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  1. Human breast microvascular endothelial cells retain phenotypic traits in long-term finite life span culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigurdsson, Valgardur; Fridriksdottir, Agla J R; Kjartansson, Jens

    2007-01-01

    uptake of low-density lipoprotein, and had E-selectin induced upon treatment with tumor necrosis factor-alpha. The first signs of senescence in passage 14 were accompanied by gain of trisomy 11. At passage 18 cells showed chromosomal aberrations and growth arrest as revealed by beta......Attempts to study endothelial-epithelial interactions in the human breast have been hampered by lack of protocols for long-term cultivation of breast endothelial cells (BRENCs). The aim of this study was to establish long-term cultures of BRENCs and to compare their phenotypic traits......-galactosidase staining. We demonstrate here that breast microvasculature may serve as a large-scale source for expansion of BRENCs with molecular and functional traits preserved. These cells will form the basis for studies on the role of endothelial cells in breast morphogenesis....

  2. Differentiation state determines neural effects on microvascular endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muffley, Lara A., E-mail: muffley@u.washington.edu [University of Washington, Campus Box 359796, 300 9th Avenue, Seattle, WA 98104 (United States); Pan, Shin-Chen, E-mail: pansc@mail.ncku.edu.tw [University of Washington, Campus Box 359796, 300 9th Avenue, Seattle, WA 98104 (United States); Smith, Andria N., E-mail: gnaunderwater@gmail.com [University of Washington, Campus Box 359796, 300 9th Avenue, Seattle, WA 98104 (United States); Ga, Maricar, E-mail: marga16@uw.edu [University of Washington, Campus Box 359796, 300 9th Avenue, Seattle, WA 98104 (United States); Hocking, Anne M., E-mail: ahocking@u.washington.edu [University of Washington, Campus Box 359796, 300 9th Avenue, Seattle, WA 98104 (United States); Gibran, Nicole S., E-mail: nicoleg@u.washington.edu [University of Washington, Campus Box 359796, 300 9th Avenue, Seattle, WA 98104 (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Growing evidence indicates that nerves and capillaries interact paracrinely in uninjured skin and cutaneous wounds. Although mature neurons are the predominant neural cell in the skin, neural progenitor cells have also been detected in uninjured adult skin. The aim of this study was to characterize differential paracrine effects of neural progenitor cells and mature sensory neurons on dermal microvascular endothelial cells. Our results suggest that neural progenitor cells and mature sensory neurons have unique secretory profiles and distinct effects on dermal microvascular endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and nitric oxide production. Neural progenitor cells and dorsal root ganglion neurons secrete different proteins related to angiogenesis. Specific to neural progenitor cells were dipeptidyl peptidase-4, IGFBP-2, pentraxin-3, serpin f1, TIMP-1, TIMP-4 and VEGF. In contrast, endostatin, FGF-1, MCP-1 and thrombospondin-2 were specific to dorsal root ganglion neurons. Microvascular endothelial cell proliferation was inhibited by dorsal root ganglion neurons but unaffected by neural progenitor cells. In contrast, microvascular endothelial cell migration in a scratch wound assay was inhibited by neural progenitor cells and unaffected by dorsal root ganglion neurons. In addition, nitric oxide production by microvascular endothelial cells was increased by dorsal root ganglion neurons but unaffected by neural progenitor cells. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dorsal root ganglion neurons, not neural progenitor cells, regulate microvascular endothelial cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neural progenitor cells, not dorsal root ganglion neurons, regulate microvascular endothelial cell migration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neural progenitor cells and dorsal root ganglion neurons do not effect microvascular endothelial tube formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dorsal root ganglion neurons, not neural progenitor cells, regulate

  3. Antiproliferative effect of elevated glucose in human microvascular endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, K.; Du, W.; Mills, I.; Sumpio, B. E.

    1998-01-01

    Diabetic microangiopathy has been implicated as a fundamental feature of the pathological complications of diabetes including retinopathy, neuropathy, and diabetic foot ulceration. However, previous studies devoted to examining the deleterious effects of elevated glucose on the endothelium have been performed largely in primary cultured cells of macrovessel origin. Difficulty in the harvesting and maintenance of microvascular endothelial cells in culture have hindered the study of this relevant population. Therefore, the objective of this study was to characterize the effect of elevated glucose on the proliferation and involved signaling pathways of an immortalized human dermal microvascular endothelial cell line (HMEC-1) that possess similar characteristics to their in vivo counterparts. Human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1) were grown in the presence of normal (5 mM) or high D-glucose (20 mM) for 14 days. The proliferative response of HMEC-1 was compared under these conditions as well as the cAMP and PKC pathways by in vitro assays. Elevated glucose significantly inhibited (P cyclic AMP accumulation, PKA, and PKC activity but was not associated with the activation of downstream events such as CRE and AP-1 binding activity. These data support the hypothesis that HMEC-1 is a suitable model to study the deleterious effects of elevated glucose on microvascular endothelial cells. Continued studies with HMEC-1 may prove advantageous in delineation of the molecular pathophysiology associated with diabetic microangiopathy.

  4. Antiproliferative effect of elevated glucose in human microvascular endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, K.; Du, W.; Mills, I.; Sumpio, B. E.

    1998-01-01

    Diabetic microangiopathy has been implicated as a fundamental feature of the pathological complications of diabetes including retinopathy, neuropathy, and diabetic foot ulceration. However, previous studies devoted to examining the deleterious effects of elevated glucose on the endothelium have been performed largely in primary cultured cells of macrovessel origin. Difficulty in the harvesting and maintenance of microvascular endothelial cells in culture have hindered the study of this relevant population. Therefore, the objective of this study was to characterize the effect of elevated glucose on the proliferation and involved signaling pathways of an immortalized human dermal microvascular endothelial cell line (HMEC-1) that possess similar characteristics to their in vivo counterparts. Human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1) were grown in the presence of normal (5 mM) or high D-glucose (20 mM) for 14 days. The proliferative response of HMEC-1 was compared under these conditions as well as the cAMP and PKC pathways by in vitro assays. Elevated glucose significantly inhibited (P pathophysiology associated with diabetic microangiopathy.

  5. Endothelial Progenitor Cells in Diabetic Microvascular Complications: Friends or Foes?

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    Cai-Guo Yu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite being featured as metabolic disorder, diabetic patients are largely affected by hyperglycemia-induced vascular abnormality. Accumulated evidence has confirmed the beneficial effect of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs in coronary heart disease. However, antivascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF treatment is the main therapy for diabetic retinopathy and nephropathy, indicating the uncertain role of EPCs in the pathogenesis of diabetic microvascular disease. In this review, we first illustrate how hyperglycemia induces metabolic and epigenetic changes in EPCs, which exerts deleterious impact on their number and function. We then discuss how abnormal angiogenesis develops in eyes and kidneys under diabetes condition, focusing on “VEGF uncoupling with nitric oxide” and “competitive angiopoietin 1/angiopoietin 2” mechanisms that are shared in both organs. Next, we dissect the nature of EPCs in diabetic microvascular complications. After we overview the current EPCs-related strategies, we point out new EPCs-associated options for future exploration. Ultimately, we hope that this review would uncover the mysterious nature of EPCs in diabetic microvascular disease for therapeutics.

  6. Are retinal microvascular abnormalities associated with large artery endothelial dysfunction and intima-media thickness? The Hoorn Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hecke, M.V.; Dekker, J.M.; Nijpels, G.; Stolk, R.P.; Henry, R.M.A.; Heine, R.J.; Bouter, L.M.; Stehouwer, C.D.A.; Polak, B.C.P.

    It has been hypothesized that microvascular dysfunction affects endothelial dysfunction of the large arteries, which may explain the relationship of microvascular disease with macrovascular disease. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship of retinal microvascular disorders

  7. Transcellular transport of CCL2 across brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Shujun; Song, Li; Serwanski, David R; Kuziel, William A; Pachter, Joel S

    2008-03-01

    The means by which the chemokine CCL2 produced in the brain parenchyma can recruit leukocytes lying behind the highly impervious endothelium of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) has remained a paradox. As other chemokines have been evidenced to stimulate their own synthesis and release by peripheral microvascular endothelial cells, and/or undergo transcytosis in the abluminal-to-luminal direction, we determined whether CCL2 experiences similar fates across brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMEC). Using cultured BMEC as a paradigm of the BBB, it was observed that exogenous unlabeled CCL2 actually depressed the release of endogenous CCL2, and further caused diminished CCL2 mRNA levels in these cells. On the other hand, exogenous (125)I-labeled CCL2 exhibited transport across BMEC in a manner that was sensitive to temperature, competition by excess unlabeled CCL2 but not unlabeled CCL3, knockdown of caveolin-1/caveolae, and elimination of the cognate CCL2 receptor CCR2. These results implied a facet of CCL2 transport by a transcellular mechanism partly involving binding of CCL2 to CCR2, and subsequent transfer to caveolae vesicles for transcytosis. This notion was supported by double-label immuno-electronmicroscopy, which revealed co-localization of caveolin-1 with exogenous CCL2, during this chemokine's transit across BMEC. Collectively, these findings provide a rationale by which CCL2, deposited on the abluminal side of the brain microvasculature during inflammatory episodes, can be relayed across the BBB to foster leukocyte recruitment.

  8. Methylene blue modulates adhesion molecule expression on microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Isabella; Guo, Fengwei; Stock, Ulrich A; Lupinski, Michèle; Meybohm, Patrick; Moritz, Anton; Beiras-Fernandez, Andres

    2014-08-01

    As methylene blue (MB) has been recently proposed to preserve blood pressure in case of vasoplegic syndrome and shock, an entity directly related to systemic inflammation, we aimed to elucidate the effect of MB on the expression of adhesion-molecules in endothelial-cells. Human microvascular endothelial-cells (HuMEC-1) were treated with 10, 30 or 60 µM MB for 30 min and 2 h each. Additionally, the treated HuMEC-1 were co-cultured with either human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) or Jurkat cells (human T-lymphocytes) for 2 h. HuMEC-1 were analyzed after MB treatment and after co-culture experiments for expression of different adhesion-molecules (ICAM-1, VCAM-1, L-selectin, E-selectin) via FACS measurement and western blot analysis. The supernatants of the experiments were analyzed with regard to the soluble forms of the adhesion molecules. We found that MB is able to modulate the expression of adhesion-molecules on EC. Administration of MB increases the expression of E-selectin and VCAM-1 depending on the dosage and time of exposure. ICAM-1 measurements provide evidence that different circulating blood cells can differently alter the adhesion-molecule expression on EC after MB exposure. Our results provide evidence regarding the immunomodulatory effect of MB upon endothelial-cells after inflammation.

  9. Shear Stress Inhibits Apoptosis of Ischemic Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiafeng Shen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available As a therapeutic strategy for ischemic stroke, to restore or increase cerebral blood flow (CBF is the most fundamental option. Laminar shear stress (LS, as an important force generated by CBF, mainly acts on brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs. In order to study whether LS was a protective factor in stroke, we investigated LS-intervented ischemic apoptosis of rat BMECs (rBMECs through PE Annexin V/7-AAD, JC-1 and Hoechst 33258 staining to observe the membranous, mitochondrial and nuclear dysfunction. Real-time PCR and western blot were also used to test the gene and protein expressions of Tie-2, Bcl-2 and Akt, which were respectively related to maintain membranous, mitochondrial and nuclear norm. The results showed that LS could be a helpful stimulus for ischemic rBMECs survival. Simultaneously, membranous, mitochondrial and nuclear regulation played an important role in this process.

  10. In vitro analysis of human periodontal microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubokawa, Mizuki; Sato, Soh

    2014-08-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) participate in key aspects of vascular biology, such as maintenance of capillary permeability, initiation of coagulation, and regulation of inflammation. According to previous reports, ECs have revealed highly specific characteristics depending on the organs and tissues. However, some reports have described the characteristics of the capillaries formed by human periodontal ECs. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to examine the functional characteristics of the periodontal microvascular ECs in vitro. Human periodontal ligament-endothelial cells (HPDL-ECs) and human gingiva-endothelial cells (HG-ECs) were isolated by immunoprecipitation with magnetic beads conjugated to a monoclonal anti-CD31 antibody. The isolated HPDL-ECs and HG-ECs were characterized to definitively demonstrate that these cell cultures represented pure ECs. Human umbilical-vein ECs and human dermal microvascular ECs were used for comparison. These cells were compared according to the proliferation potential, the formation of capillary-like tubes, the transendothelial electric resistance (TEER), and the expression of tight junction proteins. HPDL-ECs and HG-ECs with characteristic cobblestone monolayer morphology were obtained, as determined by light microscopy at confluence. Furthermore, the HPDL-ECs and HG-ECs expressed the EC markers platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (also known as CD31), von Willebrand factor, and Ulex europaeus agglutinin 1, and the cells stained strongly positive for CD31 and CD309. In addition, the HPDL-ECs and HG-ECs were observed to form capillary-like tubes, and they demonstrated uptake of acetylated low-density lipoprotein. Functional analyses of the HPDL-ECs and HG-ECs showed that, compared to the control cells, tube formation persisted for only a brief period of time, and TEER was substantially reduced at confluence. Furthermore, the cells exhibited delocalization of zonula occludens-1 and occludin at cell-cell contact sites

  11. Upcyte® Microvascular Endothelial Cells Repopulate Decellularized Scaffold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dally, Iris; Hartmann, Nadja; Münst, Bernhard; Braspenning, Joris; Walles, Heike

    2013-01-01

    A general problem in tissue engineering is the poor and insufficient blood supply to guarantee tissue cell survival as well as physiological tissue function. To address this limitation, we have developed an in vitro vascularization model in which a decellularized porcine small bowl segment, representing a capillary network within a collagen matrix (biological vascularized scaffold [BioVaSc]), is reseeded with microvascular endothelial cells (mvECs). However, since the supply of mvECs is limited, in general, and as these cells rapidly dedifferentiate, we have applied a novel technology, which allows the generation of large batches of quasi-primary cells with the ability to proliferate, whilst maintaining their differentiated functionality. These so called upcyte mvECs grew for an additional 15 population doublings (PDs) compared to primary cells. Upcyte mvECs retained endothelial characteristics, such as von Willebrandt Factor (vWF), CD31 and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression, as well as positive Ulex europaeus agglutinin I staining. Upcyte mvECs also retained biological functionality such as tube formation, cell migration, and low density lipoprotein (LDL) uptake, which were still evident after PD27. Initial experiments using MTT and Live/Dead staining indicate that upcyte mvECs repopulate the BioVaSc Scaffold. As with conventional cultures, these cells also express key endothelial molecules (vWF, CD31, and eNOS) in a custom-made bioreactor system even after a prolonged period of 14 days. The combination of upcyte mvECs and the BioVaSc represents a novel and promising approach toward vascularizing bioreactor models which can better reflect organs, such as the liver. PMID:22799502

  12. Dobesilate enhances endothelial nitric oxide synthase-activity in macro- and microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suschek, C; Kolb, H; Kolb-Bachofen, V

    1997-12-01

    1. Dobesilate is used for normalizing vascular dysfunction in a number of diseases. In search for an effect on endothelial NO production, macrovascular endothelial cells from rat aorta, microvascular endothelial cells from rat exocrine pancreatic tissue, and capillary endothelial cells from rat islets, were cultured in the presence or absence of Mg-Dobesilate. The activity of constitutive nitric oxide synthase (ecNOS) in resident cells as well as of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in cytokine-activated cells was measured indirectly by recording the citrulline concentrations in culture supernatants. 2. In each of the different endothelial cells Mg-Dobesilate incubation (0.25-1 mM) for 24 h led to a significant and concentration-dependent increase in ecNOS-activities. With cytokine-activated endothelial cell cultures only moderate effects were seen with little or no concentration-dependency. Addition of the NOS-inhibitor N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine led to a significant suppression of citrulline formation in all cultures as an evidence for the enzyme specificity of these effects. 3. iNOS- and ecNOS-specific reverse transcription and semi-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with RNA from resident or cytokine-activated endothelial cells gave no evidence for an increase in NOS-specific mRNA after Mg-Dobesilate-treatment. Furthermore, Dobesilate-mediated enhancement of NO synthesis in resting endothelial cells was not due to iNOS induction in these cells, as no iNOS-specific signal was found by RT-PCR.

  13. Metformin improves endothelial function in aortic tissue and microvascular endothelial cells subjected to diabetic hyperglycaemic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Suparna; Lakshmanan, Arun P; Hwang, Mu Ji; Kubba, Haidar; Mushannen, Ahmed; Triggle, Chris R; Ding, Hong

    2015-12-01

    The cellular mechanisms whereby metformin, the first line drug for type 2 diabetes (T2DM), mediates its antidiabetic effects remain elusive, particularly as to whether metformin has a direct protective action on the vasculature. This study was designed to determine if a brief 3-h exposure to metformin protects endothelial function against the effects of hyperglycaemia. We investigated the protective effects of metformin on endothelial-dependent vasodilatation (EDV) in thoracic aortae from T2DM db/db mice and on high glucose (HG, 40 mM) induced changes in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) signaling in mouse microvascular endothelial cells (MMECs) in culture. Exposure of aortae from db+/? non-diabetic control mice to high glucose (HG, 40 mM) containing Krebs for 3-h significantly (Pmetformin; metformin also improved ACh-induced EDV in aortae from diabetic db/db mice. Immunoblot analysis of MMECs cultured in HG versus NG revealed a significant reduction of the ratio of phosphorylated (p-eNOS)/eNOS and p-Akt/Akt, but not the expression of total eNOS or Akt. The 3-h exposure of MMECs to metformin significantly (Pmetformin can reverse/reduce the impact of HG on endothelial function, via mechanisms linked to increased phosphorylation of eNOS and Akt. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Time lapse phase contrast video microscopy of directed migration of human microvascular endothelial cells on matrigel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meade-Tollin, L. C.; van Noorden, C. J.

    2000-01-01

    Migration of microvascular endothelial cells is an early and critical step in angiogenesis. Formation of branching and polygonal cellular aggregates by endothelial cells on matrigel has often been considered to be an in vitro model for angiogenesis, although formation of lumens has not always been

  15. The effects of anti-obesity intervention with orlistat and sibutramine on microvascular endothelial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Tahami, Belqes Abdullah Mohammad; Ismail, Ab Aziz Al-Safi; Bee, Yvonne Tee Get; Awang, Siti Azima; Salha Wan Abdul Rani, Wan Rimei; Sanip, Zulkefli; Rasool, Aida Hanum Ghulam

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is associated with impaired microvascular endothelial function. We aimed to determine the effects of orlistat and sibutramine treatment on microvascular endothelial function, anthropometric and lipid profile, blood pressure (BP), and heart rate (HR). 76 subjects were recruited and randomized to receive orlistat 120 mg three times daily or sibutramine 10 mg daily for 9 months. Baseline weight, BMI, BP, HR and lipid profile were taken. Microvascular endothelial function was assessed using laser Doppler fluximetry and iontophoresis process. Maximum change (max), percent change (% change) and peak flux (peak) in perfusion to acetylcholine (ACh) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) iontophoresis were used to quantify endothelium dependent and independent vasodilatations. 24 subjects in both groups completed the trial. After treatment, weight and BMI were decreased for both groups. AChmax, ACh % change and ACh peak were increased in orlistat-treated group but no difference was observed for sibutramine-treated group. BP and total cholesterol (TC) were reduced for orlistat-treated group. HR was reduced for orlistat-treated group but was increased in sibutramine-treated group. 9 months treatment with orlistat significantly improved microvascular endothelial function. This was associated with reductions in weight, BMI, BP, HR, TC and low density lipoprotein cholesterol. No effect was seen in microvascular endothelial function with sibutramine.

  16. Gene expression microarray data from human microvascular endothelial cells supplemented with a low concentration of niacin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer M. Hughes-Large

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The systemic lipid modifying drug, niacin, can directly improve human microvascular endothelial cell angiogenic function under lipotoxic conditions, possibly through activation of niacin receptors “Niacin receptor activation improves human microvascular endothelial cell angiogenic function during lipotoxicity” (Hughes-Large et al. 2014. Here we provide accompanying data collected using Affymetrix GeneChip microarrays to identify changes in gene expression in human microvascular endothelial cells treated with 10 μM niacin. Statistical analyses of robust multi-array average (RMA values revealed that only 16 genes exhibited greater than 1.3-fold differential expression. Of these 16, only 5 were identified protein coding genes, while 3 of the remaining 11 genes appeared to be small nuclear/nucleolar RNAs. Altered expression of EFCAB4B, NAP1L2, and OR13C8 was confirmed by real time quantitative PCR.

  17. Microvascular coronary artery spasm presents distinctive clinical features with endothelial dysfunction as nonobstructive coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohba, Keisuke; Sugiyama, Seigo; Sumida, Hitoshi; Nozaki, Toshimitsu; Matsubara, Junichi; Matsuzawa, Yasushi; Konishi, Masaaki; Akiyama, Eiichi; Kurokawa, Hirofumi; Maeda, Hirofumi; Sugamura, Koichi; Nagayoshi, Yasuhiro; Morihisa, Kenji; Sakamoto, Kenji; Tsujita, Kenichi; Yamamoto, Eiichiro; Yamamuro, Megumi; Kojima, Sunao; Kaikita, Koichi; Tayama, Shinji; Hokimoto, Seiji; Matsui, Kunihiko; Sakamoto, Tomohiro; Ogawa, Hisao

    2012-10-01

    Angina without significant stenosis, or nonobstructive coronary artery disease, attracts clinical attention. Microvascular coronary artery spasm (microvascular CAS) can cause nonobstructive coronary artery disease. We investigated the clinical features of microvascular CAS and the therapeutic efficacy of calcium channel blockers. Three hundred seventy consecutive, stable patients with suspected angina presenting nonobstructive coronary arteries (coronary angiography were investigated with the intracoronary acetylcholine provocation test, with simultaneous measurements of transcardiac lactate production and of changes in the quantitative coronary blood flow. We diagnosed microvascular CAS according to lactate production and a decrease in coronary blood flow without epicardial vasospasm during the acetylcholine provocation test. We prospectively followed up the patients with calcium channel blockers for microvascular coronary artery disease. We identified 50 patients with microvascular CAS who demonstrated significant impairment of the endothelium-dependent vascular response, which was assessed by coronary blood flow during the acetylcholine provocation test. Administration of isosorbide dinitrate normalized the abnormal coronary flow pattern in the patients with microvascular CAS. Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that female sex, a lower body mass index, minor-borderline ischemic electrocardiogram findings at rest, limited-baseline diastolic-to-systolic velocity ratio, and attenuated adenosine triphosphate-induced coronary flow reserve were independently correlated with the presence of microvascular CAS. Receiver-operating characteristics curve analysis revealed that the aforementioned 5-variable model showed good correlation with the presence of microvascular CAS (area under the curve: 0.820). No patients with microvascular CAS treated with calcium channel blockers developed cardiovascular events over 47.8±27.5 months. Microvascular CAS causes

  18. Neuropilin-1 modulates interferon-γ-stimulated signaling in brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Cao, Ying; Mangalam, Ashutosh K; Guo, Yong; LaFrance-Corey, Reghann G; Gamez, Jeffrey D; Atanga, Pascal Aliihnui; Clarkson, Benjamin D; Zhang, Yuebo; Wang, Enfeng; Angom, Ramcharan Singh; Dutta, Kirthica; Ji, Baoan; Pirko, Istvan; Lucchinetti, Claudia F; Howe, Charles L; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata

    2016-10-15

    Inflammatory response of blood-brain barrier (BBB) endothelial cells plays an important role in pathogenesis of many central nervous system inflammatory diseases, including multiple sclerosis; however, the molecular mechanism mediating BBB endothelial cell inflammatory response remains unclear. In this study, we first observed that knockdown of neuropilin-1 (NRP1), a co-receptor of several structurally diverse ligands, suppressed interferon-γ (IFNγ)-induced C-X-C motif chemokine 10 expression and activation of STAT1 in brain microvascular endothelial cells in a Rac1-dependent manner. Moreover, endothelial-specific NRP1-knockout mice, VECadherin-Cre-ERT2/NRP1flox/flox mice, showed attenuated disease progression during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, a mouse neuroinflammatory disease model. Detailed analysis utilizing histological staining, quantitative PCR, flow cytometry and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated that deletion of endothelial NRP1 suppressed neuron demyelination, altered lymphocyte infiltration, preserved BBB function and decreased activation of the STAT1-CXCL10 pathway. Furthermore, increased expression of NRP1 was observed in endothelial cells of acute multiple sclerosis lesions. Our data identify a new molecular mechanism of brain microvascular endothelial inflammatory response through NRP1-IFNγ crosstalk that could be a potential target for intervention of endothelial cell dysfunction in neuroinflammatory diseases. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  19. Regulation of microvascularization in heart failure - an endothelial cell, non-coding RNAs and exosome liaison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rio P. Juni

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure is a complex syndrome involving various pathophysiological processes. An increasing body of evidence shows that the myocardial microvasculature is essential for the homeostasis state and that a decompensated heart is associated with microvascular dysfunction as a result of impaired endothelial angiogenic capacity. The intercellular communication between endothelial cells and cardiomyocytes through various signaling molecules, such as vascular endothelial growth factor, nitric oxide, and non-coding RNAs is an important determinant of cardiac microvascular function. Non-coding RNAs are transported from endothelial cells to cardiomyocytes, and vice versa, regulating microvascular properties and angiogenic processes in the heart. Small-exocytosed vesicles, called exosomes, which are secreted by both cell types, can mediate this intercellular communication. The purpose of this review is to highlight the contribution of the microvasculature to proper heart function maintenance by focusing on the interaction between cardiac endothelial cells and myocytes with a specific emphasis on non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs in this form of cell-to-cell communication. Finally, the potential of ncRNAs as targets for angiogenesis therapy will also be discussed.

  20. Nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBT), a nucleoside transport inhibitor, protects against Shiga toxin cytotoxicity in human microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmi, K; Kiyokawa, N; Sekino, T; Suzuki, T; Mimori, K; Taguchi, T; Nakajima, H; Katagiri, Y U; Fujimoto, J; Nakao, H; Takeda, T

    2001-01-01

    Infections with Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) cause microvascular endothelial cell damage, resulting in hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome. The prevention of endothelial cell damage is therefore a crucial step in overcoming this disorder. Here, we report that nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBT), a nucleoside transport inhibitor, has a protective effect against the cytotoxicity of Stxs in human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs). The relative viability of cells treated with 1.5-15 pM of Stx1 was reduced to 10-20% of that without Stx1. However, the viability of cells treated with NBT (10-100 microM) remained higher than 80%, even in the presence of Stx1. NBT also protected against Stx1 cytotoxicity in sodium butyrate-treated hypersensitive HMVECs. The protective effect of NBT against Stx cytotoxicity may be due to the depletion of ATP in the cells, thereby inhibiting the entry of Stx1.

  1. Effects of Parietaria judaica pollen extract on human microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taverna, Simona; Flugy, Anna; Colomba, Paolo; Barranca, Marilisa; De Leo, Giacomo; Alessandro, Riccardo

    2008-08-08

    Pollinosis from Parietaria judaica is one of the main causes of allergy in the Mediterranean area. The present study is designed to assess if P. judaica pollens contain bioactive compounds able to elicit a functional response in endothelial cells. We have demonstrated that addition of pollen extract to human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC-L) induces a modification of cell morphology, actin cytoskeletal rearrangements and an increase in endothelial cell permeability. We further showed that the treatment of endothelial cells with pollen extract causes an increase of E-selectin and VCAM-1 protein levels as well as an increase of IL-8 production. The stimulation of cell-cell adhesion molecules was paralleled by a dose-dependent increase of adhesion of polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs) to HMVEC-L monolayer. Our results suggest for the first time that pollen affect directly endothelial cells (EC) modulating critical functions related to the inflammatory response.

  2. Radiation-induced apoptosis in microvascular endothelial cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Langley, R. E.; Bump, E A; Quartuccio, S. G.; Medeiros, D; Braunhut, S. J.

    1997-01-01

    The response of the microvasculature to ionizing radiation is thought to be an important factor in the overall response of both normal tissues and tumours. It has recently been reported that basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), a potent mitogen for endothelial cells, protects large vessel endothelial cells from radiation-induced apoptosis in vitro. Microvessel cells are phenotypically distinct from large vessel cells. We studied the apoptotic response of confluent monolayers of capillary en...

  3. Interleukin 2 Activates Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells Resulting in Destabilization of Adherens Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylezinski, Lukasz S; Hawiger, Jacek

    2016-10-28

    The pleiotropic cytokine interleukin 2 (IL2) disrupts the blood-brain barrier and alters brain microcirculation, underlying vascular leak syndrome that complicates cancer immunotherapy with IL2. The microvascular effects of IL2 also play a role in the development of multiple sclerosis and other chronic neurological disorders. The mechanism of IL2-induced disruption of brain microcirculation has not been determined previously. We found that both human and murine brain microvascular endothelial cells express constituents of the IL2 receptor complex. Then we established that signaling through this receptor complex leads to activation of the transcription factor, nuclear factor κB, resulting in expression of proinflammatory interleukin 6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1. We also discovered that IL2 induces disruption of adherens junctions, concomitant with cytoskeletal reorganization, ultimately leading to increased endothelial cell permeability. IL2-induced phosphorylation of vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin), a constituent of adherens junctions, leads to dissociation of its stabilizing adaptor partners, p120-catenin and β-catenin. Increased phosphorylation of VE-cadherin was also accompanied by a reduction of Src homology 2 domain-containing protein-tyrosine phosphatase 2, known to maintain vascular barrier function. These results unravel the mechanism of deleterious effects induced by IL2 on brain microvascular endothelial cells and may inform the development of new measures to improve IL2 cancer immunotherapy, as well as treatments for autoimmune diseases affecting the central nervous system. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Clopidogrel improves microvascular endothelial function in subjects with stable coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willoughby, Scott R; Luu, Lee-Jen; Cameron, James D; Nelson, Adam J; Schultz, Carlee D; Worthley, Stephen G; Worthley, Matthew I

    2014-06-01

    Clopidogrel therapy has recently been shown to reduce cardiovascular events in patients with stable vascular disease. This benefit may be due to effects not exclusively related to platelet aggregation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of clopidogrel therapy on microvascular endothelial function in subjects with stable coronary artery disease (CAD). Forty subjects with stable CAD were randomised to clopidogrel therapy (75mg/day) or control. Blood and endothelial function testing occurred at baseline, one week and three months following randomisation. Microvascular endothelial function was assessed via reactive hyperaemic index (RHI). Platelet function was assessed by adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced whole blood aggregation and the VerifyNow™ system. Plasma markers of endothelial function (asymmetric dimethylarginine, ADMA) and oxidative stress (myeloperoxidase, MPO) were also tested. The primary endpoint was endothelial function assessment (RHI) at three months. At one week RHI increased by 20±10% in the clopidogrel group; this effect was maintained at three months (21±9% increase from baseline; Pmicrovascular endothelial function in patients with stable CAD. This effect is independent of its effects on ADP-induced platelet reactivity. Copyright © 2014 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. MRI assessment of coronary microvascular endothelial nitric oxide synthase function using myocardial T1 mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Sophia X; Epstein, Frederick H

    2017-08-07

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) plays a central role in regulating vascular tone, blood flow, and microvascular permeability. Endothelial dysfunction, including eNOS dysfunction, is an early biomarker of vascular disease. This study aimed to show that myocardial T1 mapping during nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition could assess coronary microvascular eNOS function. Wild-type mice, eNOS-/- mice, and wild-type mice fed a high-fat diet underwent T1 mapping at baseline and for 20 min after injection of NG -nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (LNAME), a NOS inhibitor. First-pass perfusion MRI was performed in wild-type mice at baseline and 5 min after LNAME injection. T1 mapping detected an increase in myocardial T1 5 min after an injection of 4 mg/kg LNAME compared with baseline in control mice (T1  = 1515 ± 30 ms with LNAME versus T1  = 1402 ± 30 ms at baseline, P coronary microvascular eNOS dysfunction in high-fat-diet mice. T1 mapping during NOS inhibition may be useful in preclinical studies aiming to investigate mechanisms underlying and therapies for coronary microvascular eNOS dysfunction. Magn Reson Med, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  6. Transcellular migration of neutrophils is a quantitatively significant pathway across dermal microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmon, Shana; Cammer, Michael; Raine, Cedric S; Lisanti, Michael P

    2009-01-01

    Neutrophil extravasation is central to inflammatory skin diseases like psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. In vivo, neutrophils have been shown to migrate through cell-to-cell junctions (paracellular pathway) or directly through the body of the endothelial cell (transcellular pathway). In vitro, however, neutrophil migration is a largely paracellular process where cells preferentially cross at tricellular corners devoid of tight junctions. To approximate the type of cells encountered by extravasating neutrophils in vivo, we developed a neutrophil-migration assay using primary human dermal microvascular endothelial cells. We show here that a large proportion of migrating neutrophils traverse a monolayer of microvascular endothelium using a purely transcellular pathway. In addition, we demonstrate that F-actin is rearranged similarly in neutrophils undergoing diapedesis along either route. This in vitro model closely simulates the physiological process of neutrophil extravasation in vivo and can be further utilized to evaluate the relative contribution of distinct migratory pathways to the pathophysiology of inflammatory skin disease.

  7. Microvascular endothelial dysfunction is associated with albuminuria and CKD in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seliger, Stephen L; Salimi, Shabnam; Pierre, Valerie; Giffuni, Jamie; Katzel, Leslie; Parsa, Afshin

    2016-07-13

    Impairment in glomerular endothelial function likely plays a major role in the development of albuminuria and CKD progression. Glomerular endothelial dysfunction may reflect systemic microvascular dysfunction, accounting in part for the greater cardiovascular risk in patients with albuminuria. Prior studies of vascular function in CKD have focused on conduit artery function or those with ESRD, and have not examined microvascular endothelial function with albuminuria. We conducted a cross-sectional study among older hypertensive male veterans with stage 1-4 CKD, and hypertensive controls without CKD. Microvascular function was quantified by two distinct Laser-Doppler flowmetry (LDF) measures: peak responses to 1) post-occlusive reactive hyperemia (PORH) and 2) thermal hyperemia (TH), measured on forearm skin. Associations of each LDF measure with albuminuria, eGFR, and CKD status were estimated using correlation coefficients and multiple linear regression, accounting for potential confounders. Among 66 participants (mean age 69.2 years), 36 had CKD (mean eGFR 46.1 cc/min/1.73 m(2); 30.6 % with overt albuminuria). LDF responses to PORH and TH were 43 and 39 % significantly lower in multivariate analyses among those with macroalbuminuria compared to normoalbuminuria, (β= - 0.42, p = 0.009 and β= -0.37, p = 0.01, respectively). Those with CKD had a 23.9 % lower response to PORH compared to controls (p = 0.02 after adjustment). In contrast, TH responses did not differ between those with and without CKD. Microvascular endothelial function was strongly associated with greater albuminuria and CKD, independent of diabetes and blood pressure. These findings may explain in part the excess systemic cardiovascular risk associated with albuminuria and CKD.

  8. Role of pulmonary microvascular endothelial cell apoptosis in murine sepsis-induced lung injury in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Sean E; Rohan, Marta; Mehta, Sanjay

    2015-09-16

    Sepsis remains a common and serious condition with significant morbidity and mortality due to multiple organ dysfunction, especially acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Sepsis-induced ALI is characterized by injury and dysfunction of the pulmonary microvasculature and pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVEC), resulting in enhanced pulmonary microvascular sequestration and pulmonary infiltration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) as well as disruption of the normal alveolo-capillary permeability barrier with leak of albumin-rich edema fluid into pulmonary interstitium and alveoli. The role of PMVEC death and specifically apoptosis in septic pulmonary microvascular dysfunction in vivo has not been established. In a murine cecal ligation/perforation (CLP) model of sepsis, we quantified and correlated time-dependent changes in pulmonary microvascular Evans blue (EB)-labeled albumin permeability with (1) PMVEC death (propidium iodide [PI]-staining) by both fluorescent intravital videomicroscopy (IVVM) and histology, and (2) PMVEC apoptosis using histologic fluorescent microscopic assessment of a panel of 3 markers: cell surface phosphatidylserine (detected by Annexin V binding), caspase activation (detected by FLIVO labeling), and DNA fragmentation (TUNEL labeling). Compared to sham mice, CLP-sepsis resulted in pulmonary microvascular barrier dysfunction, quantified by increased EB-albumin leak, and PMVEC death (PI+ staining) as early as 2 h and more marked by 4 h after CLP. Septic PMVEC also exhibited increased presence of all 3 markers of apoptosis (Annexin V+, FLIVO+, TUNEL+) as early as 30 mins--1 h after CLP-sepsis, which all similarly increased markedly until 4 h. The time-dependent changes in septic pulmonary microvascular albumin-permeability barrier dysfunction were highly correlated with PMVEC death (PI+; r = 0.976, p pulmonary microvascular dysfunction, including both albumin-permeability barrier dysfunction and

  9. Microvascular endothelial dysfunction predicts the development of erectile dysfunction in men with coronary atherosclerosis without critical stenoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reriani, Martin; Flammer, Andreas J; Li, Jing; Prasad, Megha; Rihal, Charanjit; Prasad, Abhiram; Lennon, Ryan; Lerman, Lilach O; Lerman, Amir

    2014-11-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease, stroke, and all-cause mortality, independent of conventional cardiovascular risk factors. Coronary endothelial dysfunction is independently associated with ED in men with early coronary atherosclerosis. We aimed to investigate whether coronary microvascular dysfunction predicts development of ED in patients presenting with coronary atherosclerosis without critical stenoses. Coronary microvascular function was evaluated in 130 men with coronary atherosclerosis without critical stenoses by administration of intracoronary acetylcholine at the time of diagnostic study. After a mean follow-up of 8.4 years, patients were assessed for the development of ED by administration of a questionnaire. In all, 68 (50%) men had microvascular endothelial dysfunction at baseline; 35 (51%) men with microvascular endothelial dysfunction developed ED on follow-up compared with 19 (31%) men without microvascular endothelial dysfunction. Men who developed ED had a lower coronary blood flow response (% [INCREMENT]CBF) compared with men who did not develop ED, with mean±SD of 25.4±71.3 versus 81.7±120 (P=0.003). In univariate analysis, microvascular endothelial dysfunction was a predictor for the development of ED, with relative risk of 2.4 (1.2-4.9) (P=0.016). In multivariate logistic regression adjusting for traditional cardiovascular risk factors (age, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, vascular disease, and family history of coronary artery disease), only microvascular endothelial dysfunction (P=0.027) and age (P=0.044) remained significant predictors of development of ED. Coronary microvascular dysfunction is a predictor of the development of ED in men with coronary atherosclerosis without critical stenoses. This study underscores the systemic involvement of the endothelial function in vascular disease.

  10. Penile microvascular endothelial function in hypertensive patients: effects of acute type 5 phosphodiesterase inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verri, V.; Brandão, A.A.; Tibirica, E.

    2018-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to evaluate penile endothelial microvascular function in patients with primary arterial hypertension and age-matched normotensive subjects using laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI). Additionally, we analyzed the acute penile microvascular effects induced by oral phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor (sildenafil; SIL) administration. Endothelium-dependent microvascular reactivity was evaluated in the penises and forearms of hypertensive patients (aged 58.8±6.6 years, n=34) and age-matched healthy volunteers (n=33) at rest and 60 min following oral SIL (100 mg) administration. LSCI was coupled with cutaneous acetylcholine (ACh) iontophoresis using increasing anodal currents. Basal penile cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) values were not significantly different between control subjects and hypertensive individuals. Penile CVC values increased significantly after SIL administration in control (Phypertensive (Phypertensive subjects after SIL administration (P=0.0427). Penile endothelium-dependent microvascular function is, to some extent, preserved in patients presenting with primary arterial hypertension under effective anti-hypertensive treatment. LSCI may be a valuable non-invasive tool for the evaluation of penile vascular responses to phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor. PMID:29340522

  11. Penile microvascular endothelial function in hypertensive patients: effects of acute type 5 phosphodiesterase inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Verri

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary aim of this study was to evaluate penile endothelial microvascular function in patients with primary arterial hypertension and age-matched normotensive subjects using laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI. Additionally, we analyzed the acute penile microvascular effects induced by oral phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor (sildenafil; SIL administration. Endothelium-dependent microvascular reactivity was evaluated in the penises and forearms of hypertensive patients (aged 58.8±6.6 years, n=34 and age-matched healthy volunteers (n=33 at rest and 60 min following oral SIL (100 mg administration. LSCI was coupled with cutaneous acetylcholine (ACh iontophoresis using increasing anodal currents. Basal penile cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC values were not significantly different between control subjects and hypertensive individuals. Penile CVC values increased significantly after SIL administration in control (P<0.0001 and hypertensive (P<0.0001 subjects. Peak CVC values were not different between the two groups during penile ACh iontophoresis before SIL administration (P=0.2052. Peak CVC values were higher in control subjects than in hypertensive subjects after SIL administration (P=0.0427. Penile endothelium-dependent microvascular function is, to some extent, preserved in patients presenting with primary arterial hypertension under effective anti-hypertensive treatment. LSCI may be a valuable non-invasive tool for the evaluation of penile vascular responses to phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor.

  12. Uptake of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Conjugated with DNA by Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Harvey

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs have been proposed to have great therapeutic potential. SWCNTs conjugated with drugs or genes travel in the systemic circulation to reach target cells or tissues following extravasation from microvessels although the interaction between SWCNT conjugates and the microvascular endothelial cells (ECs remains unknown. We hypothesized that SWCNT-DNA conjugates would be taken up by microvascular ECs and that this process would be facilitated by SWCNTs compared to facilitation by DNA alone. ECs were treated with various concentrations of SWCNT-DNA-FITC conjugates, and the uptake and intracellular distribution of these conjugates were determined by a confocal microscope imaging system followed by quantitative analysis of fluorescence intensity. The uptake of SWCNT-DNA-FITC conjugates (2 μg/mL by microvascular ECs was significantly greater than that of DNA-FITC (2 μg/mL, observed at 6 hrs after treatment. For the intracellular distribution, SWCNT-DNA-FITC conjugates were detected in the nucleus of ECs, while DNA-FITC was restricted to the cytoplasm. The fluorescence intensity and distribution of SWCNTs were concentration and time independent. The findings demonstrate that SWCNTs facilitate DNA delivery into microvascular ECs, thus suggesting that SWCNTs serving as drug and gene vehicles have therapeutic potential.

  13. Decreased endothelial nitric oxide bioavailability, impaired microvascular function, and increased tissue oxygen consumption in children with falciparum malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Tsin W; Lampah, Daniel A; Kenangalem, Enny; Tjitra, Emiliana; Weinberg, J Brice; Granger, Donald L; Price, Ric N; Anstey, Nicholas M

    2014-11-15

    Endothelial nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, microvascular function, and host oxygen consumption have not been assessed in pediatric malaria. We measured NO-dependent endothelial function by using peripheral artery tonometry to determine the reactive hyperemia index (RHI), and microvascular function and oxygen consumption (VO2) using near infrared resonance spectroscopy in 13 Indonesian children with severe falciparum malaria and 15 with moderately severe falciparum malaria. Compared with 19 controls, children with severe malaria and those with moderately severe malaria had lower RHIs (P = .03); 12% and 8% lower microvascular function, respectively (P = .03); and 29% and 25% higher VO2, respectively. RHIs correlated with microvascular function in all children with malaria (P function and increased oxygen consumption, likely contributing to the pathogenesis of the disease. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Microvascular endothelial cells from preeclamptic women exhibit altered expression of angiogenic and vasopressor factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dennis K; Nevo, Ori

    2016-06-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) is a severe complication of pregnancy associated with maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. The underlying pathophysiology involves maternal systemic vascular and endothelial dysfunction associated with circulating antiangiogenic factors, although the specific etiology of the disease remains elusive. Our aim was to investigate the maternal endothelium in PE by exploring the expression of genes involved with endothelial function in a novel platform of maternal primary endothelial cells. Adipose tissue was sampled at the time of caesarean section from both normal and preeclamptic patients. Maternal microvascular endothelial cells were isolated by tissue digestion and CD31 magnetic Dynabeads. Cell purity was confirmed by immunofluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Western analyses revealed VEGF activation of VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2) and ERK in primary cells. Quantitative PCR analyses revealed significantly altered mRNA levels of various genes involved with angiogenesis and blood pressure control in preeclamptic cells, including soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1, endoglin, VEGFR2, angiotensin receptor 1, and endothelin compared with cells isolated from normal pregnancies. Overall, maternal endothelial cells from preeclamptic patients exhibit extensive alteration of expression of factors associated with antiangiogenic and vasoconstrictive phenotypes, shedding light on the underlying mechanisms associated with the vascular dysfunction characteristic of PE. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  15. The effect of magnesium sulfate on gene expression in maternal microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dennis K; Sengupta, Anindita; Nevo, Ori

    2017-11-27

    Preeclampsia is a severe complication of pregnancy associated with maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. To date, magnesium sulfate remains the preferred method of treatment used to reduce the development of eclampsia. Our aim was to investigate the effects of magnesium sulfate on the expression of genes involved with endothelial function in maternal microvascular endothelial cells from both normal and preeclamptic pregnancies. Primary cells from normal pregnancies treated with 80 mg/L magnesium sulfate for 6 h revealed an overall trend of increased expression of angiogenic and vasopressor-related factors by qPCR analyses. Primary cells from preeclamptic pregnancies revealed an overall trend of decreased expression, with significantly lowered levels for vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, endothelin, and vascular cell adhesion protein-1. A comparison of treated cells revealed significantly increased levels for endoglin, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1, prostacyclin synthase, tumor necrosis factor α, tumor necrosis factor receptor 1, and endothelin in normal versus preeclamptic cells following treatment. These results reveal disparate activation of overall expression activity by magnesium sulfate in maternal endothelial cells from normal pregnancies over preeclamptic pregnancies.

  16. Long-term effects of bariatric surgery on peripheral endothelial function and coronary microvascular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarzia, Pierpaolo; Lanza, Gaetano A; Sestito, Alfonso; Villano, Angelo; Russo, Giulio; Figliozzi, Stefano; Lamendola, Priscilla; De Vita, Antonio; Crea, Filippo

    We previously demonstrated that bariatric surgery (BS) leads to a short-term significant improvement of endothelial function and coronary microvascular function. In this study we assessed whether BS maintains its beneficial effect at long-term follow up. We studied 19 morbidly obese patients (age 43±9years, 12 women) without any evidence of cardiovascular disease who underwent BS. Patients were studied before BS, at 3 months and at 4.0±1.5years follow up. Peripheral vascular function was assessed by flow-mediated dilation (FMD) and nitrate-mediated dilation (NMD), i.e., brachial artery diameter changes in response to post-ischemic forearm hyperhaemia and to nitroglycerin administration, respectively. Coronary microvascular function was assessed by measuring coronary blood flow (CBF) response to intravenous adenosine and to cold pressor test (CPT) in the left anterior descending coronary artery. Together with improvement of anthropometric and metabolic profile, at long-term follow-up patients showed a significant improvement of FMD (6.43±2.88 vs. 8.21±1.73%, p=0.018), and CBF response to both adenosine (1.73±0.48 vs. 2.58±0.54; pfunction and on coronary microvascular dilator function. Copyright © 2016 Asia Oceania Association for the Study of Obesity. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Mechanisms of modulation of brain microvascular endothelial cells function by thrombin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brailoiu, Eugen; Shipsky, Megan M; Yan, Guang; Abood, Mary E; Brailoiu, G Cristina

    2017-02-15

    Brain microvascular endothelial cells are a critical component of the blood-brain barrier. They form a tight monolayer which is essential for maintaining the brain homeostasis. Blood-derived proteases such as thrombin may enter the brain during pathological conditions like trauma, stroke, and inflammation and further disrupts the permeability of the blood-brain barrier, via incompletely characterized mechanisms. We examined the underlying mechanisms evoked by thrombin in rat brain microvascular endothelial cells (RBMVEC). Our results indicate that thrombin, acting on protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) increases cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration in RBMVEC via Ca(2+) release from endoplasmic reticulum through inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors and Ca(2+) influx from extracellular space. Thrombin increases nitric oxide production; the effect is abolished by inhibition of the nitric oxide synthase or by antagonism of PAR1 receptors. In addition, thrombin increases mitochondrial and cytosolic reactive oxygen species production via PAR1-dependent mechanisms. Immunocytochemistry studies indicate that thrombin increases F-actin stress fibers, and disrupts the tight junctions. Thrombin increased the RBMVEC permeability assessed by a fluorescent flux assay. Taken together, our results indicate multiple mechanisms by which thrombin modulates the function of RBMVEC and may contribute to the blood-brain barrier dysfunction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Human brain microvascular endothelial cells resist elongation due to shear stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinitz, Adam; DeStefano, Jackson; Ye, Mao; Wong, Andrew D; Searson, Peter C

    2015-05-01

    Endothelial cells in straight sections of vessels are known to elongate and align in the direction of flow. This phenotype has been replicated in confluent monolayers of bovine aortic endothelial cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in cell culture under physiological shear stress. Here we report on the morphological response of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs) in confluent monolayers in response to shear stress. Using a microfluidic platform we image confluent monolayers of HBMECs and HUVECs under shear stresses up to 16 dyne cm(-2). From live-cell imaging we quantitatively analyze the cell morphology and cell speed as a function of time. We show that HBMECs do not undergo a classical transition from cobblestone to spindle-like morphology in response to shear stress. We further show that under shear stress, actin fibers are randomly oriented in the cells indicating that there is no cytoskeletal remodeling. These results suggest that HBMECs are programmed to resist elongation and alignment under shear stress, a phenotype that may be associated with the unique properties of the blood-brain barrier. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Zika Virus Infects, Activates, and Crosses Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells, without Barrier Disruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle P. Papa

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus (ZIKV has been associated to central nervous system (CNS harm, and virus was detected in the brain and cerebrospinal fluids of microcephaly and meningoencephalitis cases. However, the mechanism by which the virus reaches the CNS is unclear. Here, we addressed the effects of ZIKV replication in human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs, as an in vitro model of blood brain barrier (BBB, and evaluated virus extravasation and BBB integrity in an in vivo mouse experimental model. HBMECs were productively infected by African and Brazilian ZIKV strains (ZIKVMR766 and ZIKVPE243, which induce increased production of type I and type III IFN, inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Infection with ZIKVMR766 promoted earlier cellular death, in comparison to ZIKVPE243, but infection with either strain did not result in enhanced endothelial permeability. Despite the maintenance of endothelial integrity, infectious virus particles crossed the monolayer by endocytosis/exocytosis-dependent replication pathway or by transcytosis. Remarkably, both viruses' strains infected IFNAR deficient mice, with high viral load being detected in the brains, without BBB disruption, which was only detected at later time points after infection. These data suggest that ZIKV infects and activates endothelial cells, and might reach the CNS through basolateral release, transcytosis or transinfection processes. These findings further improve the current knowledge regarding ZIKV dissemination pathways.

  20. Coronary microvascular endothelial dysfunction is an independent predictor of development of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Megha; Reriani, Martin; Khosla, Sundeep; Gössl, Mario; Lennon, Ryan; Gulati, Rajiv; Prasad, Abhiram; Lerman, Lilach O; Lerman, Amir

    2014-01-01

    A growing body of evidence links coronary artery atherosclerosis and calcification to osteoporosis in women. The endothelium plays a critical role in maintaining vascular integrity and may play a role in bone metabolism. We aimed to determine whether early coronary atherosclerosis, as detected by coronary microvascular endothelial dysfunction (CMED), predicts the development of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. Coronary vascular reactivity was evaluated in 194 postmenopausal women greater than 50 years of age and with non-obstructive coronary arteries by administration of intracoronary acetylcholine during diagnostic angiography. CMED was defined as ≤50% increase in coronary blood flow from baseline in response to maximal dose. After a median follow-up of 7.0±0.3 years, patients were assessed by a questionnaire for development of osteoporosis. The average age of the cohort was 60.9±7.4 years. Women with CMED were twice as likely to develop osteoporosis compared with women without endothelial dysfunction after adjustment for potential confounders (relative risk, 2.4; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1, 5.6, P=0.02). Epicardial endothelial dysfunction was not associated with development of osteoporosis. Early coronary atherosclerosis with endothelial dysfunction is an independent marker for increased risk of developing osteoporosis in postmenopausal women greater than 50 years of age without obstructive coronary artery disease. The current study supports a link between coronary atherosclerosis and osteoporosis.

  1. Increased susceptibility to amyloid-β toxicity in rat brain microvascular endothelial cells under hyperglycemic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Cristina; Katz, Paige S; Dutta, Somhrita; Katakam, Prasad V G; Moreira, Paula I; Busija, David W

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesized that hyperglycemia-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are closely associated with amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) toxicity in endothelial cells. Brain microvascular endothelial cells from rat (RBMEC) and mice (MBMEC) were isolated from adult Sprague-Dawley rats and homozygous db/db (Leprdb/Leprdb) and heterozygous (Dock7m/Leprdb) mice, and cultured under normo- and hyperglycemic conditions for 7 d followed by 24 h exposure to Aβ1-40. Some experiments were also performed with two mitochondrial superoxide (O2•-) scavengers, MitoTempo and Peg-SOD. Cell viability was measured by the Alamar blue assay and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) by confocal microscopy. Mitochondrial O2•- and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production was assessed by fluorescence microscopy and H2O2 production was confirmed by microplate reader. Hyperglycemia or Aβ1-40 alone did not affect cell viability in RBMEC. However, the simultaneous presence of high glucose and Aβ1-40 reduced cell viability and ΔΨm, and enhanced mitochondrial O2•- and H2O2 production. MitoTempo and PEG-SOD prevented Aβ1-40 toxicity. Interestingly, MBMEC presented a similar pattern of alterations with db/db cultures presenting higher susceptibility to Aβ1-40. Overall, our results show that high glucose levels increase the susceptibility of brain microvascular endothelial cells to Aβ toxicity supporting the idea that hyperglycemia is a major risk factor for vascular injury associated with AD.

  2. Microvascular endothelial dysfunction predicts the development of erectile dysfunction in men with coronary atherosclerosis without critical stenoses

    OpenAIRE

    Reriani, M; Flammer, A. J.; Li, J; M. Prasad; Rihal, C; Prasad, A.; Lennon, R; Lerman, L.O.; Lerman, A

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Erectile dysfunction (ED) is associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease, stroke, and all-cause mortality, independent of conventional cardiovascular risk factors. Coronary endothelial dysfunction is independently associated with ED in men with early coronary atherosclerosis. We aimed to investigate whether coronary microvascular dysfunction predicts development of ED in patients presenting with coronary atherosclerosis without critical stenoses. PATIENTS AND METH...

  3. Human liver endothelial cells, but not macrovascular or microvascular endothelial cells, engraft in the mouse liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filali, Ebtisam El; Hiralall, Johan K.; van Veen, Henk A.; Stolz, Donna B.; Seppen, Jurgen

    2013-01-01

    Liver cell transplantation has had limited clinical success so far, partly due to poor engraftment of hepatocytes. Instead of hepatocytes. other cell types, such as endothelial cells, could be used in ex vivo liver gene therapy. The goal of the present study was to compare the grafting and

  4. Niacin receptor activation improves human microvascular endothelial cell angiogenic function during lipotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes-Large, Jennifer M; Pang, Dominic K T; Robson, Debra L; Chan, Pak; Toma, Jelena; Borradaile, Nica M

    2014-12-01

    Niacin (nicotinic acid) as a monotherapy can reduce vascular disease risk, but its mechanism of action remains controversial, and may not be dependent on systemic lipid modifying effects. Niacin has recently been shown to improve endothelial function and vascular regeneration, independent of correcting dyslipidemia, in rodent models of vascular injury and metabolic disease. As a potential biosynthetic precursor for NAD(+), niacin could elicit these vascular benefits through NAD(+)-dependent, sirtuin (SIRT) mediated responses. Alternatively, niacin may act through its receptor, GPR109A, to promote endothelial function, though endothelial cells are not known to express this receptor. We hypothesized that niacin directly improves endothelial cell function during exposure to lipotoxic conditions and sought to determine the potential mechanism(s) involved. Angiogenic function in excess palmitate was assessed by tube formation following treatment of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC) with either a relatively low concentration of niacin (10 μM), or nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) (1 μM), a direct NAD(+) precursor. Although both niacin and NMN improved HMVEC tube formation during palmitate overload, only NMN increased cellular NAD(+) and SIRT1 activity. We further observed that HMVEC express GRP109A. Activation of this receptor with either acifran or MK-1903 recapitulated niacin-induced improvements in HMVEC tube formation, while GPR109A siRNA diminished the effect of niacin. Niacin, at a low concentration, improves HMVEC angiogenic function under lipotoxic conditions, likely independent of NAD(+) biosynthesis and SIRT1 activation, but rather through niacin receptor activation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Action of shiga toxin type-2 and subtilase cytotoxin on human microvascular endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María M Amaral

    Full Text Available The hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS associated with diarrhea is a complication of Shiga toxin (Stx-producing Escherichia coli (STEC infection. In Argentina, HUS is endemic and responsible for acute and chronic renal failure in children younger than 5 years old. The human kidney is the most affected organ due to the presence of very Stx-sensitive cells, such as microvascular endothelial cells. Recently, Subtilase cytotoxin (SubAB was proposed as a new toxin that may contribute to HUS pathogenesis, although its action on human glomerular endothelial cells (HGEC has not been described yet. In this study, we compared the effects of SubAB with those caused by Stx2 on primary cultures of HGEC isolated from fragments of human pediatric renal cortex. HGEC were characterized as endothelial since they expressed von Willebrand factor (VWF and platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1. HGEC also expressed the globotriaosylceramide (Gb3 receptor for Stx2. Both, Stx2 and SubAB induced swelling and detachment of HGEC and the consequent decrease in cell viability in a time-dependent manner. Preincubation of HGEC with C-9 -a competitive inhibitor of Gb3 synthesis-protected HGEC from Stx2 but not from SubAB cytotoxic effects. Stx2 increased apoptosis in a time-dependent manner while SubAB increased apoptosis at 4 and 6 h but decreased at 24 h. The apoptosis induced by SubAB relative to Stx2 was higher at 4 and 6 h, but lower at 24 h. Furthermore, necrosis caused by Stx2 was significantly higher than that induced by SubAB at all the time points evaluated. Our data provide evidence for the first time how SubAB could cooperate with the development of endothelial damage characteristic of HUS pathogenesis.

  6. Stathmin expression in glioma-derived microvascular endothelial cells: a novel therapeutic target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Baijing; Mu, Luyan; Qin, Xiangying; Qiao, Wanchen; Liu, Xiaodong; Yang, Liming; Xue, Li; Rainov, Nikolai G; Liu, Xiaoqian

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate stathmin expression and its mechanisms of action in GDMEC. Microvascular endothelial cells were isolated from human gliomas (n=68) and normal brain specimans (n=20), and purified by magnetic beads coated with anti-CD105 antibody. The expression of stathmin mRNA and protein were detected by RT-PCR and western blotting, respectively. Stathmin expression was silenced by application of specific siRNA in high grade GDMEC. The proliferation, apoptosis and invasion behavior of GDMEC were investigated. The stathmin positive rate of endothelial cells in normal brain, grade I-II glioma and grade III-IV glioma was 20, 66 and 95.5%, respectively (P<0.05). When cells were treated with siRNA to silence stathmin, cell viability was reduced, the apoptosis rate increased and the migration of vascular endothelial cells was suppressed significantly (P<0.05). Down-regulation of stathmin suppressed neoangiogenesis of glioma and provides a potential target for glioma treatment.

  7. Inhibition of Murine Pulmonary Microvascular Endothelial Cell Apoptosis Promotes Recovery of Barrier Function under Septic Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lefeng Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis is characterized by injury of the pulmonary microvasculature and the pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVEC, leading to barrier dysfunction and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. Our recent work identified a strong correlation between PMVEC apoptosis and microvascular leak in septic mice in vivo, but the specific role of apoptosis in septic PMVEC barrier dysfunction remains unclear. Thus, we hypothesize that PMVEC apoptosis is likely required for PMVEC barrier dysfunction under septic conditions in vitro. Septic stimulation (mixture of tumour necrosis factor α, interleukin 1β, and interferon γ [cytomix] of isolated murine PMVEC resulted in a significant loss of barrier function as early as 4 h after stimulation, which persisted until 24 h. PMVEC apoptosis, as reflected by caspase activation, DNA fragmentation, and loss of membrane polarity, was first apparent at 8 h after cytomix. Pretreatment of PMVEC with the pan-caspase inhibitor Q-VD significantly decreased septic PMVEC apoptosis and was associated with reestablishment of PMVEC barrier function at 16 and 24 h after stimulation but had no effect on septic PMVEC barrier dysfunction over the first 8 h. Collectively, our data suggest that early septic murine PMVEC barrier dysfunction driven by proinflammatory cytokines is not mediated through apoptosis, but PMVEC apoptosis contributes to late septic PMVEC barrier dysfunction.

  8. Rescue of Brain Function Using Tunneling Nanotubes Between Neural Stem Cells and Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoqing; Yu, Xiaowen; Xie, Chong; Tan, Zijian; Tian, Qi; Zhu, Desheng; Liu, Mingyuan; Guan, Yangtai

    2016-05-01

    Evidence indicates that neural stem cells (NSCs) can ameliorate cerebral ischemia in animal models. In this study, we investigated the mechanism underlying one of the neuroprotective effects of NSCs: tunneling nanotube (TNT) formation. We addressed whether the control of cell-to-cell communication processes between NSCs and brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs) and, particularly, the control of TNT formation could influence the rescue function of stem cells. In an attempt to mimic the cellular microenvironment in vitro, a co-culture system consisting of terminally differentiated BMECs from mice in a distressed state and NSCs was constructed. Additionally, engraftment experiments with infarcted mouse brains revealed that control of TNT formation influenced the effects of stem cell transplantation in vivo. In conclusion, our findings provide the first evidence that TNTs exist between NSCs and BMECs and that regulation of TNT formation alters cell function.

  9. Isolation and Culture of Human Microvascular endothelium for comparison of the morphological and molecular characteristics of Microvascular endothelial cells under normal gravity against simulated micro gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tholcopiyan L

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vascular endothelial cells play a major role in wound healing and also in growth of the tumors. Angiogenesis can be a target for treating diseases that are due to either poor vascularisation or decreased blood supply as in stroke, ulcers, heart disease, etc or abnormal and increased vasculature like in tumours. Application of specific compounds that may inhibit or induce the creation of new blood vessels in the body may help in the treatment of such diseases (1. Ex vivo generation of blood vessels may offer an excellent alternative to the synthetic valves that are being currently used in cardiology. Micro gravity also referred to, as weightlessness is not essentially zero gravity but rather minimal gravity. According to cell type, micro gravity causes variety of changes in proliferation and differentiation of cells while also affecting the migration of cells and cellular functions (2, 3. Siamwala et al from AUKBC have already studied the effects of microgravity on the microvascular endothelial cells from bovine lung and macrovascular endothelial cells from the bovine pulmonary artery. It was observed that the proliferation and migration of macrovascular endothelial cells were increased in microgravity (4, 5. Nitric oxide production was also studied and observed that microgravity treatment did not change nitric oxide production by microvascular endothelial cells (4OBJECTIVE: Isolation and Comparison of culture characteristics of Human microvascular endothelium cultured conventionally and in novel nanomaterial scaffold and further study the morphological and molecular characteristics of microvascular endothelial cells under normal gravity against simulated micro gravityMATERIALS AND METHODS: The human Omentum samples were obtained using surgical procedures after informed consent. The microvascular endothelial cells were isolated following the protocol described by Scott et al (6.The isolated cells were seeded in two groups; Group I

  10. A simple method for isolating and culturing the rat brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Xue, Qiang; Tang, Qing; Hou, Min; Qi, Hongyi; Chen, Gang; Chen, Weihai; Zhang, Jifen; Chen, Yi; Xu, Xiaoyu

    2013-11-01

    Brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs), a main component of the blood-brain barrier, play a critical role in the pathogenesis of many brain diseases. The primary culture of BMECs has been used in various models for studying cerebrovascular diseases in vitro. However, there are still several problems existing in the isolation and cultivation of primary rat BMECs, such as low yield, contamination with other cell types, and requirement of a large number of animals and expensive growth factor. In this study, we describe a simple, economical (without any growth factor) and repeatable method to obtain endothelial cells with high purity (>99%) and yield (about 2.2×10(7) per rat) from cerebral cortexes of neonatal rat, mainly from gray matter. In vitro examinations determined that the isolated cells expressed typical phenotypic markers of differentiated brain endothelium such as multiple drug resistant protein, von Willebrand factor, platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1/CD31), and intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM). These cells also possessed morphological and ultra-structural characteristics that were observed by phase contrast microscope and electric microscope. Then GFAP and α-SMA were used, respectively, to identify astrocyte and pericyte which were potential to contaminate primary culturing of BMECs. And specific reaction of endothelial cells to external stimulation was tested by culture with TNF-α for 24h. All these results of our experiments supply that our protocol provides an effective and reliable method to obtain high purity and yield of rat BMECs and offers a useful tool for studying cellular physiology, cerebrovascular diseases, brain tumors, blood-brain barrier and neurovascular units, etc. © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Thalidomide inhibits inflammatory and angiogenic activation of human intestinal microvascular endothelial cells (HIMEC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Daniel J.; Nelson, Victoria M.; Otterson, Mary F.; Shaker, Reza; Binion, David G.

    2010-01-01

    The glutamic acid derivative thalidomide is a transcriptional inhibitor of TNF-α but is also known to affect human blood vessels, which may underlie its teratogenicity. Thalidomide has been used in the treatment of refractory Crohn's disease (CD), but the therapeutic mechanism is not defined. We examined the effect of thalidomide on primary cultures of human intestinal microvascular endothelial cells (HIMEC), the relevant endothelial cell population in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), to determine its effect on endothelial activation, leukocyte interaction, and VEGF-induced angiogenesis. HIMEC cultures were pretreated with thalidomide before activation with either TNF-α/LPS or VEGF. A low-shear-stress flow adhesion assay with either U-937 or whole blood was used to assess HIMEC activation following TNF-α/LPS, and a Wright's stain identified adherent leukocytes. Expression of cell adhesion molecules (E-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1) was assessed using radioimmunoassay. Effects of thalidomide on NF-κB activation, cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression in TNF-α/LPS-activated HIMEC were determined by RT-PCR and Western blotting. Thalidomide blocked adhesion of both U-937 and whole blood leukocytes by 50% in HIMEC, inhibiting binding of all classes of leukocytes. Thalidomide also blocked NF-κB and cell adhesion molecule expression in HIMEC. In marked contrast, thalidomide did not affect either iNOS or COX-2 expression, two key molecules that play a role in the downregulation of HIMEC activation. VEGF-induced HIMEC transmigration, growth, proliferation, tube formation, and Akt phosphorylation were significantly inhibited by thalidomide. In summary, thalidomide exerted a potent effect on HIMEC growth and activation, suggesting that it may also function via an endothelial mechanism in the treatment of CD. PMID:19926820

  12. Impact of calcium signaling during infection of Neisseria meningitidis to human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmat, Tauseef M; Tenenbaum, Tobias; Jonsson, Ann-Beth; Schwerk, Christian; Schroten, Horst

    2014-01-01

    The pili and outer membrane proteins of Neisseria meningitidis (meningococci) facilitate bacterial adhesion and invasion into host cells. In this context expression of meningococcal PilC1 protein has been reported to play a crucial role. Intracellular calcium mobilization has been implicated as an important signaling event during internalization of several bacterial pathogens. Here we employed time lapse calcium-imaging and demonstrated that PilC1 of meningococci triggered a significant increase in cytoplasmic calcium in human brain microvascular endothelial cells, whereas PilC1-deficient meningococci could not initiate this signaling process. The increase in cytosolic calcium in response to PilC1-expressing meningococci was due to efflux of calcium from host intracellular stores as demonstrated by using 2-APB, which inhibits the release of calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum. Moreover, pre-treatment of host cells with U73122 (phospholipase C inhibitor) abolished the cytosolic calcium increase caused by PilC1-expressing meningococci demonstrating that active phospholipase C (PLC) is required to induce calcium transients in host cells. Furthermore, the role of cytosolic calcium on meningococcal adherence and internalization was documented by gentamicin protection assay and double immunofluorescence (DIF) staining. Results indicated that chelation of intracellular calcium by using BAPTA-AM significantly impaired PilC1-mediated meningococcal adherence to and invasion into host endothelial cells. However, buffering of extracellular calcium by BAPTA or EGTA demonstrated no significant effect on meningococcal adherence to and invasion into host cells. Taken together, these results indicate that meningococci induce calcium release from intracellular stores of host endothelial cells via PilC1 and cytoplasmic calcium concentrations play a critical role during PilC1 mediated meningococcal adherence to and subsequent invasion into host endothelial cells.

  13. Impact of calcium signaling during infection of Neisseria meningitidis to human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tauseef M Asmat

    Full Text Available The pili and outer membrane proteins of Neisseria meningitidis (meningococci facilitate bacterial adhesion and invasion into host cells. In this context expression of meningococcal PilC1 protein has been reported to play a crucial role. Intracellular calcium mobilization has been implicated as an important signaling event during internalization of several bacterial pathogens. Here we employed time lapse calcium-imaging and demonstrated that PilC1 of meningococci triggered a significant increase in cytoplasmic calcium in human brain microvascular endothelial cells, whereas PilC1-deficient meningococci could not initiate this signaling process. The increase in cytosolic calcium in response to PilC1-expressing meningococci was due to efflux of calcium from host intracellular stores as demonstrated by using 2-APB, which inhibits the release of calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum. Moreover, pre-treatment of host cells with U73122 (phospholipase C inhibitor abolished the cytosolic calcium increase caused by PilC1-expressing meningococci demonstrating that active phospholipase C (PLC is required to induce calcium transients in host cells. Furthermore, the role of cytosolic calcium on meningococcal adherence and internalization was documented by gentamicin protection assay and double immunofluorescence (DIF staining. Results indicated that chelation of intracellular calcium by using BAPTA-AM significantly impaired PilC1-mediated meningococcal adherence to and invasion into host endothelial cells. However, buffering of extracellular calcium by BAPTA or EGTA demonstrated no significant effect on meningococcal adherence to and invasion into host cells. Taken together, these results indicate that meningococci induce calcium release from intracellular stores of host endothelial cells via PilC1 and cytoplasmic calcium concentrations play a critical role during PilC1 mediated meningococcal adherence to and subsequent invasion into host endothelial cells.

  14. Cultivation of Human Microvascular Endothelial Cells on Topographical Substrates to Mimic the Human Corneal Endothelium

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    Jie Shi Chua

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Human corneal endothelial cells have a limited ability to replicate in vivo and in vitro. Allograft transplantation becomes necessary when an accident or trauma results in excessive cell loss. The reconstruction of the cornea endothelium using autologous cell sources is a promising alternative option for therapeutic or in vitro drug testing applications. The native corneal endothelium rests on the Descemet’s membrane, which has nanotopographies of fibers and pores. The use of synthetic topographies mimics the native environment, and it is hypothesized that this can direct the behavior and growth of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs to resemble the corneal endothelium. In this study, HMVECs are cultivated on substrates with micron and nano-scaled pillar and well topographies. Closely packed HMVEC monolayers with polygonal cells and well-developed tight junctions were formed on the topographical substrates. Sodium/potassium (Na+/K+ adenine triphosphatase (ATPase expression was enhanced on the microwells substrate, which also promotes microvilli formation, while more hexagonal-like cells are found on the micropillars samples. The data obtained suggests that the use of optimized surface patterning, in particular, the microtopographies, can induce HMVECs to adopt a more corneal endothelium-like morphology with similar barrier and pump functions. The mechanism involved in cell contact guidance by the specific topographical features will be of interest for future studies.

  15. Microvascular Endothelial Dysfunction in Obesity Is Driven by Macrophage-Dependent Hydrogen Sulfide Depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela, Joseph; Wang, Rui; White, Carl

    2017-05-01

    The function of perivascular adipose tissue as an anticontractile mediator in the microvasculature is lost during obesity. Obesity results in inflammation and recruitment of proinflammatory macrophages to the perivascular adipose tissue that is paralleled by depletion of the vasorelaxant signaling molecule hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in the vessel. The current objective was to assess the role of macrophages in determining vascular [H2S] and defining how this impinged on vasodilation. Contractility and [H2S] were measured in mesenteric resistance arterioles from lean and obese mice by using pressure myography and confocal microscopy, respectively. Vasodilation was impaired and smooth muscle and endothelial [H2S] decreased in vessels from obese mice compared with those from lean controls. Coculturing vessels from lean mice with macrophages from obese mice, or macrophage-conditioned media, recapitulated obese phenotypes in vessels. These effects were mediated by low molecular weight species and dependent on macrophage inducible nitric oxide synthase activity. The inducible nitric oxide synthase activity of perivascular adipose tissue-resident proinflammatory macrophages promotes microvascular endothelial dysfunction by reducing the bioavailability of H2S in the vessel. These findings support a model in which vascular H2S depletion underpins the loss of perivascular adipose tissue anticontractile function in obesity. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Multiple protocadherins are expressed in brain microvascular endothelial cells and might play a role in tight junction protein regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilling, Christina; Roewer, Norbert; Förster, Carola Y; Burek, Malgorzata

    2017-10-01

    Protocadherins (Pcdhs) are a large family of cadherin-related molecules. They play a role in cell adhesion, cellular interactions, and development of the central nervous system. However, their expression and role in endothelial cells has not yet been characterized. Here, we examined the expression of selected clustered Pcdhs in endothelial cells from several vascular beds. We analyzed human and mouse brain microvascular endothelial cell (BMEC) lines and primary cells, mouse myocardial microvascular endothelial cell line, and human umbilical vein endothelial cells. We examined the mRNA and protein expression of selected Pcdhs using RT-PCR, Western blot, and immunostaining. A strong mRNA expression of Pcdhs was observed in all endothelial cells tested. At the protein level, Pcdhs-gamma were detected using an antibody against the conserved C-terminal domain of Pcdhs-gamma or an antibody against PcdhgC3. Deletion of highly expressed PcdhgC3 led to differences in the tight junction protein expression and mRNA expression of Wnt/mTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin) pathway genes as well as lower transendothelial electrical resistance. Staining of PcdhgC3 showed diffused cytoplasmic localization in mouse BMEC. Our results suggest that Pcdhs may play a critical role in the barrier-stabilizing pathways at the blood-brain barrier.

