncertainties affecting the estimated heart dose and would for most applications be outweighed by the benefits of fully...

  3. Sequence of Radiotherapy and Chemotherapy in Breast Cancer After Breast-Conserving Surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jobsen, Jan J., E-mail: J.Jobsen@mst.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medisch Spectrum Twente, Enschede (Netherlands); Palen, Job van der [Department of Epidemiology, Medisch Spectrum Twente, Enschede (Netherlands); Department of Research Methodology, Measurement and Data Analysis, Faculty of Behavioural Science, University of Twente (Netherlands); Brinkhuis, Marieel [Laboratory for Pathology Oost Nederland, Enschede (Netherlands); Ong, Francisca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medisch Spectrum Twente, Enschede (Netherlands); Struikmans, Henk [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden (Netherlands); Radiotherapy Centre West, Medical Centre Haaglanden, the Hague (Netherlands)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: The optimal sequence of radiotherapy and chemotherapy in breast-conserving therapy is unknown. Methods and Materials: From 1983 through 2007, a total of 641 patients with 653 instances of breast-conserving therapy (BCT), received both chemotherapy and radiotherapy and are the basis of this analysis. Patients were divided into three groups. Groups A and B comprised patients treated before 2005, Group A radiotherapy first and Group B chemotherapy first. Group C consisted of patients treated from 2005 onward, when we had a fixed sequence of radiotherapy first, followed by chemotherapy. Results: Local control did not show any differences among the three groups. For distant metastasis, no difference was shown between Groups A and B. Group C, when compared with Group A, showed, on univariate and multivariate analyses, a significantly better distant metastasis-free survival. The same was noted for disease-free survival. With respect to disease-specific survival, no differences were shown on multivariate analysis among the three groups. Conclusion: Radiotherapy, as an integral part of the primary treatment of BCT, should be administered first, followed by adjuvant chemotherapy.

  4. DEGRO practical guidelines: radiotherapy of breast cancer II. Radiotherapy of non-invasive neoplasia of the breast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souchon, R. [University Hospital Tuebingen, Klinik fuer Radioonkologie, Tuebingen (Germany); Sautter-Bihl, M.L. [Municipal Hospital Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe (Germany); Sedlmayer, F. [LKH Salzburg, Paracelsus Medical University Hospital, Salzburg (Austria); Budach, W. [University Hospital Duesseldorf, Duesseldorf (Germany); Dunst, J. [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Luebeck (Germany); Feyer, P. [Klinikum Neukoelln, Berlin (Germany); Fietkau, R.; Sauer, R. [University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Harms, W. [St. Clara Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Wenz, F. [University Hospital Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Haase, W.

    2014-01-15

    To complement and update the 2007 practice guidelines of the breast cancer expert panel of the German Society of Radiation Oncology (DEGRO) for radiotherapy (RT) of breast cancer. Owing to its growing clinical relevance, in the current version, a separate paper is dedicated to non-invasive proliferating epithelial neoplasia of the breast. In addition to the more general statements of the German interdisciplinary S3 guidelines, this paper is especially focused on indication and technique of RT in addition to breast conserving surgery. The DEGRO expert panel performed a comprehensive survey of the literature comprising recently published data from clinical controlled trials, systematic reviews as well as meta-analyses, referring to the criteria of evidence-based medicine yielding new aspects compared to 2005 and 2007. The literature search encompassed the period 2008 to September 2012 using databases of PubMed and Guidelines International Network (G-I-N). Search terms were ''non invasive breast cancer'', ''ductal carcinoma in situ, ''dcis'', ''borderline breast lesions'', ''lobular neoplasia'', ''radiotherapy'' and ''radiation therapy''. In addition to the more general statements of the German interdisciplinary S3 guidelines, this paper is especially focused on indications of RT and decision making of non-invasive neoplasia of the breast after surgery, especially ductal carcinoma in situ. Among different non-invasive neoplasia of the breast only the subgroup of pure ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS; synonym ductal intraepithelial neoplasia, DIN) is considered for further recurrence risk reduction treatment modalities after complete excision of DCIS, particularly RT following breast conserving surgery (BCS), in order to avoid a mastectomy. About half of recurrences are invasive cancers. Up to 50?% of all recurrences require salvage mastectomy

  5. DEGRO practical guidelines for radiotherapy of breast cancer IV. Radiotherapy following mastectomy for invasive breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenz, Frederik; Sperk, Elena [Universitaetsmedizin Mannheim, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Mannheim (Germany); Budach, Wilfried [Heinrich-Heine-University, Duesseldorf (Germany); Dunst, Juergen [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Luebeck (Germany); Feyer, Petra [Vivantes Hospital Neukoelln, Berlin (Germany); Fietkau, Rainer; Sauer, Rolf [University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Haase, Wulf [Formerly St.-Vincentius-Hospital, Karlsruhe (Germany); Harms, Wolfgang [St. Clara Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Piroth, Marc D. [Helios Hospital, Wuppertal (Germany); Sautter-Bihl, Marie-Luise [Municipal Hospital, Karlsruhe (Germany); Sedlmayer, Felix; Fussl, Christoph [Paracelsus Medical University Hospital, Salzburg (Germany); Souchon, Rainer; Collaboration: Breast Cancer Expert Panel of the German Society of Radiation Oncology (DEGRO)

    2014-08-15

    Since the last recommendations from the Breast Cancer Expert Panel of the German Society for Radiation Oncology (DEGRO) in 2008, evidence for the effectiveness of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) has grown. This growth is based on updates of the national S3 and international guidelines, as well as on new data and meta-analyses. New aspects were considered when updating the DEGRO recommendations. The authors performed a comprehensive survey of the literature. Data from recently published (meta-)analyses, randomized clinical trials and international cancer societies' guidelines yielding new aspects compared to 2008 were reviewed and discussed. New aspects were included in the current guidelines. Specific issues relating to particular PMRT constellations, such as the presence of risk factors (lymphovascular invasion, blood vessel invasion, positive lymph node ratio > 20 %, resection margins < 3 mm, G3 grading, young age/premenopausal status, extracapsular invasion, negative hormone receptor status, invasive lobular cancer, size > 2 cm or a combination of ≥ 2 risk factors) and 1-3 positive lymph nodes are emphasized. The evidence for improved overall survival and local control following PMRT for T4 tumors, positive resection margins, > 3 positive lymph nodes and in T3 N0 patients with risk factors such as lymphovascular invasion, G3 grading, close margins, and young age has increased. Recently identified risk factors such as invasive lobular subtype and negative hormone receptor status were included. For patients with 1-3 positive lymph nodes, the recommendation for PMRT has reached the 1a level of evidence. PMRT is mandatory in patients with T4 tumors and/or positive lymph nodes and/or positive resection margins. PMRT should be strongly considered in patients with T3 N0 tumors and risk factors, particularly when two or more risk factors are present. (orig.) [German] Seit der letzten Aktualisierung der 2008 publizierten Leitlinie der &apos

  6. Dose to the contralateral breast from radiotherapy and risk of second primary breast cancer in the WECARE study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stovall, M.; Smith, S.A.; Langholz, B.M.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: To quantify the risk of second primary breast cancer in the contralateral breast (CB) after radiotherapy (RT) for first breast cancer. METHODS AND MATERIALS: The study population included participants in the Women's Environmental, Cancer, and Radiation Epidemiology study: 708 cases (wome...

  7. In vivo skin dose measurement in breast conformal radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shokouhozaman Soleymanifard

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study: Accurate skin dose assessment is necessary during breast radiotherapy to assure that the skin dose is below the tolerance level and is sufficient to prevent tumour recurrence. The aim of the current study is to measure the skin dose and to evaluate the geometrical/anatomical parameters that affect it. Material and methods : Forty patients were simulated by TIGRT treatment planning system and treated with two tangential fields of 6 MV photon beam. Wedge filters were used to homogenise dose distribution for 11 patients. Skin dose was measured by thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-100 and the effects of beam incident angle, thickness of irradiated region, and beam entry separation on the skin dose were analysed. Results : Average skin dose in treatment course of 50 Gy to the clinical target volume (CTV was 36.65 Gy. The corresponding dose values for patients who were treated with and without wedge filter were 35.65 and 37.20 Gy, respectively. It was determined that the beam angle affected the average skin dose while the thickness of the irradiated region and the beam entry separation did not affect dose. Since the skin dose measured in this study was lower than the amount required to prevent tumour recurrence, application of bolus material in part of the treatment course is suggested for post-mastectomy advanced breast radiotherapy. It is more important when wedge filters are applied to homogenize dose distribution.

  8. The Effect of Breast Reconstruction Prosthesis on Photon Dose Distribution in Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    fatemeh sari

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Siliconeprosthetic implants are commonlyutilizedfor tissue replacement and breast augmentation after mastectomy. On the other hand, some patients require adjuvant radiotherapy in order to preventlocal-regional recurrence and increment ofthe overall survival. In case of recurrence, the radiation oncologist might have to irradiate the prosthesis.The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of silicone prosthesis on photon dose distribution in breast radiotherapy. Materials and Methods: The experimental dosimetry was performed using theprosthetic breast phantom and the female-equivalent mathematical chest phantom. A Computerized Tomographybased treatment planning was performedusing a phantom and by CorePlan Treatment Planning System (TPS. For measuring the absorbed dose, thermoluminescent dosimeter(TLD chips (GR-207A were used. Multiple irradiations were completed for all the TLD positions, and the dose absorbed by the TLDs was read by a lighttelemetry (LTM reader. Results: Statistical comparisons were performed between the absorbed dosesassessed by the TLDs and the TPS calculations forthe same sites. Our initial resultsdemonstratedanacceptable agreement (P=0.064 between the treatment planning data and the measurements. The mean difference between the TPS and TLD resultswas 1.99%.The obtained findings showed that radiotherapy is compatible withsilicone gel prosthesis. Conclusion: It could be concludedthat the siliconbreast prosthesis has no clinicallysignificant effectondistribution of a 6 MV photon beam for reconstructed breasts.

  9. Effect of radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery in older patients with early breast cancer and breast ductal carcinoma in situ: a meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-jun; Zhang, Xi; Wu, Cong-cong; Zhang, Chao-ying; Sun, Shuang-shuang; Wu, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Background There are no consistent agreements on whether radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) could provide local control and survival benefit for older patients with early breast cancer or breast ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of radiotherapy after BCS in older patients with early breast cancer or DCIS. Results Radiotherapy could reduce the risk of local relapse in older patients with early breast cancer. The 5-year AR of local relapse was 2.2% and 6.2% for radiotherapy and non-radiotherapy group, respectively, with low 5-year ARD of 4.0% and high NNT of 25. The 10-year AR of local relapse was 5.3% and 10.5% for radiotherapy and non-radiotherapy group, respectively, with the 10-year ARD of 5.2% and NNT of 20. However, radiotherapy could not improve survival benefits, including overall survival, cancer-specific survival, breast-cancer-specific survival, and distant relapse. Moreover, radiotherapy could reduce the risk of ipsilateral breast events in older patients with DCIS. Materials and Methods PubMed and Embase database were searched for relevant studies. Hazard ratios (HRs), risk ratios (RRs), absolute risk (AR), absolute risk difference (ARD), and number needed to treat (NNT) were used as effect measures to evaluate the efficacy of radiotherapy in older patients. Conclusions Our study indicates that radiotherapy could slightly reduce the risk of local relapse in older patients with favorable early breast cancer. However, radiotherapy cannot translate into significant survival benefits. PMID:28415667

  10. Epidemiological survey of breast and cervical radiotherapy patients in 2008-2010 from the state of Pernambuco, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Mariana L.O.; Cantinha, Rebeca S.; Franca, Elvis J., E-mail: ejfranca@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: marianasantos_ufpe@hotmail.com, E-mail: rebecanuclear@gmail.com [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Oliveira Neto, Aristides M.; Melo, Jonathan A., E-mail: aristidesoliveira466@hotmail.com, E-mail: jonathan@truenet.com.br [Centro de Radioterapia de Pernambuco (CERAPE), Santo Amaro, PE (Brazil); Pessoa, Juanna G.; Melo, Ana M.M.A.; Amancio, Francisco F., E-mail: amdemelo@hotmail.com, E-mail: amanciobike@gmail.com, E-mail: juannapessoa@gmail.com, E-mail: marianasantos_ufpe@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Departamento de Biofisica e Radiobiologia

    2014-07-01

    Breast and cervical cancer are, respectively, the second and the third most common cancers that affect the female population. The State of Pernambuco, Brazil, is one of the highest occurrence of both cancers. Radiotherapy is a powerful alternative usually associated to surgery and chemotherapy for cancer treatment. The knowledge of the disease characteristics, as well as the patient profile, contributes for public policy delineation for prevention, treatment and control of breast and cervical cancers. This work investigated the characteristics concerning patients affected by these diseases, also analyzing intrinsic aspects of the tumor. In the period of the years of 2008, 2009 and 2010, age and region of origin of patients treated by radiotherapy were compiled based on medical records available at the Center of Radiotherapy of Pernambuco (CERAPE), which is the reference center for radiotherapy in Pernambuco. Moreover, the staging of the tumor were evaluated. Results showed that 317 patients were treated in this period for breast cancer, and, in 2010, the highest number of registered cases was observed with 162 diagnosed patients for breast cancer. In the total evaluated period, 306 cases were reported for cervix cancer, however, almost 40% (118 patients) occurred only in 2010. Breast cancer has affected individuals of 50-55 years old, while those from 40 to 60 years old were mostly affected by cervix cancer. There was the highest prevalence of patients originated from the Metropolitan Region of Recife - MRR for both cancers. Stage III was predominated in cervix cancer, while stage II for breast cancer. Although most of patients have been from MRR, this region might not be the most affected by breast and cervix cancer, considering the lack of information on the interior population especially concerning to radiotherapy. It seems that the number of women with breast and cervical cancer has increased in recent years. Considering the risk factors such as physical

  11. Projected Improvements in Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using a Novel Breast Stereotactic Radiotherapy Device: A Dosimetric Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snider, James W; Mutaf, Yildirim; Nichols, Elizabeth; Hall, Andrea; Vadnais, Patrick; Regine, William F; Feigenberg, Steven J

    2017-01-01

    Accelerated partial breast irradiation has caused higher than expected rates of poor cosmesis. At our institution, a novel breast stereotactic radiotherapy device has demonstrated dosimetric distributions similar to those in brachytherapy. This study analyzed comparative dose distributions achieved with the device and intensity-modulated radiation therapy accelerated partial breast irradiation. Nine patients underwent computed tomography simulation in the prone position using device-specific immobilization on an institutional review board-approved protocol. Accelerated partial breast irradiation target volumes (planning target volume_10mm) were created per the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project B-39 protocol. Additional breast stereotactic radiotherapy volumes using smaller margins (planning target volume_3mm) were created based on improved immobilization. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy and breast stereotactic radiotherapy accelerated partial breast irradiation plans were separately generated for appropriate volumes. Plans were evaluated based on established dosimetric surrogates of poor cosmetic outcomes. Wilcoxon rank sum tests were utilized to contrast volumes of critical structures receiving a percentage of total dose ( Vx). The breast stereotactic radiotherapy device consistently reduced dose to all normal structures with equivalent target coverage. The ipsilateral breast V20-100 was significantly reduced ( P irradiation in this series indicate a potential to improve outcomes. Clinical trials investigating this benefit have begun accrual.

  12. Risk of ischemic heart disease in women after radiotherapy for breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darby, Sarah C.; Ewertz, Marianne; McGale, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Radiotherapy for breast cancer often involves some incidental exposure of the heart to ionizing radiation. The effect of this exposure on the subsequent risk of ischemic heart disease is uncertain....

  13. Radiotherapy Results of Breast Cancer Patients with Metastatic Bone Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Dirier

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer patients with bone metastasis who had admitted to Dicle University Department of Radiation Oncology for palliative radiation therapy between September 2001 and December 2003 were evaluated. There were 31 patients (26 female, 5 male. Median age was 43 years (range 23-79. Histopathological subtypes were infiltrating ductal carcinoma (88%, tubulolobuler carcinoma (6% and inflammatory carcinoma (6%. Loci of bone metastasis were vertebra only in twelve patients (39%, non-vertebral bones only in 8 patients (26% and both vertebral and nonvertebral bones in 11 patients (35%. Two patients had refused radiotherapy. Radiation doses were 3000 cGy with 10 fractions in 15 patients, 2000 cGy with 5 fractions in 6 patients and 800 cGy single fraction in eight patients. Complete palliation of pain was achieved in 18 patients (62% and partial palliation was achieved in 11 patients (38%. Treatment related toxicity was grade I-II dermatitis. In conclusion; same respons rates in terms of palliation can be achieved in the three radiotherapy schedules.

  14. Prognostic role of adjuvant radiotherapy in triple-negative breast cancer : A historical cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhoo Pathy, Nirmala; Verkooijen, Helena M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/213707705; Wong, Fuh-Yong; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Kwong, Ava; Tan, Ern-Yu; Taib, Nur Aishah; Nei, Wen-Long; Ho, Gwo-Fuang; Tan, Benita; Chan, Patrick; Lee, Soo-Chin; Hartman, Mikael; Yip, Cheng-Har; Dent, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    The value of adjuvant radiotherapy in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is currently debated. We assessed the association between adjuvant radiotherapy and survival in a large cohort of Asian women with TNBC. Women diagnosed with TNBC from 2006 to 2011 in five Asian centers (N=1,138) were

  15. Factors influencing time between surgery and radiotherapy : A population based study of breast cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Katik, S.; Gort, M.; Jobsen, J. J.; Maduro, J. H.; Struikmans, H.; Siesling, S.

    This study describes variation in the time interval between surgery and radiotherapy in breast cancer (BC) patients and assesses factors at patient, hospital and radiotherapy centre (RTC) level influencing this variation. To do so, the factors were investigated in BC patients using multilevel

  16. An investigation of image guidance dose for breast radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado, Rosemerie; Booth, Jeremy T; Bromley, Regina M; Gustafsson, Helen B

    2013-05-06

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is used for external-beam radiation therapy setup and target localization. As with all medical applications of ionizing radiation, radiation exposure should be managed safely and optimized to achieve the necessary image quality using the lowest possible dose. The present study investigates doses from standard kilovoltage kV radiographic and CBCT imaging protocol, and proposes two novel reduced dose CBCT protocols for the setup of breast cancer patients undergoing external beam radiotherapy. The standard thorax kV and low-dose thorax CBCT protocols available on Varian's On-Board Imaging system was chosen as the reference technique for breast imaging. Two new CBCT protocols were created by modifying the low-dose thorax protocol, one with a reduced gantry rotation range ("Under breast" protocol) and the other with a reduced tube current-time product setting ("Low dose thorax 10ms" protocol). The absorbed doses to lungs, heart, breasts, and skin were measured using XRQA2 radiochromic film in an anthropomorphic female phantom. The absorbed doses to lungs, heart, and breasts were also calculated using the PCXMC Monte Carlo simulation software. The effective dose was calculated using the measured doses to the included organs and the ICRP 103 tissue weighting factors. The deviation between measured and simulated organ doses was between 3% and 24%. Reducing the protocol exposure time to half of its original value resulted in a reduction in the absorbed doses of the organs of 50%, while the reduced rotation range resulted in a dose reduction of at least 60%. Absorbed doses obtained from "Low dose thorax 10ms" protocol were higher than the doses from our departments orthogonal kV-kV imaging protocol. Doses acquired from "Under breast" protocol were comparable to the doses measured from the orthogonal kV-kV imaging protocol. The effective dose per fraction using the CBCT for standard low-dose thorax protocol was 5.00 ± 0.30 mSv; for the

  17. [Prognostic value of sequencing of radiotherapy and chemotherapy following breast-conserving surgery for patients with breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Q Z; Wang, Z; Tang, Y; Rong, Q L; Wang, S L; Jin, J; Wang, W H; Liu, Y P; Song, Y W; Fang, H; Chen, B; Qi, S N; Li, N; Tang, Y; Zhang, J H; Li, Y X

    2017-04-23

    Objective: To evaluate the prognostic value of sequencing of adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy following breast-conserving surgery for patients with breast cancer. Methods: A total of 1 154 patients withT1-2N0-3M0 breast cancer retrospectively reviewed. All patients received sequential radiotherapy and chemotherapy following breast-conserving surgery. Among them, 603 patients received radiotherapy first and 551 patients received chemotherapy first. Log-rank tests were used to determine significance of disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) rates in the Kaplan-Meier curve. Results: The 5-year DFS and OS rates for all patients were 93.0% and 97.8%. The 5-year OS rate was 98.6% in the radiotherapy first group and 96.4% in the chemotherapy first group (P=0.191), and the corresponding DFS rate was 92.7% and 93.2% (P=0.430), respectively. Among the patients with Luminal A subtype, the 5-year OS rate was 99.6% in the radiotherapy first group and 97.8% in the chemotherapy first group (P=0.789). Among the patients with Luminal B subtype, the 5-year OS rate was 94.2% and 96.0%, respectively (P=0.680). Among the patients with triple negative breast cancer, the 5-year OS rate was 100% and 90.9%, respectively, with statistically significant differences (P=0.019). Among the patients with HER-2 positive breast cancer, The 5-year DFS rate was 80.1% and 100%, respectively (P=0.045). Conclusions: The OS and DFS rates in the chemotherapy first group are not significantly different from those of radiotherapy first group after breast-conserving surgery. Patients with HER-2 positive breast cancer in chemotherapy first group have a much higher DFS rate than that of radiotherapy first group, whereas patients with triple negative breast cancer in radiotherapy first group have a better OS rate than that of chemotherapy first group. Further research is warranted to investigate the benefit of different molecular types in different sequencing of radiotherapy and

  18. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Plus Hypnosis for Distress During Breast Radiotherapy: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Guy H; Sucala, Madalina; Dillon, Matthew J; Schnur, Julie B

    2017-10-01

    Radiotherapy is a common and effective treatment for women with breast cancer. However, radiotherapy has also been shown to adversely affect patients' emotional well-being. Currently, few mind-body interventions are designed to improve patients' quality of life during radiotherapy. One intervention which has demonstrated clinical efficacy in the breast cancer radiotherapy setting is Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy plus Hypnosis. The goal of this study was to investigate the impact of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy plus Hypnosis on emotional distress in women with breast cancer undergoing radiotherapy. One hundred patients were randomly assigned to either the Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy plus Hypnosis (n = 50) or Attention Control (n = 50) group. Results revealed significant benefits of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy plus Hypnosis on emotional distress at the mid-point (d = 0.54), the conclusion (d = 0.64), and 4 weeks following the conclusion (d = 0.65) of radiotherapy (all ps Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy plus Hypnosis as an evidence-based intervention to reduce emotional distress in women with breast cancer. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy plus Hypnosis has the benefits of being brief, noninvasive, lacking side-effects, and producing beneficial effects which last beyond the conclusion of radiotherapy. Given these strengths, we propose that Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy plus Hypnosis is a strong candidate for greater dissemination and implementation in cancer populations.

  19. Breast cancer risk following radiotherapy for Hodgkin lymphoma: modification by other risk factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hill, D.A.; Gilbert, E.; Dores, G.M.; Gospodarowicz, M.; van Leeuwen, F.E.; Holowaty, E.; Glimelius, B.; Andersson, M.; Wiklund, T.; Lynch, C.F.; van de Veer, M.; Storm, H.; Pukkala, E.; Stovall, M.; Curtis, R.E.; Allan, J.M.; Boice, J.D.; Travis, L.B.

    2005-01-01

    The importance of genetic and other risk factors in the development of breast cancer after radiotherapy (RT) for Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) has not been determined. We analyzed data from a breast cancer case-control study (105 patients, 266 control subjects) conducted among 3 817 survivors of HL

  20. Regional radiotherapy in high-risk breast cancer: is the issue solved?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krause, M; Petersen, C; Offersen, B V

    2015-01-01

    Adjuvant radiotherapy is the treatment standard for breast cancer with lymph node metastases after breast-conserving surgery or mastectomy. The inclusion of regional lymph nodes into the treatment volumes has been a question in recent clinical trials. Their impact on treatment standards and open ...

  1. Intraoperative Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer: The Lasting Effects of a Fleeting Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harriet B. Eldredge-Hindy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In well-selected patients who choose to pursue breast conservation therapy (BCT for early-stage breast cancer, partial breast irradiation (PBI delivered externally or intraoperatively, may be a viable alternative to conventional whole breast irradiation. Two large, contemporary randomized trials have demonstrated breast intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT to be noninferior to whole breast external beam radiotherapy (EBRT when assessing for ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence in select patients. Additionally, IORT and other PBI techniques are likely to be more widely adopted in the future because they improve patient convenience by offering an accelerated course of treatment. Coupled with these novel techniques for breast radiotherapy (RT are distinct toxicity profiles and unique cosmetic alterations that differ from conventional breast EBRT and have the potential to impact disease surveillance and patient satisfaction. This paper will review the level-one evidence for treatment efficacy as well as important secondary endpoints like RT toxicity, breast cosmesis, quality of life, patient satisfaction, and surveillance mammography following BCT with IORT.

  2. Impact of Prior Unilateral Chest Wall Radiotherapy on Outcomes in Bilateral Breast Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araujo, Thiago B; Jue Xu, Mary; Susarla, Srinivas M; Shmelev, Karen; Jiang, Wei; Pribaz, Julian J; Hergrueter, Charles; Carty, Matthew J; Caterson, Stephanie; Chun, Yoon S

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of prior unilateral chest wall radiotherapy on reconstructive outcomes among patients undergoing bilateral immediate breast reconstruction. A retrospective evaluation of patients with a history of unilateral chest wall radiotherapy was performed. In each patient, the previously irradiated and reconstructed breast was compared to the contralateral nonirradiated side, which served as an internal control. Descriptive and bivariate statistics were computed. Multiple regression statistics were computed to identify adjusted associations between chest wall radiotherapy and complications. Seventy patients were included in the study. The mean follow-up period was 51.8 months (range, 10 to 113 months). Thirty-eight patients underwent implant-based breast reconstruction; 32 patients underwent abdominal autologous flap reconstruction. Previously irradiated breast had a significantly higher rate of overall complications (51 percent versus 27 percent; p radiotherapy was a significant risk factor for breast-related complications (OR, 2.98; p radiotherapy is associated with a 3-fold increased risk of postoperative complications following immediate breast reconstruction. Therapeutic, III.

  3. Cardiac and pulmonary complication probabilities for breast cancer patients after routine end-inspiration gated radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korreman, Stine S; Pedersen, Anders N; Josipovic, Mirjana

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: Substantial reductions of radiation doses to heart and lung can be achieved using breathing adaptation of adjuvant radiotherapy following conservative surgery for breast cancer. The purpose of this study was to estimate the radiobiological implications after routine use of an end......-inspiration gated treatment, and to compare the results with predictions based on pre-clinical CT-studies. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Nineteen consecutive patients with axillary lymph node-positive left-sided breast cancer were referred for adjuvant radiotherapy after breast conserving surgery. Treatment was performed......-inspiration gating technique compared to the uncoached end-inspiration technique employed in the CT-studies. CONCLUSIONS: In a routine clinical practice involving adjuvant breast radiotherapy gated in an enhanced end-inspiration phase, remarkably low doses to organs at risk are observed. The corresponding cardiac...

  4. Imaging dose in breast radiotherapy: does breast size affect the dose to the organs at risk and the risk of secondary cancer to the contralateral breast?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batumalai, Vikneswary, E-mail: vikneswary.batumalai@sswahs.nsw.gov.au [Liverpool Cancer Therapy Centre and Ingham Institute, Liverpool, New South Wales (Australia); South Western Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Quinn, Alexandra; Jameson, Michael [Liverpool Cancer Therapy Centre and Ingham Institute, Liverpool, New South Wales (Australia); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales (Australia); Delaney, Geoff [Liverpool Cancer Therapy Centre and Ingham Institute, Liverpool, New South Wales (Australia); South Western Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Collaboration for Cancer Outcomes Research and Evaluation, Liverpool Hospital, Liverpool, New South Wales (Australia); School of Medicine, University of Western Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Holloway, Lois [Liverpool Cancer Therapy Centre and Ingham Institute, Liverpool, New South Wales (Australia); South Western Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales (Australia); School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia)

    2015-03-15

    Correct target positioning is crucial for accurate dose delivery in breast radiotherapy resulting in utilisation of daily imaging. However, the radiation dose from daily imaging is associated with increased probability of secondary induced cancer. The aim of this study was to quantify doses associated with three imaging modalities and investigate the correlation of dose and varying breast size in breast radiotherapy. Planning computed tomography (CT) data sets of 30 breast cancer patients were utilised to simulate the dose received by various organs from a megavoltage computed tomography (MV-CT), megavoltage electronic portal image (MV-EPI) and megavoltage cone-beam computed tomography (MV-CBCT). The mean dose to organs adjacent to the target volume (contralateral breast, lungs, spinal cord and heart) were analysed. Pearson correlation analysis was performed to determine the relationship between imaging dose and primary breast volume and the lifetime attributable risk (LAR) of induced secondary cancer was calculated for the contralateral breast. The highest contralateral breast mean dose was from the MV-CBCT (1.79 Gy), followed by MV-EPI (0.22 Gy) and MV-CT (0.11 Gy). A similar trend was found for all organs at risk (OAR) analysed. The primary breast volume inversely correlated with the contralateral breast dose for all three imaging modalities. As the primary breast volume increases, the likelihood of a patient developing a radiation-induced secondary cancer to the contralateral breast decreases. MV-CBCT showed a stronger relationship between breast size and LAR of developing a radiation-induced contralateral breast cancer in comparison with the MV-CT and MV-EPI. For breast patients, imaging dose to OAR depends on imaging modality and treated breast size. When considering the use of imaging during breast radiotherapy, the patient's breast size and contralateral breast dose should be taken into account.

  5. Radio-induced malignancies after breast cancer postoperative radiotherapy in patients with Li-Fraumeni syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pachet Corinne

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are no specific recommendations for the management of breast cancer patients with germ-line p53 mutations, an exceptional genetic condition, particularly regarding postoperative radiotherapy. Preclinical data suggested that p53 mutations conferred enhanced radiosensitivity in vitro and in vivo and the few clinical observations showed that Li-Fraumeni families were at a higher risk of secondary radio-induced malignancies. Methods We reviewed a cohort of patients with germ-line p53 mutations who had been treated for breast cancer as the first tumor event. We assessed their outcome and the incidence of secondary radio-induced malignancies. Results Among 47 documented Li-Fraumeni families treated from 1997 to 2007 at the Institut Gustave Roussy, 8 patients had been diagnosed with breast cancer as the first tumor event. Three patients had undergone conservative breast surgery followed by postoperative radiotherapy and five patients had undergone a mastectomy (3 with postoperative radiotherapy. Thus, 6/8 patients had received postoperative radiotherapy. Median follow-up was 6 years. Median age at the diagnosis of the primary breast cancer was 30 years. The histological characteristics were as follows: intraductal carcinoma in situ (n = 3, invasive ductal carcinoma (n = 4 and a phyllodes tumor (n = 1. Among the 6 patients who had received adjuvant radiotherapy, the following events had occurred: 3 ipsilateral breast recurrences, 3 contralateral breast cancers, 2 radio-induced cancers, and 3 new primaries (1 of which was an in-field thyroid cancer with atypical histology. In contrast, only one event had occurred (a contralateral breast cancer among patients who had not received radiation therapy. Conclusions These observations could argue in favor of bilateral mastectomy and the avoidance of radiotherapy.

  6. National Breast Reconstruction Utilization in the Setting of Postmastectomy Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razdan, Shantanu N; Cordeiro, Peter G; Albornoz, Claudia R; Disa, Joseph J; Panchal, Hina J; Ho, Alice Y; Momoh, Adeyiza O; Matros, Evan

    2017-06-01

    Background Immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) is often deferred, when postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) is anticipated, due to high complication rates. Nonetheless, because of robust data supporting improved health-related quality of life associated with reconstruction, physicians and patients may be more accepting of tradeoffs. The current study explores national trends of IBR utilization rates and methods in the setting of PMRT, using the National Cancer Database (NCDB). The study hypothesis is that prosthetic techniques have become the most common method of IBR in the setting of PMRT. Methods NCDB was queried from 2004 to 2013 for women, who underwent mastectomy with or without IBR. Patients were grouped according to PMRT status. Multivariate logistic regression was used to calculate odds of IBR in the setting of PMRT. Trend analyses were done for rates and methods of IBR using Poisson regression to determine incidence rate ratios (IRRs). Results In multivariate analysis, radiated patients were 30% less likely to receive IBR (p < 0.05). The rate increase in IBR was greater in radiated compared with nonradiated patients (IRR: 1.12 vs. 1.09). Rates of reconstruction increased more so in radiated compared with nonradiated patients for both implants (IRR 1.15 vs. 1.11) and autologous techniques (IRR 1.08 vs. 1.06). Autologous reconstructions were more common in those receiving PMRT until 2005 (p < 0.05), with no predominant technique thereafter. Conclusion Although IBR remains a relative contraindication, rates of IBR are increasing to a greater extent in patients receiving PMRT. Implants have surpassed autologous techniques as the most commonly used method of breast reconstruction in this setting. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  7. Automatic segmentation of the heart in radiotherapy for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzen, Ebbe L; Ewertz, Marianne; Brink, Carsten

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate two fully automatic segmentation methods in comparison with manual delineations for their use in delineating the heart on planning computed tomography (CT) used in radiotherapy for breast cancer. Automatic delineation of heart in 15 breast cancer patients was performed by two different automatic delineation systems. Analysis of accuracy and precision of the differences between manual and automatic delineations were evaluated on volume, mean dose, maximum dose and spatial distance differences. Two sets of manual delineations were used in the evaluation: 1) a set prior to common delineation guidelines; and 2) a second set repeated with a common set of guidelines. Systematic differences between automatic and manual delineations were small for volume as well as dose. The uncertainty of the difference in volume was smaller than or similar to the inter-observer variation in manual delineations. For dose, the uncertainty was similar to manual delineations performed without common guidelines but slightly higher than the variation in manual delineations with common guidelines. Spatial differences between average manual and automatic delineations were largest at the base of the heart, where also large variations are observed in the manual delineations. Both algorithms could be improved slightly at the apex of the heart where the variation of automatic delineation was larger than for the manual delineations. Automatic delineation is an equal alternative to manual delineation when compared to the inter-observer variation. The reduction in precision of measured dose was small compared to other uncertainties affecting the estimated heart dose and would for most applications be outweighed by the benefits of fully automated delineations.

  8. Radiotherapy and breast reconstruction: a meta-analysis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Barry, M

    2011-05-01

    The optimum sequencing of breast reconstruction (BR) in patients receiving postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) is controversial. A comprehensive search of published studies that examined postoperative morbidity following immediate or delayed BR with combined radiotherapy was performed. Medical (MEDLINE & EMBASE) databases were searched and cross-referenced for appropriate studies where morbidity following BR was the primary outcome measured. A total of 1,105 patients were identified from 11 appropriately selected studies. Patients undergoing PMRT and BR are more likely to suffer morbidity compared with patients not receiving PMRT (OR = 4.2; 95% CI, 2.4-7.2 [no PMRT vs. PMRT]). Reconstruction technique was also examined with outcome when PMRT was delivered after BR, and this demonstrated that autologous reconstruction is associated with less morbidity in this setting (OR = 0.21; 95% CI, 0.1-0.4 [autologous vs. implant-based]). Delaying BR until after PMRT had no significant effect on outcome (OR = 0.87; 95% CI, 0.47-1.62 [delayed vs. immediate]). PMRT has a detrimental effect on BR outcome. These results suggest that where immediate reconstruction is undertaken with the necessity of PMRT, an autologous flap results in less morbidity when compared with implant-based reconstruction.

  9. Dosimetry and field matching for radiotherapy to the breast and superclavicular fossa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winfield, Elizabeth

    Radiotherapy for early breast cancer aims to achieve local disease control and decrease loco-regional recurrence rates. Treatment may be directed to breast or chest wall alone or, include regional lymph nodes. When using tangential fields to treat the breast a separate anterior field directed to the axilla and supraclavicular fossa (SCF) is needed to treat nodal areas. The complex geometry of this region necessitates matching of adjacent radiation fields in three dimensions. The potential exists for zones of overdosage or underdosage along the match line. Cosmetic results may be compromised if treatment fields are not accurately aligned. Techniques for field matching vary between centres in the UK. A study of dosimetry across the match line region using different techniques, as reported in the multi-centre START Trial Quality Assurance (QA) programme, was undertaken. A custom-made anthropomorphic phantom was designed to assess dose distribution in three dimensions using film dosimetry. Methods with varying degrees of complexity were employed to match tangential and SCF beams. Various techniques combined half beam blocking and machine rotations to achieve geometric alignment. Matching of asymmetric beams allowed a single isocentre technique to be used. Where field matching was not undertaken a gap between tangential and SCF fields was employed. Results demonstrated differences between techniques in addition to variations within the same technique between different centres. Geometric alignment techniques produced more homogenous dose distributions in the match region than gap techniques or those techniques not correcting for field divergence. For this multi-centre assessment of match plane techniques film dosimetry used in conjunction with a breast shaped phantom provided relative dose information. This study has highlighted the difficulties of matching treatment fields to achieve homogenous dose distribution through the region of the match plane and the degree of

  10. 10 year survival after breast-conserving surgery plus radiotherapy compared with mastectomy in early breast cancer in the Netherlands: a population-based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maaren, M.C. van; Munck, L.; Bock, G.H. de; Jobsen, J.J.; Dalen, T. van; Linn, S.C.; Poortmans, P.; Strobbe, L.J.A.; Siesling, S.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Investigators of registry-based studies report improved survival for breast-conserving surgery plus radiotherapy compared with mastectomy in early breast cancer. As these studies did not present long-term overall and breast cancer-specific survival, the effect of breast-conserving

  11. Novel use of an air-filled breast prosthesis to allow radiotherapy to recurrent colonic cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Duffy, F

    2011-03-01

    AiM: The authors present the novel and successful use of an air-filled breast prosthesis for extra pelvic exclusion of small bowel to facilitate adjuvant radiotherapy following resection of recurrent adenocarcinoma of the ascending bowel. The therapeutic use of radiotherapy in colon cancer can cause acute or chronic radiation enteropathy. Mobile small bowel can be sequestered in \\'dead space\\' or by adhesions exposing it to adjuvant radiotherapy. A variety of pelvic partitioning methods have been described to exclude bowel from radiation fields using both native and prosthetic materials.

  12. Estimation of the optimal number of radiotherapy fractions for breast cancer: A review of the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Karen; Delaney, Geoff P; Barton, Michael B

    2015-08-01

    There is variation in radiotherapy fractionation practice, however, there is no evidence-based benchmark for appropriate activity. An evidence-based model was constructed to estimate the optimal number of fractions for the first course of radiotherapy for breast cancer to aid in services planning and performance benchmarking. The published breast cancer radiotherapy utilisation model was adapted. Evidence-based number of fractions was added to each radiotherapy indication. The overall optimal number of fractions was calculated based on the frequency of specific clinical conditions where radiotherapy is indicated and the recommended number of fractions for each condition. Sensitivity analysis was performed to assess the impact of uncertainties on the model. For the entire Australian breast cancer patient population, the estimated optimal number of fractions per patient was 16.8, 14.6, 13.7 and 0.8 for ductal carcinoma in situ, early, advanced and metastatic breast cancer respectively. Overall, the optimal number of fractions per patient was 14.4 (range 14.4-18.7). These results allow comparison with actual practices, and workload prediction to aid in services planning. The model can be easily adapted to other countries by inserting population-specific epidemiological data, and to future changes in cancer incidence, stage distribution and fractionation recommendations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia after adjuvant thoracic radiotherapy for breast cancer. A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Katsuyasu; Ogasawara, Tomohiko; Akita, Yuko; Miyazaki, Mikinori; Inukai, Akihiro; Shinjo, Keiko; Suzuki, Masayuki [Nagoya Daini Red Cross Hospital (Japan)

    2001-02-01

    We report a case of recurrent cough and migratory pulmonary infiltrates in a 55-year-old woman after adjuvant thoracic radiotherapy for breast cancer. The pulmonary infiltrates were initially limited to the area adjacent to the irradiated breast, but later migrated to the opposite lung. The diagnosis of bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) was made using transbronchial biopsy, which disclosed intraluminal fibrosis in the distal airspace, together with a radiographic appearance typical of BOOP. This case was assumed to be in a series of reported cases of BOOP primed by radiotherapy. (author)

  14. Hypofractionated radiotherapy for breast cancers--preliminary results from a tertiary care center in eastern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Moujhuri; Mahata, Anurupa; Mallick, Indranil; Achari, Rimpa; Chatterjee, Sanjoy

    2014-01-01

    The standard radiotherapy (RT) fractionation practiced in India and worldwide is 50 Gy in 25 fractions over 5 weeks to the chest wall or whole breast followed by tumour bed boost in case of breast conservation (BCS). A body of validated data exists regarding hypofractionation in breast cancer. We here report initial results for 135 patients treated at our center with the START-B type of fractionation. From May 2011 till July 2012, women with all stages of breast cancer (excluding metastatic), who had undergone BCS or mastectomy were planned for 40 Gy in 15 fractions over 3 weeks to chest wall/whole breast and supraclavicular fossa (where indicated) followed by tumour bed boost in BCS patients. Planning was done using Casebow's technique. The primary end point was to assess the acute toxicity and the cosmetic outcomes. Using cosmetic scales; patients were assessed during radiotherapy and at subsequent follow up visits with the radiation oncologist. Of the 135 patients, 62 had undergone BCS and 73 mastectomy. Median age of the population was 52 years. Some 80% were T1 and T2 tumours in BCS whereas most patients in mastectomy group were T3 and T4 tumours (60%). 45% were node negative in BCS group whilst it was 23% in the mastectomy group. Average NPI scores were 3.9 and 4.9, respectively. Most frequently reported histopathology report was infiltrating ductal carcinoma (87%), grade III being most common (58%), and 69% were ER positive tumours, and 30% were Her 2 Neu positive. Triple negative tumours accounted for 13% and their mean age was young (43 yrs.) The maximum acute skin toxicity at the end of treatment was Grade 1 in 94% of the mastectomy group patients and 71% in BCS patients. Grade 2 toxicity was 6% in mast group and 23% in BCS group. Grade 3 was 6% in BCS group, no grade 3 toxicity in mastectomy patients and there was no grade 4 skin toxicity in any case. Post RT at 1 month; 39% of BCS patients had persisting Grade I skin reaction which was only 2% in

  15. Conformity Index and Homogeneity Index of the Postoperative Whole Breast Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, Deva; Smickovska, Snezana; Lazarevska, Emilija

    2017-10-15

    The treatment of breast cancer involves a multidisciplinary approach in which radiotherapy plays a key role. The conformity index and the homogeneity index are two analysis tools of a treatment plan using conformal radiotherapy. The purpose of this article is an analysis of these two parameters in the assessment of the treatment plans in 58 patients undergoing postoperative radiotherapy of the whole breast. All 58 patients participating in the study had a conservatively treated early-stage breast cancer. The treatment was performed using a standard regimen of fractionation in 25 fractions up to a total dose of 50 Gy. Dose-volume histograms were generated for both plans with and without segmental fields. Pair samples t-test was used. The technique with segmental fields allowed us more homogeneity distribution when compared to standard two tangential field techniques. The HI values were 1.08 ± 0.01 and 1.09 ± 0.01 for segment and technique with two tangential fields (p conformity and the homogeneity index are important tools in the analysis of the treatment plans during radiation therapy in patients with early-stage breast cancer. Adding segment fields in the administration of radiotherapy in patients with conservatively treated breast cancer can lead to improved dosage homogeneity and conformity.

  16. Breast cancer risk accumulation starts early – Prevention must also

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colditz, Graham A; Bohlke, Kari; Berkey, Catherine S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Nearly 1 in 4 breast cancers is diagnosed before the age of 50, and many early-stage premalignant lesions are present but not yet diagnosed. Therefore, we review evidence to support the strategy that breast cancer prevention efforts must begin early in life. Methods Literature review Results Exposures during childhood and adolescence affect a woman’s long-term risk of breast cancer, but have received far less research attention than exposures that occur later in life. Breast tissue undergoes rapid cellular proliferation between menarche and first full-term pregnancy, and risk accumulates rapidly until the terminal differentiation that accompanies first pregnancy. Evidence on childhood diet and growth in height, and adolescent alcohol intake, among other adolescent factors are related to breast cancer risk and risk of premalignant proliferative benign lesions. Conclusion Breast cancer prevention efforts will have the greatest effect when initiated at an early age and continued over a lifetime. Gaps in knowledge are identified and deserve increase attention to inform prevention. PMID:24820413

  17. Acute and subacute cardiac complications following radiotherapy in patients with left breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salari

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Radiation to some parts of the heart is unavoidable in the therapeutic course of primary tumors in many kinds of cancer, including breast cancer. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency of acute and subacute cardiac complications following radiotherapy in patients with left breast cancer. "nMethods: In this study, we enrolled 53 patients with left breast cancer who underwent mastectomy or lumpectomy between September 2005 and September 2006 in Imam Khomeini Hospital Complex, and subsequently underwent chemotherapy with anthracyclines (<450mg/m2 and Endoxan plus taxane/fFluorouracil followed by radiotherapy. In all patients, electrocardiography and echocardiography were performed before initiation of radiotherapy, immediately after radiotherapy and again three and six months later to check for radiotherapy-induced cardiac complications such as pericardial effusion, valvular lesions, left ventricular dysfunction, conduction system disturbances and other variables. "nResults: Thirty-nine patients completed the follow-up period. Among these, 10 (25.6% patients experienced cardiac complications following radiotherapy. Among these, mild pericardial effusion in seven (53.85% patients, mild mitral regurgitation in three cases (23.08% and Right Bundle Branch Block (RBBB in two cases (15.38% were the most common complications. We found no correlation between cardiac complication and tumor dose, dose fraction and type of chemotherapy protocol. We noted no cases of new or more serious complications, such as cardiomyopathies or coronary artery disease, nor any changes in ejection fraction by the end of the follow-up period. "nConclusion: In patients with left breast cancer, acute and subacute cardiac complications following radiotherapy are not serious and have no clinical significance. Further studies are needed for more assessments in this area.

  18. Quadrantectomy (QUAD) versus lumpectomy with radiotherapy (LUART) for small size breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takatsuka, Yuichi; Shinn, Eisei; Touno, Takeshi (Osaka National Hospital (Japan)) (and others)

    1994-12-01

    Between 1988 and 1994, 165 patients with small size breast cancer, clinically assessed as T[<=]3cm, N0 or 1a, were treated with breast conserving therapy. This included 107 patients treated with quadrantectomy without radiotherapy (QUAD) and 58 patients with lumpectomy with radiotherapy (LUART). To correct the breast deformity after QUAD, the latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap was utilized. We attempted to evaluate surgical margins by intraoperative frozen section and touch preparation cytology, and could lower the rate of residual cancer from 18.2% to 9.1%. After a median follow-up of 32 months, no differences in local recurrence rate and survival were observed between QUAD and LUART. These findings demonstrated that both QUAD and LUART have the similar efficacy for the treatment of small size breast cancer. However, QUAD required the careful evaluation of pathologic margins, in conjunction with cosmetic considerations. For the patients treated with LUART, adjuvant endocrine therapy may be recommended. (author).

  19. Methods and clinical utility of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) in breast-conserving surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyauchi, Mitsuru; Yamamoto, Naoto; Fujita, Yoshihiro; Honda, Ichiro; Hatano, Kazuo; Sekiya, Yuichi [Chiba Cancer Center (Japan); Suzuki, Masato; Nakajima, Nobuyuki

    1996-03-01

    We have developed an intraoperative radiotherapy technique in breast-conserving surgery. Following lumpectomy and axillary dissection up to Level II, the subcutaneous fat layer was lifted from the gland over the entire breast. Electron beams of 25 Gy were irradiated within cylinder, avoiding the skin and subcutaneous tissue. The surface of the gland was covered with cotton swabs saturated with normal saline to equalize the energy depth to the chest wall. This technique has so far been applied to 8 patients, all of whom went through a successful postoperative period without serious complications. The cosmetic results were satisfactory from immediately after the operation. Intraoperative radiotherapy combined with breast-conserving surgery may be helpful in improving the QOL of patients by eliminating the adverse effects associated radiation injury to the skin of the breast and long-term postoperative follow-up. (author).

  20. DEGRO practical guidelines for radiotherapy of breast cancer VI: therapy of locoregional breast cancer recurrences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harms, Wolfgang [St. Claraspital, Abteilung fuer Radioonkologie, Basel (Switzerland); Budach, W. [Heinrich-Heine-University, Duesseldorf (Germany); Dunst, J. [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany); Feyer, P. [Vivantes Hospital Neukoelln, Berlin (Germany); Fietkau, R.; Sauer, R. [University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Krug, D. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Piroth, M.D. [Witten/Herdecke University, HELIOS-Hospital Wuppertal, Wuppertal (Germany); Sautter-Bihl, M.L. [Municipal Hospital, Karlsruhe (Germany); Sedlmayer, F. [Paracelsus Medical University Hospital, Salzburg (Austria); Wenz, F. [University of Heidelberg, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Haase, W.; Souchon, R.; Collaboration: Breast Cancer Expert Panel of the German Society of Radiation Oncology (DEGRO)

    2016-04-15

    To update the practical guidelines for radiotherapy of patients with locoregional breast cancer recurrences based on the current German interdisciplinary S3 guidelines 2012. A comprehensive survey of the literature using the search phrases ''locoregional breast cancer recurrence'', ''chest wall recurrence'', ''local recurrence'', ''regional recurrence'', and ''breast cancer'' was performed, using the limits ''clinical trials'', ''randomized trials'', ''meta-analysis'', ''systematic review'', and ''guidelines''. Patients with isolated in-breast or regional breast cancer recurrences should be treated with curative intent. Mastectomy is the standard of care for patients with ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence. In a subset of patients, a second breast conservation followed by partial breast irradiation (PBI) is an appropriate alternative to mastectomy. If a second breast conservation is performed, additional irradiation should be mandatory. The largest reirradiation experience base exists for multicatheter brachytherapy; however, prospective clinical trials are needed to clearly define selection criteria, long-term local control, and toxicity. Following primary mastectomy, patients with resectable locoregional breast cancer recurrences should receive multimodality therapy including systemic therapy, surgery, and radiation +/- hyperthermia. This approach results in high local control rates and long-term survival is achieved in a subset of patients. In radiation-naive patients with unresectable locoregional recurrences, radiation therapy is mandatory. In previously irradiated patients with a high risk of a second local recurrence after surgical resection or in patients with unresectable recurrences, reirradiation should be strongly considered. Indication and dose concepts

  1. Higher locoregional recurrence rate for triple-negative breast cancer following neoadjuvant chemotherapy, surgery and radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Chi; Wang, Shuang; Israel, Hayley P; Yan, Sherry X; HOROWITZ, DAVID P.; Crockford, Seth; Gidea-Addeo, Daniela; K. S. Clifford Chao; Kalinsky, Kevin; Connolly, Eileen P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Breast cancer subtype, determined by expression of estrogen/progesterone receptor (ER/PR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER)-2, is predictive for prognosis. The importance of subtype to locoregional recurrence (LRR) following neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) is unknown, particularly after adjuvant radiotherapy (RT). Methods We retrospectively identified 160-breast cancer patients registered at Columbia University Medical Center from 1999 to 2012 treated with NAC, surger...

  2. Intraoperative radiotherapy in early stage breast cancer: potential indications and evidence to date

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, A M

    2015-01-01

    Following early results of recent studies of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) in the adjuvant treatment of patients with early breast cancer, the clinical utility of IORT is a subject of much recent debate within the breast oncology community. This review describes the intraoperative techniques available, the potential indications and the evidence to date pertaining to local control and toxicity. We also discuss any implications for current practice and future research. PMID:25734489

  3. Psychological and immunological characteristics of fatigued women undergoing radiotherapy for early-stage breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtier, Nicholas; Gambling, Tina; Enright, Stephanie; Barrett-Lee, Peter; Abraham, Jacinta; Mason, Malcolm D

    2013-01-01

    The amelioration of fatigue in radiotherapy patients is limited by an equivocal aetiology and uncertainty regarding who is likely to experience significant fatigue. The research objective was to characterise fatigue in women undergoing radiotherapy for breast cancer, in order to evaluate associations with elevations in anxiety, depression and a marker of systemic inflammation. Participants comprised 100 women, diagnosed with stages 0-IIA breast cancer and prescribed with 40 Gy in 15 fractions over 3 weeks. Fatigue was assessed at baseline between 10 and 22 days before radiotherapy, after 10 and 15 fractions of radiotherapy and 4 weeks after the completion of radiotherapy, using the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy Fatigue Subscale. Psychological status was self-reported using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Sera concentrations of interleukin-6-soluble receptor were established via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The contributions of pretreatment factors to fatigue were analysed using multivariable regression. Thirty-eight percent of participants experienced significant fatigue during radiotherapy, with the remainder little are affected. After controlling for baseline fatigue, anxiety before treatment was the strongest unique predictor of subsequent fatigue. During radiotherapy, interleukin-6-soluble receptor was significantly elevated in the fatigued group compared to the non-fatigued group (p = 0.01). This association was not mediated by depression. The data are consistent with the concept that psychological distress prior to radiotherapy relates to a distinct immunological and behavioural response during radiotherapy. Patients reporting elevated anxiety should benefit from interventions that appropriately address the underlying psychological distress and have the potential to ameliorate disabling treatment-related fatigue.

  4. Dose-response relationship for breast cancer induction at radiotherapy dose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gruber Günther

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose Cancer induction after radiation therapy is known as a severe side effect. It is therefore of interest to predict the probability of second cancer appearance for the patient to be treated including breast cancer. Materials and methods In this work a dose-response relationship for breast cancer is derived based on (i the analysis of breast cancer induction after Hodgkin's disease, (ii a cancer risk model developed for high doses including fractionation based on the linear quadratic model, and (iii the reconstruction of treatment plans for Hodgkin's patients treated with radiotherapy, (iv the breast cancer induction of the A-bomb survivor data. Results The fitted model parameters for an α/β = 3 Gy were α = 0.067Gy-1 and R = 0.62. The risk for breast cancer is according to this model for small doses consistent with the finding of the A-bomb survivors, has a maximum at doses of around 20 Gy and drops off only slightly at larger doses. The predicted EAR for breast cancer after radiotherapy of Hodgkin's disease is 11.7/10000PY which can be compared to the findings of several epidemiological studies where EAR for breast cancer varies between 10.5 and 29.4/10000PY. The model was used to predict the impact of the reduction of radiation volume on breast cancer risk. It was estimated that mantle field irradiation is associated with a 3.2-fold increased risk compared with mediastinal irradiation alone, which is in agreement with a published value of 2.7. It was also shown that the modelled age dependency of breast cancer risk is in satisfying agreement with published data. Conclusions The dose-response relationship obtained in this report can be used for the prediction of radiation induced secondary breast cancer of radiotherapy patients.

  5. Dose-response relationship for breast cancer induction at radiotherapy dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Cancer induction after radiation therapy is known as a severe side effect. It is therefore of interest to predict the probability of second cancer appearance for the patient to be treated including breast cancer. Materials and methods In this work a dose-response relationship for breast cancer is derived based on (i) the analysis of breast cancer induction after Hodgkin's disease, (ii) a cancer risk model developed for high doses including fractionation based on the linear quadratic model, and (iii) the reconstruction of treatment plans for Hodgkin's patients treated with radiotherapy, (iv) the breast cancer induction of the A-bomb survivor data. Results The fitted model parameters for an α/β = 3 Gy were α = 0.067Gy-1 and R = 0.62. The risk for breast cancer is according to this model for small doses consistent with the finding of the A-bomb survivors, has a maximum at doses of around 20 Gy and drops off only slightly at larger doses. The predicted EAR for breast cancer after radiotherapy of Hodgkin's disease is 11.7/10000PY which can be compared to the findings of several epidemiological studies where EAR for breast cancer varies between 10.5 and 29.4/10000PY. The model was used to predict the impact of the reduction of radiation volume on breast cancer risk. It was estimated that mantle field irradiation is associated with a 3.2-fold increased risk compared with mediastinal irradiation alone, which is in agreement with a published value of 2.7. It was also shown that the modelled age dependency of breast cancer risk is in satisfying agreement with published data. Conclusions The dose-response relationship obtained in this report can be used for the prediction of radiation induced secondary breast cancer of radiotherapy patients. PMID:21651799

  6. Acquired lymphangiectasis following surgery and radiotherapy of breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angoori Gnaneshwar Rao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acquired lymphangiectasia (AL is a significant and rare complication of surgery and radiotherapy. We report lymphangiectasia in a 40-year-old woman who had undergone radical mastectomy and radiotherapy. After 4 years of combined therapy, she developed multiple vesicles and bullae. Skin biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of lymphangiectasia. The case is unique as it is not associated with lymphedema, which is a usual accompaniment of lymphangiectasia following surgery and radiotherapy. AL is usually asymptomatic, but trauma may cause recurrent cellulitis. Treatment modalities include electrodessication, surgical excision, sclerotherapy and carbon dioxide laser ablation.

  7. SU-E-T-292: Dosimetric Advantage of Prone Breast Radiotherapy for Korean Left-Sided Breast Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Y; Shin, J; Yu, J; Park, W; Choi, D; Huh, S; Han, Y; Kim, J [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric benefit of prone breast radiotherapy for Korean left-sided early-stage breast cancer patients who have relatively small breast Methods: From April to June, 2014, 10 left-sided breast cancer patients received the whole breast irradiation in prone position after partial mastectomy with sentinel lymph node biopsy or axillary lymph node dissection. All patients were pTmi-2N0-1mi. Each patient underwent two computed tomoradiography (CT) simulations in supine and prone positions. The whole breast, ipsilateral lung, heart, and left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) were contoured on each simulation CT images, and then tangential-fields treatment plan in each position was designed for the whole breast irradiation with the total dose of 50 Gy in 2 Gy fractions. Dose-volume histograms of two setups were compared for target coverage and radiation dose to normal organs with Wilcoxon signed rank tests. Results: The median age of patients was 47 years (range, 37 to 53). The median chest size was 82.5 cm (range, 75 to 90) and bra cup size was A in 4, B in 4, and C in 2 patients. The radiation dose to the whole breast was similar when comparing mean dose (Dmean) and dose covering 95% of the breast volume, but maximum dose (Dmax) of breast was higher in supine (median 52.3 vs. 52.7 Gy, p=0.013). Prone position reduced significantly the radiation dose in ipsilateral lung, heart, and LAD by median 5.7, 1.1, and 6.9 Gy of Dmean (p=0.005, 0.007, and 0.005) and 28.2, 18.8, and 35.0 Gy of Dmax (p=0.005, 0.005, and 0.007), respectively. Conclusion: Prone breast radiotherapy could be beneficial for Korean breast cancer patients since it substantially spared normal organs while achieving adequate coverage of the breast tissue. Further prospective study is required to validate the potential benefit of prone breast radiotherapy.

  8. Vertical mammaplasty associated with accelerated partial breast radiotherapy: how oncoplastic surgery techniques associated with modern techniques of radiotherapy can improve the aesthetic outcome in selected patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couto, Henrique Lima, E-mail: enriquecouto@hotmail.com [Santa Fe Women' s and Maternity Hospital, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Amorim, Washington Cancado; Guimaraes, Rodrigo [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Hospital Geral; Ramires, Leandro Cruz; Castilho, Marcus Simoes [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina; Dominguez, Lorena Lima Coto [Universidade Estacio de Sa (UNESA), Rio de Janeiro, EJ (Brazil)

    2014-07-15

    Breast cancer is the second most common type of cancer in the world, being the most common among women, responsible for 22% of new cases each year. It's surgical and radiation treatment evolved from radical procedures (Halsted radical mastectomy and total external breast radiotherapy) to less radical and more conservative procedures. With the use of modern oncoplastic surgery techniques and accelerated partial breast radiotherapy, selected patients can benefit with better aesthetic results, fewer side effects, and more comfortable and brief treatments. (author)

  9. Dosimetric Comparison Between 3-Dimensional Conformal and Robotic SBRT Treatment Plans for Accelerated Partial Breast Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goggin, L M; Descovich, M; McGuinness, C; Shiao, S; Pouliot, J; Park, C

    2016-06-01

    Accelerated partial breast irradiation is an attractive alternative to conventional whole breast radiotherapy for selected patients. Recently, CyberKnife has emerged as a possible alternative to conventional techniques for accelerated partial breast irradiation. In this retrospective study, we present a dosimetric comparison between 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy plans and CyberKnife plans using circular (Iris) and multi-leaf collimators. Nine patients who had undergone breast-conserving surgery followed by whole breast radiation were included in this retrospective study. The CyberKnife planning target volume (PTV) was defined as the lumpectomy cavity + 10 mm + 2 mm with prescription dose of 30 Gy in 5 fractions. Two sets of 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy plans were created, one used the same definitions as described for CyberKnife and the second used the RTOG-0413 definition of the PTV: lumpectomy cavity + 15 mm + 10 mm with prescription dose of 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions. Using both PTV definitions allowed us to compare the dose delivery capabilities of each technology and to evaluate the advantage of CyberKnife tracking. For the dosimetric comparison using the same PTV margins, CyberKnife and 3-dimensional plans resulted in similar tumor coverage and dose to critical structures, with the exception of the lung V5%, which was significantly smaller for 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, 6.2% when compared to 39.4% for CyberKnife-Iris and 17.9% for CyberKnife-multi-leaf collimator. When the inability of 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy to track motion is considered, the result increased to 25.6%. Both CyberKnife-Iris and CyberKnife-multi-leaf collimator plans demonstrated significantly lower average ipsilateral breast V50% (25.5% and 24.2%, respectively) than 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (56.2%). The CyberKnife plans were more conformal but less homogeneous than the 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy plans. Approximately 50% shorter

  10. Delineation of target volumes and organs at risk in adjuvant radiotherapy of early breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette H; Berg, Martin; Pedersen, Anders N

    2013-01-01

    During the past decade planning of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) of early breast cancer has changed from two-dimensional (2D) to 3D conformal techniques. In the planning computerised tomography (CT) scan both the targets for RT and the organs at risk (OARs) are visualised, enabling an increased focu...

  11. The value of FATS expression in predicting sensitivity to radiotherapy in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Wu, Nan; Zhang, Tiemei; Sun, Tao; Su, Yi; Zhao, Jing; Mu, Kun; Jin, Zhao; Gao, Ming; Liu, Juntian; Gu, Lin

    2017-06-13

    The fragile-site associated tumor suppressor (FATS) is a newly identified tumor suppressor involved in radiation-induced tumorigenesis. The purpose of this study was to characterize FATS expression in breast cancers about radiotherapy benefit, patient characteristics, and prognosis. The expression of FATS mRNA was silent or downregulated in 95.2% of breast cancer samples compared with paired normal controls (P FATS was correlated with higher nuclear grade (P = .01) and shorter disease-free survival (DFS) of breast cancer (P = .036). In a multivariate analysis, FATS expression showed favorable prognostic value for DFS (odds ratio, 0.532; 95% confidence interval, 0.299 to 0.947; (P = .032). Furthermore, improved survival time was seen in FATS-positive patients receiving radiotherapy (P = .006). The results of multivariate analysis revealed independent prognostic value of FATS expression in predicting longer DFS (odds ratio, 0.377; 95% confidence interval, 0.176 to 0.809; P = 0.012) for patients receiving adjuvant radiotherapy. In support of this, reduction of FATS expression in breast cancer cell lines, FATS positive group significantly sensitized than Knock-down of FATS group. Tissue samples from 156 breast cancer patients and 42 controls in tumor bank were studied. FATS gene expression was evaluated using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). FATS function was examined in breast cancer cell lines using siRNA knock-downs and colony forming assays after irradiation. FATS status is a biomarker in breast cancer to identify individuals likely to benefit from radiotherapy.

  12. ACCELERATED REGIMENS OF ADJUVANT RADIOTHERAPY IN THE TREATMENT OF BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. V. Afonin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of breast cancer (BC is a complex multidisciplinary problem. Often, radiation therapy is an obligatory component of treatment of breast cancer patients. Numerous large randomized trials have proved the efficacy of adjuvant radiotherapy in both the standard fractionation regimen in a single focal dose of 2 Gy to a total focal dose of 50 Gy for 25 fractions and in modes of hypofractionation using radiation exposure at a larger daily dose with a reduction in the total treatment time. The presented review summarizes the data of the largest studies on the modes of hypofractionation of postoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer. Most of the studies comparing the standard mode of fractionation of postoperative radiotherapy with the modes of hypofractionation showed comparable results for the main oncological parameters with similar tolerability, frequency of complications and good cosmetic results. It also shows the economic feasibility of applying accelerated regimes in everyday practice. Despite the fact that radiotherapy in the mode of hypofractionation has already become the standard of treatment and is recommended for use by the largest European and American cancer associations, indications for its conduct, the criteria for selection in the studies and the range of recommended single focal doses differ. The obtained results do not give an opportunity to confidently judge the advantage of one or another regime. It is necessary to determine the factors of a favorable and unfavorable prognosis, to clarify the indications for the use of various radiotherapy techniques. Therefore, questions about the optimal mode of hypo-fractionation of adjuvant radiotherapy, the timing of its initiation and the criteria for selecting patients for this type of therapy as part of the comprehensive treatment of breast cancer have not yet been fully resolved. Also open is the choice of optimal single and total doses of radiation, its combination with drug

  13. Axillary radiotherapy in conservative surgery for early-stage breast cancer (stage I and II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Novoa, Alejandra; Acea Nebril, Benigno; Díaz, Inma; Builes Ramírez, Sergio; Varela, Cristina; Cereijo, Carmen; Mosquera Oses, Joaquín; López Calviño, Beatriz; Seoane Pillado, María Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Several clinical studies analyze axillary treatment in women with early-stage breast cancer because of changes in the indication for axillary lymph node dissection. The aim of the study is to analyze the impact of axillary radiotherapy in disease-free and overall survival in women with early breast cancer treated with lumpectomy. Retrospective study in women with initial stages of breast carcinoma treated by lumpectomy. A comparative analysis of high-risk women with axillary lymph node involvement who received axillary radiotherapy with the group of women with low risk without radiotherapy was performed. Logistic regression was used to determine factors influencing survival and lymphedema onset. A total of 541 women were included in the study: 384 patients (71%) without axillary lymph node involvement and 157 women (29%) with 1-3 axillary lymph node involvement. Patients with axillary radiotherapy had a higher number of metastatic lymph node compared to non-irradiated (1.6±0.7 vs. 1.4±0.6, P=.02). The group of women with axillary lymph node involvement and radiotherapy showed an overall and disease-free survival at 10 years similar to that obtained in patients without irradiation (89.7% and 77.2%, respectively). 3 lymph nodes involved multiplied by more than 7 times the risk of death (HR=7.20; 95% CI: 1.36 to 38.12). The multivariate analysis showed axillary lymph node dissection as the only variable associated with the development of lymphedema. The incidence of axillary relapse on stage I and II breast cancer is rare. In these patients axillary radiotherapy does not improve overall survival, but contributes to regional control in those patients with risk factors. Copyright © 2016 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Whole breast and excision cavity radiotherapy plan comparison: Conformal radiotherapy with sequential boost versus intensity-modulated radiation therapy with a simultaneously integrated boost

    OpenAIRE

    Small, Katherine; Kelly, Chris; Beldham-Collins, Rachael; Gebski, Val

    2013-01-01

    Introduction A comparative study was conducted comparing the difference between (1) conformal radiotherapy (CRT) to the whole breast with sequential boost excision cavity plans and (2) intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to the whole breast with simultaneously integrated boost to the excision cavity. The computed tomography (CT) data sets of 25 breast cancer patients were used and the results analysed to determine if either planning method produced superior plans. Methods CT data set...