  17. Adhesive properties of Enterobacter sakazakii to human epithelial and brain microvascular endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pospischil Andreas

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enterobacter sakazakii is an opportunistic pathogen that has been associated with sporadic cases and outbreaks causing meningitis, necrotizing enterocolitis and sepsis especially in neonates. However, up to now little is known about the mechanisms of pathogenicity in E. sakazakii. A necessary state in the successful colonization, establishment and ultimately production of disease by microbial pathogens is the ability to adhere to host surfaces such as mucous membranes, gastric and intestinal epithelial or endothelial tissue. This study examined for the first time the adherence ability of 50 E. sakazakii strains to the two epithelial cell lines HEp-2 and Caco-2, as well as the brain microvascular endothelial cell line HBMEC. Furthermore, the effects of bacterial culture conditions on the adherence behaviour were investigated. An attempt was made to characterize the factors involved in adherence. Results Two distinctive adherence patterns, a diffuse adhesion and the formation of localized clusters of bacteria on the cell surface could be distinguished on all three cell lines. In some strains, a mixture of both patterns was observed. Adherence was maximal during late exponential phase, and increased with higher MOI. The adhesion capacity of E. sakazakii to HBMEC cells was affected by the addition of blood to the bacteria growth medium. Mannose, hemagglutination, trypsin digestion experiments and transmission electron microscopy suggested that the adhesion of E. sakazakii to the epithelial and endothelial cells is mainly non-fimbrial based. Conclusion Adherence experiments show heterogeneity within different E. sakazakii strains. In agreement with studies on E. cloacae, we found no relationship between the adhesive capacities in E. sakazakii and the eventual production of specific fimbriae. Further studies will have to be carried out in order to determine the adhesin(s involved in the interaction of E. sakazakii with cells and to

  18. A unique pulmonary microvascular endothelial cell niche revealed by Weibel-Palade bodies and Griffonia simplicifolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Songwei; Zhou, Chun; King, Judy A C; Stevens, Troy

    2014-03-01

    Pulmonary endothelium displays considerable heterogeneity along the vascular axis, from arteries to capillaries to veins. Griffonia simplicifolia is a lectin that recognizes pulmonary microvascular endothelium with preference over extra-alveolar endothelium in both arteries and veins, yet the precise vascular location where this phenotypic shift occurs is poorly resolved. We gelatin-filled the circulation and agarose-loaded the airways and then labeled the lung with Griffonia lectin to enable visualization of the endothelial transition zone. Endothelium in vessels with internal diameters less than 38 μm were uniformly Griffonia positive, whereas vessels with internal diameters greater than 60 μm were always Griffonia negative. Two populations of endothelium were identified in vessels ranging from 38 to 60 μm in diameter, including some that were positive and others that were negative for binding to G. simplicifolia. To better resolve this endothelial transition zone, we performed morphology studies to measure the distribution of Weibel-Palade bodies (WPbs), since WPbs are present in conduit vessel endothelium and absent in capillary endothelium. WPbs were found in endothelium with vascular dimensions as small as 18 μm in diameter but were not found in capillaries. Thus, we identify with precision that the endothelial phenotype transition from a cell that does not interact with Griffonia lectin to one that does occurs in blood vessels with internal diameters of approximately 38 μm, and we reveal an unappreciated vascular zone, between 18 and 38 μm in diameter, where endothelium both is Griffonia positive and possesses WPbs.

  19. Evaluation of breast lesions with contrast-enhanced ultrasound using the microvascular imaging technique: initial observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, He; Jiang, Yu-Xin; Liu, Ji-Bin; Zhu, Qing-Li; Sun, Qiang

    2008-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of contrast-enhanced ultrasound using the microvascular imaging technique in the diagnosis of breast lesions. In 104 patients with 104 breast lesions scheduled for surgery, conventional and contrast-enhanced ultrasound using the microvascular imaging technique were performed after administration of SonoVue. The enhancement patterns of breast lesions were classified as no enhancement, peripheral enhancement, homogeneous enhancement, regional enhancement, or heterogeneous enhancement based on the morphologic features of enhancement. The diagnostic value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound using the microvascular imaging technique was analyzed with the observers blinded to the clinical data and pathology (which served as the gold standard). None of the enhancement patterns was suggestive of benignity, with a sensitivity of 18.3%, specificity of 97.7%, positive predictive value (PPV) of 91.7%, negative predictive value (NPV) of 46.2%, and accuracy of 51.5%. The peripheral enhancement pattern was suggestive of malignancy, with a sensitivity of 39.5%, specificity of 98.3%, PPV of 94.4%, NPV of 69.4%, and accuracy of 73.8%. Homogeneous, regional, and heterogeneous enhancement patterns did not show meaningful diagnostic information. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound using the microvascular imaging technique provides diagnostic information on breast lesions.

  20. Syncytin is involved in breast cancer-endothelial cell fusions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, B; Holck, Susanne; Christensen, Ib Jarle

    2006-01-01

    Cancer cells can fuse spontaneously with normal host cells, including endothelial cells, and such fusions may strongly modulate the biological behaviour of tumors. However, the underlying mechanisms are unknown. We now show that human breast cancer cell lines and 63 out of 165 (38%) breast cancer...... and inhibits fusions between breast cancer cells and endothelial cells. Moreover, a syncytin inhibitory peptide also inhibits fusions between cancer and endothelial cells. These results are the first to show that syncytin is expressed by human cancer cells and is involved in cancer-endothelial cell fusions....

  1. M3 receptor is involved in the effect of penehyclidine hydrochloride reduced endothelial injury in LPS-stimulated human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Qinghong; Xiao, Fei; Liu, Qiangsheng; Zheng, Fei; Shen, Shiwen; He, Qianwen; Chen, Kai; Wang, Yanlin; Zhang, Zongze; Zhan, Jia

    2017-11-17

    LPS has been recently shown to induce muscarinic acetylcholine 3 receptor (M3 receptor) expression and penehyclidine hydrochloride (PHC) is an anticholinergic drug which could block the expression of M3 receptor. PHC has been demonstrated to perform protective effect on cell injury. This study is to investigate whether the effect of PHC on microvascular endothelial injury is related to its inhibition of M3 receptor or not. HPMVECs were treated with specific M3 receptor shRNA or PBS, and randomly divided into LPS group (A group), LPS+PHC group (B group), LPS + M3 shRNA group (C group) and LPS + PHC + M3 shRNA group (D group). Cells were collected at 60 min after LPS treatment to measure levels of LDH, endothelial permeability, TNF-α and IL-6 levels, NF-κB p65 activation, I-κB protein expression, p38MAPK, and ERK1/2 activations as well as M3 mRNA expression. PHC could decrease LDH levels, cell permeability, TNF-α and IL-6 levels, p38 MAPK, ERK1/2, NF-κB p65 activations and M3 mRNA expressions compared with LPS group. When M3 receptor was silence, the changes of these indices were much more obvious. These findings suggest that M3 receptor plays an important role in LPS-induced pulmonary microvascular endothelial injury, which is regulated through NF-κB p65 and MAPK activation. And knockout of M3 receptor could attenuate LPS-induced pulmonary microvascular endothelial injury. Regulative effects of PHC on pulmonary microvascular permeability and NF-κB p65 as well as MAPK activations are including but not limited to inhibition of M3 receptor. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. The anti-apoptotic effect of fluid mechanics preconditioning by cells membrane and mitochondria in rats brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Shan; Zhu, Fengping; Hu, Ruiping; Tian, Song; Chen, Xingxing; Lou, Dan; Cao, Bing; Chen, Qiulei; Li, Bai; Li, Fang; Bai, Yulong; Wu, Yi; Zhu, Yulian

    2018-01-01

    Exercise preconditioning is a simple and effective way to prevent ischemia. This paper further provided the mechanism in hemodynamic aspects at the cellular level. To study the anti-apoptotic effects of fluid mechanics preconditioning, Cultured rats brain microvascular endothelial cells were given fluid intervention in a parallel plate flow chamber before oxygen glucose deprivation. It showed that fluid mechanics preconditioning could inhibit the apoptosis of endothelial cells, and this process might be mediated by the shear stress activation of Tie-2 on cells membrane surface and Bcl-2 on the mitochondria surface. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Resistance of human brain microvascular endothelial cells in culture to methylmercury: cell-density-dependent defense mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirooka, Takashi; Fujiwara, Yasuyuki; Shinkai, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Chika; Yasutake, Akira; Satoh, Masahiko; Eto, Komyo; Kaji, Toshiyuki

    2010-06-01

    Vascular toxicity is important for understanding the neurotoxicity of methylmercury, because microvessels strongly influence the construction of microenvironment around neurons. Previously, we found that low density-human brain microvascular pericytes are markedly susceptible to methylmercury cytotoxicity due to high expression levels of the L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT-1) that transports methylmercury into the cells. Although LAT-1 can be, in general, highly expressed in sparse cells that require amino acids for growth, we found that human brain microvascular endothelial cells, regardless of cell density, were resistant to methylmercury cytotoxicity. To investigate the mechanisms underlying this resistance, we exposed the endothelial cells at low and high cell densities to methylmercury and determined the extent of nonspecific cell damage, intracellular accumulation of methylmercury, expression of LAT-1 and LAT-2 mRNAs, and intracellular expression of reduced glutathione and metallothionein. These experiments indicate that sparse endothelial cells intracellularly accumulate more methylmercury via the highly expressed LAT-1, but are resistant to methylmercury cytotoxicity by higher expression of the protective sulfhydryl peptides, namely, reduced glutathione and metallothionein. It is suggested that both nonspecific and functional damage is caused in pericytes, whereas functional abnormalities rather than nonspecific damage may occur to a greater extent in the endothelial cells in the brain microvessels exposed to methylmercury. The previous and present data also suggest that methylmercury exhibits toxicity in endothelial cells in a manner different from that in pericytes in the brain microvessels.

  4. Microvascular Coronary Artery Spasm Presents Distinctive Clinical Features With Endothelial Dysfunction as Nonobstructive Coronary Artery Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ohba, Keisuke; Sugiyama, Seigo; Sumida, Hitoshi; Nozaki, Toshimitsu; Matsubara, Junichi; Matsuzawa, Yasushi; Konishi, Masaaki; Akiyama, Eiichi; Kurokawa, Hirofumi; Maeda, Hirofumi; Sugamura, Koichi; Nagayoshi, Yasuhiro; Morihisa, Kenji; Sakamoto, Kenji; Tsujita, Kenichi

    2012-01-01

    Background Angina without significant stenosis, or nonobstructive coronary artery disease, attracts clinical attention. Microvascular coronary artery spasm (microvascular CAS) can cause nonobstructive coronary artery disease. We investigated the clinical features of microvascular CAS and the therapeutic efficacy of calcium channel blockers. Methods and Results Three hundred seventy consecutive, stable patients with suspected angina presenting nonobstructive coronary arteries (

  5. Impact of Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction Therapy on Myocardial Function and Endothelial Dysfunction in Female Patients with Microvascular Angina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bong Joon; Cho, In Suk; Cho, Kyoung Im

    2017-12-01

    Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) is a structured group program that employs mindfulness meditation to alleviate suffering associated with physical, psychosomatic, and psychiatric disorders. In this study, we investigate the impact of MBSR on left ventricular (LV) and endothelial function in female patients with microvascular angina. A total of 34 female patients (mean age 52.2 ± 13.8 years) diagnosed with microvascular angina underwent a MBSR program with anti-anginal medication for 8 weeks. The global longitudinal strain (GLS) of the LV was used as a parameter to assess myocardial function and reactive brachial flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) was used to assess endothelial function. Symptoms were analyzed by the Symptom Checklist 90 Revised to determine emotional stress. Changes in GLS and FMD between baseline and post-MBSR were analyzed. After 8 weeks of programmed MBSR treatment, stress parameters were significantly decreased. In addition, GLS (-19.5 ± 2.1% vs. -16.6 ± 2.5%, p < 0.001) and reactive FMD significantly improved (8.9 ± 3.0% vs. 6.9 ± 2.6%, p = 0.005) after MBSR compared to baseline. The changes in GLS correlated to changes in FMD (r = 0.120, p = 0.340) and with the changes in most stress parameters. MBSR has beneficial impacts on myocardial and endothelial function in female patients with microvascular angina.

  6. Effect of interleukin-6 inhibition on coronary microvascular and endothelial function in myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holte, Espen; Kleveland, Ola; Ueland, Thor; Kunszt, Gabor; Bratlie, Marte; Broch, Kaspar; Michelsen, Annika E; Bendz, Bjørn; Amundsen, Brage H; Aakhus, Svend; Damås, Jan Kristian; Gullestad, Lars; Aukrust, Pål; Wiseth, Rune

    2017-10-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a driver of inflammation and associated endothelial cell activation in acute coronary syndromes. We evaluated the effect of the IL-6 receptor antagonist tocilizumab on coronary microvascular function and endothelial dysfunction measured by coronary flow reserve (CFR) and markers of endothelial cell activation in patients with non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI). This substudy was part of a two-centre, double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial evaluating the effect of a single dose of tocilizumab in NSTEMI. Markers of endothelial cell activation (vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and von Willebrand factor) were assessed in 117 patients. In 42 of these patients, 20 assigned to placebo and 22 to tocilizumab, we measured CFR. Blood samples were obtained at seven consecutive time points between day 1 and 3. CFR was measured by transthoracic echocardiography during hospitalisation and after 6 months. Tocilizumab did not affect CFR during hospitalisation (tocilizumab: 3.4±0.8 vs placebo: 3.3±1.2, p=0.80). CFR improved significantly in both groups at 6 months. Patients in the tocilizumab group had significantly higher area under the curve for VCAM-1 (median 622 vs 609 ng/mL/hour, tocilizumab and placebo respectively, p=0.003). There were inverse correlations between VCAM-1 and CFR in the placebo (hospitalisation: r=-0.74, p<0.01, 6 months: r=-0.59, p<0.01), but not in the tocilizumab group (hospitalisation: r=0.20, p=0.37, 6 months r=-0.28, p=0.20). Tocilizumab did not affect CFR during hospitalisation or after 6 months. Tocilizumab increased VCAM-1 levels during hospitalisation, but this was not associated with reduced CFR in these patients. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  7. Fermented Chinese Formula Shuan-Tong-Ling Protects Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells against Oxidative Stress Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingjing Tan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fermented Chinese formula Shuan-Tong-Ling (STL, composed of fourteen medicinal herbs, was an experiential formula by Dr. Zhigang Mei for treating vascular encephalopathy, but the underlying mechanisms remained unknown. In this study, we aimed to investigate the protective effects of fermented STL on hydrogen peroxide- (H2O2- induced injury in rat brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs and the possible mechanisms. Cultured BMECs were treated with H2O2, STL, or nicotinamide (NAM, a SIRT1 inhibitor. Then, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT assay was employed to detect cell proliferation and senescence-associated beta-galactosidase (SA-β-gal was used to examine cell senescence. Cell nuclei were observed by 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole. Additionally, changes in reactive oxygen species (ROS, superoxide dismutase (SOD, and glutathione (GSH levels were measured. Expression of SIRT1, p21, and PGC-1α was determined by western blot. Cell proliferation significantly increased with STL treatment in a dose-dependent manner. H2O2 treatment could intensify cell senescence and nuclei splitting or pyknosis. With STL treatment, the reduced ROS level was accompanied by increased SOD and GSH activity. Further assays showed upregulation of SIRT1 and PGC-1α and downregulation of p21 after STL treatment. The results revealed that STL could protect BMECs against oxidative stress injury at least partially through the SIRT1 pathway.

  8. Differentiation and characterization of human pluripotent stem cell-derived brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebbins, Matthew J; Wilson, Hannah K; Canfield, Scott G; Qian, Tongcheng; Palecek, Sean P; Shusta, Eric V

    2016-05-15

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a critical component of the central nervous system (CNS) that regulates the flux of material between the blood and the brain. Because of its barrier properties, the BBB creates a bottleneck to CNS drug delivery. Human in vitro BBB models offer a potential tool to screen pharmaceutical libraries for CNS penetration as well as for BBB modulators in development and disease, yet primary and immortalized models respectively lack scalability and robust phenotypes. Recently, in vitro BBB models derived from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have helped overcome these challenges by providing a scalable and renewable source of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs). We have demonstrated that hPSC-derived BMECs exhibit robust structural and functional characteristics reminiscent of the in vivo BBB. Here, we provide a detailed description of the methods required to differentiate and functionally characterize hPSC-derived BMECs to facilitate their widespread use in downstream applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Autophagy inhibits high glucose induced cardiac microvascular endothelial cells apoptosis by mTOR signal pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zheng; Zhang, Shenwei; Wang, Yong; Yang, Ming; Zhang, Ning; Jin, Zhitao; Ding, Liping; Jiang, Wei; Yang, Junke; Sun, Zhimin; Qiu, Chunguang; Hu, Taohong

    2017-08-20

    Cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (CMECs) dysfunction is an important pathophysiological event in the cardiovascular complications induced by diabetes. However, the underlying mechanism is not fully clarified. Autophagy is involved in programmed cell death. Here we investigated the potential role of autophagy on the CMECs injury induced by high glucose. CMECs were cultured in normal or high glucose medium for 6, 12 and 24 h respectively. The autophagy of CMECs was measured by green fluorescence protein (GFP)-LC3 plasmid transfection. Moreover, the apoptosis of CMEC was determined by flow cytometry. Furthermore, 3-Methyladenine (3MA), ATG7 siRNA and rapamycin were administrated to regulate the autophagy state. Moreover, Western blotting assay was performed to measure the expressions of Akt, mTOR, LC3 and p62. High glucose stress decreased the autophagy, whereas increased the apoptosis in CMECs time dependently. Meanwhile, high glucose stress activated the Akt/mTOR signal pathway. Furthermore, autophagy inhibitor, 3-MA and ATG7 siRNA impaired the autophagy and increased the apoptosis in CMECs induced by high glucose stress. Conversely, rapamycin up-regulated the autophagy and decreased the apoptosis in CMECs under high glucose condition. Our data provide evidence that high glucose directly inhibits autophagy, as a beneficial adaptive response to protect CMECs against apoptosis. Furthermore, the autophagy was mediated, at least in part, by mTOR signaling.

  10. Piperine Decreases Binding of Drugs to Human Plasma and Increases Uptake by Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Raghvendra K; Leeners, Brigitte; Imthurn, Bruno; Merki-Feld, Gabriele Susanne; Rosselli, Marinella

    2017-09-26

    We previously reported that piperine, an active alkaloidal principal of black and long peppers, enhances drug bioavailability by inhibiting drug metabolism. Another mechanism influencing drug availability/uptake is its free fraction. Since piperine is highly lipophilic, we hypothesize that it could also interact with drugs through binding displacement and influence their bioavailability. Accordingly, using equilibrium dialysis, we investigated whether piperine alters the binding of model drug ligands, that is flunitrazepam, diazepam, warfarin, salicylic acid, propranolol, lidocaine, and disopyramide to human plasma (n = 4). Since alterations in binding influence drug disposition, we also studied the effects of piperine on the uptake of plasma bound (3) H-propranolol and (14) C-warfarin by cultured bovine brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs). Piperine (1-1000 μM) increased the free fraction (fu) of both albumin and alpha-acid glycoprotein bound drugs in a concentration-dependent manner (p piperine (10 μM) increased the uptake of (3) H-propranolol and (14) C-warfarin by BMECs (p piperine displaces plasma bound drugs from both albumin and alpha-acid glycoprotein and facilitates drug uptake across biological membranes (e.g. BMEC). Moreover, it is feasible that piperine may similarly facilitate the transport of drugs into tissues, in vivo, and alter both pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of administered drugs. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Infectomic Analysis of Gene Expression Profiles of Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells Infected with Cryptococcus neoformans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambrose Jong

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to dissect the pathogenesis of Cryptococcus neoformans meningoencephalitis, a genomic survey of the changes in gene expression of human brain microvascular endothelial cells infected by C. neoformans was carried out in a time-course study. Principal component analysis (PCA revealed sigificant fluctuations in the expression levels of different groups of genes during the pathogen-host interaction. Self-organizing map (SOM analysis revealed that most genes were up- or downregulated 2 folds or more at least at one time point during the pathogen-host engagement. The microarray data were validated by Western blot analysis of a group of genes, including β-actin, Bcl-x, CD47, Bax, Bad, and Bcl-2. Hierarchical cluster profile showed that 61 out of 66 listed interferon genes were changed at least at one time point. Similarly, the active responses in expression of MHC genes were detected at all stages of the interaction. Taken together, our infectomic approaches suggest that the host cells significantly change the gene profiles and also actively participate in immunoregulations of the central nervous system (CNS during C. neoformans infection.

  12. Heparanase mediates vascular endothelial growth factor gene transcription in high-glucose human retinal microvascular endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingwei; Leng, Xuan; Hu, Yijun; Shen, Huangxuan; Song, Xin

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To observe the nuclear expression and interaction of heparanase and RNA polymerase II (RNA Pol II), an enzyme that catalyzes the transcription of DNA in eukaryotic cells) in human retinal microvascular endothelial cells (HRECs) under high glucose condition and to investigate the association of heparanase with the transcription activity of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene promoter. Methods Cultured HRECs were maintained for 3 days in media with high or normal glucose. The expressions of heparanase and RNA Pol II in each group were analyzed with immunofluorescence. Co-immunoprecipitation was applied to detect the interaction of heparanase and Pol II proteins. Cells in both groups were used for chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) with anti-heparanase and anti-RNA Pol II antibodies to identify high-confidence heparanase-binding regions across the entire VEGF gene promoter. Moreover, real-time PCR was used to demonstrate the interaction between heparanase and the VEGF gene promoter region. Results The immunofluorescence studies showed that the nuclear expression of heparanase was intense in high-glucose HRECs but faint in the normal group; RNA Pol II in the nucleus was also intense in high glucose HRECs, and the distribution of heparanase was consistent with that of RNA Pol II. The co-immunoprecipitation data showed that heparanase combined with RNA Pol II in HRECs cells treated with high glucose, and the molecular size of HPA interacted with RNA Pol II was 50 kDa, while no combination of two proteins was evident in normal HRECs cells. Real-time PCR–based ChIP results showed that the high-confidence HPA-binding region was −1155 to −1018 (containing hypoxia response element) in the VEGF gene promoter, and the cells treated with high glucose showed increases in heparanase and RNA Pol II in the VEGF gene promoter region compared with the normal glucose treated cells (t = –3.244, p = 0.032; t = –6.096, p = 0.004, respectively

  13. Endothelial monocyte activating polypeptide II in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus: Relation to micro-vascular complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adly, Amira A M; Ismail, Eman A; Tawfik, Lamis M; Ebeid, Fatma S E; Hassan, Asmaa A S

    2015-12-01

    Endothelial monocyte-activating polypeptide II (EMAP II) is a multifunctional polypeptide with proinflammatory and antiangiogenic activity. Hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia appears to be significant factors contributing to increased EMAP-II levels. We determined serum EMAP II in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes as a potential marker for micro-vascular complications and assessed its relation to inflammation and glycemic control. Eighty children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes were divided into 2 groups according to the presence of micro-vascular complications and compared with 40 healthy controls. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and EMAP II levels were assessed. Serum EMAP II levels were significantly increased in patients with micro-vascular complications (1539 ± 321.5 pg/mL) and those without complications (843.6 ± 212.6 pg/mL) compared with healthy controls (153.3 ± 28.3 pg/mL; pII was increased in patients with microalbuminuria than normoalbuminuric group (pII levels and body mass index, fasting blood glucose, HbA1c, serum creatinine, triglycerides, total cholesterol, urinary albumin creatinine ratio (UACR) and hs-CRP (pII at 1075 pg/mL could differentiate diabetic patients with and without micro-vascular complications with a sensitivity of 93% and specificity of 82%. We suggest that EMAP II is elevated in type 1 diabetic patients, particularly those with micro-vascular complications. EMAP II levels are related to inflammation, glycemic control, albuminuria level of patients and the risk of micro-vascular complications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Oxytocin inhibits ox-LDL-induced adhesion of monocytic THP-1 cells to human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuyan; Pan, Shengying; Tan, Jing; Zhao, Weina; Liu, Fengguo

    2017-12-15

    The attachment of monocytes to human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMVEs) caused by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) is associated with an early event and the pathological progression of cerebrovascular diseases. Oxytocin (OT) is a human peptide hormone that is traditionally used as a medication to facilitate childbirth. However, little information is available regarding the physiological function of OT in brain endothelial dysfunction. In the present study, our results indicate that the oxytocin receptor (OTR) was expressed in human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMVEs) and was upregulated in response to ox-LDL in a concentration-dependent manner. Notably, OT significantly suppressed ox-LDL-induced attachment of THP-1 monocytes to HBMVEs. Furthermore, we found that OT reduced the expression of adhesion molecules, such as VCAM-1 and E-selectin. Interestingly, it was shown that OT could restore ox-LDL-induced reduction of KLF4 in HBMVEs. Importantly, knockdown of KLF4 abolished the inhibitory effects of OT on ox-LDL-induced expressions of VCAM-1 and E-selectin as well as the adhesion of human monocytic THP-1 cells to endothelial HBMVEs. Mechanistically, we found that the stimulatory effects of OT on KLF4 expression are mediated by the MEK5/MEF2A pathway. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Cardiotoxic drugs Herceptin and doxorubicin inhibit cardiac microvascular endothelial cell barrier formation resulting in increased drug permeability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma L. Wilkinson

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Cardiotoxicity induced by anti-cancer therapeutics is a severe, and potentially fatal, adverse reaction of the heart in response to certain drugs. Current in vitro approaches to assess cardiotoxicity have focused on analysing cardiomyocytes. More recently it has become apparent that non-cardiomyocyte cells of the heart can potentially contribute to cardiotoxicity. Herceptin and doxorubicin are known to induce cardiotoxicity in the clinic. The effect of these drugs on the endothelial tight junction barrier was tested by analysing tight junction formation and zona occludens-1 (ZO-1 levels, revealing that Herceptin and doxorubicin are able to induce barrier perturbment and decrease barrier function in human cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (HCMECs leading to increased permeability. Herceptin treatment had no effect on the tight junction barrier function in human dermal and human brain microvascular endothelial cells. HCMECs showed detectable levels of HER2 compared with the other endothelial cells suggesting that Herceptin binding to HER2 in these cells may interfere with tight junction formation. Our data suggests that doxorubicin and Herceptin can affect tight junction formation in the cardiac microvasculature leading to increased drug permeability and adverse effects on the cardiac myocytes.

  16. Cocaine inhibits store-operated Ca2+ entry in brain microvascular endothelial cells: critical role for sigma-1 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brailoiu, G Cristina; Deliu, Elena; Console-Bram, Linda M; Soboloff, Jonathan; Abood, Mary E; Unterwald, Ellen M; Brailoiu, Eugen

    2016-01-01

    Sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) is an intracellular chaperone protein with many ligands, located at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Binding of cocaine to Sig-1R has previously been found to modulate endothelial functions. In the present study, we show that cocaine dramatically inhibits store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE), a Ca(2+) influx mechanism promoted by depletion of intracellular Ca(2+) stores, in rat brain microvascular endothelial cells (RBMVEC). Using either Sig-1R shRNA or pharmacological inhibition with the unrelated Sig-1R antagonists BD-1063 and NE-100, we show that cocaine-induced SOCE inhibition is dependent on Sig-1R. In addition to revealing new insight into fundamental mechanisms of cocaine-induced changes in endothelial function, these studies indicate an unprecedented role for Sig-1R as a SOCE inhibitor. © 2016 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  17. The Relationship between Endothelial Progenitor Cell Populations and Epicardial and Microvascular Coronary Disease—A Cellular, Angiographic and Physiologic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kim H.; Simpson, Philippa J. L.; Yong, Andy S.; Dunn, Louise L.; Chawantanpipat, Chirapan; Hsu, Chijen; Yu, Young; Keech, Anthony C.; Celermajer, David S.; Ng, Martin K. C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are implicated in protection against vascular disease. However, studies using angiography alone have reported conflicting results when relating EPCs to epicardial coronary artery disease (CAD) severity. Moreover, the relationship between different EPC types and the coronary microcirculation is unknown. We therefore investigated the relationship between EPC populations and coronary epicardial and microvascular disease. Methods Thirty-three patients with a spectrum of isolated left anterior descending artery disease were studied. The coronary epicardial and microcirculation were physiologically interrogated by measurement of fractional flow reserve (FFR), index of microvascular resistance (IMR) and coronary flow reserve (CFR). Two distinct EPC populations (early EPC and late outgrowth endothelial cells [OECs]) were isolated from these patients and studied ex vivo. Results There was a significant inverse relationship between circulating OEC levels and epicardial CAD severity, as assessed by FFR and angiography (r = 0.371, p = 0.04; r = -0.358, p = 0.04; respectively). More severe epicardial CAD was associated with impaired OEC migration and tubulogenesis (r = 0.59, p = 0.005; r = 0.589, p = 0.004; respectively). Patients with significant epicardial CAD (FFRcoronary microvascular disease. PMID:24736282

  18. The relationship between endothelial progenitor cell populations and epicardial and microvascular coronary disease-a cellular, angiographic and physiologic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kim H; Simpson, Philippa J L; Yong, Andy S; Dunn, Louise L; Chawantanpipat, Chirapan; Hsu, Chijen; Yu, Young; Keech, Anthony C; Celermajer, David S; Ng, Martin K C

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are implicated in protection against vascular disease. However, studies using angiography alone have reported conflicting results when relating EPCs to epicardial coronary artery disease (CAD) severity. Moreover, the relationship between different EPC types and the coronary microcirculation is unknown. We therefore investigated the relationship between EPC populations and coronary epicardial and microvascular disease. Thirty-three patients with a spectrum of isolated left anterior descending artery disease were studied. The coronary epicardial and microcirculation were physiologically interrogated by measurement of fractional flow reserve (FFR), index of microvascular resistance (IMR) and coronary flow reserve (CFR). Two distinct EPC populations (early EPC and late outgrowth endothelial cells [OECs]) were isolated from these patients and studied ex vivo. There was a significant inverse relationship between circulating OEC levels and epicardial CAD severity, as assessed by FFR and angiography (r=0.371, p=0.04; r=-0.358, p=0.04; respectively). More severe epicardial CAD was associated with impaired OEC migration and tubulogenesis (r=0.59, p=0.005; r=0.589, p=0.004; respectively). Patients with significant epicardial CAD (FFRcoronary microvascular disease.

  19. A Unique Pulmonary Microvascular Endothelial Cell Niche Revealed by Weibel-Palade Bodies and Griffonia Simplicifolia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wu, Songwei; Zhou, Chun; King, Judy A. C; Stevens, Troy

    2014-01-01

    .... Griffonia simplicifolia is a lectin that recognizes pulmonary microvascular endothelium with preference over extra-alveolar endothelium in both arteries and veins, yet the precise vascular location...

  20. Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells and Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells Differentially Facilitate Leukocyte Recruitment and Utilize Chemokines for T Cell Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shumei Man

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Endothelial cells that functionally express blood brain barrier (BBB properties are useful surrogates for studying leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions at the BBB. In this study, we compared two different endothelial cellular models: transfected human brain microvascular endothelial cells (THBMECs and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. With each grow under optimal conditions, confluent THBMEC cultures showed continuous occludin and ZO-1 immunoreactivity, while HUVEC cultures exhibited punctate ZO-1 expression at sites of cell-cell contact only. Confluent THBMEC cultures on 24-well collagen-coated transwell inserts had significantly higher transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER and lower solute permeability than HUVECs. Confluent THBMECs were more restrictive for mononuclear cell migration than HUVECs. Only THBMECs utilized abluminal CCL5 to facilitate T-lymphocyte migration in vitro although both THBMECs and HUVECs employed CCL3 to facilitate T cell migration. These data establish baseline conditions for using THBMECs to develop in vitro BBB models for studying leukocyte-endothelial interactions during neuroinflammation.

  1. Metformin represses glucose starvation induced autophagic response in microvascular endothelial cells and promotes cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Samson Mathews; Ghosh, Suparna; Majeed, Yasser; Arunachalam, Gnanapragasam; Emara, Mohamed M; Ding, Hong; Triggle, Chris R

    2017-05-15

    Metformin, the most frequently administered drug for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, is being investigated for its potential in the treatment of various types of cancer; however, the cellular basis for this putative anti-cancer action remains controversial. In the current study we examined the effect of metformin on endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and autophagy in glucose-starved micro-vascular endothelial cells (MECs). The rationale for our experimental protocol is that in a growing tumor MECs are subjected to hypoxia and nutrient/glucose starvation that results from the reduced supply and relatively high consumption of glucose. Mouse MECs (MMECs) were glucose-starved for up to 48h in the absence or presence of metformin (50μM and 2mM) and the status of ER stress, autophagic, cell survival and apoptotic markers were assessed. Activation of ER stress and autophagy was observed in glucose starved MECs as evidenced by the significant increase in the levels of ER stress and autophagic markers while accumulation of LC3B stained punctae in the MECs confirmed autophagic activation. Treatment with 2mM metformin, independent of AMPK, significantly reversed glucose starvation induced ER stress and autophagy in MECs, but, at 24h, did not decrease cell viability; however, at 48h, persistent ER stress and metformin associated inhibition of autophagy decreased cell viability, caused cell cycle arrest in G2/M and increased the number of cells in the sub-G0/G1 phase of cell cycle. Treatment with metformin reduced phosphorylation of Akt and mTOR and inhibited downstream targets of mTOR. Our findings support the argument that treatment with metformin when used in combination with glycolytic inhibitors will inhibit pro-survival autophagy and promote cell death and potentially prove to be the basis for an effective anti-cancer strategy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Zika Virus Persistently Infects and Is Basolaterally Released from Primary Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan C. Mladinich

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus (ZIKV is a mosquito-borne Flavivirus that has emerged as the cause of encephalitis and fetal microencephaly in the Americas. ZIKV uniquely persists in human bodily fluids for up to 6 months, is sexually transmitted, and traverses the placenta and the blood-brain barrier (BBB to damage neurons. Cells that support persistent ZIKV replication and mechanisms by which ZIKV establishes persistence remain enigmatic but central to ZIKV entry into protected neuronal compartments. The endothelial cell (EC lining of capillaries normally constrains transplacental transmission and forms the BBB, which selectively restricts access of blood constituents to neurons. We found that ZIKV (strain PRVABC59 persistently infects and continuously replicates in primary human brain microvascular ECs (hBMECs, without cytopathology, for >9 days and following hBMEC passage. ZIKV did not permeabilize hBMECs but was released basolaterally from polarized hBMECs, suggesting a direct mechanism for ZIKV to cross the BBB. ZIKV-infected hBMECs were rapidly resistant to alpha interferon (IFN-α and transiently induced, but failed to secrete, IFN-β and IFN-λ. Global transcriptome analysis determined that ZIKV constitutively induced IFN regulatory factor 7 (IRF7, IRF9, and IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs 1 to 9 days postinfection, despite persistently replicating in hBMECs. ZIKV constitutively induced ISG15, HERC5, and USP18, which are linked to hepatitis C virus (HCV persistence and IFN regulation, chemokine CCL5, which is associated with immunopathogenesis, as well as cell survival factors. Our results reveal that hBMECs act as a reservoir of persistent ZIKV replication, suggest routes for ZIKV to cross hBMECs into neuronal compartments, and define novel mechanisms of ZIKV persistence that can be targeted to restrict ZIKV spread.

  3. Protease activated receptor signaling is required for African trypanosome traversal of human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis J Grab

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Using human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs as an in vitro model for how African trypanosomes cross the human blood-brain barrier (BBB we recently reported that the parasites cross the BBB by generating calcium activation signals in HBMECs through the activity of parasite cysteine proteases, particularly cathepsin L (brucipain. In the current study, we examined the possible role of a class of protease stimulated HBMEC G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs known as protease activated receptors (PARs that might be implicated in calcium signaling by African trypanosomes.Using RNA interference (RNAi we found that in vitro PAR-2 gene (F2RL1 expression in HBMEC monolayers could be reduced by over 95%. We also found that the ability of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense to cross F2RL1-silenced HBMEC monolayers was reduced (39%-49% and that HBMECs silenced for F2RL1 maintained control levels of barrier function in the presence of the parasite. Consistent with the role of PAR-2, we found that HBMEC barrier function was also maintained after blockade of Galpha(q with Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT. PAR-2 signaling has been shown in other systems to have neuroinflammatory and neuroprotective roles and our data implicate a role for proteases (i.e. brucipain and PAR-2 in African trypanosome/HBMEC interactions. Using gene-profiling methods to interrogate candidate HBMEC pathways specifically triggered by brucipain, several pathways that potentially link some pathophysiologic processes associated with CNS HAT were identified.Together, the data support a role, in part, for GPCRs as molecular targets for parasite proteases that lead to the activation of Galpha(q-mediated calcium signaling. The consequence of these events is predicted to be increased permeability of the BBB to parasite transmigration and the initiation of neuroinflammation, events precursory to CNS disease.

  4. BMPRII influences the response of pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells to inflammatory mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vengethasamy, Leanda; Hautefort, Aurélie; Tielemans, Birger; Belge, Catharina; Perros, Frédéric; Verleden, Stijn; Fadel, Elie; Van Raemdonck, Dirk; Delcroix, Marion; Quarck, Rozenn

    2016-11-01

    Mutations in the bone morphogenetic protein receptor (BMPR2) gene have been observed in 70 % of patients with heritable pulmonary arterial hypertension (HPAH) and in 11-40 % with idiopathic PAH (IPAH). However, carriers of a BMPR2 mutation have only 20 % risk of developing PAH. Since inflammatory mediators are increased and predict survival in PAH, they could act as a second hit inducing the development of pulmonary hypertension in BMPR2 mutation carriers. Our specific aim was to determine whether inflammatory mediators could contribute to pulmonary vascular cell dysfunction in PAH patients with and without a BMPR2 mutation. Pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMEC) and arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMC) were isolated from lung parenchyma of transplanted PAH patients, carriers of a BMPR2 mutation or not, and from lobectomy patients or lung donors. The effects of CRP and TNFα on mitogenic activity, adhesiveness capacity, and expression of adhesion molecules were investigated in PMECs and PASMCs. PMECs from BMPR2 mutation carriers induced an increase in PASMC mitogenic activity; moreover, endothelin-1 secretion by PMECs from carriers was higher than by PMECs from non-carriers. Recruitment of monocytes by PMECs isolated from carriers was higher compared to PMECs from non-carriers and from controls, with an elevated ICAM-1 expression. CRP increased adhesion of monocytes to PMECs in carriers and non-carriers, and TNFα only in carriers. PMEC from BMPR2 mutation carriers have enhanced adhesiveness for monocytes in response to inflammatory mediators, suggesting that BMPR2 mutation could generate susceptibility to an inflammatory insult in PAH.

  5. Zika Virus Persistently Infects and Is Basolaterally Released from Primary Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mladinich, Megan C.; Schwedes, John

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Zika virus (ZIKV) is a mosquito-borne Flavivirus that has emerged as the cause of encephalitis and fetal microencephaly in the Americas. ZIKV uniquely persists in human bodily fluids for up to 6 months, is sexually transmitted, and traverses the placenta and the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to damage neurons. Cells that support persistent ZIKV replication and mechanisms by which ZIKV establishes persistence remain enigmatic but central to ZIKV entry into protected neuronal compartments. The endothelial cell (EC) lining of capillaries normally constrains transplacental transmission and forms the BBB, which selectively restricts access of blood constituents to neurons. We found that ZIKV (strain PRVABC59) persistently infects and continuously replicates in primary human brain microvascular ECs (hBMECs), without cytopathology, for >9 days and following hBMEC passage. ZIKV did not permeabilize hBMECs but was released basolaterally from polarized hBMECs, suggesting a direct mechanism for ZIKV to cross the BBB. ZIKV-infected hBMECs were rapidly resistant to alpha interferon (IFN-α) and transiently induced, but failed to secrete, IFN-β and IFN-λ. Global transcriptome analysis determined that ZIKV constitutively induced IFN regulatory factor 7 (IRF7), IRF9, and IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) 1 to 9 days postinfection, despite persistently replicating in hBMECs. ZIKV constitutively induced ISG15, HERC5, and USP18, which are linked to hepatitis C virus (HCV) persistence and IFN regulation, chemokine CCL5, which is associated with immunopathogenesis, as well as cell survival factors. Our results reveal that hBMECs act as a reservoir of persistent ZIKV replication, suggest routes for ZIKV to cross hBMECs into neuronal compartments, and define novel mechanisms of ZIKV persistence that can be targeted to restrict ZIKV spread. PMID:28698279

  6. Co-culture model consisting of human brain microvascular endothelial and peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strazza, Marianne; Maubert, Monique E.; Pirrone, Vanessa; Wigdahl, Brian; Nonnemacher, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Numerous systems exist to model the blood-brain barrier (BBB) with the goal of understanding the regulation of passage into the central nervous system (CNS) and the potential impact of selected insults on BBB function. These models typically focus on the intrinsic cellular properties of the BBB, yet studies of peripheral cell migration are often excluded due to technical restraints. New Method This method allows for the study of in vitro cellular transmigration following exposure to any treatment of interest through optimization of co-culture conditions for the human brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMEC) cell line, hCMEC/D3, and primary human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Results hCMEC/D3 cells form functionally confluent monolayers on collagen coated polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) transwell inserts, as assessed by microscopy and tracer molecule (FITC-dextran (FITC-D)) exclusion. Two components of complete hCMEC/D3 media, EBM-2 base-media and hydrocortisone (HC), were determined to be cytotoxic to PBMCs. By combining the remaining components of complete hCMEC/D3 media with complete PBMC media a resulting co-culture media was established for use in hCMEC/D3 – PBMC co-culture functional assays. Comparison with existing methods Through this method, issues of extensive differences in culture media conditions are resolved allowing for treatments and functional assays to be conducted on the two cell populations co-cultured simultaneously. Conclusion Described here is an in vitro co-culture model of the BBB, consisting of the hCMEC/D3 cell line and primary human PBMCs. The co-culture media will now allow for the study of exposure to potential insults to BBB function over prolonged time courses. PMID:27216631

  7. Biomarkers of microvascular endothelial dysfunction predict incident dementia: a population-based prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, H; Nägga, K; Nilsson, E D; Ricci, F; Melander, O; Hansson, O; Bachus, E; Magnusson, M; Fedorowski, A

    2017-07-01

    Cerebral endothelial dysfunction occurs in a spectrum of neurodegenerative diseases. Whether biomarkers of microvascular endothelial dysfunction can predict dementia is largely unknown. We explored the longitudinal association of midregional pro-atrial natriuretic peptide (MR-proANP), C-terminal endothelin-1 (CT-proET-1) and midregional proadrenomedullin (MR-proADM) with dementia and subtypes amongst community-dwelling older adults. A population-based cohort of 5347 individuals (men, 70%; age, 69 ± 6 years) without prevalent dementia provided plasma for determination of MR-proANP, CT-proET-1 and MR-proADM. Three-hundred-and-seventy-three patients (7%) were diagnosed with dementia (120 Alzheimer's disease, 83 vascular, 102 mixed, and 68 other aetiology) over a period of 4.6 ± 1.3 years. Relations between baseline biomarker plasma concentrations and incident dementia were assessed using multivariable Cox regression analysis. Higher levels of MR-proANP were significantly associated with increased risk of all-cause and vascular dementia (hazard ratio [HR] per 1 SD: 1.20, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.07-1.36; P = 0.002, and 1.52; 1.21-1.89; P dementia increased across the quartiles of MR-proANP (p for linear trend = 0.004; Q4, 145-1681 pmol L -1 vs. Q1, 22-77 pmol L -1 : HR: 1.83; 95%CI: 1.23-2.71) and was most pronounced for vascular type (p for linear trend = 0.005: HR: 2.71; 95%CI: 1.14-6.46). Moreover, the two highest quartiles of CT-proET-1 predicted vascular dementia with a cut-off value at 68 pmol L -1 (Q3-Q4, 68-432 pmol L -1 vs. Q1-Q2,4-68 pmol L -1 ; HR: 1.94; 95%CI: 1.12-3.36). Elevated levels of MR-proADM indicated no increased risk of developing dementia after adjustment for traditional risk factors. Elevated plasma concentration of MR-proANP is an independent predictor of all-cause and vascular dementia. Pronounced increase in CT-proET-1 indicates higher risk of vascular dementia. © 2017 The Association for the Publication of the

  8. [Effects of transient exposure to high glucose on biological behaviors of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, L; Yang, H Z; Li, X C; Huang, X Q; Yuan, B; Zhou, Z D

    2017-02-20

    Objective: To observe the effects of transient exposure to high glucose on biological behaviors of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells cultured in vitro. Methods: The dividing method and treatment of cells for the detection of all indexes in this study were as follows. Human dermal microvascular endothelial cells of the 4th passage were divided into 3 groups according to the random number table, with 12 wells in each group. Cells in control group (C) were cultured with complete culture solution containing 5 mmol/L D-glucose for 7 d. Cells in transient high glucose group (THG) were cultured with complete culture solution containing 30 mmol/L D-glucose for 2 d and complete culture solution containing 5 mmol/L D-glucose for 5 d. Cells in prolonged high glucose group (PHG) were cultured with complete culture solution containing 30 mmol/L D-glucose for 7 d. (1) The cell morphology in groups C and PHG on culture day 7 and that in group THG on culture day 2 and 7 was observed by inverted optical microscope. (2) On culture day 0, 2, 4, and 7, cell proliferation rate was determined by cell viability analyzing counter. (3) After culture day 2, the scratch experiment was performed, and the cells were further cultured. At post scratch hour (PSH) 0, 24, 48, 72, 96, and 120, the scratch area was measured, and the cell migration rates of the latter 5 time points were calculated. (4) On culture day 0, 2, 4, and 7, the cell apoptosis rate was determined by cell analyzer. (5) Cells were seeded into Matrigel to culture for 24 h after culture day 7. The formation of vessel-like structure was observed by inverted optical microscope. The length and number of branch point of vessel-like structure were calculated. (6) On culture day 2, 4, and 7, mRNA expression of vascularization-related gene tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-3 (TIMP-3) was determined with real-time fluorescent quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Data were processed with

  9. Galectin-1 suppresses methamphetamine induced neuroinflammation in human brain microvascular endothelial cells: Neuroprotective role in maintaining blood brain barrier integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Neil U; Aalinkeel, R; Reynolds, J L; Nair, B B; Sykes, D E; Mammen, M J; Schwartz, S A; Mahajan, S D

    2015-10-22

    Methamphetamine (Meth) abuse can lead to the breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity leading to compromised CNS function. The role of Galectins in the angiogenesis process in tumor-associated endothelial cells (EC) is well established; however no data are available on the expression of Galectins in normal human brain microvascular endothelial cells and their potential role in maintaining BBB integrity. We evaluated the basal gene/protein expression levels of Galectin-1, -3 and -9 in normal primary human brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVEC) that constitute the BBB and examined whether Meth altered Galectin expression in these cells, and if Galectin-1 treatment impacted the integrity of an in-vitro BBB. Our results showed that BMVEC expressed significantly higher levels of Galectin-1 as compared to Galectin-3 and -9. Meth treatment increased Galectin-1 expression in BMVEC. Meth induced decrease in TJ proteins ZO-1, Claudin-3 and adhesion molecule ICAM-1 was reversed by Galectin-1. Our data suggests that Galectin-1 is involved in BBB remodeling and can increase levels of TJ proteins ZO-1 and Claudin-3 and adhesion molecule ICAM-1 which helps maintain BBB tightness thus playing a neuroprotective role. Galectin-1 is thus an important regulator of immune balance from neurodegeneration to neuroprotection, which makes it an important therapeutic agent/target in the treatment of drug addiction and other neurological conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Quercetin protects human brain microvascular endothelial cells from fibrillar β-amyloid1–40-induced toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjie Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid beta-peptides (Aβ are known to undergo active transport across the blood-brain barrier, and cerebral amyloid angiopathy has been shown to be a prominent feature in the majority of Alzheimer׳s disease. Quercetin is a natural flavonoid molecule and has been demonstrated to have potent neuroprotective effects, but its protective effect on endothelial cells under Aβ-damaged condition is unclear. In the present study, the protective effects of quercetin on brain microvascular endothelial cells injured by fibrillar Aβ1–40 (fAβ1–40 were observed. The results show that fAβ1–40-induced cytotoxicity in human brain microvascular endothelial cells (hBMECs can be relieved by quercetin treatment. Quercetin increases cell viability, reduces the release of lactate dehydrogenase, and relieves nuclear condensation. Quercetin also alleviates intracellular reactive oxygen species generation and increases superoxide dismutase activity. Moreover, it strengthens the barrier integrity through the preservation of the transendothelial electrical resistance value, the relief of aggravated permeability, and the increase of characteristic enzyme levels after being exposed to fAβ1–40. In conclusion, quercetin protects hBMECs from fAβ1–40-induced toxicity.

  11. Streptococcal-vimentin cross-reactive antibodies induce microvascular cardiac endothelial proinflammatory phenotype in rheumatic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delunardo, F; Scalzi, V; Capozzi, A; Camerini, S; Misasi, R; Pierdominici, M; Pendolino, M; Crescenzi, M; Sorice, M; Valesini, G; Ortona, E; Alessandri, C

    2013-09-01

    Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is characterized by the presence of anti-streptococcal group A antibodies and anti-endothelial cell antibodies (AECA). Molecular mimicry between streptococcal antigens and self proteins is a hallmark of the pathogenesis of rheumatic fever. We aimed to identify, in RHD patients, autoantibodies specific to endothelial autoantigens cross-reactive with streptococcal proteins and to evaluate their role in inducing endothelial damage. We used an immunoproteomic approach with endothelial cell-surface membrane proteins in order to identify autoantigens recognized by AECA of 140 RHD patients. Cross-reactivity of purified antibodies with streptococcal proteins was analysed. Homologous peptides recognized by serum cross-reactive antibodies were found through comparing the amino acid sequence of streptococcal antigens with human antigens. To investigate interleukin (IL)-1R-associated kinase (IRAK1) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation, we performed a Western blot analysis of whole extracts proteins from unstimulated or stimulated human microvascular cardiac endothelial cells (HMVEC-C). Adhesion molecule expression and release of proinflammatory cytokines and growth factors were studied by multiplex bead based immunoassay kits. We observed anti-vimentin antibodies in sera from 49% RHD AECA-positive patients. Cross-reactivity of purified anti-vimentin antibodies with heat shock protein (HSP)70 and streptopain streptococcal proteins was shown. Comparing the amino acid sequence of streptococcal HSP70 and streptopain with human vimentin, we found two homologous peptides recognized by serum cross-reactive antibodies. These antibodies were able to stimulate HMVEC-C inducing IRAK and NF-κB activation, adhesion molecule expression and release of proinflammatory cytokines and growth factors. In conclusion, streptococcal-vimentin cross-reactive antibodies were able to activate microvascular cardiac endothelium by amplifying the inflammatory response

  12. Ca2+ homeostasis in microvascular endothelial cells from an insulin-dependent diabetic model: role of endosomes/lysosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanka, Shankar C.; Bennett, David C.; Rojas, Jose D.; Tasby, Geraldine B.; Meininger, Cynthia J.; Wu, Guoyao; Wesson, Donald E.; Pfarr, Curtis M.; Martinez-Zaguilan, Raul

    2000-04-01

    Cytosolic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]cyt) regulates several cellular functions, e.g. cell growth, contraction, secretion, etc. In many cell types, ion homeostasis appears to be coupled with glucose metabolism. In certain cell types, a strict coupling between glycolysis and the activity of Sarcoplasmic/Endoplasmic Reticulum Ca2+-ATPases (SERCA) has been suggested. Glucose metabolism is altered in diabetes. We hypothesize that: (1) Ca2+ homeostasis is altered in microvascular endothelial cells from diabetic animals due to the dysfunction of glycolysis coupling the activity of SERCA; (2) endosomal/lysosomal compartments expressing SERCA are involved in the dysfunction associated with diabetes.

  13. Restrictive use of perioperative blood transfusion does not increase complication rates in microvascular breast reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Anne C; Barandun, Marina; Cha, Jieun; Zhong, Toni; Hofer, Stefan O P

    2016-08-01

    With increasing appreciation of the possible adverse effects of peri-operative blood transfusion, restrictive policies regarding use of blood products have been adopted in many surgical specialties. Although microvascular breast reconstruction has become a routine procedure, high peri-operative transfusion rates continue to be reported in the literature. In this study we examine the impact of our restrictive approach on blood transfusion rates and postoperative complications in patients undergoing microvascular blood transfusion. A retrospective review of patients undergoing microvascular breast reconstruction with abdominal flaps at a single institution was performed. Patient age and body mass index as well as type, timing and laterality of reconstruction was recorded. Pre-operative and post-operative hemoglobin and hematocrit were recorded. Peri-operative blood transfusion rates were calculated. Post-operative complication rates were compared between patients with higher and lower post-operative hemoglobin levels. Five hundred and twelve patients were included in this study. The peri-operative transfusion rate was 0.98% in this series. There was no significant difference between transfusion rates in unilateral and bilateral reconstructions (0.68 vs 1.36% p = 0.08) or immediate and delayed reconstructions (1.02 vs 0.51% p = 0.72 and 1.01 vs 1.60% p = 0.09 for unilateral and bilateral respectively). Lower post-operative hemoglobin levels were not associated with increased flap related, surgical or medical complications rates. A restrictive approach to peri-operative blood transfusion can be safely adopted in microvascular breast reconstruction without compromising flap viability or overall complication rates. Copyright © 2016 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of shear stress on iPSC-derived human brain microvascular endothelial cells (dhBMECs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeStefano, Jackson G; Xu, Zinnia S; Williams, Ashley J; Yimam, Nahom; Searson, Peter C

    2017-08-04

    The endothelial cells that form the lumen of capillaries and microvessels are an important component of the blood-brain barrier. Cell phenotype is regulated by transducing a range of biomechanical and biochemical signals in the local microenvironment. Here we report on the role of shear stress in modulating the morphology, motility, proliferation, apoptosis, and protein and gene expression, of confluent monolayers of human brain microvascular endothelial cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells. To assess the response of derived human brain microvascular endothelial cells (dhBMECs) to shear stress, confluent monolayers were formed in a microfluidic device. Monolayers were subjected to a shear stress of 4 or 12 dyne cm -2 for 40 h. Static conditions were used as the control. Live cell imaging was used to assess cell morphology, cell speed, persistence, and the rates of proliferation and apoptosis as a function of time. In addition, immunofluorescence imaging and protein and gene expression analysis of key markers of the blood-brain barrier were performed. Human brain microvascular endothelial cells exhibit a unique phenotype in response to shear stress compared to static conditions: (1) they do not elongate and align, (2) the rates of proliferation and apoptosis decrease significantly, (3) the mean displacement of individual cells within the monolayer over time is significantly decreased, (4) there is no cytoskeletal reorganization or formation of stress fibers within the cell, and (5) there is no change in expression levels of key blood-brain barrier markers. The characteristic response of dhBMECs to shear stress is significantly different from human and animal-derived endothelial cells from other tissues, suggesting that this unique phenotype that may be important in maintenance of the blood-brain barrier. The implications of this work are that: (1) in confluent monolayers of dhBMECs, tight junctions are formed under static conditions, (2) the formation

  15. Differential effects of Bartonella henselae on human and feline macro- and micro-vascular endothelial cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Berrich, Moez; Kieda, Claudine; Grillon, Catherine; Monteil, Martine; Lamerant, Nathalie; Gavard, Julie; Boulouis, Henri Jean; Haddad, Nadia

    2011-01-01

    ... lines.To this purpose, we have developed nine feline EC lines which allowed comparing the effects of Bartonella strains on human and feline micro-vascular ECs representative of the infection development...

  16. Exosomal signaling during hypoxia mediates microvascular endothelial cell migration and vasculogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Salomon

    Full Text Available Vasculogenesis and angiogenesis are critical processes in fetal circulation and placental vasculature development. Placental mesenchymal stem cells (pMSC are known to release paracrine factors (some of which are contained within exosomes that promote angiogenesis and cell migration. The aims of this study were: to determine the effects of oxygen tension on the release of exosomes from pMSC; and to establish the effects of pMSC-derived exosomes on the migration and angiogenic tube formation of placental microvascular endothelial cells (hPMEC. pMSC were isolated from placental villi (8-12 weeks of gestation, n = 6 and cultured under an atmosphere of 1%, 3% or 8% O2. Cell-conditioned media were collected and exosomes (exo-pMSC isolated by differential and buoyant density centrifugation. The dose effect (5-20 µg exosomal protein/ml of pMSC-derived exosomes on hPMEC migration and tube formation were established using a real-time, live-cell imaging system (Incucyte™. The exosome pellet was resuspended in PBS and protein content was established by mass spectrometry (MS. Protein function and canonical pathways were identified using the PANTHER program and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis, respectively. Exo-pMSC were identified, by electron microscopy, as spherical vesicles, with a typical cup-shape and diameters around of 100 nm and positive for exosome markers: CD63, CD9 and CD81. Under hypoxic conditions (1% and 3% O2 exo-pMSC released increased by 3.3 and 6.7 folds, respectively, when compared to the controls (8% O2; p<0.01. Exo-pMSC increased hPMEC migration by 1.6 fold compared to the control (p<0.05 and increased hPMEC tube formation by 7.2 fold (p<0.05. MS analysis identified 390 different proteins involved in cytoskeleton organization, development, immunomodulatory, and cell-to-cell communication. The data obtained support the hypothesis that pMSC-derived exosomes may contribute to placental vascular adaptation to low oxygen tension under both

  17. Influenza H5N1 virus infection of polarized human alveolar epithelial cells and lung microvascular endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuen Kit M

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI H5N1 virus is entrenched in poultry in Asia and Africa and continues to infect humans zoonotically causing acute respiratory disease syndrome and death. There is evidence that the virus may sometimes spread beyond respiratory tract to cause disseminated infection. The primary target cell for HPAI H5N1 virus in human lung is the alveolar epithelial cell. Alveolar epithelium and its adjacent lung microvascular endothelium form host barriers to the initiation of infection and dissemination of influenza H5N1 infection in humans. These are polarized cells and the polarity of influenza virus entry and egress as well as the secretion of cytokines and chemokines from the virus infected cells are likely to be central to the pathogenesis of human H5N1 disease. Aim To study influenza A (H5N1 virus replication and host innate immune responses in polarized primary human alveolar epithelial cells and lung microvascular endothelial cells and its relevance to the pathogenesis of human H5N1 disease. Methods We use an in vitro model of polarized primary human alveolar epithelial cells and lung microvascular endothelial cells grown in transwell culture inserts to compare infection with influenza A subtype H1N1 and H5N1 viruses via the apical or basolateral surfaces. Results We demonstrate that both influenza H1N1 and H5N1 viruses efficiently infect alveolar epithelial cells from both apical and basolateral surface of the epithelium but release of newly formed virus is mainly from the apical side of the epithelium. In contrast, influenza H5N1 virus, but not H1N1 virus, efficiently infected polarized microvascular endothelial cells from both apical and basolateral aspects. This provides a mechanistic explanation for how H5N1 virus may infect the lung from systemic circulation. Epidemiological evidence has implicated ingestion of virus-contaminated foods as the source of infection in some instances and our

  18. Endo-MitoEGFP mice: a novel transgenic mouse with fluorescently marked mitochondria in microvascular endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Pickles

    Full Text Available Blood vessel-specific fluorescent transgenic mice are excellent tools to study the development of the vasculature and angiogenic processes. There is growing interest in the biological processes relevant to endothelial cells but limited tools exist to selectively evaluate subcellular functions of this cell type in vivo. Here, we report a novel transgenic animal model that expresses mitochondrially targeted enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP via the Hb9 promoter, a homeobox transcription factor with limited known involvement in the vasculature. Random integration of the transgene, containing the entire mouse Hb9 promoter, was found to be expressed in a variety of vascularised tissues. Further inspection revealed that Mito-EGFP localizes to the endothelial cells (ECs of a subset of microvascular blood vessels, especially in the central nervous system (CNS, heart, spleen, thymus, lymph nodes and skin. We demonstrate the utility of this novel transgenic mouse, named Endo-MitoEGFP, in the detection, imaging, and isolation of microvascular ECs and evaluation of EC mitochondrial function isolated from adult animals. These transgenic mice will be useful to studies of ECs in development, physiology, and pathology.

  19. Endo-MitoEGFP mice: a novel transgenic mouse with fluorescently marked mitochondria in microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickles, Sarah; Cadieux-Dion, Maxime; Alvarez, Jorge I; Lécuyer, Marc-Andre; Peyrard, Sarah L; Destroismaisons, Laurie; St-Onge, Lydia; Terouz, Simone; Cossette, Patrick; Prat, Alexandre; Vande Velde, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Blood vessel-specific fluorescent transgenic mice are excellent tools to study the development of the vasculature and angiogenic processes. There is growing interest in the biological processes relevant to endothelial cells but limited tools exist to selectively evaluate subcellular functions of this cell type in vivo. Here, we report a novel transgenic animal model that expresses mitochondrially targeted enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) via the Hb9 promoter, a homeobox transcription factor with limited known involvement in the vasculature. Random integration of the transgene, containing the entire mouse Hb9 promoter, was found to be expressed in a variety of vascularised tissues. Further inspection revealed that Mito-EGFP localizes to the endothelial cells (ECs) of a subset of microvascular blood vessels, especially in the central nervous system (CNS), heart, spleen, thymus, lymph nodes and skin. We demonstrate the utility of this novel transgenic mouse, named Endo-MitoEGFP, in the detection, imaging, and isolation of microvascular ECs and evaluation of EC mitochondrial function isolated from adult animals. These transgenic mice will be useful to studies of ECs in development, physiology, and pathology.

  20. The Balance Between Metalloproteinases and TIMPs: Critical Regulator of Microvascular Endothelial Cell Function in Health and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masciantonio, Marcello G; Lee, Christopher K S; Arpino, Valerie; Mehta, Sanjay; Gill, Sean E

    2017-01-01

    Endothelial cells (EC), especially the microvascular EC (MVEC), have critical functions in health and disease. For example, healthy MVEC provide a barrier between the fluid and protein found within the blood, and the surrounding tissue. Following tissue injury or infection, the microvascular barrier is often disrupted due to activation and dysfunction of the MVEC. Multiple mechanisms promote MVEC activation and dysfunction, including stimulation by cytokines, mechanical interaction with activated leukocytes, and exposure to harmful leukocyte-derived molecules, which collectively result in a loss of MVEC barrier function. However, MVEC activation is also critical to facilitate recruitment of inflammatory cells, such as neutrophils (PMNs) and monocytes, into the injured or infected tissue. Metalloproteinases, including the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and the closely related, a disintegrin and metalloproteinases (ADAMs), have been implicated in regulating both MVEC barrier function, through cleavage of adherens and tight junctions proteins between adjacent MVEC and through degradation of the extracellular matrix, as well as PMN-MVEC interaction, through shedding of cell surface PMN receptors. Moreover, the tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs), which collectively inhibit most MMPs and ADAMs, are critical regulators of MVEC activation and dysfunction through their ability to inhibit metalloproteinases and thereby promote MVEC stability. However, TIMPs have been also found to modulate MVEC function through metalloproteinase-independent mechanisms, such as regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor signaling. This chapter is focused on examining the role of the metalloproteinases and TIMPs in regulation of MVEC function in both health and disease. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Hepatocyte growth factor suppresses hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced XO activation in cardiac microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yingqian; Hu, Shunying; Chen, Yundai

    2015-07-01

    Hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) is one of the cellular stresses in pathological conditions, such as myocardial infarction, stroke and organ transplantation. Oxidative stress caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a crucial element of H/R injury in vascular endothelial cells (ECs). Xanthine oxidase (XO) has been recognized to contribute to H/R injury. Of note, xanthine oxidoreductase is synthesized as xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) and needs to be converted to XO to become a source of superoxide. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) has been found to protect ECs against H/R injury. The relation, however, between HGF and XO in ECs under H/R conditions remains to be determined. Primary cultured rat cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (CMECs) were exposed to 4 h of hypoxia and followed by 1 h of reoxygenation. Generation of ROS and cytosolic Ca2+ concentration was measured by flow cytometry qualification of DCFHDA and fluo-3 AM staining cells, respectively. XDH mRNA was qualified by qRT-PCR analysis. XO activity was determined by colorimetric assay and XO protein levels were determined by Western blot. Cell apoptosis was assessed by caspase-3 activity and Annexin V/PI staining. After H/R, cellular ROS production significantly increased. Both XO activity and XO protein increased after H/R. Cellular ROS elevation was inhibited by allopurinol (a potent XO inhibitor), indicting XO accounting for the generation of ROS after H/R. In addition, XDH mRNA increased after H/R, indicating a de novo XDH synthesis, which needs to be converted to XO to become a source of superoxide. Pretreatment of HGF inhibited the elevation of XO activity and XO protein level after H/R; however, HGF has no effect on the increase of XDH mRNA. We also find an increase of the cytosolic Ca2+ in CMECs after H/R. BAPTA-AM, a cell-permeable Ca2+ chelator, prevented the increase of XO activity and XO protein levels, implicating the elevated cytosolic Ca2+ concentration involvement in XO conversion and XO

  2. NKX2-3 transcriptional regulation of endothelin-1 and VEGF signaling in human intestinal microvascular endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Yu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: NKX2-3 is associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. NKX2-3 is expressed in microvascular endothelial cells and the muscularis mucosa of the gastrointestinal tract. Human intestinal microvascular endothelial cells (HIMECs are actively involved in the pathogenesis of IBD and IBD-associated microvascular dysfunction. To understand the cellular function of NKX2-3 and its potential role underlying IBD pathogenesis, we investigated the genes regulated by NKX2-3 in HIMEC using cDNA microarray. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: NKX2-3 expression was suppressed by shRNA in two HIMEC lines and gene expression was profiled by cDNA microarray. Pathway Analysis was used to identify gene networks according to biological functions and associated pathways. Validation of microarray and genes expression in intestinal tissues was assessed by RT-PCR. NKX2-3 regulated genes are involved in immune and inflammatory response, cell proliferation and growth, metabolic process, and angiogenesis. Several inflammation and angiogenesis related signaling pathways that play important roles in IBD were regulated by NKX2-3, including endothelin-1 and VEGF-PI3K/AKT-eNOS. Expression levels of NKX2-3, VEGFA, PI3K, AKT, and eNOS are increased in intestinal tissues from IBD patients and expression levels of EDN1 are decreased in intestinal tissues from IBD patients. These results demonstrated the important roles of NKX2-3, VEGF, PI3K, AKT, eNOS, and EDN1 in IBD pathogenesis. Correlation analysis showed a positive correlation between mRNA expression of NKX2-3 and VEGFA and a negative correlation between mRNA expression of NKX2-3 and EDN1 in intestinal tissues from IBD patients. CONCLUSION/RELEVANCE: NKX2-3 may play an important role in IBD pathogenesis by regulating endothelin-1 and VEGF signaling in HIMECs.

  3. Decreased expression of serum and microvascular vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 in meningococcal sepsis*.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flier, M. van der; Baerveldt, E.M.; Miedema, A.; Hartwig, N.G.; Hazelzet, J.A.; Emonts, M.; Groot, R. de; Prens, E.P.; Vught, A.J. van; Jansen, N.J.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the skin microvessel expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 and serum-soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 levels in children with meningococcal sepsis. DESIGN: Observational study. SETTING: Two tertiary academic children hospital PICUs.

  4. A study on microvascular density in breast carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Pyakurel

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Breast Cancer is the most frequent neoplasm causing death in women between 35-55 years of age. Of the Prognostic indicators existing for breast cancer, axillary lymph node status has been regarded as the most important one. Twenty to thirty percent of all lymph node negative patients will still develop a recurrence of the disease within 10 years of initial treatment. Therefore, a new prognostic marker that could identify patients at high risk of tumor recurrence more accurately than existing indicators would be of great value, one potential indicator is tumor-induced angiogenesis. Materials and Methods: This is a six months prospective (January 2010-June 2010 and 1 year retrospective (Jan2009-Dec2009 study which included thirty five breast cancer cases visiting the Surgical OPD. Angiogenesis was estimated by determining micro vessel counting after immune staining the paraffin embedded tissue sections using anti-CD34 antibody. Results: Age of the patients ranged from 25 to 80 years with a mean age of 45.48 years. Most of the cases were infiltrating ductal carcinoma comprising of 33 cases (94.28%. Three cases (9.10% showed vascular invasion by the tumor. Majority showed (63.64% vessel count of less than 200 per 10 high power fields. Conclusion: Micro vascular density positively correlated with size of the tumor, lymph nodes involved by the tumor and Nottingham prognostic index. In the future, Antibodies specific to proliferating endothelium, together with the development of automated image analysis, may improve the accuracy and value of measuring angiogenesis-induced microvessel density. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jpn.v4i7.10315 Journal of Pathology of Nepal (2014 Vol. 4, 570-575  

  5. RNA-seq reveals novel transcriptome of genes and their isoforms in human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells treated with thrombin.

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    Li Qin Zhang

    Full Text Available The dysregulation of vascular endothelial cells by thrombin has been implicated in the development of a number of pathologic disorders such as inflammatory conditions, cancer, diabetes, coronary heart disease. However, transcriptional regulation of vascular endothelial cells by thrombin is not completely understood. In the present study, Illumina RNA-seq was used to profile the transcriptome in human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC-L treated with thrombin for 6 h to gain insight into thrombin's direct effects on the endothelial function. Out of 100 million total reads from a paired end sequencing assay, 91-94% of the reads were aligned to over 16,000 genes in the reference human genome. Thrombin upregulated 150 known genes and 480 known isoforms, and downregulated 2,190 known genes and 3,574 known isoforms by at least 2 fold. Of note, thrombin upregulated 1,775 previously unknown isoforms and downregulated 12,202 previously unknown isoforms by at least 2 fold. Many genes displayed isoform specific differential expression levels and different usage of transcriptional start sites after the thrombin treatment. The cross comparisons between our RNA-seq data and those of DNA microarray analysis of either 6 h thrombin treated HUVEC or 5 h TNFα treated HMVEC have provided a significant overlapping list of differentially expressed genes, supporting the robust utility of our dataset. Further in-depth follow-up analysis of the transcriptional regulation reported in this study may shed light on molecular pathogenic mechanisms underlying thrombin mediated endothelial dysfunction in various diseases and provide new leads of potential therapeutic targets.

  6. RNA-seq Reveals Novel Transcriptome of Genes and Their Isoforms in Human Pulmonary Microvascular Endothelial Cells Treated with Thrombin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li Qin; Cheranova, Dilyara; Gibson, Margaret; Ding, Shinghua; Heruth, Daniel P.; Fang, Deyu; Ye, Shui Qing

    2012-01-01

    The dysregulation of vascular endothelial cells by thrombin has been implicated in the development of a number of pathologic disorders such as inflammatory conditions, cancer, diabetes, coronary heart disease. However, transcriptional regulation of vascular endothelial cells by thrombin is not completely understood. In the present study, Illumina RNA-seq was used to profile the transcriptome in human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC-L) treated with thrombin for 6 h to gain insight into thrombin's direct effects on the endothelial function. Out of 100 million total reads from a paired end sequencing assay, 91–94% of the reads were aligned to over 16,000 genes in the reference human genome. Thrombin upregulated 150 known genes and 480 known isoforms, and downregulated 2,190 known genes and 3,574 known isoforms by at least 2 fold. Of note, thrombin upregulated 1,775 previously unknown isoforms and downregulated 12,202 previously unknown isoforms by at least 2 fold. Many genes displayed isoform specific differential expression levels and different usage of transcriptional start sites after the thrombin treatment. The cross comparisons between our RNA-seq data and those of DNA microarray analysis of either 6 h thrombin treated HUVEC or 5 h TNFα treated HMVEC have provided a significant overlapping list of differentially expressed genes, supporting the robust utility of our dataset. Further in-depth follow-up analysis of the transcriptional regulation reported in this study may shed light on molecular pathogenic mechanisms underlying thrombin mediated endothelial dysfunction in various diseases and provide new leads of potential therapeutic targets. PMID:22359579

  7. Vitamin E isoforms differentially regulate intercellular adhesion molecule-1 activation of PKCα in human microvascular endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiam Abdala-Valencia

    Full Text Available ICAM-1-dependent leukocyte recruitment in vivo is inhibited by the vitamin E isoform d-α-tocopherol and elevated by d-γ-tocopherol. ICAM-1 is reported to activate endothelial cell signals including protein kinase C (PKC, but the PKC isoform and the mechanism for ICAM-1 activation of PKC are not known. It is also not known whether ICAM-1 signaling in endothelial cells is regulated by tocopherol isoforms. We hypothesized that d-α-tocopherol and d-γ-tocopherol differentially regulate ICAM-1 activation of endothelial cell PKC.ICAM-1 crosslinking activated the PKC isoform PKCα but not PKCβ in TNFα-pretreated human microvascular endothelial cells. ICAM-1 activation of PKCα was blocked by the PLC inhibitor U73122, ERK1/2 inhibitor PD98059, and xanthine oxidase inhibitor allopurinol. ERK1/2 activation was blocked by inhibition of XO and PLC but not by inhibition of PKCα, indicating that ERK1/2 is downstream of XO and upstream of PKCα during ICAM-1 signaling. During ICAM-1 activation of PKCα, the XO-generated ROS did not oxidize PKCα. Interestingly, d-α-tocopherol inhibited ICAM-1 activation of PKCα but not the upstream signal ERK1/2. The d-α-tocopherol inhibition of PKCα was ablated by the addition of d-γ-tocopherol.Crosslinking ICAM-1 stimulated XO/ROS which activated ERK1/2 that then activated PKCα. ICAM-1 activation of PKCα was inhibited by d-α-tocopherol and this inhibition was ablated by the addition of d-γ-tocopherol. These tocopherols regulated ICAM-1 activation of PKCα without altering the upstream signal ERK1/2. Thus, we identified a mechanism for ICAM-1 activation of PKC and determined that d-α-tocopherol and d-γ-tocopherol have opposing regulatory functions for ICAM-1-activated PKCα in endothelial cells.

  8. Activation of sonic hedgehog signaling attenuates oxidized low-density lipoprotein-stimulated brain microvascular endothelial cells dysfunction in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiu-Long; Chen, Ting; Zhang, Xu

    2015-01-01

    The study was performed to investigate the role of sonic hedgehog (SHH) in the oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL)-induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption. The primary mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells (MBMECs) were exposed to oxLDL. The results indicated that treatment of MBMECs with oxLDL decreased the cell viability, and oxidative stress was involved in oxLDL-induce MBMECs dysfunction with increasing intracellular ROS and MDA formation as well as decreasing NO release and eNOS mRNA expression. In addition, SHH signaling components, such as SHH, Smo and Gli1, mRNA and protein levels were significantly decreased after incubation with increasing concentrations of oxLDL. Treatment with oxLDL alone or SHH loss-of-function significantly increased the permeability of MBMECs, and overexpression of SHH attenuated oxLDL-induced elevation of permeability in MBMECs. Furthermore, SHH gain-of-function could reverse oxLDL-induced apoptosis through inhibition caspase3 and caspase8 levels in MBMECs. Taken together, these results demonstrated that the suppression of SHH in MBMECs might contribute to the oxLDL-induced disruption of endothelial barrier. However, the overexpression of SHH could reverse oxLDL-induced endothelial cells dysfunction in vitro.

  9. Morphine induces expression of platelet-derived growth factor in human brain microvascular endothelial cells: implication for vascular permeability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxiu Wen

    Full Text Available Despite the advent of antiretroviral therapy, complications of HIV-1 infection with concurrent drug abuse are an emerging problem. Morphine, often abused by HIV-infected patients, is known to accelerate neuroinflammation associated with HIV-1 infection. Detailed molecular mechanisms of morphine action however, remain poorly understood. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF has been implicated in a number of pathological conditions, primarily due to its potent mitogenic and permeability effects. Whether morphine exposure results in enhanced vascular permeability in brain endothelial cells, likely via induction of PDGF, remains to be established. In the present study, we demonstrated morphine-mediated induction of PDGF-BB in human brain microvascular endothelial cells, an effect that was abrogated by the opioid receptor antagonist-naltrexone. Pharmacological blockade (cell signaling and loss-of-function (Egr-1 approaches demonstrated the role of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs, PI3K/Akt and the downstream transcription factor Egr-1 respectively, in morphine-mediated induction of PDGF-BB. Functional significance of increased PDGF-BB manifested as increased breach of the endothelial barrier as evidenced by decreased expression of the tight junction protein ZO-1 in an in vitro model system. Understanding the regulation of PDGF expression may provide insights into the development of potential therapeutic targets for intervention of morphine-mediated neuroinflammation.

  10. Tick-borne encephalitis virus infects human brain microvascular endothelial cells without compromising blood-brain barrier integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palus, Martin; Vancova, Marie; Sirmarova, Jana; Elsterova, Jana; Perner, Jan; Ruzek, Daniel

    2017-07-01

    Alteration of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a hallmark of tick-borne encephalitis (TBE), a life-threating human viral neuroinfection. However, the mechanism of BBB breakdown during TBE, as well as TBE virus (TBEV) entry into the brain is unclear. Here, primary human microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs) were infected with TBEV to study interactions with the BBB. Although the number of infected cells was relatively low in culture (10 6 pfu/ml). Infection did not induce any significant changes in the expression of key tight junction proteins or upregulate the expression of cell adhesion molecules, and did not alter the highly organized intercellular junctions between HBMECs. In an in vitro BBB model, the virus crossed the BBB via a transcellular pathway without compromising the integrity of the cell monolayer. The results indicate that HBMECs may support TBEV entry into the brain without altering BBB integrity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Functional expression of choline transporter like-protein 1 (CTL1) and CTL2 in human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwao, Beniko; Yara, Miki; Hara, Naomi; Kawai, Yuiko; Yamanaka, Tsuyoshi; Nishihara, Hiroshi; Inoue, Takeshi; Inazu, Masato

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we examined the molecular and functional characterization of choline transporter in human brain microvascular endothelial cells (hBMECs). Choline uptake into hBMECs was a saturable process that was mediated by a Na(+)-independent, membrane potential and pH-dependent transport system. The cells have two different [(3)H]choline transport systems with Km values of 35.0 ± 4.9 μM and 54.1 ± 8.1 μM, respectively. Choline uptake was inhibited by choline, acetylcholine (ACh) and the choline analog hemicholinium-3 (HC-3). Various organic cations also interacted with the choline transport system. Choline transporter-like protein 1 (CTL1) and CTL2 mRNA were highly expressed, while mRNA for high-affinity choline transporter 1 (CHT1) and organic cation transporters (OCTs) were not expressed in hBMECs. CTL1 and CTL2 proteins were localized to brain microvascular endothelial cells in human brain cortical sections. Both CTL1 and CTL2 proteins were expressed on the plasma membrane and mitochondria. CTL1 and CTL2 proteins are mainly expressed in plasma membrane and mitochondria, respectively. We conclude that choline is mainly transported via an intermediate-affinity choline transport system, CTL1 and CTL2, in hBMECs. These transporters are responsible for the uptake of extracellular choline and organic cations. CTL2 participate in choline transport mainly in mitochondria, and may be the major site for the control of choline oxidation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. mCRP triggers angiogenesis by inducing F3 transcription and TF signalling in microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Esther; de la Torre, Raquel; Arderiu, Gemma; Slevin, Mark; Badimon, Lina

    2017-01-26

    Inflammation contributes to vascular disease progression. However, the role of circulating inflammatory molecules on microvascular endothelial cell (mECs) is not fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the short pentraxin CRP on microvascular endothelial cell angiogenic function. Subcutaneously implanted collagen plugs seeded with human mECs exposed to monomeric CRP (mCRP) in mice showed formation of an extended network of microvessels both in the plug and the overlying skin tissue, while mECs exposure to pentameric native CRP (nCRP) induced a much milder effect. To understand the mechanisms behind this angiogenic effects, mECs were exposed to both CRP forms and cell migration, wound repair and tube-like formation were investigated. nCRP effects were moderate and of slow-onset whereas mCRP induced rapid, and highly significant effects. We investigated how circulating nCRP is transformed into mCRP by confocal microscopy and western blot. nCRP is transformed into mCRP on the mECs membranes in a time dependent fashion. This transformation is specific and in part receptor dependent, and the formed mCRP triggers F3 gene transcription and TF-protein expression in mECs to induce angiogenesis. F3-silenced mECs are unable to form angiotubes. In agreement, mCRP induced upregulation of the TF signalling pathway in mECs with downstream phosphorylation of AKT and activation of the transcription factor ETS1 leading to increased CCL2 release. The circulating pentraxin nCRP with little pro-angiogenic effect when dissociated into mCRP on the surface of mECs is able to trigger potent proangiogenic effects by inducing F3-gene upregulation and TF signalling.

  13. Effect of penehyclidine hydrochloride on β-arrestin-1 expression in lipopolysaccharide-induced human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhan, J. [Department of Anesthesiology, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei (China); Xiao, F. [Department of Osteology, Pu Ai Hospital, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei (China); Zhang, Z.Z.; Wang, Y.P.; Chen, K.; Wang, Y.L. [Department of Anesthesiology, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei (China)

    2013-12-02

    β-arrestins are expressed proteins that were first described, and are well-known, as negative regulators of G protein-coupled receptor signaling. Penehyclidine hydrochloride (PHC) is a new anti-cholinergic drug that can inhibit biomembrane lipid peroxidation, and decrease cytokines and oxyradicals. However, to date, no reports on the effects of PHC on β-arrestin-1 in cells have been published. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of PHC on β-arrestin-1 expression in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HPMEC). Cultured HPMEC were pretreated with PHC, followed by LPS treatment. Muscarinic receptor mRNAs were assayed by real-time quantitative PCR. Cell viability was assayed by the methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) conversion test. The dose and time effects of PHC on β-arrestin-1 expression in LPS-induced HPMEC were determined by Western blot analysis. Cell malondialdehyde (MDA) level and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were measured. It was found that the M{sub 3} receptor was the one most highly expressed, and was activated 5 min after LPS challenge. Furthermore, 2 μg/mL PHC significantly upregulated expression of β-arrestin-1 within 10 to 15 min. Compared with the control group, MDA levels in cells were remarkably increased and SOD activities were significantly decreased in LPS pretreated cells, while PHC markedly decreased MDA levels and increased SOD activities. We conclude that PHC attenuated ROS injury by upregulating β-arrestin-1 expression, thereby implicating a mechanism by which PHC may exert its protective effects against LPS-induced pulmonary microvascular endothelial cell injury.

  14. Impairment of systemic microvascular endothelial and smooth muscle function in individuals with early-onset coronary artery disease: studies with laser speckle contrast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Elaine G; De Lorenzo, Andrea; Huguenin, Grazielle; Oliveira, Glaucia M M; Tibiriçá, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The assessment of systemic microvascular reactivity is currently considered to be critical in the stratification of cardiovascular risk. In the present study, we compared skin microvascular function in individuals with early-onset (premature) coronary artery disease (EOCAD, n=30) with that of age-matched and sex-matched healthy individuals (n=30). Using laser speckle contrast imaging, cutaneous blood flow was assessed in the forearm at rest and during reactivity tests, including postocclusive reactive hyperemia and the iontophoresis of acetylcholine or sodium nitroprusside with increasing currents of 30, 60, 90, 120, 150, and 180 μA for 10-s intervals spaced 1 min apart. Carotid intima-media thickness was evaluated using an ultrasound system and a 7.5 MHz ultrasound transducer. The endothelium-dependent skin microvascular vasodilator responses that were induced by both acetylcholine and postocclusive reactive hyperemia were significantly reduced in patients with EOCAD compared with healthy individuals. The vasodilator responses that were induced by sodium nitroprusside were also significantly reduced in individuals with EOCAD. These systemic microvascular alterations were concurrent with increased carotid intima-media thickness in these patients. Laser speckle contrast imaging identifies endothelial-dependent and endothelial-independent microvascular dysfunction in individuals presenting with EOCAD, and thus could be valuable as an early peripheral marker of atherothrombotic disease.

  15. Increased microparticle production and impaired microvascular endothelial function in aldosterone-salt-treated rats: protective effects of polyphenols.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia López Andrés

    Full Text Available We aimed to characterize circulating microparticles in association with arterial stiffness, inflammation and endothelial dysfunction in aldosterone-salt-induced hypertension in rats and to investigate the preventive effects of red wine polyphenols. Uninephrectomized male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with aldosterone-salt (1 µg.h(-1, with or without administration of either red wine polyphenols, Provinols™ (20 mg.kg(-1.day(-1, or spironolactone (30 mg.kg(-1.day(-1 for 4 weeks. Microparticles, arterial stiffness, nitric oxide (NO spin trapping, and mesenteric arterial function were measured. Aldosterone-salt rats showed increased microparticle levels, including those originating from platelets, endothelium and erythrocytes. Hypertension resulted in enhanced aortic stiffness accompanied by increased circulating and aortic NO levels and an upregulation of aortic inducible NO-synthase, NFκB, superoxide anions and nitrotyrosine. Flow-induced dilatation was reduced in mesenteric arteries. These effects were prevented by spironolactone. Provinols™ did not reduce arterial stiffness or systolic hypertension but had effects similar to those of spironolactone on endothelial function assessed by flow-mediated vasodilatation, microparticle generation, aortic NO levels and oxidative stress and apoptosis in the vessel wall. Neither the contractile response nor endothelium-dependent relaxation in mesenteric arteries differed between groups. The in vivo effects of Provinols™ were not mediated by mineralocorticoid receptors or changes in shear stress. In conclusion, vascular remodelling and endothelial dysfunction in aldosterone-salt-mediated hypertension are associated with increased circulating microparticles. Polyphenols prevent the enhanced release of microparticles, macrovascular inflammation and oxidative stress, and microvascular endothelial dysfunction independently of blood pressure, shear stress and mineralocorticoid receptor activation in a

  16. Higher vascular endothelial growth factor-C concentration in plasma is associated with increased forearm capillary filtration capacity in breast cancer-related lymphedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mads Radmer; Simonsen, Lene; Karlsmark, Tonny

    2015-01-01

    shown that the forearm capillary filtration coefficient (CFC) is increased bilaterally in BCRL. In this study, we aimed to elucidate if increased CFC is associated with low-grade inflammation and/or vascular endothelial growth factor-c (VEGF-C) signaling. Fourteen patients with unilateral BCRL and nine......Breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL) is a frequent, chronic and debilitating swelling that mainly affects the ipsilateral arm and develops as a complication to breast cancer treatment. The pathophysiology is elusive opposing development of means for prediction and treatment. We have earlier...... increased forearm CFC in BCRL subjects. Interstitially increased MCP-1 levels may augment local microvascular protein permeability in BCRL....

  17. Iron oxide nanoparticles induce human microvascular endothelial cell permeability through reactive oxygen species production and microtubule remodeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Xianglin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Engineered iron nanoparticles are being explored for the development of biomedical applications and many other industry purposes. However, to date little is known concerning the precise mechanisms of translocation of iron nanoparticles into targeted tissues and organs from blood circulation, as well as the underlying implications of potential harmful health effects in human. Results The confocal microscopy imaging analysis demonstrates that exposure to engineered iron nanoparticles induces an increase in cell permeability in human microvascular endothelial cells. Our studies further reveal iron nanoparticles enhance the permeability through the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS and the stabilization of microtubules. We also showed Akt/GSK-3β signaling pathways are involved in iron nanoparticle-induced cell permeability. The inhibition of ROS demonstrate ROS play a major role in regulating Akt/GSK-3β – mediated cell permeability upon iron nanoparticle exposure. These results provide new insights into the bioreactivity of engineered iron nanoparticles which can inform potential applications in medical imaging or drug delivery. Conclusion Our results indicate that exposure to iron nanoparticles induces an increase in endothelial cell permeability through ROS oxidative stress-modulated microtubule remodeling. The findings from this study provide new understandings on the effects of nanoparticles on vascular transport of macromolecules and drugs.

  18. Regulation of monocarboxylic acid transporter-1 by cAMP dependent vesicular trafficking in brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhernik, Amy L; Li, Lun; LaVoy, Nathan; Velasquez, Micah J; Smith, Jeffrey P

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a detailed characterization of Monocarboxylic Acid Transporter-1 (Mct1) in cytoplasmic vesicles of cultured rat brain microvascular endothelial cells shows them to be a diverse population of endosomes intrinsic to the regulation of the transporter by a brief 25 to 30 minute exposure to the membrane permeant cAMP analog, 8Br-cAMP. The vesicles are heterogeneous in size, mobility, internal pH, and co-localize with discreet markers of particular types of endosomes including early endosomes, clathrin coated vesicles, caveolar vesicles, trans-golgi, and lysosomes. The vesicular localization of Mct1 was not dependent on its N or C termini, however, the size and pH of Mct1 vesicles was increased by deletion of either terminus demonstrating a role for the termini in vesicular trafficking of Mct1. Using a novel BCECF-AM based assay developed in this study, 8Br-cAMP was shown to decrease the pH of Mct1 vesicles after 25 minutes. This result and method were confirmed in experiments with a ratiometric pH-sensitive EGFP-mCherry dual tagged Mct1 construct. Overall, the results indicate that cAMP signaling reduces the functionality of Mct1 in cerebrovascular endothelial cells by facilitating its entry into a highly dynamic vesicular trafficking pathway that appears to lead to the transporter's trafficking to autophagosomes and lysosomes.

  19. Molecular and Cellular Characterization of Space Flight Effects on Microvascular Endothelial Cell Function - PreparatoryWork for the SFEF Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsamo, Michele; Barravecchia, Ivana; Mariotti, Sara; Merenda, Alessandra; De Cesari, Chiara; Vukich, Marco; Angeloni, Debora

    2014-12-01

    Exposure to microgravity during space flight (SF) of variable length induces suffering of the endothelium (the cells lining all blood vessels), mostly responsible for health problems found in astronauts and animals returning from space. Of interest to pre-nosological medicine, the effects of microgravity on astronauts are strikingly similar to the consequences of sedentary life, senescence and degenerative diseases on Earth, although SF effects are accelerated and reversible. Thus, microgravity is a significant novel model for better understanding of common pathologies. A comprehensive cell and molecular biology study is needed in order to explain pathophysiological findings after SFs. This project will study the effects of microgravity and cosmic radiation on endothelial cells (ECs) cultured on the International Space Station through analysis of 1) cell transcriptome, 2) DNA methylome, 3) DNA damage and cell senescence, 4) variations in cell cycle and cell morphology. This project has been selected by the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency and is presently in preparation. The ground study presented here was performed to determine the biological and engineering requirements that will allow us to retrieve suitable samples after culturing, fixing and storing ECs in space. We expect to identify molecular pathways activated by space microgravity in microvascular ECs, which may shed light on pathogenic molecular mechanisms responsible for endothelial suffering shared by astronauts and individuals affected with aging, degenerative and sedentary life-associated pathologies on Earth.

  20. The Multifaceted Responses of Primary Human Astrocytes and Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells to the Lyme Disease Spirochete, Borrelia Burgdorferi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine A. Brissette

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The vector-borne pathogen, Borrelia burgdorferi, causes a multi-system disorder including neurological complications. These neurological disorders, collectively termed neuroborreliosis, can occur in up to 15% of untreated patients. The neurological symptoms are probably a result of a glial-driven, host inflammatory response to the bacterium. However, the specific contributions of individual glial and other support cell types to the pathogenesis of neuroborreliosis are relatively unexplored. The goal of this project was to characterize specific astrocyte and endothelial cell responses to B. burgdorferi. Primary human astrocytes and primary HBMEC (human brain microvascular endothelial cells were incubated with B. burgdorferi over a 72-h period and the transcriptional responses to the bacterium were analyzed by real-time PCR arrays. There was a robust increase in several surveyed chemokine and related genes, including IL (interleukin-8, for both primary astrocytes and HBMEC. Array results were confirmed with individual sets of PCR primers. The production of specific chemokines by both astrocytes and HBMEC in response to B. burgdorferi, including IL-8, CXCL-1, and CXCL-10, were confirmed by ELISA. These results demonstrate that primary astrocytes and HBMEC respond to virulent B. burgdorferi by producing a number of chemokines. These data suggest that infiltrating phagocytic cells, particularly neutrophils, attracted by chemokines expressed at the BBB (blood–brain barrier may be important contributors to the early inflammatory events associated with neuroborreliosis.

  1. Prostaglandin F2-alpha receptor (FPr expression on porcine corpus luteum microvascular endothelial cells (pCL-MVECs

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    Forni Monica

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The corpus luteum (CL is a transient endocrine gland and prostaglandin F2-alpha is considered to be the principal luteolysin in pigs. In this species, the in vivo administration of prostaglandin F2-alpha induces apoptosis in large vessels as early as 6 hours after administration. The presence of the prostaglandin F2-alpha receptor (FPr on the microvascular endothelial cells (pCL-MVECs of the porcine corpus luteum has not yet been defined. The aim of the study was to assess FPr expression in pCL-MVECs in the early and mid-luteal phases (EL-p, ML-p, and during pregnancy (P-p. Moreover, the effectiveness of prostaglandin F2-alpha treatment in inducing pCL-MVEC apoptosis was tested. Methods Porcine CLs were collected in the EL and ML phases and during P-p. All CLs from each animal were minced together and the homogenates underwent enzymatic digestion. The pCL-MVECs were then positively selected by an immunomagnetic separation protocol using Dynabeads coated with anti-CD31 monoclonal antibody and seeded in flasks in the presence of EGM 2-MV (Microvascular Endothelial Cell Medium-2. After 4 days of culture, the cells underwent additional immunomagnetic selection and were seeded in flasks until the confluent stage. PCR Real time, western blot and immunodetection assays were utilized to assess the presence of FPr on pCL-MVEC primary cultures. Furthermore, the influence of culture time (freshly isolated, cultured overnight and at confluence and hormonal treatment (P4 and E2 on FPr expression in pCL-MVECs was also investigated. Apoptosis was detected by TUNEL assay of pCL-MVECs exposed to prostaglandin F2-alpha. Results We obtained primary cultures of pCL-MVECs from all animals. FPr mRNA and protein levels showed the highest value (ANOVA in CL-MVECs derived from the early-luteal phase. Moreover, freshly isolated MVECs showed a higher FPr mRNA value than those cultured overnight and confluent cells (ANOVA. prostaglandin F2-alpha

  2. Body Mass Index Is Associated With Microvascular Endothelial Dysfunction in Patients With Treated Metabolic Risk Factors and Suspected Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heijden, Dirk J; van Leeuwen, Maarten A H; Janssens, Gladys N; Lenzen, Mattie J; van de Ven, Peter M; Eringa, Etto C; van Royen, Niels

    2017-09-14

    Obesity is key feature of the metabolic syndrome and is associated with high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Obesity is associated with macrovascular endothelial dysfunction, a determinant of outcome in patients with coronary artery disease. Here, we compared the influence of obesity on microvascular endothelial function to that of established cardiovascular risk factors such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and smoking in patients with suspected coronary artery disease. Endothelial function was assessed during postocclusive reactive hyperemia of the brachial artery and downstream microvascular beds in 108 patients who were scheduled for coronary angiography. In all patients, microvascular vasodilation was assessed using peripheral arterial tonometry; laser Doppler flowmetry and digital thermal monitoring were performed. Body mass index was significantly associated with decreased endothelium-dependent vasodilatation measured with peripheral arterial tonometry (r=0.23, P=0.02), laser Doppler flowmetry (r=0.30, Pmicrovascular vasodilatation. Especially in diabetic patients, endothelial function was not significantly reduced (control versus diabetes mellitus, mean±SEM or median [interquartile range], peripheral arterial tonometry: 1.90±0.20 versus 1.67±0.20, P=0.19, laser Doppler flowmetry: 728% [interquartile range, 427-1110] versus 589% [interquartile range, 320-1067] P=0.28, and digital thermal monitoring: 6.6±1.0% versus 2.5±1.7%, P=0.08). In multivariate linear regression analysis, body mass index was the only risk factor that significantly attenuated endothelium-dependent vasodilatation using all 3 microvascular function tests. Higher body mass index is associated with reduced endothelial function in patients with suspected coronary artery disease, even after adjustment for treated diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and smoking. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association

  3. Exposure to lipopolysaccharide and/or unconjugated bilirubin impair the integrity and function of brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Filipa L; Kittel, Agnes; Veszelka, Szilvia; Palmela, Inês; Tóth, Andrea; Brites, Dora; Deli, Mária A; Brito, Maria A

    2012-01-01

    Sepsis and jaundice are common conditions in newborns that can lead to brain damage. Though lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is known to alter the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), little is known on the effects of unconjugated bilirubin (UCB) and even less on the joint effects of UCB and LPS on brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMEC). Monolayers of primary rat BMEC were treated with 1 µg/ml LPS and/or 50 µM UCB, in the presence of 100 µM human serum albumin, for 4 or 24 h. Co-cultures of BMEC with astroglial cells, a more complex BBB model, were used in selected experiments. LPS led to apoptosis and UCB induced both apoptotic and necrotic-like cell death. LPS and UCB led to inhibition of P-glycoprotein and activation of matrix metalloproteinases-2 and -9 in mono-cultures. Transmission electron microscopy evidenced apoptotic bodies, as well as damaged mitochondria and rough endoplasmic reticulum in BMEC by either insult. Shorter cell contacts and increased caveolae-like invaginations were noticeable in LPS-treated cells and loss of intercellular junctions was observed upon treatment with UCB. Both compounds triggered impairment of endothelial permeability and transendothelial electrical resistance both in mono- and co-cultures. The functional changes were confirmed by alterations in immunostaining for junctional proteins β-catenin, ZO-1 and claudin-5. Enlargement of intercellular spaces, and redistribution of junctional proteins were found in BMEC after exposure to LPS and UCB. LPS and/or UCB exert direct toxic effects on BMEC, with distinct temporal profiles and mechanisms of action. Therefore, the impairment of brain endothelial integrity upon exposure to these neurotoxins may favor their access to the brain, thus increasing the risk of injury and requiring adequate clinical management of sepsis and jaundice in the neonatal period.

  4. Caveolin-1 mediates tissue plasminogen activator-induced MMP-9 up-regulation in cultured brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xinchun; Sun, Yanyun; Xu, Ji; Liu, Wenlan

    2015-03-01

    Thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) increases matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activity in the ischemic brain, which exacerbates blood-brain barrier injury and increases the risk of symptomatic cerebral hemorrhage. The mechanism through which tPA enhances MMP-9 activity is not well understood. Here we report an important role of caveolin-1 in mediating tPA-induced MMP-9 synthesis. Brain microvascular endothelial cell line bEnd3 cells were incubated with 5 or 20 μg/ml tPA for 24 hrs before analyzing MMP-9 levels in the conditioned media and cellular extracts by gelatin zymography. tPA at a dose of 20 μg/mL tPA, but not 5 μg/mL, significantly increased MMP-9 level in cultured media while decreasing it in cellular extracts. Concurrently, tPA treatment induced a 2.3-fold increase of caveolin-1 protein levels in endothelial cells. Interestingly, knockdown of Cav-1 with siRNA inhibited tPA-induced MMP-9 mRNA up-regulation and MMP-9 increase in the conditioned media, but did not affect MMP-9 decrease in cellular extracts. These results suggest that caveolin-1 critically contributes to tPA-mediated MMP-9 up-regulation, but may not facilitate MMP-9 secretion in endothelial cells. Thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) increases matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activity in the ischemic brain, which exacerbates ischemic blood brain barrier (BBB) injury and increases the risk of symptomatic cerebral hemorrhage. Our results suggest a novel mechanism underlying this tPA-MMP 9 axis. In response to tPA treatment, caveolin-1 protein levels increased in endothelial cells, which mediate MMP-9 mRNA up-regulation and its secretion into extracellular space. Caveolin-1 may, however, not facilitate MMP-9 secretion in endothelial cells. Our data suggest caveolin-1 as a novel therapeutic target for protecting the BBB against ischemic damage. The schematic outlines tPA-induced MMP-9 upreguation. © 2015 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  5. Carnosine protects brain microvascular endothelial cells against rotenone-induced oxidative stress injury through histamine H₁ and H₂ receptors in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Luyi; Yao, Ke; Fan, Yanying; He, Ping; Wang, Xiaofen; Hu, Weiwei; Chen, Zhong

    2012-12-01

    Although it is believed that carnosine has protective effects on various cell types, its effect on microvascular endothelial cells has not been well defined. In the present study, we investigated the protective effects of carnosine in microvascular endothelial cells using an in vitro rotenone-induced oxidative stress model. Mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells were exposed to 1 μmol/L rotenone for 18 h. In some experiments, carnosine (100 nmol/L-1 mmol/L) was added 30 min prior to rotenone exposure. When used, histamine receptor antagonists (100 nmol/L-10 μmol/L) were added 15 min before carnosine treatment. After rotenone exposure, apoptosis of microvascular cells was analysed by Hoechst 33342 staining, whereas mitochondrial membrane potential was assessed by JC-1 staining. Intracellular carnosine and histamine levels were determined using HPLC or ultra-HPLC. Over the range 1 μmol/L-1 mmol/L, carnosine concentration-dependently decreased the number of apoptotic cells after 18 h exposure to rotenone. This effect was reversed by the histamine H1 receptor antagonists pyrilamine and diphenhydramine (1 and 10 μmol/L) and the H2 receptor antagonists cimetidine (100 nmol/L-10 μmol/L) and zolatidine (10 μmol/L). α-Fluoromethylhistidine (100 μmol/L), a selective and irreversible inhibitor of histidine decarboxylase, also significantly inhibited the protective effects of carnosine. At 0.1 mmol/L, carnosine restored the decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential after 6 h exposure to 1 μmol/L rotenone and this effect was also reversed by the H1 and H2 receptor antagonists. Moreover, intracellular carnosine levels increased as early as 1 h after carnosine treatment, whereas intracellular histamine levels increased 18 h after carnosine treatment. The results of the present study indicate that carnosine protects brain microvascular endothelial cells against rotenone-induced oxidative stress injury via histamine H1 and H2 receptors. The

  6. Effects of Aging on Parasite Biomass, Inflammation, Endothelial Activation, Microvascular Dysfunction and Disease Severity in Plasmodium knowlesi and Plasmodium falciparum Malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Bridget E; Grigg, Matthew J; William, Timothy; Piera, Kim A; Boyle, Michelle J; Yeo, Tsin W; Anstey, Nicholas M

    2017-06-15

    In populations pauci-immune to malaria, risk of severe malaria increases with age. This is particularly apparent in Plasmodium knowlesi malaria. However, pathophysiological mechanisms underlying knowlesi malaria, and of the age-related increase in risk of severe malaria in general, are poorly understood. In Malaysian patients aged ≥12 years with severe (n = 47) and nonsevere (n = 99) knowlesi malaria, severe (n = 21) and nonsevere (n = 109) falciparum malaria, and healthy controls (n = 50), we measured parasite biomass, systemic inflammation (interleukin 6 [IL-6]), endothelial activation (angiopoietin-2), and microvascular function, and evaluated the effects of age. Plasmodium knowlesi parasitemia correlated with age (Spearman's correlation coefficient [rs] = 0.36; P malaria, IL-6, angiopoietin-2, and microvascular dysfunction were increased in severe compared to nonsevere disease, and all correlated with age, independent of parasitemia. In falciparum malaria, angiopoietin-2 increased with age, independent of parasite biomass (histidine-rich protein 2 [HRP2]). Independent risk factors for severe malaria included parasitemia and angiopoietin-2 in knowlesi malaria, and HRP2, angiopoietin-2, and microvascular dysfunction in falciparum malaria. Parasite biomass, endothelial activation, and microvascular dysfunction are associated with severe disease in knowlesi malaria and likely contribute to pathogenesis. The association of each of these processes with aging may account for the greater severity of malaria observed in older adults in low-endemic regions.

  7. Targeted siRNA Delivery to Diseased Microvascular Endothelial Cells-Cellular and Molecular Concepts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kowalski, Piotr S.; Leus, Niek G. J.; Scherphof, Gerrit L.; Ruiters, Marcel H. J.; Kamps, Jan A. A. M.; Molema, Grietje

    Increased insight in the role of endothelial cells in the pathophysiology of cancer, inflammatory and cardiovascular diseases, has drawn great interest in pharmacological interventions aiming at the endothelium in diseased sites. Their location in the body makes them suitable targets for therapeutic

  8. ESCRT-0 Component Hrs Promotes Macropinocytosis of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus in Human Dermal Microvascular Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veettil, Mohanan Valiya; Kumar, Binod; Ansari, Mairaj Ahmed; Dutta, Dipanjan; Iqbal, Jawed; Gjyshi, Olsi; Bottero, Virginie; Chandran, Bala

    2016-04-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) enters human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC-d), its naturalin vivotarget cells, by lipid raft-dependent macropinocytosis. The internalized viral envelope fuses with the macropinocytic membrane, and released capsid is transported to the nuclear vicinity, resulting in the nuclear entry of viral DNA. The endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT) proteins, which include ESCRT-0, -I, -II, and -III, play a central role in endosomal trafficking and sorting of internalized and ubiquitinated receptors. Here, we examined the role of ESCRT-0 component Hrs (hepatocyte growth factor-regulated tyrosine kinase substrate) in KSHV entry into HMVEC-d by macropinocytosis. Knockdown of Hrs by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) transduction resulted in significant decreases in KSHV entry and viral gene expression. Immunofluorescence analysis (IFA) and plasma membrane isolation and proximity ligation assay (PLA) demonstrated the translocation of Hrs from the cytosol to the plasma membrane of infected cells and association with α-actinin-4. In addition, infection induced the plasma membrane translocation and activation of the serine/threonine kinase ROCK1, a downstream target of the RhoA GTPase. Hrs knockdown reduced these associations, suggesting that the recruitment of ROCK1 is an Hrs-mediated event. Interaction between Hrs and ROCK1 is essential for the ROCK1-induced phosphorylation of NHE1 (Na(+)/H(+)exchanger 1), which is involved in the regulation of intracellular pH. Thus, our studies demonstrate the plasma membrane association of ESCRT protein Hrs during macropinocytosis and suggest that KSHV entry requires both Hrs- and ROCK1-dependent mechanisms and that ROCK1-mediated phosphorylation of NHE1 and pH change is an essential event required for the macropinocytosis of KSHV. Macropinocytosis is the major entry pathway of KSHV in human dermal microvascular endothelial cells, the natural target cells of KSHV

  9. Dexamethasone suppresses JMJD3 gene activation via a putative negative glucocorticoid response element and maintains integrity of tight junctions in brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Wonho; Shin, Jee Y; Lee, Jee Y; Jeong, Sangyun; Kim, Won-Sun; Yune, Tae Y; Ju, Bong-Gun

    2017-12-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) exhibits a highly selective permeability to support the homeostasis of the central nervous system (CNS). The tight junctions in the BBB microvascular endothelial cells seal the paracellular space to prevent diffusion. Thus, disruption of tight junctions results in harmful effects in CNS diseases and injuries. It has recently been demonstrated that glucocorticoids have beneficial effects on maintaining tight junctions in both in vitro cell and in vivo animal models. In the present study, we found that dexamethasone suppresses the expression of JMJD3, a histone H3K27 demethylase, via the recruitment of glucocorticoid receptor α (GRα) and nuclear receptor co-repressor (N-CoR) to the negative glucocorticoid response element (nGRE) in the upstream region of JMJD3 gene in brain microvascular endothelial cells subjected to TNFα treatment. The decreased JMJD3 gene expression resulted in the suppression of MMP-2, MMP-3, and MMP-9 gene activation. Dexamethasone also activated the expression of the claudin 5 and occludin genes. Collectively, dexamethasone attenuated the disruption of the tight junctions in the brain microvascular endothelial cells subjected to TNFα treatment. Therefore, glucocorticoids may help to preserve the integrity of the tight junctions in the BBB via transcriptional and post-translational regulation following CNS diseases and injuries.

  10. Thiram activates NF-kappaB and enhances ICAM-1 expression in human microvascular endothelial HMEC-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurpios-Piec, Dagmara; Grosicka-Maciąg, Emilia; Woźniak, Katarzyna; Kowalewski, Cezary; Kiernozek, Ewelina; Szumiło, Maria; Rahden-Staroń, Iwonna

    2015-02-01

    Thiram (TMTD) is a fungicidal and bactericidal agent used as antiseptic, seed disinfectant and animal repellent. In the light of known properties, thiram is considered to be used as an inhibitor of angiogenesis and/or inflammation. Since angiogenesis requires the growth of vascular endothelial cells we have used microvascular endothelial cell line HMEC-1 to elucidate the effect of thiram on normal and stimulated cells. We cultured HMEC-1 cells in the presence of thiram at low concentration (0.5 µg/mL or 2 µg/mL) (0.2 µM or 0.8 µM) or TNF-α (10 ng/mL) alone, and thiram together with TNF-α. TNF-α was used as a cytokine that triggers changes characteristic for inflammatory state of the cell. We carried out an in vitro study aimed at assessing generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), activation of NF-κB, and expression of cell adhesion molecules ICAM-1, VCAM-1, PECAM-1. It was found that TMTD produced ROS and activated NF-κB. Activation of NF-κB was concurrent with an increase in ICAM-1 expression on the surface of HMEC-1 cells. ICAM-1 reflects intensity of inflammation in endothelial cell milieu. The expression of VCAM-1 and PECAM-1 on these cells was not changed by thiram. It was also found that stimulation of the HMEC-1 cells with the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α caused activation of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression with concomitant decrease of PECAM-1 cell surface expression above the control levels. Treatment with thiram and TNF-α changed cellular response compared with effects observed after treatment with TNF-α alone, i.e. further increase of ICAM-1 expression and impairment of the TNF-α effect on PECAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression. This study demonstrated that thiram acts as a pro-oxidant, and elicits in endothelial cell environment effects characteristic for inflammation. However, when it is present concurrently with pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α interferes with its action. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Assessment of endothelial function by brachial artery flow mediated dilatation in microvascular disease

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    Naidu Otikunta

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiac syndrome X is an important therapeutic and diagnostic challenge to physician. Study of Csx patients may help to understand the pathophysiology of coronary microcirculation and to gain an insight on the management of these group patients. Methods We measured the flow mediated dilation of the brachial artery both endothelium dependent and independent vasodilatation by high resolution ultrasound in 30 cardiac syndrome X patients and matched with 30 healthy control subjects. Results Significantly decreased flow mediated dilatation was observed in patients when compared to control (9.42 ± 7.20 vs 21.11 ± 9.16 p 11.11(p Conclusions The study suggests impairment of endothelial function in cardiac syndrome X patients. Increased Systolic blood pressure and body mass index may increase the risk of impairment of endothelial function in this group of patients.

  12. Tumor Microvasculature: Endothelial Leakiness and Endothelial Pore Size Distribution in a Breast Cancer Model

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    E.E. Uzgiris

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor endothelial leakiness is quantified in a rat mammary adenocarcinoma model using dynamic contrast enhancement MRI and contrast agents of widely varying sizes. The contrast agents were constructed to be of globular configuration and have their uptake rate into tumor interstitium be driven by the same diffusion process and limited only by the availability of endothelial pores of passable size. It was observed that the endothelial pore distribution has a steep power law dependence on size, r−β, with an exponent of −4.1. The model of large pore dominance in tumor leakiness as reported in some earlier investigation with fluorescent probes and optical chamber methods is rejected for this tumor model and a number of other tumor types including chemically induced tumors. This steep power law dependence on size is also consistent with observations on human breast cancer.

  13. Binding characteristics of S fimbriated Escherichia coli to isolated brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stins, M. F.; Prasadarao, N. V.; Ibric, L.; Wass, C. A.; Luckett, P.; Kim, K. S.

    1994-01-01

    To assess the role of S fimbriae in the pathogenesis of Escherichia coli meningitis, transformants of E. coli strains with or without S fimbriae plasmid were compared for their binding to microvessel endothelial cells isolated from bovine brain cortices (BMEC). The BMEC's displayed a cobblestone appearance, were positive for factor VIII, carbonic anhydrase IV, took up fluorescent-labeled acetylated low density lipoprotein, and exhibited gamma glutamyl transpeptidase activity. Binding of S fimbriated E. coli to BMEC was approximately threefold greater than nonfimbriated E. coli Similarly S fimbriated E. coli bound to human brain endothelial cells approximately threefold greater than nonfimbriated E. coli. Binding was reduced approximately 60% by isolated S fimbriae and about 80% by anti-S adhesin antibody. Mutating the S adhesin gene resulted in a complete loss of the binding, whereas mutagenesis of the major S fimbriae subunit gene sfaA did not significantly affect binding. Pretreatment of BMEC with neuraminidase or prior incubation of S fimbriated E. coli with NeuAc alpha 2,3-sialyl lactose completely abolished binding. These findings indicate that S fimbriated E. coli bind to NeuAc alpha 2,3-galactose containing glycoproteins on brain endothelial cells via a lectin-like activity of SfaS adhesin. This might be an important early step in the penetration of bacteria across the blood-brain barrier in the development of E. coli meningitis. Images Figure 6 PMID:7977653

  14. Stimulated mast cells promote maturation of myocardial microvascular endothelial cell neovessels by modulating the angiopoietin-Tie-2 signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Z.H. [Division of Cardiology, Shanghai Sixth People' s Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai, China, Division of Cardiology, Shanghai Sixth People’s Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai (China); Yancheng People' s First Hospital, Division of Cardiology, Yancheng, Jiangsu, China, Division of Cardiology, Yancheng People’s First Hospital, Yancheng, Jiangsu (China); Zhu, W.; Tao, J.P.; Zhang, Q.Y.; Wei, M. [Division of Cardiology, Shanghai Sixth People' s Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai, China, Division of Cardiology, Shanghai Sixth People’s Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai (China)

    2013-10-22

    Angiopoietin (Ang)-1 and Ang-2 interact in angiogenesis to activate the Tie-2 receptor, which may be involved in new vessel maturation and regression. Mast cells (MCs) are also involved in formation of new blood vessels and angiogenesis. The present study was designed to test whether MCs can mediate angiogenesis in myocardial microvascular endothelial cells (MMVECs). Using a rat MMVEC and MC co-culture system, we observed that Ang-1 protein levels were very low even though its mRNA levels were increased by MCs. Interestingly, MCs were able to enhance migration, proliferation, and capillary-like tube formation, which were associated with suppressed Ang-2 protein expression, but not Tie-2 expression levels. These MCs induced effects that could be reversed by either tryptase inhibitor [N-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone (TLCK)] or chymase inhibitor (N-tosyl-L-phenylalanyl chloromethyl ketone), with TLCK showing greater effects. In conclusion, our data indicated that MCs can interrupt neovessel maturation via suppression of the Ang-2/Tie-2 signaling pathway.

  15. EGb 761 Protects Cardiac Microvascular Endothelial Cells against Hypoxia/Reoxygenation Injury and Exerts Inhibitory Effect on the ATM Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Wang, Deng-Feng; Zhang, Zhuang; Han, Dong; Yang, Kan

    2017-03-28

    Ginkgo biloba extract (EGb 761) has been widely used clinically to reduce myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury (MIRI). Microvascular endothelial cells (MVECs) may be a proper cellular model in vitro for the effect and mechanism study against MIRI. However, the protective effect of EGb 761 on MVECs resisting hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) injury is little reported. In this study, H/R-injured MVECs were treated with EGb 761, and then the cell viability, apoptosis, ROS production, SOD activity, caspase-3 activity, and protein level of ATM, γ-H2AX, p53, and Bax were measured. ATM siRNA was transfected to study the changes of protein in the ATM pathway. EGb 761 presented protective effect on H/R-injured MVECs, with decreasing cell death, apoptosis, and ROS, and elevated SOD activity. Next, EGb 761 could inhibit H/R-induced ATM, γ-H2AX, p53, and Bax in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, ATM siRNA also could inhibit H/R-induced ATM, γ-H2AX, p53, and Bax. Overall, these findings verify that EGb 761 protects cardiac MVECs from H/R injury, and for the first time, illustrate the influence on the ATM pathway and apoptosis by EGb 761 via dampening ROS.

  16. Neisseria meningitidis induces brain microvascular endothelial cell detachment from the matrix and cleavage of occludin: a role for MMP-8.

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    Alexandra Schubert-Unkmeir

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB is a hallmark event in the pathophysiology of bacterial meningitis. Several inflammatory mediators, such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha, nitric oxide and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, contribute to this disruption. Here we show that infection of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC with Neisseria meningitidis induced an increase of permeability at prolonged time of infection. This was paralleled by an increase in MMP-8 activity in supernatants collected from infected cells. A detailed analysis revealed that MMP-8 was involved in the proteolytic cleavage of the tight junction protein occludin, resulting in its disappearance from the cell periphery and cleavage to a lower-sized 50-kDa protein in infected HBMEC. Abrogation of MMP-8 activity by specific inhibitors as well as transfection with MMP-8 siRNA abolished production of the cleavage fragment and occludin remained attached to the cell periphery. In addition, MMP-8 affected cell adherence to the underlying matrix. A similar temporal relationship was observed for MMP activity and cell detachment. Injury of the HBMEC monolayer suggested the requirement of direct cell contact because no detachment was observed when bacteria were placed above a transwell membrane or when bacterial supernatant was directly added to cells. Inhibition of MMP-8 partially prevented detachment of infected HBMEC and restored BBB permeability. Together, we established that MMP-8 activity plays a crucial role in disassembly of cell junction components and cell adhesion during meningococcal infection.

  17. New concepts and materials in microvascular grafting: prosthetic graft endothelial cell seeding and gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Lio, A L; Jones, N F

    1998-01-01

    Microsurgical free tissue transfer is currently associated with very high success rates and few complications. While interposition vein grafting is clearly an important adjunct to the microsurgeon's armamentarium, it has been associated with higher free flap/replantation failures and complication rates. With appropriate flap planning and surgical techniques, the need for interposition vein grafting should be quite infrequent and hopefully avoided if at all possible. Nevertheless, when necessary, the vein graft remains the gold standard, with virtually all alternative interposition grafts demonstrating lower patency rates. One of the more promising areas of research is the concept of genetic manipulation of the endothelial cell via molecular biological techniques. It is likely that in the near future this may become a clinical reality, not only improving the patency of microsurgical anastomoses and interposition vein grafts, but quite possibly altering the target organ functionally as well.

  18. LPS Induces Occludin Dysregulation in Cerebral Microvascular Endothelial Cells via MAPK Signaling and Augmenting MMP-2 Levels

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    Lan-hui Qin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Disrupted blood-brain barrier (BBB integrity contributes to cerebral edema during central nervous system infection. The current study explored the mechanism of lipopolysaccharide- (LPS- induced dysregulation of tight junction (TJ proteins. Human cerebral microvascular endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3 were exposed to LPS, SB203580 (p38MAPK inhibitor, or SP600125 (JNK inhibitor, and cell vitality was determined by MTT assay. The proteins expressions of p38MAPK, JNK, and TJs (occludin and zonula occludens- (ZO- 1 were determined by western blot. The mRNA levels of TJ components and MMP-2 were measured with quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR, and MMP-2 protein levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. LPS, SB203580, and SP600125 under respective concentrations of 10, 7.69, or 0.22 µg/mL had no effects on cell vitality. Treatment with LPS decreased mRNA and protein levels of occludin and ZO-1 and enhanced p38MAPK and JNK phosphorylation and MMP-2 expression. These effects were attenuated by pretreatment with SB203580 or SP600125, but not in ZO-1 expression. Both doxycycline hyclate (a total MMP inhibitor and SB-3CT (a specific MMP-2 inhibitor partially attenuated the LPS-induced downregulation of occludin. These data suggest that MMP-2 overexpression and p38MAPK/JNK pathways are involved in the LPS-mediated alterations of occludin in hCMEC/D3; however, ZO-1 levels are not influenced by p38MAPK/JNK.

  19. Effects of selenium supplementation on expression of endothelin-1 and its receptors in pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells from chick embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jianfeng; Zhang, Ding; Zhang, Kerong; Liu, Mengyuan; Han, Zhaoqing; Li, Jiakui

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of supplemental selenium (Se) on expression of endothelin-1 (ET-1) and its receptors in cultured chick embryos pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVECs). To accomplish this, PMVECs were treated in Se-deficient or Se-supplement (12, 24, 50, 100 ng/ml) culture medium for 48 h. Low Se medium was achieved by reducing serum concentrations and the essential growth factors were added. After the incubation, the effects of supplemental Se on ET-1 and its receptors gene expression were assessed by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). Compared with the control group, our results showed that among the different concentrations of Se supplement, the levels of ET-1 gene expression treated with both the moderate Se doses (24, 50 ng/ml, P doses (100 ng/ml, P dose group (12 ng/ml), which showed no changes. Meanwhile, Se supplement (24, 50, 100 ng/ml) was found to be effective in reducing the expression levels of ETA (P  0.05) in ETB mRNA levels during the cell proliferation. These observations indicated that Se may play both direct and indirect role in the regulation of ET-1 and its receptors gene expression and their production in avian PMVECs. Se supplement decreases in ET-1 and ETA production in Se-deficient PMVECs may partly explain the mechanism of the protective effects of the Se on the cardiovascular system.

  20. Edaravone protected human brain microvascular endothelial cells from methylglyoxal-induced injury by inhibiting AGEs/RAGE/oxidative stress.

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    Wenlu Li

    Full Text Available Subjects with diabetes experience an increased risk of cerebrovascular disease and stroke compared with nondiabetic age-matched individuals. Increased formation of reactive physiological dicarbonyl compound methylglyoxal (MGO seems to be implicated in the development of diabetic vascular complication due to its protein glycation and oxidative stress effect. Edaravone, a novel radical scavenger, has been reported to display the advantageous effects on ischemic stroke both in animals and clinical trials; however, little is known about whether edaravone has protective effects on diabetic cerebrovascular injury. Using cultured human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC, protective effects of edaravone on MGO and MGO enhancing oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD induced injury were investigated. Cell injury was measured by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT formation, cell account, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH release and Rhodamine 123 staining. Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs formation and receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE expression were measured by western blotting. Cellular oxidative stress was measured by reactive oxygen species (ROS release. Treatment of MGO for 24 h significantly induced HBMEC injury, which was inhibited by pretreatment of edaravone from 10-100 µmol/l. What's more, treatment of MGO enhanced AGEs accumulation, RAGE expression and ROS release in the cultured HBMEC, which were inhibited by 100 µmol/l edaravone. Finally, treatment of MGO for 24 h and then followed by 3 h OGD insult significantly enhanced cell injury when compared with OGD insult only, which was also protected by 100 µmol/l edaravone. Thus, edaravone protected HBMEC from MGO and MGO enhancing OGD-induced injury by inhibiting AGEs/RAGE/oxidative stress.

  1. High glucose induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in cardiac microvascular endothelial cells are regulated by FoxO3a.

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    Chaoming Peng

    Full Text Available Cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (CMECs dysfunction contributes to cardiovascular complications in diabetes, whereas, the underlying mechanism is not fully clarified. FoxO transcription factors are involved in apoptosis and reactive oxygen species (ROS production. Therefore, the present study was designed to elucidate the potential role of FoxO3a on the CMECs injury induced by high glucose.CMECs were isolated from hearts of adult rats and cultured in normal or high glucose medium for 6 h, 12 h and 24 h respectively. To down-regulate FoxO3a expression, CMECs were transfected with FoxO3a siRNA. ROS accumulation and apoptosis in CMECs were assessed by dihydroethidine (DHE staining and TUNEL assay respectively. Moreover, the expressions of Akt, FoxO3a, Bim and BclxL in CMECs were assessed by Western blotting assay.ROS accumulation in CMECs was significantly increased after high glucose incubation for 6 to 24 h. Meanwhile, high glucose also increased apoptosis in CMECs, correlated with decreased the phosphorylation expressions of Akt and FoxO3a. Moreover, high glucose incubation increased the expression of Bim, whereas increased anti-apoptotic protein BclxL. Furthermore, siRNA target FoxO3a silencing enhanced the ROS accumulation, whereas suppressed apoptosis in CMECs. FoxO3a silencing also abolished the disturbance of Bcl-2 proteins induced by high glucose in CMECs.Our data provide evidence that high glucose induced FoxO3a activation which suppressed ROS accumulation, and in parallel, resulted in apoptosis of CMECs.

  2. PJ-34 inhibits PARP-1 expression and ERK phosphorylation in glioma-conditioned brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motta, Carla; D'Angeli, Floriana; Scalia, Marina; Satriano, Cristina; Barbagallo, Davide; Naletova, Irina; Anfuso, Carmelina Daniela; Lupo, Gabriella; Spina-Purrello, Vittoria

    2015-08-15

    Inhibitors of PARP-1(Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1) act by competing with NAD(+), the enzyme physiological substrate, which play a protective role in many pathological conditions characterized by PARP-1 overactivation. It has been shown that PARP-1 also promotes tumor growth and progression through its DNA repair activity. Since angiogenesis is an essential requirement for these activities, we sought to determine whether PARP inhibition might affect rat brain microvascular endothelial cells (GP8.3) migration, stimulated by C6-glioma conditioned medium (CM). Through wound-healing experiments and MTT analysis, we demonstrated that PARP-1 inhibitor PJ-34 [N-(6-Oxo-5,6-dihydrophenanthridin-2-yl)-N,N-dimethylacetamide] abolishes the migratory response of GP8.3 cells and reduces their viability. PARP-1 also acts in a DNA independent way within the Extracellular-Regulated-Kinase (ERK) signaling cascade, which regulates cell proliferation and differentiation. By western analysis and confocal laser scanning microscopy (LSM), we analyzed the effects of PJ-34 on PARP-1 expression, phospho-ERK and phospho-Elk-1 activation. The effect of MEK (mitogen-activated-protein-kinase-kinase) inhibitor PD98059 (2-(2-Amino-3-methoxyphenyl)-4 H-1-benzopyran-4-one) on PARP-1 expression in unstimulated and in CM-stimulated GP8.3 cells was analyzed by RT-PCR. PARP-1 expression and phospho-ERK activation were significantly reduced by treatment of GP8.3 cells with PJ-34 or PD98059. By LSM, we further demonstrated that PARP-1 and phospho-ERK are coexpressed and share the same subcellular localization in GP8.3 cells, in the cytoplasm as well as in nucleoplasm. Based on these data, we propose that PARP-1 and phospho-ERK interact in the cytosol and then translocate to the nucleus, where they trigger a proliferative response. We also propose that PARP-1 inhibition blocks CM-induced endothelial migration by interfering with ERK signal-transduction pathway. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  3. The interaction between circulating complement proteins and cutaneous microvascular endothelial cells in the development of childhood Henoch-Schonlein Purpura.

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    Yao-Hsu Yang

    Full Text Available In addition to IgA, the deposition of complement (C3 in dermal vessels is commonly found in Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP. The aim of this study is to elucidate the role of circulating complement proteins in the pathogenesis of childhood HSP.Plasma levels of C3a, C4a, C5a, and Bb in 30 HSP patients and 30 healthy controls were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. The expression of C3a receptor (C3aR, C5a receptor (CD88, E-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1, C3, C5, interleukin (IL-8, monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP-1, and RANTES by human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC-d was evaluated either by flow cytometry or by ELISA.At the acute stage, HSP patients had higher plasma levels of C3a (359.5 ± 115.3 vs. 183.3 ± 94.1 ng/ml, p < 0.0001, C5a (181.4 ± 86.1 vs. 33.7 ± 26.3 ng/ml, p < 0.0001, and Bb (3.7 ± 2.6 vs. 1.0 ± 0.6 μg/ml, p < 0.0001, but not C4a than healthy controls. Although HSP patient-derived acute phase plasma did not alter the presentation of C3aR and CD88 on HMVEC-d, it enhanced the production of endothelial C3 and C5. Moreover, C5a was shown in vitro to up-regulate the expression of IL-8, MCP-1, E-selectin, and ICAM-1 by HMVEC-d with a dose-dependent manner.In HSP, the activation of the complement system in part through the alternative pathway may have resulted in increased plasma levels of C3a and C5a, which, especially C5a, may play a role in the disease pathogenesis by activating endothelium of cutaneous small vessels.

  4. Endothelial cells stimulate growth of normal and cancerous breast epithelial cells in 3D culture

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    Magnusson Magnus K

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epithelial-stromal interaction provides regulatory signals that maintain correct histoarchitecture and homeostasis in the normal breast and facilitates tumor progression in breast cancer. However, research on the regulatory role of the endothelial component in the normal and malignant breast gland has largely been neglected. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of endothelial cells on growth and differentiation of human breast epithelial cells in a three-dimensional (3D co-culture assay. Methods Breast luminal and myoepithelial cells and endothelial cells were isolated from reduction mammoplasties. Primary cells and established normal and malignant breast cell lines were embedded in reconstituted basement membrane in direct co-culture with endothelial cells and by separation of Transwell filters. Morphogenic and phenotypic profiles of co-cultures was evaluated by phase contrast microscopy, immunostaining and confocal microscopy. Results In co-culture, endothelial cells stimulate proliferation of both luminal- and myoepithelial cells. Furthermore, endothelial cells induce a subpopulation of luminal epithelial cells to form large acini/ducts with a large and clear lumen. Endothelial cells also stimulate growth and cloning efficiency of normal and malignant breast epithelial cell lines. Transwell and gradient co-culture studies show that endothelial derived effects are mediated - at least partially - by soluble factors. Conclusion Breast endothelial cells - beside their role in transporting nutrients and oxygen to tissues - are vital component of the epithelial microenvironment in the breast and provide proliferative signals to the normal and malignant breast epithelium. These growth promoting effects of endothelial cells should be taken into consideration in breast cancer biology.

  5. Late-Start Days Increase Total Operative Time in Microvascular Breast Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Michael W; Barr, Jason S; Hill, J Bradford; Weichman, Katie E; Karp, Nolan S; Levine, Jamie P

    2015-07-01

    Prolonged operative time has been associated with increased postoperative complications and higher costs. Many academic centers have a designated day for didactics that cause cases to start 1 hour later. The purpose of this study is to analyze the late-start effect of microvascular breast reconstructions on operative duration. A retrospective review was performed on all patients who underwent abdomina-based free flap breast reconstruction from 2007 to 2011 and analyzed by those who had surgery on late-start versus normal-start days. Patient demographics, average operative time, postoperative complications, and individual surgeon effects were analyzed. A Student t-test was used to compare operative times with statistical significance set at p start days and 251 cases were performed on normal-start days. Patient demographics and complications were not statistically different between the groups. The average operative time for all reconstructions was 434.3 minutes. The average operative times were significantly longer for late-start days, 517.6 versus 427.3 minutes (p = 0.002). This was true for both unilateral and bilateral reconstructions (432.8 vs. 350.9 minutes, p = 0.05; 551.5 vs. 461.2 minutes, p = 0.007). There were no differences in perioperative complications and multivariate regression showed no statistically significant relationship of confounders to duration of surgery. Starting cases 1 hour later can increase operative times. Although outcomes were not affected, we recommend avoiding lengthy procedures on late-start days. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  6. Blocking of α1β1 and α2β1 adhesion molecules inhibits eosinophil migration through human lung microvascular endothelial cell monolayer

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    Stanisława Bazan-Socha

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In cell trafficking to the airways in asthma, among integrins the most important are those containing α4 and β2 subunits. We have previously shown that also blocking of collagen receptors, α1β1 and α2β1 integrins, inhibits transmigration of eosinophils of asthmatic subjects through a monolayer of skin microvascular endothelial cells seeded on collagen IV coated inserts. However, it was not clear whether this observation was limited to asthma or depended on the type of microvascular cell and collagen IV used as a base. In the current study we performed a transmigration assay using human lung microvascular endothelial cells seeded directly on a plastic surface as a base and blood cells isolated from 12 representatives of each of two groups, asthmatics and healthy donors, by gradient centrifugation, followed by immunomagnetic negative separation of eosinophils. Isolated eosinophils and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC were inhibited by snake venom-derived integrin antagonists including viperistatin and VP12, as inhibitors of α1β1 and α2β1 integrin, respectively, and VLO5 and VLO4, as inhibitors of α4β1 and α5β1 integrin, respectively. All snake venom-derived anti-adhesive proteins were effective in inhibiting eosinophil transmigration, whilst only VLO5 and VLO4 reduced PBMC mobility in this assay. This observation was similar in both groups of subjects studied. α1β1 and α2β1 integrins could be involved in transmigration of eosinophil to the inflammatory site. Migratory inhibition was observed in asthma subjects as well as in healthy donors, and did not depend on origin of endothelial cells or the extracellular matrix component used as a base.

  7. Differential Effects of Bartonella henselae on Human and Feline Macro- and Micro-Vascular Endothelial Cells: e20204

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moez Berrich; Claudine Kieda; Catherine Grillon; Martine Monteil; Nathalie Lamerant; Julie Gavard; Henri Jean Boulouis; Nadia Haddad

    2011-01-01

    .... To this purpose, we have developed nine feline EC lines which allowed comparing the effects of Bartonella strains on human and feline micro-vascular ECs representative of the infection development...

  8. Early peripheral endothelial dysfunction predicts myocardial infarct extension and microvascular obstruction in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo Baptista, Sérgio; Faustino, Mariana; Brizida, Luís; Loureiro, José; Augusto, João; Abecasis, João; Monteiro, Célia; Leal, Paulo; Nédio, Maura; Farto E Abreu, Pedro; Gil, Victor; Morais, Carlos

    2017-10-01

    The role of endothelial dysfunction (ED) in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is poorly understood. Peripheral arterial tonometry (PAT) allows non-invasive evaluation of ED, but has never been used for this purpose early after primary percutaneous coronary intervention (P-PCI). Our purpose was to analyze the relation between ED assessed by PAT and both the presence of microvascular obstruction (MVO) and infarct extension in STEMI patients. ED was assessed by the reactive hyperemia index (RHI), measured by PAT and defined as RHI extension was assessed by troponin I (TnI) release and contrast-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance (ceCMR). MVO was assessed by ceCMR and by indirect angiographic and ECG indicators. An echocardiogram was also performed in the first 12 h. We included 38 patients (mean age 60.0±13.7 years, 29 male). Mean RHI was 1.87±0.60 and 16 patients (42.1%) had ED. Peak TnI (median 118 mg/dl, IQR 186 vs. 67/81, p=0.024) and AUC of TnI (median 2305, IQR 2486 vs. 1076/1042, p=0.012) were significantly higher in patients with ED, who also showed a trend for more transmural infarcts (63.6% vs. 22.2%, p=0.06) and larger infarct mass on ceCMR (median 17.5%, IQR 15.4 vs. 10.1/10.3, p=0.08). Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was lower and wall motion score index (WMSI) was higher on both echocardiogram and ceCMR in patients with ED. On ceCMR, MVO was more frequent in patients with RHI <1.67 (54.5% vs. 11.1%, p=0.03). ECG and angiographic indicators of MVO all showed a trend toward worse results in these patients. The presence of ED assessed by PAT 24 h after P-PCI in patients with STEMI is associated with larger infarcts, lower LVEF, higher WMSI and higher prevalence of MVO. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Reprogramming of TIMP-1 and TIMP-3 expression profiles in brain microvascular endothelial cells and astrocytes in response to proinflammatory cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugno, M; Witek, B; Bereta, J; Bereta, M; Edwards, D R; Kordula, T

    1999-04-01

    Cytokine-dependent regulation of tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) expression provides an important mechanism for controlling the activity of matrix metalloproteinases. We present data indicating that during inflammatory processes TIMP-1 and TIMP-3 may be involved in the proteolytic remodeling of subendothelial basement membrane of the brain microvascular system, a key step during leukocyte migration into the brain perivascular tissue. In brain endothelial cells the expression of TIMP-1 is dramatically up-regulated by major proinflammatory cytokines, with the combination of interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha) exhibiting the strongest synergistic stimulation. Simultaneously, IL-1beta/TNF alpha almost completely blocks TIMP-3 expression. Both synergistic effects are dose-dependent within the concentration range 0.05-5 ng/ml of both cytokines and correlate with the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, an endothelial cell activation marker. Down-regulation of TIMP-3 expression is also detected in astrocytes treated with TNF alpha or IFN-gamma whereas oncostatin M as well as TNF alpha up-regulate TIMP-1 mRNA level. We propose that the cytokine-modified balance between TIMP-1 and TIMP-3 expression provides a potential mechanism involved in the regulation of microvascular basement membrane proteolysis.

  10. A novel paradigm for heart failure with preserved ejection fraction: comorbidities drive myocardial dysfunction and remodeling through coronary microvascular endothelial inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulus, Walter J; Tschöpe, Carsten

    2013-07-23

    Over the past decade, myocardial structure, cardiomyocyte function, and intramyocardial signaling were shown to be specifically altered in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF). A new paradigm for HFPEF development is therefore proposed, which identifies a systemic proinflammatory state induced by comorbidities as the cause of myocardial structural and functional alterations. The new paradigm presumes the following sequence of events in HFPEF: 1) a high prevalence of comorbidities such as overweight/obesity, diabetes mellitus, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and salt-sensitive hypertension induce a systemic proinflammatory state; 2) a systemic proinflammatory state causes coronary microvascular endothelial inflammation; 3) coronary microvascular endothelial inflammation reduces nitric oxide bioavailability, cyclic guanosine monophosphate content, and protein kinase G (PKG) activity in adjacent cardiomyocytes; 4) low PKG activity favors hypertrophy development and increases resting tension because of hypophosphorylation of titin; and 5) both stiff cardiomyocytes and interstitial fibrosis contribute to high diastolic left ventricular (LV) stiffness and heart failure development. The new HFPEF paradigm shifts emphasis from LV afterload excess to coronary microvascular inflammation. This shift is supported by a favorable Laplace relationship in concentric LV hypertrophy and by all cardiac chambers showing similar remodeling and dysfunction. Myocardial remodeling in HFPEF differs from heart failure with reduced ejection fraction, in which remodeling is driven by loss of cardiomyocytes. The new HFPEF paradigm proposes comorbidities, plasma markers of inflammation, or vascular hyperemic responses to be included in diagnostic algorithms and aims at restoring myocardial PKG activity. Copyright © 2013 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of mir-21 on Cardiac Microvascular Endothelial Cells After Acute Myocardial Infarction in Rats: Role of Phosphatase and Tensin Homolog (PTEN)/Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) Signal Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Feng; Liu, Wenwei; Yan, Xiaojuan; Zhou, Hanyun; Zhang, Hongshen; Liu, Jianfei; Yu, Ming; Zhu, Xiaoshan; Ma, Kezhong

    2016-01-01

    Background This study investigated how miR-21 expression is reflected in acute myocardial infarction and explored the role of miR-21 and the PTEN/VEGF signaling pathway in cardiac microvascular endothelial cells. Material/Methods We used an in vivo LAD rat model to simulate acute myocardial infarction. MiR-21 mimics and miR-21 inhibitors were injected and transfected into model rats in order to alter miR-21 expression. Cardiac functions were evaluated using echocardiographic measurement, ELIS...

  12. [Expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in different breast tissues and clinical significance thereof].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei-Guo; Wang, Gang; Liu, Yang; Zou, Yu-Huan; Song, Ji-Ning; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Wang, Wen-Ya

    2008-03-25

    To investigate the differences in the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and microvessel density (MVD) count in breast benign affection, breast atypical hyperplasia, and breast carcinoma in situ and to clarify the association of VEGF expression and MVD with the clinicopathological features of these diseases. Immunohistochemistry (SP-method) was used to examine the expression of VEGF and MVD count in 100 samples of breast benign affection (including 35 cases of breast fibroid tumor, 35 cases of breast cystic hyperplasia, and 30 cases of intraductal papilloma), and 15 samples of breast atypical hyperplasia, and 25 samples of breast carcinoma in situ, obtained during operation. The positive rate of VEGF of the breast carcinoma in situ group was 56% , significantly higher than hose of the breast benign affection and breast atypical hyperplasia groups (22% and 33% respectively, P breast fibroid tumor, breast cystic hyperplasia, and intraductal papilloma (all P > 0.05). The MVD value of the breast carcinoma in situ group was 20.1 +/- 6.1, significantly higher than those of the breast benign affection group and breast atypical hyperplasia groups (14.3 +/- 3. 5 and 18.5 +/- 3.6 respectively, both P breast fibroid tumor, breast cystic hyperplasia, and intraductal papilloma (all P > 0.05). In breast tumors, angiogenesis is probably mediated mainly by VEGF. The occurrence and progression of breast cancer may be related with the expression of VEGF.

  13. Protein C activation peptide inhibits the expression of ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and interleukin-8 induced by TNF-α in human dermal microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pina-Canseco, María Del Socorro; Páez-Arenas, Araceli; Massó, Felipe; Pérez-Campos, Eduardo; Martínez-Cruz, Ruth; Hernández-Cruz, Pedro; Majluf-Cruz, Abraham; Martínez-Cruz, Margarito; Pérez-Campos Mayoral, Laura; Pérez-Santiago, Alma Dolores; Zenteno, Edgar

    2012-10-08

    Activated protein C (APC) is generated from the cleavage of protein C by thrombin coupled to thrombomodulin and, subsequently, is released as protein C activation peptide (papC). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of papC on human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1), activated with 5 ng//mL TNF-α. Flow cytometry showed that papC inhibited the expression of VCAM-1 and ICAM-1, after activation with TNF-a. Similarly, RT-PCR analysis revealed that 2 and 4 pM papC inhibited the expression of VCAM-1 and IL-8 mRNA in TNF-α-treated HMEC-1. In addition, the expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase(eNOS) increased in HMEC-1 treated with papC, compared to those without treatment. Furthermore, Jurkat cell adhesion to HMEC-1 induced by TNF-a was significantly inhibited after the addition of papC, compared to HMEC-1 without papC (p = 0.03). Finally, a control peptide analog to papC showed no effect on the expression of ICAM and VCAM on the surface of HMEC-1. In conclusion, our results suggest that papC exerts anti-inflammatory effects on endothelial cells.

  14. Contacting co-culture of human retinal microvascular endothelial cells alters barrier function of human embryonic stem cell derived retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skottman, H; Muranen, J; Lähdekorpi, H; Pajula, E; Mäkelä, K; Koivusalo, L; Koistinen, A; Uusitalo, H; Kaarniranta, K; Juuti-Uusitalo, K

    2017-10-01

    Here we evaluated the effects of human retinal microvascular endothelial cells (hREC) on mature human embryonic stem cell (hESC) derived retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. The hESC-RPE cells (Regea08/017, Regea08/023 or Regea11/013) and hREC (ACBRI 181) were co-cultured on opposite sides of transparent membranes for up to six weeks. Thereafter barrier function, small molecule permeability, localization of RPE and endothelial cell marker proteins, cellular fine structure, and growth factor secretion of were evaluated. After co-culture, the RPE specific CRALBP and endothelial cell specific von Willebrand factor were appropriately localized. In addition, the general morphology, pigmentation, and fine structure of hESC-RPE cells were unaffected. Co-culture increased the barrier function of hESC-RPE cells, detected both with TEER measurements and cumulative permeability of FD4 - although the differences varied among the cell lines. Co-culturing significantly altered VEGF and PEDF secretion, but again the differences were cell line specific. The results of this study showed that co-culture with hREC affects hESC-RPE functionality. In addition, co-culture revealed drastic cell line specific differences, most notably in growth factor secretion. This model has the potential to be used as an in vitro outer blood-retinal barrier model for drug permeability testing. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Generation of Brain Microvascular Endothelial-Like Cells from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells by Co-Culture with C6 Glioma Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruka Minami

    Full Text Available The blood brain barrier (BBB is formed by brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs and tightly regulates the transport of molecules from blood to neural tissues. In vitro BBB models from human pluripotent stem cell (PSCs-derived BMECs would be useful not only for the research on the BBB development and function but also for drug-screening for neurological diseases. However, little is known about the differentiation of human PSCs to BMECs. In the present study, human induced PSCs (iPSCs were differentiated into endothelial cells (ECs, and further maturated to BMECs. Interestingly, C6 rat glioma cell-conditioned medium (C6CM, in addition to C6 co-culture, induced the differentiation of human iPSC-derived ECs (iPS-ECs to BMEC-like cells, increase in the trans-endothelial electrical resistance, decreased in the dextran transport and up-regulation of gene expression of tight junction molecules in human iPS-ECs. Moreover, Wnt inhibitors attenuated the effects of C6CM. In summary, we have established a simple protocol of the generation of BMEC-like cells from human iPSCs, and have demonstrated that differentiation of iPS-ECs to BMEC-like cells is induced by C6CM-derived signals, including canonical Wnt signals.

  16. Metformin induces up-regulation of blood-brain barrier functions by activating AMP-activated protein kinase in rat brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takata, Fuyuko; Dohgu, Shinya; Matsumoto, Junichi; Machida, Takashi; Kaneshima, Shuji; Matsuo, Mai; Sakaguchi, Shinya; Takeshige, Yuki; Yamauchi, Atsushi; Kataoka, Yasufumi

    2013-04-19

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption occurs frequently in CNS diseases and injuries. Few drugs have been developed as therapeutic candidates for facilitating BBB functions. Here, we examined whether metformin up-regulates BBB functions using rat brain microvascular endothelial cells (RBECs). Metformin, concentration- and time-dependently increased transendothelial electrical resistance of RBEC monolayers, and decreased RBEC permeability to sodium fluorescein and Evans blue albumin. These effects of metformin were blocked by compound C, an inhibitor of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). AMPK stimulation with an AMPK activator, AICAR, enhanced BBB functions. These findings indicate that metformin induces up-regulation of BBB functions via AMPK activation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. West Nile virus infection modulates human brain microvascular endothelial cells tight junction proteins and cell adhesion molecules: Transmigration across the in vitro blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Saguna; Lo, Yeung; Chapagain, Moti; Lum, Stephanie; Kumar, Mukesh; Gurjav, Ulziijargal; Luo, Haiyan; Nakatsuka, Austin; Nerurkar, Vivek R

    2009-03-15

    Neurological complications such as inflammation, failure of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and neuronal death contribute to the mortality and morbidity associated with WNV-induced meningitis. Compromised BBB indicates the ability of the virus to gain entry into the CNS via the BBB, however, the underlying mechanisms, and the specific cell types associated with WNV-CNS trafficking are not well understood. Brain microvascular endothelial cells, the main component of the BBB, represent a barrier to virus dissemination into the CNS and could play key role in WNV spread via hematogenous route. To investigate WNV entry into the CNS, we infected primary human brain microvascular endothelial (HBMVE) cells with the neurovirulent strain of WNV (NY99) and examined WNV replication kinetics together with the changes in the expressions of key tight junction proteins (TJP) and cell adhesion molecules (CAM). WNV infection of HBMVE cells was productive as analyzed by plaque assay and qRT-PCR, and did not induce cytopathic effect. Increased mRNA and protein expressions of TJP (claudin-1) and CAM (vascular cell adhesion molecule and E-selectin) were observed at days 2 and 3 after infection, respectively, which coincided with the peak in WNV replication. Further, using an in vitro BBB model comprised of HBMVE cells, we demonstrate that cell-free WNV can cross the BBB, without compromising the BBB integrity. These data suggest that infection of HBMVE cells can facilitate entry of cell-free virus into the CNS without disturbing the BBB, and increased CAM may assist in the trafficking of WNV-infected immune cells into the CNS, via 'Trojan horse' mechanism, thereby contributing to WNV dissemination in the CNS and associated pathology.

  18. Up-to-date Doppler techniques for breast tumor vascularity: superb microvascular imaging and contrast-enhanced ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ah Young; Seo, Bo Kyoung

    2017-08-19

    Ultrasonographic Doppler techniques have improved greatly over the years, allowing more sophisticated evaluation of breast tumor vascularity. Superb microvascular imaging (SMI) and contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) with second-generation contrast agents are two representative up-to-date techniques. SMI is a sensitive Doppler technique that adopts an intelligent filter system to separate low-flow signals from artifacts. With the development of second-generation contrast agents, CEUS has also emerged as a useful Doppler technique for evaluating tumor microcirculation. Both techniques can improve the diagnostic performance of gray-scale ultrasonography by providing vascular information useful not only for the morphologic assessment of microvessels, but also for the quantitative analysis of perfusion. In this review, we explain the imaging principles and previous research underlying these two vascular techniques, and describe our clinical experiences.

  19. Effects of mir-21 on Cardiac Microvascular Endothelial Cells After Acute Myocardial Infarction in Rats: Role of Phosphatase and Tensin Homolog (PTEN)/Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) Signal Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Feng; Liu, Wenwei; Yan, Xiaojuan; Zhou, Hanyun; Zhang, Hongshen; Liu, Jianfei; Yu, Ming; Zhu, Xiaoshan; Ma, Kezhong

    2016-01-01

    Background This study investigated how miR-21 expression is reflected in acute myocardial infarction and explored the role of miR-21 and the PTEN/VEGF signaling pathway in cardiac microvascular endothelial cells. Material/Methods We used an in vivo LAD rat model to simulate acute myocardial infarction. MiR-21 mimics and miR-21 inhibitors were injected and transfected into model rats in order to alter miR-21 expression. Cardiac functions were evaluated using echocardiographic measurement, ELISA, and Masson staining. In addition, lenti-PTEN and VEGF siRNA were transfected into CMEC cells using standard procedures for assessing the effect of PTEN and VEGE on cell proliferation, apoptosis, and angiogenesis. MiR-21, PTEN, and VEGF expressions were examined by RT-PCR and Western blot. The relationship between miR-21 and PTEN was determined by the luciferase activity assay. Results We demonstrated that miR-21 bonded with the 3′-UTR of PTEN and suppressed PTEN expressions. Established models significantly induced cardiac infarct volume and endothelial injury marker expressions as well as miR-21 and PTEN expressions (Pcell proliferation, apoptosis, and angiogenesis (P<0.05). Conclusions MiR-21 exerts protective effects on endothelial injury through the PTEN/VEGF pathway after acute myocardial infarction. PMID:27708252

  20. Let-7i attenuates human brain microvascular endothelial cell damage in oxygen glucose deprivation model by decreasing toll-like receptor 4 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Wei; Tian, Canhui; Peng, Shunli; Zhou, Liang; Pan, Suyue; Deng, Zhen

    2017-11-04

    The let-7 family of microRNAs (miRNAs) plays an important role on endothelial cell function. However, there have been few studies on their role under ischemic conditions. In this study, we demonstrate that let-7i, belonging to the let-7 family, rescues human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs) in an oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) model. Our data show that the expression of let-7 family miRNAs was downregulated after OGD. Overexpression of let-7i significantly alleviated cell death and improved survival of OGD-treated HBMECs. Let-7i also protected permeability in an in vitro blood brain barrier (BBB) model. Further, let-7i downregulated the expression of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), an inflammation trigger. Moreover, overexpression of let-7i decreased matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP9) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression under OGD. Upon silencing TLR4 expression in HBMECs, the anti-inflammatory effect of let-7i was abolished. Our research suggests that let-7i promotes OGD-induced inflammation via downregulating TLR4 expression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Apigenin Isolated from the Medicinal Plant Elsholtzia rugulosa Prevents β-Amyloid 25–35-Induces Toxicity in Rat Cerebral Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingshan Liu

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Endothelial cells of cerebral capillaries forming the blood-brain barrier play an important role in the pathogenesis and therapy of Alzheimer’s disease. Amyloid-β peptides are key pathological elements in the development of this disease. Apigenin (4’,5,7-tetrahydroxyflavone is a plant flavonoid and pharmacologically active agent that can be isolated from several plant species. In the present study, effects of apigenin obtained from the medicinal plant Elsholtzia rugulosa (Labiatae on primary cultured rat cerebral microvascular endothelial cells (CMECs mediated by amyloid-β peptide 25–35 (Aβ25–35 were examined. Aβ25–35 showed toxic effects on CMECs, involving reduction of cell viability, release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, increase of nuclear condensation, over-production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS, decrease of superoxide dismutase (SOD activity, and breakage of the barrier integrity and function. Based on this model, we demonstrated that apigenin from the medicinal plant Elsholtzia rugulosa protected cultured rat CMECs by increasing cell viability, reducing LDH release, relieving nuclear condensation, alleviating intracellular ROS generation, increasing SOD activity, and strengthening the barrier integrity through the preservation of transendothelial electrical resistance, permeability property and characteristic enzymatic activity after being exposed to Aβ25–35. In conclusion, apigenin isolated from Elsholtzia rugulosa has the ability to protect rat CMECs against Aβ25–35-induced toxicity.