  15. Incidence of organizing pneumonia after whole-breast radiotherapy for breast cancer, and risk factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Hisashi; Ebi, Junko; Tamaki, Tomoaki; Yukawa, Ami; Nakajima, Masaru; Ohtake, Tohru; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki

    2018-02-03

    Radiation-induced organizing pneumonia (OP) reportedly occurs in ~2% of patients who receive whole-breast radiotherapy (WBRT). Though there are several reported risk factors, they remain unclear and controversial. We analyzed the incidence of and risk factors for OP after WBRT at our institution. We analyzed 665 breast cancer patients (with WBRT of 679 breasts) who underwent WBRT from October 2007 to September 2012 at our institution and were followed up for more than 1 year after completion of WBRT. Factors included in the analysis were age, the side affected, central lung distance (CLD), radiation dose, concurrent endocrine therapy, and chemotherapy. The median age was 56 years (range, 23-89 years). The sides affected were left, right and bilateral in 342, 309 and 14 patients, respectively. The median CLD was 1.1 cm (range, 0-3.0 cm). Concurrent endocrine therapy was performed in 236 patients, and chemotherapy was given in 215 patients; of these, 4 received concurrent chemotherapy. OP developed in nine patients (1.4%). The median time taken to develop OP after the completion of WBRT was 4 months (range, 2-12 months). All nine patients were treated with steroids, and symptoms promptly improved, except in two patients who relapsed. Statistical analysis revealed that only CLD (≥1.5 cm) was significantly associated with the development of OP (P = 0.004). In conclusion, the incidence of OP after WBRT was 1.4%, and CLD was a significant risk factor. In these patients, OP was controlled with steroid administration. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  16. Left-sided breast cancer irradiation using rotational and fixed-field radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, X. Sharon, E-mail: xqi@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Liu, Tian X. [Department of Radiology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Liu, Arthur K.; Newman, Francis; Rabinovitch, Rachel; Kavanagh, Brian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado, Denver, CO (United States); Hu, Y. Angie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States)

    2014-10-01

    The 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) technique is the standard for breast cancer radiotherapy. During treatment planning, not only the coverage of the planning target volume (PTV) but also the minimization of the dose to critical structures, such as the lung, heart, and contralateral breast tissue, need to be considered. Because of the complexity and variations of patient anatomy, more advanced radiotherapy techniques are sometimes desired to better meet the planning goals. In this study, we evaluated external-beam radiation treatment techniques for left breast cancer using various delivery platforms: fixed-field including TomoDirect (TD), static intensity-modulated radiotherapy (sIMRT), and rotational radiotherapy including Elekta volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and tomotherapy helical (TH). A total of 10 patients with left-sided breast cancer who did or did not have positive lymph nodes and were previously treated with 3DCRT/sIMRT to the entire breast were selected, their treatment was planned with Monaco VMAT, TD, and TH. Dosimetric parameters including PTV coverage, organ-at-risk (OAR) sparing, dose-volume histograms, and target minimum/maximum/mean doses were evaluated. It is found that for plans providing comparable PTV coverage, the Elekta VMAT plans were generally more inhomogeneous than the TH and TD plans. For the cases with regional node involvement, the average mean doses administered to the heart were 9.2 (± 5.2) and 8.8 (± 3.0) Gy in the VMAT and TH plans compared with 11.9 (± 6.4) and 11.8 (± 9.2) Gy for the 3DCRT and TD plans, respectively, with slightly higher doses given to the contralateral lung or breast or both. On average, the total monitor units for VMAT plans are 11.6% of those TH plans. Our studies have shown that VMAT and TH plans offer certain dosimetric advantages over fixed-field IMRT plans for advanced breast cancer requiring regional nodal treatment. However, for early-stage breast cancer fixed

  17. Spectrophotometer and ultrasound evaluation of late toxicity following breast-cancer radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, E J; Chen, H; Torres, M A; Curran, W J; Liu, T

    2011-10-01

    Radiation-induced normal-tissue toxicities are common, complex, and distressing side effects that affect 90% of patients receiving breast-cancer radiotherapy and 40% of patients post radiotherapy. In this study, the authors investigated the use of spectrophotometry and ultrasound to quantitatively measure radiation-induced skin discoloration and subcutaneous-tissue fibrosis. The study's purpose is to determine whether skin discoloration correlates with the development of fibrosis in breast-cancer radiotherapy. Eighteen breast-cancer patients were enrolled in our initial study. All patients were previously treated with a standard course of radiation, and the median follow-up time was 22 months. The treated and untreated breasts were scanned with a spectrophotometer and an ultrasound. Two spectrophotometer parameters-melanin and erythema indices-were used to quantitatively assess skin discoloration. Two ultrasound parameters-skin thickness and Pearson coefficient of the hypodermis-were used to quantitatively assess severity of fibrosis. These measurements were correlated with clinical assessments (RTOG late morbidity scores). Significant measurement differences between the treated and contralateral breasts were observed among all patients: 27.3% mean increase in skin thickness (p spectrophotometer parameters do not correlate with ultrasound parameters. Spectrophotometry and quantitative ultrasound are objective tools that assess radiation-induced tissue injury. Spectrophotometer parameters did not correlate with those of quantitative ultrasound suggesting that skin discoloration cannot be used as a marker for subcutaneous fibrosis. These tools may prove useful for the reduction of radiation morbidities and improvement of patient quality of life.

  18. Unilateral solitary choroid metastasis from breast cancer: Rewarding results of external radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmala S

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Intraocular metastatic tumor is the commonest intraocular malignancy in adults, with uveal tract the commonest site. In nearly 85% of cases the choroid is the afflicted site due to its vascularity. Breast and lung are the common primaries. In breast primaries, this could be the first metastatic disease. This condition should always be kept in mind in patients with visual symptoms. Fundus examination, ultrasonography and CT/MRI of the orbit help in diagnosis. Early recognition and timely treatment can save the visual function thus imparting good quality of life to the patient. External beam radiotherapy is a good local form of treatment. Hormone therapy in hormone receptor positive tumors can have additional benefits. Here we report a case of unilateral solitary choroid metastasis in a case of breast cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy.

  19. Breast interest group faculty of radiation oncology: Australian and New Zealand patterns of practice survey on breast radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Kimberley; Mackenzie, Penny; Allen, Angela; Dreosti, Marcus; Morgia, Marita; Zissiadis, Yvonne; Lamoury, Gilian; Windsor, Apsara

    2017-08-01

    This patterns of practice study was conducted on behalf of the RANZCR Breast Interest Group in order to document current radiotherapy practices for breast cancer in Australia and New Zealand. The survey identifies variations and highlights potential contentious aspects of radiotherapy management of breast cancer. A fifty-eight question survey was disseminated via the Survey Monkey digital platform to 388 Radiation Oncologists in Australia and New Zealand. In total, 156 responses were received and collated. Areas of notable consensus among respondents included hypofractionation (77.3% of respondents would 'always' or 'sometimes' consider hypofractionation in the management of ductal carcinoma in-situ and 99.3% in early invasive breast cancer); margin status in early breast cancer (73.8% believe a clear inked margin is sufficient and does not require further surgery) and use of bolus in post-mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) (91.1% of participants use bolus in PMRT). Areas with a wider degree of variability amongst respondents included regional nodal irradiation and components of radiotherapy planning and delivery (examples include the technique used for delivery of boost and frequency of bolus application for PMRT). The results of these patterns of practice survey informs radiation oncologists in Australia and New Zealand of the current clinical practices being implemented by their peers. The survey identifies areas of consensus and contention, the latter of which may lead to a development of research trials and/or educational activities to address these areas of uncertainty. © 2016 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  20. Breast Radiotherapy with Mixed Energy Photons; a Model for Optimal Beam Weighting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birgani, Mohammadjavad Tahmasebi; Fatahiasl, Jafar; Hosseini, Seyed Mohammad; Bagheri, Ali; Behrooz, Mohammad Ali; Zabiehzadeh, Mansour; Meskani, Reza; Gomari, Maryam Talaei

    2015-01-01

    Utilization of high energy photons (>10 MV) with an optimal weight using a mixed energy technique is a practical way to generate a homogenous dose distribution while maintaining adequate target coverage in intact breast radiotherapy. This study represents a model for estimation of this optimal weight for day to day clinical usage. For this purpose, treatment planning computed tomography scans of thirty-three consecutive early stage breast cancer patients following breast conservation surgery were analyzed. After delineation of the breast clinical target volume (CTV) and placing opposed wedge paired isocenteric tangential portals, dosimeteric calculations were conducted and dose volume histograms (DVHs) were generated, first with pure 6 MV photons and then these calculations were repeated ten times with incorporating 18 MV photons (ten percent increase in weight per step) in each individual patient. For each calculation two indexes including maximum dose in the breast CTV (Dmax) and the volume of CTV which covered with 95% Isodose line (VCTV, 95%IDL) were measured according to the DVH data and then normalized values were plotted in a graph. The optimal weight of 18 MV photons was defined as the intersection point of Dmax and VCTV, 95%IDL graphs. For creating a model to predict this optimal weight multiple linear regression analysis was used based on some of the breast and tangential field parameters. The best fitting model for prediction of 18 MV photons optimal weight in breast radiotherapy using mixed energy technique, incorporated chest wall separation plus central lung distance (Adjusted R2=0.776). In conclusion, this study represents a model for the estimation of optimal beam weighting in breast radiotherapy using mixed photon energy technique for routine day to day clinical usage.

  1. The Cambridge Breast Intensity-modulated Radiotherapy Trial: Comparison of Clinician- versus Patient-reported Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukesh, M B; Qian, W; Wah Hak, C C; Wilkinson, J S; Barnett, G C; Moody, A M; Wilson, C; Coles, C E

    2016-06-01

    Breast radiotherapy-associated toxicity is often reported using clinical and photographic assessments. The addition of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) is becoming more common. This study investigated the concordance between clinician- and patient-reported outcomes. The Cambridge Breast Intensity-modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) trial prospectively collected data on clinician assessment and PROMs at 2 and 5 years after breast radiotherapy. Clinician assessment included physical examination and photographic assessment. PROMs included European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) BR23 questionnaire and four breast radiotherapy-specific questions. The correlation between patient and clinician scores were analysed on an independent patient basis using percentage agreement, Cohen's kappa coefficient (k) and Bowker's test of symmetry. The analysis was repeated after stratifying patients based on age, baseline Hospital Anxiety and Depression Score (HADS) and baseline body image score. At 2 and 5 years, a weak level of concordance was seen between the clinician-based assessment and PROMS for all the five toxicity end points (k = 0.05-0.21), with individual patient-based agreement of 32.9-78.3% and a highly discordant Bowker's test of symmetry (P < 0.001). The most frequently reported moderate-severe toxicity by patients was change in breast appearance (14% at both 2 and 5 years), whereas it was breast induration (36% and 25% at 2 and 5 years, respectively) by the clinicians. The lack of concordance was not affected by patient's age, baseline HADS and baseline body image score. This study found that moderate-severe toxicity reported by patients is low and the overall concordance between clinicians and patients is low. This could be due to methodological limitations or alternatively reflects the subjective nature of PROMs. Incorporation of a patient's perception on treatment-related toxicity will have important implications for treatment

  2. Local-regional radiotherapy and surgery is associated with a significant survival advantage in metastatic breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Bevan Hong; Vlastos, Georges; Rapiti, Elisabetta; Vinh-Hung, Vincent; Nguyen, Nam Phong

    2010-01-01

    There is growing evidence of a survival benefit for metastatic breast cancer patients receiving surgery of the primary tumor. We investigated whether or not adjuvant radiotherapy can improve survival. Women diagnosed between 1988 and 2003 with metastatic, histologically confirmed unilateral primary breast cancer were selected from the SEER Program. Overall survival and specific survival were computed by the Kaplan-Meier method. Treatment hazard ratios of breast-conserving surgery or mastectomy versus no surgery, and radiotherapy versus none, were computed by Cox regression adjusting for period of diagnosis, age, marital status, race, histology, grade, and hormone receptors. Of 8761 women, radiotherapy was given to 1473 of 3905 who did not undergo surgery, to 882 of 2070 who underwent breast-conserving surgery, and to 1103 of 2786 mastectomy patients. Median overall survival was: for no surgery, 14 months; for breast-conserving surgery, 23 months; and for mastectomy, 28 months (P < 0.0001). The median overall survival of radiotherapy versus none was respectively 16 vs. 13 months without surgery (P = 0.0003), 28 vs. 20 months for breast-conserving surgery patients (P < 0.0001), and 28 vs. 28 months among mastectomy patients (P = 0.895). Multivariate analysis showed relative mortality reductions of 28% by breast-conserving surgery, 42% by mastectomy, and 10% by radiotherapy. Specific survival showed comparable results. Surgery and radiotherapy were associated with a significant survival advantage. We argue that local therapy should be considered even in metastatic disease.

  3. Precision medicine for early breast cancer radiotherapy: Opening up new horizons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernier, Jacques

    2017-05-01

    So far most efforts put forth to test the value of predictive and prognostic tools in the field of breast radiotherapy remained globally disappointing, or at least below the convincing levels reached for systemic therapy. Nevertheless the addition of predictive tools to the clinical armament tends to prevail over the use of the sole prognostic factors, also in radiotherapy. A number of predictive assays, clinically validated or not, have recently elicited significant associations between molecular profiles and tumor biological aggressiveness and/or radiosensitivity levels. Will it take a long time for these radiation-specific assays to provide added value to the - already crowded - constellation of predictive tools in the breast cancer? On the one hand, optimizing radiotherapy through the integration of precision medicine into the breast cancer management still remains a challenging issue. On the other hand, recent advances in predictive assays aimed at distinguishing patients with a more radioresistant tumor that necessitates radiation dose escalation or a switch to therapeutic approaches other than radiotherapy, plea in favor of an increasing role, in a near future, for radiation-specific molecular signatures. Streamlining predictive assays platforms via concerted actions should imperatively be given high priority, also in terms of health economics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Breast-conserving therapy: radiotherapy margins for breast tumor bed boost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topolnjak, Rajko; van Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Minkema, Danny; Remeijer, Peter; Nijkamp, Jasper; Elkhuizen, Paula; Rasch, Coen

    2008-11-01

    To quantify the interfraction position variability of the excision cavity (EC) and to compare the rib and breast surface as surrogates for the cavity. Additionally, we sought to determine the required margin for on-line, off-line and no correction protocols in external beam radiotherapy. A total of 20 patients were studied who had been treated in the supine position for 28 daily fractions. Cone-beam computed tomography scans were regularly acquired according to a shrinking action level setup correction protocol based on bony anatomy registration of the ribs and sternum. The position of the excision area was retrospectively analyzed by gray value cone-beam computed tomography-to-computed tomography registration. Subsequently, three setup correction strategies (on-line, off-line, and no corrections) were applied, according to the rib and breast surface registrations, to estimate the residual setup errors (systematic [Sigma] and random [sigma]) of the excision area. The required margins were calculated using a margin recipe. The image quality of the cone-beam computed tomography scans was sufficient for localization of the EC. The margins required for the investigated setup correction protocols and the setup errors for the left-right, craniocaudal and anteroposterior directions were 8.3 mm (Sigma = 3.0, sigma = 2.6), 10.6 mm (Sigma = 3.8, sigma = 3.2), and 7.7 mm (Sigma = 2.7, sigma = 2.9) for the no correction strategy; 5.6 mm (Sigma = 2.0, Sigma = 1.8), 6.5 mm (Sigma = 2.3, sigma = 2.3), and 4.5 mm (Sigma = 1.5, sigma = 1.9) for the on-line rib strategy; and 5.1 mm (Sigma = 1.8, sigma = 1.7), 4.8 mm (Sigma = 1.7, sigma = 1.6), and 3.3 mm (Sigma = 1.1, sigma = 1.6) for the on-line surface strategy, respectively. Considerable geometric uncertainties in the position of the EC relative to the bony anatomy and breast surface have been observed. By using registration of the breast surface, instead of the rib, the uncertainties in the position of the EC area were reduced.

  5. Risk of pacemaker implantation subsequent to radiotherapy for early-stage breast cancer in Denmark, 1982-2005

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehammar, Jens Christian; Videbaek, L.; Brock Johansen, J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Adjuvant radiotherapy reduces the risk of recurrence and death for early-stage breast cancer. However, dose to the heart should be considered since recent data suggest an increasing risk of ischemic heart disease with increasing dose to the heart. Conduction abnormalities have been...... reported after mediastinal radiation for Hodgkin's disease, but the risk of conduction disorders and arrhythmias does not appear to be increased subsequent to breast cancer radiotherapy. Such conduction abnormalities constitute a quite heterogenous group covering mild as well as severe disorders....... Objectives: The aim of this study was to examine the risk of severe conduction abnormalities evaluated by implantation of a pacemaker, subsequent to breast cancer radiotherapy. Methods: From the database of the Danish Breast Cancer Collaborative Group, we identified women treated with radiotherapy for early...

  6. Risk of pacemaker or implantable cardioverter defibrillator after radiotherapy for early-stage breast cancer in Denmark, 1982-2005

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehammar, Jens Christian; Johansen, Jens Brock; Jensen, Maj-Britt

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To examine the risk of cardiac conduction abnormalities or severe ventricular arrhythmias requiring implantation of a cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED), either a pacemaker or an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator, subsequent to breast cancer (BC) radiotherapy...

  7. Prognostic factors for locoregional recurrence and survival in stage IIIC breast carcinoma: impact of adjuvant radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuru, B

    2011-04-01

    The aims of the present study were to define the prognostic factors for locoregional recurrence (LRR) and survival in stage IIIC breast carcinoma as well as to examine the impact of adjuvant radiotherapy on the outcome of the disease. The records of 586 consecutive patients with stage IIIC breast carcinoma who underwent modified radical mastectomy were evaluated, and the prognostic factors for LRR and survival were analysed. Survival curves were generated using the Kaplan-Meier method, and multivariate analysis was performed using the Cox proportional hazard model. Five-year LRR and survival of stage IIIC breast carcinoma were 15 percent and 41.3 percent, respectively. Five-year LRR was significantly lower and five-year survival was significantly higher for all patients as well as for T1-2 patients with one to three apical node involvements who were treated with adjuvant radiotherapy. In multivariate analysis, apical node involvement, age below 35 years, T4 tumour, grade 3, extracapsular extension and lymphovascular invasion decreased survival, whereas adjuvant tamoxifen and adjuvant radiotherapy (risk ratio [RR] 0.51, 95 percent confidence interval [CI] 0.39-0.67) increased survival. Adjuvant radiotherapy was the sole independent factor that was found to be significantly associated with decreased LRR (RR 0.25, 95 percent CI 0.16-0.38). Radiotherapy decreased LRR and increased survival significantly in all stage IIIC patients and in the subgroup of T1-2 patients with one to three apical node involvements. Thus, it should be considered in the treatment of stage IIIC breast carcinoma.

  8. Extended radical mastectomy versus simple mastectomy followed by radiotherapy in primary breast cancer. A fifty-year follow-up to the Copenhagen Breast Cancer randomised study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, H.; Kaae, S.; Jensen, Maiken Brit

    2008-01-01

    From November 1951 to December 1957, 666 consecutive patients with untreated primary breast cancer admitted to the Radium Center in Copenhagen were randomised before their operability was evaluated into two groups, simple mastectomy with postoperative radiotherapy or extended radical mastectomy...

  9. Breathing adapted radiotherapy of breast cancer: reduction of cardiac and pulmonary doses using voluntary inspiration breath-hold

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders N; Korreman, Stine; Nyström, Håkan

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Adjuvant radiotherapy of breast cancer using wide tangential photon fields implies a risk of late cardiac and pulmonary toxicity. This CT-study evaluates the detailed potential dosimetric consequences of applying breathing adapted radiotherapy (BART), and the feasibility...

  10. Dosimetric Improvements with a Novel Breast Stereotactic Radiotherapy Device for Delivery of Preoperative Partial-Breast Irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snider, James W; Mutaf, Yildirim; Nichols, Elizabeth; Hall, Andrea; Vadnais, Patrick; Regine, William F; Feigenberg, Steven J

    2017-01-01

    Partial-breast irradiation (PBI) with external-beam radiotherapy has produced higher than expected rates of fair-to-poor cosmesis. Worsened outcomes have been correlated with larger volumes of breast tissue exposed to radiation. A novel breast-specific stereotactic radiotherapy (BSRT) device (BSRTD) has been developed at our institution and has shown promise in delivering highly conformal dose distributions. We compared normal tissue sparing with this device with that achieved with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT)-PBI. Fifteen women previously treated with breast conservation therapy were enrolled on an institutional review board-approved protocol. Each of them underwent CT simulation in the prone position using the BSRTD-specific immobilization system. Simulated postoperative and preoperative treatment volumes were generated based on surgical bed/clip position. Blinded planners generated IMRT-PBI plans and BSRT plans for each set of volumes. These plans were compared based on clinically validated markers for cosmetic outcome and toxicity using a Wilcoxon rank-sum test. The BSRT plans consistently reduced the volumes receiving each of several dose levels (Vx) to breast tissue, the chest wall, the lung, the heart, and the skin in both preoperative and postoperative settings (p < 0.05). Preoperative BSRT yielded particularly dramatic improvements. The novel BSRTD has demonstrated significant dosimetric benefits over IMRT-PBI. Further investigation is currently proceeding through initial clinical trials. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Feasibility of breast preserving therapy with single fraction in situ radiotherapy delivered intraoperatively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollila, David W; Klauber-DeMore, Nancy; Tesche, Leora J; Kuzmiak, Cherie M; Pavic, Dag; Goyal, Lav K; Lian, Jun; Chang, Sha; Livasy, Chad A; Sherron, Rachel F; Sartor, Carolyn I

    2007-02-01

    Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) has gained widespread interest as a means of improving the convenience and availability of breast conserving radiotherapy. Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) is an APBI technique that delivers breast radiotherapy as a single dose at the time of partial mastectomy. We adapted the technique of Veronesi to deliver IORT prior to tumor excision to improve delivery to the region at risk and reduce the volume of normal tissue irradiated. Patients age >or=55 with ultrasonographically defined tumors surgery using ultrasound tumor definition, selecting cone size and electron energy to optimize dose distribution. In the operating room, the surgeon retracted the skin over the tumor, cone was placed and radiotherapy delivered. Standard partial mastectomy was then performed. Twenty-three patients were enrolled in the study. Eighteen patients completed IORT with 10 patients having successful IORT no additional local therapy necessary. In five patients, the intraoperative radiation therapy served as the boost and in three patients unsuspected larger tumors or multicentric disease necessitated a mastectomy. The majority of patients had a good to excellent cosmetic result. Single fraction in situ IORT prior to partial mastectomy is feasible for patients with small breast cancers in achieving a good to excellent cosmetic result. Based on this early preliminary data, we plan to expand our feasibility trial.

  12. Skin-sparing Helical Tomotherapy vs 3D-conformal Radiotherapy for Adjuvant Breast Radiotherapy: In Vivo Skin Dosimetry Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capelle, Lisa [Division of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute and University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Warkentin, Heather; MacKenzie, Marc [Division of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute and University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Joseph, Kurian; Gabos, Zsolt; Pervez, Nadeem; Tankel, Keith; Chafe, Susan [Division of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute and University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Amanie, John [Division of Statistics and Epidemiology, Cross Cancer Institute and University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Ghosh, Sunita; Parliament, Matthew [Division of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute and University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Abdulkarim, Bassam, E-mail: bassam.abdulkarim@mcgill.ca [Division of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute and University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: We investigated whether treatment-planning system (TPS)-calculated dose accurately reflects skin dose received for patients receiving adjuvant breast radiotherapy (RT) with standard three-dimensional conformal RT (3D-CRT) or skin-sparing helical tomotherapy (HT). Methods and Materials: Fifty patients enrolled in a randomized controlled trial investigating acute skin toxicity from adjuvant breast RT with 3D-CRT compared to skin-sparing HT, where a 5-mm strip of ipsilateral breast skin was spared. Thermoluminescent dosimetry or optically stimulated luminescence measurements were made in multiple locations and were compared to TPS-calculated doses. Skin dosimetric parameters and acute skin toxicity were recorded in these patients. Results: With HT there was a significant correlation between calculated and measured dose in the medial and lateral ipsilateral breast (r = 0.67, P<.001; r = 0.44, P=.03, respectively) and the medial and central contralateral breast (r = 0.73, P<.001; r = 0.88, P<.001, respectively). With 3D-CRT there was a significant correlation in the medial and lateral ipsilateral breast (r = 0.45, P=.03; r = 0.68, P<.001, respectively); the medial and central contralateral breast (r = 0.62, P=.001; r = 0.86, P<.001, respectively); and the mid neck (r = 0.42, P=.04, respectively). On average, HT-calculated dose overestimated the measured dose by 14%; 3D-CRT underestimated the dose by 0.4%. There was a borderline association between highest measured skin dose and moist desquamation (P=.05). Skin-sparing HT had greater skin homogeneity (homogeneity index of 1.39 vs 1.65, respectively; P=.005) than 3D-CRT plans. HT plans had a lower skin{sub V50} (1.4% vs 5.9%, respectively; P=.001) but higher skin{sub V40} and skin{sub V30} (71.7% vs 64.0%, P=.02; and 99.0% vs 93.8%, P=.001, respectively) than 3D-CRT plans. Conclusion: The 3D-CRT TPS more accurately reflected skin dose than the HT TPS, which tended to overestimate dose received by 14% in patients

  13. Patient-reported symptoms of radiation dermatitis during breast cancer radiotherapy: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jieun; Park, Won; Choi, Doo Ho; Huh, Seung Jae; Kim, Im-Ryung; Kang, Danbee; Cho, Juhee

    2017-07-01

    To find out which symptoms most frequently and severely affect breast cancer patients during radiotherapy and how patients manage the symptoms and unmet needs. A cross-sectional survey was conducted with 111 patients who receive radiotherapy for breast cancer from January to April 2015 at Samsung Medical Center in Seoul, South Korea. Participants were asked about symptoms and discomfort due to radiotherapy, management methods for radiation dermatitis, unmet needs for radiation dermatitis care, and clinical and socio-demographic information. Of total, 108 out of 111 patients (97.3%) reported symptoms related to radiation dermatitis. Hyperpigmentation was the most commonly reported uncomfortable symptom followed by erythema. On average, patients reported 8.6 radiotherapy-induced skin problems (range, 0-11). Of total, 59 (53.2%) patients stated that they wanted care for radiation dermatitis, and 80.0, 59.4, and 51% of patients searched for information, used products, and visited the hospital to manage radiotherapy-related skin problems. Patients who experienced dryness, burning feelings, irritation, roughness, and hyperpigmentation were 11.73, 7.02, 5.10, 4.27, and 2.80 times more likely to have management needs than patients without those symptoms, respectively, adjusting age, current cycle of radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and type of surgery. Most of the breast cancer patients experience multiple symptoms associated with radiation dermatitis. Hyperpigmentation was the most common and uncomfortable symptom followed by erythema. Majority of patients wanted management for radiation dermatitis and patients who experienced dryness, burning feelings, irritation, roughness, and hyperpigmentation had higher needs for radiation dermatitis management.

  14. Neoadjuvant radiotherapy of early-stage breast cancer and long-term disease-free survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poleszczuk, Jan; Luddy, Kimberly; Chen, Lu; Lee, Jae K; Harrison, Louis B; Czerniecki, Brian J; Soliman, Hatem; Enderling, Heiko

    2017-06-30

    Compared with surgery alone, postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) improves relapse-free survival of patients with early-stage breast cancer. We evaluated the long-term overall and disease-free survival rates of neoadjuvant (presurgical) versus adjuvant RT in early-stage breast cancer patients. We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database provided by the National Institutes of Health to derive an analytic dataset of 250,195 female patients with early-stage breast cancer who received RT before (n = 2554; 1.02%) or after (n = 247,641; 98.98%) surgery. Disease-free survival, defined as time to diagnosis of a second primary tumor at any location, was calculated from automated patient identification matching of all SEER records. Partial and complete mastectomies were performed in 94.4% and 5.6% of patients, respectively. In the largest cohort of estrogen receptor-positive women who underwent partial mastectomy, the HR of developing a second primary tumor after neoadjuvant compared with adjuvant RT was 0.64 (95% CI 0.55-0.75; P early-stage breast cancer. This finding warrants further exploration of potential long-term benefits of neoadjuvant radiotherapy for early-stage breast cancer in a controlled, prospective clinical trial setting, with correlative studies done to identify potential mechanisms of superiority.

  15. Clinical therapy and HER-2 oncogene amplification in breast cancer: chemo- vs radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuehlinger, M.; Dobianer, K.; Hruza, Ch. (Ludwig Boltzmann Inst. for Experimental Endocrinology, Vienna (Austria)); Helmer, H.; Spona, J. (Ludwig Boltzmann Inst. for Experimental Endocrinology, Vienna (Austria) Vienna Univ. (Austria)); Rainer, H.; Locker, G. (Vienna Univ. (Austria))

    1994-05-01

    One hundred and five breast cancer patients with stage T3/4, N [+-], Mo were treated at random either with a pre- and postoperative chemotherapy (5-drug-combination + tamoxifen) or with a pre- and postoperative radiotherapy. Paraffin embedded tissue samples were prepared from tumor material taken by biopsy prior to therapy as well as at surgery from patients of both groups to estimate the HER-2 oncogene copy numbers before and after treatment. (Author).

  16. [Development of an educational program starting from a process approach in a department of radiotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenaerts, E; Delgaudine, M; Coucke, P

    2014-01-01

    In order to be able to implement technological evolution and organizational changes on a regular and continuous manner, the radiotherapy department initiated in 2007 a comprehensive policy of operational risk management and overall quality program. The leadership in the department is convinced that the management of professional skills is mandatory to implement rapidly new treatment techniques while simultaneously assuring a high level of quality for patient care. The "process approach" is based on a comprehensive description of all the processes building up the organization in order to check how every single process contributes to patient satisfaction. This kind of approach allows an enhanced visibility on the functioning of the department, a better control on the inter-individual relations, both between different professional groups among caregivers and between those latter and the patients. This approach yields a view on the gain obtained with each single process and leads to identification of failures in safety barriers. The process approach identifies the required professional skills in order to guarantee a high quality of care. This has resulted in the development of a training program tailored to the needs of a radiotherapy department. This training program has recently been submitted and validated by the university authorities and is nowadays registered as a certificate at the university of Liège.

  17. Multifocal squamous cell carcinoma of the oesophagus following radiotherapy for bilateral breast carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shousha, S; Fawcett, A; Luqmani, Y; Theodorou, N

    2001-01-01

    A 60 year old woman who presented with dysphagia and weight loss was found to have multiple foci of dysplasia and in situ and invasive squamous cell carcinoma scattered along the whole length of the oesophagus, with intervening areas of normal mucosa. The patient had a history of two breast carcinomas 19 and one year previously for which she had repeated radiotherapy. Several members of the patient's close family had histories of malignant disease. All oesophageal lesions and the more recent breast cancer showed positive immunostaining for p53 protein. p53 mutations, some involving different exons, were also detected in these lesions. No p53 immunostaining or mutations were detected in the normal oesophageal mucosa. The findings suggest an independent origin of the multiple dysplastic and neoplastic foci, which might have developed in a background of a field change, possibly related to the previous radiotherapy. The strong family history of malignant diseases raises the possibility that, in addition, genetic factors might have played a role in the development of the oesophageal disease. Key Words: oesophageal carcinoma • breast carcinoma • p53 • radiotherapy PMID:11533082

  18. Cost effectiveness of new breast cancer radiotherapy technologies in diverse populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Heather Taffet; Hayes, Mary Katherine

    2012-11-01

    Accelerated partial breast radiotherapy (RT) strategies (3-D conformal external-beam RT (3-D CRT) and brachytherapy with balloon catheter) reduce time and transportation burdens of whole breast RT for breast cancer. Long-term clinical trial evidence is unavailable for accelerated modalities, but uncertainty might be acceptable for patients likely to receive suboptimal whole breast RT. The objective of this study is to assess the cost effectiveness of accelerated partial breast RT compared to on-time and delayed whole breast RT. The design used in this study is decision analytic Markov model. The data sources are published literature; and national/federal sources. The target population of this study is a hypothetical cohort of 60 years old women previously treated with breast-conserving surgery for node-negative, estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer with tumors costs (2008 US$), quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios. The base-case results were: 3-D CRT was the preferred strategy, costing on average $10,800 and yielding 11.21 QALYs. On-time whole breast RT costs $368,000/QALY compared to 3-D CRT, above the $100,000/QALY WTP threshold. 3-D CRT was also preferred over delayed whole breast RT. Brachytherapy was never preferred. Sensitivity analysis indicated that the results were sensitive to the rate of recurrence outside the initial tumor quadrant ("elsewhere failure") in one-way analysis. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis indicated that results were sensitive to parameter uncertainty, and that the elsewhere-failure rate and treatment preferences may drive results. The limitation of this study is that efficacy estimates are derived from studies that may not fully represent the population modeled. As a conclusion, 3-D CRT was preferred to whole breast RT and for women likely to delay RT, indicating that 3-D CRT could be targeted more efficiently before randomized trial evidence.

  19. A Phase II Study of Radiotherapy and Concurrent Paclitaxel Chemotherapy in Breast-Conserving Treatment for Node-Positive Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, William C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States); Kim, Janice [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Kim, Edward [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ohio State University Medical Center, Columbus, OH (United States); Silverman, Paula [Department of Medicine, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States); Overmoyer, Beth [Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Cooper, Brenda W. [Department of Medicine, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States); Anthony, Sue [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States); Shenk, Robert; Leeming, Rosemary [Department of Surgery, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States); Hanks, Shelli H. [Arizona Institute of Urology, Tucson, AZ (United States); Lyons, Janice A., E-mail: janice.lyons@uhhospitals.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Administering adjuvant chemotherapy before breast radiotherapy decreases the risk of systemic recurrence, but delays in radiotherapy could yield higher local failure. We assessed the feasibility and efficacy of placing radiotherapy earlier in the breast-conserving treatment course for lymph node-positive breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Between June 2000 and December 2004, 44 women with node-positive Stage II and III breast cancer were entered into this trial. Breast-conserving surgery and 4 cycles of doxorubicin (60 mg/m{sup 2})/cyclophosphamide (600 mg/m{sup 2}) were followed by 4 cycles of paclitaxel (175 mg/m{sup 2}) delivered every 3 weeks. Radiotherapy was concurrent with the first 2 cycles of paclitaxel. The breast received 39.6 Gy in 22 fractions with a tumor bed boost of 14 Gy in 7 fractions. Regional lymphatics were included when indicated. Functional lung volume was assessed by use of the diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide as a proxy. Breast cosmesis was evaluated with the Harvard criteria. Results: The 5-year actuarial rate of disease-free survival is 88%, and overall survival is 93%. There have been no local failures. Median follow-up is 75 months. No cases of radiation pneumonitis developed. There was no significant change in the diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide either immediately after radiotherapy (p = 0.51) or with extended follow-up (p = 0.63). Volume of irradiated breast tissue correlated with acute cosmesis, and acute Grade 3 skin toxicity developed in 2 patients. Late cosmesis was not adversely affected. Conclusions: Concurrent paclitaxel chemotherapy and radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery shortened total treatment time, provided excellent local control, and was well tolerated.

  20. Dosimetric Comparison in Breast Radiotherapy of 4 MV and 6 MV on Physical Chest Simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donato da Silva, Sabrina; Passos Ribeiro Campos, Tarcisio [Nuclear Engineering Department, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Batista Nogueira, Luciana [Anatomy and Imaging Department, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Lima Souza Castro, Andre [Nuclear Engineering Department, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Institute of Radiation San Francisco, Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Alves de oliveira, Marcio; Galvao Dias, Humberto [Cancer Hospital in Uberlandia, Uberlandia (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    According to the World Health Organization (2014) breast cancer is the main cause of death by cancer in women worldwide. The biggest challenge of radiotherapy in the treatment of cancer is to deposit the entire prescribed dose homogeneously in the breast, sparing the surrounding tissue. In this context, this paper aimed at evaluating and comparing internal dose distribution in the mammary gland based on experimental procedures submitted to two distinct energy spectra produced in breast cancer radiotherapy. The methodology consisted of reproducing opposite parallel fields used in the treatment of breast tumors in a chest phantom. This simulator with synthetic breast, composed of equivalent tissue material (TE), was previously developed by the NRI Research Group (UFMG). The computer tomography (CT) scan of the simulator was obtained antecedently. The radiotherapy planning systems (TPS) in the chest phantom were performed in the ECLIPSE system from Varian Medical Systems and CAT 3D system from MEVIS. The irradiations were reproduced in the Varian linear accelerator, model SL- 20 Precise, 6 MV energy and Varian linear accelerator, 4 MV Clinac 6x SN11 model. Calibrations of the absorbed dose versus optical density from radiochromic films were generated in order to obtain experimental dosimetric distribution at the films positioned within the glandular and skin equivalent tissues of the chest phantom. The spatial dose distribution showed equivalence with the TPS on measurement data performed in the 6 MV spectrum. The average dose found in radiochromic films placed on the skin ranged from 49 to 79%, and from 39 to 49% in the mammary areola, for the prescribed dose. Dosimetric comparisons between the spectra of 4 and 6 MV, keeping the constant geometry of the fields applied in the same phantom, will be presented showing their equivalence in breast radiotherapy, as well as the variations will be discussed. To sum up, the dose distribution has reached the value expected in

  1. Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Sonja; Debus, Jürgen; Neuhof, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    Solitary plasmocytoma occurring in bone (solitary plasmocytoma of the bone, SBP) or in soft tissue (extramedullary plasmocytoma, EP) can be treated effectively and with little toxicity by local radiotherapy. Ten-year local control rates of up to 90% can be achieved. Patients with multiple myeloma often suffer from symptoms such as pain or neurological impairments that are amenable to palliative radiotherapy. In a palliative setting, short treatment schedules and lower radiation doses are used to reduce toxicity and duration of hospitalization. In future, low-dose total body irradiation (TBI) may play a role in a potentially curative regimen with nonmyeloablative conditioning followed by allogenic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation.

  2. Physical and psychosocial support requirements of 1,500 patients starting radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchheiner, K.; Czajka, A.; Luetgendorf-Cacig, C.; Schmid, M.P.; Komarek, E.; Poetter, R. [Medical Univ. of Vienna, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Ponocny-Seliger, E. [Sigmund Freud Private Univ. Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Psychology; Doerr, W. [Medical Univ. of Vienna, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Medical Univ. of Vienna (Austria). Christian Doppler Lab. for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology

    2013-05-15

    Background. The need for psychosocial support in cancer patients is estimated in the literature at 14-50%. At the Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, approximately 3,000 patients are seen annually. Due to limited staff resources, highly distressed patients need to be selected for focused support. A multidisciplinary screening questionnaire covering physical, social and psychological problems and needs was successfully implemented in clinical routine. We present the results of a representative sample of 1,500 heterogeneous cancer patients before beginning radiotherapy. Patients and methods. The prevalence rates of physical, social and psychological problems and needs were evaluated. Independent risk factors for critical psychological distress were analyzed in a multivariate logistic regression model, in order to identify vulnerable subgroups for focused psychosocial support. Results. Critical psychological distress was found in 22% of the overall cohort, of whom only 26% reported a need for psychological information. Clinically relevant pain was suffered by 31%. Patients' most frequent complaints were weakness, sleeping difficulties and exhaustion. Consequently, 40% were impaired in activities and 35% reported a requirement for support in daily life. A need for further information was expressed by 37% of patients. Significant risk factors for critical psychological distress included pain, functional status, support requirements and patient-reported symptoms. Differences in tumor type, metastases and sociodemographic variables had no impact on critical psychological distress. Conclusion. Approximately one third of all patients beginning radiotherapy have physical, social and psychological problems and should receive focused psychosocial support. Multivariate analysis reveals that patients with impaired ''physical integrity'' are at a significantly higher risk of experiencing critical psychological distress. (orig.)

  3. A Bayesian network and heuristic approach for systematic characterization of radiotherapy receipt after breast-conservation surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Ferrari, Milton; Prieto, Diana; Munene, Gitonga

    2017-06-28

    Breast-conservation surgery with radiotherapy is a treatment highly recommended by the guidelines from the National Comprehensive Cancer Network. However, several variables influence the final receipt of radiotherapy and it might not be administered to breast cancer patients. Our objective is to propose a systematic framework to identify the clinical and non-clinical variables that influence the receipt of unexpected radiotherapy treatment by means of Bayesian networks and a proposed heuristic approach. We used cancer registry data of Detroit, San Francisco-Oakland, and Atlanta from years 2007-2012 downloaded from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program. The samples had patients diagnosed with in situ and early invasive cancer with 14 clinical and non-clinical variables. Bayesian networks were fitted to the data of each region and systematically analyzed through the proposed Zoom-in heuristic. A comparative analysis with logistic regressions is also presented. For Detroit, patients under stage 0, grade undetermined, histology lobular carcinoma in situ, and age between 26-50 were found more likely to receive breast-conservation surgery without radiotherapy. For stages I, IIA, and IIB patients with age between 51-75, and grade II were found to be more likely to receive breast-conservation surgery with radiotherapy. For San Francisco-Oakland, patients under stage 0, grade undetermined, and age >75 are more likely to receive BCS. For stages I, IIA, and IIB patients with age >75 are more likely to receive breast-conservation surgery without radiotherapy. For Atlanta, patients under stage 0, grade undetermined, year 2011, and primary site C509 are more likely to receive breast-conservation surgery without radiotherapy. For stages I, IIA, and IIB patients in year 2011, and grade III are more likely to receive breast-conservation surgery without radiotherapy. For in situ breast cancer and early invasive breast cancer, the results are in accordance with the

  4. Towards breast cancer radiotherapy on the MRI-linac

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Heijst, TCF

    2017-01-01

    With the introduction of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-linear accelerator (linac) at University Medical Center Utrecht, on-line MRI guidance for radiation therapy (RT) treatments is possible. This PhD thesis explores technical implementation of the MRI-linac for local and regional breast

  5. Comparing Relaxation Programs for Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, women with breast cancer who have had surgery and are scheduled to undergo radiation therapy will be randomly assigned to one of two different stretching and relaxation programs or to a control group that will receive usual care.

  6. Cardiotoxicity from intensive chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy in breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    deGraaf, H; Dolsma, WV; Willemse, PHB; vanderGraaf, WTA; Sleijfer, DT; deVries, EGE; Mulder, NH

    1997-01-01

    Cardiac function was evaluated in 86 breast cancer patients after standard chemotherapy, followed by ablative chemotherapy and chest irradiation. One patient died of subacute heart failure 3 months after ablative chemotherapy. At a minimum of 1 year's follow-up (range 1-11 years) left vertricular

  7. Usefulness of a thermoplastic breast bra for breast cancer radiotherapy. A prospective analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piroth, Marc D.; Holy, Richard [RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Aachen (Germany); HELIOS University Hospital Wuppertal, Witten/Herdecke University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Wuppertal (Germany); Petz, Dalma; Pinkawa, Michael; Eble, Michael J. [RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Aachen (Germany)

    2016-09-15

    Despite modern techniques, in some patients receiving whole breast radiotherapy (WBI) parts of the heart and the lung might receive doses which are nowadays considered relevant for the development of late morbidity. Our aim was to analyze the usefulness of a thermoplastic breast brassiere to reduce lung and heart doses. A total of 29 patients with left-sided and 16 patients with right-sided breast cancer treated with breast conserving surgery and WBI between 2012 and 2013 were included in a prospective study analyzing the effectiveness of a thermoplastic breast bra. WBI was performed using 3D tangential fields up to 50.4 Gy. Treatment planning was performed with and without bra. Several dosimetrical parameters were analyzed comparatively focusing on the heart and ipsilateral lung. For heart dose comparisons, subvolumes like the left anterior descending artery (LAD) and a defined apical region, so-called ''apical myocardial territory'' (AMT), were defined. By using the bra, the mean lung dose was reduced by 30.6 % (left-sided cancer) and 29.5 % (right-sided; p < 0.001). The V{sub 20Gy} for the left lung was reduced by 39.5 % (4.9 vs. 8.1 % of volume; p < 0.001). The mean and maximum heart doses were significantly lower (1.6 vs. 2.1 Gy and 30.7 vs. 39.3 Gy; p = 0.01 and p < 0.001), which also applies to the mean and maximum dose for the AMT (2.5 vs. 4.4 Gy and 31.0 vs. 47.2 Gy; p < 0.01 and p < 0.001). The mean and maximum dose for LAD was lower without reaching significance. No acute skin toxicities > grade 2 were observed. By using a thermoplastic breast bra, radiation doses to the heart and especially parts of the heart apex and ipsilateral lung can be significantly lowered without additional skin toxicity. (orig.) [German] Trotz moderner Techniken koennen bei manchen Patientinnen bei der Ganzbrustbestrahlung Areale des Herzens und der Lunge Dosen erhalten, die heute als relevant fuer Spaettoxizitaeten gelten. Ziel war es, den Nutzen eines

  8. Redefining radiotherapy for early-stage breast cancer with single dose ablative treatment: a study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charaghvandi, R K; van Asselen, B; Philippens, M E P; Verkooijen, H M; van Gils, C H; van Diest, P J; Pijnappel, R M; Hobbelink, M G G; Witkamp, A J; van Dalen, T; van der Wall, E; van Heijst, T C; Koelemij, R; van Vulpen, M; van den Bongard, H J G D

    2017-03-09

    A shift towards less burdening and more patient friendly treatments for breast cancer is currently ongoing. In low-risk patients with early-stage disease, accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) is an alternative for whole breast irradiation following breast-conserving surgery. MRI-guided single dose ablative APBI has the potential to offer a minimally burdening, non-invasive treatment that could replace current breast-conserving therapy. The ABLATIVE study is a prospective, single arm, multicenter study evaluating preoperative, single dose, ablative radiation treatment in patients with early-stage breast cancer. Patients with core biopsy proven non-lobular invasive breast cancer, (estrogen receptor positive, Her2 negative, maximum tumor size 3.0 cm on diagnostic MRI) and a negative sentinel node biopsy are eligible. Radiotherapy (RT) planning will be performed using a contrast enhanced (CE) planning CT-scan, co-registered with a CE-MRI, both in supine RT position. A total of twenty-five consecutive patients will be treated with a single ablative RT dose of 20 Gy to the tumor and 15 Gy to the tumorbed. Follow-up MRIs are scheduled within 1 week, 2, 4 and 6 months after single-dose RT. Breast-conserving surgery is scheduled at six months following RT. Primary study endpoint is pathological complete response. Secondary study endpoints are the radiological response and toxicity. Furthermore, patients will fill out questionnaires on quality of life and functional status. Cosmetic outcome will be evaluated by the treating radiation oncologist, patient and 'Breast Cancer Conservation Treatment cosmetic results' software. Recurrence and survival rates will be assessed. The patients will be followed up to 10 years after diagnosis. If patients give additional informed consent, a biopsy and a part of the irradiated specimen will be stored at the local Biobank and used for future research on radiotherapy response associated genotyping. The ABLATIVE study evaluates

  9. Less increase of CT-based calcium scores of the coronary arteries. Effect three years after breast-conserving radiotherapy using breath-hold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mast, M.E.; Kempen-Harteveld, M.L. van; Petoukhova, A.L. [Centre West, Radiotherapy, The Hague (Netherlands); Heijenbrok, M.W. [Medical Center Haaglanden, Department of Radiology, The Hague (Netherlands); Scholten, A.N. [Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Wolterbeek, R. [Leiden University Medical Centre, Department of Medical Statistics and Bioinformatics, Leiden (Netherlands); Schreur, J.H.M. [Medical Center Haaglanden, Department of Cardiology, The Hague (Netherlands); Struikmans, H. [Centre West, Radiotherapy, The Hague (Netherlands); Leiden University Medical Centre, Department of Clinical Oncology, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2016-10-15

    The aim of this prospective longitudinal study was to compare coronary artery calcium (CAC) scores determined before the start of whole breast irradiation with those determined 3 years afterwards. Changes in CAC scores were analysed in 99 breast cancer patients. Three groups were compared: patients receiving left- and right-sided radiotherapy, and those receiving left-sided radiotherapy with breath-hold. We analysed overall CAC scores and left anterior descending (LAD) and right coronary artery (RCA) CAC scores. Between the three groups, changes of the value of the LAD minus the RCA CAC scores of each individual patient were also compared. Three years after breath-hold-based whole breast irradiation, a less pronounced increase of CAC scores was noted. Furthermore, LAD minus RCA scores in patients treated for left-sided breast cancer without breath-hold were higher when compared to LAD minus RCA scores of patients with right-sided breast cancers and those with left-sided breast cancer treated with breath-hold. Breath-hold in breast-conserving radiotherapy leads to a less pronounced increase of CT-based CAC scores. Therefore, breath-hold probably prevents the development of radiation-induced coronary artery disease. However, the sample size of this study is limited and the follow-up period relatively short. (orig.) [German] Das Ziel dieser prospektiven Langzeitstudie war der Vergleich der Coronary-Artery-Calcium-(CAC-)Werte vor Beginn der Brustbestrahlung mit den Werten nach 3 Jahren. Aenderungen der CAC-Werte wurden bei 99 Brustkrebspatienten analysiert. Drei Gruppen wurden untersucht: Patienten nach links- und rechtsseitiger Strahlentherapie sowie mit Bestrahlung unter Atemanhalt. Wir analysierten die Gesamt-CAC-Werte sowie die CAC-Werte der vorderen linken absteigenden (''left anterior descending'', LAD) und der rechten Koronararterie (''right coronary artery'', RCA). Zwischen den drei Gruppen wurden auch die Veraenderungen

  10. Adjuvant immunotherapy after surgery and radiotherapy for breast carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papavasiliou, C.; Pappas, J.; Pavlatou, M.; Keramopoulos, A.; Giannakoulis, N.; Koumantakis, E.; Nicolaidis, C.

    1982-04-01

    One hundred patients with operable breast cancer received 'prophylactic' postoperative irradiation after mastectomy. In addition, during irradiation and for four months afterwards, part of the patients received immunotherapy (BCG scarification and oral administration of levamisole), while the rest served as controls. Although survival time in the two groups was about the same, disease-free survival time was significantly longer in the immunotherapy group. Tumor reactivation was preceded by deterioration of the Leucocyte Migration Inhibition Index.

  11. Surface dosimetry for breast radiotherapy in the presence of immobilization cast material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, Andrew; Hardcastle, Nicholas; Metcalfe, Peter; Cutajar, Dean; Quinn, Alexandra; Cardoso, Michael; Rosenfeld, Anatoly [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW (Australia); Foo, Kerwyn [Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Barlin, Sheree, E-mail: anatoly@uow.edu.au [Illawarra Cancer Care Centre, Wollongong Hospital, Wollongong, NSW (Australia)

    2011-02-21

    Curative breast radiotherapy typically leaves patients with varying degrees of cosmetic damage. One problem interfering with cosmetically acceptable breast radiotherapy is the external contour for large pendulous breasts which often results in high doses to skin folds. Thermoplastic casts are often employed to secure the breasts to maintain setup reproducibility and limit the presence of skin folds. This paper aims to determine changes in surface dose that can be attributed to the use of thermoplastic immobilization casts. Skin dose for a clinical hybrid conformal/IMRT breast plan was measured using radiochromic film and MOSFET detectors at a range of water equivalent depths representative of the different skin layers. The radiochromic film was used as an integrating dosimeter, while the MOSFETs were used for real-time dosimetry to isolate the contribution of skin dose from individual IMRT segments. Strips of film were placed at various locations on the breast and the MOSFETs were used to measure skin dose at 16 positions spaced along the film strips for comparison of data. The results showed an increase in skin dose in the presence of the immobilization cast of up to 45.7% and 62.3% of the skin dose without the immobilization cast present as measured with Gafchromic EBT film and MOSFETs, respectively. The increase in skin dose due to the immobilization cast varied with the angle of beam incidence and was greatest when the beam was normally incident on the phantom. The increase in surface dose with the immobilization cast was greater under entrance dose conditions compared to exit dose conditions.

  12. Investigation of electron boost radiotherapy in patients with breast cancer: Is a direct electron field optimal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghili, M; Barzegartahamtan, M; Alikhassi, A; Mohammadpour, R

    2018-02-01

    Historically, electron boost dose mainly was delivered by a direct field in adjuvant radiotherapy of breast cancer. In this prospective study, we investigated direct electron field, in terms of optimal coverage of tumour bed volume following localization using ultrasound and surgical clips. First, for all 24 patients, a breast sonographer drew perimeter of tumour bed on the breast skin. Then an electron boost field was outlined on the demarcated territory, and a lead wire marker compatible with CT scan was placed on the field borders by a 2cm margin. After CT scan simulation, all patients underwent adjuvant whole breast irradiation with 3D-conformal radiotherapy to 50Gy in 25 fractions. Then for boost radiotherapy, lead wire in CT images was countoured as electron boost field. Also, the tumour bed was contoured based on surgical clips (true clinical target volume and true planning target volume). Electron treatment planning was done for electron boost field. Finally isodose coverages for true planning target volume investigated. On average, 16.68% of clips planning target volume (true planning target volume; range: 0.00 to 95%) received 90% oor more of the prescribed dose when the electron treatment plan was made. Isodose curves does not provide adequate coverage on the tumour bed (clips planning target volume) when electron boost treatment planning was generated for electron boost field (en face electron field). In fact, a part of target (planning target volume-c) is missed and more doses is absorbed in normal tissue. Electron boost treatment planning (an en face electron field) following tumour bed localization using ultrasonography does not provide an optimized coverage of tumour bed volume. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  13. Voluntary Breath-hold Technique for Reducing Heart Dose in Left Breast Radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Frederick R.; Colgan, Ruth M.; Donovan, Ellen M.; Carr, Karen; Landeg, Steven; Clements, Nicola; McNair, Helen A.; Locke, Imogen; Evans, Philip M.; Haviland, Joanne S.; Yarnold, John R.; Kirby, Anna M.

    2014-01-01

    Breath-holding techniques reduce the amount of radiation received by cardiac structures during tangential-field left breast radiotherapy. With these techniques, patients hold their breath while radiotherapy is delivered, pushing the heart down and away from the radiotherapy field. Despite clear dosimetric benefits, these techniques are not yet in widespread use. One reason for this is that commercially available solutions require specialist equipment, necessitating not only significant capital investment, but often also incurring ongoing costs such as a need for daily disposable mouthpieces. The voluntary breath-hold technique described here does not require any additional specialist equipment. All breath-holding techniques require a surrogate to monitor breath-hold consistency and whether breath-hold is maintained. Voluntary breath-hold uses the distance moved by the anterior and lateral reference marks (tattoos) away from the treatment room lasers in breath-hold to monitor consistency at CT-planning and treatment setup. Light fields are then used to monitor breath-hold consistency prior to and during radiotherapy delivery. PMID:25046661

  14. Toxicity and cosmetic outcome of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for accelerated partial breast irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gatti, M.; Bresciani, S.; Ponzone, R.; Panaia, R.; Salatino, A.; Stasi, M.; Gabriele, P. [IRCC, Candiolo (Italy)

    2011-10-15

    Full text of publication follows: Purpose.- To analyse the incidence and severity of acute and late normal tissue toxicity and cosmetic outcome using three - dimensional conformal radiotherapy to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation. Patients and Methods.- 70 patients with stage I disease were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for accelerated partial breast irradiation, in an approved protocol. The prescribed dose was 34 Gy in all patients delivered in 10 fractions over 5 consecutive days. On all CT scans gross tumor volume (GTV ) was defined around surgical clips. A 1.5 cm margin was added in order to account for clinical target volume (CTV) . A margin of 1 cm was added to CTI to define the planning target volume (PTV). The dose-volume constraints were followed in accordance with the specifications as dictated in the NSABP/RTOG protocol. After treatment, patients underwent a clinical and cosmetic evaluation every 3 months. Late toxicity was evaluated according to the RTOG grading schema. The cosmetic assessment was performed by the physicians using the controlateral untreated breast as the reference (Harvard scale). Results.- Median patient age was 66 years (range 51-80). Median follow-up was 15 months (range 6-46). Tumor size was < 10 mm in 33 patients (53%) and > 2 cm in 4(6%). The mean value of the ratio between the PTV and the whole ipsilateral breast volume was 38 % and the median percentage whole breast volume that received 95 % of prescribed dose was 34% (range 16%-55%). The rate of G1 and G2 acute skin toxicity was 28% and 2% respectively and the late toxicity was 17% (G1). G2 or greater toxicities were not observed. The most pronounced G1 late toxicity was subcutaneous fibrosis, developed in 3 patients. The cosmetic outcome was excellent in 83% and good in 17%. Conclusion.- Accelerated partial breast irradiation using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy is technically feasible with very low acute and late toxicity. Long

  15. Five Year Outcome of 145 Patients With Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS) After Accelerated Breast Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciervide, Raquel [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Dhage, Shubhada; Guth, Amber; Shapiro, Richard L.; Axelrod, Deborah M.; Roses, Daniel F. [Department of Surgery, New York University School of Medicine, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Formenti, Silvia C., E-mail: silvia.formenti@nyumc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Background: Accelerated whole-breast radiotherapy (RT) with tumor bed boost in the treatment of early invasive breast cancer has demonstrated equivalent local control and cosmesis when compared with standard RT. Its efficacy in the treatment of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) remains unknown. Methods and Materials: Patients treated for DCIS with lumpectomy and negative margins were eligible for 2 consecutive hypofractionated whole-breast RT clinical trials. The first trial (New York University [NYU] 01-51) prescribed to the whole breast 42 Gy (2.8 Gy in 15 fractions) and the second trial (NYU 05-181) 40.5 Gy (2.7 Gy in 15 fractions) with an additional daily boost of 0.5 Gy to the surgical cavity. Results: Between 2002 and 2009, 145 DCIS patients accrued, 59 to the first protocol and 86 to the second trial. Median age was 56 years and 65% were postmenopausal at the time of treatment. Based on optimal sparing of normal tissue, 79% of the patients were planned and treated prone and 21% supine. At 5 years' median follow-up (60 months; range 2.6-105.5 months), 6 patients (4.1%) experienced an ipsilateral breast recurrence in all cases of DCIS histology. In 3/6 patients, recurrence occurred at the original site of DCIS and in the remaining 3 cases outside the original tumor bed. New contralateral breast cancers arose in 3 cases (1 DCIS and 2 invasive carcinomas). Cosmetic self-assessment at least 2 years after treatment is available in 125 patients: 91% reported good-to-excellent and 9% reported fair-to-poor outcomes. Conclusions: With a median follow-up of 5 years, the ipsilateral local recurrence rate is 4.1%, comparable to that reported from the NSABP (National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project) trials that employed 50 Gy in 25 fractions of radiotherapy for DCIS. There were no invasive recurrences. These results provide preliminary evidence that accelerated hypofractionated external beam radiotherapy is a viable option for DCIS.

  16. Radiotherapy in breast-conserving treatment for ductal carcinoma in situ: first results of the EORTC randomised phase III trial 10853. EORTC Breast Cancer Cooperative Group and EORTC Radiotherapy Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julien, J P; Bijker, N; Fentiman, I S; Peterse, J L; Delledonne, V; Rouanet, P; Avril, A; Sylvester, R; Mignolet, F; Bartelink, H; Van Dongen, J A

    2000-02-12

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast is a disorder that has become more common since it may manifest as microcalcifications that can be detected by screening mammography. Since selected women with invasive cancer can be treated safely with breast conservation therapy it is paradoxical that total mastectomy has remained the standard treatment for DCIS. We did a randomised phase III clinical trial to investigate the role of radiotherapy after complete local excision of DCIS. Between 1986 and 1996, women with clinically or mammographically detected DCIS measuring less than or equal to 5 cm were treated by complete local excision of the lesion and then randomly assigned to either no further treatment (n=503) or to radiotherapy (n=507; 50 Gy in 5 weeks to the whole breast). The median duration of follow-up was 4.25 years (maximum 12.0 years). All analyses were by intention to treat. 500 patients were followed up in the no further treatment group and 502 in the radiotherapy group. In the no further treatment group 83 women had local recurrence (44 recurrences of DCIS, and 40 invasive breast cancer). In the radiotherapy group 53 women had local recurrences (29 recurrences of DCIS, and 24 invasive breast cancer). The 4-year local relapse-free was 84% in the group treated with local excision alone compared with 91% in the women treated by local excision plus radiotherapy (log rank p=0.005; hazard ratio 0.62). Similar reductions in the risk of invasive (40%, p=0.04) and non-invasive (35%, p=0.06) local recurrence were seen. Radiotherapy after local excision for DCIS, as compared with local excision alone, reduced the overall number of both invasive and non-invasive recurrences in the ipsilateral breast at a median follow-up of 4.25 years.

  17. Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer: How Can it Benefit from Advancing Technology?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Kron

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available There have been significant technological and technical advances in radiotherapy over the last 20 years. This paper presents the pertinent advances and examines their application in contemporary breast cancer (BC radiotherapy, particularly for reducing the long-term toxicity, using intensity-modulated radiation therapy, image-guided radiation therapy, and management of breathing motion. These modern technologies and techniques enable precise delivery of a highly conformal radiation dose distribution to the target volume in real-time, to optimise tumour control, and minimise treatment toxicity. They have been used for the treatment of BC in selected centres around the world. Although there is insufficient high-level evidence to support their routine application in BC at present, implementation of these technologies has been shown to be feasible, and could result in clinically meaningful long-term benefits for selected patients with BC.

  18. Late-Start Days Increase Total Operative Time in Microvascular Breast Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Michael W; Barr, Jason S; Hill, J Bradford; Weichman, Katie E; Karp, Nolan S; Levine, Jamie P

    2015-07-01

    Prolonged operative time has been associated with increased postoperative complications and higher costs. Many academic centers have a designated day for didactics that cause cases to start 1 hour later. The purpose of this study is to analyze the late-start effect of microvascular breast reconstructions on operative duration. A retrospective review was performed on all patients who underwent abdomina-based free flap breast reconstruction from 2007 to 2011 and analyzed by those who had surgery on late-start versus normal-start days. Patient demographics, average operative time, postoperative complications, and individual surgeon effects were analyzed. A Student t-test was used to compare operative times with statistical significance set at p start days and 251 cases were performed on normal-start days. Patient demographics and complications were not statistically different between the groups. The average operative time for all reconstructions was 434.3 minutes. The average operative times were significantly longer for late-start days, 517.6 versus 427.3 minutes (p = 0.002). This was true for both unilateral and bilateral reconstructions (432.8 vs. 350.9 minutes, p = 0.05; 551.5 vs. 461.2 minutes, p = 0.007). There were no differences in perioperative complications and multivariate regression showed no statistically significant relationship of confounders to duration of surgery. Starting cases 1 hour later can increase operative times. Although outcomes were not affected, we recommend avoiding lengthy procedures on late-start days. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  19. Modified simultaneous integrated boost radiotherapy for unresectable locally advanced breast cancer: preliminary results of a prospective clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomiya, Takuma; Akamatsu, Hiroko; Harada, Mayumi; Ota, Ibuki; Hagiwara, Yasuhito; Ichikawa, Mayumi; Miwa, Misako; Suzuki, Akihiko; Nemoto, Kenji

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of modified simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) radiotherapy for patients with extensive breast cancer. Patients with macroscopic tumor and histologically proven adenocarcinoma of the breast were enrolled in the study. Patients were included whether they had or did not have previous surgery, chemotherapy, hormone therapy, or molecular targeted therapy; patients with past history of thoracic radiotherapy were excluded. Under conditions of not exceeding the tolerance dose for normal tissue, irradiation to the tumor was increased to the maximum possible extent using the modified SIB technique. Three breast cancer patients were treated with the modified SIB technique. All patients were diagnosed as T4b (median maximum diameter of the tumor: 16 cm; range, 15.5-22 cm), and all patients exhibited symptoms because of the extremely large tumor. The median total dose to the part of tumor tissue was 128.8 Gy (range, 110-140 Gy). Total dose to normal tissue was radiotherapy. Although much care is required in delivering extremely high doses of radiotherapy to the tumor, modified SIB radiotherapy was shown to be effective against extremely large tumors that could not be controlled using conventional radiotherapy. In future, an increase in the number of study patients and establishment of the technique will be required. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Efficiency and prognosis of whole brain irradiation combined with precise radiotherapy on triple-negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xinhong; Luo, Bo; Wei, Shaozhong; Luo, Yan; Feng, Yaojun; Xu, Juan; Wei, Wei

    2013-11-01

    To investigate the treatment efficiency of whole brain irradiation combined with precise radiotherapy on triple-negative (TN) phenotype breast cancer patients with brain metastases and their survival times. A total of 112 metastatic breast cancer patients treated with whole brain irradiation and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) were analyzed. Thirty-seven patients were of TN phenotype. Objective response rates were compared. Survival times were estimated by using the Kaplan-Meier method. Log-rank test was used to compare the survival time difference between the TN and non-TN groups. Potential prognostic factors were determined by using a Cox proportional hazard regression model. The efficiency of radiotherapy treatment on TN and non-TN phenotypes was 96.2% and 97%, respectively. TN phenotype was associated with worse survival times than non-TN phenotype after radiotherapy (6.9 months vs. 17 months) (P brain irradiation followed by IMRT or 3DCRT treatment, TN phenotype breast cancer patients with intracranial metastasis had high objective response rates but shorter survival time. With respect to survival in breast cancer patients with intracranial metastasis, the TN phenotype represents a significant adverse prognostic factor.

  1. Breast radiotherapy as part of loco-regional treatments in stage IV breast cancer patients with oligometastatic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgier, Céline; Khodari, Wassim; Vataire, Anne-Lise; Pessoa, Eduardo Lima; Dunant, Ariane; Delaloge, Suzette; Uzan, Catherine; Balleyguier, Corinne; Mathieu, Marie-Christine; Marsiglia, Hugo; Arriagada, Rodrigo

    2010-08-01

    Local treatments seem to improve metastasis progression-free survival (MPFS) and overall survival (OS) when added to systemic therapies in stage IV breast cancer. From 1990 to 2003, we reviewed 9138 cases treated and registered in the Institut Gustave-Roussy breast cancer database. Among them, 308 had presented with stage IV disease. Eighty percent of patients (n=239) had received a loco-regional treatment and they were categorized into two groups: loco-regional radiotherapy (LRRT) alone (Group 1; n=147) or breast and axillary surgery+/-LRRT (Group 2; n=92). The median follow-up was 6.5 years. LRRT obtained a long-standing loco-regional clinical response in 85% of patients. The 3-year MPFS rates were 20% in Group 1 and 39% in Group 2; the 3-year OS rates were 39% and 57%, respectively. However, no significant differences in MPFS or OS were observed between the two groups when adjusted on prognostic factors. Radiation therapy alone provides long-standing local control and yields MPFS and OS rates equivalent to those obtained when radiation therapy is combined with surgery, whatever the prognostic factors. Loco-regional therapies, especially radiation therapy alone, may have an important role to play in the treatment of selected patients with stage IV breast cancer. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Different intensity extension methods and their impact on entrance dose in breast radiotherapy: A study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sankar A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In breast radiotherapy, skin flashing of treatment fields is important to account for intrafraction movements and setup errors. This study compares the two different intensity extension methods, namely, Virtual Bolus method and skin flash tool method, to provide skin flashing in intensity modulated treatment fields. The impact of these two different intensity extension methods on skin dose was studied by measuring the entrance dose of the treatment fields using semiconductor diode detectors. We found no significant difference in entrance dose due to different methods used for intensity extension. However, in the skin flash tool method, selection of appropriate parameters is important to get optimum fluence extension.

  3. Impact of radiotherapy on psychological, financial, and sexual aspects in postmastectomy carcinoma breast patients: A prospective study and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelam Sharma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the impact of radiotherapy (RT on psychological, financial, and sexual aspects in postmastectomy carcinoma breast patients affecting their quality of life (QOL before, during, and after RT with a strong emphasis on their management and rehabilitation aspects. Methods: A cross-sectional study carried out in a specialized institution, comprising sixty women. Two standardized questionnaires European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC 30-item Quality of Life Questionnaire and Quality of Life Questionnaire breast cancer-23 (QLQ-BR23 for health-related quality, translated and validated for the Hindi language were used. The scores' manual of the EORTC was used to calculate the domain scores of the questionnaires. Results: According to the first questionnaire, the emotional function was most affected even at onset of RT treatment and it was worst at the completion of RT treatment with a mean score of 63.75. The global QOL score was also worst at the end of radiation treatment with a mean score of 32.36, while the score 3 months after completion of treatment was 68.16. The symptoms with the highest scores were insomnia with a worst scoring at completion of treatment (29.99, fatigue (26.57, and pain (23.05. According to the QLQ-BR23, the mean score for side effects such as sexual functioning was minimum 0.55 at the completion of RT, which improved to 11.66 on the first follow-up after 3 months. Mean future perspective score which was 57.22 before the start of RT which was reduced to 50.55 at completion, which means that many women experience side effects of RT and impaired sexual satisfaction. Conclusions: Women with breast cancer showed changes in the following domains: financial, emotional, sexual satisfaction, and future prospects. The most frequently mentioned symptoms were fatigue, insomnia, and pain.

  4. Dosimetric research on intensity-modulated arc radiotherapy planning for left breast cancer after breast-preservation surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yong; Chen, Jinhu; Sun, Tao; Ma, Changsheng; Lu, Jie; Liu, Tonghai; Wang, Ruozheng

    2012-01-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has played an important role in breast cancer radiotherapy after breast-preservation surgery. Our aim was to study the dosimetric and implementation features/feasibility between IMRT and intensity-modulated arc radiotherapy (Varian RapidArc, Varian, Palo Alto, CA). The forward IMRT plan (f-IMRT), the inverse IMRT, and the RapidArc plan (RA) were generated for 10 patients. Afterward, we compared the target dose distribution of the 3 plans, radiation dose on organs at risk, monitor units, and treatment time. All 3 plans met clinical requirements, with RA performing best in target conformity. In target homogeneity, there was no statistical significance between RA and IMRT, but both of homogeneity were less than f-IMRT's. With regard to the V(5) and V(10) of the left lung, those in RA were higher than in f-IMRT but were lower than in IMRT; for V(20) and V(30), the lowest was observed in RA; and in the V(5) and V(10) of the right lung, as well as the mean dose in normal-side breast and right lung, there was no statistically significance difference between RA and IMRT, and the lowest value was observed in f-IMRT. As for the maximum dose in the normal-side breast, the lowest value was observed in RA. Regarding monitor units (MUs), those in RA were higher than in f-IMRT but were lower than in IMRT. Treatment time of RA was 84.6% and 88.23% shorter than f-IMRT and IMRT, respectively, on average. Compared with f-IMRT and IMRT, RA performed better in target conformity and can reduce high-dose volume in the heart and left lung-which are related to complications-significantly shortening treatment time as well. Compared with IMRT, RA can also significantly reduce low-dose volume and MUs of the afflicted lung. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Hypofractionated Radiotherapy for Post-Operative Breast Cancer Patients at Delta Hospital - an Evaluation of Clinical Experience

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    Parvin Akhter Banu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: As hypofractionated radiotherapy for post-operative breast cancer patients safe, effective and more convenient, it might be beneficial for patients of developing countries like ours. Objective: This study was done to evaluate the safety and efficacy of hypofractionated whole breast radiation therapy in patients who underwent breast conserving surgery and hypofractionated radiation therapy in patients who underwent mastectomy and axillary clearance. Materials and method: This cross sectional study was conducted in Delta Hospital Ltd, Dhaka, Bangladesh, including 50 postoperative patients, (12 patients in Breast Conservation Therapy group and 38 in Post Mastectomy Radiation Therapy group, with invasive ductal carcinoma of breast treated with this hypofractionated radiotherapy protocol during the last 1.5 year. The patients were treated with 3DCRT, LINAC, 6 MV photon and appropriate electron energy. Results: Minimal post treatment acute morbidity was observed. Forty seven patients (94% had grade-I acute skin toxicity and only 3 patients (6% developed grade-II acute skin toxicity. Conclusion: Hypofractionated radiotherapy is as safe and effective as conventional fractionated radiotherapy and superior in terms of convenience.

  6. Surface dose measurements in and out of field: Implications for breast radiotherapy with megavoltage photon beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonski, Peta; Ramachandran, Prabhakar; Franich, Rick; Kron, Tomas

    2017-12-01

    This study examines the difference in surface dose between flat and flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams in the context of breast radiotherapy. The surface dose was measured for 6MV, 6MV FFF, 10MV, 10MV FFF and 18MV photon beams using a thin window ionisation chamber for various field sizes. Profiles were acquired to ascertain the change in surface dose off-axis. Out-of-field measurements were included in a clinically representative half beam block tangential breast field. In the field centres of FFF beams the surface dose was found to be increased for small fields and decreased for large fields compared to flat beams. For FFF beams, surface dose was found to decrease off-axis and resulted in lower surface dose out-of-field compared to flat beams. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  7. CT images and radiotherapy treatment planning of patients with breast cancer: A dataset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Rezaei

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The data presented here were originally collected for the research project “CT-Scan processing and analysis in patient with breast cancer after radiotherapy”. Also, it reported in our study “Prediction of Lung Tissue Damage by Evaluating Clinical and Dosimetric Parameters in Breast Cancer Patients” (Hasanabdali et al., 2016 [1]. This article describes and directly links to 52 subjects referred to Mahdieh Oncology and Radiotherapy Center from February to August 2015. Treatment planning was done for delivering 50 Gy dose to PTV in 25 fractions. the lungs and heart objects were extracted from CT images along with compliance Dose plan. Dose-volume histogram (DVH and Dose-mass histogram (DMH extracted using CT images and dose plan matrix. Moreover, the complete clinical and dosimetric specifications of subjects is attached.

  8. Simple shielding reduces dose to the contralateral breast during prone breast cancer radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goyal, Uma, E-mail: uma.goyal@gmail.com; Locke, Angela; Smith-Raymond, Lexie; Georgiev, Georgi N.

    2016-07-01

    Our goal was to design a prone breast shield for the contralateral breast and study its efficacy in decreasing scatter radiation to the contralateral breast in a prone breast phantom setup receiving radiation therapy designed for breast cancer. We constructed a prone breast phantom setup consisting of (1) A thermoplastic mask with a left-sided depression created by a water balloon for a breast shape; (2) 2 plastic bags to hold water in the thermoplastic mask depression; (3) 2000 mL of water to fill the thermoplastic mask depression to create a water-based false breast; (4) 1-cm thick bolus placed in the contralateral breast holder; (5) 2 lead (Pb) sheets, each 0.1-cm thick for blocking scatter radiation in the contralateral bolus-based false breast; (6) a prone breast board to hold the thermoplastic mask, water, bolus, and lead; (7) 9 cm solid water on top of the breast board to simulate body; (8) a diode was used to verify dose for each treatment field of the treated water-based breast; (9) metal–oxide–semiconductor-field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters to measure dose to the contralateral bolus-based breast. The phantom prone breast setup was CT simulated and treatment was designed with 95% isodose line covering the treated breast. The maximum dose was 107.1%. Megavoltage (MV) port images ensured accurate setup. Measurements were done using diodes on the treated water-based breast and MOSFET dosimeters at the medial and lateral sides of the contralateral bolus-based breast without and with the Pb shield. Five treatments were done for each of the 3 data sets and recorded individually for statistical purposes. All treatments were completed with 6 MV photons at 200 cGy per treatment. The dose contributions from each of the 3 data sets including 15 treatments total without and with the prone lead shield to the medial and lateral portions of contralateral bolus-based breast were averaged individually. Unshielded dose means were 37.11 and 2.94 cGy, and

  9. Do patients with very few brain metastases from breast cancer benefit from whole-brain radiotherapy in addition to radiosurgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rades, Dirk; Huttenlocher, Stefan; Hornung, Dagmar; Blanck, Oliver; Schild, Steven E; Fischer, Dorothea

    2014-12-04

    An important issue in palliative radiation oncology is the whether whole-brain radiotherapy should be added to radiosurgery when treating a limited number of brain metastases. To optimize personalized treatment of cancer patients with brain metastases, the value of whole-brain radiotherapy should be described separately for each tumor entity. This study investigated the role of whole-brain radiotherapy added to radiosurgery in breast cancer patients. Fifty-eight patients with 1-3 brain metastases from breast cancer were included in this retrospective study. Of these patients, 30 were treated with radiosurgery alone and 28 with radiosurgery plus whole-brain radiotherapy. Both groups were compared for local control of the irradiated metastases, freedom from new brain metastases and survival. Furthermore, eight additional factors were analyzed including dose of radiosurgery, age at radiotherapy, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance score, number of brain metastases, maximum diameter of all brain metastases, site of brain metastases, extra-cranial metastases and the time from breast cancer diagnosis to radiotherapy. The treatment regimen had no significant impact on local control in the univariate analysis (p=0.59). Age ≤59 years showed a trend towards improved local control on univariate (p=0.066) and multivariate analysis (p=0.07). On univariate analysis, radiosurgery plus whole-brain radiotherapy (p=0.040) and ECOG 0-1 (p=0.012) showed positive associations with freedom from new brain metastases. Both treatment regimen (p=0.039) and performance status (p=0.028) maintained significance on multivariate analysis. ECOG 0-1 was positively correlated with survival on univariate analysis (pbreast cancer patients with few brain metastases, radiosurgery plus whole-brain radiotherapy resulted in significantly better freedom from new brain metastases than radiosurgery alone. However, this advantage did not lead to significantly better survival.

  10. Measurement of Thyroid Dose by TLD arising from Radiotherapy of Breast Cancer Patients from Supraclavicular Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhood B.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer and the leading global cause of cancer death among women worldwide. Radiotherapy plays a significant role in treatment of breast cancer and reduces locoregional recurrence and eventually improves survival. The treatment fields applied for breast cancer treatment include: tangential, axillary, supraclavicular and internal mammary fields. Objective: In the present study, due to the presence of sensitive organ such as thyroid inside the supraclavicular field, thyroid dose and its effective factors were investigated. Materials and Methods: Thyroid dose of 31 female patients of breast cancer with involved supraclavicular lymph nodes which had undergone radiotherapy were measured. For each patient, three TLD-100 chips were placed on their thyroid gland surface, and thyroid doses of patients were measured. The variables of the study include shield shape, the time of patient’s setup, the technologists’ experience and qualification. Finally, the results were analyzed by ANOVA test using SPSS 11.5 software. Results: The average age of the patients was 46±10 years. The average of thyroid dose of the patients was 140±45 mGy (ranged 288.2 and 80.8 in single fraction. There was a significant relationship between the thyroid dose and shield shape. There was also a significant relationship between the thyroid dose and the patient’s setup time. Conclusion: Beside organ at risk such as thyroid which is in the supraclavicular field, thyroid dose possibility should be reduced. For solving this problem, an appropriate shield shape, the appropriate time of the patient’s setup, etc. could be considered.

  11. Clinical therapy and HER-2 oncogene amplification in breast cancer: chemo- vs radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stühlinger, M; Helmer, H; Dobianer, K; Hruza, C; Rainer, H; Locker, G; Spona, J

    1994-05-01

    One hundred and five breast cancer patients with stage T3/4, N+/-, Mo were treated at random either with a pre- and postoperative chemotherapy (A) (5-drug-combination + tamoxifen) or with a pre- and postoperative radiotherapy (B). Paraffin embedded tissue samples were prepared from tumor material taken by biopsy prior to therapy as well as at surgery from patients of both groups to estimate the HER-2 oncogene copy numbers before and after treatment. In 53 and 50% of the pretherapeutic samples the HER-2 gene was amplified in groups A and B, respectively. In the post-therapeutic group 60% of the chemotherapy and 48% of the radiotherapy patients, respectively, had low or high HER-2 oncogene copy numbers. In addition, HER-2 amplification before and after therapy was estimated in 28 patients. An increase of oncogene copy numbers could be detected in 21% of the chemotherapy patients, and a decrease was noted in 11%. No radiotherapy patient showed a rise, but 11% a loss of copy numbers. Although amplification of HER-2 oncogene was not found to be associated with overall survival as it was in many studies before, it could still be a predictor of clinical outcome and the cause of mammary carcinomas developing into stage T3/4.

  12. Examining Mediators and Moderators of Yoga for Women With Breast Cancer Undergoing Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratcliff, Chelsea G; Milbury, Kathrin; Chandwani, Kavita D; Chaoul, Alejandro; Perkins, George; Nagarathna, Raghuram; Haddad, Robin; Nagendra, Hongasandra Ramarao; Raghuram, N V; Spelman, Amy; Arun, Banu; Wei, Qi; Cohen, Lorenzo

    2016-09-01

    Hypothesis This study examines moderators and mediators of a yoga intervention targeting quality-of-life (QOL) outcomes in women with breast cancer receiving radiotherapy.Methods Women undergoing 6 weeks of radiotherapy were randomized to a yoga (YG; n = 53) or stretching (ST; n = 56) intervention or a waitlist control group (WL; n = 54). Depressive symptoms and sleep disturbances were measured at baseline. Mediator (posttraumatic stress symptoms, benefit finding, and cortisol slope) and outcome (36-item Short Form [SF]-36 mental and physical component scales [MCS and PCS]) variables were assessed at baseline, end-of-treatment, and 1-, 3-, and 6-months posttreatment. Results Baseline depressive symptoms (P = .03) and sleep disturbances (P benefit finding than ST and WL across the follow-up (P = .01). Three-month benefit finding partially mediated the effect of YG on 6-month PCS. Posttraumatic stress symptoms and cortisol slope did not mediate treatment effect on QOL. Conclusion Yoga may provide the greatest mental-health-related QOL benefits for those experiencing pre-radiotherapy sleep disturbance and depressive symptoms. Yoga may improve physical-health-related QOL by increasing ability to find benefit in the cancer experience. © The Author(s) 2016.

  13. Novel use of an air-filled breast prosthesis to allow radiotherapy to recurrent colonic cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Duffy, F

    2012-02-01

    AiM: The authors present the novel and successful use of an air-filled breast prosthesis for extra pelvic exclusion of small bowel to facilitate adjuvant radiotherapy following resection of recurrent adenocarcinoma of the ascending bowel. The therapeutic use of radiotherapy in colon cancer can cause acute or chronic radiation enteropathy. Mobile small bowel can be sequestered in \\'dead space\\' or by adhesions exposing it to adjuvant radiotherapy. A variety of pelvic partitioning methods have been described to exclude bowel from radiation fields using both native and prosthetic materials. METHOD: In this case a 68 year old presented with ascending colon adenocarcinoma invading the peritoneum and underwent en bloc peritoneal resection. Thirty-seven months later surveillance CT identified a local recurrence. Subsequent resection resulted in a large iliacus muscle defect which would sequester small bowel loops thus exposing the patient to radiation enteropathy. The lateral position of the defect precluded the use of traditional pelvic partitioning methods which would be unlikely to remain in place long enough to allow radiotherapy. A lightweight air-filled breast prosthesis (Allergan 133 FV 750 cms) secured in place with an omentoplasty was used to fill the defect. RESULTS: Following well tolerated radiotherapy the prosthesis was deflated under ultrasound guidance and removed via a 7-cm transverse incision above the right iliac crest. The patient is disease free 18 months later with no evidence of treatment related morbidity. CONCLUSION: The use of a malleable air-filled prosthesis for pelvic partitioning allows specific tailoring of the prosthesis size and shape for individual patient defects. It is also lightweight enough to be secured in place using an omentoplasty to prevent movement related prosthesis migration. In the absence of adequate omentum a mesh sling may be considered to allow fixation. In this case the anatomy of the prosthesis position allowed for its

  14. Iterative dataset optimization in automated planning: Implementation for breast and rectal cancer radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jiawei; Wang, Jiazhou; Zhang, Zhen; Hu, Weigang

    2017-06-01

    To develop a new automated treatment planning solution for breast and rectal cancer radiotherapy. The automated treatment planning solution developed in this study includes selection of the iterative optimized training dataset, dose volume histogram (DVH) prediction for the organs at risk (OARs), and automatic generation of clinically acceptable treatment plans. The iterative optimized training dataset is selected by an iterative optimization from 40 treatment plans for left-breast and rectal cancer patients who received radiation therapy. A two-dimensional kernel density estimation algorithm (noted as two parameters KDE) which incorporated two predictive features was implemented to produce the predicted DVHs. Finally, 10 additional new left-breast treatment plans are re-planned using the Pinnacle3 Auto-Planning (AP) module (version 9.10, Philips Medical Systems) with the objective functions derived from the predicted DVH curves. Automatically generated re-optimized treatment plans are compared with the original manually optimized plans. By combining the iterative optimized training dataset methodology and two parameters KDE prediction algorithm, our proposed automated planning strategy improves the accuracy of the DVH prediction. The automatically generated treatment plans using the dose derived from the predicted DVHs can achieve better dose sparing for some OARs without compromising other metrics of plan quality. The proposed new automated treatment planning solution can be used to efficiently evaluate and improve the quality and consistency of the treatment plans for intensity-modulated breast and rectal cancer radiation therapy. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  15. Preventing the acute skin side effects in patients treated with radiotherapy for breast cancer: the use of corneometry in order to evaluate the protective effect of moisturizing creams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Franco, Rossella; Sammarco, Elena; Calvanese, Maria Grazia; De Natale, Flora; Falivene, Sara; Di Lecce, Ada; Giugliano, Francesca Maria; Murino, Paola; Manzo, Roberto; Cappabianca, Salvatore; Muto, Paolo; Ravo, Vincenzo

    2013-03-12

    The purpose of this study was to add, to the objective evaluation, an instrumental assessment of the skin damage induced by radiation therapy. A group of 100 patients affected by breast cancer was recruited in the study over one year. Patients were divided into five groups of 20 patients. For each group it was prescribed a different topical treatment. The following products were used: Betaglucan, sodium hyaluronate (Neoviderm®), Vitis vinifera A. s-I-M.t-O.dij (Ixoderm®), Alga Atlantica plus Ethylbisiminomethylguaicolo and Manganese Cloruro (Radioskin1®) and Metal Esculetina plus Ginko Biloba and Aloe vera (Radioskin 2®); Natural triglycerides-fitosterols (Xderit®); Selectiose plus thermal water of Avene (Trixera+®). All hydrating creams were applied twice a day starting 15 days before and one month after treatment with radiations. Before and during treatment patients underwent weekly skin assessments and corneometry to evaluate the symptoms related to skin toxicity and state of hydration. Evaluation of acute cutaneous toxicity was defined according to the RTOG scale. All patients completed radiotherapy; 72% of patients presented a G1 cutaneous toxicity, 18% developed a G2 cutaneous toxicity, 10% developed a G3 toxicity, no one presented G4 toxicity. The corneometry study confirmed the protective role of effective creams used in radiation therapy of breast cancer and showed its usefulness to identify radiation-induced dermatitis in a very early stage. The preventive use of topic products reduces the incidence of skin side effects in patients treated with radiotherapy for breast cancer. An instrumental evaluation of skin hydration can help the radiation oncologist to use strategies that prevent the onset of toxicity of high degree. All moisturizing creams used in this study were equally valid in the treatment of skin damage induced by radiotherapy.

  16. Combination of radiotherapy and double blockade HER2 with pertuzumab and trastuzumab for HER2-positive metastatic or locally recurrent unresectable and/or metastatic breast cancer: Assessment of early toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajgal, Z; de Percin, S; Diéras, V; Pierga, J Y; Campana, F; Fourquet, A; Kirova, Y M

    2017-04-01

    We evaluate the early toxicity of concurrent use of radiotherapy, pertuzumab and trastuzumab in patients with HER2-positive metastatic or locally recurrent unresectable breast cancer. A retrospective study was performed in a population of 23 consecutive patients between 2013 and 2015. Radiotherapy was performed on the chest area or metastatic sites during maintenance with pertuzumab and trastuzumab after six cycles of pertuzumab, trastuzumab and docetaxel. Toxicity was assessed according to the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria version 4. Irradiation volumes were whole breast (8 patients) and chest wall (9 patients) at 50Gy in 25 fractions, the supraclavicular nodes (16 patients), the axillary area (nine patients) and the internal mammary nodes (9 patients) at 46Gy in 23 fractions. For five patients, radiotherapy was palliative: bone irradiation (4 patients), whole brain radiotherapy (one patient). Median follow-up was 12.6 months (range: 6.1-21.6 months) since the start of pertuzumab and trastuzumab. One patient presented an asymptomatic decrease of left ventricular ejection fraction below 50%. No symptomatic cardiac events were reported. Two patients presented asymptomatic grade I radiation pneumonitis. Acute skin toxicity was grade III (one patient), grade II (6 patients), and grade I (5 patients). There were two grade II esophagitis. Combination of pertuzumab, trastuzumab and radiotherapy was well tolerated, which should be confirmed by the results of larger studies. Copyright © 2017 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Three dimensional conformal radiotherapy for synchronous bilateral breast irradiation using a mono iso-center technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Karthick Raj; Basu, Saumen; Bhuiyan, Md Anisuzzaman; Ahmed, Sharif; Sumon, Mostafa Aziz; Haque, Kh Anamul; Sengupta, Ashim Kumar; Un Nabi, Md Rashid; Das, K. J. Maria

    2017-06-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the synchronous bilateral breast irradiation radiotherapy technique using a single isocenter. Materials and Methods: Six patients of synchronous bilateral breast were treated with single isocenter technique from February 2011 to June 2016. All the patients underwent a CT-simulation using appropriate positioning device. Target volumes and critical structures like heart, lung, esophagus, thyroid, etc., were delineated slice by slice in the CT data. An isocenter was placed above the sternum on the skin and both medial tangential and lateral tangential of the breast / chest wall were created using asymmetrical jaws to avoid the beam divergence through the lung and heart. The field weighting were adjusted manually to obtain a homogenous dose distribution. The planning objectives were to deliver uniform doses around the target and keep the doses to the organ at risk within the permissible limit. The beam energy of 6 MV or combination of 6 MV and 15 MV photons were used in the tangential fields according to the tangential separation. Boluses were used for all the mastectomy patients to increase the doses on the chest wall. In addition to that enhanced dynamic wedge and field in field technique were also used to obtain a homogenous distribution around the target volume and reduce the hot spots. The isocenter was just kept on the skin, such that the beam junctions will be overlapped only on the air just above the sternum. Acute toxicity during the treatment and late toxicity were recorded during the patient's follow-up. Results: During the radiotherapy treatment follow-up there were no acute skin reactions in the field junctions, but one patient had grade 1 esophagitis and two patients had grade 2 skin reactions in the chest wall. With a median follow-up of 38.5 months (range: 8 - 49 months), no patients had a local recurrence, but one patients with triple negative disease had a distant metastases in brain and died

  18. Radiotherapy for a breast cancer patient with Schnitzler syndrome: Report of acute toxicity and early follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Samir Abdallah; Calich, Ana Luisa Garcia; Katz, Artur; Calich, Isidio; Duarte, Gustavo Gibin; Bevilacqua, José Luiz Barbosa

    2017-01-01

    This article provides description about acute toxicity and early follow-up of one patient treated for breast cancer and Schnitzler syndrome. There are no previously reported cases exploring this interaction on medical literature. The expected radiodermitis to occur in the region treated with radiotherapy along with urticarial-like lesions might be challenging in view of the interaction between symptoms and therapeutic measures.

  19. Is the coronary artery calcium score associated with acute coronary events in breast cancer patients treated with radiotherapy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos, Catharina T G; van den Bogaard, Veerle A B; Greuter, Marcel J W; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; Schuit, Ewoud; Langendijk, Johannes A; van der Schaaf, Arjen; Crijns, Anne P G; Maduro, John H

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The main objective of this study was to test whether pre-treatment coronary artery calcium (CAC) was associated with the cumulative incidence of acute coronary events (ACE) among breast cancer (BC) patients treated with postoperative radiotherapy (RT). MATERIAL AND METHODS:

  20. Loco-regional morbidity after breast conservation and axillary lymph node dissection for early breast cancer with or without regional nodes radiotherapy, perspectives in modern breast cancer treatment: the Skagen Trial 1 is active

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hanne Melgaard; Friis, Rasmus Blechingberg; Linnet, Søren

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) and adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) in early breast cancer are associated with a risk of morbidity, including lymphedema and impaired shoulder mobility. The aim of this study was to evaluate loco-regional morbidity after breast conserving surgery (BCS...

  1. Targeted intraoperative radiotherapy tumour bed boost during breast-conserving surgery after neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolberg, Hans-Christian; Akpolat-Basci, Leyla; Stephanou, Miltiades [Marienhospital Bottrop gGmbH, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Bottrop (Germany); Loevey, Gyoergy [BORAD, Bottrop (Germany); Fasching, Peter A. [University of Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Untch, Michael [Helios Klinikum Berlin-Buch, Berlin (Germany); Liedtke, Cornelia [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein/Campus Luebeck, Luebeck (Germany); Bulsara, Max [University of Notre Dame, Fremantle (Australia); University College, London (United Kingdom); Vaidya, Jayant S. [University College, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-01-15

    The use of targeted intraoperative radiotherapy (TARGIT-IORT) as a tumour bed boost during breast-conserving surgery (BCS) for breast cancer has been reported since 1998. We present its use in patients undergoing breast conservation following neoadjuvant therapy (NACT). In this retrospective study involving 116 patients after NACT we compared outcomes of 61 patients who received a tumour bed boost with IORT during lumpectomy versus 55 patients treated in the previous 13 months with external (EBRT) boost. All patients received whole breast radiotherapy. Local recurrence-free survival (LRFS), disease-free survival (DFS), distant disease-free survival (DDFS), breast cancer mortality (BCM), non-breast cancer mortality (NBCM) and overall mortality (OS) were compared. Median follow up was 49 months. The differences in LRFS, DFS and BCM were not statistically significant. The 5-year Kaplan-Meier estimate of OS was significantly better by 15% with IORT: IORT 2 events (96.7%, 95%CI 87.5-99.2), EBRT 9 events (81.7%, 95%CI 67.6-90.1), hazard ratio (HR) 0.19 (0.04-0.87), log rank p = 0.016, mainly due to a reduction of 10.1% in NBCM: IORT 100%, EBRT 89.9% (77.3-95.7), HR (not calculable), log rank p = 0.015. The DDFS was as follows: IORT 3 events (95.1%, 85.5-98.4), EBRT 12 events (69.0%, 49.1-82.4), HR 0.23 (0.06-0.80), log rank p = 0.012. IORT during lumpectomy after neoadjuvant chemotherapy as a tumour bed boost appears to give results that are not worse than external beam radiotherapy boost. These data give further support to the inclusion of such patients in the TARGIT-B (boost) randomised trial that is testing whether IORT boost is superior to EBRT boost. (orig.) [German] Die intraoperative Radiotherapie (TARGIT-IORT) als vorgezogener Boost im Rahmen der brusterhaltenden Therapie (BET) ist seit 1998 Gegenstand der wissenschaftlichen Diskussion. Wir praesentieren Daten zum Einsatz der IORT bei der BET nach neoadjuvanter Therapie (NACT). In diese retrospektive Analyse

  2. Prolonged impact of chemotherapy on fatigue in breast cancer survivors: a longitudinal comparison with radiotherapy-treated breast cancer survivors and noncancer controls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goedendorp, M.M.; Andrykowski, M.A.; Donovan, K.A.; Jim, H.S.; Phillips, K.M.; Small, B.J.; Laronga, C.; Jacobsen, P.B.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In this study, the authors examined the influence of prior treatment on the course of fatigue in breast cancer survivors. Patients who received chemotherapy were expected to have greater fatigue than patients who received radiotherapy and noncancer controls 6 months after the completion

  3. Prolonged impact of chemotherapy on fatigue in breast cancer survivors : a longitudinal comparison with radiotherapy-treated breast cancer survivors and noncancer controls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goedendorp, Martine M; Andrykowski, Michael A; Donovan, Kristine A; Jim, Heather S; Phillips, Kristin M; Small, Brent J; Laronga, Christine; Jacobsen, Paul B

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In this study, the authors examined the influence of prior treatment on the course of fatigue in breast cancer survivors. Patients who received chemotherapy were expected to have greater fatigue than patients who received radiotherapy and noncancer controls 6 months after the completion

  4. Fibrotic changes after postmastectomy radiotherapy and reconstructive surgery in breast cancer. A retrospective analysis in 109 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Classen, Johannes [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; St. Vincentius-Kliniken, Karlsruhe (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Nitzsche, Sibille [St. Vincentius-Kliniken, Karlsruhe (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Wallwiener, Diethelm; Brucker, Sara [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Gynecology; Kristen, Peter [Kreiskliniken Reutlingen (Germany). Dept. of Gynecology; Souchon, Rainer; Bamberg, Michael [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2010-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the probability and time course of fibrotic changes in breast reconstruction before or after postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT). Between 1995 and 2004, 109 patients were treated with PMRT at Tuebingen University and underwent heterologous (HL) or autologous (AL) breast reconstruction prior or subsequent to radiation therapy. Fibrosis of the reconstructed breast after radiotherapy was assessed using the Baker score for HL reconstructions and the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) for all patients. Actuarial rates of fibrosis were calculated for the maximum degree acquired during follow- up and at the last follow-up visit documented. Median time to follow-up was 34 months (3-227 months). Radiotherapy was applied with a median total dose of 50.4 Gy. A total of 44 patients (40.4%) received a boost treatment with a median dose of 10 Gy. Breast reconstruction was performed with AL, HL, or combined techniques in 20, 82, and 7 patients, respectively. The 3-year incidence of {>=} grade III maximum fibrosis was 20% and 43% for Baker and CTCAE scores, respectively. The corresponding figures for fibrosis at last follow-up visit were 18% and 2%. The 3-year rate of surgical correction of the contralateral breast was 30%. Initially unplanned surgery of the reconstructed breast was performed in 39 patients (35.8%). Boost treatment and type of cosmetic surgery (HL vs. AL) were not significantly associated with the incidence of fibrosis. We found severe fibrosis to be a frequent complication after PMRT radiotherapy and breast reconstruction. However, surgical intervention can ameliorate the majority of high grade fibrotic events leading to acceptable long-term results. No treatment parameters associated with the rate of fibrosis could be identified. (orig.)

  5. An imaging evaluation of the simultaneously integrated boost breast radiotherapy technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turley, Jessica; Claridge Mackonis, Elizabeth [Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, New South Wales (Australia)

    2015-09-15

    To evaluate in-field megavoltage (MV) imaging of simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) breast fields to determine its feasibility in treatment verification for the SIB breast radiotherapy technique, and to assess whether the current-imaging protocol and treatment margins are sufficient. For nine patients undergoing SIB breast radiotherapy, in-field MV images of the SIB fields were acquired on days that regular treatment verification imaging was performed. The in-field images were matched offline according to the scar wire on digitally reconstructed radiographs. The offline image correction results were then applied to a margin recipe formula to calculate safe margins that account for random and systematic uncertainties in the position of the boost volume when an offline correction protocol has been applied. After offline assessment of the acquired images, 96% were within the tolerance set in the current department-imaging protocol. Retrospectively performing the maximum position deviations on the Eclipse™ treatment planning system demonstrated that the clinical target volume (CTV) boost received a minimum dose difference of 0.4% and a maximum dose difference of 1.4% less than planned. Furthermore, applying our results to the Van Herk margin formula to ensure that 90% of patients receive 95% of the prescribed dose, the calculated CTV margins were comparable to the current departmental procedure used. Based on the in-field boost images acquired and the feasible application of these results to the margin formula the current CTV-planning target volume margins used are appropriate for the accurate treatment of the SIB boost volume without additional imaging.

  6. The photon dose calculation algorithm used in breast radiotherapy has significant impact on the parameters of radiobiological models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petillion, Saskia; Swinnen, Ans; Defraene, Gilles; Verhoeven, Karolien; Weltens, Caroline; Van den Heuvel, Frank

    2014-07-08

    The comparison of the pencil beam dose calculation algorithm with modified Batho heterogeneity correction (PBC-MB) and the analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA) and the mutual comparison of advanced dose calculation algorithms used in breast radiotherapy have focused on the differences between the physical dose distributions. Studies on the radiobiological impact of the algorithm (both on the tumor control and the moderate breast fibrosis prediction) are lacking. We, therefore, investigated the radiobiological impact of the dose calculation algorithm in whole breast radiotherapy. The clinical dose distributions of 30 breast cancer patients, calculated with PBC-MB, were recalculated with fixed monitor units using more advanced algorithms: AAA and Acuros XB. For the latter, both dose reporting modes were used (i.e., dose-to-medium and dose-to-water). Next, the tumor control probability (TCP) and the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) of each dose distribution were calculated with the Poisson model and with the relative seriality model, respectively. The endpoint for the NTCP calculation was moderate breast fibrosis five years post treatment. The differences were checked for significance with the paired t-test. The more advanced algorithms predicted a significantly lower TCP and NTCP of moderate breast fibrosis then found during the corresponding clinical follow-up study based on PBC calculations. The differences varied between 1% and 2.1% for the TCP and between 2.9% and 5.5% for the NTCP of moderate breast fibrosis. The significant differences were eliminated by determination of algorithm-specific model parameters using least square fitting. Application of the new parameters on a second group of 30 breast cancer patients proved their appropriateness. In this study, we assessed the impact of the dose calculation algorithms used in whole breast radiotherapy on the parameters of the radiobiological models. The radiobiological impact was eliminated by

  7. Neoadjuvant radiotherapy followed by mastectomy and immediate breast reconstruction. An alternative treatment option for locally advanced breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pazos, Montserrat; Corradini, Stefanie; Schoenecker, Stephan; Scheithauer, Heike; Belka, Claus [LMU Munich, Department of Radiation Oncology, Munich (Germany); Dian, Darius [Mednord Munich Clinic, Munich (Germany); Bodungen, Vera von; Ditsch, Nina; Wuerstlein, Rachel; Harbeck, Nadia [LMU Munich, Breast Center, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Munich (Germany)

    2017-04-15

    The optimal sequence of mastectomy with immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) and radiotherapy (RT) for the treatment of locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) is still under debate. Increased rates of postoperative complications are described following postmastectomy RT. Neoadjuvant RT aims to improve the aesthetic results and simplify the reconstructive pathway. A total of 22 patients diagnosed with LABC and treated with neoadjuvant RT followed by mastectomy and IBR between 04/2012 and 03/2015 were retrospectively analyzed. RT consisted of external beam RT to the breast and the regional lymphatics, if indicated. Both implant-based and autologous tissue-transfer reconstruction techniques were used. At the time of RT, 10 patients had no prior surgery and 12 patients had previously undergone breast-conserving surgery (BCS) with positive resection margins without the possibility to perform a second BCS. Additional neoadjuvant chemotherapy was administered in 18 patients prior to RT. A complete pathological response was achieved in 55.0% of patients. The 2-year overall survival rate was 89.3%, the 2-year disease-free-survival 79.8% and the local-recurrence-free survival was 95.2%. The cosmetic result was excellent or good in 66% of the patients treated with upfront mastectomy and 37% of the patients who had previously undergone BCS. Among patients who received implant-based IBR, 4 patients developed serious wound-healing problems with implant loss. The most satisfactory results were achieved with autologous tissue reconstruction. A sequential neoadjuvant chemo-/radiotherapy to allow IBR following mastectomy in selected cases of LABC seems feasible and can be safely attempted. Careful patient selection, close monitoring, and continuous patient support is mandatory to ensure compliance in this treatment strategy. (orig.) [German] Die optimale Therapiesequenz von Mastektomie mit sofortiger Brustrekonstruktion (IBR) und Radiotherapie (RT) beim lokal fortgeschrittenen

  8. Trastuzumab improves locoregional control in HER2-positive breast cancer patients following adjuvant radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Lu; Cai, Gang; Xu, Fei; Yang, Zhao-Zhi; Yu, Xiao-Li; Ma, Jin-Li; Zhang, Qian; Wu, Jiong; Guo, Xiao-Mao; Chen, Jia-Yi

    2016-08-01

    The benefit of adjuvant trastuzumab in disease-free and overall survival for human epidermal receptor 2-positive (HER2+) breast cancer patients is well established. However, the effect of trastuzumab on locoregional control remains unclear, particularly in patients treated with adjuvant radiotherapy (RT). In this study, we investigated the locoregional benefit of trastuzumab in patients with HER2+ breast cancer after adjuvant RT.Using a single institutional database, we identified 278 patients with stage II/III invasive HER2+ breast tumors receiving adjuvant RT between January 2008 and July 2011. We compared the locoregional outcomes of 134 patients who received trastuzumab to 144 patients without trastuzumab within the same period. Clinical and biological factors that might impact on the locoregional benefit of trastuzumab were also assessed.At the median follow-up of 45 months, trastuzumab significantly lowered the risk of locoregional recurrence (LRR) with a 3-year LRR rate of 2.4% versus 7.5% for the cohort with and without trastuzumab (P = 0.019). Trastuzumab was associated with a more significant locoregional benefit in the hormone receptor-positive (HR+)/HER2+ subgroup, with a 3-year LRR of 0% versus 6.7% in the cohort with and without trastuzumab (P = 0.027). For HR-/HER2+ breast tumor patients, the 3-year LRR rate was still lower for the cohort with trastuzumab (4.7% vs 8.6%). However, statistical significance was not found (P = 0.179). Both univariate and multivariate analyses confirmed that trastuzumab treatment was the only significant predictive factor for LRR (hazard ratio, 4.05; 95% confidence interval, 1.07-15.35; P = 0.039).Adjuvant trastuzumab in addition to RT is associated with significant reduced LRR risk in HER2+ breast cancer.

  9. Megavoltage cone beam CT near surface dose measurements: potential implications for breast radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinn, Alexandra; Holloway, Lois; Cutajar, Dean; Hardcastle, Nicholas; Rosenfeld, Anatoly; Metcalfe, Peter [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia) and Liverpool Cancer Therapy Centre, Liverpool Hospital, Liverpool, NSW 2170 (Australia); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Liverpool Cancer Therapy Centre, Liverpool Hospital, Liverpool, NSW 2170 (Australia) and Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia) and Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia) and Liverpool Cancer Therapy Centre, Liverpool Hospital, Liverpool, NSW 2170 (Australia)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is fast becoming standard on modern linear accelerators. CBCT increases the dose to regions within and outside the treatment field, potentially increasing secondary cancer induction and toxicity. This study quantified megavoltage (MV) CBCT skin dose and compared it to skin dose delivered during standard tangential breast radiotherapy.Method: Dosimetry was performed both in- and out-of-field using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and a metal-oxide-semiconductor-field-effect-transistor (MOSFET) detector specifically designed for skin dosimetry; these were placed superficially on a female anthropomorphic phantom. Results: The skin dose from a single treatment fraction ranged from 0.5 to 1.4 Gy on the ipsilateral breast, 0.031-0.18 Gy on the contralateral breast, and 0-0.02 Gy in the head and pelvic region. An 8 MU MV CBCT delivered a skin dose that ranged from 0.02 to 0.05 Gy in the chest region and was less than 0.01 Gy in the head and pelvis regions. One MV CBCT per fraction was found to increase the out-of-field skin dose from both the CBCT and the treatment fields by approximately 20%. The imaging dose as a percentage of treatment doses in the ipsilateral breast region was 3% for both dosimeters.Conclusion: Imaging increases the skin dose to regions outside the treatment field particularly regions immediately adjacent the target volume. This small extra dose to the breasts should be considered when developing clinical protocols and assessing dose for clinical trials.

  10. A cosmetic evaluation of breast cancer treatment: a randomized study of radiotherapy boost technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vass, Sylvie; Bairati, Isabelle

    2005-08-01

    To compare cosmetic results of two different radiotherapy (RT) boost techniques used in the treatment of breast cancer after whole breast radiotherapy and to identify factors affecting cosmetic outcomes. Between 1996 and 1998, 142 patients with Stage I and II breast cancer were treated with breast conservative surgery and adjuvant RT. Patients were then randomly assigned to receive a boost dose of 15 Gy delivered to the tumor bed either by iridium 192, or a combination of photons and electrons. Cosmetic evaluations were done on a 6-month basis, with a final evaluation at 36 months after RT. The evaluations were done using a panel of global and specific subjective scores, a digitized scoring system using the breast retraction assessment (BRA) measurement, and a patient's self-assessment evaluation. As cosmetic results were graded according to severity, the comparison of boost techniques was done using the ordinal logistic regression model. Adjusted odds ratios (OR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) are presented. At 36 months of follow-up, there was no significant difference between the two groups with respect to the global subjective cosmetic outcome (OR = 1.40; 95%CI = 0.69-2.85, p = 0.35). Good to excellent scores were observed in 65% of implant patients and 62% of photon/electron patients. At 24 months and beyond, telangiectasia was more severe in the implant group with an OR of 9.64 (95%CI = 4.05-22.92, p cosmetic outcome was the presence of concomitant chemotherapy (OR = 3.87; 95%CI = 1.74-8.62). The BRA value once adjusted for age, concomitant chemotherapy, and boost volume showed a positive association with the boost technique. The BRA value was significantly greater in the implant group (p = 0.03). There was no difference in the patient's final self-assessment score between the two groups. Three variables were statistically associated with an adverse self-evaluation: an inferior quadrant tumor localization, postoperative hematoma, and concomitant

  11. Post-operative radiotherapy is beneficial for T1/T2 triple negative breast cancer patients with four or more positive lymph nodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Zhang, Jinfeng; Chen, Jiayi; Liu, Lili; Liang, Lili; Shangguan, Zhiyi; Wang, Dandan

    2017-06-27

    The efficacy of adjuvant radiotherapy for the treatment of triple negative breast cancer patients with varying numbers of positive lymph nodes is not clear. We assessed the association between adjuvant radiotherapy and survival in 943 T1/T2 triple negative breast cancer patients treated at our institute between 2008 and 2012. We determined that post-operative radiotherapy improved overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), and local recurrence-free survival (LRFS) in patients with ≥ 4 positive nodes (p = 0.037, p = 0.035, and p = 0.012, respectively). Although Cox regression analysis demonstrated that radiotherapy was a significant prognostic factor in triple negative breast cancer with ≥ 4 positive nodes, post-operative radiotherapy had no clear effect on OS, DFS, or LRFS in patients with 1-3 positive nodes (p = 0.849, p = 0.860, and p = 0.162, respectively). The prognosis (i.e., OS, DFS, and LRFS) of triple negative breast cancer patients without lymph node metastasis who underwent breast-conserving surgery and post-operative radiotherapy was similar to that of patients who underwent mastectomy alone (p = 0.336, p = 0.537, and p = 0.978, respectively). Our findings demonstrate that post-operative radiotherapy is beneficial for T1/T2 triple negative breast cancer patients with ≥ 4 positive lymph nodes.

  12. Evaluation of immediate breast reconstruction and radiotherapy: Factors associated with complications; Reconstruction mammaire immediate apres mastectomie suivie de radiotherapie: facteurs de risque de complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross, E.; Cowen, D. [Departement de radiotherapie, hopital de la Timone, 13 - Marseille (France); Hannoun-Levi, J.M. [Departement de radiotherapie, centre Antoine-Lacassagne, 06 - Nice (France); Rouanet, P. [Departement de chirurgie, centre Val-d' Aurelle-Paul-Lamarque, 34 - Montpellier (France); Houvenaeghel, G. [Departement de chirurgie, institut Paoli-Calmettes, 13 - Marseille (France); Teissier, E. [Centre azureen de cancerologie, 06 - Mougins (France); Ellis, S. [Centre catalan d' oncologie, 66 - Perpignan (France); Resbeut, M. [Centre de radiotherapie Saint-Louis, 83 - Toulon (France); Tallet, A. [Departement de radiotherapie, institut Paoli-Calmettes, 13 - Marseille (France); Vaini Cowen, V. [Departement de chirurgie gynecologique, polyclinique du Parc-Rambot, 13 - Aix-en-Provence (France); Azria, D. [Departement de radiotherapie, centre Val-d' Aurelle-Paul-Lamarque, 34 - Montpellier (France)

    2010-12-15

    Objectives: To determine prospectively the factors associated with reconstruction failure (i.e. requiring expander removal) and capsular contracture in patients undergoing mastectomy and immediate two-stage breast reconstruction with a tissue expander and implant, and radiotherapy for breast cancer. This is a multi-institutional prospective non-randomized trial. Patients and Methods: Between 2/1998 and 9/2006, we prospectively evaluated 141 consecutive patients who received 141 implants after mastectomy and underwent chest wall radiotherapy (46 to 50 Gy in 23 to 25 fractions). Patients were evaluated after 24 to 36 months by two senior physicians (radiation oncologist and surgeon). Results: Medical follow-up was 37 months. Baker 1 and 2 capsular contracture was observed in 67.5% of patients, Baker 3 and 4 in 32.5%. There were 32 reconstruction failures. In a univariate analysis, the following factors were associated with Baker 3 and 4 capsular contracture: surgeon, use of hormonotherapy and smoking, of which only one remained in the multivariate analysis: surgeon. In a univariate analysis, the following factors were associated with reconstruction failure: tumor size T3 or T4, smoking, pN+ axilla. Three factors remained associated with reconstruction failure in a multiple logistic regression: large tumors T3/T4, smoking and pN+ axilla. Conclusions: Mastectomy, radiotherapy and immediate breast reconstruction with a tissue expander and implant should be considered when breast conserving surgery has been denied. Adequate patients can be easily selected by using three factors of favourable outcome. (authors)

  13. Electrons for intraoperative radiotherapy in selected breast-cancer patients: late results of the Montpellier phase II trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemanski, Claire; Azria, David; Gourgou-Bourgade, Sophie; Ailleres, Norbert; Pastant, Aurelie; Rouanet, Philippe; Fenoglietto, Pascal; Dubois, Jean-Bernard; Gutowski, Marian

    2013-08-01

    The Montpellier cancer institute phase II trial started in 2004 and evaluated the feasibility of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) technique given as a sole radiation treatment for patients with an excellent prognostic and very low recurrence risk. Forty-two patients were included between 2004 and 2007. Inclusion criteria were patients ≥ 65 years old, T0-T1, N0, ductal invasive unifocal carcinoma, free-margin > 2 mm. IORT was delivered using dedicated linear accelerator. One fraction of 21 Gy was prescribed and specified at the 90% isodose using electrons. In vivo dosimetry was performed for all patients. Primary end-point was the quality index. Secondary endpoints were quality of life, local recurrences, cosmetic results, specific and overall survival. At inclusion, median age was 72 years (range, 66-80). Median tumor diameter was 10 mm. All patients received the total prescribed dose. No acute grade 3 toxicities were observed. Late cosmetic results were good at 5 years despite the poor agreement of accuracy assessment between patients and physicians. Four patients (9.5%) experienced a local failure and underwent salvage mastectomy. The 5 year-disease free survival is 92.7% (range 79.1-97.6). All patients are still alive with a median follow-up of 72 months (range 66-74). Our results confirm with a long-term follow-up that exclusive partial breast IORT is feasible for early-breast cancer in selected patients. IORT provides good late cosmetics results and should be considered as a safe and very comfortable "one-step" treatment procedure. Nevertheless, patient assessments are essential for long-term quality results.

  14. One life saved by four prevented recurrencies? Update of the early breast cancer trialists confirms. Postoperative radiotherapy improves survival after breast conserving surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sautter-Bihl, M.L. [Staedtisches Klinikum Karlsruhe (Germany). Klinik fuer Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie; Sedlmayer, F. [Landeskrankenhaus Salzburg (Austria); Budach, W. [University Hospital Duesseldorf (DE)] (and others)

    2012-06-15

    The debate about the impact of local control on survival in early breast cancer patients is still going on, in spite of the continuously growing evidence that avoidance of locoregional disease reduces the risk of tumor-specific death. Recently, B. Fisher, one of the pioneers of breast conserving therapy claimed that during the last two decades, as a result of the use of systemic therapy in conjunction with breast conserving surgery and radiation, the incidence of locoregional recurrence has been reduced to a level where further reduction is likely to have little impact on survival. The penultimate meta-analysis of the Early Breast Cancer Trialists' Collaborative Group (EBCTCG) reported the effect of radiotherapy in early breast cancer on recurrence and survival in 2005 and provided the essential message that four prevented local recurrences at 5 years would avoid one breast cancer death in 15 years. The scientific community has eagerly awaited the quinquennial update of the EBCTCG which has now been published. A total of 17 randomized studies comparing postoperative radiotherapy vs. none were analyzed and comprised 7 new studies in addition to follow-up data of from 9 previously reported trials. A total of 10,801 patients with pT1-2 tumors were included, the majority of whom (n=7,287) were node negative, while 1,050 were node positive (2,464 unknown). In contrast to the previous meta-analysis, all patients received breast conserving surgery, consisting of lumpectomy (n=8,422) or more extensive techniques like quadrantectomy or sectoral resection (n= 2,399). The effect of radiotherapy on 10-year recurrences of any type and their relation to the 15-year breast cancer death rate were studied in correlation to various prognostic parameters and treatment characteristics (e.g., surgery, tamoxifen use). Moreover, a subgroup analysis was performed according to low, intermediate, and high initial risk of recurrence, from which the expected absolute benefit was derived

  15. Prophylactic radiotherapy of the breast in patients with prostatic carcinoma before application of contrasexual hormones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arndt, D.; Heibel, J.H.

    1983-08-01

    Symptoms and objective parameters of gynecomastia are analysed in 113 patients, who received prophylactic irradiation of the breast (12 Gy in 3 fractions) prior to estrogen therapy of prostatic carcinoma. Another 10 patients were treated equally after estrogens had caused severe complaints. Symptoms increased from 10% to 100% in relation to 4 classes of gynecomastia. They were mild in 27.5%, moderate in 23.9% and severe in 8.8%. A correlation between metric classification and graded symptoms became more evident when only 2 groups were distinguished. With a maximum diameter of 3.5 cm only 17% of the patients had mostly slight discomfort in contrast to 70% of the patients with a gland of more than 3.5 cm in diameter; they revealed moderate or serious complaints. These results indicate that prophylactic radiotherapy may reduce severe complications to less than 10% as compared to 70-80% without irradiation. If gynecomastia has developed, regression by subsequent radiotherapy seems to be impossible; but the intensity of complaints could be reduced in our ten patients. Provided that irradiation precedes estrogen application, this sequence may be considered as a reasonable alternative to expensive antiandrogen therapy.

  16. Meta-Analysis of Local Invasive Breast Cancer Recurrence After Electron Intraoperative Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harness, Jay K; Davies, Kalatu; Via, Christina; Brooks, Elizabeth; Zambelli-Weiner, April; Shah, Chirag; Vicini, Frank

    2017-11-06

    Electron intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) can be used during breast conserving surgery to treat early-stage invasive breast cancer. Using data from current clinical and observational studies, this study aimed to assess the impact of single-fraction electron IORT on local recurrence rates. Studies on single-fraction electron IORT during breast conserving surgery were identified through a search of PubMed and Google Scholar, as well as through secondary referencing. Local recurrence rate was the main outcome of interest. A meta-analysis of proportions using a binomial distribution to model the within-study variability and a random effects model was conducted to estimate a pooled local recurrence rate. To estimate a 5-year recurrence rate, a single-sample Poisson-normal model was applied to model the probability of events occurring during a fixed period (60 months). The study identified 13 publications. The analysis demonstrated a pooled monthly local recurrence rate of 0.02% per person-month (95% confidence interval CI 0.00-0.06%) for the studies with a follow-up period shorter than 5 years, 0.03% per person-month (95% CI 0.02-0.06%) for studies with a follow-up period of 5 years or longer, and 0.02% per person-month (95% CI 0.01-0.04%) overall. Based on this model, the predicted 5-year local recurrence rate was 2.7% (range 1.9-3.7%). According to the published literature, the rate of breast cancer local recurrence after electron IORT was 0.02% per person-month, with an adjusted 5-year recurrence rate of 2.7%. These findings support the recent guidelines from the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) supporting the use of electron IORT for low-risk patients.

  17. In vivo dosimetry and acute toxicity in breast cancer patients undergoing intraoperative radiotherapy as boost

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jason Joon Bock; Choi, Jin Hyun; Lee, Ik Jae; Park, Kwang Woo; Kim, Kang Pyo; Kim, Jun Won [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Sung Gwe; Jeong, Joon [Dept. of Surgery, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    To report the results of a correlation analysis of skin dose assessed by in vivo dosimetry and the incidence of acute toxicity. This is a phase 2 trial evaluating the feasibility of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) as a boost for breast cancer patients. Eligible patients were treated with IORT of 20 Gy followed by whole breast irradiation (WBI) of 46 Gy. A total of 55 patients with a minimum follow-up of 1 month after WBI were evaluated. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimeter (OSLD) detected radiation dose delivered to the skin during IORT. Acute toxicity was recorded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v4.0. Clinical parameters were correlated with seroma formation and maximum skin dose. Median follow-up after IORT was 25.9 weeks (range, 12.7 to 50.3 weeks). Prior to WBI, only one patient developed acute toxicity. Following WBI, 30 patients experienced grade 1 skin toxicity and three patients had grade 2 skin toxicity. Skin dose during IORT exceeded 5 Gy in two patients: with grade 2 complications around the surgical scar in one patient who received 8.42 Gy. Breast volume on preoperative images (p = 0.001), ratio of applicator diameter and breast volume (p = 0.002), and distance between skin and tumor (p = 0.003) showed significant correlations with maximum skin dose. IORT as a boost was well-tolerated among Korean women without severe acute complication. In vivo dosimetry with OSLD can help ensure safe delivery of IORT as a boost.

  18. Single nucleotide polymorphisms and unacceptable late toxicity in breast cancer adjuvant radiotherapy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazzari G

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Grazia Lazzari,1 Maria Iole Natalicchio,2 Angela Terlizzi,3 Francesco Perri,4 Giovanni Silvano1 1Radiation Oncology Unit, San Giuseppe Moscati Hospital, Taranto, 2Molecular Biology Laboratory, Pathological Anatomy Department, Ospedali Riuniti, Foggia, 3Medical Physic Unit, San Giuseppe Moscati Hospital, 4Medical Oncology Unit, Presidio Ospedaliero Centrale - Santissima Annunziata, Taranto, Italy Background: There has recently been a strong interest in the inter-individual variation in normal tissue and tumor response to radiotherapy (RT, because tissue radiosensitivity seems to be under genetic control. Evidence is accumulating on the role of polymorphic genetic variants, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs that could influence normal tissue response after radiation. The most studied SNPs include those in genes involved in DNA repair (single- and double-strand breaks, and base excision and those active in the response to oxidative stress.Case report: We present the case report of a 60-year-old woman with early breast cancer who underwent adjuvant hormone therapy and conventional radiotherapy, and subsequently developed unacceptable cosmetic toxicities of the irradiated breast requiring a genetic test of genes involved in DNA repair mechanisms. The patient was found to be heterozygous for G28152A (T/C and C18067T (A/G mutations in X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1 and 3 (XRCC3, respectively, homozygous for A313G (G/G mutation in glutathione S transferase Pi 1 (GSTP1, and wild-type for A4541G (A/A in XRCC3 and G135C (G/G in RAD51 recombinase.Conclusion: The role of SNPs should be taken into account when a severe phenomenon appears in normal tissues after radiation treatment, because understanding the molecular basis of individual radiosensitivity may be useful for identifying moderately or extremely radiosensitive patients who may need tailored therapeutic strategies. Keywords: radiosensitivity, SNPs, fibrosis, DNA repair

  19. Risk of Heart Failure With Preserved Ejection Fraction in Older Women After Contemporary Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiki, Hirofumi; Petersen, Ivy A; Scott, Christopher G; Bailey, Kent R; Dunlay, Shannon M; Finley, Randi R; Ruddy, Kathryn J; Yan, Elizabeth; Redfield, Margaret M

    2017-04-11

    Cardiomyocytes are resistant to radiation. However, cardiac radiation exposure causes coronary microvascular endothelial inflammation, a perturbation implicated in the pathogenesis of heart failure (HF) and particularly HF with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). Radiotherapy for breast cancer results in variable cardiac radiation exposure and may increase the risk of HF. We conducted a population-based case-control study of incident HF in 170 female residents of Olmsted County, Minnesota (59 cases and 111 controls), who underwent contemporary (1998-2013) radiotherapy for breast cancer with computed tomography-assisted radiotherapy planning. Controls were matched to cases for age, tumor side, chemotherapy use, diabetes mellitus, and hypertension. Mean cardiac radiation dose (MCRD) in each patient was calculated from the patient's computed tomography images and radiotherapy plan. Mean age at radiotherapy was 69±9 years. Of HF cases, 38 (64%) had EF≥50% (HFpEF), 18 (31%) had EFradiotherapy to HF was 5.8±3.4 years. The odds of HF was higher in patients with a history of ischemic heart disease or atrial fibrillation. The MCRD was 2.5 Gy (range, 0.2-13.1 Gy) and higher in cases (3.3±2.7 Gy) than controls (2.1±2.0 Gy; P=0.004). The odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for HF per log MCRD was 9.1 (3.4-24.4) for any HF, 16.9 (3.9-73.7) for HFpEF, and 3.17 (0.8-13.0) for HF with reduced EF. The increased odds of any HF or HFpEF with increasing MCRD remained significant after adjustment for HF risk factors and in sensitivity analyses matching by cancer stage rather than tumor side. Only 18.6% of patients experienced new or recurrent ischemic events between radiotherapy and the onset of HF. The relative risk of HFpEF increases with increasing cardiac radiation exposure during contemporary conformal breast cancer radiotherapy. These data emphasize the importance of radiotherapy techniques that limit MCRD during breast cancer treatment. Moreover, these data provide

  20. Pulmonary function after high-dose chemotherapy with autologous bone marrow transplantation and radiotherapy in patients with advanced loco-regional breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolsma, WV; DeVries, EGE; VanderMark, TW; Sleijfer, DT; Willemse, PHB; VanderGraaf, WTA; Mulder, POM; Szabo, BG; Mulder, NH

    1997-01-01

    Our aim was to study the extent of pulmonary toxicity after high-dose chemotherapy and radiotherapy in breast cancer patients. In a retrospective study the pulmonary symptoms and chest X-rays were analysed before, during and after treatment in 17 patients, treated with loco-regional radiotherapy to

  1. Incidental irradiation of internal mammary lymph nodes in breast cancer: conventional two-dimensional radiotherapy versus conformal three-dimensional radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leite, Elton Trigo Teixeira; Ugino, Rafael Tsuneki; Lopes, Mauricio Russo; Pelosi, Edilson Lopes; Silva, Joao Luis Fernandes da, E-mail: eltontt@gmail.com [Hospital Sirio-Libanes, Sao paulo, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Radiologia e Oncologia; Santana, Marco Antonio; Ferreira, Denis Vasconcelos; Carvalho, Heloisa de Andrade [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FM/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Departamento de Radiologia e Oncologia

    2016-05-15

    Objective: to evaluate incidental irradiation of the internal mammary lymph nodes (IMLNs) through opposed tangential fields with conventional two-dimensional (2D) or three-dimensional (3D) radiotherapy techniques and to compare the results between the two techniques. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective study of 80 breast cancer patients in whom radiotherapy of the IMLNs was not indicated: 40 underwent 2D radiotherapy with computed tomography for dosimetric control, and 40 underwent 3D radiotherapy. The total prescribed dose was 50.0 Gy or 50.4 Gy (2.0 or 1.8 Gy/day, respectively). We reviewed all plans and defined the IMLNs following the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group recommendations. For the IMLNs, we analyzed the proportion of the volume that received 45 Gy, the proportion of the volume that received 25 Gy, the dose to 95% of the volume, the dose to 50% of the volume, the mean dose, the minimum dose (Dmin), and the maximum dose (Dmax). Results: Left-sided treatments predominated in the 3D cohort. There were no differences between the 2D and 3D cohorts regarding tumor stage, type of surgery (mastectomy, breast-conserving surgery, or mastectomy with immediate reconstruction), or mean delineated IMLN volume (6.8 vs. 5.9 mL; p = 0.411). Except for the Dmin, all dosimetric parameters presented higher mean values in the 3D cohort (p < 0.05). The median Dmax in the 3D cohort was 50.34 Gy. However, the mean dose to the IMLNs was 7.93 Gy in the 2D cohort, compared with 20.64 Gy in the 3D cohort. Conclusion: Neither technique delivered enough doses to the IMLNs to achieve subclinical disease control. However, all of the dosimetric parameters were significantly higher for the 3D technique. (author)

  2. Mathematical modelling of survival of glioblastoma patients suggests a role for radiotherapy dose escalation and predicts poorer outcome after delay to start treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnet, N G; Jena, R; Jefferies, S J; Stenning, S P; Kirkby, N F

    2006-03-01

    The outcome of patients with glioblastoma (GBM) remains extremely poor. We have developed a mathematical model, using pathological and radiation biology concepts, to assess the detrimental effect of delay to start radiotherapy, the possible benefit from dose escalation, and to extract biological data from clinical data. Survival data were available for 154 adult patients with GBM treated in our centre with curative intent to a dose of 60 Gy in 30 fractions between 1996 and 2002. Survival data for 129 patients from the 60 Gy arm of the MRC BR02 randomised trial of radiotherapy dose were obtained for comparison. The model generates the equivalent of individual patients with a brain tumour, and produces an explicit outcome, either death or survival. The tumour, assumed to be growing exponentially, causes normal cell damage in the brain, and death occurs when the number of normal brain cells falls below a critical level. The outcome for an individual patient is determined by values of the variables assigned by the model. Parameters for the single patient include tumour doubling time, surviving fraction of tumour cells after each fraction of radiotherapy, and a waiting time from presentation to the start of radiotherapy. A surrogate for performance status is implemented, using a rule that rejects patients whose tumours are too advanced at presentation to be suitable for radical radiotherapy. Values for the parameters that determine individual patient outcome are randomly assigned from a set of probability distributions, using Monte Carlo simulation. The simulation constructs survival results for a population, typically 2000 individuals. The descriptors of the probability distributions that are used to determine the parameters that define the patient characteristics are adjusted to optimise the fit of the modelled population to real clinical data, using a combination of folding polygon and simulated annealing techniques. The model fits the clinical data well. The results

  3. Preoperative Single Fraction Partial Breast Radiotherapy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palta, Manisha; Yoo, Sua; Adamson, Justus D.; Prosnitz, Leonard R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Horton, Janet K., E-mail: janet.horton@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Several recent series evaluating external beam accelerated partial breast irradiation (PBI) have reported adverse cosmetic outcomes, possibly related to large volumes of normal tissue receiving near-prescription doses. We hypothesized that delivery of external beam PBI in a single fraction to the preoperative tumor volume would be feasible and result in a decreased dose to the uninvolved breast compared with institutional postoperative PBI historical controls. Methods and Materials: A total of 17 patients with unifocal Stage T1 breast cancer were identified. Contrast-enhanced subtraction magnetic resonance images were loaded into an Eclipse treatment planning system and used to define the target volumes. A 'virtual plan' was created using four photon beams in a noncoplanar beam arrangement and optimized to deliver 15 Gy to the planning target volume. Results: The median breast volume was 1,713 cm{sup 3} (range: 1,014-2,140), and the median clinical target volume was 44 cm{sup 3} (range: 26-73). In all cases, 100% of the prescription dose covered 95% of the clinical target volume. The median conformity index was 0.86 (range: 0.70-1.12). The median percentage of the ipsilateral breast volume receiving 100% and 50% of the prescribed dose was 3.8% (range: 2.2-6.9) and 13.3% (range: 7.5-20.8) compared with 18% (range: 3-42) and 53% (range: 24-65) in the institutional historical controls treated with postoperative external beam PBI (p = .002). The median maximum skin dose was 9 Gy. The median dose to 1 and 10 cm{sup 3} of skin was 6.7 and 4.9 Gy. The doses to the heart and ipsilateral lung were negligible. Conclusion: Preoperative PBI resulted in a substantial reduction in ipsilateral breast tissue dose compared with postoperative PBI. The skin dose appeared reasonable, given the small volumes. A prospective Phase I trial evaluating this technique is ongoing.

  4. DEGRO practical guidelines for radiotherapy of breast cancer II. Postmastectomy radiotherapy, irradiation of regional lymphatics, and treatment of locally advanced disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sautter-Bihl, M.L. [Municipal Hospital Karlsruhe (Germany); Souchon, R. [Allgemeines Krankenhaus Hagen (Germany); Budach, W. [Univ. Hospital Duesseldorf (Germany); Sedlmayer, F. [Univ. Hospital, Salzburger Landeskliniken, Salzburg (Austria); Feyer, P. [Klinikum Neukoelln, Berlin (Germany); Harms, W. [St. Clara Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Haase, W. [St.-Vincentius-Kliniken, Karlsruhe (Germany); Dunst, J. [Univ. Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Luebeck (Germany); Wenz, F. [Univ. Hospital Mannheim (Germany); Sauer, R. [Univ. Hospital Erlangen (Germany)

    2008-07-15

    Background and purpose: the aim of the present paper is to update the practical guidelines for radiotherapy of breast cancer published in 2006 by the breast cancer expert panel of the German Society for Radiooncology (DEGRO). These recommendations were complementing the S3 guidelines of the German Cancer Society (DKG) elaborated in 2004. The present DEGRO recommendations are based on a revision of the DKG guidelines provided by an interdisciplinary panel and published in February 2008. Methods: the DEGRO expert panel (authors of the present manuscript) performed a comprehensive survey of the literature. Data from lately published meta-analyses, recent randomized trials and guidelines of international breast cancer societies, yielding new aspects compared to 2006, provided the basis for defining recommendations referring to the criteria of evidence-based medicine. In addition to the more general statements of the DKG, this paper emphasizes specific radiooncologic issues relating to radiotherapy after mastectomy (PMRT), locally advanced disease, irradiation of the lymphatic pathways, and sequencing of local and systemic treatment. Technique, targeting, and dose are described in detail. Results: PMRT significantly reduces local recurrence rates in patients with T3/T4 tumors and/or positive axillary lymph nodes (12.9% with and 40.6% without PMRT in patients with four or more positive nodes). The more local control is improved, the more substantially it translates into increased survival. In node-positive women the absolute reduction in 15-year breast cancer mortality is 5.4%. Data referring to the benefit of lymphatic irradiation are conflicting. However, radiotherapy of the supraclavicular area is recommended when four or more nodes are positive and otherwise considered individually. Evidence concerning timing and sequencing of local and systemic treatment is sparse; therefore, treatment decisions should depend on the dominating risk of recurrence. Conclusion: there

  5. Radiobiological analysis of the field in field technique in breast cancer radiotherapy treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medel B, E.; Vasquez R, M. A. [IMSS, Centro Medico Nacional Manuel Avila Camacho, Calle 2 Nte. 2004, Barrio de San Francisco, 72090 Puebla, Pue. (Mexico); Tejeda M, G., E-mail: marcosalivasquez@gmail.com [Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Facultad de Ciencias Fisico Matematicas, Av. San Claudio y 18 Sur, Ciudad Universitaria, 72570 Puebla, Pue. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: In vivo dosimetry was performed in 6 unilateral breast cancer patients treated with external beam radiation therapy in order to evaluate the dose calculated by the radiotherapy treatment planning system (Xi O, ELEKTA). Results show a maximum difference of 0.473 Gy between the dose calculated by the treatment planning system and the dose measured in vivo using solid state detectors. Based on the DVHs statistics, tumor control probability (Tcp) was obtained using the Target-Poisson model, with the following Tcp parameters: α=0.288/Gy, α{sub s}pread= 0.13 and α/β=4.9 Gy. Tcp average obtained for the Clinical Tumor Volume (Ctv) is 35.1% and for Supra Clavicle Volume (Scv) is 35.345%. Finally using Lyman model Normal Tissue Complication Probability (Ntcp) was obtained for the following endpoints: contralateral breast fibrosis, lung radiation pneumonitis and heart pericarditis. Nonetheless the Ntcp values are not high; the improvement of the Tcp based on this plan makes Ntcp for lung radiation pneumonitis reach the 100% of probability in some cases. (Author)

  6. Lymphoscintigraphy Can Select Breast Cancer Patients for Internal Mammary Chain Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hindie, Elif, E-mail: elif.hindie@sls.aphp.fr [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris 7 University, Paris (France); Department of Nuclear Medicine, CHU de Bordeaux, University of Bordeaux-Segalen, Bordeaux (France); Groheux, David [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris 7 University, Paris (France); Hennequin, Christophe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris (France); Zanotti-Fregonara, Paolo; Vercellino, Laetitia; Berenger, Nathalie; Toubert, Marie-Elisabeth [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris 7 University, Paris (France); Maylin, Claude [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris (France); Vilcoq, Jacques-Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hartmann Hospital, Neuilly sur Seine (France); Espie, Marc [Breast Diseases Unit, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris (France)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Given the risk of undesired toxicity, prophylactic internal mammary (IM) chain irradiation should be offered only to patients at high risk of occult involvement. Lymphoscintigraphy for axillary sentinel node biopsy might help in selecting these patients. Methods and Materials: We reviewed published studies with the following selection criteria: {>=}300 breast cancer patients referred for axilla sentinel node biopsy; scintigraphy performed after peritumoral or intratumoral tracer injection; IM biopsy in the case of IM drainage; and axilla staged routinely independent of IM status. Results: Six prospective studies, for a total of 3,876 patients, fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Parasternal drainage was present in 792 patients (20.4%). IM biopsy was performed in 644 patients and was positive in 111 (17.2%). Of the positive IM biopsies, 40% were associated with tumors in the lateral breast quadrants. A major difference in the IM positivity rate was found according to the axilla sentinel node status. In patients with negative axilla, the IM biopsy was positive in 7.8% of cases. In patients with positive axilla, however, the IM biopsy was positive in 41% (p < .00001). Because biopsy of multiple IM hot nodes is difficult, the true risk could be even greater, probably close to 50%. Conclusions: Patients with IM drainage on lymphoscintigraphy and a positive axilla sentinel node have a high risk of occult IM involvement. These women should be considered for IM radiotherapy.

  7. Combined treatment of radiotherapy and local hyperthermia using 8 MHz RF-wave for advanced carcinoma of the breast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuwa, Nobukazu

    1988-01-01

    During the period from January 1983 through September 1986, 13 patients with carcinoma of the breast were treated with local hyperthermia combined with radiotherapy. Six patients were inoperable advanced cases and the other 7 were recurrent cases. Local heat was applied with an 8-MHz RF-capacitive heating equipment, once or twice a week after radiotherapy, for 40 approx. 60 minutes per session. Of the 6 cases with inoperable advanced lesions, 4 achieved CR and the other 2 achieved PRa (80 approx. 100 % regression), and of the 7 cases with local recurrent tumors, 3 achieved CR and the other 4 achieved PRa. As complications of the thermoradiotherapy, grade I-II skin burns were observed in 9 cases, pain around the ribs in 8 cases, mild lassitude in 2 cases, persistent tachycardia in 1 case and acute erosive gastritis in 1 case. It is worth noting that CR was achieved in these huge tumors, which can not be controlled by radiotherapy alone.

  8. Expander/implant breast reconstruction before radiotherapy. Outcomes in a single-institute cohort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aristei, C.; Palumbo, I. [Perugia Univ. (Italy). Radiation Oncology Section; Santa Maria della Misericordia Hospital, Perugia (Italy); Falcinelli, L.; Petitto, R.P.; Perrucci, E. [Santa Maria della Misericordia Hospital, Perugia (Italy). Radiation Oncology Div.; Bini, V. [Perugia Univ. (Italy). Dept. of Internal Medicine; Farneti, A. [Perugia Univ. (Italy). Radiation Oncology Section; Gori, S. [Santa Maria della Misericordia Hospital, Perugia (Italy). Medical Oncology Div.

    2012-12-15

    Background and purpose: Radiotherapy (RT) of reconstructed breasts was associated with major complications and poor cosmetic outcome. The present study assessed complication rates, the link between risk factors and prosthesis removal, as well as cosmetic outcomes. Patients and methods: From 1997 to 2009, 101 consecutive patients received RT after breast reconstruction because of risk factors for relapse (92) or because relapse had occurred (9). At RT, 90 patients had temporary tissue expanders and 11 had permanent implants. Twelve patients underwent neo-adjuvant chemotherapy; all patients received adjuvant chemo- and/or hormone therapy. Results: At a median follow-up of 50 months, late toxicities occurred in 28 patients: pain in 7, lymphedema in 6, G1 cutaneous toxicity in 5, and subcutaneous toxicity in 19 (2G1, 9G2, 7G3, 1G4), with more than one side effect in 12. In 8 patients the prosthesis ruptured (3), was displaced (3), was displaced and ruptured (1), or lost shape (1). Capsular contracture was classified in 89 patients as IA in 14, IB in 47, II in 10, III in 11, and IV in 7. Twelve prostheses (11.9%) were removed. The only significant factor for prosthesis removal was age (p = 0.007). Judgments of cosmetic results were available from 81 physicians and 84 patients. Outcome was excellent/good in 58/81 physician judgments and in 57/84 patient evaluations. Overall inter-rater agreement on outcome was good ({kappa}-value 0.64; 95% CI: 0.48-0.79). Conclusion: RT to reconstructed breasts was associated with low rates of late toxicity and prosthesis removal. Cosmetic outcomes were, on the whole, good to excellent. (orig.)