  2. Real-time imaging of VCAM-1 mRNA in TNF-α activated retinal microvascular endothelial cells using antisense hairpin-DNA functionalized gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Md Imam; Jayagopal, Ashwath; Wong, Alexis; McCollum, Gary W; Wright, David W; Penn, John S

    2018-01-01

    Vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) is an important inflammatory biomarker correlating with retinal disease progression. Thus, detection of VCAM-1 mRNA expression levels at an early disease stage could be an important predictive biomarker to assess the risk of disease progression and monitoring treatment response. We have developed VCAM-1 targeted antisense hairpin DNA-functionalized gold nanoparticles (AS-VCAM-1 hAuNP) for the real time detection of VCAM-1 mRNA expression levels in retinal endothelial cells. The AS-VCAM-1 hAuNP fluorescence enhancement clearly visualized the TNF-α induced cellular VCAM-1 mRNA levels with high signal to noise ratios compared to normal serum treated cells. The scrambled hAuNP probes were minimally detectable under same image acquisition conditions. Intracellular hAuNPs were detected using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis of the intact cells. In addition, the AS-VCAM-1 hAuNP probes exhibited no acute toxicity to the retinal microvascular endothelial cells as measured by live-dead assay. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Circulating Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells (cBMECs) as Potential Biomarkers of the Blood–Brain Barrier Disorders Caused by Microbial and Non-Microbial Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chun-Hua; Cao, Hong; Zhang, Aimin; Jong, Ambrose

    2013-01-01

    Despite aggressive research, central nervous system (CNS) disorders, including blood-brain barrier (BBB) injury caused by microbial infection, stroke, abused drugs [e.g., methamphetamine (METH) and nicotine], and other pathogenic insults, remain the world's leading cause of disabilities. In our previous work, we found that dysfunction of brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs), which are a major component of the BBB, could be caused by nicotine, meningitic pathogens and microbial factors, including HIV-1 virulence factors gp41 and gp120. One of the most challenging issues in this area is that there are no available cell-based biomarkers in peripheral blood for BBB disorders caused by microbial and non-microbial insults. To identify such cellular biomarkers for BBB injuries, our studies have shown that mice treated with nicotine, METH and gp120 resulted in increased blood levels of CD146+(endothelial marker)/S100B+ (brain marker) circulating BMECs (cBMECs) and CD133+[progenitor cell (PC) marker]/CD146+ endothelial PCs (EPCs), along with enhanced Evans blue and albumin extravasation into the brain. Nicotine and gp120 were able to significantly increase the serum levels of ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase 1 (UCHL1) (a new BBB marker) as well as S100B in mice, which are correlated with the changes in cBMECs and EPCs. Nicotine- and meningitic E. coli K1-induced enhancement of cBMEC levels, leukocyte migration across the BBB and albumin extravasation into the brain were significantly reduced in alpha7 nAChR knockout mice, suggesting that this inflammatory regulator plays an important role in CNS inflammation and BBB disorders caused by microbial and non-microbial factors. These results demonstrated that cBMECs as well as EPCs may be used as potential cell-based biomarkers for indexing of BBB injury. PMID:23637989

  4. Circulating brain microvascular endothelial cells (cBMECs) as potential biomarkers of the blood-brain barrier disorders caused by microbial and non-microbial factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sheng-He; Wang, Lin; Chi, Feng; Wu, Chun-Hua; Cao, Hong; Zhang, Aimin; Jong, Ambrose

    2013-01-01

    Despite aggressive research, central nervous system (CNS) disorders, including blood-brain barrier (BBB) injury caused by microbial infection, stroke, abused drugs [e.g., methamphetamine (METH) and nicotine], and other pathogenic insults, remain the world's leading cause of disabilities. In our previous work, we found that dysfunction of brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs), which are a major component of the BBB, could be caused by nicotine, meningitic pathogens and microbial factors, including HIV-1 virulence factors gp41 and gp120. One of the most challenging issues in this area is that there are no available cell-based biomarkers in peripheral blood for BBB disorders caused by microbial and non-microbial insults. To identify such cellular biomarkers for BBB injuries, our studies have shown that mice treated with nicotine, METH and gp120 resulted in increased blood levels of CD146+(endothelial marker)/S100B+ (brain marker) circulating BMECs (cBMECs) and CD133+[progenitor cell (PC) marker]/CD146+ endothelial PCs (EPCs), along with enhanced Evans blue and albumin extravasation into the brain. Nicotine and gp120 were able to significantly increase the serum levels of ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase 1 (UCHL1) (a new BBB marker) as well as S100B in mice, which are correlated with the changes in cBMECs and EPCs. Nicotine- and meningitic E. coli K1-induced enhancement of cBMEC levels, leukocyte migration across the BBB and albumin extravasation into the brain were significantly reduced in alpha7 nAChR knockout mice, suggesting that this inflammatory regulator plays an important role in CNS inflammation and BBB disorders caused by microbial and non-microbial factors. These results demonstrated that cBMECs as well as EPCs may be used as potential cell-based biomarkers for indexing of BBB injury.

  5. Circulating brain microvascular endothelial cells (cBMECs as potential biomarkers of the blood-brain barrier disorders caused by microbial and non-microbial factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-He Huang

    Full Text Available Despite aggressive research, central nervous system (CNS disorders, including blood-brain barrier (BBB injury caused by microbial infection, stroke, abused drugs [e.g., methamphetamine (METH and nicotine], and other pathogenic insults, remain the world's leading cause of disabilities. In our previous work, we found that dysfunction of brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs, which are a major component of the BBB, could be caused by nicotine, meningitic pathogens and microbial factors, including HIV-1 virulence factors gp41 and gp120. One of the most challenging issues in this area is that there are no available cell-based biomarkers in peripheral blood for BBB disorders caused by microbial and non-microbial insults. To identify such cellular biomarkers for BBB injuries, our studies have shown that mice treated with nicotine, METH and gp120 resulted in increased blood levels of CD146+(endothelial marker/S100B+ (brain marker circulating BMECs (cBMECs and CD133+[progenitor cell (PC marker]/CD146+ endothelial PCs (EPCs, along with enhanced Evans blue and albumin extravasation into the brain. Nicotine and gp120 were able to significantly increase the serum levels of ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase 1 (UCHL1 (a new BBB marker as well as S100B in mice, which are correlated with the changes in cBMECs and EPCs. Nicotine- and meningitic E. coli K1-induced enhancement of cBMEC levels, leukocyte migration across the BBB and albumin extravasation into the brain were significantly reduced in alpha7 nAChR knockout mice, suggesting that this inflammatory regulator plays an important role in CNS inflammation and BBB disorders caused by microbial and non-microbial factors. These results demonstrated that cBMECs as well as EPCs may be used as potential cell-based biomarkers for indexing of BBB injury.

  6. Adenosine receptors regulate gap junction coupling of the human cerebral microvascular endothelial cells hCMEC/D3 by Ca2+influx through cyclic nucleotide-gated channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, Almke; Bintig, Willem; Begandt, Daniela; Klett, Anne; Siller, Ina G; Gregor, Carola; Schaarschmidt, Frank; Weksler, Babette; Romero, Ignacio; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Hell, Stefan W; Ngezahayo, Anaclet

    2017-04-15

    Gap junction channels are essential for the formation and regulation of physiological units in tissues by allowing the lateral cell-to-cell diffusion of ions, metabolites and second messengers. Stimulation of the adenosine receptor subtype A 2B increases the gap junction coupling in the human blood-brain barrier endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3. Although the increased gap junction coupling is cAMP-dependent, neither the protein kinase A nor the exchange protein directly activated by cAMP were involved in this increase. We found that cAMP activates cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels and thereby induces a Ca 2+ influx, which leads to the increase in gap junction coupling. The report identifies CNG channels as a possible physiological link between adenosine receptors and the regulation of gap junction channels in endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier. The human cerebral microvascular endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3 was used to characterize the physiological link between adenosine receptors and the gap junction coupling in endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier. Expressed adenosine receptor subtypes and connexin (Cx) isoforms were identified by RT-PCR. Scrape loading/dye transfer was used to evaluate the impact of the A 2A and A 2B adenosine receptor subtype agonist 2-phenylaminoadenosine (2-PAA) on the gap junction coupling. We found that 2-PAA stimulated cAMP synthesis and enhanced gap junction coupling in a concentration-dependent manner. This enhancement was accompanied by an increase in gap junction plaques formed by Cx43. Inhibition of protein kinase A did not affect the 2-PAA-related enhancement of gap junction coupling. In contrast, the cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channel inhibitor l-cis-diltiazem, as well as the chelation of intracellular Ca 2+ with BAPTA, or the absence of external Ca 2+ , suppressed the 2-PAA-related enhancement of gap junction coupling. Moreover, we observed a 2-PAA-dependent activation of CNG channels by a combination of

  7. Effects ofPlasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes on matrix metalloproteinase-9 regulation in human microvascular endothelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sarah D Alessandro; Nicoletta Basilico; Mauro Prato

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the regulation of matrix metalloproteinases(MMPs) and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases(TIMPs) in human microvascular endothelium(HMEC-1) exposed to erythrocytes infected by different strains ofPlasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum).Methods:HMEC-1 cells were co-incubated for72 h with erythrocytes infected by late stage trophozoite of D10(chloroquine-sensitive) orW2(chloroquine-resistant)P. falciparum strains.Cell supernatants were then collected and the levels of pro- or active gelatinasesMMP-9 andMMP-2 were evaluated by gelatin zymography and densitometry.The release of pro-MMP-9,MMP-3,MMP-1 andTIMP-1 proteins was analyzed by western blotting and densitometry.Results:Infected erythrocytes inducedde novo proMMP-9 andMMP-9 release.Neither basal levels of proMMP-2 were altered, nor activeMMP-2 was found.MMP-3 andMMP-1 secretion was significantly enhanced, whereas basalTIMP-1 was unaffected.All effects were similar for both strains. Conclusions:P. falciparum parasites, either chloroquine-sensitive or -resistant, induce the release of activeMMP-9 protein from human microvascular endothelium, by impairing balances between proMMP-9 and its inhibitor, and by enhancing the levels of its activators.This work provides new evidence onMMP involvement in malaria, pointing atMMP-9 as a possible target in adjuvant therapy.

  8. Atorvastatin prevents hypoxia-induced inhibition of endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression but does not affect heme oxygenase-1 in human microvascular endothelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loboda, Agnieszka; Jazwa, Agnieszka; Jozkowicz, Alicj A.; Dorosz, Jerzy; Balla, Jozsef; Molema, Grietje; Dulak, Jozef

    Beneficial cardiovascular effects of statins, the inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, are particularly assigned to the modulation of inflammation. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) are listed among the crucial protective,

  9. Differential cytotoxic actions of Shiga toxin 1 and Shiga toxin 2 on microvascular and macrovascular endothelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bauwens, Andreas; Bielaszewska, Martina; Kemper, Björn; Langehanenberg, Patrik; von Bally, Gert; Reichelt, Rudolf; Mulac, Dennis; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich; Friedrich, Alexander W; Kim, Kwang S; Karch, Helge; Müthing, Johannes

    Shiga toxin (Stx)-mediated injury to vascular endothelial cells in the kidneys, brain and other organs underlies the pathogenesis of haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS) caused by enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC). We present a direct and comprehensive comparison of cellular injury induced by

  10. Exosomes from iPSCs Delivering siRNA Attenuate Intracellular Adhesion Molecule-1 Expression and Neutrophils Adhesion in Pulmonary Microvascular Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Zhihai; Ma, Jinhui; Wang, Chen; Yu, Jie; Qiao, Yeru; Hei, Feilong

    2017-04-01

    The pro-inflammatory activation of pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells resulting in continuous expression of cellular adhesion molecules, and subsequently recruiting primed neutrophils to form a firm neutrophils-endothelium (PMN-EC) adhesion, has been examined and found to play a vital role in acute lung injury (ALI). RNA interference (RNAi) is a cellular process through harnessing a natural pathway silencing target gene based on recognition and subsequent degradation of specific mRNA sequences. It opens a promising approach for precision medicine. However, this application was hampered by many obstacles, such as immunogenicity, instability, toxicity problems, and difficulty in across the biological membrane. In this study, we reprogrammed urine exfoliated renal epithelial cells into human induced pluripotent stem cells (huiPSCs) and purified the exosomes (Exo) from huiPSCs as RNAi delivery system. Through choosing the episomal system to deliver transcription factors, we obtained a non-integrating huiPSCs. Experiments in both vitro and vivo demonstrated that these huiPSCs possess the pluripotent properties. The exosomes of huiPSCs isolated by differential centrifugation were visualized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showing a typical exosomal appearance with an average diameter of 122 nm. Immunoblotting confirmed the presence of the typical exosomal markers, including CD63, TSG 101, and Alix. Co-cultured PKH26-labeled exosomes with human primary pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs) confirmed that they could be internalized by recipient cells at a time-dependent manner. Then, electroporation was used to introduce siRNA against intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) into exosomes to form an Exo/siRNA compound. The Exo/siRNA compound efficiently delivered the target siRNA into HMVECs causing selective gene silencing, inhibiting the ICAM-1 protein expression, and PMN-EC adhesion induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). These data suggest

  11. Microvascular Angina

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or chest pain, may be a symptom of coronary microvascular disease (MVD) . Coronary MVD is heart disease that affects ... Learn more: What is angina or chest pain? Coronary microvascular disease (MVD) Stable Angina Unstable Angina Variant Angina This ...

  12. Tetramethylpyrazine Protects Against Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation-Induced Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells Injury via Rho/Rho-kinase Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guang; Qian, Chen; Wang, Ning; Lin, Chenyu; Wang, Yan; Wang, Guangyun; Piao, Xinxin

    2017-05-01

    Tetramethylpyrazine (TMP, also known as Ligustrazine), which is isolated from Chinese Herb Medicine Ligustium wollichii Franchat (Chuan Xiong), has been widely used in China for the treatment of ischemic stroke by Chinese herbalists. Brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs) are the integral parts of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), protecting BMECs against oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) which is important for the treatment of ischemic stroke. Here, we investigated the protective mechanisms of TMP, focusing on OGD-injured BMECs and the Rho/Rho-kinase (Rho-associated kinases, ROCK) signaling pathway. The model of OGD-injured BMECs was established in this study. BMECs were identified by von Willebrand factor III staining and exposed to fasudil, or TMP at different concentrations (14.3, 28.6, 57.3 µM) for 2 h before 24 h of OGD injury. The effect of each treatment was examined by cell viability assays, measurement of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and transendothelial electric resistance and western blot analysis (caspase-3, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), RhoA, Rac1). Our results show that TMP significantly attenuated apoptosis and the permeability of BMECs induced by OGD. In addition, TMP could notably down-regulate the characteristic proteins in Rho/ROCK signaling pathway such as RhoA and Rac1, which triggered abnormal changes of eNOS and ROS, respectively. Altogether, our results show that TMP has a strong protective effect against OGD-induced BMECs injury and suggest that the mechanism might be related to the inhibition of the Rho/ROCK signaling pathway.

  13. Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells Derived from the BC1 iPS Cell Line Exhibit a Blood-Brain Barrier Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katt, Moriah E; Xu, Zinnia S; Gerecht, Sharon; Searson, Peter C

    2016-01-01

    The endothelial cells that form capillaries in the brain are highly specialized, with tight junctions that minimize paracellular transport and an array of broad-spectrum efflux pumps that make drug delivery to the brain extremely challenging. One of the major limitations in blood-brain barrier research and the development of drugs to treat central nervous system diseases is the lack of appropriate cell lines. Recent reports indicate that the derivation of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (hBMECs) from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) may provide a solution to this problem. Here we demonstrate the derivation of hBMECs extended to two new human iPSC lines: BC1 and GFP-labeled BC1. These hBMECs highly express adherens and tight junction proteins VE-cadherin, ZO-1, occludin, and claudin-5. The addition of retinoic acid upregulates VE-cadherin expression, and results in a significant increase in transendothelial electrical resistance to physiological values. The permeabilities of tacrine, rhodamine 123, and Lucifer yellow are similar to values obtained for MDCK cells. The efflux ratio for rhodamine 123 across hBMECs is in the range 2-4 indicating polarization of efflux transporters. Using the rod assay to assess cell organization in small vessels and capillaries, we show that hBMECs resist elongation with decreasing diameter but show progressive axial alignment. The derivation of hBMECs with a blood-brain barrier phenotype from the BC1 cell line highlights that the protocol is robust. The expression of GFP in hBMECs derived from the BC1-GFP cell line provides an important new resource for BBB research.

  14. Hyperglycaemia promotes human brain microvascular endothelial cell apoptosis via induction of protein kinase C-βI and prooxidant enzyme NADPH oxidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beili Shao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Blood–brain barrier disruption represents a key feature in hyperglycaemia-aggravated cerebral damage after an ischaemic stroke. Although the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown, activation of protein kinase C (PKC is thought to play a critical role. This study examined whether apoptosis of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC might contribute to hyperglycaemia-evoked barrier damage and assessed the specific role of PKC in this phenomenon. Treatments with hyperglycaemia (25 mM or phorbol myristate acetate (PMA, a protein kinase C activator, 100 nM significantly increased NADPH oxidase activity, O2•− generation, proapoptotic protein Bax expression, TUNEL-positive staining and caspase-3/7 activities. Pharmacological inhibition of NADPH oxidase, PKC-α, PKC-β or PKC-βI via their specific inhibitors and neutralisation of O2•− by a cell-permeable superoxide dismutase mimetic, MnTBAP normalised all the aforementioned increases induced by hyperglycaemia. Suppression of these PKC isoforms also negated the stimulatory effects of hyperglycaemia on the protein expression of NADPH oxidase membrane-bound components, Nox2 and p22-phox which determine the overall enzymatic activity. Silencing of PKC-βI gene through use of specific siRNAs abolished the effects of both hyperglycaemia and PMA on endothelial cell NADPH oxidase activity, O2•− production and apoptosis and consequently improved the integrity and function of an in vitro model of human cerebral barrier comprising HBMEC, astrocytes and pericytes. Hyperglycaemia-mediated apoptosis of HBMEC contributes to cerebral barrier dysfunction and is modulated by sequential activations of PKC-βI and NADPH oxidase.

  15. Quantitative Proteomics Analysis of Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury-Modulated Proteins in Cardiac Microvascular Endothelial Cells and the Protective Role of Tongxinluo

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    Qing Li

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The protection of endothelial cells (ECs against reperfusion injury has received little attention. In this study, we used Tandem Mass Tag (TMT labeling proteomics to investigate the modulated proteins in an in vitro model of cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (CMECs subjected to ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury and their alteration by traditional Chinese medicine Tongxinluo (TXL. Methods: Human CMECs were subjected to 2 h of hypoxia followed by 2 h of reoxygenation with different concentrations of TXL Protein expression profiles of CMECs were determined using tandem mass spectrometry. We evaluated several proteins with altered expression in I/R injury and summarized some reported proteins related to I/R injury. Results: TXL dose-dependently decreased CMEC apoptosis, and the optimal concentration was 800 µg/mL. I/R significantly altered proteins in CMECs, and 30 different proteins were detected between a normal group and a hypoxia and serum deprivation group. In I/R injury, TXL treatment up-regulated 6 types of proteins including acyl-coenzyme A synthetase ACSM2B mitochondrial (ACSM2B, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B (CDKN1B, heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1, transcription factor SOX-17 (SOX17, sequestosome-1 isoform 1 (SQSTM1, and TBC1 domain family member 10B (TBC1D10B. Also, TXL down-regulated 5 proteins including angiopoietin-2 isoform c precursor (ANGPT2, cytochrome c oxidase assembly factor 5 (COA5, connective tissue growth factor precursor (CTGF, cathepsin L1 isoform 2 (CTSL, and eukaryotic elongation factor 2 kinase (LOC101930123. These types of proteins mainly had vital functions, including cell proliferation, stress response, and regulation of metabolic process. Conclusions: The study presented differential proteins upon I/R injury through a proteomic analysis. TXL modulated the expression of proteins in CMECs and has a protective role in response to I/R.

  16. Methylxanthines and calcium-mobilizing agents inhibit the expression of cytokine-inducible nitric oxide synthase and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 in murine microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereta, M; Bereta, J; Georgoff, I; Coffman, F D; Cohen, S; Cohen, M C

    1994-06-01

    In response to exposure to the inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), murine brain microvascular endothelial cells (MME) synthesize the cell surface molecule, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), and the intracellular enzyme, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). However, iNOS synthesis requires the presence of both TNF and IFN-gamma, while VCAM-1 can be induced by either cytokine alone. We examined the induction of VCAM-1 and iNOS under a variety of conditions to better define the regulation of TNF and IFN-gamma signal transduction pathways in MME. We utilized the analysis of steady-state levels of iNOS mRNA as well as the measurement of MME-released NO-EDRF (nitric oxide as an endothelium-derived relaxing factor) activity and accumulation of nitrite in the culture medium to define iNOS expression and activity. VCAM-1 expression was determined by flow cytometric analysis. Our data indicate that low density lipoproteins inhibited cytokine-induced iNOS activity by affecting the steady-state levels of iNOS mRNA. Methylxanthines (caffeine and theophylline) as well as several calcium-mobilizing agents inhibited the expression/activity of both iNOS and VCAM-1 in MME. The effectiveness of these agents was dependent upon the degree of disruption in cell calcium homeostasis during cytokine treatment. Cells which had been pretreated with calcium-modulating drugs and then washed and allowed to return to normal calcium homeostasis showed little to no effect from these agents. In addition, our results suggest that NO produced by iNOS acts as a metabolic switch during inflammation by inhibiting oxidative phosphorylation and forcing vascular endothelial cells to temporarily utilize anaerobic energy metabolism.

  17. Alterations in Galectin-3 Expression and Distribution Correlate with Breast Cancer Progression : Functional Analysis of Galectin-3 in Breast Epithelial-Endothelial Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Shekhar, Malathy P.V.; Nangia-Makker, Pratima; Tait, Larry; Miller, Fred; Raz, Avraham

    2004-01-01

    To define the role of galectin-3 in breast cancer progression, we have used a novel three-dimensional co-culture system that recapitulates in vivo reciprocal functional breast epithelial-endothelial cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions, and examined the expression of galectin-3 mRNA and protein in human breast tumors and xenografts. Galectin-3 is required for the stabilization of epithelial-endothelial interaction networks because immunoneutralization with galectin-3 antibodies abolishes th...

  18. Modulation of human dermal microvascular endothelial cell and human gingival fibroblast behavior by micropatterned silica coating surfaces for zirconia dental implant applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta S Laranjeira

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Dental ceramic implants have shown superior esthetic behavior and the absence of induced allergic disorders when compared to titanium implants. Zirconia may become a potential candidate to be used as an alternative to titanium dental implants if surface modifications are introduced. In this work, bioactive micropatterned silica coatings were produced on zirconia substrates, using a combined methodology of sol–gel processing and soft lithography. The aim of the work was to compare the in vitro behavior of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs and human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMECs on three types of silica-coated zirconia surfaces: flat and micropatterned (with pillars and with parallel grooves. Our results showed that cells had a higher metabolic activity (HGF, HDMEC and increased gene expression levels of fibroblast-specific protein-1 (FSP-1 and collagen type I (COL I on surfaces with pillars. Nevertheless, parallel grooved surfaces were able to guide cell growth. Even capillary tube-like networks of HDMEC were oriented according to the surface geometry. Zirconia and silica with different topographies have shown to be blood compatible and silica coating reduced bacteria adhesion. All together, the results indicated that microstructured bioactive coating seems to be an efficient strategy to improve soft tissue integration on zirconia implants, protecting implants from peri-implant inflammation and improving long-term implant stabilization. This new approach of micropatterned silica coating on zirconia substrates can generate promising novel dental implants, with surfaces that provide physical cues to guide cells and enhance their behavior.

  19. Comparative study of expression and activity of glucose transporters between stem cell-derived brain microvascular endothelial cells and hCMEC/D3 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ahmad, Abraham J

    2017-10-01

    Glucose constitutes a major source of energy of mammalian brains. Glucose uptake at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) occurs through a facilitated glucose transport, through glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1), although other isoforms have been described at the BBB. Mutations in GLUT1 are associated with the GLUT1 deficiency syndrome, yet none of the current in vitro models of the human BBB maybe suited for modeling such a disorder. In this study, we investigated the expression of glucose transporters and glucose diffusion across brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs) derived from healthy patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). We investigated the expression of different glucose transporters at the BBB using immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry and measured glucose uptake and diffusion across BMEC monolayers obtained from two iPSC lines and from hCMEC/D3 cells. BMEC monolayers showed expression of several glucose transporters, in particular GLUT1, GLUT3, and GLUT4. Diffusion of glucose across the monolayers was mediated via a saturable transcellular mechanism and partially inhibited by pharmacological inhibitors. Taken together, our study suggests the presence of several glucose transporters isoforms at the human BBB and demonstrates the feasibility of modeling glucose across the BBB using patient-derived stem cells. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  20. Assessment of Heparanase-Mediated Angiogenesis Using Microvascular Endothelial Cells: Identification of λ-Carrageenan Derivative as a Potent Anti Angiogenic Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Poupard

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Heparanase is overexpressed by tumor cells and degrades the extracellular matrix proteoglycans through cleavage of heparan sulfates (HS, allowing pro-angiogenic factor release and thus playing a key role in tumor angiogenesis and metastasis. Here we propose new HS analogs as potent heparanase inhibitors: Heparin as a positive control, Dextran Sulfate, λ-Carrageenan, and modified forms of them obtained by depolymerization associated to glycol splitting (RD-GS. After heparanase activity assessment, 11 kDa RD-GS-λ-Carrageenan emerged as the most effective heparanase inhibitor with an IC50 of 7.32 ng/mL compared to 10.7 ng/mL for the 16 kDa unfractionated heparin. The fractionated polysaccharides were then tested in a heparanase-rich medium-based in vitro model, mimicking tumor microenvironment, to determine their effect on microvascular endothelial cells (HSkMEC angiogenesis. As a preliminary study, we identified that under hypoxic and nutrient poor conditions, MCF-7 cancer cells released much more mature heparanase in their supernatant than in normal conditions. Then a MatrigelTM assay using HSkMEC cultured under hypoxic conditions in the presence (or not of this heparanase-rich supernatant was realized. Adding heparanase-rich media strongly enhanced angiogenic network formation with a production of twice more pseudo-vessels than with the control. When sulfated polysaccharides were tested in this angiogenesis assay, RD-GS-λ-Carrageenan was identified as a promising anti-angiogenic agent.

  1. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase 27VNTR (4b/4a) gene polymorphism and the risk of diabetic microvascular complications in Chinese populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X; Yang, Z; Chen, X

    2017-10-31

    To access the association of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) gene 27VNTR (4b/4a) polymorphism with diabetic microvascular complications (DMI) susceptibility in Chinese populations. Data were retrieved in a systematic manner on PubMed database, ISI Web of Knowledge, the Cochrane Library, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, and Wanfang, as well as manual searching of the references of the identified articles. Odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval were used to evaluate the strength of associations. Potential sources of heterogeneity and publication bias were explored. Twelve published articles with thirteen outcomes including 1484 DMI patients and 1225 diabetic controls were included in the meta-analysis. The results showed no evidence for significant association of 27VNTR (4b/4a) polymorphism with DMI risk in dominant model (OR=1.36, 95% CI=0.90-2.06, P=0.15), and similar results were obtained in the allelic, additive and the recessive models (P﹥0.05). Our meta-analysis suggests that eNOS gene 27VNTR (4b/4a) polymorphism might not be a risk factor for DMI in Chinese populations.

  2. Modulation of human dermal microvascular endothelial cell and human gingival fibroblast behavior by micropatterned silica coating surfaces for zirconia dental implant applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laranjeira, Marta S.; Carvalho, Ângela; Pelaez-Vargas, Alejandro; Hansford, Derek; Ferraz, Maria Pia; Coimbra, Susana; Costa, Elísio; Santos-Silva, Alice; Fernandes, Maria Helena; Monteiro, Fernando Jorge

    2014-04-01

    Dental ceramic implants have shown superior esthetic behavior and the absence of induced allergic disorders when compared to titanium implants. Zirconia may become a potential candidate to be used as an alternative to titanium dental implants if surface modifications are introduced. In this work, bioactive micropatterned silica coatings were produced on zirconia substrates, using a combined methodology of sol-gel processing and soft lithography. The aim of the work was to compare the in vitro behavior of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) and human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMECs) on three types of silica-coated zirconia surfaces: flat and micropatterned (with pillars and with parallel grooves). Our results showed that cells had a higher metabolic activity (HGF, HDMEC) and increased gene expression levels of fibroblast-specific protein-1 (FSP-1) and collagen type I (COL I) on surfaces with pillars. Nevertheless, parallel grooved surfaces were able to guide cell growth. Even capillary tube-like networks of HDMEC were oriented according to the surface geometry. Zirconia and silica with different topographies have shown to be blood compatible and silica coating reduced bacteria adhesion. All together, the results indicated that microstructured bioactive coating seems to be an efficient strategy to improve soft tissue integration on zirconia implants, protecting implants from peri-implant inflammation and improving long-term implant stabilization. This new approach of micropatterned silica coating on zirconia substrates can generate promising novel dental implants, with surfaces that provide physical cues to guide cells and enhance their behavior.

  3. Protective Effects of Scutellarin on Human Cardiac Microvascular Endothelial Cells against Hypoxia-Reoxygenation Injury and Its Possible Target-Related Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meina Shi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Scutellarin (SCU is one of the main components of traditional Chinese medicine plant Erigeron breviscapus (Vant. Hand.-Mazz. In this paper, we studied the protective effects of SCU on human cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (HCMECs against hypoxia-reoxygenation (HR injury and its possible target-related proteins. Results of MTT assay showed that pretreatment of SCU at doses of 1, 5, and 10 μM for 2 h could significantly inhibit the decrease in cell viability of HCMECs induced by HR injury. Subcellular fractions of cells treated with vehicle control, 1 μM SCU, HR injury, or 1 μM SCU + HR injury were separated by ultracentrifugation. The protein expression profiles of cytoplasm and membrane/nuclei fractions were checked using protein two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE. Proteins differentially expressed between control and SCU-treated group, control and HR group, or HR and SCU + HR group were identified using mass spectrometry (MS/MS. Possible interaction network of these target-related proteins was predicted using bioinformatic analysis. The influence of SCU on the expression levels of these proteins was confirmed using Western blotting assay. The results indicated that proteins such as p27BBP protein (EIF6, heat shock 60 kDa protein 1 (HSPD1, and chaperonin containing TCP1 subunit 6A isoform (CCT6A might play important roles in the effects of SCU.

  4. In vitro model of cerebral ischemia by using brain microvascular endothelial cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokubu, Yasuhiro; Yamaguchi, Tomoko; Kawabata, Kenji

    2017-04-29

    Brain-derived microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs), which play a central role in blood brain barrier (BBB), can be used for the evaluation of drug transport into the brain. Although human BMEC cell lines have already been reported, they lack original properties such as barrier integrity. Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) can be used for various applications such as regenerative therapy, drug screening, and pathological study. In the recent study, an induction method of BMECs from PSCs has been established, making it possible to more precisely study the in vitro human BBB function. Here, using induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived BMECs, we examined the effects of oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) and OGD/reoxygenation (OGD/R) on BBB permeability. OGD disrupted the barrier function, and the dysfunction was rapidly restored by re-supply of the oxygen and glucose. Interestingly, TNF-α, which is known to be secreted from astrocytes and microglia in the cerebral ischemia, prevented the restoration of OGD-induced barrier dysfunction in an apoptosis-independent manner. Thus, we could establish the in vitro BBB disease model that mimics the cerebral ischemia by using iPS cell-derived BMECs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. p130Cas scaffolds the signalosome to direct adaptor-effector cross talk during Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus trafficking in human microvascular dermal endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Chirosree; Veettil, Mohanan Valiya; Dutta, Sujoy; Chandran, Bala

    2014-12-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) interacts with cell surface receptors, such as heparan sulfate, integrins (α3β1, αVβ3, and αVβ5), and EphrinA2 (EphA2), and activates focal adhesion kinase (FAK), Src, phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K), c-Cbl, and RhoA GTPase signal molecules early during lipid raft (LR)-dependent productive macropinocytic entry into human dermal microvascular endothelial cells. Our recent studies have identified CIB1 as a signal amplifier facilitating EphA2 phosphorylation and subsequent cytoskeletal cross talk during KSHV macropinocytosis. Although CIB1 lacks an enzymatic activity and traditional adaptor domain or known interacting sequence, it associated with the KSHV entry signal complex and the CIB1-KSHV association was sustained over 30 min postinfection. To identify factors scaffolding the EphA2-CIB1 signal axis, the role of major cellular scaffold protein p130Cas (Crk-associated substrate of Src) was investigated. Inhibitor and small interfering RNA (siRNA) studies demonstrated that KSHV induced p130Cas in an EphA2-, CIB1-, and Src-dependent manner. p130Cas and Crk were associated with KSHV, LRs, EphA2, and CIB1 early during infection. Live-cell microscopy and biochemical studies demonstrated that p130Cas knockdown did not affect KSHV entry but significantly reduced productive nuclear trafficking of viral DNA and routed KSHV to lysosomal degradation. p130Cas aided in scaffolding adaptor Crk to downstream guanine nucleotide exchange factor phospho-C3G possibly to coordinate GTPase signaling during KSHV trafficking. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that p130Cas acts as a bridging molecule between the KSHV-induced entry signal complex and the downstream trafficking signalosome in endothelial cells and suggest that simultaneous targeting of KSHV entry receptors with p130Cas would be an attractive potential avenue for therapeutic intervention in KSHV infection. Eukaryotic cell adaptor molecules, without any intrinsic

  6. Inflammation stimulates thrombopoietin (Tpo) expression in rat brain-derived microvascular endothelial cells, but suppresses Tpo in astrocytes and microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Juan; Freyer, Dorette; Rung, Olga; Im, Ae-Rie; Hoffmann, Olaf; Dame, Christof

    2010-07-01

    Thrombopoietin (Tpo) and its receptor (c-Mpl; TpoR), which primary regulate megakaryopoiesis and platelet production, are also expressed in the central nervous system (CNS). Increased Tpo concentrations are present in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of some patients with bacterial or viral meningitis. Since previous data implicated a proapoptotic role of Tpo on newly generated neuronal cells, we herein elucidated the regulation of Tpo in primary rat neurons (e17), astrocytes, and microglia (p0-p3), as well as in brain-derived vascular endothelial cells of 3-week-old rats after exposure to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS inhibited Tpo gene expression in astrocytes and microglia, but not in neurons, most likely due to absence of Toll-like receptor 4 in neurons. While Tpo mRNA expression recovered in astrocytes after 24 h, it remained suppressed in microglia. Furthermore, we detected Tpo mRNA expression in primary brain-derived vascular endothelial cells, which also express the TpoR. In these cells, LPS significantly up-regulated Tpo mRNA expression. TpoR mRNA and protein expression remained constitutive in all cell types. Thus, our data provide evidence for a cell-type-specific modulation of Tpo mRNA expression by inflammation in brain-derived cells. Transient down-regulation of Tpo expression in astrocytes and microglia may limit Tpo-induced neuronal cell death in inflammatory brain disorders.

  7. Upregulation of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) on brain microvascular endothelial cells in rat ischemic cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X; Siren, A L; Liu, Y; Yue, T L; Barone, F C; Feuerstein, G Z

    1994-10-01

    The expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) was studied in rat focal ischemic cortex. A significant increase in ICAM-1 mRNA expression in the ischemic cortex over levels in contralateral (nonischemic) site was observed by means of Northern blot analysis following either permanent or temporary occlusion with reperfusion of the middle cerebral artery (PMCAO or MCAO with reperfusion) in spontaneously hypertensive rats. In the ischemic cortex, levels of ICAM-1 mRNA increased significantly at 3 h (2.6-fold, n = 3, P hypertensive rats than in two normotensive rat strains. Immunostaining using anti-ICAM-1 antibodies indicated that upregulated ICAM-1 expression was localized to endothelial cells of intraparenchymal blood vessels in the ischemic but not contralateral cortex. The data suggest that an upregulation of ICAM-1 mRNA and protein on brain capillary endothelium may play an important role in leukocyte migration into ischemic brain tissue.

  8. Signaling mechanisms in tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced death of microvascular endothelial cells of the corpus luteum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rueda Bo R

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The microvasculature of the corpus luteum (CL, which comprises greater than 50% of the total number of cells in the CL, is thought to be the first structure to undergo degeneration via apoptosis during luteolysis. These studies compared the apoptotic potential of various cytokines (tumor necrosis factor α, TNFα; interferon gamma, IFNγ; soluble Fas ligand, sFasL, a FAS activating antibody (FasAb, and the luteolytic hormone prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α on CL-derived endothelial (CLENDO cells. Neither sFasL, FasAb nor PGF2α had any effect on CLENDO cell viability. Utilizing morphological and biochemical parameters it was evident that TNFα and IFNγ initiated apoptosis in long-term cultures. However, TNFα was the most potent stimulus for CLENDO cell apoptosis at early time points. Unlike many other studies described in non-reproductive cell types, TNFα induced apoptosis of CLENDO cells occurs in the absence of inhibitors of protein synthesis. TNFα-induced death is typically associated with acute activation of distinct intracellular signaling pathways (e.g. MAPK and sphingomyelin pathways. Treatment with TNFα for 5–30 min activated MAPKs (ERK, p38, and JNK, and increased ceramide accumulation. Ceramide, a product of sphingomyelin hydrolysis, can serve as an upstream activator of members of the MAPK family independently in numerous cell types, and is a well-established pro-apoptotic second messenger. Like TNFα, treatment of CLENDO cells with exogenous ceramide significantly induced endothelial apoptosis. Ceramide also activated the JNK pathway, but had no effect on ERK and p38 MAPKs. Pretreatment of CLENDO cells with glutathione (GSH, an intracellular reducing agent and known inhibitor of reactive oxygen species (ROS or TNFα-induced apoptosis, significantly attenuated TNFα-induced apoptosis. It is hypothesized that TNFα kills CLENDO cells through elevation of reactive oxygen species, and intracellular signals that promote

  9. Protein C activation peptide inhibits the expression of ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and interleukin-8 induced by TNF-a in human dermal microvascular endothelial cells Protein C activation peptide inhibits the expression of ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and interleukin-8 induced by TNF-a in human dermal microvascular endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Del Socorro Pina-Canseco

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Activated protein C (APC is generated from the cleavage of protein C by thrombin coupled to thrombomodulin
    and, subsequently, is released as protein C activation peptide (papC. The aim of this study was to
    evaluate the effect of papC on human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1, activated with 5 ng/
    /mL TNF-a. Flow cytometry showed that papC inhibited the expression of VCAM-1 and ICAM-1, after activation
    with TNF-a. Similarly, RT-PCR analysis revealed that 2 and 4 pM papC inhibited the expression of VCAM-1
    and IL-8 mRNA in TNF-a-treated HMEC-1. In addition, the expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase
    (eNOS increased in HMEC-1 treated with papC, compared to those without treatment. Furthermore, Jurkat
    cell adhesion to HMEC-1 induced by TNF-a was significantly inhibited after the addition of papC, compared to
    HMEC-1 without papC (p = 0.03. Finally, a control peptide analog to papC showed no effect on the expression
    of ICAM and VCAM on the surface of HMEC-1. In conclusion, our results suggest that papC exerts antiinflammatory
    effects on endothelial cells.Activated protein C (APC is generated from the cleavage of protein C by thrombin coupled to thrombomodulin
    and, subsequently, is released as protein C activation peptide (papC. The aim of this study was to
    evaluate the effect of papC on human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1, activated with 5 ng/
    /mL TNF-a. Flow cytometry showed that papC inhibited the expression of VCAM-1 and ICAM-1, after activation
    with TNF-a. Similarly, RT-PCR analysis revealed that 2 and 4 pM papC inhibited the expression of VCAM-1
    and IL-8 mRNA in TNF-a-treated HMEC-1. In addition, the expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase
    (eNOS increased in HMEC-1 treated with papC, compared to those without treatment. Furthermore, Jurkat
    cell adhesion to HMEC-1 induced by TNF-a was significantly inhibited after the

  10. Endothelial Cell Migration and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Expression Are the Result of Loss of Breast Tissue Polarity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Amy; Cuevas, Ileana; Kenny, Paraic A; Miyake, Hiroshi; Mace, Kimberley; Ghajar, Cyrus; Boudreau, Aaron; Bissell, Mina; Boudreau, Nancy

    2009-05-26

    Recruiting a new blood supply is a rate-limiting step in tumor progression. In a three-dimensional model of breast carcinogenesis, disorganized, proliferative transformed breast epithelial cells express significantly higher expression of angiogenic genes compared with their polarized, growth-arrested nonmalignant counterparts. Elevated vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secretion by malignant cells enhanced recruitment of endothelial cells (EC) in heterotypic cocultures. Significantly, phenotypic reversion of malignant cells via reexpression of HoxD10, which is lost in malignant progression, significantly attenuated VEGF expression in a hypoxia-inducible factor 1{alpha}-independent fashion and reduced EC migration. This was due primarily to restoring polarity: forced proliferation of polarized, nonmalignant cells did not induce VEGF expression and EC recruitment, whereas disrupting the architecture of growth-arrested, reverted cells did. These data show that disrupting cytostructure activates the angiogenic switch even in the absence of proliferation and/or hypoxia and restoring organization of malignant clusters reduces VEGF expression and EC activation to levels found in quiescent nonmalignant epithelium. These data confirm the importance of tissue architecture and polarity in malignant progression.

  11. Development and Validation of an In-Cell Western for Quantifying P-Glycoprotein Expression in Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial (hCMEC/D3) Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInerney, Mitchell P; Pan, Yijun; Short, Jennifer L; Nicolazzo, Joseph A

    2017-09-01

    An in-cell western (ICW) protocol detecting the relative expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in human cerebro-microvascular endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3) was developed and optimized, with the intention of improving throughput relative to western blotting (WB). For validation of the ICW protocol, hCMEC/D3 cells were incubated with known P-gp upregulators (10 μM rifampicin and 5 μM SR12813) and treated with siRNA targeted against MDR1, before measuring changes in P-gp expression, using both ICW and WB in parallel. To confirm a relationship between the detected P-gp expression and function, the uptake of the P-gp substrate rhodamine-123 was assessed following SR12813 treatment. Rifampicin and SR12813 significantly upregulated P-gp expression (1.5-fold and 1.9-fold, respectively) compared to control, as assessed by the ICW protocol. WB analysis of the same treatments revealed 1.4-fold and 1.5-fold upregulations. MDR1 siRNA reduced P-gp abundance by 20% and 35% when assessed by ICW and WB, respectively. SR12813 treatment reduced rhodamine-123 uptake by 18%, indicating that the observed changes in P-gp expression by ICW were associated with comparable functional changes. The correlation of P-gp upregulation by WB, rhodamine-123 uptake, and the ICW protocol provide validation of a new ICW method as an alternative method for quantification of P-gp in hCMEC/D3 cells. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. In vitro characterization of pralidoxime transport and acetylcholinesterase reactivation across MDCK cells and stem cell-derived human brain microvascular endothelial cells (BC1-hBMECs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Erin; Minn, Il; Chambers, Janice E; Searson, Peter C

    2016-07-11

    Current therapies for organophosphate poisoning involve administration of oximes, such as pralidoxime (2-PAM), that reactivate the enzyme acetylcholinesterase. Studies in animal models have shown a low concentration in the brain following systemic injection. To assess 2-PAM transport, we studied transwell permeability in three Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCKII) cell lines and stem cell-derived human brain microvascular endothelial cells (BC1-hBMECs). To determine whether 2-PAM is a substrate for common brain efflux pumps, experiments were performed in the MDCKII-MDR1 cell line, transfected to overexpress the P-gp efflux pump, and the MDCKII-FLuc-ABCG2 cell line, transfected to overexpress the BCRP efflux pump. To determine how transcellular transport influences enzyme reactivation, we developed a modified transwell assay where the inhibited acetylcholinesterase enzyme, substrate, and reporter are introduced into the basolateral chamber. Enzymatic activity was inhibited using paraoxon and parathion. The permeability of 2-PAM is about 2 × 10(-6) cm s(-1) in MDCK cells and about 1 × 10(-6) cm s(-1) in BC1-hBMECs. Permeability is not influenced by pre-treatment with atropine. In addition, 2-PAM is not a substrate for the P-gp or BCRP efflux pumps. The low permeability explains poor brain penetration of 2-PAM and therefore the slow enzyme reactivation. This elucidates one of the reasons for the necessity of sustained intravascular (IV) infusion in response to organophosphate poisoning.

  13. Qi-Shen-Yi-Qi Dripping Pills Promote Angiogenesis of Ischemic Cardiac Microvascular Endothelial Cells by Regulating MicroRNA-223-3p Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Hua Dai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM research shows that Qi-Shen-Yi-Qi Dripping Pills (QSYQ can promote ischemic cardiac angiogenesis. Studies have shown that microRNAs (miRNAs are the key component of gene regulation networks, which play a vital role in angiogenesis and cardiovascular disease. Mechanisms involving miRNA by which TCM promotes ischemic cardiac angiogenesis have not been reported. We found that microRNA-223-3p (mir-223-3p was the core miRNA of angiogenesis of rats ischemic cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (CMECs and inhibited angiogenesis by affecting RPS6KB1/HIF-1α signal pathway in previous study. Based on the results, we observed biological characteristics and optimal dosage for QSYQ intervening in rats ischemic CMECs angiogenesis and concluded that QSYQ low-dose group had the strongest ability to promote angiogenesis of ischemic myocardium. Using miRNA chip and real-time PCR techniques in this study, we identified mir-223-3p as the pivotal miRNA in QSYQ that regulated angiogenesis of ischemic CMECs. From real-time PCR and western blot analysis, research showed that gene and protein expression of factors located RPS6KB1/HIF-1α signaling pathway, including HIF-1α, VEGF, MAPK, PI3K, and AKT, were significantly upregulated by QSYQ to regulate angiogenesis of ischemic CMECs. This study showed that QSYQ promote ischemic cardiac angiogenesis by downregulating mir-223-3p expression in rats ischemic CMECs.

  14. Effect of full flavor and denicotinized cigarettes exposure on the brain microvascular endothelium: a microarray-based gene expression study using a human immortalized BBB endothelial cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Pooja; Sajja, Ravi K; Prasad, Shikha; Cucullo, Luca

    2015-06-23

    Tobacco smoke (TS) toxicity to the brain microvasculature is still an understudied area till date. NF-E2 related factor (Nrf2) is a key transcription factor responsible for activating the antioxidant response element (ARE) genes following an oxidative insult. Till date, several studies targeting the blood brain barrier (BBB) have shown some protective role of Nrf2 in ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury, however, its functional role in chronic smokers subjected to a life-long oxidative stress has never been addressed. This is of crucial importance since smokers have a much higher risk for cerebrovascular stroke and tobacco smoke exposure has been clearly shown to enhance BBB damage following an ischemia/reperfusion injury. Thus, the goal of our study was to investigate the defense pathways activated at the BBB endothelial level by TS exposure. Specifically we focused on Nrf2 and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B signaling response (NF-κβ) as the central protective mechanisms related to oxidative insult. With the exception of Nicotine, both full flavor (3R4F) and decotinized (ULN) cigarettes activated Nrf2 and NFκβ pathways in hCMEC/D3 endothelial cells. Several detoxification and anti-oxidant genes including downstream products were also activated including NAD(P)H dehydrogenase quinone 1 (NQO-1), heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX-1), catalytic and modifier subunits of glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCL), solute carrier-SLC7A11). Gene expression levels of cytochrome P450s (CYP2S1 and CYP51A1) and efflux transporters P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and multi-drug resistance protein-4 (MRP4) were also enhanced. Increase of P-gp functional activity and depletion of GSH were also observed. Strikingly, toxicity of denicotinized ("reduced exposure") cigarettes was equivalent to 3R4F (or worse). This study provides a detailed analysis of Nrf2-related cytoprotective mechanisms activated in response to 3R4F and ULN-derived TS exposure correlating the results with their

  15. Blockade of extracellular NM23 or its endothelial target slows breast cancer growth and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokdang, Nucharee; Nordmeier, Senny; Speirs, Katie; Burkin, Heather R; Buxton, Iain L O

    Nucleoside Diphosphate Kinase (NDPK), described as NM23 a metastasis suppressor, is found in the culture medium of cancer cells lines suggesting that the kinase may have an extracellular role. We propose that extracellular NM23 released from breast cancers in vivo stimulates tumor cell migration, proliferation and endothelial cell angiogenesis in support of metastasis development. NM23 in the bloodstream of immunocompromised mice carrying human triple-negative breast cancers or in breast cancer patients was measured by ELISA. Primary and metastatic tumor development, the impact of blockade of NM23 and/or its stimulation of nucleotide receptors were measured using in vivo imaging. NM23 expression data in the Curtis breast dataset was examined to test our hypothesis that NM23 may play a mechanistic role in breast cancer development. SCID mice carrying metastatic MDA-MB-231Luc+ triple-negative human breast tumor cells elaborate NM23 into the circulation correlated with primary tumor growth. Treatment of mice with the NM23 inhibitor ellagic acid (EA) or the purinergic receptor antagonist MRS2179 slowed primary tumor growth. At 16 weeks following implantation, lung metastases were reduced in mice treated with EA, MRS2179 or the combination. Expression of NM23 in the Curtis breast dataset confirmed a likely role for NM23 in tumor metastasis. Extracellular NM23 may constitute both a biomarker and a therapeutic target in the management of breast cancer.

  16. Regulation of human cerebro-microvascular endothelial baso-lateral adhesion and barrier function by S1P through dual involvement of S1P1 and S1P2 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiltshire, Rachael; Nelson, Vicky; Kho, Dan Ting; Angel, Catherine E; O'Carroll, Simon J; Graham, E Scott

    2016-01-27

    Herein we show that S1P rapidly and acutely reduces the focal adhesion strength and barrier tightness of brain endothelial cells. xCELLigence biosensor technology was used to measure focal adhesion, which was reduced by S1P acutely and this response was mediated through both S1P1 and S1P2 receptors. S1P increased secretion of several pro-inflammatory mediators from brain endothelial cells. However, the magnitude of this response was small in comparison to that mediated by TNFα or IL-1β. Furthermore, S1P did not significantly increase cell-surface expression of any key cell adhesion molecules involved in leukocyte recruitment, included ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. Finally, we reveal that S1P acutely and dynamically regulates microvascular endothelial barrier tightness in a manner consistent with regulated rapid opening followed by closing and strengthening of the barrier. We hypothesise that the role of the S1P receptors in this process is not to cause barrier dysfunction, but is related to controlled opening of the endothelial junctions. This was revealed using real-time measurement of barrier integrity using ECIS ZΘ TEER technology and endothelial viability using xCELLigence technology. Finally, we show that these responses do not occur simply though the pharmacology of a single S1P receptor but involves coordinated action of S1P1 and S1P2 receptors.

  17. Listeriolysin O mediates cytotoxicity against human brain microvascular

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penetration of the brain microvascular endothelial layer is one of the routes L. monocytogenes use to breach the blood-brain barrier. Because host factors in the blood severely limit direct invasion of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs) by L. monocytogenes, alternative mechanisms m...

  18. Morphology and endothelial function of microvessels in microvascular angina. With special reference to the expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) before and after treatment with K{sub ATP} channel opener

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akao, Hironobu [Kanazawa Medical Univ., Uchinada, Ishikawa (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    In patients with microvascular angina (MVA), we studied myocardial metabolic disturbance, morphological characteristics of microvessels and the presence or absence of the expression of eNOS before and after treatment with K{sub ATP} channel opener. The study population consisted of 21 patients with MVA, and 8 patients with valvular disease and without ischemic lesions who served as the control. Myocardial metabolic disturbance was assessed by calculating the standardized uptake value (SUV) of {sup 18}FDG from glucose metabolism using nuclear imaging by {sup 18}FDG-PET, and quantitatively determining the severity of ischemia. Before treatment with K{sub ATP} channel opener, {sup 18}FDG uptake was detected in all 21 patients (100%) with MVA, by fasting {sup 18}FDG-PET during rest. After treatment, improvement at the site of uptake was detected in 19 of the 21 patients (90.5%). Before treatment, SUV of all 21 patients was 1.43{+-}0.76 and, after treatment, SUV was 0.39{+-}0.17; a statistically significant improvement (p<0.001). Histologically, the right ventricular myocardial specimens obtained by biopsy were studied for morphological changes under light and electron microscopes. In all MVA patients, histological examination revealed severe narrowing of the lumen with marked thickening of the media and swelling and proliferation of the endothelial cells in many arterioles, most of which also showed thickening of the basement membrane in all MVA patients. Many capillary vessels also showed the appearance of medial smooth muscle cells and swelling and proliferating of endothelial cells, resulting in narrowing of the lumen. This narrowing is the likely cause of ischemia. The eNOS expression in the arterioles and capillaries was immnohistochemically determined in 11 of the 21 patients. Before treatment, the eNOS expression was barely observable. After treatment, it was increased markedly to a level similar to that of the controls. In conclusion, the eNOS expression in the

  19. Effect of steroid hormones and retinoids on the formation of capillary-like tubular structures of human microvascular endothelial cells in fibrin matrices is related to urokinase expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansink, M; Koolwijk, P; van Hinsbergh, V; Kooistra, T

    1998-08-01

    Angiogenesis, the formation of new capillary blood vessels, is a feature of a variety of pathological processes. To study the effects of a specific group of hormones (all ligands of the steroid/retinoid/thyroid hormone receptor superfamily) on the angiogenic process in humans, we have used a model system in which human microvascular endothelial cells from foreskin (hMVEC) are cultured on top of a human fibrin matrix in the presence of basic fibroblast growth factor and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. This model mimics the in vivo situation where fibrin appears to be a common component of the matrix present at sites of chronic inflammation and tumor stroma. Our results show that testosterone and dexamethasone are strong inhibitors and all-trans retinoic acid (at-RA) and 9-cis retinoic acid (9-cis RA) are potent stimulators of the formation of capillary-like tubular structures. These effects are mediated by their respective nuclear hormone receptors as demonstrated by the use of specific synthetic receptor agonists and antagonists. 17beta-estradiol, progesterone, and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 did not affect or only weakly affected in vitro angiogenesis, which may be related to the lack of significant nuclear receptor expression. Although hMVEC express both thyroid hormone receptors alpha and beta, no effect of thyroid hormone on tube formation was found. The effects of testosterone, dexamethasone, at-RA, and 9-cis RA on tube formation were accompanied by parallel changes in urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA) expression, at both mRNA and antigen levels. Exogenous suppletion of the medium with single chain u-PA enhances tube formation in our in vitro model, whereas quenching of u-PA activity (but not of tissue-type plasminogen activator activity) or of u-PA binding to u-PA receptor by specific antibodies suppressed basal and retinoid-stimulated tube formation. Moreover, addition of scu-PA to testosterone- or dexamethasone-treated hMVEC restored the suppressed

  20. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor is necessary to protect fetal human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells against hyperoxic injury: Mechanistic roles of antioxidant enzymes and RelB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Shaojie; Patel, Ananddeep; Chu, Chun; Jiang, Weiwu; Wang, Lihua; Welty, Stephen E.; Moorthy, Bhagavatula; Shivanna, Binoy, E-mail: shivanna@bcm.edu

    2015-07-15

    Hyperoxia contributes to the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in premature infants. Activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) protects adult and newborn mice against hyperoxic lung injury by mediating increases in the expression of phase I (cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A) and phase II (NADP(H) quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1)) antioxidant enzymes (AOE). AhR positively regulates the expression of RelB, a component of the nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) protein that contributes to anti-inflammatory processes in adult animals. Whether AhR regulates the expression of AOE and RelB, and protects fetal primary human lung cells against hyperoxic injury is unknown. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that AhR-deficient fetal human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HPMEC) will have decreased RelB activation and AOE, which will in turn predispose them to increased oxidative stress, inflammation, and cell death compared to AhR-sufficient HPMEC upon exposure to hyperoxia. AhR-deficient HPMEC showed increased hyperoxia-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), and cell death compared to AhR-sufficient HPMEC. Additionally, AhR-deficient cell culture supernatants displayed increased macrophage inflammatory protein 1α and 1β, indicating a heightened inflammatory state. Interestingly, loss of AhR was associated with a significantly attenuated CYP1A1, NQO1, superoxide dismutase 1(SOD1), and nuclear RelB protein expression. These findings support the hypothesis that decreased RelB activation and AOE in AhR-deficient cells is associated with increased hyperoxic injury compared to AhR-sufficient cells. - Highlights: • AhR deficiency potentiates oxygen toxicity in human fetal lung cells. • Deficient AhR signaling increases hyperoxia-induced cell death. • AhR deficiency increases hyperoxia-induced ROS generation and inflammation. • Anti-oxidant enzyme levels are attenuated in AhR-deficient lung cells

  1. CIB1 synergizes with EphrinA2 to regulate Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus macropinocytic entry in human microvascular dermal endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chirosree Bandyopadhyay

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available KSHV envelope glycoproteins interact with cell surface heparan sulfate and integrins, and activate FAK, Src, PI3-K, c-Cbl, and Rho-GTPase signal molecules in human microvascular dermal endothelial (HMVEC-d cells. c-Cbl mediates the translocation of virus bound α3β1 and αVβ3 integrins into lipid rafts (LRs, where KSHV interacts and activates EphrinA2 (EphA2. EphA2 associates with c-Cbl-myosin IIA and augmented KSHV-induced Src and PI3-K signals in LRs, leading to bleb formation and macropinocytosis of KSHV. To identify the factor(s coordinating the EphA2-signal complex, the role of CIB1 (calcium and integrin binding protein-1 associated with integrin signaling was analyzed. CIB1 knockdown did not affect KSHV binding to HMVEC-d cells but significantly reduced its entry and gene expression. In contrast, CIB1 overexpression increased KSHV entry in 293 cells. Single virus particle infection and trafficking during HMVEC-d cell entry was examined by utilizing DiI (envelope and BrdU (viral DNA labeled virus. CIB1 was associated with KSHV in membrane blebs and in Rab5 positive macropinocytic vesicles. CIB1 knockdown abrogated virus induced blebs, macropinocytosis and virus association with the Rab5 macropinosome. Infection increased the association of CIB1 with LRs, and CIB1 was associated with EphA2 and KSHV entry associated signal molecules such as Src, PI3-K, and c-Cbl. CIB1 knockdown significantly reduced the infection induced EphA2, Src and Erk1/2 activation. Mass spectrometry revealed the simultaneous association of CIB1 and EphA2 with the actin cytoskeleton modulating myosin IIA and alpha-actinin 4 molecules, and CIB1 knockdown reduced EphA2's association with myosin IIA and alpha-actinin 4. Collectively, these studies revealed for the first time that CIB1 plays a role in virus entry and macropinocytosis, and suggested that KSHV utilizes CIB1 as one of the key molecule(s to coordinate and sustain the EphA2 mediated signaling involved in its

  2. Placental growth factor enhances angiogenesis in human intestinal microvascular endothelial cells via PI3K/Akt pathway: Potential implications of inflammation bowel disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Yi, E-mail: mondayzy@126.com; Tu, Chuantao, E-mail: tu.chuantao@zs-hospital.sh.cn; Zhao, Yuan, E-mail: zhao.yuan@zs-hospital.sh.cn; Liu, Hongchun, E-mail: liuhch@aliyun.com; Zhang, Shuncai, E-mail: zhang.shuncai@zs-hospital.sh.cn

    2016-02-19

    Background: Angiogenesis plays a major role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Placental growth factor (PlGF) is a specific regulator of pathological angiogenesis and is upregulated in the sera of IBD patients. Therefore, the role of PlGF in IBD angiogenesis was investigated here using HIMECs. Methods: The expression of PlGF and its receptors in human intestinal microvascular endothelial cells (HIMECs) and inflamed mucosa of IBD patients were examined using quantitative PCR and western blot analysis and the role of PlGF in IBD HIMECs was further explored using small interfering RNA (siRNA). The induction of pro-inflammatory cytokine by PlGF in HIMECs was confirmed by ELISA. The capacity of PlGF to induce angiogenesis in HIMECs was tested through proliferation, cell-migration, matrigel tubule-formation assays and its underlying signaling pathway were explored by western blot analysis of ERK1/2 and PI3K/Akt phosphorylation. Results: mRNA and protein expression of PlGF and its receptor NRP-1 were significantly increased in IBD HIMECs. Inflamed mucosa of IBD patients also displayed higher expression of PIGF. The production of IL-6 and TNF-α in culture supernatant of HIMECs treated with exogenous recombinant human PlGF-1 (rhPlGF-1) were increased. Furthermore, rhPlGF-1 significantly induced HIMECs migration and tube formation in a dose-dependent manner and knockdown of endogenous PlGF in IBD HIMECs using siRNA substantially reduced these angiogenesis activities. PlGF induced PI3K/Akt phosphorylation in HIMECs and pretreatment of PlGF-stimulated HIMECs with PI3K inhibitor (LY294002) significantly inhibited the PlGF-induced cell migration and tube formation. Conclusion: Our results demonstrated the pro-inflammatory and angiogenic effects of PlGF on HIMECs in IBD through activation of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. PlGF/PI3K/Akt signaling may serve as a potential therapeutic target for IBD. - Highlights: • Expression of PlGF and its receptor NRP-1

  3. Molecular Mechanisms in Compromised Endothelial Barrier during Breast Cancer Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    those working in breast cancer, but for any investigators who need to expand their FRET imaging repertoire to study dynamic signaling, protein ...processing, protein - protein interactions as well as protein conformational changes in three dimension either in single cells or in thicker tissue specimens...Obtain FRET-based biosensors for MLCK, Rho, and Rac [accomplished] • Standardizing simultaneous CFP /YFP FRET imaging techniques [accomplished

  4. Rosetting Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes bind to human brain microvascular endothelial cells in vitro, demonstrating a dual adhesion phenotype mediated by distinct P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Yvonne; Kuhnrae, Pongsak; Higgins, Matthew K; Ghumra, Ashfaq; Rowe, J Alexandra

    2014-03-01

    Adhesion interactions between Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes (IE) and human cells underlie the pathology of severe malaria. IE cytoadhere to microvascular endothelium or form rosettes with uninfected erythrocytes to survive in vivo by sequestering IE in the microvasculature and avoiding splenic clearance mechanisms. Both rosetting and cytoadherence are mediated by the parasite-derived IE surface protein family Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1). Rosetting and cytoadherence have been widely studied as separate entities; however, the ability of rosetting P. falciparum strains to cytoadhere has received little attention. Here, we show that IE of the IT/R29 strain expressing a rosette-mediating PfEMP1 variant (IT4var09) cytoadhere in vitro to a human brain microvascular endothelial cell line (HBEC-5i). Cytoadherence was inhibited by heparin and by treatment of HBEC-5i with heparinase III, suggesting that the endothelial receptors for IE binding are heparan sulfate proteoglycans. Antibodies to the N-terminal regions of the IT4var09 PfEMP1 variant (NTS-DBL1α and DBL2γ domains) specifically inhibited and reversed cytoadherence down to low concentrations (experiments showed that the NTS-DBLα and DBL2γ domains bind strongly to heparin, with half-maximal binding at a concentration of ∼0.5 μM in both cases. Therefore, cytoadherence of IT/R29 IE is distinct from rosetting, which is primarily mediated by NTS-DBL1α interactions with complement receptor 1. These data show that IT4var09-expressing parasites are capable of dual interactions with both endothelial cells and uninfected erythrocytes via distinct receptor-ligand interactions.

  5. Microvascular inflammation in atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Vitiello

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Atherogenesis is the pathogenetic process leading to formation of the atheroma lesion. It is associated to a chronic inflammatory state initially stimulated by an aberrant accumulation of lipid molecules beyond the endothelial barrier. This event triggers a cascade of deleterious events mainly through immune cell stimulation with the consequent liberation of potent pro-inflammatory and tissue damaging mediators. The atherogenetic process implies marked modifications of endothelial cell functions and a radical change in the endothelial–leukocyte interaction pattern. Moreover, accumulating evidence shows an important link between microvascular and inflammatory responses and major cardiovascular risk factors. This review illustrates the current knowledge on the effects of obesity, hypercholesterolemia and diabetes on microcirculation; their pathophysiological implications will be discussed.

  6. The utility of ultrasound superb microvascular imaging for evaluation of breast tumour vascularity: comparison with colour and power Doppler imaging regarding diagnostic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, A Y; Seo, B K; Woo, O H; Jung, K S; Cho, K R; Park, E K; Cha, S H; Cha, J

    2017-11-06

    To investigate the utility of superb microvascular imaging (SMI) for evaluating the vascularity of breast masses in comparison with colour or power Doppler ultrasound (US) and the effect on diagnostic performance. A total of 191 biopsy-proven masses (99 benign and 92 malignant) in 166 women with greyscale, colour Doppler, power Doppler, and SMI images were enrolled in this retrospective study. Three radiologists analysed the vascular images using a three-factor scoring system to evaluate the number, morphology, and distribution of tumour vessels. They assessed the Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System categories for greyscale US alone and combinations of greyscale US and each type of vascular US. The Kruskal-Wallis test was performed and the area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC) measured. On SMI, vascular scores were compared between benign and malignant masses and the optimal cut-off value for the overall score was determined. SMI showed higher vascular scores than colour or power Doppler US and malignant masses had higher scores than benign masses (pDoppler US (AUC, 0.815 versus 0.774, 0.789, 0.791; pDoppler US for characterising the vascularity in breast masses and improving diagnostic performance. Copyright © 2017 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The Contribution Of Toll-Like Receptors In The Pathogenesis Of Diabetic Retinopathy In Human Microvascular Retinal Endothelial Cells In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Dad Bakhsh, Fadheela

    2016-01-01

    Background: Diabetes Mellitus is a chronic systemic inflammatory disease including the eye causing macrovascular as well as microvascular complications known as diabetic retinopathy (DR), thus increasing the risk of vision impairment and blindness among working adults. The activation of the innate immune system during diabetes leads to an increase in certain biomarkers which in turn can antagonize the immune system leading to more complications. Toll like receptors (TLRs) are receptors of the...

  8. Serum vascular endothelial growth factors a, C and d in human breast tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gisterek, Iwona; Matkowski, Rafal; Lacko, Aleksandra; Sedlaczek, Pawel; Szewczyk, Krzysztof; Biecek, Przemyslaw; Halon, Agnieszka; Staszek, Urszula; Szelachowska, Jolanta; Pudelko, Marek; Bebenek, Marek; Harlozinska-Szmyrka, Antonina; Kornafel, Jan

    2010-09-01

    Available evidence suggests that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) a potent regulator of vasculogenesis and tumor angiogenesis may be a predictor of recurrence in breast cancer patients. We sought to determine whether VEGF serum levels (VEGF-A, VEGF-C and VEGF-D) in 377 patients with malignant and benign breast tumors differ and whether there is association between vascular growth factors, clinicopathologic features and prognosis. There was no significant difference in investigated circulating angiogenic markers between patients with malignant and non malignant lesions. We found strong correlation between VEGF-A and VEGF-D and between VEGF- C and VEGF-D. Besides serum VEGF-D levels and estrogen receptor (ER) expressions no other correlations between VEGF and clinicopathologic variables were observed. However, elevated VEGF-A and VEGF-C concentrations were associated with increased number of erythrocytes, leukocytes and platelets. In Cox model values of angiogenic serum markers and recognized prognostic markers in breast cancer, VEGF-C turned out as independent prognostic factor. Our study is the first analysis showing correlation between serum concentrations of three angiogenic factors: VEGF-A, VEGF-C, VEGF-D. Associations between angiogenic cytokines and number of blood cells may be due to release of VEGF from platelets and leucocytes. Prognostic role of VEGF is still uncertain, though VEGF-C has a potential to serve as a prognostic marker.

  9. Magnetic fluid hyperthermia inhibits the growth of breast carcinoma and downregulates vascular endothelial growth factor expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    WANG, GUIHUA; XU, DERONG; CHAI, QIN; TAN, XIAOLANG; ZHANG, YU; GU, NING; TANG, JINTIAN

    2014-01-01

    The application of magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) with nanoparticles has been shown to inhibit tumor growth in several animal models. However, the feasibility of using MFH in vivo to treat breast cancer is uncertain, and the mechanism is unclear. In the present study, it was observed that the intratumoral administration of MFH induced hyperthermia significantly in rats with Walker-265 breast carcinomas. The hyperthermia treatment with magnetic nanoparticles inhibited tumor growth in vivo and promoted the survival of the tumor-bearing rats. Furthermore, it was found that MFH treatment downregulated the protein expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the tumor tissue, as observed by immunohistochemistry. MFH treatment also decreased the gene expression of VEGF and its receptors, VEGF receptor 1 and 2, and inhibited angiogenesis in the tumor tissues. Taken together, these results indicate that the application of MFH with nanoparticles is feasible for the treatment of breast carcinoma. The MFH-induced downregulation of angiogenesis may also contribute to the induction of an anti-tumor effect. PMID:24765139

  10. Magnetic fluid hyperthermia inhibits the growth of breast carcinoma and downregulates vascular endothelial growth factor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guihua; Xu, Derong; Chai, Qin; Tan, Xiaolang; Zhang, Yu; Gu, Ning; Tang, Jintian

    2014-05-01

    The application of magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) with nanoparticles has been shown to inhibit tumor growth in several animal models. However, the feasibility of using MFH in vivo to treat breast cancer is uncertain, and the mechanism is unclear. In the present study, it was observed that the intratumoral administration of MFH induced hyperthermia significantly in rats with Walker-265 breast carcinomas. The hyperthermia treatment with magnetic nanoparticles inhibited tumor growth in vivo and promoted the survival of the tumor-bearing rats. Furthermore, it was found that MFH treatment downregulated the protein expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the tumor tissue, as observed by immunohistochemistry. MFH treatment also decreased the gene expression of VEGF and its receptors, VEGF receptor 1 and 2, and inhibited angiogenesis in the tumor tissues. Taken together, these results indicate that the application of MFH with nanoparticles is feasible for the treatment of breast carcinoma. The MFH-induced downregulation of angiogenesis may also contribute to the induction of an anti-tumor effect.

  11. Fumaric Acid Esters Do Not Reduce Inflammatory NF-κB/p65 Nuclear Translocation, ICAM-1 Expression and T-Cell Adhesiveness of Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haarmann, Axel; Nehen, Mathias; Deiß, Annika; Buttmann, Mathias

    2015-08-13

    Dimethyl fumarate (DMF) is approved for disease-modifying treatment of patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Animal experiments suggested that part of its therapeutic effect is due to a reduction of T-cell infiltration of the central nervous system (CNS) by uncertain mechanisms. Here we evaluated whether DMF and its primary metabolite monomethyl fumarate (MMF) modulate pro-inflammatory intracellular signaling and T-cell adhesiveness of nonimmortalized single donor human brain microvascular endothelial cells at low passages. Neither DMF nor MMF at concentrations of 10 or 50 µM blocked the IL-1β-induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB/p65, whereas the higher concentration of DMF inhibited the nuclear entry of p65 in human umbilical vein endothelium cultured in parallel. DMF and MMF also did not alter the IL-1β-stimulated activation of p38 MAPK in brain endothelium. Furthermore, neither DMF nor MMF reduced the basal or IL-1β-inducible expression of ICAM-1. In accordance, both fumaric acid esters did not reduce the adhesion of activated Jurkat T cells to brain endothelium under basal or inflammatory conditions. Therefore, brain endothelial cells probably do not directly mediate a potential blocking effect of fumaric acid esters on the inflammatory infiltration of the CNS by T cells.

  12. Fumaric Acid Esters Do Not Reduce Inflammatory NF-κB/p65 Nuclear Translocation, ICAM-1 Expression and T-Cell Adhesiveness of Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axel Haarmann

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Dimethyl fumarate (DMF is approved for disease-modifying treatment of patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Animal experiments suggested that part of its therapeutic effect is due to a reduction of T-cell infiltration of the central nervous system (CNS by uncertain mechanisms. Here we evaluated whether DMF and its primary metabolite monomethyl fumarate (MMF modulate pro-inflammatory intracellular signaling and T-cell adhesiveness of nonimmortalized single donor human brain microvascular endothelial cells at low passages. Neither DMF nor MMF at concentrations of 10 or 50 µM blocked the IL-1β-induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB/p65, whereas the higher concentration of DMF inhibited the nuclear entry of p65 in human umbilical vein endothelium cultured in parallel. DMF and MMF also did not alter the IL-1β-stimulated activation of p38 MAPK in brain endothelium. Furthermore, neither DMF nor MMF reduced the basal or IL-1β-inducible expression of ICAM-1. In accordance, both fumaric acid esters did not reduce the adhesion of activated Jurkat T cells to brain endothelium under basal or inflammatory conditions. Therefore, brain endothelial cells probably do not directly mediate a potential blocking effect of fumaric acid esters on the inflammatory infiltration of the CNS by T cells.

  13. HIV-1/cocaine induced oxidative stress disrupts tight junction protein-1 in human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells: role of Ras/ERK1/2 pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranjali Dalvi

    Full Text Available Intravenous drug use (IVDU is the major risk factor in the development of HIV-related pulmonary arterial hypertension (HRPAH; however, the pathogenesis of HRPAH in association with IVDU has yet to be characterized. Endothelial injury is considered to be an initiating factor for pulmonary vascular remodeling in animal models of PAH. Our previous study shows that simultaneous exposure to HIV-Trans-activator of transcription (Tat and cocaine exacerbates both disruption of tight junction proteins and permeability of human pulmonary artery endothelial cells compared with either treatment alone. We here now demonstrate that this HIV-Tat and cocaine mediated endothelial dysfunction accompanies with increase in hydrogen peroxide and superoxide radicals generation and involves redox sensitive signaling pathway. Pretreatment with antioxidant cocktail attenuated the cocaine and Tat mediated disassembly of Zonula Occludens (ZO-1 and enhancement of endothelial monolayer permeability. Furthermore, inhibition of NADPH oxidase by apocynin or siRNA-mediated knockdown of gp-91(phox abolished the Tat/cocaine-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS production, suggesting the NADPH oxidase mediated generation of oxidative radicals. In addition, ROS dependent activation of Ras and ERK1/2 Kinase was observed to be mediating the TJP-1 disassembly, and endothelial dysfunction in response to cocaine and Tat exposure. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that Tat/cocaine -mediated production of ROS activate Ras/Raf/ERK1/2 pathway that contributes to disruption of tight junction protein leading to pulmonary endothelial dysfunction associated with pulmonary vascular remodeling.

  14. West Nile virus-induced cell adhesion molecules on human brain microvascular endothelial cells regulate leukocyte adhesion and modulate permeability of the in vitro blood-brain barrier model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelsey Roe

    Full Text Available Characterizing the mechanisms by which West Nile virus (WNV causes blood-brain barrier (BBB disruption, leukocyte infiltration into the brain and neuroinflammation is important to understand the pathogenesis of WNV encephalitis. Here, we examined the role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules (CAMs in mediating the adhesion and transendothelial migration of leukocytes across human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMVE. Infection with WNV (NY99 strain significantly induced ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin in human endothelial cells and infected mice brain, although the levels of their ligands on leukocytes (VLA-4, LFA-1and MAC-1 did not alter. The permeability of the in vitro BBB model increased dramatically following the transmigration of monocytes and lymphocytes across the models infected with WNV, which was reversed in the presence of a cocktail of blocking antibodies against ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin. Further, WNV infection of HBMVE significantly increased leukocyte adhesion to the HBMVE monolayer and transmigration across the infected BBB model. The blockade of these CAMs reduced the adhesion and transmigration of leukocytes across the infected BBB model. Further, comparison of infection with highly neuroinvasive NY99 and non-lethal (Eg101 strain of WNV demonstrated similar level of virus replication and fold-increase of CAMs in HBMVE cells suggesting that the non-neuropathogenic response of Eg101 is not because of its inability to infect HBMVE cells. Collectively, these results suggest that increased expression of specific CAMs is a pathological event associated with WNV infection and may contribute to leukocyte infiltration and BBB disruption in vivo. Our data further implicate that strategies to block CAMs to reduce BBB disruption may limit neuroinflammation and virus-CNS entry via 'Trojan horse' route, and improve WNV disease outcome.