  9. Local relapse after breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy. Effects on survival parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammer, Josef; Spiegl, Kurt J.; Feichtinger, Johannes; Braeutigam, Elisabeth [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Barmherzige Schwesten Hospital, Linz (Austria); Track, Christine [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Barmherzige Schwesten Hospital, Linz (Austria); Comprehensive Breast Health Center, Barmherzige Schwesten Hospital, Linz (Austria); Seewald, Dietmar H. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, General Hospital, Voecklabruck (Austria); Petzer, Andreas L. [Dept. of Internal Medicine I - Hematology and Oncology, Barmherzige Schwesten Hospital, Linz (Austria); Langsteger, Werner [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and PET Center, Barmherzige Schwesten Hospital, Linz (Austria); Poestlberger, Sabine [Comprehensive Breast Health Center, Barmherzige Schwesten Hospital, Linz (Austria); Dept. of Surgery, Barmherzige Schwesten Hospital, Linz (Austria)

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: This retrospective analysis of 1,610 women treated for breast cancer and 88 patients with local relapse aims to show the poor survival parameters after local failure and to evaluate risk factors and compare them with other studies and analyses published. Patients and methods: Between 1984 and 1997, 1,610 patients presenting with a total of 1,635 pT1-2 invasive and noninvasive carcinomas of the breast were treated at the authors' institution. The mean age was 57.1 years (range 25-85 years). Treatment protocols involved breast-conserving surgery with or without systemic therapy and whole-breast radiotherapy in all women, followed by a boost dose to the tumor bed according to risk factors for local recurrence. All axillary node-positive patients underwent systemic therapy (six cycles of classic CMF or tamoxifen 20 mg/day for 2-5 years). The time of diagnosis of local relapse was defined as time 0 for the survival curves after local failure. The association of clinicopathologic factors was studied using uni- and multivariate analyses. Survival and local control were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier actuarial method and significance by the log-rank test. Results: After a mean follow-up of 104 months, 88 local failures were recorded (5.4%). Calculated from the time of diagnosis of local relapse, 5-year overall survival (OS) was 62.8%, metastasis-free survival 60.6%, and disease-specific survival 64.2%. In patients with failure during the first 5 years after treatment, the survival parameters were worse (OS 50.6%) compared to those who relapsed after 5 years (OS 78.8%; p < 0.028). Significances were also found for initial T- and N-stage and type of failure (solid tumor vs. diffuse spread). Conclusion: This analysis again shows that the survival parameters are worsening after local relapse, especially in case of early occurrence. In breast cancer treatment, therefore, the goal remains to avoid local failure. (orig.)

  10. The Malthus Programme: developing radiotherapy demand models for breast and prostate cancer at the local, regional and national level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Round, C; Mee, T; Kirkby, N F; Cooper, T; Williams, M V; Jena, R

    2013-09-01

    The Malthus Programme has delivered a tool for modelling radiotherapy demand in England. The model is capable of simulating demand at the local level. This article investigates the local and regional level variation in predicted demand with respect to Breast and Prostate cancer, the two tumour types responsible for the majority of radiotherapy treatment workload in England. Simulations were performed using the Malthus model, using base population incidence data for the period from 2007-2009. Simulations were carried out at the level of Primary Care Trusts, Cancer Networks, and nationwide, with annual projections for 2012, 2016 and 2020. Benchmarking was undertaken against previously published models from the UK, Canada and Australia. For breast cancer, the fraction burden for 2012 varied from 5537 fractions per million in Tower Hamlets PCT to 18 896 fractions per million in Devon PCT (national mean - 13 592 fractions per million). For prostate cancer, the fraction burden for 2012 varied from 4874 fractions per million in Tower Hamlets PCT to 23 181 fractions per million in Lincolnshire PCT (national mean - 15 087 fractions per million). Predictions of population growth by age cohort for 2016 and 2020 result in the regional differences in radiotherapy demand becoming greater over time. Similar effects were also observed at the level of the cancer network. Our model shows the importance of local population demographics and cancer incidence rates when commissioning radiotherapy services. Copyright © 2013 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Patients' perceptions of health-related quality of life during and after adjuvant radiotherapy for T1N0M0 breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaresan, P; Sullivan, L; Pendlebury, S; Kirby, A; Rodger, A; Joseph, D; Campbell, I; Dhillon, H M; Stockler, M R

    2015-01-01

    The effects of radiotherapy on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) may influence decisions about adjuvant radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery. We sought women's ratings of HRQOL during and after radiotherapy. Women completed HRQOL measures before, during and after adjuvant radiotherapy for node-negative, hormone receptor-positive breast cancers that were less than 2 cm in size. Acute and late toxicities were rated by clinicians. There were 161 participants with a median age of 58 years (range 34-82). Mean scores for most aspects of HRQOL worsened only slightly during radiotherapy and improved to baseline levels or better within a few months. The symptoms rated as most distressing were: difficulty sleeping (29%), fatigue (23%), breast discolouration (21%), uncertainty about the future (18%), feeling sad or depressed (18%), feeling anxious or worried (19%). Most rated their experience as better (39%) or much better (28%) than expected. Grade 3 toxicities were rare (5% acute, 1% late) with no grade 4 toxicities. Radiotherapy was associated with transient and generally mild impairments in a few aspects of HRQOL. Concerns about adverse effects on HRQOL should not weigh heavily on decisions about adjuvant breast radiotherapy. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Risk of pacemaker or implantable cardioverter defibrillator after radiotherapy for early-stage breast cancer in Denmark, 1982-2005

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehammar, Jens Christian; Johansen, Jens Brock; Jensen, Maj-Britt

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To examine the risk of cardiac conduction abnormalities or severe ventricular arrhythmias requiring implantation of a cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED), either a pacemaker or an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator, subsequent to breast cancer (BC) radiotherapy....... CONCLUSIONS: BC RT as practiced in Denmark in 1982-2005 did not increase the risk of CIED implants. This indicates that RT for BC does not increase the risk of severe ventricular arrhythmias or cardiac conduction abnormalities....

  13. Estimating the Risks of Breast Cancer Radiotherapy: Evidence From Modern Radiation Doses to the Lungs and Heart and From Previous Randomized Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Carolyn; Correa, Candace; Duane, Frances K; Aznar, Marianne C; Anderson, Stewart J; Bergh, Jonas; Dodwell, David; Ewertz, Marianne; Gray, Richard; Jagsi, Reshma; Pierce, Lori; Pritchard, Kathleen I; Swain, Sandra; Wang, Zhe; Wang, Yaochen; Whelan, Tim; Peto, Richard; McGale, Paul

    2017-05-20

    Purpose Radiotherapy reduces the absolute risk of breast cancer mortality by a few percentage points in suitable women but can cause a second cancer or heart disease decades later. We estimated the absolute long-term risks of modern breast cancer radiotherapy. Methods First, a systematic literature review was performed of lung and heart doses in breast cancer regimens published during 2010 to 2015. Second, individual patient data meta-analyses of 40,781 women randomly assigned to breast cancer radiotherapy versus no radiotherapy in 75 trials yielded rate ratios (RRs) for second primary cancers and cause-specific mortality and excess RRs (ERRs) per Gy for incident lung cancer and cardiac mortality. Smoking status was unavailable. Third, the lung or heart ERRs per Gy in the trials and the 2010 to 2015 doses were combined and applied to current smoker and nonsmoker lung cancer and cardiac mortality rates in population-based data. Results Average doses from 647 regimens published during 2010 to 2015 were 5.7 Gy for whole lung and 4.4 Gy for whole heart. The median year of irradiation was 2010 (interquartile range [IQR], 2008 to 2011). Meta-analyses yielded lung cancer incidence ≥ 10 years after radiotherapy RR of 2.10 (95% CI, 1.48 to 2.98; P radiotherapy were as follows: lung cancer, approximately 4% for long-term continuing smokers and 0.3% for nonsmokers; and cardiac mortality, approximately 1% for smokers and 0.3% for nonsmokers. Conclusion For long-term smokers, the absolute risks of modern radiotherapy may outweigh the benefits, yet for most nonsmokers (and ex-smokers), the benefits of radiotherapy far outweigh the risks. Hence, smoking can determine the net effect of radiotherapy on mortality, but smoking cessation substantially reduces radiotherapy risk.

  14. Risk of heart disease in relation to radiotherapy and chemotherapy with anthracyclines among 19,464 breast cancer patients in Denmark, 1977-2005

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehammar, Jens Christian; Jensen, Maj-Britt; McGale, Paul

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The risk of heart disease subsequent to breast cancer radiotherapy was examined with particular focus on women receiving anthracycline-containing chemotherapy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Women diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer in Denmark, 1977-2005, were identified from ...

  15. Risk of heart disease in relation to radiotherapy and chemotherapy with anthracyclines among 19,464 breast cancer patients in Denmark, 1977-2005

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehammar, Jens Christian; Jensen, Maj-Britt; McGale, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose: The risk of heart disease subsequent to breast cancer radiotherapy was examined with particular focus on women receiving anthracycline-containing chemotherapy. Material and methods: Women diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer in Denmark, 1977-2005, were identified from ...

  16. Exclusive Alternating Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy in Nonmetastatic Inflammatory Breast Cancer: 20 Years of Follow-Up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourgier, Celine, E-mail: bourgier@igr.fr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Breast Unit, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Pessoa, Eduardo Lima [Department of Radiation Oncology, Breast Unit, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Dunant, Ariane [Biostatistics and Epidemiology Unit, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Heymann, Steve [Department of Radiation Oncology, Breast Unit, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Spielmann, Marc [Department of Medical Oncology, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Uzan, Catherine [Department of Breast Surgery, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Mathieu, Marie-Christine [Department of Pathology, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Arriagada, Rodrigo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Breast Unit, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Department of Radiation Oncology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Marsiglia, Hugo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Breast Unit, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Radiation Department University of Florence, Florence (Italy)

    2012-02-01

    Background: Locoregional treatment of inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is crucial because local relapses may be highly symptomatic and are commonly associated with distant metastasis. With a median follow-up of 20 years, we report here the long-term results of a monocentric clinical trial combining primary chemotherapy (CT) with a schedule of anthracycline-based CT and an alternating split-course of radiotherapy (RT Asterisk-Operator CT) without mastectomy. Methods and Materials: From September 1983 to December 1989, 124 women with nonmetastatic IBC (T4d M0) were treated with three cycles of primary AVCMF chemotherapy (anthracycline, vincristine, cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and 5-fluorouracil) and then an alternating RT Asterisk-Operator CT schedule followed by three cycles of FAC. Hormonal therapy was systematically administered: ovarian irradiation (12 Gy in four fractions) or tamoxifen 20 mg daily. Results: Local control was achieved in 82% of patients. The 10- and 20-year local relapse rates were 26% and 33%, respectively, but only 10% of locally controlled cases were not associated with concurrent distant metastasis. The 10- and 20-year overall survival rates were 39% and 19%, respectively. Severe fibrosis occurred in 54% of patients, grade 3 brachial plexus neuropathy in 4%, grade 2 pneumonitis in 9%. Grade 1, 2 and 3 cardiac toxicity was observed in 3.8%, 3.8% and 1.2% of cases respectively. Conclusions: This combined regimen allowed good long-term local control without surgery. Survival rates were similar to those obtained with conventional regimens (primary chemotherapy, total mastectomy, and adjuvant radiotherapy). Since IBC continues to be an entity with a dismal prognosis, this approach, safely combining preoperative or postoperative radiation therapy and systemic treatments, should be reassessed when suitable targeted agents are available.

  17. Hypofractionated whole breast radiotherapy in breast conservation for early-stage breast cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, Luca F; Agarwal, Surbhi; Bickel, Kathleen E; Herchek, Haley A; Nalepinski, David C; Kapadia, Nirav S

    2017-04-01

    Breast conservation therapy (BCT) for early-stage breast cancer involves lumpectomy followed by whole breast radiotherapy, which can involve either standard fractionation (SRT) or accelerated fractionation (ART). This systematic review and meta-analysis was performed to determine whether any benefit exists for ART or SRT. We searched MEDLINE (1966-2014), all seven databases of the Cochrane Library (1968-2014), EMBASE (1974-2014), clinicaltrials.gov, ISRCTN, WHO ICTRP, and meeting abstracts in the Web of Science Core Collection (1900-2014). RCTs comparing SRT to ART among women undergoing BCT with stage T1-T2 and/or N1 breast cancer or carcinoma in situ were included. Follow-up was 30 days for acute toxicity, or three years for disease control and late toxicity. 13 trials with 8189 participants were included. No differences were observed in local failure (n = 7 trials; RR 0.97; 95% CI 0.78-1.19, I (2) = 0%), locoregional failure, (n = 8 trials; RR 0.86; 95% CI 0.63-1.16, I (2) = 0%), or survival (n = 4 trials; RR 1.00; 95% CI 0.85-1.17, I (2) = 0%). ART was associated with significantly less acute toxicity (n = 5 trials; RR 0.36; 95% CI 0.21-0.62, I (2) = 20%), but no difference in late cosmesis (RR 0.95; 95% CI 0.81-1.12, I (2) = 54%). ART use does not reduce disease control or worsen long-term cosmetic outcome, and may decrease the risk of acute radiation toxicity as compared to SRT.

  18. Retrospective methods to estimate radiation dose at the site of breast cancer development after Hodgkin lymphoma radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola S. Russell

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: An increased risk of breast cancer following radiotherapy for Hodgkin lymphoma (HL has now been robustly established. In order to estimate the dose–response relationship more accurately, and to aid clinical decision making, a retrospective estimation of the radiation dose delivered to the site of the subsequent breast cancer is required. Methods: For 174 Dutch and 170 UK female patients with breast cancer following HL treatment, the 3-dimensional position of the breast cancer in the affected breast was determined and transferred onto a CT-based anthropomorphic phantom. Using a radiotherapy treatment planning system the dose distribution on the CT-based phantom was calculated for the 46 different radiation treatment field set-ups used in the study population. The estimated dose at the centre of the breast cancer, and a margin to reflect dose uncertainty were determined on the basis of the location of the tumour and the isodose lines from the treatment planning. We assessed inter-observer variation and for 47 patients we compared the results with a previously applied dosimetry method. Results: The estimated median point dose at the centre of the breast cancer location was 29.75 Gy (IQR 5.8–37.2, or about 75% of the prescribed radiotherapy dose. The median dose uncertainty range was 5.97 Gy. We observed an excellent inter-observer variation (ICC 0.89 (95% CI: 0.74–0.95. The absolute agreement intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC for inter-method variation was 0.59 (95% CI: 0.37–0.75, indicating (nearly good agreement. There were no systematic differences in the dose estimates between observers or methods. Conclusion: Estimates of the dose at the point of a subsequent breast cancer show good correlation between methods, but the retrospective nature of the estimates means that there is always some uncertainty to be accounted for. Keywords: Retrospective dosimetry, Hodgkin lymphoma, Breast carcinogenesis

  19. Concurrent chemo-radiotherapy following neoadjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zinser-Sierra Juan

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite broad advances in multimodal treatment of locally advanced breast cancer (LABC, 30 to 40% of patients develop loco-regional relapse. The aim of this study was to analyze in a retrospective manner the effectiveness of concurrent chemo-radiotherapy (CCRTh after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT in patients with LABC. Methods One hundred twelve patients with LABC (stage IIB-IIIB were treated with NCT (5-fluorouracil 500 mg/m2, doxorubicin 50 mg/m2, and cyclophosphamide 500 mg/m2 (FAC, or doxorubicin 50 mg/m2 and cyclophosphamide 500 mg/m2 (AC IV in four 21-day courses followed by CCRTh (60 Gy breast irradiation and weekly mitomycin 5 mg/m2, 5-fluorouracil 500 mg/m2, and dexamethasone 16 mg, or cisplatin 30 mg/m2, gemcitabine 100 mg/m2 and dexamethasone 16 mg, and 6–8 weeks later, surgery and two additional courses of FAC, AC, or paclitaxel 90 mg/m2 weekly for 12 weeks, and in case of estrogen-receptor positive patients, hormonal therapy. Results Stages IIB, IIIA and -B were 21.4, 42.9, and 35.7%, respectively. Pathological complete response (pCR in the breast was 42% (95% CI, 33.2–50.5% and, 29.5% (95% CI, 21.4–37.5% if including both the breast and the axillary nodes. Multivariate analysis showed that the main determinant of pCR was negative estrogen-receptor status (HR = 3.8; 95% CI, 1.5–9; p = 0.016. The 5-year disease-free survival (DFS was 76.9% (95% CI, 68.2–84.7%. No relationship between pCR and DFS was found. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that the main DFS determinant was clinical stage (IIB and IIIA vs. IIIB, HR = 3.1; 95% CI, 1.02–9.74; p = 0.04. Only one patient had local recurrence. Five-year overall survival was 84.2% (95% CI, 75–93.2%. The toxicity profile was acceptable. Conclusion This non-conventional multimodal treatment has good loco-regional control for LABC. Randomized clinical trials of preoperative CCRTh following chemotherapy, in patients with LABC are warranted.

  20. Radiation-induced pulmonary toxicity following adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Sung Ho; Kim, Tae Jung; Eom, Keun Young; Kim, Jee Hyun; Kim, Sung Won; Kim, Jae Sung; Kim, In Ah [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-06-15

    To evaluate the incidences and potential predictive factors for symptomatic radiation pneumonitis (SRP) and radiographic pulmonary toxicity (RPT) following adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) for patients with breast cancer. A particular focus was made to correlate RPT with the dose volume histogram (DVH) parameters based on three-dimensional RT planning (3D-RTP) data. From September 2003 through February 2006, 171 patients with breast cancer were treated with adjuvant RT following breast surgery. A radiation dose of 50.4 Gy was delivered with tangential photon fields on the whole breast or chest wall. A single anterior oblique photon field for supraclavicular (SCL) nodes was added if indicated. Serial follow-up chest radiographs were reviewed by a chest radiologist. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) toxicity criteria were used for grading SRP and a modified World Health Organization (WHO) grading system was used to evaluate RPT. The overall percentage of the ipsilateral lung volume that received {>=} 15 Gy (V{sub 15}), 20 Gy (V{sub 20}), and 30 Gy (V{sub 30}) and the mean lung dose (MLD) were calculated. We divided the ipsilateral lung into two territories, and defined separate DVH parameters, i.e., V{sub 15} {sub TNGT}, V{sub 20} {sub TNGT}, V{sub 30} {sub TNGT}, MLD {sub TNGT}, and V{sub 15} {sub SCL}, V{sub 20} {sub SCL} V {sub 30SCL}, MLD {sub SCL} to assess the relationship between these parameters and RPT. Four patients (2.1%) developed SRP (three with grade 3 and one with grade 2, respectively). There was no significant association of SRP with clinical parameters such as, age, pre-existing lung disease, smoking, chemotherapy, hormonal therapy and regional RT. When 137 patients treated with 3D-RTP were evaluated, 13.9% developed RPT in the tangent (TNGT) territory and 49.2% of 59 patients with regional RT developed RPT in the SCL territory. Regional RT ({rho} < 0.001) and age ({rho} = 0.039) was significantly correlated with RPT. All DVH parameters except for V

  1. Comparison of three instrumental methods for the objective evaluation of radiotherapy induced erythema in breast cancer patients and a study of the effect of skin lotions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nystroem, Josefina; Lindholm-Sethson, Britta [Dept. of Chemistry, Umeaa Univ ., Umeaa (Sweden); Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics, Umeaa Univ., Umeaa (Sweden); Geladi, Paul [Unit of Biomass Technology and Chemistry, SLU Roebaecksdal en, Umeaa (Sweden); Svensk, Ann-Christine; Larson, Johan; Franzen, Lars [Dept. of Oncology, N orthern Univ. Hospital, Umeaa (Sweden)

    2007-10-15

    A non-blinded three armed study of the effect of Aloe vera, Essex and no lotion on erythema was performed. The erythema is an effect of radiotherapy treatment in breast cancer patients. The study required testing of objective methods for measuring the erythema. The chosen experimental methods were Near Infrared Spectroscopy, Laser Doppler Imaging and Digital Colour Photography. The experimental setup was made in such a way that in parallel with testing the effect of the lotions there was also a test of the sensitivity of the instruments. Fifty women were selected consecutively to participate in the study. They were all subjected to treatment with high-energy electrons (9-20 MeV) after mastectomy, 2 Gy/day to a total dose of 50 Gy. Measurements were performed before the start of radiotherapy and thereafter once a week during the course of treatment. Aloe vera and Essex lotion were applied twice every radiation day in selected sites. The increase in skin redness could be monitored with all techniques with a detection limit of 8 Gy for Digital Colour Photography and Near Infrared Spectroscopy and 18 Gy for Laser Doppler Imaging. In clinical practice our recommendation is to use Digital Colour Photography. No significant median differences were observed between the pairs no lotion-Essex, no lotion-Aloe vera and Essex-Aloe vera for any of the techniques tested.

  2. Short course radiotherapy with simultaneous integrated boost for stage I-II breast cancer, early toxicities of a randomized clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background TomoBreast is a unicenter, non-blinded randomized trial comparing conventional radiotherapy (CR) vs. hypofractionated Tomotherapy (TT) for post-operative treatment of breast cancer. The purpose of the trial is to compare whether TT can reduce heart and pulmonary toxicity. We evaluate early toxicities. Methods The trial started inclusion in May 2007 and reached its recruitment in August 2011. Women with stage T1-3N0M0 or T1-2N1M0 breast cancer completely resected by tumorectomy (BCS) or by mastectomy (MA) who consented to participate were randomized, according to a prescribed computer-generated randomization schedule, between control arm of CR 25x2 Gy/5 weeks by tangential fields on breast/chest wall, plus supraclavicular-axillary field if node-positive, and sequential boost 8x2 Gy/2 weeks if BCS (cumulative dose 66 Gy/7 weeks), versus experimental TT arm of 15x2.8 Gy/3 weeks, including nodal areas if node-positive and simultaneous integrated boost of 0.6 Gy if BCS (cumulative dose 51 Gy/3 weeks). Outcomes evaluated were the pulmonary and heart function. Comparison of proportions used one-sided Fisher's exact test. Results By May 2010, 70 patients were randomized and had more than 1 year of follow-up. Out of 69 evaluable cases, 32 were assigned to CR (21 BCS, 11 MA), 37 to TT (20 BCS, 17 MA). Skin toxicity of grade ≥1 at 2 years was 60% in CR, vs. 30% in TT arm. Heart function showed no significant difference for left ventricular ejection fraction at 2 years, CR 4.8% vs. TT 4.6%. Pulmonary function tests at 2 years showed grade ≥1 decline of FEV1 in 21% of CR, vs. 15% of TT and decline of DLco in 29% of CR, vs. 7% of TT (P = 0.05). Conclusions There were no unexpected severe toxicities. Short course radiotherapy of the breast with simultaneous integrated boost over 3 weeks proved feasible without excess toxicities. Pulmonary tests showed a slight trend in favor of Tomotherapy, which will need confirmation with longer

  3. Left-sided breast cancer loco-regional radiotherapy with deep inspiration breath-hold: Does volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy reduce heart dose further compared with tangential intensity-modulated radiotherapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Trang T; Ward, Rachel; Latty, Drew; Owen, Catherine; Gebski, Val; Chojnowski, Jacek; Kelly, Christopher; Ahern, Verity; Tiver, Kenneth; Stuart, Kirsty; Wang, Wei

    2016-08-01

    Left-sided breast cancer radiotherapy has been associated with an increase in cardiac mortality. This study investigated the potential heart-sparing effect of volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT). We compared VMAT to tangential intensity-modulated radiotherapy (t-IMRT) in the loco-regional treatment of left-sided breast cancer, including internal mammary nodal irradiation, based on deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) and free-breathing (FB). Radiotherapy for 15 patients was re-planned. Four plans were compared: t-IMRT-DIBH; VMAT-DIBH; t-IMRT-FB; VMAT-FB. Prescribed dose was 50 Gy in 25 fractions. T-IMRT plans were generated using tangentially orientated fields. VMAT plans were generated using two partial arcs (average arc 190°). Mean heart dose (MHD) was 5 ± 2.4 Gy, 5.7 ± 1.4 Gy, 9.7 ± 3.3 Gy and 8.1 ± 2.0 Gy for t-IMRT-DIBH, VMAT-DIBH, IMRT-FB and VMAT-FB respectively. The difference in MHD between IMRT-DIBH and VMAT-DIBH was not significant (P = 0.14). VMAT-DIBH significantly spared the volume of heart irradiated to doses of 20 Gy and above (p 6.3 Gy with t-IMRT-DIBH, the use of VMAT-DIBH resulted in a benefit in reducing the MHD. © 2016 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  4. Postoperative radiotherapy following mastectomy for patients with left-sided breast cancer: A comparative dosimetric study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jiahao, E-mail: mashenglin@medmail.com.cn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hangzhou Cancer Hospital, Hangzhou (China); Li, Xiadong; Deng, Qinghua [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hangzhou First People' s Hospital, Hangzhou (China); Xia, Bing; Wu, Shixiu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hangzhou Cancer Hospital, Hangzhou (China); Liu, Jian [Department of Breast Surgery, Hangzhou First People' s Hospital, Hangzhou (China); Ma, Shenglin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hangzhou First People' s Hospital, Hangzhou (China)

    2015-10-01

    The purposes of this article were to compare the biophysical dosimetry for postmastectomy left-sided breast cancer using 4 different radiotherapy (RT) techniques. In total, 30 patients with left-sided breast cancer were randomly selected for this treatment planning study. They were planned using 4 RT techniques, including the following: (1) 3-dimensional conventional tangential fields (TFs), (2) tangential intensity-modulated therapy (T-IMRT), (3) 4 fields IMRT (4F-IMRT), and (4) single arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (S-VMAT). The planning target volume (PTV) dose was prescribed 50 Gy, the comparison of target dose distribution, conformity index, homogeneity index, dose to organs at risk (OARs), tumor control probability (TCP), normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), and number of monitor units (MUs) between 4 plans were investigated for their biophysical dosimetric difference. The target conformity and homogeneity of S-VMAT were better than the other 3 kinds of plans, but increased the volume of OARs receiving low dose (V{sub 5}). TCP of PTV and NTCP of the left lung showed no statistically significant difference in 4 plans. 4F-IMRT plan was superior in terms of target coverage and protection of OARs and demonstrated significant advantages in decreasing the NTCP of heart by 0.07, 0.03, and 0.05 compared with TFs, T-IMRT, and S-VMAT plan. Compared with other 3 plans, TFs reduced the average number of MUs. Of the 4 techniques studied, this analysis supports 4F-IMRT as the most appropriate balance of target coverage and normal tissue sparing.

  5. MRI sequences for the detection of individual lymph nodes in regional breast radiotherapy planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heijst, Tristan C F; van Asselen, Bram; Pijnappel, Ruud M; Cloos-van Balen, Marissa; Lagendijk, Jan J W; van den Bongard, Desirée; Philippens, Mariëlle E P

    2016-07-01

    In regional radiotherapy (RT) for patients with breast cancer, lymph node (LN) targets are delineated on CT, defined by anatomical boundaries. By identifying individual LNs, MRI-based delineations may reduce target volumes and thereby toxicity. We optimized MRI sequences for this purpose. Our aim was to evaluate the techniques for LN delineation in RT planning. Supine MRI was explored at 1.5 T in RT position (arms in abduction). 5 MRI techniques were optimized in 10 and evaluated in 12 healthy female volunteers. The scans included one T1 weighted (T1w), three T2 weighted (T2w) and a diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) technique. Quantitative evaluation was performed by scoring LN numbers per volunteer and per scan. Qualitatively, scans were assessed on seven aspects, including LN contrast, anatomical information and insensitivity to motion during acquisition. Two T2w fast spin-echo (FSE) methods showed the highest LN numbers (median 24 axillary), high contrast, excellent fat suppression and relative insensitivity to motion during acquisition. A third T2w sequence and DWI showed significantly fewer LNs (14 and 10) and proved unsuitable due to motion sensitivity and geometrical uncertainties. T1w MRI showed an intermediate number of LNs (17), provided valuable anatomical information, but lacked LN contrast. Explicit LN imaging was achieved, in supine RT position, using MRI. Two T2w FSE techniques had the highest detection rates and were motion insensitive. T1w MRI showed anatomical information. MRI enables direct delineation of individual LNs. Our optimized MRI scans enable accurate target definition in MRI-guided regional breast RT and development of personalized treatments.

  6. Effects of an 18-week exercise programme started early during breast cancer treatment : A randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Travier, Noemie; Velthuis, Miranda J.; Steins Bisschop, Charlotte N.; van den Buijs, Bram; Monninkhof, Evelyn M.; Backx, Frank; Los, Maartje; Erdkamp, Frans; Bloemendal, Haiko J.; Rodenhuis, Carla; de Roos, Marnix A. J.; Verhaar, Marlies; ten Bokkel Huinink, Daan; van der Wall, Elsken; Peeters, Petra H. M.; May, Anne M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Exercise started shortly after breast cancer diagnosis might prevent or diminish fatigue complaints. The Physical Activity during Cancer Treatment (PACT) study was designed to primarily examine the effects of an 18-week exercise intervention, offered in the daily clinical practice

  7. Meeting breast cancer patients' information needs during radiotherapy: what can we do to improve the information and support that is currently provided?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halkett, G K B; Kristjanson, L J; Lobb, E; O'Driscoll, C; Taylor, M; Spry, N

    2010-07-01

    Previous research has reported that patients require specific information relating to radiotherapy; however, these studies fail to describe patients' specific information needs over time. The aims of this study were to determine the specific information needs of breast cancer patients who are receiving radiotherapy and identify when patients prefer to receive specific information. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 34 early breast cancer patients and 14 health professionals. Seventeen patients were interviewed after treatment completion, and 17 patients were interviewed on at least two occasions during their radiotherapy. Grounded theory and the constant comparative method were used to analyse the data. Three main categories emerged from the data: 'repertoire of information', 'amount of information relating specifically to radiotherapy' and'tailoring information to match patients' radiotherapy journeys'. Patients' information needs were identified, and key messages and strategies to inform patients were described. This paper identifies breast cancer patient's specific information needs during radiotherapy and shows that patients' information needs are highest during their first appointment with their radiation oncologist and at the time of their planning appointment. The findings presented will enable health professionals to develop and refine their approaches to patient education in radiotherapy.

  8. DEGRO practical guidelines for radiotherapy of breast cancer V. Therapy for locally advanced and inflammatory breast cancer, as well as local therapy in cases with synchronous distant metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budach, Wilfried; Matuschek, Christiane; Boelke, Edwin [University Hospital, Heinrich-Heine-University Duesseldorf, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Duesseldorf (Germany); Dunst, Juergen [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Luebeck (Germany); Feyer, Petra [Vivantes Hospital Neukoelln, Berlin (Germany); Fietkau, Rainer; Sauer, Rolf [University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Harms, Wolfgang [St. Clara Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Piroth, Marc D. [Helios Hospital, Wuppertal (Germany); Sautter-Bihl, Marie-Luise [Municipal Hospital, Karlsruhe (Germany); Sedlmayer, Felix [Paracelsus Medical University Hospital, Salzburg (Austria); Wenz, Frederick [Universitaetsmedizin Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Haase, Wulf; Souchon, Rainer; Collaboration: Breast Cancer Expert Panel of the German Society of Radiation Oncology (DEGRO)

    2015-08-15

    The purpose of this work is to give practical guidelines for radiotherapy of locally advanced, inflammatory and metastatic breast cancer at first presentation. A comprehensive survey of the literature using the search phrases ''locally advanced breast cancer'', ''inflammatory breast cancer'', ''breast cancer and synchronous metastases'', ''de novo stage IV and breast cancer'', and ''metastatic breast cancer'' and ''at first presentation'' restricted to ''clinical trials'', ''randomized trials'', ''meta-analysis'', ''systematic review'', and ''guideline'' was performed and supplemented by using references of the respective publications. Based on the German interdisciplinary S3 guidelines, updated in 2012, this publication addresses indications, sequence to other therapies, target volumes, dose, and fractionation of radiotherapy. International and national guidelines are in agreement that locally advanced, at least if regarded primarily unresectable and inflammatory breast cancer should receive neoadjuvant systemic therapy first, followed by surgery and radiotherapy. If surgery is not amenable after systemic therapy, radiotherapy is the treatment of choice followed by surgery, if possible. Surgery and radiotherapy should be administered independent of response to neoadjuvant systemic treatment. In patients with a de novo diagnosis of breast cancer with synchronous distant metastases, surgery and radiotherapy result in considerably better locoregional tumor control. An improvement in survival has not been consistently proven, but may exist in subgroups of patients. Radiotherapy is an important part in the treatment of locally advanced and inflammatory breast cancer that should be given to all patients regardless to the intensity and effect of

  9. Complications of Radiotherapy after Immediate Breast Reconstruction with Implant: Risk Factors and Management - Our Institute’s Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heba G. El-Sheredy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Breast cancer is the most frequent malignant tumor in women worldwide. In recent years, defined reconstruction principles along with numerous surgical techniques with volume replacement have been published. Autologous breast reconstruction is more natural but leaves donor site morbidity. It provides the opportunity to restore the breast mound without the need for scars. This study aims to evaluate the complications of radiotherapy after immediate breast reconstruction with implants in breast cancer patients who submitted to skin sparing mastectomy and nipple sparing mastectomy by taking into consideration the risk factors and management at our institution. Methods: The current study prospectively included patients with invasive breast cancer admitted between January and June 2012 who were scheduled for skin sparing mastectomy or nipple sparing mastectomy and axillary dissection followed by immediate breast reconstruction with implant. Patients received adjuvant chemotherapy followed by conventional fractionated radiation. Complications were classified as either minor or major. The minor complications included capsular contracture (Baker 1-2, seroma, minor skin infection and skin dehiscence without exposure of the implant. Major complications included capsular contracture (Baker 3-4, severe infection and major wound dehiscence with implant exposure. Capsular contracture was scored according to the modified Baker classification. Results: The study included 38 patients. Of these, 28 had skin sparing mastectomy while 10 underwent nipple sparing mastectomy. The overall complication rate was 71%. We observed minor complications in 18 patients while 9 patients had major complications. Complications occurred with a median time of 13 months following radiotherapy completion. All minor complications were managed conservatively whereas all major complications required repeat surgery. No loco-regional recurrences occurred during the follow up

  10. A randomized control trial evaluating fluorescent ink versus dark ink tattoos for breast radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landeg, Steven J; Kirby, Anna M; Lee, Steven F; Bartlett, Freddie; Titmarsh, Kumud; Donovan, Ellen; Griffin, Clare L; Gothard, Lone; Locke, Imogen; McNair, Helen A

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this UK study was to evaluate interfraction reproducibility and body image score when using ultraviolet (UV) tattoos (not visible in ambient lighting) for external references during breast/chest wall radiotherapy and compare with conventional dark ink. In this non-blinded, single-centre, parallel group, randomized control trial, patients were allocated to receive either conventional dark ink or UV ink tattoos using computer-generated random blocks. Participant assignment was not masked. Systematic (∑) and random (σ) setup errors were determined using electronic portal images. Body image questionnaires were completed at pre-treatment, 1 month and 6 months to determine the impact of tattoo type on body image. The primary end point was to determine that UV tattoo random error (σsetup) was no less accurate than with conventional dark ink tattoos, i.e. tattoos. 45 patients completed treatment (UV: n = 23, dark: n = 22). σsetup for the UV tattoo group was tattoo group compared with the dark ink group at 1 month [56% (13/23) vs 14% (3/22), respectively] and 6 months [52% (11/21) vs 38% (8/21), respectively]. UV tattoos were associated with interfraction setup reproducibility comparable with conventional dark ink. Patients reported a more favourable change in body image score up to 6 months following treatment. Advances in knowledge: This study is the first to evaluate UV tattoo external references in a randomized control trial.

  11. SU-F-T-115: Uncertainty in the Esophagus Dose in Retrospective Epidemiological Study of Breast Cancer Radiotherapy Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosher, E; Kim, S; Lee, C [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD (United States); Lee, C [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Pelletier, C; Jung, J [Department of Physics, East Carolina University Greenville, NC (United States); Jones, E [Radiology and Imaging Sciences Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Epidemiological studies of second cancer risks in breast cancer radiotherapy patients often use generic patient anatomy to reconstruct normal tissue doses when CT images of patients are not available. To evaluate the uncertainty involved in the dosimetry approach, we evaluated the esophagus dose in five sample patients by simulating breast cancer treatments. Methods: We obtained the diagnostic CT images of five anonymized adult female patients in different Body Mass Index (BMI) categories (16– 36kg/m2) from National Institutes of Health Clinical Center. We contoured the esophagus on the CT images and imported them into a Treatment Planning System (TPS) to create treatment plans and calculate esophagus doses. Esophagus dose was calculated once again via experimentally-validated Monte Carlo (MC) transport code, XVMC under the same geometries. We compared the esophagus doses from TPS and the MC method. We also investigated the degree of variation in the esophagus dose across the five patients and also the relationship between the patient characteristics and the esophagus doses. Results: Eclipse TPS using Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm (AAA) significantly underestimates the esophagus dose in breast cancer radiotherapy compared to MC. In the worst case, the esophagus dose from AAA was only 40% of the MC dose. The Coefficient of Variation across the patients was 48%. We found that the maximum esophagus dose was up to 2.7 times greater than the minimum. We finally observed linear relationship (Dose = 0.0218 × BMI – 0.1, R2=0.54) between patient’s BMI and the esophagus doses. Conclusion: We quantified the degree of uncertainty in the esophagus dose in five sample breast radiotherapy patients. The results of the study underscore the importance of individualized dose reconstruction for the study cohort to avoid misclassification in the risk analysis of second cancer. We are currently extending the number of patients up to 30.

  12. Concurrent radiotherapy and taxane chemotherapy in patients with locoregional recurrence of breast cancer. A retrospective analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semrau, S.; Klautke, G.; Fietkau, R. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Univ. of Rostock (Germany); Gerber, B.; Reimer, T. [Dept. of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Univ. of Rostock. Suedstadt Hospital, Rostock (Germany)

    2006-10-15

    Background and purpose: locoregional breast cancer recurrence is characterized by a high rate of systemic and local re-recurrence. Data on concurrent radiochemotherapy (RCT) in these cases are scarce. The purpose of this study was to evaluate feasibility, toxicity and efficacy of local control of a radiotherapy combined with a chemotherapy containing a taxane. Patients and methods: between May 1999 and November 2004, 36 women referred to the authors' clinic because of locoregional breast cancer recurrence that was either inoperable (n = 29) or resected (n = 7) received concurrent irradiation and taxane monotherapy weekly (TAX/RT; n = 28: paclitaxel 90 mg/m{sup 2} n = 24, or docetaxel 35 mg/m{sup 2}, n = 4) or taxane + cisplatin therapy (TAX/CIS/RT; n = 8; paclitaxel 135 mg/m{sup 2} d1 and cisplatin 20 mq/m{sup 2} d1-5 q28). Results: comparing TAX/RT with TAX/CIS/RT, the complete remission rate in patients with macroscopic tumor prior to RCT was significantly higher for TAX/RT than for TAX/CIS/RT (7/19 vs. 0/8; p = 0.046), but overall remission rates were comparable, i.e., partial remission: 11/20 versus 6/8 cases, stable disease (no change): 1/20 versus 2/8 cases, and response rate: 95% versus 75%, respectively. The cumulative local recurrence-free survival rate at 1 and 2 years post-treatment was 83% and 68% and that of systemic recurrence-free survival 56% and 29%, respectively. The main toxic reactions of third-degree and higher were dermatitis in TAX/RT (57% vs. 11% for TAX/CIS/RT) and leukocytopenia in TAX/CIS/RT (62% vs. 7% for TAX/RT). Conclusion: concurrent irradiation and taxane chemotherapy weekly, in particular with paclitaxel, is recommended due to response and acceptable side effects for treatment of inoperable locoregional breast cancer recurrence. (orig.)

  13. Association between access to accelerated partial breast irradiation and use of adjuvant radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Elyn H; Park, Henry S; Rutter, Charles E; Gross, Cary P; Soulos, Pamela R; Yu, James B; Evans, Suzanne B

    2017-02-01

    The current study was performed to determine whether access to facilities performing accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) is associated with differences in the use of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT). Using the National Cancer Data Base, the authors performed a retrospective study of women aged ≥50 years who were diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer between 2004 and 2013 and treated with breast-conserving surgery (BCS). Facilities performing APBI in ≥10% of their eligible patients within a given year were defined as APBI facilities whereas those not performing APBI were defined as non-APBI facilities. All other facilities were excluded. The authors identified independent factors associated with RT use using multivariable logistic regression with clustering in the overall sample as well as in subsets of patients with standard-risk invasive cancer, low-risk invasive cancer, and ductal carcinoma in situ. Among 222,544 patients, 76.6% underwent BCS plus RT and 23.4% underwent BCS alone. The likelihood of RT receipt in the overall sample did not appear to differ significantly between APBI and non-APBI facilities (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 1.02; P = .61). Subgroup multivariable analysis demonstrated that among patients with standard-risk invasive cancer, there was no association between evaluation at an APBI facility and receipt of RT (AOR, 0.98; P = .69). However, patients with low-risk invasive cancer were found to be significantly more likely to receive RT (54.4% vs 59.5%; AOR, 1.22 [P<.001]), whereas patients with ductal carcinoma in situ were less likely to receive RT (56.9% vs 55.3%; AOR, 0.89 [P = .04]) at APBI facilities. Patients who were eligible for observation were more likely to receive RT in APBI facilities but no difference was observed among patients with standard-risk invasive cancer who would most benefit from RT. Cancer 2017;123:502-511. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  14. The expression level of HJURP has an independent prognostic impact and predicts the sensitivity to radiotherapy in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Zhi; Huang, Ge; Sadanandam, Anguraj; Gu, Shenda; Lenburg, Marc E; Pai, Melody; Bayani, Nora; Blakely, Eleanor A; Gray, Joe W; Mao, Jian-Hua

    2010-06-25

    Introduction: HJURP (Holliday Junction Recognition Protein) is a newly discovered gene reported to function at centromeres and to interact with CENPA. However its role in tumor development remains largely unknown. The goal of this study was to investigate the clinical significance of HJURP in breast cancer and its correlation with radiotherapeutic outcome. Methods: We measured HJURP expression level in human breast cancer cell lines and primary breast cancers by Western blot and/or by Affymetrix Microarray; and determined its associations with clinical variables using standard statistical methods. Validation was performed with the use of published microarray data. We assessed cell growth and apoptosis of breast cancer cells after radiation using high-content image analysis. Results: HJURP was expressed at higher level in breast cancer than in normal breast tissue. HJURP mRNA levels were significantly associated with estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), Scarff-Bloom-Richardson (SBR) grade, age and Ki67 proliferation indices, but not with pathologic stage, ERBB2, tumor size, or lymph node status. Higher HJURP mRNA levels significantly decreased disease-free and overall survival. HJURP mRNA levels predicted the prognosis better than Ki67 proliferation indices. In a multivariate Cox proportional-hazard regression, including clinical variables as covariates, HJURP mRNA levels remained an independent prognostic factor for disease-free and overall survival. In addition HJURP mRNA levels were an independent prognostic factor over molecular subtypes (normal like, luminal, Erbb2 and basal). Poor clinical outcomes among patients with high HJURP expression werevalidated in five additional breast cancer cohorts. Furthermore, the patients with high HJURP levels were much more sensitive to radiotherapy. In vitro studies in breast cancer cell lines showed that cells with high HJURP levels were more sensitive to radiation treatment and had a higher rate of apoptosis

  15. Better compliance with hypofractionation vs. conventional fractionation in adjuvant breast cancer radiotherapy. Results of a single, institutional, retrospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudat, Volker; Nour, Alaa; Hammoud, Mohamed; Abou Ghaida, Salam [Saad Specialist Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Al Khobar (Saudi Arabia)

    2017-05-15

    The aim of the study was to identify factors significantly associated with the occurrence of unintended treatment interruptions in adjuvant breast cancer radiotherapy. Patients treated with postoperative radiotherapy of the breast or chest wall between March 2014 and August 2016 were evaluated. The radiotherapy regimens and techniques applied were either conventional fractionation (CF; 28 daily fractions of 1.8 Gy or 25 fractions of 2.0 Gy) or hypofractionation (HF; 15 daily fractions of 2.67 Gy) with inverse planned intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or three-dimensional planned conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). Logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with noncompliance. Noncompliance was defined as the missing of at least one scheduled radiotherapy fraction. In all, 19 of 140 (13.6%) patients treated with HF and 39 of 146 (26.7%) treated with CF experienced treatment interruptions. Of 23 factors tested, the fractionation regimen emerged as the only independent significant prognostic factor for noncompliance on multivariate analysis (CF; p = 0.007; odds ratio, 2.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-4.2). No statistically significant differences concerning the reasons for treatment interruptions could be detected between patients treated with CF or HF. HF is significantly associated with a better patient compliance with the prescribed radiotherapy schedule compared with CF. The data suggest that this finding is basically related to the shorter overall treatment time of HF. (orig.) [German] Ziel der Untersuchung war es, Faktoren zu identifizieren, die mit ungeplanten Behandlungsunterbrechungen bei der adjuvanten Strahlentherapie des Mammakarzinoms assoziiert sind. Es wurden Patienten untersucht, die eine adjuvante Strahlentherapie der Mamma oder Brustwand zwischen Maerz 2014 und August 2016 erhielten. Zur Anwendung kamen als Fraktionierungsprotokoll und strahlentherapeutische Technik eine konventionell fraktionierte (CF; 28 Fraktionen mit

  16. Effect of radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery on 10-year recurrence and 15-year breast cancer death: meta-analysis of individual patient data for 10,801 women in 17 randomised trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Darby, S.; McGale, P.; Correa, C.; Taylor, C.; Arriagada, R.; Clarke, M.; Cutter, D.; Davies, C.; Ewertz, M.; Godwin, J.; Gray, R.; Pierce, L.; Whelan, T.; Wang, Y.; Peto, R.; Albain, K.; Anderson, S.; Barlow, W.; Bergh, J.; Bliss, J.; Buyse, M.; Cameron, D.; Carrasco, E.; Coates, A.; Collins, R.; Costantino, J.; Cuzick, J.; Davidson, N.; Davies, K.; Delmestri, A.; Di Leo, A.; Dowsett, M.; Elphinstone, P.; Evans, V.; Gelber, R.; Gettins, L.; Geyer, C.; Goldhirsch, A.; Gregory, C.; Hayes, D.; Hill, C.; Ingle, J.; Jakesz, R.; James, S.; Kaufmann, M.; Kerr, A.; MacKinnon, E.; McHugh, T.; Norton, L.; Ohashi, Y.; Paik, S.; Pan, H. C.; Perez, E.; Piccart, M.; Pritchard, K.; Pruneri, G.; Raina, V.; Ravdin, P.; Robertson, J.; Rutgers, E.; Shao, Y. F.; Swain, S.; Valagussa, P.; Viale, G.; Winer, E.; Wood, W.; Abe, O.; Abe, R.; Enomoto, K.; Kikuchi, K.; Koyama, H.; Masuda, H.; Nomura, Y.; Sakai, K.; Sugimachi, K.; Toi, M.; Tominaga, T.; Uchino, J.; Yoshida, M.; Haybittle, J. L.; Leonard, C. F.; Calais, G.; Geraud, P.; Collett, V.; Sayer, J.; Harvey, V. J.; Holdaway, I. M.; Kay, R. G.; Mason, B. H.; Forbes, J. F.; Wilcken, N.; Bartsch, R.; Dubsky, P.; Fesl, C.; Fohler, H.; Gnant, M.; Greil, R.; Lang, A.; Luschin-Ebengreuth, G.; Marth, C.; Mlineritsch, B.; Samonigg, H.; Singer, C. F.; Steger, G. G.; Stöger, H.; Canney, P.; Yosef, H. M. A.; Focan, C.; Peek, U.; Oates, G. D.; Powell, J.; Durand, M.; Mauriac, L.; Dolci, S.; Larsimont, D.; Nogaret, J. M.; Philippson, C.; Piccart, M. J.; Masood, M. B.; Parker, D.; Price, J. J.; Lindsay, M. A.; Mackey, J.; Martin, M.; Hupperets, P. S. G. J.; Bates, T.; Blamey, R. W.; Chetty, U.; Ellis, I. O.; Mallon, E.; Morgan, D. A. L.; Patnick, J.; Pinder, S.; Olivotto, I.; Ragaz, J.; Berry, D.; Broadwater, G.; Cirrincione, C.; Muss, H.; Weiss, R. B.; Abu-Zahra, H. T.; Portnoj, S. M.; Bowden, S.; Brookes, C.; Dunn, J.; Fernando, I.; Lee, M.; Poole, C.; Rea, D.; Spooner, D.; Barrett-Lee, P. J.; Mansel, R. E.; Monypenny, I. J.; Gordon, N. H.; Davis, H. L.; Lehingue, Y.; Romestaing, P.; Dubois, J. B.; Delozier, T.; Griffon, B.; Mace Lesec'h, J.; Rambert, P.; Mustacchi, G.; Petruzelka, A. N.; Pribylova, O.; Owen, J. R.; Harbeck, N.; Jänicke, F.; Meisner, C.; Schmitt, M.; Thomssen, C.; Meier, P.; Shan, Y.; Wang, X.; Zhao, D. B.; Chen, Z. M.; Howell, A.; Swindell, R.; Burrett, J. A.; Hermans, D.; Hicks, C.; Lay, M.; Albano, J.; de Oliveira, C. F.; Gervásio, H.; Gordilho, J.; Johansen, H.; Mouridsen, H. T.; Gelman, R. S.; Harris, J. R.; Henderson, C.; Shapiro, C. L.; Christiansen, P.; Ejlertsen, B.; Jensen, M.-B.; Møller, S.; Carstensen, B.; Palshof, T.; Trampisch, H. J.; Dalesio, O.; de Vries, E. G. E.; Rodenhuis, S.; van Tinteren, H.; Comis, R. L.; Davidson, N. E.; Robert, N.; Sledge, G.; Solin, L. J.; Sparano, J. A.; Tormey, D. C.; Dixon, J. M.; Forrest, P.; Jack, W.; Kunkler, I.; Rossbach, J.; Klijn, J. G. M.; Treurniet-Donker, A. D.; van Putten, W. L. J.; Rotmensz, N.; Veronesi, U.; Bartelink, H.; Bijker, N.; Bogaerts, J.; Cardoso, F.; Cufer, T.; Julien, J. P.; van de Velde, C. J. H.; Cunningham, M. P.; Huovinen, R.; Joensuu, H.; Costa, A.; Tinterri, C.; Bonadonna, G.; Gianni, L.; Goldstein, L. J.; Bonneterre, J.; Fargeot, P.; Fumoleau, P.; Kerbrat, P.; Luporsi, E.; Namer, M.; Eiermann, W.; Hilfrich, J.; Jonat, W.; Kreienberg, R.; Schumacher, M.; Bastert, G.; Rauschecker, H.; Sauer, R.; Sauerbrei, W.; Schauer, A.; Blohmer, J. U.; Costa, S. D.; Eidtmann, H.; Gerber, G.; Jackisch, C.; Loibl, S.; von Minckwitz, G.; de Schryver, A.; Vakaet, L.; Belfiglio, M.; Nicolucci, A.; Pellegrini, F.; Pirozzoli, M. C.; Sacco, M.; Valentini, M.; McArdle, C. S.; Smith, D. C.; Stallard, S.; Dent, D. M.; Gudgeon, C. A.; Hacking, A.; Murray, E.; Panieri, E.; Werner, I. D.; Segui, M. A.; Galligioni, E.; Lopez, M.; Erazo, A.; Medina, J. Y.; Horiguchi, J.; Takei, H.; Fentiman, I. S.; Hayward, J. L.; Rubens, R. D.; Skilton, D.; Scheurlen, H.; Sohn, H. C.; Untch, M.; Dafni, U.; Markopoulos, C.; Dafni, D.; Fountzilas, G.; Mavroudis, D.; Klefstrom, P.; Saarto, T.; Gallen, M.; Margreiter, R.; de Lafontan, B.; Mihura, J.; Roché, H.; Asselain, B.; Salmon, R. J.; Vilcoq, J. R.; Bourgier, C.; Koscielny, S.; Laplanche, A.; Lê, M. G.; Spielmann, M.; A'Hern, R.; Ellis, P.; Kilburn, L.; Yarnold, J. R.; Benraadt, J.; Kooi, M.; van de Velde, A. O.; van Dongen, J. A.; Vermorken, J. B.; Castiglione, M.; Colleoni, M.; Collins, J.; Forbes, J.; Gelber, R. D.; Lindtner, J.; Price, K. N.; Regan, M. M.; Rudenstam, C. M.; Senn, H. J.; Thuerlimann, B.; Bliss, J. M.; Chilvers, C. E. D.; Coombes, R. C.; Hall, E.; Marty, M.; Possinger, K.; Schmid, P.; Wallwiener, D.; Foster, L.; George, W. D.; Stewart, H. J.; Stroner, P.; Borovik, R.; Hayat, H.; Inbar, M. J.; Robinson, E.; Bruzzi, P.; del Mastro, L.; Pronzato, P.; Sertoli, M. R.; Venturini, M.; Camerini, T.; de Palo, G.; Di Mauro, M. G.; Formelli, F.; Amadori, D.; Martoni, A.; Pannuti, F.; Camisa, R.; Cocconi, G.; Colozza, A.; Passalacqua, R.; Aogi, K.; Takashima, S.; Ikeda, T.; Inokuchi, K.; Sawa, K.; Sonoo, H.; Korzeniowski, S.; Skolyszewski, J.; Ogawa, M.; Yamashita, J.; Bastiaannet, E.; van de Water, W.; van Nes, J. G. H.; Christiaens, R.; Neven, P.; Paridaens, R.; van den Bogaert, W.; Braun, S.; Janni, W.; Martin, P.; Romain, S.; Janauer, M.; Seifert, M.; Sevelda, P.; Zielinski, C. C.; Hakes, T.; Hudis, C. A.; Wittes, R.; Giokas, G.; Kondylis, D.; Lissaios, B.; de la Huerta, R.; Sainz, M. G.; Altemus, R.; Camphausen, K.; Cowan, K.; Danforth, D.; Lichter, A.; Lippman, M.; O'Shaughnessy, J.; Pierce, L. J.; Steinberg, S.; Venzon, D.; Zujewski, J. A.; D'Amico, C.; Lioce, M.; Paradiso, A.; Chapman, J.-A. W.; Gelmon, K.; Goss, P. E.; Levine, M. N.; Meyer, R.; Parulekar, W.; Pater, J. L.; Pritchard, K. I.; Shepherd, L. E.; Tu, D.; Ohno, S.; Anderson, A.; Bass, G.; Brown, A.; Bryant, J.; Dignam, J.; Fisher, B.; Mamounas, E. P.; Redmond, C.; Wickerham, L.; Wolmark, N.; Baum, M.; Jackson, I. M.; Palmer, M. K.; Ingle, J. N.; Suman, V. J.; Bengtsson, N. O.; Emdin, S.; Jonsson, H.; Lythgoe, J. P.; Kissin, M.; Erikstein, B.; Hannisdal, E.; Jacobsen, A. B.; Varhaug, J. E.; Gundersen, S.; Hauer-Jensen, M.; Høst, H.; Nissen-Meyer, R.; Mitchell, A. K.; Robertson, J. F. R.; Ueo, H.; Di Palma, M.; Mathé, G.; Misset, J. L.; Levine, M.; Morimoto, K.; Takatsuka, Y.; Crossley, E.; Harris, A.; Talbot, D.; Taylor, M.; Martin, A. L.; di Blasio, B.; Ivanov, V.; Paltuev, R.; Semiglazov, V.; Brockschmidt, J.; Cooper, M. R.; Falkson, C. I.; Ashley, S.; Makris, A.; Powles, T. J.; Smith, I. E.; Gazet, J. C.; Browne, L.; Graham, P.; Corcoran, N.; Deshpande, N.; di Martino, L.; Douglas, P.; Lindtner, A.; Notter, G.; Bryant, A. J. S.; Ewing, G. H.; Firth, L. A.; Krushen-Kosloski, J. L.; Anderson, H.; Killander, F.; Malmström, P.; Rydén, L.; Arnesson, L.-G.; Carstensen, J.; Dufmats, M.; Fohlin, H.; Nordenskjöld, B.; Söderberg, M.; Carpenter, J. T.; Murray, N.; Royle, G. T.; Simmonds, P. D.; Crowley, J.; Gralow, J.; Green, S.; Hortobagyi, G.; Livingston, R.; Martino, S.; Osborne, C. K.; Adolfsson, J.; Bondesson, T.; Celebioglu, F.; Dahlberg, K.; Fornander, T.; Fredriksson, I.; Frisell, J.; Göransson, E.; Iiristo, M.; Johansson, U.; Lenner, E.; Löfgren, L.; Nikolaidis, P.; Perbeck, L.; Rotstein, S.; Sandelin, K.; Skoog, L.; Svane, G.; af Trampe, E.; Wadström, C.; Maibach, R.; Thürlimann, B.; Hakama, M.; Holli, K.; Isola, J.; Rouhento, K.; Saaristo, R.; Brenner, H.; Hercbergs, A.; Yoshimoto, M.; Paterson, A. H. G.; Fyles, A.; Meakin, J. W.; Panzarella, T.; Bahi, J.; Reid, M.; Spittle, M.; Bishop, H.; Bundred, N. J.; Forsyth, S.; Pinder, S. E.; Sestak, I.; Deutsch, G. P.; Kwong, D. L. W.; Pai, V. R.; Senanayake, F.; Boccardo, F.; Rubagotti, A.; Hackshaw, A.; Houghton, J.; Ledermann, J.; Monson, K.; Tobias, J. S.; Carlomagno, C.; de Laurentiis, M.; de Placido, S.; Williams, L.; Broglio, K.; Buzdar, A. U.; Love, R. R.; Ahlgren, J.; Garmo, H.; Holmberg, L.; Liljegren, G.; Lindman, H.; Wärnberg, F.; Asmar, L.; Jones, S. E.; Gluz, O.; Liedtke, C.; Nitz, U.; Litton, A.; Wallgren, A.; Karlsson, P.; Linderholm, B. K.; Chlebowski, R. T.; Caffier, H.

    2011-01-01

    After breast-conserving surgery, radiotherapy reduces recurrence and breast cancer death, but it may do so more for some groups of women than for others. We describe the absolute magnitude of these reductions according to various prognostic and other patient characteristics, and relate the absolute

  17. Effect of radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery on 10-year recurrence and 15-year breast cancer death: meta-analysis of individual patient data for 10,801 women in 17 randomised trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darby, S; McGale, P; Correa, C

    2011-01-01

    After breast-conserving surgery, radiotherapy reduces recurrence and breast cancer death, but it may do so more for some groups of women than for others. We describe the absolute magnitude of these reductions according to various prognostic and other patient characteristics, and relate the absolute...

  18. Impact of different breathing conditions on the dose to surrounding normal structures in tangential field breast radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhakar Ramachandran

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac toxicity is an important concern in tangential field breast radiotherapy. In this study, the impact of three different breathing conditions on the dose to surrounding normal structures such as heart, ipsilateral lung, liver and contralateral breast has been assessed. Thirteen patients with early breast cancer who underwent conservative surgery (nine left-sided and four right-sided breast cancer patients were selected in this study. Spiral CT scans were performed for all the three breathing conditions, viz., deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH, normal breathing phase (NB and deep expiration breath-hold (DEBH. Conventional tangential fields were placed on the 3D-CT dataset, and the parameters such as V30 (volume covered by dose> 30 Gy for heart, V20 (volume covered by dose> 20 Gy for ipsilateral lung and V50 (volume receiving> 50% of the prescription dose for heart and liver were studied. The average reduction in cardiac dose due to DIBH was 64% (range: 26.5-100% and 74% (range: 37-100% as compared to NB and DEBH respectively. For right breast cancer, DIBH resulted in excellent liver sparing. Our results indicate that in patients with breast cancer, delivering radiation in deep inspiration breath-hold condition can considerably reduce the dose to the surrounding normal structures, particularly heart and liver.

  19. Impact of different breathing conditions on the dose to surrounding normal structures in tangential field breast radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakar, Ramachandran; Tharmar, Ganesh; Julka, Pramod K; Rath, Goura K; Joshi, Rakesh C; Bansal, Anil K; Bisht, R K; Gopishankar, N; Pant, G S; Thulkar, S

    2007-01-01

    Cardiac toxicity is an important concern in tangential field breast radiotherapy. In this study, the impact of three different breathing conditions on the dose to surrounding normal structures such as heart, ipsilateral lung, liver and contralateral breast has been assessed. Thirteen patients with early breast cancer who underwent conservative surgery (nine left-sided and four right-sided breast cancer patients) were selected in this study. Spiral CT scans were performed for all the three breathing conditions, viz., deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH), normal breathing phase (NB) and deep expiration breath-hold (DEBH). Conventional tangential fields were placed on the 3D-CT dataset, and the parameters such as V30 (volume covered by dose >30 Gy) for heart, V20 (volume covered by dose >20 Gy) for ipsilateral lung and V(50) (volume receiving >50% of the prescription dose) for heart and liver were studied. The average reduction in cardiac dose due to DIBH was 64% (range: 26.5-100%) and 74% (range: 37-100%) as compared to NB and DEBH respectively. For right breast cancer, DIBH resulted in excellent liver sparing. Our results indicate that in patients with breast cancer, delivering radiation in deep inspiration breath-hold condition can considerably reduce the dose to the surrounding normal structures, particularly heart and liver.

  20. Prolonged impact of chemotherapy on fatigue in breast cancer survivors: a longitudinal comparison with radiotherapy-treated breast cancer survivors and noncancer controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goedendorp, Martine M; Andrykowski, Michael A; Donovan, Kristine A; Jim, Heather S; Phillips, Kristin M; Small, Brent J; Laronga, Christine; Jacobsen, Paul B

    2012-08-01

    In this study, the authors examined the influence of prior treatment on the course of fatigue in breast cancer survivors. Patients who received chemotherapy were expected to have greater fatigue than patients who received radiotherapy and noncancer controls 6 months after the completion of treatment, but they were expected to recover to levels similar to those of the other 2 groups 3 years later. Patients with stage 0 through II breast cancer completed the Fatigue Symptom Inventory (FSI) and the Profile of Mood States Fatigue Scale (POMS-FAT) 6 months (T1) and 42 months (T2) after completing chemotherapy with or without radiotherapy (the CT group; n = 103) or radiotherapy only (the RT group; n = 102). An age-matched group of women with no history of cancer (the NC group; n = 193) was assessed over a similar interval. A significant (P = .041) group × time effect for FSI severity scores revealed that fatigue worsened over time in the CT group but remained stable and lower in the RT and NC groups. There also were significant group effects for FSI days (P < .001) and POMS-FAT (P = .010) scores, indicating that fatigue was significantly greater across time in the CT group than in the NC group (POMS-FAT) or the RT and NC groups (FSI days). Contrary to expectations, fatigue did not diminish over time in patients with breast cancer who received chemotherapy. This finding has important implications for patient education and for fatigue monitoring during follow-up. The authors concluded that future research should seek to examine possible mechanisms to explain the apparent prolonged impact of chemotherapy on fatigue in breast cancer survivors. Copyright © 2011 American Cancer Society.

  1. Late radiation side effects, cosmetic outcomes and pain in breast cancer patients after breast-conserving surgery and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy : Risk-modifying factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hille-Betz, Ursula; Vaske, Bernhard; Bremer, Michael; Soergel, Philipp; Kundu, Sudip; Klapdor, Rüdiger; Hillemanns, Peter; Henkenberens, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to identify parameters influencing the risk of late radiation side effects, fair or poor cosmetic outcomes (COs) and pain in breast cancer patients after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Between 2006 and 2013, 159 patients were treated at the Hannover Medical School. Physician-rated toxicity according to the LENT-SOMA criteria, CO and pain were assessed by multivariate analysis. LENT-SOMA grade 1-4 toxicity was observed as follows: fibrosis 10.7 %, telangiectasia 1.2 %, arm oedema 8.8 % and breast oedema 5.0 %. In addition, 15.1 % of patients reported moderate or severe breast pain, and 21.4 % complained about moderate or severe pain in the arm or shoulder. In multivariate analysis, axillary clearing (AC) was significantly associated with lymphoedema of the arm [odds ratio (OR) 4.37, p = 0.011, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.4-13.58]. Breast oedema was also highly associated with AC (OR 10.59, p = 0.004, 95 % CI 2.1-53.36), a ptosis grade 2/3 or pseudoptosis and a bra size ≥ cup C (OR 5.34, p = 0.029, 95 % CI 1.2-24.12). A ptosis grade 2/3 or pseudoptosis and a bra size ≥ cup C were the parameters significantly associated with an unfavourable CO (OR 3.19, p = 0.019, 95 % CI 1.2-8.4). Concerning chronic breast pain, we found a trend related to the prescribed radiation dose including boost (OR 1.077, p = 0.060, 95 % CI 0.997-1.164). Chronic shoulder or arm pain was statistically significantly associated with lymphoedema of the arm (OR 3.9, p = 0.027, 95 % CI 1.17-13.5). Chronic arm and breast oedema were significantly influenced by the extent of surgery (AC). Ptotic and large breasts were significantly associated with unfavourable COs and chronic breast oedema. Late toxicities exclusive breast pain were not associated with radiotherapy parameters.

  2. A pilot study to investigate the role of the 26S proteasome in radiotherapy resistance and loco-regional recurrence following breast conserving therapy for early breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfadl, Dalia; Hodgkinson, Victoria C; Long, Ervine D; Scaife, Lucy; Drew, Philip J; Lind, Michael J; Cawkwell, Lynn

    2011-08-01

    Breast conserving therapy is a currently accepted method for managing patients with early stage breast cancer. However, approximately 7% of patients may develop loco-regional tumour recurrence within 5 years. We previously reported that expression of the 26S proteasome may be associated with radio-resistance. Here we aimed to analyse the 26S proteasome in a pilot series of early breast cancers and correlate the findings with loco-regional recurrence. Fourteen patients with early breast cancer who developed loco-regional recurrence within 4 years of completing breast conserving therapy were selected according to strict criteria and compared with those from 14 patients who were disease-free at 10 years. Decreased expression of the 26S proteasome was significantly associated with radio-resistance, manifested as the development of a loco-regional recurrence within 4 years of breast conserving therapy (p = 0.018). This small pilot study provides further suggestion that the 26S proteasome may be associated with response to radiotherapy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Random start ovarian stimulation for fertility preservation appears unlikely to delay initiation of neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letourneau, Joseph M; Sinha, Nikita; Wald, Kaitlyn; Harris, Eve; Quinn, Molly; Imbar, Tal; Mok-Lin, Evelyn; Chien, A Jo; Rosen, Mitchell

    2017-10-01

    Is random start ovarian stimulation associated with delays in initiation of neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer? Among women who complete fertility preservation (FP) consultation, random start ovarian stimulation is unlikely to delay time to initiation of neoadjuvant chemotherapy start. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy is now a widely accepted treatment modality for operable breast cancer and random start ovarian stimulation is an increasingly-utilized modality for FP. While conventional ovarian stimulation does not appear to delay starting adjuvant chemotherapy, the relationship between random start ovarian stimulation and neoadjuvant chemotherapy start is not well-understood. Cross-sectional study of all women seen between from January 2011 to April 2017 for FP consultation prior to starting neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer. A chart-review was performed. Study inclusion criteria were female sex; age 18-45; non-metastatic breast cancer diagnosis; underwent FP consultation; underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Referrals for FP evaluation came from a regional referral base of oncology clinics. Various time-points related to cancer diagnosis, FP or chemotherapy were obtained from medical record review. We compared time-points between those who underwent ovarian stimulation for FP versus those who did not using T-tests and linear modeling. A total of 89 women who had FP consultation prior to neoadjuvant chemotherapy were identified. Sixty-seven percent underwent ovarian stimulation prior to cancer treatment and 33% did not. Women who underwent ovarian stimulation were similar in parity and clinical cancer stage to those who did not. Overall, the average time from cancer diagnosis to chemotherapy start was similar between the group that did undergo ovarian stimulation and those who did not (38.1 ± 11.3 versus 39.4 ± 18.5 days, P = 0.672). Those that underwent ovarian stimulation were referred 9.4 ± 6.8 days after diagnosis versus 17.9 ± 15.3 days for those

  4. TARGIT-E(lderly—Prospective phase II study of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT in elderly patients with small breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neumaier Christian

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients ≥ 70 years with small, low-risk breast cancer who are operated but not irradiated how local relapse rates around 4% after 4 years. With adjuvant whole breast radiotherapy (WBRT the local relapse rate drops to 1% after 4 years under Tamoxifen. It has been demonstrated that the efficacy of radiotherapy of the tumor bed only in a selected group can be non-inferior to WBRT. Methods/Design This prospective, multicentric single arm phase II study is based on the protocol of the international TARGIT-A study. The TARGIT-E study should confirm the efficacy of a single dose of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT in a well selected group of elderly patients with small breast cancer and absence of risk factors. Patients will receive IORT (20 Gy with Intrabeam system/Carl Zeiss during breast conserving surgery. In presence of risk factors postoperative WBRT will be added to complete the radiotherapeutic treatment according to international guidelines. Endpoints are the local relapse rate (within 2 cm of the tumor bed, ipsilateral in breast relapse, cancer-specific and overall survival and contralateral breast cancer as well as documentation of quality of life and cosmetic outcome. The expected local relapse rates are 0.5/1/1.5% after 2.5/5/7.5 years, respectively. Discontinuation of the trial is scheduled if rates of local relapse rates rise to 3/4/6% after 2.5/5/7.5 years. Power calculations result in 540 patients with a calculated dropout rate of 20% and loss to follow-up of 20%, an alpha of 0.01 and a beta 0.05. There will be a pre- and a post-pathology stratum (n = 270 each. Discussion It is a pragmatic trial in which each participating centre has the option to modify entry criteria and criteria for WBRT according to this core protocol after consultation with the steering committee and local ethics committee (e.g. size, free margins. Only centers with access to the Intrabeam system (Carl Zeiss can

  5. Radiation-induced squamous cell carcinoma of the chest wall seven years after adjuvant radiotherapy following the surgery of breast cancer. A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokota, Tohru; Roppongi, Takashi; Kanno, Keiichi; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki; Sakamoto, Ichiro; Fujii, Takanao [Numata National Hospital, Shibukawa, Gunma (Japan)

    2000-12-01

    A 54-year-old woman, who had underwent an adjuvant radiotherapy following the modified radical mastectomy in the left primary breast cancer in June 1988. She underwent second surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy (electronic radiotherapy) for recurrent breast cancer in the major pectoral muscle and received chemoimmunotherapy in May 1989. In May 1996 she complained of two ulcers of the chest wall. The ulcer biopsy findings was squamous cell carcinoma, and we diagnosed she fell the radiation-induced skin cancer. She underwent chest wall resection and reconstruction with vertical rectal abdominal musculocutaneous flap (V-RAM). However two months later her chest wall resection, she again got the recurrent squamous cell carcinoma in the right axillary lymph nodes and left pleura. The third radiotherapy and the chemotherapy with pepleomycin were uneffective on her recurrent cancer. And she died in March 1997. (author)

  6. Carbonic anhydrase IX and response to postmastectomy radiotherapy in high-risk breast cancer: a subgroup analysis of the DBCG82 b and c trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyndi, M.; Sorensen, F.B.; Alsner, J.

    2008-01-01

    studies included 3,083 high-risk Danish breast cancer patients. The women were randomly assigned to postmastectomy radiotherapy plus systemic therapy (cyclophosfamide, methotrexate and fluorouracil in premenopausal women; and tamoxifen in postmenopausal women) or to systemic therapy alone. Cores from......Introduction A significant survival improvement after postmastectomy radiotherapy was identified in the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group (DBCG82) b and c studies and in the British Columbia Randomized Radiation Trial. Recently, potential predictive value regarding response to postmastectomy...... radiotherapy was reported for carbonic anhydrase (CA) IX in a study (reported in abstract form) that included 160 patients. The purpose of the present study was to examine the importance of CA IX to response to postmastectomy radiotherapy in the larger scaled DBCG82 b and c studies. Methods The DBCG82 b and c...

  7. Carbonic anhydrase IX and response to postmastectomy radiotherapy in high-risk breast cancer: a subgroup analysis of the DBCG82 b and c trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyndi, Marianne; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Knudsen, Helle

    2008-01-01

    studies included 3,083 high-risk Danish breast cancer patients. The women were randomly assigned to postmastectomy radiotherapy plus systemic therapy (cyclophosfamide, methotrexate and fluorouracil in premenopausal women; and tamoxifen in postmenopausal women) or to systemic therapy alone. Cores from......INTRODUCTION: A significant survival improvement after postmastectomy radiotherapy was identified in the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group (DBCG82) b and c studies and in the British Columbia Randomized Radiation Trial. Recently, potential predictive value regarding response to postmastectomy...... radiotherapy was reported for carbonic anhydrase (CA) IX in a study (reported in abstract form) that included 160 patients. The purpose of the present study was to examine the importance of CA IX to response to postmastectomy radiotherapy in the larger scaled DBCG82 b and c studies. METHODS: The DBCG82 b and c...

  8. [Intra-arterial regional chemotherapy and intensive loco-regional radiotherapy in the treatment of locally advanced cancer of the breast].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolato, A

    1990-09-01

    A multimodal treatment combining intra-arterial chemotherapy and intensive loco-regional radiotherapy was administered to 55 patients with locally advanced breast cancer. Adjuvant polychemotherapy followed, and eventually endocrino-therapy. Combined intra-arterial chemotherapy and intensive radiotherapy gave excellent results in both primary and lymph node lesions, with 90.9% and 92.2% complete/partial response rates. Three-year and 5-year actuarial survival rates were 69% and 59%, respectively. Patients showing better local responses to combined intra-arterial chemotherapy and intensive radiotherapy had longer survival and less frequent local recurrences. Combined intra-arterial chemotherapy and intensive loco-regional radiotherapy seems to be an effective modality for the treatment of locally advanced breast cancer.

  9. Risk of second non-breast cancer among patients treated with and without postoperative radiotherapy for primary breast cancer: A systematic review and meta-analysis of population-based studies including 522,739 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grantzau, Trine; Overgaard, Jens

    2016-01-01

    -irradiated patients had no increased risk of second lung or esophagus cancer, neither overall nor over time. For non-irradiated patients' risk of second thyroid cancer (SIR 1.21) and sarcomas (SIR 1.42) were increased overall, but with no remaining risk ⩾10 after breast cancer. CONCLUSION: Radiotherapy for breast......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Radiotherapy plays an essential role in early breast cancer treatment, but is also associated with an increased risk of second malignancies decades after the exposure. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We systematically searched the data-bases Medline/Pubmed, Cochrane, Embase......, and Cinahl, for cohort studies estimating the risk of second non-breast cancer after primary breast cancer. Every included study was to report the standardized incidence ratio [SIR] of second cancers, comparing the risk among either irradiated or unirradiated female breast cancer patients to the risk...

  10. Intractable radiation pericarditis and pleuritis developed 20 years after postoperative radiotherapy in a case with breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuji, Misa; Shintani, Uichirou; Ohmoto, Yasuhiro; Isshiki, Noriyuki; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Kitamura, Masami; Kato, Shigetake; Misaki, Moriharu [Mie National Central Hospital, Hisai (Japan); Shouin, Hiroshi

    1999-01-01

    We reported a 64-year-old woman with radiation-related intractable pericarditis and pleuritis which developed 20 years after radiotherapy. She underwent a left total mastectomy for a breast cancer and 50 Gy of radiotherapy postoperatively at the age of 43. She was admitted to our hospital because of facial edema and dyspnea. A chest roentgenogram on admission showed massive bilateral pleural effusion and a echocardiography revealed massive pericardial effusion. Though the symptoms of heart failure subsided after the administration of moderate diuretics and cardiotonics, the pleural effusion and pericardial effusion persisted and, she became worse and died. The histological findings at autopsy, showed chronic fibrous pericarditis with marked pericardial thickening, fibrous pleuritis and myocarditis. These findings were compatible with those of previously reported radiation-induced heart disease. We reported a case of pleuritis and pericarditis probably caused by radiation therapy. A long term observation is necessary for the radiation-related heart disease. (author)

  11. Planning with intensity-modulated radiotherapy and tomotherapy to modulate dose across breast to reflect recurrence risk (IMPORT High trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Ellen M; Ciurlionis, Laura; Fairfoul, Jamie; James, Hayley; Mayles, Helen; Manktelow, Sophie; Raj, Sanjay; Tsang, Yat; Tywman, Nicola; Yarnold, John; Coles, Charlotte

    2011-03-15

    To establish planning solutions for a concomitant three-level radiation dose distribution to the breast using linear accelerator- or tomotherapy-based intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), for the U.K. Intensity Modulated and Partial Organ (IMPORT) High trial. Computed tomography data sets for 9 patients undergoing breast conservation surgery with implanted tumor bed gold markers were used to prepare three-level dose distributions encompassing the whole breast (36 Gy), partial breast (40 Gy), and tumor bed boost (48 or 53 Gy) treated concomitantly in 15 fractions within 3 weeks. Forward and inverse planned IMRT and tomotherapy were investigated as solutions. A standard electron field was compared with a photon field arrangement encompassing the tumor bed boost volume. The out-of-field doses were measured for all methods. Dose-volume constraints of volume >90% receiving 32.4 Gy and volume >95% receiving 50.4 Gy for the whole breast and tumor bed were achieved. The constraint of volume >90% receiving 36 Gy for the partial breast was fulfilled in the inverse IMRT and tomotherapy plans and in 7 of 9 cases of a forward planned IMRT distribution. An electron boost to the tumor bed was inadequate in 8 of 9 cases. The IMRT methods delivered a greater whole body dose than the standard breast tangents. A contralateral lung volume >2.5 Gy was increased in the inverse IMRT and tomotherapy plans, although it did not exceed the constraint. We have demonstrated a set of widely applicable solutions that fulfilled the stringent clinical trial requirements for the delivery of a concomitant three-level dose distribution to the breast. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A clip-based protocol for breast boost radiotherapy provides clear target visualisation and demonstrates significant volume reduction over time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Lorraine [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Cox, Jennifer [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Morgia, Marita [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Atyeo, John [Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Lamoury, Gillian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia)

    2015-09-15

    The clinical target volume (CTV) for early stage breast cancer is difficult to clearly identify on planning computed tomography (CT) scans. Surgical clips inserted around the tumour bed should help to identify the CTV, particularly if the seroma has been reabsorbed, and enable tracking of CTV changes over time. A surgical clip-based CTV delineation protocol was introduced. CTV visibility and its post-operative shrinkage pattern were assessed. The subjects were 27 early stage breast cancer patients receiving post-operative radiotherapy alone and 15 receiving post-operative chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy. The radiotherapy alone (RT/alone) group received a CT scan at median 25 days post-operatively (CT1rt) and another at 40 Gy, median 68 days (CT2rt). The chemotherapy/RT group (chemo/RT) received a CT scan at median 18 days post-operatively (CT1ch), a planning CT scan at median 126 days (CT2ch), and another at 40 Gy (CT3ch). There was no significant difference (P = 0.08) between the initial mean CTV for each cohort. The RT/alone cohort showed significant CTV volume reduction of 38.4% (P = 0.01) at 40 Gy. The Chemo/RT cohort had significantly reduced volumes between CT1ch: median 54 cm{sup 3} (4–118) and CT2ch: median 16 cm{sup 3}, (2–99), (P = 0.01), but no significant volume reduction thereafter. Surgical clips enable localisation of the post-surgical seroma for radiotherapy targeting. Most seroma shrinkage occurs early, enabling CT treatment planning to take place at 7 weeks, which is within the 9 weeks recommended to limit disease recurrence.

  13. Phase I study of topical epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) in patients with breast cancer receiving adjuvant radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hanxi; Zhu, Wanqi; Jia, Li; Sun, Xiaorong; Chen, Guanxuan; Zhao, Xianguang; Li, Xiaolin; Meng, Xiangjiao; Kong, Lingling; Yu, Jinming

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the safety, tolerability and preliminary effectiveness of topical epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) for radiation dermatitis in patients with breast cancer receiving adjuvant radiotherapy. Methods: Patients with breast cancer who received radiotherapy to the chest wall after mastectomy were enrolled. EGCG solution was sprayed to the radiation field from the initiation of Grade 1 radiation dermatitis until 2 weeks after completion of radiotherapy. EGCG concentration escalated from 40 to 660 μmol l−1 in 7 levels with 3–6 patients in each level. EGCG toxicity was graded using the NCI (National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events) v. 3.0. Any adverse event >Grade 1 attributed to EGCG was considered dose-limiting toxicity. The maximum tolerated dose was defined as the dose level that induced dose-limiting toxicity in more than one-third of patients at a given cohort. Radiation dermatitis was recorded weekly by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scoring and patient-reported symptoms. Results: From March 2012 to August 2013, 24 patients were enrolled. Acute skin redness was observed in 1 patient and considered to be associated with the EGCG treatment at 140 μmol l−1 level. Three more patients were enrolled at this level and did not experience toxicity to EGCG. The dose escalation stopped at 660 μmol l−1. No other reported acute toxicity was associated with EGCG. Grade 2 radiation dermatitis was observed in eight patients during or after radiotherapy, but all decreased to Grade 1 after EGCG treatments. Patient-reported symptom scores were significantly decreased at 2 weeks after the end of radiotherapy in pain, burning, itching and tenderness, p < 0.05. Conclusion: The topical administration of EGCG was well tolerated and the maximum tolerated dose was not found. EGCG may be effective in treating radiation dermatitis with preliminary investigation. Advances in

  14. Whole breast and excision cavity radiotherapy plan comparison: Conformal radiotherapy with sequential boost versus intensity-modulated radiation therapy with a simultaneously integrated boost

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Small, Katherine [Nepean Cancer Care Centre, Penrith, New South Wales 2750 (Australia); Kelly, Chris; Beldham-Collins, Rachael [Nepean Cancer Care Centre, Penrith, New South Wales 2750 (Australia); The Crown Princess Mary Cancer Centre, Westmead, New South Wales 2145 (Australia); Gebski, Val [NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2050 (Australia); Nepean Cancer Care Centre, Penrith, New South Wales 2750 (Australia)

    2013-03-15

    A comparative study was conducted comparing the difference between (1) conformal radiotherapy (CRT) to the whole breast with sequential boost excision cavity plans and (2) intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to the whole breast with simultaneously integrated boost to the excision cavity. The computed tomography (CT) data sets of 25 breast cancer patients were used and the results analysed to determine if either planning method produced superior plans. CT data sets from 25 past breast cancer patients were planned using (1) CRT prescribed to 50 Gy in 25 fractions (Fx) to the whole-breast planning target volume (PTV) and 10 Gy in 5Fx to the excision cavity and (2) IMRT prescribed to 60 Gy in 25Fx, with 60 Gy delivered to the excision cavity PTV and 50 Gy delivered to the whole-breast PTV, treated simultaneously. In total, 50 plans were created, with each plan evaluated by PTV coverage using conformity indices, plan maximum dose, lung dose, and heart maximum dose for patients with left-side lesions. CRT plans delivered the lowest plan maximum doses in 56% of cases (average CRT = 6314.34 cGy, IMRT = 6371.52 cGy). They also delivered the lowest mean lung dose in 68% of cases (average CRT = 1206.64 cGy, IMRT = 1288.37 cGy) and V20 in 88% of cases (average CRT = 20.03%, IMRT = 21.73%) and V30 doses in 92% of cases (average CRT = 16.82%, IMRT = 17.97%). IMRT created more conformal plans, using both conformity index and conformation number, in every instance, and lower heart maximum doses in 78.6% of cases (average CRT = 5295.26 cGy, IMRT = 5209.87 cGy). IMRT plans produced superior dose conformity and shorter treatment duration, but a slightly higher planning maximum and increased lung doses. IMRT plans are also faster to treat on a daily basis, with shorter fractionation.

  15. Whole breast and excision cavity radiotherapy plan comparison: Conformal radiotherapy with sequential boost versus intensity-modulated radiation therapy with a simultaneously integrated boost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Katherine; Kelly, Chris; Beldham-Collins, Rachael; Gebski, Val

    2013-01-01

    Introduction A comparative study was conducted comparing the difference between (1) conformal radiotherapy (CRT) to the whole breast with sequential boost excision cavity plans and (2) intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to the whole breast with simultaneously integrated boost to the excision cavity. The computed tomography (CT) data sets of 25 breast cancer patients were used and the results analysed to determine if either planning method produced superior plans. Methods CT data sets from 25 past breast cancer patients were planned using (1) CRT prescribed to 50 Gy in 25 fractions (Fx) to the whole-breast planning target volume (PTV) and 10 Gy in 5Fx to the excision cavity and (2) IMRT prescribed to 60 Gy in 25Fx, with 60 Gy delivered to the excision cavity PTV and 50 Gy delivered to the whole-breast PTV, treated simultaneously. In total, 50 plans were created, with each plan evaluated by PTV coverage using conformity indices, plan maximum dose, lung dose, and heart maximum dose for patients with left-side lesions. Results CRT plans delivered the lowest plan maximum doses in 56% of cases (average CRT = 6314.34 cGy, IMRT = 6371.52 cGy). They also delivered the lowest mean lung dose in 68% of cases (average CRT = 1206.64 cGy, IMRT = 1288.37 cGy) and V20 in 88% of cases (average CRT = 20.03%, IMRT = 21.73%) and V30 doses in 92% of cases (average CRT = 16.82%, IMRT = 17.97%). IMRT created more conformal plans, using both conformity index and conformation number, in every instance, and lower heart maximum doses in 78.6% of cases (average CRT = 5295.26 cGy, IMRT = 5209.87 cGy). Conclusion IMRT plans produced superior dose conformity and shorter treatment duration, but a slightly higher planning maximum and increased lung doses. IMRT plans are also faster to treat on a daily basis, with shorter fractionation. PMID:26229603

  16. Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Left-Sided Breast Cancer Patients: Geometrical Uncertainty of the Heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Topolnjak, Rajko; Borst, Gerben R.; Nijkamp, Jasper [Radiotherapy Department, Netherlands Cancer Institute/Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Huis, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Sonke, Jan-Jakob, E-mail: j.sonke@nki.nl [Radiotherapy Department, Netherlands Cancer Institute/Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Huis, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To quantify the geometrical uncertainties for the heart during radiotherapy treatment of left-sided breast cancer patients and to determine and validate planning organ at risk volume (PRV) margins. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two patients treated in supine position in 28 fractions with regularly acquired cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans for offline setup correction were included. Retrospectively, the CBCT scans were reconstructed into 10-phase respiration correlated four-dimensional scans. The heart was registered in each breathing phase to the planning CT scan to establish the respiratory heart motion during the CBCT scan ({sigma}{sub resp}). The average of the respiratory motion was calculated as the heart displacement error for a fraction. Subsequently, the systematic ({Sigma}), random ({sigma}), and total random ({sigma}{sub tot}={radical}({sigma}{sup 2}+{sigma}{sub resp}{sup 2})) errors of the heart position were calculated. Based on the errors a PRV margin for the heart was calculated to ensure that the maximum heart dose (D{sub max}) is not underestimated in at least 90% of the cases (M{sub heart} = 1.3{Sigma}-0.5{sigma}{sub tot}). All analysis were performed in left-right (LR), craniocaudal (CC), and anteroposterior (AP) directions with respect to both online and offline bony anatomy setup corrections. The PRV margin was validated by accumulating the dose to the heart based on the heart registrations and comparing the planned PRV D{sub max} to the accumulated heart D{sub max}. Results: For online setup correction, the cardiac geometrical uncertainties and PRV margins were N-Ary-Summation = 2.2/3.2/2.1 mm, {sigma} = 2.1/2.9/1.4 mm, and M{sub heart} = 1.6/2.3/1.3 mm for LR/CC/AP, respectively. For offline setup correction these were N-Ary-Summation = 2.4/3.7/2.2 mm, {sigma} = 2.9/4.1/2.7 mm, and M{sub heart} = 1.6/2.1/1.4 mm. Cardiac motion induced by breathing was {sigma}{sub resp} = 1.4/2.9/1.4 mm for LR/CC/AP. The PRV D{sub max

  17. Monte Carlo skin dose simulation in intraoperative radiotherapy of breast cancer using spherical applicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, F.; Ung, N. M.; Khandaker, M. U.; Mahdiraji, G. A.; Saad, M.; Malik, R. Abdul; Bustam, A. Z.; Zaili, Z.; Bradley, D. A.

    2017-08-01

    The relatively new treatment modality electronic intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) is gaining popularity, irradiation being obtained within a surgically produced cavity being delivered via a low-energy x-ray source and spherical applicators, primarily for early stage breast cancer. Due to the spatially dramatic dose-rate fall off with radial distance from the source and effects related to changes in the beam quality of the low keV photon spectra, dosimetric account of the Intrabeam system is rather complex. Skin dose monitoring in IORT is important due to the high dose prescription per treatment fraction. In this study, modeling of the x-ray source and related applicators were performed using the Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code. The dosimetric characteristics of the model were validated against measured data obtained using an ionization chamber and EBT3 film as dosimeters. By using a simulated breast phantom, absorbed doses to the skin for different combinations of applicator size (1.5-5 cm) and treatment depth (0.5-3 cm) were calculated. Simulation results showed overdosing of the skin (>30% of prescribed dose) at a treatment depth of 0.5 cm using applicator sizes larger than 1.5 cm. Skin doses were significantly increased with applicator size, insofar as delivering 12 Gy (60% of the prescribed dose) to skin for the largest sized applicator (5 cm diameter) and treatment depth of 0.5 cm. It is concluded that the recommended 0.5-1 cm distance between the skin and applicator surface does not guarantee skin safety and skin dose is generally more significant in cases with the larger applicators. Highlights: • Intrabeam x-ray source and spherical applicators were simulated and skin dose was calculated. • Skin dose for constant skin to applicator distance strongly depends on applicator size. • Use of larger applicators generally results in higher skin dose. • The recommended 0.5-1 cm skin to applicator distance does not guarantee skin

  18. Effect of radiotherapy on activity and concentration of serum paraoxonase-1 in breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenas, Meritxell; García-Heredia, Anabel; Cabré, Noemí; Luciano-Mateo, Fedra; Hernández-Aguilera, Anna; Sabater, Sebastià; Bonet, Marta; Gascón, Marina; Fernández-Arroyo, Salvador; Fort-Gallifa, Isabel; Camps, Jordi; Joven, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    Paraoxonase-1 (PON1) is an intra-cellular antioxidant enzyme found also in the circulation associated with high-density lipoproteins. The activity of this enzyme has been shown to be decreased in breast cancer (BC) patients. The aims of our study were to investigate the changes produced by radiotherapy (RT) on activity and concentration of serum PON1 in BC patients, and to evaluate the observed variations in relation to clinical and pathological characteristics of patients and tumors, and the response to treatment. We studied 200 women with BC who were scheduled to receive RT following excision of the tumor. Blood for analyses was obtained before and after the irradiation procedure. The control group was composed of 200 healthy women. Relative to control, BC patients had significantly lower serum PON1 activities pre-RT, while PON1 concentrations were at similar levels. RT was associated with a significant increase in serum PON1 activities and concentrations. We observed significant differences in serum PON1 concentrations post-RT between patients with luminal A or luminal B tumors. Serum PON1 concentration post-RT was markedly lower in BC patients with metastases. We conclude that benefit from RT accrues to the BC patients not only through its direct effect on cancer cells but also indirectly by improving the organism's anti-oxidant defense mechanisms. In addition, our preliminary evidence suggests that the measurement of serum PON1 concentration post-RT could be an efficient prognostic biomarker, and may be used as an index of the efficacy of the RT.

  19. Inter-observer variation in delineation of the heart and left anterior descending coronary artery in radiotherapy for breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laugaard Lorenzen, Ebbe; Taylor, C. W.; Maraldo, M.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To determine the extent of inter-observer variation in delineation of the heart and left anterior descending coronary artery (LADCA) and its impact on estimated doses. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Nine observers from five centres delineated the heart and LADCA on fifteen patients...... receiving left breast radiotherapy. The delineations were carried out twice, first without guidelines and then with a set of common guidelines. RESULTS: For the heart, most spatial variation in delineation was near the base of the heart whereas for the LADCA most variation was in its length at the apex...

  20. Intraoperative avidination for radionuclide treatment as a radiotherapy boost in breast cancer: results of a phase II study with {sup 90}Y-labeled biotin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paganelli, Giovanni; De Cicco, Concetta; Carbone, Giuseppe; Pacifici, Monica [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Milan (Italy); Ferrari, Mahila E.; Cremonesi, Marta; Di Dia, Amalia [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Medical Physics, Milan (Italy); Pagani, Gianmatteo; Galimberti, Viviana; Luini, Alberto [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Senology, Milan (Italy); Leonardi, Maria Cristina; Ferrari, Annamaria; Orecchia, Roberto [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Radiotherapy, Milan (Italy); De Santis, Rita [Sigma-Tau SpA R and D, Rome (Italy); Zurrida, Stefano [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Senology, Milan (Italy); University of Milan School of Medicine, Milan (Italy); Veronesi, Umberto [European Institute of Oncology, Scientific Director, Milan (Italy)

    2010-02-15

    External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) after conservative surgery for early breast cancer requires 5-7 weeks. For elderly patients and those distant from an RT center, attending for EBRT may be difficult or impossible. We investigated local toxicity, cosmetic outcomes, and quality of life in a new breast irradiation technique - intraoperative avidination for radionuclide therapy (IART) - in which avidin is administered to the tumor bed and {sup 90}Y-labelled biotin later administered intravenously to bind the avidin and provide irradiation. Reduced duration EBRT (40 Gy) is given subsequently. After surgery, 50 (ten patients), 100 (15 patients) or 150 mg (ten patients) of avidin was injected into the tumor bed. After 12-24 h, 3.7 GBq {sup 90}Y-biotin (beta source for therapeutic effect) plus 185 MBq {sup 111}In-biotin (gamma source for imaging and dosimetry) was infused slowly. Whole-body scintigraphy and SPECT/CT images were taken for up to 30 h. Shortened EBRT started 4 weeks later. Local toxicity was assessed by RTOG scale; quality of life was assessed by EORTC QOL-30. Of 35 patients recruited (mean age 63 years; range 42-74) 32 received IART plus EBRT. 100 mg avidin provided 19.5 {+-} 4.0 Gy to the tumor bed and was considered the optimum dose. No side-effects of avidin or {sup 90}Y-biotin occurred, with no hematological or local toxicity. Local G3 toxicity occurred in 3/32 patients during EBRT. IART plus EBRT was well accepted, with good cosmetic outcomes and maintained quality of life. IART plus reduced EBRT can accelerate irradiation after conservative breast surgery. (orig.)

  1. The future of breast cancer radiotherapy: From one size fits all to taylor-made treatment; L'avenir de la radiotherapie du cancer du sein: de la taille unique au sur-mesure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennequin, C. [Service de cancerologie-radiotherapie, hopital Saint-Louis, 1, avenue Claude-Vellefaux, 75475 Paris (France); Azria, D. [Departement de cancerologie radiotherapie, CRLC Val-d' Aurelle-Paul-Lamarque, rue Croix-Verte, 34298 Montpellier cedex 5 (France); Universite de Montpellier I, 5, boulevard Henri-IV, CS 19044, 34967 Montpellier cedex 2 (France); Inserm U896, institut de recherche en cancerologie de Montpellier, CRLC Val-d' Aurelle-Paul-Lamarque, rue Croix-Verte, 34298 Montpellier cedex 5 (France)

    2011-10-15

    Various subgroups of breast tumours have been identified during the last 10 years according to the risk of local relapse. Prognostic factors for local relapse are age, surgical margins, tumour size, Her2 expression and hormonal receptors status. For tumours with a high risk of local relapse, an increased in boost dose or the addition of new drugs (trastuzumab, anti-angiogenics, PARP inhibitors) could be considered. For low risk tumours, hypo-fractionated, accelerated partial breast and intraoperative radiotherapy are being evaluated. The classical schedule (45-50 Gy to the whole gland followed by a boost dose of 16 Gy) is no longer the universal rule. Treatment individualization, according to clinical and biological characteristics of the tumour and - possibly - to the radiobiological profile of the patient, is likely to be the future of breast cancer radiotherapy. (authors)

  2. Estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, HER-2, and response to postmastectomy radiotherapy in high-risk breast cancer: The Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyndi, M.; Sorensen, F.B.; Overgaard, M.

    2008-01-01

    -2+, Rec-/HER-2- (triple negative), and Rec-/HER-2+. Results A significantly improved overall survival after PMRT was seen only among patients characterized by good prognostic markers such as hormonal receptor-positive and HER-2- patients (including the two Rec+ subtypes). No significant overall......Purpose To examine the importance of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PgR), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2), and constructed subtypes in a large study randomly assigning patients to receive or not receive postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT). Patients and Methods...... The present analysis included 1,000 of the 3,083 high-risk breast cancer patients randomly assigned to PMRT in the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group (DBCG) protocol 82 trials b and c. Tissue microarray sections were stained for ER, PgR, and HER-2. Median follow-up time for patients alive was 17 years...

  3. The impact of prenatal education on behavioral changes toward breast feeding and smoking cessation in a healthy start population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caine, Virginia A; Smith, Mark; Beasley, Yvonne; Brown, Haywood L

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of prenatal education by case managers on 2 social determinants of health behaviors-breast feeding and smoking cessation-among participants enrolled in Indianapolis Healthy Start (IHS). Birth and death data up to 1 year for IHS clients were collected from Marion County vital records for births 20 weeks or greater. Case managers provide education on the health benefits for mothers and infants on breast feeding and smoking cessation to all clients. Data were analyzed for differences between the IHS participants and other Marion County births. Most participants (63%) were non-Hispanic blacks aged less than 25 years (56%), without a high school diploma or general education development (53%), and enrolled in Medicaid (91%). Program participants were more likely to initiate breast feeding than nonparticipants (OR, 1.33; 95% CI, 1.10-1.61), and 22% continued to breast feed for 6 months. Hispanic women were more likely to breast feed for at least 6 months (OR, 4.71; 95% CI, 2.32-9.58). Women with advanced education were more likely to have quit smoking, as were women who were breast feeding at hospital discharge. After controlling for education, IHS clients tended to be less likely to continue to smoke during the third trimester (OR, 0.76, 95% CI, 0.49-1.16), as were those with a first pregnancy (OR, 0.32; 95% CI, 0.10, 0.98) and no other smokers in the home (OR, 0.25; 95% CI, 0.08, 0.74). Breast feeding and smoking cessation are modifiable risk factors that were impacted by behavioral interventions through case management education.

  4. Accelerated partial breast irradiation with external beam radiotherapy. First results of the German phase 2 trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, Oliver J.; Strnad, Vratislav; Stillkrieg, Wilhelm; Fietkau, Rainer [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany); Uter, Wolfgang [University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Dept. of Medical Informatics, Biometry and Epidemiology, Erlangen (Germany); Beckmann, Matthias W. [University Hospital Erlangen, Dept. of Gynecology, Erlangen (Germany)

    2017-01-15

    To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of external beam three-dimensional (3D) conformal accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) for selected patients with early breast cancer. Between 2011 and 2016, 72 patients were recruited for this prospective phase 2 trial. Patients were eligible for APBI if they had histologically confirmed breast cancer or pure ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), a tumor diameter ≤3 cm, clear resection margins ≥2 mm, no axillary lymph node involvement, no distant metastases, tumor bed clips, and were aged ≥50 years. Patients were excluded if mammography showed a multicentric invasive growth pattern, or if they had residual diffuse microcalcifications postoperatively, an extensive intraductal component, or vessel invasion. Patients received 3D conformal external beam APBI with a total dose of 38 Gy in 10 fractions in 1-2 weeks. The trial had been registered at the German Clinical Trials Register, DRKS-ID: DRKS00004417. Median follow-up was 25.5 months (range 1-61 months). Local control was maintained in 71 of 72 patients. The 3-year local recurrence rate was 2.1% (95% confidence interval, CI: 0-6.1%). Early toxicity (grade 1 radiodermatitis) was seen in 34.7% (25/72). Late side effects ≥ grade 3 did not occur. Cosmetic results were rated as excellent/good in 96.7% (59/61). APBI with external beam radiotherapy techniques is feasible with low toxicity and, according to the results of the present and other studies, on the way to becoming a standard treatment option for a selected subgroup of patients. (orig.) [German] Untersuchung der Vertraeglichkeit und Sicherheit der externen, 3-D-konformalen akzelerierten Teilbrustbestrahlung (APBI) fuer ausgewaehlte Patientinnen mit einem fruehen Mammakarzinom. Von 2011 bis 2016 wurden 72 Patientinnen in diese prospektive Phase-2-Studie eingebracht. Einschlusskriterien waren ein histologisch gesichertes Mammakarzinom oder DCIS, ein Tumordurchmesser ≤ 3 cm, tumorfreie Resektionsraender ≥ 2

  5. Redefining radiotherapy for early-stage breast cancer with single dose ablative treatment : a study protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Charaghvandi, R K; van Asselen, B; Philippens, M E P; Verkooijen, H M; van Gils, C H; van Diest, P J; Pijnappel, R M; Hobbelink, M G G; Witkamp, A J; van Dalen, T; van der Wall, E; van Heijst, T C; Koelemij, R; van Vulpen, M; van den Bongard, H J G D

    2017-01-01

    Background A shift towards less burdening and more patient friendly treatments for breast cancer is currently ongoing. In low-risk patients with early-stage disease, accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) is an alternative for whole breast irradiation following breast-conserving surgery. MRI-guided single dose ablative APBI has the potential to offer a minimally burdening, non-invasive treatment that could replace current breast-conserving therapy. Methods The ABLATIVE study is a prosp...

  6. Abnormalities by pulmonary regions studied with computer tomography and clinical correlation following local-regional radiotherapy for breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kallol Bhadra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adjuvant local-regional radiotherapy (RT is commonly recommended for breast cancer patients. Postoperative adjuvant RT for breast cancer is associated with pulmonary side effects. This study was undertaken to measure the RT-induced pulmonary radiological changes with computer tomography (CT scan using a CT-adapted modification of the Arriagada classification system, and to correlate these changes to RT techniques, pulmonary complications, and pulmonary function. The aim of the study is to study pulmonary radiological abnormalities with CT following different RT techniques for breast cancer, and their correlation to pulmonary complications and reduction in forced vital capacity (FVC. Materials and Methods: CT scans of the lungs were performed prior to and 4 months following RT in 53 breast cancer patients treated with local-regional RT. The radiological abnormalities were analyzed with a CT-adapted modification of a classification system originally proposed by Arriagada. The patients were monitored for RT-induced pulmonary complications. FVC was measured prior to and 6 months following RT. Statistical analysis used were that increasing CT scores were correlated with pulmonary complications ( P 0.05. Conclusions: Radiological abnormalities detected on CT images and scored with a modification of Arriagada′s classification system can be used as an objective endpoint for pulmonary side effects in postmastectomy RT.

  7. A Case of Brain Metastases from Breast Cancer Treated with Whole-Brain Radiotherapy and Eribulin Mesylate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten Nieder

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with triple receptor-negative breast cancer often develop aggressive metastatic disease, which also might involve the brain. In many cases, systemic and local treatment is needed. It is important to consider the toxicity of chemo- and radiotherapy, especially when newly approved drugs become available. Randomised studies leading to drug approval often exclude patients with newly diagnosed brain metastases. Here we report our initial experience with eribulin mesylate and whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT in a heavily pretreated patient with multiple brain, lung, and bone metastases from triple receptor-negative breast cancer. Eribulin mesylate was given after 4 previous lines for metastatic disease. Two weeks after the initial dose, that is, during the first cycle, the patient was diagnosed with 5 brain metastases with a maximum size of approximately 4.5 cm. She continued chemotherapy and received concomitant WBRT with 10 fractions of 3 Gy. After 3 cycles of eribulin mesylate, treatment was discontinued because of newly diagnosed liver metastases and progression in the lungs. No unexpected acute toxicity was observed. The only relevant adverse reactions were haematological events after the third cycle (haemoglobin 9.5 g/dL, leukocytes 3.1×109/L. The patient died from respiratory failure 18.5 months from diagnosis of metastatic disease, and 2.7 months from diagnosis of brain metastases. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on combined WBRT and eribulin mesylate.

  8. Overall survival and the response to radiotherapy among molecular subtypes of breast cancer brain metastases treated with targeted therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jacob A; Kotecha, Rupesh; Ahluwalia, Manmeet S; Mohammadi, Alireza M; Chao, Samuel T; Barnett, Gene H; Murphy, Erin S; Vogelbaum, Michael A; Angelov, Lilyana; Peereboom, David M; Suh, John H

    2017-06-15

    The current study was conducted to investigate survival and the response to radiotherapy among patients with molecular subtypes of breast cancer brain metastases treated with or without targeted therapies. Patients diagnosed with breast cancer brain metastases at a single tertiary care institution were included. The primary outcome was overall survival, whereas secondary outcomes included the cumulative incidences of distant intracranial failure, local failure, and radiation necrosis. Competing risks regression was used to model secondary outcomes. Within the study period, 547 patients presented with 3224 brain metastases and met inclusion criteria. Among patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-amplified disease, 80% received HER2 antibodies and 38% received HER2/epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). The median survival was significantly shorter in the basal cohort (8.4 months), and progressively increased in the luminal A (12.3 months), HER2-positive (15.4 months), and luminal B (18.8 months) cohorts (Pbrain radiotherapy for salvage. Cancer 2017;123:2283-2293. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  9. Breast Cancer Risk in Childhood Cancer Survivors Without a History of Chest Radiotherapy: A Report From the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Tara O; Moskowitz, Chaya S; Chou, Joanne F; Bradbury, Angela R; Neglia, Joseph Phillip; Dang, Chau T; Onel, Kenan; Novetsky Friedman, Danielle; Bhatia, Smita; Strong, Louise C; Stovall, Marilyn; Kenney, Lisa B; Barnea, Dana; Lorenzi, Elena; Hammond, Sue; Leisenring, Wendy M; Robison, Leslie L; Armstrong, Gregory T; Diller, Lisa R; Oeffinger, Kevin C

    2016-03-20

    Little is known about the breast cancer risk among childhood cancer survivors who did not receive chest radiotherapy. We sought to determine the magnitude of risk and associated risk factors for breast cancer among these women. We evaluated cumulative breast cancer risk in 3,768 female childhood cancer survivors without a history of chest radiotherapy who were participants in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study. With median follow up of 25.5 years (range, 8 to 39 years), 47 women developed breast cancer at a median age of 38.0 years (range, 22 to 47 years) and median of 24.0 years (range, 10 to 34 years) from primary cancer to breast cancer. A four-fold increased breast cancer risk (standardized incidence ratio [SIR] = 4.0; 95% CI, 3.0 to 5.3) was observed when compared with the general population. Risk was highest among sarcoma and leukemia survivors (SIR = 5.3; 95% CI, 3.6 to 7.8 and SIR = 4.1; 95% CI, 2.4 to 6.9, respectively). By the age of 45 years, the cumulative incidence of breast cancer in sarcoma and leukemia survivors was 5.8% (95% CI, 3.7 to 8.4) and 6.3% (95% CI, 3.0 to 11.3), respectively. No other primary cancer diagnosis was associated with an elevated risk. Alkylators and anthracyclines were associated with an increased breast cancer risk in a dose-dependent manner (P values from test for trend were both radiotherapy who survive childhood sarcoma or leukemia have an increased risk of breast cancer at a young age. The data suggest high-dose alkylator and anthracycline chemotherapy increase the risk of breast cancer. This may suggest a possible underlying gene-environment interaction that warrants further study. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  10. Quality of life of women with breast cancer undergoing radiotherapy using the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muszalik, Marta; Kołucka-Pluta, Małgorzata; Kędziora-Kornatowska, Kornelia; Robaczewska, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers in women, particularly among older women. This illness along with its treatment has a great impact on a woman's subjective opinion of her quality of life and functioning in everyday life. The aim of this research was to assess the quality of life in women undergoing radiotherapy for the treatment of breast cancer. The research was carried out in 120 patients with breast cancer undergoing radiotherapy in the Oncological Center in Bydgoszcz, Poland. Among the 120 examined patients, there were 30 women aged between 20-50 years and the remaining were over 50 years of age, including 42 women over the age of 60. Demographic and clinical data were collected and the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue questionnaire (version 4) was used to assess health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of the patients. Statistical analyses were conducted using Statistica, version 10.0. Patients with breast cancer undergoing radiotherapy rated their quality of life with an average of 113.83 points. Older patients above 71 years of age also displayed significantly higher HRQOL (122.70 points). A lower level of fatigue was noticed among patients ≤50 years and ≥71 years of age. Education and marital status also had an important impact on HRQOL. Educated women with a good financial situation had a significantly higher HRQOL, compared to those with a lower education and in poor living conditions. HRQOL and state of fatigue in breast cancer patients treated with radiotherapy depended upon their age. Both were high among women aged 71 years and above, while younger patients (51-70 years of age) had slightly lower values. Results suggest that sociodemographic factors influence the conditions of life of women treated with radiotherapy for breast cancer in a significant way. Overall, patients tolerated this type of treatment well.

  11. Estimation of the risk of secondary cancer in the thyroid gland and the breast outside the treated volume in patients undergoing brain, mediastinum and breast radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlachopoulou, Vassiliki; Malatara, Georgia; Delis, Harry; Kardamakis, Dimitrios; Panayiotakis, George

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the peripheral dose which is the absorbed dose in organs located outside the treatment volume such as the thyroid gland and the breast in patients undergoing radiotherapy, utilising the MOSFET dosemeters, as well as to estimate the probability of secondary cancer. The thyroid gland doses, expressed as a percentage of the prescribed dose (%TD), were measured to be 2.0±0.3 %, in whole brain irradiation, 10.0±8.0 % in mediastinum treatment and 8.0±2.0 and 2.0±0.8 % in breast treatment, with and without the supraclavicular irradiation, respectively, with a corresponding risk of 0.2, 2.0, 1.0 and 0.3 %. The dose to the breast was 7.0±2.0 %, in the mediastinum treatment, and 4.0±1.0 and 2.0±0.8 %, in the breast treatment, with and without supraclavicular irradiation, respectively, with a corresponding risk of 4.0, 2.0 and 1.0 %. Although the results indicate that the risk is not negligible, its significance should be considered in conjunction with the existing pathology and age of the patients.

  12. An investigational protocol of intraoperative radiotherapy in the treatment of early-stage breast cancer: partial results from the Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvio Eduardo Bromberg

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe and assess the experience of the HospitalAlbert Einstein on the treatment of early-stage breast cancer withintraoperative radiotherapy. Methods: Twenty-two patients withinvasive breast cancer, older than 45 years, with tumors ≤ 2.5 cm andwith clinically normal axillary lymph nodes at intraoperative evaluation,who underwent quadrantectomy with sentinel lymph node biopsyand intraoperative radiotherapy. Clinical characteristics, histologicalfindings and intraoperative radiotherapy technique were assessed.Results: The mean age of patients was 60.4 years and 90.9% of themwere post-menopausal. Mean tumor diameter was 1.5 cm, with 81%being of the invasive ductal type; 89% were hormonal receptor positiveand Her-2/neu negative. Clinical stage I was found in 86.4%. Sentinellymph node was negative in 81.8%. The radiation dose was 21 Gy inall patients, with a mean radiation time of 9.65 minutes, mean surgerytime of 234 minutes and mean depth of breast tissue irradiated of 1.72cm. Conclusion: Our preliminary results are similar to those of theliterature, demonstrating that intraoperative radiotherapy is a feasibletechnique in our setting, safe and equivalent to conventional externalbeam radiotherapy, with potential radiobiological, technical, clinical,psychosocial and economic advantages.

  13. Conventional radiotherapy of localized right side breast cancer after radical mastectomy: development of innovative “field in field” technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Marošević

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this paper is to study the distribution of the therapy dosage applied by a modified conventional “field in field” technique and compare it to the distribution of the dosage applied by the standard conventional technique.Methods: The study included ten patients with right side breast cancer, after they were exposed to radical mastectomy and chemotherapy. Radiotherapy dosage of TD 50 Gy in 25 fractions was applied to the anterolateral side of the right thoracic wall, with two opposite conventional tangential fields by the linear accelerator Elekta Synergy and the energy of 6 megavolts (MV. A delineation of the target volume (CTV – Clinical Target Volume was done within conventional fields. At the XiO system for planning we included additional fields within the existing conventional fields, which was the so called “field in field” technique. On the basis of CTV the Dose Volume  Histogram (DVH was calculated for conventional and “field in field” plans. VD90%, VD95%, VD107%, VD115%, CI and HI were calculated for both techniques. Means were pared with the paired Student's t-test. The results were considered significantly different if p<0.05.Results: VD90% and VD 95% were significantly higher for the “field in field” technique. Therefore, CI also favored the “field in field” technique (p=0.02. There was no difference in VD107% and VD115% between the compared groups. Consequently, there was no statistically significant difference in HI (1.13±0.03 vs.1.13±0.03, p=0.06.Conclusion: Conventional postoperative radiotherapy of localized right side breast cancer by “field in field” technique provides excellent coverage of the target volume by radiotherapy isodose.

  14. SU-F-T-87: Comparison of Advanced Radiotherapy Techniques for Post- Mastectomy Breast Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heins, D; Zhang, R [Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Hogstrom, K; Sanders, M [Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To determine if bolus electron conformal therapy (Bolus-ECT) combined with intensity modulated x-ray therapy (IMXT) and flattening filter free volumetric modulated arc therapy (FFF-VMAT (6x and 10x)) can maintain equal or better dose coverage than standard volumetric modulated arc therapy (Std-VMAT) while reducing doses to organs at risk (OARs). Methods: Bolus-ECT with IMXT, FFF-VMAT, and Std-VMAT treatment plans were produced for ten post-mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) patients previously treated at our clinic. The treatment plans were created on commercially available treatment planning system (TPS) and all completed treatment plans were reviewed and approved by a radiation oncologist. The plans were evaluated based on planning target volume (PTV) coverage, tumor control probability (TCP), dose homogeneity index (DHI), conformity index (CI), and dose to organs at risk (OAR). Results: All techniques produced clinically acceptable PMRT plans. Overall, Bolus-ECT with IMXT exhibited higher maximum dose compared to all VMAT techniques. Bolus-ECT with IMXT and FFF-VMAT10x had slightly improved TCP over FFF-VMAT6x and Std-VMAT. However, all VMAT techniques showed improved CI and DHI over Bolus-ECT with IMXT. All techniques showed very similar mean lung dose. Bolus-ECT with IMXT exhibited a reduced mean heart dose over Std-VMAT. Both FFF-VMAT techniques had higher mean heart dose compared to Std-VMAT. In addition, Bolus-ECT with IMXT was able to reduce mean dose to the contralateral breast compared to Std-VMAT and both FFF-VMAT techniques had comparable but slightly reduced dose compared to Std-VMAT. Conclusion: This work has shown that Bolus-ECT with IMXT produces clinically acceptable plans while reducing OAR doses. Both FFF-VMAT techniques are comparable to Std-VMAT with slight improvements. Even though all VMAT techniques produce more homogenous and conformal dose distributions, Bolus-ECT with IMXT is a viable option for treating post-mastectomy patients

  15. Effects of an integrated yoga program in modulating psychological stress and radiation-induced genotoxic stress in breast cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Birendranath; Vadiraj, H S; Ram, Amritanshu; Rao, Raghavendra; Jayapal, Manikandan; Gopinath, Kodaganur S; Ramesh, B S; Rao, Nalini; Kumar, Ajay; Raghuram, Nagarathna; Hegde, Sridevi; Nagendra, H R; Prakash Hande, M

    2007-09-01

    Effects of an integrated yoga program in modulating perceived stress levels, anxiety, as well as depression levels and radiation-induced DNA damage were studied in 68 breast cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. Two psychological questionnaires--Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and Perceived Stress Scale (PSS)--and DNA damage assay were used in the study. There was a significant decrease in the HADS scores in the yoga intervention group, whereas the control group displayed an increase in these scores. Mean PSS was decreased in the yoga group, whereas the control group did not show any change pre- and postradiotherapy. Radiation-induced DNA damage was significantly elevated in both the yoga and control groups after radiotherapy, but the postradiotherapy DNA damage in the yoga group was slightly less when compared to the control group. An integrated approach of yoga intervention modulates the stress and DNA damage levels in breast cancer patients during radiotherapy.

  16. Internal mammary chain irradiation in breast cancer: State of the art; Radiotherapie de la chaine mammaire interne dans les cancers du sein: etat des lieux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auberdiac, P.; Cartier, L.; Hau Desbat, N.H.; De Laroche, G.; Magne, N. [Unite de curietherapie, departement de radiotherapie, institut de cancerologie de la Loire, 108 bis, avenue Albert-Raimond, BP 60008, 42271 Saint-Priest-en-Jarez cedex (France); Chargari, C. [Service d' oncologie radiotherapie, hopital d' instruction des armees du Val-de-Grace, 74, boulevard Port-Royal, 75230 Paris cedex 5 (France); Zioueche, A. [Service de radiotherapie, CHU Dupuytren, 2, avenue Martin-Luther-King, 87000 Limoges (France); Melis, A. [Departement d' oncologie medicale, institut de cancerologie de la Loire, 108 bis, avenue Albert-Raimond, 42271 Saint-Priest-en-Jarez cedex (France); Kirova, Y.M. [Service de radiotherapie oncologique, institut Curie, 26, rue d' Ulm, 75005 Paris (France)

    2011-04-15

    Radiation therapy has a major role in the management of infiltrative breast cancers. However, there is no consensus for the prophylactic treatment of the internal mammary chain (IMC), with strategies that show strong differences according to centers and physicians. Indications for internal mammary chain radiotherapy are debated, since this treatment significantly increases the dose delivered to the heart and leads to potential technical difficulties. Important prospective data recently suggested that internal mammary chain radiotherapy would not be necessary, even in cases of internal or central tumor locations, or in patients with positive axillary lymph nodes. Although these data warrant confirmation by two other prospective trials, there is evidence that the indications for internal mammary chain radiotherapy should be careful and that high quality techniques should be used for decreasing the dose delivered to the heart. This review of literature presents the state of art on the radiotherapy of internal mammary chain, with special focus on the indications, techniques, and potential toxicity. (authors)

  17. Improvement of dose distribution in breast radiotherapy using a reversible transverse magnetic field Linac-MR unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeeli, A D; Mahdavi, S R; Pouladian, M; Monfared, A S; Bagheri, S

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the improvement in dose distribution in tangential breast radiotherapy using a reversible transverse magnetic field that maintains the same direction of Lorentz force between two fields. The investigation has a potential application in future Linac-MR units. Computed tomography images of four patients and magnetic fields of 0.25-1.5 Tesla (T) were used for Monte Carlo simulation. Two patients had intact breast while the other two had mastectomy. Simulations of planning and chest wall irradiation were similar to the actual clinical process. The direction of superior-inferior magnetic field for the medial treatment beam was reversed for the lateral beam. For the ipsilateral lung and heart mean doses were reduced by a mean (range) of 45.8% (27.6%-58.6%) and 26.0% (20.2%-38.9%), respectively, depending on various treatment plan setups. The mean V20 for ipsilateral lung was reduced by 55.0% (43.6%-77.3%). In addition acceptable results were shown after simulation of 0.25 T magnetic field demonstrated in dose-volume reductions of the heart, ipsilateral lung, and noninvolved skin. Applying a reversible magnetic field during breast radiotherapy, not only reduces the dose to the lung and heart but also produces a sharp drop dose volume histogram for planning target volume, because of bending of the path of secondary charged particles toward the chest wall by the Lorentz force. The simulations have shown that use of the magnetic field at 1.5 T is not feasible for clinical applications due to the increase of ipsilateral chest wall skin dose in comparison to the conventional planning while 0.25 T is suitable for all patients due to dose reduction to the chest wall skin.

  18. Improvement of dose distribution in breast radiotherapy using a reversible transverse magnetic field Linac-MR unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esmaeeli, A. D., E-mail: ali-esmaeeli-d@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Rasht Branch, Islamic Azad University, Rasht, 41476-54919 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahdavi, S. R. [Department of Medical Physics, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, 14174 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Pouladian, M.; Bagheri, S. [Department of Medical Radiation Engineering, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, 14778-93855 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Monfared, A. S. [Department of Medical Physics, Babol University of Medical Sciences, Babol, 47148-71167 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: To investigate the improvement in dose distribution in tangential breast radiotherapy using a reversible transverse magnetic field that maintains the same direction of Lorentz force between two fields. The investigation has a potential application in future Linac-MR units. Methods: Computed tomography images of four patients and magnetic fields of 0.25–1.5 Tesla (T) were used for Monte Carlo simulation. Two patients had intact breast while the other two had mastectomy. Simulations of planning and chest wall irradiation were similar to the actual clinical process. The direction of superior-inferior magnetic field for the medial treatment beam was reversed for the lateral beam. Results: For the ipsilateral lung and heart mean doses were reduced by a mean (range) of 45.8% (27.6%–58.6%) and 26.0% (20.2%–38.9%), respectively, depending on various treatment plan setups. The mean V{sub 20} for ipsilateral lung was reduced by 55.0% (43.6%–77.3%). In addition acceptable results were shown after simulation of 0.25 T magnetic field demonstrated in dose-volume reductions of the heart, ipsilateral lung, and noninvolved skin. Conclusions: Applying a reversible magnetic field during breast radiotherapy, not only reduces the dose to the lung and heart but also produces a sharp drop dose volume histogram for planning target volume, because of bending of the path of secondary charged particles toward the chest wall by the Lorentz force. The simulations have shown that use of the magnetic field at 1.5 T is not feasible for clinical applications due to the increase of ipsilateral chest wall skin dose in comparison to the conventional planning while 0.25 T is suitable for all patients due to dose reduction to the chest wall skin.

  19. Supervised physical therapy in women treated with radiotherapy for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Nara Fernanda Braz da Silva; Oliveira, Harley Francisco de; Carrara, Hélio Humberto Angotti

    2016-08-15

    to evaluate the effect of physical therapy on the range of motion of the shoulders and perimetry of the upper limbs in women treated with radiotherapy for breast cancer. a total of 35 participants were randomized into two groups, with 18 in the control group (CG) and 17 in the study group (SG). Both of the groups underwent three evaluations to assess the range of motion of the shoulders and perimetry of the upper limbs, and the study group underwent supervised physical therapy for the upper limbs. the CG had deficits in external rotation in evaluations 1, 2, and 3, whereas the SG had deficits in flexion, abduction, and external rotation in evaluation 1. The deficit in abduction was recovered in evaluation 2, whereas the deficits in all movements were recovered in evaluation 3. No significant differences in perimetry were observed between the groups. the applied supervised physical therapy was effective in recovering the deficit in abduction after radiotherapy, and the deficits in flexion and external rotation were recovered within two months after the end of radiotherapy. Registration number of the clinical trial: NCT02198118. avaliar o efeito da fisioterapia na amplitude de movimento do ombro e na perimetria do membro superior, aplicada durante o período da radioterapia nas mulheres em tratamento para o câncer de mama. 35 voluntárias foram randomizadas em dois grupos, 18 para o grupo controle e 17 para o grupo de estudo. Os dois grupos foram submetidos a três avaliações da amplitude de movimento do ombro e perimetria do membro superior, sendo o grupo de estudo também submetido à fisioterapia supervisionada para os membros superiores. o grupo controle apresentou déficit entre os membros para o movimento de rotação externa nas avaliações 1, 2 e 3. O grupo de estudo apresentou déficit entre os membros para os movimentos de flexão, abdução e rotação externa na avaliação 1. Houve recuperação do déficit de movimento de abdução na avaliação 2

  20. Troponin T-release associates with cardiac radiation doses during adjuvant left-sided breast cancer radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skyttä, Tanja; Tuohinen, Suvi; Boman, Eeva; Virtanen, Vesa; Raatikainen, Pekka; Kellokumpu-Lehtinen, Pirkko-Liisa

    2015-07-10

    Adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) for left-sided breast cancer increases cardiac morbidity and mortality. For the heart, no safe radiation threshold has been established. Troponin T is a sensitive marker of myocardial damage. Our aim was to evaluate the effect of left-sided breast cancer RT on serum high sensitivity troponin T (hscTnT) levels and its association with cardiac radiation doses and echocardiographic parameters. A total of 58 patients with an early stage, left-sided breast cancer or ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) who received adjuvant breast RT without prior chemotherapy were included in this prospective, non-randomized study. Serum samples were taken before, during and after RT. An increase of hscTnT >30 % was predefined as significant. A comprehensive 2D echocardiograph and electrocardiogram (ECG) were performed before and after RT. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were generated for different cardiac structures. The hscTnT increased during RT from baseline in 12/58 patients (21 %). Patients with increased hscTnT values (group A, N = 12) had significantly higher radiation doses for the whole heart (p = 0.02) and left ventricle (p = 0.03) than patients without hscTnT increase (group B, N = 46). For the left anterior descending artery (LAD), differences between groups A and B were found in volumes receiving 15 Gy (p = 0.03) and 20 Gy (p = 0.03) Furthermore, after RT, the interventricular septum thickened (p = 0.01), and the deceleration time was prolonged (p = 0.008) more in group A than in group B. The increase in hscTnT level during adjuvant RT was positively associated with the cardiac radiation doses for the whole heart and LV in chemotherapy-naive breast cancer patients. Whether these acute subclinical changes increase the risk of excessive long-term cardiovascular morbidity or mortality, will be addressed in the follow-up of our patients.

  1. Multibeam inverse intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for whole breast irradiation: a single center experience in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhaozhi; Zhang, Li; Chen, Xingxing; Ma, Jinli; Mei, Xin; Chen, Jiayi; Yu, Xiaoli; Guo, Xiaomao

    2015-10-27

    To present the clinical experience in our cancer center with multibeam inverse intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for early stage breast cancer (BC) patients with whole breast irradiation (WBI). We retrospectively analyzed 622 patients with Stage 0 to III BC treated from 2008 to 2011 with wide local excision and WBI, using an inverse IMRT technique. All of the patients were prescribed a total dose of 50 Gy to the whole breast in 2-Gy fractions, followed by a tumor bed boost of 10 Gy in 5 fractions using an electron beam. Of all of the patients, 132 (21.2%) received whole breast plus regional lymph node (RLN) irradiation. 438 of 622 patients had records of acute skin toxicity based on common terminology criteria (CTC) for adverse events. Two hundred eighty (64%) patients had Grade 0/1 toxicity, 153 (35%) had Grade 2 and only 4 patients experienced grade 3 toxicity. Seventy patients (16%) had moist desquamation. Univariate analysis revealed that breast planning target volume was the only predictive factor for Grade ≥2 acute dermatitis (P = 0.002). After 4 years, 170 patients reported cosmetic results by self-assessment, of whom 151 (89%) patients reported good/excellent cosmetic results, and 17 (11%) patients reported fair assessments. For invasive cancer, the four-year rate of freedom from locoregional recurrence survival was 98.3%. Regarding carcinoma in situ, no patients experienced recurrence. BC patients who underwent conservative surgery followed by inverse IMRT plan exhibited acceptable acute toxicities and clinical outcomes. Longer follow-up is needed.

  2. Effects of an 18-week exercise programme started early during breast cancer treatment: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travier, Noémie; Velthuis, Miranda J; Steins Bisschop, Charlotte N; van den Buijs, Bram; Monninkhof, Evelyn M; Backx, Frank; Los, Maartje; Erdkamp, Frans; Bloemendal, Haiko J; Rodenhuis, Carla; de Roos, Marnix A J; Verhaar, Marlies; ten Bokkel Huinink, Daan; van der Wall, Elsken; Peeters, Petra H M; May, Anne M

    2015-06-08

    Exercise started shortly after breast cancer diagnosis might prevent or diminish fatigue complaints. The Physical Activity during Cancer Treatment (PACT) study was designed to primarily examine the effects of an 18-week exercise intervention, offered in the daily clinical practice setting and starting within 6 weeks after diagnosis, on preventing an increase in fatigue. This multi-centre controlled trial randomly assigned 204 breast cancer patients to usual care (n = 102) or supervised aerobic and resistance exercise (n = 102). By design, all patients received chemotherapy between baseline and 18 weeks. Fatigue (i.e., primary outcome at 18 weeks), quality of life, anxiety, depression, and physical fitness were measured at 18 and 36 weeks. Intention-to-treat mixed linear model analyses showed that physical fatigue increased significantly less during cancer treatment in the intervention group compared to control (mean between-group differences at 18 weeks: -1.3; 95 % CI -2.5 to -0.1; effect size -0.30). Results for general fatigue were comparable but did not reach statistical significance (-1.0, 95%CI -2.1; 0.1; effect size -0.23). At 18 weeks, submaximal cardiorespiratory fitness and several muscle strength tests (leg extension and flexion) were significantly higher in the intervention group compared to control, whereas peak oxygen uptake did not differ between groups. At 36 weeks these differences were no longer statistically significant. Quality of life outcomes favoured the exercise group but were not significantly different between groups. A supervised 18-week exercise programme offered early in routine care during adjuvant breast cancer treatment showed positive effects on physical fatigue, submaximal cardiorespiratory fitness, and muscle strength. Exercise early during treatment of breast cancer can be recommended. At 36 weeks, these effects were no longer statistically significant. This might have been caused by the control participants' high physical

  3. Clinical and diagnosis characteristics of breast cancers in women with a history of radiotherapy in the first 30years of life: A French multicentre cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demoor-Goldschmidt, C; Supiot, S; Oberlin, O; Helfre, S; Vigneron, C; Brillaud-Meflah, V; Bernier, V; Laprie, A; Ducassou, A; Claude, L; Mahé, M A; de Vathaire, F

    2017-08-01

    Irradiation (>3Gy) to the breast or axillae before 30years of age increases the risk of secondary breast cancer (SBC). The purpose of this article is to describe the clinical characteristics of SBC and the way of diagnosis in young women (before the age of national screening) in France who had received previous radiotherapy for a childhood or a young adulthood cancer. This retrospective, multicentre study reviewed the medical records of women with SBC before the age of the national screening who had received irradiation (≥3Gy) on part or all of the breast before 30years of age, for any type of tumour except BC. A total of 121 SBC were detected in 104 women with previous radiotherapy. Twenty percent of SBC were detected during regular breast screening and 16% of the women had a regular radiological follow-up. Our results points out that the main proportion of childhood cancer survivors did not benefit from the recommended breast cancer screening. This result is comparable to other previously published studies in other countries. A national screening programme is necessary and should take into account the patient's age, family history, personal medical history and previous radiotherapy to reduce the number of SBC diagnosed at an advanced stage. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. SU-F-T-499: Anatomic Features for Selection of Electronic Tissue Compensation Radiotherapy in Early-Stage Breast Cancer Patients After Breast-Conserving Surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Y; Gan, L; Chen, X; Zhang, T; Ren, G [Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, Chongqing (China); Zhang, M [Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers The State University of New, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Yue, N [Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To explore the correlations between anatomic features and dose-volumetric parameters in 3DCRT and eComp whole breast irradiation and identify the feasibility of anatomic parameters to predict the planning method selection. Methods: We compared the effectiveness between conventional three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and electronic tissue compensation (eComp) for whole breast irradiation. 3DCRT and eComp planning techniques were used to generate treatment plans for 60 whole breast patients, respectively. The planning goal was to cover 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) with 95% of the prescription dose while minimizing dose to lung, heart, and skin. Statistical analyses were performed between critical organ doses and patient anatomic features, i.e., central lung distance (CLD), maximal heart distance (MHD), maximal heart length (MHL) and breast separation (BS). Results: Comparing to 3DCRT plans, on the average, eComp treatment planning process was about 7 minutes longer, but resulted in lower lung V20Gy, lower mean skin dose, with similar heart dose. The benefits were more pronounced for larger breast patients. To keep the lung V20Gy lower than 20% and mean skin dose lower than 85% of the prescription dose, eComp was the preferred method for patients with more than 2.3 cm CLD or larger than 22.5 cm BS. Conclusion: The study results may be useful in providing a handy criterion in clinical practice allowing us to easily choose between different planning techniques to satisfy the planning goal with minimal increase in complexity and cost. This study was supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (NO. 31420103915) and Chongqing Health and Family Planning Commission Project (2015MSXM012).

  5. Comparison of Long-Term Outcomes of Postmastectomy Radiotherapy between Breast Cancer Patients with and without Immediate Flap Reconstruction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Hua Lee

    Full Text Available To compare the long-term clinical outcomes of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT between breast cancer patients with and without immediate transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM flap reconstruction.The study included 492 patients with stage II or III breast cancer who underwent modified radical mastectomy (MRM and chemotherapy followed by PMRT between 1997 and 2011. Cox regression model and Kaplan-Meier curves were calculated, and the log-rank test was used to evaluate the differences between overall and disease-free survival rates in the 2 groups.Among 492 patients, 213 patients had immediate TRAM flap reconstruction. The mean follow-up was 7.2 years (range, 11-191 months. The 5-year and 10-year disease free survival rates were 81% and 76% for the TRAM flap group and 78% and 73% for the non-flap group. The 5-year and 10-year overall survival rates were 89% and 73% for the TRAM flap group and 83% and 74% for the non-flap group.There exists no statistically significant difference in the rates of local recurrence, distant metastasis, disease-free and overall survival when comparing immediate TRAM flap reconstruction with no reconstruction. Our results suggest that immediate TRAM flap reconstruction does not compromise long term clinical outcomes in breast cancer patients requiring PMRT.

  6. Breast-feeding Duration, Age of Starting Solids, and High BMI Risk and Adiposity in Indian Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    This study utilized data from a prospective birth cohort study on 568 Indian children, to determine whether a longer duration of breast-feeding and later introduction of solid feeding was associated with a reduced higher body mass index (BMI) and less adiposity. Main outcomes were high BMI (>90th within-cohort sex-specific BMI percentile) and sum of skinfold thickness (triceps and subscapular) at age 5. Main exposures were breast-feeding (6 categories from 1-4 to ≥21 months) and age of starting regular solid feeding (4 categories from ≤3 to ≥6 months). Data on infant feeding practices, socioeconomic and maternal factors were collected by questionnaire. Birthweight, maternal and child anthropometry were measured. Multiple regression analysis which accounted for potential confounders, demonstrated a small magnitude of effect for breast-feeding duration or introduction of solid feeds on the risk of high BMI but not for lower skinfold thickness. Breast-feeding duration was strongly negatively associated with weight gain (0-2 years) (adjusted β= −0.12 SD 95% CI: −0.19 to −0.05 per category change in breast-feeding duration, p=0.001) and weight gain (0-2 years) was strongly associated with high BMI at 5 years (adjusted OR = 3.8, 95 % CI: 2.53 to 5.56, pbreast-feeding duration and later introduction of solids has a small reduction on later high BMI risk and a negligible effect on skinfold thickness. However, accounting for sampling variability, these findings cannot exclude the possibility of no effect at the population-level. PMID:21978208

  7. MEASUREMENT OF THE CONTRALATERAL BREAST PHOTON AND THERMAL NEUTRON DOSES IN BREAST CANCER RADIOTHERAPY: A COMPARISON BETWEEN PHYSICAL AND DYNAMIC WEDGES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Hamed; Rabie Mahdavi, Seyed; Shekarchi, Babak; Manouchehri, Farhad; Farhood, Bagher

    2018-01-01

    This research aimed to measure the received photon and thermal neutron doses to contralateral breast (CB) in breast cancer radiotherapy for various field sizes in presence of physical and dynamic wedges. The measurement of photon and thermal neutron doses was carried out on right breast region of RANDO phantom (as CB) for 18 MV photon beams. The dose measurements were performed by thermoluminescent dosimeter chips. These measurements obtained for various field sizes in presence of physical and dynamic wedges. The findings of this study showed that the received doses (both of the photon and thermal neutron) to CB in presence of physical wedge for 11 × 13, 11 × 17 and 11 × 21 cm2 field sizes were 5.92, 6.36 and 6.77% of the prescribed dose, respectively as well as for dynamic wedge were 2.92, 4.63 and 5.60% of the prescribed dose, respectively. The results showed that the received photon and thermal neutron doses to CB increase with increment of field sizes. The received photon and thermal neutron doses to CB in presence of physical wedge were more than dynamic wedge. According to obtained findings, it is suggested that using a dynamic wedge is preferable than physical wedge, especially for medial tangential field. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Feasibility of helical tomo-therapy of a second thoracic cancer after radiotherapy for a breast cancer; Faisabilite de la tomotherapie helicoidale d'un second cancer thoracique apres radiotherapie pour un cancer du sein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahe, M.A.; Rouault, B.; Rio, E.; Thillays, F.; Munos, C.; Lisbona, A. [Centre Rene-Gauducheau, 44 - Saint-Herblain (France)

    2010-10-15

    The authors report an assessment of feasibility in terms of acute toxicity of a helical tomo-therapy for a lung or oesophagus cancer among patients already irradiated for a breast cancer. Another aim of this study was the local control and survival. Six patients were concerned, and all had concomitant chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The authors report the observed effects and outline that no clinic pulmonary toxicity has been reported. Short communication

  9. Quality of life of women with breast cancer undergoing radiotherapy using the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muszalik M

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Marta Muszalik,1 Małgorzata Kołucka-Pluta,2 Kornelia Kędziora-Kornatowska,1 Joanna Robaczewska1 1Department and Clinic of Geriatrics, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Collegium Medicum in Bydgoszcz, 2Centrum of Oncology in Bydgoszcz, Bydgoszcz, Poland Objective: Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers in women, particularly among older women. This illness along with its treatment has a great impact on a woman’s subjective opinion of her quality of life and functioning in everyday life. The aim of this research was to assess the quality of life in women undergoing radiotherapy for the treatment of breast cancer. Patients and methods: The research was carried out in 120 patients with breast cancer undergoing radiotherapy in the Oncological Center in Bydgoszcz, Poland. Among the 120 examined patients, there were 30 women aged between 20–50 years and the remaining were over 50 years of age, including 42 women over the age of 60. Demographic and clinical data were collected and the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue questionnaire (version 4 was used to assess health-related quality of life (HRQOL of the patients. Statistical analyses were conducted using Statistica, version 10.0. Results: Patients with breast cancer undergoing radiotherapy rated their quality of life with an average of 113.83 points. Older patients above 71 years of age also displayed significantly higher HRQOL (122.70 points. A lower level of fatigue was noticed among patients ≤50 years and ≥71 years of age. Education and marital status also had an important impact on HRQOL. Educated women with a good financial situation had a significantly higher HRQOL, compared to those with a lower education and in poor living conditions. Conclusion: HRQOL and state of fatigue in breast cancer patients treated with radiotherapy depended upon their age. Both were high among women aged 71 years and above, while younger patients (51–70 years of age had

  10. Gingival metastasis of a radiotherapy-induced breast angiosarcoma: diagnosis and multidisciplinary treatment achieving a prolonged complete remission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarelli, Alessandro; Boccone, Paola; Goia, Franco; Gatti, Marco; De Rosa, Giovanni; Manca, Antonio; Galizia, Danilo; Aglietta, Massimo; Grignani, Giovanni

    2012-11-01

    Angiosarcoma is a rare and highly malignant mesenchymal tumor. Similar to other soft tissue sarcomas, it may arise in any organ, although it occurs more frequently within skin structures like the scalp. Angiosarcoma has a characteristic pattern of local and distant relapse involving primary site, regional lymph nodes, and lung. Patients affected by unresectable relapses or metastases have a dismal prognosis with a median overall survival of less than 9 months. We present the case of a 74-year-old woman who previously underwent total mastectomy for a radiotherapy-induced angiosarcoma of the breast. She subsequently developed a rapidly growing gingival tumor lesion that was in fact a unique distant metastasis of her angiosarcoma. In general, surgery is the mainstay of angiosarcoma treatment, and even metastases are aggressively resected whenever feasible. We describe the successful multidisciplinary treatment that avoided a likely mutilating surgery and review the literature regarding primary and metastatic gingival angiosarcoma.