  15. West Nile virus-induced cell adhesion molecules on human brain microvascular endothelial cells regulate leukocyte adhesion and modulate permeability of the in vitro blood-brain barrier model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, Kelsey; Orillo, Beverly; Verma, Saguna

    2014-01-01

    Characterizing the mechanisms by which West Nile virus (WNV) causes blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption, leukocyte infiltration into the brain and neuroinflammation is important to understand the pathogenesis of WNV encephalitis. Here, we examined the role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) in mediating the adhesion and transendothelial migration of leukocytes across human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMVE). Infection with WNV (NY99 strain) significantly induced ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin in human endothelial cells and infected mice brain, although the levels of their ligands on leukocytes (VLA-4, LFA-1and MAC-1) did not alter. The permeability of the in vitro BBB model increased dramatically following the transmigration of monocytes and lymphocytes across the models infected with WNV, which was reversed in the presence of a cocktail of blocking antibodies against ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin. Further, WNV infection of HBMVE significantly increased leukocyte adhesion to the HBMVE monolayer and transmigration across the infected BBB model. The blockade of these CAMs reduced the adhesion and transmigration of leukocytes across the infected BBB model. Further, comparison of infection with highly neuroinvasive NY99 and non-lethal (Eg101) strain of WNV demonstrated similar level of virus replication and fold-increase of CAMs in HBMVE cells suggesting that the non-neuropathogenic response of Eg101 is not because of its inability to infect HBMVE cells. Collectively, these results suggest that increased expression of specific CAMs is a pathological event associated with WNV infection and may contribute to leukocyte infiltration and BBB disruption in vivo. Our data further implicate that strategies to block CAMs to reduce BBB disruption may limit neuroinflammation and virus-CNS entry via 'Trojan horse' route, and improve WNV disease outcome.

  16. Homocysteine Is an Oncometabolite in Breast Cancer, Which Promotes Tumor Progression and Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    ANGPTL-4 and MMP-9 in breast cancer cell lines. TASK 5: Analyze the influence of homocysteine and ANGPTL-4 on the permeability of lung...of protein lysates for western blotting, and preparation of RNA for qPCR. Lungs were perfused with India ink and Fekete solution to visualize... permeability of lung microvascular endothelial cells. Lung is the one of the primary sites for breast cancer metastasis, and it is believed that the

  17. Body mass index is associated with microvascular endothelial dysfunction in patients with treated metabolic risk factors and suspected coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.J. Van Der Heijden (Dirk J.); M.A.H. van Leeuwen (Maarten); G.N. Janssens (Gladys N.); M.J. Lenzen (Mattie); P.M. van de Ven (Peter); E.C. Eringa (Etto ); N. van Royen (Niels)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground--Obesity is key feature of the metabolic syndrome and is associated with high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Obesity is associated with macrovascular endothelial dysfunction, a determinant of outcome in patients with coronary artery disease. Here, we compared the

  18. Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy Sections What Is Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy? ... Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy Treatment What Is Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy? Leer en Español: ¿Qué Es una Parálisis ...

  19. Effect of rosuvastatin on fasting and postprandial endothelial biomarker levels and microvascular reactivity in patients with type 2 diabetes and dyslipidemia: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung Min; Jung, Kyong Yeun; Yun, Han Mi; Lee, Seo Young; Oh, Tae Jung; Jang, Hak Chul; Lim, Soo

    2017-11-09

    The cardiovascular benefits of statins have been proven, but their effect on circulation in small vessels has not been examined fully. We investigated the effect of 20 mg rosuvastatin on biomarkers, including paraoxonase-1 (PON-1) and asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), and on microvascular reactivity. We enrolled 20 dyslipidemic patients with type 2 diabetes and 20 age- and body mass index (BMI)-matched healthy controls. Rosuvastatin (20 mg/day) was given to the patient group for 12 weeks. Biochemical parameters, including PON-1 and ADMA, were compared between the patient and control groups, and before and after rosuvastatin treatment in the patient group. Fasting and 2 h postprandial levels of PON-1 and ADMA after mixed-meal challenge were also compared. Microvascular reactivity in a peripheral artery was examined using laser Doppler flowmetry. The respective mean ± standard deviation of age and BMI were 50.1 ± 3.8 year and 25.8 ± 3.7 kg/m(2) in the patients and 50.2 ± 3.2 year and 25.4 ± 3.4 kg/m(2) in the controls. The patient group had worse profiles of cardiometabolic biomarkers, including PON-1 and ADMA, than the controls. In the patients treated with 20 mg rosuvastatin, low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol decreased from 147.2 ± 26.5 to 68.3 ± 24.5 mg/dL and high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol increased from 42.4 ± 5.2 to 44.7 ± 6.2 mg/dL (both P fasting and 2 h postprandial levels of PON-1 increased and those of ADMA decreased after treatment with rosuvastatin for 12 weeks. The changes in postprandial levels of both biomarkers were greater than those after fasting. Microcirculation assessed as reactive hyperemia in the patients after an ischemic challenge increased significantly from 335.3 ± 123.4 to 402.7 ± 133.4% after rosuvastatin treatment. The postprandial changes in the biomarkers were significantly associated with improvement of microvascular reactivity. Rosuvastatin treatment for 12

  20. Distribution of a 69-kD laminin-binding protein in aortic and microvascular endothelial cells: modulation during cell attachment, spreading, and migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yannariello-Brown, J; Wewer, U; Liotta, L

    1988-01-01

    Affinity chromatography and immunolocalization techniques were used to investigate the mechanism(s) by which endothelial cells interact with the basement membrane component laminin. Bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) membranes were solubilized and incubated with a laminin-Sepharose affinity...... column. SDS-PAGE analysis of the eluted proteins identified a 69-kD band as the major binding protein, along with minor components migrating at 125, 110, 92, 85, 75, 55, and 30 kD. Polyclonal antibodies directed against a peptide sequence of the 69-kD laminin-binding protein isolated from human tumor...... cells identified this protein in BAEC lysates. In frozen sections, these polyclonal antibodies and monoclonal antibodies raised against human tumor 69-kD stained the endothelium of bovine aorta and the medial smooth muscle cells, but not surrounding connective tissue or elastin fibers. When...

  1. Identification of Developmental Endothelial Locus-1 on Circulating Extracellular Vesicles as a Novel Biomarker for Early Breast Cancer Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Pyong-Gon; Lee, Jeong-Eun; Cho, Young-Eun; Lee, Soo Jung; Jung, Jin Hyang; Chae, Yee Soo; Bae, Han-Ik; Kim, Young-Bum; Kim, In-San; Park, Ho Yong; Baek, Moon-Chang

    2016-04-01

    Currently, there are no molecular biomarkers for the early detection of breast cancer. This study focused on identifying surface proteins found on circulating extracellular vesicles (EVs) for detecting early-stage breast cancer. Circulating EVs, isolated from the plasma of 10 patients with breast cancer (stages I and II) and 5 healthy controls, were analyzed using LC-MS/MS. Developmental endothelial locus-1 protein (Del-1) was selected as a candidate biomarker. Two different ELISAs were used to measure Del-1 in plasma samples from healthy controls (n= 81), patients with breast cancer (n= 269), breast cancer patients after surgical resection (n= 50), patients with benign breast tumors (n= 64), and patients with noncancerous diseases (n= 98) in two cohorts. Plasma Del-1 levels were significantly higher (Pbreast cancer than in all controls and returned to almost normal after tumor removal. The diagnostic accuracy of Del-1 was AUC, 0.961 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.924-0.983], sensitivity of 94.70%, and specificity of 86.36% in test cohort and 0.968 (0.933-0.988), 92.31%, and 86.62% in validation cohort for early-stage breast cancer by one type of ELISA. Furthermore, Del-1 maintained diagnostic accuracy for patients with early-stage breast cancer using the other type of ELISA [0.946 (0.905-0.972), 90.90%, and 77.14% in the test cohort; 0.943 (0.900-0.971), 89.23%, and 80.99% in the validation cohort]. Del-1 on circulating EVs is a promising marker to improve identification of patients with early-stage breast cancer and distinguish breast cancer from benign breast tumors and noncancerous diseases. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  2. Reduction in cardiolipin decreases mitochondrial spare respiratory capacity and increases glucose transport into and across human brain cerebral microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hieu M; Mejia, Edgard M; Chang, Wenguang; Wang, Ying; Watson, Emily; On, Ngoc; Miller, Donald W; Hatch, Grant M

    2016-10-01

    Microvessel endothelial cells form part of the blood-brain barrier, a restrictively permeable interface that allows transport of only specific compounds into the brain. Cardiolipin is a mitochondrial phospholipid required for function of the electron transport chain and ATP generation. We examined the role of cardiolipin in maintaining mitochondrial function necessary to support barrier properties of brain microvessel endothelial cells. Knockdown of the terminal enzyme of cardiolipin synthesis, cardiolipin synthase, in hCMEC/D3 cells resulted in decreased cellular cardiolipin levels compared to controls. The reduction in cardiolipin resulted in decreased mitochondrial spare respiratory capacity, increased pyruvate kinase activity, and increased 2-deoxy-[(3) H]glucose uptake and glucose transporter-1 expression and localization to membranes in hCMEC/D3 cells compared to controls. The mechanism for the increase in glucose uptake was an increase in adenosine-5'-monophosphate kinase and protein kinase B activity and decreased glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta activity. Knockdown of cardiolipin synthase did not affect permeability of fluorescent dextran across confluent hCMEC/D3 monolayers grown on Transwell(®) inserts. In contrast, knockdown of cardiolipin synthase resulted in an increase in 2-deoxy-[(3) H]glucose transport across these monolayers compared to controls. The data indicate that in hCMEC/D3 cells, spare respiratory capacity is dependent on cardiolipin. In addition, reduction in cardiolipin in these cells alters their cellular energy status and this results in increased glucose transport into and across hCMEC/D3 monolayers. Microvessel endothelial cells form part of the blood-brain barrier, a restrictively permeable interface that allows transport of only specific compounds into the brain. In human adult brain endothelial cell hCMEC/D3 monolayers cultured on Transwell(®) plates, knockdown of cardiolipin synthase results in decrease in mitochondrial

  3. Protein kinase C-α signals P115RhoGEF phosphorylation and RhoA activation in TNF-α-induced mouse brain microvascular endothelial cell barrier dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deng Xiaolu

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, a proinflammatory cytokine, is capable of activating the small GTPase RhoA, which in turn contributes to endothelial barrier dysfunction. However, the underlying signaling mechanisms remained undefined. Therefore, we aimed to determine the role of protein kinase C (PKC isozymes in the mechanism of RhoA activation and in signaling TNF-α-induced mouse brain microvascular endothelial cell (BMEC barrier dysfunction. Methods Bend.3 cells, an immortalized mouse brain endothelial cell line, were exposed to TNF-α (10 ng/mL. RhoA activity was assessed by pull down assay. PKC-α activity was measured using enzyme assasy. BMEC barrier function was measured by transendothelial electrical resistance (TER. p115RhoGEF phosphorylation was detected by autoradiography followed by western blotting. F-actin organization was observed by rhodamine-phalloidin staining. Both pharmacological inhibitors and knockdown approaches were employed to investigate the role of PKC and p115RhoGEF in TNF-α-induced RhoA activation and BMEC permeability. Results We observed that TNF-α induces a rapid phosphorylation of p115RhoGEF, activation of PKC and RhoA in BMECs. Inhibition of conventional PKC by Gö6976 mitigated the TNF-α-induced p115RhoGEF phosphorylation and RhoA activation. Subsequently, we found that these events are regulated by PKC-α rather than PKC-β by using shRNA. In addition, P115-shRNA and n19RhoA (dominant negative mutant of RhoA transfections had no effect on mediating TNF-α-induced PKC-α activation. These data suggest that PKC-α but not PKC-β acts as an upstream regulator of p115RhoGEF phosphorylation and RhoA activation in response to TNF-α. Moreover, depletion of PKC-α, of p115RhoGEF, and inhibition of RhoA activation also prevented TNF-α-induced stress fiber formation and a decrease in TER. Conclusions Taken together, our results show that PKC-α phosphorylation of p115RhoGEF mediates TNF

  4. Prognostic impact of placenta growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor A in patients with breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maae, Else; Olsen, Dorte Aalund; Steffensen, Karina Dahl

    2012-01-01

    Placenta growth factor (PlGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) are angiogenic growth factors interacting competitively with the same receptors. VEGF-A is essential in both normal and pathologic conditions, but the functions of PlGF seem to be restricted to pathologic conditions...... such as ischemic heart disease, arthritis and tumor growth. Angiogenesis is a complex process with several growth factors involved. Because PlGF modulates VEGF-A responses, we investigated their mutual relationship and impact on breast cancer prognosis. Quantitative PlGF and VEGF-A levels were measured in 229...... tumor tissue specimen from primarily operated patients with unilateral breast cancer. Non-malignant breast tissue was also dissected near the tumor and quantitative measurements were available for 211 patients. PlGF and VEGF-A protein levels in homogenized tissue lysates were analyzed using the Luminex...

  5. Assessment of maturation status of tumor-infiltrating dendritic cells in invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast: relation with vascular endothelial growth factor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Deeb, Nevine M F; Mehanna, Radwa A

    2013-01-01

    Poor immunogenicity has been described in breast carcinoma although dendritic cells, the major antigen presenters, are known to infiltrate the tumor. Vascular endothelial growth factor has been proposed to reduce local immune response in tumors. We investigated the maturation status of dendritic cells in invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast in relation to vascular endothelial growth factor expression and clinicopathological parameters. Fifty invasive ductal carcinomas of the breast were immunostained with CD1a (marker of immature dendritic cells); CD83 (marker of mature dendritic cells), vascular endothelial growth factor, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor. Mature dendritic cells were detected in 36 cases (72%), and correlated with smaller tumor size, negative lymph nodes, positive steroid receptor status, and lower grade (P cells were found in 100% of cases and correlated only with negative steroid receptor expression (estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor) (P=0.006 and 0.020 respectively). Vascular endothelial growth factor expression was detected in 44 cases (88%), and correlated directly with positive nodal metastases (P=0.014), correlated inversely with mature dendritic cell count (P=0.005); and did not correlate with immature dendritic cell count (P=0.104). Mature dendritic cell count correlates with good prognostic features in invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast, suggesting their role in initiating primary anti-tumor immune response. Vascular endothelial growth factor expression may play a role in inhibition of dendritic cell maturation sequence in the tumor microenvironment.

  6. Prognostic impact of placenta growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor A in patients with breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maae, Else; Olsen, Dorte Aalund; Dahl Steffensen, Karina

    2012-01-01

    Background: Placenta growth factor (PlGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) are angiogenic growth factors interacting competitively with the same receptors. VEGF-A is essential in both normal and pathologic conditions, but the functions of PlGF seem to be restricted to pathologic...... conditions such as ischemic heart disease, arthritis and tumor growth. Angiogenesis is a complex process with several growth factors involved. Because PlGF modulates VEGF-A responses we investigated their mutual relationship and impact on prognosis. Materials and methods: Quantitative PlGF and VEGF-A levels...... were measured in 229 tumor tissue specimen from primarily operated patients with unilateral breast cancer. Non-malignant breast tissue was also dissected near the tumor and quantitative measurements were available for 211 patients. PlGF and VEGF-A protein levels in homogenized tissue lysates were...

  7. Prognostic impact of placenta growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor A in patients with breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maae, Else; Olsen, Dorte Aalund; Dahl Steffensen, Karina

    Background: Placenta growth factor (PlGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) are angiogenic growth factors interacting competitively with the same receptors. VEGF-A is essential in both normal and pathologic conditions, but the functions of PlGF seem to be restricted to pathologic...... conditions such as ischemic heart disease, arthritis and tumor growth. Angiogenesis is a complex process with several growth factors involved. Because PlGF modulates VEGF-A responses we investigated their mutual relationship and impact on prognosis. Materials and methods: Quantitative PlGF and VEGF-A levels...... were measured in 229 tumor tissue specimen from primarily operated patients with unilateral breast cancer. Non-malignant breast tissue was also dissected near the tumor and quantitative measurements were available for 211 patients. PlGF and VEGF-A protein levels in homogenized tissue lysates were...

  8. Lactate dehydrogenase a expression is necessary to sustain rapid angiogenesis of pulmonary microvascular endothelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenda Parra-Bonilla

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis is a fundamental property of endothelium, yet not all endothelial cells display equivalent angiogenic responses; pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells undergo rapid angiogenesis when compared to endothelial cells isolated from conduit vessels. At present it is not clear how pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells fulfill the bioenergetic demands that are necessary to sustain such rapid blood vessel formation. We have previously established that pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells utilize aerobic glycolysis to generate ATP during growth, a process that requires the expression of lactate dehydrogenase A to convert pyruvate to lactate. Here, we test the hypothesis that lactate dehydrogenase A is required for pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells to sustain rapid angiogenesis. To test this hypothesis, Tet-On and Tet-Off conditional expression systems were developed in pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells, where doxycycline is utilized to induce lactate dehydrogenase A shRNA expression. Expression of LDH-A shRNA induced a time-dependent decrease in LDH-A protein, which corresponded with a decrease in glucose consumption from the media, lactate production and cell growth; re-expression of LDH-A rescued each of these parameters. LDH-A silencing greatly reduced network formation on Matrigel in vitro, and decreased blood vessel formation in Matrigel in vivo. These findings demonstrate that LDH-A is critically important for sustaining the rapid angiogenesis of pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells.

  9. Knock-down of CD44 regulates endothelial cell differentiation via NFκB-mediated chemokine production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berit Olofsson

    Full Text Available A striking feature of microvascular endothelial cells is their capacity to fuse and differentiate into tubular structures when grown in three-dimensional (3D extracellular matrices, in collagen or Matrigel, mimicking the in vivo blood vessel formation. In this study we demonstrate that human telomerase-immortalised foreskin microvascular endothelial (TIME cells express high levels of the hyaluronan receptor CD44 and the hyaluronidase HYAL2. Knock-down of CD44 or HYAL2 resulted in an inability of TIME cells to form a tubular network, suggesting a key regulatory role of hyaluronan in controlling TIME cell tubulogenesis in 3D matrices. Knock-down of CD44 resulted in an upregulation of mRNA expression of the chemokines CXCL9 and CXCL12, as well as their receptors CXCR3 and CXCR4. This was accompanied by a defect maturation of the tubular structure network and increased phosphorylation of the inhibitor of NFκB kinase (IKK complex and thus translocation of NFκB into the nucleus and activation of chemokine targed genes. Furthermore, the interaction between CD44 and hyaluronan determines the adhesion of breast cancer cells. In summary, our observations support the notion that the interaction between CD44 and hyaluronan regulates microvascular endothelial cell tubulogenesis by affecting the expression of cytokines and their receptors, as well as breast cancer dissemination.

  10. MicroRNA-7 suppresses the homing and migration potential of human endothelial cells to highly metastatic human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yu-Xin; Bradbury, Robyn; Flamini, Valentina; Wu, Bo; Jordan, Nicola; Jiang, Wen G

    2017-06-27

    MicroRNA-7 (miR-7) has been observed as a potent tumour suppressor in multiple cancer types including breast cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the response sensitivities of metastatic breast cancer cells to miR-7 and the roles of miR-7 in the interaction of endothelial cells and metastatic cancer cells. Expression profile of miRNAs in a breast cancer specimen cohort and breast cancer cells were determined using real-time quantitative miRNA assays. Effect of the altering expression of miR-7 on migration, invasion, proliferation, interaction and underlying molecular mechanism of breast cancer cells and endothelial cells was investigated after treatment with the synthesised mimic of miR-7. Luciferase activity analysis was performed to validate Wave-3 as a novel target of miR-7. miR-7 expression was negatively correlated with the stage, grade and survival of the breast cancer patients. There was also differential expression of miRNAs including miR-7 in the breast cancer cells. The synthesised mimic of miR-7 inhibits the motility and wound healing potential of breast cancer cells. The highly metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells are more sensitive to the miR-7 treatment than the poorly invasive MCF-7 cells. Treatment with miR-7 downregulated the expression of EGFR, IGF1R and Wave3 in MDA-MB-231 cells but not in MCF-7 cells. In addition, we further demonstrated that miR-7 inhibited the proliferation, migration and invasion of endothelial cells. And more importantly, miR-7 suppressed the homing and migration of endothelial cells to more aggressive tumour cell conditions. Given the dual inhibitory effect of miR-7 on metastatic breast cancer cells alone and the interaction of endothelial cells with the tumour-conditioned microenvironment, we suggest miR-7 may be a new therapeutic candidate for its capacity not only to prevent breast cancer cell spreading but also to inhibit tumour-associated angiogenesis in the metastatic breast cancer.

  11. Protective Effects of MicroRNA-126 on Human Cardiac Microvascular Endothelial Cells Against Hypoxia/Reoxygenation-Induced Injury and Inflammatory Response by Activating PI3K/Akt/eNOS Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hong-Hui; Chen, Yan; Gao, Chuan-Yu; Cui, Zhen-Tian; Yao, Jian-Min

    2017-01-01

    This study explored the protective effects of the microRNA-126 (miR-126)-mediated PI3K/Akt/eNOS signaling pathway on human cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (HCMECs) against hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R)-induced injury and the inflammatory response. Untreated HCMECs were selected for the control group. After H/R treatment and cell transfection, the HCMECs were assigned to the H/R, miR-126 mimic, mimic-negative control (NC), miR-126 inhibitor, inhibitor-NC, wortmannin (an inhibitor of PI3K) and miR-126 mimic + wortmannin groups. Super oxide dismutase (SOD), nitric oxide (NO), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured utilizing commercial kits. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were performed to detect miR-126 expression and the mRNA and protein expression of inflammatory factors. Western blotting was used to determine the expression of key members in the PI3K/Akt/eNOS signaling pathway. ACCK-8 assay and flow cytometry were employed to examine cell proliferation and apoptosis, respectively. The angiogenic ability in each group was detected by the lumen formation test. Compared to the control group, p/t-PI3K, p/t-Akt and p/t-eNOS expression, NO, VEGF and SOD levels, cell proliferation and in vitro lumen formation ability were decreased, while the ROS content, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α expression and cell apoptosis were significantly increased in the H/R, mimic-NC, miR-126 inhibitor, inhibitor-NC, wortmannin and miR-126 mimic + wortmannin groups. Additionally, in comparison with the H/R group, the miR-126 mimic group had elevated p/t-PI3K, p/t-Akt and p/t-eNOS expression, increased NO, VEGF and SOD contents, and strengthened cell proliferation and lumen formation abilities but also exhibited decreased ROS content, reduced IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α expressions, and weakened cell apoptosis, while the miR-126 inhibitor

  12. Protective Effects of MicroRNA-126 on Human Cardiac Microvascular Endothelial Cells Against Hypoxia/Reoxygenation-Induced Injury and Inflammatory Response by Activating PI3K/Akt/eNOS Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Hui Yang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study explored the protective effects of the microRNA-126 (miR-126-mediated PI3K/Akt/eNOS signaling pathway on human cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (HCMECs against hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R-induced injury and the inflammatory response. Methods: Untreated HCMECs were selected for the control group. After H/R treatment and cell transfection, the HCMECs were assigned to the H/R, miR-126 mimic, mimic-negative control (NC, miR-126 inhibitor, inhibitor-NC, wortmannin (an inhibitor of PI3K and miR-126 mimic + wortmannin groups. Super oxide dismutase (SOD, nitric oxide (NO, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and reactive oxygen species (ROS were measured utilizing commercial kits. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA were performed to detect miR-126 expression and the mRNA and protein expression of inflammatory factors. Western blotting was used to determine the expression of key members in the PI3K/Akt/eNOS signaling pathway. ACCK-8 assay and flow cytometry were employed to examine cell proliferation and apoptosis, respectively. The angiogenic ability in each group was detected by the lumen formation test. Results: Compared to the control group, p/t-PI3K, p/t-Akt and p/t-eNOS expression, NO, VEGF and SOD levels, cell proliferation and in vitro lumen formation ability were decreased, while the ROS content, interleukin (IL-6, IL-10 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α expression and cell apoptosis were significantly increased in the H/R, mimic-NC, miR-126 inhibitor, inhibitor-NC, wortmannin and miR-126 mimic + wortmannin groups. Additionally, in comparison with the H/R group, the miR-126 mimic group had elevated p/t-PI3K, p/t-Akt and p/t-eNOS expression, increased NO, VEGF and SOD contents, and strengthened cell proliferation and lumen formation abilities but also exhibited decreased ROS content, reduced IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α expressions, and weakened cell

  13. GLP-1 inhibits VEGFA-mediated signaling in isolated human endothelial cells and VEGFA-induced dilation of rat mesenteric arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rotbøl, Cecilie Egholm; Khammy, Makhala Michell; Dalsgaard, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    to PLCγ activation, Src, and endothelial NOS (eNOS) signaling, thereby controlling endothelial vessel tone. By using RT-PCR analysis, we found mRNA for the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) in human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMEC), human retinal microvascular endothelial cells, and rat arteries...

  14. Renal and cardiac microvascular endothelium: injury and repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterhuis, NR|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/338923020

    2016-01-01

    Injury to the capillary endothelium can be devastating for renal and cardiac function. To halt the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and heart failure (HF) preservation of the microvascular endothelial cell (EC) function and structure is of great importance.1 Increasing knowledge about

  15. PGE2 promotes breast cancer-associated lymphangiogenesis by activation of EP4 receptor on lymphatic endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Pinki; Girish, Gannareddy V; Majumder, Mousumi; Xin, Xiping; Tutunea-Fatan, Elena; Lala, Peeyush K

    2017-01-05

    Lymphatic metastasis, facilitated by lymphangiogenesis is a common occurrence in breast cancer, the molecular mechanisms remaining incompletely understood. We had earlier shown that cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression by human or murine breast cancer cells promoted lymphangiogenesis and lymphatic metastasis by upregulating VEGF-C/D production by tumor cells or tumor-associated macrophages primarily due to activation of the prostaglandin receptor EP4 by endogenous PGE2. It is not clear whether tumor or host-derived PGE2 has any direct effect on lymphangiogenesis, and if so, whether EP4 receptors on lymphatic endothelial cells (LEC) play any role. Here, we address these questions employing in vitro studies with a COX-2-expressing and VEGF-C/D-producing murine breast cancer cell line C3L5 and a rat mesenteric (RM) LEC line and in vivo studies in nude mice. RMLEC responded to PGE2, an EP4 agonist PGE1OH, or C3L5 cell-conditioned media (C3L5-CM) by increased proliferation, migration and accelerated tube formation on growth factor reduced Matrigel. Native tube formation by RMLEC on Matrigel was abrogated in the presence of a selective COX-2 inhibitor or an EP4 antagonist. Addition of PGE2 or EP4 agonist, or C3L5-CM individually in the presence of COX-2 inhibitor, or EP4 antagonist, restored tube formation, reinforcing the role of EP4 on RMLEC in tubulogenesis. These results were partially duplicated with a human dermal LEC (HMVEC-dLyAd) and a COX-2 expressing human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231. Knocking down EP4 with shRNA in RMLEC abrogated their tube forming capacity on Matrigel in the absence or presence of PGE2, EP4 agonist, or C3L5-CM. RMLEC tubulogenesis following EP4 activation by agonist treatment was dependent on PI3K/Akt and Erk signaling pathways and VEGFR-3 stimulation. Finally in a directed in vivo lymphangiogenesis assay (DIVLA) we demonstrated the lymphangiogenic as well as angiogenic capacity of PGE2 and EP4 agonist in vivo. These results demonstrate

  16. Role of mitochondrial dysfunction in hyperglycaemia-induced coronary microvascular dysfunction: Protective role of resveratrol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Mandar S; Williams, David; Horlock, Duncan; Samarasinghe, Thilini; Andrews, Karen L; Jefferis, Ann-Maree; Berger, Philip J; Chin-Dusting, Jaye P; Kaye, David M

    2015-05-01

    Microvascular complications are now recognized to play a major role in diabetic complications, and understanding the mechanisms is critical. Endothelial dysfunction occurs early in the course of the development of complications; the precise mechanisms remain poorly understood. Mitochondrial dysfunction may occur in a diabetic rat heart and may act as a source of the oxidative stress. However, the role of endothelial cell-specific mitochondrial dysfunction in diabetic vascular complications is poorly studied. Here, we studied the role of diabetes-induced abnormal endothelial mitochondrial function and the resultant endothelial dysfunction. Understanding the role of endothelial mitochondrial dysfunction in diabetic vasculature is critical in order to develop new therapies. We demonstrate that hyperglycaemia leads to mitochondrial dysfunction in microvascular endothelial cells, and that mitochondrial inhibition induces endothelial dysfunction. Additionally, we show that resveratrol acts as a protective agent; resveratrol-mediated mitochondrial protection may be used to prevent long-term diabetic cardiovascular complications. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Microvascular dysfunction as a link between obesity, insulin resistance and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaca, Ü; Schram, M T; Houben, A J H M; Muris, D M J; Stehouwer, C D A

    2014-03-01

    Impaired microvascular dilatation from any cause and impaired insulin-mediated capillary recruitment in particular result in suboptimal delivery of glucose and insulin to skeletal muscle, and subsequently impairment of glucose disposal (insulin resistance). In addition, microvascular dysfunction, through functional and/or structural arteriolar and capillary drop-out, and arteriolar constriction, increases peripheral resistance and thus blood pressure. Microvascular dysfunction may thus constitute a pathway that links insulin resistance and hypertension. Overweight and obesity may be an important cause of microvascular dysfunction. Mechanisms linking overweight and obesity to microvascular dysfunction include changes in the secretion of adipokines leading to increased levels of free fatty acids and inflammatory mediators, and decreased levels of adiponectin all of which may impair endothelial insulin signaling. Microvascular dysfunction may thus constitute a new treatment target in the prevention of type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Is tamoxifen associated with an increased risk for thromboembolic complications in patients undergoing microvascular breast reconstruction? [Ist die Einnahme von Tamoxifen zum Zeitpunkt der mikrovaskulären Brustrekonstruktion mit einer erhöhten Rate an thrombembolischen Komplikationen assoziiert?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krämer, Robert

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available [english] Introduction: Tamoxifen is associated with a twofold increased risk of thromboembolic events. Third generation aromatase inhibitors (AIs, such as letrozole, anastrozole, and exemestane have therefore replaced tamoxifen in the adjuvant therapy of hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. A retrospective review was performed in patients who underwent delayed microvascular breast reconstruction and received tamoxifen at the time of surgery in order to assess the risk of both minor and major flap complications including thromboembolic events.Patients and methods: Twenty-nine patients who underwent delayed microsurgical breast reconstruction with autologous tissue between 2006 and 2012 were included in the study. The overall complication rates were compared between patients who did versus those who did not receive tamoxifen at the time of microsurgical breast reconstruction. Results: Breast reconstruction was performed with a DIEP flap in and with a TRAM flap in 4 patients. Overall, the complication rate was 37.9% (n=11 consisting of 5 major (including one total flap loss and 6 minor complications. In patients receiving tamoxifen (n=5, we observed one minor complication and one major complication with a total flap loss due to thrombus formation at the anastomosis site. In one patient pulmonary embolism occurred without association to tamoxifen. The number of thromboembolic events was equivalent in both groups (p=0.642. No increase of major (p=0.858 or minor (p=0.967 complications in the tamoxifen group could be observed. Taking the overall complication rate into account there was no statistically difference between the two groups (p=0.917.Conclusion: In our study we could not observe an increased risk for thromobembolic events in patients receiving tamoxifen while undergoing autologous microvascular breast reconstruction.[german] Aromatasehemmer der dritten Generation haben mittlerweile Tamoxifen in der neoadjuvanten und adjuvanten Therapie

  19. Inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation and tumor angiogenesis by up-regulating NDRG2 expression in breast cancer cells.

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    Ji Ma

    Full Text Available The N-myc downstream-regulated gene 2 (NDRG2 is involved in tumor cell differentiation and apoptosis, but its function in tumor angiogenesis remains to be established. Here, we employed adenovirus overexpressing NDRG2 (Ad-NDRG2 to efficiently up-regulate target gene expression in the NDRG2-low-expressing, breast cancer cell line MCF-7. Moreover, VEGF secretion was decreased in MCF-7 cells infected by Ad-NDRG2, and medium conditioned by these infected cells could significantly inhibit the proliferation, tube formation and invasion of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. Further study indicated that the angiogenesis promoting factors VEGF and HIF-1α were down-regulated, whereas the angiogenesis suppressing factors p53 and VHL were up-regulated in MCF-7 cells infected by Ad-NDRG2. Finally, in a nude mouse model, intratumoral injections of Ad-NDRG2 every 3 days for 20 days significantly inhibited the growth and angiogenesis of xenografted MCF-7 tumors. In summary, these data indicate that NDRG2 may be involved in angiogenesis by impacting the expression of angiogenesis related factors. Thus, specific overexpression of NDRG2 by adenovirus represents a promising approach for the treatment of tumor angiogenesis.

  20. Podoplanin increases the migration of human fibroblasts and affects the endothelial cell network formation: A possible role for cancer-associated fibroblasts in breast cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchanski, Jaroslaw; Tejchman, Anna; Zacharski, Maciej; Piotrowska, Aleksandra; Grzegrzolka, Jedrzej; Chodaczek, Grzegorz; Nowinska, Katarzyna; Rys, Janusz; Dziegiel, Piotr; Kieda, Claudine; Ugorski, Maciej

    2017-01-01

    In our previous studies we showed that in breast cancer podoplanin-positive cancer-associated fibroblasts correlated positively with tumor size, grade of malignancy, lymph node metastasis, lymphovascular invasion and poor patients' outcome. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to assess if podoplanin expressed by fibroblasts can affect malignancy-associated properties of breast cancer cells. Human fibroblastic cell lines (MSU1.1 and Hs 578Bst) overexpressing podoplanin and control fibroblasts were co-cultured with breast cancer MDA-MB-231 and MCF7 cells and the impact of podoplanin expressed by fibroblasts on migration and invasiveness of breast cancer cells were studied in vitro. Migratory and invasive properties of breast cancer cells were not affected by the presence of podoplanin on the surface of fibroblasts. However, ectopic expression of podoplanin highly increases the migration of MSU1.1 and Hs 578Bst fibroblasts. The present study also revealed for the first time, that podoplanin expression affects the formation of pseudo tubes by endothelial cells. When human HSkMEC cells were co-cultured with podoplanin-rich fibroblasts the endothelial cell capillary-like network was characterized by significantly lower numbers of nodes and meshes than in co-cultures of endothelial cells with podoplanin-negative fibroblasts. The question remains as to how our experimental data can be correlated with previous clinical data showing an association between the presence of podoplanin-positive cancer-associated fibroblasts and progression of breast cancer. Therefore, we propose that expression of podoplanin by fibroblasts facilitates their movement into the tumor stroma, which creates a favorable microenvironment for tumor progression by increasing the number of cancer-associated fibroblasts, which produce numerous factors affecting proliferation, survival and invasion of cancer cells. In accordance with this, the present study revealed for the first time, that such

  1. Podoplanin increases the migration of human fibroblasts and affects the endothelial cell network formation: A possible role for cancer-associated fibroblasts in breast cancer progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslaw Suchanski

    Full Text Available In our previous studies we showed that in breast cancer podoplanin-positive cancer-associated fibroblasts correlated positively with tumor size, grade of malignancy, lymph node metastasis, lymphovascular invasion and poor patients' outcome. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to assess if podoplanin expressed by fibroblasts can affect malignancy-associated properties of breast cancer cells. Human fibroblastic cell lines (MSU1.1 and Hs 578Bst overexpressing podoplanin and control fibroblasts were co-cultured with breast cancer MDA-MB-231 and MCF7 cells and the impact of podoplanin expressed by fibroblasts on migration and invasiveness of breast cancer cells were studied in vitro. Migratory and invasive properties of breast cancer cells were not affected by the presence of podoplanin on the surface of fibroblasts. However, ectopic expression of podoplanin highly increases the migration of MSU1.1 and Hs 578Bst fibroblasts. The present study also revealed for the first time, that podoplanin expression affects the formation of pseudo tubes by endothelial cells. When human HSkMEC cells were co-cultured with podoplanin-rich fibroblasts the endothelial cell capillary-like network was characterized by significantly lower numbers of nodes and meshes than in co-cultures of endothelial cells with podoplanin-negative fibroblasts. The question remains as to how our experimental data can be correlated with previous clinical data showing an association between the presence of podoplanin-positive cancer-associated fibroblasts and progression of breast cancer. Therefore, we propose that expression of podoplanin by fibroblasts facilitates their movement into the tumor stroma, which creates a favorable microenvironment for tumor progression by increasing the number of cancer-associated fibroblasts, which produce numerous factors affecting proliferation, survival and invasion of cancer cells. In accordance with this, the present study revealed for the first

  2. Acute alcohol intoxication-induced microvascular leakage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doggett, Travis M; Breslin, Jerome W

    2014-09-01

    Alcohol intoxication can increase inflammation and worsen injury, yet the mechanisms involved are not clear. We investigated whether acute alcohol intoxication increases microvascular permeability and investigated potential signaling mechanisms in endothelial cells that may be involved. Conscious rats received a 2.5 g/kg alcohol bolus via gastric catheters to produce acute intoxication. Microvascular leakage of intravenously administered fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-conjugated albumin (FITC-albumin) from the mesenteric microcirculation was assessed by intravital microscopy. Endothelial-specific mechanisms were studied using cultured endothelial cell monolayers. Transendothelial electrical resistance (TER) served as an index of barrier function, before and after treatment with alcohol or its metabolite acetaldehyde. Pharmacologic agents were used to test the roles of alcohol metabolism, oxidative stress, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), myosin light-chain kinase (MLCK), rho kinase (ROCK), and exchange protein activated by cAMP (Epac). VE-cadherin localization was investigated to assess junctional integrity. Rac1 and RhoA activation was assessed by ELISA assays. Alcohol significantly increased FITC-albumin extravasation from the mesenteric microcirculation. Alcohol also significantly decreased TER and disrupted VE-cadherin organization at junctions. Acetaldehyde significantly decreased TER, but inhibition of alcohol dehydrogenase or application of a superoxide dismutase mimetic failed to prevent alcohol-induced decreases in TER. Inhibition of p38 MAPK, but not MLCK or ROCK, significantly attenuated the alcohol-induced barrier dysfunction. Alcohol rapidly decreased GTP-bound Rac1 but not RhoA during the drop in TER. Activation of Epac increased TER, but did not prevent alcohol from decreasing TER. However, activation of Epac after initiation of alcohol-induced barrier dysfunction quickly resolved TER to baseline levels. Our results suggest that

  3. Cardiovascular risk factors as determinants of retinal and skin microvascular function: The Maastricht Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben M Sörensen

    Full Text Available Microvascular dysfunction is an important underlying mechanism of microvascular diseases. Determinants (age, sex, hypertension, dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia, obesity, and smoking of macrovascular diseases affect large-artery endothelial function. These risk factors also associate with microvascular diseases. We hypothesized that they are also determinants of microvascular (endothelial function.In The Maastricht Study, a type 2 diabetes-enriched population-based cohort study (n = 1991, 51% men, aged 59.7±8.2 years, we determined microvascular function as flicker light-induced retinal arteriolar %-dilation and heat-induced skin %-hyperemia. Multiple linear regression analyses were used to assess the associations of cardiovascular risk factors (age, sex, waist circumference, total-to-high-density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol ratio, fasting plasma glucose (FPG, 24-h systolic blood pressure, and cigarette smoking with retinal and skin microvascular function.In multivariate analyses, age and FPG were inversely associated with retinal and skin microvascular function (regression coefficients per standard deviation (SD were -0.11SD (95%CI: -0.15;-0.06 and -0.12SD (-0.17;-0.07 for retinal arteriolar %-dilation and -0.10SD (-0.16;-0.05 and -0.11SD (-0.17;-0.06 for skin %-hyperemia, respectively. Men and current smokers had -0.43SD (-0.58;-0.27 and -0.32SD (-0.49;-0.15 lower skin %-hyperemia, respectively. 24-h systolic blood pressure, waist circumference, and total-to-HDL cholesterol ratio were not statistically significantly associated with these microvascular functions.Associations between cardiovascular risk factors and retinal and skin microvascular function show a pattern that is partly similar to the associations between cardiovascular risk factors and macrovascular function. Impairment of microvascular function may constitute a pathway through which an adverse cardiovascular risk factor pattern may increase risk of diseases that are partly or wholly

  4. Cardiovascular risk factors as determinants of retinal and skin microvascular function: The Maastricht Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houben, Alfons J. H. M.; Berendschot, Tos T. J. M.; Schouten, Jan S. A. G.; Kroon, Abraham A.; van der Kallen, Carla J. H.; Henry, Ronald M. A.; Koster, Annemarie; Dagnelie, Pieter C.; Schaper, Nicolaas C.; Schram, Miranda T.; Stehouwer, Coen D. A.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Microvascular dysfunction is an important underlying mechanism of microvascular diseases. Determinants (age, sex, hypertension, dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia, obesity, and smoking) of macrovascular diseases affect large-artery endothelial function. These risk factors also associate with microvascular diseases. We hypothesized that they are also determinants of microvascular (endothelial) function. Methods In The Maastricht Study, a type 2 diabetes-enriched population-based cohort study (n = 1991, 51% men, aged 59.7±8.2 years), we determined microvascular function as flicker light-induced retinal arteriolar %-dilation and heat-induced skin %-hyperemia. Multiple linear regression analyses were used to assess the associations of cardiovascular risk factors (age, sex, waist circumference, total-to-high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol ratio, fasting plasma glucose (FPG), 24-h systolic blood pressure, and cigarette smoking) with retinal and skin microvascular function. Results In multivariate analyses, age and FPG were inversely associated with retinal and skin microvascular function (regression coefficients per standard deviation (SD) were -0.11SD (95%CI: -0.15;-0.06) and -0.12SD (-0.17;-0.07) for retinal arteriolar %-dilation and -0.10SD (-0.16;-0.05) and -0.11SD (-0.17;-0.06) for skin %-hyperemia, respectively. Men and current smokers had -0.43SD (-0.58;-0.27) and -0.32SD (-0.49;-0.15) lower skin %-hyperemia, respectively. 24-h systolic blood pressure, waist circumference, and total-to-HDL cholesterol ratio were not statistically significantly associated with these microvascular functions. Conclusions Associations between cardiovascular risk factors and retinal and skin microvascular function show a pattern that is partly similar to the associations between cardiovascular risk factors and macrovascular function. Impairment of microvascular function may constitute a pathway through which an adverse cardiovascular risk factor pattern may increase risk of

  5. Raised plasma endostatin levels correlate inversely with breast cancer angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, Swee H; Hill, Arnold D K; Lee, Adriana W S; Foley, Deirdre; Kennedy, Susan; Young, Leonie; McDermott, Enda; O'Higgins, Niall

    2004-01-01

    Angiogenesis is essential for solid tumors, such as breast cancer, to grow. The effect of surgical removal of breast tumors on plasma endostatin and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels was evaluated. Tumor tissues were analyzed for expression of Intratumoral microvessel density (IMVD) and endostatin. The effect of VEGF and endostatin in inducing apoptosis on human liver microvascular endothelial cells (HLMVEC) was investigated. Plasma from healthy volunteers, patients with fibroadenomas and breast cancer patients were assayed for endostatin and VEGF via immunoassay, pre-operatively and four weeks post-operatively. Expression of endostatin in tumor tissue was determined by Western blotting. IMVD was assessed following immunohistochemical staining with anti-CD34 antibody. Plasma endostatin levels, in breast cancer patients, were significantly elevated (P = 0.015) in the post-operative (60.59 +/- 7.70 etag/ml) compared with the pre-operative group (30.62 +/- 4.54 etag/ml) and with normal age-matched controls (34.97 +/- 3.76 etag/ml). In patients with high pre-operative plasma endostatin value, IMVD was decreased to 20.1 +/- 3.2 counts compared with 41.9 +/- 5.4 counts in those with low pre-operative endostatin value (P = 0.006). Neither plasma endostatin nor VEGF levels correlated with routine clinico-pathological parameters. Endostatin induced endothelial cell apoptosis and modulated the cytoprotective effect of VEGF in HLMVEC survival. Plasma endostatin levels are increased in patients following surgical removal of the primary tumor. The decreased IMVD seen in patients with higher endostatin levels may be due to the apoptosis-inducing effect of endostatin on microvascular endothelial cells.

  6. Antecedent ethanol ingestion prevents postischemic microvascular dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamada, Kazuma; Dayton, Catherine B; Yamaguchi, Taiji; Korthuis, Ronald J

    2004-04-01

    Prolonged ischemia followed by reperfusion (I/R) results in impaired endothelial cell function in all segments of the microvasculature. Moreover, microcirculatory dysfunction plays a major role in the genesis of the reperfusion component of total tissue injury in I/R. Thus, preservation of endothelial function is an important therapeutic goal for ameliorating injury in tissues subjected to I/R. An accumulating body of evidence indicates that low to moderate ethanol consumption produces an adaptive transformation to a protected phenotype in both microvascular endothelium and parenchymal cells such that they are rendered resistant to the pathologic effects of I/R. The purpose of this review is to summarize our current understanding of the signaling pathways underlying the development of the preconditioned state induced by antecedent ethanol in arteriolar, capillary, and venular endothelium. In addition, we will highlight understudied areas with regard to microvascular protection afforded by antecedent ethanol in the hopes that this will stimulate investigation of its underlying mechanisms. Understanding these signaling pathways may provide a mechanistic rationale for the development of novel treatment interventions that target both the microcirculatory and parenchymal sequelae to I/R, thereby maximizing the therapeutic potential of the protected phenotypes produced by pharmacologic preconditioning.

  7. Association of Microvascular Dysfunction With Late-Life Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Agtmaal, Marnix J M; Houben, Alfons J H M; Pouwer, Frans

    2017-01-01

    estimates of microvascular dysfunction were considered in participants with or without depression: plasma markers of endothelial function, albuminuria, measurements of skin and muscle microcirculation, retinal arteriolar and venular diameter, and markers for cerebral small vessel disease. Data are reported......Importance: The etiologic factors of late-life depression are still poorly understood. Recent evidence suggests that microvascular dysfunction is associated with depression, which may have implications for prevention and treatment. However, this association has not been systematically reviewed....... Objective: To examine the associations of peripheral and cerebral microvascular dysfunction with late-life depression. Data Sources: A systematic literature search was conducted in MEDLINE and EMBASE for and longitudinal studies published since inception to October 16, 2016, that assessed the associations...

  8. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and other common tissue prognostic indicators in breast cancer: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolini, A; Campani, D; Miccoli, P; Spinelli, C; Carpi, A; Menicagli, M; Ferrari, P; Gadducci, G; Rossi, G; Fini, M; Giavaresi, G; Bonazzi, V; Giardino, R

    2004-01-01

    VEGF is a specific mitogen and survival factor for endothelial cells and a key promoter of angiogenesis in physiological and pathological conditions. Nevertheless, VEGF tissue evaluation in cancer patients as a prognostic factor compared to the conventional histological and biological parameters is still controversial. In this case-control study, tissue VEGF was retrospectively determined by immunohistochemistry and related to T, N, ER, PgR, c-erbB-2, p53, MIB-1 and cyclin D1 in 129 breast cancer patients. Seventy-four of these patients had developed distant metastases postoperatively. The remaining 55 patients had remained disease-free >10 years after surgery. In 17 (13%) of the 129 patients (six with distant metastases and eleven disease-free) tissue and plasma VEGF were concomitantly evaluated. In univariate analysis no significant differences in VEGF and tumor size were found between metastatic and disease-free patients, whereas there were significant differences in N, ER, PgR, c-erbB-2, p53, MIB-1 and cyclin D1 (p ranging from 0.001 to 0.0001). In multivariate analysis VEGF showed less significance than N, ER, c-erbB-2, MIB-1 and cyclin D1 (p = 0.012, p = 0.007, p = 0.005, p = 0.005, p = 0.002 and p = 0.001, respectively). VEGF was a significant unfavorable prognostic indicator only in the N+ subset (p = 0.015), while ER (p = 0.05 and p = 0.021) and MIB-1 (p = 0.031 and p = 0.022) were significant in both the N+ and N- subgroups. In multivariate analysis in the 74 metastatic cases VEGF did not show any significance in relation to disease-free interval and overall survival from the time of mastectomy and from the time of relapse, whereas N and PgR did (p ranging from 0.018 to 0.001). In conclusion, tissue VEGF does not seem a suitable candidate to replace conventional histological and other common biological prognostic factors in breast cancer.

  9. In Vitro Endothelialization Test of Biomaterials Using Immortalized Endothelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Kono

    Full Text Available Functionalizing biomaterials with peptides or polymers that enhance recruitment of endothelial cells (ECs can reduce blood coagulation and thrombosis. To assess endothelialization of materials in vitro, primary ECs are generally used, although the characteristics of these cells vary among the donors and change with time in culture. Recently, primary cell lines immortalized by transduction of simian vacuolating virus 40 large T antigen or human telomerase reverse transcriptase have been developed. To determine whether immortalized ECs can substitute for primary ECs in material testing, we investigated endothelialization on biocompatible polymers using three lots of primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC and immortalized microvascular ECs, TIME-GFP. Attachment to and growth on polymer surfaces were comparable between cell types, but results were more consistent with TIME-GFP. Our findings indicate that TIME-GFP is more suitable for in vitro endothelialization testing of biomaterials.

  10. Microvascular Coronary Dysfunction and Ischemic Heart Disease – Where Are We in 2014?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, John W.; Pepine, Carl J.

    2014-01-01

    Many patients with angina and signs of myocardial ischemia on stress testing have no significant obstructive epicardial coronary disease. There are many potential coronary and non-coronary mechanisms for ischemia without obstructive epicardial coronary disease, and prominent among these is coronary microvascular and/or endothelial dysfunction. Patients with coronary microvascular and/or endothelial dysfunction are often at increased risk of adverse cardiovascular events, including ischemic events and heart failure despite preserved ventricular systolic function. In this article, we will review the diagnosis and treatment of coronary microvascular and endothelial dysfunction, discuss their potential contribution to heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, and highlight recent advances in the evaluation of atherosclerotic morphology in these patients, many of whom have non-obstructive epicardial disease. PMID:25454903

  11. Microvascular coronary dysfunction and ischemic heart disease: where are we in 2014?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, John W; Pepine, Carl J

    2015-02-01

    Many patients with angina and signs of myocardial ischemia on stress testing have no significant obstructive epicardial coronary disease. There are many potential coronary and non-coronary mechanisms for ischemia without obstructive epicardial coronary disease, and prominent among these is coronary microvascular and/or endothelial dysfunction. Patients with coronary microvascular and/or endothelial dysfunction are often at increased risk of adverse cardiovascular events, including ischemic events and heart failure despite preserved ventricular systolic function. In this article, we will review the diagnosis and treatment of coronary microvascular and endothelial dysfunction, discuss their potential contribution to heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, and highlight recent advances in the evaluation of atherosclerotic morphology in these patients, many of whom have non-obstructive epicardial disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Increased number of endothelial progenitors in peripheral blood as a possible early marker of tumour growth in post-menopausal breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhone, P; Ruszkowska-Ciastek, B; Celmer, M; Brkic, A; Bielawski, K; Boinska, J; Zarychta, E; Rosc, D

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the number of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (circulating EPCs) in the blood of patients diagnosed with breast cancer and to make an attempt at finding associations with the number of circulating EPCs and selected clinic-pathological factors; TNM and histological grading, molecular subtype of breast cancer, hormonal status, the expression of Ki-67 and the size of tumour. The study involved 96 Caucasian ethnicity post-menopausal women. Sixty-six women aged 48 - 63 (mean age 55) with breast cancer diagnosis without distant metastases (M0). The median value of the tumour diameter was 1.51 cm. The control group consisted of 30 healthy, non-smoking, post-menopausal women, mean age 49, range 44 - 54 years of age. The exclusion criteria for all the participants were hypertension, hyperlipidaemia, and hyperglycaemia, acute and chronic infection. With regard to the fresh blood samples the number of circulating endothelial progenitors was determined using flow cytometry. The fluorescence of 100,000 cells was measured during the analysis. Circulating EPCs were identified with the immune-phenotype CD45 - , CD34 + , CD133 + , CD31 + . A significantly higher number of circulating EPCs in the study group, as compared to the controls (P = 0.0001) and a significantly higher number of circulating EPCs in women over 60 with breast cancer than in the younger women (P = 0.0029) were reported. A positive correlation was noted between circulating EPCs and age as well as between circulating EPCs and HER-2 (P = 0.0231, P = 0.0414, respectively), and a negative correlation between circulating EPCs and histological grading of breast cancer (P = 0.0272). The study has shown a higher number of circulating EPCs in breast cancer patients, which indicates stimulation of neovascularization. Additionally, since bone morrow-derived circulating EPCs are more intensively mobilised in older and overweight breast cancer patients, we can speculate that more

  13. Long noncoding RNA-MEG3 is involved in diabetes mellitus-related microvascular dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Gui-Zhen [Department of Health, Linyi People' s Hospital, Shandong University, Shandong (China); Tian, Wei [Department of Nursing, Linyi Oncosurgical Hospital, Shandong (China); Fu, Hai-Tao [Department of Ophthalmology, Linyi People' s Hospital, Shandong University, Shandong (China); Li, Chao-Peng, E-mail: lcpcn@163.com [Eye Institute of Xuzhou, Jiangsu (China); Liu, Ban, E-mail: liuban@126.com [Department of Cardiology, Shanghai Tenth People' s Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China)

    2016-02-26

    Microvascular dysfunction is an important characteristic of diabetic retinopathy. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) play important roles in diverse biological processes. In this study, we investigated the role of lncRNA-MEG3 in diabetes-related microvascular dysfunction. We show that MEG3 expression level is significantly down-regulated in the retinas of STZ-induced diabetic mice, and endothelial cells upon high glucose and oxidative stress. MEG3 knockdown aggravates retinal vessel dysfunction in vivo, as shown by serious capillary degeneration, and increased microvascular leakage and inflammation. MEG3 knockdown also regulates retinal endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and tube formation in vitro. The role of MEG3 in endothelial cell function is mainly mediated by the activation of PI3k/Akt signaling. MEG3 up-regulation may serve as a therapeutic strategy for treating diabetes-related microvascular complications. - Highlights: • LncRNA-MEG3 level is down-regulated upon diabetic stress. • MEG3 knockdown aggravates retinal vascular dysfunction in vivo. • MEG3 regulates retinal endothelial cell function in vitro. • MEG3 regulates endothelial cell function through PI3k/Akt signaling.

  14. Effect of resistance training on microvascular density and eNOS content in skeletal muscle of sedentary men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocks, Matthew; Shaw, Christopher S; Shepherd, Sam O; Fisher, James P; Ranasinghe, Aaron M; Barker, Thomas A; Tipton, Kevin D; Wagenmakers, Anton J M

    2014-11-01

    The effects of RT on muscle mass, strength, and insulin sensitivity are well established, but the underlying mechanisms are only partially understood. The main aim of this study was to investigate whether RT induces changes in endothelial enzymes of the muscle microvasculature, which would increase NO bioavailability and could contribute to improved insulin sensitivity. Eight previously sedentary males (age 20 ± 0.4 years, BMI 24.5 ± 0.9 kg/m(2) ) completed six weeks of RT 3x/week. Muscle biopsies were taken from the m. vastus lateralis and microvascular density; and endothelial-specific eNOS content, eNOS Ser(1177) phosphorylation, and NOX2 content were assessed pre- and post-RT using quantitative immunofluorescence microscopy. Whole-body insulin sensitivity (measured as Matsuda Index), microvascular Kf (functional measure of the total available endothelial surface area), and arterial stiffness (AIx, central, and pPWV) were also measured. Measures of microvascular density, microvascular Kf , microvascular eNOS content, basal eNOS phosphorylation, and endothelial NOX2 content did not change from pre-RT to post-RT. RT increased insulin sensitivity (p < 0.05) and reduced resting blood pressure and AIx (p < 0.05), but did not change central or pPWV. RT did not change any measure of muscle microvascular structure or function. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Correlation of serum intercellular adhesion molecule 1 and vascular endothelial growth factor with tumor grading and staging in breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghi, Alireza Rastgoo; Vahedi, Amir; Shekarchi, Ali Akbar; Kamran, Aziz

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. There are several prognostic factors for this disease. The aim of this article is to explore the correlation of serum level of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM1) with tumor, node, metastasis staging and grading of breast cancer. Serum samples of 51 patients with breast cancer were assessed with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the level of VEGF and ICAM1 preoperatively. After the operation, histopathologic specimens stained with hematoxylin and eosin were evaluated for tumor size, histopathologic subtype, grade, lymph node, vascular and lymphatic involvement. Then, the correlation of tumor stage and grade and serum level of markers was analyzed. There was no significant correlation between serum level of markers with vascular invasions, lymph node involvement, and menstruation. There was a weak correlation between tumor size and serum level of ICAM1 with Pearson score correlation, but there was no significant correlation with VEGF. There was no significant correlation between tumor grading and staging with the level of markers. There was a significant correlation between the level of VEGF and ICAM1 and histologic type of tumors in invasive through in situ tumors. Levels of VEGF and ICAM1 can be used as a predictor of tumor invasion and also for target therapy.

  16. Lack of relationship between microvascular and macrovascular disease in heart transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Qaoud, Mohamed S; Stoletniy, Liset N; Chen, David; Kerstetter, Justin; Kuhn, Michael; Pai, Ramdas G

    2012-11-15

    A key determinant of long-term survival in heart transplant recipients is the development of coronary vasculopathy. Both coronary macrovascular and microvascular disease are prognostically important. However, the relationship between these in transplant patients and the determinants of microvascular disease are not known. We reviewed the simultaneously obtained endomyocardial biopsies and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) images of coronary arteries in 33 heart transplant recipients. Coronary microvascular disease was classified by light microscopy into four grades based on thickening of endothelial cell layer and stenotic versus nonstenotic medial wall thickening. Macrovascular disease was evaluated from IVUS studies and assigned into one of five grades based on the Stanford classification. Coronary microvascular and macrovascular diseases were compared. Age at transplantation was 26 (18) years; 67% were men, and the average time to posttransplantation study was 4 years. Endomyocardial biopsy revealed more advanced grade C and D microvascular disease in 45% and 36% of the patients, respectively. However, IVUS analysis for macrovascular disease revealed mostly lesser changes with grade 1 in 12%, grade 2 in 61%, and grade 3 in 21%. There was no significant correlation between grades of microvascular and macrovascular disease (P=0.10). Microvascular disease correlated positively with donor age (P=0.06) and treatment with tacrolimus (0=0.02) and statins (P=0.05). There is a poor relationship between coronary microvascular and macrovascular disease in patients with cardiac transplants, likely indicating divergent pathogenetic mechanisms. Microvascular disease increases with donor age. There is an intriguing positive relationship between microvascular disease and treatment with statins and tacrolimus.

  17. Microvascular alterations in transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khairoun, Meriem

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial injury and repair are most important concepts for our understanding of renal disease and allograft injury. The concept that injury to the endothelium may precede renal fibrosis strongly suggests that interventions to maintain vascular integrity are of major importance for renal function.

  18. Vascular islands during microvascular regression and regrowth in adult networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molly Rose Kelly-Goss

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Angiogenesis is the growth of new vessels from pre-existing vessels and commonly associated with two modes: capillary sprouting and capillary splitting. Our previous work suggests vascular island incorporation might be another endothelial cell dynamic involved in microvascular remodeling. Vascular islands are defined as endothelial cell segments disconnected from nearby networks, and their origin remains unclear. The objective of this study was to determine whether vascular islands associated with microvascular regression are involved in network regrowth.Methods: Mesenteric tissues were harvested from adult male Wistar rats according to the experimental groups: unstimulated, post stimulation (10 and 70 days, and 70 days post stimulation + restimulation (3 and 10 days. Stimulation was induced by mast cell degranulation via intraperitoneal injections of compound 48/80. Tissues were immunolabeled for PECAM (endothelial cells, NG2 (pericytes, collagen IV (basement membrane, and BrdU (proliferation.Results: Vascular area per tissue area and length density increased by day 10 post stimulation compared to the unstimulated group. At day 70, vascular area and length density were then decreased, indicating vascular regression compared to day 10. The number of vascular islands at day 10 post stimulation was dramatically reduced compared to the unstimulated group. During regression at day 70, the number of islands increased. The disconnected endothelial cells were commonly bridged to surrounding networks by collagen IV labeling. NG2-positive pericytes were observed along both the islands and the collagen IV tracks. At 3 days post restimulation, vascular islands contained BrdU-positive cells. By day 10 post restimulation, the number of vascular islands was dramatically reduced.Conclusion: The results suggest that vascular islands originating during microvascular regression are capable of proliferation and incorporation into nearby networks during

  19. Cell proliferation along vascular islands during microvascular network growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly-Goss Molly R

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Observations in our laboratory provide evidence of vascular islands, defined as disconnected endothelial cell segments, in the adult microcirculation. The objective of this study was to determine if vascular islands are involved in angiogenesis during microvascular network growth. Results Mesenteric tissues, which allow visualization of entire microvascular networks at a single cell level, were harvested from unstimulated adult male Wistar rats and Wistar rats 3 and 10 days post angiogenesis stimulation by mast cell degranulation with compound 48/80. Tissues were immunolabeled for PECAM and BRDU. Identification of vessel lumens via injection of FITC-dextran confirmed that endothelial cell segments were disconnected from nearby patent networks. Stimulated networks displayed increases in vascular area, length density, and capillary sprouting. On day 3, the percentage of islands with at least one BRDU-positive cell increased compared to the unstimulated level and was equal to the percentage of capillary sprouts with at least one BRDU-positive cell. At day 10, the number of vascular islands per vascular area dramatically decreased compared to unstimulated and day 3 levels. Conclusions These results show that vascular islands have the ability to proliferate and suggest that they are able to incorporate into the microcirculation during the initial stages of microvascular network growth.

  20. Strategies to reverse endothelial dysfunction in diabetic nephropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Badal, Shawn S.; Danesh, Farhad R.

    2012-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction underlies the basic pathophysiology of microvascular complications of diabetes. Endothelial dysfunction is associated with impaired nitric oxide (NO) availability. Since NO production is tightly regulated by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), several therapeutic strategies have been investigated and proposed to improve eNOS bioavailability in the vasculature. The findings of Cheng et al. suggest that increased availability of eNOS may be an effective strategy in...

  1. Prognostic impact of placenta growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor A in patients with breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maae, Else; Olsen, Dorte Aalund; Steffensen, Karina Dahl

    2012-01-01

    such as ischemic heart disease, arthritis and tumor growth. Angiogenesis is a complex process with several growth factors involved. Because PlGF modulates VEGF-A responses, we investigated their mutual relationship and impact on breast cancer prognosis. Quantitative PlGF and VEGF-A levels were measured in 229...... tumor tissue specimen from primarily operated patients with unilateral breast cancer. Non-malignant breast tissue was also dissected near the tumor and quantitative measurements were available for 211 patients. PlGF and VEGF-A protein levels in homogenized tissue lysates were analyzed using the Luminex...

  2. Blood-based biomarkers of microvascular pathology in Alzheimer's disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ewers, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Sporadic Alzheimer\\'s disease (AD) is a genetically complex and chronically progressive neurodegenerative disorder with molecular mechanisms and neuropathologies centering around the amyloidogenic pathway, hyperphosphorylation and aggregation of tau protein, and neurofibrillary degeneration. While cerebrovascular changes have not been traditionally considered to be a central part of AD pathology, a growing body of evidence demonstrates that they may, in fact, be a characteristic feature of the AD brain as well. In particular, microvascular abnormalities within the brain have been associated with pathological AD hallmarks and may precede neurodegeneration. In vivo assessment of microvascular pathology provides a promising approach to develop useful biological markers for early detection and pathological characterization of AD. This review focuses on established blood-based biological marker candidates of microvascular pathology in AD. These candidates include plasma concentration of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) that are increased in AD. Measures of endothelial vasodilatory function including endothelin (ET-1), adrenomedullin (ADM), and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), as well as sphingolipids are significantly altered in mild AD or during the predementia stage of mild cognitive impairment (MCI), suggesting sensitivity of these biomarkers for early detection and diagnosis. In conclusion, the emerging clinical diagnostic evidence for the value of blood-based microvascular biomarkers in AD is promising, however, still requires validation in phase II and III diagnostic trials. Moreover, it is still unclear whether the described protein dysbalances are early or downstream pathological events and how the detected systemic microvascular alterations relate to cerebrovascular and neuronal pathologies in the AD brain.

  3. Diagnostic Power of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor and Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor in Breast Cancer Patients Based on ROC Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Zajkowska

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer (BC is the most common malignancy in women. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF has been described as an important regulator of angiogenesis which plays a vital role in the progression of tumor. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF is a cytokine whose functions include regulation of hematopoietic lineages cells growth, proliferation, and differentiation. We investigated the diagnostic significance of these parameters in comparison to CA15-3 in BC patients and in relation to the control group (benign breast tumor and healthy women. Plasma levels of the tested parameters were determined by ELISA and CA15-3 was determined by CMIA. VEGF was shown to be comparable to CA15-3 values of sensitivity in BC group and, what is more important, higher values in early stages of BC. VEGF was also the only parameter which has statistically significant AUC in all stages of cancer. M-CSF has been shown to be comparable to CA15-3 and VEGF, specificity, and AUC values only in stages III and IV of BC. These results indicate the usefulness and high diagnostic power of VEGF in the detection of BC. Also, it occurred to be the best candidate for cancer diagnostics in stages I and II of BC and in the differentiation between BC and benign cases.

  4. A new impedimetric biosensor utilizing VEGF receptor-1 (Flt-1): early diagnosis of vascular endothelial growth factor in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezgintürk, Mustafa Kemal

    2011-06-15

    A new impedimetric biosensor, based on the use of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 (VEGF-R1), was developed for the determination of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). VEGF-R1 was immobilized through covalent coupling with 3-mercaptopropionic acid which formed a self-assembled monolayer on gold electrodes. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques were employed to characterize the immobilization process and to detect VEGF. To successfully construct the biosensor current, experimental parameters were optimized. Kramers-Kronig Transform was performed on the experimental impedance data. The obtained results provided a linear response range from 10 to 70 pg/mL human VEGF. The applicability of the developed biosensor in the determination of VEGF in a spiked artificial human serum sample was experienced, yielding average recovery of 101%, in that order, with an average relative deviation value less than 5%. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Microvascular Recruitment in Insulin Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjøberg, Kim Anker

    In this PhD work a new method for measuring microvascular recruitment was developed and evaluated, using continues real-time imaging of contrast enhanced ultrasound. Gas-filled microbubbles were infused intravenously and by taking advantage of the echogenic properties of the microbubbles the reso......In this PhD work a new method for measuring microvascular recruitment was developed and evaluated, using continues real-time imaging of contrast enhanced ultrasound. Gas-filled microbubbles were infused intravenously and by taking advantage of the echogenic properties of the microbubbles...... the resonating sound from the microbubbles in the systemic circulation were recorded for determination of microvascular recruitment in designated muscle segments. Results showed that microvascular recruitment increased with insulin stimulation by ~30% in rats and ~40% in humans (study I). Furthermore...... hormone glucagon-like-peptide-1 (GLP-1) in the microcirculation. Glucagon-like-peptide-1 analogs are drugs used for treatments of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes but the vascular effects of GLP-1 in vivo are elusive. Here it was shown that GLP-1 rapidly increased the microvascular recruitment...

  6. Retinal microvascular structure and function in patients with risk factors of atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Fiadh, Ali H; Farouque, Omar; Kawasaki, Ryo; Nguyen, T T; Uddin, Nazim; Freeman, Melanie; Patel, Sheila K; Burrell, Louise M; Wong, Tien Y

    2014-04-01

    Retinal microvascular signs are markers of cardiovascular disease risk. There are limited data, on relationships between retinal microvascular signs and retinal microvascular endothelial function. We sought to determine the relationship of retinal vascular signs with retinal microvascular endothelial function in patients with or at high risk of coronary artery disease. Participants with atherosclerosis risk factors and coronary disease (n=258; mean age 57±11 years) were recruited to have static and dynamic retinal vascular assessment. Retinal arteriolar dilatation in response to flicker light (FI-RAD) was measured using the Digital Vessel Analyser and expressed as percentage increase over baseline diameter. Static retinal photographs were acquired utilising a digital fundus camera for measurement of central retinal artery and vein equivalent (CRAE and CRVE), arteriovenous nicking (AVN) and focal arteriolar narrowing (FAN). Intra-class correlation coefficient was 0.82 for flicker-light induced retinal arteriolar dilatation. There were modest associations in retinal vascular measurements between eyes. For each 10 μm decrease in retinal arteriolar diameter, the absolute increase in FI-RAD was 0.28% (95% CI 0.11, 0.45; p=0.002) independent of age, gender and atherosclerosis risk factors. AVN and FAN were associated with attenuated FI-RAD (β=-0.67%; 95% CI -1.20, -0.15; p=0.012) and (β=-0.83%; 95% CI -1.44, -0.23; p=0.007) respectively after adjustment for age and gender. Assessment of retinal microvascular endothelial function is reproducible and correlated with retinal microvascular structure and signs, independent of atherosclerosis risk factors. Assessment of retinal vascular structure and function may provide insights into atherosclerotic disease. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Prevalence of Coronary Microvascular Dysfunction Among Patients With Chest Pain and Nonobstructive Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sara, Jaskanwal D; Widmer, R Jay; Matsuzawa, Yasushi; Lennon, Ryan J; Lerman, Lilach O; Lerman, Amir

    2015-09-01

    This study assessed the prevalence of coronary microvascular abnormalities in patients presenting with chest pain and nonobstructive coronary artery disease (CAD). Coronary microvascular abnormalities mediate ischemia and can lead to an increased risk of cardiovascular events. Using an intracoronary Doppler guidewire, endothelial-dependent microvascular function was examined by evaluating changes in coronary blood flow in response to acetylcholine, whereas endothelial-independent microvascular function was examined by evaluating changes in coronary flow velocity reserve in response to intracoronary adenosine. Patients were divided into 4 groups depending on whether they had a normal (+) or abnormal (-) coronary blood flow (CBF) in response to acetylcholine (Ach) and a normal (+) or abnormal (-) coronary flow velocity reserve (CFR) in response to adenosine (Adn): CBFAch+, CFRAdn+ (n = 520); CBFAch-, CFRAdn+ (n = 478); CBFAch+, CFRAdn- (n = 173); and CBFAch-, CFRAdn- (n = 268). Two-thirds of all patients had some sort of microvascular dysfunction. Women were more prevalent in each group (56% to 82%). Diabetes was uncommon in all groups (7% to 12%), whereas hypertension and hyperlipidemia were relatively more prevalent in each group, although rates for most conventional cardiovascular risk factors did not differ significantly between groups. There were no significant differences in the findings of noninvasive functional testing between groups. In a multivariable analysis, age was the only variable that independently predicted abnormal microvascular function. Patients with chest pain and nonobstructive CAD have a high prevalence of coronary microvascular abnormalities. These abnormalities correlate poorly with conventional cardiovascular risk factors and are dissociated from the findings of noninvasive functional testing. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Modified Continuous Loop Technique for microvascular anastomosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Pramod

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A modified method of continuous loop technique for microvascular anastomosis is described. The handling of loop is easier & even last suture is placed under vision. This makes the microvascular anastomosis easier and simpler.

  9. Microvascular Dysfunction and Cognitive Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Silva, T. Michael; Faraci, Frank M.

    2016-01-01

    The impact of vascular risk factors on cognitive function has garnered much interest in recent years. The appropriate distribution of oxygen, glucose and other nutrients by the cerebral vasculature is critical for proper cognitive performance. The cerebral microvasculature is a key site of vascular resistance and a preferential target for small vessel disease. While deleterious effects of vascular risk factors on microvascular function are known, the contribution of this dysfunction to cognitive deficits is less clear. In this review, we summarize current evidence for microvascular dysfunction in brain. We highlight effects of select vascular risk factors (hypertension, diabetes and hyperhomocysteinemia) on the pial and parenchymal circulation. Lastly, we discuss potential links between microvascular disease and cognitive function, highlighting current gaps in our understanding. PMID:26988697

  10. Inhibition of endothelial nitric oxide synthase decreases breast cancer cell MDA-MB-231 adhesion to intact microvessels under physiological flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Zeng, Min

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) at different concentrations may promote or inhibit tumor growth and metastasis under various conditions. To test the hypothesis that tumor cells prefer to adhere to the locations with a higher endothelial NO production in intact microvessels under physiological flows and to further test that inhibiting NO production decreases tumor cell adhesion, we used intravital fluorescence microscopy to measure NO production and tumor cell adhesion in postcapillary venules of rat mesentery under normal and reduced flow conditions, and in the presence of an endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) inhibitor, NG-monomethyl-l-arginine (l-NMMA). Rats (SD, 250–300 g) were anesthetized. A midline incision (∼2 inch) was made in the abdominal wall, and the mesentery was taken out from the abdominal cavity and spread over a coverslip for the measurement. An individual postcapillary venule (35–50 μm) was first loaded with 4,5-diaminofluorescein diacetate (DAF-2 DA), a fluorescent indictor for NO. Then the DAF-2 intensity was measured for 30 min under a normal or reduced flow velocity, with and without perfusion with MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, and in the presence of l-NMMA. We found that tumor cells prefer to adhere to the microvessel locations with a higher NO production such as curved portions. Inhibition of eNOS by l-NMMA attenuated the flow-induced NO production and reduced tumor cell adhesion. We also found that l-NMMA treatment for ∼40 min reduced microvessel permeability to albumin. Our results suggest that inhibition of eNOS is a good approach to preventing tumor cell adhesion to intact microvessels under physiological flows. PMID:27059076

  11. Retroviral hybrid LTR vector strategy: functional analysis of LTR elements and generation of endothelial cell specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, T B; Kaspers, J; Porter, C D

    2004-05-01

    Transcriptional targeting is an important aspect of developing gene therapy vectors in order to restrict transgene expression to selected target cells. One approach, when using retroviral vectors, is to replace viral transcriptional control elements within the long terminal repeat (LTR) with sequences imparting the desired specificity. We have developed such hybrid LTR retroviruses, incorporating sequences from each of the human promoters for flt-1, ICAM-2 and KDR, as part of our antivascular cancer gene therapy strategy targeting tumour endothelial cells. The chosen fragments were used to replace the enhancer or combined enhancer and proximal promoter regions of the viral LTR. All showed activity in primary human breast microvascular endothelial cells, with viruses incorporating ICAM-2 sequences exhibiting the greatest specificity versus nonendothelial cells in vitro and a marked alteration of specificity towards endothelial cells in a subcutaneous xenograft model in vivo. Moreover, our study documents the effect of enhancer and/or proximal promoter deletion on LTR activity and reports that differential dependence in different cell lines can give the false impression of specificity if experiments are not adequately controlled. This finding also has implications for other retroviral vector designs seeking to provide transcriptional specificity and for their safety with respect to prevention of gene activation at sites of proviral integration.

  12. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) -TrKB signaling modulates cancer-endothelial cells interaction and affects the outcomes of triple negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yi-Fang; Tseng, Ling-Ming; Hsu, Chih-Yi; Yang, Muh-Hwa; Chiu, Jen-Hwey; Shyr, Yi-Ming

    2017-01-01

    There is good evidence that the tumor microenvironment plays an important role in cancer metastasis and progression. Our previous studies have shown that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) participates in the process of metastasis and in the migration of cancer cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of BDNF on the tumor cell microenvironment, namely, the cancer cell-endothelial cell interaction of TNBC cells. We conducted oligoneucleotide microarray analysis of potential biomarkers that are able to differentiate recurrent TNBC from non-recurrent TNBC. The MDA-MB-231 and human endothelial HUVEC lines were used for this study and our approaches included functional studies, such as migration assay, as well as Western blot and real-time PCR analysis of migration and angiogenic signaling. In addition, we analyzed the survival outcome of TNBC breast cancer patients according to their expression level of BDNF using clinical samples. The results demonstrated that BDNF was able to bring about autocrinal (MDA-MB-231) and paracrinal (HUVECs) regulation of BDNF-TrkB gene expression and this affected cell migratory activity. The BDNF-induced migratory activity was blocked by inhibitors of ERK, PI3K and TrkB when MDA-MB-231 cells were examined, but only an inhibitor of ERK blocked this activity when HUVEC cells were used. Furthermore, decreased migratory activity was found for △BDNF and △TrkB cell lines. Ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA) of MDA-MB-231 cells showed that BDNF is a key factor that is able to regulate a network made up of metalloproteases and calmodulin. Protein expression levels in a tissue array of tumor slices were found to be correlated with patient prognosis and the results showed that there was significant correlation of TrkB expression, but not of BDNF. expressionwith patient DFS and OS. Our study demonstrates that up-regulation of the BDNF signaling pathway seems tobe involved in the mechanism associated with early recurrence in

  13. Acute hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia enhance vasodilatation in type 1 diabetes mellitus without increasing capillary permeability and inducing endothelial dysfunction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kant, GD; Dullaart, RPF; Smit, AJ

    Uncomplicated Type I (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus is characterized by generalized vasodilatation. Its possible correlates, increased microvascular permeability and endothelial dysfunction, have been associated with long-term complications. The objective was to study the effects of acute

  14. No effects of acute hyperglycaemia and hyperinsulinaemia on skin microcirculation and endothelial markers in Type II diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kant, GD; Dullaart, RPF; Tervaert, JWC; Smit, AJ

    Background: Increased microvascular permeability is a hallmark of microangiopathy in Type I diabetes mellitus and is associated with endothelial dysfunction and haemodynamic alterations. Type II diabetes mellitus is characterized by insulin resistance and hyperinsulinaemia. The purpose of this study

  15. Microvascular Disease After Renal Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Lun Ooi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Individuals who reach end-stage kidney disease (CKD5 have a high risk of vascular events that persists even after renal transplantation. This study compared the prevalence and severity of microvascular disease in transplant recipients and patients with CKD5. Methods: Individuals with a renal transplant or CKD5 were recruited consecutively from renal clinics, and underwent bilateral retinal photography (Canon CR5-45, Canon. Their retinal images were deidentified and reviewed for hypertensive/microvascular signs by an ophthalmologist and a trained grader (Wong and Mitchell classification, and for vessel caliber at a grading centre using a computer-assisted method and Knudtson's modification of the Parr-Hubbard formula. Results: Ninety-two transplant recipients (median duration 6.4 years, range 0.8 to 28.8 and 70 subjects with CKD5 were studied. Transplant recipients were younger (pConclusions: Hypertensive/microvascular disease occurred just as often and was generally as severe in transplant recipients and subjects with CKD5. Microvascular disease potentially contributes to increased cardiac events post- transplantation.

  16. Intravascular Stenting in Microvascular Anastomoses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assersen, Kristine; Sørensen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Background The effect of intravascular stenting (IVaS) on microvascular anastomoses has given adverse results. For experienced microsurgeons the benefit of IVaS is doubtful. We have investigated the potential benefit of the IVaS technique for two groups of inexperienced microsurgeons with differe...

  17. Tumor microvascular changes in antiangiogenic treatment : Assessment by magnetic resonance contrast media of different molecular weights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turetschek, K; Preda, A; Novikov, [No Value; Brasch, RC; Weinmann, HJ; Wunderbaldinger, P; Roberts, TPL

    Purpose: To test magnetic resonance (MR) contrast media of different molecular weights (MWs) for their potential to characterize noninvasively microvascular changes in an experimental tumor treatment model. Materials and Methods: MD-MBA-435, a poorly differentiated human breast cancer cell line, was

  18. Effect of cilostazol in treating diabetes-associated microvascular complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asal, Nicole J; Wojciak, Karolina A

    2017-05-01

    Cilostazol (Pletal), a phosphodiesterase-3 inhibitor, was approved in the United States in 1999 to reduce symptoms of intermittent claudication. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate levels increase from inhibition of phosphodiesterase resulting in anti-platelet, anti-inflammatory, and vasodilatory effects. Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease that causes endothelial and platelet dysfunction leading to both microvascular and macrovascular complications. This mini-review highlights the emerging evidence suggesting benefits of using cilostazol in treating microvascular complications associated with diabetes mellitus. A review of literature was conducted using PubMed and Embase databases focusing on cilostazol use in diabetes mellitus. Cilostazol demonstrated renoprotective effects in patients with diabetic nephropathy by reducing serum soluble adhesion molecule-1 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. Cilostazol's anti-inflammatory actions predictably attenuate glomerular damage from increased leukocyte adherence. Additionally, cilostazol delayed renal dysfunction secondary to type 2 diabetes mellitus as albuminuria was reduced most likely resulting from inhibition of nuclear factor kappa-induced inflammatory and endothelial markers. Cilostazol's anti-inflammatory actions in addition to its vasodilatory actions relieved retinal hypoxia and decreased excessive production of retinal blood vessels suggesting benefit in diabetic retinopathy. Cilostazol did not improve neuropathy symptom scores signifying that it may not be as beneficial in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy without diabetic nephropathy or diabetic retinopathy. Cilostazol's pleiotropic effects may be beneficial in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and diabetic nephropathy. Additional, larger studies need to be conducted to assess the benefits and risks of using cilostazol as an alternative agent in treating patients with diabetic microvascular complications.

  19. Nab-paclitaxel Efficacy in the Orthotopic Model of Human Breast Cancer Is Significantly Enhanced By Concurrent Anti–Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa D. Volk

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Nab-paclitaxel is an albumin-bound 130-nm particle form of paclitaxel that has shown an improved efficacy in experimental tumor models and clinical studies compared with solvent-based paclitaxel. Anti–vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A antibody bevacizumab is known to enhance antitumor activity of cytotoxic drugs. This study evaluated the effects of combined nab-paclitaxel and bevacizumab therapy on growth and metastatic spread of orthotopic breast tumors. Cytotoxic and clonogenic assays measured VEGF-A–dependent modulation of nabpaclitaxel toxicity on cultured tumor cells. Antitumor effects were assessed in mice with luciferase-tagged, wellestablished MDA-MB-231 tumors (250–310 mm3 treated with one, two, or three cycles of nab-paclitaxel (10 mg/ kg, daily for five consecutive days, bevacizumab (2–8 mg/kg, twice a week, or with combination of both drugs. VEGF-A protected MDA-MB-231 cells against nab-paclitaxel cytotoxicity, whereas bevacizumab sensitized cells to the effect of the drug. Combined bevacizumab and nab-paclitaxel treatment synergistically inhibited tumor growth and metastasis resulting in up to 40% of complete regressions of well-established tumors. This therapy also decreased the incidence of lymphatic and pulmonary metastases by 60% and 100%, respectively. The significant increase in the cure of tumor-bearing mice in the nab-paclitaxel/bevacizumab combined group compared with mice treated with single drugs strongly advocates for implementing such strategy in clinics.

  20. Expression analysis of E-cad and vascular endothelial growth factor in triple-negative breast cancer patients of different ethnic groups in western China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Weihua; Li, Yongtao; Ou, Jianghua; Wang, Xiaowen; Zhang, Chenguang; Yi, Lina; Xue, Laiti; Zhang, Mingshuai

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this article is to investigate the expression of E-cadherin (E-cad) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) of Han and Uygur women patients in western China, and their relationship with clinical features of TNBC.Totally, 172 cases of Han TNBC patients and 79 cases of Uighur TNBC patients were enrolled. The expressions of E-cad and VEGF were detected with immunohistochemistry. The correlation of E-cad and VEGF expression with lymph node metastasis, TNM stage, and histological grade were analyzed. The 5-year disease-free survival rate of the 2 groups was also evaluated.There was no significant difference in the 5-year disease-free survival rate (P > .05) and the expression of E-cad between the 2 groups. The positive rate of VEGF in Han was significantly lower than that in Uygur (P cad was negatively correlated with lymph node metastasis, TNM stage, and histological grade (-1≤r cad and VEGF and their relationship with clinical features of TNBC suggest that Uygur TNBC patients might have different prognostic factors as compared with Han patients.

  1. Effects of Chinese medicinal herbs on expression of brain-derived Neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its interaction with human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells and endothelial HUVECs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Jen-Hwey; Chen, Fang-Pey; Tsai, Yi-Fang; Lin, Man-Ting; Tseng, Ling-Ming; Shyr, Yi-Ming

    2017-08-12

    Our previous study demonstrated that an up-regulation of the Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) signaling pathway is involved the mechanism causing the recurrence of triple negative breast cancer. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of commonly used Chinese medicinal herbs on MDA-MB-231 and HUVEC cells and how they interact with BDNF. Human TNBC MDA-MB-231 cells and human endothelial HUVEC cells were used to explore the effect of commonly used Chinese herbal medicines on cancer cells alone, on endothelial cells alone and on cancer cell/endothelial cell interactions; this was done via functional studies, including migration and invasion assays. Furthermore, Western blot analysis and real-time PCR investigations were also used to investigate migration signal transduction, invasion signal transduction, and angiogenic signal transduction in these systems. Finally, the effect of the Chinese medicinal herbs on cancer cell/endothelial cell interactions was assessed using co-culture and ELISA. In terms of autoregulation, BDNF up-regulated TrkB gene expression in both MDA-MB-231 and HUVEC cells. Furthermore, BDNF enhanced migration by MDA-MB-231 cells via Rac, Cdc42 and MMP, while also increasing the migration of HUVEC cells via MMP and COX-2 expression. As measured by ELISA, the Chinese herbal medicinal herbs A. membranaceus, P. lactiflora, L. chuanxiong, P. suffruticosa and L. lucidum increased BDNF secretion by MDA-MB-231 cells. Similarly, using a co-culture system with MDA-MB-231 cells, A. membranaceus and L. lucidum modulated BDNF-TrkB signaling by HUVEC cells. We conclude that BDNF plays an important role in the metastatic interaction between MDA-MB-231 and HUVEC cells. Some Chinese medicinal herbs are able to enhance the BDNF-related metastatic potential of the interaction between cancer cells and endothelial cells. These findings provide important information that should help with the development of integrated medical therapies for breast

  2. The importance of endothelin-1 for microvascular dysfunction in diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Kalani

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Majid KalaniDepartment of Clinical Sciences Karolinska Institutet, Dept of Cardiology, Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm, SwedenAbstract: Most of the late diabetic complications such as retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy, have their basis in disturbed microvascular function. Structural and functional changes in the microcirculation are present in diabetes mellitus irrespective of the organ studied, and the pathogenesis is complex. Endothelial dysfunction, characterized by an imbalance between endothelium-derived vasodilator and vasoconstrictor substances, plays an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetic microangiopathy. Increased circulating levels of endothelin-1 (ET-1, a potent vasoconstrictor peptide, has been found in patients with diabetes, and a positive correlation between plasma ET-1 levels and microangiopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes has been demonstrated. In addition to its direct vasoconstrictor effects, enhanced levels of ET-1 may contribute to endothelial dysfunction through inhibitory effects on nitric oxide (NO production. Vascular endothelial dysfunction may precede insulin resistance, although the feature of insulin resistance syndrome includes factors that have negative effects on endothelial function. Furthermore, ET-1 induces a reduction in insulin sensitivity and may take part in the development of the metabolic syndrome. In the following, the mechanisms by which ET-1 contributes to the development of diabetic microangiopathy and the potentially beneficial effect of selective ETA receptor antagonists are discussed.Keywords: endothelin-1, diabetes mellitus, microcirculation, diabetic microangiopathy, ETA-receptor antagonist

  3. Inhaled nitric oxide pretreatment but not posttreatment attenuates ischemia-reperfusion-induced pulmonary microvascular leak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetham, P M; Sefton, W D; Bridges, J P; Stevens, T; McMurtry, I F

    1997-04-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) pulmonary edema probably reflects a leukocyte-dependent, oxidant-mediated mechanism. Nitric oxide (NO) attenuates leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions and I/R-induced microvascular leak. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) agonists reverse and prevent I/R-induced microvascular leak, but reversal by inhaled NO (INO) has not been tested. In addition, the role of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) activation in the NO protection effect is unknown. Rat lungs perfused with salt solution were grouped as either I/R, I/R with INO (10 or 50 ppm) on reperfusion, or time control. Capillary filtration coefficients (Kfc) were estimated 25 min before ischemia (baseline) and after 30 and 75 min of reperfusion. Perfusate cell counts and lung homogenate myeloperoxidase activity were determined in selected groups. Additional groups were treated with either INO (50 ppm) or isoproterenol (ISO-10 microM) after 30 min of reperfusion. Guanylyl cyclase was inhibited with 1H-[1,2,4]Oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ-15 microM), and Kfc was estimated at baseline and after 30 min of reperfusion. (1) Inhaled NO attenuated I/R-induced increases in Kfc. (2) Cell counts were similar at baseline. After 75 min of reperfusion, lung neutrophil retention (myeloperoxidase activity) and decreased perfusate neutrophil counts were similar in all groups. (3) In contrast to ISO, INO did not reverse microvascular leak. (4) 8-bromoguanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-br-cGMP) prevented I/R-induced microvascular leak in ODQ-treated lungs, but INO was no longer effective. Inhaled NO attenuates I/R-induced pulmonary microvascular leak, which requires sGC activation and may involve a mechanism independent of inhibition of leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions. In addition, INO is ineffective in reversing I/R-induced microvascular leak.

  4. Cancer-associated fibroblast promote transmigration through endothelial brain cells in three-dimensional in vitro models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoon Pyo; Lee, Joo Hyun; Gao, Ming-Qing; Kim, Baek Gil; Kang, Suki; Kim, Se Hoon; Cho, Nam Hoon

    2014-11-01

    Brain metastases are associated with high morbidity as well as with poor prognosis and survival in breast cancer patients. Despite its clinical importance, metastasis of breast cancer cells through the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is poorly understood. The objective of our study was to investigate whether cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) play crucial roles in breast cancer brain metastasis. Using a cell adhesion assays, in vitro BBB permeability and transmigration assays and soft agar colony formation assays, we investigated the physical roles of CAFs in breast cancer brain metastasis. We also performed immunofluorescence, flow cytometric analysis, Droplet Digital PCR and Simon™ Simple Western System to confirm changes in expression levels. We established two novel three-dimensional (3D) culture systems using a perpendicular slide chamber and applying 3D embedded culture method to reflect brain metastasis conditions. With a newly developed device, CAFs was proven to promote cell adhesion to human brain microvascular endothelial cells, in vitro BBB permeability and transmigration and colony formation of breast cancer cells. Furthermore, CAFs enhanced the invasive migration of breast cancer cells in two kinds of 3D cultures. These 3D models also reliably recapitulate the initial steps of BBB transmigration, micro-metastasis and colonization. Expression of integrin α5β1 and αvβ3, c-MET and α2,6-siayltransferase was increased in breast cancer cells that migrated through the BBB. In conclusion, based on our in vitro BBB and co-culture models, our data suggest that CAFs may play a role in breast cancer brain metastasis. © 2014 UICC.

  5. Inflammation-induced microvascular insulin resistance is an early event in diet-induced obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lina; Fu, Zhuo; Wu, Jing; Aylor, Kevin W; Barrett, Eugene J; Cao, Wenhong; Liu, Zhenqi

    2015-12-01

    Endothelial dysfunction and vascular insulin resistance usually coexist and chronic inflammation engenders both. In the present study, we investigate the temporal relationship between vascular insulin resistance and metabolic insulin resistance. We assessed insulin responses in all arterial segments, including aorta, distal saphenous artery and the microvasculature, as well as the metabolic insulin responses in muscle in rats fed on a high-fat diet (HFD) for various durations ranging from 3 days to 4 weeks with or without sodium salicylate treatment. Compared with controls, HFD feeding significantly blunted insulin-mediated Akt (protein kinase B) and eNOS [endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase] phosphorylation in aorta in 1 week, blunted vasodilatory response in small resistance vessel in 4 weeks and microvascular recruitment in as early as 3 days. Insulin-stimulated whole body glucose disposal did not begin to progressively decrease until after 1 week. Salicylate treatment fully inhibited vascular inflammation, prevented microvascular insulin resistance and significantly improved muscle metabolic responses to insulin. We conclude that microvascular insulin resistance is an early event in diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance and inflammation plays an essential role in this process. Our data suggest microvascular insulin resistance contributes to the development of metabolic insulin resistance in muscle and muscle microvasculature is a potential therapeutic target in the prevention and treatment of diabetes and its related complications. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  6. Microvascularization on collared peccary placenta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santos, Tatiana Carlesso; Oliveira, Moacir Franco; Dantzer, Vibeke

    2012-01-01

    The microvascularization of the collared peccary (Tayassu tajacu) placenta was studied by vascular casts and immunolocalization of a-smooth muscle actin and vimentin, to identify the three dimensional organization and vascular flow interrelation in the microvasculature between the maternal...... and fetal compartments of the placentae. The immunolocalization of vimentin in the vascular endothelium and in the smooth muscle cells of blood vessels showed indented capillaries along the uterine epithelium and the trophoblast at the sides of complementary maternal and fetal microfolds, or rugae...... into a microvascular network wall in a basket-like fashion. At the base of these baskets venules were formed. On the fetal side, arterioles branched centrally in the fetal rugae into a capillary network in a bulbous form, complementary to the opposite maternal depressions forming the baskets. At the base...

  7. Intravascular Stenting in Microvascular Anastomoses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assersen, Kristine; Sørensen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Background The effect of intravascular stenting (IVaS) on microvascular anastomoses has given adverse results. For experienced microsurgeons the benefit of IVaS is doubtful. We have investigated the potential benefit of the IVaS technique for two groups of inexperienced microsurgeons with differe...... or experienced microsurgeons regardless of their clinical experience. The study also shows that some surgical experience seems to be an advantage in performing microsurgery....

  8. Noninvasive assessment of coronary microvascular function in women at risk for ischaemic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campisi, R

    2008-02-01

    The primary objective of the current review is to describe the assessment of coronary microvascular function by noninvasive imaging techniques in women at risk for and with ischaemic heart disease (IHD). The search criteria were the analyses of the related bibliography published in PUBMED database. Normal or minimal obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) at angiography is a common finding in women with signs of ischaemia. Up to 50% of them will have coronary microvascular dysfunction, suggesting that the mechanism of ischaemia may be localised at coronary microcirculation level. Noninvasive measurements of coronary microvascular function can be performed by radionuclide techniques. In particular, positron emission tomography (PET) measures myocardial blood flow (MBF) not only relatively but also in absolute units. Thus, PET offers the possibility to uncover microvascular dysfunction even in patients without obstructive CAD. PET-derived estimates of MBF showed an abnormal coronary microvascular function in women with chest pain and non-obstructive CAD and in women with high-risk conditions for CAD. Interestingly, there is a relationship between an abnormal coronary vascular function and adverse cardiovascular outcomes. In particular, this significant relationship was observed with measurements related to endothelial function. Recent evidence suggests that vascular dysfunction plays a central role as an estimator of outcomes in women at risk for or with IHD. Therefore, assessment of coronary vascular function in these women appears to be of clinical relevance. Whether such evaluation may have an impact to reduce cardiac events needs further investigation.

  9. Enhanced breast cancer cell adherence to the lung endothelium via PAF acetylhydrolase inhibition: a potential mechanism for enhanced metastasis in smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kispert, Shannon E; Marentette, John O; McHowat, Jane

    2014-11-15

    Cancer deaths are primarily caused by distant metastases, rather than by primary tumor growth; however, the role of smoking in metastasis remains unclear. We demonstrated previously that endothelial cell platelet-activating factor (PAF) production results in enhanced inflammatory cell recruitment to the lung. We propose that endothelial cell PAF accumulation plays a role in cancer cell migration to distal locations. We used cigarette smoke extract (CSE) to inhibit the activity of endothelial cell PAF acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH), which hydrolyzes and inactivates PAF, and determined whether this results in increased endothelial cell PAF accumulation and breast cancer adherence. Incubation of human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC-L) with CSE resulted in a significant inhibition of PAF-AH activity that was accompanied by increased PAF production and adherence of highly invasive MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Pretreatment of HMVEC-L with (S)-bromoenol lactone to inhibit calcium-independent phospholipase A2β (iPLA2β, which initiates endothelial cell PAF production) prior to CSE exposure resulted in complete inhibition of MDA-MB-231 cell adherence. Similarly, pretreatment of MDA-MB-231 cells with the PAF receptor antagonist Ginkgo biloba resulted in inhibition of adherence to the endothelium. Immunoblot analysis indicated an increase in MDA-MB-231 cell PAF receptor expression with CSE exposure. Taken together, our data indicate that CSE exposure increases endothelial cell PAF production, resulting in enhanced adherence of tumor cells to the endothelium. Our in vitro data indicate that increased tumor cell adherence would lead to enhanced metastasis formation in smokers. Potential therapeutic targets include endothelial cell iPLA2β or the tumor cell PAF receptor. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  10. A novel effective method for the assessment of microvascular function in male patients with coronary artery disease: a pilot study using laser speckle contrast imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, J.P. [Laboratório de Atividade Física e Promoção è Saúde, Departamento de Desporto Coletivo, Instituto de Educação Física e Desportos, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Lopes, G.O. [Laboratório de Atividade Física e Promoção è Saúde, Departamento de Desporto Coletivo, Instituto de Educação Física e Desportos, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Cardiologia, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Verri, V.; Coelho, M.P.; Nascimento, P.M.C.; Kopiler, D.A. [Instituto Nacional de Cardiologia, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Tibirica, E. [Instituto Nacional de Cardiologia, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Laboratório de Investigação Cardiovascular, Departamento Osório de Almeida, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, FIOCRUZ, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2016-09-01

    Evaluation of microvascular endothelial function is essential for investigating the pathophysiology and treatment of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Although laser speckle contrast imaging technology is well accepted as a noninvasive methodology for assessing microvascular endothelial function, it has never been used to compare male patients with coronary artery disease with male age-matched healthy controls. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine whether laser speckle contrast imaging could be used to detect differences in the systemic microvascular functions of patients with established cardiovascular disease (n=61) and healthy age-matched subjects (n=24). Cutaneous blood flow was assessed in the skin of the forearm using laser speckle contrast imaging coupled with the transdermal iontophoretic delivery of acetylcholine and post-occlusive reactive hyperemia. The maximum increase in skin blood flow induced by acetylcholine was significantly reduced in the cardiovascular disease patients compared with the control subjects (74 vs 116%; P<0.01). With regard to post-occlusive reactive hyperemia-induced vasodilation, the patients also presented reduced responses compared to the controls (0.42±0.15 vs 0.50±0.13 APU/mmHg; P=0.04). In conclusion, laser speckle contrast imaging can identify endothelial and microvascular dysfunctions in male individuals with cardiovascular disease. Thus, this technology appears to be an efficient non-invasive technique for evaluating systemic microvascular and endothelial functions, which could be valuable as a peripheral marker of atherothrombotic diseases in men.

  11. The Role of Calcineurin/NFAT in SFRP2 Induced Angiogenesis—A Rationale for Breast Cancer Treatment with the Calcineurin Inhibitor Tacrolimus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siamakpour-Reihani, Sharareh; Caster, Joseph; Bandhu Nepal, Desh; Courtwright, Andrew; Hilliard, Eleanor; Usary, Jerry; Ketelsen, David; Darr, David; Shen, Xiang Jun; Patterson, Cam; Klauber-DeMore, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    Tacrolimus (FK506) is an immunosuppressive drug that binds to the immunophilin FKBPB12. The FK506-FKBP12 complex associates with calcineurin and inhibits its phosphatase activity, resulting in inhibition of nuclear translocation of nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT). There is increasing data supporting a critical role of NFAT in mediating angiogenic responses stimulated by both vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and a novel angiogenesis factor, secreted frizzled-related protein 2 (SFRP2). Since both VEGF and SFRP2 are expressed in breast carcinomas, we hypothesized that tacrolimus would inhibit breast carcinoma growth. Using IHC (IHC) with antibodies to FKBP12 on breast carcinomas we found that FKBP12 localizes to breast tumor vasculature. Treatment of MMTV-neu transgenic mice with tacrolimus (3 mg/kg i.p. daily) (n = 19) resulted in a 73% reduction in the growth rate for tacrolimus treated mice compared to control (n = 15), p = 0.003; which was associated with an 82% reduction in tumor microvascular density (pTacrolimus (1 µM) inhibited SFRP2 induced endothelial tube formation by 71% (p = 0.005) and inhibited VEGF induced endothelial tube formation by 67% (p = 0.004). To show that NFATc3 is required for SFRP2 stimulated angiogenesis, NFATc3 was silenced with shRNA in endothelial cells. Sham transfected cells responded to SFRP2 stimulation in a tube formation assay with an increase in the number of branch points (ptacrolimus inhibits angiogenesis in vitro and breast carcinoma growth in vivo. This provides a rationale for examining the therapeutic potential of tacrolimus at inhibiting breast carcinoma growth in humans. PMID:21673995

  12. Feasibility Study of EndoTAG-1, a Tumor Endothelial Targeting Agent, in Combination with Paclitaxel followed by FEC as Induction Therapy in HER2-Negative Breast Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michail Ignatiadis

    Full Text Available EndoTAG-1, a tumor endothelial targeting agent has shown activity in metastatic triple-negative breast cancer (BC in combination with paclitaxel.HER2-negative BC patients candidates for neoadjuvant chemotherapy were scheduled to receive 12 cycles of weekly EndoTAG-1 22mg/m2 plus paclitaxel 70mg/m2 followed by 3 cycles of FEC (Fluorouracil 500mg/m2, Epirubicin 100mg/m2, Cyclophosphamide 500mg/m2 every 3 weeks followed by surgery. Primary endpoint was percent (% reduction in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI estimated Gadolinium (Gd enhancing tumor volume at the end of EndoTAG-1 plus paclitaxel administration as compared to baseline. Safety, pathological complete response (pCR defined as no residual tumor in breast and axillary nodes at surgery and correlation between % reduction in MRI estimated tumor volume and pCR were also evaluated.Fifteen out of 20 scheduled patients were included: Six patients with estrogen receptor (ER-negative/HER2-negative and 9 with ER-positive/HER2-negative BC. Nine patients completed treatment as per protocol. Despite premedication and slow infusion rates, grade 3 hypersensitivity reactions to EndoTAG-1 were observed during the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 6th weekly infusion in 4 patients, respectively, and required permanent discontinuation of the EndoTAG-1. Moreover, two additional patients stopped EndoTAG-1 plus paclitaxel after 8 and 9 weeks due to clinical disease progression. Two patients had grade 3 increases in transaminases and 1 patient grade 4 neutropenia. pCR was achieved in 5 of the 6 ER-/HER2- and in none of the 9 ER+/HER2- BC patients. The mean % reduction in MRI estimated tumor volume at the end of EndoTAG-1 plus paclitaxel treatment was 81% (95% CI, 66% to 96%, p<0.001 for the 15 patients that underwent surgery; 96% for patients with pCR and 73% for patients with no pCR (p = 0.04.The EndoTAG-1 and paclitaxel combination showed promising preliminary activity as preoperative treatment, especially in ER-/HER2

  13. Selenoglycoproteins attenuate adhesion of tumor cells to the brain microvascular endothelium via a process involving NF-κB activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrobel, Jagoda K; Choi, Jeong June; Xiao, Rijin; Eum, Sung Yong; Kwiatkowski, Stefan; Wolff, Gretchen; Spangler, Leya; Power, Ronan F; Toborek, Michal

    2015-02-01

    Selenium-containing compounds and selenized yeast have anticancer properties. In order to address possible mechanisms involved in these effects, selenoglycoproteins (SGPs) were extracted from selenium-enriched yeast at pH 4.0 and 6.5 (the fractions are called SGP40 and SGP65, respectively), followed by evaluation of their impact on the interactions of lung and breast tumor cells with human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs). Extracted SGPs, especially SGP40, significantly inhibited adhesion of tumor cells to HBMECs and their transendothelial migration. Because the active components of SGPs are unknown, small selenium-containing compounds [leucyl-valyl-selenomethionyl-arginine (LVSe-MR) and methylselenoadenosine (M-Se-A)], which are normally present in selenized yeast, were introduced as additional treatment groups. Treatment of HBMECs with SGP40, LVSe-MR and M-Se-A induced changes in gene signatures, which suggested a central involvement of nuclear factor (NF)-κB-dependent pathway. These observations were confirmed in the subsequent analysis of NF-κB DNA binding activity, quantitative measurements of the expression of selected genes and proteins, and tumor cell adhesion assay with a specific NF-κB inhibitor as the additional treatment factor. These findings indicate that specific organic selenium-containing compounds have the ability to inhibit tumor cell adhesion to brain endothelial cells via down-regulation of NF-κB. SGPs appear to be more effective than small selenium-containing compounds, suggesting the role of not only selenium but also the glycoprotein component in the observed protective impact. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Who Is at Risk for Coronary Microvascular Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NHLBI on Twitter. Who Is at Risk for Coronary Microvascular Disease? Coronary microvascular disease can affect both men and women. However, women may be at risk for coronary microvascular disease if they have lower than normal levels of ...

  15. The effect of exercise training on the level of tissue IL-6 and vascular endothelial growth factor in breast cancer bearing mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadegh Amani Shalamzari

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: The goal of this study was assessing the prophylactic effect of exercise and its role as an adjuvant therapy on level of cytokines involved in angiogenesis in estrogen-dependent breast cancer. Materials and Methods: Forty female BALB/c mice were randomly assigned to exercise-tumor-exercise (ETE, exercise-tumor-rest (ETR, rest-tumor-exercise (RTE and rest-tumor-rest (RTR groups. After orientation in the environment, two groups of mice performed continuous endurance exercise for 8 weeks, and thereafter estrogen-dependent MC4L2 cancer cells were injected to them. Then, one group of each of trained and non-trained mice performed endurance exercise 5 days per week for 6 weeks. Tumor volume was measured by a digital caliper weekly. Finally, the mice were sacrificed; tumor tissue was removed, immediately frozen and kept in              -70°C. Tumor sample was homogenized; levels of cytokines were measured and quantified using ELISA. Results: There was significant reduction in the level of interlukin-6 (IL-6 (P=0.001, Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF (P=0.0001 and tumor volume (P=0.0001 among the groups performing endurance exercise after malignancy (RTE and ETE in comparison with groups not performing endurance exercise (ETR and RTR, and these results were in agreement with tumor growth rate. Conclusion: Exercise can cause reduction in levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in tumor tissue. Decreased IL-6 production could reduce the generation of VEGF, resulting in reduced intra-tumor angiogenesis. Due to reduction of the level of these cytokines in groups doing exercise before and after malignancy, exercise is presumed to be an adjuvant therapy in estrogen-receptor dependent tumors in addition to its effective prophylactic role.

  16. Endothelial disruptive proinflammatory effects of nicotine and e-cigarette vapor exposures

    OpenAIRE

    Schweitzer, Kelly S.; Chen, Steven X.; Law, Sarah; Van Demark, Mary; Poirier, Christophe; Matthew J Justice; Hubbard, Walter C.; Kim, Elena S.; Lai, Xianyin; Wang, Mu; Kranz, William D.; Carroll, Clinton J.; Ray, Bruce D.; Bittman, Robert; Goodpaster, John

    2015-01-01

    The increased use of inhaled nicotine via e-cigarettes has unknown risks to lung health. Having previously shown that cigarette smoke (CS) extract disrupts the lung microvasculature barrier function by endothelial cell activation and cytoskeletal rearrangement, we investigated the contribution of nicotine in CS or e-cigarettes (e-Cig) to lung endothelial injury. Primary lung microvascular endothelial cells were exposed to nicotine, e-Cig solution, or condensed e-Cig vapor (1–20 mM nicotine) o...

  17. Endothelial progenitor cells physiology and metabolic plasticity in brain angiogenesis and blood-brain barrier modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Malinovskaya

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Currently, there is a considerable interest to the assessment of blood-brain barrier (BBB development as a part of cerebral angiogenesis developmental program. Embryonic and adult angiogenesis in the brain is governed by the coordinated activity of endothelial progenitor cells, brain microvascular endothelial cells, and non-endothelial cells contributing to the establishment of the BBB (pericytes, astrocytes, neurons. Metabolic and functional plasticity of endothelial progenitor cells controls their timely recruitment, precise homing to the brain microvessels, and efficient support of brain angiogenesis. Deciphering endothelial progenitor cells physiology would provide novel engineering approaches to establish adequate microfluidically-supported BBB models and brain microphysiological systems for translational studies.

  18. Endothelial progenitor cells in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and emphysema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, Russell P.; Parikh, Megha A.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Shimbo, Daichi; Austin, John H. M.; Smith, Benjamin M.; Hueper, Katja; Vogel-Claussen, Jens; Lima, Joao; Gomes, Antoinette; Watson, Karol; Kawut, Steven; Barr, R. Graham

    2017-01-01

    Endothelial injury is implicated in the pathogenesis of COPD and emphysema; however the role of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), a marker of endothelial cell repair, and circulating endothelial cells (CECs), a marker of endothelial cell injury, in COPD and its subphenotypes is unresolved. We hypothesized that endothelial progenitor cell populations would be decreased in COPD and emphysema and that circulating endothelial cells would be increased. Associations with other subphenotypes were examined. The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis COPD Study recruited smokers with COPD and controls age 50–79 years without clinical cardiovascular disease. Endothelial progenitor cell populations (CD34+KDR+ and CD34+KDR+CD133+ cells) and circulating endothelial cells (CD45dimCD31+CD146+CD133-) were measured by flow cytometry. COPD was defined by standard spirometric criteria. Emphysema was assessed qualitatively and quantitatively on CT. Full pulmonary function testing and expiratory CTs were measured in a subset. Among 257 participants, both endothelial progenitor cell populations, and particularly CD34+KDR+ endothelial progenitor cells, were reduced in COPD. The CD34+KDR+CD133+ endothelial progenitor cells were associated inversely with emphysema extent. Both endothelial progenitor cell populations were associated inversely with extent of panlobular emphysema and positively with diffusing capacity. Circulating endothelial cells were not significantly altered in COPD but were inversely associated with pulmonary microvascular blood flow on MRI. There was no consistent association of endothelial progenitor cells or circulating endothelial cells with measures of gas trapping. These data provide evidence that endothelial repair is impaired in COPD and suggest that this pathological process is specific to emphysema. PMID:28291826

  19. Endothelial progenitor cells in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Margaret F; Tracy, Russell P; Parikh, Megha A; Hoffman, Eric A; Shimbo, Daichi; Austin, John H M; Smith, Benjamin M; Hueper, Katja; Vogel-Claussen, Jens; Lima, Joao; Gomes, Antoinette; Watson, Karol; Kawut, Steven; Barr, R Graham

    2017-01-01

    Endothelial injury is implicated in the pathogenesis of COPD and emphysema; however the role of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), a marker of endothelial cell repair, and circulating endothelial cells (CECs), a marker of endothelial cell injury, in COPD and its subphenotypes is unresolved. We hypothesized that endothelial progenitor cell populations would be decreased in COPD and emphysema and that circulating endothelial cells would be increased. Associations with other subphenotypes were examined. The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis COPD Study recruited smokers with COPD and controls age 50-79 years without clinical cardiovascular disease. Endothelial progenitor cell populations (CD34+KDR+ and CD34+KDR+CD133+ cells) and circulating endothelial cells (CD45dimCD31+CD146+CD133-) were measured by flow cytometry. COPD was defined by standard spirometric criteria. Emphysema was assessed qualitatively and quantitatively on CT. Full pulmonary function testing and expiratory CTs were measured in a subset. Among 257 participants, both endothelial progenitor cell populations, and particularly CD34+KDR+ endothelial progenitor cells, were reduced in COPD. The CD34+KDR+CD133+ endothelial progenitor cells were associated inversely with emphysema extent. Both endothelial progenitor cell populations were associated inversely with extent of panlobular emphysema and positively with diffusing capacity. Circulating endothelial cells were not significantly altered in COPD but were inversely associated with pulmonary microvascular blood flow on MRI. There was no consistent association of endothelial progenitor cells or circulating endothelial cells with measures of gas trapping. These data provide evidence that endothelial repair is impaired in COPD and suggest that this pathological process is specific to emphysema.

  20. Sirtuin 2 Regulates Microvascular Inflammation during Sepsis

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    Nancy Buechler

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Sepsis and septic shock, the leading causes of death in noncoronary intensive care units, kill more than 200,000/year in the US alone. Circulating cell-endothelial cell interactions are the rate determining factor in sepsis inflammation. Sirtuin, a seven-member family of proteins (SIRT1–7, epigenetically controls inflammation. We have studied the roles of SIRTs 1, 3, and 6 in sepsis previously. In this project, we studied the role of SIRT2 on sepsis-related inflammation. Methods. Sepsis was induced in C57Bl/6 (WT, SIRT2 knockout (SIRT2KO, and SIRT2 overexpressing (SIRT2KI mice by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP. We studied leukocyte/platelet adhesion using intravital microscopy and E-selectin/ICAM-1 adhesion molecule expression in the small intestine with immunohistochemistry (IHC six hours post-CLP/sham surgery. We also studied 7-day survival rates in WT, SIRT2KO, and SIRT2KI sepsis mice. Results. Compared to WT mice, SIRT2KO mice show exaggeration while SIRT2KI mice show attenuation of cellular adhesion with sepsis in the small intestine. We also show that the small intestinal E-selectin and ICAM-1 expressions increased in SIRT2KO and decreased in SIRT2KI mice versus those in WT sepsis mice. We show that the 7-day survival rate is decreased in SIRT2KO and increased in SIRT2KI sepsis mice. Conclusion. SIRT2 modulates microvascular inflammation in sepsis and affects survival.

  1. Hypercholesterolemia and microvascular dysfunction: interventional strategies

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    James Milinda E

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hypercholesterolemia is defined as excessively high plasma cholesterol levels, and is a strong risk factor for many negative cardiovascular events. Total cholesterol levels above 200 mg/dl have repeatedly been correlated as an independent risk factor for development of peripheral vascular (PVD and coronary artery disease (CAD, and considerable attention has been directed toward evaluating mechanisms by which hypercholesterolemia may impact vascular outcomes; these include both results of direct cholesterol lowering therapies and alternative interventions for improving vascular function. With specific relevance to the microcirculation, it has been clearly demonstrated that evolution of hypercholesterolemia is associated with endothelial cell dysfunction, a near-complete abrogation in vascular nitric oxide bioavailability, elevated oxidant stress, and the creation of a strongly pro-inflammatory condition; symptoms which can culminate in profound impairments/alterations to vascular reactivity. Effective interventional treatments can be challenging as certain genetic risk factors simply cannot be ignored. However, some hypercholesterolemia treatment options that have become widely used, including pharmaceutical therapies which can decrease circulating cholesterol by preventing either its formation in the liver or its absorption in the intestine, also have pleiotropic effects with can directly improve peripheral vascular outcomes. While physical activity is known to decrease PVD/CAD risk factors, including obesity, psychological stress, impaired glycemic control, and hypertension, this will also increase circulating levels of high density lipoprotein and improving both cardiac and vascular function. This review will provide an overview of the mechanistic consequences of the predominant pharmaceutical interventions and chronic exercise to treat hypercholesterolemia through their impacts on chronic sub-acute inflammation, oxidative stress, and

  2. Bubble-Induced Endothelial Microparticles Promote Endothelial Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xuhua; Xu, Jiajun; Huang, Guoyang; Zhang, Kun; Qing, Long; Liu, Wenwu; Xu, Weigang

    2017-01-01

    Decompression sickness is a systemic pathophysiological process caused by bubbles and endothelial microparticles (EMPs) are established markers reflecting competency of endothelial function and vascular biology. Here, we investigated the effects of bubble-induced EMPs on endothelial cells in vitro and vivo. Rat pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVECs) were isolated and stimulated by bubbles and bubble-induced EMPs were collected and incubated with normal PMVECs in vitro. Cell viability and apoptosis were detected using Cell Counting Kit-8 assay and Annexin V FITC/PI double staining, respectively. Cell permeability and pro-inflammatory cytokines were determined by electric cell substrate impedance sensing and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. Intracellular nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species production were analyzed microscopically. In vivo study, bubble-induced EMPs were intravenously injected to the rats and soluble thrombomodulin, intercellular adhesion molecule 1, and vascullar adhesion molecule 1 were involved in evaluating endothelial dysfunction. In our study, bubble stimulus resulted in a significant increase of EMPs release by 3 fold. Bubble-induced EMPs significantly decreased cell viability and increased cell apoptosis. Moreover, bubble-induced EMPs induced abnormal increase of cell permeability and over-expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Intracellular ROS production increased while NO production decreased. These negative effects caused by bubble-induced EMPs were remarkably suppressed when EMPs pretreated with surfactant FSN-100. Finally, intravenous injection of bubble-induced EMPs caused elevations of soluble thrombomodulin and pro-inflammatory cytokines in the circulation. Altogether, our results demonstrated that bubble-induced EMPs can mediate endothelial dysfunction in vitro and vivo, which can be attenuated by EMPs abatement strategy. These data expanded our horizon of the detrimental effects of bubble

  3. Bubble-Induced Endothelial Microparticles Promote Endothelial Dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuhua Yu

    Full Text Available Decompression sickness is a systemic pathophysiological process caused by bubbles and endothelial microparticles (EMPs are established markers reflecting competency of endothelial function and vascular biology. Here, we investigated the effects of bubble-induced EMPs on endothelial cells in vitro and vivo. Rat pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVECs were isolated and stimulated by bubbles and bubble-induced EMPs were collected and incubated with normal PMVECs in vitro. Cell viability and apoptosis were detected using Cell Counting Kit-8 assay and Annexin V FITC/PI double staining, respectively. Cell permeability and pro-inflammatory cytokines were determined by electric cell substrate impedance sensing and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. Intracellular nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species production were analyzed microscopically. In vivo study, bubble-induced EMPs were intravenously injected to the rats and soluble thrombomodulin, intercellular adhesion molecule 1, and vascullar adhesion molecule 1 were involved in evaluating endothelial dysfunction. In our study, bubble stimulus resulted in a significant increase of EMPs release by 3 fold. Bubble-induced EMPs significantly decreased cell viability and increased cell apoptosis. Moreover, bubble-induced EMPs induced abnormal increase of cell permeability and over-expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Intracellular ROS production increased while NO production decreased. These negative effects caused by bubble-induced EMPs were remarkably suppressed when EMPs pretreated with surfactant FSN-100. Finally, intravenous injection of bubble-induced EMPs caused elevations of soluble thrombomodulin and pro-inflammatory cytokines in the circulation. Altogether, our results demonstrated that bubble-induced EMPs can mediate endothelial dysfunction in vitro and vivo, which can be attenuated by EMPs abatement strategy. These data expanded our horizon of the detrimental effects

  4. Dysregulation of coronary microvascular reactivity in asymptomatic patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Momose, Mitsuru; Neverve, Jodi; Nekolla, Stephan G.; Schwaiger, Markus; Bengel, Frank M. [Nuklearmedizinische Klinik und Poliklinik der Technischen Universitaet Muenchen, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Ismaninger Strasse 22, 81675 Munich (Germany); Abletshauser, Claudia [Department of Medicine, Novartis Pharma GmbH, Nuernberg (Germany); Schnell, Oliver; Standl, Eberhard [Institut fuer Diabetesforschung, Munich (Germany)

    2002-12-01

    In diabetic patients, a number of studies have suggested an impairment of vascular reactivity in response to vasodilatory stimuli. The pattern of dysregulation at the coronary microcirculatory level, however, has not been clearly defined. Thus, it was the aim of this study to characterise coronary microvascular function non-invasively in a homogeneous group of asymptomatic type 2 diabetic patients. In 46 patients with type 2 diabetes, myocardial blood flow (MBF) was quantified at baseline, in response to cold pressor test (CPT) and during adenosine-mediated vasodilation using positron emission tomography and nitrogen-13 ammonia. None of the patients had been treated with insulin, and none had symptoms of cardiac disease. Decreased MBF during CPT, indicating microvascular dysregulation, was observed in 16 patients (CPT-), while 30 patients demonstrated increased MBF during CPT (CPT+). Response to CPT was mildly, but significantly correlated with response to adenosine (r=0.44, P=0.0035). There was no difference in HbA1c, serum lipid levels or serum endothelial markers between the groups. Microvascular dysregulation in the CPT- group was associated with elevated baseline MBF (P<0.0001), reduced baseline vascular resistance (P=0.0026) and an abnormal increase in resistance during CPT (P=0.0002). In conclusion, coronary microvascular dysregulation is present in approximately one-third of asymptomatic, non-insulin-treated type 2 diabetic patients. Elevated baseline blood flow and reduced microvascular resistance at rest are characteristics of this dysregulation. These data suggest a state of activation of endothelial-dependent vasodilation at baseline which appears to limit the flow response to stress conditions. (orig.)

  5. GM-CSF Ameliorates Micro-vascular Barrier Integrity via Pericytes Derived Ang-1 in Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Min; Hu, Yange; Yao, Min; Bao, Shisan; Fang, Yong

    2018-01-12

    Skin wound healing involves complex coordinated interactions of cells, tissues and mediators. Maintaining microvascular barrier integrity is one of the key events for endothelial homeostasis during wound healing. Vasodilation is observed after vasoconstriction, which causes blood vessels to become porous, facilitates leukocyte infiltration and aids angiogenesis at the wound-area, post-injury. Eventually, vessel integrity has to be re-established for vascular maturation. Numerous studies have found that granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) accelerates wound healing by inducing recruitment of repair cells into the injury area and releases of cytokines. However, whether GM-CSF is involving in the maintaining of micro-vascular barrier integrity and the underlying mechanism remain still unclear. Aim of this study was to investigate the effects of GM-CSF on modulation of micro-vascular permeability in wound healing and underlying mechanisms. Wound closure and micro-vascular leakage was investigated using a full-thickness skin wound mouse model after GM-CSF intervention. The endothelial permeability was measured by Evans-blue assay in vivo and in vitro endothelium/pericyte co-culture system using a FITC-Dextran permeability assay. To identify the source of angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1), double staining is used in vivo and ELISA and qPCR are used in vitro. To determine the specific effect of Ang-1 on GM-CSF maintaining micro-vascular stabilization, Ang-1 siRNA was applied to inhibit Ang-1 production in vivo and in vitro. Wound closure was significantly accelerated and micro-vascular leakage was ameliorated after GM-CSF treatment in mouse wound sites. GM-CSF decreased endothelial permeability through tightening endothelial junctions and increased Ang-1 protein level that was derived by perictye. Furthermore, applications of siRNAAng-1 inhibited GM-CSF mediated protection of micro-vascular barrier integrity both in vivo and in vitro. Our data indicate that GM

  6. Effect of decompression-induced bubble formation on highly trained divers microvascular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrechts, Kate; Pontier, Jean-Michel; Mazur, Aleksandra; Buzzacott, Peter; Morin, Jean; Wang, Qiong; Theron, Michael; Guerrero, Francois

    2013-11-01

    We previously showed microvascular alteration of both endothelium-dependent and -independent reactivity after a single SCUBA dive. We aimed to study mechanisms involved in this postdive vascular dysfunction. Ten divers each completed three protocols: (1) a SCUBA dive at 400 kPa for 30 min; (2) a 41-min duration of seawater surface head immersed finning exercise to determine the effect of immersion and moderate physical activity; and (3) a simulated 41-min dive breathing 100% oxygen (hyperbaric oxygen [HBO]) at 170 kPa in order to analyze the effect of diving-induced hyperoxia. Bubble grades were monitored with Doppler. Cutaneous microvascular function was assessed by laser Doppler. Endothelium-dependent (acetylcholine, ACh) and -independent (sodium nitroprusside, SNP) reactivity was tested by iontophoresis. Endothelial cell activation was quantified by plasma Von Willebrand factor and nitric oxide (NO). Inactivation of NO by oxidative stress was assessed by plasma nitrotyrosine. Platelet factor 4 (PF4) was assessed in order to determine platelet aggregation. Blood was also analyzed for measurement of platelet count. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) response to ACh delivery was not significantly decreased by the SCUBA protocol (23 ± 9% before vs. 17 ± 7% after; P = 0.122), whereas CVC response to SNP stimulation decreased significantly (23 ± 6% before vs. 10 ± 1% after; P = 0.039). The HBO and immersion protocols did not affect either endothelial-dependent or -independent function. The immersion protocol induced a significant increase in NO (0.07 ± 0.01 vs. 0.12 ± 0.02 μg/mL; P = 0.035). This study highlighted change in microvascular endothelial-independent but not -dependent function in highly trained divers after a single air dive. The results suggest that the effects of decompression on microvascular function may be modified by diving acclimatization.

  7. Gene variations of nitric oxide synthase regulate the effects of a saturated fat rich meal on endothelial function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objective: Endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene variations have been linked to a higher risk for cardiovascular diseases by unknown mechanisms. Our aim was to determine if two SNPs located in NOS3 (E298D and i19342) interfere with microvascular endothelial function (MEF) and/or oxidative stress du...

  8. The association of systemic microvascular changes with lung function and lung density: a cross-sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Harris

    Full Text Available Smoking causes endothelial dysfunction and systemic microvascular disease with resultant end-organ damage in the kidneys, eyes and heart. Little is known about microvascular changes in smoking-related lung disease. We tested if microvascular changes in the retina, kidneys and heart were associated with obstructive spirometry and low lung density on computed tomography. The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis recruited participants age 45-84 years without clinical cardiovascular disease. Measures of microvascular function included retinal arteriolar and venular caliber, urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio and, in a subset, myocardial blood flow on magnetic resonance imaging. Spirometry was measured following ATS/ERS guidelines. Low attenuation areas (LAA were measured on lung fields of cardiac computed tomograms. Regression models adjusted for pulmonary and cardiac risk factors, medications and body size. Among 3,397 participants, retinal venular caliber was inversely associated with forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV(1 (P<0.001 and FEV(1/forced vital capacity (FVC ratio (P = 0.04. Albumin-to-creatinine ratio was inversely associated with FEV(1 (P = 0.002 but not FEV(1/FVC. Myocardial blood flow (n = 126 was associated with lower FEV(1 (P = 0.02, lower FEV(1/FVC (P = 0.001 and greater percentage LAA (P = 0.04. Associations were of greater magnitude among smokers. Low lung function was associated with microvascular changes in the retina, kidneys and heart, and low lung density was associated with impaired myocardial microvascular perfusion. These cross-sectional results suggest that microvascular damage with end-organ dysfunction in all circulations may pertain to the lung, that lung dysfunction may contribute to systemic microvascular disease, or that there may be a shared predisposition.

  9. Brain endothelial dysfunction in cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musolino, Patricia L; Gong, Yi; Snyder, Juliet M T; Jimenez, Sandra; Lok, Josephine; Lo, Eng H; Moser, Ann B; Grabowski, Eric F; Frosch, Matthew P; Eichler, Florian S

    2015-11-01

    See Aubourg (doi:10.1093/awv271) for a scientific commentary on this article.X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy is caused by mutations in the ABCD1 gene leading to accumulation of very long chain fatty acids. Its most severe neurological manifestation is cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy. Here we demonstrate that progressive inflammatory demyelination in cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy coincides with blood-brain barrier dysfunction, increased MMP9 expression, and changes in endothelial tight junction proteins as well as adhesion molecules. ABCD1, but not its closest homologue ABCD2, is highly expressed in human brain microvascular endothelial cells, far exceeding its expression in the systemic vasculature. Silencing of ABCD1 in human brain microvascular endothelial cells causes accumulation of very long chain fatty acids, but much later than the immediate upregulation of adhesion molecules and decrease in tight junction proteins. This results in greater adhesion and transmigration of monocytes across the endothelium. PCR-array screening of human brain microvascular endothelial cells after ABCD1 silencing revealed downregulation of both mRNA and protein levels of the transcription factor c-MYC (encoded by MYC). Interestingly, MYC silencing mimicked the effects of ABCD1 silencing on CLDN5 and ICAM1 without decreasing the levels of ABCD1 protein itself. Together, these data demonstrate that ABCD1 deficiency induces significant alterations in brain endothelium via c-MYC and may thereby contribute to the increased trafficking of leucocytes across the blood-brain barrier as seen in cerebral adrenouleukodystrophy. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Experimental glomerular endothelial injury in vivo.

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    George Haddad

    Full Text Available The microvascular endothelium of the kidney glomerulus is injured in Shiga-like toxigenic bacterial infection, genetic or acquired loss of complement regulatory protein function, and allo-immune responses of solid-organ or bone marrow transplantation. Existing models of diseases with glomerular endothelial cell (EC injury, collectively grouped as thrombotic microangiopathies, are problematic, impeding investigation of the mechanisms of microvascular defense and repair. To develop a model of glomerular endothelial injury in the mouse, we conjugated the M. oreades lectin to the cytotoxin, saporin, (LS to selectively injure the glomerular endothelium. Injury of the microvasculature was evaluated by light, immunofluorescence, and electron microscopy, and by quantitative RT-PCR of cell-type specific transcripts. Renal function was evaluated by quantitation of serum creatinine. The toxin conjugate induced apoptosis of microvascular ECs in vitro, and subtle histologic features of thrombotic microangiopathy in vivo that were enhanced by co-injection of 50 μg/kg LPS. Among LS/LPS-treated animals, loss of glomerular EC staining correlated with decreased expression of EC-specific transcripts, and impaired kidney function. Selective injury of the glomerular microvasculature with LS toxin conjugate and LPS elicits histologic features of thrombotic microangiopathy and acute kidney failure.

  11. Cryptogenic stroke following abdominal free flap breast reconstruction surgery

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    Huizhuang Xie

    2014-01-01

    CONCLUSION: Surgeons and cardiologists should be aware of this cerebrovascular complication secondary to PFO following major reconstructive surgery such as microvascular breast reconstruction. It also serves to challenge microvascular surgeons to reconsider routine use of central venous pressure lines in free flap patients who might otherwise have good peripheral vessels for postoperative fluid and antibiotic administration.

  12. Dietary Lipids, Cell Adhesion and Breast Cancer Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-10-01

    S. Jiang, S. Avraham, Vascular endothelial (IGF-1) can stimulate VEGF synthesis through the Akt- growth factor modulates the transendothelial...induces microvascular calmodulin antagonist chlorpromazine and poly(ADP-ribose) polymer- endothelial cell retraction. Cancer Res. 54. 565-574. ase...supplementation enhances in vivo immune response in healthy glandin synthesis by fibroblasts and squamous carcinoma cells. Pros- elderly: a dose

  13. Effects of finasteride on microvascular density and VEGF expression in glomeruli of diabetic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He-lin TIAN

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To investigate the effects of finasteride on microvascular density and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF expression in glomeruli of streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. Methods  Diabetes was induced in mice with a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin in a dose of 150mg/kg, and they were randomly divided into 4 groups (7 each: diabetic model group and 3 treatment groups (treated with 0.1, 1, 10mg/kg of finasteride, respectively. Seven normal mice served as control group. Animals in finasteride treatment groups were intragastrically administered with finasteride 0.1, 1 and 10mg/kg once daily for 4 weeks, respectively, and those in control and diabetic model group were given the same volume of normal saline at the same time. The kidney sections from all mice were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (HE for the pathological study, and immunohistochemistry methods were performed to detect the microvascular density, and VEGF expression in glomeruli. Results  Compared with control group, the glomerular area and volume, microvascular density and VEGF index were significantly increased in diabetic model and finasteride treated groups (P<0.05. However, the glomerular area and volume, microvessel density and VEGF index were significantly decreased in 10mg/kg finasteride treated group compared with that in diabetic model group (P<0.05. Conclusion  Finasteride can inhibit the VEGF expression and decrease the glomerular microvascular density in diabetic mice.

  14. Immunofluorescence microscopy to assess enzymes controlling nitric oxide availability and microvascular blood flow in muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocks, Matthew; Shepherd, Sam O; Shaw, Christopher S; Achten, Juul; Costa, Matthew L; Wagenmakers, Anton J M

    2012-10-01

    The net production of NO by the muscle microvascular endothelium is a key regulator of muscle microvascular blood flow. Here, we describe the development of a method to quantify the protein content and phosphorylation of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS content and eNOS ser(1177) phosphorylation) and NAD(P)H oxidase expression. Human muscle cryosections were stained using antibodies targeting eNOS, p-eNOS ser(1177) and NOX2 in combination with markers of the endothelium and the sarcolemma. Quantitation was achieved by analyzing fluorescence intensity within the area stained positive for the microvascular endothelium. Analysis was performed in duplicate and repeated five times to investigate CV. In addition, eight healthy males (age 21 ± 1 year, BMI 24.4 ± 1.0 kg/m(2)) completed one hour of cycling exercise at ~65%VO(2max) . Muscle biopsies were taken from the m. vastus lateralis before and immediately after exercise and analyzed using the new methods. The CV of all methods was between 6.5 and 9.5%. Acute exercise increased eNOS serine(1177) phosphorylation (fold change 1.29 ± 0.05, p < 0.05). These novel methodologies will allow direct investigations of the molecular mechanisms underpinning the microvascular responses to insulin and exercise, the impairments that occur in sedentary, obese and elderly individuals and the effect of lifestyle interventions. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Plasma soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor level is independently associated with coronary microvascular function in patients with non-obstructive coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mekonnen, Girum; Corban, Michel T; Hung, Olivia Y

    2015-01-01

    microvascular function. METHODS: Coronary blood flow velocity and plasma suPAR levels were evaluated in patients with non-obstructive coronary artery disease. Coronary flow reserve (CFR) was calculated as the ratio of hyperemic to basal average peak blood flow velocity and coronary microvascular dysfunction...... microvascular function. Larger prospective clinical trials are warranted to investigate the prognostic value of this novel biomarker and the role of immune dysregulation in coronary microvascular disease.......BACKGROUND: Soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) is a novel biomarker released from leukocytes and endothelial cells that has been associated with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. We hypothesized that plasma suPAR level is an independent predictor of coronary...

  16. Pharmacological approaches to coronary microvascular dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarini, Giacinta; Huqi, Alda; Morrone, Doralisa; Capozza, Paola; Todiere, Giancarlo; Marzilli, Mario

    2014-12-01

    In recent decades coronary microvascular dysfunction has been increasingly identified as a relevant contributor to several cardiovascular conditions. Indeed, coronary microvascular abnormalities have been recognized in patients suffering acute myocardial infarction, chronic stable angina and cardiomyopathies, and also in patients with hypertension, obesity and diabetes. In this review, we will examine pathophysiological information needed to understand pharmacological approaches to coronary microvascular dysfunction in these different clinical contexts. Well-established drugs and new pharmacological agents, including those for which only preclinical data are available, will be covered in detail. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Adenosine formation in contracting primary rat skeletal muscle cells and endothelial cells in culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellsten, Ylva; Frandsen, Ulrik

    1997-01-01

    1. The present study examined the capacity for adenosine formation, uptake and metabolism in contracting primary rat muscle cells and in microvascular endothelial cells in culture. 2. Strong and moderate electrical simulation of skeletal muscle cells led to a significantly greater increase...... in the extracellular adenosine concentration (421 +/- 91 and 235 +/- 30 nmol (g protein)-1, respectively; P muscle cells (161 +/- 20 nmol (g protein)-1). The ATP concentration was lower (18%; P muscle cells....... 3. Addition of microvascular endothelial cells to the cultured skeletal muscle cells enhanced the contraction-induced accumulation of extracellular adenosine (P cells in culture alone did not cause extracellular accumulation of adenosine. 4. Skeletal muscle cells were...

  18. Coronary microvascular dysfunction in overt diabetic cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Bratis

    2014-11-01

    Conclusion: In patients with DM2 myocardial perfusion reserve is markedly decreased, suggestive of microvascular disease. In this small cohort MPRI impairment did not correlate to the LV EF deterioration.

  19. Macrovascular and microvascular function after implantation of left ventricular assist devices in end-stage heart failure: Role of microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansone, Roberto; Stanske, Beate; Keymel, Stefanie; Schuler, Dominik; Horn, Patrick; Saeed, Diyar; Boeken, Udo; Westenfeld, Ralf; Lichtenberg, Artur; Kelm, Malte; Heiss, Christian

    2015-07-01

    The hemodynamic vascular consequences of implanting left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) have not been studied in detail. We investigated the effect of LVAD implantation compared with heart transplant (HTx) on microvascular and macrovascular function in patients with end-stage heart failure and evaluated whether microparticles may play a role in LVAD-related endothelial dysfunction. Vascular function was assessed in patients with end-stage heart failure awaiting HTx, patients who had undergone implantation of a continuous-flow centrifugal LVAD, and patients who had already received a HTx. Macrovascular function was measured by flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD) using high-resolution ultrasound of the brachial artery. Microvascular function was assessed in the forearm during reactive hyperemia using laser Doppler perfusion imaging and pulsed wave Doppler. Age-matched patients without heart failure and without coronary artery disease (CAD) (healthy control subjects) and patients with stable CAD served as control subjects. Circulating red blood cell (CD253(+)), leukocyte (CD45(+)), platelet (CD31(+)/CD41(+)), and endothelial cell (CD31(+)/CD41(-), CD62e(+), CD144(+)) microparticles were determined by flow cytometry and free hemoglobin by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. FMD and microvascular function were significantly impaired in patients with end-stage heart failure compared with healthy control subjects and patients with stable CAD. LVAD implantation led to recovery of microvascular function, but not FMD. In parallel, increased free hemoglobin was observed along with red and white cell microparticles and endothelial and platelet microparticles. This finding indicates destruction of blood cells with release of hemoglobin and activation of endothelial cells. HTx and LVAD implantation led to similar improvements in microvascular function. FMD increased and microparticle levels decreased in patients with HTx, whereas shear stress during reactive hyperemia was

  20. Novel biomarkers of coronary microvascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Olivia Y; Lee, Suegene K; Eshtehardi, Parham; Samady, Habib

    2016-07-01

    Coronary microvascular disease in the absence of myocardial diseases has traditionally been diagnosed through coronary reactivity testing in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. Compared with invasive procedures, blood-based biomarkers may have reduced cost, less risk of physical harm and greater accessibility, making them ideal for an outpatient management strategy. There are a variety of biomarkers available with potential utility in the management of microvascular disease; however, none have yet been extensively validated or established in this clinical patient population.

  1. Coronary microvascular dysfunction, microvascular angina, and treatment strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinescu, Mark A; Löffler, Adrián I; Ouellette, Michelle; Smith, Lavone; Kramer, Christopher M; Bourque, Jamieson M

    2015-02-01

    Angina without coronary artery disease (CAD) has substantial morbidity and is present in 10% to 30% of patients undergoing angiography. Coronary microvascular dysfunction (CMD) is present in 50% to 65% of these patients. The optimal treatment of this cohort is undefined. We performed a systematic review to evaluate treatment strategies for objectively-defined CMD in the absence of CAD. We included studies assessing therapy in human subjects with angina and coronary flow reserve or myocardial perfusion reserve coronary artery stenosis ≥50% or structural heart disease. Only 8 papers met the strict inclusion criteria. The papers were heterogeneous, using different treatments, endpoints, and definitions of CMD. The small sample sizes severely limit the power of these studies, with an average of 11 patients per analysis. Studies evaluating sildenafil, quinapril, estrogen, and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation application demonstrated benefits in their respective endpoints. No benefit was found with L-arginine, doxazosin, pravastatin, and diltiazem. Our systematic review highlights that there is little data to support therapies for CMD. We assess the data meeting rigorous inclusion criteria and review the related but excluded published data. We additionally describe the next steps needed to address this research gap, including a standardized definition of CMD, routine assessment of CMD in studies of chest pain without obstructive CAD, and specific therapy assessment in the population with confirmed CMD. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A biomimetic collagen derived peptide exhibits anti-angiogenic activity in triple negative breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena V Rosca

    Full Text Available We investigated the application of a mimetic 20 amino acid peptide derived from type IV collagen for treatment of breast cancer. We showed that the peptide induced a decrease of proliferation, adhesion, and migration of endothelial and tumor cells in vitro. We also observed an inhibition of triple negative MDA-MB-231 xenograft growth by 75% relative to control when administered intraperitoneally for 27 days at 10 mg/kg. We monitored in vivo the changes in vascular properties throughout the treatment using MRI and found that the vascular volume and permeability surface area product decreased significantly. The treatment also resulted in an increase of caspase-3 activity and in a reduction of microvascular density. The multiple mode of action of this peptide, i.e., anti-angiogenic, and anti-tumorigenic, makes it a viable candidate as a therapeutic agent as a monotherapy or in combination with other compounds.

  3. A biomimetic collagen derived peptide exhibits anti-angiogenic activity in triple negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosca, Elena V; Penet, Marie-France; Mori, Noriko; Koskimaki, Jacob E; Lee, Esak; Pandey, Niranjan B; Bhujwalla, Zaver M; Popel, Aleksander S

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the application of a mimetic 20 amino acid peptide derived from type IV collagen for treatment of breast cancer. We showed that the peptide induced a decrease of proliferation, adhesion, and migration of endothelial and tumor cells in vitro. We also observed an inhibition of triple negative MDA-MB-231 xenograft growth by 75% relative to control when administered intraperitoneally for 27 days at 10 mg/kg. We monitored in vivo the changes in vascular properties throughout the treatment using MRI and found that the vascular volume and permeability surface area product decreased significantly. The treatment also resulted in an increase of caspase-3 activity and in a reduction of microvascular density. The multiple mode of action of this peptide, i.e., anti-angiogenic, and anti-tumorigenic, makes it a viable candidate as a therapeutic agent as a monotherapy or in combination with other compounds.

  4. HIV-1 Tat Protein Enhances Expression and Function of Breast Cancer Resistance Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yancong; Zhang, Kun; Yin, Xiaojie; Nie, Qichang; Ma, Yonggang

    2016-01-01

    ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters can transfer a variety of antiviral agents from the cytoplasm to body fluid, which results in a reduced intracellular concentration of the drugs. Proteins of HIV-1, e.g., Tat and gp120, altered some types of ABC transporter expression in brain microvascular endothelial cells and astrocytes. However, the effect of Tat on ABC transporters in T lymphocytes is unclear. In this study the status of breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) in Tat expressing cell lines was examined with real-time PCR and flow cytometry. It was found that HIV-1 Tat protein upregulated BCRP expression and enhanced efflux mediated by BCRP significantly, which could inhibit antiviral drugs from entering infected cells and interfere with the therapeutic effect of HAART.

  5. Pregnancy-associated plasma protein A is positively correlated to first trimester skin microvascular reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacobaeus, C; Kahan, T; Jörneskog, G; Bremme, K; Andolf, E; Thorsell, M

    2017-04-11

    To investigate if there is a correlation between levels of circulating maternal pregnancy-associated plasma protein A (PAPP-A) and first trimester maternal vascular function. A cross-sectional study of 53 healthy non-smoking, pregnant, nulliparous women in Stockholm, Sweden. PAPP-A and vascular function were assessed during gestational week 11-14. Forearm skin microcirculation was investigated by laser Doppler perfusion imaging during iontophoresis of acetylcholine (ACh) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) to assess endothelium dependent and endothelium independent microvascular vasodilatation, respectively. Vascular endothelial dependent and independent vasodilatation in the brachial artery was evaluated by post-ischemic hyperaemia induced flow mediated vasodilatation (FMD) and by sublingual glyceryl trinatrate (GTN), respectively. PAPP-A related to skin microvascular endothelial function index, i.e. peak Ach/peak SNP (β for PAPP-A 1.008 (0.34 - 1.68), r 2  = 0.17, P = 0.004). PAPP-A also related inversely to FMD (β for PAPP-A = -0.052 (-0.094 - -0.011), r 2  = 0.14, P = 0.014) but did not to FMD/GTN. The results were retained in multivariate analyses including known confounding factors. First trimester endothelium dependent skin microvascular reactivity was positively related to PAPP-A-levels. If confirmed, these novel findings suggest that first trimester skin microvascular reactivity could be a useful early marker for placental function. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. Globular adiponectin ameliorates metabolic insulin resistance via AMPK-mediated restoration of microvascular insulin responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lina; Fu, Zhuo; Wu, Jing; Aylor, Kevin W; Barrett, Eugene J; Cao, Wenhong; Liu, Zhenqi

    2015-09-01

    Adiponectin is an adipokine with anti-inflammatory and anti-diabetic properties. Hypoadiponectinaemia is closely associated with endothelial dysfunction and insulin resistance in obesity and diabetes. Insulin resistance is present in muscle microvasculature and this may contribute to decreased insulin delivery to, and action in, muscle. In this study we examined whether adiponectin ameliorates metabolic insulin resistance by affecting muscle microvascular recruitment. We demonstrated that a high-fat diet induces vascular adiponectin and insulin resistance but globular adiponectin administration can restore vascular insulin responses and improve insulin's metabolic action via an AMPK- and nitric oxide-dependent mechanism. This suggests that globular adiponectin might have a therapeutic potential for improving insulin resistance and preventing cardiovascular complications in patients with diabetes via modulation of microvascular insulin responses. Hypoadiponectinaemia is closely associated with endothelial dysfunction and insulin resistance, and microvasculature plays a critical role in the regulation of insulin action in muscle. Here we tested whether adiponectin replenishment could improve metabolic insulin sensitivity in male rats fed a high-fat diet (HFD) via the modulation of microvascular insulin responses. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed either a HFD or low-fat diet (LFD) for 4 weeks. Small resistance artery myograph changes in tension, muscle microvascular recruitment and metabolic response to insulin were determined. Compared with rats fed a LFD, HFD feeding abolished the vasodilatory actions of globular adiponectin (gAd) and insulin on pre-constricted distal saphenous arteries. Pretreatment with gAd improved insulin responses in arterioles isolated from HFD rats, which was blocked by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) inhibition. Similarly, HFD abolished microvascular responses to either gAd or insulin and decreased insulin-stimulated glucose disposal by

  7. Tumor endothelial expression of P-glycoprotein upon microvesicular transfer of TrpC5 derived from adriamycin-resistant breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, YePing; Pan, QiongXi; Jiang, Li; Chen, Zhen; Zhang, FangFang; Liu, YanJun; Xing, Hui; Shi, Mei; Li, Jiao; Li, XiYuan; Zhu, YaoDan; Chen, Yun; Bruce, Iain C.; Jin, Jian, E-mail: jinjian31@126.com; Ma, Xin, E-mail: maxin@jiangnan.edu.cn

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • TrpC5 was mainly accumulated in microvesicles of drug-resistant MCF-7/ADM cells. • Microvesicles from MCF-7/ADM transferred TrpC5 to endothelial cells. • TrpC5 inhibition reduced P-glycoprotein accumulation on tumor blood vessels in vivo. - Abstract: Treatment of carcinoma commonly fails due to chemoresistance. Studies have shown that endothelial cells acquire resistance via the tumor microenvironment. Microvesicle (MV) shedding from the cell membrane to the microenvironment plays an important role in communication between cells. The aim of the present study was to determine whether MCF-7 adriamycin-resistant cells (MCF-7/ADM) shed MVs that alter the characteristics of human microvessel endothelial cells (HMECs). MVs from tumor cells transferred a Ca{sup 2+}-permeable channel TrpC5 to HMECs, inducing the expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) by activation of the transcription factor NFATc3 (nuclear factor of activated T cells isoform c3). Expression of the mdr1 gene was blocked by the TrpC5-blocking antibody T5E3, and the production of P-gp in HMECs was reduced by blockade of TrpC5. Thus, we postulate that endothelial cells acquire the resistant protein upon exposure to TrpC5-containg MVs in the microenvironment, and express P-gp in the TrpC5–NFATc3 signal pathway.

  8. Grateloupia longifolia polysaccharide inhibits angiogenesis by downregulating tissue factor expression in HMEC-1 endothelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    ZHANG, Chao; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Xiong-Wen; Wang, Shun-Chun; Li, Mei-Hong; Lin, Li-Ping; Ding, Jian

    2006-01-01

    The antiangiogenic and antitumor properties of Grateloupia longifolia polysaccharide (GLP), a new type of polysaccharide isolated from the marine alga, were investigated with several in vitro and in vivo models. Possible mechanisms underlying its antiangiogenic activity were also assessed.GLP dose-dependently inhibited proliferation of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), with IC50 values of 0.86 and 0.64 mg ml−1, respectively. In ...

  9. Uterine microvascular sensitivity to nanomaterial inhalation: An in vivo assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapleton, P A; McBride, C R; Yi, J; Nurkiewicz, T R

    2015-11-01

    With the tremendous number and diverse applications of engineered nanomaterials incorporated in daily human activity, exposure can no longer be solely confined to occupational exposures of healthy male models. Cardiovascular and endothelial cell dysfunction have been established using in vitro and in situ preparations, but the translation to intact in vivo models is limited. Intravital microscopy has been used extensively to understand microvascular physiology while maintaining in vivo neurogenic, humoral, and myogenic control. However, a tissue specific model to assess the influences of nanomaterial exposure on female reproductive health has not been fully elucidated. Female Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were exposed to nano-TiO2 aerosols (171 ± 6 nm, 10.1 ± 0.39 mg/m(3), 5h) 24-hours prior to experimentation, leading to a calculated deposition of 42.0 ± 1.65 μg. After verifying estrus status, vital signs were monitored and the right horn of the uterus was exteriorized, gently secured over an optical pedestal, and enclosed in a warmed tissue bath using intravital microscopy techniques. After equilibration, significantly higher leukocyte-endothelium interactions were recorded in the exposed group. Arteriolar responsiveness was assessed using ionophoretically applied agents: muscarinic agonist acetylcholine (0.025 M; ACh; 20, 40, 100, and 200 nA), and nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside (0.05 M; SNP; 20, 40, and 100 nA), or adrenergic agonist phenylephrine (0.05 M; PE; 20, 40, and 100 nA) using glass micropipettes. Passive diameter was established by tissue superfusion with 10(-4)M adenosine. Similar to male counterparts, female SD rats present systemic microvascular dysfunction; however the ramifications associated with female health and reproduction have yet to be elucidated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Exercise training reverses age-induced diastolic dysfunction and restores coronary microvascular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotta, Kazuki; Chen, Bei; Behnke, Bradley J; Ghosh, Payal; Stabley, John N; Bramy, Jeremy A; Sepulveda, Jaime L; Delp, Michael D; Muller-Delp, Judy M

    2017-06-15

    training, IVRT, a measure of active ventricular relaxation, did not differ between old and young rats. In old rats, exercise training reversed the reduction in E/A, reduced aortic stiffness, and eliminated impairment of coronary blood flow responses and endothelium-dependent vasodilatation. Thus, age-related diastolic and microvascular dysfunction are reversed by late-life exercise training. The restorative effect of exercise training on coronary microvascular function may result from improved endothelial function. © 2017 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2017 The Physiological Society.