  11. Low p53 Binding Protein 1 (53BP1) Expression Is Associated With Increased Local Recurrence in Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Breast-Conserving Surgery and Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neboori, Hanmanth J.R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute of New Jersey and University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Haffty, Bruce G., E-mail: hafftybg@umdnj.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Cancer Institute of New Jersey and University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Wu Hao [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute of New Jersey and University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Yang Qifeng [Department of Breast Surgery, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Ji' nan (China); Aly, Amal [Division of Medical Oncology, The Cancer Institute of New Jersey and University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Goyal, Sharad; Schiff, Devora [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute of New Jersey and University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Moran, Meena S. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Golhar, Ryan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute of New Jersey and University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Chen Chunxia; Moore, Dirk [Department of Biostatistics, The Cancer Institute of New Jersey and University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); and others

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether the expression of p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1) has prognostic significance in a cohort of early-stage breast cancer patients treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy (BCS+RT). Methods and Materials: A tissue microarray of early-stage breast cancer treated with BCS+RT from a cohort of 514 women was assayed for 53BP1, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and HER2 expression by immunohistochemistry. Through log-rank tests and univariate and multivariate models, the staining profile of each tumor was correlated with clinical endpoints, including ipsilateral breast recurrence-free survival (IBRFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), cause-specific survival (CSS), recurrence-free survival (RFS), and overall survival (OS). Results: Of the 477 (93%) evaluable tumors, 63 (13%) were scored as low. Low expression of 53BP1 was associated with worse outcomes for all endpoints studied, including 10-year IBRFS (76.8% vs. 90.5%; P=.01), OS (66.4% vs. 81.7%; P=.02), CSS (66.0% vs. 87.4%; P<.01), DMFS (55.9% vs. 87.0%; P<.01), and RFS (45.2% vs. 80.6%; P<.01). Multivariate analysis incorporating various clinico-pathologic markers and 53BP1 expression found that 53BP1 expression was again an independent predictor of all endpoints (IBRFS: P=.0254; OS: P=.0094; CSS: P=.0033; DMFS: P=.0006; RFS: P=.0002). Low 53BP1 expression was also found to correlate with triple-negative (TN) phenotype (P<.01). Furthermore, in subset analysis of all TN breast cancer, negative 53BP1 expression trended for lower IBRFS (72.3% vs. 93.9%; P=.0361) and was significant for worse DMFS (48.2% vs. 86.8%; P=.0035) and RFS (37.8% vs. 83.7%; P=.0014). Conclusion: Our data indicate that low 53BP1 expression is an independent prognostic indicator for local relapse among other endpoints in early-stage breast cancer and TN breast cancer patients treated with BCS+RT. These results should be verified in larger cohorts of patients to validate their clinical

  12. Subsets of Women With Close or Positive Margins After Breast-Conserving Surgery With High Local Recurrence Risk Despite Breast Plus Boost Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lupe, Krystine [British Columbia Cancer Agency, Department of Radiation Oncology, Victoria and Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Truong, Pauline T., E-mail: ptruong@bccancer.bc.ca [British Columbia Cancer Agency, Department of Radiation Oncology, Victoria and Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Alexander, Cheryl [Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Lesperance, Mary [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Victoria, Victoria, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Speers, Caroline [Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Tyldesley, Scott [British Columbia Cancer Agency, Department of Radiation Oncology, Victoria and Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: (1) To examine the effect of surgical margin status on local recurrence (LR) and survival following breast-conserving therapy; (2) To identify subsets with close or positive margins with high LR risk despite whole breast radiotherapy (RT) plus boost. Methods and Materials: Subjects were 2,264 women with pT1-3, any N, M0 invasive breast cancer, treated with breast-conserving surgery and whole breast {+-} boost RT. Five-year Kaplan-Meier (KM) LR, breast cancer-specific and overall survival (BCSS and OS) were compared between cohorts with negative (n = 1,980), close (n = 222), and positive (n = 62) margins. LR rates were analyzed according to clinicopathologic characteristics. Multivariable Cox regression modeling and matched analysis of close/positive margin cases and negative margin controls were performed. Results: Median follow-up was 5.2 years. Boost RT was used in 92% of patients with close or positive margins. Five-year KM LR rates in the negative, close and positive margin cohorts were 1.3%, 4.0%, and 5.2%, respectively (p = 0.001). BCSS and OS were similar in the three margin subgroups. In the close/positive margin cohort, LR rates were 10.2% with age <45 years, 11.8% with Grade III, 11.3% with lymphovascular invasion (LVI), and 26.3% with {>=}4 positive nodes. Corresponding rates in the negative margin cohort were 2.3%, 2.4%, 1.0%, and 2.4%, respectively. On Cox regression analysis of the entire cohort, close or positive margin, Grade III histology, {>=}4 positive nodes, and lack of systemic therapy were significantly associated with higher LR risk. When close/positive margin cases were matched to negative margin controls, the difference in 5-year LR remained significant (4.25% vs. 0.7%, p < 0.001). Conclusions: On univariable analysis, subsets with close or positive margins, in combination with age <45 years, Grade III, LVI, and {>=}4 positive nodes, have 5-year LR >10% despite whole breast plus boost RT. These patients should be considered for

  13. SU-E-J-134: An Augmented-Reality Optical Imaging System for Accurate Breast Positioning During Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazareth, D; Malhotra, H; French, S [Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY (United States); Hoffmann, K [Neurosurgery at SUNY at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY (United States); Merrow, C [Bassett Healthcare, Oneonta, NY (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Breast radiotherapy, particularly electronic compensation, may involve large dose gradients and difficult patient positioning problems. We have developed a simple self-calibrating augmented-reality system, which assists in accurately and reproducibly positioning the patient, by displaying her live image from a single camera superimposed on the correct perspective projection of her 3D CT data. Our method requires only a standard digital camera capable of live-view mode, installed in the treatment suite at an approximately-known orientation and position (rotation R; translation T). Methods: A 10-sphere calibration jig was constructed and CT imaged to provide a 3D model. The (R,T) relating the camera to the CT coordinate system were determined by acquiring a photograph of the jig and optimizing an objective function, which compares the true image points to points calculated with a given candidate R and T geometry. Using this geometric information, 3D CT patient data, viewed from the camera's perspective, is plotted using a Matlab routine. This image data is superimposed onto the real-time patient image, acquired by the camera, and displayed using standard live-view software. This enables the therapists to view both the patient's current and desired positions, and guide the patient into assuming the correct position. The method was evaluated using an in-house developed bolus-like breast phantom, mounted on a supporting platform, which could be tilted at various angles to simulate treatment-like geometries. Results: Our system allowed breast phantom alignment, with an accuracy of about 0.5 cm and 1 ± 0.5 degree. Better resolution could be possible using a camera with higher-zoom capabilities. Conclusion: We have developed an augmented-reality system, which combines a perspective projection of a CT image with a patient's real-time optical image. This system has the potential to improve patient setup accuracy during breast radiotherapy, and could

  14. Significance of ABO-Rh blood groups in response and prognosis in breast cancer patients treated with radiotherapy and chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cihan, Yasemin Benderli

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate whether ABO-Rh blood groups have significance in the treatment response and prognosis in patients with non-metastatic breast cancer. We retrospectively evaluated files of 335 patients with breast cancer who were treated between 2005 and 2010. Demographic data, clinic- pathological findings, treatments employed, treatment response, and overall and disease-free survivals were reviewed. Relationships between clinic-pathological findings and blood groups were evaluated. 329 women and 6 men were included to the study. Mean age at diagnosis was 55.2 years (range: 26-86). Of the cases, 95% received chemotherapy while 70% were given radiotherapy and 60.9% adjuvant hormone therapy after surgery. Some 63.0% were A blood group, 17.6% O, 14.3% B and 5.1% AB. In addition, 82.0% of the cases were Rh-positive. Mean follow-up was 24.5 months. Median overall and progression-free survival times were 83.9 and 79.5 months, respectively. Overall and disease-free survival times were found to be higher in patients with A and O blood groups (pABO blood groups were identified as factors that had significant effects on overall and disease-survival times (p=0.011 and p=0.002). It was seen that overall and disease-free survival times were higher in breast cancer patients with A and O blood groups when compared to those with other blood groups. It was seen that A and O blood groups had good prognostic value in patients with breast cancer.

  15. Assessment of pulmonary toxicities in breast cancer patients undergoing treatment with anthracycline and taxane based chemotherapy and radiotherapy- a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aramita Saha

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anthracycline based regiments and/or taxanes and adjuvant radiotherapy; the main modalities of treatment for breast cancers are associated with deterioration of pulmonary functions and progressive pulmonary toxicities. Aim: Assessment of pulmonary toxicities and impact on pulmonary functions mainly in terms of decline of forced vital capacity (FVC and the ratio of forced expiratory volume (FEV in 1 Second and FEV1/FVC ratio with different treatment times and follow ups in carcinoma breast patients receiving anthracycline and/or taxane based chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Materials and methods: A prospective single institutional cohort study was performed with 58 breast cancer patients between January 2011 to July 2012 who received either anthracycline based (37 patients received 6 cycles FAC= 5 FU, Adriamycin, Cyclophosphamide regime and radiotherapy or anthracycline and taxane based chemotherapy (21 patients received 4cycles AC= Adriamycin, Cyclophosphamide; followed by 4 cycles of T=Taxane and radiotherapy. Assessment of pulmonary symptoms and signs, chest x-ray and pulmonary function tests were performed at baseline, midcycle, at end of chemotherapy, at end radiotherapy, at 1 and 6 months follow ups and compared. By means of a two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA model, the course of lung parameters across the time points was compared. Results and Conclusion: Analysis of mean forced vital capacities at different points of study times showed definitive declining pattern, which is at statistically significant level at the end of 6th month of follow up (p=0.032 .The FEV1/FVC ratio (in percentage also revealed a definite decreasing pattern over different treatment times and at statistically significant level at 6th month follow up with p value 0.003. Separate analysis of mean FEV1/FVC ratios over time in anthracycline based chemotherapy and radiotherapy group as well as anthracycline and taxane based chemotherapy and radiotherapy group

  16. An international randomised controlled trial to compare TARGeted Intraoperative radioTherapy (TARGIT) with conventional postoperative radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery for women with early-stage breast cancer (the TARGIT-A trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Jayant S; Wenz, Frederik; Bulsara, Max; Tobias, Jeffrey S; Joseph, David J; Saunders, Christobel; Brew-Graves, Chris; Potyka, Ingrid; Morris, Stephen; Vaidya, Hrisheekesh J; Williams, Norman R; Baum, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Based on our laboratory work and clinical trials we hypothesised that radiotherapy after lumpectomy for breast cancer could be restricted to the tumour bed. In collaboration with the industry we developed a new radiotherapy device and a new surgical operation for delivering single-dose radiation to the tumour bed - the tissues at highest risk of local recurrence. We named it TARGeted Intraoperative radioTherapy (TARGIT). From 1998 we confirmed its feasibility and safety in pilot studies. To compare TARGIT within a risk-adapted approach with whole-breast external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) over several weeks. The TARGeted Intraoperative radioTherapy Alone (TARGIT-A) trial was a pragmatic, prospective, international, multicentre, non-inferiority, non-blinded, randomised (1 : 1 ratio) clinical trial. Originally, randomisation occurred before initial lumpectomy (prepathology) and, if allocated TARGIT, the patient received it during the lumpectomy. Subsequently, the postpathology stratum was added in which randomisation occurred after initial lumpectomy, allowing potentially easier logistics and a more stringent case selection, but which needed a reoperation to reopen the wound to give TARGIT as a delayed procedure. The risk-adapted approach meant that, in the experimental arm, if pre-specified unsuspected adverse factors were found postoperatively after receiving TARGIT, EBRT was recommended. Pragmatically, this reflected how TARGIT would be practised in the real world. Thirty-three centres in 11 countries. Women who were aged ≥ 45 years with unifocal invasive ductal carcinoma preferably ≤ 3.5 cm in size. TARGIT within a risk-adapted approach and whole-breast EBRT. The primary outcome measure was absolute difference in local recurrence, with a non-inferiority margin of 2.5%. Secondary outcome measures included toxicity and breast cancer-specific and non-breast-cancer mortality. In total, 3451 patients were recruited between March 2000 and June 2012. The

  17. Randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effects of progressive resistance training compared to progressive muscle relaxation in breast cancer patients undergoing adjuvant radiotherapy: the BEST study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potthoff, Karin; Schmidt, Martina E; Wiskemann, Joachim; Hof, Holger; Klassen, Oliver; Habermann, Nina; Beckhove, Philipp; Debus, Juergen; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Steindorf, Karen

    2013-03-28

    Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is one of the most common and distressing side effects of cancer and its treatment. During and after radiotherapy breast cancer patients often suffer from CRF which frequently impairs quality of life (QoL). Despite the high prevalence of CRF in breast cancer patients and the severe impact on the physical and emotional well-being, effective treatment methods are scarce.Physical activity for breast cancer patients has been reported to decrease fatigue, to improve emotional well-being and to increase physical strength. The pathophysiological and molecular mechanisms of CRF and the molecular-biologic changes induced by exercise, however, are poorly understood.In the BEST trial we aim to assess the effects of resistance training on fatigue, QoL and physical fitness as well as on molecular, immunological and inflammatory changes in breast cancer patients during adjuvant radiotherapy. The BEST study is a prospective randomized, controlled intervention trial investigating the effects of a 12-week supervised progressive resistance training compared to a 12-week supervised muscle relaxation training in 160 patients with breast cancer undergoing adjuvant radiotherapy. To determine the effect of exercise itself beyond potential psychosocial group effects, patients in the control group perform a group-based progressive muscle relaxation training. Main inclusion criterion is histologically confirmed breast cancer stage I-III after lumpectomy or mastectomy with indication for adjuvant radiotherapy. Main exclusion criteria are acute infectious diseases, severe neurological, musculosceletal or cardiorespiratory disorders. The primary endpoint is cancer-related fatigue; secondary endpoints include immunological and inflammatory parameters analyzed in peripheral blood, saliva and urine. In addition, QoL, depression, physical performance and cognitive capacity will be assessed. The BEST study is the first randomized controlled trial comparing progressive

  18. Health-related quality of life in survivors of stage I-II breast cancer: randomized trial of post-operative conventional radiotherapy and hypofractionated tomotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Versmessen Harijati

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health-related quality of life (HRQOL assessment is a key component of clinical oncology trials. However, few breast cancer trials comparing adjuvant conventional radiotherapy (CR and hypofractionated tomotherapy (TT have investigated HRQOL. We compared HRQOL in stage I-II breast cancer patients who were randomized to receive either CR or TT. Tomotherapy uses an integrated computed tomography scanner to improve treatment accuracy, aiming to reduce the adverse effects of radiotherapy. Methods A total of 121 stage I–II breast cancer patients who had undergone breast conserving surgery (BCS or mastectomy (MA were randomly assigned to receive either CR or TT. CR patients received 25 × 2 Gy over 5 weeks, and BCS patients also received a sequential boost of 8 × 2 Gy over 2 weeks. TT patients received 15 × 2.8 Gy over 3 weeks, and BCS patients also received a simultaneous integrated boost of 15 × 0.6 Gy over 3 weeks. Patients completed the EORTC QLQ-C30 and BR23 questionnaires. The mean score (± standard error was calculated at baseline, the end of radiotherapy, and at 3 months and 1, 2, and 3 years post-radiotherapy. Data were analyzed by the 'intention-to-treat' principle. Results On the last day of radiotherapy, patients in both treatment arms had decreased global health status and functioning scores; increased fatigue (clinically meaningful in both treatment arms, nausea and vomiting, and constipation; decreased arm symptoms; clinically meaningful increased breast symptoms in CR patients and systemic side effects in TT patients; and slightly decreased body image and future perspective. At 3 months post-radiotherapy, TT patients had a clinically significant increase in role- and social-functioning scores and a clinically significant decrease in fatigue. The post-radiotherapy physical-, cognitive- and emotional-functioning scores improved faster in TT patients than CR patients. TT patients also had a better

  19. The value of radiotherapy in breast cancer patients with isolated ipsilateral supraclavicular lymph node metastasis without distant metastases at diagnosis: a retrospective analysis of Chinese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu SG

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available San-Gang Wu,1,* Jia-Yuan Sun,2,* Juan Zhou,3,* Feng-Yan Li,2 Qin Lin,1 Huan-Xin Lin,2 Zhen-Yu He2 1Xiamen Cancer Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University, Xiamen, People's Republic of China; 2Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Department of Radiation Oncology, Collaborative Innovation Center of Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China; 3Xiamen Cancer Center, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University, Xiamen, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: The purpose of this study was to investigate the prognosis of ipsilateral supraclavicular lymph node metastasis (ISLM without evidence of distant metastases at diagnosis in Chinese women with breast cancer and to elucidate the clinical value of adjuvant radiotherapy. Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of clinical data for 39 patients with ISLM from breast cancer without distant metastasis at diagnosis. Combined modality therapy, consisting of neoadjuvant chemotherapy, surgery, and adjuvant chemotherapy with or without adjuvant radiotherapy, was offered to the patients. Results: The patients in this study accounted for 1% of all breast cancer patients treated during the same time period. The median follow-up was 35 months. The 5-year locoregional recurrence-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, disease-free survival (DFS, and overall survival (OS were 57.3%, 42.3%, 34.4%, and 46.2%, respectively. Twenty-three patients received postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy. However, there was no significant difference in the 3- and 5-year locoregional recurrence-free survival (P=0.693, ISLM-free recurrence (P=0.964, distant metastasis-free survival (P=0.964, DFS (P=0.234, and OS (P=0.329 rates between the groups of patients who received or did not receive adjuvant radiotherapy

  20. Late radiation side effects, cosmetic outcomes and pain in breast cancer patients after breast-conserving surgery and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. Risk-modifying factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hille-Betz, Ursula; Soergel, Philipp; Kundu, Sudip; Klapdor, Ruediger; Hillemanns, Peter [Hannover Medical School, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Hannover (Germany); Vaske, Bernhard [Hannover Medical School, Institute of Medical Biometry and Informatics, Hannover (Germany); Bremer, Michael; Henkenberens, Christoph [Hannover Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology and Special Oncology, Hannover (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    The purpose of this work was to identify parameters influencing the risk of late radiation side effects, fair or poor cosmetic outcomes (COs) and pain in breast cancer patients after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Between 2006 and 2013, 159 patients were treated at the Hannover Medical School. Physician-rated toxicity according to the LENT-SOMA criteria, CO and pain were assessed by multivariate analysis. LENT-SOMA grade 1-4 toxicity was observed as follows: fibrosis 10.7 %, telangiectasia 1.2 %, arm oedema 8.8 % and breast oedema 5.0 %. In addition, 15.1 % of patients reported moderate or severe breast pain, and 21.4 % complained about moderate or severe pain in the arm or shoulder. In multivariate analysis, axillary clearing (AC) was significantly associated with lymphoedema of the arm [odds ratio (OR) 4.37, p = 0.011, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.4-13.58]. Breast oedema was also highly associated with AC (OR 10.59, p = 0.004, 95 % CI 2.1-53.36), a ptosis grade 2/3 or pseudoptosis and a bra size ≥ cup C (OR 5.34, p = 0.029, 95 % CI 1.2-24.12). A ptosis grade 2/3 or pseudoptosis and a bra size ≥ cup C were the parameters significantly associated with an unfavourable CO (OR 3.19, p = 0.019, 95 % CI 1.2-8.4). Concerning chronic breast pain, we found a trend related to the prescribed radiation dose including boost (OR 1.077, p = 0.060, 95 % CI 0.997-1.164). Chronic shoulder or arm pain was statistically significantly associated with lymphoedema of the arm (OR 3.9, p = 0.027, 95 % CI 1.17-13.5). Chronic arm and breast oedema were significantly influenced by the extent of surgery (AC). Ptotic and large breasts were significantly associated with unfavourable COs and chronic breast oedema. Late toxicities exclusive breast pain were not associated with radiotherapy parameters. (orig.) [German] Ziel dieser Arbeit war es, Parameter zu identifizieren, die Spaetschaeden nach Radiotherapie, ein unguenstiges

  1. Dose volume histogram analysis of normal structures associated with accelerated partial breast irradiation delivered by high dose rate brachytherapy and comparison with whole breast external beam radiotherapy fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Alexandra J; O'Farrell, Desmond A; Cormack, Robert A; Hansen, Jorgen L; Khan, Atif J; Mutyala, Subhakar; Devlin, Phillip M

    2008-11-19

    To assess the radiation dose delivered to the heart and ipsilateral lung during accelerated partial breast brachytherapy using a MammoSite applicator and compare to those produced by whole breast external beam radiotherapy (WBRT). Dosimetric analysis was conducted on patients receiving MammoSite breast brachytherapy following conservative surgery for invasive ductal carcinoma. Cardiac dose was evaluated for patients with left breast tumors with a CT scan encompassing the entire heart. Lung dose was evaluated for patients in whom the entire lung was scanned. The prescription dose of 3400 cGy was 1 cm from the balloon surface. MammoSite dosimetry was compared to simulated WBRT fields with and without radiobiological correction for the effects of dose and fractionation. Dose parameters such as the volume of the structure receiving 10 Gy or more (V10) and the dose received by 20 cc of the structure (D20), were calculated as well as the maximum and mean doses received. Fifteen patients were studied, five had complete lung data and six had left-sided tumors with complete cardiac data. Ipsilateral lung volumes ranged from 925-1380 cc. Cardiac volumes ranged from 337-551 cc. MammoSite resulted in a significantly lower percentage lung V30 and lung and cardiac V20 than the WBRT fields, with and without radiobiological correction. This study gives low values for incidental radiation received by the heart and ipsilateral lung using the MammoSite applicator. The volume of heart and lung irradiated to clinically significant levels was significantly lower with the MammoSite applicator than using simulated WBRT fields of the same CT data sets.

  2. Dose volume histogram analysis of normal structures associated with accelerated partial breast irradiation delivered by high dose rate brachytherapy and comparison with whole breast external beam radiotherapy fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutyala Subhakar

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To assess the radiation dose delivered to the heart and ipsilateral lung during accelerated partial breast brachytherapy using a MammoSite™ applicator and compare to those produced by whole breast external beam radiotherapy (WBRT. Materials and methods Dosimetric analysis was conducted on patients receiving MammoSite breast brachytherapy following conservative surgery for invasive ductal carcinoma. Cardiac dose was evaluated for patients with left breast tumors with a CT scan encompassing the entire heart. Lung dose was evaluated for patients in whom the entire lung was scanned. The prescription dose of 3400 cGy was 1 cm from the balloon surface. MammoSite dosimetry was compared to simulated WBRT fields with and without radiobiological correction for the effects of dose and fractionation. Dose parameters such as the volume of the structure receiving 10 Gy or more (V10 and the dose received by 20 cc of the structure (D20, were calculated as well as the maximum and mean doses received. Results Fifteen patients were studied, five had complete lung data and six had left-sided tumors with complete cardiac data. Ipsilateral lung volumes ranged from 925–1380 cc. Cardiac volumes ranged from 337–551 cc. MammoSite resulted in a significantly lower percentage lung V30 and lung and cardiac V20 than the WBRT fields, with and without radiobiological correction. Conclusion This study gives low values for incidental radiation received by the heart and ipsilateral lung using the MammoSite applicator. The volume of heart and lung irradiated to clinically significant levels was significantly lower with the MammoSite applicator than using simulated WBRT fields of the same CT data sets. Trial registration Dana Farber Trial Registry number 03-179

  3. Contralateral breast cancer after radiotherapy among BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernstein, Jonine L; Thomas, Duncan C; Shore, Roy E

    2013-01-01

    Women with germline BRCA1 or BRCA2 (BRCA1/BRCA2) mutations are at very high risk of developing breast cancer, including asynchronous contralateral breast cancer (CBC). BRCA1/BRCA2 genes help maintain genome stability and assist in DNA repair. We examined whether the risk of CBC associated with ra...

  4. Prepectoral Implant-Based Breast Reconstruction and Postmastectomy Radiotherapy: Short-Term Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Sigalove, MD

    2017-12-01

    Conclusions:. Immediate implant-based prepectoral breast reconstruction followed by PMRT appears to be well tolerated, with no excess risk of adverse outcomes, at least in the short term. Longer follow-up is needed to better understand the risk of PMRT in prepectorally reconstructed breasts.

  5. Towards MRI-guided radiotherapy in early-stage breast cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartogh, M.D. den

    2014-01-01

    At the Department of Radiation Oncology of the UMC Utrecht, an MRI-linear accelerator (MRI-linac) is being developed. This hybrid MRI radiotherapy system features an 8 MV linear accelerator rotating around a 1.5 T cylindrical MRI scanner. This combination enables direct visualization of the

  6. Evaluation of ECG changes after Radiotherapy of left chest wall by Electron in patients with left breast cancer who receive Anthracycline based chemotherapy following mastectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Emami

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cardiovascular damage after Radiotherapy of left chest wall for left breast cancer is a potential fear, therefore studing both the possible causes of radiation-induced heart damage and preventive measures are crucial issues in radiation therapy of breast cancer. The present study investigates noninvasively the possible acute and chronic ECG changes and their incidences after Radiotherapy in patients with left sided breast cancer who have received 6-8 courses of Anthracycline based chemotherapy following mastectomy. Methods: 56 patients with breast cancer (invasive ductal carcinoma who had been undergone modified radical mastectomy, adjuvant Anthracycline based chemotherapy, and left sided chest wall electron therapy with direct field, have been evaluated. All patients investigated with physical examination and standard 12 leads ECG before, and immediately after completion of radiation therapy, and 6 months afterward. Results: New electrocardiographic changes after therapy were seen in 3 patients (5.35% and reduced to 2 cases (3.57% after 6 months. there was no significant difference in T wave findings before and after radiation therapy(P=0.521.Also there wasn’t any correlation between stage of cancer and any changes in ECG findings after radiation therapy (P=0.56. Conclusion: There were no clinical cardiac symptoms or signs after Radiotherapy. Most affected leads in ECG were V1-V4 and the main abnormality was Inverted T wave. This findings suggest that the most acute and chronic electrocardiographic effect of irradiation on heart is repolarization abnormality. This study suggests that there are no significant ECG changes after Radiotherapy of left chest wall by electron beam in patients with left sided breast cancer who has received Anthracycline based chemotherapy following mastectomy. Also Radiotherapy by electron doesn't induce any clinical cardiac symptoms and signs in these patients. Therefore, we recommend

  7. Dose comparison using deformed image registration method on breast cancer radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Won; Kim, Jung Hoon [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, KonYang University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Won, Young Jin [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, InJe University Ilsan Paik Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    The purpose of this study is to reconstruct the treatment plan by applying CBCT and DIR to dose changes according to the change of the patient's motion and breast shape in the large breast cancer patients and to compare the doses using TWF, FIF and IMRT. CT and CBCT were performed with MIM6 to create DIRCT and each treatment plan was made. The patient underwent computed tomography simulation in both prone and supine position. The homogeneity index (HI), conformity index (CI), coverage index (CVI) to the left breast as planning target volume (PTV) were determined and the doses to the lung, heart, and right breast as organ at risk (OAR) were compared by using dose-volume histogram and the unique property of each organ. The value of HI of the PTV breast increased in all treatment planning methods using DIRCT, and CVI and CI were decreased in the treatment planning methods using DIRCT.

  8. Prevention of Gynecomastia and Breast Pain Caused by Androgen Deprivation Therapy in Prostate Cancer: Tamoxifen or Radiotherapy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arruda Viani, Gustavo, E-mail: gusviani@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Marilia Medical School, Marilia, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Bernardes da Silva, Lucas Godoi; Stefano, Eduardo Jose [Department of Radiation Oncology, Marilia Medical School, Marilia, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To determine, in a meta-analysis, whether gynecomastia and breast pain rates in men with prostate cancer treated with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) are reduced if treated with prophylactic radiotherapy (RT) or tamoxifen (TMX). Methods and Materials: The MEDLINE, EMBASE, CANCERLIT, and Cochrane Library databases, as well as proceedings of annual meetings, were systematically searched to identify randomized, controlled studies comparing RT or TMX with observation for men with prostate cancer using ADT. Results: Six RCTs (three RT trials and three TMX trials, N = 777 patients total) were identified that met the study criteria. Pooled results from these RCTs comparing RT vs. observation showed a significant reduction in the incidence of gynecomastia and breast pain rates in patients treated with RT (odds ratio [OR] = 0.21, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.12-0.37, p < 0.0001, and OR = 0.34, 95% CI 0.20-0.57, p < 0.0001, respectively). Use of RT resulted in an absolute risk reduction (ARR) of 29.4% and 19.9%, with a number needed to treat (NNT) of 3.4 and 5 to avoid one case of gynecomastia and breast pain, respectively. Pooled results from trials comparing TMX vs. observation showed a statistical benefit for breast pain and gynecomastia in favor of TMX arms (OR = 0.04, 95% CI = 0.02-0.08, p < 0.0001 and OR = 0.07, 95% CI = 0.0-0.14, p < 0.00001). TMX resulted in an ARR = 64.1% and 47.6%, with an NNT of 1.56 and 2.1 to avoid one case of gynecomastia and breast pain, respectively. Considering adverse effects, TMX was 6 times more adverse effects than RT. Conclusions: Our data have shown that both TMX and RT prevented gynecomastia and breast pain in patients with prostate cancer receiving ADT for prostate cancer. Although TMX was two times more effective in preventing gynecomastia, RT should represent an effective and safe treatment option, to take into account mainly in patients with cardiovascular risk factors or thrombotic diathesis.

  9. [Accelerated partial breast irradiation with image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy following breast-conserving surgery - preliminary results of a phase II clinical study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mészáros, Norbert; Major, Tibor; Stelczer, Gábor; Zaka, Zoltán; Mózsa, Emõke; Fodor, János; Polgár, Csaba

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to implement accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) by means of image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) following breast-conserving surgery (BCS) for low-risk early invasive breast cancer. Between July 2011 and March 2014, 60 patients with low-risk early invasive (St I-II) breast cancer who underwent BCS were enrolled in our phase II prospective study. Postoperative APBI was given by means of step and shoot IG-IMRT using 4 to 5 fields to a total dose of 36.9 Gy (9×4.1 Gy) using a twice-a-day fractionation. Before each fraction, series of CT images were taken from the region of the target volume using a kV CT on-rail mounted in the treatment room. An image fusion software was used for automatic image registration of the planning and verification CT images. Patient set-up errors were detected in three directions (LAT, LONG, VERT), and inaccuracies were adjusted by automatic movements of the treatment table. Breast cancer related events, acute and late toxicities, and cosmetic results were registered and analysed. At a median follow-up of 24 months (range 12-44) neither locoregional nor distant failure was observed. Grade 1 (G1), G2 erythema, G1 oedema, and G1 and G2 pain occurred in 21 (35%), 2 (3.3%), 23 (38.3%), 6 (10%) and 2 (3.3%) patients, respectively. No G3-4 acute side effects were detected. Among late radiation side effects G1 pigmentation, G1 fibrosis, and G1 fat necrosis occurred in 5 (8.3%), 7 (11.7%), and 2 (3.3%) patients, respectively. No ≥G2 late toxicity was detected. Excellent and good cosmetic outcome was detected in 45 (75%) and 15 (25%) patients. IG-IMRT is a reproducible and feasible technique for the delivery of APBI following conservative surgery for the treatment of low-risk, early-stage invasive breast carcinoma. Preliminary results are promising, early radiation side effects are minimal, and cosmetic results are excellent.

  10. Supine MRI for regional breast radiotherapy: imaging axillary lymph nodes before and after sentinel-node biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heijst, Tristan C. F.; Eschbach-Zandbergen, Debora; Hoekstra, Nienke; van Asselen, Bram; Lagendijk, Jan J. W.; Verkooijen, Helena M.; Pijnappel, Ruud M.; de Waard, Stephanie N.; Witkamp, Arjen J.; van Dalen, Thijs; Desirée van den Bongard, H. J. G.; Philippens, Marielle E. P.

    2017-08-01

    Regional radiotherapy (RT) is increasingly used in breast cancer treatment. Conventionally, computed tomography (CT) is performed for RT planning. Lymph node (LN) target levels are delineated according to anatomical boundaries. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could enable individual LN delineation. The purpose was to evaluate the applicability of MRI for LN detection in supine treatment position, before and after sentinel-node biopsy (SNB). Twenty-three female breast cancer patients (cTis-3N0M0) underwent 1.5 T MRI, before and after SNB, in addition to CT. Endurance for MRI was monitored. Axillary levels were delineated. LNs were identified and delineated on MRI from before and after SNB, and on CT, and compared by Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. LN locations and LN-based volumes were related to axillary delineations and associated volumes. Although postoperative effects were visible, LN numbers on postoperative MRI (median 26 LNs) were highly reproducible compared to preoperative MRI when adding excised sentinel nodes, and higher than on CT (median 11, p  <  0.001). LN-based volumes were considerably smaller than respective axillary levels. Supine MRI of LNs is feasible and reproducible before and after SNB. This may lead to more accurate RT target definition compared to CT, with potentially lower toxicity. With the MRI techniques described here, initiation of novel MRI-guided RT strategies aiming at individual LNs could be possible.

  11. High local recurrence risk is not associated with large survival reduction after postmastectomy radiotherapy in high-risk breast cancer: a subgroup analysis of DBCG 82 b

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyndi, Marianne; Overgaard, Marie; Nielsen, Hanne M

    2009-01-01

    randomly assigned to not receive radiotherapy, three prognostic subgroups of LR risk were found. "The good" defined by at least four out of five favorable criteria (3 positive nodes, tumor size 2cm, Grade 1 malignancy, estrogen or progesterone receptor positive, HER2 negative), "the Poor" defined...... radiotherapy in the DBCG82 b&c trials. Tissue microarrays had been constructed and sections stained for estrogen, progesterone and HER2 receptors. Median potential follow-up time was 17 years. Endpoints were LR as isolated first event, breast cancer mortality and overall mortality. RESULTS: Among patients...... by at least two out of three un-favorable criteria (>3 positive nodes, tumor size >5cm, Grade 3 malignancy) and finally "the Intermediate" the group in between. The smallest absolute reduction in 5-year LR probability (11%) after radiotherapy was seen for the good prognosis group. A similar absolute reduction...

  12. Locoregional recurrence of triple-negative breast cancer: effect of type of surgery and adjuvant postoperative radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayoumi Y

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Yasser Bayoumi,1 Ayman AbdelSamie,2 Ahmed Abdelsaid,3 Aida Radwan4 1Radiation Oncology, 2Medical Oncology, 3Surgical Oncology, 4Medical Physics, National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt Background/purpose: The aim was to evaluate the prognostic significance of postoperative radiotherapy (PORT and surgical type on local recurrence-free survival (LRFS and overall survival (OS in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC in the Egyptian population. Patients and methods: We evaluated 111 patients with stage I–III TNBC diagnosed at our institute during the period from 2004 to 2009. Patients were stratified according to PORT into two groups: a PORT group and a non-PORT group. The influence of PORT and surgical type on LRFS and OS were evaluated. A cross-matching was done to the non-TNBC group of patients to compare the recurrence and survival rates between them and the studied group of TNBC patients. Results: The mean age of TNBC patients at diagnosis was 63±7 years. The majority of the patients had stage III disease (68.5% and 73% had clinical or pathological positive lymph nodes. Sixty percent (67/111 of patients had modified radical mastectomy and 44/111 (40% patients had breast-conserving treatment. PORT was given for 63% of patients, while systemic treatment was given in 89% of patients. At the time of analysis, 13 patients (11% developed local recurrence: five of 70 (7% in the PORT group and eight of 41 (19.5% in the non-PORT group. Five-year LRFS for the whole group of patients was 88%±6%, which was significantly affected by PORT. The surgical type did not affect local recurrence significantly. Five-year OS for the whole group was 54%±8%. PORT and surgical type did not affect OS significantly (P-value 0.09 and 0.11, respectively. Five-year LRFS was 88%±6% and 90%±11% for TNBC and non-TNBC patients, respectively (P-value 0.8; however, OS for TNBC was significantly lower than for non-TNBC (P-value 0.04. Conclusion: TNBC is an

  13. ATM Mutations and the Development of Severe Radiation-Induced Morbidity Following Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rosenstein, Barry

    2003-01-01

    ... of this project are to (1) screen 50 breast cancer patients for a ATM mutations who developed radiation-induced grade 3/4 late subcutaneous tissue morbidity as defined by the RTOG/EORTC scoring scheme, (2...

  14. Accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy as adjuvant regimen after conserving surgery for early breast cancer: interim report of toxicity after a minimum follow up of 3 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Accelerated hypofractionation is an attractive approach for adjuvant whole breast radiotherapy. In this study we evaluated the adverse effects at least 3 years post an accelerated hypofractionated whole breast radiotherapy schedule. Methods From October 2004 to March 2006, 39 consecutive patients aged over 18 years with pTis, pT1-2, pN0-1 breast adenocarcinoma who underwent conservative surgery were treated with an adjuvant accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy schedule consisting of 34 Gy in 10 daily fractions over 2 weeks to the whole breast, followed after 1 week by an electron boost dose of 8 Gy in a single fraction to the tumour bed. Skin and lung radiation toxicity was evaluated daily during therapy, once a week for one month after radiotherapy completion, every 3 months for the first year and from then on every six months. In particular lung toxicity was investigated in terms of CT density evaluation, pulmonary functional tests, and clinical and radiological scoring. Paired t-test, Chi-square test and non-parametric Wilcoxon test were performed. Results After a median follow-up of 43 months (range 36-52 months), all the patients are alive and disease-free. None of the patients showed any clinical signs of lung toxicity, no CT-lung toxicity was denoted by radiologist on CT lung images acquired about 1 year post-radiotherapy, no variation of pulmonary density evaluated in terms of normalised Hounsfield numbers was evident. Barely palpable increased density of the treated breast was noted in 9 out of 39 patients (in 2 patients this toxicity was limited to the boost area) and teleangectasia (radiotherapy schedule investigated in this study (i.e 34 Gy in 3.4 Gy/fr plus boost dose of 8 Gy in single fraction) is a feasible and safe treatment and does not lead to adjunctive acute and late toxicities. A longer follow up is necessary to confirm these favourable results. PMID:20100335

  15. Patterns of utilization of adjuvant radiotherapy and outcomes in black women after breast conservation at a large multidisciplinary cancer center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards-Bennett, Sophia M; Jacks, Lindsay M; McCormick, Beryl; Zhang, Zhigang; Azu, Michelle; Ho, Alice; Powell, Simon; Brown, Carol

    2011-07-15

    Population-based studies have reported that as many of 35% of black women do not undergo radiotherapy (RT) after breast conservation surgery (BCS). The objective of the present study was to determine whether this trend persisted at a large multidisciplinary cancer center, and to identify the factors that predict for noncompliance with RT and determine the outcomes for this subset of patients. Between January 2002 and December 2007, 83 black women underwent BCS at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and were therefore eligible for the present study. Of the 83 women, 38 (46%) had Stage I, 38 (46%) Stage II, and 7 (8%) Stage III disease. Of the study cohort, 31 (37%) had triple hormone receptor-negative tumors. RT was recommended for 81 (98%) of the 83 patients (median dose, 60 Gy). Of the 81 women, 12 (15%) did not receive the recommended adjuvant breast RT. Nonreceipt of chemotherapy (p = .003) and older age (p = .009) were associated with nonreceipt of RT. With a median follow-up of 70 months, the 3-year local control, locoregional control, recurrence-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival rate was 99% (actuarial 5-year rate, 97%), 96% (actuarial 5-year rate, 93%), 95% (actuarial 5-year rate, 92%), 92% (actuarial 5-year rate, 89%), and 95% (actuarial 5-year rate, 91%), respectively. We found a greater rate of utilization adjuvant breast RT (85%) among black women after BCS than has been reported in recent studies, indicating that excellent outcomes are attainable for black women after BCS when care is administered in a multidisciplinary cancer center. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Risk of myeloid neoplasms after radiotherapy among older women with localized breast cancer: A population-based study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jessica B.; Wang, Rong; Hu, Xin; Yu, James B.; Huntington, Scott F.; Abel, Gregory A.; Mougalian, Sarah S.; Podoltsev, Nikolai A.; Gore, Steven D.; Gross, Cary P.; Ma, Xiaomei; Davidoff, Amy J.

    2017-01-01

    Background There are inconsistent and limited data regarding the risk of myeloid neoplasms (MN) among breast cancer survivors who received radiotherapy (RT) in the absence of chemotherapy. Concern about subsequent MN might influence the decision to use adjuvant RT for women with localized disease. As patients with therapy-related MN have generally poor outcomes, the presumption of subsequent MN being therapy-related could affect treatment recommendations. Methods We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)–Medicare linked database to study older women with in-situ or stage 1–3 breast cancer diagnosed 2001–2009 who received surgery. Chemotherapy and RT were ascertained using Medicare claims, and new MN diagnoses were captured using both SEER registry and Medicare claims. We excluded women who received chemotherapy for initial treatment, and censored at receipt of subsequent chemotherapy. Competing-risk survival analysis was used to assess the association between RT and risk of subsequent MN adjusting for relevant characteristics. Results Median follow-up for 60,426 eligible patients was 68 months (interquartile range, 46 to 92 months), with 47.6% receiving RT. In total, 316 patients (0.52%) were diagnosed with MN; the cumulative incidence per 10,000 person-years was 10.6 vs 9.0 among RT-treated vs non-RT-treated women, respectively (p = .004); the increased risk of subsequent MN persisted in the adjusted analysis (hazard ratio = 1.36, 95% confidence interval: 1.03–1.80). The results were consistent in multiple sensitivity analyses. Conclusions Our data suggest that RT is associated with a significant risk of subsequent MN among older breast cancer survivors, though the absolute risk increase is very small. These findings suggest the benefits of RT outweigh the risks of development of subsequent MN. PMID:28902882

  17. Objective assessment of cosmetic outcome after targeted intraoperative radiotherapy in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keshtgar, Mohammed R S; Williams, Norman R; Bulsara, Max

    2013-01-01

    and thus impair cosmesis further, so we objectively evaluated the aesthetic outcome of patients within the TARGIT randomised controlled trial. We have used an objective assessment tool for evaluation of cosmetic outcome. Frontal digital photographs were taken at baseline (before TARGIT or EBRT) and yearly...... in a randomised setting, the aesthetic outcome of patients demonstrates that those treated with TARGIT have a superior cosmetic result to those patients who received conventional external beam radiotherapy....

  18. Design of 7 MeV electron beams for breast radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jon In; Kim, Jung In; Kwon, Hyuck Jun [Interdisplinary Program in Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University Graduate School, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Sung Whan; Kim, Il Han [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyun Suk; Ye, Sung Joon [Program in Biomedical Radiation Sciences, Dept. of Transdisciplinary Studies, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    For treating early stage breast cancer, breast conserving therapy with lumpectomy followed by radiation therapy has been preferred as the standard method Irradiation technique consists of whole breast irradiation of 50.0 Gy and supplemental boost of 10 Gy to the tumor bed. The 'boost' to supplement the dose to the highest risk breast tissue around the lumpectomy following whole breast irradiation (WBI) improves in-breast local control. Electron beams have been favored radiation as boost irradiation. Because of limited depth in electron beams, it is possible to reduce the dose for unwished organ such as lung and heart in located in deeper region. Traditionally, electron beams can be modified using a bolus. The use of bolus conforms 90% isodose curve of a single energy electron beam to the distal edge of the target volume. However, it often increases the skin dose with electron beams of energy below 10 MeV. Therefore, with an aim to simultaneously control the penetration depth of the electron beams and the skin dose, we produced the new 7 MeV electron beam by modulating 9 MeV electron beams available in clinical linear accelerators. In this study, we show that the 7 MeV electron beam is appropriate for treatment of patient with a tumor bed located in clinical depth (R90 – R80)

  19. Intraoperative radiotherapy as a protocol for the treatment of initial breast cancer; Radioterapia intraoperatoria como protocolo de tratamento do cancer de mama inicial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bromberg, Silvio Eduardo; Hanriot, Rodrigo de Morais, E-mail: sbromberg@terra.com.br [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Nazario, Afonso Celso Pinto [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina

    2013-07-01

    To report on preliminary outcomes of single-dose intraoperative radiotherapy for early-stage breast cancer based on local recurrence rates and complications. Methods: fifty postmenopausal women with ≤2.5cm breast tumors and clinically normal axillary lymph nodes were submitted to quadrantectomy, sentinel lymph node biopsy and intraoperative radiotherapy and studied. Mean follow-up time was 52.1 months. Results: mean patient age was 65.5 years; mean tumor diameter was 1.41cm 82% of nodules were hormonal receptor positive and HER-2negative. All patients received a 21 Gy radiation dose for a mean time of 8.97 minutes. Distant metastases were not observed. Local recurrence was documented in three cases, with identical histological diagnosis as the primary tumors. Thirty-five (70%) patients had local fibrosis, with gradual improvement and complete resolution over 18 months. Postoperative infection and seroma formation were not observed. Conclusion: partial radiotherapy is a potentially feasible and promising technique. Careful patient selection is recommended before a longer follow-up period has elapsed to confirm intraoperative radiotherapy safety and efficacy. (author)

  20. A new isocentric technique for exact geometric matching in the radiotherapy of the breast and ipsilateral supraclavicular fossa using dual asymmetric jaws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, Nando

    2012-10-01

    In some clinical situations breast or chest wall radiotherapy for cancer is given in association with supraclavicular fossa irradiation. Often the treatment is delivered by two tangential fields to the breast or chest wall and an anterior field that irradiates the supraclavicular region. The tissue between the breast or chest wall and the supraclavicular region may be under or overdosed, because of the junction between the two tangential fields and the anterior field. To present a new isocentric technique for exact geometric matching between the two tangential fields and the anterior field. Patients are positioned with both arms raised. Using three-dimensional trigonometry, two half-fields, with isocenter between the breast and the supraclavicular region, are easily matched. The tangential fields have a collimator rotation to protect the lung without additional shielding. The correct gantry, collimator and couch positions are defined for the anterior field to match the tangential fields. A general formula for exact geometric matching in radiotherapy of the breast and supraclavicular fossa is presented. The method does not require additional shielding to eliminate divergence other than the four independent jaws. The result is simple to implement in modern delivery facilities. Copyright © 2011 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The Comparison 2D and 3D Treatment Planning in Breast Cancer Radiotherapy with Emphasis on Dose Homogeneity and Lung Dose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Falahatpour

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Breast conserving radiotherapy is one of the most common procedures performed in any radiation oncology department. A tangential parallel-opposed pair is usually used for this purpose. This technique is performed using 2D or 3D treatment planning systems. The aim of this study was to compare 2D treatment planning with 3D treatment planning in tangential irradiation in breast conserving radiotherapy. In this comparison, homogeneity of isodoses in the breast volume and lung dose were considered. Material and Methods: Twenty patients with breast cancer treated with conservative surgery were included in this study. The patients were CT scanned. Two-dimensional treatment planning with the Alfard 2D TPS was performed for each patient using a single central CT slice. The data used on the Alfard 2D TPS was imported into the Eclipse 3D TPS, on which 3D treatment planning was performed. Cobalt-60 beams were used in all plans. Results: Comparing 2D and 3D treatment planning, homogeneity of isodoses was improved in 3D treatment planning (p30Gy was increased in 3D treatment planning (p< 0.01. Discussion and Conclusion: 3D treatment planning is a more suitable option for patients with breast cancer treated with conservative surgery because of improved dose homogeneity in 3D treatment planning. The results of the treatment can be improved with reduced recurrence probability and skin problems.

  2. An Unusual Case of Marginal Zone B-Cell Lymphoma Arising in the Breast - Its Diagnosis and the Role of Radiotherapy in its Management.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rock, Kathy

    2011-10-01

    BACKGROUND: Primary lymphoma of the breast accounts for 0.04-0.5% of all breast malignancies and approximately 1% of all extranodal lymphomas. For stage IE node-negative disease, involved field radiotherapy is recommended except for very young women in whom the risk of breast cancer is a concern. The rate of complete response for limited stage extranodal marginal B-cell lymphoma is in excess of 90%. CASE REPORT: We report the case of a 62-year-old lady who presented with a unilateral painless palpable right breast lump. She subsequently underwent a trucut biopsy of the lesion. The histology revealed a low-grade B-cell non-Hodgkin\\'s lymphoma (NHL). Immunohistochemistry showed that more than 95% of the cells were B cells which were CD 20+\\/CD 45+ and BC L6+. This confirmed the diagnosis of marginal zone lymphoma. Staging work-up was negative for distant metastases. Serum alkaline phosphatase and lactate dehydrogenase were normal. The patient had no \\'B\\' symptoms. Her final diagnosis was clinical stage IAE NHL, and she was referred for curative radiotherapy. CONCLUSION: Radiation treatment is a safe and extremely effective modality of treatment for early stage I marginal zone B-cell lymphomas of the breast.

  3. Debate: Pro intraoperative radiation therapy in breast cancer; Debat: pour la radiotherapie peroperatoire dans le cancer du sein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubois, J.B.; Lemanski, C.; Azria, D. [Departement de radiotherapie, CRLC Val-d' Aurelle-Paul-Lamarque, 208, rue des Apothicaires, 34298 Montpellier cedex 5 (France); Gutowski, M.; Rouanet, P.; Saint-Aubert, B. [Departement de chirurgie, CRLC Val-d' Aurelle-Paul-Lamarque, 208, rue des Apothicaires, 34298 Montpellier cedex 5 (France)

    2011-10-15

    The use of intraoperative radiation therapy in breast cancer patients started about 20 years ago. Several retrospective and prospective studies have been published. Intraoperative radiation therapy was initially given as a boost to the tumour bed, followed by whole-breast irradiation. These studies have demonstrated the feasibility of the technique, with local control rates and cosmetic results similar to those obtained with standard treatments. Accelerated partial breast irradiation yields local recurrence rates as low as those observed after whole-breast irradiation. Intraoperative radiation therapy as a single irradiation modality with a unique dose has been investigated in recent prospective studies showing satisfactory local results. Intraoperative radiation therapy can be proposed either as a boost or as a unique treatment in selected cases (tumour size, nodal and hormonal status, patient's age). Intraoperative radiation therapy can be delivered by orthovoltage (50 kV) X-rays from mobile generators, or by electrons from linear accelerators, mobile or fixed, dedicated or not to intraoperative radiation therapy. (authors)

  4. Diabetes insipidus and breast cancer - planning radiotherapy by the use of MRT. Diabetes insipidus und Mammakarzinom - Bedeutung der Kernspintomographie (MRT) zur Therapieplanung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeurer, J.; Busch, M.; Matthaei, D.; Duehmke, E. (Goettingen Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie); Helwig, A. (Goettingen Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Neuroradiologie)

    1993-02-01

    In patients with advanced breast cancer the incidence of diabetes insipidus is between 0,1% and 0,9%. Satisfactory symptomatic relief can be obtained with Desmorpressin-acetat. In the presence of this symptom complex magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can aid in the detection of metastases to the posterior pituitary. By the use of magnetic resonance imaging, the incidence for and implementation of local radiotherapy can be firmly grounded. (orig.).

  5. Retrospective study of radiotherapy-induced skin reactions in breast cancer patients: reduced incidence of moist desquamation with a hydroactive colloid gel versus dexpanthenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Censabella, Sandrine; Claes, Stefan; Orlandini, Marc; Braekers, Roel; Thijs, Herbert; Bulens, Paul

    2014-10-01

    Dermatitis is a very frequent and distressing side effect of radiation therapy that may necessitate a treatment interruption when evolving towards more severe forms such as moist desquamation (MD). The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of two topical agents, a dexpanthenol cream vs a hydroactive colloid gel combining absorbing and moisturising properties, in preventing MD in breast cancer patients. This retrospective study compared two successive groups of breast cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy after breast-sparing surgery between 2008 and 2012. A group of 267 patients applied a 5% dexpanthenol cream on the irradiated zone throughout the course of their radiotherapy. Another group of 216 patients applied first the dexpanthenol cream then replaced it by the hydroactive colloid gel after 11-14 days of radiotherapy. Radiation treatment (total dose, technique, and equipment) was the same for the two groups. The clinical outcomes were the occurrence and time to onset of moist desquamation. The overall incidence of MD was significantly lower in patients who applied the hydroactive colloid gel (16%) than in those who applied the dexpanthenol cream (32%, odds-ratio = 0.35). Also, MD occurred significantly later with the hydroactive colloid gel than with the dexpanthenol cream (hazard ratio = 0.39). Compared with the dexpanthenol cream, the hydroactive colloid gel significantly reduced the risk of developing MD in patients undergoing radiotherapy for breast cancer. These promising results warrant further research on the efficacy of hydroactive colloid gels in managing radiation dermatitis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Accelerated partial breast irradiation using intensity-modulated radiotherapy versus whole breast irradiation: 5-year survival analysis of a phase 3 randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livi, Lorenzo; Meattini, Icro; Marrazzo, Livia; Simontacchi, Gabriele; Pallotta, Stefania; Saieva, Calogero; Paiar, Fabiola; Scotti, Vieri; De Luca Cardillo, Carla; Bastiani, Paolo; Orzalesi, Lorenzo; Casella, Donato; Sanchez, Luis; Nori, Jacopo; Fambrini, Massimiliano; Bianchi, Simonetta

    2015-03-01

    Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) has been introduced as an alternative treatment method for selected patients with early stage breast cancer (BC). Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has the theoretical advantage of a further increase in dose conformity compared with three-dimensional techniques, with more normal tissue sparing. The aim of this randomised trial is to compare the local recurrence and survival of APBI using the IMRT technique after breast-conserving surgery to conventional whole-breast irradiation (WBI) in early stage BC. This study was performed at the University of Florence (Florence, Italy). Women aged more than 40years affected by early BC, with a maximum pathological tumour size of 25mm, were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive either WBI or APBI using IMRT. Patients in the APBI arm received a total dose of 30 Gy to the tumour bed in five daily fractions. The WBI arm received 50Gy in 25 fractions, followed by a boost on the tumour bed of 10Gy in five fractions. The primary end-point was occurrence of ipsilateral breast tumour recurrences (IBTRs); the main analysis was by intention-to-treat. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02104895. A total of 520 patients were randomised (260 to external WBI and 260 to APBI with IMRT) between March 2005 and June 2013. At a median follow-up of 5.0 years (Interquartile Range (IQR) 3.4-7.0), the IBTR rate was 1.5% (three cases) in the APBI group (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.1-3.0) and in the WBI group (three cases; 95% CI 0.0-2.8). No significant difference emerged between the two groups (log rank test p=0.86). We identified seven deaths in the WBI group and only one in the APBI group (p=0.057). The 5-year overall survival was 96.6% for the WBI group and 99.4% for the APBI group. The APBI group presented significantly better results considering acute (p=0.0001), late (p=0.004), and cosmetic outcome (p=0.045). To our knowledge, this is the first randomised

  7. Prone Whole-Breast Irradiation Using Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy in Women Undergoing Breast Conservation for Early Disease Yields High Rates of Excellent to Good Cosmetic Outcomes in Patients With Large and/or Pendulous Breasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergom, Carmen; Kelly, Tracy; Morrow, Natalya; Wilson, J. Frank [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Walker, Alonzo [Department of Surgery, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Xiang Qun; Ahn, Kwang Woo [Division of Biostatistics, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); White, Julia, E-mail: jwhite@mcw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To report our institution's experience using prone positioning for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) to deliver post-lumpectomy whole breast irradiation (WBI) in a cohort of women with large and/or pendulous breasts, to determine the rate of acute and late toxicities and, more specifically, cosmetic outcomes. We hypothesized that using 3D-CRT for WBI in the prone position would reduce or eliminate patient and breast size as negative prognostic indicators for toxicities associated with WBI. Methods and Materials: From 1998 to 2006, 110 cases were treated with prone WBI using 3D-CRT. The lumpectomy, breast target volumes, heart, and lung were contoured on all computed tomography scans. A dose of 45-50 Gy was prescribed to the breast volume using standard fractionation schemes. The planning goals were {>=}95% of prescription to 95% of the breast volume, and 100% of boost dose to 95% of lumpectomy planning target volume. Toxicities and cosmesis were prospectively scored using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Effects Version 3.0 and the Harvard Scale. The median follow-up was 40 months. Results: The median body mass index (BMI) was 33.6 kg/m{sup 2}, and median breast volume was 1396 cm{sup 3}. The worst toxicity encountered during radiation was Grade 3 dermatitis in 5% of our patient population. Moist desquamation occurred in 16% of patients, with only 2% of patients with moist desquamation outside the inframammary/axillary folds. Eleven percent of patients had Grade {>=}2 late toxicities, including Grade 3 induration/fibrosis in 2%. Excellent to good cosmesis was achieved in 89%. Higher BMI was associated with moist desquamation and breast pain, but BMI and breast volume did not impact fibrosis or excellent to good cosmesis. Conclusion: In patients with higher BMI and/or large-pendulous breasts, delivering prone WBI using 3D-CRT results in favorable toxicity profiles and high excellent to good cosmesis rates. Higher BMI was

  8. Ultrasound elastography as an objective diagnostic measurement tool for lymphoedema of the treated breast in breast cancer patients following breast conserving surgery and radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adriaenssens, Nele; Belsack, Dries; Buyl, Ronald; Ruggiero, Leonardo; Breucq, Catherine; De Mey, Johan; Lievens, Pierre; Lamote, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Background. Lymphoedema of the operated and irradiated breast is a common complication following early breast cancer treatment. There is no consensus on objective diagnostic criteria and standard measurement tools. This study investigates the use of ultrasound elastography as an objective quantitative measurement tool for the diagnosis of parenchymal breast oedema. Patients and methods. The elasticity ratio of the subcutis, measured with ultrasound elastography, was compared with high-frequency ultrasound parameters and subjective symptoms in twenty patients, bilaterally, prior to and following breast conserving surgery and breast irradiation. Results. Elasticity ratio of the subcutis of the operated breast following radiation therapy increased in 88.9% of patients, was significantly higher than prior to surgery, unlike the non operated breast and significantly higher than the non operated breast, unlike preoperative results. These results were significantly correlated with visibility of the echogenic line, measured with high-frequency ultrasound. Big preoperative bra cup size was a significant risk factor for the development of breast oedema. Conclusions. Ultrasound elastography is an objective quantitative measurement tool for the diagnosis of parenchymal breast oedema, in combination with other objective diagnostic criteria. Further research with longer follow-up and more patients is necessary to confirm our findings. PMID:23412910

  9. The impact of the use of intraoperative radiotherapy on costs, travel time and distance for women with breast cancer in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargallo-Rocha, Juan Enrique; Soto-Perez-de-Celis, Enrique; Picó-Guzmán, Francisco Javier; Quintero-Rodríguez, Carlos Eduardo; Almog, David; Santiago-Concha, Gabriel; Flores-Balcazar, Christian Haydee; Corona, Jaime; Vazquez-Romo, Rafael; Villarreal-Garza, Cynthia; Mohar, Alejandro

    2017-11-01

    The low availability and poor access to external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in developing countries makes it hard for women with breast cancer to receive breast conservation. We studied the effect of providing intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) on the travel time, distance, and costs of in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA). Sixty-nine patients treated between January 2013 and September 2014 were analyzed. Travel distance and transit time was calculated using Google Maps. The time and distance patients living in the MCMA treated with IORT would have spent if they had received EBRT was calculated. Cost analysis for each modality was performed. 71% (n = 49) lived in the MCMA. Sixteen (33%) received additional EBRT and 33 (66%) received IORT only. Mean driving distance and transit time of those 33 women was 132.6 km (SD 25.7) and 66 min (SD 32.9). Patients from the MCMA receiving IORT alone avoided 990 visits, 43 700 km and 65 400 min in transit. IORT led to a 12% reduction in costs per patient. By reducing costs and time needed for patients to receive radiotherapy, IORT could potentially enhance access to breast conservation in resource-limited developing countries. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Balloon-based adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer: comparison between (99m)Tc and HDR (192)Ir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Campos, Tarcísio Passos Ribeiro; de Lima, Carla Flavia; Cuperschmid, Ethel Mizrahy

    2016-01-01

    To perform a comparative dosimetric analysis, based on computer simulations, of temporary balloon implants with (99m)Tc and balloon brachytherapy with high-dose-rate (HDR) (192)Ir, as boosts to radiotherapy. We hypothesized that the two techniques would produce equivalent doses under pre-established conditions of activity and exposure time. Simulations of implants with (99m)Tc-filled and HDR (192)Ir-filled balloons were performed with the Siscodes/MCNP5, modeling in voxels a magnetic resonance imaging set related to a young female. Spatial dose rate distributions were determined. In the dosimetric analysis of the protocols, the exposure time and the level of activity required were specified. The (99m)Tc balloon presented a weighted dose rate in the tumor bed of 0.428 cGy.h(-1).mCi(-1) and 0.190 cGyh(-1).mCi(-1) at the balloon surface and at 8-10 mm from the surface, respectively, compared with 0.499 and 0.150 cGyh(-1).mCi(-1), respectively, for the HDR (192)Ir balloon. An exposure time of 24 hours was required for the (99m)Tc balloon to produce a boost of 10.14 Gy with 1.0 Ci, whereas only 24 minutes with 10.0 Ci segments were required for the HDR (192)Ir balloon to produce a boost of 5.14 Gy at the same reference point, or 10.28 Gy in two 24-minutes fractions. Temporary (99m)Tc balloon implantation is an attractive option for adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer, because of its availability, economic viability, and similar dosimetry in comparison with the use of HDR (192)Ir balloon implantation, which is the current standard in clinical practice.

  11. Balloon-based adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer: comparison between {sup 99m}Tc and HDR {sup 192}Ir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, Tarcisio Passos Ribeiro de; Lima, Carla Flavia de; Cuperschmid, Ethel Mizrahy, E-mail: tprcampos@pq.cnpq.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2016-03-15

    Objective: To perform a comparative dosimetric analysis, based on computer simulations, of temporary balloon implants with {sup 99m}Tc and balloon brachytherapy with high-dose-rate (HDR) {sup 192}Ir, as boosts to radiotherapy. We hypothesized that the two techniques would produce equivalent doses under pre-established conditions of activity and exposure time. Materials and methods: simulations of implants with {sup 99m}Tc-filled and HDR {sup 192}Ir-filled balloons were performed with the Siscodes/MCNP5, modeling in voxels a magnetic resonance imaging set related to a young female. Spatial dose rate distributions were determined. In the dosimetric analysis of the protocols, the exposure time and the level of activity required were specified. Results: the {sup 99m}Tc balloon presented a weighted dose rate in the tumor bed of 0.428 cGy.h{sup -1}.mCi{sup -1} and 0.190 cGyh{sup -1} at the balloon surface and at 8-10 mm from the surface, respectively, compared with 0.499 and 0.150 cGyh{sup -1}.mCi{sup -1}, respectively, for the HDR {sup 192}Ir balloon. An exposure time of 24 hours was required for the {sup 99m}Tc balloon to produce a boost of 10.14 Gy with 1.0 Ci, whereas only 24 minutes with 10.0 Ci segments were required for the HDR {sup 192}Ir balloon to produce a boost of 5.14 Gy at the same reference point, or 10.28 Gy in two 24-minutes fractions. Conclusion: temporary {sup 99m}Tc balloon implantation is an attractive option for adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer, because of its availability, economic viability, and similar dosimetry in comparison with the use of HDR {sup 192}Ir balloon implantation, which is the current standard in clinical practice. (author)

  12. Ultrasound elastography as an objective diagnostic measurement tool for lymphoedema of the treated breast in breast cancer patients following breast conserving surgery and radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Adriaenssens, Nele; Belsack, Dries; Buyl, Ronald; Ruggiero, Leonardo; Breucq, Catherine; De Mey, Johan; Lievens, Pierre; Lamote, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Background. Lymphoedema of the operated and irradiated breast is a common complication following early breast cancer treatment. There is no consensus on objective diagnostic criteria and standard measurement tools. This study investigates the use of ultrasound elastography as an objective quantitative measurement tool for the diagnosis of parenchymal breast oedema. Patients and methods. The elasticity ratio of the subcutis, measured with ultrasound elastography, was compared with high-frequen...

  13. Dosimetric advantages of generalised equivalent uniform dose-based optimisation on dose–volume objectives in intensity-modulated radiotherapy planning for bilateral breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, T-F; Ting, H-M; Chao, P-J; Wang, H-Y; Shieh, C-S; Horng, M-F; Wu, J-M; Yeh, S-A; Cho, M-Y; Huang, E-Y; Huang, Y-J; Chen, H-C; Fang, F-M

    2012-01-01

    Objective We compared and evaluated the differences between two models for treating bilateral breast cancer (BBC): (i) dose–volume-based intensity-modulated radiation treatment (DV plan), and (ii) dose–volume-based intensity-modulated radiotherapy with generalised equivalent uniform dose-based optimisation (DV-gEUD plan). Methods The quality and performance of the DV plan and DV-gEUD plan using the Pinnacle3® system (Philips, Fitchburg, WI) were evaluated and compared in 10 patients with stage T2–T4 BBC. The plans were delivered on a Varian 21EX linear accelerator (Varian Medical Systems, Milpitas, CA) equipped with a Millennium 120 leaf multileaf collimator (Varian Medical Systems). The parameters analysed included the conformity index, homogeneity index, tumour control probability of the planning target volume (PTV), the volumes V20 Gy and V30 Gy of the organs at risk (OAR, including the heart and lungs), mean dose and the normal tissue complication probability. Results Both plans met the requirements for the coverage of PTV with similar conformity and homogeneity indices. However, the DV-gEUD plan had the advantage of dose sparing for OAR: the mean doses of the heart and lungs, lung V20 Gy, and heart V30 Gy in the DV-gEUD plan were lower than those in the DV plan (p<0.05). Conclusions A better result can be obtained by starting with a DV-generated plan and then improving it by adding gEUD-based improvements to reduce the number of iterations and to improve the optimum dose distribution. Advances to knowledge The DV-gEUD plan provided superior dosimetric results for treating BBC in terms of PTV coverage and OAR sparing than the DV plan, without sacrificing the homogeneity of dose distribution in the PTV. PMID:23091290

  14. Optimization of indications for parasternal radiotherapy in patients with breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Zaytceva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Detection of regional lymph nodes involvement is an extremely important step in the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. As with axillary lymph node metastases, parasternal lymph nodes metastases are an important prognostic factor. 1125 patients with breast cancer were under- went to thoracoscopicinternal mammary lymphadenectomy. Metastases were found in 204 of 1125 cases (18,3 %, representing 33,9 % of all cases of regional metastases (n = 601. Median overall survival in patients with internal mammary lymph nodes metastases who received radiation therapy and appropriate systemic treatment was 7,8 years, which is contrary to the earlier experience and is consistent with the results of the last years publications. We believe this excellent result is due to irradiation of the internal mammary nodes, and we believe that the thoracoscopic internal mammary lymphadenectomy should be a part of the diagnostic process in patients with breast cancer.