  11. Early systemic microvascular damage in pigs with atherogenic diabetes mellitus coincides with renal angiopoietin dysbalance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meriem Khairoun

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM is associated with a range of microvascular complications including diabetic nephropathy (DN. Microvascular abnormalities in the kidneys are common histopathologic findings in DN, which represent one manifestation of ongoing systemic microvascular damage. Recently, sidestream dark-field (SDF imaging has emerged as a noninvasive tool that enables one to visualize the microcirculation. In this study, we investigated whether changes in the systemic microvasculature induced by DM and an atherogenic diet correlated spatiotemporally with renal damage.Atherosclerotic lesion development was triggered in streptozotocin-induced DM pigs (140 mg/kg body weight by administering an atherogenic diet for approximately 11 months. Fifteen months following induction of DM, microvascular morphology was visualized in control pigs (n = 7, non-diabetic pigs fed an atherogenic diet (ATH, n = 5, and DM pigs fed an atherogenic diet (DM+ATH, n = 5 using SDF imaging of oral mucosal tissue. Subsequently, kidneys were harvested from anethesized pigs and the expression levels of well-established markers for microvascular integrity, such as Angiopoietin-1 (Angpt1 and Angiopoietin-2 (Angpt2 were determined immunohistochemically, while endothelial cell (EC abundance was determined by immunostaining for von Willebrand factor (vWF.Our study revealed an increase in the capillary tortuosity index in DM+ATH pigs (2.31±0.17 as compared to the control groups (Controls 0.89±0.08 and ATH 1.55±0.11; p<0.05. Kidney biopsies showed marked glomerular lesions consisting of mesangial expansion and podocyte lesions. Furthermore, we observed a disturbed Angpt2/Angpt1 balance in the cortex of the kidney, as evidenced by increased expression of Angpt2 in DM+ATH pigs as compared to Control pigs (p<0.05.In the setting of DM, atherogenesis leads to the augmentation of mucosal capillary tortuosity, indicative of systemic microvascular damage. Concomitantly, a dysbalance in

  12. Non-invasive evaluation of vasomotor and metabolic functions of microvascular endothelium in human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorovich, Andrey A

    2012-07-01

    Correlation between metabolic and microhemodynamic processes in skin was assessed through acute pharmacological test with metabolically active Actovegin in 28 healthy volunteers. Laser Doppler flowmetry in combination with wavelet analysis of blood flow oscillations was used to identify functional state of arteriolar-venular areas of microvascular bed in the right forearm skin; capillary blood flow parameters were assessed through computer capillaroscopy in the nail bed of the right hand on the 4th finger. The metabolic effect (improved oxygen uptake and glucose disposal by tissues) was accompanied by significant increase in endothelial rhythm amplitude by 98% (pendothelium. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A novel effective method for the assessment of microvascular function in male patients with coronary artery disease: a pilot study using laser speckle contrast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, J P; Lopes, G O; Verri, V; Coelho, M P; Nascimento, P M C; Kopiler, D A; Tibirica, E

    2016-09-01

    Evaluation of microvascular endothelial function is essential for investigating the pathophysiology and treatment of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Although laser speckle contrast imaging technology is well accepted as a noninvasive methodology for assessing microvascular endothelial function, it has never been used to compare male patients with coronary artery disease with male age-matched healthy controls. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine whether laser speckle contrast imaging could be used to detect differences in the systemic microvascular functions of patients with established cardiovascular disease (n=61) and healthy age-matched subjects (n=24). Cutaneous blood flow was assessed in the skin of the forearm using laser speckle contrast imaging coupled with the transdermal iontophoretic delivery of acetylcholine and post-occlusive reactive hyperemia. The maximum increase in skin blood flow induced by acetylcholine was significantly reduced in the cardiovascular disease patients compared with the control subjects (74 vs 116%; Pmicrovascular dysfunctions in male individuals with cardiovascular disease. Thus, this technology appears to be an efficient non-invasive technique for evaluating systemic microvascular and endothelial functions, which could be valuable as a peripheral marker of atherothrombotic diseases in men.

  14. Role of genetic polymorphisms of ion channels in the pathophysiology of coronary microvascular dysfunction and ischemic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedele, Francesco; Mancone, Massimo; Chilian, William M; Severino, Paolo; Canali, Emanuele; Logan, Suzanna; De Marchis, Maria Laura; Volterrani, Maurizio; Palmirotta, Raffaele; Guadagni, Fiorella

    2013-11-01

    Conventionally, ischemic heart disease (IHD) is equated with large vessel coronary disease. However, recent evidence has suggested a role of compromised microvascular regulation in the etiology of IHD. Because regulation of coronary blood flow likely involves activity of specific ion channels, and key factors involved in endothelium-dependent dilation, we proposed that genetic anomalies of ion channels or specific endothelial regulators may underlie coronary microvascular disease. We aimed to evaluate the clinical impact of single-nucleotide polymorphisms in genes encoding for ion channels expressed in the coronary vasculature and the possible correlation with IHD resulting from microvascular dysfunction. 242 consecutive patients who were candidates for coronary angiography were enrolled. A prospective, observational, single-center study was conducted, analyzing genetic polymorphisms relative to (1) NOS3 encoding for endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS); (2) ATP2A2 encoding for the Ca²⁺/H⁺-ATPase pump (SERCA); (3) SCN5A encoding for the voltage-dependent Na⁺ channel (Nav1.5); (4) KCNJ8 and KCNJ11 encoding for the Kir6.1 and Kir6.2 subunits of K-ATP channels, respectively; and (5) KCN5A encoding for the voltage-gated K⁺ channel (Kv1.5). No significant associations between clinical IHD manifestations and polymorphisms for SERCA, Kir6.1, and Kv1.5 were observed (p > 0.05), whereas specific polymorphisms detected in eNOS, as well as in Kir6.2 and Nav1.5 were found to be correlated with IHD and microvascular dysfunction. Interestingly, genetic polymorphisms for ion channels seem to have an important clinical impact influencing the susceptibility for microvascular dysfunction and IHD, independent of the presence of classic cardiovascular risk factors.

  15. Early gene response of human brain endothelial cells to Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The gene expression of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) to Listeria monocytogenes at 4 hour infection was analyzed. Four hours after infection, the expression of 456 genes of HBMEC had changed (p<0.05). We noted that many active genes were involved in the formyl-methionylleucylph...

  16. Label-free quantitative cell division monitoring of endothelial cells by digital holographic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Björn; Bauwens, Andreas; Vollmer, Angelika; Ketelhut, Steffi; Langehanenberg, Patrik; Müthing, Johannes; Karch, Helge; von Bally, Gert

    2010-05-01

    Digital holographic microscopy (DHM) enables quantitative multifocus phase contrast imaging for nondestructive technical inspection and live cell analysis. Time-lapse investigations on human brain microvascular endothelial cells demonstrate the use of DHM for label-free dynamic quantitative monitoring of cell division of mother cells into daughter cells. Cytokinetic DHM analysis provides future applications in toxicology and cancer research.

  17. Targeting tissue factor on tumour cells and angiogenic vascular endothelial cells by factor VII-targeted verteporfin photodynamic therapy for breast cancer in vitro and in vivo in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to develop a ligand-targeted photodynamic therapy (tPDT) by conjugating factor VII (fVII) protein with photosensitiser verteporfin in order to overcome the poor selectivity and enhance the effect of non-targeted PDT (ntPDT) for cancer. fVII is a natural ligand for receptor tissue factor (TF) with high affinity and specificity. The reason for targeting receptor TF for the development of tPDT is that TF is a common but specific target on angiogenic tumour vascular endothelial cells (VEC) and many types of tumour cells, including solid tumours and leukaemia. Methods Murine factor VII protein (mfVII) containing a mutation (Lys341Ala) was covalently conjugated via a cross linker EDC with Veterporfin (VP) that was extracted from liposomal Visudyne, and then free VP was separated by Sephadex G50 spin columns. fVII-tPDT using mfVII-VP conjugate, compared to ntPDT, was tested in vitro for the killing of breast cancer cells and VEGF-stimulated VEC and in vivo for inhibiting the tumour growth of breast tumours in a mouse xenograft model. Results We showed that: (i) fVII protein could be conjugated with VP without affecting its binding activity; (ii) fVII-tPDT could selectively kill TF-expressing breast cancer cells and VEGF-stimulated angiogenic HUVECs but had no side effects on non-TF expressing unstimulated HUVEC, CHO-K1 and 293 cells; (iii) fVII targeting enhanced the effect of VP PDT by three to four fold; (iii) fVII-tPDT induced significantly stronger levels of apoptosis and necrosis than ntPDT; and (iv) fVII-tPDT had a significantly stronger effect on inhibiting breast tumour growth in mice than ntPDT. Conclusions We conclude that the fVII-targeted VP PDT that we report here is a novel and effective therapeutic with improved selectivity for the treatment of breast cancer. Since TF is expressed on many types of cancer cells including leukaemic cells and selectively on angiogenic tumour VECs, fVII-tPDT could have broad

  18. Targeting tissue factor on tumour cells and angiogenic vascular endothelial cells by factor VII-targeted verteporfin photodynamic therapy for breast cancer in vitro and in vivo in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rao Benqiang

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this study was to develop a ligand-targeted photodynamic therapy (tPDT by conjugating factor VII (fVII protein with photosensitiser verteporfin in order to overcome the poor selectivity and enhance the effect of non-targeted PDT (ntPDT for cancer. fVII is a natural ligand for receptor tissue factor (TF with high affinity and specificity. The reason for targeting receptor TF for the development of tPDT is that TF is a common but specific target on angiogenic tumour vascular endothelial cells (VEC and many types of tumour cells, including solid tumours and leukaemia. Methods Murine factor VII protein (mfVII containing a mutation (Lys341Ala was covalently conjugated via a cross linker EDC with Veterporfin (VP that was extracted from liposomal Visudyne, and then free VP was separated by Sephadex G50 spin columns. fVII-tPDT using mfVII-VP conjugate, compared to ntPDT, was tested in vitro for the killing of breast cancer cells and VEGF-stimulated VEC and in vivo for inhibiting the tumour growth of breast tumours in a mouse xenograft model. Results We showed that: (i fVII protein could be conjugated with VP without affecting its binding activity; (ii fVII-tPDT could selectively kill TF-expressing breast cancer cells and VEGF-stimulated angiogenic HUVECs but had no side effects on non-TF expressing unstimulated HUVEC, CHO-K1 and 293 cells; (iii fVII targeting enhanced the effect of VP PDT by three to four fold; (iii fVII-tPDT induced significantly stronger levels of apoptosis and necrosis than ntPDT; and (iv fVII-tPDT had a significantly stronger effect on inhibiting breast tumour growth in mice than ntPDT. Conclusions We conclude that the fVII-targeted VP PDT that we report here is a novel and effective therapeutic with improved selectivity for the treatment of breast cancer. Since TF is expressed on many types of cancer cells including leukaemic cells and selectively on angiogenic tumour VECs, fVII-tPDT could have

  19. Current Diagnostic and Therapeutic Strategies in Microvascular Angina

    OpenAIRE

    Mumma, Bryn; Flacke, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Microvascular angina is common among patients with signs and symptoms of acute coronary syndrome and is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events. Unfortunately, microvascular is often under-recognized in clinical settings. The diagnosis of microvascular angina relies on assessment of the functional status of the coronary microvasculature. Invasive strategies include acetylcholine provocation, intracoronary Doppler ultrasound, and intracoronary thermodilut...

  20. Ubiquinol decreases hemorrhagic shock/resuscitation‐induced microvascular inflammation in rat mesenteric microcirculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Qiuhua; Holloway, Naomi; Thimmesch, Amanda; Wood, John G.; Clancy, Richard L.; Pierce, Janet D.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Hemorrhagic shock (HS) is a leading cause of death in traumatic injury. Ischemia and hypoxia in HS and fluid resuscitation (FR) creates a condition that facilitates excessive generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This is a major factor causing increased leukocyte‐endothelial cell adhesive interactions and inflammation in the microcirculation resulting in reperfusion tissue injury. The aim of this study was to determine if ubiquinol (coenzyme Q10) decreases microvascular inflammation following HS and FR. Intravital microscopy was used to measure leukocyte‐endothelial cell adhesive interactions in the rat mesentery following 1‐h of HS and 2‐h post FR with or without ubiquinol. Hemorrhagic shock was induced by removing ~ 40% of anesthetized Sprague Dawley rats' blood volume to maintain a mean arterial blood pressure mesenteric microcirculation through its antioxidant properties. PMID:25413319

  1. Ascorbate prevents microvascular dysfunction in the skeletal muscle of the septic rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, J; Tyml, K; Lidington, D; Wilson, J X

    2001-03-01

    Septic patients have low plasma ascorbate concentrations and compromised microvascular perfusion. The purpose of the present experiments was to determine whether ascorbate improves capillary function in volume-resuscitated sepsis. Cecal ligation and perforation (CLP) was performed on male Sprague-Dawley rats. The concentration of ascorbate in plasma and urine, mean arterial blood pressure, and density of continuously perfused capillaries in the extensor digitorum longus muscle were measured 24 h after surgery. CLP caused a 50% decrease (from 56 +/- 4 to 29 +/- 2 microM) in plasma ascorbate concentration, 1,000% increase (from 46 +/- 13 to 450 +/- 93 microM) in urine ascorbate concentration, 20% decrease (from 115 +/- 2 to 91 +/- 2 mmHg) in mean arterial pressure, and 30% decrease (from 24 +/- 1 to 17 +/- 1 capillaries/mm) in the density of perfused capillaries, compared with time-matched controls. A bolus of intravenous ascorbate (7.6 mg/100 g body wt) administered immediately after the CLP procedure increased plasma ascorbate concentration and restored both blood pressure and density of perfused capillaries to control levels. In vitro experiments showed that ascorbate (100 microM) inhibited replication of bacteria and prevented hydrogen peroxide injury to cultured microvascular endothelial cells. These results indicate that ascorbate is lost in the urine during sepsis and that a bolus of ascorbate can prevent microvascular dysfunction in the skeletal muscle of septic animals. Our study supports the view that ascorbate may be beneficial for patients with septic syndrome.

  2. Protective effects of vascular endothelial growth factor in cultured brain endothelial cells against hypoglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fei; Deng, Jiangshan; Yu, Xiaoyan; Li, Dawei; Shi, Hong; Zhao, Yuwu

    2015-08-01

    Hypoglycemia is a common and serious problem among patients with type 1 diabetes receiving treatment with insulin. Clinical studies have demonstrated that hypoglycemic edema is involved in the initiation of hypoglycemic brain damage. However, the mechanisms of this edema are poorly understood. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a potent regulator of blood vessel function, has been observed an important candidate hormone induced by hypoglycemia to protect neurons by restoring plasma glucose. Whether VEGF has a protective effect against hypoglycemia-induced damage in brain endothelial cells is still unknown. To investigate the effects of hypoglycemia on cerebral microvascular endothelial cells and assess the protective effect of exogenous VEGF on endothelial cells during hypoglycemia, confluent monolayers of the brain endothelial cell line bEnd.3 were treated with normal (5.5 mM glucose), hypoglycemic (0, 0.5, 1 mM glucose) medium or hypoglycemic medium in the presence of VEGF. The results clearly showed that hypoglycemia significantly downregulated the expression of claudin-5 in bEnd.3 cells, without affecting ZO-1 and occludin expression and distribution. Besides, transendothelial permeability significantly increased under hypoglycemic conditions compared to that under control conditions. Moreover, the hypoglycemic medium in presence of VEGF decreased endothelial permeability via the inhibition of claudin-5 degradation and improved hypoglycemia-induced cell toxicity. Furthermore, Glucose transporter-1 (Glut-1) and apoptosis regulator Bcl-2 expression were significantly upregulated. Taken together, hypoglycemia can significantly increase paraendocellular permeability by downregulating claudin-5 expression. We further showed that VEGF protected brain endothelial cells against hypoglycemia by enhancing glucose passage, reducing endothelial cell death, and ameliorating paraendocellular permeability.

  3. Anesthetic propofol overdose causes endothelial cytotoxicity in vitro and endothelial barrier dysfunction in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Ming-Chung [Institute of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Department of Anesthesiology, Chi Mei Medical Center, Liouying, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chia-Ling [Center of Infectious Disease and Signaling Research, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Yang, Tsan-Tzu; Choi, Pui-Ching [Institute of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Hsing, Chung-Hsi [Department of Anesthesiology, Chi Mei Medical Center, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Department of Anesthesiology, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chiou-Feng, E-mail: cflin@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Institute of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Center of Infectious Disease and Signaling Research, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China)

    2012-12-01

    An overdose and a prolonged treatment of propofol may cause cellular cytotoxicity in multiple organs and tissues such as brain, heart, kidney, skeletal muscle, and immune cells; however, the underlying mechanism remains undocumented, particularly in vascular endothelial cells. Our previous studies showed that the activation of glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3 is pro-apoptotic in phagocytes during overdose of propofol treatment. Regarding the intravascular administration of propofol, we therefore hypothesized that propofol overdose also induces endothelial cytotoxicity via GSK-3. Propofol overdose (100 μg/ml) inhibited growth in human arterial and microvascular endothelial cells. After treatment, most of the endothelial cells experienced caspase-independent necrosis-like cell death. The activation of cathepsin D following lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) determined necrosis-like cell death. Furthermore, propofol overdose also induced caspase-dependent apoptosis, at least in part. Caspase-3 was activated and acted downstream of mitochondrial transmembrane potential (MTP) loss; however, lysosomal cathepsins were not required for endothelial cell apoptosis. Notably, activation of GSK-3 was essential for propofol overdose-induced mitochondrial damage and apoptosis, but not necrosis-like cell death. Intraperitoneal administration of a propofol overdose in BALB/c mice caused an increase in peritoneal vascular permeability. These results demonstrate the cytotoxic effects of propofol overdose, including cathepsin D-regulated necrosis-like cell death and GSK-3-regulated mitochondrial apoptosis, on endothelial cells in vitro and the endothelial barrier dysfunction by propofol in vivo. Highlights: ► Propofol overdose causes apoptosis and necrosis in endothelial cells. ► Propofol overdose triggers lysosomal dysfunction independent of autophagy. ► Glycogen synthase kinase-3 facilitates propofol overdose-induced apoptosis. ► Propofol overdose causes an increase

  4. Estetrol modulates endothelial nitric oxide synthesis in human endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Magdalena eMontt-Guevara

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Estetrol (E4 is a natural human estrogen that is present at high concentrations during pregnancy. E4 has been reported to act as an endogenous estrogen receptor modulator, exerting estrogenic actions on the endometrium or the central nervous system but presenting antagonistic effects on the breast. Due to these characteristics, E4 is currently being developed for a number of clinical applications, including contraception and menopausal hormone therapy. Endothelial nitric oxide (NO is a key player for vascular function and disease during pregnancy and throughout ageing in women. Endothelial NO is an established target of estrogens that enhance its formation in human endothelial cells. We here addressed the effects of E4 on the activity and expression of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC. E4 stimulated the activation of eNOS and NO secretion in HUVEC. E4 was significantly less effective compared to E2 and a peculiar concentration-dependent effect was found, with higher amounts of E4 being less effective than lower concentrations. When E2 was combined with E4, an interesting pattern was noted. E4 antagonized NO synthesis induced by pregnancy-like E2 concentrations. However, E4 did not impede the modest induction of NO synthesis associated with postmenopausal-like E2 levels. These results support the hypothesis that E4 may be a regulator of NO synthesis in endothelial cells and raise questions on its peculiar signaling in this context. Our results may be useful to interpret the role of E4 during human pregnancy and possibly to help develop this interesting steroid for clinical use.

  5. Reduced systemic microvascular density and reactivity in individuals with early onset coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibirica, Eduardo; Souza, Elaine G; De Lorenzo, Andrea; Oliveira, Glaucia M M

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to test whether patients with early-onset coronary artery disease (EOCAD, n=30) showed systemic microvascular rarefaction and endothelial dysfunction in comparison to age- and sex-matched healthy controls (CTL, n=30), as evaluated by skin video-capillaroscopy. Functional capillary density (FCD) was defined as the number of spontaneously perfused capillaries per square millimeter of skin area and assessed by high-resolution intra-vital color microscopy in the dorsum of the middle phalanx. Capillary recruitment (capillary reserve) was evaluated using post-occlusive reactive hyperemia (PORH) after arm ischemia for 3min. The mean capillary density at rest was significantly reduced in patients with EOCAD compared to controls (CTL 95±20 and EOCAD 80±18capillaries/mm(2), P=0.0040). During PORH, capillary density was also markedly reduced in EOCAD patients (CTL 96±18 and EOCAD 71±20capillaries/mm(2), Pmicrovascular endothelial function. Thus, the early detection of these microvascular alterations in young adults at an increased risk of coronary artery disease could be useful as a surrogate marker of subclinical atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Regulation of VCAM-1 expression and involvement in cell adhesion to murine microvascular endothelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereta, J; Bereta, M; Cohen, S; Cohen, M C

    1993-04-01

    The present studies were undertaken to examine the regulation of murine VCAM-1 expression and the involvement of this molecule in adhesive processes occurring on the surface of microvascular endothelium. Flow cytometric analyses revealed that murine microvascular endothelium (MME) in culture constitutively expresses VCAM-1 and that stimulation of MME by TNF, IL-1, or LPS, but not by PMA or staurosporine, strongly increased the surface expression of this cell adhesion molecule. Stimulation of VCAM-1 expression by TNF may be diminished by ionomycin as well as by inhibitors of protein kinases (H-7 and sangivamycin). However, TGF-beta, which strongly inhibited the adhesiveness of endothelium, had little effect on the expression of VCAM-1. A newly developed adhesion assay, based on the rosette technique, allowed us to distinguish between the adhesive properties of an individual endothelial cell and those of endothelial cell monolayers and demonstrated that inhibition of binding by TGF-beta resulted primarily from its influence on the adhesive properties of individual cells. Studies on the inhibition of cell binding by monoclonal antibodies against mouse VCAM-1 and mouse VLA-4 indicated that VCAM-1 plays a dominant role in mediating the adherence of a variety of cell types, including murine splenocytes and thymocytes, P815 mastocytoma cells, PT 18 mast/basophil cells, human Molt-4 cells, and human eosinophils, to cytokine-activated MME.

  7. Diabetes Mellitus-Induced Microvascular Destabilization in the Myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkel, Rabea; Howe, Andrea; Renner, Simone; Ng, Judy; Lee, Seungmin; Klett, Katharina; Kaczmarek, Veronika; Moretti, Alessandra; Laugwitz, Karl-Ludwig; Skroblin, Philipp; Mayr, Manuel; Milting, Hendrik; Dendorfer, Andreas; Reichart, Bruno; Wolf, Eckhard; Kupatt, Christian

    2017-01-17

    Diabetes mellitus causes microcirculatory rarefaction and may impair the responsiveness of ischemic myocardium to proangiogenic factors. This study sought to determine whether microvascular destabilization affects organ function and therapeutic neovascularization in diabetes mellitus. The authors obtained myocardial samples from patients with end-stage heart failure at time of transplant, with or without diabetes mellitus. Diabetic (db) and wild-type (wt) pigs were used to analyze myocardial vascularization and function. Chronic ischemia was induced percutaneously (day 0) in the circumflex artery. At day 28, recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) (5 × 10(12) viral particles encoding vascular endothelial growth factor-A [VEGF-A] or thymosin beta 4 [Tβ4]) was applied regionally. CD31+ capillaries per high power field (c/hpf) and NG2+ pericyte coverage were analyzed. Global myocardial function (ejection fraction [EF] and left ventricular end-diastolic pressure) was assessed at days 28 and 56. Diabetic human myocardial explants revealed capillary rarefaction and pericyte loss compared to nondiabetic explants. Hyperglycemia in db pigs, even without ischemia, induced capillary rarefaction in the myocardium (163 ± 14 c/hpf in db vs. 234 ± 8 c/hpf in wt hearts; p myocardium. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Microvascular Coronary Dysfunction in Women- Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothawade, Kamlesh; Merz, C. Noel Bairey

    2011-01-01

    Women exhibit a greater symptom burden, more functional disability, and a higher prevalence of no obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) compared to men when evaluated for signs and symptoms of myocardial ischemia. Microvascular Coronary Dysfunction (MCD) defined as limited coronary flow reserve (CFR) and/or coronary endothelial dysfunction is the predominant etiological mechanism of ischemia in women with the triad of persistent chest pain, no obstructive CAD, and ischemia evidenced by stress testing. Evidence shows that approximately 50% of these patients have physiologic evidence of MCD. MCD is associated with a 2.5% annual major adverse event rate that includes death, nonfatal MI, nonfatal stroke and congestive heart failure. Although tests such as adenosine stress cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) may be a useful non-invasive method to predict subendocardial ischemia, the gold standard test to diagnose MCD is an invasive Coronary Reactivity Testing (CRT). Early identification of MCD by CRT may be beneficial in prognostication and stratifying these patients for optimal medical therapy. Currently, understanding of MCD pathophysiology can be used to guide diagnosis and therapy. Continued research in MCD is needed to further advance our understanding. PMID:21723447

  9. Microvascular coronary dysfunction in women: pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothawade, Kamlesh; Bairey Merz, C Noel

    2011-08-01

    Women exhibit a greater symptom burden, more functional disability, and a higher prevalence of no obstructive coronary artery disease compared to men when evaluated for signs and symptoms of myocardial ischemia. Microvascular coronary dysfunction (MCD), defined as limited coronary flow reserve and/or coronary endothelial dysfunction, is the predominant etiologic mechanism of ischemia in women with the triad of persistent chest pain, no obstructive coronary artery disease, and ischemia evidenced by stress testing. Evidence shows that approximately 50% of these patients have physiological evidence of MCD. MCD is associated with a 2.5% annual major adverse event rate that includes death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, nonfatal stroke, and congestive heart failure. Although tests such as adenosine stress cardiac magnetic resonance imaging may be a useful noninvasive method to predict subendocardial ischemia, the gold standard test to diagnose MCD is an invasive coronary reactivity testing. Early identification of MCD by coronary reactivity testing may be beneficial in prognostication and stratifying these patients for optimal medical therapy. Currently, understanding of MCD pathophysiology can be used to guide diagnosis and therapy. Continued research in MCD is needed to further advance our understanding. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Diabetic microvascular complications: possible targets for improved macrovascular outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijan Roshan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available John A D’Elia1, George Bayliss1,2, Bijan Roshan1, Manish Maski1, Ray E Gleason1, Larry A Weinrauch11Renal Unit, Joslin Diabetes Center, Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; 2Department of Medicine, Rhode Island Hospital, Alpert School of Medicine, Brown University, Providence, RI, USAAbstract: The results of recent outcome trials challenge hypotheses that tight control of both glycohemoglobin and blood pressure diminishes macrovascular events and survival among type 2 diabetic patients. Relevant questions exist regarding the adequacy of glycohemoglobin alone as a measure of diabetes control. Are we ignoring mechanisms of vasculotoxicity (profibrosis, altered angiogenesis, hypertrophy, hyperplasia, and endothelial injury inherent in current antihyperglycemic medications? Is the polypharmacy for lowering cholesterol, triglyceride, glucose, and systolic blood pressure producing drug interactions that are too complex to be clinically identified? We review angiotensin–aldosterone mechanisms of tissue injury that magnify microvascular damage caused by hyperglycemia and hypertension. Many studies describe interruption of these mechanisms, without hemodynamic consequence, in the preservation of function in type 1 diabetes. Possible interactions between the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system and physiologic glycemic control (through pulsatile insulin release suggest opportunities for further clinical investigation.Keywords: angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, pulsatile insulin, diabetic nephropathy, cardiac autonomic neuropathy, podocytes, beta cells 

  11. Uric acid is associated with inflammation, coronary microvascular dysfunction, and adverse outcomes in postmenopausal women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Megha; Matteson, Eric L.; Herrmann, Joerg; Gulati, Rajiv; Rihal, Charanjit S.; Lerman, Lilach O.; Lerman, Amir

    2016-01-01

    Uric acid is a risk factor for coronary artery disease (CAD) in postmenopausal women but the association with inflammation and coronary microvascular endothelial dysfunction (CED) is not well-defined. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship of serum uric acid (SUA), inflammatory markers and CED. In this prospective cohort study, serum uric acid, hsCRP levels, and neutrophil count were measured in 229 postmenopausal women who underwent diagnostic catheterization, were found to have no obstructive CAD and underwent coronary microvascular function testing, to measure coronary blood flow (CBF) response to intracoronary acetylcholine. The average age was 58 years (IQR 52, 66) years. Hypertension was present in 48%, type 2 diabetes mellitus in 5.6%, and hyperlipidemia in 61.8%. CED was diagnosed in 59% of postmenopausal women. Mean uric acid level was 4.7 ± 1.3 mg/dL. Postmenopausal women with CED had significantly higher SUA compared to patients without CED (4.9 ± 1.3 vs. 4.4 ± 1.3 mg/dL; p=0.02). There was a significant correlation between SUA and % change in CBF to acetylcholine (p=0.009), and this correlation persisted in multivariable analysis. SUA levels were significantly associated with increased neutrophil count (p=0.02) and hsCRP levels (p=0.006) among patients with CED, but not those without CED. Serum uric acid is associated with coronary microvascular endothelial dysfunction in postmenopausal women and may be related to inflammation. These findings link serum uric acid levels to early coronary atherosclerosis in postmenopausal women. PMID:27993955

  12. The impact of early aerobic exercise on brain microvascular alterations induced by cerebral hypoperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leardini-Tristão, Marina; Borges, Juliana Pereira; Freitas, Felipe; Rangel, Raquel; Daliry, Anissa; Tibiriçá, Eduardo; Estato, Vanessa

    2017-02-15

    The therapeutic potential of early exercise training following cerebral hypoperfusion was investigated on brain perfusion and inflammation in rats with permanent bilateral occlusion of the common carotid arteries (2VO). Wistar rats were subjected to 2VO or sham surgery and each group was then subdivided randomly into sedentary or exercise groups. Early exercise training was initiated after three days of 2VO or sham surgery and consisted of seven days of treadmill training (30min/day at ∼60% of maximal exercise test), composing four groups: 1) Sham sedentary (Sham-Sed), 2) Sham exercised (Sham-Ex), 3) 2VO sedentary (2VO-Sed) and 4) 2VO exercised (2VO-Ex). Microvascular cerebral blood flow (MCBF) and NADPH oxidase and eNOS gene expression were evaluated by laser speckle contrast imaging and RT-PCR, respectively, and brain functional capillary density and endothelial-leukocyte interactions were evaluated by fluorescence intravital video-microscopy. The 2VO-Sed group presented a decrease in MCBF (Sham-Sed: 230.9±12.2 vs. 2VO-Sed: 183.6±10.6 arbitrary perfusion units, Pphysical exercise was able to prevent the cerebral microvascular inflammation by decreasing endothelial-leukocyte interactions (2VO-Ex: 0.9±0.3 vs. 2VO-Sed: 5±0.6cells/min/100μm, Pbrain NADPH oxidase gene expression (2VO-Ex: 1.7±0.1 arbitrary units, Pphysical exercise may represent a means of preventing the microvascular alterations induced by chronic cerebral hypoperfusion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Neutralizing Endogenous VEGF Following Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury Modulates Microvascular Plasticity but not Tissue Sparing or Functional Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, Richard L.; Maddie, Melissa A.; Gruenthal, Mark J.; Hagg, Theo; Whittemore, Scott R.

    2010-01-01

    Acute loss of spinal cord vascularity followed by an endogenous adaptive angiogenic response with concomitant microvascular dysfunction is a hallmark of traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). Recently, the potent vasoactive factor vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has received much attention as a putative therapeutic for the treatment of various neurodegenerative disorders, including SCI. Exogenous VEGF exerts both protective and destabilizing effects on microvascular elements and tissue following SCI but the role of endogenous VEGF is unclear. In the present study, we systemically applied a potent and well characterized soluble VEGF antagonist to adult C57Bl/6 mice post-SCI to elucidate the relative contribution of VEGF on the acute evolving microvascular response and its impact on functional recovery. While the VEGF Trap did not alter vascular density in the injury epicenter or penumbra, an overall increase in the number of Griffonia simplicifolia isolectin-B4 bound microvessels was observed, suggesting a VEGF-dependency to more subtle aspects of endothelial plasticity post-SCI. Neutralizing endogenous VEGF neither attenuated nor exacerbated chronic histopathology or functional recovery. These results support the idea that overall, endogenous VEGF is not neuroprotective or detrimental following traumatic SCI. Furthermore, they suggest that angiogenesis in traumatically injured spinal tissue is regulated by multiple effectors and is not limited by endogenous VEGF activation of affected spinal microvessels. PMID:19442162

  14. Endothelial dysfunction, ambulatory pulse pressure and albuminuria are associated in Type 2 diabetic subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Søren Tang; Jeppesen, Peter; Frederiksen, Christian Alcaraz

    2007-01-01

    examined. We examined the relation between PP, markers of endothelial activation and albuminuria in Type 2 diabetic patients. METHODS: In 46 Type 2 diabetic patients and 19 non-diabetic subjects, we performed 24-h ambulatory blood pressure (AMBP) monitoring. Urinary albumin excretion rate was measured......: Increased PP is associated with endothelial activation and albuminuria in Type 2 diabetic patients. Thus, endothelial dysfunction may represent a pathophysiological link between an elevated PP and microvascular complications in these subjects. Prospective studies are needed to further elucidate...

  15. αB-crystallin: a Novel Regulator of Breast Cancer Metastasis to the Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malin, Dmitry; Strekalova, Elena; Petrovic, Vladimir; Deal, Allison M.; Ahmad, Abraham Al; Adamo, Barbara; Miller, C. Ryan; Ugolkov, Andrey; Livasy, Chad; Fritchie, Karen; Hamilton, Erika; Blackwell, Kimberly; Geradts, Joseph; Ewend, Matt; Carey, Lisa; Shusta, Eric V.; Anders, Carey K.; Cryns, Vincent L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Basal-like breast tumors are typically (ER/PR/HER2) triple-negative and are associated with a high incidence of brain metastases and poor clinical outcomes. The molecular chaperone αB-crystallin is predominantly expressed in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) and contributes to an aggressive tumor phenotype in preclinical models. We investigated the potential role of αB-crystallin in brain metastasis in TNBC. Experimental Design αB-crystallin expression in primary breast carcinomas and brain metastases was analyzed by immunohistochemistry among breast cancer patients with brain metastases. αB-crystallin was overexpressed or silenced in two different TNBC cell lines. The effects on cell adhesion to human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs) or extracellular matrix proteins, transendothelial migration, and transmigration across a HBMEC/astrocyte co-culture blood-brain barrier (BBB) model were examined. Additionally, the effects of overexpressing or silencing αB-crystallin on brain metastasis in vivo were investigated using orthotopic TNBC models. Results In a cohort of women with breast cancer brain metastasis, αB-crystallin expression in primary breast carcinomas was associated with poor overall survival and poor survival after brain metastasis, even among TNBC patients. Stable overexpression of αB-crystallin in TNBC cells enhanced adhesion to HBMECs, transendothelial migration, and BBB transmigration in vitro, while silencing αB-crystallin inhibited these events. αB-crystallin promoted adhesion of TNBC cells to HBMECs at least in part through an α3β1 integrin-dependent mechanism. αB-crystallin overexpression promoted brain metastasis, while silencing αB-crystallin inhibited brain metastasis in orthotopic TNBC models. Conclusion αB-crystallin is a novel regulator of brain metastasis in TNBC and represents a potential biomarker and drug target for this aggressive disease. PMID:24132917

  16. Effect of the glucagon-like peptide-1 analogue liraglutide on coronary microvascular function in patients with type 2 diabetes – a randomized, single-blinded, cross-over pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, Rebekka; Zander, Mette; Pena, Adam

    2015-01-01

    dipyridamole induced stress. Peripheral microvascular endothelial function was assessed by Endo-PAT2000®. Interventions were compared by two-sample t-test after ensuring no carry over effect. RESULTS: A total of 24 patients were included. Twenty patients completed the study (15 male; mean age 57 ± 9; mean BMI...

  17. Selective expression of erg isoforms in human endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewett, P W; Nishi, K; Daft, E L; Clifford Murray, J

    2001-04-01

    Erg and Fli-1 are closely related members of the ets family of transcription factors. There are at least five human Erg isoforms (Erg-1, Erg-2, Erg-3/p55(Erg), p49(Erg) and p38(Erg)) produced through differential mRNA splicing and alternative use of translational start codons. However, relatively little is known about the expression or function of these isoforms in vitro or their distribution in vivo. We used RT-PCR to screen a panel of primary and established human cell lines for erg and fli-1 consensus sequences. Whilst fli-1 was expressed in several human cell types, erg was detected mainly in endothelial cells. To identify which erg isoforms are expressed in endothelial cells we used RT-PCR, Northern blotting and 5'-RACE. Erg-3/p55(Erg) and p38(Erg)/p38(Erg)-like transcripts were detected in both microvascular and large vessel endothelial cells affinity-purified from different vascular beds. Moreover, these erg isoforms were present in both freshly isolated, and confluent endothelial cells following several passages in culture, indicating that endothelial erg expression in vitro may be broadly representative of that in vivo. The selective expression of the Erg-3/p55(Erg) and p38(Erg)/p38(Erg)-like isoforms in endothelial cells indicates their involvement in the regulation of endothelial-restricted genes.

  18. Globotriaosylsphingosine accumulation and not alpha-galactosidase-A deficiency causes endothelial dysfunction in Fabry disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Namdar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fabry disease (FD is caused by a deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme alpha-galactosidase A (GLA resulting in the accumulation of globotriaosylsphingosine (Gb3 in a variety of tissues. While GLA deficiency was always considered as the fulcrum of the disease, recent attention shifted towards studying the mechanisms through which Gb3 accumulation in vascular cells leads to endothelial dysfunction and eventually multiorgan failure. In addition to the well-described macrovascular disease, FD is also characterized by abnormalities of microvascular function, which have been demonstrated by measurements of myocardial blood flow and coronary flow reserve. To date, the relative importance of Gb3 accumulation versus GLA deficiency in causing endothelial dysfunction is not fully understood; furthermore, its differential effects on cardiac micro- and macrovascular endothelial cells are not known. METHODS AND RESULTS: In order to assess the effects of Gb3 accumulation versus GLA deficiency, human macro- and microvascular cardiac endothelial cells (ECs were incubated with Gb3 or silenced by siRNA to GLA. Gb3 loading caused deregulation of several key endothelial pathways such as eNOS, iNOS, COX-1 and COX-2, while GLA silencing showed no effects. Cardiac microvascular ECs showed a greater susceptibility to Gb3 loading as compared to macrovascular ECs. CONCLUSIONS: Deregulation of key endothelial pathways as observed in FD vasculopathy is likely caused by intracellular Gb3 accumulation rather than deficiency of GLA. Human microvascular ECs, as opposed to macrovascular ECs, seem to be affected earlier and more severely by Gb3 accumulation and this notion may prove fundamental for future progresses in early diagnosis and management of FD patients.

  19. Peptides Derived from Type IV Collagen, CXC Chemokines, and Thrombospondin-1 Domain-Containing Proteins Inhibit Neovascularization and Suppress Tumor Growth in MDA-MB-231 Breast Cancer Xenografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob E. Koskimaki

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis or neovascularization, the process of new blood vessel formation from preexisting microvasculature, involves interactions among several cell types including parenchymal, endothelial cells, and immune cells. The formation of new vessels is tightly regulated by a balance between endogenous proangiogenic and antiangiogenic factors to maintain homeostasis in tissue; tumor progression and metastasis in breast cancer have been shown to be angiogenesis-dependent. We previously introduced a systematic methodology to identify putative endogenous antiangiogenic peptides and validated these predictions in vitro in human umbilical vein endothelial cell proliferation and migration assays. These peptides are derived from several protein families including type IV collagen, CXC chemokines, and thrombospondin-1 domain-containing proteins. On the basis of the results from the in vitro screening, we have evaluated the ability of one peptide selected from each family named pentastatin-1, chemokinostatin-1, and properdistatin, respectively, to suppress angiogenesis in an MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer orthotopic xenograft model in severe combined immunodeficient mice. Peptides were administered intraperitoneally once per day. We have demonstrated significant suppression of tumor growth in vivo and subsequent reductions in microvascular density, indicating the potential of these peptides as therapeutic agents for breast cancer.

  20. Hyperglycemia and Diabetes Downregulate the Functional Expression of TRPV4 Channels in Retinal Microvascular Endothelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaghan, Kevin; McNaughten, Jennifer; McGahon, Mary K.; Kelly, Catriona; Kyle, Daniel; Yong, Phaik Har

    2015-01-01

    Retinal endothelial cell dysfunction is believed to play a key role in the etiology and pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. Numerous studies have shown that TRPV4 channels are critically involved in maintaining normal endothelial cell function. In the current paper, we demonstrate that TRPV4 is functionally expressed in the endothelium of the retinal microcirculation and that both channel expression and activity is downregulated by hyperglycaemia. Quantitative PCR and immunostaining demonstrated molecular expression of TRPV4 in cultured bovine retinal microvascular endothelial cells (RMECs). Functional TRPV4 activity was assessed in cultured RMECs from endothelial Ca2+-responses recorded using fura-2 microfluorimetry and electrophysiological recordings of membrane currents. The TRPV4 agonist 4α-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate (4-αPDD) increased [Ca2+]i in RMECs and this response was largely abolished using siRNA targeted against TRPV4. These Ca2+-signals were completely inhibited by removal of extracellular Ca2+, confirming their dependence on influx of extracellular Ca2+. The 4-αPDD Ca2+-response recorded in the presence of cyclopiazonic acid (CPA), which depletes the intracellular stores preventing any signal amplification through store release, was used as a measure of Ca2+-influx across the cell membrane. This response was blocked by HC067047, a TRPV4 antagonist. Under voltage clamp conditions, the TRPV4 agonist GSK1016790A stimulated a membrane current, which was again inhibited by HC067047. Following incubation with 25mM D-glucose TRPV4 expression was reduced in comparison with RMECs cultured under control conditions, as were 4αPDD-induced Ca2+-responses in the presence of CPA and ion currents evoked by GSK1016790A. Molecular expression of TRPV4 in the retinal vascular endothelium of 3 months’ streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats was also reduced in comparison with that in age-matched controls. We conclude that hyperglycaemia and diabetes reduce the

  1. Invasive assessment of coronary microvascular dysfunction in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: the index of microvascular resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutiérrez-Barrios, Alejandro, E-mail: aleklos@hotmail.com [Cardiology Department, Jerez Hospital, Jerez (Spain); Camacho-Jurado, Francisco [Cardiology Department, Punta Europa Hospital, Algeciras (Spain); Díaz-Retamino, Enrique; Gamaza-Chulián, Sergio; Agarrado-Luna, Antonio; Oneto-Otero, Jesús; Del Rio-Lechuga, Ana; Benezet-Mazuecos, Javier [Cardiology Department, Jerez Hospital, Jerez (Spain)

    2015-10-15

    Summary: We present a review of microvascular dysfunction in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and an interesting case of a symptomatic familial HCM patient with inducible ischemia by single photon emission computed tomography. Coronary angiography revealed normal epicardial arteries. Pressure wire measurements of fractional flow reserve (FFR), coronary flow reserve (CFR) and index of microvascular resistance (IMR) demonstrated a significant microcirculatory dysfunction. This is the first such case that documents this abnormality invasively using the IMR. The measurement of IMR, a novel marker of microcirculatory dysfunction, provides novel insights into the pathophysiology of this condition. - Highlights: • Microvascular dysfunction is a common feature in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and represents a strong predictor of unfavorable outcome and cardiovascular mortality. • The index of microvascular resistance (IMR) is a new method for invasively assessing the state of the coronary microcirculation using a single pressure-temperature sensor-tipped coronary wire. • However assessment of IMR in HCM has not been previously reported. We report a case in which microvascular dysfunction is assessed by IMR. This index may be useful in future researches of HCM.

  2. Obligatory role of hyperaemia and shear stress in microvascular adaptation to repeated heating in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Daniel J; Carter, Howard H; Fitzsimons, Matthew G; Cable, N Timothy; Thijssen, Dick H J; Naylor, Louise H

    2010-05-01

    The endothelium, a single layer of cells lining the entire circulatory system, plays a key role in maintaining vascular health. Endothelial dysfunction independently predicts cardiovascular events and improvement in endothelial function is associated with decreased vascular risk. Previous studies have suggested that exercise training improves endothelial function in macrovessels, a benefit mediated via repeated episodic increases in shear stress. However, less is known of the effects of shear stress modulation in microvessels. In the present study we examined the hypothesis that repeated skin heating improves cutaneous microvascular vasodilator function via a shear stress-dependent mechanism. We recruited 10 recreationally active males who underwent bilateral forearm immersion in warm water (42 degrees C), 3 times per week for 30 min. During these immersion sessions, shear stress was manipulated in one arm by inflating a pneumatic cuff to 100 mmHg, whilst the other arm remained uncuffed. Vasodilatation to local heating, a NO-dependent response assessed using laser Doppler, improved across the 8 week intervention period in the uncuffed arm (cutaneous vascular conductance week 0 vs. week 4 at 41 degrees C: 1.37 +/- 0.45 vs. 2.0 +/- 0.91 units, P = 0.04; 42 degrees C: 2.06 +/- 0.45 vs. 2.68 +/- 0.83 units; P = 0.04), whereas no significant changes were evident in the cuffed arm. We conclude that increased blood flow, and the likely attendant increase in shear stress, is a key physiological stimulus for enhancing microvascular vasodilator function in humans.

  3. Perturbation of the microvascular glycocalyx and perfusion in infants after cardiopulmonary bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussbaum, Claudia; Haberer, Amelie; Tiefenthaller, Anna; Januszewska, Katarzyna; Chappell, Daniel; Brettner, Florian; Mayer, Peter; Dalla Pozza, Robert; Genzel-Boroviczény, Orsolya

    2015-12-01

    Perturbation of the endothelial glycocalyx is discussed in the pathogenesis of complications related to cardiopulmonary bypass. We evaluated the effects of cardiopulmonary bypass on the microcirculation and the microvascular endothelial glycocalyx of infants undergoing surgery for congenital cardiac defects. The microcirculation was visualized at the ear conch using Sidestream dark field imaging before surgery (T0), after admission to the intensive care unit (T1), 24 hours postsurgery (T2), and 7 days postsurgery (T3). Glycocalyx thickness was assessed by measurement of the perfused boundary region. Microcirculatory parameters included total and perfused vessel density, vessel diameters, and microcirculatory flow index. A total of 40 infants undergoing cardiac surgery (36 with cardiopulmonary bypass, 4 without cardiopulmonary bypass) were examined. As controls, measurements before and after cardiac catheterization (n = 6) and before and after surgery for cleft palate (n = 9) were performed. After surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass, the perfused boundary region was significantly increased, indicating reduced glycocalyx thickness at T1 compared with preoperative values with a stepwise return to baseline by T3. In the control groups, no significant perfused boundary region changes were noted. Furthermore, after cardiopulmonary bypass, a transient, significant reduction of the microcirculatory flow index and the perfused vessel density was seen at T1. Similar changes were observed after cardiac surgery without cardiopulmonary bypass, but not in the other controls. Our study reveals for the first time local perturbations of the endothelial glycocalyx and microvascular perfusion in infants after surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. Microcirculatory monitoring might be a useful tool to evaluate interventions aiming at reduction of bypass-related complications. Copyright © 2015 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Radionuclide assessment of pulmonary microvascular permeability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groeneveld, A.B.J. [Medical Intensive Care Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, Free University Hospital, De Boelelaan 1117, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1997-04-01

    The literature has been reviewed to evaluate the technique and clinical value of radionuclide measurements of microvascular permeability and oedema formation in the lungs. Methodology, modelling and interpretation vary widely among studies. Nevertheless, most studies agree on the fact that the measurement of permeability via pulmonary radioactivity measurements of intravenously injected radiolabelled proteins versus that in the blood pool, the so-called pulmonary protein transport rate (PTR), can assist the clinician in discriminating between permeability oedema of the lungs associated with the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and oedema caused by an increased filtration pressure, for instance in the course of cardiac disease, i.e. pressure-induced pulmonary oedema. Some of the techniques used to measure PTR are also able to detect subclinical forms of lung microvascular injury not yet complicated by permeability oedema. This may occur after cardiopulmonary bypass and major vascular surgery, for instance. By paralleling the clinical severity and course of the ARDS, the PTR method may also serve as a tool to evaluate new therapies for the syndrome. Taken together, the currently available radionuclide methods, which are applicable at the bedside in the intensive care unit, may provide a gold standard for detecting minor and major forms of acute microvascular lung injury, and for evaluating the severity, course and response to treatment. (orig.). With 2 tabs.

  5. Vascular endothelial growth factor is increased during the first 48 hours of human septic shock and correlates with vascular permeability.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pickkers, P.; Sprong, T.; Eijk, L.T. van; Hoeven, J.G. van der; Smits, P.; Deuren, M. van

    2005-01-01

    Meningococcal septic shock is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in children and young adults worldwide and is the prototypical gram-negative septic shock. One of the key factors in the development of shock is increased microvascular permeability. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)

  6. SAINT-liposome-polycation particles, a new carrier for improved delivery of siRNAs to inflamed endothelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kowalski, Piotr S.; Kuninty, Praneeth R.; Bijlsma, Klaas T.; Stuart, Marc C. A.; Leus, Niek G. J.; Ruiters, Marcel H. J.; Molema, Grietje; Kamps, Jan A. A. M.

    Interference with acute and chronic inflammatory processes by means of delivery of siRNAs into microvascular endothelial cells at a site of inflammation demands specific, non-toxic and effective siRNA delivery system. In the current work we describe the design and characterization of siRNA carriers

  7. Glyoxalase-1 overexpression reduces endothelial dysfunction and attenuates early renal impairment in a rat model of diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brouwers, Olaf; Niessen, Petra M G; Miyata, Toshio

    2014-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: In diabetes, advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) and the AGE precursor methylglyoxal (MGO) are associated with endothelial dysfunction and the development of microvascular complications. In this study we used a rat model of diabetes, in which rats transgenically overexpressed ...

  8. Uncoupling of eNOS contributes to redox-sensitive leukocyte recruitment and microvascular leakage elicited by methylglyoxal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yang; Qadri, Syed M; Hossain, Mokarram; Wu, Lingyun; Liu, Lixin

    2013-12-15

    Elevated levels of the glycolysis metabolite methylglyoxal (MG) have been implicated in impaired leukocyte-endothelial interactions and vascular complications in diabetes, putative mechanisms of which remain elusive. Uncoupling of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) was shown to be involved in endothelial dysfunction in diabetes. Whether MG contributes to these effects has not been elucidated. By using intravital microscopy in vivo, we demonstrate that MG-triggered reduction in leukocyte rolling velocity and increases in rolling flux, adhesion, emigration and microvascular permeability were significantly abated by scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS). In murine cremaster muscle, MG treatment reduced tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4)/total biopterin ratio, increased arginase expression and stimulated ROS and superoxide production. The latter was significantly blunted by ROS scavengers Tempol (300μM) or MnTBAP (300μM), by BH4 supplementation (100μM) or by NOS inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 20μM). In these tissues and cultured murine and human primary endothelial cells, MG increased eNOS monomerization and decreased BH4/total biopterin ratio, effects that were significantly mitigated by supplementation of BH4 or its precursor sepiapterin but not by L-NAME or tetrahydroneopterin, indicative of MG-triggered eNOS uncoupling. MG treatment further decreased the expression of guanosine triphosphate cyclohydrolase I in murine primary endothelial cells. MG-induced leukocyte recruitment was significantly attenuated by supplementation of BH4 or sepiapterin or suppression of superoxide by L-NAME confirming the role of eNOS uncoupling in MG-elicited leukocyte recruitment. Together, our study uncovers eNOS uncoupling as a pivotal mechanism in MG-induced oxidative stress, microvascular hyperpermeability and leukocyte recruitment in vivo. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. TNF-α stimulates endothelial palmitic acid transcytosis and promotes insulin resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenjing; Yang, Xiaoyan; Zheng, Tao; Xing, Shasha; Wu, Yaogong; Bian, Fang; Wu, Guangjie; Li, Ye; Li, Juyi; Bai, Xiangli; Wu, Dan; Jia, Xiong; Wang, Ling; Zhu, Lin; Jin, Si

    2017-01-01

    Persistent elevation of plasma TNF-α is a marker of low grade systemic inflammation. Palmitic acid (PA) is the most abundant type of saturated fatty acid in human body. PA is bound with albumin in plasma and could not pass through endothelial barrier freely. Albumin-bound PA has to be transported across monolayer endothelial cells through intracellular transcytosis, but not intercellular diffusion. In the present study, we discovered that TNF-α might stimulate PA transcytosis across cardiac microvascular endothelial cells, which further impaired the insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by cardiomyocytes and promoted insulin resistance. In this process, TNF-α-stimulated endothelial autophagy and NF-κB signaling crosstalk with each other and orchestrate the whole event, ultimately result in increased expression of fatty acid transporter protein 4 (FATP4) in endothelial cells and mediate the increased PA transcytosis across microvascular endothelial cells. Hopefully the present study discovered a novel missing link between low grade systemic inflammation and insulin resistance. PMID:28304381

  10. Multiple roles of protein kinase a in arachidonic acid-mediated Ca2+ entry and tumor-derived human endothelial cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorio Pla, Alessandra; Genova, Tullio; Pupo, Emanuela; Tomatis, Cristiana; Genazzani, Armando; Zaninetti, Roberta; Munaron, Luca

    2010-11-01

    We recently showed that arachidonic acid (AA) triggers calcium signals in endothelial cells derived from human breast carcinoma (B-TEC). In particular, AA-dependent Ca(2+) entry is involved in the early steps of tumor angiogenesis in vitro. Here, we investigated the multiple roles of the nitric oxide (NO) and cyclic AMP/protein kinase A (PKA) pathways in AA-mediated Ca(2+) signaling in the same cells. B-TEC stimulation with 5 μmol/L AA resulted in endothelial NO synthase (NOS) phosphorylation at Ser(1177), and NO release was measured with the fluorescent NO-sensitive probe DAR4M-AM. PKA inhibition by the use of the membrane-permeable PKA inhibitory peptide myristoylated PKI(14-22) completely prevented both AA- and NO-induced calcium entry and abolished B-TEC migration promoted by AA. AA-dependent calcium entry and cell migration were significantly affected by both the NOS inhibitor N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester and the NO scavenger 2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl 3-oxide, suggesting that NO release is functionally involved in the signaling dependent on AA. Moreover, pretreatment with carboxyamidotriazole, an antiangiogenic compound that interferes with agonist-activated calcium entry, prevented AA-dependent B-TEC motility. Interestingly, even in the absence of AA, enhancement of the cyclic AMP/PKA pathway with the adenylyl cyclase activator forskolin evoked a calcium entry dependent on NOS recruitment and NO release. The functional relevance of AA-induced calcium entry could be restricted to tumor-derived endothelial cells (EC) because AA evoked a smaller calcium entry in normal human microvascular ECs compared with B-TECs, and even more importantly, it was unable to promote cell motility in wound healing assay. This evidence opens an intriguing opportunity for differential pharmacologic treatment between normal and tumor-derived human ECs. ©2010 AACR.

  11. Direct ink writing of microvascular networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Willie

    Nature is replete with examples of embedded microvascular systems that enable efficient fluid flow and distribution for autonomic healing, cooling, and energy harvesting. The ability to incorporate microvascular networks in functional materials systems is therefore both scientifically and technologically important. In this PhD thesis, the direct-write assembly of planar and 3D biomimetic microvascular networks within polymer and hydrogel matrices is demonstrated. In addition, the influence of network design of fluid transport efficiency is characterized. Planar microvascular networks composed of periodic lattices of uniformal microchannels and hierarchical, branching architectures are constructed by direct-write assembly of a fugitive organic ink. Several advancements are required to facilitate their patterning, including pressure valving, dual ink printing, and dynamic pressure variation to allow tunable control of ink deposition. The hydraulic conductance is measured using a high pressure flow meter as a function of network design. For a constant vascular volume and areal coverage, 2- and 4-generation branched architectures that obey Murray's Law exhibited the highest hydraulic conductivity. These experimental observations are in good agreement with predictions made by analytic models. 3D microvascular networks are fabricated by omnidirectional printing a fugitive organic ink into a photopolymerizable hydrogel matrix that is capped with fluid filler of nearly identical composition. Using this approach, 3D networks of arbitrary design can be patterned. After ink deposition is complete, the matrix and fluid filler are chemically cross-linked via UV irradiation, and the ink is removed by liquefication. Aqueous solutions composed of a triblock copolymer of polyethylene oxide (PEO)-polypropylene oxide (PPO)-PEO constitute the materials system of choice due to their thermal- and concentration-dependent phase behavior. Specifically, the fugitive ink consists of a 23 w

  12. [Vascular endothelial growth factor secreted by breast cancer cells plays a critical role in the formation of pre-metastatic niche in the mouse lung].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ranran; Yuan, Bing; Zhang, Ying; Dai, Jianjian; Zhang, Pengfei; Fang, Feifei; Han, Mingyong

    2016-01-01

    To explore the formation of pre-metastatic niche in the mouse lung and to study the underlying molecular mechanisms whereby primary breast carcinoma-derived factors mediate recruitment of bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs) and affect the formation of pre-metastatic lung environment before the arrival of tumor cells. Mammary carcinoma 4T1 cells were inoculated into the mammary gland to construct mouse model of breast cancer. Confocal microscopy was used to detect the recruitment of BMDCs in the pre-metastatic lungs. The expression of factors in the mouse sera and 4T1 cell culture media was assayed using RayBio Custom mouse cytokine antibody array kit. The mice were injected daily with recombinant VEGF for 7 consecutive days to observe the effect of VEGF on BMDCs recruitment in the mouse lung. No BMDCs were observed in the lungs of control and 4T1-tumor-bearing mice on day 0. On day 7 and 14, clusters of BMDCs observed in the lungs of 4T1-tumor-bearing mice were 8.7±2.2/objective field and 48.8±3.2/objective field, respectively, significantly higher than those in the control mice (1.1±0.8/objective field and 3.1±1.7/objective field) (Pcancer cells preferentially facilitate BMDCs recruitment sites in the pre-metastatic mouse lungs. The levels of VEGF, GM-CSF, and IL-6 in the serum of 4T1-tumor-bearing mice were significantly increased compared with those in the control group (Pmouse lung tissue was (22.8±3.6)/objective field in the VEGF group and (3.1±0.4)/objective field in the control group (Pcancer cells can alter the lung microenvironment during the pre-metastatic phase and induce the formation of pre-metastatic niche. Primary tumor cell-derived VEGF may be a crucial factor responsible for the formation of pre-metastatic niche.

  13. Diode laser welding in microvascular applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reali, Umberto M.; Gelli, Riccardo; Giannotti, Vanni; D'Anna, M.; Pini, Roberto; Toncelli, F.; Vanni, U.

    1994-12-01

    In this work we report our experiences on diode laser-assisted end-to-end microvascular anastomosis performed on femoral arteries and veins of rats and rabbits at very low laser power (30 - 40 mW). In the course of our trials we approached laser anastomosis with a reduced number of permanent stays to decrease foreign body reaction. Recently we demonstrated the possibility to perform anastomosis without supporting stays. Significant improvements in comparison with traditional procedures were also furnished by histology examination, which showed a better healing process in LAMA cases.

  14. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase in the microcirculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Xiaohong; Keller, T C Stevenson; Begandt, Daniela; Butcher, Joshua T; Biwer, Lauren; Keller, Alexander S; Columbus, Linda; Isakson, Brant E

    2015-12-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS, NOS3) is responsible for producing nitric oxide (NO)--a key molecule that can directly (or indirectly) act as a vasodilator and anti-inflammatory mediator. In this review, we examine the structural effects of regulation of the eNOS enzyme, including post-translational modifications and subcellular localization. After production, NO diffuses to surrounding cells with a variety of effects. We focus on the physiological role of NO and NO-derived molecules, including microvascular effects on vessel tone and immune response. Regulation of eNOS and NO action is complicated; we address endogenous and exogenous mechanisms of NO regulation with a discussion of pharmacological agents used in clinical and laboratory settings and a proposed role for eNOS in circulating red blood cells.

  15. Zingiber officinale attenuates retinal microvascular changes in diabetic rats via anti-inflammatory and antiangiogenic mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dongare, Shirish; Mathur, Rajani; Saxena, Rohit; Mathur, Sandeep; Agarwal, Renu; Nag, Tapas C.; Srivastava, Sushma; Kumar, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Diabetic retinopathy is a common microvascular complication of long-standing diabetes. Several complex interconnecting biochemical pathways are activated in response to hyperglycemia. These pathways culminate into proinflammatory and angiogenic effects that bring about structural and functional damage to the retinal vasculature. Since Zingiber officinale (ginger) is known for its anti-inflammatory and antiangiogenic properties, we investigated the effects of its extract standardized to 5% 6-gingerol, the major active constituent of ginger, in attenuating retinal microvascular changes in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes. Methods Diabetic rats were treated orally with the vehicle or the ginger extract (75 mg/kg/day) over a period of 24 weeks along with regular monitoring of bodyweight and blood glucose and weekly fundus photography. At the end of the 24-week treatment, the retinas were isolated for histopathological examination under a light microscope, transmission electron microscopy, and determination of the retinal tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels. Results Oral administration of the ginger extract resulted in significant reduction of hyperglycemia, the diameter of the retinal vessels, and vascular basement membrane thickness. Improvement in the architecture of the retinal vasculature was associated with significantly reduced expression of NF-κB and reduced activity of TNF-α and VEGF in the retinal tissue in the ginger extract–treated group compared to the vehicle-treated group. Conclusions The current study showed that ginger extract containing 5% of 6-gingerol attenuates the retinal microvascular changes in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes through anti-inflammatory and antiangiogenic actions. Although precise molecular targets remain to be determined, 6-gingerol seems to be a potential candidate for further investigation. PMID:27293376

  16. Coronary microvascular disease as an early culprit in the pathophysiology of diabetes and metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labazi, Hicham; Trask, Aaron J

    2017-09-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a group of cardio-metabolic risk factors that includes obesity, insulin resistance, hypertension, and dyslipidemia; these are also a combination of independent coronary artery disease (CAD) risk factors. Alarmingly, the prevalence of MetS risk factors are increasing and a leading cause for mortality. In the vasculature, complications from MetS and type 2 diabetes (T2D) can be divided into microvascular (retinopathy and nephropathy) and macrovascular (cardiovascular diseases and erectile dysfunction). In addition to vascular and endothelial dysfunction, vascular remodeling and stiffness are also hallmarks of cardiovascular disease (CVD), and well-characterized vascular changes that are observed in the early stages of hypertension, T2D, and obesity [1-3]. In the heart, the link between obstructive atherosclerosis of coronary macrovessels and myocardial ischemia (MI) is well established. However, recent studies show that abnormalities in the coronary microcirculation are associated with functional and structural changes in coronary microvessels (classically defined as being ≤150-200μm internal diameter), which may cause or contribute to MI even in the absence of obstractive CAD. This suggests a prognostic value of an abnormal coronary microcirculation as an early sub-clinical culprit in the pathogenesis and progression of heart disease in T2D and MetS. The aim of this review is to summarize recent studies investigating the coronary microvascular remodeling in an early pre-atherosclerotic phase of MetS and T2D, and to explore potential mechanisms associated with the timing of coronary microvascular remodeling relative to that of the macrovasculature. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Zingiber officinale attenuates retinal microvascular changes in diabetic rats via anti-inflammatory and antiangiogenic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dongare, Shirish; Gupta, Suresh K; Mathur, Rajani; Saxena, Rohit; Mathur, Sandeep; Agarwal, Renu; Nag, Tapas C; Srivastava, Sushma; Kumar, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a common microvascular complication of long-standing diabetes. Several complex interconnecting biochemical pathways are activated in response to hyperglycemia. These pathways culminate into proinflammatory and angiogenic effects that bring about structural and functional damage to the retinal vasculature. Since Zingiber officinale (ginger) is known for its anti-inflammatory and antiangiogenic properties, we investigated the effects of its extract standardized to 5% 6-gingerol, the major active constituent of ginger, in attenuating retinal microvascular changes in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes. Diabetic rats were treated orally with the vehicle or the ginger extract (75 mg/kg/day) over a period of 24 weeks along with regular monitoring of bodyweight and blood glucose and weekly fundus photography. At the end of the 24-week treatment, the retinas were isolated for histopathological examination under a light microscope, transmission electron microscopy, and determination of the retinal tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels. Oral administration of the ginger extract resulted in significant reduction of hyperglycemia, the diameter of the retinal vessels, and vascular basement membrane thickness. Improvement in the architecture of the retinal vasculature was associated with significantly reduced expression of NF-κB and reduced activity of TNF-α and VEGF in the retinal tissue in the ginger extract-treated group compared to the vehicle-treated group. The current study showed that ginger extract containing 5% of 6-gingerol attenuates the retinal microvascular changes in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes through anti-inflammatory and antiangiogenic actions. Although precise molecular targets remain to be determined, 6-gingerol seems to be a potential candidate for further investigation.

  18. Venous gas emboli are involved in post-dive macro, but not microvascular dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrechts, Kate; Balestra, Costantino; Theron, Michaël; Henckes, Anne; Galinat, Hubert; Mignant, Fanny; Belhomme, Marc; Pontier, Jean-Michel; Guerrero, François

    2017-02-01

    Previous studies have shown vascular dysfunction of main conductance arteries and microvessels after diving. We aim to evaluate the impact of bubble formation on vascular function and haemostasis. To achieve this, we used a vibration preconditioning to influence bubble levels without changing any other parameters linked to the dive. Twentty-six divers were randomly assigned to one of three groups: (1) the "vibrations-dive" group (VD; n = 9) was exposed to a whole-body vibration session 30 min prior the dive; (2) the "diving" group (D; n = 9) served as a control for the effect of the diving protocol; (3) The "vibration" protocol (V; n = 8) allowed us to assess the effect of vibrations without diving. Macro- and microvascular function was assessed for each subject before and after the dive, subsequently. Bubble grades were monitored with Doppler according to the Spencer grading system. Blood was taken before and after the protocol to assess any change of platelets or endothelial function. Bubble formation was lower in the VD than the diving group. The other measured parameters remained unchanged after the "vibration" protocol alone. Diving alone induced macrovascular dysfunction, and increased PMP and thrombin generation. Those parameters were no longer changed in the VD group. Conversely, a microvascular dysfunction persists despite a significant decrease of circulating bubbles. Finally, the results of this study suggest that macro- but not microvascular impairment results at least partly from bubbles, possibly related to platelet activation and generation of pro-coagulant microparticles.

  19. Sialic acids regulate microvessel permeability, revealed by novel in vivo studies of endothelial glycocalyx structure and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betteridge, Kai B.; Arkill, Kenton P.; Neal, Christopher R.; Harper, Steven J.; Foster, Rebecca R.; Satchell, Simon C.; Bates, David O.

    2017-01-01

    Key points We have developed novel techniques for paired, direct, real‐time in vivo quantification of endothelial glycocalyx structure and associated microvessel permeability.Commonly used imaging and analysis techniques yield measurements of endothelial glycocalyx depth that vary by over an order of magnitude within the same vessel.The anatomical distance between maximal glycocalyx label and maximal endothelial cell plasma membrane label provides the most sensitive and reliable measure of endothelial glycocalyx depth.Sialic acid residues of the endothelial glycocalyx regulate glycocalyx structure and microvessel permeability to both water and albumin. Abstract The endothelial glycocalyx forms a continuous coat over the luminal surface of all vessels, and regulates multiple vascular functions. The contribution of individual components of the endothelial glycocalyx to one critical vascular function, microvascular permeability, remains unclear. We developed novel, real‐time, paired methodologies to study the contribution of sialic acids within the endothelial glycocalyx to the structural and functional permeability properties of the same microvessel in vivo. Single perfused rat mesenteric microvessels were perfused with fluorescent endothelial cell membrane and glycocalyx labels, and imaged with confocal microscopy. A broad range of glycocalyx depth measurements (0.17–3.02 μm) were obtained with different labels, imaging techniques and analysis methods. The distance between peak cell membrane and peak glycocalyx label provided the most reliable measure of endothelial glycocalyx anatomy, correlating with paired, numerically smaller values of endothelial glycocalyx depth (0.078 ± 0.016 μm) from electron micrographs of the same portion of the same vessel. Disruption of sialic acid residues within the endothelial glycocalyx using neuraminidase perfusion decreased endothelial glycocalyx depth and increased apparent solute permeability to albumin in the same

  20. Current Diagnostic and Therapeutic Strategies in Microvascular Angina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumma, Bryn; Flacke, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    Microvascular angina is common among patients with signs and symptoms of acute coronary syndrome and is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events. Unfortunately, microvascular is often under-recognized in clinical settings. The diagnosis of microvascular angina relies on assessment of the functional status of the coronary microvasculature. Invasive strategies include acetylcholine provocation, intracoronary Doppler ultrasound, and intracoronary thermodilution; noninvasive strategies include cardiac positron emission tomography (PET), cardiac magnetic resonance, and Doppler echocardiography. Once the diagnosis of microvascular angina is established, treatment is focused on improving symptoms and reducing future risk of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events. Pharmacologic options and lifestyle modifications for patients with microvascular angina are similar to those for patients with coronary artery disease. PMID:25685641

  1. Anesthetic Propofol Overdose Causes Vascular Hyperpermeability by Reducing Endothelial Glycocalyx and ATP Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ming-Chung; Lin, Chiou-Feng; Li, Chien-Feng; Sun, Ding-Ping; Wang, Li-Yun; Hsing, Chung-Hsi

    2015-01-01

    Prolonged treatment with a large dose of propofol may cause diffuse cellular cytotoxicity; however, the detailed underlying mechanism remains unclear, particularly in vascular endothelial cells. Previous studies showed that a propofol overdose induces endothelial injury and vascular barrier dysfunction. Regarding the important role of endothelial glycocalyx on the maintenance of vascular barrier integrity, we therefore hypothesized that a propofol overdose-induced endothelial barrier dysfunction is caused by impaired endothelial glycocalyx. In vivo, we intraperitoneally injected ICR mice with overdosed propofol, and the results showed that a propofol overdose significantly induced systemic vascular hyperpermeability and reduced the expression of endothelial glycocalyx, syndecan-1, syndecan-4, perlecan mRNA and heparan sulfate (HS) in the vessels of multiple organs. In vitro, a propofol overdose reduced the expression of syndecan-1, syndecan-4, perlecan, glypican-1 mRNA and HS and induced significant decreases in the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+)/NADH ratio and ATP concentrations in human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1). Oligomycin treatment also induced significant decreases in the NAD+/NADH ratio, in ATP concentrations and in syndecan-4, perlecan and glypican-1 mRNA expression in HMEC-1 cells. These results demonstrate that a propofol overdose induces a partially ATP-dependent reduction of endothelial glycocalyx expression and consequently leads to vascular hyperpermeability due to the loss of endothelial barrier functions. PMID:26023717

  2. Expansion of microvascular networks in vivo by phthalimide neovascular factor 1 (PNF1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieghaus, Kristen A; Nickerson, Meghan M; Petrie Aronin, Caren E; Sefcik, Lauren S; Price, Richard J; Paige, Mikell A; Brown, Milton L; Botchwey, Edward A

    2008-12-01

    Phthalimide neovascular factor (PNF1, formerly SC-3-149) is a potent stimulator of proangiogenic signaling pathways in endothelial cells. In this study, we evaluated the in vivo effects of sustained PNF1 release to promote ingrowth and expansion of microvascular networks surrounding biomaterial implants. The dorsal skinfold window chamber was used to evaluate the structural remodeling response of the local microvasculature. PNF1 was released from poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLAGA) films, and a transport model was utilized to predict PNF1 penetration into the surrounding tissue. PNF1 significantly expanded microvascular networks within a 2mm radius from implants after 3 and 7 days by increasing microvessel length density and lumenal diameter of local arterioles and venules. Staining of histological sections with CD11b showed enhanced recruitment of circulating white blood cells, including monocytes, which are critical for the process of vessel enlargement through arteriogenesis. As PNF1 has been shown to modulate MT1-MMP, a facilitator of CCL2 dependent leukocyte transmigration, aspects of window chamber experiments were repeated in CCR2(-/-) (CCL2 receptor) mouse chimeras to more fully explore the critical nature of monocyte recruitment on the therapeutic benefits of PNF1 function in vivo.

  3. Role of endothelin-1 and cyclic nucleotides in ischemia/reperfusion-mediated microvascular leak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, René; Chong, Terry; Curran, Brian; Victorino, Gregory P

    2006-03-01

    A consequence of ischemia/reperfusion (IR) is endothelial barrier dysfunction and intravascular volume loss. The purposes of our study are to explore the impact of: 1) cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) synthesis inhibition, 2) cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) synthesis inhibition, 3) treatment with endothelin-1, and 4) endothelin-1 (ET-1)-mediated cAMP changes on IR-induced fluid leak. We hypothesize that IR-mediated microvascular fluid leak results from increased cGMP activity and ET-1 decreases IR-induced fluid leak via cAMP. A micro-cannulation technique was used to determine fluid leak or hydraulic permeability (Lp) in rat mesenteric venules. Lp was measured during IR and after treatment with 1) cGMP synthesis inhibitor (LY83583,10 micromol/L) 2) cAMP synthesis inhibitor (2',5'dideoxyadenosine,10 micromol/L), 3) ET-1 (80 pM), and 4) cAMP synthesis inhibitor plus ET-1 (n=6 in each group; Lp represented as mean+/-standard error of the mean; units 10-cm/sec/cmH2O). IR resulted in an increase in Lp (Lp=7.07+/-0.20) sevenfold above baseline (1.05+/-0.31) (pcentral role as a mediator of IR-induced postcapillary venular leak. ET-1 mildly decreased leak. Furthermore, ET-1 may not exert its effects on microvascular fluid leak during IR via cAMP.

  4. Diabetes-related microvascular and macrovascular diseases in the physical therapy setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cade, W Todd

    2008-11-01

    Physical therapists commonly treat people with diabetes for a wide variety of diabetes-associated impairments, including those from diabetes-related vascular disease. Diabetes is associated with both microvascular and macrovascular diseases affecting several organs, including muscle, skin, heart, brain, and kidneys. A common etiology links the different types of diabetes-associated vascular disease. Common risk factors for vascular disease in people with diabetes, specifically type 2 diabetes, include hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, hypertension, tobacco use, and obesity. Mechanisms for vascular disease in diabetes include the pathologic effects of advanced glycation end product accumulation, impaired vasodilatory response attributable to nitric oxide inhibition, smooth muscle cell dysfunction, overproduction of endothelial growth factors, chronic inflammation, hemodynamic dysregulation, impaired fibrinolytic ability, and enhanced platelet aggregation. It is becoming increasingly important for physical therapists to be aware of diabetes-related vascular complications as more patients present with insulin resistance and diabetes. The opportunities for effective physical therapy interventions (such as exercise) are significant.

  5. Improving diagnosis and treatment of women with angina pectoris and microvascular disease: 

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prescott, Eva; Abildstrøm, Steen Zabell; Aziz, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The iPOWER study aims at determining whether routine assessment of coronary microvascular dysfunction (CMD) in women with angina and no obstructive coronary artery disease is feasible and identifies women at risk. METHODS: All women with angina referred to invasive angiographic...... identified, 530 contacted, and 299 (56%) agreed to participate. Among the first 50 patients, Doppler CFR was successfully measured in 49 (98%). CONCLUSIONS: Among women with suspected ischemic heart disease and no obstructive coronary artery disease, non-invasive Doppler CFR is feasible as a routine...... of coronary flow reserve (CFR) by Doppler of the left anterior descending artery. In substudies CMD will be assessed by positron emission tomography, peripheral endothelial function, magnetic resonance imaging-and computed tomography derived myocardial perfusion scans, angiographic corrected TIMI frame counts...

  6. The brain microvascular endothelium supports T cell proliferation and has potential for alloantigen presentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Wheway

    Full Text Available Endothelial cells (EC form the inner lining of blood vessels and are positioned between circulating lymphocytes and tissues. Hypotheses have formed that EC may act as antigen presenting cells based on the intimate interactions with T cells, which are seen in diseases like multiple sclerosis, cerebral malaria (CM and viral neuropathologies. Here, we investigated how human brain microvascular EC (HBEC interact with and support the proliferation of T cells. We found HBEC to express MHC II, CD40 and ICOSL, key molecules for antigen presentation and co-stimulation and to take up fluorescently labeled antigens via macropinocytosis. In co-cultures, we showed that HBEC support and promote the proliferation of CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells, which both are key in CM pathogenesis, particularly following T cell receptor activation and co-stimulation. Our findings provide novel evidence that HBEC can trigger T cell activation, thereby providing a novel mechanism for neuroimmunological complications of infectious diseases.

  7. Pathophysiological roles of microvascular alterations in pulmonary inflammatory diseases: possible implications of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and CXC chemokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanami Orihara

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Kanami Orihara, Akio MatsudaDepartment of Allergy and Immunology, National Research Institute for Child Health and Development, Tokyo, JapanAbstract: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and bronchial asthma are common respiratory diseases that are caused by chronic infl ammation of the airways. Although these diseases are mediated by substantially distinct immunological reactions, especially in mild cases, they both show increased numbers of neutrophils, increased production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α and poor responses to corticosteroids, particularly in patients with severe diseases. These immunological alterations may contribute strongly to airway structural changes, commonly referred to as airway remodeling. Microvascular alterations, a component of airway remodeling and caused by chronic inflammation, are observed and appear to be clinically involved in both diseases. It has been well established that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF plays important roles in the airway microvascular alterations in mild and moderate cases of both diseases, but any role that VEGF might play in severe cases of these diseases remains unclear. Here, we review recent research findings, including our own data, and discuss the possibility that TNF-α and its associated CXC chemokines play roles in microvascular alterations that are even more crucial than those of VEGF in patients with severe COPD or asthma.Keywords: TNF-α, CXC chemokines, corticosteroid, pulmonary microvessels, COPD, asthma

  8. Reversibility of endothelial dysfunction in diabetes: role of polyphenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suganya, N; Bhakkiyalakshmi, E; Sarada, D V L; Ramkumar, K M

    2016-07-01

    The endothelium, a thin single sheet of endothelial cells, is a metabolically active layer that coats the inner surface of blood vessels and acts as an interface between the circulating blood and the vessel wall. The endothelium through the secretion of vasodilators and vasoconstrictors serves as a critical mediator of vascular homeostasis. During the development of the vascular system, it regulates cellular adhesion and vessel wall inflammation in addition to maintaining vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. A shift in the functions of the endothelium towards vasoconstriction, proinflammatory and prothrombic states characterise improper functioning of these cells, leading to endothelial dysfunction (ED), implicated in the pathogenesis of many diseases including diabetes. Major mechanisms of ED include the down-regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase levels, differential expression of vascular endothelial growth factor, endoplasmic reticulum stress, inflammatory pathways and oxidative stress. ED tends to be the initial event in macrovascular complications such as coronary artery disease, peripheral arterial disease, stroke and microvascular complications such as nephropathy, neuropathy and retinopathy. Numerous strategies have been developed to protect endothelial cells against various stimuli, of which the role of polyphenolic compounds in modulating the differentially regulated pathways and thus maintaining vascular homeostasis has been proven to be beneficial. This review addresses the factors stimulating ED in diabetes and the molecular mechanisms of natural polyphenol antioxidants in maintaining vascular homeostasis.

  9. Using cultured endothelial cells to study endothelial barrier dysfunction: Challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aman, Jurjan; Weijers, Ester M; van Nieuw Amerongen, Geerten P; Malik, Asrar B; van Hinsbergh, Victor W M

    2016-08-01

    Despite considerable progress in the understanding of endothelial barrier regulation and the identification of approaches that have the potential to improve endothelial barrier function, no drug- or stem cell-based therapy is presently available to reverse the widespread vascular leak that is observed in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and sepsis. The translational gap suggests a need to develop experimental approaches and tools that better mimic the complex environment of the microcirculation in which the vascular leak develops. Recent studies have identified several elements of this microenvironment. Among these are composition and stiffness of the extracellular matrix, fluid shear stress, interaction of endothelial cells (ECs) with pericytes, oxygen tension, and the combination of toxic and mechanic injurious stimuli. Development of novel cell culture techniques that integrate these elements would allow in-depth analysis of EC biology that closely approaches the (patho)physiological conditions in situ. In parallel, techniques to isolate organ-specific ECs, to define EC heterogeneity in its full complexity, and to culture patient-derived ECs from inducible pluripotent stem cells or endothelial progenitor cells are likely to advance the understanding of ARDS and lead to development of therapeutics. This review 1) summarizes the advantages and pitfalls of EC cultures to study vascular leak in ARDS, 2) provides an overview of elements of the microvascular environment that can directly affect endothelial barrier function, and 3) discusses alternative methods to bridge the gap between basic research and clinical application with the intent of improving the translational value of present EC culture approaches. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Purification of murine endothelial cell cultures by flow cytometry using fluorescein-labeled griffonia simplicifolia agglutinin.

    OpenAIRE

    Sahagun, G.; Moore, S. A.; Fabry, Z.; Schelper, R. L.; Hart, M. N.

    1989-01-01

    Griffonia simplicifolia agglutinin (GSA) is a valuable histochemical tool in the identification of endothelium. In this study GSA labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (GSA-FITC) was used to purify cultures of murine cerebral microvascular endothelium. Cultures were stained with GSA-FITC, then sorted using a fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS). GSA-positive endothelial cells were collected, re-cultured, and subsequently re-analyzed by FACS using GSA-FITC. Cultures that initially conta...

  11. Effects of Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption on Microvascular and Macrovascular Function in a Healthy Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loader, Jordan; Meziat, Cindy; Watts, Rani; Lorenzen, Christian; Sigaudo-Roussel, Dominique; Stewart, Simon; Reboul, Cyril; Meyer, Gregory; Walther, Guillaume

    2017-06-01

    To assess vascular function during acute hyperglycemia induced by commercial sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption and its effect on underlying mechanisms of the nitric oxide pathway. In a randomized, single-blind, crossover trial, 12 healthy male participants consumed 600 mL (20 oz.) of water or a commercial SSB across 2 visits. Endothelial and vascular smooth muscle functions were assessed in the microcirculation using laser speckle contrast imaging coupled with iontophoresis and in the macrocirculation using brachial artery ultrasound with flow- and nitrate-mediated dilation. Compared with water, SSB consumption impaired microvascular and macrovascular endothelial function as indicated by a decrease in the vascular response to acetylcholine iontophoresis (208.3±24.3 versus 144.2±15.7%, Pfunction were observed during acute hyperglycemia in an in vivo rat model. However, function was fully restored by treatment with the antioxidants, N-acetylcysteine and apocynin. In addition, ex vivo experiments revealed that although the production of reactive oxygen species was increased during acute hyperglycemia, the bioavailability of nitric oxide in the endothelium was decreased, despite no change in the activation state of endothelial nitric oxide synthase. To our knowledge, this is the first study to assess the vascular effects of acute hyperglycemia induced by commercial SSB consumption alone. These findings suggest that SSB-mediated endothelial dysfunction is partly due to increased oxidative stress that decreases nitric oxide bioavailability. URL: https://www.anzctr.org.au/Trial/Registration/TrialReview.aspx?id=366442&isReview=true. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry Number: ACTRN12614000614695. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. The role of cyclo-oxygenase-1 in high-salt diet-induced microvascular dysfunction in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavka, Ana; Cosic, Anita; Jukic, Ivana; Jelakovic, Bojan; Lombard, Julian H; Phillips, Shane A; Seric, Vatroslav; Mihaljevic, Ivan; Drenjancevic, Ines

    2015-12-15

    Recent studies have shown that some of the deleterious effects of a high-salt (HS) diet are independent of elevated blood pressure and are associated with impaired endothelial function. Increased generation of cyclo-oxygenase (COX-1 and COX-2)-derived vasoconstrictor factors and endothelial activation may contribute to impaired vascular relaxation during HS loading. The present study aimed to assess the regulation of microvascular reactivity and to clarify the role of COX-1 and COX-2 in normotensive subjects on a short-term HS diet. The present study demonstrates the important role of COX-1 derived vasoconstrictor metabolites in regulation of microvascular blood flow during a HS diet. These results help to explain how even short-term HS diets may impact upon microvascular reactivity without changes in blood pressure and suggest that a vasoconstrictor metabolite of COX-1 could play a role in this impaired tissue blood flow. The present study aimed to assess the effect of a 1-week high-salt (HS) diet on the role of cyclo-oxygenases (COX-1 and COX-2) and the vasoconstrictor prostaglandins, thromboxane A2 (TXA2 ) and prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α ), on skin microcirculatory blood flow, as well as to detect its effect on markers of endothelial activation such as soluble cell adhesion molecules. Young women (n = 54) were assigned to either the HS diet group (N = 30) (∼14 g day(-1) NaCl ) or low-salt (LS) diet group (N = 24) (diet protocols. One HS diet group subset received 100 mg of indomethacin (non-selective COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitor), and another HS group subset received 200 mg of celecoxib (selective COX-2 inhibitor) before repeating laser Doppler flowmetry measurements. Blood pressure was unchanged after the HS diet, although it significantly reduced after the LS diet. Twenty-four hour urinary sodium was increased, and plasma renin activity and plasma aldosterone levels were decreased after the HS diet. The HS diet significantly impaired PORH and

  13. Gene delivery of therapeutic polypeptides into brain capillary endothelial cells for protein secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Annette Burkhart; Thomsen, Louiza Bohn; Moos, Torben

    cells (BCECs) and their intermingling tight junctions. Polypeptides like brain derived neurotropic factor (BDNF), erythropoietin (EPO), and FGL peptide (part of Neuronal adhesion molecule (NCAM)) are acknowledged for their neuroprotective and neurogenerative effects. Generally, however...... has been to investigate the usage of BCEC as factories for recombinant protein production. A non-viral gene carrier was prepared from pullulan-spermine conjugated with plasmid DNA (Thomsen et al., 2011). In vitro transfection of Rat Brain Endothelial Cells (RBE4) and Human Brain Microvascular......, Moos T. Gene delivery by pullulan derivatives in brain capillary endothelial cells for protein secretion. J Control Release. 2011 Jan 18....

  14. Measurement of the filtration coefficient (Kfc) in the lung of Gallus domesticus and the effects of increased microvascular permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidner, W Jeffrey; Waddell, David S; Furlow, J David

    2006-08-01

    The filtration coefficient (Kfc) is a sensitive measure of microvascular hydraulic conductivity and has been reported for the alveolar lungs of many mammalian species, but not for the parabronchial avian lung. This study reports the Kfc in the isolated lungs of normal chickens and in the lungs of chickens given the edemogenic agents oleic acid (OA) or dimethyl amiloride (DMA). The control Kfc =0.04+/-0.01 ml min(-1) kPa(-1) g(-1). This parameter increased significantly following the administration of both OA (0.12+/-0.02 ml min(-1) kPa(-1) g(-1)) and DMA (0.07+/-0.01 ml min kPa(-1) g(-1)). As endothelial cadherins are thought to play a role in the dynamic response to acute lung injury, we utilized Western blot analysis to assess lung cadherin content and Northern blot analysis to assess pulmonary vascular endothelial (VE) cadherin expression following drug administration. Lung cadherin content decreases markedly following DMA, but not OA administration. VE cadherin expression increases as a result of DMA treatment, but is unchanged following OA. Our results suggest that the permeability characteristics of the avian lung are more closely consistent with those of the mammalian rather than the reptilian lung, and, that cadherins may play a significant role in the response to acute increases in avian pulmonary microvascular permeability.

  15. Tumor endothelial inflammation predicts clinical outcome in diverse human cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean P Pitroda

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial cells contribute to the pathogenesis of numerous human diseases by actively regulating the stromal inflammatory response; however, little is known regarding the role of endothelial inflammation in the growth of human tumors and its influence on the prognosis of human cancers.Using an experimental model of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α-mediated inflammation, we characterized inflammatory gene expression in immunopurified tumor-associated endothelial cells. These genes formed the basis of a multivariate molecular predictor of overall survival that was trained and validated in four types of human cancer.We report that expression of experimentally derived tumor endothelial genes distinguished pathologic tissue specimens from normal controls in several human diseases associated with chronic inflammation. We trained these genes in human cancer datasets and defined a six-gene inflammatory signature that predicted significantly reduced overall survival in breast cancer, colon cancer, lung cancer, and glioma. This endothelial-derived signature predicted outcome independently of, but cooperatively with, standard clinical and pathological prognostic factors. Consistent with these findings, conditioned culture media from human endothelial cells stimulated by pro-inflammatory cytokines accelerated the growth of human colon and breast tumors in immunodeficient mice as compared with conditioned media from untreated endothelial cells.This study provides the first prognostic cancer gene signature derived from an experimental model of tumor-associated endothelial inflammation. These findings support the notion that activation of inflammatory pathways in non-malignant tumor-infiltrating endothelial cells contributes to tumor growth and progression in multiple human cancers. Importantly, these results identify endothelial-derived factors that could serve as potential targets for therapy in diverse human cancers.

  16. Total ‘rib’-preservation technique of internal mammary vessel exposure for free flap breast reconstruction: A 5-year prospective cohort study and instructional video

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anais Rosich-Medina

    2015-09-01

    Discussion & conclusion: The total ‘rib’-preservation technique of IMV exposure is a safe, reliable and versatile method for microvascular breast reconstruction and should be considered as a valid alternative to the ‘rib’-sacrificing techniques.

  17. Very rapid effect of pitavastatin on microvascular function in comparison to rosuvastatin: reactive hyperemia peripheral arterial tonometric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kono Y

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Yasushi Kono,1 Shota Fukuda,1 Kenei Shimada,2 Koki Nakanishi,2 Kenichiro Otsuka,2 Tomoichiro Kubo,1 Satoshi Jissho,1 Haruyuki Taguchi,1 Junichi Yoshikawa,3 Minoru Yoshiyama21Department of Medicine, Osaka Ekisaikai Hospital, Nishi-ku, Osaka, Japan; 2Department of Internal Medicine and Cardiology, Osaka City University School of Medicine, Abeno-ku, Osaka, Japan; 3Nishinomiya Watanabe Cardiovascular Center, Nishinomiya, JapanBackground: It has been reported that pitavastatin improves endothelial function faster than other statins. Recently introduced reactive hyperemia peripheral arterial tonometry (RH-PAT provides objective and quantitative assessment of peripheral microvascular function.Purpose: This study aimed to investigate whether peripheral microvascular function improved 2 hours after pitavastatin in subjects with coronary artery disease (CAD using RH-PAT, and the results were compared with those of rosuvastatin.Methods: This study included 94 subjects with CAD, assigned to a group given 2 mg of pitavastatin (n = 36, a group given 2.5 mg of rosuvastatin (n = 38, and a control group (n = 20. RH-PAT examinations were performed before and 2 hours after statin administration.Results: The RH-PAT index increased 2 hours after pitavastatin administration from 1.82 ± 0.45 to 2.16 ± 0.62 (P = 0.02, whereas there were no differences in the RH-PAT index in the rosuvastatin group (1.79 ± 0.71 to 1.91 ± 0.53, P = 0.09 and the control group (1.68 ± 0.36 to 1.84 ± 0.58, P = 0.4. No significant changes were observed at 2 hours in serum cholesterol levels in each group.Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that peripheral microvascular function improved 2 hours after a single clinical dose of pitavastatin, but not after rosuvastatin.Keywords: coronary artery disease, statin, microvascular function

  18. Acute cocoa flavanol supplementation improves muscle macro- and microvascular but not anabolic responses to amino acids in older men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Bethan E; Atherton, Philip J; Varadhan, Krishna; Limb, Marie C; Williams, John P; Smith, Kenneth

    2016-05-01

    The anabolic effects of nutrition on skeletal muscle may depend on adequate skeletal muscle perfusion, which is impaired in older people. Cocoa flavanols have been shown to improve flow-mediated dilation, an established measure of endothelial function. However, their effect on muscle microvascular blood flow is currently unknown. Therefore, the objective of this study was to explore links between the consumption of cocoa flavanols, muscle microvascular blood flow, and muscle protein synthesis (MPS) in response to nutrition in older men. To achieve this objective, leg blood flow (LBF), muscle microvascular blood volume (MBV), and MPS were measured under postabsorptive and postprandial (intravenous Glamin (Fresenius Kabi, Germany), dextrose to sustain glucose ∼7.5 mmol·L(-1)) conditions in 20 older men. Ten of these men were studied with no cocoa flavanol intervention and a further 10 were studied with the addition of 350 mg of cocoa flavanols at the same time that nutrition began. Leg (femoral artery) blood flow was measured by Doppler ultrasound, muscle MBV by contrast-enhanced ultrasound using Definity (Lantheus Medical Imaging, Mass., USA) perflutren contrast agent and MPS using [1, 2-(13)C2]leucine tracer techniques. Our results show that although older individuals do not show an increase in LBF or MBV in response to feeding, these absent responses are apparent when cocoa flavanols are given acutely with nutrition. However, this restoration in vascular responsiveness is not associated with improved MPS responses to nutrition. We conclude that acute cocoa flavanol supplementation improves muscle macro- and microvascular responses to nutrition, independently of modifying muscle protein anabolism.

  19. IL-17A potentiates TNFα-induced secretion from human endothelial cells and alters barrier functions controlling neutrophils rights of passage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bosteen, Markus H; Tritsaris, Katerina; Hansen, Anker J

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-17A (IL-17A) is an important pro-inflammatory cytokine that regulates leukocyte mobilization and recruitment. To better understand how IL-17A controls leukocyte trafficking across capillaries in the peripheral blood circulation, we used primary human dermal microvascular endothelial...

  20. Bicarbonate disruption of the pulmonary endothelial barrier via activation of endogenous soluble adenylyl cyclase, isoform 10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obiako, Boniface; Calchary, Wendy; Xu, Ningyong; Kunstadt, Ryan; Richardson, Bianca; Nix, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly apparent that cAMP signals within the pulmonary endothelium are highly compartmentalized, and this compartmentalization is critical to maintaining endothelial barrier integrity. Studies demonstrate that the exogenous soluble bacterial toxin, ExoY, and heterologous expression of the forskolin-stimulated soluble mammalian adenylyl cyclase (AC) chimera, sACI/II, elevate cytosolic cAMP and disrupt the pulmonary microvascular endothelial barrier. The barrier-disruptive effects of cytosolic cAMP generated by exogenous soluble ACs are in contrast to the barrier-protective effects of subplasma membrane cAMP generated by transmembrane AC, which strengthens endothelial barrier integrity. Endogenous soluble AC isoform 10 (AC10 or commonly known as sAC) lacks transmembrane domains and localizes within the cytosolic compartment. AC10 is uniquely activated by bicarbonate to generate cytosolic cAMP, yet its role in regulation of endothelial barrier integrity has not been addressed. Here we demonstrate that, within the pulmonary circulation, AC10 is expressed in pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVECs) and pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAECs), yet expression in PAECs is lower. Furthermore, pulmonary endothelial cells selectively express bicarbonate cotransporters. While extracellular bicarbonate generates a phosphodiesterase 4-sensitive cAMP pool in PMVECs, no such cAMP response is detected in PAECs. Finally, addition of extracellular bicarbonate decreases resistance across the PMVEC monolayer and increases the filtration coefficient in the isolated perfused lung above osmolality controls. Collectively, these findings suggest that PMVECs have a bicarbonate-sensitive cytosolic cAMP pool that disrupts endothelial barrier integrity. These studies could provide an alternative mechanism for the controversial effects of bicarbonate correction of acidosis of acute respiratory distress syndrome patients. PMID:23686854

  1. RhoA GTPase regulates radiation-induced alterations in endothelial cell adhesion and migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousseau, Matthieu; Gaugler, Marie-Helene; Rodallec, Audrey; Bonnaud, Stephanie; Paris, Francois [Inserm UMR U892, Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie Nantes-Angers CRCNA, Institut de Recherche Therapeutique IRT-UN, Universite de Nantes, 8 Quai Moncousu, BP 70721, F-44007 (France); Corre, Isabelle, E-mail: icorre@nantes.inserm.fr [Inserm UMR U892, Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie Nantes-Angers CRCNA, Institut de Recherche Therapeutique IRT-UN, Universite de Nantes, 8 Quai Moncousu, BP 70721, F-44007 (France)

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We explore the role of RhoA in endothelial cell response to ionizing radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RhoA is rapidly activated by single high-dose of radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiation leads to RhoA/ROCK-dependent actin cytoskeleton remodeling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiation-induced apoptosis does not require the RhoA/ROCK pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiation-induced alteration of endothelial adhesion and migration requires RhoA/ROCK. -- Abstract: Endothelial cells of the microvasculature are major target of ionizing radiation, responsible of the radiation-induced vascular early dysfunctions. Molecular signaling pathways involved in endothelial responses to ionizing radiation, despite being increasingly investigated, still need precise characterization. Small GTPase RhoA and its effector ROCK are crucial signaling molecules involved in many endothelial cellular functions. Recent studies identified implication of RhoA/ROCK in radiation-induced increase in endothelial permeability but other endothelial functions altered by radiation might also require RhoA proteins. Human microvascular endothelial cells HMEC-1, either treated with Y-27632 (inhibitor of ROCK) or invalidated for RhoA by RNA interference were exposed to 15 Gy. We showed a rapid radiation-induced activation of RhoA, leading to a deep reorganisation of actin cytoskeleton with rapid formation of stress fibers. Endothelial early apoptosis induced by ionizing radiation was not affected by Y-27632 pre-treatment or RhoA depletion. Endothelial adhesion to fibronectin and formation of focal adhesions increased in response to radiation in a RhoA/ROCK-dependent manner. Consistent with its pro-adhesive role, ionizing radiation also decreased endothelial cells migration and RhoA was required for this inhibition. These results highlight the role of RhoA GTPase in ionizing radiation-induced deregulation of essential endothelial

  2. Universal cancer vaccine: an update on the design of cancer vaccines generated from endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokhov, Petr G; Balashova, Elena E

    2013-07-01

    Among the potential cancer immunotherapies, vaccination against antigens expressed by endothelial cells lining the tumor vasculature represents one of the most attractive options because this approach may prevent the growth of any solid tumor. Therefore, endothelial cells can be used as a source of antigens for developing a so-called "universal" cancer vaccine. Unfortunately, efficient endothelial cell-based cancer vaccines have not yet been developed because previous approaches utilized direct endothelial cell immunizations which is not effective and can result in the elicitation of autoimmune responses associated with systemic autoimmune vasculitis. Recently, the heterogeneity of the endothelial cell surface was defined using an in vitro system as a means of developing antiangiogenic cancer vaccines. This analysis demonstrated that tumors induced specific changes to the microvascular of human endothelial cell (HMEC) surface thereby providing a basis for the design of endothelial cell-based vaccines that directly target the tumor endothelium. (1) This commentary further describes HMEC heterogeneity from the perspective of designing an endothelial cell-based universal (for the treatment of all solid tumors) cancer vaccine with high immunogenicity that does not pose the risk of eliciting autoimmunity.

  3. Histamine Induces Vascular Hyperpermeability by Increasing Blood Flow and Endothelial Barrier Disruption In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashina, Kohei; Tsubosaka, Yoshiki; Nakamura, Tatsuro; Omori, Keisuke; Kobayashi, Koji; Hori, Masatoshi; Ozaki, Hiroshi; Murata, Takahisa

    2015-01-01

    Histamine is a mediator of allergic inflammation released mainly from mast cells. Although histamine strongly increases vascular permeability, its precise mechanism under in vivo situation remains unknown. We here attempted to reveal how histamine induces vascular hyperpermeability focusing on the key regulators of vascular permeability, blood flow and endothelial barrier. Degranulation of mast cells by antigen-stimulation or histamine treatment induced vascular hyperpermeability and tissue swelling in mouse ears. These were abolished by histamine H1 receptor antagonism. Intravital imaging showed that histamine dilated vasculature, increased blood flow, while it induced hyperpermeability in venula. Whole-mount staining showed that histamine disrupted endothelial barrier formation of venula indicated by changes in vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin) localization at endothelial cell junction. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis (NOS) by L-NAME or vasoconstriction by phenylephrine strongly inhibited the histamine-induced blood flow increase and hyperpermeability without changing the VE-cadherin localization. In vitro, measurements of trans-endothelial electrical resistance of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMECs) showed that histamine disrupted endothelial barrier. Inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC) or Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK), NOS attenuated the histamine-induced barrier disruption. These observations suggested that histamine increases vascular permeability mainly by nitric oxide (NO)-dependent vascular dilation and subsequent blood flow increase and maybe partially by PKC/ROCK/NO-dependent endothelial barrier disruption. PMID:26158531

  4. Endothelial Cells Enhance Tumor Cell Invasion through a Crosstalk Mediated by CXC Chemokine Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristy A. Warner

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Field cancerization involves the lateral spread of premalignant or malignant disease and contributes to the recurrence of head and neck tumors. The overall hypothesis underlying this work is that endothelial cells actively participate in tumor cell invasion by secreting chemokines and creating a chemotactic gradient for tumor cells. Here we demonstrate that conditioned medium from head and neck tumor cells enhance Bcl-2 expression in neovascular endothelial cells. Oral squamous cell carcinoma-3 (OSCC3 and Kaposi's sarcoma (SLK show enhanced invasiveness when cocultured with pools of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells stably expressing Bcl-2 (HDMEC-Bcl-2, compared to cocultures with empty vector controls (HDMEC-LXSN. Xenografted OSCC3 tumors vascularized with HDMEC-Bcl-2 presented higher local invasion than OSCC3 tumors vascularized with control HDMEC-LXSN. CXCL1 and CXCL8 were upregulated in primary endothelial cells exposed to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, as well as in HDMEC-Bcl-2. Notably, blockade of CXCR2 signaling, but not CXCR1, inhibited OSCC3 and SLK invasion toward endothelial cells. These data demonstrate that CXC chemokines secreted by endothelial cells induce tumor cell invasion and suggest that the process of lateral spread of tumor cells observed in field cancerization is guided by chemotactic signals that originated from endothelial cells.

  5. A phase-I study of lapatinib in combination with foretinib, a c-MET, AXL and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor inhibitor, in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2)-positive metastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Stephen K; Ellard, Susan L; Mates, Mihaela; Welch, Stephen; Mihalcioiu, Catalin; Miller, Wilson H; Gelmon, Karen; Lohrisch, Caroline; Kumar, Vikaash; Taylor, Sara; Hagerman, Linda; Goodwin, Rachel; Wang, Tao; Sakashita, Shingo; Tsao, Ming S; Eisenhauer, Elizabeth; Bradbury, Penelope

    2017-05-02

    The mechanisms of resistance to anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER 2) therapies are unclear but may include the tyrosine-protein kinase Met (c-Met), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and AXL pathways. Foretinib is an inhibitor of c-Met, VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR-2), platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta (PDGFRB), AXL, Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3), angiopoiten receptor (TIE-2), RET and RON kinases. This phase Ib study sought to establish the associated toxicities, pharmacokinetics (PK) and recommended phase II doses (RP2D) of foretinib and lapatinib in a cohort of HER-2-positive patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC). Women with HER-2 positive MBC, Performance status (PS 0-2), and no limit on number of prior chemotherapies or lines of anti-HER-2 therapies were enrolled. A 3 + 3 dose escalation design was utilized. Four dose levels were intended with starting doses of foretinib 30 mg and lapatinib 750 mg orally once a day (OD) on a 4-weekly cycle. Assessment of c-MET status from the primary archival tissue was performed. We enrolled 19 patients, all evaluable for toxicity assessment and for response evaluation. Median age was 60 years (34-86 years), 95% were PS 0-1, 53% were estrogen receptor-positive and 95% had at least one prior anti-HER-2-based regimen. The fourth dose level was reached (foretinib 45 mg/lapatinib 1250 mg) with dose-limiting toxicities of grade-3 diarrhea and fatigue. There was only one grade-4 non-hematological toxicity across all dose levels. There were no PK interactions between the agents. A median of two cycles was delivered across the dose levels (range 1-20) with associated progression-free survival of 3.2 months (95% CI 1.61-4.34 months). By immunohistochemical assessment with a specified cutoff, none of the 17 samples tested were classified as positive for c-Met. The RP2D of the combined foretinib and lapatinib is 45 mg and 1000 mg PO OD, respectively. Limited activity was seen with this

  6. Retinal microvascular abnormalities and stroke: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doubal, F.N.; Hokke, P.E.; Wardlaw, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Lacunar strokes account for 25% of ischaemic strokes, but their precise aetiology is unknown. Similarities between the retinal and cerebral small vessels mean that clarification of the exact relationship between retinal microvascular abnormalities and stroke, and particularly with stroke

  7. Epicardial fat volume is associated with coronary microvascular response in healthy subjects: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaborit, Bénédicte; Kober, Frank; Jacquier, Alexis; Moro, Pierre Julien; Flavian, Antonin; Quilici, Jacques; Cuisset, Thomas; Simeoni, Umberto; Cozzone, Patrick; Alessi, Marie-Christine; Clément, Karine; Bernard, Monique; Dutour, Anne

    2012-06-01

    Epicardial fat (EF) is an active ectopic fat depot, which has been associated with coronary atherosclerosis, and which could early influence endothelial function. We thus investigated the relationship between EF and endothelium-dependent vasoreactivity of the coronary microcirculation, in highly selected healthy volunteers. Myocardial blood flow (MBF) was determined by measuring coronary sinus flow with velocity-encoded cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 3T. We measured MBF at baseline and in response to sympathetic stimulation by cold pressor testing (CPT) in 30 healthy volunteers with normal left ventricular (LV) function (age 22 ± 4 years, BMI = 21.3 ± 2.8 kg/m(2)). EF volume was volumetrically assessed by manual delineation on short-axis views. CPT was applied by immersing one foot in ice water for 4 min. Mean EF volume was 56 ± 26 ml and mean LV mass 100 ± 28 g. CPT significantly increased heart rate (HR) by 32 ± 19%, systolic blood pressure by 14 ± 10%, and rate-pressure product by 45 ± 25%, P glycemic parameters. In multivariate analysis, adiponectin and EF volume remained both independently associated with ΔMBF. A high EF amount is associated with a lower coronary microvascular response, suggesting that EF could early influence endothelial function.

  8. Methylglyoxal administration induces diabetes-like microvascular changes and perturbs the healing process of cutaneous wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlanga, Jorge; Cibrian, Danay; Guillén, Isabel; Freyre, Freya; Alba, José S; Lopez-Saura, Pedro; Merino, Nelson; Aldama, Alfredo; Quintela, Ana M; Triana, Maria E; Montequin, Jose F; Ajamieh, Hussam; Urquiza, Dioslaida; Ahmed, Naila; Thornalley, Paul J

    2005-07-01

    Increased formation of MG (methylglyoxal) and related protein glycation in diabetes has been linked to the development of diabetic vascular complications. Diabetes is also associated with impaired wound healing. In the present study, we investigated if prolonged exposure of rats to MG (50-75 mg/kg of body weight) induced impairment of wound healing and diabetes-like vascular damage. MG treatment arrested growth, increased serum creatinine, induced hypercholesterolaemia (all P < 0.05) and impaired vasodilation (P < 0.01) compared with saline controls. Degenerative changes in cutaneous microvessels with loss of endothelial cells, basement membrane thickening and luminal occlusion were also detected. Acute granulation appeared immature (P < 0.01) and was associated with an impaired infiltration of regenerative cells with reduced proliferative rates (P < 0.01). Immunohistochemical staining indicated the presence of AGEs (advanced glycation end-products) in vascular structures, cutaneous tissue and peripheral nerve fibres. Expression of RAGE (receptor for AGEs) appeared to be increased in the cutaneous vasculature. There were also pro-inflammatory and profibrotic responses, including increased IL-1beta (interleukin-1beta) expression in intact epidermis, TNF-alpha (tumour necrosis factor-alpha) in regions of angiogenesis, CTGF (connective tissue growth factor) in medial layers of arteries, and TGF-beta (transforming growth factor-beta) in glomerular tufts, tubular epithelial cells and interstitial endothelial cells. We conclude that exposure to increased MG in vivo is associated with the onset of microvascular damage and other diabetes-like complications within a normoglycaemic context.

  9. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 blockade attenuates inflammatory response and improves microvascular perfusion in rat pancreas grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preissler, Gerhard; Eichhorn, Martin; Waldner, Helmut; Winter, Hauke; Kleespies, Axel; Massberg, Steffen

    2012-10-01

    After pancreas transplantation (PTx), early capillary malperfusion and leukocyte recruitment indicate the manifestation of severe ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI). Oscillatory blood-flow redistribution (intermittent capillary perfusion, IP), leading to an overall decrease in erythrocyte flux, precedes complete microvascular perfusion failure with persistent blood flow cessation. We addressed the role of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) for leukocyte-endothelial interactions (LEIs) after PTx and evaluated the contribution of IP and malperfusion. Pancreas transplantation was performed in rats after 18-hour preservation, receiving either isotype-matched IgG or monoclonal anti-ICAM-1 antibodies (10 mg/kg intravenously) once before reperfusion. Leukocyte-endothelial interaction, IP, erythrocyte flux, and functional capillary density, respectively, were examined in vivo during 2-hour reperfusion. Nontransplanted animals served as controls. Tissue samples were analyzed by histomorphometry. In grafts of IgG-treated animals, IP was encountered already at an early stage after reperfusion and steadily increased over 2 hours, whereas erythrocyte flux declined continuously. In contrast, inhibition of ICAM-1 significantly improved erythrocyte flux and delayed IP appearance by 2 hours. Further, anti-ICAM-1 significantly reduced LEI and leukocyte tissue infiltration when compared to IgG; edema development was less pronounced in response to anti-ICAM-1 monoclonal antibody. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 blockade significantly attenuates IRI via immediate reduction of LEI and concomitant improvement of capillary perfusion patterns, emphasizing its central role during IRI in PTx.

  10. Coronary Microvascular Resistance: Methods for Its Quantification in Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Knaapen, P.; Camici, P G; Marques, K M J; Nijveldt, R.J; Bax, J J; Westerhof, N.; Gotte, M.J.W.; Jerosch-Herold, M.; Schelbert, H R; Lammertsma, A A; Rossum, van, E.N.A.

    2009-01-01

    Coronary microvascular dysfunction is a topic that has recently gained considerable interest in the medical community owing to the growing awareness that microvascular dysfunction occurs in a number of myocardial disease states and has important prognostic implications. With this growing awareness, comes the desire to accurately assess the functional capacity of the coronary microcirculation for diagnostic purposes as well as to monitor the effects of therapeutic interventions that are target...

  11. Bimodal Pattern of Coronary Microvascular Involvement in Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Sezer, Murat; Kocaaga, Mehmet; Aslanger, Emre; Atici, Adem; Demirkiran, Ahmet; Bugra, Zehra; Umman, Sabahattin; Umman, Berrin

    2016-01-01

    Background The contribution of functionally disturbed coronary autoregulation and structurally impaired microvascular vasodilatory function to reduced coronary flow velocity reserve, reflecting impaired coronary microcirculation in diabetes mellitus (DM), has not been clearly elucidated. The objective of this study was to identify the mechanism of coronary microvascular impairment in DM in relation to duration of disease. Methods and Results Coronary flow velocities in the anterior descending...

  12. Endothelial binding of beta toxin to small intestinal mucosal endothelial cells in early stages of experimentally induced Clostridium perfringens type C enteritis in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, V L; Martel, A; Pasmans, F; Van Immerseel, F; Posthaus, H

    2013-07-01

    Beta toxin (CPB) is known to be an essential virulence factor in the development of lesions of Clostridium perfringens type C enteritis in different animal species. Its target cells and exact mechanism of toxicity have not yet been clearly defined. Here, we evaluate the suitability of a neonatal piglet jejunal loop model to investigate early lesions of C. perfringens type C enteritis. Immunohistochemically, CPB was detected at microvascular endothelial cells in intestinal villi during early and advanced stages of lesions induced by C. perfringens type C. This was first associated with capillary dilatation and subsequently with widespread hemorrhage in affected intestinal segments. CPB was, however, not demonstrated on intestinal epithelial cells. This indicates a tropism of CPB toward endothelial cells and suggests that CPB-induced endothelial damage plays an important role in the early stages of C. perfringens type C enteritis in pigs.

  13. Targeting Pulmonary Endothelial Hemoglobin α Improves Nitric Oxide Signaling and Reverses Pulmonary Artery Endothelial Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Roger A; Miller, Megan P; Hahn, Scott A; Galley, Joseph C; Bauer, Eileen; Bachman, Timothy; Hu, Jian; Sembrat, John; Goncharov, Dmitry; Mora, Ana L; Rojas, Mauricio; Goncharova, Elena; Straub, Adam C

    2017-12-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is characterized by pulmonary endothelial dysfunction. Previous work showed that systemic artery endothelial cells (ECs) express hemoglobin (Hb) α to control nitric oxide (NO) diffusion, but the role of this system in pulmonary circulation has not been evaluated. We hypothesized that up-regulation of Hb α in pulmonary ECs contributes to NO depletion and pulmonary vascular dysfunction in pulmonary hypertension. Primary distal pulmonary arterial vascular smooth muscle cells, lung tissue sections from unused donor (control) and idiopathic pulmonary artery (PA) hypertension lungs, and rat and mouse models of SU5416/hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension (PH) were used. Immunohistochemical, immunocytochemical, and immunoblot analyses and transfection, infection, DNA synthesis, apoptosis, migration, cell count, and protein activity assays were performed in this study. Cocultures of human pulmonary microvascular ECs and distal pulmonary arterial vascular smooth muscle cells, lung tissue from control and pulmonary hypertensive lungs, and a mouse model of chronic hypoxia-induced PH were used. Immunohistochemical, immunoblot analyses, spectrophotometry, and blood vessel myography experiments were performed in this study. We find increased expression of Hb α in pulmonary endothelium from humans and mice with PH compared with controls. In addition, we show up-regulation of Hb α in human pulmonary ECs cocultured with PA smooth muscle cells in hypoxia. We treated pulmonary ECs with a Hb α mimetic peptide that disrupts the association of Hb α with endothelial NO synthase, and found that cells treated with the peptide exhibited increased NO signaling compared with a scrambled peptide. Myography experiments using pulmonary arteries from hypoxic mice show that the Hb α mimetic peptide enhanced vasodilation in response to acetylcholine. Our findings reveal that endothelial Hb α functions as an endogenous scavenger of NO in the pulmonary endothelium

  14. Endothelial safety of radiological contrast media: why being concerned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoditti, Egeria; Massaro, Marika; Montinari, Maria Rosa

    2013-01-01

    Iodinated radiocontrast media have been the most widely used pharmaceuticals for intravascular administration in diagnostic and interventional angiographic procedures. Although they are regarded as relatively safe drugs and vascular biocompatibility of contrast media has been progressively improved, severe adverse reactions may occur, among which acute nephropathy is one of the most clinically significant complications after intravascular administration of contrast media and a powerful predictor of poor early and long-term outcomes. Since radiocontrast media are given through the arterial or the venous circulation in vascular procedures, morphological and functional changes of the microvascular and macrovascular endothelial cells substantially contribute to the pathogenesis of organ-specific and systemic adverse reactions of contrast media. Endothelial toxicity of contrast media seems to be the result of both direct proapoptotic effects and morphological derangements, as well as endothelial dysfunction and induction of inflammation, oxidative stress, thrombosis, and altered vasomotor balance, with predominant vasoconstrictive response in atherosclerotic coronary arteries and kidney microcirculation. Further understanding of pathogenetic mechanisms underlying contrast media-induced adverse reactions in cellular targets, including endothelial cells, will hopefully lead to the development of novel preventive strategies appropriately curbing the pathogenesis of contrast media vasotoxicity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. UVB therapy decreases the adhesive interaction between peripheral blood mononuclear cells and dermal microvascular endothelium, and regulates the differential expression of CD54, VCAM-1, and E-selectin in psoriatic plaques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, J.-P.; Harris, K.; Chin, Y.H. [Miami Univ., FL (United States). School of Medicine; Falanga, V.; Taylor, J.R. [Miami Univ., FL (United States). School of Medicine]|[Miami Veteran Affairs Medical Center, Miami, FL (United States)

    1996-01-01

    A dermal lymphocytic infiltrate is a characteristic feature of psoriasis, and may be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. We have previously shown that specialized dermal microvascular endothelial cells (DMEC) in psoriatic lesions promote the selective adherence of the CD4 CD45Ro helper T-cell subset. In this study, we examined the adhesive interaction between peripheral blood mononuclear cells and psoriatic DMEC in patients treated with ultraviolet B light (UVB), and correlated the results with the expression and function of endothelial adhesion molecules on DMEC. (author).

  16. Endothelial Na+/H+ exchanger NHE1 participates in redox-sensitive leukocyte recruitment triggered by methylglyoxal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qadri, Syed M; Su, Yang; Cayabyab, Francisco S; Liu, Lixin

    2014-09-30

    Excessive levels of methylglyoxal (MG) encountered in diabetes foster enhanced leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions, mechanisms of which are incompletely understood. MG genomically upregulates endothelial serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase 1 (SGK1) which orchestrates leukocyte recruitment by regulating the activation and expression of transcription factors and adhesion molecules. SGK1 regulates a myriad of ion channels and carriers including the Na+/H+ exchanger NHE1. Here, we explored the effect of MG on SGK1-dependent NHE1 activation and the putative role of NHE1 activation in MG-induced leukocyte recruitment and microvascular hyperpermeability. Using RT-PCR and immunoblotting, we analyzed NHE1 mRNA and protein levels in murine microvascular SVEC4-10EE2 endothelial cells (EE2 ECs). NHE1 phosphorylation was detected using a specific antibody against the 14-3-3 binding motif at phospho-Ser703. SGK in EE2 ECs was silenced using targeted siRNA. ROS production was determined using DCF-dependent fluorescence. Leukocyte recruitment and microvascular permeability in murine cremasteric microvasculature were measured using intravital microscopy. The expression of endothelial adhesion molecules was determined by immunoblotting and confocal imaging analysis. MG treatment significantly upregulated NHE1 mRNA and dose-dependently increased total- and phospho-NHE1. Treatment with SGK1 inhibitor GSK650394, antioxidant Tempol and silencing SGK all blunted MG-triggered phospho-NHE1 upregulation in EE2 ECs. NHE1 inhibitor cariporide attenuated MG-triggered ROS production, leukocyte adhesion and emigration and microvascular hyperpermeability, without affecting leukocyte rolling. Cariporide treatment did not alter MG-triggered upregulation of P- and E-selectins, but reduced endothelial ICAM-1 expression. MG elicits SGK1-dependent activation of endothelial Na+/H+ exchanger NHE1 which participates in MG-induced ROS production, upregulation of endothelial ICAM-1, leukocyte

  17. Differential regulation of TRPV1 channels by H2O2: implications for diabetic microvascular dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    DelloStritto, Daniel J.; Connell, Patrick J.; Dick, Gregory M.; Fancher, Ibra S.; Klarich, Brittany; Fahmy, Joseph N.; Kang, Patrick T.; Chen, Yeong-Renn; Damron, Derek S.; Thodeti, Charles K.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrated previously that TRPV1-dependent coupling of coronary blood flow (CBF) to metabolism is disrupted in diabetes. A critical amount of H2O2 contributes to CBF regulation; however, excessive H2O2 impairs responses. We sought to determine the extent to which differential regulation of TRPV1 by H2O2 modulates CBF and vascular reactivity in diabetes. We used contrast echocardiography to study TRPV1 knockout (V1KO), db/db diabetic, and wild type C57BKS/J (WT) mice. H2O2 dose-dependently increased CBF in WT mice, a response blocked by the TRPV1 antagonist SB366791. H2O2-induced vasodilation was significantly inhibited in db/db and V1KO mice. H2O2 caused robust SB366791-sensitive dilation in WT coronary microvessels; however, this response was attenuated in vessels from db/db and V1KO mice, suggesting H2O2-induced vasodilation occurs, in part, via TRPV1. Acute H2O2 exposure potentiated capsaicin-induced CBF responses and capsaicin-mediated vasodilation in WT mice, whereas prolonged luminal H2O2 exposure blunted capsaicin-induced vasodilation. Electrophysiology studies re-confirms acute H2O2 exposure activated TRPV1 in HEK293A and bovine aortic endothelial cells while establishing that H2O2 potentiate capsaicin-activated TRPV1 currents, whereas prolonged H2O2 exposure attenuated TRPV1 currents. Verification of H2O2-mediated activation of intrinsic TRPV1 specific currents were found in isolated mouse coronary endothelial cells from WT mice and decreased in endothelial cells from V1KO mice. These data suggest prolonged H2O2 exposure impairs TRPV1-dependent coronary vascular signaling. This may contribute to microvascular dysfunction and tissue perfusion deficits characteristic of diabetes. PMID:26907473

  18. Model Microvascular Networks Can Have Many Equilibria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karst, Nathaniel J; Geddes, John B; Carr, Russell T

    2017-03-01

    We show that large microvascular networks with realistic topologies, geometries, boundary conditions, and constitutive laws can exhibit many steady-state flow configurations. This is in direct contrast to most previous studies which have assumed, implicitly or explicitly, that a given network can only possess one equilibrium state. While our techniques are general and can be applied to any network, we focus on two distinct network types that model human tissues: perturbed honeycomb networks and random networks generated from Voronoi diagrams. We demonstrate that the disparity between observed and predicted flow directions reported in previous studies might be attributable to the presence of multiple equilibria. We show that the pathway effect, in which hematocrit is steadily increased along a series of diverging junctions, has important implications for equilibrium discovery, and that our estimates of the number of equilibria supported by these networks are conservative. If a more complete description of the plasma skimming effect that captures red blood cell allocation at junctions with high feed hematocrit were to be obtained empirically, then the number of equilibria found by our approach would at worst remain the same and would in all likelihood increase significantly.

  19. Endothelium dependent vasomotion and in vitro markers of endothelial repair in patients with severe sepsis: an observational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina H van Ierssel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Outcome in sepsis is mainly defined by the degree of organ failure, for which endothelial dysfunction at the macro- and microvascular level is an important determinant. In this study we evaluated endothelial function in patients with severe sepsis using cellular endothelial markers and in vivo assessment of reactive hyperaemia. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients with severe sepsis (n = 30 and 15 age- and gender- matched healthy volunteers were included in this study. Using flow cytometry, CD34+/KDR+ endothelial progenitor cells (EPC, CD31+ T-cells, and CD31+/CD42b- endothelial microparticles (EMP were enumerated. Migratory capacity of cultured circulating angiogenic cells (CAC was assessed in vitro. Endothelial function was determined using peripheral arterial tonometry at the fingertip. RESULTS: In patients with severe sepsis, a lower number of EPC, CD31+ T-cells and a decreased migratory capacity of CAC coincided with a blunted reactive hyperaemia response compared to healthy subjects. The number of EMP, on the other hand, did not differ. The presence of organ failure at admission (SOFA score was inversely related with the number of CD31+ T-cells. Furthermore, the number of EPC at admission was decreased in patients with progressive organ failure within the first week. CONCLUSION: In patients with severe sepsis, in vivo measured endothelial dysfunction coincides with lower numbers and reduced function of circulating cells implicated in endothelial repair. Our results suggest that cellular markers of endothelial repair might be valuable in the assessment and evolution of organ dysfunction.

  20. Endothelial barrier protection by local anesthetics: ropivacaine and lidocaine block tumor necrosis factor-α-induced endothelial cell Src activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piegeler, Tobias; Votta-Velis, E Gina; Bakhshi, Farnaz R; Mao, Mao; Carnegie, Graeme; Bonini, Marcelo G; Schwartz, David E; Borgeat, Alain; Beck-Schimmer, Beatrice; Minshall, Richard D

    2014-06-01

    Pulmonary endothelial barrier dysfunction mediated in part by Src-kinase activation plays a crucial role in acute inflammatory disease. Proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), activate Src via phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase/Akt-dependent nitric oxide generation, a process initiated by recruitment of phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase regulatory subunit p85 to TNF-receptor-1. Because amide-linked local anesthetics have well-established anti-inflammatory effects, the authors hypothesized that ropivacaine and lidocaine attenuate inflammatory Src signaling by disrupting the phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase-Akt-nitric oxide pathway, thus blocking Src-dependent neutrophil adhesion and endothelial hyperpermeability. Human lung microvascular endothelial cells, incubated with TNFα in the absence or presence of clinically relevant concentrations of ropivacaine and lidocaine, were analyzed by Western blot, probing for phosphorylated/activated Src, endothelial nitric oxide synthase, Akt, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, and caveolin-1. The effect of ropivacaine on TNFα-induced nitric oxide generation, co-immunoprecipitation of TNF-receptor-1 with p85, neutrophil adhesion, and endothelial barrier disruption were assessed. Ropivacaine and lidocaine attenuated TNFα-induced Src activation (half-maximal inhibitory concentration [IC50] = 8.611 × 10 M for ropivacaine; IC50 = 5.864 × 10 M for lidocaine) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation (IC50 = 7.572 × 10 M for ropivacaine; IC50 = 6.377 × 10 M for lidocaine). Akt activation (n = 7; P = 0.006) and stimulus-dependent binding of TNF-receptor-1 and p85 (n = 6; P = 0.043) were blocked by 1 nM of ropivacaine. TNFα-induced neutrophil adhesion and disruption of endothelial monolayers via Src-dependent intercellular adhesion molecule-1- and caveolin-1-phosphorylation, respectively, were also attenuated. Ropivacaine and lidocaine effectively blocked inflammatory TNFα signaling in endothelial

  1. Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Endothelial Cells for Three-Dimensional Microphysiological Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurokawa, Yosuke K; Yin, Rose T; Shang, Michael R; Shirure, Venktesh S; Moya, Monica L; George, Steven C

    2017-08-01

    Microphysiological systems (MPS), or "organ-on-a-chip" platforms, aim to recapitulate in vivo physiology using small-scale in vitro tissue models of human physiology. While significant efforts have been made to create vascularized tissues, most reports utilize primary endothelial cells that hinder reproducibility. In this study, we report the use of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived endothelial cells (iPS-ECs) in developing three-dimensional (3D) microvascular networks. We established a CDH5-mCherry reporter iPS cell line, which expresses the vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin fused to mCherry. The iPS-ECs demonstrate physiological functions characteristic of primary endothelial cells in a series of in vitro assays, including permeability, response to shear stress, and the expression of endothelial markers (CD31, von Willibrand factor, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase). The iPS-ECs form stable, perfusable microvessels over the course of 14 days when cultured within 3D microfluidic devices. We also demonstrate that inhibition of TGF-β signaling improves vascular network formation by the iPS-ECs. We conclude that iPS-ECs can be a source of endothelial cells in MPS providing opportunities for human disease modeling and improving the reproducibility of 3D vascular networks.

  2. Control of cAMP in lung endothelial cell phenotypes. Implications for control of barrier function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, T; Creighton, J; Thompson, W J

    1999-07-01

    Pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVECs) form a more restrictive barrier to macromolecular flux than pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (PAECs); however, the mechanisms responsible for this intrinsic feature of PMVECs are unknown. Because cAMP improves endothelial barrier function, we hypothesized that differences in enzyme regulation of cAMP synthesis and/or degradation uniquely establish an elevated content in PMVECs. PMVECs possessed 20% higher basal cAMP concentrations than did PAECs; however, increased content was accompanied by 93% lower ATP-to-cAMP conversion rates. In PMVECs, responsiveness to beta-adrenergic agonist (isoproterenol) or direct adenylyl cyclase (forskolin) activation was attenuated and responsiveness to phosphodiesterase inhibition (rolipram) was increased compared with those in PAECs. Although both types of endothelial cells express calcium-inhibited adenylyl cyclase, constitutive PMVEC cAMP accumulation was not inhibited by physiological rises in cytosolic calcium, whereas PAEC cAMP accumulation was inhibited 30% by calcium. Increasing either PMVEC calcium entry by maximal activation of store-operated calcium entry or ATP-to-cAMP conversion with rolipram unmasked calcium inhibition of adenylyl cyclase. These data indicate that suppressed calcium entry and low ATP-to-cAMP conversion intrinsically influence calcium sensitivity. Adenylyl cyclase-to-cAMP phosphodiesterase ratios regulate cAMP at elevated levels compared with PAECs, which likely contribute to enhanced microvascular barrier function.

  3. Retinal Microvascular Network and Microcirculation Assessments in High Myopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Yang, Ye; Jiang, Hong; Gregori, Giovanni; Roisman, Luiz; Zheng, Fang; Ke, Bilian; Qu, Dongyi; Wang, Jianhua

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the changes of the retinal microvascular network and microcirculation in high myopia. A cross-sectional, matched, comparative clinical study. Twenty eyes of 20 subjects with nonpathological high myopia (28 ± 5 years of age) with a refractive error of -6.31 ± 1.23 D (mean ± SD) and 20 eyes of 20 age- and sex-matched control subjects (30 ± 6 years of age) with a refractive error of -1.40 ± 1.00 D were recruited. Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) was used to image the retinal microvascular network, which was later quantified by fractal analysis (box counting [Dbox], representing vessel density) in both superficial and deep vascular plexuses. The Retinal Function Imager was used to image the retinal microvessel blood flow velocity (BFV). The BFV and microvascular density in the myopia group were corrected for ocular magnification using Bennett's formula. The density of both superficial and deep microvascular plexuses was significantly decreased in the myopia group in comparison to the controls (P  .05). Microvascular densities in both superficial (r = -0.45, P = .047) and deep (r = -0.54, P = .01) vascular plexuses were negatively correlated with the axial lengths in the myopic eye. No correlations were observed between BFV and vessel density (P > .05). Retinal microvascular decrease was observed in the high myopia subjects, whereas the retinal microvessel BFV remained unchanged. The retinal microvascular network alteration may be attributed to ocular elongation that occurs with the progression of myopia. The novel quantitative analyses of the retinal microvasculature may help to characterize the underlying pathophysiology of myopia and enable early detection and prevention of myopic retinopathy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Sprint interval and endurance training are equally effective in increasing muscle microvascular density and eNOS content in sedentary males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocks, Matthew; Shaw, Christopher S; Shepherd, Sam O; Fisher, James P; Ranasinghe, Aaron M; Barker, Thomas A; Tipton, Kevin D; Wagenmakers, Anton J M

    2013-02-01

    Sprint interval training (SIT) has been proposed as a time efficient alternative to endurance training (ET) for increasing skeletal muscle oxidative capacity and improving certain cardiovascular functions. In this study we sought to make the first comparisons of the structural and endothelial enzymatic changes in skeletal muscle microvessels in response to ET and SIT. Sixteen young sedentary males (age 21 ± SEM 0.7 years, BMI 23.8 ± SEM 0.7 kg m(-2)) were randomly assigned to 6 weeks of ET (40-60 min cycling at ∼65% , 5 times per week) or SIT (4-6 Wingate tests, 3 times per week). Muscle biopsies were taken from the m. vastus lateralis before and following 60 min cycling at 65% to measure muscle microvascular endothelial eNOS content, eNOS serine(1177) phosphorylation, NOX2 content and capillarisation using quantitative immunofluorescence microscopy. Whole body insulin sensitivity, arterial stiffness and blood pressure were also assessed. ET and SIT increased skeletal muscle microvascular eNOS content (ET 14%; P < 0.05, SIT 36%; P < 0.05), with a significantly greater increase observed following SIT (P < 0.05). Sixty minutes of moderate intensity exercise increased eNOS ser(1177) phosphorylation in all instances (P < 0.05), but basal and post-exercise eNOS ser(1177) phosphorylation was lower following both training modes. All microscopy measures of skeletal muscle capillarisation (P < 0.05) were increased with SIT or ET, while neither endothelial nor sarcolemmal NOX2 was changed. Both training modes reduced aortic stiffness and increased whole body insulin sensitivity (P < 0.05). In conclusion, in sedentary males SIT and ET are effective in improving muscle microvascular density and eNOS protein content.

  5. Risk of Heart Failure With Preserved Ejection Fraction in Older Women After Contemporary Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiki, Hirofumi; Petersen, Ivy A; Scott, Christopher G; Bailey, Kent R; Dunlay, Shannon M; Finley, Randi R; Ruddy, Kathryn J; Yan, Elizabeth; Redfield, Margaret M

    2017-04-11

    Cardiomyocytes are resistant to radiation. However, cardiac radiation exposure causes coronary microvascular endothelial inflammation, a perturbation implicated in the pathogenesis of heart failure (HF) and particularly HF with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). Radiotherapy for breast cancer results in variable cardiac radiation exposure and may increase the risk of HF. We conducted a population-based case-control study of incident HF in 170 female residents of Olmsted County, Minnesota (59 cases and 111 controls), who underwent contemporary (1998-2013) radiotherapy for breast cancer with computed tomography-assisted radiotherapy planning. Controls were matched to cases for age, tumor side, chemotherapy use, diabetes mellitus, and hypertension. Mean cardiac radiation dose (MCRD) in each patient was calculated from the patient's computed tomography images and radiotherapy plan. Mean age at radiotherapy was 69±9 years. Of HF cases, 38 (64%) had EF≥50% (HFpEF), 18 (31%) had EFradiotherapy to HF was 5.8±3.4 years. The odds of HF was higher in patients with a history of ischemic heart disease or atrial fibrillation. The MCRD was 2.5 Gy (range, 0.2-13.1 Gy) and higher in cases (3.3±2.7 Gy) than controls (2.1±2.0 Gy; P=0.004). The odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for HF per log MCRD was 9.1 (3.4-24.4) for any HF, 16.9 (3.9-73.7) for HFpEF, and 3.17 (0.8-13.0) for HF with reduced EF. The increased odds of any HF or HFpEF with increasing MCRD remained significant after adjustment for HF risk factors and in sensitivity analyses matching by cancer stage rather than tumor side. Only 18.6% of patients experienced new or recurrent ischemic events between radiotherapy and the onset of HF. The relative risk of HFpEF increases with increasing cardiac radiation exposure during contemporary conformal breast cancer radiotherapy. These data emphasize the importance of radiotherapy techniques that limit MCRD during breast cancer treatment. Moreover, these data provide

  6. Interaction between Endothelial Protein C Receptor and Intercellular Adhesion Molecule 1 to Mediate Binding of Plasmodium falciparum-Infected Erythrocytes to Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avril, Marion; Bernabeu, Maria; Benjamin, Maxwell; Brazier, Andrew Jay; Smith, Joseph D

    2016-07-12

    Intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and the endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) are candidate receptors for the deadly complication cerebral malaria. However, it remains unclear if Plasmodium falciparum parasites with dual binding specificity are involved in cytoadhesion or different parasite subpopulations bind in brain microvessels. Here, we investigated this issue by studying different subtypes of ICAM-1-binding parasite lines. We show that two parasite lines expressing domain cassette 13 (DC13) of the P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family have dual binding specificity for EPCR and ICAM-1 and further mapped ICAM-1 binding to the first DBLβ domain following the PfEMP1 head structure in both proteins. As PfEMP1 head structures have diverged between group A (EPCR binders) and groups B and C (CD36 binders), we also investigated how ICAM-1-binding parasites with different coreceptor binding traits influence P. falciparum-infected erythrocyte binding to endothelial cells. Whereas levels of binding to tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α)-stimulated endothelial cells from the lung and brain by all ICAM-1-binding parasite lines increased, group A (EPCR and ICAM-1) was less dependent than group B (CD36 and ICAM-1) on ICAM-1 upregulation. Furthermore, both group A DC13 parasite lines had higher binding levels to brain endothelial cells (a microvascular niche with limited CD36 expression). This study shows that ICAM-1 is a coreceptor for a subset of EPCR-binding parasites and provides the first evidence of how EPCR and ICAM-1 interact to mediate parasite binding to both resting and TNF-α-activated primary brain and lung endothelial cells. Cerebral malaria is a severe neurological complication of P. falciparum infection associated with infected erythrocyte (IE) binding in cerebral vessels. Yet little is known about the mechanisms by which parasites adhere in the brain or other microvascular sites. Here, we studied parasite lines

  7. ADIPONECTIN DIMINISHES ORGAN-SPECIFIC MICROVASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL CELL ACTIVATION ASSOCIATED WITH SEPSIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Meurs, Matijs; Castro, Pedro; Shapiro, Nathan I.; Lu, Shulin; Yano, Midori; Maeda, Norikazu; Funahashi, Tohru; Shimomura, Ichiro; Zijlstra, Jan G.; Molema, Grietje; Parikh, Samir M.; Aird, William C.; Yano, Kiichiro

    Experimental sepsis was induced in male C57BL/6j, adiponectin-deficient mice (ADPNKO), and wild-type littermates by i.p. injection of 16 mg/kg lipopolysaccharide or cecal ligation and puncture. Blood and tissue samples were harvested 24 h after model induction. Circulating adiponectin is reduced in

  8. Malvidin’s Effects on Rat Pial Microvascular Permeability Changes Due to Hypoperfusion and Reperfusion Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapi, Dominga; Chiurazzi, Martina; Di Maro, Martina; Mastantuono, Teresa; Battiloro, Laura; Sabatino, Lina; Ricci, Serena; Di Carlo, Angelina; Starita, Noemy; Guida, Bruna; Santillo, Mariarosaria; Colantuoni, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The present study was aimed to evaluate the malvidin’s protective effects on damage induced by 30 min bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO) and 60 min reperfusion (RE) in rat pial microcirculation. Rat pial microcirculation was observed using fluorescence microscopy through a closed cranial window. Western blotting analysis was performed to investigate the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), phosphorylated eNOS (p-eNOS) and matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) expression. Moreover, MMP-9 activity was evaluated by zymography. Finally, neuronal damage and radical oxygen species (ROS) formation were assessed. In all animals, pial arterioles were classified in five orders of branching according to Strahler’s method. In hypoperfused rats, 30 min BCCAO and 60 min RE caused a decrease in arteriolar diameter, an increase in microvascular leakage and leukocyte adhesion, accompanied by decreased capillary perfusion and red blood cell velocity (VRBC). Moreover, marked neuronal damage and evident ROS generation were detected. Conversely, malvidin administration induced arteriolar dilation in dose-related manner, reducing microvascular leakage as well as leukocyte adhesion. Capillary perfusion and VRBC were protected. Nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibition significantly attenuated malvidin’s effects on arteriolar diameter. Western blotting analysis revealed an increase in eNOS and p-eNOS expression, while zymography indicated a decrease in MMP-9 activity after malvidin’s administration. Furthermore, malvidin was able to prevent neuronal damage and to decrease ROS generation. In conclusion, malvidin protects rat pial microcirculation against BCCAO/RE injury, preventing blood-brain impairment and neuronal loss. Malvidin’s effects appear to be mediated by eNOS activation and scavenger activity. PMID:27445688

  9. Malvidin's Effects on Rat Pial Microvascular Permeability Changes Due to Hypoperfusion and Reperfusion Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapi, Dominga; Chiurazzi, Martina; Di Maro, Martina; Mastantuono, Teresa; Battiloro, Laura; Sabatino, Lina; Ricci, Serena; Di Carlo, Angelina; Starita, Noemy; Guida, Bruna; Santillo, Mariarosaria; Colantuoni, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The present study was aimed to evaluate the malvidin's protective effects on damage induced by 30 min bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO) and 60 min reperfusion (RE) in rat pial microcirculation. Rat pial microcirculation was observed using fluorescence microscopy through a closed cranial window. Western blotting analysis was performed to investigate the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), phosphorylated eNOS (p-eNOS) and matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) expression. Moreover, MMP-9 activity was evaluated by zymography. Finally, neuronal damage and radical oxygen species (ROS) formation were assessed. In all animals, pial arterioles were classified in five orders of branching according to Strahler's method. In hypoperfused rats, 30 min BCCAO and 60 min RE caused a decrease in arteriolar diameter, an increase in microvascular leakage and leukocyte adhesion, accompanied by decreased capillary perfusion and red blood cell velocity (VRBC). Moreover, marked neuronal damage and evident ROS generation were detected. Conversely, malvidin administration induced arteriolar dilation in dose-related manner, reducing microvascular leakage as well as leukocyte adhesion. Capillary perfusion and VRBC were protected. Nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibition significantly attenuated malvidin's effects on arteriolar diameter. Western blotting analysis revealed an increase in eNOS and p-eNOS expression, while zymography indicated a decrease in MMP-9 activity after malvidin's administration. Furthermore, malvidin was able to prevent neuronal damage and to decrease ROS generation. In conclusion, malvidin protects rat pial microcirculation against BCCAO/RE injury, preventing blood-brain impairment and neuronal loss. Malvidin's effects appear to be mediated by eNOS activation and scavenger activity.

  10. Paradoxic effects of metformin on endothelial cells and angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Antonino; Cantelmo, Anna R.; Albini, Adriana

    2014-01-01

    The biguanide metformin is used in type 2 diabetes management and has gained significant attention as a potential cancer preventive agent. Angioprevention represents a mechanism of chemoprevention, yet conflicting data concerning the antiangiogenic action of metformin have emerged. Here, we clarify some of the contradictory effects of metformin on endothelial cells and angiogenesis, using in vitro and in vivo assays combined with transcriptomic and protein array approaches. Metformin inhibits formation of capillary-like networks by endothelial cells; this effect is partially dependent on the energy sensor adenosine-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) as shown by small interfering RNA knockdown. Gene expression profiling of human umbilical vein endothelial cells revealed a paradoxical modulation of several angiogenesis-associated genes and proteins by metformin, with short-term induction of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), cyclooxygenase 2 and CXC chemokine receptor 4 at the messenger RNA level and downregulation of ADAMTS1. Antibody array analysis shows an essentially opposite regulation of numerous angiogenesis-associated proteins in endothelial and breast cancer cells including interleukin-8, angiogenin and TIMP-1, as well as selective regulation of angiopioetin-1, -2, endoglin and others. Endothelial cell production of the cytochrome P450 member CYP1B1 is upregulated by tumor cell supernatants in an AMPK-dependent manner, metformin blocks this effect. Metformin inhibits VEGF-dependent activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, and the inhibition of AMPK activity abrogates this event. Metformin hinders angiogenesis in matrigel pellets in vivo, prevents the microvessel density increase observed in obese mice on a high-fat diet, downregulating the number of white adipose tissue endothelial precursor cells. Our data show that metformin has an antiangiogenic activity in vitro and in vivo associated with a contradictory short

  11. Paradoxic effects of metformin on endothelial cells and angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallaglio, Katiuscia; Bruno, Antonino; Cantelmo, Anna R; Esposito, Alessia I; Ruggiero, Luca; Orecchioni, Stefania; Calleri, Angelica; Bertolini, Francesco; Pfeffer, Ulrich; Noonan, Douglas M; Albini, Adriana

    2014-05-01

    The biguanide metformin is used in type 2 diabetes management and has gained significant attention as a potential cancer preventive agent. Angioprevention represents a mechanism of chemoprevention, yet conflicting data concerning the antiangiogenic action of metformin have emerged. Here, we clarify some of the contradictory effects of metformin on endothelial cells and angiogenesis, using in vitro and in vivo assays combined with transcriptomic and protein array approaches. Metformin inhibits formation of capillary-like networks by endothelial cells; this effect is partially dependent on the energy sensor adenosine-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) as shown by small interfering RNA knockdown. Gene expression profiling of human umbilical vein endothelial cells revealed a paradoxical modulation of several angiogenesis-associated genes and proteins by metformin, with short-term induction of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), cyclooxygenase 2 and CXC chemokine receptor 4 at the messenger RNA level and downregulation of ADAMTS1. Antibody array analysis shows an essentially opposite regulation of numerous angiogenesis-associated proteins in endothelial and breast cancer cells including interleukin-8, angiogenin and TIMP-1, as well as selective regulation of angiopioetin-1, -2, endoglin and others. Endothelial cell production of the cytochrome P450 member CYP1B1 is upregulated by tumor cell supernatants in an AMPK-dependent manner, metformin blocks this effect. Metformin inhibits VEGF-dependent activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, and the inhibition of AMPK activity abrogates this event. Metformin hinders angiogenesis in matrigel pellets in vivo, prevents the microvessel density increase observed in obese mice on a high-fat diet, downregulating the number of white adipose tissue endothelial precursor cells. Our data show that metformin has an antiangiogenic activity in vitro and in vivo associated with a contradictory short

  12. Hypothyroidism Is Associated With Coronary Endothelial Dysfunction in Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sara, Jaskanwal D; Zhang, Ming; Gharib, Hossein; Lerman, Lilach O; Lerman, Amir

    2015-07-29

    Hypothyroidism is associated with an increased risk of coronary artery disease, beyond that which can be explained by its association with conventional cardiovascular risk factors. Coronary endothelial dysfunction precedes atherosclerosis, has been linked to adverse cardiovascular events, and may account for some of the increased risk in patients with hypothyroidism. The aim of this study was to determine whether there is an association between epicardial and microvascular coronary endothelial dysfunction and hypothyroidism. In 1388 patients (mean age 50.5 [12.3] years, 34% male) presenting with stable chest pain to Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN for diagnostic coronary angiography, and who were found to have nonobstructive coronary artery disease (hypothyroidism, defined as a documented history of hypothyroidism or a thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) >10.0 mU/mL, n=188, and euthyroidism, defined as an absence of a history of hypothyroidism in the clinical record and/or 0.3hypothyroidism had a significantly lower % Δ CBF Ach (48.26 [80.66] versus 64.58 [128.30]) compared to patients with euthyroidism, while the % Δ CAD Ach did not vary significantly between groups. After adjusting for covariates, females with hypothyroidism still had a significantly lower % Δ CBF Ach (estimated difference in % Δ CBF Ach [SE]: -16.79 [8.18]). Hypothyroidism in women is associated with microvascular endothelial dysfunction, even after adjusting for confounders, and may explain some of the increased risk of cardiovascular disease in these patients. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  13. Hypothyroidism Is Associated With Coronary Endothelial Dysfunction in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sara, Jaskanwal D; Zhang, Ming; Gharib, Hossein; Lerman, Lilach O; Lerman, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Background Hypothyroidism is associated with an increased risk of coronary artery disease, beyond that which can be explained by its association with conventional cardiovascular risk factors. Coronary endothelial dysfunction precedes atherosclerosis, has been linked to adverse cardiovascular events, and may account for some of the increased risk in patients with hypothyroidism. The aim of this study was to determine whether there is an association between epicardial and microvascular coronary endothelial dysfunction and hypothyroidism. Methods and Results In 1388 patients (mean age 50.5 [12.3] years, 34% male) presenting with stable chest pain to Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN for diagnostic coronary angiography, and who were found to have nonobstructive coronary artery disease (hypothyroidism, defined as a documented history of hypothyroidism or a thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) >10.0 mU/mL, n=188, and euthyroidism, defined as an absence of a history of hypothyroidism in the clinical record and/or 0.3hypothyroidism had a significantly lower % Δ CBF Ach (48.26 [80.66] versus 64.58 [128.30]) compared to patients with euthyroidism, while the % Δ CAD Ach did not vary significantly between groups. After adjusting for covariates, females with hypothyroidism still had a significantly lower % Δ CBF Ach (estimated difference in % Δ CBF Ach [SE]: −16.79 [8.18]). Conclusions Hypothyroidism in women is associated with microvascular endothelial dysfunction, even after adjusting for confounders, and may explain some of the increased risk of cardiovascular disease in these patients. PMID:26224049

  14. TAKOTSUBO SYNDROME AS ACUTE FORM OF MICROVASCULAR ANGINA. CLINICAL CASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Boldueva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of stress-induced cardiomyopathy (takotsubo syndrome have not been fully determined. A clinical case of the development of stressinduced cardio-myopathy in a patient with microvascular angina is presented. A 73-year-old woman was hospitalized to the cardiology clinic with a diagnosis of acute circular myocardial infarction (elevation ST II, III, aVF, V2-6, positive troponin test. According to coronary angiography stenosis of coronary arteries were not identified. According to echocardiography the following abnormalities were revealed: decrease in global contractility of the myocardium, hyperkinesia of the basal parts of the left ventricle and at the same time akinesia of the apex and hypokinesia of the middle segments of the left ventricle. After 1 month a contractility of the myocardium was normal, there were no zones of violation of contractility. It was suggested that the patient had takotsubo syndrome. Anginal pain due to physical and emotional stress with unchanged coronary arteries suggested primary microvascular angina. It was confirmed by the presence of endothelium-dependent vasodilation disorders that were revealed by positron emission tomography of myocardium with cold pressor test and peripheral arterial tonometry. This clinical case demonstrates one of the discussed pathogenetic mechanisms of the takotsubo syndrome – generalized microvascular spasm. As the patient suffered previously from chronic microvascular angina, it seems logical in this case to regard stress-induced cardiomyopathy as an acute form of microvascular angina.

  15. Single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with abnormal coronary microvascular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, Satoshi; Cilluffo, Rebecca; Best, Patricia J M; Atkinson, Elizabeth J; Aoki, Tatsuo; Cunningham, Julie M; de Andrade, Mariza; Choi, Byoung-Joo; Lerman, Lilach O; Lerman, Amir

    2014-06-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are the most common source of genetic variation. Although microvascular pathology is associated with cardiovascular events, genetic phenotypes causing microvascular disease remain largely unknown. This study identifies sex-specific SNPs associated with coronary microvascular dysfunction. Six hundred and forty-three patients without significant obstructive coronary heart disease were enrolled, referred for cardiac catheterization, and underwent invasive coronary microcirculatory assessment. Patient data were collected from 1529 autosomal SNPs and seven X chromosome SNPs, which were selected to represent the variability from 76 candidate genes with published associations with coronary vasoreactivity, angiogenesis, inflammation, vascular calcification, atherosclerosis risk factors, female hormones, blood coagulation, or coronary heart disease. Coronary flow reserve (CFR) was assessed by an intracoronary injection of adenosine. Patients were categorized according to a CFR above or below 2.5 and were stratified by sex.After adjusting for age, sex, and BMI, this study shows that SNPs within VEGFA and CDKN2B-AS1 are associated with abnormal CFR (Pcoronary microvascular dysfunction. Furthermore, sex-specific allelic variants within MYH15, VEGFA, and NT5E are associated with an increased risk of coronary microvascular dysfunction in men.

  16. International standardization of diagnostic criteria for microvascular angina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Peter; Camici, Paolo G; Beltrame, John F; Crea, Filippo; Shimokawa, Hiroaki; Sechtem, Udo; Kaski, Juan Carlos; Bairey Merz, C Noel

    2018-01-01

    Standardization of diagnostic criteria for ischemic symptoms due to coronary microvascular dysfunction (CMD) is needed for further investigation of patients presenting with anginal chest pain consistent with "microvascular angina" (MVA). At the annual Coronary Vasomotion Disorders International Study Group (COVADIS) Summits held in August 2014 and 2015, the following criteria were agreed upon for the investigative diagnosis of microvascular angina: (1) presence of symptoms suggestive of myocardial ischemia; (2) objective documentation of myocardial ischemia, as assessed by currently available techniques; (3) absence of obstructive CAD (coronary diameter reduction and/or fractional flow reserve (FFR) >0.80) (4) confirmation of a reduced coronary blood flow reserve and/or inducible microvascular spasm. These standardized criteria provide an investigative structure for mechanistic, diagnostic, prognostic and clinical trial studies aimed at developing an evidence base needed for guidelines in this growing patient population. Standardized criteria will facilitate microvascular angina registries and recruitment of suitable patients into clinical trials. Mechanistic research will also benefit from the implementation of standardized diagnostic criteria for MVA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli Hemolysin Employs Outer Membrane Vesicles to Target Mitochondria and Cause Endothelial and Epithelial Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunsmann, Lisa; Greune, Lilo; Bauwens, Andreas; Zhang, Wenlan; Kuczius, Thorsten; Kim, Kwang Sik; Mellmann, Alexander; Schmidt, M. Alexander; Karch, Helge

    2013-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) strains cause diarrhea and hemolytic uremic syndrome resulting from toxin-mediated microvascular endothelial injury. EHEC hemolysin (EHEC-Hly), a member of the RTX (repeats-in-toxin) family, is an EHEC virulence factor of increasingly recognized importance. The toxin exists as free EHEC-Hly and as EHEC-Hly associated with outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released by EHEC during growth. Whereas the free toxin is lytic towards human endothelium, the biological effects of the OMV-associated EHEC-Hly on microvascular endothelial and intestinal epithelial cells, which are the major targets during EHEC infection, are unknown. Using microscopic, biochemical, flow cytometry and functional analyses of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) and Caco-2 cells we demonstrate that OMV-associated EHEC-Hly does not lyse the target cells but triggers their apoptosis. The OMV-associated toxin is internalized by HBMEC and Caco-2 cells via dynamin-dependent endocytosis of OMVs and trafficked with OMVs into endo-lysosomal compartments. Upon endosome acidification and subsequent pH drop, EHEC-Hly is separated from OMVs, escapes from the lysosomes, most probably via its pore-forming activity, and targets mitochondria. This results in decrease of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential and translocation of cytochrome c to the cytosol, indicating EHEC-Hly-mediated permeabilization of the mitochondrial membranes. Subsequent activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3 leads to apoptotic cell death as evidenced by DNA fragmentation and chromatin condensation in the intoxicated cells. The ability of OMV-associated EHEC-Hly to trigger the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in human microvascular endothelial and intestinal epithelial cells indicates a novel mechanism of EHEC-Hly involvement in the pathogenesis of EHEC diseases. The OMV-mediated intracellular delivery represents a newly recognized mechanism for a bacterial toxin to enter host cells in

  18. Topical negative pressure stimulates endothelial migration and proliferation: a suggested mechanism for improved integration of Integra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Christopher; Potter, Matthew; Clayton, Elizabeth; Irvine, Laurie; Dye, Julian</