  15. Prone Hypofractionated Whole-Breast Radiotherapy Without a Boost to the Tumor Bed: Comparable Toxicity of IMRT Versus a 3D Conformal Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardee, Matthew E.; Raza, Shahzad; Becker, Stewart J.; Jozsef, Gabor; Lymberis, Stella C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Hochman, Tsivia; Goldberg, Judith D. [Division of Biostatistics, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); DeWyngaert, Keith J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Formenti, Silvia C., E-mail: silvia.formenti@nyumc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: We report a comparison of the dosimetry and toxicity of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) vs. intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) among patients treated in the prone position with the same fractionation and target of the hypofractionation arm of the Canadian/Whelan trial. Methods and Materials: An institutional review board-approved protocol identified a consecutive series of early-stage breast cancer patients treated according to the Canadian hypofractionation regimen but in the prone position. Patients underwent IMRT treatment planning and treatment if the insurance carrier approved reimbursement for IMRT; in case of refusal, a 3D-CRT plan was used. A comparison of the dosimetric and toxicity outcomes during the acute, subacute, and long-term follow-up of the two treatment groups is reported. Results: We included 97 consecutive patients with 100 treatment plans in this study (3 patients with bilateral breast cancer); 40 patients were treated with 3D-CRT and 57 with IMRT. IMRT significantly reduced the maximum dose (Dmax median, 109.96% for 3D-CRT vs. 107.28% for IMRT; p < 0.0001, Wilcoxon test) and improved median dose homogeneity (median, 1.15 for 3D-CRT vs. 1.05 for IMRT; p < 0.0001, Wilcoxon test) when compared with 3D-CRT. Acute toxicity consisted primarily of Grade 1 to 2 dermatitis and occurred in 92% of patients. Grade 2 dermatitis occurred in 13% of patients in the 3D-CRT group and 2% in the IMRT group. IMRT moderately decreased rates of acute pruritus (p = 0.03, chi-square test) and Grade 2 to 3 subacute hyperpigmentation (p = 0.01, Fisher exact test). With a minimum of 6 months' follow-up, the treatment was similarly well tolerated in either group, including among women with large breast volumes. Conclusion: Hypofractionated breast radiotherapy is well tolerated when treating patients in the prone position, even among those with large breast volumes. Breast IMRT significantly improves dosimetry but yields only a modest

  16. VMAT radiation-induced nausea and vomiting in adjuvant breast cancer radiotherapy: The incidental effect of low-dose bath exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Lazzari

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: To investigate the hypothesis on low-dose bath exposure related to radiation-induced nausea and vomiting (RINV in adjuvant breast volumetric modulated arch therapy (VMAT. Methods and materials: A total of 106 consecutive breast cancer patients (pts treated with adjuvant radiotherapy (RT with VMAT from January 2013 to May 2016 were evaluated retrospectively. For each pt, a planning CT was reimported and the coeliac plexus and gastroesophageal junction with gastric mouth (GEJCPs were contoured as a new organ at risk (OAR in the upper abdominal area. RINV was associated with Dmax and Dmean to GEJCPs. Univariate analysis with χ2, t-test, and Pearson’s covariance was used for statistical analysis. Results: Of 106 pts, 64% complained of acute RINV according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE version 4.03. RINV was related to Dmax > 10 Gy and Dmean > 3 Gy to GEJCPs (P < 0.005. The radiation breast side and planning target volume (PTV correlated with RINV. Conclusions: RINV in VMAT breast radiotherapy could be a new emerging acute side effect due to a low dose bath to upper abdominal structures such as the GEJCPs. A Dmax < 10 Gy and Dmean < 3 Gy to GEJCPs should be constrained in VMAT planning to minimize RINV risk in breast radiotherapy. Keywords: Volumetric modulated arch therapy, Gastroesophageal junction, Coeliac plexus, Nausea, Vomit

  17. Local High-Dose Radiotherapy Induces Systemic Immunomodulating Effects of Potential Therapeutic Relevance in Oligometastatic Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Muraro

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Local irradiation of cancer through radiotherapy can induce spontaneous regression of non-directly irradiated lesions, suggesting the involvement of systemic antitumor immune responses. In oligometastatic breast cancer (BC patients, the use of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT favors the local control of treated lesions and may contribute to break local tolerance and release tumor-associated antigens (TAAs, improving host antitumor immunity. We performed a detailed immunomonitoring of BC patients undergoing SBRT to verify its ability to “switch on” the anti-tumor immunity both systemically, in peripheral blood, and locally, employing in vitro BC models. Twenty-one BC patients with ≤6 metastases were treated with 3 daily doses of 10 Gy with SBRT. Blood samples for immune profiling were collected before and after treatment. One month after treatment a third of patients displayed the boosting or even the de novo appearance of polyfunctional CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses against known BC TAAs (survivin, mammaglobin-A, HER2, through intracellular staining in flow cytometry. Half of patients showed increased numbers of activated natural killer (NK cells, measured with multispectral flow cytometry, immediately after the first dose of SBRT. Interestingly, high levels of activated NK cells at diagnosis correlated with a longer progression-free survival. BC in vitro models, treated with the same SBRT modality, showed enhanced expression of MHC class-I and class-II, major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain A/B, and Fas molecules, and increased release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-1β and TNF-α. Consistently, we noticed enhanced production of perforin by CD4+ T cells when patients’ lymphocytes were cultured in the presence of irradiated BC cell line, compared to untreated targets. Besides immunogenic effects, SBRT also enhanced the percentages of circulating regulatory T cells, and increased indoleamine 2

  18. Whole breast radiotherapy in the lateral decubitus position: a dosimetric and clinical solution to decrease the doses to the organs at risk (OAR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirova, Youlia M; Hijal, Tarek; Campana, Francois; Fournier-Bidoz, Nathalie; Stilhart, Anne; Dendale, Rémi; Fourquet, Alain

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate whole breast 3D-conformal radiotherapy (RT) delivered in the lateral decubitus position (isocentric lateral decubitus [ILD]) and to report the acute toxicity of a series of consecutive patients treated with ILD. From January to December 2010, 56 consecutive patients with large breasts and early-stage breast cancer treated by breast conserving surgery underwent 3D-conformal whole breast RT in the lateral decubitus position. A dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions via two opposed isocentric beams was prescribed to whole breast, with or without a 16 Gy photon tumor bed boost. Dosimetry of all patients was reviewed, and the acute toxicity of treatment, evaluated weekly using the NCI CTC v3.0 scale, was analyzed. Median age was 57 years (range: 33-71). 85% of patients had a breast circumference of at least 95 cm and 80% had at least a C cup size. Average breast volume was 991 cm(3) (range: 225-2791 cm(3)). Median dose to the breast was 50 Gy, while median dose to the tumor bed was 16 Gy. Grade 1, 2 and 3 dermatitis developed in 37.5%, 58.9% and 1.8% of patients, respectively. From a dosimetric point of view, doses to the ipsilateral lung were extremely low: average V(1Gy), V(2Gy) and V(5Gy) were 26.6%, 9.3% and 0.7%, respectively. Average mean lung dose was 0.96 Gy. For the 26 patients with left-sided tumors, heart doses were also extremely low: average V(1Gy), V(2Gy) and V(5Gy) were 58.8%, 14.2% and 0.7%, respectively. Average mean heart dose was 1.35 Gy. Whole breast radiotherapy in the lateral decubitus position for patients with large breasts and early-stage breast cancer provides an excellent dosimetric profile, with low doses to the heart and ipsilateral lung. It is also very well tolerated, with a good acute toxicity profile. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A topology-based method to mitigate the dosimetric uncertainty caused by the positional variation of the boost volume in breast conservative radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Peng-Yi; Lin, Chih-Yuan; Chen, Shang-Wen; Chien, Chun-Ru; Chu, Chun-Nan; Hsu, Hsiu-Ting; Liang, Ji-An; Lin, Ying-Jun; Shiau, An-Cheng

    2017-03-20

    To improve local control rate in patients with breast cancer receiving adjuvant radiotherapy after breast conservative surgery, additional boost dose to the tumor bed could be delivered simultaneously via the simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) modulated technique. However, the position of tumor bed kept changing during the treatment course as the treatment position was aligned to bony anatomy. This study aimed to analyze the positional uncertainties between bony anatomy and tumor bed, and a topology-based approach was derived to stratify patients with high variation in tumor bed localization. Sixty patients with early-stage breast cancer or ductal carcinoma in situ were enrolled. All received adjuvant whole breast radiotherapy with or without local boost via SIB technique. The delineation of tumor bed was defined by incorporating the anatomy of seroma, adjacent surgical clips, and any architectural distortion on computed tomography simulation. A total of 1740 on-board images were retrospectively analyzed. Positional uncertainty of tumor bed was assessed by four components: namely systematic error (SE), and random error (RE), through anterior-posterior (AP), cranial-caudal (CC), left-right (LR) directions and couch rotation (CR). Age, tumor location, and body-mass factors including volume of breast, volume of tumor bed, breast thickness, and body mass index (BMI) were analyzed for their predictive role. The appropriate margin to accommodate the positional uncertainty of the boost volume was assessed, and the new plans with this margin for the tumor bed was designed as the high risk planning target volume (PTV-H) were created retrospectively to evaluate the impact on organs at risk. In univariate analysis, a larger breast thickness, larger breast volume, higher BMI, and different tumor locations correlated with a greater positional uncertainty of tumor bed. However, BMI was the only factor associated with displacements of surgical clips in the multivariate analysis

  20. Radiotherapy for stage II and stage III breast cancer patients with negative lymph nodes after preoperative chemotherapy and mastectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Scodan, Romuald; Selz, Jessica; Stevens, Denise; Bollet, Marc A; de la Lande, Brigitte; Daveau, Caroline; Lerebours, Florence; Labib, Alain; Bruant, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) in Stage II-III breast cancer patients with negative lymph nodes (pN0) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). Of 1,054 breast cancer patients treated with NAC at our institution between 1990 and 2004, 134 had pN0 status after NAC and mastectomy. The demographic data, tumor characteristics, metastatic sites, and treatments were prospectively recorded. The effect of PMRT on locoregional recurrence-free survival and overall survival (OS) was evaluated by multivariate analysis, including known prognostic factors. Of the 134 eligible patients, 78 (58.2%) received PMRT and 56 (41.8%) did not. At a median follow-up time of 91.4 months, the 5-year locoregional recurrence-free survival and OS rate was 96.2% and 88.3% with PMRT and 92.5% and 94.3% without PMRT, respectively (p = NS). The corresponding values at 10 years were 96.2% and 77.2% with PMRT and 86.8% and 87.7% without PMRT (p = NS). On multivariate analysis, PMRT had no effect on either locoregional recurrence-free survival (hazard ratio, 0.37; 95% confidence interval, 0.09-1.61; p = .18) or OS (hazard ratio, 2.06; 95% confidence interval, 0.71-6; p = .18). This remained true in the subgroups of patients with clinical Stage II or Stage III disease at diagnosis. A trend was seen toward poorer OS among patients who had not had a pathologic complete in-breast tumor response after NAC (hazard ratio, 6.65; 95% confidence interval, 0.82-54.12; p = .076). The results from the present retrospective study showed no increase in the risk of distant metastasis, locoregional recurrence, or death when PMRT was omitted in breast cancer patients with pN0 status after NAC and mastectomy. Whether the omission of PMRT is acceptable for these patients should be addressed prospectively. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Outcomes of Positron Emission Tomography-Staged Clinical N3 Breast Cancer Treated With Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy, Surgery, and Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hae Jin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Kyung Hwan, E-mail: radiat@ncc.re.kr [Center for Breast Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Proton Therapy Center, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Kwan Ho [Proton Therapy Center, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Park, In Hae; Lee, Keun Seok; Ro, Jungsil; Jung, So-Youn; Lee, Seeyoun; Kim, Seok Won; Kang, Han-Sung [Center for Breast Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Chie, Eui Kyu; Ha, Sung Whan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the treatment outcome and efficacy of regional lymph node irradiation after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) and surgery in positron emission tomography (PET)-positive clinical N3 (cN3) breast cancer patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 55 patients with ipsilateral infraclavicular (ICL), internal mammary (IMN), or supraclavicular (SCL) lymph node involvement in the absence of distant metastases, as revealed by an initial PET scan, were retrospectively analyzed. The clinical nodal stage at diagnosis (2002 AJCC) was cN3a in 14 patients (26%), cN3b in 12 patients (22%), and cN3c in 29 patients (53%). All patients were treated with NCT, followed by mastectomy or breast-conserving surgery and subsequent radiotherapy (RT) with curative intent. Results: At the median follow-up of 38 months (range, 9-80 months), 20 patients (36%) had developed treatment failures, including distant metastases either alone or combined with locoregional recurrences that included one ipsilateral breast recurrence (IBR), six regional failures (RF), and one case of combined IBR and RF. Only 3 patients (5.5%) exhibited treatment failure at the initial PET-positive clinical N3 lymph node. The 5-year locoregional relapse-free survival, disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival rates were 80%, 60%, and 79%, respectively. RT delivered to PET-positive IMN regions in cN3b patients and at higher doses ({>=}55 Gy) to SCL regions in cN3c patients was not associated with improved 5-year IMN/SCL relapse-free survival or DFS. Conclusion: NCT followed by surgery and RT, including the regional lymph nodes, resulted in excellent locoregional control for patients with PET-positive cN3 breast cancer. The primary treatment failure in this group was due to distant metastasis rather than RF. Neither higher-dose RT directed at PET-positive SCL nodes nor coverage of PET-positive IMN nodes was associated with additional gains in locoregional control or DFS.

  2. An assessment of quality of life for early phase after adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer survivors: a Korean multicenter survey (KROG 14-09).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rim, Chai Hong; Ahn, Sung-Ja; Kim, Jin Hee; Yoon, Won Sup; Chun, Mison; Yang, Dae Sik; Lee, Jong-Hoon; Kim, Kyubo; Kong, Moonkyoo; Kim, Suzy; Kim, Juree; Park, Kyung Ran; Shin, Young-Joo; Ma, Sun Young; Jeong, Bae-Kwon; Kim, Su Ssan; Kim, Yong Bae; Lee, Dong Soo; Cha, Jaehyung

    2017-05-10

    Quality of life (QoL) has become a major concern as the survival time of breast cancer increases. We investigated the changes in QoL through comprehensive categorical analysis, for the first three years after breast cancer treatment including radiotherapy. A total of 1156 patients were enrolled from 17 institutions. All survivors were grouped according to a surveillance period of 9-15 months (first year), 21-27 months (second year), and 33-39 months (third year) from the end of radiotherapy. The 5-dimensional questionnaire by the EuroQol group (EQ-5D) and the EORTC Quality of Life Questionnaire; breast cancer specific module (QLQ-BR23) were checked by self-administrated method. First, second and third year groups comprised 51.0, 28.9, and 21.0%. In EQ-5D-3 L (3-Likert scale) analysis, pain/discomfort and anxiety/depression categories showed lower QoL. In multivariate analyses of EQ-5D-VAS (visual-analogue scale), categories of pain/discomfort and self-care were improved with time; axillary dissection was a significant clinical factor deteriorates pain/discomfort, self-care and usual activities. In QLQ-BR23 analysis, the lowest scored category was sexual activity, followed by sexual enjoyment, future perspective, and hair loss, and the best scored category was breast symptoms. In multivariate analyses, arm symptoms, breast symptoms and body image were improved with time. Categories of pain/discomfort and self-care in EQ-5D-VAS, arm/breast symptoms and body image in QLQ-BR23 were improved, while categories of anxiety/depression and future perspective BR23 were not, suggesting necessity of psychosocial support. This research provides comprehensive information on the categorical aspects of QoL and changes during early follow-up after breast cancer treatment.

  3. Breast cancer and funnel chest. Comparing helical tomotherapy and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy with regard to the shape of pectus excavatum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhl, M.; Sterzing, F.; Habl, G.; Schubert, K.; Hof, H.; Debus, J.; Herfarth, K. [Univ. of Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2012-02-15

    Preserving lung, heart, and the contralateral breast from toxicity is a technical challenge in women with funnel chest, who require breast irradiation. The purpose of this study was to determine whether helical tomotherapy (HT) offers an advantage compared to three-dimensional (3D) conformal radiotherapy (CRT) for patients with pectus excavatum with regard to its shape. Ten breast cancer patients with pectus excavatum were graded into a low or high deformation group using different indices, measured and calculated by using the planning CT. A planning comparison was performed, creating plans for CRT and HT. Target uniformity, target conformity, and exposure to the organs at risk (OARs) were compared. The uniformity and conformity of the target dose distribution and the median/average dose of the planning target volume (PTV) was inferior in CRT compared to HT in both deformation groups. By using tomotherapy, the volume of the lungs, the contralateral breast, and the heart, which received high dose exposure, could be significantly reduced. Tomotherapy plans led to a significantly higher low dose exposure to the lungs and contralateral breast. This is the first study which evaluates a group of 10 breast cancer patients with funnel chest. Better uniformity and conformity combined with a significant reduction of high dose exposure to the OARs can be reached using tomotherapy. However, tomotherapy plans have a significantly larger volume of low dose to the lungs and contralateral breast. Therefore, the stochastic risk should be considered after low dose exposure in women with low deformation. (orig.)

  4. Automated daily breath hold stability measurements by real-time imaging in radiotherapy of breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Boer, Hans C J; Van Den Bongard, Desirée J G; van Asselen, B

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Breath hold is increasingly used for cardiac sparing in left-sided breast cancer irradiation. We have developed a fast automated method to verify breath hold stability in each treatment fraction. Material and methods We evaluated 504 patients treated with breath hold. Moderate

  5. beta 1 integrin inhibition dramatically enhances radiotherapy efficacy in human breast cancer xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Catherine C.; Park, Catherine C.; Zhang, Hui J.; Yao, Evelyn S.; Park, Chong J.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2008-06-02

    {beta}1 integrin signaling has been shown to mediate cellular resistance to apoptosis after exposure to ionizing radiation (IR). Other signaling molecules that increase resistance include Akt, which promotes cell survival downstream of {beta}1 integrin signaling. We showed previously that {beta}1 integrin inhibitory antibodies, AIIB2, enhance apoptosis and decrease growth in human breast cancer cells in 3 dimensional laminin-rich extracellular matrix (3D lrECM) cultures and in vivo. Here we asked whether AIIB2 could synergize with IR to modify Akt-mediated IR resistance. We used 3D lrECM cultures to test the optimal combination of AIIB2 with IR treatment of two breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and HMT3522-T4-2, as well as T4-2 myr-Akt breast cancer colonies or HMT3522-S-1, which form normal organotypic structures in 3D lrECM. Colonies were assayed for apoptosis and {beta}1 integrin/Akt signaling pathways were evaluated using western blot. In addition, mice bearing MCF-7 xenografts were used to validate the findings in 3D lrECM. We report that AIIB2 increased apoptosis optimally post-IR by down regulating Akt in breast cancer colonies in 3D lrECM. In vivo, addition of AIIB2 after IR significantly enhanced tumor growth inhibition and apoptosis compared to either treatment alone. Remarkably, the degree of tumor growth inhibition using AIIB2 plus 2 Gy radiation was similar to that of 8 Gy alone. We showed previously that AIIB2 had no discernible toxicity in mice; here, its addition allowed for a significant reduction in the IR dose that was necessary to achieve comparable growth inhibition and apoptosis in breast cancer xenografts in vivo.

  6. Intrinsic subtypes and benefit from postmastectomy radiotherapy in node-positive premenopausal breast cancer patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy - results from two independent randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurberg, Tinne; Tramm, Trine; Nielsen, Torsten; Alsner, Jan; Nord, Silje; Myhre, Simen; Sørlie, Therese; Leung, Samuel; Fan, Cheng; Perou, Charles; Gelmon, Karen; Overgaard, Jens; Voduc, David; Prat, Aleix; Cheang, Maggie Chon U

    2017-11-25

    The study of the intrinsic molecular subtypes of breast cancer has revealed differences among them in terms of prognosis and response to chemotherapy and endocrine therapy. However, the ability of intrinsic subtypes to predict benefit from adjuvant radiotherapy has only been examined in few studies. Gene expression-based intrinsic subtyping was performed in 228 breast tumors collected from two independent post-mastectomy clinical trials (British Columbia and the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group 82b trials), where pre-menopausal patients with node-positive disease were randomized to adjuvant radiotherapy or not. All patients received adjuvant chemotherapy and a subgroup of patients underwent ovarian ablation. Tumors were classified into intrinsic subtypes: Luminal A, Luminal B, HER2-enriched, Basal-like and Normal-like using the research-based PAM50 classifier. In the British Columbia study, patients treated with radiation had an overall significant lower incidence of locoregional recurrence compared to the controls. For Luminal A tumors the risk of loco-regional recurrence was low and was further lowered by adjuvant radiation. These findings were validated in the DBCG 82b study. The individual data from the two cohorts were merged, the hazard ratio (HR) for loco-regional recurrence associated with giving radiation was 0.34 (0.19 to 0.61) overall and 0.12 (0.03 to 0.52) for Luminal A tumors. In both postmastectomy trials, patients with Luminal A tumors turned out to have a significant lower incidence of loco-regional recurrence when randomized to adjuvant radiotherapy, leaving no indication to omit postmastectomy adjuvant radiation in pre-menopausal high-risk patients with Luminal A tumors. It was not possible to evaluate the effect of radiotherapy among the other subtypes because of limited sample sizes.

  7. One-year longitudinal study of fatigue, cognitive functions, and quality of life after adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noal, Sabine; Levy, Christelle; Hardouin, Agnès; Rieux, Chantal; Heutte, Natacha; Ségura, Carine; Collet, Fabienne; Allouache, Djelila; Switsers, Odile; Delcambre, Corinne; Delozier, Thierry; Henry-Amar, Michel; Joly, Florence

    2011-11-01

    Most patients with localized breast cancer (LBC) who take adjuvant chemotherapy (CT) complain of fatigue and a decrease in quality of life during or after radiotherapy (RT). The aim of this longitudinal study was to compare the impact of RT alone with that occurring after previous CT on quality of life. Fatigue (the main endpoint) and cognitive impairment were assessed in 161 CT-RT and 141 RT patients during RT and 1 year later. Fatigue was assessed with Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General questionnaires, including breast and fatigue modules. At baseline, 60% of the CT-RT patients expressed fatigue vs. 33% of the RT patients (p <0.001). Corresponding values at the end of RT were statistically similar (61% and 53%), and fatigue was still reported at 1 year by more than 40% of patients in both groups. Risk factors for long-term fatigue included depression (odds ratio [OR] = 6), which was less frequent in the RT group at baseline (16% vs. 28 %, respectively, p = 0.01) but reached a similar value at the end of RT (25% in both groups). Initial mild cognitive impairments were reported by RT (34 %) patients and CT-RT (24 %) patients and were persistent at 1 year for half of them. No biological disorders were associated with fatigue or cognitive impairment. Fatigue was the main symptom in LBC patients treated with RT, whether they received CT previously or not. The correlation of persistent fatigue with initial depressive status favors administering medical and psychological programs for LBC patients treated with CT and/or RT, to identify and manage this main quality-of-life-related symptom. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Topical Hyaluronic Acid vs. Standard of Care for the Prevention of Radiation Dermatitis After Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer: Single-Blind Randomized Phase III Clinical Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinnix, Chelsea; Perkins, George H.; Strom, Eric A.; Tereffe, Welela; Woodward, Wendy; Oh, Julia L.; Arriaga, Lisa [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Munsell, Mark F. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Kelly, Patrick; Hoffman, Karen E.; Smith, Benjamin D.; Buchholz, Thomas A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Yu, T. Kuan, E-mail: tkyu@houstonprecisioncc.com [Houston Precision Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of an emulsion containing hyaluronic acid to reduce the development of {>=}Grade 2 radiation dermatitis after adjuvant breast radiation compared with best supportive care. Methods and Materials: Women with breast cancer who had undergone lumpectomy and were to receive whole-breast radiotherapy to 50 Gy with a 10- to 16-Gy surgical bed boost were enrolled in a prospective randomized trial to compare the effectiveness of a hyaluronic acid-based gel (RadiaPlex) and a petrolatum-based gel (Aquaphor) for preventing the development of dermatitis. Each patient was randomly assigned to use hyaluronic acid gel on the medial half or the lateral half of the irradiated breast and to use the control gel on the other half. Dermatitis was graded weekly according to the Common Terminology Criteria v3.0 by the treating physician, who was blinded as to which gel was used on which area of the breast. The primary endpoint was development of {>=}Grade 2 dermatitis. Results: The study closed early on the basis of a recommendation from the Data and Safety Monitoring Board after 74 of the planned 92 patients were enrolled. Breast skin treated with the hyaluronic acid gel developed a significantly higher rate of {>=}Grade 2 dermatitis than did skin treated with petrolatum gel: 61.5% (40/65) vs. 47.7% (31/65) (p = 0.027). Only 1ne patient developed Grade 3 dermatitis using either gel. A higher proportion of patients had worse dermatitis in the breast segment treated with hyaluronic acid gel than in that treated with petrolatum gel at the end of radiotherapy (42% vs. 14%, p = 0.003). Conclusion: We found no benefit from the use of a topical hyaluronic acid-based gel for reducing the development of {>=}Grade 2 dermatitis after adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer. Additional studies are needed to determine the efficacy of hyaluronic acid-based gel in controlling radiation dermatitis symptoms after they develop.

  9. Intrinsic subtypes and benefit from postmastectomy radiotherapy in node-positive premenopausal breast cancer patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy - results from two independent randomized trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurberg, Tinne; Tramm, Trine; Nielsen, Torsten

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The study of the intrinsic molecular subtypes of breast cancer has revealed differences among them in terms of prognosis and response to chemotherapy and endocrine therapy. However, the ability of intrinsic subtypes to predict benefit from adjuvant radiotherapy has only been examined...... in few studies. METHODS: Gene expression-based intrinsic subtyping was performed in 228 breast tumors collected from two independent post-mastectomy clinical trials (British Columbia and the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group 82b trials), where pre-menopausal patients with node-positive disease were......: In the British Columbia study, patients treated with radiation had an overall significant lower incidence of locoregional recurrence compared to the controls. For Luminal A tumors the risk of loco-regional recurrence was low and was further lowered by adjuvant radiation. These findings were validated in the DBCG...

  10. Accelerated partial breast irradiation using 3D conformal radiotherapy: initial clinical experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gatti, M.; Madeddu, A.; Malinverni, G.; Delmastro, E.; Bona, C.; Gabriele, P. [IRCC-Radiotherapy, Candiolo, TO (Italy); Baiotto, B.; Stasi, M. [IRCC-Medical Physics, Candiolo, TO (Italy); Ponzone, R.; Siatis, D. [IRCC-Surgery, Candiolo, TO (Italy)

    2006-11-15

    Accelerated partial breast irradiation using 3D-C.R.T. is technically sophisticate but feasible and acute toxicity to date has been minimal. A C.T.V.-to-P.T.V. margin of 10 mm seems to provide coverage for analyzed patients. However, more patients and additional studies will be needed to validate the accuracy of this margin, and longer follow-up will be needed to assess acute and chronic toxicity, tumor control, and cosmetic results. (author)

  11. Atlas-based segmentation in breast cancer radiotherapy: Evaluation of specific and generic-purpose atlases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciardo, Delia; Gerardi, Marianna Alessandra; Vigorito, Sabrina; Morra, Anna; Dell'acqua, Veronica; Diaz, Federico Javier; Cattani, Federica; Zaffino, Paolo; Ricotti, Rosalinda; Spadea, Maria Francesca; Riboldi, Marco; Orecchia, Roberto; Baroni, Guido; Leonardi, Maria Cristina; Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja

    2017-04-01

    Atlas-based automatic segmentation (ABAS) addresses the challenges of accuracy and reliability in manual segmentation. We aim to evaluate the contribution of specific-purpose in ABAS of breast cancer (BC) patients with respect to generic-purpose libraries. One generic-purpose and 9 specific-purpose libraries, stratified according to type of surgery and size of thorax circumference, were obtained from the computed tomography of 200 BC patients. Keywords about contralateral breast volume and presence of breast expander/prostheses were recorded. ABAS was validated on 47 independent patients, considering manual segmentation from scratch as reference. Five ABAS datasets were obtained, testing single-ABAS and multi-ABAS with simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE). Center of mass distance (CMD), average Hausdorff distance (AHD) and Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) between corresponding ABAS and manual structures were evaluated and statistically significant differences between different surgeries, structures and ABAS strategies were investigated. Statistically significant differences between patients who underwent different surgery were found, with superior results for conservative-surgery group, and between different structures were observed: ABAS of heart, lungs, kidneys and liver was satisfactory (median values: CMDbreast and spinal cord obtained moderate performance (median values: 2 mm ≤ CMDbreast ABAS. The homogeneity in the selection of atlases based on multiple anatomical and clinical features and the use of specific-purpose libraries can improve ABAS performance with respect to generic-purpose libraries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. DEGRO practice guidelines for palliative radiotherapy of metastatic breast cancer. Bone metastases and metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souchon, Rainer [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, UKT Tuebingen (Germany); Wenz, Frederik [Univ. Hospital Mannheim (Germany); Sedlmayer, Felix [Univ. Hospital, Salzburger Landeskliniken, Salzburg (Austria); Budach, Wilfried [Univ. Hospital Duesseldorf (Germany); Dunst, Juergen [Univ. Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Luebeck (Germany); Feyer, Petra [Klinikum Neukoelln, Berlin (Germany); Haase, Wulf [St.-Vincentius-Kliniken, Karlsruhe (Germany); Harms, Wolfgang [St. Clara Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Sautter-Bihl, Marie-Luise [Municipal Hospital, Karlsruhe (Germany); Sauer, Rolf [Univ. Hospital Erlangen (Germany)

    2009-07-15

    To provide practice guidelines and clinical recommendations on preferred standard palliative radiation therapy of bone metastases as well as metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) for metastatic breast cancer patients. Methods: The breast cancer expert panel of the German Society of Radiation Oncology (DEGRO) performed a comprehensive survey of the literature comprising recently published data from clinical controlled trials. The literature search encompassed the period 1995-2008 using databases of PubMed and Guidelines International Network (G-I-N). Search terms were ''breast cancer'', ''bone metastasis'', ''osseous metastasis'', ''metastatic spinal cord compression'' as well as ''radiotherapy'' and ''radiation therapy''. Clinical recommendations were formulated based on the panel's interpretation of the level of evidence referring to the criteria of evidence-based medicine. Results: Different therapeutic goals (pain relief, local tumor control, prevention or improvement of motor deficits, stabilization of the spine or other bones) require complex approaches considering individual factors (i.e. life expectancy, tumor progression at other sites). Best results are achieved by close interdisciplinary cooperation minimizing the interval between diagnosis and onset of treatment. Most important criteria for prognosis and choice of treatment (mostly combined multimodal therapy) are neurologic status at diagnosis of MSCC, time course of duration and progression of the neurologic symptoms. Radiation therapy is effective and regarded as treatment of choice for MSCC with or without motor deficits and/or bone metastases, which do not need immediate surgical intervention. It may be used either postoperatively or as primary treatment in case of inoperability. An optimal dose fractionation schedule or optimal standard dose for treatment of bone

  13. Development of Patients' Decision Aid for Older Women With Stage I Breast Cancer Considering Radiotherapy After Lumpectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Jennifer [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); D' Alimonte, Laura [Department of Radiation Therapy, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Angus, Jan [Lawrence S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Paszat, Larry [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Metcalfe, Kelly [Lawrence S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Whelan, Tim [Department of Radiation Oncology, Juravinski Cancer Centre, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Llewellyn-Thomas, Hilary [Department of Community and Family Medicine, The Center of Informed Choice, The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, Dartmouth Medical School, Lebanon, NH (Lebanon); Warner, Eiran [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Franssen, Edmee [Consultant Statistician, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Szumacher, Ewa, E-mail: Ewa.Szumacher@sunnybrook.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To develop a patient decision aid (PtDA) for older women with Stage I, pathologically node negative, estrogen receptor-positive progesterone receptor-positive breast cancer who are considering adjuvant radiotherapy after lumpectomy and to examine its impact on patients' decision making. Methods and Materials: A PtDA was developed and evaluated in three steps according to the Ottawa Decision Support Framework: (1) needs assessment (n = 16); (2) Pilot I to examine PtDA acceptability (n = 12); and (3) Pilot II, a pretest posttest (n = 38) with older women with estrogen receptor-positive progesterone receptor-positive breast cancer after lumpectomy who were receiving adjuvant radiation therapy. Measures included patients' satisfaction with the PtDA, self-reported decisional conflict, level of distress, treatment-related knowledge, and choice predisposition. Results: The PtDA is a booklet that details each adjuvant treatment option's benefits, risks, and side effects tailored to the patient's clinical profile; includes a values clarification exercise; and includes steps to guide patients towards their decision. On the basis of qualitative comments and satisfaction ratings, all women thought that the PtDA was helpful and informative. In comparison with their baseline scores, patients had a statistically significant (p < 0.05) reduction in decisional conflict (adjusted mean difference [AMD], -7.18; 95% confidence interval [CI], -13.50 to 12.59); increased clarity of the benefits and risks (AMD, -10.86; CI, -20.33 to 21.49); and improved general treatment knowledge (AMD, 8.99; CI, 2.88-10.28) after using the PtDA. General trends were also reported in the patients' choice predisposition scores that suggested potential differences in treatment decision after PtDA use. Conclusions: This study provides evidence that this PtDA may be a helpful educational tool for this group of women. The quality of care for older breast cancer patients may be

  14. Effects of a Short-Term Dance Movement Therapy Program on Symptoms and Stress in Patients With Breast Cancer Undergoing Radiotherapy: A Randomized, Controlled, Single-Blind Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Rainbow T H; Fong, Ted C T; Cheung, Irene K M; Yip, Paul S F; Luk, Mai-Yee

    2016-05-01

    Integrated interventions with combined elements of body movement and psychotherapy on treatment-related symptoms in cancer patients are relatively scarce. The aim of the present study is to investigate the effectiveness of dance movement therapy (DMT) on improving treatment-related symptoms in a randomized controlled trial. A total of 139 Chinese patients with breast cancer awaiting adjuvant radiotherapy were randomized to DMT or control group. The intervention included six 1.5-hour DMT sessions provided twice a week over the course of radiotherapy. Self-report measures on perceived stress, anxiety, depression, fatigue, pain, sleep disturbance, and quality of life were completed before and after the three-week program. DMT showed significant effects on buffering the deterioration in perceived stress, pain severity, and pain interference (Cohen d = 0.34-0.36, P  0.05). The short-term DMT program can counter the anticipated worsening of stress and pain in women with breast cancer during radiotherapy. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. MRI-guided single fraction ablative radiotherapy for early-stage breast cancer: a brachytherapy versus volumetric modulated arc therapy dosimetry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charaghvandi, Ramona K; den Hartogh, Mariska D; van Ommen, Anne-Mar L N; de Vries, Wilfred J H; Scholten, Vincent; Moerland, Marinus A; Philippens, Mariëlle E P; Schokker, Rogier I; van Vulpen, Marco; van Asselen, Bram; van den Bongard, Desirée H J G

    2015-12-01

    A radiosurgical treatment approach for early-stage breast cancer has the potential to minimize the patient's treatment burden. The dosimetric feasibility for single fraction ablative radiotherapy was evaluated by comparing volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with an interstitial multicatheter brachytherapy (IMB) approach. The tumors of 20 patients with early-stage breast cancer were delineated on a preoperative contrast-enhanced planning CT-scan, co-registered with a contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), both in radiotherapy supine position. A dose of 15 Gy was prescribed to the planned target volume of the clinical target volume (PTVCTV), and 20 Gy integrated boost to the PTV of the gross tumor volume (PTVGTV). Treatment plans for IMB and VMAT were optimized for adequate target volume coverage and minimal organs at risk (OAR) dose. The median PTVGTV/CTV receiving at least 95% of the prescribed dose was ⩾99% with both techniques. The median PTVCTV unintentionally receiving 95% of the prescribed PTVGTV dose was 65.4% and 4.3% with IMB and VMAT, respectively. OAR doses were comparable with both techniques. MRI-guided single fraction radiotherapy with an integrated ablative boost to the GTV is dosimetrically feasible with both techniques. We perceive IMB less suitable for clinical implementation due to PTVCTV overdosage. Future studies have to confirm the clinical feasibility of the single fraction ablative approach. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Radiotherapy Breast Boost With Reduced Whole-Breast Dose Is Associated With Improved Cosmesis: The Results of a Comprehensive Assessment From the St. George and Wollongong Randomized Breast Boost Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hau, Eric, E-mail: helloerico@yahoo.com [Cancer Care Centre, St. George Hospital, Kogarah, Sydney (Australia); Browne, Lois H.; Khanna, Sam; Cail, Stacy; Cert, Grad; Chin, Yaw; Clark, Catherine; Inder, Stephanie; Szwajcer, Alison; Graham, Peter H. [Cancer Care Centre, St. George Hospital, Kogarah, Sydney (Australia)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate comprehensively the effect of a radiotherapy boost on breast cosmetic outcomes after 5 years in patients treated with breast-conserving surgery. Methods: The St. George and Wollongong trial (NCT00138814) randomized 688 patients with histologically proven Tis-2, N 0-1, M0 carcinoma to the control arm of 50 Gy in 25 fractions (342 patients) and the boost arm of 45 Gy in 25 fractions to the whole breast followed by a 16 Gy in 8 fraction electron boost (346 patients). Five-year cosmetic outcomes were assessed by a panel subjectively in 385 patients and objectively using pBRA (relative breast retraction assessment). A subset of patients also had absolute BRA measurements. Clinician assessment and patient self-assessment of overall cosmetic and specific items as well as computer BCCT.core analysis were also performed. Results: The boost arm had improved cosmetic overall outcomes as scored by the panel and BCCT.core software with 79% (p = 0.016) and 81% (p = 0.004) excellent/good cosmesis respectively compared with 68% in no-boost arm. The boost arm also had lower pBRA and BRA values with a mean difference of 0.60 and 1.82 mm, respectively, but was not statistically significant. There was a very high proportion of overall excellent/good cosmetic outcome in 95% and 93% in the boost and no-boost arms using patient self-assessment. However, no difference in overall and specific items scored by clinician assessment and patient self-assessment was found. Conclusion: The results show the negative cosmetic effect of a 16-Gy boost is offset by a lower whole-breast dose of 45 Gy.

  17. Breast dosimetry in complementary radiotherapy with sodium pertechnetate-{sup 99m}-Tc (Na{sup 99m}TcO{sub 4}{sup -}) balloon at neoplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Carla Flavia de; Campos, Tarcisio P. R. de, E-mail: tprcampos@pq.cnpq.br, E-mail: carla.flavia@terra.com.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, BH (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear. Programa de Ciencias e Tecnicas Nucleares

    2013-07-01

    A dosimetric analyzes was performed at breast tissue in which a sodium pertechnetate-{sup 99m}Tc filled balloon was placed. An additional dose booster can be used as a complementary method to the surgical treatment in patients with breast cancer. The methodology involved the development of dosimetry in a physical phantom and a computational voxel model. Radiochromic films were calibrated providing dose versus optical density (OD) response from sample films taken at the surface of the balloon up to 10 cm far with the theoretical dose provided by MCNP modeling in water-equivalent model. A voxel model of the breast, developed at the SISCODES software, with an filled balloon inside was simulated at the MCNP code in order to generate the spatial dose distribution. Spatial dose distributions and the doses at surfaces of the breast, including those received in the chest wall, skin and lung were generated. The dosimetric results allow validating the dose in the tumor bed and adjacent health tissues. The simulations show that the application of sodium pertechnetate-{sup 99m}Tc implies high dose in the breast tissue adjacent to the tumor and preserves vital adjacent structures. As conclusion, the balloon presents itself as a viable option for the adjunctive treatment of breast cancer in patients who have appropriate indication. Irradiation with sodium pertechnetate-{sup 99m}Tc generates high doses in breast tissue and consequently in the tumor bed. Adjuvant radiation therapy in situ with sodium pertechnetate-{sup 99m}Tc balloon has low cost, availability and reduced time of treatment, decreasing the side effects of conventional radiotherapy. In progress, the dose versus OD mathematical representation will be used to identify absorbed doses at planar film placed at a breast phantom in order to generate maps of breast doses. (author)

  18. Calibration and start-up of the system of radiotherapy extract image-guided; Calibracion y puesta en marcha del sistema de radioterpia guiada por la imagen exactrac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clemente Gutierrez, I.; Perez Vara, C.; Prieto Villacorta, M.

    2013-07-01

    The accuracy in the administration of external radiotherapy treatments may be increased through the use of guidance systems by image. Constitute a particular case x-rays teams independent of the treatment unit. Among them is the ExacTrac (Brainlab) system. The objective of this work is to briefly introduce the procedure followed in the calibration and implementation of such a system. (Author)

  19. Reproducible deep-inspiration breath-hold irradiation with forward intensity-modulated radiotherapy for left-sided breast cancer significantly reduces cardiac radiation exposure compared to inverse intensity-modulated radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolukbasi, Yasemin; Saglam, Yucel; Selek, Ugur; Topkan, Erkan; Kataria, Anglina; Unal, Zeynep; Alpan, Vildan

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the objective utility of our clinical routine of reproducible deep-inspiration breath-hold irradiation for left-sided breast cancer patients on reducing cardiac exposure. Free-breathing and reproducible deep-inspiration breath-hold scans were evaluated for our 10 consecutive left-sided breast cancer patients treated with reproducible deep-inspiration breath-hold. The study was based on the adjuvant dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions of 2 Gy/fraction. Both inverse and forward intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans were generated for each computed tomography dataset. Reproducible deep-inspiration breath-hold plans with forward intensity-modulated radiotherapy significantly spared the heart and left anterior descending artery compared to generated free-breathing plans based on mean doses - free-breathing vs reproducible deep-inspiration breath-hold, left ventricle (296.1 vs 94.5 cGy, P = 0.005), right ventricle (158.3 vs 59.2 cGy, P = 0.005), left anterior descending artery (171.1 vs 78.1 cGy, P = 0.005), and whole heart (173.9 vs 66 cGy, P = 0.005), heart V20 (2.2% vs 0%, P = 0.007) and heart V10 (4.2% vs 0.3%, P = 0.007) - whereas they revealed no additional burden on the ipsilateral lung. Reproducible deep-inspiration breath-hold and free-breathing plans with inverse intensity-modulated radiotherapy provided similar organ at risk sparing by reducing the mean doses to the left ventricle, left anterior descending artery, heart, V10-V20 of the heart and right ventricle. However, forward intensity-modulated radiotherapy showed significant reduction in doses to the left ventricle, left anterior descending artery, heart, right ventricle, and contralateral breast (mean dose, 248.9 to 12.3 cGy, P = 0.005). The mean doses for free-breathing vs reproducible deep-inspiration breath-hold of the proximal left anterior descending artery were 1.78 vs 1.08 Gy and of the distal left anterior descending artery were 8.11 vs 3.89 Gy, whereas mean distances to the 50 Gy

  20. Assessment of voluntary deep inspiration breath-hold with CINE imaging for breast radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estoesta, Reuben Patrick; Attwood, Lani; Naehrig, Diana; Claridge-Mackonis, Elizabeth; Odgers, David; Martin, Darren; Pham, Melissa; Toohey, Joanne; Carroll, Susan

    2017-10-01

    Deep Inspiration Breath-Hold (DIBH) techniques for breast cancer radiation therapy (RT) have reduced cardiac dose compared to Free Breathing (FB). Recently, a voluntary deep inspiration breath-hold (vDIBH) technique was established using in-room lasers and skin tattoos to monitor breath-hold. An in-house quality assessment of positional reproducibility during RT delivery with vDIBH in patients with left-sided breast cancer was evaluated. The electronic portal imaging device (EPID) was used in cinematographic (CINE) mode to capture a sequence of images during beam delivery. Weekly CINE images were retrospectively assessed for 20 left-sided breast cancer patients receiving RT in vDIBH, and compared with CINE images of 20 patients treated in FB. The intra-beam motion was assessed and the distance from the beam central axis (CA) to the internal chest wall (ICW) was measured on each CINE image. These were then compared to the planned distance on digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR). The maximum intra-beam motion for any one patient measurement was 0.30 cm for vDIBH and 0.20 cm for FB. The mean difference between the distance from the CA to ICW on DRR and the equivalent distance on CINE imaging (as treated) was 0.28 cm (SD 0.17) for vDIBH patients and 0.25 cm (SD 0.14) for FB patients (P = 0.458). The measured values were comparable for patients undergoing RT in vDIBH, and for those in FB. This quality assessment showed that using in-room lasers and skin tattoos to independently monitor breath-hold in vDIBH as detected by 'on-treatment' CINE imaging is safe and effective. © 2017 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  1. [Does nodal irradiation (clavicular and internal mammary chains) increase the toxicity of adjuvant breast radiotherapy?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riou, O; Bourgier, C; Fenoglietto, P; Azria, D

    2015-06-01

    Treatment volume is a major risk factor of radiation-induced toxicity. As nodal irradiation increases treatment volume, radiation toxicity should be greater. Nevertheless, scientific randomised data do not support this fact. However, a radiation-induced toxicity is possible outside tangential fields in the nodal volumes not related to breast-only treatment. Treatment should not be adapted only to the disease but personalized to the individual risk of toxicity for each patient. Copyright © 2015 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluation of safety by skin dosimetry in Intraoperative Radiotherapy for breast cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, In Ho; Kim, Joon Won; Park, Kwang Woo; Ha, Jin Sook; Jon, Min Jin; Cho, Yoon Jin; Kim, Sei Joon; Kim, Jong Dae; Shin, Dong Bong [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    We investigated the safety of Intrabeam™ system, X-ray unit for Intraoperative Radiotheray (IORT) by measuring surface dose using Optically Stimulated Luminescent Dosimeter(OSLD). 30 patients were selected, who were in breast cancer patients and had an operation of breast conserving surgery (BCS). At the inner surface of tumor bed, 20 Gy were described, and 5 Gy at 1cm depth from the inner surface. Along the size of tumor bed which could be decided after resection of tumor, the size of applicator were determined. Usual treatment time were from 18 to 40 minutes. For the measurement of surface doses, OSLD were placed at superior(U1,2), inferior(D1,2), lateral(L1,2) and medial(M1,2) directions from the center of applicator. Each direction, two OSLD were placed at 0.5 cm and 1.5 cm from the center. Mean, maximum, and minimum doses were analyzed to be compared. Mean values were U1 2.23±0.80 Gy, U2 1.54±0.53 Gy, D1 1.73±0.63 Gy, D2 1.25±0.45 Gy, L1 1.95±0.82 Gy, L2 1.38±0.42 Gy, M1 2.03±0.70 Gy, and M2 1.51±0.58 Gy. Maximum values were 4.34 Gy at U1, and Minimum values were 0.45 Gy at M2. 13.3 % of patient (4pts out of 30) were reported that surface dose were over 4 Gy. The fact that skin dose of all patients were less than 5 Gy based on OSLD measurement showed the safety of Intrabeam™ system. In the relatively small breast volume, the tendency that surface dose was increased had been shown, which was analyzed by the data of patients who irradiated over 4Gy at skin surface. Therefore, for appropriate indication for IORT, it is suggested that breast volume as well as the size and position of tumor should be carfully considered.

  3. Photobiomodulation therapy for the management of radiation-induced dermatitis. A single-institution experience of adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer patients after breast conserving surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strouthos, Iosif [Sana Klinikum Offenbach, Department of Radiation Oncology, Offenbach (Germany); Medical Center - Albert Ludwigs University of Freiburg, Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Freiburg (Germany); Chatzikonstantinou, Georgios; Tselis, Nikolaos [Sana Klinikum Offenbach, Department of Radiation Oncology, Offenbach (Germany); J.W. Goethe University, Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Bon, Dimitra [J.W. Goethe University, Institute of Biostatistics and Mathematical Modelling, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Karagiannis, Efstratios [Sana Klinikum Offenbach, Department of Radiation Oncology, Offenbach (Germany); Otto von Guericke University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Magdeburg (Germany); Zoga, Eleni; Ferentinos, Konstantinos; Maximenko, Julia; Nikolettou-Fischer, Vassiliki; Zamboglou, Nikolaos [Sana Klinikum Offenbach, Department of Radiation Oncology, Offenbach (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    Radiation therapy (RT) comprises a key component in the treatment of breast cancer. Radiation-induced skin toxicity is the major adverse event experienced by patients; however, radiodermatitis (RD) prevention and management remains trivial. It is proven that photobiomodulation (PBM) therapy using light-emitting diode (LED) increases wound healing and depicts an anti-inflammatory effect. This single-institute study evaluates the beneficial role of PBM-LED in preventing/reducing RD during breast cancer RT. Of 70 consecutively treated patients, 25 patients were treated with PBM-LED twice a week prior to adjuvant 3D conformal RT after breast-conserving surgery. RD was reported using Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events Version 4.0 and pain intensity using a visual analog scale (VAS). For comparison, a control group (n = 45) received RT without PBM-LED. In addition, a ''matched'' group (n = 25) was generated from the control group based on propensity for potentially confounding variables. In the PBM group, 22 patients (88%) presented grade 1 and 3 (12%) grade 2 RD. In the control group, 25 patients (55.6%) developed grade 1 reactions, 18 patients (40%) grade 2, and 2 (4.4%) patients grade 3 RD. Concerning pain intensity, 15 patients (60%) of the PBM treatment arm reported no pain, 5 patients (20%) VAS 2, and 5 (20%) VAS 3. In the control group, 13 patients (28.9%) reported no pain, 2 (4.4%) VAS 1, 7 (15.6%) VAS 2, 9 patients (20%) reported VAS 3, 12 (26.7%) patients VAS 4, and 2 (4.4%) patients VAS 5. PBM-LED therapy applied prior to RT might be effective in decreasing the incidence and sequelae of radiation-induced skin toxicity in breast cancer patients treated with breast-conserving surgery. (orig.) [German] Radiotherapie (RT) ist integrativer Bestandteil der multimodalen Therapie beim Mammakarzinom. Strahlentherapieinduzierte Hauttoxizitaet ist dabei das haeufigste unerwuenschte Ereignis; dennoch sind Praevention und Management der

  4. Cost-effectiveness of radiotherapy during surgery compared with external radiation therapy in the treatment of women with breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedie Mosalanezhad

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Intraoperative radiation therapy device (IORT is one of the several options for partial breast irradiation. IORT is sent to the tumor bed during surgery and can be replaced with conventional standard therapy (EBRT. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of IORT machine compared with EBRT and to determine the dominant option in terms of the cost-effectiveness. Method: This study was conducted in two phases; the first phase was a comprehensive review of the electronic databases search that was extracted after extraction and selection of the articles used in this article on effectiveness outcomes. Data collection form was completed by professionals and experts to estimate the cost of treatment, intraoperative radiotherapy and radiotherapy cost when using external radiation therapy process; direct costs were considered from the perspective of service provider and they were calculated in the second phase to determine the option of cost-effective ICER. Excel software was used for data analysis and sensitivity analysis was performed to determine the strength of the results of cost-effectiveness. Results:18 studies were selected but only 8 of them were shown to have acceptable quality. The consequences like “rate of cancer recurrence”, “seroma”, “necrosis”, “toxic”, “skin disorders and delayed wound healing” and “spread the pain” were among the consequences used in the selected articles. The total costs for each patient during a course of treatment for EBRT and IORT were estimated 1398 and $5337.5, respectively. During the analysis, cost-effectiveness of the consequences of cancer recurrence, seroma, necrosis and skin disorders and delayed wound healing ICER was calculated. And IORT was found to be the dominant supplier in all cases. Also, in terms of implications of toxicity and prevalence of pain, IORT had a lower cost and better effectiveness and consequently the result was more cost

  5. Individual patient data meta-analysis shows a significant association between the ATM rs1801516 SNP and toxicity after radiotherapy in 5456 breast and prostate cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Christian Nicolaj; Rosenstein, Barry S; Kerns, Sarah L

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Several small studies have indicated that the ATM rs1801516 SNP is associated with risk of normal tissue toxicity after radiotherapy. However, the findings have not been consistent. In order to test this SNP in a well-powered study, an individual patient data meta-analysis was carried out...... by the International Radiogenomics Consortium. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The analysis included 5456 patients from 17 different cohorts. 2759 patients were given radiotherapy for breast cancer and 2697 for prostate cancer. Eight toxicity scores (overall toxicity, acute toxicity, late toxicity, acute skin toxicity, acute...... rectal toxicity, telangiectasia, fibrosis and late rectal toxicity) were analyzed. Adjustments were made for treatment and patient related factors with potential impact on the risk of toxicity. RESULTS: For all endpoints except late rectal toxicity, a significantly increased risk of toxicity was found...

  6. Incidental dose to coronary arteries is higher in prone than in supine whole breast irradiation. A dosimetric comparison in adjuvant radiotherapy of early stage breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wuerschmidt, Florian; Stoltenberg, Solveigh; Kretschmer, Matthias; Petersen, Cordula

    2014-06-15

    Sparing of normal lung is best achieved in prone whole breast irradiation (WBI). However, exposure of the heart and coronary arteries might increase due to anterior movement of the heart in prone WBI. Treatment plans of 46 patients with large breasts irradiated for mammary cancer after breast-conserving surgery were retrospectively analyzed. The average treated breast volume of right-sided breasts (n = 33) was 1,804 ccm and 1,500 ccm for left-sided breasts (n = 13). The majority had invasive cancer (96 %) of which 61 % were pT1 and 39 % pT2 tumors. All patients received radiation therapy to the breast only. For three-dimensional (3D) treatment planning, all patients underwent a noncontrast-enhanced CT in the supine position with a wingboard and a second CT in the prone position using a prone breastboard. Nontarget volumes of the lung, heart, and coronary arteries were contoured. A total dose of 50.4 Gy was prescribed to the breast only. Differences were calculated for each patient and compared using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Treatment of left-sided breasts resulted in similar average mean heart doses in prone versus supine WBI (4.16 vs. 4.01 Gy; p = 0.70). The left anterior descending artery (LAD) had significantly higher dose exposure in left versus right WBI independent of position. Prone WBI always resulted in significantly higher exposures of the right circumflex artery (RCA) and LAD as compared to supine WBI. In left WBI, the mean LADprone was 33.5 Gy vs. LADsupine of 25.6 Gy (p = 0.0051). The V20prone of the LAD was 73.6 % vs. V20supine 50.4 % (p = 0.0006). The heart dose is not different between supine and prone WBI. However, in left WBI the incidental dose to the LAD with clinically relevant doses can be significantly higher in prone WBI. This is discussed controversially in the literature as it might depend on contouring and treatment techniques. We recommend contouring of LAD if patients are treated in prone WBI and evaluation of alternative

  7. The feasibility of a heart block with an electron compensation as an alternative whole breast radiotherapy technique in patients with underlying cardiac or pulmonary disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Jin Kang

    Full Text Available We aimed to evaluate the feasibility of the heart block with electron compensation (HBE technique, based on three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT in left-sided breast cancer patients with underlying cardiac or pulmonary disease.Twenty patients with left-sided breast cancer who were treated with whole breast radiotherapy (WBRT were included in this study. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT, 3D-CRT, and HBE treatment plans were generated for each patient. Based on the 3D-CRT plan, the HBE plan included a heart block from the medial tangential field to shield the heart and added an electron beam to compensate for the loss in target volume coverage. The dosimetric parameters for the heart and lung and the target volume between the three treatment types were compared.Of the three plans, the HBE plan yielded the most significant reduction in the doses received by the heart and lung (heart Dmean: 5.1 Gy vs. 12.9 Gy vs. 4.0 Gy and lung Dmean: 11.4 Gy vs. 13.2 Gy vs. 10.5 Gy, for 3D-CRT, IMRT, and HBE, respectively. Target coverage with all three techniques was within the acceptable range (Dmean 51.0 Gy vs. 51.2 Gy vs. 50.6 Gy, for 3D-CRT, IMRT, and HBE, respectively.The HBE plan effectively reduced the amount of radiation exposure to the heart and lung. It could be beneficial for patients who are vulnerable to radiation-related cardiac or pulmonary toxicities.

  8. The feasibility of a heart block with an electron compensation as an alternative whole breast radiotherapy technique in patients with underlying cardiac or pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hye Jin; Kim, Shin-Wook; Son, Seok Hyun

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the feasibility of the heart block with electron compensation (HBE) technique, based on three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) in left-sided breast cancer patients with underlying cardiac or pulmonary disease. Twenty patients with left-sided breast cancer who were treated with whole breast radiotherapy (WBRT) were included in this study. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), 3D-CRT, and HBE treatment plans were generated for each patient. Based on the 3D-CRT plan, the HBE plan included a heart block from the medial tangential field to shield the heart and added an electron beam to compensate for the loss in target volume coverage. The dosimetric parameters for the heart and lung and the target volume between the three treatment types were compared. Of the three plans, the HBE plan yielded the most significant reduction in the doses received by the heart and lung (heart Dmean: 5.1 Gy vs. 12.9 Gy vs. 4.0 Gy and lung Dmean: 11.4 Gy vs. 13.2 Gy vs. 10.5 Gy, for 3D-CRT, IMRT, and HBE, respectively). Target coverage with all three techniques was within the acceptable range (Dmean 51.0 Gy vs. 51.2 Gy vs. 50.6 Gy, for 3D-CRT, IMRT, and HBE, respectively). The HBE plan effectively reduced the amount of radiation exposure to the heart and lung. It could be beneficial for patients who are vulnerable to radiation-related cardiac or pulmonary toxicities.

  9. The curative effects of radiotherapy-based therapies for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive breast cancer: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Minghai; Zhang, Chi; Qin, Qin; Zhang, Zhaoyue; Zhu, Hongcheng; Di, Xiaoke; Sun, Xinchen

    2017-09-01

    This meta-analysis was designed to fully assess the curative effects of radiotherapy-based therapies for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive (HER2+) breast cancer (BC). English articles were retrieved through searching Cochrane library, PubMed, and Embase databases updated to February 2017. Studies were selected based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria. The curative effects of radiotherapy-based therapies forHER2+ BC patients were assessed using hazard rates (HRs) or odds ratios (ORs), as well as their 95% confidence intervals (CIs). In addition, Egger test was used to assess publication bias, followed by sensitivity analysis. All statistic methods were conducted using R 3.12 software. A total of 9 eligible studies were included into this meta-analysis, which involved 2236 HER2+ BC patients. Egger test showed that the eligible studies had no publication bias (t = 2.198, P = .05918). Sensitivity analysis demonstrated that the results were stable. HER2+ BC patients in radiotherapy group had lower locoregional recurrences than those in other groups. Moreover, meta-analysis showed that no significant difference was found between HER2+ BC patients in radiotherapy group and other groups on the 1-year overall survival (P = 0.5263, I = 65.4%), 3-year overall survival (P = 0.4591, I = 0), and 5-year overall survival (P = 0.06277, I = 0). Radiotherapy-based therapies might have certain advantages in treating HER2+ BC patients.

  10. Heart position variability during voluntary moderate deep inspiration breath-hold radiotherapy for breast cancer determined by repeat CBCT scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Haaren, Paul; Claassen-Janssen, Fiere; van de Sande, Ingrid; Boersma, Liesbeth; van der Sangen, Maurice; Hurkmans, Coen

    2017-08-01

    Voluntary moderate deep inspiration breath hold (vmDIBH) in left-sided breast cancer radiotherapy reduces cardiac dose. The aim of this study was to investigate heart position variability in vmDIBH using CBCT and to compare this variability with differences in heart position between vmDIBH and free breathing (FB). For 50 patients initial heart position with respect to the field edge (HP-FE) was measured on a vmDIBH planning CT scan. Breath-hold was monitored using an in-house developed vertical plastic stick. On pre-treatment CBCT scans, heart position variability with respect to the field edge (ΔHP-FE) was measured, reflecting heart position variability when using an offline correction protocol. After registering the CBCT scan to the planning CT, heart position variability with respect to the chest wall (ΔHP-CW) was measured, reflecting heart position variability when using an online correction protocol. As a control group, vmDIBH and FB computed tomography (CT) scans were acquired for 30 patients and registering both scans on the chest wall. For 34 out of 50 patients, the average HP-FE and HP-CW increased over the treatment course in comparison to the planning CT. Averaged over all patients and all treatment fractions, the ΔHP-FE and the ΔHP-CW was 0.8±4.2mm (range -9.4-+10.6mm) and 1.0±4.4mm (range -8.3-+10.4mm) respectively. The average gain in heart to chest wall distance was 11.8±4.6mm when using vmDIBH instead of FB. In conclusion, substantial variability in heart position using vmDIBH was observed during the treatment course. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Targeted dose enhancement in radiotherapy for breast cancer using gold nanoparticles, part 1: A radiobiological model study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrero, Veronica; Visonà, Giovanni; Dalmasso, Federico; Gobbato, Andrea; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Strigari, Lidia; Visentin, Sonja; Attili, Andrea

    2017-05-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are being proposed in combination with radiotherapy to improve tumor control. However, the exact mechanisms underlying GNP radiosensitization are yet to be understood, thus, we present a new approach to estimate the nanoparticle-driven increase in radiosensitivity. A stochastic radiobiological model, derived from the Local Effect Model (LEM), was coupled with Monte Carlo simulations to estimate the increase in radiosensitivity produced by the interactions between photons and GNPs at nanometric scale. The model was validated using in vitro survival data of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells containing different concentrations of 2 nm diameter GNPs receiving different doses using 160 kVp, 6 MV, and 15 MV photons. A closed analytical formulation of the model was also derived and a study of RBE and TCP behavior was conducted. Results support the increased radiosensitivity due to GNP-driven dose inhomogeneities on a nanometric scale. The model is in good agreement with experimental clonogenic survival assays for 160 kVp, 6 MV, and 15 MV photons. The model suggests a RBE and TCP enhancement when lower energies and lower doses per fraction are used in the presence of GNPs. The evolution of the local effect model was implemented to assess cellular radiosensitization in the presence of GNPs and then validated with in vitro data. The model provides a useful framework to estimate the nanoparticle-driven radiosensitivity in treatment irradiations and could be applied to real clinical treatment predictions (described in a second part of this paper). © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  12. The cost-effectiveness of routine postoperative radiotherapy after sector resection and axillary dissection for breast cancer stage I. Results from a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljegren, G; Karlsson, G; Bergh, J; Holmberg, L

    1997-08-01

    Cost-effectiveness of routine postoperative radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery has not been prospectively evaluated earlier. In times of rationing of medical resources, valid assessments of cost-effectiveness are important for rational allocation of resources. Cost and cost-effectiveness of routine postoperative radiotherapy was calculated in a prospective randomized trial comparing sector resection plus axillary dissection with (XRT group) or without (non-XRT group) postoperative radiotherapy in breast cancer stage I. Three hundred eighty-one patients were included. After a median follow-up of five years 43 local recurrences, six of them in the XRT-group occurred (P costs as well as indirect costs in terms of production lost during the treatment period and travel expenses were estimated from data in the medical records and the national insurance registry of each patient. Average costs of different treatment activities and measures were estimated for the XRT-group and the non-XRT group respectively. From these estimates differences in costs and effectiveness between the groups were calculated and marginal cost-effectiveness ratios were estimated. For the construction of QALYs each life-year was quality-adjusted by a utility value depending on which health state the patient was considered to perceive. Taking into account the cost of primary treatment, the cost of follow-up, the cost of treatment of a local recurrence, travel expenses and indirect costs (production lost) excluding costs for treatment of regional and distant recurrence the cost per avoided local recurrence at five years was SEK 337,727 ($44,438, Pounds 27,018). Adjustment for quality of life showed a cost for every gained QALY to be SEK approximately 1.6 million, ($210,526, Pounds 128,000), range SEK 0.2-3.9 million ($26,315-513,158, Pounds 16,000-312,000). The cost of routine postoperative radiotherapy after sector resection and axillary dissection in breast cancer stage I per avoided local

  13. Breast Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... result in the development of breast cysts. Breast trauma, prior breast surgery or other factors localized to the breast can lead to breast pain. Breast pain may also start outside the breast — in the chest wall, muscles, joints or heart, for example — and ...

  14. The incidence of arm edema in women with breast cancer randomized on the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project study B-04 to radical mastectomy versus total mastectomy and radiotherapy versus total mastectomy alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Melvin; Land, Stephanie; Begovic, Mirsada; Sharif, Saima

    2008-03-15

    To determine the incidence and factors associated with the development of arm edema in women who participated in the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) study B-04. Between 1971 and 1974, the NSABP protocol B-04 randomized 1,665 eligible patients with resectable breast cancer to either (1) the Halstead-type radical mastectomy; (2) total mastectomy and radiotherapy to the chest wall, axilla, supraclavicular region, and internal mammary nodes if by clinical examination axillary nodes were involved by tumor; and (3) for patients with a clinically uninvolved axilla, a third arm, total mastectomy alone. Measurements of the ipsilateral and contralateral arm circumferences were to be performed every 3 months. There was at least one recorded measurement of arm circumferences for 1,457 patients (87.5% of eligible patients). There were 674 women (46.3%) who experienced arm edema at some point during the period of follow-up until February 1976. For radical mastectomy patients, total mastectomy and radiotherapy patients, and total mastectomy patients alone, arm edema was recorded at least once in 58.1%, 38.2%, and 39.1% of patients, respectively (pmastectomy, including those whose treatment plans do not include axillary dissection or postoperative radiotherapy, suffer an appreciable incidence of arm edema.

  15. Breast cancer patients treated with chemotherapy reports more unmet supportive care needs in the early treatment phase, than patients treated only with radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen-Johansen, Mikael Birkelund; Meldgaard, Anette; Henriksen, Jette

    2016-01-01

    Breast Cancer Patients Treated with Chemo-therapy Reports More Unmet Supportive Care Needs in the Early Treatment Phase, than Patients Treated Only with Radio-therapy Jensen-Johansen, Mikael Birkelund, Meldgaard, Anette, Henriksen, Jette, Villadsen, Ingrid VIA University College, Holstebro, Denmark...... Aims: The purpose was to identify unmet supportive care needs in the early treatment phase of women treated for breast cancer and to investigate differences in needs between groups treated with chemo-therapy and radiationtherapy. If it is possible to identify early unmet needs, it may be possible...... of a large battery of selfadministered questionnaires, the women filled out at home, the Supportive Care Needs Survey (SCNS-SF34) together with demographic items (socioeconomic status, working hours, marital status etc.). The SCNS-SF34 includes 5 different domains of needs: Psychological-, Health system...

  16. Reduction of cardiac and pulmonary complication probabilities after breathing adapted radiotherapy for breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korreman, Stine S; Pedersen, Anders N; Juhler-Nøttrup, Trine

    2006-01-01

    the remaining breast, internal mammary, and periclavicular nodes were optimized for each scan, prescription dose 48 Gy. Normal tissue complication probabilities were calculated using the relative seriality model for the heart, and the model proposed by Burman et al. for the lung. RESULTS: Previous computed...... tomography studies showed that both voluntary DIBH and IG provided reduction of the lung V50 (relative volume receiving more than 50% of prescription dose) on the order of 30-40%, and a 80-90% reduction of the heart V50 for left-sided cancers. Corresponding pneumonitis probability of 28.1% (range, 0.......7-95.6%) for FB could be reduced to 2.6% (range, 0.1-40.1%) for IG, and 4.3% (range, 0.1-59%) for DIBH. The cardiac mortality probability could be reduced from 4.8% (range, 0.1-23.4%) in FB to 0.5% (range, 0.1-2.6%) for IG and 0.1% (range, 0-3.0%) for DIBH. CONCLUSIONS: Remarkable potential is shown for simple...

  17. Implant breast reconstruction followed by radiotherapy: Can helical tomotherapy become a standard irradiation treatment?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massabeau, Carole, E-mail: cmassabeau@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris (France); Fournier-Bidoz, Nathalie; Wakil, Georges; Castro Pena, Pablo; Viard, Romain; Zefkili, Sofia; Reyal, Fabien; Campana, Francois; Fourquet, Alain; Kirova, Youlia M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris (France)

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the benefits and limitations of helical tomotherapy (HT) for loco-regional irradiation of patients after a mastectomy and immediate implant-based reconstruction. Ten breast cancer patients with retropectoral implants were randomly selected for this comparative study. Planning target volumes (PTVs) 1 (the volume between the skin and the implant, plus margin) and 2 (supraclavicular, infraclavicular, and internal mammary nodes, plus margin) were 50 Gy in 25 fractions using a standard technique and HT. The extracted dosimetric data were compared using a 2-tailed Wilcoxon matched-pair signed-rank test. Doses for PTV1 and PTV2 were significantly higher with HT (V95 of 98.91 and 97.91%, respectively) compared with the standard technique (77.46 and 72.91%, respectively). Similarly, the indexes of homogeneity were significantly greater with HT (p = 0.002). HT reduced ipsilateral lung volume that received {>=}20 Gy (16.7 vs. 35%), and bilateral lungs (p = 0.01) and neighboring organs received doses that remained well below tolerance levels. The heart volume, which received 25 Gy, was negligible with both techniques. HT can achieve full target coverage while decreasing high doses to the heart and ipsilateral lung. However, the low doses to normal tissue volumes need to be reduced in future studies.

  18. Accelerated partial breast irradiation for elderly women with early breast cancer: A compromise between whole breast irradiation and omission of radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumodhee, Shakeel; Levy, Johan; Chamorey, Emmanuel; Lam Cham Kee, Daniel; Chand, Marie-Eve; Gautier, Mathieu; Peyrottes, Isabelle; Barranger, Emmanuel; Hannoun-Levi, Jean-Michel

    Regarding adjuvant radiation therapy making decision for elderly women, Albert (2013) published a nomogram predicting the mastectomy-free survival (MFS) rate with or without adjuvant irradiation. Based on this approach, we proposed to investigate the use of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) vs. whole breast irradiation (WBI) or endocrine therapy alone in elderly low-risk breast cancer patients. For each elderly woman treated by conserving surgery and APBI (multicatheter interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy), 5- and 10-year MFS rates were calculated. For each treated patient, using the Albert nomogram, we calculated the estimated MFS rates at 5 and 10 years, with and without WBI. Then, we compared the estimated MFS rates after no irradiation and WBI vs. observed MFS rates after APBI. From 2005 to 2016, 79 patients were treated. Median followup was 96.8 months [68.6-104.9], median age was 77 years [66-89]. Expected 5- and 10-year mastectomy rates calculated with the Albert nomogram without WBI were 2.95% and 7.25%, respectively, leading to a 10-year MFS rate of 92.7%. Expected 5- and 10-year mastectomy rates after WBI were 1.41% and 3.66%, respectively, leading to a 10-year MFS rate of 96.3%. Regarding observed MFS rate, 1 pt (1.3%) experienced a salvage mastectomy. The 10-year MFS rate after APBI was 97.4% vs. 96.3% after WBI (p = 1) and 92.7% after no irradiation (p = 0.27). No toxicity Grade 3 or more was observed. APBI seems to be an attractive compromise between WBI and no irradiation for elderly women with early stage breast cancer as far as local control, quality of life and cost benefit is concerned. Copyright © 2017 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Significant negative impact of adjuvant chemotherapy on Health-Related Ouality of Life (HR-OoL) in women with breast cancer treated by conserving surgery and postoperative 3-D radiotherapy. A prospective measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galalae, R.M.; Michel, J.; Kimmig, B. [Clinic for Radiation Therapy (Radiooncology), Univ. Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel (Germany); Siebmann, J.U.; Kuechler, T.; Eilf, K. [Dept. of General and Thoracic Surgery/Reference Center on Quality of Life in Oncology, Univ. Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel (Germany)

    2005-10-01

    Purpose: to prospectively assess health-related quality of life (HR-QoL) in women after conserving surgery for breast cancer during/after postoperative 3-D radiotherapy. Patients and methods: 109 consecutively treated patients were analyzed. HR-QoL was assessed at initiation (t1), end (t2), and 6 weeks after radiotherapy (t3) using the EORTC modules QLQ-C30/BR23. Patients were divided into three therapy groups. Group I comprised 41 patients (radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy), group II 45 patients (radiotherapy and adjuvant hormonal therapy), and group III 23 patients (radiotherapy alone). Reliability was tested. Scale means were calculated. Univariate (ANOVA) and multivariate (MANCOVA) analyses were performed. Results: reliability testing revealed mean Cronbach's {alpha} > 0.70 at all measurement points. ANOVA/MANCOVA statistics revealed significantly better HR-QoL for patients in group II versus I. Patients receiving radiotherapy alone (group III) showed the best results in HR-QoL. However, scale mean differences between groups II and III were not significant. Conclusion: HR-QoL measurement using EORTC instruments during/after radiotherapy is reliable. Adjuvant chemotherapy significantly lowered HR-QoL versus hormones or radiotherapy alone. Chemotherapy patients did not recover longitudinally (from t1 to t3). (orig.)

  20. Postmastectomy radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shikama, Naoto; Koguchi, Masahiko; Sasaki, Shigeru; Kaneko, Tomoki; Shinoda, Atsunori; Nishikawa, Atsushi [Shinshu Univ., Matsumoto, Nagano (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-10-01

    Since there have been few reports on postmastectomy radiotherapy having a high evidence level in Japan, the significance of postoperative radiotherapy and the irradiation techniques were reviewed based on reports from Western countries. Authors focused on the indications for postoperative irradiation, irradiation methods (irradiation sites, irradiation techniques; prosthetics, methods of irradiating the chest wall and lymph nodes, timing of irradiation), and complications, and discuss them. The factors thought to be adaptable to postmastectomy radiotherapy have been listed. Axillary lymph node metastasis and the size of the primary focus are thought to be important factors in locoregional recurrence. The chest wall and the supraclavicular lymph nodes are the usual sites of irradiation after mastectomy. The irradiation method consists of tangential irradiation of the chest wall and single-field irradiation of the supraclavicular lymph nodes, with 46-50 Gy in fractional doses of 1.8-2 Gy x 5/w is administered for 4.5-5.5 weeks. The timing of irradiation in the West is generally after chemotherapy. Adverse radiation effects include ischemic heart disease, pneumonitis, arm edema, rib fractures, and brachial plexus paralysis. The frequency of these complications is increased by the combined use of chemotherapy or surgery. The breast cancer cure rate in Japan is generally better than in the West. It remains to be determined whether the clinical data from Europe and America are applicable to the treatment of breast cancer in Japan. To address this issue, a clinical investigation should be performed in Japan with close cooperation between surgeons, physicians, pathologists, and radiotherapists. (K.H.)

  1. Exclusive radiotherapy and concurrent endocrine therapy for the management of elderly breast cancer patients: Case study and review of hypo-fractionated schemes; Hormonoradiotherapie exclusive dans la prise en charge du cancer du sein de la personne agee: cas clinique et revue de la litterature des schemas hypofractionnes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auberdiac, P.; Cartier, L.; Malkoun, N.; Chauleur, C.; De Laroche, G.; Magne, N. [Departement de radiotherapie, institut de cancerologie de la Loire, 108 bis, avenue Albert-Raimond, BP 60008, 42271 Saint-Priest-en-Jarez cedex (France); Chargari, C. [Service d' oncologie radiotherapie, hopital d' instruction des armees du Val-de-Grace, 74, boulevard de Port-Royal, 75230 Paris cedex 5 (France); Melis, A.; Jacquin, J.P. [Departement d' oncologie medicale, institut de cancerologie de la Loire, 108 bis, avenue Albert-Raimond, BP 60008, 42271 Saint-Priest-en-Jarez cedex (France)

    2011-12-15

    Normo-fractionated radiotherapy is standard for adjuvant management of patients treated with breast conservative surgery for breast cancer. However, many elderly patients are not eligible to such strategy, either because of concurrent diseases, or because the tumor is inoperable. Several protocols of exclusive radiotherapy have been reported in the literature, frequently using hypo-fractionated radiotherapy and endocrine therapy. We report a case of a patient treated with exclusive endocrine and radiotherapy and address the state of the art on hypo-fractionated schemes for the management of elderly breast cancer patients. While hypo-fractionated radiotherapy does not compromise the oncologic or cosmetic outcome, there is no prospective data that assesses the place of radiotherapy for the exclusive treatment of elderly patients. This strategy should be further assessed in clinical randomized trial. (authors)

  2. Predictive Models for Pulmonary Function Changes After Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer and Lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Nieto, Beatriz, E-mail: bsanchez@fis.puc.cl [Facultad de Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Goset, Karen C. [Unidad de Radioterapia, Clinica Alemana de Santiago, Santiago (Chile); Caviedes, Ivan [Servicio y Laboratorio Broncopulmonar, Clinica Alemana de Santiago, Santiago (Chile); Departamento de Medicina, Facultad de Medicina, Clinica Alemana-Universidad del Desarrollo, Santiago (Chile); Delgado, Iris O. [Instituto de Epidemiologia y Politicas de Salud Publica, Facultad de Medicina, Clinica Alemana-Universidad del Desarrollo, Santiago (Chile); Cordova, Andres [Unidad de Radioterapia, Clinica Alemana de Santiago, Santiago (Chile)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To propose multivariate predictive models for changes in pulmonary function tests ({Delta}PFTs) with respect to preradiotherapy (pre-RT) values in patients undergoing RT for breast cancer and lymphoma. Methods and Materials: A prospective study was designed to measure {Delta}PFTs of patients undergoing RT. Sixty-six patients were included. Spirometry, lung capacity (measured by helium dilution), and diffusing capacity of carbon monoxide tests were used to measure lung function. Two lung definitions were considered: paired lung vs. irradiated lung (IL). Correlation analysis of dosimetric parameters (mean lung dose and the percentage of lung volume receiving more than a threshold dose) and {Delta}PFTs was carried out to find the best dosimetric predictor. Chemotherapy, age, smoking, and the selected dose-volume parameter were considered as single and interaction terms in a multivariate analysis. Stability of results was checked by bootstrapping. Results: Both lung definitions proved to be similar. Modeling was carried out for IL. Acute and late damage showed the highest correlations with volumes irradiated above {approx}20 Gy (maximum R{sup 2} = 0.28) and {approx}40 Gy (maximum R{sup 2} = 0.21), respectively. RT alone induced a minor and transitory restrictive defect (p = 0.013). Doxorubicin-cyclophosphamide-paclitaxel (Taxol), when administered pre-RT, induced a late, large restrictive effect, independent of RT (p = 0.031). Bootstrap values confirmed the results. Conclusions: None of the dose-volume parameters was a perfect predictor of outcome. Thus, different predictor models for {Delta}PFTs were derived for the IL, which incorporated other nondosimetric parameters mainly through interaction terms. Late {Delta}PFTs seem to behave more serially than early ones. Large restrictive defects were demonstrated in patients pretreated with doxorubicin-cyclophosphamide-paclitaxel.

  3. Loco-regional morbidity after breast conservation and axillary lymph node dissection for early breast cancer with or without regional nodes radiotherapy, perspectives in modern breast cancer treatment: the Skagen Trial 1 is active.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Hanne Melgaard; Friis, Rasmus Blechingberg; Linnet, Søren; Offersen, Birgitte Vrou

    2017-05-01

    Axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) and adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) in early breast cancer are associated with a risk of morbidity, including lymphedema and impaired shoulder mobility. The aim of this study was to evaluate loco-regional morbidity after breast conserving surgery (BCS), ALND, taxane-based chemotherapy and whole breast irradiation (WBI) with or without regional nodes RT. Eligible patients had BCS and ALND from 2007 to 2012 followed by adjuvant taxane-based chemotherapy and if indicated, trastuzumab and endocrine treatment. The RT consisted of WBI and regional nodes RT in case of ≥ pN1 disease (group 1) and WBI only in case of pN0-1(mic) disease (group 2). The dose was 50 Gy in 25 fractions. The patients were invited to participate in a cross-sectional study evaluating morbidity. Of the 347 eligible patients, 277 patients (79%) accepted the invitation. Of these, 185 patients (67%) belonged to group 1 and 92 patients (33%) to group 2. The median time from RT to evaluation of morbidity was 3.3 years (group 1) and 4.3 years (group 2). In group 1, 34 patients (18%) and in group 2, 15 patients (16%) had ≥2 cm enlargement in circumference of ipsilateral upper or lower arm (p = .67). The frequence of impairment of ipsilateral shoulder abduction to ≤120° was 3% in both groups and of shoulder flexion to ≤120° was 1% and 2% (group 1 versus 2). No difference in patient reported outcome measure (PROM) data regarding heaviness or enlargement of ipsilateral upper and lower arm or mobility and sensory disturbances. The risk of lymphedema was low in patients after ALND and not related to use of regional nodes RT. Impairment of shoulder function was rare, and no differences in PROM were detected regarding use or not of regional nodes RT.

  4. Automatic Coronary Artery Calcium Scoring on Radiotherapy Planning CT Scans of Breast Cancer Patients: Reproducibility and Association with Traditional Cardiovascular Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gernaat, Sofie A. M.; Išgum, Ivana; de Vos, Bob D.; Takx, Richard A. P.; Young-Afat, Danny A.; Rijnberg, Noor; Grobbee, Diederick E.; van der Graaf, Yolanda; de Jong, Pim A.; Leiner, Tim; van den Bongard, Desiree H. J.; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Verkooijen, Helena M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Coronary artery calcium (CAC) is a strong and independent predictor of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. This study assesses reproducibility of automatic CAC scoring on radiotherapy planning computed tomography (CT) scans of breast cancer patients, and examines its association with traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Methods This study included 561 breast cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy between 2013 and 2015. CAC was automatically scored with an algorithm using supervised pattern recognition, expressed as Agatston scores and categorized into five categories (0, 1–10, 11–100, 101–400, >400). Reproducibility between automatic and manual expert scoring was assessed in 79 patients with automatically determined CAC above zero and 84 randomly selected patients without automatically determined CAC. Interscan reproducibility of automatic scoring was assessed in 294 patients having received two scans (82% on the same day). Association between CAC and CVD risk factors was assessed in 36 patients with CAC scores >100, 72 randomly selected patients with scores 1–100, and 72 randomly selected patients without CAC. Reliability was assessed with linearly weighted kappa and agreement with proportional agreement. Results 134 out of 561 (24%) patients had a CAC score above zero. Reliability of CVD risk categorization between automatic and manual scoring was 0.80 (95% Confidence Interval (CI): 0.74–0.87), and slightly higher for scans with breath-hold. Agreement was 0.79 (95% CI: 0.72–0.85). Interscan reliability was 0.61 (95% CI: 0.50–0.72) with an agreement of 0.84 (95% CI: 0.80–0.89). Ten out of 36 (27.8%) patients with CAC scores above 100 did not have other cardiovascular risk factors. Conclusions Automatic CAC scoring on radiotherapy planning CT scans is a reliable method to assess CVD risk based on Agatston scores. One in four breast cancer patients planned for radiotherapy have elevated CAC score. One in three patients with high CAC

  5. A dosimetric analysis of cardiac dose with or without active breath coordinator moderate deep inspiratory breath hold in left sided breast cancer radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunheri, Beena; Kotne, Sanketh; Nair, Sneha S; Makuny, Dinesh

    2017-01-01

    Cardiac toxicity is a major concern for left breast tangential field irradiation. The left ventricle and left anterior descending (LAD) artery are suggested to be radiosensitive and radiation to these structures leads to late lethal cardiotoxicity. Moderate deep inspiration breath hold (mDIBH) during radiation treatment delivery helps in reducing the cardiac dose. This study compares dosimetric parameters of heart with and without active breath coordinator (ABC) mDIBH during tangential field breast cancer radiation. This is a dosimetric comparative study. Forty-five consecutive patients with left-sided breast cancer who underwent breast-conserving surgery and adjuvant tangential field and radiotherapy with ABC mDIBH between November 2013 and September 2015 in our center were analyzed in this study. The ABC device was used for respiratory control and patients who could hold their breath for 20-30 s were considered for radiation with ABC mDIBH. Simulation scans of both free breathing (FB) and ABC mDIBH were done. Tangent field treatment plans with a dose prescription of 40 Gy/15 Fr were generated for each patient, in both scans. Target coverage, dose to the heart, LAD, and the left lung were documented with dose-volume histograms. Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, version 20 software, was used for analysis and the level of significance was set at P cardiac dose and hence can be considered as a promising tool for cardiac sparing.

  6. SU-E-P-56: Dosimetric Comparison of Three Post Modified Radical Mastectomy Radiotherapy Techniques for Locally Advanced Left-Sided Breast Cancer and Beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, C; Zhang, W; Lu, J; Wu, L; Wu, F; Huang, B; Li, D [Cancer Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetry of post modified radical mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRMRT) for left-sided breast cancer using 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Methods: We created ten sets of PMRMRT plans for ten consecutive patients and utilized two tangential and one or two supraclavicular beams in 3DCRT, a total of 5 beams in IMRT and two optimized partial arcs in VMAT. The difference in results between any two of the three new plans, between new and previous 3DCRT plans were compared and analyzed by ANOVA (α =0.05) and paired-sample t-test respectively. P values less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: Both IMRT and VMAT plans had similar PTV coverage, hotspot area and conformity (all p>0.05), and significantly higher PTV coverage compared with new 3DCRT (both p<0.001). IMRT plans had significantly less heart and left lung radiation exposure compared with VMAT (all p<0.05). The 3DCRT plans with larger estimated CTV displacement had better target coverage but worse OARs sparing compared to those with smaller one. Conclusion: IMRT has dosimetrical advantages over the other two techniques in PMRMRT for left-sided breast cancer. Individually quantifying and minimizing CTV displacement can significantly improve dosage distribution. This work was supported by the Medical Scientific Research Foundation of Guangdong Procvince (A2014455 to Changchun Ma)

  7. Development of delineation for the left anterior descending coronary artery region in left breast cancer radiotherapy: An optimized organ at risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jie; Hua, Kai-Lung; Hsu, Shih-Ming; Lin, Jhen-Bin; Lee, Chou-Hsien; Lu, Kuo-Wei; Dai, Kun-Yao; Huang, Xu-Nian; Huang, Jun-Zhao; Wu, Meng-Hao; Chen, Yu-Jen

    2017-03-01

    The left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) and diagonal branches (DBs) are blurred on computed tomography (CT). We aimed to define the LAD region (LADR) with adequate inclusion of the LAD and DBs and contouring consistency. The LADR was defined using coronary CT angiograms. The inclusion ratio was used to assess the LAD and DBs inclusion by the LADR. Four radiation oncologists delineated the LAD and LADR, using contrast-enhanced CT of 15 patients undergoing left breast radiotherapy. The Sørensen-Dice similarity index (DSI), Jaccard similarity index (JSI), and Hausdorff distance (HD) were calculated to assess similarity. The mean dose (D mean ) and maximum dose (D max ) to the LAD and LADR were calculated to compare consistency. Correlations were evaluated using Pearson's correlation coefficient. The inclusion ratio of the LAD by the LADR was 96%. The mean DSI, JSI, and HD values were respectively 27.9%, 16.7%, and 0.42mm for the LAD, and 83.1%, 73.0%, and 0.18mm for the LADR. The D mean between the LAD and LADR were strongly correlated (r=0.93). Delineation of the LADR significantly improved contouring similarity and consistency for dose reporting. This could optimize dose estimation for breast radiotherapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Studies on serum protein fractions of patients with breast cancer undergoing radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onizuka, Keiichiro; Mihara, Keikichi; Tukino, Haruaki; Mizoguchi, Naoki; Migita, Shunsuke

    1987-08-01

    Serial changes in serum levels of 15 proteins were analyzed in 84 breast cancer patients treated with postoperative irradiation. All patients had a minimum follow-up of 5 years. The patients before mastectomy had a tendency for decreased prealbumin (Pre-alb), albumin (Alb), transferrin (Tf), ..cap alpha../sub 2/-macroglobulin (..cap alpha../sub 2/M), ..cap alpha../sub 2/HS-glycoprotein (..cap alpha../sub 2/HS) and IgM, and a significantly increased ..cap alpha../sub 1/-acid glycoprotein (..cap alpha../sub 1/AG), haptoglobin (Hp), IgG and IgA, as compared with healthy controls. After mastectomy, the levels of ..cap alpha../sub 1/AG, ..cap alpha../sub 1/-antitrypsin (..cap alpha../sub 1/AT), ..cap alpha../sub 1/-antichymotrypsin (..cap alpha../sub 1/X) and ceruloplasmin (Cp) were increased, as opposed to decreased ..cap alpha../sub 2/M level. The levels of Alb, Hp, ..cap alpha../sub 2/HS, IgG and IgA tended to return to normal. At the completion of irradiation, the levels of IgG and IgA were increased, and those of ..cap alpha../sub 1/AG, ..cap alpha../sub 1/AT, ..cap alpha../sub 1/X, Hp, Cp, ..cap alpha../sub 2/HS, and Hx were decreased. In less than or equal to 5-year survivors, there were a significant decrease in Pre-alb and a significant increase in ..cap alpha../sub 1/AG, ..cap alpha../sub 1/AT, ..cap alpha../sub 1/X, Cp, Hx, and IgG. This was noted in patients who died within two years. Serial analysis after irradiation revealed: a trend toward normalization of Pre-alb, Alb, ..cap alpha../sub 1/AG, ..cap alpha../sub 1/AT, ..cap alpha../sub 1/X, Hp, Cp, ..cap alpha../sub 2/HS, Tf, and Hx and increased IgG, IgA, and IgM in > 5-year survivors; and a trend toward decreased Pre-alb, increased ..cap alpha../sub 1/AG, ..cap alpha../sub 1/AT, ..cap alpha../sub 1/X, Cp, and Hx, and slightly decreased IgG, IgA, and IgM in less than or equal to 5-year survivors. (Namekawa, K.).

  9. Breast-conserving surgery with or without radiotherapy in women with ductal carcinoma in situ: a meta-analysis of randomized trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leon Paola G

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To investigate whether Radiation therapy (RT should follow breast conserving surgery in women with ductal carcinoma in situ from breast cancer (DCIS with objective of decreased mortality, invasive or non invasive recurrence, distant metastases and contralateral breast cancer rates. We have done a meta-analysis of these results to give a more balanced view of the total evidence and to increase statistical precision. Methods A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCT was performed comparing RT treatment for DCIS of breast cancer to observation. The MEDLINE, EMBASE, CANCERLIT, Cochrane Library databases, Trial registers, bibliographic databases, and recent issues of relevant journals were searched. Relevant reports were reviewed by two reviewers independently and the references from these reports were searched for additional trials, using guidelines set by QUOROM statement criteria. Results The reviewers identified four large RCTs, yielding 3665 patients. Pooled results from this four randomized trials of adjuvant radiotherapy showed a significant reduction of invasive and DCIS ipsilateral breast cancer with odds ratio (OR of 0.40 (95% CI 0.33 – 0.60, p Conclusion The conclusion from our meta-analysis is that the addition of radiation therapy to lumpectomy results in an approximately 60% reduction in breast cancer recurrence, no benefit for survival or distant metastases compared to excision alone. Patients with high-grade DCIS lesions and positive margins benefited most from the addition of radiation therapy. It is not yet clear which patients can be successfully treated with lumpectomy alone; until further prospective studies answer this question, radiation should be recommended after lumpectomy for all patients without contraindications.

  10. Acute skin toxicity-related, out-of-pocket expenses in patients with breast cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy: a descriptive, exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnur, Julie B; Graff Zivin, Joshua; Mattson, David M K; Green, Sheryl; Jandorf, Lina H; Wernicke, A Gabriella; Montgomery, Guy H

    2012-12-01

    Acute skin toxicity is one of the most common side effects of breast cancer radiotherapy. To date, no one has estimated the nonmedical out-of-pocket expenses associated with this side effect. The primary aim of the present descriptive, exploratory study was to assess the feasibility of a newly developed skin toxicity costs questionnaire. The secondary aims were to: (1) estimate nonmedical out-of-pocket costs, (2) examine the nature of the costs, (3) explore potential background predictors of costs, and (4) explore the relationship between patient-reported dermatologic quality of life and expenditures. A total of 50 patients (mean age = 54.88, Stage 0-III) undergoing external beam radiotherapy completed a demographics/medical history questionnaire as well as a seven-item Skin Toxicity Costs (STC) questionnaire and the Skindex-16 in week 5 of treatment. Mean skin toxicity costs were $131.64 (standard error [SE] = $23.68). Most frequently incurred expenditures were new undergarments and products to manage toxicity. Education was a significant unique predictor of spending, with more educated women spending more money. Greater functioning impairment was associated with greater costs. The STC proved to be a practical, brief measure which successfully indicated specific areas of patient expenditures and need. Results reveal the nonmedical, out-of-pocket costs associated with acute skin toxicity in the context of breast cancer radiotherapy. To our knowledge, this study is the first to quantify individual costs associated with this treatment side effect, as well as the first to present a scale specifically designed to assess such costs. In future research, the STC could be used as an outcome variable in skin toxicity prevention and control research, as a behavioral indicator of symptom burden, or as part of a needs assessment.

  11. SU-E-P-51: Dosimetric Comparison to Organs at Risk Sparing Using Volumetric-Modulated Arc Therapy Versus Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in Postoperative Radiotherapy of Left-Sided Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiao, L; Deng, G [Department of Oncology, Shandong University School of Medicine, Jinan, Shandong (China); Xie, J; Cheng, J; Liang, N; Zhang, J [Department of Radiation Oncology, Qianfoshan Hospital Affiliated to Shandon, Jinan, Shandong (China); Zhang, J; Luo, H [Division of Oncology, Department of Graduate, Weifang Medical College, 2610, Jinan, Shandong (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetric characteristics of volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) techniques in treatment planning for left-sided breast cancer patients with modified radical mastectomy. Methods: Twenty-four left-sided breast cancer patients treated with modified radical mastectomy were selected in this study. The planning target volume (PTV) was generated by using 7-mm uniform expansion of the clinical target volume (CTV) in all direction except the skin surface. The organs at risk (OARs) included heart, left lung, right lung, and right breast. Dose volume histograms (DVHs) were utilized to evaluate the dose distribution in PTV and OARs. Results: Both VMAT and IMRT plans met the requirement of PTV coverage. VMAT was superior to IMRT in terms of conformity, with a statistically significant difference (p=0.024). Mean doses, V5 and V10 of heart and both lungs in VMAT plans were significantly decreased compared to IMRT plans (P<0.05), but in terms of heart volume irradiated by high doses (V30 and V45), no significant differences were observed (P>0.05). For right breast, VMAT showed the reduction of V5 in comparison with IMRT (P<0.05). Additionally, the mean number of monitor units (MU) and treatment time in VMAT (357.21, 3.62 min) were significantly less than those in IMRT (1132.85, 8.74 min). Conclusion: VMAT showed similar PTV coverage and significant advantage in OARs sparing compared with IMRT, especially in terms of decreased volumes irradiated by low doses, while significantly reducing the treatment time and MU number.

  12. Dosimetric comparison between intra-cavitary breast brachytherapy techniques for accelerated partial breast irradiation and a novel stereotactic radiotherapy device for breast cancer: GammaPod™

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ödén, Jakob; Toma-Dasu, Iuliana; Yu, Cedric X.; Feigenberg, Steven J.; Regine, William F.; Mutaf, Yildirim D.

    2013-07-01

    The GammaPod™ device, manufactured by Xcision Medical Systems, is a novel stereotactic breast irradiation device. It consists of a hemispherical source carrier containing 36 Cobalt-60 sources, a tungsten collimator with two built-in collimation sizes, a dynamically controlled patient support table and a breast immobilization cup also functioning as the stereotactic frame for the patient. The dosimetric output of the GammaPod™ was modelled using a Monte Carlo based treatment planning system. For the comparison, three-dimensional (3D) models of commonly used intra-cavitary breast brachytherapy techniques utilizing single lumen and multi-lumen balloon as well as peripheral catheter multi-lumen implant devices were created and corresponding 3D dose calculations were performed using the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group-43 formalism. Dose distributions for clinically relevant target volumes were optimized using dosimetric goals set forth in the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project Protocol B-39. For clinical scenarios assuming similar target sizes and proximity to critical organs, dose coverage, dose fall-off profiles beyond the target and skin doses at given distances beyond the target were calculated for GammaPod™ and compared with the doses achievable by the brachytherapy techniques. The dosimetric goals within the protocol guidelines were fulfilled for all target sizes and irradiation techniques. For central targets, at small distances from the target edge (up to approximately 1 cm) the brachytherapy techniques generally have a steeper dose fall-off gradient compared to GammaPod™ and at longer distances (more than about 1 cm) the relation is generally observed to be opposite. For targets close to the skin, the relative skin doses were considerably lower for GammaPod™ than for any of the brachytherapy techniques. In conclusion, GammaPod™ allows adequate and more uniform dose coverage to centrally and peripherally

  13. Effect of radiotherapy after mastectomy and axillary surgery on 10-year recurrence and 20-year breast cancer mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGale, P; Taylor, C; Correa, C

    2014-01-01

    mastectomy and axillary surgery versus the same surgery but no radiotherapy. Follow-up lasted 10 years for recurrence and to Jan 1, 2009, for mortality. Analyses were stratified by trial, individual follow-up year, age at entry, and pathological nodal status. FINDINGS: 3786 women had axillary dissection...... to at least level II and had zero, one to three, or four or more positive nodes. All were in trials in which radiotherapy included the chest wall, supraclavicular or axillary fossa (or both), and internal mammary chain. For 700 women with axillary dissection and no positive nodes, radiotherapy had...

  14. SU-E-J-76: Incorporation of Ultrasound Elastography in Target Volume Delineation for Partial Breast Radiotherapy Planning: A Comparative Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juneja, P; Harris, E; Bamber, J [The Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: There is substantial observer variability in the delineation of target volumes for post-surgical partial breast radiotherapy because the tumour bed has poor x-ray contrast. This variability may result in substantial variations in planned dose distribution. Ultrasound elastography (USE) has an ability to detect mechanical discontinuities and therefore, the potential to image the scar and distortion in breast tissue architecture. The goal of this study was to compare USE techniques: strain elastography (SE), shear wave elastography (SWE) and acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging using phantoms that simulate features of the tumour bed, for the purpose of incorporating USE in breast radiotherapy planning. Methods: Three gelatine-based phantoms (10% w/v) containing: a stiff inclusion (gelatine 16% w/v) with adhered boundaries, a stiff inclusion (gelatine 16% w/v) with mobile boundaries and fluid cavity inclusion (to mimic seroma), were constructed and used to investigate the USE techniques. The accuracy of the elastography techniques was quantified by comparing the imaged inclusion with the modelled ground-truth using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). For two regions of interest (ROI), the DSC measures their spatial overlap. Ground-truth ROIs were modelled using geometrical measurements from B-mode images. Results: The phantoms simulating stiff scar tissue with adhered and mobile boundaries and seroma were successfully developed and imaged using SE and SWE. The edges of the stiff inclusions were more clearly visible in SE than in SWE. Subsequently, for all these phantoms the measured DSCs were found to be higher for SE (DSCs: 0.91–0.97) than SWE (DSCs: 0.68–0.79) with an average relative difference of 23%. In the case of seroma phantom, DSC values for SE and SWE were similar. Conclusion: This study presents a first attempt to identify the most suitable elastography technique for use in breast radiotherapy planning. Further analysis will

  15. Dosimetric effect of images of double field exposure and positioning in radiotherapy of breast treatment; Efecto dosimetrico de las imagenes de doble exposicion de campo y posicionamiento en tratamientos de radioterapia de mama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bermudez Luna, R.; Rodriguez Rodriguez, C.; Martin Martin, G.; Lopez Fernandez, A.; Caballero Perea, B.; Ludena Martinez, B.; Prados Losa, R.

    2013-07-01

    The objectives of this study are to quantify the increased dose in white volume and the organ at risk in breast radiotherapy treatment, derived from portals of double-exposure images scheduled for treatment, evaluate dose reduction by passing images of single exposure and consider whether it would be wise to consider this doses in the planning process. (Author)

  16. Relationship between the prognostic and predictive value of the intrinsic subtypes and a validated gene profile predictive of loco-regional control and benefit from post-mastectomy radiotherapy in patients with high-risk breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tramm, Trine; Kyndi, Marianne; Myhre, Simen

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Breast cancer is characterized by great molecular heterogeneity demonstrated, e.g. by the intrinsic subtypes. Administration of post-mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) does, however, not reflect this heterogeneity. A gene profile (DBCG-RT profile) has recently been developed and validated...

  17. Evaluation of the perturbation of the mesh Bra Breast TiLoop in the planning process-radiotherapy; Evaluacion de la perturbacion de la malla mamaria TiLoop Bra en el proceso de planificacion-tratamiento radioterapico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camacho, C.; Pujades, M. C.; Perez-Calatayud, J.; Lliso, F.; Carmona, V.; Richart, J.; Ballester, F.

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the dosimetric impact TiLoop Mesh Bra breast radiotherapy treatments, and their influence on both the quality and the disruption of the gray levels of the radiographic image required for treatment planning.

  18. Effect of radiotherapy after mastectomy and axillary surgery on 10-year recurrence and 20-year breast cancer mortality: meta-analysis of individual patient data for 8135 women in 22 randomised trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McGale, P.; Taylor, C.; Correa, C.; Cutter, D.; Duane, F.; Ewertz, M.; Gray, R.; Mannu, G.; Peto, R.; Whelan, T.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Z.; Darby, S.; Abe, O.; Abe, R.; Enomoto, K.; Kikuchi, K.; Koyama, H.; Masuda, H.; Nomura, Y.; Ohashi, Y.; Sakai, K.; Sugimachi, K.; Toi, M.; Tominaga, T.; Uchino, J.; Yoshida, M.; Haybittle, J. L.; Leonard, C. F.; Calais, G.; Geraud, P.; Collett, V.; Davies, C.; Delmestri, A.; Sayer, J.; Harvey, V. J.; Holdaway, I. M.; Kay, R. G.; Mason, B. H.; Forbes, J. F.; Wilcken, N.; Bartsch, R.; Dubsky, P.; Fesl, C.; Fohler, H.; Gnant, M.; Greil, R.; Jakesz, R.; Lang, A.; Luschin-Ebengreuth, G.; Marth, C.; Mlineritsch, B.; Samonigg, H.; Singer, C. F.; Steger, G. G.; Stöger, H.; Canney, P.; Yosef, H. M. A.; Focan, C.; Peek, U.; Oates, G. D.; Powell, J.; Durand, M.; Mauriac, L.; Di Leo, A.; Dolci, S.; Larsimont, D.; Nogaret, J. M.; Philippson, C.; Piccart, M. J.; Masood, M. B.; Parker, D.; Price, J. J.; Lindsay, M. A.; Mackey, J.; Martin, M.; Hupperets, P. S. G. J.; Bates, T.; Blamey, R. W.; Chetty, U.; Ellis, I. O.; Mallon, E.; Morgan, D. A. L.; Patnick, J.; Pinder, S.; Olivotto, I.; Ragaz, J.; Berry, D.; Broadwater, G.; Cirrincione, C.; Muss, H.; Norton, L.; Weiss, R. B.; Abu-Zahra, H. T.; Portnoj, S. M.; Bowden, S.; Brookes, C.; Dunn, J.; Fernando, I.; Lee, M.; Poole, C.; Rea, D.; Spooner, D.; Barrett-Lee, P. J.; Mansel, R. E.; Monypenny, I. J.; Gordon, N. H.; Davis, H. L.; Cuzick, J.; Lehingue, Y.; Romestaing, P.; Dubois, J. B.; Delozier, T.; Griffon, B.; Mace Lesech, J.; Brain, E.; de La Lande, B.; Mouret-Fourme, E.; Mustacchi, G.; Petruzelka, L.; Pribylova, O.; Owen, J. R.; Harbeck, N.; Jänicke, F.; Meisner, C.; Schmitt, M.; Thomssen, C.; Meier, P.; Shan, Y.; Shao, Y. F.; Wang, X.; Zhao, D. B.; Chen, Z. M.; Pan, H. C.; Howell, A.; Swindell, R.; Burrett, J. A.; Clarke, M.; Collins, R.; Davies, K.; Elphinstone, P.; Evans, V.; Gettins, L.; Godwin, J.; Gregory, C.; Hermans, D.; Hicks, C.; James, S.; Kerr, A.; Liu, H.; MacKinnon, E.; Lay, M.; McHugh, T.; Morris, P.; Albano, J.; de Oliveira, C. F.; Gervásio, H.; Gordilho, J.; Ejlertsen, B.; Jensen, M.-B.; Johansen, H.; Mouridsen, H.; Palshof, T.; Gelman, R. S.; Harris, J. R.; Hayes, D.; Henderson, C.; Shapiro, C. L.; Winer, E.; Christiansen, P.; Møller, S.; Mouridsen, H. T.; Trampisch, H. J.; Dalesio, O.; de Vries, E. G. E.; Rodenhuis, S.; van Tinteren, H.; Comis, R. L.; Davidson, N. E.; Robert, N.; Sledge, G.; Solin, L. J.; Sparano, J. A.; Tormey, D. C.; Wood, W.; Cameron, D.; Dixon, J. M.; Forrest, P.; Jack, W.; Kunkler, I.; Rossbach, J.; Klijn, J. G. M.; Treurniet-Donker, A. D.; van Putten, W. L.; Rotmensz, N.; Veronesi, U.; Viale, G.; Bartelink, H.; Bijker, N.; Bogaerts, J.; Cardoso, F.; Cufer, T.; Julien, J. P.; Rutgers, E.; van de Velde, C. J. H.; Cunningham, M. P.; Huovinen, R.; Joensuu, H.; Costa, A.; Bonadonna, G.; Gianni, L.; Valagussa, P.; Goldstein, L. J.; Bonneterre, J.; Fargeot, P.; Fumoleau, P.; Kerbrat, P.; Luporsi, E.; Namer, M.; Eiermann, W.; Hilfrich, J.; Jonat, W.; Kaufmann, M.; Kreienberg, R.; Schumacher, M.; Bastert, G.; Rauschecker, H.; Sauer, R.; Sauerbrei, W.; Schauer, A.; Blohmer, J. U.; Costa, S. D.; Eidtmann, H.; Gerber, B.; Jackisch, C.; Loibl, S.; von Minckwitz, G.; de Schryver, A.; Vakaet, L.; Belfiglio, M.; Nicolucci, A.; Pellegrini, F.; Pirozzoli, M. C.; Sacco, M.; Valentini, M.; McArdle, C. S.; Smith, D. C.; Stallard, S.; Dent, D. M.; Gudgeon, C. A.; Hacking, A.; Murray, E.; Panieri, E.; Werner, I. D.; Carrasco, E.; Segui, M. A.; Galligioni, E.; Lopez, M.; Erazo, A.; Medina, J. Y.; Horiguchi, J.; Takei, H.; Fentiman, I. S.; Hayward, J. L.; Rubens, R. D.; Skilton, D.; Scheurlen, H.; Sohn, H. C.; Untch, M.; Dafni, U.; Markopoulos, C.; Fountzilas, G.; Mavroudis, D.; Klefstrom, P.; Blomqvist, C.; Saarto, T.; Gallen, M.; Tinterri, C.; Margreiter, R.; de Lafontan, B.; Mihura, J.; Roché, H.; Asselain, B.; Salmon, R. J.; Vilcoq, J. R.; André, F.; Arriagada, R.; Delaloge, S.; Hill, C.; Koscielny, S.; Michiels, S.; Rubino, C.; A'Hern, R.; Bliss, J.; Ellis, P.; Kilburn, L.; Yarnold, J. R.; Benraadt, J.; Kooi, M.; van de Velde, A. O.; van Dongen, J. A.; Vermorken, J. B.; Castiglione, M.; Coates, A.; Colleoni, M.; Collins, J.; Forbes, J.; Gelber, R. D.; Goldhirsch, A.; Lindtner, J.; Price, K. N.; Regan, M. M.; Rudenstam, C. M.; Senn, H. J.; Thuerlimann, B.; Bliss, J. M.; Chilvers, C. E. D.; Coombes, R. C.; Hall, E.; Marty, M.; Buyse, M.; Possinger, K.; Schmid, P.; Wallwiener, D.; Foster, L.; George, W. D.; Stewart, H. J.; Stroner, P.; Borovik, R.; Hayat, H.; Inbar, M. J.; Peretz, T.; Robinson, E.; Bruzzi, P.; del Mastro, L.; Pronzato, P.; Sertoli, M. R.; Venturini, M.; Camerini, T.; de Palo, G.; Di Mauro, M. G.; Formelli, F.; Amadori, D.; Martoni, A.; Pannuti, F.; Camisa, R.; Cocconi, G.; Colozza, A.; Passalacqua, R.; Aogi, K.; Takashima, S.; Ikeda, T.; Inokuchi, K.; Sawa, K.; Sonoo, H.; Korzeniowski, S.; Skolyszewski, J.; Ogawa, M.; Yamashita, J.; Bastiaannet, E.; van de Water, W.; van Nes, J. G. H.; Christiaens, R.; Neven, P.; Paridaens, R.; van den Bogaert, W.; Braun, S.; Martin, P.; Romain, S.; Janauer, M.; Seifert, M.; Sevelda, P.; Zielinski, C. C.; Hakes, T.; Hudis, C. A.; Wittes, R.; Giokas, G.; Kondylis, D.; Lissaios, B.; de la Huerta, R.; Sainz, M. G.; Altemus, R.; Camphausen, K.; Cowan, K.; Danforth, D.; Lichter, A.; Lippman, M.; O'Shaughnessy, J.; Pierce, L. J.; Steinberg, S.; Venzon, D.; Zujewski, J. A.; D'Amico, C.; Lioce, M.; Paradiso, A.; Chapman, J.-A. W.; Gelmon, K.; Goss, P. E.; Levine, M. N.; Meyer, R.; Parulekar, W.; Pater, J. L.; Pritchard, K. I.; Shepherd, L. E.; Tu, D.; Ohno, S.; Anderson, S.; Bass, G.; Brown, A.; Bryant, J.; Costantino, J.; Dignam, J.; Fisher, B.; Geyer, C.; Mamounas, E. P.; Paik, S.; Redmond, C.; Swain, S.; Wickerham, L.; Wolmark, N.; Baum, M.; Jackson, I. M.; Palmer, M. K.; Perez, E.; Ingle, J. N.; Suman, V. J.; Bengtsson, N. O.; Emdin, S.; Jonsson, H.; Lythgoe, J. P.; Kissin, M.; Erikstein, B.; Hannisdal, E.; Jacobsen, A. B.; Varhaug, J. E.; Gundersen, S.; Hauer-Jensen, M.; Høst, H.; Nissen-Meyer, R.; Reinertsen, K.; Mitchell, A. K.; Robertson, J. F. R.; Ueo, H.; Di Palma, M.; Mathé, G.; Misset, J. L.; Levine, M.; Morimoto, K.; Takatsuka, Y.; Crossley, E.; Harris, A.; Talbot, D.; Taylor, M.; di Blasio, B.; Ivanov, V.; Paltuev, R.; Semiglazov, V.; Brockschmidt, J.; Cooper, M. R.; Falkson, C. I.; Dowsett, M.; Makris, A.; Parton, M.; Pennert, K.; Powles, T. J.; Smith, I. E.; Gazet, J. C.; Browne, L.; Graham, P.; Corcoran, N.; Businico, A.; Deshpande, N.; di Martino, L.; Douglas, P.; Lindtner, A.; Notter, G.; Bryant, A. J. S.; Ewing, G. H.; Firth, L. A.; Krushen-Kosloski, J. L.; Anderson, H.; Killander, F.; Malmström, P.; Rydén, L.; Arnesson, L.-G.; Carstensen, J.; Dufmats, M.; Fohlin, H.; Nordenskjöld, B.; Söderberg, M.; Carpenter, J. T.; Murray, N.; Royle, G. T.; Simmonds, P. D.; Albain, K.; Barlow, W.; Crowley, J.; Gralow, J.; Hortobagyi, G.; Livingston, R.; Martino, S.; Osborne, C. K.; Ravdin, P. M.; Adolfsson, J.; Bergh, J.; Bondesson, T.; Celebioglu, F.; Dahlberg, K.; Fornander, T.; Fredriksson, I.; Frisell, J.; Göransson, E.; Iiristo, M.; Johansson, U.; Lenner, E.; Löfgren, L.; Nikolaidis, P.; Perbeck, L.; Rotstein, S.; Sandelin, K.; Skoog, L.; Svane, G.; af Trampe, E.; Wadström, C.; Janni, W.; Maibach, R.; Thürlimann, B.; Hakama, M.; Holli, K.; Isola, J.; Rouhento, K.; Saaristo, R.; Brenner, H.; Hercbergs, A.; Yoshimoto, M.; Paterson, A. H. G.; Fyles, A.; Meakin, J. W.; Panzarella, T.; Bahi, J.; Reid, M.; Spittle, M.; Bishop, H.; Bundred, N. J.; Forsyth, S.; Pinder, S. E.; Sestak, I.; Deutsch, G. P.; Kwong, D. L. W.; Pai, V. R.; Senanayake, F.; Martin, A. L.; Boccardo, F.; Rubagotti, A.; Hackshaw, A.; Houghton, J.; Ledermann, J.; Monson, K.; Tobias, J. S.; Carlomagno, C.; de Laurentiis, M.; de Placido, S.; Williams, L.; Broglio, K.; Buzdar, A. U.; Hsu, L.; Love, R. R.; Ahlgren, J.; Garmo, H.; Holmberg, L.; Liljegren, G.; Lindman, H.; Wärnberg, F.; Asmar, L.; Jones, S. E.; Gluz, O.; Liedtke, C.; Nitz, U.; Litton, A.; Wallgren, A.; Karlsson, P.; Linderholm, B. K.; Chlebowski, R. T.; Caffier, H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Postmastectomy radiotherapy was shown in previous meta- analyses to reduce the risks of both recurrence and breast cancer mortality in all women with node- positive disease considered together. However, the benefit in women with only one to three positive lymph nodes is uncertain. We

  19. Radiotherapy access in Belgium: How far are we from evidence-based utilisation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lievens, Y; De Schutter, H; Stellamans, K; Rosskamp, M; Van Eycken, L

    2017-10-01

    Underutilisation of radiotherapy has been observed worldwide. To evaluate the current situation in Belgium, optimal utilisation proportions (OUPs) adopted from the European SocieTy for Radiotherapy and Oncology - Health Economics in Radiation Oncology (ESTRO-HERO) project were compared to actual utilisation proportions (AUPs) and with radiotherapy advised during the multidisciplinary cancer team (MDT) meetings. In addition, the impact of independent variables was analysed. AUPs and advised radiotherapy were calculated overall and by cancer type for 110,810 unique cancer diagnoses in 2009-2010. Radiotherapy utilisation was derived from reimbursement data and distinguished between palliative and curative intent external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and/or brachytherapy (BT). Sensitivity analyses regarding the influence of the follow-up period, the survival length and patient's age were performed. Advised radiotherapy was calculated based on broad treatment categories as reported at MDT meetings. The overall AUP of 37% (39% including BT) was lower than the OUP of 53%, but in line with advised radiotherapy (35%). Large variations by tumour type were observed: in some tumours (e.g. lung and prostate cancer) AUP was considerably lower than OUP, whereas in others there was reasonable concordance (e.g. breast and rectal cancer). Overall, 84% of treatments started within 9 months following diagnosis. Survival time influenced AUP in a cancer type-dependent way. Elderly patients received less radiotherapy. Although the actually delivered radiotherapy in Belgium aligns well to MDT advices, it is lower than the evidence-based optimum. Further analysis of potential barriers is needed for radiotherapy forecasting and planning, and in order to promote adequate access to radiotherapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Forward intensity-modulated radiotherapy planning in breast cancer to improve dose homogeneity: feasibility of class solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peulen, Heike; Hanbeukers, Bianca; Boersma, Liesbeth; van Baardwijk, Angela; van den Ende, Piet; Houben, Ruud; Jager, Jos; Murrer, Lars; Borger, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    To explore forward planning methods for breast cancer treatment to obtain homogeneous dose distributions (using International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements criteria) within normal tissue constraints and to determine the feasibility of class solutions. Treatment plans were optimized in a stepwise procedure for 60 patients referred for postlumpectomy irradiation using strict dose constraints: planning target volume (PTV)(95%) of >99%; V(107%) of planning started with classic tangential beams. Optimization was done by adding a maximum of four segments before adding beams, in a second step. A breath-hold technique was used for heart sparing if necessary. Dose constraints were met for all 60 patients. The classic tangential beam setup was not sufficient for any of the patients; in one-third of patients, additional segments were required (plans fulfilling strict dose homogeneity criteria and normal tissue constraints could be obtained for all patients by stepwise dose intensity modification using limited numbers of segments and additional beams. In patients with a CD of >23.6 cm, additional beams were always required. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The benefit of adjuvant radiotherapy after breast conserving surgery in older patients with low risk breast cancer- a meta-analysis of randomized trials

    OpenAIRE

    Matuschek, Christiane; B?lke, Edwin; Haussmann, Jan; Mohrmann, Svjetlana; Nestle-Kr?mling, Carolin; Gerber, Peter Arne; Corradini, Stefanie; Orth, Klaus; Kammers, Kai; Budach, Wilfried

    2017-01-01

    Purpose/Objective(s) It is currently unclear whether patients with low risk breast cancer receiving adjuvant endocrine therapy need adjuvant radiation therapy after breast conserving surgery. The data of randomized trials are available. Materials/Methods In a database search 5 randomized trials including in total 3766 mostly elderly patients with early stage breast cancer tr?eated either with adjuvant endocrine therapy or with endocrine therapy and additional whole breast radiation after brea...

  2. A comparative dosimetric study on tangential photon beams, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT) for breast cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, C.-M.; Ding, M.; Li, J. S.; Lee, M. C.; Pawlicki, T.; Deng, J.

    2003-04-01

    Recently, energy- and intensity-modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT) has garnered a growing interest for the treatment of superficial targets. In this work, we carried out a comparative dosimetry study to evaluate MERT, photon beam intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and conventional tangential photon beams for the treatment of breast cancer. A Monte Carlo based treatment planning system has been investigated, which consists of a set of software tools to perform accurate dose calculation, treatment optimization, leaf sequencing and plan analysis. We have compared breast treatment plans generated using this home-grown treatment optimization and dose calculation software for these treatment techniques. The MERT plans were planned with up to two gantry angles and four nominal energies (6, 9, 12 and 16 MeV). The tangential photon treatment plans were planned with 6 MV wedged photon beams. The IMRT plans were planned using both multiple-gantry 6 MV photon beams or two 6 MV tangential beams. Our results show that tangential IMRT can reduce the dose to the lung, heart and contralateral breast compared to conventional tangential wedged beams (up to 50% reduction in high dose volume or 5 Gy in the maximum dose). MERT can reduce the maximum dose to the lung by up to 20 Gy and to the heart by up to 35 Gy compared to conventional tangential wedged beams. Multiple beam angle IMRT can significantly reduce the maximum dose to the lung and heart (up to 20 Gy) but it induces low and medium doses to a large volume of normal tissues including lung, heart and contralateral breast. It is concluded that MERT has superior capabilities to achieve dose conformity both laterally and in the depth direction, which will be well suited for treating superficial targets such as breast cancer.

  3. Fat necrosis and parenchymal scarring after breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy with an intraoperative electron or fractionated, percutaneous boost: a retrospective comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piroth, Marc D; Fischedick, Karin; Wein, Berthold; Heindrichs, Uwe; Piroth, Daniela M; Holy, Richard; Pinkawa, Michael; Eble, Michael J

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this retrospective analysis was to evaluate mammographic changes such as fat necroses and parenchymal scarring in the breast tissue within the first 3 years after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) and whole-breast irradiation with an additional intraoperative electron boost (IO-B) versus fractionated percutaneous boost (FP-B). A total of 53 breast cancer patients (stage I/II) treated between 2006 and 2008 were included. All patients underwent BCS followed by fractionated whole-breast radiotherapy with a total dose and single dose of 50.4 and 1.8 Gy. Twenty patients had 10 Gy IO-B using electrons, and 33 patients were treated with a FP-B with 10.8 Gy. The IO-B was performed using the mobile linear accelerator NOVAC 7. The follow-up mammograms were focused on fat necroses, parenchymal scarring and skin thickening. Fat necroses occurred significantly more frequently in IO-B patients compared to FP-B patients (50.0 vs. 18.2 %). The fat necroses were mammographically detected a median of 17 versus 23 months post-surgery for the IO-B versus FP-B patients. The median size of fat necroses was 24 (14-30) mm for the IO-B group and 14 (4-53) mm for the FP-B group. Parenchymal scarring in the grade 3-4 tumor bed area was seen significantly more frequently in the IO-B patients (55.0 vs. 21.2 %). Skin thickening did not differ significantly. The IO-B led to significantly more fat necroses and local restricted parenchymal scarring in our analysis.

  4. Impact of active coping, religion and acceptance on quality of life of patients with breast cancer in the department of radiotherapy, UCH, Ibadan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elumelu, Theresa N; Asuzu, Chioma C; Akin-Odanye, Elizabeth O

    2015-06-01

    A breast cancer diagnosis as well as the treatment that follows has considerable consequences on women's physical functioning, psychological health and overall well-being, resulting in significant interference with patients' quality of life (QoL). The study seeks to assess the impact of active coping, religion and acceptance on the QoL of patients with breast cancer. This study, which is descriptive in nature, assessed the QoL and coping mechanism of 110 patients with breast cancer receiving treatment at the radiotherapy clinic in the University College Hospital (UCH). The patients had an age range of 25-75, an average age of 46.82 and an SD of 10.55. Male patients were 4 (3.60%), while 106 (96.40%) were female. Currently married participants were 84 (76.40%), while 26 (23.60%) were not. Data was collected using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast (FACT-B) V.4 QoL questionnaire and Carver's Brief Cope questionnaire. Analysis of data showed that significant differences were found between participants who used active coping, religious coping and acceptance more than those who did not in the overall QoL (pcancer based on the coping style they adopt. Patients with breast cancer should be helped to adopt coping styles that would enhance their QoL. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  5. Effect of radiotherapy on survival of women with locally excised ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast: a Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results population-based analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian GW

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Guo-Wei Qian,1,* Xiao-Jian Ni,1,* Zheng Wang,2 Yi-Zhou Jiang,1 Ke-Da Yu,1 Zhi-Ming Shao1 1Department of Breast Surgery, 2Department of Radiation Oncology, Shanghai Cancer Center and Cancer Institute, Fudan University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Although it has been previously reported that radiotherapy (RT effectively reduced the incidence of local recurrence of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS following breast-conserving surgery (BCS, little is known about the effect of RT on survival of patients with locally excised DCIS. Patients and methods: Using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry data, we selected 56,968 female DCIS patients treated with BCS between 1998 and 2007. Overall survival (OS and breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS were compared among patients who received RT or no RT using the Kaplan–Meier methods and Cox proportional hazards regression models. Results: Median follow-up was 91 months. In the multivariable model, patients receiving postoperative RT had better OS than those undergoing BCS alone (hazard ratio [HR] 0.59, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.53–0.67, P<0.001. This pattern remained after stratification by estrogen receptor (ER status and age. In contrast, RT delivery was not significantly associated with improved BCSS (HR 0.71, 95% CI 0.48–1.03, P=0.073. However, after stratifying by the above two variables, RT contributed to better BCSS in ER-negative/borderline patients (HR 0.41, 95% CI 0.19–0.88, P=0.023 and younger patients (≤50 years old; HR 0.37, 95% CI 0.15–0.91, P=0.030. Conclusion: Our analysis confirms the beneficial effect of RT on OS in women with locally excised DCIS and reveals the specific protective effect of RT on BCSS in ER-negative/borderline and younger patients. Keywords: ductal carcinoma in situ, breast cancer, breast-conserving surgery, radiotherapy, survival

  6. Population-based outcomes after whole brain radiotherapy and re-irradiation in patients with metastatic breast cancer in the trastuzumab era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karam Irene

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose This study examined the population-based use and outcomes of brain radiotherapy (BRT for brain metastases (BM from breast cancer with a focus on repeat BRT in the trastuzumab era. Methods and materials All women with breast cancer diagnosed from 2000-2007 and treated with BRT were retrospectively identified from a provincial database. Results A total of 441 women with BM from breast cancer were identified. The median age was 55 years and 40% (176/441 had human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 positive disease. The median survival (MS from the initial BRT for all 441 women was 4.5 months. The MS by Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Recursive Partitioning Analysis (RPA class was: 1 (14.5 months, 2 (6.4 months and 3 (1.8 months. For the 37 cases receiving repeat BRT, 27% (10/37 had stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS and 70% (26/37 had HER2 positive disease, of which, 81% (21/26 received trastuzumab in the metastatic setting. For repeat BRT, the median survival by RPA class was: 1 (9.8 months, 2 (7.4 months and 3 (2.0 months. For RPA class 1 and 2, the one-year overall survival (OS was 45%. Conclusion The proportion of cases with HER2 positive disease was increased at repeat BRT compared to initial BRT. RPA class 1 and 2 patients should be considered for repeat BRT.

  7. External beam boost versus interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost in the adjuvant radiotherapy following breast-conserving therapy in early-stage breast cancer: a dosimetric comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchert, Corinna; Kovács, György

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study aims to compare the dosimetric data of local tumor's bed dose escalation (boost) with photon beams (external beam radiation therapy – EBRT) versus high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (HDR-BT) after breast-conserving treatment in women with early-stage breast cancer. Material and methods We analyzed the treatment planning data of 136 irradiated patients, treated between 2006 and 2013, who underwent breast-conserving surgery and adjuvant whole breast irradiation (WBI; 50.4 Gy) and boost (HDR-BT: 10 Gy in one fraction [n = 36]; EBRT: 10 Gy in five fractions [n = 100]). Organs at risk (OAR; heart, ipsilateral lung, skin, most exposed rib segment) were delineated. Dosimetric parameters were calculated with the aid of dose-volume histograms (DVH). A non-parametric test was performed to compare the two different boost forms. Results There was no difference for left-sided cancers regarding the maximum dose to the heart (HDR-BT 29.8% vs. EBRT 29.95%, p = 0.34). The maximum doses to the other OAR were significantly lower for HDR-BT (Dmax lung 47.12% vs. 87.7%, p skin 57.1% vs. 94.75%, p < 0.01; in the case of right-sided breast irradiation, dose of the heart 6.00% vs. 16.75%, p < 0.01). Conclusions Compared to EBRT, local dose escalation with HDR-BT presented a significant dose reduction to the investigated OAR. Only left-sided irradiation showed no difference regarding the maximum dose to the heart. Reducing irradiation exposure to OAR could result in a reduction of long-term side effects. Therefore, from a dosimetric point of view, an interstitial boost complementary to WBI via EBRT seems to be more advantageous in the adjuvant radiotherapy of breast cancer. PMID:27648082

  8. External beam boost versus interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost in the adjuvant radiotherapy following breast-conserving therapy in early-stage breast cancer: a dosimetric comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martje Marie Terheyden

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : This study aims to compare the dosimetric data of local tumor’s bed dose escalation (boost with photon beams (external beam radiation therapy – EBRT versus high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (HDR-BT after breast-conserving treatment in women with early-stage breast cancer. Material and methods : We analyzed the treatment planning data of 136 irradiated patients, treated between 2006 and 2013, who underwent breast-conserving surgery and adjuvant whole breast irradiation (WBI; 50.4 Gy and boost (HDR-BT: 10 Gy in one fraction [n = 36]; EBRT: 10 Gy in five fractions [n = 100]. Organs at risk (OAR; heart, ipsilateral lung, skin, most exposed rib segment were delineated. Dosimetric parameters were calculated with the aid of dose-volume histograms (DVH. A non-parametric test was performed to compare the two different boost forms. Results : There was no difference for left-sided cancers regarding the maximum dose to the heart (HDR-BT 29.8% vs. EBRT 29.95%, p = 0.34. The maximum doses to the other OAR were significantly lower for HDR-BT (Dmax lung 47.12% vs. 87.7%, p < 0.01; rib 61.17% vs. 98.5%, p < 0.01; skin 57.1% vs. 94.75%, p < 0.01; in the case of right-sided breast irradiation, dose of the heart 6.00% vs. 16.75%, p < 0.01. Conclusions : Compared to EBRT, local dose escalation with HDR-BT presented a significant dose reduction to the investigated OAR. Only left-sided irradiation showed no difference regarding the maximum dose to the heart. Reducing irradiation exposure to OAR could result in a reduction of long-term side effects. Therefore, from a dosimetric point of view, an interstitial boost complementary to WBI via EBRT seems to be more advantageous in the adjuvant radiotherapy of breast cancer.

  9. Breast Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is prevention? Go ... from starting. Risk-reducing surgery . General Information About Breast Cancer Key Points Breast cancer is a disease in ...

  10. Radiotherapy in breast-conserving treatment for ductal carcinoma in situ: first results of the EORTC randomised phase III trial 10853. EORTC Breast Cancer Cooperative Group and EORTC Radiotherapy Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Julien, J. P.; Bijker, N.; Fentiman, I. S.; Peterse, J. L.; Delledonne, V.; Rouanet, P.; Avril, A.; Sylvester, R.; Mignolet, F.; Bartelink, H.; van Dongen, J. A.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast is a disorder that has become more common since it may manifest as microcalcifications that can be detected by screening mammography. Since selected women with invasive cancer can be treated safely with breast conservation therapy it is

  11. Identification of Risk Factors for Locoregional Recurrence in Breast Cancer Patients with Nodal Stage N0 and N1: Who Could Benefit from Post-Mastectomy Radiotherapy?

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    Eunjin Jwa

    Full Text Available The locoregional recurrence (LRR rate was reported as high as approximately 20% in stage I-II breast cancer following mastectomy. To investigate the risk factors for LRR in pT1-2N0-1 breast cancer patients treated with mastectomy but not radiation, and to define a subgroup of patients at high risk of LRR who may benefit from postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT.In total, 390 patients with pT1-2N0M0 (n = 307 and pT1-2N1M0 (n = 83 breast cancer who underwent total mastectomy without adjuvant radiotherapy from 2002 to 2011 were enrolled in the study.After a median follow-up period of 5.6 years (range, 0.6-11.3 years, 21 patients had 18 systemic relapses and 12 LRRs including six in the chest wall and eight in the regional nodal area. The 5-year LRR-free survival (LRRFS rates were 97.0% in pN0, 98.8% in pN1, and 97.4% in all patients. Multivariate analysis revealed that age < 50 years (Hazard Ratio, 11.4; p = 0.01 and no adjuvant chemotherapy (Hazard Ratio, 10.2; p = 0.04 were independent risk factors for LRR in pN0 patients. Using these factors, the 5-year LRRFS rates were 100% without any risk factors, 96.4% with one risk factor, and 86.7% with two risk factors. In pN1 patients, multivariate analysis revealed that having a hormone receptor negative tumor (Hazard Ratio, 18.3; p = 0.03 was the only independent risk factor for LRR. The 5-year LRRFS rates were 100.0% for luminal type, and 92.3% for non-luminal type cancer.Patients with pT1-2N0-1 breast cancer who underwent total mastectomy without PMRT could be stratified by nodal stage and risk factors for LRR. PMRT may have of value for node negative patients aged less than 50 years and who are not treated with adjuvant chemotherapy, and for non-luminal type patients with one to three positive nodes.

  12. Identification of Risk Factors for Locoregional Recurrence in Breast Cancer Patients with Nodal Stage N0 and N1: Who Could Benefit from Post-Mastectomy Radiotherapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jwa, Eunjin; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Lim, Hyeon Woo; Jung, So-Youn; Lee, Seeyoun; Kang, Han-Sung; Lee, EunSook; Park, Young Hee

    2015-01-01

    The locoregional recurrence (LRR) rate was reported as high as approximately 20% in stage I-II breast cancer following mastectomy. To investigate the risk factors for LRR in pT1-2N0-1 breast cancer patients treated with mastectomy but not radiation, and to define a subgroup of patients at high risk of LRR who may benefit from postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT). In total, 390 patients with pT1-2N0M0 (n = 307) and pT1-2N1M0 (n = 83) breast cancer who underwent total mastectomy without adjuvant radiotherapy from 2002 to 2011 were enrolled in the study. After a median follow-up period of 5.6 years (range, 0.6-11.3 years), 21 patients had 18 systemic relapses and 12 LRRs including six in the chest wall and eight in the regional nodal area. The 5-year LRR-free survival (LRRFS) rates were 97.0% in pN0, 98.8% in pN1, and 97.4% in all patients. Multivariate analysis revealed that age risk factors for LRR in pN0 patients. Using these factors, the 5-year LRRFS rates were 100% without any risk factors, 96.4% with one risk factor, and 86.7% with two risk factors. In pN1 patients, multivariate analysis revealed that having a hormone receptor negative tumor (Hazard Ratio, 18.3; p = 0.03) was the only independent risk factor for LRR. The 5-year LRRFS rates were 100.0% for luminal type, and 92.3% for non-luminal type cancer. Patients with pT1-2N0-1 breast cancer who underwent total mastectomy without PMRT could be stratified by nodal stage and risk factors for LRR. PMRT may have of value for node negative patients aged less than 50 years and who are not treated with adjuvant chemotherapy, and for non-luminal type patients with one to three positive nodes.

  13. Verification of the Accuracy of the Delivered Dose in Pelvic and Breast Cancer Radiotherapy by in-vivo Semi-Conductor Dosimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Shabani

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Delivering maximum dose to tumor and minimum dose to normal tissues is the most important goal in radiotherapy. According to ICRU, the maximum acceptable uncertainty in the delivered dose compared to the prescribed dose should be lower than 5%, and this is because of the relationship between absorbed dose, tumor control and normal tissue damage. Absorbed dose accuracy is investigated by an in vivo dosimetry method. In this paper, we compared absorbed dose in the tumors of the breast and pelvic region against the calculated dose. The amount of deviations and the factors that cause this deviation in dose delivery to patients and some methods for decreasing them were evaluated. Materials and methods: The entrance and exit doses of 36 pelvic-region cancer patients and 38 breast cancer patients who were treated by cobalt-60 teletherapy were measured using p-type diodes. It should be noted that the transmission method was used to assess the dose at isocenter. Two ionization chambers (0.6 cc and 0.3 cc were used for calibration and determination of the correction coefficients in water and slab phantoms. Deviations between calculated and measured doses of entrance, exit and midline points were calculated and the results were shown using histograms. Results: The average and standard deviation for entrance, exit and midline points for pelvis cancer were assessed to be about 0.10%, -1.86% and -1.35% for mean deviation and 5.03%, 7.32% and 5.86% for standard deviation, respectively. The corresponding data for breast cancer were 0.78%, 5.29% and 3.59% for mean deviation and 5.97%, 10.23% and 9.86%, respectively. There was no significant difference between the calculated and measured doses (p > 0.1, except exit dose in breast cancer (p < 0.05. The temperature and angle of incidence correction factors were neglected due to their less than 1% deviations. Discussion and Conclusions: Some error sources are patient setup error, patient motion and

  14. Efficiency and prognosis of whole brain irradiation combined with precise radiotherapy on triple-negative breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinhong Wu

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: After whole brain irradiation followed by IMRT or 3DCRT treatment, TN phenotype breast cancer patients with intracranial metastasis had high objective response rates but shorter survival time. With respect to survival in breast cancer patients with intracranial metastasis, the TN phenotype represents a significant adverse prognostic factor.

  15. Thoracic radiotherapy in stereotactic conditions: difficulties met when starting up and proposed solutions; Radiotherapie thoracique en conditions stereotaxiques: difficultes rencontrees lors de la mise en route et solutions proposees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halley, A.; Assouline, A.; Belghith, B.; Hemery, C.; Cuenca, X.; Lang, P.; Boisserie, G.; Simon, J.M.; Mazeron, J.J.; Feuvret, L. [Groupe hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere, assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Paris (France)

    2011-10-15

    The authors report the study of difficulties met when starting up a thoracic irradiation in stereotactic conditions with respiratory feedback by means of a spirometry system. Eight patients have been selected. Images have been acquired in deep-inspiration breath-hold. Various dose levels have delivered in four sessions on the 80-per-cent isodose. It appears that this technique is constrained by the patient's physical capacities and the available technical means. Solutions are the use of a suitable support system, the screening of harmful positioning, and a training phase to respiratory feedback. Short communication

  16. SU-C-BRB-06: Dosimetric Impact of Breast Contour Reconstruction Errors in GammaPod Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, Y [Xcision Medical Systems LLC, Columbia, MD (United States); Becker, S; Mutaf, Y [University Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Yu, C [Xcision Medical Systems LLC, Columbia, MD (United States); University Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The first GammaPod™ unit, a dedicated prone stereotactic treatment device for early stage breast cancer, has been installed and commissioned at University of Maryland School of Medicine. The objective of this study was to investigate potential dosimetric impact of inaccurate breast contour. Methods: In GammaPod treatments, patient’s beast is immobilized by a breast cup device (BCID) throughout the entire same-day imaging and treatment procedure. 28 different BICD sizes are available to accommodate patients with varying breast sizes. A mild suction helps breast tissue to conform to the shape of the cup with selected size. In treatment planning, dose calculation utilizes previously calculated dose distributions for available cup geometry rather than the breast shape from CT image. Patient CT images with breast cups indicate minor geometric discrepancy between the matched shape of the cup and the breast contour, i.e., the contour size is larger or smaller. In order to investigate the dosimetric impact of these discrepancies, we simulated such discrepancies and reassessed the dose to target as well as skin. Results: In vicinity of skin, hot/cold spots were found when matched cup size was smaller/larger than patient’s breast after comparing the corrected dose profiles from Monte Carlo simulation with the planned dose from TPS. The overdosing/underdosing of target could yield point dose differences as large as 5% due to these setup errors (D95 changes within 2.5%). Maximal skin dose was overestimated/underestimated up to 25%/45% when matched cup size was larger/smaller than real breast contour. Conclusion: The dosimetric evaluation suggests substantial underdosing/overdosing with inaccurate cup geometry during planning, which is acceptable for current clinical trial. Further studies are needed to evaluate such impact to treating small volume close to skin.

  17. Duration of Twice-Daily Thoracic Radiotherapy and Time From the Start of Any Treatment to the End of Chest Irradiation as Significant Predictors of Outcomes in Limited-Disease Small-Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Masahiro; Okishio, Kyoichi; Akira, Masanori; Omachi, Naoki; Tamiya, Akihiro; Asami, Kazuhiro; Kawaguchi, Tomoya; Atagi, Shinji

    2017-03-01

    The hypothesis of this retrospective study was that the duration of twice-daily (BID) thoracic radiotherapy (TRT) and time from the start of any treatment to the end of chest irradiation (SER) would predict outcomes in limited-disease small-cell lung cancer. All 81 patients received 45 Gy in 30 fractions BID with a ≥ 6-hour interval and concurrent chemotherapy of platinum and etoposide. The median radiotherapy duration was 25 days (range, 21-38 days). The 5-year overall survival rates were 26.2% (95% confidence interval [CI], 14.3%-38.0%), and the median survival time was 30 months (95% CI, 15.5-44.5 months). Using multivariate regression analysis, the significant predictors of survival were the sum of the diameters of the primary tumor and metastatic lymph nodes, male gender, age ≥ 60 years, and the duration of BID-TRT (hazard ratio [HR], 1.15; 95% CI, 1.06-1.25; HR, 2.38; 95% CI, 1.13-5.02; HR, 2.38; 95% CI, 1.10-5.17; and HR, 1.08; 95% CI, 1.01-1.15, respectively). A total of 70 of 81 patients (86%) received radiotherapy during the first chemotherapy cycle. The median SER was 29 days (range, 21-109 days). The 5-year local control rate was 48.7% (95% CI, 33.9%-63.6%). The significant predictors of local control were the sum of the diameters of the primary tumor and metastatic lymph nodes, age ≥ 60 years, and SER (HR, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.06-1.31; HR, 4.18; 95% CI, 1.23-14.24; and HR, 1.02; 95% CI, 1-1.04, respectively). The duration of BID-TRT and SER were identified as one of the significant predictors of survival and local control in limited-disease small-cell lung cancer treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy at 45 Gy in 30 fractions, respectively. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Role of postmastectomy radiotherapy in early-stage (T1-2N0-1M0) triple-negative breast cancer: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fengxia; Pu, Feifei

    2017-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), which represents 15%-20% of all breast cancers, is defined by the absence of estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) and overexpression of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2). Owing to the absence of specific therapeutic targets and its aggressive biologic characteristics, TNBC patients often experience a high risk of disease progression and poor overall survival. Furthermore, TNBC exhibits an early pattern of recurrence with a peak recurrence risk at 2-3 years after surgery. Currently, chemotherapy continues to be the mainstay in TNBC patients; however, such treatment leaves them associated with a high rate of local and systemic relapses even in early-stage (T1-2N0-1M0). Therefore, in early-stage disease, greater emphasis is placed on locoregional treatments, based on radiation therapy (RT) after surgery, to reduce local and systemic relapses. However, there are no specific treatment guidelines for early-stage (T1-2N0-1M0) TNBC patients. In this review, we discuss the type of surgery received and the relevant adverse clinicopathologic factors and underlying BRCA1 mutation status regarding the influence of tailing postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT). In addition, we assess the role of PMRT in early-stage (T1-2N0-1M0) TNBC patients.

  19. A phase I/II trial of intraoperative breast radiotherapy in an Asian population: 5-year results of local control and cosmetic outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Mariko; Itoh, Yoshiyuki; Sawaki, Masataka; Kikumori, Toyone; Tsunoda, Nobuyuki; Kamomae, Takeshi; Kubota, Seiji; Okada, Tohru; Nakahara, Rie; Ito, Junji; Hayashi, Hironori; Naganawa, Shinji

    2015-07-25

    To date, there are no reports of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) use with long-term follow up as a method of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in Asian countries. We initiated a prospective phase I/II clinical trial of IORT in Japan in 2007, and herein, we report the 5-year follow-up results. The following inclusion criteria were used for enrollment in the trial: (1) tumor size surgery, (3) age >50 years, and (4) negative margins after resection. In February 2009, the eligibility criteria were changed to include only patients with sentinel lymph node-negative